<%BANNER%>
Wakulla news
ALL ISSUES CITATION MAP IT! DOWNLOADS
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00377
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 10-06-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00377
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 40th Issue Thursday, October 6, 2011 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 CentsThe WakullanewsInside This Week Public Notices ..............Page 3A Comment & Opinion ....Page 4A Church..........................Page 5A Community....................Page 6A School...........................Page 7A Sports ....................Pages 8, 9A In The Huddle ............Page 10A Outdoors ...................Page 11A Water Ways...............Page 12A Sheriffs Report ..........Page 13A Business ......................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..........Page 2B Classi eds ....................Page 7B Legal Notices ...............Page 8B P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y Published Weekly, R e a d D a i l y Read Daily n By HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsWhere theres smoke, theres bound to be “ re. And if you found yourself in Hudson Park this past Saturday, there was also the tangy sting of barbecue sauce ” oating on the wind. The ribs, pulled pork, chicken and side-dishes at this years Smoke and Fire Barbecue Competition Fundraiser were not up for discussion. Simply put, they were there to be devoured. Smoke and Fire hosted its second annual cook-off competition as a charity bene“ t for the Camp Amigo Childrens Burn Camp, and Richard Rhea Scholarship Fund. The event, attended by Wakulla residents, “ rst responders from our area, Quincy, Havanna, Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, among others, is the partnering result of the Wakulla County Volunteer/Paid Fire Department, and Wakulla County Sheriffs Department. Continued on Page 2Asmoke and fireFire ghters hold their annual barbecue fundraiser on Saturday in Hudson ParkWildwood has a new owner By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAs of Sept. 22, Wildwood Golf Course and Inn has a new owner who hopes to get the property back on track and make it more ef“ cient. Reagan Hobbs, of Tallahassee, purchased the inn and golf course and wants to transform the golf course into a place where people in the county gather and call home, whether they golf or not. I want to turn it into the peoples place,Ž Hobbs said of his vision. Hobbs has 16 years of real estate experience and has been the majority owner of The Golf Club at Summerbrooke in Tallahassee since 2003. Ive always had a passion for golf,Ž Hobbs said. His idea is to combine the two golf clubs and let members play and be a part of both courses. Golfers in Tallahassee are looking for options with their golf membership and this will be the only golf course membership that will allow you to play more than one course for your membership,Ž Hobbs said. Hobbs said this idea is popular in many larger cities, but something that hasnt been seen in Leon and Wakulla counties. He said after speaking with members of Summerbrooke, many said they have never played at Wildwood and many have also never been to Wakulla County. They dont know whats offered,Ž Hobbs said. Continued on Page 3ADavid Edwards takes over as administratorRezoning of 20 commercial lots weighed by board By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netTwenty lots located directly behind Ace Hardware have been sitting vacant for almost 10 years without being developed and the owners feel if the zoning was changed from commercial to residential, those lots would sell and be developed. The owners are TFB Holdings Inc. and Beth Taff as Trustee of the Oleta Lawhon Family Trust. TFB Holdings Inc. owns 17 of the lots and the Oleta Lawhon Family Trust owns three, which are lots of the Commodore Commons Subdivision that was platted in 2002. The current zoning allows for retail, commercial of“ ces and restaurants. The request is to change it from C-2 to RSU-1 which allows for residential density of two dwelling units per acre and single family and mobile homes. The Wakulla County Commission heard this request at its Oct. 3 meeting. Prior to coming before the commission, the planning commission voted unanimously to recommend denial of the rezoning. County Planner Melissa Corbett said the county has had many written responses and phone calls against the rezoning. Continued on Page 3A By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter almost a year-long process, the new county administrator has “ nally taken over the reins. County Administrator David Edwards started on Oct. 3 taking the position previously held by Benjamin Pingree. Assistant County Administrator Tim Barden served as interim county administrator after Pingree resigned on Nov. 30, 2010. Edwards was welcomed aboard by the County Commission at its Oct. 3 meeting where Edwards was no longer seated in the audience but at the table next to County Attorney Heather Encinosa. I will do my best to keep the county at the quality and livelihood it is now,Ž Edwards said. Edwards said he is looking forward to serving, as well as the challenge ahead. Im glad to be here,Ž Edwards said. Weve got a lot of work to do. Im ready.Ž Edwards said he plans to institute better control within the county administration. And ” ush out some ef“ ciencies,Ž Edwards said. He said he doesnt have any speci“ c ideas of how the county can be more ef“ cient, but is in the process of evaluating the way it does business. Then he plans to present ideas once each area has been looked at. Right now, I dont have any preconceived notions,Ž Edwards said. Edwards was elected to the Sopchoppy City Commission in 2009 and stepped down from that role prior to taking his new post because of possible con” ict. He is known for being very outspoken and opinionated as a commissioner, as well as someone who asks a lot of questions. Because of these characteristics, there has been a lot of gossip circulating that Edwards planned to shake things up within the county, eliminating departments and employees. Edwards said he has no plans to do that because it wouldnt be fair to come in and change everything without knowing how things are being done “ rst. He added that the county has a good quality staff and he is looking forward to working with them. Continued on Page 3A Wakulla Station Fire“ ghter David Reeves offers a tempting glimpse of the stations pulled pork.PHOTOS BY HERB DONALDSON/Special to The News JENNIFER JENSENNew country administrator David Edwards. Reagan Hobbs e troubled golf course and inn in Medart is sold to Reagan Hobbs, majority owner of The Golf Club at Summerbrooke The owners believe rezoning the Crawfordville lots to residential will help them sell; some county commissioners question whether the rezoning would undermine the Town Plan Nearly a year after the resignation of Ben Pingree, and after a long back-and-forth hiring process, Edwards is at the helm of county government Im glad to be here, he tells the board at his “ rst meeting as administrator. Weve got a lot of work to do. Im ready. The smiling face of Faye Russell as she serves people at the fundraiser. Senior PromWar Eagles dominate Jefferson County, 33-14See Page 9A See Page 14A

PAGE 2

Continued from Page 1A We started this event for Camp Amigo,Ž says Bill Russell, president of the Wakulla Firefighters Association. It gives the kids a chance to go to Cape San Blas for a week. Its a place where they can feel free to be themselves. Fire“ ghters do all the cooking and everybody has a great time.Ž Some years ago, Tallahassee Fire“ ghters would attend camps offered by the Southeast Burn Foundation in Florida. One of those “ re“ ghters, Rusty Roberts, felt the need to develop a similar camp for the North Florida area, with a result of a few Tallahassee Firefighters conducting their “ rst camp in 2001, on Cape San Blas. Sometime later, their Childrens Burn Camp of North Florida would become a non-profit. Camp Amigo is a result of these efforts, and offers young lives a way to move beyond their physical and emotional scars into an environment that builds a network of support among their peers with similar issues. Private donations fund the camp, and the participants stay free of charge. We also do this event,Ž continues Russell, to support the Richard Rhea Scholarship Fund. We look to “ nd that young person who wants to become a certi“ ed EMT or “ re“ ghter and offer them a scholarship towards those efforts.Ž On Jan. 24, 2009, Fire Capt. Richard Rhea, 60, slipped on wet grass and fell onto a live powerline that had come down at the scene of a car crash. Capt. Rhea was the only “ re“ ghter to die in the line of duty in Wakulla in 35 years. The barbecue fundraiser, under the guise of food and fun, gave the public a chance to thank “ re“ ghters for their work and the lives they touch on a daily basis. In 2005 our house burned down,Ž says Crawfordville resident, Alice Williams. We were at the hospital dealing with another emergency and nowhere near Wakulla when it happened. But the “ re department was right there at our house when we didnt even know what was going on. Its a blessing from God to have such wonderful people in Wakulla County to help when people are in need.Ž Ive been a “ re“ ghter for seven years,Ž says David Reeves, of Wakulla Station. Its the greatest feeling in the world to be around the people we serve, and to love the place where we live.Ž Others have contributed to the safety and wellbeing of Wakulla for what some would consider a small lifetime. Ive been in it for 34 years, so for me, its been my life,Ž says Bruce Ashley of the sheriffs department. Most people you talk to in this profession, theyre dedicated to the work and helping people. Thats why they do it. We fully believe in partnering with the community. Were all partners in keeping each other safe.Ž Sheila Johnson is with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce Mounted Posse Unit. They have 12 members, led by Capt. Harris Johnson. She and her horse, Buck,Ž work the parades, help with crowd control and assist search and rescue missions. I love law enforcement,Ž says Sheila, I come from a military and law enforcement family. When we use our horses, we have the advantage of being up high and can see a lot of whats going on, in case we need to send out and alert deputies or other enforcement to whats happening. Buck … being a horse … can part a crowd pretty quick.Ž Some of that crowd stood close to the air-transport helicopter where Kathy Hogan and Don Spells kindly answered questions and demonstrated equipment. We supply air medical transport for surrounding counties,Ž says Kathy. Im very blessed to save lives, to do what I love and love what I do. Even in grade school I would use acebandages on my dog. Ive always been fascinated by healing, I guess its just translated into this.Ž As the pilot,Ž says Don Spells, My job is to take the medical crew to wherever they need to go. We work closely with “ re and ambulance departments in the counties that are a part of our service area. Sometimes we have “ re departments that also provide ambulance service for a whole county. Our unit is based in Quincy,Ž he says, but we serve all counties surrounding Leon and Gadsden. I apply my skills as a pilot and use them to serve and save the lives of people in need. Ive been ” ying helicopters for over 34 years, and doing this provides a great deal of grati“ cation.Ž Jimmie Doyle and Harriet Rich are members of the Appalachee Bay Fire Department Auxiliary. Both women have been elected volunteer of the year at different times for their efforts. We build fundraisers and help make money to support them,Ž says Doyle. We dont always make enough to buy their equipment, but all the same, we do our part so they can do theirs.Ž Rich adds, Im here to make sure the people know that they should support these men of the “ re department because most of them are volunteers. These men save lives.Ž Ive been a “ re“ ghter about 14 years,Ž says Andrew Aries, every time we go out there we get good feedback (from the community). Sometimes its hard on my family, you know, the time you spend away. But my wife has been good enough to understand. She lets me do it because she knows that I love it.Ž I love hearing that tone go off and haulin tail to the call,Ž says Jeff Cybulski, a captain with the Apalachee Bay department. Ive been doing this going on six years, and my family gets nervous about the calls I go on, but they generally approve and like to know Im out there serving. The only negative thing is when people ask you, What took you so long?Ž You can listen to more of the Smoke and Fire Barbecue Fundraiser interviews on the Wakulla Sunday Radio Program, Friday nights after Wakulla High School football game, Sunday at 4 p.m., and Monday at 8 p.m. on WAVE 94.1. Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com 1981 1981 Wakulla High School Wakulla High School Calling All Football Players, Cheerleaders, and Band Members to Attend Wakulla High School TORECEIVEHALF-TIME RECOGNITIONGame time 7:30Friday,October 28at the Wakulla High School StadiumFor more information contact WHS Athletic Director Mike Smith850-926-7125 MILLENDER ACCOUNTING & TAX PREPARATIONAngelique and Bryan 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. in the Log Cabin (850) 926-8272 (850) 926-1316€ Electronic Filing of Tax Returns Available (At No Extra Charge When We Prepare The Return)€ Accounting € Tax Preparation & Planning € Corporation € Partnership € Estate € FiduciaryTax Preparation Bookkeeping Payroll Services for Businesses & IndividualsSmoke and Fire: Fire“ ghters hold annual barbecue fundraiser Sheila Johnson, above, of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce Mounted Posse Unit on her horse, Buck.Ž Two volunteers, Jimmie Doyle and Harriet Rich, left, enjoy the fundraiser. Pilot Don Spells relaxes next his medical helicopter. Wakulla County Judge Jill Walker and the Rev. Jeff McFalls of Medart Assembly of God were two of the judges who sampled the barbecue cooked by the “ re“ ghters. 713-001499 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95

PAGE 3

Continued from Page 1A He said he also wants to develop a long range plan for the county and implement better programs today that will bene“ t the county in the future. Edwards said one thing that will change is communications among departments, the commission, the other constitutional of“ ces and the public. Were going to change the way we communicate,Ž Edwards said. He said he has an open door policy. Im here for the citizens,Ž Edwards said. They are the ones paying my salary.Ž A small couple of things have already changed within the county administration because of Edwards family ties to two county employees. His wife, Lara Beck Edwards, was the assistant to the county administrator. She resigned last week. Encinosa said in a previous meeting that Lara Edwards would no longer be able to hold that position because she cannot fall under the supervision of her husband. Because of Edwards relationship with another county employee, Bobby Roddenberry with the Parks and Recreation Department, the county changed its organizational chart to have Roddenberry report to the assistant county administrator instead of the county administrator. Edwards was chosen as the new administrator over Wakulla County resident Pam Portwood. After more than 75 applications were submitted, they were the last two standing. On June 21, the county commission voted 3 to 2, with Commissioners Lynn Artz and Mike Stewart opposing, to hire Edwards. Artz stated several times that she felt Edwards lacked the experience needed for the job, especially when the county is at a crucial time “ nancially. She wanted the county to expand its search and “ nd the best possible candidate. Stewart voted against Edwards because of questions he said he asked Edwards regarding “ nancial disclosure, that he said Edwards did not answer truthfully. Edwards did not “ ll out the financial disclosure form to run for Sopchoppy City Commission correctly. He did not list all his debts and liabilities. There were also some issues with the Internal Revenue Service revealed on his background check. At a previous meeting, Edwards said not filling out the form properly was a mistake, but he was told he would get a full disclosure packet the following year. As far as the IRS issue, Edwards said the economy collapsed and that he was in the process of resolving those issues. Prior to the vote to hire Edwards, the county had decided to start the process over. Commissioner Alan Brock was the deciding vote for both and spoke of his struggle with the decision, stating that he felt Edwards was the best choice, but had hoped for a consensus within the commission. The option to hire Edwards was brought up a second time and this time Brock voted in favor of Edwards taking over as county administrator. Following that meeting, Stewart negotiated the employment contract with Edwards and said he would continue to work with him. Edwards lives in Sopchoppy. His former position was as project manager for Allens Excavation. Prior to that, Edwards was vice president of development for Bluegreen Communities in Atlanta, Ga., from 1997 to 2008. He also worked as vice president of community development for St. Joe Company in Bay County. From 1982 to 1997, he was the vice president of development operations for Bald Head Island Limited in Bald Head Island, N.C. Edwards attended SouthWest Georgia Technical College from 1979 to 1981.www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Continued from Page 1A I love the area and the people are just fantastic,Ž he said. Hobbs said they are currently working out the details of how to combine both golf courses. Along with the golf course, the inn was also included in the purchase. When asked if Hobbs planned to keep or sell the inn, he said he was evaluating all options, but that his main focus was on the golf course. However, Hobbs family owns the Cabot Lodge in Tallahassee so he has hotel experience as well. Thats why it was sort of a perfect “ t,Ž Hobbs said. Hobbs said most of the current staff members are staying on board. I think its critical to utilize the people of Wakulla and employ as many as “ nancially possible,Ž Hobbs said. He added that many of the other parties interested in purchasing the property planned to bring in their own employees and management “ rm, which he said concerned him. They dont see the big picture,Ž Hobbs said. Hobbs said he thinks he will be able to get Wildwood back on track, but will need the help and support of the entire community. Even if youre not a golfer, you can support Wildwood Golf,Ž Hobbs said. Such as visiting the restaurant, at a golf tournament fundraiser, meeting, corporate getaway, etc., he said. The golf club and inn was seized by FDIC as one of the bad loans through Wakulla Bank, which has since been taken over by Centennial Bank. Sheriff David Harvey and partners Joseph Barry and Gerald Thompson owned Wildwood prior to the bank seizing the property. Continued from Page 1A Corbett added that the proposed RSU-1 zoning district is consistent with the Comprehensive Plans Future Land Use Map designation and some surrounding parcels. She added that 17 of the lots meet the minimum lot size requirements for the proposed zone, except for lots 18 through 20. However, she pointed out that those lots could apply for a variance. Corbett also wanted to make the commission aware that the west side of the area is designated as Town Center 1 under the Crawfordville Town Plan that allows for 15 units per acre of residential density and a ” oor area ratio of .75 for non-residential uses. The east side is designated as an area for high density residential. If rezoned, the plan is to have single family detached homes ranging from 1,200 to 2,000 square feet, according to agent Daron Bridges. This is a great location for homes,Ž Bridges said. Oleta Lawhon said she hasnt been able to do anything with her three lots because no one wants them. Her realtor said if the lots were changed to residential, they could be sold, she said. Maxie Lawhon said the lots are not desirable to businesses because they are located on a back street and not on Crawfordville Highway. It has not sold,Ž Maxie Lawhon said. It has not and will not.Ž Those against the rezoning wondered if the residential lots will cause trouble for the businesses that are already located around the area. Walter Roberts, who owns Ace Hardware, said people might complain because of noise and lights from the current businesses. A house backed up to a business, I just dont think it would work,Ž Roberts said. Attorney Mary Ellen Davis, who represents Bush Fire Services Inc., who owns the property leased by the USDA Forest Service, said her client could possibly lose that lease because the forest service may not want to be surrounded by homes. Davis added that is no more need for residential development and the change would be inconsistent with the town plan. We worked hard on that Crawfordville town center,Ž Davis said. Commissioner Lynn Artz agreed and said, Its critical to our future economic development.Ž She added that the location in question is perfect for multi-use, having businesses downstairs and homes upstairs. Now that the town plan is approved and the boundaries of Crawfordville have been drawn, its time for the next step of creating incentives to get businesses to develop in downtown Crawfordville, she said. This is not the time to backtrack,Ž Artz said. This is what this would be doing.Ž Commissioner Alan Brock agreed and said a goal of the town plan is to encourage traf“ c off Highway 319 and establish grid systems. It all works together,Ž Brock said. Commissioner Jerry Moore said the only way there will be a walkable, talkable communityŽ here in Crawfordville is if cars are taken away from people. He added that there is no demand for those lots because they are located behind businesses, off Hwy. 319, so they lose visibility. You couldnt give me those lots,Ž Moore said. Commissioner Randy Merritt said he agrees with developing a grid system, but those lots are located in a cul-de-sac. It doesnt go anywhere,Ž Merritt said. He suggested the county require the developer to put in a buffer between the commercial and residential lots, as well as a privacy fence. Commissioner Mike Stewart agreed with Merritt and said those commercial lots are in a residential area. Corbett said the problem with making the developer install a buffer is that those types of requirements happen during the separation of lots, or platting, which has already taken place. County Attorney Heather Encinosa said if the county wants to require that of the developer, she would like to explore it further and “ gure out how to make it legally binding. Since it was already platted, there is no real way to enforce it, she said. She recommended the commission table the item. Encinosa said she would like to get everyone on the same page and come to an agreement then bring the item back to the board. Maxie Lawhon wondered why the commission couldnt vote for the rezoning with the stipulation of the buffer included and then everyone could work out the details without having to come back before the commission. Artz said if the attorney was recommending to table the item, she would like to follow her advice. Moore said, Its not always necessary to have the attorney draw the plans.Ž Ultimately, the commission voted unanimously to table the item. These are the things that get us in the most trouble,Ž Stewart said.Wildwood has new ownerDavid Edwards takes over as administratorRezoning of 20 commercial lots is weighed by board SOURCE: Wakulla Planning Department The Crawfordville lots being consideration for rezoning. FILE PHOTOSigns outside Wildwoood Golf Club last winter.NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on October 17, 2011 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.OCTOBER 6, 2011 The Wakulla County Code Enforcement Board will hold a Public Hearing on October 12, 2011, at 5:30pm in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and participate. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners ’ Office at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGOCTOBER 6, 2011

PAGE 4

Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out Comment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Staff Writer/Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ......................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising/Photographer: Lynda Kinsey .................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Bookkeeping/Circulation: Sherry Balchuck .......accounting@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Hazel Imperiale obituary •Sheriff’s Report: Sept. 15 • Hal Arlen Council obituary • Nathan Thompson Sr. obituary • New issues arise over tourism plan • Donnie Crum appointed interim sheriff thewakullanews.com READERS WRITE:Editor, The News: On Aug. 17, I wrote to the Wakulla County commissioners and Property Appraiser about the new taxes levied on my property in northern Wakulla County. I explained to them that my house, built in 1908 by my grandfather, Jake Miller, and great uncle, Bob Miller, is split on the Leon-Wakulla line. The only access to Wakulla County proper is through Woodville, which is my legal residence. In the letter, I explained that my garbage is picked up weekly by Waste Management on the Leon County side and that any Fire-EMS comes from Woodville, less than two miles away. And the Leon County dump site is only three miles away. Why should I be billed these extra taxes if I do not use or need what Im being taxed on? If the county commissioners want to see for themselves, I will be more than happy to set up a meeting. Just give me a call at 322-6014. As of yet, I have not heard one word from anyone. Daniel C. McGee Woodville Editor, The News: On Friday, Sept. 23, my family lost one of its oldest members, my father, Nathan Thompson Sr. He had been anxiously awaiting his 90th birthday, which would have been Oct. 7, only two weeks away. I have always loved to cook, and when daddy became bedridden, I decided to cook anything that I remotely thought he may enjoy eating. I cook much like my late mother, Louise Crum Thompson, who was daddys wife of 58 years. She passed on to meet our Heavenly Father on Christmas Eve of 2000. I would strive to make appetizing food and carried it to Alligator Point, where he has lived for the past nine years, with his second wife, Dee. On Aug. 30, my babyŽ brother Larry, who is 63 years young, had back surgery. My brother Nathan Jr. (BuddyŽ) took daddy to the hospital to see Larry, in a wheelchair. On Sept. 1, Dee fell and broke her hip and she was also hospitalized. Buddy took daddy a couple of times to the hospital in a wheelchair to see her, but that became too exhausting for daddy, considering his advanced stage of cancer. With Dee also in the hospital, Buddy moved in with daddy at Alligator Point and cared for him much better than any well-trained nurse could have. I took food to both of them, and Buddys soul mate, Katie, stayed busy running at all hours, fetching whatever was needed. Daddy remained with a sharp mind and memory, right up until the day before his death. Daddys philanthropy will be missed. He always grew a garden. He gave the vegetables away. It was common to see his truck loaded with fresh vegetables or “ sh, sometimes taking them as far away as Sopchoppy or Crawfordville to people he knew. His garden sits empty today. Buddy moved daddy to his and Katies home in Crawfordville, where Buddy would lie at night on the bed beside the hospital bed, holding daddys hand, while daddy slept, never leaving his side. I have to smile when I think of Buddys nursing tactics with Daddy. The best term that I can think of, is tough love. Worried that daddy wouldnt eat enough to sustain life, Buddy would sit beside him, spooning soft food, saying, Daddy, youve gotta eat this. It cost a lot of money, and you dont want to waste it.Ž The point that I want to get across in this letter is the determination to make his father live, against all odds, were lost Friday morning. Thank you, Buddy, from the bottom of my heart. We were so blessed to have you to serve as daddys nurse. Daddy had the very best of loving care. Also, a great big thank youŽ to the Hospice caregivers, the Rev. BB Barwick, especially Katie, and all of our friends and loved ones who stood by our sides, throughout our recent need. Helen Vaughn Panacea By RITA HANEY It occurs to me that raising children today is more dif“ cult than ever. When I was a child, I could roam my neighborhood playing with friends. We walked to school, came home for lunch and played outside until the street lights came on. Sometime either before or after there was homework and chores. Life seemed so much simpler then. Now we are bombarded with information 24/7. We have round tables and square tables. We have information, we have facts, we have everything at the tip of our “ ngers. Sometimes this information directly opposes what we heard yesterday. I started a Goggle search (and I love Goggle) to learn the symptoms of mental illness and my choices for gathering information were endless. As a psychotherapist, I am often concerned regarding the use of medicine on young children and teens. And yet young children and teens do not only hurt themselves with behaviors such as cutting, they have committed suicide. Medication is one component for treating such illnesses as bi-polar, depression, anxiety and any other diagnoses that may crop up. Like diabetes, mental illness needs to be controlled with behavior changes and medication. Support Groups at large hospitals for diabetics is common. Counseling for children diagnosed with a mental illness such as depression, bi-polar disorder or ADHD should also be considered. ADHD is a common diagnosis today and there is a great article stating that ADHD diagnoses often cover for a more serious illness such as major depression. This article was written by a father whose child had committed suicide and his hope was to stop this tragedy from happening at another home. The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry reports about 5 percent of children and adolescent suffer from depression. Raising happy and healthy children takes time and it seems the more time saving devices we have the faster time ” ies. The National Alliance for Mental Illness (NAMI) is both motivated and has a strong desire for parents and teachers … the front line of defense for our children and our future … to receive information on the signs and symptoms of mental illness and what resources and interventions are available in our community. On Oct. 26, Crawfordville Elementary School is offering a day of training targeted at bringing community resources together with teachers and parents. For more information, please call 926-1033 (NAMI Wakulla) or principal Tanya English 926-0065 ex. 252. Rita Haney, MSW, LCSW is a social worker in Crawfordville.Editor, The News: Thank you, thank you, thank you, Wakulla County! Because of your generosity, the Friends of the Library was able to raise more than $3,000 during our “ rst silent auction. All of the money we are able to provide is then matched by public funds, so we have actually provided more than $6,000 toward our wonderful library services. We had more than 118 businesses and individuals donate items to be auctioned off and at least 75 people participated in the bidding. It was really above our expectations! Since we are budgeted to provide the library with over $20,000 each year (before the matching funds are calculated), expect us to be active in our efforts. The legislature has cut our budget substantially in recent years, as it has most government programs, and were trying to pick up the slack. In March, we will begin our annual membership drive. Some of you may get letters from us. Others will see the membership forms in the library lobby. Please consider joining. There are a number of levels according to your ability to contribute. We are also looking for new active members. Please contact us if we can answer any questions. Thanks again. Sue Belford President, Friends of the Library friendswakullalibrary@gmail.comSchools and NAMI partner to help raise healthy kids ank you for standing behind the library What am I being charged for in Woodville? Property appraisers o ce does a good jobEditor, The News: Recently I needed property record assistance and the Wakulla Property Appraisers of“ ce was cheerfully and professionally helpful. The taxpayers are getting their moneys worth from this of“ ce. Mike Carter CrawfordvilleSheri Harvey helped a lot of peopleEditor, The News: The rain has not washed all your footprints away. Thirty-“ ve years is a very long time to serve people. Wakulla County has come a long way in those years. You have done enough good work to out-balance that which was not good. I remember Sheriff Harvey in his first election walking through our neighborhood and going houseto-house for a long time. He said, I want to be your sheriff, Ill do my best … and you have done a good job. There is an old saying that behind every good man is a good woman. Rhonda Harvey has been that good lady. She is an elect lady. Sheriff Harvey helped a lot of people. He made history many times. You gave your younger life to the people of Wakulla County and others. Your work will speak for you. As I said many times, you have never changed. Thirty“ ve years is a long time. Good luck to you and your family. You are in our prayers. Mother Ethel Skipper Sopchoppy Support of Smoke and Fire is appreciatedEditor, The News: The organizers of the Smoke and FireŽ barbecue competition and charity fundraiser want to thank all of the people that made the event a success. Without all of our sponsors, workers and the citizens that came out to eat great food, we could not continue to support our charities. The teams in the competition were Wakulla Station VFD, Appalachee Bay VFD, Medart VFD, Panacea VFD, Ochlockonee Bay VFD, Crawfordville VFD, Riversink VFD, the Wakulla County paid “ re“ ghters, St. Marks Powder, St. Marks Refuge “ re“ ghters, Tallahassee Fire Department and two teams from the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce. Ticket sales and food serving was organized by the Ochlockonee Bay Firebelles. One volunteer, Jim Feltgen Riversink VFD, gets special mention because he brought in so many raf” e prizes and donations. Air Methods brought in a med-evac helicopter for display and that was very much appreciated. Wakulla Urgent Care had a booth to give free blood pressure and blood sugar checks as a community service. Thank you to our judges: David Harvey (retired sheriff), Dave Edwards (county administrator), Heather Enscinosa (county attorney), the Rev. Jeff McFalls (Medart Assembly of God), Father Ed Jones (St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church), Genieve Jones (Wakulla Christian Coalition), William Snowden (The Wakulla News), Guinn Haskins (Wakulla Area Times) and Wakulla County Judge Jill Walker. These are community minded people that gave up their time to help make this event a success. The charities will each receive $2,000. The charities are the Richard Rhea Scholarship Fund and Camp Amigo Childrens Burn Camp. Community support for events like this makes Wakulla County a great place to live. I am sure I have forgotten to mention someone so I will just say thanks to everyone involved. Bill Russell Wakulla County United Fire“ ghters AssociationPromise Lands thrift store should do wellEditor, The News: Promise Land has done a great job with their thrift stores. I was so impressed with their hard work. Im glad that they utilized the property on Highway 319. I think they will do very well there. God bless Promise Land and all their hard working and dedicated people. I hope that every one locally will do what they can to provide donated items and use our new and established businesses to keep Wakulla County strong. Mary Pitts Panacea Tourism and TDC are great for countyEditor, The News: Tourism and TDC are great for our county. So lets stop complaining, and start helping. Lets use the time we would use writing bad things about TDC and Pam (Portwood), its director, and start volunteering time working for the county and all its great organizations so we can continue to make our county even greater. I know a tourist who came to this county in 2001 and loved it so much he came back, and rented a home, and bought some land, and then built a home, and then started a company, and then hired Wakulla citizens to work at his company. Then he started volunteering to serve the county. And he brought more people to Wakulla, who loved it too, and more businesses were bought and opened, and more citizens were hired. Then he bought another home, a second one, for rental, and brought some more folks from Tallahassee who were tourists too, and they loved it, and they bought weekend retreats … vacation homes. And then another friend of the “ rst tourist bought another home. And the “ rst tourist, now a resident of the county, volunteered his time to the local “ re department and became a board member and of“ cer for that “ re department, And so on and so on. That tourist was me. And tourists turn visitors into regular visitors, and then residents and taxpayers, and volunteers and business owners employing Wakulla citizens, and they serve on our boards and in our civic organizations. Now my “ anc is moving to the county to start her life here, because she loved it too. And she will work here, and another business will get started and more tax dollars to the county and more employees will be hired, and so on. The public could have showed up at the TDC forum to complain, but they showed up to work, and to provide ideas, and to make the TDC better and stronger. Words are cheap; actions speak louder than words, lets all volunteer to make this county better and stronger. And thanks to all those who do volunteer, its a privilege to work side by side with you every week and month. I am in awe at your commitment to this county. Its one of the reasons I never want to leave. And thank you, Pam, for all you do! Michael J. Weltman Decade long resident, former tourist anks, brother, for caring for daddy Follow us on

PAGE 5

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 – Page 5ABarbara Ann MolzahnBarbara Ann Molzahn, 79, of Crawfordville, died on Sept. 30, surrounded by family. She was born Oct. 31, 1931, in Phillipsburg, Kan., the second child of the late Cora and Frank Torres. On Dec. 26, 1961, she married Lee Molzahn. She greatly enjoyed church activities and spending time with her friends listening to the music provided at the Senior Center. A memorial service was held Tuesday, Oct. 4, at the Church of Latter Day Saints in Crawfordville. Survivors include her loving husband, Lee; one son; two step-sons; one daughter; one step-daughter; seven grandsons; nine granddaughters; five great-grandsons, twelve great-granddaughters; and one great-great grandson. She was preceded in death by a daughter. Arrangements are being handled by Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. ( 850-926-3333 or bevisfh. com).Jessie Lou S. RakerJessie Lou Strickland Raker, 86, of Crawfordville, died on Saturday, Oct. 1. She was born on March 6, 1925, in DeFuniak Springs. She lived most of her adult life in Tallahassee, before moving to Crawfordville in 1987. She was of the Pentecostal Holiness Faith. A funeral service was held on Tuesday, Oct. 4, at the Church Faith Holiness House of Prayer with private family burial at Whiddon Lake Cemetery. Friends were received from 10 a.m. until the service. Survivors include a son, Carlos (Marcia) Raker of Crawfordville; two daughters, Glinda Raker of Crawfordville and Patricia (Charles) Rodgers of Bainbridge, Ga.; 11 grandchildren; 17 great-grandchildren; and eight great-great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, J.K. Raker; and a daughter, Betty Vernell Raker. Independent Funeral Home in Quincy was in charge of the arrangements.Joseph A. SmithJoseph Andrew Smith, 48, of Crawfordville, died on Tuesday, Sept. 27, in Tallahassee. He was a lifelong resident of Crawfordville. He lived a full and happy life and he was loved. Family received friends on Thursday, Sept. 29, at Bevis Funeral Home, HarveyYoung Chapel in Crawfordville. Graveside services were held Friday, Sept. 30, at Revell Cemetery in Sopchoppy. In lieu of ” owers contributions may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308 Survivors include his sister, Attie, who took care of Joseph since 1995, and her husband Doug, who has been a part of the family since 2000; and numerous brothers and sisters and nieces and nephews. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville was in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333) www.bevisfh. com.Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers religious views and events ChurchObituaries Wakulla StationBarbara Ann Molzahn Jessie Lou Strickland Raker Joseph Andrew SmithChurch News Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Grief RECOVERY for parents who have lost a childFor more information call Gigi Cavallaro at 850-926-6011. Coastal Funeral Home, Inc.551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Digni“ed Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES Tallahassee Wakulla United Methodist Church has several upcoming events: Busy Bee Quilters will meet on Thursday, Oct. 6 at 9 a.m. at the church, 1584 Old Woodville Road, 421-5741. United Methodist Mens Meeting and Breakfast will be held on Saturday, Oct. 8, at 8 a.m. at the church. Chancel Choir Practice will be held on Sunday, Oct. 9 at 4:30 p.m. at the church. Praise Team Practice will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 11, at 6 p.m. at the church. Bead Making Class will be held Oct. 15 at 10 a.m. at the churchs Fellowship Hall. Lunch will be provided. Please call the church of“ ce 421-5741 for reservations and further details.Some upcoming events at Wakulla United Methodist ChurchCathy Adkison is new president of Big Bend HospiceSpecial to The NewsBob Inzer, chairman of the Big Bend Hospice Board of Directors, recently announced the selection of Cathy Adkison as the new president and chief executive of“ cer of Big Bend Hospice. We are excited that Cathy has come to Tallahassee to lead Big Bend Hospice,Ž Inzer said. Her extensive experience in nursing and management, especially in the hospice and home nursing arena, is outstanding.Ž Adkison came to the Big Bend area from Alabama where she was a senior vice president of operations for a large home health and hospice provider serving more than 54 counties. She is a registered nurse and holds a Bachelor of Science in nursing, as well as certi“ cation in Hospice and Home Care Administration. Adkison has 30 years of nursing experience. Twentysix of those years are in administrative and management positions. Cathy brings to our organization a wealth of clinical and management expertise in the “ eld of palliative care, and a great passion for the difficult, yet immensely rewarding task of helping patients and their loved ones “ nd comfort and peace during the most dif“ cult of times,Ž Inzer said. Since opening in 1983, Big Bend Hospice has cared for thousands of area patients. Last year alone they provided 128,404 total days of patient care and drove over a million miles to support patients in the eightcounty Big Bend region. Big Bend Hospice care is delivered by more than 200 full and part-time staff members, supported by more than 300 volunteers to patients in their homes and at the Hospice House. In addition, 2,800 hospice families and 600 community members received bereavement support through Big Bend Hospice bereavement support groups. Your hometown Hospice, Big Bend Hospice has deep roots here in the community. A local care team consisting of a Hospice physician, an experienced RN, a family counselor, a home health aide, board certi“ ed music therapist, a chaplain and trained volunteers are offered to every patient to help guide them through lifes most challenging journey. For more information on hospice services call (850) 878-5310. FOUR FAMILY SERVING YOUR FAMILY Direct Cremation $895.00 Traditional Funeral Starting at $4695.00(Includes: Metal 20 Gauge Steel Casket (4 colors to choose from), Vault, Open and Close of Grave, Graveside or Church Service with one night of visitation, Register Book and Memorial Folders).Dedicated to serving you and your family in your time of need, Providing the most affordable services in the area.Family Owned and Operated H. M. “Hank” Forbes Jr. Licensed Funeral Director/Owner Dana Forbes Hawke Forbes 1171 South 6th Street Macclenny, Florida 32063Ph: 850-559-3380Forbes Funeral Home Big Bend Hospices president and CEO Cathy Adkison.

PAGE 6

Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comhappeningsCommunityTail Wagger...By JOAN HENDRIXCHAT PresidentOctober is a special time of year when pumpkins start popping up, Halloween comes around for trick or treating and we start seeing beautiful colored falling leaves. October is also Adopta-Shelter-Dog Month and Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment (CHAT) is extending an invitation to all of you to come visit our animals and adopt a homeless pet to share your life and home. There are so many friendly, talented, loving dogs that would touch your heart and make your house a home. All across our nation, shelters and adoption centers are promoting the adoption of shelter dogs in need of a permanent home. In conjunction with all of the other non-pro“ t organizations, CHAT is reducing our adoption fees for purebreds from $200 to $150, puppies from $150 to $125, adult dogs from $125 to $100 and reducing the cost of our senior dogs from $75 to $50. These fees include an initial health examination, spaying/neutering, micro chipping, rabies vaccinations, all vaccinations up to date, worming, a small bag of dog food and one month of free pet insurance. If youve never owned a dog, now is the time to visit and spend some quality time with one that strikes your fancy. Weve got puppies, small dogs, medium-size dogs, large dogs, couch potato dogs, energetic dogs and lap dogs. Weve got dogs to “ t almost every personality and youll be amazed how easy it is to love a dog. Youll have an opportunity to walk several of your choice in a special fenced area where you can remove their leash and let them run with you or play ball or just sit down and have an eyeto-eye conversation. These are faithful, loving dogs that just need a home and some love. We, who volunteer at CHAT, see something very special every time a dog is adopted and led out the door to the waiting car that will take them home. These dogs know what is happening and you can see smiles on their faces. It is absolutely amazing to watch. Dogs are so much more intelligent than people realize and can sense so much about their surroundings. Please come and visit us at CHAT, 1 Oak Street in Crawfordville. Our phone number is 926-0890. Give one of these homeless dogs a second chance for love and life. You will be so glad that you did and youll be coming back for more! These homeless dogs have so much to give, so what are you waiting for? Special to The News The Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce is asking for volunteer mentors for a new program that will be implemented „ the Master Money Mentor (MMM) Program. The goal is to train people who are interested in the topic, but need knowledge and skills in order to assist others. Training dates are Nov. 8-10, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Extension Of“ ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville. Ten participants will receive 20 hours of training, will return that with 50 hours of service and will help families by providing free help with their household “ nances in these challenging times. The cost of this project is $20 per person and includes a background check and lunches. Materials for the program are provided through the University of Florida/ IFAS Extension and funded through a Bank of America foundation grant. Most Master Money Mentors must complete the entire training program and background check before becoming certi“ ed as a MMM. If you are a trained professional in an aspect of money management, attendance at the last day of the training is all that would be required. While every familys “ nancial picture is different, Money Mentors can help in three important areas: assisting families as they make spending and savings plans, helping them analyze their credit behavior and limit debt, and encouraging families to be proactive with lenders when problems arise. Please contact Shelley Swenson at sswenson@u” edu or (850) 926-3931 for information, to receive an application and plan on being part of this new project. Additional information is also available at our website, wakulla.ifas.u” .edu. Brittany Renee Blakeslee and Trey Vause, both of Crawfordville, announce their engagement. She is the daughter of Dale and Christina Blakeslee of Crawfordville. He is the son of Chuck and Tracy Vause of Sopchoppy. Bride-elects grandmother is Gerry Conlon of Margaretville N.Y. The groom-elects grandparents are Bobby and Loraine Vause of Sopchoppy. The bride-elect graduated from Tallahassee Community Colleges RN program last April and is currently a nurse at Tallahassee Medical Hospital. The groom-elect is a superintendent at Harts“ eld Construction. The wedding date is March 17, 2012 at Gin Greek Plantation in Moultire, Ga. Trey Vause and Brittany Renee Blakeslee Volunteers sought for money mentor program ose interested can attend training available for $20 and will take place Nov. 8-10 from at the extension o ceVause will wed BlakesleeHappy “ rst birthday, IsabellaIsabella Grace Hopkins will celebrate her first birthday on Oct. 7. She is the daughter of Brandon and Amber Hopkins of Crawfordville. Her maternal grandparents are Kathy ODonnell of Lodi, Ohio, and Bryan Askey of Mansifield, Ohio. Her paternal grandparents are Hollis Hopkins and Pauline Giddens of Crawfordville. Her maternal greatgrandparents are Jim and June Askey of Mansi“ eld, Ohio. Her paternal greatgrandparents are Paul and Edith Giddens of Crawfordville. Isabella HopkinsFire“ ghters o er a Fire Safety Checklist Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints FORENROLLMENT– No Enrollment Fee –We Accept Babies 6 weeks 5 years Also offering After School Programs for All Ages YOURE A STAR AT Miriams Playhouse850-926-2273 Miriams PlayhouseEnrichment Center1773 Crawfordville Hwy., located between Dollar General store and North Pointe Center CRAWFORDVILLENOWOPEN St Marks River Cantina(850) 925-9908 Halloween Party & Costume ContestAnd Karaoke Saturday, October 29, 2011 7 pm 11 pm59 Port Leon Dr, Saint Marks, Fl 32355 MON-THURS. 10 am 10 pm SAT-SUN 10 am 11 pm Come dressed as your favorite spook McClendon Auto Service, LLCFree EstimatesSpecializing in:Owned and operated by Fred McClendon 10 years experienceMV#66653Brak es Batteries Radia tors Wat er Pum ps Hub Be arings Star ters Alte rnators and mor e!MOBILE AUTO REPAIR850-933-4093 THE CABINET SHOPTHECABINET SHOP Custom Kitchens&Counter Tops Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) During National Fire Prevention Week, Oct. 9-15, your Wakulla County “ re“ ghters encourage all county residents to focus attention on “ re prevention. Most potential hazards can be addressed with a little common sense. For example, be sure to keep ” ammable items like bedding, clothes and curtains at least three feet away from portable heaters or lit candles, and never smoke in bed. Fire Safety Checklist: € Install and maintain a working smoke alarm outside of every sleep area and remember to change the batteries at least twice a year. A rule of thumb reminder is to change the batteries when time changes in the Fall and Spring. € Designate two escape routes from each bedroom and practice them regularly. € Teach everyone the Stop, Drop, and RollŽ technique in case clothing catches “ re. € Teach children that matches, lighters and candles are tools, not toys. If you suspect that a child is playing with “ re, check under beds and in closets for telltale signs like burned matches. Matches and lighters should be stored in a secure drawer or cabinet. If you have any questions about “ re prevention techniques, please contact your nearest volunteer “ re department or the Wakulla County Fire Rescue Department in Crawfordville.

PAGE 7

By MICHAEL PELTIER and LILLY ROCKWELLTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 3 … Citing insuf“ cient tax revenue and previous debt, economists on Monday said the state will have no money available to sell new bonds for school construction next year. A panel of state economists slashed estimates for available school construction money by $267 million for 2012, leaving educators with about $113 million in new cash available for building for the “ scal year that begins July 1. Bonding, which is typically used to construct new buildings and renovate older ones, is not an option for the upcoming year. The following year is even worse, the revenue estimating conference predicted. Projections for the 2013 “ scal year were reduced by $410 million, a 45-percent cut from the estimates made after the legislative session earlier this year. State university system of“ cials said this means going to a bare-bones wish list of mainly repair and maintenance over shiny new classrooms or laboratory space. Economists say the school building program, which is funded largely through collection of utility taxes, is being hit by a double whammy. Tough economic times have taken many customers off the electricity grid. Shuttered businesses, languid manufacturing and vacant homes dont generate tax revenue. But the building fund is also being affected by longer term trends as consumers responding to high energy costs by purchasing energy ef“ cient appliances and changing habits that reduce consumption. The magnitude of the change in the forecast took some key lawmakers by surprise Monday. Sen. Evelyn Lynn, R-Ormond Beach, and chairwoman of the Senate higher education budget subcommittee, said lawmakers were anticipating a downward projection, but Mondays cut surpassed their expectations. State bond “ nance of“ cials are scheduled to sell $150 million in Public Education Capital Outlay, or PECO, bonds in November from a 2010 authorization. Another $100 million is slated to be sold in February, but Baker said the second sale may not go forward if the amount of outstanding debt exceeds the states ability to make payments. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 – Page 7Aeducation news from local schoolsSchool Special to The News Be sure to attend this years Fall Festival at Shadeville Elementary School. It will be held on the school grounds on Saturday, Oct. 15 from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. This year promises to be even better than previous years. We have worked on creating some new booths for the children to enjoy. Come and let them create their own sand crafts, or dig for sand treasures. They can also play hula hoops, roller racers, laser tag, and much, much more. Dont miss our famous bingo, or the new and exciting performance of the Polynesian Fire Knife Dancers. There will be lots to eat and drink. The Wakulla County Volunteer Firefighters will be preparing hotdogs, hamburgers and sausage dogs for the food booth, and you cant miss the cake walk, soda walk, nachos and cheese booth or The Sweet Shop. This is the only fundraiser that is put on by the hardworking Shadeville PTO. Funds have been used to upgrade necessary equipment and enhance the students overall educational experience. Thanks to our many business partners and parents, we look forward to another successful festival. We hope to see you there. Students enjoy the hayride at last years Fall Festival.Shadeville gearing up for fall festival On Friday, Oct. 7 at 9:30 a.m., the 4-H youth at Riversink Elementary School will join millions of young people across the nation to become scientists for the day during the fourth annual 4-H National Youth Science Day (NYSD). As part of 4-H NYSD, youth will participate in Wired for Wind: the 2011 National Science Experiment,Ž which will demonstrate how young people can implement alternatives to traditional energy production and have a positive impact on their communities and ecosystems. They will also be discussing wind energy technologies and the positive impact of alternative energy sources on the environment. -To combat a national shortage of young people pursuing science college majors and occupations, and to enhance the nations contribution to the sciences, 4-H NYSD demonstrates that science, engineering, math and technology are fun and attainable options for college degrees and future careers. Currently, more than five million young people across the nation participate in 4-H science, engineering, technology and applied math year-long programming. Through the One Million New Scientists, One Million New Ideas campaign, 4-H is working toward a bold goal to engage one million new young people in science, engineering, technology and applied math programs by the year 2013. To request more information or to RSVP to attend, please contact Sherri Kraeft at sjkraeft@ u” .edu or 926-3931 They will also be displaying the experiment at the Stone Crab Festival on Oct. 22 at the 4-H booth.Science experiments will be held at Riversink Elementary on Oct. 7Economists slash 2012 education capital outlay estimate by $267 million TC C WAKULL A CENTEROFFERING TCLASSE SOct 6, 13, 6-9p.m. $25 Oct 20, 6-9p.m. $25 EXC E October 27, 6-9 p.m. $25 EXC E November 3, 6-9 p.m. $25ECOTOURISMCLASSESLOCALGEOLOGICAL FEATURES Oct 13, 6-9 p.m. $20 FORESTFIELD T LEONSINKS Oct 16, 1-5 p.m. $40 FLORIDAARCHAEOLOGY ANDPR E Oct 20, 6-9 p.m. $20 FORESTFIELD T WAKULLASINKS Oct 23, 1…5 p.m. $40 For a complete class schedule visit:www.workforce.tcc..edu/WakullaFor more information:(850)922-6290|mackiek@tcc..edu Come Join the Fun at Shadeville Elementarys Annual Fall Festival! TICKETS at T REATSCome see some CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNED JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 T IRED ?RUNDOWN? FEELING M a n a t e e T i m e s Statewide advertising—one low priceReach a wide audience (850) 926-7102 TheWakullanews

PAGE 8

Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team viewsSports Calyn Stevens, an eighth grade student at Wakulla Middle School, received the honor of being selected for the 2011-2012 Cinch Rodeo Team for the Junior High Division of the Georgia High School Rodeo Association. She was also awarded the honor of being selected out of four candidates for the Academic Team, where she had the highest average in core classes. Being selected for these two teams allowed Stevens to be placed on the Elite Rodeo Team where only one boy and one girl are selected. Congratulations, Calyn Stevens! Coach Travis Bolin began his tenure as the physical education coach at Wakulla Christian School back in August. Bolin grew up in Pensacola and attended Pace High School. He moved to Tallahassee at the age of 18 and attended Tallahassee Community College, then Florida State University where he earned a bachelors degree in physical education. His coaching experience includes “ ve years of mens collegiate basketball at TCC as an assistant under Eddie Barnes. This is his second year at Wakulla Christian School and “ rst year as the physical education instructor. He and his wife, Amanda, are expecting their “ rst child in February. By JOE JACOBSRMS CoachRMS running back Monterious Loggins just had a brand new baby sister born into the world, and he wanted to welcome her in a big way. So when Riversprings played at Taylor County on Thursday, Sept. 29, the new big brother gashed the bulldog defense with a 60yard run on the very “ rst play from scrimmage. Loggins would finish the night with nine carries for 123 yards and a touchdown. Loggins back“ eld mates Demarcus Lindsey and Sebastian Garner also ran wild in Perry. Lindsey had “ ve carries for 88 yards and one touchdown, while Garner added 59 yards on just three carries. Marquis Hutchison added a 17 yard touchdown run, and Keith Gavin pitched in a TD gallop of 20 yards. The Bear running attack piled up 360 yards rushing in the game. RMS also had a 21 yard touchdown pass from Feleip Franks to Jacobs Austin Riversprings defense also played a great game. Although Taylor County scored on their second play in the game, RMS Lights OutŽ defense did exactly that: turned the lights out on the Taylor County offensive game. RMS was led in tackles by Keith Gavin, Antonio Morris and Monterious Loggins Loggins had three tackles for a loss in the contest. According to Head Coach Joey Jacobs, It has been a while since we played a game. We showed a little ring rust, but we got our bearings back pretty quickly.Ž The Bears were scheduled to be back in action on Tuesday, Oct. 4 at home against WR Tolar. By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach On Saturday, Oct. 1, Wakulla High School cross country and community runners gathered at Azalea Park for the “ rst Ignite the Fight 5K. The race was directed by Sherri and Jason Roberts and sponsored primarily by local businesses, Anytime Fitness, Regions Construction and Rainbow International. The race was part of a fundraising effort that included a golf tournament, awards dinner and the 5K race with the proceeds earmarked for the Wakulla County Fire“ ghters Association for training and the purchase of equipment. Saturday was an open race date for the WHS runners, but rather than sleep in, a number of them showed up to take advantage of the cool weather and ” at, fast course. Approximately 100 runners competed in the 3.1 mile race. By the one-mile mark, three former WHS runners had separated from the rest of the “ eld and it was clear that the overall and male winner would come from that group. This group included 2011 graduates Josh Dismuke and Shawn Morris and 2010 graduate Adam Carr The womens winner was also decided by this point, as current WHS runner Marty Wiedeman had a solid lead over the chase group of teammates Lydia Wiedeman and Raychel Gray Dismuke, Morris and Carr continued to battle each other over the next two miles, with Dismuke gradually opening a gap on the other two and holding the lead to the “ nish. He “ nished in a new personal record (PR) of 18:15 with Carr capturing second place in 18:36 and Morris “ nishing third in 18:50. Community runner James Taylor also cracked the 19:00 barrier and “ nished in fourth place in 18:58. As expected, Wiedeman built on her lead and “ nished as the overall womens winner in the excellent time of 21:05. Gray and Lydia Wiedeman, Martys younger sister, continued to battle for second place, with Gray ultimately winning the battle and “ nishing second in 23:01, with Lydia close behind in 23:14. The “ rst and second place male and female runners received awards, as well as the oldest runner, Mike Moss 72 years young, and the youngest runner, 8-year-old Molly Jones On a related note, WHS freshman Mitchell Atkinson traveled to Jacksonville with his dad, Michael, and Assistant Cross Country Coach Greg James to compete in the annual Jacksonville Marine Corp Races. While his dad and Coach James competed in the half marathon, Mitchell ran the accompaning 5K and “ nished “ rst out of 119 runners in the 19 and under age group in a new PR of 19:37. Coach James “ nished 12th of 147 in the 4044 age group in the half marathon in the good time of 1:32:47 and Michael Atkinson ran 1:59:02. The WHS Cross Country teams will compete this Saturday at the Cougar Invitational at Phipps Park in Tallahassee, with the “ rst race starting at 8 a.m. By RICHARD LAWHONSpecial to The NewsOn Sept. 27, the Lady War Eagles traveled to Rickards High School to play their third district game of the season. The Lady War Eagles came out playing very strong in the first game winning 25-10. As they started the second game, the Lady War Eagles became a little complacent, but still won 25-14. Going into the third game, the Lady War Eagles appeared to be ready to go home and won this game 25-9. The key players for this game were Ashley Roberts with 5 kills and 3 aces, Chelsea Carroll with 12 assists and 17 aces and Emily Haley with 4 kills and 2 blocks. The Lady War Eagles improved to 3-0 in district play. On Sept. 29, the Lady War Eagles hosted Lincoln High School in a hard-fought, but heartbreaking loss. The Lady War Eagles started the first game a little lazily losing 10-25. During the second game, the Lady War Eagles began to want to win, playing very well on defense, but still not executing on offense, losing 17-25. Moving into the third game the Lady War Eagles fought very hard to try and keep the match alive, but the Lady Trojans were not giving up easily. After a hard-fought third game, the Lady War Eagles were still defeated 18-25. The key players of this game were Ashley Roberts with 6 kills, Breighly Bolton with 5 digs, Chelsea Carroll with 11 assists and 7 digs, Marina Petrandis with 4 kills and 8 digs and Jordan Pryor with 5 digs. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCalyn Stevens was chosen for the Cinch Rodeo Team.RODEOStevens receives awardsCROSS COUNTRYRunners descend on Azalea ParkVOLLEYBALLMIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALLLady War Eagles beat Rickards, fall to LincolnTravis Bolin is PE coach at Wakulla ChristianRMS keeps rolling at Taylor CountyCoach Travis Bolin ASHLEY FEEDSTOREOPEN 7 DAYSAWEEKFROM 9 A.M. 6 P.M. 8056 WAKULLA SPRINGSROAD( 850 ) 421-7703Complete line of Animal FeedBuck Stop and Midway 20 Deer Pellets. Full Line of pasture and wildlife mixes. TheWorks coffee•espresso•latts cappuccino•frapps andnowBAGELS! Monday-Friday630am-900pm Saturday8a m-9pm Sunday1 2-5pm 27FAzaleaDr•BehindBealls•850.253.7253•www.theworkscafe.com 2 0 1 1 S t a rt u p B u s i n e s s o f t h eY e a r! You’ve got questions… we have answers Q: Where are the best places to eat? A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF the EATIN’ path… a monthly page inThe Wakuulanews blocking,cleaning, restoration Bandannas 2.00 incl. taxofHATS PANACEA HATSAFACT San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOyst ers Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Huttons Seafood & More 570-1004

PAGE 9

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 – Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsWar Eagles dominate Jefferson County, 33-14By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIt wasnt even as close as the score made it appear. The Wakulla War Eagles were up 33-0 in the third quarter, and let off the pressure. The Jefferson County Tigers scored two quick touchdowns near the end of the game to at least make the score look respectable. But the War Eagles, who improved to 2-2, dominated the game … especially through the air, with a passing attack that the Tigers couldnt stop. The game, played Friday, Sept. 30, at Reynolds Stadium, also marked Senior Night for members of the Class of 2012 on the football team, cheerleaders and band. Wakulla Head Coach Scott Klees noted that it was appropriate that five seniors scored on Senior Night: Will Thomas, Evan McCoy, Marshane Godbolt, Demonta Morris and Conner Smith. Were de“ nitely happy about our seniors,Ž Klees said, noting that the upperclassmen are the team leaders. It was a good win for us,Ž Klees said. After a couple of losses, Klees said it looked like the team was back on track. The most noticeable improvement, he said, the defense started hitting again.Ž THE GAME Wakullas “ rst offensive series was marred by several penalties, and then a sack of quarterback Caleb Stephens had the War Eagles facing a third down and forever. But a long pass to Lyntonio Bowdry down to near the goal line set up a Will Thomas two-yard run for a touchdown. With the extra point by Conner Smith, Wakulla was up 7-0. Evan McCoy scored a touchdown on a pass play. Wakulla went for a twopoint conversion but the attempt failed. Quarterback Conner Smith scored on the next series. The extra point was missed, but the War Eagles were up 19-0 with 4:25 left in the half. The Tigers were stopped offensively and the most controversial officiating call of the night was made on the punt attempt: the ball went off the side of the Tiger punters foot and didnt make it to the line of scrimmage. A War Eagle picked up the ball and ran it in for a score, but the play was whistled dead and the ruling on the “ eld was that the ball could not be advanced because the punt did not reach the line of scrimmage. It ultimately didnt hurt the War Eagles: They scored again, Smith added the extra point and Wakulla was up 26-0. That was the score at halftime. Wakulla drove the ball down to the 5 yard line, and Marshane Godbolt basically walked in on a sweep play. With the extra point, Wakulla was up 33-0. In the fourth quarter, with a lot of Wakullas “ rst string players cooling it on the sidelines and the mercy rule invoked to keep the clock running, Jefferson managed a couple of quick strikes for scores. UP NEXT: RICKARDS Up next for Wakulla is district opponent Rickards at home … the “ rst district game of the year for both teams. They are very big, very physical and very athletic,Ž Klees said. Despite an 0-4 record, the Rickards Raiders are not to be underestimated, the coach warned. Every year when we play Rickards, it seems to come down to the wire,Ž Klees said. We have home field advantage and that will be huge,Ž he said. Theres routine for us at home … and youve got the crowd behind you.Ž Coach Klees also noted the junior varsity team is having a good year, off to a 3-0 start. The JV has beat Leon, John Paul IIs varsity and Suwannee by a combined total of 124-6. And Klees noted the one score came late in a game. Coming up this week, the JV faces Chiles. Wakulla High Schools 2011 Homecoming will be held on Oct. 28. There will be a reunion of the 1981 Football State Championship team which will be recognized that evening at halftime. If you were on the football team, were a cheerleader or in the band for the state championship year, please contact Athletic Director Mike Smith at Wakulla High School for information regarding the festivities. He can be reached at (850) 926-7125.JV team is unbeatenSeeking members of 1981 team Lyntonio Bowdry 2 catches for 86 yards Dequon Simmons 13 tackles, graded 85 Damonta MorrisPlayers of the WeekOFFENSEDEFENSESPECIAL TEAMS GAME PHOTOS BY BILL ROLLINS/Special to The NewsDamonta Morris, left, carries Jefferson County defenders over the goal line as he goes in for a touchdown. The War Eagle defense was swarming, above, as they kept the Tigers scoreless for the “ rst three quarters. At left, young Josie Johnston, 18 months, watches the game from the shoulders of his father, Jeremy.More photos online thewakullanews.comFollow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/ eWakullaNewsfor live updates during the game. Florida Certi“ed ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction Daviod Rossetti 850 591-6161 Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Loren Joiner 850 544-3508 Kelly Dykes 850 528-3063 all akullas inest 850 926-1011 our ome own ealtor734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL HAVE YOU HEARD THE NEWS?has expanded their circulation department! – LOOK –The Wakulla News has a new number to call to subscribe.888-852-2340CALLALISON ORNECIA TODAY! 888-852-2340 They haven't actually expanded, they're just taking advantage of Citrus Publishing's call center in Crystal River.13 Months … For only $31 From now until the end of October get Marriages Anniversaries Obituaries Births School Religion Sports Classifieds Legal NoticesSubscribe Today & StayInformed About Local:Please accept my 13 month subscription at the price of $31.00 Name Address City State Zip Phone # ( ) Email Address Credit Card __________ … __________ … __________ … __________ Exp. Send Payment to:TheWakulla NewsP.O. Box 307 Crawfordville, or go to www.thewakullanews.com and click subscribeSavings apply to Wakulla County subscriptions only.888-852-2340

PAGE 10

Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comIn The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102 F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A g a t o r s FLORIDA gators By MARTY COHENof GatorBaitThe clock hit 11:11 on Saturday night and The Swamp began emptying in droves. There was still nearly 11 minutes to go in the fourth quarter but after the blow to the solar plexus Florida took just before halftime, the air had been of“ cially taken out of Florida Field. True freshman quarterback Jeff Driskel, pressed into service after a season-crushing injury to starting “ fthyear senior quarterback John Brantley, mishandled a center snap and Alabama recovered. What began as a stirring night now left many shaken. And a season that contained so much promise is currently left hanging in the balance. The “ nal score of 38-10 was almost irrelevant because when Brantley went down 35 seconds before halftime with what sure looks like a seasonand career-ending injury to his right knee, the outcome was basically sealed. And its a shame because Florida had showed a lot of “ ght in the “ rst half, even if a bit overmatched on the line of scrimmage against an Alabama squad that looks every bit as powerful, if not maybe even a touch better all around, than the 2009 club that won the national championship. Perhaps it was “ tting that when Brantley went down, the rookie Driskel stepped in because symbolically, it demonstrated the overall climate of the two programs. Alabama is in its “ fth year under Nick Saban, and as a result, sports the abundance of skilled players necessary to implement his systems. On the other side, theres Florida in its first year under Will Muschamp, in the embryonic stages of where the rookie head coach sees his program headed. And even before Brantleys injury, which effectively ended Floridas night, the distance between the two programs had begun to show. The Gators were hanging on by a thread before Brantley went down. The Tide was controlling both sides of the line of scrimmage and punishing tailback Trent Richardson, every inch as effective as 2009 Heisman Trophy winner Mark Ingram, was exerting his will. Offensively, Florida had not been able to run the ball at all to that point, surviving thanks to some success throwing the ball down the “ eld, an ingredient absent to that point in the season. Then things started to unravel a bit. The immature Gators lost their composure on defense, as “ rst Dominique Easley and then Jon Bostic drew personal foul penalties on Alabamas third touchdown drive as the Tide scored 21 unanswered points to assume a 24-10 lead. Florida did show a touch of resilience, driving inside the Alabama 15yard line with under a minute before intermission. A touchdown at that juncture and its a seven-point game at halftime, at the worst, a workable 11-point margin if the Gators were forced to settle for another short Caleb Sturgis “ eld goal. But disaster soon struck. First linebacker Alex Watkins sacked Brantley, and then came the crusher, as 265pound linebacker Courtney Upshaw, who had already returned an interception for a touchdown, beat guard Dan Wenger and brought Brantley down awkwardly, apparently tearing up the quarterbacks right knee in the process. Brantley had to be escorted to the locker room as his leg dangled, unable to come close to putting any pressure on it. Muschamp would not comment on the severity of Brantleys injury after the game, and its possible it may not be announced until Monday, given UFs reticence when it comes to passing along information on players health. But it doesnt take a surgeon or a Holiday Inn guest to surmise that Brantleys injury will surely end his season, and ultimately, his Gator career. On a day that began with the sad news about former Florida assistant coach, and personal friend, Mike Heimerdinger, who lost his battle with cancer and passed away at the way-tooyoung age of 58, the Brantley situation was a sobering second punch. T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate No. 17 Florida at No. 1 LSUSaturday, 3:30 p.m.The game can be seen on CBS. No. 23 Florida State at Wake ForestSaturday, 12:30 p.m.The game can be seen on WTLH Fox49. G a t o r s r o l l e d b y T i d e Gators rolled by TideBy TIM LINAFELTof The OseolaIt was a simple answer to a simple question. Florida State quarterback EJ Manuel, speaking publicly for the “ rst time since injuring his left shoulder Sept. 17, was quickly asked if he expects to play Saturday when the No. 22 Seminoles visit Wake Forest (12:30, ACC Network). Yes sir,Ž Manuel said. Those two words dont completely end the speculation around Manuels status, but they sure do go a long way. Manuel left in the third quarter of FSUs 23-13 loss to Oklahoma and did not play against Clemson. He returned to practice, in limited action, last Thursday, but fully participated when the Seminoles (2-2, 0-1 Atlantic Coast Conference) took the practice “ elds in preparation for Wake Forest Monday. We expect him to practice today,Ž FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said. That brings another big dimension back to the offense. Not that (backup QB) Clint (Trickett) wasnt (effective), but it brings some athleticism … I mean extreme athleticism … back to that position. ƒWell see how it goes, but yeah, hopefully hell be ready to roll.Ž Manuel was off to a brisk start to his junior campaign before his injury. He has six touchdown passes to his credit and has completed 67 percent of his throws. Manuel is also a key component of FSUs ” edgling rushing attack … his 79 yards are second on the team, despite playing only a little more than 2 games this season. The injury hampered his non-throwing shoulder, but Manuel explained Monday that that shoulder still plays a crucial part to his throwing ability and his effectiveness. As the shoulder swelled and throbbed with pain, Manuel couldnt summon the balance and strength needed to throw the ball with any zip. That was probably the main reason I wasnt able to play, because I wasnt able to rip when I wanted to throw a 60-yard bomb or something like that,Ž Manuel said. After a while, when the swelling subsides and the pain goes away a little bit, you can still tolerate the pain, but when it is really swollen and really tender, that is when it was hard for me to try to throw any type of passes. But now it feels “ ne.Ž And that has FSU feeling much better as the Seminoles continue their conference slate with virtually no margin for error in its hopes to overtake Clemson in the ACCs Atlantic Division race.A simple answer to a simple questionFreshman backup Jeff Driskel had to come in against top-ranked Alabama.PHOTO COURTESY OF GATORBAIT FSU Head Coach Jimbo Fisher with starting quarterback EJ Manual, who expects to play in Saturdays game against Wake Forest. John Brantley helped off the “ eld.PHOTOS BY COLIN HACKLEY Osceola

PAGE 11

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 – Page 11Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsWhat do you think about this weather? If it wouldnt get any colder than this I could stand it. Long sleeve in the morning and short sleeves in the afternoon is my kind of weather. The water temperature finally dropped into the 70s and the “ shing is really getting good. When I left the dock on Sunday. it was showing about 65 degrees and by about 4 p.m. it had only gotten up to 75 degrees. With the cool weather were having this week its really gonna turn the “ sh on by the weekend. The oyster bars at the mouth of the rivers and creeks and over in Oyster Bay should be red hot and the ” ats should really turn on again. I talked to Fran at the Lanark Market and she said not many people “ shed Sunday but quite a few got out on Saturday despite the winds. The most talk she heard was the big reds being caught and released. I heard that the Dog Island Reef was still producing lots of trout, Spanish and blues and of course there are thousands of lady“ sh out there. Look for your better trout to be hanging around the big sand holes in the grass. The docks along 98 should still be good for reds and if the trout “ shing on the ” ats hasnt picked up it will. Shawn Mann took a party from Atlanta out of Shell Island on Sunday and they had a very good day. He said they caught trout, reds, Spanish and a pompano. They “ shed on the West Flats off the lighthouse. He said during the morning the “ sh wanted the white Gulp but later on they wanted live shrimp. One of my neighbors said some friends of his went out on Sunday and caught more than 30 trout and reds. They were also “ shing the West Flats. Capt. David Fife is still catching reds out of Spring Creek and he believes this cool weather is gonna put more reds around the bars in bigger schools and will also push the trout back onto the ” ats from the deeper water. I talked with Larry Hess of Shell Point last week and he said he was catching some “ sh on the ” ats but not a lot. His better catches of trout were coming from 10 to 15 feet of water. Another neighbor at Shell Point was out last week and caught two pompano and saw a huge school of them. He went back on Sunday and caught another one. Its that time of year when all the pelagics start following the bait back south to warmer water. On Thursday, I took out a group of folks in the plumbing business and we “ shed in the oyster bars around Oyster Bay. Using mostly white grubs we came in with a cooler of silver trout, one red, two whiting and four ” ounder. I took a different group of them out and we also had a bunch of silver trout but “ nally caught some speckled trout. When the tide “ nally started coming in they started biting a white gulp on a .25-ounce lead head. We caught 14 in two spots and they were schooled up. On Sunday afternoon, we had a very low tide and I thought about going to the oyster bars again but decided to see if there was anything on the ” ats. Fishing out of Shell Point with white Gulps I caught and released more than 40 trout, 15 of which were legal and none were less than 14 inches. I dont know how many “ sh I missed. I was “ shing in two to four feet of water and concentrating on the white sand holes in the grass. Fishing a straight grub with a .25-ounce lead was the ticket and the bite was as good as I have seen all year. There was hardly a spot of sand that wasnt holding a trout and quite a few were holding several. I caught a few trout using the Cajun Thunder but not too many. I also caught two nice Spanish and a 24-inch red. I tried topwater and shallow running Mirrolures but couldnt buy a bite on them. The cool water is what I have been waiting on and hopefully things will continue to get even better. To me, this is the best time of the year to “ sh because football and hunting keep a lot of “ shermen in their easy chairs watching the game or out in the woods. That means the water isnt gonna be too crowded and combine that with the cooler weather and it just doesnt get much better. My neighbor is one who does a lot of hunting though he does manage to sneak down during the week to go either trout “ shing or offshore for grouper. He took his 14-year-old son Keaton bowhunting about two weeks ago and on his “ rst time in the tree with a bow he shot a deer. On Saturday Mike took Randy Willis, his 16-year-old nephew from Tifton, and he also shot a deer on his “ rst time in a tree stand with a bow. Congratulations to these two and to Mike for putting them in the right spot. Remember to leave that ” oat plan with someone and be careful out there. Good luck and good “ shing!Fish should be biting this weekend From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Lisa Lawrence, above, and Justin Latici, below, of the Gem Land Company were married at Ring Oak Plantation last Saturday evening in a beautiful outdoor Old South ceremony, where the bride rode in on a mule drawn plantation buggy. On Sunday evening, they called Shell Points Major Alan Lamarche of Plantation Security and asked if he would take them offshore “ shing in the Gulf. The newlyweds brought along Josh, one of the groomsmen, and they spent part of their honeymoon “ shing out of Shell Point on Monday. The newlyweds caught grouper and Key West grunts until their arms were sore and said the “ shing was a honeymoon treat for their memory book. The bride and groom will reside in Colorado and they plan to return in the spring for another great “ shing trip with Lamarche. Honeymooners catchGreenwing Day to be held SaturdaySpecial to The NewsWakulla Ducks Unlimited and the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce will be hosting Wakulla Greenwing Day on Saturday, Oct. 8 at the WCSO Training Center and Firing Range. Registration will begin at 9 a.m. and the event will be held from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. The program is open to youths age 6 to 18 and parental supervision is required. The cost is $15 per child which includes a T-shirt and Greenwing magazine subscription. Lunch will be provided for parents and youths. The education stations will target firearm safety and include bench shooting, shotgun shooting, archery and a build your own turkey call station. There will be a Turkey Shoot for $2 per shot and a Chicken Shoot for $1 per shot. Winners will go home with a turkey or chicken. Giveaways and door prizes will include “ shing, camping, hunting gear and a visit from the FWC helicopter and FWC dog. Greenwing is a Ducks Unlimited event for young conservationists who want to protect wildlife for today and tomorrow. For more information, call Holly Porter at 519-0416. Email inquiries may be sent to wakullagreenwing@embarqmail.com. Registration checks may be mailed to Wakulla Greenwing, P.O. Box 1985, Crawfordville FL 32326 or dropped off at Ameris Bank in Crawfordville, attention Tara C. Sanders. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 BE SUREYOUSTOCKUPON HUNTINGEQUIPMENT BEFORETHE SEASON STARTS 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 HUNT ING SEA SON!! Get Ready for Grouper Call us today to make your reservation!www.jacksbquick.comOpen Monday Friday • 7am 6pm Saturday by appointment only Barber Shop & Salon 926-4080 Clipper Cuts Scalp Massage Steam Towels Style Cuts Neck Massage Hi-lites & Low-lites Color 926-4080 926-4080 3334 Crawfordville Hwy. TheresaDelta Waxing Perms Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 850925-5685Your Boats One Stop Paint & Body Shop 56 Industrial Court St. Marks Industrial Park,St. Marks 32355Fiberglass Supplies and Repair Marine Battery Dealer Tues. Thurs. 9am 5:30pm Friday Sunday See Us at the Gun Shows LOWER PRICED AMMO IN STOCKMany accessoriesLargest Selection of Guns in the Tallahassee Wakulla Area GunSmithing Fast Turn Around! OFFICIALPRODUCTLICENSED www.ronsgun.comLocated Main Street St. Marks483 Port Leon Dr., St. Marks Gun Show Pricing Everyday! WE BUY GUNS$ Highest Dollar Paid $ for your gun! Selling GunsSince 1999AK 47s in stock!

PAGE 12

Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Oct 6, 11 Fri Oct 7, 11 Sat Oct 8, 11 Sun Oct 9, 11 Mon Oct 10, 11 Tue Oct 11, 11 Wed Oct 12, 11 Date 3.2 ft. 12:34 AM 3.4 ft. 1:04 AM 3.6 ft. 1:31 AM 3.7 ft. 1:57 AM 3.8 ft. 2:21 AM High 2.0 ft. 4:22 AM 1.6 ft. 5:44 AM 1.2 ft. 6:36 AM 0.8 ft. 7:17 AM 0.5 ft. 7:54 AM 0.3 ft. 8:28 AM 0.2 ft. 9:00 AM Low 3.2 ft. 11:04 AM 3.3 ft. 12:12 PM 3.5 ft. 1:01 PM 3.6 ft. 1:40 PM 3.7 ft. 2:16 PM 3.7 ft. 2:49 PM 3.7 ft. 3:22 PM High 1.0 ft. 5:45 PM 1.0 ft. 6:31 PM 1.0 ft. 7:07 PM 1.1 ft. 7:37 PM 1.1 ft. 8:04 PM 1.2 ft. 8:30 PM 1.2 ft. 8:56 PM Low 3.0 ft. 11:59 PM High Thu Oct 6, 11 Fri Oct 7, 11 Sat Oct 8, 11 Sun Oct 9, 11 Mon Oct 10, 11 Tue Oct 11, 11 Wed Oct 12, 11 Date 3.2 ft. 12:31 AM 3.4 ft. 1:01 AM 3.6 ft. 1:28 AM 3.8 ft. 1:54 AM 3.8 ft. 2:18 AM High 2.1 ft. 4:19 AM 1.7 ft. 5:41 AM 1.2 ft. 6:33 AM 0.8 ft. 7:14 AM 0.5 ft. 7:51 AM 0.3 ft. 8:25 AM 0.2 ft. 8:57 AM Low 3.2 ft. 11:01 AM 3.4 ft. 12:09 PM 3.6 ft. 12:58 PM 3.7 ft. 1:37 PM 3.7 ft. 2:13 PM 3.8 ft. 2:46 PM 3.8 ft. 3:19 PM High 1.0 ft. 5:42 PM 1.1 ft. 6:28 PM 1.1 ft. 7:04 PM 1.2 ft. 7:34 PM 1.2 ft. 8:01 PM 1.3 ft. 8:27 PM 1.3 ft. 8:53 PM Low 3.0 ft. 11:56 PM High Thu Oct 6, 11 Fri Oct 7, 11 Sat Oct 8, 11 Sun Oct 9, 11 Mon Oct 10, 11 Tue Oct 11, 11 Wed Oct 12, 11 Date 2.7 ft. 12:35 AM 3.0 ft. 1:10 AM 3.1 ft. 1:40 AM 3.3 ft. 2:07 AM 3.4 ft. 2:33 AM 3.5 ft. 2:57 AM High 1.8 ft. 5:26 AM 1.4 ft. 6:48 AM 1.1 ft. 7:40 AM 0.7 ft. 8:21 AM 0.4 ft. 8:58 AM 0.3 ft. 9:32 AM 0.2 ft. 10:04 AM Low 2.9 ft. 11:40 AM 3.1 ft. 12:48 PM 3.2 ft. 1:37 PM 3.3 ft. 2:16 PM 3.4 ft. 2:52 PM 3.4 ft. 3:25 PM 3.4 ft. 3:58 PM High 0.9 ft. 6:49 PM 0.9 ft. 7:35 PM 0.9 ft. 8:11 PM 1.0 ft. 8:41 PM 1.0 ft. 9:08 PM 1.1 ft. 9:34 PM 1.1 ft. 10:00 PM Low Thu Oct 6, 11 Fri Oct 7, 11 Sat Oct 8, 11 Sun Oct 9, 11 Mon Oct 10, 11 Tue Oct 11, 11 Wed Oct 12, 11 Date 2.4 ft. 12:26 AM 2.5 ft. 12:56 AM 2.7 ft. 1:23 AM 2.8 ft. 1:49 AM 2.8 ft. 2:13 AM High 1.4 ft. 4:33 AM 1.2 ft. 5:55 AM 0.8 ft. 6:47 AM 0.6 ft. 7:28 AM 0.4 ft. 8:05 AM 0.2 ft. 8:39 AM 0.1 ft. 9:11 AM Low 2.4 ft. 10:56 AM 2.5 ft. 12:04 PM 2.6 ft. 12:53 PM 2.7 ft. 1:32 PM 2.7 ft. 2:08 PM 2.8 ft. 2:41 PM 2.8 ft. 3:14 PM High 0.7 ft. 5:56 PM 0.7 ft. 6:42 PM 0.8 ft. 7:18 PM 0.8 ft. 7:48 PM 0.8 ft. 8:15 PM 0.9 ft. 8:41 PM 0.9 ft. 9:07 PM Low 2.2 ft. 11:51 PM High Thu Oct 6, 11 Fri Oct 7, 11 Sat Oct 8, 11 Sun Oct 9, 11 Mon Oct 10, 11 Tue Oct 11, 11 Wed Oct 12, 11 Date 2.5 ft. 12:18 AM 2.6 ft. 12:48 AM 2.8 ft. 1:15 AM 2.9 ft. 1:41 AM 2.9 ft. 2:05 AM High 1.9 ft. 4:01 AM 1.5 ft. 5:23 AM 1.1 ft. 6:15 AM 0.8 ft. 6:56 AM 0.5 ft. 7:33 AM 0.3 ft. 8:07 AM 0.2 ft. 8:39 AM Low 2.5 ft. 10:48 AM 2.6 ft. 11:56 AM 2.7 ft. 12:45 PM 2.8 ft. 1:24 PM 2.9 ft. 2:00 PM 2.9 ft. 2:33 PM 2.9 ft. 3:06 PM High 0.9 ft. 5:24 PM 1.0 ft. 6:10 PM 1.0 ft. 6:46 PM 1.1 ft. 7:16 PM 1.1 ft. 7:43 PM 1.2 ft. 8:09 PM 1.2 ft. 8:35 PM Low 2.3 ft. 11:43 PM High Thu Oct 6, 11 Fri Oct 7, 11 Sat Oct 8, 11 Sun Oct 9, 11 Mon Oct 10, 11 Tue Oct 11, 11 Wed Oct 12, 11 Date 2.7 ft. 12:19 AM 2.7 ft. 12:41 AM 2.8 ft. 12:58 AM 2.9 ft. 1:12 AM 3.0 ft. 1:26 AM 3.1 ft. 1:41 AM High 1.7 ft. 3:59 AM 1.4 ft. 5:06 AM 1.2 ft. 5:58 AM 0.9 ft. 6:43 AM 0.7 ft. 7:22 AM 0.5 ft. 7:57 AM 0.4 ft. 8:30 AM Low 2.7 ft. 9:42 AM 2.7 ft. 11:25 AM 2.8 ft. 12:42 PM 2.8 ft. 1:42 PM 2.8 ft. 2:33 PM 2.8 ft. 3:19 PM 2.8 ft. 4:02 PM High 0.7 ft. 5:08 PM 0.9 ft. 5:53 PM 1.0 ft. 6:31 PM 1.2 ft. 7:02 PM 1.4 ft. 7:28 PM 1.6 ft. 7:49 PM 1.7 ft. 8:08 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacOct. 6 Oct. 12First Nov. 2 Full Oct. 11 Last Oct. 19 New Oct. 26Major Times 9:30 AM 11:30 AM 9:52 PM 11:52 PM Minor Times 2:41 AM 3:41 AM 4:10 PM 5:10 PM Major Times 10:14 AM 12:14 PM 10:36 PM 12:36 AM Minor Times 3:37 AM 4:37 AM 4:44 PM 5:44 PM Major Times 10:57 AM 12:57 PM 11:18 PM 1:18 AM Minor Times 4:31 AM 5:31 AM 5:15 PM 6:15 PM Major Times --:---:-11:39 AM 1:39 PM Minor Times 5:25 AM 6:25 AM 5:45 PM 6:45 PM Major Times 12:00 AM 2:00 AM 12:20 PM 2:20 PM Minor Times 6:18 AM 7:18 AM 6:15 PM 7:15 PM Major Times 12:41 AM 2:41 AM 1:02 PM 3:02 PM Minor Times 7:11 AM 8:11 AM 6:46 PM 7:46 PM Major Times 1:23 AM 3:23 AM 1:45 PM 3:45 PM Minor Times 8:04 AM 9:04 AM 7:20 PM 8:20 PM Average Average Average Better Better Best Best7:33 am 7:16 pm 4:11 pm 2:42 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:33 am 7:15 pm 4:44 pm 3:38 am 7:34 am 7:14 pm 5:15 pm 4:33 am 7:35 am 7:13 pm 5:46 pm 5:26 am 7:35 am 7:12 pm 6:16 pm 6:19 am 7:36 am 7:11 pm 6:47 pm 7:11 am 7:37 am 7:09 pm 7:20 pm 8:05 am64% 71% 77% 83% 89% 95% 99% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Many of you have sent me a note or called to ask about Sherrie and how she was doing. It is with great reservation that I give out anyones personal information without their consent. Many more of you have contacted her to keep tabs on her. Sherrie has always been a woman who is strong, independent and hard tell what to do. When Sherrie asked me to take over this column several months ago, I felt a great responsibility and honor at the request. She has always planned to write one last column and has on several occasions attempted to make it happen, but her health always got in the way. Today, Sherrie was “ nally able to send in a note to all of you explaining what has been going on in her life for the last while: Dear Readers, Months ago when I asked Carolyn to write the column for me I had no idea what was waiting for me. Today I want to let you know that the column is de“ nitely Carolyns. I will write one last one sometime before the end of the year to let you know what has happened to Flotilla 13 at Shell Point. Today I will brie” y cover what has happened to me since December. At Christmas time my youngest son, Ron who lived in Columbus, Ga., was diagnosed with liver cancer that had metastasized. On his birthday, Jan. 16, at 5 a.m. he quietly went to be with God. One Friday night, a few days after I “ nally came home, I was going down my back stairs when the stair light went out and I missed one step, and I fell. Being stubborn, it was Saturday night before I gave in and called 911 and was transported to Tallahassee. I ended up with three screws in my hip socket. Then there were 30 days in rehab before I came home on April 1. Wasnt long before I was back in the hospital with a stroke, then rehab for another month. Home for awhile and back in hospital for dehydration. Home again for awhile and back in hospital … they thought it was a heart attack, but it turned out to be dehydration again. And this brings us upto-date. As I said, I will write one last column later on, to say goodbye to my wonderful readers. The column is of“ cially Carolyns and I know the readers will enjoy her … she is a very special person. Bye now, Sherrie As Sherrie has alluded to, Flotilla 13 has chosen to dissolve and is no longer in Shell Point. I will let her “ ll you in on all the details, but for right now, Flotilla 12 is covering the area from the Econ“ na River over to St. George Island. I have been waiting for Sherrie to find the strength to write to all of you before asking for a favor from all of you who have been loyal to her for so many years. I would like to put together a tribute to Sherrie in a column or more. For those of you who know Sherrie, can you please take a minute to send me your fondest memories or lessons learned from her. You can send them to carolyn.treadon@uscgaux.net. I would like to put this together in the next few weeks. Last weekend, members of Flotilla 12 held our monthly meeting. I was not able to be there, and neither was Duane, so I only have a few tidbits to share. Rich Rasmussen and Phil Hill both received awards for Team Commendations. This coming weekend, many of us from all over the Division will come together in Panama City Beach for our fall conference. There should be lots to tell you about from the JAREX, as well as the great training they have lined up for us. As Sherrie reminds us, safe boating is no accident! Bob Asztalos presents a team commendation to Phil Hill.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Bob Asztalos gives a commendation to Rich Rasmussen. Fear of rising sea levels appears to be justi“ ed. Since 1930, global sea levels have risen 10 inches. But projections due to global climate change are for an additional three to six feet by the end of the century. Sea level change however, is not new to Florida or Wakulla County, geologically or historically speaking. In the past, Wakulla County has been both underwater and further elevated 40 or more feet above sea level. Florida was once an island with a surrounding water passage right through our county, which may be responsible for our abundant sand. But more interesting is our recent lower sea level, during the last 10,000 years. The land offshore of Wakulla extended out over now inundated land some 20 or more miles. Across this landscape, rivers drained the slopes. Sinkholes, springs and other karst features prevailed amongst forested terrains. Over the last several decades Dr. Joe Donoghue of the Florida State University Geology Department has been mapping submerged rivers and other karst features off our coast. Anthropologists used this data to predict human occupation sites, given that back then the land was dry. We also know that early man occupied this land back 10,000 to 12,000 years ago. We predict early man occupied villages adjoining water features. By tracing the submerged river beds in Apalachee Bay, Dr. Michael Falk of the Anthropology Department at FSU, searched and found evidence of inundated prehistoric occupation in an inundated oxbow of the river in what now has 11 feet of sea water overhead. I often decompress at the opening of caves, in broad daylight. Decompressing can take a lot of time, something we occupy by inspecting the substrate. I often “ nd chirt ” akes, tossed in the water during the knapping of arrow points by early man. Imagine a knapper enjoying the brisk morning air, while sitting over a boiling freshwater spring. All his mistakes and residual ” akes get tossed into the water, for me to “ nd thousands of years later. I was preparing to dive a favorite local cave last week when a car drove up and the driver, seeing that we were serious divers, said he knew of karst features offshore. Of course we know of several, such as Ray Hole and Escudo, long suspected to include artifacts. He expanded upon those we knew of, to include some reported to be bigger than Wakulla Springs. Imagine what we will “ nd when we get a chance to visit!Wakulla County has seen lots of sea level changes UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Diamond Offshore is an Equal Opportunity Employer and subscribes to a drug-free workplace. Diamond Offshore, one of the worlds leading deepwater drilling contractors, seeks motivated individuals to contribute to our future growth. Due to the new construction of 3 dynamically positioned, dual activity drillships, Diamond Offshore is seeking candidates for the following positions: To learn more, visit us at www.diamondoffshore.com Please forward resumes to: Diamond Offshore P. O. Box 4558, Houston, TX 77210-4558 Attn: Employment … Ad #DS01 Fax: 281-647-2295EMPLOYMENTOPPORTUNITIESDrilling Superintendent Rig Superintendent Toolpusher Driller Assistant Driller Derrickhand Subsea Specialist Mechanic Hydraulic Mechanic Electrician Electronic Technician Sr. DPO BCO **Dual Activity or Cyber Based Experience considered a plus** Competitive compensation € Salary increases available upon completion of in-house competency training (rig-based positions) € Exceptional and affordable bene ts package: medical, dental, vision, prescription drug, 401(k), and more! Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic for temporary relief from: € Back pain € Muscle pain € Arthritis pain € Joint pain Get 40 100mg/20mg pills for only $99.00CALL NOW AND GET 4 BONUS PILLS FREE! BUY THE BLUE PILL NOW!1-888-746-5615 SATISFACTION GUARANTEED SAVE $500! VIAGRA or CIALIS?D o you take

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 – Page 13AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Sept. 22, Deputy Scott Rojas investigated a suspicious vehicle on the Wakulla High School campus as school was getting ready to open. The truck was parked in the bus loading area and two sleeping men were awakened by the sound of bus air brakes. Deputy Billy Metcalf stopped the vehicle at a nearby convenience store and the two men allowed a search of the vehicle to take place. Lionel David Black, 53, of Woodbridge, Va., and Gary Joseph Lowenadler, 60, of Gilmer, Texas, were charged with possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of narcotics equipment. It was determined that the vehicle was stolen from Friend Mission Church in Montgomery, Ala., and the vehicle was seized to be held for the owner to pick up. Montgomery law enforcement of“ cials declined to extradite the two men back to Alabama for unauthorized use of the vehicle. The marijuana weighed 7.5 grams. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On Sept. 21, Mildred Posey of Panacea reported an incident involving a driver leaving the scene of an accident with property damage. A vehicle near Mineral Springs Seafood in Panacea reportedly pulled out in front of the victim and, after the crash, left the scene of the accident. The victim observed a tall blonde female in the other vehicle. € On Sept. 22, Karen James of Sopchoppy reported a traf“ c crash. James ran into the back of a vehicle that pulled in front of her vehicle on U.S. Highway 319 at Trice Lane. James pulled off the road to speak to the other driver but the other driver did not stop. James vehicle suffered minor damage. € On Sept. 22, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a two vehicle accident on U.S. Highway 319 at the Northpoint Center. Ciera Edmonds of Woodville drove her Jeep into the back of a Toyota Sequoia driven by Kimberly McKenzie of Sopchoppy. EMS responded to the scene to check out the two drivers. Neither driver needed to be transported to the hospital, although Edmonds suffered minor burns from an air bag deployment. Edmonds was found at fault for following too closely. € On Sept. 22, Law Enforcement Officer Annie White reported a criminal mischief at the countys equestrian center. A cable gate and stop sign located at the entrance of the property were damaged. A sign, trash can and table were also damaged. There was evidence that a vehicle entered the property and recklessly drove around the property. The total amount of damage is still to be determined. € On Sept. 23, Ann Larkin of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to her vehicle at Wakulla Springs Lodge. The vehicle was scratched and damage is estimated at $300. Cindy Neel of Sopchoppy also reported a criminal mischief to her vehicle at the time Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated the Larkin case. The Neel vehicle also suffered $300 worth of damage. Both victims own the same model of vehicle. € On Sept. 24, Scott Harts“ eld of Talquin Electric reported a grand theft of copper wire. An estimated 200 feet of copper valued at $3,000 was reported missing. The case is the sixth copper theft to occur at a Talquin Electric substation in Wakulla County. € On Sept. 24, Diane Greg of Tallahassee reported the loss of a wallet from Mill Creek Plaza. The wallet and contents are valued at $120. € On Sept. 24, Daniel Owen Farino, 28, of Crawfordville was charged with knowingly operating a motor vehicle with a suspended license following a traf“ c stop. A concerned citizen contacted law enforcement about a driver driving erratically. Farino was also issued a citation for an expired tag. € On Sept. 25, Angus McEachern of St. Marks reported two vehicle burglaries. A computer and air card, valued at $ $2,600, was reported missing from one vehicle and a large sum of cash was taken from a second vehicle. € On Sept. 25, Richard Snyder of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to his mailbox. A stop sign at Triplett Road and Martin Luther King Road was also damaged. Damage to the mailbox was estimated at $25. Robert Joe Soule, 25, of Crawfordville was charged with two counts of criminal mischief, one for damage under $200 and one for more than $200. Deputy Cole Wells discovered his suspect at the scene. € On Sept. 23, Gregory Marini of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. A 30-inch scratch was observed on the victims vehicle while it was parked at Wal-Mart. Damage was estimated at $500. € On Sept. 24, a Crawfordville female said she and her son were arguing over cleaning their residence. The 16-year-old juvenile created $800 worth of damages to the residence. The juvenile was arrested for criminal mischief. Due to the past history of the juvenile he was accepted into juvenile detention in Tallahassee. € On Sept. 23, Gabrielle McKenzie of Crawfordville reported the theft of a lawn mower from her home. The mower is valued at $300. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € On Sept. 23, a vehicle “ re was reported on Highway 267 and Chattin Road. U.S Forest Service of“ cials were with the vehicle and put out the blaze. The front half of the vehicle, owned by Martin Serotta of Crawfordville, was burned. The vehicle caught fire when the owner was pulling a trailer. The “ re was ruled accidental. € On Sept. 27, Kenneth Dewayne Washington, 22, of Crawfordville was charged with introduction of contraband into a correctional facility after he was found to be in possession of tobacco. Washington was a trustee on the road crew when he picked up two cigarettes and a butt while working outside the facility. A suspect threw the cigarettes out of a car window and Washington picked them up. He hid the contraband in his shoe. € On Sept. 26, William Revell of Crawfordville reported a theft of work shoes from his home. The shoes were removed from the victims porch. The victim spotted the shoes on a juvenile and got the shoes back. The victim decided not to pursue charges against the 13-year-old. € On Sept. 26, Sonia Rosier of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c crash at her home. The victims mailbox was damaged by a vehicle that left the scene without stopping. The brick mailbox is valued at $1,200. €On Sept. 26, Alyssa Taylor of Crawfordville reported recovering a vehicle keyless entry remote and other keys. The keys were recovered in the Songbird subdivision. Deputy Ian Dohme attempted to locate the vehicle in the subdivision but was unsuccessful. The keychain was entered into evidence. € On Sept. 26, Deputy Nick Gray investigated a two-vehicle accident at 952 Shadeville Road. After con“ rming no injuries, Deputy Gray discovered that Carl Bobby Hicks, 35, of Sopchoppy was driving with a suspended license. Hicks backed into a parked vehicle with a passenger inside it. Hicks allegedly failed “ eld sobriety exercises and was charged with DUI with property damage and driving while license suspended or revoked with knowledge. € On Sept. 28, Annette Clark of Crawfordville reported a credit card fraud. The victim reported that several fraudulent charges were found on her bank card. A total of 12 charges were observed with a value of $454. € On Sept. 27, Tamela Green of Tallahassee reported the loss of her purse which contained credit cards, driver license and other items. The victim was unsure where she lost her purse. The victim realized her identity had been compromised when she received a loan approval she did not apply for. A check is being conducted to make sure no other unknown accounts have been opened. € On Sept. 27, Kellie Alford of Crawfordville reported a credit card account she did not apply for. It was determined two accounts were opened in her name. The total charges were $1,175. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 681 calls for service during the past week.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce arrested 13 individuals in connection with a variety of drug charges following the purchase of illegal narcotics from suspects using con“ dential informants, said Interim Sheriff Donnie Crum. According to Undersheriff Maurice Langston, The ongoing drug operation was conducted over several weeks during the past few months by the WCSO Narcotics Division.Ž The arrests included: € Donnie Ray Boutin 60, of Crawfordville was charged with possession of marijuana and sale of marijuana. The controlled purchase allegedly netted 29.6 grams of cannabis. Boutin remains in the Wakulla County Jail under a $50,000 bond. € Joseph Brandon Anderson 20, of Crawfordville was charged possession of marijuana and sale of marijuana. Two controlled buys allegedly netted 25.9 grams and 23.8 grams of marijuana. € Jeffrey Robert Elkins 24, of Crawfordville was charged with possession of marijuana and sale of marijuana following three controlled purchases. The buys allegedly netted 7.5 grams, 12.2 grams and 15.1 grams. € Arron Michael Riley 22, of Panacea was charged with cultivation of marijuana and resisting arrest with violence after law enforcement went to his home to investigate an accidental shooting report and allegedly discovered seven marijuana plants growing at his home. € Willis Eric Andrew Adams 24, of Crawfordville was charged with possession of cocaine and sale of cocaine. He was allegedly in possession of .5 of a gram of cocaine. € Eric Lee Allred 27, of Crawfordville was charged with traf“ cking more than four grams of prescription pills, distribution of synthetic narcotics and sale of synthetic narcotics-prescription pills. € David Howard King 36, of Panacea was charged with traf“ cking more than four grams of prescription pills, distribution of synthetic narcotics and sale of synthetic narcotics-prescription pills. He allegedly was in possession of “ ve grams of pills. € Paula Ann Sheward 36, of Crawfordville was charged with possession of cocaine and sale of cocaine. Two controlled purchases allegedly netted 3.3 grams and 4.9 grams of cocaine. She remains in the Wakulla County Jail under a $100,000 bond. € Shawn Lamond Thomas 40, of Crawfordville was charged with possession of marijuana and sale of marijuana. The controlled purchase allegedly netted 9.1 grams of marijuana. € Trina Alford Debaufer 23, of Tallahassee was charged with possession of marijuana and sale of marijuana. The controlled purchase allegedly netted 14.2 grams. € Travis Jermaine Rosier 27, of Crawfordville was charged with sale of cocaine and possession of cocaine following a controlled purchase. The operation allegedly netted 2.5 grams of cocaine. Rosier is being held in the Wakulla County Jail under a $100,000 bond. € Andrea Dalsie Carol Nichols 26, of Sopchoppy was charged with possession of crack cocaine and distribution of crack cocaine. The operation allegedly netted half a gram of cocaine on two different occasions. She remains in the Wakulla County Jail under a $200,000 bond. € Joseph Clifford McPhaul 67, of Crawfordville was charged with possession of marijuana more than 20 grams following an undercover operation that involved additional agencies. Investigators discovered 948 grams of marijuana at his home. More arrests are anticipated, according to Crum.13 people busted in undercover drug buys For more information NAMI Wakulla, call 850-926-1033Put on your walking shoes for National Mental Health Awareness Week and join your friends and neighbors for a light breakfast! Azalea Park Saturday, Oct. 8 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. JOIN NAMI WAKULLA’S “WALK FOR HEROES”In the battle against mental illness! Entertainment: Michael Turner, from the group Common Zenz • Entertainment • Guest speakers • Recognition of Heroes • Hotdogs for Lunch Speakers: Dr. Jay Reeves, CEO of Apalachee Center Lt. Col. Steve Holmes, COO Florida Veterans Foundation Wildwood Country Club October 28, 20 1 1 COOLING HEATING AND HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Appointments & Walk-Ins Welcome 850-926-TEAZ(8329)1626 Crawfordville Hwy., Northpointe Center Full Service Family Hair Care Salon!Wed-Fri 10-6 Sat. 9-3 Scott A. Smith850-228-100738 Rainbow Drive, Crawfordville (behind El Jalisco)Quality Marine Canvas Fabrication and Upholsteryof all kinds...www.”agshipcanvas.com ”agshipcanvas@yahoo.com

PAGE 14

Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com (850)926-6526 We offer most preventative maintenance services Most Minor Repairs Most Competitve Prices in the Industrycharliegrim@msn.comLube-Xpert.comFull Service OILCHANGE Vacuuming Included $ 6.00OFF Expires 9/30/2011 2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Across from Beefs Locally Owned by Charlie Grim Centennial Bank believes in the importance of getting out in the community. Where our customers are. So if you need us, well be there for you. Even after hours. Thats why you can “nd us on the basketball court. Or wherever you happen to be. Some things get better with age. Capital Health Plan is one of them. Plan to attend a SEMINAR during the Medicare Annual Election Period, October 15 through December 7, 2011, to LEARN MORE about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) and Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-8708943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Paid Endorsement. Call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 to RSVP or for more information. (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week or visit us at: www.capitalhealth.com/Medicare Seminars will be held at 10:00 a.m. at Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd H5938_DP 119 File & Use 09242011 Anna Johnson says.... Join me and become a member of a Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO) plan.Ž Thursday, October 13 Friday, October 14 Tuesday, October 18 Friday, October 21 Tuesday, October 25 Friday, October 28 Friday, November 4 Saturday, November 5 Monday, November 7 Friday, November 11 Monday, November 14 Tuesday, November 15 Tuesday, November 22 Friday, November 25 Tuesday, November 29 Wednesday, November 30 the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Raymond RichSeptember 2011 Winnerank You So Much! His name was drawn fromank you to the restaurants & e News for this nice promotion Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y Resta urantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations You’ve got questions… we have answers Q: Where are the best places to eat? A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF the EATIN’ path… a monthly page inThe Wakuulanews Senior PromThe Senior Prom was held at Eden Springs on Friday, Sept. 30. The court, top photo, include, seated, Queen Betty Rogers, and Princess Oliveigh Staalenburg with her Prince William Staalenburg, along with Chuck Cascio, director of the the facility, King Dennis Miller, Duchess Mildred Mikell and her Duke, Larry Wilson, and Marjorie Hamilton, who organized the prom. Left, last years king and queen, Coleen Webber and Daniel Robinson. (Photos by Denise Folh)

PAGE 15

Taking Care of Business Business News from Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 Cool breezes are finally starting to arrive! As we enter the last quarter of another challenging year there are many reasons to be thankful for the lives we lead: Most of the people in this world would change places with us at the drop of the hat, and we need to count our blessings as we move into the season of Thanksgiving. Our county commissioners seemed to bring several issues to closure at the marathon Sept. 6 meeting: They voted in the garbage assessment, which will allow us to quit dipping into general revenues to fund an operation that was costing vastly more than the tiny tipping fees we were paying when we carried in our garbage. The BOCC also voted to increase the Fire MSBU from $61 to $75. This was probably worthwhile as the Fire Department was punished last year when the county staff encouraged the various “ re departments to create their Christmas ListsŽ in a vain attempt to pass a $193 Fire MSBU. This increase puts the Fire Department back where it was prior to the misguided effort last year. The chamber supported the Tourist Development Tax increase as we will not get eco-tourism visitors if we dont have money to promote the many unique, bountiful and beautiful attributes of Wakulla County … our rivers, springs and bays. We also firmly support paid staff to stay abreast of grant funding that comes available to a nimble Tourist Development Council. We would like to take this opportunity to thank the entire TDC Board of Directors for the excellent job they do pushing Wakulla county to the fore. Our BOCC also “ nalized the Public Utility Tax with an offset in the millage rate, accounting for decreased property values, to achieve revenue neutrality. It is now time to take a breather as we begin to deal with the unintended consequences that will arise from all this activity. I do not ever remember a Board that tackled so much in such a short time. Necessity may have played a part, but I will say that we have fundamentally changed our approach to funding our government and changed for the better. BENEFITS OF TAXING BY ASSESSMENT Taxing by assessment, as we have been moving towards, allows us to better understand the cost of providing our basic services. When they are paid through ad valorem taxes and the general fund, we tend to take the cost for granted. Taxing by assessment also adds a degree of transparency to our budget process as the tendency to shift general funds around lessens. I commend our commissioners for taking these politically tough decisions. We will have rough patches to sort out, but we are headed in the right direction. CHAMBER EVENTS The recently instituted Chamber luncheons continue to attract good crowds, with the last being held at Beef OBradys. These events offer great networking, a break from the daily grind, great food, and a good time. We hope to see you at the next one. Covenant Hospice hosted the September after-hours mixer to the pleasure of us all. These events, like the luncheons, allow us all an opportunity to catch up with somebody that we have not seen in a while. It also gives us some insight as to what these businesses or organizations do in and for our community. These events are free so dont let the next opportunity pass you by. The nominating committee has heard back from our members and will meet soon to propose a slate of of“ cers and new board members, thank you for participating. Lets take a minute to recognize Jo Ann Palmer, all the members of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and all 560 participants in the Coastal Clean-up held on Sept. 17. We are proud of Jo Ann as she is one of our current board members, and proud of the fact that KWCB was started by one of our directors, and past president of the chamber, Ray Boles. We thank St. Marks Powder, Wal-Mart, The Stow Away Center, Capital City Bank, Centennial Bank and both Super Lube locations in Crawfordville for participating in the chambers food drive during September and setting up boxes for collection. In addition, Progress Energy employees generously donated several boxes of food to help out as Wakulla is one of their service areas. Our food donations will go to local food pantries, and will help local families put a warm meal on the table. We have extended our drive until the third week in October so keep your generosity ” owing. A SPECIAL NOTE It gives me great pleasure to make this next announcement: By the time this edition of The Wakulla News is published, my darling wife, Petra, will have been sworn in as a U.S. citizen! Yours in Service, John W. Shuff President, Wakulla Chamber of Commerce. JOHN SHUFFChamber President Presidents MessageNHC, Covenant Hospice host Chamber mixer Commissioners made some big decisions Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida 4th Annual Music Festival & Silent AuctionAll Proceeds to bene t injured and orphaned wildlife www.wakullawildlife.org www.woodstorkfestival.com A Great Time for a Great Cause! Food • Drink & Beer • Cake Walk Silent Auction~ First Table opens at 10am Last Table closes at 4pm Photo Contest • Kids’ Table Raf es • Local Artists and Vendors Educational Exhibits Great Music Featuring: 10am-Ralph Pelletier • 11:30am-Swingin Harpoon 1pm-Mimi & The HearnDogs • 2:30pm-Sarah Mac Band 4pm-Rick Ott Band Saturday, October 8, 2011 • 10am – 5pmSPONSORS: 3Y Ranch 195 Harvey Young Farm Rd. Crawfordville, FL.TICKETS: ONLY $5.00 Per Person (suggested donation) Under 6: FREECome out and support Florida Wild Mammal Association Shirley Wise & Associates Posters courtesy of: PRINTING ON DEMAND 2650-5 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 (850) 926-4000 printingondemand@comcast.net LIVE AUCTION 11am 1 pm The Chamber held its monthly mixer on Sept. 15 at NHC Home Care in Medart along with Covenant Hospice. Dr. Jean Murphy, the new medical director for Covenant, seen at left with Chamber President John Shuff, was at the mixer. Covenant Director Elizabeth Schlein, lower left with Chamber member Sharol Brown, was also at the mixer. Tim Persson, who directs childrens programs for Covenant, was also present. NHC Community Liaison Laura Hyde coordinated the event. Chamber members R.H. Carter, Amy Geiger and Sharol Brown at the mixer. Spotlight on Business: Body-Tek 24 Hour Fitness Center Page 3B 24 HOUR FITNESS CENTER BeefOBradys hosts Chamber business lunch Page 4B

PAGE 16

Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comClubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, October 6  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at Beef O’ Brady’s to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WRITERS OF WAKULLA will meet from 6 to 7 p.m. in the conference room at the public library. New members are always welcome.  WAKULLA GENEALOGY GROUP will meet at 6:30 p.m. in the main meeting room of the public library. All are invited to attend. Friday, October 7  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  SASSY STRIPPERS QUILTERS GROUP meets at the public library from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. to make quilts for traumatized children. The “cruiser quilts” are donated to Wakulla County deputies to be used for children in need. New members welcome. For information, call 926-6290.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Saturday, October 8  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Saturday at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordville Highway at 5 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWER’S MARKET is held every Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Posh Java in Sopchoppy. The market features local organic and unsprayed vegetables, homemade fresh bread from Crescent Moon Farm, live music and varying demonstrations, events, vendors and activities. Growers and seafood vendors wanting to participate may phone Jennifer Taylor at (850) 241-3873 or email famu.register@gmail.com. For more information, contact Posh at 962-1010 or Debbie Dix at 528-5838, or email posh_faery@yahoo.com. Sunday, October 9  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Sunday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, October 10  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 7:30 p.m. at St. Marks First Baptist Church.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN meets each Monday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGAS CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach.  WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES GOVERNING BOARD will meet from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Jefferson County R.J. Bailar Public Library. The meeting is open to the public. Tuesday, October 11  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 824 Shadeville Road at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m. Wednesday, October 12  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, October 13  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at Beef O’ Brady’s to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Friday, October 14  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  SASSY STRIPPERS QUILTERS GROUP meets at the public library from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. to make quilts for traumatized children. The “cruiser quilts” are donated to Wakulla County deputies to be used for children in need. New members welcome. For information, call 926-6290.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BIG BEND HOSPICE ADVISORY COUNCIL will meet at 1 p.m. at Beef O’Brady’s in Crawfordville. Call Pam Allbritton at 926-9308 or 508-8749 for more information.Special EventsThursday, October 6  WAKULLA COASTAL OPTIMISTS ANNUAL EXTRAVAGANZA will be held at the senior center beginning at 6:30 p.m. with dinner at 7 p.m. Dinner will be pork medallions with madeira sauce, peach, gorganzola and pecan salad, twice baked potatoes, grilled stuffed tomatoes and pumpkin cheesecake. There will also be a fashion show/ Tickets are $30. Proceeds go towards scholarships given to Wakulla High seniors each year. Saturday, October 8  WOODSTORK FESTIVAL will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 3Y Farm. There will be music, arts and crafts, exhibits, educational booths, food and drink. There will be a silent auction from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. This is the Florida Wild Mammal Association’s annual fundraiser. All proceeds will be used for the care and feeding of injured and orphaned wildlife. Visit www.woodstorkfestival.com for more information.  NAMI WAKULLA’S WALK FOR HEROES will be held from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Azalea Park in Crawfordville. A light breakfast will be served prior to the walk. The celebration will also include guest speakers, recognition of heroes and hotdogs will be served for lunch. For more information about NAMI Wakulla, call the NAMI Wakulla of ce at 850-926-1033.  ANNUAL COUNCIL FAMILY REUNION will be held for descendants of John Cecil Council, an early pioneer of Wakulla County, at the Council family reunion picnic grounds in Crawfordville. The 59th reunion will start at 5 p.m. wish a sh fry and there will also be a covered dish lunch on Sunday starting at 11 a.m.For more information, contact Beverly Council at 926-3759.  FALL WILDFLOWER WALK will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Call (850) 925-6121for more information. Reservations may be required.  WAKULLA GREENWING DAY will be held at the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce Training and Firing Range located at 65 Qualify Lane, off Lawhon Mill Road. Registration will begin at 9 a.m. and event activities will run from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Kids aged 6 to 18 years of age are invited to participate; parental supervision is required. The cost is $15 per child, which includes a T-shirt and Greenwing Magazine subscription. Lunch will also be provided for all children and their parents. There will be bench shooting, shotgun shooting, archery, build your own turkey call, turkey shoot and chicken shoot. For more information, call Holly Porter at 850-519-0416. Sunday, October 9  COUNCIL FAMILY REUNION will be held at the Council family reunion picnic grounds for a covered dish lunch starting at 11 a.m. For more information, contact Beverly Council at 926-3759. Tuesday, October 11  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will hold its 20th annual dinner and meeting at 6 p.m. at the Wakulla Springs Lodge. Please RSVP by October 4 by calling 926-1110 or email 24research@gmail.com. Please leave your name and the number in your party that will be attending. The guest speaker will be Randy Smith, son of Harold and Elizabeth Fisher Smith. The cost of the dinner is $27.50.  RELAY FOR LIFE OF WAKULLA KICK-OFF PARTY will be held for the 2012 Relay at 6:30 p.m. at Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 176 Ocklockonee Street. The annual Kick-Off Party is the time to register as a cancer survivor or caregiver to receive invitations for future events. Teams can register and begin earning Spirit Points. Attendees will have the opportunity to vote on the theme for the 2012 Relay.  GUITAR WORKSHOP will be held at 3:30 p.m. at Posh Java in Sopchoppy with musician and music teacher Carol Earl. This workshop will introduce the student to the acoustic guitar and will teach the student how the guitar is played, with practical hands on experience. People attending this workshop must bring a guitar, however, there are a couple guitars that may be borrowed. The fee is $5 per student and refreshments and homemade baked goods will be available for sale. To sign up for this class, please contact Debbie Dix Bishop at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Wednesday, October 12  WAKULLA COUNTY DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE TASK FORCE will be showing the video, “Hidden Victims,” at 12:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Health Department, 48 Oak Street. The video portrays the pain and suffering of children who live in homes where domestic violence is present. Everyone is welcome and lunch will be provided. For more information, call 926-9005.  OCTOBER FULL MOON CLIMB at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. and will include light hors d’oeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse. For more information, contact the Visitor Center at 927-7744 or 888-927-7744. Friday, October 14  FOOD PRESERVATION WORKSHOP will be held by at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. David Moody, St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Director, and Shelley Swenson, extension agent, will cover the basics of food preservation through pressure canning and dehydrating. There is a $5 registration fee for each participant. Enroll by calling the Extension Of ce at 926-3931. Saturday, October 15  GARAGE SALE will be held at the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m.  FALL FESTIVAL will be held at Shadeville Elementary School from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. There will be children’s booths, laser tag, bingo and Polynesian Fire Knife Dancers. There will also be hamburgers and hotdogs, a cake walk, soda walk, nachos and cheese booth and a sweet shop. Coastal Optimists Club Annual Extravaganza at 6:30 p.m. at senior center. NAMI Wakulla’s Walk for Heroes at 8 a.m. at Azalea Park. Wakulla County Historical Society’s annual dinner at 6 p.m. at Wakulla Springs Lodge. Domestic and Sexual Violence Task Force meeting at 12:30 p.m. at the health department. ThursdaySaturdayTuesdayThursday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Library News...By SCOTT JOYNERInterim Library DirectorThis Friday, Oct. 7, we are showing the critically acclaimed “ lm, Win, Win.Ž Starring multi-award winning actor Paul Giamatti, and Academy Award nominee Amy Ryan, this R-rated (for language) “ lm tells the poignant tale of disheartened attorney Mike Flaherty (Giamatti), who moonlights as a high school wrestling coach. He stumbles across a star teen athlete through some questionable business dealings while trying to support his family. Just as it looks like he will get a double payday, the boys mother shows up fresh from rehab and ” at broke, threatening to derail everything. Will he put the welfare of the teen over his own desires? Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show and because of the rating no minors will be admitted without an adult. Book Extravaganza Another Success Our great patrons proved themselves again as more than $500 was raised for the library at last Saturdays Book Extravaganza. Combined with our Silent Auction the week before, more than $3,800 was raised for the Library over the past two weeks! As always, my staff, the Friends of the Library, along with myself, thank you for your continuing support of the library. We have some real exciting plans for the next year so please keep an eye on us as we continue to grow with your help. Computer Classes Our computer class schedule for the next two months is posted on our website and available at the front desk. Over the next two weeks, we are offering several classes. On Thursday, Oct. 6, Computer Basics: Arrange Your Computer Files II at 9:30 a.m. On Thursday, Oct. 13, we have Microsoft Word 2007: Envelopes, Labels, and Mail Merge at 2:30 p.m., followed by Genealogy Basics: Getting Started at 6 p.m. All computer classes are free but do require early registration. Come on out and pick up some great skills while having fun! City and County MeetingsThursday, October 6  COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a workshop at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Monday, October 10  SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will meet for its regular commission meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. Thursday, October 13  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet for its regular commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Friday, October 14  WAKULLA COUNTY VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD will hold public hearings regarding petitions that have been led with the VAB. Hearings start at 1 p.m. and are held in the commission chambers. The meetings are open to the public.

PAGE 17

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 – Page 3B S p o t l i g h t o n B u s i n e s s Spotlight on Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from CallPau l s WellGet ThemAll TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S  222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROLSERVICEƒEVERYTHING FROM TERMITESTOMICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello € Tallahassee € Quincy € Wakulla r r s TM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. Shop Local Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce TuAmigoYourFriendWillHelpYou Accident? Injured?Call Someone You Can Trust!Hablamos Espaol1-855-55AMIGOA er 911 & Before 411850.224.4960www.fsucu.org Tell us about your business: BodyTek 24 is the only full service gym in Wakulla County, with a wide range of weights, cardio equipment, selector and plated machines. Our gym consists of six instructors teaching a variety of classes from Spinning, Muscle Pump to Zumba. Equipment orientation, personal trainer classes, as well as individual personal training are available to our members. Our members health and “ tness is our No. 1 priority. Body-Tek 24 has numerous classes beginning at 5:15 a.m. throughout the day and ending at 7 p.m. Our trainers and instructors love their jobs and their profession is their passion. If you need advice or assistance, we are always available to answer your “ tness questions. Our trainers and instructors compete in a variety of competitions in order to always be on top of the latest “ tness programs. We encourage our members to always strive for what they want and nothing is impossible to achieve. What services, products do you offer? Our gym offers a wide variety of weight training and cardio equipment along with our classes and personal training programs. What sets your business apart from the competition? Our trainers and staff are what set us apart from the competition. Our classes are always taught by certi“ ed or licensed instructors through nationally recognized “ tness organizations. We are here to serve our members. What should we be on the lookout for? We are continually working with our members to improve our gym through our various weight loss programs and new class schedules. We have currently brought on two licensed Zumba instructors and the classes are phenomenal. How long have you been a chamber member? 15 years Why did you join the chamber? We wanted to network with other local businesses and we believe in supporting our community. Why should local businesses join the chamber? To network with business and to support the local community. Whats your reason why Wakulla residents should Shop Local? Our local businesses are the life blood of the community. By shopping local, the money stays in our community. If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? Even though our gym is a 24 hour gym, our staffed hours are from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. You can reach us at 926-BFIT (2348). Or visit us on facebook for more information and class schedules. We are located at 56 Rainbow Drive in Crawfordville.Business: Body-Tek 24 Hour FitnessOwners: Robert and Mary Walsh and Ted and Dianne Gerrell We welcome our new and existing businesses that joined our local chamber during September. The Wakulla Chamber is not af“ liated with the National or State organizations. Back Door Liquor Store … Spring Creek Road and Highway 98 Elite Flooring Tallahassee Hardees of Crawfordville Lamar Advertising Shell Point Realty Preble … Rish Engineering … Jasper Thomas Road Bridlewood Apartments …Crawfordville Mineral Springs Seafood Inc. d/b/a/ Mineral Springs by the Bay and Bouys Bayside Restaurant …Panacea Wave 94 Radio Station New Chamber membersPonder Enterprises and the Hardees of Crawfordville were proud to of“ cially kickoff their recent remodeling with a ribbon cutting with the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce last month. The remodel included new sidewalks, countertops, seating dcor, picnic tables, outdoor digital sign, interior and exterior painting and much more. Ponder Enterprises “ rst invested in the Crawfordville community almost 22 years ago. We are proud to reinvest in the Crawfordville community, a location that has been with our company since our early days,Ž said Director of Marketing Elizabeth Faulk. We invite everyone to enjoy our line of Thickburgers and to also make Hardees signature made from scratch biscuits a part of their morning routine.Ž A family run franchise, Ponder Enterprises opened its “ rst Hardees in Donalsonville, Ga., in 1984, and is where it has its headquarters today. Ponder Enterprises has a total of 24 restaurants spanning across southwest Georgia, southeast Alabama and North Florida. Hardees ribbon cuttingCrawfordville restaurant is newly remodeled 24 HOUR FITNESS CENTER 2615 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY., STE. 101 • 850-745-8545Buy a Dinner Entree after 4:00 pm and get ONEOFFER VALID THROUGH November 30, 2011. NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER COUPON OR DISCOUNTS. ONE COUPON PER VISIT. LUNCH SPECIALS ANYTIME, DAY or NIGHT! of equal or lesser value at50% OFFCome enjoy the Best Tasting Food, Biggest Portions and Best Values in Town!! GREAT OFFICE SPACEat The Barry BuildingFREELast Months Rent!Facilities, great atmosphere, all utilities.850-210-5849RATES START AT $250/month www.BarryBuilding.comClassified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week Call Denise at 926-7102 facebook.com/GamerZParad i se Exp. 10/31/11 (850)926-9100|theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com 635WakullaArranRoadCrawfordville,Florida32327 Kinect | X-Box Live | PS3 | Wii | Wi-fiMON THURS: SUMMER HOURS 12 9 PM FRI:12 11 PM SAT: 12 11 PM SUN: 1 8 PMCome and PLAY!Buy 1 hr of Gaming for $3 Get 1 hr FREE GOLD BUYERS OFCRAWFORDVILLE2106CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327DEEDEE PRICHARD 850-566-7348 TONY SETZER 850-566-7344*Not valid with any other offers or prior purchases. Expires: October 31, 2011Receive an additionalGold and Silver Jewelry! with this coupon*for your

PAGE 18

Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com T a k i n g C a r e o f B u s i n e s s Taking Care of Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from By PETRA SHUFFChamber of CommerceOur September luncheon was another great success. We would very much like to thank BeefOBradys for hosting and for all of their support of the chamber and community alike. Harold and Julie Slayton, owners of our local BeefsŽ are very involved in our community and host charitable events for different non-profit organizations and our schools. A salad and a wonderful chicken dish with rice and broccoli was a healthy choice and de“ nitely a crowd pleaser. A special thanks to my favorite server, Jay, who single handedly took care of our crowd of 33. Once again, we want to thank our attendees and local businesses for bringing a large array of raf” e items. The $33 cash prize was won by Mary Wallace, who donated her winnings back to the chamber. Mary suggested starting these luncheons to add an additional networking opportunity for our members, and to earn a little extra money for our organization. She therefore felt that her winnings should be donated back to the chamber. Thanks, Mary! Several of our members invited a guest. Cyndy Murphy with Rainbow Intl. and Mary Wallace with Cook Insurance each invited a guest who became a member during the luncheon. Welcome Pamela L. Power with Bridlewood Apartments, and Kimberly Williams with Williams Seafood Inc. d/b/a Mineral Springs by the Bay and Buoys Bayside Restaurant. New member Lamar Advertising shared that the company recently acquired Summit Advertising. Bridlewood Apartments was excited to announce their civil service discount, a 5-percent discount on rent for an apartment to law enforcement, “ re “ ghters, teachers, nurses, military personnel, state, city and county employees. In addition, new renters under any of the above described categories will receive a reduced security deposit of $99, and application fees will be waived. Susan Schatzman with Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla reminded us of their upcoming golf tournament taking place Oct. 21. The Drive for the Build golf tournament will help raise the necessary funds for the next Habitat for Humanity home build. This will be the 10th home built in Wakulla. Herb Donaldson announced the 20th annual meeting of the Wakulla County Historical Society at Wakulla Springs on Oct. 11 at 6 p.m. The Historical Society will hold an annual Open House at the Museum located at 24 High Drive in Crawfordville on Dec. 13. The exhibits feature our worthy veterans. The gift shop will be open for unique gifts including the new release of the annual collectable ornament. This years feature is beautiful and focuses on Panacea with the Mineral Springs Hotel on the front and the Blue Crab Festival on the back. The gift shop is open on Thursday and Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and the “ rst Saturday of the month. The genealogy suite is open for research. Volunteers who want to help preserve historic documents are welcome. In conjunction with Founders Day in March, in association with Palaver Tree Theatre Company, the Historical Society will present the annual event Wakulla Story.Ž This years theatrical production will also be in conjunction with Womens History Month. If you know of any local women heroes whose dedication and service to our community are worth recognizing, please call Herb Donaldson at (718) 682-3870 or Cathy Frank at 251-5201. Our next luncheon will be held Oct. 26 at Buoys Bayside Restaurant in Panacea. Wakulla County Veterans Day Parade10:00 am, Saturday November 5, 2011Co-Sponsored by Wakulla Christian School and the Wakulla County Veterans Services Of cePARADE ENTRY FORMYour community group or organization can become a vital part in showing your support for our troops and honoring our local veterans. It will be a very special way to pay tribute to all veterans and active duty military. The event will bene t local veterans groups and active millitary.•The theme for the 2011 Veterans Day Celebration is “ Honoring ALL Who Served ”. •Parade entries are strongly encouraged to decorate in a patriotic theme. Prizes will be awarded following the of cial Veterans Day Ceremony. •Full details of the Parade Order and your position in the line of march will be sent to you by November 3rd, 2011 •A donation of toiletry supplies for our active duty soldiers is all that is requested. These donations can be brought to the Hudson Park pavilion on November 5th.The parade will line up at 9:00 a.m. and start promptly at 10:00 a.m. As Parade Coordinator, I, Kevin Hollan, will guide everyone into position Pre-registration is necessary to ensure suf cient space for your parade unit and minimize traf c congestion. Name of Organization: ________________________________________________________ Contact Person:_________________________________________Phone: _______________ Fax #:________________________________________E-mail________________________ Contact Address ___________________________________________________________ To register your parade oat contact: KEVIN HOLLAN kevin.hollan@gmail.com Fax: 926-5186 Phone: 745-8649Call your friends and challenge them to create a better oat than yours! If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to email or call me. I’ll be glad to help! Sincerely, Kevin Hollan Veterans Day Parade Coordinator LUN CH PA RTN ER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyofwhile quantities last.926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat Try One of Our Home Made Parfaits www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service The Workswakullas coworking caf www.theworkscafe.com “ReceiveacomplimentarycopyofPastry and Coffee Special!” Let us perk up your day! Beef OBradys hosts Chamber members for September luncheonCHAMBER LUNCHEON: Chamber members and guests network and enjoy a meal at BeefOBradys. Lucy Ward has been in the childcare business for more than 28 years. She started in the childcare business when she saw the need for quality childcare. To Ward, a child needs the chance and the environment to just be a child, and to learn and grow with love and a gentle guiding hand. Ward, or MeMeŽ as she is called by the children, has never had a new facility in all her years of business. With the opening of the new center this dream has become a reality. Bright Beginnings Preschool and Daycare is located at 360 Shadeville Highway. The facility cares for children from 6 weeks to 12 years old. Transportation is provided to Medart Elementary, Shadeville Elementary, Crawfordville Elementary and to the Wakulla Educational Center. Bright Beginnings is open from 6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Breakfast, lunch and snack are provided. Bright Beginnings offers a VPK program, Early Headstart and a preschool program. Bright Beginnings accepts Early Learning Coalition students and private pay students. Our doors are always open if anyone would like to come in and view the center, or if you have any questions please feel free to call us at 926-9949. Staff and students from Bright Beginnings with Chamber members at the ribbon cutting on Sept. 7.Bright Beginnings holds a ribbon cutting PARTNER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of

PAGE 19

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 – Page 5B Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSAFFORDABLE COVERAGE TO SAVE YOU MONEY Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850-570-9734 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com The Wakulla Coastal Optimist Club’s2011ANNUAL FASHION EXTRAVAGANZAWakulla County Senior Center Thursday • October 6 • 2011 6:30pm Social 7:00pm Dinner, Auction, & Show please join us forMaurice’s Thread Tree Crum’s Mini MallTICKETS $30.00 eachall proceeds go toward scholarships for Wakulla County students WAKULLA COUNTYS Recycling and Disposal Choice for: Residential bulky items Commercial bulky items Construction debris Remodeling materials Including the kitchen sink! JYard debris Garage stuff WE APPRECIATETHE OPPORTUNITY TOSERVEYOURRECYCLINGNEEDS. 6020 Woodville Highway, Tallahassee, Florida 32305Phone(850)216-1006 Fax(850)216-1009www.marpanrecycling.comA small fee of $5.00 covers the rst 250 pounds of material. Larger loads are charged by the ton $39 per ton (2,000 pounds). Open 7:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. 8:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m. on Saturday. CONVENIENT Marpan Recycling is open most holidays and six days a week for your convenience, located just north of Woodville on SR 363 (Woodville Highway). FAST With two scales and a clean, paved drop-off area, your turnaround time will be very fast. GREEN -Marpan Recycling is a material recovery facility, not a landfill. Materials recovered include wood, concrete, cardboard, carpet, paper and metals. (Sorry no hazardous waste or food garbage.) GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 30 … Florida political leaders struck their claim this week in the presidential primary land grab as they pushed the states contest to Jan. 31 and forced traditionally early primary venues also move their contests earlier. A committee created to pick the date for the primary decided the risk of losing half the states convention delegates in both parties was a small price to pay for placing the heavily-populated swing state near the head of the line, giving it more clout in choosing the Republican nominee. The committee wasnt alone in looking ahead to 2012 elections. House Speaker Dean Cannon said his chamber will challenge a judges ruling affirming the Fair DistrictsŽ constitutional amendments passed last year that restrict the way lawmakers can draw congressional and state political boundaries. While political leaders met at the Capitol on Friday to pick the primary date on Friday, a circuit judge across the street shot down a plan to privatize 29 South Florida prisons and work camps. Union representatives who filed the lawsuit on behalf of state prison guards and other correction workers, claimed victory while privatization proponents studied options to put out for bid a huge chunk of nations third largest prison system. Providing a somber backdrop to the ” urry of forward looking activity, streams of well-wishers, former colleagues and political foes paid their last respects this week to former Gov. Claude Kirk, an idiosyncratic leader who became Floridas “ rst Republican governor since Reconstruction. Kirk passed away this week at the age of 85. PRIMARY DECISION CAUSES NATIONAL FLAP In a move certain to provide fodder for Sunday morning talk shows, Florida political delegates decided this week the state will buck the national parties and hold its presidential preference primary on Jan. 31. Setting the stage for a lastminute flurry of decisions in traditionally early primary states, a committee of state political leaders voted 7-2 for the Jan. 31 date, a move that will likely result in the state losing half its voting bloc of delegates at the nominating conventions now less than a year away. Florida would still be behind Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina … states which have typically led off the presidential selection cycle … but is breaking the parties rules by going earlier than March 6. And all those early states may now move their own primaries earlier. Were the biggest swing state in the union,Ž said former Gov. Bob Martinez, a Republican on the panel. Texas is red, New York is blue, California is blue and were 10 electoral votes greater than Ohio. So, I think this is a real, real election in Florida.Ž Two Democrats on the panel, Sen. Gary Siplin of Orlando and Rep. Cynthia Stafford of Miami voted against the proposal, pushing instead for a March 6 date that would assure that both parties delegates will be seated. I believe that Florida should respect the integrity of the process and comply with the rules that both political parties agreed to,Ž Stafford said. I dont want the voices of Floridians to be diminished and the state penalized because Florida failed to adhere to the agreement.Ž The six Republicans on the panel dismissed such concerns, saying it has been decades since the conventions played key roles in the selection of a candidate. Todays modern convention, I believe and others believe, has become a formality and a coronation of the nominee whos been determined by the momentum and coverage he gets in a 24-hour news cycle based on the victories achieved in the early stage,Ž said state Rep. Carlos Lopez-Cantera, R-Miami. One Democrat, Al Lawson, joined the Republicans in voting for the Jan. 31 date. In other election news, House Speaker Dean Cannon, R-Winter Park, told reporters this week that the chamber will appeal a federal court ruling upholding the constitutionality of a pair of constitutional amendments offered by FairDistricts Florida, which places restrictions on how lawmakers can draw political boundaries. The House has joined Florida Congresswoman Corrine Brown, a Democrat, and Congressman Mario Diaz-Balart, a Republican, who have challenged the constitutional amendments. The suit contends that the U.S. Constitution sets aside the task of redrawing the lines for the Legislature, and that state voters cant override that through the states constitution. Despite the lawsuit, Cannon said the state House and Senate will continue to draw maps under the standards in the Fair DistrictsŽ amendments, overwhelmingly approved by voters in last Novembers elections, because the 11th Circuit Court in Atlanta is unlikely to rule on the suit before lawmakers have to “ nish redrawing the lines during next years legislative session. JUDGE THROWS OUT PRIVATE PRISON PLAN Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford on Friday struck down a plan backed by Sen. J.D. Alexander, R-Lake Wales, and supported by Gov. Rick Scott to privatize prisons in the southern third of the state. In a ruling that is likely to be appealed, Fulford said lawmakers overstepped their authority by including the proposal in the proviso language of the 2012 state budget. By doing so, Fulford said lawmakers sidestepped the legislative process in an effort to transfer control of 29 south Florida facilities in 18 counties into the hands of the private sector. This court concluded that if it is the will of the Legislature to itself initiate privatization of Floridas prisons, as opposed to DOC, the Legislature must do so by general law, rather than using the hidden recesses of the General Appropriations Act,Ž Fulford said, quoting an earlier case. Backers say the move would save taxpayers $22 million a year, estimates some critics say were pulled out of thin air. Attorneys for the Police Benevolent Association and three correctional of“ cers argued that legislative leaders … attempting to avoid a debate about the controversial issue … sidestepped legal requirements by sticking the privatization plan in the “ ne print of the state budget. We believe justice has been served for the 4,000 men and women who faced the prospect of privatization,Ž said Matt Puckett, PBA Executive Director. This is a victory for the of“ cers and the citizens of Florida. It validates what the PBA has been saying all along … The Legislature is not above the law.Ž Agency of“ cials say they have not decided whether to appeal Fulfords ruling. The legislative session begins in January. GOODBYE, CLAUDIUS MAXIMUS Former Gov. Claude Kirk, a larger-than-life political outsider who made history when he was elected governor of Florida as a Republican in 1966, died this week at his home in Palm Beach County. The “ rst GOP governor of Florida since Reconstruction oversaw the rewrite of the Florida Constitution and has also been credited with raising environmental awareness in the development fueled state. But he may have been best known for his ” amboyant personality, out-spoken nature and quirky sense of humor. His nickname during his tenure was Claudius Maximus.Ž Kirk got married while he was governor, after having shown up at his inauguration with his future wife, Erika Mattfeld. Asked by reporters who the lady accompanying him was, Kirk wouldnt say, identifying her only as Madame X.Ž Later in life, long after he left the governors of“ ce, he wanted to be buried at the Capitol. Being buried up there would be a good idea, so I can keep an eye on them,Ž Kirk said a few years ago in a newspaper interview. The veteran of World War II and Korea will be buried, however, at a national cemetery in South Florida. STATE EXECUTES INMATE WITH NEW DRUG REGIMEN Florida prison officials this week executed Manuel Valle for the 1978 murder of a Coral Gables police of“ cer. After more than 30 years on death row, Valle, 61, was executed by lethal injection under a three drug procedure that for the “ rst time included the anesthetic pentobarbital. The new drug was added to the injection protocol after the drug it replaced was pulled from the market. The new drug survived a court challenge before it could be used. STORY OF THE WEEK: In a News Service “ rst, Story of the WeekŽ honors was a three-way tie as Florida says goodbye to colorful former governor Claude Kirk, political leaders approved a controversial presidential primary date and a circuit judge throws out a plan to privatize a third of Floridas prisons. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: The garden of controversy must be continually cultivated; otherwise, nobody knows you are alive,Ž Gov. Claude Kirk, (1926-2011) to Time magazine in 1967. WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Hello January primary, goodbye to a colorful governor (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile HomesER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs.

PAGE 20

Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Look for the next chapter of The Brass Bell in next weeks edition of The Wakulla news This page sponsored in part by: Find us on Mr. Morton’s Idea In most areas, Arbor Day takes place on the last Friday in April. On that day, people plant and care for trees. The idea for Arbor Day came from J. Sterling Morton, a newspaper editor who lived in Nebraska and loved nature. Morton introduced Arbor Day to the public in 1872. His idea was a hit, and the first Arbor Day celebration took place in Nebraska on April 10, 1872. In the years following, the celebration of Arbor Day spread. Today, hundreds of people in the United States and around the world observe the day and plant millions of trees. Most trees fall into two groups: deciduous, which lose their leaves once a year, and evergreen, which keep their leaves yearround. There are several types of deciduous and evergreen trees. Do you know what they are? Fill in the blanks to name that tree. 1) __ A K 2) C __ __ R E __ __ 3) B __ R C __ 4) H I __ __ O __ Y 5) J U __ I __ E __ 6) __ L M 7) __ A __ __ E NA M E T NAME T H H A A T TR E E T TREE Answers: 1) Oak, 2) Cypress, 3) Birch, 4) Hickory, 5) Juniper, 6) Elm, 7) Maple A: Sep-timber! A: A palm tree. Q: What kind of tree can fit in your hand? Q: What is a tree’s least favorite month?Jokes and Riddles Jokes and Riddles List 10 words that rhyme with “tree.” 1. ______________ 2. ______________ 3. ______________ 4. ______________ 5. ______________ 6. ______________ 7. ______________ 8. ______________ 9. ______________ 10. _____________What Rhymes with…Some answers: bee, fee, flea, free, gee, he, key, knee, spree, three Trees benefit the world in many ways. Do you know how? Take this quiz and find out.1) Trees are used to make paper and plastic. Fact or Fiction? 2) Trees reduce noise pollution. Fact or Fiction? Answers: 1) Fiction, plastic is not made from trees, 2) Fact, 3) Fiction, some trees like firs do not provide overhead shade, 4) Fact, 5) Fact, 6) Fact, 7) Fact, 8) Fiction, not all trees bear fruit, 9) Fact, 10) Fact3) Trees provide overhead shade. Fact or Fiction? 4) Trees protect the soil. Fact or Fiction? 5) Trees provide food and shelter for animals. Fact or Fiction? 6) Trees soften buildings. Fact or Fiction? 7) Trees clean the air. Fact or Fiction? 8) Trees bear fruit for people to eat. Fact or Fiction? 9) Trees provide jobs for people. Fact or Fiction? 10) Trees are used to make medicine. Fact or Fiction? Fact or Fiction? Tree Challenge COLORING PICTURE C O L O R I N G P I C T U R E COLORING PICTURE

PAGE 21

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 – Page 7B Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! 926-7102 Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $10.00 a week! Cars  Real Estate  Rentals  Employment  Services  Yard Sales  Announcements A New Look PaintingSpecializing in residential and commercial Re-painting € pressure washing € sheetrock € wood rot repairsLICENSED &INSURED850-926-2400CALL JIM PORTER: ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 CARPET CLEANING of Wakulla Residential and Commercial WATER EXTRACTION 24/7 EMERGENCY 850-567-6734CAMO New Construction, Remodeling & Repairs850.524.5894 Home Maintenance & Repair--Cliff Westbrook Services ---Full Service home maintenance and repair. Foreclosure, rental, yard cleanups. Flower beds, window washing, trash hauling. EXPERIENCED and RELIABLE850-926-2004 Crawfordville CarpetCleanersaffordable carpet care free estimates850-459-0106 850-210-5849or visit us at www.BarryBuilding.com Affordable Office Spaceat the Barry Building Enjoy working surrounded by a great atmosphere with many amenities. Rates start at $250/mo., utilities included! Come take a tour at www.BarryBuilding.com. TheNews Wakulla Readers  Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com Junior P.SandersSeptic Tank Services18-YR Experience. New System Installation-All Types. Drain Repair. Washing Machine Systems.SR0111684NO JOB TOO SMALL, FAIR PRICES, FRIENDLY GUARANTEED SERVICE!850-210-5777 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved 850-356-6801Affordable for every budget! ...Refresh Home Detailingfor a new home feel...Call for a free and friendly estimateLICENSED Will help you make the most of your outdoor space. Cabins, Barns, Playhouses, Utilities, Gazebos, Tables, Swings, Rockers and More! Pricing and Sizes to “t your needs. Cash Discounts. $25 credit on a new building with this ad. See Melissa at 1580 Crawfordville Hwy., next to Happy Time Day Care850-926-3441SOUTHERN STORAGE SOLUTIONS Stow it Away!! 5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGE GreatRates! STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.BUY€SELL€TRADE€REPAIRBoats, Motors, Trailers, New/Used Marine Supplies Sold 4815D Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Pro p Service Center Interstate Batter y Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-556-4652www.wakullaboatsales.com stowawaymarine @ comcast.net Denise’s ListCall Denise today to get your services on her list!850-926-7102 Classi eds@TheWakullaNews.net 105 Business Opportunities BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can fix those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again, and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Money Making Opportunity. Computer a must. Free evaluation & Training. Flexible hours. Great incentives. www.freedomtodream.net 352-360-5939. 110 Help Wanted RobertSmithCarpentryislookingforcarpenters.Experienceis amust.Transportationisamust. Please call 850-294-3208. 114 Miscellaneous Help Wanted FREEDOM LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH is seeking experienced musicians. Please email experience and contact information to Marjorie at audition.for.church@mail.com Auditions will be held. 120 Services and Businesses A -1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed ~ John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550 A IR CON OF WAKULLA Heating and Cooling Gary Limbaugh 926-5592 3232 Crawfordville Highway Service, Repair, Installation FL Lic. #CAC1814304 ALL ABOUT...CONCRETE blocks bricks pavers LANDSCAPE plants sod tractor workcall JOSEPH FRANCIS850-556-1178 / 850-556-3761 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 ANYTIME ELECTRIC Specializinginrepairandservice,residentialandcommercial, homesandmobilehomes. 24-hourservice.MarkOliver, ER0015233. 421-3012. BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway. Larry Carter Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931, 850-694-7041. Licensed/Insured. Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291. HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIRSales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & soundLocated in Crawfordville Doug & Sherry Quigg, Owners Lic. No’s. ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 926 -5790 HomeDayCare-WakullaStationarea.M-F.Mealsprovided. ExperienceQualiltyCare.For moreinformation,pleasecallAllison at 933-9586. KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial,residentialandmobilehomes.Repair,sales,service,installation.Allmakesand models.Lic.#RA0062516. 926-3546. POLLY NICHOLSSpecial Touch CleaningConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential.“pray like it ’ s up to God, Work like it ’ s up to you”519-7238 926-3065Licensed &Insured RefreshHomeDetailing.Fora newhomefeel.Pleasecalfora freeandfriendlyestimate.Affordableforeverybudget. LcensedinFlorida. 850-356-6801. UPHOLSTERY Flagship Canvas & Upholstery. Quality marine canvas fabrication and Upholstery of all kinds. Scott A. Smith, 38 Rainbow Dr. Crawfordville, (behind El Jalisco). 850-228-1007. www.flagshipcanvas.com flagshipcanvas@yahoo.com 275 Home Furnishings $160brandnamequeenpillowtopmattressset,NEWwithwarranty, 222-7783. $399Sofa/Loveseatset.Stillin crate,neverused.Candeliver 545-7112. Must move this week! 4pieceBedroomSet:Solid Wood.Brandnew.$439,delivery avail. 222-9879. 280 Home Appliances FrigidaireGasRange.Likenew! $450.CallDeeShriverat 850-926-8120. 320 Farm Products & Produce Farm-freshvegetables.Peas, blanchedandfrozen,okra choppedandfrozen,greenboilingpeanutsandboiledgreen peanuts.Wealsocustom-processcows,hogs,goatsanddeer. Raker Farm 926-7561. 335 Pets DOGS,PUPPIES,NICECATS ANDKITTENS...Come,take alookandbringanew friendhomeTODAY!CHAT Adoption Center:Mondays closed. Tuesdays through Wednesday& Fridays: 11:00AM to 4:30PM Thursdays: 11:00AM to 7:00 P M Saturdays: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM Sundays: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM1 OAK STREET, CRAW FORDVILLE The unconditional love of a pet is waiting for you at th e C.H.A.T. Adoption Center. orvisit: chatofwakulla.org LOW COST PET VACCINATIONAnimal Health Services will be at the CHATAdoption Center1 Oak Street, CrawfordvilleSATURDAY, OCTOBER 8from 12:30pm to 1:30pm for more information call 926-0890 355 Yard Sales IndoorSale!Friday,10/7and Saturday,10/8.9AM-3PM,1239 CoastalHwy.,Panacea.Holiday decorations,workbench,church pews,furniture,dolls,crafts. Lots more! Must not miss! Multi-Family-Sale,Sat.-10/8, 7:30AM-1PM,677EastIvan Road.B.O.B.jogging-stroller, camo,XL-dogcrate,dogcarrier, gasgrills,boy’sbikeandtoys, books,householditems, clothes framed art furniture. CHAT ADOPTION CENTER OctoberisAdopt-a-Shelter-Dog Month.Wearereducingourdog adoptionfeesby$25.Arealbargain, consideringthatallanimalswill bemicro-chipped,spayed/neutered, rabiesvaccinations,allothervaccinationsuptodate,wormingandwill receivepetfoodand1monthoffree petinsurance.Italsoincludesafree initialhealthexaminationbyalocal veterinarian.Please,comeseeusat theCHATAdoptionCenterat1Oa k Street(nexttotheSheriffsDepartment).Formoreinformationcall 926-0890. YARD SALE!!Saturday, October 8thCorner of US 98 and Spring Creek Highway.SPACES FOR VENDORS EVERY SATURDAY 8AM-4PM!Bring your Stuff and Sell it Here!!850-926-8120 (for info) 500 Real Estate PUBLISHERS NOTICEAllrealestateadvertisinginthis newspaperissubjecttotheFair HousingActwhichmakesitillegaltoadvertiseanypreference, limitation,ordiscrimination basedonrace,color,religion, sex,handicap,familialstatusor nationaloriginoranintentionto makeanysuchpreference,limitationordiscrimination.ŽFamilial statusincludeschildrenunder theageof18livingwithparents orlegalcustodians,pregnant womenandpeoplesecuringthe custodyofchildrenunderthe age of 18. Thisnewspaperwillnotaccept anyadvertisingforrealestate thatisaviolationofthelaw.Our readersareherebyinformedthat alldwellingsadvertisedinthis newspaperareavailableonan equalopportunitybasis.TocomplainofdiscriminationcallHUD tollfreeat1-800-669-9777.The tollfreenumberforthehearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 515 Apartments for Rent 2BR/1BA$375/monthat87Joe MackSmith,depositinexchangeforcleaning.Sendmailhappycamper9@columbus.rr.comor 614.578.6322, available now! 1BDR as LOW as $600/mo. 2BDR as LOW as $700/mo. 3BDR as LOW as $800/m o. swimming pool and gym850-926-1134 MOVE IN SPECIAL $99 DEPOSIT $300 LOCAL HERO DISCOUNT $99 Application Fee $35 530 Comm. Property for Rent A ffordableOfficeSpaceatthe BarryBuilding.Greatatmosphere!Includesallutilities,trash p/u,fullkitchenuse,conference room.Ratesstartat$250/mo. 850-210-5849orourwebsiteat www.Barr y Buildin g .com Mini-WarehouseSpacesfo r lease,8X10and10X12now available.ComebyorcallWakulla Realt y, 926-5084. WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE € Fitness Studio -1000/sf,(wall to wall mat & mirrors) € Retail -1250/sf (storefront w/back storage) € Divided Office Space -1074/sf.Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 535 Comm. Property for Sale Choicecornerlotatjunctureo f CrawfordvilleHighwayand pavedWhitlockWay.200'X300'. CommercialZoningGuaranteed, $70,000.DixieProperties(850) 656-6340. 545 Homes for Sale 3BR/2BAone-storyhomeon1.5 lotwithgarage.Excellentcondition.$95,000.Ownerfinancing. 850-251-7588 850-962-2016. 555 Houses for Rent 3BR/1BACH&A,closetoMedartElementaryandWakulla HighSchool.Referencesrequired.$700/mo.,plusdeposit. Please call 850-556-4464. 3BR/2BATHinMysteriousWaters.$795/rent,samedeposit. No pets. Call Jim at 566-5165. Crawfordville,clean,large2 bedrooms,2fullbathduplex, $675permonth.CallLinda, 850-926-0283. House/Acreage Charming 3BR/1BA, HVAC, appliances, ceiling fans, located on 3 acres in North Wakulla. Workshop, 2 storage sheds, $750/month, plus $500/deposit. 850-251-1253. Brenda Hicks Realty. 560 Land for Sale 2-acrelotforsalenearnew ShadevilleSchool,cornero f SteelCourtandSpringCree k Hwy.(citywater).Ownerfinancing.Call850-556-1178o r 850-556-3765. 565 Mobile Homes for Rent 12X603BR/1BAolderhome. CentralA/C,gas,heat,range. #20CutchinCt.(offEastIvan Rd.)Garbage/waterincluded. Talquin/WakullaGas.Nopets. $475/mo.+$350/deposit. 926-1428 leave messa g e. 3BR/2BA,largeporch,backsto theNationalForest.Doublecarport.Sitson5beautifulacres withapond.$650/month.plus deposit. 850-984-0044.

PAGE 22

Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Visit me on the web www.WakullaInfo.com Dawn Reed -Realtor GRICell (850) 294-3468 152 Centerline Road only $85,000. 3/2home has lots of privacy on 4.5 acres. Beautiful kitchen with brazilian cherry hardwood oors. Open Floor Plan.Extra building in the back. “Check out www.WakullaShortSales.com” 4Br 2Ba House $1220mo + Sec. Dep. 4Br 2Ba DWMH $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $1200mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $400mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co.Ž(850) 926…5084 We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!91 Posey Rd., Medart2BR/1BA, secluded cypress home w/ replace, 2 screened porches on 30 Acres. Perfect for nature lovers.$875 per month.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. 565 Mobile Homes for Rent 14X702BR/2BA.CentralA/C. Gas,heatandrange.#10 CutchinCourt,offEastIvanRd. Garbagepick-up/waterincluded. Talquin/WakullaGas.$525/mo., $400/deposit.Nopets. 926-1428. Leave messa g e. 2BR/2BASW/MH.WakullaGardensKlickitatRd.Niceinterior andexterior,openfloorplan. $575/month, first, last. 3BR/2BADWMH,WakullaGardens, CAH, Good Floor Plan. $675/month+deposit,application,references.1-yrlease.Both availblenow!Callfordiscount! Informationorforappointment 850-554-5267, 850-524-4090. 3BR/1.5BAM/Hon3acres, Panaceaarea.Centralheat/air, dishwasher,woodstove.Clean andprivate.Nosmoking.Referencesrequired.$600/month, $300/deposit. 352-493-2232. 570 Mobile Homes for Sale 2BR/1BAMH.$9,000.Excellent condition!Vinylsiding,shingled roof, new flooring throughout. Stove,Refrigerator,Microwave, A C/Unit. Must be moved. (850) 544-6760 leave message. 605 Statewide Classi eds Adoption A childless,young,successful womanseekstoadopt.Will providelovinghome/doting grandma.Largeextendedfamily.Excellentsupport.Financial security.Expensespaid.JessicaorAdam.1-800-790-5260. Bar#0150789. Announcements A dvertisingthatWorks.Putyour adinOver100PapersthroughoutFloridaforoneLOWRATE! Call(866)742-1373orvisit: www.florida-classifieds.com. Auctions A UCTION-MOUNTAINBROO K COTTAGES,Sylva,NC.30+ A cres,Farmhouse,14Furnished,fireplacecottages.Auction:October22,2011,11:00 A M.www.auctionEbid.com. MarshaHowell(404)822-3525. A uctionManagementCorporation. NCAL#7403. Autos Wanted CASHFORCARS!AnyMake, Model,orYear.WePayMORE! RunningorNot.SellYourCaror TruckTODAY.FreeTowing!Instant Offer: (888)420-3807. Business Opportunities THINKCHRISTMAS,START NOW!OWNAREDHOT!DOLLAR,DOLLARPLUS,MAILBO X ORDISCOUNTPARTYSTORE FROM$51,900WORLDWIDE! 100%TURNKEY(800)518-3064 WWW.DRSS20.COM. Education A LLIEDHEALTHcareer training-Attendcollege100% online.Jobplacementassistance.Computeravailable.FinancialAidifqualified.SCHE V certified.Call(800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com. Financial Services $$$ACCESSLAWSUITCASH NOW!!!$$$AsseenonTV.$$$ InjuryLawsuitDragging?Need $500-$500,000++within48/hrs? LowratesAPPLYNOWBY PHONE!CallToday!Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com. Help Wanted Driver-GREATMILES!Great Pay!$1000Sign-onforExperiencedCO's&$1500Incentives forO/O's.DriverAcademyRefresherCourseavailable.recruit@ffex.net. (855)356-7121. A BetterCareerWithMelton GreatEquipment&Benefits2 Mos.CDLClassADrivingExp (877)258-8782www.meltontruck.com. Drivers-NEWPAYINCREASE FORTANKDRIVERS.Lotso f Freight,GreatMiles,3Weeks PaidVacation,Incentives,Insurance&401(k).FoodGrade Products.CDL-A&1YearOTR ExperienceRequired.Call (877)882-6537.www.OakleyTransport.com. Driver-WeeklyHometime!Part & Full-time.DailyorWeeklyPay. SteadyMilesMeansMORE MONEY!ExcellentBenefits! CDL-A,3monthsrecentexperiencerequired.(800)414-9569. www.driveknight.com. Miscellaneous SAWMILLSfromonly$3997MAKEMONEY&SAVEMONEY withyourownbandmill-Cut lumberanydimension.Instock readytoship.FREEInfo&DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com (800)578-1363 Ext.300N. A TTENDCOLLEGEONLINE fromHome.*Medical,*Business, *Paralegal,*Accounting,*CriminalJustice.Jobplacementassistance.Computeravailable.FinancialAidifqualified.Call (888)203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com. A IRLINESAREHIRING-Train forhighpayingAviationMaintenanceCareer.FAAapproved program.Financialaidifqualified-HousingavailableCALL A viationInstituteofMaintenance (866)314-3769. Out of Area Real Estate 20AcreRanchFORECLOSURES!NearGrowingEl Paso,TXWas$16,900Now $12,900$0Down,takeover payments,$99/mo.Beautiful views,ownerfinancing.FREE colorbrochure(800)755-8953 www.sunsetranches.com. Real Estate A uction-Over110Properties: A L&FL.October24th-28th. Commercial,Homes,Condos, A creage&Lots.SperryVan Ness www.BidOnBankREO.com.Auctioneer#1832 Broker#000058515-0/FLAuctioneer#AU220; Broker#CQ1036111. Schools & Instruction Heat&AirJOBS-Readyto work?3weekacceleratedprogram.Handsonenvironment. Nationwidecertificationsand LocalJobPlacementAssistance! (877) 359-1690. 680 Legal Notices 681 Foreclosure Proceedings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION FILE NUMBER: 10-387CA DUANEEVANSLLC,aFloridaLimitedLiability Company, Plaintiff v. ANTOINETTEC.WALKER,a/k/aANTOINETTE C. WALKER-LIPPLETT, Defendant. AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION TO:ANTOINETTEC.WALKER,a/k/aANTOINETTEC.WALKER-LIPPLETT,ifalive, andifdead,herunknownspouse,heirs,devisees,grantees,judgmentcreditors,andall otherpartiesclaimingby,through,under,or againstthem;theunknownspouse,heirs, devisees,grantees,andjudgmentcreditors ofdeceaseddefendant,andallotherparties claimingby,through,under,oragainstdefendant;andallunknownnaturalpersonsif alive,andifdeadornotknowntobedead oralive,theirseveralandrespectiveunknownspouses,heirs,devisees,grantees, andjudgmentcreditors,orotherparties claimingby,through,orunderthoseunknownnaturalpersons;andtheseveraland respectiveunknownassigns,successorsin interest,trustees,oranyotherpersonclaimingby,through,under,oragainstanycorporationorotherlegalentitynamedasadefendant;andallclaimants,personsorparties,naturalorcorporate,orwhoseexactlegalstatusisunknown,claimingunderthe abovenamedordescribeddefendantor claimingtohaveanyright,title,orinterestin tlle property, YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactiontoquiet taxtitletothefollowingpropertyinWakulla County, Florida: ThatpartofLot2inPlatfiledforrecordrepresentingtheWestone-halfofLot36,in HartsfieldSurveythatliesNorthofState Road 61 LESSANDEXCEPTthatparcelonthe NorthwestcornerofsaidLot2,identifiedas Tax Folio Number 00-00-036-000-09673-000 ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT: Commenceataplainconcretemonument markingthenorthwestcornerofLot36of theHartsfieldSurvey,WakullaCounty,Florida,andalsobeingthesouthwestcornerof ShadevilleSouth,aplattedsubdivisionof WakullaCounty,Florida,asrecordedinPlat Book3,Page19,ofthepublicrecordsof WakullaCounty,Florida;thencerunNorth 72degrees21minutes11secondsEast 262.78feetalongthesouthboundaryof saidsubdivisiontoanironrodandcap(LB &017)forthePOINTOFBEGINNING.From saidPOINTOFBEGINNINGcontinuealong saidsouthboundaryasfollows:North72 degrees21minutes11secondsEast37.30 feettoaconcretemonumentonsaidsouth boundary;thenceNorth72degrees21minutes06secondsEast413.84feettoaconcretemonument(LB4923)onsaidsouth boundary;thenceNorth72degrees20minutes40secondsEast124.78feettoaniron rodandcap(LB7017)onsaidsouthboundary;thenceleavingsaidsouthboundaryrun South17degrees31minutes23seconds East247.85feettoanironrodandcap(LB 7017)onthenortherlyrightofwayboundary ofStateRoadNo.61(ShadevilleRoad); thencealongsaidrightofwayboundaryrun South70degrees44minutes36seconds West476.17feettoa2inchdiameteriron pipe;thenceleavingsaidrightofway boundaryrunNorth17degrees31minutes 23secondsWest264.00feettothePOINT OF BEGINNING. Theabove-describedpropertyismoreparticularly described as: CommenceataconcretemonumentmarkingtheNorthwestcornerofLot36ofthe HartsfieldSurveyoflandsinWakulla County,Florida;thencerunalongtheWesterlyboundarylineofsaidLot36andalso theWesterlyboundarylineofLot2Peter GavinsEstateasrecordedinDeedBoo k 21Page75inthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,FloridaSouth16degrees58 minutes11secondsEast271.25feettoa re-barmarkingtheintersectionofsaid WesterlyboundarylinewiththeNortherly monumentedrightofwaylineofCounty Road#61(alsoknownasShadevilleRoad); thenceleavingsaidWesterlyboundaryline runalongsaidNortherlymonumentedright ofwaylineasfollows:North70degrees52 minutes39secondsEast265.25feettoan ironpipemarkingtheSoutheastcornerof propertydescribedinOfficialRecordBoo k 162Page1inthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,Florida,saidpointalsomarkingtheSouthwestcornerofpropertyasdescribedinOfficialRecordsBook527Page 476inthePublicRecordsofWakulla County,Florida;thencecontinuealongsaid Northerlymonumenteclrightofwayline, alsobeingtheSoutherlyboundarylineof saidpropertydescribedinOfficialRecord Book527Page476North70degrees46 minutes53secondsEast576.12feettoa rodandcapmarkingtheSoutheastcorner ofsaidpropertydescribedinOfficialRecord Book527Page476,saidpointbeingthe POINTOFBEGINNING;thenceleaving saidPOINTOFBEGINNINGcontinuealong saidNortherlymonumentedrightofwayline North70degrees47minutes29seconds East289.09feettoare-bar;thenceleaving saidNortherlymonumentedrightofwayline runNorth17degrees12minutes51secondsWest239.54feettoare-barlyingon theSoutherlyboundarylineofLot9of ShadevilleSouthSubdivisionasrecordedin PlatBook3Page19ofthePublicRecords ofWakullaCounty,Florida,alsobeingthe NortherlyboundarylineofHartsfieldSurvey Lot36;thencerunalongsaidSoutherly boundarylineofLot9ofShadevilleSouth SubdivisionandsaidNortherlyboundary lineofHartsfieldSurveyLot36South72degrees26minutes37secondsWest289.99 feettoarodandcapmarkingtheNortheast cornerofpropertydescribedinOfficialRecordBook527Page476inthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,Florida;thence leavingsaidSoutherlyandNortherlyboundarylinerunalongtheEasterlyboundaryline ofsaidpropertydescribedinOfficialRecord Book527Page476South17degrees27 minutes46secondsEast247.87feettothe POINTOFBEGINNING,containing1.62 acres, more or less. hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,ifany,toitonGeorgeH.Gwynn, Esq.,theplaintiff'sattorney,whoseaddress isPostOfficeBox4128,Tallahassee,Florida,32315,onorbeforeOctober15,2011, andfiletheoriginalwiththeclerkofthis courteitherbeforeserviceontheplaintiff's attorneyorimmediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou forthereliefdemandedinthecomplaintor petition. DATED ON September 8th, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sBECKY WHALEY AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 22, 29, 2011 October 6, 13, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2011-102-CA DIVISION: CIRCUIT CIVIL JAMES BANKS, Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS CUDIHY, Defendant. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderofFinalJudgmententeredinCase No.2011-102-CAoftheCircuitCourtofthe o00CoteCcutCoutote SecondJudicialCircuitinandforWAKULLA County,Florida,wherein,JamesBanks, Plaintiff,andThomasCudihy,Defendant,I willselltothehighestbidderforcashat, 3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville, Florida32327,atthehourof11:00a.m.on the27thdayofOctober,2011,thefollowing described property: THEFOLLOWINGDESCRIBEDLAND SITUATE,LYINGANDBEINGINWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA TO-WIT: Lot3,HuntersGlennPlantation,Phase2as permaporplatthereofrecordedinPlat Book3,Page81ofthePublicRecordsof WakullaCounty,Florida,beingtheRe-Plat ofLots2,3and28ofHuntersGlennPlantationaspermaporplatthereofrecordedin PlatBook3,Page40ofthePublicRecords of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel I.D. Number: 29-3S-01E-268-05506-H03 Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendensmustfileaclaimwithin60daysafter the sale. Dated this 28th day of September, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sBECKY WHALEY AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court Ifyouareapersonwithadisabilitywho needsanyaccommodationinordertoparticipateinthisproceeding,youareentitled, atnocosttoyou,totheprovisionofcertain assistance.PleasecontacttheClerkofthe Courtsdisabilitycoordinatoratleast7days beforeyourscheduledcourtappearance,or immediatelyuponreceivingthisnotification ifthetimebeforethescheduledappearance islessthan7days;ifyouarehearingor voice impaired, call 711. October 6, 13, 2011 682 Public Sales and Auctions NOTICE OF AUCTION UndertheauthorityoftheFloridaStorage facilityActthepropertydescribedbelowhas beenseizedfornonpaymentofrentand otheraccruedexpenses.Thepropertywill besoldatauctiontothehighestbidderas providedbytheselfstoragefacilityact 83.806DoubleDstorageLLCreservesthe righttorefuseanyandallbids.CashOnly. HaroldWhiteUnit#8householditems,auctiontobeheld@DoubleDStorageLLC 289CajerPoseyRdCrawfordvilleFL32327 Oct 14, 2011 at 12:00 pm. September 29, 2011 October 6, 2011 683 Estate (Probate) Filings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION 11-55-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF LINDA BARBARA BORGIOLI BASS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TheadministrationoftheEstateofLINDA BARBARABORGIOLIBASS,deceased, CaseNumber11-55-PR,ispendinginthe CircuitCourtforWakullaCounty,Florida, ProbateDivision,theaddressofwhichis 3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville, Florida32327.Thenamesandaddressesof thePersonalRepresentativeandthePersonalRepresentativesattorneyaresetforth below. ALL CREDITORS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: AllcreditorsofthedecedentandotherpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedentsEstateonwhomacopyofthisnoticeisservedwithinthreemonthsafterthe dateofthefirstpublicationofthisnotice mustfiletheirclaimswiththisCourtWITHIN THELATEROFTHREEMONTHSAFTER THEDATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATION OFTHISNOTICEORTHIRTYDAYSAFTERTHEDATEOFSERVICEOFACOPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofthedecedentandpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstthe decedentsEstatemustfiletheirclaimswith thisCourtWITHINTHREEMONTHSAFTERTHEDATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS,DEMANDSANDOBJECTIONSNOTSOFILEDWILLBEFOREVER BARRED. ThedateofthefirstpublicationofthisNotice is September 29, 2011. Personal Representative: LINDA ANN BASS OLDS 251 South Matanzas Blvd. St. Augustine, FL 32080-4541 Attorney for Personal Representative: MARY ELLEN DAVIS, ESQUIRE Florida Bar NO. 94988 4 MARY ELLEN DAVIS LAW OFFICE Post Office Box 172 0 Crawfordville, FL 3232 6 September 29, 2011 October 6, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF BEATRICEL.ROBISON, FileNo. 11-PR-57 Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TheadministrationoftheestateofBeatrice L.Robison,deceased,whosedateofdeath wasJanuary25,2011;1FileNumber 11-PR-57,ispendingintheCircuitCourtfor WakullaCounty,Florida,ProbateDivision, theaddressofwhichis3056Crawfordville Highway,Crawfordville,Florida32327.The namesandaddressesofthepersonalrepresentativeandthepersonalrepresentative's attorney are set forth beloww. Allcreditorsofthedecedentandotherpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedent'sestate,onwhomacopyofthisnoticeisrequiredtobeserved,mustfiletheir claimswiththiscourtWITHINTHELATER OF3MONTHSAFTERTHETIMEOFTHE FIRSTPUBLICATIONOFTHISNOTICE OR30DAYSAFTERTHEDATEOF SERVICEOFACOPYOFTHISNOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofthedecedentandother personshavingclaimsordemandsagainst decedent'sestatemustfiletheirclaimswith thiscourtWITHIN3MONTHSAFTERTHE DATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATIONOF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMSNOTFILEDWITHINTHE TIMEPERIODSSETFORTHINSECTION 733.702OFTHEFLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDINGTHETIMEPERIOD SETFORTHABOVE,ANYCLAIMFILED TWO(2)YEARSORMOREAFTERTHE DECEDENT'SDATEOFDEATHIS BARRED. Thedateoffirstpublicationofthisnoticeis: September 29, 2011. JANICE M. NAZWORTH Co-Personal Representative 21 Robison Hill Drive Crawfordville, Florida 32327 ROCHELLE REVELL Co-Personal Representative 577 Sopchoppy Highway Crawfordville, Florida 32327 CAROLYN T. LEBOEUF, ESQ. Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives Florida Bar No. 0362409 909 East Park Avenue Tallahassee, Florida 32301 (850) 222-2000 September 29, 2011 October 6, 2011 684 Miscellaneous Notices NOTICE OF MEETING ChristianradiostationWUJC91.1,St. MarkswillbeholdingapublicmeetingatSt. MarksVolunteerFireDept.,on10/6at12 noon.Thisisageneralmeetingthatwilladdresspublicissues,andanyquestionsor concernsaboutWUJC.Thepublicisinvited to attend. October 6, 2011 685 Notice of Fictitious Name NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENthattheundersigned,desiringtoengageinbusinessunderthefictitiousnameofTheInnatWildwoodlocatedat3870CoastalHwy.,inthe CountyofWakulla,inCrawfordville,Florida 32327,intendstoregisterthesaidname withtheDivisionofCorporationsoftheFloridaDepartmentofState,Tallahassee,Florida.Datedthis29thdayofSeptember, 2011. -sReaghall Investments, Inc. October 6, 2011 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENthattheundersigned,desiringtoengageinbusinessunderthefictitiousnameofWildwoodGolflocatedat3870CoastalHwy.,intheCounty ofWakulla,inCrawfordville,Florida32327, intendstoregisterthesaidnamewiththe DivisionofCorporationsoftheFloridaDepartmentofState,Tallahassee,Florida. Dated this 29th day of September, 2011. -sReaghall Investments, Inc. October 6, 2011

PAGE 23

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 – Page 9BBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 26 38 44 48 59 65 68 71 2 39 60 3 40 61 21 34 49 55 4 15 18 35 45 5 27 46 6 28 41 56 62 66 69 72 7 29 50 63 8 24 36 64 25 30 47 57 9 16 19 22 42 58 10 43 51 11 31 37 52 67 70 73 12 32 53 13 33 54 ACROSS 1. Ad-__ committee 4. Olympian's prize 9. College bigwigs 1 4. Vexation 1 5. Castle of the ballroom 1 6. Sign up 1 7. Diarist Anas 1 8. Al __ (pasta specification) 1 9. "Oro y __" (Montana motto) 2 0. Deprived of one's land? 2 2. Personification of the easy life 2 3. Troubled state 2 4. "__ Gotta Have It" (Spike Lee film) 2 6. Something to watch, perhaps 2 7. Moray, for one 3 0. Minute Maid Park ballclub 3 4. Weirdos 3 7. George's lyricist 3 8. Lusterless finish 4 1. "Rope-a-dope" boxer 4 2. Plant firmly 4 4. Grow older 4 5. Genuine 4 8. "Nel blu dipinto di blu" song 5 0. "Slippery when __" 5 1. Coagulate 5 5. Bit of old Italian bread? 5 7. Section of Los Angeles 5 9. Clear from the board 6 2. Ironed? 6 5. Coffee choice 6 6. Southwestern stewpots 6 7. Potpie spheroid 6 8. Bridget Fonda, to Jane 69. Moss or fern, for example 70. Scarf down 71. Tacked on 72. Jamboree setups 73. Rap's Dr. __DOWN1. Many Eastern Indians 2. Set straight 3. Middle, in Manitoba 4. King with the golden touch 5. Put up 6. Fender blemish 7. Poker opener 8. West Yorkshire city 9. Wrinkled? 10. Join the military 11. Sea east of the Caspian 12. "Name That Tune" clue 13. Do in, as a dragon 21. Transplant, in a way 25. "2001" computer 28. Israel's Abba 29. '80s-'90s legal drama 31. Adam's donation 32. Raw resource 33. Bummed out 35. Stripped bare? 36. Word before jacket or insurance 38. Dallas hoopster, for short 39. In the past 40. __ Aviv 43. Muslim's destination 46. Above, in poesy 47. Repetitive 49. __-Lorraine (regio n of France) 52. Spoke like Daffy Duck 53. "In __ and out ..." 54. As of now 56. Take as one's own 58. Hatchlings' homes 59. Author Ferber 60. John __ (the Lone Ranger) 61. Got 100 on 63. Fashion mag 64. Scot's family American Prole Hometown Content 9/11/2011 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 200 9 HtCtt 1 23 4 5 267 82 1 374 4213 3956 6 2 739 93148 200 9 HtCtt 791 8236 4 5 352964781 864517293 518 376429 649281537 273495168 486 759312 127638954 935142876 H I N D U S M A V E D N O R I E N T A G O R E I C E N T R E T E L A C E R E P O T A L S A C M I D A S D E B R I E F E E R E C T E D O E R D E N T E B A N A D O P A N T E L A L A W E L L L E E D S L I F E C L A H A L I T E R A ND E P R E S S E D N E S T E N L I S T M E C C A A R A L R I B L I S P E N O T E O R E O N E E A A A O A Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.comThe 411 on prepaid cardsBy JASON ALDERMANAccording to Gail Cunningham, spokesperson for the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, we live in a credit-dominated society. Without a checking or savings account,Ž she says, its dif“ cult to cash payroll, Social Security and unemployment checks; you need a credit or debit card to shop online, book a ” ight or rent a car; and you may be forced to carry large amounts of cash to pay bills.Ž One increasingly common money management tool for people in this situation is prepaid cards. These cards look and work much like regular debit cards except that instead of funding them through a checking or savings account, you load money on the card by cash, check, funds transfer or direct deposit by an employer or government entity. Common prepaid card features include: € You dont need a bank account or solid credit rating to obtain one. € They start out with a zero balance until you add money. Purchases or ATM withdrawals will diminish the cards balance until it reaches zero and you discard it (as with gift cards) or you reload the card. € Spending is limited to the amount loaded on the card, so you cant buy more than you have. € Cards can offer Zero LiabilityŽ protection if you promptly report loss, theft or fraudulent charges. € Most allow ATM cash withdrawals and online or phone purchases. € Theyre safer to carry than large amounts of cash. Common types of prepaid cards include: € Reloadable cards … to which more money can later be added. € Gift cards … used until their balance is depleted; theyre not reloadable. € Teen cards … where parents can reload the cards and monitor purchases online or by phone (allowing teens a chance to manage spending and budgeting in a controlled environment). € Travel cards … a safe alternative to cash and travelers checks. Payroll cards … wages are loaded into the cards account for immediate access (similar to checking account direct deposit). Government agencyprovided cards … bene“ ts such as Social Security and unemployment are loaded into your card account. Healthcare cards … allow point-of-service access to funds in your Flexible Spending Account or Health Savings Account to pay for quali“ ed medical expenses. Prepaid cards may come with fees and restrictions, so its important to read the cards terms and conditions carefully and to shop around for the best deals. Good comparison sites include www. bankrate.com and www.creditcards.com. Here are a few questions to ask when comparing cards: What identi“ cation do I need to buy this card? Where can I use it? (Certain retailers only? Online? Phone?) Can I later add funds to it? For example, will it accept direct deposit of payroll or Social Security checks? Is there an expiration date? Will I receive monthly statements? Can I check balances by phone or online? What fees apply? Common fees include those for card activation, reloading funds, balance inquiries, ATM or bank withdrawals and declined transactions. What happens if its lost or stolen? To learn more about how prepaid cards work, you can order a free Prepaid Card BasicsŽ brochure at Practical Money Skills for Life (www.practicalmoneyskills.com), a free personal “ nancial management program run by Visa Inc. Bottom line: Always make sure you fully understand the terms and conditions of any financial product or account before signing up.Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www. twitter.com/PracticalMoney. e myth of work/life balance: Seven ways to rethink your approach to the daily grindSpecial to The NewsIn a perfect world, work and home would balance out neatly. Wed work from 8 to 5 each day, take an hour-long lunch, and then come home and spend uninterrupted time with our families. But for those of us here in the wake of the Great Recession, firmly entrenched in an always onŽ society, this notion seems hopelessly outdated. Most of us are working longer, more stressful hours, and work is spilling over into evenings and weekends. No wonder a recent survey of North American employees found that 87 percent of respondents say their work/ life balance (or lack thereof) is negatively affecting their health. With so many people suffering from this problem, you would think the natural solution would be to encourage businesses to help their stressed-out employees “ nd more balance in their lives. Not so, says best-selling author Jon Gordon. Work/life balance, at least in the sense that most of us think about it, is a myth,Ž says Gordon, whose new book is The Seed: Finding Purpose and Happiness in Life and Work.Ž It does not exist,Ž Gordon says. For many people, it never has. Personally, I have never been able to balance the scales of work and life on a day-to-day basis. Rather, Ive come to realize that the dance between work and life is more about rhythm than balance.Ž Gordon compares the rhythms of work and life to the rhythms of nature. Theres a time and a season for everything. For me and for most people, there are seasons when hard work and extra hours are a necessity, and seasons when there is more time for rest,Ž he explains. And guess what? Its okay. When you love what you do„and I truly believe there is meaning and even joy to be found in every job„youll thrive during the busy seasons and fully appreciate the down time.Ž Gordons latest book„a business fable in the same vein as his Wall Street Journal best seller, The Energy Bus,Ž follows Josh, an up and comer in his company, who has lost his passion at work. Challenged by his boss to take two weeks and decide if he really wants to work there, Josh takes off for the country, where he meets a wise farmer who gives him a seed and a promise: “ nd the right place to plant the seed, and his purpose will be revealed. This sense of purpose, asserts Gordon, is the natural remedy for the crushing guilt that many working parents in particular experience. You know the drill: when youre working late, you feel guilty that youre not home with the kids; when youre at home, you feel guilty about all the work not getting done. When you believe your job has no meaning, of course youre going to feel guilty for spending so much time there,Ž he notes. Its the realization that you are making a difference in the lives of others that lets you let go of the guilt and truly immerse yourself in what youre doing during both seasons.Ž First, let go of the work/life balance notion. Instead, think purpose and passion.Ž Its true that work/life balance is a topic that seems to be on many minds, says Gordon, citing a recent NPR segment titled In America, Too Much All Work, No Play?Ž But in many ways, he insists, a perfectly balanced life is a perfectly tepid life. How much balance do you think Bono has when U2 is on tour? What about an Olympic athlete preparing for a competition? Or the leadership team at Facebook? Probably not much, but their passion and purpose fuel them to work harder and longer with more joy and satisfaction in both work and life. When your goal is to achieve work/life balance, youll be constantly disappointed and so will your loved ones,Ž says Gordon. But when you approach every day with passion and purpose, whether youre working long hours to prepare an important presentation or staying up late with your daughter to work on her science project, you can “ nd joy and happiness in whatever it is youre pursuing at that moment.Ž Look at your work/life blend over the past year, he advises. Consider it as a whole. Rather than thinking of your work and life day to day, think of it as a whole. How many times did you get away with your family last year? Were there particular weeks/months where you worked really, really long hours? Were there times you were less busy? You might “ nd that, when viewed that way, you did have a balanced life. Or you might realize you need to make a change in the way you do things during the upcoming year. When youre at work, really engage. Fully commit to whatever youre doing at work. Dont complain … positivity goes a long way. And dont feel guilty that you are not at home. Feeling guilty is a recipe for misery and poor performance on the job and unhappiness at home. Commit fully to your season of hard work while planning for your season of rest and recharging. When youre at home, really BE at home. Throw yourself into those precious family relationships. Dont spend family time thinking about work or zoning out in front of the TV or computer. Its not about the amount of time we spend with our families, says Gordon. Its about how engaged we are during the time we do have with them. What Im really talking about is making the most of your time however you spend it„of making each and every moment really count,Ž says Gordon. If youve been killing yourself trying to achieve daily work/life balance, author Jon Gordon warns that it may be a pipe dream. He o ers up another (better) solution

PAGE 24

By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe LeRoy Collins Leon County Public Library opened a branch in Woodville on Saturday, Oct. 1, just across the county line. The branch is located in the Woodville Community Center on Old Woodville Highway, near the J. Lewis Hall Park in Woodville, and right off the St. Marks Rail Trail. Branch Manager Verna Brock, who lives in Wakulla Station in Wakulla County, said at the opening that the branch welcomes Wakulla residents. To check out materials, a library card will be needed of course, but thats free to those people who own property in Leon County or work for the county. Otherwise, the cost is $30 a year or $10 a quarter. You dont need a card to use the internet or come to read in the library, Brock said. The branch is also working closely with the local Woodville Elementary, Brock said. The library will be hosting a summer reading program and other events including a teen party slam. The ribbon-cutting ceremony for the branch included numerous Leon County elected officials and a crowd of dozens of area residents. The branch is the “ rst community center/library combination in Leon County. The Woodville Branch Library is located at 8000 Old Woodville Road. The bene“ ts of this inventive approach to the library branchs construction are two-fold: The combined community center/library will retain all current services of the community center, and residents of Woodville will now gain a library dedicated to their interests and on-site staff. The 2,000-square-foot expansion to the community center enables residents of the rapidly growing southern sector of Leon County to have comparable library service to the rest of the county and creates a community hub for county services, activities and outreach. The librarys construction is also directly connected to the St. Marks trail so citizens who are using the popular trail can stop off at the facility. The combined community center and library allows residents the ability to access both parts of the building during normal business hours, making it a more active facility. The library is open Tuesday through Saturday. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, hours are 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Wednesdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturdays, 10 a.m to 4 p.m. Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Leon County Library opens a Woodville branchWoodville branch manager Verna Brock, above, helps a library patron at the opening on Saturday. Below, some of the area residents at the opening, which included a ribbon cutting ceremony. A young library patron checks out the branchs selection of movies available for check out.Wilderness Coast board will meetThe Wilderness Coast Public Libraries (WILD) Governing Board will meet on Monday, Oct. 10, at 1:30 p.m. at the Jefferson County R.J. Bailar Public Library at 375 South Water Street in Monticello. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, please call (850) 997-7400. JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org LOCAL NEWS The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com pure speed. pure perfor mance. pure simplicity. pure broadband is everything you want from an internet connection … with no phone line required. Its all the speed you need to surf, watch, download and game without slowing down. call 866.958.7873to get pure speed today. givemepure.com stop by your CenturyLink store *Offer ends 1/28/2012. Pure Broadband available to qualifying residential customers only. The monthly rate of $29.95 requires a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months (after which the rate reverts to the then-current standard rate), and applies to up to 1.5 Mbps service. An additional monthly fee (including professional installation, if applicable) and separate shipping and handling fee will apply to customers modem or router. Gene ral … Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them by service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions … All products and services are governed by tariffs, terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at www.centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges … Applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges include a Carrier Universal Service charge, National Access Fee surcharge, a one-time Pure Broadband activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain instate surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply ba sed on standard monthly, not promotional, rates. Call for a listing of applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges. Monthly Rate … Monthly rate applies while customer subscribes to all qualifying services. If one (1) or more services are cancelled, the stan dard monthly fee will apply to each remaining service. Pure Broadband … As determined by service location, an early termination fee will apply as either a ”at $99 fee or the applicable monthly recurring service fee multiplied by the number of months remaining in the minimum service period, up to $200. Performance will vary due to conditions outside of network control and no speed is guaranteed. Telephone landline is part of the service only for the purpose of data traf“c transmission/connection and cannot be used for voice traf“c transmission, except for 911 services. 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name Ce nturyLink and the pathways logo are the property of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owne rs. a month*all high-speed internet. no phone line required.



PAGE 1

Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 40th Issue Thursday, October 6, 2011 Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 CentsThe WakullanewsInside This Week Public Notices ..............Page 3A Comment & Opinion ....Page 4A Church..........................Page 5A Community....................Page 6A School...........................Page 7A Sports ....................Pages 8, 9A In The Huddle ............Page 10A Outdoors ...................Page 11A Water Ways...............Page 12A Sheriffs Report ..........Page 13A Business ......................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..........Page 2B Classi eds ....................Page 7B Legal Notices ...............Page 8B Published Weekly, Published Weekly, Read Daily Read Daily n By HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsWhere theres smoke, theres bound to be re. And if you found yourself in Hudson Park this past Saturday, there was also the tangy sting of barbecue sauce oating on the wind. The ribs, pulled pork, chicken and side-dishes at this years Smoke and Fire Barbecue Competition Fundraiser were not up for discussion. Simply put, they were there to be devoured. Smoke and Fire hosted its second annual cook-off competition as a charity bene t for the Camp Amigo Childrens Burn Camp, and Richard Rhea Scholarship Fund. The event, attended by Wakulla residents, rst responders from our area, Quincy, Havanna, Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, among others, is the partnering result of the Wakulla County Volunteer/Paid Fire Department, and Wakulla County Sheriffs Department. Continued on Page 2Asmoke and fireFire ghters hold their annual barbecue fundraiser on Saturday in Hudson ParkWildwood has a new owner By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAs of Sept. 22, Wildwood Golf Course and Inn has a new owner who hopes to get the property back on track and make it more ef- cient. Reagan Hobbs, of Tallahassee, purchased the inn and golf course and wants to transform the golf course into a place where people in the county gather and call home, whether they golf or not. I want to turn it into the peoples place, Hobbs said of his vision. Hobbs has 16 years of real estate experience and has been the majority owner of The Golf Club at Summerbrooke in Tallahassee since 2003. Ive always had a passion for golf, Hobbs said. His idea is to combine the two golf clubs and let members play and be a part of both courses. Golfers in Tallahassee are looking for options with their golf membership and this will be the only golf course membership that will allow you to play more than one course for your membership, Hobbs said. Hobbs said this idea is popular in many larger cities, but something that hasnt been seen in Leon and Wakulla counties. He said after speaking with members of Summerbrooke, many said they have never played at Wildwood and many have also never been to Wakulla County. They dont know whats offered, Hobbs said. Continued on Page 3ADavid Edwards takes over as administratorRezoning of 20 commercial lots weighed by board By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netTwenty lots located directly behind Ace Hardware have been sitting vacant for almost 10 years without being developed and the owners feel if the zoning was changed from commercial to residential, those lots would sell and be developed. The owners are TFB Holdings Inc. and Beth Taff as Trustee of the Oleta Lawhon Family Trust. TFB Holdings Inc. owns 17 of the lots and the Oleta Lawhon Family Trust owns three, which are lots of the Commodore Commons Subdivision that was platted in 2002. The current zoning allows for retail, commercial of ces and restaurants. The request is to change it from C-2 to RSU-1 which allows for residential density of two dwelling units per acre and single family and mobile homes. The Wakulla County Commission heard this request at its Oct. 3 meeting. Prior to coming before the commission, the planning commission voted unanimously to recommend denial of the rezoning. County Planner Melissa Corbett said the county has had many written responses and phone calls against the rezoning. Continued on Page 3A By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter almost a year-long process, the new county administrator has nally taken over the reins. County Administrator David Edwards started on Oct. 3 taking the position previously held by Benjamin Pingree. Assistant County Administrator Tim Barden served as interim county administrator after Pingree resigned on Nov. 30, 2010. Edwards was welcomed aboard by the County Commission at its Oct. 3 meeting where Edwards was no longer seated in the audience but at the table next to County Attorney Heather Encinosa. I will do my best to keep the county at the quality and livelihood it is now, Edwards said. Edwards said he is looking forward to serving, as well as the challenge ahead. Im glad to be here, Edwards said. Weve got a lot of work to do. Im ready. Edwards said he plans to institute better control within the county administration. And ush out some ef ciencies, Edwards said. He said he doesnt have any speci c ideas of how the county can be more ef cient, but is in the process of evaluating the way it does business. Then he plans to present ideas once each area has been looked at. Right now, I dont have any preconceived notions, Edwards said. Edwards was elected to the Sopchoppy City Commission in 2009 and stepped down from that role prior to taking his new post because of possible con ict. He is known for being very outspoken and opinionated as a commissioner, as well as someone who asks a lot of questions. Because of these characteristics, there has been a lot of gossip circulating that Edwards planned to shake things up within the county, eliminating departments and employees. Edwards said he has no plans to do that because it wouldnt be fair to come in and change everything without knowing how things are being done rst. He added that the county has a good quality staff and he is looking forward to working with them. Continued on Page 3A Wakulla Station Fire ghter David Reeves offers a tempting glimpse of the stations pulled pork.PHOTOS BY HERB DONALDSON/Special to The News JENNIFER JENSENNew country administrator David Edwards. Reagan Hobbs e troubled golf course and inn in Medart is sold to Reagan Hobbs, majority owner of The Golf Club at Summerbrooke The owners believe rezoning the Crawfordville lots to residential will help them sell; some county commissioners question whether the rezoning would undermine the Town Plan Nearly a year after the resignation of Ben Pingree, and after a long back-and-forth hiring process, Edwards is at the helm of county government Im glad to be here, he tells the board at his rst meeting as administrator. Weve got a lot of work to do. Im ready. The smiling face of Faye Russell as she serves people at the fundraiser. Senior PromWar Eagles dominate Jefferson County, 33-14See Page 9A See Page 14A

PAGE 2

Continued from Page 1A We started this event for Camp Amigo, says Bill Russell, president of the Wakulla Firefighters Association. It gives the kids a chance to go to Cape San Blas for a week. Its a place where they can feel free to be themselves. Fire ghters do all the cooking and everybody has a great time. Some years ago, Tallahassee Fire ghters would attend camps offered by the Southeast Burn Foundation in Florida. One of those re ghters, Rusty Roberts, felt the need to develop a similar camp for the North Florida area, with a result of a few Tallahassee Firefighters conducting their rst camp in 2001, on Cape San Blas. Sometime later, their Childrens Burn Camp of North Florida would become a non-profit. Camp Amigo is a result of these efforts, and offers young lives a way to move beyond their physical and emotional scars into an environment that builds a network of support among their peers with similar issues. Private donations fund the camp, and the participants stay free of charge. We also do this event, continues Russell, to support the Richard Rhea Scholarship Fund. We look to nd that young person who wants to become a certi ed EMT or re ghter and offer them a scholarship towards those efforts. On Jan. 24, 2009, Fire Capt. Richard Rhea, 60, slipped on wet grass and fell onto a live powerline that had come down at the scene of a car crash. Capt. Rhea was the only re ghter to die in the line of duty in Wakulla in 35 years. The barbecue fundraiser, under the guise of food and fun, gave the public a chance to thank re ghters for their work and the lives they touch on a daily basis. In 2005 our house burned down, says Crawfordville resident, Alice Williams. We were at the hospital dealing with another emergency and nowhere near Wakulla when it happened. But the re department was right there at our house when we didnt even know what was going on. Its a blessing from God to have such wonderful people in Wakulla County to help when people are in need. Ive been a re ghter for seven years, says David Reeves, of Wakulla Station. Its the greatest feeling in the world to be around the people we serve, and to love the place where we live. Others have contributed to the safety and wellbeing of Wakulla for what some would consider a small lifetime. Ive been in it for 34 years, so for me, its been my life, says Bruce Ashley of the sheriffs department. Most people you talk to in this profession, theyre dedicated to the work and helping people. Thats why they do it. We fully believe in partnering with the community. Were all partners in keeping each other safe. Sheila Johnson is with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Mounted Posse Unit. They have 12 members, led by Capt. Harris Johnson. She and her horse, Buck, work the parades, help with crowd control and assist search and rescue missions. I love law enforcement, says Sheila, I come from a military and law enforcement family. When we use our horses, we have the advantage of being up high and can see a lot of whats going on, in case we need to send out and alert deputies or other enforcement to whats happening. Buck being a horse can part a crowd pretty quick. Some of that crowd stood close to the air-transport helicopter where Kathy Hogan and Don Spells kindly answered questions and demonstrated equipment. We supply air medical transport for surrounding counties, says Kathy. Im very blessed to save lives, to do what I love and love what I do. Even in grade school I would use acebandages on my dog. Ive always been fascinated by healing, I guess its just translated into this. As the pilot, says Don Spells, My job is to take the medical crew to wherever they need to go. We work closely with re and ambulance departments in the counties that are a part of our service area. Sometimes we have re departments that also provide ambulance service for a whole county. Our unit is based in Quincy, he says, but we serve all counties surrounding Leon and Gadsden. I apply my skills as a pilot and use them to serve and save the lives of people in need. Ive been ying helicopters for over 34 years, and doing this provides a great deal of grati cation. Jimmie Doyle and Harriet Rich are members of the Appalachee Bay Fire Department Auxiliary. Both women have been elected volunteer of the year at different times for their efforts. We build fundraisers and help make money to support them, says Doyle. We dont always make enough to buy their equipment, but all the same, we do our part so they can do theirs. Rich adds, Im here to make sure the people know that they should support these men of the re department because most of them are volunteers. These men save lives. Ive been a re ghter about 14 years, says Andrew Aries, every time we go out there we get good feedback (from the community). Sometimes its hard on my family, you know, the time you spend away. But my wife has been good enough to understand. She lets me do it because she knows that I love it. I love hearing that tone go off and haulin tail to the call, says Jeff Cybulski, a captain with the Apalachee Bay department. Ive been doing this going on six years, and my family gets nervous about the calls I go on, but they generally approve and like to know Im out there serving. The only negative thing is when people ask you, What took you so long? You can listen to more of the Smoke and Fire Barbecue Fundraiser interviews on the Wakulla Sunday Radio Program, Friday nights after Wakulla High School football game, Sunday at 4 p.m., and Monday at 8 p.m. on WAVE 94.1. Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com 1981 1981 Wakulla High School Wakulla High School Calling All Football Players, Cheerleaders, and Band Members to Attend Wakulla High SchoolTORECEIVEHALF-TIME RECOGNITIONGame time 7:30Friday,October 28at the Wakulla High School StadiumFor more information contact WHS Athletic Director Mike Smith850-926-7125 MILLENDER ACCOUNTING & TAX PREPARATIONAngelique and Bryan 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. in the Log Cabin (850) 926-8272 (850) 926-1316 Electronic Filing of Tax Returns Available (At No Extra Charge When We Prepare The Return) Accounting Tax Preparation & Planning Corporation Partnership Estate FiduciaryTax Preparation Bookkeeping Payroll Services for Businesses & IndividualsSmoke and Fire: Fire ghters hold annual barbecue fundraiser Sheila Johnson, above, of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Mounted Posse Unit on her horse, Buck. Two volunteers, Jimmie Doyle and Harriet Rich, left, enjoy the fundraiser. Pilot Don Spells relaxes next his medical helicopter. Wakulla County Judge Jill Walker and the Rev. Jeff McFalls of Medart Assembly of God were two of the judges who sampled the barbecue cooked by the re ghters. 713-001499 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95

PAGE 3

Continued from Page 1A He said he also wants to develop a long range plan for the county and implement better programs today that will bene t the county in the future. Edwards said one thing that will change is communications among departments, the commission, the other constitutional of ces and the public. Were going to change the way we communicate, Edwards said. He said he has an open door policy. Im here for the citizens, Edwards said. They are the ones paying my salary. A small couple of things have already changed within the county administration because of Edwards family ties to two county employees. His wife, Lara Beck Edwards, was the assistant to the county administrator. She resigned last week. Encinosa said in a previous meeting that Lara Edwards would no longer be able to hold that position because she cannot fall under the supervision of her husband. Because of Edwards relationship with another county employee, Bobby Roddenberry with the Parks and Recreation Department, the county changed its organizational chart to have Roddenberry report to the assistant county administrator instead of the county administrator. Edwards was chosen as the new administrator over Wakulla County resident Pam Portwood. After more than 75 applications were submitted, they were the last two standing. On June 21, the county commission voted 3 to 2, with Commissioners Lynn Artz and Mike Stewart opposing, to hire Edwards. Artz stated several times that she felt Edwards lacked the experience needed for the job, especially when the county is at a crucial time nancially. She wanted the county to expand its search and nd the best possible candidate. Stewart voted against Edwards because of questions he said he asked Edwards regarding nancial disclosure, that he said Edwards did not answer truthfully. Edwards did not ll out the financial disclosure form to run for Sopchoppy City Commission correctly. He did not list all his debts and liabilities. There were also some issues with the Internal Revenue Service revealed on his background check. At a previous meeting, Edwards said not filling out the form properly was a mistake, but he was told he would get a full disclosure packet the following year. As far as the IRS issue, Edwards said the economy collapsed and that he was in the process of resolving those issues. Prior to the vote to hire Edwards, the county had decided to start the process over. Commissioner Alan Brock was the deciding vote for both and spoke of his struggle with the decision, stating that he felt Edwards was the best choice, but had hoped for a consensus within the commission. The option to hire Edwards was brought up a second time and this time Brock voted in favor of Edwards taking over as county administrator. Following that meeting, Stewart negotiated the employment contract with Edwards and said he would continue to work with him. Edwards lives in Sopchoppy. His former position was as project manager for Allens Excavation. Prior to that, Edwards was vice president of development for Bluegreen Communities in Atlanta, Ga., from 1997 to 2008. He also worked as vice president of community development for St. Joe Company in Bay County. From 1982 to 1997, he was the vice president of development operations for Bald Head Island Limited in Bald Head Island, N.C. Edwards attended SouthWest Georgia Technical College from 1979 to 1981.www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Continued from Page 1A I love the area and the people are just fantastic, he said. Hobbs said they are currently working out the details of how to combine both golf courses. Along with the golf course, the inn was also included in the purchase. When asked if Hobbs planned to keep or sell the inn, he said he was evaluating all options, but that his main focus was on the golf course. However, Hobbs family owns the Cabot Lodge in Tallahassee so he has hotel experience as well. Thats why it was sort of a perfect t, Hobbs said. Hobbs said most of the current staff members are staying on board. I think its critical to utilize the people of Wakulla and employ as many as nancially possible, Hobbs said. He added that many of the other parties interested in purchasing the property planned to bring in their own employees and management rm, which he said concerned him. They dont see the big picture, Hobbs said. Hobbs said he thinks he will be able to get Wildwood back on track, but will need the help and support of the entire community. Even if youre not a golfer, you can support Wildwood Golf, Hobbs said. Such as visiting the restaurant, at a golf tournament fundraiser, meeting, corporate getaway, etc., he said. The golf club and inn was seized by FDIC as one of the bad loans through Wakulla Bank, which has since been taken over by Centennial Bank. Sheriff David Harvey and partners Joseph Barry and Gerald Thompson owned Wildwood prior to the bank seizing the property. Continued from Page 1A Corbett added that the proposed RSU-1 zoning district is consistent with the Comprehensive Plans Future Land Use Map designation and some surrounding parcels. She added that 17 of the lots meet the minimum lot size requirements for the proposed zone, except for lots 18 through 20. However, she pointed out that those lots could apply for a variance. Corbett also wanted to make the commission aware that the west side of the area is designated as Town Center 1 under the Crawfordville Town Plan that allows for 15 units per acre of residential density and a oor area ratio of .75 for non-residential uses. The east side is designated as an area for high density residential. If rezoned, the plan is to have single family detached homes ranging from 1,200 to 2,000 square feet, according to agent Daron Bridges. This is a great location for homes, Bridges said. Oleta Lawhon said she hasnt been able to do anything with her three lots because no one wants them. Her realtor said if the lots were changed to residential, they could be sold, she said. Maxie Lawhon said the lots are not desirable to businesses because they are located on a back street and not on Crawfordville Highway. It has not sold, Maxie Lawhon said. It has not and will not. Those against the rezoning wondered if the residential lots will cause trouble for the businesses that are already located around the area. Walter Roberts, who owns Ace Hardware, said people might complain because of noise and lights from the current businesses. A house backed up to a business, I just dont think it would work, Roberts said. Attorney Mary Ellen Davis, who represents Bush Fire Services Inc., who owns the property leased by the USDA Forest Service, said her client could possibly lose that lease because the forest service may not want to be surrounded by homes. Davis added that is no more need for residential development and the change would be inconsistent with the town plan. We worked hard on that Crawfordville town center, Davis said. Commissioner Lynn Artz agreed and said, Its critical to our future economic development. She added that the location in question is perfect for multi-use, having businesses downstairs and homes upstairs. Now that the town plan is approved and the boundaries of Crawfordville have been drawn, its time for the next step of creating incentives to get businesses to develop in downtown Crawfordville, she said. This is not the time to backtrack, Artz said. This is what this would be doing. Commissioner Alan Brock agreed and said a goal of the town plan is to encourage traf c off Highway 319 and establish grid systems. It all works together, Brock said. Commissioner Jerry Moore said the only way there will be a walkable, talkable community here in Crawfordville is if cars are taken away from people. He added that there is no demand for those lots because they are located behind businesses, off Hwy. 319, so they lose visibility. You couldnt give me those lots, Moore said. Commissioner Randy Merritt said he agrees with developing a grid system, but those lots are located in a cul-de-sac. It doesnt go anywhere, Merritt said. He suggested the county require the developer to put in a buffer between the commercial and residential lots, as well as a privacy fence. Commissioner Mike Stewart agreed with Merritt and said those commercial lots are in a residential area. Corbett said the problem with making the developer ins tall a buffer is that those types of requirements happen during the separation of lots, or platting, which has already taken place. County Attorney Heather Encinosa said if the county wants to require that of the developer, she would like to explore it further and gure out how to make it legally binding. Since it was already platted, there is no real way to enforce it, she said. She recommended the commission table the item. Encinosa said she would like to get everyone on the same page and come to an agreement then bring the item back to the board. Maxie Lawhon wondered why the commission couldnt vote for the rezoning with the stipulation of the buffer included and then everyone could work out the details without having to come back before the commission. Artz said if the attorney was recommending to table the item, she would like to follow her advice. Moore said, Its not always necessary to have the attorney draw the plans. Ultimately, the commission voted unanimously to table the item. These are the things that get us in the most trouble, Stewart said.Wildwood has new ownerDavid Edwards takes over as administratorRezoning of 20 commercial lots is weighed by board SOURCE: Wakulla Planning Department The Crawfordville lots being consideration for rezoning. FILE PHOTOSigns outside Wildwoood Golf Club last winter.NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on October 17, 2011 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.OCTOBER 6, 2011 The Wakulla County Code Enforcement Board will hold a Public Hearing on October 12, 2011, at 5:30pm in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and participate. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Office at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGOCTOBER 6, 2011

PAGE 4

Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out Comment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Staff Writer/Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ......................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising/Photographer: Lynda Kinsey .................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Bookkeeping/Circulation: Sherry Balchuck .......accounting@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Hazel Imperiale obituary Sheriffs Report: Sept. 15 Hal Arlen Council obituary Nathan Thompson Sr. obituary New issues arise over tourism plan Donnie Crum appointed interim sheriff thewakullanews.com READERS WRITE:Editor, The News: On Aug. 17, I wrote to the Wakulla County commissioners and Property Appraiser about the new taxes levied on my property in northern Wakulla County. I explained to them that my house, built in 1908 by my grandfather, Jake Miller, and great uncle, Bob Miller, is split on the Leon-Wakulla line. The only access to Wakulla County proper is through Woodville, which is my legal residence. In the letter, I explained that my garbage is picked up weekly by Waste Management on the Leon County side and that any Fire-EMS comes from Woodville, less than two miles away. And the Leon County dump site is only three miles away. Why should I be billed these extra taxes if I do not use or need what Im being taxed on? If the county commissioners want to see for themselves, I will be more than happy to set up a meeting. Just give me a call at 322-6014. As of yet, I have not heard one word from anyone. Daniel C. McGee Woodville Editor, The News: On Friday, Sept. 23, my family lost one of its oldest members, my father, Nathan Thompson Sr. He had been anxiously awaiting his 90th birthday, which would have been Oct. 7, only two weeks away. I have always loved to cook, and when daddy became bedridden, I decided to cook anything that I remotely thought he may enjoy eating. I cook much like my late mother, Louise Crum Thompson, who was daddys wife of 58 years. She passed on to meet our Heavenly Father on Christmas Eve of 2000. I would strive to make appetizing food and carried it to Alligator Point, where he has lived for the past nine years, with his second wife, Dee. On Aug. 30, my baby brother Larry, who is 63 years young, had back surgery. My brother Nathan Jr. (Buddy) took daddy to the hospital to see Larry, in a wheelchair. On Sept. 1, Dee fell and broke her hip and she was also hospitalized. Buddy took daddy a couple of times to the hospital in a wheelchair to see her, but that became too exhausting for daddy, considering his advanced stage of cancer. With Dee also in the hospital, Buddy moved in with daddy at Alligator Point and cared for him much better than any well-trained nurse could have. I took food to both of them, and Buddys soul mate, Katie, stayed busy running at all hours, fetching whatever was needed. Daddy remained with a sharp mind and memory, right up until the day before his death. Daddys philanthropy will be missed. He always grew a garden. He gave the vegetables away. It was common to see his truck loaded with fresh vegetables or sh, sometimes taking them as far away as Sopchoppy or Crawfordville to people he knew. His garden sits empty today. Buddy moved daddy to his and Katies home in Crawfordville, where Buddy would lie at night on the bed beside the hospital bed, holding daddys hand, while daddy slept, never leaving his side. I have to smile when I think of Buddys nursing tactics with Daddy. The best term that I can think of, is tough love. Worried that daddy wouldnt eat enough to sustain life, Buddy would sit beside him, spooning soft food, saying, Daddy, youve gotta eat this. It cost a lot of money, and you dont want to waste it. The point that I want to get across in this letter is the determination to make his father live, against all odds, were lost Friday morning. Thank you, Buddy, from the bottom of my heart. We were so blessed to have you to serve as daddys nurse. Daddy had the very best of loving care. Also, a great big thank you to the Hospice caregivers, the Rev. BB Barwick, especially Katie, and all of our friends and loved ones who stood by our sides, throughout our recent need. Helen Vaughn Panacea By RITA HANEY It occurs to me that raising children today is more dif cult than ever. When I was a child, I could roam my neighborhood playing with friends. We walked to school, came home for lunch and played outside until the street lights came on. Sometime either before or after there was homework and chores. Life seemed so much simpler then. Now we are bombarded with information 24/7. We have round tables and square tables. We have information, we have facts, we have everything at the tip of our ngers. Sometimes this information directly opposes what we heard yesterday. I started a Goggle search (and I love Goggle) to learn the symptoms of mental illness and my choices for gathering information were endless. As a psychotherapist, I am often concerned regarding the use of medicine on young children and teens. And yet young children and teens do not only hurt themselves with behaviors such as cutting, they have committed suicide. Medication is one component for treating such illnesses as bi-polar, depression, anxiety and any other diagnoses that may crop up. Like diabetes, mental illness needs to be controlled with behavior changes and medication. Support Groups at large hospitals for diabetics is common. Counseling for children diagnosed with a mental illness such as depression, bi-polar disorder or ADHD should also be considered. ADHD is a common diagnosis today and there is a great article stating that ADHD diagnoses often cover for a more serious illness such as major depression. This article was written by a father whose child had committed suicide and his hope was to stop this tragedy from happening at another home. The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry reports about 5 percent of children and adolescent suffer from depression. Raising happy and healthy children takes time and it seems the more time saving devices we have the faster time ies. The National Alliance for Mental Illness (NAMI) is both motivated and has a strong desire for parents and teachers the front line of defense for our children and our future to receive information on the signs and symptoms of mental illness and what resources and interventions are available in our community. On Oct. 26, Crawfordville Elementary School is offering a day of training targeted at bringing community resources together with teachers and parents. For more information, please call 926-1033 (NAMI Wakulla) or principal Tanya English 926-0065 ex. 252. Rita Haney, MSW, LCSW is a social worker in Crawfordville.Editor, The News: Thank you, thank you, thank you, Wakulla County! Because of your generosity, the Friends of the Library was able to raise more than $3,000 during our rst silent auction. All of the money we are able to provide is then matched by public funds, so we have actually provided more than $6,000 toward our wonderful library services. We had more than 118 businesses and individuals donate items to be auctioned off and at least 75 people participated in the bidding. It was really above our expectations! Since we are budgeted to provide the library with over $20,000 each year (before the matching funds are calculated), expect us to be active in our efforts. The legislature has cut our budget substantially in recent years, as it has most government programs, and were trying to pick up the slack. In March, we will begin our annual membership drive. Some of you may get letters from us. Others will see the membership forms in the library lobby. Please consider joining. There are a number of levels according to your ability to contribute. We are also looking for new active members. Please contact us if we can answer any questions. Thanks again. Sue Belford President, Friends of the Library friendswakullalibrary@gmail.comSchools and NAMI partner to help raise healthy kids ank you for standing behind the library What am I being charged for in Woodville? Property appraisers o ce does a good jobEditor, The News: Recently I needed property record assistance and the Wakulla Property Appraisers of ce was cheerfully and professionally helpful. The taxpayers are getting their moneys worth from this of ce. Mike Carter CrawfordvilleSheri Harvey helped a lot of peopleEditor, The News: The rain has not washed all your footprints away. Thirty- ve years is a very long time to serve people. Wakulla County has come a long way in those years. You have done enough good work to out-balance that which was not good. I remember Sheriff Harvey in his first election walking through our neighborhood and going houseto-house for a long time. He said, I want to be your sheriff, Ill do my best and you have done a good job. There is an old saying that behind every good man is a good woman. Rhonda Harvey has been that good lady. She is an elect lady. Sheriff Harvey helped a lot of people. He made history many times. You gave your younger life to the people of Wakulla County and others. Your work will speak for you. As I said many times, you have never changed. Thirty- ve years is a long time. Good luck to you and your family. You are in our prayers. Mother Ethel Skipper Sopchoppy Support of Smoke and Fire is appreciatedEditor, The News: The organizers of the Smoke and Fire barbecue competition and charity fundraiser want to thank all of the people that made the event a success. Without all of our sponsors, workers and the citizens that came out to eat great food, we could not continue to support our charities. The teams in the competition were Wakulla Station VFD, Appalachee Bay VFD, Medart VFD, Panacea VFD, Ochlockonee Bay VFD, Crawfordville VFD, Riversink VFD, the Wakulla County paid re ghters, St. Marks Powder, St. Marks Refuge re ghters, Tallahassee Fire Department and two teams from the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce. Ticket sales and food serving was organized by the Ochlockonee Bay Firebelles. One volunteer, Jim Feltgen Riversink VFD, gets special mention because he brought in so many raf e prizes and donations. Air Methods brought in a med-evac helicopter for display and that was very much appreciated. Wakulla Urgent Care had a booth to give free blood pressure and blood sugar checks as a community service. Thank you to our judges: David Harvey (retired sheriff), Dave Edwards (county administrator), Heather Enscinosa (county attorney), the Rev. Jeff McFalls (Medart Assembly of God), Father Ed Jones (St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church), Genieve Jones (Wakulla Christian Coalition), William Snowden (The Wakulla News), Guinn Haskins (Wakulla Area Times) and Wakulla County Judge Jill Walker. These are community minded people that gave up their time to help make this event a success. The charities will each receive $2,000. The charities are the Richard Rhea Scholarship Fund and Camp Amigo Childrens Burn Camp. Community support for events like this makes Wakulla County a great place to live. I am sure I have forgotten to mention someone so I will just say thanks to everyone involved. Bill Russell Wakulla County United Fire ghters AssociationPromise Lands thrift store should do wellEditor, The News: Promise Land has done a great job with their thrift stores. I was so impressed with their hard work. Im glad that they utilized the property on Highway 319. I think they will do very well there. God bless Promise Land and all their hard working and dedicated people. I hope that every one locally will do what they can to provide donated items and use our new and established businesses to keep Wakulla County strong. Mary Pitts Panacea Tourism and TDC are great for countyEditor, The News: Tourism and TDC are great for our county. So lets stop complaining, and start helping. Lets use the time we would use writing bad things about TDC and Pam (Portwood), its director, and start volunteering time working for the county and all its great organizations so we can continue to make our county even greater. I know a tourist who came to this county in 2001 and loved it so much he came back, and rented a home, and bought some land, and then built a home, and then started a company, and then hired Wakulla citizens to work at his company. Then he started volunteering to serve the county. And he brought more people to Wakulla, who loved it too, and more businesses were bought and opened, and more citizens were hired. Then he bought another home, a second one, for rental, and brought some more folks from Tallahassee who were tourists too, and they loved it, and they bought weekend retreats vacation homes. And then another friend of the rst tourist bought another home. And the rst tourist, now a resident of the county, volunteered his time to the local re department and became a board member and of cer for that re department, And so on and so on. That tourist was me. And tourists turn visitors into regular visitors, and then residents and taxpayers, and volunteers and business owners employing Wakulla citizens, and they serve on our boards and in our civic organizations. Now my anc is moving to the county to start her life here, because she loved it too. And she will work here, and another business will get started and more tax dollars to the county and more employees will be hired, and so on. The public could have showed up at the TDC forum to complain, but they showed up to work, and to provide ideas, and to make the TDC better and stronger. Words are cheap; actions speak louder than words, lets all volunteer to make this county better and stronger. And thanks to all those who do volunteer, its a privilege to work side by side with you every week and month. I am in awe at your commitment to this county. Its one of the reasons I never want to leave. And thank you, Pam, for all you do! Michael J. Weltman Decade long resident, former tourist anks, brother, for caring for daddy Follow us on

PAGE 5

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 Page 5ABarbara Ann MolzahnBarbara Ann Molzahn, 79, of Crawfordville, died on Sept. 30, surrounded by family. She was born Oct. 31, 1931, in Phillipsburg, Kan., the second child of the late Cora and Frank Torres. On Dec. 26, 1961, she married Lee Molzahn. She greatly enjoyed church activities and spending time with her friends listening to the music provided at the Senior Center. A memorial service was held Tuesday, Oct. 4, at the Church of Latter Day Saints in Crawfordville. Survivors include her loving husband, Lee; one son; two step-sons; one daughter; one step-daughter; seven grandsons; nine granddaughters; five great-grandsons, twelve great-granddaughters; and one great-great grandson. She was preceded in death by a daughter. Arrangements are being handled by Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. ( 850-926-3333 or bevisfh. com).Jessie Lou S. RakerJessie Lou Strickland Raker, 86, of Crawfordville, died on Saturday, Oct. 1. She was born on March 6, 1925, in DeFuniak Springs. She lived most of her adult life in Tallahassee, before moving to Crawfordville in 1987. She was of the Pentecostal Holiness Faith. A funeral service was held on Tuesday, Oct. 4, at the Church Faith Holiness House of Prayer with private family burial at Whiddon Lake Cemetery. Friends were received from 10 a.m. until the service. Survivors include a son, Carlos (Marcia) Raker of Crawfordville; two daughters, Glinda Raker of Crawfordville and Patricia (Charles) Rodgers of Bainbridge, Ga.; 11 grandchildren; 17 great-grandchildren; and eight great-great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, J.K. Raker; and a daughter, Betty Vernell Raker. Independent Funeral Home in Quincy was in charge of the arrangements.Joseph A. SmithJoseph Andrew Smith, 48, of Crawfordville, died on Tuesday, Sept. 27, in Tallahassee. He was a lifelong resident of Crawfordville. He lived a full and happy life and he was loved. Family received friends on Thursday, Sept. 29, at Bevis Funeral Home, HarveyYoung Chapel in Crawfordville. Graveside services were held Friday, Sept. 30, at Revell Cemetery in Sopchoppy. In lieu of owers contributions may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308 Survivors include his sister, Attie, who took care of Joseph since 1995, and her husband Doug, who has been a part of the family since 2000; and numerous brothers and sisters and nieces and nephews. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville was in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333) www.bevisfh. com.Medart Area Crawfordville Area SopchoppyWakulla Worship Centers religious views and events ChurchObituaries Wakulla StationBarbara Ann Molzahn Jessie Lou Strickland Raker Joseph Andrew SmithChurch News Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 Grief RECOVERY for parents who have lost a childFor more information call Gigi Cavallaro at 850-926-6011. Coastal Funeral Home, Inc.551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Dignied Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES Tallahassee Wakulla United Methodist Church has several upcoming events: Busy Bee Quilters will meet on Thursday, Oct. 6 at 9 a.m. at the church, 1584 Old Woodville Road, 421-5741. United Methodist Mens Meeting and Breakfast will be held on Saturday, Oct. 8, at 8 a.m. at the church. Chancel Choir Practice will be held on Sunday, Oct. 9 at 4:30 p.m. at the church. Praise Team Practice will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 11, at 6 p.m. at the church. Bead Making Class will be held Oct. 15 at 10 a.m. at the churchs Fellowship Hall. Lunch will be provided. Please call the church of ce 421-5741 for reservations and further details.Some upcoming events at Wakulla United Methodist ChurchCathy Adkison is new president of Big Bend HospiceSpecial to The NewsBob Inzer, chairman of the Big Bend Hospice Board of Directors, recently announced the selection of Cathy Adkison as the new president and chief executive of cer of Big Bend Hospice. We are excited that Cathy has come to Tallahassee to lead Big Bend Hospice, Inzer said. Her extensive experience in nursing and management, especially in the hospice and home nursing arena, is outstanding. Adkison came to the Big Bend area from Alabama where she was a senior vice president of operations for a large home health and hospice provider serving more than 54 counties. She is a registered nurse and holds a Bachelor of Science in nursing, as well as certi cation in Hospice and Home Care Administration. Adkison has 30 years of nursing experience. Twentysix of those years are in administrative and management positions. Cathy brings to our organization a wealth of clinical and management expertise in the eld of palliative care, and a great passion for the difficult, yet immensely rewarding task of helping patients and their loved ones nd comfort and peace during the most dif cult of times, Inzer said. Since opening in 1983, Big Bend Hospice has cared for thousands of area patients. Last year alone they provided 128,404 total days of patient care and drove over a million miles to support patients in the eightcounty Big Bend region. Big Bend Hospice care is delivered by more than 200 full and part-time staff members, supported by more than 300 volunteers to patients in their homes and at the Hospice House. In addition, 2,800 hospice families and 600 community members received bereavement support through Big Bend Hospice bereavement support groups. Your hometown Hospice, Big Bend Hospice has deep roots here in the community. A local care team consisting of a Hospice physician, an experienced RN, a family counselor, a home health aide, board certi ed music therapist, a chaplain and trained volunteers are offered to every patient to help guide them through lifes most challenging journey. For more information on hospice services call (850) 878-5310. FOUR FAMILY SERVING YOUR FAMILY Direct Cremation $895.00 Traditional Funeral Starting at $4695.00(Includes: Metal 20 Gauge Steel Casket (4 colors to choose from), Vault, Open and Close of Grave, Graveside or Church Service with one night of visitation, Register Book and Memorial Folders).Dedicated to serving you and your family in your time of need, Providing the most affordable services in the area.Family Owned and Operated H. M. Hank Forbes Jr. Licensed Funeral Director/Owner Dana Forbes Hawke Forbes 1171 South 6th Street Macclenny, Florida 32063Ph: 850-559-3380Forbes Funeral Home Big Bend Hospices president and CEO Cathy Adkison.

PAGE 6

Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comhappeningsCommunityTail Wagger...By JOAN HENDRIXCHAT PresidentOctober is a special time of year when pumpkins start popping up, Halloween comes around for trick or treating and we start seeing beautiful colored falling leaves. October is also Adopta-Shelter-Dog Month and Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment (CHAT) is extending an invitation to all of you to come visit our animals and adopt a homeless pet to share your life and home. There are so many friendly, talented, loving dogs that would touch your heart and make your house a home. All across our nation, shelters and adoption centers are promoting the adoption of shelter dogs in need of a permanent home. In conjunction with all of the other non-pro t organizations, CHAT is reducing our adoption fees for purebreds from $200 to $150, puppies from $150 to $125, adult dogs from $125 to $100 and reducing the cost of our senior dogs from $75 to $50. These fees include an initial health examination, spaying/neutering, micro chipping, rabies vaccinations, all vaccinations up to date, worming, a small bag of dog food and one month of free pet insurance. If youve never owned a dog, now is the time to visit and spend some quality time with one that strikes your fancy. Weve got puppies, small dogs, medium-size dogs, large dogs, couch potato dogs, energetic dogs and lap dogs. Weve got dogs to t almost every personality and youll be amazed how easy it is to love a dog. Youll have an opportunity to walk several of your choice in a special fenced area where you can remove their leash and let them run with you or play ball or just sit down and have an eyeto-eye conversation. These are faithful, loving dogs that just need a home and some love. We, who volunteer at CHAT, see something very special every time a dog is adopted and led out the door to the waiting car that will take them home. These dogs know what is happening and you can see smiles on their faces. It is absolutely amazing to watch. Dogs are so much more intelligent than people realize and can sense so much about their surroundings. Please come and visit us at CHAT, 1 Oak Street in Crawfordville. Our phone number is 926-0890. Give one of these homeless dogs a second chance for love and life. You will be so glad that you did and youll be coming back for more! These homeless dogs have so much to give, so what are you waiting for? Special to The News The Wakulla County Extension Of ce is asking for volunteer mentors for a new program that will be implemented the Master Money Mentor (MMM) Program. The goal is to train people who are interested in the topic, but need knowledge and skills in order to assist others. Training dates are Nov. 8-10, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville. Ten participants will receive 20 hours of training, will return that with 50 hours of service and will help families by providing free help with their household nances in these challenging times. The cost of this project is $20 per person and includes a background check and lunches. Materials for the program are provided through the University of Florida/ IFAS Extension and funded through a Bank of America foundation grant. Most Master Money Mentors must complete the entire training program and background check before becoming certi ed as a MMM. If you are a trained professional in an aspect of money management, attendance at the last day of the training is all that would be required. While every familys nancial picture is different, Money Mentors can help in three important areas: assisting families as they make spending and savings plans, helping them analyze their credit behavior and limit debt, and encouraging families to be proactive with lenders when problems arise. Please contact Shelley Swenson at sswenson@u edu or (850) 926-3931 for information, to receive an application and plan on being part of this new project. Additional information is also available at our website, wakulla.ifas.u .edu. Brittany Renee Blakeslee and Trey Vause, both of Crawfordville, announce their engagement. She is the daughter of Dale and Christina Blakeslee of Crawfordville. He is the son of Chuck and Tracy Vause of Sopchoppy. Bride-elects grandmother is Gerry Conlon of Margaretville N.Y. The groom-elects grandparents are Bobby and Loraine Vause of Sopchoppy. The bride-elect graduated from Tallahassee Community Colleges RN program last April and is currently a nurse at Tallahassee Medical Hospital. The groom-elect is a superintendent at Harts eld Construction. The wedding date is March 17, 2012 at Gin Greek Plantation in Moultire, Ga. Trey Vause and Brittany Renee Blakeslee Volunteers sought for money mentor program ose interested can attend training available for $20 and will take place Nov. 8-10 from at the extension o ceVause will wed BlakesleeHappy rst birthday, IsabellaIsabella Grace Hopkins will celebrate her first birthday on Oct. 7. She is the daughter of Brandon and Amber Hopkins of Crawfordville. Her maternal grandparents are Kathy ODonnell of Lodi, Ohio, and Bryan Askey of Mansifield, Ohio. Her paternal grandparents are Hollis Hopkins and Pauline Giddens of Crawfordville. Her maternal greatgrandparents are Jim and June Askey of Mansi eld, Ohio. Her paternal greatgrandparents are Paul and Edith Giddens of Crawfordville. Isabella HopkinsFire ghters o er a Fire Safety Checklist Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints FORENROLLMENT No Enrollment Fee We Accept Babies 6 weeks 5 years Also offering After School Programs for All Ages YOURE A STAR AT Miriams Playhouse850-926-2273 Miriams PlayhouseEnrichment Center1773 Crawfordville Hwy., located between Dollar General store and North Pointe Center CRAWFORDVILLENOWOPEN St Marks River Cantina(850) 925-9908 Halloween Party & Costume ContestAnd Karaoke Saturday, October 29, 2011 7 pm 11 pm59 Port Leon Dr, Saint Marks, Fl 32355 MON-THURS. 10 am 10 pm SAT-SUN 10 am 11 pm Come dressed as your favorite spook! McClendon Auto Service, LLCFree EstimatesSpecializing in:Owned and operated by Fred McClendon 10 years experienceMV#66653Brak es Batteries Radia tors Wat er Pum ps Hub Be arings Star ters Alte rnators and mor e!MOBILE AUTO REPAIR850-933-4093 THE CABINET SHOPTHECABINET SHOP Custom Kitchens&Counter Tops Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) During National Fire Prevention Week, Oct. 9-15, your Wakulla County re ghters encourage all county residents to focus attention on re prevention. Most potential hazards can be addressed with a little common sense. For example, be sure to keep ammable items like bedding, clothes and curtains at least three feet away from portable heaters or lit candles, and never smoke in bed. Fire Safety Checklist: Install and maintain a working smoke alarm outside of every sleep area and remember to change the batteries at least twice a year. A rule of thumb reminder is to change the batteries when time changes in the Fall and Spring. Designate two escape routes from each bedroom and practice them regularly. Teach everyone the Stop, Drop, and Roll technique in case clothing catches re. Teach children that matches, lighters and candles are tools, not toys. If you suspect that a child is playing with re, check under beds and in closets for telltale signs like burned matches. Matches and lighters should be stored in a secure drawer or cabinet. If you have any questions about re prevention techniques, please contact your nearest volunteer re department or the Wakulla County Fire Rescue Department in Crawfordville.

PAGE 7

By MICHAEL PELTIER and LILLY ROCKWELLTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 3 Citing insuf cient tax revenue and previous debt, economists on Monday said the state will have no money available to sell new bonds for school construction next year. A panel of state economists slashed estimates for available school construction money by $267 million for 2012, leaving educators with about $113 million in new cash available for building for the scal year that begins July 1. Bonding, which is typically used to construct new buildings and renovate older ones, is not an option for the upcoming year. The following year is even worse, the revenue estimating conference predicted. Projections for the 2013 scal year were reduced by $410 million, a 45-percent cut from the estimates made after the legislative session earlier this year. State university system of- cials said this means going to a bare-bones wish list of mainly repair and maintenance over shiny new classrooms or laboratory space. Economists say the school building program, which is funded largely through collection of utility taxes, is being hit by a double whammy. Tough economic times have taken many customers off the electricity grid. Shuttered businesses, languid manufacturing and vacant homes dont generate tax revenue. But the building fund is also being affected by longer term trends as consumers responding to high energy costs by purchasing energy ef cient appliances and changing habits that reduce consumption. The magnitude of the change in the forecast took some key lawmakers by surprise Monday. Sen. Evelyn Lynn, R-Ormond Beach, and chairwoman of the Senate higher education budget subcommittee, said lawmakers were anticipating a downward projection, but Mondays cut surpassed their expectations. State bond nance of cials are scheduled to sell $150 million in Public Education Capital Outlay, or PECO, bonds in November from a 2010 authorization. Another $100 million is slated to be sold in February, but Baker said the second sale may not go forward if the amount of outstanding debt exceeds the states ability to make payments. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 Page 7Aeducation news from local schoolsSchool Special to The News Be sure to attend this years Fall Festival at Shadeville Elementary School. It will be held on the school grounds on Saturday, Oct. 15 from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. This year promises to be even better than previous years. We have worked on creating some new booths for the children to enjoy. Come and let them create their own sand crafts, or dig for sand treasures. They can also play hula hoops, roller racers, laser tag, and much, much more. Dont miss our famous bingo, or the new and exciting performance of the Polynesian Fire Knife Dancers. There will be lots to eat and drink. The Wakulla County Volunteer Firefighters will be preparing hotdogs, hamburgers and sausage dogs for the food booth, and you cant miss the cake walk, soda walk, nachos and cheese booth or The Sweet Shop. This is the only fundraiser that is put on by the hardworking Shadeville PTO. Funds have been used to upgrade necessary equipment and enhance the students overall educational experience. Thanks to our many business partners and parents, we look forward to another successful festival. We hope to see you there. Students enjoy the hayride at last years Fall Festival.Shadeville gearing up for fall festival On Friday, Oct. 7 at 9:30 a.m., the 4-H youth at Riversink Elementary School will join millions of young people across the nation to become scientists for the day during the fourth annual 4-H National Youth Science Day (NYSD). As part of 4-H NYSD, youth will participate in Wired for Wind: the 2011 National Science Experiment, which will demonstrate how young people can implement alternatives to traditional energy production and have a positive impact on their communities and ecosystems. They will also be discussing wind energy technologies and the positive impact of alternative energy sources on the environment. -To combat a national shortage of young people pursuing science college majors and occupations, and to enhance the nations contribution to the sciences, 4-H NYSD demonstrates that science, engineering, math and technology are fun and attainable options for college degrees and future careers. Currently, more than five million young people across the nation participate in 4-H science, engineering, technology and applied math year-long programming. Through the One Million New Scientists, One Million New Ideas campaign, 4-H is working toward a bold goal to engage one million new young people in science, engineering, technology and applied math programs by the year 2013. To request more information or to RSVP to attend, please contact Sherri Kraeft at sjkraeft@ u .edu or 926-3931 They will also be displaying the experiment at the Stone Crab Festival on Oct. 22 at the 4-H booth.Science experiments will be held at Riversink Elementary on Oct. 7Economists slash 2012 education capital outlay estimate by $267 million TC C WAKULL A CENTEROFFERING TCLASSE SOct 6, 13, 6-9p.m. $25 Oct 20, 6-9p.m. $25 EXC E October 27, 6-9 p.m. $25 EXC E November 3, 6-9 p.m. $25ECOTOURISMCLASSESLOCALGEOLOGICAL FEATURES Oct 13, 6-9 p.m. $20 FORESTFIELD T LEONSINKS Oct 16, 1-5 p.m. $40 FLORIDAARCHAEOLOGY ANDPR E Oct 20, 6-9 p.m. $20 FORESTFIELD T WAKULLASINKS Oct 23, 1 p.m. $40For a complete class schedule visit:www.workforce.tcc..edu/WakullaFor more information:(850)922-6290|mackiek@tcc..edu Come Join the Fun at Shadeville Elementarys Annual Fall Festival! TICKETS at T REATSCome see some CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNED JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926 or 510 T IRED ?RUNDOWN? FEELING M a n a t e e T i m e s Statewide advertisingone low priceReach a wide audience (850) 926-7102 TheWakullanews

PAGE 8

Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team viewsSports Calyn Stevens, an eighth grade student at Wakulla Middle School, received the honor of being selected for the 2011-2012 Cinch Rodeo Team for the Junior High Division of the Georgia High School Rodeo Association. She was also awarded the honor of being selected out of four candidates for the Academic Team, where she had the highest average in core classes. Being selected for these two teams allowed Stevens to be placed on the Elite Rodeo Team where only one boy and one girl are selected. Congratulations, Calyn Stevens! Coach Travis Bolin began his tenure as the physical education coach at Wakulla Christian School back in August. Bolin grew up in Pensacola and attended Pace High School. He moved to Tallahassee at the age of 18 and attended Tallahassee Community College, then Florida State University where he earned a bachelors degree in physical education. His coaching experience includes ve years of mens collegiate basketball at TCC as an assistant under Eddie Barnes. This is his second year at Wakulla Christian School and rst year as the physical education instructor. He and his wife, Amanda, are expecting their rst child in February. By JOE JACOBSRMS CoachRMS running back Monterious Loggins just had a brand new baby sister born into the world, and he wanted to welcome her in a big way. So when Riversprings played at Taylor County on Thursday, Sept. 29, the new big brother gashed the bulldog defense with a 60yard run on the very rst play from scrimmage. Loggins would finish the night with nine carries for 123 yards and a touchdown. Loggins back eld mates Demarcus Lindsey and Sebastian Garner also ran wild in Perry. Lindsey had ve carries for 88 yards and one touchdown, while Garner added 59 yards on just three carries. Marquis Hutchison added a 17 yard touchdown run, and Keith Gavin pitched in a TD gallop of 20 yards. The Bear running attack piled up 360 yards rushing in the game. RMS also had a 21 yard touchdown pass from Feleip Franks to Jacobs Austin. Riversprings defense also played a great game. Although Taylor County scored on their second play in the game, RMS Lights Out defense did exactly that: turned the lights out on the Taylor County offensive game. RMS was led in tackles by Keith Gavin, Antonio Morris and Monterious Loggins. Loggins had three tackles for a loss in the contest. According to Head Coach Joey Jacobs, It has been a while since we played a game. We showed a little ring rust, but we got our bearings back pretty quickly. The Bears were scheduled to be back in action on Tuesday, Oct. 4 at home against WR Tolar. By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach On Saturday, Oct. 1, Wakulla High School cross country and community runners gathered at Azalea Park for the rst Ignite the Fight 5K. The race was directed by Sherri and Jason Roberts and sponsored primarily by local businesses, Anytime Fitness, Regions Construction and Rainbow International. The race was part of a fundraising effort that included a golf tournament, awards dinner and the 5K race with the proceeds earmarked for the Wakulla County Fire ghters Association for training and the purchase of equipment. Saturday was an open race date for the WHS runners, but rather than sleep in, a number of them showed up to take advantage of the cool weather and at, fast course. Approximately 100 runners competed in the 3.1 mile race. By the one-mile mark, three former WHS runners had separated from the rest of the eld and it was clear that the overall and male winner would come from that group. This group included 2011 graduates Josh Dismuke and Shawn Morris and 2010 graduate Adam Carr. The womens winner was also decided by this point, as current WHS runner Marty Wiedeman had a solid lead over the chase group of teammates Lydia Wiedeman and Raychel Gray Dismuke, Morris and Carr continued to battle each other over the next two miles, with Dismuke gradually opening a gap on the other two and holding the lead to the nish. He nished in a new personal record (PR) of 18:15 with Carr capturing second place in 18:36 and Morris nishing third in 18:50. Community runner James Taylor also cracked the 19:00 barrier and nished in fourth place in 18:58. As expected, Wiedeman built on her lead and nished as the overall womens winner in the excellent time of 21:05. Gray and Lydia Wiedeman, Martys younger sister, continued to battle for second place, with Gray ultimately winning the battle and nishing second in 23:01, with Lydia close behind in 23:14. The rst and second place male and female runners received awards, as well as the oldest runner, Mike Moss, 72 years young, and the youngest runner, 8-year-old Molly Jones. On a related note, WHS freshman Mitchell Atkinson traveled to Jacksonville with his dad, Michael, and Assistant Cross Country Coach Greg James to compete in the annual Jacksonville Marine Corp Races. While his dad and Coach James competed in the half marathon, Mitchell ran the accompaning 5K and nished rst out of 119 runners in the 19 and under age group in a new PR of 19:37. Coach James nished 12th of 147 in the 4044 age group in the half marathon in the good time of 1:32:47 and Michael Atkinson ran 1:59:02. The WHS Cross Country teams will compete this Saturday at the Cougar Invitational at Phipps Park in Tallahassee, with the rst race starting at 8 a.m. By RICHARD LAWHONSpecial to The NewsOn Sept. 27, the Lady War Eagles traveled to Rickards High School to play their third district game of the season. The Lady War Eagles came out playing very strong in the first game winning 25-10. As they started the second game, the Lady War Eagles became a little complacent, but still won 25-14. Going into the third game, the Lady War Eagles appeared to be ready to go home and won this game 25-9. The key players for this game were Ashley Roberts with 5 kills and 3 aces, Chelsea Carroll with 12 assists and 17 aces and Emily Haley with 4 kills and 2 blocks. The Lady War Eagles improved to 3-0 in district play. On Sept. 29, the Lady War Eagles hosted Lincoln High School in a hard-fought, but heartbreaking loss. The Lady War Eagles started the first game a little lazily losing 10-25. During the second game, the Lady War Eagles began to want to win, playing very well on defense, but still not executing on offense, losing 17-25. Moving into the third game the Lady War Eagles fought very hard to try and keep the match alive, but the Lady Trojans were not giving up easily. After a hard-fought third game, the Lady War Eagles were still defeated 18-25. The key players of this game were Ashley Roberts with 6 kills, Breighly Bolton with 5 digs, Chelsea Carroll with 11 assists and 7 digs, Marina Petrandis with 4 kills and 8 digs and Jordan Pryor with 5 digs. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCalyn Stevens was chosen for the Cinch Rodeo Team.RODEOStevens receives awardsCROSS COUNTRYRunners descend on Azalea ParkVOLLEYBALL MIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALLLady War Eagles beat Rickards, fall to LincolnTravis Bolin is PE coach at Wakulla ChristianRMS keeps rolling at Taylor CountyCoach Travis Bolin ASHLEY FEEDSTOREOPEN 7 DAYSAWEEKFROM 9 A.M. 6 P.M. 8056 WAKULLA SPRINGSROAD( 850 ) 421-7703Complete line of Animal FeedBuck Stop and Midway 20 Deer Pellets. Full Line of pasture and wildlife mixes. TheWorks coffeeespressolatts cappuccinofrapps andnowBAGELS! Monday-Friday630am-900pm Saturday8am-9pm Sunday12-5pm 27FAzaleaDrBehindBealls850.253.7253www.theworkscafe.com 2 0 1 1 S t a rt u p B u s i n e s s o f t h eY e a r! Youve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF the EATIN patha monthly page inThe Wakuulanews blocking,cleaning, restoration Bandannas 2.00 incl. taxofHATS PANACEA HATSAFACT San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOyst ers Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Huttons Seafood & More 570-1004

PAGE 9

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsWar Eagles dominate Jefferson County, 33-14By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIt wasnt even as close as the score made it appear. The Wakulla War Eagles were up 33-0 in the third quarter, and let off the pressure. The Jefferson County Tigers scored two quick touchdowns near the end of the game to at least make the score look respectable. But the War Eagles, who improved to 2-2, dominated the game especially through the air, with a passing attack that the Tigers couldnt stop. The game, played Friday, Sept. 30, at Reynolds Stadium, also marked Senior Night for members of the Class of 2012 on the football team, cheerleaders and band. Wakulla Head Coach Scott Klees noted that it was appropriate that five seniors scored on Senior Night: Will Thomas, Evan McCoy, Marshane Godbolt, Demonta Morris and Conner Smith. Were de nitely happy about our seniors, Klees said, noting that the upperclassmen are the team leaders. It was a good win for us, Klees said. After a couple of losses, Klees said it looked like the team was back on track. The most noticeable improvement, he said, the defense started hitting again. THE GAME Wakullas rst offensive series was marred by several penalties, and then a sack of quarterback Caleb Stephens had the War Eagles facing a third down and forever. But a long pass to Lyntonio Bowdry down to near the goal line set up a Will Thomas two-yard run for a touchdown. With the extra point by Conner Smith, Wakulla was up 7-0. Evan McCoy scored a touchdown on a pass play. Wakulla went for a twopoint conversion but the attempt failed. Quarterback Conner Smith scored on the next series. The extra point was missed, but the War Eagles were up 19-0 with 4:25 left in the half. The Tigers were stopped offensively and the most controversial officiating call of the night was made on the punt attempt: the ball went off the side of the Tiger punters foot and didnt make it to the line of scrimmage. A War Eagle picked up the ball and ran it in for a score, but the play was whistled dead and the ruling on the eld was that the ball could not be advanced because the punt did not reach the line of scrimmage. It ultimately didnt hurt the War Eagles: They scored again, Smith added the extra point and Wakulla was up 26-0. That was the score at halftime. Wakulla drove the ball down to the 5 yard line, and Marshane Godbolt basically walked in on a sweep play. With the extra point, Wakulla was up 33-0. In the fourth quarter, with a lot of Wakullas rst string players cooling it on the sidelines and the mercy rule invoked to keep the clock running, Jefferson managed a couple of quick strikes for scores. UP NEXT: RICKARDS Up next for Wakulla is district opponent Rickards at home the rst district game of the year for both teams. They are very big, very physical and very athletic, Klees said. Despite an 0-4 record, the Rickards Raiders are not to be underestimated, the coach warned. Every year when we play Rickards, it seems to come down to the wire, Klees said. We have home field advantage and that will be huge, he said. Theres routine for us at home and youve got the crowd behind you. Coach Klees also noted the junior varsity team is having a good year, off to a 3-0 start. The JV has beat Leon, John Paul IIs varsity and Suwannee by a combined total of 124-6. And Klees noted the one score came late in a game. Coming up this week, the JV faces Chiles. Wakulla High Schools 2011 Homecoming will be held on Oct. 28. There will be a reunion of the 1981 Football State Championship team which will be recognized that evening at halftime. If you were on the football team, were a cheerleader or in the band for the state championship year, please contact Athletic Director Mike Smith at Wakulla High School for information regarding the festivities. He can be reached at (850) 926-7125.JV team is unbeatenSeeking members of 1981 team Lyntonio Bowdry 2 catches for 86 yards Dequon Simmons 13 tackles, graded 85 Damonta MorrisPlayers of the WeekOFFENSE DEFENSE SPECIAL TEAMS GAME PHOTOS BY BILL ROLLINS/Special to The NewsDamonta Morris, left, carries Jefferson County defenders over the goal line as he goes in for a touchdown. The War Eagle defense was swarming, above, as they kept the Tigers scoreless for the rst three quarters. At left, young Josie Johnston, 18 months, watches the game from the shoulders of his father, Jeremy.More photos online thewakullanews.comFollow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/ eWakullaNewsfor live updates during the game. Florida Certied ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction Daviod Rossetti 850 591-6161 Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Loren Joiner 850 544-3508 Kelly Dykes 850 528-3063 all akullas inest 850 926-1011our ome own ealtor734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL HAVE YOU HEARD THE NEWS?has expanded their circulation department! LOOK The Wakulla News has a new number to call to subscribe.888-852-2340CALLALISON ORNECIA TODAY! 888-852-2340 They haven't actually expanded, they're just taking advantage of Citrus Publishing's call center in Crystal River.13Months For only$31 From now until the end of October get Marriages Anniversaries Obituaries Births School Religion Sports Classifieds Legal NoticesSubscribe Today & StayInformed About Local:Please accept my 13 month subscription at the price of $31.00 Name Address City State Zip Phone # ( ) Email Address Credit Card __________ __________ __________ __________ Exp. Send Payment to:TheWakulla NewsP.O. Box 307 Crawfordville, or go to www.thewakullanews.com and click subscribeSavings apply to Wakulla County subscriptions only.888-852-2340

PAGE 10

Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comIn The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102 FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA gators FLORIDA gatorsBy MARTY COHENof GatorBaitThe clock hit 11:11 on Saturday night and The Swamp began emptying in droves. There was still nearly 11 minutes to go in the fourth quarter but after the blow to the solar plexus Florida took just before halftime, the air had been of cially taken out of Florida Field. True freshman quarterback Jeff Driskel, pressed into service after a season-crushing injury to starting fthyear senior quarterback John Brantley, mishandled a center snap and Alabama recovered. What began as a stirring night now left many shaken. And a season that contained so much promise is currently left hanging in the balance. The nal score of 38-10 was almost irrelevant because when Brantley went down 35 seconds before halftime with what sure looks like a seasonand career-ending injury to his right knee, the outcome was basically sealed. And its a shame because Florida had showed a lot of ght in the rst half, even if a bit overmatched on the line of scrimmage against an Alabama squad that looks every bit as powerful, if not maybe even a touch better all around, than the 2009 club that won the national championship. Perhaps it was tting that when Brantley went down, the rookie Driskel stepped in because symbolically, it demonstrated the overall climate of the two programs. Alabama is in its fth year under Nick Saban, and as a result, sports the abundance of skilled players necessary to implement his systems. On the other side, theres Florida in its first year under Will Muschamp, in the embryonic stages of where the rookie head coach sees his program headed. And even before Brantleys injury, which effectively ended Floridas night, the distance between the two programs had begun to show. The Gators were hanging on by a thread before Brantley went down. The Tide was controlling both sides of the line of scrimmage and punishing tailback Trent Richardson, every inch as effective as 2009 Heisman Trophy winner Mark Ingram, was exerting his will. Offensively, Florida had not been able to run the ball at all to that point, surviving thanks to some success throwing the ball down the eld, an ingredient absent to that point in the season. Then things started to unravel a bit. The immature Gators lost their composure on defense, as rst Dominique Easley and then Jon Bostic drew personal foul penalties on Alabamas third touchdown drive as the Tide scored 21 unanswered points to assume a 24-10 lead. Florida did show a touch of resilience, driving inside the Alabama 15yard line with under a minute before intermission. A touchdown at that juncture and its a seven-point game at halftime, at the worst, a workable 11-point margin if the Gators were forced to settle for another short Caleb Sturgis eld goal. But disaster soon struck. First linebacker Alex Watkins sacked Brantley, and then came the crusher, as 265pound linebacker Courtney Upshaw, who had already returned an interception for a touchdown, beat guard Dan Wenger and brought Brantley down awkwardly, apparently tearing up the quarterbacks right knee in the process. Brantley had to be escorted to the locker room as his leg dangled, unable to come close to putting any pressure on it. Muschamp would not comment on the severity of Brantleys injury after the game, and its possible it may not be announced until Monday, given UFs reticence when it comes to passing along information on players health. But it doesnt take a surgeon or a Holiday Inn guest to surmise that Brantleys injury will surely end his season, and ultimately, his Gator career. On a day that began with the sad news about former Florida assistant coach, and personal friend, Mike Heimerdinger, who lost his battle with cancer and passed away at the way-tooyoung age of 58, the Brantley situation was a sobering second punch. The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate No. 17 Florida at No. 1 LSUSaturday, 3:30 p.m.The game can be seen on CBS. No. 23 Florida State at Wake ForestSaturday, 12:30 p.m.The game can be seen on WTLH Fox49. Gators rolled by Tide Gators rolled by TideBy TIM LINAFELTof The OseolaIt was a simple answer to a simple question. Florida State quarterback EJ Manuel, speaking publicly for the rst time since injuring his left shoulder Sept. 17, was quickly asked if he expects to play Saturday when the No. 22 Seminoles visit Wake Forest (12:30, ACC Network). Yes sir, Manuel said. Those two words dont completely end the speculation around Manuels status, but they sure do go a long way. Manuel left in the third quarter of FSUs 23-13 loss to Oklahoma and did not play against Clemson. He returned to practice, in limited action, last Thursday, but fully participated when the Seminoles (2-2, 0-1 Atlantic Coast Conference) took the practice elds in preparation for Wake Forest Monday. We expect him to practice today, FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said. That brings another big dimension back to the offense. Not that (backup QB) Clint (Trickett) wasnt (effective), but it brings some athleticism I mean extreme athleticism back to that position. Well see how it goes, but yeah, hopefully hell be ready to roll. Manuel was off to a brisk start to his junior campaign before his injury. He has six touchdown passes to his credit and has completed 67 percent of his throws. Manuel is also a key component of FSUs edgling rushing attack his 79 yards are second on the team, despite playing only a little more than 2 games this season. The injury hampered his non-throwing shoulder, but Manuel explained Monday that that shoulder still plays a crucial part to his throwing ability and his effectiveness. As the shoulder swelled and throbbed with pain, Manuel couldnt summon the balance and strength needed to throw the ball with any zip. That was probably the main reason I wasnt able to play, because I wasnt able to rip when I wanted to throw a 60-yard bomb or something like that, Manuel said. After a while, when the swelling subsides and the pain goes away a little bit, you can still tolerate the pain, but when it is really swollen and really tender, that is when it was hard for me to try to throw any type of passes. But now it feels ne. And that has FSU feeling much better as the Seminoles continue their conference slate with virtually no margin for error in its hopes to overtake Clemson in the ACCs Atlantic Division race.A simple answer to a simple questionFreshman backup Jeff Driskel had to come in against top-ranked Alabama.PHOTO COURTESY OF GATORBAIT FSU Head Coach Jimbo Fisher with starting quarterback EJ Manual, who expects to play in Saturdays game against Wake Forest. John Brantley helped off the eld.PHOTOS BY COLIN HACKLEY Osceola

PAGE 11

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 Page 11Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsWhat do you think about this weather? If it wouldnt get any colder than this I could stand it. Long sleeve in the morning and short sleeves in the afternoon is my kind of weather. The water temperature finally dropped into the 70s and the shing is really getting good. When I left the dock on Sunday. it was showing about 65 degrees and by about 4 p.m. it had only gotten up to 75 degrees. With the cool weather were having this week its really gonna turn the sh on by the weekend. The oyster bars at the mouth of the rivers and creeks and over in Oyster Bay should be red hot and the ats should really turn on again. I talked to Fran at the Lanark Market and she said not many people shed Sunday but quite a few got out on Saturday despite the winds. The most talk she heard was the big reds being caught and released. I heard that the Dog Island Reef was still producing lots of trout, Spanish and blues and of course there are thousands of lady sh out there. Look for your better trout to be hanging around the big sand holes in the grass. The docks along 98 should still be good for reds and if the trout shing on the ats hasnt picked up it will. Shawn Mann took a party from Atlanta out of Shell Island on Sunday and they had a very good day. He said they caught trout, reds, Spanish and a pompano. They shed on the West Flats off the lighthouse. He said during the morning the sh wanted the white Gulp but later on they wanted live shrimp. One of my neighbors said some friends of his went out on Sunday and caught more than 30 trout and reds. They were also shing the West Flats. Capt. David Fife is still catching reds out of Spring Creek and he believes this cool weather is gonna put more reds around the bars in bigger schools and will also push the trout back onto the ats from the deeper water. I talked with Larry Hess of Shell Point last week and he said he was catching some sh on the ats but not a lot. His better catches of trout were coming from 10 to 15 feet of water. Another neighbor at Shell Point was out last week and caught two pompano and saw a huge school of them. He went back on Sunday and caught another one. Its that time of year when all the pelagics start following the bait back south to warmer water. On Thursday, I took out a group of folks in the plumbing business and we shed in the oyster bars around Oyster Bay. Using mostly white grubs we came in with a cooler of silver trout, one red, two whiting and four ounder. I took a different group of them out and we also had a bunch of silver trout but nally caught some speckled trout. When the tide nally started coming in they started biting a white gulp on a .25-ounce lead head. We caught 14 in two spots and they were schooled up. On Sunday afternoon, we had a very low tide and I thought about going to the oyster bars again but decided to see if there was anything on the ats. Fishing out of Shell Point with white Gulps I caught and released more than 40 trout, 15 of which were legal and none were less than 14 inches. I dont know how many sh I missed. I was shing in two to four feet of water and concentrating on the white sand holes in the grass. Fishing a straight grub with a .25-ounce lead was the ticket and the bite was as good as I have seen all year. There was hardly a spot of sand that wasnt holding a trout and quite a few were holding several. I caught a few trout using the Cajun Thunder but not too many. I also caught two nice Spanish and a 24-inch red. I tried topwater and shallow running Mirrolures but couldnt buy a bite on them. The cool water is what I have been waiting on and hopefully things will continue to get even better. To me, this is the best time of the year to sh because football and hunting keep a lot of shermen in their easy chairs watching the game or out in the woods. That means the water isnt gonna be too crowded and combine that with the cooler weather and it just doesnt get much better. My neighbor is one who does a lot of hunting though he does manage to sneak down during the week to go either trout shing or offshore for grouper. He took his 14-year-old son Keaton bowhunting about two weeks ago and on his rst time in the tree with a bow he shot a deer. On Saturday Mike took Randy Willis, his 16-year-old nephew from Tifton, and he also shot a deer on his rst time in a tree stand with a bow. Congratulations to these two and to Mike for putting them in the right spot. Remember to leave that oat plan with someone and be careful out there. Good luck and good shing!Fish should be biting this weekend From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Lisa Lawrence, above, and Justin Latici, below, of the Gem Land Company were married at Ring Oak Plantation last Saturday evening in a beautiful outdoor Old South ceremony, where the bride rode in on a mule drawn plantation buggy. On Sunday evening, they called Shell Points Major Alan Lamarche of Plantation Security and asked if he would take them offshore shing in the Gulf. The newlyweds brought along Josh, one of the groomsmen, and they spent part of their honeymoon shing out of Shell Point on Monday. The newlyweds caught grouper and Key West grunts until their arms were sore and said the shing was a honeymoon treat for their memory book. The bride and groom will reside in Colorado and they plan to return in the spring for another great shing trip with Lamarche. Honeymooners catchGreenwing Day to be held SaturdaySpecial to The NewsWakulla Ducks Unlimited and the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce will be hosting Wakulla Greenwing Day on Saturday, Oct. 8 at the WCSO Training Center and Firing Range. Registration will begin at 9 a.m. and the event will be held from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. The program is open to youths age 6 to 18 and parental supervision is required. The cost is $15 per child which includes a T-shirt and Greenwing magazine subscription. Lunch will be provided for parents and youths. The education stations will target firearm safety and include bench shooting, shotgun shooting, archery and a build your own turkey call station. There will be a Turkey Shoot for $2 per shot and a Chicken Shoot for $1 per shot. Winners will go home with a turkey or chicken. Giveaways and door prizes will include shing, camping, hunting gear and a visit from the FWC helicopter and FWC dog. Greenwing is a Ducks Unlimited event for young conservationists who want to protect wildlife for today and tomorrow. For more information, call Holly Porter at 519-0416. Email inquiries may be sent to wakullagreenwing@embarqmail.com. Registration checks may be mailed to Wakulla Greenwing, P.O. Box 1985, Crawfordville FL 32326 or dropped off at Ameris Bank in Crawfordville, attention Tara C. Sanders. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 BE SUREYOUSTOCKUPON HUNTINGEQUIPMENT BEFORETHE SEASON STARTS 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 HUNT ING SEA SON!! Get Ready for Grouper Call us today to make your reservation!www.jacksbquick.comOpen Monday Friday 7am 6pm Saturday by appointment only Barber Shop & Salon 926-4080 Clipper Cuts Scalp Massage Steam Towels Style Cuts Neck Massage Hi-lites & Low-lites Color 926-4080 926-4080 3334 Crawfordville Hwy. Theresa Delta Waxing Perms Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 850925-5685Your Boats One Stop Paint & Body Shop 56 Industrial Court St. Marks Industrial Park,St. Marks 32355Fiberglass Supplies and Repair Marine Battery Dealer Tues. Thurs. 9am 5:30pm Friday Sunday See Us at the Gun Shows LOWER PRICED AMMO IN STOCKMany accessoriesLargest Selection of Guns in the Tallahassee Wakulla Area GunSmithing Fast Turn Around! OFFICIALPRODUCTLICENSED www.ronsgun.comLocated Main Street St. Marks483 Port Leon Dr., St. Marks Gun Show Pricing Everyday! WE BUY GUNS$ Highest Dollar Paid $ for your gun! Selling GunsSince 1999AK 47s in stock!

PAGE 12

Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224www.fsucu.org Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Oct 6, 11 Fri Oct 7, 11 Sat Oct 8, 11 Sun Oct 9, 11 Mon Oct 10, 11 Tue Oct 11, 11 Wed Oct 12, 11 Date 3.2 ft. 12:34 AM 3.4 ft. 1:04 AM 3.6 ft. 1:31 AM 3.7 ft. 1:57 AM 3.8 ft. 2:21 AM High 2.0 ft. 4:22 AM 1.6 ft. 5:44 AM 1.2 ft. 6:36 AM 0.8 ft. 7:17 AM 0.5 ft. 7:54 AM 0.3 ft. 8:28 AM 0.2 ft. 9:00 AM Low 3.2 ft. 11:04 AM 3.3 ft. 12:12 PM 3.5 ft. 1:01 PM 3.6 ft. 1:40 PM 3.7 ft. 2:16 PM 3.7 ft. 2:49 PM 3.7 ft. 3:22 PM High 1.0 ft. 5:45 PM 1.0 ft. 6:31 PM 1.0 ft. 7:07 PM 1.1 ft. 7:37 PM 1.1 ft. 8:04 PM 1.2 ft. 8:30 PM 1.2 ft. 8:56 PM Low 3.0 ft. 11:59 PM High Thu Oct 6, 11 Fri Oct 7, 11 Sat Oct 8, 11 Sun Oct 9, 11 Mon Oct 10, 11 Tue Oct 11, 11 Wed Oct 12, 11 Date 3.2 ft. 12:31 AM 3.4 ft. 1:01 AM 3.6 ft. 1:28 AM 3.8 ft. 1:54 AM 3.8 ft. 2:18 AM High 2.1 ft. 4:19 AM 1.7 ft. 5:41 AM 1.2 ft. 6:33 AM 0.8 ft. 7:14 AM 0.5 ft. 7:51 AM 0.3 ft. 8:25 AM 0.2 ft. 8:57 AM Low 3.2 ft. 11:01 AM 3.4 ft. 12:09 PM 3.6 ft. 12:58 PM 3.7 ft. 1:37 PM 3.7 ft. 2:13 PM 3.8 ft. 2:46 PM 3.8 ft. 3:19 PM High 1.0 ft. 5:42 PM 1.1 ft. 6:28 PM 1.1 ft. 7:04 PM 1.2 ft. 7:34 PM 1.2 ft. 8:01 PM 1.3 ft. 8:27 PM 1.3 ft. 8:53 PM Low 3.0 ft. 11:56 PM High Thu Oct 6, 11 Fri Oct 7, 11 Sat Oct 8, 11 Sun Oct 9, 11 Mon Oct 10, 11 Tue Oct 11, 11 Wed Oct 12, 11 Date 2.7 ft. 12:35 AM 3.0 ft. 1:10 AM 3.1 ft. 1:40 AM 3.3 ft. 2:07 AM 3.4 ft. 2:33 AM 3.5 ft. 2:57 AM High 1.8 ft. 5:26 AM 1.4 ft. 6:48 AM 1.1 ft. 7:40 AM 0.7 ft. 8:21 AM 0.4 ft. 8:58 AM 0.3 ft. 9:32 AM 0.2 ft. 10:04 AM Low 2.9 ft. 11:40 AM 3.1 ft. 12:48 PM 3.2 ft. 1:37 PM 3.3 ft. 2:16 PM 3.4 ft. 2:52 PM 3.4 ft. 3:25 PM 3.4 ft. 3:58 PM High 0.9 ft. 6:49 PM 0.9 ft. 7:35 PM 0.9 ft. 8:11 PM 1.0 ft. 8:41 PM 1.0 ft. 9:08 PM 1.1 ft. 9:34 PM 1.1 ft. 10:00 PM Low Thu Oct 6, 11 Fri Oct 7, 11 Sat Oct 8, 11 Sun Oct 9, 11 Mon Oct 10, 11 Tue Oct 11, 11 Wed Oct 12, 11 Date 2.4 ft. 12:26 AM 2.5 ft. 12:56 AM 2.7 ft. 1:23 AM 2.8 ft. 1:49 AM 2.8 ft. 2:13 AM High 1.4 ft. 4:33 AM 1.2 ft. 5:55 AM 0.8 ft. 6:47 AM 0.6 ft. 7:28 AM 0.4 ft. 8:05 AM 0.2 ft. 8:39 AM 0.1 ft. 9:11 AM Low 2.4 ft. 10:56 AM 2.5 ft. 12:04 PM 2.6 ft. 12:53 PM 2.7 ft. 1:32 PM 2.7 ft. 2:08 PM 2.8 ft. 2:41 PM 2.8 ft. 3:14 PM High 0.7 ft. 5:56 PM 0.7 ft. 6:42 PM 0.8 ft. 7:18 PM 0.8 ft. 7:48 PM 0.8 ft. 8:15 PM 0.9 ft. 8:41 PM 0.9 ft. 9:07 PM Low 2.2 ft. 11:51 PM High Thu Oct 6, 11 Fri Oct 7, 11 Sat Oct 8, 11 Sun Oct 9, 11 Mon Oct 10, 11 Tue Oct 11, 11 Wed Oct 12, 11 Date 2.5 ft. 12:18 AM 2.6 ft. 12:48 AM 2.8 ft. 1:15 AM 2.9 ft. 1:41 AM 2.9 ft. 2:05 AM High 1.9 ft. 4:01 AM 1.5 ft. 5:23 AM 1.1 ft. 6:15 AM 0.8 ft. 6:56 AM 0.5 ft. 7:33 AM 0.3 ft. 8:07 AM 0.2 ft. 8:39 AM Low 2.5 ft. 10:48 AM 2.6 ft. 11:56 AM 2.7 ft. 12:45 PM 2.8 ft. 1:24 PM 2.9 ft. 2:00 PM 2.9 ft. 2:33 PM 2.9 ft. 3:06 PM High 0.9 ft. 5:24 PM 1.0 ft. 6:10 PM 1.0 ft. 6:46 PM 1.1 ft. 7:16 PM 1.1 ft. 7:43 PM 1.2 ft. 8:09 PM 1.2 ft. 8:35 PM Low 2.3 ft. 11:43 PM High Thu Oct 6, 11 Fri Oct 7, 11 Sat Oct 8, 11 Sun Oct 9, 11 Mon Oct 10, 11 Tue Oct 11, 11 Wed Oct 12, 11 Date 2.7 ft. 12:19 AM 2.7 ft. 12:41 AM 2.8 ft. 12:58 AM 2.9 ft. 1:12 AM 3.0 ft. 1:26 AM 3.1 ft. 1:41 AM High 1.7 ft. 3:59 AM 1.4 ft. 5:06 AM 1.2 ft. 5:58 AM 0.9 ft. 6:43 AM 0.7 ft. 7:22 AM 0.5 ft. 7:57 AM 0.4 ft. 8:30 AM Low 2.7 ft. 9:42 AM 2.7 ft. 11:25 AM 2.8 ft. 12:42 PM 2.8 ft. 1:42 PM 2.8 ft. 2:33 PM 2.8 ft. 3:19 PM 2.8 ft. 4:02 PM High 0.7 ft. 5:08 PM 0.9 ft. 5:53 PM 1.0 ft. 6:31 PM 1.2 ft. 7:02 PM 1.4 ft. 7:28 PM 1.6 ft. 7:49 PM 1.7 ft. 8:08 PM LowGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacOct. 6 Oct. 12First Nov. 2 Full Oct. 11 Last Oct. 19 New Oct. 26Major Times 9:30 AM 11:30 AM 9:52 PM 11:52 PM Minor Times 2:41 AM 3:41 AM 4:10 PM 5:10 PM Major Times 10:14 AM 12:14 PM 10:36 PM 12:36 AM Minor Times 3:37 AM 4:37 AM 4:44 PM 5:44 PM Major Times 10:57 AM 12:57 PM 11:18 PM 1:18 AM Minor Times 4:31 AM 5:31 AM 5:15 PM 6:15 PM Major Times --:---:-11:39 AM 1:39 PM Minor Times 5:25 AM 6:25 AM 5:45 PM 6:45 PM Major Times 12:00 AM 2:00 AM 12:20 PM 2:20 PM Minor Times 6:18 AM 7:18 AM 6:15 PM 7:15 PM Major Times 12:41 AM 2:41 AM 1:02 PM 3:02 PM Minor Times 7:11 AM 8:11 AM 6:46 PM 7:46 PM Major Times 1:23 AM 3:23 AM 1:45 PM 3:45 PM Minor Times 8:04 AM 9:04 AM 7:20 PM 8:20 PM Average Average Average Better Better Best Best7:33 am 7:16 pm 4:11 pm 2:42 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:33 am 7:15 pm 4:44 pm 3:38 am 7:34 am 7:14 pm 5:15 pm 4:33 am 7:35 am 7:13 pm 5:46 pm 5:26 am 7:35 am 7:12 pm 6:16 pm 6:19 am 7:36 am 7:11 pm 6:47 pm 7:11 am 7:37 am 7:09 pm 7:20 pm 8:05 am64% 71% 77% 83% 89% 95% 99% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Many of you have sent me a note or called to ask about Sherrie and how she was doing. It is with great reservation that I give out anyones personal information without their consent. Many more of you have contacted her to keep tabs on her. Sherrie has always been a woman who is strong, independent and hard tell what to do. When Sherrie asked me to take over this column several months ago, I felt a great responsibility and honor at the request. She has always planned to write one last column and has on several occasions attempted to make it happen, but her health always got in the way. Today, Sherrie was nally able to send in a note to all of you explaining what has been going on in her life for the last while: Dear Readers, Months ago when I asked Carolyn to write the column for me I had no idea what was waiting for me. Today I want to let you know that the column is de nitely Carolyns. I will write one last one sometime before the end of the year to let you know what has happened to Flotilla 13 at Shell Point. Today I will brie y cover what has happened to me since December. At Christmas time my youngest son, Ron who lived in Columbus, Ga., was diagnosed with liver cancer that had metastasized. On his birthday, Jan. 16, at 5 a.m. he quietly went to be with God. One Friday night, a few days after I nally came home, I was going down my back stairs when the stair light went out and I missed one step, and I fell. Being stubborn, it was Saturday night before I gave in and called 911 and was transported to Tallahassee. I ended up with three screws in my hip socket. Then there were 30 days in rehab before I came home on April 1. Wasnt long before I was back in the hospital with a stroke, then rehab for another month. Home for awhile and back in hospital for dehydration. Home again for awhile and back in hospital they thought it was a heart attack, but it turned out to be dehydration again. And this brings us upto-date. As I said, I will write one last column later on, to say goodbye to my wonderful readers. The column is of cially Carolyns and I know the readers will enjoy her she is a very special person. Bye now, Sherrie As Sherrie has alluded to, Flotilla 13 has chosen to dissolve and is no longer in Shell Point. I will let her ll you in on all the details, but for right now, Flotilla 12 is covering the area from the Econ na River over to St. George Island. I have been waiting for Sherrie to find the strength to write to all of you before asking for a favor from all of you who have been loyal to her for so many years. I would like to put together a tribute to Sherrie in a column or more. For those of you who know Sherrie, can you please take a minute to send me your fondest memories or lessons learned from her. You can send them to carolyn.treadon@uscgaux.net. I would like to put this together in the next few weeks. Last weekend, members of Flotilla 12 held our monthly meeting. I was not able to be there, and neither was Duane, so I only have a few tidbits to share. Rich Rasmussen and Phil Hill both received awards for Team Commendations. This coming weekend, many of us from all over the Division will come together in Panama City Beach for our fall conference. There should be lots to tell you about from the JAREX, as well as the great training they have lined up for us. As Sherrie reminds us, safe boating is no accident! Bob Asztalos presents a team commendation to Phil Hill.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Bob Asztalos gives a commendation to Rich Rasmussen. Fear of rising sea levels appears to be justi ed. Since 1930, global sea levels have risen 10 inches. But projections due to global climate change are for an additional three to six feet by the end of the century. Sea level change however, is not new to Florida or Wakulla County, geologically or historically speaking. In the past, Wakulla County has been both underwater and further elevated 40 or more feet above sea level. Florida was once an island with a surrounding water passage right through our county, which may be responsible for our abundant sand. But more interesting is our recent lower sea level, during the last 10,000 years. The land offshore of Wakulla extended out over now inundated land some 20 or more miles. Across this landscape, rivers drained the slopes. Sinkholes, springs and other karst features prevailed amongst forested terrains. Over the last several decades Dr. Joe Donoghue of the Florida State University Geology Department has been mapping submerged rivers and other karst features off our coast. Anthropologists used this data to predict human occupation sites, given that back then the land was dry. We also know that early man occupied this land back 10,000 to 12,000 years ago. We predict early man occupied villages adjoining water features. By tracing the submerged river beds in Apalachee Bay, Dr. Michael Falk of the Anthropology Department at FSU, searched and found evidence of inundated prehistoric occupation in an inundated oxbow of the river in what now has 11 feet of sea water overhead. I often decompress at the opening of caves, in broad daylight. Decompressing can take a lot of time, something we occupy by inspecting the substrate. I often nd chirt akes, tossed in the water during the knapping of arrow points by early man. Imagine a knapper enjoying the brisk morning air, while sitting over a boiling freshwater spring. All his mistakes and residual akes get tossed into the water, for me to nd thousands of years later. I was preparing to dive a favorite local cave last week when a car drove up and the driver, seeing that we were serious divers, said he knew of karst features offshore. Of course we know of several, such as Ray Hole and Escudo, long suspected to include artifacts. He expanded upon those we knew of, to include some reported to be bigger than Wakulla Springs. Imagine what we will nd when we get a chance to visit!Wakulla County has seen lots of sea level changes UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Diamond Offshore is an Equal Opportunity Employer and subscribes to a drug-free workplace.Diamond Offshore, one of the worlds leading deepwater drilling contractors, seeks motivated individuals to contribute to our future growth. Due to the new construction of 3 dynamically positioned, dual activity drillships, Diamond Offshore is seeking candidates for the following positions: To learn more, visit us at www.diamondoffshore.com Please forward resumes to: Diamond Offshore P. O. Box 4558, Houston, TX 77210-4558 Attn: Employment Ad #DS01 Fax: 281-647-2295EMPLOYMENTOPPORTUNITIESDrilling Superintendent Rig Superintendent Toolpusher Driller Assistant Driller Derrickhand Subsea Specialist Mechanic Hydraulic Mechanic Electrician Electronic Technician Sr. DPO BCO **Dual Activity or Cyber Based Experience considered a plus** Competitive compensation Salary increases available upon completion of in-house competency training (rig-based positions) Exceptional and affordable bene ts package: medical, dental, vision, prescription drug, 401(k), and more! Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic for temporary relief from: Back pain Muscle pain Arthritis pain Joint pain Get 40 100mg/20mg pills for only $99.00CALL NOW AND GET 4 BONUS PILLS FREE! BUY THE BLUE PILL NOW!1-888-746-5615SATISFACTION GUARANTEED SAVE $500! VIAGRA or CIALIS?D o you take

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 Page 13AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Sept. 22, Deputy Scott Rojas investigated a suspicious vehicle on the Wakulla High School campus as school was getting ready to open. The truck was parked in the bus loading area and two sleeping men were awakened by the sound of bus air brakes. Deputy Billy Metcalf stopped the vehicle at a nearby convenience store and the two men allowed a search of the vehicle to take place. Lionel David Black, 53, of Woodbridge, Va., and Gary Joseph Lowenadler, 60, of Gilmer, Texas, were charged with possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of narcotics equipment. It was determined that the vehicle was stolen from Friend Mission Church in Montgomery, Ala., and the vehicle was seized to be held for the owner to pick up. Montgomery law enforcement of cials declined to extradite the two men back to Alabama for unauthorized use of the vehicle. The marijuana weighed 7.5 grams. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On Sept. 21, Mildred Posey of Panacea reported an incident involving a driver leaving the scene of an accident with property damage. A vehicle near Mineral Springs Seafood in Panacea reportedly pulled out in front of the victim and, after the crash, left the scene of the accident. The victim observed a tall blonde female in the other vehicle. On Sept. 22, Karen James of Sopchoppy reported a traf c crash. James ran into the back of a vehicle that pulled in front of her vehicle on U.S. Highway 319 at Trice Lane. James pulled off the road to speak to the other driver but the other driver did not stop. James vehicle suffered minor damage. On Sept. 22, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a two vehicle accident on U.S. Highway 319 at the Northpoint Center. Ciera Edmonds of Woodville drove her Jeep into the back of a Toyota Sequoia driven by Kimberly McKenzie of Sopchoppy. EMS responded to the scene to check out the two drivers. Neither driver needed to be transported to the hospital, although Edmonds suffered minor burns from an air bag deployment. Edmonds was found at fault for following too closely. On Sept. 22, Law Enforcement Officer Annie White reported a criminal mischief at the countys equestrian center. A cable gate and stop sign located at the entrance of the property were damaged. A sign, trash can and table were also damaged. There was evidence that a vehicle entered the property and recklessly drove around the property. The total amount of damage is still to be determined. On Sept. 23, Ann Larkin of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to her vehicle at Wakulla Springs Lodge. The vehicle was scratched and damage is estimated at $300. Cindy Neel of Sopchoppy also reported a criminal mischief to her vehicle at the time Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated the Larkin case. The Neel vehicle also suffered $300 worth of damage. Both victims own the same model of vehicle. On Sept. 24, Scott Harts eld of Talquin Electric reported a grand theft of copper wire. An estimated 200 feet of copper valued at $3,000 was reported missing. The case is the sixth copper theft to occur at a Talquin Electric substation in Wakulla County. On Sept. 24, Diane Greg of Tallahassee reported the loss of a wallet from Mill Creek Plaza. The wallet and contents are valued at $120. On Sept. 24, Daniel Owen Farino, 28, of Crawfordville was charged with knowingly operating a motor vehicle with a suspended license following a traf c stop. A concerned citizen contacted law enforcement about a driver driving erratically. Farino was also issued a citation for an expired tag. On Sept. 25, Angus McEachern of St. Marks reported two vehicle burglaries. A computer and air card, valued at $ $2,600, was reported missing from one vehicle and a large sum of cash was taken from a second vehicle. On Sept. 25, Richard Snyder of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to his mailbox. A stop sign at Triplett Road and Martin Luther King Road was also damaged. Damage to the mailbox was estimated at $25. Robert Joe Soule, 25, of Crawfordville was charged with two counts of criminal mischief, one for damage under $200 and one for more than $200. Deputy Cole Wells discovered his suspect at the scene. On Sept. 23, Gregory Marini of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. A 30-inch scratch was observed on the victims vehicle while it was parked at Wal-Mart. Damage was estimated at $500. On Sept. 24, a Crawfordville female said she and her son were arguing over cleaning their residence. The 16-year-old juvenile created $800 worth of damages to the residence. The juvenile was arrested for criminal mischief. Due to the past history of the juvenile he was accepted into juvenile detention in Tallahassee. On Sept. 23, Gabrielle McKenzie of Crawfordville reported the theft of a lawn mower from her home. The mower is valued at $300. A suspect has been identi- ed. On Sept. 23, a vehicle re was reported on Highway 267 and Chattin Road. U.S Forest Service of cials were with the vehicle and put out the blaze. The front half of the vehicle, owned by Martin Serotta of Crawfordville, was burned. The vehicle caught fire when the owner was pulling a trailer. The re was ruled accidental. On Sept. 27, Kenneth Dewayne Washington, 22, of Crawfordville was charged with introduction of contraband into a correctional facility after he was found to be in possession of tobacco. Washington was a trustee on the road crew when he picked up two cigarettes and a butt while working outside the facility. A suspect threw the cigarettes out of a car window and Washington picked them up. He hid the contraband in his shoe. On Sept. 26, William Revell of Crawfordville reported a theft of work shoes from his home. The shoes were removed from the victims porch. The victim spotted the shoes on a juvenile and got the shoes back. The victim decided not to pursue charges against the 13-year-old. On Sept. 26, Sonia Rosier of Crawfordville reported a traf c crash at her home. The victims mailbox was damaged by a vehicle that left the scene without stopping. The brick mailbox is valued at $1,200. On Sept. 26, Alyssa Taylor of Crawfordville reported recovering a vehicle keyless entry remote and other keys. The keys were recovered in the Songbird subdivision. Deputy Ian Dohme attempted to locate the vehicle in the subdivision but was unsuccessful. The keychain was entered into evidence. On Sept. 26, Deputy Nick Gray investigated a two-vehicle accident at 952 Shadeville Road. After con- rming no injuries, Deputy Gray discovered that Carl Bobby Hicks, 35, of Sopchoppy was driving with a suspended license. Hicks backed into a parked vehicle with a passenger inside it. Hicks allegedly failed eld sobriety exercises and was charged with DUI with property damage and driving while license suspended or revoked with knowledge. On Sept. 28, Annette Clark of Crawfordville reported a credit card fraud. The victim reported that several fraudulent charges were found on her bank card. A total of 12 charges were observed with a value of $454. On Sept. 27, Tamela Green of Tallahassee reported the loss of her purse which contained credit cards, driver license and other items. The victim was unsure where she lost her purse. The victim realized her identity had been compromised when she received a loan approval she did not apply for. A check is being conducted to make sure no other unknown accounts have been opened. On Sept. 27, Kellie Alford of Crawfordville reported a credit card account she did not apply for. It was determined two accounts were opened in her name. The total charges were $1,175. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 681 calls for service during the past week.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce arrested 13 individuals in connection with a variety of drug charges following the purchase of illegal narcotics from suspects using con dential informants, said Interim Sheriff Donnie Crum. According to Undersheriff Maurice Langston, The ongoing drug operation was conducted over several weeks during the past few months by the WCSO Narcotics Division. The arrests included: Donnie Ray Boutin, 60, of Crawfordville was charged with possession of marijuana and sale of marijuana. The controlled purchase allegedly netted 29.6 grams of cannabis. Boutin remains in the Wakulla County Jail under a $50,000 bond. Joseph Brandon Anderson 20, of Crawfordville was charged possession of marijuana and sale of marijuana. Two controlled buys allegedly netted 25.9 grams and 23.8 grams of marijuana. Jeffrey Robert Elkins, 24, of Crawfordville was charged with possession of marijuana and sale of marijuana following three controlled purchases. The buys allegedly netted 7.5 grams, 12.2 grams and 15.1 grams. Arron Michael Riley 22, of Panacea was charged with cultivation of marijuana and resisting arrest with violence after law enforcement went to his home to investigate an accidental shooting report and allegedly discovered seven marijuana plants growing at his home. Willis Eric Andrew Adams 24, of Crawfordville was charged with possession of cocaine and sale of cocaine. He was allegedly in possession of .5 of a gram of cocaine. Eric Lee Allred, 27, of Crawfordville was charged with traf cking more than four grams of prescription pills, distribution of synthetic narcotics and sale of synthetic narcotics-prescription pills. David Howard King, 36, of Panacea was charged with traf cking more than four grams of prescription pills, distribution of synthetic narcotics and sale of synthetic narcotics-prescription pills. He allegedly was in possession of ve grams of pills. Paula Ann Sheward 36, of Crawfordville was charged with possession of cocaine and sale of cocaine. Two controlled purchases allegedly netted 3.3 grams and 4.9 grams of cocaine. She remains in the Wakulla County Jail under a $100,000 bond. Shawn Lamond Thomas 40, of Crawfordville was charged with possession of marijuana and sale of marijuana. The controlled purchase allegedly netted 9.1 grams of marijuana. Trina Alford Debaufer 23, of Tallahassee was charged with possession of marijuana and sale of marijuana. The controlled purchase allegedly netted 14.2 grams. Travis Jermaine Rosier, 27, of Crawfordville was charged with sale of cocaine and possession of cocaine following a controlled purchase. The operation allegedly netted 2.5 grams of cocaine. Rosier is being held in the Wakulla County Jail under a $100,000 bond. Andrea Dalsie Carol Nichols 26, of Sopchoppy was charged with possession of crack cocaine and distribution of crack cocaine. The operation allegedly netted half a gram of cocaine on two different occasions. She remains in the Wakulla County Jail under a $200,000 bond. Joseph Clifford McPhaul, 67, of Crawfordville was charged with possession of marijuana more than 20 grams following an undercover operation that involved additional agencies. Investigators discovered 948 grams of marijuana at his home. More arrests are anticipated, according to Crum.13 people busted in undercover drug buys For more information NAMI Wakulla, call 850-926-1033Put on your walking shoes for National Mental Health Awareness Week and join your friends and neighbors for a light breakfast! Azalea Park Saturday, Oct. 8 8 a.m. 1 p.m. JOIN NAMI WAKULLAS WALK FOR HEROESIn the battle against mental illness! Entertainment: Michael Turner, from the group Common Zenz Entertainment Guest speakers Recognition of Heroes Hotdogs for Lunch Speakers: Dr. Jay Reeves, CEO of Apalachee Center Lt. Col. Steve Holmes, COO Florida Veterans Foundation Wildwood Country Club October 28, 20 1 1 COOLING HEATING AND HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Appointments & Walk-Ins Welcome850-926-TEAZ(8329)1626 Crawfordville Hwy., Northpointe CenterFull Service Family Hair Care Salon!Wed-Fri 10-6 Sat. 9-3 Scott A. Smith850-228-100738 Rainbow Drive, Crawfordville (behind El Jalisco)Quality Marine Canvas Fabrication and Upholsteryof all kinds...www.agshipcanvas.com agshipcanvas@yahoo.com

PAGE 14

Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com (850)926-6526We offer most preventative maintenance services Most Minor Repairs Most Competitve Prices in the Industrycharliegrim@msn.comLube-Xpert.comFull Service OILCHANGEVacuuming Included$ 6.00OFFExpires 9/30/2011 2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Across from Beefs Locally Owned by Charlie Grim Centennial Bank believes in the importance of getting out in the community. Where our customers are. So if you need us, well be there for you. Even after hours. Thats why you can nd us on the basketball court. Or wherever you happen to be. Some things get better with age. Capital Health Plan is one of them. Plan to attend a SEMINAR during the Medicare Annual Election Period, October 15 through December 7, 2011, to LEARN MORE about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) and Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-8708943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Paid Endorsement. Call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 to RSVP or for more information. (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p .m., seven days a week or visit us at: www.capitalhealth.com/MedicareSeminars will be held at 10:00 a.m. at Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd H5938_DP 119 File & Use 09242011Anna Johnson says....Join me and become a member of a Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO) plan. Thursday, October 13 Friday, October 14 Tuesday, October 18 Friday, October 21 Tuesday, October 25 Friday, October 28 Friday, November 4 Saturday, November 5 Monday, November 7 Friday, November 11 Monday, November 14 Tuesday, November 15 Tuesday, November 22 Friday, November 25 Tuesday, November 29 Wednesday, November 30 the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringRaymond RichSeptember 2011 Winnerank You So Much! His name was drawn fromank you to the restaurants & e News for this nice promotion OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Youve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF the EATIN patha monthly page inThe Wakuulanews Senior PromThe Senior Prom was held at Eden Springs on Friday, Sept. 30. The court, top photo, include, seated, Queen Betty Rogers, and Princess Oliveigh Staalenburg with her Prince William Staalenburg, along with Chuck Cascio, director of the the facility, King Dennis Miller, Duchess Mildred Mikell and her Duke, Larry Wilson, and Marjorie Hamilton, who organized the prom. Left, last years king and queen, Coleen Webber and Daniel Robinson. (Photos by Denise Folh)

PAGE 15

Taking Care of Business Business News from Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011Cool breezes are finally starting to arrive! As we enter the last quarter of another challenging year there are many reasons to be thankful for the lives we lead: Most of the people in this world would change places with us at the drop of the hat, and we need to count our blessings as we move into the season of Thanksgiving. Our county commissioners seemed to bring several issues to closure at the marathon Sept. 6 meeting: They voted in the garbage assessment, which will allow us to quit dipping into general revenues to fund an operation that was costing vastly more than the tiny tipping fees we were paying when we carried in our garbage. The BOCC also voted to increase the Fire MSBU from $61 to $75. This was probably worthwhile as the Fire Department was punished last year when the county staff encouraged the various re departments to create their Christmas Lists in a vain attempt to pass a $193 Fire MSBU. This increase puts the Fire Department back where it was prior to the misguided effort last year. The chamber supported the Tourist Development Tax increase as we will not get eco-tourism visitors if we dont have money to promote the many unique, bountiful and beautiful attributes of Wakulla County our rivers, springs and bays. We also firmly support paid staff to stay abreast of grant funding that comes available to a nimble Tourist Development Council. We would like to take this opportunity to thank the entire TDC Board of Directors for the excellent job they do pushing Wakulla county to the fore. Our BOCC also nalized the Public Utility Tax with an offset in the millage rate, accounting for decreased property values, to achieve revenue neutrality. It is now time to take a breather as we begin to deal with the unintended consequences that will arise from all this activity. I do not ever remember a Board that tackled so much in such a short time. Necessity may have played a part, but I will say that we have fundamentally changed our approach to funding our government and changed for the better. BENEFITS OF TAXING BY ASSESSMENTTaxing by assessment, as we have been moving towards, allows us to better understand the cost of providing our basic services. When they are paid through ad valorem taxes and the general fund, we tend to take the cost for granted. Taxing by assessment also adds a degree of transparency to our budget process as the tendency to shift general funds around lessens. I commend our commissioners for taking these politically tough decisions. We will have rough patches to sort out, but we are headed in the right direction.CHAMBER EVENTSThe recently instituted Chamber luncheons continue to attract good crowds, with the last being held at Beef OBradys. These events offer great networking, a break from the daily grind, great food, and a good time. We hope to see you at the next one. Covenant Hospice hosted the September after-hours mixer to the pleasure of us all. These events, like the luncheons, allow us all an opportunity to catch up with somebody that we have not seen in a while. It also gives us some insight as to what these businesses or organizations do in and for our community. These events are free so dont let the next opportunity pass you by. The nominating committee has heard back from our members and will meet soon to propose a slate of of cers and new board members, thank you for participating. Lets take a minute to recognize Jo Ann Palmer, all the members of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and all 560 participants in the Coastal Clean-up held on Sept. 17. We are proud of Jo Ann as she is one of our current board members, and proud of the fact that KWCB was started by one of our directors, and past president of the chamber, Ray Boles. We thank St. Marks Powder, Wal-Mart, The Stow Away Center, Capital City Bank, Centennial Bank and both Super Lube locations in Crawfordville for participating in the chambers food drive during September and setting up boxes for collection. In addition, Progress Energy employees generously donated several boxes of food to help out as Wakulla is one of their service areas. Our food donations will go to local food pantries, and will help local families put a warm meal on the table. We have extended our drive until the third week in October so keep your generosity owing.A SPECIAL NOTEIt gives me great pleasure to make this next announcement: By the time this edition of The Wakulla News is published, my darling wife, Petra, will have been sworn in as a U.S. citizen! Yours in Service, John W. Shuff President, Wakulla Chamber of Commerce. JOHN SHUFFChamber President Presidents MessageNHC, Covenant Hospice host Chamber mixer Commissioners made some big decisions Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida 4th Annual Music Festival & Silent AuctionAll Proceeds to bene t injured and orphaned wildlife www.wakullawildlife.org www.woodstorkfestival.com A Great Time for a Great Cause!Food Drink & Beer Cake Walk Silent Auction~ First Table opens at 10am Last Table closes at 4pm Photo Contest Kids Table Raf es Local Artists and Vendors Educational Exhibits Great Music Featuring: 10am-Ralph Pelletier 11:30am-Swingin Harpoon 1pm-Mimi & The HearnDogs 2:30pm-Sarah Mac Band 4pm-Rick Ott Band Saturday, October 8, 2011 10am 5pmSPONSORS: 3Y Ranch 195 Harvey Young Farm Rd. Crawfordville, FL.TICKETS: ONLY $5.00 Per Person (suggested donation) Under 6: FREECome out and support Florida Wild Mammal Association Shirley Wise & Associates Posters courtesy of: PRINTING ON DEMAND 2650-5 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 (850) 926-4000 printingondemand@comcast.net LIVE AUCTION 11am 1 pm The Chamber held its monthly mixer on Sept. 15 at NHC Home Care in Medart along with Covenant Hospice. Dr. Jean Murphy, the new medical director for Covenant, seen at left with Chamber President John Shuff, was at the mixer. Covenant Director Elizabeth Schlein, lower left with Chamber member Sharol Brown, was also at the mixer. Tim Persson, who directs childrens programs for Covenant, was also present. NHC Community Liaison Laura Hyde coordinated the event. Chamber members R.H. Carter, Amy Geiger and Sharol Brown at the mixer.Spotlight on Business: Body-Tek 24 Hour Fitness Center Page 3B 24 HOUR FITNESS CENTER BeefOBradys hosts Chamber business lunch Page 4B

PAGE 16

Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comClubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, October 6 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at Beef O Bradys to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WRITERS OF WAKULLA will meet from 6 to 7 p.m. in the conference room at the public library. New members are always welcome. WAKULLA GENEALOGY GROUP will meet at 6:30 p.m. in the main meeting room of the public library. All are invited to attend. Friday, October 7 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) SASSY STRIPPERS QUILTERS GROUP meets at the public library from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. to make quilts for traumatized children. The cruiser quilts are donated to Wakulla County deputies to be used for children in need. New members welcome. For information, call 926-6290. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Saturday, October 8 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Saturday at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordville Highway at 5 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET is held every Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Posh Java in Sopchoppy. The market features local organic and unsprayed vegetables, homemade fresh bread from Crescent Moon Farm, live music and varying demonstrations, events, vendors and activities. Growers and seafood vendors wanting to participate may phone Jennifer Taylor at (850) 241-3873 or email famu.register@gmail.com. For more information, contact Posh at 962-1010 or Debbie Dix at 528-5838, or email posh_faery@yahoo.com. Sunday, October 9 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Sunday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, October 10 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 7:30 p.m. at St. Marks First Baptist Church. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN meets each Monday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGAS CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES GOVERNING BOARD will meet from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Jefferson County R.J. Bailar Public Library. The meeting is open to the public. Tuesday, October 11 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 824 Shadeville Road at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. Wednesday, October 12 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, October 13 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. F AMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at Beef O Bradys to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Friday, October 14 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) SASSY STRIPPERS QUILTERS GROUP meets at the public library from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. to make quilts for traumatized children. The cruiser quilts are donated to Wakulla County deputies to be used for children in need. New members welcome. For information, call 926-6290. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BIG BEND HOSPICE ADVISORY COUNCIL will meet at 1 p.m. at Beef OBradys in Crawfordville. Call Pam Allbritton at 926-9308 or 508-8749 for more information.Special EventsThursday, October 6 WAKULLA COASTAL OPTIMISTS ANNUAL EXTRAVAGANZA will be held at the senior center beginning at 6:30 p.m. with dinner at 7 p.m. Dinner will be pork medallions with madeira sauce, peach, gorganzola and pecan salad, twice baked potatoes, grilled stuffed tomatoes and pumpkin cheesecake. There will also be a fashion show/ Tickets are $30. Proceeds go towards scholarships given to Wakulla High seniors each year. Saturday, October 8 WOODSTORK FESTIVAL will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 3Y Farm. There will be music, arts and crafts, exhibits, educational booths, food and drink. There will be a silent auction from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. This is the Florida Wild Mammal Associations annual fundraiser. All proceeds will be used for the care and feeding of injured and orphaned wildlife. Visit www.woodstorkfestival.com for more information. NAMI WAKULLAS WALK FOR HEROES will be held from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Azalea Park in Crawfordville. A light breakfast will be served prior to the walk. The celebration will also include guest speakers, recognition of heroes and hotdogs will be served for lunch. For more information about NAMI Wakulla, call the NAMI Wakulla of ce at 850-926-1033. ANNUAL COUNCIL FAMILY REUNION will be held for descendants of John Cecil Council, an early pioneer of Wakulla County, at the Council family reunion picnic grounds in Crawfordville. The 59th reunion will start at 5 p.m. wish a sh fry and there will also be a covered dish lunch on Sunday starting at 11 a.m.For more information, contact Beverly Council at 926-3759. FALL WILDFLOWER WALK will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Call (850) 925-6121for more information. Reservations may be required. WAKULLA GREENWING DAY will be held at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Training and Firing Range located at 65 Qualify Lane, off Lawhon Mill Road. Registration will begin at 9 a.m. and event activities will run from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Kids aged 6 to 18 years of age are invited to participate; parental supervision is required. The cost is $15 per child, which includes a T-shirt and Greenwing Magazine subscription. Lunch will also be provided for all children and their parents. There will be bench shooting, shotgun shooting, archery, build your own turkey call, turkey shoot and chicken shoot. For more information, call Holly Porter at 850-519-0416. Sunday, October 9 COUNCIL FAMILY REUNION will be held at the Council family reunion picnic grounds for a covered dish lunch starting at 11 a.m. For more information, contact Beverly Council at 926-3759. Tuesday, October 11 WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will hold its 20th annual dinner and meeting at 6 p.m. at the Wakulla Springs Lodge. Please RSVP by October 4 by calling 926-1110 or email 24research@gmail.com. Please leave your name and the number in your party that will be attending. The guest speaker will be Randy Smith, son of Harold and Elizabeth Fisher Smith. The cost of the dinner is $27.50. RELAY FOR LIFE OF WAKULLA KICK-OFF PARTY will be held for the 2012 Relay at 6:30 p.m. at Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 176 Ocklockonee Street. The annual Kick-Off Party is the time to register as a cancer survivor or caregiver to receive invitations for future events. Teams can register and begin earning Spirit Points. Attendees will have the opportunity to vote on the theme for the 2012 Relay. GUITAR WORKSHOP will be held at 3:30 p.m. at Posh Java in Sopchoppy with musician and music teacher Carol Earl. This workshop will introduce the student to the acoustic guitar and will teach the student how the guitar is played, with practical hands on experience. People attending this workshop must bring a guitar, however, there are a couple guitars that may be borrowed. The fee is $5 per student and refreshments and homemade baked goods will be available for sale. To sign up for this class, please contact Debbie Dix Bishop at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Wednesday, October 12 WAKULLA COUNTY DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE TASK FORCE will be showing the video, Hidden Victims, at 12:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Health Department, 48 Oak Street. The video portrays the pain and suffering of children who live in homes where domestic violence is present. Everyone is welcome and lunch will be provided. For more information, call 926-9005. OCTOBER FULL MOON CLIMB at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse. For more information, contact the Visitor Center at 927-7744 or 888-927-7744. Friday, October 14 FOOD PRESERVATION WORKSHOP will be held by at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. David Moody, St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Director, and Shelley Swenson, extension agent, will cover the basics of food preservation through pressure canning and dehydrating. There is a $5 registration fee for each participant. Enroll by calling the Extension Of ce at 926-3931. Saturday, October 15 GARAGE SALE will be held at the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. FALL FESTIVAL will be held at Shadeville Elementary School from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. There will be childrens booths, laser tag, bingo and Polynesian Fire Knife Dancers. There will also be hamburgers and hotdogs, a cake walk, soda walk, nachos and cheese booth and a sweet shop. Coastal Optimists Club Annual Extravaganza at 6:30 p.m. at senior center. NAMI Wakullas Walk for Heroes at 8 a.m. at Azalea Park. Wakulla County Historical Societys annual dinner at 6 p.m. at Wakulla Springs Lodge. Domestic and Sexual Violence Task Force meeting at 12:30 p.m. at the health department. ThursdaySaturdayTuesdayThursday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.comLibrary News...By SCOTT JOYNERInterim Library DirectorThis Friday, Oct. 7, we are showing the critically acclaimed lm, Win, Win. Starring multi-award winning actor Paul Giamatti, and Academy Award nominee Amy Ryan, this R-rated (for language) lm tells the poignant tale of disheartened attorney Mike Flaherty (Giamatti), who moonlights as a high school wrestling coach. He stumbles across a star teen athlete through some questionable business dealings while trying to support his family. Just as it looks like he will get a double payday, the boys mother shows up fresh from rehab and at broke, threatening to derail everything. Will he put the welfare of the teen over his own desires? Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show and because of the rating no minors will be admitted without an adult. Book Extravaganza Another Success Our great patrons proved themselves again as more than $500 was raised for the library at last Saturdays Book Extravaganza. Combined with our Silent Auction the week before, more than $3,800 was raised for the Library over the past two weeks! As always, my staff, the Friends of the Library, along with myself, thank you for your continuing support of the library. We have some real exciting plans for the next year so please keep an eye on us as we continue to grow with your help. Computer Classes Our computer class schedule for the next two months is posted on our website and available at the front desk. Over the next two weeks, we are offering several classes. On Thursday, Oct. 6, Computer Basics: Arrange Your Computer Files II at 9:30 a.m. On Thursday, Oct. 13, we have Microsoft Word 2007: Envelopes, Labels, and Mail Merge at 2:30 p.m., followed by Genealogy Basics: Getting Started at 6 p.m. All computer classes are free but do require early registration. Come on out and pick up some great skills while having fun! City and County MeetingsThursday, October 6 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a workshop at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Monday, October 10 SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will meet for its regular commission meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. Thursday, October 13 ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet for its regular commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Friday, October 14 WAKULLA COUNTY VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD will hold public hearings regarding petitions that have been led with the VAB. Hearings start at 1 p.m. and are held in the commission chambers. The meetings are open to the public.

PAGE 17

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 Page 3B Spotlight on Business Spotlight on Business Business News from Business News from CallPau l s WellGet ThemAll TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROLSERVICEEVERYTHING FROM TERMITESTOMICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr s TM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Business Planning and Incorporations Title Insurance Probate and Heir Land Resolution General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. Shop Local Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce TuAmigoYourFriendWillHelpYou Accident? Injured?Call Someone You Can Trust!Hablamos Espaol1-855-55AMIGOA er 911 & Before 411850.224.4960www.fsucu.org Tell us about your business: BodyTek 24 is the only full service gym in Wakulla County, with a wide range of weights, cardio equipment, selector and plated machines. Our gym consists of six instructors teaching a variety of classes from Spinning, Muscle Pump to Zumba. Equipment orientation, personal trainer classes, as well as individual personal training are available to our members. Our members health and tness is our No. 1 priority. Body-Tek 24 has numerous classes beginning at 5:15 a.m. throughout the day and ending at 7 p.m. Our trainers and instructors love their jobs and their profession is their passion. If you need advice or assistance, we are always available to answer your tness questions. Our trainers and instructors compete in a variety of competitions in order to always be on top of the latest tness programs. We encourage our members to always strive for what they want and nothing is impossible to achieve. What services, products do you offer? Our gym offers a wide variety of weight training and cardio equipment along with our classes and personal training programs. What sets your business apart from the competition? Our trainers and staff are what set us apart from the competition. Our classes are always taught by certi ed or licensed instructors through nationally recognized tness organizations. We are here to serve our members. What should we be on the lookout for? We are continually working with our members to improve our gym through our various weight loss programs and new class schedules. We have currently brought on two licensed Zumba instructors and the classes are phenomenal. How long have you been a chamber member? 15 years Why did you join the chamber? We wanted to network with other local businesses and we believe in supporting our community. Why should local businesses join the chamber? To network with business and to support the local community. Whats your reason why Wakulla residents should Shop Local? Our local businesses are the life blood of the community. By shopping local, the money stays in our community. If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? Even though our gym is a 24 hour gym, our staffed hours are from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. You can reach us at 926-BFIT (2348). Or visit us on facebook for more information and class schedules. We are located at 56 Rainbow Drive in Crawfordville.Business: Body-Tek 24 Hour FitnessOwners: Robert and Mary Walsh and Ted and Dianne GerrellWe welcome our new and existing businesses that joined our local chamber during September. The Wakulla Chamber is not af liated with the National or State organizations. Back Door Liquor Store Spring Creek Road and Highway 98 Elite Flooring, Tallahassee Hardees of Crawfordville Lamar Advertising Shell Point Realty Preble Rish Engineering Jasper Thomas Road Bridlewood Apartments Crawfordville Mineral Springs Seafood Inc. d/b/a/ Mineral Springs by the Bay and Bouys Bayside Restaurant Panacea Wave 94 Radio StationNew Chamber membersPonder Enterprises and the Hardees of Crawfordville were proud to of cially kickoff their recent remodeling with a ribbon cutting with the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce last month. The remodel included new sidewalks, countertops, seating dcor, picnic tables, outdoor digital sign, interior and exterior painting and much more. Ponder Enterprises rst invested in the Crawfordville community almost 22 years ago. We are proud to reinvest in the Crawfordville community, a location that has been with our company since our early days, said Director of Marketing Elizabeth Faulk. We invite everyone to enjoy our line of Thickburgers and to also make Hardees signature made from scratch biscuits a part of their morning routine. A family run franchise, Ponder Enterprises opened its rst Hardees in Donalsonville, Ga., in 1984, and is where it has its headquarters today. Ponder Enterprises has a total of 24 restaurants spanning across southwest Georgia, southeast Alabama and North Florida. Hardees ribbon cuttingCrawfordville restaurant is newly remodeled 24 HOUR FITNESS CENTER 2615 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY., STE. 101 850-745-8545Buy a Dinner Entree after 4:00 pm and get ONEOFFER VALID THROUGH November 30, 2011. NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER COUPON OR DISCOUNTS. ONE COUPON PER VISIT. LUNCH SPECIALS ANYTIME, DAY or NIGHT!of equal or lesser value at50% OFFCome enjoy the Best Tasting Food, Biggest Portions and Best Values in Town!! GREAT OFFICE SPACEat The Barry BuildingFREELast Months Rent!Facilities, great atmosphere, all utilities.850-210-5849RATES START AT $250/month www.BarryBuilding.comClassified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week Call Denise at 926-7102 facebook.com/GamerZParadise Exp. 10/31/11 (850)926-9100|theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com 635WakullaArranRoadCrawfordville,Florida32327 Kinect | X-Box Live | PS3 | Wii | Wi-fiMON THURS: SUMMER HOURS 12 9 PM FRI:12 11 PM SAT: 12 11 PM SUN: 1 8 PMCome and PLAY!Buy 1 hr of Gaming for $3 Get 1 hr FREE GOLD BUYERS OFCRAWFORDVILLE2106CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327DEEDEE PRICHARD 850-566-7348 TONY SETZER 850-566-7344*Not valid with any other offers or prior purchases. Expires: October 31, 2011Receive an additionalGold and Silver Jewelry! with this coupon*for your

PAGE 18

Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Taking Care of Business Taking Care of Business Business News from Business News from By PETRA SHUFFChamber of CommerceOur September luncheon was another great success. We would very much like to thank BeefOBradys for hosting and for all of their support of the chamber and community alike. Harold and Julie Slayton, owners of our local Beefs are very involved in our community and host charitable events for different non-profit organizations and our schools. A salad and a wonderful chicken dish with rice and broccoli was a healthy choice and de nitely a crowd pleaser. A special thanks to my favorite server, Jay, who single handedly took care of our crowd of 33. Once again, we want to thank our attendees and local businesses for bringing a large array of raf e items. The $33 cash prize was won by Mary Wallace, who donated her winnings back to the chamber. Mary suggested starting these luncheons to add an additional networking opportunity for our members, and to earn a little extra money for our organization. She therefore felt that her winnings should be donated back to the chamber. Thanks, Mary! Several of our members invited a guest. Cyndy Murphy with Rainbow Intl. and Mary Wallace with Cook Insurance each invited a guest who became a member during the luncheon. Welcome Pamela L. Power with Bridlewood Apartments, and Kimberly Williams with Williams Seafood Inc. d/b/a Mineral Springs by the Bay and Buoys Bayside Restaurant. New member Lamar Advertising shared that the company recently acquired Summit Advertising. Bridlewood Apartments was excited to announce their civil service discount, a 5-percent discount on rent for an apartment to law enforcement, re ghters, teachers, nurses, military personnel, state, city and county employees. In addition, new renters under any of the above described categories will receive a reduced security deposit of $99, and application fees will be waived. Susan Schatzman with Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla reminded us of their upcoming golf tournament taking place Oct. 21. The Drive for the Build golf tournament will help raise the necessary funds for the next Habitat for Humanity home build. This will be the 10th home built in Wakulla. Herb Donaldson announced the 20th annual meeting of the Wakulla County Historical Society at Wakulla Springs on Oct. 11 at 6 p.m. The Historical Society will hold an annual Open House at the Museum located at 24 High Drive in Crawfordville on Dec. 13. The exhibits feature our worthy veterans. The gift shop will be open for unique gifts including the new release of the annual collectable ornament. This years feature is beautiful and focuses on Panacea with the Mineral Springs Hotel on the front and the Blue Crab Festival on the back. The gift shop is open on Thursday and Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and the rst Saturday of the month. The genealogy suite is open for research. Volunteers who want to help preserve historic documents are welcome. In conjunction with Founders Day in March, in association with Palaver Tree Theatre Company, the Historical Society will present the annual event Wakulla Story. This years theatrical production will also be in conjunction with Womens History Month. If you know of any local women heroes whose dedication and service to our community are worth recognizing, please call Herb Donaldson at (718) 682-3870 or Cathy Frank at 251-5201. Our next luncheon will be held Oct. 26 at Buoys Bayside Restaurant in Panacea. Wakulla County Veterans Day Parade10:00 am, Saturday November 5, 2011Co-Sponsored by Wakulla Christian School and the Wakulla County Veterans Services OfcePARADE ENTRY FORMYour community group or organization can become a vital part in showing your support for our troops and honoring our local veterans. It will be a very special way to pay tribute to all veterans and active duty military. The event will bene t local veterans groups and active millitary.The theme for the 2011 Veterans Day Celebration is Honoring ALL Who Served. Parade entries are strongly encouraged to decorate in a patriotic theme. Prizes will be awarded following the ofcial Veterans Day Ceremony. Full details of the Parade Order and your position in the line of march will be sent to you by November 3rd, 2011 A donation of toiletry supplies for our active duty soldiers is all that is requested. These donations can be brought to the Hudson Park pavilion on November 5th.The parade will line up at 9:00 a.m. and start promptly at 10:00 a.m. As Parade Coordinator, I, Kevin Hollan, will guide everyone into position Pre-registration is necessary to ensure sufcient space for your parade unit and minimize traf c congestion. Name of Organization: ________________________________________________________ Contact Person:_________________________________________Phone: _______________ Fax #:________________________________________E-mail________________________ Contact Address ___________________________________________________________ To register your parade oat contact: KEVIN HOLLAN kevin.hollan@gmail.com Fax: 926-5186 Phone: 745-8649Call your friends and challenge them to create a better oat than yours! If you have any questions, dont hesitate to email or call me. Ill be glad to help! Sincerely, Kevin Hollan Veterans Day Parade Coordinator LUN CH PA RTN ER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyofwhile quantities last.926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive Deli DelioftheweekatTry One of Our Home Made Parfaits www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service The Workswakullas coworking caf www.theworkscafe.com ReceiveacomplimentarycopyofPastry and Coffee Special! Let us perk up your day! Beef OBradys hosts Chamber members for September luncheonCHAMBER LUNCHEON: Chamber members and guests network and enjoy a meal at BeefOBradys. Lucy Ward has been in the childcare business for more than 28 years. She started in the childcare business when she saw the need for quality childcare. To Ward, a child needs the chance and the environment to just be a child, and to learn and grow with love and a gentle guiding hand. Ward, or MeMe as she is called by the children, has never had a new facility in all her years of business. With the opening of the new center this dream has become a reality. Bright Beginnings Preschool and Daycare is located at 360 Shadeville Highway. The facility cares for children from 6 weeks to 12 years old. Transportation is provided to Medart Elementary, Shadeville Elementary, Crawfordville Elementary and to the Wakulla Educational Center. Bright Beginnings is open from 6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Breakfast, lunch and snack are provided. Bright Beginnings offers a VPK program, Early Headstart and a preschool program. Bright Beginnings accepts Early Learning Coalition students and private pay students. Our doors are always open if anyone would like to come in and view the center, or if you have any questions please feel free to call us at 926-9949. Staff and students from Bright Beginnings with Chamber members at the ribbon cutting on Sept. 7.Bright Beginnings holds a ribbon cutting PARTNER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of

PAGE 19

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 Page 5B Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSAFFORDABLE COVERAGE TO SAVE YOU MONEY Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850-570-9734 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com The Wakulla Coastal Optimist Clubs2011ANNUAL FASHION EXTRAVAGANZAWakulla County Senior Center Thursday October 6 2011 6:30pm Social 7:00pm Dinner, Auction, & Show please join us forMaurices Thread Tree Crums Mini MallTICKETS $30.00 eachall proceeds go toward scholarships for Wakulla County students WAKULLA COUNTYSRecycling and Disposal Choice for: Residential bulky items Commercial bulky items Construction debris Remodeling materials Including the kitchen sink! JYard debris Garage stuff WE APPRECIATETHE OPPORTUNITY TOSERVEYOURRECYCLINGNEEDS.6020 Woodville Highway, Tallahassee, Florida 32305Phone(850)216-1006 Fax(850)216-1009www.marpanrecycling.comA small fee of $5.00 covers the rst 250 pounds of material. Larger loads are charged by the ton $39 per ton (2,000 pounds). Open 7:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. 8:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m. on Saturday.CONVENIENT Marpan Recycling is open most holidays and six days a week for your convenience, located just north of Woodville on SR 363 (Woodville Highway). FAST With two scales and a clean, paved drop-off area, your turnaround time will be very fast. GREEN-Marpan Recycling is a material recovery facility, not a landfill. Materials recovered include wood, concrete, cardboard, carpet, paper and metals. (Sorry no hazardous waste or food garbage.) GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 30 Florida political leaders struck their claim this week in the presidential primary land grab as they pushed the states contest to Jan. 31 and forced traditionally early primary venues also move their contests earlier. A committee created to pick the date for the primary decided the risk of losing half the states convention delegates in both parties was a small price to pay for placing the heavily-populated swing state near the head of the line, giving it more clout in choosing the Republican nominee. The committee wasnt alone in looking ahead to 2012 elections. House Speaker Dean Cannon said his chamber will challenge a judges ruling affirming the Fair Districts constitutional amendments passed last year that restrict the way lawmakers can draw congressional and state political boundaries. While political leaders met at the Capitol on Friday to pick the primary date on Friday, a circuit judge across the street shot down a plan to privatize 29 South Florida prisons and work camps. Union representatives who filed the lawsuit on behalf of state prison guards and other correction workers, claimed victory while privatization proponents studied options to put out for bid a huge chunk of nations third largest prison system. Providing a somber backdrop to the urry of forward looking activity, streams of well-wishers, former colleagues and political foes paid their last respects this week to former Gov. Claude Kirk, an idiosyncratic leader who became Floridas rst Republican governor since Reconstruction. Kirk passed away this week at the age of 85. PRIMARY DECISION CAUSES NATIONAL FLAP In a move certain to provide fodder for Sunday morning talk shows, Florida political delegates decided this week the state will buck the national parties and hold its presidential preference primary on Jan. 31. Setting the stage for a lastminute flurry of decisions in traditionally early primary states, a committee of state political leaders voted 7-2 for the Jan. 31 date, a move that will likely result in the state losing half its voting bloc of delegates at the nominating conventions now less than a year away. Florida would still be behind Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina states which have typically led off the presidential selection cycle but is breaking the parties rules by going earlier than March 6. And all those early states may now move their own primaries earlier. Were the biggest swing state in the union, said former Gov. Bob Martinez, a Republican on the panel. Texas is red, New York is blue, California is blue and were 10 electoral votes greater than Ohio. So, I think this is a real, real election in Florida. Two Democrats on the panel, Sen. Gary Siplin of Orlando and Rep. Cynthia Stafford of Miami voted against the proposal, pushing instead for a March 6 date that would assure that both parties delegates will be seated. I believe that Florida should respect the integrity of the process and comply with the rules that both political parties agreed to, Stafford said. I dont want the voices of Floridians to be diminished and the state penalized because Florida failed to adhere to the agreement. The six Republicans on the panel dismissed such concerns, saying it has been decades since the conventions played key roles in the selection of a candidate. Todays modern convention, I believe and others believe, has become a formality and a coronation of the nominee whos been determined by the momentum and coverage he gets in a 24-hour news cycle based on the victories achieved in the early stage, said state Rep. Carlos Lopez-Cantera, R-Miami. One Democrat, Al Lawson, joined the Republicans in voting for the Jan. 31 date. In other election news, House Speaker Dean Cannon, R-Winter Park, told reporters this week that the chamber will appeal a federal court ruling upholding the constitutionality of a pair of constitutional amendments offered by FairDistricts Florida, which places restrictions on how lawmakers can draw political boundaries. The House has joined Florida Congresswoman Corrine Brown, a Democrat, and Congressman Mario Diaz-Balart, a Republican, who have challenged the constitutional amendments. The suit contends that the U.S. Constitution sets aside the task of redrawing the lines for the Legislature, and that state voters cant override that through the states constitution. Despite the lawsuit, Cannon said the state House and Senate will continue to draw maps under the standards in the Fair Districts amendments, overwhelmingly approved by voters in last Novembers elections, because the 11th Circuit Court in Atlanta is unlikely to rule on the suit before lawmakers have to nish redrawing the lines during next years legislative session. JUDGE THROWS OUT PRIVATE PRISON PLAN Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford on Friday struck down a plan backed by Sen. J.D. Alexander, R-Lake Wales, and supported by Gov. Rick Scott to privatize prisons in the southern third of the state. In a ruling that is likely to be appealed, Fulford said lawmakers overstepped their authority by including the proposal in the proviso language of the 2012 state budget. By doing so, Fulford said lawmakers sidestepped the legislative process in an effort to transfer control of 29 south Florida facilities in 18 counties into the hands of the private sector. This court concluded that if it is the will of the Legislature to itself initiate privatization of Floridas prisons, as opposed to DOC, the Legislature must do so by general law, rather than using the hidden recesses of the General Appropriations Act, Fulford said, quoting an earlier case. Backers say the move would save taxpayers $22 million a year, estimates some critics say were pulled out of thin air. Attorneys for the Police Benevolent Association and three correctional of cers argued that legislative leaders attempting to avoid a debate about the controversial issue sidestepped legal requirements by sticking the privatization plan in the ne print of the state budget. We believe justice has been served for the 4,000 men and women who faced the prospect of privatization, said Matt Puckett, PBA Executive Director. This is a victory for the of cers and the citizens of Florida. It validates what the PBA has been saying all along The Legislature is not above the law. Agency of cials say they have not decided whether to appeal Fulfords ruling. The legislative session begins in January. GOODBYE, CLAUDIUS MAXIMUS Former Gov. Claude Kirk, a larger-than-life political outsider who made history when he was elected governor of Florida as a Republican in 1966, died this week at his home in Palm Beach County. The rst GOP governor of Florida since Reconstruction oversaw the rewrite of the Florida Constitution and has also been credited with raising environmental awareness in the development fueled state. But he may have been best known for his amboyant personality, out-spoken nature and quirky sense of humor. His nickname during his tenure was Claudius Maximus. Kirk got married while he was governor, after having shown up at his inauguration with his future wife, Erika Mattfeld. Asked by reporters who the lady accompanying him was, Kirk wouldnt say, identifying her only as Madame X. Later in life, long after he left the governors of ce, he wanted to be buried at the Capitol. Being buried up there would be a good idea, so I can keep an eye on them, Kirk said a few years ago in a newspaper interview. The veteran of World War II and Korea will be buried, however, at a national cemetery in South Florida. STATE EXECUTES INMATE WITH NEW DRUG REGIMEN Florida prison officials this week executed Manuel Valle for the 1978 murder of a Coral Gables police of cer. After more than 30 years on death row, Valle, 61, was executed by lethal injection under a three drug procedure that for the rst time included the anesthetic pentobarbital. The new drug was added to the injection protocol after the drug it replaced was pulled from the market. The new drug survived a court challenge before it could be used. STORY OF THE WEEK: In a N ews Service rst, Story of the Week honors was a three-way tie as Florida says goodbye to colorful former governor Claude Kirk, political leaders approved a controversial presidential primary date and a circuit judge throws out a plan to privatize a third of Floridas prisons. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: The garden of controversy must be continually cultivated; otherwise, nobody knows you are alive, Gov. Claude Kirk, (1926-2011) to Time magazine in 1967. WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Hello January primary, goodbye to a colorful governor (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile HomesER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs.

PAGE 20

Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Look for the next chapter of The Brass Bell in next weeks edition of The Wakulla news This page sponsored in part by: Find us on Mr. Mortons IdeaIn most areas, Arbor Day takes place on the last Friday in April. On that day, people plant and care for trees. The idea for Arbor Day came from J. Sterling Morton, a newspaper editor who lived in Nebraska and loved nature. Morton introduced Arbor Day to the public in 1872. His idea was a hit, and the first Arbor Day celebration took place in Nebraska on April 10, 1872. In the years following, the celebration of Arbor Day spread. Today, hundreds of people in the United States and around the world observe the day and plant millions of trees. Most trees fall into two groups: deciduous, which lose their leaves once a year, and evergreen, which keep their leaves yearround. There are several types of deciduous and evergreen trees. Do you know what they are? Fill in the blanks to name that tree. 1) __ A K 2) C __ __ R E __ __ 3) B __ R C __ 4) H I __ __ O __ Y 5) J U __ I __ E __ 6) __ L M 7) __ A __ __ E NAME T NAME T H H A A T TREE T TREEAnswers: 1) Oak, 2) Cypress, 3) Birch, 4) Hickory, 5) Juniper, 6) Elm, 7) Maple A: Sep-timber! A: A palm tree.Q: What kind of tree can fit in your hand? Q: What is a trees least favorite month?Jokes and Riddles Jokes and Riddles List 10 words that rhyme with tree. 1. ______________ 2. ______________ 3. ______________ 4. ______________ 5. ______________ 6. ______________ 7. ______________ 8. ______________ 9. ______________ 10. _____________What Rhymes withSome answers: bee, fee, flea, free, gee, he, key, knee, spree, three Trees benefit the world in many ways. Do you know how? Take this quiz and find out.1) Trees are used to make paper and plastic. Fact or Fiction? 2) Trees reduce noise pollution. Fact or Fiction?Answers: 1) Fiction, plastic is not made from trees, 2) Fact, 3) Fiction, some trees like firs do not provide overhead shade, 4) Fact, 5) Fact, 6) Fact, 7) Fact, 8) Fiction, not all trees bear fruit, 9) Fact, 10) Fact3) Trees provide overhead shade. Fact or Fiction? 4) Trees protect the soil. Fact or Fiction? 5) Trees provide food and shelter for animals. Fact or Fiction? 6) Trees soften buildings. Fact or Fiction? 7) Trees clean the air. Fact or Fiction? 8) Trees bear fruit for people to eat. Fact or Fiction? 9) Trees provide jobs for people. Fact or Fiction? 10) Trees are used to make medicine. Fact or Fiction?Fact or Fiction? Tree Challenge COLORING PICTURE COLORING PICTURE COLORING PICTURE

PAGE 21

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 Page 7B Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! 926-7102 Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $10.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements A New Look PaintingSpecializing in residential and commercial Re-painting pressure washing sheetrock wood rot repairsLICENSED &INSURED850-926-2400CALL JIM PORTER: ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 CARPET CLEANING of Wakulla Residential and Commercial WATER EXTRACTION 24/7 EMERGENCY850-567-6734CAMO New Construction, Remodeling & Repairs850.524.5894 Home Maintenance & Repair--Cliff Westbrook Services ---Full Service home maintenance and repair. Foreclosure, rental, yard cleanups. Flower beds, window washing, trash hauling. EXPERIENCED and RELIABLE850-926-2004 Crawfordville CarpetCleanersaffordable carpet care free estimates850-459-0106 850-210-5849or visit us at www.BarryBuilding.com Affordable Office Spaceat the Barry Building. Enjoy working surrounded by a great atmosphere with many amenities. Rates start at $250/mo., utilities included! Come take a tour at www.BarryBuilding.com. TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com Junior P.SandersSeptic Tank Services18-YR Experience. New System Installation-All Types. Drain Repair. Washing Machine Systems.SR0111684NO JOB TOO SMALL, FAIR PRICES, FRIENDLY GUARANTEED SERVICE!850-210-5777 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved850-356-6801Affordable for every budget! ...Refresh Home Detailingfor a new home feel...Call for a free and friendly estimateLICENSED Will help you make the most of your outdoor space. Cabins, Barns, Playhouses, Utilities, Gazebos, Tables, Swings, Rockers and More! Pricing and Sizes to t your needs. Cash Discounts. $25 credit on a new building with this ad. See Melissa at 1580 Crawfordville Hwy., next to Happy Time Day Care850-926-3441SOUTHERN STORAGE SOLUTIONS Stow it Away!!5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGEGreatRates! STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.BUYSELLTRADEREPAIRBoats, Motors, Trailers, New/Used Marine Supplies Sold 4815D Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Pro p Service Center Interstate Batter y Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-556-4652www.wakullaboatsales.com stowawaymarine @comcast.net Denises ListCall Denise today to get your services on her list!850-926-7102 Classi eds@TheWakullaNews.net 105 Business Opportunities BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can fix those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again, and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Money Making Opportunity. Computer a must. Free evaluation & Training. Flexible hours. Great incentives. www.freedomtodream.net 352-360-5939. 110 Help Wanted RobertSmithCarpentryislookingforcarpenters.Experienceis amust.Transportationisamust. Please call 850-294-3208. 114 Miscellaneous Help Wanted FREEDOM LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH is seeking experienced musicians. Please email experience and contact information to Marjorie at audition.for.church@mail.com Auditions will be held. 120 Services and Businesses A -1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed ~ John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550 A IR CON OF WAKULLA Heating and Cooling Gary Limbaugh 926-5592 3232 Crawfordville Highway Service, Repair, Installation FL Lic. #CAC1814304 ALL ABOUT...CONCRETE blocks bricks pavers LANDSCAPE plants sod tractor workcall JOSEPH FRANCIS850-556-1178 / 850-556-3761 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 ANYTIME ELECTRIC Specializinginrepairandservice,residentialandcommercial, homesandmobilehomes. 24-hourservice.MarkOliver, ER0015233. 421-3012. BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway. Larry Carter Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931, 850-694-7041. Licensed/Insured. Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291. HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIRSales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & soundLocated in Crawfordville Doug & Sherry Quigg, Owners Lic. Nos. ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 926 -5790 HomeDayCare-WakullaStationarea.M-F.Mealsprovided. ExperienceQualiltyCare.For moreinformation,pleasecallAllison at 933-9586. KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial,residentialandmobilehomes.Repair,sales,service,installation.Allmakesand models.Lic.#RA0062516. 926-3546. POLLY NICHOLSSpecial Touch CleaningConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential.pray like it s up to God, Work like it s up to you519-7238 926-3065Licensed &Insured RefreshHomeDetailing.Fora newhomefeel.Pleasecalfora freeandfriendlyestimate.Affordableforeverybudget. LcensedinFlorida. 850-356-6801. UPHOLSTERY Flagship Canvas & Upholstery. Quality marine canvas fabrication and Upholstery of all kinds. Scott A. Smith, 38 Rainbow Dr. Crawfordville, (behind El Jalisco). 850-228-1007. www.flagshipcanvas.com flagshipcanvas@yahoo.com 275 Home Furnishings $160brandnamequeenpillowtopmattressset,NEWwithwarranty, 222-7783. $399Sofa/Loveseatset.Stillin crate,neverused.Candeliver 545-7112. Must move this week! 4pieceBedroomSet:Solid Wood.Brandnew.$439,delivery avail. 222-9879. 280 Home Appliances FrigidaireGasRange.Likenew! $450.CallDeeShriverat 850-926-8120. 320 Farm Products & Produce Farm-freshvegetables.Peas, blanchedandfrozen,okra choppedandfrozen,greenboilingpeanutsandboiledgreen peanuts.Wealsocustom-processcows,hogs,goatsanddeer. Raker Farm 926-7561. 335 Pets DOGS,PUPPIES,NICECATS ANDKITTENS...Come,take alookandbringanew friendhomeTODAY!CHAT Adoption Center:Mondays closed. Tuesdays through Wednesday& Fridays: 11:00AM to 4:30PM Thursdays: 11:00AM to 7:00 P M Saturdays: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM Sundays: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM1 OAK STREET, CRAW FORDVILLE The unconditional love of a pet is waiting for you at th e C.H.A.T. Adoption Center. orvisit: chatofwakulla.org LOW COST PET VACCINATIONAnimal Health Services will be at the CHATAdoption Center1 Oak Street, CrawfordvilleSATURDAY, OCTOBER 8from 12:30pm to 1:30pm for more information call 926-0890 355 Yard Sales IndoorSale!Friday,10/7and Saturday,10/8.9AM-3PM,1239 CoastalHwy.,Panacea.Holiday decorations,workbench,church pews,furniture,dolls,crafts. Lots more! Must not miss! Multi-Family-Sale,Sat.-10/8, 7:30AM-1PM,677EastIvan Road.B.O.B.jogging-stroller, camo,XL-dogcrate,dogcarrier, gasgrills,boysbikeandtoys, books,householditems, clothes framed art furniture. CHAT ADOPTION CENTER OctoberisAdopt-a-Shelter-Dog Month.Wearereducingourdog adoptionfeesby$25.Arealbargain, consideringthatallanimalswill bemicro-chipped,spayed/neutered, rabiesvaccinations,allothervaccinationsuptodate,wormingandwill receivepetfoodand1monthoffree petinsurance.Italsoincludesafree initialhealthexaminationbyalocal veterinarian.Please,comeseeusat theCHATAdoptionCenterat1Oa k Street(nexttotheSheriffsDepartment).Formoreinformationcall 926-0890. YARD SALE!!Saturday, October 8thCorner of US 98 and Spring Creek Highway.SPACES FOR VENDORS EVERY SATURDAY 8AM-4PM!Bring your Stuff and Sell it Here!!850-926-8120 (for info) 500 Real Estate PUBLISHERS NOTICEAllrealestateadvertisinginthis newspaperissubjecttotheFair HousingActwhichmakesitillegaltoadvertiseanypreference, limitation,ordiscrimination basedonrace,color,religion, sex,handicap,familialstatusor nationaloriginoranintentionto makeanysuchpreference,limitationordiscrimination.Familial statusincludeschildrenunder theageof18livingwithparents orlegalcustodians,pregnant womenandpeoplesecuringthe custodyofchildrenunderthe age of 18. Thisnewspaperwillnotaccept anyadvertisingforrealestate thatisaviolationofthelaw.Our readersareherebyinformedthat alldwellingsadvertisedinthis newspaperareavailableonan equalopportunitybasis.TocomplainofdiscriminationcallHUD tollfreeat1-800-669-9777.The tollfreenumberforthehearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 515 Apartments for Rent 2BR/1BA$375/monthat87Joe MackSmith,depositinexchangeforcleaning.Sendmailhappycamper9@columbus.rr.comor 614.578.6322, available now! 1BDR as LOW as $600/mo. 2BDR as LOW as $700/mo. 3BDR as LOW as $800/m o. swimming pool and gym850-926-1134MOVE IN SPECIAL $99 DEPOSIT $300 LOCAL HERO DISCOUNT $99Application Fee $35 530 Comm. Property for Rent A ffordableOfficeSpaceatthe BarryBuilding.Greatatmosphere!Includesallutilities,trash p/u,fullkitchenuse,conference room.Ratesstartat$250/mo. 850-210-5849orourwebsiteat www.Barr y Buildin g .com Mini-WarehouseSpacesfo r lease,8X10and10X12now available.ComebyorcallWakulla Realt y, 926-5084. WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE Fitness Studio -1000/sf,(wall to wall mat & mirrors) Retail -1250/sf (storefront w/back storage) Divided Office Space -1074/sf.Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 535 Comm. Property for Sale Choicecornerlotatjunctureo f CrawfordvilleHighwayand pavedWhitlockWay.200'X300'. CommercialZoningGuaranteed, $70,000.DixieProperties(850) 656-6340. 545 Homes for Sale 3BR/2BAone-storyhomeon1.5 lotwithgarage.Excellentcondition.$95,000.Ownerfinancing. 850-251-7588 850-962-2016. 555 Houses for Rent 3BR/1BACH&A,closetoMedartElementaryandWakulla HighSchool.Referencesrequired.$700/mo.,plusdeposit. Please call 850-556-4464. 3BR/2BATHinMysteriousWaters.$795/rent,samedeposit. No pets. Call Jim at 566-5165. Crawfordville,clean,large2 bedrooms,2fullbathduplex, $675permonth.CallLinda, 850-926-0283. House/Acreage Charming 3BR/1BA, HVAC, appliances, ceiling fans, located on 3 acres in North Wakulla. Workshop, 2 storage sheds, $750/month, plus $500/deposit. 850-251-1253. Brenda Hicks Realty. 560 Land for Sale 2-acrelotforsalenearnew ShadevilleSchool,cornero f SteelCourtandSpringCree k Hwy.(citywater).Ownerfinancing.Call850-556-1178o r 850-556-3765. 565 Mobile Homes for Rent 12X603BR/1BAolderhome. CentralA/C,gas,heat,range. #20CutchinCt.(offEastIvan Rd.)Garbage/waterincluded. Talquin/WakullaGas.Nopets. $475/mo.+$350/deposit. 926-1428 leave messa g e. 3BR/2BA,largeporch,backsto theNationalForest.Doublecarport.Sitson5beautifulacres withapond.$650/month.plus deposit. 850-984-0044.

PAGE 22

Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Visit me on the web www.WakullaInfo.com Dawn Reed -Realtor GRICell (850) 294-3468 152 Centerline Road only $85,000. 3/2home has lots of privacy on 4.5 acres. Beautiful kitchen with brazilian cherry hardwood oors. Open Floor Plan.Extra building in the back. Check out www.WakullaShortSales.com 4Br 2Ba House $1220mo + Sec. Dep. 4Br 2Ba DWMH $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $1200mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $400mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co.(850) 926 We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!91 Posey Rd., Medart2BR/1BA, secluded cypress home w/ replace, 2 screened porches on 30 Acres. Perfect for nature lovers.$875 per month.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. 565 Mobile Homes for Rent 14X702BR/2BA.CentralA/C. Gas,heatandrange.#10 CutchinCourt,offEastIvanRd. Garbagepick-up/waterincluded. Talquin/WakullaGas.$525/mo., $400/deposit.Nopets. 926-1428. Leave messa g e. 2BR/2BASW/MH.WakullaGardensKlickitatRd.Niceinterior andexterior,openfloorplan. $575/month, first, last. 3BR/2BADWMH,WakullaGardens, CAH, Good Floor Plan. $675/month+deposit,application,references.1-yrlease.Both availblenow!Callfordiscount! Informationorforappointment 850-554-5267, 850-524-4090. 3BR/1.5BAM/Hon3acres, Panaceaarea.Centralheat/air, dishwasher,woodstove.Clean andprivate.Nosmoking.Referencesrequired.$600/month, $300/deposit. 352-493-2232. 570 Mobile Homes for Sale 2BR/1BAMH.$9,000.Excellent condition!Vinylsiding,shingled roof, new flooring throughout. Stove,Refrigerator,Microwave, A C/Unit. Must be moved. (850) 544-6760 leave message. 605 Statewide Classi eds Adoption A childless,young,successful womanseekstoadopt.Will providelovinghome/doting grandma.Largeextendedfamily.Excellentsupport.Financial security.Expensespaid.JessicaorAdam.1-800-790-5260. Bar#0150789. Announcements A dvertisingthatWorks.Putyour adinOver100PapersthroughoutFloridaforoneLOWRATE! Call(866)742-1373orvisit: www.florida-classifieds.com. Auctions A UCTION-MOUNTAINBROO K COTTAGES,Sylva,NC.30+ A cres,Farmhouse,14Furnished,fireplacecottages.Auction:October22,2011,11:00 A M.www.auctionEbid.com. MarshaHowell(404)822-3525. A uctionManagementCorporation. NCAL#7403. Autos Wanted CASHFORCARS!AnyMake, Model,orYear.WePayMORE! RunningorNot.SellYourCaror TruckTODAY.FreeTowing!Instant Offer: (888)420-3807. Business Opportunities THINKCHRISTMAS,START NOW!OWNAREDHOT!DOLLAR,DOLLARPLUS,MAILBO X ORDISCOUNTPARTYSTORE FROM$51,900WORLDWIDE! 100%TURNKEY(800)518-3064 WWW.DRSS20.COM. Education A LLIEDHEALTHcareer training-Attendcollege100% online.Jobplacementassistance.Computeravailable.FinancialAidifqualified.SCHE V certified.Call(800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com. Financial Services $$$ACCESSLAWSUITCASH NOW!!!$$$AsseenonTV.$$$ InjuryLawsuitDragging?Need $500-$500,000++within48/hrs? LowratesAPPLYNOWBY PHONE!CallToday!Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com. Help Wanted Driver-GREATMILES!Great Pay!$1000Sign-onforExperiencedCO's&$1500Incentives forO/O's.DriverAcademyRefresherCourseavailable.recruit@ffex.net. (855)356-7121. A BetterCareerWithMelton GreatEquipment&Benefits2 Mos.CDLClassADrivingExp (877)258-8782www.meltontruck.com. Drivers-NEWPAYINCREASE FORTANKDRIVERS.Lotso f Freight,GreatMiles,3Weeks PaidVacation,Incentives,Insurance&401(k).FoodGrade Products.CDL-A&1YearOTR ExperienceRequired.Call (877)882-6537.www.OakleyTransport.com. Driver-WeeklyHometime!Part & Full-time.DailyorWeeklyPay. SteadyMilesMeansMORE MONEY!ExcellentBenefits! CDL-A,3monthsrecentexperiencerequired.(800)414-9569. www.driveknight.com. Miscellaneous SAWMILLSfromonly$3997MAKEMONEY&SAVEMONEY withyourownbandmill-Cut lumberanydimension.Instock readytoship.FREEInfo&DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com (800)578-1363 Ext.300N. A TTENDCOLLEGEONLINE fromHome.*Medical,*Business, *Paralegal,*Accounting,*CriminalJustice.Jobplacementassistance.Computeravailable.FinancialAidifqualified.Call (888)203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com. A IRLINESAREHIRING-Train forhighpayingAviationMaintenanceCareer.FAAapproved program.Financialaidifqualified-HousingavailableCALL A viationInstituteofMaintenance (866)314-3769. Out of Area Real Estate 20AcreRanchFORECLOSURES!NearGrowingEl Paso,TXWas$16,900Now $12,900$0Down,takeover payments,$99/mo.Beautiful views,ownerfinancing.FREE colorbrochure(800)755-8953 www.sunsetranches.com. Real Estate A uction-Over110Properties: A L&FL.October24th-28th. Commercial,Homes,Condos, A creage&Lots.SperryVan Ness www.BidOnBankREO.com.Auctioneer#1832 Broker#000058515-0/FLAuctioneer#AU220; Broker#CQ1036111. Schools & Instruction Heat&AirJOBS-Readyto work?3weekacceleratedprogram.Handsonenvironment. Nationwidecertificationsand LocalJobPlacementAssistance! (877) 359-1690. 680 Legal Notices 681 Foreclosure Proceedings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION FILE NUMBER: 10-387CA DUANEEVANSLLC,aFloridaLimitedLiability Company, Plaintiff v. ANTOINETTEC.WALKER,a/k/aANTOINETTE C. WALKER-LIPPLETT, Defendant. AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION TO:ANTOINETTEC.WALKER,a/k/aANTOINETTEC.WALKER-LIPPLETT,ifalive, andifdead,herunknownspouse,heirs,devisees,grantees,judgmentcreditors,andall otherpartiesclaimingby,through,under,or againstthem;theunknownspouse,heirs, devisees,grantees,andjudgmentcreditors ofdeceaseddefendant,andallotherparties claimingby,through,under,oragainstdefendant;andallunknownnaturalpersonsif alive,andifdeadornotknowntobedead oralive,theirseveralandrespectiveunknownspouses,heirs,devisees,grantees, andjudgmentcreditors,orotherparties claimingby,through,orunderthoseunknownnaturalpersons;andtheseveraland respectiveunknownassigns,successorsin interest,trustees,oranyotherpersonclaimingby,through,under,oragainstanycorporationorotherlegalentitynamedasadefendant;andallclaimants,personsorparties,naturalorcorporate,orwhoseexactlegalstatusisunknown,claimingunderthe abovenamedordescribeddefendantor claimingtohaveanyright,title,orinterestin tlle property, YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactiontoquiet taxtitletothefollowingpropertyinWakulla County, Florida: ThatpartofLot2inPlatfiledforrecordrepresentingtheWestone-halfofLot36,in HartsfieldSurveythatliesNorthofState Road 61 LESSANDEXCEPTthatparcelonthe NorthwestcornerofsaidLot2,identifiedas Tax Folio Number 00-00-036-000-09673-000 ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT: Commenceataplainconcretemonument markingthenorthwestcornerofLot36of theHartsfieldSurvey,WakullaCounty,Florida,andalsobeingthesouthwestcornerof ShadevilleSouth,aplattedsubdivisionof WakullaCounty,Florida,asrecordedinPlat Book3,Page19,ofthepublicrecordsof WakullaCounty,Florida;thencerunNorth 72degrees21minutes11secondsEast 262.78feetalongthesouthboundaryof saidsubdivisiontoanironrodandcap(LB &017)forthePOINTOFBEGINNING.From saidPOINTOFBEGINNINGcontinuealong saidsouthboundaryasfollows:North72 degrees21minutes11secondsEast37.30 feettoaconcretemonumentonsaidsouth boundary;thenceNorth72degrees21minutes06secondsEast413.84feettoaconcretemonument(LB4923)onsaidsouth boundary;thenceNorth72degrees20minutes40secondsEast124.78feettoaniron rodandcap(LB7017)onsaidsouthboundary;thenceleavingsaidsouthboundaryrun South17degrees31minutes23seconds East247.85feettoanironrodandcap(LB 7017)onthenortherlyrightofwayboundary ofStateRoadNo.61(ShadevilleRoad); thencealongsaidrightofwayboundaryrun South70degrees44minutes36seconds West476.17feettoa2inchdiameteriron pipe;thenceleavingsaidrightofway boundaryrunNorth17degrees31minutes 23secondsWest264.00feettothePOINT OF BEGINNING. Theabove-describedpropertyismoreparticularly described as: CommenceataconcretemonumentmarkingtheNorthwestcornerofLot36ofthe HartsfieldSurveyoflandsinWakulla County,Florida;thencerunalongtheWesterlyboundarylineofsaidLot36andalso theWesterlyboundarylineofLot2Peter GavinsEstateasrecordedinDeedBoo k 21Page75inthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,FloridaSouth16degrees58 minutes11secondsEast271.25feettoa re-barmarkingtheintersectionofsaid WesterlyboundarylinewiththeNortherly monumentedrightofwaylineofCounty Road#61(alsoknownasShadevilleRoad); thenceleavingsaidWesterlyboundaryline runalongsaidNortherlymonumentedright ofwaylineasfollows:North70degrees52 minutes39secondsEast265.25feettoan ironpipemarkingtheSoutheastcornerof propertydescribedinOfficialRecordBoo k 162Page1inthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,Florida,saidpointalsomarkingtheSouthwestcornerofpropertyasdescribedinOfficialRecordsBook527Page 476inthePublicRecordsofWakulla County,Florida;thencecontinuealongsaid Northerlymonumenteclrightofwayline, alsobeingtheSoutherlyboundarylineof saidpropertydescribedinOfficialRecord Book527Page476North70degrees46 minutes53secondsEast576.12feettoa rodandcapmarkingtheSoutheastcorner ofsaidpropertydescribedinOfficialRecord Book527Page476,saidpointbeingthe POINTOFBEGINNING;thenceleaving saidPOINTOFBEGINNINGcontinuealong saidNortherlymonumentedrightofwayline North70degrees47minutes29seconds East289.09feettoare-bar;thenceleaving saidNortherlymonumentedrightofwayline runNorth17degrees12minutes51secondsWest239.54feettoare-barlyingon theSoutherlyboundarylineofLot9of ShadevilleSouthSubdivisionasrecordedin PlatBook3Page19ofthePublicRecords ofWakullaCounty,Florida,alsobeingthe NortherlyboundarylineofHartsfieldSurvey Lot36;thencerunalongsaidSoutherly boundarylineofLot9ofShadevilleSouth SubdivisionandsaidNortherlyboundary lineofHartsfieldSurveyLot36South72degrees26minutes37secondsWest289.99 feettoarodandcapmarkingtheNortheast cornerofpropertydescribedinOfficialRecordBook527Page476inthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,Florida;thence leavingsaidSoutherlyandNortherlyboundarylinerunalongtheEasterlyboundaryline ofsaidpropertydescribedinOfficialRecord Book527Page476South17degrees27 minutes46secondsEast247.87feettothe POINTOFBEGINNING,containing1.62 acres, more or less. hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,ifany,toitonGeorgeH.Gwynn, Esq.,theplaintiff'sattorney,whoseaddress isPostOfficeBox4128,Tallahassee,Florida,32315,onorbeforeOctober15,2011, andfiletheoriginalwiththeclerkofthis courteitherbeforeserviceontheplaintiff's attorneyorimmediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou forthereliefdemandedinthecomplaintor petition. DATED ON September 8th, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sBECKY WHALEY AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 22, 29, 2011 October 6, 13, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2011-102-CA DIVISION: CIRCUIT CIVIL JAMES BANKS, Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS CUDIHY, Defendant. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderofFinalJudgmententeredinCase No.2011-102-CAoftheCircuitCourtofthe o00CoteCcutCoutote SecondJudicialCircuitinandforWAKULLA County,Florida,wherein,JamesBanks, Plaintiff,andThomasCudihy,Defendant,I willselltothehighestbidderforcashat, 3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville, Florida32327,atthehourof11:00a.m.on the27thdayofOctober,2011,thefollowing described property: THEFOLLOWINGDESCRIBEDLAND SITUATE,LYINGANDBEINGINWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA TO-WIT: Lot3,HuntersGlennPlantation,Phase2as permaporplatthereofrecordedinPlat Book3,Page81ofthePublicRecordsof WakullaCounty,Florida,beingtheRe-Plat ofLots2,3and28ofHuntersGlennPlantationaspermaporplatthereofrecordedin PlatBook3,Page40ofthePublicRecords of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel I.D. Number: 29-3S-01E-268-05506-H03 Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendensmustfileaclaimwithin60daysafter the sale. Dated this 28th day of September, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sBECKY WHALEY AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court Ifyouareapersonwithadisabilitywho needsanyaccommodationinordertoparticipateinthisproceeding,youareentitled, atnocosttoyou,totheprovisionofcertain assistance.PleasecontacttheClerkofthe Courtsdisabilitycoordinatoratleast7days beforeyourscheduledcourtappearance,or immediatelyuponreceivingthisnotification ifthetimebeforethescheduledappearance islessthan7days;ifyouarehearingor voice impaired, call 711. October 6, 13, 2011 682 Public Sales and Auctions NOTICE OF AUCTION UndertheauthorityoftheFloridaStorage facilityActthepropertydescribedbelowhas beenseizedfornonpaymentofrentand otheraccruedexpenses.Thepropertywill besoldatauctiontothehighestbidderas providedbytheselfstoragefacilityact 83.806DoubleDstorageLLCreservesthe righttorefuseanyandallbids.CashOnly. HaroldWhiteUnit#8householditems,auctiontobeheld@DoubleDStorageLLC 289CajerPoseyRdCrawfordvilleFL32327 Oct 14, 2011 at 12:00 pm. September 29, 2011 October 6, 2011 683 Estate (Probate) Filings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION 11-55-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF LINDA BARBARA BORGIOLI BASS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TheadministrationoftheEstateofLINDA BARBARABORGIOLIBASS,deceased, CaseNumber11-55-PR,ispendinginthe CircuitCourtforWakullaCounty,Florida, ProbateDivision,theaddressofwhichis 3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville, Florida32327.Thenamesandaddressesof thePersonalRepresentativeandthePersonalRepresentativesattorneyaresetforth below. ALL CREDITORS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: AllcreditorsofthedecedentandotherpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedentsEstateonwhomacopyofthisnoticeisservedwithinthreemonthsafterthe dateofthefirstpublicationofthisnotice mustfiletheirclaimswiththisCourtWITHIN THELATEROFTHREEMONTHSAFTER THEDATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATION OFTHISNOTICEORTHIRTYDAYSAFTERTHEDATEOFSERVICEOFACOPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofthedecedentandpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstthe decedentsEstatemustfiletheirclaimswith thisCourtWITHINTHREEMONTHSAFTERTHEDATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS,DEMANDSANDOBJECTIONSNOTSOFILEDWILLBEFOREVER BARRED. ThedateofthefirstpublicationofthisNotice is September 29, 2011. Personal Representative: LINDA ANN BASS OLDS 251 South Matanzas Blvd. St. Augustine, FL 32080-4541 Attorney for Personal Representative: MARY ELLEN DAVIS, ESQUIRE Florida Bar NO. 94988 4 MARY ELLEN DAVIS LAW OFFICE Post Office Box 172 0 Crawfordville, FL 3232 6 September 29, 2011 October 6, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF BEATRICEL.ROBISON, FileNo. 11-PR-57 Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TheadministrationoftheestateofBeatrice L.Robison,deceased,whosedateofdeath wasJanuary25,2011;1FileNumber 11-PR-57,ispendingintheCircuitCourtfor WakullaCounty,Florida,ProbateDivision, theaddressofwhichis3056Crawfordville Highway,Crawfordville,Florida32327.The namesandaddressesofthepersonalrepresentativeandthepersonalrepresentative's attorney are set forth beloww. Allcreditorsofthedecedentandotherpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedent'sestate,onwhomacopyofthisnoticeisrequiredtobeserved,mustfiletheir claimswiththiscourtWITHINTHELATER OF3MONTHSAFTERTHETIMEOFTHE FIRSTPUBLICATIONOFTHISNOTICE OR30DAYSAFTERTHEDATEOF SERVICEOFACOPYOFTHISNOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofthedecedentandother personshavingclaimsordemandsagainst decedent'sestatemustfiletheirclaimswith thiscourtWITHIN3MONTHSAFTERTHE DATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATIONOF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMSNOTFILEDWITHINTHE TIMEPERIODSSETFORTHINSECTION 733.702OFTHEFLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDINGTHETIMEPERIOD SETFORTHABOVE,ANYCLAIMFILED TWO(2)YEARSORMOREAFTERTHE DECEDENT'SDATEOFDEATHIS BARRED. Thedateoffirstpublicationofthisnoticeis: September 29, 2011. JANICE M. NAZWORTH Co-Personal Representative 21 Robison Hill Drive Crawfordville, Florida 32327 ROCHELLE REVELL Co-Personal Representative 577 Sopchoppy Highway Crawfordville, Florida 32327 CAROLYN T. LEBOEUF, ESQ. Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives Florida Bar No. 0362409 909 East Park Avenue Tallahassee, Florida 32301 (850) 222-2000 September 29, 2011 October 6, 2011 684 Miscellaneous Notices NOTICE OF MEETING ChristianradiostationWUJC91.1,St. MarkswillbeholdingapublicmeetingatSt. MarksVolunteerFireDept.,on10/6at12 noon.Thisisageneralmeetingthatwilladdresspublicissues,andanyquestionsor concernsaboutWUJC.Thepublicisinvited to attend. October 6, 2011 685 Notice of Fictitious Name NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENthattheundersigned,desiringtoengageinbusinessunderthefictitiousnameofTheInnatWildwoodlocatedat3870CoastalHwy.,inthe CountyofWakulla,inCrawfordville,Florida 32327,intendstoregisterthesaidname withtheDivisionofCorporationsoftheFloridaDepartmentofState,Tallahassee,Florida.Datedthis29thdayofSeptember, 2011. -sReaghall Investments, Inc. October 6, 2011 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENthattheundersigned,desiringtoengageinbusinessunderthefictitiousnameofWildwoodGolflocatedat3870CoastalHwy.,intheCounty ofWakulla,inCrawfordville,Florida32327, intendstoregisterthesaidnamewiththe DivisionofCorporationsoftheFloridaDepartmentofState,Tallahassee,Florida. Dated this 29th day of September, 2011. -sReaghall Investments, Inc. October 6, 2011

PAGE 23

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 Page 9BBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 26 38 44 48 59 65 68 71 2 39 60 3 40 61 21 34 49 55 4 15 18 35 45 5 27 46 6 28 41 56 62 66 69 72 7 29 50 63 8 24 36 64 25 30 47 57 9 16 19 22 42 58 10 43 51 11 31 37 52 67 70 73 12 32 53 13 33 54 ACROSS 1. Ad-__ committee 4. Olympian's prize 9. College bigwigs 1 4. Vexation 1 5. Castle of the ballroom 1 6. Sign up 1 7. Diarist Anas 1 8. Al __ (pasta specification) 1 9. "Oro y __" (Montana motto) 2 0. Deprived of one's land? 2 2. Personification of the easy life 2 3. Troubled state 2 4. "__ Gotta Have It" (Spike Lee film) 2 6. Something to watch, perhaps 2 7. Moray, for one 3 0. Minute Maid Park ballclub 3 4. Weirdos 3 7. George's lyricist 3 8. Lusterless finish 4 1. "Rope-a-dope" boxer 4 2. Plant firmly 4 4. Grow older 4 5. Genuine 4 8. "Nel blu dipinto di blu" song 5 0. "Slippery when __" 5 1. Coagulate 5 5. Bit of old Italian bread? 5 7. Section of Los Angeles 5 9. Clear from the board 6 2. Ironed? 6 5. Coffee choice 6 6. Southwestern stewpots 6 7. Potpie spheroid 6 8. Bridget Fonda, to Jane 69. Moss or fern, for example 70. Scarf down 71. Tacked on 72. Jamboree setups 73. Rap's Dr. __DOWN1. Many Eastern Indians 2. Set straight 3. Middle, in Manitoba 4. King with the golden touch 5. Put up 6. Fender blemish 7. Poker opener 8. West Yorkshire city 9. Wrinkled? 10. Join the military 11. Sea east of the Caspian 12. "Name That Tune" clue 13. Do in, as a dragon 21. Transplant, in a way 25. "2001" computer 28. Israel's Abba 29. '80s-'90s legal drama 31. Adam's donation 32. Raw resource 33. Bummed out 35. Stripped bare? 36. Word before jacket or insurance 38. Dallas hoopster, for short 39. In the past 40. __ Aviv 43. Muslim's destination 46. Above, in poesy 47. Repetitive 49. __-Lorraine (regio n of France) 52. Spoke like Daffy Duck 53. "In __ and out ..." 54. As of now 56. Take as one's own 58. Hatchlings' homes 59. Author Ferber 60. John __ (the Lone Ranger) 61. Got 100 on 63. Fashion mag 64. Scot's family American Prole Hometown Content 9/11/2011 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 2009 HtCtt 1 23 4 5 267 82 1 374 4213 3956 6 2 739 93148 00 9 HtCtt 791 8236 4 5 352964781 864517293 518 376429 649281537 273495168 486 759312 127638954 935142876 H I N D U S M A V E D N O R I E N T A G O R E I C E N T R E T E L A C E R E P O T A L S A C M I D A S D E B R I E F E E R E C T E D O E R D E N T E B A N A D O P A N T E L A L A W E L L L E E D S L I F E C L A H A L I T E R A N D E P R E S S E D N E S T E N L I S T M E C C A A R A L R I B L I S P E N O T E O R E O N E E A A A O A Brought to you by High Speed Internet Complimentary Hot Breakfast Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.comThe 411 on prepaid cardsBy JASON ALDERMANAccording to Gail Cunningham, spokesperson for the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, we live in a credit-dominated society. Without a checking or savings account, she says, its dif cult to cash payroll, Social Security and unemployment checks; you need a credit or debit card to shop online, book a ight or rent a car; and you may be forced to carry large amounts of cash to pay bills. One increasingly common money management tool for people in this situation is prepaid cards. These cards look and work much like regular debit cards except that instead of funding them through a checking or savings account, you load money on the card by cash, check, funds transfer or direct deposit by an employer or government entity. Common prepaid card features include: You dont need a bank account or solid credit rating to obtain one. They start out with a zero balance until you add money. Purchases or ATM withdrawals will diminish the cards balance until it reaches zero and you discard it (as with gift cards) or you reload the card. Spending is limited to the amount loaded on the card, so you cant buy more than you have. Cards can offer Zero Liability protection if you promptly report loss, theft or fraudulent charges. Most allow ATM cash withdrawals and online or phone purchases. Theyre safer to carry than large amounts of cash. Common types of prepaid cards include: Reloadable cards to which more money can later be added. Gift cards used until their balance is depleted; theyre not reloadable. Teen cards where parents can reload the cards and monitor purchases online or by phone (allowing teens a chance to manage spending and budgeting in a controlled environment). Travel cards a safe alternative to cash and travelers checks. Payroll cards wages are loaded into the cards account for immediate access (similar to checking account direct deposit). Government agencyprovided cards bene ts such as Social Security and unemployment are loaded into your card account. Healthcare cards allow point-of-service access to funds in your Flexible Spending Account or Health Savings Account to pay for quali ed medical expenses. Prepaid cards may come with fees and restrictions, so its important to read the cards terms and conditions carefully and to shop around for the best deals. Good comparison sites include www. bankrate.com and www.creditcards.com. Here are a few questions to ask when comparing cards: What identi cation do I need to buy this card? Where can I use it? (Certain retailers only? Online? Phone?) Can I later add funds to it? For example, will it accept direct deposit of payroll or Social Security checks? Is there an expiration date? Will I receive monthly statements? Can I check balances by phone or online? What fees apply? Common fees include those for card activation, reloading funds, balance inquiries, ATM or bank withdrawals and declined transactions. What happens if its lost or stolen? To learn more about how prepaid cards work, you can order a free Prepaid Card Basics brochure at Practical Money Skills for Life (www.practicalmoneyskills.com), a free personal nancial management program run by Visa Inc. Bottom line: Always make sure you fully understand the terms and conditions of any financial product or account before signing up.Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www. twitter.com/PracticalMoney. e myth of work/life balance: Seven ways to rethink your approach to the daily grindSpecial to The NewsIn a perfect world, work and home would balance out neatly. Wed work from 8 to 5 each day, take an hour-long lunch, and then come home and spend uninterrupted time with our families. But for those of us here in the wake of the Great Recession, firmly entrenched in an always on society, this notion seems hopelessly outdated. Most of us are working longer, more stressful hours, and work is spilling over into evenings and weekends. No wonder a recent survey of North American employees found that 87 percent of respondents say their work/ life balance (or lack thereof) is negatively affecting their health. With so many people suffering from this problem, you would think the natural solution would be to encourage businesses to help their stressed-out employees nd more balance in their lives. Not so, says best-selling author Jon Gordon. Work/life balance, at least in the sense that most of us think about it, is a myth, says Gordon, whose new book is The Seed: Finding Purpose and Happiness in Life and Work. It does not exist, Gordon says. For many people, it never has. Personally, I have never been able to balance the scales of work and life on a day-to-day basis. Rather, Ive come to realize that the dance between work and life is more about rhythm than balance. Gordon compares the rhythms of work and life to the rhythms of nature. Theres a time and a season for everything. For me and for most people, there are seasons when hard work and extra hours are a necessity, and seasons when there is more time for rest, he explains. And guess what? Its okay. When you love what you doand I truly believe there is meaning and even joy to be found in every jobyoull thrive during the busy seasons and fully appreciate the down time. Gordons latest booka business fable in the same vein as his Wall Street Journal best seller, The Energy Bus, follows Josh, an up and comer in his company, who has lost his passion at work. Challenged by his boss to take two weeks and decide if he really wants to work there, Josh takes off for the country, where he meets a wise farmer who gives him a seed and a promise: nd the right place to plant the seed, and his purpose will be revealed. This sense of purpose, asserts Gordon, is the natural remedy for the crushing guilt that many working parents in particular experience. You know the drill: when youre working late, you feel guilty that youre not home with the kids; when youre at home, you feel guilty about all the work not getting done. When you believe your job has no meaning, of course youre going to feel guilty for spending so much time there, he notes. Its the realization that you are making a difference in the lives of others that lets you let go of the guilt and truly immerse yourself in what youre doing during both seasons. First, let go of the work/life balance notion. Instead, think purpose and passion. Its true that work/life balance is a topic that seems to be on many minds, says Gordon, citing a recent NPR segment titled In America, Too Much All Work, No Play? But in many ways, he insists, a perfectly balanced life is a perfectly tepid life. How much balance do you think Bono has when U2 is on tour? What about an Olympic athlete preparing for a competition? Or the leadership team at Facebook? Probably not much, but their passion and purpose fuel them to work harder and longer with more joy and satisfaction in both work and life. When your goal is to achieve work/life balance, youll be constantly disappointed and so will your loved ones, says Gordon. But when you approach every day with passion and purpose, whether youre working long hours to prepare an important presentation or staying up late with your daughter to work on her science project, you can nd joy and happiness in whatever it is youre pursuing at that moment. Look at your work/life blend over the past year, he advises. Consider it as a whole. Rather than thinking of your work and life day to day, think of it as a whole. How many times did you get away with your family last year? Were there particular weeks/months where you worked really, really long hours? Were there times you were less busy? You might nd that, when viewed that way, you did have a balanced life. Or you might realize you need to make a change in the way you do things during the upcoming year. When youre at work, really engage. Fully commit to whatever youre doing at work. Dont complain positivity goes a long way. And dont feel guilty that you are not at home. Feeling guilty is a recipe for misery and poor performance on the job and unhappiness at home. Commit fully to your season of hard work while planning for your season of rest and recharging. When youre at home, really BE at home. Throw yourself into those precious family relationships. Dont spend family time thinking about work or zoning out in front of the TV or computer. Its not about the amount of time we spend with our families, says Gordon. Its about how engaged we are during the time we do have with them. What Im really talking about is making the most of your time however you spend itof making each and every moment really count, says Gordon. If youve been killing yourself trying to achieve daily work/life balance, author Jon Gordon warns that it may be a pipe dream. He o ers up another (better) solution

PAGE 24

By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe LeRoy Collins Leon County Public Library opened a branch in Woodville on Saturday, Oct. 1, just across the county line. The branch is located in the Woodville Community Center on Old Woodville Highway, near the J. Lewis Hall Park in Woodville, and right off the St. Marks Rail Trail. Branch Manager Verna Brock, who lives in Wakulla Station in Wakulla County, said at the opening that the branch welcomes Wakulla residents. To check out materials, a library card will be needed of course, but thats free to those people who own property in Leon County or work for the county. Otherwise, the cost is $30 a year or $10 a quarter. You dont need a card to use the internet or come to read in the library, Brock said. The branch is also working closely with the local Woodville Elementary, Brock said. The library will be hosting a summer reading program and other events including a teen party slam. The ribbon-cutting ceremony for the branch included numerous Leon County elected officials and a crowd of dozens of area residents. The branch is the rst community center/library combination in Leon County. The Woodville Branch Library is located at 8000 Old Woodville Road. The bene ts of this inventive approach to the library branchs construction are two-fold: The combined community center/library will retain all current services of the community center, and residents of Woodville will now gain a library dedicated to their interests and on-site staff. The 2,000-square-foot expansion to the community center enables residents of the rapidly growing southern sector of Leon County to have comparable library service to the rest of the county and creates a community hub for county services, activities and outreach. The librarys construction is also directly connected to the St. Marks trail so citizens who are using the popular trail can stop off at the facility. The combined community center and library allows residents the ability to access both parts of the building during normal business hours, making it a more active facility. The library is open Tuesday through Saturday. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, hours are 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Wednesdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturdays, 10 a.m to 4 p.m. Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 6, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Leon County Library opens a Woodville branchWoodville branch manager Verna Brock, above, helps a library patron at the opening on Saturday. Below, some of the area residents at the opening, which included a ribbon cutting ceremony. A young library patron checks out the branchs selection of movies available for check out.Wilderness Coast board will meetThe Wilderness Coast Public Libraries (WILD) Governing Board will meet on Monday, Oct. 10, at 1:30 p.m. at the Jefferson County R.J. Bailar Public Library at 375 South Water Street in Monticello. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, please call (850) 997-7400. JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com pure speed. pure perfor mance. pure simplicity.pure broadband is everything you want from an internet connection with no phone line required. Its all the speed you need to surf, watch, download and game without slowing down. call 866.958.7873to get pure speed today. givemepure.com stop by your CenturyLink store *Offer ends 1/28/2012. Pure Broadband available to qualifying residential customers only. The monthly rate of $29.95 requires a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months (after which the rate reverts to the then-current standard rate), and applies to up to 1.5 Mbps service. An additional monthly fee (including professional installation, if applicable) and separate shipping and handling fee will apply to customers modem or router. General Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them by service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions All products and services are governed by tariffs, terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at www.centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges Applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges include a Carrier Universal Service charge, National Access Fee surcharge, a one-time Pure Broadband activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain instate surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply ba sed on standard monthly, not promotional, rates. Call for a listing of applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges. Monthly Rate Monthly rate applies while customer subscribes to all qualifying services. If one (1) or more services are cancelled, the stan dard monthly fee will apply to each remaining service. Pure Broadband As determined by service location, an early termination fee will apply as either a at $99 fee or the applicable monthly recurring service fee multiplied by the number of months remaining in the minimum service period, up to $200. Performance will vary due to conditions outside of network control and no speed is guaranteed. Telephone landline is part of the service only for the purpose of data trafc transmission/connection and cannot be used for voice trafc transmission, except for 911 services. 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are the property of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owne rs. a month*all high-speed internet. no phone line required.