<%BANNER%>
Wakulla news
ALL ISSUES CITATION MAP IT! DOWNLOADS
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00375
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 09-22-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00375
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County Commission held its second public hearing on the proposed budget at its Sept. 19 meeting, and unlike past meetings, the public had nothing to say. The commission approved the budget unanimously for the upcoming year which includes a millage rate of 8.5, .25 mills lower than the previous year. The commission was hoping the lower property tax would help ease some of the burden of the other taxes that have either been added or increased. These include the $196 solid waste assessment, 7 percent Public Service Tax, increase in Communications Service Tax to 5.22 percent and increase in “ re protection assessment to $75 per household. Commissioner Mike Stewart said he was pleased the county was able to lower the millage and get spending back to the 200506 level. The total budget for the county is $42,901,664. To be able to reduce the millage rate, there was an need for an additional $257,285 in cuts. To obtain those cuts, the board reduced travel for circuit court judge and an OPS position for a total of $11,000, as well as eliminating the $49,680 used to pay for the leasing the Sheriffs Of“ ce annex building, which houses the Criminal Investigative Division and Road Patrol Division. The lease was up for that building on Oct. 1, so that division will be moved to the Community Center until the commission comes up with a permanent location. Continued on Page 5A By JO ANN PALMERDirector, KWCBSaturday was the perfect day for the 26th Annual International Ocean Conservancy Coastal Cleanup. The morning was overcast and breezy and by the afternoon festivities, the clouds had cleared to a beautiful sunny blue sky. When I opened the gates at Woolley Park in Panacea around 7:15 a.m., I was a little nervous about what to expect since this was my “ rst coastal cleanup as director of KWCB. There were a father and daughter from Tallahassee already waiting for the gate to be unlocked. It didnt take long with them helping me to unload the boxes of supplies and prepare for the arrival of the 384 preregistered participants we were expecting at 8 a.m. at the park. Just as the sun came up, Bruce Ashley, secretary of KWCB, and Richard Russell, general manager of Crawfordville Wal-Mart, arrived and started the grill to cook lunch, which was sponsored by Wal-Mart. They would eventually cook 850 hotdogs for the participants. The WCSO work crew, along with volunteer Marc Dickieson, filled coolers with Pepsi products donated by Refreshment Services Pepsi and opened boxes of snacks donated by Flowers Bakery and Wal-Mart. As people began arriving, our volunteers got participants signed up, gave them trash bags, pickers, gloves and showed them directions to an area to clean, sending them on their way. We had Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts, Maclay School students, Chiles High School students, NJROTC cadets from Wakulla High School, Friends of Wakulla Springs, students from the Of“ ce of Student Volunteerism at TCC, Wakulla County 4-H clubs, families and individuals patiently wait to be given their assignment and instructions. That scene was being repeated around the county at the “ ve other sites: St. Marks Refuge, Bottoms Road, St. Marks at the Wakulla River Park, Mashes Sands and Shell Point. Around 10:30 a.m., people began returning to Woolley Park and arriving from other cleanup areas, proud of what they had accomplished. WEIGH YOUR BUTTS Shelley Swenson was busy confirming that the groups bringing in the cigarette butts got them tagged and properly weighed for the Weigh Your ButtsŽ contest. Each year this contest draws participation from almost every group. The butts must be picked up off the ground on the day of the event to be considered eligible for the $100 cash award. The winning group picked up four pounds of butts. Cigarette butts are the most collected item worldwide during this event. We had a total of eight pounds collected on Saturday. DUMPSTERS FILL The dumpster provided by Waste Pro began to “ ll with old tires, a piece of an abandoned boat, plastic bags, “ shing line, diapers, food wrappers, beverage containers, hundreds of pounds of household garbage. The KWCB recycle trailer took on hundreds of pounds of glass bottles, cardboard, plastic bottles and aluminum cans. By the end of the day, the dumpster was completely full. Continued on Page 16A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 38th Issue Thursday, September 22, 2011 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 CentsThe WakullanewsInside This Week Public Notices ..............Page 3A Comment & Opinion ....Page 4A Church..........................Page 6A Community....................Page 7A School...........................Page 8A Sports ..................Pages 9, 10A In The Huddle ............Page 11A Outdoors ...................Page 12A Water Ways...............Page 13A Sheriffs Report ..........Page 15A EXTRA! .........................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..........Page 2B Classi eds ....................Page 7B Legal Notices ...............Page 8B P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y Published Weekly, R e a d D a i l y Read Daily Board OKs $42M budgetPHOTO BY AMY JARMON/Special to The News PHOTO BY JO ANN PALMER/SPecial to The NewsClean up timeSaturday was the 26th annual Coastal CleanupCOUNTY COMMISSION HELPING HANDS: Volunteers pick up trash at the Bottoms Road boat ramp in Panacea. Hundreds of volunteers turned out on Saturday for the Coastal Cleanup held at sites all over the county.Assistance program for poor modi“ edBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe County Commission approved charging a solid waste assessment of $196 to all dwelling units at its Sept. 6 meeting. Also included was a hardship assistance program, which has since been modi“ ed. Originally this assistance program was available to those property owners whose income didnt exceed 80 percent of the median income of Wakulla County as de“ ned by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, which is $65,100. This meant a two-person household that made less than $38,300 would be exempt. The commission had estimated that less than 100 households would qualify for hardship assistance. After it was determined that number would be much higher than the commission anticipated, it decided to change it from low income to very low. A family of two that makes less than $23,950 will now be exempt. For one person that income level is $20,950. For three people it is $26,950. Four-person household is $29,900, “ veperson is $32,300, six-person us $34,700, seven-person is $37,100 and eight-person is $39,500. There is also a vacancy adjustment program that is now included. During public hearings on the solid waste assessment, the commission said it felt there should be a compassionate appeals process for special cases. An example was a woman who approached the board during the hearing and said there were two homes on her property, but she was the caregiver for her father and so there was actually only one household. The board felt for her and said she was a special case and should only be charged for one assessment. The vacancy adjustment program allows for property owners to apply for a refund by providing documentation that no electrical or utility services were provided to the property. These refunds will be paid from a portion of the proceeds the county gets from the franchise fee, which is set aside to monitor the closed land“ lls. The hardship assistance program also applies to the “ re MSBU, but it is too late for people to apply for that exemption. Those wishing to apply for solid waste assistance must complete an application and turn it into the county administration by Oct. 15. The original deadline was Oct. 1, but Commissioner Lynn Artz said it was extended to give residents more time. Following this year, property owners will have to apply before June 1 every year to qualify for the exemption in both solid waste and “ re MSBU. For more information, call the county at 926-0919 or visit their website at www. mywakulla.com.$196 SOLID WASTE ASSESSMENT OLDEST, YOUNGEST: Volunteers at Saturdays Coastal Cleanup included Alice Veasman, 90, the oldest person participating, while Josiah Sorenson, 7 months old, was the youngest. 10,200 The number of pounds of trash and debris collected Saturday. 560 The number of local volunteers. 8 The weight in pounds of cigarette butts picked up by volunteers this year. It is the mostcollected item picked up worldwide during the cleanup. $100 Amount of award given out to winning group for picking up the most cigarette butts for the “Weigh Your Butts” contest. The group picked up four pounds of butts. AMY JARMONMost unusual item found during the Cleanup? A partial pair of dentures.Coastal Cleanup by the numbers County commission establishes hardship exemptions for lower income residents. For a two-person home, the income level would be less than $38,300 It is estimat ed that fewer than 100 households would qualify for the exemption Commissioners lower the millage to 8.5 mills to o set new fees, such as the garbage assessment, and Public Services Tax and increase in “ re MSBU• School board approves its millage and budget. See Page 8A More on the county commission inside:• Fire MSBU increases to $75 • Workshop held on subdivision roads See Page 2A Girls win Lincoln Invitational, See Page 9A n Trash service answers, See Page 1B

PAGE 2

Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter discussing the issue for months, the County Commission “ nally came to a conclusion regarding the requirement needed for the county to accept roads in subdivisions. At a previous meeting, the commission had decided to change the policy and require subdivisions to have a 90percent buildout threshold before the county would accept the roads because of possible damage that could be done during construction. The commission then decided it wanted to hold a workshop to discuss the issue further. In May, the commission held a workshop and decided to leave it alone and keep what is currently in place. Currently, all developers are required to warranty all paved roads in subdivisions for two years after that subdivision is approved. When the warranty expires, the Road and Bridge Department will examine the roads for approval. Any de“ ciencies found need to be corrected in order to be accepted for county maintenance. The developer or homeowners association can then petition the county to accept maintenance of the facility. However, following that meeting, the commission said it wanted to see other options and the costs involved with accepting the roads. The commission couldnt reach an agreement and then decided to hold another workshop. At the workshop held on Sept. 8, the commission decided not to touch current subdivisions, but for the new ones, a buildout of 80 percent will be required. I want some protection for the county,Ž said County Commissioner Mike Stewart. Commissioner Randy Merritt said he felt if the roads are built to county standards, they should be accepted. Commissioner Lynn Artz liked the option of accepting the roads, but instituting an MSBU for that area which would cover maintenance and future capital costs. County Attorney Heather Encinosa said a policy could be put in place that an MSBU could be charged on a case by case basis if capital costs were necessary. Artz said she liked the policy idea and to let the subdivisions know that it could happen. However, the commission agreed they liked the 80-percent buildout requirement for those new subdivisions. Thats what we originally approved,Ž Artz said. Merritt said he feft 80 percent was reasonable. This criteria will come before the board at a future meeting for approval. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAt the Sept. 6 Wakulla County Commission meeting, the commission agreed to raise the assessment for the “ re protection services or MSBU from $61 to $75 per year per household. Last year, the commission decreased the MSBU from $65 to $61 and moved the salaries for the paid “ re“ ghters into the MSBU fund. Since that time, several “ re“ ghters have expressed the need for the MSBU to be increased. Firefighter David Harrison said last year the volunteer “ re departments experienced a loss of 66 percent. We dont have the funds where we can operate,Ž Harrison said. He added that $75 was great, but even more was needed. Ochlockonee Bay Fire Chief Bill Russell said because of the decrease last year, the $75 wont get the “ re department back to where it was before. He added that more “ re“ ghters are joining and there is not enough equipment for them. The assessment includes an increase from 5 cents per square foot for non-residential to 6 cents. Land will be changed from 14 cents per acre to 17 cents. The commission voted unanimously to increase the MSBU. In other matters: €The commission voted four to one, with Commissioner Lynn Artz opposing, to approve the employment agreement with incoming County Administrator David Edwards. His base salary is $82,830. Also included is participation in the Florida Retirement System, paid holidays, health insurance, take home vehicle and cell phone. Artz said she felt with the current budget, Edwards shouldnt get a 10-percent raise above the minimum base salary and what Interim County Administrator Tim Barden currently gets paid. € At this meeting, the commission also decided to move part of the sheriffs of“ ce that is currently located in the annex building to the Community Center. The Apalachee Center informed the sheriff that the lease expired Aug. 1 and could not be renewed. The building needed to be vacated by Oct. 1. That building housed the Road Patrol and Criminal Investigation divisions. Artz was hoping to not use the Community Center, but put them in portables instead, until a permanent location was determined. Artz said if they move into the Community Center it could delay the remodeling and renovations that the county is planning, as well as the county being able to offer programs to the community in the meantime. The county is currently in discussions with Capital Area YMCA to run programs at the Community Center and have said placing the sheriffs of“ ce there could inhibit the programs they would be able to offer because of the lack of space. Commissioner Alan Brock said, I want to see it used as a community center.Ž However, he added that with current budget restraints, this may be the best option for now. Artz was also concerned about having enough time to use the money the county received from a legislative appropriation for the center because it needs to be used by Sept. 2013. Commissioner Jerry Moore said the county has a building it is trying to “ nd a use for and this is an option. Artz said, We have a use for it. We know what we want to do. Now weve got a monkeywrench in the works.Ž Brock said he was OK with putting those divisions in the community center, but wanted a timeline of when they will move out. The commission agreed to move those divisions and also look at costs to build a building for them or rent another space. The next commission meeting is Oct. 3 at 5 p.m.County commission votes to increase Fire MSBU to $75Workshop on subdivision roads leaves board looking for options e tax assessment for “ re services increases from $61 o $75. Fire“ ghters say more is needed e lease on the building being used as o ce space by sheri s detectives is terminated so the county decides to move them into the Community Center to save money. One commissioner says thats a monkeywrench in the worksŽ for using the center Commissioners consider setting a policy requiring an 80-percent buildout of a subdivision before accepting the roads Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 3095 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 Friday f September 30 6:30pm 8:30pm 4679 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FLwww.EdenSpringsRehab.comEden Springs Nursing and Rehab( 850 ) 926-7181uNewly updated uRenovated roomsuExcellent in-house therapy stauCMS 4-Star ratedCome by for a tour and see our 4-star rated facility and services!REHABƒRECOVERƒENJOY LIFE! Everyone is invited to attend ourSecond Annual Senior Prom A Well-Kept Secret Where Youll Experience The Personal TouchŽ. Auction OWNEDPROPERTIESMobileHome ParkCommercialAssetsSingleFamilyHomesLandCommercial &Residential SAT€SEPTEMBER24€11:00AM www.AuctionFDIC.com CallForFREEBrochure866.518.9064 FLRECQ1035357;AUAB110 ManySellingABSOLUTE!TallahasseeCivicCenter FLRECQ1035357;AUAB110 GolfCourseNoBuyers Premium!BrokersProtectedIncluding LOCALPROPERTIES inFlorida&GeorgiaCounties :DIXIE€FRANKLIN€GADSDEN€LEON WAKULLACOUNTIES,FL& THOMASCOUNTY,GA50Commercial&Residential NORTHFLORIDAProperties OCWEN

PAGE 3

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By SGT. THOMAS KIELBASAFlorida National Guard Public AffairsCAMP BLANDING JOINT TRAINING CENTER, Fla. (Sept. 20, 2011) … A wildlife study at the National Guards training post in North Florida may soon give biologists insight into one of the states most intriguing inhabitants. The two-year study of Florida black bears at Camp Blanding Joint Training Center near Starke began this summer, and will be looking into the movement patterns and behavioral habits of the omnivorous mammals on the military site. The study is a partnership between the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and Camp Blanding, and may help answer questions about what appears to be an expanding bear population at the 72,000-acre training site. We want to see what the bears are doing here on Blanding, because we are seeing more and more bears everywhere,Ž the camps environmental manager Paul Catlett explained. Ive got guys who have worked here for 35 years, and in the last “ ve years have seen their “ rst bear... Is it the fact that there are more bears now or the fact that they are losing habitat?Ž Catlett, who lives on the post and has been working there for 17 years, said he thinks there are just more bear sightings because the population of the animals has gradually increased. He said sightings can spike when their habitats are encroached upon by development, but that doesnt appear to be the case at Blanding. A robust bear population on the post could mean the habitat here is strong and healthy, Catlett said. As a land manager I want to know that were doing the right things; that were having a positive influence,Ž he said. Its possible this is a sign that the habitat is strong and were doing the right things here.Ž Black bears are the only species of bear found in Florida, and the FWC estimates there are between 2,500 and 3,000 black bears in the state. Adult bears weigh between 125 to 450 pounds, and can be found anywhere in Florida. The study itself is simple: biologists and volunteers place specialized tracking collars on the bears and follow their movements around the area via radio signals. The movements are plotted on a map with a latitude and longitude point for each signal, letting the team see when the bears move and where exactly they go. Getting the collars on the wild animals is a much more complicated matter. The study-team pinpoints high bear-traf“ cŽ areas on Camp Blanding, sets snares at the sites, and places scent lures (usually glazed donuts or fabric soaked in bacon fat) around the area. When a curious bear sniffs his way to the site and gets caught in the snare, a radio signal lets the team know it has a catch. The captured bear is then tranquilized, weighed tagged and “ tted with the tracking collar. We can respond quickly, dart them and get them out of the snare,Ž explained Walter McCown, an FWC research biologist who specializes in bears. After an hour or two the bear wakes up from the effects of the tranquilizer and is sent back into the forest. These collars are actually quite sophisticated,Ž McCown explained. They will acquire positions from GPS satellites and report the positions through a text message to a ground base on my computer. We dont have to follow them around. Well be getting 24 to 27 locations a day, which we will use to identify travel-ways for bears.Ž The collared bear will get used to the device around its neck after a couple of days, McCown said. The thick leather collar weighs less than four pounds with the attached battery pack, and is programmed to drop off the bears neck after about two years. McCown and the study group have already identi“ ed and collared “ ve bears on Camp Blanding, and have collared an additional two bears that were off the post. Five of the bears were males … the largest male captured weighed 320 pounds. The FWC is receiving data from each collar and sharing the results with two local schools to help educate children and dispel misconceptions about the animals. Many people in Florida are surprised we actually have bears here,Ž said McCown, who has been studying the mammals for 15 years. They are not aware of it, although bears are becoming more of an issue in this state,Ž he said. I think part of my mission is to spread information about how neat bears are, how to live with bears, and the value of preserving and maintaining the bear populations in the state.Ž Another result of the ongoing study may clear up a bit of a mystery surrounding the bear population on Camp Blanding; it could explain why the black bears at the base all seem to have migrated from Ocala National Forest about 25 miles away. Since the training base sits midway in a natural corridor between the sprawling Ocala National Forest to the south and the smaller Osceola National Forest to the north, biologists might expect to “ nd bears from both forests at Camp Blanding. However, according to Catlett a previous study of the Blanding bear population found that it shared DNA exclusively with the Ocala bears. Both Catlett and McCown said the data from this current study may help determine if the Ocala or Osceola bears are avoiding certain areas during their movements or are deterred by speci“ c roads or other obstacles to travel between the two forests. The data could possibly be used to help connect parcels of land to facilitate the bear movement and create additional conservation easements if warranted. Based on initial data McCown said he thinks there are only a few resident bears on Camp Blanding, but other bears pass through regularly due to their penchant for the thick bottomland hardwood and well-preserved swampy areas of the post.Black bear study is underway at Camp BlandingThe wildlife study at the National Guard training facility may yield insight into black bear behavior SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBlack bears are captured in snares, then tranquilized so they can be “ tted with radio transmitters that will allow scientists to track their movements. Here a small bear is measured. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS CONCERNING TEXT AMENDMENT TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENTThe Wakulla County Planning Commission and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, October 10, 2011 beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, November 7, 2011 beginning at 5:00 PM or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony.Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 3095 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.1. Application for Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment: CP11-05 Applicant:Ben C. Boynton Proposal:transmittal of FLUE SAP #1 text amendment Hearings Required: Planning Commission Monday, October 10, 2011 @ 7:00 PM County Commission Monday, November 7, 2011 @ 5:00PM SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS The Wakulla County Planning Commission proposes to consider the following applications. A Public Hearing is scheduled regarding the following before the All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony.Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 3095 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962. SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 1. Application for Conditional Use: CU11-06 Applicant:New Life Ministries of Crawfordville, Inc. Agent:Barry Wilson Proposal:to allow use as a church Tax ID Number:Part of 36-3s-02w-000-01764-004 Existing FLU Map:Urban 1 (FLUE Policy 1.2.5) Existing Zoning:RR -1 (Section 5-27, LDC) FEMA Flood Info:CŽ zone on Panel 0225-B Parcel Size:5.0+/acres Location:Arran Road, west of the old Post Of“ce site Hearings Required:Planning Commission: Monday, October 10, 2011@ 7:00 PM Staff Member:Somer Strickland, Planner WAKULLAS FLOODPLAIN Flooding can threaten at any time of the year from various sources. Wakulla County regulates construction and development in the ”oodplain to ensure that buildings will be protected from ”ood damage. All developments in the ”oodplain, not just construction of buildings, need permits. Filling and similar work are prohibited in certain areas, so check with the Planning and Community Development Department before you begin a project. Should unauthorized development in the ”oodplain be witnessed by a citizen, they can report it to the Countys Code Enforcement Of“ce at (850) 926-7636. It is also important to know that houses in the ”oodplain that are substantially damaged by “re or ”ood must be repaired to new construction standards. This includes elevating the structure to or above the base ”ood elevation when they are repaired. Damage is considered to be substantial when the cost of reconstruction equals or exceeds 50% of the buildings market value. When damage of this type occurs to a structure and repairs are necessary, visit the Planning and Community Development Department for a Development Permit Application to begin your permitting process. A recorded warranty deed and site plan, showing the improvements/repairs to the property, will be required to complete this Application. Once obtained from Planning and Zoning, the Development Permit Application should be submitted to the Building Division for permitting. Depending upon the types of work performed additional materials will be requested from the Building Division to complete the permitting of repairs to the structure. Applicable fees are due for Development Permit Applications and Building Division permits, unless otherwise waived by the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners for widespread storm damage. For further information on these topics contact the Planning and Community Development Department at (850) 926-3695. SEPTEMBER 22, 2011

PAGE 4

Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out Comment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Staff Writer/Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ......................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising/Photographer: Lynda Kinsey .................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Bookkeeping/Circulation: Sherry Balchuck .......accounting@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Ray Gray is fired by county •Board approves $196 garbage fee • Coastal Cleanup draws big crowdthewakullanews.comEditor, The News: Lately, there doesnt seem to be a lot of news to be cheery about and more often than not, its much easier to gripe than to complement. But there are times that we also need to stop and hand out kudos to elected of“ cials for making hard but smart choices. This past Monday, three Commissioners stood up for Wakullas wetlands in the face of a serious threat to diminish or even eliminate local protections. So thank you to Chairman Mike Stewart, and fellow Commissioners Lynn Artz and Alan Brock for standing strong and showing leadership. Those of us who have fought (and griped) over the years to save wetlands can greatly appreciate your collective vote. At a time when state and federal oversight and protections are seriously waning from seemingly all angles, now is not the time to capitulate on local provisions to protect our wetlands. We need our local government and elected of“ cials to remain strong in protecting our waters and the environment, not push aside protections so we can mow through the last remaining swamps and cypress stands. Also, many thanks to my fellow citizens out there who care so deeply for Wakulla and her environment. We have a tough few years, or more, ahead in not letting what happened in South Florida, and Atlanta, happen to our nature-based beautiful Wakulla home. Wakullas wetlands live for another day, thanks to you and our three commissioners. Chad Hanson Mysterious Waters Sue Damon wrote a letter in last weeks Wakulla News imploring citizens to come out to the county commission meeting on Sept. 19 to voice their opinion about the wetlands ordinance. Damon later sent an email asking that a paragraph urging them to come to the meeting be removed, but because of a misunderstanding, the paragraph ran. anks, board, for support of wetlandsEditor, The News: There are still a few art vendor and education spaces available at Florida Wild Mammals Woodstork Festival. The event will be held on Saturday, Oct. 8, at 3Y Ranch in Crawfordville from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Applications can be found on our website, www. woodstorkfestival.com. Unfortunately all of our food and beverage spaces have already been taken. Florida Wild Mammal Association would like to invite you to join us and make this day a tremendous success. All proceeds from Woodstork will be used to help care for injured and orphaned wildlife from our local area. The event features great musicians, a huge silent auction, a live auction that will run from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., local businesses and artists, fun for the kids, photo contest, raf” e, and a cake walk. You can stroll around and visit some of our talented artists and their wares. Not to be missed are the extraordinary photo contest entries, and great beer and tasty food from our best restaurants are always a hit. Its a really fun day for all so put it on your calendars. Thank you for your support, we couldnt do it without you, and we look forward to seeing you there! Thanks so much, Chris Beatty FWMA Editor, The News: Comments made before the Board of County Commissioners: The citizens of our County elect the Wakulla Board of County Commissioners. The Board is supposed to promote the general good and follow the laws of county, state and country. It is a true pleasure to witness the Board when they seriously attempt to resolve an issue and to work out the best solution, while respectfully considering citizens input. Unfortunately, that seldom happens. The Board seems to think that ignoring or muzzling the very citizens who elected them will make the problems go away. Example One: When citizens made requests of all “ ve commissioners to pull an item off the consent agenda so that the citizens could address the Board about it, not one commissioner asked that this be done. (It takes just one commissioner to do this.) Example Two: When citizens pointed to problems in purchasing policy, the commissioners quickly adjourned a meeting that was scheduled to discuss that very issue. Example Three: When citizens documented ethical problems in county government, their concerns were summarily dismissed. One commissioner said in a public meeting that he threw the documentation in the trash. And there are many more examples. Because of the countys dire fiscal situation, the Board has required many employees to take unpaid furlough days, which resulted in a pay cut of more than 20 percent. At the same time the Board has authorized raises for other employees. The Board either ignored or attacked citizens who pointed this out. It is the Boards responsibility to ensure that county staffers do their work legally and properly. It is not enough to refer citizens to the Ethics Commission, which at least one commissioner has advised when problems were pointed out. The Board has the responsibility to investigate and act on the information brought to it by the citizens. Our government has lasted for more than 200 years because citizens have been vigilant, speaking up when government goes astray. Commissioners please listen to and consider what your constituents have to say. In doing so we can create a better Wakulla County for all. Howard Kessler Panacea Editor, The News: The state Department of Community Affairs will no longer exist in Florida after this year. A recent editorial in the Tampa Tribune noted that half the planning staff was laid off and the remaining members of the planning agency would become part of the new Department of Economic Opportunity. This change heralds a shift in Floridas approach to growth management. The so-called Hometown DemocracyŽ amendment appeared on the state ballot in November 2010 but failed to pass. The proposed constitutional amendment, also known as the Florida Comprehensive Land Use Plans, Amendment 4, and technically titled Referenda Required For Adoption And Amendment of Local Government Comprehensive Land Use PlansŽ was subject to much political spin and a major public relations campaign on both sides of the issue. The election of Gov. Scott and the in” uence of a Republican-majority Legislature would soon prevail where the ballot initiative fell short. The checks and balances on local governments have been weakened and the doors appear to have been opened wide to developers. What does this mean where I live in Wakulla? It seems to mean that changes to our county comprehensive plan are on the table. One proposed amendment appears to be a lifting or reduction of the current buffer zone contained in the existing wetlands protection ordinance. In 2010, Wakulla County was lauded by Audubon of Florida for enacting progressive wetlands protection. The ordinance passed by Wakulla County Commissioners was designed to help protect the wetlands that make the area ecologically sensitive and an attraction to those who love natural Florida. The new law created a 75-foot buffer zone around the wetlands of Wakulla County. According to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the “ rst 35-feet of the buffer is required to limit impact and allows only for minimal activities such as a dock or trail with an allowance for normal or customaryŽ hunting and “ shing activities. The second 40-foot band would permit only those additional activities with minimal impacts. The ordinance also included a minimum building footprint lot size to ensure future property owners suf“ cient dry land for homes and businesses. With the decimation of the DCA accomplished and a proposal to amend Wakullas comprehensive land use plan under discussion, I have lines from an old Dr. Seuss classic, The Lorax,Ž repeating in my head: They say Im old-fashioned, and live in the past, but sometimes I think progress progresses too fast!ƒ Please! I object in the name of the trees!Ž Sometimes what passes for progress isnt exactly progressive. So, to paraphrase, who does speak for the trees? In this case, who speaks for the wetlands, where trees and so many other things grow? Maybe the Northwest Florida Water Management District (NWFWMD) does? The Water Management Districts have come under “ re this year too, with funding cuts and other reductions in scope. These special districts, created by Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, are charged with protecting and managing the water resources of Florida in a sustainable manner for the continued welfare of its residents and natural systems. Wakulla falls within the boundaries of the Northwest Florida district. Inherent in this statutory mandate to manage water resources is the protection, preservation, restoration and enhancement of wetlands within NWFWMD boundaries. According to the NWFWMD website, wetlands are vital to the economic and ecological welfare of the watershed, providing a broad array of functions and services for environmental resources and human communities including: Water quality protection, improvement and groundwater recharge; Shoreline stability, ” ood protection and moderation of surface water runoff; Ecological integrity including support for natural systems; Promotion of a natural resource economy including commercial, aesthetic and recreational bene“ ts. I think we need to be pushing green sustainable development in Wakulla. I grasp that it is initially cheaper to develop without environmentally conscious restrictions. However, in the long term, a more visionary approach to growth can yield a good return on an environmentally sound project. I think it is possible to be green while increasing the kind of greenŽ people can carry in their wallets, too. Wakulla County could be promoting green development as well as the Green Guides program. If we dont take care of our wetlands, there may not be much greenŽ left in Wakulla to warrant any sort of guide program in future years. Which county commissioners are pushing to weaken the wetlands ordinance? This might be a good week to call or email them and ask each one about his or her stance on this issue. The question in the coming weeks remains, Who will speak for the wetlands?Ž Rachel Sutz Pienta Chair Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee Editors Note: At the Sept. 19 commission meeting, the board voted not to change the comprehensive plan. Editor, The News: Those of you with kids are probably feeling the current difficult economy the most. Many parents are putting off having kids in the recession because of the costsŽ involved with feeding, clothing, housing, health care and educating a child … all the essentials. But wait, there is another important essential. Research tells us that providing opportunities for children is as essential to their healthy development as good nutrition and a good education and all the things already named. So what do you do when your budget is just short of enough money to pay for a sports team uniform, or league fee, or camp, or dance recital or music lesson, or shoes that go with the uniform? The Wakulla County Coalition for Youth may be able to help. The Wakulla County Coalition for Youth is a partnership of folks focused on the healthy development of Wakulla youth. The Coalition and its more than 30 organizational members continually seeks ways to positively impact the lives of children in our community. Through donations by Capital City Bank, a reserve fund has been set aside that is devoted exclusively to help with the kinds of participation and associated costs described above. These funds are for Wakulla youth. If you “ nd yourself short, and you have a child that wants to participate in a team sport or other organized activity, please contact the Coalition by calling 926-3526. In that call, you will be asked to complete a short application that will be reviewed by a coalition committee. Dont let your child miss out on opportunities to experience a pro-social development activity. Its a Community Thing. Bruce Ashley President WCCY e youth coalition wants to helpStill vendor spaces available for Woodstork Who would speak for wetlands?Editor, The News:The Wakulla News reported in the issue of Sept. 15, that Commission Chairman Mike Stewart stated he is disgusted with the attempted character assassination against Pam Portwood, the director of the Wakulla County Tourist Development Council. Further, he alleges that citizens voicing concerns over the County and the TDCs handling of County tax dollars are witchhunting.Ž The de“ nition of witch-hunt, according to the dictionary is de“ ned as an investigation carried out ostensibly to uncover subversive activities but actually used to harass and undermine those with differing views.Ž Also in this article, Commissioner Stewart goes on to state that, Some good came out of these concerns because administrative errors were pointed out.Ž The so-called witch-hunt did produce evidence of improprieties which he chose to categorize as administrative errors which the commission then chose to forgive with retroactive action and approvals to pay grant expenditures and contract noncompliance with after-the-fact approvals! Again, I ask, where is this witch hunt? Who is assassinating character here?! Had these so called witch-hunters not conducted the investigation and involved the Clerk of the Courts Of“ ce, would Chairman Stewart, the TDC, BOCC or administrative staff own up to the discrepancies and sloppy administrative practices? Truthfully, probably not, since time after time over the past several years citizens have repeatedly brought to the BOCC and administrative staffs attention a variety of similar administrative errors.Ž Nothing has ever been done to remedy the practices and no one has ever been held accountable. So commissioners, why should anyone comply with rules and procedures if they know that you will do exactly as you did on Sept. 6, and reward wrongdoing with praise and compensation, then punish citizen tax payers for exercising their inalienable right and duty to question their government of“ cials and demand accountability? What is wrong with this picture? Further, in this case, no one is assassinating anyones character. Commissioner Stewart has been assassinating his own character by his irresponsible behavior and actions, while Portwood is following close behind with improprieties and transgressions surrounding her county contract and other grant applications. The term character assassination is most commonly used by politicians to defend themselves or clients against claims and statements from opponents with differing views or opinions on matters of mutual concern involving public and “ nancial matters. Commissioner Stewart chooses to categorize the contract and grant improprieties as administrative errorsŽ and hollers character assassination as a defense! But, what else can he say … the facts so far clearly speak for themselves. What is becoming inherently evident is his inability to separate personal friendships, feelings and opinions when dealing with statutorily mandated duties and oath of of“ ce to faithfully and honorably carry out his duties as commissioner for the welfare and well-being of all Wakulla County citizens and taxpayers, and not just for a limited few. If I were Mr. Stewart, I would be slow to anger and quick to recognize that he has a “ duciary, moral, ethical and legal responsibility to faithfully carry out the oath of of“ ce which he swore “ rst, before God, and secondly before man, to uphold any and all laws of the United States and of the State of Florida. Gail Hickman Wakulla County CitizenWhere is the witch hunt? Commissioners should listen to citizens Clari“ cation

PAGE 5

By TAMMIE BARFIELDtbar“ eld@thewakullanews.netThere was an atmosphere of enthusiasm Tuesday evening, Sep. 13, at the campaign kick-off of this years United Way of the Big Bend. This years goal is $90,000. Last year, slightly less than $80,000 was raised … though Wakulla received more than $118,000 from United Way. The kick-off event was held at Victors where United Way representatives, the Wakulla County United Way team and members of the community at large gathered to prepare to Live UnitedŽ in 2011. United Way of the Big Bend provides donated dollars to non-pro“ t agencies that serve the Wakulla County community each year. Donations of more than $100,000 from 2010 were allocated to 24 area agencies who provide much needed services to families and individuals in our area. Marc Dickieson, campaign associate, was very excited about St. Marks Powder implementing a payroll deduction program for their employees to make contributions. Donations made to United Way in Wakulla County are distributed to agencies serving Wakulla County. Contributors may specify a particular agency to receive the donation. To “ nd out more about how you can contribute to United Way of the Big Bend, call (850) 414-0844. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 – Page 5A PHOTOS BY TAMMIE BARFIELDCounty Commissioner Alan Brock, who is this years chairman, with Shirley Howard and Mark Dickieson at the United Way Kickoff at Victors American Grill last week.United Way kicks o driveContinued from Page 1A Also, $22,000 for workers compensation was moved to the building department and “ re MSBU budgets. All these reductions still left a gap of $185,605 which was spread across all constitutional of“ ces. The board was required to cut $69,720. The sheriff must cut $96,360. The clerk must cut $4,018. The property appraiser will have to cut $9,021 and the tax collector will need to reduce her budget by $6,487. The board agreed take the portion of cuts needed for the supervisor of elections because there are two elections next year. To achieve the reductions needed for the county commission, Interim County Administrator Tim Barden suggested delaying “ lling the vacant parks and recreation director and planning director positions for six months, which would save $55,119. As well as removing tuition reimbursement for employees, reducing the funds for printing and binding and annual and sick leave payout. Also, $3,503 was realized from the county administrators health insurance. County Commissioner Lynn Artz was hoping to delay the parks and recreation director longer and only delay the hiring of a planning director for three months. Artz said the county has already received 40 applications for the position and doesnt want to see people drop out because there is no time frame for when the position will be “ lled. She added that Bryan Roddenberry, who is serving as interim parks and recreation director, is doing a good job. Weve never really had much management with the parks,Ž Artz said. Commissioner Jerry Moore said he didnt want to make that decision, but allow for incoming County Administrator David Edwards to make that decision. Commissioner Alan Brock agreed that the commission shouldnt mandate that option. Commissioners Randy Merritt and Stewart were with Brock. Moore said he didnt understand why a planning director was needed right now when no one is building. What are we planning for?Ž Moore asked. Artz pointed out the Crawfordville Town Plan, which the commission, along with the chamber, has said it wants to proceed with. Brock agreed that there was a need for someone with expertise in that position because of the town plan, possible changes to the comprehensive plan and the fact that the department still has work to do. Stewart said, There are a lot of old issues that need to be resolved.Ž The commission agreed that Artzs suggestion was a good one, but would let Edwards decide whats best. The budget also includes no raises for county employees and no growth, as well as the elimination of 27 positions across the board. Capital Improvement projects include $392,368 for the community center, $60,000 for the library expansion and $120,000 from the Florida Department of Transportation to develop a Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Master Plan. There is also $71,551 set aside from impact fees to go towards the library expansion. There has also been $340,000 budgeted to complete the paving of Old Shell Point Road from the one cent sales tax. The amount of budgeted reserve is $480,000.Board OKs $42M budget e commission will delay “ lling some vacant county positions, such as parks and recreation director and planning director. One commissioner praises the interim rec director for doing a good job, but adds, Weve never had much management with the parks. Another commissioner questions the need for a planning director when theres no construction going on. What are we planning for? The food offered at the United Way kickoff at Victors.Free info available on arthritisSpecial to The NewsToday, more than 10 million Americans suffer from osteoarthritis of the knee, making it the most common form of arthritis in the U.S. What are frequent causes of this type of arthritis, and what can you do to protect your knees, reduce the symptoms, and support your doctors treatment? With advice from some of the worlds leading knee specialists, the American Arthritis Society has compiled in its publication Arthritis InfoŽ useful and practical tips for self-care. Each tip is interesting and easy to follow. For a free sample issue of Arthritis Info, write to the American Arthritis Society, P.O. Box 271010, Minneapolis MN 55427. Please include a loose 44 cent stamp for return postage. 0009ATE CHA RLI E 2012 Contact Charlie at (850) 926-4712 charlieforsheriff@gmail.com www.charliecreel.com Charlie Creel for Sheriff Elect CharlieCREELFor Full-Time Sheriff in 2012Saturday, September 24 2 pm to 4 pmCoast Guard Auxiliary Station 1557 Shell Point Road, Crawfordville (in Shell Point, at the southern end of Shell Point Road) Light refreshments will be served. Political advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Affiliation, for SheriffWhat’s on your mind? Tell Charlie!Stop by and let’s talk about local law enforcement issues that matter to you. Florida Certied ContractorSoutheastern Home Building Services, Inc.Residential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN construction 850509-3632www.tuscanytrace.net www.buildinghomes.comREMODELING ADDITIONS KITCHENS BATHS WORK REPLACEMENT FLOORS PROJECT Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 Please Recycle

PAGE 6

Lillian G. ChandlerLillian G. Chandler, 91, passed away Sunday, Sept. 18, in Tallahassee. She was born in Athens, Ga., and had seven siblings. She had lived in this area since 1968. She retired after 27 years as a nursing assistant. She loved gardening and her pets. Family received friends Tuesday, Sept. 20, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville. Graveside services were Wednesday, Sept. 21, at 10 a.m. at Woodville Cemetery, in Woodville. Survivors include two grandchildren, Jeff Chandler (Andrea) and Sheila C. Peters; four great-grandchildren, Brad Chandler, Brittany Chandler, Bailey Chandler and Joshua Peters; and one sister, Kathleen Kenny of Athens, Ga. She was predeceased by a son, John Harold Chandler. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com)Carl F. MetcalfCarl Franklin Metcalf, 59, of Panacea, passed away Thursday, Sept. 15, surrounded by loving family and friends. He was the owner and operator of Rock Landing Seafood in Panacea and was a minister with the Congregational Holiness Association of Churches. A graveside service was held Sunday, Sept. 18, at the Panacea Park Cemetery in Panacea with the Rev. Michael Hall of“ ciating. The family received friends on Saturday, Sept. 17, at the home, 92 Alapaha Ave., in Panacea. Flowers can be received at the residence. Survivors include his wife, Elizabeth BethŽ Metcalf; daughter, Nicole M.(Donnie) Cruse of Alabama; sons, Carl Erik (Christy) Metcalf of Panacea and B. Ruel Calbatera of Crawfordville; granddaughters, Thea C. (Brandon) Taylor, Doni Marie (Jason) Cruse, and Olivia Grace Metcalf all of Panacea; grandsons, Justin Vargo of Calvary, Ga., and Elijah Franklin Metcalf and Ethan Phillip McDaniel of Panacea; great-grandson, Reed Taylor of Panacea; brothers, Danny (Marion) Metcalf Sr. of Panacea, and John Wayne (Laura) Crosby of Crawfordville; sisters, Linda M. Mangum of Perry and Linda Carol (Frank CiscoŽ) Johnson of Crawfordville; nieces, Cindy, Julie, Shelley, Leanne, Sandra and their spouses; nephews: Danny Jr., Matthew, Joshua, Colby and their spouses; nine great-nieces and four great-nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, J. Henry Metcalf and Inez Spears Metcalf; a sister, Judith M. Sanders; a brother, James H. Metcalf; and a brother-in-law, James JimmyŽ Mangum. Arrangements were under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home in Macclenny, 904-259-4600. Please sign the online guestbook at www.forbesfuneralhome.net.Margaret E.S. SawyerMargaret Eulalie Stegall Sawyer, 78, went home to be with her Lord and Savior on Sept. 18. Margaret was born in Thomasville, Ga., on March 20, 1933, to Ivan B. Stegall and Eulalie Davis Stegall. She worked beside her husband in the family business and was a homemaker after retirement. She was an active member of the First Baptist Church of Tallahassee for more than 50 years and loved her Sunday School Class. She was a member of Caroline Brevard Chapter of DAR having served numerous times as a chapter of“ cer. She was currently serving as Veterans Chairmen for Dominie Everardus Bogardus Chapter, Colonial Dames XVII Century. She was also currently serving as Chapter Registrar of Mission San Luis de Apalachee Chapter, Daughters of the American Colonies and Chapter Registrar of Treaty of Ghent Chapter United States Daughters of 1812. She served in numerous of“ cer position and committee chairmen for Anna Jackson Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy. She was also a member of Jacksonville Southern Dames. Visitation was held Wednesday, Sept. 21, at Culleys Funeral Home on Riggins Road from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Services will be held Thursday, Sept. 22 at 2 p.m. at the First Baptist Church of Tallahassee with burial to follow at Culleys Meadowood Cemetery in Tallahassee. Survivors include her children, Ava Jane Davis (Al), David I. Sawyer (Wanda) and Wilburn D. (Skip) Sawyer III; her grandchildren, Lalie Davis Lawhon (Jeremy), Megan Pate, Douglas P. Davis, Rachel Clements (Al), Crystal Smith and Jordan Sawyer; eight great-grandchildren; and many cousins, nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her husband of 56 years, Wilburn D. (Buz) Sawyer Jr.; and by her siblings, Ivan B. (Jake) Stegall, Emily Jane Stegall and Carolyn Floyd.Myrtle S. ShieldsMyrtle Smith Shields, 92, passed away on Sunday, Sept. 18. She was born and raised in Tallahassee, but spent most of her adult life in St. Marks. Mama Myrt,Ž as she was affectionately known, was married to Charles Curtis Shields Sr., who preceded her in death. During the time she lived in St. Marks, she had a home in Franklin, N.C., where she resided part time, moving there permanently in 2005. The family received friends on Wednesday, Sept. 21, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Culleys Meadowood Funeral Home, 1737 Riggins Road, in Tallahassee. Graveside services for immediate and extended family will be held at 10 a.m. on Thursday, Sept. 22, at Crawfordville Cemetery, in Crawfordville. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to the American Cancer Society or to Angel Hospice of Franklin, North Carolina 170 Church Street, Franklin NC 28734. Survivors include her daughter, Anita Register (Tillman); her son, Charles Shields (Pamela); six grandchildren, Michael Register (Sandy), Barton Shields (Biliana), Teresa Register, Barry Shields (Kathy), Loree Roberts (Jobe) and Brett Shields (Cathy); and 10 great-grandchildren. She is also survived by her sister-in-law, Irene Smith, and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. She was preceded in death by her son, Benny Bloxham Shields; and her brother, John Bloxham Smith.Earl C. Vause Sr.Earl Colbert Vause Sr., 84, went home to be with his Lord on Sept. 17. He was born in Arran, on Dec. 26, 1926, to George Vause and Ida Tucker Vause. He served his country in the U.S. Navy Construction Battalion on Guam during World War II and the Paci“ c campaign. He owned his own local contracting business in Panacea before retiring. He loved the Lord and was a member of Friendship Baptist Church. He was an ordained deacon and served as Sunday school director and music director at Ochlockonee Bay Baptist Church prior to joining Friendship. In his spare time, he loved seine “ shing and shrimping and spending time with his family. Visitation was held Monday, Sept. 19, at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Services were held Tuesday, Sept. 20, at 3 p.m. at Friendship Baptist Church with burial to follow at Panacea Park Cemetery in Panacea. Survivors include his wife of 64 years, Irene W. Vause; two sons, Earl Vause Jr. (Diane) of Crawfordville and David Vause (Peggy) of Tallahassee; one daughter, Naomi Zinser (Brian) of Panacea; four grandchildren, Jeremy Zinser (Mindy) of Crawfordville, Jarrod Zinser, Riley Vause (Jeanie) of Tallahassee and Holden Vause of Swainsboro, Ga.; and four great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his sister, Claris Ward; brothers, Otis, Durwood and Wilbur Vause; and a granddaughter, Jennifer Vause. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel was in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Obituaries continued on Page 14A Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers religious views and events ChurchObituariesChurch briefsCoastal Areas Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm 1s t Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Wakulla Station Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart Lillian G. Chandler Carl F. Metcalf Margaret E.S. Sawyer Myrtle S. Shields Earl C. Vause Sr. George H. WolfTikvat Ami. My Peoples HopeŽ New Messianic Synagogue with in-depth teachings, Judaic and contemporary music, great childrens program, active youth group, dynamite college and career age meetings and caring people. Jewish? Intermarried? Not Jewish but interested in the Jewish faith? All are welcome. Weekly Shabbat Services every Saturday at 10:30 a.m. in the Gingerbread Day School/Heritage Academy building, 3324 N. Monroe St. in Tallahassee. For more information and to “ nd out more about us and our High Holy Day service, visit our website, tikvatami.com or call or email Rabbi Josh at (850) 364-8925, rabbijosh@tikvatami.com. Pioneer Baptist Church in Crawfordville, 486 Beechwood Drive, will be honoring Sheriff David Harvey during its regular service on Sunday, Sept. 25 beginning at 10:30 a.m. Pastor Dennis Hall has invited the sheriff and members of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce to join the church for the worship service which will include an opportunity to recognize Sheriff Harvey and staff members for their contributions to the community. We want to take the time to express our appreciation for the work done by Sheriff Harvey and the sheriffs of“ ce staff,Ž said Pastor Hall. A church garage sale and “ sh fry will be held on Saturday, Sept. 24 at Christian Worship Center. The garage sale will begin at 8 a.m. The “ sh fry starts at 11 a.m. until the “ sh is gone. Christian Worship Center is located at 3922 Coastal Hwy. For more information, call (850) 25 1-9959 or (850) 745-1022. Synagogue offers services in Tallahassee Pioneer Baptist to honor Sheriff David Harvey Christian Worship Center to hold garage sale, sh fry 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Grief RECOVERY GROUP for parents who have lost a childFor more information call Gigi Cavallaro at 850-962-6117 or Melanie Lachman 850-878-5310 or 926-9308

PAGE 7

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 – Page 7AhappeningsCommunityBoy scouts attend National Youth Leadership Training Special to The News Troop 5 Scouts, Nathan Green, Blakeleigh Bolton and Chris Broussard attended the BSA National Youth Leadership Training (NYLT) course held at Wallwood Boy Scout Reservation this summer. The NYLT course centers around the concepts of what a leader must be, what he must know, and what he must do. The key elements are then taught with a clear focus on how to. The skills come alive during the week as the young men go on a Quest for the Meaning of Leadership. Troop 5 is very proud of this accomplishment. Scouts Nathan Green, Blakeleigh Bolton and Chris Broussard Special to The News Little did Randell Mainer know that the cemetery expansion he and his grandfather worked on together for his Eagle Scout project would soon be the resting place of his grandfather, Elmer Barbree. In fact, Barbree was the “ rst to be buried there after Mainers expansion project was completed. The son of Ricky and Brenda Barbree Mainer, Randell Mainer is 16, an 11th grader at Wakulla High School and a lifelong member of the Wakulla United Methodist Church. For his Eagle Project, Mainer chose to expand the churchs cemetery space with chain link fencing from 10,000 to 20,000 square feet. He dedicated the expansion to the church and to his grandfather. The prestigious award of Eagle Scout was “ rst earned in 1912 so at its almost 100th birthday, it is an honor earned by Mainer and almost 2 million other scouts, including Gerald Ford, former United States President and Neil Armstrong, NASA astronaut and the “ rst man to step on the moon. Mainer joined Boy Scout Troop 4 in St. Marks in 2006 and became certi“ ed as an Eagle Scout on July 19, 2011. Mainer served as chaplain aide for his troop since 2006 and won the District Spelling Bee in 2008, was runner up in 2009 and is a member of the Wakulla High School Academic Team. As to his future plans, Mainer plans to help other scouts in his troop to reach the highest honor in scouting, that of Eagle Scout.Randell Mainer earns rank of Eagle Scout The Rev. Janice Henry-Rinehart, minister of Wakulla United Methodist Church, and Eagle Scout Randell Mainer Workshop on preserving food is o ered David Moody, St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Director, and Shelley Swenson, Wakulla County FCS Extension Agent, will be covering the basics of food preservation through pressure canning and dehydrating on Oct. 14 at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce. Moody has years of experience preserving wildlife and “ sh and wants to share some of the things that he has learned with others. Swenson will share an overview of the pressure canner, why a pressure canner must be used for low acid vegetables, meats and “ sh and some basic canning techniques. Sample foods will be provided. At the October workshop, we also plan to discuss food dehydrating. It is one of the oldest methods of preserving food for later use. Dried foods are ideal for backpacking and camping. They are lightweight, take up little space and do not require refrigeration. Drying removes the moisture from the food so that bacteria, yeasts and molds cannot grow and spoil the food. It also slows down the action of enzymes, but does not inactivate them. Because drying removes moisture, the food becomes smaller and lighter in weight. Some foods such as jerky, fruit leathers or dried fruits can be eaten dry. Foods can be dried in the sun, in an oven or in a food dehydrator by using the right combination of warm temperature, low humidity and air circulation. Consider attending this workshop. To cover the expense of the workshop a $5 registration fee is required for each participant. Enroll today by calling the Wakulla County Extension Office, 926-3931. The Florida Wild Mammal Associations Woodstork Festival is Oct. 8 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 195 Harvey Young Farm, Crawfordville. The cost of admission is $5. For more information visit www.woodstorkfestival. com.Woodstork Festival Oct. 8 713-001499 Rock Landing RoadEnjoy Outdoor Seating Overlooking Beautiful Dickerson Bay! Fall HOurs Open: Thursday ............................... 4 P.M. 9 P.M. Friday .......................................... 4 P.M. 10 P.M. Saturday ............................ 11 A.M. 10 P.M. sunday ......................................11 A.M. 9 P.M.COME AND CHECK OUT OUR NEW SATURDAY AND SUNDAY LUNCH SPECIALS 11a.m. 3p.m. All Under $10.THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS DOMESTIC BEER $1.50 WELLS $2.00 ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 PARTNER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. You are invited to attendPastor’s Appreciation Day September 25, 2011 • 11:00amDinner will be served after church.Please join us as we extend our gratitude toPastor Charles (BB) Barwick for his years of dedicated service.Panacea Full Gospel Assembly

PAGE 8

Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schoolsSchoolBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County School Board recently approved its tax levy and budget for the 2011-12 year with comments from one citizen. Donna Sanford, a retired teacher who occasionally attends school board meetings to challenge of“ cials, appeared at the “ nal budget hearing on Sept. 12 to ask if school board members or district staff ever looked back at 2009 surveys of teachers. Theres some good ways to save, coming from teachers,Ž she said. Sanford also chided the school board: I have a hard time looking at the board, some of whom may owe more than $15,000 in back taxes, but raise the millage rate on us.Ž Sanford did not name the school board member she was referring to, but school board member Ray Gray, who owns substantial amounts of rental property in the county, is one year behind on his taxes. Superintendent David Miller responded to Sanfords comments that The only increase is the required local effortŽ portion of the tax levy, which is set by the state. The school board did not increase any of its millage,Ž Miller said. The total millage is 8.55 mills, which is $8.55 per $1,000 of assessed property value. That includes the optional .25 mill levy that Wakulla citizens voted for in a referendum last year and which the school board unanimously approved. The school board meeting room was packed, but besides Sanford, the audience was teachers and school principals, most of whom were there for other items on the agenda. In other matters: € The school board approved a resolution of support for the Florida Center for the Performing Arts and Education in Tallahassee. A presentation was made last month by St. Marks resident Pam Shields, whos on the board of the proposed performing arts center, along with Leon County Clerk of Courts Bob Inzer, another board member. Shields stressed that the facility was not just for Tallahassee residents, but would have a educational component that would make it valuable for students in the area. € The school board was also introduced to Alyssa Higgins, the new principal at COAST Charter School in St. Marks. Susan Flournoy, the former principal at COAST, introduced Higgins to the board. School board approves millage and budgetCurrent millage of 8.55 mills will remain, which includes a .25 mill levy approved by citizensRiversink Elementary remembers Sept. 11 On Sept. 11, all the students and faculty at Riversink Elementary School went outside and held hands and formed a large circle and had a moment of silence and remembered Sept. 11, 2001. By LILLY ROCKWELLTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 8 … In response to Gov. Rick Scotts interest in the controversial Texas higher education overhaul that emphasizes accountability, Florida State University President Eric Barron offered up his own proposal Thursday that he plans to take to the governor. Barrons plan embraces many of the ideas behind the Texas proposal, known as the Seven Breakthrough Solutions,Ž that emphasizes teaching over research and more accountability over performance. Barrons ideas, laid out in a 23-page paper titled Florida Can Do Better Than Texas,Ž offers an in-depth analysis of the seven solutions and responds with eight Florida solutions.Ž The Texas plan suggests monitoring how effective professors are by the number of classes taught, student satisfaction surveys and the number of A and B grades awarded. Instead, Barron suggests judging how effective professors are at teaching by examining the freshmen retention and graduation rates, offering student evaluations at the beginning and end of a course, looking at the cost per student for each credit hour, and giving post-graduation surveys to students on their university experience. Those same factors would be used in awarding tenure and faculty bonuses of up to $10,000. Scott began pushing for colleges and universities to look into the Texas higher education proposals last spring. Some members of FSUs board of trustees indicated their support for the plan, especially those appointed to the board by Scott. But others fretted over the response from faculty. This is a draconian move if you dont have the faculty with you,Ž warned Joseph Camps, a Tallahassee physician and board trustee. The lone faculty representative on the board, Sandra Lewis, who is president of the Faculty Senate and a professor of education, said she was pleased with Barrons suggestions and felt the Texas plan was too simplistic.Ž Accountability is important,Ž Lewis said. But under the Texas plan, professors would be driven to get high student satisfaction scores by bringing pizza on the last day of class and showing a movie and giving everybody As,Ž she said. Barron said his next step is to discuss his plan with Florida State University faculty and the Board of Governors before discussing it with the governor.Scholarship available at Wakulla ChristianThe Step Up for StudentsŽ corporate tax scholarship program announced that more scholarships are available for the 2011-12 school year. The scholarships are worth up to $4,011. Wakulla Christian School is an approved provider for the scholarship. For further information, please contact the WCS School Of“ ce at 926-5583.FSU President Barron proposes alternative to Texas higher education reforms The Wakulla Coastal Optimist Club’s2011ANNUAL FASHION EXTRAVAGANZAWakulla County Senior Center Thursday • October 6 • 2011 6:30pm Social 7:00pm Dinner, Auction, & Show please join us forMaurice’s Thread Tree Crum’s Mini MallTICKETS $30.00 eachall proceeds go toward scholarships for Wakulla County students 000916P facebook.com/GamerZParadise(850)926-9100|theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com 635WakullaArranRoadCrawfordville,Florida32327Come by to find out moreabout ourAfter School Program Kinect | X-Box Live | PS3 | Wii | Wi-fiMON THURS: SUMMER HOURS 12 9 PM FRI:12 11 PM SAT: 12 11 PM SUN: 1 8 PMCome and PLAY! (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile HomesER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116

PAGE 9

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 – Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsBy RICHARD LAWHONSpecial to The NewsThe Lady War Eagles traveled to Florida High School on Sept. 13 to play their first match of the week. The Lady War Eagles started the “ rst game playing fairly well but lost to Florida High 20-25. During the second game, the girls seemed to have gotten it together and played very well, but still lost, 26-28. As the third game started, the Lady War Eagles came out and played excellently, executing on every play and beat Florida High 25-15. Moving into the fourth game, the girls seemed to have lost what they had found in the third game, losing to Florida High 1725. The key players for this game were Albrey Sorrell with an amazing 24 digs, Ashley Roberts with 15 kills and 13 digs, Breighly Bolton with 11 kills, Chelsea Carroll with 35 assists, Emily Haley with 8 kills and Jordyn Pryor with 14 digs. After a fairly good practice on Wednesday, the Lady War Eagles hosted their second district game against Suwanee Valley High School on Sept. 15. The Lady War Eagles prevailed over Suwanee Valley High School 25-18, 25-14 and 25-17. The Lady War Eagles went into this game being a player short, so Coach Erica Bunch decided to call up Marina Pertrandis from the JV team and, boy, did she show out. Having never played with the varsity team and only having one day to prepare, Pertrandis played outside hitter to replace Jordyn Pryor. Pertrandis completed this game with 8 kills and 3 digs, very well for very little preparation. Some of the other key players for this game were Albrey Sorrell with 17 digs, Ashley Roberts with 7 kills and 7 digs, Breighly Bolton with 5 kills and 7 aces, Chelsea Carroll with 4 kills, 28 assists and 4 digs and Shannon Wood with 6 kills. The Lady War Eagles record is now 8-4 and their district record is 2-0. By PAUL HOOVERTrack Coach The Wakulla High School cross country teams traveled to Tom Brown Park on Saturday to compete against runners from 14 different schools at the Lincoln Invitational Cross Country Meet. The WHS girls team emerged as meet champions and the boys ran to a third place “ nish. The girls race was extremely close with the Lincoln girls team “ nishing just two points behind the WHS girls. The top 15 girls were individually recognized and the War Eagles placed four girls in this group. These included sophomore Marty Wiedeman (4th), senior Cora Atkinson (5th), freshman Kasey James (10th) and senior Kristie Hodges (15th). Additionally, freshman Lydia Wiedeman “ nished in 16th place, senior Morma Woodcock placed 17th and junior Raychel Gray placed 26 to round out the top seven. All of the top seven girls ran a varsity qualifying time. The WHS boys were led by the third place “ nish of senior Stanley Linton who covered the 5K course in 17:21. Linton was the only WHS runner to “ nish in the top 15. Rounding out the top seven for the WHS boys were senior David Victor junior Hunter Phillips sophomore Brandon Trussell senior Cody James sophomore Jacob Martinez and freshman J.P. Piotrowski. In all, 13 boys ran a varsity qualifying time at this meet. I was really happy for our kids today,Ž said Coach Paul Hoover. They have all worked hard this season and todays results were very encouraging. It is good to see their hard work paying off and to see how they worked as a team during the race.Ž The teams compete next at the FSU Invitational at Apalachee Cross Country Park on Saturday, Sept. 24. PHOTO BY KAREN JAMES/Special to The NewsThe Wakulla Girls Cross-Country team after their win last weekend.CROSS-COUNTRYGirls win Lincoln InvitationalVOLLEYBALLLady War Eagles lose to Florida High, but win against Suwannee LISA KINARD/Special to The NewsStanley Linton placed third for the boys. San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Huttons Seafood & More 570-1004 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org T T h h u u n n d d e e r r o o n n t t h h e e G G u u l l f fO c t o b e r 6 6 9 www.thunderonthegulf.com The Workswakullas coworking caf www.theworkscafe.com “ReceiveacomplimentarycopyofPastry and Coffee Special!” Let us perk up your day! JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org $39924PK SpringtimeSpringWater O S-N-S 2PACKSOF4ROLLS $1FOR JUSTT 2ROLLS $1FOR JUSTB While Supplies L astWhile Supplies Last While Supplies Last PEPSI12PKAll Flavors3FOR$11GATORADE32OZAll FlavorsPOWERADE32OZAll Flavors2FOR$32FOR$2 HOTDO G1/4LB2FOR$250

PAGE 10

Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team viewsSportsBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIt was a back-and-forth battle between Wakulla and North Florida Christian on Friday night, Sept. 16. Head Coach Scott Klees said that, ultimately, The game came down to whos going to make the first mistake.Ž While Wakulla went into the fourth quarter with a one point lead, 20-19, NFC scored a touchdown early in the period and then, bolstered by a couple of key Wakulla mistakes, held on to win. We ” inched “ rst,Ž Klees said. It was Wakullas “ rst loss of the season. The good thing about this is sometimes you learn more from a loss than a win,Ž Klees said. For the War Eagles, the players havent come together as a team, Klees said. I think we can “ x it and go forward as a better team,Ž he said. When youre winning, sometimes its hard to understandŽ the concept of playing as a team, Klees said. Wakulla scored first, a “ eld goal by kicker Conner Smith, to lead 3-0. A couple of series later, NFC scored a touchdown but missed the extra point to make the score 6-3. Wakullas next drive stalled after a holding penalty. North Florida Christian mounted a drive for another TD, and again missed the extra point, to lead 12-3. There was palpable frustration along the Wakulla sideline at that point. On Wakullas next drive, facing a fourth down and 2, Marshane Godbolt picked up the “ rst down and there seemed to be a momentum shift. A couple plays later, there was a 60-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Caleb Stephens to receiver Mikal Cromartie that, along with the Smith extra point, put Wakulla back in it at 1210 with seven seconds left in the “ rst quarter. A couple of series later, Wakulla faced a fourth and 1 at their 33 and Deonte Hutchinson ran the ball and picked up the “ rst down. After a couple of bruising Will Thomas runs, on third down and long, Marshane Godbolt caught a touchdown pass in the end zone. Smith added the extra point, and Wakulla was up 17-12 with three minutes left in the half. The mood on the Wakulla sideline had changed. And they went in at halftime leading. North Florida Christian struck back on their first possession in the second half with a TD pass and extra point that gave them a 19-17 lead. After both defenses stopped any drives, another momentum shift occurred for Wakulla when receiver Lyntonio Bowdrie and an NFC defender both came up with the ball. It was initially called an interception by NFC, but then ruled a completed pass. Another fourth down, and Mikal Cromartie made a catch for a “ rst down. With less than two minutes in the quarter, Smith kicked a 44yard “ eld goal and Wakulla was up 20-19. But a series of Wakulla mistakes helped North Florida Christian. After an NFC drive foundered near mid“ eld and the Eagles were punting the ball back to Wakulla, there was a roughing the kicker call that gave them the ball back. Its not the kids fault by any means,Ž Klees said of the play that drew the penalty. He was just going hard.Ž Two plays later, NFC quarterback Pat Dobson scored a touchdown on a keeper. The extra point was no good, but NFC was on top for the rest of the game, 25-20. There were still nine minutes left in the game after that score. On the next drive, again facing a fourth down and three, Wakulla went for it but Godbolt was stopped short on a run. The War Eagle defense held NFC, but the punt pinned Wakulla deep in its own territory. With 5:35 left, Wakulla again tried to mount a drive but NFCs defense held -including breaking up a pass on third down that forced Wakulla to punt. With less than four minutes, NFC put together a couple of runs and got a “ rst down, and the clock was quickly running out. On a pass play with less than two minutes, the receiver stayed inbounds to keep the clock running -but a Wakulla defender grabbed his facemask and added a personal foul penalty that gave NFC another “ rst down. Then NFC just ran out the clock to seal the win. Of the high and low emotions of the game, Klees said: Theres 48 minutes in a high school game, and theres a lot of ups and downs. A good team steps up.Ž For us to reach our goals this year,Ž the coach said, we have to understand our role as a football team.Ž At Mondays practice, Klees said some things came to a head and he felt improvements were being made. WAR EAGLES WILL TRAVEL TO FORT WHITE This week, the War Eagles go on the road and face Fort White, who are 2-1. They are a tough football team,Ž Klees said. Fort Whites loss came in their “ rst game, played against Taylor County in Perry. Tied at 28 in the fourth quarter, Taylor County scored a last-minute touchdown to win. Its different when youre on the road and have to travel two and a half hours to get there,Ž Klees said in anticipation of Friday nights game. We have to be mentally and physically ready,Ž he said.War Eagles fall to North Florida Christian, 25-20 Conner Smith 2 “ eld goals, including one of 44-yards Caleb Stephens 9 for 15, 2 TDs Kevin James 9 tackles, 1 sackSpecial Teams Defense O ensePlayers of the Week PHOTOS BY KEN FIELDS/Special to The NewsConner Smith kicks a “ eld goal. He had two on the night, including a 44-yarder. Receiver Marshane Godbolt hauls in a touchdown pass. A couple of mistakes trip up Wakulla in the fourth quarter. Head Coach Scott Klees is philosophical, saying the team can learn from the loss When youre winning, sometimes its hard to understand playing as a team, Klees says Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 WAKULLA COUNTYS Recycling and Disposal Choice for: Residential bulky items Commercial bulky items Construction debris Remodeling materials Including the kitchen sink! JYard debris Garage stuff WE APPRECIATETHE OPPORTUNITY TOSERVEYOURRECYCLINGNEEDS. 6020 Woodville Hig hway, T allahassee, Florida 32305Phone(850)216-1006 Fax(850)216-1009www.marpanrecycling.comA small fee of $5.00 covers the rst 250 pounds of material. Larger loads are charged by the ton $39 per ton (2,000 pounds). Open 7:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. 8:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m. on Saturday. CONVENIENT Marpan Recycling is open most holidays and six days a week for your convenience, located just north of Woodville on SR 363 (Woodville Highway). FAST With two scales and a clean, paved drop-off area, your turnaround time will be very fast. GREEN -Marpan Recycling is a material recovery facility, not a landfill. Materials recovered include wood, concrete, cardboard, carpet, paper and metals. (Sorry no hazardous waste or food garbage.) Daviod Rossetti 850 591-6161 Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Loren Joiner 850 544-3508 Kelly Dykes 850 528-3063 all akullas inest 850 926-1011 our ome own ealtor734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL

PAGE 11

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 – Page 11AIn The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102By TIM LINAFELT Osceola.com Staff WriterFor more than a few moments in the “ rst half of Florida States contest with Oklahoma Saturday, the Sooners threatened to turn it into another lopsided affair. And the Seminoles have their defense to thank that it didnt. Time and again, the FSU defense found itself in a dif“ cult position „ sometimes self-in” icted, sometimes not „ and found a way to keep Landry Jones and Co. mostly in check. In the wake of their 23-13 defeat to the topranked Sooners, no one in the Seminoles locker room felt too great about the evenings events, but the FSU defense turned out a remarkable performance that showed tangible progress from last years showing in Norman. Mark Stoops group held the Sooners to just 310 yards of total offense and a pedestrian 4.7 yards per play. OU star quarterback Landry Jones completed 18 of his 27 passes „ including the 37-yard touchdown to Kenny Stills that sealed OUs victory „ but only threw for 199 yards. And Lamarcus Joyner and Nigel Bradham each grabbed an interception. I guess it shows a lot, it shows were a different team,Ž said Bradham, who tied for the team lead with nine tackles. Those red zone stops allowed for Florida State to be within striking distance of a victory in the fourth quarter. On consecutive possessions, in the second quarter, the Sooners offense was looking to extend its 7-3 lead. The Seminoles forced “ eld goals of 21 and 29 yards. FSUs second goal line stand was especially impressive, as Oklahoma began its drive on Florida States 3-yard line thanks to an EJ Manuel interception that Tom Wort returned 69 yards. That kept us in the ballgame in the “ rst half,Ž FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said. Said defensive end Bjoern Werner: It felt great to stop them twice in the end zone. I looked in everybodys eyes and I have never seen that before from my teammates. They were just going crazy.Ž Werner played perhaps the “ nest game of his Florida State career, with a sack and two tackles for loss. I would rather have a win than 15 sacks,Ž Werner said. D e f e n s e k e e p s N o l e s w i t h i n s t r i k i n g d i s t a n c e Defense keeps Noles within striking distanceBy MARTY COHEN GatorBait.net EditorXavier Nixon was pacing, back and forth, between the 35and 45-yard lines, just glaring across the “ eld. Both teams had made their way on to the “ eld prior to kickoff, and players were mulling about. But Nixon kept pacing, never taking his eyes off the opposing sidelines, his steely glare piercing the expanse of the “ eld. It must have been “ ve minutes of real time before Nixon stopped his little march, almost a symbolic picture of a team waiting to bust out of the gate. It was hardly a secret that the real season was starting after the opening two scrimmages, even if Tennessee is still a shell of what it represented a decade or two ago. Florida, its fans, was ready to go and the result was an emotional, sloppy rollercoaster ride to a 33-23 win over Tennessee in Will Muschamps SEC debut as the head guy. The atmosphere in this stadium, its incomparable,Ž Muschamp said. Our guys understand whats at stake in the SEC and playing well in the SEC. Its certainly a different buzz around here. But this counts for one … its not one-and-a-half, its not two. Its one and next week counts for one. We need to enjoy this tonight the right way and wake up and get ready for Kentucky.Ž Understandable response from a coach who must balance the release of a hard-fought win with the straightahead focus on the next game. But this was the “ rst step, the unveiling of what we can maybe expect the rest of the way from this cherubic team. It was the initial test for a young team getting ready to embark on a two-month march through treacherous SEC landmines. Everyone got their feet wet today and they held up,Ž “ fth-year senior defensive tackle Jaye Howard said about his young defensive mates. Each week theyre going to get better.Ž In a lot of ways, the outcome was perfect fodder for the coaching staff. So much went well in all three phases of the game, yet there was a ton of sloppy play (did the of“ cials get paid by the ” ag today?) and so many areas to clean up,Ž the term du jour for this coaching staff. In the end it was a satisfying 10-point win that seemed so much more dominant. We have a lot of things to work on … we de“ nitely didnt play the best we can play today,Ž said Trey Burton, the valuable versatile man on offense who scored a pair of one-year touchdowns through the air and on the ground, the latter a fourth-and-1 plunge on the goal line. Youve got to love the Muschamp con“ dence, taking the ball to start the game after winning the coin ” ip. Too many coaches turn to the manual, which states you must defer to get that all-important third quarter kickoff. But Muschamp used common sense and kept the potent Tennessee offense on the sidelines at the outset. In a beautifully scripted series, the Gators were sharp from the opening bell, with quarterback John Brantley completing all “ ve of his throws and Jeff Demps taking off on a 28-yard scamper to the Vol 1-yard line, setting up Burtons touchdown reception. After a missed Tennessee “ eld goal, the Gators responded with another long march but had to settle for a “ eld goal when Brantley failed to lead an open Burton in the endzone on “ rst down. But the Red Zone woes that have plagued this offense throughout the season cropped up again, with the Gators settling for short “ eld goals when they had a chance to practically put the Vols away in the “ rst half. The mercurial Chris Rainey came through again, blazing 83 yards on a dump-off pass in which Brantley did a nice job maneuvering in the pocket and then letting Rainey do the heavy lifting. It was another standard Rainey 2011 performance … 100 yards rushing (108 on 21 carries), 100 yards receiving (104 yards on two receptions) and another huge special teams play with a blocked punt. Theres not too many people in the world who can do what Chris does, maybe three or four,Ž Burton said. Defensively there was a lot to like as well. With Florida getting on top early, the Vols basically abandoned any thoughts of running the ball. Tennessee running backs gained a mere 27 yards on 14 attempts. As a result, the Gators were able to put pressure on Tennessee quarterback Tyler Bray. Sharrif Floyd returned and made an instant impact, with Muschamp showing the NCAA where that group could stick it by making Floyd a game captain. It was an equally strong outing from tackles Dominique Easley and Howard inside, and Ronald Powell “ nally showed up. Powell made some plays, providing pressure, combining with Howard for a sack and hurrying Bray into a forced throw that Josh Evans intercepted on the “ rst play of the third quarter. Aided by an injury on the opening drive to talented Vol receiver Justin Hunter, the young Gator secondary was able to hold its own, despite getting ” agged for “ ve pass interference calls (the Gators committed a whopping 16 penalties for 150 yards). The Muschamp regime has seemed to energize the entire Gator Nation. A team that showed “ re and passion made it seven straight over Tennessee, baby steps beginning the long journey ahead. F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A g a t o r s FLORIDA gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate #15 Florida at KentuckySaturday, 7 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. #11 Florida State at #21 ClemsonSaturday, 3:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. FSU Quarterback EJ Manuel makes a run for it during the game against Oklahoma. G a t o r s e a r n s e v e n t h Gators earn seventh s t r a i g h t w i n o v e r t h e V o l s straight win over the VolsBy TIM LINAFELT Osceola.com Staff Writer No one wearing garnet and gold felt much like consolation as they re” ected on a 23-13 loss to Oklahoma late Saturday night and early into Sunday morning. And I know … there are no moral victories or trophies handed out for playing toe-to-toe with the nations No. 1 team and coming up short. However, we did learn that this 2011 edition of the Seminoles belonged on the “ eld with the countrys best. It just shows potential,Ž said sophomore safety Lamarcus Joyner, who picked off OUs Landry Jones in the third quarter.  Playing without three key receivers … Willie Haulstead, Bert Reed and Kenny Shaw, who looked on his way to the best game of his young career before a vicious two-sided hit near the goal line sent him to the hospital … FSUs young receivers stepped up on the biggest stage of their lives. Most notable of that bunch was Rashad Greene, who, a healthy three games into his college career, is ” irting with All-Star status. And dont forget Clint Trickett, who stepped in for the injured EJ Manuel midway through the third quarter. His 56-yard, into-triple-coverage touchdown pass to Greene on third-and-28, nearly shook Doak Campbell Stadium to its core. I hung it up there too long,Ž Trickett said. Rashad made a heck of a play.Ž And perhaps lost in a disappointing defeat is that Florida States defense turned in a performance that bordered on heroic. Last years game in Norman is still signi“ cant because its the single greatest measuring stick of just how far this defense has come under Mark Stoops. A year ago, Landry Jones passed for 380 yards and four touchdowns against FSU. This time around, he found just 199 and one score. And it was the defenses pair of goal-line stands … forcing “ eld goals instead of touchdowns … that gave the Seminoles a glimmer of hope. The running game that was a concern heading into Saturdays game has been upgraded to a full-blown worry until it proves it can have any kind of effectiveness at all. And Florida States “ rst road trip … a 3:30 affair at Clemson … is hardly an ideal environment for trying to work out the kinks. When Florida States schedule was released, we looked past Louisiana-Monroe and Charleston Southern, and circled Sept. 17 as the date when wed learn what this Florida State program has become in its 20 months under Jimbo Fisher. We learned that FSU is not as good as the No. 1 team in the nation. Not yet anyway. But we also learned that the Seminoles arent too far off either … closer than theyve been in 10 years. And as things continue to move forward under Fisher, thats not a bad place to be.FSU hangs with No. 1 teamFlorida States defense forces two “ eld goals instead of touchdowns at Saturdays game. PHOTOS BY Colin Hackley Osceola Floridas defense closes in on Tennessee Quarterback Tyler Bray.PHOTO COURTESY OF GatorBait.net Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here!

PAGE 12

Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsIts hard to believe that summer is over and fall is here. Its been a hot summer and I personally am looking forward to a little cooler weather. Cooler weather means cooler water temperatures and cooler water temperatures mean the red“ sh will start schooling up in bigger schools and trout will move onto the ” ats from deeper water. As the water gets even cooler they will start moving into the creeks and rivers. I was out on Tuesday with Bobby Rish and his son from South Georgia and we caught 10 Spanish, three trout and one red. There were acres and acres of Spanish and lady“ sh feeding on glass minnows in about 13 feet of water off the Panacea Channel. Most of the Spanish were small but there were some three-pound “ sh in the bunch. They were feeding on the last of the falling tide and as the tide starting coming in they were feeding in the deep channels. On Friday I “ shed with a couple of Oklahoma Sooners who were down for the game. They just wanted to catch “ sh and didnt care what kind they were. I went to a spot that has been holding silver trout and we caught about 35 of them and then moved to the other side of Smith Island where lady“ sh were feeding pretty heavily on glass minnows. They caught about 10 of those and I decided to “ nish the afternoon up looking for reds. They each caught two, about 24-inches long and they just couldnt believe how hard they fought. If I knew they were going to beat us in football on Saturday night I would have just kept them catching lady“ sh. On Friday I “ shed with Dr. Jim ONeil from Tallahassee and we caught three nice reds, four trout, including his biggest to date, quite a few silver trout and a variety of other “ sh. The one thing that concerns me is the small number of nice speckled trout I have been catching. I have talked to a lot of people who are having the same problems. I talked with Jimmy at Shell Island and he said that most of the trout he is seeing are coming from eight to 10 feet of water and there arent a lot of them. Quite a few reds are being caught around the oyster bars in the creeks using gold spoons and live bait. Ray Rich of Crawfordville “ shed up in the St. Marks River near the fort and they caught a couple of legal trout and he caught the biggest red he has ever caught. He just couldnt believe how hard it fought. Capt. David Fife “ shed Friday and Saturday and said they had two good days. The “ rst day they caught silver trout until the folks said they had enough. They kept all they wanted to clean and most of them were around 14 or 15 inches. They then went red “ shing and ended up with three nice reds. On Saturday they went to spots he hasnt “ shed this year and they had their limit of reds and threw back seven or eight that were legal. They left on the “ rst of the incoming tide and he said they were still biting. Everything they caught was on live minnows except the trout. I talked with Capt. Randy Peart and he said on Friday they ran offshore and looked for grouper and came in with three legal grouper and threw back a 20-pound red snapper which made everyone on the boat cry. On Saturday they fished around Turkey Point Shoals and did nothing. They then went to Dog Island Reef and caught blues, Spanish, trout and ladyfish. All the trout they caught were over 18 inches and they used a gulp on the bottom. He said that when they were running over there from the Ochlockonee River he saw acres of Spanish Mackerel feeding off Alligator Point. I had talked with a fellow at Wal-Mart and he was telling me he “ shes off the rocks over there and that there was bait everywhere over there. Dont forget the Kevins Seatrout Shootout has been moved to Oct. 1 due to bad weather. For more information you can go to kevinsseatroutshootout.com. Also on Oct. 15, the 2011 Inaugural Jack and Jill Spots and Slot Tournament will be held. This is a tournament that teams one guy and up to three girls together. Weigh-in is at Jerrys Bait and Tackle on Woodville Highway and for more information on this tournament you can go to myhometown“ shing.com. Several years ago we went up to Minnesota and “ shed for smallmouth bass. That got me hooked and last year we “ shed the French Broad River in North Carolina. We had a good time and caught a lot of “ sh but they were awfully small. Tomorrow we are driving up to Virginia and will be “ shing the New River which is supposed to be one of the top smallmouth rivers in the country. I will let you know next week. Remember to leave that float plan with someone and be careful out there. Good luck and good “ shing!Looking forward to cooler weather … and red“ sh moving onto the ” ats From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHattie Phelps usually stays home while her husband, Grady, goes off shore “ shing with his employer, Major Alan Lamarche of Plantation Security. On this recent trip out of Shell Point, Hattie was the guest of honor and Grady baited her hook and removed her “ sh while Alan handled the boat. Hattie caught 35 Key West Grunts and several nice gag grouper that were released because of the closed season. Hattie said she loved itŽ and wants to go again when she can keep some of those grouper.Gone “ shingYouth Hunting Field Day set for Sept. 24From FWC NewsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will host its Youth Hunting Field Day on Saturday, Sept. 24, at Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy, north of Tallahassee. Its no coincidence that this date happens to be National Hunting and Fishing Day, making the event a great opportunity for the entire family to come out and learn about hunting and “ shing. The FWC is partnering with Tall Timbers to put on this free, half-day event for interested kids of all ages and their parents. Advance registration is not necessary for the event, which runs from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Attendees will get to shoot at targets with bows and arrows, shotguns, ri” es and muzzleloading guns. Other activities include a hunting-dog demonstration. Those who have taken the online hunter safety course can complete the required “ eld activities at the event by registering at MyFWC.com/HunterSafety. Also, participants are eligible for door prizes, including a youth hunt or a free week of summer camp in Ocala or at the Beau Turner Youth Conservation Center (BTYCC), near Tallahassee. The BTYCC is part of the Florida Youth Conservation Centers Network initiative to create youth centers that will provide opportunities for young people and families to participate in outdoor activities and share experiences that strengthen connections with and support for fish and wildlife conservation. For more information on Youth Hunting Field Day, call 850-413-0084. For directions to Tall Timbers Research Station, go to www. talltimbers.org.NOTICE OF TALQUIN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC. ANNUAL MEETING SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2011RegistrationBusiness Portion and voting:of meeting: 8:30 – 10 a.m.10 a.m.100 VALUABLE PRIZESincluding 42” at screen tv, Wii game system, Kindle, iPods, Water Conservation kits, Electric Energy Ef ciency kits, Trolling Motor & moreEntertainment: 9:00 – 9:45 a.m. “Country Connections” at the James A. Shanks Middle School Gymnasium 1400 W. King Street, Quincy, Florida Tues. Thurs. 9am 5:30pm Friday Sunday See Us at the Gun Shows LOWER PRICED AMMO IN STOCKMany accessoriesLargest Selection of Guns in the Tallahassee Wakulla Area GunSmithing Fast Turn Around! OFFICIALPRODUCTLICENSED www.ronsgun.comLocated Main Street St. Marks483 Port Leon Dr., St. Marks Gun Show Pricing Everyday! WE BUY GUNS$ Highest Dollar Paid $ for your gun! Selling GunsSince 1999AK 47s in stock! IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 BE SUREYOUSTOCKUPON HUNTINGEQUIPMENT BEFORETHE SEASON STARTS 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 HUNT ING S EAS ON!! Get Ready for Grouper Scott A. Smith850-228-100738 Rainbow Drive, Crawfordville (behind El Jalisco)Quality Marine Canvas Fabrication and Upholsteryof all kinds...www.”agshipcanvas.com ”agshipcanvas@yahoo.com

PAGE 13

All of us have the good old “ shing stories we like to share. In Flotilla 12 we have stories about one of our most beloved facilities, Second Love. It seemed that the facility was always throwing a monkey wrench in the plans for patrols or during a patrol. Since being rehabbed, she is still out on the water and in much better spirits, but is no longer a facility. Flotilla Commander David Guttman and member Rick Yood took advantage of the great weather Saturday for a day of “ shing on the ” ats. However, David shared that upon reaching the juncture of the St. Marks and Wakulla rivers, an ear-piercing alarm started making them second guess their plans. As fate would have it, fellow Flotilla 12 member Bob Fernandez aboard the Second Love came to their rescue and assisted them back into Shell Island Fish Camp for a diagnosis. He was also out to enjoy the great day with some friends. Since the two could not go “ shing, they set out to investigate how the daily events of the Flotilla were panning out. David reported that they “ rst ran into Tim Ashley and Phil Hill collecting trash along the side of the road as part of our efforts in the Coastal Cleanup Day. After helping a bit collecting trash, the two meandered down to the Fort to see other Auxiliarists from Flotilla 12 who were providing free vessel exams. Raye Crews was completing an inspection while Norma Hill staffed the booth with our literature and talked to visitors about the Auxiliary. While everyone was working they ran into Biggin who was our working on TowBoatUS. As Norma put it, it was obviously a good day to be out on the water. But many out on the water were staying in the rivers as Tim noticed, the ramp was not as busy as it typically can be this time of year. The wind and waves may have kept folks away, or football season. Tim also passed on the following about the Annual Coastal Cleanup: Our crew, along with hundreds of volunteers around Wakulla County, participated in the Coastal Cleanup through the collection of our discarded waste or trash. Most of our bags included bottles, cans and a variety of paper/plastics products. All of which could and mostly likely will “ nd its way into the human ecological system. Our consumption of marketed consumer products is great and yet our responsibility of proper disposal of them is extremely weak. Our public parks and recreational areas contain waste receptacles for this disposition, USE THEM PROPERLY and OFTEN. We thank you and our future generations do as well. Mark Rosen agreed as he was aboard My Gail with Chuck Hickman, Mike Harrison and Terry Hoxworth. The crew headed over to the east side of our patrol area, down toward the Aucilla River. Mark had the following to say: Despite a very low tide, and an encounter with a loose crab trap, Chuck guided us through with no problem. Nothing of signi“ cance occurred, and it was a quiet day. There were not many boats on the bay. Terry advanced his training with several excellent evolutions including chart reading, anchoring and heaving line work. As Sherrie reminds us, safe boating is no accident! www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 – Page 13Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonSpecial to The NEwsPreparing to participate in the annual Coastal Cleanup. Yesterday I lost a light while diving with my Cave Diving class. The students primary cave light, a battery operated 21-watt LED system costing well over $1,000, ran out of power and ” ickered out 900 feet inside the cave at Peacock Springs State Park. Normally we would stop the dive plan and exit the cave under a diminished capacity using a small back up light. My primary was bright as ever, and we still had more exercises to complete, some with eyes closed, so I pulled my spare primary light from my leg pocket and gave it to him. The new LED light worked for another 400 feet, but then it failed also. Upon its recovery, I slid the light with its cable and battery canister back into my leg pouch and began the exit. Our exit from 1,300 feet was uneventful until I climbed out of the water to “ nd my $1,200 light missing. We were the last out before the park closed, so I returned this morning. Mind you, we must train 100 miles from our shop because we cannot dive at Wakulla Springs State Park, so I drove 200 miles to return this morning before they opened to recover the light. Early in the morning, the park was quiet, the water still and undisturbed, the wildlife, above and below the water, peaceful. On our 2,600-foot journey, we passed through grand arches over large sand and mud dunes with blind cray“ sh, amphipods and shrimp scurrying around on the ” oor and up into the crystal clear water around us. Cat“ sh bumped into walls as we passed by, not used to our bright lights. I was reminded that what organics we encountered came into these caves when the caves ” ood, the result of heavy rains that may over” ow the Suwannee River. The intruding waters can move these sand dunes around redesigning the ” oor every year. Occasionally I saw an eroded Pleistocene gray clay bed exposed below a sand dune. Elsewhere, I might have seen a Miocene bed of yellow clay with protruding fossil sea urchins, but not here. The walls and ceilings are a light cream color, and sculptured works of art. Dome ceilings abound, each a different design with ” ying buttresses, hanging rock curtains and multiple arches. I passed by what looked like a tree trunk that split into two strong branches before blending into the ceiling. The cave line ran through an elevated hole in the wall. Arched passages exit from our main corridor in all directions but we are bound to a main line so as not to get lost. I feel like I am strolling down an art gallery stunned by the beauty of the surrounding detailed design. There is only silence and our muf” ed rebreather breathing. I re” ected on our passage this morning that many thousands of others must have done before me, that this wonderful pleasure is a bene“ t afforded to me as a resident of the state of Florida, a privilege I am willing, like so many others, to pay for (I paid $214 this morning for an annual instructor fee). As a visitor to Florida Parks, I enjoy strolling through these trails, no different from those who walk the surface trails, and with the same impact. Like everyone, I want these trails preserved for future generations! But why cant I take these underwater trails in my home county of Wakulla? Yes, we found the expensive light, right where it fell out of my pocket. But the stroll was priceless. Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSAFFORDABLE COVERAGE TO SAVE YOU MONEY Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850-570-9734 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org 850925-5685Your Boats One Stop Paint & Body Shop 56 Industrial Court St. Marks Industrial Park,St. Marks 32355Fiberglass Supplies and Repair Marine Battery Dealer blocking,cleaning, restoration Bandannas 2.00 incl. taxofHATS PANACEA HATSAFACT Call us today to make your reservation!www.jacksbquick.comOpen Monday Friday • 7am 6pm Saturday by appointment only McClendon Auto Service, LLCFree EstimatesSpecializing in:Owned and operated by Fred McClendon 10 years experienceMV#66653Brakes Batteries Radiators Water Pumps Hub Bearings Starters Alternators and more!MOBILE AUTO REPAIR850-993-4093 Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday p Thu Sep 22, 11 Fr i Sep 23, 11 S a t Sep 24, 11 Sun Sep 25, 11 Mon Sep 26, 11 Tue Sep 27, 11 Wed Sep 28, 11 D a te 3.2 ft. 12:07 AM 3.4 ft. 12:47 AM 3.6 ft. 1:21 AM 3.8 ft. 1:52 AM 4.0 ft. 2:22 AM 4.1 ft. 2:52 AM H i gh 2.2 ft. 3:52 AM 1.9 ft. 5:14 AM 1.4 ft. 6:15 AM 0.9 ft. 7:06 AM 0.4 ft. 7:52 AM 0.0 ft. 8:37 AM -0.3 ft. 9:22 AM Low 3.3 ft. 9:38 AM 3.5 ft. 11:13 AM 3.8 ft. 12:21 PM 4.1 ft. 1:17 PM 4.2 ft. 2:08 PM 4.3 ft. 2:58 PM 4.2 ft. 3:45 PM H i gh 0.6 ft. 5:24 PM 0.5 ft. 6:18 PM 0.4 ft. 7:03 PM 0.4 ft. 7:43 PM 0.6 ft. 8:21 PM 0.8 ft. 8:56 PM 1.1 ft. 9:29 PM Low Thu Sep 22, 11 Fr i Sep 23, 11 S a t Sep 24, 11 Sun Sep 25, 11 Mon Sep 26, 11 Tue Sep 27, 11 Wed Sep 28, 11 D a te 3.3 ft. 12:04 AM 3.5 ft. 12:44 AM 3.7 ft. 1:18 AM 3.9 ft. 1:49 AM 4.0 ft. 2:19 AM 4.2 ft. 2:49 AM H i gh 2.3 ft. 3:49 AM 2.0 ft. 5:11 AM 1.6 ft. 6:12 AM 1.0 ft. 7:03 AM 0.5 ft. 7:49 AM 0.0 ft. 8:34 AM -0.3 ft. 9:19 AM Low 3.3 ft. 9:35 AM 3.6 ft. 11:10 AM 3.9 ft. 12:18 PM 4.1 ft. 1:14 PM 4.3 ft. 2:05 PM 4.4 ft. 2:55 PM 4.3 ft. 3:42 PM H i gh 0.7 ft. 5:21 PM 0.5 ft. 6:15 PM 0.4 ft. 7:00 PM 0.5 ft. 7:40 PM 0.6 ft. 8:18 PM 0.9 ft. 8:53 PM 1.2 ft. 9:26 PM Low Thu Sep 22, 11 Fr i Sep 23, 11 S a t Sep 24, 11 Sun Sep 25, 11 Mon Sep 26, 11 Tue Sep 27, 11 Wed Se p 28, 11 D a te 3.0 ft. 12:43 AM 3.2 ft. 1:23 AM 3.4 ft. 1:57 AM 3.5 ft. 2:28 AM 3.7 ft. 2:58 AM 3.8 ft. 3:28 AM H i gh 2.0 ft. 4:56 AM 1.7 ft. 6:18 AM 1.3 ft. 7:19 AM 0.8 ft. 8:10 AM 0.4 ft. 8:56 AM 0.0 ft. 9:41 AM -0.3 ft. 10:26 AM Low 3.0 ft. 10:14 AM 3.2 ft. 11:49 AM 3.5 ft. 12:57 PM 3.8 ft. 1:53 PM 3.9 ft. 2:44 PM 4.0 ft. 3:34 PM 3.9 ft. 4:21 PM H i gh 0.6 ft. 6:28 PM 0.4 ft. 7:22 PM 0.4 ft. 8:07 PM 0.4 ft. 8:47 PM 0.5 ft. 9:25 PM 0.8 ft. 10:00 PM 1.0 ft. 10:33 PM Low Thu Sep 22, 11 Fr i Sep 23, 11 S a t Sep 24, 11 Sun Sep 25, 11 Mon Sep 26, 11 Tue Sep 27, 11 Wed Sep 28, 11 D a te 2.6 ft. 12:39 AM 2.7 ft. 1:13 AM 2.8 ft. 1:44 AM 3.0 ft. 2:14 AM 3.1 ft. 2:44 AM H i gh 1.6 ft. 4:03 AM 1.4 ft. 5:25 AM 1.0 ft. 6:26 AM 0.7 ft. 7:17 AM 0.3 ft. 8:03 AM 0.0 ft. 8:48 AM -0.2 ft. 9:33 AM Low 2.4 ft. 9:30 AM 2.6 ft. 11:05 AM 2.8 ft. 12:13 PM 3.1 ft. 1:09 PM 3.2 ft. 2:00 PM 3.2 ft. 2:50 PM 3.1 ft. 3:37 PM H i gh 0.5 ft. 5:35 PM 0.3 ft. 6:29 PM 0.3 ft. 7:14 PM 0.3 ft. 7:54 PM 0.4 ft. 8:32 PM 0.6 ft. 9:07 PM 0.8 ft. 9:40 PM Low 2.4 ft. 11:59 PM H i gh Thu Sep 22, 11 Fr i Sep 23, 11 S a t Sep 24, 11 Sun Sep 25, 11 Mon Sep 26, 11 Tue Sep 27, 11 Wed Sep 28, 11 D a te 2.7 ft. 12:31 AM 2.8 ft. 1:05 AM 3.0 ft. 1:36 AM 3.1 ft. 2:06 AM 3.2 ft. 2:36 AM H i gh 2.1 ft. 3:31 AM 1.8 ft. 4:53 AM 1.4 ft. 5:54 AM 0.9 ft. 6:45 AM 0.4 ft. 7:31 AM 0.0 ft. 8:16 AM -0.3 ft. 9:01 AM Low 2.5 ft. 9:22 AM 2.7 ft. 10:57 AM 3.0 ft. 12:05 PM 3.2 ft. 1:01 PM 3.3 ft. 1:52 PM 3.3 ft. 2:42 PM 3.3 ft. 3:29 PM H i gh 0.6 ft. 5:03 PM 0.5 ft. 5:57 PM 0.4 ft. 6:42 PM 0.4 ft. 7:22 PM 0.6 ft. 8:00 PM 0.8 ft. 8:35 PM 1.1 ft. 9:08 PM Low 2.5 ft. 11:51 PM H i gh Thu Sep 22, 11 Fr i Sep 23, 11 S a t Sep 24, 11 Sun Sep 25, 11 Mon Sep 26, 11 Tue Sep 27, 11 Wed Se p 28, 11 D a te 2.8 ft. 12:50 AM 2.8 ft. 1:13 AM 2.8 ft. 1:31 AM 2.9 ft. 1:48 AM 3.0 ft. 2:05 AM 3.1 ft. 2:24 AM H i gh 2.1 ft. 3:17 AM 1.9 ft. 4:37 AM 1.7 ft. 5:34 AM 1.3 ft. 6:22 AM 1.0 ft. 7:06 AM 0.7 ft. 7:51 AM 0.4 ft. 8:36 AM Low 3.1 ft. 8:48 AM 3.1 ft. 10:18 AM 3.2 ft. 11:40 AM 3.3 ft. 12:53 PM 3.3 ft. 1:59 PM 3.3 ft. 3:02 PM 3.2 ft. 4:05 PM H i gh 0.5 ft. 4:55 PM 0.5 ft. 5:46 PM 0.6 ft. 6:30 PM 0.7 ft. 7:10 PM 1.0 ft. 7:46 PM 1.3 ft. 8:19 PM 1.5 ft. 8:49 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacSept. 22 – Sept. 28First Oct. 3 Full Oct. 11 Last Oct. 19 New Sept. 27Major Times 9:10 AM 11:10 AM 9:36 PM 11:36 PM Minor Times 2:07 AM 3:07 AM 4:06 PM 5:06 PM Major Times 10:03 AM 12:03 PM 10:29 PM 12:29 AM Minor Times 3:09 AM 4:09 AM 4:48 PM 5:48 PM Major Times 10:55 AM 12:55 PM 11:21 PM 1:21 AM Minor Times 4:14 AM 5:14 AM 5:28 PM 6:28 PM Major Times --:---:-11:48 AM 1:48 PM Minor Times 5:20 AM 6:20 AM 6:06 PM 7:06 PM Major Times 12:14 AM 2:14 AM 12:41 PM 2:41 PM Minor Times 6:27 AM 7:27 AM 6:45 PM 7:45 PM Major Times 1:08 AM 3:08 AM 1:35 PM 3:35 PM Minor Times 7:36 AM 8:36 AM 7:26 PM 8:26 PM Major Times 2:03 AM 4:03 AM 2:31 PM 4:31 PM Minor Times 8:45 AM 9:45 AM 8:09 PM 9:09 PM Average Average Average Better Better Best Better++7:25 am 7:34 pm 2:08 am 4:06 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:25 am 7:32 pm 3:10 am 4:48 pm 7:26 am 7:31 pm 4:15 am 5:28 pm 7:27 am 7:30 pm 5:21 am 6:07 pm 7:27 am 7:29 pm 6:28 am 6:46 pm 7:28 am 7:27 pm 7:37 am 7:26 pm 7:28 am 7:26 pm 8:47 am 8:10 pm39% 32% 25% 17% 9% 2% 6% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

PAGE 14

By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netA Crawfordville man pleaded no contest to possession of a “ rearm by a convicted felon and was sentenced to three years in state prison. The man, John Warren Strickland, was arrested by a wildlife officer back in February. According to the arrest report, the of“ cer was investigating a complaint about hunting in the Tiger Hammock area. Several men were in the area hunting hogs, and said they had permission to be on the land. One man, later identi“ ed as Strickland, appeared reluctant to come forward and identify himself. Strickland was arrested after he had identi“ ed himself and the of“ cer determined he was a convicted felon. The officer wrote that he saw Strickland in possession of a Remington ri” e with a round in the chamber and four bullets in the magazine. Strickland pleaded to the charge on Wednesday, Sept. 14, before Wakulla Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford, and was adjudicated guilty and given credit for 225 days in jail. In other court matters: € Tony Cameron Hackney, 18, pleaded guilty to lewd and lascivious battery and had adjudication withheld. He was ordered to serve four years sex offender probation, but under the states Romeo and Juliet statute, he will not be designated as a sexual offender. Deputies investigating a break-in at the Chevron station in Crawfordville in March, where the glass front door was smashed and some Spice was taken, found Hackney in a camper with a nearly nude 14-yearold. Since he and the girl were boyfriend-girlfriend and were close enough in age, Hackney met the conditions for the Romeo and Juliet statute. Hackney is also subpoenaed to testify against his co-defendants in the burglary, Brandon Radabaugh and Nick Bowen. Bowen was set to go to trial on Wednesday, Sept. 21. Hackney also had a plea deal on the burglary charge, and pleaded in court last week to burglary of a structure and had a felony grand theft charge reduced to a misdemeanor petty theft in exchange for a sentence of 30 days in the sheriffs work camp. € One of two men charged last year with stealing former County Commissioner Howard Kesslers parrot entered a plea to a charge of burglary of a dwelling and grand theft and was sentenced to two years probation and ordered to make $800 restitution to Kessler for the bird. Cody Sherrod claimed to have had no involvement in the theft and, after court, his attorney, David Kemp, indicated it was purely a plea of convenience. The other man charged in the case, Teddy Hicks, was sent off to prison several months ago on a series of charges. But he implicated Sherrod as having some involvement. According to the arrest report, Sherrod and Hicks were throwing a cast net and drinking beer in Panacea and Hicks became intoxicated and walked off. He reportedly went to Kesslers home, where he kept the parrot in a cage on his porch, and grabbed the bird. The bird was notoriously unfriendly, known to bite, and there was blood on Kesslers porch … which DNA matched to Hicks. Hicks cell phone was also found on top of the parrots cage. When deputies interviewed Hicks, he had a wound on his “ nger that was consistent with a bird bite. The parrot was never recovered. Sherrod claimed he had no involvement at all, but he faced other legal troubles over an arrest in Leon County. His attorney said he wanted to get the matter behind him and get on with his life. Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com George H. WolfGeorge Henry Wolf, 86 of Melbourne, formerly of Chicago, Broward County and Crawfordville, passed away Thursday, Sept. 15, at home in Melbourne. He was born June 22, 1925, in Evanston, Ill., to George and Alma Wolf. He worked as a purchasing agent of the City of Hollywood, as well as Broward Community College and the City of Fort Lauderdale. He was a veteran of World War II serving in the 236th Army Signal Battalion in India. Survivors include a daughter, Karen Skidmore; a son, George Wolf; three grandchildren, Brett Reno, Justin and Jordan Wolf; and three great-grandchildren, Grace and Ella Wolf and Raphael Reno. His wife Arlene preceded him in death in June. Memorial services will be on Saturday, Sept. 24, at 2 p.m. at Fountainhead Funeral Home in Palm Bay. In lieu of ” owers donations may be made to North Park University at www.northpark.edu.Special to The News The U.S. Forest Service will waive the day-use fees associated with many recreation sites or amenities on national forests nationwide on Saturday, Sept. 24, in celebration of Public Lands Day. The waiver includes Apalachicola National Forests Leon Sinks Geological Area at the Wakulla-Leon county border. The annual National Public Lands Day, coordinated by the National Environmental Education Foundation with the support of the Forest Service and other federal agencies, focuses on educating the public about the importance of natural resources and the need for shared stewardship on the land. Public Lands Day provides a great opportunity for people from all walks of life to get out and enjoy our beautiful forests and grasslands,Ž said U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell. For more information contact the Apalachicola National Forest Ranger District at (850) 643-2282; Wakulla Ranger District, (850) 9263561. To learn more about the National Forests in Florida, visit www.fs.fed.us/r8/” orida.ObituariesContinued from Page 6ACourt shortsPublic Lands Day will see fees waived on Sept. 24 4330 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida To make a donation to the auction or for more information about the event, please contact: Sue Belford at 850-926-4244 or e-mail FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail.com “Friends of Wakulla County Public Library” Bring your family & friends Bid on great items Support your Library Programs The Silent Auction includes Gift Certi cates, Vacations, Marine Supplies, Gifts, Artwork, Dinners, School Supplies & Much More!Food & Drinks will be provided. 2FOR$500 HAND-BREADED CHICKEN FILLETTM SANDWICH HAND-BREADED CHICKEN FILLETTM SANDWICH with the Chamber of Commerce Tuesday, September 27th at 11am Lunch Specials available to all guests between 11am and 1pm. Completely Remodeled Inside & OutNo coupon needed Hope to s ee yo u the re!~ Coupons, Goodies & Giveaways ~ Small Fry and Small Beverage with the purchase of our New! FREESTEAKHOUSE THICKBURGER Barber Shop & Salon 926-4080 Clipper Cuts Scalp Massage Steam Towels Style Cuts Neck Massage Hi-lites & Low-lites Color 926-4080 926-4080 3334 Crawfordville Hwy. TheresaDelta Waxing Perms pest controland, inc.tillmans termite Tillman Owens850-322-1775 Creeping, Crawling or Flying...TillmansPestControl@hotmail.comSafe for people and pets!RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL“We get them before they get you!” THE CABINET SHOPTHECABINET SHOP Custom Kitchens&Counter Tops

PAGE 15

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 – Page 15AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn Sept. 8, Douglas Coleman of Tallahassee reported a residential burglary and felony criminal mischief at his Crawfordville home. Suspects dug up the electrical service and removed the wiring and a central air conditioning unit was stolen from the home. A forced entry was observed, and electrical cords were cut and internal wiring was stolen. Damage to the home was estimated at more than $1,000 and a chest of drawers and wardrobe, valued at $400, were stolen. Lt. C.L. Morrison investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs office this week: € On Sept. 8, Mitchell Pope of St. Marks reported the theft of a weedeater from his property. The stolen item was entered in the NCIC/FCIC computer. It is valued at $250. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On Sept. 8, a retail theft was reported at Wal-Mart after store staff confronted a man who allegedly attempted to remove several items from the store without paying for them. The man placed the items in a grocery cart and left the store. The store employee asked the suspect for a receipt and the man threatened to kill the employee. Food, beer and two belts, valued at $183, were reported stolen. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. € On Sept. 8, Jeannette Dirk of Crawfordville reported the theft of her purse. The victim reported losing her purse while shopping at Wal-Mart. The contents of the purse were valued at $40. Captain Randall Taylor investigated. € On Sept. 8, David Grethe of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of I-beams, valued at $500, from his property. The location of the stolen I-beams was determined and a suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On Sept. 8, Michael Ames of Crawfordville reported the burglary of his shed. Tools, a tool box, “ rearms, and bows and arrows, valued at $12,800, were reported missing. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. €On Sept. 9, Cecil James Strickland, 58, of Panacea was charged with failing to register as a sex offender. Detective Erika Buckley was checking for sexual offender registration compliance and noted that Strickland had not complied as required by statute. Sexual offenders are required to register in person at the sheriffs of“ ce twice a year, once on their birth month and on the sixth month following their birthday. Detective Josh Lawhon and Detective Buckley took Strickland into custody at his home. € On Sept. 11, Justin Moore of Crawfordville reported a grand theft at a Crawfordville home owned by John Lee of New York City. A galvanized culvert kit was stolen from the victims property. The kit included 10 galvanized culverts, valued at $2,500. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € On Sept. 10, Zachary Pryce Taylor, 18, of Crawfordville was issued a traf“ c citation for knowingly driving while his license was suspended/canceled/revoked and possession of marijuana less than 20 grams following a traf“ c stop. The driver allegedly admitted having marijuana in his pocket and a smoking pipe in the vehicle. He was also charged with possession of drug paraphernalia. He was allegedly in possession of 2.4 grams of marijuana. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € On Sept. 10, Barry Gibbs of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a toolbox and tools from his truck. The stolen property is valued at $400. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. € On Sept. 10, a clerk at Glendas Country Store reported that an unidenti“ ed suspect stole a pack of cigarettes after displaying a knife to the female clerk.The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Lorne Whaley and Detective Erika Buckley investigated. € On Sept. 10, a 46-year-old female victim reported being involved in an aggravated assault. Charles William Crombie, 51, of Panacea allegedly threatened the victim with a gun. Crombie allegedly “ red the weapon into the ceiling of his home. The victim reported that Crombie also put the “ rearm under her chin and she feared for her life. Crombie was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. Deputy Lorne Whaley investigated. € On Sept. 10, Dusty Richard Harrell, 22, of Crawfordville was issued a traf“ c citation for knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license is suspended. Lt. Danny Harrell conducted a traf“ c stop in Crawfordville and it was determined that the suspect had a suspended license € On Sept. 9, Margaret Young of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim was attempting to apply for a replacement Social Security card when a computer pop up window requested debit card information for a $20 charge. The victim spoke to the Social Security Administration and discovered that replacement cards are free. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. € On Sept. 9, Kirstin Brand of Crawfordville reported damage to her parked vehicle at a local convenience store. Brands Lexus and a steel pole west of the business were struck by Franklin Hugh Seivers, 56, of Crawfordville. He was charged with DUI with property damage. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. € On Sept. 9, a clerk at Wal-Mart reported a credit card fraud. Suspects were purchasing items through the self-check-out and requesting large sums of cash back using a debit card. An off-duty deputy sheriff attempted to detain a suspect, but he escaped and reportedly left the parking area at a high rate of speed and struck a parked truck. The off-duty law enforcement of“ cer was able to collect evidence from the suspect that will be used for a DNA identification through the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € On Sept. 12, Joseph Cox of Crawfordville reported the theft of a natural gas tank. A value of the stolen item is still to be determined. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On Sept. 12, Elmer E. Strickland of Sopchoppy reported an environmental offense in Crawfordville. Two garbage bags were discovered in the victims trash bins. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On Sept. 12, Deputy Ian Dohme responded to the intersection of Trice Lane and Shadeville Road where a 19-year-old man was complaining about ingesting Spice and not feeling well. Wakulla EMS transported the man to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. The mans bicycle was seized for safe keeping. € On Sept. 12, Mathew Sanders of Talquin Electric Cooperative reported a burglary at an electrical substation. Copper wire was stolen from the facility. Talquin reported it as the seventh burglary at one of their substations and third in Wakulla County. The wire was valued at $2,000. Brass water spigots were also stolen. Lt. C.L. Morrison investigated. € On Sept. 12, Stone Creek Pizza reported the theft of a pizza rack, currency, thermal pizza bags and other miscellaneous items valued at $551. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On Sept. 13, Kenneth Meade of Crawfordville reported a vehicle crash on Commerce Boulevard in Crawfordville. Meade was distracted from traf“ c and avoided another vehicle when he lost control of his vehicle and collided with a CSG company sign and a parked vehicle. Meades vehicle sustained $3,000 worth of damage and the parked vehicle suffered $3,000 worth of damage. Damage to the CSG sign was estimated at $2,000 Meade was found at fault. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € On Sept. 13, Cody Smith of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a cell phone. The complainant stopped at a Woodville Highway business and left the phone on his vehicle. He left the scene and realized the phone was gone. The phone is valued at $600. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On Sept. 13, Deputy Billy Metcalf extinguished a house fire at 2500 Sopchoppy Highway. When he responded, Deputy Metcalf observed ” ames through the kitchen window. He grabbed his WCSO “ re extinguisher, ran into the house and put out the blaze. The Wakulla County Fire Department and EMS arrived at the scene a short time later. A 16-year-old juvenile was heating grease on the stove when it caught “ re. The juvenile was treated for burn and smoke injuries at the scene. Damage was estimated at $5,000. The “ re was ruled an accident and Red Cross was noti“ ed. € On Sept. 13, Sherry Bramblett of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered at the home. The victim was in the process of moving into a new home. More than $38,000 worth of property was reported stolen including “ rearms, jewelry, electronics and coins. Deputy Nick Gray, Reserve Deputy James Stubbs, Detective Erika Buckley, Capt. Steve Ganey and CSI Rae Eddens investigated. € On Sept. 12, Deputy Clint Beam investigated a traffic crash where the motorist left the scene on Dogwood Drive in Crawfordville. A citizen contacted the sheriffs of“ ce and stated that a vehicle ran off the road and struck a fence on property owned by Phillip Czechorowski. A chain link fence and cable box were damaged before the vehicle entered the victims yard. Deputy Ben Steinle investigated. € On Sept. 14, Deputy Sean Wheeler responded to a residential “ re at Quapaw Street in Crawfordville. Catherine Manning was frying food on the stove when a “ re started. The victim threw water on the ” ames which spread the “ re to cabinets. A neighbor entered the residence and put out the “ re with a garden hose. The Wakulla County Fire Department arrived on the scene a short time later and declared the scene safe. Deputy Wheeler determined that the home suffered $1,000 worth of damage. There were no injuries. € On Sept. 14, Angela Lanfair of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The victims son was driving the vehicle and experienced a ” at tire. In the time it took to leave the scene and replace the tire, the vehicle was stolen from the side of the road. The vehicle was entered into the NCIC/ FCIC computer. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € On Sept. 14, Deputies Lorne Whaley, Cole Wells and Will Hudson served an active warrant on Arron Michael Riley, 22, of Crawfordville at his home. Riley refused to comply with deputies as they ordered him to put out a cigarette and put his hands behind his back. Riley resisted efforts to take him into custody and was charged with resisting a law enforcement of“ cer with violence. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce received 693 calls for service during the past week including: 25 business and residential alarms; 95 citizen contacts; 19 disturbances; 37 investigations; 40 medical emergencies; 34 security checks; 22 special details; 13 suspicious vehicles; 13 thefts; 12 traffic enforcements; 46 traffic stops; 11 trespassing cases; 13 reckless vehicles; 18 wanted people; and 86 watch orders.Sheri s Report Ma n a t e e Ti m e s Statewide advertising—one low price Reach a wide audience (850) 926-7102 TheWakullanews Da Caju n Wagon Serving Fresh S eafood & mor e wit h da Caju n Ki ck! Welcome 850570-1625 Appointments & Walk-Ins Welcome 850-926-TEAZ(8329)1626 Crawfordville Hwy., Northpointe Center Full Service Family Hair Care Salon!Wed-Fri 10-6 Sat. 9-3 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA TIME T O DO SOMET HING FOR YOURSELF!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 KIDS BAC KINSCHOOL? TuAmigoYourFriendWillHelpYou Accident? Injured?Call Someone You Can Trust!Hablamos Espaol1-855-55AMIGOA er 911 & Before 411

PAGE 16

Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1A ESG had donated the dumpster for Mashes Sands, Marpan donated a dumpster for the St. Marks Refuge and Waste Pro also provided the dumpster for Shell Point. Every dumpster was reportedly “ lled to over” owing. We estimate that approximately 10,200 pounds of trash and debris was collected on Saturday by 560 volunteers. This estimated total weight amount is actually down from previous years. Sherri Kraeft and Durene Gilbert gave out the thank you T-shirts as people “ led through the line and headed for the food tables. Amy Geiger, Cindy Russell, JoAnne Strickland and Rotary exchange student Laiz Silveira coordinated getting the crowd through the food line smoothly and quickly and encouraged people to come back for seconds. KWCB President Don Henderson welcomed everyone and expressed his appreciation for their dedication. He then turned the microphone over to Commissioner Alan Brock, who was Master of Ceremonies. Brock got the crowd engaged with his query on who came the greatest distance -and there were participants from Holland and Bosnia. Alice Veasman, 90, was the oldest volunteer. She was proud to disclose her age, and she is a committed, strong supporter of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful. She singlehandedly cleaned the entire grounds of Woolley Park then spent the rest of the day enjoying the company of many old and new friends. The youngest participant was Josiah Sorensen of Crawfordville. He is 7 months old and was the family spotter from his stroller. His dad, mother, three sisters and brother all participated as 4-H Sea Searchers Club members. Erica Morse, former director of KWCB, has been participating in the coastal cleanup since 1990. She is still participating and brings her son and daughter. The most unusual item found was a partial pair of dentures. The events Platinum sponsors were Wal-Mart, Waste Pro, Wakulla Tobacco Prevention Program, Rotary of Wakulla and the St. Marks Refuge Association. The Gold Sponsor is Capital City Bank. Silver Sponsors are Progress Energy, Newark Recycled Fibers, Paul G. Johnson & Associates, Quill Turk Dentistry by the Sea, Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites, Centennial Bank, Alice Veasman and Goin Under Dive Services. Diamond Service Sponsors are Wal-Mart, Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce, Auto Trim & Design Signs, The Wakulla News, Wakulla Springs Lodge, Marpan Recycling, The Wakulla Area Times, ESG Operations, Gulf Specimen Marine Lab, Talquin Portable Restrooms, Wakulla Eco Tours and Costco.Its cleanup time at the 26th annual Coastal Cleanup PHOTOS BY JO ANN PALMER PHOTO BY AMY JARMONPeople gather at Woolley Park in front of the stage, top left. Volunteer Shelly Swenson collects cigarette butts, above, as part of the Weigh Your Butts contest. And a free lunch of hot dogs is served up to volunteers, bottom left. ANOTHER RETIREMENT PARTY will be held Saturday, Oct. 15 with proceeds to bene“t the Florida State Seminole Booster Houston Taff Memorial Scholarship for Wakulla High School student-athletes. The event is being held at the Florida State University Club at 6 p.m. For information, contact (850) 745-7101. Houston Taff was a Seminole athlete and Wakulla High School coach who loved Wakulla High School and FSU Seminole athletics. The late Houston Taff was Sheriff Harveys brother-in-law. Donations payable to Wakulla Seminole Boosters, will be accepted if tickets are sold out. Contributions may be sent to 15 Oak Street, Crawfordville, FL 32327.A Farewell to Wakulla County Sheriff David F. Harvey during his final hours in office.You are invited to visit the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce Thursday, Sept. 29 between 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. to offer good wishes to the Dean of Florida sheriffs, David F. Harvey.Elected 1976 Retired Sept. 30, 2011 Rhonda, David F. Harvey and Trafton Earn your Masters Degree in Construction ManagementMaster of EngineeringUAB School of Engineering Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering€ Multi-discipline peer interaction € 33 Credit Hours in 18 months € No entrance exam € Each term is 12 weeks € Online courses € Bachelors degree from accredited U.S.University requiredDeadline for Application: November 1, 2011For more information please contact:Dianne Gilmer 205-975-5848, digilmer@uab.edu j~~ ~ b ~~~ ~ K JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

PAGE 17

THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 Section BThe Wakulla News EXTRA! Q: When does our new service begin? A: Waste Pro will begin service to all residential and commercial customers on Monday, Oct. 3. Q: What does our new service consist of? A: Your new service consists of one time per week garbage and recycling service. Garbage and recycling will be picked up on the same day. Before service begins on Oct. 3, you will receive a 96-gallon roll out cart and an 18-gallon recycling bin, along with an informational packet that will give you your new service days and answer many of the questions that you will have. Please have your carts and bins out the night before your scheduled service day. Bulky items such as furniture and household items that would not be considered garbage can be put out on your scheduled day of service, and will be picked up with the garbage. We ask that during the “ rst two weeks you limit these items until we establish a pickup routine. White goods such as washers, dryers and stoves can be picked up as well. This is a scheduled service and you will need to call to have them picked up. Q: Our current hauler picks up on certain scheduled days. How will we know what our new scheduled service day is? A: Waste Pro has been delivering carts and bins beginning since Sept. 18 and is scheduled to complete these deliveries by Sept. 25. You will receive information on pickup days and additional services that we provide when we deliver your carts and bins. Please be patient; we may run later than Sept. 25, but we will complete all deliveries before your “ rst scheduled service day in October. Q: What do we do with our existing garbage cans that our current haulers provided? A: We will work with your current haulers to ensure that your existing roll out carts are picked up in October. Our focus is to ensure that everyone has a Waste Pro cart and bin before your scheduled start date. Continue to use your current haulers cart until your last scheduled pickup is completed during the last week of September. Please bear with us; your current haulers will get these carts picked up as soon as possible. Q: I am excited about the new curbside recycling service! What items will you accept? A: The truck that will service you picks up dual stream recycling. This means that there is one compartment on the truck for paper items, and one compartment for commingled items. Most paper items are accepted. They include newspaper, junk mail, white paper, pizza boxes and cardboard. Because cardboard boxes are bulky, they need to be broken down and cut up into small squares (generally 18 inches). Commingled items include aluminum, tin, glass, and No. 1 … 7 plastic containers. Continued on Page 3B Answers about trash service PHOTO BY JANICE RICKERT/Special to The News Answers to some frequently asked questions about Waste Pros service to Wakulla residents:13,000 The number of estimated households that will pay for the assessment. $196 The amount of the garbage fee charged yearly per dwelling unit. $112 The original assessment the county had planned to charge which didn’t include garbage pickup, but allowed residents to drop off waste at the transfer station for free. 1 The number of times per week Waste Pro will come and collect garbage and recyclables. 9 The percentage of gross receipts that Waste Pro will be required to pay to the county, which will be used to monitor the three closed land lls in the county and cap the land ll at the transfer station. A look at garbage by the numbers By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe mandatory curbside collection of garbage and recyclables will go into effect Oct. 1. Starting on that date, Waste Pro will be the only garbage hauler in the county and all dwelling units will be required to pay an assessment of $196 a year. The assessment will appear on the tax bill, meaning it will be charged to property owners. Vacant lots, as well as buildings without power and a kitchen facility, will not be assessed. Non-residential units will be charged a different amount and will be billed by Waste Pro directly. For businesses that use only a 96-gallon garbage can, they will be charged $18 a month. For other non-residential, that require a dumpster, those fees will range from $73 to $242 a month, depending on the size of the dumpster. Non-residential includes multi-family dwelling units which is considered “ ve or more dwelling units. Continued on Page 3B Group of Wakulla Republicans will participate in GOPs Presidency 5 in Orlando See story, Page 4B Upcoming committee hearings, presidential primary and states bleak budget outlook Weekly Roundup, Page 4B Newspapers in Education, See Page 5B pure speed. pure performance. pure simplicity. pure broadband is everything you want from an internet connection … with no phone line required. its all the speed you need to surf, watch, download and game without slowing down. *Offer ends 09/30/2011. Pure Broadband available to qualifying residential customers only. The monthly rate of $29.95 requires a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months (after which the rate reverts to the then-current standard rate), and applie s to up to 1.5 Mbps service. An additional monthly fee (including professional installation, if applicable) and separate shipping and handling fee will apply t o customers modem or router. General … Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them by service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions … All products and services are governed by tariffs, terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at www.centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges … Applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges include a Carrier Universal Service charge, National Access Fee surcharge, a one-time Pure Broadband activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-req uired charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rates. Call for a listing of applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges. Monthly Rate … Monthly rate applies while customer subscribes to all qualifying services. If one (1) or more services are cancelled, the stan dard monthly fee will apply to each remaining service. Pure Broadband … As determined by service location, an early termination fee will apply as either a ”at $99 fee or the applicable monthly recurring service fee multiplie d by the number of months remaining in the minimum service period, up to $200. Performance will vary due to conditions outside of network control and no speed is guaranteed. Telephone landline is part of the service only for the purpose of data traf“c transmission/connection and cannot be used for voice traf“c transmission, except fo r 911 services. 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are the property of Cen turyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. a month*all high-speed internet. no phone line required.call 866.958.PURE click givemepure.com come in for locations, visit centurylink.com/storespara or ofertas en espaol marque al 866.958.7873 Saturday, Sept. 24 at 8pmNEW Originals and Old FavoritesAt POSH JAVA in Downtown SopchoppyTickets: $10/RESERVED SEATING: (850) 962-1010Organics & Gifts Singer/ Song WriterRick OttIN CONCER T IN CONCERT Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall850-926-7102

PAGE 18

Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, September 22  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at Beef O’ Brady’s to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the public library.  LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS will meet at 7 p.m. at the public library. Contact Anne Ahrendt at 528-0895 or Rachel Pienta at 321-3582 for more information. Friday, September 23  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  SASSY STRIPPERS QUILTERS GROUP meets at the public library from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. to make quilts for traumatized children. The “cruiser quilts” are donated to Wakulla County deputies to be used for children in need. New members welcome. For information, call 926-6290.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Saturday, September 24  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Saturday at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordville Highway at 5 p.m. For more information, call 2242321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWER’S MARKET is held every Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Posh Java in Sopchoppy. The market features local organic and unsprayed vegetables, homemade fresh bread from Crescent Moon Farm, live music and varying demonstrations, events, vendors and activities. Growers and seafood vendors wanting to participate may phone Jennifer Taylor at (850) 241-3873 or email famu.register@gmail.com. For more information, contact Posh at 962-1010 or Debbie Dix at 528-5838, or email posh_faery@yahoo.com. Sunday, September 25  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Sunday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, September 26  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 7:30 p.m. at St. Marks First Baptist Church.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN meets each Monday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGAS CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, September 27  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 824 Shadeville Road at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m. Wednesday, September 28  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, September 29  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at Beef O’ Brady’s to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Friday, September 30  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  SASSY STRIPPERS QUILTERS GROUP meets at the public library from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. to make quilts for traumatized children. The “cruiser quilts” are donated to Wakulla County deputies to be used for children in need. New members welcome. For information, call 926-6290.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Special EventsFriday, September 23  FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY SILENT AUCTION will be held at the library from 6 to 8 p.m. The Silent Auction includes gift certi cates, vacations, marine supplies, gifts, artwork, dinners, school supplies and more. Food and drinks will be provided. For more information about the event, contact Sue Belford at 926-4244 or FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail. com.  BIG BEND HOSPICE BEREAVEMENT SEMINAR will be held from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee, for professionals and peer supporters that work with bereaved families. A registration fee of $79 is required which includes breakfast and lunch. Please call Lisa Baggett at (850) 878-5310, ext. 433 with questions or go to www.bigbendhospice.org to register.  FIFTH ANNUAL SOPCHOPPY INTERTRIBAL POW WOW will be held at Sopchoppy City Park. A traditional Native American Gathering Hosted by the Village of the Descendats a Muskogee Creek Village East of the Mississippi. Contact James Phillips at 764-1556 or powwow@ descendantsvillage.com for more information. The pow wow will be held Saturday and Sunday as well. Saturday, September 24  SOPCHOPPY OPRY presents The Kenny Hill Band at 7 p.m. in historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium. The band features Brian Hill playing the at top, Jennifer is the group’s lead vocalist and stand-up bass player and Ken Baldauf is a banjo picker and concertina player. Tickets are $10. Call 962-3711 to make reservations. Monday, September 26  NAMI WAKULLA’s monthly program will be held at 6:30 p.m. at Tallahassee Community College Wakulla Center. It will feature Phoebe Ball, attorney with Disability Rights Florida, discussing guardianship and legal issues that affect the lives of those diagnosed with a mental illness. The program is free and open to the public. Friday, September 30  IGNITE THE FIGHT GOLF TOURNAMENT will take place at Wildwood Golf Resort with registration at 11 a.m. and shotgun start at noon. Cost is $75 per golfer. Proceeds will go to bene t the Wakulla County United Fire Fighters Association. Upcoming EventsSaturday, October 1  IGNITE THE FIGHT 5K RUN will take place at Hudson Park with registration beginning at 8 a.m. and race time at 9 a.m. Cost is $10 for kids, $15 for pre-registered adults and $20 day of the race. Proceeds will go to WCUFFA.  MARC BLACK will perform at The Frog and The Hummingbird Co & Butter eld’s Roadhouse. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. The cover is $10. Contact frogandhummingbirdco@ yahoo.com or call (305) 304-2226.  BOOK EXTRAVAGANZA FUNDRAISER will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the public library. Donations aren’t required, but are appreciated. Proceeds bene t children’s programs. Limit of ve plastic bags per patron.  SMOKE AND FIRE, FIREFIGHTERS BARBECUE COMPETITION will be held from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Hudson Park. There will be barbecue plates, displays of re equipment, live music and raf es. Proceeds will go to the Richard Rhea Scholarship Fund and Children’s Burn Camp. Plates are chicken $6, two meats $7, and three meats $8, all served with slaw, baked beans and a roll. Saturday, October 8  WOODSTORK FESTIVAL will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comTail Wagger... Tourist Development Council meeting at 6:30 p.m. in the commission chambers. Friends of the Library silent auction from 6 to 8 p.m. at the library. Kenny Hill Band at the Sopchoppy Opry at 7 p.m. in the Sopchoppy High School auditorium.NAMI Wakulla’s monthly program at 7 p.m. at TCC Wakulla Center.ThursdayFridaySaturdayMonday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com City and County MeetingsThursday, September 22  WAKULLA COUNTY ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE will meet at 10 a.m. in the Board of County Commissioner’s conference room. The purpose of this meeting is to discuss ways to conserve energy.  WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet for a public roundtable meeting from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Commission Chambers.Library News...By SCOTT JOYNERInterim Library DirectorIts “ nally here. After months of preparation, the Friends of the Library Silent Auction to bene“ t Library programs takes place on Friday, Sept. 23 from 6 to 8 p.m. As I mentioned last week, we are lucky enough to have a wide variety of items donated from local merchants and our patrons for your bidding pleasure. There will be everything from weekends at hotels and resorts, “ shing and nautical items, art from our talented community in Wakulla County, gift certi“ cates from local restaurants, and tickets to the Tallahassee Symphony, and much more. Refreshments will be available to those attending so we encourage all who wish to come out, get some great items, and support a great cause to join us. As I told you last week, the funds raised by the Friends help fund our Summer Program for the Children of Wakulla County, our book budget, help us with supplies and other expenses involved in the day-to-day running of the library. Each year, the Friends have donated more than $20,000 to the library. These are funds that do not come out of local tax dollars but from the generosity of the thousands of people in this community who love and use the library each year. With the Friends support over the next year we hope to provide ebook checkouts for our patrons, buy new public access computers, begin with the long awaited final renovation of the expansionŽ wing of the library, and continue to provide computer classes, a wide variety of books, “ lms, high speed internet and other materials free of charge to the citizens of Wakulla. Ive said many times that our business actually goes up when the economy is down, so without the help of the Friends wed be hard-pressed to provide the services expected and needed by our county. There will be a bid sheet for each item for you to place your bid with myself and members of the Friends of the Library available to ask any questions. I will announce the winners at 8 p.m. and if you win you may take your item home that evening. For those who have to leave for whatever reason but end up having the winning bid on an item, you have until the following Tuesday to contact me before I go to the next person on the list. We look forward to having a lot of fun with this and hope you come out and join us and please frequent the businesses that made donations as well. See you then! If you have any questions beforehand please feel free to contact me at 926-7415. By JOAN HENDRIXCHAT PresidentIt was a day like any other day when Wakulla Animal Control got a call about a dog walking along the roadside. An employee left immediately to the location the caller described and there he was. The dog was so weak he barely could walk and you could see all of his ribs. He probably didnt have much longer to live, maybe a couple of weeks unless he could “ nd some food somewhere. He was brought back to the shelter and put in a kennel. Time went by with no inquiring calls from the owner nor was a call logged in on record “ tting that particular dogs description. When CHAT has room for dogs, Lewis will walk next door to Animal Control and look at dogs who never have an owner to come for them. He saw this dog lying in the kennel and imagined how he would look if he had been taken care of and was healthy. So, with that in mind, he brought him over to CHAT. The dog was a beautiful English Setter mix and black and white in color with pretty ” oppy black ears. This dog is categorized as a large dog and he only weighed 40.5 pounds, had an ear infection, round worms, had pale gums and was discovered to have heartworms. He was updated on all his vaccinations and wormed. His medical problems, coupled with the fact that he was terribly under weight, worried us. We all really wanted that dog to live and we were determined to do everything we could. We named him Scout and started him on heart worm treatment. I remember the “ rst day I saw Scout. He was lying on the concrete ” oor and was so weak he couldnt get up to get on his soft bed, he didnt even have the strength to bark or to wag his tail. I retrieved a blanket for his bed, went into his kennel, lifted him up and put him on the cot. I sat down next to him, stroked him for a long time, talked to him and told him he would never be alone again and was in a good safe place with people who cared. Scout is a beautiful, well behaved and happy dog that recently was adopted to a family that is so happy to have him. They eventually named him Dillon. One more homeless dog off the street and in a loving home.

PAGE 19

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 – Page 3B 4th Annual Music Festival & Silent AuctionAll Proceeds to bene t injured and orphaned wildlife www.wakullawildlife.org www.woodstorkfestival.com A Great Time for a Great Cause! Food • Drink & Beer • Cake Walk Silent Auction~ First Table opens at 10am Last Table closes at 4pm Photo Contest • Kids’ Table Raf es • Local Artists and Vendors Educational Exhibits Great Music Featuring: 10am-Ralph Pelletier • 11:30am-Swingin Harpoon 1pm-Mimi & The HearnDogs • 2:30pm-Sarah Mac Band 4pm-Rick Ott Band Saturday, October 8, 2011 • 10am – 5pmSPONSORS: 3Y Ranch 195 Harvey Young Farm Rd. Crawfordville, FL.TICKETS: ONLY $5.00 Per Person (suggested donation) Under 6: FREECome out and support Florida Wild Mammal Association Shirley Wise & Associates Posters courtesy of: PRINTING ON DEMAND 2650-5 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 (850) 926-4000 printingondemand@comcast.net LIVE AUCTION 11am 1pm the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Dwight WellsAugust 2011 Winner ank You So Much! His name was drawn fromI greatly appreciate the wonderful food! e best thig isƒ I like every restaurant on this list!Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y Resta urantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Continued from Page 1B Generally 1 … 7 plastic containers are normal food packaging. Please rinse your commingled items before putting them in the recycling bin. The recycling plant cannot accept Styrofoam or plastic grocery bags. Q: Currently, my hauler comes up my private road or driveway to pick me up. Will Waste Pro still provide this service? A: We are committed to provide as close to the same service as your current hauler provided. Generally, if your mailman can get there, we can too! We will work with your previous haulers to determine how you were being serviced. If you live on a private road or driveway, your roll out cart and bin may be left at the foot of the road. Please do not be unsettled by this. We would ask that you contact us if you have a special situation like this and we will send a supervisor out to survey your particular situation and determine the best location to service you. Q: I live in a subdivision. Where does my roll out cart and bin need to be placed? A: Please have your carts and bins within three feet of the road the night before your service day. Q: I understand that we are offered an expanded scope of services. What other services are provided? A: In addition to the basic services listed above, we offer additional services at varying costs. Many of the services are provided for free. For residents who do not want a larger 96-gallon cart, we offer a 64-gallon cart. If you are a recycler, additional bins are offered at no charge. If you feel like you need additional recycling capacity we ask that you start out with one additional bin. After the “ rst few weeks of service if you are recycling more than two 18-gallon bins, we will provide you with additional bins at no charge. If you are disabled and cannot wheel your cart to the curb, assistance will be given at no extra charge. Please contact Wakulla County to determine if you qualify for this service. Side door service for non-disabled resident are provided at an additional charge. Bear proof and bear resistant containers will be offered to all residents. Q: What are the fee schedules for additional services? How do I contact Waste Pro to set up additional services? A: The flyer that you receive with your roll out cart and bin will have a fee schedule for additional services. There is a detachable portion of the ” yer that can be mailed into our of“ ce to set up additional services. You can also request these services by calling, or sign up for services on our website. Our main focus now is to ensure that every resident has a 96 gallon roll out cart and 18 gallon bin to start service on Oct. 3. Depending on demand, requests for additional services could take two days to three weeks to deliver. Please bear with us; we will get to everyones requests as soon as possible! Q: Will I pay more for all of these expanded services? A: Your County Commission has negotiated a rate of $196 per year for these services. The typical customer in Wakulla County was paying up to $300 per year for one time per week garbage pickup only. Not only is this a savings to most residents, by doing this, you will see less litter in Wakulla County and you can take pride in the fact that you are becoming one of the greenest counties in Florida! Q: What about my current driver? A: In order to keep jobs in Wakulla County we have employed a majority of the service providers that you have come to respect over years of service. We commit to this. We will also utilize as many Wakulla County businesses as possible to keep the dollars in Wakulla County. We intend to buy fuel, parts and other items in Wakulla keeping these dollars ” owing within the county. Q: I am a commercial business. How will I be affected? A: Waste Pro services the majority of commercial businesses in Wakulla County. Most commercial customers will see a savings on their monthly bill. We will continue to bill these customers. Your new bill that you receive for October services will re” ect these reduced rates. Q: I still have questions about the new service. Who do I contact? A: Please contact Waste Pro by phone at (850) 5610800 or visit the website at www.wasteprousa.com. We will answer your questions as quickly as possible. We ask for your patience during this “ rst month of service. We have a lot of work to do in the next two weeks. Answers about trash serviceContinued from Page 1B Waste Pro will be in contact with all non-residential units to determine the best option for garbage collection. Call (850) 561-0800 for more information. Included in the assessment is weekly pickup of garbage and recyclables. There is also free bulk item pickup along with regular solid waste as long as it doesnt exceed 2 cubic yards. There is side door collection service available for free to disabled residents, if they qualify. Those who are not disabled can purchase side door collection for an extra $84 a year. A hardship assistance program is also available for low income residents. To determine criteria to qualify or for more information, call the county administration at 926-0919. 2 The number of days the transfer station will be open to receive solid waste, recyclables, white good, bulk items, yard trash, tires, used oil and construction and demolition debris. Waste Pro will make improvements to the land ll and be open Fridays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. There will be a fee of $75 per ton to drop off items. 15 The number of months worth of gross receipts paid to buyout the other haulers by Waste Pro. They have also hired around 15 people who were employed with the other haulers. 96 The size in gallons of the garbage can households will receive. 18 The size in gallons of the recycle bin households will receive. 10 The length in years of the contract agreement with Waste Pro and the county. $2,397,500 The amount of gross revenue expected to be generated from the assessment. PHOTO BY TAMMIE BARFIELDWaste Pro garbage cans being delivered in Panacea on Sunday, Sept. 18.A look at garbage by the numbers

PAGE 20

Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 16, … Despite the return of summer temperatures, fall was de“ nitely in the air this week with thoughts turning to upcoming committee hearings, presidential primaries and new budgets as agency heads prepared for yet another tight-“ sted session. Floridas economy continues to sputter, and it was reported this week that the states unemployment rate remained unchanged in August. And the Legislatures top economist warned of future revenue shortfalls. Florida Republican leaders this week named members to a committee that will begin meeting next week to decide when to hold Floridas 2012 presidential primary. Deliberations will likely spark national attention again as the swing state tries to make its case for prominence in the 2012 presidential race. Also this week, Florida teachers took their fight over merit pay to the courts, while a federal judge in Miami put a cork in a National Ri” e Association-backed law preventing physicians and other health care providers from asking their patients if they own guns. Citizens Property Insurance Corp. customers meanwhile took their battle to Tampa in an effort to prevent sinkhole rate increases that could cost some homeowners thousands of dollars a year. REVENUE PICTURE DARKENS Floridas unemployment rate held steady in August at 10.7 percent. While still 0.9 percentage points lower than a year earlier, the persistence of joblessness seem to underscore repeated warnings from economists that Floridas recovery would be a prolonged affair. Amy Baker, coordinator of the Legislatures Of“ ce of Economic & Demographic Research, said Wednesday that earlier projections of general-revenue growth this year and during the 2012-13 “ scal year will drop fairly signi“ cantly. That means more difficult budget choices for lawmakers when they start the 2012 legislative session in January --though Baker said things wont be as bad as during last springs session, when lawmakers faced a $3.6 billion shortfall. Analysts, including Baker and representatives of the governors office, House and Senate, are scheduled to meet Oct. 11 to revise general-revenue estimates. I believe that you will be looking at another tight session, she concluded. Tight budgets were also on the minds of agency heads who this week turned in their wish lists for the coming “ scal year. Some are already making their pitch for increasingly scarce funds. Department of Children and Families of“ cials, for example, are asking lawmakers next year to bolster child-protective investigations. An agency budget proposal submitted this week seeks tens of millions of dollars to add and retain child-protective investigators, improve technology and better coordinate efforts with local law enforcement. The budget documents outline problems with high turnover among investigators, large caseloads and low pay. The proposal, which would need legislative approval next year, comes seven months after the death of 10-year-old Nubia Barahona showed the need for improvements. Part of the proposal seeks $15.8 million to improve technology in the child-protection program, such as equipping investigators with mobile technology that would allow them to get case information remotely and also enter notes and details. FLORIDA TEACHERS HEAD TO COURT The Florida Education Association, meanwhile, went to court in Tallahassee to try to shoot down a merit pay law that ties the salaries of teachers and other school employees to student performance. The union says the new law is unlawful because it violates a right to collectively bargain for wages, contracts and promotions that is guaranteed in the state constitution. This sweeping change totally changed the teaching profession in Florida,Ž said FEA President Andy Ford during a press conference Wednesday. The lawsuit sets the stage for another legal battle for the powerful teachers union with the Republicancontrolled Legislature and conservative Gov. Rick Scott, both of whom were big supporters of not only the teacher merit pay law, but championed other laws that were opposed by unions and public employees. It is unfortunate that the labor union claiming to represent teachers has resisted every meaningful education reform for more than a decade,Ž responded Florida Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Mark Wilson. MEDICAID MANAGED CARE WALTZ CONTINUES Federal Medicaid officials said this week they want changes to improve patient care and increase requirements on HMOs. One change would require the state to spend millions of dollars to bolster primary-care programs, while 20 hospitals would have to come up with projects to bolster the health of low-income people. The feds are also seeking to ensure that HMOs in the pilot program spend at least 85 percent of the money they receive on patient care. CITIZENS BOARD APPROVES RATE CAP. WILL OIR FOLLOW? Responding to pressure from homeowners, lawmakers and some high ranking state of“ cials, Citizens Property Insurance Corp. board members on Monday voted to cap proposed sinkhole rate hikes at 50 percent for the coming year as they try to make the state-backed program “ nancially sound. What remains to be seen is if state regulators will allow even those capped rates to go forward as they weigh the need for actuarially sound premiums against what the company has proposed. In the backdrop is the economic distress and political backlash of increasing insurance premiums for people who when opening their bills dont really think that much about whether the company is solvent and can pay claims. Anticipating a proverbial angry mob at a public hearing scheduled in Tampa, Citizens board of governors voted to phase in premiums approved in July. By capping next years increase to 50 percent, board members hoped to cushion the blow to thousand of homeowners in sinkhole prone regions of the state. The Of“ ce of Insurance Regulation has until Monday to approve those sinkhole premium hikes, averaging 428 percent statewide. During public testimony in Tampa, Florida Insurance Commissioner Kevin McCarty and other OIR of“ cials outlined a long list of concerns over proposed hikes that would eventually raise annual sinkhole premiums in some regions by thousands of dollars a year. Without concrete data you are asking residents in some counties to pay $5,000 more,Ž McCarty said to the applause of several hundred Sinkhole AlleyŽ residents in attendance. 2012 HERE WE COME Gov. Rick Scott and leg-islative leaders announced the nine members of a committee that will select the states presidential primary date, bringing Florida closer to what seems like an inevitable confrontation with the national political parties. Scott tapped former Gov. Bob Martinez; Jenn Ungru, Scotts deputy chief of staff who oversees the Department of State; and former state Sen. Al Lawson, D-Tallahassee. Senate President Mike Haridopolos picked Sens. John Thrasher, R-St. Augustine; Rene Garcia, RHialeah; and Gary Siplin, D-Orlando. House Speaker Dean Cannon appointed House Majority Leader Carlos Lopez-Cantera, R-Miami, and Reps. Seth McKeel, R-Lakeland and Cynthia Stafford, D-Miami. STORY OF THE WEEK: Citizen Property Insurance Corp. board approves a cap on sinkhole premium increases, an attempt to offset rate hikes that is some cases would surpass 2,000 percent. Meanwhile, state insurance regulators say they have concerns about the proposed rate hikes. They will weigh in Monday. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Theres a lot that you havent heard. Contemporaneous with being the bad boy, hes always been a real good guy when it comes to youth athletics. Attorney Michael Carney comments on former 2 Live Crew rapper and freedom of expression advocate Luther Campbell, who is seeking approval to become a certi“ ed Florida teacher despite a gun violation and putting on shows involving minimally-clad women back in the day. WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Fall is in the air … committees, presidential primary, budgetsAn appeals court on Friday issued a stay to block a deposition of former Corrections Secretary Ed Buss by the state corrections of“ cers union in a lawsuit over prison privatization. Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford, who is now Wakullas circuit judge, ruled on Thursday that the Police Benevolent Association could depose Buss, who was forced out as secretary last month, in its suit seeking to block a large-scale privatization of prisons in South Florida. But the 1st District Court of Appeals blocked it in a ruling Friday, issuing an emergency stay. The state is trying to prevent Buss from testifying. The Palm Beach Post reported Friday that the appeals court gave the union and the state until Tuesday to make their cases for why Buss should testify or not. The next hearing on the privatization lawsuit is set for Sept. 29 before Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford. Bids are currently open for private companies that want to run about 30 prisons in the southern part of the state. Judge Fulford had denied a request by the state to block Buss from being deposed in a lawsuit over the privatization “ led by the Florida Police Benevolent Association. Buss quit under pressure from Gov. Rick Scott late last month, and the speed with which Florida has moved to privatize prisons was seen as one factor in an admitted disconnect between Buss and Scott. Fulford ruled Buss is reasonably likely to have unique discoverable knowledge of potentially relevant subject matterŽ and that the PBA had tried unsuccessfully to get the information elsewhere, the Post reported. … News Service of FloridaAppeals court halts Buss deposition Ed Buss Special to The News Just about every GOP presidential candidate is in the state this week, as the Republican Party of Florida hosts Presidency 5, a conference that includes a straw poll of more than 3,000 Florida GOP delegates, in Orlando starting Thursday. Theres a debate with those candidates on Thursday night. Several members of the Wakulla County Republican Executive Committee will be representing the Wakulla County Republican registered voters in the Presidential 5 event in Orlando Thursday, Sept. 22 through Saturday, Sept. 24. The three-day convention includes a nationally televised Presidential debate hosted by Fox News and the RPOF, as well as a Straw PollŽ where delegates from around the state of Florida get together and vote on who they believe the next Republican Party Presidential nominee should be. On Sept. 24, the Wakulla County delegation will join as many as 3,500 delegates from around Florida to hear the Republican candidates for President address the group and make their argument for being the Republican Presidential nominee. This Florida Straw Poll has predicted the eventual Republican nominee since 1979. The Wakulla County delegation includes WREC Chairman Ed Brimner, Secretary Melisa Taylor, Wakulla County Commissioner Jerry Moore, Virginia Moore, Marcus Floyd, Lucy Floyd, David Davis, Tina White-Brimner, and Larry Taylor.Wakulla Republicans to attend Presidency 5 CallPau l s WellGet ThemAll TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S  222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROLSERVICEƒEVERYTHING FROM TERMITESTOMICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello € Tallahassee € Quincy € Wakulla r r s TM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm TheWorks coffee•espresso•latts cappuccino•frapps andnowBAGELS! Monday-Friday630am-900pm Saturday8a m-9pm Sunday1 2-5pm 27FAzaleaDr•BehindBealls•850.253.7253•www.theworkscafe.com 2 0 1 1 S t a r t u p B u si n e ss o ft h e Y e a r THE CABINET SHOPTHECABINET SHOP Custom Kitchens&Counter Tops LUN CH PA RTN ER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyofwhile quantities last.926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat Try One of Our Home Made Parfaits

PAGE 21

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 – Page 5B Look for the next chapter of The Brass Bell in next weeks edition of The Wakulla news This page sponsored in part by:Written by Cathy Sewell and illustrated by Blaise Sewell of The Curriculum ClosetChapter Six: The End of the JourneyWhile it would seem to many that Coronados expedition was a failure, he actually discovered many new areas of the southwest United States, and claimed ownership of them for Spain. While they never found gold, their treasures were the amazing places they visited, including the Grand Canyon.Ž … Coronado and the Golden CitiesKarol, Felix and Hector stood on the sidewalk looking up at a sign that read TREASURE ROOM. There was a big golden crown under the words. Instantly, they knew they had been fooled. Is this supposed to be some kind of a joke?Ž Felix yelled. Yeah, Hector,Ž Karol also was angry. This isnt funny!Ž I had no idea that this was the treasure,Ž Hector said, apologetically. Youve got to believe me! When I was little, my dad gave me this,Ž Hector said, pulling a gold coin from his pocket. He told me that it came from Gallinas. I tried to get him to tell me more, but he wouldnt. He would only say, Just remember, the treasure is in the journey. Ž Hector held out the hand with the gold coin. It had the same crown as the sign and a few symbols, but no words. Honestly, I had no idea that the coin came from here. I would never have made you two go through everything we did, for a dumb old game token!Ž The dejected explorers all sat on the edge of the curb. It was hard for Karol and Felix to stay mad at Hector, because he looked just as disappointed as they felt. And Felix still remembered how he felt just a few days ago, when his soccer friends all shunned him. Its OK, amigo,Ž Felix told his friend. Thanks, but now we still have to get back home and were all out of food!Ž Hector sniffed. Hey, were three pretty smart explorers. Well “ gure something out!Ž Felix gave Hector a friendly punch in the arm. Whats wrong?Ž Demetri yelled from his rolled-down window. They hadnt noticed his taxi pull up, and his loud voice startled them. Well, there wasnt a treasure after all,Ž Karol told Demetri. Im sorry to hear that,Ž Demetri said. Would you kids like to meet my travel partner?Ž The friends leaned into the taxi and received a shock. Sitting in the front seat, wearing a wool-beaded vest and buckled into a safety belt, was a small brown goat. Ive got an idea,Ž Felix said, untying the string from around his neck. This is for Misha!Ž He hooked the old brass bell onto the goats collar. When he stepped back, Felix could see that Demetri had tears in his eyes. When I left Russia for a new life here in America, I had to leave behind many things,Ž he began. And one of them was a small bell that would hang from the doorway of our home. I will forever keep this bell on Misha, and it will bring me good luck. Thank you!Ž Felix felt like he had removed a heavy weight from around his neck. Youre welcome,Ž he said softly. Well, I dont know where you three are heading,Ž Demetri offered, but Im on my way to Corona, if you want a ride.Ž As soon as they heard him say Corona,Ž they were climbing into the back of his taxi. Buckle up, you three, and well be on our way!Ž he directed. They all did as he asked, then took turns telling Demetri tales of their overnight adventure. So ƒ the treasure is in the journey. What do you think it means?Ž Demetri pretended to wonder. Well, I know Ive made a couple of really great friends,Ž Karol said. And suddenly it all made sense. Thanks, Demetri,Ž Felix said. I think you helped us “ nd our treasure!Ž It was nice meeting you all. Heres your stop!Ž Demetri announced. The taxi pulled up in front of the Corona School. The explorers grabbed their backpacks and thanked Demetri for the ride. Hold on a minute, chicos,Ž he said, walking to the back of the car. He opened the trunk and pulled out a wellused, blue and green, very familiar-looking soccer ball. He tossed it to Felix and climbed back into the drivers seat without another word. I think my luck is starting to change already. Adios, see you at school tomorrow!Ž Felix said to his friends. He was eager to tell his grandma about his adventure. And as he walked home, he wondered if the curse had “ nally been lifted. Find us on COLORING PICTURE 1) A __ U M __ N __ M2) P __ __ E R3) __ __ A S T __ C4) G __ A __ S5) T __ N6) C __ R __ __ O A R __7) __ E W __ __ A P __ R SAnswers: 1) Aluminum, 2) Paper, 3) Plastic, 4) Glass, 5) Tin, 6) Cardboard, 7) NewspapersEach of the following is a product that people often recycle. Fill in the blanks to name that product. Name That Product Name That Product

PAGE 22

Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Firefighter’s BBQ Competition Saturday, Oct 1 • 11am 4pm Hudson Park, Crawfordville Bar-B-Q Plates, Displays of Fire Equipment, Live Music & Raffles. Hey Kids! Check out fire trucks, ambulances, and spray the hose! SMOKEANDFIRE PROCEEDS TO BENEFIT: Richard Rhea Scholarship Fund and Camp Amigo (Children’s Burn Camp)JUDGING AT NOON, PRIZES FOR Chicken, Ribs and Pulled Pork Judging Panel:David EdwardsFirst day as County Administrator, David HarveyFirst day as retired Sheriff, Heather EncinosaCounty Attorney, William SnowdenThe Wakulla News, Guinn HaskinsWakulla Area Times, Rev. Jeff McFall,Father Ed Jones, Art MyersWCTV, one surprise judge, come and see who it is www.campamigo.com Chicken $6, Choice of two meats $7, Choice of three meats $8(Served with Slaw, baked beans and roll)Plate prices: Price:$17,995 Year:2006 Make:Chevrolet Model:Silverado Z71Color:Black Price:$7,995 Year:1997 Make:Toyota Model:4Runner Color:Gray Price:$9,995 Year:2002 Make:Ford Model:Expedition Color:Black Price:$17,995 Year:2010 Make:Toyota Model:Corolla Color:Red Price:$11,995 Year:2005 Make:Chrysler Model:Town & CountryColor:Lt. Blue Price:$12,995 Year:2004 Make:Nissan Model:Murano Color: Silver Ultimate Image Auto, Inc I will get Everyone Approved! And I will get You approved no matter what! JB BlackYou want it! We have it!INTE REST RATES STAR TING AT 2.99% www.UltimateImageAuto.com4905 Crawfordville Rd., Tallahassee, FL850877-7222OVER150VEHICLES INSTOCK

PAGE 23

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 – Page 7B Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! 926-7102 Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $10.00 a week! Cars  Real Estate  Rentals  Employment  Services  Yard Sales  Announcements A New Look PaintingSpecializing in residential and commercial Re-painting € pressure washing € sheetrock € wood rot repairsLICENSED &INSURED850-926-2400CALL JIM PORTER: ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 CARPET CLEANING of Wakulla Residential and Commercial WATER EXTRACTION 24/7 EMERGENCY 850-567-6734CAMO New Construction, Remodeling & Repairs850.524.5894 Home Maintenance & Repair--Cliff Westbrook Services ---Full Service home maintenance and repair. Foreclosure, rental, yard cleanups. Flower beds, window washing, trash hauling. EXPERIENCED and RELIABLE850-926-2004 Crawfordville CarpetCleanersaffordable carpet care free estimates850-459-0106 850-210-5849or visit us at www.BarryBuilding.com Affordable Office Spaceat the Barry Building Enjoy working surrounded by a great atmosphere with many amenities. Rates start at $250/mo., utilities included! Come take a tour at www.BarryBuilding.com. THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Junior P.SandersSeptic Tank Services18-YR Experience. New System Installation-All Types. Drain Repair. Washing Machine Systems.SR0111684NO JOB TOO SMALL, FAIR PRICES, FRIENDLY GUARANTEED SERVICE!850-210-5777 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved 850-356-6801Affordable for every budget! ...Refresh Home Detailingfor a new home feel...Call for a free and friendly estimateLICENSED Will help you make the most of your outdoor space. Cabins, Barns, Playhouses, Utilities, Gazebos, Tables, Swings, Rockers and More! Pricing and Sizes to “t your needs. Cash Discounts. $25 credit on a new building with this ad. See Melissa at 1580 Crawfordville Hwy., next to Happy Time Day Care850-926-3441SOUTHERN STORAGE SOLUTIONS Stow it Away!! 5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGE GreatRates! STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.BUY€SELL€TRADE€REPAIRBoats, Motors, Trailers, New/Used Marine Supplies Sold 4815D Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Pro p Service Center Interstate Batter y Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-556-4652www.wakullaboatsales.com stowawaymarine @ comcast.net Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com HAYHORSE QUALITYLOWEST PRICES IN TOWN!!!850-528-0770delivery available Denise’s ListCall Denise today to get your services on her list!850-926-7102 Classi eds@TheWakullaNews.net THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 105 Business Opportunities BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can fix those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again, and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Money Making Opportunity. Computer a must. Free evaluation & Training. Flexible hours. Great incentives. www.freedomtodream.net 352-360-5939. 114 Miscellaneous Help Wanted WANTED Inhomecaretakerforelderly woman.Freerentinexchange forthepeaceofmindthata lovedoneiswelltakencareo f anddoesnotgowithout.Contact Viola at 850-926-6316. 120 Services and Businesses A -1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed ~ John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550 ALL ABOUT...CONCRETE blocks bricks pavers LANDSCAPE plants sod tractor workcall JOSEPH FRANCIS850-556-1178 / 850-556-3761 BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway. Larry Carter Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931, 850-694-7041. Licensed/Insured. Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291. HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIRSales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & soundLocated in Crawfordville Doug & Sherry Quigg, Owners Lic. No’s. ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 926 -5790 KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial,residentialandmobilehomes.Repair,sales,service,installation.Allmakesand models.Lic.#RA0062516. 926-3546. Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 POLLY NICHOLSSpecial Touch CleaningConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential.“pray like it ’ s up to God, Work like it ’ s up to you”519-7238 926-3065Licensed &Insured RefreshHomeDetailing.Fora newhomefeel.Pleasecalfora freeandfriendlyestimate.Affordableforeverybudget. LcensedinFlorida. 850-356-6801. Tillman’sTermite&PestControl, Inc.Residential,Commercial. CallTillmanOwensforaquote. 850-322-1775. UPHOLSTERY Flagship Canvas & Upholstery. Quality marine canvas fabrication and Upholstery of all kinds. Scott A. Smith, 38 Rainbow Dr. Crawfordville, (behind El Jalisco). 850-228-1007. www.flagshipcanvas.com flagshipcanvas@yahoo.com 130 Entertainment Da Cajun Wagon ServingFreshSeafoodandMore withdaCajunkick!Shrimp Po’Boy,CrabPoppers,Bouldin Balls,etc.EveryWed-Satfrom 11AM-7PM.Hwy.319bythe KangarooExpressinMedart. Callinordersarewelcome. 850-570-1625. 205 Antiques MenagerieAntiqueMallisNow open!Vendorspaceisavailable for$1.50/sqft.850-745-8381. 4340CrawfordvilleHwy.(nextto the library). 210 Auctions Real Estate Auction Nominal Opening Bid: $10,000 69 Crawford Ave, Crawfordville 3BR 2BA 1,688sf+/Sells:12:30PMWed.,Sep.28on site williamsauction.com/september 800-801-8003 Manypropertiesnowavailable for online bidding! A Buyer’sPremium(Buyer'sFee inWI)mayapply.Williams&Williams FLBroker: DanielSNelsonRe LicBK3223097;Williams&Williams Re Lic 1032049 A uctioneer: EddieBurksAuc LicAU4211;Williams&Williams A uc Lic AB-0000760. Silent Auction! “Friends of Wakulla County Public Library” tobeheldonFriday,Sept.23, 2011from6to8PMattheWakullaCountyPublicLibrary4330 CrawfordvilleHwy.Bringyou r famil y andfriends.Bidon g reat yg items.SupportyourLibraryPrograms.Giftcertificates,Vacations,MarineSupplies,Gifts, A rtwork,Dinners,SchoolSupplies,muchmore!!Foodand drinksprovided.Formoreinfo callSueBelfordat 850-926-4244. 275 Home Furnishings $159QueenPillow-TopMattress Set.Unusedinplasticwithwarranty. 222-9879. Delivery avail. 5piecebdrmset.BrandNEWin boxes.$449.Candeliver. 425-8374. 5-pieceWickerLivingRoomset. Glasstoptableswithtropical lookcushionpattern.Asking $350.Goodcondition.Call 850-926-9410. Couch&loveseat.$425.Earthtone,hardwoodframe,warranty, newincrate,del.avail. 545-7112. 320 Farm Products & Produce Farm-freshvegetables.Peas, blanchedandfrozen,okra choppedandfrozen,greenboilingpeanutsandboiledgreen peanuts.Wealsocustom-processcows,hogs,goatsanddeer. Raker Farm 926-7561. Fish Are YourFriends..Dont Throw Trash In Their Home 335 Pets DOGS,PUPPIES,NICECATS ANDKITTENS...Come,take alookandbringanew friendhomeTODAY!CHAT Adoption Center:Mondays closed. Tuesdays through Wednesday& Fridays: 11:00AM to 4:30PM Thursdays: 11:00AM to 7:00 P M Saturdays: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM Sundays: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM1 OAK STREET, CRAW FORDVILLE The unconditional love of a pet is waiting for you at th e C.H.A.T. Adoption Center. orvisit: chatofwakulla.org 355 Yard Sales Thursday9/22,Friday,9/23, 8AM-12Nat21ShorelineDrive, OchlockoneeBay.Kitchenisland,dishes,glasses,gold platedtableware,Christmas lawn displays and more!! Two-FamilyMovingSale!135 A palacheeStreet(1-mileEasto f Lanark,GulfTerrace).Saturday, 9/24,Sunday9/25.9AM-5PM. Everythingmustgo!Noearly birds please. YARD SALE!!Saturday, September 24Corner of US 98 and Spring Creek Highway.SPACES FOR VENDORS EVERY SATURDAY 8AM-4PM!Bring your Stuff and Sell it Here!!850-926-8120 (for info) 500 Real Estate PUBLISHERS NOTICEAllrealestateadvertisinginthis newspaperissubjecttotheFair HousingActwhichmakesitillegaltoadvertiseanypreference, limitation,ordiscrimination basedonrace,color,religion, sex,handicap,familialstatusor nationaloriginoranintentionto makeanysuchpreference,limitationordiscrimination.ŽFamilial statusincludeschildrenunder theageof18livingwithparents orlegalcustodians,pregnant womenandpeoplesecuringthe custodyofchildrenunderthe age of 18. Thisnewspaperwillnotaccept anyadvertisingforrealestate thatisaviolationofthelaw.Our readersareherebyinformedthat alldwellingsadvertisedinthis newspaperareavailableonan equalopportunitybasis.TocomplainofdiscriminationcallHUD tollfreeat1-800-669-9777.The tollfreenumberforthehearin g impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 505 Acreage for Lease Forsalebyowner.N.Wakulla. FiveacresinSweetwaterRidge. $146,000invested.Mustsale!! Makebestoffer.850-510-1216 or 850-523-7898. 515 Apartments for Rent 1BDR as LOW as $600/mo. 2BDR as LOW as $700/mo. 3BDR as LOW as $800/m o. swimming pool and gym850-926-1134 MOVE IN SPECIAL $99 DEPOSIT $300 LOCAL HERO DISCOUNT $99 Application Fee $35

PAGE 24

Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!91 Posey Rd., Medart2BR/1BA, secluded cypress home w/ replace, 2 screened porches on 30 Acres. Perfect for nature lovers.$875 per month.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! “A New Level of Service!!!” 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 4 Choctaw Road 3BR/2BA House on double lot $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 80 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 2BR/2BA House/beachfront, dock $1,250 No Smoking or Pets 26 Manatee Lane 2BR/2BA House $1,500 Mo. (Vacation Rental also $100 night) No Smoking or Pets 10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BA House on pilings $950 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 249 Donaldson-Williams Rd. 3BR/1.5BA MH on 7 Acres $500 Mo. Pets Okay w/Approval/Fee 26B Old Courthouse Square 2BR/2BA Townhouse $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/Pets ok 110 Mount Pleasant 3BR/2BA House on 2 acres $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House – 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Ef ciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 8 Osprey 3BR/2BA 2,390sf House with replace $1,200 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 64 Blackfoot 1,300sf 3BR/2BA House with of ce & garage $950 Mo. No Smoking/Pets negotiableAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate 530 Comm. Property for Rent A ffordableOfficeSpaceatthe BarryBuilding.Greatatmosphere!Includesallutilities,trash p/u,fullkitchenuse,conference room.Ratesstartat$250/mo. 850-210-5849orourwebsiteat www.Barr y Buildin g .com WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE € Fitness Studio -1000/sf,(wall to wall mat & mirrors) € Retail -1250/sf (storefront w/back storage) € Divided Office Space -1074/sf.Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 535 Comm. Property for Sale Choicecornerlotatjunctureo f CrawfordvilleHighwayand pavedWhitlockWay.200'X300'. CommercialZoningGuaranteed, $70,000.DixieProperties(850) 656-6340. 545 Homes for Sale NewhomeinCrawfordville! 3BR/2BA,locatedinWakulla Gardens.$79,000.RevellRealty, 850-962-2212. Sopchoppyhouse,3BR/2BA,locatedon1/2acrelot.$75,000. Revell Realty, 850-962-2212. 555 Houses for Rent 3BR/1BAhomeinMagnoliaGardens.$550/month,plussecurity. 3BR/1.5BAhomeinWakulla Gardens,$650/month,plusdeposit. Call 850-766-0170. 3BR/2BAWakullaGardens, Crawfordville.Largefamilyorientedkitchen,utilityroom, 10X10deck,shadyfan-cooled frontporchfortworockers. $850/month(lease),$850/securit y de p osit. 850-624-4664. 3BR/2BA,greatlocation!$850 permonth,lastandsecurityrequired. Please call 926-3832. 3BR/2BATHinMysteriousWaters.$795/rent,samedeposit. No pets. Call Jim at 566-5165. Crawfordville,clean,large2 bedrooms,2fullbathduplex, $675permonth.CallLinda, 850-926-0283. House/Acreage Charming 3BR/1BA, HVAC, appliances, ceiling fans, located on 3 acres in North Wakulla. Workshop, 2 storage sheds, $750/month, plus $500/deposit. 850-251-1253. Brenda Hicks Realty. 560 Land for Sale 2-acrelotforsalenearnew ShadevilleSchool,cornero f SteelCourtandSpringCreek Hwy.(citywater).Ownerfinancing.Call850-556-1178or 850-556-3765. 565 Mobile Homes for Rent 2BR/2BASW/MH.WakullaGardensKlickitatRd.Niceinterior andexterior,openfloorplan. $575/month, first, last. 3BR/2BADWMH,WakullaGardens, CAH, Good Floor Plan. $675/month+deposit,application,references.1-yrlease.Both availblenow!Callfordiscount! Informationorforappointment 850-554-5267, 850-524-4090. 2BR/2BAveryprivatenewer homeon5+acres.Largecovereddeck,appliancesincluded, W/D,neargulf,riversandstate park.$495/month,$400/deposit. 850-519-1990. 3BR/1.5BAM/Hon3acres, Panaceaarea.Centralheat/air, dishwasher,woodstove.Clean andprivate.Nosmoking.Referencesrequired.$600/month, $300/deposit. 352-493-2232. 3BR/2BAtrailerhomeforrent. Excellentcondition.Newappliances.Fenced-inyard,nopets allowed.$750/month,plussecurity.Referencesrequired.Call 926-2947. 605 Statewide Classi eds Adoption A childlesscoupleseeksto adopt.Flexibleworkschedule. WillbeHANDS-ONparents.Financialsecurity.Expensespaid. Catherine&Michael.(askformichelle/adam).(800)790-5260FL Bar#0150789. Autos Wanted CASHFORCARS!AnyMake, Model,orYear.WePayMORE! RunningorNot.SellYourCaro r TruckTODAY.FreeTowing!Instant Offer: (888)420-3807. Education A LLIEDHEALTHcaree r training-Attendcollege100% online.Jobplacementassistance.Computeravailable.FinancialAidifqualified.SCHE V certified.Call(800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com. Financial Services $$$ACCESSLAWSUITCASH NOW!!!$$$AsseenonTV.$$$ InjuryLawsuitDragging?Need $500-$500,000++within48/hrs? LowratesAPPLYNOWBY PHONE!CallToday!Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com. Help Wanted FreightUp=More$2Mos.CDL ClassADrivingExp (877)258-8782www.meltontruck.com. Driver$2000SignOnBonus! StartaNewCareer!100%Paid CDLTraining!NoExperience Required.CRSTEXPEDITED (800)326-2778 www.JoinCRST.com. $5,000Sign-OnBonus!Frac SandHaulerswithcomplete BulkPneumaticRigsonly.RelocatetoTexasfortonsofwork! Fuel/Quickpayavailable. (800)491-9029. MedicalBillingTraineesNeeded! Hospitals&InsuranceCompanieshiringnow!Noexperience? LocalTraining&JobPlacement available! (888)528-5548. Land For Sale BANKFORECLOSED,LAND LIQUIDATION,from$9,900,Blue Ridgemountains,pavedroads, utilities,countywater,panoramicviews,excellentfinancing. SaleSeptember24th,Callnow! (888)757-6867 ext. 214. A BANDONEDLAKESIDEFARM! 4acres-Lakeaccess-$16,900; 10acres-Hugeview-$29,900; 8acres-Lakefront-$69,900. ForeclosurepricedlandinUpstateNY'sSo.Tier!!Survey, cleartitle!(877)352-2844. www.newyorklandandlakes.com Miscellaneous A TTENDCOLLEGEONLINE fromHome.*Medical,*Business, *Paralegal,*Accounting,*CriminalJustice.Jobplacementassistance.Computeravailable.FinancialAidifqualified.Call (888)203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com. A IRLINESAREHIRING-Train forhighpayingAviationMaintenanceCareer.FAAapproved program.Financialaidifqualified-HousingavailableCALL A viationInstituteofMaintenance (866)314-3769. SAWMILLSfromonly$3997MAKEMONEY&SAVEMONEY withyourownbandmill-Cut lumberanydimension.Instoc k readytoship.FREEInfo&DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/30 0N (800)578-1363 Ext.300N. DIRECTVFallSpecial!FreeHD, 3monthsFREEHBO,Showtime, Starz,Cinemax!NFLSUNDAY TICKETFree-Choice Ultimate/Premier-Pkgsfrom $29.99/mo.Till9/30! (866)419-5666. RV's/Mobile Homes 200+TravelTrailersNOMINIMUMPRICE!OnlineBidding A vailable.Saturday,Septembe r 24@10amHarrah'sResort & CasinoTunica,MS www.hendersonauctions.com (225)686-2252 Lic# 266. Schools & Instruction Heat&AirJOBS-Readyto work?3weekacceleratedprogram.Handsonenvironment. Nationwidecertificationsand LocalJobPlacementAssistance! (877)359-1690. 680 Legal Notices 681 Foreclosure Proceedings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 09-0306 C A UCN: 652009CA000306XXXXX X WELLSFARGOBANK,N.A.ASTRUSTEE FOR BSSP TRUST SERIES 2007-EMXI, Plaintiff, vs. JUDY P. BROWN; et al., Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderorSummaryFinalJudgmentofforeclosuredatedApril28,2010,andanOrder ResettingSaledatedSeptember9,2011 andenteredinCaseNo.09-0306FCUCN 652009CA000306XXXXXXoftheCircuit CourtoftheSecondJudicialCircuitinand forWakullaCounty,Florida,wherein WELLSFARGOBANK,N.A.ASTRUSTEE FORBSSPTRUSTSERIES2007-EMXIis PlaintiffandJUDYP.BROWN;RANDLEE. BROWN;UNKNOWNTENANTNO.1;UNKNOWNTENANTNO.2;andALLUNKNOWNPARTIESCLAIMINGINTERESTS BY,THROUGH,UNDERORAGAINSTA NAMEDDEFENDANTTOTHISACTION, ORHAVINGORCLAIMINGTOHAVEANY RIGHT,TITLEORINTERESTINTHE PROPERTYHEREINDESCRIBED,areDefendants,Iwillselltothehighestandbest bidderforcashintheFrontlobbyoftheWakullaCountyCourthouse,3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL32327in WakullaCounty,Florida,at11:00a.m.on the27thdayofOctobe,2011,thefollowing describedpropertyassetforthinsaidOrder or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT9,BLOCKF,HUDSONHEIGHTS UNIT2ADDITIONTOCRAWFORDVILLE, ACCORDINGTOTHEMAPORPLAT THEREOFASRECORDEDINPLATBOOK I,PAGE20,PUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANYPERSONCLAIMINGANINTEREST INTHESURPLUSFROMTHESALE,IF ANY,OTHERTHANTHEPROPERTY OWNERASOFTHEDATEOFTHELIS PENDENSMUSTFILEACLAIMWITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATEDatCrawfordville,FloridaonSeptember 9, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sGLENDA PORTER AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 22, 29, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000306 US BANK, NA Plaintiff, v. CHANDAMALPHURS;KENNETHL.MALPHURS;UNKNOWNTENANT1;UNKNOWNTENANT2;ANDALLUNKNOWN PARTIESCLAIMINGBY,THROUGH,UNDERORAGAINSTTHEABOVENAMED DEFENDANT(S),WHO(IS/ARE)NOT KNOWNTOBEDEADORALIVE, WHETHERSAIDUNKNOWNPARTIES CLAIMASHEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,LIENORS,CREDITORS,TRUSTEES,SPOUSES,OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Noticeisherebygiventhat,pursuanttothe SummaryFinalJudgmentofForeclosure enteredonJuly27,2011,andtheOrderReschedulingForeclosureSaleenteredon September6,2011,inthiscause,intheCircuitCourtofWakullaCounty,Florida,Iwill sellthepropertysituatedinWakullaCounty, Florida, described as: LOT15,BLOCK5,WAKULLAGARDENS, ASUBDIVISIONASPERMAPORPLAT THEREOF,RECORDEDINPLATBOOK1, PAGE39OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 52 SIOUX TRL., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2742 atpublicsale,tothehighestandbestbidder,forcash,inthefrontlobbyoftheWakullaCountyCourthouselocatedat3056 CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL 32327,WakullaCounty,Florida,ateleven o'clock a.m., on October 13, 2011. Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendensmustfileaclaimwithing60daysafter the sale. DatedatCrawfordville,Floridathis7th,day of September, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sBECKY WHALEY AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 22, 29, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION FILE NUMBER: 10-386-CA MAJESTICACRESLLC,aFloridaLimited Liability Company, Plaintiff v. BILLYFISHERandBARBARAFISHER,et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:BILLYFISHERandBARBARA FISHER,ifalive,andifdead,theirunknown spouses,heirs,devisees,grantees,judgmentcreditors,andallotherpartiesclaiming by,through,under,oragainstthem;theunknownspouses,heirs,devisees,grantees, andjudgmentcreditorsofdeceaseddefendants,andallotherpartiesclaimingby, through,under,oragainstdefendants;and allunknownnaturalpersonsifalive,andif deadornotknowntobedeadoralive,their severalandrespectiveunknownspouses, heirs,devisees,grantees,andjudgment creditors,orotherpartiesclaimingby, through,orunderthoseunknownnatural persons;andtheseveralandrespectiveunknownassigns,successorsininterest,trustees,oranyotherpersonclaimingby, through,under,oragainstanycorporation orotherlegalentitynamedasadefendant; andallclaimants,personsorparties,natural orcorporate,orwhoseexactlegalstatusis unknown,claimingunderanyoftheabove namedordescribeddefendantsorparties orclaimingtohaveanyright,title,orinterest in the property, YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactiontoquiet tax title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot17,BIockB,WAKULLARIVERESTATESUNITONE,asperplatthereofrecordedonpage48ofPlatBookNo.1ofthe public records of Wakulla County, Florida hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,ifany,toitonGeorgeH.Gwynn, Esq.,theplaintiff'sattorney,whoseaddress is Post Office Box 4128, Tallahassee, Florida,32315,onorbeforeOctober10th, 2011,andfiletheoriginalwiththeclerkof thiscourteitherbeforeserviceontheplaintiff'sattorneyorimmediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou forthereliefdemandedinthecomplaintor petition. DATED ON August 29th 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sGLENDA PORTER AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 8, 15, 22, 29, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 2010-CA-321 BRANCHBANKINGANDTRUSTCOMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. MEEKSCONSTRUCTIONANDDEVELOPMENT,INC.,AFLORIDACORPORATION F/K/A3-MCONSTRUCTION,INC.,A FLORIDA CORPORATION, ET AL., Defendants. CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICEISGIVENthat,inaccordancewith theFinalJudgmentofForeclosuredated August23,2011,intheabove-styledcause, Iwillselltothehighestandbestbidderfor cash,attheLeonCountyCourthouseon October13,2011at11:00a.m.(EST),or assoonthereafterasthesalemayproceed, thefollowingdescribedparcelsofproperty locatedinLeonCounty,FloridaandWakulla County, Florida. Lots7and8oftheVillagesofS1.Marks,a subdivisionaspermaporplatthereofrecordedinPlatBook3,Pages70through74, ofthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty, Florida. Lot9oftheVillagesofSt.Marks,asubdivisionaspermaporplatthereofrecordedin PlatBookPages70thiough74,ofthePublic Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Lot 25 Sycamore Ridge Subdivision Commenceataconcretemonumentlying onthelinedividingSection16and17, Township2South,Range1East,Leon County,Florida,saidpointlyingonthe SoutherlyrightofwayboundaryofNatural BridgeRoadandlying1790feetSouthof theNorthwestcornerofsaidSection16; thencealongsaidSoutherlyrightofway boundaryasfollows:North89degrees59 minutes30secondsEast,1,319.52feettoa concretemonument(nonumber);thence South89degrees59minutes57seconds East,208.70feettoafoundconcretemonument(#4016)markingtheNorthwestcomer oflandsdescribedasParcel1recordedin OfficialRecordsBook1405,Page293; thenceNorth89degrees54minutes28 secondsEast;25.03feettoafoundconcretemonument(#4016),thenceNorth89 degrees59minutes35secondsEast, 230.00feettothePOINTOFBEGINNING. FromsaidPOINTOFBEGINNINGcontinue North89degrees59minutes35seconds Eastalongsaidrightofwayboundary, 185.85feet;thenceleavingsaidrightofway boundaryrunSouth00degrees00minutes 44secondsEast,118.04feet;thenceSouth 90degrees00minutes00secondsWest, 185.66feet;thenceNorth00degrees06 minutes10secondsWest,118.02feetto thePOINTOFBEGINNING,containing 21,294squarefeetor0.50acres,moreor less. A/K/ALot25ofSycamoreRidge,asubdivisionaspermaporplatthereofrecordedin PlatBook18,Page46ofthePublicRecords of Leon County, Florida. Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendensmustfileaclaimwithin60daysafter the sale. Dated this 1st day of September, 2011. BOB INZER, CLERK OF COURT By: -sANGELA BRADFORD Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) September 22, 29, 2011

PAGE 25

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 – Page 9BBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 27 33 40 44 52 57 64 68 71 2 28 53 3 29 54 4 24 41 47 65 21 34 48 58 5 15 18 49 6 30 45 55 66 69 72 7 31 50 59 8 25 35 60 22 32 42 56 9 16 19 43 10 26 36 51 67 70 73 11 23 37 46 61 12 38 62 13 39 63 Fred Piscop A CROSS 1. Sentry's imperative 5. Knocks out of one's socks 9. IHOP serving 1 4. "Essays of __" 1 5. Big picture 1 6. 34-Across became one 1 7. Hamper contents 1 8. Zilch 1 9. Bowie's last stand 2 0. Put an early end to 2 3. Give a darn? 2 4. __ chi 2 5. Western topper 2 7. Sent, as to a military outpost 3 2. Grate stuff 3 3. Give two thumbs down to 3 4. Onetime "97-pound weakling" Charles 3 6. Doo-wop group member 4 0. Obey the drill sergeant 4 4. Beat by a whisker 4 5. 1960 Wimbledon champ Fraser 4 6. Schooner contents 4 7. Graffiti, to some 5 0. They manage the wines 5 2. Flock leaders 5 6. WWE outcome 5 7. 39, to Jack Benny 5 8. Get destroyed 6 4. Conical abode 6 6. Scotto solo 6 7. Social reformer Baker 6 8. Maze word 6 9. Creditor's claim 7 0. Bartlett's abbr. 7 1. Windows icon 7 2. "__ we forget ..." 7 3. Carpet featuresDOWN1. Chopped down 2. Jai __ 3. Daffy's problem 4. Gauguin's island home 5. Pursued, as a career 6. Colorful fish 7. Left or right of the goalposts 8. Replacement players, to some 9. Jazz cats' wear 10. Business card abbr. 11. Gather together 12. Intaglio's reverse 13. Like an open secret 21. Bother persistently, as an injury 22. Actress Hagen 26. "Oh no, not __!" 27. Basilica part 28. A natural abrasive 29. Negotiations hangup 30. Verve 31. Tests for carbon 14 35. ER shout 37. Bull artist 38. Snitched 39. Till fill 41. Bog stuff 42. Seuss's Horton, for one 43. Tyro, informally 48. Steamboat builder Fulton 49. Angular opening? 51. Like vicuas and llamas 52. Party spreads 53. Smiley or Smart 54. Nasal partitions 55. Play for time 59. Lackawanna's lak e 60. Spots for tacks 61. Radius neighbor 62. Hardly four-star cuisine 63. Catches some ray s 65. Occupational suffi x American Prole Hometown Content 8/28/2011 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 200 9 HtCtt 1 234 5617 481 81 4 9582 361 4 96 7459 1238 200 9 HtCtt 718 9523 6 4 359641728 426837519 861 523947 975164832 234798651 543 289176 687415293 192376485 H E W N A P S E P A T E A L A I S A N D A G E N L I S P S N A G S E P T T A H I T I P E A T E E N A G A T R O B E R W E N T I N T O T R I O P A H E L A N S T A L W I D E D A T E S E R I S C A B S S T A T T I E U T A E L E P HA N S H A D E S N E W I E T E L T H A T A N D E A A M A S S L I A R U L N C A M E O T O L D S L O O W O A Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com 681 Foreclosure Proceedings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000259 WELLSFARGOBANK,N.A.SUCCESSOR BYMERGERTOWELLSFARGOHOME MORTGAGE,INC.F/K/ANORWEST MORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, v. ROBERTM.FRETTERD;SHEILAD. FRETTERD;UNKNOWNTENANT1;UNKNOWNTENANT2;ANDALLUNKNOWN PARTIESCLAIMINGBY,THROUGH,UNDERORAGAINSTTHEABOVENAMED DEFENDANT(S),WHO(IS/ARE)NOT KNOWNTOBEDEADORALIVE, WHETHERSAIDUNKNOWNPARTIES CLAIMASHEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,LIENORS,CREDITORS,TRUSTEES,SPOUSES,OR OTHERCLAIMANTS;WELLSFARGO BANK, N.A. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Noticeisherebygiventhat,pursuanttothe SummaryFinalJudgmentofForeclosure enteredonJuly27,2011,andtheOrderReschedulingForeclosureSaleenteredon September6,2011,inthiscause,intheCircuitCourtofWakullaCounty,Florida,Iwill sellthepropertysituatedinWakullaCounty, Florida, described as: COMMENCEATACONCRETEMONUMENTMARKINGTHENORTHWESTCORNEROFTHESOUTHEASTQUARTEROF LOT49OFTHEHARTSFIELDSURVEY OFLANDSINWAKULLACOUNTY,FLORIDA.SAIDPOINTBEINGTHEPOINTOF BEGINNINGOFTHETRACTHEREINDESCRIBED,ANDRUNTHENCENORTH71 DEGREES59MINUTES20SECONDS EASTALONGTHENORTHBOUNDARY OFTHESOUTHHALFOFSAIDLOT, 54.16FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT,THENCERUNSOUTH03DEGREES43MINUTES13SECONDSEAST GENERALLYALONGACHAINLINK FENCE143.90FEETTOACONCRETE MONUMENT,THENCERUNSOUTH85 DEGREES35MINUTES25SECONDS WEST158.06FEETTOACONCRETE MONUMENTLYINGONTHEEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOFSTATE ROADNO.365,THENCERUNNORTH03 DEGREES18MINUTES15MINUTES15 SECONDSEASTALONGSAIDBOUNDARY109.79FEETTOACONCRETE MONUMENTMARKINGTHEINTERSECTIONOFSAIDEASTERLY RIGHTH-OF-WAYBOUNDARYWITHTHE NORTHERLYBOUNDARYOFTHE SOUTHHALFOFSAIDLOTNO.49, THENCERUNNORTH71DEGREES59 MINUTES20SECONDSEASTALONG SAIDNORTHERLYBOUNDARY95.07 FEETTOTHEPOINTOFBEGINNINGBEINGINTHESOUTHHALFOFLOTNO.49 OFHARTSFIELDSURVEYOFLANDSIN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 2781 SPRING CREEK HWY., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 atpublicsale,tothehighestandbestbidder,forcash,inthefrontlobbyoftheWakullaCountyCourthouselocatedat3056 CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL 32327,WakullaCounty,Florida,ateleven o'clock a.m., on October 13, 2011. Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendensmustfileaclaimwithing60daysafter the sale. DatedatCrawfordville,Floridathis7th,day of September, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sBECKY WHALEY AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court) September 22, 29, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION FILE NUMBER: 10-387CA DUANEEVANSLLC,aFloridaLimitedLiability Company, Plaintiff v. ANTOINETTEC.WALKER,a/k/aANTOINETTE C. WALKER-LIPPLETT, Defendant. AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION TO:ANTOINETTEC.WALKER,a/k/aANTOINETTEC.WALKER-LIPPLETT,ifalive, andifdead,herunknownspouse,heirs,devisees,grantees,judgmentcreditors,andall otherpartiesclaimingby,through,under,or ihhkhi pgy,g,, againstthem;theunknownspouse,heirs, devisees,grantees,andjudgmentcreditors ofdeceaseddefendant,andallotherparties claimingby,through,under,oragainstdefendant;andallunknownnaturalpersonsif alive,andifdeadornotknowntobedead oralive,theirseveralandrespectiveunknownspouses,heirs,devisees,grantees, andjudgmentcreditors,orotherparties claimingby,through,orunderthoseunknownnaturalpersons;andtheseveraland respectiveunknownassigns,successorsin interest,trustees,oranyotherpersonclaimingby,through,under,oragainstanycorporationorotherlegalentitynamedasadefendant;andallclaimants,personsorparties,naturalorcorporate,orwhoseexactlegalstatusisunknown,claimingunderthe abovenamedordescribeddefendantor claimingtohaveanyright,title,orinterestin tlle property, YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactiontoquiet taxtitletothefollowingpropertyinWakulla County, Florida: ThatpartofLot2inPlatfiledforrecordrepresentingtheWestone-halfofLot36,in HartsfieldSurveythatliesNorthofState Road 61 LESSANDEXCEPTthatparcelonthe NorthwestcornerofsaidLot2,identifiedas Tax Folio Number 00-00-036-000-09673-000 ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT: Commenceataplainconcretemonument markingthenorthwestcornerofLot36of theHartsfieldSurvey,WakullaCounty,Florida,andalsobeingthesouthwestcornerof ShadevilleSouth,aplattedsubdivisionof WakullaCounty,Florida,asrecordedinPlat Book3,Page19,ofthepublicrecordsof WakullaCounty,Florida;thencerunNorth 72degrees21minutes11secondsEast 262.78feetalongthesouthboundaryof saidsubdivisiontoanironrodandcap(LB &017)forthePOINTOFBEGINNING.From saidPOINTOFBEGINNINGcontinuealong saidsouthboundaryasfollows:North72 degrees21minutes11secondsEast37.30 feettoaconcretemonumentonsaidsouth boundary;thenceNorth72degrees21minutes06secondsEast413.84feettoaconcretemonument(LB4923)onsaidsouth boundary;thenceNorth72degrees20minutes40secondsEast124.78feettoaniron rodandcap(LB7017)onsaidsouthboundary;thenceleavingsaidsouthboundaryrun South17degrees31minutes23seconds East247.85feettoanironrodandcap(LB 7017)onthenortherlyrightofwayboundary ofStateRoadNo.61(ShadevilleRoad); thencealongsaidrightofwayboundaryrun South70degrees44minutes36seconds West476.17feettoa2inchdiameteriron pipe;thenceleavingsaidrightofway boundaryrunNorth17degrees31minutes 23secondsWest264.00feettothePOINT OF BEGINNING. Theabove-describedpropertyismoreparticularly described as: CommenceataconcretemonumentmarkingtheNorthwestcornerofLot36ofthe HartsfieldSurveyoflandsinWakulla County,Florida;thencerunalongtheWesterlyboundarylineofsaidLot36andalso theWesterlyboundarylineofLot2Peter GavinsEstateasrecordedinDeedBoo k 21Page75inthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,FloridaSouth16degrees58 minutes11secondsEast271.25feettoa re-barmarkingtheintersectionofsaid WesterlyboundarylinewiththeNortherly monumentedrightofwaylineofCounty Road#61(alsoknownasShadevilleRoad); thenceleavingsaidWesterlyboundaryline runalongsaidNortherlymonumentedright ofwaylineasfollows:North70degrees52 minutes39secondsEast265.25feettoan ironpipemarkingtheSoutheastcornerof propertydescribedinOfficialRecordBoo k 162Page1inthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,Florida,saidpointalsomarkingtheSouthwestcornerofpropertyasdescribedinOfficialRecordsBook527Page 476inthePublicRecordsofWakulla County,Florida;thencecontinuealongsaid Northerlymonumenteclrightofwayline, alsobeingtheSoutherlyboundarylineof saidpropertydescribedinOfficialRecord Book527Page476North70degrees46 minutes53secondsEast576.12feettoa rodandcapmarkingtheSoutheastcorner ofsaidpropertydescribedinOfficialRecord Book527Page476,saidpointbeingthe POINTOFBEGINNING;thenceleaving saidPOINTOFBEGINNINGcontinuealong saidNortherlymonumentedrightofwayline North70degrees47minutes29seconds East289.09feettoare-bar;thenceleaving saidNortherlymonumentedrightofwayline runNorth17degrees12minutes51secondsWest239.54feettoare-barlyingon theSoutherlyboundarylineofLot9of ShadevilleSouthSubdivisionasrecordedin PlatBook3Page19ofthePublicRecords ofWakullaCounty,Florida,alsobeingthe NortherlyboundarylineofHartsfieldSurvey Lot36;thencerunalongsaidSoutherly boundarylineofLot9ofShadevilleSouth SubdivisionandsaidNortherlyboundary lineofHartsfieldSurveyLot36South72degrees26minutes37secondsWest289.99 feettoarodandcapmarkingtheNortheast cornerofpropertydescribedinOfficialRecordBook527Page476inthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,Florida;thence leavingsaidSoutherlyandNortherlyboundarylinerunalongtheEasterlyboundaryline ofsaidpropertydescribedinOfficialRecord Book527Page476South17degrees27 minutes46secondsEast247.87feettothe POINTOFBEGINNING,containing1.62 acres, more or less. hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarereq uiredtoserveaco py of y ourwrittendeqpyy fenses,ifany,toitonGeorgeH.Gwynn, Esq.,theplaintiff'sattorney,whoseaddress isPostOfficeBox4128,Tallahassee,Florida,32315,onorbeforeOctober15,2011, andfiletheoriginalwiththeclerkofthis courteitherbeforeserviceontheplaintiff's attorneyorimmediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou forthereliefdemandedinthecomplaintor petition. DATED ON September 8th, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sBECKY WHALEY AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 22, 29, 2011 October 6, 13, 2011 682 Public Sales and Auctions NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART IV NoticeisgivenpursuanttoFloridaSelf-StorageFaciltiyAct,FloridaStatutes,Chapter 83,PartIVthatCrawfordvilleSelfStorage willholdasalebysealedbidonSaturday, October1,2011,at10:00a.m.at3291 CrawfordvilleHwy.ofthecontentsof Mini-Warehousecontainingpersonalproperty of: DEBRA DUNCAN ELENA WOHLFORD MARANDA COX BeforethesaledateofSaturday,October1, 2011,theownersmayredeemtheirpropertybyapaymentoftheoutstandingbalanceandcostbypayinginpersonat3291 Crawfordville Hwy. September 15, 22, 2011 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OnOctober26,2011,a1995FordF150, Vin:1FTEX14HOSKA95447,SuperCab Pickup,5.8LV8FIEngine,4wheeldrive,is beingsoldatpublicauctionatWilsons Towing,2741CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 10:00 a.m. September 22, 2011 683 Estate (Probate) Filings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 11-53PR PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF ELIZABETH L. STRICKLAND Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TheadministrationoftheestateofElizabeth L.Strickland,deceased,File11-53PRis pendingintheCircuitCourtforWakulla County,Florida,ProbateDivision,theaddressofwhichis3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,Florida32327.The nameandaddressofthepersonalrepresentativeandthepersonalrepresentatives attorney is set forth below. Allcreditorsofthedecedentandotherpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedentsestateincludingunmatured,contingentorunliquidatedclaims,onwhoma copyofthisnoticeisrequiredtobeserved mustfiletheirclaimswiththiscourtWITHIN THELATEROF3MONTHSAFTERTHE DATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATIONOF THISNOTICEOR30DAYSAFTERTHE DATEOFSERVICEOFACOPYOFTHIS NOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofthedecedentandpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedentsestate,includingunmatured,contingentorunliquidatedclaimsmustfiletheir claimswiththiscourtWITHIN3MONTHS AFTERTHEDATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMSNOTSOFILEDWILLBE FOREVER BARRED. Thisdateofthefirstpublicationofthisnotice is September 22, 2011. Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq. Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. 3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (850) 926-8245 Personal Representative: Diane S. Lynn 406 Oakwood Trail Crawfordville, Florida 32327 September 22, 29, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NUMBER: 11-52-P R IN RE: ESTATE OF: MARGARET EVELYN NICHOLS, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TheadministrationoftheestateofMARGARETEVELYNNICHOLS,deceased,File NO.11-52-PR,ispendingintheCircuit CourtforWakulla,Florida,ProbateDivision, theaddresswhichisCrawfordville,Florida. Thenamesandaddressesofthepersonal representativeandhisattorneyarelisted below. Allcreditorsofthedecedentandallother personshavingclaimsordemandsagainst decedentsestateonwhomacopyofthis noticeisrequiredtobeservedmustfiletheir claimswiththiscourtWITHINTHREE(3) MONTHSAFTERTHEDATEOFTHE FIRSTPUBLICATIONOFTHISNOTICE ORTHIRTYDAYSAFTERDATEOF SERVICEOFACOPYOFTHISNOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofdecedentandother personshavingclaimsordemandsagainst decedentsestatemustfiletheirclaimswith thiscourtWITHIN3MONTHSAFTERTHE DATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATIONOF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMSNOTFILEDWITHINTHE TIMEPERIODSSETFORTHINSECTION 733.702OFTHEFLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDINGTHETIMEPERIODS SETFORTHABOVE,ANYCLAIMSFILED TWOYEARSORMOREAFTERTHEDECEDENTSDEATHAREBARREDFOR EVER. Thedateofthefirstpublicationofthisnotice is September 15th, 2011. DAVID S. NICHOLS Personal Representative JOE B. WEEKS, ESQUIRE FLORIDA BAR IS NO. 0109522 16 B East Washington Street Quincy, Florida 32351 Phone: (850) 509-1002 Fax: (850) 875-431 3 Attorney for Personal Representativ e September 15, 22, 2011 684 Miscellaneous Notices MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON SEPTEMBER 12, 2011 Themeetingwascalledtoorderbythe Chairman.IngridFunderburkwasrecognizedasEmployeeoftheMonth.Lisa BrownandMelissa(Missy)RuddwererecognizedasTeachersoftheMonth.Allwere congratulatedandpresentedwithaplaque by Chairman Scott. ThePledgeofAllegiancewasrecitedwitha prayergivenbyMr.Evans.AllboardmembersandSuperintendentMillerwereinattendance. MovedbyMrs.Cook,secondedbyMr.Gray to approve the agenda. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Thefinalpublichearingonthe2011-12 budgetwasopenedat6:00p.m.Thepublic was given the opportunity to speak. MovedbyMr.Evans,secondedbyMr.Thomastoapprovethe2011-12Resolutionfor the0.25MillageforCriticalOperating Needs. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMrs.Cook,secondedbyMr.Gray toapprovetheResolutionDetermining RevenuesandMillagesLeviedfor 2011-2012. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Gray,secondedbyMr.ThomastoapprovetheResolutionadoptingthe Final Budget for 2011-12. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. SusanFlournoy,formerPrincipalofCoast, introducedAlyssaHigginsasthenew COAST Principal. KarenWellsgaveaPowerPointontheStudentSuccessAct.BethMimspresentedan update on District Accreditation. MovedbyMr.Evans,secondedbyMrs. Cooktoapprovethefollowingconsent items: 1.ApprovedMinutesoftheMeetingheldon August 18, 2011. 2.ApprovedthefollowingEmploymentof Personnel: New Hires: 12 Month Employee Name-Program/Center-Position-Termof Service Young,Melinda-RES-AssistantPrincip al09/01/11-06/30/12 9 1/2 Month Employee Name-Program/Center-Position-Termof Service Wells,James-WHS-ESEParaprofessional08/31/11-06/04/12 9 Month Employee Name-Program/Center-Position-Termof Service Carr,Mary-Transportation-BusAttendant 2011-2012 Smith,Charles-Transportation-BusAttendant 08/24/11-05/31/12 OtherPersonnel(includingtemporary,PT& currentemployeeshiredtoasecondposition) Name Program/CenterPosition-Term of Service Brooks,Terri-WHS-Teacher…TimeLimited08/11/11-10/14/11 Clemons, Katie TransportationOffice Assistant 08/18/11-05/31/12 Dyke, Marcilla TransportationGarage/White Fleet 08/18/11-05/31/12 Fell,Deborah-Pre-K/WEC-Teacher … Time Limited 08/12/11-11/30/11 Howard, Moses TransportationMechanic 08/18/11-05/31/12 Williams, MaryWMS-Custodian … Time Limited 08/22/11-06/30/12 Wilson,Lisa-Pre-K/WEC-OfficeHealth Aide … Time Limited 09/01/11-11/18/11 Wood, WhitneyWHSOfficeAssistant … Time Limited 08/31/11-09/30/11 Supplemental Positions: Name-Program/Center-Position-Termof Service Allen,Amber-RMS-VolunteerCoordinator 2011-2012 Bowerman,Marc-WHS-WKLASponsor2011-2012 Galladay, Amy WMS-Assistant Drama Sponsor 2011-2012 Galladay, AmyWMS-Volunteer Coordinator 2011-2012 Kyle,Bonnie-CES-VolunteerCoordinator 2011-2012 Nutting, SydneyRMSAssistant Track Coach 2011-2012 Panzarina, MichaelWHSPercussion Line 2011-2012 Peck,Lee-WMS-TextbookManager2011-2012 Rozar,James-RMS-AssistantBoysSoccer Coach 2011-2012 Russell,Cindy-MES-VolunteerCoordinator 2011-2012 Thompson, CherylWHS-FlagCorp Sponsor 2011-2012 Wells,James-RMS-Asst.BoysBasketball Coach 2011-2012 Wells,James-WHS-AssistantJVFootball Coach 2011-2012 3.ApprovedthefollowingLeaveofAbsence requests: WaltraudGrantham/effectiveSeptember7, 2011 for approximately six weeks ShawndaArnett/effectivethe2011-12 school year. 4.ApprovedaLetterofResignationon Elizabeth Michel/effective July 19, 2011. 5.ApprovedthefollowingLettersofRetirement: DorothyMcHenry/effectiveOctober1,2011 and enter DROP PatsyCalhoun/effectiveAugust1,2011and enter DROP. 6.ApprovedIllnessintheLineof Duty/FMLA. (See Supplemental File #21) 7.ApprovedBudgetAmendments#10/11 -20 thru 26. 8. Approved the Warrants for payment. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Thomas,secondedbyMr. Evanstoapprovethe2011-2012SchoolImprovementPlansandDistrictAssistance Plan. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Evans,secondedbyMr.ThomastoapprovetheElderCareServices, Inc., Foster Grandparent Program. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Thomas,secondedbyMr. EvanstoapprovetheAgreementforthe Multi-DistrictProgramfortheHearingImpairedbetweenWakullaandTaylorCounties. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMrs.Cook,secondedbyMr.Gray toapproveaResolutioninsupportofthe FloridaCenterforPerformingArtsandEducation. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Gray,secondedbyMr.ThomastoapprovetheWakullaCOASTCharter School Annual Financial Audit. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Gray,secondedbyMr.Evans toapprovetheNewObservationFormand theNewTeacherEvaluation…Section6 … TheAppraisalSystempendinganyupcoming changes. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Evans,secondedbyMrs. CooktoapprovethefollowingJobDescripi ppgp tions: 1.BusAttendance/VanDriver…revisedto include van driver 2.EmploymentSpecialistParaprofessional … revised 3. Career Pathway Specialist New Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Gray,secondedbyMrs.Coo k toapproveOutofFieldteachers.(SeeSupplemental File # 21) Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Gray,secondedbyMr.Evans toapprovethePAECMasterInservicePlan revisions. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMrs.Cook,secondedbyMr.ThomastoapprovetheSuperintendentsAnnualFinancialStatementfortheperiodending June 30, 2011. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Thomas,secondedbyMrs. CooktoapprovetheComprehensiveSafety Report for 2010-2011. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Thomas,secondedbyMr. Evanstoapprovethe2011-2012Wakulla CountySchoolBoardFive-YearDistrictFacilities Work Plan. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMrs.Cook,secondedbyMr.Thomas to adjourn. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. AnExecutiveSessionwasheldimmediately aftertheboardmeetingtodiscussissues pertainingtoCollectiveBargaining.Staff present:SuperintendentMiller,AllBoard Members,AssistantSuperintendent/Beth ODonnell,CFO/RandyBeach,Executive Director/KarenWellsandJerry Copeland/Chief Negotiator. September 22, 2011 687 Invitations to Bid Advertisement Detail WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES Request for Proposal No. 2011-22 Advertisement Begin Date/Time: September 9, 2011 at 8:00 a.m. BoardDecisionswillbeavailableat:3093 CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL 32327. SealedresponsesforInformationTechnologyServicesaddressedtotheWakulla CountyPurchasingCoordinator,at3093 CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL 32327willbereceiveduntil2:00p.m.on September29,2011,atwhichtimeallproposalswillbepubliclyopened.Anyresponsesreceivedafterthetimeanddate specifiedwillnotbeacceptedandshallbe returned unopened to the Proposer. Please direct all questions to: Deborah DuBose Phone: 850.926.9500, FAX: 850.926.9006 e-mail: ddubose@mywakulla.com RFPdocumentswillbeavailableat www.mywakulla.comorcanbepickedup atthelocationlistedaboveafter8:00a.m. on Friday, September 9, 2011. Anypersonwithaqualifieddisabilityrequiringspecialaccommodationsatthebid openingshallcontactpurchasingatthe phonenumberlistedaboveatleast5businessdayspriortotheevent.Ifyouare hearingorspeechimpaired,pleasecontact thisofficebyusingtheFloridaRelayServiceswhichcanbereachedat 1.800.955.8771 (TDD). TheBoardofCountyCommissionersreservestherighttorejectanyandallbidsor acceptminorirregularitiesinthebestinterest of Wakulla County. Mike Stewart, Chairman Deborah DuBose, OMB Coordinator September 15, 22, 2011 Classified Ads For As Little As $10/Week 926-7102

PAGE 26

Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com *Offer ends 12/31/2011. Offer and stated rates are available to new, “rst-time CenturyLink’ Prism’ TV residential customers in select areas only. The $65.95 monthly rate applies to up to 1.5 Mbps Pure Broadband and Prism’ TV package for six (6) months of service with a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months, after which standard rates apply. A $6.99 monthly DVR service fee applies when the Quad Play DVR is purchased with Prism’ TV package. Promotional offer cannot be c ombined with any other Prism offers. All prices, packages and programming are subject to change without notice. Taxes, fees, an d surcharges will apply. An additional monthly fee (including professional installation, if applicable) and a shipping and handling fee will apply to customers modem or router. Customer must cancel DVR and/or HD service by calling CenturyLink Customer Service before the end of the six-month promotional period to avoid monthly charges, or the standard mont hly rate for each service will apply until service(s) are cancelled. Offers may be limited to speci“c locations. General … Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them b y service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restric tions apply. Terms and Conditions … All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, local terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at http://about.centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges … Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply, including a Carrier Universal Service charge, National Access Fee surcharge, a one-time High -Speed Internet activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rate s. Call for a listing of applicable taxes, fees, and surcharge s. Monthly Rate for All Service Bundles … The monthly rate for all bundled services will apply while customer subscribes to all qualifying services. If one (1) or more s ervices are cancelled, the standard monthly fee will apply to each remaining service. Pure Broadband … Early termination results in customer being responsible for payment of the applicable monthly recurring service fee multiplied by the number of months remaining in the minimum service period, up to $200. Performance will vary due to conditions outside of netwo rk control and no speed is guaranteed. Telephone landline is part of the service only for the purpose of data traf“c transmissi on/connection and cannot be used for voice traf“c transmission, except for 911 services. CenturyLink’ Prism’ TV … All plans require separate local phone service plan and include digital channels (including local channels), one (1) set-top bo x, one (1) modem gateway, and up to four (4) standard direct video streams to residence. CenturyLink-provided set-top boxes are required to view TV. If a term agreement applies to the offer, an early termination fee in the amount of discounts received applies if customer terminates services before the end of the appl icable term agreement. Local channel availability varies by market. Caller ID service must be purchased separately to enable th e on-screen Caller ID feature; Caller ID feature is not available in all areas. High De“nition (HD) available on all TV plans f or an additional $11.99/month, and up to two (2) of the up to four (4) video streams can be in HD. Customers location determines both HD availability and the maximum number of HD video streams (between 0 and 2 HD streams) a customer can view and record at any one time per residence, regardless of the number of set-top boxes (STBs) in the household. All non-HD video streams are provided in standard de“nition. Subscription to service precludes customers from purchasing high-speed Internet services from any third party. Additional charges will apply fo r additional programming packages, movie channel subscriptions (except for Prism’ Premium plan), Pay Per View movies and events On Demand purchases, and premium services/subscriptions for all plans. Some subscription services, events, and broadcast netw ork service may be blacked out in customers area. Customer may dial 67 (touchtone) or 1167 (rotary) prior to placing a call to block their calling information. In order for media sharing to opera te correctly customer must have Windows XP or VISTA and Windows Media Player 11. Equipment … Minimum equipment and CenturyLink professional installation are required. At initial installation, each customer receives: one (1) VDSL 2 modem; up to six (6) STBs (standard plan includes one (1) STB; additional STBs are available for an additional monthly r ate, per STB); and one (1) remote control per STB installed. All equipment must be returned to designated CenturyLink retail st ore within thirty (30) days after service disconnection in an undamaged condition, or customer is charged for each equipment pi ece not returned or returned as damaged. Prism’ TV Plan … Quad Play DVR service excluded and is available for an additional monthly fee. X-Men First Class … 2011 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. All Rights Reserved. X-Men, all character names and their dis tinctive likenesses: TM & 2011 Marvel Entertainment, LLC and its subsidiaries. All Rights Reserved. 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of th eir respective owners.NOW YOU HAVE A BETTER TV CHOICE. CenturyLinkTM PrismTMFind-It-Fast Navigation Find what you want to watch in a ”ash. Search for shows by actor, title and category. Interactive DashboardFind local news, weather, gas prices and personal info … right on your TV. PrismTM TV Pure Broadband brilliant TV pure speed + Its exactly the same as your TV now … it has the same shows, it does the same stuff … only more. A lot more. Prism has interactive features like a real Whole Home DVR, Find-It-Fast Navigation, Warp Speed Channel Change and an Interactive Dashboard. Whole Home DVRNow you can start a recorded show in 1 the Whole Home DVR. Even watch and record up to 4 shows at once with a single DVR. Not to mention, you can manage your DVR library, set recordings and reminders, and customize your online guide from any Internet-enabled PC. Call 866.484.7057



PAGE 1

By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County Commission held its second public hearing on the proposed budget at its Sept. 19 meeting, and unlike past meetings, the public had nothing to say. The commission approved the budget unanimously for the upcoming year which includes a millage rate of 8.5, .25 mills lower than the previous year. The commission was hoping the lower property tax would help ease some of the burden of the other taxes that have either been added or increased. These include the $196 solid waste assessment, 7 percent Public Service Tax, increase in Communications Service Tax to 5.22 percent and increase in re protection assessment to $75 per household. Commissioner Mike Stewart said he was pleased the county was able to lower the millage and get spending back to the 200506 level. The total budget for the county is $42,901,664. To be able to reduce the millage rate, there was an need for an additional $257,285 in cuts. To obtain those cuts, the board reduced travel for circuit court judge and an OPS position for a total of $11,000, as well as eliminating the $49,680 used to pay for the leasing the Sheriffs Of ce annex building, which houses the Criminal Investigative Division and Road Patrol Division. The lease was up for that building on Oct. 1, so that division will be moved to the Community Center until the commission comes up with a permanent location. Continued on Page 5A By JO ANN PALMERDirector, KWCBSaturday was the perfect day for the 26th Annual International Ocean Conservancy Coastal Cleanup. The morning was overcast and breezy and by the afternoon festivities, the clouds had cleared to a beautiful sunny blue sky. When I opened the gates at Woolley Park in Panacea around 7:15 a.m., I was a little nervous about what to expect since this was my rst coastal cleanup as director of KWCB. There were a father and daughter from Tallahassee already waiting for the gate to be unlocked. It didnt take long with them helping me to unload the boxes of supplies and prepare for the arrival of the 384 preregistered participants we were expecting at 8 a.m. at the park. Just as the sun came up, Bruce Ashley, secretary of KWCB, and Richard Russell, general manager of Crawfordville Wal-Mart, arrived and started the grill to cook lunch, which was sponsored by Wal-Mart. They would eventually cook 850 hotdogs for the participants. The WCSO work crew, along with volunteer Marc Dickieson, filled coolers with Pepsi products donated by Refreshment Services Pepsi and opened boxes of snacks donated by Flowers Bakery and Wal-Mart. As people began arriving, our volunteers got participants signed up, gave them trash bags, pickers, gloves and showed them directions to an area to clean, sending them on their way. We had Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts, Maclay School students, Chiles High School students, NJROTC cadets from Wakulla High School, Friends of Wakulla Springs, students from the Of ce of Student Volunteerism at TCC, Wakulla County 4-H clubs, families and individuals patiently wait to be given their assignment and instructions. That scene was being repeated around the county at the ve other sites: St. Marks Refuge, Bottoms Road, St. Marks at the Wakulla River Park, Mashes Sands and Shell Point. Around 10:30 a.m., people began returning to Woolley Park and arriving from other cleanup areas, proud of what they had accomplished. WEIGH YOUR BUTTS Shelley Swenson was busy confirming that the groups bringing in the cigarette butts got them tagged and properly weighed for the Weigh Your Butts contest. Each year this contest draws participation from almost every group. The butts must be picked up off the ground on the day of the event to be considered eligible for the $100 cash award. The winning group picked up four pounds of butts. Cigarette butts are the most collected item worldwide during this event. We had a total of eight pounds collected on Saturday. DUMPSTERS FILL The dumpster provided by Waste Pro began to ll with old tires, a piece of an abandoned boat, plastic bags, shing line, diapers, food wrappers, beverage containers, hundreds of pounds of household garbage. The KWCB recycle trailer took on hundreds of pounds of glass bottles, cardboard, plastic bottles and aluminum cans. By the end of the day, the dumpster was completely full. Continued on Page 16A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 38th Issue Thursday, September 22, 2011 Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 CentsThe WakullanewsInside This Week Public Notices ..............Page 3A Comment & Opinion ....Page 4A Church..........................Page 6A Community....................Page 7A School...........................Page 8A Sports ..................Pages 9, 10A In The Huddle ............Page 11A Outdoors ...................Page 12A Water Ways...............Page 13A Sheriffs Report ..........Page 15A EXTRA! .........................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..........Page 2B Classi eds ....................Page 7B Legal Notices ...............Page 8B Published Weekly, Published Weekly, Read Daily Read Daily Board OKs $42M budgetPHOTO BY AMY JARMON/Special to The News PHOTO BY JO ANN PALMER/SPecial to The NewsClean up timeSaturday was the 26th annual Coastal CleanupCOUNTY COMMISSION HELPING HANDS: Volunteers pick up trash at the Bottoms Road boat ramp in Panacea. Hundreds of volunteers turned out on Saturday for the Coastal Cleanup held at sites all over the county.Assistance program for poor modi edBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe County Commission approved charging a solid waste assessment of $196 to all dwelling units at its Sept. 6 meeting. Also included was a hardship assistance program, which has since been modi ed. Originally this assistance program was available to those property owners whose income didnt exceed 80 percent of the median income of Wakulla County as de ned by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, which is $65,100. This meant a two-person household that made less than $38,300 would be exempt. The commission had estimated that less than 100 households would qualify for hardship assistance. After it was determined that number would be much higher than the commission anticipated, it decided to change it from low income to very low. A family of two that makes less than $23,950 will now be exempt. For one person that income level is $20,950. For three people it is $26,950. Four-person household is $29,900, veperson is $32,300, six-person us $34,700, seven-person is $37,100 and eight-person is $39,500. There is also a vacancy adjustment program that is now included. During public hearings on the solid waste assessment, the commission said it felt there should be a compassionate appeals process for special cases. An example was a woman who approached the board during the hearing and said there were two homes on her property, but she was the caregiver for her father and so there was actually only one household. The board felt for her and said she was a special case and should only be charged for one assessment. The vacancy adjustment program allows for property owners to apply for a refund by providing documentation that no electrical or utility services were provided to the property. These refunds will be paid from a portion of the proceeds the county gets from the franchise fee, which is set aside to monitor the closed land lls. The hardship assistance program also applies to the re MSBU, but it is too late for people to apply for that exemption. Those wishing to apply for solid waste assistance must complete an application and turn it into the county administration by Oct. 15. The original deadline was Oct. 1, but Commissioner Lynn Artz said it was extended to give residents more time. Following this year, property owners will have to apply before June 1 every year to qualify for the exemption in both solid waste and re MSBU. For more information, call the county at 926-0919 or visit their website at www. mywakulla.com.$196 SOLID WASTE ASSESSMENT OLDEST, YOUNGEST: Volunteers at Saturdays Coastal Cleanup included Alice Veasman, 90, the oldest person participating, while Josiah Sorenson, 7 months old, was the youngest.10,200 The number of pounds of trash and debris collected Saturday.560 The number of local volunteers.8 The weight in pounds of cigarette butts picked up by volunteers this year. It is the mostcollected item picked up worldwide during the cleanup.$100 Amount of award given out to winning group for picking up the most cigarette butts for the Weigh Your Butts contest. The group picked up four pounds of butts. AMY JARMONMost unusual item found during the Cleanup? A partial pair of dentures.Coastal Cleanup by the numbers County commission establishes hardship exemptions for lower income residents. For a two-person home, the income level would be less than $38,300 It is estimat ed that fewer than 100 households would qualify for the exemption Commissioners lower the millage to 8.5 mills to o set new fees, such as the garbage assessment, and Public Services Tax and increase in re MSBU School board approves its millage and budget. See Page 8A More on the county commission inside: Fire MSBU increases to $75 Workshop held on subdivision roads See Page 2A Girls win Lincoln Invitational, See Page 9A n Trash service answers, See Page 1B

PAGE 2

Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter discussing the issue for months, the County Commission nally came to a conclusion regarding the requirement needed for the county to accept roads in subdivisions. At a previous meeting, the commission had decided to change the policy and require subdivisions to have a 90percent buildout threshold before the county would accept the roads because of possible damage that could be done during construction. The commission then decided it wanted to hold a workshop to discuss the issue further. In May, the commission held a workshop and decided to leave it alone and keep what is currently in place. Currently, all developers are required to warranty all paved roads in subdivisions for two years after that subdivision is approved. When the warranty expires, the Road and Bridge Department will examine the roads for approval. Any de ciencies found need to be corrected in order to be accepted for county maintenance. The developer or homeowners association can then petition the county to accept maintenance of the facility. However, following that meeting, the commission said it wanted to see other options and the costs involved with accepting the roads. The commission couldnt reach an agreement and then decided to hold another workshop. At the workshop held on Sept. 8, the commission decided not to touch current subdivisions, but for the new ones, a buildout of 80 percent will be required. I want some protection for the county, said County Commissioner Mike Stewart. Commissioner Randy Merritt said he felt if the roads are built to county standards, they should be accepted. Commissioner Lynn Artz liked the option of accepting the roads, but instituting an MSBU for that area which would cover maintenance and future capital costs. County Attorney Heather Encinosa said a policy could be put in place that an MSBU could be charged on a case by case basis if capital costs were necessary. Artz said she liked the policy idea and to let the subdivisions know that it could happen. However, the commission agreed they liked the 80-percent buildout requirement for those new subdivisions. Thats what we originally approved, Artz said. Merritt said he feft 80 percent was reasonable. This criteria will come before the board at a future meeting for approval. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAt the Sept. 6 Wakulla County Commission meeting, the commission agreed to raise the assessment for the re protection services or MSBU from $61 to $75 per year per household. Last year, the commission decreased the MSBU from $65 to $61 and moved the salaries for the paid re ghters into the MSBU fund. Since that time, several re- ghters have expressed the need for the MSBU to be increased. Firefighter David Harrison said last year the volunteer re departments experienced a loss of 66 percent. We dont have the funds where we can operate, Harrison said. He added that $75 was great, but even more was needed. Ochlockonee Bay Fire Chief Bill Russell said because of the decrease last year, the $75 wont get the re department back to where it was before. He added that more re ghters are joining and there is not enough equipment for them. The assessment includes an increase from 5 cents per square foot for non-residential to 6 cents. Land will be changed from 14 cents per acre to 17 cents. The commission voted unanimously to increase the MSBU. In other matters: The commission voted four to one, with Commissioner Lynn Artz opposing, to approve the employment agreement with incoming County Administrator David Edwards. His base salary is $82,830. Also included is participation in the Florida Retirement System, paid holidays, health insurance, take home vehicle and cell phone. Artz said she felt with the current budget, Edwards shouldnt get a 10-percent raise above the minimum base salary and what Interim County Administrator Tim Barden currently gets paid. At this meeting, the commission also decided to move part of the sheriffs of ce that is currently located in the annex building to the Community Center. The Apalachee Center informed the sheriff that the lease expired Aug. 1 and could not be renewed. The building needed to be vacated by Oct. 1. That building housed the Road Patrol and Criminal Investigation divisions. Artz was hoping to not use the Community Center, but put them in portables instead, until a permanent location was determined. Artz said if they move into the Community Center it could delay the remodeling and renovations that the county is planning, as well as the county being able to offer programs to the community in the meantime. The county is currently in discussions with Capital Area YMCA to run programs at the Community Center and have said placing the sheriffs of ce there could inhibit the programs they would be able to offer because of the lack of space. Commissioner Alan Brock said, I want to see it used as a community center. However, he added that with current budget restraints, this may be the best option for now. Artz was also concerned about having enough time to use the money the county received from a legislative appropriation for the center because it needs to be used by Sept. 2013. Commissioner Jerry Moore said the county has a building it is trying to nd a use for and this is an option. Artz said, We have a use for it. We know what we want to do. Now weve got a monkeywrench in the works. Brock said he was OK with putting those divisions in the community center, but wanted a timeline of when they will move out. The commission agreed to move those divisions and also look at costs to build a building for them or rent another space. The next commission meeting is Oct. 3 at 5 p.m.County commission votes to increase Fire MSBU to $75Workshop on subdivision roads leaves board looking for options e tax assessment for re services increases from $61 o $75. Fire ghters say more is needed e lease on the building being used as o ce space by sheri s detectives is terminated so the county decides to move them into the Community Center to save money. One commissioner says thats a monkeywrench in the works for using the center Commissioners consider setting a policy requiring an 80-percent buildout of a subdivision before accepting the roads Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 3095 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 Friday f September 30 6:30pm 8:30pm 4679 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FLwww.EdenSpringsRehab.comEden Springs Nursing and Rehab( 850 ) 926-7181uNewly updated uRenovated roomsuExcellent in-house therapy stauCMS 4-Star ratedCome by for a tour and see our 4-star rated facility and services!REHABRECOVERENJOY LIFE! Everyone is invited to attend ourSecond Annual Senior Prom A Well-Kept Secret Where Youll Experience The Personal Touch. AuctionOWNEDPROPERTIESMobileHome ParkCommercialAssetsSingleFamilyHomesLandCommercial &Residential SATSEPTEMBER2411:00AM www.AuctionFDIC.comCallForFREEBrochure866.518.9064FLRECQ1035357;AUAB110ManySellingABSOLUTE!TallahasseeCivicCenter FLRECQ1035357;AUAB110 GolfCourseNoBuyers Premium!BrokersProtectedIncluding LOCALPROPERTIES inFlorida&GeorgiaCounties:DIXIEFRANKLINGADSDENLEON WAKULLACOUNTIES,FL& THOMASCOUNTY,GA50Commercial&Residential NORTHFLORIDAProperties OCWEN

PAGE 3

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By SGT. THOMAS KIELBASAFlorida National Guard Public AffairsCAMP BLANDING JOINT TRAINING CENTER, Fla. (Sept. 20, 2011) A wildlife study at the National Guards training post in North Florida may soon give biologists insight into one of the states most intriguing inhabitants. The two-year study of Florida black bears at Camp Blanding Joint Training Center near Starke began this summer, and will be looking into the movement patterns and behavioral habits of the omnivorous mammals on the military site. The study is a partnership between the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and Camp Blanding, and may help answer questions about what appears to be an expanding bear population at the 72,000-acre training site. We want to see what the bears are doing here on Blanding, because we are seeing more and more bears everywhere, the camps environmental manager Paul Catlett explained. Ive got guys who have worked here for 35 years, and in the last ve years have seen their rst bear... Is it the fact that there are more bears now or the fact that they are losing habitat? Catlett, who lives on the post and has been working there for 17 years, said he thinks there are just more bear sightings because the population of the animals has gradually increased. He said sightings can spike when their habitats are encroached upon by development, but that doesnt appear to be the case at Blanding. A robust bear population on the post could mean the habitat here is strong and healthy, Catlett said. As a land manager I want to know that were doing the right things; that were having a positive influence, he said. Its possible this is a sign that the habitat is strong and were doing the right things here. Black bears are the only species of bear found in Florida, and the FWC estimates there are between 2,500 and 3,000 black bears in the state. Adult bears weigh between 125 to 450 pounds, and can be found anywhere in Florida. The study itself is simple: biologists and volunteers place specialized tracking collars on the bears and follow their movements around the area via radio signals. The movements are plotted on a map with a latitude and longitude point for each signal, letting the team see when the bears move and where exactly they go. Getting the collars on the wild animals is a much more complicated matter. The study-team pinpoints high bear-traf c areas on Camp Blanding, sets snares at the sites, and places scent lures (usually glazed donuts or fabric soaked in bacon fat) around the area. When a curious bear sniffs his way to the site and gets caught in the snare, a radio signal lets the team know it has a catch. The captured bear is then tranquilized, weighed tagged and tted with the tracking collar. We can respond quickly, dart them and get them out of the snare, explained Walter McCown, an FWC research biologist who specializes in bears. After an hour or two the bear wakes up from the effects of the tranquilizer and is sent back into the forest. These collars are actually quite sophisticated, McCown explained. They will acquire positions from GPS satellites and report the positions through a text message to a ground base on my computer. We dont have to follow them around. Well be getting 24 to 27 locations a day, which we will use to identify travel-ways for bears. The collared bear will get used to the device around its neck after a couple of days, McCown said. The thick leather collar weighs less than four pounds with the attached battery pack, and is programmed to drop off the bears neck after about two years. McCown and the study group have already identi- ed and collared ve bears on Camp Blanding, and have collared an additional two bears that were off the post. Five of the bears were males the largest male captured weighed 320 pounds. The FWC is receiving data from each collar and sharing the results with two local schools to help educate children and dispel misconceptions about the animals. Many people in Florida are surprised we actually have bears here, said McCown, who has been studying the mammals for 15 years. They are not aware of it, although bears are becoming more of an issue in this state, he said. I think part of my mission is to spread information about how neat bears are, how to live with bears, and the value of preserving and maintaining the bear populations in the state. Another result of the ongoing study may clear up a bit of a mystery surrounding the bear population on Camp Blanding; it could explain why the black bears at the base all seem to have migrated from Ocala National Forest about 25 miles away. Since the training base sits midway in a natural corridor between the sprawling Ocala National Forest to the south and the smaller Osceola National Forest to the north, biologists might expect to nd bears from both forests at Camp Blanding. However, according to Catlett a previous study of the Blanding bear population found that it shared DNA exclusively with the Ocala bears. Both Catlett and McCown said the data from this current study may help determine if the Ocala or Osceola bears are avoiding certain areas during their movements or are deterred by speci c roads or other obstacles to travel between the two forests. The data could possibly be used to help connect parcels of land to facilitate the bear movement and create additional conservation easements if warranted. Based on initial data McCown said he thinks there are only a few resident bears on Camp Blanding, but other bears pass through regularly due to their penchant for the thick bottomland hardwood and well-preserved swampy areas of the post.Black bear study is underway at Camp BlandingThe wildlife study at the National Guard training facility may yield insight into black bear behavior SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBlack bears are captured in snares, then tranquilized so they can be tted with radio transmitters that will allow scientists to track their movements. Here a small bear is measured. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS CONCERNING TEXT AMENDMENT TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENTThe Wakulla County Planning Commission and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, October 10, 2011 beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, November 7, 2011 beginning at 5:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony.Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 3095 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.1. Application for Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment: CP11-05 Applicant:Ben C. Boynton Proposal:transmittal of FLUE SAP #1 text amendment Hearings Required: Planning Commission Monday, October 10, 2011 @ 7:00 PM County Commission Monday, November 7, 2011 @ 5:00PM SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS The Wakulla County Planning Commission proposes to consider the following applications. A Public Hearing is scheduled regarding the following before the All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony.Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 3095 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962. SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 1. Application for Conditional Use: CU11-06 Applicant:New Life Ministries of Crawfordville, Inc. Agent:Barry Wilson Proposal:to allow use as a church Tax ID Number:Part of 36-3s-02w-000-01764-004 Existing FLU Map:Urban 1 (FLUE Policy 1.2.5) Existing Zoning:RR -1 (Section 5-27, LDC) FEMA Flood Info:C zone on Panel 0225-B Parcel Size:5.0+/acres Location:Arran Road, west of the old Post Ofce site Hearings Required:Planning Commission: Monday, October 10, 2011@ 7:00 PM Staff Member:Somer Strickland, Planner WAKULLAS FLOODPLAIN Flooding can threaten at any time of the year from various sources. Wakulla County regulates construction and development in the oodplain to ensure that buildings will be protected from ood damage. All developments in the oodplain, not just construction of buildings, need permits. Filling and similar work are prohibited in certain areas, so check with the Planning and Community Development Department before you begin a project. Should unauthorized development in the oodplain be witnessed by a citizen, they can report it to the Countys Code Enforcement Ofce at (850) 926-7636. It is also important to know that houses in the oodplain that are substantially damaged by re or ood must be repaired to new construction standards. This includes elevating the structure to or above the base ood elevation when they are repaired. Damage is considered to be substantial when the cost of reconstruction equals or exceeds 50% of the buildings market value. When damage of this type occurs to a structure and repairs are necessary, visit the Planning and Community Development Department for a Development Permit Application to begin your permitting process. A recorded warranty deed and site plan, showing the improvements/repairs to the property, will be required to complete this Application. Once obtained from Planning and Zoning, the Development Permit Application should be submitted to the Building Division for permitting. Depending upon the types of work performed additional materials will be requested from the Building Division to complete the permitting of repairs to the structure. Applicable fees are due for Development Permit Applications and Building Division permits, unless otherwise waived by the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners for widespread storm damage. For further information on these topics contact the Planning and Community Development Department at (850) 926-3695. SEPTEMBER 22, 2011

PAGE 4

Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out Comment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Staff Writer/Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ......................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising/Photographer: Lynda Kinsey .................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Bookkeeping/Circulation: Sherry Balchuck .......accounting@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Ray Gray is fired by county Board approves $196 garbage fee Coastal Cleanup draws big crowdthewakullanews.comEditor, The News: Lately, there doesnt seem to be a lot of news to be cheery about and more often than not, its much easier to gripe than to complement. But there are times that we also need to stop and hand out kudos to elected of cials for making hard but smart choices. This past Monday, three Commissioners stood up for Wakullas wetlands in the face of a serious threat to diminish or even eliminate local protections. So thank you to Chairman Mike Stewart, and fellow Commissioners Lynn Artz and Alan Brock for standing strong and showing leadership. Those of us who have fought (and griped) over the years to save wetlands can greatly appreciate your collective vote. At a time when state and federal oversight and protections are seriously waning from seemingly all angles, now is not the time to capitulate on local provisions to protect our wetlands. We need our local government and elected of cials to remain strong in protecting our waters and the environment, not push aside protections so we can mow through the last remaining swamps and cypress stands. Also, many thanks to my fellow citizens out there who care so deeply for Wakulla and her environment. We have a tough few years, or more, ahead in not letting what happened in South Florida, and Atlanta, happen to our nature-based beautiful Wakulla home. Wakullas wetlands live for another day, thanks to you and our three commissioners. Chad Hanson Mysterious Waters Sue Damon wrote a letter in last weeks Wakulla News imploring citizens to come out to the county commission meeting on Sept. 19 to voice their opinion about the wetlands ordinance. Damon later sent an email asking that a paragraph urging them to come to the meeting be removed, but because of a misunderstanding, the paragraph ran. anks, board, for support of wetlandsEditor, The News: There are still a few art vendor and education spaces available at Florida Wild Mammals Woodstork Festival. The event will be held on Saturday, Oct. 8, at 3Y Ranch in Crawfordville from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Applications can be found on our website, www. woodstorkfestival.com. Unfortunately all of our food and beverage spaces have already been taken. Florida Wild Mammal Association would like to invite you to join us and make this day a tremendous success. All proceeds from Woodstork will be used to help care for injured and orphaned wildlife from our local area. The event features great musicians, a huge silent auction, a live auction that will run from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., local businesses and artists, fun for the kids, photo contest, raf e, and a cake walk. You can stroll around and visit some of our talented artists and their wares. Not to be missed are the extraordinary photo contest entries, and great beer and tasty food from our best restaurants are always a hit. Its a really fun day for all so put it on your calendars. Thank you for your support, we couldnt do it without you, and we look forward to seeing you there! Thanks so much, Chris Beatty FWMA Editor, The News: Comments made before the Board of County Commissioners: The citizens of our County elect the Wakulla Board of County Commissioners. The Board is supposed to promote the general good and follow the laws of county, state and country. It is a true pleasure to witness the Board when they seriously attempt to resolve an issue and to work out the best solution, while respectfully considering citizens input. Unfortunately, that seldom happens. The Board seems to think that ignoring or muzzling the very citizens who elected them will make the problems go away. Example One: When citizens made requests of all ve commissioners to pull an item off the consent agenda so that the citizens could address the Board about it, not one commissioner asked that this be done. (It takes just one commissioner to do this.) Example Two: When citizens pointed to problems in purchasing policy, the commissioners quickly adjourned a meeting that was scheduled to discuss that very issue. Example Three: When citizens documented ethical problems in county government, their concerns were summarily dismissed. One commissioner said in a public meeting that he threw the documentation in the trash. And there are many more examples. Because of the countys dire fiscal situation, the Board has required many employees to take unpaid furlough days, which resulted in a pay cut of more than 20 percent. At the same time the Board has authorized raises for other employees. The Board either ignored or attacked citizens who pointed this out. It is the Boards responsibility to ensure that county staffers do their work legally and properly. It is not enough to refer citizens to the Ethics Commission, which at least one commissioner has advised when problems were pointed out. The Board has the responsibility to investigate and act on the information brought to it by the citizens. Our government has lasted for more than 200 years because citizens have been vigilant, speaking up when government goes astray. Commissioners please listen to and consider what your constituents have to say. In doing so we can create a better Wakulla County for all. Howard Kessler Panacea Editor, The News: The state Department of Community Affairs will no longer exist in Florida after this year. A recent editorial in the Tampa Tribune noted that half the planning staff was laid off and the remaining members of the planning agency would become part of the new Department of Economic Opportunity. This change heralds a shift in Floridas approach to growth management. The so-called Hometown Democracy amendment appeared on the state ballot in November 2010 but failed to pass. The proposed constitutional amendment, also known as the Florida Comprehensive Land Use Plans, Amendment 4, and technically titled Referenda Required For Adoption And Amendment of Local Government Comprehensive Land Use Plans was subject to much political spin and a major public relations campaign on both sides of the issue. The election of Gov. Scott and the in uence of a Republican-majority Legislature would soon prevail where the ballot initiative fell short. The checks and balances on local governments have been weakened and the doors appear to have been opened wide to developers. What does this mean where I live in Wakulla? It seems to mean that changes to our county comprehensive plan are on the table. One proposed amendment appears to be a lifting or reduction of the current buffer zone contained in the existing wetlands protection ordinance. In 2010, Wakulla County was lauded by Audubon of Florida for enacting progressive wetlands protection. The ordinance passed by Wakulla County Commissioners was designed to help protect the wetlands that make the area ecologically sensitive and an attraction to those who love natural Florida. The new law created a 75-foot buffer zone around the wetlands of Wakulla County. According to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the rst 35-feet of the buffer is required to limit impact and allows only for minimal activities such as a dock or trail with an allowance for normal or customary hunting and shing activities. The second 40-foot band would permit only those additional activities with minimal impacts. The ordinance also included a minimum building footprint lot size to ensure future property owners suf cient dry land for homes and businesses. With the decimation of the DCA accomplished and a proposal to amend Wakullas comprehensive land use plan under discussion, I have lines from an old Dr. Seuss classic, The Lorax, repeating in my head: They say Im old-fashioned, and live in the past, but sometimes I think progress progresses too fast! Please! I object in the name of the trees! Sometimes what passes for progress isnt exactly progressive. So, to paraphrase, who does speak for the trees? In this case, who speaks for the wetlands, where trees and so many other things grow? Maybe the Northwest Florida Water Management District (NWFWMD) does? The Water Management Districts have come under re this year too, with funding cuts and other reductions in scope. These special districts, created by Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, are charged with protecting and managing the water resources of Florida in a sustainable manner for the continued welfare of its residents and natural systems. Wakulla falls within the boundaries of the Northwest Florida district. Inherent in this statutory mandate to manage water resources is the protection, preservation, restoration and enhancement of wetlands within NWFWMD boundaries. According to the NWFWMD website, wetlands are vital to the economic and ecological welfare of the watershed, providing a broad array of functions and services for environmental resources and human communities including: Water quality protection, improvement and groundwater recharge; Shoreline stability, ood protection and moderation of sur face water runoff; Ecological integrity including support for natural systems; Promotion of a natural resource economy including commercial, aesthetic and recreational bene ts. I think we need to be pushing green sustainable development in Wakulla. I grasp that it is initially cheaper to develop without environmentally conscious restrictions. However, in the long term, a more visionary approach to growth can yield a good return on an environmentally sound project. I think it is possible to be green while increasing the kind of green people can carry in their wallets, too. Wakulla County could be promoting green development as well as the Green Guides program. If we dont take care of our wetlands, there may not be much green left in Wakulla to warrant any sort of guide program in future years. Which county commissioners are pushing to weaken the wetlands ordinance? This might be a good week to call or email them and ask each one about his or her stance on this issue. The question in the coming weeks remains, Who will speak for the wetlands? Rachel Sutz Pienta Chair Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee Editors Note: At the Sept. 19 commission meeting, the board voted not to change the comprehensive plan. Editor, The News: Those of you with kids are probably feeling the current difficult economy the most. Many parents are putting off having kids in the recession because of the costs involved with feeding, clothing, housing, health care and educating a child all the essentials. But wait, there is another important essential. Research tells us that providing opportunities for children is as essential to their healthy development as good nutrition and a good education and all the things already named. So what do you do when your budget is just short of enough money to pay for a sports team uniform, or league fee, or camp, or dance recital or music lesson, or shoes that go with the uniform? The Wakulla County Coalition for Youth may be able to help. The Wakulla County Coalition for Youth is a partnership of folks focused on the healthy development of Wakulla youth. The Coalition and its more than 30 organizational members continually seeks ways to positively impact the lives of children in our community. Through donations by Capital City Bank, a reserve fund has been set aside that is devoted exclusively to help with the kinds of participation and associated costs described above. These funds are for Wakulla youth. If you nd yourself short, and you have a child that wants to participate in a team sport or other organized activity, please contact the Coalition by calling 926-3526. In that call, you will be asked to complete a short application that will be reviewed by a coalition committee. Dont let your child miss out on opportunities to experience a pro-social development activity. Its a Community Thing. Bruce Ashley President WCCY e youth coalition wants to helpStill vendor spaces available for Woodstork Who would speak for wetlands?Editor, The News:The Wakulla News reported in the issue of Sept. 15, that Commission Chairman Mike Stewart stated he is disgusted with the attempted character assassination against Pam Portwood, the director of the Wakulla County Tourist Development Council. Further, he alleges that citizens voicing concerns over the County and the TDCs handling of County tax dollars are witchhunting. The de nition of witch-hunt, according to the dictionary is de ned as an investigation carried out ostensibly to uncover subversive activities but actually used to harass and undermine those with differing views. Also in this article, Commissioner Stewart goes on to state that, Some good came out of these concerns because administrative errors were pointed out. The so-called witch-hunt did produce evidence of improprieties which he chose to categorize as administrative errors which the commission then chose to forgive with retroactive action and approvals to pay grant expenditures and contract noncompliance with after-the-fact approvals! Again, I ask, where is this witch hunt? Who is assassinating character here?! Had these so called witch-hunters not conducted the investigation and involved the Clerk of the Courts Of ce, would Chairman Stewart, the TDC, BOCC or administrative staff own up to the discrepancies and sloppy administrative practices? Truthfully, probably not, since time after time over the past several years citizens have repeatedly brought to the BOCC and administrative staffs attention a variety of similar administrative errors. Nothing has ever been done to remedy the practices and no one has ever been held accountable. So commissioners, why should anyone comply with rules and procedures if they know that you will do exactly as you did on Sept. 6, and reward wrongdoing with praise and compensation, then punish citizen tax payers for exercising their inalienable right and duty to question their government of- cials and demand accountability? What is wrong with this picture? Further, in this case, no one is assassinating anyones character. Commissioner Stewart has been assassinating his own character by his irresponsible behavior and actions, while Portwood is following close behind with improprieties and transgressions surrounding her county contract and other grant applications. The term character assassination is most commonly used by politicians to defend themselves or clients against claims and statements from opponents with differing views or opinions on matters of mutual concern involving public and nancial matters. Commissioner Stewart chooses to categorize the contract and grant improprieties as administrative errors and hollers character assassination as a defense! But, what else can he say the facts so far clearly speak for themselves. What is becoming inherently evident is his inability to separate personal friendships, feelings and opinions when dealing with statutorily mandated duties and oath of of ce to faithfully and honorably carry out his duties as commissioner for the welfare and well-being of all Wakulla County citizens and taxpayers, and not just for a limited few. If I were Mr. Stewart, I would be slow to anger and quick to recognize that he has a duciary, moral, ethical and legal responsibility to faithfully carry out the oath of of ce which he swore rst, before God, and secondly before man, to uphold any and all laws of the United States and of the State of Florida. Gail Hickman Wakulla County CitizenWhere is the witch hunt? Commissioners should listen to citizens Clari cation

PAGE 5

By TAMMIE BARFIELDtbar eld@thewakullanews.netThere was an atmosphere of enthusiasm Tuesday evening, Sep. 13, at the campaign kick-off of this years United Way of the Big Bend. This years goal is $90,000. Last year, slightly less than $80,000 was raised though Wakulla received more than $118,000 from United Way. The kick-off event was held at Victors where United Way representatives, the Wakulla County United Way team and members of the community at large gathered to prepare to Live United in 2011. United Way of the Big Bend provides donated dollars to non-pro t agencies that serve the Wakulla County community each year. Donations of more than $100,000 from 2010 were allocated to 24 area agencies who provide much needed services to families and individuals in our area. Marc Dickieson, campaign associate, was very excited about St. Marks Powder implementing a payroll deduction program for their employees to make contributions. Donations made to United Way in Wakulla County are distributed to agencies serving Wakulla County. Contributors may specify a particular agency to receive the donation. To nd out more about how you can contribute to United Way of the Big Bend, call (850) 414-0844. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 Page 5A PHOTOS BY TAMMIE BARFIELDCounty Commissioner Alan Brock, who is this years chairman, with Shirley Howard and Mark Dickieson at the United Way Kickoff at Victors American Grill last week.United Way kicks o driveContinued from Page 1A Also, $22,000 for workers compensation was moved to the building department and re MSBU budgets. All these reductions still left a gap of $185,605 which was spread across all constitutional of ces. The board was required to cut $69,720. The sheriff must cut $96,360. The clerk must cut $4,018. The property appraiser will have to cut $9,021 and the tax collector will need to reduce her budget by $6,487. The board agreed take the portion of cuts needed for the supervisor of elections because there are two elections next year. To achieve the reductions needed for the county commission, Interim County Administrator Tim Barden suggested delaying lling the vacant parks and recreation director and planning director positions for six months, which would save $55,119. As well as removing tuition reimbursement for employees, reducing the funds for printing and binding and annual and sick leave payout. Also, $3,503 was realized from the county administrators health insurance. County Commissioner Lynn Artz was hoping to delay the parks and recreation director longer and only delay the hiring of a planning director for three months. Artz said the county has already received 40 applications for the position and doesnt want to see people drop out because there is no time frame for when the position will be lled. She added that Bryan Roddenberry, who is serving as interim parks and recreation director, is doing a good job. Weve never really had much management with the parks, Artz said. Commissioner Jerry Moore said he didnt want to make that decision, but allow for incoming County Administrator David Edwards to make that decision. Commissioner Alan Brock agreed that the commission shouldnt mandate that option. Commissioners Randy Merritt and Stewart were with Brock. Moore said he didnt understand why a planning director was needed right now when no one is building. What are we planning for? Moore asked. Artz pointed out the Crawfordville Town Plan, which the commission, along with the chamber, has said it wants to proceed with. Brock agreed that there was a need for someone with expertise in that position because of the town plan, possible changes to the comprehensive plan and the fact that the department still has work to do. Stewart said, There are a lot of old issues that need to be resolved. The commission agreed that Artzs suggestion was a good one, but would let Edwards decide whats best. The budget also includes no raises for county employees and no growth, as well as the elimination of 27 positions across the board. Capital Improvement projects include $392,368 for the community center, $60,000 for the library expansion and $120,000 from the Florida Department of Transportation to develop a Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Master Plan. There is also $71,551 set aside from impact fees to go towards the library expansion. There has also been $340,000 budgeted to complete the paving of Old Shell Point Road from the one cent sales tax. The amount of budgeted reserve is $480,000.Board OKs $42M budget e commission will delay lling some vacant county positions, such as parks and recreation director and planning director. One commissioner praises the interim rec director for doing a good job, but adds, Weve never had much management with the parks. Another commissioner questions the need for a planning director when theres no construction going on. What are we planning for? The food offered at the United Way kickoff at Victors.Free info available on arthritisSpecial to The NewsToday, more than 10 million Americans suffer from osteoarthritis of the knee, making it the most common form of arthritis in the U.S. What are frequent causes of this type of arthritis, and what can you do to protect your knees, reduce the symptoms, and support your doctors treatment? With advice from some of the worlds leading knee specialists, the American Arthritis Society has compiled in its publication Arthritis Info useful and practical tips for self-care. Each tip is interesting and easy to follow. For a free sample issue of Arthritis Info, write to the American Arthritis Society, P.O. Box 271010, Minneapolis MN 55427. Please include a loose 44 cent stamp for return postage. 0009ATE CHA RLI E 2012Contact Charlie at (850) 926-4712 charlieforsheriff@gmail.com www.charliecreel.com Charlie Creel for Sheriff Elect CharlieCREELFor Full-Time Sheriff in 2012Saturday, September 24 2 pm to 4 pmCoast Guard Auxiliary Station 1557 Shell Point Road, Crawfordville (in Shell Point, at the southern end of Shell Point Road) Light refreshments will be served. Political advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Affiliation, for SheriffWhats on your mind? Tell Charlie!Stop by and lets talk about local law enforcement issues that matter to you. Florida Certied ContractorSoutheastern Home Building Services, Inc.Residential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN construction 850509-3632www.tuscanytrace.net www.buildinghomes.comREMODELING ADDITIONS KITCHENS BATHS WORK REPLACEMENT FLOORS PROJECT Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 Please Recycle

PAGE 6

Lillian G. ChandlerLillian G. Chandler, 91, passed away Sunday, Sept. 18, in Tallahassee. She was born in Athens, Ga., and had seven siblings. She had lived in this area since 1968. She retired after 27 years as a nursing assistant. She loved gardening and her pets. Family received friends Tuesday, Sept. 20, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville. Graveside services were Wednesday, Sept. 21, at 10 a.m. at Woodville Cemetery, in Woodville. Survivors include two grandchildren, Jeff Chandler (Andrea) and Sheila C. Peters; four great-grandchildren, Brad Chandler, Brittany Chandler, Bailey Chandler and Joshua Peters; and one sister, Kathleen Kenny of Athens, Ga. She was predeceased by a son, John Harold Chandler. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com)Carl F. MetcalfCarl Franklin Metcalf, 59, of Panacea, passed away Thursday, Sept. 15, surrounded by loving family and friends. He was the owner and operator of Rock Landing Seafood in Panacea and was a minister with the Congregational Holiness Association of Churches. A graveside service was held Sunday, Sept. 18, at the Panacea Park Cemetery in Panacea with the Rev. Michael Hall of- ciating. The family received friends on Saturday, Sept. 17, at the home, 92 Alapaha Ave., in Panacea. Flowers can be received at the residence. Survivors include his wife, Elizabeth Beth Metcalf; daughter, Nicole M.(Donnie) Cruse of Alabama; sons, Carl Erik (Christy) Metcalf of Panacea and B. Ruel Calbatera of Crawfordville; granddaughters, Thea C. (Brandon) Taylor, Doni Marie (Jason) Cruse, and Olivia Grace Metcalf all of Panacea; grandsons, Justin Vargo of Calvary, Ga., and Elijah Franklin Metcalf and Ethan Phillip McDaniel of Panacea; great-grandson, Reed Taylor of Panacea; brothers, Danny (Marion) Metcalf Sr. of Panacea, and John Wayne (Laura) Crosby of Crawfordville; sisters, Linda M. Mangum of Perry and Linda Carol (Frank Cisco) Johnson of Crawfordville; nieces, Cindy, Julie, Shelley, Leanne, Sandra and their spouses; nephews: Danny Jr., Matthew, Joshua, Colby and their spouses; nine great-nieces and four great-nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, J. Henry Metcalf and Inez Spears Metcalf; a sister, Judith M. Sanders; a brother, James H. Metcalf; and a brother-in-law, James Jimmy Mangum. Arrangements were under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home in Macclenny, 904-259-4600. Please sign the online guestbook at www.forbesfuneralhome.net.Margaret E.S. SawyerMargaret Eulalie Stegall Sawyer, 78, went home to be with her Lord and Savior on Sept. 18. Margaret was born in Thomasville, Ga., on March 20, 1933, to Ivan B. Stegall and Eulalie Davis Stegall. She worked beside her husband in the family business and was a homemaker after retirement. She was an active member of the First Baptist Church of Tallahassee for more than 50 years and loved her Sunday School Class. She was a member of Caroline Brevard Chapter of DAR having served numerous times as a chapter of cer. She was currently serving as Veterans Chairmen for Dominie Everardus Bogardus Chapter, Colonial Dames XVII Century. She was also currently serving as Chapter Registrar of Mission San Luis de Apalachee Chapter, Daughters of the American Colonies and Chapter Registrar of Treaty of Ghent Chapter United States Daughters of 1812. She served in numerous of cer position and committee chairmen for Anna Jackson Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy. She was also a member of Jacksonville Southern Dames. Visitation was held Wednesday, Sept. 21, at Culleys Funeral Home on Riggins Road from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Services will be held Thursday, Sept. 22 at 2 p.m. at the First Baptist Church of Tallahassee with burial to follow at Culleys Meadowood Cemetery in Tallahassee. Survivors include her children, Ava Jane Davis (Al), David I. Sawyer (Wanda) and Wilburn D. (Skip) Sawyer III; her grandchildren, Lalie Davis Lawhon (Jeremy), Megan Pate, Douglas P. Davis, Rachel Clements (Al), Crystal Smith and Jordan Sawyer; eight great-grandchildren; and many cousins, nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her husband of 56 years, Wilburn D. (Buz) Sawyer Jr.; and by her siblings, Ivan B. (Jake) Stegall, Emily Jane Stegall and Carolyn Floyd.Myrtle S. ShieldsMyrtle Smith Shields, 92, passed away on Sunday, Sept. 18. She was born and raised in Tallahassee, but spent most of her adult life in St. Marks. Mama Myrt, as she was affectionately known, was married to Charles Curtis Shields Sr., who preceded her in death. During the time she lived in St. Marks, she had a home in Franklin, N.C., where she resided part time, moving there permanently in 2005. The family received friends on Wednesday, Sept. 21, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Culleys Meadowood Funeral Home, 1737 Riggins Road, in Tallahassee. Graveside services for immediate and extended family will be held at 10 a.m. on Thursday, Sept. 22, at Crawfordville Cemetery, in Crawfordville. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to the American Cancer Society or to Angel Hospice of Franklin, North Carolina 170 Church Street, Franklin NC 28734. Survivors include her daughter, Anita Register (Tillman); her son, Charles Shields (Pamela); six grandchildren, Michael Register (Sandy), Barton Shields (Biliana), Teresa Register, Barry Shields (Kathy), Loree Roberts (Jobe) and Brett Shields (Cathy); and 10 great-grandchildren. She is also survived by her sister-in-law, Irene Smith, and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. She was preceded in death by her son, Benny Bloxham Shields; and her brother, John Bloxham Smith.Earl C. Vause Sr.Earl Colbert Vause Sr., 84, went home to be with his Lord on Sept. 17. He was born in Arran, on Dec. 26, 1926, to George Vause and Ida Tucker Vause. He served his country in the U.S. Navy Construction Battalion on Guam during World War II and the Paci c campaign. He owned his own local contracting business in Panacea before retiring. He loved the Lord and was a member of Friendship Baptist Church. He was an ordained deacon and served as Sunday school director and music director at Ochlockonee Bay Baptist Church prior to joining Friendship. In his spare time, he loved seine shing and shrimping and spending time with his family. Visitation was held Monday, Sept. 19, at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Services were held Tuesday, Sept. 20, at 3 p.m. at Friendship Baptist Church with burial to follow at Panacea Park Cemetery in Panacea. Survivors include his wife of 64 years, Irene W. Vause; two sons, Earl Vause Jr. (Diane) of Crawfordville and David Vause (Peggy) of Tallahassee; one daughter, Naomi Zinser (Brian) of Panacea; four grandchildren, Jeremy Zinser (Mindy) of Crawfordville, Jarrod Zinser, Riley Vause (Jeanie) of Tallahassee and Holden Vause of Swainsboro, Ga.; and four great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his sister, Claris Ward; brothers, Otis, Durwood and Wilbur Vause; and a granddaughter, Jennifer Vause. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel was in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Obituaries continued on Page 14A Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comMedart Area Crawfordville Area SopchoppyWakulla Worship Centers religious views and events ChurchObituariesChurch briefsCoastal Areas Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm 1s t Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Wakulla Station Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart Lillian G. Chandler Carl F. Metcalf Margaret E.S. Sawyer Myrtle S. Shields Earl C. Vause Sr. George H. WolfTikvat Ami. My Peoples Hope New Messianic Synagogue with in-depth teachings, Judaic and contemporary music, great childrens program, active youth group, dynamite college and career age meetings and caring people. Jewish? Intermarried? Not Jewish but interested in the Jewish faith? All are welcome. Weekly Shabbat Services every Saturday at 10:30 a.m. in the Gingerbread Day School/Heritage Academy building, 3324 N. Monroe St. in Tallahassee. For more information and to nd out more about us and our High Holy Day service, visit our website, tikvatami.com or call or email Rabbi Josh at (850) 364-8925, rabbijosh@tikvatami.com. Pioneer Baptist Church in Crawfordville, 486 Beechwood Drive, will be honoring Sheriff David Harvey during its regular service on Sunday, Sept. 25 beginning at 10:30 a.m. Pastor Dennis Hall has invited the sheriff and members of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce to join the church for the worship service which will include an opportunity to recognize Sheriff Harvey and staff members for their contributions to the community. We want to take the time to express our appreciation for the work done by Sheriff Harvey and the sheriffs of ce staff, said Pastor Hall. A church garage sale and sh fry will be held on Saturday, Sept. 24 at Christian Worship Center. The garage sale will begin at 8 a.m. The sh fry starts at 11 a.m. until the sh is gone. Christian Worship Center is located at 3922 Coastal Hwy. For more information, call (850) 25 1-9959 or (850) 745-1022. Synagogue offers services in Tallahassee Pioneer Baptist to honor Sheriff David Harvey Christian Worship Center to hold garage sale, sh fry2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Grief RECOVERY GROUP for parents who have lost a childFor more information call Gigi Cavallaro at 850-962-6117 or Melanie Lachman 850-878-5310 or 926-9308

PAGE 7

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 Page 7AhappeningsCommunityBoy scouts attend National Youth Leadership Training Special to The News Troop 5 Scouts, Nathan Green, Blakeleigh Bolton and Chris Broussard attended the BSA National Youth Leadership Training (NYLT) course held at Wallwood Boy Scout Reservation this summer. The NYLT course centers around the concepts of what a leader must be, what he must know, and what he must do. The key elements are then taught with a clear focus on how to. The skills come alive during the week as the young men go on a Quest for the Meaning of Leadership. Troop 5 is very proud of this accomplishment. Scouts Nathan Green, Blakeleigh Bolton and Chris Broussard Special to The News Little did Randell Mainer know that the cemetery expansion he and his grandfather worked on together for his Eagle Scout project would soon be the resting place of his grandfather, Elmer Barbree. In fact, Barbree was the rst to be buried there after Mainers expansion project was completed. The son of Ricky and Brenda Barbree Mainer, Randell Mainer is 16, an 11th grader at Wakulla High School and a lifelong member of the Wakulla United Methodist Church. For his Eagle Project, Mainer chose to expand the churchs cemetery space with chain link fencing from 10,000 to 20,000 square feet. He dedicated the expansion to the church and to his grandfather. The prestigious award of Eagle Scout was rst earned in 1912 so at its almost 100th birthday, it is an honor earned by Mainer and almost 2 million other scouts, including Gerald Ford, former United States President and Neil Armstrong, NASA astronaut and the rst man to step on the moon. Mainer joined Boy Scout Troop 4 in St. Marks in 2006 and became certi ed as an Eagle Scout on July 19, 2011. Mainer served as chaplain aide for his troop since 2006 and won the District Spelling Bee in 2008, was runner up in 2009 and is a member of the Wakulla High School Academic Team. As to his future plans, Mainer plans to help other scouts in his troop to reach the highest honor in scouting, that of Eagle Scout.Randell Mainer earns rank of Eagle Scout The Rev. Janice Henry-Rinehart, minister of Wakulla United Methodist Church, and Eagle Scout Randell Mainer Workshop on preserving food is o ered David Moody, St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Director, and Shelley Swenson, Wakulla County FCS Extension Agent, will be covering the basics of food preservation through pressure canning and dehydrating on Oct. 14 at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Moody has years of experience preserving wildlife and sh and wants to share some of the things that he has learned with others. Swenson will share an overview of the pressure canner, why a pressure canner must be used for low acid vegetables, meats and sh and some basic canning techniques. Sample foods will be provided. At the October workshop, we also plan to discuss food dehydrating. It is one of the oldest methods of preserving food for later use. Dried foods are ideal for backpacking and camping. They are lightweight, take up little space and do not require refrigeration. Drying removes the moisture from the food so that bacteria, yeasts and molds cannot grow and spoil the food. It also slows down the action of enzymes, but does not inactivate them. Because drying removes moisture, the food becomes smaller and lighter in weight. Some foods such as jerky, fruit leathers or dried fruits can be eaten dry. Foods can be dried in the sun, in an oven or in a food dehydrator by using the right combination of warm temperature, low humidity and air circulation. Consider attending this workshop. To cover the expense of the workshop a $5 registration fee is required for each participant. Enroll today by calling the Wakulla County Extension Office, 926-3931. The Florida Wild Mammal Associations Woodstork Festival is Oct. 8 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 195 Harvey Young Farm, Crawfordville. The cost of admission is $5. For more information visit www.woodstorkfestival. com.Woodstork Festival Oct. 8 713-001499 Rock Landing RoadEnjoy Outdoor Seating Overlooking Beautiful Dickerson Bay! Fall HOurs Open: Thursday ............................... 4 P.M. 9 P.M. Friday .......................................... 4 P.M. 10 P.M. Saturday ............................ 11 A.M. 10 P.M. sunday ......................................11 A.M. 9 P.M.COME AND CHECK OUT OUR NEW SATURDAY AND SUNDAY LUNCH SPECIALS 11a.m. 3p.m. All Under $10.THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS DOMESTIC BEER $1.50 WELLS $2.00 ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 PARTNER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. You are invited to attendPastors Appreciation Day September 25, 2011 11:00amDinner will be served after church.Please join us as we extend our gratitude toPastor Charles (BB) Barwick for his years of dedicated service.Panacea Full Gospel Assembly

PAGE 8

Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schoolsSchoolBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County School Board recently approved its tax levy and budget for the 2011-12 year with comments from one citizen. Donna Sanford, a retired teacher who occasionally attends school board meetings to challenge of cials, appeared at the nal budget hearing on Sept. 12 to ask if school board members or district staff ever looked back at 2009 surveys of teachers. Theres some good ways to save, coming from teachers, she said. Sanford also chided the school board: I have a hard time looking at the board, some of whom may owe more than $15,000 in back taxes, but raise the millage rate on us. Sanford did not name the school board member she was referring to, but school board member Ray Gray, who owns substantial amounts of rental property in the county, is one year behind on his taxes. Superintendent David Miller responded to Sanfords comments that The only increase is the required local effort portion of the tax levy, which is set by the state. The school board did not increase any of its millage, Miller said. The total millage is 8.55 mills, which is $8.55 per $1,000 of assessed property value. That includes the optional .25 mill levy that Wakulla citizens voted for in a referendum last year and which the school board unanimously approved. The school board meeting room was packed, but besides Sanford, the audience was teachers and school principals, most of whom were there for other items on the agenda. In other matters: The school board approved a resolution of support for the Florida Center for the Performing Arts and Education in Tallahassee. A presentation was made last month by St. Marks resident Pam Shields, whos on the board of the proposed performing arts center, along with Leon County Clerk of Courts Bob Inzer, another board member. Shields stressed that the facility was not just for Tallahassee residents, but would have a educational component that would make it valuable for students in the area. The school board was also introduced to Alyssa Higgins, the new principal at COAST Charter School in St. Marks. Susan Flournoy, the former principal at COAST, introduced Higgins to the board. School board approves millage and budgetCurrent millage of 8.55 mills will remain, which includes a .25 mill levy approved by citizensRiversink Elementary remembers Sept. 11 On Sept. 11, all the students and faculty at Riversink Elementary School went outside and held hands and formed a large circle and had a moment of silence and remembered Sept. 11, 2001. By LILLY ROCKWELLTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 8 In response to Gov. Rick Scotts interest in the controversial Texas higher education overhaul that emphasizes accountability, Florida State University President Eric Barron offered up his own proposal Thursday that he plans to take to the governor. Barrons plan embraces many of the ideas behind the Texas proposal, known as the Seven Breakthrough Solutions, that emphasizes teaching over research and more accountability over performance. Barrons ideas, laid out in a 23-page paper titled Florida Can Do Better Than Texas, offers an in-depth analysis of the seven solutions and responds with eight Florida solutions. The Texas plan suggests monitoring how effective professors are by the number of classes taught, student satisfaction surveys and the number of A and B grades awarded. Instead, Barron suggests judging how effective professors are at teaching by examining the freshmen retention and graduation rates, offering student evaluations at the beginning and end of a course, looking at the cost per student for each credit hour, and giving post-graduation surveys to students on their university experience. Those same factors would be used in awarding tenure and faculty bonuses of up to $10,000. Scott began pushing for colleges and universities to look into the Texas higher education proposals last spring. Some members of FSUs board of trustees indicated their support for the plan, especially those appointed to the board by Scott. But others fretted over the response from faculty. This is a draconian move if you dont have the faculty with you, warned Joseph Camps, a Tallahassee physician and board trustee. The lone faculty representative on the board, Sandra Lewis, who is president of the Faculty Senate and a professor of education, said she was pleased with Barrons suggestions and felt the Texas plan was too simplistic. Accountability is important, Lewis said. But under the Texas plan, professors would be driven to get high student satisfaction scores by bringing pizza on the last day of class and showing a movie and giving everybody As, she said. Barron said his next step is to discuss his plan with Florida State University faculty and the Board of Governors before discussing it with the governor.Scholarship available at Wakulla ChristianThe Step Up for Students corporate tax scholarship program announced that more scholarships are available for the 2011-12 school year. The scholarships are worth up to $4,011. Wakulla Christian School is an approved provider for the scholarship. For further information, please contact the WCS School Of ce at 926-5583.FSU President Barron proposes alternative to Texas higher education reforms The Wakulla Coastal Optimist Clubs2011ANNUAL FASHION EXTRAVAGANZAWakulla County Senior Center Thursday October 6 2011 6:30pm Social 7:00pm Dinner, Auction, & Show please join us forMaurices Thread Tree Crums Mini MallTICKETS $30.00 eachall proceeds go toward scholarships for Wakulla County students 000916P facebook.com/GamerZParadise(850)926-9100|theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com 635WakullaArranRoadCrawfordville,Florida32327Come by to find out moreabout ourAfter School Program Kinect | X-Box Live | PS3 | Wii | Wi-fiMON THURS: SUMMER HOURS 12 9 PM FRI:12 11 PM SAT: 12 11 PM SUN: 1 8 PMCome and PLAY! (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile HomesER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926

PAGE 9

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsBy RICHARD LAWHONSpecial to The NewsThe Lady War Eagles traveled to Florida High School on Sept. 13 to play their first match of the week. The Lady War Eagles started the rst game playing fairly well but lost to Florida High 20-25. During the second game, the girls seemed to have gotten it together and played very well, but still lost, 26-28. As the third game started, the Lady War Eagles came out and played excellently, executing on every play and beat Florida High 25-15. Moving into the fourth game, the girls seemed to have lost what they had found in the third game, losing to Florida High 1725. The key players for this game were Albrey Sorrell with an amazing 24 digs, Ashley Roberts with 15 kills and 13 digs, Breighly Bolton with 11 kills, Chelsea Carroll with 35 assists, Emily Haley with 8 kills and Jordyn Pryor with 14 digs. After a fairly good practice on Wednesday, the Lady War Eagles hosted their second district game against Suwanee Valley High School on Sept. 15. The Lady War Eagles prevailed over Suwanee Valley High School 25-18, 25-14 and 25-17. The Lady War Eagles went into this game being a player short, so Coach Erica Bunch decided to call up Marina Pertrandis from the JV team and, boy, did she show out. Having never played with the varsity team and only having one day to prepare, Pertrandis played outside hitter to replace Jordyn Pryor. Pertrandis completed this game with 8 kills and 3 digs, very well for very little preparation. Some of the other key players for this game were Albrey Sorrell with 17 digs, Ashley Roberts with 7 kills and 7 digs, Breighly Bolton with 5 kills and 7 aces, Chelsea Carroll with 4 kills, 28 assists and 4 digs and Shannon Wood with 6 kills. The Lady War Eagles record is now 8-4 and their district record is 2-0. By PAUL HOOVERTrack Coach The Wakulla High School cross country teams traveled to Tom Brown Park on Saturday to compete against runners from 14 different schools at the Lincoln Invitational Cross Country Meet. The WHS girls team emerged as meet champions and the boys ran to a third place nish. The girls race was extremely close with the Lincoln girls team nishing just two points behind the WHS girls. The top 15 girls were individually recognized and the War Eagles placed four girls in this group. These included sophomore Marty Wiedeman (4th), senior Cora Atkinson (5th), freshman Kasey James (10th) and senior Kristie Hodges (15th). Additionally, freshman Lydia Wiedeman nished in 16th place, senior Morma Woodcock placed 17th and junior Raychel Gray placed 26 to round out the top seven. All of the top seven girls ran a varsity qualifying time. The WHS boys were led by the third place nish of senior Stanley Linton who covered the 5K course in 17:21. Linton was the only WHS runner to nish in the top 15. Rounding out the top seven for the WHS boys were senior David Victor, junior Hunter Phillips, sophomore Brandon Trussell, senior Cody James sophomore Jacob Martinez and freshman J.P. Piotrowski. In all, 13 boys ran a varsity qualifying time at this meet. I was really happy for our kids today, said Coach Paul Hoover. They have all worked hard this season and todays results were very encouraging. It is good to see their hard work paying off and to see how they worked as a team during the race. The teams compete next at the FSU Invitational at Apalachee Cross Country Park on Saturday, Sept. 24. PHOTO BY KAREN JAMES/Special to The NewsThe Wakulla Girls Cross-Country team after their win last weekend.CROSS-COUNTRYGirls win Lincoln InvitationalVOLLEYBALLLady War Eagles lose to Florida High, but win against Suwannee LISA KINARD/Special to The NewsStanley Linton placed third for the boys. San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Huttons Seafood & More 570-1004 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org T T h h u u n n d d e e r r o o n n t t h h e e G G u u l l f fOctober 6 6 -9 www.thunderonthegulf.com The Workswakullas coworking caf www.theworkscafe.com ReceiveacomplimentarycopyofPastry and Coffee Special! Let us perk up your day! JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org $39924PK SpringtimeSpringWater O b tn t ftnrrftnr Snf-N-St tnr. 2PACKSOF4ROLLS $1FOR JUSTT b2ROLLS $1FOR JUSTBbtn fr While Supplies L astWhile Supplies Last While Supplies Last PEPSI12PKAll Flavors3FOR$11GATORADE32OZAll FlavorsPOWERADE32OZAll Flavors2FOR$32FOR$2 HOTDO G1/4LB2FOR$250

PAGE 10

Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team viewsSportsBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIt was a back-and-forth battle between Wakulla and North Florida Christian on Friday night, Sept. 16. Head Coach Scott Klees said that, ultimately, The game came down to whos going to make the first mistake. While Wakulla went into the fourth quarter with a one point lead, 20-19, NFC scored a touchdown early in the period and then, bolstered by a couple of key Wakulla mistakes, held on to win. We inched rst, Klees said. It was Wakullas rst loss of the season. The good thing about this is sometimes you learn more from a loss than a win, Klees said. For the War Eagles, the players havent come together as a team, Klees said. I think we can x it and go forward as a better team, he said. When youre winning, sometimes its hard to understand the concept of playing as a team, Klees said. Wakulla scored first, a eld goal by kicker Conner Smith, to lead 3-0. A couple of series later, NFC scored a touchdown but missed the extra point to make the score 6-3. Wakullas next drive stalled after a holding penalty. North Florida Christian mounted a drive for another TD, and again missed the extra point, to lead 12-3. There was palpable frustration along the Wakulla sideline at that point. On Wakullas next drive, facing a fourth down and 2, Marshane Godbolt picked up the rst down and there seemed to be a momentum shift. A couple plays later, there was a 60-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Caleb Stephens to receiver Mikal Cromartie that, along with the Smith extra point, put Wakulla back in it at 1210 with seven seconds left in the rst quarter. A couple of series later, Wakulla faced a fourth and 1 at their 33 and Deonte Hutchinson ran the ball and picked up the rst down. After a couple of bruising Will Thomas runs, on third down and long, Marshane Godbolt caught a touchdown pass in the end zone. Smith added the extra point, and Wakulla was up 17-12 with three minutes left in the half. The mood on the Wakulla sideline had changed. And they went in at halftime leading. North Florida Christian struck back on their first possession in the second half with a TD pass and extra point that gave them a 19-17 lead. After both defenses stopped any drives, another momentum shift occurred for Wakulla when receiver Lyntonio Bowdrie and an NFC defender both came up with the ball. It was initially called an interception by NFC, but then ruled a completed pass. Another fourth down, and Mikal Cromartie made a catch for a rst down. With less than two minutes in the quarter, Smith kicked a 44yard eld goal and Wakulla was up 20-19. But a series of Wakulla mistakes helped North Florida Christian. After an NFC drive foundered near mid- eld and the Eagles were punting the ball back to Wakulla, there was a roughing the kicker call that gave them the ball back. Its not the kids fault by any means, Klees said of the play that drew the penalty. He was just going hard. Two plays later, NFC quarterback Pat Dobson scored a touchdown on a keeper. The extra point was no good, but NFC was on top for the rest of the game, 25-20. There were still nine minutes left in the game after that score. On the next drive, again facing a fourth down and three, Wakulla went for it but Godbolt was stopped short on a run. The War Eagle defense held NFC, but the punt pinned Wakulla deep in its own territory. With 5:35 left, Wakulla again tried to mount a drive but NFCs defense held -including breaking up a pass on third down that forced Wakulla to punt. With less than four minutes, NFC put together a couple of runs and got a rst down, and the clock was quickly running out. On a pass play with less than two minutes, the receiver stayed inbounds to keep the clock running -but a Wakulla defender grabbed his facemask and added a personal foul penalty that gave NFC another rst down. Then NFC just ran out the clock to seal the win. Of the high and low emotions of the game, Klees said: Theres 48 minutes in a high school game, and theres a lot of ups and downs. A good team steps up. For us to reach our goals this year, the coach said, we have to understand our role as a football team. At Mondays practice, Klees said some things came to a head and he felt improvements were being made. WAR EAGLES WILL TRAVEL TO FORT WHITE This week, the War Eagles go on the road and face Fort White, who are 2-1. They are a tough football team, Klees said. Fort Whites loss came in their rst game, played against Taylor County in Perry. Tied at 28 in the fourth quarter, Taylor County scored a last-minute touchdown to win. Its different when youre on the road and have to travel two and a half hours to get there, Klees said in anticipation of Friday nights game. We have to be mentally and physically ready, he said.War Eagles fall to North Florida Christian, 25-20 Conner Smith 2 eld goals, including one of 44-yards Caleb Stephens 9 for 15, 2 TDs Kevin James 9 tackles, 1 sackSpecial Teams Defense O ensePlayers of the Week PHOTOS BY KEN FIELDS/Special to The NewsConner Smith kicks a eld goal. He had two on the night, including a 44-yarder. Receiver Marshane Godbolt hauls in a touchdown pass. A couple of mistakes trip up Wakulla in the fourth quarter. Head Coach Scott Klees is philosophical, saying the team can learn from the loss When youre winning, sometimes its hard to understand playing as a team, Klees says Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Business Planning and Incorporations Title Insurance Probate and Heir Land Resolution General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 WAKULLA COUNTYSRecycling and Disposal Choice for: Residential bulky items Commercial bulky items Construction debris Remodeling materials Including the kitchen sink! JYard debris Garage stuff WE APPRECIATETHE OPPORTUNITY TOSERVEYOURRECYCLINGNEEDS.6020 Woodville Highway, T allahassee, Florida 32305Phone(850)216-1006 Fax(850)216-1009www.marpanrecycling.comA small fee of $5.00 covers the rst 250 pounds of material. Larger loads are charged by the ton $39 per ton (2,000 pounds). Open 7:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. 8:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m. on Saturday.CONVENIENT Marpan Recycling is open most holidays and six days a week for your convenience, located just north of Woodville on SR 363 (Woodville Highway). FAST With two scales and a clean, paved drop-off area, your turnaround time will be very fast. GREEN-Marpan Recycling is a material recovery facility, not a landfill. Materials recovered include wood, concrete, cardboard, carpet, paper and metals. (Sorry no hazardous waste or food garbage.) Daviod Rossetti 850 591-6161 Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Loren Joiner 850 544-3508 Kelly Dykes 850 528-3063 all akullas inest 850 926-1011our ome own ealtor734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL

PAGE 11

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 Page 11AIn The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102By TIM LINAFELT Osceola.com Staff WriterFor more than a few moments in the rst half of Florida States contest with Oklahoma Saturday, the Sooners threatened to turn it into another lopsided affair. And the Seminoles have their defense to thank that it didnt. Time and again, the FSU defense found itself in a dif cult position sometimes self-in icted, sometimes not and found a way to keep Landry Jones and Co. mostly in check. In the wake of their 23-13 defeat to the topranked Sooners, no one in the Seminoles locker room felt too great about the evenings events, but the FSU defense turned out a remarkable performance that showed tangible progress from last years showing in Norman. Mark Stoops group held the Sooners to just 310 yards of total offense and a pedestrian 4.7 yards per play. OU star quarterback Landry Jones completed 18 of his 27 passes including the 37-yard touchdown to Kenny Stills that sealed OUs victory but only threw for 199 yards. And Lamarcus Joyner and Nigel Bradham each grabbed an interception. I guess it shows a lot, it shows were a different team, said Bradham, who tied for the team lead with nine tackles. Those red zone stops allowed for Florida State to be within striking distance of a victory in the fourth quarter. On consecutive possessions, in the second quarter, the Sooners offense was looking to extend its 7-3 lead. The Seminoles forced eld goals of 21 and 29 yards. FSUs second goal line stand was especially impressive, as Oklahoma began its drive on Florida States 3-yard line thanks to an EJ Manuel interception that Tom Wort returned 69 yards. That kept us in the ballgame in the rst half, FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said. Said defensive end Bjoern Werner: It felt great to stop them twice in the end zone. I looked in everybodys eyes and I have never seen that before from my teammates. They were just going crazy. Werner played perhaps the nest game of his Florida State career, with a sack and two tackles for loss. I would rather have a win than 15 sacks, Werner said. Defense keeps Noles within striking distance Defense keeps Noles within striking distanceBy MARTY COHEN GatorBait.net EditorXavier Nixon was pacing, back and forth, between the 35and 45-yard lines, just glaring across the eld. Both teams had made their way on to the eld prior to kickoff, and players were mulling about. But Nixon kept pacing, never taking his eyes off the opposing sidelines, his steely glare piercing the expanse of the eld. It must have been ve minutes of real time before Nixon stopped his little march, almost a symbolic picture of a team waiting to bust out of the gate. It was hardly a secret that the real season was starting after the opening two scrimmages, even if Tennessee is still a shell of what it represented a decade or two ago. Florida, its fans, was ready to go and the result was an emotional, sloppy rollercoaster ride to a 33-23 win over Tennessee in Will Muschamps SEC debut as the head guy. The atmosphere in this stadium, its incomparable, Muschamp said. Our guys understand whats at stake in the SEC and playing well in the SEC. Its certainly a different buzz around here. But this counts for one its not one-and-a-half, its not two. Its one and next week counts for one. We need to enjoy this tonight the right way and wake up and get ready for Kentucky. Understandable response from a coach who must balance the release of a hard-fought win with the straightahead focus on the next game. But this was the rst step, the unveiling of what we can maybe expect the rest of the way from this cherubic team. It was the initial test for a young team getting ready to embark on a two-month march through treacherous SEC landmines. Everyone got their feet wet today and they held up, fth-year senior defensive tackle Jaye Howard said about his young defensive mates. Each week theyre going to get better. In a lot of ways, the outcome was perfect fodder for the coaching staff. So much went well in all three phases of the game, yet there was a ton of sloppy play (did the of cials get paid by the ag today?) and so many areas to clean up, the term du jour for this coaching staff. In the end it was a satisfying 10-point win that seemed so much more dominant. We have a lot of things to work on we de nitely didnt play the best we can play today, said Trey Burton, the valuable versatile man on offense who scored a pair of one-year touchdowns through the air and on the ground, the latter a fourth-and-1 plunge on the goal line. Youve got to love the Muschamp con dence, taking the ball to start the game after winning the coin ip. Too many coaches turn to the manual, which states you must defer to get that all-important third quarter kickoff. But Muschamp used common sense and kept the potent Tennessee offense on the sidelines at the outset. In a beautifully scripted series, the Gators were sharp from the opening bell, with quarterback John Brantley completing all ve of his throws and Jeff Demps taking off on a 28-yard scamper to the Vol 1-yard line, setting up Burtons touchdown reception. After a missed Tennessee eld goal, the Gators responded with another long march but had to settle for a eld goal when Brantley failed to lead an open Burton in the endzone on rst down. But the Red Zone woes that have plagued this offense throughout the season cropped up again, with the Gators settling for short eld goals when they had a chance to practically put the Vols away in the rst half. The mercurial Chris Rainey came through again, blazing 83 yards on a dump-off pass in which Brantley did a nice job maneuvering in the pocket and then letting Rainey do the heavy lifting. It was another standard Rainey 2011 performance 100 yards rushing (108 on 21 carries), 100 yards receiving (104 yards on two receptions) and another huge special teams play with a blocked punt. Theres not too many people in the world who can do what Chris does, maybe three or four, Burton said. Defensively there was a lot to like as well. With Florida getting on top early, the Vols basically abandoned any thoughts of running the ball. Tennessee running backs gained a mere 27 yards on 14 attempts. As a result, the Gators were able to put pressure on Tennessee quarterback Tyler Bray. Sharrif Floyd returned and made an instant impact, with Muschamp showing the NCAA where that group could stick it by making Floyd a game captain. It was an equally strong outing from tackles Dominique Easley and Howard inside, and Ronald Powell nally showed up. Powell made some plays, providing pressure, combining with Howard for a sack and hurrying Bray into a forced throw that Josh Evans intercepted on the rst play of the third quarter. Aided by an injury on the opening drive to talented Vol receiver Justin Hunter, the young Gator secondary was able to hold its own, despite getting agged for ve pass interference calls (the Gators committed a whopping 16 penalties for 150 yards). The Muschamp regime has seemed to energize the entire Gator Nation. A team that showed re and passion made it seven straight over Tennessee, baby steps beginning the long journey ahead. FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA gators FLORIDA gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate #15 Florida at KentuckySaturday, 7 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. #11 Florida State at #21 ClemsonSaturday, 3:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. FSU Quarterback EJ Manuel makes a run for it during the game against Oklahoma. Gators earn seventh Gators earn seventh straight win over the Vols straight win over the VolsBy TIM LINAFELT Osceola.com Staff Writer No one wearing garnet and gold felt much like consolation as they re ected on a 23-13 loss to Oklahoma late Saturday night and early into Sunday morning. And I know there are no moral victories or trophies handed out for playing toe-to-toe with the nations No. 1 team and coming up short. However, we did learn that this 2011 edition of the Seminoles belonged on the eld with the countrys best. It just shows potential, said sophomore safety Lamarcus Joyner, who picked off OUs Landry Jones in the third quarter. Playing without three key receivers Willie Haulstead, Bert Reed and Kenny Shaw, who looked on his way to the best game of his young career before a vicious two-sided hit near the goal line sent him to the hospital FSUs young receivers stepped up on the biggest stage of their lives. Most notable of that bunch was Rashad Greene, who, a healthy three games into his college career, is irting with All-Star status. And dont forget Clint Trickett, who stepped in for the injured EJ Manuel midway through the third quarter. His 56-yard, into-triple-coverage touchdown pass to Greene on third-and-28, nearly shook Doak Campbell Stadium to its core. I hung it up there too long, Trickett said. Rashad made a heck of a play. And perhaps lost in a disappointing defeat is that Florida States defense turned in a performance that bordered on heroic. Last years game in Norman is still signi cant because its the single greatest measuring stick of just how far this defense has come under Mark Stoops. A year ago, Landry Jones passed for 380 yards and four touchdowns against FSU. This time around, he found just 199 and one score. And it was the defenses pair of goal-line stands forcing eld goals instead of touchdowns that gave the Seminoles a glimmer of hope. The running game that was a concern heading into Saturdays game has been upgraded to a full-blown worry until it proves it can have any kind of effectiveness at all. And Florida States rst road trip a 3:30 affair at Clemson is hardly an ideal environment for trying to work out the kinks. When Florida States schedule was released, we looked past Louisiana-Monroe and Charleston Southern, and circled Sept. 17 as the date when wed learn what this Florida State program has become in its 20 months under Jimbo Fisher. We learned that FSU is not as good as the No. 1 team in the nation. Not yet anyway. But we also learned that the Seminoles arent too far off either closer than theyve been in 10 years. And as things continue to move forward under Fisher, thats not a bad place to be.FSU hangs with No. 1 teamFlorida States defense forces two eld goals instead of touchdowns at Saturdays game. PHOTOS BY Colin Hackley Osceola Floridas defense closes in on Tennessee Quarterback Tyler Bray.PHOTO COURTESY OF GatorBait.net Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here!

PAGE 12

Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsIts hard to believe that summer is over and fall is here. Its been a hot summer and I personally am looking forward to a little cooler weather. Cooler weather means cooler water temperatures and cooler water temperatures mean the red sh will start schooling up in bigger schools and trout will move onto the ats from deeper water. As the water gets even cooler they will start moving into the creeks and rivers. I was out on Tuesday with Bobby Rish and his son from South Georgia and we caught 10 Spanish, three trout and one red. There were acres and acres of Spanish and lady sh feeding on glass minnows in about 13 feet of water off the Panacea Channel. Most of the Spanish were small but there were some three-pound sh in the bunch. They were feeding on the last of the falling tide and as the tide starting coming in they were feeding in the deep channels. On Friday I shed with a couple of Oklahoma Sooners who were down for the game. They just wanted to catch sh and didnt care what kind they were. I went to a spot that has been holding silver trout and we caught about 35 of them and then moved to the other side of Smith Island where lady sh were feeding pretty heavily on glass minnows. They caught about 10 of those and I decided to nish the afternoon up looking for reds. They each caught two, about 24-inches long and they just couldnt believe how hard they fought. If I knew they were going to beat us in football on Saturday night I would have just kept them catching lady sh. On Friday I shed with Dr. Jim ONeil from Tallahassee and we caught three nice reds, four trout, including his biggest to date, quite a few silver trout and a variety of other sh. The one thing that concerns me is the small number of nice speckled trout I have been catching. I have talked to a lot of people who are having the same problems. I talked with Jimmy at Shell Island and he said that most of the trout he is seeing are coming from eight to 10 feet of water and there arent a lot of them. Quite a few reds are being caught around the oyster bars in the creeks using gold spoons and live bait. Ray Rich of Crawfordville shed up in the St. Marks River near the fort and they caught a couple of legal trout and he caught the biggest red he has ever caught. He just couldnt believe how hard it fought. Capt. David Fife shed Friday and Saturday and said they had two good days. The rst day they caught silver trout until the folks said they had enough. They kept all they wanted to clean and most of them were around 14 or 15 inches. They then went red shing and ended up with three nice reds. On Saturday they went to spots he hasnt shed this year and they had their limit of reds and threw back seven or eight that were legal. They left on the rst of the incoming tide and he said they were still biting. Everything they caught was on live minnows except the trout. I talked with Capt. Randy Peart and he said on Friday they ran offshore and looked for grouper and came in with three legal grouper and threw back a 20-pound red snapper which made everyone on the boat cry. On Saturday they fished around Turkey Point Shoals and did nothing. They then went to Dog Island Reef and caught blues, Spanish, trout and ladyfish. All the trout they caught were over 18 inches and they used a gulp on the bottom. He said that when they were running over there from the Ochlockonee River he saw acres of Spanish Mackerel feeding off Alligator Point. I had talked with a fellow at Wal-Mart and he was telling me he shes off the rocks over there and that there was bait everywhere over there. Dont forget the Kevins Seatrout Shootout has been moved to Oct. 1 due to bad weather. For more information you can go to kevinsseatroutshootout.com. Also on Oct. 15, the 2011 Inaugural Jack and Jill Spots and Slot Tournament will be held. This is a tournament that teams one guy and up to three girls together. Weigh-in is at Jerrys Bait and Tackle on Woodville Highway and for more information on this tournament you can go to myhometown shing.com. Several years ago we went up to Minnesota and shed for smallmouth bass. That got me hooked and last year we shed the French Broad River in North Carolina. We had a good time and caught a lot of sh but they were awfully small. Tomorrow we are driving up to Virginia and will be shing the New River which is supposed to be one of the top smallmouth rivers in the country. I will let you know next week. Remember to leave that float plan with someone and be careful out there. Good luck and good shing!Looking forward to cooler weather and red sh moving onto the ats From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHattie Phelps usually stays home while her husband, Grady, goes off shore shing with his employer, Major Alan Lamarche of Plantation Security. On this recent trip out of Shell Point, Hattie was the guest of honor and Grady baited her hook and removed her sh while Alan handled the boat. Hattie caught 35 Key West Grunts and several nice gag grouper that were released because of the closed season. Hattie said she loved it and wants to go again when she can keep some of those grouper.Gone shingYouth Hunting Field Day set for Sept. 24From FWC NewsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will host its Youth Hunting Field Day on Saturday, Sept. 24, at Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy, north of Tallahassee. Its no coincidence that this date happens to be National Hunting and Fishing Day, making the event a great opportunity for the entire family to come out and learn about hunting and shing. The FWC is partnering with Tall Timbers to put on this free, half-day event for interested kids of all ages and their parents. Advance registration is not necessary for the event, which runs from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Attendees will get to shoot at targets with bows and arrows, shotguns, ri es and muzzleloading guns. Other activities include a hunting-dog demonstration. Those who have taken the online hunter safety course can complete the required eld activities at the event by registering at MyFWC.com/HunterSafety. Also, participants are eligible for door prizes, including a youth hunt or a free week of summer camp in Ocala or at the Beau Turner Youth Conservation Center (BTYCC), near Tallahassee. The BTYCC is part of the Florida Youth Conservation Centers Network initiative to create youth centers that will provide opportunities for young people and families to participate in outdoor activities and share experiences that strengthen connections with and support for fish and wildlife conservation. For more information on Youth Hunting Field Day, call 850-413-0084. For directions to Tall Timbers Research Station, go to www. talltimbers.org.NOTICE OF TALQUIN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC. ANNUAL MEETING SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2011RegistrationBusiness Portion and voting:of meeting: 8:30 10 a.m.10 a.m.100 VALUABLE PRIZESincluding 42 at screen tv, Wii game system, Kindle, iPods, Water Conservation kits, Electric Energy Ef ciency kits, Trolling Motor & moreEntertainment: 9:00 9:45 a.m. Country Connections at the James A. Shanks Middle School Gymnasium 1400 W. King Street, Quincy, Florida Tues. Thurs. 9am 5:30pm Friday Sunday See Us at the Gun Shows LOWER PRICED AMMO IN STOCKMany accessoriesLargest Selection of Guns in the Tallahassee Wakulla Area GunSmithing Fast Turn Around! OFFICIALPRODUCTLICENSED www.ronsgun.comLocated Main Street St. Marks483 Port Leon Dr., St. Marks Gun Show Pricing Everyday! WE BUY GUNS$ Highest Dollar Paid $ for your gun! Selling GunsSince 1999AK 47s in stock! IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 BE SUREYOUSTOCKUPON HUNTINGEQUIPMENT BEFORETHE SEASON STARTS 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 HUNT ING S EASON!! Get Ready for Grouper Scott A. Smith850-228-100738 Rainbow Drive, Crawfordville (behind El Jalisco)Quality Marine Canvas Fabrication and Upholsteryof all kinds...www.agshipcanvas.com agshipcanvas@yahoo.com

PAGE 13

All of us have the good old shing stories we like to share. In Flotilla 12 we have stories about one of our most beloved facilities, Second Love. It seemed that the facility was always throwing a monkey wrench in the plans for patrols or during a patrol. Since being rehabbed, she is still out on the water and in much better spirits, but is no longer a facility. Flotilla Commander David Guttman and member Rick Yood took advantage of the great weather Saturday for a day of shing on the ats. However, David shared that upon reaching the juncture of the St. Marks and Wakulla rivers, an ear-piercing alarm started making them second guess their plans. As fate would have it, fellow Flotilla 12 member Bob Fernandez aboard the Second Love came to their rescue and assisted them back into Shell Island Fish Camp for a diagnosis. He was also out to enjoy the great day with some friends. Since the two could not go shing, they set out to investigate how the daily events of the Flotilla were panning out. David reported that they rst ran into Tim Ashley and Phil Hill collecting trash along the side of the road as part of our efforts in the Coastal Cleanup Day. After helping a bit collecting trash, the two meandered down to the Fort to see other Auxiliarists from Flotilla 12 who were providing free vessel exams. Raye Crews was completing an inspection while Norma Hill staffed the booth with our literature and talked to visitors about the Auxiliary. While everyone was working they ran into Biggin who was our working on TowBoatUS. As Norma put it, it was obviously a good day to be out on the water. But many out on the water were staying in the rivers as Tim noticed, the ramp was not as busy as it typically can be this time of year. The wind and waves may have kept folks away, or football season. Tim also passed on the following about the Annual Coastal Cleanup: Our crew, along with hundreds of volunteers around Wakulla County, participated in the Coastal Cleanup through the collection of our discarded waste or trash. Most of our bags included bottles, cans and a variety of paper/plastics products. All of which could and mostly likely will nd its way into the human ecological system. Our consumption of marketed consumer products is great and yet our responsibility of proper disposal of them is extremely weak. Our public parks and recreational areas contain waste receptacles for this disposition, USE THEM PROPERLY and OFTEN. We thank you and our future generations do as well. Mark Rosen agreed as he was aboard My Gail with Chuck Hickman, Mike Harrison and Terry Hoxworth. The crew headed over to the east side of our patrol area, down toward the Aucilla River. Mark had the following to say: Despite a very low tide, and an encounter with a loose crab trap, Chuck guided us through with no problem. Nothing of signi cance occurred, and it was a quiet day. There were not many boats on the bay. Terry advanced his training with several excellent evolutions including chart reading, anchoring and heaving line work. As Sherrie reminds us, safe boating is no accident! www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 Page 13Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonSpecial to The NEwsPreparing to participate in the annual Coastal Cleanup. Yesterday I lost a light while diving with my Cave Diving class. The students primary cave light, a battery operated 21-watt LED system costing well over $1,000, ran out of power and ickered out 900 feet inside the cave at Peacock Springs State Park. Normally we would stop the dive plan and exit the cave under a diminished capacity using a small back up light. My primary was bright as ever, and we still had more exercises to complete, some with eyes closed, so I pulled my spare primary light from my leg pocket and gave it to him. The new LED light worked for another 400 feet, but then it failed also. Upon its recovery, I slid the light with its cable and battery canister back into my leg pouch and began the exit. Our exit from 1,300 feet was uneventful until I climbed out of the water to nd my $1,200 light missing. We were the last out before the park closed, so I returned this morning. Mind you, we must train 100 miles from our shop because we cannot dive at Wakulla Springs State Park, so I drove 200 miles to return this morning before they opened to recover the light. Early in the morning, the park was quiet, the water still and undisturbed, the wildlife, above and below the water, peaceful. On our 2,600-foot journey, we passed through grand arches over large sand and mud dunes with blind cray sh, amphipods and shrimp scurrying around on the oor and up into the crystal clear water around us. Cat sh bumped into walls as we passed by, not used to our bright lights. I was reminded that what organics we encountered came into these caves when the caves ood, the result of heavy rains that may over ow the Suwannee River. The intruding waters can move these sand dunes around redesigning the oor every year. Occasionally I saw an eroded Pleistocene gray clay bed exposed below a sand dune. Elsewhere, I might have seen a Miocene bed of yellow clay with protruding fossil sea urchins, but not here. The walls and ceilings are a light cream color, and sculptured works of art. Dome ceilings abound, each a different design with ying buttresses, hanging rock curtains and multiple arches. I passed by what looked like a tree trunk that split into two strong branches before blending into the ceiling. The cave line ran through an elevated hole in the wall. Arched passages exit from our main corridor in all directions but we are bound to a main line so as not to get lost. I feel like I am strolling down an art gallery stunned by the beauty of the surrounding detailed design. There is only silence and our muf ed rebreather breathing. I re ected on our passage this morning that many thousands of others must have done before me, that this wonderful pleasure is a bene t afforded to me as a resident of the state of Florida, a privilege I am willing, like so many others, to pay for (I paid $214 this morning for an annual instructor fee). As a visitor to Florida Parks, I enjoy strolling through these trails, no different from those who walk the surface trails, and with the same impact. Like everyone, I want these trails preserved for future generations! But why cant I take these underwater trails in my home county of Wakulla? Yes, we found the expensive light, right where it fell out of my pocket. But the stroll was priceless. Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSAFFORDABLE COVERAGE TO SAVE YOU MONEY Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850-570-9734 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224www.fsucu.org 850925-5685Your Boats One Stop Paint & Body Shop 56 Industrial Court St. Marks Industrial Park,St. Marks 32355Fiberglass Supplies and Repair Marine Battery Dealer blocking,cleaning, restoration Bandannas 2.00 incl. taxofHATS PANACEA HATSAFACT Call us today to make your reservation!www.jacksbquick.comOpen Monday Friday 7am 6pm Saturday by appointment only McClendon Auto Service, LLCFree EstimatesSpecializing in:Owned and operated by Fred McClendon 10 years experienceMV#66653Brakes Batteries Radiators Water Pumps Hub Bearings Starters Alternators and more!MOBILE AUTO REPAIR850-993-4093 Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday p Thu Sep 22, 11 Fri Sep 23, 11 S a t Sep 24, 11 Sun Sep 25, 11 Mon Sep 26, 11 Tue Sep 27, 11 Wed Sep 28, 11 D a te 3.2 ft. 12:07 AM 3.4 ft. 12:47 AM 3.6 ft. 1:21 AM 3.8 ft. 1:52 AM 4.0 ft. 2:22 AM 4.1 ft. 2:52 AM H i gh 2.2 ft. 3:52 AM 1.9 ft. 5:14 AM 1.4 ft. 6:15 AM 0.9 ft. 7:06 AM 0.4 ft. 7:52 AM 0.0 ft. 8:37 AM -0.3 ft. 9:22 AM Low 3.3 ft. 9:38 AM 3.5 ft. 11:13 AM 3.8 ft. 12:21 PM 4.1 ft. 1:17 PM 4.2 ft. 2:08 PM 4.3 ft. 2:58 PM 4.2 ft. 3:45 PM H i gh 0.6 ft. 5:24 PM 0.5 ft. 6:18 PM 0.4 ft. 7:03 PM 0.4 ft. 7:43 PM 0.6 ft. 8:21 PM 0.8 ft. 8:56 PM 1.1 ft. 9:29 PM Low Thu Sep 22, 11 Fri Sep 23, 11 S a t Sep 24, 11 Sun Sep 25, 11 Mon Sep 26, 11 Tue Sep 27, 11 Wed Sep 28, 11 D a te 3.3 ft. 12:04 AM 3.5 ft. 12:44 AM 3.7 ft. 1:18 AM 3.9 ft. 1:49 AM 4.0 ft. 2:19 AM 4.2 ft. 2:49 AM H i gh 2.3 ft. 3:49 AM 2.0 ft. 5:11 AM 1.6 ft. 6:12 AM 1.0 ft. 7:03 AM 0.5 ft. 7:49 AM 0.0 ft. 8:34 AM -0.3 ft. 9:19 AM Low 3.3 ft. 9:35 AM 3.6 ft. 11:10 AM 3.9 ft. 12:18 PM 4.1 ft. 1:14 PM 4.3 ft. 2:05 PM 4.4 ft. 2:55 PM 4.3 ft. 3:42 PM H i gh 0.7 ft. 5:21 PM 0.5 ft. 6:15 PM 0.4 ft. 7:00 PM 0.5 ft. 7:40 PM 0.6 ft. 8:18 PM 0.9 ft. 8:53 PM 1.2 ft. 9:26 PM Low Thu Sep 22, 11 Fri Sep 23, 11 S a t Sep 24, 11 Sun Sep 25, 11 Mon Sep 26, 11 Tue Sep 27, 11 Wed Se p 28, 11 D a te 3.0 ft. 12:43 AM 3.2 ft. 1:23 AM 3.4 ft. 1:57 AM 3.5 ft. 2:28 AM 3.7 ft. 2:58 AM 3.8 ft. 3:28 AM H i gh 2.0 ft. 4:56 AM 1.7 ft. 6:18 AM 1.3 ft. 7:19 AM 0.8 ft. 8:10 AM 0.4 ft. 8:56 AM 0.0 ft. 9:41 AM -0.3 ft. 10:26 AM Low 3.0 ft. 10:14 AM 3.2 ft. 11:49 AM 3.5 ft. 12:57 PM 3.8 ft. 1:53 PM 3.9 ft. 2:44 PM 4.0 ft. 3:34 PM 3.9 ft. 4:21 PM H i gh 0.6 ft. 6:28 PM 0.4 ft. 7:22 PM 0.4 ft. 8:07 PM 0.4 ft. 8:47 PM 0.5 ft. 9:25 PM 0.8 ft. 10:00 PM 1.0 ft. 10:33 PM Low Thu Sep 22, 11 Fri Sep 23, 11 S a t Sep 24, 11 Sun Sep 25, 11 Mon Sep 26, 11 Tue Sep 27, 11 Wed Sep 28, 11 D a te 2.6 ft. 12:39 AM 2.7 ft. 1:13 AM 2.8 ft. 1:44 AM 3.0 ft. 2:14 AM 3.1 ft. 2:44 AM H i gh 1.6 ft. 4:03 AM 1.4 ft. 5:25 AM 1.0 ft. 6:26 AM 0.7 ft. 7:17 AM 0.3 ft. 8:03 AM 0.0 ft. 8:48 AM -0.2 ft. 9:33 AM Low 2.4 ft. 9:30 AM 2.6 ft. 11:05 AM 2.8 ft. 12:13 PM 3.1 ft. 1:09 PM 3.2 ft. 2:00 PM 3.2 ft. 2:50 PM 3.1 ft. 3:37 PM H i gh 0.5 ft. 5:35 PM 0.3 ft. 6:29 PM 0.3 ft. 7:14 PM 0.3 ft. 7:54 PM 0.4 ft. 8:32 PM 0.6 ft. 9:07 PM 0.8 ft. 9:40 PM Low 2.4 ft. 11:59 PM H i gh Thu Sep 22, 11 Fri Sep 23, 11 S a t Sep 24, 11 Sun Sep 25, 11 Mon Sep 26, 11 Tue Sep 27, 11 Wed Sep 28, 11 D a te 2.7 ft. 12:31 AM 2.8 ft. 1:05 AM 3.0 ft. 1:36 AM 3.1 ft. 2:06 AM 3.2 ft. 2:36 AM H i gh 2.1 ft. 3:31 AM 1.8 ft. 4:53 AM 1.4 ft. 5:54 AM 0.9 ft. 6:45 AM 0.4 ft. 7:31 AM 0.0 ft. 8:16 AM -0.3 ft. 9:01 AM Low 2.5 ft. 9:22 AM 2.7 ft. 10:57 AM 3.0 ft. 12:05 PM 3.2 ft. 1:01 PM 3.3 ft. 1:52 PM 3.3 ft. 2:42 PM 3.3 ft. 3:29 PM H i gh 0.6 ft. 5:03 PM 0.5 ft. 5:57 PM 0.4 ft. 6:42 PM 0.4 ft. 7:22 PM 0.6 ft. 8:00 PM 0.8 ft. 8:35 PM 1.1 ft. 9:08 PM Low 2.5 ft. 11:51 PM H i gh Thu Sep 22, 11 Fri Sep 23, 11 S a t Sep 24, 11 Sun Sep 25, 11 Mon Sep 26, 11 Tue Sep 27, 11 Wed Se p 28, 11 D a te 2.8 ft. 12:50 AM 2.8 ft. 1:13 AM 2.8 ft. 1:31 AM 2.9 ft. 1:48 AM 3.0 ft. 2:05 AM 3.1 ft. 2:24 AM H i gh 2.1 ft. 3:17 AM 1.9 ft. 4:37 AM 1.7 ft. 5:34 AM 1.3 ft. 6:22 AM 1.0 ft. 7:06 AM 0.7 ft. 7:51 AM 0.4 ft. 8:36 AM Low 3.1 ft. 8:48 AM 3.1 ft. 10:18 AM 3.2 ft. 11:40 AM 3.3 ft. 12:53 PM 3.3 ft. 1:59 PM 3.3 ft. 3:02 PM 3.2 ft. 4:05 PM H i gh 0.5 ft. 4:55 PM 0.5 ft. 5:46 PM 0.6 ft. 6:30 PM 0.7 ft. 7:10 PM 1.0 ft. 7:46 PM 1.3 ft. 8:19 PM 1.5 ft. 8:49 PM LowGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacSept. 22 Sept. 28First Oct. 3 Full Oct. 11 Last Oct. 19 New Sept. 27Major Times 9:10 AM 11:10 AM 9:36 PM 11:36 PM Minor Times 2:07 AM 3:07 AM 4:06 PM 5:06 PM Major Times 10:03 AM 12:03 PM 10:29 PM 12:29 AM Minor Times 3:09 AM 4:09 AM 4:48 PM 5:48 PM Major Times 10:55 AM 12:55 PM 11:21 PM 1:21 AM Minor Times 4:14 AM 5:14 AM 5:28 PM 6:28 PM Major Times --:---:-11:48 AM 1:48 PM Minor Times 5:20 AM 6:20 AM 6:06 PM 7:06 PM Major Times 12:14 AM 2:14 AM 12:41 PM 2:41 PM Minor Times 6:27 AM 7:27 AM 6:45 PM 7:45 PM Major Times 1:08 AM 3:08 AM 1:35 PM 3:35 PM Minor Times 7:36 AM 8:36 AM 7:26 PM 8:26 PM Major Times 2:03 AM 4:03 AM 2:31 PM 4:31 PM Minor Times 8:45 AM 9:45 AM 8:09 PM 9:09 PM Average Average Average Better Better Best Better++7:25 am 7:34 pm 2:08 am 4:06 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:25 am 7:32 pm 3:10 am 4:48 pm 7:26 am 7:31 pm 4:15 am 5:28 pm 7:27 am 7:30 pm 5:21 am 6:07 pm 7:27 am 7:29 pm 6:28 am 6:46 pm 7:28 am 7:27 pm 7:37 am 7:26 pm 7:28 am 7:26 pm 8:47 am 8:10 pm39% 32% 25% 17% 9% 2% 6% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

PAGE 14

By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netA Crawfordville man pleaded no contest to possession of a rearm by a convicted felon and was sentenced to three years in state prison. The man, John Warren Strickland, was arrested by a wildlife officer back in February. According to the arrest report, the of cer was investigating a complaint about hunting in the Tiger Hammock area. Several men were in the area hunting hogs, and said they had permission to be on the land. One man, later identi- ed as Strickland, appeared reluctant to come forward and identify himself. Strickland was arrested after he had identi ed himself and the of cer determined he was a convicted felon. The officer wrote that he saw Strickland in possession of a Remington ri e with a round in the chamber and four bullets in the magazine. Strickland pleaded to the charge on Wednesday, Sept. 14, before Wakulla Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford, and was adjudicated guilty and given credit for 225 days in jail. In other court matters: Tony Cameron Hackney, 18, pleaded guilty to lewd and lascivious battery and had adjudication withheld. He was ordered to serve four years sex offender probation, but under the states Romeo and Juliet statute, he will not be designated as a sexual offender. Deputies investigating a break-in at the Chevron station in Crawfordville in March, where the glass front door was smashed and some Spice was taken, found Hackney in a camper with a nearly nude 14-yearold. Since he and the girl were boyfriend-girlfriend and were close enough in age, Hackney met the conditions for the Romeo and Juliet statute. Hackney is also subpoenaed to testify against his co-defendants in the burglary, Brandon Radabaugh and Nick Bowen. Bowen was set to go to trial on Wednesday, Sept. 21. Hackney also had a plea deal on the burglary charge, and pleaded in court last week to burglary of a structure and had a felony grand theft charge reduced to a misdemeanor petty theft in exchange for a sentence of 30 days in the sheriffs work camp. One of two men charged last year with stealing former County Commissioner Howard Kesslers parrot entered a plea to a charge of burglary of a dwelling and grand theft and was sentenced to two years probation and ordered to make $800 restitution to Kessler for the bird. Cody Sherrod claimed to have had no involvement in the theft and, after court, his attorney, David Kemp, indicated it was purely a plea of convenience. The other man charged in the case, Teddy Hicks, was sent off to prison several months ago on a series of charges. But he implicated Sherrod as having some involvement. According to the arrest report, Sherrod and Hicks were throwing a cast net and drinking beer in Panacea and Hicks became intoxicated and walked off. He reportedly went to Kesslers home, where he kept the parrot in a cage on his porch, and grabbed the bird. The bird was notoriously unfriendly, known to bite, and there was blood on Kesslers porch which DNA matched to Hicks. Hicks cell phone was also found on top of the parrots cage. When deputies interviewed Hicks, he had a wound on his nger that was consistent with a bird bite. The parrot was never recovered. Sherrod claimed he had no involvement at all, but he faced other legal troubles over an arrest in Leon County. His attorney said he wanted to get the matter behind him and get on with his life. Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com George H. WolfGeorge Henry Wolf, 86 of Melbourne, formerly of Chicago, Broward County and Crawfordville, passed away Thursday, Sept. 15, at home in Melbourne. He was born June 22, 1925, in Evanston, Ill., to George and Alma Wolf. He worked as a purchasing agent of the City of Hollywood, as well as Broward Community College and the City of Fort Lauderdale. He was a veteran of World War II serving in the 236th Army Signal Battalion in India. Survivors include a daughter, Karen Skidmore; a son, George Wolf; three grandchildren, Brett Reno, Justin and Jordan Wolf; and three great-grandchildren, Grace and Ella Wolf and Raphael Reno. His wife Arlene preceded him in death in June. Memorial services will be on Saturday, Sept. 24, at 2 p.m. at Fountainhead Funeral Home in Palm Bay. In lieu of owers donations may be made to North Park University at www.northpark.edu.Special to The News The U.S. Forest Service will waive the day-use fees associated with many recreation sites or amenities on national forests nationwide on Saturday, Sept. 24, in celebration of Public Lands Day. The waiver includes Apalachicola National Forests Leon Sinks Geological Area at the Wakulla-Leon county border. The annual National Public Lands Day, coordinated by the National Environmental Education Foundation with the support of the Forest Service and other federal agencies, focuses on educating the public about the importance of natural resources and the need for shared stewardship on the land. Public Lands Day provides a great opportunity for people from all walks of life to get out and enjoy our beautiful forests and grasslands, said U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell. For more information contact the Apalachicola National Forest Ranger District at (850) 643-2282; Wakulla Ranger District, (850) 9263561. To learn more about the National Forests in Florida, visit www.fs.fed.us/r8/ orida.ObituariesContinued from Page 6ACourt shortsPublic Lands Day will see fees waived on Sept. 24 4330 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida To make a donation to the auction or for more information about the event, please contact: Sue Belford at 850-926-4244 or e-mail FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail.com Friends of Wakulla County Public Library Bring your family & friends Bid on great items Support your Library Programs The Silent Auction includes Gift Certi cates, Vacations, Marine Supplies, Gifts, Artwork, Dinners, School Supplies & Much More!Food & Drinks will be provided. 2FOR$500 HAND-BREADED CHICKEN FILLETTM SANDWICH HAND-BREADED CHICKEN FILLETTM SANDWICH with the Chamber of Commerce Tuesday, September 27th at 11am Lunch Specials available to all guests between 11am and 1pm. Completely Remodeled Inside & OutNo coupon needed Hope to s ee yo u the re!~ Coupons, Goodies & Giveaways ~ Small Fry and Small Beverage with the purchase of our New! FREESTEAKHOUSE THICKBURGER Barber Shop & Salon 926-4080 Clipper Cuts Scalp Massage Steam Towels Style Cuts Neck Massage Hi-lites & Low-lites Color 926-4080 926-4080 3334 Crawfordville Hwy. Theresa Delta Waxing Perms pest controland, inc.tillmans termiteTillman Owens850-322-1775 Creeping, Crawling or Flying...TillmansPestControl@hotmail.comSafe for people and pets!RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIALWe get them before they get you! THE CABINET SHOPTHECABINET SHOP Custom Kitchens&Counter Tops

PAGE 15

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 Page 15AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn Sept. 8, Douglas Coleman of Tallahassee reported a residential burglary and felony criminal mischief at his Crawfordville home. Suspects dug up the electrical service and removed the wiring and a central air conditioning unit was stolen from the home. A forced entry was observed, and electrical cords were cut and internal wiring was stolen. Damage to the home was estimated at more than $1,000 and a chest of drawers and wardrobe, valued at $400, were stolen. Lt. C.L. Morrison investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs office this week: On Sept. 8, Mitchell Pope of St. Marks reported the theft of a weedeater from his property. The stolen item was entered in the NCIC/FCIC computer. It is valued at $250. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On Sept. 8, a retail theft was reported at Wal-Mart after store staff confronted a man who allegedly attempted to remove several items from the store without paying for them. The man placed the items in a grocery cart and left the store. The store employee asked the suspect for a receipt and the man threatened to kill the employee. Food, beer and two belts, valued at $183, were reported stolen. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. On Sept. 8, Jeannette Dirk of Crawfordville reported the theft of her purse. The victim reported losing her purse while shopping at Wal-Mart. The contents of the purse were valued at $40. Captain Randall Taylor investigated. On Sept. 8, David Grethe of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of I-beams, valued at $500, from his property. The location of the stolen I-beams was determined and a suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On Sept. 8, Michael Ames of Crawfordville reported the burglary of his shed. Tools, a tool box, rearms, and bows and arrows, valued at $12,800, were reported missing. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. On Sept. 9, Cecil James Strickland, 58, of Panacea was charged with failing to register as a sex offender. Detective Erika Buckley was checking for sexual offender registration compliance and noted that Strickland had not complied as required by statute. Sexual offenders are required to register in person at the sheriffs of ce twice a year, once on their birth month and on the sixth month following their birthday. Detective Josh Lawhon and Detective Buckley took Strickland into custody at his home. On Sept. 11, Justin Moore of Crawfordville reported a grand theft at a Crawfordville home owned by John Lee of New York City. A galvanized culvert kit was stolen from the victims property. The kit included 10 galvanized culverts, valued at $2,500. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. On Sept. 10, Zachary Pryce Taylor, 18, of Crawfordville was issued a traf c citation for knowingly driving while his license was suspended/canceled/revoked and possession of marijuana less than 20 grams following a traf c stop. The driver allegedly admitted having marijuana in his pocket and a smoking pipe in the vehicle. He was also charged with possession of drug paraphernalia. He was allegedly in possession of 2.4 grams of marijuana. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. On Sept. 10, Barry Gibbs of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a toolbox and tools from his truck. The stolen property is valued at $400. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. On Sept. 10, a clerk at Glendas Country Store reported that an unidenti ed suspect stole a pack of cigarettes after displaying a knife to the female clerk.The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Lorne Whaley and Detective Erika Buckley investigated. On Sept. 10, a 46-year-old female victim reported being involved in an aggravated assault. Charles William Crombie, 51, of Panacea allegedly threatened the victim with a gun. Crombie allegedly red the weapon into the ceiling of his home. The victim reported that Crombie also put the rearm under her chin and she feared for her life. Crombie was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. Deputy Lorne Whaley investigated. On Sept. 10, Dusty Richard Harrell, 22, of Crawfordville was issued a traf c citation for knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license is suspended. Lt. Danny Harrell conducted a traf c stop in Crawfordville and it was determined that the suspect had a suspended license On Sept. 9, Margaret Young of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim was attempting to apply for a replacement Social Security card when a computer pop up window requested debit card information for a $20 charge. The victim spoke to the Social Security Administration and discovered that replacement cards are free. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. On Sept. 9, Kirstin Brand of Crawfordville reported damage to her parked vehicle at a local convenience store. Brands Lexus and a steel pole west of the business were struck by Franklin Hugh Seivers, 56, of Crawfordville. He was charged with DUI with property damage. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. On Sept. 9, a clerk at Wal-Mart reported a credit card fraud. Suspects were purchasing items through the self-check-out and requesting large sums of cash back using a debit card. An off-duty deputy sheriff attempted to detain a suspect, but he escaped and reportedly left the parking area at a high rate of speed and struck a parked truck. The off-duty law enforcement of cer was able to collect evidence from the suspect that will be used for a DNA identification through the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. On Sept. 12, Joseph Cox of Crawfordville reported the theft of a natural gas tank. A value of the stolen item is still to be determined. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On Sept. 12, Elmer E. Strickland of Sopchoppy reported an environmental offense in Crawfordville. Two garbage bags were discovered in the victims trash bins. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On Sept. 12, Deputy Ian Dohme responded to the intersection of Trice Lane and Shadeville Road where a 19-year-old man was complaining about ingesting Spice and not feeling well. Wakulla EMS transported the man to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. The mans bicycle was seized for safe keeping. On Sept. 12, Mathew Sanders of Talquin Electric Cooperative reported a burglary at an electrical substation. Copper wire was stolen from the facility. Talquin reported it as the seventh burglary at one of their substations and third in Wakulla County. The wire was valued at $2,000. Brass water spigots were also stolen. Lt. C.L. Morrison investigated. On Sept. 12, Stone Creek Pizza reported the theft of a pizza rack, currency, thermal pizza bags and other miscellaneous items valued at $551. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On Sept. 13, Kenneth Meade of Crawfordville reported a vehicle crash on Commerce Boulevard in Crawfordville. Meade was distracted from traf c and avoided another vehicle when he lost control of his vehicle and collided with a CSG company sign and a parked vehicle. Meades vehicle sustained $3,000 worth of damage and the parked vehicle suffered $3,000 worth of damage. Damage to the CSG sign was estimated at $2,000 Meade was found at fault. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. On Sept. 13, Cody Smith of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a cell phone. The complainant stopped at a Woodville Highway business and left the phone on his vehicle. He left the scene and realized the phone was gone. The phone is valued at $600. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On Sept. 13, Deputy Billy Metcalf extinguished a house f ire at 2500 Sopchoppy Highway. When he responded, Deputy Metcalf observed ames through the kitchen window. He grabbed his WCSO re extinguisher, ran into the house and put out the blaze. The Wakulla County Fire Department and EMS arrived at the scene a short time later. A 16-year-old juvenile was heating grease on the stove when it caught re. The juvenile was treated for burn and smoke injuries at the scene. Damage was estimated at $5,000. The re was ruled an accident and Red Cross was noti ed. On Sept. 13, Sherry Bramblett of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered at the home. The victim was in the process of moving into a new home. More than $38,000 worth of property was reported stolen including rearms, jewelry, electronics and coins. Deputy Nick Gray, Reserve Deputy James Stubbs, Detective Erika Buckley, Capt. Steve Ganey and CSI Rae Eddens investigated. On Sept. 12, Deputy Clint Beam investigated a traffic crash where the motorist left the scene on Dogwood Drive in Crawfordville. A citizen contacted the sheriffs of ce and stated that a vehicle ran off the road and struck a fence on property owned by Phillip Czechorowski. A chain link fence and cable box were damaged before the vehicle entered the victims yard. Deputy Ben Steinle investigated. On Sept. 14, Deputy Sean Wheeler responded to a residential re at Quapaw Street in Crawfordville. Catherine Manning was frying food on the stove when a re started. The victim threw water on the ames which spread the re to cabinets. A neighbor entered the residence and put out the re with a garden hose. The Wakulla County Fire Department arrived on the scene a short time later and declared the scene safe. Deputy Wheeler determined that the home suffered $1,000 worth of damage. There were no injuries. On Sept. 14, Angela Lanfair of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The victims son was driving the vehicle and experienced a at tire. In the time it took to leave the scene and replace the tire, the vehicle was stolen from the side of the road. The vehicle was entered into the NCIC/ FCIC computer. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. On Sept. 14, Deputies Lorne Whaley, Cole Wells and Will Hudson served an active warrant on Arron Michael Riley, 22, of Crawfordville at his home. Riley refused to comply with deputies as they ordered him to put out a cigarette and put his hands behind his back. Riley resisted efforts to take him into custody and was charged with resisting a law enforcement of cer with violence. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 693 calls for service during the past week including: 25 business and residential alarms; 95 citizen contacts; 19 disturbances; 37 investigations; 40 medical emergencies; 34 security checks; 22 special details; 13 suspicious vehicles; 13 thefts; 12 traffic enforcements; 46 traffic stops; 11 trespassing cases; 13 reckless vehicles; 18 wanted people; and 86 watch orders.Sheri s Report Ma n a t e e Ti m e s Statewide advertisingone low price Reach a wide audience (850) 926-7102 TheWakullanews Da Caju n Wagon Serving Fresh Seafood & mor e wit h da Caju n Ki ck! Welcome 850570-1625 Appointments & Walk-Ins Welcome850-926-TEAZ(8329)1626 Crawfordville Hwy., Northpointe CenterFull Service Family Hair Care Salon!Wed-Fri 10-6 Sat. 9-3 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA TIME T O DO SOMET HING FOR YOURSELF!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926 or 510 KIDS BAC KINSCHOOL? TuAmigoYourFriendWillHelpYou Accident? Injured?Call Someone You Can Trust!Hablamos Espaol1-855-55AMIGOA er 911 & Before 411

PAGE 16

Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1A ESG had donated the dumpster for Mashes Sands, Marpan donated a dumpster for the St. Marks Refuge and Waste Pro also provided the dumpster for Shell Point. Every dumpster was reportedly lled to over owing. We estimate that approximately 10,200 pounds of trash and debris was collected on Saturday by 560 volunteers. This estimated total weight amount is actually down from previous years. Sherri Kraeft and Durene Gilbert gave out the thank you T-shirts as people led through the line and headed for the food tables. Amy Geiger, Cindy Russell, JoAnne Strickland and Rotary exchange student Laiz Silveira coordinated getting the crowd through the food line smoothly and quickly and encouraged people to come back for seconds. KWCB President Don Henderson welcomed everyone and expressed his appreciation for their dedication. He then turned the microphone over to Commissioner Alan Brock, who was Master of Ceremonies. Brock got the crowd engaged with his query on who came the greatest distance -and there were participants from Holland and Bosnia. Alice Veasman, 90, was the oldest volunteer. She was proud to disclose her age, and she is a committed, strong supporter of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful. She singlehandedly cleaned the entire grounds of Woolley Park then spent the rest of the day enjoying the company of many old and new friends. The youngest participant was Josiah Sorensen of Crawfordville. He is 7 months old and was the family spotter from his stroller. His dad, mother, three sisters and brother all participated as 4-H Sea Searchers Club members. Erica Morse, former director of KWCB, has been participating in the coastal cleanup since 1990. She is still participating and brings her son and daughter. The most unusual item found was a partial pair of dentures. The events Platinum sponsors were Wal-Mart, Waste Pro, Wakulla Tobacco Prevention Program, Rotary of Wakulla and the St. Marks Refuge Association. The Gold Sponsor is Capital City Bank. Silver Sponsors are Progress Energy, Newark Recycled Fibers, Paul G. Johnson & Associates, Quill Turk Dentistry by the Sea, Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites, Centennial Bank, Alice Veasman and Goin Under Dive Services. Diamond Service Sponsors are Wal-Mart, Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce, Auto Trim & Design Signs, The Wakulla News, Wakulla Springs Lodge, Marpan Recycling, The Wakulla Area Times, ESG Operations, Gulf Specimen Marine Lab, Talquin Portable Restrooms, Wakulla Eco Tours and Costco.Its cleanup time at the 26th annual Coastal Cleanup PHOTOS BY JO ANN PALMER PHOTO BY AMY JARMONPeople gather at Woolley Park in front of the stage, top left. Volunteer Shelly Swenson collects cigarette butts, above, as part of the Weigh Your Butts contest. And a free lunch of hot dogs is served up to volunteers, bottom left. ANOTHER RETIREMENT PARTY will be held Saturday, Oct. 15 with proceeds to benet the Florida State Seminole Booster Houston Taff Memorial Scholarship for Wakulla High School student-athletes. The event is being held at the Florida State University Club at 6 p.m. For information, contact (850) 745-7101. Houston Taff was a Seminole athlete and Wakulla High School coach who loved Wakulla High School and FSU Seminole athletics. The late Houston Taff was Sheriff Harveys brother-in-law. Donations payable to Wakulla Seminole Boosters, will be accepted if tickets are sold out. Contributions may be sent to 15 Oak Street, Crawfordville, FL 32327.A Farewell to Wakulla County Sheriff David F. Harvey during his final hours in office.You are invited to visit the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Thursday, Sept. 29 between 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. to offer good wishes to the Dean of Florida sheriffs, David F. Harvey.Elected 1976 Retired Sept. 30, 2011 Rhonda, David F. Harvey and Trafton Earn your Masters Degree in Construction ManagementMaster of EngineeringUAB School of Engineering Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering Multi-discipline peer interaction 33 Credit Hours in 18 months No entrance exam Each term is 12 weeks Online courses Bachelors degree from accredited U.S.University requiredDeadline for Application: November 1, 2011For more information please contact:Dianne Gilmer 205-975-5848, digilmer@uab.edu j~~ ~ b ~~~ ~ K JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

PAGE 17

THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 Section BThe Wakulla News EXTRA! Q: When does our new service begin? A: Waste Pro will begin service to all residential and commercial customers on Monday, Oct. 3. Q: What does our new service consist of? A: Your new service consists of one time per week garbage and recycling service. Garbage and recycling will be picked up on the same day. Before service begins on Oct. 3, you will receive a 96-gallon roll out cart and an 18-gallon recycling bin, along with an informational packet that will give you your new service days and answer many of the questions that you will have. Please have your carts and bins out the night before your scheduled service day. Bulky items such as furniture and household items that would not be considered garbage can be put out on your scheduled day of service, and will be picked up with the garbage. We ask that during the rst two weeks you limit these items until we establish a pickup routine. White goods such as washers, dryers and stoves can be picked up as well. This is a scheduled service and you will need to call to have them picked up. Q: Our current hauler picks up on certain scheduled days. How will we know what our new scheduled service day is? A: Waste Pro has been delivering carts and bins beginning since Sept. 18 and is scheduled to complete these deliveries by Sept. 25. You will receive information on pickup days and additional services that we provide when we deliver your carts and bins. Please be patient; we may run later than Sept. 25, but we will complete all deliveries before your rst scheduled service day in October. Q: What do we do with our existing garbage cans that our current haulers provided? A: We will work with your current haulers to ensure that your existing roll out carts are picked up in October. Our focus is to ensure that everyone has a Waste Pro cart and bin before your scheduled start date. Continue to use your current haulers cart until your last scheduled pickup is completed during the last week of September. Please bear with us; your current haulers will get these carts picked up as soon as possible. Q: I am excited about the new curbside recycling service! What items will you accept? A: The truck that will service you picks up dual stream recycling. This means that there is one compartment on the truck for paper items, and one compartment for commingled items. Most paper items are accepted. They include newspaper, junk mail, white paper, pizza boxes and cardboard. Because cardboard boxes are bulky, they need to be broken down and cut up into small squares (generally 18 inches). Commingled items include aluminum, tin, glass, and No. 1 7 plastic containers. Continued on Page 3BAnswers about trash service PHOTO BY JANICE RICKERT/Special to The NewsAnswers to some frequently asked questions about Waste Pros service to Wakulla residents:13,000 The number of estimated households that will pa y for the assessment.$196 The amount of the garbage fee charged yearly per dwelling unit.$112 The original assessment the county had planned to charge which didnt include garbage pickup, but allowed residents to drop off waste at the transfer station for free.1 The number of times per week Waste Pro will come and collect garbage and recyclables.9 The percentage of gross receipts that Waste Pro will be required to pay to the county, which will be used to monitor the three closed land lls in the county and cap the land ll at the transfer station.A look at garbage by the numbersBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe mandatory curbside collection of garbage and recyclables will go into effect Oct. 1. Starting on that date, Waste Pro will be the only garbage hauler in the county and all dwelling units will be required to pay an assessment of $196 a year. The assessment will appear on the tax bill, meaning it will be charged to property owners. Vacant lots, as well as buildings without power and a kitchen facility, will not be assessed. Non-residential units will be charged a different amount and will be billed by Waste Pro directly. For businesses that use only a 96-gallon garbage can, they will be charged $18 a month. For other non-residential, that require a dumpster, those fees will range from $73 to $242 a month, depending on the size of the dumpster. Non-residential includes multi-family dwelling units which is considered ve or more dwelling units. Continued on Page 3BGroup of Wakulla Republicans will participate in GOPs Presidency 5 in Orlando See story, Page 4B Upcoming committee hearings, presidential primary and states bleak budget outlook Weekly Roundup, Page 4B Newspapers in Education, See Page 5B pure speed. pure performance. pure simplicity.pure broadband is everything you want from an internet connection with no phone line required. its all the speed you need to surf, watch, download and game without slowing down. *Offer ends 09/30/2011. Pure Broadband available to qualifying residential customers only. The monthly rate of $29.95 requires a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months (after which the rate reverts to the then-current standard rate), and applie s to up to 1.5 Mbps service. An additional monthly fee (including professional installation, if applicable) and separate shipping and handling fee will apply t o customers modem or router. General Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them by service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions All products and services are governed by tariffs, terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at www.centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges Applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges include a Carrier Universal Service charge, National Access Fee surcharge, a one-time Pure Broadband activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rates. Call for a listing of applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges. Monthly Rate Monthly rate applies while customer subscribes to all qualifying services. If one (1) or more services are cancelled, the stan dard monthly fee will apply to each remaining service. Pure Broadband As determined by service location, an early termination fee will apply as either a at $99 fee or the applicable monthly recurring service fee multiplied by the number of months remaining in the minimum service period, up to $200. Performance will vary due to conditions outside of network control and no speed is guaranteed. Telephone landline is part of the service only for the purpose of data trafc transmission/connection and cannot be used for voice trafc transmission, except fo r 911 services. 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are the property of Cen turyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. a month*all high-speed internet. no phone line required.call 866.958.PURE click givemepure.com come in for locations, visit centurylink.com/storespara or ofertas en espaol marque al 866.958.7873 Saturday, Sept. 24 at 8pmNEW Originals and Old FavoritesAt POSH JAVA in Downtown SopchoppyTickets: $10/RESERVED SEATING: (850) 962-1010Organics & Gifts Singer/ Song WriterRick OttIN CONCER T IN CONCERT Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County $42 per year in Florida $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall850-926-7102

PAGE 18

Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, September 22 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at Beef O Bradys to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the public library. LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS will meet at 7 p.m. at the public library. Contact Anne Ahrendt at 528-0895 or Rachel Pienta at 321-3582 for more information. Friday, September 23 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) SASSY STRIPPERS QUILTERS GROUP meets at the public library from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. to make quilts for traumatized children. The cruiser quilts are donated to Wakulla County deputies to be used for children in need. New members welcome. For information, call 926-6290. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Saturday, September 24 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Saturday at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordville Highway at 5 p.m. For more information, call 2242321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET is held every Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Posh Java in Sopchoppy. The market features local organic and unsprayed vegetables, homemade fresh bread from Crescent Moon Farm, live music and varying demonstrations, events, vendors and activities. Growers and seafood vendors wanting to participate may phone Jennifer Taylor at (850) 241-3873 or email famu.register@gmail.com. For more information, contact Posh at 962-1010 or Debbie Dix at 528-5838, or email posh_faery@yahoo.com. Sunday, September 25 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Sunday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, September 26 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 7:30 p.m. at St. Marks First Baptist Church. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN meets each Monday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGAS CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, September 27 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 824 Shadeville Road at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. Wednesday, September 28 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, September 29 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. F AMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at Beef O Bradys to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Friday, September 30 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) SASSY STRIPPERS QUILTERS GROUP meets at the public library from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. to make quilts for traumatized children. The cruiser quilts are donated to Wakulla County deputies to be used for children in need. New members welcome. For information, call 926-6290. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Special EventsFriday, September 23 FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY SILENT AUCTION will be held at the library from 6 to 8 p.m. The Silent Auction includes gift certi cates, vacations, marine supplies, gifts, artwork, dinners, school supplies and more. Food and drinks will be provided. For more information about the event, contact Sue Belford at 926-4244 or FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail. com. BIG BEND HOSPICE BEREAVEMENT SEMINAR will be held from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee, for professionals and peer supporters that work with bereaved families. A registration fee of $79 is required which includes breakfast and lunch. Please call Lisa Baggett at (850) 878-5310, ext. 433 with questions or go to www.bigbendhospice.org to register. FIFTH ANNUAL SOPCHOPPY INTERTRIBAL POW WOW will be held at Sopchoppy City Park. A traditional Native American Gathering Hosted by the Village of the Descendats a Muskogee Creek Village East of the Mississippi. Contact James Phillips at 764-1556 or powwow@ descendantsvillage.com for more information. The pow wow will be held Saturday and Sunday as well. Saturday, September 24 SOPCHOPPY OPRY presents The Kenny Hill Band at 7 p.m. in historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium. The band features Brian Hill playing the at top, Jennifer is the groups lead vocalist and stand-up bass player and Ken Baldauf is a banjo picker and concertina player. Tickets are $10. Call 962-3711 to make reservations. Monday, September 26 NAMI WAKULLAs monthly program will be held at 6:30 p.m. at Tallahassee Community College Wakulla Center. It will feature Phoebe Ball, attorney with Disability Rights Florida, discussing guardianship and legal issues that affect the lives of those diagnosed with a mental illness. The program is free and open to the public. Friday, September 30 IGNITE THE FIGHT GOLF TOURNAMENT will take place at Wildwood Golf Resort with registration at 11 a.m. and shotgun start at noon. Cost is $75 per golfer. Proceeds will go to bene t the Wakulla County United Fire Fighters Association. Upcoming EventsSaturday, October 1 IGNITE THE FIGHT 5K RUN will take place at Hudson Park with registration beginning at 8 a.m. and race time at 9 a.m. Cost is $10 for kids, $15 for pre-registered adults and $20 day of the race. Proceeds will go to WCUFFA. MARC BLACK will perform at The Frog and The Hummingbird Co & Butter elds Roadhouse. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. The cover is $10. Contact frogandhummingbirdco@ yahoo.com or call (305) 304-2226. BOOK EXTRAVAGANZA FUNDRAISER will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the public library. Donations arent required, but are appreciated. Proceeds bene t childrens programs. Limit of ve plastic bags per patron. SMOKE AND FIRE, FIREFIGHTERS BARBECUE COMPETITION will be held from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Hudson Park. There will be barbecue plates, displays of re equipment, live music and raf es. Proceeds will go to the Richard Rhea Scholarship Fund and Childrens Burn Camp. Plates are chicken $6, two meats $7, and three meats $8, all served with slaw, baked beans and a roll. Saturday, October 8 WOODSTORK FESTIVAL will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comTail Wagger... Tourist Development Council meeting at 6:30 p.m. in the commission chambers. Friends of the Library silent auction from 6 to 8 p.m. at the library. Kenny Hill Band at the Sopchoppy Opry at 7 p.m. in the Sopchoppy High School auditorium.NAMI Wakullas monthly program at 7 p.m. at TCC Wakulla Center.ThursdayFridaySaturdayMonday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com City and County MeetingsThursday, September 22 WAKULLA COUNTY ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE will meet at 10 a.m. in the Board of County Commissioners conference room. The purpose of this meeting is to discuss ways to conserve energy. WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet for a public roundtable meeting from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Commission Chambers.Library News...By SCOTT JOYNERInterim Library DirectorIts nally here. After months of preparation, the Friends of the Library Silent Auction to bene t Library programs takes place on Friday, Sept. 23 from 6 to 8 p.m. As I mentioned last week, we are lucky enough to have a wide variety of items donated from local merchants and our patrons for your bidding pleasure. There will be everything from weekends at hotels and resorts, shing and nautical items, art from our talented community in Wakulla County, gift certi cates from local restaurants, and tickets to the Tallahassee Symphony, and much more. Refreshments will be available to those attending so we encourage all who wish to come out, get some great items, and support a great cause to join us. As I told you last week, the funds raised by the Friends help fund our Summer Program for the Children of Wakulla County, our book budget, help us with supplies and other expenses involved in the day-to-day running of the library. Each year, the Friends have donated more than $20,000 to the library. These are funds that do not come out of local tax dollars but from the generosity of the thousands of people in this community who love and use the library each year. With the Friends support over the next year we hope to provide ebook checkouts for our patrons, buy new public access computers, begin with the long awaited final renovation of the expansion wing of the library, and continue to provide computer classes, a wide variety of books, lms, high speed internet and other materials free of charge to the citizens of Wakulla. Ive said many times that our business actually goes up when the economy is down, so without the help of the Friends wed be hard-pressed to provide the services expected and needed by our county. There will be a bid sheet for each item for you to place your bid with myself and members of the Friends of the Library available to ask any questions. I will announce the winners at 8 p.m. and if you win you may take your item home that evening. For those who have to leave for whatever reason but end up having the winning bid on an item, you have until the following Tuesday to contact me before I go to the next person on the list. We look forward to having a lot of fun with this and hope you come out and join us and please frequent the businesses that made donations as well. See you then! If you have any questions beforehand please feel free to contact me at 926-7415. By JOAN HENDRIXCHAT PresidentIt was a day like any other day when Wakulla Animal Control got a call about a dog walking along the roadside. An employee left immediately to the location the caller described and there he was. The dog was so weak he barely could walk and you could see all of his ribs. He probably didnt have much longer to live, maybe a couple of weeks unless he could nd some food somewhere. He was brought back to the shelter and put in a kennel. Time went by with no inquiring calls from the owner nor was a call logged in on record tting that particular dogs description. When CHAT has room for dogs, Lewis will walk next door to Animal Control and look at dogs who never have an owner to come for them. He saw this dog lying in the kennel and imagined how he would look if he had been taken care of and was healthy. So, with that in mind, he brought him over to CHAT. The dog was a beautiful English Setter mix and black and white in color with pretty oppy black ears. This dog is categorized as a large dog and he only weighed 40.5 pounds, had an ear infection, round worms, had pale gums and was discovered to have heartworms. He was updated on all his vaccinations and wormed. His medical problems, coupled with the fact that he was terribly under weight, worried us. We all really wanted that dog to live and we were determined to do everything we could. We named him Scout and started him on heart worm treatment. I remember the rst day I saw Scout. He was lying on the concrete oor and was so weak he couldnt get up to get on his soft bed, he didnt even have the strength to bark or to wag his tail. I retrieved a blanket for his bed, went into his kennel, lifted him up and put him on the cot. I sat down next to him, stroked him for a long time, talked to him and told him he would never be alone again and was in a good safe place with people who cared. Scout is a beautiful, well behaved and happy dog that recently was adopted to a family that is so happy to have him. They eventually named him Dillon. One more homeless dog off the street and in a loving home.

PAGE 19

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 Page 3B 4th Annual Music Festival & Silent AuctionAll Proceeds to bene t injured and orphaned wildlife www.wakullawildlife.org www.woodstorkfestival.com A Great Time for a Great Cause!Food Drink & Beer Cake Walk Silent Auction~ First Table opens at 10am Last Table closes at 4pm Photo Contest Kids Table Raf es Local Artists and Vendors Educational Exhibits Great Music Featuring: 10am-Ralph Pelletier 11:30am-Swingin Harpoon 1pm-Mimi & The HearnDogs 2:30pm-Sarah Mac Band 4pm-Rick Ott Band Saturday, October 8, 2011 10am 5pmSPONSORS: 3Y Ranch 195 Harvey Young Farm Rd. Crawfordville, FL.TICKETS: ONLY $5.00 Per Person (suggested donation) Under 6: FREECome out and support Florida Wild Mammal Association Shirley Wise & Associates Posters courtesy of: PRINTING ON DEMAND 2650-5 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 (850) 926-4000 printingondemand@comcast.net LIVE AUCTION 11am 1pm the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringDwight WellsAugust 2011 Winner ank You So Much! His name was drawn fromI greatly appreciate the wonderful food! e best thig is I like every restaurant on this list! OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Continued from Page 1B Generally 1 7 plastic cont ainers are normal food packaging. Please rinse your commingled items before putting them in the recycling bin. The recycling plant cannot accept Styrofoam or plastic grocery bags. Q: Currently, my hauler comes up my private road or driveway to pick me up. Will Waste Pro still provide this service? A: We are committed to provide as close to the same service as your current hauler provided. Generally, if your mailman can get there, we can too! We will work with your previous haulers to determine how you were being serviced. If you live on a private road or driveway, your roll out cart and bin may be left at the foot of the road. Please do not be unsettled by this. We would ask that you contact us if you have a special situation like this and we will send a supervisor out to survey your particular situation and determine the best location to service you. Q: I live in a subdivision. Where does my roll out cart and bin need to be placed? A: Please have your carts and bins within three feet of the road the night before your service day. Q: I understand that we are offered an expanded scope of services. What other services are provided? A: In addition to the basic services listed above, we offer additional services at varying costs. Many of the services are provided for free. For residents who do not want a larger 96-gallon cart, we offer a 64-gallon cart. If you are a recycler, additional bins are offered at no charge. If you feel like you need additional recycling capacity we ask that you start out with one additional bin. After the rst few weeks of service if you are recycling more than two 18-gallon bins, we will provide you with additional bins at no charge. If you are disabled and cannot wheel your cart to the curb, assistance will be given at no extra charge. Please contact Wakulla County to determine if you qualify for this service. Side door service for non-disabled resident are provided at an additional charge. Bear proof and bear resistant containers will be offered to all residents. Q: What are the fee schedules for additional services? How do I contact Waste Pro to set up additional services? A: The flyer that you receive with your roll out cart and bin will have a fee schedule for additional services. There is a detachable portion of the yer that can be mailed into our of ce to set up additional services. You can also request these services by calling, or sign up for services on our website. Our main focus now is to ensure that every resident has a 96 gallon roll out cart and 18 gallon bin to start service on Oct. 3. Depending on demand, requests for additional services could take two days to three weeks to deliver. Please bear with us; we will get to everyones requests as soon as possible! Q: Will I pay more for all of these expanded services? A: Your County Commission has negotiated a rate of $196 per year for these services. The typical customer in Wakulla County was paying up to $300 per year for one time per week garbage pickup only. Not only is this a savings to most residents, by doing this, you will see less litter in Wakulla County and you can take pride in the fact that you are becoming one of the greenest counties in Florida! Q: What about my current driver? A: In order to keep jobs in Wakulla County we have employed a majority of the service providers that you have come to respect over years of service. We commit to this. We will also utilize as many Wakulla County businesses as possible to keep the dollars in Wakulla County. We intend to buy fuel, parts and other items in Wakulla keeping these dollars owing within the county. Q: I am a commercial business. How will I be affected? A: Waste Pro services the majority of commercial businesses in Wakulla County. Most commercial customers will see a savings on their monthly bill. We will continue to bill these customers. Your new bill that you receive for October services will re ect these reduced rates. Q: I still have questions about the new service. Who do I contact? A: Please contact Waste Pro by phone at (850) 5610800 or visit the website at www.wasteprousa.com. We will answer your questions as quickly as possible. We ask for your patience during this rst month of service. We have a lot of work to do in the next two weeks. Answers about trash serviceContinued from Page 1B Waste Pro will be in contact with all non-residential units to determine the best option for garbage collection. Call (850) 561-0800 for more information. Included in the assessment is weekly pickup of garbage and recyclables. There is also free bulk item pickup along with regular solid waste as long as it doesnt exceed 2 cubic yards. There is side door collection service available for free to disabled residents, if they qualify. Those who are not disabled can purchase side door collection for an extra $84 a year. A hardship assistance program is also available for low income residents. To determine criteria to qualify or for more information, call the county administration at 926-0919.2 The number of days the transfer station will be open to receive solid waste, recyclables, white good, bulk items, yard trash, tires, used oil and construction and demolition debris. Waste Pro will make improvements to the land ll and be open Fridays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. There will be a fee of $75 per ton to drop off items.15 The number of months worth of gross receipts paid to buyout the other haulers by Waste Pro. They have also hired around 15 people who were employed with the other haulers.96 The size in gallons of the garbage can households will receive.18 The size in gallons of the recycle bin households will receive.10 The length in years of the contract agreement with Waste Pro and the county.$2,397,500 The amount of gross revenue expected to be generated from the assessment. PHOTO BY TAMMIE BARFIELDWaste Pro garbage cans being delivered in Panacea on Sunday, Sept. 18.A look at garbage by the numbers

PAGE 20

Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 16, Despite the return of summer temperatures, fall was de nitely in the air this week with thoughts turning to upcoming committee hearings, presidential primaries and new budgets as agency heads prepared for yet another tight- sted session. Floridas economy continues to sputter, and it was reported this week that the states unemployment rate remained unchanged in August. And the Legislatures top economist warned of future revenue shortfalls. Florida Republican leaders this week named members to a committee that will begin meeting next week to decide when to hold Floridas 2012 presidential primary. Deliberations will likely spark national attention again as the swing state tries to make its case for prominence in the 2012 presidential race. Also this week, Florida teachers took their fight over merit pay to the courts, while a federal judge in Miami put a cork in a National Ri e Association-backed law preventing physicians and other health care providers from asking their patients if they own guns. Citizens Property Insurance Corp. customers meanwhile took their battle to Tampa in an effort to prevent sinkhole rate increases that could cost some homeowners thousands of dollars a year. REVENUE PICTURE DARKENS Floridas unemployment rate held steady in August at 10.7 percent. While still 0.9 percentage points lower than a year earlier, the persistence of joblessness seem to underscore repeated warnings from economists that Floridas recovery would be a prolonged affair. Amy Baker, coordinator of the Legislatures Of ce of Economic & Demographic Research, said Wednesday that earlier projections of general-revenue growth this year and during the 2012-13 scal year will drop fairly signi cantly. That means more difficult budget choices for lawmakers when they start the 2012 legislative session in January --though Baker said things wont be as bad as during last springs session, when lawmakers faced a $3.6 billion shortfall. Analysts, including Baker and representatives of the governors office, House and Senate, are scheduled to meet Oct. 11 to revise general-revenue estimates. I believe that you will be looking at another tight session, she concluded. Tight budgets were also on the minds of agency heads who this week turned in their wish lists for the coming scal year. Some are already making their pitch for increasingly scarce funds. Department of Children and Families of cials, for example, are asking lawmakers next year to bolster child-protective investigations. An agency budget proposal submitted this week seeks tens of millions of dollars to add and retain child-protective investigators, improve technology and better coordinate efforts with local law enforcement. The budget documents outline problems with high turnover among investigators, large caseloads and low pay. The proposal, which would need legislative approval next year, comes seven months after the death of 10-year-old Nubia Barahona showed the need for improvements. Part of the proposal seeks $15.8 million to improve technology in the child-protection program, such as equipping investigators with mobile technology that would allow them to get case information remotely and also enter notes and details. FLORIDA TEACHERS HEAD TO COURT The Florida Education Association, meanwhile, went to court in Tallahassee to try to shoot down a merit pay law that ties the salaries of teachers and other school employees to student performance. The union says the new law is unlawful because it violates a right to collectively bargain for wages, contracts and promotions that is guaranteed in the state constitution. This sweeping change totally changed the teaching profession in Florida, said FEA President Andy Ford during a press conference Wednesday. The lawsuit sets the stage for another legal battle for the powerful teachers union with the Republicancontrolled Legislature and conservative Gov. Rick Scott, both of whom were big supporters of not only the teacher merit pay law, but championed other laws that were opposed by unions and public employees. It is unfortunate that the labor union claiming to represent teachers has resisted every meaningful education reform for more than a decade, responded Florida Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Mark Wilson. MEDICAID MANAGED CARE WALTZ CONTINUES Federal Medicaid officials said this week they want changes to improve patient care and increase requirements on HMOs. One change would require the state to spend millions of dollars to bolster primary-care programs, while 20 hospitals would have to come up with projects to bolster the health of low-income people. The feds are also seeking to ensure that HMOs in the pilot program spend at least 85 percent of the money they receive on patient care. CITIZENS BOARD APPROVES RATE CAP. WILL OIR FOLLOW? Responding to pressure from homeowners, lawmakers and some high ranking state of cials, Citizens Property Insurance Corp. board members on Monday voted to cap proposed sinkhole rate hikes at 50 percent for the coming year as they try to make the state-backed program nancially sound. What remains to be seen is if state regulators will allow even those capped rates to go forward as they weigh the need for actuarially sound premiums against what the company has proposed. In the backdrop is the economic distress and political backlash of increasing insurance premiums for people who when opening their bills dont really think that much about whether the company is solvent and can pay claims. Anticipating a proverbial angry mob at a public hearing scheduled in Tampa, Citizens board of governors voted to phase in premiums approved in July. By capping next years increase to 50 percent, board members hoped to cushion the blow to thousand of homeowners in sinkhole prone regions of the state. The Of ce of Insurance Regulation has until Monday to approve those sinkhole premium hikes, averaging 428 percent statewide. During public testimony in Tampa, Florida Insurance Commissioner Kevin McCarty and other OIR of cials outlined a long list of concerns over proposed hikes that would eventually raise annual sinkhole premiums in some regions by thousands of dollars a year. Without concrete data you are asking residents in some counties to pay $5,000 more, McCarty said to the applause of several hundred Sinkhole Alley residents in attendance. 2012 HERE WE COME Gov. Rick Scott and legislative leaders announced t he nine members of a committee that will select the states presidential primary date, bringing Florida closer to what seems like an inevitable confrontation with the national political parties. Scott tapped former Gov. Bob Martinez; Jenn Ungru, Scotts deputy chief of staff who oversees the Department of State; and former state Sen. Al Lawson, D-Tallahassee. Senate President Mike Haridopolos picked Sens. John Thrasher, R-St. Augustine; Rene Garcia, RHialeah; and Gary Siplin, D-Orlando. House Speaker Dean Cannon appointed House Majority Leader Carlos Lopez-Cantera, R-Miami, and Reps. Seth McKeel, R-Lakeland and Cynthia Stafford, D-Miami. STORY OF THE WEEK: Citizen Property Insurance Corp. board approves a cap on sinkhole premium increases, an attempt to offset rate hikes that is some cases would surpass 2,000 percent. Meanwhile, state insurance regulators say they have concerns about the proposed rate hikes. They will weigh in Monday. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Theres a lot that you havent heard. Contemporaneous with being the bad boy, hes always been a real good guy when it comes to youth athletics. Attorney Michael Carney comments on former 2 Live Crew rapper and freedom of expression advocate Luther Campbell, who is seeking approval to become a certi- ed Florida teacher despite a gun violation and putting on shows involving minimally-clad women back in the day. WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Fall is in the air committees, presidential primary, budgetsAn appeals court on Friday issued a stay to block a deposition of former Corrections Secretary Ed Buss by the state corrections of cers union in a lawsuit over prison privatization. Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford, who is now Wakullas circuit judge, ruled on Thursday that the Police Benevolent Association could depose Buss, who was forced out as secretary last month, in its suit seeking to block a large-scale privatization of prisons in South Florida. But the 1st District Court of Appeals blocked it in a ruling Friday, issuing an emergency stay. The state is trying to prevent Buss from testifying. The Palm Beach Post reported Friday that the appeals court gave the union and the state until Tuesday to make their cases for why Buss should testify or not. The next hearing on the privatization lawsuit is set for Sept. 29 before Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford. Bids are currently open for private companies that want to run about 30 prisons in the southern part of the state. Judge Fulford had denied a request by the state to block Buss from being deposed in a lawsuit over the privatization led by the Florida Police Benevolent Association. Buss quit under pressure from Gov. Rick Scott late last month, and the speed with which Florida has moved to privatize prisons was seen as one factor in an admitted disconnect between Buss and Scott. Fulford ruled Buss is reasonably likely to have unique discoverable knowledge of potentially relevant subject matter and that the PBA had tried unsuccessfully to get the information elsewhere, the Post reported. News Service of FloridaAppeals court halts Buss deposition Ed Buss Special to The News Just about every GOP presidential candidate is in the state this week, as the Republican Party of Florida hosts Presidency 5, a conference that includes a straw poll of more than 3,000 Florida GOP delegates, in Orlando starting Thursday. Theres a debate with those candidates on Thursday night. Several members of the Wakulla County Republican Executive Committee will be representing the Wakulla County Republican registered voters in the Presidential 5 event in Orlando Thursday, Sept. 22 through Saturday, Sept. 24. The three-day convention includes a nationally televised Presidential debate hosted by Fox News and the RPOF, as well as a Straw Poll where delegates from around the state of Florida get together and vote on who they believe the next Republican Party Presidential nominee should be. On Sept. 24, the Wakulla County delegation will join as many as 3,500 delegates from around Florida to hear the Republican candidates for President address the group and make their argument for being the Republican Presidential nominee. This Florida Straw Poll has predicted the eventual Republican nominee since 1979. The Wakulla County delegation includes WREC Chairman Ed Brimner, Secretary Melisa Taylor, Wakulla County Commissioner Jerry Moore, Virginia Moore, Marcus Floyd, Lucy Floyd, David Davis, Tina White-Brimner, and Larry Taylor.Wakulla Republicans to attend Presidency 5 CallPau l s WellGet ThemAll TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROLSERVICEEVERYTHING FROM TERMITESTOMICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr s TM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm TheWorks coffeeespressolatts cappuccinofrapps andnowBAGELS! Monday-Friday630am-900pm Saturday8am-9pm Sunday12-5pm 27FAzaleaDrBehindBealls850.253.7253www.theworkscafe.com 2 0 1 1 S t a r t u p B u si n e ss o ft h e Y e a r THE CABINET SHOPTHECABINET SHOP Custom Kitchens&Counter Tops LUN CH PA RTN ER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyofwhile quantities last.926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive Deli DelioftheweekatTry One of Our Home Made Parfaits

PAGE 21

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 Page 5B Look for the next chapter of The Brass Bell in next weeks edition of The Wakulla news This page sponsored in part by:Written by Cathy Sewell and illustrated by Blaise Sewell of The Curriculum ClosetChapter Six: The End of the JourneyWhile it would seem to many that Coronados expedition was a failure, he actually discovered many new areas of the southwest United States, and claimed ownership of them for Spain. While they never found gold, their treasures were the amazing places they visited, including the Grand Canyon. Coronado and the Golden CitiesKarol, Felix and Hector stood on the sidewalk looking up at a sign that read TREASURE ROOM. There was a big golden crown under the words. Instantly, they knew they had been fooled. Is this supposed to be some kind of a joke? Felix yelled. Yeah, Hector, Karol also was angry. This isnt funny! I had no idea that this was the treasure, Hector said, apologetically. Youve got to believe me! When I was little, my dad gave me this, Hector said, pulling a gold coin from his pocket. He told me that it came from Gallinas. I tried to get him to tell me more, but he wouldnt. He would only say, Just remember, the treasure is in the journey. Hector held out the hand with the gold coin. It had the same crown as the sign and a few symbols, but no words. Honestly, I had no idea that the coin came from here. I would never have made you two go through everything we did, for a dumb old game token! The dejected explorers all sat on the edge of the curb. It was hard for Karol and Felix to stay mad at Hector, because he looked just as disappointed as they felt. And Felix still remembered how he felt just a few days ago, when his soccer friends all shunned him. Its OK, amigo, Felix told his friend. Thanks, but now we still have to get back home and were all out of food! Hector sniffed. Hey, were three pretty smart explorers. Well gure something out! Felix gave Hector a friendly punch in the arm. Whats wrong? Demetri yelled from his rolled-down window. They hadnt noticed his taxi pull up, and his loud voice startled them. Well, there wasnt a treasure after all, Karol told Demetri. Im sorry to hear that, Demetri said. Would you kids like to meet my travel partner? The friends leaned into the taxi and received a shock. Sitting in the front seat, wearing a wool-beaded vest and buckled into a safety belt, was a small brown goat. Ive got an idea, Felix said, untying the string from around his neck. This is for Misha! He hooked the old brass bell onto the goats collar. When he stepped back, Felix could see that Demetri had tears in his eyes. When I left Russia for a new life here in America, I had to leave behind many things, he began. And one of them was a small bell that would hang from the doorway of our home. I will forever keep this bell on Misha, and it will bring me good luck. Thank you! Felix felt like he had removed a heavy weight from around his neck. Youre welcome, he said softly. Well, I dont know where you three are heading, Demetri offered, but Im on my way to Corona, if you want a ride. As soon as they heard him say Corona, they were climbing into the back of his taxi. Buckle up, you three, and well be on our way! he directed. They all did as he asked, then took turns telling Demetri tales of their overnight adventure. So the treasure is in the journey. What do you think it means? Demetri pretended to wonder. Well, I know Ive made a couple of really great friends, Karol said. And suddenly it all made sense. Thanks, Demetri, Felix said. I think you helped us nd our treasure! It was nice meeting you all. Heres your stop! Demetri announced. The taxi pulled up in front of the Corona School. The explorers grabbed their backpacks and thanked Demetri for the ride. Hold on a minute, chicos, he said, walking to the back of the car. He opened the trunk and pulled out a wellused, blue and green, very familiar-looking soccer ball. He tossed it to Felix and climbed back into the drivers seat without another word. I think my luck is starting to change already. Adios, see you at school tomorrow! Felix said to his friends. He was eager to tell his grandma about his adventure. And as he walked home, he wondered if the curse had nally been lifted. Find us on COLORING PICTURE 1) A __ U M __ N __ M2) P __ __ E R3) __ __ A S T __ C4) G __ A __ S5) T __ N6) C __ R __ __ O A R __7) __ E W __ __ A P __ R SAnswers: 1) Aluminum, 2) Paper, 3) Plastic, 4) Glass, 5) Tin, 6) Cardboard, 7) NewspapersEach of the following is a product that people often recycle. Fill in the blanks to name that product.Name That Product Name That Product

PAGE 22

Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Firefighters BBQ Competition Saturday, Oct 1 11am 4pm Hudson Park, Crawfordville Bar-B-Q Plates, Displays of Fire Equipment, Live Music & Raffles. Hey Kids! Check out fire trucks, ambulances, and spray the hose! SMOKEANDFIRE PROCEEDS TO BENEFIT: Richard Rhea Scholarship Fund and Camp Amigo (Childrens Burn Camp)JUDGING AT NOON, PRIZES FOR Chicken, Ribs and Pulled Pork Judging Panel:David EdwardsFirst day as County Administrator, David HarveyFirst day as retired Sheriff, Heather EncinosaCounty Attorney, William SnowdenThe Wakulla News, Guinn HaskinsWakulla Area Times, Rev. Jeff McFall,Father Ed Jones, Art MyersWCTV, one surprise judge, come and see who it is www.campamigo.com Chicken $6, Choice of two meats $7, Choice of three meats $8(Served with Slaw, baked beans and roll)Plate prices: Price:$17,995 Year:2006 Make:Chevrolet Model:Silverado Z71Color:Black Price:$7,995 Year:1997 Make:Toyota Model:4Runner Color:Gray Price:$9,995 Year:2002 Make:Ford Model:Expedition Color:Black Price:$17,995 Year:2010 Make:Toyota Model:Corolla Color:Red Price:$11,995 Year:2005 Make:Chrysler Model:Town & CountryColor:Lt. Blue Price:$12,995 Year:2004 Make:Nissan Model:Murano Color: Silver Ultimate Image Auto, Inc I will get Everyone Approved! And I will get You approved no matter what! JB BlackYou want it! We have it!INTEREST RATES STAR TING AT 2.99% www.UltimateImageAuto.com4905 Crawfordville Rd., Tallahassee, FL850877-7222OVER150VEHICLES INSTOCK

PAGE 23

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 Page 7B Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! 926-7102 Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $10.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements A New Look PaintingSpecializing in residential and commercial Re-painting pressure washing sheetrock wood rot repairsLICENSED &INSURED850-926-2400CALL JIM PORTER: ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 CARPET CLEANING of Wakulla Residential and Commercial WATER EXTRACTION 24/7 EMERGENCY850-567-6734CAMO New Construction, Remodeling & Repairs850.524.5894 Home Maintenance & Repair--Cliff Westbrook Services ---Full Service home maintenance and repair. Foreclosure, rental, yard cleanups. Flower beds, window washing, trash hauling. EXPERIENCED and RELIABLE850-926-2004 Crawfordville CarpetCleanersaffordable carpet care free estimates850-459-0106 850-210-5849or visit us at www.BarryBuilding.com Affordable Office Spaceat the Barry Building. Enjoy working surrounded by a great atmosphere with many amenities. Rates start at $250/mo., utilities included! Come take a tour at www.BarryBuilding.com. THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Junior P.SandersSeptic Tank Services18-YR Experience. New System Installation-All Types. Drain Repair. Washing Machine Systems.SR0111684NO JOB TOO SMALL, FAIR PRICES, FRIENDLY GUARANTEED SERVICE!850-210-5777 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved850-356-6801Affordable for every budget! ...Refresh Home Detailingfor a new home feel...Call for a free and friendly estimateLICENSED Will help you make the most of your outdoor space. Cabins, Barns, Playhouses, Utilities, Gazebos, Tables, Swings, Rockers and More! Pricing and Sizes to t your needs. Cash Discounts. $25 credit on a new building with this ad. See Melissa at 1580 Crawfordville Hwy., next to Happy Time Day Care850-926-3441SOUTHERN STORAGE SOLUTIONS Stow it Away!!5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGEGreatRates! STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.BUYSELLTRADEREPAIRBoats, Motors, Trailers, New/Used Marine Supplies Sold 4815D Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Pro p Service Center Interstate Batter y Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-556-4652www.wakullaboatsales.com stowawaymarine @comcast.net Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com HAYHORSE QUALITYLOWEST PRICES IN TOWN!!!850-528-0770delivery available Denises ListCall Denise today to get your services on her list!850-926-7102 Classi eds@TheWakullaNews.net THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 105 Business Opportunities BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can fix those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again, and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Money Making Opportunity. Computer a must. Free evaluation & Training. Flexible hours. Great incentives. www.freedomtodream.net 352-360-5939. 114 Miscellaneous Help Wanted WANTED Inhomecaretakerforelderly woman.Freerentinexchange forthepeaceofmindthata lovedoneiswelltakencareo f anddoesnotgowithout.Contact Viola at 850-926-6316. 120 Services and Businesses A -1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed ~ John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550 ALL ABOUT...CONCRETE blocks bricks pavers LANDSCAPE plants sod tractor workcall JOSEPH FRANCIS850-556-1178 / 850-556-3761 BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway. Larry Carter Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931, 850-694-7041. Licensed/Insured. Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291. HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIRSales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & soundLocated in Crawfordville Doug & Sherry Quigg, Owners Lic. Nos. ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 926 -5790 KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial,residentialandmobilehomes.Repair,sales,service,installation.Allmakesand models.Lic.#RA0062516. 926-3546. Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 POLLY NICHOLSSpecial Touch CleaningConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential.pray like it s up to God, Work like it s up to you519-7238 926-3065Licensed &Insured RefreshHomeDetailing.Fora newhomefeel.Pleasecalfora freeandfriendlyestimate.Affordableforeverybudget. LcensedinFlorida. 850-356-6801. TillmansTermite&PestControl, Inc.Residential,Commercial. CallTillmanOwensforaquote. 850-322-1775. UPHOLSTERY Flagship Canvas & Upholstery. Quality marine canvas fabrication and Upholstery of all kinds. Scott A. Smith, 38 Rainbow Dr. Crawfordville, (behind El Jalisco). 850-228-1007. www.flagshipcanvas.com flagshipcanvas@yahoo.com 130 Entertainment Da Cajun Wagon ServingFreshSeafoodandMore withdaCajunkick!Shrimp PoBoy,CrabPoppers,Bouldin Balls,etc.EveryWed-Satfrom 11AM-7PM.Hwy.319bythe KangarooExpressinMedart. Callinordersarewelcome. 850-570-1625. 205 Antiques MenagerieAntiqueMallisNow open!Vendorspaceisavailable for$1.50/sqft.850-745-8381. 4340CrawfordvilleHwy.(nextto the library). 210 Auctions Real Estate Auction Nominal Opening Bid: $10,000 69 Crawford Ave, Crawfordville 3BR 2BA 1,688sf+/Sells:12:30PMWed.,Sep.28on site williamsauction.com/september 800-801-8003 Manypropertiesnowavailable for online bidding! A BuyersPremium(Buyer'sFee inWI)mayapply.Williams&Williams FLBroker: DanielSNelsonRe LicBK3223097;Williams&Williams Re Lic 1032049 A uctioneer: EddieBurksAuc LicAU4211;Williams&Williams A uc Lic AB-0000760. Silent Auction! Friends of Wakulla County Public Library tobeheldonFriday,Sept.23, 2011from6to8PMattheWakullaCountyPublicLibrary4330 CrawfordvilleHwy.Bringyou r famil y andfriends.Bidon g reat yg items.SupportyourLibraryPrograms.Giftcertificates,Vacations,MarineSupplies,Gifts, A rtwork,Dinners,SchoolSupplies,muchmore!!Foodand drinksprovided.Formoreinfo callSueBelfordat 850-926-4244. 275 Home Furnishings $159QueenPillow-TopMattress Set.Unusedinplasticwithwarranty. 222-9879. Delivery avail. 5piecebdrmset.BrandNEWin boxes.$449.Candeliver. 425-8374. 5-pieceWickerLivingRoomset. Glasstoptableswithtropical lookcushionpattern.Asking $350.Goodcondition.Call 850-926-9410. Couch&loveseat.$425.Earthtone,hardwoodframe,warranty, newincrate,del.avail. 545-7112. 320 Farm Products & Produce Farm-freshvegetables.Peas, blanchedandfrozen,okra choppedandfrozen,greenboilingpeanutsandboiledgreen peanuts.Wealsocustom-processcows,hogs,goatsanddeer. Raker Farm 926-7561. Fish Are YourFriends..Dont Throw Trash In Their Home 335 Pets DOGS,PUPPIES,NICECATS ANDKITTENS...Come,take alookandbringanew friendhomeTODAY!CHAT Adoption Center:Mondays closed. Tuesdays through Wednesday& Fridays: 11:00AM to 4:30PM Thursdays: 11:00AM to 7:00 P M Saturdays: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM Sundays: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM1 OAK STREET, CRAW FORDVILLE The unconditional love of a pet is waiting for you at th e C.H.A.T. Adoption Center. orvisit: chatofwakulla.org 355 Yard Sales Thursday9/22,Friday,9/23, 8AM-12Nat21ShorelineDrive, OchlockoneeBay.Kitchenisland,dishes,glasses,gold platedtableware,Christmas lawn displays and more!! Two-FamilyMovingSale!135 A palacheeStreet(1-mileEasto f Lanark,GulfTerrace).Saturday, 9/24,Sunday9/25.9AM-5PM. Everythingmustgo!Noearly birds please. YARD SALE!!Saturday, September 24Corner of US 98 and Spring Creek Highway.SPACES FOR VENDORS EVERY SATURDAY 8AM-4PM!Bring your Stuff and Sell it Here!!850-926-8120 (for info) 500 Real Estate PUBLISHERS NOTICEAllrealestateadvertisinginthis newspaperissubjecttotheFair HousingActwhichmakesitillegaltoadvertiseanypreference, limitation,ordiscrimination basedonrace,color,religion, sex,handicap,familialstatusor nationaloriginoranintentionto makeanysuchpreference,limitationordiscrimination.Familial statusincludeschildrenunder theageof18livingwithparents orlegalcustodians,pregnant womenandpeoplesecuringthe custodyofchildrenunderthe age of 18. Thisnewspaperwillnotaccept anyadvertisingforrealestate thatisaviolationofthelaw.Our readersareherebyinformedthat alldwellingsadvertisedinthis newspaperareavailableonan equalopportunitybasis.TocomplainofdiscriminationcallHUD tollfreeat1-800-669-9777.The tollfreenumberforthehearin g impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 505 Acreage for Lease Forsalebyowner.N.Wakulla. FiveacresinSweetwaterRidge. $146,000invested.Mustsale!! Makebestoffer.850-510-1216 or 850-523-7898. 515 Apartments for Rent 1BDR as LOW as $600/mo. 2BDR as LOW as $700/mo. 3BDR as LOW as $800/m o. swimming pool and gym850-926-1134MOVE IN SPECIAL $99 DEPOSIT $300 LOCAL HERO DISCOUNT $99Application Fee $35

PAGE 24

Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!91 Posey Rd., Medart2BR/1BA, secluded cypress home w/ replace, 2 screened porches on 30 Acres. Perfect for nature lovers.$875 per month.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 4 Choctaw Road 3BR/2BA House on double lot $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 80 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 2BR/2BA House/beachfront, dock $1,250 No Smoking or Pets 26 Manatee Lane 2BR/2BA House $1,500 Mo. (Vacation Rental also $100 night) No Smoking or Pets 10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BA House on pilings $950 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 249 Donaldson-Williams Rd. 3BR/1.5BA MH on 7 Acres $500 Mo. Pets Okay w/Approval/Fee 26B Old Courthouse Square 2BR/2BA Townhouse $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/Pets ok 110 Mount Pleasant 3BR/2BA House on 2 acres $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Efciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 8 Osprey 3BR/2BA 2,390sf House with replace $1,200 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 64 Blackfoot 1,300sf 3BR/2BA House with ofce & garage $950 Mo. No Smoking/Pets negotiableAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate 530 Comm. Property for Rent A ffordableOfficeSpaceatthe BarryBuilding.Greatatmosphere!Includesallutilities,trash p/u,fullkitchenuse,conference room.Ratesstartat$250/mo. 850-210-5849orourwebsiteat www.Barr y Buildin g .com WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE Fitness Studio -1000/sf,(wall to wall mat & mirrors) Retail -1250/sf (storefront w/back storage) Divided Office Space -1074/sf.Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 535 Comm. Property for Sale Choicecornerlotatjunctureo f CrawfordvilleHighwayand pavedWhitlockWay.200'X300'. CommercialZoningGuaranteed, $70,000.DixieProperties(850) 656-6340. 545 Homes for Sale NewhomeinCrawfordville! 3BR/2BA,locatedinWakulla Gardens.$79,000.RevellRealty, 850-962-2212. Sopchoppyhouse,3BR/2BA,locatedon1/2acrelot.$75,000. Revell Realty, 850-962-2212. 555 Houses for Rent 3BR/1BAhomeinMagnoliaGardens.$550/month,plussecurity. 3BR/1.5BAhomeinWakulla Gardens,$650/month,plusdeposit. Call 850-766-0170. 3BR/2BAWakullaGardens, Crawfordville.Largefamilyorientedkitchen,utilityroom, 10X10deck,shadyfan-cooled frontporchfortworockers. $850/month(lease),$850/securit y de p osit. 850-624-4664. 3BR/2BA,greatlocation!$850 permonth,lastandsecurityrequired. Please call 926-3832. 3BR/2BATHinMysteriousWaters.$795/rent,samedeposit. No pets. Call Jim at 566-5165. Crawfordville,clean,large2 bedrooms,2fullbathduplex, $675permonth.CallLinda, 850-926-0283. House/Acreage Charming 3BR/1BA, HVAC, appliances, ceiling fans, located on 3 acres in North Wakulla. Workshop, 2 storage sheds, $750/month, plus $500/deposit. 850-251-1253. Brenda Hicks Realty. 560 Land for Sale 2-acrelotforsalenearnew ShadevilleSchool,cornero f SteelCourtandSpringCreek Hwy.(citywater).Ownerfinancing.Call850-556-1178or 850-556-3765. 565 Mobile Homes for Rent 2BR/2BASW/MH.WakullaGardensKlickitatRd.Niceinterior andexterior,openfloorplan. $575/month, first, last. 3BR/2BADWMH,WakullaGardens, CAH, Good Floor Plan. $675/month+deposit,application,references.1-yrlease.Both availblenow!Callfordiscount! Informationorforappointment 850-554-5267, 850-524-4090. 2BR/2BAveryprivatenewer homeon5+acres.Largecovereddeck,appliancesincluded, W/D,neargulf,riversandstate park.$495/month,$400/deposit. 850-519-1990. 3BR/1.5BAM/Hon3acres, Panaceaarea.Centralheat/air, dishwasher,woodstove.Clean andprivate.Nosmoking.Referencesrequired.$600/month, $300/deposit. 352-493-2232. 3BR/2BAtrailerhomeforrent. Excellentcondition.Newappliances.Fenced-inyard,nopets allowed.$750/month,plussecurity.Referencesrequired.Call 926-2947. 605 Statewide Classi eds Adoption A childlesscoupleseeksto adopt.Flexibleworkschedule. WillbeHANDS-ONparents.Financialsecurity.Expensespaid. Catherine&Michael.(askformichelle/adam).(800)790-5260FL Bar#0150789. Autos Wanted CASHFORCARS!AnyMake, Model,orYear.WePayMORE! RunningorNot.SellYourCaro r TruckTODAY.FreeTowing!Instant Offer: (888)420-3807. Education A LLIEDHEALTHcaree r training-Attendcollege100% online.Jobplacementassistance.Computeravailable.FinancialAidifqualified.SCHE V certified.Call(800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com. Financial Services $$$ACCESSLAWSUITCASH NOW!!!$$$AsseenonTV.$$$ InjuryLawsuitDragging?Need $500-$500,000++within48/hrs? LowratesAPPLYNOWBY PHONE!CallToday!Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com. Help Wanted FreightUp=More$2Mos.CDL ClassADrivingExp (877)258-8782www.meltontruck.com. Driver$2000SignOnBonus! StartaNewCareer!100%Paid CDLTraining!NoExperience Required.CRSTEXPEDITED (800)326-2778 www.JoinCRST.com. $5,000Sign-OnBonus!Frac SandHaulerswithcomplete BulkPneumaticRigsonly.RelocatetoTexasfortonsofwork! Fuel/Quickpayavailable. (800)491-9029. MedicalBillingTraineesNeeded! Hospitals&InsuranceCompanieshiringnow!Noexperience? LocalTraining&JobPlacement available! (888)528-5548. Land For Sale BANKFORECLOSED,LAND LIQUIDATION,from$9,900,Blue Ridgemountains,pavedroads, utilities,countywater,panoramicviews,excellentfinancing. SaleSeptember24th,Callnow! (888)757-6867 ext. 214. A BANDONEDLAKESIDEFARM! 4acres-Lakeaccess-$16,900; 10acres-Hugeview-$29,900; 8acres-Lakefront-$69,900. ForeclosurepricedlandinUpstateNY'sSo.Tier!!Survey, cleartitle!(877)352-2844. www.newyorklandandlakes.com Miscellaneous A TTENDCOLLEGEONLINE fromHome.*Medical,*Business, *Paralegal,*Accounting,*CriminalJustice.Jobplacementassistance.Computeravailable.FinancialAidifqualified.Call (888)203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com. A IRLINESAREHIRING-Train forhighpayingAviationMaintenanceCareer.FAAapproved program.Financialaidifqualified-HousingavailableCALL A viationInstituteofMaintenance (866)314-3769. SAWMILLSfromonly$3997MAKEMONEY&SAVEMONEY withyourownbandmill-Cut lumberanydimension.Instoc k readytoship.FREEInfo&DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/30 0N (800)578-1363 Ext.300N. DIRECTVFallSpecial!FreeHD, 3monthsFREEHBO,Showtime, Starz,Cinemax!NFLSUNDAY TICKETFree-Choice Ultimate/Premier-Pkgsfrom $29.99/mo.Till9/30! (866)419-5666. RV's/Mobile Homes 200+TravelTrailersNOMINIMUMPRICE!OnlineBidding A vailable.Saturday,Septembe r 24@10amHarrah'sResort & CasinoTunica,MS www.hendersonauctions.com (225)686-2252 Lic# 266. Schools & Instruction Heat&AirJOBS-Readyto work?3weekacceleratedprogram.Handsonenvironment. Nationwidecertificationsand LocalJobPlacementAssistance! (877)359-1690. 680 Legal Notices 681 Foreclosure Proceedings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 09-0306 C A UCN: 652009CA000306XXXXX X WELLSFARGOBANK,N.A.ASTRUSTEE FOR BSSP TRUST SERIES 2007-EMXI, Plaintiff, vs. JUDY P. BROWN; et al., Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderorSummaryFinalJudgmentofforeclosuredatedApril28,2010,andanOrder ResettingSaledatedSeptember9,2011 andenteredinCaseNo.09-0306FCUCN 652009CA000306XXXXXXoftheCircuit CourtoftheSecondJudicialCircuitinand forWakullaCounty,Florida,wherein WELLSFARGOBANK,N.A.ASTRUSTEE FORBSSPTRUSTSERIES2007-EMXIis PlaintiffandJUDYP.BROWN;RANDLEE. BROWN;UNKNOWNTENANTNO.1;UNKNOWNTENANTNO.2;andALLUNKNOWNPARTIESCLAIMINGINTERESTS BY,THROUGH,UNDERORAGAINSTA NAMEDDEFENDANTTOTHISACTION, ORHAVINGORCLAIMINGTOHAVEANY RIGHT,TITLEORINTERESTINTHE PROPERTYHEREINDESCRIBED,areDefendants,Iwillselltothehighestandbest bidderforcashintheFrontlobbyoftheWakullaCountyCourthouse,3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL32327in WakullaCounty,Florida,at11:00a.m.on the27thdayofOctobe,2011,thefollowing describedpropertyassetforthinsaidOrder or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT9,BLOCKF,HUDSONHEIGHTS UNIT2ADDITIONTOCRAWFORDVILLE, ACCORDINGTOTHEMAPORPLAT THEREOFASRECORDEDINPLATBOOK I,PAGE20,PUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANYPERSONCLAIMINGANINTEREST INTHESURPLUSFROMTHESALE,IF ANY,OTHERTHANTHEPROPERTY OWNERASOFTHEDATEOFTHELIS PENDENSMUSTFILEACLAIMWITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATEDatCrawfordville,FloridaonSeptember 9, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sGLENDA PORTER AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 22, 29, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000306 US BANK, NA Plaintiff, v. CHANDAMALPHURS;KENNETHL.MALPHURS;UNKNOWNTENANT1;UNKNOWNTENANT2;ANDALLUNKNOWN PARTIESCLAIMINGBY,THROUGH,UNDERORAGAINSTTHEABOVENAMED DEFENDANT(S),WHO(IS/ARE)NOT KNOWNTOBEDEADORALIVE, WHETHERSAIDUNKNOWNPARTIES CLAIMASHEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,LIENORS,CREDITORS,TRUSTEES,SPOUSES,OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Noticeisherebygiventhat,pursuanttothe SummaryFinalJudgmentofForeclosure enteredonJuly27,2011,andtheOrderReschedulingForeclosureSaleenteredon September6,2011,inthiscause,intheCircuitCourtofWakullaCounty,Florida,Iwill sellthepropertysituatedinWakullaCounty, Florida, described as: LOT15,BLOCK5,WAKULLAGARDENS, ASUBDIVISIONASPERMAPORPLAT THEREOF,RECORDEDINPLATBOOK1, PAGE39OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 52 SIOUX TRL., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2742 atpublicsale,tothehighestandbestbidder,forcash,inthefrontlobbyoftheWakullaCountyCourthouselocatedat3056 CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL 32327,WakullaCounty,Florida,ateleven o'clock a.m., on October 13, 2011. Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendensmustfileaclaimwithing60daysafter the sale. DatedatCrawfordville,Floridathis7th,day of September, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sBECKY WHALEY AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 22, 29, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION FILE NUMBER: 10-386-CA MAJESTICACRESLLC,aFloridaLimited Liability Company, Plaintiff v. BILLYFISHERandBARBARAFISHER,et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:BILLYFISHERandBARBARA FISHER,ifalive,andifdead,theirunknown spouses,heirs,devisees,grantees,judgmentcreditors,andallotherpartiesclaiming by,through,under,oragainstthem;theunknownspouses,heirs,devisees,grantees, andjudgmentcreditorsofdeceaseddefendants,andallotherpartiesclaimingby, through,under,oragainstdefendants;and allunknownnaturalpersonsifalive,andif deadornotknowntobedeadoralive,their severalandrespectiveunknownspouses, heirs,devisees,grantees,andjudgment creditors,orotherpartiesclaimingby, through,orunderthoseunknownnatural persons;andtheseveralandrespectiveunknownassigns,successorsininterest,trustees,oranyotherpersonclaimingby, through,under,oragainstanycorporation orotherlegalentitynamedasadefendant; andallclaimants,personsorparties,natural orcorporate,orwhoseexactlegalstatusis unknown,claimingunderanyoftheabove namedordescribeddefendantsorparties orclaimingtohaveanyright,title,orinterest in the property, YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactiontoquiet tax title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot17,BIockB,WAKULLARIVERESTATESUNITONE,asperplatthereofrecordedonpage48ofPlatBookNo.1ofthe public records of Wakulla County, Florida hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,ifany,toitonGeorgeH.Gwynn, Esq.,theplaintiff'sattorney,whoseaddress is Post Office Box 4128, Tallahassee, Florida,32315,onorbeforeOctober10th, 2011,andfiletheoriginalwiththeclerkof thiscourteitherbeforeserviceontheplaintiff'sattorneyorimmediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou forthereliefdemandedinthecomplaintor petition. DATED ON August 29th 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sGLENDA PORTER AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 8, 15, 22, 29, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 2010-CA-321 BRANCHBANKINGANDTRUSTCOMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. MEEKSCONSTRUCTIONANDDEVELOPMENT,INC.,AFLORIDACORPORATION F/K/A3-MCONSTRUCTION,INC.,A FLORIDA CORPORATION, ET AL., Defendants. CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICEISGIVENthat,inaccordancewith theFinalJudgmentofForeclosuredated August23,2011,intheabove-styledcause, Iwillselltothehighestandbestbidderfor cash,attheLeonCountyCourthouseon October13,2011at11:00a.m.(EST),or assoonthereafterasthesalemayproceed, thefollowingdescribedparcelsofproperty locatedinLeonCounty,FloridaandWakulla County, Florida. Lots7and8oftheVillagesofS1.Marks,a subdivisionaspermaporplatthereofrecordedinPlatBook3,Pages70through74, ofthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty, Florida. Lot9oftheVillagesofSt.Marks,asubdivisionaspermaporplatthereofrecordedin PlatBookPages70thiough74,ofthePublic Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Lot 25 Sycamore Ridge Subdivision Commenceataconcretemonumentlying onthelinedividingSection16and17, Township2South,Range1East,Leon County,Florida,saidpointlyingonthe SoutherlyrightofwayboundaryofNatural BridgeRoadandlying1790feetSouthof theNorthwestcornerofsaidSection16; thencealongsaidSoutherlyrightofway boundaryasfollows:North89degrees59 minutes30secondsEast,1,319.52feettoa concretemonument(nonumber);thence South89degrees59minutes57seconds East,208.70feettoafoundconcretemonument(#4016)markingtheNorthwestcomer oflandsdescribedasParcel1recordedin OfficialRecordsBook1405,Page293; thenceNorth89degrees54minutes28 secondsEast;25.03feettoafoundconcretemonument(#4016),thenceNorth89 degrees59minutes35secondsEast, 230.00feettothePOINTOFBEGINNING. FromsaidPOINTOFBEGINNINGcontinue North89degrees59minutes35seconds Eastalongsaidrightofwayboundary, 185.85feet;thenceleavingsaidrightofway boundaryrunSouth00degrees00minutes 44secondsEast,118.04feet;thenceSouth 90degrees00minutes00secondsWest, 185.66feet;thenceNorth00degrees06 minutes10secondsWest,118.02feetto thePOINTOFBEGINNING,containing 21,294squarefeetor0.50acres,moreor less. A/K/ALot25ofSycamoreRidge,asubdivisionaspermaporplatthereofrecordedin PlatBook18,Page46ofthePublicRecords of Leon County, Florida. Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendensmustfileaclaimwithin60daysafter the sale. Dated this 1st day of September, 2011. BOB INZER, CLERK OF COURT By: -sANGELA BRADFORD Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) September 22, 29, 2011

PAGE 25

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 Page 9BBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 27 33 40 44 52 57 64 68 71 2 28 53 3 29 54 4 24 41 47 65 21 34 48 58 5 15 18 49 6 30 45 55 66 69 72 7 31 50 59 8 25 35 60 22 32 42 56 9 16 19 43 10 26 36 51 67 70 73 11 23 37 46 61 12 38 62 13 39 63 Fred Piscop A CROSS 1. Sentry's imperative 5. Knocks out of one's socks 9. IHOP serving 1 4. "Essays of __" 1 5. Big picture 1 6. 34-Across became one 1 7. Hamper contents 1 8. Zilch 1 9. Bowie's last stand 2 0. Put an early end to 2 3. Give a darn? 2 4. __ chi 2 5. Western topper 2 7. Sent, as to a military outpost 3 2. Grate stuff 3 3. Give two thumbs down to 3 4. Onetime "97-pound weakling" Charles 3 6. Doo-wop group member 4 0. Obey the drill sergeant 4 4. Beat by a whisker 4 5. 1960 Wimbledon champ Fraser 4 6. Schooner contents 4 7. Graffiti, to some 5 0. They manage the wines 5 2. Flock leaders 5 6. WWE outcome 5 7. 39, to Jack Benny 5 8. Get destroyed 6 4. Conical abode 6 6. Scotto solo 6 7. Social reformer Baker 6 8. Maze word 6 9. Creditor's claim 7 0. Bartlett's abbr. 7 1. Windows icon 7 2. "__ we forget ..." 7 3. Carpet featuresDOWN1. Chopped down 2. Jai __ 3. Daffy's problem 4. Gauguin's island home 5. Pursued, as a career 6. Colorful fish 7. Left or right of the goalposts 8. Replacement players, to some 9. Jazz cats' wear 10. Business card abbr. 11. Gather together 12. Intaglio's reverse 13. Like an open secret 21. Bother persistently, as an injury 22. Actress Hagen 26. "Oh no, not __!" 27. Basilica part 28. A natural abrasive 29. Negotiations hangup 30. Verve 31. Tests for carbon 14 35. ER shout 37. Bull artist 38. Snitched 39. Till fill 41. Bog stuff 42. Seuss's Horton, for one 43. Tyro, informally 48. Steamboat builder Fulton 49. Angular opening? 51. Like vicuas and llamas 52. Party spreads 53. Smiley or Smart 54. Nasal partitions 55. Play for time 59. Lackawanna's lak e 60. Spots for tacks 61. Radius neighbor 62. Hardly four-star cuisine 63. Catches some ray s 65. Occupational suffi x American Prole Hometown Content 8/28/2011 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 2009 HtCtt 1 234 5617 481 81 4 9582 361 4 96 7459 1238 00 9 HtCtt 718 9523 6 4 359641728 426837519 861 523947 975164832 234798651 543 289176 687415293 192376485 H E W N A P S E P A T E A L A I S A N D A G E N L I S P S N A G S E P T T A H I T I P E A T E E N A G A T R O B E R W E N T I N T O T R I O P A H E L A N S T A L W I D E D A T E S E R I S C A B S S T A T T I E U T A E L E P H A N S H A D E S N E W I E T E L T H A T A N D E A A M A S S L I A R U L N C A M E O T O L D S L O O W O A Brought to you by High Speed Internet Complimentary Hot Breakfast Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com681 Foreclosure Proceedings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000259 WELLSFARGOBANK,N.A.SUCCESSOR BYMERGERTOWELLSFARGOHOME MORTGAGE,INC.F/K/ANORWEST MORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, v. ROBERTM.FRETTERD;SHEILAD. FRETTERD;UNKNOWNTENANT1;UNKNOWNTENANT2;ANDALLUNKNOWN PARTIESCLAIMINGBY,THROUGH,UNDERORAGAINSTTHEABOVENAMED DEFENDANT(S),WHO(IS/ARE)NOT KNOWNTOBEDEADORALIVE, WHETHERSAIDUNKNOWNPARTIES CLAIMASHEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,LIENORS,CREDITORS,TRUSTEES,SPOUSES,OR OTHERCLAIMANTS;WELLSFARGO BANK, N.A. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Noticeisherebygiventhat,pursuanttothe SummaryFinalJudgmentofForeclosure enteredonJuly27,2011,andtheOrderReschedulingForeclosureSaleenteredon September6,2011,inthiscause,intheCircuitCourtofWakullaCounty,Florida,Iwill sellthepropertysituatedinWakullaCounty, Florida, described as: COMMENCEATACONCRETEMONUMENTMARKINGTHENORTHWESTCORNEROFTHESOUTHEASTQUARTEROF LOT49OFTHEHARTSFIELDSURVEY OFLANDSINWAKULLACOUNTY,FLORIDA.SAIDPOINTBEINGTHEPOINTOF BEGINNINGOFTHETRACTHEREINDESCRIBED,ANDRUNTHENCENORTH71 DEGREES59MINUTES20SECONDS EASTALONGTHENORTHBOUNDARY OFTHESOUTHHALFOFSAIDLOT, 54.16FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT,THENCERUNSOUTH03DEGREES43MINUTES13SECONDSEAST GENERALLYALONGACHAINLINK FENCE143.90FEETTOACONCRETE MONUMENT,THENCERUNSOUTH85 DEGREES35MINUTES25SECONDS WEST158.06FEETTOACONCRETE MONUMENTLYINGONTHEEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOFSTATE ROADNO.365,THENCERUNNORTH03 DEGREES18MINUTES15MINUTES15 SECONDSEASTALONGSAIDBOUNDARY109.79FEETTOACONCRETE MONUMENTMARKINGTHEINTERSECTIONOFSAIDEASTERLY RIGHTH-OF-WAYBOUNDARYWITHTHE NORTHERLYBOUNDARYOFTHE SOUTHHALFOFSAIDLOTNO.49, THENCERUNNORTH71DEGREES59 MINUTES20SECONDSEASTALONG SAIDNORTHERLYBOUNDARY95.07 FEETTOTHEPOINTOFBEGINNINGBEINGINTHESOUTHHALFOFLOTNO.49 OFHARTSFIELDSURVEYOFLANDSIN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 2781 SPRING CREEK HWY., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 atpublicsale,tothehighestandbestbidder,forcash,inthefrontlobbyoftheWakullaCountyCourthouselocatedat3056 CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL 32327,WakullaCounty,Florida,ateleven o'clock a.m., on October 13, 2011. Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendensmustfileaclaimwithing60daysafter the sale. DatedatCrawfordville,Floridathis7th,day of September, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sBECKY WHALEY AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court) September 22, 29, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION FILE NUMBER: 10-387CA DUANEEVANSLLC,aFloridaLimitedLiability Company, Plaintiff v. ANTOINETTEC.WALKER,a/k/aANTOINETTE C. WALKER-LIPPLETT, Defendant. AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION TO:ANTOINETTEC.WALKER,a/k/aANTOINETTEC.WALKER-LIPPLETT,ifalive, andifdead,herunknownspouse,heirs,devisees,grantees,judgmentcreditors,andall otherpartiesclaimingby,through,under,or ihhkhi pg y ,g ,, againstthem;theunknownspouse,heirs, devisees,grantees,andjudgmentcreditors ofdeceaseddefendant,andallotherparties claimingby,through,under,oragainstdefendant;andallunknownnaturalpersonsif alive,andifdeadornotknowntobedead oralive,theirseveralandrespectiveunknownspouses,heirs,devisees,grantees, andjudgmentcreditors,orotherparties claimingby,through,orunderthoseunknownnaturalpersons;andtheseveraland respectiveunknownassigns,successorsin interest,trustees,oranyotherpersonclaimingby,through,under,oragainstanycorporationorotherlegalentitynamedasadefendant;andallclaimants,personsorparties,naturalorcorporate,orwhoseexactlegalstatusisunknown,claimingunderthe abovenamedordescribeddefendantor claimingtohaveanyright,title,orinterestin tlle property, YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactiontoquiet taxtitletothefollowingpropertyinWakulla County, Florida: ThatpartofLot2inPlatfiledforrecordrepresentingtheWestone-halfofLot36,in HartsfieldSurveythatliesNorthofState Road 61 LESSANDEXCEPTthatparcelonthe NorthwestcornerofsaidLot2,identifiedas Tax Folio Number 00-00-036-000-09673-000 ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT: Commenceataplainconcretemonument markingthenorthwestcornerofLot36of theHartsfieldSurvey,WakullaCounty,Florida,andalsobeingthesouthwestcornerof ShadevilleSouth,aplattedsubdivisionof WakullaCounty,Florida,asrecordedinPlat Book3,Page19,ofthepublicrecordsof WakullaCounty,Florida;thencerunNorth 72degrees21minutes11secondsEast 262.78feetalongthesouthboundaryof saidsubdivisiontoanironrodandcap(LB &017)forthePOINTOFBEGINNING.From saidPOINTOFBEGINNINGcontinuealong saidsouthboundaryasfollows:North72 degrees21minutes11secondsEast37.30 feettoaconcretemonumentonsaidsouth boundary;thenceNorth72degrees21minutes06secondsEast413.84feettoaconcretemonument(LB4923)onsaidsouth boundary;thenceNorth72degrees20minutes40secondsEast124.78feettoaniron rodandcap(LB7017)onsaidsouthboundary;thenceleavingsaidsouthboundaryrun South17degrees31minutes23seconds East247.85feettoanironrodandcap(LB 7017)onthenortherlyrightofwayboundary ofStateRoadNo.61(ShadevilleRoad); thencealongsaidrightofwayboundaryrun South70degrees44minutes36seconds West476.17feettoa2inchdiameteriron pipe;thenceleavingsaidrightofway boundaryrunNorth17degrees31minutes 23secondsWest264.00feettothePOINT OF BEGINNING. Theabove-describedpropertyismoreparticularly described as: CommenceataconcretemonumentmarkingtheNorthwestcornerofLot36ofthe HartsfieldSurveyoflandsinWakulla County,Florida;thencerunalongtheWesterlyboundarylineofsaidLot36andalso theWesterlyboundarylineofLot2Peter GavinsEstateasrecordedinDeedBoo k 21Page75inthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,FloridaSouth16degrees58 minutes11secondsEast271.25feettoa re-barmarkingtheintersectionofsaid WesterlyboundarylinewiththeNortherly monumentedrightofwaylineofCounty Road#61(alsoknownasShadevilleRoad); thenceleavingsaidWesterlyboundaryline runalongsaidNortherlymonumentedright ofwaylineasfollows:North70degrees52 minutes39secondsEast265.25feettoan ironpipemarkingtheSoutheastcornerof propertydescribedinOfficialRecordBoo k 162Page1inthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,Florida,saidpointalsomarkingtheSouthwestcornerofpropertyasdescribedinOfficialRecordsBook527Page 476inthePublicRecordsofWakulla County,Florida;thencecontinuealongsaid Northerlymonumenteclrightofwayline, alsobeingtheSoutherlyboundarylineof saidpropertydescribedinOfficialRecord Book527Page476North70degrees46 minutes53secondsEast576.12feettoa rodandcapmarkingtheSoutheastcorner ofsaidpropertydescribedinOfficialRecord Book527Page476,saidpointbeingthe POINTOFBEGINNING;thenceleaving saidPOINTOFBEGINNINGcontinuealong saidNortherlymonumentedrightofwayline North70degrees47minutes29seconds East289.09feettoare-bar;thenceleaving saidNortherlymonumentedrightofwayline runNorth17degrees12minutes51secondsWest239.54feettoare-barlyingon theSoutherlyboundarylineofLot9of ShadevilleSouthSubdivisionasrecordedin PlatBook3Page19ofthePublicRecords ofWakullaCounty,Florida,alsobeingthe NortherlyboundarylineofHartsfieldSurvey Lot36;thencerunalongsaidSoutherly boundarylineofLot9ofShadevilleSouth SubdivisionandsaidNortherlyboundary lineofHartsfieldSurveyLot36South72degrees26minutes37secondsWest289.99 feettoarodandcapmarkingtheNortheast cornerofpropertydescribedinOfficialRecordBook527Page476inthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,Florida;thence leavingsaidSoutherlyandNortherlyboundarylinerunalongtheEasterlyboundaryline ofsaidpropertydescribedinOfficialRecord Book527Page476South17degrees27 minutes46secondsEast247.87feettothe POINTOFBEGINNING,containing1.62 acres, more or less. hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarereq uiredtoserveaco py of y ourwrittendeqp y y fenses,ifany,toitonGeorgeH.Gwynn, Esq.,theplaintiff'sattorney,whoseaddress isPostOfficeBox4128,Tallahassee,Florida,32315,onorbeforeOctober15,2011, andfiletheoriginalwiththeclerkofthis courteitherbeforeserviceontheplaintiff's attorneyorimmediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou forthereliefdemandedinthecomplaintor petition. DATED ON September 8th, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sBECKY WHALEY AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 22, 29, 2011 October 6, 13, 2011 682 Public Sales and Auctions NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART IV NoticeisgivenpursuanttoFloridaSelf-StorageFaciltiyAct,FloridaStatutes,Chapter 83,PartIVthatCrawfordvilleSelfStorage willholdasalebysealedbidonSaturday, October1,2011,at10:00a.m.at3291 CrawfordvilleHwy.ofthecontentsof Mini-Warehousecontainingpersonalproperty of: DEBRA DUNCAN ELENA WOHLFORD MARANDA COX BeforethesaledateofSaturday,October1, 2011,theownersmayredeemtheirpropertybyapaymentoftheoutstandingbalanceandcostbypayinginpersonat3291 Crawfordville Hwy. September 15, 22, 2011 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OnOctober26,2011,a1995FordF150, Vin:1FTEX14HOSKA95447,SuperCab Pickup,5.8LV8FIEngine,4wheeldrive,is beingsoldatpublicauctionatWilsons Towing,2741CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 10:00 a.m. September 22, 2011 683 Estate (Probate) Filings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 11-53PR PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF ELIZABETH L. STRICKLAND Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TheadministrationoftheestateofElizabeth L.Strickland,deceased,File11-53PRis pendingintheCircuitCourtforWakulla County,Florida,ProbateDivision,theaddressofwhichis3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,Florida32327.The nameandaddressofthepersonalrepresentativeandthepersonalrepresentatives attorney is set forth below. Allcreditorsofthedecedentandotherpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedentsestateincludingunmatured,contingentorunliquidatedclaims,onwhoma copyofthisnoticeisrequiredtobeserved mustfiletheirclaimswiththiscourtWITHIN THELATEROF3MONTHSAFTERTHE DATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATIONOF THISNOTICEOR30DAYSAFTERTHE DATEOFSERVICEOFACOPYOFTHIS NOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofthedecedentandpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedentsestate,includingunmatured,contingentorunliquidatedclaimsmustfiletheir claimswiththiscourtWITHIN3MONTHS AFTERTHEDATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMSNOTSOFILEDWILLBE FOREVER BARRED. Thisdateofthefirstpublicationofthisnotice is September 22, 2011. Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq. Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. 3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (850) 926-8245 Personal Representative: Diane S. Lynn 406 Oakwood Trail Crawfordville, Florida 32327 September 22, 29, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NUMBER: 11-52-P R IN RE: ESTATE OF: MARGARET EVELYN NICHOLS, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TheadministrationoftheestateofMARGARETEVELYNNICHOLS,deceased,File NO.11-52-PR,ispendingintheCircuit CourtforWakulla,Florida,ProbateDivision, theaddresswhichisCrawfordville,Florida. Thenamesandaddressesofthepersonal representativeandhisattorneyarelisted below. Allcreditorsofthedecedentandallother personshavingclaimsordemandsagainst decedentsestateonwhomacopyofthis noticeisrequiredtobeservedmustfiletheir claimswiththiscourtWITHINTHREE(3) MONTHSAFTERTHEDATEOFTHE FIRSTPUBLICATIONOFTHISNOTICE ORTHIRTYDAYSAFTERDATEOF SERVICEOFACOPYOFTHISNOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofdecedentandother personshavingclaimsordemandsagainst decedentsestatemustfiletheirclaimswith thiscourtWITHIN3MONTHSAFTERTHE DATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATIONOF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMSNOTFILEDWITHINTHE TIMEPERIODSSETFORTHINSECTION 733.702OFTHEFLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDINGTHETIMEPERIODS SETFORTHABOVE,ANYCLAIMSFILED TWOYEARSORMOREAFTERTHEDECEDENTSDEATHAREBARREDFOR EVER. Thedateofthefirstpublicationofthisnotice is September 15th, 2011. DAVID S. NICHOLS Personal Representative JOE B. WEEKS, ESQUIRE FLORIDA BAR IS NO. 0109522 16 B East Washington Street Quincy, Florida 32351 Phone: (850) 509-1002 Fax: (850) 875-431 3 Attorney for Personal Representativ e September 15, 22, 2011 684 Miscellaneous Notices MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON SEPTEMBER 12, 2011 Themeetingwascalledtoorderbythe Chairman.IngridFunderburkwasrecognizedasEmployeeoftheMonth.Lisa BrownandMelissa(Missy)RuddwererecognizedasTeachersoftheMonth.Allwere congratulatedandpresentedwithaplaque by Chairman Scott. ThePledgeofAllegiancewasrecitedwitha prayergivenbyMr.Evans.AllboardmembersandSuperintendentMillerwereinattendance. MovedbyMrs.Cook,secondedbyMr.Gray to approve the agenda. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Thefinalpublichearingonthe2011-12 budgetwasopenedat6:00p.m.Thepublic was given the opportunity to speak. MovedbyMr.Evans,secondedbyMr.Thomastoapprovethe2011-12Resolutionfor the0.25MillageforCriticalOperating Needs. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMrs.Cook,secondedbyMr.Gray toapprovetheResolutionDetermining RevenuesandMillagesLeviedfor 2011-2012. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Gray,secondedbyMr.ThomastoapprovetheResolutionadoptingthe Final Budget for 2011-12. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. SusanFlournoy,formerPrincipalofCoast, introducedAlyssaHigginsasthenew COAST Principal. KarenWellsgaveaPowerPointontheStudentSuccessAct.BethMimspresentedan update on District Accreditation. MovedbyMr.Evans,secondedbyMrs. Cooktoapprovethefollowingconsent items: 1.ApprovedMinutesoftheMeetingheldon August 18, 2011. 2.ApprovedthefollowingEmploymentof Personnel: New Hires: 12 Month Employee Name-Program/Center-Position-Termof Service Young,Melinda-RES-AssistantPrincip al09/01/11-06/30/12 9 1/2 Month Employee Name-Program/Center-Position-Termof Service Wells,James-WHS-ESEParaprofessional08/31/11-06/04/12 9 Month Employee Name-Program/Center-Position-Termof Service Carr,Mary-Transportation-BusAttendant 2011-2012 Smith,Charles-Transportation-BusAttendant 08/24/11-05/31/12 OtherPersonnel(includingtemporary,PT& currentemployeeshiredtoasecondposition) Name Program/CenterPosition-Term of Service Brooks,Terri-WHS-TeacherTimeLimited08/11/11-10/14/11 Clemons, Katie TransportationOffice Assistant 08/18/11-05/31/12 Dyke, Marcilla TransportationGarage/White Fleet 08/18/11-05/31/12 Fell,Deborah-Pre-K/WEC-Teacher Time Limited 08/12/11-11/30/11 Howard, Moses TransportationMechanic 08/18/11-05/31/12 Williams, MaryWMS-Custodian Time Limited 08/22/11-06/30/12 Wilson,Lisa-Pre-K/WEC-OfficeHealth Aide Time Limited 09/01/11-11/18/11 Wood, WhitneyWHSOfficeAssistant Time Limited 08/31/11-09/30/11 Supplemental Positions: Name-Program/Center-Position-Termof Service Allen,Amber-RMS-VolunteerCoordinator 2011-2012 Bowerman,Marc-WHS-WKLASponsor2011-2012 Galladay, Amy WMS-Assistant Drama Sponsor 2011-2012 Galladay, AmyWMS-Volunteer Coordinator 2011-2012 Kyle,Bonnie-CES-VolunteerCoordinator 2011-2012 Nutting, SydneyRMSAssistant Track Coach 2011-2012 Panzarina, MichaelWHSPercussion Line 2011-2012 Peck,Lee-WMS-TextbookManager2011-2012 Rozar,James-RMS-AssistantBoysSoccer Coach 2011-2012 Russell,Cindy-MES-VolunteerCoordinator 2011-2012 Thompson, CherylWHS-FlagCorp Sponsor 2011-2012 Wells,James-RMS-Asst.BoysBasketball Coach 2011-2012 Wells,James-WHS-AssistantJVFootball Coach 2011-2012 3.ApprovedthefollowingLeaveofAbsence requests: WaltraudGrantham/effectiveSeptember7, 2011 for approximately six weeks ShawndaArnett/effectivethe2011-12 school year. 4.ApprovedaLetterofResignationon Elizabeth Michel/effective July 19, 2011. 5.ApprovedthefollowingLettersofRetirement: DorothyMcHenry/effectiveOctober1,2011 and enter DROP PatsyCalhoun/effectiveAugust1,2011and enter DROP. 6.ApprovedIllnessintheLineof Duty/FMLA. (See Supplemental File #21) 7.ApprovedBudgetAmendments#10/11 -20 thru 26. 8. Approved the Warrants for payment. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Thomas,secondedbyMr. Evanstoapprovethe2011-2012SchoolImprovementPlansandDistrictAssistance Plan. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Evans,secondedbyMr.ThomastoapprovetheElderCareServices, Inc., Foster Grandparent Program. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Thomas,secondedbyMr. EvanstoapprovetheAgreementforthe Multi-DistrictProgramfortheHearingImpairedbetweenWakullaandTaylorCounties. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMrs.Cook,secondedbyMr.Gray toapproveaResolutioninsupportofthe FloridaCenterforPerformingArtsandEducation. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Gray,secondedbyMr.ThomastoapprovetheWakullaCOASTCharter School Annual Financial Audit. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Gray,secondedbyMr.Evans toapprovetheNewObservationFormand theNewTeacherEvaluationSection6 TheAppraisalSystempendinganyupcoming changes. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Evans,secondedbyMrs. CooktoapprovethefollowingJobDescripi pp g p tions: 1.BusAttendance/VanDriverrevisedto include van driver 2.EmploymentSpecialistParaprofessional revised 3. Career Pathway Specialist New Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Gray,secondedbyMrs.Coo k toapproveOutofFieldteachers.(SeeSupplemental File # 21) Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Gray,secondedbyMr.Evans toapprovethePAECMasterInservicePlan revisions. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMrs.Cook,secondedbyMr.ThomastoapprovetheSuperintendentsAnnualFinancialStatementfortheperiodending June 30, 2011. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Thomas,secondedbyMrs. CooktoapprovetheComprehensiveSafety Report for 2010-2011. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMr.Thomas,secondedbyMr. Evanstoapprovethe2011-2012Wakulla CountySchoolBoardFive-YearDistrictFacilities Work Plan. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. MovedbyMrs.Cook,secondedbyMr.Thomas to adjourn. Votingforthemotion:Mrs.Cook,Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. AnExecutiveSessionwasheldimmediately aftertheboardmeetingtodiscussissues pertainingtoCollectiveBargaining.Staff present:SuperintendentMiller,AllBoard Members,AssistantSuperintendent/Beth ODonnell,CFO/RandyBeach,Executive Director/KarenWellsandJerry Copeland/Chief Negotiator. September 22, 2011 687 Invitations to Bid Advertisement Detail WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES Request for Proposal No. 2011-22 Advertisement Begin Date/Time: September 9, 2011 at 8:00 a.m. BoardDecisionswillbeavailableat:3093 CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL 32327. SealedresponsesforInformationTechnologyServicesaddressedtotheWakulla CountyPurchasingCoordinator,at3093 CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL 32327willbereceiveduntil2:00p.m.on September29,2011,atwhichtimeallproposalswillbepubliclyopened.Anyresponsesreceivedafterthetimeanddate specifiedwillnotbeacceptedandshallbe returned unopened to the Proposer. Please direct all questions to: Deborah DuBose Phone: 850.926.9500, FAX: 850.926.9006 e-mail: ddubose@mywakulla.com RFPdocumentswillbeavailableat www.mywakulla.comorcanbepickedup atthelocationlistedaboveafter8:00a.m. on Friday, September 9, 2011. Anypersonwithaqualifieddisabilityrequiringspecialaccommodationsatthebid openingshallcontactpurchasingatthe phonenumberlistedaboveatleast5businessdayspriortotheevent.Ifyouare hearingorspeechimpaired,pleasecontact thisofficebyusingtheFloridaRelayServiceswhichcanbereachedat 1.800.955.8771 (TDD). TheBoardofCountyCommissionersreservestherighttorejectanyandallbidsor acceptminorirregularitiesinthebestinterest of Wakulla County. Mike Stewart, Chairman Deborah DuBose, OMB Coordinator September 15, 22, 2011Classified Ads For As Little As $10/Week 926-7102

PAGE 26

Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com *Offer ends 12/31/2011. Offer and stated rates are available to new, rst-time CenturyLink Prism TV residential customers in select areas only. The $65.95 monthly rate applies to up to 1.5 Mbps Pure Broadband and Prism TV package for six (6) months of service with a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months, after which standard rates apply. A $6.99 monthly DVR service fee applies when the Quad Play DVR is purchased with Prism TV package. Promotional offer cannot be c ombined with any other Prism offers. All prices, packages and programming are subject to change without notice. Taxes, fees, an d surcharges will apply. An additional monthly fee (including professional installation, if applicable) and a shipping and handling fee will apply to customers modem or router. Customer must cancel DVR and/or HD service by calling CenturyLink Customer Service before the end of the six-month promotional period to avoid monthly charges, or the standard monthly rate for each service will apply until service(s) are cancelled. Offers may be limited to specic locations. General Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them b y service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restric tions apply. Terms and Conditions All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, local terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at http://about.centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply, including a Carrier Universal Service charge, National Access Fee surcharge, a one-time High-Speed Internet activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rate s. Call for a listing of applicable taxes, fees, and surcharge s. Monthly Rate for All Service Bundles The monthly rate for all bundled services will apply while customer subscribes to all qualifying services. If one (1) or more services are cancelled, the standard monthly fee will apply to each remaining service. Pure Broadband Early termination results in customer being responsible for payment of the applicable monthly recurring service fee multiplied by the number of months remaining in the minimum service period, up to $200. Performance will vary due to conditions outside of network control and no speed is guaranteed. Telephone landline is part of the service only for the purpose of data trafc transmissi on/connection and cannot be used for voice trafc transmission, except for 911 services. CenturyLink Prism TV All plans require separate local phone service plan and include digital channels (including local channels), one (1) set-top bo x, one (1) modem gateway, and up to four (4) standard direct video streams to residence. CenturyLink-provided set-top boxes are required to view TV. If a term agreement applies to the offer, an early termination fee in the amount of discounts received applies if customer terminates services before the end of the appl icable term agreement. Local channel availability varies by market. Caller ID service must be purchased separately to enable th e on-screen Caller ID feature; Caller ID feature is not available in all areas. High Denition (HD) available on all TV plans f or an additional $11.99/month, and up to two (2) of the up to four (4) video streams can be in HD. Customers location determines both HD availability and the maximum number of HD video streams (between 0 and 2 HD streams) a customer can view and record at any one time per residence, regardless of the number of set-top boxes (STBs) in the household. All non-HD video streams are provided in standard denition. Subscription to service precludes customers from purchasing high-speed Internet services from any third party. Additional charges will apply fo r additional programming packages, movie channel subscriptions (except for Prism Premium plan), Pay Per View movies and events On Demand purchases, and premium services/subscriptions for all plans. Some subscription services, events, and broadcast netw ork service may be blacked out in customers area. Customer may dial 67 (touchtone) or 1167 (rotary) prior to placing a call to block their calling information. In order for media sharing to opera te correctly customer must have Windows XP or VISTA and Windows Media Player 11. Equipment Minimum equipment and CenturyLink professional installation are required. At initial installation, each customer receives: one (1) VDSL 2 modem; up to six (6) STBs (standard plan includes one (1) STB; additional STBs are available for an additional monthly r ate, per STB); and one (1) remote control per STB installed. All equipment must be returned to designated CenturyLink retail st ore within thirty (30) days after service disconnection in an undamaged condition, or customer is charged for each equipment pi ece not returned or returned as damaged. Prism TV Plan Quad Play DVR service excluded and is available for an additional monthly fee. X-Men First Class 2011 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. All Rights Reserved. X-Men, all character names and their dis tinctive likenesses: TM & 2011 Marvel Entertainment, LLC and its subsidiaries. All Rights Reserved. 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of th eir respective owners.NOW YOU HAVE A BETTER TV CHOICE. CenturyLinkTM PrismTMFind-It-Fast Navigation Find what you want to watch in a ash. Search for shows by actor, title and category. Interactive DashboardFind local news, weather, gas prices and personal info right on your TV. PrismTM TV Pure Broadband brilliant TV pure speed + Its exactly the same as your TV now it has the same shows, it does the same stuff only more. A lot more. Prism has interactive features like a real Whole Home DVR, Find-It-Fast Navigation, Warp Speed Channel Change and an Interactive Dashboard. Whole Home DVRNow you can start a recorded show in 1 the Whole Home DVR. Even watch and record up to 4 shows at once with a single DVR. Not to mention, you can manage your DVR library, set recordings and reminders, and customize your online guide from any Internet-enabled PC. Call 866.484.7057