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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00373
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 09-08-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00373
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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 36th Issue Thursday, September 8, 2011 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 CentsThe WakullanewsInside This Week Public Notices ..............Page 3A Comment & Opinion ....Page 4A Church..........................Page 5A School...........................Page 6A Outdoors .....................Page 7A Sports ..........................Page 8A In The Huddle ..............Page 9A Water Ways...............Page 10A Sheriffs Report ..........Page 11A Green Scene ................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..........Page 2B Classi eds ....................Page 7B Legal Notices ...............Page 8B P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y Published Weekly, R e a d D a i l y Read Daily Jackie Fulford is Wakullas new circuit judgeCounty reduces utility taxBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netCircuit Judge Jackie Fulford isnt new to Wakulla County. She was chief prosecutor in the county for several years. With the retirement of Circuit Judge N. Sanders Sauls at the end of August, Chief Judge Charles Francis gave Judge Fulford the assignment to cover Wakulla County. Sauls had been assigned Wakulla for the last 13 years and stepped down after reaching the mandatory retirement age of 70. Fulford is already making some changes … including allowing members of the jury to submit questions during trials, something that has been done for the past year or so in Leon County trials after a state Supreme Court decision. Perhaps one of the biggest changes is that Fulford, who describes herself as a morning person, starts court early. For her “ rst full day in Wakulla on Monday, Aug. 26, she had a hearing set at 6 a.m. in the courthouse, and had another major hearing and selected juries for three felony trials to be held later in the week. All that by lunchtime. I think people will get used to it,Ž Judge Fulford says of the early start. When she was “ rst appointed to the bench, two years ago in July, she was given a post over civil cases in Leon County. There was such a backlog of cases, Fulford said, and moving things forward hampered by trying to set hearings in which attorneys often had scheduling con” icts. She decided to offer early morning hearings, noting that it was less likely for a scheduling con” ict at 7:30 a.m. She quickly cleared the backlog and got her cases better managed. Fulford also reasoned that its important for the public to have access to the courts. Since Leon County is home to the state capitol, there are frequently constitutional challenge cases that take a priority over other types of cases. But, Fulford says she realizes that when people have a pending court case, its often the most important thing in their lives … and she didnt think it fair to bump those cases for the high-pro“ le cases. Continued on Page 3A WILLIAM SNOWDENWakulla Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford in her judicial chambers. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter initially deciding to levy the Public Services Tax at the maximum amount of 10 percent, the County Commission rescinded that action and decided to lower it to 7 percent, with a 500 kilowatt exemption included. I cant do this to people,Ž said County Commissioner Mike Stewart. This is another new tax.Ž For the next “ scal year, the commission has decided to increase the Communications Services Tax to 5.22 percent, implement a solid waste assessment of $196 and is also looking at increasing the “ re MSBU to $75 per household. Stewart brought up the idea at the August meeting to lower the tax after the board voted four to one, with Commissioner Jerry Moore opposing, to levy the full 10 percent at the June 21 meeting. Stewart originally wanted the PST to be lowered to 5 percent and also lower the millage rate by the same amount to make it revenue neutral. Commissioners Alan Brock, Randy Merritt and Lynn Artz were not as keen on that idea. A compromise was hatched and the commission decided to impose a 7-percent tax with an exemption included. I think this is the best compromise we can hope for,Ž Stewart said, although he added he wasnt entirely happy about it. Lowering the PST would mean the budget would decrease by $346,259. However, the sheriffs of“ ce has projected that jail bed revenues will be coming in higher for this year and anticipate an extra $250,000. The commission agreed to include that in the budget, which would mean $96,259 would still need to be cut. Artz said if jail bed revenues end up not being over what was projected then the sheriffs of“ ce should be held accountable and make up for the de“ cit. The $96,259 would be spread out across all constitutional of“ ces, except for the supervisor of elections. The commission said it would take that portion because there are two elections next year. Merritt said the countys proposed budget is at 2005-06 operating levels, meaning it had reduced its budget to pre-Pingree. He added that the county is dealing with a decrease in revenues, trying to increase its reserves and not pull money from other funds to support the general fund. The can got kicked down the road and its in our laps now,Ž Merritt said. Continued on Page 3AWar Eagles defeat Mosley in season opener, 31-14By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe War Eagles kicked off their season with a big win on the road against Mosley High School, 31-14, on Thursday, Sept. 1 at Tommy Oliver Stadium in Panama City. Marshane Godbolt had three touchdowns in the game. He was able to “ nd creases in the Dolphin defense and then outrun them to the goal line. Running back Will Thomas, who is a punishing runner, had 14 carries and gained nearly 120 yards in the game. We got off to kind of a sluggish start in the “ rst half,Ž Head Coach Scott Klees said. A fumbled punt return gave the Dolphins good “ eld position and they were able to score. The War Eagles did lead at the end of the half, 13-7. Godbolt had four rushes for 65 yards, and two rushing touchdowns -including one 60-yard run. He also had a catch that was an 80-yard run for a touchdown. Deonte Hutchinson scored on a “ ve-yard run. In the third quarter, Thomas busted off a long run and the War Eagles scored to go up 19-7. They went for a two-point conversion but it was caught out-of-bounds. Later in the quarter, the War Eagles got a “ eld goal to go up 22-7. Continued on Page 12A By HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsMany in the Wakulla County area know, or have heard of, The Promise Land Ministries Lighthouse. The fellowship hall is located at 20 Church Road, not far from Shell Point. On Oct. 1, Promise Land will launch its latest outreach endeavor: a thrift store in the heart of Crawfordville. The original efforts of the ministry … which de“ nes itself as non-denominational … began in 1991 when the Spring Creek Community Church realized the growing need for a homeless shelter to be built in Wakulla County. Land was developed and a mobile home was moved onto the acquired property. The ministry, the facilities, along with the land area itself, have been carefully cultivated ever since. In 2010 they served close to 18,000 meals to hungry individuals and helped to support almost 4,000 families in their time of need. A great deal of prayer and community support have gone into getting the new thrift store (3299 Crawfordville Highway) location in position for the grand opening, and it seems the efforts of the few are quickly bearing fruit. Continued on Page 2ASee Page 9AIn The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State A founding member of The Promise Land Ministries Lighthouse, Billie Davis, along with Pastor Glenn Hamel, are in the process of opening a thrift store in Crawfordville. The store will open on Oct. 1. Promise Land plans to open a thrift storePHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/Special to The NewsWakullas Willie Thomas breaks free during the game against Mosley High School on Sept. 1. PHOTO BY HERB DONALDSON/Special to The News Coastal Cleanup is Sept. 17See Page 1B

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Daviod Rossetti 850 591-6161 Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Loren Joiner 850 544-3508 Kelly Dykes 850 528-3063 all akullas inest 850 926-1011 our ome own ealtor734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FLPromise Land plans to open a thrift storeContinued from Page 1 Upon my arrival at the thrift store location, I was greeted by a huge truck. Their latest food delivery had just come in and the unloading was in full swing. Fruit, vegetables, meats, frozen and canned goods covered the entire front porch area of the building. It was enough to stock a small grocery store. In the center of it all was an agile and determined little woman, pulling down the heavy boxes stacked along the trucks tailgate by the deliveryman. Her name is Billie Davis, from Wakulla, who … along with her husband Bruce … were among the founding members of Promise Land. She currently serves on the Board of Trustees and is the Secretary. Given her focus and energy, she obviously was well acquainted with hard work. After we exchanged a few pleasantries, I found myself on the back of the truck unloading boxes with the delivery team. With the truck finally cleared, I wanted to know from Davis why she felt an organization like Promise Land was so important: I feel it serves the community greatly,Ž she says. A lot of people down here are in need, so we give out this food to help them. We have the ministry and we also prepare three meals a day for the guys that are involved with the lawn service that helps those who can truly bene“ t from it.Ž Davis friend, Pat Ogletree, was also there. She comes in once a week from Leon County to help sort the food along with other odd duties that need attending. From the time of my arrival to the time I left, people from the community drifted in and out to drop off a donation, or offer well wishes for the new thrift store well, or to lend a hand for an hour or so before going about the rest of their day. The deliveryman, Terrence Jones, is also from Leon County. He “ nds the work that he does … delivery of food to those who serve the needy … to be nourishing for not only the body, but the spirit of the people at large. He delivers to over 10 surrounding counties in one day. He usually travels close to 120 miles, with Port St. Joe being one of the more far-reaching stops. My next question to Davis was how has this type of work had changed her. I feel like Im doing something worthy with my time,Ž she says. I come out here and volunteer, and now that Glenns taken over Im still behind him and I show it by coming out to help and do all I can.Ž Glenn, is Glenn Hamel. A married father of seven who … at “ rst sight … looks more like the man who was sent to build the church, rather than run it. With his jeans, T-shirt, and pullover cap, one becomes aware that hes here to roll up his sleeves and get down to business. Named after both of his grandfathers … one who was a pastor in Wakulla, the other in Starke, Fla. … this particular type of service having become Hamels life work is no real surprise. In 2001, Davis and her husband, Bruce, were ready to retire from the larger role of Promise Land. After much prayer and thought, they felt the lord was leading them to ask Hamel to become the leading pastor of the organization. Before this, Hamel admits, he and Miss Billie, as he calls her, were only acquaintances. When he was approached about the chance to lead Promise Land, he says I told her, well, God hasnt told me anything yet, so Ive really got to pray about that.Ž At the time, Hamel was working on a number of community projects based primarily in Tallahassee. We had a food bank there in our house,Ž says Hamel. We had a clothing closet also for people who needed a change from their dirty or worn-out clothes. We even took in pregnant teens with no place to go.Ž This was all being done as a part of the W.A.T.C.H program (Wakulla Area Teens and Childrens Home), of which Hamel was the resident house father. I was doing all of that while working as manager of a restaurant in Tallahassee full-time. I got my community work in wherever I could. The only thing I was looking for was to serve God.Ž He talks about being awakened one morning at around 3 a.m. with excruciating leg cramps. Unable to go back to sleep, a different conversation with God begins to develop I said, Lord, its not good enough … Ive got to eat. I need to know if you want me to go to Promise Land or not,Ž he says. If I go, Ive got to give up my full-time job cause its a full-time ministry. Ive got to move out of here … and go live there … get things established. Ive got four kids. If I take the position, Ive got to sacri“ ce my time with them. I need for You to tell me what You want me to do. So I went to my Bible, and the “ rst thing I saw was: Was not Abraham considered righteous when he offered Isaac as a sacri“ ce unto the Lord? Ž After that, all I could say was Alright, Lord … I got it. I closed my Bible, called Miss Billie and brother Bruce and told them Id take the offer to come onboard with Promise Land and see what I could do with it. Ive been here ever since.Ž Promise Land Ministries Lighthouse is, for the most part, a mens facility. One of their short-term goals is to build a womens location as well, but for now, they refer women and children to similar organizations throughout the county. Theres a lot of shame and embarrassment that comes with the word homeless,Ž says Hamel. There are people sitting in Wakulla churches every Sunday who never tell you the truth about their situation, so its hard to know how many there are without a home or food in the area.Ž Those who participate in the program are men whohave hit a few bumps along the road of life, or who currently find themselves on the verge of a similar setback. These include the homeless, those with issues stemming from substance abuse and a few of the formerly incarcerated seeking a positive entrance back into the general society. Promise Lands in-house rehabilitation program offers a 32-week regimen, complete with 12-step programs to overcome addiction, and lessons in discipleship that may usher a few disquieted souls toward a more personal … deeper … walk with the lord. Many graduates of the program have stayed on to help the ministry that helped them. This includes offering support through conversation and mentorship to new recruits of the program. Promise Lands secondary programs, such as the foodbank, serve the larger public. Every “ rst Wednesday of the month from 1 to 3 p.m., the food bank is open. Appointments are not necessary to receive food that is given on a “ rst come/“ rst serve basis. Thursday food shipments began recently with a plan to partner with other organizations in surrounding counties to better target and distribute items to places that have been overlooked or underserved. The third ministry of Promise Land is most widely used and well known. The Lawn Care and Handyman Service is donation-based and services commercial and residential properties alike. The lawn care service provides mowing, tree trimming, leaf blowing, hedging and more, while the maintenance arm of the service offers pressure washing, minor construction repairs, basic home maintenance and a few other options. The donations from these services help to fund the other ministries. It is also therapeutic, allowing program participants to give back to the community by offering their talents. Their latest ministry is the thrift store. After numerous yard sales, the door of opportunity seems to have opened on this location, which has been a dream of Promise Lands for some time. The thrift store will offer a range of items, from clothes and handmade jewelry, to furniture and kitchen appliances. The goal, of course, is to reach out to those in need … or those who just love a great bargain … by offering quality goods at much discounted prices. The store looks to partner with other churches (or businesses) to build a gift-certi“ cate program. This means the church (or agency) can purchase gift certi“ cates to keep on-hand at their location. The hours of operation are still unanswered at this point. They are currently seeking volunteers to offer an hour or two of their time. Students from the high school seeking credit/community service hours, or seniors looking to help a community project get on its feet. Oct. 1 is the grand opening of the thrift store and Partner Appreciation Day for Promise Land. Partner Appreciation day has been an ongoing event for almost 4 years where those who have contributed to the ministry through donations, or having been recipients of the lawn care or maintenance services, are the honored guests of the day. Food, music, activities for the kids and more are expected and the entire county is asked to come out. The success stories of Promise Land Ministries are more like quiet victories, hard won lessons played out behind the scenes with very little fanfare. Like the young man who drove to the fellowship hall and left a photo of himself, his wife and their new child with an inscription on the back that read, Thank you Promise Land. You changed my life.Ž Or the man who went to jail because of his struggles with addiction, who would later go on to receive a degree in psychology and now works as a counselor for those who are living the life he once led. We are a Christian organization and believe that Jesus has the power to change lives,Ž says Hamel. But we dont limit that to who we serve. Were here to love whoever. Whatever their beliefs are. Were here to show them respect, and help them “ nd out who they can be in Christ.Ž To learn more, call 9263281, visit the website at www.promiselandministries. org or email stepoutofthedarkness@msn.com. Glenn Hamel, pastor of Promise Land, says the goal of the thrift store is to reach out to those in need. They are currently looking for volunteers to help with their latest ministry. 713-001499 Rock Landing RoadEnjoy Outdoor Seating Overlooking Beautiful Dickerson Bay! Fall HOurs Open: Thursday ............................... 4 P.M. 9 P.M. Friday .......................................... 4 P.M. 10 P.M. Saturday ............................ 11 A.M. 10 P.M. sunday ......................................11 A.M. 9 P.M.COME AND CHECK OUT OUR NEW SATURDAY AND SUNDAY LUNCH SPECIALS 11a.m. 3p.m. All Under $10.THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS DOMESTIC BEER $1.50 WELLS $2.00 ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 Thank You!To the hundreds of people who cooked up support for Wakulla County Mental Health at the Pancake Breakfast on Saturday, Aug. 27Once again Wakulla County has proved that mental health is a priority!For more information about NAMI Wakulla, call 850-926-1033on Crawfordville Hwy. want to say &

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. LUN CH PA RTN ER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyofwhile quantities last.926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat Try One of Our Home Made Parfaits 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. The Workswakullas coworking caf www.theworkscafe.com “ReceiveacomplimentarycopyofPastry and Coffee Special!” Let us perk u p your day! PARTNE R… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy ofCounty commission reduces utility taxContinued from Page 1A He added that none of them want to raise taxes and everyone hates paying taxes, himself included. But weve got to run this county,Ž Merritt said. Stewart said the county commission is back to 05-06 spending levels, but it still needed to shrink the size of government. He added that the county commission has cut, but said it has to happen across the board. Its got to go beyond our doors,Ž Stewart said. Artz said she believed the sheriffs of“ ce could cut its budget more and she wished it would be more aggressive with cuts. However, she pointed out that if the commission tells the constitutional of“ cers to cut their budgets by a certain amount, they can decide to appeal to the governor. He then could make the commission fund the constitutional of“ cers budgets and the commission would be stuck with coming up with the difference. So forgive me if were a little gun shy,Ž Artz said. The commission also discussed possibly including an exemption from the tax for industrial companies, such as St. Marks Powder. John Nichols with St. Marks Powder said the tax would amount to $400,000 for the company and would mean laying off employees. Moore said if he was going to open a business in Wakulla County and would have to pay this tax, he would look elsewhere. Because we cant balance our own budget, were going to tax him,Ž Moore said. The commission said it would discuss that possible exemption at a later date. All commissioners were in agreement that the PST was a more fair tax than ad valorem and hoped to be able to cut the millage rate. This is a tax you can do something to reduce,Ž Artz said. It is within their power to lower utility use and reduce this tax.Ž Moore agreed and said this tax would be spread out to people who arent currently paying taxes. Artz had several suggestions for saving the county money and making up for the decrease in revenues gained from the PST. She suggested the county delay the hiring of incoming County Administrator David Edwards, a new planning director and new parks and recreation director. She said she would rather have a planning director than two planning technicians and suggested cutting those two positions and hiring a director. Another idea was a 10-percent pay cut for all commissioners and constitutional of“ cers. Artz said she thinks the commission can lower the millage to 8.5 and is hoping they can go to 8.25. Each commissioner agreed to come back at the next meeting with ways to save the county more money, so the millage rate could be lowered.Fulford is Wakullas new circuit judgeContinued from Page 1A Thus, another reason to hold early morning court. At the same time, Fulford does recognize that people have early morning con” icts. Im a single mom,Ž she says. And I understand there are some people who cant make itŽ for early morning court. At the time she was appointed to the bench, Fulford had risen to the rank of chief assistant prosecutor under State Attorney Willie Meggs. As a judge, she faced a con” ict because, as she puts it, her hands had touched most of the case “ les coming through the of“ ce. It meant she couldnt preside over criminal cases. In August, Judge Sauls gave her the nod to preside over felony court day … and it was obvious how much Fulford was enjoying criminal court. I do enjoy it,Ž she says. While she was a prosecutor for 11 years before being appointed a judge, Fulford says she was proud of the number of defense attorneys who submitted letters of recommendation on her behalf. She says she felt it was an acknowledgement that she was fair. I recognize that not every person needs to go to prison, and not every crime needs to be prosecuted the way law enforcement “ les the charges,Ž she says. I treat everybody the same,Ž she says. By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATHE CAPITAL, September 2.....With Labor Day beckoning, things were quiet around the capital this week with the exception of college students returning. Despite the unof“ cial end of summer, an abbreviated list of things to do occupied state and party of“ cials as August summer vacations gave way to September tailgate parties. The Republican Party of Florida will be led by another as its chairman, David Bitner, announced his coming retirement this week for health reasons. Meanwhile, one of his predecessors, the ousted Jim Greer, talked publicly for the “ rst time in a while this week, pointing “ ngers at members of the party who forced him out. Consumers remain edgy over their economic security, according to a University of Florida poll that says Floridians remain skeptical and cautious as the states economy sputters back to life. Much of the week was spent laying the groundwork for future endeavors. A handful of would-be presidential contenders toured the state. Meanwhile, a slew of interim reports were released on Thursday and legislative leaders concluded a statewide tour to get input on redrawing political boundaries, but hinted that future meetings may be in order after voters actually have something to look at. ECONOMIC NEWS Economic news remained foremost in the minds of consumers and political candidates this week as the nations sputtering recovery prompted responses from the campaign trail to the kitchen table. Mounting fear over the nations economic health dragged down consumer con“ dence in Florida, which in August fell to the near record low posted at the bottom of the housing bust, a University of Florida report indicated Tuesday. Consumer confidence among Floridians fell to 62 on the UF index in August, a con“ dence level only three points higher than the record-low 59 set in June 2008, according to data compiled monthly by the schools Bureau of Economic and Business Research. Respondents over 60 years old were most dramatically more gloomy. Their faith in the U.S. economy over the next five years fell by 16 points. But the survey also found younger respondents more pessimistic about the countrys long-term economic health and more likely in August to hold off on major purchases. Such caution appears to have been shared by others. U.S. unemployment in August held steady at 9.1 percent, but an anticipated increase in the workforce did not materialize, the U.S. Department of Labor reported Friday. State economists, however, say they are not ready to cede the notion that the nation is heading into the second of a double dip recession. Despite some negative “ gures, economists say the chances of growth remain higher than another recessionary slip. One indication is that state revenue collections have been higher than expected. THE RIVER OF GAS? Republican presidential hopeful Michele Bachmann started it off by arguing that oil drilling and Everglades water could mix, an assertion that drew immediate “ re from a number of people in Florida, including fellow tea party favorite, Republican U.S. Rep. Allen West. Meanwhile, Sen. Arthenia Joyner, D-Tampa, resurrected a proposed ban on oil drilling in the eastern Gulf of Mexico by “ ling a proposed constitutional amendment to end such exploration and production. Bachmann made the comments during a campaign swing, leading a list of Republican hopefuls including Herman Cain and Mitt Romney who also visited the critical swing state during the week. TEACHER PAY PROMPTS EXODUS: A News Service of Florida analysis of salaries published this week found that on average, school districts have raised the minimum pay for a teacher by 1 percent over the last four years, according to newly released data by the Florida Department of Education. And fewer than half of all school districts havent given raises at all, with most districts keeping salaries ” at over the last four years. In the last four years, the average pay of a Florida teacher has decreased $1,199, from $46,922 in the 2007-2008 school year to $45,723 in the 2010-2011 school year, a decline of about 2.5 percent. Lawmakers say their goal for next year is to keep funding for education stable, rather than having to cut as deeply as this year, when lawmakers approved a budget that slashed school funding by 8 percent on a per-student basis. BITNER STEPS DOWN: Republican Party of Florida Chairman David Bitner said Wednesday he would resign because of his declining health, a move that sends the party looking for its fourth leader in less than two years. Bitner announced earlier this year that he has ALS, or Lou Gehrigs Disease. Bitner, a former lawmaker, will step aside Sept. 23, following the partys Presidency 5 event. Vice Chairman Lenny Curry, who also heads the Duval County GOP, is Bitners heir apparent after receiving his former bosss blessing. POLITICAL BOUNDARY TOUR MAY INCLUDE ENCORE: While party leaders regroup, legislative efforts to get public buy-in on new political boundaries may not be “ nished despite the conclusion this week of a statewide tour of committee meetings. Republican leaders appear to be acknowledging the criticism that voters are being asked to comment on new congressional and state legislative boundaries before any proposed maps have even been drawn up. e re g ed g an e nt c evt ero rd, ree nd w ay a ke a nt s ee. m et h er h at h at m ap he h is are e xt t he i er, u ire M iv es i ng i da E K: to i gn o re c an h er or e rn a ts d to Of o ne o nEvdo i ng i ng e xt o ut l en v er-WEEKLY ROUNDUP: (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Republican Party leader steps downI treat everybody the same, Judge Jackie Fulford saysCity of Sopchoppy On September 12, 2011 at 6:30 pm, the City Commission will consider the adoption of a resolution establishing an exclusive franchise for solid waste collection and hauling with Waste Pro. If adopted, the resolution will establish Waste Pro as the only contractor authorized to pick up and haul solid waste within the City limits. All interested parties are encouraged to attend the meeting and express their concerns or support for the exclusive franchise. A copy of the proposal may be obtained and persons wishing to comment may do so in person at the public hearing or by writing to the City of Sopchoppy, P.O. Box 1219, Sopchoppy, Florida 32358.If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE: Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Jackie Lawhon at the above address or by phone at 850-962-4611.SEPTEMBER 8, 2011City of Sopchoppy The City of Sopchoppy will be holding two public hearings on Ordinance 2011-05 An Ordinance of the City of Sopchoppy adopting the operating budgets for the City of Sopchoppy for the 2011-2012 “scal year. The “rst reading and public hearing will be held during the regular monthly meeting of the City Council on Monday, September 12, 2011 and the second public hearing and adoption of the Ordinance will be held at a Special Called Meeting on September 19, 2011 Both meetings will begin at 6:30 p.m. and will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, Florida. The special called meeting on September 19 will be held only for the purpose of adopting the budget. A copy of the Budget may be viewed at City Hall from 8:00 a.m. … 4:30 p.m. Monday thru Thursday and from 8:00 a.m. … 3:00 p.m. Friday.If special assistance is needed to attend this meeting, please call the Clerks of“ce at 962-4611 at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting.SEPTEMBER 8, 15, 2011 The Wakulla County Code Enforcement Board will hold a Public Hearing on September 14, 2011, at 5:30pm in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and participate. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners ’ Office at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGSEPTEMBER 8, 2011

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak outComment & OpinionEditor, The News: I have been following the news on the proposed fee increases by our county commission and have read the various responses in The Wakulla News. For starters, I admit that I hate to pay taxes, especially extra taxes. Unfortunately, we are dealing with dif“ cult economic times, and this puts the squeeze on everyone. But this economic condition has also made it even more dif“ cult for government to come up with the necessary resources to provide the services we purport to want. Like it or not, you simply cant get something for nothing. I prefer something to nothing. I like the idea that a deputy will show up if I need help or the fire department will be there if my house is burning down. For that matter, I supported the extra taxes for the Wakulla County school system. My children received an excellent education in Wakulla schools. I could say that my kids are no longer in the school system and to hell with everyone else. Instead, I choose to support future students as others chose to support mine. As for the proposed garbage assessment, I commend the commissioners who supported this. I dont like the dump-it-in-the woods mentality, and this change will prove to be very popular when most people “ gure it out. One recent writer to The Wakulla News equated this garbage proposal to the dreaded Socialism word. My guess is that he enjoys his Social Security check and Medicare coverage, which is about as socialistic as one can get. (I look forward to mine, by the way.) At any rate, call me old fashioned, but I think you get what you pay for. Is this the right mixture of property taxes and fees? Probably not, but that is what debate is all about. For those opposed to these thoughts, I would ask: what is your plan to make sure that a deputy or the fire department will show up when most needed? These things dont materialize out of thin air. Criticizing is easy; workable solutions are much harder. David Murrell CrawfordvilleEditor, The News:I am forwarding an email to you that I am sending to the County Commission of“ ce today. I wasnt sure if this was something that you want to help tackle by publishing, but its a serious issue to the residents of Wakulla Gardens. Letter to Commissioners: Good Afternoon. I was forwarding your email response back to you because I have not heard anything on this issue. I would have thought that after more than “ ve months, I would have gotten some type of response. As with Mike Stewarts, I was assured my email would be forwarded and I would hear something in return after your departments had a chance to review the situation. The initial idea of putting limestone gravel down as a roadbed was a good idea, however, I dont think that people thought the matter through completely prior to implementation, and here is why: Limestone on a road that isnt heavily traveled will not breakdown as fast therefore the dust is minimal. On the other hand, limestone that has been applied on a road that has 4050 homes and traf“ c throughout the day will breakdown extremely fast (which is what it has done). To be honest, you could have applied recycled asphalt as a road base instead of this gravel surface and probably would have saved money. There is a lot of this stuff around because after its milled from an existing road, the contractors usually dump it in huge piles on their property. Since having originally sent my email dated March 26, things with these roads have not gotten any better. During the very dry weeks, the dust is a huge issue. Now, Ive done some research and it doesnt appear that anyone listed as a commissioner in Wakulla County lives on a limestone gravel road (Wakulla County Property Appraiser), therefore you cannot understand my problem, or the problems of all of my neighbors. Im inviting each of you to my home (after the roads dry from the rain that we had recently), so you can experience “ rsthand what its like to stand in the front yard when cars driving by are creating huge dust clouds. Listen, not only is this a health issue from breathing in this severe dust, but its also a quality of life issue as well. I cannot go outside without having to breathe in huge amounts of this dust when a car drives by; I cannot open the windows to my home because if I do, everything is covered in dust; and I cant keep my car clean because its constantly covered in dust. Keep in mind that I am not the only one complaining about this issue. You have many residents of Wakulla Gardens upset, however it seems as though Im the only one sending emails. I feel as though one step to helping solve this problem is for the commission to hold a special hearing on this subject (for starters) so there you can hear from each person how it affects them. As commissioners I would think that you would want to hear from your constituents on how they feel since you were elected by them. What I do not want it a one line response to this email from your Blackberry (i.e.; Jerry Moores response dated March 26 to my initial email) telling me that At almost every county meeting we discuss how we can best improve Wakulla Gardens.Ž To me, if you cannot take the time and effort to send an appropriate response to something that I deem important, then I would rather you not send a response at all. It also makes me question why I voted for someone who obviously doesnt feel that one of his constituents issues is important enough to respond to with something more. I do appreciate the initial responses that I received from Alan, Lynn, and Mike, however, I think the follow-up was lost somewhere along the way and I wanted to bring it up again. I look forward to hearing from everyone on this issue. Sincerely, Michael Mckenzie CrawfordvilleEditor, The News: Wakulla Pregnancy Center has been able to effectively run for nearly 4 years now with the help of a giving community. We are “ nding ourselves running short on some much needed supplies and again ask for help from our community. The center is in need of a vacuum, and it doesnt have to be new (just working). We also need baby supplies like lotion, wash, powder, wipes and diapers. If you can buy at least one of these items when you go to the store and get it to us, it will be greatly appreciated and will get used. Thank you for your giving hearts, Angie Holshouser Wakulla Pregnancy CenterThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Staff Writer/Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ......................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising/Photographer: Lynda Kinsey .................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Bookkeeping/Circulation: Sherry Balchuck .......accounting@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• War Eagles beat Leon, Lincoln at football jamboree • Elizabeth L. ‘Betty’ Strickland obituary • Ray Gray is fired by county • Week in Wakulla: Aug. 18-25 • Week in Wakulla: Aug. 25-Sept. 1 • Julie Moran Petros obituary • Solid waste assessment moving forward thewakullanews.comBy MARJ LAW When I was young, P F Flyers could make you run faster and jump higher than any other brand of shoe. Thats what their ads said and I knew it was true. Athletic shoes were sneakers back then. We called them our sneaksŽ. New shoes were very special. I looked at them in their nest of tissue paper in the rectangular box. New shoe smell wafted out. They were perfect right now and would never be so white again. I took them out of the box, and laced them up. I ran and hopped and came to a whiz-bang short stop, admiring my newborn running and jumping abilities and the shoes pristine white newness. Mama!Ž Id exclaim. Watch this!Ž and Id skid around the patio. Unh-huh,Ž shed reply absently while doing something else. But I didnt care if she was really listening. I was breaking in my new shoes and they had magical abilities. Back then, sneakers sported thin ” at manila-colored soles. A little bit of tread was stamped into them. There were no inch-deep, air or gel soles. Most of the sneakers were white or black back then, too. A band of white rubber circled the lower portion of the shoe. In the center back, a green tag was embossed with the name: P F Flyer. They were the real thing. Sneakers went the way of dungarees. Dungarees are now blue jeans or jeans. Sneakers turned into athletic shoes, jogging shoes and tennis shoes. Nobody wears sneakers anymore. Somewhere along the way, the magic went, too. But when youre ten years old and youre wearing new P F Flyers, anything can happen.Marj Law is the retired director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and an occasional columnist for The Wakulla News.Ive been thinking...About sneakers Football has started and all is right with the worldBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.etAs the leaves start to change and the air gets colder, we know fall and its perfect complement, football, is upon us. Although, for Florida, that doesnt really describe our fall. Our fall is more like an extension of summer and we dread the possibility of a noon game in the beginning of the season with the weather still 90 degrees and up. But in spite of the still hot weather, once the season starts approaching, people began to count down the days until football starts and it seems the majority of conversations center around the upcoming season and predictions of how each team will do. The college football season began on Sept. 1 and the regular season for the NFL will begin tonight, Sept. 8. I love the NFL and get my heart broken every year by my beloved Dolphins, as well as my No. 2 Jaguars. However, to me, there is nothing like college football. The start of college football was long overdue, with fans getting a small taste of their teams in the spring with spring games, but then having to wait five more months until the season would start. On Friday, Sept. 2, I was decked out in my orange and blue, ready to cheer on my Gators on Saturday. I wore my colors proud. And although my heart lies in Gainesville at the University of Florida, my place of residence lies in Tallahassee. So, my husband, who happens to be an Auburn Tigers fan, and I made our way to a Florida State tailgate to join the diehard FSU fans we call our friends. Yes, even during football season, although not so sure on that last game in November. That has yet to be determined. We had fun, like we always do. In the South, college football reigns supreme and its always nice to partake in it, even if it isnt your team. Standing outside with a cold drink, burgers on the grill, game on TV, laughing and trash talking with friends. Ahhh, football. How I have missed you. That day, like most days during the season, we divided up our time tailgating, watching Auburn vs. Utah State and then Florida vs. Florida Atlantic. Obviously both gimme games, but still a chance to see our teams in action. Everyone always has high hopes for their team at the beginning of the year and well see how it all plays out. Florida State is in its second season with Jimbo Fisher at the helm and people are expecting big things. They are currently ranked No. 6. FSU took on Louisiana-Monroe and beat them 34-0. The team will really be tested when they play currently ranked No. 1, Oklahoma State, the third week in September. I know Tallahassee will get crazy whichever way it goes. Florida started its first season with new coach Will Muschamp on Saturday, as they took on Florida Atlantic and came out victorious, 41-3. Im excited to see what Muschamp will bring to the table this season. I saw some improvement in Quarterback John Brantley in the “ rst game. There were some positives, but there were also interceptions. And if he is throwing interceptions against Florida Atlantic, that makes me a tad nervous about how he will react at future games. The team will receive its “ rst test against Tennessee on Sept. 17. Any game against an SEC opponent is a challenge and I just hope we come out on top. Whatever happens this season, Im ready for it. Heres hoping for a happy football season. Jennifer Jensen is a reporter for The Wakulla News. Cant get something for nothingRoads in Wakulla Gardens are an issue Please help Wakulla Pregnancy Center Find us on Food drive underway at chamber Editor, The News: The Wakulla Chamber of Commerce is partnering with Americas Second Harvest of the Big Bend to bring Wakulla residents donated groceries through a food drive. The drive aims to collect 300 pounds of non-perishable goods by September 30. Donors can drop off non-perishable items in bins at the chamber of“ ce, located at 23 High Drive in Crawfordville. Common donations include high-quality, nutritious food such as canned meats, peanut butter, canned vegetables and fruits, canned soups, rice, pasta and whole grain cereal. Non-food items are also accepted, including new deodorants, soaps, toothpastes and toothbrushes, hair brushes and diapers. The chamber will deliver the donations to Americas Second Harvest of the Big Bend. The donations will then be sorted and distributed to partners in Wakulla County, putting food on the tables of countless families. One local partner making an impact on the food drive is St. Marks Powder. The Crawfordville manufacturer is accepting donations through a generous companywide campaign. For more information about ending hunger, donating to food drives and ways you can help make an impact, visit www. “ ghtinghunger.org./.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 – Page 5AEloise J. HarveyEloise J. Harvey, 89, a lifelong resident of Crawfordville, passed away Monday, Sept. 5, after a lengthy battle with Alzheimers Disease. She was born in Ivan on March 14, 1922, to the late John Vickers and Bertie Raker. A memorial service will be held on Friday, Sept. 9 at 11 a.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville with burial immediately following at Arran Cemetery. She graduated from Crawfordville High School with honors where she lettered in basketball. She attended Tallahassee Junior College and Florida State University School for Women. She worked as cafeteria manager at Crawfordville School and after 30 years of service retired. She was the “ rst president and certi“ cation chairman of the Wakulla County School Food Service Association. She was a faithful member of the First Baptist Church of Crawfordville, The Gleaners Sunday School Class, Capital City Optimist Club, Women of the Moose, Golden Girls Club, Young at Heart, Baptist Supper Club and Crawfordville Womens Club. She was a devoted wife, mother, mother-in-law, sister, sister-in-law, aunt, grandmother and great-grandmother who loved spending time with her family. She was surrounded by family members who held her hands and shared special memories together the last several days of her life. She is survived by her daughter and son-in-law, Peggy and Doug Hammons, Tallahassee, with whom she lived for the past two years; her son, Paul Harvey, Crawfordville; twin sister, Louise Johnson, Tallahassee; brothers, Alvin Vickers, Winter Park, and Robert Vickers (Evelyn), Cypress; daughters-in-law, Denise Guidry and Pat Harvey, Crawfordville; sister-inlaw, Montine Durrance of DeQuincy, LA; grandchildren, Brenda Mueller (Joe), Tallahassee, Susan Barrinew (Stacy), Tallahassee, Cindy Hammons King, Tallahassee, Chris Harvey (Leigh Ann), Clarksville, Tenn., Hollie Harvey, Ashville, N.C., Charlie Harvey, Crawfordville, Donna Boggs (Danny), Clarksville, Tenn., Brad Harvey (Katherine), Tallahassee, and Joey Harvey (Melanie), Tallahassee; and several great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband, J.C. Harvey; and her eldest son, Joe Harvey. The family wishes to express their sincere appreciation to Dr. Harts“ eld, staff and volunteers of Big Bend Hospice who helped care for Eloise the past two years and to all the friends and family members who visited, called, sent beautiful cards, thoughts and prayers throughout her long illness. In lieu of ” owers, the family requests memorial donations be sent to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee, FL 32308. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Perry M. PresnellPerry Miles Presnell, 93, passed away Saturday, Sept. 3, in Crawfordville. He was born Jan. 1, 1918, in Gadsden County. He retired from West Florida Gas in 1982, was an avid “ sherman and deeply loved all of his family. He was of the Baptist faith. The family received friends from 1 to 2 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 6, at Abbey Funeral Home, followed by the funeral at 2 p.m. Interment immediately followed after the service at Tallahassee Memory Gardens. He is survived by his son, Frank Presnell (Linda); daughters, Shirley Carter (Myers) and Debbie Presnell (friend, Andy Mosley); grandchildren, Kenny Carter, Tammy Peltier, Kathy Gray, Robby, Christopher and Michael Presnell, Jodie Campbell and Jarrod Kirkley; and nine great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents; seven brothers; three sisters; and his wife, Pearl. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice. Online condolences may be made at www.abbeyfh.com.Phyllis M. WhitePhyllis M. White, 73, died Wednesday, Aug. 31, in Ypsilanti, Mich. She was born in Ypsilanti, was a member of Stony Creek Freewill Baptist Church and worked for Willow Run Public Schools as a bus driver for more than 20 years. Graveside services were Monday, Sept. 5, at 10 a.m. at Friendship Cemetery in Medart. Family received friends from 9 to 10 a.m. prior to the service. She is survived by three daughters, Jan Barnes (Edward) of Illinois, Lita Hart (Kit) of N.C. and Tina Brimner (Ed) of Florida; one son; Greg Hensley (Linda) of Florida; nine grandchildren; one great-grandchild; two brothers, Dick Adams (Deborah) of Milan and Fred Harberts of Ypsilanti; and several nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband, Kelland White in 2010; her parents, Richard and Mary Adams; and son, Donnie White. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville was in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh. com) Crawfordville Area Wakulla Worship Centers Sopchoppy Medart Area religious views and eventsChurchObituariesChurch briefsCoastal Areas Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Grief RECOVERY GROUP for parents who have lost a childFor more information call Gigi Cavallaro at 850-962-6117 or Melanie Lachman 850-878-5310 or 926-9308 Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm 1s t Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Eloise J. Harvey Perry M. Presnell Phyllis M. WhiteWakulla Station Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart On Sept. 8 at 9 a.m. Busy Bee Quilters will meet at Wakulla United Methodist Church, 1584 Old Woodville Road. On Sept. 8, at 7 p.m. there will be a Salsa Making Party, held by the United Methodist Women at Wakulla United Methodist Church. Reservations needed. Cost is $10 per person, Call 925-7733 to make a reservation. On Sept. 10 at 8 a.m. there will be a United Methodist Men Meeting and Breakfast (dutch treat at Savannahs) and church cleaning. On Sept. 21 at 6 p.m. there will be a church dinner provided by the United Methodist Women. The cost is $5 per person and $15 per family, The dinner will be at Wakulla United Methodist Church. Please call for reservations 421-5741. Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church would like to invite you and your family to come out to the annual kickoff for our AWANA club. It will be Sunday, Sept. 11, from 5 to 7 p.m. Please come prepared to get wet with your swimsuit and towel. There will be food, water games, and lots of fun. There will be a short parent orientation as well. If you have any questions, please call 962-7822.Sopchoppy Southern Baptist holds AWANA eventWorship service on 9-11 to be held at Pioneer BaptistPioneer Baptist Church will have a special 9-11 Worship Service on Sunday, Sept. 11 at 10:30 a.m. Free childcare will be available. The worship service will have sacred and patriotic music, recognition of those serving and having served in uniform, and a sermon. We invite those who do not have a regular church home to worship with us as we remember the tragedy of 9-11. Pioneer Baptist Church is located four miles east of Crawfordville, just north of the Spring Creek Road and Dr. M L King, Jr. Memorial Road. The address is 486 Beechwood Drive. For more information, please call Pastor Dennis Hall at 878-5224.Night of gospel music will be held at Sopchoppy OpryThe Sopchoppy Opry presents An Adventure in Gospel Music on Saturday, Sept. 17 at 7 p.m. in the old Sopchoppy School Gymnasium. This is a bene“ t for the Sopchoppy Historic GF&A Railroad Depot. Tickets are $10 each. Call for available seating at 9622668, 962-2210 or 962-2646. Available unassigned seats will be sold at the door, however, there is no guarantee of available seating at the door., so please call early to reserve your seat.Ivan Assembly of God hosts Cry Out AmericaUpcoming events are announced at Wakulla United Methodist On Sept. 11, 2001, America was shaken to its foundation by a series of surprise terrorist attacks. All of us were awakened to the new reality of global terrorism. Ten years later, our nation needs to be awakened again, to the threats of terrorism, but to our critical spiritual condition. In response to our nations need and Gods biblical and historical pattern for bringing awakening to America, we are calling for extraordinary, united prayer. Please join us on Sunday from 5 to 6 p.m., at the Wakulla County Courthouse as we gather together with others to pray for our nation, state, county, church-es and families.

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comhappeningsCommunitySpecial to The News The Jake Pigott Memorial American Legion Post and Auxiliary 144 sent seven students to the annual Boys and Girls State Session to represent Wakulla County. The session was held in July in Tallahassee. The Wakulla High School students, who are currently seniors, took part in a mock legislative session similar to the session held by the Florida Legislature. Participants elect members to serve as governor and other state, county and city positions. The propose bills and pass legislature. Kelsey Lynne Cook and Molly Victoria Vise attended girls state for Wakulla County. Stanley Victor Linton, Zachary Tye Azzarito, Kendell Lee Barron, Matthew Wayne Hill and Aaron Walker Rhodes attended the boys state seminar. Cook is the daughter of Chuck and Diane Cook of Sopchoppy. Vise is the daughter of Mike Vise of Crawfordville. Linton is the son of Byron and Maria Linton of Crawfordville. Azzarito is the son of John and Kim Azzarito of Crawfordville. Barron is the son of Kenneth and Robin Barron of Crawfordville. Hill is the son of Christopher and Melinda Hill of Crawfordville. Rhodes is the son of Wayne and Toni Rhodes of Crawfordville. Barrie Glover of American Legion Post 114 has served 31 years as a counselor for the boys state program.Students represent Wakulla well at stateThe Wakulla County Historical Society will hold its monthly program Sept. 13 at 7 p.m. at the public library. This months presentation is called, Wakullas Political PastŽ and will focus on the Wakulla County citizens who have held of“ ces at the state level from 1845 to the present. Wakulla Historical Society Vice President Richard Harden will be presenting this program. The public is encouraged to attend. Gray to wed GerrellBrittany Nicole Gerrell, of Wakulla Springs, and Joshua Derricke Gray, of Crawfordville, announce their engagement. She is the daughter of Scott and Traci Gerrell of Wakulla Springs. He is the son of Derricke and Kathy Gray of Crawfordville. The wedding is planned for March 31, 2012 at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church. Brittany Gerrell and Joshua GrayHistorical Society looks into Wakulla’s political past Free Hugs performs at PoshFree Hugs, composed of musicians Aaron ORourke (dulcimer), Erik Alvar (standup bass), Mickey Abraham (mandolin/guitar) and Mark Russell (violin), will perform at Posh Java on Saturday, September 10, at 8 p.m. in Sopchoppy. Free Hugs is described as traditional music strung together with classical, jazz, and modern ideas.Ž For reservations please contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@ gmail.com. Tickets are $12. Reservations are suggested. Barber Shop & Salon 926-4080 Clipper Cuts Scalp Massage Steam Towels Style Cuts Neck Massage Hi-lites & Low-lites Color 926-4080 926-4080 3334 Crawfordville Hwy. TheresaDelta Waxing Perms education news from local schoolsSchoolBy CADET ENSIGN AZZARITONJROTC Public Affairs Of“ cerAugust has come and gone, and what is August famous for? Yup, school starting. Wakulla County schools began on Thursday, Aug. 18. For a young group of high school juniors and seniors, however, it began Thursday, Aug. 11. The 17 of“ cers of the WHS NJROTC unit began the planning and organizing required for the unit to run successfully this upcoming school year. Cadet Lieutenant Devin Lovett, company commanding of“ cer, began the all of“ cers meeting, dubbed AOM in the unit, Thursday morning at 1100 hours, starting off the week-long adventure. Cadet Lieutenant Stanley Linton, company executive of“ cer gave a brief welcome back before going over some of the things discussed during the summer AOM. The of“ cers quickly dove in and started to prepare for the upcoming school year. The old driver education room was now back in ROTC hands and they worked diligently on moving all of the desk and other items from the muster room to the driver education room, now the ROTC class room. After some hard work and a bit of cleaning, the of“ cers were released early for a 3-day weekend. After the welcome back from the weekend break, the of“ cers split up and began their work. Over the course of the week the of“ cers did a multitude of things. The six core staff members, the commanding of“ cer, executive officer, operations officer, administrative of“ cer, supply of“ cer and company chief conducted a core staff meeting on Wednesday. The five new platoon leaders along with last years platoon leaders (now the members of the core staff) held a platoon leader meeting. They discussed different tips, advice, things to remember to do in the upcoming school year to have a successful unit. The platoon leaders are the backboneŽ of the unit. They are the ones who come in contact with the cadets on a daily basis. The success of the unit depends on how successful the platoon leaders are in doing their job. Thus, the platoon leader meeting was highly important. Other things, such as a team commander meeting and planning Oral Boards for Cadets applying for the rank of cadet chief petty of“ cer occurred at the AOMs. The of“ cers helped decorate many of the old boards, update information displays for cadets, and create the unit goals for the year. Overall the AOMs conducted by Captain Huddleston, Lieutenant Stewart and the cadet of“ cers were a big success and extremely helpful for the success of the unit in the upcoming school year.WHS NJROTC planning for a successful year Coleman gets AP awardShelby Coleman, 2011 WHS Graduate, received notice this week that she has received the AP Scholar Award with Distinction. This is granted to students who receive an average score of at least 3.5 on all AP Exams taken, and scores of 3 or higher on “ ve or more of these exams. Coleman is currently attending Florida State University. The College Boards Advanced Placement Program provides willing and academically prepared students with the opportunity to take rigorous collegelevel courses while still in high school, and to earn college credit, advanced placement, or both for successful performance on the AP Exams. About 18 percent of the more than 1.9 million students worldwide who took AP Exams performed at a suf“ ciently high level to also earn an AP Scholar Award. Shelby ColemanComputer classes at TCCTech@Night begins Sept. 8 with a free course offering. In Wakulla County, the topic will be Getting Started: Computers, a workshop designed to help students get over the fear of using a computer. The fall series continues through Dec. 13 and will cover the following topics: graphics, web design and development, photography, Of“ ce 2007 and 2010, and Windows 7. Classes at the TCC Wakulla Center are held from 6-9 p.m. Cost is $25 for early registration. Walkins are $30 and will be accepted between 5:45 and 6 p.m. on the date of the workshop. To register or download a complete fall class schedule, log on to www. tcc.fl.edu/tech@night. For more information on Tech@Night, contact TCCs Center for Workforce Development at (850) 201-8760. CHA RLI E 2012 Contact Charlie at (850) 926-4712 charlieforsheriff@gmail.com www.charliecreel.com Charlie Creel for Sheriff Elect CharlieCREELFor Full-Time Sheriff in 2012Saturday, September 24 2 pm to 4 pmCoast Guard Auxiliary Station 1557 Shell Point Road, Crawfordville (in Shell Point, at the southern end of Shell Point Road) Light refreshments will be served. Political advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Affiliation, for SheriffWhat’s on your mind? Tell Charlie!Stop by and let’s talk about local law enforcement issues that matter to you. Florida Certi“ed ContractorSoutheastern Home Building Services, Inc.Residential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN construction 850509-3632www.tuscanytrace.net www.buildinghomes.comREMODELING ADDITIONS KITCHENS BATHS WORK REPLACEMENT FLOORS PROJECT Happy 70th Birthday Dora Lee Greene RosierMother Dora was born in Sopchoppy, Florida on September 13, 1941 to Tom Greene and Carrie Plummer. Dora grew up in a humble home with her parents; after the death of her mother she moved in with her aunt and uncle. Dora grew up and married the late Ossie B. Rosier. Dora and Ossie are the proud parents of four wonderful children; Alan, Greg, Shelia, and Dexter. Brianna Rosier, granddaughter, wrote the following to describe a woman that we have the honor to celebrate today: “…..Her name probably won’t go down in history, but she was de nitely one to make a difference. She has affected the lives of her children, which began a chain of effect to all their children. Through this, her one soul has affected the lives of hundreds of people.” Dora Lee Rosier is a woman with a strong sense of self, unconditional love, unbreakable faith, and the one we all go to when we are lacking faith. We are going to celebrate her birthday by trying to live our lives the way she does. In her own words Dora says,“I want people to remember that I stand on the truth. The truth is what I stand on.” Let’s all come together and celebrate Mother Dora Lee Rosier’s birthday by having the strength to stand for the truth.

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Well the Labor Day Weekend was a complete wash. You didnt have to worry about other boats on the water though there were plenty of wind surfers enjoying the 25-plus mile per hour winds over on the beach at Shell Point. I tried to “ sh last Wednesday but the wind kept me from going where I wanted to and then the threat of some torrential downpours and lightning made me come in and call it a wash. I had two guys that had just gotten back from tours in Iraq and Afghanistan and I really wanted to have a good day. We caught some “ sh but not what I had hoped for. Capt. David Fife said quite a few reds are starting to be caught in the Spring Creek and Oyster Bay area. Live minnows, cut bait and live shrimp are all producing. Mark and Louie Prance had their other son down from Gainesville, Ga., and they were able to “ sh Thursday and Friday although Mark said it was tough anchoring. Both days they caught some real big silver trout and they hooked one red which got off at the boat. Its getting to be that time of the year when the white trout, silver trout, or gray trout, whatever you want to call them, start schooling up in big numbers. Cut bait on the bottom can “ ll a cooler in a short while when they are really biting. Along with them you are sure to catch some whiting which also pull very hard for their size. The deep hole out from the old Tradewinds Dock, which is at the mouth of the Ochlockonee River, is a good place to “ sh. You will also catch some big reds and speckled trout at times. Another good spot is the white trout hole at the Panacea Channel. This is to the west of the next to the last green markers going out of the Panacea channel. The water is about 15-feet deep and there is some stuff on the bottom that will show up on your bottom machine. Another spot where I have caught them is south of where the St. Marks and Wakulla Rivers meet. Fish the east bank about 100 yards down from the Wakulla. It seems like the best tides on any of these places is the beginning or end of either the high or low tide. I was at Shell Island Fish Camp on Wednesday and Ken Hobbs was telling me he and Alan went out week before last and “ shed. They went to about 9 feet of water out from the Aucilla and caught their limit of trout using Gulps “ shed on the bottom. He said they were back at the dock before eleven. Kenny was telling me some nice reds were being caught at the mouth of Big Pass and Little Pass on the incoming tides. Reds are starting to show up in good numbers around the Aucilla and the docks off 98 around Lanark are producing lots of reds. The Lanark Reef is also producing quite a few “ sh. The weather looks like its gonna start cooling down some and maybe the water temperature will drop and put the trout back on the ” ats and out of that deep water. The cooler it gets the better. Dont forget that the Kevins H20 Trout Tournament date was changed until Oct. 1 due to small craft advisories. I “ nally talked with the folks at the Lanark Market and they said business was good. Their hours are Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 6 a.m. until 7 p.m. They are going to carry live bait and frozen baits, they have a deli with hamburgers and sandwiches, an outdoor shower and they carry non-ethanol gas. Fran, who worked there when Mike Hopkins had the store, will be working there again and she was always a pleasure to work with. Remember to know those limits and leave that ” oat plan with someone. Good luck and good “ shing. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 – Page 7Aoutdoor sports and shing reports Outdoors TIME T O DO SOMET HING FOR YOURSELF!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 KIDS BAC KINSCHOOL?850.224.4960www.fsucu.org GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 850925-5685Your Boats One Stop Paint & Body Shop 56 Industrial Court St. Marks Industrial Park,St. Marks 32355Fiberglass Supplies and Repair Marine Battery Dealer Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) Labor Day weekend was a washWakulla Springs News and Notes...By JEFF HUGOof Wakulla Springs It is not a figment of imagination that the summer of 2011 has been unusually hot. Many temperature records dating into the earlier years of the last century have fallen. But the cool and refreshing waters of the Wakulla River still bathe its guests in comfort and relief. Of course, many who have prospered from the rejuvenating waters of Wakulla Spring have now returned to the cold realities of school, work and family responsibilities. The weekends, however, still hold out hope of freedom from the mundane cares of the well-worn schedule. Three upcoming events at Wakulla Springs State Park hold out the hope and encouragement of escape from the early routines of fall. All three occur during the second weekend of September. The fun begins on the afternoon of Friday, Sept. 9. In cooperation with the Wakulla County Public Library, there will be a Book Giveaway in the lobby of the Wakulla Springs Lodge. There will be free, used library books available until Sunday evening, Sept. 11. It will be a great opportunity for visitors to larder there lairs with literature at an unbeatable price (Theyre free!). On the evening of Saturday, Sept. 10, from 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., park rangers will host A Swift Night Out at Wakulla Springs. This unusual and interactive ranger-led program will offer guests an opportunity to witness one of the great natural phenomena that occurs in the park … the roosting of the chimney swifts. The small twittering birds assemble in great numbers in both the spring and the fall of the year. At dusk, they begin their dizzying dance circling the Wakulla Springs Lodge. As darkness begins to descend upon the lodge, the chimney swifts begin their descent into one of its unused chimneys. Not only are participants of A Swift Night Out awed by the sight of these small insect-eating birds retreating to the safety of their roost, they are challenged to count the small black specters as they dive into the chimney. Amidst laughter, oohs and aahs, they collect their data. The information is sent to www.concentric. net/~dwa/page56.html, where it is amassed with counts held on the same night all across the country. There is no charge to participate in a Swift Night Out and entrance fees to the park will not be collected after 7 p.m. Please call 850561-7286 to let park staff know youre coming. If youre interested in rounding out your evening with dinner in the lodge (they have new expanded hours from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.) please call 421-2000 for reservations. Sunday, Sept. 11 is the day that the Florida Park Service celebrates September as Literacy Month. Park guests to all 160 state parks can have their entrance fees waived on Sunday if they present a library card or book, or donate a new or gently used family friendly book. Embrace the opportunities to break free from the routine.Several events are scheduled Chimney Swifts roost in the Wakulla Springs Lodge chimney on the right. A Swift Night Out will be held on Sept. 10.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Free hunter safety course is o eredThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is offering a free hunter safety course in Leon County. The course is in the Farris Bryant Building, Tallahassee. Instruction is from 6 to 9 p.m. on Sept. 13, 15, 20 and 22. The range portion of the class is Sept. 24. An adult must accompany children under the age of 16 at all times. The course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license People interested in attending this course can register online at MyFWC. com/HunterSafety or by calling (850) 265-3676. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 BE SUREYOUSTOCKUPON HUNTINGEQUIPMENT BEFORETHE SEASON STARTS 26 o ata iha M at (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 HUNT ING SEA SON!! Get Ready for Grouper Tues. Thurs. 9am 5:30pm Friday Sunday See Us at the Gun Shows LOWER PRICED AMMO IN STOCKMany accessoriesLargest Selection of Guns in the Tallahassee Wakulla Area GunSmithing Fast Turn Around! OFFICIALPRODUCTLICENSED www.ronsgun.comLocated Main Street St. Marks483 Port Leon Dr., St. Marks Gun Show Pricing Everyday! WE BUY GUNS$ Highest Dollar Paid $ for your gun! Selling GunsSince 1999AK 47s in stock! M a n a te e Ti m e s Statewide advertising—one low priceReach a wide audience (850) 926-7102 TheWakullanews

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team viewsSports At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75¢.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink) TuAmigoYourFriendWillHelpYou Accident? Injured?Call Someone You Can Trust!Hablamos Espaol1-855-55AMIGOA er 911 & Before 411 blocking,cleaning, restoration Bandannas 2.00 incl. taxofHATS PANACEA HATSAFACT VOLLEYBALL Special to The News After “ nishing 1-1 at the Canopy Roads Pre-Season Classic, the Lady War Eagles traveled to Lawton Chiles High School to play the Lady Timberwolves on Tuesday Aug. 30. Having such a young team the Lady War Eagles struggled against the Lady Timberwolves. In the first match, the Lady War Eagles did not play very strong and lost 1225. After regrouping, the Lady War Eagles played a little better their second match, but still lost 16-25. The Lady War Eagles lost the third match as well, 14-25. Some of the key players for this game were Chelsea Carroll with 16 assists and 8 digs, Albrey Sorrell with 7 digs, Ashley Roberts with 4 kills and Haley Brown with 5 kills and 4 digs. On Sept. 1, the Lady War Eagles traveled to Orlando to play in the KSA tournament hosted by the ESPN Wide World of Sports. This year the tournament hosted 28 teams from all over the United States. The Lady War Eagles played on Sept. 2, against Claremont High School from Oklahoma. The Lady War Eagles prevailed over this team 25-22 and 25-22. The key players for this game were Ashley Roberts with 5 kills, Breighly Bolton with 5 kills, Chlesea Carroll with 13 assists and 5 digs and Shannan Wood with 4 kills. The next game was against Cobleskill High School from New York. The Lady War Eagles prevailed against this team as well, 25-12 and 25-11. The key players for this game were Shannan Wood with 6 kills, Chelsea Carroll with 19 assists and 2 kills and Jordan Pryor, Breighly Bolton and Ashley Roberts all with 4 kills. The third game was against Tarkington High School from Texas. This team posed to be a bit better than the two prior teams and the Lady War Eagles lost 15-25 and 17-25. The key players for this game were Emily Haley with 6 kills, Albrey Sorrell with 1 kill and 9 digs and Chelsea Carroll with 10 assists and 3 digs. The “ nal game was against Rondout High School from New York. The Lady War eagles won 25-11 and 25-4. The key players for this game were Ashley Roberts with 8 kills and 2 digs, Emily Haley with 6 kills and Chelsea Carroll with 16 assists and 2 digs. The next day, the team played against Hernando High School from Mississippi. The Lady War Eagles began the day strong and won this game 25-14 and 25-13. The key players for this game were Emily Haley with 4 kills, Albrey Sorrell with 6 digs and Chelsea Carroll with 14 assists. The last and “ nal game of the tournament was against Saddle Brook High School from New Jersey. The Lady War Eagles would “ nish the tournament strong taking the win 25-16 and 27-25. The key players for this game were Emily Haley with 6 kills, Shannan Wood with 5 kills, Ashley Roberts with 5 kills, Breighly Bolton with 7 digs and Chelsea Carroll with 16 assists. Overall the Lady War Eagles had a great weekend “ nishing as the runner up in their bracket, with only one loss.Lady War Eagles “ nish as the runner up in KSA tournament in OrlandoMIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALL Special to The News The RMS Bears overcame four “ rst quarter fumbles and a 16-0 de“ cit, to defeat the visiting Suwannee Bulldogs, 34-16. Once the Bears stopped putting the ball on the ground, the offense started clicking. The Bears defense played well all night, holding the line while the RMS offense got on track. Offensively, Riversprings was driven by their rushing attack. They were paced by running backs Monterious Loggins and Demarcus Lindsey Loggins had 5 carries for 72 yards, including a 32-yard touchdown run. Loggins also powered in 2 extra point conversions for RMS. Lindsey had 5 carries for 128 yards including a 51-yard touchdown scamper. He also added 2 pass receptions for 70 yards and a 43-yard touchdown catch. Receiver Keith Gavin also had a 64-yard TD run. According to head coach Joey Jacobs, Our offense played OK. Our O-line at times played lights out. Isaiah Youmas dominated on the line, and at times so did Kyle Weaver. We just have to put together a complete game, which we have yet to do. We are getting better though, and thats what were looking for.Ž On defense, the bears were paced by Monterious Loggins and Keith Gavin. Monterious had 4 tackles, 2 assists, and 1 pass defended. One factor that doesnt show up in the stat book is that Loggins tackled Suwannee Quarterback Stephen Alexander all night long, eventually wearing down the big bulldog playmaker. Gavin had 7 tackles, 3 assists, and 2 tackles for loss. Isaiah Youmas made his presence known by harassing the Suwannee back“ eld. Safety Feleip Franks had an interception and made a touchdown saving tackle. The Bears ” exed their collective muscle on two huge goal line stands. Our defense played well, but we didnt play perfectly. We just want to get better each game, thats our goal,Ž Jacobs added. The Suwannee game was also the inaugural radio broadcast of RMS Bear football. Riversprings football can be heard live over 94.1 FM The Wave. Coach Jacobs wanted to encourage everyone to, Tell your grandmas, grandpas, aunts, uncles, and anybody else you can about the Bears playing on the radio. You can also get on the internet and listen live on WAVE 94s website.Ž The Bears will be back in action on Thursday, Sept. 8, at 6 p.m. at JD Jones Stadium at Jerry Reynolds Field. Come out and support the Bears.RMS defeats Suwannee, 34-16WMS victorious over Taylor CountyBy BOBBY WELLSWMS Coach The Wakulla Middle School Wildcats won their opening game on Thursday night, Sept. 1, against the Bulldogs of Taylor County. Wakulla opened the game with a 78-yard drive in five plays to take the lead 6-0. The Bulldogs tried to answer, but constant pressure on Taylors double wing offense kept them in check all night. A defensive battled ensued with neither team able to push the ball into the end zone. Three times the Bulldogs were denied in the red zone as Wakullas defense stiffened. Jaylin Gilyard ended the night with 94 yards rushing followed by Cephus Greenes 27 yards. The offensive line featured Jake Bryan, Anthony Romanus, Jake Hutto, Tyler Teegan, George Gatlin and Austin Miller They opened holes all night for the Wakulla offense. On the defensive side of the ball, Austin Johnson, Austin Beaulieu and Dakota Rhodes held the Bullldogs to under 100 yards of offense for the night. The Wildcats will be back in action again this week as they travel to Suwannee County. Kickoff will be at 4 p.m. at Suwannee High School in Live Oak, Fla. Wildcat fans, dont forget to purchase the WMS Wildcat Football Program at every home game for only $3. All money raised will support the WMS Wildcat football team. CROSS COUNTRYBy PAUL HOOVER Track Coach The WHS girls cross country team enters the upcoming season ranked 13th in the state among Class 2A schools. The ranking, by the Florida Athletics Coaches Association and flrunners.com, marks the “ rst time in the programs history that a team enters the season ranked in the top 15. The rankings are based on last years performance and who is expected to return. The top runners returning from last year include seniors Cora Atkinson, Norma Woodcock, Emily McCullers, Krisite Hodges, junior Raychel Gray and the top runner, sophomore Marty Wiedeman. Others to watch from last years squad include sophomore Rachel Woofter and junior Wyomi Creel. The team also has a group of promising “ rst-year runners that include Kasey James, Lydia Wiedeman, Lilli Broadway, Savanna Strickland and Tyler Kinard. The WHS boys team also features a strong group of veteran runners that should challenge Marianna for the District title. The team is led by returning seniors Stanley Linton, D.J Victor, Cody James, Zach Broadway, Will Bartnick and Kendall Barron. Others to watch include returning runners Hunter Phillips, Brandon Trussell, Tyler Bennett, Micah Grey, Travis Hinsey and Gabe Hutchins. The boys team also includes of new runners J.P. Piotrowski, Jacob Martinez, Reid Tillery and Mitchell Atkinson. The pre-season ranking is nice and a compliment to the work the girls have put in the last 3-4 years, but our goal is to be there or higher at the end of the season, so we have a lot of work ahead of us,Ž noted Coach Paul Hoover. Our boys squad should also be pretty strong. We have a good mix on that team and I think they will surprise some people. The first meet is Saturday, Sept. 10 at 8 a.m. at the Panhandle Jamboree in Marianna.WHS girls team ranked 13th in pre-seasonPHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla High School Lady War Eagles volleyball team placed second in the KSA tournament held in Orlando. For more information NAMI Wakulla, call 850-926-1033Put on your walking shoes for National Mental Health Awareness Week and join your friends and neighbors for a light breakfast! SAVE THE DATESaturday, Oct. 8 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. Azalea Park JOIN NAMI WAKULLA’S “WALK FOR HEROES”In the battle against mental illness! • Ente rta inme nt • Guest speaker s • Rec ognitio n of He roe s • Hot dogs for Lunc h

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 – Page 9ABy TIM LINAFELT Osceola.com Staff WriterWith his leaping, acrobatic, mid-air adjusting 25-yard catch in the second quarter of Florida States 34-0 win over ULM, Bert Reed brie” y showed a ” ash what head coach Jimbo Fisher had told everyone during preseason camp … that Reed, a “ fth-year receiver from Panama City, was ready to take his game up a notch for his “ nal season. Reed, FSUs only senior receiver, got off to a fast start Saturday, nabbing three of his four catches in the “ rst half, including a 9-yard touchdown strike from quarterback EJ Manuel that put the Seminoles on the board for the “ rst time in 2011. Bert is one of those guys, you always want to get him the ball because hes going to make plays for you,Ž Manuel said. ƒ He was my “ rst and then became my fourth read on that touchdown pass. I came back to him, he was wide open and just ran on in.Ž Reed and Manuel nearly linked up for another score later in the second quarter, but Reeds toe-dragging reception just inside the goal line was ruled out of bounds and the Seminoles settled for a “ eld goal. Fisher said that the throw itself might have been Manuels best of the day. Ah, I know, I know,Ž the charismatic Reed smiled after Saturdays game. I couldve run a better route. I put it in the referees hands, you know what I mean? I could have done a better job of releasing and squeezing back on the defender and giving myself more room for the sideline, but I can work on that and get better.Ž Reeds game wasnt perfect …Fisher mentioned that Reed shortened a route in the ULM end zone that led to Manuels lone interception … but like most of those wearing garnet and gold Saturday, the good far outweighed the few early-season missteps. I was in the zone.Ž Reed said. And once you go in the zone its like every ball is yours, and thats the attitude youve got have as a receiver.Ž R e e d t a k e s t h i n g s u p i t a n o t c h Reed takes things up it a notchBy MARTY COHEN GatorBait.net EditorWe were treated to lots of orange, a healthy helping of Chris Rainey and Jeff Demps and no sign of Sharrif Floyd as Florida began the Will Muschamp Era by dusting off Florida Atlantic 41-3 Saturday night. It was a solid all-around display, with enough fireworks to leave folks smiling about the 2011 debut, but also enough miscues to provide the coaches plenty of ammunition for the desired improvement by week two. Perhaps it was a nod to Muschamps Gator upbringing in the 1980s that the Gators resurrected the orange tops (he said they will return to blue as their standard jersey), but it was also a return to a more traditional-looking offense under the direction of offensive coordinator Charlie Weis that will surely hog the headlines. The Gators were quite ef“ cient until a strange decision to insert freshman QB Jeff Driskel midway through the second quarter defused the momentum a bit. All in all it was a satisfying opening night in The Swamp against a vastly over-matched opponent and as we usually do after the “ rst contest, lets trot out a few ideas of what we learned at the unveiling: For some reason it took four years, a different system and a new coordinator to put tailbacks Chris Rainey and Jeff Demps on the “ eld at the same time and simultaneously utilize their wondrous speed and athletic ability. Although we barely got past the “ rst chapter of Charlie Weis playbook Saturday night, its clearly evident that Rainey and Demps (a combined 32 touches, not to mention special teams action) are going to be at the forefront of the 2011 Gator offense. They are special with the ball in their hands,Ž Muschamp said of his dynamic tailback duo. Rainey got to let it all hang out for possibly the “ rst time in his Gator career. You wonder if he wants to petition the NCAA to get some of the years back that he toiled in the spread, where he was ef“ cient, but not the big-playwaiting-to-happen like he displayed Saturday in his “ rst game under Weis. It seemed so elementary, but the Gators actually threw the ball to the running backs, an element absent in the spread offense. Very few college defenses can handle a steady diet of covering the running backs in space and to boot, these are safe throws. People forget that a huge factor in Steve Spurriers UF aerial show was numerous throws to backs like Errict Rhett, Eli Williams, etc. The versatility of Rainey (six catches for 67 yards to go along with his 79 yards rushing on 11 carries) and Demps (three catches for 21 yards on top of his game-high 105 yards rushing on 12 attempts) will present sleepless nights for defensive coordinators. Certainly its premature to gush too much because Florida Atlantic is not going to win many games this season, but theres little doubt that Weis is digging the opportunity to work with worldclass speedsters like Demps and Rainey. *Certainly this is more like what we expected to see from quarterback John Brantley, who appeared decisive and confident in his decisionmaking (again, lets keep in mind the opposition). Florida didnt go down the “ eld all that much, but didnt need to display a huge vertical passing attack (Brantleys longest completion was just 19 yards) against a soft FAU defense. Brantley delivered a number of nicely-thrown out patterns and certainly looked calm on a night that didnt produce much stress. Although the irony of the opening drive, that resulted in a 51-yard Caleb Sturgis “ eld goal, being derailed by an errant snap from center Jon Harrison wasnt lost on Muschamp. Yall rolled your eyes when you saw that, didnt you?Ž Muschamp said in his droll style. F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A FLORIDA g a t o r s gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Ball State at #22 South FloridaSaturday, 7 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN3.com. UAB at #18 FloridaSaturday, 7 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN3.com. Charrleston So. at #5 Florida StateSaturday, 6 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN3.com. Senior receiver Bert Reed hauled in FSUs “ rst touchdown of the season. S o l i d d i s p l a y b y Solid display by G a t o r s i n o p e n e r Gators in openerBy TIM LINAFELT Osceola.com Staff WriterAll the no-huddle, hurryup and misdirection offensive ingenuity LouisianaMonroe could muster didnt amount to much Saturday in Tallahassee. It was FSUs “ rst shutout since it blanked Wake Forest, 31-0, in week four of last season, and just its third since 2008.Florida States defense, which spent much of the week focusing on the Warhawks unconventional offense, overpowered and overmatched ULM on the way to a 34-0 shutout here at Doak Campbell Stadium. Im extremely happy,Ž Seminoles coach Jimbo Fisher said. [The defense] played well. What I was happy about was that ULM ran a no-huddle, we were making adjustments, we were getting our blitzes, we were getting our checks in, were used to doing what were doing.Ž Fisher said earlier this week that he expected ULM (0-1) to come out with guns blazing,Ž but from their “ rst offensive possession, it was clear that the Warhawks were “ ring only blanks. ULM crossed into FSU territory just twice, both times in the second half, and was held to double-digits in both rushing yards (99) and passing yards (92). Mark Stoops unit finished the game having allowed a meager 3.1 yards per play. And the Warhawks top receiver, speedy senior Luther Ambrose, the Sun Belts “ fth-leading receiver from 2010, failed to record a catch and registered just one rush attempt for “ ve yards. It felt great,Ž said FSU middle linebacker Vince Williams, who made his “ rst career start Saturday and led the Seminoles with seven tackles. We were prepared. Coach [Mark] Stoops did a good job with the game plan and kind of simpli“ ed the playbook and things like that. I think we did fantastic.Ž If Stoops indeed kept it simple, there was hardly any reason for him to complicate things, as FSUs renovated defensive line disrupted ULM all afternoon. All-America candidate Brandon Jenkins showed no signs of slowing down from his stellar sophomore season, racking up “ ve tackles (three solo), two tackles for loss „ one of which could have been ruled a sack „ and a pass break-up. And Jenkins counterpart, sophomore defensive end Bjoern Werner, proved equally antagonizing in his “ rst career start, with a sack, a forced fumble and 1.5 tackles for loss. By the “ nal whistle, FSUs defensive line had totaled 21 of the teams 68 total tackles (30.8 percent) and registered two of four sacks (one was a teamŽ sack), facts not lost on Fisher. Those two (Jenkins and Werner) can play,Ž Fisher said with a smile. Ive seen it all spring and fall. Ive been telling yall. And Im gonna tell you „ Dan Hicks, when he comes in there, and Tank Carradine, those guys, Im telling you now, theyre good football players. Theyre really good football players.Ž And when the Warhawks did attempt a pass „ which only happened 22 times „ the Seminoles secondary more often than not was ready for it. Browning, who finished just 11-of-19 for 85 yards, attempted only one deep ball, which was promptly picked off by safety Lamarcus Joyner. ULM tried to dink and dunk it in there, and we had some pressure,Ž Fisher said. They did an outstanding job on defense. We were physical. ULM couldnt get any runs in and I thought, up front, we did a really nice job.ŽFSU ‘D’ answers the challenge Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSAFFORDABLE COVERAGE TO SAVE YOU MONEY Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850-570-9734 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com Appointments & Walk-Ins Welcome () Full Service Family Hair Care Salon! www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service THE CABINET SHOPTHECABINET SHOP Custom Kitchens&Counter Tops pest controlan d, inc.tillmans termite Tillman Owens850-322-1775 Creeping, Crawling or Flying...TillmansPestControl@hotmail.comSafe for people and pets!RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL“We get them before they get you!”FSUs Lamarcus Joyner and Christian Jones bring down a ULM receiver. FLRECQ1035357;AUAB110 FLRECQ1035357;AUAB110 Auction MobileHome ParkCommercialAssetsSingleFamilyHomesLandCommercial &Residential SAT€SEPT24€11:00AMattheTallahasseeCivicCenter ManySellingABSOLUTE! GolfCourseNoBuyers Premium!BrokersProtected OWNED PROPERTIESCallForFREEBrochure866.518.906450Commercial&Residential NORTHFLORIDAProperties OCWENwww.AuctionFDIC.com PHOTOS BY Colin Hackley Osceola Chris Rainey points to the crowd after scoring a touchdown in the season opener. PHOTO COURTESY OF GatorBait.net

PAGE 10

Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton TheWorks coffee•espresso•latts cappuccino•frapps andnowBAGELS! Monday-Friday630am-900pm Saturday8a m-9pm Sunday1 2-5pm 27FAzaleaDr•BehindBealls•850.253.7253•www.theworkscafe.com 2 0 1 1 S t a rt u p B u s i n e s s o f t h eY e a r Well, it seems we have dodged yet another bullet with Lee and Katia. I hope everyone was able to enjoy the Labor Day weekend despite all the rain and wind. While plans for an outdoor gathering were thwarted, we enjoyed an indoor day of games with family and friends. Needless to say, the weather kept us all on land, and scheduled patrols for the weekend were scrubbed. As we watched the weather moving across the gulf coast, I sent out an e-mail to see how our western Flotillas were managing as they were getting more of an impact than us. Anne DelBello from Flotilla 14 in Panama City sent in a report of more than 9 inches of rain and a tornado warning following a water spout that began over Destin and Choctawhatchee Bay moving towards Niceville and Bluewater Bay area before veering off to Walton County and Choctaw Beach. After 30 minutes, the weather dissipated and all was clear. Patti Fritchie, from Flotilla 19 in Panama City Beach reported that they were also having a lot of rain and wind, but thankfully the biggest problem they were facing was overflowing pools and some minor other water related issues. She was planning to stay in, watch the weather and get caught up on reading. In honor of the Labor Day, I thought I would offer a few tidbits about the history of the holiday and why we celebrate it on the “ rst Monday of September. The Department of Labor website has lots of interesting facts about Labor Day. The “ rst Labor Day was celebrated on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 1882, in New York City and was organized by the Central Labor Union. It was born out of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. A year later it was again celebrated on Sept. 5. In 1884, the “ rst Monday in September was selected as the of“ cial holiday and the Central Labor Union urged similar organizations in the Nation to join in the celebration. In 1885 Labor Day was celebrated in many industrial centers of the country. As the holiday became more supported and unions lobbied for support, stated began passing legislation to make the “ rst Monday a holiday. By 1894, Federal legislation was passed and on June 28 of that year, Congress passed an act making the “ rst Monday in September of each year a legal holiday. I sincerely hope that everyone was able to take advantage of the holiday and get some rest and relaxation. While it may not have been ideal weather, it was still an opportunity to take a break from the normal hustle and bustle of the everyday grind. In that spirit, Flotilla 12 took a break from our normal scheduled meeting and will be having our September meeting on Sept. 10. We will be meeting at the Crawfordville Fire Station beginning at our normal time of 10 a.m. As Sherrie reminds us, safe boating is no accident! In light of the recent storms, fair winds and following seas to all. My current rebreather student is a direct product of seeds I planted 25 years ago. While a graduate student at Florida State University (FSU), I collaborated with fellow students to create a service program to assist us in our underwater research activities. Since we had no money but plenty of ideas, little of“ cial status but plenty of time, we decided that working together for a common good just might get us what we wanted. Back then we were young and naive. But the program was born of countless contribution at all levels. At “ rst, we collected diving equipment, then took it to the facility to store and disperse it. We informally taught basic diving as a reward for service. Those who wanted access must also participate in acquisition and maintenance. Before long, we were training our own interns, so called wannabes.Ž And “ nally we were asked for an identity. I rushed out and had a printer make me and the others in the group a business card that said Academic Diving Program (ADP). By the time I completed my graduate training, I was offered a faculty position to continue expanding this unique and popular program. Across the next decade, we grew into better facilities on campus, expanded opportunities and supported more research. We joined national organizations of like mind and hosted their conventions at FSU. The provost noticed and offered to unify all campus diving under our ADP. By the second decade our program had four staff members, annually taught 12 credits worth of classes in three departments, assisted a large diving club and supported millions of dollars of aquatic research conducted by faculty in seven departments. Our shared locker was valued at more than a million dollars. We saw the creation of an Underwater Archaeology specialization in the Anthropology Department and continued growth in underwater scientists on the faculty. When I moved my faculty position to Panama City to teach the Scientist In the Sea Program in 2000, our ADP was supporting 500 people a year for a total of $200,000 price tag (and that included my salary as well). Was it worth the investment? I found my answer today when my Rebreather student revealed why he is who he is today. Mark graduated from the University of Florida (UF). Early in his studies he worked as an intern for the Academic Diving Program at UF, a sister program that took on our name and model during our earlier years. There he learned valuable skills and experiences that convinced him to seek a degree in marine science. He later worked for Dr. Bill Lindberg at UF. Bill was one of our early ADP graduate collaborators that participated in our formative years. Mark went on into “ sheries science and is today returning for a continuation of his technical training at the next level, that of rebreather diving. He said that he would never have achieved his success had the UF-ADP not been there for him a decade ago, and the UF-ADP would not have been there had a few poverty stricken graduate students not decided to run on a dream that if we all pitched in, synergism would help us all. Sadly, today both ADP programs are nearly gone, remnants of their former glory and in” uence on the emerging student populations on both campuses. What will it take to spark that enthusiasm again? Over my graduate desk in 1975 I had a sentence posted that read: CAUTION, ENTHUSIASM is EPIDEMIC.Adventurous women sought for outdoor workshop Womens outdoor workshop is coming to Panama City. The single-day workshop takes place Saturday, Oct. 15 at Gulf Coast State College along the beautiful shores of St. Andrews Bay. The workshop runs 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The workshop is open to anyone 18 years or older who wants to improve their outdoor skills and enjoy several recreational activities. In two, three-and-one-half-hour sessions, the BOW mini-workshop teaches skills associated with “ shing, hunting and other forms of outdoor recreation, at all levels of physical activity. The cost for the one-day workshop is $50, and there are discounted slots available. For more information, visit MyFWC.com/BOW or contact Susan Harrass at 561-625-5122 or Susan.Harrass@MyFWC.com. Great Value, Great Results Go painlessly with Thera-Gesic THG-11903 Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday p Thu Sep 8, 11 Fri Sep 9, 11 Sat Sep 10, 11 Sun Sep 11, 11 Mon Sep 12, 11 Tue Sep 13, 11 Wed Sep 14, 11 Date 2.9 ft. 12:43 AM 3.1 ft. 1:18 AM 3.3 ft. 1:48 AM 3.5 ft. 2:15 AM 3.7 ft. 2:41 AM 3.8 ft. 3:05 AM 3.8 ft. 3:28 AM High 1.9 ft. 5:48 AM 1.6 ft. 6:48 AM 1.2 ft. 7:33 AM 0.9 ft. 8:12 AM 0.7 ft. 8:47 AM 0.5 ft. 9:20 AM 0.4 ft. 9:52 AM Low 3.6 ft. 12:19 PM 3.8 ft. 1:10 PM 3.9 ft. 1:52 PM 3.9 ft. 2:29 PM 3.9 ft. 3:03 PM 3.9 ft. 3:36 PM 3.8 ft. 4:08 PM High 0.5 ft. 7:07 PM 0.5 ft. 7:45 PM 0.6 ft. 8:16 PM 0.7 ft. 8:43 PM 0.8 ft. 9:08 PM 0.9 ft. 9:32 PM 1.0 ft. 9:56 PM Low Thu Sep 8, 11 Fri Sep 9, 11 Sat Sep 10, 11 Sun Sep 11, 11 Mon Sep 12, 11 Tue Sep 13, 11 Wed Sep 14, 11 Date 3.0 ft. 12:40 AM 3.2 ft. 1:15 AM 3.4 ft. 1:45 AM 3.6 ft. 2:12 AM 3.7 ft. 2:38 AM 3.8 ft. 3:02 AM 3.9 ft. 3:25 AM High 2.1 ft. 5:45 AM 1.7 ft. 6:45 AM 1.3 ft. 7:30 AM 1.0 ft. 8:09 AM 0.7 ft. 8:44 AM 0.6 ft. 9:17 AM 0.5 ft. 9:49 AM Low 3.7 ft. 12:16 PM 3.8 ft. 1:07 PM 4.0 ft. 1:49 PM 4.0 ft. 2:26 PM 4.0 ft. 3:00 PM 4.0 ft. 3:33 PM 3.9 ft. 4:05 PM High 0.6 ft. 7:04 PM 0.6 ft. 7:42 PM 0.6 ft. 8:13 PM 0.7 ft. 8:40 PM 0.9 ft. 9:05 PM 1.0 ft. 9:29 PM 1.1 ft. 9:53 PM Low Thu Sep 8, 11 Fri Sep 9, 11 Sat Sep 10, 11 Sun Sep 11, 11 Mon Sep 12, 11 Tue Sep 13, 11 Wed Se p 14, 11 Date 2.7 ft. 1:19 AM 2.9 ft. 1:54 AM 3.1 ft. 2:24 AM 3.3 ft. 2:51 AM 3.4 ft. 3:17 AM 3.5 ft. 3:41 AM 3.6 ft. 4:04 AM High 1.8 ft. 6:52 AM 1.4 ft. 7:52 AM 1.1 ft. 8:37 AM 0.8 ft. 9:16 AM 0.6 ft. 9:51 AM 0.5 ft. 10:24 AM 0.4 ft. 10:56 AM Low 3.4 ft. 12:55 PM 3.5 ft. 1:46 PM 3.6 ft. 2:28 PM 3.6 ft. 3:05 PM 3.6 ft. 3:39 PM 3.6 ft. 4:12 PM 3.5 ft. 4:44 PM High 0.5 ft. 8:11 PM 0.5 ft. 8:49 PM 0.5 ft. 9:20 PM 0.6 ft. 9:47 PM 0.7 ft. 10:12 PM 0.8 ft. 10:36 PM 0.9 ft. 11:00 PM Low Thu Sep 8, 11 Fri Sep 9, 11 Sat Sep 10, 11 Sun Sep 11, 11 Mon Sep 12, 11 Tue Sep 13, 11 Wed Sep 14, 11 Date 2.2 ft. 12:35 AM 2.4 ft. 1:10 AM 2.5 ft. 1:40 AM 2.6 ft. 2:07 AM 2.8 ft. 2:33 AM 2.8 ft. 2:57 AM 2.9 ft. 3:20 AM High 1.4 ft. 5:59 AM 1.1 ft. 6:59 AM 0.9 ft. 7:44 AM 0.7 ft. 8:23 AM 0.5 ft. 8:58 AM 0.4 ft. 9:31 AM 0.3 ft. 10:03 AM Low 2.7 ft. 12:11 PM 2.8 ft. 1:02 PM 2.9 ft. 1:44 PM 2.9 ft. 2:21 PM 2.9 ft. 2:55 PM 2.9 ft. 3:28 PM 2.8 ft. 4:00 PM High 0.4 ft. 7:18 PM 0.4 ft. 7:56 PM 0.4 ft. 8:27 PM 0.5 ft. 8:54 PM 0.6 ft. 9:19 PM 0.7 ft. 9:43 PM 0.7 ft. 10:07 PM Low Thu Sep 8, 11 Fri Sep 9, 11 Sat Sep 10, 11 Sun Sep 11, 11 Mon Sep 12, 11 Tue Sep 13, 11 Wed Sep 14, 11 Date 2.3 ft. 12:27 AM 2.4 ft. 1:02 AM 2.6 ft. 1:32 AM 2.8 ft. 1:59 AM 2.9 ft. 2:25 AM 2.9 ft. 2:49 AM 3.0 ft. 3:12 AM High 1.9 ft. 5:27 AM 1.5 ft. 6:27 AM 1.2 ft. 7:12 AM 0.9 ft. 7:51 AM 0.7 ft. 8:26 AM 0.5 ft. 8:59 AM 0.4 ft. 9:31 AM Low 2.8 ft. 12:03 PM 2.9 ft. 12:54 PM 3.0 ft. 1:36 PM 3.1 ft. 2:13 PM 3.1 ft. 2:47 PM 3.0 ft. 3:20 PM 3.0 ft. 3:52 PM High 0.5 ft. 6:46 PM 0.5 ft. 7:24 PM 0.6 ft. 7:55 PM 0.7 ft. 8:22 PM 0.8 ft. 8:47 PM 0.9 ft. 9:11 PM 1.0 ft. 9:35 PM Low Thu Sep 8, 11 Fri Sep 9, 11 Sat Sep 10, 11 Sun Sep 11, 11 Mon Sep 12, 11 Tue Sep 13, 11 Wed Se p 14, 11 Date 2.7 ft. 1:44 AM 2.7 ft. 2:02 AM 2.7 ft. 2:18 AM 2.8 ft. 2:31 AM 2.9 ft. 2:41 AM 3.0 ft. 2:52 AM 3.1 ft. 3:05 AM High 1.9 ft. 5:11 AM 1.6 ft. 6:08 AM 1.4 ft. 6:55 AM 1.2 ft. 7:36 AM 1.0 ft. 8:13 AM 0.9 ft. 8:47 AM 0.7 ft. 9:19 AM Low 3.0 ft. 11:07 AM 3.1 ft. 12:24 PM 3.1 ft. 1:22 PM 3.0 ft. 2:12 PM 3.0 ft. 2:57 PM 2.9 ft. 3:41 PM 2.8 ft. 4:26 PM High 0.5 ft. 6:38 PM 0.6 ft. 7:16 PM 0.8 ft. 7:47 PM 1.0 ft. 8:13 PM 1.1 ft. 8:32 PM 1.3 ft. 8:48 PM 1.5 ft. 9:02 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacSept. 8 – Sept. 14First Oct. 3 Full Sept. 11 Last Sept. 20 New Sept. 27Major Times 10:45 AM 12:45 PM 11:08 PM 1:08 AM Minor Times 3:48 AM 4:48 AM 5:34 PM 6:34 PM Major Times --:---:-11:31 AM 1:31 PM Minor Times 4:45 AM 5:45 AM 6:09 PM 7:09 PM Major Times --:---:-12:16 PM 2:16 PM Minor Times 5:42 AM 6:42 AM 6:41 PM 7:41 PM Major Times 12:37 AM 2:37 AM 12:58 PM 2:58 PM Minor Times 6:36 AM 7:36 AM 7:12 PM 8:12 PM Major Times 1:19 AM 3:19 AM 1:40 PM 3:40 PM Minor Times 7:30 AM 8:30 AM 7:43 PM 8:43 PM Major Times 2:01 AM 4:01 AM 2:21 PM 4:21 PM Minor Times 8:22 AM 9:22 AM 8:13 PM 9:13 PM Major Times 2:42 AM 4:42 AM 3:04 PM 5:04 PM Minor Times 9:16 AM 10:16 AM 8:44 PM 9:44 PM Average Good Better Best Best Better Better7:17 am 7:51 pm 5:34 pm 3:49 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:18 am 7:50 pm 6:10 pm 4:47 am 7:18 am 7:49 pm 6:42 pm 5:43 am 7:19 am 7:47 pm 7:13 pm 6:37 am 7:19 am 7:46 pm 7:43 pm 7:31 am 7:20 am 7:45 pm 8:13 pm 8:24 am 7:21 am 7:44 pm 8:45 pm 9:17 am74% 81% 87% 93% 99% 95% 88% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

PAGE 11

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 – Page 11AOn Aug. 25, David Rosier of Sopchoppy reported the theft of a motor vehicle and wood splitter which were taken from his home. The vehicle is valued at $2,000 and the wood splitter is valued at $500. Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On Aug. 25, a 16-yearold Wakulla High School student reported the theft of her book bag which contained personal items and identification valued at $65. € On Aug. 26, a retail theft was reported at WalMart when three men allegedly took beer from the store without paying for it. The beer was valued at $28 and a tag number of the vehicle transporting the suspects was obtained. € On Aug. 25, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a two vehicle accident at Wal-Mart. Bea C. Bradford of Crawfordville backed into a vehicle driven by William Q. Skeens of Crawfordville. Bradfords vehicle suffered $500 worth of damage and the Skeens vehicle suffered $5,000 worth of damage. Bradford was found at fault. Skeens was cited for having an expired tag, more than four months. No injuries were reported. € On Aug. 25, Ann L. Estes of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Two ” owering bushes were cut. The plants are valued at $80. € On Aug. 25, a retail theft was reported at WalMart. Justin Leon Harvell, 21, of Crawfordville was allegedly observed attempting to conceal a wireless game controller in his clothing. Harvell was confronted by Wal-Mart employees outside the store and returned inside the store. He was charged with retail theft. The game controller was valued at $58. Deputy Mike Zimba and Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On Aug. 26, Karen Rogers of Crawfordville reported a fraud as she received internet correspondence sending her a check for $2,050 and asking her to send $1,700 to a person in California. The victim mailed the money and it was determined that the original check was from a non-existent bank account. € On Aug. 26, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a traf“ c crash on Springhill Road north of Highway 267. He observed a Mercury Mountaineer overturned in the ditch. Leon County Communications informed WCSO that they were with a pedestrian who was walking on the road near the crash site. Marco A. Marines-Rangel, 28, of Crawfordville reported that he was not injured in the crash. However, he did not possess a valid driver license. It had been suspended in May for failure to pay a citation. He was charged with knowingly driving with a license that was suspended, cancelled or revoked and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. € On Aug. 27, John Hall of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of farm equipment. A cultivator and plow, valued at $500, were reported missing from an individual who was renting it. € On Aug. 27, Suesun Trice of Crawfordville reported two fraudulent transactions on her bank account. The two transactions were reported at Wal-Mart for $387. € On Aug. 27, Jeanie Murkerson of Tallahassee reported a criminal mischief to an air conditioning unit at her home in Crawfordville. The air conditioning unit was demolished and a shed was broken into. A forced entry was observed at the shed. Damage to the air conditioning unit was estimated at $2,800. € On Aug. 28, Rosa Burdette of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victims vehicle was damaged while it was parked overnight at a Crawfordville bar. Someone used a closed “ st to twice punch the rear panel of the truck. € On Aug. 26, a Crawfordville man found a magazine with live rounds at Songbird Avenue and Wakulla Arran Road. The resident discovered the .40-caliber magazine as he was driving and turned it in to sheriffs of“ ce. There were 14 rounds in the magazine. PSO Mitchell Hampton investigated. € On Aug. 29, Mary Scott Gilbert, 49, of Crawfordville was observed by Deputy Mike Zimba driving an estimated 45 to 50 miles per hour in the Medart Elementary School 20 mile per hour school zone. The deputy conducted a traf“ c stop and the driver did not possess a valid driver license. Gilbert also allegedly gave Deputy Zimba a false name. Gilbert was charged with knowingly driving while license is suspended or revoked and falsely identifying herself to a law enforcement of“ cer. There was also a state notice to seize her vehicle tag which Deputy Zimba completed. € On Aug. 29, John Barthel of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim was at his home when he heard a noise coming from outside his kitchen. He investigated and determined that three individuals were attempting to get into the home and had damaged a window screen. Damage to the screen is estimated at $20. The suspects appeared to be juveniles. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On Aug. 30, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a vehicle accident involving Wakulla County EMS Rescue 01. Randy B. Williams was backing the ambulance into a parking space at Victors when he struck a utility pole. Damage to the vehicle is estimated at $500 and damage to the pole is also estimated at $500. Neither Williams nor passenger Michael E. Register were injured. € On Aug. 29, Rajubhai Shah of Crawfordville reported a fraud at Triangle Petro as a woman cashed a $138 check at the store that was later determined to have been altered or “ ctitious.Ž A Panacea victim was identi“ ed who had checks stolen in July. A suspect has also been identi“ ed in the case as two of the checks were cashed at a Crawfordville bank in July. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € On Aug. 29, Amanda Kelly of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a laptop computer, valued at $1,200. The victim identi“ ed a suspect who was at her home. The computer information was entered into the NCIC/FCIC computer. € On Aug. 30, Joyce Gregory of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c accident where a motorist struck the rear of her vehicle and left the scene without stopping. The accident was reported at the 2400 block of Crawfordville Highway. The victim was southbound in her vehicle when she was struck from behind. The other driver pulled off the shoulder of the road, drove to her passenger window, shouted that there was no damage and left the scene. An inspection of the victims vehicle noted approximately $1,000 worth of damage. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On Aug. 31, Tracy Burkett of Sopchoppy reported a house fire on Mathis Road in Sopchoppy. Deputy Randy Phillips observed a doublewide mobile home fully engulfed in “ re. The victims, Burkett and Albert A. Grimes, were both safe and uninjured. The fire originated in the kitchen as a result of hot grease. Damage to the mobile home and contents was estimated at $50,000, a total loss. The “ re was ruled accidental. € On Aug. 31, Jessica Welch of Crawfordville reported a burglary and theft of fuel from storage tanks at Welch Land Development. The gas is valued at $100. Evidence was collected at the scene. Captain Chris Savary investigated. € On Aug. 31, Riley Miller of Crawfordville reported a vehicle “ re on Wakulla Springs Road. Miller subdued the “ re with a garden hose. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston observed a smoldering vehicle and a dashboard melted into the ” oorboard. The “ re appeared to have begun near the fuse area. The front windshield was broken and the interior was severely charred. The “ re was electrical in nature and was ruled an accident. The vehicle is owned by David Parker of Tallahassee. € On Aug. 31, Paulette Anderson of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim was driving in the area of Glendas Store on Crawfordville Highway when a student in a school bus threw something out the window that broke her windshield. Deputy Lorne Whaley is reviewing bus security video with Wakulla County School District Transportation Director Pat Jones in an attempt to identify the student. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 772 calls for service during the past week including: 22 business and residential alarms; 106 citizen contacts; 16 disturbances; 46 investigations; 41 medical emergencies; 56 security checks; 26 special details; 10 subpoena services; 13 suspicious vehicles; 14 traf“ c enforcements; 53 traf“ c stops; 15 disabled vehicles; 16 reckless vehicles; 25 wanted people; 12 warrant services; and 111 watch orders. reportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Auction OWNEDPROPERTIESMobileHome ParkCommercialAssetsSingleFamilyHomesLandCommercial &Residential SAT€SEPTEMBER24€11:00AM www.AuctionFDIC.com CallForFREEBrochure866.518.9064 FLRECQ1035357;AUAB110 ManySellingABSOLUTE!TallahasseeCivicCenter FLRECQ1035357;AUAB110 GolfCourseNoBuyers Premium!BrokersProtectedIncluding LOCALPROPERTIES inFlorida&GeorgiaCounties :DIXIE€FRANKLIN€GADSDEN€LEON WAKULLACOUNTIES,FL& THOMASCOUNTY,GA50Commercial&Residential NORTHFLORIDAProperties OCWEN HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Tallahassee man arrested for burglary in WakullaSpecial to The News The U.S. Marshals North Florida Regional Fugitive Task Force arrested a 32year-old Tallahassee man in Leon County Thursday, Sept. 1 in connection with an April 18 burglary in Crawfordville, according to Sheriff David Harvey. The Task Force apprehended Christopher Kanta Bradham at a home at 293 Bermuda Street at 1:15 p.m. Bradham was arrested without incident and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Bradham was wanted for the April 18 residential burglary of a home owned by Clinton Shettlesworth on McMyers Road in Crawfordville where $5,725 worth of property was stolen including a “ rearm, jewelry, electronic games and a large television. During the April burglary investigation, a DNA sample was taken from the victims home which was sent to the Florida Department of Law Enforcements Crime Lab. A match was discovered Aug. 19. After matching the DNA profile with Bradham, a photographic search was conducted and reviewed for similarities in photos provided by the victims security system. Bradham was charged with burglary of a structure, grand theft and grand theft of a “ rearm. He is being held in the Wakulla County Jail under a $45,000 bond. Bradham is also a registered sexual offender, according to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, as a result of lewd and lascivious battery and assault charges from 1999 and 2001. The stolen property has not been recovered, however the investigation is continuing. The Task Force includes law enforcement of“ cers from agencies throughout the region including Wakulla and Leon County and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. Additional charges are pending. Christopher K. BradhamSheri s o ce will hold 9-11 memorial serviceSpecial to The News The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce will host the 10th Annual 9-11 Memorial Service on Sunday, Sept. 11 in the parking lot of the sheriffs of“ ce. Sheriff David Harvey and the staff will remember the victims of the 911 terrorist attack with a ceremony that will begin at 8:45 a.m., the same time the “ rst airplane crashed into the World Trade Center in New York City. The memorial service is open to the public. San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Huttons Seafood & More 570-1004

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Centennial Bank believes in the importance of getting out in the community. Where our customers are. More than just “nancially strong, if you need us, well be there for you. Even after hours. Thats why you can “nd us while playing in your front yard. Or wherever you happen to be. MY100BANK.COM | A Home BancShares Company (Nasdaq: HOMB) Da Caju n Wagon Serving Fresh Sea food & mor e wit h da Caju n Ki ck! Welcome 850570-1625 War Eagles defeat Mosley in season opener, 31-14Continued from page 1A At the start of the fourth quarter, Mosley scored on a quarterback keeper at the goal line and got the extra point to make the score 22-14. But Godbolt broke through the defense with his deceptive speed and ran for a touchdown with 5:51 left in the fourth quarter. The extra point was missed and the War Eagles were up 28-14. With less than two minutes left, kicker Conner Smith nailed a 30-yard “ eld goal to put the War Eagles up 31-14. Mosley threatened at the end of the game, driving the ball down the “ eld … but was unable to punch the ball in before time expired. The defense played extremely well,Ž Klees said. They only allowed one touchdown in the “ rst half that was set up by the fumbled punt. And one in the fourth quarter -which was helped by a penalty.Ž Ryan Henderson had 11 tackles and recovered a fumble. Klees praised Hendersons play and said he was extremely proudŽ of him. Luke Taylor had seven tackles. Mikal Cromartie had seven tackles and two pass de” ections. Klees also praised kicker Conner Smith for his two “ eld goals. The next game is at home against Taylor County on Friday, Sept. 9. They beat us last year and beat us pretty good,Ž Klees said. It should be a war here Friday night. It should be a great game.Ž PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/Special to The NewsQuarterback Dalton Norman hands off the ball to No. 10 Evan Mccoy. Players of the Week Rhonda A. Carroll, MAI State Certi ed General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459 575-1999 • 926-6111 • Fax 575-1911 Competitive Rates • County Resident • Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) • Leon/Wakulla Native • 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate •Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com r r sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property MaintenanceGeneral Landscaping € Hauling € Recycling 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com Please RecycleLicensed-InsuredMember-Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Rodney True OwnerMember-Keep Wakulla County Beautiful 4330 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida To make a donation to the auction or for more information about the event, please contact: Sue Belford at 850-926-4244 or e-mail FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail.com “Friends of Wakulla County Public Library” Bring your family & friends Bid on great items Support your Library Programs The Silent Auction includes Gift Certi cates, Vacations, Marine Supplies, Gifts, Artwork, Dinners, School Supplies & Much More!Food & Drinks will be provided. #21 Marshane Godbolt #22 Ryan Henderson #13 Conner Smith Left: Willie Thomas stiff arms a rival player for a gain. Below Left: Tyson Stephens, 14 months old, in the arms of his grandmother, Pam Parker. Tyson, who is a cousin of War Eagle quarterback Caleb Stephens, was cheering for his cousin … Go, Caleb!Ž he called out.Saturday, Sept. 10 at 8pm$12 SeatFor Reserva ons(850) 962-1010poshjava@gmail.comlocated on the corner of Rose St. &Winthrop Ave., Sopchoppy. FREE HUGSMickey Abraham, Aaron ORourke, Erik Alvar & Mark Russell Organics & Gifts

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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 Section B Green Scene Rules and Entry Form available at of“ce location3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Floridaor online at www.thewakullanews.comEntry Forms due by September 16, 2011 (Digital photos only)850-926-71022011 Pet Photo Contest What is nonpoint source pollution?EarthTalk, Page 3BAll-natural local bodybuildersGet Fit, Page 6BBreath, blood and the emotionsYoga for Life, Page 4B Coastal Cleanup is Sept. 17 By JOANN PALMERKWCB Director Last year during Coastal Cleanup, hosted locally by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, volunteers removed 13,524 pounds of trash and debris from our area. At 8 a.m. on Sept. 17, hundreds of volunteers from Wakulla, Leon, Jefferson and Franklin counties will once again converge on the shores, marshes, roads and rivers of Wakulla County to remove trash and debris. This year marks the 26th International Coastal Cleanup. Volunteers participate in this annual event because of their commitment to the environment. Keep Wakulla County Beautiful works all year long to remove trash and debris from our roadways and waterways, identify the sources of that debris, and educate our citizens to change the behaviors that allow it to end up on our roadways and reach the ocean in the “ rst place. Wakulla County is a beautiful place to live and visit. Unfortunately, when people do not respect their environment, they become complacent and litter accumulates. Not only does it have a negative impact visually, it impacts our local economy. Visitors want to see clean shores, litter free marshes and beautiful rivers. These areas are only sustainable if everyone pitches in everyday and works to maintain a clean environment. Volunteers spend the morning picking up everything from cigarette butts and food wrappers to lost “ shing nets and major appliances. This debris can not only be a danger to humans, our marine life is at risk as well. Because trash travels to the ocean by way of storm drains and waterways, much of the debris is located in the delicate marshes such as those at the St. Marks Lighthouse. The “ ve major sites for the 2011 cleanup will be St. Marks Refuge, Shell Point, Mashes Sands, St. Marks and Bottoms Road. Volunteers can either proceed directly to the site of their choice or come to Woolley Park in Panacea. At any site, you will sign in, receive a wrist band and be directed where to clean. You can sign up in Panacea and “ nd out more information on all the sites. You do not have to be familiar with the sites to participate. Volunteers can sign up early by sending an email to helpkwcb@gmail.com. You should wear comfortable closed toed shoes, tennis shoes are preferable, bring sunscreen, insect repellent, a hat and gloves. Trash bags will be provided. Following the cleanup, all participants are invited to come to the headquarters at Woolley Park in Panacea for a free participant lunch hosted by Wal-Mart of Crawfordville. Manager Richard Russell and several Wal-Mart associates, Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce staff and the Board of Directors of KWCB will be serving up hotdogs, chips and a cold drink as a thank you. In addition, participants will receive a complimentary T-shirt designed by local high school student Dilyan Sharp and made possible by the generous support of our local sponsors. Following lunch, Master of Ceremonies Commissioner Alan Brock, will present the cash prize for the most cigarette butts collected on Saturday by a group, and will be handing out door prizes donated by our many local businesses. As an added bonus again this year, Jack Rudloe of Gulf Specimen Marine Lab is offering a free tour of their facility for participants in the cleanup. The lab is located a few blocks from the park. Visit their website at gulfspecimen.org. Remember, recycle, reduce your personal trash and reuse where possible. FILE PHOTO Volunteers pick up trash for last years Coastal Cleanup. Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida By ELINOR ELFNERCommittee Chair With the new public service tax of 7 percent being enacted this year, each of us has a new challenge. How much can we reduce our use of electricity? Can we live with only the 500 kilowatts (KW) of electricity per month that is exempted from the tax? If so, we will not be paying the 7-percent tax on electricity. There are things you can do yourself to save electricity, but you also have a utility company who has trained personnel to help you identify the best practices to save money. If your provider is Talquin Electric Cooperative, call 850-627-7651 to make an appointment for a free energy analysis, and check out www. talquinelectric.com/conserv. If your provider is Progress Energy, call 1-877-574-0340, and check out www.progressenergy.com/florida/home/ save-energy-money. Dont wait for the utility company to help you. Start now. First, look at your last utility bill. How many kilowatts of electricity did you use? Put that “ gure on the top of a notepad on the refrigerator where the whole family can see it. Each month youll want to record the new amount, subtract and write the amount used in another column. Save space for a star when you have done a really great job of conserving electricity. If a month is too much time to wait to check your progress, start another chart with weekly readings. One of the kids can have the job of reading and recording every Saturday morning. Now, pencil in a goal for the week. When your child reads the meter the next week he/she can figure out how much electricity was actually used and see if the goal was met. Gradually, everyone will become aware of their own use of electricity. It may take some time for everyone in the family to play the electricity saving-money savingŽ game, but gradually you start seeing less money going to the utility company. Some ideas to get you started on the path to saving electricity and saving money are divided into three lists; ideas with no cost to you, low cost and investments. Continued on page 3B Ways to save electricity and moneyRecommendations from Wakulla County Energy Conservation Committee

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, September 8  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at Beef O’ Brady’s to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. Friday, September 9  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  SASSY STRIPPERS QUILTERS GROUP meets at the public library from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. to make quilts for traumatized children. The “cruiser quilts” are donated to Wakulla County deputies to be used for children in need. New members welcome. For information, call 926-6290.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BIG BEND HOSPICE ADVISORY COUNCIL will meet at 1 p.m. at Beef O’Brady’s in Crawfordville. Please call Pam Allbritton at 926-9308 or 508-8749 for more information. Saturday, September 10  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Saturday at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordville Highway at 5 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWER’S MARKET is held every Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Posh Java in Sopchoppy. The market features local organic and unsprayed vegetables, homemade, hand-ground, fresh bread from Crescent Moon Farm, live music and varying demonstrations, events, vendors and activities. Growers and seafood vendors wanting to participate may phone Jennifer Taylor at (850) 241-3873 or email famu. register@gmail.com. For general information or to offer an activity, demonstration or performance, contact Posh at (850) 962-1010 or Debbie Dix at (850) 528-5838, or email posh_faery@yahoo.com. Sunday, September 11  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Sunday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, September 12  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 7:30 p.m. at St. Marks First Baptist Church.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN meets each Monday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 5451853.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGAS CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach.  WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION will meet at 7 p.m. at the public library. Tuesday, September 13  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 824 Shadeville Road at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 2242321.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will meet at 7 p.m. at the public library. The public is encouraged to attend all meetings.  CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BOARD will meet at 8 a.m. at the Old Historic Wakulla County Courthouse located on High Drive in Crawfordville. Call (850) 9261848 for more information. Wednesday, September 14  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  WAKULLA COUNTY DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TASK FORCE will meet at noon at TCC Wakulla Center in Crawfordville. Lunch is provided. Call (850) 926-9005 for more information. Thursday, September 15  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at Beef O’ Brady’s to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Friday, September 16  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  SASSY STRIPPERS QUILTERS GROUP meets at the public library from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. to make quilts for traumatized children. The “cruiser quilts” are donated to Wakulla County deputies to be used for children in need. New members welcome. For information, call 926-6290.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Special EventsFriday, September 9  ELVIS AND FRIENDS will perform at the Senior Center at 8 p.m. featuring Todd Allen Herendeen and the FTD Band. Tickets are available at $25 per person and are tax deductible. Seating is limited. Purchase tickets or for more information please call the Senior Center at (850) 926-7145. The Senior Center is located at 33 Michael Drive in Crawfordville. Please join us as a community supporting the Senior Center, meals on wheels program and other critical needs of our seniors. Saturday, September 10  GRAVE MARKER DEDICATION CEREMONY will be held by the R. Don McLeod Chapter 2469 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy of Wakulla County at 10:30 a.m. at the Pigott Cemetery in Medart, to honor a former member, Celia Catherine Revell Whaley. The Wakulla Guards Camp 742, Sons of Confederate Veterans of Wakulla County and the Quincy Young Guards Camp 703, Sons of Confederate Veterans from Quincy will also be participating. She is the granddaughter of Private Stephen Calvin Revell, 5th Regiment, Florida Infantry, Confederate States of America. Sunday, September 11  9-11 MEMORIAL SERVICE will be held at the sheriff’s of ce at 8:45 a.m. to remember those lost. This year marks the 10th anniversary of the attack. Tuesday, September 13  WAKULLA TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED COORDINATING BOARD will meet at 10 a.m. at the public library. In addition to its regular business, the agenda includes a recommendation to the CTC competitive procurement process and the Annual Operating Report. A time for public comments will be afforded to anyone wishing to address the board.Upcoming EventsThursday, September 15  CHAMBER BUSINESS MIXER will be hosted by Convenant Hospice and NHC Homecare from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Location to be announced. Invitation will be emailed prior, RSVP to the Chamber of ce at (850) 926-1848.  PAIN MANAGEMENT SEMINAR will be held at 7 p.m. at the Crawfordville United Methodist Church sponsored by the Wakulla County Cancer Support group. It doesn’t matter what kind of pain you experience and you don’t have to have cancer to attend. If pain is a big issue in your life, please come. Kathleen J. Barnett, Pain Management Clinical Specialist of Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, will be the featured speaker. Friday, September 16  BENEFIT for the Anthony Revell Scholarship Fund will be held at Dux’s Lounge at 9:30 p.m. Fireplug will be playing. Donations will be accepted all night. Saturday, September 17  COASTAL CLEANUP will be held by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and The Ocean Conservancy from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The different locations are St. Marks Refuge, Mashes Sands, Bottoms Road, Shell Point, Ochlockonee Bay or Woolley Park. A free lunch will be served to volunteers at Woolley Park at 11:30 a.m. Raf es and door prizes. For more information contact helpkwcb@gmail.com or (850) 745-7111. Thursday, September 22  WOMEN AGAINST MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS LUNCHEON will be held to raise awareness about MS and raise money to bene t those living with MS in North Florida. The event will be held at the University Center Club in FSU Doak Campbell Stadium. at 11:30 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. For more information, call (850)386-4843 or email MSluncheon@earthlink.net. Friday, September 23  FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY SILENT AUCTION will be held at the public library from 6 to 8 p.m. The Silent Auction includes gift certi cates, vacations, marine supplies, gifts, artwork, dinners, school supplies and more. Food and drinks will be provided. To make a donation to the auction or for more information about the event, please contact Sue Belford at (850) 926-4244 or FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail.com. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com St. Marks City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Elvis and Friends show at 8 p.m. at the Senior Center. Sopchoppy Grower’s Market from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. 9-11 Memorial Service at 8:45 a.m. at the sheriff’s of ce. ThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com City and County MeetingsThursday, September 8  COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. for a workshop on subdivision road acceptance options.  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, September 12  SCHOOL BOARD will meet at 5:45 p.m. with a public hearing on the budget at 6 p.m.  SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will meet for its regular meeting at 6:30 p.m. Library News...By SCOTT JOYNERInterim Library DirectorFriday Night Movie On Friday, Sept. 9, were showing the Robert Redford directed “ lm about the trial of Mary Surratt for conspiring in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. Starring James McAvoy and Robin Wright ,the film tells the story of how in the wake of Abraham Lincolns assassination, seven men and one woman are arrested and charged with conspiring to kill the President, the Vice-President and the Secretary of State. The lone woman charged, Mary Surratt, 42, owns a boarding house where John Wilkes Booth and others met and planned the simultaneous attacks. Against the ominous back-drop of post-Civil War Washington, newly-minted lawyer, Frederick Aiken, a 28-yearold Union war-hero, reluctantly agrees to defend Surratt before a military tribunal. As the trial unfolds, Aiken realizes his client may be innocent and that she is being used as bait and hostage in order to capture the only conspirator to have escaped a massive manhunt, her own son. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. or this 7 p.m. show. The “ lm is rated PG-13 for some violence. Celebrate Literacy at Wakulla Springs In honor of September being Florida Adult and Family Literacy month, the library, in conjunction with Wakulla Springs State Park, is proud to present Reflections at Wakulla Springs. From Friday, Sept. 9 through Sunday, Sept. 11, there will be a book giveaway in the lodge lobby. On Saturday, Sept. 9, join us for A Swift Night Out,Ž to come and enjoy an unusual ranger-led program to see “ rsthand one of natures amazing spectacles. During Swift Night Out, people all over the country stand beneath chimneys to watch and count chimney swifts enter their roost. The Lodge at Wakulla Springs has a large ” ock that roosts in one of its inactive chimneys. Come to witness the ” ying cigarŽ shaped birds perform their swirling aerial dance prior to their descent into the chimney and be part of a nationwide program to estimate their numbers. Park admission is also free on Sunday, Sept. 11 if you present your library card or donate a slightly used family friendly book. Quit Smoking Classes Return to WCPL Beginning Tuesday, Sept. 13, the Big Bend Area Health Education Center will begin another 6-week round of quit smoking classes at the library. These classes are designed by ex-smokers who are well aware of how hard it is to quit the habit. Smoking cessation products like patches and gum are also available as supplies last. The class begins at 6 p.m. and will be held each Tuesday evening through Oct. 18. This program, like everything else we do at the library, is free and open to the public. Computer classes for the rest of the month On Thursday, Sept. 15, were happy to offer Computer Basics: Arrange Your Computer Files at 9:30 a.m. followed by Microsoft Excel 2007: Understanding Formulas and Functions at 1:30 p.m. On Tuesday, Sept. 20, our “ nal 2 classes of the month are Skype: Getting Started at 9:30 a.m. followed by Digital Photography: Windows Live Essentials Photo Gallery at 1:30 p.m. Computer classes are free but do require early registration and “ ll up fast so call us soon.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 – Page 3B 2011 Coastal Cleanup Sponsored by: The Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup & Keep Wakulla County Beautiful Items to bring/wear Comfortable Clothing, Hat, Closed toed shoes (tennis shoes are best), Glovessite captains will have some extra cotton gloves, Sunscreen and insect repellant Schedule of events 8:00-till volunteers will arrive at the cleanup site of their choice 8:00-10:30 Pick up litter 10:30 Place bags of trash at proper points and head to Wooley Park in Panacea. 11:00 -Meet at Wooley Park for lunch and prize giveaways. Please Helpƒ Keep Wakulla County Beautiful Sites Headquarters: Wooley Park in Panacea St. Marks Refuge at the visitor’s center Mashes Sands at the boat landing parking lot Shell Point – near the pavilion St. Marks -Wakulla River Park near the Yacht Club Saturday, September 17th 2011 Saturday, September 17th 2011 *To locate a site look for signs or FLORIDA GEORGIA GLASS TRUCKS. Site Captains will greet you as you arrive, get you signed up give you an armband, trash bags and a map for directions. They will also have gallon-sized bags for you if you want to participate in the “ Weigh Your Butts” competition (groups only please). Following the morning cleanup all volunteers should return to your site captain to complete a da ta card and head over to Woolley Park for lunch and prize giveaways. CALL OR EMAIL FOR MORE INFORMATION (850) 745-7111 or email helpkwcb@gmail.com. Thank You to Our Sponsors WAL-MART WAKULLA CO TOBACCO PREVENTION PROGRAM WASTE PRO ROTARY CAPITAL CITY BANK THE WAKULLA AREA TIMES CENTENNIAL BANK ST. MARKS REFUGE ASSOCIATION PAUL G. JOHNSON AND ASSOCIATES MARPAN PROGRESS ENERGY AUTO TRIM & DESIGN PURPLE MARTIN GULF SPECIMEN MARINE LAB CITY OF ST. MARKS TALQUIN PORTABLE RESTROOMS NEWARK RECYCLED FIBERS As of this publication Register Early Groups of 5 or more are encouraged to register beforehand by contacting the Keep Wakulla County Beautiful of ce at 850-745-7111 or by email at helpkwcb@gmail.com. Follow us on FACEBOOK for updates. Green Scene Dear EarthTalk: What is nonpoint source pollution?Ž How much of a problem is it and how can it be controlled? … Devon Corey, New York, NYUnlike pollution that comes from speci“ c industrial factories, sewage treatment plants and other easily discernible points, nonpoint source pollution comes from many diffuse sources, but in the aggregate creates a formidable challenge for municipal, state and federal environmental and water control authorities. According to the EPA, nonpoint source pollution is caused by rainfall or snowmelt moving over and through the ground [where it] picks up and carries away natural and human-made pollutants, “ nally depositing them into lakes, rivers, wetlands, coastal waters and ground waters.Ž Some of the most common pollutants in nonpoint source pollution include excess fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides from agricultural lands and residential areas and oil, grease and toxic chemicals from urban runoff and energy production. Sediment from construction, mining and agricultural sites, as well as salts, acids, bacteria and atmospheric deposition from myriad sources also play a role. While its effects vary region to region, nonpoint source pollution is likely the largest threat to our water quality. The U.S. has made tremendous advances in the past 25 years to clean up the aquatic environment by controlling pollution from industries and sewage treatment plants,Ž says the EPA. Unfortunately, we did not do enough to control pollution from diffuse, or nonpoint, sources.Ž The EPA also calls nonpoint source pollution the U.S.s largest source of water quality problemsŽ and the main reason 40 percent of our rivers, lakes, and estuaries are not clean enough to meet basic uses such as fishing or swimming.Ž Because it comes from so many sources, regulating nonpoint source pollution is almost impossible, so it really comes down to individuals taking steps to minimize the pollution generated by their actions. The EPA reports that we can all do our part by keeping litter, pet waste, leaves and debris out of street gutters and storm drains, which usually drain right into nearby water bodies; applying lawn and garden chemicals sparingly; disposing of used oil, antifreeze, paints and other household chemicals properly, that is, at your nearest hazardous household waste dropoff, not in storm drains; cleaning up spilled brake ” uid, oil, grease and antifreeze, not hosing them into the street where they will eventually reach local waterways; and controlling soil erosion on your property by planting ground cover and stabilizing erosionprone areas. Beyond what we can do individually, local, regional and state governments can also help reduce nonpoint source pollution by enacting and enforcing building codes and other rules that can reduce out” ows. The voluntary reduction in phosphates in dishwashing detergents in the U.S. last year, for example, was a big step in reducing the nutrient load into our streams and lakes. Some municipalities have gone so far as to mandate erosion and sediment control ordinances requiring the construction of natural buffers in building and landscaping projects to “ lter out pollutants before they reach local watersheds. If your community doesnt have similar rules in place, encourage your local officials to enact them. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Send questions to earthtalk@ emagazine.com. Subscribe: www. emagazine.com/subscribe. What is nonpoint source pollution? How can it be controlled? Nonpoint source pollution comes from many diffuse sources, but in the aggregate creates a formidable challenge for municipal, state and federal environmental and water control authorities -and is likely the largest threat to our water quality. Pictured is runoff of fertilizer-laced soil from a farm.PHOTO BY USDA e EPA reports that we can all do our part by keeping litter, pet waste, leaves and debris out of street gutters and storm drains Continued from page 1BSAVINGS WITH NO COST TO YOU: You might put reminder sticky notes up for some of these. Turn off lights when you leave a room every time. Turn off machines when you leave a room (TVs, computers, radios, stereos, video games, etc.) Fill your dishwasher ef“ ciently and limit the number of times you run it. Keep furniture away from air conditioning and heating vents so air can circulate ef“ ciently. Always keep doors and windows tightly closed when heating or cooling the house. (OK, you can open a door and quickly run out or in.) Adjust temperature setting on hot water heater to no higher than 110 or 115 degrees. Be sure outside lighting is off during the day. Decide what you want from the refrigerator or freezer BEFORE you open the door so you can minimize the loss of cold air. Only wash full loads of clothes and use cold water with a cold water detergent. Clean the lint “ lter of the dryer before every load, OR, better yet, use a solar dryer (commonly called a clothes line). When using a dryer, dry full loads and dry one load right after another, and stop the dryer as soon as clothes are dry. (Some people only use the dryer to ” uff, line dried clothes.) Use ceiling fans (or any fan) only while you are in the room. This makes it feel cooler due to evaporation and doesnt help the temperature when no one is in the room. Set the cooling thermostat at 78 degrees or higher in the summer, and 70 or lower in the winter. When leaving the house for work, set the thermostat up a few degrees in the summer and down a few more degrees in the winter. When you return, just change the setting 2 or 3 degrees and the system will kick in again. If your air conditioning unit is in the sun, “ nd some remnants from your last building project and build a roof to shade the unit. Close blinds and drapes as necessary to keep the summer sun from heating the rooms inside. Change air “ lters for your air conditioner or heating units regularly. Many are effective only for one month. A dirty “ lter makes the unit run more, causing use of more electricity. Unplug the old refrigerator in the garage that you really dont need. Its an energy guzzler! LOW COST SAVING PRACTICES Change any incandescent bulbs to Fluorescent. Start by replacing all the old-fashioned bulbs with the curlyŽ bulbs that use 75% less electricity for the equivalent brightness. Be sure you buy bulbs with the energy starŽ label to guarantee the savings, and change a 75-watt bulb for a 75-watt equivalent bulb (usually 20 watts). Fluorescent bulbs also give off less heat. Put in a programmable thermostat to keep the temperature set at most ef“ cient settings for day time and for night time. Put insulation around the pipes going to and from your water heater, and if it is rather old, buy an insulated blanket to put around the hot water tank. Hold a ribbon or candle up to the edges of doors and windows to identify where air is leaking in. Then put in weather stripping or caulking to keep the outside air from coming in. Put a timer on the hot water heater so that water is heated only during the time of day that you must have hot water. INVESTMENTS FOR SAVING ELECTRICITY Check the insulation in your attic. If it is not about 15 inches, consider having more blown in. Whenever you are replacing an appliance, be sure to buy the most ef“ cient model you can afford. At a minimum it should be Energy Star certi“ ed. Really old refrigerators and water heaters are generally worth replacing with the new very energy ef“ cient models. The one effective use of solar is to heat water. If you are replacing a water heater, get an appraisal for putting a solar thermal system in your house.1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. 2. 3. 4. Ways to save

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com CallPau l s WellGet ThemAll TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S  222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROLSERVICEƒEVERYTHING FROM TERMITESTOMICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello € Tallahassee € Quincy € Wakulla r r s TM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm VisionCenterDr. Ed Gardner Board Certi“ed Optometric Physician Most Insurance Accepted926-620635 Mike Stewart Drive Licensed Optician Licensed OpticianMost Insurance AcceptedMon. Sat. 9-7Closed Sunday926-299035 Mike Stewart Drive, CRAWFORDVILLE welcome back teachers & students welcome back teachers & students the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Dwight WellsAugust 2011 Winner ank You So Much! His name was drawn fromI greatly appreciate the wonderful food! e best thig isƒ I like every restaurant on this list!Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y Resta urantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Call us today to make your reservation!www.jacksbquick.comOpen Monday Friday • 7am 6pm Saturday by appointment only Scott A. Smith850-228-100738 Rainbow Drive, Crawfordville (behind El Jalisco)Quality Marine Canvas Fabrication and Upholsteryof all kinds...www.”agshipcanvas.com ”agshipcanvas@yahoo.com McClendon Auto Service, LLCFree EstimatesSpecializing in:Owned and operated by Fred McClendon 10 years experienceMV#66653Brakes Batteries Radiators Water Pumps Hub Bearings Starters Alternators and more!MOBILE AUTO REPAIR850-933-4093 HEALTH & FITNESSSpecial to The NewsDo you live with pain? On Thursday, Sept. 15, at 7 p.m. at the Crawfordville United Methodist Church near the courthouse, the Wakulla Cancer Support Group is sponsoring a seminar on pain and pain management. It doesnt matter what kind of pain you experience and you dont have to have cancer to attend. If pain is a big issue in your life, please come. Kathleen J. Barnett, pain management clinical specialist of Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, will be the featured speaker. She is a nurse of 31 years. She worked in emergency and trauma for 12 years, and taught at FSU for two years. Barnett has been focusing on pain management at TMH for the past 19 years. She knows pain. She will discuss the purpose of pain management and the three most common medication groups used to treat pain. Barnett will speak of addiction, tolerance and dependence: what they are and what they are not. She will also discuss techniques that can help with pain relief and can help to reduce the stress that accompanies it. Write down your questions, so you dont forget what you want to ask. The meeting will be held in the Fellowship Hall. Look for the cars and for a person standing at the door to direct you. For more information, call 9266050. Why do we breathe? Why cant we enter the breathless state of concentration for as long as we want? Contrary to popular conception, it is not the lack of oxygen that triggers the desire to breathe … it is the build up of toxins in the blood, particularly carbon dioxide. If the blood were purified of these toxins, than we could experience the breathless state more easily and for longer periods of time. The make-up of our blood is constantly changing and reflecting our mental/emotional state. Norman Cousins authored Anatomy of an IllnessŽ and went on to publish several books on the mind/body research he conducted at UCLA. In one study, blood was drawn from random subjects who were then asked to sit back and visualize whatever would make them happy for five minutes. For some it was envisioning world peace, for others it was earning a ton of money. After a few minutes of visualization their blood was drawn again. When these before and after blood samples were tested for three major indicators of immunity, all three indicators had gone up … in just in a few minutes! Just as we can alter our blood chemistry for the better with positive thoughts and emotions, we can also pollute our blood with negative thoughts and emotions. Anger is inevitably accompanied with forced, rapid breathing to purify the blood of the toxins the emotion is producing. Likewise, depression is accompanied by shallow chest breathing which inadequately purifies our blood and saps our vitality. This is one reason why ethical and moral training were included in all traditional Yoga disciplines. Someone who is habitually fearful, angry or depressed will find it difficult to become calm and concentrate because their blood is more toxic and their breathing more irregular. Someone who is calm, cheerful and kind will find it much easier. Breathe in, breathe out...ahhh! Smile... be happy! Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 3800140. YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Breath, blood and the emotionsPain management seminar is setSpecial to The NewsWhen infertility strikes, it can be a massive source of stress for couples, and many are too quick to assume its a female issue. Alarmingly, the average sperm count for adult males has decreased by 50 percent since 1938 and is currently declining at a rate of 2 percent each year, according to a study in the British Medical Journal. Stress, exposure to environmental toxins and diets de“ cient in key vitamins and minerals are likely to blame. Its a fact that one in six couples will have dif“ culty conceiving, but many arent aware that almost half the time, its the male who is the cause of the problem,Ž said fertility expert, Dr. Amos Grunebaum. When couples address this issue, its been my experience that the woman is the “ rst to see a specialist to determine her fertility status. Its a little more dif“ cult to get the man on board with doing the same thing. Some men just dont want to acknowledge that they may have a fertility problem. As such, they are more reluctant to get tested and I have seen a lot of men delay seeing a specialist or even avoid it completely.Ž Unfortunately, Dr. Grunebaum can con“ rm these disturbing statistics as he has seen sperm counts decline in his 25plus years of practice. From my experience, low sperm count is one of the primary reasons that couples have a difficult time conceiving,Ž said Dr. Grunebaum, also a medical health advisor for Fairhaven Health (www. fairhavenhealth.com). Quite simply, the fewer sperm a man produces, the lower the likelihood that one will successfully fertilize the egg.Ž However, according to Dr. Grunebaum, there are a variety of ways men can help improve their reproductive health. A diet rich in antioxidants such as vitamins C, E and Zinc can go a long way in improving sperm health. Exercising regularly plus limiting caffeine, alcohol and tobacco intake can also help a great deal,Ž he added. While low sperm count is known to be a major cause of infertility, for many men, visiting a doctor or clinic to have a sperm analysis done can be a daunting task. The testing process itself can be a little embarrassing and even more so when faced with the prospect of exposing their condition to the doctor, nurse or of“ ce staff,Ž he added. Fortunately, there is now a way to test for low sperm count in the privacy of ones own home. A new product from Fairhaven Health, the SpermCheck Fertility Test, accurately con“ rms if a man has a normal count (20 million per milliliter). The test can be completed in a matter of minutes and retails for around $35. Should the SpermCheck at-home test con“ rm a low count, its generally a good indicator that he should see a specialist to help further diagnose the problem. There are many benefits from determining early on if sperm count is a problem for you,Ž Dr. Grunebaum said. The sooner an issue is pinpointed, the sooner proper treatment can be started. Treatments for male infertility typically include lifestyle changes, vitamin, mineral or herbal supplementation, prescription medication or even surgical procedures. But before any of that can begin, the couple has to be able to communicate and agree to take action,Ž said Dr. Grunebaum. When infertility becomes a guy thingSeminar featuring pain management clinical specialist Kathleen J. Barnett will be held at Crawfordville United Methodist Church on Thursday, Sept. 15 at 7 p.m.How men can combat declining fertility trends with vitamins, exercise and limiting ca eine, alcohol and tobacco intake

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 – Page 5B Look for the next chapter of The Brass Bell in next weeks edition of The Wakulla news This page sponsored in part by:Written by Cathy Sewell and illustrated by Blaise Sewell of The Curriculum ClosetChapter Four of SixThe Ninja in the ForestThe Coronado expedition set up their winter camp of 1540-41 in Tiguex, which is near present-day Albuquerque, New Mexico. A brutal war broke out between Coronados men and the native Americans.Ž … Coronado and the Golden Cities Sounds of footsteps and breaking branches scared the friends, and all three froze. Their silhouettes looked like a trio of oddly-shaped cactus plants. Who, or what, is that?Ž Karol whispered. I dont know, but it sounds big!Ž Hector whispered back loudly, grabbing a thick stick sitting nearby. The sounds came closer and closer. Karol slid over by Felix and they all peered into the darkness, straining to see what was about to invade their camp. Hey, I smell pizza!Ž a loud voice said as three strange boys jumped out from behind a large tree. How did you get them to deliver all the way out here?Ž Nobody delivered it. We just stuck the thawed slices onto our roasting sticks, see?Ž Hector said proudly, holding up a cheesy piece of evidence. Well, Ive never heard of roasting a pizza over an open “ re,Ž one of the other invaders said. And when Felix looked at him, he could see the re” ection of the camp“ re in his eyes. Felix thought it looked like pure evil. Hola! Would you like some pizza?Ž Karol tried to be friendly. And we also have licorice!Ž Felix offered. Well, the way I see it, well just take whatever we want,Ž Evil Eyes said. And I dont think theres anything you can do to stop us.Ž Perhaps I should warn you,Ž Hector said, trying to copy a ninja pose he saw in a movie. I am a black belt.Ž Oh, really?Ž the bullies challenged Hector. Why dont you show us your best move?Ž Hector swallowed hard and tried to remember some ninja moves, but the three visitors didnt seem all that impressed. They squinted their eyes, clenched their “ sts and moved toward the three explorers. Right then, a Jeep pulled up and a woman wearing a green uniform jumped out. She had a clipboard and a long, metal ” ashlight, which brightly lit the whole campsite. What are you nios up to?Ž she asked. You know you cant build a “ re out in the open like that. This is a national park!Ž Sorry, maam,Ž Felix said, throwing dirt over the “ re. We were just hungry and a little cold.Ž Thats OK. Just make sure you follow park rules,Ž she said, handing a typed list to Felix. And is that you, Max?Ž she asked the evil-eyed boy. Your mom is gonna have your hide. Does she know where you are? Get in the Jeep … Im taking you three home!Ž Yes, Tia Maria,Ž the boy said sheepishly. Before whisking away the bullies in her all-terrain vehicle, the ranger jotted down the names of the three young explorers, promising to let their parents know where they were camping. Wow, that was close!Ž Karol said, after the uninvited guests disappeared over a hill. I was scared.Ž Not me!Ž Hector said. I was just about to release some ninja terror on them!Ž Yeah, thankfully you didnt have to hurt them!Ž Felix winked at Karol. They both knew that Hector was just as scared, but hed never in a million years admit it. They decided to let the ninja keep his pride. Soon after, they all settled into their sleeping bags, trying to get close to the remnants of the “ re for warmth. But Felix kept thinking about Eduardo and his little accident,Ž so he kept his distance from the “ re. He fell asleep with his hand clasped around the bell. The next morning, the three friends packed up their bags, buried the last remaining embers of the “ re and set off toward Gallinas. They had trail mix and licorice for breakfast. So, where is this gold you speak of?Ž Felix asked, in his best conquistador voice. I told you, its in Gallinas, and were almost there,Ž Hector said, walking ahead of Felix and Karol. He rubbed the gold coin he had hidden in his pocket for luck. As they walked into Gallinas, Felixs excitement grew. Now well “ nd a golden treasure, just like Coronado!Ž What did he “ nd on his expedition?Ž Karol asked Felix. Um, I dont know. I havent actually gotten that far in the book yet,Ž Felix said, a little embarrassed. Little did the three explorers know, Coronado never found any gold. In fact, he was sometimes referred to as the cursedŽ conquistador. Find us on WHAT RHYMES WITH… List 10 words that rhyme with “rain.” 1. _____________ 2. ____________ 3. ____________ 4. ____________ 5. ____________ 6. _____________ 7. ____________ 8. ____________ 9. ____________ 10. ____________ Some answers: cane, crane, drain, grain, main, mane, pain, pane, sane, vain 1) B __ I __ __ A __ D 2) E __ R __ __ Q __ A __ E 3) T __ U __ A M __ 4) __ O __ N A __ __ 5) C __ __ L O __ E 6) __ A __ L S __ O R __ 7) F __ A __ __ F __ O O __ Name That Weather Event Each of the following is a type of weather event. Fill in the blanks to name that weather event.Answers: 1) Blizzard, 2) Earthquake, 3) Tsunami, 4) Tornado, 5) Cyclone, 6) Hailstorm, 7) Flash flood

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com pure speed. pure performance. pure simplicity. pure broadband is everything you want from an internet connection … with no phone line required. its all the speed you need to surf, watch, download and game without slowing down. *Offer ends 09/30/2011. Pure Broadband available to qualifying residential customers only. The monthly rate of $29.95 requires a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months (after which the rate reverts to the then-current standard rate), and applie s to up to 1.5 Mbps service. An additional monthly fee (including professional installation, if applicable) and separate shipping and handling fee will apply t o customers modem or router. General … Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them by service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions … All products and services are governed by tariffs, terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at www.centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges … Applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges include a Carrier Universal Service charge, National Access Fee surcharge, a one-time Pure Broadband activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-req uired charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rates. Call for a listing of applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges. Monthly Rate … Monthly rate applies while customer subscribes to all qualifying services. If one (1) or more services are cancelled, the stan dard monthly fee will apply to each remaining service. Pure Broadband … As determined by service location, an early termination fee will apply as either a ”at $99 fee or the applicable monthly recurring service fee multiplie d by the number of months remaining in the minimum service period, up to $200. Performance will vary due to conditions outside of network control and no speed is guaranteed. Telephone landline is part of the service only for the purpose of data traf“c transmission/connection and cannot be used for voice traf“c transmission, except fo r 911 services. 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are the property of Cen turyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. a month*all high-speed internet. no phone line required.call 866.958.PURE click givemepure.com come in for locations, visit centurylink.com/storespara or ofertas en espaol marque al 866.958.7873 Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall850-926-7102 L o o k i n g f o r Looking for t h e l a t e s t the latest L o c a l N e w s ? Local News? LOCAL NEWS The Wakulla Newswww.thewakulla news.com Congrats to all-natural local bodybuildersOn Aug. 6, four Wakulla residents entered their “ rst bodybuilding show ever and won big. They competed at the Supernatural Bodybuilding and Figure Show PRO/ AM Show at Fort Walton Beach. These four competitors all came in “ rst through fourth. They worked hard for their win, constant changes in their food regiments, weightlifting routines and constant cardio. Not to mention their hours of posing, walking and preparing routines for muscularity, muscle symmetry and leanness. A bodybuilding contest is not an easy thing to compete in, and as we say in bodybuilding, if it was easy, everyone would do it.Ž But they dont. So please congratulate the following local residents from our beloved Wakulla County: Jason Lowe, 1st Place Novice Bodybuilding (one class) Will Splitt, 2nd Place Novice Bodybuilding (one class) Shelby Cash, 3rd Place Open Bikini (one class) Colleen Morgan, 4th Place Open Bikini (one class) They were all professionals; they worked hard for their win and focused on what they had to do to achieve their “ nal goals. So congratulations to them all.Pamela Chicester, CFT is Body-Tek 24 Hour Fitness manager. She can be reached at 926-2348. GET FITBy PAMELA CHICHESTERShelby Cash, above left, and Colleen Morgan, above. Below, Jason Lowe, left, and Will Splitt. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSpecial to The NewsWhen it comes to improving bone health in postmenopausal women „ and people of all ages, actually „ a Florida State University researcher has found a simple, proactive solution to help prevent fractures and osteoporosis: eating dried plums. Over my career, I have tested numerous fruits, including “ gs, dates, strawberries and raisins, and none of them come anywhere close to having the effect on bone density that dried plums, or prunes, have,Ž said Bahram H. Arjmandi, Florida States Margaret A. Sitton professor and chairman of the Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences in the College of Human Sciences. All fruits and vegetables have a positive effect on nutrition, but in terms of bone health, this particular food is exceptional.Ž Arjmandi and a group of researchers from Florida State and Oklahoma State University tested two groups of postmenopausal women. Over a 12-month period, the “ rst group, consisting of 55 women, was instructed to consume 100 grams of dried plums (about 10 prunes) each day, while the second „ a comparative control group of 45 women „ was told to consume 100 grams of dried apples. All of the studys participants also received daily doses of calcium (500 milligrams) and vitamin D (400 international units). The group that consumed dried plums had significantly higher bone mineral density in the ulna (one of two long bones in the forearm) and spine, in comparison with the group that ate dried apples. This, according to Arjmandi, was due in part to the ability of dried plums to suppress the rate of bone resorption, or the breakdown of bone, which tends to exceed the rate of new bone growth as people age. The groups research, Comparative Effects of Dried Plum and Dried Apple on Bone in Post Menopausal Women,Ž was published in the British Journal of Nutrition. Arjmandi conducted the research with his graduate students Shirin Hooshmand, Sheau C. Chai and Raz L. Saadat of the College of Human Sciences; Dr. Kenneth Brummel-Smith, Florida States Charlotte Edwards Maguire professor and chairman of the Department of Geriatrics in the College of Medicine; and Oklahoma State University statistics Professor Mark E. Payton. In the United States, about 8 million women have osteoporosis because of the sudden cessation of ovarian hormone production at the onset of menopause. Whats more, about 2 million men also have osteoporosis. In the “ rst “ ve to seven postmenopausal years, women are at risk of losing bone at a rate of 3 to 5 percent per year,Ž Arjmandi said. However, osteoporosis is not exclusive to women and, indeed, around the age of 65, men start losing bone with the same rapidity as women.ŽEating prunes helps prevent fractures and osteoporosisSpecial to The NewsRegistration for the free annual prostate screening offered by the Tallahassee Memorial Cancer Center and Southeastern Urological Center is now open. The screenings will take place this year on Tuesday, Sept. 13, and Wednesday, Sept. 14, at Southeastern Urological Center located at 2000 Centre Point Blvd. in Tallahassee. Men who wish to participate must pre-register, as there are only a limited number of appointments available. Appointments can be made online 24/7 at www. tmh.org, or by calling the Tallahassee Memorial Cancer Center at 850-431-ICAN (4226). The exam, which takes about 15 minutes, consists of a digital rectal exam (DRE) and a prostate speci“ c antigen (PSA) blood test, which are considered to be the most effective procedures for detecting prostate cancer at an early and potentially curable stage. Prostate cancer is usually found in men age 65 and older, although urologists have diagnosed prostate cancer in men as young as 40. Register for free prostate screenings

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 – Page 7B Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! 926-7102 Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $10.00 a week! Cars  Real Estate  Rentals  Employment  Services  Yard Sales  Announcements A New Look PaintingSpecializing in residential and commercial Re-painting € pressure washing € sheetrock € wood rot repairsLICENSED &INSURED850-926-2400CALL JIM PORTER: ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 CARPET CLEANING of Wakulla Residential and Commercial WATER EXTRACTION 24/7 EMERGENCY 850-567-6734CAMO New Construction, Remodeling & Repairs850.524.5894 Crawfordville CarpetCleanersaffordable carpet care free estimates850-459-0106 850-210-5849or visit us at www.BarryBuilding.com Affordable Office Spaceat the Barry Building Enjoy working surrounded by a great atmosphere with many amenities. Rates start at $250/mo., utilities included! Come take a tour at www.BarryBuilding.com. Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com Junior P.SandersSeptic Tank Services18-YR Experience. New System Installation-All Types. Drain Repair. Washing Machine Systems.SR0111684NO JOB TOO SMALL, FAIR PRICES, FRIENDLY GUARANTEED SERVICE!850-210-5777 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Will help you make the most of your outdoor space. Cabins, Barns, Playhouses, Utilities, Gazebos, Tables, Swings, Rockers and More! Pricing and Sizes to “t your needs. Cash Discounts. $25 credit on a new building with this ad. See Melissa at 1580 Crawfordville Hwy., next to Happy Time Day Care850-926-3441SOUTHERN STORAGE SOLUTIONS Stow it Away!! 5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGE GreatRates! STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.BUY€SELL€TRADE€REPAIRBoats, Motors, Trailers, New/Used Marine Supplies Sold 4815D Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Pro p Service Center Interstate Batter y Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-556-4652www.wakullaboatsales.com stowawaymarine @ comcast.net TEACHABLE MOMENTSFAMILY HOME CARE ENROLLING INFANTS! We are a school readiness provider serving children birth-through-12 years old. Two nutritious meals and a snack are included in tuition. For more information call 850-926-1287.Sandblast Art on Glassby MIKE KINSEYBeautiful platters, bowls, mirrors Special requests available. Please stop by Tranquility by Candlelight to view sandblast art on glass and more local artwork. (across from courthouse in Crawfordville). 850-408-3483www.tbccafe. y olasite.com Denise’s ListCall Denise today to get your services on her list!850-926-7102 Classi eds@TheWakullaNews.net 105 Business Opportunities BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can fix those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again, and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Money Making Opportunity. Computer a must. Free evaluation & Training. Flexible hours. Great incentives. www.freedomtodream.net 352-360-5939. 110 Help Wanted has a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable,focused,and capable of meeting production quotas.Good grammar,reading and writing skills are required.Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents,and report writing.The starting/training salary ranges from $20K to $24K based on qualifications,with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUP benefits include 10 paidholidays,monthly personal accrual,Health,Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to Cheryl@cjisgroup.com.Or send by mail to:CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville,Fl 32327.CJIS GROUP Inc., a Market Research firm, Store Clerk Full time 1/2 day on Friday, all day Saturday & Sunday. Nice working environment/benefits. Send resume to PO BOX 218, St. Marks, FL 32355. 120 Services and Businesses A -1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed ~ John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550 A IR CON OF WAKULLA Heating and Cooling Gary Limbaugh 926-5592 3232 Crawfordville Highway Service, Repair, Installation FL Lic. #CAC1814304 ALL ABOUT...CONCRETE blocks bricks pavers LANDSCAPE plants sod tractor workcall JOSEPH FRANCIS850-556-1178 / 850-556-3761 ANYTIME ELECTRIC Specializinginrepairandservice,residentialandcommercial, homesandmobilehomes. 24-hourservice.MarkOliver, ER0015233. 421-3012. BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway. Larry Carter Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931, 850-694-7041. Licensed/Insured. Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291. HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIRSales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & soundLocated in Crawfordville Doug & Sherry Quigg, Owners Lic. No’s. ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 926 -5790 JenniferWalker’sCleaning. Weekly,bi-weekly,monthly,or j ustwhenyouneedyourhome cleaned.Reasonablerates,locallyownedandoperated.Licensed/insured.Over25yrs.exp erience. 850-570-7780. KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial,residentialandmobilehomes.Repair,sales,service,installation.Allmakesand models.Lic.#RA0062516. 926-3546. Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 UPHOLSTERY Flagship Canvas & Upholstery. Quality marine canvas fabrication and Upholstery of all kinds. Scott A. Smith, 38 Rainbow Dr. Crawfordville, (behind El Jalisco). 850-228-1007. www.flagshipcanvas.com flagshipcanvas@yahoo.com POLLY NICHOLSSpecial Touch CleaningConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential.“pray like it ’ s up to God, Work like it ’ s up to you”519-7238 926-3065Licensed &Insured Tillman’sTermite&PestControl, Inc.Residential,Commercial. CallTillmanOwensforaquote. 850-322-1775. 130 Entertainment Da Cajun Wagon ServingFreshSeafoodandMore withdaCajunkick!Shrimp Po’Boy,CrabPoppers,Bouldin Balls,etc.EveryWed-Satfrom 11AM-7PM.Hwy.319bythe KangarooExpressinMedart. Callinordersarewelcome. 850-570-1625. 205 Antiques MenagerieAntiqueMallisNow open!Vendorspaceisavailable for$1.50/sqft.850-745-8381. 4340CrawfordvilleHwy.(nextto the library). 275 Home Furnishings $159QUEENPILLOWTOPmattress&box.Manufacture r wrapped,warranty.222-7783 Deliver y available. $399Sofa/Loveseatset.Stillin crate,neverused.Candelive r 545-7112. Must move this week! 4pieceBedroomSet:Solid Wood.Brandnew.$439,delivery available. 222-9879. 320 Farm Products & Produce Farm-freshvegetables.We-pick, U-pick.Peas:blackeye,pinkeye, purplehull,whiteacreandzipper.Also,greenboilingpeanuts. Wecustom-processcows,hogs, goats,deer.RakerFarm, 926-7561. 335 Pets DOGS,PUPPIES,NICECATS ANDKITTENS...Come,take alookandbringanew friendhomeTODAY!CHAT Adoption Center:Mondays closed. Tuesdays through Wednesday& Fridays: 11:00AM to 4:30PM Thursdays: 11:00AM to 7:00 P M Saturdays: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM Sundays: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM1 OAK STREET, CRAW FORDVILLE The unconditional love of a pet is waiting for you at th e C.H.A.T. Adoption Center. orvisit: chatofwakulla.org 355 Yard Sales Sat.-9/10,8AM-1PM,44Traynor Court.Fishingtackle,hunting gear,boatingstuff.Ladder stands,guns,Columbiashirts, life-jackets,camoclothes,fly rods,rods/reels,terminaltackle, household items. Saturday,Sept.10,9AM-4PMat ChristChurchAnglican,3383 CoastalHighway(justeastofthe highschool).Dishwasher, clotheswasher,severalentertainmentcenters,bicycles,toys, dollhouse,clothing,othertreasures.HotDogsandsoftdrinks will be on sale too! Saturday,September10, 8AM-12Noonat7BirchCourt. Householditems,clothes,yard decorations,tools,purses,miscellaneous Christmas items. 435 Lost and Found Foundlostjewelryinfrontofthe icehouse,infrontofACEHardwareinCrawfordville.Pleasecall 926-4825 for more information. 500 Real Estate PUBLISHERS NOTICEAllrealestateadvertisinginthis newspaperissubjecttotheFair HousingActwhichmakesitillegaltoadvertiseanypreference, limitation,ordiscrimination basedonrace,color,religion, sex,handicap,familialstatusor nationaloriginoranintentionto makeanysuchpreference,limitationordiscrimination.ŽFamilial statusincludeschildrenunder theageof18livingwithparents orlegalcustodians,pregnant womenandpeoplesecuringthe custodyofchildrenunderthe age of 18. Thisnewspaperwillnotaccept anyadvertisingforrealestate thatisaviolationofthelaw.Our readersareherebyinformedthat alldwellingsadvertisedinthis newspaperareavailableonan equalopportunitybasis.TocomplainofdiscriminationcallHUD tollfreeat1-800-669-9777.The tollfreenumberforthehearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 505 Acreage for Lease Forsalebyowner.N.Wakulla. FiveacresinSweetwaterRidge. $146,000invested.Mustsale!! Makebestoffer.850-510-1216 or 850-523-7898. 515 Apartments for Rent Contemporaryloftforthestylish individual.Largebedroom,spiral staircase,manycustomfeatures.Walk-in-closet,1.5bath, washeranddryer,hugedeckon privatepond.$600/month. 850-962-2849. 1BDR as LOW as $600/mo. 2BDR as LOW as $700/mo. 3BDR as LOW as $800/m o. swimming pool and gym850-926-1134 MOVE IN SPECIAL $99 DEPOSIT $300 LOCAL HERO DISCOUNT $99 Application Fee $35 530 Comm. Property for Rent DowntownCrawfordville!close tocourthouse.1,000sqft.office building.Rentisnegotiable, p lease call 850-962-2358. A ffordableOfficeSpaceatthe BarryBuilding.Greatatmosphere!Includesallutilities,trash p/u,fullkitchenuse,conference room.Ratesstartat$250/mo. 850-210-5849orourwebsiteat www.Barr y Buildin g .com Mini-WarehouseSpacesfo r lease,8X10and10X12now available.ComebyorcallWakulla Realt y, 926-5084. WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE € Fitness Studio -1000/sf,(wall to wall mat & mirrors) € Retail -1250/sf (storefront w/back storage) € Divided Office Space -1074/sf.Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 535 Comm. Property for Sale Choicecornerlotatjunctureo f CrawfordvilleHighwayand pavedWhitlockWay.200'X300'. CommercialZoningGuaranteed, $70,000.DixieProperties(850) 656-6340. 555 Houses for Rent 2BR/1BAHomeat21JRMilton, Crawfordville$750/mo.Newly remodeled,newflooring,kitchen cabinets,andHVACunit.Large, shadyfencedyard,cornerlot. Largelivingroomandden w/openfloorplan.Approximately 1,200sqft.Allkitchenappliances included,W/Dhookups.Pets considered. 850-926-5088. 3BR/2BAat31LibertyRd., Crawfordville.$800/mo.Like newconstruction,vaultedceilingsingreatroom.Approximately1,100sqft.Privacyfenced yard,countymaintainedroad.All kitchenappliancesincluded, W/Dhookups.Petsconsidered. 850-926-5088. 3BR/2BAWakullaGardens, Crawfordville.Largefamilyorientedkitchen,utilityroom, 10X10deck,shadyfan-cooled frontporchfortworockers. $850/month(lease),$850/securit y de p osit. 850-624-4664. 3BR/2BATHinMysteriousWaters.$795/rent,samedeposit. No pets. Call Jim at 566-5165. Crawfordville,clean,large2 bedrooms,2fullbathduplex, $675permonth.CallLinda, 850-926-0283.

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Ochlockonee Bay 984-50071-Acre corner lot with Bay view. 2BR/1BA home with enclosed garage … 1,440 total square feet. Mile from Lanark Boat ramp, golf course, restaurant & beach. Sold AS-IS for quick sale. $99,000. MLS# 218221, property #1676-F Bank says SELL! 3BR/2BA home, 2-car garage, screened patio, fenced backyard, tile and pergo ”ooring. Acre lot in desirable neighborhood. Close to everything! $156,000. MLS# 218756, property # 1201W. Great location! 3BR/2BA home is situated nicely on an acre lot on paved road in North Wakulla. Only 12 miles south of Tallahassee & 15 miles north of beaches & rivers. $149,900. MLS# 219090, property #1191-W. WWW.C21FCP.COM Shell Point 926-7811Florida Coastal Properties, Inc. Crawfordville 926-5111Silver Coast Realty T. Gaupin, Broker We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!49 Anna Drive3BR/1.5BA in Crawfordville. $800 Mo. 91 Posey Rd., Medart3BR/1BA, secluded cypress home w/ replace, 2 screened porches on 30 Acres. Perfect for nature lovers.$875 per month.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. 4Br 2Ba House $1250mo + Sec. Dep. 4Br 2Ba DWMH $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $1200mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $400mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba House $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co.Ž(850) 926…5084 RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! “A New Level of Service!!!” 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 47 Reservation Court 4BR/2BA House w/Gar 2 Acres $1250 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 47 Mohawk Trail, 3BR/2BA House w/Garage on double lot $850 mo. No Smoking or Pets4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000 sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 4 Choctaw Road 3BR/2BA House on double lot $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 80 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 2BR/2BA House/beachfront, dock $1,250 No Smoking or Pets 26 Manatee Lane 2BR/2BA House $1,500 Mo. (Vacation Rental also $100 night) No Smoking or Pets 10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BA House on pilings $950 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 249 Donaldson-Williams Rd. 3BR/1.5BA MH on 7 Acres $500 Mo. Pets Okay w/Approval/Fee 26B Old Courthouse Square 2BR/2BA Townhouse $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/Pets ok 31 Chehaw Road-Panacea 4BR/2BA MH $750 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 110 Mount Pleasant 3BR/2BA House on 2 acres $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House with Guest Quarters – 3 BR/3 BA total. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate 560 Land for Sale 2-acrelotforsalenearnew ShadevilleSchool,cornero f SteelCourtandSpringCree k Hwy.(citywater).Ownerfinancing.Call850-556-1178or 850-556-3765. 565 Mobile Homes for Rent 2BR/2BASW/MH.WakullaGardensKlickitatRd.Niceinterior andexterior,openfloorplan. $575/month,first,last,references,applicationrequired. A vailblenow.850-524-4090. Call for discount! 2BR/2BA,naturalspringinbackyard.Twoadults,petsunder20# ok.$650/month,plus$500/dep. Call 850-926-5521. 3BR/1.5BAM/Hon3acres, Panaceaarea.Centralheat/air, dishwasher,woodstove.Clean andprivate.Nosmoking.Referencesrequired.$625/month, $300/deposit. 352-493-2232. 605 Statewide Classi eds Adoption A childlesscoupleseeksto adopt.Flexibleworkschedule. WillbeHANDS-ONparents.Financialsecurity.Expensespaid. Catherine&Michael.(askformichelle/adam).(800)790-5260FL Bar#0150789. Education A LLIEDHEALTHcareer training-Attendcollege100% online.Jobplacementassistance.Computeravailable.FinancialAidifqualified.SCHE V certified.Call(800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com. Financial Services $$$ACCESSLAWSUITCASH NOW!!!$$$AsseenonTV.$$$ InjuryLawsuitDragging?Need $500-$500,000++within48/hrs? LowratesAPPLYNOWBY PHONE!CallToday!Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com. Help Wanted Driver-SouthernFreightneeds Drivers!!Solo,Team,Company &O/O.WehaveLOTSo f FREIGHT!!!Call(877)893-9645 for details. Need13GoodDriversTop5% Pay&401K2Mos.CDLClass A DrivingExp(877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com. Drivers-NoExperience~No Problem.100%PaidCDLTraining.ImmediateBenefits.20/10 program.TrainersEarnupto 49¢permile!CRSTVANEXPEDITED ( 800 ) 326-2778 () www.JoinCRST.com. $5,000Sign-OnBonus!Frac SandHaulerswithcomplete BulkPneumaticRigsonly.RelocatetoTexasfortonsofwork! Fuel/Quickpayavailable. (800)491-9022. Land For Sale LAKEFRONTBARGAIN!1+ A cres-only$49,900DOCKABLE DEEPWATER!Was$89,900. Primelakefrontparcelwithdirect accesstoGulf.On12,000acre recreationallakecoveredin hugeliveoaks!Closetothecity. Pavedroads,countywater, power,phone,communityboat launch.Excellentfinancing.Call now (866)952-5302. GALANDSALE-17Tractsto choosefrom.Creeks,pond sites,wooded,clearcut,etc. V isitourwebsite. stregispaper.com(478)987-9700 St. Regis Paper Co. Miscellaneous SAWMILLSfromonly$3997MAKEMONEY&SAVEMONEY withyourownbandmill-Cut lumberanydimension.Instock readytoship.FREEInfo&DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/30 0N (800)578-1363 Ext.300N. A TTENDCOLLEGEONLINE fromHome.*Medical,*Business, *Paralegal,*Accounting,*CriminalJustice.Jobplacementassistance.Computeravailable.FinancialAidifqualified.Call (888)203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com. A IRLINESAREHIRING-Train forhighpayingAviationMaintenanceCareer.FAAapproved program.Financialaidifqualified-HousingavailableCALL A viationInstituteofMaintenance (866)314-3769. DIRECTVSummerSpecial!1 YearFREEShowtime!3mos FREEHBO/Starz/Cinemax!NFL SUNDAYTICKETFree-Choice Ultimate/Premier-Pkgsfrom $29.99/mo.Callby9/30! (800)360-2254. Real Estate BANKFORECLOSED,LAND LIQUIDATION,from$9,900,Blue Ridgemountains,pavedroads, utilities,countywater,panoramicviews,excellentfinancing. SaleSeptember24th,Callnow! (888)757-6867ext.214RV's/Mobile Homes. RV’s/Mobile Homes PUBLICAUCTION150+Spec andDealerModelTravelTrailers. NOMINIMUMPRICE!Online BiddingAvailableSaturday, September10,10amPhiladelphia,MSwww.hendersonauction.com (225)686-2252 Lic# 266 Schools & Instruction Heat&AirJOBS-Readyto work?3weekacceleratedprogram.Handsonenvironment. Nationwidecertificationsand LocalJobPlacementAssistance! (877)359-1690 680 Legal Notices IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-00020 0 DIVISION: PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. RICHARDL.WESTBERRYA/K/ARICHARD LAMAR WESTBERRY et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderReschedulingForeclosureSaledated August29,2011andenteredinCaseNo. 65-2010-CA-000200oftheCircuitCourtof theSECONDJudicialCircuitinandforWAKULLACounty,FloridawhereinPHH MORTGAGECORPORATION,isthePlaintiffandRICHARDL.WESTBERRYA/K/A RICHARDLAMARWESTBERRY;MELANIES.WESTBERRYA/K/AMELANIE STURDIVANTWESTBERRY;FLORIDA COMMERCE CREDIT UNION; TENANT #1 N/K/AKELLYWESTBERRYaretheDefendants,TheClerkoftheCourtwillselltothe highestandbestbidderforcashatthe LobbyOFTHEWAKULLACOUNTY COURTHOUSE,3056CrawfordvilleHighwayat11:00AM,onthe29thdayofSeptember,2011,thefollowingdescribedproperty as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCEATANOLDCONCRETE MONUMENTMARKINGTHENORTHWESTCORNEROFTHESOUTHHALF OFTHENORTHWESTQUARTEROF SECTION33,TOWNSHIP2SOUTH, RANGE1EAST,WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAANDRUNTHENCESOUTH00 DEGREE01MINUTE07SECONDSWEST 658.50FEET,THENCESOUTH00DEGREE01MINUTE56SECONDSWEST 658.51FEET,THENCESOUTH89DEGREES54MINUTES59SECONDSEAST 1237.93FEETTOAPOINTONTHE EASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY GRADEDCOUNTYROAD,THENCE NORTH10DEGREES46MINUTES34 SECONDSWESTALONGSAIDEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYADISTANCEOF334.54FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT(PLSNO.3293)FOR THEPOINTOFBEGINNING.FROMSAID POINTOFBEGINNINGRUNTHENCE NORTH10DEGREES54MINUTES44 SECONDSWESTALONGSAIDEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYADISTANCEOF377.49FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT(LBNO.732), THENCELEAVINGSAIDEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYANDRUN SOUTH89DEGREES52MINUTES15 SECONDSEAST294.54FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT(LBNO.732), THENCESOUTH10DEGREES45MINUTES37SECONDSEAST377.41FEET TOACONCRETEMONUMENT(LBNO. 732),THENCENORTH89DEGREES50 MINUTES51SECONDSWEST293.55 FEETTOTHEPOINTOFBEGINNING. THESOUTHERLY60.00FEETOFTHE ABOVEDESCRIBEDLANDSBEINGSUBJECTTOA60.00FOOTRIGHT-OF-WAY EASEMENTFORTHEPURPOSEOFINGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITIES. TOGETHERWITHTHATCERTAINMOBILEHOMELOCATEDTHEREONASA FIXTUREANDAPPURTENANCE THERETO:1997,PEACHTREE,VIN# PSHGA20066A & PSHGA20066B. A/K/A 803 OLD WOODVILLE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateoftheLis Pendensmustfileaclaimwithinsixty(60) days after the sale. WITNESSMYHANDandthesealofthis Court on August 30, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sTAMIKA PETERSON AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court) AnypersonswithadisabilityrequiringreasonableaccommodationsshouldcallCler k of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. September 8, 15, 2011 681 Foreclosure Proceedings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION FILE NUMBER: 10-386-CA MAJESTICACRESLLC,aFloridaLimited Liability Company, Plaintiff v. BILLYFISHERandBARBARAFISHER,et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:BILLYFISHERandBARBARA FISHER,ifalive,andifdead,theirunknown spouses,heirs,devisees,grantees,judgmentcreditors,andallotherpartiesclaiming by,through,under,oragainstthem;theunknownspouses,heirs,devisees,grantees, andjudgmentcreditorsofdeceaseddefendants,andallotherpartiesclaimingby, through,under,oragainstdefendants;and allunknownnaturalpersonsifalive,andif deadornotknowntobedeadoralive,their severalandrespectiveunknownspouses, heirs,devisees,grantees,andjudgment creditors,orotherpartiesclaimingby, through,orunderthoseunknownnatural persons;andtheseveralandrespectiveunknownassigns,successorsininterest,trustees,oranyotherpersonclaimingby, through,under,oragainstanycorporation orotherlegalentitynamedasadefendant; andallclaimants,personsorparties,natural orcorporate,orwhoseexactlegalstatusis unknown,claimingunderanyoftheabove namedordescribeddefendantsorparties orclaimingtohaveanyright,title,orinterest in the property, YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactiontoquiet tax title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot17,BIockB,WAKULLARIVERESTATESUNITONE,asperplatthereofrecordedonpage48ofPlatBookNo.1ofthe public records of Wakulla County, Florida hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,ifany,toitonGeorgeH.Gwynn, Esq.,theplaintiff'sattorney,whoseaddress is Post Office Box 4128, Tallahassee, Florida,32315,onorbeforeOctober10th, 2011,andfiletheoriginalwiththeclerkof thiscourteitherbeforeserviceontheplaintiff'sattorneyorimmediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou forthereliefdemandedinthecomplaintor petition. DATED ON August 29th 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sGLENDA PORTER AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 8, 15, 22, 29, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-124-CA JLT MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. TOMMYE.TANNER;MICHELLER.TANNER;WAKULLACOUNTY;andUNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Noticeisherebygiventhat,pursuanttoFinalJudgmentofForeclosureenteredinthe above-styledcause,intheCircuitCourtof WakullaCounty,Florida,IwillsellthepropertysituateinWakullaCounty,Florida,described as: Lots32and33,Block26ofGreinersAdditiontoTownofCrawfordvilleasmaporplat thereofrecordedinPlatBook1ofthePublic Records of Wakulla County, Florida. atpublicsale,tothehighestbidder,for cash,atthelobbyoftheWakullaCounty Courthouse,Crawfordville,Floridaat11:00 a.m.,onSeptember29,2011.Anyperson claiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthe sale,otherthanthepropertyowner,must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sGLENDA PORTER AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 11-129-CA DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. ALENNA D. TRUSIK, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: ALENNA D. TRUSIK BRIAN J. TRUSIK Last Known Address: 8334 Caplock Rd Tallahassee, FL 32311-4176 Current Address: 8334 Caplock Rd Tallahassee, FL 32311 ANYANDALLUNKNOWNPARTIES CLAIMINGBY,THROUGH,UNDER,AND AGAINSTTHEHEREINNAMEDINDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S)WHOARENOT KNOWNTOBEDEADORALIVE, WHETHERSAIDUNKNOWNPARTIES MAYCLAIMANINTERESTASSPOUSES, HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address:Unknown Current Address:Unknown YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactiontoforecloseamortgageonthefollowingproperty in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT122,VILLAGESOFST.MARKS,ACCORDINGTOTHEPLATTHEREOF,RECORDEDINPLATBOOK3,PAGE(S)70, OFHEPUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 122 COQUINA CROSSING, ST MARKS, FL 32327 hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenseswithin30daysafterthefirstpublication,ifany,onAlbertelliLaw,Plaintiffsattorney,whoseaddressisP.O.Box23028, Tampa,FL33623,andfiletheoriginalwith thisCourteitherbeforeserviceonPlaintiffs attorney,orimmediatelythereafter;otherwise,adefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou forthereliefdemandedintheComplaintor petition. WITNESSmyhandandthesealofthis court on this 19th day of August, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sTAMIKA PETERSON AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court InaccordancewiththeAmericanswithDisabilitiesAct,personsneedingaspecialaccomodationtoparticipateinthisproceeding shouldcontacttheADACoordinatornot laterthanseven(7)dayspriortotheproceedingattheOfficeoftheWakullaCounty ClerkofCourt,3056CrawfordvilleHwy., Crawfordville,FL32327;Telephone:(850) 926-0905;1-800-955-8771(TDD); 1-800-955-8770(Voice),viaFloridaRelay Service.Tofileresponsepleasecontact WakullaCountyClerkofCourt,3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. September 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-93 C A AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank 4899 Belfort Road, Suite 100 Jacksonville, Florida 32256 Plaintiff, v. THEUNKNOWNHEIR,DEVISEES, GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,CREDITORS, LIENORS,ANDTRUSTEESOFLYLEF. RINKEL,DECEASED,ANDALLOTHER PERSONSCLAIMINGBY,THROUGH,UNDER,ANDAGAINSTTHENAMESDEFENDANTS;THEUNKNOWNHEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,ANDASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,LIENORS,ANDTRUSTEES OFBETTYC.RINKELA/K/ABETTYRAILEYRINKEL,DECEASED,ANDALL OTHERPERSONSCLAMINGBY THROUGH,UNDER,ANDAGAINSTTHE NAMEDDEFENDANTS,DANNYDANFORD,MIKERINKEL,JERRYRINKEL, AMBERGREENE,BARBARAWALLACE, NANCYSYKES,CARISDAVISANDTHE UNKNOWNTENANTINPOSSESSIONOF 25ElizabethStreet,Crawfordville,Florida 32327, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION THEUNKNOWNHEIRS,DEVISEE, GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,CREDITORS, LIENORS,ANDTRUSTEESOFLYLEF. RINKEL,DECEASED,ANDALLOTHER PERSONCLAIMINGBY,THROUGH,UNDER,ANDAGAINTTHENAMEDDEFENDANTSandTHEUNKNOWNHEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES, CREDITOES,LIENORS,ANDTRUSTEES OFBETTYC.RINKELA/K/ABETTYRAILEYRINKEL,DECEASED,ANDALL OTHERPERSONSCLAIMINGBY, THROUGH,UNDER,ANDAGAINSTTHE NAMED DEFENDANT: YOUARENOTIFIEDthatacivilactionhas beenfiledagainstyouintheCircuitCourt, CountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida,for damagesinexcessof$15,000.00.Youare requiredtofileawrittenresponsewiththe Courtandserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,ifany,toitonTimothyD.Padgett, Plaintiffsattorney,whoseaddressis2878 RemingtonGreenCircle,Tallahassee,Florida32308,atleastthirty(30)daysfromthe dateoffirstpublication,andfiletheoriginal withtheclerkofthiscourteitherbefore serviceonPlaintiffsattorneyorimmediately thereafter;otherwise,adefaultwillbeenteredagainstyouforthereliefdemandedin the complaint. Dated this 18th day of August, 2011 BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sTAMIKA PETERSON AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE #2008-142-FC SHOREFINANCIALSERVICES,INC. D/B/A UNITED WHOLESALE MORTGAGE PLAINTIFF VS. WILLIAM P. LALLY ET AL. DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoa FinalJudgmentofforeclosuredated 8/25/2011enteredinCivilCaseNo. 2008-142-FCoftheCircuitCourtinandfor WAKULLACounty,Florida,Iwillselltothe highestandbestbidderforcashatTHE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSElocatedat3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,Fl.32327at11:00a.m.onthe29th dayofSeptember,2011thefollowingdescribedpropertyassetforthinsaidFinal Judgment, to-wit: Lot10,BlockHŽ,ofSpringwoodSubdivision,PhaseII,asubdivisionasperMapor PlatthereofrecordedinPlatBook3,at Page14andthrough17,ofthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,Florida.Together witha1997REDMDoublewideMobile Home,VIN#sFLA14611088Aand FLA14611088B,Title#s71720938and 71720939.Datedthis25thdayofAugust, 2011. Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendensmustfileaclaimwithinsixty(60)days after the sale. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sGLENDA PORTER AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court Ifyouareapersonwithadisabilitywho needsanyaccommodationinordertoparticipateinthisproceeding,youareentitled, atnocosttoyou,toprovisionofcertainassistance.Pleasecontact:SusanWilson, ADACoordinator301SouthMonroeStreet Tallahassee,FL32301850.577.4401at least7daysbeforeyourscheduledcourt appearance,orimmediatelyuponreceiving thisnotificationifthetimebeforethescheduledappearanceislessthan7days;ifyou are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. September 8, 125, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY Case #: 2010 CA-000298 Division #: Florida Commerce Credit Union Plaintiff, -vs.MelissaNicoleCarmichaela/k/aMelissa CarmichaelandJamesLeeCarmichael a/k/aJamesL.Carmichaela/k/aJames Carmichael,WifeandHusband;Clerkof Circuit Court Wakulla County Florida; Defendant(s), NOTICE OF SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderofFinalJudgmentofForeclosure dated8/25/11,enteredinCivilCaseNo. 2010-CA-000298oftheCircuitCourtofthe 2ndJudicialCircuitinandforWakulla County,Florida,whereinFloridaCommerce CreditUnion,PlaintiffandMelissaNicole Carmichaela/k/aMelissaCarmichaeland JamesLeeCarmichaela/k/aJamesL.Carmichaela/k/aJamesCarmichael,Wifeand Husbandaredefendant(s),Iwillselltothe highestandbestbidderforcashATTHE LOBBYOFTHEWAKULLACOUNTY COURTHOUSELOCATEDATCHURCH STREET,HIGHWAY319,CRAWFORDVILLE,FLORIDAAT11:00A.M.on 11/10/11thefollowingdescribedpropertyas set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: Parcel ŽCŽ COMMENCEATTHESOUTHEASTCORNERFOTHENORTHEASTQUARTEROF SECTION32,TOWNSHIP2-SOUTH, RANGE1WEST,WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAANDRUNNORTH89DEGREES 15MINUTES57SECONDSWEST1471.39 FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT (MARKED#2919),THENCERUNNORTH 00DEGREES19MINUTES17SECONDS WEST1309.79FEETTOACONCRETE MONUMENT,THENCERUNNORTH89 DEGREES43MINUTES50SECONDS WEST1293.91FEETTOACONCRETE MONUMENTLYINGONTHEEASTERLY MAINTAINEDRIGHT-OF-WAYOFLONNIE RAKERROAD,THENCELEAVINGSAID EASTERLYMAINTAINEDRIGHT-OF-WAY CONTINUENORTH89DEGREES43MINUTES50SECONDSWEST30.00FEET TOACONCRETEMONUMENT(MARKED #7160)LYINGONTHEWESTERLYMAINTAINEDRIGHT-OF-WAYOFLONNIERAKERROAD,THENCERUNSOUTH01DEGREES57MINUTES05SECONDSWEST ALONGSAIDWESTERLYMAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY263.85FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT(MARKED#7160), THENCELEAVINGSAIDWESTERLY MAINTAINEDRIGHT-OF-WAYRUN SOUTH89DEGREES54MINUTES32 SECONDSWEST1164.43FEETTPAM IRONPIPE,THENCERUNNORTH00DEGREES30MINUTES47SECONDSEAST 896.19FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT(MARKED#7160)MARKINGTHE POINTOFBEGINNING.FROMSAID POINTOFBEGINNINGCONTINUE NORTH00DEGREES30MINUTES47 SECONDSEAST671.04FEETTOAN OLDAXLE,THENCERUNSOUTH89DEGREES55MINUTES02SECONDSEAST 322.50FEETTOANOLDAXLE,THENCE RUNNORTH88DEGREES15MINUTES 14SECONDSEAST59.61FEETTOA CONCRETEMONUMENT(MARKED #2919),THENCERUNSOUTH00DEGREES31MINUTES55SECONDSWEST 658.20FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT,THENCERUNSOUTH89DEGREES43MINUTES45SECONDSEAST 758.57FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENTLYINGONTHEEASTERLYMAINTAINEDRIGHT-OF-WAYOFLONNIERAKERROAD,THENCERUNSOUTH11DEGREES13MINUTES03SECONDSEAST ALONGSAIDMAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY16.33FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT(MARKED#7160), THENCELEAVINGSAIDMAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAYRUNNORTH89DEGREES43MINUTES45SECONDSWEST 1143.73FEETTOTHEPOINTOFBEGINNING. ANYPERSONCLAIMINGANINTEREST INTHESURPLUSFROMTHESALE,IF ANY,OTHERTHANTHEPROPERTY OWNERASOFTHEDATEOFTHELIS PENDENSMUSTFILEACLAIMWITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sGLENDA PORTER AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-170-CA GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, 225 Town Park Drive, Suite 325 Kennesaw, GA 30144-3710 Plaintiff, v. STEPHENM.ROBBINSA/K/ASTEVEM. ROBBINS,THEUNKNOWNSPOUSEOF STEPHENM.ROBBINSA/K/ASTEVEM. ROBBINS,ANGELAK.ROBBINS,THE UNKNOWNSPOUSEOFANGELAK. ROBBINS,CITLOANCORPORATION, successorininteresttotheCITGroup/ConsumerFinance,Inc.,MONOGRAMCREDIT CARDBANKOFGEORGIA,acorporation, andHSBCBANKNEVADA,NATIONALASSOCIATION,successorininteresttoDirect MerchantsCreditCardBank,NationalAssociation,

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 – Page 9BBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 28 42 44 52 60 65 68 2 37 61 3 38 62 21 39 56 4 15 18 34 45 53 5 29 46 6 30 43 54 63 66 69 7 31 47 57 8 24 35 58 22 32 40 59 9 16 19 41 55 10 33 36 48 11 25 49 64 67 70 12 26 50 13 27 51ACROSS1. Fuse rating unit 4. Taj __ 9. Managed, somehow 14. Comic Charlotte 15. In unison 16. In heaven 17. Whopper 18. Gym offering 19. Poet's concern 20. "Kid Galahad" star 23. Morticia, to Fester 24. Stirrup site 25. 3,000-hit club member Ripken 28. Baja California city 32. "On the Street Where You Live" singer Vic 34. Send to the Hill 36. "__ the Roof" (Driftershit) 37. "Billy Bathgate" star 42. Flower in a Stein line 43.Prefixwithcomic 44. "Relax, soldier!" 47.Takes away 52. Take the plunge 53. One-man play about Capote 55. Get the lead out? 56. "The Nanny" star 60. Toulouse toodleoo 63. Kangaroo __ 64."Howwas __ know?" 65. "No ms" boxer Roberto 66.Golferwith an "army" 67. Baton Rouge sch. 68. Remora's ride 69. Etonian's dad 70. Elgart or BrownDOWN1. __ Francisof "What's My Line?" 2. Like some rebates 3.Annoys 4. "Manon" composer Jules 5. "Pronto!" in memos 6. Billing unit, for some 7. Meara or Murray 8.Auto contract, maybe 9. Funt's "candid" gear 10. Toe the line 11. Beer belly 12. Eden evictee 13. "__ Rosenkavalier" 21. Zamboni's milieu 22. Young kiltie 25. Manilow song setting 26. Before long 27. Novelist Deighton 29. He "stung like a bee" 30.Placesfor trophy cases 31. Needed liniment 33. Not talking 35. Went like the blazes 37. __ on (love to excess) 38. Like thrift shop wares 39.Vastexpanse 40. In great shape 41."The African Queen" author C.S. 42. Like some deals or data 45. "The Elements of Style" coauthor 46. Hurler's stat 48. Pendulum's path 49. 1973 title role for John Wayne 50. Dreaded fly 51. Pertaining to blood fluid 54. Open, as a bottle 56. North Carolina's Cape __ 57. "Dumb" girl of old comics 58. Litter's littlest 59. Toledo's waterfront 60. Messages from SWMs, e.g. 61. "That's obvious!" in teen talk 62. Sinn Fin's gp. American Profile Hometown Content 8/14/2011 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 200 9 HtCtt 1 23 4567 8729 6 178 54 7352 29 85 3297 146 200 9 HtCtt 617 8924 5 3 942563781 835741629 426 917538 359286147 781354296 294 678315 563129874 178435962 A R L E N E R A W A D S M A I L I N D O T E D U H P E E V E S U S E D I R A I C E S E A F E A R M A S S E N E T S T R U N K A S A P A L I E R A H O U R D E N S U N C A P A N N E A C H E D D O R A L E A S E T O R E R U N T L A D F I T E R I E C A M E R A F O R E S T E R O B E Y M U M A R C P O T C O P A C A H I L L E V E A N O N T S E T S E D E R L E N S E R O U S Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.comSelling Something? Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week 926-7102 681 Foreclosure Proceedings Defendant, NOTICE OF ACTION TO:STEPHENM.ROBBINSA/K/ASTEVE M.ROBBINS,THEUNKNOWNSPOUSE OFSTEPHENM.ROBBINSA/K/ASTEVE M.ROBBINS,ANGELAK.ROBBINS,and THEUNKNOWNSPOUSEOFANGELAK. ROBBINS: YOUARENOTIFIEDthatacivilactionhas beenfiledagainstyouiintheCircuitCourt, CountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida,toforeclosecerrtainrealpropertydescribedasfollows: LOT17,KENMOREESTATES,ASUBDIVISIONASPERMAPORPLATTHEREOF RECORDEDINPLATBOOK3,PAGE13 OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA;TOGETHERWITH THATCERTAIN199364X28NOBILITY MOBILEHOME,SERIALNUMBER N86032AB. Youarerequiredtofileawrittenresponse withtheCourtandserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,ifany,toitonTimothyD. Padgett,Plantiff’sattorney,whoseaddress is2878RemingtonGreenCircle,Tallahassee,Florida32308,atleastthirty(30)days fromthedateoffirstpublication,andfilethe originalwiththeclerkofthiscourteitherbeforeserviceonPlaintiff’sattorneyorimmediatelythereafter;otherwise,adefaultwill beenteredagainstyouforthereliefdemanded in the complaint. Dated this 29th day of August, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sGLENDA PORTER AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE No. 65-2009-CA-00045 5 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. LEWIS, THOMAS C., et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderorFinalJudgmententerinCaseNo. 65-2009-CA-000455oftheCircuitCourtof the2NDJudicialCircuitinandforWakulla County,Florida,wherein,BANKOFAMERICA,N.A.,Plaintiff,and,LEWIS,THOMAS C.,et.al.,areDefendants,Iwillselltothe highestbidderforcastat,atthe11a.m. hourof,onthe29thdayofSeptember, 2011, the following described property: THEFOLLOWINGDESCRIBEDLAND SITUATE,LYINGANDBEINGINWAKULLACOUNTY,FLORIDATO-WIT:LOTS 51&52VILLAGESOFST.MARKS,ACCORDINGTOTHEPLATTHEREOFRECORDEDINPLATBOOK3,PAGE(S)70, OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesales,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendensmustfileaclaimwith60daysafterthe sale. DATED this 25th day of August, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sTAMIKA PETERSON AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2008-CA-000259 DIVISION INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK FSB, Plaintiff, vs. JOHN W. SMITH, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO:WESLEYSMITH,ASANHEIROF THEESTATEOFJOHNW.SMITHA/K/A JOHN WESLEY SMITH DECEASED LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN STACYSMITH,ASANHEIROFTHEESTATEOFJOHNW.SMITHA/K/AJOHN WESLEY SMITH DECEASED LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactiontoforecloseamortgageonthefollowingproperty in WAKULLA County, Florida: LOT3COMMENCEATTHESOUTHEAST CORNEROFTHESOUTHEASTQUARTEROFSECTION18,T3S,R1W,AS MARKEDBYACONCRETEMONUMENT NO.1254,ANDACCEPTEDBYCERTIFIED CORNERRECORDNO.32915,ANDRUN SOUTH89DEGREES56MINUTES25 SECONDSWESTALONGTHESECTION LINE653.09FEETTOACONCRETE MONUMENT,THENCERUNNORTH01 DEGREES00MINUTES43SECONDS WEST874.57FEETTOANIRONPIPE MARKINGTHESOUTHEASTCORNEROF LANDSDESCRIBEDINOFFICIALRECORDSBOOK119,PAGE984OFTHE PUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA,SAIDPOINTBEING THEPOINTOFBEGINNING.FROMSAID POINTOFBEGINNINGRUNTHENCE SOUTH89DEGREES53MINUTES33 SECONDSWESTALONGSAIDSOUTH BOUNDARY377.09FEETTHENCELEAVINGSAIDSOUTHBOUNDARYRUN NORTH00DEGREES59MINUTES21 SECONDSWEST552.44FEET,THENCE SOUTH89DEGREES48MINUTES17 SECONDSEAST60.76FEET,THENCE NORTH02DEGREES42MINUTES56 SECONDSEAST20.02FEET,THENCE SOUTH89DEGREES48MINUTES11 SECONDSEAST315.08FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENTMARKINGTHE EASTERLYBOUNDARYOFSAIDLANDS DESCRIBEDINOFFICIALRECORDS BOOK119,PAGE984,THENCESOUTH 00DEGREES59MINUTES21SECONDS EASTALONGSAIDEASTERLYBOUNDARY570.45FEETTOTHEPOINTOFBEGINNING. THEEASTERLYANDSOUTHERLY40.00 THEREOFBEINGSUBJECTTOAROADWAY EASEMENT. RESERVINGUNTOTHEGRANTOR HEREINAROADWAYEASEMENTOVER THEEASTERLYANDSOUTHERLY40.00 FEET THEREOF. TOGETHERWITHANEASEMENTFOR INGRESSANDEGRESSOVERAND ACROSSTHESOUTHERLY40FEETOF THEFOLLOWINGDESCRIBEDPROPERTY: COMMENCEATA4INCHBY4INCH CONCRETEMONUMENT(MARKED #1254)MARKINGTHESOUTHEASTCORNEROFTHESOUTHWESTQUARTER OFSECTION18,TOWNSHIP3SOUTH, RANGE1WEST,WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAANDRUNSOUTH89DEGREES 53MINUTES03SECONDSWESTALONG THESOUTHBOUNDARYOFSAIDSECTION18,ADISTANCEOF653.04FEET TOA4INCHBY4INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT,THENCERUNNORTH01 DEGREES03MINUTES26SECONDS WEST874.64FEETTOA1INCHIRON PIPEMARKINGTHEPOINTOFBEGINNING.FROMSAIDPOINTOFBEGINNING RUNSOUTH89DEGREES54MINUTES 19SECONDSWEST735.81FEETTOA1 INCHIRONPIPELYINGONTHEEASTERLYMAINTAINEDRIGHT-OF-WAYOF REVADEESPEARSROAD,THENCERUN NORTH03DEGREES58MINUTES13 SECONDSWESTALONGSAIDMAINTAINEDRIGHT-OF-WAY576.08FEETTO A5/8INCHRE-ROD(MARKED#7160), THENCELEAVINGSAIDMAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAYRUNSOUTH89DEGREES43MINUTES34SECONDSEAST 765.19FEETTOA4INCHBY4INCH CONCRETEMONUMENT,THENCERUN SOUTH01DEGREES03MINUTES26 SECONDSEAST569.92FEETTOTHE POINT OF BEGINNING. hasbeenfiledagainsstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenseswithin30daysafterthefirstpublication,ifany,onFloridaDefaultLawGroup, P.L.,Plaintif’sattorney,whoseaddressis 4919MemorialHighway,Suite200,Tampa, Florida33634,andfiletheoriginalwiththis CourteitherbeforeserviceonPlaintiff’sattorneyorimmediatelythereafater,otherwise adefaultwillbeenteredagainstyouforthe relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESSMYHANDandthesealofthis Court on this 15th day of August, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sGLENDA PORTER AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court) AnypersonswithadisabilityrequiringreasonableaccommodationsshouldcallCler k of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. September 1, 8, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000425 21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. STACIERENEEKIRKLANDA/K/ASTACIE R.KIRKLAND;ANTROYLEMORE KIRKLANDA/K/AANTROYL.KIRKLAND; DIANEDELORESROBERTS;UNKNOWN SPOUSEOFDIANEDELORESROBERTS; IFLIVING,INCLUDINGANYUNKNOWN SPOUSEOFSAIDDEFENDANT(S),IFREMARRIED,ANDIFDECEASED,THERESPECTIVEUNKNOWNHEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,CREDITORS,LIENORS,ANDTRUSTEES,AND ALLOTHERPERSONSCLAIMINGBY, THROUGH,UNDERORAGAINSTTHE NAMEDDEFENDANT(S);UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Noticeisherebygiventhat,pursuanttoaFinalSummaryJudgmentofForeclosureenteredintheabovestyledcause,intheCircuitCourtofWakullaCounty,Florida,Iwill sellthepropertysituateinWakullaCounty, Florida, described as: FromtheSouthwestcorneroftheNortheast 1/4ofSection3,Township3South,Range 1West,WakullaCounty,Florida,runEast 711.12feetalongtheSouthboundaryline ofsaidNortheast1/4toaconcretemonumentandthePOINTOFBEGINNING.From saidconcretemonument,rundueNorth 1,296.43feettoapointonatraverselinein theapproximatecenteroftheBetheltoWakullapublicroad;thencerunNorth 8705'20”Eastalongsaidtraverseline 127.22feettoananglepoint;thenrun South7416'Eastalongsaidtraverseline 98.32feet;thencerundueSouth1,276.23 feettotheSouthboundarylineoftheNortheast1/4ofsaidSection3,Township3 South,Range1West;thencerunWest alongtheSouthboundarylineofsaidNortheast1/4221.78feettothePOINTOFBEGINNING.LesstheSoutherlypartofthe BetheltoWakullapublicroad,lyingandbeingintheSouth1/2oftheNortheast1/4of Section3,Township3South,Range1 West,WakullaCounty,Florida.Saidland beingotherwisedescribedasLot4ofan unrecordedplatofasurveyoflandsofthe Estate of Stacey Roberts, deceased. To include a: 2006 NOBI VIN N110006A 0097019045 2006 NOBI VIN N110006B 0097019298 A/K/A 154 ROBERTS WILLIAM Crawfordville, FL 32327 atpublicsale,tothehighestandbestbidder,forcash,attheLobbyoftheWakulla CountyCourthouse,3056Crawfordville Highway,Crawfordville,FL32327at11:00 o'clock, A.M., on September 29, 2011. DATED THIS 26th DAY OF AUGUST,2011. Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendens,mustfileaclaimwithin60daysafter the sale. Witness,myhandandsealofthiscourton the 26TH day of August, 2011. THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff Ifyouareapersonwithadisabilitywho needsanyaccommodationinordertoparticipateinacourtproceeding,youareentitled,atnocosttoyou,totheprovisionof certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Office of Court Administration 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 atleast7daysbeforeyourscheduledcourt appearance,orimmediatelyuponreceiving notificationifthetimebeforethescheduled appearanceislessthan7days;ifyouare hearing or voice impaired, call 711. September 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-00020 6 DIVISION: THEBANKOFNEWYORKMELLON TRUSTCOMPANY,NATIONALASSOCIATIONFKATHEBANKOFNEWYORK TRUSTCOMPANY,N.A.ASSUCCESSOR TOJPMORGANCHASEBANKN.A.AS TRUSTEE, Plaintiff, vs. THEUNKNOWNHEIRS,DEVISEES, GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,LIENORS, CREDITORS,TRUSTEES,OROTHER CLAIMANTSCLAIMINGBY,THROUGH, UNDER,ORAGAINST,SHERROLD.WILSONA/K/ASHERROLL.WILSONA/K/A SHERROLLEEWILSON,DECEASED,et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To:THEUNKNOWNHEIRS,DEVISEES, GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,LIENORS, CREDITORS,TRUSTEES,OROTHER CLAIMANTSCLAIMINGBY,THROUGH, UNDER,ORAGAINST,SHERROLD.WILSONA/K/ASHERROLL.WILSONA/K/A SHERROL LEE WILSON, DECEASED Last Known Address:Unknown Current Address:Unknown ANYANDALLUNKNOWNPARTIES CLAIMINGBY,THROUGH,UNDER,AND AGAINSTTHEHEREINNAMEDINDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S)WHOARENOT KNOWNTOBEDEADORALIVE, WHETHERSAIDUNKNOWNPARTIES MAYCLAIMANINTERESTASSPOUSES, HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address:Unknown Current Address:Unknown YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactiontoforecloseamortgageonthefollowingproperty in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT7,BLOCKD,WOODVILLESOUTH,A SUBDIVISIONASPERMAPORPLAT THEREOFRECORDEDINPLATBOOK NO.2,PAGE31OFPUBLICRECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 157 FINNER DR., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL* 32327-5427 hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenseswithin30daysafterthefirstpublication,ifany,onAlbertelliLaw,Plaintiff’sattorney,whoseaddressisP.O.Box23028, Tampa,FL33623,andfiletheoriginalwith thisCourteitherbeforeserviceonPlaintiff’s attorney,orimmediatelythereafter;otherwise,adefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou forthereliefdemandedintheComplaintor petition. WITNESSmyhandandthesealofthis court on this 26th day of August, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sGLENDA PORTER AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court InaccordancewiththeAmericanswithDisabilitiesAct,personsneedingaspecialaccomodationtoparticipateinthisproceeding shouldcontacttheADACoordinatornot laterthanseven(7)dayspriortotheproceedingattheOfficeoftheWakullaCounty ClerkofCourt,3056CrawfordvilleHwy., Crawfordville,FL32327;Telephone:(850) 926-0905;1-800-955-8771(TDD); 1-800-955-8770(Voice),viaFloridaRelay Service.Tofileresponsepleasecontact WakullaCountyClerkofCourt,3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. September 8, 15, 2011 683 Estate (Probate) Filings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 11-47PR PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF JOSEPH HAROLD BLANCHARD Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TheadministrationoftheestateofJoseph HaroldBlanchard,deceased,File11-47PR ispendingintheCircuitCourtforWakulla County,Florida,ProbateDivision,theaddressofwhichis3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,Florida32327.The nameandaddressofthepersonalrepresentativeandthepersonalrepresentative’s attorney is set forth below. Allcreditorsofthedecedentandotherpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedent’sestateincludingunmatured,contingentorunliquidatedclaims,onwhoma copyofthisnoticeisrequiredtobeserved mustfiletheirclaimswiththiscourtWITHIN THELATEROF3MONTHSAFTERTHE DATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATIONOF THISNOTICEOR30DAYSAFTERTHE DATEOFSERVICEOFACOPYOFTHIS NOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofthedecedentandpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedent’sestate,includingunmatured,contingentorunliquidatedclaimsmustfiletheir claimswiththiscourtWITHIN3MONTHS AFTERTHEDATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMSNOTSOFILEDWILLBE FOREVER BARRED. Thisdateofthefirstpublicationofthisnotice is September 8, 2011. Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq. Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A 3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (850) 926-8245 Personal Representative: Rose Regina Blanchard 55 Midnight Pass Crawfordville, Florida 32327 September 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FL PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 2011-44-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF MAURICE AUBREY BRADLEY Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS Theadministrationoftheestateof MAURICEAUBREYBRADLEY,deceased, whosedateofdeathwasApril30,2011;is pendingintheCircuitCourtforWakulla County,Florida,ProbateDivision;FileNo.: 2011-44-PR;theaddressofwhichisProbateDivision,WakullaCountyCourthouse, Crawfordville,Florida32327.Thenames andaddressesofthePersonalRepresentativeandthePersonalRepresentative’sattorney are set forth below. Allcreditorsofthedecedentandotherpersons,whohaveclaimsordemandsagainst decedent’sestate,includingunmatured, contingentorunliquidatedclaims,andwho havebeenservedacopyofthisnotice, mustfiletheirclaimswiththisCourtWITHIN THELATEROFTHREE(3)MONTHSAFTERTHEDATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATIONOFTHISNOTICEORTHIRTY(30) DAYSAFTERTHEDATEOFSERVICEOF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofthedecedentandother personswhohaveclaimsordemands againstthedecedent’sestate,includingunmatured,contingentorunliquidatedclaims, mustfiletheirclaimswiththisCourtWITHIN THREE(3)MONTHSAFTERTHEDATE OFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATIONOFTHIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMSNOTSOFILEDWILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDINGTHETIMEPERIODS SETFORTHABOVE,ANYCLAIMFILED TWO(2)YEARSORMOREAFTERTHE DECEDENT’SDATEOFDEATHIS BARRED. THEDATEOFFIRSTPUBLICATIONOF THISNOTICEIS:Thursday,September1, 2011. SAMUEL N. SULLIVAN 4679 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Personal Representative Attorney and Personal Representative: -sCECIL L. DAVIS, JR. Florida Bar No.: 0242721 BANKER LOPEZ GASSLER, P.A.. 111 North Calhoun Street Tallahassee, Florida 32301 (850) 681-4213 September 1, 8, 2011 684 Miscellaneous Notices NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETINGS OF THE NORTH FLORIDA BROADBAND AUTHORITY OPERATIONS COMMITTEE TheNorthFloridaBroadbandAuthority ("NFBA")announcesmeetingsoftheNFBA OperationsCommitteethatallinterested personsareinvitedtoattend.TheNFBAis alegalentityandpublicbodycreatedpursuanttotheprovisionsofSection163.01,FloridaStatutes,andanInterlocalAgreement amongBaker,Bradford,Columbia,Dixie, Gilchrist,Hamilton,Jefferson,Lafayette, Levy,Madison,Putnam,Suwannee,Taylor, UnionandWakullaCountiesandmunicipalitiesofCedarKey,CrossCity,LakeCity, LiveOak,Monticello,Perry,WhiteSprings andWorthingtonSprings,Florida.The NFBA’sOperationsCommitteemeetingwill beheldat10:00a.m.onThursday,September8,2011;andat10:00a.m.onthefollowingWednesdays,September28,2011;October26,2011;November30,2011;and December28,2011allattheCabotLodge BoardRoom,3726SW40thBoulevard, Gainesville,FL32608.TheNFBA’sOperationalCommitteemeetingistoconductgeneralbusiness.Ifapersondecidestoappeal anydecisionmadebytheNFBAwithrespecttoanymatterconsideredatthemeeting,suchpersonwillneedarecordofthe proceedingsandmayneedtoensurethata verbatimrecordismade,includingthetestimonyandevidenceuponwhichtheappeal istobemade.Inaccordancewiththe AmericanswithDisabilitiesAct,persons needingspecialaccommodationoraninterpretertoparticipateinthisproceedingor haveanyquestionspleasecontactFaith Doyle,ClerktotheNFBABoardat(877) 552-3482or(407)629-6900atleasttwo(2) businessdayspriortothedateofthemeeting. September 8, 2011 692 Gov Notice of Meeting THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY announces the following: EVENT:Regular School Board Meeting and Public Hearing on the 2011-2012 Budget. DATE:Monday, September 12, 2011 TIME:5:45 PM Regular Meeting 6:00 PM Public Hearing PLACE:School Board Room 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE:Regular School Board Meeting& Public Hearing on the BudgetFor further information please contact: Superintendent’s Offic e Wakulla County Schools P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, FL 3232 6 850-926-006 5 September 8, 2011

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com PAID ADVERTISEMENT CHECK IT OUT WHO TREASURE HUNTERS ROADSHOW WHAT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC TO SELL THEIR ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES WHERE BEST WESTERN PLUS WAKULLA INN & SUITES 3292 COASTAL HWY 98 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 WHEN SEPTEMBER 6TH 10TH TUESDAY…FRIDAY 9AM…6PM SATURDAY 9AM…4PMDIRECTIONS 850.926.3737 SHOW INFO 217.787.7767*This amount depends upon rarity, condition and what collectors are willing to pa yPAYING CASH FOR ALL COINS PRE-1970 & CURRENCY WE BUY ALL GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY WE ALSO PURCHASE SILVERWARE SETS POCKET WATCHES ANDWRIST WATCHES STERLING SILVERSILVERCOSTUME JEWELRY SCRAP GOLD .999 FINE SILVER MILITARY ITEMS & SWORDS PLATINUM SPORTS MEMORABILIAINVESTMENT GOLD ds upon rarity, condition and what collectors are willing N VE ST MENT G OL D *This amount depends up POCKET & WRIST WATCHES P LAT IN GUITARS PRE 1934 PAPER CURRENCY INDIAN CENT UP TO $500* MERCURY DIME UP TO $3,600* 3 CENT PIECE UP TO $2,500* MORGAN SILVER DOLLAR UP TO $100,000* LIBERTY VŽ NICKEL UP TO $2,800* BARBER DIME UP TO $2,800* JEFFERSON WARŽ NICKEL UP TO $2,000* WHEAT BACK CENT UP TO $1,500* STANDING LIBERTY QUARTER UP TO $4,400* SHIELD NICKEL UP TO $4,000* WALKING LIBERTY HALF DOLLAR UP TO $4,700* CAPPED BUST HALF DIME UP TO $10,000* BARBER QUARTER UP TO $3,200* 2 CENT PIECE UP TO $2,000* PEACE DOLLAR UP TO $3,000* BUFFALO NICKEL UP TO $1,800* BRAIDED HAIR LARGE CENT UP TO $3,800* SEATED LIBERTY DIME UP TO $6,500* BARBER HALF DOLLAR UP TO $6,750* KENNEDY HALF DOLLAR MANY TIMES FACE VALUE* 3 CE NT P IE CE BUFFALONICKEL BERT TYVŽNICK E BARBERDIME MERCURYDI ME ATEDLIBERTYDIM A RB ER Q UA RT ER INGLIBERTYQ UA G LI BE RT Y HA LF NEDYHALFDOLL L RBERHALFDOLL PEACEDOLL AR ERSONWARŽNIC We buy all Gold & Silver Jewelry WRIST WATCHES



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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 36th Issue Thursday, September 8, 2011 Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 CentsThe WakullanewsInside This Week Public Notices ..............Page 3A Comment & Opinion ....Page 4A Church..........................Page 5A School...........................Page 6A Outdoors .....................Page 7A Sports ..........................Page 8A In The Huddle ..............Page 9A Water Ways...............Page 10A Sheriffs Report ..........Page 11A Green Scene ................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..........Page 2B Classi eds ....................Page 7B Legal Notices ...............Page 8B Published Weekly, Published Weekly, Read Daily Read Daily Jackie Fulford is Wakullas new circuit judgeCounty reduces utility taxBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netCircuit Judge Jackie Fulford isnt new to Wakulla County. She was chief prosecutor in the county for several years. With the retirement of Circuit Judge N. Sanders Sauls at the end of August, Chief Judge Charles Francis gave Judge Fulford the assignment to cover Wakulla County. Sauls had been assigned Wakulla for the last 13 years and stepped down after reaching the mandatory retirement age of 70. Fulford is already making some changes including allowing members of the jury to submit questions during trials, something that has been done for the past year or so in Leon County trials after a state Supreme Court decision. Perhaps one of the biggest changes is that Fulford, who describes herself as a morning person, starts court early. For her rst full day in Wakulla on Monday, Aug. 26, she had a hearing set at 6 a.m. in the courthouse, and had another major hearing and selected juries for three felony trials to be held later in the week. All that by lunchtime. I think people will get used to it, Judge Fulford says of the early start. When she was rst appointed to the bench, two years ago in July, she was given a post over civil cases in Leon County. There was such a backlog of cases, Fulford said, and moving things forward hampered by trying to set hearings in which attorneys often had scheduling con icts. She decided to offer early morning hearings, noting that it was less likely for a scheduling con ict at 7:30 a.m. She quickly cleared the backlog and got her cases better managed. Fulford also reasoned that its important for the public to have access to the courts. Since Leon County is home to the state capitol, there are frequently constitutional challenge cases that take a priority over other types of cases. But, Fulford says she realizes that when people have a pending court case, its often the most important thing in their lives and she didnt think it fair to bump those cases for the high-pro le cases. Continued on Page 3A WILLIAM SNOWDENWakulla Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford in her judicial chambers. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter initially deciding to levy the Public Services Tax at the maximum amount of 10 percent, the County Commission rescinded that action and decided to lower it to 7 percent, with a 500 kilowatt exemption included. I cant do this to people, said County Commissioner Mike Stewart. This is another new tax. For the next scal year, the commission has decided to increase the Communications Services Tax to 5.22 percent, implement a solid waste assessment of $196 and is also looking at increasing the re MSBU to $75 per household. Stewart brought up the idea at the August meeting to lower the tax after the board voted four to one, with Commissioner Jerry Moore opposing, to levy the full 10 percent at the June 21 meeting. Stewart originally wanted the PST to be lowered to 5 percent and also lower the millage rate by the same amount to make it revenue neutral. Commissioners Alan Brock, Randy Merritt and Lynn Artz were not as keen on that idea. A compromise was hatched and the commission decided to impose a 7-percent tax with an exemption included. I think this is the best compromise we can hope for, Stewart said, although he added he wasnt entirely happy about it. Lowering the PST would mean the budget would decrease by $346,259. However, the sheriffs of ce has projected that jail bed revenues will be coming in higher for this year and anticipate an extra $250,000. The commission agreed to include that in the budget, which would mean $96,259 would still need to be cut. Artz said if jail bed revenues end up not being over what was projected then the sheriffs of ce should be held accountable and make up for the de cit. The $96,259 would be spread out across all constitutional of- ces, except for the supervisor of elections. The commission said it would take that portion because there are two elections next year. Merritt said the countys proposed budget is at 2005-06 operating levels, meaning it had reduced its budget to pre-Pingree. He added that the county is dealing with a decrease in revenues, trying to increase its reserves and not pull money from other funds to support the general fund. The can got kicked down the road and its in our laps now, Merritt said. Continued on Page 3AWar Eagles defeat Mosley in season opener, 31-14By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe War Eagles kicked off their season with a big win on the road against Mosley High School, 31-14, on Thursday, Sept. 1 at Tommy Oliver Stadium in Panama City. Marshane Godbolt had three touchdowns in the game. He was able to nd creases in the Dolphin defense and then outrun them to the goal line. Running back Will Thomas, who is a punishing runner, had 14 carries and gained nearly 120 yards in the game. We got off to kind of a sluggish start in the rst half, Head Coach Scott Klees said. A fumbled punt return gave the Dolphins good eld position and they were able to score. The War Eagles did lead at the end of the half, 13-7. Godbolt had four rushes for 65 yards, and two rushing touchdowns -including one 60-yard run. He also had a catch that was an 80-yard run for a touchdown. Deonte Hutchinson scored on a ve-yard run. In the third quarter, Thomas busted off a long run and the War Eagles scored to go up 19-7. They went for a two-point conversion but it was caught out-of-bounds. Later in the quarter, the War Eagles got a eld goal to go up 22-7. Continued on Page 12A By HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsMany in the Wakulla County area know, or have heard of, The Promise Land Ministries Lighthouse. The fellowship hall is located at 20 Church Road, not far from Shell Point. On Oct. 1, Promise Land will launch its latest outreach endeavor: a thrift store in the heart of Crawfordville. The original efforts of the ministry which de- nes itself as non-denominational began in 1991 when the Spring Creek Community Church realized the growing need for a homeless shelter to be built in Wakulla County. Land was developed and a mobile home was moved onto the acquired property. The ministry, the facilities, along with the land area itself, have been carefully cultivated ever since. In 2010 they served close to 18,000 meals to hungry individuals and helped to support almost 4,000 families in their time of need. A great deal of prayer and community support have gone into getting the new thrift store (3299 Crawfordville Highway) location in position for the grand opening, and it seems the efforts of the few are quickly bearing fruit. Continued on Page 2ASee Page 9AIn The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State A founding member of The Promise Land Ministries Lighthouse, Billie Davis, along with Pastor Glenn Hamel, are in the process of opening a thrift store in Crawfordville. The store will open on Oct. 1. Promise Land plans to open a thrift storePHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/Special to The NewsWakullas Willie Thomas breaks free during the game against Mosley High School on Sept. 1. PHOTO BY HERB DONALDSON/Special to The NewsCoastal Cleanup is Sept. 17See Page 1B

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Daviod Rossetti 850 591-6161 Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Loren Joiner 850 544-3508 Kelly Dykes 850 528-3063 all akullas inest 850 926-1011our ome own ealtor734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FLPromise Land plans to open a thrift storeContinued from Page 1 Upon my arrival at the thrift store location, I was greeted by a huge truck. Their latest food delivery had just come in and the unloading was in full swing. Fruit, vegetables, meats, frozen and canned goods covered the entire front porch area of the building. It was enough to stock a small grocery store. In the center of it all was an agile and determined little woman, pulling down the heavy boxes stacked along the trucks tailgate by the deliveryman. Her name is Billie Davis, from Wakulla, who along with her husband Bruce were among the founding members of Promise Land. She currently serves on the Board of Trustees and is the Secretary. Given her focus and energy, she obviously was well acquainted with hard work. After we exchanged a few pleasantries, I found myself on the back of the truck unloading boxes with the delivery team. With the truck finally cleared, I wanted to know from Davis why she felt an organization like Promise Land was so important: I feel it serves the community greatly, she says. A lot of people down here are in need, so we give out this food to help them. We have the ministry and we also prepare three meals a day for the guys that are involved with the lawn service that helps those who can truly bene t from it. Davis friend, Pat Ogletree, was also there. She comes in once a week from Leon County to help sort the food along with other odd duties that need attending. From the time of my arrival to the time I left, people from the community drifted in and out to drop off a donation, or offer well wishes for the new thrift store well, or to lend a hand for an hour or so before going about the rest of their day. The deliveryman, Terrence Jones, is also from Leon County. He nds the work that he does delivery of food to those who serve the needy to be nourishing for not only the body, but the spirit of the people at large. He delivers to over 10 surrounding counties in one day. He usually travels close to 120 miles, with Port St. Joe being one of the more far-reaching stops. My next question to Davis was how has this type of work had changed her. I feel like Im doing something worthy with my time, she says. I come out here and volunteer, and now that Glenns taken over Im still behind him and I show it by coming out to help and do all I can. Glenn, is Glenn Hamel. A married father of seven who at rst sight looks more like the man who was sent to build the church, rather than run it. With his jeans, T-shirt, and pullover cap, one becomes aware that hes here to roll up his sleeves and get down to business. Named after both of his grandfathers one who was a pastor in Wakulla, the other in Starke, Fla. this particular type of service having become Hamels life work is no real surprise. In 2001, Davis and her husband, Bruce, were ready to retire from the larger role of Promise Land. After much prayer and thought, they felt the lord was leading them to ask Hamel to become the leading pastor of the organization. Before this, Hamel admits, he and Miss Billie, as he calls her, were only acquaintances. When he was approached about the chance to lead Promise Land, he says I told her, well, God hasnt told me anything yet, so Ive really got to pray about that. At the time, Hamel was working on a number of community projects based primarily in Tallahassee. We had a food bank there in our house, says Hamel. We had a clothing closet also for people who needed a change from their dirty or worn-out clothes. We even took in pregnant teens with no place to go. This was all being done as a part of the W.A.T.C.H program (Wakulla Area Teens and Childrens Home), of which Hamel was the resident house father. I was doing all of that while working as manager of a restaurant in Tallahassee full-time. I got my community work in wherever I could. The only thing I was looking for was to serve God. He talks about being awakened one morning at around 3 a.m. with excruciating leg cramps. Unable to go back to sleep, a different conversation with God begins to develop I said, Lord, its not good enough Ive got to eat. I need to know if you want me to go to Promise Land or not, he says. If I go, Ive got to give up my full-time job cause its a full-time ministry. Ive got to move out of here and go live there get things established. Ive got four kids. If I take the position, Ive got to sacri ce my time with them. I need for You to tell me what You want me to do. So I went to my Bible, and the rst thing I saw was: Was not Abraham considered righteous when he offered Isaac as a sacri ce unto the Lord? After that, all I could say was Alright, Lord I got it. I closed my Bible, called Miss Billie and brother Bruce and told them Id take the offer to come onboard with Promise Land and see what I could do with it. Ive been here ever since. Promise Land Ministries Lighthouse is, for the most part, a mens facility. One of their short-term goals is to build a womens location as well, but for now, they refer women and children to similar organizations throughout the county. Theres a lot of shame and embarrassment that comes with the word homeless, says Hamel. There are people sitting in Wakulla churches every Sunday who never tell you the truth about their situation, so its hard to know how many there are without a home or food in the area. Those who participate in the program are men whohave hit a few bumps along the road of life, or who currently find themselves on the verge of a similar setback. These include the homeless, those with issues stemming from substance abuse and a few of the formerly incarcerated seeking a positive entrance back into the general society. Promise Lands in-house rehabilitation program offers a 32-week regimen, complete with 12-step programs to overcome addiction, and lessons in discipleship that may usher a few disquieted souls toward a more personal deeper walk with the lord. Many graduates of the program have stayed on to help the ministry that helped them. This includes offering support through conversation and mentorship to new recruits of the program. Promise Lands secondary programs, such as the foodbank, serve the larger public. Every rst Wednesday of the month from 1 to 3 p.m., the food bank is open. Appointments are not necessary to receive food that is given on a rst come/ rst serve basis. Thursday food shipments began recently with a plan to partner with other organizations in surrounding counties to better target and distribute items to places that have been overlooked or underserved. The third ministry of Promise Land is most widely used and well known. The Lawn Care and Handyman Service is donation-based and services commercial and residential properties alike. The lawn care service provides mowing, tree trimming, leaf blowing, hedging and more, while the maintenance arm of the service offers pressure washing, minor construction repairs, basic home maintenance and a few other options. The donations from these services help to fund the other ministries. It is also therapeutic, allowing program participants to give back to the community by offering their talents. Their latest ministry is the thrift store. After numerous yard sales, the door of opportunity seems to have opened on this location, which has been a dream of Promise Lands for some time. The thrift store will offer a range of items, from clothes and handmade jewelry, to furniture and kitchen appliances. The goal, of course, is to reach out to those in need or those who just love a great bargain by offering quality goods at much discounted prices. The store looks to partner with other churches (or businesses) to build a gift-certi cate program. This means the church (or agency) can purchase gift certi cates to keep on-hand at their location. The hours of operation are still unanswered at this point. They are currently seeking volunteers to offer an hour or two of their time. Students from the high school seeking credit/community service hours, or seniors looking to help a community project get on its feet. Oct. 1 is the grand opening of the thrift store and Partner Appreciation Day for Promise Land. Partner Appreciation day has been an ongoing event for almost 4 years where those who have contributed to the ministry through donations, or having been recipients of the lawn care or maintenance services, are the honored guests of the day. Food, music, activities for the kids and more are expected and the entire county is asked to come out. The success stories of Promise Land Ministries are mor e like quiet victories, hard won lessons played out behind the scenes with very little fanfare. Like the young man who drove to the fellowship hall and left a photo of himself, his wife and their new child with an inscription on the back that read, Thank you Promise Land. You changed my life. Or the man who went to jail because of his struggles with addiction, who would later go on to receive a degree in psychology and now works as a counselor for those who are living the life he once led. We are a Christian organization and believe that Jesus has the power to change lives, says Hamel. But we dont limit that to who we serve. Were here to love whoever. Whatever their beliefs are. Were here to show them respect, and help them nd out who they can be in Christ. To learn more, call 9263281, visit the website at www.promiselandministries. org or email stepoutofthedarkness@msn.com. Glenn Hamel, pastor of Promise Land, says the goal of the thrift store is to reach out to those in need. They are currently looking for volunteers to help with their latest ministry. 713-001499 Rock Landing RoadEnjoy Outdoor Seating Overlooking Beautiful Dickerson Bay! Fall HOurs Open: Thursday ............................... 4 P.M. 9 P.M. Friday .......................................... 4 P.M. 10 P.M. Saturday ............................ 11 A.M. 10 P.M. sunday ......................................11 A.M. 9 P.M.COME AND CHECK OUT OUR NEW SATURDAY AND SUNDAY LUNCH SPECIALS 11a.m. 3p.m. All Under $10.THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS DOMESTIC BEER $1.50 WELLS $2.00 ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 Thank You!To the hundreds of people who cooked up support for Wakulla County Mental Health at the Pancake Breakfast on Saturday, Aug. 27Once again Wakulla County has proved that mental health is a priority!For more information about NAMI Wakulla, call 850-926-1033on Crawfordville Hwy. want to say &

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. LUN CH PA RTN ER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyofwhile quantities last.926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive Deli DelioftheweekatTry One of Our Home Made Parfaits 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. The Workswakullas coworking caf www.theworkscafe.com ReceiveacomplimentarycopyofPastry and Coffee Special! Let us perk u p your day! PARTNE R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy ofCounty commission reduces utility taxContinued from Page 1A He added that none of them want to raise taxes and everyone hates paying taxes, himself included. But weve got to run this county, Merritt said. Stewart said the county commission is back to 05-06 spending levels, but it still needed to shrink the size of government. He added that the county commission has cut, but said it has to happen across the board. Its got to go beyond our doors, Stewart said. Artz said she believed the sheriffs of ce could cut its budget more and she wished it would be more aggressive with cuts. However, she pointed out that if the commission tells the constitutional of cers to cut their budgets by a certain amount, they can decide to appeal to the governor. He then could make the commission fund the constitutional of cers budgets and the commission would be stuck with coming up with the difference. So forgive me if were a little gun shy, Artz said. The commission also discussed possibly including an exemption from the tax for industrial companies, such as St. Marks Powder. John Nichols with St. Marks Powder said the tax would amount to $400,000 for the company and would mean laying off employees. Moore said if he was going to open a business in Wakulla County and would have to pay this tax, he would look elsewhere. Because we cant balance our own budget, were going to tax him, Moore said. The commission said it would discuss that possible exemption at a later date. All commissioners were in agreement that the PST was a more fair tax than ad valorem and hoped to be able to cut the millage rate. This is a tax you can do something to reduce, Artz said. It is within their power to lower utility use and reduce this tax. Moore agreed and said this tax would be spread out to people who arent currently paying taxes. Artz had several suggestions for saving the county money and making up for the decrease in revenues gained from the PST. She suggested the county delay the hiring of incoming County Administrator David Edwards, a new planning director and new parks and recreation director. She said she would rather have a planning director than two planning technicians and suggested cutting those two positions and hiring a director. Another idea was a 10-percent pay cut for all commissioners and constitutional of cers. Artz said she thinks the commission can lower the millage to 8.5 and is hoping they can go to 8.25. Each commissioner agreed to come back at the next meeting with ways to save the county more money, so the millage rate could be lowered.Fulford is Wakullas new circuit judgeContinued from Page 1A Thus, another reason to hold early morning court. At the same time, Fulford does recognize that people have early morning con icts. Im a single mom, she says. And I understand there are some people who cant make it for early morning court. At the time she was appointed to the bench, Fulford had risen to the rank of chief assistant prosecutor under State Attorney Willie Meggs. As a judge, she faced a con ict because, as she puts it, her hands had touched most of the case les coming through the of ce. It meant she couldnt preside over criminal cases. In August, Judge Sauls gave her the nod to preside over felony court day and it was obvious how much Fulford was enjoying criminal court. I do enjoy it, she says. While she was a prosecutor for 11 years before being appointed a judge, Fulford says she was proud of the number of defense attorneys who submitted letters of recommendation on her behalf. She says she felt it was an acknowledgement that she was fair. I recognize that not every person needs to go to prison, and not every crime needs to be prosecuted the way law enforcement les the charges, she says. I treat everybody the same, she says. By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATHE CAPITAL, September 2.....With Labor Day beckoning, things were quiet around the capital this week with the exception of college students returning. Despite the unof cial end of summer, an abbreviated list of things to do occupied state and party of cials as August summer vacations gave way to September tailgate parties. The Republican Party of Florida will be led by another as its chairman, David Bitner, announced his coming retirement this week for health reasons. Meanwhile, one of his predecessors, the ousted Jim Greer, talked publicly for the rst time in a while this week, pointing ngers at members of the party who forced him out. Consumers remain edgy over their economic security, according to a University of Florida poll that says Floridians remain skeptical and cautious as the states economy sputters back to life. Much of the week was spent laying the groundwork for future endeavors. A handful of would-be presidential contenders toured the state. Meanwhile, a slew of interim reports were released on Thursday and legislative leaders concluded a statewide tour to get input on redrawing political boundaries, but hinted that future meetings may be in order after voters actually have something to look at. ECONOMIC NEWS Economic news remained foremost in the minds of consumers and political candidates this week as the nations sputtering recovery prompted responses from the campaign trail to the kitchen table. Mounting fear over the nations economic health dragged down consumer con- dence in Florida, which in August fell to the near record low posted at the bottom of the housing bust, a University of Florida report indicated Tuesday. Consumer confidence among Floridians fell to 62 on the UF index in August, a con- dence level only three points higher than the record-low 59 set in June 2008, according to data compiled monthly by the schools Bureau of Economic and Business Research. Respondents over 60 years old were most dramatically more gloomy. Their faith in the U.S. economy over the next five years fell by 16 points. But the survey also found younger respondents more pessimistic about the countrys long-term economic health and more likely in August to hold off on major purchases. Such caution appears to have been shared by others. U.S. unemployment in August held steady at 9.1 percent, but an anticipated increase in the workforce did not materialize, the U.S. Department of Labor reported Friday. State economists, however, say they are not ready to cede the notion that the nation is heading into the second of a double dip recession. Despite some negative gures, economists say the chances of growth remain higher than another recessionary slip. One indication is that state revenue collections have been higher than expected. THE RIVER OF GAS? Republican presidential hopeful Michele Bachmann started it off by arguing that oil drilling and Everglades water could mix, an assertion that drew immediate re from a number of people in Florida, including fellow tea party favorite, Republican U.S. Rep. Allen West. Meanwhile, Sen. Arthenia Joyner, D-Tampa, resurrected a proposed ban on oil drilling in the eastern Gulf of Mexico by ling a proposed constitutional amendment to end such exploration and production. Bachmann made the comments during a campaign swing, leading a list of Republican hopefuls including Herman Cain and Mitt Romney who also visited the critical swing state during the week. TEACHER PAY PROMPTS EXODUS: A News Service of Florida analysis of salaries published this week found that on average, school districts have raised the minimum pay for a teacher by 1 percent over the last four years, according to newly released data by the Florida Department of Education. And fewer than half of all school districts havent given raises at all, with most districts keeping salaries at over the last four years. In the last four years, the average pay of a Florida teacher has decreased $1,199, from $46,922 in the 2007-2008 school year to $45,723 in the 2010-2011 school year, a decline of about 2.5 percent. Lawmakers say their goal for next year is to keep funding for education stable, rather than having to cut as deeply as this year, when lawmakers approved a budget that slashed school funding by 8 percent on a per-student basis. BITNER STEPS DOWN: Republican Party of Florida Chairman David Bitner said Wednesday he would resign because of his declining health, a move that sends the party looking for its fourth leader in less than two years. Bitner announced earlier this year that he has ALS, or Lou Gehrigs Disease. Bitner, a former lawmaker, will step aside Sept. 23, following the partys Presidency 5 event. Vice Chairman Lenny Curry, who also heads the Duval County GOP, is Bitners heir apparent after receiving his former bosss blessing. POLITICAL BOUNDARY TOUR MAY INCLUDE ENCORE: While party leaders regroup, legislative efforts to get public buy-in on new political boundaries may not be nished despite the conclusion this week of a statewide tour of committee meetings. Republican leaders appear to be acknowledging the criticism that voters are being asked to comment on new congressional and state legislative boundaries before any proposed maps have even been drawn up. e re g ed g an e nt c evt ero rd, ree nd w ay a ke a nt s ee. m et h er h at h at m ap he h is are e xt t he i er, u ire M iv es i ng i da E K: to i gn o re c an h er or e rn a ts d to Of o ne o nEvdo i ng i ng e xt o ut l en v er-WEEKLY ROUNDUP: (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Republican Party leader steps downI treat everybody the same, Judge Jackie Fulford saysCity of Sopchoppy On September 12, 2011 at 6:30 pm, the City Commission will consider the adoption of a resolution establishing an exclusive franchise for solid waste collection and hauling with Waste Pro. If adopted, the resolution will establish Waste Pro as the only contractor authorized to pick up and haul solid waste within the City limits. All interested parties are encouraged to attend the meeting and express their concerns or support for the exclusive franchise. A copy of the proposal may be obtained and persons wishing to comment may do so in person at the public hearing or by writing to the City of Sopchoppy, P.O. Box 1219, Sopchoppy, Florida 32358.If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE: Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Jackie Lawhon at the above address or by phone at 850-962-4611.SEPTEMBER 8, 2011City of Sopchoppy The City of Sopchoppy will be holding two public hearings on Ordinance 2011-05, An Ordinance of the City of Sopchoppy adopting the operating budgets for the City of Sopchoppy for the 2011-2012 scal year. The rst reading and public hearing will be held during the regular monthly meeting of the City Council on Monday, September 12, 2011 and the second public hearing and adoption of the Ordinance will be held at a Special Called Meeting on September 19, 2011. Both meetings will begin at 6:30 p.m. and will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, Florida. The special called meeting on September 19 will be held only for the purpose of adopting the budget. A copy of the Budget may be viewed at City Hall from 8:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Monday thru Thursday and from 8:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. Friday.If special assistance is needed to attend this meeting, please call the Clerks ofce at 962-4611 at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting.SEPTEMBER 8, 15, 2011 The Wakulla County Code Enforcement Board will hold a Public Hearing on September 14, 2011, at 5:30pm in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and participate. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Office at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGSEPTEMBER 8, 2011

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak outComment & OpinionEditor, The News: I have been following the news on the proposed fee increases by our county commission and have read the various responses in The Wakulla News. For starters, I admit that I hate to pay taxes, especially extra taxes. Unfortunately, we are dealing with dif cult economic times, and this puts the squeeze on everyone. But this economic condition has also made it even more dif cult for government to come up with the necessary resources to provide the services we purport to want. Like it or not, you simply cant get something for nothing. I prefer something to nothing. I like the idea that a deputy will show up if I need help or the fire department will be there if my house is burning down. For that matter, I supported the extra taxes for the Wakulla County school system. My children received an excellent education in Wakulla schools. I could say that my kids are no longer in the school system and to hell with everyone else. Instead, I choose to support future students as others chose to support mine. As for the proposed garbage assessment, I commend the commissioners who supported this. I dont like the dump-it-in-the woods mentality, and this change will prove to be very popular when most people gure it out. One recent writer to The Wakulla News equated this garbage proposal to the dreaded Socialism word. My guess is that he enjoys his Social Security check and Medicare coverage, which is about as socialistic as one can get. (I look forward to mine, by the way.) At any rate, call me old fashioned, but I think you get what you pay for. Is this the right mixture of property taxes and fees? Probably not, but that is what debate is all about. For those opposed to these thoughts, I would ask: what is your plan to make sure that a deputy or the fire department will show up when most needed? These things dont materialize out of thin air. Criticizing is easy; workable solutions are much harder. David Murrell CrawfordvilleEditor, The News:I am forwarding an email to you that I am sending to the County Commission of ce today. I wasnt sure if this was something that you want to help tackle by publishing, but its a serious issue to the residents of Wakulla Gardens. Letter to Commissioners: Good Afternoon. I was forwarding your email response back to you because I have not heard anything on this issue. I would have thought that after more than ve months, I would have gotten some type of response. As with Mike Stewarts, I was assured my email would be forwarded and I would hear something in return after your departments had a chance to review the situation. The initial idea of putting limestone gravel down as a roadbed was a good idea, however, I dont think that people thought the matter through completely prior to implementation, and here is why: Limestone on a road that isnt heavily traveled will not breakdown as fast therefore the dust is minimal. On the other hand, limestone that has been applied on a road that has 4050 homes and traf c throughout the day will breakdown extremely fast (which is what it has done). To be honest, you could have applied recycled asphalt as a road base instead of this gravel surface and probably would have saved money. There is a lot of this stuff around because after its milled from an existing road, the contractors usually dump it in huge piles on their property. Since having originally sent my email dated March 26, things with these roads have not gotten any better. During the very dry weeks, the dust is a huge issue. Now, Ive done some research and it doesnt appear that anyone listed as a commissioner in Wakulla County lives on a limestone gravel road (Wakulla County Property Appraiser), therefore you cannot understand my problem, or the problems of all of my neighbors. Im inviting each of you to my home (after the roads dry from the rain that we had recently), so you can experience rsthand what its like to stand in the front yard when cars driving by are creating huge dust clouds. Listen, not only is this a health issue from breathing in this severe dust, but its also a quality of life issue as well. I cannot go outside without having to breathe in huge amounts of this dust when a car drives by; I cannot open the windows to my home because if I do, everything is covered in dust; and I cant keep my car clean because its constantly covered in dust. Keep in mind that I am not the only one complaining about this issue. You have many residents of Wakulla Gardens upset, however it seems as though Im the only one sending emails. I feel as though one step to helping solve this problem is for the commission to hold a special hearing on this subject (for starters) so there you can hear from each person how it affects them. As commissioners I would think that you would want to hear from your constituents on how they feel since you were elected by them. What I do not want it a one line response to this email from your Blackberry (i.e.; Jerry Moores response dated March 26 to my initial email) telling me that At almost every county meeting we discuss how we can best improve Wakulla Gardens. To me, if you cannot take the time and effort to send an appropriate response to something that I deem important, then I would rather you not send a response at all. It also makes me question why I voted for someone who obviously doesnt feel that one of his constituents issues is important enough to respond to with something more. I do appreciate the initial responses that I received from Alan, Lynn, and Mike, however, I think the follow-up was lost somewhere along the way and I wanted to bring it up again. I look forward to hearing from everyone on this issue. Sincerely, Michael Mckenzie CrawfordvilleEditor, The News: Wakulla Pregnancy Center has been able to effectively run for nearly 4 years now with the help of a giving community. We are nding ourselves running short on some much needed supplies and again ask for help from our community. The center is in need of a vacuum, and it doesnt have to be new (just working). We also need baby supplies like lotion, wash, powder, wipes and diapers. If you can buy at least one of these items when you go to the store and get it to us, it will be greatly appreciated and will get used. Thank you for your giving hearts, Angie Holshouser Wakulla Pregnancy CenterThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Staff Writer/Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ......................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising/Photographer: Lynda Kinsey .................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Bookkeeping/Circulation: Sherry Balchuck .......accounting@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: War Eagles beat Leon, Lincoln at football jamboree Elizabeth L. Betty Strickland obituary Ray Gray is fired by county Week in Wakulla: Aug. 18-25 Week in Wakulla: Aug. 25-Sept. 1 Julie Moran Petros obituary Solid waste assessment moving forward thewakullanews.comBy MARJ LAW When I was young, P F Flyers could make you run faster and jump higher than any other brand of shoe. Thats what their ads said and I knew it was true. Athletic shoes were sneakers back then. We called them our sneaks. New shoes were very special. I looked at them in their nest of tissue paper in the rectangular box. New shoe smell wafted out. They were perfect right now and would never be so white again. I took them out of the box, and laced them up. I ran and hopped and came to a whiz-bang short stop, admiring my newborn running and jumping abilities and the shoes pristine white newness. Mama! Id exclaim. Watch this! and Id skid around the patio. Unh-huh, shed reply absently while doing something else. But I didnt care if she was really listening. I was breaking in my new shoes and they had magical abilities. Back then, sneakers sported thin at manila-colored soles. A little bit of tread was stamped into them. There were no inch-deep, air or gel soles. Most of the sneakers were white or black back then, too. A band of white rubber circled the lower portion of the shoe. In the center back, a green tag was embossed with the name: P F Flyer. They were the real thing. Sneakers went the way of dungarees. Dungarees are now blue jeans or jeans. Sneakers turned into athletic shoes, jogging shoes and tennis shoes. Nobody wears sneakers anymore. Somewhere along the way, the magic went, too. But when youre ten years old and youre wearing new P F Flyers, anything can happen.Marj Law is the retired director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and an occasional columnist for The Wakulla News.Ive been thinking...About sneakers Football has started and all is right with the worldBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.etAs the leaves start to change and the air gets colder, we know fall and its perfect complement, football, is upon us. Although, for Florida, that doesnt really describe our fall. Our fall is more like an extension of summer and we dread the possibility of a noon game in the beginning of the season with the weather still 90 degrees and up. But in spite of the still hot weather, once the season starts approaching, people began to count down the days until football starts and it seems the majority of conversations center around the upcoming season and predictions of how each team will do. The college football season began on Sept. 1 and the regular season for the NFL will begin tonight, Sept. 8. I love the NFL and get my heart broken every year by my beloved Dolphins, as well as my No. 2 Jaguars. However, to me, there is nothing like college football. The start of college football was long overdue, with fans getting a small taste of their teams in the spring with spring games, but then having to wait five more months until the season would start. On Friday, Sept. 2, I was decked out in my orange and blue, ready to cheer on my Gators on Saturday. I wore my colors proud. And although my heart lies in Gainesville at the University of Florida, my place of residence lies in Tallahassee. So, my husband, who happens to be an Auburn Tigers fan, and I made our way to a Florida State tailgate to join the diehard FSU fans we call our friends. Yes, even during football season, although not so sure on that last game in November. That has yet to be determined. We had fun, like we always do. In the South, college football reigns supreme and its always nice to partake in it, even if it isnt your team. Standing outside with a cold drink, burgers on the grill, game on TV, laughing and trash talking with friends. Ahhh, football. How I have missed you. That day, like most days during the season, we divided up our time tailgating, watching Auburn vs. Utah State and then Florida vs. Florida Atlantic. Obviously both gimme games, but still a chance to see our teams in action. Everyone always has high hopes for their team at the beginning of the year and well see how it all plays out. Florida State is in its second season with Jimbo Fisher at the helm and people are expecting big things. They are currently ranked No. 6. FSU took on Louisiana-Monroe and beat them 34-0. The team will really be tested when they play currently ranked No. 1, Oklahoma State, the third week in September. I know Tallahassee will get crazy whichever way it goes. Florida started its first season with new coach Will Muschamp on Saturday, as they took on Florida Atlantic and came out victorious, 41-3. Im excited to see what Muschamp will bring to the table this season. I saw some improvement in Quarterback John Brantley in the rst game. There were some positives, but there were also interceptions. And if he is throwing interceptions against Florida Atlantic, that makes me a tad nervous about how he will react at future games. The team will receive its rst test against Tennessee on Sept. 17. Any game against an SEC opponent is a challenge and I just hope we come out on top. Whatever happens this season, Im ready for it. Heres hoping for a happy football season. Jennifer Jensen is a reporter for The Wakulla News. Cant get something for nothingRoads in Wakulla Gardens are an issue Please help Wakulla Pregnancy Center Find us on Food drive underway at chamber Editor, The News: The Wakulla Chamber of Commerce is partnering with Americas Second Harvest of the Big Bend to bring Wakulla residents donated groceries through a food drive. The drive aims to collect 300 pounds of non-perishable goods by September 30. Donors can drop off non-perishable items in bins at the chamber of ce, located at 23 High Drive in Crawfordville. Common donations include high-quality, nutritious food such as canned meats, peanut butter, canned vegetables and fruits, canned soups, rice, pasta and whole grain cereal. Non-food items are also accepted, including new deodorants, soaps, toothpastes and toothbrushes, hair brushes and diapers. The chamber will deliver the donations to Americas Second Harvest of the Big Bend. The donations will then be sorted and distributed to partners in Wakulla County, putting food on the tables of countless families. One local partner making an impact on the food drive is St. Marks Powder. The Crawfordville manufacturer is accepting donations through a generous companywide campaign. For more information about ending hunger, donating to food drives and ways you can help make an impact, visit www. ghtinghunger.org./.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 Page 5AEloise J. HarveyEloise J. Harvey, 89, a lifelong resident of Crawfordville, passed away Monday, Sept. 5, after a lengthy battle with Alzheimers Disease. She was born in Ivan on March 14, 1922, to the late John Vickers and Bertie Raker. A memorial service will be held on Friday, Sept. 9 at 11 a.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville with burial immediately following at Arran Cemetery. She graduated from Crawfordville High School with honors where she lettered in basketball. She attended Tallahassee Junior College and Florida State University School for Women. She worked as cafeteria manager at Crawfordville School and after 30 years of service retired. She was the rst president and certi cation chairman of the Wakulla County School Food Service Association. She was a faithful member of the First Baptist Church of Crawfordville, The Gleaners Sunday School Class, Capital City Optimist Club, Women of the Moose, Golden Girls Club, Young at Heart, Baptist Supper Club and Crawfordville Womens Club. She was a devoted wife, mother, mother-in-law, sister, sister-in-law, aunt, grandmother and great-grandmother who loved spending time with her family. She was surrounded by family members who held her hands and shared special memories together the last several days of her life. She is survived by her daughter and son-in-law, Peggy and Doug Hammons, Tallahassee, with whom she lived for the past two years; her son, Paul Harvey, Crawfordville; twin sister, Louise Johnson, Tallahassee; brothers, Alvin Vickers, Winter Park, and Robert Vickers (Evelyn), Cypress; daughters-in-law, Denise Guidry and Pat Harvey, Crawfordville; sister-inlaw, Montine Durrance of DeQuincy, LA; grandchildren, Brenda Mueller (Joe), Tallahassee, Susan Barrinew (Stacy), Tallahassee, Cindy Hammons King, Tallahassee, Chris Harvey (Leigh Ann), Clarksville, Tenn., Hollie Harvey, Ashville, N.C., Charlie Harvey, Crawfordville, Donna Boggs (Danny), Clarksville, Tenn., Brad Harvey (Katherine), Tallahassee, and Joey Harvey (Melanie), Tallahassee; and several great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband, J.C. Harvey; and her eldest son, Joe Harvey. The family wishes to express their sincere appreciation to Dr. Harts eld, staff and volunteers of Big Bend Hospice who helped care for Eloise the past two years and to all the friends and family members who visited, called, sent beautiful cards, thoughts and prayers throughout her long illness. In lieu of owers, the family requests memorial donations be sent to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee, FL 32308. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Perry M. PresnellPerry Miles Presnell, 93, passed away Saturday, Sept. 3, in Crawfordville. He was born Jan. 1, 1918, in Gadsden County. He retired from West Florida Gas in 1982, was an avid sherman and deeply loved all of his family. He was of the Baptist faith. The family received friends from 1 to 2 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 6, at Abbey Funeral Home, followed by the funeral at 2 p.m. Interment immediately followed after the service at Tallahassee Memory Gardens. He is survived by his son, Frank Presnell (Linda); daughters, Shirley Carter (Myers) and Debbie Presnell (friend, Andy Mosley); grandchildren, Kenny Carter, Tammy Peltier, Kathy Gray, Robby, Christopher and Michael Presnell, Jodie Campbell and Jarrod Kirkley; and nine great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents; seven brothers; three sisters; and his wife, Pearl. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice. Online condolences may be made at www.abbeyfh.com.Phyllis M. WhitePhyllis M. White, 73, died Wednesday, Aug. 31, in Ypsilanti, Mich. She was born in Ypsilanti, was a member of Stony Creek Freewill Baptist Church and worked for Willow Run Public Schools as a bus driver for more than 20 years. Graveside services were Monday, Sept. 5, at 10 a.m. at Friendship Cemetery in Medart. Family received friends from 9 to 10 a.m. prior to the service. She is survived by three daughters, Jan Barnes (Edward) of Illinois, Lita Hart (Kit) of N.C. and Tina Brimner (Ed) of Florida; one son; Greg Hensley (Linda) of Florida; nine grandchildren; one great-grandchild; two brothers, Dick Adams (Deborah) of Milan and Fred Harberts of Ypsilanti; and several nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband, Kelland White in 2010; her parents, Richard and Mary Adams; and son, Donnie White. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville was in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh. com) Crawfordville AreaWakulla Worship CentersSopchoppy Medart Area religious views and eventsChurchObituariesChurch briefsCoastal Areas Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Grief RECOVERY GROUP for parents who have lost a childFor more information call Gigi Cavallaro at 850-962-6117 or Melanie Lachman 850-878-5310 or 926-9308 Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm 1s t Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Eloise J. Harvey Perry M. Presnell Phyllis M. WhiteWakulla Station Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart On Sept. 8 at 9 a.m. Busy Bee Quilters will meet at Wakulla United Methodist Church, 1584 Old Woodville Road. On Sept. 8, at 7 p.m. there will be a Salsa Making Party, held by the United Methodist Women at Wakulla United Methodist Church. Reservations needed. Cost is $10 per person, Call 925-7733 to make a reservation. On Sept. 10 at 8 a.m. there will be a United Methodist Men Meeting and Breakfast (dutch treat at Savannahs) and church cleaning. On Sept. 21 at 6 p.m. there will be a church dinner provided by the United Methodist Women. The cost is $5 per person and $15 per family, The dinner will be at Wakulla United Methodist Church. Please call for reservations 421-5741. Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church would like to invite you and your family to come out to the annual kickoff for our AWANA club. It will be Sunday, Sept. 11, from 5 to 7 p.m. Please come prepared to get wet with your swimsuit and towel. There will be food, water games, and lots of fun. There will be a short parent orientation as well. If you have any questions, please call 962-7822.Sopchoppy Southern Baptist holds AWANA eventWorship service on 9-11 to be held at Pioneer BaptistPioneer Baptist Church will have a special 9-11 Worship Service on Sunday, Sept. 11 at 10:30 a.m. Free childcare will be available. The worship service will have sacred and patriotic music, recognition of those serving and having served in uniform, and a sermon. We invite those who do not have a regular church home to worship with us as we remember the tragedy of 9-11. Pioneer Baptist Church is located four miles east of Crawfordville, just north of the Spring Creek Road and Dr. M L King, Jr. Memorial Road. The address is 486 Beechwood Drive. For more information, please call Pastor Dennis Hall at 878-5224.Night of gospel music will be held at Sopchoppy OpryThe Sopchoppy Opry presents An Adventure in Gospel Music on Saturday, Sept. 17 at 7 p.m. in the old Sopchoppy School Gymnasium. This is a bene t for the Sopchoppy Historic GF&A Railroad Depot. Tickets are $10 each. Call for available seating at 9622668, 962-2210 or 962-2646. Available unassigned seats will be sold at the door, however, there is no guarantee of available seating at the door., so please call early to reserve your seat.Ivan Assembly of God hosts Cry Out AmericaUpcoming events are announced at Wakulla United Methodist On Sept. 11, 2001, America was shaken to its foundation by a series of surprise terrorist attacks. All of us were awakened to the new reality of global terrorism. Ten years later, our nation needs to be awakened again, to the threats of terrorism, but to our critical spiritual condition. In response to our nations need and Gods biblical and historical pattern for bringing awakening to America, we are calling for extraordinary, united prayer. Please join us on Sunday from 5 to 6 p.m., at the Wakulla County Courthouse as we gather together with others to pray for our nation, state, county, church-es and families.

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comhappeningsCommunitySpecial to The News The Jake Pigott Memorial American Legion Post and Auxiliary 144 sent seven students to the annual Boys and Girls State Session to represent Wakulla County. The session was held in July in Tallahassee. The Wakulla High School students, who are currently seniors, took part in a mock legislative session similar to the session held by the Florida Legislature. Participants elect members to serve as governor and other state, county and city positions. The propose bills and pass legislature. Kelsey Lynne Cook and Molly Victoria Vise attended girls state for Wakulla County. Stanley Victor Linton, Zachary Tye Azzarito, Kendell Lee Barron, Matthew Wayne Hill and Aaron Walker Rhodes attended the boys state seminar. Cook is the daughter of Chuck and Diane Cook of Sopchoppy. Vise is the daughter of Mike Vise of Crawfordville. Linton is the son of Byron and Maria Linton of Crawfordville. Azzarito is the son of John and Kim Azzarito of Crawfordville. Barron is the son of Kenneth and Robin Barron of Crawfordville. Hill is the son of Christopher and Melinda Hill of Crawfordville. Rhodes is the son of Wayne and Toni Rhodes of Crawfordville. Barrie Glover of American Legion Post 114 has served 31 years as a counselor for the boys state program.Students represent Wakulla well at stateThe Wakulla County Historical Society will hold its monthly program Sept. 13 at 7 p.m. at the public library. This months presentation is called, Wakullas Political Past and will focus on the Wakulla County citizens who have held of ces at the state level from 1845 to the present. Wakulla Historical Society Vice President Richard Harden will be presenting this program. The public is encouraged to attend. Gray to wed GerrellBrittany Nicole Gerrell, of Wakulla Springs, and Joshua Derricke Gray, of Crawfordville, announce their engagement. She is the daughter of Scott and Traci Gerrell of Wakulla Springs. He is the son of Derricke and Kathy Gray of Crawfordville. The wedding is planned for March 31, 2012 at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church. Brittany Gerrell and Joshua GrayHistorical Society looks into Wakullas political past Free Hugs performs at PoshFree Hugs, composed of musicians Aaron ORourke (dulcimer), Erik Alvar (standup bass), Mickey Abraham (mandolin/guitar) and Mark Russell (violin), will perform at Posh Java on Saturday, September 10, at 8 p.m. in Sopchoppy. Free Hugs is described as traditional music strung together with classical, jazz, and modern ideas. For reservations please contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@ gmail.com. Tickets are $12. Reservations are suggested. Barber Shop & Salon 926-4080 Clipper Cuts Scalp Massage Steam Towels Style Cuts Neck Massage Hi-lites & Low-lites Color 926-4080 926-4080 3334 Crawfordville Hwy. Theresa Delta Waxing Perms education news from local schoolsSchoolBy CADET ENSIGN AZZARITONJROTC Public Affairs Of cerAugust has come and gone, and what is August famous for? Yup, school starting. Wakulla County schools began on Thursday, Aug. 18. For a young group of high school juniors and seniors, however, it began Thursday, Aug. 11. The 17 of cers of the WHS NJROTC unit began the planning and organizing required for the unit to run successfully this upcoming school year. Cadet Lieutenant Devin Lovett, company commanding of cer, began the all of- cers meeting, dubbed AOM in the unit, Thursday morning at 1100 hours, starting off the week-long adventure. Cadet Lieutenant Stanley Linton, company executive of cer gave a brief welcome back before going over some of the things discussed during the summer AOM. The of cers quickly dove in and started to prepare for the upcoming school year. The old driver education room was now back in ROTC hands and they worked diligently on moving all of the desk and other items from the muster room to the driver education room, now the ROTC class room. After some hard work and a bit of cleaning, the of cers were released early for a 3-day weekend. After the welcome back from the weekend break, the of cers split up and began their work. Over the course of the week the of cers did a multitude of things. The six core staff members, the commanding of cer, executive officer, operations officer, administrative of cer, supply of cer and company chief conducted a core staff meeting on Wednesday. The five new platoon leaders along with last years platoon leaders (now the members of the core staff) held a platoon leader meeting. They discussed different tips, advice, things to remember to do in the upcoming school year to have a successful unit. The platoon leaders are the backbone of the unit. They are the ones who come in contact with the cadets on a daily basis. The success of the unit depends on how successful the platoon leaders are in doing their job. Thus, the platoon leader meeting was highly important. Other things, such as a team commander meeting and planning Oral Boards for Cadets applying for the rank of cadet chief petty of cer occurred at the AOMs. The of cers helped decorate many of the old boards, update information displays for cadets, and create the unit goals for the year. Overall the AOMs conducted by Captain Huddleston, Lieutenant Stewart and the cadet of cers were a big success and extremely helpful for the success of the unit in the upcoming school year.WHS NJROTC planning for a successful year Coleman gets AP awardShelby Coleman, 2011 WHS Graduate, received notice this week that she has received the AP Scholar Award with Distinction. This is granted to students who receive an average score of at least 3.5 on all AP Exams taken, and scores of 3 or higher on ve or more of these exams. Coleman is currently attending Florida State University. The College Boards Advanced Placement Program provides willing and academically prepared students with the opportunity to take rigorous collegelevel courses while still in high school, and to earn college credit, advanced placement, or both for successful performance on the AP Exams. About 18 percent of the more than 1.9 million students worldwide who took AP Exams performed at a suf ciently high level to also earn an AP Scholar Award. Shelby ColemanComputer classes at TCCTech@Night begins Sept. 8 with a free course offering. In Wakulla County, the topic will be Getting Started: Computers, a workshop designed to help students get over the fear of using a computer. The fall series continues through Dec. 13 and will cover the following topics: graphics, web design and development, photography, Of ce 2007 and 2010, and Windows 7. Classes at the TCC Wakulla Center are held from 6-9 p.m. Cost is $25 for early registration. Walkins are $30 and will be accepted between 5:45 and 6 p.m. on the date of the workshop. To register or download a complete fall class schedule, log on to www. tcc.fl.edu/tech@night. For more information on Tech@Night, contact TCCs Center for Workforce Development at (850) 201-8760. CHA RLI E 2012Contact Charlie at (850) 926-4712 charlieforsheriff@gmail.com www.charliecreel.com Charlie Creel for Sheriff Elect CharlieCREELFor Full-Time Sheriff in 2012Saturday, September 24 2 pm to 4 pmCoast Guard Auxiliary Station 1557 Shell Point Road, Crawfordville (in Shell Point, at the southern end of Shell Point Road) Light refreshments will be served. Political advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Affiliation, for SheriffWhats on your mind? Tell Charlie!Stop by and lets talk about local law enforcement issues that matter to you. Florida Certied ContractorSoutheastern Home Building Services, Inc.Residential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN construction 850509-3632www.tuscanytrace.net www.buildinghomes.comREMODELING ADDITIONS KITCHENS BATHS WORK REPLACEMENT FLOORS PROJECT Happy 70th Birthday Dora Lee Greene RosierMother Dora was born in Sopchoppy, Florida on September 13, 1941 to Tom Greene and Carrie Plummer. Dora grew up in a humble home with her parents; after the death of her mother she moved in with her aunt and uncle. Dora grew up and married the late Ossie B. Rosier. Dora and Ossie are the proud parents of four wonderful children; Alan, Greg, Shelia, and Dexter. Brianna Rosier, granddaughter, wrote the following to describe a woman that we have the honor to celebrate today: ..Her name probably wont go down in history, but she was de nitely one to make a difference. She has affected the lives of her children, which began a chain of effect to all their children. Through this, her one soul has affected the lives of hundreds of people. Dora Lee Rosier is a woman with a strong sense of self, unconditional love, unbreakable faith, and the one we all go to when we are lacking faith. We are going to celebrate her birthday by trying to live our lives the way she does. In her own words Dora says,I want people to remember that I stand on the truth. The truth is what I stand on. Lets all come together and celebrate Mother Dora Lee Rosiers birthday by having the strength to stand for the truth.

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Well the Labor Day Weekend was a complete wash. You didnt have to worry about other boats on the water though there were plenty of wind surfers enjoying the 25-plus mile per hour winds over on the beach at Shell Point. I tried to sh last Wednesday but the wind kept me from going where I wanted to and then the threat of some torrential downpours and lightning made me come in and call it a wash. I had two guys that had just gotten back from tours in Iraq and Afghanistan and I really wanted to have a good day. We caught some sh but not what I had hoped for. Capt. David Fife said quite a few reds are starting to be caught in the Spring Creek and Oyster Bay area. Live minnows, cut bait and live shrimp are all producing. Mark and Louie Prance had their other son down from Gainesville, Ga., and they were able to sh Thursday and Friday although Mark said it was tough anchoring. Both days they caught some real big silver trout and they hooked one red which got off at the boat. Its getting to be that time of the year when the white trout, silver trout, or gray trout, whatever you want to call them, start schooling up in big numbers. Cut bait on the bottom can ll a cooler in a short while when they are really biting. Along with them you are sure to catch some whiting which also pull very hard for their size. The deep hole out from the old Tradewinds Dock, which is at the mouth of the Ochlockonee River, is a good place to sh. You will also catch some big reds and speckled trout at times. Another good spot is the white trout hole at the Panacea Channel. This is to the west of the next to the last green markers going out of the Panacea channel. The water is about 15-feet deep and there is some stuff on the bottom that will show up on your bottom machine. Another spot where I have caught them is south of where the St. Marks and Wakulla Rivers meet. Fish the east bank about 100 yards down from the Wakulla. It seems like the best tides on any of these places is the beginning or end of either the high or low tide. I was at Shell Island Fish Camp on Wednesday and Ken Hobbs was telling me he and Alan went out week before last and shed. They went to about 9 feet of water out from the Aucilla and caught their limit of trout using Gulps shed on the bottom. He said they were back at the dock before eleven. Kenny was telling me some nice reds were being caught at the mouth of Big Pass and Little Pass on the incoming tides. Reds are starting to show up in good numbers around the Aucilla and the docks off 98 around Lanark are producing lots of reds. The Lanark Reef is also producing quite a few sh. The weather looks like its gonna start cooling down some and maybe the water temperature will drop and put the trout back on the ats and out of that deep water. The cooler it gets the better. Dont forget that the Kevins H20 Trout Tournament date was changed until Oct. 1 due to small craft advisories. I nally talked with the folks at the Lanark Market and they said business was good. Their hours are Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 6 a.m. until 7 p.m. They are going to carry live bait and frozen baits, they have a deli with hamburgers and sandwiches, an outdoor shower and they carry non-ethanol gas. Fran, who worked there when Mike Hopkins had the store, will be working there again and she was always a pleasure to work with. Remember to know those limits and leave that oat plan with someone. Good luck and good shing. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 Page 7Aoutdoor sports and shing reports Outdoors TIME T O DO SOMET HING FOR YOURSELF!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926 or 510 KIDS BAC KINSCHOOL?850.224.4960www.fsucu.org GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 850925-5685Your Boats One Stop Paint & Body Shop 56 Industrial Court St. Marks Industrial Park,St. Marks 32355Fiberglass Supplies and Repair Marine Battery Dealer Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) Labor Day weekend was a washWakulla Springs News and Notes...By JEFF HUGOof Wakulla Springs It is not a figment of imagination that the summer of 2011 has been unusually hot. Many temperature records dating into the earlier years of the last century have fallen. But the cool and refreshing waters of the Wakulla River still bathe its guests in comfort and relief. Of course, many who have prospered from the rejuvenating waters of Wakulla Spring have now returned to the cold realities of school, work and family responsibilities. The weekends, however, still hold out hope of freedom from the mundane cares of the well-worn schedule. Three upcoming events at Wakulla Springs State Park hold out the hope and encouragement of escape from the early routines of fall. All three occur during the second weekend of September. The fun begins on the afternoon of Friday, Sept. 9. In cooperation with the Wakulla County Public Library, there will be a Book Giveaway in the lobby of the Wakulla Springs Lodge. There will be free, used library books available until Sunday evening, Sept. 11. It will be a great opportunity for visitors to larder there lairs with literature at an unbeatable price (Theyre free!). On the evening of Saturday, Sept. 10, from 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., park rangers will host A Swift Night Out at Wakulla Springs. This unusual and interactive ranger-led program will offer guests an opportunity to witness one of the great natural phenomena that occurs in the park the roosting of the chimney swifts. The small twittering birds assemble in great numbers in both the spring and the fall of the year. At dusk, they begin their dizzying dance circling the Wakulla Springs Lodge. As darkness begins to descend upon the lodge, the chimney swifts begin their descent into one of its unused chimneys. Not only are participants of A Swift Night Out awed by the sight of these small insect-eating birds retreating to the safety of their roost, they are challenged to count the small black specters as they dive into the chimney. Amidst laughter, oohs and aahs, they collect their data. The information is sent to www.concentric. net/~dwa/page56.html, where it is amassed with counts held on the same night all across the country. There is no charge to participate in a Swift Night Out and entrance fees to the park will not be collected after 7 p.m. Please call 850561-7286 to let park staff know youre coming. If youre interested in rounding out your evening with dinner in the lodge (they have new expanded hours from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.) please call 421-2000 for reservations. Sunday, Sept. 11 is the day that the Florida Park Service celebrates September as Literacy Month. Park guests to all 160 state parks can have their entrance fees waived on Sunday if they present a library card or book, or donate a new or gently used family friendly book. Embrace the opportunities to break free from the routine.Several events are scheduled Chimney Swifts roost in the Wakulla Springs Lodge chimney on the right. A Swift Night Out will be held on Sept. 10.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Free hunter safety course is o eredThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is offering a free hunter safety course in Leon County. The course is in the Farris Bryant Building, Tallahassee. Instruction is from 6 to 9 p.m. on Sept. 13, 15, 20 and 22. The range portion of the class is Sept. 24. An adult must accompany children under the age of 16 at all times. The course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license People interested in attending this course can register online at MyFWC. com/HunterSafety or by calling (850) 265-3676. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 BE SUREYOUSTOCKUPON HUNTINGEQUIPMENT BEFORETHE SEASON STARTS o ata iha M at (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 HUNT ING SEA SON!! Get Ready for Grouper Tues. Thurs. 9am 5:30pm Friday Sunday See Us at the Gun Shows LOWER PRICED AMMO IN STOCKMany accessoriesLargest Selection of Guns in the Tallahassee Wakulla Area GunSmithing Fast Turn Around! OFFICIALPRODUCTLICENSED www.ronsgun.comLocated Main Street St. Marks483 Port Leon Dr., St. Marks Gun Show Pricing Everyday! WE BUY GUNS$ Highest Dollar Paid $ for your gun! Selling GunsSince 1999AK 47s in stock! M a n a te e Ti m e s Statewide advertisingone low priceReach a wide audience (850) 926-7102 TheWakullanews

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team viewsSports At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink) TuAmigoYourFriendWillHelpYou Accident? Injured?Call Someone You Can Trust!Hablamos Espaol1-855-55AMIGOA er 911 & Before 411 blocking,cleaning, restoration Bandannas 2.00 incl. taxofHATS PANACEA HATSAFACT VOLLEYBALL Special to The News After nishing 1-1 at the Canopy Roads Pre-Season Classic, the Lady War Eagles traveled to Lawton Chiles High School to play the Lady Timberwolves on Tuesday Aug. 30. Having such a young team the Lady War Eagles struggled against the Lady Timberwolves. In the first match, the Lady War Eagles did not play very strong and lost 1225. After regrouping, the Lady War Eagles played a little better their second match, but still lost 16-25. The Lady War Eagles lost the third match as well, 14-25. Some of the key players for this game were Chelsea Carroll with 16 assists and 8 digs, Albrey Sorrell with 7 digs, Ashley Roberts with 4 kills and Haley Brown with 5 kills and 4 digs. On Sept. 1, the Lady War Eagles traveled to Orlando to play in the KSA tournament hosted by the ESPN Wide World of Sports. This year the tournament hosted 28 teams from all over the United States. The Lady War Eagles played on Sept. 2, against Claremont High School from Oklahoma. The Lady War Eagles prevailed over this team 25-22 and 25-22. The key players for this game were Ashley Roberts with 5 kills, Breighly Bolton with 5 kills, Chlesea Carroll with 13 assists and 5 digs and Shannan Wood with 4 kills. The next game was against Cobleskill High School from New York. The Lady War Eagles prevailed against this team as well, 25-12 and 25-11. The key players for this game were Shannan Wood with 6 kills, Chelsea Carroll with 19 assists and 2 kills and Jordan Pryor, Breighly Bolton, and Ashley Roberts all with 4 kills. The third game was against Tarkington High School from Texas. This team posed to be a bit better than the two prior teams and the Lady War Eagles lost 15-25 and 17-25. The key players for this game were Emily Haley with 6 kills, Albrey Sorrell with 1 kill and 9 digs and Chelsea Carroll with 10 assists and 3 digs. The nal game was against Rondout High School from New York. The Lady War eagles won 25-11 and 25-4. The key players for this game were Ashley Roberts with 8 kills and 2 digs, Emily Haley with 6 kills and Chelsea Carroll with 16 assists and 2 digs. The next day, the team played against Hernando High School from Mississippi. The Lady War Eagles began the day strong and won this game 25-14 and 25-13. The key players for this game were Emily Haley with 4 kills, Albrey Sorrell with 6 digs and Chelsea Carroll with 14 assists. The last and nal game of the tournament was against Saddle Brook High School from New Jersey. The Lady War Eagles would nish the tournament strong taking the win 25-16 and 27-25. The key players for this game were Emily Haley with 6 kills, Shannan Wood with 5 kills, Ashley Roberts with 5 kills, Breighly Bolton with 7 digs and Chelsea Carroll with 16 assis ts. Overall the Lady War Eagles had a great weekend nishing as the runner up in their bracket, with only one loss.Lady War Eagles nish as the runner up in KSA tournament in OrlandoMIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALL Special to The News The RMS Bears overcame four rst quarter fumbles and a 16-0 de cit, to defeat the visiting Suwannee Bulldogs, 34-16. Once the Bears stopped putting the ball on the ground, the offense started clicking. The Bears defense played well all night, holding the line while the RMS offense got on track. Offensively, Riversprings was driven by their rushing attack. They were paced by running backs Monterious Loggins and Demarcus Lindsey. Loggins had 5 carries for 72 yards, including a 32-yard touchdown run. Loggins also powered in 2 extra point conversions for RMS. Lindsey had 5 carries for 128 yards including a 51-yard touchdown scamper. He also added 2 pass receptions for 70 yards and a 43-yard touchdown catch. Receiver Keith Gavin also had a 64-yard TD run. According to head coach Joey Jacobs, Our offense played OK. Our O-line at times played lights out. Isaiah Youmas dominated on the line, and at times so did Kyle Weaver. We just have to put together a complete game, which we have yet to do. We are getting better though, and thats what were looking for. On defense, the bears were paced by Monterious Loggins and Keith Gavin. Monterious had 4 tackles, 2 assists, and 1 pass defended. One factor that doesnt show up in the stat book is that Loggins tackled Suwannee Quarterback Stephen Alexander all night long, eventually wearing down the big bulldog playmaker. Gavin had 7 tackles, 3 assists, and 2 tackles for loss. Isaiah Youmas made his presence known by harassing the Suwannee back eld. Safety Feleip Franks had an interception and made a touchdown saving tackle. The Bears exed their collective muscle on two huge goal line stands. Our defense played well, but we didnt play perfectly. We just want to get better each game, thats our goal, Jacobs added. The Suwannee game was also the inaugural radio broadcast of RMS Bear football. Riversprings football can be heard live over 94.1 FM The Wave. Coach Jacobs wanted to encourage everyone to, Tell your grandmas, grandpas, aunts, uncles, and anybody else you can about the Bears playing on the radio. You can also get on the internet and listen live on WAVE 94s website. The Bears will be back in action on Thursday, Sept. 8, at 6 p.m. at JD Jones Stadium at Jerry Reynolds Field. Come out and support the Bears.RMS defeats Suwannee, 34-16WMS victorious over Taylor CountyBy BOBBY WELLSWMS Coach The Wakulla Middle School Wildcats won their opening game on Thursday night, Sept. 1, against the Bulldogs of Taylor County. Wakulla opened the game with a 78-yard drive in five plays to take the lead 6-0. The Bulldogs tried to answer, but constant pressure on Taylors double wing offense kept them in check all night. A defensive battled ensued with neither team able to push the ball into the end zone. Three times the Bulldogs were denied in the red zone as Wakullas defense stiffened. Jaylin Gilyard ended the night with 94 yards rushing followed by Cephus Greenes 27 yards. The offensive line featured Jake Bryan, Anthony Romanus, Jake Hutto, Tyler Teegan, George Gatlin and Austin Miller. They opened holes all night for the Wakulla offense. On the defensive side of the ball, Austin Johnson, Austin Beaulieu and Dakota Rhodes held the Bullldogs to under 100 yards of offense for the night. The Wildcats will be back in action again this week as they travel to Suwannee County. Kickoff will be at 4 p.m. at Suwannee High School in Live Oak, Fla. Wildcat fans, dont forget to purchase the WMS Wildcat Football Program at every home game for only $3. All money raised will support the WMS Wildcat football team. CROSS COUNTRYBy PAUL HOOVER Track Coach The WHS girls cross country team enters the upcoming season ranked 13th in the state among Class 2A schools. The ranking, by the Florida Athletics Coaches Association and flrunners.com, marks the rst time in the programs history that a team enters the season ranked in the top 15. The rankings are based on last years performance and who is expected to return. The top runners returning from last year include seniors Cora Atkinson, Norma Woodcock, Emily McCullers, Krisite Hodges, junior Raychel Gray and the top runner, sophomore Marty Wiedeman. Others to watch from last years squad include sophomore Rachel Woofter and junior Wyomi Creel. The team also has a group of promising rst-year runners that include Kasey James, Lydia Wiedeman, Lilli Broadway, Savanna Strickland and Tyler Kinard. The WHS boys team also features a strong group of veteran runners that should challenge Marianna for the District title. The team is led by returning seniors Stanley Linton, D.J Victor, Cody James, Zach Broadway, Will Bartnick and Kendall Barron. Others to watch include returning runners Hunter Phillips, Brandon Trussell, Tyler Bennett, Micah Grey, Travis Hinsey and Gabe Hutchins. The boys team also includes of new runners J.P. Piotrowski, Jacob Martinez, Reid Tillery and Mitchell Atkinson. The pre-season ranking is nice and a compliment to the work the girls have put in the last 3-4 years, but our goal is to be there or higher at the end of the season, so we have a lot of work ahead of us, noted Coach Paul Hoover. Our boys squad should also be pretty strong. We have a good mix on that team and I think they will surprise some people. The first meet is Saturday, Sept. 10 at 8 a.m. at the Panhandle Jamboree in Marianna.WHS girls team ranked 13th in pre-seasonPHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla High School Lady War Eagles volleyball team placed second in the KSA tournament held in Orlando. For more information NAMI Wakulla, call 850-926-1033Put on your walking shoes for National Mental Health Awareness Week and join your friends and neighbors for a light breakfast! SAVE THE DATESaturday, Oct. 8 8 a.m. 1 p.m. Azalea Park JOIN NAMI WAKULLAS WALK FOR HEROESIn the battle against mental illness! Ente rta inme nt Guest speaker s Rec ognitio n of He roe s Hot dogs for Lunc h

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 Page 9ABy TIM LINAFELT Osceola.com Staff WriterWith his leaping, acrobatic, mid-air adjusting 25-yard catch in the second quarter of Florida States 34-0 win over ULM, Bert Reed brie y showed a ash what head coach Jimbo Fisher had told everyone during preseason camp that Reed, a fth-year receiver from Panama City, was ready to take his game up a notch for his nal season. Reed, FSUs only senior receiver, got off to a fast start Saturday, nabbing three of his four catches in the rst half, including a 9-yard touchdown strike from quarterback EJ Manuel that put the Seminoles on the board for the rst time in 2011. Bert is one of those guys, you always want to get him the ball because hes going to make plays for you, Manuel said. He was my rst and then became my fourth read on that touchdown pass. I came back to him, he was wide open and just ran on in. Reed and Manuel nearly linked up for another score later in the second quarter, but Reeds toe-dragging reception just inside the goal line was ruled out of bounds and the Seminoles settled for a eld goal. Fisher said that the throw itself might have been Manuels best of the day. Ah, I know, I know, the charismatic Reed smiled after Saturdays game. I couldve run a better route. I put it in the referees hands, you know what I mean? I could have done a better job of releasing and squeezing back on the defender and giving myself more room for the sideline, but I can work on that and get better. Reeds game wasnt perfect Fisher mentioned that Reed shortened a route in the ULM end zone that led to Manuels lone interception but like most of those wearing garnet and gold Saturday, the good far outweighed the few early-season missteps. I was in the zone. Reed said. And once you go in the zone its like every ball is yours, and thats the attitude youve got have as a receiver. Reed takes things up it a notch Reed takes things up it a notchBy MARTY COHEN GatorBait.net EditorWe were treated to lots of orange, a healthy helping of Chris Rainey and Jeff Demps and no sign of Sharrif Floyd as Florida began the Will Muschamp Era by dusting off Florida Atlantic 41-3 Saturday night. It was a solid all-around display, with enough fireworks to leave folks smiling about the 2011 debut, but also enough miscues to provide the coaches plenty of ammunition for the desired improvement by week two. Perhaps it was a nod to Muschamps Gator upbringing in the 1980s that the Gators resurrected the orange tops (he said they will return to blue as their standard jersey), but it was also a return to a more traditional-looking offense under the direction of offensive coordinator Charlie Weis that will surely hog the headlines. The Gators were quite ef cient until a strange decision to insert freshman QB Jeff Driskel midway through the second quarter defused the momentum a bit. All in all it was a satisfying opening night in The Swamp against a vastly over-matched opponent and as we usually do after the rst contest, lets trot out a few ideas of what we learned at the unveiling: For some reason it took four years, a different system and a new coordinator to put tailbacks Chris Rainey and Jeff Demps on the eld at the same time and simultaneously utilize their wondrous speed and athletic ability. Although we barely got past the rst chapter of Charlie Weis playbook Saturday night, its clearly evident that Rainey and Demps (a combined 32 touches, not to mention special teams action) are going to be at the forefront of the 2011 Gator offense. They are special with the ball in their hands, Muschamp said of his dynamic tailback duo. Rainey got to let it all hang out for possibly the rst time in his Gator career. You wonder if he wants to petition the NCAA to get some of the years back that he toiled in the spread, where he was ef cient, but not the big-playwaiting-to-happen like he displayed Saturday in his rst game under Weis. It seemed so elementary, but the Gators actually threw the ball to the running backs, an element absent in the spread offense. Very few college defenses can handle a steady diet of covering the running backs in space and to boot, these are safe throws. People forget that a huge factor in Steve Spurriers UF aerial show was numerous throws to backs like Errict Rhett, Eli Williams, etc. The versatility of Rainey (six catches for 67 yards to go along with his 79 yards rushing on 11 carries) and Demps (three catches for 21 yards on top of his game-high 105 yards rushing on 12 attempts) will present sleepless nights for defensive coordinators. Certainly its premature to gush too much because Florida Atlantic is not going to win many games this season, but theres little doubt that Weis is digging the opportunity to work with worldclass speedsters like Demps and Rainey. *Certainly this is more like what we expected to see from quarterback John Brantley, who appeared decisive and confident in his decisionmaking (again, lets keep in mind the opposition). Florida didnt go down the eld all that much, but didnt need to display a huge vertical passing attack (Brantleys longest completion was just 19 yards) against a soft FAU defense. Brantley delivered a number of nicely-thrown out patterns and certainly looked calm on a night that didnt produce much stress. Although the irony of the opening drive, that resulted in a 51-yard Caleb Sturgis eld goal, being derailed by an errant snap from center Jon Harrison wasnt lost on Muschamp. Yall rolled your eyes when you saw that, didnt you? Muschamp said in his droll style. FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Ball State at #22 South FloridaSaturday, 7 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN3.com. UAB at #18 FloridaSaturday, 7 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN3.com. Charrleston So. at #5 Florida StateSaturday, 6 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN3.com. Senior receiver Bert Reed hauled in FSUs rst touchdown of the season. Solid display by Solid display by Gators in opener Gators in openerBy TIM LINAFELT Osceola.com Staff WriterAll the no-huddle, hurryup and misdirection offensive ingenuity LouisianaMonroe could muster didnt amount to much Saturday in Tallahassee. It was FSUs rst shutout since it blanked Wake Forest, 31-0, in week four of last season, and just its third since 2008.Florida States defense, which spent much of the week focusing on the Warhawks unconventional offense, overpowered and overmatched ULM on the way to a 34-0 shutout here at Doak Campbell Stadium. Im extremely happy, Seminoles coach Jimbo Fisher said. [The defense] played well. What I was happy about was that ULM ran a no-huddle, we were making adjustments, we were getting our blitzes, we were getting our checks in, were used to doing what were doing. Fisher said earlier this week that he expected ULM (0-1) to come out with guns blazing, but from their rst offensive possession, it was clear that the Warhawks were ring only blanks. ULM crossed into FSU territory just twice, both times in the second half, and was held to double-digits in both rushing yards (99) and passing yards (92). Mark Stoops unit finished the game having allowed a meager 3.1 yards per play. And the Warhawks top receiver, speedy senior Luther Ambrose, the Sun Belts fth-leading receiver from 2010, failed to record a catch and registered just one rush attempt for ve yards. It felt great, said FSU middle linebacker Vince Williams, who made his rst career start Saturday and led the Seminoles with seven tackles. We were prepared. Coach [Mark] Stoops did a good job with the game plan and kind of simpli ed the playbook and things like that. I think we did fantastic. If Stoops indeed kept it simple, there was hardly any reason for him to complicate things, as FSUs renovated defensive line disrupted ULM all afternoon. All-America candidate Brandon Jenkins showed no signs of slowing down from his stellar sophomore season, racking up ve tackles (three solo), two tackles for loss one of which could have been ruled a sack and a pass break-up. And Jenkins counterpart, sophomore defensive end Bjoern Werner, proved equally antagonizing in his rst career start, with a sack, a forced fumble and 1.5 tackles for loss. By the nal whistle, FSUs defensive line had totaled 21 of the teams 68 total tackles (30.8 percent) and registered two of four sacks (one was a team sack), facts not lost on Fisher. Those two (Jenkins and Werner) can play, Fisher said with a smile. Ive seen it all spring and fall. Ive been telling yall. And Im gonna tell you Dan Hicks, when he comes in there, and Tank Carradine, those guys, Im telling you now, theyre good football players. Theyre really good football players. And when the Warhawks did attempt a pass which only happened 22 times the Seminoles secondary more often than not was ready for it. Browning, who finished just 11-of-19 for 85 yards, attempted only one deep ball, which was promptly picked off by safety Lamarcus Joyner. ULM tried to dink and dunk it in there, and we had some pressure, Fisher said. They did an outstanding job on defense. We were physical. ULM couldnt get any runs in and I thought, up front, we did a really nice job.FSU D answers the challenge Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSAFFORDABLE COVERAGE TO SAVE YOU MONEY Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850-570-9734 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com Appointments & Walk-Ins Welcome()Full Service Family Hair Care Salon! www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service THE CABINET SHOPTHECABINET SHOP Custom Kitchens&Counter Tops pest controlan d, inc.tillmans termiteTillman Owens850-322-1775 Creeping, Crawling or Flying...TillmansPestControl@hotmail.comSafe for people and pets!RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIALWe get them before they get you!FSUs Lamarcus Joyner and Christian Jones bring down a ULM receiver. FLRECQ1035357;AUAB110 FLRECQ1035357;AUAB110 AuctionMobileHome ParkCommercialAssetsSingleFamilyHomesLandCommercial &Residential SATSEPT2411:00AMattheTallahasseeCivicCenter ManySellingABSOLUTE! GolfCourseNoBuyers Premium!BrokersProtected OWNED PROPERTIESCallForFREEBrochure866.518.906450Commercial&Residential NORTHFLORIDAProperties OCWENwww.AuctionFDIC.com PHOTOS BY Colin Hackley Osceola Chris Rainey points to the crowd after scoring a touchdown in the season opener. PHOTO COURTESY OF GatorBait.net

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton TheWorks coffeeespressolatts cappuccinofrapps andnowBAGELS! Monday-Friday630am-900pm Saturday8am-9pm Sunday12-5pm 27FAzaleaDrBehindBealls850.253.7253www.theworkscafe.com 2 0 1 1 S t a rt u p B u s i n e s s o f t h eY e a r Well, it seems we have dodged yet another bullet with Lee and Katia. I hope everyone was able to enjoy the Labor Day weekend despite all the rain and wind. While plans for an outdoor gathering were thwarted, we enjoyed an indoor day of games with family and friends. Needless to say, the weather kept us all on land, and scheduled patrols for the weekend were scrubbed. As we watched the weather moving across the gulf coast, I sent out an e-mail to see how our western Flotillas were managing as they were getting more of an impact than us. Anne DelBello from Flotilla 14 in Panama City sent in a report of more than 9 inches of rain and a tornado warning following a water spout that began over Destin and Choctawhatchee Bay moving towards Niceville and Bluewater Bay area before veering off to Walton County and Choctaw Beach. After 30 minutes, the weather dissipated and all was clear. Patti Fritchie, from Flotilla 19 in Panama City Beach reported that they were also having a lot of rain and wind, but thankfully the biggest problem they were facing was overflowing pools and some minor other water related issues. She was planning to stay in, watch the weather and get caught up on reading. In honor of the Labor Day, I thought I would offer a few tidbits about the history of the holiday and why we celebrate it on the rst Monday of September. The Department of Labor website has lots of interesting facts about Labor Day. The rst Labor Day was celebrated on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 1882, in New York City and was organized by the Central Labor Union. It was born out of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. A year later it was again celebrated on Sept. 5. In 1884, the rst Monday in September was selected as the of cial holiday and the Central Labor Union urged similar organizations in the Nation to join in the celebration. In 1885 Labor Day was celebrated in many industrial centers of the country. As the holiday became more supported and unions lobbied for support, stated began passing legislation to make the rst Monday a holiday. By 1894, Federal legislation was passed and on June 28 of that year, Congress passed an act making the rst Monday in September of each year a legal holiday. I sincerely hope that everyone was able to take advantage of the holiday and get some rest and relaxation. While it may not have been ideal weather, it was still an opportunity to take a break from the normal hustle and bustle of the everyday grind. In that spirit, Flotilla 12 took a break from our normal scheduled meeting and will be having our September meeting on Sept. 10. We will be meeting at the Crawfordville Fire Station beginning at our normal time of 10 a.m. As Sherrie reminds us, safe boating is no accident! In light of the recent storms, fair winds and following seas to all. My current rebreather student is a direct product of seeds I planted 25 years ago. While a graduate student at Florida State University (FSU), I collaborated with fellow students to create a service program to assist us in our underwater research activities. Since we had no money but plenty of ideas, little of cial status but plenty of time, we decided that working together for a common good just might get us what we wanted. Back then we were young and naive. But the program was born of countless contribution at all levels. At rst, we collected diving equipment, then took it to the facility to store and disperse it. We informally taught basic diving as a reward for service. Those who wanted access must also participate in acquisition and maintenance. Before long, we were training our own interns, so called wannabes. And nally we were asked for an identity. I rushed out and had a printer make me and the others in the group a business card that said Academic Diving Program (ADP). By the time I completed my graduate training, I was offered a faculty position to continue expanding this unique and popular program. Across the next decade, we grew into better facilities on campus, expanded opportunities and supported more research. We joined national organizations of like mind and hosted their conventions at FSU. The provost noticed and offered to unify all campus diving under our ADP. By the second decade our program had four staff members, annually taught 12 credits worth of classes in three departments, assisted a large diving club and supported millions of dollars of aquatic research conducted by faculty in seven departments. Our shared locker was valued at more than a million dollars. We saw the creation of an Underwater Archaeology specialization in the Anthropology Department and continued growth in underwater scientists on the faculty. When I moved my faculty position to Panama City to teach the Scientist In the Sea Program in 2000, our ADP was supporting 500 people a year for a total of $200,000 price tag (and that included my salary as well). Was it worth the investment? I found my answer today when my Rebreather student revealed why he is who he is today. Mark graduated from the University of Florida (UF). Early in his studies he worked as an intern for the Academic Diving Program at UF, a sister program that took on our name and model during our earlier years. There he learned valuable skills and experiences that convinced him to seek a degree in marine science. He later worked for Dr. Bill Lindberg at UF. Bill was one of our early ADP graduate collaborators that participated in our formative years. Mark went on into sheries science and is today returning for a continuation of his technical training at the next level, that of rebreather diving. He said that he would never have achieved his success had the UF-ADP not been there for him a decade ago, and the UF-ADP would not have been there had a few poverty stricken graduate students not decided to run on a dream that if we all pitched in, synergism would help us all. Sadly, today both ADP programs are nearly gone, remnants of their former glory and in uence on the emerging student populations on both campuses. What will it take to spark that enthusiasm again? Over my graduate desk in 1975 I had a sentence posted that read: CAUTION, ENTHUSIASM is EPIDEMIC.Adventurous women sought for outdoor workshop Womens outdoor workshop is coming to Panama City. The single-day workshop takes place Saturday, Oct. 15 at Gulf Coast State College along the beautiful shores of St. Andrews Bay. The workshop runs 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The workshop is open to anyone 18 years or older who wants to improve their outdoor skills and enjoy several recreational activities. In two, three-and-one-half-hour sessions, the BOW mini-workshop teaches skills associated with shing, hunting and other forms of outdoor recreation, at all levels of physical activity. The cost for the one-day workshop is $50, and there are discounted slots available. For more information, visit MyFWC.com/BOW or contact Susan Harrass at 561-625-5122 or Susan.Harrass@MyFWC.com. Great Value, Great Results.Go painlessly with Thera-GesicTHG-11903 Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224www.fsucu.org Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday p Thu Sep 8, 11 Fri Sep 9, 11 Sat Sep 10, 11 Sun Sep 11, 11 Mon Sep 12, 11 Tue Sep 13, 11 Wed Sep 14, 11 Date 2.9 ft. 12:43 AM 3.1 ft. 1:18 AM 3.3 ft. 1:48 AM 3.5 ft. 2:15 AM 3.7 ft. 2:41 AM 3.8 ft. 3:05 AM 3.8 ft. 3:28 AM High 1.9 ft. 5:48 AM 1.6 ft. 6:48 AM 1.2 ft. 7:33 AM 0.9 ft. 8:12 AM 0.7 ft. 8:47 AM 0.5 ft. 9:20 AM 0.4 ft. 9:52 AM Low 3.6 ft. 12:19 PM 3.8 ft. 1:10 PM 3.9 ft. 1:52 PM 3.9 ft. 2:29 PM 3.9 ft. 3:03 PM 3.9 ft. 3:36 PM 3.8 ft. 4:08 PM High 0.5 ft. 7:07 PM 0.5 ft. 7:45 PM 0.6 ft. 8:16 PM 0.7 ft. 8:43 PM 0.8 ft. 9:08 PM 0.9 ft. 9:32 PM 1.0 ft. 9:56 PM Low Thu Sep 8, 11 Fri Sep 9, 11 Sat Sep 10, 11 Sun Sep 11, 11 Mon Sep 12, 11 Tue Sep 13, 11 Wed Sep 14, 11 Date 3.0 ft. 12:40 AM 3.2 ft. 1:15 AM 3.4 ft. 1:45 AM 3.6 ft. 2:12 AM 3.7 ft. 2:38 AM 3.8 ft. 3:02 AM 3.9 ft. 3:25 AM High 2.1 ft. 5:45 AM 1.7 ft. 6:45 AM 1.3 ft. 7:30 AM 1.0 ft. 8:09 AM 0.7 ft. 8:44 AM 0.6 ft. 9:17 AM 0.5 ft. 9:49 AM Low 3.7 ft. 12:16 PM 3.8 ft. 1:07 PM 4.0 ft. 1:49 PM 4.0 ft. 2:26 PM 4.0 ft. 3:00 PM 4.0 ft. 3:33 PM 3.9 ft. 4:05 PM High 0.6 ft. 7:04 PM 0.6 ft. 7:42 PM 0.6 ft. 8:13 PM 0.7 ft. 8:40 PM 0.9 ft. 9:05 PM 1.0 ft. 9:29 PM 1.1 ft. 9:53 PM Low Thu Sep 8, 11 Fri Sep 9, 11 Sat Sep 10, 11 Sun Sep 11, 11 Mon Sep 12, 11 Tue Sep 13, 11 Wed Se p 14, 11 Date 2.7 ft. 1:19 AM 2.9 ft. 1:54 AM 3.1 ft. 2:24 AM 3.3 ft. 2:51 AM 3.4 ft. 3:17 AM 3.5 ft. 3:41 AM 3.6 ft. 4:04 AM High 1.8 ft. 6:52 AM 1.4 ft. 7:52 AM 1.1 ft. 8:37 AM 0.8 ft. 9:16 AM 0.6 ft. 9:51 AM 0.5 ft. 10:24 AM 0.4 ft. 10:56 AM Low 3.4 ft. 12:55 PM 3.5 ft. 1:46 PM 3.6 ft. 2:28 PM 3.6 ft. 3:05 PM 3.6 ft. 3:39 PM 3.6 ft. 4:12 PM 3.5 ft. 4:44 PM High 0.5 ft. 8:11 PM 0.5 ft. 8:49 PM 0.5 ft. 9:20 PM 0.6 ft. 9:47 PM 0.7 ft. 10:12 PM 0.8 ft. 10:36 PM 0.9 ft. 11:00 PM Low Thu Sep 8, 11 Fri Sep 9, 11 Sat Sep 10, 11 Sun Sep 11, 11 Mon Sep 12, 11 Tue Sep 13, 11 Wed Sep 14, 11 Date 2.2 ft. 12:35 AM 2.4 ft. 1:10 AM 2.5 ft. 1:40 AM 2.6 ft. 2:07 AM 2.8 ft. 2:33 AM 2.8 ft. 2:57 AM 2.9 ft. 3:20 AM High 1.4 ft. 5:59 AM 1.1 ft. 6:59 AM 0.9 ft. 7:44 AM 0.7 ft. 8:23 AM 0.5 ft. 8:58 AM 0.4 ft. 9:31 AM 0.3 ft. 10:03 AM Low 2.7 ft. 12:11 PM 2.8 ft. 1:02 PM 2.9 ft. 1:44 PM 2.9 ft. 2:21 PM 2.9 ft. 2:55 PM 2.9 ft. 3:28 PM 2.8 ft. 4:00 PM High 0.4 ft. 7:18 PM 0.4 ft. 7:56 PM 0.4 ft. 8:27 PM 0.5 ft. 8:54 PM 0.6 ft. 9:19 PM 0.7 ft. 9:43 PM 0.7 ft. 10:07 PM Low Thu Sep 8, 11 Fri Sep 9, 11 Sat Sep 10, 11 Sun Sep 11, 11 Mon Sep 12, 11 Tue Sep 13, 11 Wed Sep 14, 11 Date 2.3 ft. 12:27 AM 2.4 ft. 1:02 AM 2.6 ft. 1:32 AM 2.8 ft. 1:59 AM 2.9 ft. 2:25 AM 2.9 ft. 2:49 AM 3.0 ft. 3:12 AM High 1.9 ft. 5:27 AM 1.5 ft. 6:27 AM 1.2 ft. 7:12 AM 0.9 ft. 7:51 AM 0.7 ft. 8:26 AM 0.5 ft. 8:59 AM 0.4 ft. 9:31 AM Low 2.8 ft. 12:03 PM 2.9 ft. 12:54 PM 3.0 ft. 1:36 PM 3.1 ft. 2:13 PM 3.1 ft. 2:47 PM 3.0 ft. 3:20 PM 3.0 ft. 3:52 PM High 0.5 ft. 6:46 PM 0.5 ft. 7:24 PM 0.6 ft. 7:55 PM 0.7 ft. 8:22 PM 0.8 ft. 8:47 PM 0.9 ft. 9:11 PM 1.0 ft. 9:35 PM Low Thu Sep 8, 11 Fri Sep 9, 11 Sat Sep 10, 11 Sun Sep 11, 11 Mon Sep 12, 11 Tue Sep 13, 11 Wed Se p 14, 11 Date 2.7 ft. 1:44 AM 2.7 ft. 2:02 AM 2.7 ft. 2:18 AM 2.8 ft. 2:31 AM 2.9 ft. 2:41 AM 3.0 ft. 2:52 AM 3.1 ft. 3:05 AM High 1.9 ft. 5:11 AM 1.6 ft. 6:08 AM 1.4 ft. 6:55 AM 1.2 ft. 7:36 AM 1.0 ft. 8:13 AM 0.9 ft. 8:47 AM 0.7 ft. 9:19 AM Low 3.0 ft. 11:07 AM 3.1 ft. 12:24 PM 3.1 ft. 1:22 PM 3.0 ft. 2:12 PM 3.0 ft. 2:57 PM 2.9 ft. 3:41 PM 2.8 ft. 4:26 PM High 0.5 ft. 6:38 PM 0.6 ft. 7:16 PM 0.8 ft. 7:47 PM 1.0 ft. 8:13 PM 1.1 ft. 8:32 PM 1.3 ft. 8:48 PM 1.5 ft. 9:02 PM LowGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacSept. 8 Sept. 14First Oct. 3 Full Sept. 11 Last Sept. 20 New Sept. 27Major Times 10:45 AM 12:45 PM 11:08 PM 1:08 AM Minor Times 3:48 AM 4:48 AM 5:34 PM 6:34 PM Major Times --:---:-11:31 AM 1:31 PM Minor Times 4:45 AM 5:45 AM 6:09 PM 7:09 PM Major Times --:---:-12:16 PM 2:16 PM Minor Times 5:42 AM 6:42 AM 6:41 PM 7:41 PM Major Times 12:37 AM 2:37 AM 12:58 PM 2:58 PM Minor Times 6:36 AM 7:36 AM 7:12 PM 8:12 PM Major Times 1:19 AM 3:19 AM 1:40 PM 3:40 PM Minor Times 7:30 AM 8:30 AM 7:43 PM 8:43 PM Major Times 2:01 AM 4:01 AM 2:21 PM 4:21 PM Minor Times 8:22 AM 9:22 AM 8:13 PM 9:13 PM Major Times 2:42 AM 4:42 AM 3:04 PM 5:04 PM Minor Times 9:16 AM 10:16 AM 8:44 PM 9:44 PM Average Good Better Best Best Better Better7:17 am 7:51 pm 5:34 pm 3:49 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:18 am 7:50 pm 6:10 pm 4:47 am 7:18 am 7:49 pm 6:42 pm 5:43 am 7:19 am 7:47 pm 7:13 pm 6:37 am 7:19 am 7:46 pm 7:43 pm 7:31 am 7:20 am 7:45 pm 8:13 pm 8:24 am 7:21 am 7:44 pm 8:45 pm 9:17 am74% 81% 87% 93% 99% 95% 88% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 Page 11AOn Aug. 25, David Rosier of Sopchoppy reported the theft of a motor vehicle and wood splitter which were taken from his home. The vehicle is valued at $2,000 and the wood splitter is valued at $500. Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On Aug. 25, a 16-yearold Wakulla High School student reported the theft of her book bag which contained personal items and identification valued at $65. On Aug. 26, a retail theft was reported at WalMart when three men allegedly took beer from the store without paying for it. The beer was valued at $28 and a tag number of the vehicle transporting the suspects was obtained. On Aug. 25, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a two vehicle accident at Wal-Mart. Bea C. Bradford of Crawfordville backed into a vehicle driven by William Q. Skeens of Crawfordville. Bradfords vehicle suffered $500 worth of damage and the Skeens vehicle suffered $5,000 worth of damage. Bradford was found at fault. Skeens was cited for having an expired tag, more than four months. No injuries were reported. On Aug. 25, Ann L. Estes of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Two owering bushes were cut. The plants are valued at $80. On Aug. 25, a retail theft was reported at WalMart. Justin Leon Harvell, 21, of Crawfordville was allegedly observed attempting to conceal a wireless game controller in his clothing. Harvell was confronted by Wal-Mart employees outside the store and returned inside the store. He was charged with retail theft. The game controller was valued at $58. Deputy Mike Zimba and Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On Aug. 26, Karen Rogers of Crawfordville reported a fraud as she received internet correspondence sending her a check for $2,050 and asking her to send $1,700 to a person in California. The victim mailed the money and it was determined that the original check was from a non-existent bank account. On Aug. 26, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a traf c crash on Springhill Road north of Highway 267. He observed a Mercury Mountaineer overturned in the ditch. Leon County Communications informed WCSO that they were with a pedestrian who was walking on the road near the crash site. Marco A. Marines-Rangel, 28, of Crawfordville reported that he was not injured in the crash. However, he did not possess a valid driver license. It had been suspended in May for failure to pay a citation. He was charged with knowingly driving with a license that was suspended, cancelled or revoked and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. On Aug. 27, John Hall of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of farm equipment. A cultivator and plow, valued at $500, were reported missing from an individual who was renting it. On Aug. 27, Suesun Trice of Crawfordville reported two fraudulent transactions on her bank account. The two transactions were reported at Wal-Mart for $387. On Aug. 27, Jeanie Murkerson of Tallahassee reported a criminal mischief to an air conditioning unit at her home in Crawfordville. The air conditioning unit was demolished and a shed was broken into. A forced entry was observed at the shed. Damage to the air conditioning unit was estimated at $2,800. On Aug. 28, Rosa Burdette of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victims vehicle was damaged while it was parked overnight at a Crawfordville bar. Someone used a closed st to twice punch the rear panel of the truck. On Aug. 26, a Crawfordville man found a magazine with live rounds at Songbird Avenue and Wakulla Arran Road. The resident discovered the .40-caliber magazine as he was driving and turned it in to sheriffs of ce. There were 14 rounds in the magazine. PSO Mitchell Hampton investigated. On Aug. 29, Mary Scott Gilbert, 49, of Crawfordville was observed by Deputy Mike Zimba driving an estimated 45 to 50 miles per hour in the Medart Elementary School 20 mile per hour school zone. The deputy conducted a traf c stop and the driver did not possess a valid driver license. Gilbert also allegedly gave Deputy Zimba a false name. Gilbert was charged with knowingly driving while license is suspended or revoked and falsely identifying herself to a law enforcement of cer. There was also a state notice to seize her vehicle tag which Deputy Zimba completed. On Aug. 29, John Barthel of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim was at his home when he heard a noise coming from outside his kitchen. He investigated and determined that three individuals were attempting to get into the home and had damaged a window screen. Damage to the screen is estimated at $20. The suspects appeared to be juveniles. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On Aug. 30, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a vehicle accident involving Wakulla County EMS Rescue 01. Randy B. Williams was backing the ambulance into a parking space at Victors when he struck a utility pole. Damage to the vehicle is estimated at $500 and damage to the pole is also estimated at $500. Neither Williams nor passenger Michael E. Register were injured. On Aug. 29, Rajubhai Shah of Crawfordville reported a fraud at Triangle Petro as a woman cashed a $138 check at the store that was later determined to have been altered or ctitious. A Panacea victim was identi ed who had checks stolen in July. A suspect has also been identi ed in the case as two of the checks were cashed at a Crawfordville bank in July. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. On Aug. 29, Amanda Kelly of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a laptop computer, valued at $1,200. The victim identi ed a suspect who was at her home. The computer information was entered into the NCIC/FCIC computer. On Aug. 30, Joyce Gregory of Crawfordville reported a traf c accident where a motorist struck the rear of her vehicle and left the scene without stopping. The accident was reported at the 2400 block of Crawfordville Highway. The victim was southbound in her vehicle when she was struck from behind. The other driver pulled off the shoulder of the road, drove to her passenger window, shouted that there was no damage and left the scene. An inspection of the victims vehicle noted approximately $1,000 worth of damage. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On Aug. 31, Tracy Burkett of Sopchoppy reported a house fire on Mathis Road in Sopchoppy. Deputy Randy Phillips observed a doublewide mobile home fully engulfed in re. The victims, Burkett and Albert A. Grimes, were both safe and uninjured. The fire originated in the kitchen as a result of hot grease. Damage to the mobile home and contents was estimated at $50,000, a total loss. The re was ruled accidental. On Aug. 31, Jessica Welch of Crawfordville reported a burglary and theft of fuel from storage tanks at Welch Land Development. The gas is valued at $100. Evidence was collected at the scene. Captain Chris Savary investigated. On Aug. 31, Riley Miller of Crawfordville reported a vehicle re on Wakulla Springs Road. Miller subdued the re with a garden hose. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston observed a smoldering vehicle and a dashboard melted into the oorboard. The re appeared to have begun near the fuse area. The front windshield was broken and the interior was severely charred. The re was electrical in nature and was ruled an accident. The vehicle is owned by David Parker of Tallahassee. On Aug. 31, Paulette Anderson of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim was driving in the area of Glendas Store on Crawfordville Highway when a student in a school bus threw something out the window that broke her windshield. Deputy Lorne Whaley is reviewing bus security video with Wakulla County School District Transportation Director Pat Jones in an attempt to identify the student. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 772 calls for service during t he past week including: 22 business and residential alarms; 106 citizen contacts; 16 disturbances; 46 investigations; 41 medical emergencies; 56 security checks; 26 special details; 10 subpoena services; 13 suspicious vehicles; 14 traf c enforcements; 53 traf c stops; 15 disabled vehicles; 16 reckless vehicles; 25 wanted people; 12 warrant services; and 111 watch orders. reportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Business Planning and Incorporations Title Insurance Probate and Heir Land Resolution General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 AuctionOWNEDPROPERTIESMobileHome ParkCommercialAssetsSingleFamilyHomesLandCommercial &Residential SATSEPTEMBER2411:00AM www.AuctionFDIC.comCallForFREEBrochure866.518.9064FLRECQ1035357;AUAB110ManySellingABSOLUTE!TallahasseeCivicCenter FLRECQ1035357;AUAB110 GolfCourseNoBuyers Premium!BrokersProtectedIncluding LOCALPROPERTIES inFlorida&GeorgiaCounties:DIXIEFRANKLINGADSDENLEON WAKULLACOUNTIES,FL& THOMASCOUNTY,GA50Commercial&Residential NORTHFLORIDAProperties OCWEN HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAATallahassee man arrested for burglary in WakullaSpecial to The News The U.S. Marshals North Florida Regional Fugitive Task Force arrested a 32year-old Tallahassee man in Leon County Thursday, Sept. 1 in connection with an April 18 burglary in Crawfordville, according to Sheriff David Harvey. The Task Force apprehended Christopher Kanta Bradham at a home at 293 Bermuda Street at 1:15 p.m. Bradham was arrested without incident and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Bradham was wanted for the April 18 residential burglary of a home owned by Clinton Shettlesworth on McMyers Road in Crawfordville where $5,725 worth of property was stolen including a rearm, jewelry, electronic games and a large television. During the April burglary investigation, a DNA sample was taken from the victims home which was sent to the Florida Department of Law Enforcements Crime Lab. A match was discovered Aug. 19. After matching the DNA profile with Bradham, a photographic search was conducted and reviewed for similarities in photos provided by the victims security system. Bradham was charged with burglary of a structure, grand theft and grand theft of a rearm. He is being held in the Wakulla County Jail under a $45,000 bond. Bradham is also a registered sexual offender, according to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, as a result of lewd and lascivious battery and assault charges from 1999 and 2001. The stolen property has not been recovered, however the investigation is continuing. The Task Force includes law enforcement of cers from agencies throughout the region including Wakulla and Leon County and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. Additional charges are pending. Christopher K. BradhamSheri s o ce will hold 9-11 memorial serviceSpecial to The News The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce will host the 10th Annual 9-11 Memorial Service on Sunday, Sept. 11 in the parking lot of the sheriffs of ce. Sheriff David Harvey and the staff will remember the victims of the 911 terrorist attack with a ceremony that will begin at 8:45 a.m., the same time the rst airplane crashed into the World Trade Center in New York City. The memorial service is open to the public. San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Huttons Seafood & More 570-1004

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Centennial Bank believes in the importance of getting out in the community. Where our customers are. More than just nancially strong, if you need us, well be there for you. Even after hours. Thats why you can nd us while playing in your front yard. Or wherever you happen to be. MY100BANK.COM | A Home BancShares Company (Nasdaq: HOMB) Da Caju n Wagon Serving Fresh Sea food & mor e wit h da Caju n Ki ck! Welcome 850570-1625 War Eagles defeat Mosley in season opener, 31-14Continued from page 1A At the start of the fourth quarter, Mosley scored on a quarterback keeper at the goal line and got the extra point to make the score 22-14. But Godbolt broke through the defense with his deceptive speed and ran for a touchdown with 5:51 left in the fourth quarter. The extra point was missed and the War Eagles were up 28-14. With less than two minutes left, kicker Conner Smith nailed a 30-yard eld goal to put the War Eagles up 31-14. Mosley threatened at the end of the game, driving the ball down the eld but was unable to punch the ball in before time expired. The defense played extremely well, Klees said. They only allowed one touchdown in the rst half that was set up by the fumbled punt. And one in the fourth quarter -which was helped by a penalty. Ryan Henderson had 11 tackles and recovered a fumble. Klees praised Hendersons play and said he was extremely proud of him. Luke Taylor had seven tackles. Mikal Cromartie had seven tackles and two pass de ections. Klees also praised kicker Conner Smith for his two eld goals. The next game is at home against Taylor County on Friday, Sept. 9. They beat us last year and beat us pretty good, Klees said. It should be a war here Friday night. It should be a great game. PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/Special to The NewsQuarterback Dalton Norman hands off the ball to No. 10 Evan Mccoy. Players of the Week Rhonda A. Carroll, MAIState Certied General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459575-1999 926-6111Fax 575-1911Competitive Rates County Resident Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) Leon/Wakulla Native 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com rr sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property MaintenanceGeneral Landscaping Hauling Recycling 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com Please RecycleLicensed-InsuredMember-Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Rodney True OwnerMember-Keep Wakulla County Beautiful 4330 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida To make a donation to the auction or for more information about the event, please contact: Sue Belford at 850-926-4244 or e-mail FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail.com Friends of Wakulla County Public Library Bring your family & friends Bid on great items Support your Library Programs The Silent Auction includes Gift Certi cates, Vacations, Marine Supplies, Gifts, Artwork, Dinners, School Supplies & Much More!Food & Drinks will be provided. #21 Marshane Godbolt #22 Ryan Henderson #13 Conner Smith Left: Willie Thomas stiff arms a rival player for a gain. Below Left: Tyson Stephens, 14 months old, in the arms of his grandmother, Pam Parker. Tyson, who is a cousin of War Eagle quarterback Caleb Stephens, was cheering for his cousin Go, Caleb! he called out.Saturday, Sept. 10 at 8pm$12 SeatFor Reserva ons(850) 962-1010poshjava@gmail.comlocated on the corner of Rose St. &Winthrop Ave., Sopchoppy. FREE HUGSMickey Abraham, Aaron ORourke, Erik Alvar & Mark Russell Organics & Gifts

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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 Section B Green Scene Rules and Entry Form available at ofce location3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Floridaor online at www.thewakullanews.comEntry Forms due by September 16, 2011 (Digital photos only)850-926-71022011 Pet Photo Contest What is nonpoint source pollution?EarthTalk, Page 3BAll-natural local bodybuildersGet Fit, Page 6BBreath, blood and the emotionsYoga for Life, Page 4B Coastal Cleanup is Sept. 17By JOANN PALMERKWCB DirectorLast year during Coastal Cleanup, hosted locally by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, volunteers removed 13,524 pounds of trash and debris from our area. At 8 a.m. on Sept. 17, hundreds of volunteers from Wakulla, Leon, Jefferson and Franklin counties will once again converge on the shores, marshes, roads and rivers of Wakulla County to remove trash and debris. This year marks the 26th International Coastal Cleanup. Volunteers participate in this annual event because of their commitment to the environment. Keep Wakulla County Beautiful works all year long to remove trash and debris from our roadways and waterways, identify the sources of that debris, and educate our citizens to change the behaviors that allow it to end up on our roadways and reach the ocean in the rst place. Wakulla County is a beautiful place to live and visit. Unfortunately, when people do not respect their environment, they become complacent and litter accumulates. Not only does it have a negative impact visually, it impacts our local economy. Visitors want to see clean shores, litter free marshes and beautiful rivers. These areas are only sustainable if everyone pitches in everyday and works to maintain a clean environment. Volunteers spend the morning picking up everything from cigarette butts and food wrappers to lost shing nets and major appliances. This debris can not only be a danger to humans, our marine life is at risk as well. Because trash travels to the ocean by way of storm drains and waterways, much of the debris is located in the delicate marshes such as those at the St. Marks Lighthouse. The ve major sites for the 2011 cleanup will be St. Marks Refuge, Shell Point, Mashes Sands, St. Marks and Bottoms Road. Volunteers can either proceed directly to the site of their choice or come to Woolley Park in Panacea. At any site, you will sign in, receive a wrist band and be directed where to clean. You can sign up in Panacea and nd out more information on all the sites. You do not have to be familiar with the sites to participate. Volunteers can sign up early by sending an email to helpkwcb@gmail.com. You should wear comfortable closed toed shoes, tennis shoes are preferable, bring sunscreen, insect repellent, a hat and gloves. Trash bags will be provided. Following the cleanup, all participants are invited to come to the headquarters at Woolley Park in Panacea for a free participant lunch hosted by Wal-Mart of Crawfordville. Manager Richard Russell and several Wal-Mart associates, Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce staff and the Board of Directors of KWCB will be serving up hotdogs, chips and a cold drink as a thank you. In addition, participants will receive a complimentary T-shirt designed by local high school student Dilyan Sharp and made possible by the generous support of our local sponsors. Following lunch, Master of Ceremonies Commissioner Alan Brock, will present the cash prize for the most cigarette butts collected on Saturday by a group, and will be handing out door prizes donated by our many local businesses. As an added bonus again this year, Jack Rudloe of Gulf Specimen Marine Lab is offering a free tour of their facility for participants in the cleanup. The lab is located a few blocks from the park. Visit their website at gulfspecimen.org. Remember, recycle, reduce your personal trash and reuse where possible. FILE PHOTO Volunteers pick up trash for last years Coastal Cleanup. Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida By ELINOR ELFNERCommittee ChairWith the new public service tax of 7 percent being enacted this year, each of us has a new challenge. How much can we reduce our use of electricity? Can we live with only the 500 kilowatts (KW) of electricity per month that is exempted from the tax? If so, we will not be paying the 7-percent tax on electricity. There are things you can do yourself to save electricity, but you also have a utility company who has trained personnel to help you identify the best practices to save money. If your provider is Talquin Electric Cooperative, call 850-627-7651 to make an appointment for a free energy analysis, and check out www. talquinelectric.com/conserv. If your provider is Progress Energy, call 1-877-574-0340, and check out www.progressenergy.com/florida/home/ save-energy-money. Dont wait for the utility company to help you. Start now. First, look at your last utility bill. How many kilowatts of electricity did you use? Put that gure on the top of a notepad on the refrigerator where the whole family can see it. Each month youll want to record the new amount, subtract and write the amount used in another column. Save space for a star when you have done a really great job of conserving electricity. If a month is too much time to wait to check your progress, start another chart with weekly readings. One of the kids can have the job of reading and recording every Saturday morning. Now, pencil in a goal for the week. When your child reads the meter the next week he/she can figure out how much electricity was actually used and see if the goal was met. Gradually, everyone will become aware of their own use of electricity. It may take some time for everyone in the family to play the electricity saving-money saving game, but gradually you start seeing less money going to the utility company. Some ideas to get you started on the path to saving electricity and saving money are divided into three lists; ideas with no cost to you, low cost and investments. Continued on page 3BWays to save electricity and moneyRecommendations from Wakulla County Energy Conservation Committee

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, September 8 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at Beef O Bradys to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. Friday, September 9 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) SASSY STRIPPERS QUILTERS GROUP meets at the public library from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. to make quilts for traumatized children. The cruiser quilts are donated to Wakulla County deputies to be used for children in need. New members welcome. For information, call 926-6290. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BIG BEND HOSPICE ADVISORY COUNCIL will meet at 1 p.m. at Beef OBradys in Crawfordville. Please call Pam Allbritton at 926-9308 or 508-8749 for more information. Saturday, September 10 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Saturday at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordville Highway at 5 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET is held every Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Posh Java in Sopchoppy. The market features local organic and unsprayed vegetables, homemade, hand-ground, fresh bread from Crescent Moon Farm, live music and varying demonstrations, events, vendors and activities. Growers and seafood vendors wanting to participate may phone Jennifer Taylor at (850) 241-3873 or email famu. register@gmail.com. For general information or to offer an activity, demonstration or performance, contact Posh at (850) 962-1010 or Debbie Dix at (850) 528-5838, or email posh_faery@yahoo.com. Sunday, September 11 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Sunday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, September 12 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 7:30 p.m. at St. Marks First Baptist Church. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN meets each Monday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 5451853. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGAS CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION will meet at 7 p.m. at the public library. Tuesday, September 13 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 824 Shadeville Road at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 2242321. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will meet at 7 p.m. at the public library. The public is encouraged to attend all meetings. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BOARD will meet at 8 a.m. at the Old Historic Wakulla County Courthouse located on High Drive in Crawfordville. Call (850) 9261848 for more information. Wednesday, September 14 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. WAKULLA COUNTY DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TASK FORCE will meet at noon at TCC Wakulla Center in Crawfordville. Lunch is provided. Call (850) 926-9005 for more information. Thursday, September 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. R OTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at Beef O Bradys to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Friday, September 16 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) SASSY STRIPPERS QUILTERS GROUP meets at the public library from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. to make quilts for traumatized children. The cruiser quilts are donated to Wakulla County deputies to be used for children in need. New members welcome. For information, call 926-6290. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Special EventsFriday, September 9 ELVIS AND FRIENDS will perform at the Senior Center at 8 p.m. featuring Todd Allen Herendeen and the FTD Band. Tickets are available at $25 per person and are tax deductible. Seating is limited. Purchase tickets or for more information please call the Senior Center at (850) 926-7145. The Senior Center is located at 33 Michael Drive in Crawfordville. Please join us as a community supporting the Senior Center, meals on wheels program and other critical needs of our seniors. Saturday, September 10 GRAVE MARKER DEDICATION CEREMONY will be held by the R. Don McLeod Chapter 2469 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy of Wakulla County at 10:30 a.m. at the Pigott Cemetery in Medart, to honor a former member, Celia Catherine Revell Whaley. The Wakulla Guards Camp 742, Sons of Confederate Veterans of Wakulla County and the Quincy Young Guards Camp 703, Sons of Confederate Veterans from Quincy will also be participating. She is the granddaughter of Private Stephen Calvin Revell, 5th Regiment, Florida Infantry, Confederate States of America. Sunday, September 11 9-11 MEMORIAL SERVICE will be held at the sheriffs of ce at 8:45 a.m. to remember those lost. This year marks the 10th anniversary of the attack. Tuesday, September 13 WAKULLA TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED COORDINATING BOARD will meet at 10 a.m. at the public library. In addition to its regular business, the agenda includes a recommendation to the CTC competitive procurement process and the Annual Operating Report. A time for public comments will be afforded to anyone wishing to address the board.Upcoming EventsThursday, September 15 CHAMBER BUSINESS MIXER will be hosted by Convenant Hospice and NHC Homecare from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Location to be announced. Invitation will be emailed prior, RSVP to the Chamber of ce at (850) 926-1848. PAIN MANAGEMENT SEMINAR will be held at 7 p.m. at the Crawfordville United Methodist Church sponsored by the Wakulla County Cancer Support group. It doesnt matter what kind of pain you experience and you dont have to have cancer to attend. If pain is a big issue in your life, please come. Kathleen J. Barnett, Pain Management Clinical Specialist of Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, will be the featured speaker. Friday, September 16 BENEFIT for the Anthony Revell Scholarship Fund will be held at Duxs Lounge at 9:30 p.m. Fireplug will be playing. Donations will be accepted all night. Saturday, September 17 COASTAL CLEANUP will be held by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and The Ocean Conservancy from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The different locations are St. Marks Refuge, Mashes Sands, Bottoms Road, Shell Point, Ochlockonee Bay or Woolley Park. A free lunch will be served to volunteers at Woolley Park at 11:30 a.m. Raf es and door prizes. For more information contact helpkwcb@gmail.com or (850) 745-7111. Thursday, September 22 WOMEN AGAINST MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS LUNCHEON will be held to raise awareness about MS and raise money to bene t those living with MS in North Florida. The event will be held at the University Center Club in FSU Doak Campbell Stadium. at 11:30 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. For more information, call (850)386-4843 or email MSluncheon@earthlink.net. Friday, September 23 FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY SILENT AUCTION will be held at the public library from 6 to 8 p.m. The Silent Auction includes gift certi cates, vacations, marine supplies, gifts, artwork, dinners, school supplies and more. Food and drinks will be provided. To make a donation to the auction or for more information about the event, please contact Sue Belford at (850) 926-4244 or FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail.com. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com St. Marks City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Elvis and Friends show at 8 p.m. at the Senior Center. Sopchoppy Growers Market from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. 9-11 Memorial Service at 8:45 a.m. at the sheriffs of ce. ThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com City and County MeetingsThursday, September 8 COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. for a workshop on subdivision road acceptance options. ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, September 12 SCHOOL BOARD will meet at 5:45 p.m. with a public hearing on the budget at 6 p.m. SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will meet for its regular meeting at 6:30 p.m. Library News...By SCOTT JOYNERInterim Library DirectorFriday Night Movie On Friday, Sept. 9, were showing the Robert Redford directed lm about the trial of Mary Surratt for conspiring in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. Starring James McAvoy and Robin Wright ,the film tells the story of how in the wake of Abraham Lincolns assassination, seven men and one woman are arrested and charged with conspiring to kill the President, the Vice-President and the Secretary of State. The lone woman charged, Mary Surratt, 42, owns a boarding house where John Wilkes Booth and others met and planned the simultaneous attacks. Against the ominous back-drop of post-Civil War Washington, newly-minted lawyer, Frederick Aiken, a 28-yearold Union war-hero, reluctantly agrees to defend Surratt before a military tribunal. As the trial unfolds, Aiken realizes his client may be innocent and that she is being used as bait and hostage in order to capture the only conspirator to have escaped a massive manhunt, her own son. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. or this 7 p.m. show. The lm is rated PG-13 for some violence. Celebrate Literacy at Wakulla Springs In honor of September being Florida Adult and Family Literacy month, the library, in conjunction with Wakulla Springs State Park, is proud to present Reflections at Wakulla Springs. From Friday, Sept. 9 through Sunday, Sept. 11, there will be a book giveaway in the lodge lobby. On Saturday, Sept. 9, join us for A Swift Night Out, to come and enjoy an unusual ranger-led program to see rsthand one of natures amazing spectacles. During Swift Night Out, people all over the country stand beneath chimneys to watch and count chimney swifts enter their roost. The Lodge at Wakulla Springs has a large ock that roosts in one of its inactive chimneys. Come to witness the ying cigar shaped birds perform their swirling aerial dance prior to their descent into the chimney and be part of a nationwide program to estimate their numbers. Park admission is also free on Sunday, Sept. 11 if you present your library card or donate a slightly used family friendly book. Quit Smoking Classes Return to WCPL Beginning Tuesday, Sept. 13, the Big Bend Area Health Education Center will begin another 6-week round of quit smoking classes at the library. These classes are designed by ex-smokers who are well aware of how hard it is to quit the habit. Smoking cessation products like patches and gum are also available as supplies last. The class begins at 6 p.m. and will be held each Tuesday evening through Oct. 18. This program, like everything else we do at the library, is free and open to the public. Computer classes for the rest of the month On Thursday, Sept. 15, were happy to offer Computer Basics: Arrange Your Computer Files at 9:30 a.m. followed by Microsoft Excel 2007: Understanding Formulas and Functions at 1:30 p.m. On Tuesday, Sept. 20, our nal 2 classes of the month are Skype: Getting Started at 9:30 a.m. followed by Digital Photography: Windows Live Essentials Photo Gallery at 1:30 p.m. Computer classes are free but do require early registration and ll up fast so call us soon.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 Page 3B 2011 Coastal CleanupSponsored by: The Ocean Conservancys International Coastal Cleanup & Keep Wakulla County Beautiful Items to bring/wearComfortable Clothing, Hat, Closed toed shoes (tennis shoes are best), Glovessite captains will have some extra cotton gloves, Sunscreen and insect repellant Schedule of events8:00-till volunteers will arrive at the cleanup site of their choice 8:00-10:30 Pick up litter 10:30 Place bags of trash at proper points and head to Wooley Park in Panacea. 11:00 -Meet at Wooley Park for lunch and prize giveaways.Please Help Keep Wakulla County Beautiful SitesHeadquarters: Wooley Park in Panacea St. Marks Refugeat the visitors center Mashes Sands at the boat landing parking lot Shell Point near the pavilion St. Marks-Wakulla River Park near the Yacht Club Saturday, September 17th 2011 Saturday, September 17th 2011*To locate a site look for signs or FLORIDA GEORGIA GLASS TRUCKS. Site Captains will greet you as you arrive, get you signed up give you an armband, trash bags and a map for directions. They will also have gallon-sized bags for you if you want to participate in the Weigh Your Butts competition (groups only please). Following the morning cleanup all volunteers should return to your site captain to complete a da ta card and head over to Woolley Park for lunch and prize giveaways. CALL OR EMAIL FOR MORE INFORMATION (850) 745-7111 or email helpkwcb@gmail.com. Thank You to Our SponsorsWAL-MART WAKULLA CO TOBACCO PREVENTION PROGRAM WASTE PRO ROTARY CAPITAL CITY BANK THE WAKULLA AREA TIMES CENTENNIAL BANK ST. MARKS REFUGE ASSOCIATION PAUL G. JOHNSON AND ASSOCIATES MARPAN PROGRESS ENERGY AUTO TRIM & DESIGN PURPLE MARTIN GULF SPECIMEN MARINE LAB CITY OF ST. MARKS TALQUIN PORTABLE RESTROOMS NEWARK RECYCLED FIBERS As of this publication Register EarlyGroups of 5 or more are encouraged to register beforehand by contacting the Keep Wakulla County Beautiful ofce at 850-745-7111 or by email at helpkwcb@gmail.com. Follow us on FACEBOOK for updates. Green Scene Dear EarthTalk: What is nonpoint source pollution? How much of a problem is it and how can it be controlled? Devon Corey, New York, NYUnlike pollution that comes from speci c industrial factories, sewage treatment plants and other easily discernible points, nonpoint source pollution comes from many diffuse sources, but in the aggregate creates a formidable challenge for municipal, state and federal environmental and water control authorities. According to the EPA, nonpoint source pollution is caused by rainfall or snowmelt moving over and through the ground [where it] picks up and carries away natural and human-made pollutants, nally depositing them into lakes, rivers, wetlands, coastal waters and ground waters. Some of the most common pollutants in nonpoint source pollution include excess fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides from agricultural lands and residential areas and oil, grease and toxic chemicals from urban runoff and energy production. Sediment from construction, mining and agricultural sites, as well as salts, acids, bacteria and atmospheric deposition from myriad sources also play a role. While its effects vary region to region, nonpoint source pollution is likely the largest threat to our water quality. The U.S. has made tremendous advances in the past 25 years to clean up the aquatic environment by controlling pollution from industries and sewage treatment plants, says the EPA. Unfortunately, we did not do enough to control pollution from diffuse, or nonpoint, sources. The EPA also calls nonpoint source pollution the U.S.s largest source of water quality problems and the main reason 40 percent of our rivers, lakes, and estuaries are not clean enough to meet basic uses such as fishing or swimming. Because it comes from so many sources, regulating nonpoint source pollution is almost impossible, so it really comes down to individuals taking steps to minimize the pollution generated by their actions. The EPA reports that we can all do our part by keeping litter, pet waste, leaves and debris out of street gutters and storm drains, which usually drain right into nearby water bodies; applying lawn and garden chemicals sparingly; disposing of used oil, antifreeze, paints and other household chemicals properly, that is, at your nearest hazardous household waste dropoff, not in storm drains; cleaning up spilled brake uid, oil, grease and antifreeze, not hosing them into the street where they will eventually reach local waterways; and controlling soil erosion on your property by planting ground cover and stabilizing erosionprone areas. Beyond what we can do individually, local, regional and state governments can also help reduce nonpoint source pollution by enacting and enforcing building codes and other rules that can reduce out ows. The voluntary reduction in phosphates in dishwashing detergents in the U.S. last year, for example, was a big step in reducing the nutrient load into our streams and lakes. Some municipalities have gone so far as to mandate erosion and sediment control ordinances requiring the construction of natural buffers in building and landscaping projects to lter out pollutants before they reach local watersheds. If your community doesnt have similar rules in place, encourage your local officials to enact them. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Send questions to earthtalk@ emagazine.com. Subscribe: www. emagazine.com/subscribe. What is nonpoint source pollution? How can it be controlled? Nonpoint source pollution comes from many diffuse sources, but in the aggregate creates a formidable challenge for municipal, state and federal environmental and water control authorities -and is likely the largest threat to our water quality. Pictured is runoff of fertilizer-laced soil from a farm.PHOTO BY USDA e EPA reports that we can all do our part by keeping litter, pet waste, leaves and debris out of street gutters and storm drains Continued from page 1BSAVINGS WITH NO COST TO YOU: You might put reminder sticky notes up for some of these. Turn off lights when you leave a room every time. Turn off machines when you leave a room (TVs, computers, radios, stereos, video games, etc.) Fill your dishwasher ef ciently and limit the number of times you run it. Keep furniture away from air conditioning and heating vents so air can circulate ef ciently. Always keep doors and windows tightly closed when heating or cooling the house. (OK, you can open a door and quickly run out or in.) Adjust temperature setting on hot water heater to no higher than 110 or 115 degrees. Be sure outside lighting is off during the day. Decide what you want from the refrigerator or freezer BEFORE you open the door so you can minimize the loss of cold air. Only wash full loads of clothes and use cold water with a cold water detergent. Clean the lint lter of the dryer before every load, OR, better yet, use a solar dryer (commonly called a clothes line). When using a dryer, dry full loads and dry one load right after another, and stop the dryer as soon as clothes are dry. (Some people only use the dryer to uff, line dried clothes.) Use ceiling fans (or any fan) only while you are in the room. This makes it feel cooler due to evaporation and doesnt help the temperature when no one is in the room. Set the cooling thermostat at 78 degrees or higher in the summer, and 70 or lower in the winter. When leaving the house for work, set the thermostat up a few degrees in the summer and down a few more degrees in the winter. When you return, just change the setting 2 or 3 degrees and the system will kick in again. If your air conditioning unit is in the sun, nd some remnants from your last building project and build a roof to shade the unit. Close blinds and drapes as necessary to keep the summer sun from heating the rooms inside. Change air lters for your air conditioner or heating units regularly. Many are effective only for one month. A dirty lter makes the unit run more, causing use of more electricity. Unplug the old refrigerator in the garage that you really dont need. Its an energy guzzler! LOW COST SAVING PRACTICES Change any incandescent bulbs to Fluorescent. Start by replacing all the old-fashioned bulbs with the curly bulbs that use 75% less electricity for the equivalent brightness. Be sure you buy bulbs with the energy star label to guarantee the savings, and change a 75-watt bulb for a 75-watt equivalent bulb (usually 20 watts). Fluorescent bulbs also give off less heat. Put in a programmable thermostat to keep the temperature set at most ef cient settings for day time and for night time. Put insulation around the pipes going to and from your water heater, and if it is rather old, buy an insulated blanket to put around the hot water tank. Hold a ribbon or candle up to the edges of doors and windows to identify where air is leaking in. Then put in weather stripping or caulking to keep the outside air from coming in. Put a timer on the hot water heater so that water is heated only during the time of day that you must have hot water. INVESTMENTS FOR SAVING ELECTRICITY Check the insulation in your attic. If it is not about 15 inches, consider having more blown in. Whenever you are replacing an appliance, be sure to buy the most ef cient model you can afford. At a minimum it should be Energy Star certi ed. Really old refrigerators and water heaters are generally worth replacing with the new very energy ef cient models. The one effective use of solar is to heat water. If you are replacing a water heater, get an appraisal for putting a solar thermal system in your house.1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. 2. 3. 4.Ways to save

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com CallPau l s WellGet ThemAll TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROLSERVICEEVERYTHING FROM TERMITESTOMICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr s TM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm VisionCenterDr. Ed Gardner Board Certied Optometric Physician Most Insurance Accepted926-620635 Mike Stewart Drive Licensed Optician Licensed OpticianMost Insurance AcceptedMon. Sat. 9-7Closed Sunday926-299035 Mike Stewart Drive, CRAWFORDVILLEwelcome back teachers & students welcome back teachers & students the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringDwight WellsAugust 2011 Winner ank You So Much! His name was drawn fromI greatly appreciate the wonderful food! e best thig is I like every restaurant on this list! OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Call us today to make your reservation!www.jacksbquick.comOpen Monday Friday 7am 6pm Saturday by appointment only Scott A. Smith850-228-100738 Rainbow Drive, Crawfordville (behind El Jalisco)Quality Marine Canvas Fabrication and Upholsteryof all kinds...www.agshipcanvas.com agshipcanvas@yahoo.com McClendon Auto Service, LLCFree EstimatesSpecializing in:Owned and operated by Fred McClendon 10 years experienceMV#66653Brakes Batteries Radiators Water Pumps Hub Bearings Starters Alternators and more!MOBILE AUTO REPAIR850-933-4093 HEALTH & FITNESSSpecial to The NewsDo you live with pain? On Thursday, Sept. 15, at 7 p.m. at the Crawfordville United Methodist Church near the courthouse, the Wakulla Cancer Support Group is sponsoring a seminar on pain and pain management. It doesnt matter what kind of pain you experience and you dont have to have cancer to attend. If pain is a big issue in your life, please come. Kathleen J. Barnett, pain management clinical specialist of Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, will be the featured speaker. She is a nurse of 31 years. She worked in emergency and trauma for 12 years, and taught at FSU for two years. Barnett has been focusing on pain management at TMH for the past 19 years. She knows pain. She will discuss the purpose of pain management and the three most common medication groups used to treat pain. Barnett will speak of addiction, tolerance and dependence: what they are and what they are not. She will also discuss techniques that can help with pain relief and can help to reduce the stress that accompanies it. Write down your questions, so you dont forget what you want to ask. The meeting will be held in the Fellowship Hall. Look for the cars and for a person standing at the door to direct you. For more information, call 9266050. Why do we breathe? Why cant we enter the breathless state of concentration for as long as we want? Contrary to popular conception, it is not the lack of oxygen that triggers the desire to breathe it is the build up of toxins in the blood, particularly carbon dioxide. If the blood were purified of these toxins, than we could experience the breathless state more easily and for longer periods of time. The make-up of our blood is constantly changing and reflecting our mental/emotional state. Norman Cousins authored Anatomy of an Illness and went on to publish several books on the mind/body research he conducted at UCLA. In one study, blood was drawn from random subjects who were then asked to sit back and visualize whatever would make them happy for five minutes. For some it was envisioning world peace, for others it was earning a ton of money. After a few minutes of visualization their blood was drawn again. When these before and after blood samples were tested for three major indicators of immunity, all three indicators had gone up in just in a few minutes! Just as we can alter our blood chemistry for the better with positive thoughts and emotions, we can also pollute our blood with negative thoughts and emotions. Anger is inevitably accompanied with forced, rapid breathing to purify the blood of the toxins the emotion is producing. Likewise, depression is accompanied by shallow chest breathing which inadequately purifies our blood and saps our vitality. This is one reason why ethical and moral training were included in all traditional Yoga disciplines. Someone who is habitually fearful, angry or depressed will find it difficult to become calm and concentrate because their blood is more toxic and their breathing more irregular. Someone who is calm, cheerful and kind will find it much easier. Breathe in, breathe out...ahhh! Smile... be happy! Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 3800140. YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Breath, blood and the emotionsPain management seminar is setSpecial to The NewsWhen infertility strikes, it can be a massive source of stress for couples, and many are too quick to assume its a female issue. Alarmingly, the average sperm count for adult males has decreased by 50 percent since 1938 and is currently declining at a rate of 2 percent each year, according to a study in the British Medical Journal. Stress, exposure to environmental toxins and diets de cient in key vitamins and minerals are likely to blame. Its a fact that one in six couples will have dif culty conceiving, but many arent aware that almost half the time, its the male who is the cause of the problem, said fertility expert, Dr. Amos Grunebaum. When couples address this issue, its been my experience that the woman is the rst to see a specialist to determine her fertility status. Its a little more dif cult to get the man on board with doing the same thing. Some men just dont want to acknowledge that they may have a fertility problem. As such, they are more reluctant to get tested and I have seen a lot of men delay seeing a specialist or even avoid it completely. Unfortunately, Dr. Grunebaum can con rm these disturbing statistics as he has seen sperm counts decline in his 25plus years of practice. From my experience, low sperm count is one of the primary reasons that couples have a difficult time conceiving, said Dr. Grunebaum, also a medical health advisor for Fairhaven Health (www. fairhavenhealth.com). Quite simply, the fewer sperm a man produces, the lower the likelihood that one will successfully fertilize the egg. However, according to Dr. Grunebaum, there are a variety of ways men can help improve their reproductive health. A diet rich in antioxidants such as vitamins C, E and Zinc can go a long way in improving sperm health. Exercising regularly plus limiting caffeine, alcohol and tobacco intake can also help a great deal, he added. While low sperm count is known to be a major cause of infertility, for many men, visiting a doctor or clinic to have a sperm analysis done can be a daunting task. The testing process itself can be a little embarrassing and even more so when faced with the prospect of exposing their condition to the doctor, nurse or of ce staff, he added. Fortunately, there is now a way to test for low sperm count in the privacy of ones own home. A new product from Fairhaven Health, the SpermCheck Fertility Test, accurately con rms if a man has a normal count (20 million per milliliter). The test can be completed in a matter of minutes and retails for around $35. Should the SpermCheck at-home test con rm a low count, its generally a good indicator that he should see a specialist to help further diagnose the problem. There are many benefits from determining early on if sperm count is a problem for you, Dr. Grunebaum said. The sooner an issue is pinpointed, the sooner proper treatment can be started. Treatments for male infertility typically include lifestyle changes, vitamin, mineral or herbal supplementation, prescription medication or even surgical procedures. But before any of that can begin, the couple has to be able to communicate and agree to take action, said Dr. Grunebaum. When infertility becomes a guy thingSeminar featuring pain management clinical specialist Kathleen J. Barnett will be held at Crawfordville United Methodist Church on Thursday, Sept. 15 at 7 p.m.How men can combat declining fertility trends with vitamins, exercise and limiting ca eine, alcohol and tobacco intake

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 Page 5B Look for the next chapter of The Brass Bell in next weeks edition of The Wakulla news This page sponsored in part by:Written by Cathy Sewell and illustrated by Blaise Sewell of The Curriculum ClosetChapter Four of SixThe Ninja in the ForestThe Coronado expedition set up their winter camp of 1540-41 in Tiguex, which is near present-day Albuquerque, New Mexico. A brutal war broke out between Coronados men and the native Americans. Coronado and the Golden Cities Sounds of footsteps and breaking branches scared the friends, and all three froze. Their silhouettes looked like a trio of oddly-shaped cactus plants. Who, or what, is that? Karol whispered. I dont know, but it sounds big! Hector whispered back loudly, grabbing a thick stick sitting nearby. The sounds came closer and closer. Karol slid over by Felix and they all peered into the darkness, straining to see what was about to invade their camp. Hey, I smell pizza! a loud voice said as three strange boys jumped out from behind a large tree. How did you get them to deliver all the way out here? Nobody delivered it. We just stuck the thawed slices onto our roasting sticks, see? Hector said proudly, holding up a cheesy piece of evidence. Well, Ive never heard of roasting a pizza over an open re, one of the other invaders said. And when Felix looked at him, he could see the re ection of the camp re in his eyes. Felix thought it looked like pure evil. Hola! Would you like some pizza? Karol tried to be friendly. And we also have licorice! Felix offered. Well, the way I see it, well just take whatever we want, Evil Eyes said. And I dont think theres anything you can do to stop us. Perhaps I should warn you, Hector said, trying to copy a ninja pose he saw in a movie. I am a black belt. Oh, really? the bullies challenged Hector. Why dont you show us your best move? Hector swallowed hard and tried to remember some ninja moves, but the three visitors didnt seem all that impressed. They squinted their eyes, clenched their sts and moved toward the three explorers. Right then, a Jeep pulled up and a woman wearing a green uniform jumped out. She had a clipboard and a long, metal ashlight, which brightly lit the whole campsite. What are you nios up to? she asked. You know you cant build a re out in the open like that. This is a national park! Sorry, maam, Felix said, throwing dirt over the re. We were just hungry and a little cold. Thats OK. Just make sure you follow park rules, she said, handing a typed list to Felix. And is that you, Max? she asked the evil-eyed boy. Your mom is gonna have your hide. Does she know where you are? Get in the Jeep Im taking you three home! Yes, Tia Maria, the boy said sheepishly. Before whisking away the bullies in her all-terrain vehicle, the ranger jotted down the names of the three young explorers, promising to let their parents know where they were camping. Wow, that was close! Karol said, after the uninvited guests disappeared over a hill. I was scared. Not me! Hector said. I was just about to release some ninja terror on them! Yeah, thankfully you didnt have to hurt them! Felix winked at Karol. They both knew that Hector was just as scared, but hed never in a million years admit it. They decided to let the ninja keep his pride. Soon after, they all settled into their sleeping bags, trying to get close to the remnants of the re for warmth. But Felix kept thinking about Eduardo and his little accident, so he kept his distance from the re. He fell asleep with his hand clasped around the bell. The next morning, the three friends packed up their bags, buried the last remaining embers of the re and set off toward Gallinas. They had trail mix and licorice for breakfast. So, where is this gold you speak of? Felix asked, in his best conquistador voice. I told you, its in Gallinas, and were almost there, Hector said, walking ahead of Felix and Karol. He rubbed the gold coin he had hidden in his pocket for luck. As they walked into Gallinas, Felixs excitement grew. Now well nd a golden treasure, just like Coronado! What did he nd on his expedition? Karol asked Felix. Um, I dont know. I havent actually gotten that far in the book yet, Felix said, a little embarrassed. Little did the three explorers know, Coronado never found any gold. In fact, he was sometimes referred to as the cursed conquistador. Find us on WHAT RHYMES WITH List 10 words that rhyme with rain. 1. _____________ 2. ____________ 3. ____________ 4. ____________ 5. ____________ 6. _____________ 7. ____________ 8. ____________ 9. ____________ 10. ____________ Some answers: cane, crane, drain, grain, main, mane, pain, pane, sane, vain 1) B __ I __ __ A __ D 2) E __ R __ __ Q __ A __ E 3) T __ U __ A M __ 4) __ O __ N A __ __ 5) C __ __ L O __ E 6) __ A __ L S __ O R __ 7) F __ A __ __ F __ O O __Name That Weather Event Each of the following is a type of weather event. Fill in the blanks to name that weather event.Answers: 1) Blizzard, 2) Earthquake, 3) Tsunami, 4) Tornado, 5) Cyclone, 6) Hailstorm, 7) Flash flood

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com pure speed. pure performance. pure simplicity.pure broadband is everything you want from an internet connection with no phone line required. its all the speed you need to surf, watch, download and game without slowing down. *Offer ends 09/30/2011. Pure Broadband available to qualifying residential customers only. The monthly rate of $29.95 requires a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months (after which the rate reverts to the then-current standard rate), and applie s to up to 1.5 Mbps service. An additional monthly fee (including professional installation, if applicable) and separate shipping and handling fee will apply t o customers modem or router. General Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them by service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. 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Pure Broadband As determined by service location, an early termination fee will apply as either a at $99 fee or the applicable monthly recurring service fee multiplie d by the number of months remaining in the minimum service period, up to $200. Performance will vary due to conditions outside of network control and no speed is guaranteed. Telephone landline is part of the service only for the purpose of data trafc transmission/connection and cannot be used for voice trafc transmission, except fo r 911 services. 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are the property of Cen turyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. a month*all high-speed internet. no phone line required.call 866.958.PURE click givemepure.com come in for locations, visit centurylink.com/storespara or ofertas en espaol marque al 866.958.7873 Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County $42 per year in Florida $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall850-926-7102 Looking for Looking for the latest the latest Local News? Local News? LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww.thewakulla news.com Congrats to all-natural local bodybuildersOn Aug. 6, four Wakulla residents entered their rst bodybuilding show ever and won big. They competed at the Supernatural Bodybuilding and Figure Show PRO/ AM Show at Fort Walton Beach. These four competitors all came in rst through fourth. They worked hard for their win, constant changes in their food regiments, weightlifting routines and constant cardio. Not to mention their hours of posing, walking and preparing routines for muscularity, muscle symmetry and leanness. A bodybuilding contest is not an easy thing to compete in, and as we say in bodybuilding, if it was easy, everyone would do it. But they dont. So please congratulate the following local residents from our beloved Wakulla County: Jason Lowe, 1st Place Novice Bodybuilding (one class) Will Splitt, 2nd Place Novice Bodybuilding (one class) Shelby Cash, 3rd Place Open Bikini (one class) Colleen Morgan, 4th Place Open Bikini (one class) They were all professionals; they worked hard for their win and focused on what they had to do to achieve their nal goals. So congratulations to them all.Pamela Chicester, CFT is Body-Tek 24 Hour Fitness manager. She can be reached at 926-2348. GET FITBy PAMELA CHICHESTERShelby Cash, above left, and Colleen Morgan, above. Below, Jason Lowe, left, and Will Splitt. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSpecial to The NewsWhen it comes to improving bone health in postmenopausal women and people of all ages, actually a Florida State University researcher has found a simple, proactive solution to help prevent fractures and osteoporosis: eating dried plums. Over my career, I have tested numerous fruits, including gs, dates, strawberries and raisins, and none of them come anywhere close to having the effect on bone density that dried plums, or prunes, have, said Bahram H. Arjmandi, Florida States Margaret A. Sitton professor and chairman of the Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences in the College of Human Sciences. All fruits and vegetables have a positive effect on nutrition, but in terms of bone health, this particular food is exceptional. Arjmandi and a group of researchers from Florida State and Oklahoma State University tested two groups of postmenopausal women. Over a 12-month period, the rst group, consisting of 55 women, was instructed to consume 100 grams of dried plums (about 10 prunes) each day, while the second a comparative control group of 45 women was told to consume 100 grams of dried apples. All of the studys participants also received daily doses of calcium (500 milligrams) and vitamin D (400 international units). The group that consumed dried plums had significantly higher bone mineral density in the ulna (one of two long bones in the forearm) and spine, in comparison with the group that ate dried apples. This, according to Arjmandi, was due in part to the ability of dried plums to suppress the rate of bone resorption, or the breakdown of bone, which tends to exceed the rate of new bone growth as people age. The groups research, Comparative Effects of Dried Plum and Dried Apple on Bone in Post Menopausal Women, was published in the British Journal of Nutrition. Arjmandi conducted the research with his graduate students Shirin Hooshmand, Sheau C. Chai and Raz L. Saadat of the College of Human Sciences; Dr. Kenneth Brummel-Smith, Florida States Charlotte Edwards Maguire professor and chairman of the Department of Geriatrics in the College of Medicine; and Oklahoma State University statistics Professor Mark E. Payton. In the United States, about 8 million women have osteoporosis because of the sudden cessation of ovarian hormone production at the onset of menopause. Whats more, about 2 million men also have osteoporosis. In the rst ve to seven postmenopausal years, women are at risk of losing bone at a rate of 3 to 5 percent per year, Arjmandi said. However, osteoporosis is not exclusive to women and, indeed, around the age of 65, men start losing bone with the same rapidity as women.Eating prunes helps prevent fractures and osteoporosisSpecial to The NewsRegistration for the free annual prostate screening offered by the Tallahassee Memorial Cancer Center and Southeastern Urological Center is now open. The screenings will take place this year on Tuesday, Sept. 13, and Wednesday, Sept. 14, at Southeastern Urological Center located at 2000 Centre Point Blvd. in Tallahassee. Men who wish to participate must pre-register, as there are only a limited number of appointments available. Appointments can be made online 24/7 at www. tmh.org, or by calling the Tallahassee Memorial Cancer Center at 850-431-ICAN (4226). The exam, which takes about 15 minutes, consists of a digital rectal exam (DRE) and a prostate speci c antigen (PSA) blood test, which are considered to be the most effective procedures for detecting prostate cancer at an early and potentially curable stage. Prostate cancer is usually found in men age 65 and older, although urologists have diagnosed prostate cancer in men as young as 40. Register for free prostate screenings

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 Page 7B Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! 926-7102 Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $10.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements A New Look PaintingSpecializing in residential and commercial Re-painting pressure washing sheetrock wood rot repairsLICENSED &INSURED850-926-2400CALL JIM PORTER: ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 CARPET CLEANING of Wakulla Residential and Commercial WATER EXTRACTION 24/7 EMERGENCY850-567-6734CAMO New Construction, Remodeling & Repairs850.524.5894 Crawfordville CarpetCleanersaffordable carpet care free estimates850-459-0106 850-210-5849or visit us at www.BarryBuilding.com Affordable Office Spaceat the Barry Building. Enjoy working surrounded by a great atmosphere with many amenities. Rates start at $250/mo., utilities included! Come take a tour at www.BarryBuilding.com. Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com Junior P.SandersSeptic Tank Services18-YR Experience. New System Installation-All Types. Drain Repair. Washing Machine Systems.SR0111684NO JOB TOO SMALL, FAIR PRICES, FRIENDLY GUARANTEED SERVICE!850-210-5777 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State ApprovedWill help you make the most of your outdoor space. Cabins, Barns, Playhouses, Utilities, Gazebos, Tables, Swings, Rockers and More! Pricing and Sizes to t your needs. Cash Discounts. $25 credit on a new building with this ad. See Melissa at 1580 Crawfordville Hwy., next to Happy Time Day Care850-926-3441SOUTHERN STORAGE SOLUTIONS Stow it Away!!5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGEGreatRates! STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.BUYSELLTRADEREPAIRBoats, Motors, Trailers, New/Used Marine Supplies Sold 4815D Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Pro p Service Center Interstate Batter y Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-556-4652www.wakullaboatsales.com stowawaymarine @comcast.net TEACHABLE MOMENTSFAMILY HOME CARE ENROLLING INFANTS! We are a school readiness provider serving children birth-through-12 years old. Two nutritious meals and a snack are included in tuition. For more information call 850-926-1287.Sandblast Art on Glassby MIKE KINSEYBeautiful platters, bowls, mirrors Special requests available. Please stop by Tranquility by Candlelight to view sandblast art on glass and more local artwork. (across from courthouse in Crawfordville). 850-408-3483www.tbccafe. y olasite.com Denises ListCall Denise today to get your services on her list!850-926-7102 Classi eds@TheWakullaNews.net 105 Business Opportunities BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can fix those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again, and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Money Making Opportunity. Computer a must. Free evaluation & Training. Flexible hours. Great incentives. www.freedomtodream.net 352-360-5939. 110 Help Wanted has a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable,focused,and capable of meeting production quotas.Good grammar,reading and writing skills are required.Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents,and report writing.The starting/training salary ranges from $20K to $24K based on qualifications,with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUP benefits include 10 paidholidays,monthly personal accrual,Health,Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to Cheryl@cjisgroup.com.Or send by mail to:CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville,Fl 32327.CJIS GROUP Inc., a Market Research firm, Store Clerk Full time 1/2 day on Friday, all day Saturday & Sunday. Nice working environment/benefits. Send resume to PO BOX 218, St. Marks, FL 32355. 120 Services and Businesses A -1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed ~ John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550 A IR CON OF WAKULLA Heating and Cooling Gary Limbaugh 926-5592 3232 Crawfordville Highway Service, Repair, Installation FL Lic. #CAC1814304 ALL ABOUT...CONCRETE blocks bricks pavers LANDSCAPE plants sod tractor workcall JOSEPH FRANCIS850-556-1178 / 850-556-3761 ANYTIME ELECTRIC Specializinginrepairandservice,residentialandcommercial, homesandmobilehomes. 24-hourservice.MarkOliver, ER0015233. 421-3012. BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway. Larry Carter Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931, 850-694-7041. Licensed/Insured. Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291. HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIRSales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & soundLocated in Crawfordville Doug & Sherry Quigg, Owners Lic. Nos. ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 926 -5790 JenniferWalkersCleaning. Weekly,bi-weekly,monthly,or j ustwhenyouneedyourhome cleaned.Reasonablerates,locallyownedandoperated.Licensed/insured.Over25yrs.exp erience. 850-570-7780. KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial,residentialandmobilehomes.Repair,sales,service,installation.Allmakesand models.Lic.#RA0062516. 926-3546. Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 UPHOLSTERY Flagship Canvas & Upholstery. Quality marine canvas fabrication and Upholstery of all kinds. Scott A. Smith, 38 Rainbow Dr. Crawfordville, (behind El Jalisco). 850-228-1007. www.flagshipcanvas.com flagshipcanvas@yahoo.com POLLY NICHOLSSpecial Touch CleaningConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential.pray like it s up to God, Work like it s up to you519-7238 926-3065Licensed &Insured TillmansTermite&PestControl, Inc.Residential,Commercial. CallTillmanOwensforaquote. 850-322-1775. 130 Entertainment Da Cajun Wagon ServingFreshSeafoodandMore withdaCajunkick!Shrimp PoBoy,CrabPoppers,Bouldin Balls,etc.EveryWed-Satfrom 11AM-7PM.Hwy.319bythe KangarooExpressinMedart. Callinordersarewelcome. 850-570-1625. 205 Antiques MenagerieAntiqueMallisNow open!Vendorspaceisavailable for$1.50/sqft.850-745-8381. 4340CrawfordvilleHwy.(nextto the library). 275 Home Furnishings $159QUEENPILLOWTOPmattress&box.Manufacture r wrapped,warranty.222-7783 Deliver y available. $399Sofa/Loveseatset.Stillin crate,neverused.Candelive r 545-7112. Must move this week! 4pieceBedroomSet:Solid Wood.Brandnew.$439,delivery available. 222-9879. 320 Farm Products & Produce Farm-freshvegetables.We-pick, U-pick.Peas:blackeye,pinkeye, purplehull,whiteacreandzipper.Also,greenboilingpeanuts. Wecustom-processcows,hogs, goats,deer.RakerFarm, 926-7561. 335 Pets DOGS,PUPPIES,NICECATS ANDKITTENS...Come,take alookandbringanew friendhomeTODAY!CHAT Adoption Center:Mondays closed. Tuesdays through Wednesday& Fridays: 11:00AM to 4:30PM Thursdays: 11:00AM to 7:00 P M Saturdays: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM Sundays: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM1 OAK STREET, CRAW FORDVILLE The unconditional love of a pet is waiting for you at th e C.H.A.T. Adoption Center. orvisit: chatofwakulla.org 355 Yard Sales Sat.-9/10,8AM-1PM,44Traynor Court.Fishingtackle,hunting gear,boatingstuff.Ladder stands,guns,Columbiashirts, life-jackets,camoclothes,fly rods,rods/reels,terminaltackle, household items. Saturday,Sept.10,9AM-4PMat ChristChurchAnglican,3383 CoastalHighway(justeastofthe highschool).Dishwasher, clotheswasher,severalentertainmentcenters,bicycles,toys, dollhouse,clothing,othertreasures.HotDogsandsoftdrinks will be on sale too! Saturday,September10, 8AM-12Noonat7BirchCourt. Householditems,clothes,yard decorations,tools,purses,miscellaneous Christmas items. 435 Lost and Found Foundlostjewelryinfrontofthe icehouse,infrontofACEHardwareinCrawfordville.Pleasecall 926-4825 for more information. 500 Real Estate PUBLISHERS NOTICEAllrealestateadvertisinginthis newspaperissubjecttotheFair HousingActwhichmakesitillegaltoadvertiseanypreference, limitation,ordiscrimination basedonrace,color,religion, sex,handicap,familialstatusor nationaloriginoranintentionto makeanysuchpreference,limitationordiscrimination.Familial statusincludeschildrenunder theageof18livingwithparents orlegalcustodians,pregnant womenandpeoplesecuringthe custodyofchildrenunderthe age of 18. Thisnewspaperwillnotaccept anyadvertisingforrealestate thatisaviolationofthelaw.Our readersareherebyinformedthat alldwellingsadvertisedinthis newspaperareavailableonan equalopportunitybasis.TocomplainofdiscriminationcallHUD tollfreeat1-800-669-9777.The tollfreenumberforthehearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 505 Acreage for Lease Forsalebyowner.N.Wakulla. FiveacresinSweetwaterRidge. $146,000invested.Mustsale!! Makebestoffer.850-510-1216 or 850-523-7898. 515 Apartments for Rent Contemporaryloftforthestylish individual.Largebedroom,spiral staircase,manycustomfeatures.Walk-in-closet,1.5bath, washeranddryer,hugedeckon privatepond.$600/month. 850-962-2849. 1BDR as LOW as $600/mo. 2BDR as LOW as $700/mo. 3BDR as LOW as $800/m o. swimming pool and gym850-926-1134MOVE IN SPECIAL $99 DEPOSIT $300 LOCAL HERO DISCOUNT $99Application Fee $35 530 Comm. Property for Rent DowntownCrawfordville!close tocourthouse.1,000sqft.office building.Rentisnegotiable, p lease call 850-962-2358. A ffordableOfficeSpaceatthe BarryBuilding.Greatatmosphere!Includesallutilities,trash p/u,fullkitchenuse,conference room.Ratesstartat$250/mo. 850-210-5849orourwebsiteat www.Barr y Buildin g .com Mini-WarehouseSpacesfo r lease,8X10and10X12now available.ComebyorcallWakulla Realt y, 926-5084. WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE Fitness Studio -1000/sf,(wall to wall mat & mirrors) Retail -1250/sf (storefront w/back storage) Divided Office Space -1074/sf.Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 535 Comm. Property for Sale Choicecornerlotatjunctureo f CrawfordvilleHighwayand pavedWhitlockWay.200'X300'. CommercialZoningGuaranteed, $70,000.DixieProperties(850) 656-6340. 555 Houses for Rent 2BR/1BAHomeat21JRMilton, Crawfordville$750/mo.Newly remodeled,newflooring,kitchen cabinets,andHVACunit.Large, shadyfencedyard,cornerlot. Largelivingroomandden w/openfloorplan.Approximately 1,200sqft.Allkitchenappliances included,W/Dhookups.Pets considered. 850-926-5088. 3BR/2BAat31LibertyRd., Crawfordville.$800/mo.Like newconstruction,vaultedceilingsingreatroom.Approximately1,100sqft.Privacyfenced yard,countymaintainedroad.All kitchenappliancesincluded, W/Dhookups.Petsconsidered. 850-926-5088. 3BR/2BAWakullaGardens, Crawfordville.Largefamilyorientedkitchen,utilityroom, 10X10deck,shadyfan-cooled frontporchfortworockers. $850/month(lease),$850/securit y de p osit. 850-624-4664. 3BR/2BATHinMysteriousWaters.$795/rent,samedeposit. No pets. Call Jim at 566-5165. Crawfordville,clean,large2 bedrooms,2fullbathduplex, $675permonth.CallLinda, 850-926-0283.

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Ochlockonee Bay 984-50071-Acre corner lot with Bay view. 2BR/1BA home with enclosed garage 1,440 total square feet. Mile from Lanark Boat ramp, golf course, restaurant & beach. Sold AS-IS for quick sale. $99,000. MLS# 218221, property #1676-F Bank says SELL! 3BR/2BA home, 2-car garage, screened patio, fenced backyard, tile and pergo ooring. Acre lot in desirable neighborhood. Close to everything! $156,000. MLS# 218756, property # 1201W. Great location! 3BR/2BA home is situated nicely on an acre lot on paved road in North Wakulla. Only 12 miles south of Tallahassee & 15 miles north of beaches & rivers. $149,900. MLS# 219090, property #1191-W. WWW.C21FCP.COM Shell Point 926-7811Florida Coastal Properties, Inc. Crawfordville 926-5111Silver Coast Realty T. Gaupin, Broker We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!49 Anna Drive3BR/1.5BA in Crawfordville. $800 Mo. 91 Posey Rd., Medart3BR/1BA, secluded cypress home w/ replace, 2 screened porches on 30 Acres. Perfect for nature lovers.$875 per month.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. 4Br 2Ba House $1250mo + Sec. Dep. 4Br 2Ba DWMH $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $1200mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $400mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba House $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co.(850) 926 RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 47 Reservation Court 4BR/2BA House w/Gar 2 Acres $1250 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 47 Mohawk Trail, 3BR/2BA House w/Garage on double lot $850 mo. No Smoking or Pets4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000 sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 4 Choctaw Road 3BR/2BA House on double lot $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 80 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 2BR/2BA House/beachfront, dock $1,250 No Smoking or Pets 26 Manatee Lane 2BR/2BA House $1,500 Mo. (Vacation Rental also $100 night) No Smoking or Pets 10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BA House on pilings $950 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 249 Donaldson-Williams Rd. 3BR/1.5BA MH on 7 Acres $500 Mo. Pets Okay w/Approval/Fee 26B Old Courthouse Square 2BR/2BA Townhouse $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/Pets ok 31 Chehaw Road-Panacea 4BR/2BA MH $750 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 110 Mount Pleasant 3BR/2BA House on 2 acres $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House with Guest Quarters 3 BR/3 BA total. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate 560 Land for Sale 2-acrelotforsalenearnew ShadevilleSchool,cornero f SteelCourtandSpringCree k Hwy.(citywater).Ownerfinancing.Call850-556-1178or 850-556-3765. 565 Mobile Homes for Rent 2BR/2BASW/MH.WakullaGardensKlickitatRd.Niceinterior andexterior,openfloorplan. $575/month,first,last,references,applicationrequired. A vailblenow.850-524-4090. Call for discount! 2BR/2BA,naturalspringinbackyard.Twoadults,petsunder20# ok.$650/month,plus$500/dep. Call 850-926-5521. 3BR/1.5BAM/Hon3acres, Panaceaarea.Centralheat/air, dishwasher,woodstove.Clean andprivate.Nosmoking.Referencesrequired.$625/month, $300/deposit. 352-493-2232. 605 Statewide Classi eds Adoption A childlesscoupleseeksto adopt.Flexibleworkschedule. WillbeHANDS-ONparents.Financialsecurity.Expensespaid. Catherine&Michael.(askformichelle/adam).(800)790-5260FL Bar#0150789. Education A LLIEDHEALTHcareer training-Attendcollege100% online.Jobplacementassistance.Computeravailable.FinancialAidifqualified.SCHE V certified.Call(800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com. Financial Services $$$ACCESSLAWSUITCASH NOW!!!$$$AsseenonTV.$$$ InjuryLawsuitDragging?Need $500-$500,000++within48/hrs? LowratesAPPLYNOWBY PHONE!CallToday!Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com. Help Wanted Driver-SouthernFreightneeds Drivers!!Solo,Team,Company &O/O.WehaveLOTSo f FREIGHT!!!Call(877)893-9645 for details. Need13GoodDriversTop5% Pay&401K2Mos.CDLClass A DrivingExp(877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com. Drivers-NoExperience~No Problem.100%PaidCDLTraining.ImmediateBenefits.20/10 program.TrainersEarnupto 49permile!CRSTVANEXPEDITED ( 800 ) 326-2778 () www.JoinCRST.com. $5,000Sign-OnBonus!Frac SandHaulerswithcomplete BulkPneumaticRigsonly.RelocatetoTexasfortonsofwork! Fuel/Quickpayavailable. (800)491-9022. Land For Sale LAKEFRONTBARGAIN!1+ A cres-only$49,900DOCKABLE DEEPWATER!Was$89,900. Primelakefrontparcelwithdirect accesstoGulf.On12,000acre recreationallakecoveredin hugeliveoaks!Closetothecity. Pavedroads,countywater, power,phone,communityboat launch.Excellentfinancing.Call now (866)952-5302. GALANDSALE-17Tractsto choosefrom.Creeks,pond sites,wooded,clearcut,etc. V isitourwebsite. stregispaper.com(478)987-9700 St. Regis Paper Co. Miscellaneous SAWMILLSfromonly$3997MAKEMONEY&SAVEMONEY withyourownbandmill-Cut lumberanydimension.Instock readytoship.FREEInfo&DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/30 0N (800)578-1363 Ext.300N. A TTENDCOLLEGEONLINE fromHome.*Medical,*Business, *Paralegal,*Accounting,*CriminalJustice.Jobplacementassistance.Computeravailable.FinancialAidifqualified.Call (888)203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com. A IRLINESAREHIRING-Train forhighpayingAviationMaintenanceCareer.FAAapproved program.Financialaidifqualified-HousingavailableCALL A viationInstituteofMaintenance (866)314-3769. DIRECTVSummerSpecial!1 YearFREEShowtime!3mos FREEHBO/Starz/Cinemax!NFL SUNDAYTICKETFree-Choice Ultimate/Premier-Pkgsfrom $29.99/mo.Callby9/30! (800)360-2254. Real Estate BANKFORECLOSED,LAND LIQUIDATION,from$9,900,Blue Ridgemountains,pavedroads, utilities,countywater,panoramicviews,excellentfinancing. SaleSeptember24th,Callnow! (888)757-6867ext.214RV's/Mobile Homes. RVs/Mobile Homes PUBLICAUCTION150+Spec andDealerModelTravelTrailers. NOMINIMUMPRICE!Online BiddingAvailableSaturday, September10,10amPhiladelphia,MSwww.hendersonauction.com (225)686-2252 Lic# 266 Schools & Instruction Heat&AirJOBS-Readyto work?3weekacceleratedprogram.Handsonenvironment. Nationwidecertificationsand LocalJobPlacementAssistance! (877)359-1690 680 Legal Notices IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-00020 0 DIVISION: PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. RICHARDL.WESTBERRYA/K/ARICHARD LAMAR WESTBERRY et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderReschedulingForeclosureSaledated August29,2011andenteredinCaseNo. 65-2010-CA-000200oftheCircuitCourtof theSECONDJudicialCircuitinandforWAKULLACounty,FloridawhereinPHH MORTGAGECORPORATION,isthePlaintiffandRICHARDL.WESTBERRYA/K/A RICHARDLAMARWESTBERRY;MELANIES.WESTBERRYA/K/AMELANIE STURDIVANTWESTBERRY;FLORIDA COMMERCE CREDIT UNION; TENANT #1 N/K/AKELLYWESTBERRYaretheDefendants,TheClerkoftheCourtwillselltothe highestandbestbidderforcashatthe LobbyOFTHEWAKULLACOUNTY COURTHOUSE,3056CrawfordvilleHighwayat11:00AM,onthe29thdayofSeptember,2011,thefollowingdescribedproperty as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCEATANOLDCONCRETE MONUMENTMARKINGTHENORTHWESTCORNEROFTHESOUTHHALF OFTHENORTHWESTQUARTEROF SECTION33,TOWNSHIP2SOUTH, RANGE1EAST,WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAANDRUNTHENCESOUTH00 DEGREE01MINUTE07SECONDSWEST 658.50FEET,THENCESOUTH00DEGREE01MINUTE56SECONDSWEST 658.51FEET,THENCESOUTH89DEGREES54MINUTES59SECONDSEAST 1237.93FEETTOAPOINTONTHE EASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY GRADEDCOUNTYROAD,THENCE NORTH10DEGREES46MINUTES34 SECONDSWESTALONGSAIDEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYADISTANCEOF334.54FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT(PLSNO.3293)FOR THEPOINTOFBEGINNING.FROMSAID POINTOFBEGINNINGRUNTHENCE NORTH10DEGREES54MINUTES44 SECONDSWESTALONGSAIDEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYADISTANCEOF377.49FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT(LBNO.732), THENCELEAVINGSAIDEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYANDRUN SOUTH89DEGREES52MINUTES15 SECONDSEAST294.54FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT(LBNO.732), THENCESOUTH10DEGREES45MINUTES37SECONDSEAST377.41FEET TOACONCRETEMONUMENT(LBNO. 732),THENCENORTH89DEGREES50 MINUTES51SECONDSWEST293.55 FEETTOTHEPOINTOFBEGINNING. THESOUTHERLY60.00FEETOFTHE ABOVEDESCRIBEDLANDSBEINGSUBJECTTOA60.00FOOTRIGHT-OF-WAY EASEMENTFORTHEPURPOSEOFINGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITIES. TOGETHERWITHTHATCERTAINMOBILEHOMELOCATEDTHEREONASA FIXTUREANDAPPURTENANCE THERETO:1997,PEACHTREE,VIN# PSHGA20066A & PSHGA20066B. A/K/A 803 OLD WOODVILLE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateoftheLis Pendensmustfileaclaimwithinsixty(60) days after the sale. WITNESSMYHANDandthesealofthis Court on August 30, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sTAMIKA PETERSON AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court) AnypersonswithadisabilityrequiringreasonableaccommodationsshouldcallCler k of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. September 8, 15, 2011 681 Foreclosure Proceedings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION FILE NUMBER: 10-386-CA MAJESTICACRESLLC,aFloridaLimited Liability Company, Plaintiff v. BILLYFISHERandBARBARAFISHER,et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:BILLYFISHERandBARBARA FISHER,ifalive,andifdead,theirunknown spouses,heirs,devisees,grantees,judgmentcreditors,andallotherpartiesclaiming by,through,under,oragainstthem;theunknownspouses,heirs,devisees,grantees, andjudgmentcreditorsofdeceaseddefendants,andallotherpartiesclaimingby, through,under,oragainstdefendants;and allunknownnaturalpersonsifalive,andif deadornotknowntobedeadoralive,their severalandrespectiveunknownspouses, heirs,devisees,grantees,andjudgment creditors,orotherpartiesclaimingby, through,orunderthoseunknownnatural persons;andtheseveralandrespectiveunknownassigns,successorsininterest,trustees,oranyotherpersonclaimingby, through,under,oragainstanycorporation orotherlegalentitynamedasadefendant; andallclaimants,personsorparties,natural orcorporate,orwhoseexactlegalstatusis unknown,claimingunderanyoftheabove namedordescribeddefendantsorparties orclaimingtohaveanyright,title,orinterest in the property, YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactiontoquiet tax title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot17,BIockB,WAKULLARIVERESTATESUNITONE,asperplatthereofrecordedonpage48ofPlatBookNo.1ofthe public records of Wakulla County, Florida hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,ifany,toitonGeorgeH.Gwynn, Esq.,theplaintiff'sattorney,whoseaddress is Post Office Box 4128, Tallahassee, Florida,32315,onorbeforeOctober10th, 2011,andfiletheoriginalwiththeclerkof thiscourteitherbeforeserviceontheplaintiff'sattorneyorimmediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou forthereliefdemandedinthecomplaintor petition. DATED ON August 29th 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sGLENDA PORTER AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 8, 15, 22, 29, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-124-CA JLT MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. TOMMYE.TANNER;MICHELLER.TANNER;WAKULLACOUNTY;andUNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Noticeisherebygiventhat,pursuanttoFinalJudgmentofForeclosureenteredinthe above-styledcause,intheCircuitCourtof WakullaCounty,Florida,IwillsellthepropertysituateinWakullaCounty,Florida,described as: Lots32and33,Block26ofGreinersAdditiontoTownofCrawfordvilleasmaporplat thereofrecordedinPlatBook1ofthePublic Records of Wakulla County, Florida. atpublicsale,tothehighestbidder,for cash,atthelobbyoftheWakullaCounty Courthouse,Crawfordville,Floridaat11:00 a.m.,onSeptember29,2011.Anyperson claiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthe sale,otherthanthepropertyowner,must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sGLENDA PORTER AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 11-129-CA DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. ALENNA D. TRUSIK, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: ALENNA D. TRUSIK BRIAN J. TRUSIK Last Known Address: 8334 Caplock Rd Tallahassee, FL 32311-4176 Current Address: 8334 Caplock Rd Tallahassee, FL 32311 ANYANDALLUNKNOWNPARTIES CLAIMINGBY,THROUGH,UNDER,AND AGAINSTTHEHEREINNAMEDINDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S)WHOARENOT KNOWNTOBEDEADORALIVE, WHETHERSAIDUNKNOWNPARTIES MAYCLAIMANINTERESTASSPOUSES, HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address:Unknown Current Address:Unknown YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactiontoforecloseamortgageonthefollowingproperty in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT122,VILLAGESOFST.MARKS,ACCORDINGTOTHEPLATTHEREOF,RECORDEDINPLATBOOK3,PAGE(S)70, OFHEPUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 122 COQUINA CROSSING, ST MARKS, FL 32327 hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenseswithin30daysafterthefirstpublication,ifany,onAlbertelliLaw,Plaintiffsattorney,whoseaddressisP.O.Box23028, Tampa,FL33623,andfiletheoriginalwith thisCourteitherbeforeserviceonPlaintiffs attorney,orimmediatelythereafter;otherwise,adefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou forthereliefdemandedintheComplaintor petition. WITNESSmyhandandthesealofthis court on this 19th day of August, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sTAMIKA PETERSON AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court InaccordancewiththeAmericanswithDisabilitiesAct,personsneedingaspecialaccomodationtoparticipateinthisproceeding shouldcontacttheADACoordinatornot laterthanseven(7)dayspriortotheproceedingattheOfficeoftheWakullaCounty ClerkofCourt,3056CrawfordvilleHwy., Crawfordville,FL32327;Telephone:(850) 926-0905;1-800-955-8771(TDD); 1-800-955-8770(Voice),viaFloridaRelay Service.Tofileresponsepleasecontact WakullaCountyClerkofCourt,3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. September 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-93 C A AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank 4899 Belfort Road, Suite 100 Jacksonville, Florida 32256 Plaintiff, v. THEUNKNOWNHEIR,DEVISEES, GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,CREDITORS, LIENORS,ANDTRUSTEESOFLYLEF. RINKEL,DECEASED,ANDALLOTHER PERSONSCLAIMINGBY,THROUGH,UNDER,ANDAGAINSTTHENAMESDEFENDANTS;THEUNKNOWNHEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,ANDASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,LIENORS,ANDTRUSTEES OFBETTYC.RINKELA/K/ABETTYRAILEYRINKEL,DECEASED,ANDALL OTHERPERSONSCLAMINGBY THROUGH,UNDER,ANDAGAINSTTHE NAMEDDEFENDANTS,DANNYDANFORD,MIKERINKEL,JERRYRINKEL, AMBERGREENE,BARBARAWALLACE, NANCYSYKES,CARISDAVISANDTHE UNKNOWNTENANTINPOSSESSIONOF 25ElizabethStreet,Crawfordville,Florida 32327, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION THEUNKNOWNHEIRS,DEVISEE, GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,CREDITORS, LIENORS,ANDTRUSTEESOFLYLEF. RINKEL,DECEASED,ANDALLOTHER PERSONCLAIMINGBY,THROUGH,UNDER,ANDAGAINTTHENAMEDDEFENDANTSandTHEUNKNOWNHEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES, CREDITOES,LIENORS,ANDTRUSTEES OFBETTYC.RINKELA/K/ABETTYRAILEYRINKEL,DECEASED,ANDALL OTHERPERSONSCLAIMINGBY, THROUGH,UNDER,ANDAGAINSTTHE NAMED DEFENDANT: YOUARENOTIFIEDthatacivilactionhas beenfiledagainstyouintheCircuitCourt, CountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida,for damagesinexcessof$15,000.00.Youare requiredtofileawrittenresponsewiththe Courtandserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,ifany,toitonTimothyD.Padgett, Plaintiffsattorney,whoseaddressis2878 RemingtonGreenCircle,Tallahassee,Florida32308,atleastthirty(30)daysfromthe dateoffirstpublication,andfiletheoriginal withtheclerkofthiscourteitherbefore serviceonPlaintiffsattorneyorimmediately thereafter;otherwise,adefaultwillbeenteredagainstyouforthereliefdemandedin the complaint. Dated this 18th day of August, 2011 BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sTAMIKA PETERSON AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE #2008-142-FC SHOREFINANCIALSERVICES,INC. D/B/A UNITED WHOLESALE MORTGAGE PLAINTIFF VS. WILLIAM P. LALLY ET AL. DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoa FinalJudgmentofforeclosuredated 8/25/2011enteredinCivilCaseNo. 2008-142-FCoftheCircuitCourtinandfor WAKULLACounty,Florida,Iwillselltothe highestandbestbidderforcashatTHE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSElocatedat3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,Fl.32327at11:00a.m.onthe29th dayofSeptember,2011thefollowingdescribedpropertyassetforthinsaidFinal Judgment, to-wit: Lot10,BlockH,ofSpringwoodSubdivision,PhaseII,asubdivisionasperMapor PlatthereofrecordedinPlatBook3,at Page14andthrough17,ofthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,Florida.Together witha1997REDMDoublewideMobile Home,VIN#sFLA14611088Aand FLA14611088B,Title#s71720938and 71720939.Datedthis25thdayofAugust, 2011. Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendensmustfileaclaimwithinsixty(60)days after the sale. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sGLENDA PORTER AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court Ifyouareapersonwithadisabilitywho needsanyaccommodationinordertoparticipateinthisproceeding,youareentitled, atnocosttoyou,toprovisionofcertainassistance.Pleasecontact:SusanWilson, ADACoordinator301SouthMonroeStreet Tallahassee,FL32301850.577.4401at least7daysbeforeyourscheduledcourt appearance,orimmediatelyuponreceiving thisnotificationifthetimebeforethescheduledappearanceislessthan7days;ifyou are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. September 8, 125, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY Case #: 2010 CA-000298 Division #: Florida Commerce Credit Union Plaintiff, -vs.MelissaNicoleCarmichaela/k/aMelissa CarmichaelandJamesLeeCarmichael a/k/aJamesL.Carmichaela/k/aJames Carmichael,WifeandHusband;Clerkof Circuit Court Wakulla County Florida; Defendant(s), NOTICE OF SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderofFinalJudgmentofForeclosure dated8/25/11,enteredinCivilCaseNo. 2010-CA-000298oftheCircuitCourtofthe 2ndJudicialCircuitinandforWakulla County,Florida,whereinFloridaCommerce CreditUnion,PlaintiffandMelissaNicole Carmichaela/k/aMelissaCarmichaeland JamesLeeCarmichaela/k/aJamesL.Carmichaela/k/aJamesCarmichael,Wifeand Husbandaredefendant(s),Iwillselltothe highestandbestbidderforcashATTHE LOBBYOFTHEWAKULLACOUNTY COURTHOUSELOCATEDATCHURCH STREET,HIGHWAY319,CRAWFORDVILLE,FLORIDAAT11:00A.M.on 11/10/11thefollowingdescribedpropertyas set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: Parcel C COMMENCEATTHESOUTHEASTCORNERFOTHENORTHEASTQUARTEROF SECTION32,TOWNSHIP2-SOUTH, RANGE1WEST,WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAANDRUNNORTH89DEGREES 15MINUTES57SECONDSWEST1471.39 FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT (MARKED#2919),THENCERUNNORTH 00DEGREES19MINUTES17SECONDS WEST1309.79FEETTOACONCRETE MONUMENT,THENCERUNNORTH89 DEGREES43MINUTES50SECONDS WEST1293.91FEETTOACONCRETE MONUMENTLYINGONTHEEASTERLY MAINTAINEDRIGHT-OF-WAYOFLONNIE RAKERROAD,THENCELEAVINGSAID EASTERLYMAINTAINEDRIGHT-OF-WAY CONTINUENORTH89DEGREES43MINUTES50SECONDSWEST30.00FEET TOACONCRETEMONUMENT(MARKED #7160)LYINGONTHEWESTERLYMAINTAINEDRIGHT-OF-WAYOFLONNIERAKERROAD,THENCERUNSOUTH01DEGREES57MINUTES05SECONDSWEST ALONGSAIDWESTERLYMAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY263.85FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT(MARKED#7160), THENCELEAVINGSAIDWESTERLY MAINTAINEDRIGHT-OF-WAYRUN SOUTH89DEGREES54MINUTES32 SECONDSWEST1164.43FEETTPAM IRONPIPE,THENCERUNNORTH00DEGREES30MINUTES47SECONDSEAST 896.19FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT(MARKED#7160)MARKINGTHE POINTOFBEGINNING.FROMSAID POINTOFBEGINNINGCONTINUE NORTH00DEGREES30MINUTES47 SECONDSEAST671.04FEETTOAN OLDAXLE,THENCERUNSOUTH89DEGREES55MINUTES02SECONDSEAST 322.50FEETTOANOLDAXLE,THENCE RUNNORTH88DEGREES15MINUTES 14SECONDSEAST59.61FEETTOA CONCRETEMONUMENT(MARKED #2919),THENCERUNSOUTH00DEGREES31MINUTES55SECONDSWEST 658.20FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT,THENCERUNSOUTH89DEGREES43MINUTES45SECONDSEAST 758.57FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENTLYINGONTHEEASTERLYMAINTAINEDRIGHT-OF-WAYOFLONNIERAKERROAD,THENCERUNSOUTH11DEGREES13MINUTES03SECONDSEAST ALONGSAIDMAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY16.33FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT(MARKED#7160), THENCELEAVINGSAIDMAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAYRUNNORTH89DEGREES43MINUTES45SECONDSWEST 1143.73FEETTOTHEPOINTOFBEGINNING. ANYPERSONCLAIMINGANINTEREST INTHESURPLUSFROMTHESALE,IF ANY,OTHERTHANTHEPROPERTY OWNERASOFTHEDATEOFTHELIS PENDENSMUSTFILEACLAIMWITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sGLENDA PORTER AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-170-CA GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, 225 Town Park Drive, Suite 325 Kennesaw, GA 30144-3710 Plaintiff, v. STEPHENM.ROBBINSA/K/ASTEVEM. ROBBINS,THEUNKNOWNSPOUSEOF STEPHENM.ROBBINSA/K/ASTEVEM. ROBBINS,ANGELAK.ROBBINS,THE UNKNOWNSPOUSEOFANGELAK. ROBBINS,CITLOANCORPORATION, successorininteresttotheCITGroup/ConsumerFinance,Inc.,MONOGRAMCREDIT CARDBANKOFGEORGIA,acorporation, andHSBCBANKNEVADA,NATIONALASSOCIATION,successorininteresttoDirect MerchantsCreditCardBank,NationalAssociation,

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 Page 9BBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 28 42 44 52 60 65 68 2 37 61 3 38 62 21 39 56 4 15 18 34 45 53 5 29 46 6 30 43 54 63 66 69 7 31 47 57 8 24 35 58 22 32 40 59 9 16 19 41 55 10 33 36 48 11 25 49 64 67 70 12 26 50 13 27 51ACROSS1. Fuse rating unit 4. Taj __ 9. Managed, somehow 14. Comic Charlotte 15. In unison 16. In heaven 17. Whopper 18. Gym offering 19. Poet's concern 20. "Kid Galahad" star 23. Morticia, to Fester 24. Stirrup site 25. 3,000-hit club member Ripken 28. Baja California city 32. "On the Street Where You Live" singer Vic 34. Send to the Hill 36. "__ the Roof" (Driftershit) 37. "Billy Bathgate" star 42. Flower in a Stein line 43.Prefixwithcomic 44. "Relax, soldier!" 47.Takes away 52. Take the plunge 53. One-man play about Capote 55. Get the lead out? 56. "The Nanny" star 60. Toulouse toodleoo 63. Kangaroo __ 64."Howwas __ know?" 65. "No ms" boxer Roberto 66.Golferwith an "army" 67. Baton Rouge sch. 68. Remora's ride 69. Etonian's dad 70. Elgart or BrownDOWN1. __ Francisof "What's My Line?" 2. Like some rebates 3.Annoys 4. "Manon" composer Jules 5. "Pronto!" in memos 6. Billing unit, for some 7. Meara or Murray 8.Auto contract, maybe 9. Funt's "candid" gear 10. Toe the line 11. Beer belly 12. Eden evictee 13. "__ Rosenkavalier" 21. Zamboni's milieu 22. Young kiltie 25. Manilow song setting 26. Before long 27. Novelist Deighton 29. He "stung like a bee" 30.Placesfor trophy cases 31. Needed liniment 33. Not talking 35. Went like the blazes 37. __ on (love to excess) 38. Like thrift shop wares 39.Vastexpanse 40. In great shape 41."The African Queen" author C.S. 42. Like some deals or data 45. "The Elements of Style" coauthor 46. Hurler's stat 48. Pendulum's path 49. 1973 title role for John Wayne 50. Dreaded fly 51. Pertaining to blood fluid 54. Open, as a bottle 56. North Carolina's Cape __ 57. "Dumb" girl of old comics 58. Litter's littlest 59. Toledo's waterfront 60. Messages from SWMs, e.g. 61. "That's obvious!" in teen talk 62. Sinn Fin's gp.American Profile Hometown Content 8/14/2011 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 2009 HtCtt 1 23 4567 8729 6 178 54 7352 29 85 3297 146 00 9 HtCtt 617 8924 5 3 942563781 835741629 426 917538 359286147 781354296 294 678315 563129874 178435962 A R L E N E R A W A D S M A I L I N D O T E D U H P E E V E S U S E D I R A I C E S E A F E A R M A S S E N E T S T R U N K A S A P A L I E R A H O U R D E N S U N C A P A N N E A C H E D D O R A L E A S E T O R E R U N T L A D F I T E R I E C A M E R A F O R E S T E R O B E Y M U M A R C P O T C O P A C A H I L L E V E A N O N T S E T S E D E R L E N S E R O U S Brought to you by High Speed Internet Complimentary Hot Breakfast Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.comSelling Something? Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week 926-7102 681 Foreclosure Proceedings Defendant, NOTICE OF ACTION TO:STEPHENM.ROBBINSA/K/ASTEVE M.ROBBINS,THEUNKNOWNSPOUSE OFSTEPHENM.ROBBINSA/K/ASTEVE M.ROBBINS,ANGELAK.ROBBINS,and THEUNKNOWNSPOUSEOFANGELAK. ROBBINS: YOUARENOTIFIEDthatacivilactionhas beenfiledagainstyouiintheCircuitCourt, CountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida,toforeclosecerrtainrealpropertydescribedasfollows: LOT17,KENMOREESTATES,ASUBDIVISIONASPERMAPORPLATTHEREOF RECORDEDINPLATBOOK3,PAGE13 OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA;TOGETHERWITH THATCERTAIN199364X28NOBILITY MOBILEHOME,SERIALNUMBER N86032AB. Youarerequiredtofileawrittenresponse withtheCourtandserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,ifany,toitonTimothyD. Padgett,Plantiffsattorney,whoseaddress is2878RemingtonGreenCircle,Tallahassee,Florida32308,atleastthirty(30)days fromthedateoffirstpublication,andfilethe originalwiththeclerkofthiscourteitherbeforeserviceonPlaintiffsattorneyorimmediatelythereafter;otherwise,adefaultwill beenteredagainstyouforthereliefdemanded in the complaint. Dated this 29th day of August, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sGLENDA PORTER AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE No. 65-2009-CA-00045 5 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. LEWIS, THOMAS C., et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderorFinalJudgmententerinCaseNo. 65-2009-CA-000455oftheCircuitCourtof the2NDJudicialCircuitinandforWakulla County,Florida,wherein,BANKOFAMERICA,N.A.,Plaintiff,and,LEWIS,THOMAS C.,et.al.,areDefendants,Iwillselltothe highestbidderforcastat,atthe11a.m. hourof,onthe29thdayofSeptember, 2011, the following described property: THEFOLLOWINGDESCRIBEDLAND SITUATE,LYINGANDBEINGINWAKULLACOUNTY,FLORIDATO-WIT:LOTS 51&52VILLAGESOFST.MARKS,ACCORDINGTOTHEPLATTHEREOFRECORDEDINPLATBOOK3,PAGE(S)70, OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesales,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendensmustfileaclaimwith60daysafterthe sale. DATED this 25th day of August, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sTAMIKA PETERSON AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2008-CA-000259 DIVISION INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK FSB, Plaintiff, vs. JOHN W. SMITH, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO:WESLEYSMITH,ASANHEIROF THEESTATEOFJOHNW.SMITHA/K/A JOHN WESLEY SMITH DECEASED LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN STACYSMITH,ASANHEIROFTHEESTATEOFJOHNW.SMITHA/K/AJOHN WESLEY SMITH DECEASED LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactiontoforecloseamortgageonthefollowingproperty in WAKULLA County, Florida: LOT3COMMENCEATTHESOUTHEAST CORNEROFTHESOUTHEASTQUARTEROFSECTION18,T3S,R1W,AS MARKEDBYACONCRETEMONUMENT NO.1254,ANDACCEPTEDBYCERTIFIED CORNERRECORDNO.32915,ANDRUN SOUTH89DEGREES56MINUTES25 SECONDSWESTALONGTHESECTION LINE653.09FEETTOACONCRETE MONUMENT,THENCERUNNORTH01 DEGREES00MINUTES43SECONDS WEST874.57FEETTOANIRONPIPE MARKINGTHESOUTHEASTCORNEROF LANDSDESCRIBEDINOFFICIALRECORDSBOOK119,PAGE984OFTHE PUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA,SAIDPOINTBEING THEPOINTOFBEGINNING.FROMSAID POINTOFBEGINNINGRUNTHENCE SOUTH89DEGREES53MINUTES33 SECONDSWESTALONGSAIDSOUTH BOUNDARY377.09FEETTHENCELEAVINGSAIDSOUTHBOUNDARYRUN NORTH00DEGREES59MINUTES21 SECONDSWEST552.44FEET,THENCE SOUTH89DEGREES48MINUTES17 SECONDSEAST60.76FEET,THENCE NORTH02DEGREES42MINUTES56 SECONDSEAST20.02FEET,THENCE SOUTH89DEGREES48MINUTES11 SECONDSEAST315.08FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENTMARKINGTHE EASTERLYBOUNDARYOFSAIDLANDS DESCRIBEDINOFFICIALRECORDS BOOK119,PAGE984,THENCESOUTH 00DEGREES59MINUTES21SECONDS EASTALONGSAIDEASTERLYBOUNDARY570.45FEETTOTHEPOINTOFBEGINNING. THEEASTERLYANDSOUTHERLY40.00 THEREOFBEINGSUBJECTTOAROADWAY EASEMENT. RESERVINGUNTOTHEGRANTOR HEREINAROADWAYEASEMENTOVER THEEASTERLYANDSOUTHERLY40.00 FEET THEREOF. TOGETHERWITHANEASEMENTFOR INGRESSANDEGRESSOVERAND ACROSSTHESOUTHERLY40FEETOF THEFOLLOWINGDESCRIBEDPROPERTY: COMMENCEATA4INCHBY4INCH CONCRETEMONUMENT(MARKED #1254)MARKINGTHESOUTHEASTCORNEROFTHESOUTHWESTQUARTER OFSECTION18,TOWNSHIP3SOUTH, RANGE1WEST,WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAANDRUNSOUTH89DEGREES 53MINUTES03SECONDSWESTALONG THESOUTHBOUNDARYOFSAIDSECTION18,ADISTANCEOF653.04FEET TOA4INCHBY4INCHCONCRETE MONUMENT,THENCERUNNORTH01 DEGREES03MINUTES26SECONDS WEST874.64FEETTOA1INCHIRON PIPEMARKINGTHEPOINTOFBEGINNING.FROMSAIDPOINTOFBEGINNING RUNSOUTH89DEGREES54MINUTES 19SECONDSWEST735.81FEETTOA1 INCHIRONPIPELYINGONTHEEASTERLYMAINTAINEDRIGHT-OF-WAYOF REVADEESPEARSROAD,THENCERUN NORTH03DEGREES58MINUTES13 SECONDSWESTALONGSAIDMAINTAINEDRIGHT-OF-WAY576.08FEETTO A5/8INCHRE-ROD(MARKED#7160), THENCELEAVINGSAIDMAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAYRUNSOUTH89DEGREES43MINUTES34SECONDSEAST 765.19FEETTOA4INCHBY4INCH CONCRETEMONUMENT,THENCERUN SOUTH01DEGREES03MINUTES26 SECONDSEAST569.92FEETTOTHE POINT OF BEGINNING. hasbeenfiledagainsstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenseswithin30daysafterthefirstpublication,ifany,onFloridaDefaultLawGroup, P.L.,Plaintifsattorney,whoseaddressis 4919MemorialHighway,Suite200,Tampa, Florida33634,andfiletheoriginalwiththis CourteitherbeforeserviceonPlaintiffsattorneyorimmediatelythereafater,otherwise adefaultwillbeenteredagainstyouforthe relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESSMYHANDandthesealofthis Court on this 15th day of August, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sGLENDA PORTER AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court) AnypersonswithadisabilityrequiringreasonableaccommodationsshouldcallCler k of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. September 1, 8, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000425 21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. STACIERENEEKIRKLANDA/K/ASTACIE R.KIRKLAND;ANTROYLEMORE KIRKLANDA/K/AANTROYL.KIRKLAND; DIANEDELORESROBERTS;UNKNOWN SPOUSEOFDIANEDELORESROBERTS; IFLIVING,INCLUDINGANYUNKNOWN SPOUSEOFSAIDDEFENDANT(S),IFREMARRIED,ANDIFDECEASED,THERESPECTIVEUNKNOWNHEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,CREDITORS,LIENORS,ANDTRUSTEES,AND ALLOTHERPERSONSCLAIMINGBY, THROUGH,UNDERORAGAINSTTHE NAMEDDEFENDANT(S);UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Noticeisherebygiventhat,pursuanttoaFinalSummaryJudgmentofForeclosureenteredintheabovestyledcause,intheCircuitCourtofWakullaCounty,Florida,Iwill sellthepropertysituateinWakullaCounty, Florida, described as: FromtheSouthwestcorneroftheNortheast 1/4ofSection3,Township3South,Range 1West,WakullaCounty,Florida,runEast 711.12feetalongtheSouthboundaryline ofsaidNortheast1/4toaconcretemonumentandthePOINTOFBEGINNING.From saidconcretemonument,rundueNorth 1,296.43feettoapointonatraverselinein theapproximatecenteroftheBetheltoWakullapublicroad;thencerunNorth 87'20Eastalongsaidtraverseline 127.22feettoananglepoint;thenrun South74'Eastalongsaidtraverseline 98.32feet;thencerundueSouth1,276.23 feettotheSouthboundarylineoftheNortheast1/4ofsaidSection3,Township3 South,Range1West;thencerunWest alongtheSouthboundarylineofsaidNortheast1/4221.78feettothePOINTOFBEGINNING.LesstheSoutherlypartofthe BetheltoWakullapublicroad,lyingandbeingintheSouth1/2oftheNortheast1/4of Section3,Township3South,Range1 West,WakullaCounty,Florida.Saidland beingotherwisedescribedasLot4ofan unrecordedplatofasurveyoflandsofthe Estate of Stacey Roberts, deceased. To include a: 2006 NOBI VIN N110006A 0097019045 2006 NOBI VIN N110006B 0097019298 A/K/A 154 ROBERTS WILLIAM Crawfordville, FL 32327 atpublicsale,tothehighestandbestbidder,forcash,attheLobbyoftheWakulla CountyCourthouse,3056Crawfordville Highway,Crawfordville,FL32327at11:00 o'clock, A.M., on September 29, 2011. DATED THIS 26th DAY OF AUGUST,2011. Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendens,mustfileaclaimwithin60daysafter the sale. Witness,myhandandsealofthiscourton the 26TH day of August, 2011. THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff Ifyouareapersonwithadisabilitywho needsanyaccommodationinordertoparticipateinacourtproceeding,youareentitled,atnocosttoyou,totheprovisionof certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Office of Court Administration 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 atleast7daysbeforeyourscheduledcourt appearance,orimmediatelyuponreceiving notificationifthetimebeforethescheduled appearanceislessthan7days;ifyouare hearing or voice impaired, call 711. September 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-00020 6 DIVISION: THEBANKOFNEWYORKMELLON TRUSTCOMPANY,NATIONALASSOCIATIONFKATHEBANKOFNEWYORK TRUSTCOMPANY,N.A.ASSUCCESSOR TOJPMORGANCHASEBANKN.A.AS TRUSTEE, Plaintiff, vs. THEUNKNOWNHEIRS,DEVISEES, GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,LIENORS, CREDITORS,TRUSTEES,OROTHER CLAIMANTSCLAIMINGBY,THROUGH, UNDER,ORAGAINST,SHERROLD.WILSONA/K/ASHERROLL.WILSONA/K/A SHERROLLEEWILSON,DECEASED,et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To:THEUNKNOWNHEIRS,DEVISEES, GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,LIENORS, CREDITORS,TRUSTEES,OROTHER CLAIMANTSCLAIMINGBY,THROUGH, UNDER,ORAGAINST,SHERROLD.WILSONA/K/ASHERROLL.WILSONA/K/A SHERROL LEE WILSON, DECEASED Last Known Address:Unknown Current Address:Unknown ANYANDALLUNKNOWNPARTIES CLAIMINGBY,THROUGH,UNDER,AND AGAINSTTHEHEREINNAMEDINDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S)WHOARENOT KNOWNTOBEDEADORALIVE, WHETHERSAIDUNKNOWNPARTIES MAYCLAIMANINTERESTASSPOUSES, HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address:Unknown Current Address:Unknown YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactiontoforecloseamortgageonthefollowingproperty in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT7,BLOCKD,WOODVILLESOUTH,A SUBDIVISIONASPERMAPORPLAT THEREOFRECORDEDINPLATBOOK NO.2,PAGE31OFPUBLICRECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 157 FINNER DR., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL* 32327-5427 hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenseswithin30daysafterthefirstpublication,ifany,onAlbertelliLaw,Plaintiffsattorney,whoseaddressisP.O.Box23028, Tampa,FL33623,andfiletheoriginalwith thisCourteitherbeforeserviceonPlaintiffs attorney,orimmediatelythereafter;otherwise,adefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou forthereliefdemandedintheComplaintor petition. WITNESSmyhandandthesealofthis court on this 26th day of August, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sGLENDA PORTER AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court InaccordancewiththeAmericanswithDisabilitiesAct,personsneedingaspecialaccomodationtoparticipateinthisproceeding shouldcontacttheADACoordinatornot laterthanseven(7)dayspriortotheproceedingattheOfficeoftheWakullaCounty ClerkofCourt,3056CrawfordvilleHwy., Crawfordville,FL32327;Telephone:(850) 926-0905;1-800-955-8771(TDD); 1-800-955-8770(Voice),viaFloridaRelay Service.Tofileresponsepleasecontact WakullaCountyClerkofCourt,3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. September 8, 15, 2011 683 Estate (Probate) Filings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 11-47PR PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF JOSEPH HAROLD BLANCHARD Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TheadministrationoftheestateofJoseph HaroldBlanchard,deceased,File11-47PR ispendingintheCircuitCourtforWakulla County,Florida,ProbateDivision,theaddressofwhichis3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,Florida32327.The nameandaddressofthepersonalrepresentativeandthepersonalrepresentatives attorney is set forth below. Allcreditorsofthedecedentandotherpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedentsestateincludingunmatured,contingentorunliquidatedclaims,onwhoma copyofthisnoticeisrequiredtobeserved mustfiletheirclaimswiththiscourtWITHIN THELATEROF3MONTHSAFTERTHE DATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATIONOF THISNOTICEOR30DAYSAFTERTHE DATEOFSERVICEOFACOPYOFTHIS NOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofthedecedentandpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedentsestate,includingunmatured,contingentorunliquidatedclaimsmustfiletheir claimswiththiscourtWITHIN3MONTHS AFTERTHEDATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMSNOTSOFILEDWILLBE FOREVER BARRED. Thisdateofthefirstpublicationofthisnotice is September 8, 2011. Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq. Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A 3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (850) 926-8245 Personal Representative: Rose Regina Blanchard 55 Midnight Pass Crawfordville, Florida 32327 September 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FL PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 2011-44-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF MAURICE AUBREY BRADLEY Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS Theadministrationoftheestateof MAURICEAUBREYBRADLEY,deceased, whosedateofdeathwasApril30,2011;is pendingintheCircuitCourtforWakulla County,Florida,ProbateDivision;FileNo.: 2011-44-PR;theaddressofwhichisProbateDivision,WakullaCountyCourthouse, Crawfordville,Florida32327.Thenames andaddressesofthePersonalRepresentativeandthePersonalRepresentativesattorney are set forth below. Allcreditorsofthedecedentandotherpersons,whohaveclaimsordemandsagainst decedentsestate,includingunmatured, contingentorunliquidatedclaims,andwho havebeenservedacopyofthisnotice, mustfiletheirclaimswiththisCourtWITHIN THELATEROFTHREE(3)MONTHSAFTERTHEDATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATIONOFTHISNOTICEORTHIRTY(30) DAYSAFTERTHEDATEOFSERVICEOF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofthedecedentandother personswhohaveclaimsordemands againstthedecedentsestate,includingunmatured,contingentorunliquidatedclaims, mustfiletheirclaimswiththisCourtWITHIN THREE(3)MONTHSAFTERTHEDATE OFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATIONOFTHIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMSNOTSOFILEDWILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDINGTHETIMEPERIODS SETFORTHABOVE,ANYCLAIMFILED TWO(2)YEARSORMOREAFTERTHE DECEDENTSDATEOFDEATHIS BARRED. THEDATEOFFIRSTPUBLICATIONOF THISNOTICEIS:Thursday,September1, 2011. SAMUEL N. SULLIVAN 4679 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Personal Representative Attorney and Personal Representative: -sCECIL L. DAVIS, JR. Florida Bar No.: 0242721 BANKER LOPEZ GASSLER, P.A.. 111 North Calhoun Street Tallahassee, Florida 32301 (850) 681-4213 September 1, 8, 2011 684 Miscellaneous Notices NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETINGS OF THE NORTH FLORIDA BROADBAND AUTHORITY OPERATIONS COMMITTEE TheNorthFloridaBroadbandAuthority ("NFBA")announcesmeetingsoftheNFBA OperationsCommitteethatallinterested personsareinvitedtoattend.TheNFBAis alegalentityandpublicbodycreatedpursuanttotheprovisionsofSection163.01,FloridaStatutes,andanInterlocalAgreement amongBaker,Bradford,Columbia,Dixie, Gilchrist,Hamilton,Jefferson,Lafayette, Levy,Madison,Putnam,Suwannee,Taylor, UnionandWakullaCountiesandmunicipalitiesofCedarKey,CrossCity,LakeCity, LiveOak,Monticello,Perry,WhiteSprings andWorthingtonSprings,Florida.The NFBAsOperationsCommitteemeetingwill beheldat10:00a.m.onThursday,September8,2011;andat10:00a.m.onthefollowingWednesdays,September28,2011;October26,2011;November30,2011;and December28,2011allattheCabotLodge BoardRoom,3726SW40thBoulevard, Gainesville,FL32608.TheNFBAsOperationalCommitteemeetingistoconductgeneralbusiness.Ifapersondecidestoappeal anydecisionmadebytheNFBAwithrespecttoanymatterconsideredatthemeeting,suchpersonwillneedarecordofthe proceedingsandmayneedtoensurethata verbatimrecordismade,includingthetestimonyandevidenceuponwhichtheappeal istobemade.Inaccordancewiththe AmericanswithDisabilitiesAct,persons needingspecialaccommodationoraninterpretertoparticipateinthisproceedingor haveanyquestionspleasecontactFaith Doyle,ClerktotheNFBABoardat(877) 552-3482or(407)629-6900atleasttwo(2) businessdayspriortothedateofthemeeting. September 8, 2011 692 Gov Notice of Meeting THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY announces the following: EVENT:Regular School Board Meeting and Public Hearing on the 2011-2012 Budget. DATE:Monday, September 12, 2011 TIME:5:45 PM Regular Meeting 6:00 PM Public Hearing PLACE:School Board Room 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE:Regular School Board Meeting& Public Hearing on the BudgetFor further information please contact: Superintendents Offic e Wakulla County Schools P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, FL 3232 6 850-926-006 5 September 8, 2011

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com PAID ADVERTISEMENT CHECK IT OUT WHO TREASURE HUNTERS ROADSHOW WHAT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC TO SELL THEIR ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES WHERE BEST WESTERN PLUS WAKULLA INN & SUITES 3292 COASTAL HWY 98 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 WHEN SEPTEMBER 6TH 10TH TUESDAYFRIDAY 9AMPM SATURDAY 9AMPMDIRECTIONS 850.926.3737 SHOW INFO 217.787.7767*This amount depends upon rarity, condition and what collectors are willing to payPAYING CASH FOR ALL COINS PRE-1970 & CURRENCY WE BUY ALL GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY WE ALSO PURCHASE SILVERWARE SETS POCKET WATCHES ANDWRIST WATCHES STERLING SILVER SILVER COSTUME JEWELRY SCRAP GOLD .999 FINE SILVER MILITARY ITEMS & SWORDS PLATINUM SPORTS MEMORABILIAINVESTMENT GOLD ds upon rarity, condition and what collectors are willing N VE ST MENT G OL D *This amount depends up POCKET & WRIST WATCHES P LAT IN GUITARS PRE 1934 PAPER CURRENCY INDIAN CENT UP TO $500* MERCURY DIME UP TO $3,600* 3 CENT PIECE UP TO $2,500* MORGAN SILVER DOLLAR UP TO $100,000* LIBERTY V NICKEL UP TO $2,800* BARBER DIME UP TO $2,800* JEFFERSON WAR NICKEL UP TO $2,000* WHEAT BACK CENT UP TO $1,500* STANDING LIBERTY QUARTER UP TO $4,400* SHIELD NICKEL UP TO $4,000* WALKING LIBERTY HALF DOLLAR UP TO $4,700* CAPPED BUST HALF DIME UP TO $10,000* BARBER QUARTER UP TO $3,200* 2 CENT PIECE UP TO $2,000* PEACE DOLLAR UP TO $3,000* BUFFALO NICKEL UP TO $1,800* BRAIDED HAIR LARGE CENT UP TO $3,800* SEATED LIBERTY DIME UP TO $6,500* BARBER HALF DOLLAR UP TO $6,750* KENNEDY HALF DOLLAR MANY TIMES FACE VALUE* 3 CE NT P IE CE BUFFALONICKEL BERT TYVNICK E BARBERDIME MERCURYDI ME ATEDLIBERTYDIM A RB ER Q UA RT ER INGLIBERTYQ UA G LI BE RT Y HA LF NEDYHALFDOLL L RBERHALFDOLL PEACEDOLL AR ERSONWARNIC We buy all Gold & Silver Jewelry WRIST WATCHES