Title: Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00290
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville, Fla
Publication Date: September 9, 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States of America -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00028313
Volume ID: VID00290
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
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Preceded by: Wakulla County news

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Board abruptly ends meeting on Pingree


Howard Kessler
here now...
The perception of him as anti-
growth or anti-business is an over-
simplification of his views, he says.
Votes he cast in the past against
some proposed developments
should not be looked at as for no-


War Eagles upsethby Taylor Co


un nYGREEN SCENE


Please see page 8A


By JENNIFER RAYMOND
jraymond@thewakullanews.net
A unexpected turn of events occurred at
last Thursday night's county commission
meeting that had been called to address
concerns raised about County Administra-
tor Ben Pingree.
Before the commission could get to pub-
lic comments, Commissioner Mike Stewart
made a motion to adjourn the meeting,
which he called a public lynching.
"There's been far too much reprimand
in public," Stewart said,
The commissioners voted 4 to 1 in favor
of the motion, with Chairman Howard
Kessler opposing, to end the special called
meeting.
Kessler was the one who proposed
the meeting to the board, which voted to
schedule it.
Kessler said he was disappointed at the
Outcome of the meeting.
"The board has spoken," Kessler said.
And that was, they aren't concerned
about any of the issues that were brought
up, Kessler said.
He added that he felt these were issues
that needed to be looked at, but the other
board members felt differently,
"That's behind us now and we move
on," Kessler said.
Kessler said he wouldn't bring these is-
sues back up because the board has made
up its mind, however, if another issues
arises, he will address it.
For Pingree, he was greeted with hugs
at the end of the meeting.


"I've been through the mud and I'm still
here," Pingree said.
Amid speculation that he was going to
resign, Pingree said he never intended to
quit.
"I'm walking away from nothing," Pingree
said. "That's never been in the cards."
Pingree said he came to the meeting
with the hope that the mood surrounding
the commission meetings would stop.
However, if that didn't happen, he was
going to protect himself and his family and
ask for a separation from the county.
"I take this as a sign that we are getting
back to focusing on the people we serve,"
Pingree said.
Several citizens who showed up for the
meeting were disappointed that they didn't
have the chance to speak.
"We all showed up for this," citizen Steve
Fults said.
He added that Pingree was denied due
process and the citizens were denied their
freedom of speech,
"I'm dumbfounded," Fults said."There's
Constitutional violations all over Wakulla
County."
At the start of the meeting, Kessler made
a motion to form a citizen advisory commit-
tee to evaluate the issues concerning Pin-
,oree and come back with an assessment.
Kessler said the committee could come
back with recommendations to avoid any
issues like this in the future.
Commissioner George Green seconded
Kessler's motion for discussion,
Continued on Page SA


,





Ben Pingree, above right, said he was 'walking away from nothing.' Citizens
such as Steve Fults, above left, a critic of Pingree, was dismayed that there
would be no citizen comment. The board, top, discusses the matter before pass-
ing a 4-1 motion to adjourn.


By MILINDA CHRISTIANSEN
Special to The News
Eric Ecklund's backyard isn't typical,
While there are trees, grass, and other
plants that most people might have, he
also has a 1/2" 1 foot scale G-gauge
model train running throughout his
backyard.
As you walk out the back door of the
Ecklund's home, the first thing you see is
an eight foot waterfall flowing into a koi
pond surrounded by papyrus plants, ferns,
succulents and a train track.
The train track runs around the pond


through Ecklund's train shed.
While the train track is made of brass
and pressure treated wood and is able
to withstand the outdoors, the trains
are kept out of the weather on the track
inside his shed,
Also housed within the shed are the
main controls for the tracks and trains. He
has a remote that he uses to control the
trains anywhere in the yard.
Six different types of trains run on
three different levels of 1,200 feet of track
through several mini "towns" along the
track all built by Ecklund.


There are two towns, one on either side
of the waterfall. They include churches,
sheriffs offices, cemeteries, and even a
miniature junkyard.
All of these are very detailed with some
of them displaying lighting and sounds.
Other parts of the yard along the track
feature a logging area with its own min-
iature pond and a coal mine among large
rocks stacked to look like mountains.
Around every corner of the track,
among lots of small crevices, is something
unique expressing Ecklund's sense of fun
Or other objects that one might if they


didn't look closely.
There are mountain lions and gnomes
above the coal mine, cows inside a barn,
a miniature Barney Fife standing on the
porch of the Sheriffs Office and even
people inside the town saloons and skel-
etons in the graveyards.
There's also a section of the train track
that's a wreckage site where Ecklund set
up a train car that looks like it has fallen
off the track and, around it, are a fire
truck and several firemen attending to
the site.
Continued on Page 12A


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
editor@thewakullanews.net
Eight years ago, Howard Kessler
was one of the first Republicans
elected to county-wide office in
Wakulla County in modern times.
When he ran for re-election to the
county commission four years ago,
he ran with no party affiliation
and won,
Kessler is now seeking a third
term on the commission running
again with no party affiliation,
He faces Republican challenger
Jerry Moore in the Nov. 2 election,
Kessler ticks off a list of priori-
ties: fiscal responsibility; an open
and accountable government; rep-
resenting citizens and protecting
their interests; and protecting the
county's quality of life.
Wakulla's abundant natural
resources, he says, are "the reason
many chose to live here 100 years
ago and why others choose to be


growth, but rather to have slowed
the pace of growth.
"I think the model we have used
in the past is not sustainable," Kes-
sler says.
He contends the county's wide-
open pace of growth of a few years
ago which came to a screeching
halt when the real estate bubble
burst is hampering recovery of
the local market: he cites figures
that Wakulla's housing market has
four to five times the availability it
should have, depressing local hous-
ing values,
Rather than a six-month supply
of available homes, Wakulla County
has more than a year-and-a-halfs
supply of homes on the market, and
seven years' worth of lots,
Yes, the market problems are
part of the larger global economy,
he says, but adds:"We were part of
the frenzy."
The glut of housing on the local


market will only add to the prob-
lems of the unemployment of local
tradesmen, he says. "Now is not
the time to build more," he says,
"we need to get the market more
into balance."
He acknowledges that, in his first
term in office, he was frequently
odd-man-out, although he does
contend that 80 percent of the time
hewaswiththemajority.Theother
votes were major land-use issues.
"In the last two years, with a
changing board, the other board
members were open to dialogue,"
he says, which led to commission-
ers taking a more unified direction
together.
on budget issues, Kessler said
he's concerned that property values
in the county are going down but
tax bills are going up.
He's sensitive to the economic
problems of citizens in the county,
Continued on Page SA


Outdoors ...................Page 9A
Almanac...................Page10A
Sheriff's Report........Page 11A
Green Scene Page 1B
Week in Wal Health & Fitness Page 3B


15 o


Eric Ecklund has a Iobole backyard of trains


IHoward Kessler seeks re-election to third term


1 4 8












Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 9, 2010


What should happen to
County Administrator Ben Pingreet


g%
(3 votes)
Notsure/
Undecided,


w; NE
NATIONAL

NEWSPAPER
O
top
bvSPAp MEMBER


The Wakulla News (USPS 664-6-0 is published weekly at
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News,
P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.


Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one
year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $30/yr. $16.50/6 mo. Out of County - 4 $22/6 mo.
out of state - 4: $22/6 mo.


Editor, The News:
There is something not very joyous
about the Wakulla County Commission's
budget preparation season. I think it is the
feeling of adversity and the "us against
them" mentality. I sure hope this doesn't
continue on much longer,
One of the strengths of our American
political system is our ability to question
Our leaders. This seems to be changing
nationally and locally. What is wrong with
questioning a viewpoint of a local elected
official?
Why can't a Wakulla County resident
speak to Commissioner Howard Kessler
about a particular viewpoint without being
attacked by his supporters who attend the
meetings like a pack of rabid wild dogs
ready to pounce on anyone who dares to
challenge his views?
In the community I have repeatedly
heard citizens say, "I don't necessarily dis-
agree with Kessler's viewpoint, but I hate
the way he goes about it."
There is a serious feeling of hatred
emanating from the county commission
chambers. The hatred is causing county
business to slip while Kessler continues on
his witch hunt with County Administrator
Ben Pingree. How in the world do you think
the county employees feel as they watch


their boss being tossed to the lions chunk
by chunk?
I have heard discussion about cutting
back on county management to save money.
That concept may sound good, but how
does the county commission expect county
business to operate without the administra-
tive leadership Kessler would like to cut?
It will probably take years for the county
to recover from this cut-throat mentality, but
only one week for Kessler's core of support-
ers to pen another letter to the editor about
how great he is and how wrong everybody
else in the world is.
The budget process is filled with some
fancy footwork as well. Kessler leads the
charge to cut public safety that is not under
his control. He leads the charge to raise
taxes through "fees" to fund firefighters,
but is quick to push for cuts to law enforce-
ment.
I think it is time for Wakulla County vot-
ers to support a candidate who's willing to
work for the good of Wakulla County and
not for the good of himself and a tiny core
of zealots who seem to get some morbid joy
out of tearing down the county and creating
pockets of disorder,
Jim Stokley
Sopchoppy


the rumble of a large ve-
hicle,
"It's the electric com-
pany!" he rejoices.
By 10:45, Calvin and
James are setting up the
microphones and fiddling
with the trap house roof.
They fiddle. And they
fiddle some more.
"What's wrong?" calls
Al.
"The voice activated trap
system isn't working," ex-
plains James.
"Didja charge it?"
"Last night!"
"Ask John to look at it.
He's the engineer!" suggests
Al, grinning at John.
John ambles over to the
trap house.
"We could go to the
hand-operated pull," he
says. The other guys laugh
at this suggestion from the
"expert."
"Or we could go home,"
mutters Al.
"Shoot. And we've waited
all morning."
So they opt for that "old"
technology.
They take down the
mikes. Then they pace a
few yards away and set up a
raised wooden framed chair
which has an umbrella at-
tached over it. Looks a little
prissy to me.
One man climbs into the
seat. He has a gizmo in his
hand with a button on it,
The gizmo is connected to
the trap house by a cable,
When he pushes the but-
ton with his thumb, an
Orange "birdie" flies out of
the house.
This is, apparently, that
scorned old technology. But,
hey, it works.
The guys make derisive
jokes, but it's their only op-
tion if they plan to compete
today,
Five men line up in "sta-
tions" several yards in front
of the chair and 16 yards
from the trap house.
The man on the far left
asks if the scorekeeper is
ready, then if the squad is
ready. After all signal ready,
aisesh ssl2-galudeers

yells, "Pulll"
At this command, the
man in the umbrella chair
pushes the button and a


birdie flies in an arbitrary
arc from the trap house
to a point 45 yards away.
Normally, I'm told, the guys
try to shoot that birdie as it
rises in its arc.
Blaml
The birdie explodes into
fragments.
This is trap.
And it's 10:45 and 100
degrees. Yikes,
"Don't look at the ther.
mometer," suggests Calvin.
"It's bad for morale."
"We could attach a two.
by-four on the scorer's seat,"
says Al helpfully. "Then
we could nail a fan right
on it."
"Heck," says James. "We
could just enclose the whole
thing and put in air condi.
tioningl"
The guys take turns
shooting at their stations.
They mop the rivers of
sweat running into their
eyes, raise their guns in
turn, shoot, lower their shot-
guns and mop their faces
again. And their heads. And
their necks.
Umbrella guy totes up
the times each shooter
breaks the clays. They get
25 chances and then they
take a break.
To the water.
Then back for 25 more
rounds.
After 50 shots, the next
team shoots and repeats
the same activities. When
they take their break, the
first team shoots another
50 rounds for a total of 100
rounds,
Then they line up at the
water cooler. Damp dark-
ened shirts cling,
They shake hands,
I go up to a successful
100-birdie blammer,
"How do you feel about
today's shoot?" I ask.
He gulps half the con-
tents of his cup and stares
down at me.
"Should'a stayed home,"
he replies without a smile,
However, I can't help
but notice the twinkle in
his eyes.

Marf Lawis the former
director of Keep Wakulla
CountyBeautifulandan oc.
casional columnist for The
Wakulla News,


By MARJ LAW
"Yep. It's warm."
Well, that's an under-
statement. I wasn't shooting
trap, but I was planning to
watch. I also watched the
big blue thermometer slide
from 86 to 90 degrees in 15
minutes.
Today, I'm learning about
trap shoots. It's my second
meet.
And it's hot.
Start time is supposed to
be at 9 a.m. Right now, it's
8:30 a.m.
The guys reach into their
car trunks and unload their
12-gauge shotguns. Then,
one of the men tells us
that the power is "Off." This
means the trap house won't
open to send those orange
"birdies" flying into the air.
The guys won't be able to
yell "Pull" into the voice
activated birdie system.
One of the guys calls the
electric company. A very po-
lite voice reassures him that
every call will be treated as
an emergency.
So we wait. In the heat,
Under a tin-roofed shelter.
"A housing development
is an emergency," grumbles
Calvin. "We're not. We'll be
last on the list."
James says, "Hey, the
person says that we're all
emergencies."
We wait. The first of Au-
gust is hot hot hot. Should
we go home in defeat?
One of the men decides
it's time to eat. He sets uP
the grill and cooks a hot dog
and bratwurst breakfast.
It 100 degrnees.wTtwait

some more. It's now 10:30.
Did I say we we're pretty
hot?
Suddenly, Calvin hears


Editor, The News:
Ihave been quietly listen-
ing and watching the heat-
ed adversarial comments
being thrown by many good
people about allegations in-
volving County Administra-
tor Ben Pingree. This issue
has been so divisive as to
seriously affect the county
employees' morale at all
levels of administration,
There have been so many
accusations, it was difficult
to separate the wheat from
the chaff.
First, I blame the County
Commissioners as a whole
for not being attentive to
their sworn duties and im-
mediately create a cohesive
plan to deal with complaints
as they were made. Instead,
most acted or ignored in-
dependently and allowed
the mass of complaints and
misinformation to flood
the gates. They failed to
take immediate action, to
make an objective analysis
that would allow a fair and


impartial "judicial" deci-
sion in order to protect the
county's interest as well as
the accused's interest,
Commissioner's indepen-
dent grandstanding creates
animosity, bickering that
degrades respect for the
commissioner and financial
waste.
I would like to remind
commissioners Alan Brock,
Mike Stewart, and Lynn Artz
that a polished diamond
has many facets. Viewing
just one facet may show a
serious flaw in the diamond
and seriously degrade the
value of that stone. Human
beings, like a diamond, can
have many facets too: a
person can be a good father,
an outstanding leader, com-
passionate, and yet have a
dark side,
The law wisely requires
that an accused must be
judged for his actions on
a specific charge, and that
the accused's brilliant mind,
outstanding contributions,


and wonderful family, and
managerial expertise cannot
be considered. The issue
is very narrow: Did the ac-
cused do wrong or not?
There appears to be
evidence that something
improper may have been
done by Pingree and com-
missioners should not just
sweep these complaints
"under the rug" for the sake
of tranquility.
I do laud Commissioner
Howard Kessler insisting
on a hearing where docu-
mented evidence, if any, can
be presented. It is almost
impossible for Pingree to
silence the accusations by
himself even if he is in-
no cent.
Only by comparing his
actions and documenta-
tions with the requirements
of the law can his guilt or
innocence be positively
established and his critics
be silenced,
Dr. John E. Probert
Panacea


Editor, The News:
I would like to thank EVERYONE for
the thoughts, prayers, calls, flowers, cards,
money, get well wishes and visits sent to
my daughter Brittany and myself.
I want to thank everyone from God, her
friends at the lake, to the EMTs and Life-
Flight. To everyone from the doctors and
nurses to our friends and family and the
community we live in.
I cannot put into words the feelings I
have when I think we could have lost her,


Everyone took such good care of her
and I will never be able to give that back or
forget the outgoing help we received from
everyone. Brittany has a long road of ahead
of her but she is with us and she will get
better each day.
Thank you so very much and God
Bless.
Kim, Brittany and Melissa Hagan, and
Cody Thornton
Crawfordville


Editor, The News:
This is in response to the
letter from Smith Creek resi-
dent Derek Davis ("What is
happening to Smith Creek?,"
letter, Sept. 2) who noticed
that the grounds of the
Volunteer Fire Department
were not maintained to his
expectations.
I agree that former Chief
Billy Langston and others
did an outstanding job
of operating the depart-
ment. Volunteers like them
seldom receive the public
recognitiontheydeservefor


their service to the commu-
nity, and I am glad for this
opportunity to commend
them.
Unfortunately, Smith
Creek and many other vol-
unteer fire departments
in Wakulla County have
experienced a decline in
membership in recent years.
The work of running a de-
partment is falling upon
the shoulders of a smaller
group of dedicated volun-
teers. We focus our efforts
on maintenance of trucks
and equipment, training,


education and certification,
operational organization,
and response to fire and
medical emergencies,
Sometimes we do not get
the grass mowed as often
as we would like and sure
would appreciate some help
with that.
There are many ways that
Wakulla County residents
can help their volunteer fire
departments.Althoughpart
of our budget comes from
MSBU taxes, public sup-
port for fundraising events
held throughout the year
is crucial to providing the
additional money needed
tO Operate.
The Wakulla County Unit-
ed Firefighters Association is
sponsoring a barbecue cook-
off competition Saturday,
Oct. 30 in Hudson Park from
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. to benefit
the Richard Rhea fund and
the Children's Burn Camp
of North Florida. There will
be fire trucks, demonstra-
tions, entertainment for
children and adults, and of
course the world's finest
barbecue.
Perhaps the best way to
help is to join your nearby
fire department as a volun-
teer. Every station can use
some more good firefight-
ers, and associate members
can help with a lot of the
work of running a depart.
ment. Many hands make
light work. Your volunteers
need you to help them help
our community.
Charley Ingle
Chief
Smith Creek Volunteer
Fire-Rescue Department


25%
(8 VOteS)
He's become
adis traction
and should
step dow n.




(10 votes)
He's
performing
oori and
Sho uid be
fired.


General Manager: Tammie Bar field.............
Editor:WilliamSnowden..................... .....
StaffWriter/Reporter: Jennifer: ..I
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(1, el....I i....I DeniseFolh...................
...II.....n.......ni,1,.... Sherry .11..l.....I
Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton.....
GraphicArtist:Milindall... 11...


.....tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
.........editor@thewakullanews.net
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Total of 32 votes


Vebeten hikig..


Kessler's zealots enjoy crreating disorder


BOard should look into Pingree allegations


Thanks to everyone CUo boelped mny daughter


We do need hels at Smith Cr-eek VFD


35%
(11 votes)
He's doing a
good job
and should
re ma in in
place.


Vote online at thewakullanews.com





Sept.$ 2-5p.m

-

Sept.9 6-9p.m.

-

Sept.14 2-5p.m.



Sept.14 6-9p.m.



Sept.16&21 2-5p.m.



Sept.16&21 6-9p.m.







Sept.28&30 2-5p.m.


FREE CLASSES available
I



at TCC for Wakulla County


residents impacted by the



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face your economic and ecological challengeS.


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4 04, Space is limited, register today!



1 O
< r--


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 9, 2010 Page 3A


Editor, The News:
MynameisMaryRoberts
and I'm a fifth grade teacher
at Shadeville Elementary
School.
I am writing to you at my
student's request: Yesterday,
Sept. 1, on the playground at
recess, the students found
a very unusual and large
caterpillar.Itwasthelargest
caterpillar that any of us,
including our principal, Mrs.
Brazier, had ever seen. We
advised the students not to
touch it but to just observe,
because we were unsure if
it was poisonous.
We got a camera and
took pictures, one with
my classroom whistle next
to it to give its size some
perspective. It was near the
tulip trees, so we guessed


that was probably its food
source.
Because we were unsure
what to feed it, we did not
capture it though we
.
did coax it mto a box and
moved it to the outside
fence of the schoolyard
so that it would not be
trampled on or handled by
a curious student,
Our dilemma is, that
upon going back inside
after recess and looking
on several websites on the
internet, we were unable to
identify it.
We were hoping that
you might have someone
on staff who could come
out and talk to some of the
students, see the picture,
and then publish an article
about it in the local news-


paper.
Maybe someone out
there could help us identify
it and the kind of butterfly
or moth that it will eventu-
ally become,
This is a real school-
yard science problem and if
someoneinthecommunity
could help us, it would be
an excellent example of
how the school and the
community can work to-
gether to solve problems,
If you are interested,
please contact me at Shadev-
ille Elementary, 926-7155
ext. 808.
Thank you for your
time,
Mary Roberts
mary.roberts@wesb.us


Now that the Deepwater Horizon oil spill
is capped, one question that percolates to
the surface is, "What is the future of oil and
gas development in the northeastern Gulf
and, more specifically, for Florida?
At a free public lecture on Thursday,
.
Sept. 9, at Florida State University Marine
Laboratory in St. Teresa, two FSU facule
members will join forces to answer that

quSs .ing will be Donna R. Christie, who
is a professor and associate dean at FSU's
College of Law, as well as a leading author-
ity on legal issues surrounding ocean and
coastal management law, and Felicia C.
Coleman, a distinguished marine ecologist
in the Department of Biological Science,
and the director of the Coastal and Marine
Laboratory.
Christie and Coleman will discuss the
legalproceduresthataccompanyoilandgas
development and the economic, legal and
ecological liabilities involved,
In the process, they will review the tra-
jectory of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill


and the impact is has had on the way many
people now think about energy use in the
United States.
Refreshments will be served following
the lecture, which will be held beginning
at 7 p.m. in the auditorium.

FSU researchers

RHRIVZin Gulf oil

With nearly $200,000 in funding from
the National Science Foundation, research-
ers at the National High Magnetic Field
Laboratory at The Florida State University
are using incredibly precise analytical
tools housed at the lab to analyze petro-
leum samples collected from the Gulf of
Mexico.
Results of those analyses will help
determine whether or not the samples
originated from the Deepwater Horizon
oil spill- critical information in predicting
where the oil is going.


Editor, The News:
At the Sept. 2 special meeting on County
Administrator Ben Pingree, Commissioner
Mike Stewart asked, "How did we get to
this point of controversy?"
Commissioner Stewart then answered
his own question. It seems a number of
citizens compiled and presented each com-
missioner with a book summarizing the
allegations and controversies raised over
the last several months. Stewart called
them lies and mistruths and said he threw
it away,
If that is the case, Mr. Stewart, then you
are saying the county records are wrong.
Commissioner, this is a prime example
of not listening to the people and shows
disrespect to those who have researched the
records to try and make you listen. That has
brought the county to turmoil,
I admit it took my wife and me sometime
listening to presentations, each showing
extensive research, before we started to
substantiate the facts for ourselves. It
wasn't until Mr. Pingree started vehemently
denying these allegations that we felt there
must be some truth in what was being
presented,
It is said, "The person who denies the
loudest has the most to hide."
Commissioners, you and your adminis-
tration watched these presentations with-
out the slightest response. You completely


ignored your citizens. These records can
easily be looked up. They can be requested
by any citizen. You don't have to take
someone's word for it. You can care enough
to look for yourself
Mr. Stewart, except for Dr. Kessler, you
andyourfellowcommissionersinsultedev-
ery citizen present. Your motion to adjourn
the meeting and the acceptance by Brock
and Artz, denied the citizens of Wakulla
County the right to be heard! No doubt,
some citizens would have commented favor-
ably on our administrator. All citizens had
a right to speaks
The only bright spot of the meeting was
Commissioner Kessler's attempt to mitigate
the situation by moving to use an impartial
citizen panel to review the book and return
with suggestions that could improve the
administrative process,
Once again, Pingree arrogantly objected
to anyone questioning his authority.
The board's approach to Kessler's motion
was that it was inciting a lynching and re-
jected the motion with little discussion,
Failure of the commission to act on
Kessler's motion will result in the coun
continuing its methods of operation and
will lead us to the same improprieties and
turmoil that we have today.
Charles Hickman
Crawfordville


1 1
Continued from Page 1A
"People are skipping
meals to get to the next
paycheck.Peopleareoutof
work, for months or years.
No matter how good the
project," he says, "now is
not the time to put more
burden on our citizens."
Later, he summarizes the
point: "We should have a
budget that the taxpayers
can afford."
The board had requested
county departments and
constitutional officers cut
their budgets 10 percent
- something he says the
commission asked for and
never got.
While he said he is aware
some areas have cut their
budgets to the bone, Kessler
said he still believes there


are two agencies with fat to
cut: county administration
and the sheriffs budget.
The discussion about
County Administrator Ben
Pingree was prior to last
week's special meeting that
ended abruptly. But Kessler
said of the matter: "Person-
ally or politically, I don't
wantturmoilwithin govern-
ment. But I would be remiss
if I didn't speak out... I am
concerned that there are
serious issues."
Of the sheriffs budget,
which was submitted with-
out any cuts, Kessler indi-
cated he was disappointed
that Sheriff David Harvey
did not try to trim his bud-
get. "The answer came back,
'We can't,'" Kessler said. The
board didn't tell the sheriff


where to cut his budget, he
said, and certainly no one
wants to cut deputies on the
frontline.
No matter what the fu-
ture holds, the county's
growth should protect what
attracts people here, Kessler
says.
"What attracted me to
Wakulla County is what
attracts a lot of people its
rural nature. For others, it's
the school system."
One project close to his
heart is the proposed Capi-
tal City to the Sea Loop
- a multi-use trail that is in
the planning stages and is
anticipated to go through
the Apalachicola National
Forest.


continued from Page 1A
Commissioner Alan Brock said he didn't
feel that the board or volunteers should do
that, but rather the ethics commission if
there is an issue.
After the meeting, Brock said, "It is not
the responsibility of the county commission
to determine if an ethics violation has been
committed."
He added that if a concerned citizen
wants to file a complaint with the state
ethics commission because they believe
an ethics violation has occurred, then they
should,
Stewart hoped that the board would kill
Kessler's motion.
"We're out of control," Stewart said.
Kessler said this meeting was being held
because the Florida Sunshine Law requires
that the evaluation be done in public,
"It's an uncomfortable process, but it's
state law," Kessler said.
Pingree agreed with Brock that the Flori-
da Ethics Commission should look into any
issues, rather than a citizen committee.
He added that he wouldn't be a part of
a think tank or a lynch mob.
Kessler said the intention was for due
process and to reach a fair decision regard-
ing Pingree.
Commissioner Lynn Artz said she wished
the citizen committee idea would have been
proposed earlier,
She added that the whole situation has
been festering so long,


After Artz's comments, Green withdrew
his second.
Kessler said after the meeting, "I'm dis-
appointed that the board didn't want to
support a citizen committee again.
Stewart said there is no requirement
for the board to disclose its evaluations
in public, they just have to submit them
in public.
County Attorney Heather Encinosa said
the law states that the board can't meet
in private on any future decision and they
can't exchange their opinions in writing
amongst each other,
Then Stewart moved to end the meeting,
A meeting that was originally thought to be
several hours, ended in about 30 minutes,
Now, the commission will turn in the
evaluations to Kessler. Once they are
turned in, they become public record, Kes-
sler said.
And ultimately, Kessler is the one who
decides if Pingree should get a bonus or
not,
"It rests solely in my hands," Kessler
said.
In Pingree's contract, he receives a 3-
percent pay increase every year, no matter
what, Kessler said.
Any increase would be in addition to
that one, he added,
Brock said after the meeting, "I believe
the message from our special meeting was
clear. We are moving forward with Admin-
istrator Pingree."


Editor, The News:
A few issues back, the
Wakulla News had a brief
note about a new business
called Flagship Canvas and
Upholstery.
Well, this isn't really a new
business. Scott Smith had


this business in St. Marks
and about seven years ago
we had him make complete
covers for our Parker boat.
well, sitting out in the
sun these covers needed
replacement.
I was glad to see the note


that Flagship was back in
business. I called Scott and
he came to our house in Shen
Point, gave us a very good
price and I took our boat for
him to make new canvas.
In talking with Scott, it
seems he and his wife want-
ed to explore the USA and
decided to drive a truck an
around the country. After a
few years of this they decid-
ed to come back and restart
their business.
To my surprise, after two
days he called me and said I
could pick up my boat.
What a great job he did,
and I highly recommend to
all to have your boat canvas,
cushions, and any other
upholstery work done by
them.
They can be reached at
228-1007.
I am very glad to have
back another great Wakulla
County business.
Ron Piasecki
Shell Point


F 4

sense..


"Where are the
best places to eat?

Check out the


a monthly page
in





everything-toced,
3119 Crawfordville Hwy.
926-7102
www.thewakullanes.com


Mllust show proof of residency in Wa7kulla County


TCC Wa kulIla Center 5CrsetW CrwodleFrda


Help us identify this unusual caterpillar


Boar-d's lack of action Ivill continue turmoil


Pi2 ree


Glad to have back this W~akulla business





Catch all the games
live on Wave 94!



Then tune in the Beef O'Brady's
Florida High School Scoreboard Show
10 p.m. to midnight each Friday night




IIts? #9 R7
THE WORD IN PRAISE


briefs
ing throughout the entire
event i.e. D.J, live music,
choirs, gospel rap, spoken
word, praise dancers, solo-
ists, Christian rock, drama,
prizes and much more.
Our goal is to involve
as many churches, orga-
nizations, agencies, and
individuals as possible in
the surrounding counties
to come together and join
this event to demonstrate
true unity,
Fresh out 2K10 will be
held on Oct. 23, at Hudson
Park in Crawfordville from
4 to 8 p.m.

Women's
Enrichment
Expo is set
Women from all over
North Florida and South
Georgia can expect to expe-
rience uplifting, enriching,
and empowering activities
during the Women's Enrich-
ment Expo scheduled for
Saturday, Sept. 18 from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m.
The event is hosted by
Pastor Lisa Stewart and
the women's ministry at
ALARM International, Inc.,
located at 367 Marpan Lane
in Woodville.
During the Expo, attend-
ees will participate in dis-
cussions with trusted lead-
ers in the health, wellness
and beauty fields, and have
access to resources that will
help them achieve a higher
standard of living through
spiritual, economic and
social enrichment
Local vendors will offer
the latest products and ser-
vices catering to women of
.. .
""'
Lutheran
Church ofWakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
Lutheransonline.corn/trinityofwakulla
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5Years)
Pastor Vicar Bert Matlock
Church926-7808*Pre-School926-5557

Orfbegence

4,
Un ited
Methodist
Church
Adul yWS I :3 a.m.
Pastor Avin diall
(850) 984-0127


allagesandbackgrounds.In
addition, there will be door
prizes, giveaways, food tast-
ing and a children's zone
with activities for kids.
The half-day event is
the closing activity for the
annual Sisters in Covenant
Conference, which begins
Sept. 16 and features dy-
namic speakers, dancers
and musicians.
"We've been coordinat-
ing and hosting the Sister's
in Covenant Conference for
more than a decade and this
year we're expanding our
efforts to provide women
in this community with
more access to the resources
they need to achieve their
personal and professional
goals,"saidStewart.
Women who want to
move their lives toward a
better position should not
miss this Expo or the con-
ference,
There is no charge to
attend and women can
register at http://bit.1y/Wo-
mensEnrichmentExpo.

Sopchoppy
S h B i
Out ern apt st
Will host
WOrkshop
Sopchoppy Southern
Baptist Church will be host-
ing a two-day workshop by
Cynthia Roberts from Pre-
cept Ministries founded by
Kay Arthur on Friday, Oct. 8
and Saturday, Oct. 9
Each day will begin at
8:30 a.m. and run until 5
p.m. with lunch provided.
Each workshop is in.
dependent of each other.

Sopchoppy
-
United
*
Methodist
(g b
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship a.m.
Pastor Kevin Hall
8 50-962-25 II


Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...0:30 a.m.
Worship...................10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship.............5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m*

Home ie Co s mi ble...
please call for details,
062-2213


Crawf~ordville United
Methodist Church
4 Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 9 26-7 209
Ochlockonee &Arran Road "Come Girow With Us" www.crawfordville-umc.org


YOU'Ve Got Bible Questions?


Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 9, 2010


Second Annual























Fresvn hOutc 2K10
to be held Ot. 23
tries plns to pel~sentte
secodanual Fresh$ outf [s

out nda we h ad............ ovr40 am
peda ople i attend......... Vendors,
sponsn ors, n i nistries......... are
ben sou gh t tov............. pefo m at

ths e r's vet, Cu

Haye at nmiisris@
gmail0cm forl morle infor-


ministry with a vaisionto
"Expsand the0 Kindomt ofbl S
Godbyestoringthe -Spepler a
Giden ourae e and womt ben Glse


The soevJh purpoer Rof reh

Community throgh Min-


Earl Enge
Earl Enge, 83, died at
home on Sept. 3, under the
care of Big Bend Hospice,
The cause was Parkinson's
disease,
He was a gentle man
and a loving husband, son,
brother, brother-in-law, and
uncle. His passions included
political and environmental
activism, sailing and music,
He served in the U.S. Navy
during World War II, went
to college in Wisconsin after
the war, and taught in high
schools there and then in
American high schools in
Orleans and Paris, France,
where he met Eleanor. After
their marriage, he earned an
M.A. and a Ph.D. and taught
at Grand Valley University
in Michigan. When he re-
tired, the couple moved to
Florida.
There will be a celebra-
tion of his life in Wakulla
County, with details to be
announced later.
Survivors include his wife
of 53 years, Eleanor; his
sister and brother-in-law,
Maxine and William Wilcox
of Black River Falls, Wis.; his
sister-in-law, Marian Brown
of Portage, Mich.; several
nieces and nephews and
grand nieces and nephews,
as well as a host of friends.
Arrangements were being
made by Culley Meadow-
Wood Funeral Home.

Saint Teresa
Episcopal
Church
1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98
Rev. Teri Monica, Priest
Sunday Holy Eucharist
5:30 pm
Sunday School, supper
and fellowship provided.
850-274-4490 ,

7,
]@
First Baptist Church
CRAWFORDVILLE
Regular
Sunday Services
and Times
8:30 am Contemporary
Worship Service
9:45 am Sunday School
11:00 am Traditional Worship
Service
6 pm Evening Service
7 pm Discipleship Training
(On Hw h33 hbI I south
850-926-7896 office
www.fbcc.embarqspace.com


Angel Food untoadzng
Volunteers showed up on Aug. 28 to help unload
7,000 pounds of food to be distributed through
Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church, Radical
Restoration, Crawfordville First Baptist, Harvest Fel-
lowship, as well as the Ronald McDonald House and
Haven of Rest Rescue Mission in Tallahasssee,


Space is limited to 50 par-
ticipants daily and the cost
is $75 for one day or $109.50
for both days payable upon
registration with the dead-
line of Oct. 1.
These workshops are
open to both men and
women. Day one consists
of "Basics of Precept Upon
Precept" teaching the Induc-
tive Bible Study Method and
daytwoconsistsof"Howto
study New Testament Let-
ters" utilizing the Inductive
Study Method.
For more information or
to register please contact
the church office at 962-
7822.

U Gran OCla th S I
Services seeking
COmputers
Lutheran Social Services
of North Flonda is looking
for donations of Pentium
& t
St. Elizabeth
,
Ann Seton
Oatholio Chath
MaSS 9 a.m. Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Father Edward T. Jones, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
926-1797
4 4

Wakulla United
-
Methodist Church
Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 am
Sunday School for all ages 10 am
Sunday Worship-111m.
WednesdayService-7p.m
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor Jadre Henry Risebarl


4 or greater desktops and
















laptops aswll a sal

bi Rshin andet Technical As-

proitheuman service aec
clieshent~s).:_~
Torhis progam as e
cyced ovayuer 600 comptr
se.ince207-reducin the_~~
Wdamount Gof~ eletroics trashl
senut tuo gthelnflhl

prvovidinga high- valuen Ced-e
ucational expriec o


2 at,

Earn 1
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
n AWANA 5:00 p.m.
Is Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a famdy; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org


117 CUTUiS Mill Road, Sopchoppy


church Office


ObitaryChurch7


Sunday school G*SS AM


Wednesilav7 PM Pravor Mooting,
Youth&Children'sPrograms
Dr.BillientiesPaster
Dagill MIen, Associate Paster/Studelit Minister
manorangerseeministeremusic
lerrIEgalls, Mike Oranch, Borille Kelug Husicialls





Doga .Mile


"


"


Plan to attend a SEMINAR to LEARN MORE
about CHP Advantage Plus (HMO)
and CHP Preferred Advantage (HMO).


Call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512
to RSVP or for more information.
(TTY/TDD: 850-383-3534 or 1-800-955-8771)
8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week
or visit us at: www.capitalhealth.com/medicare


Seminars will be held at 10:00 a.m.
at the Capital Health Plan Health Center
1491 Governor's Square Blvd.


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 9, 2010 Page 5A


Air Force Reserve Airman
First Class Douglas A. McCulley
graduated from basic military
training at Lackland Air Force
Base in San Antonio, Texas.
The airman completed an
intensive, eight-week program
that included training in military
discipline and studies, Air Force
core values, physical fitness and
basic warfare principles and
skills
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits toward
an associate in applied science
degree through the Community
College of the Air Force.
He is the son of Ronald and
Janice McCulley of Crawford-
ville.
McCulley is a 2007 graduate
of Wakulla High School.


Tom Kennedy and Judy Calman


for the New Mexico Wilderness


The Capital City Democratic Women's Club (held
the 6th Annual Golden Legacy Award Luncheon on
Thursday, Aug. 5, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 pm at the
FSU Turnbull Conference Center.
Wakulla County resident Ruth High was honored
as a Golden Democrat for her years for service to
the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee and
to the Florida Democratic Party.
A lifelong Democrat, Ruth High was born and
raisedinWakullaCounty.ShegraduatedfromFlorida
State University in 1948 with a B.A. in education,
during which she interned at Sealey Elementary
School. She pursued graduate work at Vassar.
Her many accomplishments include teaching,
managing Wakulla Springs, managing a maternity
and infant wear shop at the then new Edison Mall,
and serving as a National Senior Sales Director
for Mary Kay Cosmetics. She also established the
first out-patient mental health clinic in Southwest
Florida with the support and financial backing of
Fred Babcock.
From Punta Gorda, Ruth moved to Kentucky,


and then to New York City where she worked for
the Rose Taft fashion design firm. Fifteen years
ago she married her third grade sweetheart, "D.P."
High.
She and D.P. returned to Wakulla County in
2002, to the homestead where she was born.
Ruth and D.P. joined the Wakulla Democratic
Executive Committee as Precinct #12 Committee
Man and woman.
She is a dedicated mentor to children in both
elementary and middle schools in Wakulla County.
She has served as principal fundraiser for many
Organizations, including the WDEC. Ruth's latest
endeavor has been instrumental in establishing the
local chapter of NAMI, with the soon to be realized
goal of having an out-patient mental health facility
in Wakulla County
"No matter where Ruth has traveled, no matter
where she has lived, she has been committed to
community involvement and to the empowerment
of women and children,"said Wakulla Democratic
Women's Club Vice President Verna Brock.


Keep Wakulla County Beautiful
(KWCB) will be hosting, and the Ocean
Conservancy will be sponsoring the
annual International Coastal Cleanup
Saturday, Sept. 25 from 8 a.m. until
a lunch program is held at 11 a.m. at
Woolley Park in Panacea.
Each year, KWCB joins groups
around the world in the international
event. The purpose of the program
is to remove as much litter from the
coastlines and beaches as possible,
Locally, volunteers pick up trash at
waterways, sinkholes, rivers and along
the coast to dispose of trash properly
and recycle materials if possible.
There will be several sites around
the county where volunteers can
concentrate their efforts. The sites
include: Woolley Park in Panacea, the
St. Marks Refuge Visitor Center, Mashes
Sands boating landing parking lot in
Ochlockonee Bay, Shell Point pavilion
and the St. Marks Park near the yacht
club.


Volunteers will be greeted by site
captains who will provide trash bags,
gloves and data cards to record what is
being collected,
Many of the volunteers are
experienced and recommend wearing
comfortable clothing and closed toed
shoes while also bringing gloves,
sunscreen and insect repellant. KWCB
is seeking sponsors for financial
support. KWCB will print 1,000 T-shirts
to give to volunteers and the names
of sponsors will appear on the back of
the T-shirt.
There are a number of levels of
support from a small donation to a
large contribution. KWCB Director
Erica Morse can provide additional
information on sponsorships.
The hog dog lunchwillincludeprize
giveaways at Woolley Park beginning at
11 a.m. For more information or to sign
up a group, class or team, call KWCB
at 745-7111 or e-mail to to keepwakulla
countybeautiful@gmail.com.


~hC4~4~4~4~4~4~4~4~4~~ ~ZL~YLbV~T~ ~31~


"Join me and become

a member of

a CHPMedicare Advantage

(HMO) Plan"*

Capital Health
P L A N
AnIndependentLicensecofthe
Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association


Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial)
Estate Planning-- Wills, Power of Attomey, Living Wills, Trusts
Business Planning and Incorporations
Title Insurance
Probate and Heir Land Resolution
General Practice


Phone 926-8245 Fax 926-2396
3042 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL visit us at www.francielowe.com
,,


Friday, September 10
Friday, September 24
Friday, October 8
Friday, October 22
Tuesday, November 9


Friday, November 12
Monday, November 15
Tuesday, November 16
Tuesday, November 23
Friday, November 26


Kenndy ad CamanAirmant First Class


**. McCulle Graduates


I_


tomarr

Ann and Bill Kennedy of
Wakulla Station are happy to
announce the engagement of their
son, Tom Kennedy to Judy Calman,
both of Albuquerque, N.M.
Tom Kennedy graduated from
Wakulla High School, received his
B.S. degree in Biology from Florida
State University, then continued on
to earn a Masters de ree from the
University of Virginia and a Ph.D. in
Biology from the University of New
Mexico. He is currently teaching at
Central New Mexico Community
College in Albuquerque, New
Mexico.
CalmanisthedaughterofNancy
Harris of College Park, Md., and of
Jack Calman of Silver Springs, Md*
Judy has a JD from the University of
New Mexico School of Law and a
masters in Environmental Law and


Resident honored at luncheon


Cosa Cleau Imst CH S St


11)1~


Some things get better with age.

Capital Health Plan is one of them.
Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For
accommodations of persons with special needs at sales meetings,
call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY/TDD: 850-383-3534 or
1-800-955-8771) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week. A licensed
authorized representative will be present with information and
applications. Paid Endorsement. H5938 DP 108 File & Use 07262010











Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 9, 2010


Featuring All You Can Eat.


JOY CE C. VI I LLE N DE R

Certified Public Accountant




This is an open letter to the many friends and clients that


business. THANK YOU! THANK YOU! I am retiring
GS of October 1, 2010


If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to
contact me at 850-926-8272, leave a message and I will
return your call.
Again, thank you!

Sincerely,
JOJCC C. Mi endeT, CPA


Pacific interculturalexchange
Foreign high school stu- through an informal in- P.I.E. is a non-profit edu-
dents are scheduled to ar- home meeting. Prospective national organization that
rive soon for the academic host families are able to has sponsored more than
semester and year homestay review student applications 25,000 students from 45
programs, and the sponsor- and select the perfect match. countries since its founding
ing organization needs a few As there are no "typical" in 1975. The organization is
more local host families, host families, P.I.E. can fit designated by the United
.
The students are anxiously a student mto just about States Department of State
awaiting news of their new any situation, whether it is and is listed by the Council
families. This is the last a single parent, a childless on Standards for Interna-
chance for these young couple, a retired couple or a tonal Educational Travel
ambassadors to fulfill their large family. (CSIET), certifying that the
life-long dreams, and their Families who host for organization complies with
.
placement deadlines are P.I.E. are also chgible to the standards set forth in
rapidly approaching, claim a monthly charitable CSIET's Standards for Inter-
According to Pacific In- contribution deduction on national Educational Travel
.
tercultural Exchange (P.I.E.) their itemized tax returns Programs,
President, John Doty, the for each month they host a Doty encourages families
students are all between the sponsored student, to contact the program im-
ages of 15 and 18 years old, For the upcoming pro- immediately, as it will allow
are English-speaking, have grams, P.I.E. has students the proper time for the
their own spending money, from Germany, the Former students and hosts to get
carry accident and health Soviet Union, Venezuela, to know one another before
insurance, and are anxious Argentina, Norway, Belgium, they actually meet for the
to share their cultural ex- The NetherlandsBrazil, Hun- first time,
.
experiences with their new gary, Korea, Mexico, Austra- Famihes interested in
American families, lia, China, and many other learning more about student
P.I.E. currently has pro- countries, exchange or arranging for a
grams to match almost every P.I.E. is also participating meeting with a community
family's needs, ranging in in two special government- representative may call P.I.E.,
length from one semester funded programs to bring toll-free, at 1-866-546-1402.
to a full academic year, scholarship students from Theagencyalsohastray-
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mon interests and lifestyles Oatar to the United States. students and schools.


By KATHLEEN HAUGHNEY
THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA
THE CAPITAL, TALLAHASSEE, Aug. 24,
2010..... Florida is set to collect $700 mil-
lion for its schools, the U.S. Department of
Education announced, naming the Sunshine
State one of 10 winners in the second
round of its $4.35 billion Race to the Top
competition,
The funds will help shore up education
spending in a down economy and set the
stage for lawmakers and the state Depart-
ment of Education to push for reforms in
public schools that could include instituting
a merit pay system for teachers, which was
the subject of a nasty political fight this
past spring,
"We are very, very thrilled to be one of
those that will receive an award in round
two,"said state Education Commissioner
Eric Smith. "I think that this round is a
true example of what can happen when
a state collaborates, works together, pulls
together."
Race to the Top is part of President
Barack Obama's $800-billion stimulus plan
that passed in 2009. Money is doled out
through a competitive two-round grant
apphcation process. Florida was widely
rumored to be a frontrunner in the first
round, but finished fourth and out of con-
tention for federal dollars. Only Delaware
and Tennessee took home money when
the first round winners were announced
in late March.
.
Federal school officials cited problems
.
with the state's imtial application for the
money, mainly the lack of support from
teacher unions across the state. The Florida
Education Association, the statewide lobby-
ing arm for the individual unions, said they
hadn't been included or listened to during
many initial conversations about the state's
grant application and voiced concerns about
the proposals, particularly ones enforcing
a merit pay system for teachers based on
student test scores,
The revamped application, which did win


union approval, still focuses on merit pay
for teachers. But it would not be imposed
on districts where an agreement could not
be reached via the local collective bargain-
ing process.
Smith, Gov. Charlie Crist and a delega-
.
tion of Flonda educators pitched the state's
overhauled proposal to federal education
officials earlier last month. It also presented
the overall goals of doubling the number of
students who graduate high school and take
college credits, narrowing the achievement
gap in reading and math and increasing the
number of students who read above the
proficiency level.
"We're heartened that Florida became a
recipient of the Race to the Top grant in the
second phase of the federal program," FEA
President Andy Ford said in a statement,
"Our state was unsuccessful in the first
phase because the scope of Florida's appli-
cation was imposed by the state. When the
governor appointed a working group that
included superintendents, school boards,
teachers, parents, FEA and other groups,
differences were quickly worked out."
The other states that will receive federal
funds are the District of Columbia, Georgia,
HawaiiMassachusettsMarylandNewYork,
North Carolina, Ohio and Rhode Island,
And the U.S. Department of Education has
asked Congress for another $1.35 billion to
continue the program so more states can
receive funding,
In both rounds combined, 46 states and
the District of Columbia applied for the
grant money.
The next step is for local school boards
to develop a plan of how they will imple-
ment reforms and use the federal money.
The local boards have 90 days, starting Aug.
24, to develop those plans, but they will not
include full blown contract negotiations,
Smith said. Schools who do not participate
in the reforms will not receive any money.
Smith also said he does not anticipate
that the department will need any legisla-
tive action to implement reforms.


Tallahassee Community College's Wakulla
Center is opening its doors to the commu-
nity for a special Preview TCC event on Mon-
day, Sept. 13 from 6 to 8 p.m. The preview
will give Wakulla residents an opportunity
to meet with TCC representatives and learn
about the application process, financial aid,
scholarships and the College's degree, certifi-
cate and workforce training programs.
Local high school students and their par-
ents, people interested in continuing their
education and anyone wanting to learn more
about the opportunities at TCC are invited
to attend the event.
"This is a chance for TCC to demonstrate
what we have to offer,
and for


people to ask questions and learn how
TCC can help them achieve their education
and career goals," said Lourena Maxwell,
a counseling specialist at TCC. "TCC is al-
ways looking for ways to connect with the
community, and this open house event is
another example of how the College values
its relationship with Wakulla County."
The Sept. 13 open house is the first
among a series that extends into next year,
with the next Preview TCC to be held Oc-
tober 18.
The TCC Wakulla Center is located at
5 Crescent Way in Crawfordville. For more
information on the Wakulla Center and its
Preview TCC sessions please contact Bonnie
Holub at 850-922-2416 or holubb@tcc.fl.edu.


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& NOTICE OF
-r
PUBLICHEARING

The Wakulla County Board of County
Commissioners will hold a
Public Hearing on
September 20, 2010 at 5:00 p.m.
in the Commission Chambers,
29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
To Consider:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE
WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
AMENDING SECTION 6.010.2,
WAKULLA COUNTY CODE OF
ORDINANCES PERTAINING TO
APPEALS FROM DECISIONS MADE
BY THE WAKULLA COUNTY
DIVISION OF ANIMAL CONTROL-
PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY;
AND PROVIDING AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.
A copy of this ordinance shall be available for
inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville
Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested
parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit
comments and be heard with respect to the proposed
ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the board, agency, or commission with
respect to any matter considered at such meeting or
hearing, he or she will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she
may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings is made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based.
Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired
person or any non-English speaking person needing
special assistance should contact the Wakulla County
Board of County Commissioners' Office at (850) 926-
0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201. September 9, 2010


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 9, 2010 Page 7A


By BETTY GREEN
of the Historical Society
The Wakulla County Historical Society
invites the public to attend the regularly
scheduled program Tuesday, Sept. 14, at
7 p.m. at the public library to hear John
Y. Roberts, now a WCHS Board Member
who has strong ties to the history of
Wakulla County, speak pertaining to
the Confederate Salt Works in Wakulla
County.
As a child, Roberts was very interested
in history. He was especially interested in
the history of Wakulla County because he
soon learned there was so much of it.
His grandfather, John Young Gresham,
was the St. Marks Lighthouse keeper for
many years, and would tell Roberts of the
"Old saltworks near the lighthouse."
Both Gresham and Roberts' father, E.
W. Roberts, pointed out to John a place
known as "Salt Pan Island," just up the
St. Marks River from old Port Leon. They
said the ruins of one of the salt works
was on that island-


Sadly, both men passed away when
Roberts was 15 years old, but before
that, he and the late Sammy Mock, from
St. Marks, went up Salt Pan Creek and
explored the ruins of the salt works on
that island.
After returning to this area following
many years roaming the world as an em-
ployee of the U. S.Navy, Roberts' interest
in those salt works resurfaced. Though
not claiming to be an expert in this area,
he has logged a number of miles walking
out on the sand flats of Wakulla County,
and found a few of the ruins.
The Historical Society is pleased that
Roberts has agreed to share what he does
know about the salt works in Wakulla
County during the Confederate era of
our history.
We are looking forward to another
very worthwhile historical meeting and
encourage all who enjoy history to mark
your calendars to attend.
For more information, call B. Green,
926-7405.


T~he 2010 varsity cheerleaders


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
editor@thewakullanews.net
The Wakulla Coalition
for Youth presented awards
of appreciation to Sheriff
David Harvey and Superin-
tendent of Schools David
Miller to acknowledge their
contribution in helping
form the group and their
continuing support.
Gail Campbell, a founder
of the coalition, credited
"the two Davids" with rec-
nizing the ne 9f,52
school survey showed
smoking, drinking, drugs
and other risky behaviors
among students were on
theTrise.existi rou s -
tuven us e Counc
- merged to form the Coali-
tion for Youth, and brought
together law enforcement
and social service provid-
ers and other community
meCm rp ell noted that,
every year since the first
Florida Youth Substance
Abuse Survey began, Wakul-
la's youth use rates have
declined for tobacco, mari-
juana, and alcohol use.
"I'm so proud of this co-
alition," Harvey said of the
group's efforts*
Major Maurice Langston
noted that the sheriffs
Juvenile Justice Division
is now housed at Wakulla
High School, "where they're


T~he 2010 junior varsity cheerleaders


Superintendent of Schools David Miller and Sheriff


in direct, one-on-one con-
tact with students."
Those officers also par-
ticipate in law-related ed-
ucation classes as well,
Langston said.
Langston credited the
sheriff and Miller with


working together to make
the program work.
For his part, Miller said,
The real hero in the room
is Ms. Campbell." Her fore-
sight is what led to the cre-
ation of the youth coalition,
he said.


"aAer READY TO SCARE!
CAUZICAN CARE
NIMAL RESCUE
will be holding a meeting on Saturday, Sept. 11, 2010,
for all volunteers ages 18 and older who would like to
be part of this year's HAUNTED HOUSE.
Brin0 a Oroup and
Let's get together and design your own room.
help as many animals
as we can.
Meeting will be held at
The Wakulla County
( S Animal Control
- Conference room at
questions? please em 90 tr it in
insanecircus2010@yahoo.co from 2-4 PM on 9/11/10.


Tallahassee Community College's


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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 9, 2010


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
editor@thewakullanews.net
"We're injured," Wakulla Head Coach
Scoett Klees said after the game.
We've got nine or 10 kids who are in-
jured and we haven't quite bounced back
fromhthatnot an excuse, Klees said, adding:
"Taylor County played good and we turned
over the ball."
Still it was a disappointing season open-
er, falling 24-6 to Taylor County in Perry on
Friday, Sept. 3.
The Taylor Bulldogs dominated the first
half, 17-0, and held Wakulla scoreless until
the final minutes of the fourth quarter.
"We had seven starters out," Klees said,
"It's hard to win like that."
The War Eagles injuries include two torn
ACLs, a kid with a concussion "things you
hope don't happen," the coach said.
"Still, we're going to have to play," he
said. "We can't make excuses."
The home opener this Friday night pits
the War Eagles against East Gadsden.
"East Gadsden is extremely big and


Wakulla falls 24-6 to Taylor
County in Perry. Coach Scott
Klees s s the team has an over-
whelming number of injuries
but won't make excuses.

extremely talented," Klees said. "The chal-
lenge is going to be for our young men to
step up."
Hopefully, some of the injured starters
will be back, Klees said.
He noted that both safeties, the nose
guard and a tackle were among those un-
able to play against Taylor County.
The team is down to eight linemen for
both offense and defense.
"It's just one of those years," he said.
He doesn't take anything away from
Taylor's win:"Their defense did a good job,
and we hurt ourselves with turnovers."
Team morale is still good, Klees said,
At practice on Monday, Labor Day, "every
kid was there." he said.


Running back Mikal

::-n:::::: :,:
County in Perry at the
season opener on Friday,
Sept. 3. Wakulla was held
scoreless until the fourth
quarter when this touch-
down was scored, right.
I
Photos by Ken Fields


Defensive player of the week


The 2010 Riversprings Middle School Bears


special to The News
The 2010 edition of the
Riversprings Middle School
Bears football team is hard
at work, preparing for the
upcoming campaign. Head
coach Joey Jacobs is hoping
to improve on the 4-4 mark
of a year ago.
On offense, the Bears
have to overcome the loss
of their top playmaker and
team leader of last season,
quarterback James Douin.
RMS has tabbed seventh
grader Feleiph Franks to fill
the large shoes that Douin
leaves behind.
"We are confident in
Feleiph's abilities," coach
Jacobs saaid.s"He h already

ty from last year to this, and
he has proven to be a quick
study, picking up quickly on
the offense."
The Bears will also have
to find a replacement for
Douin's favorite target, the
sure-handed Jordan Franks,
who has taken his talents
over to WHS.
Riversprings will also
feature an entirely new
starting backfield, led by
seventh grader Monterious
Logging.
According to coach Ja-
cobs, "Monte has emerged
as a team leader, and shows
excellseentm uityd poise

RMS will also look to
Greyson Rudd, Alan Pear-
son, and newcomers J.P.
Piotrowski, Antonio Mor-
ris and Sebastian Garner
to accentuate the ground


attack.
The Bears return only
two starters from a year
ago: Devin Griffin and Keith
Gavin. Griffin will anchor
the line, and Gavin will be
a huge threat to make plays
all over the field.
Defensively, the Bears
return three starters: eighth
grader Gage Chance, and
seventh graders Gavin and
Franks.
"Defense has always
been a point of emphasis
here at Riversprings," coach
Jacobs said. "We definitely
preach the old axioms de-
fense wins championships
and if they can't score they
can't win."


Despite the dearth of
experience on the defense,
defensive coordinator Louis
Hernandez is optimistic,
"The defense looks to
be fast this year. Although
we are a team dominated
by seventh graders we will
have significant contribu-
tions from our few return-
ing eighth graders, as well
as a few surprises in sixth
grade," he said.
"We return our entire
coaching staff, and have
added former Wakulla High
standout OB Jimbo Rozar
to work with our quarter-
backs," coach Jacobs said.
"Who knows, we may
surprise some folks."


John Brown, linebacker, had 10 tackles.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 9, 2010 Page 9A


Well summer is wrapping
up, and we're finally getting
some slightly cooler weather,
and definitely dryer air, at
leastobrt uimetbeing.01er

days will be the norm, and
it'll sure be a relief for this
old "forest fink."
Of course winter has al-
ready kicked in for those
birds that chose to nest in
the upper Canadian Zone
and especially the Arctic.
Waterfowl are starting to
leave their northern nest-
ing grounds, and in another
month some species will
start arriving in our region
like the Northern Shoveler,
American Wigeon and the
Green- winged Teal,
The Blue-winged Teal
most likely has already skid-
ded its' palate (webbed)
feet to an aquatic landing in
Our lily-padded fresh water
pools in the St. Marks Na-
tional Refuge. Though I've
not been in the refuge for a
while, I'm confident they are
there, as they usually return
for the winter-a few anyhow
by mid-August.
The neat thing about the
teal, especially the Blue-wing,
is they're coming out of their
eclipse plumage, and you will
think that all you are seeing
are hen ducks. Wrong,
Let me explain, as the
eclipse is really unique.
When pond ducks migrate
north to nest, very soon after
arriving in their ancestral
nesting grounds and pairing
up, they go into complete
molt. They not only shed


We were fishing live
shrimp under the Cajun
Thunder on a pretty strong
falling tide,

welhdethardd swthhingnisnh g
with young kids and some-
times adults, is to get them
to be patient when fishing
a cork and live bait.
They want to set the
hook as soon as the cork
starts going under. I tell
them to be patient. Ifa trout
or a red strikes and takes
the cork under, it's typically
not going to come back up
so you have plenty of time
to set the hook.
Also getting them to get
the slack out of their line
before setting the hook
was a tough thing for them
to do.
They caught some nice
Spanish and plenty of lady.
fish so even if they did prob.
ably miss a lot of good trout
they had a good time and
that's what it's all about.
I didn't fish at all on Sat-
urday so I went out on Sun-
day on my own and caught
and released about 25 trout
that hit the D.O.A. and gulp
under a Cajun Thunder,
There are plenty of trout
on the flats and with the wa.
ter temperature starting to
drop, I'm hearing real good
reports on trout and reds
eastoftheLighthouse.
Use topwater plugs and
spoons around the oyster
bars early. Trout are also
starting to move in close
and fish 3 to 4 feet of wa-
ter with live shrimp or the
Gulp.
Remember to leave that
float plan with someone
and be careful out there.
Good luck and good fish-
ingl


Well I hope you had a
safe and enjoyable Labor
Day weekend. There were
plenty of boats out on the
water both fishing, tub-
ing and just riding around
and enjoying the beautiful
weather.
This will probably be the
last really busy weekend we
will have with football get-
ting started, school in and
hunting season upon us.
That's not a bad thing
for those of us who will
continue to fish through
the fall.
There's some good news
for the offshore fishermen:
The FWC announced that
in state waters from Oct. 1
until Nov. 21, recreational
fishermen will be allowed
to keep their two fish (Red
Snapper) bag limit with size
limits staying the same,
on Friday, Saturday and
Sunday during that time
period.
As I write this article,
I couldn't find anywhere
that the federal govern-
ment had followed suit,
but on the FWC website, it
said they would probably
do the same. The FWC is
also discussing whether or
not to change the bag limit
for red fish for recreational
fishermen.
Tom Riddle, Greg An-
derson and Mike Pearson
went out on Friday and
had a pretty exciting day for
guys who typically fish for


grouper.
They caught quite a few
grouper but said as they got
out past V-tower the wa-
ter turned cobalt blue and
they decided to do some
trolling.
They caught a small sail-
fish, quite a few kings, a 20-
pound dolphin and hooked
a wahoo that Tom said
probably weighed about 40
or 50 pounds.
It got Mike all fired up
and he was heading to West
Marine to get outriggers for
his boat.
I saw Jason Callaghan at
the beach on Sunday and he
had just come in from fish-
ing the area around Oyster
Bay in his kayak.
He said that just as the
tide starting falling, the
bite really turned on and for
45 minutes he caught trout,
reds and jacks on every cast
using a chartreuse spoon,
On Saturday he fished
around Lanark and found
lots ofbig trout and reds
looking for a top water
plug.
I fished half a day on
Saturday with Kevin McWil-
liams, his two sons and 10-
year- old nephew. We fished
out near the Shell Point reef
and caught 52 trout but only
four were legal. They did
catch one real nice fish over
20 inches long. We caught
quite a few 14.5-inch-trout
and the boys lost a lot of
good fish.


their contour feathers (the
body feathers), but also their
flight feathers.
This molt takes place
while the hen is laying her
eggs, and many of the shed
insulating body feathers are
in turn used to insulate the
eggs, as they are normally
laid one a day in a climate
that often gets below freez-
ing, especially at night.
As fast as she'll lay her
eggs, she'll pluck feathers
from her breast to insulate
the eggs as well as hide
them, creating a bare area on
her breast called the brood
patch. Finally when all the
eggs have been laid, she will
place her brood patch on the
eggs, and start incubating,
Since she starts incubating
all her eggs at the same time,
they in turn all hatch at the
same time, and as you'll
recall soon, very soon, the
young ducklings will leave
the nest, as they hatch out
precoatial, or ready to go.
Unlikesongbirdswhohatch
up in their tree nests and are
naked and helpless when
hatching, termed altricial,
By now the adults have
grown back in their contour
feathers, but not their flight


feathers, So, the parents are
forced to stay near the duck-
lings, as they can't fly away!
That's neat in itself, but
even neater is the fact that
the drakes, rather than grow-
ing back the stunning breed-
ing plumage they are noted
for, in turn have grown in a
hen's plumage, to be cryptic,
or camouflagedas she always
is. This way when leading
the little ducklings around
in the prairie pot holes, or
northern lakes/ponds, both
parents are inconspicuous.
On the other hand, when
the young ducks have finally
grown their first flight feath-
ers, the adults by then have
also got theirs. Once they are
all flying, then the drakes go
into another molt, molting
out the hens subdued plum-
age, and gradually replacing
it with the showy drake's
feathers. They no longer
need to be camouflaged.
Our Blue-wing drakes are
stillinthestageofgettingrid
ofthehen'splumageandso
basically many still appear to
be hen's. The white crescent
the drakes have in front of
their eye, (a key identifying
mark) has barely begun to
show.


The Florida Fish and WIld-
life Commission is holding
a Becoming an Outdoors-
Woman (BOW) workshop.
The three-day workshop
will be Oct. 8-10 in Ouincy
at the Wallwood Boy Scout
Camp, 23 Wallwood BSA
Drive,
The session begins Friday
at 10 a.m. and ends Sunday
with lunch.
The workshop is open to


anyone 18 years and older
who wants to improve her
outdoor skills and enjoy sev-
eral recreational activities,
In four three-and-one-half-
hour sessions, the BOW
workshop teaches skills asso-
ciated with fishing, hunting
and other forms of outdoor
recreation,
The cost for the three-
day workshop is $175, and
there are a limited number


of discounted slots available
for low-income participants,
single parents and college
students attending the work-
shop for the first time. The
workshop is restricted to 100
participants on a first-come,
first-served basis.
For more information
about the BOW workshop
or how you can register, visit
MyFWC.com/BOW, or call
561-625-5122.


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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 9, 2010


I ~I


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Coast Guard Station
Panama City ...................... ..................... (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown .. .. (352) 447-6900
CoastGuardAuxiliary
St. Marks (Flotilla 12) .......................................... (850) 906-0540
or ........................... ... ...................... 893-5137
Shell Point (Flotilla 13) ........................................ (850) 926-2606
or .. ... 926-5654


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Credit worthiness and membership eligibility required. Contact Crawfordville Office for complete details.
~eradl Llol(850) 224-4960, ext. 1254 I www.fsucu.org
For tides at the following points High Tide Low Tide
Gulf Coast Weekly Almanac add to Dog Island Listings: Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min.
Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min.
Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min.
Tide charts by Sept. 9 Sept. 15 4.~ SS Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min.
Zihua Software, LLC West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 in.

St. Marks River Entrance City of St. Marks -' Shell Point, Spring Creek

Date Hih Low Hih Low Hih Date Hih Low Hih Low Hih Date Hih Low Hih Low Hg
Thu 4.0 ft. 0.1 ft. 4.3 ft. 0.7 ft. Thu 3.7 ft. 0.1 ft. 4.0 ft. 0.7 ft. Thu 4.0 ft. 0.1 ft. 4.4 ft. 0.8 ft.
Sp9, 10 3:15 AM 19:23 AM 3:40 PM 19:45 PM Sp9, 10 3:51 AM 10:27 AM 14:16 PM 10:49 PM Sp9, 10 3:12 AM 9:20 AM 3:37 PM 9:42 PM -
Fri 4.0 ft. -0.1 ft. 4.1 ft. 1.1 ft. Fri 3.8 ft. -0.1 ft. 3.8 ft. 1.0 ft. Fri 4.1 ft. -0.1 ft. 4.2 ft. 1.2 ft.
Sp10, 10 3:43 AM 110:08 AM 14:28 PM 110:15 PM Sp10, 10 4:19 AM 111:12 AM 15:04 PM 111:19 PM Sp10, 10 3:40 AM 110:05 AM 14:25 PM 110:12 PMFit
Sat 4.1 ft. -0.1 ft. 3.7 ft. 1.4 ft. Sat 3.8 ft. -0.1 ft. 3.5 ft. 1.3 ft. Sat 4.2 ft. -0.1 ft. 3.8 ft. 1.6 ft.
Sp11, 10 4:10 AM 10:54 AM 15:15 PM 10:43 PM Sp11, 10 4:46 AM 11:58 AM 15:51 PM 11:47 PM Sp11, 10 4:07 AM 10:51 AM 15:12 PM 10:40 PM Sept. 15
Sun 4.0 ft. 0.1 ft. 3.3 ft. 1.7 ft. Sun 3.8 ft. 0.0 ft. 3.1 ft. Sun 4.1 ft. 0.1 ft. 3.4 ft. 1.9 ft.
Sp12, 10 4:37 AM 11:43 AM 16:04 PM 11:09 PM Sp12, 10 5:13 AM 112:47 PM 16:40 PM Sp12, 10 4:34 AM 11:40 AM 6:01 PM 11:06 PM
Mon 3.9 ft. 0.3 ft. 2.9 ft. 2.0 ft. Mon 1.6 ft. 3.6 ft. 0.3 ft. 2.7 ft. Mon 4.0 ft. 0.4 ft. 3.0 ft. 2.1 ft..
Sp13, 10 15:06 AM 112:38 PM 17:00 PM 111:36 PM Sp13, 10 12:13 AM 15:42 AM 1:42 PM 7:36 PM Sp13, 10 5:03 AM 112:35 PM 16:57 PM 111:33 PM ~
Tue 3.7 ft. 0.7 ft. 2.6 ft. Tue 1.8 ft. 3.5 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.4 ft. Tue 3.8 ft. 0.7 ft. 2.6 ft. *.
Sp14, 10 5:38 AM 11:46 PM 8:15 PM Sp14, 10 12:40 AM 16:14 AM 12:50 PM 8:51 PM Sp14, 10 5:35 AM 11:43 PM 8:12 PM
Wed 2.1 ft. 3.5 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.4 ft. Wed 1.9 ft. 3.2 ft. 0.8 ft. 2.3 ft. Wed 2.3 ft. 3.5 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.5 ft.
Full
Sp15. 10 12:08 AM 16:21 AM 13:15 PM 10:04 PM Se 15. 10 1:12 AM 6:57 AM 4:19 PM 10:40 PM Se 15. 10 12:05 AM 6:18 AM 13:12 PM 10:01 PM
Sept. 23

Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Dog Island West End

Date Hih Low Hih Low Hih Date Hih Low Hih Low Date High Low Hih Low
Thu 3.0 ft. 0.1 ft. 3.2 ft. 0.5 ft. Thu 3.1 ft. 0.1 ft. 3.4 ft. 0.7 ft. Th t t t t
Sep9, 10 3:07 AM 9:34 AM 3:32 PM 9:56 PM Sp9, 10 2:59 AM 19:02 AM 3:24 PM 19:24 PM Se 9, 10 3:08 AM 8:34 AM 3:38 PM 9:10 PM
Fri 3.0 ft. -0.1 ft. 3.1 ft. 0.8 ft. Fi3.2 f. -0.1 f. 3.2 f. 1.1 f.Fri 3.0 ft. 0.6 ft. 3.2 ft. 1.4 ft. Last
Sep 10, 10 3:35 AM 110:19 AM 14:20 PM 110:26 PM Sp10, 10 13:27 AM 19:47 AM 4:12 PM 9:54 PM Sp10, 10 3:23 AM 19:23 AM 4:41 PM 9:36 PM Oct. 1
Sat 3.1 ft. -0.1 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.1 ft. Sat 3.2 ft. -0.1 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.4 ft. Sat 3.2 ft. 0.4 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.7 ft.
Sep 11, 10 14:02 AM 111:05 AM 15:07 PM 110:54 PMSe 11, 10 13:54 AM 110:33 AM 14:59 PM 110:22 PMSe 11, 10 13:42 AM 110:13 AM 15:47 PM 19:59 PM
Sun 3.0 ft. 0.0 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.3 ft. Sun 3.1 f. 0.0 f. 2.6 f. 1.7 f. Sun 3.3 ft. 0.4 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.9 ft.
Sep 12, 10 14:29 AM 111:54 AM 15:56 PM 111:20 PM Sp12, 10 14:21 AM 111:22 AM 15:48 PM 110:48 PM Sp12, 10 14:07 AM 111:10 AM 17:02 PM 110:20 PM
Mon 2.9 ft. 0.2 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.4 ft. Mon 3.1 ft. 0.3 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.9 ft. Mon 3.4 ft. 0.4 ft. 2.6 ft. 2.0 ft.
Sep 13, 10 4:58 AM 12:49 PM 16:52 PM 11:47 PM Sp13, 10 14:50 AM 112:17 PM 16:44 PM 111:15 PM Sp13, 10 4:38 AM 12:16 PM 8:34 PM 10:41 PM
Tue 2.8 ft. 0.5 ft. 1.9 ft. Tue 2.9 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.0 ft. 2.1 ft. Tue 3.4 ft. 0.5 ft.
Sep 14, 10 5:30 AM 1:57 PM 8:07 PM Sp14, 10 5:22 AM 1:25 PM 7:59 PM 11:47 PM Sp14, 10 5:16 AM 1:36 PM New
Wed 1.6 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.7 ft. 1.8 ft. Wd 2.7 f. 0.9 f. 1.9 f.Wed 3.3 ft. 0.5 ft. Oct. 7
Sep 15, 10 12:19 AM 6:13 AM 13:26 PM 9:56 PM Sp15, 10 6:05 AM 2:54 PM 9:48 PM Sp15, 10 6:05 AM 2:59 PM
Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
MalorTimes MalorTimes MalorTimes MalorTimes MalorTimes MalorTimes MalorTimes Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesda
2 37 pm-4 37 pm 3 30 pm-5 30 pm 4 25pm-6 25pm 521 pm-7 21 pm 6 17pm-8 17pm 713pm-913pm 806pm-1006pm Sunrise 7:18 am 7:19 am 7:19 am 7:20 am 7:20 am 7:21 am 7:21 am
2 10 am-4 10 am 3 03 am-5 03 am 3 58 am-5 58 am 4 53 am-6 53 am 5 49 am-7 49am 6 45 am-8 45 am 7 40 am-9 40 am Sunset 7:50 pm 7:48 pm 7:47 pm 7:46 pm 7:45 pm 7:43 pm 7:42 pm
Mmor Times Mmor Times Mmor Times Mmor Times Mmor Times Mmor Times Mmor Times Nonie 83a ,6a 05 m 1:1p .5p :4p :6p
836am-936am 945am-1045am 1053am-ll53am 1200pm-100pm I04pm-204pm 2 03pm-3 03pm 2 56 pm-35p $10 ie83 m 94 m 1:5a 20 m 10 m 20 m 256 pm
8 27 pm-9 27pm 9 07pm-10 07pm 9 50pm-10 50pm 10 36 pm-ll 36 pm ------- -- ---- 108Set 8:29 pm 9:08 pm 9:51 pm 10:37 pm 11:28 pm --:-- 12:21 am
Better Good Average Average Average Average Average Brightness 7% 15% 22% 30% 37% 4-?,, 50%


Labor Day weekend has
come and gone...unevent-
fully.
How things have changed
over the years. I can remember
when that weekend was the
official end of summer, and
the Tuesday morning was
back to school for students
all over the country.
When I joined the Coast
Guard Auxiliary in 1971, Labor
Day weekends were always
one of our busiest times. That
was before the CB radios and
the boaters had no means of
letting us know they were in
trouble. Most of the rescues
happened when our patrol
vessels came upon the dis-
abled boater as they (the Aux-
iliary vessel) ran their routine,
scheduled atrol.
The CB and VHF-FM ra-
dios were a blessing to all
concerned. I remember one
rescue when we utilized both
types. It was a rescue that
lived on in the memory of
those involved and was viv-
idly recalled by Mitch Miller
when he became Flotilla Com-
.
meander m 1991.
In reply to my letter, Mitch
replied, "When you wrote and
asked what was my special
memory of the Auxiliary, a
tear came to my eyes ... not
because of anything bad, but
because of my fondest memo-
.
ries involving an Auxilliarist
who has passed away.
"It was Saturday, July 1,
1989, and Bob Gibson had


patroldutywithJohnHealyas
his crew. For some unknown
reason, Ken Lloyd was on
radio by himself."
The Shell Point Station was
authorized for two radio op-
erators and Mitchtold of how
a mayday was heard about 5
p.m. from a vessel that was
taking on water at K-Tower
with 10 persons on board.
Bob picked up an additional
crewman, Trip Corbin, and
headed that way.
Due to the number of
people on the sinking boat,
the Coast Guard at Panama
City requested a second rescue
vessel be dispatched. Mitch
and Becky Miller volunteered.
Little over an hour later they
were on scene. Many of the
p geassen rs had been trans-
ferred to other vessels and
were on their way in,
TheMillersstoodbywhile
the owner made arrange-
mentswithashrimpertotow
his 38-foot boat into port, then
they departed for Shell Point
with three of the passengers.
Bob Gibson and one of their
crewmen remained with the
vessel at K-Tower.
Mitch told of how, when
it was getting dark, he and
Becky commented that they
would be able to see the
firework displays scheduled
for Alligator Point and Shell
Point. They saw fireworks all
right, but not as expected. As
they neared Buoy 16 a thun-
derstorm was approaching

4 SCHOOL
18 BACK IN...
DOSOMEIHING
FOR YOURSELF
GET IN SHAPE
I CAN HELP!
CALL
Gena Davis
Personal Trainer
926-7685 or 510-2326


with a staff meeting at 5:15
p.m., followed by a business
meeting at 7 p.m., then our
usualpot-luckdinner.Visitors
are always welcomed,
Members are urged to
attend because a member
training class will be held
afterwards,
And now a report on Flo-
tilla 12 (St. Marks) news by
Carolyn Treadon. On Saturday,
members of Flotilla 12 held a
ramp day to provide free ves-
sel examinations. Our staff
officer for vessel exams, Steve
Hults, organized the event!
We try to select days when
we have the best chance to
reach the most number of
folks, like a busy holiday boat-
ing weekend. We will get a
grand total of the number of
inspections performed at our
monthly meeting next week.
we have moved our
monthly meeting to Sept. 11
to accommodate the Labor
Day holiday. We also shifted
the time to 10 a.m. This is a
busy time of year for us and
the meetings are a great time
for all of us to catch up and
begin planning for the fast
approaching upcoming new
year.
REMEMBER SAFE BOAT-
ING IS NO ACCIDENT


munications,
Bob apparently realized
what had happened and
turned off his radio. Ken
remembered that Bob's boat,
"Loophole," also had a CB
radio and gave him a call on
it.BobansweredassuringKen
thattheywereokaybutcould
make only about six knots
due to the weather,
It was shortly after 3 a.m.,
on July 2 when they secured
the station,
Mitch stated, "As far as I
know this was Ken's last duty.
He spent more than 15 hours
without a break at the radio
and all but the last four by
himself. During most of that
time he was doing the job of
three people. He is an indi-
vidual I will never forget."
Kenneth H. Lloyd died
23 October 1989. As he had
requested, his ashes were
taken to sea aboard the Aux-
iliary Vessel "Dingbat," and
the owner of boat and good
friend, Tom Kinnebrew, pre-
sided over the poignantly
beautiful burial at sea cer-
emony.
Back to the present. Flo-
tilla 13 will hold its September
meeting at the Shell Point
Coast Guard Auxiliary Station
this coming Saturday, Sept. 11,


and there was no way around
so they secured everything
and updated Ken Lloyd on
radio duty.
They went through not
one, but two thunderstorms
with seas going from smooth
to 4-6 foot with ever changing
winds. It was a nightmare, but
Ken was there on the radio.
He kept track of positions of
the Millers and Bob and the
weather conditions.
He had been on duty alone
for over 11 hours when Dr.
School Davis joined him. To-
.
gather they coordmated with
a USCG Falcon Jet that was
attempting to drop a pump
and fuelto the disabled vessel
because it was taking on more
water than the pump they had
could handle
Bob, the shrimper and the
vessel in tow were now in
the middle of the thunder-
storms.


The parachute became
fouled in Bob's prop and he
took water over the stern at-
tempting to cut it off. Water
got into Bob's VHF radio
microphone and keyed it
open, thus eliminating allVHF
communications between the
jet, the shrimper, Bob and the
station,
We later learned that the
jet did drop another pump,
which was put into service.
After the Millers secured
.
their boat "Daybreak," Mitch
went to the station. Ken had
managed to establish commu-
nications with the shrimper
on another channel and had
been informed that Bob and
crew had just left for Shell
Point.
CG Panama City was not
too thrilled about this the
last thing they needed was
another Auxiliary vessel in a
thunderstorm without com-


&


Coast Guard Auxiliary Reports











THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 9, 2010 Page 11A


JOf fl ILS OT
.
OIISilitillon Day

.
Friday Sentember 17 2010
] / /

Hudson Park 12:00 1:00



Free Lunch for Everyone

Pulled pork sandwich, chips, drink, & more


Meet Republican candidates during

lunch as we celebrate the greatest form


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I.Inn Alan Thompson
CRIMINAL DEFENSE
misdemeanor felony
DUI BUI
"I will personally handle your case".
The first consultation is free. Thirty years
defending clients in Wakulla County.
850-926-7663
7 High Drive, Crawfordville, Florida
www.Iynnthompsonlaw.com



On the end,
it's all about the baby.



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GIFT CERTIFICHE3 MAILMLE


WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSIONERS'
SCHEDULE FOR WORKSHOPS,
PUBLIC HEARINGS, & MEETINGS
akulla 2010 CALENDAR
ounty
(To be held in the Commission Chambers)


ARRET EDa

DEMAND TO SPEAK TO AN ATTORNEY



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Extensive Trial and Litigation Experience

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Robbery | Sexual Crimes | Battery | Assault | Fraud

VOP + ALL FELONY CHARGES


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.


All Workshops, Public Hearings and Commission Meetings are open to the
public. Wakulla County does not discriminate on the basis of race, color,
national origin, sex, religion, age or handicapped status in employment or
the provision of services. Handicapped individuals may receive special
accommodations with one working day's notice as per section 286.011(6)
ES. If special accommodations are required, please call Lara Beck-Edwards,
Executive Assistant to the County Administrator at (850) 926-0919.
September 9, 2010


Sheriff's Report

On Aug. 26, School Re- knife had a 4.5 i
source Officer Deputy Carl blade and the stu
Allen responded to a com- issued a notice t
plaint of an unruly student in court for posse
at Wakulla Middle School. concealed weapon
The 12-year-old male created On Aug. 2
a disturbance in a classroom Green of Crawfor
by swinging a backpack at a ported a vehicle
teacher. Someone smashed
Deputy Allen discovered dow of her vehicle
the student hiding behind radio was discover
the school. The juvenile ing from a screw.
was suspended from school On Aug. 28,
for three days and given a Tucker of Craw
civil citation for 16 hours reported a grand
for disruption of a school victim parked a M
function. vice company veh
On Aug. 30, Joe Lee to a Crawfordville
Dennard, 56, of Havana, address for 10 mi
was charged with careless when he returned
driving following a traffic quito fogger, value
accident on U.S. Highway had been removed
319 near Buck Miller Road. back of the truck,
Dennard struck the back of On Aug. 28, T
a vehicle that was stopped JordanofPanacea
making a turn onto a drive- burglary of a hunt
way. A forced entry w
The victim was Joshua ered at the camp h
Lee Blankenship of Craw- firearms stored at
fordville. Both vehicles were were stolen. The
towed and a traffic delay were valued at $2,
was created. Dennard was On Aug. 30
given a traffic citation for Hansen of Craw
careless driving, reported a fraudul
On Aug. 28, Kelvin E. a credit card. Thirt
Webster of Crawfordville ent charges were d
reported a residential bur- on the victim's c
glary. A forced entry was for a total of $1,
discovered and a television, other charges fo
valued at $400, was taken, were attempted u
Damage to the home was fully. The charges
estimatedat$50. intheUnitedKing
On Aug. 28, Lucinda On Aug. 31,
Daniel of Crawfordville re- Goodwin of Craw
ported a fraud as someone reported a fraud. F
created bogus charges on actions in Virginia
her bank account in Mary- covered on her c
land. Fifteen transactions for a total of $2,05
totaled $1,555. On Aug. 31, A
On Aug. 26, Lana Mahaffey,44,ofTa
Grimes of Tallahassee re- was charged wit
ported a grand theft at her with a suspended
Panacea home. Items in her and operating an
shed, valued at $405, were tered vehicle afte
taken including a power stop. Deputy Ry
saw, mower and gasoline.
On Aug. 27, Simeon
L. Nelson of Wakulla High
School reported a weapon -.
offense as a 17-year-old fe- .==
male was carrying a steak
knife. A number of female
students were discovered
smoking in a restroom.
When the students were
searched for contraband, 35 years .
a knife was discovered in Sc 1 eat
the student's backpack. The


nch fixed
dent was
o appear
ssion of a
,
8, Sherri
dville re-
burglary.
d the win-
and a CB
red hang-

James H.
fordville
theft. The
cCall Ser-
icle next
Highway
nutes and
d a mos-
d at $500,
from the

timothy R.
reported
ing camp.
as discov-
ouse. Five
the camp
firearms
200.
, Katrina
fordville
ent use of
een differ-
iscovered
redit card
086. Two
r $1,326
nsuccess-
originated
dom,
Deborah
fordville
ive trans-
were dis-
redit card
1.
nthony D.
llahassee,
h driving
d license
unregis-
r a traffic
an Muse


made the traffic stop after
discovering that the vehicle
had no tag.
On Sept. 1, Scotty McK-
eith Wooten, 24, of Tallahas-
see, was stopped for driving
60 miles per hour in a 45
mile per hour zone on Craw-
fordville Highway. Wooten's
driver's license was sus-
pended as a habitual of-
fender and he was charged
with Driving With License
Suspended or Revoked with
knowledge. Deputy Will
Hudson investigated,
On Aug. 20, Haley Jill
Whitlock, 32, of Crawford-
ville was stopped by law
enforcement officials and
faces charges of possession
of a Schedule III or IV drug
and obtaining a controlled
substance by fraud. Inves-
tigators determined that
Whitlock would attempt
to purchase a prescription
from a local drug store after
posing as an employee at a
doctor's office. Investigators
allowed the transaction to
take place and stopped their
suspectatthedrivethrough
window.
Whitlock told investiga-
tors that she has used three
names to obtain medica-
tions in the past. She was
stopped with 60 Hydrocodo-
ne tablets at the time of the
investigation. Due to having
a young child with her,
investigators allowed her
to turn herself in and face
the charges after her family
obligations were met.
During the past week the
Wakulla County Sheriffs
Office received 1,055 calls
for service including 21
residential and business
alarms; 132 citizen contacts;
11 frauds; and 56 investiga-
tions.


special to The News
wakulla County Sher-
iffs Office investigators
arrested a 20-year-old Craw-
fordville man following a
three hour manhunt that
began at approximately
3:15 p.m. and concluded
shortly after 6:15 p.m. Fri-
day, Sept. 3, according to
Sheriff David Harvey.
The search began in
the wakulla Gardens area
and concluded about three
miles away near a conve-
nience store and storage
area at the intersection
of U.S. Highway 98 and
Highway 365 (Spring Creek
Highway).
Nathaniel Allen Wil-
liams III, 20, of Crawford-
ville was arrested without
incident and charged with
unlawful possession of a
concealed handcuff key,
resisting an officer without
violence, false imprison-
ment, aggravated battery
with a victim who was
pregnant at the time of the
offense, aggravated bat-
tery with use of a deadly
weapon and violation of
conditions of a pretrial
release to refrain from con-
tact with the victim.
Deputy Taff Stokley was
called to a home in the
wakulla Gardens area to
investigate a disturbance
and heard a male shouting
in a loud and aggressive
voice. Deputy Stokley was
allowed into the home
by the 31-year-old female
victim. He checked on
her welfare and observed
Williams run out the back
door of the home into a
wooded area.
Law enforcement of-


enforcement until approxi-
mately 6:20 p.m. when the
sheriffs office received a
tip that he was near the
storage units. Det. Rob
Giddens, Lt. Bruce Ashley
and Det. Erika Fore found
williams hiding near the
administrative area of the
storage units and recov-
ered a five inch knife, a
handcuff key concealed
under his shirt and a bottle
of prescription medication
that was taken from the
victim.
"There was no way we
were going to give up on
this tonight," said Major
Maurice Langston. "We
were here for the long
haul. We didn't want him
on the loose because we
were concerned for her
safety."
williams' Ford Bronco
was recovered in the area
along with a small amount
of marijuana and a pillow
case that contained pet
snakes and a turtle that
had died.
In addition to Major
Langston, the case was
investigated by Det. Nick
Boutwell, Captain Cliff Car-
roll, Det. Erika Fore, Cap-
tain Steve Ganey, Det. Rob
GiddensDeputyNickGray,
Lt. Bruce Ashley, CSI Al-
lison Blackstock, Sgt. Ron-
ald Mitchell, Captain Billy
Jones, Deputy Taff Stokley,
Deputy Vicki Mitchell, Det.
Derek Lawhon, Lt. Mike
Kemp, Deputy Ryan Muse,
Captain Bill Poole, Deputy
will Hudson, Deputy Ward
Kromer and officials from
the Leon County Sheriffs
Office helicopter and WCI
K-9 (Unit).


Nathaniel Allen Williams
was te suhuect oa man-
'
facials set up a perimeter
and additional law en-
forcement officers arrived
on the scene to interview
the victim. She reported
that she was held against
her will by Williams who
had a pipe wrench and
held a knife against her
body. Williams allegedly
threw her to the floor and
jumped on her. The victim
issevenmonthspregnant.
EMS officials treated the
victim at the scene and she
refused transportation to a
Tallahassee hospital. She
had been cut three times
on the leg and choked by
the suspect. Williams also
damaged the inside of the
home before fleeing the
scene.
The WCSO K-9 Unit was
deployed as well as search
dogs from the wakulla Cor-
rectional Institution and a
helicopter from the Leon
County Sheriffs Office. A
command post was set up
a Klickitat Drive and Maido
Street and law enforce-
ment officials searched the
region.
Williams escaped law


September 7, 2010


Regular Board Meeting 5:00 P.M.
(Including Budget Public Hearing)
Public Hearings to Consider Imposing the 6:00 P.M.
Solid Waste Service Special Assessment and
the Fire Protection Services Assessment.
(To Be Held at the Community Center)


September 20, 2010


October 4, 2010

October 7, 2010



October 7, 2010
October 7, 2010


October 18, 2010
November 1, 2010


Regular Board Meeting
(Including Budget Public Hearing)
Regular Board Meeting
Workshop to Discuss the Roads Clean
Action Plan Committees Final Report
and Recommendations
Workshop: To Discuss Mt. Beasor Rd.
Workshop: To Discuss the Proposed
Solid Waste Licensing Ordinance

Regular Board Meeting
Regular Board Meeting


5:00 P.M.


5:00 P.M.

5:00 P.M.



6:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.


5:00 P.M.
5:00 P.M.


Mlan is sought in manhunt













J


Eckhmrd


Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 9, 2010

FWMA Yard Sale is held

By JENNIFER RAYMOND
jraymond@thewakullanews.net -
In order to raise money for
their injured and orphaned of
animals, the Florida wild -
Mammal Association holds a
yard sale every six months.
"It's a great fundraiser,"
executive director Chris -
Beatty said. But she added
that she wouldn't want to do
any more often.
"It's a lot of work," Beatty
said.
The yard sale took place
Friday and Saturday and
Beatty said they received a lot
of merchandise including .
those from an estate sale as
well as donated items. ..
All proceeds go to FWMA
and any left over items
are taken to Promise Land
Ministries, Beatty said.
FWMA starts collecting
items about a month prior
and uses a storage unit from
Townsend's Nad's Mini
Storage to store the items
until the sale. .
The next upcoming event .. c.' 0 -- .
for FWMA is the third annual
Woodstork Festival and load, up to eight passengers,
Silent Auction on Oct. 9 from or $5 for a single car. Shoppers at the y
sale, right, sort thr<
11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For more information
items for sale. The
The festivals still seeking visit www.woodstorkfestival,
sale is a major fundi
sponsors, com or www.wakullawildlife. for FWMA.
Admission is $10 per car org.


Continued from Page 1A
Not only does Ecklund
include fun things among
the trains but also objects
that have a personal mean-
ing to him.
Sitting near the pond on
some rocks is a silver Statue
of Liberty, which is sig-
nificant because Ecklund's
father came to Ellis Island
from Sweden. He says he
plans to improve the Statue
of Liberty by building a
sturdy platform so it will
stand in the pond,
In some of the yards of
the houses along the track


are baseball players, which
Ina Ecklund, Eric Ecklund's
wife, says is for her grand-
son, who loves baseball.
Walking around the cor-
ner of part of the track a
large Tyrannosaurus Rex
is peeking out of the rocks
because their grandchildren
really like the movie Juras-
sic Park.
The trains themselves
are quite detailed as well,
Not only do the trains emit
sounds but some of them
also have smoke coming
from the locomotive,
Viewing this train col-


election as a whole is quite
impressive, especially since
Ecklund built it all him-
self.
His fascination with
trains started when he
was 4 or 5 years old in
Jamestown, N.Y. and saw
a moving model train in a
department store. He has
loved them ever since.
The trains he has now he
began collecting in 1998.
Currently, he is work-
ing on a circus train that
has various circus animals
including a rhinoceros that
moves and various rides


such as a ferris wheel and
carousel that the train will The Cauzican animal rescue group is planning to hold
go by. a haunted house,
Today he is a member of An organizational meeting for volunteers who wold
the Florida Garden Railway like to participate will be held on Saturday, Sept. 11, at the
Society. The Ecklunds travel animal control conference room from 2 to 4 p.m.
to Tampa and Orlando to Cauzican also welcomes groups that want to design their
various model train shows own room within the haunted house,
where he enjoys conversing For more information, email insanecircus2010@yahoo.
with fellow train collectors com.
many of them traveling as
far as South Carolina and
south Florida to see his col-
lection at his home.
Dressed in a train T-shirt
and engineer's cap, it's clear
Ecklund is an avid fan of
trains.


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THE ll'AKULLAI NEll'S. Th~ursdlay. September 9. 2010


I
The planned growers market is
to be held in the yard in front
of Posh, above, beginning in
late October. The market is
being organized by Debbie Dix,
right, owner of Posh, and Jenni-
fer Taylor of FAMU's Small Farm
Program.


-- ----- -


- -- -..... --...1
0 a a


= * * * *

*



October 29, 2010
Wildwood Country Club


The weekend market, which is slated to
start at the end of October, would offer
organic or unsprayed produce, fresh-
caught seafood plus music, children's
activities, cooking demonstrations and
workshops on sustainable living.


people will enjoy the music
and poetry of local artists,
fresh-baked sweets from
Posh and local vendors,
and more."
"We are very excited
to get a growers market
started in Sopchoppy," said
Debbie Dix, owner of Posh
Java, Organics and Gifts,
"There are a large num-
ber of growers who use
organic practices who will
benefit from having a week-
end Wakulla County mar-
ket where they can sell
their produce, and there
are residents and travelers
who will enjoy having an
opportunity to purchase
unsprayed produce locally,
from the farmers and grow-
ers themselves, rather than
having to travel an hour
Or more to outlying coun-
ties...
The target date for the
first market is Friday, Oct.
29 and Saturday, Oct. 30.
In addition to the pro-
duce, there will be live
music, children's activities,


By DEBBIE DIX
special to The News
A growers market is
forming in Sopchoppy,
with plans for it to be held
outside of Posh beginning
at the end of October,
The market is planned to
be weekly on Fridays and
Saturday and would of-
fer produce that has either
been organically grown or
unsprayed by pesticides,
Growers interested in
participating in the market
should contact Jennifer
Taylor, coordinator of the
Small Farms Program at
FAMU, at (850) 241-3873 or
(850) 412-7065.
Local growers may sell
their own produce or food
items as well as canned
goods produced in a li-
censed facility.
"At the Sopchoppy grow-
ers market, people will
enjoy the seasonal delights
and variety of fresh pro-
duce from our local farm-
ers, and local fresh-catch
seafood," said Taylor. "Also,


,,
- "- .-T.


a cooking demonstration
using in-season produce,
as well as the possibility of
other workshops of sustain-
able living practices.
We encourage people to
slow down, come out and
enjoy the Sopchoppy differ-
ence," said Taylor.
Int rested gr ow ers
should contact Taylor to be
approved to participate.


Special to The News
Local author Doug Al-
derson's book, "New Dawn
for the Kissimmee River:
Orlando to Okeechobee by
Kayak" has been deemed
the best outdoor book of
2009 by the Florida Outdoor
Writers Association,
The award was given at
the group's annual awards
ceremony held in Tallahas-
see on Aug. 21.
Alderson, who lives in
the Woodville area, was also
awarded first place prizes
for magazine articles in
the travel and conservation
categories.
The nonfiction Kissim-
mee book, published by the
University Press of Florida,
uses a 12-day hiking and kay-
aking expedition from Or-
lando to Lake Okeechobee
as a way to highlight the
restoration of the Kissim-
mee River.
The story includes his-
toric journal entries from
expeditions during the Sec-


The Kissimmee River
was channelized for flood
control between 1960 and
1971, reducing a 103-mile
natural river with a marshy
floodplain up to three miles
wide to a 52-mile canal.
In 1999, the first phase of
restoration began in which
a segment of the canal was
filled in and water was
forced back into the Kis-
simmee's old channel and
floodplain. Within months,
silt was flushed out, native
marsh plants sprouted anew,
andfishandwildlifepopula.
tions started to rebound.


. .
01n your neighbors and

help your community

SATURDAY,

SEPT. 11, 2010

And help

Make A Difference!

8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.


Doug Alderson
ond Seminole War and the
1890s, and one chapter is
devoted to the region's col-
orful cowboy and ranching
history,


4 4 4 4
ga ,
a ffift a
goor
e 1111
LLilic
CO
a (Of
a ets *
mm O\till /
9 pe"
9 4 4 4 4 4


.
Sign up for volunteers
Sheriff's Office September 11
Memorial Ceremony
Hudson Park to select a volunteer
location Volunteer Service
(or go directly to your organization's
volunteer site
Lunch and Celebrate Wakulla!
(Lunch will be provided for all
volunteers!)
Enjoy your day and thank you for
joining VolunteerWAKULLA to help
MAKE A DIFFERENCE!


7:30 a.m.
8:30 a.m.

9:30 a.m.




12:30 p.m.



2:00 p.m.


Call 745-0060 for more information or

Visit VolunteerWAKULLA.0rg & learn

how you can VOLUNTEER

VolunteerWAKULLA
8A Cedar Street
Crawfordville, FL
32327 O
745-0600
www.volunteerwakulla.org .


Section B


4 RE EN


Doug Alderson woins book award





v
to make your reservation.
www.jacksbquick.com
Open Monday Friday 7am 6pm
Saturday by appointment only



*



Order the special








4 Or o
okplimentary Co?$


while quantities last.

Check out our new

MORU ItelRSI


926-3500 ran orders 926-3501
500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvill


MISSING AH OLD ERIENI?


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- e e That's a Huge Savings Off
Our Regular Subscription Price
* r -
RE-SUBSCRIBE TO THE
g I I
A

I I


6 Months 1 0 subscribers


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Expires E

IWall lo: The Wakulla News
P.O. Box 307
Crawfordville. FL 32326
Or call 850-926-7102 with credit or debit card





*


Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 9, 2010


Thursday, Sept. 9
BINGO will be held
at the VFW Post on Arran
Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
BINGO, to benefit the
Florida Wild Mammal As-
sociation, will be held at
Hamaknockers Oasis in
Ochlockonee Bay from 6
p.m.to 9 p.m.
ROTARY CLUB meets
at the senior center at
noon.
TOASTMASTERS will
be held from 6:30 to 7:30
p.m. at Posey's Up the
Creek. For more informa-
tion call 528-0895.
BIG BEND HOSPICE
offers an Adult Grief Sup-
port Group starting today
and going until September
16. It starts at 6 p.m. at Big
Bend Hospice Counseling
and Resource Center, 1669
Mahan Center Blvd., Tal-
lahassee. Contact Wendy
at 878-5310, ext. 704 or
wendy@bigbendhospice.
org.
COASTAL OPTIMIST
CLUB will meet at noon at
Posey's Steam Room in
Panacea.
ALCOHOLICS ANON-
YMOUS will meet at 7:30
p.m. at St. Marks First Bap-
tist Church.
SOPCHOPPY DEPOT
COMMITTEE will meet at 6
p.m. at Posh. Contact Deb-
bie at 528-5838.
WAKULLA DEMO-
CRATIC WOMEN'S CLUB
will meet at Myra Jean's
in Crawfordville from 6 to
8 p.m.
Friday, Sept.10
FRIDAY AFTERNOON
BOOK CLUB meets at the
public library from 3 p.m. to
4:30 p.m.
GAMBLERS ANONY-
MOUSmeetsatSt.Teresa's
Episcopal Church in Medart
from 7 p.m.to 8:30 p.m.
PICKING' 'N' GRINNING'
JAM SESSION will be held
at the senior center from
10 a.m. to noon. (Also on
Tuesday)
SASSY STRIPPERS
QUILTERS GROUP meets
at the public library from
9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. to
make quilts for traumatized
children.The "cruiser quilts"
are donated to Wakulla
County deputies to be used
for children in need. New
members welcome. For in-
formation, call 926-6290.
KARAOKE will be held
at Hamaknockers's Oasis.
ALCOHOLICS ANON-
YMOUS meets each Friday
at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee
Street in Crawfordville. Call
(850)545-1853 for more
information.
BIG BEND HOSPICE


ADVISORY COUNCIL will
meet at 10 a.m. at Posey's
Steam Room in Panacea.
Please call Pam Allbritton
at 926-9308 for more infor-
mation.
Saturday, Sept.11
NARCOTICS ANON-
YMOUS meets at 3240
Crawfordville Highway at 5
p.m. For more information,
call 224-2321.
ALCOHOLICS ANON-
YMOUS meets each Sat-
urday at 5:30 p.m. at Mis-
sion by the Sea Church on
Alligator Drive in Alligator
Point. Call (850)545-1853
for more information.
Sunday, Sept.12
*ALCOHOLICSANONY-
MOUS meets each Sunday
at 6:00 p.m. at 54 Ochlock-
onee Street in Crawfordville,
Florida. For more informa-
tion call (850)545-1853.
*AFRICAN DRUMMING
WORKSHOP with Yasid will
meet at Posh in Sopchoppy
at2:30 p.m. For more infor-
mation, call 962-1010.
OUTDOORS4-H CLUB
will meet at 2 p.m. at the
Wakulla County Exten-
sion Office. Contact Alvin
Henderson at 251-6072 for
more information. Partici-
pation is open to students
ages 8-18. The cost is $12
for the school year and
covers membership in all
4-H clubs.
ARTS AND CRAFT-
ERS 4-H CLUB will meet
at 11 a.m. at the Wakulla
County Extension Off ice.
Contact Sue Sullivan at
766-7407 for more informa-
tion. Participation is open
to students ages 8-18. The
cost is $12 for the school
year and covers member-
ship in all 4-H clubs.
SEA SEARCHERS 4-
H CLUB will meet at 9:30
a.m. at the Wakulla County
Extension Office. Contact
Stacy Harvey at 510-0219
for more information. Par-
ticipation is open to stu-
dents ages 8-18. The cost
is $12 for the school year
and covers membership in
all 4-H clubs.
SEWING PARLOR with
4-H is from 2 to 4 p.m. at the
Wakulla County Extension
Office.Contact Jan Fincher
at 556-2624 for more infor-
mation. Participation is open
to students ages 8-18. The
cost is $12 for the school
year and covers member-
ship in all 4-H clubs.
Monday, Sept.13
LINE DANCING will be
held at the senior center at
1:30 p.m.
WOMEN'S ALCOHOL-
ICSANONYMOUSmeeting
is held each Monday at 6


p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee
Street in Crawfordville.
For more information call
(850)545-1853.
ALCOHOLICS ANON-
YMOUS will meet at 7:30
p.m.at St. Marks First Bap-
tist Church.
WAKULLA COUNTY
CHRISTIAN COALITION
will meet at 7 p.m. at the
public library.
Tuesday, Sept. 14
ALANON meets at
54 Ochlockonee Street in
Crawfordville at noon.
BOOK BUNCH meets
in the children's room at the
public library at 10:30 a.m.
NARCOTICS ANON-
YMOUS meets at 3240
Crawfordville Highway at 7
p.m. For more information,
call 224-2321.
VFW LADIES AUXIL-
IARY BINGO will be held
at the VFW Post on Arran
Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
CRAWFORDVILLE Ll-
ONS CLUB will meet at 6
p.m. at the Hudson House
behind Wakulla Bank.
WAKULLA COUNTY
TRANSPORTATION DIS-
ADVANTAGED COORDI-
NATING BOARD will meet
at 10 a.m. at the Wakulla
County Public Library. In
addition to its regular busi-
ness, the agenda willin-
clude the annual operat-
ing report and the actual
expenditure report. A time
for public comments will be
afforded to anyone wish-
ing to address the board.
For additional information,
contact Vanita Anderson
at the Apalachee Regional
Planning Council, 20776
Central Avenue East, Suite
1, Blountstown, FL 32424.
LIVESTOCK4-H CLUB
will meet at 7 p.m for an
informational meeting at
the Wakulla County Ex-
tension Office. For more
information, contact Justin
Coddington at 728-0213.
Participation is open to stu-
dents ages 8-18.The cost is
$12 for the school year and
covers membership in all
4-H clubs.
WAKULLA COUNTY
H ISTO R ICAL SOCIETY
will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the
public library.
WA KULLA HIG H
SCHOOL ADV ISOR Y
COUNCIL will hold its first
meeting of the year from
3 to 5 p.m. in the public
library. The public is invited
to attend.

Wednesday, Sept. 15
ALCOHOLICS ANON-
YMOUS meets at Ochlock-
onee Bay UMC on Surf
Roadatnoon.


BOOK BABIES, sto-
rytime with activities for
toddlers, will be held at the
public library at 10:30 a.m.
BRAIN GYM CLASS
will be held at the senior
center at 10:30 a.m.
KNITTING GROUP
meets at the public library
from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For
information, call491-1684.
LINE DANCING will be
held at the senior center at
2 p.m.
ThursdaySept.16
TOASTMASTERS will
be held from 6:30 to 7:30
p.m. at Posey's Up the
Creek. For more informa-
tion call 528-0895.
COASTAL OPTIMIST
CLUB will meet at noon at
Posey's Steam Room in
Panacea.
ALCOHOLICS ANON-
YMOUS will meet at 7:30
p.m.at St.Marks First Bap-
tist Church.
ROTARY CLUB OF
WAKULLA COUNTY will
meet at 12 p.m. at the
Wakulla County Senior
Citizen's Center.
CONCERNED CITI-
ZENS OF WAKULLA will
meet at 7 p.m. at the public
library.
Friday, Sept. 17
ALCOHOLICS ANON-
YMOUS meets each Friday
at 8 p.m.at 54 Ochlockonee
Street in Crawfordville. Call
(850)545-1853 for more
information.

Ci ty and Coun ty
Meetings
Thursday, Sept.9
ST.MARKS CITY COM-
MISSION will meet in a
workshop on the possibility
of buying the building that
houses the United States
post office at 6 p.m. The
regular commission meet-
ing will follow at 7 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 13
SOPCHOPPY CITY
COMMISSION will meet at
6:30 p.m. at city hall for its
monthly meeting.
WAKULLA COUNTY
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION will meet at
7 p.m. in the county com-
mission chambers.

Special Events
Saturday, Sept. 11
M AK EADIFFER -
ENCE DAY will be hosted
by VolunteerWAKULLA at
Hudson Park beginning at
9:30 a.m. featuring several
community service events.
Volunteer sign-up will begin
at 7:30 a.m.at Hudson Park.
Next to the park, the Sher-
iffs Office will be having an
eventcommemorating9/11
beginningat8:30a.m.After


the activities are completed
there will be a free lunch,
door prizes, and community
celebration. Call 745-0600
for more information.
NINTH ANNUAL SEPT.
11 MEMORIAL SERVICE
will be held at the sheriff's
office at 15 Oak Street be-
ginning at 8:45 a.m.
COMMUNITY-WIDE
YARD SALE will be held in
Sopchoppy 8 a.m. until 2
p.m.There will be individual
sellers as well as sales to
benefit the Sopchoppy De-
pot and the Lion's Club. If
anyone plans to have a yard
sale in Sopchoppy that day,
please call Susan at Sisters
at 962-2550. Sisters will


provide the directional road
signs into Rose Street that
morning. If the weather is
bad, the yard sale will be
rescheduled for Sept. 18.
Sunday, Sept.12
PICKING IN THE PARK
will be held from 2 to 4 p.m.
in Hudson Park. A group of
local musicians would like
to make it a monthly pro-
gram on the second Sun-
day of each month. It will
feature a mix of classic and
current country, Gospel,
fifties music from local mu-
sicians. Musicians wanting
to participate can call Dick
Bickford at 926-8136.


sacrificing your free time
forourhomelessanimals,
Please know that you are
very much appreciated,
Now, the cute little
Doxies are gone but, we
have a few dogs and cats
that have been with us
for quite some time now.
They are not cute little
puppies anymore and
often get overlooked,
Some of them are already
house trained and their
adoption fee has been
reduced. They are spayed
and neutered, and up to
date on their shots. They
are wonderful animals
looking for a chance to
win your love. Come visit,
and one of them might
catch your eye.
CHAT is now on Face-
book. If you have a Face-
book accountplease look
for and "like" CHAT.
TheupcomingRescues
and Runways fashion
show and silent auction,
hosted by Maurice's in
Crawfordville, 2000 Craw-
fordville Hwy., will be
held Sunday, Sept. 26 at
7 p.m. This is the second
year in a row Maurice's is
helping CHAT raise funds
and items on our wishlist,
and we are thankful for
their efforts,
We would be grateful
for items donated to our
silentauctio.Everypenny
raised from the auction
will benefit our homeless
animals, and help fund
medical treatments.
Maurice's will be ac-
cepting donations for
CHAT at their store loca-
tion should you not be
able to join us Sept. 26.
Items on our wish list are
listed on chatofwakulla.
org.


By PETRA SHUFF
C.H.A.T.
Recently we took in a
litter of little, cute pure
bredDachshundpuppies,
an adult female and a
blind 9-month-old male.
We barely had a chance
to get them on Petfinder,
combeforeallofthepups
had a forever home. A
couple of them even had
a list of possible adopters,
should the first adopter
change their mind,
one of these new par-
ents drove all the way
from Fort Walton just to
visit his new addition to
the family. He called me
the day after his visit to
comment on the clean
facility, the health of our
animals and the wonder-
ful attitude of our volun-
teers,
His words were: "I
came very early on Sun-
day, too early for you to
be open to the public.
It was a rainy, nasty day
but your volunteers were
there cleaning, taking
care of the animals. They
were smiling and very
friendly even though we
interrupted their morning
routine. We have been to
a lot of shelters but your
place is certainly one of
the nicest and friendliest
we have ever visited."
He compared us to
Alaqua shelter that Heide
visited a few months ago
and shared that road trip
story with you. Knowing
that shelter, the com-
parison was a big compli-
ment.Sothis compliment
needed to be shared, and
I want to again thank
our board members and
volunteers that worked
that day, or any day, for


.




Call us to


WEEK IN WVAKULLA


Tall Waggers...


>age


LargePly Bting55sTrim
ConIrolled Environment

4,, Allsi;esandareeJ<

day "'a everience




























































This year's honoree, pay for spaying and neu-
Sarah Nan Haney, is no tearing of pets when their
exception to that stan- owners cannot afford the
dard. She is clearly an in- procedures.
spirational At the
role model, age of 36,
She and her The "Pink Tie" event Hane y
husband d* will be held Oct. 2 learned
Mark, have that she
been mar- and is $75 per guest had thyroid
ried for 19 h all d cancer. A
wit nrocee s to
years and r year later,
have three benefit Tallahassee she was
daughters. IViemorial Cancer diagnosed
Profess with breast
sionall y, programs. cancer,
Haney is "That's
the Director of Be The when my whole world
Solution, a non-profit changed," she said. She
organization that helps underwent a double mas-

MARY ELLEN DAVIS

E Pae nn d robale Locatedin
commerce Transact.ons waknuscoury
ea Pr pe uncesses

(850) 926-6003
17 High Drive, Suite C
Courthouse Square
Crawfordville, Florida
The rairing of a lawyer .s an .mporlanI aec.sion Inal should not be
based solely on an adverlisement Before you aecide, asit rne Io send you
f"ee written informaloon abour my qual.ficanons and experience


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 9, 2010 Page 3B


The great English play-
wright William Shakespeare
wrote plays and sonnets
that were set in gorgeous
gardens.
Anyone can have a gar-
den inspired by Shake-
speare by recreating scenes
and planting commonly
found flowers and herbs
that were referenced in his
literary works.
Create a winding Shake-
speare's path with familiar
flowers, a wooden fence
and benches.
Plant a garden for all the
seasons with flowers cho-
sen for successive blooms,
a pleasure in summer, with
ferns roses and lavender, as
well as in spring with cro-
cuses, pansies, hellebores,
and iris.
Place plaques along the
path with quotations from
the great masterpieces.
What to Buy / Plant


for we are to utter sweet
breath," from "A Midsum-
mer Night's Dream."
"The strawberry grows
underneath the nettle and
wholesome berries thrive
and best ripen neighboured
by fruit of baser quality,"
from Henry V.
"The arm potent Mars,
of lances the almighty,
gave Hector a gift, a gilt
nutmeg, a lemon stuck
with cloves." from "Love's
Labours Lost."
For Fun
It is fun to explore each
plant mentioned in the
plays.
The world of Shake-
speare's plays and poems
seems made for children.
Through illustrations, rid-
dles and even paper dolls,
explore all the imaginative
ways in which Shakespeare
has been accessible to chil-
dren over the centuries.


'
'



By NANCY GEORGE


Winn-Dixie Stores will
offer flu vaccinations on a
walk-in basis and through
vaccine clinics at all of its
in-store pharmacies.
Customers using their
Winn-Dixie Customer Re-
ward Card will receive a $5
discount off the $28 flu vac-
cine ($23 with the Customer
Reward Card).
Winn-Dixie's pharmacies
also are offering a new, high
dosage flu vaccine for those
65 and older for $43 with
the Customer Reward Card
($48 for non-cardholders)
this year.
Both the regular and high


dose flu vaccines provide
protection against the H1N1
virus.
The Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention
(CDC) says the most im-
portant step in protecting
against the flu is to get
vaccinated. The CDC recom-
mends all people over the
age of six months of age
should be vaccinated each
year,
Flu vaccines will be ad-
ministered by certified phar-
macists. No appointment is
necessary,
See your Winn-Dixie
pharmacist for details,


The goal is to show
the relationship of Shake-
speare's literary art to the
plants you select.
From "The Winter's
Tale:" "Here's flowers for
you; Hot lavender, mints,
savory, marjoram; the
marigold, that goes to bed
wi' the sun and with him
rises weeping: these are
flowers of middle sum-
mer."
From "Hamlet:" "There's
rosemary, that's for remem-
brance; pray, love, remem-
ber: and there is pansies.
that's for thoughts."
A Shakespearean garden
features flowers, such as


aster, lily, daisy, iris, rose,
columbine, narcissus, pop.
pies, hyssop, violet, tulip,
daffodil and pinks known
as dianthus; and also herbs
for example: nettle, thyme,
lemon balm, parsley, fen.
nel, rue mint, lettuce, mus.
tard; and shrubs like honey.
suckle, hemlock, ferns and
ornamental grasses,
"I was seven of the nine
days out of the wonder
before you came; for look
here what I found on a
palm tree," from "As You
Like It."
Edibles
"And, most dear actors,
eat no onions or garlic,


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Southeastern Urological Cen-
ter is open,
The screenings will take
place this year on Tuesday,
Sept.14,andWednesdaySept.
15,atSoutheasternUrological
Center located at 2000 Centre
Point Blvd. in Tallahassee.
Men who wish to partici-
patemustpre-registerasthere
are only a limited number of


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T STRY


Thefifthannual"Cards
for a Cure" Charity Ca-
sino Night and Auction
will be held Oct. 2, 2010
at the Tallahassee An-
tique Car Museum from
7 p.m. to midnight.
This "Pink Tie" event
is $75 per guest with all
proceeds to benefit Talla-
hassee Memorial Cancer
programs.
The Tallahassee Me-
morial HealthCare Foun-
dation and the Cards for
a Cure Committee will
again offer a wonderful
evening featuring hors
d'oeuvres, beverages of
choice, fabulous des-
serts, gaming, dancing,
an exciting live auction,

nduars bntndu beT e
Groove Merchants.
October is National

BroanstthCaanncer Awarenei
Cards for a Cure honors
a woman in the commu-
nity who has displayed
valor, vigor and dignity
in confronting the chal-
lenges of cancer,


tectomy and radiation
treatments at Tallahassee
Memorial.
Now, she is doing well
and actively advocates
for women with cancer
through initiatives such
as Cards for a Cure.
For more information
and to purchase tickets,
call the TMH Foundation
at 431-5389, or visit www.
cardsforacuretallahassee.
com.

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 9, 2010


WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)


the court's bounds. They
pointed out that most of
the justices were appointed
by former Democratic Gov.
Lawton Chiles and current
Gov. Charlie Crist.
It was not clear which
was more of an epithet,
though two dissents came
from Crist appointees Jus-
tices Ricky Polston and
Charles Canady.
"It's terribly disappoint-
ing to have the work of the
legislative branch demol-
ished by a co-equal branch
of government, especially
when there's no express
authority in the Constitu-
tion for their doing so,"
said Cannon, who was the
losing lawyer in the case
over Amendment 7, having
personally argued it before
the court.
The other measure the
Court refused to give a clean
bill of health to was Amend-
ment 9, which was the
Republican-led Legislature's
response to the Obama
administration's healthcare
overhaul.
The amendment would
have tried to prevent Florid-
ians from being compelled
to participate in any health
care system and sought to
protect residents who want
to opt out of a new federal
requirement that they even-
tually buy health insurance
or face penalties,
Circuit Judge James Shelf-
er killed that proposal, and
the Supreme Court, in a
5-2 decision with Canady
and Polston again dissent-
ing, agreed that the ballot
proposal did not pass con-
stitutional muster and that
the summary voters would
see was a classic example of
"flying under false colors."
Thecourtalsodismissed
an idea by Attorney Gen-
eral Bill McCollum to put
the entire amendment on


the ballot to clear up any
confusion.
Rep. Scott Plakon (R-
Longwood) who sponsored
the health care amendment
in the House, echoed Hari-
dopolos and Cannon. He
said the opinion smelled
of *judicial activism" and
that it was "judges playing
politics."
He also said that he
would refile the amend-
ment during the next leg-
islative session and try to
put it on the November
2012 ballot.
"This is far from over,"
he said,
But with ballots for No-
vember about to be printed,
it's at least over for this
year.
A BALLOT ADDITION
With all the subtractions
from the November ballot
this week, it was tough to
figure out what would be
left when voters go to the
polls. But one thing was
added: Republican guberna-
torial nominee Rick's Scott's
running mate.
Scott, who claimed the
Republican nomination
after campaigning against
Tallahassee insiders and im-
migrants, this week picked a
number two who is both.
A Trinidadian-immigrant
who's been in the Legisla-
ture since 2003, Rep. Jen-
nifer Carroll (R-Fleming Is-
land) joined the Scott ticket,
possiblyinhopesthatshe'll
draw African-American, Ca-
ribbean and female votes, or
at least some interest, away
from Democrat Alex Sink.
Carroll, the lone black Re-
publican in the Legislature,
was introduced by Scott
on a three-city fly-around,
starting at the Jacksonville
Naval Air Station, one of the
postingsduringher20-year
Navy career.


The same Republican
Party leaders who fought
tooth and nail to keep Scott
from being the party's nomi-
nee rushed to praise his
first big decision,
Scott's choice of Carroll
quickly received praise from
party leaders, including
House Speaker Designate
Dean Cannon and state par-
ty chairman John Thrasher,
both of whom backed Attor-
ney General Bill McCollum
in the Republican primary,
Another Republican who
backed McCollum liked the
pick: Jennifer Carroll. She
acknowledged on her first
day on the ticket, that yes,
she'd supported the other
guy, because, she said, she'd
given him her word, and
that was important.
But Scott, like his party
did for him, appears to have
forgiven and forgotten with
Carroll's place on the ticket
possibly a step toward heal-
ing wounds in a party trying
not to have an elephant's
memory about its bitter
primary.
Asked whether Carroll
would draw votes away
from her, Sink demurred,
though she noted the out-
sider looked inside for his
number two.
"Of course he has (picked
an insider), but I don't think
it really plays into the cam-
paign, frankly," Sink con-
ceded. "Rick Scott is the
candidate for governor."
Another candidate for
governor became a candi-
date no more this week.
Independent Lawton "Bud"
Chiles, son of the legendary
former Democratic senator
and governor, ended his
quixotic bid and threw his
support behind Sink.
Scott'scampquicklytried
to throw cold water on the
notionthatChilesdropping
Out would benefit Sink, and
even Chiles wouldn't say for
sure all his support would


go to the CFO.
"The Bud Chiles support-
ers will be supporting Alex
Sink perhaps not all of
them," he added. "But the
majority of them will."
Sink tried to make the
political marriage seem like
a match made in Heaven
- "You and I share a deep
love for Florida," she said,
But it was clear the union
was far from perfect, howev-
er, when talk turned to 527s,
the independent spending
organizations that played a
big role in the Republican
governor's primary and
will likely become a central,
shadowy source for corpo-
rate, union, and industry
association money in the
Sink-Scott contest.
A week before he exited
the governor's race stage
left, Chiles called the or-
ganizations "legal money
laundering." Accepting his
endorsement, Sink said she
hadn't thought about it.
With ads against her
already airing and Florida's
$50 million man preparing
to launch his television cam-
paign, she likely will think
about it soon, however.

WHAT'S SO SPECIAL
ABOUT A SESSION?
House Speaker Larry Cre-
tul made it clear he didn't
want to have a special ses-
sion to deal with issues
related to the Gulf Coast oil
spilling July. He made it clear
this week he doesn't want
to have one in September,
either,
Following reports by
several working groups
that an immediate legisla-
tive session was unneeded,
Cretul said any issues aris-
ing out of the Gulf oil spill
that need to be tackled by
lawmakers can wait until
spring,
In less than hour, legisla-
tive leaders had pledged to
look at possible economic


responses to the spill after
they rebuffed Gov. Crist in
July when he called lawmak-
ers to Tallahassee to ban oil
drilling,
They didn't even bother
convening this time.
For Senate President Jeff
Atwater, who appeared to
accept Cretul's verdict, it was
a far cry from as a week ago,
when he said he wanted to
lawmakers to reconvene as
soon as possible,
In an Aug. 19 memo At-
water wrote to the Senate,
he said he would be "disap-
pointed if we do not return
in a special session at the
earliest possible date."
Atwater's opponent for
Chief Financial Officer,
Democrat Loranne Ausley,
wasted little time criticiz-
ing the decision, saying
Atwater's previous state-
ments about wanting a
special session were "empty
promises."
The back-and-forth over
the not-so-special session
came as another oil rig in
the Gulf of Mexico, the Ver-
milion Block 380 rig located
80-miles off the coast of
Louisiana, exploded. But it
remains to be seen if the in-
cident adds fuel back to the
special session fire, which
was for this week anyway,
extinguished,

STORY OF THE WEEK:
The Florida Supreme Court
checked-and-balanced three
proposed constitutional
amendments lawmakers
desperately wanted on the
November ballot, but let
two others they wanted to
give the heave-ho to stay,
OUOTE OF THE WEEK:
"I believe in equal branches
of government. It sounds
to me like the court thinks
it is more equal than the
other branches," Senate
President-designate Mike
Haridopolos.


By KEITH LAING
THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA
TALLAHASSEE Equality
isn't what it used to be.
At least not this week
in the eyes of Republican
leaders in the Legislature
like Senate President-desig-
nate Mike Haridopolos and
future House Speaker Dean
Cannon,
Haridopolos and Cannon
were steamed this week be-
cause their co-equal branch
of government saw three
proposed constitutional
amendments they'd put
on the November ballot co-
equally rejected by another
branch,
The Florida Supreme
Court said no to proposals
asking voters to block parts
of the federal health care
law and preserve legislators'
ability to draw legislative
districts in a certain way.
Another rejected amend-
ment dealt with new prop-
erty tax exemptions.
Making matters worse
for the Legislature, the high
court allowed two amend-
ments lawmakers had want-
ed tossed to stand,
Amendments 5 and 6,
aimed at preventing the
drawing of districts that
favor themselves or their
party, were given the OK,
despite protests from leg-
islators that it was nearly
impossible and could erase
gains made by minorities.
Amendments 5 and 6
had been challenged by
two members of Congress.
Amendment 7, the legisla-
tively-written amendment
removed from the ballot by
the court on Tuesday, was
a response to Amendments
5 and 6.
As they usually do when
they don't agree with a
court ruling, GOP lawmak-
ers decried the "activist
judges" for over stepping


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PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act whic makes it ille-
i ta rtise ef nicen
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin or an intention to
t2 di r i tn n ,nlI -
status includes children under
the age of 18 living with parents
or legal custodians, pregnant
women and le securing the
sto 80f ren under the
This newspaper will not accept
any advertising for real estate
that is a violation of the law. Our
aea rs a r tnkm d at
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To com-
plain of discrimination call HUD
toll free at 1-800-669-9777. The
toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

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LENDER

515 Apartments for
Rent





$munounsQuarnamns
1 BDR as LOW as 3550/M0.
2 BDR as LOW as $650/M0.
3 BDR as LOW as $750/M0.
amenities include: swimming
pool, gym, computer lab.
Call 926-1134
for more information.

530 Comm.Property
for Rent


105 Bsines Opprtu-Mr. Stump


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110 Hel Wanted

0
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Part-time
school bus driver.
COAST Charter School,
St. Marks. Contact
Carrie at 925-6344.

120 Services and Busi-


Licensed John Farrell
926-5179
566-7550
ALL ABOUT...
CONCRETE LANDSCAPE
bl plar s
pavers tractor work
call JOSEPH FRANCIS
850-556-1178/
850-926-9064
BACK FORTY TRACTOR
SERVICE Bushhogging, Box-
blading Driveway. Larry Carter
Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931,
850-694-7041. Licensed/In-
sured.
Harold Burse Stump Grinding
926-7291.














KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR
Commercial, residential and mo-
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models. Lic. #RA0062516.
926-3546.


S355 Yard SaleS


OFFICE SPAGE!I
Several E
frontage
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le
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at $250/mo. First and last month s rent.
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WOM WH AT W
an A a Dassan
Thursday 9/9 & Friday 9110,
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Quality antique furniture: quarter
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washer/dryer, antique ice box, old
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custom jewelry, lighter col section,
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pan, old cast iron pots an
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So bring your truck& help to load-
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311 Rehwinkle Dr
(off of Crawfordville Hwy.)
850-408-0467


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BUSINESSIRETAIL
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Woodville Retail
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Divided Office Space-1074/sf
Lewiswood Center
421-5039

555 Houses for Rent

2BR/1BA $850/month. Access
to Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious
WateCs Rd. Availae6in Septem-
-
Mashes Sands Rd. 2BR/2BA on
the bay. Furnished or unfur-
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smoking or pets. Deposit and
applic at lon req uired .
706-845-7626, 706-302-6003.

560 Land for Sale

2-acre lot for sale near new
Shadeville School, corner of
Steel Court and Spring Creek
Hwy. (city water). Owner financ-
ing.
850-556-1178.
Two acres zoned residential
North of Crawfordville on H.R.
Linzey Rd. $38,995.00. Call
850-510-4869 or 850-933-4955.
565 Mobile Homes for
Rent
3BR/2BA D/W on 5 acres. Nice!
3 miles from Woodville.
$780/mo., first, last and security
Call 850-574-4354
3BR/2BA, DW/MH, Merwyn Dr.
near Lake Ellen. $695/month,
+deposit, lease/purchase-option
available. Central-Air/Heat,
fenced yard, tiled-in kitchen.
$1000FF August's rent.
850-212-5650
Nice Mobile Home for Rent or
Sell 3Br/2Ba, Large Yard, Deck
$650.00 per Month. First Months
Rent Plus Deposit. Call Revell
Reality 962-2212 or Owner
962-1967
Woodville M/H, 2BR/1BA on one
acre lot, front and back
decks/porches, washer/dryer
hook u p. No smok ing .
$400/month, plus deposit. Call
850-933-2903.

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For Sale
CHERRY BEDROOM SET. Solid
Wood, never used, brand new in
factory boxes. English Dovetail.
Original cost $4500. Sell for
$895. Can deliver. Call Tom
(813)600-3653
Help Wanted
DRIVERS--ASAPI New Pay In-
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275 Home Furnishings

$175 Queen Pillow-Top Mattress
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The administration of the estate of Alvin F.
aumga n rayd2e2 e81e0dj iswh indytnethof
rocb eC s nWhacku ad n cr d
3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the per-
al representative's attorney are set forth
w.
All creditors of the decedent and other per-
nvbnst chioT30 m a
ti ds re i toobetsWry NmustEfiLeAtThE r
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
RRV3 ED SAAFTPEROFHTEH ANTET E
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons who have claims or demands
nst e ed trts Ta NmusMf etThebr

A ERN FETDHAPNOFICEE FIRST PUBLl-
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DER D NT'S DATE OF DEATH IS

tT idatep mhbe irst2p0 location of this No-

toanleyE. Groorbs nal Representative:
Fla. BarNo.0365971
Law Offices of Stuart E. Goldberg, P.L.
P.O. Box 12458
Tallahassee, Florida 32317
(850)222-4000
Personal Representative:
Julie S. Beachler
139 Fox Run Circle
Crawfordville, Florida 32327
September 2, 9, 2010
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 83, PART IV
Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida
Self Storage Facility Act Florida Statutes,"
Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away
Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on
Thursday, September 16, 2010 at 11:00 am
at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring
Creek Hwy for the contents of a Mini Self
Storage unit containing the personal prop-
ertyof:
GEDEEHNNRRllSAS
Before the sale date of September 16,
2010, the owners may redeem their prop-
erty by payment of the outstanding balance
and costs by paying in person at the Stow
Away Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy,
CrawfordvilleFL32327.
September 2, 9, 2010


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3Br 2Ba DWMH $825mo
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3Br 2Ba Duplex $775mo +
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1


Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 9, 2010


Roger R. Craft; Unknown Parties in Posses-
in nl; bf Ilym ndu eU wnai tnti
vr t b ddeaDd oe t(s)hewhho are Ct
known Parties may claim an Interest as
2hoeur l, Helrs, Devisees, Grantees, or
alma s
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
tdeedro A st m0ej, nteroe nosC%1
Case No. 2009-CA-000429 of the Circuit
Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for

unu lora ern it onr
best bidder for cash AT THE FRO T DOOR
OF THE TEMPORARY WAKULLA
2USNHTADECVOU TRHOUSRAWFOARTDEVDLLAET
FLORIDA AT 11:00 A.M. on October 7,
20t\0, thh fsol wii I 3rr eend, ierty as
LOT 4, BLOCK A" OF RIVER BEND ES-
MATREESPAANRUNRUELCARRDEDESSUCB BVESDIOANS
FOLLOWS

NOMMENCEEACTT E NORTHWANSSTH OR6
SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA
SOU AR N AND RAUSNTTNEEN E
SAID SECTION 3, A DISTANCE OF 3369.2


THE SCHOOL BOARD


NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 83, PART IV

No i e ur ur tatoS cuitda Selh to
83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage
will hold a sale by sealed bid on ? .Iued "
September 18, 2010, at 10:00 a.m .1
Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of
Mini-Warehouse containing personal prop-
ertyof:
KAARME A ROB S
LATRESE WEBSTER
THOMAS CAROLING
Before the sale date of Saturday, Septem-
berpl8b2010atheownetrsofmtaher td
balance and cost by paying in person at
3291 Crawfordville Hwy.
September 2, 9, 2010

IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE
2NID JAUNDDC RCWRC T FCOLUNRTIDA,
Case #: 2009-CA-000429
Division #:
CitiMortgage, Inc.
Plaintiff
vs


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$3,000.00 tax Credit-2011 Get
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Miscellaneous
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Out of Area Real Estate
WATERFRONT 152' WATER-
FRONT, North Alabama, Scotts-
boro. 1.8 Acres, 3000 sq.ft.
Home, enclosed inground pool,
boathouse, pier, electric lifts for
boat / jet ski. Debbie Mathis Re-
alty (256)599-5910

NORTH ALABAMA FARM: 33
ACRES, 2 Barns, fenced, Large
Kennel, 3500 sq.ft. Home, sell
for Appraisal Price $329,000.
Debbie Mathis Realty
(256)599-5910

NORTH ALABAMA LAND: 480
Acres. Joins the Tennessee
River! Pasture, Bluff, Road
Frontage, Trees. $2500.00 /Acre.
Close to Chattanooga, TN & GA.
De bbie M at his Realt
(256)599-5910

Unbelievable Coastal Bargain!
Only $34,900 with FREE Boat
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Owner financing: (800)810-1590
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for great layout, springs, creeks,
private, reduced $199,500! Call
owner, (866)789-8535

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REDC | View Full Listings

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DATE:


Monday, September 13, 2010
Public Hearing on Class Size:
5:15 p.m.

M :S5 Fp.Board
Final Public Hearing on
2010-11 Budget6:00p.m.
School Board Room
69Arran Road
CrawfordvilleFlorida


IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-206-CA
JOHN J. RYAN and SHARON W. RYAN,
Plaintiff
vs.

livDeON NdlCHdOh EWINwnBROWNby
heirs, devisees, rantees, creditors, as-
ts gha d loPagearinptaht s claiming by
Defendant.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: EDWIN BROWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Tax
Deed Quiet Title has been filed against you,
regarding the property described as follows:
LOT 3, BLOCK H. AQUA DE VIDA, A SUB-
DIVISION AS PER SHOWN BY MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
S OPFA A L OEUN ,LIFCLR
IDA.
Wakulla County Parcel ID
No. 25-5S-02W-046-03397-000
and you are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on MARY W.
COLON, ESQUIRE, SMITH, THOMPSON,
SHAW & MANAUSA, P.A., Plaintiff s attor-
neys, 3520 Thomasville Road, 4th Floor,
tThana tsy 30 rTr0 4fTstnpoubme
tion date of this notice of action, and file the
ori inal with the Clerk of this Court either
be ore service on Plaintiffs attorneys or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition.
DATED this 9th day August, 2010.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- IRVENE METCALF
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of theCircuitCoun)
August 19, 26, 2010
September, 9, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 10-221 CA
AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank,
25365 West NPew r R d,
Newberry, Florida 32669
Plaintiff,


MAHRNA .LLE ,Vll and
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursu-
ant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned
action, I will sell the property situated in Wa-
t tCounty, Florida, described as follows
Lot 24 Section D Ochlockonee Shores a
subdivision as per map or plat thereof re-
corded in Plat Book 1 Page 17 of the Public
Records ofWakulla County, Florida.
at public sale, to the highest and best bid-
tde tr sI c ptnatsh e th yhmebnctal.
d0dr0aatsd Ot0h rnafte aas n andar
proceed to the h gdhest bidder for cash, ex-
epkua roeusn bCouln a g p2hSha i
Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327.
If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming
a right to funds remaining after the sale you
tuesrtt na6 a ysw f rhthClerkeofl fn
to I c imdou will not be entitled to any

Not ep soPn esiohna ahbi t awbdti edi
accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the Court Administrator s of-
fice not later than seven days prior to the
proceeding.
BRENTX.THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -sASR ECTLCEAR
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
September, 16, 2010


IN IHEClHOUll COUHI
OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.:10-56-PR

LRI ESB U GARTNER,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS


----


PURPOSE: Public hearings and
regular boar meeting.
For further information please contact:
WSaukpueljnCeonud tSs ffT
P.O. BC% 00d leArFaLn3
850-926-0065
Should you like more information regarding
board agendas and board meeting minutes,
please o to our website at
cwa sardcold tei tor ahnedpcl on
September, 2010


0










a
IS Available




At T he
a
F 0110 Wm g
.
Locations:


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Residents complain aboul wellands rules


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IN CRAWFORDVILLE
The Wakulla News Office
Ace Hardware
BeefO'Bradv's
CVS Pharmacy
Dollar General
Dux Liquors
El Jalisco
Food Mart
Hamaknocker's
Hardee s
Karol's Korner Petro
Lee s Liquor/Sqky Box Sports Bar
Lmdv s Chicken
Lube Expert
Michele's Convenience Store
Ming Tree
Myra Jeans
Savannah's
Senior Center
Stop N Save
Tasty Takeout
Victor s American Grille
Walgreen's
Wal-Mart
Winn Dixie

IN PANACEA
Big Top Supermarket
CTUH1 S Mini Mall
Dollar General

IN OCHLOCKONEE BAY
Angelo's
Mashes Sands BP

IN SOPCHOPPY
Express Lane
Lou's Bait and Tackle
Sally's
Sopchoppy Grocery


IN MEDART
Dollar General
Inland Store
Petro
Wakulla Co Public Library
Wildwood Inn

IN SPRING CREEK
Spring Creek Restaurant
IN SHELL POINT
C21/Florida Coastal Properties

IN ST. MARKS
Bo Lynn's
Express Lane
IN WOODVELE
Ace Hardware
Bert Thomas Grocery
Dollar General
Gulf C L b
oast um er
IGAGrocery Store

IN WAKULLA STATION
Dollar General
Savannah's
Stop N Save
Wakulla Station BP

AND ELSEWHERE
Glenda s Country Store
Mack's Country Meats
Spring Creek Restaurant
Stop N Save (Bloxham Cutoff/H'way 319)
Stop N Save (H'way 98/Spring Creek Road)
Wakulla Springs Lodge

IN TALLAHASSEE
Circle K (Capital Circle & C'ville Highway)
Public (Capital Circle & C'ville Highway)


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926-7811
Florida Coastal
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SEASONAL Snug Ha (0 0 alloille available 101 reni

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SHELL POINT Furnished 2BR 2BA mili pool. canal-
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.
Legal Notice


PEEl 10 A POIN I UN I HE SOU I HEHN
BOUNDARY OF THE 80 FOOT
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF STATE ROAD NO.
S-372, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 20
MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE
OF 632.15 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 12 DE-
GREES 10 MINUTES EAST 908.33 FEET
THEHALVERAGEEHEGHBAWATETRHEMARK
ALONG SAID AVERAGE HIGH WATER
MARK AS FOLLOWS:
SOUTH 54 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 22
SECONDS WEST 135.57 FEET, THENCE
SOUTH 61 DEGREES 10 MINUTES WEST
187.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 80 DE-
GREES 56 MINUTES WEST 100.00 FEET,
THENCE LEAVING SAID AVERAGE HIGH
WATER MARK RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES
59 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST 198.51
FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY
RATPHREOPO ETD 50.0dO TN OAD
SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN
THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 59 MIN-
UTES 31 SECONDS EAST 198.51 FEET
TOESNACD ASVEURTAHG HDGEHGWEAETER56M NK,
UTES WEST ALONG SAID AVERAGE
HIGH WATER MARK 16.95 FEET,
THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 04 MIN-
UTES 10 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID
AVERAGE HIGH WATER MARK 85.93
FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 09
MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 200.04
FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY
OF SAID PROPOSED 50.0 FOOT ROAD-
WAY, THENCE EASTERLY ALONG SAID
PROPOSED SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY
90.04 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST
IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF
ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN
60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
DATED at CRAWFORDVILLE Florida, this
26th day of August, 2010.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- BECKY WHALEY
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
September 9, 16, 2010



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO: 10-67PR
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAYNARD HUST
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

Mayhnearadmirdstdr coanse Ftihee 1 teR
pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla
County, Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 3056 Crawfordville High-
way, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The

tn t a f h or nI pe snearlt
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate including unmatured,
contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom
a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OFOSERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
All other creditors of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, including unmatured,
contingent or unliquidated claims must file
their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATIONOFTHISNOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
This date of the first publication of this
notice is September 2, 2010.
AttorneyforPersonal Representative:
Frances Casey Lowe
Crawfordville, Florida
Florida Bar No. 521450
3042 Crawfordville Highway
Crawfordville, Florida 32326
(850) 926-8245
Personal Representative:
Victoria S. Hust
St. Joh 6 Sprbng r8ee9

September, 9, 2010


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 9, 2010 Page 7B


r 1 ,dde obcashtont h da)yntof Oct
the Wakulla County Courthouse, 322
Shadeville Road, Crawfordville, Florida
32327, relative to the following described
property as set forth in the Fina Judgment
towit. '
LOT 5 OF THE RESORT ESTATES AT
SHELL POINT UNIT ONE, ACCORDING
TOTHEPLATTHEREOFASRECORDED
CPLRAETCBORDKS4bPAWAK58, AF CHEUNUB-
FLORIDA '
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, i hney, ttheerofthan3 tLhe
pPreonpdee% sterile a olaim within 60 days afs
ter the sal e.
This is an attempt to collect a debt and any
f obt d b d for th
in formation a ne may e use at
purpose.
If ith disability wh
ne s are ac modwtionain order t aro
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled
at no cost to you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the Court Ad-
ministrator at 850-926-d09 IllfF daaeR71ar-
Sneg or v803edrnpal y
DAq AT CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA
THIS 26TH DAY OF AUGUST, 2010.

CLERKOFBTRHEE I CTUHURMOND
BY -s- IRVENE METCALF
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Wakulla Coun Clerk
(Seal, of the CircuiPCourt)

CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE
I HEREBY CERTIFY that a tr d ct
f the f f ue d bo@st
assoU.S. a s tsh T sof August
2010, to the following. '
M Hardwick Schneide S
r /Owen Sokolof Att fror Pla tffn
10 E h Blvd S tne 20 T '
FL 336 en ower , ampa'
GEORGE W. HEATON, C/O DANA G
ROAD ALELSA SS3n FLT3HOOM8ASVILLE
THE RESORT ESTATESATSHELL POINT
HOMEOWNERS' ASSOCIATION, INC., c/o
DanaG. Toole, Esq., 3320 Thomasville
Road, Suite 201, Tallahassee" FL
32308-0733
SHELL POINT RESORT HOME OWNERS
AR T ANM EC 2F2L 3N34FOL7AGLER
September 9, 16, 2010


COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST COR- 2006-4,
NER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 4
SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, WAKULLA Plaintiff,
COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN
SOUTH ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUND- vs.
ARY OF SAID SECTION 25, A DISTANCE
OF 1583.91 FEET TO A CONCRETE HOWARD R. HAULING J et al
MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGIN- R, ,
NING. FROM SAID POINTOF BEGINNING Defendantss.
THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 09
MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 592.46 NOTICEOFRESCHEDULED
FEET TO A GOVERNMENT CONCRETE FORECLOSURE SALE
MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLY MAIN-
TAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN nt t
09ADEPGARREKERO3A TNHUETNECSE1RUSNESONDS an Order Rescheduling Forec rueaSale
WEST ALONG SAID MAINTAINED dated August 18, 2010 and entered in Case
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 389.56 NO. 65-2008-CA-000200 of the Circuit
FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 02 DE- Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in
GREES 18 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein
A LO NG SA ID MAIN TA INED U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 19.44 FEET,
THENCE RUN WEST 398.73 FEET, TRUSTEE FOR CSMC
THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE MORTGAGE-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SEC- CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-4, is the
TION 25, A DISTANCE OF 377.09 FEET Plaintiff and HOWARD R. HAULING JR;
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. JUDY HAULING; LIMERICK MORTGAGE
VENTURE, LLC, A FLORIDA LIMITED Ll-
aterpubicc le, e hr t tnar cbeesofTh ABILITY COMPANY; are the Defendants, I
temporary Wakulla County Courthouse, 322 will sell to the highest and best bidder for
Shadeville Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 at cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA
11:00 o clock, A.M., on October 7, 2010. COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 322 Shadeville
Dated this 26th day of August, 2010. Roadeat H:00AMboen the 23ird da of rSep-
Any person claiming an interest in the sur- property as set forth in said Final Judg-
plus from the sale, if any, other than the ment:
property owner as of the date of the lis pen-
dens, must file a claim within 60 days after LOT NUMBER EIGHT (8) IN SECTION B OF
the sale. OCHLOCKONEE SHORES SUBDIVISION
AS SHOWN BY PLATS OF SAID SUBDIVI-
Witness, my hand and seal of this court on
tthe 26th dayof August, 2010. SION OF RECORD ON PAGES 16 AND 17
OF PLAT BOOK NO.1 OF THE PUBLIC RE-
BRENT X. THURMOND CORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT A/K/A 319 MASHES SANDS ROAD, PANA-
BY -s- BECKY WHALEY CEA, FL 32346.
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court) Any person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
In accordance with the American with Dis- property owner as of the date of the Lis
abilities Act of 1990, persons needing a Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)
special accommodation to participate in this days after the sale.
c t nc t Ap pr rr CVV TN7ESS MY HAND and the seal of this
the proceedings. If hearing impaired, please ugu .
call (800) 955-8771 (TDD) or (800)
955-8770 (voice), via Florida Relay Service. Brent X. Thurmond
Clerk of the Circuit Court
September 9, 16, 2010 By: Irvene Metcalf
Deputy Clerk
September, 9, 2010
Advertisement Detail
WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLACOUNTYFLORIDA
CASE NO. 56-2009-CA-000359
RBC CENTURY BANK,
Plaintiff
vs.
CLARK, ERIC E., et al.,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order or Final Judgment entered in Case
No. 56-2009-CA-000359 of the Circuit Court
of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for WA-
KULLA County, Florida, wherein RBC CEN-
TURA BANK, Plaintiff, and, CLARK, ERIC
E., et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the
highest bidder for cash at 318 Shadeville
Road, Crawfordville, FL, at the hour of,
11:00 a.m. on the 7th day of October, 2010
thefollowing described property:
TRACTS, GRASS INLETATOYSTER BAY
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST COR-
RO LATTd5,U TOCNKd'H2, AFSUBSD R
SION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 10
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
CUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN
ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY
OF SAID SUBDIVISION AND ALONG THE
EASTERLY AND NORTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF GATOR
TRAIL, AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 20 DE-
GREES 03 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST
50.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT THENCE NORTH 69 DEGREES 56
MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 358.57
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CON-
TINUE ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY AS FOLLOW: NORTH 69 DE-
GREES 56 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST
55.62 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO
THE RIGHT, THENCE NORTHWESTERLY
8 3N1GFSEAETD HROEG TAHCAE R LSANF
GLE OF 29 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 14
SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF
85.20 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH
84 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 33 SECONDS
EAST 12.39 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH
25 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 12 SECONDS
WEST 25.36 FEET, THENCE RUN ORTH
EA TE R 9E E0E8 pHUETNECSE USNENOND
47 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 11 SECONDS
EAST 100.87 FEET, THENCE RUN
NORTH 63 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14
SECONDS EAST 81.23 FEET, THENCE
RUN SOUTH 50 DEGREES 37 MINUTES
55 SECONDS EAST 84.98 FEET, THENCE
RUN SOUTH 35 DEGREES 41 MINUTES
SECONDS WEST 177.53 FEET TO THE
POINTOFBEGINNING.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pen-
tdhee7amust file a claim within 60 days after
DATED this 1st day of September, 2010.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- BECKY WHALEY
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Waktu CCi CC

In accordance with the Americans with Dis-
abilities Act, persons needing a reasonable
accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should, no later than seven (7)

ng Sc t Of uDI)

September 9, 16, 2010



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 65-2009-CA-000224
SEC -
FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COMPANY
Plaintiff,
v
GEORGE W. HEATON; ANY AND ALL UN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIM ING BY,
HHRO GH AUMNEDDEFI ANDDAUGAALINDSETFTEHN
DAN RWAL VAE EWNHETTKNRWN IDOUBNE
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;
THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT
ANDMSHEWNER TARSESSOCRITAHIOMN NWC
ERS ASSOCIATION, INC.
Defendant (s).
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an

O erC d 5mu2 d tn or
Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit
in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein
the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEC-
OND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WA-
KULLACOUNTYFLORIDA
CIVll.. DIVISION
Case No.:65-2009-CA-000378
Division:
U.S. BANK N.A., AS TRUSTEE
FOR THE REGISTERED
HOLDERSOFMASTRASSET
BACKED SECURITIES TRUST,
2006-AM1, MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AMI
Plaintiff,
v.
RALPH DELLOSSO; EVELYN DELLOSSO;
UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DE-
FENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME
UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN IN-
RS GRAASNTSEPES SERS, H ERRSCDAEIV
ANTS,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to
a Final Summary Judgment dated March
24, 2010, entered in Civil Case No.:
65-2009-CA-000378, of the Circuit Court of
the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wa-
kulla County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK
N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGIS-
TERED HOLDERS OF MASTR ASSET
BACKED SECURITIES TRUST, 2006-AM1,
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFl-
CATES, SERIES 2006-AMI is Plaintiff, and
RALPH DELLOSSO, is Defendant.
I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at
11:00 a.m. at front door of the Courthouse,
322 Shadeville Road, Crawfordville, FL
32327 on the 23rd day of September, 2010
the following described real property as set
forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to
wit:
LOT 21, BLOCK "A", AMELIA WOOD, A
SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2,
PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
This property is located at the Street ad-
dress of: 83 Marie Circle, Crawfordville, FL
32327.
If you are a person claiming a right to
funds remaining after the sale, you must file
a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days
after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you
will not be entitled to any remaining funds.
After 60 days, only the owner of record as of
the date of the lis pendens may claim the
surplus.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of the
court on August 192010.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE COURT
By: IN etMet kf

hr a n, P.A
1701 West Hillsboro Blvd, Suite 307
Deerfield Beach, FL 33442
Telephone: (954) 354-3544

C NrehR TE HA I r
commodation in order to participate in a
court proceeding, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the Office of Court


a 5 7
compelling you to appear at a court pro-
ceeding; If you are hearing or voice im-
pairedcall711.
September 2, 9, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
WSATK LELAFCFOLUONR Ag LADNIDI ORN
CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000150
CU MEMBERS MORTGAGE, A DIVISION
OF COLONIAL SAVINGS, F.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
NATHAN G. TAYLOR; UNKNOWN
SPOUSEAOFONRAU NOGWNT LOOURSECOAF

AGSEYNYS.UTNAKNL ;N FSP S FCSA
DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED, AND IF
DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UN-
O NEHESFIS DEDllSTEOERSdGR NNTOEES,
AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PER
SORNS CALAl NGS BY, THROEUGHNUANMDEE
DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2,
Defendants)
NOTICE OF SALE


e oud Fuosreec a
cuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will
sell the property situate in Wakulla County,
Florida, described as:


INSURANCE SERVICES
Request for Proposal No. 2010-10
AdvertisementBeginDate/Time: August
27, 2010 at8:00 a.m.
Board Decisions will be available at: 3093
awfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL

Sealed responses for Insurance Services
addressed to the Wakulla County Purchas-
ing Director, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville, FL 32327 will be received un-
til 2:00 p.m. on September 14, 2010, at
edtimAn re poopn re v apf tue t
time and date specified will not be ac-
cepted and shall be returned unopened to
the Proposer.


ee i 95 0.926.9006
e-mail: ddubose@mvwakulla.com
RFP documents will be available at
www.mvwakulla.com or can be picked up
at the location listed above after 8:00 a.m.
on Friday, August27, 2010.

Any person with a qualified disability requir-
ing special accommodations at the bid
usmh r da bopvuer 5at
ness days prior to the event. If you are
hearing or speech impaired, please contact
this office by using the Florida Relay Serv-
ices which can be reached at
1.800.955.8771 (TDD).
The Board of County Commissioners re-
serves the right to reject any and all bids or
accept minor irregularities in the best inter-
estofWakullaCounty.
Howard Kessler, M.D., Chairman
Deborah DuBose, OMB Coordinator

September2,9,2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 65-2008-C -V

U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE FOR CSMC
MORTGAGE-BACKED
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES


MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY
SCHOOL O RMBMEERE2TINGHELD

The meeting was called to order by the
Chairman. The Pledge of Allegiance was re-
ed aMpeay aa@veSnur ne t
Miller were in attendance.
Moved by Mr. Scott, seconded by Mr. Gray
to approve the agenda.
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr.
Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
Holly Dlncman, Attorney for the Board,

a ths e tqnteh n eD -
man stated into record the reasons for the
expulsion hearing regarding the student ex-
pulslon. The floor was then given to Jeff
Wahlen, Attorney for the Petitioner. Mr.
I

dent had more than 10 pages of disciplinary
referrals that included more than 110 of-
fr IstW hsttuhd netcwoambr mdr ecripd a
be expelled for the remainder of the
2010-2011 school year through July 31,
2011 without educational services for one
year. The Board having considered the rec-
ommendation of expulsion by the Superin-
tendent, and the evidence Included in the
cord, the Board makes the following mo-

Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Gray
to find that the Superintendent has proven
the charges against student #09/10-10 by a
preponderance of competent substantial
d c r the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr.
Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Scott
to accept and impose the penalty recom-
m d y9thle0-S1u0pwritnht td try epsulso hoe

Vemainderrofdhe 201 2011Mscho oy r. Mr.
Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr.
Evans to accept and adopt the proposed
rr t ImF I 0) dredn ele0- psq
moving co nsemotion: Mroner.ook, Mr.
Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
The student expulsion hearing was then
closed.
Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Tho-

s r r tiMott aMnrds.M m .
September 9, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 10-360-DR
SHAINA R. TABLE
PETITIONER
AND
CHARLES B. TABLE
RESPONDENT.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE

HSAT EEESTBS HERPPY, FL 32356
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has
been filed against you and that you are re-
Reuireditoaseate t pSH INoAurRwnt nLEde-
whose address is 559 EAST IVAN ROAD
CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 on or befor
October 1, 2010, and file the original with the
clerk of this Court at 3056 Crawfordville
Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 before serv-
ice on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If
yoodo sobaed uldem n de

Copies of all court documents in this case,
including orders, are available at the Clerk
of the Circuit Courts office. You may review
these documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit
Courts office notified of your current ad-
dress. (You may file Notice of Current Ad-
dress, Florida Supreme Court Approved
tFasmilywb7 Fr 12 le5d)t" ur pdap s
record at the clerk s office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family
Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of documents and in-
formation. Failure to comply can result in
nacd including dismissal or striking of
Dated this 23rd day of August, 2010.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -ASBDETPHUD NCA1AK
(Seal, Waktu CCiou yCC)Ie

September 2, 9, 16, 23, 2010


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He then referred to the
Deepwater Horizon oil
spill in the Gulf and said
that oil has played a big
part of the economic di-
saster over the last couple
of years when gas at the
pump reached $4.50 per
gallon. He strongly encour-
aged support for weaning
ourselves from an energy
source that is controlled by
other countries.
Boyd noted a couple of
interesting statistical points
- for example, the U.S. is
number one in the world
per capital in health care
spending but 37th in the
world in outcome,
He said there are still
50 million Americans un-
insured.
He then stated immigra-
tion was an issue that had
eluded the previous admin-
istrations,
Boyd said the United
States became a great coun-
try by enlarging the middle
class and policies should be
focused on that area.
He then suggested as a
community, Wakulla County
should address the fol-
lowing issues as priority
in its agenda: education,
transportation, security,
environmental protection,
and creating a solid agricul-
ture policy.


By TAMMIE BARFIELD
tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Congressman Allen Boyd
(D-Monticello) recently held
an informal chat room dis-
cussion with members of
the Wakulla County Cham-
ber of Commerce board of
directors and guests.
Boyd said he wanted to
bring listeners up to speed
on where we are economi-
cally and a little about how
we ended up where we are
currently,
Since Sept.11, 2001, Boyd
said, there has been a wid-
ening gap between revenue
and expenditures in terms
of the federal budget. He
stated in 2007 there were
22 straight months of job
losses nationwide.
In 2008 and 2009 there
was the crash of the finan-
cial institutions with an
attempted
bailout in 4
s
Septem e congress
ber2oos to with chamber
ensure the discuss econ
ban k ing including t
infrastruc-
ture would bailout and
remain in- the current s
tact. Boyd 're-set,'not a
said then-
President George W. Bush
and both presidential candi-
dates Obama and McCain
- supported the strategy.


State Rep. Leonard Bem-
bry (D-Greenville) addressed
the chamber board of direc-
tors recently to provide a
summary of thepastlegisla-
tive session,
"To say that there's a
budgetary challenge is an
understatement," Rep. Bem-
bry said,
Bembry added that the
same issues that affect larger
communities affect smaller
communities in a different
way. The state, he said, has
been in a financial "free fall"
for about 16 months and the
biggest issue at present is
the oil spill for which he
has been appointed to the
governor's task force and
visited Baton Rouge, La., on
Aug. 9.
Ralph Thomas asked
Bembry if he endorsed any
of the proposed constitu-
tional amendments, who
answered that he believes
amendments are a poor way


to legislate,
As an example, Bembry
referred to Amendment 4
, the so-called "Hometown
Democracy" amendment
that would require voter
approval for local comp
plan amendments, stating
it would be the worse thing
that could happen pos-
sibly paralyzing business in
the state,
PaulJohnsoncommented
that Rep. Bembry is extreme-
ly accessible. He also stated
the infrastructure needs of
Wakulla County have not
kept up with the growth in
the county and suggested
those needs should be ad-
dressed legislatively,
Johnson also anticipated
there would be water issues
as wells alternative energy
needs which would require
a commitment to develop-
ing a good renewable en-
ergy policy.
Tammie Barfield


Congressman Allen Boyd, left, visits with Chamber


Boyd told the audience
in 2006 until 2008 he head-
ed up the Blue Dog Demo-
crats calling for a balanced
budget. He said they had
researched the range of
strategic options through a
wide spec-
tr um of
an met 15 econo-
members to mists and
mic issues all agreed
e financial that doing
noth in g
referred to wa s n ot
nation as a an option,
recession. Bo yd
said the
bailout strategy ultimately
diverted a disaster.
In the last two years,
Boyd said, 55,000 jobs per


month have been lost.
However, right now there
are actually jobs being cre.
ated, and for four consecu.
tive quarters there has been
a slow but steady sign of
economic growth.
Boyd referred to the cur.
rent economic situation as
an economic "re-set" not
recession. He said during a
recession, after the econom-
ic downturn, things go back
to the way they were.
He said he was optimism.
tic that during this "re-set,"
changes would be made
to make a difference after
the economic downturn.
Boyd stated those changes
would be in technology and
energy.


m
r
o
h
r
it
r


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