Title: Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00260
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: January 28, 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028313
Volume ID: VID00260
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
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Preceded by: Wakulla County news

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. Seniors Celebrate Life

Please turn to Page 1 B


School District awards

Please turn to Page 8A


Published Weekly,
Read Daily


uak ulla
Our 115th Year, 4th Issue Thursday, Jan. 28,


2010


Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century


Two Sections

75 Cents


Floods

create

emergency

spending

By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Last week's heavy rain
caused significant flooding
in Wakulla Gardens. The
roads were impassable to the
extent that residents parked
two or three blocks away and
walked to their homes.
When County Commis-
sioner Mike Stewart loaded
up County Administrator
Ben Pingree in his truck dur-
ing the rain for a "field trip"
to assess the flooding in
that neighborhood, Stewart
hesitated to drive his vehicle
down the roads.
Stewart, who was act-
ing commission chair since
Chairman Howard Kessler
was away on a humanitarian
mission to aid earthquake
victims in Haiti, said he con-
templated calling an emer-
gency meeting of the board
to discuss the problem.
Continued on Page 12A


OF INTEREST


fLi! 0a


Bruce Skelton, left, with Clayton Lewis and the tumbler that eliminates the dead clams.

Clam mers iW- W-


He Haiti on TV
Helo Haiti


victims as

Kessler has
On January 12 Haiti was
hit with a powerful 7.0 earth-
quake. Reports are still com-
ing in of the devastation that
has occurred in and around
Haiti's capital, Port-au-Prince.
Volunteer Florida is providing
the following links for more
information on how you can
help:
Volunteer Florida en-
courages donating wisely
to support Haiti earthquake
relief operations. For a review
of trusted charitable orga-
nizations, check out Charity
Navigator www.charitynavi-
gator.org or GuideStar www.
guidestar.org.
The Center for Interna-
tional Disaster Information
www.cidi.org. CIDI has a
database to register your
offer of assistance for Haiti
earthquake relief.
AidMatrix Foundation
www.aidmatrix.org/haiti is
partnering with non-govern-
ment organizations providing
relief in Haiti by managing
offers of donations. AidMa-
trix has a database to register
your offer of assistance and
can provide a list of medi-
cal and other relief supplies
requested by response orga-
nizations.
Continued on Page 5A

Inside

This Week
Comment&Opinion.... Page 2A
Week in Wakulla ........ Page 2A
Church Page 4A
Sports Page 6A
People Page 7A
School Page 8A
Sheriff's Report.......... Page 9A
Outdoors................. Page 10A
Almanac................... Page 11A
Senior Citizens........... Page 1B
Health/Fitness............ Page 2B
Classifieds .................. Page 3B





6 84578 202'5 o


By TAMMIE BARFIELD
tbaifield- thewakullanews.net
St. Teiesa Clam Co. andt
owners Clayton Lewis and
Bruce Skelton \\ere featued
on Disco\'ei'V Channel's .
"Dil ty Jobs with lMike Rowe" :
Tuesday. Dec. 22. The ciew\
headed to Alligator Haibor
Aquatic Piesex'e to haix'est
clams with Lewis and Skel-
ton who farm clams from -I
leases in Alligator Harbor.
The clams are processed at
a plant in Sopchoppy and
ll.are sold both locally and
IShI.pped out to a variety of
whil]. ae. z iin Florida and
the northeast.
the Continued on 1. ii ......
Continued" Biii!Pa ii *ii


Bruce Skelton works the grader which sizes the clams.


Special

swearing in

ceremony

Page 3A





Sex case

charges

dismissed

By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Sexual battery charges
against two Wakulla County
men were dismissed when
Wakulla Circuit Judge N. Sand-
ers Sauls directed a judgment
of acquittal, finding that there
was insufficient evidence to
support the charge.
The men, Andrew Haubrick
and Justin Millians, had been
charged with sexual battery
on a woman they had been
drinking with in February
2005. When the judge an-
nounced his decision, on
Thursday, Jan. 21, after two full
days of testimony in the trial,
the men's numerous friends
and family in the courtroom
gasped with joy.
"Thank you, your honor,"
Millions' attorney, Tony Bajoc-
zky said as the judge granted
the motion for a judgment of
acquittal.
"Thank you, Jesus!" came a
voice from the gallery.
Both Bajoczky and
Haubrick's attorney Mike Cart-
er commented that they felt
justice had been done with
the acquittal of their clients.
Continued on Page 5A


Sisters pedal Wakulla and country for books


Sisters biking through
Wakulla ride out cold,
flat tires and "swooped
up" by Shell Point
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
They set out from Charles-
ton, S.C. on Jan. 1 for a yearlong
bicycle ride that would take
them across the country to
California and north to Alaska.
Their goal: to raise $12,000 to
develop three libraries in Asia
and Africa.
On Monday, Jan. 11, after
riding from Tallahassee down
the St. Marks Rail Trail, sisters
Adelaide and Lydia Perr were
enticed by the "Free maps"
sign at Shell Point Realty on
U.S. Highway 98 and stopped
to get information. They told
Dee Shriver of their plan to
camp in a tent overnight at the
Ochlockonee River State Park.
With freezing temperatures
predicted, Shriver invited the
women to stay in her RV in
the driveway of her Shell Point
home. They accepted the invi-
tation, and joined Shiver and
her husband Sam for a potluck
dinner that night at the fire
station.
"She swooped us up," Ad-
elaide said of the Shrivers with
a chuckle. When the sisters
asked if there were any chores
they could do to pay back the
hospitality, they were invited
to a community art class on
watercolor.
During an interview at a
Tallahassee bike shop, the sis-
ters said they took advantage
of the down time to get some


better tires for their bicycles
- they'd suffered five flats in
a few days.
The Perrs are collecting
donations to Room to Read, a
nonprofit group that has sup-
ported three million children
with 700 schools and libraries
with five million books. The
sisters have a blog nokeysre-
quired.com where donations
can be made. To date, they
have raised $565.
Lydia worked at a risk con-
sulting firm in New York City
and was laid off because of
the economy. She e-mailed
Adelaide, who was living
in Charleston and between
things, with the idea of "Let's
go on an expedition."
"We thought it would be a
good idea to see the U.S. at a
slower pace," said Adelaide.
While the two sisters, who
grew up in Pittsburgh, are both
athletic, Lydia admitted that
neither of them had ever biked
seven days straight. Up until
the unplanned layover in Shell
Point, they had been averaging
50 miles a day.
During their stay, Shell
Point residents took them
to visit Wakulla Springs and
watch the migration of the
whooping cranes.
"Our hosts at Shell Point
seemed genuinely happy,"
Lydia posted in her blog, nok-
eysrequired.com, on Jan. 14.
"I attribute some of this hap-
piness to the way neighbors
interact, making time to spend
together and to help each
other out. We met professors,


Girls with their bicycles and Faith Durbin-Purdue, Dee Shriver at realty office.
teachers, pilots, businesswom-
en and many others. Everyone il
seemed to have an interesting
past. Everyone seemed to em-
brace a variety of interesting
activities from bird watching
to boat sailing to rummage
sale-ing.
"Someday," she added,
"I hope to live in an equally
spirited place."
On that same day, the sis-
ters aimed their bikes down
Highway 98 and headed to-
ward Pensacola.
You can donate to Room to
Read online at roomtoread.kin-
tera.org/rtd/nokeysrequired. Adelaide and Lydia Perr during a quieter moment,


JICW5o


-r


--











Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 28, 2010






Established in Wakulla County in 189



GPS technology -


is hard to wrap ron AWO- A I ?W KS
W rO eVt A ILCT /WAEf MRyMrA?

my arms around -M', G\' 7IYt'r5 yuAEnEGrA1
.l i pp- SUPOSED RENGon


Nurse
Judy's
Nook


A Judy
Conlin
I didn't really want a
GPS. I don't understand
new technology very well
and constantly have prob-
lems when I attempt to
use it. Nurse Judy, on the
other hand, thinks she is
really with it and wants to
try out every new product
that comes on the market.
She began whining as soon
as GPS's came out.
"You have to get one,"
she whined. "You're always
getting us lost." I held
out for a long time, but
what she said was true. I
have no sense of direction
and I'm constantly getting
lost. I finally gave in and
bought one. I think it was
a mistake.
After reading the manual
three times, I hooked it up
and directed it to take me
to Crawfordville. I couldn't
get out of Lake Tallavana.
The GPS lady in the sky
told me in a nice reason-
able tone to turn right and
take Quail Court to Route
12. "Quail Court is a dead
end," I told Nurse Judy.
"You are so not with
it," she answered. "This
is new technology. This
gadget knows things that
you don't. You need to do
what it says."
I obediently turned right
into Ouail Court with no
way out except for the way
I came in. When I tried to
reverse my course, the nice
GPS lady turned not so
nice. "Make a u-turn and
take Quail Court to Route
12," she snapped. If I made
a u-turn I would be in the
same dilemma-facing a
dead end with no way out.
I sat there doing nothing.
I was used to minding,
but this lady was wrong.
Finally, I slowly began
driving out. The GPS lady
immediately came to life.
"Make a u-turn and take
Quail Court to Route 12,"
she shouted at me in a very
mean way.
I had to ignore her since
there was no way to obey.
Even Nurse Judy was quiet
as I slowly motored out of
Quail Court. The lady was
not quiet. "Recalculating,"
she said in what can only
be described as a complete-
ly exasperated tone.
I did not like being talk-
ed to like this. I felt like a
bad child. I tried to discuss
my feelings with her, but
there was no response.
My only recourse was to


pull her plug and take my
chances on finding my
destination.
I didn't want to try again,
but Nurse Judy insisted
that I give the GPS lady
more chances. She refused
to change her mind and
kept directing me into a
street with no outlet. Each
time I did the only thing
I could. I pulled the GPS
lady's life support plug and
continued on my way.
Finally, Nurse Judy said,
"I have an idea. Why don't
you wait until you are on
Route 12 before you hook
the GPS up?"
I thought about this.
I don't like to admit that
she sometimes does have
a good idea, but in this
case, she did. I tried it and
it worked. After that, about
80 percent of the time the
lady took us where we
wanted to go.
Recently, I went to Or-
lando for a book signing.
I know the route by heart,
but Nurse Judy wanted to
use that GPS. Reluctantly,
I programmed in our desti-
nation and off we went. I'm
beginning to think that GPS
lady has a perverse sense
of humor. I didn't know
where we were once we got
off 1-75. We rolled through
streets I had never heard
of in downtown Orlando.
It began getting dark and
I was losing hope when
suddenly a checkered flag
popped up and the lady
said happily, "You have ar-
rived at your destination."
I peered around in the
dusk. There was a Sun Bank
on one corner and a gas sta-
tion on the other. I chose
the gas station and asked
directions, explaining that
my GPS had directed me
here. "Oh, you have to go
back the way you came,"
he said. "The GPS doesn't
recognize that the address
you are seeking is on north
blank street." I thanked
him muttering under my
breath that that wasn't all
the GPS didn't recognize.
I started the long trek
back with the lady an-
grily protesting every few
minutes until I finally
squelched her. Once we
got to our hotel, I stuffed
the bound and gagged GPS
in the trunk and vowed
to take my regular route
home. That was another
disaster, but that is also an-
other story. I may tell you
about it in another column
once I get calmed down.
More later,
Judy and Nurse Judy
www.nursejudyinfo.
com
Judy Conlin and her alter
ego write from Havana.


'VWSPAPr" 0W w MEMBER

TOt akulla 0t6u35
The Wakulla News (USPS 644-64i) is published weekly at
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News,
P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.

General Manager: Tammie Barfield........................tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Editor: Keith Blackmar kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Reporter: William Snowden wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey II ...1 i 11I .
Classifieds/In House Sales: Denise Folh..............classifieds @thewakullanews.net
P.. 1, ,, : S h e rry I. l,,.. I ... ....,,,h ,, 'I I, .. .. .. .
Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net

Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one
year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $26 yr. $14.50 1/2 yr, Out of County $35 yr. $19 1/2 yr.
Out of State $40 yr. $22 1/2 yr..


Republicans should purge our RINOs


Editor, The News:
I am encouraged.
A majority of the Wakulla
County Republican Executive
Committee (REC) initiated a
push to purge our ranks of
"Republican in Name Only"
(RINO) elected officials who
refuse to run their re-elec-
tion campaign as a proud
Republican.
For too long the Wakulla
County REC has been satis-
fied with supporting anyone
who would claim to be a
Republican. This is coming
to a screeching halt!
At the last REC meeting, a


motion to remove from the
REC anyone who decides to
run for office as a "No Party
Affiliate" caused an uproar
complete with threats from
our state committeeman and
committeewoman to resign
if the motion passed.
As a long-standing conser-
vative, I am proud to stand
with the men and women
on the REC who insist the
candidates we support also
support the basic beliefs of
smaller government, lower
taxes and more personal
responsibility. It is only due
to internal parliamentary


technicalities that we did not
pass this motion,
Wakulla County Repub-
licans are joining with mil-
lions of concerned citizens
throughout America in re-
turning to the conservative
ideals that made America
great.
We believe in holding
individuals responsible for
their own lives, supporting
small businesses that create
jobs, and allowing citizens
to keep and spend their own
money by lowering taxes. It
is time to stop elected of-


ficials from attacking free
enterprise and responsible
growth with oppressive fees
and environmental restric-
tions as well as directing an
assault on anyone who dares
to defend property rights or
economic growth.
If you too are ready for
change, consider joining the
Republican Party fight for
smaller government, lower
taxes, and more personal
responsibility.
Ed Brimner
Crawfordville


For online community calendar
visit www.thewakullanews.com
and click on calendar.

WEEK IN WAKULLA


Thursday, January 28, 2010
BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from
6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
BINGO, to benefit the Florida Wild Mammal
Association, will be held at Hamaknockers Oasis in
Ochlockonee Bay from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB meets at Posey's Up the Creek
in Panacea at noon.
QUIT SMOKING NOW classes will beheld at the public
library at 6 p.m. For more information, call Calandra
Portalatin at 224-1177. (Through Feb. 18)
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.
"SEMINOLES IN SPANISH BORDERLANDS," a lecture by
FSU history professor Andrew Frank, will be held at the
St. Marks Yacht Club at 7 p.m. The lecture is sponsored
by the Wakulla County Historical Society.
Friday, January 29, 2010
FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public
library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
FRIDAY NIGHT MOVIE will be screened at the public
library beginning at 7 p.m.
GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa's
Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
PICKIN' 'N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at the
senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
SASSY STRIPPERS QUILTERS GROUP meets at the public
library from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. to make quilts for
traumatized children. The "cruiser quilts" are donated
to Wakulla County deputies to be used for children in
need. New members welcome. For information, call
926-6290.
Saturday, January 30, 2010
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordville
Highway at 5 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.
Monday, February 1, 2010
ALZHEIMER'S SUPPORT GROUP meets at Lake Ellen
Baptist Church at 1 p.m.
COUNTY COMMISSION meets at the commission
boardroom at 5 p.m.
MEN'S FRATERNITY, a Christian community men's
group, meets at the public library at 6:30 p.m.
MOOSE LODGE #2510 meets at the lodge in Panacea at
7 p.m.
Tuesday, February 2, 2010
ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in
Crawfordville at noon.
BOOK BUNCH meets in the children's room at the
public library at 10:30 a.m.
CONGRESSIONAL STAFF from the office of U.S. Rep.
Allen Boyd will be in the commission complex from 9:30
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. to discuss issues of local concern.
DIABETES EDUCATION CLASS will be held at the
health department from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. every week for
six weeks.
FARMER'S MARKET will be held at Purple Martin
Nurseries, north of Crawfordville, from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.
FREE TAX HELP through AARP is available at the public
library from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. for low- to moderate-
income taxpayers and especially those age 60 and
older. (Through April 15)
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordville
Highway at 7 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.
VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW
Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Wednesday, February 3, 2010
AA meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.
BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will
be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at
10:30 a.m.
LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.


Editor, The News:
Elder Emmett Whaley
was a great man. Needless
to say, I am overwhelmed
with all the good things I am
hearing and reading about
him everywhere I look.
Unfortunately, coming
to the county five years ago
I did not know this fine
gentleman, a devoted man
of God. I feel I have wasted
an important part of my life
which I will never be able


Editor, The News:
Big Bend Hospice wishes
to thank the many busi-
nesses and volunteers who
helped make our 2009 Trees
of Remembrance so success-
ful. There were 27 tree sites in
the eight counties served by
Big Bend Hospice. In Wakulla
County, trees were located
at Capital City Bank, Ameris
Bank and Wakulla Bank. The
Leon County tree found a
new home inside of Best Buy
on Apalachee Parkway. From
the Sunday before Thanksgiv-
ing through Dec. 24, more
than 200 volunteers staffed
the tree, two at a time, three
shifts daily, from 10 a.m. to
9 p.m., and two shifts on
Sunday. Volunteers and staff
at the additional locations
assisted donors in filling out
their tags and attaching them
to a bell, bow or angel which
was then placed on the tree.
Each name and message
was a heartfelt sentiment
and each was part of a unique
personal story. Our tree vol-
unteers have shared some of
their experiences with us and
we want to share just a few
with you....
A new mother pushed the
baby carriage up to the tree
table to make a donation. She
was obviously so proud of her
infant daughter wrapped up
in pink. The volunteer struck
up a conversation with the
mother as she filled out three
tags, each to attach to a bow.
She wanted to remember the
three babies she lost before
her daughter was born. "I'm
so happy to have my little
girl, but I'll never forget those


to regain.
This world needs more
men like Elder Whaley. This
county has lost a good citi-
zen, a man everyone liked,
a man devoted to God and
a man with a Christian mis-
sion.
May God bless Elder
Whaley. He will be missed
by everyone.
J.D. Rogers
Crawfordville


three that didn't make it," she
told the volunteer,
One little boy approached
the volunteer table with
some trepidation. Quietly he
placed $2 from his Christmas
money on the table and
asked the volunteer if he
could get a bow for his dog
that had recently been put
to sleep.
An elderly lady had her
family bring her to Best Buy
this tree season. She made
a donation for her husband
and she wanted to see the
tree and hopefully find the
angel she had dedicated.
Her family shopped while
she and the volunteer sat
together looking at the lights
and ornaments as she remi-
nisced about her long and
happy marriage.
A staff member arrived
at the tree to set things up
before the first volunteer
shift. A woman was patiently
waiting to make a donation.
Her mother had just died
at the hospital and her first
thought was to drive to the
Tree of Remembrance and
get an angel in memory of
her mother.
These are just a few of
the many stories of love and
devotion that were expressed
on the tags attached to bells,
bows and angels. This year
we added an on-line Tree of
Remembrance that will stay
up all year long. Read the
many tributes online at www.
treeofremembrance.org and
marvel at the enduring power
of love.
Big Bend Hospice
Serving Wakulla County


1-28.page2A.indd 1


Emmett Whaley


was a great man


B.B. Hospice gives

thanks to businesses


1/26/10 3:28:09 PM











THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 28, 2010 Page 3A


Fruit of Ka-Boom A very special swearing in
E N E U E O- -


Editor, The News:
The newest brand of un-
derwear has been unveiled
by Yemen and most likely in
the future from other freedom
hating countries around the
world.
We have proven that no
matter how we apologize to the
entire world and bow down to
their leaders the United States
is in the cross hairs of countries
that do not like our freedoms.
We are disliked because we
believe in religious freedoms,
political freedoms and our high
standards.
Our envy reminds me of
the story in the Bible when a
mother of a child had her moth-
erhood challenged by another
woman who wanted a child but
did not have one.
The woman who claimed
that the child was hers when
it wasn't was satisfied when
King Solomon said he would
cut the baby into two pieces.
Immediately, the actual mother
responded by giving the child
to the other woman.
King Solomon immediately
knew who the paternal mother
was and handed the baby to
the real mother. The moral of
the story is that the woman
who wanted the other woman's
child would have rather killed
the baby ratherthan not acquire
the child.
The birth mother would
have rather lost the child than
have the baby killed even if it
meant someone else would
raise the child. Countries
around the world would rather
see the United States fall flat on
its face than to have the U.S. be
the crown jewel of the civilized
world.
We are not hated because of


our dominating ways, we are
hated because of the success
and freedoms that our people
have. The United States sends
money to every country in the
world except Iran and Cuba and
we are the most envied and
hated country in the world due
to our deeds.
The Fruit of Ka-Boom Bomb-
er from Yemen was not the
first person who has tried to
kill the people of the United
States and he will not be the
last to try to hurt our citizens.
The citizens of the United States
must understand that we are
going to be hated no matter
what we do. The citizens of the
United States and our leaders
should not bow to leaders of
other countries nor should we
apologize for the hardships of
other countries when we help
the standard of life in those
countries. Whenever there are
disasters around the world can
you bet your bottom dollar that
the United States will most
likely be the first one there
to help the needy around the
world no matter our relation-
ship with that country.
The United States must
stand strong and tall when it


Thanks for attending event
Editor, The News: been answered. Mr. Wells librarians for their help.
Concerned Citizens of demonstrated his openness Chuck Hess
Wakulla, Inc. (CCOW) would to new ideas, his eagerness Chair, CCOW
like to thank everyone who to get citizens involved in Crawfordville


came to the showing of the
movie Hacking Democracy
on Jan. 22. In particular, we
thank Wakulla County Su-
pervisor of Elections Henry
J. "Buddy" Wells and Senior
Deputy Lorie Green.
After the movie, Mr. Wells
and Ms. Green stayed until
everyone's questions had


the election process, and his
great sense of humor.
We were delighted that
State Rep. Curtis J. Rich-
ardson and his charming
daughter Carina came to
the event.
Finally, thanks to every-
one who brought the fabu-
lous food, and thanks to the


ceremony was nela in Virginia


comes to what this country has
done for people all around the
world. The United States has
made mistakes but our inten-
tions have always been good.
Women around the Middle East
have freedoms today because
of the American blood that has
been shed for their lifestyle.
We do not tell people what
religion they should have nor
demand that they pay us for
the freedoms that we bring to
their countries. I would rather
have to make a stand against
the people who want to destroy
this country in their country
rather than have Americans
lying dead on the streets of
this country. Americans must
get used to the fact that our
freedoms are going to be af-
fected by people like The Fruit
of Ka-Boom Bomber. Security
is always going to be hard but
we must quit being politically
correct and handle the terror-
ism issue. The hijackers have
not been Baptist, Democrats,
Republicans, Jewish, Hindu,
Buddhist, but have been Mus-
lims. Not all Muslims are bad
and most would probably tell
you in private that they deplore
the violence and the reputation
that those very violent individu-
als bring upon their religion.
The biggest problem is the
compassionate Muslims are
afraid to criticize the violent,
radical part of their religion be-
cause of safety for themselves
and their families. The radical
side of the Muslim religion has
nothing less in their hearts than
the destruction of the people
and the country that allows its
citizens the freedoms that the
United States allows.
Garland W. Burdette
Crawfordville


It's not every day that
siblings in the military con-
verge on the same place at
the same time. It's even less
frequent if those siblings
don't serve under the same
service flag.
So when two siblings
from different services, one
officer and one enlisted,
assemble in the same loca-
tion at the same time, it's
a once in a lifetime occur-
rence. It happened on Dec.
28, 2009.
Air Force Staff Sgt. Erika
M. Villiard of Sopchoppy
spent some of her Christ-
mas leave with family in
northern Virginia. This
wasn't a typical family gath-
ering, however, as there
was business to tend to;
business that needs tend-
ing to every four years or so
in the enlisted ranks of the
Armed Forces. Villiard was
to extend her career in the
U.S. Air Force by Aanother
four years.
So what's so unique
about her re-enlistment
engagement? Villiard's old-
er brother, Marine Corps
2nd Lt. Brian "Scott" Vil-
liard, was her re-enlisting
officer.
"I look up to him, and
I wanted to be the first
person he re-enlisted," said
Erika.
"It was my first oppor-
tunity to be someone's re-
enlisting officer, and I was
proud to have been asked
to administer the oath to
my little sister," said Scott,
who accepted his commis-
sion in May 2008 after crest-
ing 11 years as an enlisted
Marine.
On a windy, 30-degree
day, under the arching
spires of the U.S. Air Force


mid-February. Friends and
family are encouraged to
keep in touch by mailing
her at erika.villiard@yahoo.
com or by looking her up
on Facebook.
Erika and Scott are both
the children of Retired
Army Staff Sgt. Kevin and
Brenda Villiard and the
grandchildren of William
"Bill" and Bobbie Stephens,
all of Sopchoppy. Photo by
Sean Cummins.


Hours expand for


the Martime Center


The Big Bend Maritime
Center has expanded its
hours and invites the public
to visit while in Panacea.
The Big Bend Maritime
Center is located in the
Shops by the Bay in Pana-
cea.
"We are still small, but
we are growing," said Larry
Tucker. "We recently added
several new exhibits includ-
ing one on lighthouses, a
mullet display and a very
interesting oral history lis-
tening station where visitors
can listen to a local master
boat builder (Larry Tucker)
describe how I learned my
craft and the techniques of
building wooden boats as it
was practiced in this region


50 years ago."
The hours have expanded
to Thursday, Friday, and
Sunday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on
Saturday. The museum also
offers programs for visiting
school groups and others by
prior arrangement.
There is no entrance fee at
this point in the museum's
development.
"Please drop in, browse
the exhibits, listen to color-
ful stories, ask questions,
and give us your ideas," said
Tucker.
Shops by the Bay is in
the center of Panacea on
U.S. Highway 98, the Coastal
Highway. For more informa-
tion, call 962-7845.


The Wakulla County Tourist Development Council (TDC) is developing a new marketing strategy to promote
Wakulla County as a nature- and heritage-based tourism destination. At a recent Public Roundtable Meeting, a
suggestion was made to develop a marketing theme that plays off the "7 Wonders of the World" by promoting the
"Wonders of Wakulla". The "Wonders" could be a special place such as Wakulla Springs or the St. Marks National
Wildlife Refuge, a unique event that captures the Wakulla way of life, an activity that is best experienced in Wakulla
such as birding, biking, hiking, or "Wakulla Made" items or activities such as favorite local food, art, or music.

So TDC wants to hear about your "Wonders of Wakulla". Please take a minute to complete the survey below
and help us identify the many special places, events, activities and experiences that make Wakulla a wonderfull
place to be.


1. Are you a resident of Wakulla County?
If no, where do you live?
City


Yes _No

State ,Country,


2. Age? 10-18 yrs 18-30 yrs 31-50 yrs 51 and over

3. Sex M F -M -- -F

4. Please list one (1) to three (3) of your favorite "Wonders of Wakulla" to visit and/or take visitors to?

1.


Happy first birthday


Micah E. Burlingame
Happy first birthday to
Micah Ezekiel Burlingame
on Dec. 27. He is the son
of Joseph and Serena Maio-
rano-Burlingame of Craw-


fordville.
Maternal grandparents
are Anthony and Suzanne
Maiorano of Crawfordville.
Paternal grandparents are
Deborah Snyder of Havana
and Billy Burlingame of Ta-
berg, N.Y.
Maternal great-grandpar-
ents are Floyd and Marjorie
Gray of Crawfordville and
Juanita Crosby of Wood-
ville.
Paternal great-grandpar-
ents are Stephen and Marjo-
rie Burlingame of Corry, Pa.,
Charles and Sue Snyder of
Tallahassee and Mary Snyder
of Havana.


5. What time of year is best to visit/experience this "Wonder"?

1. Spring Summer Fall Winter Year round

2. Spring Summer Fall Winter Year round

3. Spring Summer Fall Winter Year round

6. What activity/experience do you enjoy most there?
1
1.

2.



.7. If you are interested in receiving hforaeition about future TDC meetings and activities,
please provide the following-.cntatt information: ,


Name: ,.
Mailing address:
Mailing address:


... ***


............
S Email: rr et r

P, Pm return the survey: *
... .By al to: ...irtwood embarqmail.m m

' ... ... ,; By fax to: 926-5770 t : ,:..
..... Bym tt Wakulla Couthty, Pa.Box 67, Panaaea, FL 3 2
B" m~tft ~y ~Q~Uox 7, F" 323Ib **;i*'


1-28.page3A.indd 1


Scott Villiard swears in sister, Erika, in Virginia.


l


1/26/10 3:29:09 PM


Memorial in Arlington, Va.,
Erika swore to support and
defend the Constitution of
the United States, against
all enemies, foreign and
domestic, as she has daunt-
lessly done since Aug. 27,
2002.
Erika, an Aerospace Med-
ical Services Craftsman
currently stationed at Land-
stuhl Regional Medical Cen-
ter, Germany, is scheduled
to deploy to Afghanistan in




















Obituaries


Anne Boland Bevi
Anne Boland, 82, of Wacissa Young
died Tuesday, Jan. 19 in Tal- was in
lahassee. ments.
A celebration of life will be
held at a later date. In lieu of Doi
flowers, please send a dona- Dor
tion to the American Heart 82,ofT,
Association, Big Bend Hospice day, Jai
or your favorite charity. Fam
A longtime resident of urday,
Woodville, she was a resident Home
of Wacissa at the time of her A n
death. he lived
Survivors include her two past 15
sons, Ronnie Boland and Bren- ber of
da and Dale Boland and Julie, Moose
all of Wacissa; four grand- Soo Lii
children, Vickie Boland, Blue Sur
Boland and Vickie, Michael of 14
Boland and Michele, Angela five ch
Harrison and Richard and Janet and Joe
Hines, all of Wacissa; five great- gess ar
grandchildren, Cailin Boland, Patty B
Michael Boland, Cami Harri- ville, K
son, Hunter Boland and Tyler and V
Boland, all of Wacissa; three Crawfo
brothers, Raymond Crosby of Erland
Tallahassee, RaineyCrosbyand a host
Betty of Woodville and Bobby great-g:
Crosby and Jean of Calhoun,
Ga.; a sister, Winola Thompson
and James of Sopchoppy; and Barb
a brother-in-law, Lester Boland hassee
and Aileen of Capitola. A native
had liv
Ernest C. Del Favero, Sr. to Talla
Ernest Caesar Del Favero Sr., The
85, of Lanark Village died on St. Aug
Jan. 22 in Tallahassee. Big Ber
Graveside services were andsu]
held Tuesday, Jan. 26 at Ever- please
green Cemetery in Carrabelle. Bend i
A memorial service was held Center
at the American Legion Post 32308.
#82 in Lanark Village following Su r
the service. In lieu of flowers, daught
donations may be made to of Talla
the American Legion Post #82, Weber
486 Oak St,, Lanark Village, FL ville; tw
32323. and Ja:
A native of Tuckahoe, N.Y., Steve E
he was a WWII veteran of the and otl
U.S. Army Air Corps 700th friends
bombardment group. He was Cull
a retired postal worker. gins Ro
Survivors include two sons, charge
Ernie and Edward of Miami; a
daughter-in-law, Debbie; four Alb
grandchildren, Cindy, Greg, Albe
Angela and Daniel; three great- 82, of C
grandchildren, Kailey, Christian day, Ja
and Jordan; and his extended The
family, Sheila, Cody and Chey- held Fi
enne of Lanark Village. He Unitec
enjoyed campfires and cutting Wakull
his firewood, a cold beer and thechu
his beloved dog, Mary.


Christ Church
Anglican
Sunday
8:30am Service
9:30am Adult Bible Class
10:30am Children's Class
10:30am Service
Nursery available
Thursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study
Wednesday 6:30 pm Supper and
Children, Youth and Adult Bible Classes
The Rev. John Spicer, Rector
850-745-8412
3383 Coastal Highway


Blood
SWord
Spirit


is Funeral Home-Harvey-
Chapel in Crawfordville
charge of the arrange-


nald G, Erlandson
lald Gordon Erlandson,
allahassee died Wednes-
n. 20 in Tallahassee.
lily received friends Sat-
Jan. 23 at Bevis Funeral
in Tallahassee.
ative of Duluth, Minn.,
d in Tallahassee for the
years. He was a mem-
the Loyal Order of the
#1075 and retired from
ne Railroad.
iivors include his wife
years, Betty Erlandson;
lildren, Susan Drumm
e of Hudson, Jean Bur-
nd Matt of Tallahassee,
amres and Jim of Louis-
y., and Tony Chandler
ickie Crum, both of
irdville; one brother, Ed
son of Michigan; and
of grandchildren and
grandchildren.

Barbara Hulse
bara Hulse, 83, of Talla-
died Saturday, Jan. 23.
'e of El Paso, Texas, she
ed in Miami and moved
lhassee in 1972.
family wishes to thank
;ustine Plantation and
id Hospice for their care
pport. In lieu of flowers,
make memorials to Big
Hospice, 1723 Mahan
Blvd. Tallahassee, FL

vivors include two
:ers, Nancy Ann Hulse
lhassee and Janet Hulse
and Ken of Crawford-
wo grandchildren, John
red Weber; a nephew,
lest of Redmond, Wash.
her relatives and many

ey's MeadowWood Rig-
oad in Tallahassee was in
of the arrangements.

>erta H. McCranie
erta Hewett McCranie,
:rawfordville died Mon-
n. 18 in Tallahassee.
e funeral service was
iday, Jan. 22 at Wakulla
I Methodist Church,
a Station, with burial at
irch cemetery. Memorial


contributions may be made
to Wakulla United Methodist
Church, 1584 Old Woodville
Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Alberta followed her hus-
band, Cleo, during his years
in the U.S. Marine Corps for
20 years and volunteered with
the American Red Cross. After
Cleo's retirement, they moved
to Supply, N.C. where she did
volunteer work with Brunswick
Community Hospital. Alberta
was taught by her mother
and grandmother to quilt
and was an active member
of her church quilting group
at Wakulla United Methodist
Church known as the Busy
Bee Quilters. The Family would
like to thank the staff of Tal-
lahassee Memorial Hospital,
Big Bend Hospice House and
especially Dr. Mabry who
fondly referred to her as his
"traveling patient."
Survivors include her chil-
dren, Earl McCranie of Talla-
hassee and Susie Stallings and
husband Mike of Woodville;
two grandchildren, Michael
Stallings and wife Christine
of Tallahassee and Matthew
Stallings and wife Jennifer
of Woodville; and four great-
grandchildren, Blake, Cole,
Emily and Chloe Stallings.
Bevis Funeral Home in Tal-
lahassee was in charge of the
arrangements.

Walter E, Nelson
Walter E. Nelson, 89, of
Crawfordville died Tuesday,
Jan. 19 in Crawfordville.
Funeral services were held
Saturday, Jan. 23, in Parnick
Jennings Funeral Home in
Cartersville, Ga., with burial in


Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worship ...................10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .............5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details,
962-2213


1 Saint Teresa&
Episcopal


Church
Ochlockonee 1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
Bought lckn At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98
Taught Christian Center Rev.Teri Monica, Priest
Wrou vanlical xpositional Rev. Roy Lima, Deacon
Bble Tachg Sunday Holy Eucharist 5:30 pm
Bible Teaching n nn
SL d S' hl~* ~lJ.W


Schedule of Services
Sunday School........ 945 a.m.
W orship .................11 :0 a.m .
Prayer ................... 5:00 p.m. t.
Wednesday Supper .6:00 p.m. I i
Wednesday Study ....7:00 p.m.
Thursday Ladies ... 10:00 a.m.
2263 Curtis Mill Rd.
Sopchoppy, FL 962-3774
Pastor John S. Dunning
(From Rhema Bible Training Center)
www.ochcc.org


Crawfordville United
Methodist Church
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 926-7209
Ochlockonee &Arran Road "Come Grow With Us"www.crawfordville-umc.org


lciscoer t2ie


SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
\/lrninr \ Wlrcin 1 1 .00 l m


Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Discipleship Training 7:00 p.m

First Baptist Church WEDNESDAY
CRAWFORDVILLE Fellowship Meal 6:00 p.m.
3086 Crawfordville Hwy. (call for reservations)
(South of the Courthouse) Children's Events 6:30 p.m.
Church Office: 926-7896 Student Worship 7:00 p.m.
www.fbcc.embarqspace.com Prayer/Bible Study 7:00 p.m.


Hwy 319 Medart,
aKe Elle Office 926-5265
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
o Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
ED Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
hAWANA 5:00 p.m.
u Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org


uilunay cicwooi, supper
and fellowship provided.
926-4288
^ -


Sunset Memory Gardens.
He was born in Bartow
County, Ga., and served in
the U.S. Navy where he was
awarded the Purple Heart.
Survivors include his wife
of 60 years, Louise Ledford Nel-
son of Sopchoppy, and several
nieces and nephews.

Marriage workshop
is planned
A marriage workshop will
be held on Feb. 6 at Mt. Olive
Primitive Baptist Church #2.
"Marriage God's Way" will
be instructed with Pastor Sam-
uel F. Hayes and Mother Vera
Hayes. "Husbands, love your
wives, just as Christ loved the
church," Ephesians 5:25.
The workshop will begin at
2 p.m. at the church, located on
Spring Creek Highway.
For information, call 926-
3645.

Luncheon for clergy
is slated
Big Bend Hospice chaplains
invite area clergy and other
leaders in the congregation to
attend a special luncheon at
noon Thursday, Jan. 28 at Big
Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan
Center Blvd., Tallahassee. The
date changed from Jan. 21.
Come enjoy a complimen-
tary meal and fellowship with
community clergy. "We invite
clergy to be present at this
luncheon to hear and share
ideas of how to help congre-
gants who are providing care
for others," said Reverend
Candace McKibben, Big Bend
Hospice Pastoral Care Manager.
"While targeted to congregant
caregivers, clergy offer care to


Oc lockonee


United
Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship 9 a.m.
Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
vustor evin Wttll
(850) 984-0127


St. Elizabeth


Ann Seton

Catholic Church
Mass 9 a.m. Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Father lames MacGee, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
926-1797 J


You've Got Bible Questions?
We Got Bible Answers



Let the Bible Speak


.





5585 Crawfordville Hwy.
Tallahassee, FL 32305
SOwned & Operated By Wesley Schweinsberg
Son of the Late Harold Schweinsberg
Office: (850) 421-7211 Mobile: (850) 510-3983
Call and Compare... You'll Save Time & Money
Same Quality & Service


117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy
Church Office: 962-7822
January 31, 2010
One Day REVIVAL featuring
Guest Speaker, Chuck Dugan
Pastor New Home Baptist Church, Perry, FL
Special Music by
The Wehry Family, Northumberland, PA
Sunday School 9:45 AM AWANA CLUB 5PM
Morning Worship 11 AM Evening Worship 6 PM
Dr. Bill Jenkins, Pastor
David Allen, Associate Pastor/Student Minister
Randy Anderson, Minister of Music
Jerry Evans, Mike Crouch, Bernie Kemp Musicians


many and will learn and share
ideas for self-care as well."
Julian Sollohub, LCSW, Big
Bend Hospice Social Worker,
will be the speaker for this
quarterly meeting and his topic
will be Care of Caregivers. The
meeting is open to all clergy in
Leon, Jefferson, Madison, Tay-
lor, Wakulla, Franklin, Liberty
and Gadsden counties.
Please RSVP to Candace
McKibben as soon as possible
at 878-5310, X250 or candace@
bigbendhospice.org. Please
feel free to invite other clergy
or leaders.

Homecoming revival set
A homecoming revival will
be held at Odom Memorial
Campground in Sopchoppy
from Monday, Feb. 1 to Friday,
Feb. 5. Services begin at 7:30
p.m. nightly. The guest speaker
will be Rev. Chet Smith.

Prayer Labyrinth
groundbreaking held
On Jan. 24, the Ladies Guild
held a groundbreaking, bless-
ing and breakfast for the Prayer
Labyrinth at the Sacred Heart
of Jesus Catholic Church, 2653
Hwy. 98 East Lanark Village.
The Prayer Labyrinth is to
promote spiritual growth for
both tourist and local resi-
dents of Franklin and Wakulla
counties. Visitors to the area
seek tangible connection to
the inspiration and serenity
Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
LB' Crawfordville
Pastor,
SDaniel Cooksey
Come& Worship ith Us"
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School ........................ 10 a.m .
Sunday W worship ...................... 11 a.m.
Evening W orship......................6 p.m.
W wednesday Service..................7 p.m.
& Youth Service..................... 7 p.m.
Royal Rangers.......................... 7 p.m .
M issionettes ..............................7 p.m .

Trinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Vicar Bert Matlock
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557




InHosplcS
W^S90y^SsLhht.
.f^ 7S1w


found in nature. A person's
spiritual side can be nurtured
by fishing or walking the
beach. The labyrinth, unlike
a maze, will be handicapped
accessible. The path will have
a circuitous route and intricate
design. Its single path will lead
from the church to a gazebo, a
journey which will promote
peace, beauty, meditation, and
prayer.
A 12 foot vinyl coated ga-
zebo has all ready been pur-
chased.
Traditionally, prayer laby-
rinths have been used by a va-
riety of religious and spiritual
cultures for at least 3,500 years
and have been a destination of
many pilgrimages. A journey
through a labyrinth will have
two benefits. It will promote
eco-tourism by helping indi-
viduals to reflect on the natural
beauty of "The Old Florida"
while providing a serene at-
mosphere to foster spiritual
healing and growth.
The church plans to sell
remembrance stepping stones
and all donations will be ac-
cepted. These will go for the
upkeep of the labyrinth.
For information contact
Pat Hilliard at (850) 984-5021
or write: Sacred Heart of Jesus
Ladies Guild, P.O. Box 393, Car-
rabelle, FL 32322.




Wakulla United
Methodist Church
Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m
Sunday Worship -11 a.m.
Wednesday Service 7 p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor Jani Hen9 Rineart


W Ia f Ua
WaveMakerls




Who is the latest

Wakulla Wavemaker?"

Tune in daily at

2 p.m. and 6 p.m.






THE WORD IN PRAISE



WAKU 94.1 FM www.wave94.com
926-8000 (fax: 926-2000)


1-28.page4A.indd 1


A.


1/26/10 3:29:45 PM














Clammers


Continued from Page 1A
Fresh St. Teresa Clam
Co. clams are available
for purchase in Wakulla
County at Mineral Springs
Seafood in Panacea and in
Leon County at Southern
Seafood in Tallahassee.
Lewis and Skelton be-
gan farming clams together
in 2007. There are a couple
of methods for farming
clams and they use both.
Nursery seeds can be pur-
chased and "planted" in
bags in the bottom of the
bay and the clams must
survive predators like rays,
redfish and conch. Another
method used is purchasing
the baby clams in latex
dipped clam bags (900 to
1,000 clams per bag) that
are placed on the bottom
of the bay secured with
specially made pins where
the clams then "bury up"
in three to four weeks and
grow to harvest size. The
bags are available with two
different mesh sizes, 4 mm
or 9 mm, from which the
clam company can "grow
out" the clams.
According to Lewis,
clams from the St. Teresa
Clam Co. have been "in-
formally" declared the best
tasting clams in Florida
through a taste test con-
ducted by the University of
Florida. Four different siz-
es of clams are offered for
purchase; small, medium,
large and cherrystone.
A machine called a
"grader" sizes the clams as
they are run through and
bagged. The clams are also
put through a "tumbler" to
throw out any clams that
may open (or are dead).


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 28, 2010 Page 5A


Sex case


i

Lewis displays a clam bag that helps clams grow.


Lewis said residents in
this area grew up eating
fish, shrimp and oysters
and really need to become
more familiar with the
great taste and versatil-
ity of clams and how to
handle and store them
before preparation. "Fresh
Florida," a division of the
Florida Department of Ag-
riculture, has information
available on clams from
processing and transport-
ing to storage and prepara-
tion. Clams should be kept
in their original shipment
bag and stored in tempera-
tures from 38 to 41 degrees.
They should be free of
cracks, have a mild odor
(similar to the gulf), and
be stored in a breathable


container (bag or cardboard
box) not directly on ice.
Clayton Lewis moved
to Wakulla County from
Tallahassee in 1970 and
has been a commercial
fisherman most of his life.
He said unlike fishing, in
clamming you can count
on making a living.
Bruce Skelton moved
here in 1983 and has
worked in construction
and real estate prior to
becoming a clam grower.
Both were raised in Tal-
lahassee.
To learn more about
the St. Teresa Clam Co.
and their clams, visit their
website at southernclams.
com.


Haiti, Kessler


Continued from Page 1A
SERVFL for Medical
Volunteers www.servfl.
cor is the State of Florida's
online system for managing
public health and medical
disaster responders (volun-
teers and staff teams). If
you are a licensed medical
professional interested in
volunteering, register on
this site.
A list of Florida organiza-
tions providing earthquake
relief to Haiti can be found
at www.volunteerfloridadi-
saster.org/HaitiOrgs.html.
Wakulla County Commis-
sioner Dr. Howard Kessler
recently departed for Haiti
to provide medical assis-
tance to residents of the
devastated island. Kessler
is an orthopedic surgeon,
on his first medical mis-
sionary trip. He has a wife,


Crowd

shows up

to help

Leila
Songs of Support for
Leila filled up the hall of
the American Legion in
Tallahassee on Saturday,
Jan. 23 as supporters of
the late Leslie Drew and
her daughter gave an in-
credible response to the
fundraiser. There were
lots of friends and family
showing their support.
People from Wakulla, Tal-
lahassee, Madison and
Georgia attended.
The music played non-
stop. A few local business-
es in St. Marks donated
gift certificates that were
raffled. Other businesses
in Tallahassee supported
the cause as well. Drew's
family members expressed
their appreciation. All the
proceeds from this ben-
efit will help establish a
college fund for Drew's
daughter, Leila. This will
help make Leslie's dream
of a college education for
her daughter a reality.
Drew's book, "Legend
of the Riversink Otters,"
was on sale for a dona-
tion of $10. It can also
be purchased by sending
a $10 donation to 1853
Hopkins Drive, Tallahas-
see, FL 32303. The check
should be made payable
to "Benefit Account for
Leila Donley."


Anne, and two children. He
will be recognized in Haiti
by wearing his FSU medical
school cap, friends said.
The team members re-
ported that they arrived
safely and are beginning
long hours of work to help
the victims.
"Finally got to St. Marc,
an outlying town about two
hours from Port-au-Prince,
population 250,000," said
Kessler. "Remaining por-
tions of the team went to
the hospital and asked the
administrator what he most
needed. He had received
two orthopedists and a gen-
eral surgeon, part of a team
put together from Mass.
General Hospital. I expect
12 hour days. People still
dying from ortho injuries a
week after the quake. Glad I
am here. It is so sad."


A
*Polic
*Sear


Howard Kessler departs.


Day-Long Celebration
ceDogs of Dogs...
ch and


Rescue Dogs Dy
* Wiener Dog Races
* Dog Fashion Contest
* Frisbee Demonstrations
* Jack Russell Terrier Races
* Labrador Retriever
Demonstrations
* Fly Ball Demonstrations
* Agility Demonstrations
* Blood Hounds
* Obedience Demonstrations
* Wide Variety of Vendors
* Food/Drinks
* Educational Booths
* Adoption Agencies to help you
find a special friend


Dogs...

For Dogs...

Wakulla
High School
Stadium

March 6, 2010

9am 5pm

Tickets $5
Children
under 5 free


BigBendBarkfest. com


Continued from Page 1A
Assistant State Attorney
Kathy Ray, who prosecuted
the case, said she was disap-
pointed with the result and
had wanted for the sake of
the victim for the matter to
be decided by the jury.
Testimony indicated
that Haubrick and Millians
stopped by the woman's
house in Crawfordville on
Feb. 25, 2005, and chatted
with her. Haubrick had a
bottle of Old Crow and they
began drinking.
The victim testified that
she had one drink with the
men but she blacked out
and when she regained con-
sciousness she was in the
hospital emergency room. A
friend who had plans with
the victim that night arrived
at the house as Haubrick and
Millians were leaving. The
friend reportedly found the
victim unconscious in her
bedroom, nude, and called
the sheriff's office to report
a rape.
The initial investigation
focused on the possibility
that some drug had been
slipped to the victim, but the
state crime lab found noth-
ing in tests on the victim's
blood or the cups and liquor
bottles at the house. She
did have a blood alcohol
level of .235 and .238 at the
hospital,
The crux of the case was
consent. The victim said
she did not consent to sex
with the men, but she could
remember nothing from
the point she got up off the
tailgate of Haubrick's truck
as he played the guitar and
she headed inside her house
to use the restroom.
Evidence submitted by
the state to support the
contention that a crime was
committed included photos
of bruises on the woman's
body, the report from emer-
gency medical technicians
that there was blood on
her nose, and saliva on her
brassiere that DNA testing
definitively showed was
from Haubrick.
The state wanted to in-
troduce statements from
Haubrick and Millians that
Ray described as "confes-


sions" and the defense re-
ferred to as "admissions" in
interrogations with sheriff's
detectives.
Millians was asked in an
interview with Detective
John Zarate, "You will admit,
though, that she was too
drunk to totally tell you no,"
to which Millians answered,
"Yes sir, I will admit that."
But Millians added that they
were all drunk.
Haubrick made similar
statements in interviews
with sheriff's Capt. Bill
Poole.
In a motion hearing held
with the jury outside the
courtroom, Bajoczky argued
that there was no evidence
connecting his client to
any sexual activity with the
woman except Millians' own
statements. Bajoczky argued
that the interviews should
not presented to the jury
because, as a matter of law,
the prosecution must have
more evidence of an alleged
crime than a defendant's
confession.
Carter argued that there
had been absolutely noth-
ing presented by the state
that indicated that any sex
between his client and the
woman was not consen-
sual.
After taking a break to
study the applicable law
and review the men's state-
ments, Judge Sauls returned
with a determination that
"These are not confessions.
They do not confess to any
criminal offense. They would
have to be characterized as
admissions," he said, "but
admissions to what?"
Sauls ruled that the state-
ments would not be allowed
in as evidence. Given the rul-
ing, the state decided to rest
its case and not put on any
more witnesses. Bajoczky
and Carter both made mo-
tions for acquittal. Ray was
already packing her docu-
ments away, indicating she
believed it was a foregone
conclusion.
Sauls left and returned
with his decision that there
was insufficient evidence
presented by the state on the
issue of whether the victim
had consented.


Later, after the jury was
dismissed, Carter compared
the case to a Greek tragedy
in that all three people that
night had, he said, shown a
failure of character and lack
of command over their ac-
tions which he blamed on
the alcohol.
Carter, who had retired
his law practice last year
except for this case, said he
hoped the community would
accept the two men and give
them back their good reputa-
tion. "They made a mistake,"
Carter said, "but did not in
any way commit a crime."
He noted that Haubrick,
who had been a prison
guard at Wakulla Correc-
tional Institute, had lost his
job as a result of the charges
and been limited to work-
ing part-time pickup jobs.
Carter said Haubrick had
also delayed making a deci-
sion about whether to marry
his girlfriend because of the
uncertainty about his future
- whether he might be sent
to prison if found guilty.
Bajoczky was more suc-
cinct, saying he felt "the case
was wrongly mis-evaluated
by the prosecutor." Neverthe-
less, he added, "I am delight-
ed with the outcome."
The families gathered
and prayed in a jury room
outside the courtroom, giv-
ing praise to the Almighty
for the result. Afterwards,
when Haubrick walked by
a reporter standing in the
hallway, he said simply:
"Deuteronomy 3:22."
That Bible verse in the
King James reads: "Ye shall
not fear them: for the Lord
your God he shall fight for
you."
Millians' mother and
stepfather, Tanya and Brian
English, deferred comment
to attorney Christopher Nor-
ris, who works at Bajoczky's
firm. "Mr. and Mrs. English
are grateful for the outcome,"
Norris said. "It's been a long
five years."
In the state attorney's
office on the third floor of
the courthouse, Ray com-
mented that she was "just
disappointed that a jury
did not get to hear all the
evidence."


& Celebration in Thve Park


Saturday, February 14

at Hudson Park in Crawfordville


SWEETHEART PARADE

Breakfast in the Park will begin at 8:00 a.m.
Eggs, grits, sausage, biscuits, coffee and orange juice

Parade line-up will begin at 9:00 a.m.

Winn-Dixie Sweetheart parade will begin at 10:00 a.m.



Celebration in The park

Immediately following parade until 3:00 p.m.

Raffle drawing for $1000 shopping spree

from Winn-Dixie
Raffle tickets can be purchased from any Rotary member; cost is $1 each;
They can be purchased ahead of time or at the park on day of festival

There will be food, entertainment,

arts and crafts, ibits & ld'sact es.

Mechanical bull riding Rock wall climbing

Inflatable slide and obstacle course Ponyrides

Mini-Striker game Euro Bungee Fake tattoos


4Spomsors:
Winn-Dixie

Doug Apple and Wave 94FM
Doug Apple and Wave 94FM


I










Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 28, 2010


War Eagle grapplers finish second


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
The Wakulla War Eagle
wrestling team placed sec-
ond out of 10 teams at the
Palm Harbor University Tour-
nament in Tampa.
Dunedin won the tourna-
ment, but the War Eagles
placed second against some
larger schools and strong
competition, according to
Coach John Wainwright.
"They all made weight
and they did well," said the
coach of his team.
Jeremy Hall was 8-1 at 103
pounds. Zach Malick was
6-3 at 112. Tyler Hill was 9-0
at 119.
Carlton Atkinson was 5-4


Wakulla players, coaches with their tourney trophy.
at 125 while Cameron Crum 145. Brett Buckridge did not
was 6-3 at 130. Robert Douin win a match, but is a new
was 6-3 at 135. Scott Varner wrestler who wrestled hard,
was 7-2 at 140. according to his coach.
Brandon Cardin was 7-2 at Luke Taylor was 7-2 at 160


and Matt Fields was 7-2 at
171. Tyler Corbett was 7-2 at
189. Cole Woofter and Chris
Griffin split the 215 weight
class. Woofter was 2-2 and
Griffin was 1-2. Heavyweight
Travis McCollough was 8-1.
"It was a good tourna-
ment," said Coach Wain-
wright. "I was pleased with
the kids. They wrestled
hard."
Wakulla will host the
Wakulla Bank Duals Tourna-
ment Friday and Saturday,
Jan. 29 and Jan. 30. The
action begins at 2 p.m. on
Friday and 9:30 a.m. on Satur-
day. Powerhouse schools like
Niceville and Clay County are
expected to attend.


WHS cagers fall to Leon and Rutherford


By SCOTT COLLINS
Special to The Wakulla News
The Leon Lions boys'
basketball team visited Me-
dart on Tuesday, Jan. 19 and
defeated the War Eagles by
a score of 67-59.
In a game that was tied
27-27 late in the second quar-
ter, Wakulla fought hard, but
couldn't hold off a 15-4 Leon
run that ended up being the
difference in the game.
"I think if we can put
together a whole game of
good basketball then we can
string together some wins,"
said Coach Michael Sweatt.



Babe Ruth registration
is slated
The Wakulla Babe Ruth
League (WBRL) will hold a
pre-season parent meeting
Tuesday, Feb. 2 at 6:30 p.m.
The parent meeting will
be held in the children's
room at the Wakulla County
Public Library. The purpose
of the meeting is to solidify
this season's officer and par-
ent representatives, as well
as finalize the pre-season
league organization.
If you have questions, con-
tact Kelly Dugger at 566-5661
or e-mail to: kelly@bandbdug-
ger.com. This baseball league
is for boys aged 13 to 15 years
of age, and registration dates
will be held Feb. 6 and Feb.
13 at the recreation park.

Baseball alumni game
is planned
The Second Annual Hous-
ton Taff Memorial Alumni
Baseball Game will be played
Feb. 6 at Houston Taff Field


Johnny Robinson led the
way with 17 points and three
steals. Takija Knight had 12
points, 14 rebounds, and
two blocks. Mikal Cromartie
had 10 points and three
steals. Greg Thomas had six
points, six rebounds and four
blocks. Justin Willoughby
had six points and seven
assists.
Wakulla also hosted
Springfield Rutherford last
week in another district
contest and played a much
better game on Friday, Jan.
22.
The final score was 78-62


Sports
at Wakulla High School.
The fundraiser includes a
seven inning game, Alumni
vs. Alumni, and a Homerun
Derby Competition. Any
former Wakulla War Eagle
interested in participating
may contact Coach Mike
Gauger.
The team will be selling a
chicken dinner with potato
salad and baked beans. All
proceeds will benefit the
Wakulla High School Base-
ball Team. The homerun
derby begins at 11 a.m. and
dinners will be served and
the alumni game will begin
at noon.
For any additional infor-
mation, please contact Coach
Mike Gauger at MDGJR33@
yahoo.com or call 926-7125.

WHS 1980 Cagers
will be recognized
On Feb. 5, the first and
only Wakulla High School
State championship basket-
ball team will be recognized.


with Rutherford coming out
on top. Wakulla was within
seven points for most of the
final quarter and kept the
game close until the very
end when Rutherford was
able to convert several free
throws to seal the victory.
Greg Thomas led the way
with 17 points, 10 rebounds,
and three blocked shots.
Mikal Cromartie had 15
points, with three steals
and four assists, all coming
the second half. Justin Wil-
loughby had 11 points and
10 assists. Johnny Robinson
had seven points and three


steals. Takija Knight had six
points and four rebounds
before leaving the game for
good with a first quarter
sprained ankle.
"Takija's injury really hurt
us on the glass for rebounds
and we ended up giving
Rutherford way too many
second chance shots," said
Coach Sweatt.
The team fell to 2-15
on the season. This week
Wakulla played at Godby on
Tuesday, Jan. 26, at FAMU
High on Thursday, Jan. 28
and at NFC on Friday, Jan.


Coach Jessica Bishop Royse instructs her players.


Lady War

Eagles

make

playoffs

The 2009-2010 regular sea-
son drew to a close for the
Wakulla Lady War Eagle soc-
cer team last week as Coach
Jessica Bishop Royse and
her squad played Godby and
Springfield Rutherford.
Wakulla qualified for the
state playoffs by beating
Godby 3-0. The district cham-
pionship game resulted in
a 2-0 loss against the Lady
Rams.
Wakulla goals came from
Brooklynn Tindall, Chelsea
Sanders and Lauren Stauden-
maier. The goals were assist-
ed by Alicia Porter, Brooklyn
Roddenberry and Chelsea
Sanders. Goalkeeper Shay
Barwick had one save in the
Wakulla goal.


r- T :--



Lauren Staudenmaier
heads the ball against
Godby Lady Cougars.
The 2-0 loss at home to
Rutherford will send Wakul-
la on the road for the region-
al semifinals against Gulf
Breeze. The game will be
played on Tuesday, Feb. 2.
Wakulla fell to 5-11-4 over-
all.


Shorts


The 30th anniversary of that
championship year will re-
unite players, coaches, cheer-
leaders and families.
There will be a ceremony
preceding the War Eagle Boys
varsity game against North
Florida Christian School.
The 1980 squad was led


by legendary Coach Jerry
Davis, who has more than
700 career victories in high
school basketball. Coach
Mike Sweat invites the public
to attend this game as it is
also the last regular season
home game for the current
War Eagle squad.


JOYCE C. MILLENDER

Certified Public Accountant

* Electronic Filing of Tax Returns Available
(At No Extra Charge When We Prepare The Return)
Accounting
Tax Preparation & Planning
Corporation
Partnership
Estate
Fiduciary


4432 Crawfordville Hwy.
:, Crawfordville, fL 32327


(850) 926-8272
(850) 926-8273 .:


FREE WEATHERIZATION
LOWER YOUR BILLS.


Weatherization Works
Are your energy bills climbing out of control? Is
your house or mobile home drafty? Does it
become an oven in the summer or a freezer in
the winter? Let the Wakulla County
Weatherization Program help you reduce your
energy bills. The Wakulla County Weatherization
Program is accepting applications to conduct free
home energy audits and weatherization services
for qualified low-income households (including
renters). This is a free government Program to
help reduce energy consumption, thus reducing
energy bills for those who qualify for the
Program. Please call (850) 926-6292 or stop by
the Wakulla County Housing Office located at
15B Crescent Way, Crawfordville, for a simple
application form and let the County do the rest.


WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS AND
RECREATION DEPARTMENT


Gayla Parks, Agent
5032 Capital Circle SW
Tallahassee, FL 32305
Bus: 850-222-6208
gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com NOw that's teamwork.
Call me for your insurance
needs and see how it feels to
be on a #1 team. Like a good
neighbor, State Farm is there.
CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7




SStateFarm

097313 State Farm Home Office, Bloomington, IL


Saturday, Feb. 6th &13th
at Medart Park
from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon


SPORT


1. T-BALL MINOR LEAGUE
2. T-BALL MAJOR LEAGUE


3. PITCHING MACHINE LEAGUE 7 & 8
Pitching Machine League will end by Spring Break


4. PLAYER PITCH LEAGUE 7 & 8 $45.00
Player pitch league will start shortly after Spring Break Player
pitch registration will start on March 29. Deadline for player pitch
will be Thursday 4/1/10. The league will commence only if there is
enough participation.


3Y anuchR


5. WAKULLA CAL RIPKEN ASSOCIATION 9 & 10
------- Minor *


$85.00


6. WAKULLA CAL RIPKEN ASSOCIATION 11 & 12 $85.00
------- Major *
(All Minor and Major Cal Ripken players must attend a player
evaluation being conducted during registration times. Please bring
your child with baseball gear to registration so he may run, throw,
catch and hit. DEADLINE IS FEBRUARY 13TH AT 12:00 noon.
Please contact WCPRD Office, 926-7257, if you cannot be at the
February 6th or 13th registration dates.)


7. BABE RUTH ASSOCIATION *
8. GIRLS SOFTBALL ASSOCIATION *


9. BATON TWIRLING PROGRAM


13-15
10 and under
12 and under
14 and under


$100.00
$60.00
$60.00
$60.00


Horse Boarding All Breeds and Disciplines
Horses for Sale Including: Roping
Training Ranch/Cattle

Lessons Barrel Racing
English/Dressage


t-I11lni


Alicia Hay for Sale


* Means a Copy of Birth Certificate Required.
All leagues age determining dates are April 30th, except Girls'
Softball.
Age determining date which is January 1st. All children must provide
proof of health insurance or purchase the $7.50 policy.
Registration DEADLINE for T-Ball and Pitching Machine League is
2/13/10, 12:00 P.M. All of the Associations deadlines may vary so
please sign up early so your child secures a spot.
For more information call 926-7227
or go to our webpage at WWW.WCPRD.com.


1-28.page6A.indd 1


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Ages 5 and up $45.00


1/26/10 3:34:41 PM











THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 28, 2010 Page 7A


h la Adopt, save a greyhound


Mr, and Mrs, James R, Crona


Stephanie M. Wells


and Crona marry


Stephanie Michelle Wells
of St. Petersburg and James
Ryan Crona of St. Petersburg
were married Oct. 23, 2009 at
St. Peter's Episcopal Cathe-
dral in St. Petersburg with
The Very Reverend Stephen
Morris officiating.
The bride's is the daughter
of late Michael Klauk and
the late Linda Wells-Klauk,
formerly of Vero Beach.
The groom is the son of
Mark and Cindy Hudson of
Crawfordville and Jim and
Susan Crona of Tallahassee.
Stephanie graduated from
Vero Beach Senior High
School in 1997 and Florida
State University in 2001 where
she earned a Bachelor of Sci-


ence degree in Sociology and
Social Sciences. Stephanie is
a member of Kappa Kappa
Gamma sorority and is em-
ployed by PMSI as a corpo-
rate event planner.
Ryan graduated from Lin-
coln High School in 1998
and Florida State University
in 2005 where he earned a
Bachelor of Science degree in
Information Studies. He is a
veteran of the United States
Army Reserves and served
overseas during Operation
Enduring Freedom. He is
employed by Raymond James
and Associates as a Business
Analyst. A reception imme-
diately followed at the Hotel
Indigo, St. Petersburg.


John and Christine Johnson

Johnsons celebrate

46th anniversary


Pat Ross

Now I know that all of
the lobbyists in our state
are going to deny what I am
about to tell you, but I am
telling you facts from my
own experience.
Racing greyhounds are
in constant confinement
unless they are racing. The
only other reason that they
are not in confinement is a
few times a day the dogs
will be taken out to relieve
themselves.
These large dogs are kept
in a kennel that is an inch
or less from the top of their
heads and the animals have
just enough room to lie
down. They can't reposition
easily and will stay in the
same position for hours
and hours per day. You can
tell because many of them
have areas where the hair
is gone from the leg where
the pressure on the same
area gets all the pressure for
the many hours the dogs are
confined.
Win or Die. That is the


way it is. Dogs are killed
when they are no longer
making money for the own-
er. If the dog is injured or
sick, the dog is euthanized.
I know this to be a fact
because I have rescued too
many to count that were
about to be euthanized be-
cause of a minor injury.
For instance, an injury that
would take 10 days of anti-
biotics to cure is enough to
euthanize a greyhound. All
of the dogs I have rescued
have had severe infestations
of ticks and fleas. Some have
had internal parasites.
Did you know that the
outside rail on the track is
electrified. If a dog hits the
rail it is usually electrocuted
and dies on the track. 4-D
Meat is the racing grey-
hounds diet. 4-D means meat
derived from dying, diseased,
disabled and dead livestock
that has been deemed unfit
for human consumption.
These dogs are fed this meat
raw. While it is true that
some of this meat is used
by dog food companies, the
meat is cooked to kill the
dangerous bacteria.
No other dog has been
through what the racing


greyhound has been through.
They have never been petted
or loved. They don't know
anything about being a pet.
They don't know about stairs
(you have to teach them
to go up and down stairs)
and they don't know about
windows (they walk right
into them). They have never
seen or heard a television.
Greyhounds do not know to
take a treat out of your hand.
Nobody has ever given them
one. You will have to put it
on the ground and they will
pick it up. When you adopt
a racing greyhound it is as if
you have a brand new puppy
to mold.
These are the gentlest
of creatures. They are great
house companions and do
not require a great deal of ex-
ercise. They are calm, sweet
and regal. Please open your
homes and your hearts to
these beautiful animals.
Here are some facts about
these magnificent animals:
Greyhounds live to an
average of 12 of 14 years.
Their only health issues
are Osteo-sarcoma (bone can-
cer- occurs more frequently
than other breeds) and teeth
issues (need cleaning more


frequently than most dogs).
They are listed as one of
the "hypoallergenic" dogs
and very good for people
with allergies or kids with
allergies.
Most greys don't shed
very much, if at all. One of
the greyhounds at CHAT
may shed for a while, but
I think she will eventually
lose the furry coat she has
which likely came from be-
ing given testosterone (male
hormones).
Although they love to
run, they need some exercise
everyday (could be a walk),
but will lay around like the
largest of couch potatoes the
rest of the day (not hyper or
high energy dogs).
Some greys have a very
high chase instinct and can-
not live in a home with cats
or small dogs. This is the
exception. Most greys are
fine with cats, or are cat cor-
rectable, meaning they are
tempted to run after the cat,
but after you correct them
several times, they are fine.
These dogs rarely
bark. When your doorbell
rings, no commotion. These
dogs do not beg for food (un-
less you teach them to).


Return the overdue books, materials


From the Desk
of the Public
Library


Scott Joyner

The library's amnesty pe-
riod ended on Jan. 16 but
we have decided to wipe
the slate clean so to speak
and reset all overdue fines
to zero as of Jan. 19. This
means that if you've returned
items late but never paid the
fines your record is clear. If
you still have items out, the
overdue fines began accruing
from zero again on Jan. 19,
so if you bring the materials
back soon your fines could
be drastically reduced. This
only applies to overdue fines
and not damage or replace-
ment fees. If you have any
questions please call us at
926-7415.
Friday Night Movie
On Friday, Jan. 29 we're
happy to show a film that
made numerous top 10 lists
last year, including the Talla-
hassee Democrat's Mark Hin-
son who ranked it Number 8.
This film (which our Public


Viewing License forbids me
to name) was written and
directed by Academy Award
winner Jane Campion (The
Piano) and tells the story
of the last three years of
poet John Keats' life and the
passionate love he had for
his neighbor which was cut
short by his untimely death.
This tender love story is
rated PG. Doors open at 6:45
p.m. for the 7 p.m. showing.
Quilt Drawing
You still have a week and
a half left to enter the draw-
ing for the handmade quilt
donated by the Sassy Strip-
pers Quilting Guild. The tick-
ets are $2 and proceeds will
go toward programs here at
the library, like our popular
Summer Program of Events
that we're setting up now.
They may be purchased at
the front desk or from mem-
bers of the quilting guild or
the Friends of the Wakulla
County Public Library. The
drawing will be at the end of
our Book Extravaganza Fund-
raiser on Feb. 6. The quilt is
being displayed at the front
desk and there is a picture on
the library's Facebook page.
Thanks for your continued
support of the Library.


AARP Tax Prep and Tax
Forms Available
The AARP will begin their
annual free tax preparations
on Tuesday, Feb. 2 at 4 p.m.
at the library. They will be
here every Tuesday from 4
p.m. to 7 p.m. and every Sat-
urday from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. until Tax Day on April
15. This program is intended
for taxpayers with low to
middle income with special
attention to those age 60 or
older. This is a first-come
first-served basis so getting
here early would be best.
We do have free copies
of tax forms available at the
library with a few exceptions.
Hard copies of forms W-2,
W-3, W-4, and 1099-misc. are
not available due to a deci-
sion by the IRS. They must
be downloaded from the
IRS web site. We would be
more than happy to help you
download these or any forms
you may need.
Computer Classes and
Community Meetings
On Thursday, Jan. 28 we
have two computer class-
es: Microsoft PowerPoint I
at 9:30 a.m. and eBay buy-
ing guide at 1:30 p.m. On
Tuesday, Feb. 2 we have:


Microsoft Word 2007: Mail
Merge at 9:30 a.m. and Ar-
range Your Computer Files
in Windows Vista at 1:30
p.m. On Wednesday, Feb.
3 we have: Resumes/Cover
Letters at 12:30 p.m. along
with Online Job Resources
at 2:30 p.m. These classes
are free of charge and require
early registration as seating
is limited.
There will be Census job
testing on Thursday, Jan. 28
at 6 p.m. The Quit Smoking
Program will have its weekly
meeting on Jan. 28, also at
6 p.m. The quilting guild
meets every Friday at 10
a.m. and the library's book
club meets every Friday at
3 p.m. The Men's Fraternity
meets Monday, Feb. 1 at 6:30
p.m. and our two weekly
children's programs meet
every Tuesday (pre-school-
ers) and Wednesday (infants)
at 10:30 a.m. on each day.
For information about any
meetings/programs here at
the library, or to be added
to our weekly e-mail news-
letter, please contact us at
926-7415, e-mail me at scottj@
wakullalibrary.org or visit our
Facebook page.


John and Christine John-
son of Crawfordville celebrat-
ed their 46th anniversary on
Jan. 5. They were married
Jan. 5, 1964 in Pahokee.
The couple has eight chil-
dren, John Johnson II and Jo-
sette, Jana Gavin and Keith,
Jeff Johnson and Patricia,
Ray Johnson and Meletta,
Adrian Franklin and Denise
and Tamika Peterson and


LaMonta, all of Crawford-
ville, Evelyn Wilson and Er-
nest of Gainesville and Keith
Fisher of Tallahassee.
The Johnsons also have
26 grandchildren and one
great-grandchild with an-
other great-grandchild on
the way.
The couple shared a fam-
ily dinner on Jan. 16 with
family and friends.


FOREIGN CAR


REPAIR


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Serving Wakulla & Surrounding
Counties for over 30 years
Lic # MV15601
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1-28.page7A.indd 1


1/26/10 3:37:44 PM











Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 28, 2010


School district honors Mathers, Cook and Crum


Superintendent David
Miller and the Wakulla Coun-
ty School Board recognized
and praised the skill and
dedication of three employ-
ees Tuesday, Jan. 19. Their
energetic commitment to
meeting the diverse needs
of all students was com-
mended.
Bethany Mathers, Janu-
ary Teacher of the Month, has
deep roots in Wakulla as she
and her husband are prod-
ucts of the Wakulla County
School District. Mathers has
been a Varying Exception-
alities teacher at Shadeville
Elementary School since
October 2005.
"Since I was a little girl
and into my internship, I
knew that Shadeville was a
school where students come
first, and all adults work to-
gether with the students in
mind," she said.
After college, Mathers
pursued a career in business
and worked in administra-
tion for several years. When
employed by the Department
of Education in the Early
Learning Division, she real-
ized that she was missing out
by not being in the schools.
"When a position became
available as an ESE teacher
at Shadeville, I jumped at the
chance," she said. "It was the
best decision of my career."
Mathers enjoys staying
busy and challenged. It takes


a lot of energy to determine
strengths and weaknesses of
each student. Fortunately she
is able to incorporate strate-
gies that meet the needs of
the individual. And she does
so while being cheerful and
uplifting.
"Not everyone has the
chance to affect so many
kids for the better every
day. I am lucky indeed,"
notes Mathers. Her desire to
continually learn is evident
as she has returned to FSU
to receive an endorsement
in autism.
Principal Susan Brazier
applauded Mathers as well.
"Bethany Mathers is an ex-
traordinary teacher. She be-
lieves in her students and
therefore they believe in
themselves. She continually
strives to meet the diverse
needs of her students. She


is positive, hard working
and a wonderful advocate
for the children in her care.
She looks for ways to as-
sist them in the learning
process whether it is get-
ting them glasses, hearing
aids, assistive technology
or a more appropriate set of
educational materials. She is
well respected as a devoted
educator by her peers and
loved by the students and
parents whose lives that she
has touched."
When not busy teaching,
Mathers serves the school as
a team leader, chairman of
the school's Green Team, PLT
and SAC committee member,
and the leader of the Apple
Basket Diner program.
Diane Cook, Wakulla
High School Medical Acad-
emy Teacher and January
Teacher of the Month, is also
a registered nurse and has
been a War Eagle since Au-
gust 2001. Prior to that time,
she worked at the Capital
Regional Medical Center, Tal-
lahassee Memorial Hospital
and West Jersey Hospital as
a registered nurse.
Cook graduated from
Gloucester County College
in New Jersey with an As-
sociate of Science degree in
Nursing in 1991. Just recently,
she graduated from Flagler
College with a Bachelor's
degree in Education. Cook is
an advocate for students in


Diane Cook
the clinical setting. "Students
'get it' when they are putting
what they learned into prac-
tice. Their enthusiasm for the
most routine skills always
amazes me," she said.
A career highlight for
Cook occurred last May with
the first graduation pinning
ceremony for the WHS medi-
cal seniors.
"Our graduates were cel-
ebrated by the community,
their families and the school
board," Cook said. "To have
the opportunity to express
how proud I was of these
students was a great experi-
ence."
Principal Mike Crouch
enthusiastically states, "Ms.
Cook is a no-nonsense teach-
er who cares deeply for her
students and her students
know that she cares about
them. She is head of our


Medical Academy, which
boasts 200 students, and is
our most popular club, sport,
academic or non-academic
activity. No other group in
the school can say one out of
every six students is involved
in my activity.
"I admire the fact that
Ms. Cook is an RN and then
became a teacher. I am very
grateful to have Diane on the
Wakulla High School staff.
She comes to work every day
prepared and ready to teach.
Our students are fortunate to
have a teacher of her promi-
nence and mastery in a field
that is so important to our
society and our future."
When not busy as the
lead instructor at the medical
academy, she has supported
the school and community
through Relay for Life, AIDS
walk, youth leader and girls
weightlifting coach.
Trudie Crum, the Janu-
ary Employee of the Month,
started her career with the
school district in 2004 as
a custodian. Prior to em-
ployment with the Wakulla
Schools she worked 23 years
at the family seafood busi-
ness. Crum was born in Geor-
gia, but grew up in Florida,
graduating from Sopchoppy
High School.
"I like my job and thank
God I have a job," she said.
"I love kids and find them
enjoyable. I have worked


Trudie crum
at Medart Elementary, the
District Office, WMS and
now WHS. I have met a lot
of wonderful people. I am
so appreciative of the health
insurance and benefits I have
with my job."
Crum takes pride in her
work. "Everyday is amusing
and exciting because of the
kids. When teachers tell me
I do a good job, it makes me
feel good just knowing they
have a clean classroom to
teach in."
WHS Operation Foreman
Sam Tolar is Crum's imme-
diate supervisor. "Trudie
exhibits the qualities that
make a great employee," he
said. "She is conscientious,
dedicated and knows how
to clean. Add to that a cheer-
ful attitude and pleasant
personality and you have an
extremely good employee."


Brinson retires from district


Angela Brinson with H Director Karen Wells
Angela Brinson with H.R. Director Karen Wells,


Angela Brinson, Wakulla
County School District Risk
Management Specialist, will
retire on Jan. 29.
Brinson has dedicated
more than 14 years of her life
serving the Wakulla County
School District. She officially
retires from the school dis-
trict as of Jan. 29. She is a risk
management specialist and
received formal training and
certification from the Florida
Educational Risk Manage-
ment Association and the
State Department of Library
and Archives.
Originally from Georgia,
Brinson moved to Smith
Creek when she married
Wayman Brinson in 1982.


She served with the now
retired Jay Wiggins in the
maintenance and risk man-
agement departments from
1995 to 2005.
Brinson brought several
years of secretarial experi-
ence with her when she
began in 1995. Following
district level reorganization
and the retirement of Wig-
gins, Brinson transferred to
Human Resources and Risk
Management in 2005. Her
daughter, Lacie Sanders, is
a product of the Wakulla
County School District and
graduate of WHS.
"Mrs. Brinson has been a
valuable asset to the Wakulla
County School District," said


Superintendent David Miller.
"Her integrity and skill level
have contributed to the over-
all success of our school dis-
trict. Even though she prefers
working quietly behind the
scenes, her hard work has
not gone unnoticed. She will
leave a void difficult to fill."
Karen Wells, Executive
Director of HR, added, "Mrs.
Brinson has institutional
knowledge that is irreplace-
able. She has facilitated work-
ers compensation claims,
FMLA, insurance renewal,
student accident, property
loss, insurance claims, em-
ployee drug test results,
records management, bud-
get management and dis-
trict online forms. Her or-
ganizational skills coupled
with her attention to detail
have enabled HR and Risk
Management to transition
to electronic formats. Mrs.
Brinson has made a positive
difference throughout the
school district, in the HR
and Risk Department and
in my life. We all wish Mrs.
Brinson and her husband,
Wayman, Godspeed as they
begin their next adventure
traveling the continent in
their deluxe RV."


COAST student wins art contest


Principal Mike Crouch, Wal-Mart's Richard Russell, Board Chair Becky Cook.


Wal-Mart donates to schools


On behalf of the Crawford-
ville Wal-Mart Store, Store
Manager Richard Russell,
attended the Jan. 19 Wakulla
County School Board meet-
ing and donated money to
the school district.
Wakulla High School Prin-


cipal Mike Crouch accepted
a $1,000 check for the WHS
Band as Manager Richard
Russell and School Board
Chair Becky Cook looked
on.
Cook accepted a $1,150
check from Wal-Mart to


be used for student incen-
tives. "The Wakulla County
School District is grateful
for the business partners
who continually support our
schools," said Superinten-
dent David Miller.


SAC meetings will be held
Crawfordville SAC at the school. The meeting be meeting Thur:
Crawfordville Elementary is open to the public. 4 from 3 p.m. to
School will host a SAC meet- WHS SAC the school library.
ing. The group is meeting The Wakulla High School is invited to atten
Tuesday, Feb. 9 at 6:30 p.m. School Advisory Council will Evans is SAC Chai


sday, Feb.
5 p.m. in
Everyone
d. Shari J.
r.


COAST Charter School
sixth grader Logan Hudson
won the middle school divi-
sion in the Mission: 10,000
Rockets Art Contest.
The competition is spon-
sored by Artsonia: the World's
Largest Kids Art Museum,
Bing Maps and Microsoft. The
contest was held to celebrate
the DigitalGlobe satellite
launch that will capture high-
resolution pictures for Bing
Maps.
The contestants had to use
their imaginations to design a
two-dimensional rocket of the
future since every invention
starts from a simple drawing
on paper.
After reviewing more than
30,000 entries, a panel of
scientists selected three of
the drawings. The winning
rockets will be made into 3-D
models and Logan's is one of
the three.
Her drawing will be fea-
tured on the Mission: 10,000
Rockets web site, where the
three judges will talk about


Logan Hudson with Sigrid Fain and Kelley Tidwell,


why they liked the drawings.
The drawings and 3-D models
will be featured in a book to
be published in the spring. All
entries can be viewed on both
the Mission: 10,000 Rocket's
site as well on the Artsonia
web site. Logan's science
teacher, Sigrid Fain, and art


teacher, Kelley Tidwell, gave
time and encouragement to
help the C.O.A.S.T. students
produce their rocket designs
for the contest.
C.O.A.S.T entered 31 stu-
dent drawings, all of which
will be included in the pub-
lished book.


Black History Program slated at WHS


The Wakulla High
School Black Culture Club
will be hosting their Sec-
ond Annual Black History
Program themed, "Lifting
as We Climb."
The program will be
held in the WHS Auditori-


um on Thursday, Feb. 18 at
6 p.m. The featured guest
speaker will be Randy
Nelson, PhD. For enter-
tainment, there will be
singing by various youth
choirs, a step show, dance
ensembles, monologues


and poetry. Please come
to fellowship and support
your community.
For more information,
call Simeon Nelson at 528-
3182 or 926-7125 ext.329.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 28, 2010 Page 9A


Sheriff's Report


Wakulla County Sheriff's Office
officials investigated a multi-vehicle
traffic accident on Thursday, Jan. 21
that occurred on U.S. Highway 319
near Emmett Whaley Road, accord-
ing to Sheriff David Harvey.
Four vehicles were involved in
the rear-end crash that occurred at
2:17 p.m. There were seven juvenile
victims from Wakulla High School.
A number of emergency vehicles
were called to the scene and the
victims were transported to Talla-
hassee hospitals by ambulances.
Det. Bruce Ashley said the vic-
tims do not have life threatening
injuries. However, one of the stu-
dents was thrown into the wind-
shield and another was trapped
inside a vehicle for a short period
of time.
"The message we want to get
across is that none of them were
wearing their seatbelts," said
Ashley.
Captain Jones said all of the
students have been treated and
released from the hospital. Five
of the seven students were trans-
ported for treatment, he said.
A 16-year-old Crawfordville ju-
venile was charged with careless


driving.
All of the vehicles were travel-
ing north on U.S. Highway 319
when one of the vehicles began to
make a turn onto Emmett Whaley
Road. The charged driver failed to
stop and created a chain reaction
accident of vehicles striking the
cars in front of them, according to
the report.
Captain Billy Jones was the lead
investigator for the sheriff's office
and Deputy Ben Steinle also inves-
tigated and the Florida Highway
Patrol assisted at the scene.

In other activity reported by the
Wakulla County Sheriff's Office
during the past week:
On Jan. 19, a fire was reported
in the Wakulla High School boy's
restroom by James Rodney Bennett
of Crawfordville. Bennett put out
the fire which started in a trash
can. A 15-year-old and 16-year-old
student were identified as suspects
through evidence at the scene
and they face arson charges. Lt.
Ray Johnson Deputy Nick Gray,
Det. Lindsay Allen and Det. Sean
Wheeler investigated.
On Jan. 19, Carolyn Sherrell of


Crawfordville reported a burglary
at Sandy Bottoms Bar on the Wood-
ville Highway. A forced entry into
a cash register was reported and
$180 was stolen. Sgt. Jud McAlpin
investigated.
On Jan. 19, Cherylyn Mills-
Brown of Crawfordville reported a
residential burglary. A computer,
electronic games and coins were
reported missing. The value of the
stolen property was $1,150. Deputy
Ward Kromer investigated.
On Jan. 20, Charles C. Aller of
Crawfordville reported the theft of
a package. Clothing and ammuni-
tion, valued at $50, were reported
missing. Deputy Nathan Taylor
investigated.
On Jan. 20, Janis M. David of
Crawfordville reported a forgery as
several $100 bills were determined
to be fake. The victim was con-
tacted by her bank. Deputy Nick
Boutwell investigated.
On Jan. 21, Janice A. Stone of
Crawfordville reported a vehicle
burglary. Someone removed medi-
cations from her vehicle. The loss is
estimated at $10. Deputy Michael
Lawhon investigated.
On Jan. 21, Davis J. Strack of


Crawfordville reported a fraud.
Money was withdrawn from the
victim's bank account. The bogus
withdrawals totaled more than
$150 from Montreal and New
Hampshire. Deputy Charles Porter
investigated.
On Jan. 15, Tena L. Altman of
Crawfordville reported a forgery
as she received counterfeit money.
The money was a $5 bill. Deputy
Nathan Taylor investigated.
On Jan. 15, Pollie Lawhon of
Sopchoppy reported a $350 fraud
on her bank account. The charge
was for cable which the victim
does not have. Det. Evelyn Brown
investigated.
On Jan. 18, a criminal mischief
was reported by Randolph W.
Howell of Crawfordville. Someone
vandalized his mailbox. Damage
was estimated at $50. Deputy Ward
Kromer investigated.
On Jan. 25, Bob Nichols of
Sopchoppy reported a structure
fire. A mobile home was engulfed
when firefighters arrived at Lon-
nie Raker Road in Crawfordville. A
witness spotted the fire and called
emergency personnel. The cause of
the fire is unknown. The mobile


home was valued at $10,000. The
state Fire Marshal was called to
investigate. Deputy Mitchell Revels
investigated.
On Jan. 22, Jeremy S. Degrove
of Crawfordville reported a grand
theft at his home. A total of $1,072
worth of jewelry and electronics
were stolen. A suspect has been
identified. Deputy Anthony Curies
investigated.
On Jan 22, a felony criminal
mischief was reported by Lawrence
D. Flanagan of Crawfordville. Dam-
age was observed to his home and
septic system which was estimated
at $8,515. Deputy Ruel Raker inves-
tigated.
On Jan. 22, Thomas S. Hunt
of Crawfordville reported a grand
theft as $2,094 worth of tools were
stolen from his vehicle. A suspect
has been identified. Deputy Ruel
Raker investigated.
The Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office received 721 calls for service
during the past week. Note to
our readers: The people who are
reported as charged with crimes
in this column have not yet been
to trial and are therefore innocent
until proven guilty.


WHS soccer team prepares for playoffs by beating PSJ


The Wakulla War Eagle
soccer team concluded its
regular season on Saturday,
Jan. 23 with a win against
Port St. Joe.
Playing a game that was
postponed from earlier in
the week due to bad weather,
WHS hosted PSJHS for the fi-
nal home game of the year.
The graduating class of
2010 was recognized during
halftime as eight seniors were


escorted from midfield by
family and friends, through
an aisle of teammates, down
to meet Coach Bob Wallace at
the sidelines.
Morgan Henry, defensive
captain Rhett Harvey, Wayne
Murray, Liam Daniels, Blake
Howell, offensive captain
Gage Martin, game captain
Dustyn Robison and Josh
Oliver were honored with
a ceremony where they re-


ceived personalized gifts to
help them always remember
their high school soccer ex-
perience.
The home team was able
to enjoy the halftime fes-
tivities without distraction
as they amassed a 2-0 lead in
the first 40 minutes of play.
Martin scored on a partial
breakaway early in the game.
Then, just before the half,
returning player John Lemon


made a beautiful cross to Dal-
ton Norman who was able
to score a goal amid mass
confusion in the heart of the
Shark defense.
The second half would see
several shots, but no goals
and the game ended with
the same score as halftime.
The War Eagles now turn
their attention to the post-
season play.
"Trying to remain healthy


4-H youths busy displaying projects


By JASON PARISH
This year the 4-H Arts-
n-Crafters got involved in
gardening. Now they have a
club called the Junior Master
Gardeners Club, or the JMG
club.
The Arts-n-Crafters club
has put entries in the North
Florida Fair for the past
seven years. The club holds
a work day just for the fair.
This year, because of the JMG
club, we had plant entries
as well as craft items. At the
beginning of the year we col-
lected donations of plants,
soil, barrels, and hard hats
to name a few.
Organic and inorganic
fertilizers were used to see
which one grew the best
plant.
We made dish gardens at


our first meeting. Cacti and
succulents, gloxinia, flower-
ing kale, and pentas plants
were donated by local nurs-
eries for our projects. At the
work day we used the barrels
that were donated to make
painted rain barrels. The hard
hats made cute little beetles.
Bottleneck gourds made little
insect plant stakes.
The group had fun and
got great placings in the
North Florida Fair. This year
was a great turnout for the
4-H fair projects.
We would like to thank
all of the businesses that
continue to support our
program this year. They
are: Mike's Qwik Cash, Tal-
lahassee Nursery, Esposito's
Garden Center, Purple Martin
Nursery, Edible Arrange-


ments, Just Fruit and Exotics,
SLD Nurseries, and Gourds
and Gophers. Thank you for
your generosity!
In February, the Wakulla


County Arts and Crafters/Ju-
nior Master Gardener Club
will be displaying fair items
in the Florida State Fair in
Tampa.


---

Rebecca Kelley, Chayton Bussey, Jason Parish, Daniel
Sullivan, Eulalia Saly, Caylie Bussey and Katherine
Sullivan with projects and ribbons.


and focused this far into the
season is tough, but we've
got the momentum of clos-
ing with a win and we are
going to ride it all the way
into the playoffs," said Coach


Wallace.
Wakulla will travel Fri-
day, Jan. 29 back to Panama
City to battle for the title of
Region 2, Class 4A district
champions.


Law Offices of
Lynn Alan Thompson
CRIMINAL DEFENSE
misdemeanor felony
DUI- BUI
"I will personally handle your case".
The first consultation is free. Thirty years
35 ears defending clients in Wakulla County.
experience in 850-926-7663
criminal law 7 High Drive, Crawfordville, Florida


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Genealogy group to host discussion


"Using a Diary as a
Source for your Genealogy
Quest" is the theme of the
Wakulla Genealogy Group
meeting Feb. 4 at 6:30 p.m.
The guest speaker will be
Sara Straub.
Straub has been work-
ing on her genealogy for
many years but in the
last 10 years she has been
researching the surnames
of Straub, Schroeder, Haas,


Willi, Montefiore and
Knapp.
Come hear how she has
taken a diary that was writ-
ten on a trip from London
to Barbados, Jamaica and
eventually to America.
She will explain how
she did this and more.


For more information, call
Carolyn W. Harvey at 524-
5334.
7J / YOUR NEWSPAPER
PEOPLE
j SERVING
S-% PEOPLE


I Dea Hicks
J Dec. 2009 Winner

... lank Youl So Much!

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ove to try diLffrenE
auranrs, .mid this \, ill
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OFF The Eatin' Path o,
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Name
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e-mail
-


1-28.page9A.indd 1


1/26/10 3:52:58 PM










Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 28, 2010







Mother Nature continues to hamper fishing efforts


From The Dock
BY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL


We didn't get all the rain
they expected us to get on
Sunday but we got enough
for the month Thursday, Jan.
21. The water was just starting
to cear up some and now it's
dirtier than ever. Water tem-
peratures are in the low 50s
and none of that is good for
fishing, especially inshore.
Tom Riddle from Tifton
went out from Shell Point
last Wednesday and came
back with no keepers. He said
they did catch some grouper,
but they were small, and
they caught a lot of red snap-


per. Jeff May from Atlanta
also went out on Wednesday
and came back with no fish
though they said they caught
a lot of shorts. Larry Hess,
who always catches fish, said
he went out and trolled for
about two hours with not
so much as a bite and then
went to one of his sea bass
and grunt holes and came in
with nothing. Right after the
end of our cold weather, Alan
Lamarche went out and came
in with seven nice grouper
and Mike Pearson from Tifton
went out that day and came


in with five grouper.
Last night I talked with
Vev Persellin from Panama
City who does surveys for
the FWC and he and Scott
Rudloe went out of Panacea
last week to 45 feet of water
and came in with their limit
of grouper, two limits of big
sea bass and they released a
redfish that was more than
30 inches long. He said they
didn't get to any cear water
until they were about seven
miles out and they caught
all of their grouper on squid.
He said they did catch all of
their sea bass less than seven
miles from shore and in the
dirty water.
Capt. Luke Frazier from
AMS said he heard some
reds were being caught in the
Ochlockonee River, in Levy
Bay and around Spring Creek.
Morris Brown told me he had
been catching some reds in


a creek off the Ochlockonee
right after the cold weather
and said the water tempera-
ture was showing 42 degrees.
Gary Griffin, a longtime friend
from Tallahassee, went with
another fellow in a canoe and
put in at Wakulla Beach the
day before the cranes returned
to Wakulla County. His fishing
partner felt a small bite and
set the hook. He started reel-
ing and told Gary he thought
he just had a big clump of oys-
ters. He got it upside the boat
and it was a 27 inch redfish.
The water was so cold the red
was lethargic and never put
up a fight.
I talked to J.R. at the Aucilla
River and he said they caught
some fish in the river before it
got terribly cold, but since the
very cold weather, nothing.
This is the time of year
the big sheepshead start
heading offshore to spawn,


Quite a few have been caught
in the St. Marks River in the
deep holes. Ray Rich of Craw-
fordville said they caught
some nice sheepshead fish-
ing down from Shell Island
Marina. They used shrimp
on the bottom. He said they
caught some small ones, but
also some nice legal fish.
I knew when we got all
of that cold weather, and
especially in South Florida,
that we were going to have
some serious fish kills. That
was confirmed when a friend
e-mailed me an article from a
Tampa paper. They weren't
sure how bad it was but
thought it was pretty bad.
Well it was bad enough that
the FWC has said there will
be no possession of snook
until Aug. 31 and no posses-
sion of bonefish or tarpon
until March 31. You can still
catch and release them but


you can't keep one. The only
people who ever keep tarpon
or bonefish are people that
want a skin mount.
Trout season and grouper
season coses in our area on
Feb. 1. Trout season reopens
on March 1, but grouper sea-
son won't reopen until April
1.
When it does reopen the
limit will be an aggregate of
four grouper. You can have no
more than two red grouper or
gag grouper in your limit and
the gag and black grouper
must be 22 inches long and
red grouper must be 20 inches
long. Also, on commercial
Charter boats the captain and
crew have a zero bag limit. The
size limit on commercial red
grouper drops to 18 inches.
Now what's that all about?
Remember to know your
limits and be careful out there.
Good luck and good fishing


Wakulla Lady War Eagle basketball team keeps on winning


The Wakulla Lady War
Eagle basketball team topped
Chiles and Godby last week to
improve to 13-8 on the season
with three games left in the
regular season.
Wakulla topped Chiles 58-
49 and defeated Godby 53-34.


3Y Ranch in Crawford-
ville will welcome the par-
ticipants in the Florida State
Equestrian Team Spring
Horse Show. This show is
the first of its kind to come
to Crawfordville and will fea-
ture equestrian teams from
eight colleges from around
the southeast. More than
120 riders will make up the
teams from Florida State Uni-
versity, University of Florida,
University of Central Florida,
Georgia Southern University,

Rec sports

sign up set
The Wakulla Parks and Rec-
reation Department will host
spring sports registration on
Saturday, Feb. 6 and Saturday,
Feb. 13 at the Medart Park from
8 a.m. until noon. Baseball,
softball and baton twirling
will be offered. For more in-
formation, call 926-7227 orvisit
www.wcprd.com.


Taylor Eglton provided
the most offense for Wakulla
with 23 points and Artigua
Kilpatrick added 16 points.
The rest of the offense came
from Kiara Harvey with six
points and Kayla Pennywell
and Mariah Vernon with four


College of Charleston, Sa-
vannah College of Art and
Design, University of Miami,
and Mercer University. The
competition begins at 9 a.m.
and lasts throughout the
day. Riders will compete in
English and Hunter/Jumper
disciplines. The activities will
take place in the large cov-


points each. Kelsey Lee added
three points and Nese Jackson
scored two.
Wakulla jumped out to a
comfortable lead and Chiles
did not cut into the lead until
the fourth quarter.
The Lady War Eagles built


ered lighted arena and also
in the adjacent arena. Food
will be available throughout
the day. 3Y Ranch is located
at 195 Harvey Young Farm
Road in Crawfordville. Plan
now to come out and bring
the whole family for a great
day of equestrian entertain-
ment.


NOTICE


The City of St. Marks
Board of Commissioners Election
Wednesday, February 17,2010
7:00 am 7:00 pm


The City of St. Marks is located at
788 Port Leon Drive,
Phone (850) 925-6224.
January 21, 28, 2010
February 4, 11, 2010


a big lead against Godby at
halftime. WHS expanded a
19-6 lead in the first quarter
to 34-15 at the break.
Kilpatrick scored 23 points
and added eight rebounds
and four steals. Eglton had 10


points with five assists and six
steals. Harvey had eight points
and six rebounds. Kelsey Lee
added six points while Pen-
nywell scored four and Kelby
Davis had two. Nese Jackson
had two assists and a blocked


shot.
Wakulla hosted North
Florida Christian on Jan. 26
and will host Port St. Joe on
Thursday, Jan. 28 at 6:30 p.m.
for Senior Night. Florida High
will host WHS on Jan. 29.


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3Y Ranch hosts FSU equestrian

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U.S. Coast Guard crews
continue to work around
the clock as part of the U.S.
government's humanitarian
assistance and disaster re-
sponse efforts in Haiti. As of
Jan. 24, the Coast guard has
evacuated 1,142 American citi-
zens from Haiti, transported
692 responders to Haiti and
medically evacuated more
than 240 critically injured
people.
Last week, Admiral Thad
Allen, the commandant of
the Coast Guard, sent out the
following communication to
the men and women of the
United States Coast Guard
and Coast Guard Auxiliary:
Exactly one week ago to-
day, a little before 1700 EST, a
violent earthquake devastated
Port Au Prince, Haiti. Without
waiting for tasking, Coast
Guard men and women from
all over the country made
immediate preparations to
assist the beleaguered Haitian
people. The next morning,
Haitians witnessed President
Obama's pledge "You will
not be forsaken and you will
not be forgotten" become
reality when the cutter For-
ward arrived with the rising
sun as the first American
asset on-scene. Amidst the
devastation, Forward deliv-
ered damage assessments,
critical command and control
capabilities, and most impor-
tantly hope.
I am incredibly proud of
the performance of all our
personnel during this chal-
lenging period and like you,
my heart goes out to the
Haitian people who have suf-
fered so greatly. Coast Guard
units were the first on-scene
in Port Au Prince and have
been working around the
clock with our interagency
partners to provide humani-
tarian assistance, evacuate
U.S. citizens, and help the
most seriously wounded.
On-scene, the cutters Tahoma
and Mohawk quickly estab-
lished a makeshift trauma
unit with the Haitian Coast
Guard and triaged hundreds
of injured people. Tahoma's
crew even delivered a baby
boy from an injured Haitian
woman on their flight deck
and a second baby at their
shoreside clinic.
C-130 aircraft performed
damage assessment flights
and the cutter Valiant con-


ducted a port assessment of
Cap Haitian to create another
entryway for supplies that
were backing up at the air-
port. The cutter Oak contin-
ues to survey Port Au Prince
harbor and repair the primary
pier to allow much needed
supplies to flow directly into
the city. Aircrews from Mo-
bile, Ala., Elizabeth City, N.C.,
Sacramento, Calif., Barbers
Point, Hawaii, Detroit, Mich.
and Jacksonville and Miami
are also assisting with over-
flights and evacuations.
Supporting our forward op-
erations have been thousands
of Guardians working inside
and outside of the Coast
Guard. The Seventh District
Commander has been lead-
ing the Homeland Security
Task Force South East which
is a key coordination point
for the federal government's
collective response and evacu-
ation efforts. A joint FEMA-
Coast Guard team has been
deployed to Port Au Prince
to support United States
response operations being
directed by the U.S. Agency
for International Develop-
ment (USAID).
We are also supporting
U.S. Southern Command
Joint Task Force Haiti with
individual augmentees.
Our Area Commanders
have worked seamlessly to
flow forces rapidly including
moving the cutter Hamilton
through the Panama Canal
from the West Coast. The
Chief of Staff, exercising his
mission support responsibili-
ties, has skillfully integrated
and deployed logistics ele-
ments demonstrating the
maturation of our new sup-
port model. Here in Washing-
ton, our staffs have integrated
with key partners including
DOD, FEMA and SAID.
I have worked with FEMA
Director, Craig Fugate, in sup-
port of Secretary Napolitano


S* Boating Emergencies 'j
Coast Guard Station
Panam a City ...................................... .......... (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown ............................... ............... (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
St. M arks (Flotilla 12) .......................................... (850) 906-0540
or ..................................................................................... 89 3-5 13 7
Shell Point (Flotilla 13) ................................ (850) 926-2606
or ............................... ...................... 926-5654


and Deputy Secretary Lute
at a number of White House
meetings. We continue to
surge people and assets be-
cause we will have to sustain
our response efforts in Haiti.
Hamilton and Legare will
soon be on-scene pushing
our total number of Guard-
ians in theater to over 700.
We are also recalling Coast
Guard reservists to augment
our humanitarian efforts and
ensure maritime safety and
security for relief supplies
arriving in theater.
Our immediate and sus-
tained response illustrates
the value of the Coast Guard's
flexible command structure,
ability to operate across the
interagency and international
spectrums, and the initiative
of our people to take action.
This is why the Coast Guard
is so valuable to the American
public and the global mari-
time community. Our efforts
have not gone unnoticed. Sec-
retary of State Clinton com-
mented, "Our Coast Guard
has been unbelievable." At a
press conference last week,
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs
of Staff, ADM Mike Mullen
stated, "The Coast Guard was
magnificent from day one.
First, they were medevacing


people literally within the
first 24 hours. And I want
to give them a great deal of
credit for their response capa-
bility as well."
Those comments are di-
rected at all of you who
executing or supporting our
operations. Many have ques-
tioned how the Coast Guard
can do so much so quickly,
and I simply reply: "This is
what we do." Our Guardians
are committed to protecting,
defending, and saving with-
out having to be told to do
so. Along with all Americans,
I am truly inspired by the
Coast Guard men and women


operating in theater, Daclfill-
ing for deployed units, or
providing the necessary sup-
port to make it all possible.
As always, our Guardians are
here to protect and ready to
rescue at a moment's notice.
That is who we are and why
we serve.
I cannot describe it any
better than a young petty
officer assigned to Tahoma
in this e-mail to his family:
"There is an eerie feeling
in the air amongst our crew
tonight. Those who remained
shielded on the cutter today
see in the eyes of those who
went ashore what a major
disaster can do to a nation.
I have never seen so many
grown men and women with
tears in their eyes. Those who
did go ashore experienced
first-hand the severity of the
situation. I've been shielded
today only talking over the
radio to those who have seen
it. Never once was there a
question of professionalism
in their voice. I remember in
boot camp being told that the
U.S. Coast Guard on the right
side of our chest takes prior-


ity over our name.
Today the men and wom-
en who went ashore wore
coveralls without their names
on them. All that was visible
were the letters USCG. Today
was the first day I think I've
truly been more thankful to
be an American. Not because
of our infrastructure or the
freedoms given to us, but
because as a country we will
be there when a country of
less fortune is in need.
Haiti rarely exports any-
thing to our country. They
have no oil or major cash
crop we use. But as a county
we will stand together and
put aside our different opin-
ions of healthcare, war, or
economy and help out those
in need. Right now we are tak-
ing it hour by hour, aftershock
by aftershock, every little bit
helps. I'm going to try and get
some sleep, as I've already put
in a solid 16 hours. Tomorrow
will be longer."
Well said. Thank you and
Semper Paratus! Admiral
Thad Allen Commandant, U.S.
Coast Guard. Remember Safe
Boating is No Accident.


William H Webster
Attorney At Law


*Former Assistant State Attorney
*Former Assistant Public Defender
*Value Adjustment Board Special Magistrate


, Family Law
r Dependency
, Real Property


SProbate
, Civil Litigation


926-2561 /
whwebster@embarqmail.com
4395 Crawfordville Hwy. South of Crawfordville Member of FL. B r 34 years
"The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based solely on advrtisements.
Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written information
about his or her qualifications and experience."


1-28.pagellA.indd 1


Coast Guard

Auxiliary Reports
By Jim McGill


1)


I Sales -Servic


Im, 4D 40 0


:X/


WAM


1/26/10 4:30:08 PM


1444M--


4 A










Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 28, 2010

Flooding


Continued from Page 1A
He didn't. But at the regu-
lar meeting of the commis-
sion a few days later, Stewart
stressed the urgency of the
problem, and asked the board
to support his idea of spend-
ing $20,000 for a stormwater
study and engineering plans
to relieve the neighborhood's
flooding at least in those
areas where the flooding was
considered "critical."
That is far from what it
will actually cost to construct
stormwater facilities, how-
ever. That price tag will likely
be upwards of $1 million.
The board voted unan-


imously at their meeting
on Monday, Jan. 25, to take
$20,000 from the county's
emergency reserve for the
study and plans.
Engineer Leslie Hope said
the area of heavy flooding
would be the focus of those
plans. Once the drawings are
completed, the county could
go out to bid on the project.
A stormwater study in al-
ready in the works for Wakul-
la Gardens along with plans
to install central sewer and
improve the roads.
Wakulla Gardens was plat-
ted in the 1950s before Wakul-
la County had zoning and the


small lots were sold as Florida
real estate at the World's Fair
as a novelty without it ever
being considered that, 50
years later, people might actu-
ally build homes there.
During the building boom,
Wakulla Gardens and some
other similar historic neigh-
borhoods Magnolia Gar-
dens, Greiner's Addition,
Lake Ellen Estates proved
popular with builders and
homebuyers as an affordable
alternative to Tallahassee.
But the neighborhood has
its problems: while most of
the development has central
water, the homes are on sep-


U.S. 98 lane closures continue


Temporary lane closures
will continue on U.S. High-
way 98 westbound between
Manatee Way and Anhinga
Point in Wakulla County.
Weather permitting,
motorists can expect lane
closures daily for the next
two weeks, Monday, Jan. 25


through Friday, Jan. 29 and
Monday, Feb. 1 through,
Friday, Feb. 5.
Lane closures will begin
at 8 a.m. and end around
5 p.m. and will allow the
contractor an opportunity to
continue work on the new
roadway.


The work is part of a
$4,399,764.06 construction
contract to build a new
bridge over Wakulla River.
Motorists are reminded
to use caution and obey traf-
fic flaggers while traveling
through work zone.


tic tanks and the roads are
unpaved.
Commissioner Lynn Artz
noted that the neighborhood
is in line for some $400,000
in FEMA money to put down
gravel on some roads.
Earlier in the meeting, the
issue of seeking state and fed-
eral money for a stormwater
study for all of Crawfordville
and the cost of construction


was suggested as a priority.
That stormwater study is
expected to cost $100,000 it
includes the "critical area"
covered by the emergency
spending and is projected
to cost $3 million to build and
as much as $7 million when
road paving is calculated.
Also during the meeting,
the board approved the pur-
chase of one lot in Wakulla


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Gardens needed for the sewer
expansion project. Eutaw
Utilities, the engineer on the
project, had recommended
that two lots were needed
and a price of $21,000 had
been negotiated.
But commissioners hesi-
tated over concern about the
availability of other property
and only approved buying
one lot.


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THE LL NES. Thursday, Jan. 28,2010
THE \VNKULLA NEWS. Thursday, Jan. 28, 2010


Wakulla County comes through for seniors


Executive Director
Cold weather arrived. January
usually confronts the Senior Citi-
zens Center with seniors who are
more lonely and isolated since it
follows a long holiday season. This
year the problems of most Janu-
arys were complicated by freezing
weather. Seniors began to call for
blankets and heaters.
The first employee confronted
with the problem called a friend at
a church in Panacea and a friend
at a church in Crawfordville and
asked them to let their church
know of the needs of senior
citizens. Within 24 hours we had
enough blankets and heaters to
meet our immediate needs. This re-


sponse has always been so typical
of our community. A huge Thank
You goes out to everyone who gave
to the cause.
The employees of the senior
citizens center continually ask me
to request financial contributions
to help support our unfunded
services. They know that my big-
gest concern is for them to have
enough money to provide the
services that are badly needed. I
requested donations in an article
about two months ago. I hesitate
to repeatedly ask for donations,
but the services for seniors are so
much more important than my
reluctance to ask.
The grant that we receive from
the Old Americans Act for congre-
gate meals provides 20 meals per
day or 100 per week. I began to fol-
low our daily and weekly services
as of Jan. 4. During the first week
of January we served 70 per day or
350 for the week. At that rate we
will expend our 2010 allocation
before June and must raise funds
to serve the rest of 2010. We could
reduce some cost by reducing meal


quality. We could also reduce costs
by limiting the number of seniors
who eat. Anyone who came and
observed our luncheons would
agree that reducing quality or
quantity would be unacceptable.
We pay for these extra meals with
funds we raise, lunches sold to the
Rotary Club, breakfasts sold to the
Realtors Association, donations
from United Way and donations
from our churches and community.
Every employee and volunteer is
strongly impacted by notes we
receive form seniors. One note
stated, "I worked so many years
and now I get to come to the Se-
nior Center. I cannot express how
much this means to me."
Another said, "Thank you for
giving me a place to live. This is my
life." Similar comments are voiced
in the Senior Center every day.
Recently, I was in a locally
owned business. While I was
there a customer asked me what
we did for seniors. I explained in
detail congregate meals, meals-
on-wheels, in-home services and
transportation. I also explained


Blankets and heaters were donated by residents to seniors.


how we funded their services. As
I explained, the wife went into
a back office and returned with
a check for the Wakulla County
Senior Center for $1,000. I thanked
her and put the check in my
pocket. The customer asked how
we could afford the extra services.


I showed him the check and said,
"With friends and neighbors like
this."
We are fortunate to live in a
community that cares so much for
their neighbors. Working in the
senior center has changed my life
and how I see our community.


Browns share their citrus

with senior citizens


By DIANE LATER
Of the Wakulla Senior
Citizens Center Staff
Oranges, grapefruit, sat-
sumas, tangerines, kum-
quats, limes. It sounds like
an advertisement for the
Florida citrus industry.
On Dec. 16, the senior
citizens were invited to
Steve and Kathy Brown's
home to enjoy the beauty
of their orchard and pick
the delicious fruit.
What started out as a
cool and very windy day,
turned out to be just perfect
for the task ahead. We were
greeted with a sight that re-
minded us of the postcards
that are typical of Florida.
Fruit, glorious fruit, was
everywhere.
We grabbed our bags and
began loading the boxes
on the bus, but not before
sampling some of the trea-
sures.
Some of the comments
included, "Oh, this one is
the best" and "My, look how
easy these are to peel. Here,
carry my bag, it's too heavy.


Don't forget the lemons,
(Chef) Mary wants to make
lemon pies for lunch."
We picked for an hour
and the boxes were full. We
now had enough to take
back to the senior center
and share with everyone.
And the lemon pie? Wow,
lemon pie never tasted so
good and all of this because
the Browns shared their
bounty with the senior citi-


zens center.
For the past few years
the Browns have invited
our seniors to visit their
orchard and gather fruit. Ev-
ery year the seniors eagerly
anticipate this fun trip.
We are grateful that they
remember us and continue
to bring joy to the seniors.
We look forward to next
year and another successful
outing.


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Will Arnett, Don Allen, Dot Harris and Mattie Williams enjoy picking fruit.


FS MARY ELLEN DAVIS
Attorney-al-Law
Estate Planning ana ProDale Lorted in
Commercial Transaciions Waiulla County
SReal Property since 1998
Business Law
(850) 926-6003
17 High Drive, Suite C
Courthouse Square
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Tne hirng of a lawyer is an imporlanl aecision Ihal should noi De
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Dear Lee's Place


Talking about cancer
By KAREN LOCKARD, LCSW
Children's Therapist
Lee's Place Grief and Loss
Counseling Center
Dear Lee's Place,
Q: My wife of 15 years was recently
diagnosed with an aggressive type of
breast cancer. We have two boys, ages
9 and 12, who know mom has gone to
the doctor a lot lately, but we haven't
talked to them about the cancer. How
do we explain her illness? What do we
say? What if she becomes terminal?
We can barely wrap our minds around
this ourselves so we really need help
talking to our boys.
A First, you are to be commended


for asking for help at this time. Treat-
ment for a serious illness can take its
toll on the entire family so addressing
the illness in an open, honest and
calm manner is a good first step. We
believe telling kids the truth at an
age appropriate level is always best
Below is a suggestion on what you and
your wife could say to your children
followed by possible questions your
boys may ask-
"I have been to the doctor a lot
lately because I have breast cancer.
This is a sickness that is in my breast
and I'm working with the doctors to
find the medicines and other treat-
ments that can hopefully make it go
away. I may have surgery to try to take


out the cancer, but we don't know yet
We will tell you when we find out. I
will probably take some time off from
work so I can do everything the doc-
tors suggest. We want you to ask us
anything you want to know. Your Dad
and I want to make sure you two are
OK and we will let you know what is
happening.
"Are you going to die?" (This is a
very serious disease and it is possible
that I could die from it, but the doctors
are giving me very good treatment
and we are doing everything we can
to help me feel better.)
"Can I catch this disease from
you?" (No, you cannot catch it from
me or anyone else, even if you drink


or eat after me.)
"What will happen to me if you
die?" (Daddy will take care of you, you
will stay in the same house, go to the
same school, have the same friends.
Aunt _, Uncle _, and Grandma/
Grandpa will be around to help take
care of you.)
"Did I do something that caused
you to be sick?" (No, there is nothing
you wished for, prayed about or did
that caused my illness.)
Keep your children up to date
with any significant changes in their
mother's treatment. You will need to
define some of the basic treatment
language such as radiation, chemo-
therapy, etc. If she is going to be


hospitalized or have surgery, explain
where their mother will be, how long
she will be in the hospital and how
often they may call or go see her. It's
always a good idea to ask kids to tell
you what they understand so you
can correct any misunderstandings or
misinformation.
Lee's Place, a nonprofit grief and
loss counseling center, invites you
to submit questions about grief/loss
issues to dearleesplace@leesplace.org,
or 216 Lake Ella Drive, Tallahassee,
32303. Lee's Place is a grief and loss
counseling center on Lake Ella Drive in
Tallahassee. Services address all kinds
of loss including divorce, death, life
transitions, physical illness, trauma.


Fitness Matters


Expert answers to your
health and wellness
questions
By RUSSELL BARBARINO,
M.S., C.S.C.S., S.C.C.C.
Question It's obvious to me
that women see their physi-
cians much more frequently
than men. As a guy, I want to be
proactive about my health, but
I really don't know how often
to schedule regular check-ups.
Any advice?
Answer: That's a great ques-
tion, and one that lots of fellas
have probably been curious
about. To be honest, it really
depends on who you ask Every
doctor is different, and I'm sure
they all have an opinion when
it comes to this issue. My advice
would be to ask your personal


physician first. You can also fol-
low something I like to call the
five-year rule. This means that
you should schedule a doctor
visit at least every five years,
starting right after high school
and continuing through to age
50. After that, more frequent
visits may be in order in hopes
of catching any health issues
early on as you get older. Ide-
ally, the visits should include
a basic physical exam, as well
as comprehensive blood work.
This should be enough to keep
you healthy and happy foryears
to come, but again, ask your
doctor what he/she thinks as
well.
Questions Boot camps seem
to be a pretty popular form of
exercise these days. What do


you think of these workouts-
worth a try?
Answer: You're right-boot
camps have taken the country
by storm. Group exercise in-
structors are including them in
the club setting, but there are
also a number of companies
popping up that hire fitness
professionals to facilitate camps
in a variety of outdoor loca-
tions as well. I personally like
boot camp workouts because
they're different. They get you
out of your fitness comfort
zone. When workouts become
stagnant, results tend to fol-
low, and this is sure to have
a detrimental effect on your
motivation to exercise. These
types of workouts also tend to
focus on multi-joint, full-body


movements with both cardio
and strength components,
which often produce greater
fitness benefits. But that's not
even the best part! Boot camps
are a lot of fun, and we all know
you're more likely to participate
in something that you find
enjoyable. Remember, you can
always design your own per-
sonalized boot camp too. If you
need some help figuring out
what to incorporate, talk to a
personal trainer at your club.
Question: Lately, I've be-
come much more aware of
my carbohydrate intake, spe-
cifically focusing on sugars. I
watch sweets and limit refined
grains, but what about fruit? It
obviously has a lot of sugar, so
should I limit that too?


Answer: Fruit is essentially
all sugar, but it also has lots of
vitamins, minerals, and phyto-
chemicals. Because of this, there
is no reason to limit or avoid
fruit. In fact, most people could
probably use an extra serving
or two each day. The only indi-
viduals that may need to mod-
erate their intake a bit would
be those dealing with diabetes,
but even they can still have a
few servings daily, as long as
they're spaced well throughout
the day. Generally, when we
talk about limiting sugar, we're
focusing on the added sugars
that seem to appear in so many
foods. Added sugars contribute
significantly to overall carbohy-
drate and calorie intake, and are
one of the many reasons forthe


nation's expanding waistline.
Unfortunately, it's very easy for
an avoidance of added sugars
to become an avoidance of all
sugars, and even carbohydrates
in general. Let's not forget the
carbohydrates are an important
energy source for the brain,
the red blood cells, and our
muscles. And carbohydrate-
heavy foods are not just empty
calories; they contain a variety
of other healthful nutrients
as well.
About the author; Russell
Barbarino is Club Owner/Fit-
ness Professional at Anytime
Fitness in Crawfordville and Tal-
lahassee. To submit a question
for future articles, please contact
the author at CrawfordvilleFL@
AnytimeFitness.com.


Bicycle trail communities supported by advocacy group
One campaign is called "This effort is very important port from Director Sayer and of the Capital City to the Sea
"Supporting Bicycling Com- to our area," said Kessler. "As the cyclists in attendance. Loop, answered questions about
munities" and is working to we explore regional solutions Sayer said that he is look- the loop's development
promote bicycle travel in ad- to economic and health issues, ing forward to returning to our "They were very impressed
Svocacy efforts in order to gain Wakulla County can do a lot." region to ride the loop. with our efforts so far," said
better conditions and services The loop drew words of sup- Kessler, an early proponent Kessler.
for bicycle travelers. The "Capi- AU


Jim Sayer, Commissioner Howard Kessler, trail map.
Howard Kessler, M.D., Chair- Adventure Cycling's efforts
man of the county commission, are attempting to build a net-
attended a "Supporting Bicy- work of bicycle routes that en-
cling Communities" meeting able bicyclists to explore the his-
presented by Jim Sayer, Execu- tory and beauty of America.
tive Director of Adventure Cy-
cling Association, a nationwide
bicycle advocacy group.
"What a great presenta-
tion," said Dr. Kessler. "Jim was
thoughtful, dynamic and very
humorous. The organization's
mission is to inspire people of
all ages to travel by bicycle for Lai
fitness, fun and self-discovery.
While traveling through our ( O 2c
country he rides the various Years
trails with cyclists and digni-
taries."
Sayer, traveled from Missou- Call Rita today
la,MonttoTallahasseetospeak to make your r
to a group of approximately 75
cyclists some of whom traveled www.jacks]
from as far as Destin and Ocala Open Monday F
to hear him speak. Saturday by ap


tal City to the Sea Loop" was
among the topics discussed.

& YOU DON'T HAVE

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YOURSELF TO LOSE...
JUST GET A GREAT
WORKOUT PLAN
CALL
Gena Davis
Personal Trainer
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NAME
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PHONE [ NEW NEW SUBSCRIBERS
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Offer good for Wakulla County subscribers only.
All major credit cards accepted. Offer expires 1/31/2010
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1-28.page2B.indd 1


1/25/10 11:13:41 AM












THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 28, 2010 Page 3B


CLASS I IED ADS Starting atjust $8.00 a week!


105 Business Opportu- -
nities .

ALL CASH VENDING! Do you
earn $800 in a day? 25 Local
Machines and Candy $9,995.
(888)629-9968 BO2000033
CALL US: We will not be under-
sold!


BRIIIG YOUR
OL PHOTOS
TO IFEH
I can fix those
wonderful old pictures
so you can enjoy them
again, and make
copies to share.
Keep the family heritage
alive with restored
photographs

Just $15 per photo.
850-766-7655
dougapple@gmail.com

COMMERCIAL CLEANING
FRANCHISE Work evenings part
time- Monthly income $1,500-
Financing available- minimum
down $200.00- call
(866)502-1162 (24hr).

PROVEN ONLINE BUSINESS
Looking for Motivated People To
Fill Openings Complete Training
Provided Great Income, Flexible
Hours Check Us Out Today
surie@enjoythefreedom.net.

110 Help Wanted
I


AVON Full-time pay for
part-time work. Call Shirl,
850-948-4162.


CDL DRIVERS NEEDED:
BROOKS CONCRETE NOW HIRING.
Drivers needed for redi-mix
deliveries; experience
required; apply in person;
1532 Coastal Highway,
Panacea;
NO PHONE CALLS.

Drivers IMMEDIATE NEED!
OTR Tanker positions available
NOW! CDL-A w/Tanker REQ'D.
Outstanding pay & Benefits! Call
a recruiter TODAY!
(877)484-3042 www.oakley-
transport.com.

Experienced short order cook
and preps. Apply in person at
The Riverside Cafe in St. Marks.

Foster Parents Needed. Open
your heart and home to an ado-
lescent in need. Generous
monthly stipend. Contact Florida
MENTOR at (800)910-7754 or
www.thementornetwork.com.

Fun and active job for energetic
people. Bonuses, incentives and
vacations. $350 per week, base
pay. Full-time only.
Call 850-728-2659.

Over 18? Between High School


STUDENT EXCHANGE PRO-
GRAM Seeks Local Coordina-
tors Passionate about your com-
munity? Help us expand! Unpaid
but monetary/travel incentives.
Must be 25+. Visit
effoundation.org or call
(877)216-1293.
S120 Services and Busi-
nesses

A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING
Free Estimates
Licensed John Farrell
926-5179
566-7550
AIR CON OF WAKULLA
Heating and Cooling
Gary Limbaugh 926-5592
3232 Crawfordville Highway
Service, Repair, Installation
FL Lic. #CAC1814304

ALL ABOUT...
CONCRETE LANDSCAPE
blocks plants
bricks sod
pavers tractor work
call JOSEPH FRANCIS
850-556-1178 /
850-926-9064

ANYTIME ELECTRIC
Specializing in repair and serv-
ice, residential and commercial,
homes and mobile homes.
24-hour service. Mark Oliver,
ER0015233. 421-3012.
BACK FORTY TRACTOR
SERVICE Bushhogging, Box-
blading Driveway. Larry Carter
Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931,
850-694-7041. Licensed/In-
sured.

Behind On Your Mortgage?
Fight Foreclosure! Hire Skilled
Foreclosure Attorneys. Call
NOW For A FREE Consultation
On Saving Your Home. Call KEL
(877)264-6231.
C & R Tractor/Backhoe Services,
large tract and residential site
clearing rock, dirt, and road
base hauling, call Crandall
(850)933-3346.
Certified Med-Tech/Home
Health Aid, will care for your
loved one. 15-yrs. experience,
excellent references. Best rates
around! 850-933-9162.
Electrotax Need money now??
Same day refund checks.
850-926-2248.
www.1040.com/electrotax/
Authorized IRS E-File Provider.
2543 Crawfordville Hwy.
7-days-week.














IND eSTIES
SaeIntlato0 Rpi


ana College? Travel ana nave
Fun w/Young Successful Busi-
ness Group. No Experience sPAINTING
Necessary. 2wks Paid Training. Service
Lodging, Transportation Pro- ileellilg.ill your painting needs.
L i T n t.i l & repaints,
vided. (877)646-5050. residential, commercial, free estimates,
licensed & insured.
PTL OTR Drivers. NEW PAY 926-1322 Henry Conner
PACKAGE! Great Miles! Up to
41cpm. 12 months experience Mr. Stump
required. No felony or DUI past 5 Stump Grinding
years. (877)740-6262. Quick Service
www.otl-inc.com. ,-n..-, -rn oi on


KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR
Commercial, residential and mo-
bile homes. Repair, sales, serv-
ice, installation. All makes and
models. Lic. #RA0062516.
926-3546.


MUNGE'S TREE SERVICE
Professional Work done at
Affordable Rates
24-Hr Emergency Service
Mike Mongeon
ASI certified arborist FL-6125A
850-421-8104
firewood available.





wickless
candles
tugs & Kisss,
is the perfect way to say
"be mine". Create a
personalized basket for
your sweetheart!
Tell me what
your Sweethear
likes and I will
design a
personalized basket
l,14 rherl

Call today!
Janet Creel
87 Duncan Dr.
Audubon Forest
www.scentsy.com/janetcreel
5 I 9-0720


POLLY NICHOLS
Special Touch Cleaning
Construction Cleanup,
Commercial, Residential.
"pray like it's up
to God, Work like
it's up to you"

Y 519-7238
926-3065
Licensed & Insured

Tasty Takeout!!
Always something tasty on our
menu. Eat in or take out!
2698-B Crawfordville Hwy.
(across from Ace Hardware)
745-8442.

200 Items For Sale


Forever roses. Natural wooden
roses. Beautiful! Must see!
Arrangements or by the dozen.
Starting $6/dozen. Cissy Jones
933-9162,
cissyjones63@yahoo.com


220 Cars


1985 Chevy S10, 5.7L 350V-8
performance parts 1993 2.8LV-6
extended cab. Project vehicles
$1700 for both, o.b.o.
850-745-8059.


320 Farm Products &
415 Announcements
Produce


Grain fed beef for your freezer.
Half or whole, $2.89/lb. Also
okra and green boiling peanuts
for sale. Raker Farms,
850-926-756R1


230 Motor Homes and
Campers I Horses


36Ft. 2001 Fleetwood Expedi-
tion, sleeps 6 with 2 slides,
31,000 miles. Transmission Alli-
son, fuel diesel, loaded. No
smoking/pets. $63,700. Also:
2006 Chevy Silverado 1500 4X4
crew cab tow vehicle, one
owner, with only 62,000 miles.
Equipped for towing. contact
Jimmy at 850-962-4742 or
850-519-5959.
PUBLIC AUCTION 450+ Travel
Trailers, Park Homes, Mobile
Homes 2007-2005 Models NO
MINIMUM PRICE! Carencro, LA
- Saturday, Feb 6, 2010
(225)686-2252 or www.hender-
sonauctions.com LA LIC# 136.


275 Home Furnishings


$159 Queen Pillow-Top Mattress
Set. Unused in sealed plastic
w/warranty. 222-9879. Delivery
available.
100% LEATHER sofa & love. No
vinyl. Never used. Still in crates.
List, $2,749. Asking $675.
425-8374, can deliver.
BEAUTIFUL CHERRY solid
wood sleigh bed & mattress.
NEW. $369.222-9879.
Full mattress set in sealed plas-
tic NEW $129. Can Deliver.
545-7112.

Micro-Fiber sofa/chair. $500.
Hardwood frame, warranty, new
in crate, del avail. 545-7112.

S 285 Jewelry


WANTED GOLD & SILVER Top
prices paid for your jewelry and
coins. Local Investor Call
(904)405-0729 or visit our web-
site for nearest location
www.buygoldjacksonville.com.

300 Misc. for Sale


Get Dish -FREE
Installation-$19.99/mo HBO &
Showtime FREE-Over 50 HD
Channels FREE Lowest
Prices-No Equipment to Buy!
Call Now for full Details-
(877)227-2998.


i ...... ...I I I resoffers anopenflc iI ..
with cathedral ceilings, semi-split plan (2 BD on 1 e .. I
2BD on the other), beautiful fireplace, huge rooms, rustic
master suite with stone around the jetted tub, In-Law suite
with 1BD/1BA, 2 car garage, front and rear rocking
chair porches, fenced yard
Dawn Reed Realtor BlueWater "
(850) 294-3468 Realty Gro
www.wakullainfo.com Gr
lr


3yRanch
Horse boarding, Training, Les-
sons, Clinics, Roping, Cow
Work, English, Dressage, Lawn-
care, Firewood, Alicia Hay.
www.3yranch.com 544-0238.


335 Pets












DOGS, PUPPIES, NICE CATS
AND KITTENS... Come, take
a look and bring a new
friend home TODAY!

CHAT
Adoption Center:
Monday closed.
Tuesday through Wednesday&
Friday: ll:00AM to 4:30PM
Thursday: 11:00AM to 7:00 PM
Saturday: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM
Sunday: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM
1 OAK STREET, CRAWFORDVILLE
or visit:
chatofwakulla.com





355 Yard Sales



Saturday, January 30th,
7:00AM-until. 196 Otter Lake
Road, Panacea. Plus size
women's clothes, small appli-
ances, some furniture, ods &
ends.


926-7811
Florida Coastal
properties. Inc.
Shm Z,*


Advertise in Over 100 Papers!
One Call One Order One Pay-
ment The Advertising Networks
of Florida Put Us to work for
You! 850-926-7102 www.thewa-
kullanews.com, classifieds@the-
wakullanews.com.
Advertise in Over 100 Papers!
One Call One Order One Pay-
ment The Advertising Networks
of Florida Put Us to work for
You! 850-926-7102 www.thewa-
kullanews.com, classifieds@the-
wakullanews.com.
ROOT 319 has moved! Come
see us at 2809 Crawfordville
Hwy. We are a full service hair
and nail salon. 926-8319.

500 Real Estate


***FREE Foreclosure Listings***
Over 400,000 properties nation-
wide. LOW Down Payment. Call
NOW! (800)860-4064.
FORECLOSED GOLF HOMES &
GOLF LOTS! 100fs of listings in
the Carolinas. Own for fraction
of value! Call (877)526-3615, x
2454 foreclosedgolfhome.com.

LAKE LOT SALE! 5 Acres only
$24,900 with FREE BOAT SLIPS!
Saturday, 1/30/10 Only. (was
$59,900.) SAVE $35,000 during
off- season! Beautiful mix of
woods & meadows-walk to pri-
vate fishing lake. Quiet country
road frontage, utilities, warranty
deed. Low financing. Call now
(888)792-5253, x.3377 www.in-
dianlaketn.com.

LAND OR DEVELOPMENTS
WANTED. We buy or market de-
velopment lots. Mountain or Wa-
terfront Communities in NC, SC,
AL, GA and FL. Call
(800)455-1981, Ext.1034.

TIMBER COMPANY LAND
SALE! 20+ Acres only $89,900.
(was $169,900) Saturday 1/30
only! Beautifully wooded acre-
age near Florida/ Georgia border
just 90 minutes Jacksonville.
Great hunting/ outdoor recrea-
tion. Long road frontage, utilities.
Excellent seller financing! Bonus:
Pay No Closing Costs! Perfect
for log cabin. Call now
(800)898-4409, x.1500
www.georgialargeacreage.com.


r I. ,.jupin. tE ?OK-
S I ,


C rawlord,,Ile
9Cdr26lO 1I'
926-5111
Silver Coast
Realty


S 4


REDUCED! BE-ul.lul :BR hrone AnIh onie..:, i.: ned
poi:.h Ajioi i-'rip l.l:her Qui- n epp r r in lill Holloi, Lushri.lnd
SLjpir in ups.:,jle utdr i,.on I Ion ai r1 rm^om r j'ij
Priced at $189.900. MLS# 194849. properly *2316-W.

Ta3i.+ .3 na, on Ih+ ;.on,.
nienl rside-' 1 424 sql h:BR
A olnrlaonae Is lo,: aed
in Ir-e hea; l 01 a-.30Atld lie
Full .3ppl.j3n.:e p.1:,.)age 'eal
parao rais an ee:l .C nang
I a: leaned
:onnmmunir pool .,:ubhouse #901WW. MLS# 186619
NOW RECDUCEDTO $109.500.

RENTALS
FURNISHED 2BR 2.5 Condo r -.: m.n:ir,h E,:uuri de.1:.:i required
t1K:i PET, i :.:'j'0
2BR 1BA on 1.21 acres ,:,r, C.:,,';ij H ', 'll m,:,riir, 1:,li p iu.i ),r.
,: til ,3ep:,":''l" Helrer.,:e required
SHELL POINT BEACH FI.IRlJliHEEi :EBR BA C nr.il ir.:.r hr:nm
ilE 1:ie .- 1 ,',', ered me:: rn.r n 11 1:mii p;.+1 'ir, e'.:,. 1 '1 ",fI
mn:rnilh ';:uril, ,d":'';ii required .:'.i .'\
SEASONAL nr.uq Hjrt..:.r T,:,,nr.h:,n.m 3 jilj e I,:r rnr. l fi .1 0
2r,. -', tr mn ..mum ..:ihedule In jn, qi n m.:.rnh C.:'nnmmurnl p:x:.l
, c,'.-t ." d, ee 'ie:. '*l~r ," ln. 1 I.:.c n| 3 r qied ,-.:.:.nrn[url1, I -' PETI_


"'Licensed Real Estate Agents Needed""
ConlaclTed or Thelma
850-926-7811
WWW.C21FCP.COM


1-28.page3B.indd 1


1/25/10 3:24:33 PM















Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2010

500 Real Estate 515 Apartments for COVERED BOAT/RV
500 Real Estate Rent STORAGE AVAILABLE

Self Storage Units, Retail Space,
Locks, Boxes & more!
Locks, Boxes & more Ridgeway Ct. 5BR/2BA DWMH,
S ow Away Cenler deluxe kitchen, mast. bath, fenced
850-926-5725 backyard, lots of extras.
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE www.stowawaycenter.com A Must See!! $900/month.
Sugar Pine Ct. 3BR/2BA DWMH, -
All real estate advertising in this I ImL .E R N oodville Retail Lrg. deluxe kitchen w/island.
newspaper is subject to the Fairoodville Retail yard, powered storage
Housing Act which makes it ille- 1, 2 & 3 BEDROOMS Space Available shed. $70/month. No inside
gal to advertise "any preference, HO DEPOSIT!!! smoking or pets. ALSO FOR SALE!!
limitation, or discrimination
based on race color, religion, Year-End specials! Fitness Studio-1000/sf
,hnnrlnn f.mi.i. tntiia or 92BR unit for (Wall to wall mat & mirrors) H1C Barry 926-4511


national origin or an intention to
make any such preference, limi-
tation or discrimination." Familial
status includes children under
the age of 18 living with parents
or legal custodians, pregnant
women and people securing the
custody of children under the
age of 18.

This newspaper will not accept
any advertising for real estate
that is a violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To com-
plain of discrimination call HUD
toll free at 1-800-669-9777. The
toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.




I gill IiMJiL
LENDER



TEXAS LAND FORECLOSURES!
20 & 40 acre tracts. Near Grow-
ing El Paso & proposed
travel/space center! No Credit
Checks/Owner Financing Money
Back Guarantee 0 Down. Take
Over $159 per/mo.
(800)843-7537 www.sunse-
tranches.com.


the price of a 1BR unit.
NEW Low Rates for 3BR.
Call 926-1134
for more information.


Weekly Rentals with all utilities,
cable TV, internet and phone ac-
cess. Microwave, refrigerator,
coffee maker, furnished com-
fortably. Rates begin at $150 per
week. Call 850-984-5421, Pana-
cea Motel.
530 Comm. Property
for Rent

1200sqft. 4-room office on 319
in Crawfordville. Has kitchen,
reception area, great location.
Must see!! $900/mo. Call
850-926-6289 or 850-421-2792.

Commercial building on busy
Hwy. 98/Panacea for rent.
$550/month. $550/security.
Ochlockonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001.
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com

Mini-Warehouse Spaces for
lease, 8X10 and 10X12 now
available. Come by or call Wa-
kulla Realty. 926-5084.


*gts AmS-


0-a, -rb w 0 a140


Pig


















"Copyrighted Material _



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers"
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**~i;c>


* Retail -1250/sf
(Storefront w/back storage)
Two-Bay Garage-1200/sf
Divided Office Space-1074/sf

Lewiswood Center
421-5039


545 Homes for Sale



By Owner, below market price!!
$99,500, 3BR/2BA. Built 2003
on 2 lots. New A/C, refrigerator
and microwave. Custom-built
dining table w/benches. Wood
laminate floors. Must See!
545-4066, 926-8100, 228-4579.

On 3 lots in Wakulla Gardens.
23 Neeley Rd., 1800sqft.
4BR/2BA, Renovated. $135,000.
Only $75/square foot !!!
Nick Chason, 850-766-7750 for
information.


555 Houses for Rent
ouses r e


570 Mobile Homes for
Sale

2004 16X80 2BR/2BA on 1.86
ares (corner lot). Very clean, lots
of room. $76,900. 519-4609,
545-1355.

3BR/2BA 2005 M/H on a double
lot. Owner financing. Call
850-556-1178 for more details.

New, (2006) MH, 2BR/1BA,
14-feet wide, no carpet. $9,500.
Must move to your lot within
three weeks. Call for appoint-
ment: 850-766-3536.

Legal Notice



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 09-144 CA
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.
Plaintiff,


VS.


1BR/1BA fenced, cathedral ceil-
ing, screened porch, overlooking
Sopchoppy River. Separate
laundry. 85 Mt. Beasor Road.
$490/mo. Peek, then call
850-524-1026.

2BR/1 BA fireplace/deck with ac-
cess to Wakulla River. $750/mo.
First and last month. Call
(850)926-2783, 850-926-7538.

3BR/2BA House w/hardwood
floors, in-ground pool. Riversink,
Shadeville school area. All-new
appliances, small pet o.k.,
850-510-7008. Available now!

3BR/2BA, Wakulla Gardens,
$800/month, plus $500 deposit.
No pets or smoking. Call
850-570-0575.

Bay-front 3BR/2BA on Mashes
Sands. Partially furnished.
$875/month. $875/security. No
Pets. No Smoking. Ochlock-
onee Bay Realty: 850-984-0001
www.obrealty.com obr@obre-
alty.com

Crawfordville, clean, large 2
Bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms du-
plex. $675/month. Call Linda at
926-0283.

Crawfordville. 3BR/2BA. W/D
hookups. New appliances. Ce-
ramic tile floor. Screened porch.
Huge yard. $850/mo. + deposit.
850-228-0422.

Furnished house for Rent
3BR/2BA located in Crawford-
ville. $1,000/month, +deposit.
Call 728-6496 or 926-6036.


560 Land for Sale



2-acre lot for sale near new
Shadeville School, corner of
Steel Court and Spring Creek
Hwy. (city water). Owner financ-
ing.
850-556-1178.

20 ACRE LAND FORECLO-
SURES Near Growing El Paso,
Texas. No Credit Checks/Owner
Financing. $0 Down, Take over
$159/mo. payment. Was
$16,900, NOW $12,856.
(800)755-8953 www.texasland-
foreclosures.net.

20 ACRE LAND FORECLO-
SURES Near Growing El Paso,
Texas. No Credit Checks/Owner
Financing. $0 Down, Take over
$159/mo. payment. Was
$16,900, NOW $12,856.
(800)755-8953 www.texasland-
foreclosures.net.

565 Mobile Homes for

Rent


2BR M/H for rent near Spring
Creek Hwy. $500/month, plus
deposit. Call 728-6496 or
926-6036.

2BR/1BA M/H in park. $4,000
cash. Please call to see and for
more details. 850-879-0492.

2BR/2BA in woods. No smoking.
small pet 10Lb. o.k.
$550/month, $500/deposit. Call
926-5521.

3BR/2BA DWMH, 1 acre North
Wakulla County. $750/month,
plus deposit. No smoking or
pets. Call 509-0250.

3BR/2BA, DW/MH on Merwyn
Dr. near Lake Ellen. $695/month,
plus deposit. Central Air/Heat,
fenced yard, tile in kitchen.
2BR/1BA $500/month + deposit.
Nice lots, laundry, freshly
painted. Available now! Call
850-212-5650.

4BR/2BA M/H in Panacea. Com-
pletely renovated. Lakefront.
Contact Katrina: 850-962-7855.

M/H in Sopchoppy. 2BR/1.5BA,
screened porch, private setting.
$450/month, plus deposit. Call
566-4124.

Smoke-free 2BR/1 BA, screened
porch, open deck. Large lot
abuts state land. $450/month,
plus utilities. 917-538-7472 or
850-349-3595.


ANDREW L. HINDMAN, et al.,
Defendantss),
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order of Final Judgment Scheduling Fore-
closure Sale entered on November 23,
2009 in this case now pending in said Court,
the style of which is indicated above.
I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash in the WAKULLA County Courthouse,
3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327 at 11:00 a.m., on the 25th
day of February, 2010, the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Order or
Final Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 12 OF SHARONWOOD, A SUBDIVI-
SION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 22,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
a/k/a: 246 SHARONWOOD DRIVE, CRAW-
FORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST
IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF
ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN
60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
ENTERED at WAKULLA County, Florida,
this 25 day of NOVEMBER, 2009.
BRENT X.THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
January 21, 28, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND seconds L
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR 72 degree
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA 312.57 fee
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Tract II:
CASE NO: 65-2009-CA-000420
Commenc
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., boundary
Quarter o
PLAINTIFF Range 2V
the east
VS. graded cc
Ochlockor
KIMBALL CARPENTER, AS TRUSTEE OF along said
THE TRUST F/B/O SAMANTHA CARPEN- follows: S
TER, ESTABLISHED UNDER THE LAST seconds
WILL AND TESTAMENT OF JOHN F. agrees 03
BRINKMAN, DATED MAY 14, 2008; ES- eetto the
TELLA BRINKMAN CARPENTER, CATHY point of B
GESICK AND SAMANTHA CARPENTER, grees 03
AS BENEFICIARY OF THE TRUST ES- said east
TABLISHED UNDER THE LAST WILL AND 339.90 fee
TESTAMENT OF JOHN F. BRINKMAN, Section 1
DATED MAY 14,2008; UNKNOWN right-of-wa
SPOUSE OF ESTELLA BRINKMAN CAR- 41 minute
PENTER IF ANY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF South boi
CATHY GESICK IF ANY; UNKNOWN tance of
SPOUSE OF SAMANTHA CARPENTER IF south bou
ANY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES minutes
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND thence rur
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVID- seconds V
UAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT ginning.
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES Parcel Ill:
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR Commenc
OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND boundary
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN quarter of
POSSESSION, Range 2
with the E
DEFENDANT(S) county gra
onee and
NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE known as
SERVICE Southwest
boundary
TO: UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE South 24
TRUST F/B/O SAMANTHA CARPENTER, West 484.
ESTABLISHED UNDER THE LAST WILL utes 53 s
AND TESTAMENT OF JOHN F. BRINK- re-rod (mi
MAN, DATED MAY 14,2008 whose resi- right-of-w,
dence is unknown if he/she/they be living; grees 24 r
and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown re-rod (ma
defendants who may be spouses, heirs, de- Beginning
visees, grantees, assignees, lienors, credi- North 03
tors, trustees, and all parties claiming an in- East 174
terest by, through, under or against the De- #4261), t0
fenaants, who are not known to be dead or minutes 0
alive, and all parties having or claiming to re-rod (m
have any right, title or interest in the prop- boundary
erty described in the mortgage being fore- mented),
closed herein. minutes 1
boundary
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an ac- #4261), th
tion to foreclose a mortgage and enforce a run North
lost note and/or mortgage on the following bonds Wes
property: #4261), tl
minutes 1
LOT 3 OF SNUG HARBOR, A SUBDIVI- Point of E
SION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF more or le
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 37
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA Together
COUNTY, FLORIDA. easement
following c
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written de- Commenc
fenses, if any, to it on DAVID J. STERN, boundary
ESQ. Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is quarter of
900 South Pine Island Road, Suite 400, Range 2V
Plantation, Florida 33324-3920, no later the Easte
than 30 days from the date of the first publi- county gra
cation of this notice of action and file the onee and
original with the clerk of this court either be- known as
fore service on Plaintiff's attorney or imme- Southwes
diately thereafter; otherwise a default will be boundary
entered against you for the relief demanded South 24
in the complaint or petition filed herein. West 484.
utes 53 s
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Point of B
Court at WAKULLA County, Florida, this 8th ginning an
day of January, 2010. ary run S
seconds F
BRENT X. THURMOND beginning.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY-s- LETHA M. WELLS ANY PER
AS DEPUTY CLERK IN THE S
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk ANY, OT
of the Circuit Court) OWNER
PENDENS
60 DAYS
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERI-
CANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons DATED: Ja
with disabilities needing a special accom-
modation should contact COURT ADMIN-
ISTRATION, at the WAKULLA County C
Courthouse at 850-926-0905,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.
January 21, 28, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 09-147-CA
American General Home Equity, Inc.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Delores Nelson a/k/a Delores S. Nelson,
and George C. Nelson, Sr. a/k/a George
Nelson,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated. December
30, 2009 in Case Number 09-147-CA, of the
Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit


Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit
in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which
American General Home Equity, Inc. is the
plaintiff, and Delores Nelson a/k/a Delores
S. Nelson and George C. Nelson, Sr. a/k/a
George Nelson are the defendants, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for cash in
the entry way of the Wakulla County Court-
house, in Crawfordville, Wakulla County,
Florida, at 11:00 A.M. on Thursday, Febru-
ary 04, 2010, the property described in Ex-
hibit "A" attached hereto as set forth in the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure.
Parcel I:
All that certain land situate in Wakulla
County, Florida:
TRACT I:
Commence at a point where the North
boundary line of the South half of the South-
east Quarter of Section 12, Township 4
South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County,
Florida Intersects, the East right-of-way
boundary of the Old Ochlockonee and Talla-
hassee public road and thence run South 24
degrees 40 minutes 26 seconds West along
said right-of-way boundary 209.00 feet for
the Point of Beginning, from said Point of
Beginning run South 86 degrees 21 minutes
50 seconds East 209.00 feet, thence run
North 24 degrees 40 minutes 26 seconds
East 209.00 feet, thence run South 86 de-
grees 21 minutes 50 seconds East 745.02
feet, thence run South 03 degrees 38 min-
utes 10 seconds West 361.08 feet, thence
run North 86 degrees 21 minutes 50 sec-
onds West 1092.90 feet to the East
right-of-way boundary of said public road,
thence run North 24 degrees 40 minutes 26
seconds East along said right-of-way
boundary 177.87 feet to the Point of Begin-
ning, containing 7.55 acres, more or less.


AND


IHACT II:
Commence at the intersection of the North
boundary of the South half of the Southeast
quarter of Section 12, Township 4 South,
Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida with
the Easterly right-of-way boundary of a
graded county road (Old Tallahassee and
chlockonee Public Road) and thence run
South 84 degrees 21 minutes 50 seconds
East along said North boundary 954.02 feet
to the Point of Beginning, from said Point of
Beginning continue South 86 degrees 21
minutes 50 seconds East 174.92 feet to the
Northeast corner of the South half of the
Southeast quarter of said Section 12,
thence run South 00 degrees 18 minutes 16
seconds East along the East boundary of
said Section 12 a distance of 387.99 feet,
thence run North 86 degrees 21 minutes 50
seconds West 401.58 feet, thence run North
03 degrees 38 minutes 10 seconds East
387.07 feet to the Point of Beginning con-
taining 3.45 acres, more or less.
Parcel II:
Tract I: Commence at a point where the
North boundary line of the South half of the
Southeast Quarter of Section 12, Township
4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County,
Florida, intersects the East right-of-way
boundary of the Old Ochlockonee and Talla-
hassee Public Road and thence run South
24 degrees 40 minutes 26 seconds West
along said right-of-way boundary 601.15
feet for the point of beginning. From said
point of Beginning run North 24 degrees 40
minutes 26 seconds East 214.28 feet,
thence run South 86 degrees 21 minutes 50
seconds East 1,092.90 feet, thence run
South 03 degrees 38 minutes 10 seconds
West 200.00 feet, and thence run North 86
degrees 21 minutes 50 seconds West
1,169.82 feet, more or less, to the Point of
Beginning.
Less and Except that portion of the above
described property lying within the following
described parcel:
Commence at the intersection of the North
boundary of the South half of the Southeast
quarter of Section 12, Township 4 South,
Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida with
the Easterly right of way boundary of a
graded county road (Old Tallahassee and
Ochlockonee Public Road) and thence run
along said easterly right-of-way Boundary
as follows: South 24 degrees 40 minutes 26
seconds West 484.17 feet, South 17 de-
grees 03 minutes 10 seconds West 60.72
feet to the Point of Beginning. From said
Point of Beginning continue South 17 de-
grees 03 minutes 10 seconds West along
said easterly right-of-way boundary 278.72
feet, thence leaving said easterly
right-of-way boundary run South 72 degrees
56 minutes 50 seconds East 312.57 feet,
thence run North 17 degrees 03 minutes 10
--st Z-reel,70nencehrun- orm


:ast 278.72 feet, thence run Nortnn
es 56 minutes 50 seconds West
et to the Point of Beginning.


e at the intersection of the North
of the South half of the Southeast
M Qection104Ti.ownsni, A4 ,.utn


ville Highway, Crawfordville, FL at 11:00
a.m. on the 11th day of February, 2010, the
following described property:
Commencing at a point where the North
boundary of the Southwest quarter (SW 1/4)
of Section 25, Township 2 South, Range 2
West, intersects the Southwesterly
right-of-way limits of State Road No. S-267,
run thence West along said Section line
464.0 feet to the Point of Beginning. From
said POINT OF BEGINNING, run thence
South 1330.0 feet to a point, thence run
West 469.0 feet to a point, thence run North
1325.0 feet to a point, thence run East 469.
feet to the Point of Beginning. Said tract in
the Southwest quarter (SW1/4) of Section
25, Township 2 South, Range 2 West, Wa-
kulla County, Florida.
TOGETHER WITH a
2001 Eagletra Double Wide Mobile Home
ID#GAFL154B86372ET22
& GAFL154A86372ET22.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this
Court on the 25th day of November, 2009.
INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES NEED-
ING A REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING
SHOULD CONTACT THE COURT ADMIN-
ISTRATORS OFFICE, AS SOON AS POS-
SIBLE, TELEPHONE: 926-0905; OR, IF
HEARING IMPAIRED, 1-800-995-8771
(TTD); OR 1-800-955-8770 (V), VIA FLOR-
IDA RELAY SERVICE.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHAM. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
January 21, 28, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 09-276-CA
WAKULLA BANK, a Florida banking corpo-
ration,
Plaintiff,
v.
CLEAR SPRINGS PROPERTY, LLC; JOHN
W. LENTZ; MARIA A. LENTZ, AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFEN-
DANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a
Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure
dated January 11, 2010, entered in Case
No. 09-267-CA of the Circuit Court of the
Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla
County, Florida, wherein WAKULLA BANK,
a Florida banking corporation, is the Plain-
tiff, and CLEAR SPRINGS PROPERTY,
LLC; JOHN W. LENTZ; MARIA A. LENTZ,
AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DE-
FENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are
the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash at the
front door of the Wakulla County Court-
house, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Craw-
fordville, Florida, at 11 o'clock a.m. on Feb-
ruary 11, 2010 the following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Final Summary
Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit:
Lot 4, WEST POINT SUBDIVISION OF
LIVE OAK ISLAND, UNIT NO. 5, a subdivi-
sion as per map or plat thereof as recorded
in Plat Book 1, Page 67, Public Records of
Wakulla County, Florida.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pen-
dens must file a claim within 60 days after
sale.
Dated this 12 day of January, 2010.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)


r Section 12, Township 4 outhn,
Vest, Wakulla County, Florida with
Irly right-of-way boundary of a
county road (Old Tallahassee and
nee Public Road) and thence run
easterly right-of-way boundary as
outh 24 degrees 40 minutes 26
Nest 484.17 feet, South 17 de- IN THE COU
minutes 10 seconds West 578.85 WAKULL
e Point of Beginning. From Said AKULL
Beginning continue South 17 de-
minutes 10 seconds West along
earlyy right-of-way boundary of Terr A.Pose
et to the South boundary of said jerry A sey
2, Thence leaving said easterly Plaintiff,
my boundary run north 89 degrees
es 52 seconds East along thev
indary of said section 12, a dis-
67231 feet thence leavin said


e, gd r'nay .av.. ..
indary run North 17 d1ir ? 03
10 seconds East 1* -'-:0 eet,
n South 89 degrees 41 minutes 52
lest 672.31 feet to the point of be-



e at the intersection of the North
of the South half of the Southeast
Section 12, Township 4 South,
West, Wakulla County, Florida,
asterly right-of-way boundary of a
aded road known as Old Ochlock-
Tallahassee Public Road, also
Hill Green Road and thence run
sterly along said right-of-way
the following two (2) courses:
degrees 39 minutes 53 seconds
11 feet, South 16 degrees 59 min-
;econds West 112.56 feet to a
arked #4261) thence leaving said
ay boundary run SOuth 86 de-
ninutes 44 seconds East 1,153.42
marked #4261) marking the Point of
SFrom said Point of Beginning run
degrees 35 minutes 16 seconds
.01 feet to a re-rod (marked
hence run South 86 degrees 14
2 seconds East 401.38feet to a
arked #4261) lying on the East
of said Section 12 (as monu-
thence run South 00 degrees 17
2 seconds East along said East
213.75 feet to a re-rod (marked
ence leaving said East boundary
86 degrees 14 minutes 02 sec-
t 415.82 feet to a re-rod (marked
hence run North 03 degrees 35
6 seconds East 39.21 feet to the
beginning containing 2.00 acres,
ss.
with a 30.00 foot wide access
lying 15.00 feet each side of the
described line:
e at the intersection of the North
of the South half of the Southeast
Section 12, Township 4 South,
Vest, Wakulla County, Florida with
erly right-of-way boundary of a
aded road known as Old Ochlock-
Tallahassee Public Road, also
Hill Green Road and thence run
sterly along said right-of-way
the following two (2) courses:
degrees 39 minutes 53 seconds
11 feet, South 16 degrees 59 min-
;econds West 97.14 feet to the
beginning. From said Point of Be-
d leaving said right-of-way bound-
outh 86 degrees 24 minutes 44
East 1149.84 feet to the point of

*SON CLAIMING AN INTEREST
;URPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF
HER THAN THE PROPERTY
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
S MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN
AFTER THE SALE.
anuary 14, 2010.
BRENT X.THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
January 21, 28, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-186-CA
AMERIS BANK,
PLAINTIFF,
vs.
ALETHA M. McDONALD,
DEFENDANT.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure
entered herein, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash in the lobby of the Wa-
kulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawford-


January 21, 28, 2010


NTY COURT IN AND FOR
A COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 10-1-SC


Esther Pearl Moneyhan (deceased), a/k/a
Esther P. Branch, a/k/a Esther P. Green
Defendant.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Unknown heirs of Esther Pearl Money-
han (deceased), a/k/a Esther P. Branch,
a/k/a Esther P. Green
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for es-
tablishment of ownership of personal prop-
erty described as: Redman Mobile Home,
serial number FLA-14610493 80S3BD has
been filed against you and you are required
to serve a a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Plaintiff, Terry A. Posey, whose
address is: P.O. Box 1181, Crawfordville,
FL 32326, on or before February 12, 2010,
and file the original with the Clerk of this
Court immediately thereafter; otherwise a
Default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
Dated on January 6, 2010
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s-GLENDA PORTER
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
January 14, 21, 28, 2010
February 4, 2010




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO: 10-2PR
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HAROLD LEO SMITH
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Harold
Leo Smith, deceased, File 10-2PR is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Craw-
fordville, Florida 32327. The name and ad-
dress of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney is set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against de-
cedent's estate including unmatured, contin-
gent or unliquidated claims, on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and per-
sons having claims or demands against de-
cedent's estate, including unmatured, con-
tingent or unliquidated claims must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
This date of the first publication of this no-
tice is January 28, 2010.
Personal Representative:
Bonita R. Holub
P.O. Box 663
Panacea, Florida 32346
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Frances Casey Lowe
Crawfordville, Florida
Florida Bar No. 521450
3042 Crawfordville Highway
PO Box 306
Crawfordville, Florida 32326
(850) 926-8245
January 28, 2010
February 4, 2010


1-28.page4B.indd 1


- 11I


1/25/10 1:31:43 PM














THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 28, 2010 Page 5B


Legal Notice




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL
JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-000176
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
PLAINTIFF
VS.
SHARON BENNETT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF SHARON BENNETT, IF ANY; ANY
AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DE-
FENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;
JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION.
DEFENDANTS)
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order Granting the Motion to Reset Foreclo-
sure Sale dated January 12, 2010, entered
in Civil Case No. 65-2008-CA-000176 of the
Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in
and for WAKULLA County, Crawfordville,
Florida, I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the Front Door of the WA-
KULLA County Courthouse, 3056 Crawford-
ville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 18th day of February,
2010 the following described property as set
forth in said Summary Final Judgment,
to-wit:
LOT 2, BLOCK 4, WAKULLA GARDENS,
UNIT I, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pen-
dens, must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
Dated this 19th day of January, 2010.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERI-
CANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons
with disabilities needing a special accom-
modation should contact COURT ADMIN-
ISTRATION, at the WAKULLA County
Courthouse at 850-926-0905,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.
January 28, 2010
February 4, 2010


NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Stor-
age Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter
83, Part IV, that ABC Storage will hold a
sale by sealed bid on Saturday, February
13, 2010 at 2:00 p.m. at 3743 Crawfordville
Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327, of the con-
tents of Mini Warehouse containing per-
sonal property of:
KATTIE REESE
CASEY DEWAYNE GOODWIN
Payments must be made before Saturday,
February 13th by 12:00 noon before the
sale date of February 13th, 2010 at 2:00
p.m. The owners may redeem their property
by payment of the Outstanding Balance and
cost by contacting ABC Storage at
508-5177. Or by paying in person at the
warehouse location.
January 28, February 4, 2010


IAl


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CHANGE
RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE:
School Board Policy 3.90 Charter School
PURPOSE AND EFFECT:
To reflect legislative requirements and dis-
trict procedures.
LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41, 1012.22, Florida Statutes
LAWS IMPLEMENTED:
1001.02, 1001.43, 1002.33, Florida Statutes
ECONOMIC IMPACT: None
REVISION ORIGINATED BY:
Beth O'Donnell, Assistant Superintendent
for Instruction
REVISION APPROVED BY:
David Miller, Superintendent of Schools
IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE
(21) DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, A HEARING
WILL BE HELD
TIME: 5:45 p.m.
PLACE: Administrative Offices
Wakulla County School Board
69 Arran Road
Crawfordville, Florida 32327
DATE: March 15, 2010
A COPY OF THE PROPOSED REVISION
MAY BE OBTAINED AT COST FROM:
Wakulla County School Board
Post Office Box 100
69 Arran Road
Crawfordville, Florida 32326-0100
January 28, 2009


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CHANGE
RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE:
School Board Policy 6.18* Contracts: In-
structional and Administrative Personnel.
PURPOSE AND EFFECT:
To reflect legislative requirements and dis-
trict procedures.
LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41, 1012.22, 1012.23 Florida Statutes
LAWS IMPLEMENTED:
120.57, 1001.43, 1011.60, 1012.22,
1012.32, 1012.34, 1012.56, Florida Statutes
ECONOMIC IMPACT: None
REVISION ORIGINATED BY:
Beth O'Donnell, Assistant Superintendent
for Instruction
REVISION APPROVED BY:
David Miller, Superintendent of Schools
IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE
(21) DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, A HEARING
WILL BE HELD
TIME: 5:45 p.m.
PLACE: Administrative Offices
Wakulla County School Board
69 Arran Road
Crawfordville, Florida 32327
DATE: March 15, 2010
A COPY OF THE PROPOSED REVISION
MAY BE OBTAINED AT COST FROM:
Wakulla County School Board
Post Office Box 100
69 Arran Road
Crawfordville, Florida 32326-0100
January 28, 2009


MINUTES OF THE
WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
MEETING HELD ON
JANUARY 11, 2010

The meeting was called to order by the
Chairman. Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray,
Mr. Scott, Mr. Thomas and Superintendent
Miller were in attendance. The Pledge of
Allegiance was recited with a prayer given
by Mr. Scott.
Moved by Mr. Scott, seconded by Mr. Gray
to approve the agenda.


For Real


Pain Therapy...


Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr.
Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr.
Evans to approve Student Expulsion
#09/10-04. (See Supplemental File #19)
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr.
Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Gray
to approve Out of State travel. (See Supple-
mental File #19)
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr.
Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Scott, seconded by Mr. Evans
to adjourn.
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr.
Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
January 28, 2010





NOTICE OF INTENT TO USE
UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTING
NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS
The Board of County Commissioners of Wa-
kulla County, Florida (the "Board"), hereby
provides notice, pursuant to section
197.3632(3)(a), Florida Statutes, of its intent
to use the uniform method of collecting
non-ad valorem special assessments to be
levied within the unincorporated area of Wa-
kulla County for the cost of providing road
maintenance, road paving, neighborhood
beautification, street lighting, sidewalks, and
other neighborhood improvements, facilities,
and associated services commencing for
the Fiscal Year beginning on October 1,
2010 and future fiscal years. The Board will
consider the adoption of a resolution elect-
ing to use the uniform method of collecting
such assessments authorized by section
197.3632, Florida Statutes, at a public hear-
ing to be held at 5:00p.m., February 16,
2010, in the County Commission Chambers,
29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida. Such
resolution will state the need for the levy
and will contain a legal description of the
boundaries of the real property subject to
the levy. Copies of the proposed form of
resolution, which contains the legal descrip-
tion of the real property subject to the levy,
are on file at the Office of the County Clerk
of Wakulla County, 3056 Crawfordville High-
way, Crawfordville, Florida. All interested
persons are invited to attend.
In the event any person decides to appeal
any decision by the Board with respect to
any matter relating to the consideration of
the resolution at the above-referenced pub-
lic hearing, a record of the proceeding may
be needed and in such an event, such per-
son may need to ensure that a verbatim re-
cord of the public hearing is made, which re-
cord includes the testimony and evidence
on which the appeal is to be based. In ac-
cordance with the Americans with Disabili-
ties Act, persons needing a special accom-
modation or an interpreter to participate in
this proceeding should contact the Wakulla
County Board of County Commissioners'
Office at (850) 926-0919 at least seven
days prior to the date of the hearing.
DATED this 8th day of December, 2009.
By Order of:
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT,
EX OFFICIO CLERK OF THE
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
January 21, 28, 2010
February 4, 11,2010


NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Stor-
age Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter
83, Part IV, that Sopchoppy Mini Storage
will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday,
February 6, 2010 at 10:00 a.m. at Sop-
choppy Hwy., Sopchoppy, FL 32358, of the
contents of Mini Warehouse containing per-
sonal property of:
JAMES KILBORN
JENNIFER BRADLEY
ANDREW MORRIS
SHARON WHITT
JANELL CURLES
Payments must be made on Friday, Febru-
ary 5, 2010 by 5:00 p.m. before the sale
date of February 6, 2010. The owners may
redeem their property by payment of the
Outstanding Balance and cost by contacting
Sopchoppy Mini Storage at 850-962-4742.
Or by paying in person at the warehouse lo-
cation.


Whaley, Cheryl / Transportation / School
Bus Driver / 12/14/09-5/26/10
Transfers:
12 Month Employee
Name / Position From / Program From / Po-
sition To / Program To / Term of Service
Nelson, Karla / Paraprofessional / SEC /
Teacher / Pre-K/SEC / 01/04/10-5/28/10
Peck, Lee / Bookkeeper / WMS / Admin.
Secretary WMS / 01/01/10-6/30/10
10 Month Employee
Name / Position From / Program From / Po-
sition To / Program To / Term of Service
Smith, Shari / Teacher / Pre-K/SEC /
Teacher / Pre-K/WEC / 01/04/10-5/28/10
9 1/2 Month Employee
Name / Position From / Program From / Po-
sition To / Program To / Term of Service
Clark, Heather / Parapro/ SEC / ESE
Parapro / RES / 01/04/10-5/28/10


Other Personnel (including temporary, PT &
January 21, 28, 2010 current employees hired to a second posi-
tion) "Time Limited -TL"


MINUTES OF THE
WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
MEETING HELD ON JANUARY 19, 2010
Chairman Cook called the meeting to order.
The following Employees were recognized:
Trudie Crum as Employee of the Month,
Bethany Mathers and Diane Cook as
Teachers of the Month. All were congratu-
lated and presented with a plaque by Chair-
man Cook. Richard Russell, a representa-
tive of the Crawfordville WalMart, presented
monetary gifts to the school board to help
the children of Wakulla County. After the
recognition the Pledge of Allegiance was
recited and a prayer was given by Mr. Tho-
mas. Becky Cook, Jerry Evans, Ray Gray
and Greg Thomas were in attendance.
Mike Scott was absent. Superintendent
Miller was also in attendance.
Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Gray
to approve the agenda as amended.
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr.
Evans, Mr. Gray and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr.
Gray to approve the following consent
items:
1. Approved Minutes of the Meeting held on
December 14, 2009.
2. Approved the following Employment of
Personnel:
New Hires:
12 Month Employee
Name / Program/Center / Position / Term of
Service
Walker-Cox, Becky / WMS / Bookkeeper /
01/01/10-06/30/10
9 1/2 Month Employee
Name / Program/Center / Position / Term of
Service
Brown, Judy / Pre-K/WEC / Paraprofes-
sional /01/04/10-05/28/10
Cleveland, Ashley / Pre-K/WEC / Parapro-
fessional /01/04/10-5/28/10
Daughtry, Amanda / Pre-K/SEC / Parapro-
fessional / 01/04/10-5/28/10
Piper (Lawhon), Erin / Pre-K/SEC / Parapro-
fessional / 01/05/10-5/28/10
Revell, Rosalinda / Pre-K/SEC / Paraprofes-
sional / 01/04/10-5/28/10
9 Month Employee
Name / Program/Center / Position / Term of
Service
Johnson, Lucy / Transportation / School Bus
Driver / 01/05/10-5/26/10


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Name / Program/Center / Position / Term of
Service
Arant, Cay / RMS / Remediation Teacher /
01/12/10-3/02/10
Burnham, Cassandra / RES / Remediation
Teacher /01/12/10-3/04/10
Callaghan, Margy / RES / Remediation
Teacher/01/12/10-3/04/10
Crombie, Megan / RES / Remediation
Teacher /01/12/10-3/04/10
Den Bleyker, Angela / CES / Remediation
Teacher/01/06/10-3/04/10
Dutrow, Jeffrey / RMS / Remediation
Teacher /01/12/10-3/02/10
Garrett, Lauren / RES / Remediation
Teacher / 01/12/10-3/04/10
Hames, Louann / CES / Remediation
Teacher /01/06/10-3/04/10
Harden, Holly / CES / Remediation Teacher
/01/06/10-3/04/10
Harvey, Frankie / CES / Remediation
Teacher/01/06/10-3/04/10
Hatfield, Heather / CES / Remediation
Teacher/01/06/10-3/04/10
Hernandez, Louis / RMS / Remediation
Teacher / 01/12/10-3/02/10
Hobbs, Betty / CES Remediation Teacher /
01/07/10-3/04/10
Jacobs, Joseph / RMS / Remediation
Teacher /01/12/10-3/02/10
Johnson, Adrian / Pre-K/SEC / CDA Time
Limited /01/04/10-5/28/10
Kane, John / RMS / Remediation Teacher /
01/12/10-3/02/10
Lovestrand, Sara / RMS / Teacher/TL /
01/04/10-2/26/10
Madden, John / RMS / Remediation
Teacher /01/12/10-3/02/10
McBrayer, David / RMS / Remediation
Teacher /01/12/10-3/02/10
Momier, Shane / WHS / VE Teacher/TL /
01/04/10-4/01/10
Morgan, Deborah / CES / Remediation
Teacher / 01/06/10-3/04/10
Price, Terry / CES / Remediation Teacher /
01/06/10-3/04/10
Ray, Michael / RMS / Remediation Teacher
/ 01/12/10-3/02/10
Revell, Cori / CES / Remediation Teacher /
01/06/10-3/04/10
Roddenberry, Katrina / RES / Remediation
Teacher /01/12/10-03/04/10
Rozar, James / SES / Paraprofessional/TL /
01/04/10-05/28/10
Smith, Marian / CES / Remediation Teacher
/ 01/06/10-03/04/10
Spears, Tiffany / RES / Remediation Para-
professional / 01/12/10-3/04/10
Strickland, Chelsea / CES / Remediation
Teacher / 01/06/10-03/04/10
Teuton, Christina / CES / Remediation
Teacher / 01/06/10-03/04/10
Tucker, Scarlet / CES / Parapro-
fessional/TL 01/04/10-04/23/10
Ward, Stan / RES / Remediation Teacher /
01/12/10-03/04/10
Weaver, Nick / RES / Remediation Teacher
/ 01/12/10-03/04/10


Supplemental Positions 2009-2010:
Name / Program/Center / Position / Term of
Service
Galladay, Amy / WMS / Volunteer Coordina-
tor / 2009-2010
Randolph, Brandon / WHS / Assistant Var-
sity Football Coach / 2009-2010
3. Approved the following requests for
Leave of Absence:
Sally Denmon/extended leave from January
4, 2010 through April 2, 2010
Tammi Light/effective January 4, 2010
through the 2009-2010 school year
Cami Bernales/effective February 15, 2010
through March 15, 2010.
4. Approve a Letter of Resignation on Na-
thaniel Maxwell, Sr./effective January 4,
2010.
5. Approved a Letter of Retirement from An-
gela Brinson/effective February 1, 2010.
6. Approved the Illness in the Line of
Duty/FMLA. (See Supplemental File#19)
7. Approved the Disposal of Equipment.
(See Supplemental File #19)
8. Approved Budget Amendments #09/10- 5
&6.
9. Approved the December financial state-
ment.
10. Approve Warrants #73614-74004 for
payment.
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr.
Evans, Mr. Gray and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Evans
to approve the Pre-K non-certificated per-
sonnel.
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr.
Evans, Mr. Gray and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr.
Gray to approve a new job description -
Other Health Services Assistant.
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr.
Evans, Mr. Gray and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Tho-
mas to approve Out of Field teachers. (See
Supplemental File #19)
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr.
Evans, Mr. Gray and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Tho-
mas to approve the revisions to the
2009-2010 Student Progression Plan as ad-
vertised.
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr.
Evans, Mr. Gray and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Gray
to approve School Board Policy 3.50 Pub-
lic Information and Inspection of Records as
advertised.
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr.
Evans, Mr. Gray and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Evans
to approve School Board Policy 3.90 -
Charter Schools for advertising.
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr.
Evans, Mr. Gray and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr.
Evans to approve School Board Policy 6.18
- Contracts: Instructional and Administra-
tive Personnel for advertising.
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr.
Evans, Mr. Gray and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Tho-
mas to approve the Speech/Language Ther-
apy Vendor Contracts.
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr.
Evans, Mr. Gray and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr.
Evans to adjourn.
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr.
Evans, Mr. Gray and Mr. Thomas.
January 28, 2010


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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2010


Mother Nature spreads a lot of liquid sunshine


Top, Wakulla County firefighters responded to the Stop N Save at the intersection of U.S. Highway 98 and
Spring Creek Highway after the drainage in the area made a reservoir out of the convenience store's gas
dispensing area. The water came right up to the front door as store employees attempted to keep the water
from creeping under the front door. Below and right, residents of the Wakulla Gardens area are used to
dealing with high water levels, but several homeowners expressed frustration over the Jan. 21 flooding. The
roadways looked like rivers or mud bogs depending on where in the subdivision area you live.


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
After predominately dry
and cold weather, Mother
Nature gave Wakulla Coun-
ty something completely
different on Thursday, Jan.
21.
Very dark clouds covered
the sky and severe thunder-
storm and tornado reports
blared from emergency
broadcasts. Several hours
later the rain ended, but
not before leaving a mark
all over the county.
Wakulla County Emer-
gency Management Direc-
tor Scott Nelson said the
county received a mas-
sive amount of rain over
a relatively short period
of time.
"We received six to seven
inches of rainfall over the
last several hours," he said.
"We had very few trees or
power line down calls, how-
ever, we experienced road
flooding countywide during
the heaviest rainfall. We
have one home with minor
flooding (FEMA's definition
of minor flooding is any-


thing less than 18 inches).
This home experienced
two to four inches of water
within the home; however,
minor and major is depen-
dent on the perspective. I
would submit that water
in any home at any level is
considered a major impact
to the homeowner."
"The Stop N Save on
U.S. Highway 98 and Spring
Creek Highway experienced
minor flooding as well (one
to two inches). We also had
one home in Wakulla Gar-
dens that has a half inch
before flooding would have
been experienced."
At The Wakulla News of-
fice, several residents called
to report flooding to their
roads and expressed dis-
pleasure toward the county
commission, particularly in
the Wakulla Gardens area.
The bad weather also
kept emergency response
vehicles busy. Later, two
more Wakulla Gardens
homes reported flood dam-
age and Nelson monitored
rising river waters. Photos
by Eric Stanton.


EACH entry must have this form firmly attached to the back of the mounted photo.
All cnlncs niust be RECEIVED b\ FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 12. 2110. Adult entries
must be accoimiipnieid Ib a Sill entrl fee for ii) to three (3) hlolos entered per


TELEPHONE: (DAY) EVENING: T e V'a Irnllh Aj


E-MAIL ADDRESS:


PHOTO TITLE:


WHERE AND WHEN WAS PHOTO TAKEN:


IAM:
AMATEUR PROFESSIONAL (You derive 5% or more of your
annual income from taking photographs)

MEMBER OF THE FRIENDS OF WAKULLA SPRINGS
(Does not affect your entry)

I WISH TO DONATE MY PHOTO TO THE WAKULLA NEWS

I HAVE READ AND I AGREE TO THE CONTEST RULES.


SIGNATURE


DATE


IF YOU ARE UNDER 18 YEARS OF AGE, A PARENT OR GUARDIAN MUST
FILL OUT THE FOLLOWING:


I am the parent/legal guardian of (name of entrant)

I have read and agree to the contest rules, and his/her entry is with my permission.
Name of parent/legal guardian (Please Print)


Telephone: (Day):


(Evening)


Signature


All entries must be RECEIVED by the The Wakulla News by: Friday, February 12, 2010.
Judges will pick winners in the Best Wildlife Photo category.
Each photo submitted must have been taken in Wakulla County in the past year by the person who
submits it for entry in the contest. There will be a $10 entry fee for up to 3 photos (There will be
no entry fee for Young Nature Photographers 12 and under). Make checks payable to The Wakulla
News. Judges will decide whether each entry is suited to the Wakulla Wildlife category. Judges'
decisions are final. Winners will be notified by mail or e-mail.
FORMAT: Prints only. No frames please. All photos must be 8" x 10" or 81/2" x 11". Prints
may be mounted on 11" x 14" black or white foam board, or just matted, with the completed entry
form attached to the back. Photos are also requested to be submitted and/or available in a digital
format for slideshow display on thewakullanews.com. Digital photo entries may be emailed to
,,,.I' L* II h l ..i '., i l .i.1 I I
Young Nature Photographers The same categories will be set up for young photographers 12
years old and younger. Entrants will be divided into two groups, 3-7 years of age, and 8-12 years
of age.
YOUTH FORMAT: Prints only. No frames please. All entries must be 4" x 6" or 5" x 7". Prints
may be mounted on 81/2" x 11" black or white poster board or card stock in lieu of the foam board
with the completed entry form attached to the back.
To submit an entry into the contest, photographers must be 18 years of age or submit a release from
a parent or guardian, and be a resident of Wakulla County.
Participants will be notified when to pick up their prints or you may wish to donate them to The
Wakulla News. Donated prints may be published in The Wakulla News at the Editor's discretion.
Mail entries to: The Wakulla News, Photo Contest, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326,
or deliver photos to The Wakulla News office at 3119 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville,
Florida. Do not send pictures by e-mail.
Entrant's signature (or Guardian's signature) constitutes a release to The Wakulla News for the
right to use, reproduce, publish, and/or display the photographs without further compensation.
The original slide or negative may be requested. Scans of entries will be published in The Wakulla
News. All entries will be displayed at the 2009 Wakulla Wildlife Festival at Wakulla Springs April
2-4, 2009. (Entries may also be available upon request in digital/electronic format for publication
in The Wakulla News -Wakulla Wildlife Festival special section in March.)
PRIZES will be awarded as follows: Best of Show $100 in Cash; 2nd Place $25 in Cash; 3rd
Place -A Gift Subscription to The Wakulla News. Prizes for youth entries will be awarded as
follows: Best of Show $25 in cash.
The Small Print: Void where prohibited. Contest is open to anyone who has taken photographs
in Wakulla County, Florida. All federal, state, and local laws apply. Each entrant warrants the
originality of each entry submitted by him/her and warrants that he/she owns all rights in each such
entry. Submission of an entry form of photograph is evidence of entrant's agreement with and
acceptance of these rules and regulations. The Wakulla News is not responsible for lost or damaged
entries.


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