Title: Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00256
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: December 31, 2009
Copyright Date: 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028313
Volume ID: VID00256
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
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Preceded by: Wakulla County news

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Published,Weekly,
Read Daily' ~i


Our 114th Year, 52nd Issue Thursday, Dec. 31, 2009 Two Sections
Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century 75 Cents


Board


discusses


priorities

By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
County commissioners
set their priorities for 2010
at a board retreat, goals that
include moving to advanced
wastewater treatment at the
sewage treatment plant, devel-
oping a Crawfordville overlay
zone to encourage urban de-
velopment, and constructing
a community center for youth
with a swimming pool.
Commissioners met for
a retreat on Dec. 10, held at
the Wakulla County Public
Library.
The areas that commis-
sioners identified they want-
ed to focus on were Water
Quality Improvements, Com-
prehensive Plan and Land
Development Code Updates,
Transportation Improve-
ments, Youth Enrichment,
Public Safety and Expansion
of Public Services, and Energy
Conservation.
Continued on Page 5A


Grant


writers


are eyed

By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
With the budget belt
pulled tight, county commis-
sioners have indicated they
are putting more emphasis
on getting grants to make
up the difference.
At the board retreat on
Thursday, Dec. 10, commis-
sioners expressed some
concern about an admin-
istrative re-organization of
the grants department and
the Office of Management
and Budget.
Assistant County Admin-
istrator Tim Barden offered
a PowerPoint and stressed
a new team approach in the
office.
Former Human Resources
Director Debbie Dubose is
now OMB director, with
former Grants Director Eva
Thorpe now working as an
OMB analyst, along with
Virginia Dekle and William
Wright.
Chairman Howard Kessler
expressed concern about the
re-organization, saying the
board wanted more of a
focus on grants.
Continued on Page 5A


Inside

This Week
Comment&Opinion.... Page 2A
Week in Wakulla ........ Page 2A
Church Page 4A
Health and Fitness..... Page 6A
School Page 7A
People Page 8A
Sheriff's Report.......... Page 9A
Outdoors ............. Page 10A
Almanac................... Page 11A
Year in Review ............ Page 1B
.Year in Review............ Page 2B







6 84578 202'5 o


Wakulla Welcoming Committee


Courthouse employees turned out on Tuesday, Dec. 22, to greet returning serviceman Johnny Golden,
who serves in the U.S. Navy. Golden, of Panacea, waved back as staff from the Clerk of Courts office,
State Attorney's office, and others lined U.S. Highway 319 to cheer his return, waving American flags.
(Photo by William Snowden)











Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 31, 2009






Established in Wakulla County in 189M



Year ends: Time Food Blog-Lindy's Fried


for New Year's


resolutions


N
JA
n


sunglasses;
urse concealer;
tdy's s* Teabags and cucumber
slices;
Took The failing eyesight of
most of my friends.
Judy This year I would like to
Conlin get more exercise, but in-
stead I will be thankful for:


The New Year elevators and escala
Every year I make a lot tors;
of New Year's resolutions, people movers;
which I am never able to arthroscopic surgery;
keep. It is not because I Orthopedists;
don't have any will power. Glucosamine and Ibu
I really do. It is all because profen;
of that alter ego I live with, lounge chairs and big
Nurse Judy. screen televisions;
Nurse Judy sabotages the slowing down o
every self-improvement ef- most of my friends.
fort I make. Therefore, this This year I would like tc
year, I have decided not be a perfect person, but in
to make any resolutions, stead I will be thankful for
but to make a thankful list any small step I car
instead-things I'm thank- make in that direction;
ful for because improving Nurse Judy, who point!
myself no longer seems an out all my faults;
option. my family who hav
This year, I would like had to put up with imperfec
to resolve to lose weight, me all these years;
but instead I will be thank- laughter which help!
ful for: me through my blunders;
Elastic waist pants, my friends who forgive
which can expand along me my faults.
with my protruding abdo- Oh, the heck with it. It'!
men (especially after all the New Year's and in 2010, I an
holiday treats that Nurse going to lose weight, sleep
Judy has been eating); more, exercise more and be
Big shirts that cover a better person. After al
up a multitude of figure it's not whether you wir
faults; or lose, it's how you rur
Girdles and Spandex; the race and if you don'
Muumuus and caf- set a goal, you don't have
tans; chance of reaching it.
The failing eyesight of Happy New Year.
most of my friends. Watch for the new an
This year I would like to improved Judy and Nurse
resolve to get more sleep Judy
to rid myself of black cir- www.nursejudyinfo.com
cles and puffiness under Judy Conlin and her alter
my eyes, but instead I will ego write from Havana,
thankful for:


Christmas edition

helped make our day


Editor, The News:
What a wonderful
Christmas edition of The
Wakulla News! We thank
you.
We also wanted to sa-
lute David Damon and
his scouts this holiday
season. We are so proud of
them all. They've done a
wonderful thing continu-
ing to help Miss Elsie and
they are a great asset to
the community. The plus
is that David reports and
writes so well and the
dedication, to his mother,
who recently passed away,
was very touching. We
wanted to salute you all
for printing the story.
It was also fun reading
the letters to Santa from
local children, the Christ-
mas memories and thank
you notes from our neigh-
bors. We're all part of this
community and the spirit


a-




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a-
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n

ts

e
t

s

e
s


ln
ie
1
n
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t
a


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of Christmas reflected in
your edition reminds us
we are all connected.
We also wanted to
thank you for the photo of
our mastodon. It was sent
as our Christmas card to
family, friends and neigh-
bors. What a pleasant sur-
prise to see it in the paper!
The clipping's already on
our memory wall. Now we
have to figure out what to
do with a 15 foot by eight
foot Santa hat, but the
honking and wonder of
folks stopping by to look
justified the work.
We hope everyone had
a wonderful holiday and
are looking forward to a
New Year. Your edition
helped make our Christ-
mas.
Mary Cortese
Hugh Taylor
Crawfordville


'9,WSPA?' W 'w MEMBER

TOt akulla 0t6u35
The Wakulla News (USPS 644-64)i is published weekly at
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News,
P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.

General Manager: Tammie Barfield........................tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Editor: Keith Blackmar kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Reporter: William Snowden wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey II ...1 11. 1. ...
Classifieds/In House Sales: Denise Folh..............classifieds@thewakullanews.net
P.. 1,t ,, : S h erry I. 1 1. I ,.. , .- I ,,. 1 ..1 .. .. .
Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net

Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one
year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $26 yr. $14.50 1/2 yr, Out of County $35 yr. $19 1/2 yr.
Out of State $40 yr. $22 1/2 yr..


Chicken in Crawfordville


By DR. RACHEL S. PIENTA
Special to The Wakulla News
There are actually quite a
few places to order chicken
wings in Crawfordville.
I have mentioned before
I am partial to the wings at
Rummy's. Hamaknocker's
wings are decent, too. A
hungry wing lover could
find their favorite sauce
drenched treat at Pizza Hut,
Beef O'Brady's, or even as
take out from a grocery
store or, word has it, a gas
station.
However, in my house, if
wings are being ordered by
my husband, those wings
are coming from Lindy's
Chicken.
For a recent football party,
I told my husband we could
get wings from the Craw-
fordville Lindy's location. I
was really trying to cushion
the blow in preparation
for the whooping that my
Gators were going to dish
out against his Seminoles. I
figured I would give him his
favorite wings, a nice cold
beverage, and set up a fire
out back. He was out tending
the fire by halftime.
While only the Gator fans
among my party guests really
enjoyed the game that day,
everyone remarked on how
much they enjoyed Lindy's
wings. A common point of
agreement, however, was
that Lindy's takeout orders
are never ready on time.
We all had stories about
calling an order in, being
told a time, then arriving to
wait an additional amount
of time for the food to be
ready. While we all appreci-
ate fresh, piping hot food


- inaccurate wait times are
aggravating. In fact, my wing
order was not ready when
they said it would be on that
day, either.
Wait times on take out
orders aside, Lindy's is a
favorite stop on days when
I am running around and
really need a sweet tea and
a convenient bite to get me
through my errands. When
I am on the go, I like to get
a chicken sandwich es-
pecially the chicken salad
sandwich.
The Crawfordville Lindy's
has recently added a few
items to the menu. Previous-
ly, I have sampled chicken
tenders, mashed potatoes,
biscuits, chicken salads and
wings. At this Lindy's, you
can also order pork chops
and fish. The little signs
along the roadway adver-
tising new items such as
chicken chili and sweet po-
tato fries were enticing and
had been calling my name
for a few weeks.
On a cold rainy day, I
decided to treat one of my
favorite college students to
lunch. Her father is a chef
and veteran food service
professional and this young
woman's palate has become
fairly discerning due to dad's
influence.
We decided to head over
to Lindy's and place our
orders to go. I occasionally
eat in the Lindy's dining
area. They have a few televi-
sion screens and the table
space is plentiful. If you are
dining on site, you can refill
your beverages as often as
you like.
On this visit, we wanted


to eat at my house. We
decided to order a tasting
menu of items to try some
new choices along with our
favorites. By the time we
were done we had chosen a
pint of chicken salad, small
orders of chicken chili and
macaroni and cheese, an or-
der of sweet potato fries and
a slice of chocolate peanut
butter pie.
We ate the chicken salad
on toasted bagels. I added
a leaf of lettuce to mine.
You can get lettuce on your
chicken salad sandwiches if
you order the sandwich at
Lindy's. However, you won't
find any bagels on their
menu. The chicken salad, my
friend and I agreed, is a hit or
miss item at Lindy's. Some-
times it is exactly what you
want from a chicken salad.
Other times, the mayonnaise
overpowers the chicken or
the meat itself is gristly. The
order that day was perfect.
The pint made a sandwich
for each of us and I had an
additional sandwich out of
it the next day.
The chicken chili had a
moderately spicy red sauce.
Generally, I like white chick-
en chili with beans and green
chilies. This red chicken chili
was meaty and well-flavored,
but not something I would
order again.
I love sweet potato fries.
When Lindy's advertised
them as a new menu item,
I was hoping for hand cut
fries. No such luck. My lunch
partner and I agreed that
these fries had come frozen
in a bag.
The macaroni and cheese
was another recent menu


addition. Lindy's hit a home
run with this one. Yuml We
enjoyed the flavorful cheesy
creaminess. No secret savory
spices added here, just a clas-
sic mac and cheese.
About that chocolate pea-
nut butter pie, I had been
eyeing the pie case on re-
cent visits. I kept looking at
those pie slices in the cold
case and thinking about the
pies at the old Julie Mae's in
Carrabelle. I miss Julia Mae's
pies. One time I asked the
young woman behind the
counter who made the pies.
She told me she didn't know
who had made them. On
this visit, I ordered a slice to
share with my lunch buddy.
As today's counter person
handed me our order, I asked
about the pie's origins again,
then wished I hadn't ordered
the pie when she told me it
was from Sysco. Sigh, fro-
zen pie from a major food
wholesaler.
Fried pickles have also
been added to the menu. I
didn't try the fried pickles
that day. I am sure I will
get to them another day.
My sister and I once spent
a summer sampling fried
pickles at every Big Bend
establishment that offered
them.
We like fried pickles,
chips not spears. Hand bat-
ter the juicy green slices and
put a little love into the spice
mix. Serve up a basket with a
tasty dipping sauce and keep
the sweet tea glass full. I will
find out about Lindy's fried
pickles another day.
Dr. Rachel S. Pienta, a
college educator, writes
from Crawfordville.


Consumers could be spared huge bills


Editor, The News:
Consumers would be
spared having to pay huge
medical bills under Demo-
cratic health care legisla-
tion that's moving through
Congress, as lawmakers
agree on the need to put
limits on how much people
would pay out of their own
pockets.
"There will be a cap on
annual expenditures, out-
of-pocket expenditures,"
Rep. Steny Hoyer, D-Md.,
the majority leader in the
House of Representatives,
declared this week. Bills
pending before the House
and the Senate would set
different limits, but virtually
everyone agrees on a key
principle: "You shouldn't go
bankrupt" because of your
medical costs, said Elizabeth
Carpenter, a policy analyst at
the New America Founda-
tion, a center-left research
center.
According to a study in
the August issue of the
American Journal of Medi-
cine, increasing numbers
of people are going bank-
rupt because of illness and
medical costs. Health-related
debts caused 62.1 percent of
all bankruptcies in 2007, up
from 46 percent six years
earlier.
Dr. Steffie Woolhandler,
the study's senior author,
expects about the same
percentage of this year's
anticipated 1.4 million to
1.5 million bankruptcies to
be caused at least in part by
medical expenses.
The increases are caused
largely by "health coverage
that is getting skimpier and
skimpier," said Woolhandler,
a professor of medicine at
Harvard Medical School. She
was skeptical that the legis-
lation would cause the bank-
ruptcy numbers to drop.
"Yes, the limits would be
an improvement," she said,
but "if you have diabetes or
some other chronic condi-
tion, every year you'd still be
subject to the cap over and
over again."
Lawmakers and other
experts say the caps are an
important step. "You get a
lot of security for very little


cost," said Sen. Ron Wyden,
D-Ore.
According to the Ameri-
can Journal of Medicine
study, out-of-pocket medical
costs averaged $17,943 for all
medically bankrupt families
in 2007, $26,971 for unin-
sured families and $17,749
for those who had private
insurance at the outset.
The House bill would
cap annual out-of-pocket
medical expenses at $5,000
per individual and $10,000
per family starting in 2013.
New plans offered through
new employers, as well as
policies sold through the
proposed health insurance
exchange, a marketplace
where consumers can com-
pare plans and prices, would
be subject to limits.
Most employers today
offer policies with limits
on out-of-pocket expenses.
Under Senate proposals, ex-
isting employer plans would
be exempt from the limits,
but the House would require
employer plans to have caps
in place by 2019.
The Senate legislation
would tie the annual out-of-
pocket limits to those that
exist under current law for
health savings accounts,
which will be $5,950 and
$11,900 in 2010 but should
increase by the time new
rules would go into effect
in 2013 under the proposed
legislation.
Out-of-pocket expenses
are expected to include
co-payments for medical
services and prescription
drugs, deductibles and co-
insurance, though premium
payments wouldn't count
toward the out-of-pocket
maximum. Once a consumer
reached the limit, his or her
plan would pay 100 percent
of further expenses.
"This is a pretty signifi-
cant improvement," said Lin-
da Blumberg, an economist
at the Urban Institute, a cen-
ter-left Washington research
group. The health insurance
industry disagrees.
"We don't believe a cap
is the best way to control
rising health care costs,"
said Robert Zirkelbach, a
spokesman for America's


Health Insurance Plans, the
industry trade group.
To curb high bills, he
said, "policymakers need to
address the underlying cost
of medical care, which is the
key driver of rising health
care costs."
Among most experts and
lawmakers, however, the
most serious debates are
about whether the caps are
too high and whether the


bankruptcy problem is exag-
gerated.
"Health care expenses can
contribute in some ways to
bankruptcy, but whether it's
the precipitating factor is
more difficult to determine,"
said Peter Cunningham, a
senior fellow at the Center
for Studying Health System
Change, a nonpartisan re-
search center.
Continued on Page3A


For online community calendar
visit www.thewakullanews.com
and click on calendar.

WEEK IN WAKULLA

Thursday, December 31, 2009
NEW YEAR'S EVE
Friday, January 1, 2010
HAPPY NEW YEAR!
Saturday, January 2, 2010
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordville
Highway at 5 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.
PORT LEON FIELD TRIP, a visit to the ghost town
that was the first Wakulla County seat before it
was wiped out by a hurricane in 1849, will be held at
the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge beginning at
2 p.m. For reservations, call the refuge at 925-6121. A
van will also run from St. Marks City Hall at 1:30 p.m.,
to make a reservation for that, call city hall at 925-6225.
SHRINE CLUB TURKEY SHOOT at the Shriner's Building
south of Crawfordville begins at 8:30 a.m.
Monday, January 4, 2010
MEN'S FRATERNITY, a Christian community men's
group, meets at the public library at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, January 5, 2010
SCHOOL RESUMES for students of Wakulla Public
Schools.
ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in
Crawfordville at noon.
BOOK BUNCH meets in the children's room at the
public library at 10:30 a.m.
FARMER'S MARKET will be held at Purple Martin
Nurseries, north of Crawfordville, from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordville
Highway at 7 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.
VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW
Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Wednesday, January 6, 2010
AA meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road
at noon.
BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for
toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at
10:30 a.m.
LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at
2 p.m.
WETLANDS ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet at the
public library at 1 p.m.

Take The Wakulla News county commission poll on
the newspaper web site: www.thewakullanews.net.
Grade the performance of the Wakulla County
Commission as a whole during the 2009 calendar year.


12-31.page2A.indd 1


12/29/09 4:18:07 PM











THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 31, 2009 Page 3A


Backwoods should be


allowed to sell beer, wine


New Year, New Decade


Editor, The News:
Re: Sopchoppy to hold
beer, wine referendum Dec.
24 issue.
After reading this article I
was trying to figure out why
on-site consumption isn't al-
lowed at Backwoods Bistro.
Mr. Rice stated he has
been in business for nearly
four years with a commit-
ment to endure. He says,
"It's been a struggle" and the
sale of beer and wine would
add the the restaurant's bot-
tom line.
If his business is in good
standing with the communi-
ty, I don't understand why he
wouldn't be allowed to have
on-site consumption because
he would have control and
he wouldn't have to serve
anyone he felt had to much


to drink or was causing a dis-
turbance. Plus he would have
done his part to prevent a
potential drunk driver.
I also don't understand
why it's okay to buy beer and
wine at a convenience store,
walk down the street with
it in the public view to the
Bistro, and drink it there, but
it's not okay to buy and con-
sume it at the Bistro if they
had on-site consumption?
Since Mr. Rice has to deal
with the drinking issue in
his establishment anyway,
he should be able to make
money off of the sale of it
to help pay his bills.
I was a visitor along with
some friends in Sopchoppy
two years ago when we
stopped in for a beer and
pizza at the Bistro. We were


Consumers


told if we wanted to drink
beer one of us would have
to walk down to the con-
venience store, buy it, then
walk back. I can attest that
was very inconvenient. Walk-
ing back I wondered what
people thought of me carry-
ing beer down the street and
if the pizza would be cold
when I got back.
Mr. Rice seems to be striv-
ing to do his very best to pro-
vide for his family in these
hard economic times.
The Backwoods Bistro re-
peat customers are potential
shoppers for the other busi-
nesses in town.
That would be some-
thing I think any community
would embrace.
Roger Messimer
Crawfordville


Boy Scouts Nathan Green and Devin Bell with Terry Defoor.


Scouts share Christmas joy


Editor, The News:
Sometimes a Boy Scout
isn't a "boy" scout. That's
what this writer is think-
ing as I remember a recent
Sunday meeting with Terry
Defoor of Wakulla's River
Plantation Road.
Symbolizing the prepara-
tion and fortitude that Boy
Scouts all over this nation
represent, not to mention
the dogged determination
we all strive for, Ms. Defoor
had taken every measure
necessary to carry her beau-
tiful Frasier Fir Christmas
tree home in her gorgeous


mint-condition Volkswagon
Bug Convertible.
With plastic sheeting,
Christmas tree bags and a
carefully positioned pas-
senger seat, she had it all
covered. She happily waved
as she drove away with
her Christmas passenger in
place.
As the Troop 5 Scouts con-
tinue our annual Christmas
tree sale tradition at your lo-
cal Winn-Dixie supermarket
in an effort to help supply
every family in Crawfordville
with a beautiful new Christ-
mas memory, we instead


are reminded that everyone
around us has something
valuable to teach us.
And in the words of Ms.
Defoor, Bah Humbug to all
those who don't think they
can learn something new
today.
The Scouts are indeed
grateful to have so many
wonderful teachers in our
community. Merry Christmas
to all of you who continue to
represent this community,
and this nation, with such a
true Christmas joy.
Becky Green
Crawfordville


Santa for Seniors was success


Editor, The News:
NHC HomeCare wants to
thank everyone who par-
ticipated in our Santa for
Seniors program this year.
This was our first year put-


ting it on and due to the
great success, we will make
it an annual affair.
There is no better feeling
than knowing you were able
to touch the lives of others.


For some of our local seniors,
having a little something un-
der their tree did just that.
The staff of
NHC HomeCare
Crawfordville


Thank your for the support
Editor, The News: We were overwhelmed by Love,
The Brown family would your kindness, prayers, food Joy, Larry, and Jeff Brown
like to thank everyone for and cards, and Candace and Jon
their love and support dur- Your courtesy is greatly Hicks. St. Marks and Craw-
ing our time of loss, appreciated, fordville


Continued from Page 2A
Cunningham thinks that
limits on out-of-pocket ex-
penses are necessary to
reduce the financial burden
of health care on families
as deductibles, co-pays and
prescription drug costs rise,
meaning "a whole lot of low-
er- and middle-class people
face higher medical bills."
There's some concern
about whether the combi-
nation of premium costs
and out-of-pocket expenses
could be too much for some
consumers.
The House and Senate

Bank sues
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla Bank filed a
lawsuit for contract indebt-
edness against David Har-
vey, Wakulla Sheriff, and
business partners Gerald
Thompson and Joe Barry
claiming they have default-
ed on more than $6.4 mil-
lion in loans.
The lawsuit was filed in
circuit court on Tuesday,
Dec. 22.
The three men are busi-
ness partners in Wildwood
Golf LLC and Wildwood Re-
sort, a hotel and golf course
in Medart.
According to the law-
suit, Wildwood Golf LLC
took out a promissory note
in February 2006 for just
over $6 million with the
three partners jointly guar-
anteeing repayment. The
loan was modified over the
years, but the bank claims


bills propose a complex sys-
tem of premium subsidies,
generally for people with
incomes up to 400 percent
of the poverty level, or about
$88,000 per family. The sub-
sidies would be offered on a
sliding scale.
For instance, according to
Kaiser Health News, under
the Senate Finance Commit-
tee bill a family of four in
which the 45-year-old poli-
cyholder heads a household
with a $50,000 income would
pay $4,169 annually for ba-
sic coverage after receiving
a government subsidy of


$6,911.
Would it be too burden-
some, however, to add that
$4,169 to another $10,000 to
$11,900 for medical expens-
es? Such judgments are what
Congress is wrestling over.
"That's a big issue. You're
looking for a balance," said
David Certner, the legisla-
tive policy director at AARP,
which represents seniors.
Joan Hendrix
Crawfordville
Sources: AARP and Mc-
Clatchy Washington Bureau


Wildwood over loans


that the loan has been in
default since September.
With interest and penalties,
the bank claims the three
men owe $6.271 million.
A second promissory
note taken out by Wild-
wood Golf LLC and Wild-
wood Resort Inc., formerly
doing business as Barry En-
terprises is also in default,
the bank claims, and totals
more than $223,186.
The country club has also
faced legal challenges from
the state Division of Alco-
holic Beverages and Tobac-
co, which has determined
that Sheriff Harvey violated
state laws prohibiting law
enforcement officers with
state arrest powers from
having an interest in a bev-
erage license.
Wildwood is challenging
the proposed revocation
of the license by ABT, and
the case will be heard in


March before an administra-
tive law judge at the state
Division of Administrative
Hearings.
The liquor license is held
by a separate company
- Wildwood Golf Opera-
tions LLC whose directors
are Thompson, Barry and
Harvey's wife, Rhonda.
An investigation by ABT
determined that Sheriff Har-
vey was covering cost calls
for Wildwood Golf Opera-
tions, and that he therefore
has a personal interest.
State Attorney Willie
Meggs reviewed the case
with an eye toward pursu-
ing a criminal case, but
ultimately determined there
was nothing criminal in the
arrangement.
Meggs noted in his anal-
ysis that the country club
is losing money, and has
been a financial drain on
Harvey.


12-31.page3A.indd 1


12/29/09 4:01:25 PM





















Obituaries


Douglas M. Moody
Douglas M. Moody, 86, of
Tallahassee died Tuesday,
Dec. 22 in Crawfordville.
The funeral service was
held Monday, Dec. 28 grave-
side at Oakland Cemetery in
Tallahassee. Memorial contri-
butions may be made to Big
Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan
Center Blvd. Tallahassee, Fl.
32308.
A native and lifelong
resident of the Tallahassee
area, he graduated from
Leon High School and was
a veteran of World War II,
having served in the Army
Air Corps. He worked for the
State of Florida as manager
of the employment office in
Ft. Walton Beach and moved
back in 1970 to become the
first manager of the employ-
ment office in Tallahassee.
He was a past president of
the Ft. Walton Beach Kiwanis
Club. He loved the outdoors,
hunting and fishing with his
dad and sons.
Survivors include his chil-
dren, Larry Moody, Sheryle
Donnell, Rodney Moody
and Sharon, Rick Moody and
Rhonda, Paul Moody and
Kendall Moody, all of Tal-
lahassee; 11 grandchildren;
14 great-grandchildren and
other loving family mem-
bers.
Bevis Funeral Home in
Tallahassee was in charge of
the arrangements.


Amanda C, Potter
Amanda Christine Potter,
78, of Greensboro died Sun-
day, Dec. 27.
The funeral service was
held Wednesday, Dec. 30 at
Rock Bluff Assembly of God
in Rock Bluff, with burial at
Sycamore Cemetery in the
Sycamore community. Me-
morial contributions may be
made to Covenant Hospice,
4440 Lafayette St., Suite C,
Marianna, FL 32446.
A native of Liberty County,
she was a longtime resident
of Gadsden County. She re-
tired from Superior Pet and
was a member of Rock Bluff
Assembly of God Church.
Survivors include two
sons, Franklin Potter, Jr. and
Mary and Grover Cleveland
Potter, all of Greensboro;
three daughters, Joyce Diann
Potter of Crawfordville, Annie
Proctor and Jerry and Catha-
leen Sadberry and Albert,
all of Greensboro; a brother,
Johnnie Arnold and Alice of
Hosford; 12 grandchildren;
and 13 great-grandchildren.
Independent Funeral
Home in Quincy was in
charge of the arrangements.

Prince Albert Sanders
Prince Albert Sanders, 87,
of Sopchoppy died Wednes-
day, Dec. 23.
The funeral service was
held Monday, Dec. 28 at Har-
vey-Young Chapel with burial


at Crum-Sanders Cemetery.
He served in the U.S. Army
and U.S. Navy during World
War II. He lived a long and
eventful life.
Survivors include three
daughters, Betty Henning,
Stella Burgin and Sallie At-
kins; three sons, Percel Sand-
ers, Andrew Sanders and
John Sanders; 27 grandchil-
dren; 58 great-grandchildren;
and three great-great-grand-
children.
Bevis Funeral Home, Har-
vey-Young Chapel was in
charge of the arrangements.

Harold L. Smith
Harold Leo "Bud" Smith,
88, of Panacea died Dec. 24
in Panacea.
A memorial service was
held at Tuesday, Dec. 29 at
2323 Surf Road in Ochlock-
onee Bay. In lieu of flowers,
please contribute to a charity
of your choice.
A native of Cedar Rapids,
Iowa, he was the son of the
late Carlton K. Smith and
Alice A. Smith. He graduated
from McKinley High School
and attended Coe College in
Cedar Rapids. He attended
Iowa State University in
Ames before entering the
Air Force in 1941, serving
in Europe for 21 months.
Returning home from World
War II, he worked with Smith
Construction Company, a
family-owned business. In


1955, he moved to Coggon,
Iowa where he owned and
operated Coggon Bowl, bowl-
ing lanes. He was co-owner
of Marion Bowl in Marion,
Iowa. He held a private pi-
lots license for many years.
On retirement in 1969, he
moved to Largo and in 1981
he moved to Panacea.
He was a thoughtful and
caring man, always there for
his family. He could build
and fix anything.
He was a man of few
words, and when he spoke
it was to the point and often
laced with wit. He loved to
fish and golf.
Survivors include his sis-
ter, Dorothy Holub of Craw-
fordville; five nieces, Bonnie
Holub and Tim Jordan of
Panacea and Rozanne Hicks
of Kemah City, Texas, Travis
Monroe and Richard and Patti
Leviner and Mark of Alexan-
dria, La., and Julie Gordon of
Cedar Rapids; five nephews,
Jim Hicks of Alexandria,
Vance Gordon and Wanda
of Marion, Iowa, Marve Gor-
don of Cedar Rapids, Steve
Gordon of Crawfordville
and their many children and
grandchildren.
Bevis Funeral Home, Har-
vey-Young Chapel in Craw-
fordville was in charge of the
arrangements.

Annette Taylor
Annette Taylor, 74, of


Crawfordville died Sunday,
Dec. 27 at the Margaret Z.
Dozier Hospice House of Big
Bend Hospice.
Graveside services were
held Tuesday, Dec. 29 at
Culley's MeadowWood Me-
morial Park. In lieu of flow-
ers, memorials may be made
to Big Bend Hospice, 1723
Mahan Center Blvd., Talla-
hassee, FL 32308.
A native of Leeds, Ala.,
she moved to Tallahassee
in 1965 and to Crawfordville
in 1971.
Survivors include her
son, Larry Taylor and wife
Melisa of Crawfordville; two
daughters; Lisa Lehman of
Tallahassee and Judy Russell
and husband Steve of Craw-
fordville; her brother, Charles
Adkins and wife Doris of Tal-
lahassee; her special friend,
Clayton "Doc" Newton; eight
grandchildren, Kimberly,
Adam, Shanna, Shelby, Justin,
Marshall, Paige and Phillip;
and seven great-grandchil-
dren.
Culley's MeadowWood
Funeral Home in Tallahassee
was in charge of arrange-
ments.

Michael L, Vaughan, Sr.
Michael Lee Vaughan, Sr.,
60, of Archer died Wednes-
day, Dec. 16 at his home.
Funeral services will be
held at Forest Meadows Fu-
neral Home in Gainesville at


a future date. In lieu of flow-
ers, memorial contributions
may be made to the Leuke-
mia & Lymphoma Society,
10475 Northwest 28th Place,
Ocala, FL 34482.
A native of Miami, he
moved to the Gainesville
area in 1988. He was a vet-
eran of the U.S. Navy and
worked for the University
of Florida, Physical Plant
Division, as a maintenance
supervisor. He enjoyed NAS-
CAR, football and traveling
with his family.
Survivors include by
his wife of 13 years, Karen
Vaughan of Archer; two sons,
Michael L. Vaughan, Jr. and
wife Chasity of Crawfordville
and Matthew Vaughan and
wife Ashley of Cullman, Ala.;
a daughter, Jennifer Baker
and husband Bryan of Coral
Springs; two brothers, C.S.
"Buddy" Vaughan and wife
Ellen of Archer and Gary
Vaughan of Bronson; seven
grandchildren, Taylor, Jordan
and Matalyn Vaughan, and
Alicia, Katie, Christopher,
Jr., and Nicholas Davis; two
nieces, Sherry Martensen
and husband Pete and Casey
Vaughan; a great-nephew,
Landon Martensen; and two
step-children, Jason Tafoya
and Tonja Davis.
Forest Meadows Funeral
Home in Gainesville was in
charge of the arrangements.


Cowboy Country Church service will be held Jan. 7


Wakulla County has a new atmosphere, come and wor-
"Cowboy Country Church" ship with them as they seek
for individuals who enjoy the God to heal hearts and change
western lifestyle and heritage. lives.
It's called the 3-C. The Cowboy Skip Young, Maurice Langs-
Country Church is not just ton and Jerry Evans along with
another church. Every service his very talented friends invite
will be different. They don't everyone to come as you are to
have assigned seating and they Cowboy Country Church at the
dress very casually. 3 Y Ranch, 195 Harvey Young
If you like the country way, Road (off Rehwinkle Road),
country gospel music, simple, Crawfordville, Thursday, Jan.
clear and concise sermons 7 at 7 p.m.
about Jesus Christ in a relaxed The Cowboy Country

Islamic open house set


Islamic Center of Tallahas-
see, 1020 W. Pensacola St. in
Tallahassee, is hosting an open
house and a question and an-
swer hotline (681-9022) from
Jan. 11 to Jan. 15 from 11 a.m. to
1 p.m. for anyone interested in
learning more about Islam.
Islam calls to the way of life
of all the prophets from Adam
to Jesus to Muhammad (peace
be upon them), submission to
the will of the Lord of the heav-
ens and earth. Islam is the Way
of Life for more than 1.5 billion
people all over the world.
What would you like to

I 9 Saint Teresa
Episcopal
Church
1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98
Rev. Teri Monica, Priest
Rev. Roy Lima, Deacon
Sunday Holy Eucharist 5:30 pm
Sunday School, supper
and fellowship provided.
926-4288
0 J


7J~eojTL~c re~l


know about it? Stop by, call
or e-mail them at dawa@ictal-
lahassee.org or http://www.
ictallahassee.org/.
Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
Crawfordville
Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey
Come & Worship With Us"
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School ........................ 10 a.m .
Sunday W orship...................... 11 a.m.
Evening Worship.......... ........ .... 6 p.m.
W wednesday Service..................7 p.m.
& Youth Service......................... 7 p.m .
Royal Rangers........................... 7 p.m .
M issionettes .............................. 7 p.m .

Trinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Vicar Bert Matlock
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557


SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.


Morning Worshi 1


01 0n a m


*'Vl"g I."" a.1.
/ Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Discipleship Training 7:00 p.m

First Baptst Church WEDNESDAY
CRAWFORDVILLE Fellowship Meal 6:00 p.m.
3086 Crawfordville Hwy. (call for reservations)
(South of the Courthouse) Children's Events 6:30 p.m.
Church Office: 926-7896 Student Worship 7:00 p.m.
www.fbcc.embarqspace.com Prayer/Bible Study 7:00 p.m.


1.


Hwy 319 Medart,
e ElOffice 926-5265
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
o Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
EDl Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
AWANA 5:00 p.m.
u Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org


Church is a non-traditional ple who want to get to know
church for down to earth peo- God personally and discover


St. Elizabeth"


Ann Seton

Catholic Church
Mass 9 a.m. Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Father James MacGee, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
926-1797


SCrawfordville United
Methodist Church
Christmas Cantata "Journey of Promises"
December 20, 3 p.m.
Christmas Eve Services 7 p.m. and 11 p.m.
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 926-7209
Ochlockonee &Arran Road "Come Grow With Us" www.crawfordville-umc.org


You've Got Bible Questions?
We Got Bible Answers
Find the Peace and Hope and
Answers in these Troubling Times.

Let the Bible Speak
1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville Florida 32327
"the churches of Christ salutes you" Romans 16:16
www.OysterBayChurchofChrist.org


117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy


Sunday School 9A45 AM
Church Office Morning Worship 11 AM
962-7822 AWANA CLUB 5PM
Evening Worship 6 PM

Wednesday 7 PM Prayer Meeting,
Youth & Children's Programs 'A
Dr. Bill Jenkins, Pastor
Daid Alen, Associate Pastor/Student Minister
Rand Anderson, Minister f Music
Jerry Evans, Mike Crouch, Blrnie Kemp Musicians


their spiritual gifts.
Cowboy Churches have
been gaining popularity all
across the United States prov-
ing our western heritage makes
us hungry for the Word of
God.
The Cowboy Country

Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worship ...................10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .............5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details,
962-2213


Wakulla United
Methodist Church
Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 am.
Sunday School for all ages-10 a.m.
Sunday Worship 11 am.
Wednesday Service 7 p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
PasorJanm Hsnry Risubart


Church Mission is to reach
people, empower people, and
eliminate barriers in an atmo-
sphere of Christ-like unity and
biblical accountability. For more
information, call 408-2744.


Christ Church
Anglican
Sunday
i 8:30am Service
S9:30am Adult Bible Class
10:30am Children's Class
10:30am Service
Nursery available
Thursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study
Wednesday 6:30 pm Supper and
Children, Youth and Adult Bible Classes
The Rev. John Spicer, Rector
850-745-8412
3383 Coastal Highway


^^---------"--^^_


5585 Crawfordville Hwy.
Tallahassee, FL 32305
Owned & Operated By Wesley Schweinsberg
Son of the Late Harold Schweinsberg
Office: (850) 421-7211 Mobile: (850) 510-3983
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12-31.page4A.indd 1


Ocktockonee

r ay
United
Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship 9 a.m.
Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
astor x~in datll
(850) 984-0127


12/29/09 4:02:12 PM











THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 31, 2009 Page 5A


Board priorities Storage facility celebrates


Continued from Page 1A
A lot of the water quality
tasks deal with sewer, in-
cluding the upgrade to AWT
standards, completing agree-
ments with Panacea Area
Water System and Talquin
Electric, and developing a
county-wide Wastewater
Master Plan that would ex-
amine sewer expansion or
the possibility of other treat-
ments in certain areas, such
as cluster systems.
Another priority is to
sunset some of the approved
developments in order to
free up capacity at the treat-
ment plant.
The storm water element
looks at the engineered
plans and implementation
for Wakulla Gardens, as
well as identifying various
funding options for his-
toric neighborhoods around


Crawfordville.
The comp plan/Land De-
velopment Code updates
include developing the Craw-
fordville overlay to develop
boundaries, design and sig-
nage requirements. Other
priorities include re-evaluat-
ing Enterprise Zones to be
sure they are in locations
where the county wants
to encourage commercial
growth.
And while the county has
a tree ordinance in place for
commercial development,
the board wants to work on
developing a residential tree
ordinance.
Transportation priorities
include improvements to
U.S. Highway 319, regional
public transit for commuters,
bike lanes and sidewalk en-
hancements, and promoting
the Capital City to the Sea


Grant writers


Continued from Page 1A
County Administrator Ben
Pingree said the new struc-
ture would allow team mem-
bers to work together on
projects, including grants.
Kessler again expressed
"concern about the struc-
ture" of the department,
saying he would prefer a
grants writer and grants
director. "We need to have
a proper not analyst, not
coordinator but a director,"
Kessler said.


"I cannot see taking three
people and say, 'Do noth-
ing but grants,'" Pingree
answered.
Commissioner Lynn Artz
said her idea was for the
county to bring in contract
employees to work on grants,
noting that salaries for those
staff members could come
from the administration fees
included in most grants.
Pingree said he could do
that.
Figures offered in the


proposed bike trail.
Youth enrichment goals
include construction of a
community center, including
a swimming pool, as well as
exploring the possibility of
a northside recreation park,
and looking into developing
neighborhood parks in some
of the historic subdivisions
- such as Greiner's Addition
and Wakulla Gardens.
Public services priorities
are upgrading fire and EMS
facilities, land acquisition,
and expansion of library fa-
cilities in the northern part
of the county.
For energy conservation,
the priorities are encourag-
ing Energy Star and LEED
standards, and retrofitting
of county facilities with
solar powered heating and
cooling, plus energy-saving
lights and appliances.


presentation indicated that,
for fiscal year 2008-09, the
OMB was administering 34
grants totaling $11.4 mil-
lion, and 27 of those grants
were completed, totaling $7.6
million or 67 percent of the
grants budget.
During the same period,
the county applied for 31
new grants totaling $9 mil-
lion.
For FY 2009-10, the county
will have 26 working grants
totaling $11 million.


Public Safety achieves goal


The members of the
Wakulla County Volunteer
Firefighters Association and
the Wakulla County Fire
Department held educa-
tional training throughout
the county to achieve the
specific goal of "Fire Safety"
as part of Fire Prevention
Month held in October.
The objective of achiev-
ing Fire Safety is a state and
federal standard shared with
fire departments all over
the country. The fire preven-
tion related groups included
members of the county and
state.
A direct result of their
assistance made the fire pre-
vention effort a success this
year, county officials said.


Three thousand children
and 361 adults through day
care centers, schools, Girl
Scouts, homeschool groups,
public and private schools,
and public educational
events were made aware of
the important matter of fire
safety.
"Fire Prevention Week
is one of my favorite times
of year as a firefighter. We
really enjoy getting out and
interacting with the kids.
Our goal is to present fire
prevention and fire safety
tips to the kids in a way
that is fun and engaging.
Every year, following our
visit to the schools, we get
letters from students thank-
ing us and describing what


they learned. Knowing the
kids actually learn from us
is very rewarding," said Ian
Brazier, Volunteer Firefighter,
Station 8.
"While this effort was a
remarkable achievement,
we are hoping that this ef-
fort can be developed even
further for years to come,"
said Scott McDermid, Public
Safety Director.
The Department of Pub-
lic Safety requests that any
church, community group,
day care center and home-
school interested in learning
more about fire prevention,
fire education and fire safety
training, contact Colleen
Skipper at 745-8697.


Wakulla jobless rate up slightly


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla County's un-
employment rate was up
slightly in November to 7.8
percent in November, from
7.7 percent in October and
7.2 percent in September,
according to the Agency for
Workforce Innovation.
Despite the increase,
Wakulla had the third low-
est jobless rate in the state.
Of the 67 counties in Florida,
only Liberty County at 6.1
percent and Monroe County
at 7.3 percent were lower.
The unemployment rate
in Florida continued to rise,
up to 11.5 percent in No-
vember from 11.2 percent in
October. The rate represents
1.056 million jobless people
out of a labor force of 9.2
million.
Nationally, unemploy-
ment decreased in Novem-
ber, down to 10.0 percent
from 10.2 percent in Octo-
ber.
In Florida, 48 of the 67
counties now have unem-
ployment rates above 10
percent, with eight more
being added in November.
The highest unemployment
continued to be in Flagler
County where the unemploy-
ment rate was up to 16.8
percent.
"The rate released today
reinforces the need for a va-
riety of strategies to help bol-
ster job growth in Florida,"
said Agency for Workforce
Innovation Director Cynthia
Lorenzo. She anticipated
that, Under the Florida Back
to Work program and the
passenger rail legislation
that Gov. Crist signed into
law last week would help as
many as 39,000 Floridians
find work.
The three industries that
accounted for more than two-
thirds of job losses in the
state are construction; trade,
transportation and utilities;
and professional and busi-
ness services. Healthcare has
been Florida's only growth
sector for most of 2009.


Wakulla's labor force de-
creased in November, down
50 people, to 15,335 people
of which 14,139 were em-
ployed and 1,196 were un-
employed.
In October, Wakulla's la-
bor force consisted of 15,385
people of which 14,201 were
employed and 1,184 were
unemployed.
Unemployment in the Tal-
lahassee Metropolitan Sta-
tistical Area, which includes


Wakulla, Leon, Jefferson and
Gadsden counties for the
purpose of market analysis,
was higher in November,
up to 8.1 percent from 7.5
percent in October.
Of 23 MSAs in the state,
the Tallahassee area contin-
ued to have one of the low-
est rates only the Gaines-
ville MSA at 8.0 percent
was lower, while Ft. Walton
Beach-Crestview-Destin at
8.1 percent was the same.


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10 years of service


Ten years ago, The Wakul-
la News published a rib-
bon cutting ceremony that
took place at Crawfordville
Self Storage. Time has gone
by and R.E. Meadows, the
owner still enjoys the busi-
ness and says he is very glad
to still be in the self storage
business.
While recapturing the
past, Meadows tells the
story of how he accidentally
stumbled upon the opportu-
nity of becoming a business
owner in Wakulla County,
especially while he was look-
ing for something entirely
unrelated.
In 1999, he owned what
he called "a junk store" in
Tallahassee. He had just
placed a tractor on the front
lawn with the intention of
selling it and shortly after
that, the late Steve Revell
made him an offer that
Meadows couldn't refuse.
Revell offered to trade some
of his land for the trac-
tor. Not too long after that,
Meadows was the proud
owner of Wakulla land. Eager
to learn where his newly
purchased lots were located,
he took on a "search expedi-
tion," driving up and down
Crawfordville Highway. It
was then that he spotted the
"for sale" sign at Crawford-
ville Self Storage. That same
afternoon he was visiting
with Skip Young at Citizens
Bank who helped Meadows
acquire the self-storage busi-
ness and to whom Meadows
said he is still very grateful.
In 1999, Crawfordville Self
Storage was a 13,000 square


R.E. Meadows with his dog companion, Susie.


foot storage facility with two
buildings, 94 units in three
different sizes. In the past
ten years, many improve-
ments have taken place at
Crawfordville Self Storage.
It is now a 23,000 square
foot facility with four build-
ings including the desirable
climate-controlled storage
units. All the storage units
are convenient, accessible at
all times and are monitored
by a 24-hour surveillance
system. Boat and RV storage
is also available. The addi-
tion of a web site is another
recent improvement. You can
find them online at crawford-
villeselfstorage.com
When asked what were


his plans for the near future,
he said that he is consider-
ing the possibility of becom-
ing an independent portable
storage dealer. "These por-
table units are very conve-
nient. For example if you are
in the process of remodeling
a house, you can rent one of
these units and place them
on your property. If there
is a demand in the area for
these portable units, I will
definitely make them part
of my services," Meadows
said.
Crawfordville Self Storage
is located at 3291 Crawford-
ville Highway and can be
reached anytime at 850-228-
7197.


Genealogy group will meet


The Wakulla Genealogy
Group will start 2010 off in
the correct way with a gene-
alogy program called, "The
Ruth J. Burlingame Memory
Ouilt." Guests can come and
meet Jay Collins who has
been involved in genealogy
research for nearly 20 years.


PO




tO


The project is a demon-
stration of Jay's commitment
to research and genealogy as
he delves into the history of
the quilt and the lives of the
people named on all the quilt
blocks. The quilt dates from
the early 1800s and bears the
names of 48 of Ruth's friends


and family. Join the group on
Thursday, Jan. 7 at 6:30 p.m.
at the Wakulla Library for the
first meeting of the year and
learn about the quilt and the
research behind it.
For more information,
call Carolyn W. Harvey at
524-5334.


Dec. 31st, 2009
Featuring:



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health


Dear Lee's Place


By KAREN LOCKARD, LCSW
Children's Counselor
Q: Do Men and women grieve
the same way?
A: The differences in commu-
nication styles between men and
women is well understood by
anyone who is married or lived
with the opposite sex or even
worked with the opposite sex.
There wouldn't be sitcoms if there
weren't such marked differences!
Women tend to be more emo-
tionally expressive, enjoy talking
about their feelings to trusted
others, in fact many need to talk
about their feelings in order to feel
better. Women are typically not
embarrassed or ashamed of emo-
tion and therefore, women respond
well to each other when emotion is
expressed. Men, on the other hand,
are often quite opposite.
Men shy away from expressing
emotion, are often silent when
emotions are intense and often are
visually uncomfortable when other
men express emotion. Men often


respond to emotion by wanting to
"fix it." And this is where grief can
really complicate things because
with grief there is nothing to fix,
there is nothing to do. Men often
withdraw from others, isolate
themselves in their pain and can
look more angry than sad.
When couples share the loss
of a loved one such as a child,
each can feel as though the other
doesn't understand. In reality, each
can be desperately struggling but
because each struggles so differ-
ently from each other, it is easy
to misunderstand or become
judgmental about how the other is
grieving. A man might clear-cut a
piece of land, go for long drives, sit
alone outside for hours at a time,
or work overtime as he attempts
to manage his grief. A woman
tends to talk to friends or family
often, cry openly, seek out others
for comfort, appear to "wallow" in
the pain, and have more difficulty
focusing on the usual responsibili-
ties of work.


One couple, whose 19-year-old
daughter was killed in a automo-
bile accident, shared an incident
that demonstrated their differences
perfectly. The woman came home
from work one day in December
and her husband was hanging
Christmas lights. She was horri-
fied, "How could you even think we
would celebrate the holidays?" He
was taken aback by her response,
"I was just trying to make (fix) you
feel better!"
So how do couples survive
when each is hurting so differ-
ently? The first thing is to be
willing to accept and respect the
differences in grieving styles. This
requires trust, compassion and
commitment to the other. This
may also require some assistance
from a grief specialist who can help
identify and discuss the differences
between the partners. The second
thing is to find a way to share
some (maybe not all) feelings with
each other while recognizing that
a woman may need to say much


more than a man. Men often need
to learn how to "be present" in
another's pain by listening, sitting
cose, holding hands and just being
quiet. All the while, recognizing
there is nothing to fix. A woman's
challenge is to understand that
because there may be no outward
expression of emotion in her mate,
it doesn't mean there is no inward
pain. Just because a man doesn't
cry openly doesn't mean he doesn't
cry at all. Women tend to want to
discuss the hurting and men often
will say it just isn't helpful to talk
about it. These are significant dif-
ferences which when examined
and understood can lead to a softer
heart toward the other.
Stages and timelines of grief
are part of the myths of the griev-
ing process that we talk about in
therapy. Many try to pigeonhole
themselves or their spouse in one
of the stages which isn't helpful
and can become frustrating. Griev-
ing is far messier than any prede-
termined stage or framework. The


last thing a grieving person needs
is a message of what he or she is
"supposed" to be feeling
So be gentle with each other,
be patient with each other and
share your feelings and worries
when you are able. Grief is a long
process, so hold on tight to your
mate and open your hearts to
each other.
Lee's Place, 216 Lake Ella Dr., Tal-
lahassee, FL 32303. (850) 841-7733,
www.leesplace.org.
Lee's Place Grief and Loss
Counseling Center
Lee's Place, a nonprofit grief and
loss counseling center, invites you
to submit questions about grief/
loss issues to dearleesplace@lees-
place.org, or 216 Lake Ella Drive,
Tallahassee, 32303.
Lee's Place is a grief and loss
counseling center on Lake Ella
Drive in Tallahassee. Services ad-
dress all kinds of loss including di-
vorce, death, life transitions, physi-
cal illness, trauma and more.


Fitness Matters


Expert answers to your health
and wellness questions
By RUSSELL BARBARINO, M.S.,
CSCS, SCCC
Question: How come I never see
anyone else doing a warm-up prior
to working out?
Answer: That's a great question,
and one that's relatively easy to
answer. Most people simply don't
make time for a warm-up. Lots of
folks just want to "get in and get
out," and don't really consider the
benefits of properly preparing the
body for exercise. Let's highlight a
few of these benefits, so you have
justification for incorporating it
into your workout.
Increases the temperature of
your muscles and joints, which
makes movement more efficient
and reduces the risk of injury;
Causes blood vessels to dilate,
which shuttles oxygen and nutri-
ents to the muscles, allowing you
to achieve peak performance;
Prepares you for exercise men-


tally, heightening your senses and
allowing you to focus and concen-
trate on the work at hand.
There are lots of other benefits,
but no matter why you do it, a
simple fact remains. You will feel
better and perform better if you
include a warm-up in your exercise
session. Take five minutes, and do
some light cardiovascular exercise,
along with a few basic bodyweight
strength exercises. Try the elliptical
or some fast walking, and throw in
some lunges, push-ups, squats, or
planks. And don't forget, it's best to
try and mimic your actual workout
if possible!
Question: I'm sure you knew
this was coming. How do I man-
age my food intake during the
holidays, especially with all the
cakes, cookies, and other goodies
seemingly everywhere? Help!
Answer: I thought we were
going to skirt by without address-
ing this, but I'm glad you asked.
Interestingly enough, the answer


depends almost entirely on you.
Assuming you're susceptible to
sweets and other treats, you really
only have three options-go all-out
and worry about the ramifications
later, avoid them at all costs, or
take a reasoned approach and in-
dulge to a modest degree. I think
most people would argue that the
third idea is the best one. After
all, why not treat yourself to a few
holiday goodies, especially if you
can limit yourself to one or two
here and there. And don't forget
to continue with your workouts
during this time as well. Restrict-
ing foods that you truly enjoy will
only increase your cravings for
them, and make for an unhappy
holiday season. Bottom line-it
comes down to choice, and you can
choose to make healthy decisions
or not, but you have to be realistic.
Keep variety, moderation, and bal-
ance in mind, and reward yourself
for being active all year long
Question: I saw a trainer post


something in the club about rest-
ing metabolic rate testing. What is
this, and is it worth it?
Answer: Resting metabolic rate
(RMR) testing is something that's
becoming much more common,
and for good reason. Your rest-
ing metabolic rate is essentially
the number of calories needed to
maintain basic bodily functions,
and represents the approximate
number of calories you would burn
if you laid in bed for 24 hours do-
ing nothing. When someone is try-
ing to reach a specific weight goal,
they often want to pinpoint (as
accurately as possible) how many
calories they need to reach that
goal. Knowing your RMR is the first
step in that process, and obtaining
a measured RMR is more accurate
than using a standard equation.
Your metabolic rate is determined
by a breath test, which measures
your oxygen consumption and
carbon dioxide production. These
values can be directly linked to


caloric expenditure. Keep in mind,
once you know your RMR, you also
have to determine how many calo-
ries you burn through daily activity
and the digestion of food, and also
factor in a surplus or deficit if you
want to gain or lose weight.
A personal trainer can help you
calculate your total caloric expen-
diture, which takes into account all
of these variables. Then, you can
then match this number with your
dietary intake in order to reach
your goals.
This is what calorie balance is
all about. Give it a try and see what
you think!
About the author: Russell Bar-
barino is the Club Owner/Nation-
ally Recognized Certified Fitness
Professional at Anytime Fitness in
Crawfordville and Tallahassee.
To submit a question for future
articles, please contact the author
at CrawfordvilleFL@AnytimeFit-
ness.com.


Census poster contest will be held Shriner turkey shoot
A poster contest will be The posters must be on 22 will be a Wii Sports system Feb. 15. Contestants may turn slated for Jan 2
held for students from kin- inch by 28 inch poster board with a game included. Sec- in their poster to your school l e dr
dergarten through 12th grade with no computer aided or ond place prizes are $50 or the Wakulla Library. A turkey shoot will be hosted by the Wakulla Shrine Clu
related to Census 2010. copy machine entries. Entries Wal-Mart gift cards. For more information at the Shrine building, three miles south of Crawfordvill
The contest will be di- need to be from Wakulla The deadline to enter is about the upcoming Cen- on U.S. Highway 319.
vided into three categories, County residents. Jan. 30. Winners will be noti- sus, visit www.census.gov/ The event will be held Saturday, Jan. 2 beginning
Grades K-5, Grades 6-8 and The theme is April 1, 2010 fled by phone no later than schools. 8:30 a.m.
Grades 9-12. Census Day. First place prizes


b
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12-31.page6A.indd 1


I


12/29/09 4:06:09 PM


i~~ess










THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 31, 2009 Page 7A







SAngel Fund helps students


Riversprings grade level Geography Bee winners display their contest awards.

Geography Bee winner picked


Wakulla High School teach-
ers shared their good will
again this year by donating
to the Angel Fund. The Angel
Fund was created at Wakulla
High School to help students
who needed supplies through-
out the school year.
It is supported by a core
team composed of Wakulla
High faculty and staff. The
money raised by this team
targets students in need of
items such as clothing, food,
graduation materials and gifts
for Christmas.
Wakulla High Principal
Mike Crouch describes the An-
gel Fund as, "A small measure
of how Wakulla High cares for
our students."
The Angel Fund has been
at Wakulla High for several


years and each year the dona-
tions from faculty and staff
grow larger and larger. This
year the Angel Fund team put
together three baskets from
contributions. There were two
spa baskets, which included
gift certificates for tanning
and spa services at local salons
as well as the Aveda Institute
in Tallahassee and a chocolate
basket that contained items
from hot chocolate to choco-
late cookies and candies.
Each department in the
high school also contributed
baked goods for an auction
that took place in the War
Eagle Cafe before teachers
left for break. Cakes, cookies
and brownies were bid on by
faculty and staff to help raise
money for the Angel Fund.


The purpose of the Angel
Fund is to help students who
may require assistance not
just during the holidays, but
throughout the school year.
Superintendent of Schools
David Miller said, "Teachers
across the district continu-
ously provide not only quality
education for our children, but
the emotional support they
need to succeed. This is an
example of one of those times
when teachers go above and
beyond to help children."
The teacher who coordi-
nates the Angel Fund, Te-
resa Murphy, spent countless
hours organizing items to be
delivered to students houses
before school closed for the
holidays with money raised
by the team.


The Riversprings Mid-
dle School Bears held their
school-wide Geographic Bee
on Thursday, Dec. 10.
Competing in the bee
were four sixth graders:
Sarah Collins, Dalton McCul-
ley, Steven Waites and John
Ahrendt. For the seventh
grade the competitors were:
Gabe Hoover, Ben West,
Chrishnika Almanzor, Marisa


Rossetti and Mitchell Roth.
The eighth grade competi-
tors were: Sylvia Terrones,
Robert Sarvis, Landon Glover
and Robbie McBride.
The overall winner was
Ben West while second place
went to Robbie McBride and
third place was awarded to
John Ahrendt.
"Congratulations to all
the contestants on a job well


done," school officials said.
Ben West will take a
written test, which will be
submitted to National Geo-
graphic.
If he places in the top 100
contestants, he will move on
to the National Geographic
Bee and the possibility of
winning a $25,000 scholar-
ship.


Toys collected at Wakulla High


Back row from left, Melanie Homan, Kristy Phillips, Ethel Brannon. Front row
from left, Krista Millender, Teresa Murphy, Shirley Core and Jillian Solburg.

Food collected by RMS students


SSGT Figueroa, Kieifi Myrick, Sergeant Taylor, Shelby Coleman, Delia Ostojich,


This year's Wakulla High
School National Honor So-
ciety wanted to give back
directly to the community,
so in conjunction with the
Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office, Victim's Advocates
Office, and Wakulla Supports
Others, NHS held a Coins for
Christmas and Christmas
Collection. For the Christ-
mas Collection, NHS students
brought in new gifts for mid-
dle school and high school
aged students. However, the
Coins for Christmas drive
was even more successful.
Each grade fought it out
in a Penny War and collected
change during both lunches
for one month. The grade
that collected the most pen-
nies (after deducting dollars
and silver coins from their
totals) won cookies, brown-
ies, and cupcakes served by
the losing grade. While the
seniors collected more than


$100 in pennies, the total col-
lection from coins and gifts
exceeded $500.
"We're very proud of our
students for giving to those
less fortunate and spreading
Christmas cheer!" said Kasey
Hollington. The NHS sponsor
is Melisa Taylor.
The Junior Class Council
held Operation Holidays
From Home to join in the
countywide effort to support
local troops serving in Iraq
and Afghanistan this holiday
season. Students, faculty, and
staff donated hundreds of
items for care packages for
our soldiers. The sponsors
were Nancy Floyd Richardson
and Melinda House.
The Interact Club was
also able to collect hundreds
of canned goods through
their Trick or Treat canned
food drive. The sponsors
were Melanie Homan and
Michelle Snow.


Student Government
members held a Toys for
Tots drive this year and with
the help of the student body
they were able to collect
more then 200 toys for local
children.
James Vernon's first pe-
riod Economics class won a
donut party for bringing in
the most toys of any class.
They brought in 53 toys.
Kasey Hollington's third
period American History
Honors class came in second
place with 43 toys.
SGA members also used
profits from the Homecoming
dance that they sponsored to
provide Thanksgiving dinner
for a family and they also
provided Christmas for a
student's family including
a tree, decorations, presents
and food. SGA sponsors are
Kasey Hollington and Kristi
Keith.


Elementary school lunch menu
JANUARY 2010 Tidbits, Milk. Jan. 6 Chicken Jan. 7 Turkey and Noodles,
Jan. 4 No School Evalu- Fajita Strips, Creamy Mashed Seasoned Turnip Greens,
ation Day. Jan. 5 Pizza, Sea- Potatoes, Yeast Roll, Blue- Cornbread, Banana, Milk.
soned Green Beans, Pineapple berries with topping, Milk. Continued on Page 10A


Riversprings Middle
School Student Council
members collected canned
food for the needy from
the student body. The items
were submitted to soldiers in
Iraq and the Senior Citizens
Center during three weeks in
November.
A huge collection of items
were forwarded to school
district administrator Karen
Wells for the soldiers and
the senior citizen items were
given to the Junior Optimist
organization as they collect
more through the month of
December.
The canned goods and
other non-perishable items
were forwarded to those in
need before the Thanksgiv-
ing holidays.


RMS students wheel their collected food in the hall.
Food was given to senior citizens and the military,


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12-31.page7A.indd 1


12/29/09 4:07:13 PM











Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 31, 2009


St. Marks Fire Department Guardian volunteers graduate


makes the holidays brighter


ST. MARKS
By Linda Walker


Hi neighbors. If you are
anything like me, you are glad
the holidays are over. It's just
not the same unless you have
small children. People run
themselves ragged for this
one day each year and then
in 10 minutes it's gone.
But I am blessed with
friends and memories and my
two cats. It was very peaceful
at my house.
I talked to Alice Knowles
and she went to Georgia to
spend Christmas with her
daughter and grandchildren,
but was so glad to get back
home to her watchdog, "Little
Bit." He might weigh three
pounds, but thinks he's a
Great Dane and acts like it,
too. She had a great time
though.
Carson and Charlotte Stan-
ley had a visitor other than
Santa Claus that they could
have done without. Yep, it was
that huge black bear again in
their garbage can. Carson said
when he stood up, the bear
looked to be at least six to
seven feet tall. Please be care-
ful outside at night. Everyone
who has called says nothing
can be done until there is an
incident.
I don't like the sound of
that myself. It sounds like
when you used to call the
law in Atlanta when your ex
was using you for a punching
bag. We can't lock him up
unless he really hurts you or
kills you.
This is getting a little out
of hand. Please keep your
kids and pets inside at night
for safety.


If you see the bear, just let
him or her eat all the garbage
it wants. It's against the law
to hurt it.
Neighbors, our thoughts
and prayers go to Ms. Joy and
her family due to the loss of
her son, Michael. He fought a
tough battle for a long time,
but is now at peace. How
blessed he was to have the
kind of mother he did.
Our St. Marks Fire Depart-
ment wants to thank the
following for their help and
donations for their toy drive
this year: Wakulla Free Riders,
Iron Ravens, Dollar General,
Shadeville Elementary School
and all of you who gave your
time and gifts.
They were able to make
sure that 125 children had
a wonderful Christmas this
year. Our fire department
does this toy drive every year
so why not get involved next
year and put a smile on some
child's face? May God bless
you all.
Neighbors, I don't know
about the rest of you but
maybe it's just me being
older than dirt myself. Any-
way, my brother told me to
watch some show on televi-
sion about "housewives of
wherever" so I did for about
10 minutes.
I don't remember my days
as a housewife being any-
thing like that. Everyone
knows I was a housewife
many times. But I never got
to dress like that or get to
go those places or do those
things. What is this? I do
believe the writers of this
show have never met a real
housewife before. This is just
my personal opinion.
I think since they changed
all of the television stations


to digital format they must be
making a killing. They keep
showing the same things
over and over every day. If
you miss a show, don't worry.
You can watch it the same
night. Yes, I do watch a lot of
television since God slowed
me down and my car is scared
to leave St. Marks. But I am
thankful that I can get to the
Post Office and Ms. Joy's. I am
praying for a miracle, but I get
miracles every day of my life
and you do too if you stop
and look for them.
On our prayer list please
remember to pray for each
other, Ms. Joy and her family,
Brad's father, Lloyd Wright,
Nettie, Junior and Gordon
Strickland, Jerelen Howard,
Jim and Betty Ward, Eddie
Ward, Betty Smith, Melissa
Knight and everyone not
named here. Pray for our
soldiers overseas and their
families, our Vietnam vets
and their families, pray for
our town, our country and
pray for peace.
Please act like you have
good sense on New Year's Eve
and get a designated driver.
Now I want to wish these
special people happy birth-
day: my granddaughter, Me-
lodee's little girl Lauren, who
will turn 19 on Jan. 1, Ms.
Jewel Franklin on Jan. 2, Lane
Lynn and Sharon Blair on
Jan. 6 and happy birthday to
everyone of you who are not
on our list.
Thought for this week: No
matter what anyone tells you,
do not put Preparation H on
your face! It does not get rid
of wrinkles!
Y'all have a safe and Happy
New Year. If you have news,
get it to me, you know how.


Nichols daughter is born


Alexis C. Nichols
Bob and Angie Nichols
of Sopchoppy announce the
birth of their daughter, Alex-
is Cheyenne Nichols, on Dec.
22 at Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital. She weighed 7.1
pounds and measured 19 1/2
inches in length.


Maternal grandparents
are Rose and Todd Crane
of Crawfordville. Paternal
grandparents are Bob and
Tammy Nichols and Nancy
Turner, all of Sopchoppy.
Maternal great-grandpar-
ents are Olivia McAlpin
of Crawfordville and the


late Merl McAlpin. Paternal
great-grandparents are Irene
Nichols of Sopchoppy and
the late Alex Nichols.
Alexis joins two brothers,
Brandon Nichols, age 15, and
Bryan Nichols, age 14, both
of Sopchoppy.


Blue crab closure is announced


The harvest of blue crabs
from traps will not be allowed
from Jan. 5 through Jan. 14 in
all waters of Franklin County
west to the Florida-Alabama
border, except all waters
of the Ochlockonee River
and Ochlockonee Bay. This
closure will give authorized
groups the opportunity to


identify and retrieve lost and
abandoned blue crab traps
from the coastal and inland
waters in this area.
All commercial and rec-
reational blue crab traps
within three nautical miles
from shore and in the inland
waters of Franklin County
west to the Florida-Alabama


border, except all waters of
the Ochlockonee River and
Ochlockonee Bay, must be
removed before the start of
the 10-day cosed period.
Continued on Page 10A


Deborah Moore and Judge James C. Hankinson


The Second Judicial Circuit
Guardian Ad Litem Program
held its graduation recently
for the latest training class of
volunteers. Honorable Judge
James C. Hankinson attended
the event and congratulated
the guardians on their com-
mitment to Florida's abused


and neglected children.
Twenty-five guardians
were certified after complet-
ing 30-hours of training
to prepare each of them
to be the child's voice in
court. Commenting on the
occasion, Judge Hankinson
stated, "The judges of this


circuit appreciate the great
work done by the Guardian
ad Litem volunteers."
A Guardian ad Litem vol-
unteer is appointed by the
court to advocate for the
best interest of children in-
volved in dependency court
proceedings. The average
time commitment is ap-
proximately six to 10 hours
a month.
"The volunteer along with
our program attorney and
volunteer supervisor make
up a strong advocacy team"
said Deborah Moore, Cir-
cuit Director of the Second
Judicial Circuit, "We are so
excited to have 25 new team
members!"
The Guardian Ad Litem
Program provides volunteer
training every other month
in Tallahassee. The next
training begins in January.
Please visit www.guardi-
anadlitem2.org or call (850)
606-1200 for more informa-
tion about the program and
how to become a volunteer.


Humor is important in life


BUCKHORN
By Ethel Skipper


Happy New Yearl
Now that we are entering
the New Year, there are many
good things that await each
one of us.
When was the last time
you made someone happy?
When was the last time
you made someone laugh?
Different things are funny
to different people. When
was the last time you made
someone laugh out loud?
That ability is built into
everyone of us, just in dif-
ferent ways.
Have you ever challenged
yourself to make even the
most sour person grunt out


a small chuckle or at least
turn up the corners of their
mouth? It is a great day to
laugh.
In the world we live in
today, let us rejoice and be
glad in it, because it is the
day the Lord has made.
In the New Year we won't
let go of God. Let us love
each another. Let us fix our
eyes on Jesus. Let your con-
versation always be full of
grace. Commit to the Lord
whatever you do and your
plans will succeed.
Skipper Temple Church
of Christ will host a Watch
Night Service on Thursday,
Dec. 31 at 10 p.m. We wel-
come you to come and praise
the Lord with us. There will
be singing, preaching, prais-
ing the Lord and a shouting


good time. Let us usher in
the New Year with Christ to-
gether. Everyone is welcome
to attend.
On Sunday, Jan. 3, a fel-
lowship service will be held
at 11:30 a.m. Sunday school
will be held at 10:30 a.m.
Our prayers and concerns
go out to all of the sick and
shut-in, those in hospitals
and nursing homes, the pris-
ons and everyone in need of
prayer. Let us pray for each
other.
Happy belated birthday
greetings to Kevin Hines. He
celebrated on Dec. 27. Best
wishes from your family.
Woodville Church of
Christ invites everyone to
Watch Night Services. The
host pastor will be Elder
Andrew Morris.


Riversprings to host tourney


The Riversprings Mid-
dle School wrestling team
will host the Fifth Annual
Bearclaw Classic on Jan.
9 at Riversprings. The ap-
proximate start time is 10
a.m. Spectators are invited
to come and support local
middle school wrestling at
its finest.
Thank you again to the
following sponsors for your
continued support of RMS
wrestling and the Bearclaw


Classic: Crum's Mini Mall,
Iron Images, Florida Tees,
Parmer Fencing, LLC, High
Quality Heating & Air, El
Jalisco's #3, Victor's Ameri-
can Grill, Beef O' Brady's,
Black Gold Dog Food, Harper
Revell Heating & Air, Inc. 877-
1306, Aubrey's Pest Control,
Strategic Wealth Alliance,
LLC, Bobby and Jimmy Dan-
iels, TCB Marketing, LLC,
Five Star Plumbing Big Bend
Inc., Airgas and James A. Ste-


phens and Associates, PA.
The team is still seeking
sponsorships to help put
on the very best tourna-
ment possible. If you are
interested in participating
or sponsoring please con-
tact Shannon Smith (RMS
wrestling coach) at smiths@
wakulla.kl2.fl.us or 528-1038
or Colleen Davis at davis@
magnet.fsu.edu (RMS wres-
tling secretary).


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 31, 2009 Page 9A









Court Shorts


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
A 48-year-old Crawfordville
man, Carlton Ray Willis, was
sentenced to serve two years in
the Wakulla County Jail and 20
years of sex offender probation
as part of a plea deal on posses-
sion of child pornography and
cultivation of cannabis.
Attorney John Kenny, who
represented Willis, negotiated
a plea structured so that Willis
could serve two one-year terms
in the jail, rather than going to
state prison.
Willis entered a plea in Au-
gust to charges of cultivation of
cannabis, possession of more
than 20 grams of cannabis and
a misdemeanor charge of pos-
session of drug paraphernalia;
he also had a case that included
36 counts of possession of child
porn and one count of child
abuse.
Willis has been in jail since
July 2008, but as part of the sen-
tence agreed to give up credit for
the more than 500 days he has
been held.
Wakulla Circuit Judge N. Sand-
ers Sauls accepted the negoti-
ated sentence at a hearing on
Wednesday, Dec. 16.
Assistant State Attorney Sean
Desmond prosecuted the case.
A 29-year-old woman who
got in a fight at the health de-
partment was found guilty of
battery after a one-day trial last
week.
Vicki Champion was at the
health department clinic on


Aug. 25 and was irritated at the
time it was taking for her to be
called back, and she and a friend
were angry and cussing loudly.
A woman in the waiting room
asked the two to be quiet, and
Champion allegedly told the
woman off, including telling her
she wouldn't hit a person over 40
but she would call her mother
to come up there and fight her.
When another woman who
was sitting with her husband
and child went to the desk
to complain about Champion,
testimony indicated that she got
especially angry and knocked
chairs out of the way as she
charged at the woman who was
complaining.
The woman hit Champion and
the two got into a tussle, and
Champion's friend jumped in
to it, and the woman's husband
broke it up.
Champion had been released
from state prison on Nov. 1, 2008,
after serving a year and three
months on an aggravated assault
with a deadly weapon charge
from Leon County.
Champion was found guilty of
misdemeanor battery after the
trial on Tuesday, Dec. 15.
Wakulla County Judge Jill
Walker put off sentencing until
March, saying it appeared obvi-
ous Champion needed some
counseling to deal with issues,
Champion was represented
by attorney Andrew Beasley. The
case was prosecuted by Assistant
State Attorney Shepard Bruner,
A 23-year-old man who was


given a break for absconding
from his probation in the spring
was back before the court on a
new violation and was sentenced
to four years in prison.
Thomas Lindsey was on pro-
bation for a number of felonies,
including burglary, grand theft,
battery on an inmate in jail, and
some drug charges for which
he could have faced a maximum
of 40 years in prison. As part
of a plea deal, Lindsey admit-
ted to violating his probation
in exchange for a sentence of
49 months in state prison with
credit for 212 days served.
According to the affidavit
filed by Lindsey's probation of-
ficer, Lindsey got into an alterca-
tion with a neighbor in Franklin
County.
In April after a VOP hearing,
Judge Sauls found that Lindsey
had committed a substantial vio-
lation, but that it was not willful,
after he confronted an off-duty
deputy sheriff in a grocery store.
The deputy, a woman, had her
purse in the grocery cart with a
pistol inside and Lindsey came
up and pushed the cart away. She
ordered him to bring it back, and
he made a comment he said he
intended it to be funny that she
wasn't so tough when she wasn't
dressed in green.
Knowing he was on probation
and expecting to be violated, he
then did not report to his proba-
tion officer and was later found
at his girlfriend's apartment
in Tallahassee, hiding under a
bed.


Lindsey acknowledged hav-
ing some psychiatric problems
- he told the court in April that
he had been diagnosed as bi-
polar but could not afford the
medication.
In the Franklin County inci-
dent, according to the affidavit,
Lindsey was on the neighbor's
property and the neighbor told
him to leave. Lindsey then made
an aggressive move towards the
man, threatening to fight him.
Lindsey and his girlfriend
recently had a child.
A 41-year-old woman charged
with eight counts of grand theft
and eight counts of criminal
use of personal identification,
pleaded no contest and was
sentenced to two years in state
prison, followed by three years
of probation.
Jessica Wade could have faced
a maximum of 80 years in prison
on the charges. She appeared in
court on Tuesday, Dec. 15, before
Judge Sauls.
As part of the plea deal, once
she is released from prison Wade
agreed to pay $4,300 in restitu-
tion to Zurich Insurance during
her term of probation making
payments of $200 a month.
Wade was employed at Jack-
son Hewitt Tax office in Craw-
fordville, where she had worked
for four tax seasons. On April
14, the manager of the office
reported stimulus checks belong-
ing to clients were missing and
had been cashed, apparently by
Wade.
Wade was represented by


Assistant Public Defender Matt
Ream. Assistant State Attorney
Jason Osteen prosecuted the
case.
Wakulla Bank filed several
contract indebtedness lawsuits
right before Christmas on some
line of credit loans, including a
Gadsden County business known
as One New Orleans Place and
partners Gerald Thompson and
Greg Suber for $3.687 million.
That business received a $1
million loan in 2004, renegoti-
ated for $4.2 million in 2005,
but which the bank claims the
partners defaulted on in Sep-
tember.
The lawsuit was filed in
Wakulla Circuit Court on Dec.
22.
The bank also filed an indebt-
edness lawsuit against seven
partners involved in Florida
Plant Specialists LLC, a plant
nursery located on Commerce
Boulevard near the Wakulla Cor-
rectional Institution.
The partners in that case have
reportedly defaulted on three
promissory notes, one with a
balance of $150,000, another
for $416,000, and the other for
$122,000.
The partners are Armand
Cognetta, Richard Lazzarini, Jr.,
Bernard Chodyla, Edward Fenzl,
Michael Fernandez, Edward Fox
and Royal Heins.
As personal guarantors of
the loan, the bank's complaint
claims each of the partners owes
$81,375 to cover the notes.


Sheriff's Report

Wakulla County Sheriff's total value of the stolen valued at $100. Lt. Jimmy D. Tillman of Crawfordville


Office officials are investi-
gating a vehicle burglary
and grand theft reported
Dec. 26 by two 17-year-old
juveniles from Sopchoppy,
according to Sheriff David
Harvey.
The victims told inves-
tigators that they were at-
tending a party in Sopchop-
py and left their purses in
the unlocked vehicle. The


property is $911 and sus-
pects have been identified.
Captain Steve Ganey inves-
tigated.
In other activity report-
ed by the Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office during the
past week:
On Dec. 27, Anthony T.
O'Buck of Crawfordville re-
ported the theft of a bicycle
from his home. The bike is


Sessor investigated.
On Dec. 27, Rosalind
E. Thornburg of Panacea
reported the theft of a vehi-
cle. A relative borrowed the
victim's vehicle and failed
to return it. The vehicle was
entered into the NCIC/FCIC
computer. A suspect has
been identified. Deputy
Erika Fore investigated.
On Dec. 26, Marianna


reported the theft of a gift
card from her mail. The gift
card is valued at $150. A
neighbor reported receiving
open holiday cards as well
as the theft of her news-
paper. Deputy Erika Fore
investigated.
On Dec. 28, Robert L.
Adkins of Panacea reported
the theft of a trampoline.
The victim was in the pro-


cess of moving and left his
trampoline behind until
he could move into a new
residence. The property is
valued at $230. Deputy Na-
than Taylor investigated.
The sheriff's office
will be stepping up traffic
enforcement over the New
Year's Eve holiday period.
Both uniform patrol officers
and criminal investigations
officials will be looking for


parties involving underage
drinking over the holiday
weekend.
The Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office received
547 calls for service during
the past week. Note to our
readers: The people who are
reported as charged with
crimes in this column have
not yet been to trial and
are therefore innocent until
proven guilty.


Federal amberjack zone to reopen


The recreational harvest
of greater amberjack from
federal waters in the Gulf
of Mexico will reopen on
Jan. 1.
Federal waters extend
beyond nine nautical miles
from shore in the Gulf off
Florida.
The National Marine
Fisheries Service closed
the recreational harvest of
greater amberjack in these
waters on Oct. 24 because
an established annual rec-
reational harvest quota for


greater amberjack in the
Gulf had been met. Gulf
state waters (within nine
nautical miles from shore)
were not closed and remain
open to the recreational
harvest of greater amber-
jack.
Recreational anglers may
keep one greater amberjack
of at least 30 inches fork
length daily per person in
Gulf waters off Florida, and
the fish must be landed in
a whole condition. More
information is available at


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Thinking of Filing Bankruptcy?


Free Informational Seminar open to the public

Wednesday, January 13, 2010 at 7:00 p.m.

Main Conference Room Wakulla County Public Library

No pre-registration required

Presented by Deirdre A. Farrington, Esq.


Farrington Law Office

Deirdre A. Farrington, Esq. 68-B Feli Way Oust off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.)
Lic. FLA & VA Crawfordville, Florida 32327


Bankruptcy, Divorce,

Custody, Wills, Probate


(850) 926-2700 (850) 926-2741 Fax
E-mail: Farringtonlaw@embarqmail.com


LEGAL NOTICE

ROAD CLOSING

NOTICE IS GIVEN that a public hearing will be
held by the Wakulla County Board of County
Commissioners on Monday, February 1, 2010,
beginning at 5:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as
time permits in the County Commission
Chambers located west of the Courthouse at 29
Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 to
consider a request to close that portion of Hardee
Avenue that lies west of T Barwick Street and
east of RL Graham Street. Also, as shown on the
file in the office of the Planning and Community
Development Department, Wakulla County
Commissioner's Complex, 3093 Crawfordville
Highway and is further shown below.









-4











These administrative actions are in accordance with
the provisions of Section 336.10, Florida Statutes. If
any person desires to appeal any board or
commission, that person must insure that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made which includes all
testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based.
December 31, 2009


12-31.page9A.indd 1


12/29/09 4:36:54 PM











Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 31, 2009








Hope Santa Claus got you a rod and reel or tackle box


From The Dock
BY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL


It is hard to believe that
Christmas has come and
gone and in less than a week
it will be January 2010. Hope-
fully Santa brought you that
new rod and reel or tackle
box that you have been hint-
ing about for the last couple
of weeks and you'll get a
chance to use them in the
coming weeks.
I talked to the folks at
Shell Island Fish Camp and
they said not many folks have
been fishing and those who
have been fishing haven't


been doing very much.
Teresa at Jerry's Bait and
Tackle said they did have a
good weekend for business,
but she didn't hear of many
fish being caught. She did
say Eric Keyser, one of her
customers who fishes all the
trout tournaments, sent her
a picture of a trout he caught
on Saturday morning, but
she didn't know where the
trout were caught or with
what.
I did get one report and
that was from Brian Lowe


at the Moorings Marina
in Carrabelle. Brian, Larry
Rishell and Benson Green
went out the Tuesday before
Christmas on Brian's boat the
Lowe Pressure and fished
in 60 feet of water with cut
LY's. They limited out on gag
grouper consisting of two 8-
pound grouper, a 10, 12 and
14-pound fish and a monster
18-pound fish. That proves
they are out there but you've
got to go to catch them.
Alan Lamarche took his
son Danny and his family
offshore last Monday and
fished for black sea bass.
Danny said they were con-
stantly hooked up on fish
and they brought home 12
big sea bass for supper.
According to reports com-
ing out of Keaton Beach they
are still catching trout on
Mirrolures, live shrimp and


the Gulp. Most are being
caught in very shallow water
later in the day as the water
warms up.
I called to talk to J.R. at the
Aucilla but he wasn't in. He
was probably in the woods
hunting or in his airboat
looking for mullet. The girl at
the store said several people
she talked to got their limits
and quite a few people had
gone over the weekend.
One of the most memo-
rable days I have ever had
fishing was on the Aucilla
River back in February 1995.
We had been having some
real cold weather and the
weekend was going to warm
up into the 60s.
I had been hearing some
really good reports from
the Aucilla so I went down
on Saturday by myself and
fished all day. I didn't catch


a single fish until about 20
minutes before I was getting
ready to leave. I caught real
nice trout in four consecu-
tive casts and because of the
falling tide and time of day
decided to call it quits. I
wasn't going to go on Sunday
but woke up with nothing
to do.
Gail was out of town on
business. The boat was still
hooked to the truck and the
temperature was supposed
to be around 65. I launched
the boat about 8:30 and went
right back to the spot I had
caught those fish the night
before and I anchored the
boat. I immediately started
catching fish and it was on
every cast. Across the river I
noticed Dr. Galt Allee and a
couple of other anglers and
the only thing Dr. Allee fish-
es with is a fly rod. It seemed


like every time I looked over
their way one of them had
a fish on. After a while I
started counting the fish. I
was counting and at about
4:30 when I quit fishing I had
caught and released more
than 150 trout and redfish.
All of the trout were legal
but all the reds were from 16
to 18 inches and everything
was caught on a yellow/red
Greedy Gut lure and /4 ounce
red headed jig. I never moved
from that spot and the fish
bit all the way through the
falling tide, slack tide and
into the rising tide. That's a
day I will always remember
as if it were yesterday.
Remember to leave that
float plan with someone and
know your limits.
Good luck and good fish-
ingl Have a Safe and Happy
New Year.


School lunch menu


Continued from Page 7A
Jan. 8 Macaroni, Ham and
Cheese Casserole, Tossed
Garden Salad, Saltine Crack-
ers, Apricots, Milk. Jan. 11
Sloppy Joe on Bun, Whole
Kernel Corn, Orange Wedg-
es, Milk. Jan. 12 Chicken
and Rice, Sweet Green Peas,
Fluffy Biscuit, Apple, Milk.
Jan. 13 Corndog, Potato
Wedge, Apricot Cup, Milk.
Jan. 14 Spaghetti with Meat
Sauce, Steamed Broccoli,
Yeast Roll, Banana, Milk. Jan.
15 Chicken Patty on Bun,
Seasoned Green Beans, Fruit
Cup, Milk.


Jan. 18 Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr. Holiday. Jan. 19 Hot
Ham and Cheese on Bun,
Breaded Okra, Apple Wedg-
es, Milk. Jan. 20 Oven Fried
Chicken, Mixed Vegetables,
Fluffy Biscuit, Blueberries,
Milk. Jan. 21 Chili Con Came,
Saltine Crackers, Cinnamon
Roll, Orange Wedges, Milk.
Jan. 22 Turkey and Noodles,
Tossed Garden Salad, Corn-
bread, Apricots, Milk. Jan. 25
Pizza, Whole Kernel Corn,
Applesauce, Milk.
Jan. 26 Chicken and Rice,
Seasoned Turnips, Corn-
bread, Orange Wedges,


Blue crab closure


Continued from Page SA
The harvest of blue crabs
by other gear, such as dip
nets and fold-up traps, will
still be permitted during the
10-day closure. Blue crab har-
vesters also may use standard
blue crab traps if the traps are
attached to private property.
The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commis-
sion (FWC) has cited lost and
abandoned blue crab traps
as a problem in the blue


crab fishery because they
can continue to trap crabs
and fish when they are not
maintained. They also can
be unsightly in the marine
environment, damage sensi-
tive habitats and pose navi-
gational hazards to boaters
on the water.
Lost and abandoned
traps cannot easily be dis-
tinguished from legal traps
so they often remain in the
water indefinitely. The 10-day


Milk. Jan. 27 Spaghetti with
Meat Sauce, Steamed Broc-
coli, Yeast Roll, Banana, Milk.
Jan. 28 Chicken Nuggets,
Sweet Peas, Fluffy Biscuit,
Strawberry Cup, Milk. Jan.
29 Diced Ham and Cheese
Wrap, Tossed Garden Salad,
Fruit Cup, Milk.

Make Smart
Calorie Choices
USDA's MyPyramid recom-
mends three cups of fat-free
or lowfat milk or equivalents
like yogurt and cheese daily
for most people from the
milk group. Milk, cheese and



closure will enable FWC-
authorized groups to collect
lost and abandoned blue crab
traps that remain in the water
during the closed period.
Six regional 10-day blue
crab trap closures take place
in Florida at different times
during the year. More infor-
mation regarding the FWC's
trap retrieval program, blue
crab trap closure dates,
regulations, and how you
can participate in cleanup


WHS players prepare for game


Wakulla High School
senior football players
have been invited to play
in the Florida/Georgia
Border War All Star Foot-
ball Game.


We Buy Estate Guns
www.ronsgun .com
Open Mon.- Fri. 9:00am 5:30pm
Wide Variety Located at St. Marks Marine
'Ammo in Stock 483 Port Leon Dr., St. Marks I Many Accessories


Five members of the
senior class have been
invited to participate in-
cluding: Tyler Schmidt,
Antonio Kilpatrick, Loren-
zo Randolph, E. J. Forbes


and John Cooper.
The All Star game will
be Jan. 9 in Thomasville,
Ga.


William H Webster
Attorney At Law
*Former Assistant State Attorney
*Former Assistant Public Defender
*Value Adjustment Board Special Magistrate


- Family Law
- Dependency


- Probate
- Civil Litigation


yogurt provide nine essential
nutrients such as calcium,
potassium, vitamin D, and
protein. Try these tips to get
the most nutrition for the
fewest calories from Milk
Group Foods.
Choose fat-free or low-
fat milk, yogurt and cheese.
If your family usually
drinks whole milk, try step-
ping down to reduced-fat
(two percent), then lowfat
(one percent) and finally fat-
free milk.
Stock a few cans of
evaporated fat-free milk to
use in coffee and to replace



events is available online at
Traps http://www.myfwc.
com/RULESANDREGS/Salt-
waterTraps_index.htm. You
also can contact FWC's trap
retrieval coordinator, Kyle
Miller, at 487-0554.


I
r
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I


cream in recipes.
For a sweet treat, try


"light" ice cream or frozen
yogurt.


Has gambling caused you


problems this

N


past year?


^
^ \^a


m, u


JANUARY 2010


'7Zew


I'I


Subscribe Now


<10 Months for










New Subscribers Only!

r-------------------------------------


Mail or bring coupon with payment to TCi~ Wakuila ~etu~s
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., P.O. Box 307 Crawfordville, FL 32327
NAME

ADDRESS

CITY ZIP

PHONE [ NEW NEW SUBSCRIBERS
ONLY!
Offer good for Wakulla County subscribers only.
All major credit cards accepted. Offer expires 1/31/2010


-I ----------- ---------------


12-31.page10A.indd 1


- Real Property

926-2561
whwebster@embarqmail.com
4395 Crawfordville Hwy. South of Crawfordville Member of FL. B, 34 years
"The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements.
Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written information
about his or her qualifications and experience."


m


1


12/29/09 4:38:56 PM










THE WAKULLA NEWS, TI


t b to


S"Copyrighted Material -


.. ..* Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers"



I


4


, Boating Emergencies
Coast Guard Station
Panama City ...................... ..... ................ (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown ....................... ..... ................ (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
St. M arks (Flotilla 12) .......................................... (850) 906-0540
or ............................................. ...... 893-5137
Shell Point (Flotilla 13). .. (850) 926-2606
or .. 926-5654


Coast Guard

Auxiliary Reports
By Sherrie Alverson


It is the time to take one last
look at 2009. For Flotilla 12 at
St. Marks it was an outstand-
ing year.
Their dynamic recruiting
program brought in 10 new
members. They also found a
comfortable meeting place in
Crawfordville. For Flotilla 13 at
Shell Point the year continued
to bring "challenges." Trying
to run safety patrols without
a marina has been difficult to
say the least
There are very few boats
going out of Shell Point. At-
tempting to have "Ramp Days"
to offer free safety checks of
recreational boats without
either boats or ramp is not
productive.
January: At Flotilla 12's meet-
ing there were many awards
presented to their members.
Plans for the upcoming year
were discussed and as Carolyn
Treadon, their reporter, pre-
dicted it would be a busy year,
and it was.
It was a quiet, uneventful
month for Flotilla 13 at Shell
Point.
February: The highlight of
the District Conference in Fort
Walton Beach was the formal
and elegant wedding of the
Director of Auxiliary, Capt.
James Montgomery and Remi

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Navarro. For them to share
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lives with us was heartwarm-
ing. Capt Montgomery is not
only the director, but also our
friend.
March: When the Coast
Guard became a part of Home-
land Security, many changes
occurred. Often these changes
required additional training
for the Coast Guard family. In
addition to gearing up for this
training, Flotilla 12 manned
safe boating booths at both the
North Florida Boat Show at the
Leon County Fairgrounds and at
Springtime Tallahassee.
April First weekend of April
is considered the "official"
opening of the boating season
in our area with both Flotillas
running routine and Red Tide
sampling patrols. Flotilla 12
members participated in the
dedication ceremonies for the
newly reconstructed St. George
Lighthouse. It had collapsed
in 2005. CWO4 Chuck Bush,
Officer in Charge, Coast Guard
Station Panama City, conducted
a joint training session at the
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las 12 and 13. His briefing of
changes in operations was
comprehensive and very infor-
mative.
May: For National Safe Boat-
ing Week (May 18 to May 22),
Flotilla 12 was instrumental in
having a proclamation signed
at the Wakulla County Com-
mission meeting. Members
of both flotillas attended the
ceremony.
June: Flotilla 13 presented
another Boat Smart course to
area Boy Scout troops. Flotilla 12
members attended CPR classes
presented bythe Wakulla Coun-
ty Sheriff's Office.
The highlight of the Division
1 Meeting in Milton, hosted by
newest Flotilla 18, was a training
session on boaters fire safety.
After the classroom portion the
students moved outside where
they participated in the actual
use of fire extinguishers. Coast
Guard Auxiliary celebrated its
70th Anniversary on June 23,
2009. All in all, it was a very
busy productive month. On
negative side, another hoax
Mayday call resulted in wasted
time for Flotilla 13 volunteers,
but worse, wasted time and
money for local rescue units.
July: For Flotilla 13 the Fourth
was packed with fundraising
activities. A pancake breakfast
was held along with the first
Patriotic Golf Cart Parade, an
ice cream social and parade
awards ceremonies. Remainder
of month rocked along with pa-
trols, public education courses
and member training classes.
August: The month began
for Flotilla 13 with news that
a boat from Shell Point Village
had been stolen and was later
capsized off Shell Point. Wheth-
er there were people on board


at the time was not known for
awhile. At Flotilla 12's meeting,
Fran Councill, Wakulla County
EMS, presented the flotilla with
an AED (Automated External
Defibrillator) to be used when
out on the water.
September: It was an ex-
tremely busy month for Flotilla
12. Besides their patrols, there
were various boating safely
courses presented, vessel ex-
aminations and inspection of
ATONs (Aids to Navigation
- buoys, lights, day markers,
etc.)
October: Division 1 Meeting
at Panama City Beach Oct. 17
and Oct. 18 was packed with
training sessions in all phases
of Auxiliary. Officers elected for
2010 Flotilla 12-David Guttman,
re-elected Commander; Bob Asz-
talos elected Vice Commander;
Flotilla 13-Bob Morgan, elected
Commander and John Sykes re-
elected Vice Commander.
For Flotilla 12, the month
ended with coordinating the
impressive flyover of two heli-
copters from Air Station Mobile
before the FSU Homecoming
game.
November: Both flotillas
staffed an educational booth
at the North Florida Fair in
Tallahassee. The booth drew
an honorable mention for its
display. Month ended with
our local auxiliarists attending
a mandatory eight hour Team
Coordination Training (TCT)
session. Once again CWO4
Chuck Bush, OIC, Coast Station
Panama City, made the trip to
Tallahassee to be the Facilitator
(military title for super instruc-
tor.)
December: The first Sunday
in December is always the Di-
vision 1 Change of Watch held
traditionally at St. Andrews Bay


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Homeschoolers visit

local fire department


\ 4 # 4


Front from left, Erin and Jonah. Back from left,
Adriana, Rafel, Della, Christa, Brayden and Taylor.


On Dec. 23, a group of
homeschoolers visited the
fire station in Crawford-
ville They learned about the
work firefighters do, what
to do in a fire emergency


and how to prevent a fire.
The students thanked Don
Burton and Andy Bowman
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them. Submitted by Adriana
Fortier, age 8.


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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 31, 2009


RMS students will travel to Washington, D.C.


In April 2010,35 Riversprings Mid-
dle School students will experience
history first-hand when they make
the second annual trip to Washing-
ton D.C. They will spend four days
of their spring break exploring our
nation's monuments and museums
to learn about American history in a
way no textbook could capture.
The students will fly to D.C. ac-
companied by eighth grade teachers
Brian Dow and John Kane.
While there, they will visit the
Air and Space, Natural History,
and American History Smithson-
ian museums; travel to the top of
the Washington Monument for a


birds-eye view of the city; tour the
Capitol building; see pandas at the
National Zoo; learn about sacrifice at
the Vietnam, Korean, and WWII me-
morials; reflect on the achievements
of great Americans at the Jefferson,
Lincoln, and FDR memorials; and
much more.
This year, the students will also
have the very special honor of laying
a wreath at the Tomb of the Un-
known Soldier in Arlington National
Cemetery,
"This promises to be a very mov-
ing experience and the highlight of
our trip," said teacher Brian Dow.
"I was amazed at the impact it had


on the students. They were very
excited to be in Washington, D.C.
and had a great appreciation for the
importance of what they were see-
ing and experiencing. While waiting
in line at Mt. Vernon, I was pleased
to overhear a student saying 'Wow,
George Washington actually walked
right here where we are standing'
I was particularly struck that many
of them found Arlington National
Cemetery to be their favorite part of
the trip. While Arlington is a deeply
moving place for me, I was a little
surprised that eighth graders would
fully understand the significance of
that hallowed ground. Not only were


the students learning, I felt like I was
watching them grow and mature
before my eyes."
During these tough economic
times, the students are working
very hard to raise the money neces-
sary to go on this amazing trip. This
year, Dow has decided to challenge
himself to help them in their fund-
raising efforts.
He will be lacing up his running
shoes and participating in the Tal-
lahassee Marathon on Feb. 7. The
race is 26.2 miles starting at FSU
and traveling down and back the St.
Marks Trail.
He is asking that supporters spon-


sor his efforts with all donations
going directly to the students' trip.
For more information or to make a
donation to support the students,
you may contact Brian Dow at Riv-
ersprings at 926-2300 or by e-mail at
dowb@wakulla.kl2.fl.us.
Donations must be submitted by
Jan. 15 to ensure they can be credited
to the students before their payment
deadline.
You may also donate online
through Jan. 1 at http://www.givefor-
ward.org/WakullaWashingtonDC.
The RMS trip to Washington, D.C.
will take place during Spring Break.


School board must decide about federal funds


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
The Wakulla County
School Board is considering
approving federal stimulus
funds that could create a
new merit pay program for
Wakulla County teachers.
But administrators and
board members are skeptical
of the recognition program
and are unsure how it will be
implemented fairly.
On Monday, Dec. 14, the
board went into a private ex-
ecutive session and returned
to open session to approve
the chairman of the board


signing a Memorandum of authorize School Board Chair without accepting the perfor-


Understanding for "Race to
the Top" funds.
Assistant Superintendent
for Finance Jimmie Dugger
said he reviewed the Race
for the Top paperwork and
became concerned about how
the district will be able to
judge which teachers receive
federal merit pay.
Dugger said the adminis-
tration has planned two con-
ference calls, one held Thurs-
day, Dec. 17 and another on
Tuesday, Jan. 5, to get answers
to all of their concerns.
Board members voted to


Becky Cook to sign the Mem-
orandum of Understanding
on Dec. 14 because the district
must return the agreement by
Jan. 12. The school board does
not meet again until Jan. 19.
Dugger added that he will
be discussing the issue with
members of the Wakulla
Classroom Teachers Associa-
tion (WCTA) as well.
There are additional fed-
eral stimulus dollars available
for other district programs,
but the district will have to
determine if it qualifies for
the grant stimulus money


mance pay money.
Dugger added that the
district has reservations about
the federal program. "We are
keeping our options open,"
he said.
In other matters in front
of the Wakulla County School
Board on Monday, Dec. 14:
The board approved a
field trip for Jamonique Holt's
Spanish 3 and 4 students to
Cuernavaca, Mexico from Jan.
22 to Feb. 5. Eight students
will leave the country and
Mexican students will come
to Wakulla County as part of


the same program in April.
The board approved an
agreement with Gulf Coast
Community College for an
Educator Preparation Institute
in Bay County. The program
provides a modified intern-
ship for educators.
An agreement was
signed with Big Brothers/Big
Sisters to match students to
the organization.
A surplus property
sale concluded with the dis-
trict selling $2,003 worth of
property to bidders in the
county.
An agreement was signed


between Capital Regional
Medical Center and the WHS
Medical Academy to provide
drug screening and finger
printing for students who are
part of hospital internships.
A $4,691 Carl Perkins
Vocational and Technical
Education Secondary Grant
was approved to assist the
WHS business education
program.
Wakulla County school
students will return to the
classroom on Tuesday, Jan.
5 following a teacher evalua-
tion day on Monday, Jan. 4.


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Section B


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 31, 2009


By KEITH BLACKMAR -
kblackmar~thewakullanews.net -


JANUARY
The Wakulla County Com-
mission took input from
the public over the merits
of impact fees. The board
members were considering
repealing the action of the
former county commission
which put a moratorium
on the collection of impact
fees.
State statistics revealed
that Wakulla High School
graduates performed well in
college when compared to
former seniors throughout
the State of Florida.
A total of 86.3 percent of
WHS graduates enrolled in
college in 2007 received at
least a 2.0 grade point aver-
age. The state average was
75.7 percent.
A migration of whoop-
ing cranes from Wisconsin
were planning on wintering
on two national refuges in
Florida including St. Marks
Refuge. Early in the month
the cranes stopped in Ten-
nessee and Alabama on
their way to St. Marks.
The new year brought
Wakulla County a new su-
pervisor of elections as
Buddy Wells replaced the
retiring Sherida Crum.
Wells was sworn in by
Judge Jill Walker and Sheriff
David Harvey was sworn in
by Judge N. Sanders Sauls.
Teenager Brandon Maloy
made it to the top of the
scouting mountain by earn-
ing an Eagle Scout rank. He
completed a school project
for the Wakulla Education
Center by painting and mak-
ing shelving.
Homeowners were not
the only individuals feeling
the pinch of mortgages as
several county subdivisions
were facing foreclosures as
banks called in financing.
Loans were called for more
than $500,000 to $900,000 in
some cases.
Manatees continued to
visit and stay at Wakulla
Springs State Park rather
than swimming back to


warmer waters in Central
Florida. Families and park
officials have kept a close
watch on the sea cows while
they have played in the
spring swimming area.
School district officials
braced for more bad bud-
get news as state officials
predicted more education
cuts in 2009 on top of bud-
get slices already made in
2008.
Another county commis-
sion workshop on impact
fees was held, but board
members failed to take any
action to restore the fees
that were suspended prior to
the old county commission's
departure from office in No-
vember 2008.
Longtime volunteer fire-
fighter Richard Rhea died
in the line of duty while
responding to a traffic ac-
cident call.
Rhea was electrocuted
when he touched a live elec-
trical line that had been dis-
turbed by the car accident.
Wakulla Fire Chief Jason
Honeybone was terminated
from his job after failing a
drug test, according to coun-
ty officials. Honeybone was
replaced by Scott McDermid
who became Director of Pub-
lic Safety over EMS and the
Fire Department.
Judge Jill Walker ordered
Wallace and Kathy Bailey


Eight Wakulla County educators were nominated for Teacher of the Year.


to reduce the number of
dogs at their "puppy mill"
on Lower Bridge Road. The
couple was required to cut
the number of animals from
160 to 50.
Several Wakulla County
residents traveled to Wash-
ington, D.C. to attend the
inauguration ceremonies
of President Barack Obama.
Some individuals went for
the joy of attending the his-
toric event while some law
enforcement officials were
part of a Florida security de-
tail required of every state.
Shoppers at Winn-Dixie
remembered their "helper"
after the death of Harley
Gilbert in January. Gilbert
was an unpaid "helper" at
the grocery store. A black
wreath was placed on the
bench where he sat at the
grocery store.


FEBRUARY
Lawyers taking part in
the MSBU lawsuit settle-
ment were in court again
in February as Judge N.
Sanders Sauls had ques-
tions about the residential
mailing to property owners
and the fees charged by the
attorneys.


The MSBU case has been
in the circuit court and the
appellate court before being
returned to circuit court a
second time.
Legal fees in the case
topped $335,000 for the law-
yers in the case and another
$200,000 went to the Ron
Mowrey law firm that repre-
senting Wakulla County.
Wakulla High School
joined Lincoln, Leon and
Chiles to form the new
Class 4A football district
in Fall 2009. The change
in district moved Wakulla
away from Godby, Rickards
and Madison County which
formed the Class 3A district
in the area.
The 2009 Teacher of the
Year was named and judges
selected Angie Gentry from
Wakulla Middle School to
represent the county at the
state competition.
A 25-year-old Crawford-
ville man died in a single-
wide mobile home fire on
Feb. 8.
Anthony Jerome Bradwell
was found dead on his
couch as firefighters battled
the blaze.
Florida Highway Patrol
Trooper Charlie Odom was
charged with sexual battery
for allegedly taking pictures
of a female victim's breasts
following a traffic stop. FHP
officials fired Odom from


his post.
State officials aired plans
to expand the St. Marks Rail-
Trail which included repav-
ing of the trail and potential
widening.
County commissioners
instructed staff to call in a
letter of credit on the Flow-
ers subdivision to pay for
the sewer expansion.
The $650,000 letter of
credit at Tallahassee State
Bank was to cover the unfin-
ished improvements to the
Flowers subdivision started
three years ago.
Ochlockonee River State
Park and St. Marks National
Wildlife Refuge celebrated
the outdoors. The state park
held a three-day Stone Age
Festival and the refuge held
a Wildlife Heritage and Out-
doors Festival.
Wakulla County Commis-
sioners promised to revisit
the impact fee issue in the
fall in an effort to create
amended fees. The 2008
board put a moratorium on
collecting impact fees in an
effort to help the economy
in the county. The fees will
be changed slightly from the
method they were charged
prior to the moratorium.
Paving projects in Pana-
cea were completed on Fish-


ing Fool Street, Tower Road
and Chattahoochee Street.
The projects were part of the
county paving program.
Wakulla County officials
joined elected officials in
Leon, Jefferson and Gads-
den counties to be part of a
stimulus package from the
federal government.
The county officials hope
the regional spending plan
will assist the four coun-
ties receive federal dollars.
Wakulla County's part of
the $1.1 billion request is
$42 million.
County officials con-
tinued to prepare for the
upcoming budget year by
acknowledging that the
2009-2010 budget year will
be lean with less revenue
coming in.
The Rotary Club of Wakul-
la County celebrated Valen-
tine's Day with a parade
and other event at Hudson
Park. Mother Nature spent
some time raining on their
parade.
St. Marks City Com-
missioners were unhappy
with the stimulus proposal
because the city was not
included in the planning
process. There are no city
projects for Sopchoppy or
St. Marks included in the
federal request plan.
Wakulla Superintendent
of Schools David Miller an-


nounced that the district
may be forced to cut salaries
and jobs if state budget cuts
are as deep as anticipated.
A total of 80 percent of the
budget is spent on salaries,
he said.
Commissioner Howard
Kessler asked the Florida
Department of Law Enforce-
ment (FDLE) to investigate
a traffic accident involving
Sheriff David Harvey. Harvey
was involved in a minor traf-
fic accident on Rehwinkel
Road on his way home on
Feb. 20. Nobody was injured
in the fender-bender.
County commissioners
approved an operational au-
dit for county departments.
However, the board did not
determine who would pay
for the audit.
The 43rd Wakulla County
Swine Show was a success
as Tanner Gainer and his
hog were selected as Grand
Champion.
The St. Marks National
Wildlife Refuge Photo Con-
test, sponsored by the photo
club, was held in December
and winners were selected
in January. The Best of Show
adult winner was Judy Lyle
and the youth winner was
Diana Robertson.



MARCH
Medart Elementary
School was locked down
as sheriff's office deputies
searched for a suspect who
was reported to have been
involved in an armed rob-
bery in Medart.
The suspect was caught
near the school property and
arrested before entering the
property. Law enforcement
officials did not recover the
alleged weapon and believe
the case was a "drug buy
gone bad."
Wakulla County legisla-
tors Rep. Leonard Bembry,
Rep. Marti Coley and Sena-
tor Al Lawson listened to the
concerns of area residents
and public officials during
the annual legislative del-
egation meeting. As always,
the discussion centered on
state funding and potential
revenue cuts.
A two-day workshop was
held to discuss the Wakulla
Springs Basin in Wakulla
and Leon counties. Public
officials from Wakulla and
Leon attended the event
which resulted in a signed


Obama Inauguration was well attended by residents.


agreement to protect the
Springs.
County commissioners
discussed the role of the
Tourist Development Coun-
cil and the contract of Ex-
ecutive Director Pam Port-
wood. The goal of the TDC
is to bring more visitors to
Wakulla County.
A group of citizens pro-
tested the actions of Com-
missioner Howard Kessler
against Sheriff David Harvey
following the Harvey's car
accident on Feb. 20. The pro-
testers supported the sheriff
by wearing T-shirts that said,
"Harvey is My Sheriff."
They were responding
to Tallahassee media cover-
age of the event which was
spearheaded by Kessler.
Two individuals, includ-
ing a gunman, were arrested
two days after an armed rob-
bery at Murphy Oil in Craw-
fordville. Law enforcement
officials pieced together
evidence from the Sunday,
March 1 incident and con-
nected Daniel Brown, Jr., 20,
of Tallahassee and Jessica
Watson, 18, of Tallahassee
to the crime.
County commissioners
announced that they would
restart the impact fees again
in September.
Board members agreed
to scale down the fees from
what a consulting firm origi-
nally recommended.
County officials hope to
work with a private land-


owners at Shell Point to
create a public boat ramp in
the community. The Shell
Point boat ramp was closed
down by developer George
Heaton due to insurance li-
ability concerns.
The popular Wakulla Com-
munity Theatre performed
Hello, Dolly! in March at the
historic Sopchoppy Audito-
rium. Reba Mason was the
production director.
Florida Department of
Transportation officials
visited Crawfordville with
consultants designing the
proposed four laning of
Crawfordville Highway.
While the four laning
project will not be con-
structed for several years, a
resurfacing project on the
highway from Crawfordville
to the Leon County line will
be completed in 2011.
Construction of the new
Rock Land Dock was ap-
proved after Ben Withers,
Inc. was selected as the low
bidder. The drawings for
the dock call for a reduction
in height over the original
plans.
St. Marks City Commis-
sioners hope to purchase
riverfront property for a
common area to attract visi-
tors and business to the
coastal town.
The riverfront park would
replace the former Posey's
Oyster Bar.
Continued on Page 2B


Firefighter Richard Rhea died in line of duty in 2009.


Scott Varner, center, won a state championship in wrestling. He was joined by
his Coach John Wainwright and teammates in celebrating the state title.


It was the start of another term for Wakulla Constitutional Officers in 2009.











Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 31, 2009




2009 Year in Review


The late Houston Taff was honored by the FSU Baseball Program.


Visiting whooping cranes get ready for their return trip to Wisconsin.


Continued from Page 1B
Gulf State Community Bank
filed a lawsuit to foreclose
on the Best Western Hotel in
Medart. The owners failed to
pay on a loan since September
2008.
Sopchoppy City Commis-
sioners honored former Flor-
ida Gator Jim Tartt. Mayor
Bob Greener presented Tartt
with the Distinguished Citizen
award.
FSU announced that Coach
Bobby Bowden would play in
the Houston Taff Scholarship
Golf Tournament in April. FSU
Baseball Coach Mike Martin
accepted a $39,000 check from
the Taff family, Sheriff David
Harvey and the Wakulla Coun-
ty Seminole Boosters.
County Commissioner
Lynn Artz asked her fellow
board members to consider
alternatives to a $20 million
sewer project in the Wakulla
Gardens subdivision. She told
the board that commissioners
had not explored all of the
options.
Wakulla County Commis-
sioners debated the best way
to replace retiring County At-
torney Ron Mowrey at the end
of September. The board con-
sidered hiring a new county
attorney as well as replacing
Mowrey with an "in-house"
legal staff.
Major changes to the school
calendar were approved by the
Wakulla County School Board.
The state allowed the county
to begin the new school year
earlier than most other dis-
tricts since the district has high
performing schools.
Three county commission-
ers and two staff members
went to Washington, D.C. to
lobby federal officials about
stimulus money.
The third Green Living Expo
and Education Fair was held at
Riversprings Middle School as
visitors learned more about
methods to help protect the
environment and planet.
An additional $17,000 was
approved as a payment to
the county lobbyists. Gover-
nance Services represented
the county in front of the state
legislature and in Washington,
D.C.
Wakulla High School rolled
out a new spring production,
"It was a Dark and Stormy
Night." The play was a comedy
spoof of murder mysteries.
Susan Solburg is the drama
program director.


APRIL
Wakulla County Commis-
sioners held a "town hall"
meeting at Wakulla Springs
State Park to discuss visioning
and the direction of county
growth. The meeting was at-
tended by more county staff
members than members of
the public.
Two garbage companies
battled it out in court over the
leaking of customer informa-
tion from one outfit to the
other. Waste Pro was told by
Wakulla County Circuit Court
Judge N. Sanders Sauls not to
contact any of the Emerald
Waste Service customers for
six months.
A Wakulla County Jail visit
for a man meeting with his
wife turned into a high speed
car chase as the 26-year-old
man attempted to elude Dep-
uty Jeremy Johnston. The dep-
uty determined that the man,
Christopher Jones, did not
have a valid driver license and
had left a 15-month old baby
home along without supervi-
sion. The deputy conducted
the traffic stop to determine
why the driver had failed to
use a blinker or stop at a stop
sign near the sheriff's office.
Another property owner
filed a lawsuit against Shell
Point developer George Hea-
ton over coastal development.
Steven Sciarretta of Palm Beach
filed a lawsuit claiming he
purchased a lot at Shell Point
based on the assurance there
would be a marina, restaurant,
high-end homes and a tiki bar.
The development has been
slowed by a downturn in the
real estate market.
Wakulla Springs State Park
held the 2009 Wildlife Festival
which showcased not only
area wildlife, but the heritage
of the region as well.
Wakulla Circuit Court Judge
N. Sanders Sauls asked attor-
neys working on the special as-
sessment lawsuit to send out
another mailing to property
owners to determine which
individuals want to be part of
the MSBU lawsuit.
A 61-year-old Ochlockonee
Bay man was charged in a
molestation case where he
allegedly had lewd contact
with a 6-year-old female and a
12-year-old male victim. Robert
"Bob" Beaudet Talbot was held
in the Wakulla County Jail with
no bond after his arrest.
The 2009 delinquent tax
sale was an "online" affair
again in May as Tax Collector


Cheryll Olah conducted her
annual sale using the Internet.
The Internet sale eliminates
the need for Olah to conduct
the delinquent tax sale in
person.
The Wakulla County Com-
mission agreed to take over
the oversight of the recreation
board due to concerns over a
lack of financial documenta-
tion in the board's records.
The county's auditing firm
raised concerns over lack of
documentation.
Panacea resident Ronald
Fred Crum filed a complaint
against Commissioner Howard
Kessler claiming that work at
his home violated the wet-
lands ordinance.
Kessler asked the county
code enforcement office to
investigate whether Crum
had violated the wetlands
ordinance in December and
Crum received a cease and de-
sist order. Kessler said he was
responding to complaints from
citizens and was not acting
politically. He denied violat-
ing the wetlands ordinance at
his home.
The Ninth Annual Sopchop-
py Worm Gruntin' Festival
drew a large crowd to western
Wakulla County and drew
national television attention
from Katie Couric. The festival
featured a worming eating
contest which drew a number
of hungry visitors munching
on the invertebrates.
County commissioners
plan to seek land to create a
boat ramp on the upper sec-
tion of the Wakulla River near
the Wakulla Springs State Park
property.
Ameris Bank moved for-
ward with plans to develop
Magnolia Park after acquir-
ing the subdivision through
an auction. The project was
developed in the early stages
by Thomas Ertl of Ertl Custom
Homes.
Law enforcement officials
from the sheriff's office and
Wakulla Correctional Institu-
tion took part in the annual
Special Olympics torch run.
Runners put on their shoes
and scrambled from the sher-
iff's office to the courthouse.
Consultants for the Capital
Region Transportation Plan-
ning Agency (CRTPA) were in
Wakulla County in April as the
agency attempted to gather
input from the community on
what Wakulla County's long
term transportation needs are.
The turnout was small, but
issues included safer bicycle


routes, four laning of U.S. High-
way 319 and turning lanes on
the major highways.
St. Marks City Commission-
ers pondered the future of
Posey's Oyster Bar and the po-
tential use of the property as a
waterfront park. Posey's closed
after the storms of 2005.
The Animal Control Unit
will move back under the
supervision of the county com-
missioners after Sheriff David
Harvey requested the board
take the operation out from
under his umbrella.
Wakulla County ranked
as the 15th safest county in
Florida, according to statistics
released by the Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement.
The statistics measure index
crimes which include mur-
der, rape, motor vehicle theft,
burglaries and more. Orange
County ranked as the most
dangerous county in the state
with a much higher percentage
chance of becoming a victim
of a crime.
Jo Ann Daniels announced
that she would retire as princi-
pal of Wakulla Middle School.
Daniels joined J.D. Jones and
Kay Floyd in retiring in June.
A Night to Remember was
the theme of a special needs
prom held with the support
of Wakulla Springs Baptist
Church. Students from the
middle schools and Wakulla
High School took part in the
event on April 18.


MAY
Wakulla County Commis-
sioner Alan Brock asked the
board to get behind the cham-
ber of commerce's "Buy Local"
campaign and revamp the
board's web site. Brock told the
commission that their web site
is outdated and in need of a
fresher look to bring potential
tourists to the community.
The county received word
that stimulus money will
go toward funding pending
projects. The county received
$3.5 million for housing and
$600,000 for local road proj-
ects. Another $1 million was
approved for the St. Marks
National Wildlife Refuge.
A former school teacher
headed to trial to face murder
charges in the death of an in-
fant who was in the teacher's
care. The teacher, Jeffrey Dug-
gar, will not face the death
penalty, but could receive a
sentence of life in prison if
convicted.


Mayor Greener recognizes Jim Tartt in Sopchoppy.


Marlin Miller created a
wood sculpture of an eagle for
the Wakulla Welcome Center
after Miller attended the Blue
Crab Festival. Miller received
national attention by carv-
ing tree stumps into artwork
following the West Florida,
Mississippi and Alabama hur-
ricanes earlier in the decade.
The Blue Crab Festival drew
hundreds of visitors during the
35th annual festival May 2.
Former athlete Kelly Pelt
was killed in a motorcycle
accident on Harvey-Mill Road.
The victim's body was discov-
ered early in the morning of
April 29.
Wakulla County FCAT
scores for writing were near
the top of the state as WHS
sophomores and middle
school eighth graders scored
well following the release of
the results by state education
officials.
Wakulla County Commis-
sioners met with the county
recreation board in hopes
of ironing out financial ac-
countability issues with the
volunteer group. Auditors
questioned how the recreation
board was handling collections
and payments for sports pro-
gram participants and game
officials at the Medart facility.
Tax Collector Cheryll Olah
began negotiations with the
state Department of Motor
Vehicles to keep the Craw-
fordville DMV office open
past July 1.
County commissioners
adjusted board meeting times
and added a workshop date
to avoid lengthy regular meet-
ings continuing until mid-
night. The change took effect
in June.
Vandals created $9,000
worth of damage to a grand
piano owned by Daniel
Mathers. The piano was at
the home of Gale Mathers in
the Ivan community at the
time it was damaged.
FSU Coach Bobby Bowden
visited the Wildwood Coun-
try Club to take part in the
Houston Taff Memorial Golf
Tournament which was a
fundraiser for the Seminole
Boosters Scholarship for
Wakulla High School ath-
letes.
Commissioners voted
down Comp Plan Land Use
Amendments before them
because they did not reflect
the board's desire to push
more development into the
center of Crawfordville. The
development requests were
for parcels outside the more
densely developed Crawford-
ville area.
The murder trial for for-
mer Wakulla County school
teacher Jeffrey Duggar began
on Monday, May 18. Duggar
is accused of causing the
death of a 15-month-old baby


in his custody.
The City of St. Marks will
not form its own building
department. City commis-
sioners toyed with the idea
of creating their own permit-
ting office, but decided to
continue to use the county
building department.
Lt. Jason Newlin of the
Wakulla County Sheriff's Of-
fice and a member of the U.S.
Marshal's Florida Regional
Fugitive Task Force helped
grab two fugitives from jus-
tice in two raids in Franklin
and Taylor counties.
Wakulla High School
teacher Karen James brought
a piece of Wakulla County
to New York City when she
transported her student's
painted tiles to display in the
Tiles for America exhibit hon-
oring those who died in the
Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.
Marcelo da Luz visited St.
Marks with a solar powered
automobile on his way to Key
West. The native of Brazil and
resident of Canada stayed at
Phil and Mickey Cantner's
home for a night before de-
parting for South Florida.
Mike Barwick was pro-
moted to Principal of Wakulla
Middle School. He replaced
the retiring Jo Ann Daniels.
After a five day trial, a
six person jury found Jeff
Duggar guilty of aggravated
child abuse in the death of
15-month-old James Hurley.
Duggar originally faced a mur-
der charge in the case, but did
not the death penalty.
Test scores for Wakulla
County third graders ranked
near the top of the state and
Big Bend when compared to
other third grade students in
other counties.
County commissioners
reviewed wetland regulations
after Commissioner Howard
Kessler was accused of violat-
ing the wetlands ordinance.
Kessler was part of a group of
citizens who worked on the
ordinance as a way to better
protect the sensitive land in
the county.
A 72-year-old Crawford-
ville man was killed in a
two vehicle accident on U.S.
Highway 319. Juan J. Murillo
died after being struck by a
vehicle driven by Kristin N.
Evans Matthews.
Sopchoppy received $5.1
million in a low interest loan
to construct sewage treat-
ment in the community.
County commissioners
resolved financial questions
with the recreation board
while addressing concerns of
the county's auditing firm.
Biologist Chuck Hess took
a group of Wakulla County
residents on a field trip to the
Apalachicola National Forest
to view the rare red cockaded
woodpecker.


12-31.page2B.indd 1


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12/28/09 3:10:03 PM











THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 31, 2009 Page 3B


2009 Year in Review



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Wakulla County veterans celebrate the Independce Day holiday on July 4 in Sopchoppy.


JUNE
Wakulla High School
graduated 252 seniors on
the final day of the 2008-
2009 school year. After days
of rain, the weather cooper-
ated long enough for the
graduation ceremony and
the Bacccalaureate event two
days prior to graduation.
Wakulla County Com-
missioners hope to receive
federal stimulus money to
make improvements to the
county's sewage treatment
operation. Originally, the
board considered using a
low interest loan for the
project.
Hundreds of law enforce-
ment officials and guests
from outside of Wakulla
County visited Harvey-Young
Farm to take part in the an-
nual Law Day. The event
honors the contributions of
law enforcement to the com-
munity. Wakulla Bank was
one of the program sponsors
and Senator Bill Nelson was
the guest speaker,
The school district re-
ceived good news from the
state as FCAT results were
released. The students tak-
ing the tests scored in the
top 10 of the 67 counties in
each subject test area.
State Attorney Willie
Meggs won't be deposed as
part of the Charlie Odom
legal proceedings as Judge
William Gary rejected the
request from legal counsel
for Odom, a former Florida
Highway Patrol trooper, who
was charged with sexual bat-
tery and fired by the FHP.
Wakulla County Attor-
ney Ron Mowrey changed
his opinion about whether
Wakulla County Commis-
sioner Howard Kessler and
Panacea resident Ronald
Fred Crum were in violation
of the county's wetlands
ordinance. Mowrey deter-
mined that because both
men were involved with ar-
tificial ponds, they were not
subject to the ordinance.
The Big Bend Maritime
Museum became a contro-
versial county commission
issue as Chairman Howard
Kessler expressed concern
about the potential financial
drain the museum might
have on county coffers.
Museum supporters said
the expenses will be covered
by grants and volunteers
and ultimately the board
approved a grant to purchase
Crum property for the Pana-
cea project.
The state Department of
Environmental Protection
announced that it would be-
gin to disperse $5.1 million
of federal stimulus money to
be used for Sopchoppy sew-
age treatment lines,
County commissioners
decided not to fund a major
Shell Point Beach erosion
improvement project but
would provide some sand
to save a cedar tree near the
new picnic pavilion. The tree
roots became exposed by
beach erosion.
The Wakulla Gridiron
Booster Club began its third
and final year with Andy
Messer as president of the
organization, Messer and
his fellow volunteers oper-
ate the football booster club
with a $50,000 budget.
County Commissioners
began budget preparations


by feeling the squeeze of
what they anticipate will
be lower tax collections and
possibly a higher millage
rate.
Four attorneys inter-
viewed with the county com-
mission in a effort to replace
the retiring Ron Mowrey as
the county attorney. Mowrey
has served the county for
nearly 30 years.
The county's wetlands
ordinance was challenged in
court by attorney Bob Routa,
representing Log Creek LLC.
The court documents stated
that the ordinance should
be declared unconstitutional
because it is unclear what
lands are regulated.
The annual tax certificate
sale set more records, but
more property tax deeds
were "struck off" to the
county. A record total of $2.6
million worth of property
went through the tax sale.
A motion to suppress
evidence collected through
a traffic stop was rejected
by a judge who allowed
the information collected
by deputies to be used in a
home invasion case.
Ten more dogs graduated
from the Paws in Prison
program and found new
homes. WCI inmates helped
train the animals who were
adopted rather than eutha-
nized.
Wakulla Middle School
Principal Jo Ann Daniels
finished her final weeks as
the Top Wildcat in June. She
turned the school over to
former Assistant Principal
Mike Barwick.
The county Weatheriza-
tion program was featured in
the New York Times. The sto-
ry dealt with an increase of
federal stimulus money go-
ing to warm weather states
for summer cooling.
The Maritime Museum
remained a hot issue as
volunteers, including Don
Lesh and Bill Lowrie, created
a fact sheet to respond to
what they perceived as Com-
missioner Howard Kessler's
opposition to the center.
County commissioners
began their budget work by
deciding on a tentative mill-
age rate. Board members said
the 2009-2010 budget would
be tight and spending would
be cut.
The Nabors Giblin Nick-
erson law firm was tenta-
tively selected to replace
the retiring Wakulla County
Attorney Ron Mowrey. At-
torney Heather Encinosa
represented the Tallahassee
firm in negotiations with
the county.
School meal prices in-
creased 25 cents as the
school district attempted
to keep up with food costs
and make Wakulla meal fees
similar to the surrounding
communities.
Cornerstone Ministries
found a way to help resi-
dents stretch their food
budget. Volunteers at the
church volunteered to co-
ordinate Angel Food Minis-
tries and provide a low cost
food supplement program
to help residents feed their
families.
For the fourth year in a
row, the Wakulla County
School District received an
"A" grade.
All of the schools in the
district earned an "A" ex-


cept Wakulla High School,
Crawfordville Elementary
School and COAST Charter
School. The three schools
all earned "B" grades. WHS
was lowered to a "C" because
the school failed to meet the
percentage needed for the
lowest quartile in Reading
making learning gains.


JULY
Retired Circuit Court Judge
William Gary sentenced Jeff
Duggar to 78 months in the
state prison system after
scores of individuals spoke
on his behalf at the sentenc-
ing hearing.
Duggar was sentenced to
the minimum allowed by
sentencing guidelines and
had already served more
than one year at the time of
sentencing.
He was accused of killing
a toddler in his care, but
found guilty of child abuse
and avoided a longer prison
sentence.
Wakulla County Commis-
sioners announced plans to
pave a portion of Old Bethel
Road, leaving a small por-
tion dirt where the property
owner has not agreed to
provide right-of-way to the
county.
Commissioners agreed
to seek a lease to oper-
ate the Shell Point boat
ramp in an effort to give
residents a nearby ramp to
escape storms in the Gulf of
Mexico.
The commissioners also
agreed to address the Wakul-
la River "upper" boat launch
area in an effort to eliminate
some of the dangers posed
by launch area users and
motorists along Shadeville
Highway.
Thinking that the Panacea
Area Water System (PAWS) is
charging too much to provide
sewer billing assistance, the
county commission asked to
meet over the fees charged
by PAWS to the board.
The City of Sopchoppy
broke ground for a sewer
collection system that will
connect to the county's treat-
ment plant in Otter Creek.
The sewer lines will get


residents off septic tanks in
the community. The project
was funded by $5 million of
federal stimulus money.
The ongoing dispute over
the county commission's
wetlands ordinance raged
on in July as board members
held a private attorney client
meeting to discuss pending
litigation filed against the
board. The meeting to set up
the private attorney meeting
was short as Commissioner
Mike Stewart left the meet-
ing when specific litigation
was discussed by the public.
Stewart's departure left only
two board members at the
meeting since two were ab-
sent from the beginning of
the special meeting.
Attorney Bill Webster re-
turned to Wakulla County to
practice law in Crawfordville
after spending approximate-
ly seven years in Key West.
Independence Day in
Sopchoppy featured a parade
and festivities at Myron
Hodge City Park. The weath-
er cooperated with no rain,
but high temperatures.
CHAT officials, hoping
to reduce the number of
unwanted pets in Wakulla
County, announced plans to
create an assistance program
that provided spay and neu-
ter services for animals.
Wakulla County Circuit
Court Judge N. Sanders Sauls
issued an injunction against
the Wakulla wetlands ordi-
nance that stopped the coun-
ty's enforcement efforts.
The county had no au-
thority to issue cease-and-
desist orders against alleged
violators under the law, the
judge said.
Property Appraiser Don-
nie Sparkman announced
that the 2009 tax roll de-
creased which will create
less tax revenue for the tax-
ing authorities,
The 2010 tax roll could
result in even more of a
reduction of tax revenue for
the local taxing authorities,
he said.
Wildflowers may dot the
side of U.S. Highway 98 as
part of a state Department
of Transportation pilot proj-
ect.
St. Marks Waterfronts


Committee members spear-
headed an effort to bring
historical signs to the com-
munity. The first two were
unveiled in July, Port Leon
and the St. Marks Railroad
Trail.
A paraplegic who was
seriously injured in a one
vehicle crash in 2008 was
sentenced in circuit court in
July. Elizabeth McCabe's DUI
accident killed Wakulla High
School senior Emily Hardy,
who gave birth to her child
shortly before her death.
An 85-year-old optom-
etrist, Dr. Bob Greenberg of
the Wal-Mart Vision Center,
celebrated his birthday July
19 with a sky diving jump
at the Wakulla County Air-
port in Panacea. Greenberg
jumped with fellow Wal-
Mart Vision Center employee
Matt Kirksey.
Wakulla Bank, Capital
City Bank and several others
overcame a computer hard-
ware problem that forced the
banks to operate like it was
the 1980s for two days. Bank
transactions occurred during
the time the hardware was
not operating properly and
bank officials had to account
for the transactions manu-
ally at the end of the day as
they did two decades ago.
Bank officials could not pull
up account information on
the computers until the hard-
ware problem was solved.
The trial of former Flori-
da Highway Patrol Trooper
Charlie Odom was delayed
at a motion hearing in July
as legal counsel for Odom
asked for more time to re-
view DNA evidence.
Wakulla County School
Board members agreed to
advertise the $39 million
2009-2010 operating budget.
The first hear was held July
27.
St. Marks was awarded
a grant to purchase the old
St. Marks Refinery property.
The property was once home
to a refinery that produced
jet fuel.
The Florida Department
of Highway Safety and Mo-
tor Vehicles pulled out of
Crawfordville, but Wakulla
Tax Collector Cheryll Olah
and her staff stepped in to
provide local motorists with
the services once provided
by the state.
The DHSMV continued
to operate offices in Leon
County where Wakulla resi-
dents could receive the same
services they were provided
in Crawfordville.
County commissioners
agreed to re-advertise and
re-adopt the controversial
wetlands ordinance. The
ordinance had been chal-
lenged in court.
The commission voted
unanimously to continue
with the proposed Maritime
Museum project in Panacea.
The museum had become an
issue with some members
of the board prior to the
July vote.
The school board ap-
proved the tentative budget
for 2009-2010 at a hearing
on July 27. The $39 million
budget received comments
from only one speaker.
County commissioners
approved the renaming of


Lower Bridge Road as Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. Road.
The Wakulla Christian Coali-
tion had attempted to get
the name changed for the
past several years.
Sopchoppy musician Kai-
tlin Crouch released her
first CD, The Beauty of Life,
with the help of her musical
father, Mike. Mike Crouch is
principal of Wakulla High
School and once served as
the school's band director.


AUGUST
St. Marks Powder received
federal defense money to
be used for testing and
enhancement of a hybrid
propellant produced at the
General Dynamics facility.
Rep. Allen Boyd announced
that $5 million had been
secured for the project.
Federal stimulus money
also went to road improve-
ments and enhancement of
the county sewer collection
system,
The case of the Bailey
family's "puppy mill" was
back in court in August as
legal counsel for the Bailey's
attempted to clear up record
keeping issues in front of
Judge Jill Walker.
Panacea area residents
complained about the coun-
ty's wetlands regulations as
three commissioners took
part in a town hall meeting
at the Welcome Center.
Good Samaritan George
Smith saved the life of a
sea turtle who had become
tangled in crab trap lines.
Despite the danger of the
turtle biting Smith, he man-
aged to control the turtle
long enough to free the
creature from the lines and
save its life.
The exhausted turtle
would have died in a short
period of time if Smith had
not cut it free.
The Municipal Service
Benefit Unit (MSBU) settle-
ment was back in court again
as attorneys attempted to
hammer out a settlement
and attorneys fees.
But the hearing ended
when Judge N. Sanders Sauls
became irritated with legal
counsel and set the issue for
a future date.
County commissioners ap-
proved a lease with George
Heaton for the Shell Point
boat ramp.
Residents expressed con-
cern about not having a
boat ramp open nearby in
the event that homeowners
have to quickly remove their
vessels from the water due
to storms.
Funding for a new solid
waste transfer station was
granted to the county. The
funding is worth $2.3 mil-
lion.
Wakulla's crime rate was
too low for Sheriff David
Harvey failed to acquire a
COPS grant to add additional
manpower on the roads and
fund six positions for a three
year period.
Impact fees may be re-
turning, according to county
commissioners. The fees
were suspended in Septem-
ber 2008 for a period of one
year,
Continued on Page 4B


12-31.page3B.indd 1


SEWER COLLECTION SYSTEM
FOR THE
CITY OF SOPCHOPPY, FLORIDA

MAYOR: ROBERT W. GREENER CITYOFSOCHOPP
CIYCOMMISSIONERS UICORKSDIREC

M T EVANS RDTARr
Eo CLERK:

ENc


Sopchoppy City Commissioners break ground on the new sewage treatment system.


12/28/09 3:08:36 PM











Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 31, 2009


2009
Continued from Page 3B
The Nabors law firm
was added as co-counsel
for the wetlands ordinance
lawsuit. The law firm was
scheduled to take over for
retiring County Attorney
Ron Mowrey on Oct. 1.
Wakulla County schools
opened for the 2009-2010
school year and enrollment
was slightly down as 19 few-
er students were enrolled
on Aug. 13 compared to
opening day in 2008-2009.
District officials were con-
fident that the enrollment
numbers would continue
to climb through Labor Day
week in early September
and the district would end
up with more than 40 new
students.
More lawsuits were filed
over the development at
Shell Point Resort. The
South Florida developer
responsible for the project
faced nearly $5 million
worth of foreclosures on
two lots.
Woodville area author
Doug Alderson spoke about
his new national park book
that recreated the jour-
ney of his grandparents in
1939. The book was titled,
Through Time and Wilder-
ness: Exploring Old and
New Trails of the American
West.
The female victim in a
Florida Highway Patrol sex
case was put in jail follow-
ing two traffic incidents on
the same day. The woman
was stopped in both Wakul-
la and Franklin counties.
No charges were filed
against Wakulla County
Commissioner Howard Kes-
sler in an investigation
by the State Attorney's of-
fice into whether Kessler
violated the state Sunshine
Law when he spoke to other
commissioners following
the Rehwinkel Road acci-
dent involving Sheriff Har-
vey earlier in the year.
The WCTA and school
district ratified the 2009-
2010 teacher contract and
salary schedule. There were
no pay increases for instruc-
tion or non-instructional
staff during a very lean bud-
get year. The last pay raise
for school board employees
and teachers occurred in the
2007-2008 school year.
The Wakulla County Sher-
iff's Office opened the new
video visitation building
so that inmates could visit
with friends and relatives
without having to enter
the jail or have the inmates
leave their pods.
The new technology al-
lowed the sheriff's office
to offer more visitation
opportunities and have
male and female inmates
involved with visitation at
the same time.
County commissioners
voted unanimously to ex-
ecute the purchase of the
Panacea property that will
be used to house the Mari-
time Museum.
Leon County officials an-
nounced that they were con-
sidering requiring perfor-
mance-based septic systems
for residents in Woodville.
The effort began as a meth-
od to protect the Wakulla
Springs basin and followed
the lead of the Wakulla
County Commission.
Rep. Allen Boyd packed
the senior citizens center
Aug. 25 as residents dis-
cussed heath care reform
with the "Blue Dog Demo-
crat."
The TRIM notices were
mailed to property owners
and many residents contact-
ed the property appraiser's
office in an effort to discuss
their latest taxable values.
The county commission
and Talquin Electric Co-
operative officials hoped
to work to find answers


to pollution issues at the
Oyster Bay sewage plant on
the coast.
County commissioners
discussed their desires for
the 2009-2010 budget as the
new budget year rapidly ap-
proached. The budget was
approved in late September
and the new budget year
began Oct. 1.


SEPTEBER
Wakulla County Circuit
Court Judge N. Sanders


Sauls issued a permanent
injunction against the
Wakulla wetlands ordi-
nance.
The court determined
that a number of procedural
flaws in the enactment of
the wetlands ordinance
were present including ad-
vertising problems and
submitting the document
to the Secretary of State's
office late.
A new Surface Water
Improvement Plan for the
St. Marks Watershed in-
cluded renewed emphasis
on stormwater treatment.
The SWIM plan was pre-
sented at a public hearing
in Midway.
The Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office Victim's Ad-
vocate Program continued
due to a new $103,133 grant.
Advocates Laurie Langston
and Tina Brimner continued
to serve the sheriff's office
victims.
A manatee rescued from
the St. Marks River and tak-
en to Tampa for treatment
at Lowry Park Zoo died the
day after being rescued.
The sea cow was struck by
a boat propeller.
County commissioners
agreed to put a limit on their
travel expenses in an effort
to adjust to a lean budget
year. More than $7,500 was
spent by board members
with about a month left in
the budget year.
County Commissioner
Mike Stewart proposed a
sewage treatment discount
for Crawfordville residents
north of Wal-Mart who
were willing to hook on to
the sewage treatment lines.
He asked board members
to consider a 75 percent
discount.
An injured Bald Eagle
was released in St. Marks
after nearly a year in recov-
ery with the Florida Wild
Mammal Association and
the Audubon Center.
Violent crimes decreased
in 2008 when compared
to the statistics from the
Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office in 2007. Petty crimes
and calls for service con-
tinue to increase as Wakulla
County's population has
also increased.
Wakulla Bank addressed
issues in an agreement be-
tween itself and the Florida
Office of Financial Regula-
tion. State officials issued a
report that stated concern
over Wakulla Bank's over-
sight of loans and other
issues.
Transportation plan-
ners discussed Wakulla
County's long range trans-
portation needs. However,
only a handful of residents
showed up to discuss the
issues with consultants as
was the case when the con-
sultants visited in April.
A 95-year-old former
Wakulla Springs employee
talked about his days work-
ing for Ed Ball during the
1930s. Robert Murray, Sr.
was responsible for creat-
ing the many pavers that
decorate the state park. He
also shared memories of
the rate of pay for workers
and hauling marble from
Jacksonville to Wakulla
County.
Wakulla County Commis-
sioners stated their desire
to cut the 2009-2010 budget
and lower the millage rate
as the board neared the first
of two public hearings on
the new budget.
A decision by the board
on a potential biomass
plant in the northeastern
section of Wakulla County
was delayed by the commis-
sion. The board will have to
approve language for the
N.G. Wade owned develop-
ment near the Wakulla Cor-
rectional Institution.
Sgt. Joe Page of the sher-
iff's office returned from the
law enforcement Olympic
games in Port St. Lucie with
14 more medals after enter-


ing 14 events. Page now
has 67 medals since he first
started attending the Olym-
pic Games in 2000.
The county commission
agreed to continue the im-
pact fee moratorium for an-
other 180 days. The original
moratorium on the fees ran
out in September.
State Attorney Willie
Meggs reviewed a report by


the Florida Department of
Business and Professional
Regulation regarding Sher-
iff David Harvey having
ownership in the Wildwood
Country Club, a facility that
sells alcohol, while he was
still sheriff.
Meggs said he would
come to a decision on
whether Harvey will be
charged with a misdemean-
or crime or not.
Law enforcement, fire-
fighters and emergency
medical personnel joined
members of the public who
took part in the annual
Sept. 11 ceremony at the
sheriff's office. The ceremo-
ny is held each year at the
exact time the first aircraft
struck the first tower of the
World Trade Center in New
York City.
A community meeting
was held by Commission-
er Howard Kessler in the
Smith Creek community
where residents asked the
board chairman to consider
paving Forest Highway 13.
Kessler said he would bring
the issue before the full
board for consideration at
a future meeting.
Native Americans gath-
ered in Sopchoppy for the
annual Pow Wow at City
Park. Part of the event fea-
tured a cultural activity for
elementary school children.
The Muskogee East Tribe of
the Mississippi Village do-
nated $1,250 to the school
district to provide buses
and drivers to transport the
students to the park.
A 54-year-old Crawford-
ville woman died prior to
the beginning of a yard sale
when he husband acciden-
tally discharged a firearm.
The bullet struck Mary
G. Dicks after striking a
wooded structure.
State Attorney Willie
Meggs declined to file
criminal charges against
Sheriff David Harvey after
residents filed a complaint
against Harvey over having
an interest in Wildwood
Country Club, an establish-
ment that sells alcoholic
beverages.
Meggs based his decision
on a 1986 Attorney General
opinion where a similar
case arose in Ocala.
The school board ap-
proved a $55.8 million bud-
get without any comments
from the public.
Renovation work was
completed on the Rock
Landing Pier in Panacea.
County officials held a
"grand opening" for the
facility on Oct. 1.


OCTOBER
Wakulla County Commis-
sioners reached an agree-
ment on their 2009-2010
budget. The board sliced a
tiny amount of the budget
through travel and office
supplies. The new budget


year began Oct. 1 and con-
cludes on Sept. 30, 2010.
The county commission's
new Industrial Develop-
ment Authority will have
more members after board
members decided to ad-
vertise the ordinance with
changes including the mem-
bership additions.
A large number of TRIM
notice petitions were filed
as property owners ques-
tioned their property as-
sessments. A majority of the
petitions came from George
Heaton at Shell Point and
individuals at the Villages
of St. Marks.
WFSU-TV visited Craw-
fordville to create an inter-
view on the history of the
old wooded courthouse
through the memories of
historian Betty Green.
The first phase of the
Shell Point Beach restora-
tion project began as vol-
unteers planted native salt
tolerant flowers and grasses
around the restrooms and
parking areas. The project
will be completed in three
phases.
Accused murderer Gary
Michael Hilton appeared in
circuit court in Tallahassee
to have a date considered
for his murder trial. Judge
Terry Lewis did not set a
trial date at the hearing, but
added that a date could be
set soon.
The Value Adjustment
Board organized in anticipa-
tion of hearing a number
of TRIM notice petitions.
Three days were set aside
for the hearings.
Wakulla County Attor-
ney Ron Mowrey retired
after 28 years of service to
the county commission. He
received a plaque with all of
the names of county com-
missioners who were in
office during his tenure.
Panacea celebrated the
Mighty Mullet Festival and
the opening of the new
Rock Landing Dock over
a three day period. Rep.
Leonard Bembry spoke at
the dock ceremony and
Bernice and Jonas Porter
were selected as Mighty
Mullet Oueen and King at
the festival.
A Crawfordville woman,
Stephanie L. Strickland,
died in a one vehicle crash
in Franklin County, accord-
ing to the Florida Highway
Patrol. A passenger in the
vehicle escaped serious
injury when the car struck
a tree.
A small group of con-
cerned citizens listened to a
presentation regarding the
Chason Woods proposed
development just over the
border in Leon County. The
citizens expressed their
environmental concerns
while project officials dis-
cussed ways they plan to
protect the environment,
St. Marks City Commis-
sioners were awarded a


Coastal Cleanup beautified the St. Marks Refuge,
$350,000 federal grant to late October.
help the city acquire a 55- Wakulla County Admin-
acre parcel that was once an istrator Ben Pingree spoke
industrial site. City officials to the Rotary Club in Craw-
hope to use the property fordville about the annual
for a solar power project budget process and what
and get some use out of the residents can expect during
property that was declared the 2009-2010 budget year.
a state "brownfield." Amanda Council and
Hydrologist Todd Kin- Brock Glover were named
caid told members of the as the 2009 Homecoming
Wakulla Springs Basin Queen and King at Wakulla
Working Group that the High School. The crowning
region needs a water use occurred at halftime of the
plan to help monitor con- Wakulla-Jefferson County
sumption of the precious football game and was part
resource in North Florida. of a full week of activities.
Two suspects smashed The health department
their way into a Crawford- slated H1N1 flu clinics
ville area convenience store along with seasonal flu
and attempted to steal the clinics for residents to re-
ATM from inside. ceive protection from the
Captain Bill Poole of influenza.
the sheriff's office spotted The Spring Creek area
the two men and thwarted was considered for springs
the theft. A high speed ve- protection since Wakulla
hide chase ensued across Springs and Spring Creek
Wakulla County into Leon. are both linked by under-
The two men escaped into ground conduits.
a wooded area near Wood- Friends of Wakulla
ville, but law enforcement Springs asked state offi-
stepped up their investiga- cials to consider purchas-
tive efforts after locating ing property slated for the
key evidence. Chason Woods residential
A re-adoption vote for development. The develop-
the wetlands ordinance ment is located over the
failed when Commissioner line in Leon County.
Mike Stewart voted against County commissioners
it. The ordinance was re- considered creating a new
quired to pass by a unani- Industrial Development Au-
mous vote. thority with a larger num-
The county commission ber of representatives from
supported a hiking and bik- the community on it.
ing trail concept in the re- Myrtle Shields celebrat-
gion. The trail was dubbed ed her 90th birthday with
the Capital City to the Sea parties from St. Marks to
Loop. North Carolina. She was
A Comprehensive Plan born July 21, 1919 in Tal-
amendment and rezoning lahassee.
for the Wakulla Presbyte- Wetlands Committee
rian Church was approved members were asked to
by the county commission, reach a consensus by Con-
Some controversy arose mission Chairman Howard
about the issue when a Kessler as the group con-
county commission sent tinued work to solve is-
out an e-mail noting that sues with the old wetlands
the Medart property could ordinance.
be used for a "big box St. Marks National Wild-
store." life Refuge and the City of
Improvements were St. Marks celebrated the
completed at Hickory Park Monarch Butterfly Festival
in Crawfordville including and Stone Crab Festival
playground equipment, respectively. The 2009 Bull
a lighted walking trail, Bash was well received. The
benches and a tennis court. event was sanctioned by
A grand opening ceremony the Southern Extreme Bull
was held by the county in Riding Association.


Wakulla County residents show off Mighty Mullet Festival Fashions at the 2009 Festival in Panacea,


12-31.page4B.indd 1


Year in Review


Wakulla County Attorney Ron Mowrey retired,


12/28/09 3:07:50 PM












THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 31, 2009 Page 5B


CLASS I IED ADS tarting at just $8.00 a week!


105 Business Opportu- -
nities .

4Br 3Ba Foreclosure! $11,500!
Only $217/Mo! 5% down 15
years @ 8% apr. Buy, 3 Br
$199/Mo! for listings
(800)366-9783 ext 5798.

ALL CASH VENDING! Do you
earn $800 in a day? 25 Local
Machines and Candy $9,995.
(888)629-9968 B02000033
CALL US: We will not be under-
sold!


BRIIG YOUR

OLD PHOTOS

TO IFEH
I can fix those
wonderful old pictures
so you can enjoy them
again, and make
copies to share.
Keep the family heritage
alive with restored
photographs

Just $15 per photo.
850-766-7655
dougapple@gmail.com


110 Help Wanted


AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train
for high paying Aviation Mainte-
nance Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid if quali-
fied Housing available. CALL
Aviation Institute of Maintenance
(888)349-5387.

Are you pregnant? Considering
adoption. A childless, young,
loving, single woman seeks to
adopt & needs your help! Finan-
cial security. Expenses paid.
Call Yael (ask for adam).
(800)790-5260.


AVON Full-time pay for
part-time work. Call Shirl,
850-948-4162.


Busy local Auto/Tire Shop needs
full-time tire, light repair techni-
cian. Motivated, clean-cut, hard
worker, will be doing tire work,
light repairs, shop maintenance.
Will train the right person. Start-
ing pay dependent on experi-
ence. Apply in person between
1PM-5PM at Crawfordville Auto
& Tire, 2235 Crawfordville Hwy.

Job Announcement
Family Service Worker
Needed
North Florida Child
Development, Inc. is seeking an
individual to work cooperatively
with the parents and the
community of Wakulla County to
ensure the enhancement of young
children's lives. Will maintain a
client caseload. Must have
excellent organizational and
interpersonal skills, superior
written and oral communication.
Ability to interview parents and
relate to individuals from various
socioeconomic backgrounds.
Must maintain client
confidentiality. Basic computer
literacy, database skills, and
willingness to learn new skills are
necessary. Bachelors degree in
human services field or
successful work experience in
human services. Only team
players considered. NFCD, Inc.
offers an attractive benefits
package as well as a competitive
salary.
DFWP/M-F/EOE
Closing Date: January 10, 2010
www.floridachildren.org
Resumes should be mailed to
NFCD, Attn: Human Resources,
PO Box 38, Wewahitchka FL
32465, Fax (850) 639-4173;
or email to:
smcgill @floridachildren.org


Hair Stylist and massage thera-
pist needed!!! Commission or
booth rental option. Will accom-
modate. Call Shayla at Evolution
Day Spa for more details.
850-926-1650.

Heating/Air Tech Training. 3
week accelerated program.
Hands on environment. State of
Art Lab. Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job Placement
Assistance! CALL NOW:
(877)994-9904

PTL OTR Drivers. NEW PAY
PACKAGE! Great Miles! Up to
46cpm. 12 months experience
required. No felony or DUI past 5
years. (877)740-6262.
www.ptl-inc.com

Travel, Travel, Travel! $500
Sign-on-bonus. Seeking sharp
guys and gals, Rock-n-Roll At-
mosphere, Blue Jean Environ-
ment! Call Ally (800)716-0048 to-
day.


120 Services and Busi-
nesses

A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING
Free Estimates
Licensed John Farrell
926-5179
566-7550

ALL ABOUT...
CONCRETE LANDSCAPE
blocks plants
bricks sod
pavers tractor work
call JOSEPH FRANCIS
850-556-1178 /
850-926-9064

BACK FORTY TRACTOR
SERVICE Bushhogging, Box-
blading Driveway. Larry Carter
Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931,
850-694-7041. Licensed/In-
sured.

.'Bd 'i,,-_.l& Biseuit&e

Our new and unique way to pamper
your baby. At Bella's we don't "board",
we welcome our guest into our home.
Bella's Grooming Boutique is a spa
treatment that is also kennel-free and
offers: Bella's Buffet and Bella's pee
patch. And remember... at Bella's,
"we spoil them". Call today for an
appointment.
926-1016

C & R Tractor/Backhoe Services,
large tract and residential site
clearing rock, dirt, and road
base hauling, call Crandall
(850)933-3346.
Foxtrot Farm Horse Boarding.
Full or pasture, trails. Quality
care, 850-926-2004.


















D PAINTING
dL VL Services LLC
Meeting all your painting needs.
............ & repaints,
residential, commercial, free estimates,
licensed & insured.
926-1322 Henry Conner

KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR
Commercial, residential and mo-
bile homes. Repair, sales, serv-
ice, installation. All makes and
models. Lic. #RA0062516.
926-3546.

Mr. Stump
Stump Grinding
Quick Service
Cellular: 509-8530
MUNGE'S TREE SERVICE
Professional Work done at
Affordable Rates
24-Hr Emergency Service
Mike Mongeon
ASI certified arborist FL-6125A
850-421-8104
firewood available.

Paul's Trucking 850-528-6722.
Hwy 98 South of High School.
Masonry sand, Rock #5, 57.69.
Lime for garden. Mulch, potting
soil. Call for more info. We de-
liver or you pick up.




wickless
candles
Warm, Enliven
and Inspire your
n Holidays!
No flame. Beautiful warmers
use a bulb to slowly melt
fragrant long-lasting scents.







Reasonably priced.
Janel Creel
87 Duncan Drive
Audubon Forest
www.scentsy.com/janetcreel
5 I 9-0 20





Tasty Takeout!!
Always something tasty on our
menu. Eat in or take out!
2698-B Crawfordville Hwy.
(across from Ace Hardware)
745-8442.


POLLY NICHOLS
Special Touch Cleaning
Construction Cleanup,
Commercial, Residential.
"pray like it's up
to God, Work like
it's up to you"

S519-7238
926-3065
Licensed & Insured


125 Schools and In-
structions


ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal, *Accounting, *Crimi-
nal Justice. Job placement as-
sistance. Computer available. Fi-
nancial Aid if qualified. Call
(888)203-3179, www.Centura-
Online.com.


210 Auctions


FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION
200+ FLORIDA Homes Auction:
Jan 23 REDC I View Full Listings
www.Auction.com RE No.
CQ1031187.


220 Cars


2000 Honda Civic $800! 2001
Nissan Altima $350! 2000 Acura
Integra $300! POLICE IM-
POUNDS! for listings call
(800)366-9813 ext 9271.

230 Motor Homes and L
Campers


PUBLIC AUCTION 400+ FEMA
Mobile Homes & Campers -
Many Unused All selling no re-
serve January 9th Lafayette, LA
www.hendersonauctions.com
(225)686-2252 la lic 136-09


275 Home Furnishings


$159 Queen Pillow-Top Mattress
Set. Unused in sealed plastic
w/warranty. 222-9879. Delivery
avail.


100% LEATHER sofa & love. No
vinyl. Never used. Still in crates.
List, $2,749. Asking $675.
425-8374, can deliver.


BEAUTIFUL CHERRY solid
wood sleigh bed & mattress.
NEW. $369. 222-9879.


Full mattress set in sealed plas-
tic NEW $129. Can Deliver.
545-7112.


Micro-Fiber sofa/chair. $500.
Hardwood frame, warranty, new
in crate, del avail. 545-7112.


295 Building Materials


METAL ROOFING TAX CREDIT!
40 yr Warranty. Direct from
manufacturer. 30 colors in stock
Quick turnaround. Delivery avail-
able. Gulf Coast Supply & Manu-
facturing, (888)393-0335
www.gulfcoastsupply.com.

320 Farm Products &
Produce


Grain fed beef for your freezer.
Half or whole, $2.89/lb. Also
okra and green boiling peanuts
for sale. Raker Farms,
850-926-7561.


Meat for your freezer. Pork
$1.59/Lb. hanging weight.
Smoked price not included. BBQ
pigs $100-$150/each. Beef
$2.89/Lb. hanging weight. Call
Joe Duggar 545-0330.


335 Pets



20 black Lab puppies ready to
go. Two different litters, pure
bred, no papers. Webbed-feet.
$125/each. Reasonable offers
considered. 688-3081.


530 Comm. Property
Mfor Rent I

COVERED BOAT/RV
STORAGE AVAILABLE
Self Storage Units, Retail Space,
Locks, Boxes & more!
Stow Away Center
DOGS, PUPPIES, HICE CATS 850-926-5725
GS, PUPPIES NIC AS www.stowawaycenter.com
AND KITTENS... Come, take
a look and bring a new Woodville Retail
friend home TODAY! Space Available


CHAT
Adoption Center:
Monday closed.
Tuesday through Wednesday&
Friday: 11:00AM to 4:30PM
Thursday: 11:00AM to 7:00 PM
Saturday: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM
Sunday: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM
1 OAK STREET, CRAWFORDVILLE
or visit:
chatofwakulla.com





415 Announcements


Advertise in Over 100 Papers!
One Call One Order One Pay-
ment The Advertising Networks
of Florida Put Us to work for
You! 850-926-7102 www.thewa-
kullanews.com, classifieds@the-
wakullanews.com.

Advertise in Over 100 Papers!
One Call One Order One Pay-
ment The Advertising Networks
of Florida Put Us to work for
You! 850-926-7102 www.thewa-
kullanews.com, classifieds@the-
wakullanews.com.

500 Real Estate


C&M Painting Services, LLC. All
your painting needs. Pressure
washing, new and repaints, resi-
dential/commercial, free esti-
mates, Licensed/insured. Henry
Conner 926-1322.

LAND OR DEVELOPMENTS
WANTED. We buy or market de-
velopment lots. Mountain or Wa-
terfront Communities in NC, SC,
AL, GA and FL. Call
(800)455-1981, Ext.1034.

LOTS FROM $13,9K! Waterfront
community on Georgia Coast.
Access to Ocean. Hurricane
Free Zone. Limited Release on
lots from $13,9K. Best Value.
Call (888)506-6707!! www.penin-
sula-goldenisles.com

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE

All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination
based on race color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin or an intention to
make any such preference, limi-
tation or discrimination." Familial
status includes children under
the age of 18 living with parents
or legal custodians, pregnant
women and people securing the
custody of children under the
age of 18.

This newspaper will not accept
any advertising for real estate
that is a violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To com-
plain of discrimination call HUD
toll free at 1-800-669-9777. The
toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.



Il|lli iMO lL
LENDER

515 Apartments for
Rent

HUD HOMES! 4bdr 3ba
$217/mo! 3 bdrm only $199/mo!
Stop Renting! 5% dw, 15 yrs @
8% apr For Listings
(800)366-9783 ext 5669.






1,2 & 3 BEDROOMS
NO DEPOSIT!!!
Year-End specials!
2BR units for
the price of a 1BR unit.
NEW Low Rates for 3BR.
Call 926-1134
for more information.


* Fitness Studio-1000/sf
(Wall to wall mat & mirrors)
Retail -1250/sf
(Storefront w/back storage)
Two-Bay Garage-1 200/sf
Divided Office Space-1i 074/sf

Lewiswood Center
421-5039


545 Homes for Sale


6Br 4Ba Foreclosure! $19,900!
Only $225/Mo! 5% down 30
years @ 8% apr. Buy, 4 Br
$269/Mo! for listings
(800)366-9783 ext 5760.

By Owner, below market price!!
$99,500, 3BR/2BA. Built 2003
on 2 lots. New A/C, refrigerator
and microwave. Custom-built
dining table w/benches. Wood
laminate floors. Must See!
545-4066, 926-8100, 228-4579.

By owner: 3BR/2BA, 22 Eagles
Ridge Drive. Wood-laminate
flooring, wooden-blinds, all ap-
pliances, 2-car garage,
screened-in-tiled porch, fire-
place, $174,000, or reasonable
offer, 850-528-5715.

On 3 lots in Wakulla Gardens.
23 Neeley Rd., 1800sqft.
4BR/2BA, Renovated. $135,000.
Only $75/square foot !!!
Nick Chason, 850-766-7750 for
information.

555 Houses for Rent


3BR/2BA House w/hardwood
floors, in-ground pool. Riversink,
Shadeville school area. All-new
appliances, small pet o.k.,
850-510-7008. Available now!

3BR/2BA, Wakulla Gardens,
$800/month, plus $500 deposit.
No pets or smoking. Call
850-570-0575.


Charming cottage in Panacea.
2BR, 1 large bath, w/W/D
hook-up, new hardwood floors,
screened porch. Clean as a
whistle. $600/mo.+$600/deposit.
459-9774, 926-4217.

Crawfordville, clean, large 2
bedroom, 2 full bath duplex.
$625 per month. Call Linda
926-0283.

Crawfordville. 3BR/2BA. W/D
hookups. New appliances. Ce-
ramic tile floor. Screened porch.
Huge yard. $850/mo. + deposit.
850-228-0422.

House w/acreage. 4BR/2BA
North Wakulla. Two private
acres, paved road, workshop.
$875/month+security deposit.
Brenda Hicks Realty 251-1253.

Sopchoppy Riverfront. 3BR/2BA
w/2 screened porches, fireplace.
$1,000/mo. 850-766-1449.

560 Land for Sale


2-acre lot for sale near new
Shadeville School, corner of
Steel Court and Spring Creek
Hwy. (city water). Owner financ-
ing.
850-556-1178.
565 Mobile Homes for
Rent

3BR/2BA, DW/MH on Merwyn
Dr. near Lake Ellen. $695/month,
plus deposit. Central Air/Heat,
fenced yard, tile in kitchen.
2BR/1 BA $500/month + deposit.
Nice lots, laundry, freshly
painted. Available now! Call
850-212-5650.

Large 2BR/2BA M/H on 1.5 acre,
near Woodville. Clean, partially
furnished, some appliances in-
cluded. No smoking/no indoor
pets. $650/mo.+deposit.
850-519-4609.

Wildwood Acres, 3BR/2BA close
to schools, golf and recreation
park. $690/mo.+$600/dep. No
pets!! Available now! Call:
850-251-4204 or 850-926-1588.
570 Mobile Homes for
Sale

2004 16X80 2BR/2BA on 1.86
ares (corner lot). Very clean, lots
of room. $76,900. 519-4609,
545-1355.


12-31.page5B.indd 1


TakIe .a" .iialkon the con' eifent %ide!
1 424 sci ft 'BR 2B\13A"o%%nlonkhici oc~acd
in Iic iificm t w%%foic llc Fullipplniicc
Imcki~i..c icii Imno luiii ccciiic mIII & i
ipm' ic fciicd C oniniILIIIL pool (A, clubII0Lhc

TO '%H10151411.

*. PRICE REDUCED
BELOM IHRKET!
Ri\ i Pliiintat ii E t1it1%
4BR B!. bAiI Iioblmc



1 1itli- LR DR I.i i i



Iiosc i n Ioc.diic on I 45 IC icw in iwited comnwnul
% ili .iccct 10 pool im iiiis clubIioLus cmd bol
IwIIp on lic \\oInw LIu Ri' ci
NCR% ONLI 's11.fumfl



LICENSED REAL ESTATE AGENTS NEEDED'
CONTACT TED OR THELMA~
N511'-9 26-011I


12/28/09 4:32:32 PM
















Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 31, 2009


570 Mobile Homes for

Sale


3BR/2BA 2005 M/H on a double
lot. Owner financing. Call
850-556-1178 for more details.



FOR SALE OR TRADE
Like new 16X80 Mobile Home
on 2 lots. Located in Panacea
on Fishing Fool Road.
Will consider all offers of cash
or will trade for old coins.
850-697-3189



New, (2006) MH, 2BR/1BA,
14-feet wide, no carpet. $9,500.
Must move to your lot within
three weeks. Call for appoint-
ment: 850-766-3536.


580 Rooms for Rent/

Roommates


Large room for rent, with bath,
fridge & microwave. On Wakulla
river. Separate entrance.
$90/week. Utilities included.
850-926-2783.



Legal Notice



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL
JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 07-70-FC

GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC PLAINTIFF
VS.

DIANNE DAVIS; KENNETH DAVIS; ANY
AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DE-
FENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;
CONSTRUCTION SUPPORT SOUTH-
EAST, INC.; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE
AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSES-
SION

DEFENDANTS)
RE- NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order Granting the Motion to Reset Foreclo-
sure Sale dated December 14, 2009 en-
tered in Civil Case No. 07-70-FC of the Cir-
cuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and
for WAKULLA County, CRAWFORDVILLE,
Florida, I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR of the
WAKULLA County Courthouse, 3056
CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAW-
FORDV[LLE, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the
14th day of January, 2010, the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Sum-
mary Final Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 5 AND THE SOUTH HALF OF LOT 6,
BLOCK 44, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 5
AS SHOWN BY PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVI-
SION OF RECORD ON PAGE 56 OF PLAT
BOOK NO. ONE OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA

Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pen-
dens, must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.

Dated this 14th day of December, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERI-
CANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons
with disabilities needing a special accom-
modation should contact COURT ADMIN-
ISTRATION, at the WAKULLA County
Courthouse at 904-926-3341,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.
December 24, 31,2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 09-00164

SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ERIK W. DUNN; ASHLEY L. LYNCH; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF ASHLEY L. LYNCH;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ERIK W. DUNN;
UNKNOWN TENANT (S); IN POSSESSION
OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE-SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale Date
dated the 16th day of December, 2009, and
entered in Case No. 09-00164, of the Circuit
Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for
Wakulla County, Florida, wherein SUN-
TRUST MORTGAGE, INC. is the Plaintiff
and ERIK W. DUNN; ASHLEY L. LYNCH;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ASHLEY L.
LYNCH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ERIK W.
DUNN; UNKNOWN TENANT (S); JOHN
DOE; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT
(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY are defendants. I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at the
FRONT DOOR OF COURTHOUSE at the
Wakulla County Courthouse in Crawford-
ville, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 21st day
of January, 2010, the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment,
to wit:

LOT 32, OF BLOCK 19, OF WAKULLA
GARDENS, AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1,
PAGE 39 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST
IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF
ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN
60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
In accordance with the Americans with Dis-
abilities Act of 1990 (ADA), disabled per-
sons who, because of their disabilities, need
special accommodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA Coordi-
nator at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Craw-
fordville, FL 32327 or Telephone Voice
(850) 926-0905 not later than five business
days prior to such proceeding.
Dated this 17th day of December, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
December 31,2009
January 7, 2010




NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Stor-
age Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter
83, Part IV, that ABC Storage will hold a
sale by sealed bid on Saturday, January 2,
2010 at 2:00 p.m. at 3743 Crawfordville
Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327, of the con-
tents of Mini Warehouse containing per-
sonal property of:
AMY CRUM
JANET LYNN POWELL
KAY KINSER

Payments must be made before Saturday,
January 2nd by 12:00 noon before the sale
date of January 2nd, 2010 at 2:00 p.m. The
owners may redeem their property by pay-
ment of the Outstanding Balance and cost
by contacting ABC Storage at 508-5177. Or
by paying in person at the warehouse loca-
tion.

December 24, 31,2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 09-172-CA

WAKULLA COUNTY, a political subdivision
of the State of Florida,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DELORISS FORT, MICHAEL MOORE;
and all unknown parties claiming by,
through, under, and against the herein
named individual Defendants who are not
known to be dead or alive, whether said un-
known parties may claim an interest as
spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, or other
claimants.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in
this cause on December 17, 2009, I will sell
the following properties situated in Wakulla
County, Florida, as described herein, to the
highest and best bidder, for cash, at the
Wakulla County Courthouse, located at
3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville,
Florida, 33237, at 11:00 a.m., on the 28th
day of January, 2010.
* Lots 1 and 2 in Block 48 of WAKULLA
GARDENS, UNIT V, as shown by plat of
said subdivision of record on page 56 in Plat
Book One of the Public Records of Wakulla
County, Florida;
* Lots 3, 4, 5, and 6 in Block 48 of WA-
KULLA GARDENS, UNIT V, as shown by
plat of said subdivision of record on page
56, in Plat Book One of the Public Records
of Wakulla County, Florida.
* Lots 7 and 8 in Block 48 of WAKULLA
GARDENS, UNIT V, as shown by plat of
said subdivision of record on page 56, in
Plat Book One of the Public Records of Wa-
kulla County, Florida.
* Lot number Two (2) in Block Fourteen (14)
of WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT III, as
shown by plat of said subdivision of record
on page 43 in Plat Book One of the Public
Records of Wakulla County, Florida.
Lot number Three (3) in Block Fourteen (14)
of WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT III, as
shown by plat of said subdivision of record
on page 43 in Plat Book One of the Public
Records of Wakulla County, Florida.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST
IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF
ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN
60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

DATED THIS 17TH DAY OF DECEMBER,
2009.
BRENT X.THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)

IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABIL-
ITY WHO NEEDS AN ACCOMMODATION,
YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO
YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN
ASSISTANCE. TO REQUEST SUCH AN
ACCOMMODATION, PLEASE CONTACT
THE ADA COORDINATOR WITHIN TWO
WORKING DAYS OF THE DATE THE
SERVICE IS NEEDED; IF YOU ARE
HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL
711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT,
ADA COORDINATOR, WAKULLA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, LOCATED AT 3056
CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAW-
FORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 33237 PHONE:
850.926.0300,
EMAIL: VShepherd@wakullaclerk.com.
December 24, 31,2009



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 09-272-CA

WAKULLA BANK, a Florida banking corpo-
ration,
Plaintiff,
v.
FREDA M. WHITE f/k/a FREDA M.
MOORE, a single woman; COASTAL COM-
MUNITY BANK d/b/a APALACHICOLA
STATE BANK; AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER,
AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDI-
VIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a
Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure
dated December 14, 2009, entered in Case
No. 09-272-CA of the Circuit Court of the
Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla
County, Florida, wherein WAKULLA BANK,
a Florida banking corporation, is the Plain-
tiff, and FREDA M. WHITE f/k/a FREDA M.
MOORE, a single woman; COASTAL COM-
MUNITY BANK d/b/a APALACHICOLA
STATE BANK; AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER,
AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDI-
VIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants,
the undersigned will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at the front door of the
Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Craw-
fordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, at
11 o'clock a.m. on January 14, 2010 the fol-
lowing described property as set forth in
said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclo-
sure, to-wit:
Lot 6 in Block "102" of RIVER VIEW SUBDI-
VISION, a subdivision according to the map
or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1,
Page 36, of the Public Records of Wakulla
County, Florida.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pen-
dens must file a claim within 60 days after
sale.

DATED this 22nd day of December, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
December 31,2009
January 7, 2010

NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 83, PART IV
Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Stor-
age Faciltiy Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter
83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage
will hold a sale by sealed bid on i ,l,,id ,
January 9, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. i1 -i
Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of
Mini-Warehouse containing personal prop-
erty of:
ALLEN CARTER
KATRENA ROBERTS

Before the sale date of Saturday, January 9,
2010, the owners may redeem their prop-
erty by a payment of the outstanding bal-
ance and cost by paying in person at 3291
Crawfordville Hwy.
December 24, 31, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL
JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 09-31 CA

US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS


TRUSTEE FOR SABR 2006-WM1
PLAINTIFF
VS.
CRYSTAL A. WONSCH A/K/A CRYSTAL
WONSCH A/K/A CRYSTAL MITHCELL;
BRANDON WONSCH A/K/A BRANDON
CHRISTOPHER FOLSOM; ANY AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFEN-
DANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;
AMERICAN GENERAL HOME EQUITY,
INC.;
JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION

DEFENDANTS)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated December 17, 2009 entered in Civil


Case No. 09-31 CA of the Circuit Court of
the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for WA-
KULLA County, CRAWFORDVILLE, Flor-
ida, I will sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash at the FRONT DOOR of the WA-
KULLA County Courthouse located at 3056
CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY in CRAW-
FORDVILLE, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the
21st day of January, 2010, following de-
scribed property-as set forth in said Sum-
mary Final Judgment, to-wit:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST COR-
NER OF THE WEST HALF OF THE
SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF LOT 55 OF
THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND
THENCE RUN SOUTH 15 DEGREES, 06
MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST ALONG
THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE WEST
HALF OF SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER
291.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING
CONTINUE SOUTH 15 DEGREES 06 MIN-
UTES 16 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID
EAST BOUNDARY 105.00 FEET TO AN
IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DE-
GREES 53 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST
424.79 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT
-OF- WAY BOUNDARY OF CAJER POSEY
ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 02 DE-
GREES 11 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST
ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY 109.98 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH
74 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 44 SECONDS
EAST 392.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale. if any. other than the
property owner as of the date
of the lis pendens, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THECIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERI-
CANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons
with disabilities needing a special accom-
modation should contact COURT ADMIN-
ISTRATION, at the WAKULLA County
Courthouse at 850-926-3341,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.
December 31, 2009
January 7, 2010







IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 09000052CA

WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,
v.
JAMEY N. SPIVEY, JR. A/K/A JAMIE N.
SPIVEY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JAMEY N. SPIVEY, JR. A/K/A JAMIE N.
SPIVEY; and all unknown parties claiming
by, through, under or against the herein
named Defendants, who are not known to
be dead or alive, whether said unknown
parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees,
spouses, or other claimants; TENANT #1
and/or TENANT #2, the parties intended to
account for the person or persons in pos-
session; CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY SERV-
ICES, INC.; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC
REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.; FAIR-
WAYS AT WILDWOOD HOMEOWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure
entered on August 26, 2009, and the Order
Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale entered on
December 15, 2009, in this cause, in the
Circuit Court of WAKULLA County, Florida, I
will sell the property situated in WAKULLA
County, Florida, described as:
LOT 9, THE FAIRWAYS AT WILDWOOD, A
SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3,
PAGE 51 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
a/k/a 43 Fair Way, Crawfordville, Florida
32327-4238 at public sale, to the highest
and best bidder, for cash, in the front lobby
of the Wakulla County Courthouse located
at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawford-
ville, WAKULLA County, Florida, at 11:00
o'clock a.m., on January 21, 2010.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur
plus from the sale, if any, other than the
property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 17th
day of December 17, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
December 31, 2009
January 7, 2010








LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT
REQUEST FOR
ENGINEERING PROPOSALS
RFP 2009-ENG

Panacea Area Water System, Inc.
1445 Coastal Hwy (P.O. Box 215)
Panacea, FL 32346
Phone: 850-984-5301
Fax: 850-984-2917

The Panacea Area Water System, Inc. will
receive sealed proposals for: ENGINEER-
ING CONSULTING SERVICES FOR WA-
TER FACILITY IMPROVEMENT PRO-
JECTS TO THE PANACEA AREA WATER
SYSTEM, PANACEA, FLORIDA, INCLUD-
ING PRIORITY ONE: USDA RURAL DE-
VELOPMENT APPLICATION, PRELIMI-
NARY ENGINEERING REPORT, ENVI-
RONMENTAL REPORT, ENGINEERING
DESIGN, DRAWINGS, CONSTRUCTION
DOCUMENTS & SPECIFICATIONS, PER-
MITTING, BID EVALUATION, SERVICES
DURING CONSTRUCTION, AND FINAL
CERTIFICATION. PRIORITY TWO:
PREPARATION OF DOCUMENTS, DRAW-
INGS, ANS SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE
CONSUMPTIVE USE PERMIT RENEWAL
IN ACCORDANCE WITH RULES AND
REGULATIONS OF THE NORTHWEST
FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DIS-
TRICT. PRIORITY THREE: PROVIDE
DRAWINGS, DOCUMENTS, DESIGNS
AND SPECIFICATIONS USED IN PREPA-
RATION OF GRANT APPLICATIONS FOR
GIS MAPPING OF THE EXISTING SYS-
TEM, INCLUDING ASSET INVENTORY
AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR RE-
PLACEMENT OF AGING INFRASTRUC-
TURE.

Sealed proposals will be received by PANA-
CEA AREA WATER SYSTEM, INC., Pana-
cea, Florida at 1445 Coastal Hwy, Pana-
cea, Florida, 32346 (location address) or
P.O. Box 215 Panacea, Florida 32346 (mail-
ing address) until 2:00 PM EST on THURS-
DAY, JANUARY 14, 2010. Proposals re-
ceived after the designated time and/or date
will not be considered.

Proposals will be publicly opened and read
aloud in the Panacea Area Water System,
Inc. offices on the above appointed date
and time. Late submittals will be retained
by the Panacea Area Water System, Inc.
unopened. Envelopes must be clearly
marked with the RFP number, time and date
of opening.
Mail to: Panacea Area Water System, Inc.
P.O. Box 215
Panacea, FL 32346
Attn: SHERYL MOSLEY,
OFFICE MANAGER
Deliver to:


Panacea Area Water System, Inc.
1445 Coastal Hwy (U.S. Hwy 98)
Panacea, Florida 32346
Scope: Includes, but is not limited to the
above listed services, including compliance
with all applicable Panacea Area Water
System, Inc. 501(c)(3) not for profit organi-
zation requirements, state and federal laws,
statutes, administrative rules, contract provi-
sions, acts and procedural requirements
and in accordance with USDA Rural Utilities
Service guidelines.
Copies of the RFP package may be ob-
tained from Panacea Area Water System,
Inc. offices, 1445 Coastal Hwy, Panacea,
FL 32346 or requested on-line at panacea-
water @embarqmail.com.
Panacea Area Water System, Inc. reserves
the right to: waive any technicalities; reject
any and all proposals which are incomplete,
conditional, non-responsive, or which con-
tain additions not allowed for; reject any or
all proposals in whole or in part with or with-
out cause; and accept the proposal which
best serves the utility.
December 24, 31,2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2007-110-FC
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST
COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE, OF AMERI-
QUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES, INC.,
ASSET BACKED PASS THROUGH CER-
TIFICATES,
SERIES 2004-R9, UNDER THE POOLING
AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED
AS OF SEPTEMBER 1, 2004, WITHOUT
RECOURSE,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CATHERINE CLUSSMAN A/K/A CATHER-
INE R. SCHUYLER A/K/A CHATERINE R.
SCHUYLER; TERRY L. CLUSSMAN; JOHN
DOE; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT
(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale Date
dated the 14th day of December, 2009, and
entered in Case No. 2007-110-FC, of the
Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in
and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST
COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE, OF AMERI-
QUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES, INC.,
ASSET BACKED PASS THROUGH CER-
TIFICATES, SERIES 2004-R9, UNDER
THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREE-
MENT DATED AS OF SEPTEMBER 1,
2004, WITHOUT RECOURSE is the Plaintiff
and CATHERINE CLUSSMAN A/K/A
CATHERINE R. SCHUYLER A/K/A
CHATERINE R. SCHUYLER; TERRY L.
CLUSSMAN; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS
UNKNOWN TENANT (S) IN POSSESSION
OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defen-
dants. I will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at the FRONT DOOR OF
COURTHOUSE at the Wakulla County
Courthouse in Crawfordville, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 21st day of January,
2010, the following described property
as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
Commence at a U.S. Government concrete
monument marking the Northeast corner of
Section 35, Township 4 South. Range 3
West, Wakulla County, Florida, and thence
run North 89 degrees 21 minutes 41 sec-
onds West along the North boundary of said
Section 35, a distance of 1243.04 feet to an
old Concrete monument, thence run South
00 degrees 29 minutes 18 seconds West
2704.77 feet to an old concrete monument,
thence run South 02 degrees 54 minutes 01
seconds West 1105.84 feet to an old light-
wood hub, thence run South 17 degrees 49
minutes 29 seconds West 258.53 feet to a
concrete monument, thence run South 31
degrees 37 minutes 42 seconds West
751.06 feet to an old concrete monument,
thence South 34 degrees 26 minutes 30
seconds West 113.80 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGIN-
NING thence run South 59 degrees 20 min-
utes 29 seconds East 419.01 feet to the
Westerly right-of-way boundary of a graded
county road, thence run South 30 degrees
39 minutes 31 seconds West along said
Westerly rigth-of-way boundary 500.07 feet,
thence run North 59 degrees 20 minutes 29
seconds West 452.07 feet, thence run North
34 degrees 26 minutes 30 seconds East
501.16 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING
containing 5.00 acres, more or less.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST
IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF
ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN
60 DA YS AFTER THE SALE.
In accordance with the Americans with Dis-
abilities Act of 1990 (ADA), disabled per-
sons who, because of their disabilities, need
special accommodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA Coordi-
nator at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Craw-
fordville, FL 32327 or Telephone Voice
(850) 926-0905 not later than five business
days prior to such proceeding.
Dated this 17th day of December, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
December 31, 2009
January 7, 2010



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL
JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 2007-111-FC
THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE
FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS
CWABS, INC. ASSET-BACKED CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2005-IM3
PLAINTIFF
VS.

MILDRED AMADEO; ANGEL AMADEO;
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVID-
UAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS; MORTGAGE ELEC-
TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.;
JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION

DEFENDANTS)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated November 23, 2009 entered in Civil
Case No. 2007-111-FC of the Circuit Court
of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for WA-
KULLA County, CRAWFORDVILLE, Flor-
ida, I will sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash at THE FRONT DOOR OF THE
COURTHOUSE at the WAKULLA County
Courthouse located at 3056 CRAWFORD-
VILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL
32327 in CRAWFORDVILLE, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 21st day of January, 2010
the following described property as set forth
in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 6, CAMELOT, A SUBDIVISION AS
PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 122, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pen-
dens, must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale

Dated this 17th day of December, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERI-
CANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons
with disabilities needing a special accom-
modation should contact COURT ADMIN-
ISTRATION, at the WAKULLA County
Courthouse at 850-926-3341,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.
December 31, 2009
January 7, 2010




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL
JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 2008-CA-000043

JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, AS TRUSTEE
FOR STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II INC., MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES
2003-AR4


PLAINTIFF
VS.
MICHAEL W. BARNES A/K/A MICHAEL
BARNES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MI-
CHAEL W. BARNES A/K/A MICHAEL BAR-
NES IF ANY; JANE I BARNES A/K/A JANE
BARNES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JANE I
BARNES A/K/A JANE BARNES IF ANY;
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVID-
UAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS; SUNTRUST BANK;
JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION

DEFENDANT (S)
RE- NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order Granting the Motion to Reset Foreclo-
sure Sale dated December 16, 2009 en-
tered in Civil Case No. 2008-CA-000043 of


the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit
in and for WAKULLA County, Crawfordville,
Florida, I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR of the
WAKULLA County Courthouse, 3056 Craw-
fordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 21st day of January,
2010, the following described property as
set forth in said Summary Final Judgment,
to-wit:
LOT 2, BLOCK "A", THE FARM SUBDIVI-
SION, PHASE I, AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3,
PAGES 93-98 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale. ifany. other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pen-
dens, must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale
Dated this 17th day of December, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERI-
CANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons
with disabilities needing a special accom-
modation should contact COURT ADMIN-
ISTRATION, at the WAKULLA County
Courthouse at 850-926-3341,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.
December 31, 2009
January 7, 2010




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WA-
KULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE No. 2008-CA-000264
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST
COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR MORGAN
STANLEY, MSAC 2007-NC3,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SMITH, PATTIE F., et. al.,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order or Final Judgment entered in Case
No. 2008-CA-000264 of the Circuit Court of
the Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA
County, Florida, wherein, DEUTSCHE
BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS
TRUSTEE FOR MORGAN STANLEY,
MSAC 2007-NC3, Plaintiff, and, SMITH,
PATTIE F., et. al., are Defendants, I will sell
to the highest bidder for cash at the WA-
KULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE located
at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville,
FL 32327, at the hour of 11:00 a.m., on the
21st day of
January, 2010, the following described
property:
Lots 22 and 23, Block "A", MAGNOLIA
GARDENS, a subdivision as per Map or
Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page
37 of the Public Records of Wakulla County,
Florida.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pen-
dens must file a claim within 60 days- after
the sale.

DATED this 17th day of December, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)


In accordance with the Americans with Dis-
abilities Act, persons needing a reasonable
accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should, no later than seven (7)
days prior, contact the Clerk of the Court's
disability coordinator at 850-926-0905. If
hearing or voice g impaired, contact (TDD)
(800)955-8771 via Florida Relay System.
December 31, 2009
January 7, 2010




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL
JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 65-2009-CA-000337

BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P.
F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS
SERVICING, L.P.,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.

JAMES W. TYUS, ETAL.,
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: ANGELA D. TYUS AND JAMES W.
TYUS

whose residence is unknown if he/she/they
be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the
unknown defendants who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lien-
ors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claim-
ing an interest by, through, under or against
the Defendants, who are not known to be
dead or alive, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title or interest in
the property described in the mortgage be-
ing foreclosed herein.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion to foreclose a mortgage on the following
property:
LOT 1, BLOCK "D" HIDDEN MEADOWS A
SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4,
PAGES 66-71, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA.

has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses if in'; to it on DAVID J. STERN,
ESQ. -.,111i : attorney, whose address is
900 South Pine Island Road #400, Planta-
tion, FL 33324-3920 on or before, 2009, (no
later than 30 days from the date of the first
publication of this notice of action) and file
the original with the clerk of this court either
before service on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition filed
herein.

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court at WAKULLA County, Florida, this
10th day of December, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERI-
CANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons
with disabilities needing a special accom-
modation should contact COURT ADMIN-
ISTRATION, at the WAKULLA County
Courthouse at 850-926-0905,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.
December 24, 31,2009


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Legal Notice

IN IHE CIHCUII COUHI OI- IHE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 65-2009-CA-000212
DIVISION:
vs.
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
DALE H. ARMSTRONG, et al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DALE H. ARMSTRONG
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
92 LISA DRIVE
CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327
CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
CHRISTINE B. ARMSTRONG
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
92 LISA DRIVE
CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327
CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVID-
UAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following property
in WAKULLA County, Florida:
COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE
MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF LOT 77
OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF
LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA,


THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 12
MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG
THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID
LOT 77 A DISTANCE OF 921.10 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING (SAID POINT
BEING REFERENCED BY AN IRON PIPE
OFFSET 14.82 FEET SOUTHERLY ON
THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF HEREIN
DESCRIBED). FROM SAID POINT OF BE-
GINNING RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 23
MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 220.00
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT,
THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 12
MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 100.12
FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN
NORTH 17 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 35
SECONDS WEST 220.00 FEET TO A
POINT ON THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY
OF SAID LOT 77, (SAID POINT BEING
REFERENCED BY A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT OFFSET 16.88 FEET SOUTHERLY
ON THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF
HEREIN DESCRIBED), THENCE RUN
SOUTH 72 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH-
ERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 77 A
DISTANCE OF 100.12 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.51
ACRES, MORE OR LESS IN THE NORTH-
WEST QUARTER OF SAID LOT 77,
HARTSFIELD SURVEY, AND SUBJECT
TO A PUBLIC ROAD LYING ALONG THE
NORTHERLY BOUNDARY.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses within 30 days after the first publica-
tion, if any, on Florida Default Law Group,
P.L., Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
9119 Corporate Lake Drive, Suite 300,
Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original
with this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the Com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once each
week for two consecutive weeks in the The
Wakulla News.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court on this 14th day of December, 2009.
Any persons with a disability requiring rea-
sonable accommodations should call Clerk
of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
December24, 31, 2009


Trying to sell something?


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Locations:


IN CRAWFORDVILLE
The Wakulla News Office
Ace Hardware
Beef O'Brady's
Century 21 Realty at Shell Point
CVS Pharmacy
Dux Liquors
El Jalisco
Food Mart
Hamaknocker's
Karol's Korner Petro
Lee's Liquor/Sky Box Sports Bar
Lindy's Chicken
Michele's Convenience Store
Ming Tree
Myra Jeans
Petty's BP
Senior Center
Stop N Save
Victor's American Grille
Walgreen's
Wal-Mart
Winn Dixie

IN PANACEA
Big Top Supermarket
Crum's Mini Mall

IN OCHLOCKONEE BAY
Angelo's
Mashes Sands BP

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Express Lane
Lou's Bait and Tackle
Sally's
Sopchoppy Grocery


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IN SPRING CREEK
Spring Creek Restaurant

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IN ST. MARKS
Bo Lynn's
Express Lane

IN WOODVILLE
Ace Hardware
Bert Thomas Grocery
Gulf Coast Lumber
IGA Grocery Store

IN WAKULLA STATION
Savannah's
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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 31, 2009


20 0 Yeari 8 eview


The Harden family keeps the tradition of cane syrup making alive
The Harden family keeps the tradition of cane syrup making alive,


NOVEMBER
Wakulla County saluted
veterans at a special event in
Crawfordville on Nov. 7. Five
veterans told their stories to
The Wakulla News as part of
the Salute to Our Veterans
feature.
The Chamber of Com-
merce kicked off the "Shop
Local Wakulla" shopping
campaign to keep dollars in
the county.
Wakulla High School
teacher Windy Taff Jones
scratched her way to
$100,000 as a lucky winner
of a Florida Lottery scratch
off game.
A school bus crash in-
jured about a dozen people
when a motorist crashed
into the back of the bus
which was getting ready to
discharge students.
Skip, Brian and Trey
Young of the 3Y Ranch se-
lected as the 2009 Wakulla
County Outstanding Farm
Family. They represented the
county at the North Florida
Fair.
The Wakulla High School
NJROTC held the annual
Pass In Review in front of
Commander Dirk Hebert at
J.D. Jones Stadium. School
district officials and parents
watched from the stands as
Commander Hebert comple-
mented the work of the
cadets. The cadets were in-
spected by the commander
and were given an opportu-
nity to perform in front of
family and friends.
County commissioners
said they plan to honor the
late Gretchen Evans by nam-
ing the Wakulla River Bridge
in her honor. Her canoe
rental business neighbors
the bridge which is under
rehabilitation until summer
2010.
Wildwood Golf filed a
request to have a hearing
regarding the possible loss
of the liquor license after
residents filed a complaint
about the golf complex and
Sheriff David Harvey. Harvey
has been one of the individ-
uals keeping the golf course
open. State law prohibits
law enforcement officers
from holding alcoholic bev-
erage licenses. Wildwood
officials dispute the findings


of the Division of Alcoholic
Beverages and Tobacco.
The school district and
sheriff's office joined forces
to acquire a $608,000 fed-
eral grant to form a juvenile
justice unit at Wakulla High
School that serves the entire
school district. Sheriff David
Harvey assigned seven ex-
perienced members of his
law enforcement division to
head the new unit.
Commissioner Howard
Kessler discussed his back-
ground as a medical doctor
and his life as a pilot and
medical man in Sarasota
in an interview with The
Wakulla News. Kessler also
discussed his life as an ac-
tive volunteer in the medical
field along with his involve-
ment with the arts.
Wakulla Building Official
Luther Council was fired
from his post Nov. 4 after a
series of incidents involving
his chief building inspec-
tor and an alleged sexual
harassment complaint was
filed by a female employee
against one of Council's
employees.
County commissioners
agreed to move their board
meetings to Thursdays in
2010.
The City of Sopchoppy
opened the brand new City
Hall across the street from
the old city home. City com-
missioners were given a new
meeting room and more
office space was created for
city staff.
The Queen of Wakulla
Clean, KWCB Director Marj
Law, retired from her post to
pursue other interests. She
held the job for 16 years.
Bears visited neighbor-
hoods in Sopchoppy and
Crawfordville to look for
the elusive picnic basket
of goodies, A Sopchoppy
resident was forced to have
the FWC remove one of the
bears to the Osceola Nati-
ponal Forest that visited
her home and became ag-
gressive.
Wakulla County Commis-
sioners agreed to investigate
an allegation involving the
budget from the departed
building official, Luther
Council. Council was fired
by the county following a
series of issues that arose in


his office. Several members
of the community appeared
before the commission at
a following board meeting
to voice their support for
Council.
County commissioners
continued discussions to re-
instate impact fees that were
placed under a moratorium
when the economy slowed
in 2007. Board members may
reinstate the fees in March,
but commissioners must
decide how much to charge
for new development.
Judge Terry Lewis set a
trial date for alleged mur-
derer Gary Michael Hilton.
The trial was set for July in
the case of the murder of


Leslie Dyan Drew


Cheryl Dunlap in December
2007.
School board members
agreed not to implement im-
pact fees when county com-
missioners get their fees up
and running again. School
district officials said they no
longer had any project that
could use the growth related
fees since Riversink Elemen-
tary School is finished and
operating.
Commissioners contin-
ued to debate days of the
week in which to hold their
2010 board meetings.
The Wakulla Commu-
nity Theatre slated the 18th
annual Christmas concert
at the historic Sopchoppy
School.
The whooping cranes
from Wisconsin began their
winter journey to their sum-
mer home in St. Marks and
Citrus County. The early 2010
visit will be the second for
officials at the St. Marks Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge.
As was the case in 2009,


the cranes ran into foul
weather in Illinois at the
start of their journey.


DECEMBER
A 28-year-old woman and
a 29-year-old man died after
an apparent domestic dis-
pute on Nov. 29. Teacher
aide Leslie Dyan Drew was
found slain in the Apalachic-
ola National Forest by a resi-
dent who was walking his
dog. She died of a gunshot
wound to her head. Steven
Lee Stubbs was found shot
in his home in an apparent
suicide attempt. Stubbs was
a suspect in the shooting of
his girlfriend. He died the
next day at a Tallahassee
hospital.
Wakulla County Commis-
sioners considered a tract
of land owned by New Life
Ministries as a potential
site for the new community
center. The site is located off
Trice Lane in Crawfordville.
The debate over paving
Forest Highway 13 contin-
ued as two groups of people
debated the merits in front
of county commissioners.
One group is looking for
help in paving the road to
Smith Creek, while other
residents said they want the
forest road to remain a dirt
surface.
The Shadeville High
School, now Wakulla Edu-
cation Center, was remem-
bered for 100 years of ser-
vice to the community. The
school site was also used
as the old Shadeville El-
ementary School under Su-
perintendent David Miller
who was principal of the
elementary school at the
time it closed.
Like the forest road pav-
ing idea, the "Capital City to
the Sea" bike loop has gath-
ered supporters and those
opposing the idea. The 120
mile trail would provide a
connection from Tallahassee
to the coast and connect to
the trail project underway in
Ochlockonee Bay.
Commissioners also con-
sidered a proposal to change
the format of the Planning
and Zoning Commission.
The terms and make-up
of the board could change
under a proposal from Com-
missioner Lynn Artz.
The St. Marks Refuge
Photo Club held a holiday


event at the federal property
and taught children how to
make Christmas crafts.
The Charlie Odom sexual
battery trial ended with
a hung jury as five jurors
voted for an acquittal and a
sixth juror voted for guilty.
A new trial will start again


in February.
The Harden family took a
page out of past history by
cane grinding the old fash-
ioned way in Sopchoppy.
County residents rallied
behind the Leslie Drew fam-
ily after her shooting death
on Nov. 29. Her mother, Bar-
bara Strickland said she was
amazed by the outpouring of
love following the tragedy.
Panacea kicked off the
holiday season with Santa
Claus and the Fifth Annual
Christmas in Panacea cel-
ebration.
NAMI, the National Al-
liance for Mental Illness/
Wakulla, held a panel discus-
sion to address suicide in
Wakulla County.
Crawfordville and Sop-
choppy hosted Christmas
activities and opportunities
to meet with Santa Claus.
Crawfordville participants
endured cold and damp
weather one night while
Sopchoppy had to deal with
monsoon conditions for
most of their event the fol-
lowing day.
Rev. Emmett Whaley was
remembered as a man who
touched many lives during
his 93 years of life. Whaley
died on Dec. 4.
The Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation an-
nounced several Wakulla
County projects as part of
the five year work plan at a
public hearing in Midway.
The makeup of the plan-


ning and zoning commis-
sion will change. The voting
status of the St. Marks and
Sopchoppy representatives
also changed as the cities
lost their voting power.
On a soggy Friday, Dec.
4, county commissioners
and staff dedicated Wool-


ley Park and improvements
completed at the popular
coastal facility.
County commission im-
pact fees will be returning
in March. A single-family
home will be charged just
over $1,570. The board had
stopped collecting the fees
for more than 18 months.
Former Building Official
Luther Council was rejected
in an appeal to get his job
back. A three member panel
hearing was held at the
Wakulla County Library.
Circuit Court Judge N.
Sanders Sauls ordered a
refund of ambulance MSBU
funds, but reduced the per-
centage of money that was
originally earmarked to at-
torneys involved in the
case.
Sopchoppy City Commis-
sioners agreed to hold a
beer and wine referendum
during the 2010 election
after owners of Backwoods
Bistro requested to sell beer
and wine at their establish-
ment. A motion was filed by
the State Attorney's office re-
questing a new judge in the
FHP Trooper Charlie Odom
case. The state wants Judge
Gary off the bench for the
new trial in 2010. The mo-
tion stated a concern about
Judge Gary and rulings that
went against the prosecu-
tion that "may have been
influenced by inappropriate
factors." The trial ended
without a verdict.


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