Title: Wakulla news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00219
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville, Fla
Publication Date: April 30, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028313
Volume ID: VID00219
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Full Text



P SMA UNCOVER OF FL3U7

Lady War Eagles cruise to district champion GAINESVILE FI

Pitcher Mandy McClendon tosses two no-hitter" '/,

in the same week.
Pictured: Hannah Lovestrand, Coach Tom Graham
Please turn to Page 6A


"akutia


e


Our 114th Year, 17th Issue Thursday, April 30,2009 T1
Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century 5


rt V//s/r/


Crime Rate:

Wakulla ranks in

top 15 for safety


Orange County is the
most dangerous county
in Florida to become a
victim of an index crime,
By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmai@thewakullanews.netl
The Florida Department
of Law Enforcement (FDLE)
has released the 2008 Crime
in Florida-Uniform Crime
Report (UCR) an'd Wakulla
'County is ranked 15th as
one of the safest counties
in Florida.
The UCR ranks "index"
crimes which include mur-


der, forcible rape, robbery,
aggravated assault, burglary,
larceny and motor vehicle
'theft.
According to the statistics,
Lafayette County is the safest
county in Florida followed by
Union, Calhoun, Baker and
Washington.
Orange County is the
least safe county in the state
ranking with Putnam, Duval,
Miami-Dade and Monroe.
Liberty County was the only
county in the state that failed
to report UCR cases.
Continued on Page 5A


Daniels will retire

as WMS principal


A Night to

Remember
With great anticipation many
young people from Wakulla High
School, Wakulla Middle School,
and Riversprings Middle School
were waiting patiently for a very
special night that came on April
18. It was a Saturday that promised
to be "A Night to Remember," and
that it was.
Twenty-five special needs stu-
dents from the Wakulla Coun-
ty area along with their guests,
teachers, and many of the young
(and young at heart) members of
Wakulla Springs Baptist Church
enjoyed an unforgettable evening of
celebration that was full of fun and
laughter and a whole lot of danc-
' ing to the tunes at the fingertips of
the great D.J. Bubba King, Bubba
Howard.
"With the lights and the bal-
loons and the music, not to men-
tion the disco ball, the dance floor
and all this food, the kids truly are
experiencing what it is to attend a
real Prom," said one of the chaper-
ones. "We really didn't know'what
to expect, but this was more than
we imagined," said another guest.
Wakulla High Class of 2008
student Chris Reeves said how
great the evening was and person-
ally thanked the Prom's event
coordinator while asking if the
church was planning this again for'
next year because it meant so much
to him and his friends.


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmat@thewakullanews.net
The Wakulla County School
District will lose a longtime ad-
ministrator, a teacher with the
longest tenure in the school
system and a veteran football
and physical education coach
when June arrives.
Jo Ann Daniels will retire
as principal of Wakulla Middle
School on June 30 which is the
same day Katherine "Kay" R.
Floyd finishes her career at
Medart Elementary School '
Coach J.D. Jones will com-
plete his time in the state
DROP retirement program on
June 2. Jones had been out of
the football coaching business
for a couple of years but he
is still active as a teacher at


Bettie Mae Bodiford. Sandi DeRoss, Walker Bodiford walk through balloons.
"This is just one of the ways we
desire to reach out and love on the
people in our community," said
Lewis Pollard, pastor of Wakulla
Springs Baptist Church. "The
families within our church are pur-
suing life with a different approach;
simply, Loving God, Loving People,
and Serving the World.' "
"It is our desire to reach others
in the community with the love of
Jesus Christ. Through this incred-
ible night we were able to celebrate
the joy of the Special Olympic ath- -
letes in this area and remind them
of how loved they are, by us as well
as by the loving God we sen e," said
event coordinator Sandi DeRoss.
"We have many to thank for mak-
ing this a very special night"
Continued on Page 5A Amber Mclver, Alex Dutton dance at the prom.


Wakulla High School
Daniels will be tending to
family matters rather than en-
tering the DROP program.
"This has been a very dif-
ficult decision but I feel it is
what I need +o do at this time,"
Daniels said in her resignation
letter. "I have truly loved being
i part of the Wakulla County
School System for the past
30 years. It has been a great
experience that enabled me
to grow professionally and to
be inactive martin the success
of our students."
The school district has
already begun the advertis-
ing process to hire a new
principal.
Continued on Page 5A


County tripped by

wetlands rules


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
A strict reading of the wet-
lands ordinance and the re-
quired 75-foot setback from any
wetlands is creating a number
of problems and resulting in
code complaints against the
county's own crews for road
maintenance work within 75
feet of a wetlands.
The commission chairman
himself. Howard Kessler, has
been questioned about an ap-
parent violation of the wetlands
ordinance for mowing within
75 feet of a wetland on his
property which was brought
to the attention of code enforce-
ment by a complaint filed by a
property owner irritated that
Kessler had carried a complaint
of a wetlands violation against


him to code enforcement
At the same time, an ac-
cess road to a subdivision
was approved to go through a
wetlands with a vote of condi-
tional-use approval by the plan-
ning commission without any
review by the county commis-
sion. At a recent meeting, the
board considered revoking the
conditional use, and a majority
of commissioners seemed in
support of the idea, but were
hamstrung by the legalities.
Resident Chad Hanson, who
helped draft the wetlands or-
dinance, suggested that the
road issue for Muir Woods
subdivision should have been
conducted as a variance, which
would have required county
commission approval.
Continued on Page 3A


Inside Blue crabs will be

This Week featured crustacean


Comment&Opinlon.....Page 2A
Week In Wakulla ..........Page 2A
Church .........................Page 4A
Sports..........................Page 6A.
People.........................Page 8A
Law Enforcement........Page 9A
Outdoors ..................Page 10A'
Almanac.....................Page 11A
Wakulla Wildlife...........Page 1B
School..........................Page 2B
People..........................Page 4B
Business......................Page 6B





6 4ll45I78 20I215


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
The blue crab will take cen-
ter stage at the 35th Annual
Wakulla County Blue Crab Fes-
tival Saturday, May 2 at Wool-
ley Park in Panacea.
The seafood industry will
also be represented by other
creatures including mullet and
shrimp.
The festival began in 1975
as a way to celebrate the crab
industry in Wakulla County. Or-
ganizers trimmed the two day
event to one day several years
ago in an effort to streamline
the program.
SThe Coastal Optimist Club
Parade will start the activities
at 10 a.m. on U.S. Highway 98.


The gate to Woolley Park opens
after the parade and admission
is $3 per person. Children un-
der age 12 get in for free.
The opening ceremonies
will be held at 11 a.m. and
Coon Bottom Creek will per-
form at 11:15 a.m.
The mullet toss will be held
at approximately noon and the
Mountain Dew Cloggers will
perform at 1 p.m.
The crab picking contest
will commence at 2 p.m. and
the steel drum Caribbean band
Blue Chameleon will play at
2:45 p.m.
The Mountain Dew Cloggers
perform again at 3:30 p.m.
Continued on Page 5A


Mother Nature provided an outstanding weekend for the 36th Annual Stephen C.
Smith Memorial Regatta at Shell Point Beach. The beautiful weather allowed visi-
tors to dip their toes and other parts of their bodies in the water of Apalachee Bay.
The auction, races, food and other items drew hundreds of visitors to the coast
with the American Cancer Society the winner of the event. Organizers hope the
regatta raises more than $15,000. (Photo by Eric "Q" Stanton)
I


e


" '~-







Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009


Why save
By JACK RUDLOE
Special to The Wakulla News
Wetlands and the Code
Enforcement Board have beer
in the news lately, which is a
good reason to remind people
why Wakulla County adopted
a wetland ordinance. The wet
lands of Wakulla County have
stood since the melting of the
last ice age 10,000 years ago.
Yet some people say, "There's
plenty of wetlands on refuge
and national forest lands, why
not develop the rest?
Ask the birds, including
ithe wood ducks that forage in
ithe wooded ponds, and shal-
low, clear underwater grassy
meadows and lily pads. They
Don't like dredged out catfish
ponds. The birds that collect
around natural wetlands give
us pleasure, few things can lift
Ithe spirit or rival the beauty
and magnificence of a Great
Blue Heron rising up from the
Marshes with its wings out-
i stretched. Yet as development
encroaches on their feeding
grounds, it's becoming harder
for these creatures to find
food. To a Great Blue Heron
in search of a frog or crawfish,
there are no legal boundaries;
it doesn't know whether a
wetland is public or privately
owned or whether humans
label it isolated or connected.
Definitions such "isolated" or
a "connected" wetlands mean
nothing to it. To a mullet forag-
ing among the marsh grass on
an incoming tide, there is no
such thing as "mean high wa-
ter." These are legal definitions
devised by man, an attempt at a
political compromise between
developers and environmental-
ists. They have no ecological
meaning whatsoever.
Standing there with endless
- patience, the herons and egrets
'salk the riviers, the lakes, the
swamps'and bogs, waiting for
a fish to swirl. The reeds, lily
pads, St. Johns Wart bushes.
sawgrass and cattails are their
home. They know that life
abounds in the low swampy
places that we call "wetlands"
with their mucky wet hydricc"
soils. Multitudes of aquatic
insects,grass shrimp and other
crustaceans, mosquito fish and
tadpoles abound there. Flocks
of woodstorks sweep the water
and mud with their large bills
until they feel something alive
and a thousandth of a second,
grab it with a reflective snap.
fHere in the eternal food
chain, the big prey upon the
little: the tiny mosquito fish
Spicks at the decaying veg-
etation, delicately eating the
nearly microscopic water mites
;and nematodes, until a sun-
fish, bream or crappie rushes
in and grabs one. Then down
Stabs the beak of the dazzling
white' snowy egret, who has
been standing in the reeds,
perched above the shallows
witi endless patience waiting
for the right moment In the
endless cycle of life and death,
a marsh hawk swoops down
and catches a water snake to


wetlands?
feed its young, an eagle grabs
the rabbit, or an alligator scores
Sa pond turtle.
S And yes, there are mosqui-
i toes that live in wetlands, that
make us part of the food chain.
i But that's part of living in the
Country and on the coast.
S Sometimes, during periods
of drought, wetlands become
. dry lands, and tiny creatures
; dig down into the mud, go
into torpid sleep, die or move
on. Alligators, frogs and turtles
move from one low puddle to
another seeking water. Some
Wetlands are ephemeral low
spots, seemingly barren of life
that evaporate completely, yet
they may be the home to en-
dangered flat woods salaman-
: ders. They require areas that
dry out, keep fish populations
t from building up and eating
their eggs.
When the rains come, the
bogs, marshes, depressions
even the high ground pine-
woods turn into what survey-
ors call "swamp and overflow
lands."
When it floods all wetlands
are connected and fish swim
through the forests, and frogs
which were silenced by the
drought, chirp and grunt, and
fill the night with music. The
dark enriched tannin stained
waters flow through the wire-
grass and palmetto into creeks
then to the rivers. Rivers of
tannin tea flow out to the Gulf
of Mexico carrying dissolved
and digested vegetation from
uplands which stimulates the
growth of sea grass. Miles out
at sea, the swamp waters cause
plankton to flourish and give
us delicious seafood to eat.
Untold trillions of tiny larval
fish, crabs, shrimp and oysters
derive benefit from wetlands.
But when dump trucks pile
dirt, on them and turn them
into permanent dry land or
dig them out into sterile deep
lakes where sunlight cannot
penetrate the bottoms,the
eternal life cycle is diminished.
Ditching and draining shallow
wetlands destroys their numer-
ous functions. They lose their
ability to retain stormwater
as life disappears. Wetlands
remove excess nutrients and
retain stormwater, keeping ad-
jacent lands, roads and houses
from flooding. Their ability to
cleanse and filter stormwater
run off disappears when wet-
lands disappear. Regardless of
their size, or their ownership,
whether they are classed as
wetlands, bogs and marshes,
isolated or not, they all act like
livers and kidneys removing
pollutants and heavy metals.
They affect the micro-climate,
preventing the air frbm becom-
ing too hot in the summer
and too cold in the winter. To
function properly, wetlands
also need a buffer, a forest
or wooded area around their
edge, which act as a transition
from dry land to wetland. The
greater the size, the better the
level of protection,
Continued on Page 3A


My View


Editor, The Newss
I want to thank the City of
Sopchoppy for employing us
for the last two years as manag-
ers of city park. As "outsiders,"
they took a chance on us, and
we appreciate everything the


city has done for us.
I want to thank everyone
who has come to the park. We
enjoyed having you as guests
and will miss you.
There are individuals who
made us feel like family. There


are too many to list all of you, but it will go by fast. Again,
so I'm sorry to group you all thank you everyone for making
together. We have two years us welcome in your town.
of stuff we've collected and 30 Dave and Laura Moshier
days may seem like a long time, Sopchoppy


For online community calendar
visit www.thewakullanews.com
and click on calendar.

WEEK IN WAKULLA


in Wakulla County and people
were in a shoot first, ask ques-
tions later frame of mind. Thursday, April 50, 2009
tios later frame of i CELEBRATION OF THE ARTS, featuring music, dance and
Shortly after this abuse, I comedy from district schools, will he held at Wakulla
left forAfrica for a very extend- High School auditorium beginning at 6:30 p.m. Admission is
ed period and had no time to $5 adults, $2 students.'. ..
deal with their, so-called viola- COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB meets at Posey's Up thd Creek
tion. My entire home was a in Panacea at noon.
code violation violated by our MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA, a fellowship of men
code department themselves who gather to share and support one another in the quest
Code was informed of my job for authentic manhood, meets "outback" (behind)
in Africa and that Africa was Cornerstone Ministries at 6:30 p.m. For more information,
not a small town down the call at 508-2560.
road from Panacea, but an ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.
road from Panacea, but an an Road
VFW BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran' Road
actual continent from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
While in Africa, I was e- Friday, May 1, 2009
mailed by Jaime Baze and AA meets at the American Legion Building next to the
told that my home would be Women's Club in Crawfordville with an open meeting at
seized and sold at auction by 8 p.m. There are also open meetings
the Wakulla County Sheriffs FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public
Office if I did not rectify their library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
so-called violation. I duly GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa's Episcopal
informed Ms. Baze of my Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
situation, that I could not PICKIN' 'N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the
leave Sudan to meet her time senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
frame and had no idea when Saturday, May 2, 2009
frame and had no idea when BLUE CRAB FESTIVAL will be held throughout the day at
I was coming home. I also Woolley Park in Panacea. For more information, see story
informed my commissioner, on Page 1A.
Howard Kessler, via e-mail of NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordville
these facts but at the time did, Highway at 5 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321
not receive a response. It was NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, a free class for individuals
impossible to do anything interested in learning how to use their digital cameras, wil
about the situation. Shortly be offered the first Saturday of every month from 10 a.m.
after, I again received another to noon. Ranger Barney Parker will teach the class. To
threat that the home would register, call 925-6121.
be seized, that lawyers would Sunday, May 3, 2009
be neied, that l s would ueMEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKUL. meets at First Baptist
be notified, that I would be Church of Crawfordville at 7 p.m.
fined, be responsible for court Monday, May 4, 2009
costs, etc. GRANT WRITING WORKSHOP will be held at TCC Wakulla
Again, I wrote Ms. Baze from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Registration is $50. Bonnie Holub
of my situation and got no teaches the class. Call 922-6290 for more information or
response, just more threats of register online at wakullacenter@tcc.fl.edu. (The workshop
impending action, continues over three weeks)
At this point, I decided to MOOSE LODGE #2510 meets at the lodge in Panacea at 7 p.m.
stop making payments on the Tuesday, May 5, 2009
house. What was the use if the CINCO DE MAYO
home was going to be seized BOOK BUNCH, for pre-school and home school families,
home was going ti be seized meets at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
and sold by the time I returned CONGRESSIONAL STAFF from the office of Rep. Allen Boyd
home? It's tough to comply will be at the commission complex from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.
with ridiculous demands at to discuss issues of local concern.
home when you're delivering FARMER'S MARKET will be held at Purple Martin Nuseries, .
food aid to Darfur, not to men- north of Crawfordville, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.
tion the delays in finding an NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordvile
Internet connection. Highway at 7 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.
They have put a lien on VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW
my separate. lot and are now Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
attempting to get $2,500 out of Wednesday, May 6, 2009
me for back fines to release the AA meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.
e o ac nes the l e BEADING CLASSES will be held at the senior center from
lien so I can sell the lot. I earn 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Cost is $5.
my money in an extremely BOOK BABIES, for infants and toddlers, will be held at the
hazardous part of the world public library at 10:30 a.m.
and have told them repeatedly BOOK NOOK, for children in grades K-5, is 10:30 a.m. and
that Wakulla County will not 1 p.m.
get a dime of it. In fact, I am BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at
actively pursuing legal action. 10:30 a.m.
[ may not win but it won't be HEALTH FAIR will be held at the senior center from 9 a.m. to
because I didn't tryl 1 p.m. Representatives will be on hand to address issue
For the record, Mr. Kessler related to healthcare.
and County Administrator LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.
Ben Pingree did respond later Visit the 35th Annual Wakulla County Blue Crab Festival at
and offer to help rectify this Woolley Park in Panacea on Saturday, May 2 beginning with
calamity. This help was never a 10 a.m. parade on U.S. Highway 98. The day concludes with
followed up by either of them fireworks shortly after dark. Admission is $3 for adults and
after my stating that I was children under age 12 are free. Caitlin Nicole Eadie is the
pursuing legal recourse, headlining music act this year.


Editor, The News .
In response to the recent
article concerning code viola-
tions, I would like to submit
the following on the drama
playing out at 73 Tarpine Drive
near Ochlockonee Bay.
I'm a volunteer Vietnam vet-
eran and commercialpilot I fly
humanitarian missions for the
U.N. World Food Program in
northern and southern Sudan.
I am at home infrequently, es-
pecially now that I don't have a
home thanks to the Wakulla
County Code Department and
their enforcement division.
In late 2007, I was posted
with a Stop Work order on my
home where I was remodeling
a very poorly designed (and
approved by code) porch roof
that, during heavy rains, would
leak water into the main home:
wall and flooring. This porch
roof was signed off by our
building department along
with many other hazardous
conditions such as electrical
outlets that pulled out of walls
and smoked when something
was plugged into them. The
roof was caving in at certain
places causing additional leaks
into the home. The porch
stairs were allowed to be built
into the earth with no founda-
tion causing the stairway to
rot and pose an additional
hazard. These were all signed
off and approved by Wakulla
County.
After I had most of the
construction completed and
very early on a freezing cold
and dark February morning,
a person assigned by Jaime
Baze of the Wakulla County
Code Enforcement Depart-
ment pounded on my door at
6:15 a.m. That's a.m. as in very
early in the morning while
my family and I were sound
asleep. Not a loud knock, but
an actual pounding. This con-
tinued for about three minutes
while I gathered my thoughts,
dressed and decided against
going out the back door and
approaching the front with a
spotlight and shotgun.
The person then, without
showing any identification
whatsoever, proceeded to
shove a letter in my face while
abruptly saying, "I was told to
give you this!" He left immedi-
ately with no further words of
explanation or apologies. The
better was from the Wakulla
County Code Enforcement
Department stating my code
violation but was zero excuse
for this sort of treatment.
This was shortly after the
roung woman had been killed


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COUNTY COMMISSION MEoNS --A LK ATHOW 7SMfE 5SPE

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Wakulla County Commission Pie Chart.


Thank you Sopchoppy, it was great!


Code enforcement

drama plays out


Trb .akiulla aJlVU&
The Wakulla News (USPS 644-640) is published weekly Ft
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla
News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
General Manager: Tammie Barfield........................ tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Editor: Keith Blackmar...............................kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Reporter: William Snowden............................... wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton................estanton@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey ...................kinsey@thewakullanews.net
Bookkeeping: Sherry Balchuck ..........................accounting@thewakulanews.net
Classifieds/In House Sales: Denise Folh..............classifieds@thewakullanews.net
Circulation: Gary Fazzina................................. circulation@thewakullanews.net

Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable
one year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $26 yr. $14.50 1/2 yr., Out of County $35 yr. $19 1/2 yr.
Out of State $40 yr. $22 1/2 yr..


Continued on Page 3A








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009 Page 3A


Wetlands
Continued from Page 2A my surpr
When people destroy wet- wetlands
lands, the quality of life is several ye
diminished'for everyone who The fi:
lives here. The birds lose their couple of
food, the ability of the land to it's a star
harmlessly absorb flooding is tive Will
lost, the filtering of pollutants state's f.
out of the water is reduced, bill, henc
and the serenity and peace our court
of mind that wading birds in than not
scenic wetlands give us goes by Floric
with them. The filtering abili- Environn
ties that protect the larval fish, shoddy ir
crabs, shrimp and oysters that of how w
move into our waters dimin- need our
ishes, and year after year the whether
rich protein basket that has fed or not.
us for so many generations, de-
clines. That is why the Wakulla Jack Rud
County Commission, much to Panacea


County tripped-


ise, voted to have a
protection ordinance
ears ago.
nes are miniscule, a
hundred dollars, but
t. Former Representa-
Kendrick gutted the
reshwater wetland
e any protection that
nty gives is better
:hing. Enforcement
la's Department of
mental Regulation is
n spite of the rhetoric
wonderful they are. We
Wetlands protected
some people like it


loe writes from


Drama plays out


Continued from Page 2A
I would like to urge the
citizens of Wakulla County to
have a back up plan for situa-
tions such as this. If someone
comes knocking on your door
:in the wee hours, do not open
the door for any reason. Do


Clarification

A story on Animal Control
being transferred from the
sheriff's office back to the
county commission noted that
there is one county employee
who works at the Adoption
Center, which is operated by
the non-profit group Citizens
for Humane Animal Treat-


not depend on law enforce-
ment to arrive in time. Have a
plan of action.
I will never allow this to
happen to me or my family
again.
Bill Catalin4
Ochlockonee Bay


1r

ment. While the position of
veterinarian technician is
officially under the sheriff's
office so that the person in
the job is eligible for health
benefits, the salary of that
position is reimbursed to the
county by CHAT.


'The Tree' loses hope


Continued from page 1A issue:
In response to those prob- The board is pursuing
lems, at the commission meet- calling in letters of credit on
ing on Tuesday, April 21, the Hidden Meadows subdi-
commissioners directed staff vision for unfinished infra-
to amend the ordinance to structure, while at the same
put in certain exemptions for time stormwater runoff from
activities around wetlands the subdivision is running
and increase the penalties for onto the land of neighboring
violations. property owner Guy Revell
The intent of the revisions and into sinkholes that are
would be to clarify that the known to be linked to Wakulla
ordinance only applies to Springs and Spring Creek.
those new clearing activities The preliminary plat for
within the wetlands and the Hidden Meadows was ap-
required 75-foot buffer after proved in 2005 by the county
the ordinance's effective date commission and included
of May 1, 2006. stormwater ponds. Eight days
Currently, the ordinance after that approval, the de-
allows the Code Enforcement velopers went to the state
Board to levy fines, require Department of Environmental
restitution and mitigation Protection and got a swale
- but the fines are based exemption. The final plat was
on whether the violation is later approved, but commis-
irreparable, irreversible or a sioners on that board said
repeat violation. Staff will they were unaware of the
look at more specific language stormwater changes.
for fines and restoration of After a couple of heavy
impacted areas, rains, it became apparent
It is also proposed that that the overflow runoff from
an exemption be created for the subdivision was directed
county road-maintenance ac- to the sinkholes. That drew
tivities. The ordinance as it concern from Wakulla Springs
currently reads specifically Ambassador Cal Jamison as
states that the county "shall well as Chad Hanson of the
not be exempt from this chap- Wakulla Watershed Coali-
ter nor from the rules and tion.
regulations found therein." The untreated runoff go-
As for the conditional use ing into Revell's sinkholes,
issue, the board indicated it Jamison told the commission,
did not want to review all con- is "thwarting your efforts to
ditional use applications for protect Wakulla Springs and
wetlands, but certainly those the rest of the county."
with greater impact. The watershed coalition is
The issue will come back seeking to get DEP to inter-
before the commission for vene in the case.
further consideration and Assistant County Admin-
review. istrator Lindsay Stevens told
In another environmental commissioners that DEP had


been out to the site at the
request of the county and
looked at the swales and said
that the swales would treat
80 percent of the water of a
three year-one hour rain event
within 72 hours, which is the
state requirement. That's four
times the treatment of storm-
water ponds.
Before the real estate bust,
Hidden Meadows had gotten
permits to build 14 homes,
of which 12 are actually com-
pleted.
Meantime, the developer's
letters of credit that the county
is calling in amount to enough
money to cover the cost of put-
ting in some of the remaining
infrastructure.
"There may be enough
money for a final layer of
asphalt, sidewalks and play-
ground equipment," Stevens
told commissioners. But not
enough for other items on
the infrastructure list such as
landscaping.
The board considered
whether it should take some
action to alleviate the flooding
and/or to pursue some legal
action against the developer.
Citing concerns about the
expense and difficulty of
pursing a lawsuit, Chairman
Howard Kessler said he was
"Not willing to do that."
County Attorney Ron
Mowrey said that, in prepara-
tion for a lawsuit, the couilty
would need to have an engi-
neer or hydrogeologist look at
the plans and review what's
out there and determine if
something's wrong, look at
the question of whether there
was some intentional misrep-


presentation or fraud. Mowrey
noted the county's standing
to even file a lawsuit could be
challenged given that it would
in effect be challenging its
own development order.
And ultimately, Mowrey
said, the developers are prob-
ably organized as a limited li-
ability corporation so that the
only asset of the partnership
is the land meaning that,
even if the county were to win
a lawsuit, it could end up with
the land but no money.
"I'm still back to the idea,"
said Commissioner Mike
Stewart, "that it doesn't mat-
ter if they got these swale
exemptions. If the ponds filled
up, the water would still flow
to the sinkholes."
Revell and his attorney,
retired circuit judge Charles
McClure, urged the board to
take some action to protect
the karst features.
Commissioner Lynn Artz
had made a motion to direct
the county attorney to obtain
expert analysis and advice
and then contact the devel-
oper with remedies or else
purse an injunction or other
legal action. That motion was
seconded by Commissioner
George Green.
The motion failed when it
came to a vote, with only Artz
and Green voting yea. Kessler,
Stewart and Alan Brock all
voted nay.
Kessler called a break in.
the meeting and, during the
break, Jamison expressed his
extreme disappointment to
the chairman about the lack
of any action by the board to
protect the sinkholes.


Editor, The News;
Shell Point beach and "The
Tree", have withstood gen-
erations of storms, hurricanes
and flooding, but it only took
some individual less than 12
months to bring about the
final demise of both. Does
anyone care?
Throughout the eons, the
storms and high tides have
deposited seaweed teeming
with invertebrate life, grasses
Sand seeds that literally "fed"
Shell Point beach and served
as nature's "cement" to hold
the shells and sap together.
Each moon and high tide
brought support for the previ-
ous "cementing" that main-
tained a stable but delicate
ecosystem unique to this jewel
of a beach.
A developer came on the
scene and, rumor has it, want-
ed to make the beach look like
South Florida beaches. About
12 months ago, a bulldozer'
began scraping off the beach
every, week-from the Coast
Guard Station to the other side


of "The Tree." The bulldozer
scraped up all the "ugly" sea-
weed and the unique beach
grasses that grew, which were
hauled to the dump every
week. After the bulldozer got
rid of all that "bad" growth,
there was only that "ugly" sea-
weed tb contend with.
I guess bulldozers are ex-
pensive, so it was replaced
by one or more humans, who
came every week (Thursday or
Friday). They brought broad
rakes, pitch forks, a truck and
trailer and cleaned up all that
nasty seaweed and hauled it
to the dump. In the last year,
there have been many tons of
what would have been Shell
Point Beach that went to the
dump. Is this legal? Is this
moral? Because of the removal
of nature's "cement," the new
picnic tables and The Tree
will fall into the bay before
summer's end. The pavilion
won't be far behind. Does
anyone care?
Kathleen Lamarche
Shell Point


Volunteers rewarded


Editor, The News:
Thank you Volunteersl
I want to thank the volun-
teers who came to the C.H.A.T.
(Citizens for Humane Animal
Treatment) Adoption Center
last Saturday as part of their
contribution to Volunteer
Wakulla.
We so often forget to think
of others who are less fortu-
nate and it was good to see
. people wanting to help. Some
of you mentioned that you
would like to come back, and
our volunteer staff and our
animals would appreciate a
few extra hands to help out.
Our animals depend on vol-


unteers to get exercise, pets
and belly rubs. Socialization is
most important to the animals
while they are waiting to meet
their new companion for life.
It is rather rewarding to
hear purring and see a wag-
ging tail, and a couple of
hours a week can make all the
difference in the world for a
homeless pet.
SThank you, and all of bur
volunteers at the Adoption
Center for the time you spent
with the animals and helping
at the office
Petra Shuff
C.H.A.T. President
Crawfordville


Flowers look great


Editor, The Newss
'The roadside flowers on
the way to Shell Point are
spectacular this year. Thanks


for not mowing them down.
Marcia Bjerregaard
Shell Point


Subscribe to

Sie WakuUa JetWus 926-7102


PENSION, DUCHEMIN
& DAVIS P.A.
ATTORNEYS

AI Penson Claire Duchemin Mary Ellen Davis
Donna Biggins Jennifer Sweeting Shaun Amarnani


* Family Law
* Bankruptcy
* Civil Litigation
* Estate Planning


* Real Estate Transactions and Matters
* Commercial Transactions
and Business Law
* Construction/Lien Law


and Probate of Estates Administrative Law/Licensing
850-926-6003
17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville
The hiring of an attorney Is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisement.
Before you dedde, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience.


Kessler is polarizing? Nonsense!


Editor, The News: what's going on or coloring same letters section last week
I applaud Michael Keys' let- it with opinion masquerad- told of a woman tired of speed-
ter and I salute you for publish- ing as news. Which is pretty ers in her neighborhood. Will
ing it. We need you both. polarizing in itself, come to she be considered "polarizing"
Keys' topic about "polariza- think of it. for calling the law? Yeah, may-
tion," seems but one aspect Adjectives like "polarizing" be. Until a kid gets killed. But
of a larger "get Commissioner are a.great way to marginalize to suggest Kessler's polarizing
Kessler" drive. It's a conversa- and divert attention from the is just nonsense.
tion we could have, but in the real issues, so let's keep them, And, yes, Commissioner


letters and opinion pages, not
news stories. The Wakulla
News must act as the town
square for opinion; there for
everyone's opinions. Any-
thing less and your credibility
will suffer. Local media can-
not be coniplicit in ignoring


on the opinion pages.
Let's remember all this
started with the sheriff's hit.
and run. The story leads all the
TV stations and Democrat but
not much from The News? And
then the "get Kessler" starts?
For what? Doing his job? The


Stewart, citizens do have a
"dog" in that "fight" That dog's
just plain financial liability plus
the consistent, equitable, even
application of law enforcement
and transparency of public ser-
vants' actions which certainly
was perceived, in the sheriff's


case, by many, as big bowl of
just not happening. You get
any calls? What did you tell
them, "move along, nothing
to see here?"
Without Dr. Kessler that
whole hit and run thing would
have slid out of sight, bounc-
ing from lane to lane down
Rehwinkel Road.
Pretty ironicthatthey'req ut
to get Kessler because of tlie
sheriffs hit and rIun ;,!
They don't need The Wakul-
la News'helping.
Hugh Taylor
Crawfordville


Wakulla County makes a difference


Editor, The Newss
On Saturday, April 25,
VolunteerWAKULLA held its
Second Annual Make A Dif-
ference Day at Hudson Park
featuring simultaneous com-
munity service events. The
event was a success with 141
volunteers contributing 423
hours of service at 12 venues
in Wakulla County. The most
recent estimated dollar value
of volunteer time for the State
of Florida is $17.78 per hour as


provided by independsector.
org. The value of the combined
service projects is estimated to
be $7,520.94.
VolunteerWAKULLA would
like to thank the local business-
es and agencies that contrib-
uted to the success of "Make
A Difference Day," Lindy's
Chicken, Winn-Dixie, COSTCO,
McDonald's, Seineyard Res-
taurant, Pepsi Cola, Frito Lay,
Publix, Gulf Coast Lumber,
Capital City Bank, Super Lube,


St. Mark's Refuge Associa-
tion, Ace Hardware, El Jalisco
Restaurant, Subway, Hardee's,
Allie's Ice Cream Parlor, Rum-
my's Pizza/Pasta Grill, Beef O'
Brady's, Myra Jean's Restaurant,
Forgotten Coast Restaurant,
Keep Wakulla County Beauti-
ful, Gulf State Community
Bank, Wakulla Bank, Wakulla


iTA50-STA 30-9

iK' 850-370-6911


County Sheriffs Office and the
Wakulla County Commission,
for their support and participa-
tion in this event;
L Scott Jackson
Wakulla County Extension
Director





Antiques and Uniques
"Something for Everyone"
61 Rose Street, Sochopppy '.
850-962-2550
Open Tue. Sat. 10 5 p.m
www.antiquesatsisters.com
MOTHER'S DAY,
MADE SIMPLE;..
A Gift or Gift Certificate
3 from Sisters!


IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR DRINKING WATER
Monitoring Requirements Not Met for Panacea Area Water System, Inc.
Our water system violated two drinking water standards over the past year. Even though these were not emergencies, as
our customers, you have a right to know what happened and what we did to correct these situations.
We are required to monitor your drinking water for specific contaminants on a regular basis. Reslts of regular monitoring
are an indicator of whether or not our drinking water meets health standards. During 2008, we did not monitor for lead and
copper and therefore cannot be sure of the quality of our drinking water during that time.
What should I do?
There is nothing you need to do at this time.
The table below lists the contaminants we did not properly test for during the last year, how often we are supposed to
sample for these contaminants, how many samples we are supposed to take, how many samples we took, when samples
should have been taken, and the date on which follow-up samples were (or will be) taken.

Contaminant Required sampling Number of samples Whenallsamples When samples were
frequency taken should have been or will be taken
taken
Lead 10 samples every 0 June September 2008 June September 2009
three years
Copper 10 samples every
three years 0 June September 2008 June September 2009

What happened? What is being done?
We plan to take the required samples soon, as described in the last column of the table above.
For more information, please contact Panacea Area Water System at (850)984-5301.
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially whose who may not have received
this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by
posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Panacea Area Water System, Inc.
Public Water System ID = 1650514
Date Distributed: January 29, 2009


-Lo b.








Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009


ChurchNews -

SOpchoppy UMC to

celebrate 150 years:


Sopch6ppyrnited4Method-
ist Church will hold its two-
day sesqincentennial celebra-
tion this weekend. This event;:
in a year of observance of the
church's '190 years, begins at
noon on Saturday, May 2, at'
the church's eriw facilities on
Faith Aven e.
Planters on the rich land
west of the Sopchoppy River
,in southwestern Wakulla
County founded Sopchoppy
UMC in the antebellum year
1859. Eventual establishment,
of a rail line and depot two
miles away on the other side
of the river drew the popu-'
lation and the chuichl t6
present-day Sopchoppy at
the beginning of the 20th
Century. The grand pine-frame
sanctuary constructed in 1904
served until 1960 when it was
replaced by the brick structure.
standing now.
The congregation acquired
facilities much larger and
made the move across the
street. The current pastor for
Sopchoppy and Ochlockonee
Bay UMCs and perhaps the


70th pastor for Sopchoppy is
Rev. Bill, Rhoads.
Saturday's program Will
feature a slate of activities
honoring the church's history
and will feature gospel music
performances. Dinner will be
provided. The Sunday pro-
gram begins at 10 a.m. with a
special worship service at 11
a.m. A covered-dish luncheon
will follow. 'Six of the former
pastors of the church are ex-
pected to visit for the two day
celebration.
A new update ,of the
church's written history is
also part of the sequicenten-
nial observance. "The Gather-
ing by the River," by church
historian David Roddenberry
and former pastor Rev. Jesse
L Baker, came out in hardback
in December and will be avail-
able at the event for $20, with
proceeds going to the church.
The book features more than
100 photographs, including a
picture of steep-roofed 1904
sanctuary on the cover. The
authors will be available to
sign copies.


Praise in Park slated
Wakulla Springs Baptist the Wakulla Springs Baptist
Church will be sponsoring a Church Praise and Team Band,
Praise in the Park at Hudson Fisher Creek, Chosen Vessels,
Park Saturday, May 2 from 4 Free Fire, Friends of Christ
p.m. to 10 p.m. The event will and others.
be a benefit fundraiser for Food donations will be ac-
Teen Challenge featuring the cepted and a contest will be
Total Impact Dance Team and held for the best chili.


Buckhorn News


By ETHEL SKIPPER
Thought for the week:
Prayer is a good way to start
the day. Ask for the blessing of
the Father on our family and to
guide us in work, school, shop-
ping, church or wherever we
may be. Let His angels watch
over us,
People pray every day, all
over the country, in neighbor-
hood prayer groups, in mid-
week services, and in special
prayer sessions, praying in one
accord, praying out loud, pray-
ing silently, in short prayers
or some lasting a longer time.
When we pray, we must draw
nigh to God. Wait in silence un-
til you feel Him there with you.
Now pray, thanking God, most
times we get to him when we
are in need, but He already
knows what we need,
A happy birthday wish to
Mother Lossie Mae Rosier on


St. izabemth
Ann Seton
Catholic C
Mass 9 a.m Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Father lames MacGee, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
926-1797

Trinity B a
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pro-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Vicar Bert Matlock
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557


May 1. Love and best wishes
from family and friends.
Happy birthday greetings
to Rev. Gary Clary, Sr. on May
3, from your son Gary and
the rest of the family. We all
love you.
On Sunday, May 3, at Skip-
per Temple Church, 165 Surf
Rd., at 6 p.m., a service will be
held in appreciation of Evan-
gelist Glenda Simmons on her
graduation from Bible college.
Family and friends are wel-
come to come and share this
great occasion with her.
Happy 56th anniversary to
Mr, and Mrs. Willie F. Skipper,
Sr. on May 2. Happy belated
birthday to Evangelist Joann
Burn on April 7.
Our prayers and concern go
out to the sick,.shut-ins, and
those in hospitals and nurs-
ing homes, and those in need
everywhere.


\aNv Church
1255,Rehwinkel Rd.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd.& US 98
Holy Eucharist
10:30am
Sunday School Provided
The Reverend Roy Lima
926-1742


Wakulla United
F Methodist Church
Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m
Sunday School for alleges -10 am.
S Sunday Worship 11 a.m.
Wednesday Service 7 p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
PastorJadni Hiny Risneart


Hwy 319 Medart,
Office 926-5265
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
o3 Sunday School 9:45 anm.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
SAWANA 4:00 p.m.
Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Oar Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org


Obituarie,


Hilda R. M. Mathers
Hilda .Ruth, McKenzie
Mathers, 81, of Crawfordville
died Thursday, April 23, at
her home.
.The funeral service was
held Monday. April 77, at
Ivani Assembly of God with
Pastor baniel Cooksey' and
Rev. Gerald Fielder officiat-
ing. Interment followed in
Ivan Assembly's cemetery. In
lieu of flowers, please make
contributions in Hilda's name
to Big Bend Hospice: .;
She was born January
19, 1928, in Walulla County,
where she lived most.of her
life. Hilda worked as teller at
Lewis State Bank for 19 years
where she made countless
friends. Two years after her
second child'whs born, she
left this position to become
a full-time homemaker and
childcare provider. She vol-
unteered at her church, Ivan
Assembly of God, serving
over the years as worship
leader, Sunday School teach-
er and Women's Ministries
president. She also served
on the Benevolence Commit-
tee, Missions Committee and
Hospitality Team.
Survivors include her
husband, Flavey Mathers of
Crawfordville; her children,
Linda and husband, Paul
Coroleuski of Ozark, Mo., and
Ron Mathers of Crawfordville;
her siblings, Everett McKenzie
of Sopchoppy, W. T. McKenzie
of Thomasville, Ga., Maxine
Bussell df Tallahassee, J.C.
McKenzie of High Springs,
Carolyn Clark of Jonesboro,
Ga., Gail Bohannon of Sop-
choppy, Carl "Buddy" McKen-
zie of Crawfordville, Dianne
McKenzie of Orlando and
Ellen Daaboul of North Rich-
land Hills, Texas; four grand-
children, Benjamin Mathers
and Christine Mathers, both
of Crawfordville and Ethan
and wife, Lauren Coroleuski
and Adam Coroleuski, all of
Ozark, Mo.
Harvey-Young Funeral
Home in Crawfordville was in
charge of the arrangements.

Karen M. McIntosh
Karen May McIntosh, 62,
of Crawfordville died Sunday,
April 19 in Tallahassee.
A memorial service will
be held Saturday, May 2 at 3
p.m. at Crawfordville United
Methodist Church. In lieu of
flowers, memorial contribu-
tions may be made to the


Sopchoppy
-United
SMethodist
Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship I I a.rm.
Rev. Bill Rhoads
850-962-2511


qygFc~iJeL tA&


S


American Heart Association.
2851 Reninlgon Green, Suite
C. Tallahassee, FL 32308.
A native of Yakima. Wash.;,
she was born in 1946 and
lived in Florida for most of
her life.She worked as a jani-
tor for the Manatee County
School Board and was of the
Baptist faith. She enjoyed the
senior citizens center and had
a strong love of nature.
Survivors include two sons,
Robin McIntosh and wife
Debbie of Jacksonville and
Clinton McIntosh and wife
Deborah of Knoxville, Tenn.; a
brother, John R. McClain and
wife Ginger of Lake City; a
sister, Mary M. Albritton and
husband Clark of Crawford-
ville; and many other family
members and friends.
Harvey-Young Funeral
Home in Crawfordville is in
charge of the arrangements.

Thelma M. Monroe
Thelma Marie Monroe, 77,
of Woodville died Thursday,
April 14 in Tallahassee.
The service was held Sun-
day, April 26 at Little Salem
Primitive Baptist Church in
Crawfordville, with burial at
Crawford Cemetery.
She was a member of
Little Salem Primitive Baptist
Church and a household tech-
nician. Survivors include her
husband, Joe Mae Monroe;
one daughter, Patricia Mon-
roe Williams and Fred; two
brothers, May Smith Gavin,
Jr. and Eva and James Gavin
and Rebecca; one sister, Nel-
lie White; two grandchildren,
Tasha Williams and Jerome
and Derick Williams and Tina;
nine great-grandchildren;
and two great-great-grand-
children.
Strong & Jones Funeral
Home in Tallahassee was in
charge of the arrangements.

Jim T. Robinson
iin Tom Robiinson 51, of
Crawfordville'died Saturday,
April 25 in Crawfordville;
The funeral service will be
held at 2 p.m. Friday, May 1 at
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
Chapel in Crawfordville, with
burial at Elizabeth Anne Se-
ton Cemetery in Medart. The
family will receive friends
from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at the fu-
neral home Friday, May 1, one
hour prior to the service.
A native of Donalsonville,
Ga., he moved to Crawford-
ville from Tallahassee eight


SochopyBaptist Church
Church Of Christ 24Mteisse Rea,
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St. .


Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worship................ 10:30 am.
Evening Worship ............. .m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...? p.m.
Visitors are welcokel
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details,
962-2213


SUNDAY
larlv W:30shitv R8:3 a m


SSunday School 9:45 a.m.
C f/' *Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Discipleship Training 7:00 p.mn

First Baptt Church WEDNESDAY
CRAWFORDVILLE Fellowship Meal 6:00 p.m.


3086 Crawfordville Hwy.
(South of the Courthouse)
Church Office: 926-7896
www.fbcc.embarqspace.com


1.


(call for reservations)
Children's Events 6:30 p.m.
Student Worship 7:00 p.m.
Prayer/Bible Study 7:00 p.m.


Suinay School 10 a.m.
Worship 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 p,.
Pastor, Jerry Spears


years ago. He was the Clinical
Coordinator for Insurance at .
Tallahassee Memorial Hos-
pital.
Survivors' include his life
pritner, Vince Rivas of Craw-
fordville; three daughters,
Heather Robinson of Craw-
fordville, Tiffani Cunninghani'
of Bainbridge and Brittani"
Hodges of Claxton, Ga.f four
brothers, Jimmy Robinson,
Douglas Robinson, Eddie
Wayne Robinson, and Lamar
Robinson, all of New Jersey;
three sisters, Cathy Lomi-
neck of Bainbridge, Myrtle
Young of Dorialsonville and
Ann Stoler of Lakeland; and
a granddaughter, .Megan
Hodges.
Harvey-Young Funeral
Home in Crawfordville is in
charge of the arrangements.

Ward Sellers
Ward Sellers, 94, of Talla-
hassee died Friday, April 24
at his residence.
A memorial service will be
held at 10 a.m. Saturday, May
9 at Calvary United Methodist
Church. Family will receive
friends following the service
at the church. In lieu of flow-
ers, memorials may be made
to Big Bend Hospice, 1723
Mahan Center Blvd. Tallahas-
see, FL 32308.
A native of Whigham,
Ga., he made Tallahassee
his home in 1949. He was a
member of Calvary United
Methodist Church and retired
as a customer service supervi-
sor from Eastern Airlines.
Survivors include his son,
Jim Sellers and Lisa, daugh-
ters; Maureen Pelt and Mike
and JoAnne Sellers; a step-
daughter, Nita Brown and
Randy, 10 grandchildren and
12 great grandchildren.
Culley's MeadowWood
Riggins Road Funeral Home
in Tallahassee is in charge of
arrangements.


Oickloekonee
tlfayf
S United
Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship 9 a.m.
Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m
Pastor fil fieaass
(850) 984-0127


IPanacea Park 1


I 850-745-8412
4340 Crawfordville Highway


- Crawfordville United

Methodist Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 1:00 a.m.
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 926-7209
Odhlb4cte & Arran Road "Come Grow With Us' www.crawfordvltleime.erg


117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy


Sunday School 945 AM
Church Office Morning Worship 11AM
962-7822 AWANA CLUB 5PM
Evening Worship 6 PM

Wednesday 7 PM Prayer Meeting,
Youth & Children's Programs
Dr. BIN enkans, Paster
David Allen, Associate Paster/Student Minister
Randy Anderson, Mnister of Mule
erry Evans, Mike Crouch, Barnl Kemp Musicians


Who is the latest

Wakulla Wavemaker?"

Tune in daily at

2 p.m. and 6 p.m.





THE WORD IN PRAISE



WAKU 94.1 FM www.wave94.com
926-8000 (fax: 926-2000)


a


L


1


Catherine K. Stout
Catherine Kerce Stout, 88,
of Tallahassee died Thursday,
April 23, at St. Augustine
Plantation.
The service was held
Tuesday, April 28 at Culley's
MeadowWood Riggins Road
Chapel, with interment at
Roselawn Cemetery. Memori-
als may be made to Big Bend'
Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center"
Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308.
A resident of Tallahas-:
see since 1944, Catherine
was a gifted photographer,
working with her husband,
Red Kerce, until his death
in 1964. She graduated from
Florida State University in
1970 with a Bachelor's degree
in elementary education. She
taught special needs children
for 20 years at Apalachee
and W.T. Moore elementary
schools until her retirement.
Catherine loved to quilt with
her church group' at Wakulla
United Methodist. She was
a piano teacher and square
dancer. She and her husband
of 21 years, Arthur Stout,
shared a love for fishing and
traveling with their many
friends in the Tallahassee
Good Sam Club.
SSurvivors include her sons,
Joe Kerce and Donna, John
Kerce and Dona, Doug Kerce,
Jack Kerce, Ed Kerce, and
Bob Kerce; her grandchil-
dren, Kristi Kerce Bulloch and
Camp, John Thomas Kerce,
Gipi Kerce and Sam Kerce;
her great-grandchildren, Ad-
dison, Kate and Will Bulloch 1
a sister, Bunny Evans, as well i
as many family, friends and
neighbors,
Culley's MeadowWood
Funeral Home in Tallahassee
was in charge of the arrange-
ments.



IvaniAssembly of God:
2. QZ:i.ya. Church Road i ,,. .
Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey
"C-or A Worhip Wth us"
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School......................... 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship..................... 11 a.m.
Evening Worship.....................6p.nm.
Wednesday Service................ 7 p.m.
& Youth Service................7.....7 p.m.
Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m.
M issionettes..............................7 p.m.

Christ Church
Anglican

Sunday
8:30am Service
9:30am Adult Bible Class
10:30am Children's Class
10:30am Service
Nursery available
Thursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study
Wednesday 6:30 pm Supper and
Children, Youth and Adult Bible Classes









Crime Rate


Continued from Page 1A
With an increasing popula-
tion, Wakulla County had 737
index crimes in 2008 which is
down from 750 in 2007, a 1.7
percent decrease.
Murders fell from one to
zero while forcible rapes in-
creased from eight to 11. Rob-
bery cases jumped from six
to eight while aggravated as-
saults dropped from 84 to 70.
Burglary cases decreased from
229 in 2007 to 167 in 2008. Lar-
ceny cases increased from 372
to 437. Motor vehicle thefts
decreased from 50 to 44.
Using an FDLE formula, 24.4
Wakulla County residents out
of 1,000 were victims of index
crimes in 2007. That figure de-
creased to 23.9 out of 1,000 in
2008, a 5.9 percent decrease.
Wakulla County cleared
34.5 percent of the index
cases in 2007 while 29 per-
cent of the 2008 index crimes
were cleared. The statewide
clearance rate in 2008 was 24
percent,
The state average for be-
coming an index crime victim
in 2008 was 46.9 out of 1,000
people. In Orange County,
the statistics show 65.1 out
of 1,000 people were victims.
In Lafayette County, it was
5.91 out of 1,000 people were
victims.
In 2008, the Florida index
crime rate increased.1 percent
The state has reported a 31.2
percent drop in index crimes
since 1998.
"The Uniform Crime Report
is a measure of the success or
failure of the safety of a com-
munity," said Sheriff David
Harvey. "I look at this each
year to determine 4f we have
less, quality of life in Wakulla
County."
Harvey said the county
population continues to in-
crease while the crime rate has


Daniels
Continued from Page 1A
In other matters in front
of the Wakulla County School
Board on Monday, April 20:
The board voted to expel
a ninth grader at the Second
Chance School in Sopchoppy.
The male student had -rumer-
ous suspensions in Wakulla
after being expelled for narcot-
ics in Bay County in 2008. His
parents signed a waiver reject-
ing their opportunity to appeal
the suspension which remains
in effect for the remainder of
the school year.
The summer program
days and hours were approved
by the board. Voluntary Pre-K
at WEC will be held from June
4 to July 30 and the student
day is 8 asm. until 5,p.m. No
transportation is provided. The
Pre-K ESE program at WEC will
begin July 7 and conclude July
30 from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.
Summer school is being
held at Wakulla High School
for high school and middle


gone down. "We maintain that
by making sure we have the
tools to do the job," he added.
"Politics aside, the measure
of our success is in the crime
rate. We look at every year to
see if we are losing our quality
of life."
Major Maurice Langston
said the number of burglaries
declined because the sheriffs
office has placed a high prior-
ity on reducing the drug trade
in the county. "Our burglaries
are down because of our ag-
gressive approach to street
crimes and narcotics," he
said. Individuals using drugs
often commit burglaries to
sell property and raise money
to purchase drugs.
The sheriff said that Wakul-
la has several areas that con-
tribute to a safe county and a
low crime rate including "the
outstanding people working
at this department, an aggres-
sive State Attorney." 150 local
prisoners off the street and in
the county jail and "we don't
have an urban core;"
The sheriff's office is re-
sponding to 60,000 calls per
)year with a population in-
crease from 29,417 in 2007.to


school students, who need
credits for graduation or to
advance to ninth grade. The
program begins June 8 and
concludes July 2 The student
day is 8 a.m. until 2:30 p.m.
The third grade reading
camp is also offered at WHS
for elementary students who
need assistance.
The summer feeding pro-
gram will be offered at both
WEC and WHS for children
age 18 and younger. The WEC
feeding hours are 8:30 a.m.
to 9:15 a.m. for breakfast and
11130 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. for
lunch. The WHS feeding hours
are 7:45 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. for
breakfast and 11:30 a.m. until
12:15 p.m. for lunch.
Superintendent David Mill-
er said that it has been five
years since the school district
offered traditional summer
school for students in kinder-
garten through eighth grade.
The Auditor General is-
sued a report for the fiscal


30,717 in 2008, according to
FDLE.
The sheriff and his staff
recently conducted an office
operation overview for a mem-
ber of the Tallahassee media
and Commissioner Alan Brock.
Commissioners Mike Stewart
and Lynn Artz will participate
in an orientation program
with the sheriff on April 30.
"Governments have put a
.lot of money into law enforce-
ment," Harvey said. "We're
hoping to use stimulus money
and grants to allow us to
maintain a level of service
that won't impact our quality
of life."
Major Langston gave credit
to the caliber of individuals
moving into Wakulla Coun-
ty seeking safety and good
schools.
"The Wakulla County Sher-
iffs Office is the only agency
in the county making house-
calls," added Langston. "They
know when they call they are
going to get a response."
"The population went
up and the crime rate went
down," Harvey concluded.
"That is unheard off."


year ending June 30 2008.
There were no deficiencies in
internal control over financial
reporting, the report said.
Assistant Superintendent
for Finance Jimmie Dugger
said none of the issues dis-
cussed.in they report :were
"major." "They were looking at
things they have never looked
at before," he said.
The report asked the dis-
trict to create a fraud policy for
reporting fraud to the proper
authorities as well as imple-
menting a comprehensive
security awareness training
program. In addition, a written
policy and procedure is being
required to include certain
information technology func-
tions.
Superintendent Miller
called the report "a good au,
dit with no significant prob-
lems."
"They (auditors) are here
off and on for nine months of
the year," Miller concluded.


Special Prom


Continued from Page 1A
The SpecialNeeds SpringProm
is only one of the many events on
the church's calendar. They are
also reaching out to the communi-
ty through providing fresh food for
those in need with the new garden
recently planted in the front yard
of the church, collecting clothes
and non-perishable food items for
the local clothing closets and food
banks in the area. As the summer


approaches they are collecting new
'and slightly used shoes for kids
who -are less fortunate as well as
school supplies as the new school
year draws near.
"The reason for all of this," said
DeRoss, "scripture tells us that we
should look not only to our own
interests butalso to the interest
of others. And that is what we are
trying to do!"


Thank youto our event spon-
sors: Hair of Grace, Catering by
Judi, Printing on Demand, Amaz-
.ing Mail Solutions, Northern
Lights Florist, Wakulla Florist,
Karla Nelson Photography, Saci-
n6's, WakullaCounty Bus Garage,
Mclver Flooring, Michaels, Bubba
Howard, Nikki White, and many
friends and families of Wakulla
Springs Baptist Church..


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009 Page 5A
SIwl


Saturday, May 2nd, 2009

Woolley Park on Senic Dierson Bay in Panaa, Fl.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS


10:00 a.m.


The Coastal Optimist Club Parade


11:00 a.m.(
11:15 a.m.


Opening Ceremonies
Coon Bottom Creek


12:15 p.m. Mullet Toss
1:00 p.m. Mountain Dew Cloggers
2:00 p.m. Crab Pickin' Contest
2:45 p.m. Blue Chameleon (Steel Drum Caribbean)
3:30 p.m. Mountain Dew Cloggers


4:30 p.m.


Brett Kelly (Solo Modern Country)


5:30 p.m. Lindsay Evans (Country Rock)
6:30 p.m. Harvest Gypsies (Traditional Rock/Jazz)
7:45 p.m. Caitlan Nicole Eadie (Country/Rock)


DARK: FIREWORKS!!


hr^:; br^rs"o


I i I,
Fresh
C7a Flda,


Liv G rnterstir t A Irt & Crafts

Kid .*n A ibiS Fi works


Major:


Wakulla County
Tourist Dev.


Gold Sponsors


Ben Withers, Inc.
Bridlewood Apartments
Coastal Optimist Club
Coke
Dentistry by the Sea
Embarq
HardWater Ice
Liberty Communications
Nichols & Son's Sea Food


North FL Medical Center, Inc.
Wakulla Medical Center.
O'Kelley Sammons Advertising
Talquin Portable Restrooms
The Wakulla News
Wakulla Bank
Wakulla. Com
Wakulla County Board
of County Commissioners


Silver Sponsors


Blue crabs


Continued from Page 1A
The country sound of Brett
Kelly will be heard at 4:30
p.m.
Lindsay Evans and her coun-
try rock will be heard at 5:30
p.m. and the traditional rock
and jazz sound of Harvest


Gypsies will be on stage at
6:30 p.m.
SThe headliner is Caitlin Ni-
cole Eadie and she will perform
country and rock at 7:45 p.m.
The fireworks will commence
at dark along Dickerson Bay.
The park will be filled with


food vendors and arts and
crafts booths where food,
souvenirs and gifts can be
acquired.
The Blue Crab Festival Com-
mittee is also selling T-shirts
and cookbooks at the festival.


Farmer's Market opens May 5


. The Wakulla County com-
munity is excited to welcome
the first Tuesday Farmer's
Market, opening May 5.
SModeled after the Grower's
Market at Lake Ella in Talla-
hassee, the weekly Tuesday
Farmer's Market will feature
local small-scale growers us-
ing organic methods, plus lo-
cal seafood and art. The Tues-
day Market will also include
cooking and other workshops
for a sustainable lifestyle.
The Grand Opening cel-
ebration will run through
the month of May and will


welcome farmers from Leon, shine.
Jefferson and Wakulla coun- Any interested participants
ties. To kickoff the celebration, may contact Jennifer Taylor at
the May 5 market will include FAMU Statewide Small Farm
a cooking demonstration, us- Programs/Cooperative Exten-
ing local, seasonal veggies, by sion Service (412-5260 jennifer.
Eclectic Eatz Bakery starting taylor@famu.edu).
at 4 p.m; as well as a green Also, feel free to cal Purple
cleaning workshop provided Martin Nurseries for market
by Maureen Rogers, starting at information and updates at
5 p.m. Workshops are free. 926-8335. We look forward
The Tuesday Farmer's Mar- to seeing you, so mark your
ket will be held at Purple calendars for the Tuesday
Martin Nurseries, located at Farmer's Market to enjoy
1554 Crawfordville Highway fresh, local produce grown
in Crawfordville, and will run right in your community.
from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., rain or


AMS Marine Supply Hamaknockers Oasis BBQ
Auto Trim Intuition Creative Group
Brooks Concrete North State Title Services, Inc.
Capital City Bank Posey's Up The Creek
Century Park Rogers, Gunter, Vaughn Insurance, Inc.
Crums Mini Mall Wakulla Discount Liquors
David Harvey, Sheriff Wakulla Realty
Forest Realty, Inc. Wakulla Title Company, Inc.


Blue Sponsors

Body Pump Jim & Stella Johnson Insurance Agency
Century 21/ Florida Donnie Sparkman/Wakulla
Coastal Properties County Property Appraiser
Edwin G. Brown & Assoc. Mike's Marine
Farm Bureau Revell Realty, Inc.
Gold on the Go Wakulla Area Times
Harvey Young Funeral Home Wakulla LP Gas
Woodlands Title Company, Inc.

850-984-CRAB www.bluecrabfest.com


"


r


-
' ~-t~

















Baseballers beat


Munroe, honor Crisp


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmai@thewakullanews
The Wakulla War Eagle baseball
team got ready for the district tourna-
ment by playing Lincoln, Springfield
Rutherford and Robert F. Munroe last
week.
Wakulla was too generous with the
extra opportunities for Lincoln and
Rutherford as they gave the Trojans
and Rams extra outs due to errors.
Lincoln topped Wakulla 7-2 in Tal-
lahassee and Rutherford beat Wakulla
9-6 in Medart. WHS got back on the
winning track by beating Munroe 10-0
in six innings.
Coach Mike Gauger said he wanted
a difficult schedule to make his team
tougher for the state playoffs. "I hope
it works out for us," he said looking
back at the difficulty of the games
WHS played.
"We spotted these teams, Lincoln
and Rutherford, early leads and we
made errors in both games," said
Gauger. Wakulla spotted Lincoln a 4-1
lead after three innings and Ruther-
ford led 7-1 after 3 1/2 innings. WHS
made two errors against Lincoln and
eight against Rutherford.
* Rance McBratney scored a run on
a Justin Pichard safety squeeze bunt
to give Wakulla an early lead in Tal-
lahassee. Austin Lentz singled in Shay
Barwick with the other Wakulla run.
Lentz had two hits including a dou-


ble. Ryan Smith and Casey Eddinger
had hits and Shay Barwick was 2-2.
Robbie Coles pitched four innings
and gave up four runs, two earned, five
hits, one walk and had five strikeouts.
Ryan Smith pitched two innings and
gave up three runs, two earned and
three hits. He had two strikeouts.
Gauger said losing to Rutherford
by three runs was "a moral victory"
when the War Eagles made eight er-
rors and fell behind by six runs early,
Seven of the nine Rutherford runs
were unearned.
Brad Crisp pitched 2 1/3 innings
and gave up six runs, two earned, and
four hits. He walked two and struck
out three. Rance McBratney pitched 1
2/3 6f an inning and had a walk and
two strikeouts. Zach Stinson, Jose
Linton and Mark Price each pitched
an inning.
The offense was provided by
Jordan Miller and Austin Lentz who
had three hits each. Lentz also had
an RBI.
Antonio Kilpatrick had two hits
along with Casey Eddinger. McBratney
had a hit along with Brock Glover,
Ryan Smith and Shay Barwick. "We
left nine men on base," said Gauger.
Wakulla scored three runs in
the fifth inning and five more in the
sixth on the way to the 10-0 win over
Munroe.
Ryan Smith pitched three innings


and gave up one hit and a walk while
striking out three. Robbie Coles
pitched two innings and gave up one
hit with four strikeouts and Shay
Barwick pitched one inning and had
three strikeouts.
Wakulla had 15 hits including two
each from Barwick, Kilpatrick, Casey
Eddinger and Logan Runyan. Barwick
and Kilpatrick combined for six RBIs.
Other hitters included Jordan Mill-
er, Austin Lentz, Brock Glover, Ryan
Smith, Robbie Coles, Justin Pichard


and Mark Price.
Gauger said it felt good to get
hits from the majority of the line-up
with several players getting multi-hit
games.
Wakulla will play the winner of the
Panama City Bay-Panama City Beach
Arnold game Wednesday, April 29
in the second round of the district
tournament. Wakulla is the top seed.
Rickards will play the winner of the
Godby-East Gadsden game the same
night. The semifinal winners will play


for the championship on Friday, May 1
at 7 p.m. All games are at Godby.
Wakulla improved to 15-9 overall
and finished the district portion of
the schedule at 8-2.
Pitcher Brad Crisp signed a scholar-
ship to attend Brewton Parker College
in.Georgia after the Rutherford game.
Gauger said he was pleased that Crisp
has an opportunity to continue play-
ing baseball while attending college.
He pitched well when given the op-
portunity.


WHS romps past

Rickards and Arnold


The Lovestrands escort daughter, Hannah, through
raised bats during her final regular season home game,


WHS wins another district
'title behind McClendon.
By SCOTT COLLINS
Special to The Wakulla News
The Wakulla Lady War Ea-
gle's fastpitch softball team
trampled through their district
tournament held in Panama
City and won their 15th and
16th consecutive games.
By doing so, the team won
another District 2 Class 4A title
and set a new record for con-
secutive wins by a varsity team
at Wakulla High School. The.
old record of 15 consecutive
wins was set in 1979 by coach
and now Superintendent David
Miller's varsity baseball team.
"Our girls keep a low key
approach, focus on the job
at hand, and don't talk about
consecutive wins" said Coach
Tom Graham.
Wakulla earned a bye in the
tournament by going in as the
number one seed. In the semi-
final round on Tuesday, April
21, Wakulla faced the Rickards
Raiders. Mandy McClendon
threw a no-hit complete game
as the Lady War Eagles won 14-
0 in a game shortened to five
innings by the 10 run mercy
rule. McClendon had nine
strikeouts and walked only
one batter.
Ki Myrick was 4-4, scoring
four runs with two homeruns
and 4 RBIs. Hannah Lovestrand
was 3-3 with two doubles, three
RBIs and scored three runs.
Sarah Gregory was 3-3 with
a double and and two RBIs.
Artigua Kilpatrick was 2-3 with
a double, a triple, two RBIs


and scored two runs. Megan
Rollins was 2-4 ahd scored
twice. Wakulla had 17 hits in
the game.
On Thursday, April 23, the
Lady War Eagles played tourna-
ment host Panama City Beach
Arnold in what was supposed
to be a tough game between
the 16-3 Lady Dolphins and the
19-3 Lady War Eagles. However,
the girls from Wakulla, once
again, took care of the business
at hand and won 10-0. Mandy
McClendon hurled six innings
giving up no hits, no runs and
two bases on balls while strik-
ing out six.
"Mandy's not overpowering,
but her control and change-up
has been key all season" said
Coach Graham.
Ki Myrick was 3-4 with a
homerun, an RBI and scored
twice. The game marked a
two week period for Myrick in
which she had a remarkable 14
hits in 15 at bats.
Hannah Lovestrand was 3-3
with two doubles, four RBIs
and two runs scored. Brook-
lynn Tindall and Jessica Wild
had two hits each as Wakulla
recorded the shutout.
Wakulla played host to Na-
varre, a team that upset Milton,
on Tuesday, April 29.
Navarre has a recent history
of advancing far into the play-
offs as they have been to the
regional finals in three of the
last four years.
"Our girls our confident, but
not overconfident" said Coach
Graham. Softball photos by Bill
Rollins.


School records fall at regional track meet


Shingles advances to the
state track finals.
The WHS boys and girls track
teams competed Friday, April 24
at the Regional Track Meet held
in Tallahassee at Chiles High
School. All of the athletes who'
competed at this meet had qual-
ified in District competitions
last week and represented the
best in their respective events.
The top four individuals and/or
relay teams will move on to the
State meet which will be held in
Winter Park on Saturday, May 2.
WHS had qualified three relay
teams and five individuals to
the Regional meet.
The WHS girls 4 x 400 meter
relay team of Cora Atkinson,
Norma Woodcock, Chelsea
Thompson and Sydney Nutting
finished 10th overall and ran an
excellent time of 11:03.54. "The
girls ran a good race and a good
time and set a new school re-
cord in the process," said Coach
Paul Hoover. "They beat the
previous record of 11:12, which
was set earlier this year, by
nine seconds. This race was for
Sydney (Nutting), who was the
only senior on the relay team.
The other three members are
all freshmen and they wanted
Sydney to go out with a new
school record in her last high
school meet. Syd has been our
best female runner for all four
of her years in high school and
we will really miss her next
year. We have been blessed to
have her." Sydney also placed
10th in the 1,600 meter run in
an extremely competitive field,


Amanda Ricks competed in the
discus, placing 14th, and threw
well especially considering this
was her first year on the team,
said the coach.
The WHS boys performed
well at the meet with the 4 x
800 meter relay team of Bran-
don Maloy, Steven Urling, Liam
Daniels and Adam Carr placing
eighth overall in 8:51.22. The
time was also a new school
record, bettering the old record
set last week in the District
meet by eight seconds. The 4 x
400 meter relay team (Nickola
Shingles, Adam Carr, Brandon
Maloy and Willie Thomas)
continued to excel and surprise
the competition by finishing
seventh overall in another new
school record of 3:32.93.
Individually, Willie Thomas
placed ninth in the 200 meters
and Steven Urling placed 14th
in the 3,200 meters. The perfor-
mance of the day for WHS was
recorded by Nickola Shingles
in the 300 meter hurdles. He
won his heat and then finished
a close second in the finals in
the State Elite and school record
time of 39.06 seconds. Because
of this outstanding perfor-
mance, he will advance to the
State Meet this Saturday.
"This was a good meet for
us. Our athletes set four school
records and showed that we are
stating to get to the level where
we can compete with some of
the best teams in the state,"
said Hoover. "bur athletes
worked hard this year and it
showed. We are a young team


and we are already looking
forward to next year."
'WHS sophomore Nickola
Shingles served notice that
he is and will be a force to be
reckoned with in the 300 me-
ter intermediate hurdles. The
meet, which included the best
hurdlers in the this part of the
state, provided an opportunity
for him to see exactly how he
stacked up against them in
head to head competition. In
his preliminary round, Nidola
took an early lead on the field
and, despite looking back to
see where the other hurdlers
were and losing some time,
cruised to a first place finish, set
a new season best and a new
school record. This set up the
first head to head match up in
the finals with Darius Jones, a
senior at Rickards High School
who is the Big Bend leader in
the 300 Hurdles (Shingles is
ranked second) and is one of
the best hurdlers in the state.
In the finals, it was a dog fight
the whole way with Darius edg-
ing out Shingles by just .53 of
a second. Shingles, and Darius
both rah an outstanding race
with Shingles running another
State Elite and school record
time of 39.06 seconds. This
performance was good enough
to advance Shingles to the State
Finals Meet which will be held
on Saturday, May 2, at Showwal-
ter Field in Winter Park.
This is Shingles first year
at WHS after moving into the
area last summer from Arkan-


sas. This is also his first year
competing in the hurdle event.
He participated in track at his
former school, but competed
primarily as an 800 meter run-
ner.
Coach Simeon Nelson said,
"When Nickola first came out
for the team, we were thinking
of him as primarily a 400 to 800
meter runner and then one day
when we were working with
some of the female hurdlers,
he said he would like to try that
and, I guess, as they say, the
rest is history. He is new to this
event and to say he has far ex-
ceeded our expectations would
be an under statement." Coach
Paul Hoover added, "Nickola has
several things going for him. He
obviously has great natural
ability and a competitive will,
but even more importantly, he
listens and is eager to learn and
has the work ethic that it takes
to compete at that level. He is
always at practice, including the
optional ones over spring break,
and when he is there he is all
business. He never complains,
he just does what is necessary.
He has paid his dues this year
and it has paid off for him. I am
confident that he will make his
presence felt at the State meet
this weekend."
Shingles is also the lead-off
runner and an intergral part of
the WHS boys 4 x 400 meter
relay team that has come into
its own during the post-season
competition.


Forbes finishes third


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla High School senior
Mookie Forbes placed third at
the state weightlifting cham-
pionships in New Port Rickey
Saturday, April 25. Forbes
lifted a total of 490 pounds
which helped him improve
on last year when he placed
fourth. He was lifting at 119
pounds and just missed finish-
ing in second place.
Forbes is a three time Big
Bend placer and two time Big
Bend Champion and a three


time state meet qualifier and
two time state placer.
Freshman David Gay placed
seventh at 129 pounds, just
missing out on an opportunity
to place sixth.
Lorenzo Randolph lifted at
199 pounds and Dalton Hall
lifted at 238 pounds.
The 2009 season was the
third in a row where WHS
went undefeated in dual
matches, running the winning
streak to 15 matches. Wakulla
is also the defending Big Bend
Tournament champion.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009 Page 7A


Superintendent: David Miller
Executive Director of Cirriculum: Beth Mims
Wakulla High School Principal: Mike Crouch
Wakulla Middle School Principal: Jo Ann Daniels
Riversprings Middle Principal: Dod Walker
Riversprings Guidance Counselor: Catherine Harris
Teachers: Eddie Metcalf Windy Jones, Deborah Randle,
Michael Sweatt Keith Anderson, Frances Knight


1^^ iL ;v




the A



.Ll.org WITrainin
Strengthening Marriages & Families
" ,,' I I) . -- . - ,
Funding for this project was provided by the United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Grant # 90-AE-0280. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations
expressed in this material are those of the authors) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families.






Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009


Judy and JerryPeck

Judy, Jerry Peck

renew their vows


Jerry and Judy renewed their acceptable 'behavior that was
marriage vows on the day after once not acceptable), scientific
their 50th anniversary. More history (men landing on the
than 80 family members and moon and returning safely to
friends witnessed the couple's earth), technological history
renewal of their vows and ex- (personal computers and the
pressed their never fading love World Wide Web) and their
for one another. Judy's sister, family history (two daugh-
Linda Gill. and Linda's family terms, Susan and Patricia. five
traveled from Massachusetts to grandchildren, and six great-
celebrate the occasion. grandchildren). They were
The couple was reminded reminded they had survived
of the various types of history all the changes of the past
they had witnessed during 50 years, and like a mighty
their 50 years of marriage: oak which had weathered
political history (11 US Presi- storm and sun, wind and rain,
dents), cultural history (music, grew into a tree of impressive
fashion, and what is now strength and stature.

Happy first birthdays
Ava S. Robinett Herring, on Feb. 11 in Mari-,
Greg and Diana Robinett of anna. He weighed 7 pounds,
Wake Forest, N. C. announce 14 ounces.
the birth.of their daughter, Maternal grandparents are
Ava sphia,.Rebietti on April James and elly Chason pf.Tal-_.
. She weighted 7 pop&nds, 12 lahassee. Paternal grandpar-
ounces, ents are Ronnie and Thersea
Maternal grandparents are Gray and the late Timothy Ray
Gene and Brenda McCarthy Herring, Sr, of Crawfordville.
of Crawfordville and George Maternal great-grandpar-
and Jill Carraway of Louis- ents are Thad and Dottie Cla-
ville. Ky. :' '; i a son of Talissee and Charles
Paternal grandparents are: and Pat Voss of Thomasville.
John and Donna Robinett of Maternal great-grandparents
Chesapeake, Va. are Iris Johnson and the late


S Ronnie J. Herring
Jay Herring and Elizabeth
Herring announce the birth
of their son, Ronnie James


Robert Ready, the late Jim and
Jessie Cooper and the Late
Floyd and Marjorie Gray of
Crawfordville,


NAMI provides resource


NAMI Wakulla, a non-profit
affiliate of the National Alli-
ance on Mental Illness, offers
services and support for peo-
ple facing mental health emer-
gencies and has a telephone
helpline up and running.
By dialing 926-1033, callers
in Wakulla County can expect
to get information that can
guide them to the best avail-
able resources for help.
"That's what we do," said
Jimmie Doyle, the president of
Wakplla NAMI. "And more."
On the planning board for
June is the beginning of NAMI
Wakulla's Peer-to-Peer service,
a learning program for those
with serious mental illnesses
who-want to work toward re-
covery and maintain it.
The program will be led by
two trained Peer-to-Peer mem-
bers, one a NAMI Wakulla
member, and the other a
NAMI Florida representative.
"To be able to offer this
class is.a good start for NAMI
Wakulla," said Rose Delaney.
a Wakulla County resident and
NAMI Florida representative.
As NAMI Wakulla's mem-
bership grows, so do the of-
Edmondson,
Mosley wed
Julie Reynolds Mosley of
Panacea and Ronald "Ron" Ed-
mondson of Medart were mar-
ried March 26 in Panacea.
The bride is the daughter
of J.C. and Virginia Reynolds
of Panacea. The groom is the
son of Neil and Shirley Clark
of Moultrie. Ga. and the late
Louis Edmondson.
The couple lives in Med-


fers of support.
NAMI Wakulla will meet
,at 6.30 p.m. on May 18 at the
Wakulla County Health De-
partment.
The meeting is open to the
general public.'


Stephens and Moon to marry


Crawfordville.
The bride-elect graduated
from Wakulla High School
in 2005 and is attending
TCC majoring in Criminol-
ogy. She is employed at
Wakulla Bank, Appleyard
Branch, in Tallahassee.
Her fiance graduated
from Wakulla High School
in 2004 and graduated from
Pat Thomas Law Enforce-
ment Academy in 2008. He
is employed as a Sheriff's
'Deputy with the Wakulla
County Sheriff's Office.
The wedding will be
held May 16 at home of
groom's grandmother, Mar-
tha Moon in Tallahassee.


r







Aimee Stephens and Richard Moon, Jr.


Joe, and Debi Morgan
of Tallahassee and Al Ste-
phens of Chesapeake, Ohio
announce the engagement
and upcoming marriage of
their daughter, Aimee Ste-
phens of Crawfordville, to
Richard Steven Moon, Jr. of


Microtype Graphics


Crawfordville. He is the son


of Steve and Anita Moon of
KEEP AMERICA BEAUTIFUL MONTH


It's Our


Home
r -


*0 at,- 5 --._ 5k Run Benefit for the
Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park
0, Join the Friends for the annual 5k Run for the Friends. This is a
S' sanctioned event in conjunction with Gulf Winds Track Club. This
a unique run winds through a wilderness area of the State Park which
is not open to the general public. Last year's crowd was over 200.

S Date: May 16, 2009
Location: Wakulla Springs State Park, Wakulla County
&4 (22 miles south of Tallahassee)
Distances & 1 mile Family Run begins at 8:00 am
I Race Times: 5k run begins at 8:30 am


Fees:


Pre-registration ends May 13'"


Pre-registered $12; Day of race $15; No shirt option $7
Family Fun Run $5 (T-Shirts Additional Cost)


T-shirts: 1 shir


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Happy first
Taylie R. Oaks
Happy first birthday to.
Taylie Rebecca Oaks on May:
1. She was born at only one.
pound and four ounces. She
is the daughter of Chad and
Linda Oaks of Crawfordville.
Maternal grandparents are:
Marcia and Harry George of:
Crawfordville. Paternal grand-
parents are Bobby and Becky.
Oaks of Lakeland.


- -' I,


Please see www.thewakullanews.com under features for registration form.


The Friends of Wakulla Springs would like to thank our sponsors. Without their support, we could not
host the 5K Run that directly benefits Wakulla Springs. This year, the Friends of Wakulla Springs hope
to raise enough money for the park to refurbish the four river boats, and the four glass bottom boats that
were built by Edward Ball in the 1960's. To learn more about donating to the Friends, or to become a
member, please visit htt.p//www. wakullaspnnos. orq/projects. html ...


at the St. Marks RiverBrid

Saturday

May 9,2009

Lil Joe's Smoke House

Good Food

Face Piating by

Good00 Company .


oors open at 1 0:00 AM
feeB( 0 0O C


Call for more information
Call for Vendor Space No Charge


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I'C.1 ..







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009 Page 9A


Sheriff's Report


:akulla County Sheriff's
Office iAvestigators visited St.
Marli~ where a member of the St
Marks Water System reported the
grand theft of water, according to
Sheriff David Harvey.
A water meter had been
locked due to the account being
delinquent, but the worker dis-
covered that the lock had been
forcibly removed. A suspect has
been identified. Damage to the
meter and pipes was estimated
at $250. The city estimated that
2,000 gallons of water was con-
sumed after the meter was
locked.
The case was sent to the
Criminal Investigations Division.
Deputy Andrew Vass investi-
gated.
In other activity reported by
the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of-
fice during the past week
*On April 21, Dorothy E.
Mitchell of Crawfordville re-
ported a criminal mischief to
a soft drink machine at Shell
Point A Coca-Cola machine was
broken into and beverages were
removed. Deputy Nicholas Gray
investigated.


On April 23, a home owned
by Robert D. Bush in Panacea suf-
fered damage in a fire. A person
in the home, Roger Brown, was
awakened by a barking dog and
discovered that the room was
full of smoke. Four occupants of
the home escaped before flames
joined the smoke. Firefighters
stated that the blaze originated in
an external light socket Deputy
Vicki Mitchell reported serious
damage to the home.
On April 22, Felicia M. Page
of Crawfordville reported a retail
theft at the Bloxham Cutoff
Stop and Save. Someone stole
a scratch off ticket from behind
the counter. A male suspect was
observed taking the $20 ticket
Deputy William Hudson inves-
tigated.
On April 22, an illegal dump
site was observed at the end of
Meridian Road in Crawfordville.
Twelve 55 gallon trash bags were
observed and a suspect has been
identified. The weight of the
garbage was estimated at more
than 500 pounds. Deputy Ryan
Muse investigated.
OnApril 21, AronL Foumier


of Crawfordville reported a grand
theft of a GPS unit The unit was
stolen from inside his vehicle. It
is valued at $300, Deputy Jeremy
Johnston investigated.
On April 22, Joseph A. Har-
rison of Crawfordville reported
the theft of currency. The victim
accidently left his ATM card at
the machine after withdrawing
money Someone turned the card
into his bank, but $50 was unac-
counted for in his account. Lt.
Jimmy Sessor investigated.
On April 22, John M. Con-
ley of Tallahassee reported a
burglary in Ochlockonee Bay.
Liquor bottles were stolen and
a forced entry was reported. The
liquor bottles were valued at $50
and damage to the home was
estimated at $26. Deputy Nick
Petowsky investigated.
On April 22, Pamela A.
Posey of Crawfordville reported a
vehicle burglary. Electronic items,
valued at $133, were reported
missing. Deputy Will Raker in-
vestigated`
On April 22, David A. Kop-
penaal of Crawfordville reported
a vehice burglary as a $50 CD


receiver was stolen. Det John
Zarate investigated.
On April 22, Family Dollar
in Crawfordville reported a retail
theft as Shelia Lynn Kilgore, 22, of
Crawfordville allegedly removed
$6.52 worth of merchandise from
the store without paying. The
items included a utility knife,
raw hide bones, dishwashing
liquid and a soda. The suspect
had been observed in another
store prior to the arrest at Fam-
ily Dollar. Deputy Vicki Mitchell
investigated '
On April 21, Ricky Christmas
of Crawfordville reported a bur-
glary at his home. Damage was
estimated at $150, but nothing
was reported missing. Sgt Eddie
Wester investigated.
On April 21, Clyde W. Trux-
ell of Crawfordville reported the
theft of two firearms from his
"Gun Smoke" business. Two
rifles were entered into the
NCIC/FCIC computer. Deputy
Scott Powell investigated.
On April 21, Joshua T. Mar-
tin of Crawfordville reported a
vehicle theft as someone stole
the victim's wallet.The victim's


credit cards were used Sgt. Eddie
Wester investigated.
On April 21, Randy Conway
of Crawfordville and Bealls Outlet
reported a retail theft asSbPhayla
Nico Harris, 19, of Crawfordville
was charged with putting doth-
inginherbag without paying for
it She was charged with retail
theft and taken to the jail Deputy
Nick Boutwell investigated.
On April 23, Joel Famner of
Tallahassee reported a vehicle
burglary as stereo equipment,
valued at $600, was taken from
his vehicle. Deputy Ryan Muse
investigated.
On April 23,; Kimberly D.
Tucker of Crawfordville reported
a fraud as someone in Miami-
Dade claimed her son on their
tax retuh'rnThe victim said the
suspects have used her son's
Social Security number and listed
him as a dependent for the third
year in a row. Deputy William
Hudson investigated.
On April 23, Martin H.
Miller of Crawfordville reported
a vehicle burglary. Stereo equip-
ment and coins, valued at $315,
were reported missing. The


victim had taken the truck mud
bogging when he noticed his
property missing. Lt Jimmy Ses-
sor investigated.
SOn April 27, Millard Butts
of Crawfordville reported a grand
theft of two chain saws. The saws
were taken from the victim's
shed and are valued at $300. A
suspect has been identified. The
victim also stated that two of his
checks were forged and uttered
at a Woodville business. Deputy
Matt Helms told the victim that
the Woodville case would have
to be investigated by the Leon
County Sheriffs Office.
OnApril27,SusanSchatzman
of Crawfordville reported a theft
of Century 21 property from Sop-
choppy. The real estate sign was
valued at $160. Sgt Judd McAplin
investigated.
The Wakulla County Sher-
iffs Office received 747 calls for
service during the past week.
Note to our readers: The peo-
ple who are reported as charged
with crimes in this column have
not yet been to trial and are
therefore innocent until proven
guilty.


Court Shorts


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
A former county employee
charged with the theft of $5,700
worth of tires from the county
road department was sentenced
last week to 10 years in prison.
Jack Granger, 36, had worked
as fleet manager for the road
department until the thefts were
discovered While out on bond
on a charge of organized dealing
in stolen property, a first-degree
felony, Granger was arrested on
charges of dealing drugs, in this
case pain pills.
At Granger's sentencing hear-
ing on Thursday, April 16, Wakulla
Circuit Judge N. Sanders Sauls
ordered him to serve 10 years in
ppison followed by five years of
pVobation and to pay $5,712 in
restitution to the county.
Before going to work for the
road department, Granger was
in the Wakulla County Jail on
grand theft and dealing in stolen
property charges and earned the
trust and respect of the sheriffs
office, working on vehicles in
the sheriffs garage. After his jail
term was up, despite his criminal
record, the sheriffs office hired
him as an employee, working in
the garage. When he wanted to
apply for a.job with the county.
Undishenff Donnie Crum wrote
him a letter of recommendation.
Granger's attorney, Darren
Shippy, said that his client's life
changed in January 2008 when a
fellow road department employ-
ee, Aubrey Lawhon, was killed
whilethe two men were trying to
jump-start a tractor and it ran over
Lawhon. Granger blamed himself
and was prescribed numerous
medications by his doctor for
pain, anxiety and depression. He
eventually became dependent on
painkillers, Shippy said
Public Works Director Cleve
Fleming was called as a witness
forthe prosecution and disputed
the timeline offered by Granger.
"His theft of tires began before
the accident he refers to," Flem-
ing said.
And Assistant State Attorney
Jack Campbell, who prosecut-
ed the case, noted that when
Granger got out on bond for the
theft, he was arrested after a
confidential informant bought


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pain medication from him. "Not
using," Campbell said, "selling."
Heather Obenland, who has
two children by Granger, ages 2
and 5, said he had lost everything
- his family, his home. "Please,
judge," she said, "Give him a
chance to prove to you that he
can become a better man."
Campbell questioned Oben-
land, noting that she was con-
victed of selling Lortab, and
alleging that her children were
in the home at the time she was
selling drugs. She denied her
children were present during the
drug deal.
In other court matters:
A Sopchoppy man whose
probation had just been rein-
stated in November after he
refused to take a urinalysis test
and then went into hiding, was in
court on Wednesday, April 15, on
a charge that he had violated his


probation in December by having
a confrontation with an off-duty
deputy in December and went
into hiding again, was found to
not have been in violation.
Thomas Lindsey n, 23, on
probation for burglary and grand
theft charges, as well as a num-
ber of felony battery charges for
getting in fights at the Wakulla
County Jail, saw Deputy Pam
Veltkamp at a Crawfordville gro-
cery store in December 2008 and
pushed her shopping cart away
while her back was turned.
Veltkamp, who was later dis-
missed as a deputy for disciplin-
ary reasons, testified at the viola-
tion of probation hearing that
she was concerned when Lindsey
pushed her cart away because her
off-duty weapon was in her purse,
which was in the cart
Lindsey was later told that he
needed to report to his probation


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officer over the incident, and
fearing he would be.sent back
to jail, he and his girlfriend left
and moved to Tallahassee. Judge
Sauls found it was a substantial


but not willful violation. 'If you
don't," the judge said, "they're not
going to want to deal with you
anymore and I'm not going to
have any option but to send you


off (to prison) You understand?
Go get yourself a job and work
hard and take care of your family,"
the judge told him


CITY OF SOPCHOPPY
PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF
CITY ORDINANCE
The City Commission of the City of Sopchoppy, Florida, proposes to enact the
following ordinance:
ORDINANCE NO; 2009t03
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF SOPCHOPPY, FLORIDA, AMENDING THE ,
CITY OF SOPCHOPPY'ZONING MAP BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO
CHANGE THE ZONING FOR THE AFFECTED PARCEL FROM RESIDENTIAL
(R-1) TO COMMERCIAL (C-1); PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; REPEALING
ALL ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
A public hearing on the proposal will be held nt Mo6nday, May 11, 2009, at 7:00
p.m., 'or as soon as can be heard in the City Hall, 100 Municipal Avenue,
Sopchoppy, FL. More information can be obtained and the proposed amendment
may be inspected at the City Hall (telephone: 850-962-4611).
Persons wishing to comment may do so in person at the public hearing or by
writing to the City Commission at P.O. Box 1219, Sopchoppy, Florida 32358.
If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the commission with
respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the
individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE:
Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with
Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation to participate in this
meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by
contacting, Jackie Lawhon at the above address or phone number.


Robert Greener, Mayor
Attest: Jackie Lawhon, City Clerk April 30,2009


Notice of Amendment of

CITY OF SOPCHOPPY Zoning Map
The City Con~mission -of the City of Sopchoppy proposes to amend its
Zoning Map amending the zoning designation for a parcel of land,
changing the zoning designation from Residential (R-1) to Commercial
(C-1).
The Property affected by the proposed amendments is:
Folio Numbers: 12-5S-03W-000-00678-000
Also known as 2026 Sopchoppy Highway.
A public hearing on the proposal will be held on Monday, May 11, 2009, at
7:00 p.m., or as soon as can be heard in the City Hall, 100 Municipal
Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL. More information can be obtained and the
proposed amendment may be inspected at the City Hall (telephone: 850-
962-4611).
Persons wishing to comment may do so in person at the public hearing or
by writing to the City Commission at P.O. Box 1219, Sopchoppy, Florida
32358.
If an individual decides to appeal:any decision made by the commission
with respect to this meeting, 'a verbatim transcript may be required. If so,
the individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the
meeting, (RE: Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of
the Americans with Disabilities '.Act, any person requiring special
accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at
least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Jackie Lawhon at the
above address or phone number.











--




Robert Greener, Mayor
Attest: Jackie Lawhon, City Clerk April 30, 2009


r-







Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009



|BB|HBBBBB^~ 11 ^ LZi


Winds pleased regatta as many boats dotted the water"


From The Dock
BY CAPT JODY CAMPBELL


It was a gorgeous weekend
except for the wind, but rm sure
the folks at the Stephen C Smith
Regatta were glad to see it There
was plenty of sunshine and
plenty of folks on the water fish-
ing. Mike Hopkins said they had
about 35 boats put in at Lanark
on Saturday and about 90 percent
of them were fishing inshore.
For Hazel Wagners 86th birth-
day she wanted to go fishing: Her
son, Ron Wagner, Sheri Wagner
and Bill Donalson, all of Shell
Point took her. After Sunrise
Service on Easter morning they
went to the flats and she caught
quite a few trout and a mackerel
Ron said she had a great time and
kept commenting to him what a
great feeling it was to feel a fish
tugging on the other end of your
line. She said it was a great birth-
day and hopefully Ron will take
her on her 87th birthday.
Tammy at Jerry's Bait and
Tackle said her mom was so busy
last weekend she wasn't able
to get any fishing reports, but
she said most fishermen were
/


catching their trout east of the
lighthouse. Their next tourna-
ment will be on May 16.
Dr. Philip Sharp ofTallahassee
fished in theOutcast Invitational
Cobia Tournament in Pensacola
two weekends ago with Joe
Camp, Albert Lee, Bill Hagan and
Rick Henry. They fished with
Capt Gary Jarvis on his boat the
Back Down out of Destin. Phil
caught a 65 pound cobia which
placed first in' the tournament
and they also had the most
weight overall for the tourna-
ment His cobia was caught on a
bucktail jig in nine foot seas.
Mike Hopkins at Lanark Vil-
lage said trout fishing is. very
good right now and red fishing
is as good as he has ever seen
it The water is starting to dear
up and it seems,to have really
turned the fish on. Trout are still
being caught on live shrimp and
the Gulp in the same old places.
Reds are still around the docks
and the east end of the Lanark
Reef is producing a lot of reds,
Live bait, top water, the Gulp


Chad Largo with large grouper caught while fishing
with Tom Riddle out of Shell Point,
or gold spoons will all produce, snapper, which will probably
Lots of Spanish are being caught move by the time the season
between Turkey Point Shoals and opens. A few cobia have been
the gulf side of the Lanark ReeE caught, but very few kings.
around the number one buoy at Jeff May from Carrolton, Ga.
Dog Island and the West End of came down with a bunch of his
Dog Island. Some pompano are U.S. Marshal buddies from the
being caught and quite a few big Atlanta area and they stayed at
jacks have been caught Offshore Shell Point for four days and
fishing has been so, so with lots fished. Some of them fished
of short grouper being caught offshore while the others stayed
Besides the short grouper most inshore and fished. Jeff came in
good areas are covered with red one day with grouper after fish-


ing heavy seas. On Thursday, he
came in with 12, Tim Boggs was
with him and had never caught a
red. I told him I would take him
on Wednesday afternoon for a
couple of hours on the high tide
and see if we could catch one. He
ended up catching one 24 inch
red and five around 17 inches.
He also caught and released a 5-
pound trout On Saturday, I took
Harvey Green from Albany and
his two boys, Dallas and Chance.
We came in with a 4-pound
pompano, four Spanish, 10 trout
and our limit of reds. Everything
was caught on live shrimp. On
Sunday, I took Joe Fowler, Jack
Boyt Jr. and Doug Bennett from
Atlanta and they all caught the
biggest reds they had every
caught Jack caught and released
a nice six pound trout Again, all
we used was live shrimp.
Anytime I am some place


where there is a bait and tackle
store or marina I try to go in
and see what they have that;I
don't Believe me, I have been
in a bunch of them. If you have
not been to the new Ships Store
at Shields in St Marks you nee~
to make a special trip by there.
This is the nicest Ships Store:I
have ever been in. In fact, wheb
I was standing at the counted,
which is shaped like the froit
of a big boat, a customer opened
the door to come in and when he
stuck his head in I heard him say
"Wow." They have a state of the
arts shrimp tank and everything
in the store is first class. I know
they are very proud of the way it
turned out and it's worth the trip
down to see it-
Remember to know your linm-
its and don't forget to leave that
float plan with someone. Good
luck and good fishing.


There were songbirds everywhere


BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHI


I found myself arriving in
Cariabelle right at dawn. I had to
,brake for a few deer on the way
from my home in Smith Creek
during the pre-dawn darkness,
and it was a relief to see the sun's
glow lighting up the eastern sky.
My reason for wanting to be at
St George was to witness a "fall
out" What's a fall out? Let me
explain: Every, spring, millions
of songbirds migrate up from
Central and South America, the
Yucatan. and the Caribbean to
North America and Canada to set
up their breeding territory and
nest Doppler Radar, now all over
Florida to help in weather predict-
ing, actually picks up these waves
of thousands of birds as they ar-
rive along our coasts.These song-
birds cannot (contrary to popular
belief) predict weather, and thou-
sands may find themselves flying
into a strong headwind as a cold
front blasts down from the Arctic
and sweeps out to sea. By the
next morning, they've crossed
the Gulf and disperse over our re-
gion through the daylight hours
to feed, once again migrating
north the following evening. But
when they fly headlong into an
advancing front, by first light of
dawn they're exhausted and very
hungry. When they finally do see
land, they literally "fall out" of
the sky, dropping down to our
coastlines for survival,
As the wind continues to blast
out of the north for a day or so,
these little perching birds will
hang tight, feeding all through
the days to replenish their fat
supply (used while migrating).
On Tuesday, April 14, we had
a cold front slam through our
Big Bend region about 2 p.m or
3 p.m., and by 6 p.m. the wind
was blasting out of the north. My


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a major fall out on the following
morning. I timed it perfectly.
The youth camp was alive with
migrants birds we rarely see,
much less up cose.
After about three hours of


standing around glassing (view-
ing) the oaks and other vegeta-
tion, I was ready for a break, so I
joined others at the picnic table.
It soon became obvious this
palmetto patch was loaded with
insects attracted to blooming
palms because Orchard orioles
were constantly flying in and out
of the palm fronds.
There were often four or five
Scarlet tanager males in view
at one time with their brilliant
crimson bodies and black wings
.and tails. And as many cardinal
red summer tanager males could
be viewed from the same picnic
tables. As many as six male


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common grackle, Red-winged
blackbird, Rufous-sided towhee,
painted bunting, indigo bunting.
blue grosbeak and about 12-plus
warbler species, like hooded,
prothonotary by the dozens, and
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FS Credit i


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009 Page 11A


850-224-4960 www.fsucu.org

~ MORTGAGES -FREE CHECKING ~ AUTO LOANS ~ CREDIT CARDS


For tides at the following points


St. Marks


High


G ulf Coast W weekly Alm anac add to Dog Island Listings: Carrabelle 28
Cat Point 1 HI
Tide charts by April 30 -May 6 Lower Anchorage 1 H
Zihua Software, LLC West Pass 1 H

s River Entrance City of St. Marks Shell Point, Spring Creek


h Tide
SMin.
r., 53 Min.
r., 13 Min.
r., 36 Min.
r., 26 Min.


Low lide
25 Min.
2 Hrs., 38 Min.
2 Hrs., 31 Min.
2 Hrs., 3 Min.
2 Hrs., 39 Min.


Date High Low High Low High
Thu -0.3 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.9 ft. 3.7 ft.
Apr 30, 09 12:51 AM 7:44 AM 12:04 PM 5:51 PM
Fri 0.0 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.9 ft. 3.2 ft.
May 1, 09 1:57 AM 8:58 AM 1:26 PM 7:05 PM
Sat 0.4 ft. 2.8ft. 1.8 ft. 2.9 ft.
May 2, 09 3:10 AM 10:09 AM 3:16 PM 9:04 PM
Sun 0.7 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.8 ft. -
Ma 3, 09 4:21 AM 11:05 AM 4:56 PM 11:03 PM
Mon 0.9 ft. 3.3 ft. 0.8 ft.
May 4, 09 5:22 AM 11:49 AM 6:07 PM
Tue 3.0 ft. 1.1 ft. 3.5 ft. 0.3 ft.
May 5, 09 12:22 AM 6:12 AM 12:27 PM 7:00 PM
Wed 3.1 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.7 ft. -0.1 ft.
May 6, 09 1:20 AM 6:53 AM 1:01 PM 7:45 PM _


Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay

Date High Low High Low High
Thu -0.2 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.7 ft.
Apr 30, 09 __ 1:02 AM 7:36 AM 12:15 PM 5:43 PM
Fri 0.0 ft. 2.0 ft: 1.4 ft. 2.4 ft.
May 1,09 2:08 AM 8:50 AM 1:37 PM 6:57 PM
Sat 0.3 ft. 2.1 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.1 ft.
May 2, 09 3:21 AM 10:01 AM 3:27 PM 8:56 PM
Sun Q.5 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.1 ft.
May 3, 09 4:32 AM 10:57 AM 5:07 PM 10:55 PM
Mon 0.6 ft. 2.4 ft. 0.6 ft.
May 4, 09 5:33 AM 11:41 AM 6:18 PM
Tue 2.2 ft. 0.8 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.2 ft.
May 5,09 12:14 AM 6:23 AM 12:19 PM 7:11 PM
Wed 2.3 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.8 ft. -0.1 ft.
May 6,09 1:12 AM 7:04 AM 12:53 PM 7:56 PM


Date High Low High Low High
Thu -0.3 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.7 ft. 3.4 ft.
Apr 30, 09 1:55 AM 8:20 AM 1:08 PM 6:27 PM
Fr 0.0 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.7 ft. 3.0 ft.
May 1, 09 3:01 AM 9:34 AM 2:30 PM 7:41 PM
Sat 0.3 ft. 2.6 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.7 ft.
May 2, 09 4:14 AM 10:45 AM 4:20 PM 9:40 PM
Sun 0.6 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.6 ft.
May 3, 09 5:25 AM 11:41 AM 6:00 PM 11:39 PM
Mon 0.8 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.7 ft.
May 4, 09 6:26 AM 12:25 PM 7:11 PM
Tue 2.7 ft. 1.0 ft. 3.2 ft. 0.2 ft.
May 5, 09 12:58 AM 7:16 AM 1:03 PM 8:04 PM
Wed 2.9 ft. 1.1 ft. 3.4 ft. -0.1 ft.
May 6, 09 1:56 AM 7:57 AM 1:37 PM 8:49 PM


St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.

Date High Low High Low High
Thu -0.3 ft. 2.1 ft. 1.8 ft. 2.9 ft.
Apr30, 09 12:30 AM 7:28 AM 11:43 AM 5:35 PM
Fri 0.0ft. 2.1 ft.- 1.9 ft. 2.5 ft.
May 1, 09 1:36 AM 8:42 AM 1:05 PM 6:49 PM
Sat 0.4 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.7 ft. 2.2 ft.
May 2, 09 2:49 AM 9:53 AM 2:55 PM 8:48 PM
Sun 0.6 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.2 ft.
May 3, 09 4:00 AM 10:49 AM 4:35 PM 10:47 PM
Mon 0.9 ft. 2.5 ft. 0.7 ft.
May 4, 09 5:01 AM 11:33 AM 5:46 PM
Tue 2.3 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.7 ft. 0.2 ft.
May 5, 09 12:06 AM 5:51 AM 12:11 PM 6:39 PM
Wed 2.4 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.9 ft. -0.1 ft.
May 6. 09 1:04 AM 6:32 AM 12:45 PM 7:24 PM


Date High Low High Low High
Thu -0.3 ft. 2.8 ft. 2.0 ft. 3.7 ft.
Apr 30, 09 12:48 AM 7:4i AM 12:01 PM 5:48 PM
Fn 0.1 ft. 2.7 ft. 2.1 ft. 3.3 ft.
May 1, 09 1:54 AM 8:55 AM 1:23 PM 7:02 PM
Sat 0.4 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.9 ft. 2.9 ft.
May 2, 09 3:07 AM 10:06 AM 3:13 PM 9:01 PM
Sun 0.7 ft. 3.1 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.9 ft.
May 3, 09 4:18 AM 11:02 AM 4:53 PM 11:00 PM
Mon 0.9 ft. 3.3 ft. 0.8 ft.
May-4, 09 5:19 AM 11:46 AM 6:04 PM
Tue 3.0 ft. 1.1 ft. 3.6 ft. 0.3 ft.
May 5, 09 12:19 AM 6:09 AM 12:24 PM 6:57 PM
Wed 3.2 ft. 1.3 ft. 3.8 ft. -0.1 ft.
May 6, 09 1:17 AM 6:50 AM 12:58 PM 7:42 PM


Dog Island West End

Date High Low High Low High
Thu -0.3 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.9 ft. 2.9 ft.
Apr 30, 09 12:42 AM 9:53 AM 11:29 AM 5:27 PM
Fri -0.1 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.7 ft. 2.6 ft.
May 1, 09 1:52 AM 10:28 AM 1:31 PM 6:51 PM
Sat 0.1 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.3 ft.
May 2, 09 2:58 AM 10:53 AM 3:16 PM 8:40 PM
Sun 0.4 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.1 ft.
May 3, 09 3:57 AM 11:14 AM 4:33 PM 10:43 PM
Mon 0.7 ft.' 2.4 ft. 0.6 ft.
May 4, 09 4:48 AM 11:33 AM 5:33 PM
Tue 2.2 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.5 ft. 0.2 ft.
May 5, 09 12:31 AM 5:33 AM 11:50 AM 6:24 PM
Wed 2.3 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.6 ft. -0.0 ft.
May 6, 09 1:56 AM 6:12 AM 12:07 PM 7:09 PM


'1


S. ver the years I have learned
that any activity planned for
the Stephen C. Smith Memorial
Regatta weekend is doomed to
o:me out second best
Snowing that, why did Flotil-
Sla13decide to have Open House
at the Shell Point Coast Guard
Auxiliary Station? Perhaps we
thought those attending the
'egatta would also enjoy see-
ing the Coast Guard Auxiliary
Station.
.* The Coast Guara Station at
Panama City was very support-
ive and sent their 25-foot RBS
(Response Boat, Small) for us to
have on display. With the boat
came its usual four-man crew:
:BM2 John Martin, MK2 Kevin
Peffer, FM Jared Landrum and
MK3 Douglas Clark.
SThose on Open House duty
at the Stationwere Commander
John Edrington, Mae Waters,
Flotilla Commander, Frans and
Linda Buytendorp and Sherrie
:Alverson. In addition to the open
house, there were two qualified
Swatchstanders on duty.
'. I asked BM2 Martin for some
facts and figures about the boat
He explained that in the Coast
IGuard anything less that 65-feet
Sare'known as Small Boats. The
65-footers and above are known
as. Cutters. The 25-footer that we
had on display was an unusual
configuration. It has a dosed
cell polyurethane foam collar
which allows the boat to search
Sin very shallow water. The boat
Itself is made of aluminum and
is powered with two Honda 225,
four stroke gasoline outboard
engines.
SIt has a 10 person capacity,
a person crew and six people
;'hey have rescued. Maximum
,speed of 46 knots. Knot-that is
j;anotherjnautical term for the
:would-be or soon-to-be boaters
,,to know. A knot is defined as
!a unit of speed equaling 1.12
:niles. In other words those 46
,knots are 51.52 miles per hour.
'For a boat that size, you would
; feel as though you were flying.

j Gatort
Profession
General Lai
850-
!ww.galortra
Please w 1
Recycle
S Rodney Tr


I


As I said before, with the new
stop sign forcing people to stop
right in front of the Coast Guard,
we expected at least 100 people
touring the station. Our Flotilla
Commander, Mae Waters, pur-
chased the wonderful banner,
Frans and Linda Buytendorp
brought those delicious cookies
and punch for 200.
Beforehand, John Edring-
ton arranged for a crew from
Promise Land Ministries to
thoroughly dean the Station.
They did a terrific job. The sta-
tion hasn't looked that dean
since its original open house
back in 1997.
Mae was a really busy lady
Saturday. Not only was she help-
ing out with the open house, she
was also publicity chair for the
regatta. Although her work was
done in that capacity, she still
went down to help out wherever
she could. Joeann Vesecky, who
everyone knows is the mainstay
of the regatta, reported that Mae
had done an outstanding job.
We are proud of Mae, regardless
what hat she is wearing.
As I said, there were radio
watchstanders on duty Satur-
day. For once the lead operator
wasn't a Flotilla 13 member,
instead it was Steve Hults from
12 at St Marks. Flotilla 12 had
a patrol vessel on duty. Mark
Rosen was the coxswain. Also on
board were Rick Yood, Bob Sur-
dakowski, John Well and John
Denmark. John Sykes (13) was
the back-up watchstander.
Not only was it a routine
patrol, but they used it as a
boat crew training mission. The
weather was so beautiful, espe-
cially out on the water. I have a
hunch that many of us would
have enjoyed being with them.
Carolyn Treadon reported
there wasn't any other Flotilla 12
news. They will have a meeting
on Saturday, but details haven't
been worked out Members will
be notified as soon as they are.
Remember safe boating is no
accident


Sunrise
Sunset
Moon rise
Moon set
Brightness


Coast Guard crew visited Shell Point for open house.

Photo class set for May 2


On Saturday, May 2, the
St. Marks National Wildlife
Refuge will offer a free nature
photography photo class for
individuals interested in learn-
ing how to use their digital
cameras. The class is offered
the first Saturday of every
month from 10 a.m. to 12 fol-
lowed by a photo walk in the


refuge. The class is taught by
Ranger Barney Parker and is
open to adults and families.
To register for this month's
class, call the Refuge Visitor
Center at 925-6121 to reserve a
place in the class. Participants
meet in the Education Cabin
next to the Refuge Visitor
Center.


Wood sculptor to visit


Wood sculptor Marlin Mill-
er who started the Katrina
Sculpture Project, and has
been featured on television
and in magazines, will be
visiting the Blue Crab Festival
.on May 2.
Miller will be completing
a wood sculpture for the
Wakulla Welcome Center,
The wood sculpture Miller is
giving to Wakulla County will


be carved onsite at the festival
on May 2.
Miller is featured on MS-
NBC cable news web site:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/
id/3032619/#29825649.
The story was also featured
in Southern Living and Coast-
al Living magazines.
To learn more about the
Katrina Sculpture Project, just
google....Marlin Miller Biloxi.


w* ~ Cto aiJndaEsta&
S!Z7<3J2ladi2A
0 &&a&CYrn^n2 & Pwza&i



9'ana, Cau yoweansc IP.C1.

c4ttovz. U c iJE aw

926-8245 3042 Crawfordville Hwy.
Crawfordville, FL
www.francielowe.com


Fishing clinic slated

for Saturday, May 9


Teaching children a life-
long hobby, instilling an ap-
preciation for our marine
environment and providing a
fun, faiiily outing are the ob-
jectives for the Panacea Kids'
Fishing Clinic.
The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission
(FWC), the'St. Marks Nation-
al Wildlife Refuge, Wakulla
County, St. Marks Refuge As-
sociation and the Sport Fish
Restoration Program will pres-
ent a free Kids' Fishing Clinic
for children, ages 4 to 16 on
Saturday, May 9..
Registration will be from 11
a.m. to 2 p.m. The clinic will be
at Woolley Park in Panacea.
This event will enable
young people to learn the
basics of environmental stew-
ardship, fishing ethics, angling
skills and safety. In addition,
environmental displays will
provide participants with a
unique chance to experience
Florida's marine life first-
hand.
Kids' Fishing Clinics strive
toward several goals, but the
main objective is to create
responsible marine resource

Chess team


stewards by teaching children
about the vulnerability of
Florida's marine ecosystems.
Also, the clinics aspire to teach
fundamental saltwater fishing
skills and provide participants
with a positive fishing experi-
ence.
Fishing equipment and bait
will be supplied for children
to use during the clinic, but
those who own fishing tackle
are encouraged to bring it.
A limited number of rods
and reels will be given away to
participants upon completion
of the clinic.
If conditions allow, par-
ticipants will have the oppor-
tunity to practice their new
skills and fish from the pier.
This event is a photo catch-
and-release activity, and all
participants must be accom-
panied by an adult.
Individuals or companies
interested in helping sponsor
this event or volunteer at the
clinic should contact David
Moody with the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service at St. Marks
National Wildlife Refuge at
925-6121 or Gus Cancro with
the FWC at 48-6058.

seeks


donations for tourney


The Wakulla County Chess
Club is seeking donations so
that youth chess teams can
compete in the Florida Invita-
tional Supei Stars Tournament
in Palm Beach Gardens on May
15 through May 17.
The cub is asking for cash
donations, restaurant gift cards
and gas gift cards.
Donations are tax-deductible
and can be made online at www.
eteamz.com/WCC or at Wakulla
Bank.
For more information call


Jennifer Briggs at 925-4782 or
Marlene Adams.at 926-2300.

^ Feel More
Alert
,' ...Energized
...& Focused
AND LOOK GREAT IN THAT
Swim Suit
Gena Davis
Personal Trainer
926-7685 or 510-2326


First
May 1


Full
May 8


Last
May 17


New
May 24


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
5:11.am 6:11am 7:05 am 7:51am 8:33 am 9:12 am 9:52 am
5:40 pm 6:39pm .7:30 pm 8:15pm 8:56 pm 9:35 pm 10:15 pm
11:26 am : 12:01am 12:52am 1:39am 2:22 am 3:01 am 3:40 am
11:55pm 12:25pm 1:17pm 2:03pm 2:44 pm 3:24pm 4:03 pm


SMajor
Activity
Minor
Activity


Coast Guard

SAuxiliary Reports
I, 'By Sherrie Alverson


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
6:54 am 6:54 am 6:53 am 6:52 am 6:51 am 6:50 am 6:49 am
8:14pm 8:14pm 8:15pm 8:16pm 8:16pm 8:17pm 8:18pm
11:56 am 1:04pm 2:10pm 3:13 pm 4:14 pm 5:14 pm 6:14 pm
1:22 am 2:08 am 2:48 am 3:23 am 3:55 am 4:26 am 4:57 am
39% 46% 53% 60% 67% 74% 81%


* Boating Emergencies
Coast Guard Station
Panam a City ....................................................... (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown .................................................. (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ..................:.;..-.......(850) 9060540
or ..893..........-................`9-5137
or ..'.......................... ...... .... ............................ 893-5137
Shell Point (Flotilla 13) ................................ (850) 926-2606
or .................................... .................. ... 926-5654


I


r_


16- Id


I








Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009

Volunteers receive praise from library


Mary Register
On Friday, April 24, the library
hosted a Volunteer Appreciation
event in honor of the many vol-
unteers who give of their time
and talents for the benefit of
the library, The keynote speaker
for the event, Mary Register,
Volunteer Services Consultant
with the Governor's Commis-
sion of Volunteerism and Com-
munity Service, complimented
our county on the progress it
has made in establishing Vol-
unteerWakulla as an umbrella
volunteer organization in our
community. She said we are way
ahead of many other small coun-
ties and thanked Clerk of Court


Brent Thurmond, TCC Wakulla
Center, and many others who
helped VolunteerWakulla get
organized.
Register noted that many
agencies in Wakulla receive valu-
able help from their volunteers.
In tough economic times, the
contribution volunteers make is
doubly important Volunteerism
saves the taxpayer money, frees
up staff time to deal with the
increased workload that reces-
sions and unemployment bring,
and perhaps most importantly,
gives strength and meaning to
the lives of those who volunteer.
Studies show, she said, that vol-
unteers sleep better at night are
healthier, and have lower blood
pressure than the population at-
large. Volunteering is a win-win
situation for everyone involved.
Library Volunteer Coordina-
tor Pam Mueller, who recently
became a certified Volunteer
Manager upon completing a
series of six workshops at TCC,
recognized the library's many
volunteers. Gloria Hatton, Nancy
Myers, Reba Goodman, Sean Mc-
Cool. Jim Boileau, Jim Maguire,
Mary Holden, Peg Simpson, Terri
Jonson, Jenny Mueller, Elders


From the Desk
of the Public
Library




Doug Jones
Gyther and Eden, and Bright
Futures Scholar Derek Kelly were
presented small gifts from the
Friends of the Library. Friends
volunteers present at the event
Cathy Cameron, Jeri Cooper and
Helen Joyner, who join many
other volunteers assisting at the
library's Free Book Extravagan-
zas,. were also recognized.
The library has been very
fortunate to have many volun-
teers who assist us year-in and
year-out
In addition to the Friends
of the Library, the Iris Garden
Club has voluntarily planted and.
maintained the library grounds
since 1976, when we were lo-
cated in the Old Courthouse.
The AARP Volunteer Income
Tax Counselors have been pro-
viding that service to low in-
come taxpayers since the early
1980s. Members of the Wakulla


County Historical Society have
volunteered their time to help
the library establish a local his-
tory collection and local history
programming. Members of the
Iris Garden Club and Native
Plant,Society are establishing a
native plant garden immediately
in front of the library We would
like to thank all our volunteers
for their dedicated service.
Friday Night at the Movies
Another in the Library's se-
ries of Oscar films will be shown
on Friday, May 1 at 7 p.m. This
particular film (rated PG-13) was
nominated for five Oscars: Best
Actor, Best Actress, Best Sup-
porting Actor, Best Supporting
Actress, and Best Screenplay. It
stars previous Oscar winners
Meryl Streep and Philip Seymour
Hoffman.
Library Advisory Board
The Library Advisory Board
will meet at the library on Mon-
day, May 4 at 4 p.m. The public
is invited to attend this meet-
ing where library policies and
issues are discussed. For more
information about the library,
please contact us at 926-7415 or
visit our web site at www, wakul-
lalibrary.org.


ST. MARKS
By Linda Walker

Hi neighbors. I do believe it
is now summertime. She who
shall remain nameless should
be shucking her longjohns and
doing cartwheels. When I go
outside j start sweating.
Congratulations to "Cassie,"
up at the Express Lane. She is
Russ Wireman's daughter and
she and her husband celebrated
their fifth wedding anniversary
last weekend.
Angel wings to those who
make our lives easier here in
St Marks. The people who go
that extra step to help another
without expecting anything back.
That is called kindness. People in
our beautiful little town will stop
to help you for no reason other
than being kind.
Let's wish these very special
people happy birthday: David
Field and Debra Iverston on May
3 and a special happy birthday
to Bobby Dean on May 4, Lyfda
Humphries and Ronnie Day on
May 4.
A late, but very happy birth-
day, to my friend from the flea
market, Charlotte Goode on
April 23.


Angel wings to "Kenny" for
doing such a great job cleaning
out my gutters and the roof
On our prayer list please re-
member Newell Ladd, Margaret
Pelt Kent and Thelma Murphy,
Nettie, Junior and Gordon Strick-
land. Ms. Nettie is not doing well
at all. Pray for Dottie Lynn, Jim
and Betty Ward, Eddie and Mary
Ward, my nephew, Buddy John-
son, Billy Brown, Merelene Beard.
Melissa Knight, Sandy Chapman,
Nancy Nichols, Mr. and Mrs.
Johnny Reams, Pam Lawhon. Jim
Ward's daughter, Jayne Marshall
and Barnard Sessions, my friend
Ed Zsorey and let's pray for each
other and all of those not named
here. Pray for our soldiers and
their families, our Vietnam vets,
our town and country and pray
for peace.
Tip for this week: if you want
to get that old wax out of your
vase, put it in the freezer over-
night It will break free easily.
Thought for this week: Let me
remember not to be so quick to
judge another. Anger and resent-
ment will eat your soul and I have
no way of knowing what is going
on in their lives. '
Congratulations to "April,"
finally getting an air condition-
ing unit It is way too hot to live
without one these days.


1000


Every Restaurant!


The Original Hamaknockers BBQ
Six years ago Jim Lowe and good friend. Mark Baker. decided
to quit talking about the need for good barbecue in Wakulla
County and opened up their own BBQ business. HAMAKNOCK-
ERS BBQ.
They started out in a small concession trailer along with a
smoker and set up inthe Rose Alley strip mall. That was the
humble beginning of the original HAMAKNOCKERS. Everything
was cooked onsite; pulled pork, ribs, and chicken, but according to
Jim, "The best part was the good times we had with the people
who stopped by. Mark used to play his guitar and. slg a few
songs and some of the customers even joined in from time to
time. But as the summer got hotter and the bugs became more
plentiful the fun seemed to melt away, so we shut it down. But
people didn't forget us. Wherever we went, it seemed people
would ask us when and where we were going to open HA-
MAKNOCKERS BBQ up again."
Mark and MaryAnn decided to move back to Tennessee to
be with their family. But since there was still interest from the
community for HAMAKNOCKERS to re-open. Jim consulted with
his family about pursuing the BBQ business if a suitable building
became available. Jim's wife, Candy, and their sons, Jesse, Jason


and Jared all agreed to give it a go.
The little house next to The Wakulla News office became avail-
able. "We wanted to keep it simple, so originally we started out
with 'carry out" only. It was a lot of work, and a learn-as-you-go
process. The family worked together to make the business work.
and we are still working at it. We've had a lot of good employees
who have helped make HAMAKNOCKERS BBQ successfuL We've
made some changes since we first opened. We now seat about

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warm, friendly and comfortable atmosphere."
The menu has expanded to include items including smoked
wings, wraps, the original "HAMABURGER," quesadillas, great
salads, cold beer, and now, HAND CUT RIBEYE STEAKS on Friday
and Saturday nights. Yes, changes have been made, but not the
quality and uniqueness of HAMAKNOCKERS BBQ.


I0ll


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Section B


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009


Wildlife photography Brought to you by


JJ rt Wakulla aesW and our readers.


"
'*`

'
"'
11; -- -


-s ..

A


Following


the birds


This week we display pho-
tography contributors Ron
Piasecki, Frank Thornton and
Leslie Thornton's waterfowl
photographs from recent
trips to the coast and Wakulla
Springs.
Ron Piasecki took a pho-
to of a yellow crown night
heron, top left, on a recent
trip to visit nature. A male
and female wood duck kept
I a close eye on Frank Thorn-
ton, top right, as he captured
their images in a quiet pose.
Thornton also photographed
a St. Marks National Wild-
life Refuge pelican, middle;
shortly after takeoff from a


county pond.
Leslie Thornton photo-
graphed a little blue heron,
right, scampering through
shallow waters in search of
a meal.
The Wakulla News peri-
odically publishes the work
of area photographers who
enjoy capturing wildlife and
landscapes around Wakulla
County.
If you have images that
you would like to see pub-
lished, e-mail them to Editor
Keith Blackmar at kblackmar@
thewakullanews.net, We will
publish the best shots as
soon a space permits.


.; "*. .^;,, 'p- ^.. ; -. fr .. .' .. Q f . "i /
, t... ?. ; .. ,., -/ ....
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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009


SThree school teachers and

an employee are honored


Back row left, Tammie Barfield, Nathan Lee, Destiny Revis, Dakota Rhodes, Taylor
Lawhon, Dustin Grubbs and Superintendent David Miller. Front row left, Sally
Gandy, Shane Bellew, Connor Keith, Jacob Evanshine, Kaleb Campbell, Katie Sand-
ers, Ethan Trumbull and Principal Bobby Pearce.


Medart brains battle it out


Medart Elementary School
held its annual Brain Brawl
on Friday, April 17. The event
was sponsored by the Coastal
Optimist Club. Sally Gandy,
Tammie Barfield, and Dustin
Grubbs served as moderator,
scorekeeper, and timekeeper
respectively.
Team B won the competi-
tion with 344 points. Captain
Nathan Lee, son of John and
Bridgett Lee, was high scorer
for Team B. In addition, Na-


than was the top scorer for the
competition with 84 points.
The' rest of the team in-
cluded Shane Bellew, son of
Samantha Bellew and Shan-
non Bellew; Destiny Revis,
daughter of Brooke Boyd and
Eric Revis; Dakota Rhodes, son
of Misty Rhodes and grandson
of Ken Rhodes; and Taylor
Lawhon, daughter of Chris
and Michele Lawhon.
Team A collected 259
points. The high scorer for


Team A was Captain Connor
Keith, daughter of Kristi Keith
and Jonathan Keith. The rest
of Team A included Jacob
Evanshine, son of Kreana
Evanshine and Thomas Evan-
shine; Kaleb Campbell, son of-
Reggie and Keith Ann Camp-
bell; Katie Sanders, daughter
of JoAnn Sanders and Sam
Sanders, and niece of Julie
Sanders; and Ethan Trumbull,
son of Leisa Ledford and Ste-
ven Trumbull.


Celebrate the Arts on April 30
TheWakullaCountyArts school Orff Bands will p.m. Kohl's is this years
Coalition, which consists play together as will the "community partner" and
of all music, drama and art Elementary Chorus. Both will be helping at the art
teachers in Wakulla Coun- Riversprings and Wakulla auction.
ty, invites the public to the middle schools will offer Admission for adults
Eighth Annual Celebration a combination jazz band is $5, students are $2 and
of the Arts on Thursday, performance and the high anyone under age five will
April 30 at the Wakulla school will offer jazz band, be admitted free. All pro-
High School auditorium, chorus and drama tidbits. ceeds benefit this student
The event will be filled The silent art auction scholarships for deserving
with' music, dancing and will begin at 5:30 p.m. with band, drama and visual arts
laughter. The elementary the show beginning at 6:30 seniors.


The Wakulla County School
Board recognized March
Teacher of the Month, Riv-
ersprings Middle School's
Shannon Smith and April
Teachers of the Month, Riv-
ersink Elementary School's
Diane Driggers and Wakulla
Education Pre-K Center, Joy
Coke at the Monday, April 20
board meeting. The district
also recognized Employee of
the Month Janet Grigg of the
Transportation Department.
Shannon Smith was rec-
ognized as the March Teacher
of the Month in April because
he was coaching a Bear sports
team during the March meet-
ing and was unavailable.
Smith is a product of the
Wakulla County School Dis-
trict and has been a Wakulla
County math teacher since
August 2004. After attending
Shadeville Elementary School,
Wakulla Middle School and
Wakulla High School, he
joined the United States Ma-
rine Corps. After returning
home, he graduated from
Florida State University and
was hired as a teacher.
"Wakulla County is the
only place to teach," he said.
"The people I work with make
my job enjoyable. I enjoy
watching the excitement on


Diane Driggers Joy Coke
a student's face when they, I lived in the little farm com-


grasp a new concept."
Smith teaches in the class-
room'and on the athletic field.
He has coached softball, foot-
ball, baseball and wrestling.
"Working with the student
athletes in our county and
teaching them new skills
that will hopefully help them
in life is very satisfying," he
added.
Principal Dod Walker add-
ed, "The Riversprings family is
proud to have Shannon Smith
represent us as the Wakulla
County Teacher of the Month.
He is the head coach for our
baseball team and wrestling
team. As a sixth grade math-
ematics teacher, Mr. Smith
stands above the crowd as an
excellent educator and dedi-
cated teacher. He-is always
willing to provide assistance
to his colleagues, his students
and his friends whenever
they are in need. Mr. Smith
is a valuable asset."
Joy Coke, Wakulla Educa-
tion Center pre-K teacher, was
selected as the April Teacher
of the Month. Unfortunately
for Wakulla County, this is her
last month working in Craw-
fordville as she is returning to
her home in Tennessee.
"Until I was 12 years old,


munity of Indian Mound
Tennessee," she reflected.
"I attended Indian Mound
School first to seventh grade.
We then moved to Clarksville,
Tenn. where I graduated from
High School."
Coke received her formal
education at Trevecca Naza-
rene in Nashville, Tenn. where
she received her Bachelor's
degree. To help fulfill her
youngest daughter's dream
of attending FSU, her fam-
ily moved to North Florida.
Coke adds, "It was just an
added bonus that I already
had three grand babies living
here, too."
It only took a few years in
Wakulla County for Coke to
develop a positive reputation.
Principal Kim Dutton added,
"Joy Coke is a natural She
has exuded enthusiasm and
excitement over the successes
of her three and four year olds
since she began in 2003. It is
obvious that helping children
grow and progress provides
great satisfaction for Mrs.
Coke."
Making a difference in the
lives of children one at a time
is her mission.

Continued on Page 3B








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009 Page 3B


EPga~3~IaPag.B^^w^.^.egn;..r v.I, .^ *-p*, ^-.-Z -f-r .W- .. -i.A--wr ---. --
Jerry Evans, Greg Thomas, Chair Becky Cook and Ken Weber of Division of Forestry
with check, Superintendent David Miller, Ray Gray and Mike Scott,

State forestry hands over money


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla County School
Board members love when
Ken Weber of the Florida
Division of Forestry attends
school board meetings. He is
not only married to one of the
district's top educators, but he
usually brings a state revenue
sharing check when he visits
the boardroom.


Weber provided the school
district with a check for $58,370
on Monday, April 20. The
check represented an increase
from $33,000 last year.
The money represents 15
percent of the revenue raised
by the Wakulla State Forest
and the Land Management
Revenue Sharing Program.
State land is used for a va-
riety of services and provides


Artwork was displayed


Wakulla Springs State Park
recently held the Wakulla
Wildlife Festival and students
from the Wakulla County
Schools displayed art work
of animals, fish, birds, insects
and themes of recycling, pol-
lution and more.
The following students


placed in the contest:
Wakulla High School: first
place Raheena Bascome, sec-
ond Bailey Bargain and third
Hannah Proulx.
At the middle School/el-
ementary level: first Kayla
Weismantel of COAST Charter
School, second George Gait-


the counties with an oppor-
tunity to receive a slice of the
financial pie, said Weber.
Weber added that St. Joe
Paper Company planted many
trees on the state forest land
before it was acquired and
trees harvest sales provide
revenue for both the state and
county. Livestock also uses the
land and creates revenue, he
concluded.

at Springs
lin of MES and third Caitlin
Rowley of Wakulla Middle
School.
At the elementary level:
first Bailey Smith of Shadev-
ille, second Austin Hart of
Riversink and third Abbie
Hollington of Riversink.


ACT test deadline is approaching


The next ACT achievement
test will be administered on
June 13. Students who wish
to take the college admission
and placement exam must
register by May 8. Late regis-
tration deadline is available
May 9 to May 22 for an extra
fee. Students may register
online at www.actstudent.org
or pick up registration forms
from high school counseling
offices.
The Juqe test date is popu-
lar with high school juniors.
Many of them take the ACT at
the end of 11th grade, know-
ing they can re-take it, the
following year.
Once they receive their
scores, juniors can plan their
senior coursework to bet-
ter prepare for college and
careers. Seniors who take
the test may send up to four

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free score reports to colleges
and universities. Test results
represent true student choice;
the students decide only
those test scores they wish
to report.
The cost is $l1 for the tra-
ditional ACT test and $46 for
the ACT Plus Writing. Students
should determine whether
colleges and universities they
are considering require the op-
tional writing score. A list of
schools that require the writ-
ing test can be found at www.
actstudent.org/writing. ACT
scores are accepted by all four-
year colleges and universities.
across the United States.
This year, ACT is also
pleased to begin offering a
September test in all 50 states.
Registration for the Sept. 12
test begins in mid-July. For
those students who qualify,


fee waivers for the September
test are available from school
counselors. The waivers will
be available before summer
and are needed during regis-
tration.
The ACT, a curriculum-
based achievement exam,
consists of tests in English,
mathematics, reading and
science, and takes about three
hours. The optional ACT Plus
Writing requires an additional
30 minutes to complete. Un-
like other tests, students are
not penalized for guessing
and answering all the ques-
tions on each section. In fact,
it is beneficial to students to
answer all questions.
The ACT website, www.act-
student.org, has helpful infor-
mation, free sample tests and
inexpensive test prep materials.


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Teachers honored


Continued from Page 2B
She remembers a time she
taught a special needs child
who was incredibly bright but
fearful to extreme distraction.
"When he became upset
and afraid I would say, take a
deep breath, everything is go-
ing to be alright. There is noth-
ing to be afraid of," she said.
"Standing next to him, I would
model deep breaths. Then, one
day, just before the end of his
second year, we went on a walk
outside and a bee flew up and
buzzed right by his head. I
knew a major meltdown was
on the way. I was thrilled when
he suddenly started taking
enormous breaths and speak-
ing in a little monotone voice
he said to himself, 'Everything
will be alright. There is nothing
to be afraid of."'
Joy Coke will be sorely
missed, said Superintendent
David Miller. "We wish her
only the best as she returns
to her rocky top roots in Ten-
nessee. Her legacy of helping
children gain confidence and
believe in their own ability
will not be lost in Wakulla
County."
Also recognized at the
board meeting, was the Riv-
ersink Elementary School
April Teacher of the Month,
Diane Driggers. Driggers began
her Wakulla County career in
1996 as a long-term substitute
teacher. Originally from Penn-
sylvania by way of Key West,
Driggers moved to Tallahas-
see in 1995. Nova University
conferred both a Bachelor and
Master's degree in Elementary
Education to her.
"Being a part of Riversink
this year has really renewed
my love of teaching," shared
Driggers. "I love being at a
brand new school. It is a
unique opportunity to be a
part of creating ahd developing
new policies, programs and
building our Otter team."


Her outlook is further re-
flected in the fact that Driggers
wrote the school song, "Otter's
Rule," which was performed
for the first time at the Riv-
ersink Spring Festival.
Principal Jackie High added,
"Awesome, outstanding, enthu-
siastic, all describe Diane Drig-
gers but do not do her justice.
She is a teacher who takes her
profession seriously. She has
mastered the art of teaching,
yet demonstrates the enthu-
siasm of a first year teacher.
The second you step into her
classroom, you realize this is a
lady who loves her job. She not
only carries this enthusiasm'
over to her students, creating
a wonderful learning environ-
ment, but spreads it amongst
all who work with her, creating
a fun, exciting place to be each
day. To put it simply, Diane
Driggers is a true outstanding
teacher, and it is an absolute
joy to work with her."
When not busy teaching in
the classroom, Driggers also
serves as the professional de-
velopment council and reading
leadership team representa-
tive, she is the FAIR trainer,
fourth grade team leader and
an adjunct professor at Flagler
College.
School bus driver Ja-
net Grigg was selected as
the Wakulla School District
April Employee of the Month.


Since 1986, Grigg has been a
school bus driver for the "best
fleet of drivers in the State of
Florida."
Born in Sopchoppy, Grigg
attended Wakulla High School
and received her GED from
FAMU. She notes, "Wakulla
County kids are the best. The
parents of this county are sup-
portive and appreciative. I love
my job and I especially love the
kids. They bring so much joy
into my life."
Transportation Coordina-
tor Pat Jones applauds Grigg
as well. "Janet Grigg is one of
the finest bus drivers that I
have known. She is dedicated,
dependable and considerate.
Student safety is her number
one priority. Her second pri-
ority is being on the job and
keeping her bus dean, Janet
takes pride in knowing her
students and their parents,
communicating with my of-
fice and the principal's office
when needed. She goes out of
her way to show concern and
compliment students. She is
a jewel."
Grigg shared a funny story
about one morning on her bus.
Before the sun came up a fe-
male student on her bus start-
ing screaming, "There's some-
thing on my leg." Janet pulled
the bus over, turned on the
inside lights and saw students
standing on the seats. The
whole time she was silently
praying, "Oh Lord please don't
let it be a snake." Fortunately
her prayer was answered. She
did, however, discover a gi-
ant rain frog on the student.
Grigg reflects, "I knocked the
rain frog off her leg, chased it
down the bus aisle, grabbed
the frog and threw it out the
bus window." It's amazing how
much respect a bus driver can
earn from both boys and girls
by handling a giant rain frog
with no fear.


Wakulla nationally recognized
Wakulla High School was homepage April 23, to show learning experience.
selected to be nationally recog- SchoolTube's national audi- Wakulla was automatically
nized as a SchoolTube Featured ence a great example of how registered to become a win-
School of The Day. WHS was the school is excelling at using ner in SchoolTube's Featured
highlighted on SchoolTube's video to enrich your students School of the Month award.


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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009


Ki; *


Youths learn the art of public speaking .


SBy KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
One of the most frighten-
ing educational events for
students in fourth through
sixth grade is standing up in
front of an audience and giv-
ing a speech,
But that did not stop a
handful of Wakulla County
students who'took part in the
4-H/Tropicana Public Speaking
Program at the extension of-


fice Thursday, April 23.
4-H Agent Sherri Hood or-
ganized the event and broke
contestants into a fourth and
fifth grade category and a
sixth grade grouping,
Sam Roddenberry of Med-
art Elementary School was the
fourth/fifth grade winner with
a speech on his youth baseball
team. His humorous theme
was "We're not the worst.".
Jadon Hunkar pf Wakulla


Christian School placed sec-
ond with a speech about
his hairless cats. Danielle
McNair won a COAST Charter
School contest to be part of
the county competition, but
did not attend. The alternates
included Devin Weismantel
of COAST, Dallas Harris of
Medart Elementary and Anna
Golden of Wakulla Christian
School.
The first place winner for


Buckridge appointed
DaveBuckridge, ofWakul- Buckridge serves on
la Bank, has been appointed Wakulla Bank's credit and
to the WORKFORCE plus asset quality team and has
Board of Directors. His term been involved in the local fi-
began in March 2009. WORK- nancial market since moving
FORCE plus is the regional to Crawfordville in January
workforce board serving 2005. He served as the 2008
Gadsden, Leon and Wakulla president of the Wakulla
counties and provides em- County Chamber of Com-
ployment solutions to job merce and has been active
seekers and employers. in the community through


the sixth grade division was
Tucker Pearce of Wakulla Mid-
dle School who spoke about
playing Wildcat football.
Mitchell Atkinson of River-
springs Middle School placed
second after discussing Bully-
ing in Schools.
The third place award went
to Hallie Anderson of COAST
who spoke about the dangers
of the Internet. The alternates
were Taylor Barnes of COAST,
Cade Cutchen of Riversprings
and Emma Donaldson of
Wakulla Middle School.
Roddenberry and Pearce
advanced to the district com-
petition which will be held at
FAMU on Thursday, April 30.
They also won a $200 scholar-
ship to attend a 4-H camp of
their choice during the year
and a plaque. The second place
winners will also advance to
districts and will speak if the
winners are unable to attend.
Hood said schools were not
required to participate in the
contest, but she hopes to have
more students involved in the
speech contest next year.
The judges for the con-
test included Jo Barksdale of
the Wakulla Green Guides
Girls Program at Tallahassee
Community College, Dexter
Harrell of the Florida Depart-
ment of Juvenile Justice and
Keith Blackmar, Editor of The
Wakulla News.


to board
I
membership in various civic
organizations. He is a mem-
ber of Crawfordville United
Methodist Church.
'He and his wife Syman-
tha have two children, Lac-
ey, 16, who is a sophomore
at Wakulla High School and
Brett, 13, an eighth-grad-
er at Riversprings Middle
School.


Amanda B. Thomas and Daniel C. Poole

Amanda B. Thomas

will marry Poole


D.J. and Mary Thomas
of Crawfordville announce
the engagement and upcom-
ing wedding of their daugh-
ter, Amanda Brooke Thomas
of Crawfordville, to Daniel
Charles Poole of Tallahassee.
He is the son of David and
Cathi Poole of Tallahassee.
The bride-elect is a 2005
graduate of Wakulla High
School and a 2007 graduate
of Tallahassee Community
College. She is employed at


Capital Regional Medical Cen-
ter. She is working toward
completing her credentials to
become a radiology technician
by December 2009.
Her fiance is a 2005 gradu-
ate of Lincoln High School.
He is employed by Outsource,
Inc. as a telephone engineer.
He is working on a degree in
engineering.
The wedding will be held
Saturday, May 2 at 2 p.m. at
Willow Pond in Monticello.


SSelling Something?
Classified Ads For
As tittle As $8 A Week
926-7102


Donations are needed


A benefit bank account has
been set up to assist Crawford-
ville resident Debbie "Deb"
Wallin with expenses related
to her cancer treatment.
Wallin has not been able to
work during her treatments and
an account has been set up at
Wakulla Bank to assist her with


transportation costs and other
expenses. She was employed
in the Wal-Mart deli before her
illness. She was diagnosed with
Stage Two cervical cancer,
Wallin is the sister of The
Wakulla News advertising rep-
resentative Lynda Kinsey.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009 Page 5B


SBeware of warmer weather


Chemist Rosemary Bottcher identified the waste chemicals.


Each waste roundup is unique


Keep Wakulla
County
Beautiful




Marl Law

The household Hazardous
Waste Roundup filled a semi
truck with electronics and
bulbs as 286 Wakulla County
Residents participated in the
Saturday, April 18 Household
Hazardous Waste Day.
Since the event ran from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Keep Wakul-
la County Beautiful (KWCB)
greeter volunteers met about
one vehicle each 1.25 minutes
as cars and trucks pulled into
the driveway of 340 Trice
Lane. The KWCB volunteers
asked drivers what type of
hazardous waste they were
transporting to the Roundup.
Depending on the drivers' re-
sponses, our KWCB volunteers
informed them whether to
take their load to the left, for
electronics, or to the right, by-
passing the electronics station,
to get rid of paints, solvents,
pesticides, batteries, used fuel
oil and much more.
ESG personnel, our pub-
lic works people, set up the
grounds in advance for the
most efficient traffic flow.
"It's overwhelming," said
Nannette Watts, who works


for ESG, "to know how much
our residents appreciate this
event."
Each Roundup brings sur-
prises. The biggest surprise
this time was the tremendous
amount of electronics, such as
old television sets, computers,
monitors and fluorescent light
bulbs, brought to the event.
By the time we closed down,
workers busied themselves
by reshuffling the contents
of their truck; creating just a
little extra bit of room to pack
in the last of the monitors and
the barrels filled with fluo-
rescent bulbs. They stacked
carefully because contents
actually filled the semi truck
to its ceiling.
As usual, residents brought
in lots of paint. Sheriff Harvey
allowed us the use of the
sheriffs weekend work camp
crew to sort it and lift the cans
onto pallets. By 3 p.m., the
crew had filled 18 pallets. This
is equal to the most we have
collected in past events.
Jeff Clark, of Evergreen
Industrial Fuels LLC, took in
used oil. He did not expect so
many gallons of it, but he was
prepared, nonetheless. Jeff col-
lected more than 400 gallons
of used oil. This was especially
surprising as our landfill now
is able to take used oil free of
charge.
Arsenic. Yes, someone
brought us arsenic.


"It's the most concentrated
I've ever seen," exclaimed
chemist Rosemary Bottcher,
"It's a 40 percent solution and
will kill almost anything, but
mostly it has been used for
weed control." She said that
the normal amount is a 2
percent solution.
Chlordane surprised Rose-
mary, too. Although it was
banned in 1986, someone
turned in four gallons of the
chemical which was used pri-
marily as a pesticide.
SAnother resident brought
two gallons of sulfuric acid.
Rosemary informed us that it
is three times more concen-
trated than battery acid
I asked her what general
advice she could give.
"Tell your residents," she
instructed, "not to purchase
more than they need." She
pointed to 12 containers of
Ferti-lome. I'd never seen this
product before, but Rosemary
said it was used as a tent cat-
erpillar spray.
"Use the least toxic alter-
native that you have," she
advised.
The next Household Haz-
ardous Waste Roundup is
scheduled for a Saturday in
October. If you would like to
volunteer for this event, call
the KWCB office at 926-0830.
We'd appreciate extra help. It's
our volunteers who keep the
lines moving. They're great!


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Susan Velton
This is the time of the year
when the weather is beauti-
ful, not too hot and not too
cold. I have always wished it
would stay that way all year,
but if you have lived here a
long time, you know how hot
it will get in a few months.
We are fast approaching the
time of year when we need to
remember that it is not always
in your dog's best interest to
take them with you for a short
trip to "run an errand."
Dogs can suffer and die
when left inside parked cars,
even on mildly warm days. On
a 78 degree day, the tempera-
ture inside a shaded car is 90
degrees, while the inside of
a car parked in the sun can
reach 160 degrees in minutes.
Animals can succumb to heat-
stroke in just 15 minutes.
If you see a dog left alone
in a car on a hot day, take
down the car's color, model,
make, and license plate num-
ber and have the owner paged
inside the store.
Most of the time, it is a
situation where a person who
loves their dog lost track of


.I


Shook finishes basic


Air Force Airman Jessica L.
Shook graduated from basic
military training at Lackland
Air Force Base, San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman completed an
intensive, dight-week program
that included training in mili-
tary discipline and studies,
Air Force core values, physi-
cal fitness, and basic warfare
principles and skills.


Airmen who complete ba-
sic training earn four credits
toward an associate in applied
science degree through the
Community College of the
Air Force.
Shook is the daughter of
Don and Ann Shook of Craw-
fordville.
The airman is a 2007 gradu-
ate of Wakulla High School.


We Buy Gold,


Diamonds, Silver,


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In Any Condition!




Saturday at


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1/4 Mile South of Courthouse


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For More Information


call Scott


(352) 949-0877


~- '


the time they have been in
the store. You would be doing
them and the dog a big favor
by contacting them.
You could also call Animal
Control staff but since they
may be on a call, it is best
to start at the store. All our
local stores are very helpful
in these types of situations.
But if no one responds to the
call, please call Animal Con-
trol (926-0902) or the Sheriff's
Office.
We are still a rural county
and many people are accus-
tomed to letting their dog ride
in the back of their pickup
truck. Fortunately, we don't
see this practice as often as
past years. On the surface, it
seems like a humane thing to
do. Your dog has your compan-
ionship, is not subject to high
temperatures in an enclosed
vehicle, is not crated, etc.
Although this practice is not
prohibited by local ordinance,
it is not in the animal's best
interest nor is it condoned
by CHAT.
Not too long ago, I saw
a beautiful young Labrador
retriever at Wakulla Animal
Hospital. He was there with
his owner for a check -up
because he lost a leg when
he jumped out of the back of
the owner's truck. CHAT is
not a proponent of tethering,
but if you must transport your
dog in the back of your truck,


please tether appropriately, so
that the dog cannot hurt itself
during transport.
If you are like many of us at
CHAT who have to transport
dogs back and forth to the
adoption center, we try to do
the "right thing" by using a
crate whenever we can. We
don't have the luxury of a
special van, but if you are look-
ing for dog friendly vehicles,
the new version of the Honda
Element is a "Ritz-Carlton" for
the canine set.
It features a built in bed in
the cargo area, a private elec-
tric cooling fan, a spill proof
water bowl, fold out ramp
for dogs that can't or won't
walk, and a mesh net to keep
the animals separated from
people. It goes on sale late
summer and will compete
with the Toyota's Venza dog
friendly vehicle. No price yet,
but I would imagine that it
is well over the basic cost of
the Element, which retails for
$22,385.
Just a reminder for this
month and upcoming months,
April is Cat Adoption Month.
Lots of cute cats and kittens
are available and the adoption
fee is reduced to $50, which
includes spay/neuter, rabies
and a healthy cat. Also, please
mark your calendar for CHAT's
June 6 yard sale. Call Heide at
926-3849 or Petra at 228-1242
to make donations.








Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009


Unemployment creeps downward i i


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla's unemployment
rate was down in March to
6.8 percent from 7.2 percent
in February, according to the
state Agency for Workforce
Innovation.
A year ago, March 2008, un-
employment was nearly half
the current rate 3.5 percent
in Wakulla County.
The unemployment rate
in Florida was up to 9.7 per-
cent in March from 9.6 per-
cent from February. Those
numbers represent 893,000
jobless of a workforce of 9.2
million statewide. Florida's
unemployment continued
to outpace the national rate,
which was up sharply as well
- 8.5 percent in March from
8.1 in February.
Workforce Innovation re-
ported that the state unem-
ployment rate is the highest
since January, February and
March of 1976. The last time
the unemployment rate was
higher was December 1975
when it was 10.0 percent.
The job loss continues the


trend that began in August
2007, starting with declines in
construction jobs, but which
has now spread to almost all
other major industries.
"More than $1.5 billion in
federal stimulus funds are
flowing into our state to as-
sist unemployed Floridians,"
said Agency Interim Direc-
tor Cynthia Lorenzo. "These
funds are providing enhanced
unemployment compensation
benefits and expanding job
placement and job training
programs to help bolster the
economic recovery of Florida's
families."
Even with the rise in lo-
cal unemployment, Wakulla
County continues to have one
of the lowest unemployment
rates in the state. Of 67 coun-
ties in Florida, Wakulla was
tied with neighboring Frank-
lin County for the sixth lowest
jobless rate. Those with lower
unemployment were Jackson
County at 6.7 percent. Leon
County at 6.2 percent, Alachua
and Monroe counties at 6.1
percent, and Liberty County
at 5.2 percent.


The highest unemploy-
ment in the state continued
to be in Flagler County, which
reported a jobless rate of 14.3
percent. There are now 26
counties in the state with un-
employment at 10.0 percent or
higher, and another 10 coun-
ties with a rate higher than
9.0 percent.
In March, the Wakulla labor
force was reported as 15,329
people, of which 14,288 were
employed and 1,041 were
unemployed. In February, the
labor force consisted of 15,456
people with 14,337 with jobs
and 1,119 without.
The Tallahassee Metro-
politan Area, which includes
Wakulla, Leon, Jefferson and
Gadsden counties for the
purpose of market analysis,
had an increase in the overall
unemployment rate in March
of 6.8 percent, down from 6.9
percent a month earlier. The
local MSA continued to have
.one of the lowest jobless rates
of the 23 MSAs in the state
- only the Gainesville MSA at
6.2 percent was lower.


Fashion Wear is family affair


Andrea Williams opened new Snapdragon Flowers and More store in Sopchoppy.

Snapdragon opens in Sopchoppy


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Andrea Williams opened
Snapdragon Flowers and More
in Sopchoppy on the Saturday
of the Worm Gruntin' Festival,
April 25.
And Sopchoppy's small-
town feel was perfectly ex-
pressed that day, she said,
when a big black dog cane
in the open door and walked
around the shop. Unlike some
places where the dog might be
shoo'd out, Williams gave the
big dog a bowl of water, which
it proceeded to lap up and, as
is typical with big dogs, water
splashed all over.
She grins as she tells the
story.
The front of the store is
full of vintage furniture and
decorative items. "It's really
a flower shop," she stresses.
"The other is extra."
She and her husband, Bink
Williams, who operates the
Tallahassee shop Body Pierc-



It's Ow


ing by Bink, live on a dairy
goat farm outside Sopchoppy.
A perfect day, as she describes
it, is to get up and milk the
goats, feed the goats, and then
come to the flower shop.
The farm, she says, started
as a little weekend place but
it got so hard to leave on Sun-
days that they decided to live
there instead.
She worked as an office
manager in Tallahassee, mak-
ing the daily commute from
Sopchoppy. She says she got
tired of the drive and just
wanted to work in town and
the opportunity came up dur-
ing a conversation with Joann
Edwards, who used to run a
flower shop from the building.
In fact, on this day Edwards
dropped by the shop to see
how Williams was doing and
explains that she has recently
remarried arid she and her
husband like to spend their
time traveling.
For Williams, this was the


chance to have her own flower
shop. Her very first job was
working for a florist.
Her biggest concern,, she
says, is keeping her costs
down. "Flowers are an extra,"
she says, a luxury; "so I want
to keep them affordable if I
can."
Of the other items, she says
sheets had a lot of people stop
by and express an interest in
selling items on consignment,
and she welcomes that.
Williams said she also
wants to promote the work of
some artists, and mentions a
Tallahassee potter and an art-
ist who works in collage and
lives in Orlando.
Snapdragon Flowers &
More is located at 44 Rose
Street in Sopchoppy. It's open
weekdays from 10 a.m. to 6
p.m.', Saturdays 10 a.m. to 4
p.m., and by appointment.
The shop phone number is
962-5430.


Star Dixon and Angela Smith at Family Fashion Wear in Crawfordville.


Family Fashion Wear re-
cently opened in Crawford-
ville at 3055 Crawfordville
Highway across from the
Wakulla County Courthouse.
The store is owned and op-
erated by two sisters, Angela
Smith and Pamela Reese, and
their mother, Star Dixon, all
of Quincy. The family had a
dream to develop a profit-
able company while also
enhancing the Crawfordville.
business community. Their


dream became a reality when
the store opened for business
on Feb. 28.
"We have a strong relation-
ship among each of us with
an open door communication
approach," said Star. "We
have always had a wonder-
ful relationship and that will
continue to blossom."
Family Fashion Wear is
open Monday to Friday from
10 a.m, to 6 p.m., 10 a.m. until
7 p.m. on Saturday and 1 p.m.


to 6 p.m. on Sunday "to sat-
isfy the needs of the Wakulla
County community."
S"We believe in quality and
style," said Angela. "The fash-
ion doctors are here to service
you in all your fashion and
hair wear needs."
Some of the other prod-
ucts available for purchase
include shoes,, handbags,
dresses, weave, urban wear,
church clothing, hats and
prom dresses.


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Commissioners unanimous for sewer ordinance


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla County Commis-
sioners did away with the
controversial "readiness to
serve" charge of $19 a month
for lots where sewer is avail-
able but not connected and,
with that change, county
commissioners unanimously
approved the comprehensive
sewer ordinance.
The readiness to serve fee
brought numerous developers
to the commission meeting on
Tuesday, April 21, to complain
that they would be charged
twice for the sewer lines
- once when they paid to put
the lines in their subdivisions,
and again with the fee.,
"I think they have a valid
point," Commission Chairman
Howard Kessler said. "They've
paid the nickel for the pipe,
but what they haven't paid
is the cost for the upgrade of
the plant."
The county is on the verge
of filing a loan application for
the first phase of a $20 million
project to extend sewer ser-
vice to Wakulla Gardens, up-


grade the Otter Creek sewage
treatment plant to advanced
wastewater standards, and
put in a force main to pump
sewage from Shell Point to the
county plant.
The first phase providing
sewer service to 350 homes in
units 2 and 5 of Wakulla Gar-
dens will cost $7.5 million.
The deadline to apply for a
loan from the state revolving
fund is May 15.
The sewer ordinance is a
step toward getting the loan.
While it combines all of the
county's previous sewer or-
dinances and clears up the
sometimes conflicting lan-
guage,'it also prepares the way
for an increase in sewer rates,
which have not gone up in 15
years. It's gotten to the point,
said County Administrator
Ben Pingree, that the sewer
system isn't paying for itself,
but takes general fund money
to keep going.
Residential customers will
see rates go up from about $29
a month for a typical customer,
using 6,000 gallons of water, to
$35 a month in 2010 and $44 a


month in 2011, with the rates
tied to inflation after that.
But it was the readiness to
serve fee, in which lots would
be charged a monthly fee on
the basis that the county has
had to reserve capacity at the
sewage plant to include that
customer, that drew concern.
Developers including Ben
Boynton, whose develop-
ments include Flowers and
Songbird, Doug Turner of
Turner Heritage Homes, Philip
Spencer, who is developing
Saralan, and Guy Revell, who
developed The Farm, all spoke
against the readiness to serve
fee.
Boynton questioned the
legality of the fee. Turner said
developers would have dif-
ficulty paying the fees given
the current housing freeze and
no money coming in, and that
many are already having prob-
lems with their banks.
"The well is dry," Spencer
told the board. "We're just try-
ing to pay interest" on bank
loans at this point.
Revell was more direct.
"Why should I pay for sewer


that I put in there?"
Builder Tim Bozeman wor-
ried about the increases in
sewer rates the board was
considering, saying some
residents can't afford the $50
a month charge. "Do the right
thing for once," Bozeman said.
"Not pushing it through be-
cause you have a deadline."
Panacea builder Walt Dick-
son and Ochlockonee Bay
Realtor Tim Jordan both asked
the board to consider the pay-


ments made by residents of
their communities when the
county first installed sewer
in 1987. Back then, to pay a
Farmers Home Administra-
tion loan, the commission
imposed a frontage fee that as-
sessed property owners based
on low much of their land
fronted on the sewer lines.
Jordan said that those
residents paid for the first
phase of the sewage plant and
shouldn't have to pay more.


After the vote for the or-
dinance, Dickson, who is on
the board of the Panacea Area
Water System, told commis-
sioners that the system would
consider ceasing its sewer
billing for the county. PAWS
was to meet on Thursday,
April 23.
The county relies on public
water systems for billing and
collection since its sewer rates
are based on water consump-
tion.


Work ends at county offices


Board reverses decision


on flooding ordinance


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
After being talked out
of it at a previous meeting,
Commissioner George Green
went ahead with a motion to
rescind an ordinance just
passed a month ago that
requires builders in flood-
prone subdivisions to built
homes with a floor elevation
two feet above the crown of
the road.
The commission,passed
text changes to the ordinance
on March 17 by a 3-2 vote that
included Green in the major-
ity. At the April 7 meeting,
Green was questioning the
wisdom of the ordinance but
was reassured by staff that
the ordinance was intended to
be a stopgap measure until a
stormwater study is complet-
ed for Wakulla Gardens and
more site-specific regulations
could be enforced.
At the meeting on Tuesday;
April 21, Green made a motion
to rescind the text changes,
which wassuipported by com-
missioners Mike Stewart and
Alan Brock, who had voted
against the measure. Officially,
the ordinance will remain
in effect until the board can
advertise a public hearing to
discuss repealing it.
The text changes were
brought about by ongoing
flooding problems in some
of the older subdivisions,
especially Wakulla Gardens.
That point was stressed earlier
in the commission meeting
when real estate broker Bob


Teel complained about a two-
story rental home he owns in
the Gardens having flooded
twice in two years. The most
recent flooding, earlier this
month during heavy rains,
filled the bottom unit with six
inches of water, and the floor
is 12 inches above ground
level, meaning there was 18
inches of water in his lot.
Teel complained that no
other lots in the area flooded
and asked commissioners to
do something, to solve the
problem. "You're using my lot
for a retention pond," Teel told
the board.
Builders Randy Nelson,
who is effected by the ordi-
nance on homes he builds in
Greiner's Addition, and Tim
Bozeman, who builds homes
in Wakulla Gardens, both
insisted the ordinance was.
poorly conceived. Nelson said
the FEMA maps for Greiner's
are accurate as far as flooding
and that he shouldn't have to
conform to rules designed to
prevent flooding when he's
building in areas that aren't
flood-prone.
"It's fundamentally unfair,"
Nelson said.
Bozeman submitted a let-
ter from surveyor Thurman
Roddenberry that pointed
to recent topographical sur-
veys that have been done on
Wakulla Gardens and said that
should allow a determination
of what areas are flood prone.
Additionally, Bozeman urged
the board to bring in experts
who understand the problem


to work on solutions, rather
than having the board try to
solve the problem without a
technical understanding of
the issue.
"I'd like to see us rescind
it and get a group of these
people together," Stewart said,
noting that the ordinance
would soon become obsolete
when the county gets its.
stormwater study.
County Administrator Ben
Pingree estimated that a com-
pleted stormwater study was
perhaps six months away.
Commissioner Lynn Artz
countered that the ordinance's
provisions are intended to
be temporary and suggested
that builders bring proposed
language changes rather than
yanking what's already been
done.
"I agree with Commis-
sioner Artz," said Chairman
Howard Kessler, "that we have
an ordinance in place that's
meant to be temporary."
In response to Nelson's and
Bozeman's contention that
the ordinance only adds more
expense for what's intended
to be affordable housing,
Kessler said: "When you're
building affordable housing
and you're building houses
.that are potentially going to
flood or you're putting them
on a septic tank that's going
to have to be ripped out, I
don't know how affordable
that housing really is to the
person who doesn't know
what they're getting in to."


SPlease Recycle


Work crews with Peavy & Son were in Crawfordville recently and in the process of re-pav-
ing the parking lots for the county office complex in Crawfordville. The work included doing
away with parking in front of the county administration building and the property appraiser/
supervisor of elections building so that drivers would no longer try to back out onto U.S.
Highway 319. While the paving project was underway, county employees had to park across
the highway at the First Baptist Church. (Photo by Eric Q. Stanton)


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ext. 1.


Advertisement


NOTICE OF

PUBLIC MEETING


The Wakulla County Board of County
Commissioners has scheduled a Public
Meeting of the Citizens Advisory
Committee for Infrastructure Devel-
opment on May 6, 2009 at 3:30 P.M. in
the Commission Complex conference
room at 3093 Crawfordville Highway in
Crawfordville, FL. Interested parties
are invited to attend and participate.

Persons needing special access
considerations should call the Wakulla
County Administrative Offices at least
48 hours before the date for scheduling
purposes. The Administrative Offices
may be contacted at (850) 926-0919.







WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009


Wakulla Line Drive gets Down

and Dirty at tournament
p~mamwa mmmmemmmmM aB~r r m FAmmam`Y~ Immasf dirM-th'l aRAF44!IIiliiliiM t


Back from left, Brittany Joseph, Amy Walker, Jessica Gilmore Wells and Lauren
Hatch. Front from left, Molly Harper and Tori Hatch at an FSU game.

Gilmore-Wells and FSU head

toward post-season play


After placing fourth in the
April 3 to April 5 Shores of
Panama Spring Break Classic, the
first time the Wakulla Line Drive
team has ever placed lower than
second, the Wakulla team de-.
cided victory tasted much better
and showed up to play ball in
the weekend tournament
The Down and Dirty in
D'ville II was held in Donald-
sonville, Ga. With 17 teams and
a weekend full of great weather
the tournament couldn't be any-
thing but fun and Wakulla Line
Drive 11U baseball team showed
up to play some ball.
S Bay County Xtreme and the
Dothan Diamond Dawgs both
came out to play, but the Line
Drive would play better. Jake
Webb brought his big bat with a
home run against Bay County in
the first inning. With two down
on Saturday they ,ot ready for
Sunday, and Sunday proved to
be a show.
The X-treme Fury went down
first ini a'12-0 loss. Next'up for
Wakulla was the Tallahassee
Marlins who succumbedin a
14-8 loss. The Columbus Young
Guns were the next victims on
the list and suffered an 8-0 loss.
The championship game was a
nail biter. Tallahassee Blue put
up a fight and tied the score
in the sixth inning and took
the game into overtime for a

Bay slips

by4-3

By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla War Eagle Tennis
Coach Theresa Harrell had more
than winning a regional tennis
match against Panama City Bay
Tuesday, April 21 on her mind.
The match came down to the
final contest of the day involv-
ing Travel Harrell, the son of the
coach. Harrell was playing the
fifth seeded singles match.
If the stress of watching her
son was not enough for Harrell,
the match went to three sets
before Travis lost, 4-6, 7-6 (9-7
in a tiebreaker) and 6-2. Travis
won the first set and appeared
to have the upper hand in the
second before the Bay player
fought back to win. Wakulla
and Bay split the two doubles
matches and the four singles
matches in the Class 2A Region
1 tournament.in Medart.
Jared Lowe lost the top
seeded singles match, but Will
Harvey beat his opponent at
second seeded singles.
Seniors Lowe and Harvey
completed the Medart portion
of their high school careers, but
will still advance to the state
championships in Altamonte
Springs Wednesday and Thurs-
day, April 29 and April 30. Josh
Colman also completed his
career with the War Eagles.
Juniors Travis Harrell and
Caleb Fisher will be returning
to the team next season along
with freshman Sam O'Cain
who played in a-number of
matches.
Lowe and Harvey advanced
to the state championship
since they won the top seeded
singles matches at the district
tournament.
The loss to Bay ends the
team portion of the tennis sea-
son for WHS.


tiebreaker.
But that did not deter the
Wakulla Line Drive as the final
score was 10-6 with Wakulla
coming out on top.
Bats were swinging all week-
end with home runs by Jake
Bryan (1), Jake Webb (3) and
Jacob Plouffe (2).
The 11U Wakulla Line Drive
is comprised of: Jake Bryan,
Jake Webb, Jacob Thomas, Jacob
Plouffe, Dylan Causseaux, Nick

-L9w


Lentz, Reid Strickland, Michael
.McGlamry, Hunter Causseaux
and RJ Kinard. Coaches: Andy
Bryan, Darrin McGlamry, James
Plouffe and John Lentz.
The team would like to thank
El Jalisco of Crawfordville for
the sponsorship. The team is
currently looking for additional
sponsors. Anyone interested
in sponsoring the Wakulla Line
Drive 2009 season please call
Andy Bryan at 556-5853.


Jessica Gilmore Wells of her 17 years of experience
Crawfordville, a member of on the athletic field to teach
the Lady Seminole softball Wakulla youths. She won a
team, is completing her senior silver medal at the Olympics
year at FSU. The three 'senior for the USA junior team.
players on the team were Gilmore Wells anticipates a
recognized at the conclusion strong showing from the Lady
of the Sunday, April 26 game Seminoles in the regional
against Virginia. tournament which will begin
Gilmore Wells said she is May 15 and continue through
looking forward to the day May 17. FSU is a potential
when she will be able to use tournament host site.


Gilmore Wells married
National Guard Specialist
Chase Wells, who will soon
be deployed to the.Middle
East, in January 2009. She will
leave FSU with a dual major
in Sociology and Education
in May.
FSU was ranked in the top
15 in the country with 35 wins
in late April.




S..,
*" *
.9-.*


, RE"RE MoVING!
.. ,


CALL AWAY


AUTO AND TRUCK REPAIR


DUE TO THE OVERWHELMING PATRONAGE

FROM THE COMMUNITY WE WILL BE MOVED

AND OPEN FOR BUSINESS AS USUAL AT OUR

" NEW LARGERFACILITY MAY 4, 2009

STO BETTER SERVE OUR CUSTOMERS' NEEDS.


DEVILLE 11w

r '^ kt4 Bays & Pie
1 FormerI) Hobb

....; 1 .
dgr'11U Ltc V^H B ^ H ? ....


LEBRATING
D OLI-KE TO THAN-
*.FOR PUTTING THE











THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009 Page 9B
A


Deadline

klonday


11:00 A.CLA1FIED

926-I102


35 Cents

Per Word



ADS i$8.00
Minimum


Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


CATEGORIES
100 EMPLOYMENT
105 Business Opportunities
110 Help Wanted
111 Medical/Dental Help 'Wanted
112 Office/Administrative Help Wanted
113 Construction Help Wanted
114 Miscellaneous Help Wanted
'115 Work Wanted
120 Services and Businesses
125 Schools and Instruction
1301Entertainment
200 ITEMS FOR SALE
205,Antiques
210 Auctions
215Auto Parts and Accessories
220 Cars
225 Trucks
230 Motor Homes and Campers
235 Motorcycles and 4-Wheelers
240 Boats and Motors I
245 Personal Watercraft ,.
250 Sporting Goods E---qu-i
255 Guns
260 Business Equipment


265 Computers and Internet
270 Electronics
275 Home Furnishings
280 Home Appliances
285 Jewelry
290 Musical Instruments
295 Building Materials
300 MISC. FOR SALE
305 Machinery, Tools & Equipment
310 Firewood Products
315 Farm & Garden Equipment
320 Farm Products & Produce
325 Horses
330 Livestock, Farm Animals
335 Pets
340 Plants
345 Swap, Barter, Trade
350 Wanted to Buy
355 Yard Sales
400 NOTICES
410 Free Items
415 Announcements
420 Card of Thanks
425 Occasion Cards
430 In Memoriam
435 Lost and Found


440 Personals and Notices
500 REAL ESTATE, HOMES, MOBILES
505 Acreage for Lease
510 Acreage for Sale
515 Apartments for Rent
520 Townhouses for Rent
525 Townhouses for Sale
530 Commercial Property for Rent
535 Commercial Property for Sale
540 Farms for Sale
545 Homes for Sale
550 Homes with Acreage for Sale
555 Houses for Rent
560 Land for Sale
565 Mobile Homes for Rent qIZ
570 Mobile Homes for Sale
575 Mobile Homes with Land for Sale
580 Rooms for Rent/Roommates Wanted
585 Wanted to Rent
590 Waterfront Homes/Land for Sale
595 Vacation Rental
600 Open House


CALL 926-7102 TODAY
Email: classifieds@thewakullanews.net


Legal Notice |


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 09000052CA
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAMEY N! SPIVEY, JR. A/K/A JAMIE N.
SPIVEY, et al.
Defendantss).
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JAMEY N. SPIVEY, JR. A/K/A JAMIE N.
SPIVEY and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
.JAMEY N. SPIVEY, JR. A/K/A JAMIE N.
SPIVEY, and all unknown parties claiming by,
through, under or against the above named
Defendants, who are not known to be dead or
alive, whether said unknown parties claim as
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claim-
ants,
Current Residence Unknown, but whose last
known address was:
43 Fair Way, Crawfordville, Florida 32327
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following property in
Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit:
LOT 9, THE FAIRWAYS AT WILDWOOD, A
SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3,
PAGE 51 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM,
P.A., Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
18820 U.S. Highway 19 North, Suite 212,
Clearwater, Florida 33764, on or before May
22, 2009 or within thirty (30) days after the first
publication of this Notice of Action, and file the
original with the Clerk of this Court at 3056
Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL
32327, either before service on Plaintiff's attor-
ney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a de-
fault wiJI be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on
this9thIday of April, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
S BY-s- BECKY WHALEY
S' AS DEPUTY CLERK
Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
IF OU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY
WHO NEEDS 'ANY ACCOMMODATION IN
ORDER.TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NOT
COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF
CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT
LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT. 222,
WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OFYOUR RE-
CEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARY INJUNCTION.
IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IM-
PAIRED, CALL TDD 1-800-955-8771.
April 23, 30, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA -
CASE NO.: 2009DR778
DIVISION
SARAH A. HILLMAN
Petitioner
and
CHRISTOPHER SHOLES
Respondent.
S NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
.DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: Christopher Sholes
:00 6lh Silre l
-.:oni Te,-a 77465.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been
filed'&gainst you and that you are required to
servj a copy of your written defenses, if any,
to it-n Sarah A. Hillman, whose address is
611.'E. Park Ave. #1, Tallahassee, Florida
32341 on or before April 24, 2009, and file the
original with the clerk of this Court at 201 N.
Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 before
service on,.Petitioner or immediately thereaf-
ter. If you fail to do so, a default may be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded in
the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this case, in-
cludin' orders, are available at the Clerk of
the Circuit Court's office. You may review
these documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office notified of your current address. (You
may file Notice of Current Address, Florida
Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form
12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be
mailed to the address on record at the clerk's
office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law
Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and information. Fail-
ure to comply can result in sanctions, includ-
ing dismissal or striking of pleadings.
Dated march 13, 2009.
BOB INZER,
Clerk of Circuit Court
BY s CYNTHIA McREED
AS DEPUTY CLERK
April 16, 23, 30, 2009
May 7, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-000127
DIVISION:
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,
Plaintiff, ;i
vs.


FREDA M. MOORE A/K/A FREDA M. WHITE
A/K/A FREDA MANNING WHITE, et al,
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
THE UNKNOWN.SPOUSE OF FREDA M.
MOORE A/K/A FREDA M. WHITE A/K/A
FREDA MANNING WHITE
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
160 LAUGHING GULL LANE
CARRABELLE, FL 323228004
CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFEN-
DANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following property in
WAKULLA County, Florida:
COMMENCE AT AN &LD CONCRETE
MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF THE WEST HALF OF THE
NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTH-
EAST QUARTER OF SECTION 1, TOWN-
SHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, FRANKLIN
COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT LYING ON
THE CENTERLINE OF COW CREEK ROAD
(STATE ROAD NO. S-370)'AND THENCE
RUN NORTH 39 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 36
SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTER-
LINE 2520.31 FEET, THENCE LEAVING
SAID CENTERLINE RUN NORTH 04 DE-
GREES 46 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST
40.13 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT
(MARKED # 1254) LYING ON THE NORTH-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID
COW CREEK ROAD (STATE ROAD NO.
S-370), THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES
58 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST ALONG
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 682.27
FEET TO A 3 INCH ROUND CONCRETE
MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE
LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY
RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 32
SECONDS EAST 415.41 FEET TO THE WA-
TER'S EDGE OF THE OCHLOCKONEE
RIVER FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND
LEAVING SAID WATER'S EDGE RUN
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 32 SEC-
ONDS WEST 415.41 FEET TO A 3 INCH
ROUND CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED
#2919) LYING ON THE NORTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID COW
CREEK ROAD (STATE ROAD NO. S-370),
THENCE RUN WEST ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 106.12 FEET
TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED
#1254), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF
WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 00 DE-
GREES 06 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST
413.61 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT
(MARKED #1254) LYING ON THE WATER'S
EDGE OF SAID OCHLOCKONEE RIVER,
THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 01
MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID
RIVER'S EDGE 105.88 FEET, MORE OR
LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses within'30 days after the first publica-
tion, if any, on Florida Default Law Group,
P.L., Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
9119 Corporate Lake Drive, Suite 300,
Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original
with this Court either before service on Plain-
tiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint or peti-
tion. -
This notice shall be published once each week
for two consecutive weeks in the The Wakulla
News.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of'this Court
on this 15th day of April, 2009.
S, BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
S(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
Any persons with a disability requiring reason-
able accommodations should call Clerk of Cir-
cuit Court at (850) 926-0905.
April 23, May 7, 2009


WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Architectural and Engineering Services
Request for Qualifications
Advertisement Number: 2009-009
Advertisement Begin Date/Time:
April 24, 2009 at 8:00 A.M.

Board Decisions will be available at:
3093 Crawfordville Highway
Crawfordville, FL 32327
196 Ochlockonee
Street
Crawfordville, FL 32326
Responses will be opened at the above
address at 2:00 p.m. on May 21, 2009.
Please direct all questions to:
Deborah DuBose
Phone: 850.926.9500
FAX: 850.926.9006
e-mail: ddubose@mywakulla.com
RFQ specifications can be found at
www.mywakulla.com in the County
Bid section.
Any person with a qualified disability requiring
special accommodations at the bid opening
shall contact purchasing at the phone number
listed above at least 5 business days prior to
the event. If you are hearing or speech im-
paired, please contact this office by using the
Florida Relay Services which can be reached
at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD).
The Board of County Conrrhissioners reserves
the right to reject any and all bids or accept
minor irregularities in the best interest of Wa-
kulla County.
April 30, May 7, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL
JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO:. 65-2008-CA0110FC
AURORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
William Cesar, et al.,
Defendant(s).
-NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: WILLIAM CESAR AND UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF WILLIAM CESAR
whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be
living; and if he/she/they be dead, the un-
known defendants who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an
interest by, through, under or against the De-
fendants, who are not known to be deador
alive, and all parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or interest in the property
described in the mortgage being foreclosed
herein.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the following prop-
erty:
LOT 7 BLOCK H THE FARM SUBDIVISION,
PHASE I, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 3 PAGE 93, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on DAVID J. STERNI ESQ.
Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 900
South Pine Island Road #400, Plantation, FL
33324-3920 no later than 30 days from the
date of the first publication of this notice of ac-
tion) and file the original with the clerk of this
court either before service on Plaintiffs attor-
ney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition filed
herein.
WITNESS my 'and and the.seal of this Court
at WAKULLA County. Florida, this 14h day of
April, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons with dis-
abilities needing a special accommodation
should contact COURT ADMINISTRATION, at
the WAKULLA County Courthouse at
850-926-3341, 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
April 23, 30, 2009


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA
.COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CHANGE
RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE:
School Board Policy 5.62+ Administration of
Medication During School Hours
PURPOSE AND EFFECT:
To reflect legislative requirements and district
procedures.
LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41, 1001.42, Florida Statutes
LAWS IMPLEMENTED:
1001.43; 1002.22,1006.62, Florida Statutes
ECONOMIC IMPACT: None
REVISION ORIGINATED BY:
Beth O'Donnell, Assistant Superintendent for
Instruction
REVISION APPROVED BY:
David Miller, Superintendent of Schools
IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE (21)
DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, A HEARING WILL
BE HELD
TIME: 5:45 p.m.
PLACE: Administrative Offices
Wakulla County School Board
69 Arran Road
Crawfordville, Florida 32327
DATE: June 15, 2009
A COPY OF .THE PROPOSED REVISION
MAY BE OBTAINED AT COST FROM:
Wakulla County School Board
Post Office Box 100
69 Arran Road
Crawfordville, Florida 32326-0100
April 30, 2009


NOTICE OF DISPOSAL OF SEIZED
EVIDENCE BY WAKULLA COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
Notice is hereby provided that the below de-
scribed evidence has been in the custody of
the Wakulla County Sheriff's office for longer
than 60 days after the conclusion of all pro-
ceedings regarding its seizure, regarding said
evidence.
The Wakulla County Sheriff's office, pursuant
to Florida Statutes, Chapter 705.105(1)(a),
pursuant thereto the Sheriff's office elects to
retain the following vehicle for the agency's
own use.
PROPERTIES BEING RETAINED:
1997 White.Ford, four-door Explorer,
VIN #1 FMDU32X7VZC34331
Notice is hereby given that Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office, pursuant to Section 705.103,
Florida Statutes, will sell to the highest bidder
the below listed seized properties. Said sale
shall occur at Wakulla County Sheriff's Office
on May 11, 2009, at 1:00 PM.
Sale shall be subject to any and all liens. Wa-
kulla County Sheriff's Office makes no guaran-
tee or warranty, expressed or Implied, of any
nature as to the condition of the vehicles of-
fered for sale.
Properties being sold:
1988 Blue/White GMC SW,
VIN #1GCKT18ZOJ0527622
April 30, 2009
May 7, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL
JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO.: 65-2009-CA-000013
CITIMORTGAGE, INC.
Plaintiff,
vs.
LINDA J. ERDMANN A/K/A LINDA ERD-
MANN, ETAL,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE,
TO: ROBERT C. ERDMANN whose residence
is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if
he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants
who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grant-
ees, assignees, lienors,,creditors, trustees,
and all parties claiming an Interest by,
through, under or against the Defendants, who
are not known to be dead or alive, and all par-
ties having or claiming to have any right, title
or interest in the property described in the
mortgage being foreclosed herein.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action
tn fnreclnos a mnrtnna nnn tha fnllowinn nrop-


erty:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTI
NER OF SECTION 13, Ti
SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST
COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT
THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT
STOKLEY ROAD; THENCE
SAID RIGHT OF WAY AS
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINI
ONDS WEST 984.39 FEET TC
CAP FOR THE POINT OF
THENCE FROM SAID POINT
NING CONTINUE SOUTH 89
MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST
TO A ROD AND CAP;, THEN
SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN Si
AGREES 22 MINUTES 45 SEC
299.09 FEET TO A ROD AND C
NORTH 89 DEGREES 37 MINI
UTES 15 SECONDS EAST 12.4
ROD AND CAP; THENCE SC
GREES 22 MINUTES 45 SEC
521.61 FEET TO A ROD AND C
NORTH 89 DEGREES 50 MINUS
ONDS EAST 259.19 FEET TO
CAP; THENCE NORTH 00 C
MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING
ING 5.00 ACRES MORE OR LE
has been filed against you an
quired to serve a copy of yoi
fenses, if any, to it on DAVID J.
Plaintiff's attorney, whose ad
South Pine Island Road #400,
33324-3920, (no later than 30
date of the first publication of th
tion) and file the original with th
court either before service on F
ney or immediately thereafter; o
fault will be entered against yo
demanded In the complaint or
herein.
WITNESS my hand and the sea
at WAKULLA County, Florida, th
April, 2009.
BRENTX
CLERK OF THE CIF
BY -s- LET
AS DE
(Seal, Wakulli
of the
In accordance with the Americ
abilities Act, persons with dlsat
a special accommodation sh
Court Administration at the W
Courthouse at 850-926-0905, 1
(TDD) or 1-800-955-8770, via
Service.




NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is given pursuant to Flo
age Facility Act, Florida Statute
Part IV, that ABC Storage will
sealed bid on Saturday, May 9,
a.m. at 3743 Crawfordvllle Hw
ville, FL 32327, of the contents
house containing personal prop
CLIFFORD SUTCLIF
B. THOMAS BROW
ELAINE THORNBUI
CHRISTOPHER GRIf
ANTONIA CARRIF
IRENE HARRELL
SHARA HARVEY
Payments must be made on Fi
8th, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. before th
May 9th, 2009. The ownersma
property by payment of the Ou
ance and cost by contacting AB
508-5177. Or by paying in person
house location.
April 23,


MINUTES OF THE AKULL
SCHOOL BOARD MEETING
APRIL 20. 2009


Name Program/Center Position
Term of Service
Griffin, Rhonda WMS
Teacher Time
Limited 03/30/09-06/02/09
Franklin, Dorothy RMS
.Custodian Time
Limited 04/20/09-06/22/09
Other Personnel (including temporary, PT &
current employees hired to a second position)
Name Program/Center- Position
Term of Service
Hoover, Jessica WMS A/S Remediation
Teacher 10/29/08-05/13/09
Seidler, Amy ESE/DO Hospltal/Homebound
Teacher 03/23/09-06/0/09

Supplemental Positions 2008-2009
Name Program/Center Position
Term of Service
Randolph, Brandon WHS
Assistant JV Football Coach 2008-2009
3. Approved Illness in the Line of Duty. (See
Supplemental File #18)


4. Approved the following Letters of Resigna-
tion;
EAST COR-
OWNSHIP 3 Emily L. Jones/effective April 10,2009
, WAKULLA Joyce M. Coke/effective April 24,2009:
NT LYING ON Gigl Cavallaro/effective March 23, 2009.
OF WAY OF
RUN ALONG 5. Approved the following Letters of Retire-
FOLLOWS: ment:
JTES 43 SEC-
I A ROD AND John D Jonesletectlve June 2 2009
BEGINNING; Katherine R Floyd/eltecthe June 30. 2009
T OF BEGIN- Jo Ann Daniels/effective June 30, 2009
DEGREES 49 Kathy L. Hallowell/effective the end of the
T 274.50 FEET 2008-2009 school year
CE LEAVING Shirley Core/effective June 30, 2009.
SOUTH 00 DE-
;ONDS EAST 6. Approved a Leave of Absence request on
CAP; THENCE Mary K. Taff/effective April 13, 2009 for ap-
UTES 15 MIN- proximately five weeks.
42 FEET TO A
)UTH 00 DE- 7. Approved the Disposal of Equipment. (See
CONDS EAST Supplemental File #18)
CAP; THENCE
ITES 56 SEC- 8. Approved the March financial statement.
) A ROD AND
)EGREES 10 9. Approve Warrants #69705-70096 for pay-
T 820.74 FEET ment
G, CONTAIN-
SS. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans,
Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
d you are re- Moved by Mr. Scott, seconded by Mr. Gray to
ur written de- approve Student Expulsion #08/09-05.
STERN, ESQ. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans,
Dress is 900 Mr. Gray,Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
Plantation, FL Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr.
days from the Evans to approve a request from the YMCA
is notice of ac- and also from Wakulla County Senior Citizens
he clerk of this Council, Inc., to use school buses and drivers.
plaintiff'ss attor- Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans,-
therwise a de- Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
u for the relief Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Scott to
r petition filed approve the Emergency Classroom Exits, Wa-
kulla High School,.Wakulla Educational Cen-
ter, Sopchoppy Educational Center Bid
al of this Court #08/09-05 as complete.
5ls 20th day of Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans,
Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Scott, seconded by Mr. Thomas
.THURMOND to approve the Elementary School "A" and
ICUIT COURT Shadevlle Elementary Three classroom addi-
HA M. WELLS tion Bid #06/07-08 as complete.
PUTY CLERK Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans,
a County Clerk Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
Circuit Court) Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Scott
ans With Dis- to approve School Board Policy 3.50, Public
illltes needing Information and Inspection of Public Records,
should contact School Board Policy 6.27*, Professional Eth-
akulla County ics School Board Policy 6.29, Report of Mis-
-800-955-8771 conduct, School Board Policy 6.30, Anti-Fraud
Florida Relay and School Board Policy 6.32, Phone Usage
as advertised.
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans,
April 30 2009 Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
ay 7,2009 Moved by Mr.Gray, seconded by Mr. Thomas
to approve Deletion of School Board Policy
#3.51 Photocopying of Public Records.
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans,
E Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Gray
rida Self-Stor- to approve School Board Policy 5.62+ Ad-
s, Chapter 83 ministration of Medication during school hours
hold a sale by for advertising.
2009 at 10:00 Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans,
wy., Crawford- Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
Sof Mini Ware- Moved by Mr. Scott, seconded by Mr. Gray to
erty of: approve the 2009-2010 Software Lease
Agreement between the Wakulla County
:FE School Board and Project Lead the Way, Inc.
IN Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans,
RG Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
FFIN Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr.
N Evans to approve the 2009 Pre-K, High
School, Middle School and Third Grade Sum-
mer Schedule.
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans,
riday, May the Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
he sale date of Moved by Mr. Scott, seconded by Mr. Gray to
y redeem their approve the individual School Technology
standing Bal- Plans for 2009-2010 and the District Technol-
BC Storage at ogy Plans for 2007-2010.
on at the ware- Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans,
Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr.
April 30, 2009 Evans tf approve the Auditor General Report
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2008.
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans,
Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Scott, seconded by Mr. Gray to
A COUNTY adjourn.
i HELD ON Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr., Evans,
Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
April 30, 2009


Superintendent Miller, Chairman Cook and the
School Board recognized Janet Grigg as Em-
ployee of the Month, Shannon Smith (March),
Diane Driggers and Joy Coke (April) as
Teachers of the Month. All were congratu-
lated and presented with a plaque by Chair-
man Cook. Mr. Ken Weber from the Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services presented the school board with a
check, which reflects the distribution of the
Wakulla and Lake Talquin State Forest re-
ceipts for fiscal year 2007-2008 in accordance
with Section 589, Florida Statutes.
Mrs. Cook called the meeting to order, the
Pledge of Allegiance was recited and a prayer
was given by Mr. Scott. All school board
members and the superintendent were pre-
sent.
Moved by Mr. Scott, seconded by Mr. Gray to
approve the agenda as amended.
Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans,
Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.
Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Evans to
approve the following consent Items:
1. Approved Minutes of the Meeting held on
March 16, 2009.
2. Approved the following Employment of Per-
sonnel:
New Hires


CLASSIFIED


$8 Per Week!,


105 Business Opportuni-
ties


BRIG YOUR OID

PHOTOS TO liiFEM
I can fix those
wonderful old pictures
so you can enjoy them
again, and make
copies to share.

Keep the family heritage
alive with restored
photographs

Just $15 per photo.
850-766-7655
dougapple@gmail.com


110 Help Wanted



HAZARDOUS
SUBSTANCES
EMERGENCY EVENTS
SURVEILLANCE
COORDINATOR
GR000435
$45,760 annually
DOH/Environmental Public .
Health Medicine
Closing 5 pm 5/8/09
PROJECT MANAGER
GR000664
Competitive Salary
DOE/CLASP
Closing 5 pm 5/8/09
POSTSECONDARY
ASSESSMENT
COORDINATOR
GR000655
$38,000 annually
Additional salary
commensurate to training and
experience
DOE/Postsecondary
Assessment
Closing 5 pm 5/8/09
MANAGER OF
RESEARCH
AND DEVELOPMENT
GR000663
Competitive Salary
College Center for
Library Automation
Closing 5 pm 5/11/09
The above vacancies are
Fiscal year funded
CONSTRUCTION &
SKILLED TRADES
ALTERNATIVE ENERGY
INSTRUCTORS
$25 per hour minimum Center
for Economic & Workforce
Development Open until filled
The above vacancies are fiscal
year funded. Visit the College's
website at www.tcc.fl.edu for
position details, employment
application, and application
process. For ADA accom-
modations notify Human
Resources; (850) 201-8510, fax
201-8489, TDD 201-8491 or FL
Relay 711. Submit mandatory
Tallahassee Community College
employment application to Human
Resources TCC, 444 Appleyard
Dr., Tallahassee, FL 32304-2895;
or email humres@tcc.fl.edu.
Human Resources hours 8 A.M. -
5 P.M., Mon Fri.
An Equal Opportunity/
Affirmative Action Employer


NOW HIRING! Busy real estate
company needs full-time agents.
Real estate license is required.
Contact Ochlockonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001 or 850-926-9260
obr@obrealty.com
www.obrealty.com

YOUR NEWSPAPER



PEOPLE



SERVING


PEOPLE,





_ .___~l.~~~~-~.L...~~~~.~~....~..~......- .....~-.~...~.....~~~.~









Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009


110 Help Wanted


Seasonal Employment
Parks and Recreation
Department
The Wakulla' County Board of
Commissioners is seeking qualified
applicants for Summer/Seasonal part-
time employment within the De-
partment of Parks and Recreation.
These positions include a variety of
jobs: Beach Attendants, Summer
Camp Counselors, Summer Park
Attendants, etc.
Work is performed under the super-
vision of the Parks and Recreation
staff who establish the routines and
details of specific assignments or
projects and constantly monitors the
work in progress and completion.
To apply, send a Wakulla County
Employment Application to: Human
Resources, P.O. Box 309,
Crawfordville, FL 32326. Applications
may be obtained by visiting our
website at www.mywakulla.com or at
the Administrator's office at 850-926-
0919. Drug screening is required as
well as a background check. Veteran's
preference will be given to qualified
applicants. Wakulla County is an
Affirmative Action / Equal Opportunity
Employer. Salary will be based on
qualifications and experience; with a
minimum starting salary of $7.25
hourly.
Job openings are open until filled.


120 Services and Busi-
nesses

It's time for Spring, cleaning Call
right nowl 850-590-7853.
A-1 PRESSURE
CLEANING
Free Estimates
Licensed ~ John Farrell
926-5179 566-7550

Affordable Handyman Services.,
Interior/Exterior painting, cleaning,
soft/pressure wash, cool seal, car-
pentry and many other'odd jobs.
References avail. Bobby/Carol
Lowered rates! 850-926-2462
850-459-1071.
AIR CON OF WAKULLA
Heating and Cooling
Gary Limbaugh 926-5592
3232 Crawfordville Highway
Service, Repair, Installation
FL Lic. #CAC1814304

ALL ABOUT...
CONCRETE LANDSCAPE
blocks plants
bricks sod .
Savers tractor work
call JOSEPH FRANCIS
850-556-1178 / 850-926-9064
ALTERATIONS All Kinds. Please
call for quotes (850) 508-5294.
ANYTIME ELECTRIC
Specializing in repair and service,
.residential arid: .commercial,
hoe s and mobile homes.
24 -ou'r service. Mark Oliver,
ER0015233. 421-3012.
BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE
Bushhogging, Boxblading
Driveway. Larry Carter
Owner/Operator. .
850-925-7931, 850-694-7041.
Licensed/Insured.

Bella's Bed & Biscuit
Doggie Daycare. Overnight board-
ing; Extended stays. Kennel free
home environment. Lots of love &
pampering. 519-4529 or
926-1016.
In home child care 6-weeks to 4
yrs, old. References. Meals and
snacks provided. Call 926-6347.


C & R Tractor/Backhoe Services,
large tract and residential site
clearing rock, dirt, and road base
hauling, call Crandall
(850)933-3346.
Courson's Cleaning Services.
Pressure/soft washing. Commer-
cial and Residential Cleaning. Li-
censed and Insured. Free esti-
mates, references. Casey
850-509-6884, Jill 850-688-3980.
Crawfordville Self Storage 3291
Crawfordville Hwy. Climate con-
trolled and regular storage,
24-Hour Video surveillance. Easy
access. 5x10 thru 10x20.
850-228-7197.
Custom Concrete Services
specializing in slabs, engineered
foundations, driveways, patios,
footers, pool decks. Licensed and
insured. Call anytime.
Mike Smith 519-3684


E.^^~iim


Physical Therapy in your own
backyard
TOSPT In Crawfordville
Call 926-8555
to schedule an appointment
-;,g--A - ->^--


& Cape lintemcnce
MGAPbters3, uc
Pressure washing, clean-ups,
repairs & maintenance
High quality work for
Blue Collarprces.. 850-933-2380

VAUSE CONSTRUQON LLC
850-984-9988
850-559-487


Wesley_VOaue@yahoo.com

en Property Services
Lawn Service, Yard
work, Tractor work,
Bush hogging.
CALL PHILLIP
850-519-1853


B1 & SMALL ,125 Schools and Instruc-I
Get the DEAL tionsg
of DiEALS!
Michelle Snow
Placement to Site SCHOOL OF MUSIC


Gulf to Bay pool cleaning service.
Certified pool-tech owner/opera-
tor. Serving Wakulla and Franklin
counties. $90/mo.+chemicals.
850-251-9985 or 850-984-3278.

Harold Burse.Stump Grinding
926-7291.
















Wakulla Sparkles, LLC
cleaning service
Licensed & Insured
References available
Residential
Commercial
Move-In,
Move-Out


850-590-7853
CALL FOR A FREE ESTIMATE
wakullasparkles@yahoo.com

KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR
Commercial, residential and mo-
bile homes. Repair, sales, service,
installation. All makes and mod-
els. Lic. #RA0062516. 926-3546.

Mr. Stump
Stump Grinding
Quick Service
Cellular: 509-8530
MUNGE'S TREE SERVICE
Professional Work done at
Affordable Rates
24-Hr Emergency Service
850-421-8104


926-7627
Music lessons of all types for all
ages

200 Items For Sale

Moving! Selling furniture, clothing,
crafts, kitchenware, and every-
thing-plusl Call 850-926-4028
230 Motor Homes and
Campers

Coachman Camper, 1998, 21 ft.
Clean and in very good condition.
Ready to use. $4500 (negotiable).
Call 850-508-4052.


100% LEATHER 5 pc LIVING
ROOM SET. NEW, hardwood
foundation w/lifetime warranty,
sacrifice $699. (delivery available).
425-8374.
2 Piece Living Room Set. NEW
100% micro fiber, stain resistant,
$500, delivery available.
222-9879.
5-pc Pub Set solid wood -
BRAND new. $249. Can deliver.
222-9879.
6 piece Solid Wood Bedroom Set.
$649 Dovetail Drawers. Brand
new! Can deliver. 425-8374.
ALL NEW Queen Orthopedic Pil-
lowtop Mattress Set in Sealed
Plastic $249, Warranty. Can De-
liver. 222-9879.
Beautiful 7-piece QUEEN Solid
Wood Bedroom Set w/dovetail
drawers. Still in boxes. $2400
value, must sacrifice $999
222-7783. Can Deliver.
BRAND NEW Pillowtop King Mat-
tress Set. Still in plastic w/War-
ranty. $299. 425-8374. Can de-
liver.
Comfortable iRECLINER brand
NEW, 100% MicroFiber $199.
222-9879. Delivery available.
Complete SOLID WOOD Sleigh
Bed. $250. NEW in box. $250.
545-7112.
NEW SOLID WOOD Dinette Set
w/4chairs $200. Still in boxes.
222-7783. Can deliver.

.'., ...:. ,, .* ,

",?': "-',lIW:Ig


275 Home Furnishings

$155 Queen Plushtop mattress
set. NEW in plastic w/warranty.
Can deliver. 545-7112. .





450 FLORIDA HOMES
including this CRAWFORDVILLE Home
31a Old Courthouse. Crawfordville
3 BR, 2 BA, 1440 SF Home
Selling from house a 801 E. 9th Ave., Havana
on Wednes May,6, 1:00 PM

Agent: Josh Collins
(919) 345-4759 Benham Real Estate Group
Get your next home at the price you set with N'OSTARTING BIDS. If you're
buying your first home or your 10th, today's housing market and low interest rates
make this an ideal time for you to, buy!



FLHouseAudtion.com


J-U
HUDSON&,
MARSHALL


Uc #s:


I---


# AB110; B. G. Hudson, Jr. #s; BK3006464 & AU230


a


335 Pets


SHELTER
Make ION

new
friend.
ADOPT.

DOGS, PUPPIES,
NICE CATS AND
KITTENS...
Come and take a look...
Adult dogs with all their shots,
spayed/neutered are $75
for 1 week only!

C.H.A.T.
Adoption Center:
Monday closed.
Tuesday through Wednesday&
Friday: 11:00AM to 4:30PM
Thursday: 11:00AM to 7:00 PM
Saturday: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM
Sunday: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM
1 OAK STREET, CRAWFORDVILLE
chatofwakulla.com

340 Plants

Landscaping Plants marked
down. Bargain prices. Boxwoods,
Azaleas, Loropetalum, Border
grass, Leyland Cypress, Hydran-
gea, Ligustrum, Viburnum. We do
landscaping. Powell Nursery. 4410
Crawfordville Hwy. Tallahassee,
FL 32305. 850-877-3509.


NICE PLANTS
Boxwoods 3.95/up
Azaleas 4.95/up
We offer many varieties of
plants. We also landscape.
POWELL NURSERY
4410 Crawfordville Rd.
Tallahassee
877-3509

355 Yard Sales

Four-Family sale! Collectibles,
Beannie Babies, household items,
jewelry. Saturday, May 2nd,
8AM-until. 113 H.R. Linzy Lane
(North of Purple Martin).
Garage sale. Saturday, May 2nd,
8AM-12N. 102 Taff Drive, (behind
Winn-Dixie).
Huge sale. Saturday-May-2nd.,,
8AM-12N. Furniture, glassware,.
household items, tools; electron-.
ics, walk-in-shower. 91 Sam.
Smith Circle (off of Bloxham).,
Cancelled if rains.
Saturday, May 2nd, (9AM-3PM)
135 Burnt Pine Loop, St. Marks,
(look for signs). Lots of miscella-
neous items.

SUPER
YARD SALE
Small kitchen appliances,
dishes, crystal, houseware,
new and used clothes, toys,,
books, tapes, cosmetics, some
furniture, bake sale, etc.:
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF
WAKULLA STATION
945 Woodville Hwy.
FRIDAY/SATURDAY May 1 and 2
7 L- RAIN OR SHINE!


Today's Weather


Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
4/29 4/30 5/1 5/2 5/3


86/61
Times of
sun and
clouds.
Highs in the
mid 80s and
lows in the
low 60s.

Sunrise;
6:55 AM
Sunset:
8:14 PM


86/62
Partly
cloudy.
Highs in the
mid 80s and
lows in the
low 60s.


Sunrise:
6:54 AM
Sunset:
8:14 PM


86/62
Partly
cloudy.
Highs in the
mid 80s and
lows in the
low 60s.


Sunrise:
6:54 AM
Sunset:
8:15 PM


85/63
Isolated
thunder-
storms,
Highs in the
mid 80s and
lows in the
low 60s.

Sunrise:
6:53 AM
Sunset:


*w= CelebYtf,
Stories far and about home
,:;- ;; ^J~o~~6iiZ -s


86/62
Isolated
thunder-
storms,
Highs In the
mid 80s and
lows in the
low 60s.

Sunrise:
6:52 AM
Sunset:
S0.4PM D


Florida At A Glance


IJacksonvIlle
\ 86'6


Tampa
8&67


I aupin, Broker
Shell Point Crawfordville
926-7811 926-5111 .,
Florida Coastal Silver Coast
Properties, Inc. Realty
GREAT COMMERCIAL LOCATION With high visibility on l
side of curve with 35 MPH speed limit. Currently has rented
building across from Medical Center $500,000. #803-W, MLS
195030
WELL MAINTAINED and roomy 4BR/2BA doublewide mobile.
home on .56 acres (MOL) featuring open living area and split;
bedroom floor plan, fireplace, storage building, front & badc
decks. Great location at a great prices $94.900. #909-W, MLS9
191252
THIS HOME HAS IT ALL! 3BR/2BA home in great location ir
Crawfordville features Pergo flooring in LR, DR. Kitchen, split bed
room plan, all Kitchen appliances. Deluxe 15X40 screened paio
with Spanish Tile floor, hot tub, 2 TViDVDs, and much more. Man's
shed, privacy fenced back yald. A must see'l 1201-W, MLS#"
185120 priced at $199,500.
Building lots in Wakulla Gardens, several locations to choose frorrl
Pnces slartng from $7,500.

"RENTALS"
FURNISHED 2BR/2 5 Condo $1.200,month, security deposit re'.
quired. NO PETS #6341W
OCHLOCKONEE BAY 3BR'2BA furnished waterfront house $1.000/
Month, secuiily deposit required. PETS ALLOWED. #6343W
SEASONAL Snug Harbor Townhome available for renI at $1,500/
week. 2-week maximum schedule in any given month Community'
pool, docks on deep-water canal located in a gated community. NO
PETS
'BR/2BA home walking distance to Wal-man. $850!month. security,
deposit required. #6406W 'a
'"Licensed Real Estate Agents Needed"-
Contact Ted or Thelma
850-926-7811


2009 ISTHE DATETO LOOK, LINGER & RELOCATE,
SO GO FORTH GOLD!
WWW.C21FCP.COM

Ochlockonee Bay 984-5007


CoAt
(850)
520 Cn

COASTWISE


NEW






Lynn Cole-Eddinger
Broker 545-8284
lynncole5228@msn.com






David Hoover
Realtor 519-7944
dhoover2@hotmail.com






Sherri Parsons
Realtor 524-4294
peggyfox94@comcast.net

baths, a kitchen to die fe
ceilings, barbeque pit, w
+ all appliances, at $117
REDUCED
140 DUANE STREET/I
New construction with ti
bedroom, 2 bath, home
tile floors in dining room
bedrooms, Open floor p
comes with all appliance
Reduced to $109,9001

Soone


[i4 RMea41, Ib.
926-8038 (850) 926-2390 fax
awfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL
E.HOMESANDLAND.COM


LISTINGS!

THESE HOMES WON'T LAST LONG
CALL TODAY!
90 Shadow Oak Circle
Top quality Gene Cuthchin construction.
3 bedroom, 2 bath home on .65 of an
acre. Freshly painted, recent carpet, open
floor plan, gorgeous laminate flooring in
living area and master bedroom.
9 ft. ceilings, fireplace, screened back
porch, + side entry + two car garage.
Asking $154,900.

97 Jean Drive
Only $169,900 for this beautifully maintained
3 bedroom, 2 bath, home on one acre near
schools, golf course, & coast. Front chair
rocking porch, operi living & dining area, nice
size kitchen, 24 x16 deck overlooking fenced
back yard and newer POOL. 2 car carport +
workshop.
261 ROYAL TERN WAY/ST. JAMES BAY
Are you looking for a new luxury home at an
unbelievable price? Check this one out. 4500
sq. feet of pure luxury on the Golf Course.
Three story, 4 bedrooms, 4 1/2 gorgeous
or, living room, family room, fire place, 9+ foot
ret bar, screened porch w/inground pool,
7.56 a sq. foot. Asking $529,000.

MAGNOLIA GARDENS
ons of upgrades, reduced to sell! Three
w/laminate wood floors in living and hallway,
I, kitchen, laundry, and baths, carpet in
lan, trey ceiling in master, bar in kitchen,
es, vaulted ceiling, Ig. utility room and pantry.


.r or later
it's Coastwise!


Area Cities
.,r 0*


Clearwater 88
Crestview 87
Daytona Beach 83
FortLauderdale 82
Fori Myers 88
Gainesville 87
Hollywood 83
Jacksonville 86
Key West 81
Lady Lake 87
Lake City 86
Madison 88
Melbourne 82
Miami 81
N Smyma Beach 82


National Cities
I~fl,, li~(


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Houston
Los Angeles
Miami


pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
ptsunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
ptsunny
ptsunny


b9 cloudy
42 ptsunny
49 cloudy
67 t-storm
42 mst sunny
70 t-storm
55 ptsunny
75 ptsunny


Ocala 89
Orlando 86
Panama City 82
Pensacola 81
Plant City 91
Pompano Beach 82
Port Charlotte 88
Saint Augustine 81
Saint Petersburg 86
Sarasota 85
Tallahassee 87
Tampa 88
Titusville 83
Venice 86
W Palm Beach 83


Minneapolis
New York
Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


.. . 0


63 ptsunny
67 pt sunny
63 pt-sunny
65 pt sunny
64 pt sunny
73 ptsunny
64 ptsunny
66 ptsunny
70 pt.sunny
65 pt sunny
61 pt sunny
67 pt sunny
66 ptsunny
66 ptsunny
72 ptsunny


56 51 rain
64 48 rain
87 61 sunny
65 46 sunny
58. 44 rain
76 65 cloudy
68 53 rain


Moon Phases






New First Full Last
Apr25 May 1 May 9 May 17


UV Index
Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
4/29 4/30 5/1 5/2 5/3

Very High Very High Very High Very High Very High
The UV Index is measured on a 11 number scale, 0 !>f 11
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.


OPEN HOUSE:
Sat. & Sun.
May 2-3
1 to 3 PM.


fLT


,


Le t yH L "l


-i' ''


---


-' I~_.r_.=NMI


~5~~1









THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 30, 2009 Page 11B


415 Announcements h 525TownhousesforSale 555 Houses for Rent


Families needed for government 2BR/2.5BA Townhome. Built
loans, new or preowned homes 2004. 1,325 sq.ft. Superbly main-
available. Call 850-576-5458 for tainted. $99,900, in Crawfordville.
details. Call 772-216-4628.
530 Comm. Property for
435 Lost and Found Rent


Found'color wallet-size photo at
Wal-Mart. The back of the photo
reads Megan Posey, 3-months.
Please call Judy, 850-926-2849.,

500 Real Estate


PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertisingin this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it ille-
gal
to advertise "any preference, limi-
tation, or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, ,sex, handi-
cap, familial status or national ori-
gin or an intention to make any
such preference, limitation or dis-
crimination."' Familial status in-
cludes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing the custody of
children under the age of 18.
This newspaper will not accept
any advertising for real estate
that is a violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To com-
plain of discrimination call HUD
toll free at 1-800-669-9777. The
toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


55 "(LENDER 'R

515 Apartments for Rent


IBR/1BA $600/mo.
ONE MONTH FREE!
41.6 B. Teal Lane, between the
Hospitals off Miccosukee Road.
1BR/1BA full size, very nice and
clean, private area, new carpet, full
kitchen, indoor laundry w/washer &
dryer, large bedroom with walk-in
closet, large bathroom with 5' vanity
& sink top, nice covered front patio,
metal blinds. Quadruplex with easy
parking. Senior citizen discount.
Must see! One of the best 1BR
units around. Call 325-2000.





DjtlN.Kwn-o,,AUrTMEK..-

FOR RENT
1, 2 AND 3 BEDROOMS
$675-$850

Call 926-1134
for more information.


Commercial building on busy
Hwy. 98/Panacea for rent.
$550/month. $550/security. Och-
lockonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001.
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com
Great-Location! 1,200sq.ft. Craw-
fordville Hwy. adjoining The Wa-
kulla News. Three offices, recep-
tion, waiting area, large kitchen.
$1,000/mo. Call 926-6289 or
421-2792.
Mini-Warehouse Spaces for lease,
8X10 and 10X12 now available.
Come by or call Wakulla Realty,
926-5084.


DOWNSIZING
Several H
frontage t
office
spaces
available.
Great atmosphere! All rents, plus sales
tax, incl. all utilities, trash p/u, full kitchen
use, and clean restrooms. Cleaning of
common area. Rates starting at $300/mo.
First and last month's rent. Call 926-4511.
SPECIAl: 1st MONTH FREE
W/13-month lease.
Woodville Retail
Space Available
* Fitness Studio-1000/sf
(Wall to wall mat & mirrors)
* Retail -1250/sf
(Storefront w/back storage)
* Two-Bay Garage-1200/sf
* Divided Office Space-1074/sf
-Lewiswood Center
421-5039

540 Farms for Sale


Need a home, need a loan, call
850-576-5458 we can help.
Home Centers, Inc.
2521 W. Tennessee Street
Tallahassee, Florida 32304
850-576-5458.

545 Homes for Sale

Prestige Home Center has several
discounted home's (lot models)
don't miss out on these good
deals. Call 850-576-5458.
550 Homes w/Acreage
for Sale


J 3EBR/2E3BA
modular home on 1.? acre Edirj
iroom w/fire-place. Many beaulilul
always, fountains, grapevine
& worksheds. Carport and
garage. Off Hwy 20 on Big
RichardRd. $61,900.00. Owner:
financing to qualified buyers.
850-926-4511 for more info.


I I


L I


landing. $850/mo. 850-926-6289 575 Mobile Homes w/

S 560Lad575 Mobile Homes w I Land
560 Land for Sale Land


2-acre lot for' sale near new
Shadeville School, corner of Steel
Court and Spring Creek Hwy. (city
water). Owner financing.
850-556-1178.
Beautiful, untimbered, mature
wooded 20-acre tract. Easy ac-
cess from Hwy 98. Reduced
$125,000. Call Susan McKaye,
owner/agent (850)510-2477. Och-
lockonee Bay Realty.
www.hardwoodhammock.com
Ochlockonee Bay, Knotty Pine St.
off Surf Rd., 1 mile from Marina.
Lots 19 & 20. Price reduced!
850-984-0192.


._. S m


Savan
ac. trac

$57,
c.


106 W. 5t Ave.
Tallahassee, FL 32303
(850) 222-2166 tel.
wwwr.mleeco.com
On
Steepleclase $79,900 to
$99,900. ac: wooded
tracts. Horse friendly! Lo-
cated off of Lower Bridge
,Road

Carmen Maia -$29,900.
Lots up to 1 ac. in size.
Conveniently located lo
Tallahassee and Lake
Talquin.

Montelo $34,900
Located off ofBelair Road
in Tallahassee.
City electric, water, & sewer


Used manufactured homes with
land, ready to move in, easy fi-
nancing and down payment assis-
tance. Call 850-576-5458.


nah Forest $39,900. 1
'ts off tWakulla Aaron Rd.
Walkers Mill
,900. 2 acre lots, located
n L-.i'.'cr Endr e F.7.6j
Sellars Crossing
$59,900. 1+ ac lots
North Wakulla Co..
SAce High Stable Rd.
Carmen Rocio 2 ac.
lot offShadeville Hwy
near W.i-ull.i tjtJ.'n
$64,900.
2 acre tract w large
hardwoods in Beech-
wood Subdivision off
Shadeville Hwy.
$52,900.
Two 5+ acre tracts offt
Rehwinkel Rd. w. large
trees on the back of
properties & a small
pond. Can be
purchased together.
$134,750 and $136,250.


590 Waterfront Homes/ 590 Waterfront Homes/
Land LandI


George's Lighthouse Pointe
Unit A-3, 19 Mashes Sand Road,
Panacea, Condominium Unit.
1BR/1 BA, LR, DR, CHA. Front
porch faces pool & tennis court.
Back porch faces marina & view
of bay (Both 12x30). Gated
Community w/beautiful new
landscaping. 825 sq. ft. H&C.
850-545-5057. $229,900


Riverfront lot, Sopchoppy river,
1.76 beautifully wooded acres in a
house-only subdivision. 265' of
river frontage, http://www.cy-
presssoftwarefl.com/riverfrontlot.h
tm. $69,000. 850-653-8488.
OUR NEWSPAPER
PEOPLE
j SSERVING
PEOPLE


23 Neeley Rd. $900/month, plus
deposit. 1800SF, 4BR/2BA. Large
fenced yard. Call Nick at
850-766-7750.
2BR/2BA, Crawfordville. Com-
pletely renovated, huge yard.
$800/mont + deposit. Includes all
appliances. Call 850-926-2819.
3BR/2BA Custom-built 2007. 37
John David Dr. Short walk to Lake
Ellen. Energy-efficient "green
house" $850/month. Rent-to-own,
owner's finance options.
850-443-3300.
Bay-front 3BR/2BA on Mashes
Sands. Partially furnished.
$875/month. $875/security. No
Pets. No Smoking. Ochlockonee
Bay Realty: 850-984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com
Crawfordville, clean, large 2 Bed-
room, 2 Full Bath Duplex $675/per
month. Call Linda 850-926-0283.
Wakulla River; 2BR/2BA, large
porch. Walking distance to river,
community park, dock and boat


8 Lost Creek Trail
3BR/2.5BA located on 10 picturesque
;lrez minute; fro- J'o 'r, "n; Crjw-
i~r t b'T .,lle T 3s br],: h.:..me feature" a
In family r.-:m '..t firepla;ce ard
Frer.ch .c :r": ':"rl. ..:,kImg IF :r:h & Do a'Card
screerned Ingroup.J p,:,Il are"- Wiv-. 850508-1235
marq-y e'-r3 1I lii:;t 3--e .:'', ':

Proposed Construction by Steve Byrd Construction in 4 beautiful
neighborhoods.
Pre-construcion pricing. Contractearly and pick your colors.


Steeplechase
Beautiful homes
located on 5+ ac.
tracts,
Priced from $243,000
to $268,00


Savannah Forest
3 great plans to
choose from.
Priced from
$178,900 to
193,900.
SeUars Crossing
Spacious homes on
1+ ac.home sites.
Priced from
$223,900 to
$248,900.


Walkers Mill
SGreat homes on 2 ac.
lots. Located in Wa-
kulla County
Priced
From $221,900 to
$246,900


Brain


Teasers


, cow


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PRICE REDUCED!!
Woodville, 1.6 acres.
Corner lot. Close enough to
town, but very private.
$40,000 negotiable.
850-545-1355
565 Mobile Homes for
Rent

2BR I BA
2BR 2 BA
3BR 2 BA
$500 $550 per month
deposit required
in St. Marks Crawfordville area.
BRASHTON INVESTMENT
PROPERTIES, LLC
850-251-8338

2BR/1BA M/H Sopchoppy area
Ochlockonee River. $400/month +
deposit. Call 850-570-9943 and
850-962-2358.

2BR/2BA M/H, in Sopchoppy on
large corner lot. $450/mo. + secu-
rity deposit. Call 850-566-4124.


Trying to sell something?


Call and enter a

Classified Ad Only $8








The



Wakulla









Denise Folh
classifieds@thewakullanews.net


I I _


40M 4h






















ICaz Help A"oy Oie Lose Weight!
Geneva lost 80 pounds in Tallahasseel
\v Size 20 to a Size 14/16
Marshall lost 30 Pounds
371/2 inches to 32 inches!
No Fadl No StarvingI
No DietingI No Dramal
We Have Lost Over One Million Poundsl
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850-544-8534

Sandi Donnick
Cosmetologist
12 years exp. Hair & Nails



926-6772


Amanda
.Mann
Trainedby
Paul
Mitcfie(
Master Cosmetologist


926-6772


a I aL1, 1,,
s Your ife... ive'it In= Styl



Calt shdl -naponmn wt hePoessoa o orchie tdy!


Monday- Saturday
926-3094




Cferyl LaChapelle 926-6772
Specializing in:
; a u yle e& Color
TL rights 8~,Highlights



S 158 i chlockopee Si.


1f&1L'94
HAIR WORKS
* Foils & Highlights
* Eye BrowWax &Tint
* Perms & Body Waves
* Hair Mask & Mud Packs


Organic

anlly
Created by
Resident e'' ..enf.
makeup Artist ake' Dnec
850-544-6598
:A Sold at
lazz eo~


Stlan's
Barber Shop
926-8289
Choice '.(,a
2008 T -
Servingll te Community
for over 20 years
51 CTawordillle Hwy. Crawfordille

NRonsi Ztaclk!i
rom Hi he Cafomnia SaUattcal
A% 0lubnhrorp
926-4282
See her
Sor au
care need.


926-1139
Open Tuesday Friday
North Pointe Center
Crawfordville
* Matrix & Redken'
Coloring
* Lowlihts ,& Highlights
* Ear Piercing *-
I


-si


Show them. how much they mean to
us with a Mother's Day ad in

tl Wahulla etuO .

Just $25 fappy)/

Send us her photo Da
or advertise your
Mother's Day /-
Special. Lovely
Deadline: April 30 Yr Krd-
Publication Date: May 7


Call Lynda, Denise or Sherry at 926-7102
or e-mail: classifieds@thewakullanews.net
p


W Barber Shop & Salon

N- Q926-4080
0In dulging Options ,
S Always REE Advice with Any Service
His & Her's Barber Shop & Salon (Acros from Gulf Coast Lumber)


A hairstylist and their customers
share a special bond. In
appreciation of all hairstylists this
year, let's celebrate in the finesse
of this. unique character! When
you think about how important
it is to look and feel good you,
wonder sometimes how we value
these individuals who so graciously
transform us one hair strand at a
time.

Hairstylists are caretakers at
heart. They help women and ren
alike achieve the highest level
of confidence by how the world
perceives them. They guide us and
suggest styles and colors for us that
best suit individual face shapes,
attitudes and lifestyles. Hairstylists
use their knowledge and creativity
Sto enhance personal beauty,
while placing us in their chair, in
frontpf a mirror, dedicating the
entire appointment to us,

Hairstylists are very good
listeners. Since this relationship
is typically every four to six
weeks, a friendship blossoms
and it becomes easy to talk
to them and look to them for
support while sharing feelings
and experiences. These
Stylists act as counselors
in a sense, as they intently
listen and offer kindness
and compassion. They
are a smile and a
gentle spark in difficult
economic times.


A really good hairstylist not only;
is equipped with creative talent
but also offers a special touch
like massage, shampoo relaxation
treatment and even in some cases
makeup application, which all
create a spa experience in the
allotted time frame between hectic
careers and family life.

Hair Stylists, we salute you and
we dedicate this day in celebration
of YOU!

By Courtney Laine Rozanski


etfiany Lassiter
Master Colorist
7 9a stylist

926-6772
158 Ochfochohu St.
CraHwardiitffe
or.. sL


Unsda Oaks
Sp..Mtdau. im.
Style Cates Color
HIighUghts, Lowiughs


926-6772
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L II I s ,I


As".


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~D~se~~sJu ;


HairStyist pprciaion ayis Ar~il'3







April 2, 2009 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR Page 5B


Jack Stella
(left) and Karyn
Merritt perform
in "One More
Dream," one of
three one-act
plays being
performed by
the Lake
Region
Community
Theatre. Final
performances
are this
weekend.



Theater's
one-act plays
take final bow
this weekend
This weekend brings the
final performances of the Lake
SRegion Community Theatre's
"A Night of One-Acts," which
will be held Friday-Sunday,
April 3-5, at the theater's home
on 218 S.E. Walnut St. in
Starke.
The one-act plays "One
More Dream," "Blind
Woman's Bluff" and "Good
Night, Charlotte" will be
.performed at 7 p.m. April 3
and 4 and at 2 p.m.April 5.
Donation prices are $12 for
adults and $10 for children.
Reservations are
recommended due to limited
seating.
For reservations or for more
information, please call the
box office at (352) 226-4082
or send e-mail to
lrct09(embarqmail.com.

Woman's Club
to meet April 8
Starke Woman's Club will
hold their regular monthly
meeting Wednesday, April 8,
with social hour at'l 1:30 a.m.
Lunch will be at 12 noon.
Program will be presented
by board members. Election of
officers for the coming year
will be the main topic.
Tickets for the May 1 gala
will be on sale. Theme for this
year is "Honoring our
Patriots."

Starke
Kiwanis golf
tournament is
April 10
The Kiwanis Club of
Starke's annual golf
tournament is scheduled for
Friday. April 10, at the Starke
Golf and Country Club. It
begins with a shotgun start at
8:30 a.m.
Cost is $50 per person, with
players as part of four-member
teams. Prizes of $500, $300
and $200 will be awarded to
first, second and third place,
with winning teams


determined by a luck-of-the-
draw format (individual player
scores are randomly drawn to
create new teams at the
tournament's conclusion).
There will be chipping and
putting contests as well as
drawings for additional prizes.
For more information,
please call Cheryl Canova at
(904) 964-5382 or Steve
Denmark at (904) 964-5827.


Matnnew Masten


Dale Masten
graduates basic
Matthew Dale Masten,
formerly of Keystone Heights,
and son of Mrs. Debbie Halle
of Starke, and Kermit D
Masten of Quincy, Ill., has
graduated basic training with
Yankee Company 180 Feb. 27.
Based in Cape May, N.J., the
United States Coast Guard
graduate is a former Keystone
Heights High School student
and 2002 graduate of Quincy
High School, Quincy, 1ll.
Masten has been assigned to
the U.S.C.G. Cutter Vigorous
stationed in Cape May. Masten
plans to pursue Maritime Law
Enforcement in ,.the Coast
Guard. When not at sea,
Masten resides in Cape May,
N.J. with his wife, Kristen, and
their two dogs, Gordon and
Brutus.

Pfc. Taylor
graduates basic
Army Pfc. Loleta A. Taylor
has graduated from basic
combat training at Fort
Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of
training, Pfc. Taylor studied
the Army mission, history,
tradition and core values,
physical fitness, received


TIB


For Florida Concealed
Carry Firearms
License


,Instruction in Revolvers
Semi Autos
FL 790-06 Laws


WAYNE M. WALL, SR. Phone: 904-964-7648
NRA Certified Individual or Group
hillbillies2@amnetline.com

4V New Life Lawn
!- I? & Landscape, LLC
FI'" QuaCity service; fro the rgrouni p.
Tl'AS! Residential Commercial
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COMPLETE LAWN & LANDSCAPE
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Call Tbday ror your FREE ESTIMRTE!


instruction and practice in
basic combat skills, military
weapons, chemical warfare
and bayonet training, drill and
ceremony, marching, rifle
marksmanship, armed and
unarmed combat, map reading,
field tactics, military courtesy
and justice system, basic first
aid, and foot marches and field
training exercises.
Pfc. Taylor is the daughter
of David Taylor of Starke and
niece of Chernice Lane of
Jacksonville. She is a 2008
graduate of the University
Christian School of
Jacksonville.


Pvt. Lindsey
completes basic
Army Pvt. Joshua C.
Lindsey has graduated from
basic combat training at Fort
Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of
training, Pfc. Taylor studied
the Army mission, history,
tradition and core values,
physical fitness, received
instruction and practice in
basic combat skills, military
weapons, chemical warfare
and bayonet training, drill and
ceremony, marching, rifle
marksmanship, armed and
unarmed combat, map reading,
field tactics, military courtesy
and justice system, basic first
aid, and foot marches and field
training exercises.
Pvt. Lindsey is the grandson
of Dotti Lindsey of White
Springs and son of Jeffery
Lindsey of Raiford. He is a
2007 graduate of Columbia
High School, Lake City.

Delton Hill
graduates basic,
Army .Pvt..Delton R. Hill
has graduated from basic
combat training at Fort
Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of
training, the soldier studied the
Army mission, history,
tradition and core values,
physical fitness, and received
instruction and practice in
basic combat skills, military
weapons, chemical warfare
and bayonet training, drill and


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ceremony, marching, rifle
marksmanship, armed and
unarmed combat, map reading,
field tactics, military courtesy,
military justice system, basic
first aid, foot marches, and
field training exercises.
He is the son of Raymond
Hill and Debra Porter, both of
Starke. The private is a 2004
graduate of Bradford High
School.


Airman Keith Wheeler


Wheeler
graduates basic
Air Force Airman Keith M.
Wheeler has graduated from
basic military training at
Lackland Air Force Base, San
Antonio, Texas.
During the six weeks of
training, Airman Wheeler
studied the Air Force mission,
organization, core values, and
military customs and
courtesies; performed drill and


ceremony marches, and
received physical training, rifle
marksmanship, field training
exercises, and special training
in human relations.
In addition, airmen who
complete basic training earn
credits toward an associate in
applied science degree relating
through the Community
College of the Air Force.
Airman Wheeler is the son
of Tabitha Castell of Melrose
and is a 2005 graduate of
Keystone Heights High
School.

Starke Rec.
Dept. offers
summer
softball
The Starke Recreation
Department is registering
children for its summer
softball program, which begins
June 15.
There are four age divisions:
T-ball (4-5), smallfry (6-8),
junior (9-12) and senior (13-
15)..Age-determining date is
June 15.
The cost of participation is
$45.
For more information,
please call (904) 964-6792.

Every murderer is
probably somebody's old
friend.
Agatha Christie'
1891-1976, British
Mystery Writer


*Get Your FREE Spinal
Screening Examination!
($125 Value)
YQU MAY HAVE ONE OF THESE 16 DANGER SIGNALS OF PINCHED
NERVES .
''- Low 6ac Pa.n" 'DO Ni 9. Numb Hands 13. Numb Fingers
2. Headaches 6. Sore Elbows 10. Bursitis 14. Hip Pain
3. Shoulder Pain 7. NeckPain 11. Pain Down Legs 15. TightMusdes
4. Arthritis 8. Indigestion 12. Muscle Spasms 16. Aching Feet.
FIND OUT NOW whether careful, professional chiropractic care can relieve your aches and pains. This
examination will include a spinal alignment check, an examination for restricted or excess motion in the
spine, an examination for swelling and muscle spasms and a private consultation with the doctor to
discuss the results. This examination is entirely FREE.
FREE LIMITED TIME OFFER. Call for your appointment TODAY! This
STARKE CHIROPRACTIC INC.
225 South Orange Street
_Starke, FL 32091 CAU"


Rebecca Parrott
Justin Britten
Parrott-Britten
to wed in June
Rebecca Parrott, daughter of
Timothy and Vicky Parrott, all
of Starke, and Justin Britten of
Hawthorne, son of Dr. L.
Britten and Mrs. Anne Britten
of Arkansas and the. late
Jeanne Britten announce their
engagement and upcoming
marriage.
The bride-elect is a 2003
graduate of Bradford High
School and has a paralegal
degree. She is currently
employed at Gator Patch as
head of advertising and helps
in the clothing design
department. She is a member
of Madison Street Baptist
Church.
The groom-elect is the
owner of four Gator Patch
stores.
The by invitation only
ceremony will be held June 27,
2009 at Club Continental,
Orange Park with a reception
to follow. All friends and
family are invited to attend.


Dr. Martin Slaughter
Chropractor I
entire examination is FREE. If you want more
care and treatment, we do all the paperwork.
904 368-0011 |I
NOW...BRING THIS COUPON WITH YOU
I


U .r... a,. d. 'sis m a a m mC POU aHE yK PATENTIAMD ANYOriiE R SPOI FOelAIIAilASARum TTOREFsE.
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