Title: Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00218
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville, Fla
Publication Date: April 23, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028313
Volume ID: VID00218
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Full Text




Stephen C. Smith Memorial Regatta
Friday, April 24 Sunday, April 26


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MEORA RGAT

5 5


Published Weekly Our 114th Year, 16th Issue Thursday. April 23, 200!
Read Daily Serving Wakulla County For More Than A


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9 ..Two Sections
Century 50 Cents


- 'S" -R--R~*.. -Transportation:


Plans for future


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Consultants for the Capital
Region Transportation Plan-
ning Agency (CRTPA) visited
Wakulla County Thursday, April
16 to seek input from the com-
munity regarding the Regional
Mobility Plan.
Part of Wakulla County is in-
duded in the planning agency's
coverage area along with por-
tions of Gadsden. Jefferson and
Leon counties.
Consultant Beverly Davis of
RS & H of Savannah. Ga. and
Jacksonville led the meeting
and invited residents to tell
the CRTPA what transportation
needs they want addressed in
Wakulla County.
While the turnout of resi-
dents was sparse, those who


attended gave input to the
consultants and addressed
concerns such as carpoolmg,
creating bus routes and mass
transportation service through
StarMetro and safe bike lanes.
The consultants noted that
39 percent of Wakulla residents
commute within the county
and 55 percent commute to
neighboring Leon County. Only
18 percent of the county is
residential property use while
19 percent is agricultural and 62
percent is conservation land.
According to statistics cre-
ated by the CRTPA. Wakulla
County has 81 miles of state
roads and U.S. Highway 319
carries 12,900 to 14.445 ve-
hicles per day along some
segments.
Continued on Page 5A


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.Chris;Morgan, MattStone,.
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aid Robei"Coo;," as they
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.:ric, a Wakulla County
n- ative, spends a great deal
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ing our coapt,.particularly
t :. Sprig reek.area. He
'would not revealhis favor-
1' fishing holes.
:'t the waterfowl photd-
giraphs were shot on and
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Inside

.This Week
Comment&Opinion.....Page 2A
Week In Wakulla..........Page 2A
Church.........................Page 4A
Sports ..........................Page 6A
People ..........................Page 7A
School..........................Page 8A
Law Enforcement........Page 9A
Outdoors ...................Page 10A
Almanac.....................Page 11A
Senior Citizens............Page 1B
Health/Fitness .............Page 2B
People..........................Page 4B






6 184578 2021 5 0


Animal Control on the move


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Animal Control will no
longer be under the sheriff's
office and, instead, will be back
under the Board of County
Commissioners.
Sheriff David Harvey. whose
office has overseen animal-con-
trolsince it was made a divi-
sion in 1993, wrote a memo in
November 2008 indicating he
wantedto transition oversight
to the county.
"The daily operations and
supervisory requirements (of
animal control) are such that
the Command Staff at the
sheriff's office simply does not
have time to deal with so many
problem cases, as well as other
issues," Harvey wrote.
At the county commission
meeting on April 7, the board
indicated it would take over
supervision of animal control
at the beginning of the'2009-10
fiscal year, which begins Oct.
1. Sheriff Harvey wanted to
transition animal control back
to the county on May 1.
Under state .law, county
governments are responsible
for providing animal control


services to citizens.
Currently, animal control
has a budget of $230,000 and
three employees Director
Ivanhoe Carroll and two ani-
mal control officers. There are
three acres of land and four
buildings, including the Citi-
zens for Humane Animal Treat-
ment (CHAT) Adoption Center,
staffed by CHAT volunteers
and one county employee, the
animal shelter, where animals
are housed that have been
impounded, surrendered, lost
or found, and those under
quarantine. There is also a
portable building used as an
office, and a livestock area for
large animals such as horses
and cattle that have been
seized or surrendered.
In other matters before the
board:
Commissioner Mike Stew-
art urged fellow commission-
ers to move forward with tak-
ing steps to relieve flooding in
Wakulla Gardens after recent
heavy rains.
"We have got to get the wa-
ter out of the roads," Stewart
said, stressing that emergency
vehicles could not get through


the flooded roads. If there was
a fire in'the subdivision, the
house would have burned to
the ground," he said. "If there
had been a person with a heart
attack, he would be dead."
"This is the hand we've
been dealt and we've got to fix
it," Stewart said of problems.
with Wakulla Gardens, which
was platted in the 1960s before
the county had zoning. The
subdivision has homes on
small lots with unpaved roads
and no access to public sewer.
Some homes have no public
water.
"If I was the chairman,"
Stewart said, "I would have
called an emergency meeting"
to push a stormwater plan
with engineers and identify
and buy lots within the neigh-
borhood.
Chairman Howard Kessler
commented that he knows
people don't like to hear the'
"M-word," but he suggested
an 18-month moratorium be
imposed on new construction
in Wakulla Gardens until the
neighborhood's problems are
addressed.
Continued on Page 5A


St. Marks ponders


future of Posey's


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
It was a landmark draw-
ing visitors, the subject of
countless artworks, and one
of the oldest operating busi-
nesses in Wakulla County. In
July 2005, flooding from Hur-
ricane Dennis caused sub-
stantial damage to Posey's
Oyster Bar in St. Marks but
owners John Gunter and
Daphne Beckham were un-
able to afford the extensive
repairs to the building.
Since then, the building
has been condemned by the
county and stands derelict,


panes broken in the old
glass picture windows.
As the City of St. Marks
tries to move forward with
changes to remake itself
as a tourism and day-trip
destination, it faces the
question of what to do with
Posey's. Should it allow the
building to remain standing
in the hopes that another
business owner will see the
value of the landmark and
come in and restore it? Or
should the city tear down
the deteriorating building
as a nuisance?
Continued on Page 5A


Regatta sails away


The Stephen C. Smith Re-
gatta will be held on April 24
through April 26 at the Shell
Point Beach. The 36th Annual
Stephen C. Smith Memorial
Regatta is the largest and lon-
gest running regatta in the
Big Bend area. The regatta
benefits the American Cancer
Society in memory of Stephen
Smith. Smith was a local sailor
who died from a rare from


leukemia at the age of 29,
The event is sponsored by
the Apalachee Bay Yacht Club,
Shell Point Sailboard Club and
the American Cancer Society,
with the help of numerous
businesses and individuals.
Each year the SCSR has
drawn as many as 200 regis-
tered participants and hun-
dreds of spectators.
Continued on Page 5A


City seats open


Three seats on the Sop-
choppy City Commission
will be up for a city election
in June.
The seats are currently
held by Martha Evans, Rich-
ard Harden and Colleen
Skipper. .. ..
Qualifying for candidates
began on Friday, April 17,
and continues through May


8 at noon. Any Sopchoppy
resident who is a registered
voter can qualify as a can-
didate.
The election will be held
on June 9.
For more information,
contact City Clerk Jackie
Lawhon or I)eputy Clerk
Linda Langston at 962-4611.


the annual Children's Fish-
ing Tournament will be held
Saturday, April 25 with the
weigh-in and festivities held
in Panacea's Woolley Park. The
event will start at 7 a.m. at the
Port Panacea Marina. The last
tournament fleet boat will
leave the dock at 8:30 a.m. so
don't be late and don't miss
the boat Children not going
out on a family boat or with
one of the fleet of volunteer
captains may fish from any
safe location and bring their
catch to Woolley Park. Weigh-
in will begin at 10 a.m. and
conclude at 1 p.m., no excep-
tions. Children must be in line
before 1 p.m. in order for their
fish to qualify. The two divi-
sions are Fresh Water; which
includes bass, panfish, and cat-


fish. Saltwater: including white
trout speckled trout, Spanish
mackerel, redfish, flounder
and whiting. Since this is an
inshore event, no offshore or
reef species will be weighed.
This means grouper, snapper,
amberjack, etc. will not qualify.
Absolutely no sharks, no rays,
no hard head or sail catfish
will be considered.
Every child from the ages
of 3 to 15, will receive a T-shirt
and goody bag as well as a
hot dog lunch with chips and
a drink. There will be games
galore and trophies, too. Last
year organizers gave away
tackle boxes and fishing poles,
The big giveaway grand prize
is a special surprise this year
so be sure to register for your
free chance to win.


Youths will seek

fish during tourney


"* '. I . . - .


....


; w ;.







Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009


Being a mother not just a 9 to 5 job or for 18 years


NURSE JUDYS NOOK
By JUDY CONLIN
.Special to The Wakulla News
Being a mother is not just
a 9 to 5 job or a birth to age


18 job. Maybe it should be,
but some mothers, myself
included, view it as a lifetime
commitment.
It doesn't matter how old
their child is, if good old
mom thinks they need a
little discipline, a talking to,
a scolding, she's right there
on the job, much to the detri-
ment of family relationships.
Mothers also have the ability
to remember every past real or
imagined grievance and bring
it up months or years later.
They are also the undisputed
experts in the art of laying on
the guilt trip.
For any of you who have
mothers who might fit this


description, you can be sure of
it if you've ever heard words
like these:
"Just you wait until your
father comes home."
I would never have spo-
ken like that to my mother."
You'll be the death of
me yet."
You're not too big to
spank."
Pretty is as pretty does."
"Handsome is as hand-
some does."
I don't care what 'they'
said. I'm your mother and
what I say goes."
Someday you'll wish I was
still around." -
I don't like to interfere but


you need to know you hurt
your sister's (insert anyone
here) feelings."
The Bible says,' Honor thy
father and mother'."
"I can't believe I endured
20 hours of labor to listen to
this."
"It may be none of my busi-
ness but.............."
"I know you're their mother
and I'm only their grandmoth-
er, but I don't think that is the
way to handle the situation."
"Just what did you mean
when you threw your teddy
bear out of your crib and said
'I hate you, Mommy'?"
"You'll be sorry when I'm
dead and gone."


"Just what did you mean
when you told me how cool
your best friend's mother
was?"
"Why haven't you answered
my calls, letters, e-mails etc? I
won't be around forever, you
know."
"Why haven't you visited,
stayed longer, given me the
same amount of time as the
in-laws etc.? I won't be around
forever, you know."
"Why are you giving me
that look? Everyone else likes
it when I sing and dance in
the supermarket aisles?"
"When you say that, it's
like putting a dagger into my
heart."


"You'll sit on thatchair un-
til you can say you're sorry."
If you recognize any of
these statements, if any of
them have emanated from
your mother's mouth, don't
despair. They all come from
love. A mother's love is un-
ending as is her need to con-
stantly be your mother. She
just can't give the role up.
Give her a big hug this
Mother's Day. After all she
won't be around forever.
More later,
Nurse Judy

Nurse Judy and her alter
ego write from Havana,


Men's Fraternity: Not for men only.


By STEVE SMITH
Men's Fraternity of Wakulla
I do a lot of journaling. I
try to keep up with my day-to-
day or at least, week-to-week
thoughts and ideas. Writing my
thoughts down helps me keep
my focus in the direction I'm
trying to go. Since I'm involved
in several areas simultane-
ously, sometimes it's hard to
stay on track. There is a lot of
merit to writing things down.
It helps me to be able to think
about events and activities I'm
involved in and where-God is
or has led me to be involved.
In retrospect, it also points out
some of my failures or short-
comings from what God origi-
nally instructed. It reminds me
to stay the course, examine the
direction Im going, rekindle my
initial flame to the task and
re-evaluate where I am in my
journey of life and take correc-
.tive action.
As 2008 came to a dose, I've


had some opportunities to go
back and look at some of those
writings. As a result, I've come
to realize that I've allowed my-
self to veer off the main course.
I've allowed too many "mini-
trips" to invade my journey.
Many have been worthwhile,
but as each takes me off course
just a little, my end destination
is not reached because of so
many side trips.
Let me explain. My ultimate
mission or calling is to reach
children and families with
God's love and provision. A tar-
get to do that is to involve dads
in unity with other dads (men)
to see the day-to-day battles we
fight are not ours alone. We
share this battle with each oth-
er, but don't share 'with each
other' to fight those battles.
A solution to that is uniting
and sharing with each other
in a safe environment We can
see some of our problems or
concerns, talk about solutions


and support each other in our
efforts. This was the main rea-
son Men's Fraternity of Wakulla
came into existence, to allow
men to support one another in
our journey.
This general concept is
-great. It's the follow through
where we fall short. We know
we need help, but we fear
asking for it. Pride keeps us
from sharing. Fear of failure is
another obstacle. We fear we
will fail at our attempt to cor-
rect or improve our situation,
and we allow Satan to defeat
us before we even get started.
We see the 'mini-failures' of
others, coupled with the lack of
'immediate results' in our own
efforts, and we certainly don't
want to share so others will see
our failures as well. We remain
alone and quiet. There is a solu-
tion to this dilemma.
Daily devotions and prayer
for God's help coupled with
trusting that God will help us


in all our endeavors allows
us to have a better perspec-
tive of life. There are support
groups for most everything,
alcohol and drug abuse, smok-
ing, marital concerns, divorce
groups, over active children,
abused spouses, even singles
over a certain age, the list goes
on and on. Each one does
some good in it's own rite,
the problem is they are "after
the fact" support groups. If we
could address these situations
before they become a problem,
life would be more satisfying
and fulfilling.
At Men's Fraternity of Wakul-
la we have a saying: "You can't
climb the mountain of man-
hood disconnected from other
men." We are each unique in
our own way. We deal with situ-
ations in different ways. What
works for one may not work for
someone else, but as we share
we have the opportunity to
pick and choose, to blend our


Drivers should slow down in subdivision


Editor, The News;
Twenty-five miles per hour
'isthe speed limit in most resi-
dential neighborhoods in the
State of Florida all the time,
This includes the neighbor-
hood at the Wakulla Middle
School, Wildwoood Acres. This
speed limit is not just when
the school zone light is flash-
ing on Highway 98. There are
seven speed limit signs located
throughout the neighborhood
to inform drivers of this. Also
located in the Wildwood sub-
division are two home daycare
providers. Residents, teachers,
bus drivers and parents, this is
not just a school zone, this is
where families, children and


pets live, play and exercise.
I walk a two-mile route
twice daily for health reasons.
Once at 9 a.m. and then again
around 4 p.m. It is unbeliev-
able the speeds people drive
in here. On these walks I am
passed by seven or eight vehi-
des induding buses dropping
off and picking up children
at the middle school and for
daycare as well as other desti-
nations. At least five of these
exceed the speed limit. I know
the stress of running late, but
the 10 or 15 seconds you save
is not worth the danger you
put yourself, your passengers
(children) and others in.
In the 18 years I have been


walking in this area, drivers
have spit at me and thrown
bottles, cans and other things
at me. Obscenities have been
yelled at me for shouting
at them to slow down. But
when the man in the white
truck yelled at me that he
was only doing a little over 35


and to mind my own "%@&$1
business," I realized that my
neighbors' safety and my own
is my business.
Please slow down. The
speed limit is not a suggestion,
it is the law.
Bea Bradford
Crawfordville


Thanks to community


Editor, The News:
I would like to take this
opportunity to thank the
community for the support
of the Wakulla Heritage book
that the Wakulla County His-
torical Society published. The
stories and financial support
have been great.
I would like to thank the
people who helped me with
the delivery of the book last
week. I couldn't have done it
without them: Betty Green,
Linda Thompson, Mary Samp-
son, Tanya Lynn, Helen Har-
vey, John Roberts, Lawanda
Williams and Mike Harvey. I
would also like to thank the
Wakulla County Heritage Book
Committee for all the work
that they put into this book.
To others who helped, thanks
to you as well.


I will be at the Wakulla
County Archives and Museum
(back of the courthouse) on
Thursday, April 23 from 2 p.m.
until 6 p.m. for any one who
would like to look at the book
and buy a copy for the family.
The cost is $64.20 per book.
I will also be at the Blue
Crab Festival on May 2 in
Panacea selling the book. If
you can't make any of these
times please call me at 926-
7031 or 524-5334 and wq can
make other arrangements.
Again, thanks for all the
past and future support of
the Wakulla County Historical
Society.
Carolyn Wrenn Harvey
Treasurer, Wakulla County
Heritage Book Committee
Crawfordville


Republicans unite


Editor, The News:
Many Wakulla citizens at-
tended the tax day tea party
held at the old capitol steps
in downtown Tallahassee on
April 15.
More than 1,000 people at-
tended. The attendees were
a coalition of individuals and
groups from around the Tal-
lahassee area who oppose the
recent trend of fiscal irresponsi-
bility in government at the local,
state, and federal levels.
Tea Party organizers state
that "This wasn't a conservative
or liberal thing. This was about
voicing our concern over govern-
ment forking over billions and
trillions of dollars to businesses
that should have failed.
Most attendees expressed


concern that we are bankrupting
our nation and passing on gen-
erational debt. If we don't stand
up for our rights and our liber-
ties today, future generations
will ask us: what did you do
when freedom was at stake?"
This was a very well attended
event. It could be the start of
many citizens awakening and
getting involved politically at
the grass roots level. One thing
this event proved is that you
are definitely not alone in your
conservative beliefs. The Tea
Party coalition has stated that
they will remain in place and
stay involved in organizing.
Stay tuned
Gordon McCleary
Crawfordville


Newspapers in 2009
"Our calling was never enrich the lives of thousands
more important. We have the of people every day."
capacity to inform, to enlight- Frank Batten, retired chair-
en, to awaken and to inspire, man of Landmark Commu-
We have the opportunity to nications


thoughts on how to deal with
life's day-to-day challenges.
Now you might ask, what
has all this got to do with jour-
naling, staying the course and
those 'mini-trips' that side track
me along the way? At Men's
Fraternity of Wakulla, we do
more than just get together to
talk. There are outside projects
that we participate in by help-
ing folks in the community
which helps us fellowship and
get to know each other better.
It's that comradery that allows
us to share what we're feeling
and support each other.
That's where the coordina-
tor comes into place. Someone


has to coordinate those proj-
ects, make contacts, order ma-
terials and set up dates, attend
meetings and coordinate with
agencies to procure contact
names and funding for those
projects.
I welcome your thoughts
and comments. Please reply
to MensFraternityofWakulla@
byHISgrace.cc. For more infor-
mation about Men's Fraternity
of Wakulla visit our website:
www.byhisgrace.cc/mensfra-
ternityofwakulla or call 850-
508-2560.
Steve Smith is coordinator
for the Men's Fraternity of
Wakulla in Crawfordville.


For online community calendar
visit www.thewakullanews.com
and click on calendar.

WEEK IN WAKULLA

Thursday, April 23, 2009
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB meets at Posey's Up the Creek
in Panacea at noon.
GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP, offered through Big Bend Hospice,
will meet at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.
MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA, a fellowship of men
who gather to share and support one another in the quest
for authentic manhood, meets "outback" (behind) Corner-
stone Ministries at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call at
508-2560.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.
TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL meets at the Wakulla
Welcome Center in Panacea at 8:30 a.m.
VFW BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road
from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Friday, April 24, 2009
AA meets at the American Legion Building next to the
Women's Club in Crawfordville with an open meeting at
8 p.m. There are also open meetings
* ALZHEIMER'S SUPPORT GROUP meets at the senior center
at 1:30 p.m.
FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public
library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa's Episcopal
Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
PICKING' 'N' GRINNING' JAM SESSION will be held at the
senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
SENIOR CENTER DANCE will be held at the center from
7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Admission is free.
Saturday, April 25, 2009
CASINO FUN NIGHT, a fundraiser for the Wakulla Gridiron
Club, will be held at the senior center beginning at 6 p.m.
with the Las Vegas-style casino opening at 7 p.m. Tickets at the
door are $15 per person, $20 per couple, which covers admission,
drinks and snacks, and money to play games. For more information,
call Andy Messer at 509-3912 or Jack Cooper at 590-5517.
CRAWFORDVILLE ELEMENTARY SPRING FESTIVAL will be
held at the school from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. The event will
feature hay rides, slides, a dunking booth and more.
KIDS FISHING TOURNAMENT will be held with boats
leaving Port Panacea Marina from 7 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. and
weigh-in at Woolley Park in Panacea from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordville
Highway at 5 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.
Sunday, April 26, 2009
MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA meets at First Baptist
Church of Crawfordville at 7 p.m.
Monday, April 27,2009
COUNTY COMMISSION WORKSHOP, to discuss the
Economic Development Council and the Tourist
Development Council, will be held in the commission
boardroom at 5 p.m.
SAVVY SENIOR, a monthly outreach program through
Capital Health Plan, will be held at the senior center at
10:30 a.m. The program will be about colon screening.
Tuesday, April 28, 2009
BOOK BUNCH, for pre-school and home school families,
meets at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP meets at the senior center at
12:45 p.m.
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordville
Highway at 7 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.
VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW
Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Wednesday, April 29, 2009
AA meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.
BEADING CLASSES will be held at the senior center from
1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Cost is $5.
BOOK BABIES, for infants and toddlers, will be held at the
public library at 10:30 a.m.
BOOK NOOK, for children in grades K-5, is 10:30 a.m. and
1 p.m.
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior citizens center
at 10:30 a.m.
GUIDING GOOD CHOICES Parenting Workshop will be held
at the public library at 6 p.m. and the following four
Wednesday. The program helps parents develop the skills
to help their children, ages 9 to 14, with the transition to
adolescence. For information, contact Kate Jensen at 566-528A.
LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.
WILD BOOKMOBILE will be at Summer Trace in Panacea
from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.


Letters Policy
The Wakulla News welcomes your letters, but we request
that you adhere to the following guidelines:
Letters should not be longer than 300 words,
They must include the writers name, home address and
telephone number. (Only name and town will be listed: the
reast is used solely for the purpose of verification.)
Writers may be limited to one letter per month, depend-
ing upon space limitations.
With very few exceptions, anonymous letters will not
be published.
Letters can be sent via mail or e-mail to kblackmar@
thewakullanews.net), or they can be dropped off at our
Crawfordville Highway office. The Wakulla News reserves
the right to edit all letters.


Qbte Vakulla a0635
The Wakulla News (USPS 644-640) is published weekly at
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla
News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
General Manager: Tammie Barfield........................ tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Editor Keith Blackmar........................................kblackmar@thewakullanewsnet
Reporter William Snowden................................ wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey..................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net
Bookkeeping: Sherry Balchuck ..........................accounting@thewakullanews.net
Classifieds/In House Sales: Denise Folh..............classifieds@thewakullanews.net
Circulation: Gary Fazzina................................... circulation@thewakullanews.net

Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable
one year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $26 yr. $14.50 1/2 yr., Out of County $35 yr. $19 1/2 yr.
Out of State $40 yr. $22 112 yr..








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009 Page 3A
-- -


More Letters to the Editor


Kessler is not polarizing


Editor, The News,
The Wakulla News has
taken another gratuitous op-
portunity to claim that Com-
mission Chairman Howard
Kessler, "...has proved polariz-
ing." (see "Code Enforcement",
April 16 The Wakulla News).
It is more accurate to say
that Dr. Kessler has consis-
tently been a voice of reason
and principle on issues that
are dear to the hearts, well
being and pocketbooks of
Wakulla's citizens. To imply
that he is the force driving
competing interests away
from common ground is un-


fair and false.
Of course, some issues de-
bated in the national, state, or
local political arenas do prove
to be polarizing. However, a
newspaper is not really pro-
viding much "news" by simply
re-typing and disseminating
he-said, she-said arguments
while labeling people as di-
visive. There may indeed be
two sides to any issue, but
it doesn't follow that truth
is equally shared between
them.
Instead of taking the low
road and casting blame to-
ward the most visible target


(Howard Kessler), The Wakulla
News should consider serving
the people better by conduct-
ing independent investiga-
tive journalism that seeks to
uncover the true facts behind
contentious issues important
to your readers.
Give us your opinion if
you wish on the Opinions
page. !
Elsewhere, stick to the
pertinent facts and critical
analyses. Then you can leave
the name calling up to us, the
well informed citizenry.
Michael Keys
Mysterious Waters


2: 27
Gulf State Bank Relay For Life tent was the pirate movies.


Thank you to our friends, family

Editor, The News: brought to the house has sustained us. Wakulla County Relay event


The family of Bonnie Lou
Lindsey would like to thank
friends and neighbors for
the many acts of kindness
through her illness and death.
The prayers, visits, cards and
the food that have been


Editor, The Newss
SThis year's Worm Gruntin'
Festival was the best one of
the nine we have had. The
festivals are organized by a
small group of volunteers,
the Sopchoppy Preservation
and Improvement Associa-
tion (SPIA), and proceeds are
used in partnership with the
city on projects such as the
restoration of the Whaley
Cabin in Myron B. Hodges
City Park. Our success is due
to the generous hard work'
by our many volunteers, the
colorful gruntin' demonstra-
tion by Gary Revell, this year's
King, popular local football
hero, Jim Tartt, the terrific
entertainment provided by
mostly local (by that I mean
Sopchoppy) musicians and a
few from elsewhere, the huge
array of artists, crafts people,
food vendors, plus our ever
popular T-shirts. And we had
terrific weather for the first
time in years.
There were several indi-
cators prior to the festival
that, given good weather, this
would be our best one. For
example, we expected this
year's shirt might be our most
popular because of the beau-
tiful design by Joan Matey
and sure enough, Sister's An-
tiques, our local retail outlet,
reported that pre-festival sales
were brisk and that the first
purchaser was a vacationing
Englishman. And one morn-
ing I was startled by a call
from a Texas radio station that
started the conversation with
"You're on the airl" Basically,
they wanted to know "What in
the world is worm grunting"
and "where is Sopchoppy"
and "what is this festival'
with lots of chuckles on their
end. And during festival week
I was interviewed by e-mail
reviewed? ) for an article on
worm grunting for a French
scientific magazine. Then,
Wednesday, I was called by'
CBS News, specifically Steve
Hartman's staff, who was con-


greatly touched us.
Bonnie will be greatly
missed by her family and
friends but the consideration
of people who reached out to
us as a family at this difficult
time has comforted us and


sidering coming down to tape
a segment of "Then and Now"
for the Friday night newscast.
Until then I couldn't imagine
the words "Sopchoppy Worm
Gruntin' Festival" spoken by
Katie Couric but they were,
twice Have we arrived or
what?
Our festival has an eco-
nomic impact. Our local res-
taurants and most shops have
record sales that day. Local
musicians benefit as does
From the Heart Recording
Studio for their state of the art
sound equipment and Mon-
day night radio program. Party
Tents and More and Howdy's
get a piece of the action as
well. And let's not forget The
Wakulla News, WFSU, Oyster
Radio, print and sign shops,
trophy shops, and others. We
also hire a handful of people
to help us set up and tear
down plus provide security.
We had 70 arts and crafts
vendors, food vendors, exhibi-
tors, and children's train rides
and rock climbing games. We
provide a great opportunity
for the Iris Garden Club for
their spring sale. Several lo-
cal churches raise money for
their programs and Buddy
Wells was out there register-
ing voters. And I know that
we put heads in beds, as they
say, at the Inn at Wildwood
plus local campgrounds are
usually full.
For the people who come
to the festival I think the kids,
parents, and grandparents get
'the most out of the day. This
begins with the Worm Grun-
tin' Contest. In recent years we
have been embarrassed by the
lack of worms the kids would
find despite 30 to 40 minutes
of hard work. So, this year we
focused on making certain
that there would be worms. As
always we seeded the grounds
with worms collected by Gary
Revell but upped the count
to 1,500. We spread manure,
fed them with corn meal and
coffee grounds, covered the


A special thank you to the
Rev. Dennis Hall and Rev.
Henry Jones for the touching
service.
The family of Bonnie Lou
Lindsey
Crawfordville


ground with straw to retain
moisture, and prayed to the
worm god. And it worked
There were a record number
of worms captured and we
gave cash prizes to nine kids
from about 4 years old and
up. There was the hula hoop
contest and for adults the
horseshoe championship.
Plus, we offered great music
from 10 a.m. until 10 p.m.
non-stop.
All-in-all it was a fantastic
day and we owe a lot to the
many volunteers, too many to
be mentioned in this letter.
When I try to come up with a
short list of those who really
gave their all, I don't know
where to draw the line and I
am afraid I will do more harm
than good. But, I will mention
one. Nelson Martin, who gives
up days of paid work to be
the go to guy for any problem
that comes up. We will post
a complete list on our web
site, Wormgruntinfestival.
com. We also want to thank
The Wakulla News for giving
us terrific coverage with two
lengthy articles and the vari-
ous web sites for adding us
to their calendars. I also want
to thank the Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office for their sup-
port helping with security and
controlling parking.
Lastly, here is a special
thank you to the Sopchoppy
Grocery and Sopchoppy Hard-
ware who are forced to grin
and bear it. Many of their
regular customers avoid shop-
ping that' day to avoid the
congestion. We thank these
businesses for their patience
and hope that it balances out
for the month. And in addi-
tion, thank you to any other
Sopchoppy residents who may
have been inconvenienced
by the cars parked anywhere
there was room. ,
P.S. T-shirts are still avail-
able at Sister's Antiques.
Bill Lowrie
Sopchoppy


raises more than $30,000


The 2009 Wakulla County Re-
lay for Life committee brought
together cancer survivors and
caregivers, corporate sponsors,
and community participants
for an 18 hour Oscar-themed
event on the Wakulla High
School track April 17 and April
18. Event Chair Dalynda Vause
explained that the O.S.CA.R.S
theme stood for "Outstanding
Survivors, Caregivers and Relay
Supporters." Teams decorated'
their campsites to represent
movies including Pirates of,
the Caribbean, Beauty and the
Beast, Steel Magnolias; Willy
Wonka and the Chocolate
Factory, Superman, Disney's
Ratatouille, and Nacho Libre,
among other crowd-pleasing
cinematic favorites,
The 2009 Wakulla County
Relay for Life raised more
than $30,000 for the American
Cancer Society. The Relay com-
mittee would like to recognize
and thank the following major
corporate sponsors:
Major Corporate Sponsors
Wakulla Bank Stage Spon-
sor
Progress Energy Bronze
Sponsor
Ameris Bank Sponsor
Wakulla County School
Board Bronze Sponsor
Team Contest Winners
Best Team Campsite -
Wakulla Bank (Willy Wonka
and the Chocolate Factory)
Runner Up Gulf State Com-
munity Bank (Pirates of the
Caribbean)
Second Runner UP Cure
Seekers (Beauty and the
Beast)
Best Team Costumes St.
Elizabeth Ann Seton/Links in
Life (Monty Python)
Runner Up Cure Seekers
(Beauty and the Beast)
Second Runner Up Gulf
State Community Bank (Pirates,
of the Caribbean)
Best Team Cuisine Wakulla
Bank (Willy Wonka and the
Chocolate Factory)


2009 Cancer Survivor
Shalyn Estes


Runner Up River of Life
Church (Walk of Fame)
Second Runner Up Wakul-
la High School Rotary Interact
Club (Nacho Libre)
This year, the American
Cancer Society built on the
Relay for Life theme by add-
ing the message "Celebrate,
Remember and Fight Back."
Participants, whether young
or old, survivor, caregiver or
supporter had the opportunity
to celebrate the lives of those
diagnosed with cancer who
have won their victory over
the disease. They had time to
remember the loved ones and
friends who have lost their
battle. They were given the
opportunity and the challenge
to Fight Back against cancer by
raising money t' help fund
research to help in the battle
to find a cure for this dreaded
disease that affects more lives
every year.
Relay for Life is a, national
American Cancer Society event
that began in 1985 in Tacoma,
Wash. as as the City of Destiny
Classic 24-Hour Run Against
Cancer.
In 2009, the American Can-
cer Society celebrated "25
years of hope" and 315 million
participants in Relay for Life
events in the United States


and around the globe since
the original 1985 Relay for
Life event in Tacoma. Wakulla
County began hosting a local
Relay for Life eight years ago.
The 2009 chair Dalynda Vause
took a moment after the dos-
ing ceremonies to express her
appreciation for everyone who
has helped Relay to thrive and
grow in Wakulla over the past
eight years,
"I would like to thank each
and every person who par-
ticipated in our event this
year including the survivors,
caregivers, relay walkers and
sponsors," she said. "Our com-
mittee couldn't have been
successful without the team
effort of everyone involved.
I would like to give a special
thank you to our committee,
some are new to relay this
year and others have been
involved since our first relay
8 years ago. It just gets better
every year."
All 2009 Relay for Life par-
ticipants are invited to the
Community Wrap-Up Celebra-
tion on May 14 at 7 p.m. in
the Wakulla Bank Community
Room. For more information,
contact Dalynda Vause at 926-
'711. 'The Relay for' Ife com-
mittee will also be accepting
Early Bird Registration applica-
tions for the 2010 event
Early Bird Information: To
Sign Up for the 2010 Relay For
Life of Wakulla, please call
Rebecca Parrish at 329-4545'or
e-mail rebecca.parrish@cancer.
org. All Early Bird Teams will
receive a gift for register-
ing early. Registration Fee is
$100.
There were 238 registered
participants with the Relay For
Life, this does not include the
general public who attended.
Money raised: more than
$30,000.
Survivors registered: 54.
Number of teams regis-
tered: 33. Photos by Sherry
Balchuck.


WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSIONERS' SCHEDULE FOR
WORKSHOPS, PUBLIC HEARINGS, & MEETINGS
2009 CALENDAR.
(To be held in the Commission Chambers)


April 20, 2009
April 21, 2009



April 21, 2009
April 21, 2009

April 27, 2009


April 28, 2009

May 5, 2009

May 5, 2009
May 19, 2009
May 19, 2009
May 28, 2009
June 2, 2009
June 2, 2009
June 9, 2009


Educational Workshop on Sewer/Septic
Workshop: To Discuss a Proposal for
the Acceptance of the American Recovery
& Reinvestment Act of 2009 Weatherization
Assistance Program Grant Funding
Regular Board Meeting
Public Hearing To Adopt the Proposed
Comprehensive Sewer Ordinance
Workshop: To Discuss the Economic
Development Council & the Tourist
Development Council
Regional Government Springshed Meeting
Wakulla Springs Lodge
Workshop: To Facilitate Board Discussion
with the Parks & Recreation Board
Regular Board Meeting
2nd Budget Development Workshop
Regular Board Meeting
Town Hall Meeting Senior Center
Workshop to Discuss Hurricane Preparedness
Regular Board Meeting
3rd Budget Development
Workshop Operating-Budget


5:00 PM.
5:00 P.M.



6:00 P.M.
6:00 P.M.

5:00 P.M.
to 7:00 P.M.

10:00 A.M.
to 2:30 P.M.
5:00 PM.

6:00 P.M.
5:00 PM.
6:00 P.M.
6:00 P.M.
5:00 P.M.
6:00 P.M.
5:00 PM:
to 8:00 P.M.


All Workshops, Public Hearings and Commission Meetings are open to the
public. Wakulla County does not discriminate on the basis of race, color,
national origin, sex, religion, age or handicapped status in employment or the
provision of services. Handicapped individuals may receive special
accommodations with one working day's notice as per section 286.011(6) F.S.
If special accommodations are required, please call Debbie DuBose, Executive
Assistant to the County Administrator at (850) 926-0919. April 23, 2009


Giving thanks to the worm gods


ALLYOU CANEAT







Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009


Obituaries-


Beverly J. Brake
Beverly Jane Brake, 80, of
Tallahassee died Friday, April
17 in Tallahassee.
Graveside services were
held Tuesday, April 21 at Whid-
don Lake Cemetery.
Survivors include two sons,
Andrew Reeves and Stephen
Stoudinger; and two daugh-
ters, Gayle Reeves and Bonnie
Folk.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.

Edna L Buscarini
Edna L Buscarini, 84, of Tal-
lahassee died Monday, April
20 in Margaret Dozier Hospice
House at Big Bend Hospice.
The graveside service was
held Wednesday, April 22 at
New Hope Cemetery in Tal-
lahassee. Memorial contribu-
tions may be made to: Big Bend
Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center
Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308.
A native of Leon County,
she was and a longtime resi-
dent of Summerfield, N.J. She
moved to the area from New
Jersey 28 years ago.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Ozzie Buscarini of Craw-
fordville; two sons, Daniel
Buscarini of Tavares and James
K Buscarini of Syracuse, N.Y.; a
daughter, Patricia Hubbard of
Boulder Creek,. Calif.; a sister,
Pansy Vause of Richmond, Va.;
five grandchildren: and six
great-grandchildren.
Bevis Funeral Home is Tal-
lahassee was in charge of the
arrangements.

Dorothy C. Davis
Dorothy C. Davis, 81, of
Chipley died on April 15 in
Chipley.
Services were held at Peel
Funeral Home in Bonifay and
interment was at Caryville City
Cemetery in Caryville. Rev.
Rodd Jones officiated.
She was one of 12 children
born to John and Allie Craw-
ley in Georgia. all of whom
preceded her in death; in ad-





Catholic Ci
Mass 9 a.m. Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Father lames MacGee, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
926-1797


Trinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from;WHS
Web site:
Lutheransonline.comtrinityofwakulla
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Vicar Bert Matlock
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557

Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
W Crawfordville
Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey
R "Cfi A H Un ll mt V
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School..................... 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship ................. 11 a.m.
Evening Worship.......................6 p.m
Wednesday Service.................7p.m.
& Youth Service..................7 p.m.
Royal Rangers.......................7 p.m.
M issionettes ........................... 7 p.m.

Wakulla United
Methodist Church
Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30
Sunday School for ll ages 10 am.
Sunday Worsip 11 a.m.
Wdt ic.dIy Str ,c-7 7p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Walulla Station
421-5741
Pater Jane Harty Rinbehart


edition to her husband William
P. Davis.
Survivors include two
daughters, Gloria Sanders
and Junior of Sopchoppy, and
Debbie Harrison of Caryville;
five grandchildren, Johnny
Brown and Stacy of Panacea,
Jason Brown and Kela and
Michelle Sanders and David
of Sopchoppy, Brandi Harrison
of Cottondale, and Melissa
Peterson of Vernon; and five
great-grandchildren.
Peel Funeral Home in Boni-
fay was in charge of the ar-
rangements.

Bernice H. Donaldson
Bernice-H. Donaldson, 66,
of Crawfordville died Saturday,
April 11 in Tallahassee.
;The funeral service was
held Saturday, April 18 at
Pilgrim Rest Primitive Bap-
tist Church in Crawfordville,
with burial at Pilgrim Rest
Cemetery. A lifelong resident
of Crawfordville, she was a
member of Pilgrim Rest P. B.
Church and sang in the church
choir. She was a retired nurse's
assistant at Wakulla, Manor
(now Eden Springs), and was a
member'ofthe Wakulla County
Choir Union and served as the
financial secretary. Survivors
include three sons, Kelvin Don-
aldson and Christine, Anthony
Donaldson and Kimberly and
Farrah Donaldson: three step-
sons, Paul Donaldson, Keith
Donaldson and Carla, and Joe
Jones and Carol; three step-
daughters, Leshia Donaldson,
Angela Owens and Charles and
Wanda Taylor and Lawrence;
a brother, Cephus Harvey and
Joan; three sisters, Josephine
Greene, Dorothy Ford and Em-
mett and Olivia Harvey; nine
grandchildren and a. host of
other relatives and friends.
Strong & Jones Funeral
Home in Tallahassee was in


charge of the arrangements.

Patrick L Hilliard
Patrick L. "Pat" Hilliard, 63,
of Crawfordville died Sunday,
April 5, at his home.
The family received friends
at the Christian Worship Cen-
ter on Thursday, April 9 and
graveside services followed at
the Bonnett Pond Cemetery
with Rev. Stevie Taylor and
Rev. Charles Revell officiating.
He was a native a Racine,
Wis. and served in the U.S.
Navy. He was a heavy equip-
ment operator for Wakulla
County;
Survivors include his wife,
Annette Harrell Hilliard of
Crawfordville; a daughter,
Ronnette Montgomery of Bain-
bridge, Ga.; a son, Rod Cruse
and Jenni of Crawfordville;
four grandsons, Michael T.
Cruse and Haley, Jamen Taylor,
Austin Cruse, and Trevor Cruse;
and a great-granddaughter,
Adyson Grace Cruse.
ICS Cremation and Funeral
Home of Lake City was in
charge of the arrangements.

Nevaeh D. L Johnson
Nevaeh Destiny-Lynn John-
son, the infant daughter of
Catherine Lynn Johnson and
Acie Langston, Jr. of Crawford-
ville, died Friday, March 27, in
Tallahassee.
She is survived by a sister
and a brother, Kaia Renee
Johnson and Kaden Carl John-
son, both of Crawfordville;
her maternal grandparents,
Carlton Johnson and Heather
Johnson of Crawfordville; and
her paternal grandparents, Acie
Langston, Sr. and Olivia Langs-
ton of Crawfordville.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.


----- ---- -
- Crawfordville, United

SMethodiset Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11:00 am.
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 926-7209
Ochlcone & Aran Rad 'Come Gr ow Wt Us'w www.crawrordville-me.org


6/~cove,~(Z


Olivia H. MacRostie
Olivia High MacRostie, 85,
of Crawfordville died April 19
of multiple myeloma.
The funeral service was
held on Wednesday, April 22
at Crawfordville First Baptist
Church with burial in Craw-
fordville Cemetery.
A native of Blountstown,
she was one of seven children
of B.C. and Ina Lee Cox High;
and raised in Crawfordville.
She attended Andrew College
in Cuthbert, Ga., and during
World World II met and mar-
ried Don MacRostie, who was
stationed in the Tallahassee
area. She was an active mem-
ber of the Order of the Eastern
Star and Daughters of the Nile,
and a member of First Baptist
Church of Crawfordville.
Survivors include her sister,
Josie Lee Daniel and John H.,
two brothers, James M. High
and JoAnne, and Daniel P. High
and Ruth, all of Crawfordville;
three children, Don MacRostie
and Nicki of Athens, Ohio,
Linda Hill and Michael of Ches-
terton, Ind., and Judy Dwyer
and Michael of Longwood, Fla.;
and 10 grandchildren and eight
great-grandchildren.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.

James E. Stansbury, Jr,
James Edward Stansbury,
Jr., 97, of Petersburg, Va. died
on Thursday, April 16.
Masonic rites were held
April 17 at the Petersburg
Chapel of J.T. Morriss & Son
Funeral Home & Cremation
Service. A graveside service
with full military honors was
held Saturday, April 18 at
Southlawn Memorial Park. In
lieu of flowers, memorial con-
tributions may be made to the


Panacea Park

Baptist Church
24 Missiu Rald, Puacea
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Worship 11 a...
Wed. Prayer meeting 7 p.m.
Pastor, Jerry Spears


SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Moiing \YWrshin 11:00 a m


Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Discipleship Training 7:00 p.m.

First Baptist Church WEDNESDAY
CRAWFORDVILLE Fellowship Meal 6:00 p.m.
3086 Crawfordvflle Hwy. (call for reservations)
(South of the Courhouse) Children's Events 6:30 p.m.
Church Office: 926-7896 Student Worship 7:00 p.m.
www.fbcc.embarqspace.com Prayer/Bible Study 7:00 p.m.


AWANA CLUB 5PM
Evning Worship 6 PM


Wednesday 7 PM Prayer Meetng,
Youth a Children's Programs
Dr. Bill lenkims Paster
David Allen, Associate Pastor/Student Minister
.Realy Andersen, Minister of Music
Jerry Eans, Mile Crouch, Bernie Kemp Musicians

S s HBwy3191Medart,
OEffice 926-5265
E Early Worship 8:30 am.
0 0 Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
[) Morning Worship 11:00a.m.
AWANA 4:00 p.m.
Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mision is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families:
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org


N. Church
1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98
Holy Eucharist
10:30 am
Sunday School Provided
The Reverend Roy Lima
926-1742

1Christ Church
Anglican

Sunday
8:30am Service
9:30am Adult Bible Class
10:30am Children's Class
10:30am Service
Nursery available
Thursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study
Wednesday 6:30 pm Supper and
Children, Youth and Adult Bible Classes
850-745-8412
4340 Crawfordville Highway


National Kidney Foundation,
5001 West Broad Street, Suite
217, Richmond, VA 23230.
Stan was born in King Wil-
liam County., Va. to a well to
do, but restless family. He with
his mom, Edmonia, brother,
Harry and two sisters, Mary
and "Toots" moved from place-
to-place as his father built
canning factories up and down
the eastern seaboard from New
York to Cuba. His father's fate-
ful decision to cash in on the
Florida land boom after World
War I brought Stan to the rural
town of Sopchoppy.
He graduated from OCS as
a new 2LT in 1932 and once
again traveled the country
from Florida to Alaska with
a stop in Texas in 1943 that
resulted in a 66 year marriage
to Mildred.
On a return assignment to
Ft. Bliss near El Paso the family
was joined by a daughter. Next
there was an unaccompanied
detour to the Korean War
where he served honorably
as a petroleum supply officer.
Next it was off to Ft. Lewis,
Wash., Japan, Ft. Lee, Va. and
finally an assignment to Stutt-
gart, Germany where he retired

Sopchoppy
-United
Methodist
Church

Worship II a.m.
Rev. Bill Rhoads
850-962-2511


as a Lt Colonel in 1961. After
that, he returned to the Ft.
Lee area. After completing 20
more years of federal civilian
service, he retired from Ft Lee
at the age of 70 after serving
many years as their chief of the
Plans, Training and Security
Directorate. He is a member of
the Faith Lutheran Parish,
Survivors include his wife of
66 years, Mildred Lpah Stans-
bury; a son, James E. Stansbury
III and Barbara of Waverly, Va.;
a daughter, Linda K. Stansbury
of Greensboro, N.C; a grand-
son, Jeffery Miller aid Jennifer
of Bremerton, Wash.; a grand-
daughter, J. Cristal Crosby and
Blake; five great-grandchil-
dren, Sally and Henry Miller,
Brandbn, Ethan and Zachary
Crosby; a sister, Mary Stans-
bury Butera of Sopchoppy;
sisters-in-law, Helen Stansbury
of Savannah, Ga. and Dorothy
Frey of Los Angeles, Calif.; and
many long time good friends
such as Carl Keller, Jim Nolan,
Dean Angel.

More Church News
on Page 5A



Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 am.
Worship...................10:30 am.
Evening Worship .............5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details,
962-2213


5585 Crawfordville Hwy.
Tallahassee, FL 32305
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S Son of the Late Harold Schweinsberg
Office: 850) 421-72t1 Mobile: (850). 510-3983
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1.







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009 Page 5A


St. Marks


Continued from Page 1A
Those were questions St.
Marks City Commissioners
wrestled with at their meeting
on Thursday, April 9, as the
town's Waterfronts Florida
committee talked about the
possibility of getting a state
grant to purchase some of the
property along the St. Marks
River.
Waterfronts committee
president Billy Bishop has
urged the city commission not
to tear down the building just
yet, contending that Posey's is
a name recognized by travelers
to St. Marks and should be
preserved in some form.
Bishop suggested that for
$500, he could buy plywood
and other materials that
would enable the building to
be sealed against trespassers.
But City Commissioner
Allen Hobbs said he was to-
tally against that, reasoning
that "Once the city starts to
barricade it then the city as-
sumes some liability if some-
thing happens." City Attorney
Charles McMurry advised that
was indeed a possibility.


"Seems to me if the build-
ing is salvageable, then some
investor would come in and
salvage it," Hobbs said.
"John and Daphne don't
seem very interested" in seal-
ing the building, Bishop said.
He noted that the condition
of Posey's was a pretty cear
indication that regular main-
tenance hadn't been done on
the building over the past 40
years.
Additions to the old Posey's
building have been put on at
least twice, including a back-
room and porch.
An inspection by the coun-
.ty building department after
the flood showed that there
was significant water damage
to structural supports. Because
of the extent of the damage,
the building would have to
be brought up to current code
- adding more expense.
'A year or so ago, Beckham
announced that plans were
being made to re-open the
business, but those efforts ap-
parently came to naught.
Waterfronts committee di-
rector Pam Portwood, who is


overseeing the grant applica-
tion to get Florida Communi-
ties Trust money to buy wa-
terfront property, noted" that
Posey's is listed on the Na-
tional List of Historic Sites.
In past meetings, Water-
fronts committee member
Mike Pruitt has suggested
the city consider using the
Posey's name whether the
building is saved or moved or
demolished because of its
value as a recognizable name,
or brand.
Portwood announced that
Riverside Cafe owner Stan
West agreed to consider offers
to sell his property along
with other waterfront prop-
erty owners along the stretch
of the St. Marks River from
Posey's to his property. Port-
wood said that West agreeing
to hear offers from the state
substantially improves the
city's chances of obtaining a
grant.
West and the other owners
are not committed to selling,
only that they will consider a
fair offer. The state will only
pay appraised value, it's up to


property owners to determine
if they want to accept it.
The city's master plan
calls for a riverfront park or
square where boats can dock
and people can picnic, and a
boardwalk that is planned to
ultimately go from up the St.
Marks River around the fort
and up the Wakulla River.
Efforts to remake the town
were in evidence when city
commissioners rejected a pitch
from businessman Charles
Prout who proposed putting
a biomass plant at the site of
the old St. Marks Refinery.
Prout, representing the
South,Florida sugar company
Florida Crystals, said the $50
million plant would have 30
well-paid jobs and the electric-
ity generated could be sold to
the City of Tallahassee, which
has the Purdom Power Plant
on the adjacent property. The
only emission from the-plant
would be steam, Prout said.
Commissioner Hobbs ap-
peared disappointed with
the requirement that 37 to 40
trucks a day would be coming
into the community bringing


yard waste and wood to use
at the plant, in addition to
materials being brought in
on barges.
Mayor Chuck Shields ques-
tioned how Prout expected
the city to give approval for
something on property the
city doesn't own.
St. Marks Refinery is in
bankruptcy with numerous
liens against it. The state De-
partment of Environmental
Protection came in several
years ago and spent millions
of dollars to dean up the con-
tamination on the property
and take down the old stor-
age tanks.
City Commissioner Phil
Canter has been working
with the federal Environmen-
tal Protection Agency trying
to get funding for the city
to perhaps buy the property.
Cantner has promoted the
possibility of using the land
as a solar energy farm.
"Even if we had the proper-
ty, I don't think that's what St.
Marks is looking for," Hobbs
told Prout. "I just wouldn't be
interested in something like


that coming to town."
St. Marks was a quiet fish-
ing village until the 1950s
when Tallahassee built the
Purdom Plant and the refinery
was built. Petroleum storage
tanks were in the center of
town until a couple of years
ago.
Now, the city is trying
to move away from heavy
industry and become a rec-
reational haven. A developer
has proposed building upscale
condominiums on the river a
project the city has stressed
will not be like Carrabelle's
condos that are high-rise and
block the view of the river.
With the downturn in the real
estate market, that project is
on hold.
The city has also heard a
proposal from its Waterfronts
committee to develop a con-
ference center to bring in
business travelers, and would
generate money for support
industries such as restaurants,
hotels, and recreation.


Transportation


Continued from Page 1A
In central Wakulla County,
the traffic volume is 3,000 to
9,000 vehicles per day. Wakulla
has no active railroad lines and
only one public grass landing
strip airport.
Davis explained that the
April meeting was the first
round of public meetings to
update the transportation
plan. The long range plan
addresses 20 years of time
with updates every four years,
she said. "We're looking into
mobility as a whole and we're
looking into the future," she
said.
A second set of public hear-
ings will be held in August or
September and the plan will
go to final public hearings
in 2010. The plan must be


adopted by the CRTPA board
by December 2010.
S"We want to know what
people see as an issue," said
Davis. "In Leon County, people
discussed bicycle safety and
alternative modes of trans-
portation."
The 2010 adopted plan will
be a "~scenario of what the
community looks like in the
future," she added.
CR(TPA and StarMetro have
a brief online survey residents
can complete to give opinions
without having to attend
public hearings. The survey
'is available at www.capitalle-
gacyproject.com. Federal fund-
ing will become available to
implement ideas presented in
the mobility plan, said Davis.
Wakulla County Commis-


sioner Howard Kessler is
the only representative from
Wakulla on the CRTPA. Com-
missioner Mike Stewart is the
alternate.
Stewart called the activities
of the CRTPA "frustrating." His
frustration stemmed from the
lack of representation on the
CRTPA, most of the representa-
tion is from Leon County and
Tallahassee, and the lack of
residents attending the public
meetings to discuss the plan.
"We have no voice where
the money goes and one vote
is nothing," he said. "We've got
to get some help four-laning
Highway 319. At the very least
we need opposing turn lanes
from Bloxham Cutoff down."
Stewart added that StarMetro
bus service to Wakulla County


would reduce the number of
vehicles on the road.
Regionally, the CRTPA esti-
mated the population in the
four county service area at
357,259 people with a 39 per-
cent growth increase between
2005 and 2030 expected.
The average commute time
in the CRTPA service area is
22.7 minutes and 81 percent
of workers are driving to
work alone. In addition, 12
percent carpool, one percent
use public transportation and
four percent use other means
of transportation.
During the past 10 years,
the area labor force has grown
nearly 12 percent putting
additional pressure on the
highways.


More Church News


Obituary
Ronnie T. Williams, Sr.
Ronnie T. Williams, Sr., 52,
of Crawfordville, died Tues-
day, April 14.
The funeral service was
held Wednesday, April 22, at
Mt. Pleasant M. B. Church in
Crawfordville with burial at
the Mt, Olive #1 Community
Cemetery.
He was educated in the
schools ofWakulla County. He
joined the United States Army
in 1977 and served his country
until 1984.
Survivors include his wife,.
Anna T. Williams of Craw-
fordville; a son, Ronnie T. Wil-
liams, Jr.; his father, Clyde Wil-
liams, Sr.; a sister, Carolyn and
Al Donaldson; two brothers,
James and Evelyn Williams
and Willie and Barbara Wil-
liams; an aunt, Georgia Drum-
mond; three uncles, Frank and
Mercedes Williams, Joseph
and Edna Williams, and Trave
and Gladys Williams; a sister-
in-law, Elvira Williams and a
host of nieces, nephews, and
cousins. From Germany: two
sisters-in-law, four brothers-in-
law, and a host of nieces and
nephews.


Worship Homecoming

Center hosts scheduled
A homecoming revival will
barbecue be held at theChristian Wor-
Olki rA~~r q77 r MtI


The Christian Worship Cen-
ter, 3922 Coastal Highway near
Medart, will host a barbecue
dinner fundraiser on Friday,
April 24. Proceeds from the
fundraiser will go toward the
Steve Harrell Sanctuary.
The meal includes chicken
for $7, ribs for $8 or a combo for
$9. The dinners include potato
salad, baked beans, dinner
roll and a slice of pound cake.
To place an order, call 926-6302
or drop by the church.

Free luncheon

will be held
Good News Assembly of God
will host a free luncheon on April
25from 11 am.to 1pan. forthese-
nior citizens of Wakulla County.
This month the church
will have turkey and dressing,
chicken and dumplings, mixed
steamed vegetables, dessert and
refreshments.
The church is located on the
left onemile east of Highway 319
on Highway 267.


sniip center, 3y92 Coastai
Highway, on Sunday, April
26 through Wednesday, April
29.
On April 26, homecoming
dinner will be held on the
grounds. The event speaker
is Rev. Wilbur Reeves of Craw-
fordville. The Sunday morning
service will be at 11 a.m. and
the evening service will be
at 6 p.m. The services will
be at 7 p.m. Monday through
Wednesday. The pastors are
Steve and Malissa Taylor. Ev-
eryone is welcome to attend.

Happenings

Community

baby shower

slated
The public is invited to a
Community-Wide Baby Show'
er hosted by Healthy Start,
The event is open to anyone
interested, pregnant or not.
Children are welcome.


There will be games, prizes,
informational booths, food.
and so much more. In addi-
tion, there will be a speaker
on interconceptional health.
The shower will be held at
First Baptist Crawfordville on
Saturday, May 9 from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. For more informa-
tion, call Mary Westbrook
at 926-3591, extension 139
or Kalle Metcalf at 926-3591,
extension 143.


Eadie to be

at Blue Crab
The Wakulla County Blue Crab
Festival will be held at Woolley
Park in Panacea on Saturday, May
2. The event will begin at 10 arm.
with the Coastal Optimist Club
Parade and conclude with Caitlin
Nicole Eadie as the entertain-
ment headliner.
Eadie plays country and rock
music and more information
about her can be obtained at
www.sonicbids.com/caitlinNi-
coleEadie. Other entertainers
include Harvest Gypsies, Lindsay
Evans and Brett Kelly.


Regatta


Continued from Page 1A
The regatta events include
offshore racing yachts, din-
ghies, catamarans and wind-
surfers. Races are held on both
Saturday and Sunday with
other events for sponsors,
spectators and participants.
On Sunday afternoon there
will be a Parrothead Parade
with boats decorated with
the Jimmy Buffett theme, fol-
lowed by the live auction at
2 p.m. Concessions, dinner
and other entertainment will


be available on Saturday and
Sunday.
Since the inception, the
Stephen C. Smith Memorial
Regatta Foundation, Inc. has
been able to contribute more
than $300,000 in which the
majority stayed in the Big
Bend, area, providing educa-
tional programs and patient
services to area residents.
For additional information,
visit the web site at www.
smithregatta.com or call Jo-
eanne Vesecky at 926-1051.


Animal Control


Continued from page 1A
"I would support that How-
ard, right now" Stewart said,
"if we could take the next
step" and begin working on
solving the problem.
County Administrator Ben
Pingree answered that staff
has been working on the
problem, and asked for the
board to Igive them more
time to bring back a proposal
- perhaps with money from
the Northwest Florida Water
Management District to pay
for improvements.
Commissioner George
Green asked the board to
reconsider its vote on an or-
dinance that established flood
hazard areas in specific sub-
divisions, including Wakulla
Gardens, and set building


elevations at two feet above
the crown of the road.
Builders Tim Bozeman and
Randy Nelson spoke against
the ordinance, which had
been approved at the board's
last meeting on March 17,
complaining that it sought
to impose a "one size fits all"
solution to the problem, .a
Both Bozeman and Nelsobi
argued that the ordiriaktid's
requirements can create ab-
surd results.
Assistant County Admin-
istrator Lindsay Stevens said
the ordinance was merely a
stop-gap, at least for Wakulla
Gardens, until more mapping
of the subdivision is done
and a stormwater plan is in
place.


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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009


WHS tennis team aces district test Lady War Eagles
By KEITH BLACKMAR dominate opponents
Tlacma@he wakulla onne
The Wakulla War Eagle a the
tennis team captured the t LMmA on the diamond


District 2 2A championship at
Tom Brown Park in Tallahas-
see last week. The Lady War
Eagle team did not advance to
the regional competition, but
played well in Tallahassee.
"The boys won districts"
said Coach Theresa Harrell.
"They sure gave me a scare
though. Since the boys were
going into Districts uridefeat-
ed you would have thought
it would have been a smooth
ride. However, the first day my
number one and three singles
lost their second round match
after having a bye in the first
round.
"That set us back a few
points which forced us to win
every match on the second day
in order to win. Wakulla was
tied with Suwannee County at
13 points going into the last
two doubles finals against Su-
wannee and the boys pulled it
off winning both matches."
The top doubles team of
Jared Lowe and Will Harvey
won 6-2; 6-2, and No. 2 doubles
team of Caleb Fisher and Josh
Colman won 6-2, 6-2.


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
After winning eight straight
district contests, the Wakul-
la War Eagle baseball team
dropped the two.final regular
season district games. Rick-
ards beat WHS 8-6 last week
to grab the second seed in the
district behind Wakulla.
Coach Mike Gauger's dia-
mond players finished 8-2 in
district games losing only to
Panama City Bay and Rickards
at home.
Wakulla defeated Florida
High 9-6 before ending the
week with a 7-1 loss against
former district rival Taylor
County.
Wakulla fell to 14-7 overall
and will have one more week
of regular season play before
participating in the district
'tournament at Godby.
"Rickards played really
well," said Coach Mike Gauger.
"We didn't pitch well and we
gave up six runs in the first
two innings. If you give up
six runs early, you're going
to lose."
Rickards scored all of the
Raiders runs on homeruns,


The singles finalist were,
No. 2 Will Harvey, No. 4 Ca-
leb Fisher and No. 5 Travis
Harrell.
"I know Coach Dave Price
would have been so proud of
these boys since he taught
most of them how to play ten-
nis," said Harrell. "I sure am
proud of them. They played
really hard to win this title.
This is the first time since
1996 that the Wakulla boys
tennis team brought home the
district title.


two three run homers and a
two run homerun.
Rance McBratney and An-
tonio Kilpatrick responded
with homeruns for Wakulla.
McBratney was 2-4 with an
RBI and a run scored. Kilpat-
rick was 1-3 with three RBIs.
Austin Lentz was 1-3 with an
RBI and a run scored. Casey
Eddinger was 2-4 while Ryan
Smith and Brock Glover had
hits. Mark Price and Justin
Pichard had hits as well.
Brad Crisp was the starter
and pitched two innings giv-
ing up four hits, five earned
runs and six runs overall.
Rance McBratney pitched two
innings and gave up two hits.
Jose Linton pitched two in-
nings and gave up one hit, one
earned run and two runs over-
all. The three Wakulla pitchers'
combined for 12 strikeouts
with Linton getting six batters
and McBratney four.
Wakulla scored in every
inning except the third against
Florida High. The Seminoles
scored three runs in the bot-
tom of the seventh inning to
make the game dose.
McBratney pitched five


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Wakulla will host the Re-
gional match against the
runner-up of the District 1-2A
competition on Tuesday, April
21 at Wakulla High.
The Lady War Eagles came
in third place behind district
champion Suwannee County
and Rickards. .
All the WHS girls advanced
to the second round singles
except for No. 4 singles player
Kellie Graves who had a hard
and long match against God-
by's No. 4.


innings and gave up five hits
and three unearned runs.
Robbie Coles pitched an in-
ning and gave up three hits
and three runs, two earned
runs, and Shay Barwick added
an inning and didn't give up
anything. The pitchers com-
bined for three walks and five
strikeouts.
"Rance was lights out on
the mound," said Gauger. "We
swung the bat really well.
Florida High is a pretty good
team."
Wakulla did not do much
against Taylor County as the
Bulldogs scored four runs in
the third innings on the way
to victory. Taylor led 5-0 after
four innings.
The War Eagles had only
five hits and a walk in the
contest,
Justin Pichard was 1-2 with
a double. Logan Runyan was
2-3. Rance McBratney had a hit
and a walk and Ryan Smith
also had a hit.
Brad Crisp pitched three in-
nings and gave up six hits and


Please

Recycle


Both girls doubles team
advanced to the second round
and lost.
"They all played the best
they could play," said Harrell.
"I'm very proud of them."
The Wakulla players rep-
resenting the War Eagles
included: Jared Lowe, Will
Harvey, Josh Colman, Caleb
Fisher and Travis Harrell,
Representing the Lady War
Eagles were: Kelsey Harrell,
Jessie Mohr, Katy Parker, Kel-
lie Graves and Shelby Bunce.


four earned runs, five overall.
Jose Linton pitched an inning
as did Blake McGough and
Shay Barwick. McGough gave
up a hit and two unearned
runs,
Wakulla traveled to Lincoln
April 21 and will host Spring-
field Rutherford on April 23.
Robert F. Munroe will come
to Medart for a make-up of a
rained out game on April 24.
The district tournament
will begin April 28 at Godby.
Godby will play East Gadsden
and Panama City Bay will play
Panama City Beach Arnold on
April 28. The winner of the
Godby game will play Rickards
on April 29 and Wakulla will
play the winner of the game
involving the two Panama
City schools. The champion-
ship game will be played on
Friday, May 1.


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Lovestrand signs with
Chipola College
By SCOTT COLLINS
Special to The Wakulla News
The Wakulla Lady War Eagle
fastpitch softball team won
their final two regular season
games and extended their win-
ning streak to 14 games. Their
record is now 18-3 overall and
they remain undefeated in
Class 4A District 2 with a 9-0
record.
When combining their sta-
tistics with their business-like
approach to winning, fans
don't have to wonder why
seventh year Head Coach Tom
Graham seems to be smiling
all the time.
After a mediocre 4-3 start,
the very young Wakulla team
dominated the Big Bend while
playing one of the area's tough-
est schedules.
Wakulla's only senior, Han-
nah Lovestrand, signed to play
collegiate softball at Chipola
Junior College last week and
has been Wakulla's most con-
sistent hitter while playing
third base and shortstop for
the Lady War Eagles this sea-
son.
"Hannah is having a great
year and is excited about
playing at the next level" said
Coach Graham.
On Thursday, April 16,
Wakulla traveled to Madison
and defeated a very good
Cowgirl team behind another
complete game pitching perfor-
mance by Mandy McClendon
who improved her record to 14-
2. McClendon gave up five hits
and two walks while striking
out four over seven innings.
Wakulla was leading'4-3
heading to the top of the sixth
inning when the Lady War
Eagles took control behind a
three run homer by Brooklynn
Tindall and a two run homer
by Sarah Gregory. Wakulla
never looked back and finished
off Madison by a score of 11-3.
Tindall ended up 2-2 with the
homerun and five RBIs. Greg-
ory was 1-3 with her homerun


~wawoysterradioxamn


and two RBIs. Ki Myrick was
3-3, scored four runs with a
double and had a stolen base.
Artigua Kilpatrick was 3-4 with
two RBIs. Hannah Lovestrand
was 2-3 with two doubles and
scored twice. Jessica Wild was
2-3 with a stolen base and a
run scored.
"We needed a tight game
to help prepare us for the dis-
trict tournament" said Coach
Graham.
On Friday, Wakulla finished
up their regular season by
hosting and defeating the Leon
Lady Lions by a score of 10-4.
Sarah Gregory got the win as
she hurled four innings, giving
up no earned runs on one hit
and four walks. Gregory struck
out four batters. Ki Myrick was
4-4 and ended the week an
incredible 7-7 streak.
Hannah Lovestrand was 3-3
with three RBIs. Mandy Mc-
Clendon was 2-2 with a double.
Jessica Wild was 2-3 with a
double and an RBI.
Wakulla has earned a bye
in the district tournament and
will play the winner of Rickards
and Panama City Bay game in
the tournament semi-finals.
All tournament games will be
played in Panama City.
The first round of the tour-
nament was played April 20
and'the Wakulla game was
played April 21. The champi-
onship game will be played
April 23.
Wakulla hopes to continue
the season in the regional
championships beginning
April 28.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009 Page 7A


Hannah I. Creamer and Scotty A. Lolley

Hannah I. Creamer

will marry Lolley


Miiss Ashten M. Lolley an-
nounces the engagement and
upcoming marriage of her
father, Scotty A. Lolley, to Han-
nah I. Creamer of Crawford-
ville. Hannah is the daughter


of Doug and Gwen Creamer.
The wedding will be held
Saturday, May 23 at 2 p.m. at
Medart Assembly of God in
Crawfordville.
A reception will follow.


Bonny and Diane Ison
of Crawfordville celebrated
their 50th anniversary with
a reception by their children
at the Picking Parlour Park
in Crawfordville on April
12.
The couple married in
1959 in Griffin, Ga. They
went to school together and
started dating while attend-
ing the same church.
Their children are Serita
Gay of Apilachicola; Loretta
Barfield of Crawfordville,


Steve Ison of Crawfordville,
and Kathy Farris of Tal-
lahassee. The couple has
nine grandchildren and one
great-grandchild.
Bonny is self-employed as
a painting contractor, Diane
is a homemaker.

GETTHE NEWS
DELIVERED
EACH WEEK!
Call 926-7102


Big Bend
Big Bend Hospice is once
again partnering with Tal-
lahassee Nurseries to host
Spring Fling 2009: Under a
Caribbean Moonl Guests will
enjoy tropically inspired food,
drink and the beat of steel
drums in the lavish gardens of
Tallahassee Nurseries, Thurs-
day, April 30 from 7 P.M. to
10:30 p.m.
"We are thrilled to be part-
nering again with Tallahassee
Nurseries on this event," said
Laura Glenn, Big Bend Hos-
pice Events Coordinator. "The
nursery was so beautiful last
year. I'm sure Paul Brock and
employees will pull out all the
stops this year." Proceeds for
the event will benefit patient
care in all of the counties
served by Big Bend Hospice,
.which includes Wakulla.
Log on to www.bigbend-
hospice.org to purchase tick-
ets online or call 701-1375,
the Big Bend Hospice reserva-
tion line. Tickets are also on
sale at Tallahassee Nurser-
ies, 2911 Thomasville Road.
Recommended attire for the


I Hospice to host 2009 Fling


e
v
e
I


From left, Patti and Rocky Bevis, and Carla Braveman, Big Bend Hospice CEO, and
her husband, Jeff, enjoy last year's Spring Fling at Tallahassee Nurseries. Photo by
Shems Hamilton
evening is dressy casual and Tallahassee Magazine, WCTV ates Advertising.
ralet parking services will be Eyewitness News, Rapid Press, For more information
provided Sponsors of this The Moon, Proctor Honda, please contact Laura Gleni
evening getaway to the is- Beggs Funeral Home, the at (850) 701-1341 or laurag@
ands are Hank 99.9, Q106.1, Krizner Group, Cade & Associ- bigbendhospice.org.


n
n


Census begins address operations


Since March, the U.S. Census
Bureau has been sending out ad-
dress canvassers as apart of early
operations. The workforce has
been walking or driving through
neighborhoods to check that all
addresses are in the database
when the questionnaire is de-
livered in March 2010. This early
operation is vital to ensuring a
complete and accurate count
Many people don't realize
that the Address Canvassing


operation occurs as much as a
year ahead of the official Census
day on April 1, 2010. Address
Canvassing is the first large field
operation for the 2010 Census
and it is designed to identify all
housing units and other living
quarters. Census workers will
use hand held computers with
maps on them to verify and list
structures; including the collec-
tion of GPS coordinates for each
location.


Address Canvassers will not
ask for personal information.
They may need to speak to a
resident to confirm the address,
ask about other living quarters on
the property, etc. Census employ-
ees will never ask for your Social
Security number, any personal
banking information or your
legal status (documented/un-
documented resident).
All information collected by
Address Canvassers and oth-


er Census employees is kept
strictly confidential and can-
not be shared with any other
persons, institutions, agen-
cies or governmental entities.
Each address canvasser will
be equipped with a lap-
top or a hand-held comput-
er. Census workers wear an
official identification badge.
For more information about the
2010 Census visit: www.census.
gov.


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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009


Crawfordville prepares for festival


Crawfordville Elementary
School is hosting its Spring
Festival Saturday, April 25 from
2 p.m. to 6 p.m. There will be
hay rides, giant slides, a dunk-
ing booth with Crawfordville


teachers as the victims, cotton
candy, games, entertainment,
Bingo and Super Bingo with
prizes, food, a silent auction,
and much, much more.
"This will be a day to cel-


ebrate with family and friends efforts," said Principal Angie
and a chance for Crawfordville Walker. "Come join the family
faculty and staff to give a little fun and festivities Saturday,
back to the community and April 25 at Crawfordville El-
parents who are continually, ementary School."
supporting the school and its


New format planned for science fair/expo


The Wakulla County
School District will host
a Science Expo Tuesday,
April 28 from 6:30 p.m. to
8 p.m. at Wakulla Middle
School.


The event will give the
community an opportu-
nity to view the winning
middle school science fair
projects and watch as bud-
ding scientists demon-


state and explain their ration Center. A book fair
experiments, will be held along with an
There will also be dis- awards presentation and a
plays from Gulf Coast Ma- parent/student education
rine Lab, the Mag Lab, and center. The event is open
Science on the Move Explo- to the public.


Track athletes will advance to regionals


The WHS boys and
girls track teams competed
Wednesday, April 15, in the
District Track Meet that was
held at Godby High School in
Tallahassee. Both teams had
solid performances and placed
fifth overall.
"Our overall placing was
okay, but more important was
the number of relay teams and
individuals that we qualified
to move on to the regional
meet next week." said Coach
Paul Hoover. "To qualify for
regionals, the relay teams or
individuals had to finish in
the top four in their event.
Our goal this year was to.
increase the number of our
athletes who get to go to the
next level, and in that respect,
we did well. Last year we had
one relay team and two indi-
viduals qualify, this year we
qualified three relay teams
and five individuals."
The girls qualified in the


4 x 800 meter relay with a
second place finish (Cora At-
kinson, Nora Woodcock, Susan
Hansen and Chelsea Thomp-
son), in the the discus.
Amanda Ricks was fourth
and in the 1,600 meters Syd-
ney Nutting finished fourth.
The boys qualified in the 4
x 800 meter relay and placed
third (Brandon Maloy, Liam
Daniels, Steven Urling and
Adam Carr). In the 200 meters,
Willie Thompson was fourth.
Nickola Shingles placed sec-
ond in the 300 meter hurdles.
In the 3,200 meters, Steven
Urling placed fourth, and the 4
x 400 meter relay WHS placed
second (Nickola Shingles,
Adam Carr, Brandon Maloy
and Willie Thompson).
Coach Hoover commented:
"We expected to-qualify in
most of these events, but the
biggest surprise had to be the
4 x 400 relay team. We haven't
been very competitive in that


event all year, but we kept
playing with the line-up and
trying different combinations
of athletes and I think we
found one that worked! We re-
ally surprised a lot of people,
including ourselves, in that
one. The boys improved their
season best time by more than
seven seconds and finished
ahead of perennially strong
teams from East Gadsden,
Florida High, Rickards and
Madison County.
Nickola also had a great
run in the 300 hurdles. He was
only .46 of a second behind
the winner and broke the 40
second barrier by running
39.99 seconds and recording
a State Elite Time. We were
really proud of the way our
athletes performed and even
more importantly, the way
they have conducted them-
selves this year."
Other athletes placing in
the top eight in their respec-


tive events include:
Caleb Vernon, 6th in
discus; Robert Carroway, 7th
discus; Mariah Vernon, 5th
discus; Amanda Ricks; 5th'
shot put; Willie Thomas, 7th
100 meters; Chelsea Thomp-
son, 6th 1,600 meters; Adam
Carr, 6th 1,600 meters; Rachel
Capps, 8th 300 meter hurdles;
Tevin Edwards, 5th 300 me-
ter hurdles; Norma Wood-
cock, 6th 800 meters; Chelsea
Thompson, 8th 800 meters;
Kendalin Burns, 6th 3,200
meters; Kristie Hodges, 8th
3,200 meters; Liam Daniels,
5th 3,200 meters; girls 4 x 400
meter relay, 6th (Sydney Nut-
ting, Norma Woodcock, Julie
Freeman and Rachel Capps).
The track qualifiers next
compete at the Regional Meet
at Chiles High School in Tal-
lahassee on Friday, April 25,
with the competition begin-
ning at 1 p.m.


Wakulla Springs to host 5K and Fun Run


A 5K Run to benefit.the
Friends of Wakulla Springs
State Park will be held Satur-
day, May 16 at 8 a.m.
The run is a sanctioned
event in conjunction with
Gulf Winds Track Club. This
unique run winds through a
wilderness area of the state
park which is not open to
the general public. Last year's
crowd was more than 200.
There will be a one mile
family run at 8 a.m. and the 5K
Run begins at 8:30 a.m.
Pre-registration ends on
May 13. The fee is $12 in ad-
vance and $15 the day of the
race. For those who want to


run but don't want a T shirt, 1960s. To learn more- about
the fee is $7 for the 5K and $5 donating to the friends, or to
for the one mile run and no become a member, please visit
registration is required. http://www.wakullasprings,
'Runners may register on- .org/projects.html.
line at www.thewakullanews. The sponsors include: The
com by accessing this sports Wakulla News, Microtype
story. Graphics, Tallahassee Maga-
The Friends of Wakulla zine, Wakulla Bank, J.P. Roberts
Springs would like to thank Company, Wakulla Realty, the
the sponsors. Without their St. Marks Refuge Association,
support, the event would not Coastwise Realty, Inc., Publix,
be possible. This year, the Capital Health Plan, Benson's
Friends of Wakulla Springs Heating and Air Conditioning
hope to raise enough money and Wakulla.com.
for the park to refurbish the .For more information con-
four river boats and the four tact Cheryl Creel, 509-7103 or
glass bottom boats that were e-mail cwcreel@embarqmail.
built by Edward Ball in the com. Make checks payable


SJRCC seeks former student athletes


Did you play baseball for
St. Johns River Community
College? Members of the
Viking baseball program, un-
der the leadership of new
head coach Ross Jones, have
declared a new era at SJRCC
- and that new era includes
former student-athletes. Since
the founding of the SJRCC
Athletic Association last fall,
Jones' plans have included
creating a database for its ap-
proximate 500 baseball alumni
along with fundraisirig, barbe-
cues, golf tournaments and
more. "It's important that
members reconnect with their


teammates and share their
personal successes along with
the successes of the depart-
ment," Jones said. "Whether
our alumni played two years
ago or forty years ago, we
hope they will want to stay
in touch."
Jones, a former Texas Rang-
er and coach for the Univer-
sity of Florida and Vanderbilt
University, said the Tindall


It's Our


Field has experienced many
upgrades during the past
few years including lighting
for night games, new batting
cages, bleachers, restrooms
and most recently new locker
rooms.
Interested baseball alumni
should contact Jones at the
Palatka Campus at (386) 312-
4146 or by e-mail at ross-
jones@sjrcc.edu.



rly Home


to FRIENDS OF WAKULLA
SPRINGS (5 K run), 550 Wakul-
la Park Dr., Wakulla Springs,
FL 32327-0390.
Visit wakullasprings.org for
more information.


The Wakulla High School
Gridiron Club will host a Casi-
no Fun Night with all proceeds
going toward the WHS football
program. The event will be held
April 25 at the Wakulla Senior
Citizens Center in Crawford-
ville. Tickets are $10 in advance
for one person or $15 for two.
The cost is $15 for one at the


door and $25 for two at the
door. Finger foods and drinks
will be served. The program is
open to minors and adults.
Doors open at 6 p.m. and ca-
sino activities will be held from
7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Prizes will be
awarded. For more information,.
call 509-3912 or 590-5517.


Klees joins Methodist


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmat@thewakullanews.net
Former Wakulla War Eagle
football quarterback Zach Klees
signed a scholarship to play foot-
ball at Methodist University in
Burlington, N.C. The Monarchs
are a Division IM school that of-
fers scholarship money for both
academics and athletics.
The scholarship signing was
special for WHS Coach Scott
Klees because he had an oppor-.
tunity to coach his nephew for
Zach's senior season.
"He came in for his senior
year and did an unbelievable job
picking up the offense," said the
coach. "He has a good arm."
Zach Klees threw for ap-
proximately 800 yards and six
touchdowns in leading WHS to
the state playoffs. He split time
in the backfield with Casey Ed-


dinger.
Klees said his nephew was "a
great team player" after arriving
from North Florida Christian.
"I will always cherish the op-
portunity I had to coach Zach,"
said Coach Klees. "It meant the;
world to me as a coach."
Klees added that his nephew
was pleased to have the oppor-
tunity to play at WHS after he,
transferred from NFC.
Wakulla will be young in 2009
as Klees is expected to start 15
sophomores against a slate of 10
teams, some of which Wakulla
has not played in years.
The new district includes
Lincoln, Leon and Chiles and
the non-district games include
Florida High, FAMU High, North
Florida Christian, Jefferson Coun-
ty, Taylor County, Fort Walton
Beach and East Gadsden.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009 Page 9A




r d -7orq K


Sheriff's Report


Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office investigators arrested
a 31-year-old Crawfordville
female in connection with a
reported prescription fraud
at the Buckhorn. Pharmacy,
according to Sheriff David
Harvey.
Kimberly Cheri Houck was
charged with passing a forged
or altered instrument after she
allegedly attempted to forge
the signature of one of the vet-
erinarians at Wakulla County
Animal Hospital.
Houck allegedly used the
forged signature to acquire
medications, but left quickly
when the pharmacy employee
began to verify the informa-
tion on the prescription.
The suspect attempted to
secure pills that are not used
for animals despite using the
animal hospital prescription
form. Deputy Ben Steinle
investigated the April 15 case
and the arrest was made April
16.
In other activity reported by
the Wakulla County Sheriffs
Office during the past week,
On April 17, Jody D. Smith
of Crawfordville reported a ve-


hide burglary. A rear window
on a Wakulla County Health
Department van was broken.
Damage was estimated at
$380. Deputy Ryan Muse in-
vestigated.
On April 15, Shasta M.
Stephens of Crawfordville
reported the theft of medica-
tions, cash and sunglasses
from her home. The missing
property was valued at $74.
Deputy Ben Steinle investi-
gated.
On April 14, James E.
Nichols of Crawfordville re-
ported a burglary of his home.
A camera, tools and appli-
ances, valued at $640, were
reported missing. Lt. Ronald
Mitchell investigated.
On April 14, Michael
Groat of Crawfordville report-
ed a fraud as he sent a money
order to a company to get a
loan. The victim never received
his loan money. Deputy Vicki
Mitchell investigated.
On April 15, Sandra L.
Gavin of Crawfordville re-
ported a burglary at her home.
The victim reported the loss
of $1,819 worth of CDs, DVDs,
a purse, coins and jewelry.


Deputy Lorne Whaley inves-
tigated.
On April 16, Victor S. Pur-
vis of Crawfordville reported a
burglary at his home. Jewelry,
valued at $400, was removed
from the home. Deputy Nick
Boutwell investigated.
On April 16, Beverly J.
Webster of Crawfordville re-
ported a residential burglary
as a flat screen television and
entertainment center were
stolen. The property is valued
at $1,800. Damage to the home
following a forced entry was
estimated at $445. Deputy
Scott Powell investigated.
On April 15, Thomas
C. Lewis of Crawfordville re-
ported a residential burglary.
The victim reported the theft
of $4,464 worth of property
including a camera, cash, com-
puter, camcorder, video games,
jewelry and coins. Deputy
Lorne Whaley investigated.
On April 20, four Wakulla
High School students were
arrested and charged with
robbery of another student in
a school restroom. Ethan Kelby
Fletcher, 18, of Crawfordville,
Jashua Juane Hicks, 19, of


Crawfordville, Adam Wesley
Reynolds, 18, of Crawfordville
and a 17-year-old juvenile from
Crawfordville allegedly took
$40 from a 15-year-old victim
from Panacea.
The suspects allegedly set
up a purchase of marijuana
with the victim in the rest-
room. The.suspects allegedly
held the victim down until
he threw two $20 bills on
the floor. Hicks, Fletcher and
Reynolds were transported to
the Wakulla County Jail and
booked on robbery charges.
The juvenile was taken to the
juvenile detention center. Det.
Evelyn Brown and Deputy Billy
Jones investigated.
On April 19, Katie W. Da-
vis of Crawfordville reported
a theft at the Bloxham Cutoff
Stop N Save. The clerk reported
that the lock on the ice cooler
was missing when she opened
the store. An estimated 10
bags of ice were reported miss-
ing along with the lock. The
value of the stolen property
was estimated at $35. Deputy
Vicki Mitchell investigated.
On April 18, Angela N.
O'Neal of Crawfordville re-


Traffic accident kills Crawfordville man


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
A 56-year-old Crawfordville
man died in a Gadsden County
traffic accident Saturday, April
11, according to the Florida
Highway Patrol (FHP).
; The accident occurred ap-
proximately 3.2 miles south
cOf Quincy near Mile Marker
184 at 12:26 a.m.
: Leslie J. Messina was op-
erating a 1998 GMC truck
westbound in the outside
lIne of Interstate 10. For un-
known reasons, Messina was
distracted while approaching
1 1982 loaded log trailer which


was properly parked in the
emergency lane.
Messina's passenger side
collided with the rear section
of the log truck and Messina's
vehicle overturned onto the
roadway'ejecting him. The
crash caused an obstruction
in both westbound lanes, FHP
officials said.
Michael S. Gutshall, 26,
of Patrick Air Force Base was
traveling westbound in the
outside lane when he collided
with Messina's truck.
A commercial tractor
trailer operated by Thomas
Williams 45, of Dothan, Ala.,


also collided with the Messina
truck. The 2001 tractor trailer
jackknifed in the highway af-
ter colliding with the truck.
Messina's truck suffered
$12,000 worth of damage
while the log trailer suffered
$5,000 worth of damage. Mes-
sina was not wearing a seat-
belt. The log trailer was regis-
tered in O'Brien, Fla.
SGutshall was driving a 2008
Pontiac which suffered $8,000
worth of damage. Gutshall
was critically injured and
transported to Tallahassee
Memorial Hospital. He was
wearing a seatbelt.


Williams' tractor trailer suf-
fered $10,000 worth of dam-
age, but he was not injured.
Charges are pending in the
case. FHP Trooper M. Jason
King was the crash investiga-
tor and Corporal T. Chukes
was the homicide investigator.
The Gadsden EMS, Gadsden
County Sheriff's Office, Wa-
tumpka VFD and Quincy Fire
Department assisted the FHP
at the accident scene.


ported a burglary at her home.
The victim was in the pro-
cess of moving and reported
the theft of $1,400 worth of
property. Deputy Ryan Muse
investigated.
On April 18, Julius E. Pear-
son of Blackleaf, Ga. reported
burglaries of four trailers at
his hunting camp. The victim
reported the theft of a shotgun
and boots, valued at $250.
Three other victims are being
notified. A forced entry was
discovered and damage was
estimated at $50. The weapon
was entered in the NCIC/FCIC
computer. Deputy William
Hudson investigated.
On April 21, Jerrett Allen
Lynn, 25, of Crawfordville was
charged with a narcotics felony
after a traffic stop on Highway
267 and Rock Road. Lynn was
observed driving 71 miles per
hour in a 45 MPH zone. During
the traffic stop, Deputy Jeremy
Johnson observed a weapon in


the vehicle and discovered a
crack pipe on Allen and crack
cocaine inside the vehicle. A
Playstation 3 was found in the
vehicle that had been stolen
out of Leon County. Lynn was
charged with possession of co-
caine and possession of drug
paraphernalia. Deputy Matt
Helms also investigated.
On April 18, Kenneth
A. Johnson of Crawfordville
reported suspicious charges
on his debit card. There were
21 Internet charges on the
card which were valued at
$312. Deputy William Hudson
investigated.
The Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office received 770
calls for service during the
past week.
Note to our readers: The
people who are reported as
charged with crimes in this
column have not yet been to
trial and are therefore inno-
cent until proven guilty.


Judge Janet Ferris will retire


SCircuit Judge Janet Ferris
announced that she will retire
fom the bench on June 30.
\ Judge Ferris was elected
tp the court in 1998, and has
served in the felony, civil and
family divisions for the last 10
years. She was also assigned to
Franklin County for two and a
lalf years.
"I have thoroughly enjoyed
serving the people of this cir-


cuit," she said. "Ths has been
the most challenging position I
have held in 30 years of public
service, and it is an extraordi-
nary responsibility. I truly hope
that everyone who has appeared
before me feels that they have
been treated fairly and with re-
spect, and that they have been
heard.
"I will especially miss the
juvenile delinquency docket,"


NOTICE
Change of regular meeting time

City of St. Marks will change
the regular meeting time to 7:30 pm
beginning May 14th, 2009.

The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port
Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone
(850) 925-6224. Persons needing special
Access considerations should call the City
Office at least 24 hours before the date for
scheduling purposes. The Board Office
may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.
April 23, 2009



Soliciting Applications for
Transportation Enhancement Funding
The Capital Region Transportation Planning Agency (CRTPA) is
seeking applications for transportation enhancement projects.
The Federal Transportation Act, known as SAFTEA-LU, contains
funding for projects that strengthen the cultural, aesthetic or
environmental value of the transportation system and includes
the four main project types:
Bicycle and pedestrian projects
Historic preservation related to service transportation
Landscaping and scenic beautification
Environmental mitigation
The CRTPA will be holding two workshop sessions to discuss the
enhancement funding process. The workshops will be held on:
Thursday, April 30
Florida Room, Tallahassee City Hall, 300 South Adams Street
Times: 4:30 p.m. -.5:30 p.m., or 6:00 p.m. 7:00p.m.
Completed applications should be submitted to the CRTPA by
4:30 PM by Wednesday, May 27, 2009. Enhancement project
information and applications are available online at www.dot.state.
fl.us/emo/enhance/how.shtm or may be obtained from the CRTPA
at 408 N. Adams Street, 4th Floor, Tallahassee, FL 32301. For
more information, please contact the CRTPA
at 891-6800. If you have
a disability requiring .' "
accommodations, please '. Tra portatlon Pflnning Apnc
contact the CRTPA at (850)
891-6800, or TDD at 711 P A


Ferris said. "The dedicated pros-
ecutors, public defenders, agen-
cies and court personnel have
made a difficult assignment
very rewarding; and I hope to be
able to address issues related to
children in the future."
As a circuit judge, Ferris was
appointed to numerous com-
mittees of the Florida Supreme
Court, including serving as chair
of the Alternative Dispute Reso-
lution Policy Committee, and as
a member of the Select Commit-
tee on Justice Teaching.


'S


trIVrSTaPs e~Os19TH ANNUAL
, groofyIEaIAV Ru


Sponsored in part by
Eveready Gas
Progress Energy
WCTV6
FairPoint Communications


* Liberty Communications
* Pepsi
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SThe Franklin County Tourist
Development Council


CITY ELECTION NOTICE
The City of Sopchoppy will be holding
elections for three seats on the Sopchoppy
City Council. These seats are held at present
by Martha Evans, Richard Harden and Colleen
Skipper. Any resident who is a registered voter
may qualify as a candidate with the City Clerk.
Qualifying begins April 17, 2009. The last day
for qualifying will be Friday, May 8, 2009 at
NOON. Any resident wishing to qualify should
register with the City Clerk and obtain the
necessary forms. Elections will be held at City
Hall from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m., Tuesday,
June 9, 2009.
For more information, contact City Clerk,
Jackie Lawhon or Deputy Clerk Linda
Langston at City Hall, 100 Municipal Avenue,
Sopchoppy, FL or phone 962-4611.
April 23, 2009






Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009


Windy conditions keep fishermen closer to shore


From The Dock
-- BY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL


Will the wind ever stop
blowing? I thought last year
was bad but this year is start-
ing off even worse. On Friday, I
got up and put on shorts, took
the dog out and turned around
and went back for long pants
and a sweatshirt and was cold
all day on the water. I couldn't
believe it was as cold as it was
-in the middle of April. Besides
that, the water temperature
dropped dramatically and sure
made fishing tough until it
warmed up in the afternoon.
Mike Hopkins at Lanark
said they had quite a few
fishermen on Saturday, but
everyone fished inshore. No-
body has been offshore since
one day last week. The fish
were caught in 45 to 50 feet
of water and all were gags,
no red grouper. Inshore fish-
ing for trout continues to be


St. Marks
Lighthouse keeper/his-
torian Ranger Andy Edel
and his crew of lighthouse
supporters will have the St.
Marks Lighthouse open for
visitors on Saturday, April 25
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
There will be exhibits, liv-
ing history, short programs
and lots of great information
about this beloved historical
landmark. For more informa-
tion, please call the St. Marks


very good with the Gulp and
live shrimp catching most of
the fish. The same old spots
continue to be good as well.
More people are starting to
fish for reds and there are
plenty around the docks. This
week will be perfect for fishing
the docks because of the high
tides. Capt. Gene Strickland
went to West Pass last week
and caught 12 pompano. It was'
so rough last weekend Mike
said nobody even fished the
Dog Island Reef.
Tom Riddle from Tifton, Ga.
was able to get out on Wednes-
day and took six of his busi-
ness associates from Georgia.
He said they fished in four to
six foot seas all day long and
the only time it calmed down
was when they headed in.
Tom said they had their limit
of 14 gags by 10 a,m. and spent


the rest of the day looking for Gary D. fished out of St. Marks
red grouper, but couldn't find and caught their limit of trout
any that were legal. Most of using live shrimp and top wa-
the spots he went to were also ter plugs. They also landed a
covered with red snapper and 24-inch Spanish. Tabitha Mills
he caught them in as shallow and Brandon Stubbs fished
as 32 feet. He said they were with Otto Hough out of St.
fishing a sunken barge and Marks and they managed to
hooked a huge Goliath grou- troll up three nice gag grouper.
per. The next red fish tournament
Tammy at Jerry's Bait and will be Saturday, May 16.
Tackle said they had their On Friday, while I was at
monthly trout tournament Shell Island waiting for the
last Sunday and fishing was shrimp truck to arrive, I talked
pretty tough due to the wind. with Capt. Sid Stringer who I
Keith Cardin and Chuck Cobb had not seen in years. Every
finished in first place with time I go to Shell Island he
five fish weighing 9 pounds, has already left with his party,
8 ounces. Jeff Pettis and Bo but this time he was waiting
Raker came in second with on his party to arrive. Sid said
five fish totaling 8 pounds, 7 fishing had been good and
ounces and Casey Cook and one day he found the trout
Jay Evans finished third with out in about eight feet of wa-
three fish weighing 6 pounds, ter. Sid and I got our Captains
10 ounces. In other reports, licenses at the same time and
Erik and Leif Lundquist fished he is a great guide and a great
near Live Oak Island with bull person. I asked how he had
minnows and live shrimp and been doing and he said fine
caught a 24 and a 23-inch red, for an 80-year-old guy. Sid you
Bob Bouchard, Marty Smith are my hero. I hope and pray
and Jeff Hardison fished out I can still be guiding when I'm
of St. Marks and caught their 80. I'm only 62 and some days
limit of reds and the big- when I get in I wonder if I can
gest was 26 inches long and still be'guiding when I'm 63.
weighed 6 pounds. Gary Z. and For those of you who like


Lighthouse opens on April 25
National Wildlife Refuge at recently rebuilt Cape St. The Florida Lighthouse Asso-
925-6121. George, the newly restored ciation lighthouse specialty
Governor Charlie Crist Crooked River and Cape license plate is available at
has proclaimed April 25 as San Blas lighthouses. These the county tax collector's of-
Florida Lighthouse Day. nine and at least eight of fice. The additional $25 for
Of the 59 historic light- the historic lighthouses not the specialty plate, which
houses constructed in the normally open to the pub- is tax deductible, will pro-
state, 30 are still standing. Of lic, plan special events for vide sustained funding for
the 30 historic lighthouses, April 25. All the lighthouses Florida's remaining historic
nine are open to the public: will be celebrating the new lighthouses. The Florida
St. Augustine, Ponce de Leon Visit Our Lights lighthouse Lighthouse Association will
Inlet, Jupiter, Cape Florida, specialty license tag, which allocate the funds through a
Key West, Boca Grande, the went on sale in December. grant process.


to fish tournaments, there is
one coming up on May 16
and May 17. It is the Reel Pro
Big 4 Offshore Tournament. It
will be held out of C Quarters
in Carrabelle and the species
will be kings, grouper, amber-
jack and Spanish. Basically an
offshore tournament, but with
Spanish as a species, inshore
boats can also participate. For
more information go to www.
big4offshore.com.
We have good tides this
week and fishing-should really
be good. It was tough over the
weekend and we managed to
catch a bunch of fish, but we
really had to hunt them. On
Friday at 5:30, we had three
trout and I told them we
would hit one final place on
the way in. At 6:30, we quit and
had three limits of trout. On
Sunday they didn't really start
biting well until the last of the
falling tide which was late in
the afternoon, but when they
started it was hot. We caught


some big trout for the flats
and some nice Spanish. The
redfishing wasn't as good aa
last week, but we did catch
quite a few and lost some big
ones. Everything was caught
using live shrimp and I think
I caught one fish using the
Gulp. On Thursday afternoon,
I went out for a short while
and they were eating the Gulp
up. I caught fish for about two
hours on almost every cast.
That all changed with the
winds on Friday, Saturday and
Sunday and all they wanted
was shrimp.
One report I left out last
week was from the Moorings
in Carrabelle. Brian Lowe, Vin-
cent Green and Larry Reishel
fished in 65 feet of water and
caught the limit of gag grouper
and also caught three slot size
redfish.
Remember to leave that
float plan with someone and
be careful out there. Good luck
and good fishing


Hunting zones, deer

dates could change


The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission
(FWC) has scheduled six public
meetings throughout the state
to receive input from Florida
hunters on possible changes to
the state's hunting zones and
corresponding deer hunting
season dates.
The FWC wants to solicit as
much public comment as pos-
sible, and everyone is invited.
If changes are approved by the
commission, they could take


effect as early as the 2010-2011
hunting season.
The local meeting will be
held in Tallahassee Wednesday,
June 10 from 6 p.m. to8 p.m. at
the Antique Car Museum, 6800
Mahan Drive, (942-0137).
Meetings will be open-house
type format with FWC staff mak-
ing a presentation, followed by
question-and-answer sessions
with FWC staff, giving hunters
more one-on-one time.


Bradwell Unit open by permit


Due to an abundance
of wild hogs, a number of
hunting opportunities will
be available during the com-
ing, months on the Bradwell
Unit of the Apalachicola
Wildlife Management Area.
The Florid-a Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) has quo-
ta permits available for
hog-dog and still hunts for
May, June and July on the
1,400-acre tract in Liberty
County.
The FWC set the hog-dog
hunts for nighttime hours
on May 1 to May 3, June 5.
to June 7 and July 3 to July
5. It will issue three quota
permits for each three-day
hunt. Permit holders can
bring along one guest. The
permit holder and guest are
limited to one firearm.
Dogs of any size or breed
are allowed, with a maxi-
mum of three dogs per
permit holder.
The FWC set daytime le-
gal still hunting for May 15
to May 17, June 19 to June
21 and July 17 to July 19. It
will issue up.to six permits
for each still hunt. Permits


Get The

News

Every


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are transferrable.
Anyone interested in ap-
plying for the May, June or
July hunts can do,so begin-
ning April 21 at 10 a.m. EDT
through the Tothl Licens-
ing System at county tax
collector's offices or online
on a first-come, first-served


basis. The FWC's Managed
Hog Hunt worksheet has
more information about the
hunts. Go to the Hunting
section of MyFWC.com.
The agency will hold
subsequent drawings start-
ing in June for August and
September,hunts. See the


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009 Page 11A
I


850-224-4960


www.fsucu.org


~ MORTGAGES -FREE CHECKING ~ AUTO LOANS ~ CREDIT CARDS


Gulf Coast Weekly Almanac


L J Tide charts by
Zihua Software, LLC

St. Marks River Entrance


Date High Low High Low
Thu 3.3 ft. 0.9 ft. 3.6 ft. -0.2 ft.
Apr 23, 09 2:00 AM 7:39 AM 1:38 PM 8:19 PM
Fri 3.5 ft. 1.0 ft. 3.8 ft. -0.6 ft.
Apr 24, 09 2:44 AM 8:11 AM 2:03 PM 8:57 PM
Sat 3.5 ft. 1.2 ft. 4.0 ft. -0.8 ft.
Apr 25, 09 3:27 AM 8:43 AM 2:30 PM 9:36 PM
Sun 3.5 ft. 1.3 ft. 4.2 ft. -0.9 ft.
Apr 26, 09 4:11 AM 9:15 AM 3:01 PM 10:18 PM
Mon 3.3 ft. 1.5 ft. 4.3 ft. -0.8 ft.
Apr 27, 09 4:56 AM 9:49 AM 3:35 PM 11:04 PM
Tue 3.1 ft. 1.6 ft. 4.2 ft. -0.6 ft.
Apr 28, 09 5:45 AM 10:26 AM 4:14 PM 11:54 :PM
Wed 2.9 ft. 1.7 ft. 4.0 ft.
Apr 29, 09 6:40 AM 11:09 AM 4:58 PM


Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 2.5 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.7 ft. -0.2ft.
Apr 23, 09 1:52 AM 7:50 AM 1:30 PM 8:30 PM
Fi '2.6 ft. 0.7 ft. 2.9 ft. -0.4 ft.
Apr 24, 09 2:36 AM 8:22 AM 1:55 PM 9:08 PM
Sat 2.6 ft. 0.9 ft. 3.0 ft. -0.6 ft.
Apr 25, 09 3:19 AM 8:54 AM 2:22 PM 9:47 PM
Sun 2.6 ft. 1.0 ft. 3.1 ft. -0.7 ft.
Apr 26, 09 4:03 AM 9:26 AM 2:53 PM 10:29 PM
Mon 2.5 ft. 1.1 ft. 3.2 ft. -0.6 ft;
Apr 27, 09 4:48 AM 10:00 AM 3:27 PM 11:15 PM
Tue 2.3 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.2 ft.
Apr 28, 09 5:37 AM -10:37 AM 4:06 PM
Wed -0.5 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.3 ft. 3.0 ft.
Apr29, 09 __ 12:05 AM 6:32 AM 11:20 AM 4:50 PM


April 23 -April 29


City of St. Marks


Date High Low High Low High
Thu 3.1 ft. 0.8 ft. 3.4 ft. -0.2 ft.
Apr 23, 09 2:36 AM 8:43 AM 2:14 PM 9:23 PM
Fri 3.2 ft. 0.9 ft. 3.6 ft. -0.5 ft.
Apr 24, 09 3:20 AM 9:15 AM 2:39 PM 10:01 PM
Sat 3.3 ft. 1.1 ft. 3.7 ft. -0.7 ft.
Apr 25, 09 4:03 AM 9:47 AM 3:06 PM 10:40 PM
Sun 3.2 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.9 ft. -0.8 ft.
Apr 26, 09 4:47.AM 10:19 AM 3:37 PM 11:22 PM
Mon 3.1 ft. 1.3 ft. 4.0 ft.
Apr 27, 09 5:32 AM 10:53 AM. 4:11 PM
Tue -0.8 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.5 ft. 3.9 ft.
Apr 28, 09 12:08 AM 6:21 AM 11:30 AM 4:50 PM
Wed -0.6 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.6 ft. 3.7 ft.
Apr 29, 09 12:58 AM 7:16 AM 12:13 PM 5:34 PM


St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.

Date High Low High Low
Thu 2.6 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.8 ft. -0.2 ft.
Apr 23, 09 1:44 AM 7:18 AM 1:22 PM 7:58 PM
Fri 2.7 ft. 1.0 ft. 3.0 ft. -0.6 ft.
Apr 24, 09 2:28 AM 7:50 AM 1:47 PM 8:36 PM
Sat 2.8 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.1 ft. -0.8 ft.
Apr 25, 09 3:11 AM 8:22 AM 2:f4 PM 9:15 PM
Sun 2.7 ft. 1.3 ft. 3.3 ft. -0.9 ft.
Apr 26, 09 3:55 AM 8:54 AM 2:45 PM 9:57 PM
Mon 2.6 ft. 1.4 ft. 3.3 ft. -0.8 ft.
Apr 27, 09 4:40 AM 9:28 AM 3:19 PM 10:43 PM
Tue 2.4 ft. 1.6 ft. 3.3 ft. -0.6 ft.
Apr 28, 09 5:29 AM 10:05 AM 3:58 PM 11:33 PM
Wed 2.2 ft. 1.7 ft. 3.1 ft.
Apr 29. 09 6:24 AM 10:48 AM 4:42 PM


For tides at the following points
add to Dog Island Listings: Carrabelle
Apalachicola
Cat Point
LowerAnchorage
West Pass


High Tide
28 Min.
1 Hr., 53 Min.
1 Hr., 13 Min.
1 Hr., 36 Min.
1 Hr., 26 Min.


wf Shell Point, Spring Creek

Date High Low High Low
Thu 3.4 ft. 0.9 ft. 3.7 ft. -0.2 ft.
Apr 23, 09 1:57 AM 7:36 AM 1:35 PM 8:16 PM
Fri 3.5 ft. 1.1 ft. 3.9 ft. -0.6 ft.
Apr 24, 09 2:41 AM 8:08 AM 2:00 PM 8:54 PM
Sat 3.6 ft. 1.3 ft. 4.1 ft. -0.9 ft.
Apr 25, 09 3:24 AM 8:40 AM 2:27 PM 9:33 PM
Sun 3.5 ft. 1.4 ft. 4.3 ft. -1.0 ft.
Apr 26, 09 4:08 AM 9:12 AM 2:58 PM 10:15 PM
Mon 3.4 ft. 1.6 ft. 4.3 ft. -0.9 ft.
Apr 27, 09 4:53 AM 9:46 AM 3:32 PM 11:01 PM
Tue 3.2 ft. 1.7 ft. 4.3 ft. -0.7 ft.
Apr 28, 09 5:42 AM 10:23 AM 4:11 PM 11:51 PM
Wed 2.9 ft. 1.9 ft. 4.1 ft.
Apr 29, 09 6:37 AM 11:06 AM 4:55 PM


Dog Island West End

Date High Low High Low
Thu 2.4 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.7 ft. -0.1 ft.
Apr 23, 09 2:16 AM 6:47 AM 12:50 PM 7:36 PM
Fri 2.5ft. 1.4 ft. 2.8 ft. -0.3 ft.
Apr 24, 09 3:19 AM 7:20 AM 1:09 PM 8:14 PM
Sat 2.6 ft. 1.6 ft. 3.0 ft. -0.5 ft.
Apr 25, 09 4:21 AM 7:50 AM 1:34 PM 8:54 PM
Sun 2.6 ft. 1.8 ft. 3.1 ft. -0.6 ft.
Apr 26, 09 5:23 AM 8:19 AM 2:05 PM 9:40'PM
Mon 2.6 ft. 1.9 ft. 3.2 ft. -0.6 ft.
Apr 27, 09 6:29 AM 8:48 AM 2:43 PM 10:33 PM
Tue 2.5 ft. 2.0 ft. 3.2 ft. -0.5 ft.
Apr 28, 09 7:40 AM 9:19 AM 3:28 PM 11:34 PM
Wed '3.1 ft.
Apr 29, 09 4:22 PM


Low Tide
25 Min.
2 Hrs., 38 Min.
2 Hrs., 31 Min.
2 Hrs., 3 Min.
2 Hrs., 39 Min:


First
May 1






Full
May 8


Last
May 17


New
April 24


Thursday
10:33 am
10:57 pm
4:21 am
4:45 pm


Saturday
--:-- am
12:40 pm
5:58 am
6:26'pm


'Friday Sunday


Friday
11:19am
11:45pm
5:06am
5:32pm


L. a -


Monday
1:47 am
2:18 pm
8:02 am
8:34 pm


Tuesday
2:56 am
3:27 pm
9:11am
9:43 pm


Wednesday
4:05 am
4:36 pm.
10:20 am
10:51 pm


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
Sunrise 7:01 am 7:00 am 6:59 am 6:58 am 6:57 am 6:56 am 6:55 am
Sunset 8:09 pm 8:10 pm 8:11 pm 8:11 pm 8:12 pm 8:12 pm 8:13 pm
Moon rise 5:45 am 6:19 am 6:59 am 7:45 am 8:38 am 9:40 am 10:47 am
Moon set 6:57 pm 8:02 pm 9:10pin 10:20 pm 11:27 pm --:-- 12:29 am
Brightness 13% 6% 1% 9% 16% 24% 31%


It was a quiet weekend for
Flotilla 13 at Shell Point. That
isn't saying there wasn't any
activity. Quite the contrary. It
seemed as though the whole
community, including the
Auxiliary, was busily gear-
ing up for the 36th annual
Stephen C. Smith Memorial
Regatta this weekend.
I just spoke with Mae Wa-
ters, Flotilla 13 Commander,
and she said there would be a
Coast Guard Auxiliary display
at the Regatta. As always,
there will be handouts and
brochures on safe boating.
Also, we will be focusing on
recruiting new members.
As I said above, the regatta
holds a special place in the
:hearts of many. It is held at
Shell Point each spring for
,the benefit of the American'
!Cancer Society in memory
,,of Stephen C. Smith. It is the
largest and longest running
regatta in the Big Bend area.
Stephen was a local sailor
who died February 16, 1974
fiom a rare form of leukemia.
:At the time of his death he
was only 29. The regatta is
presented by the Apalachee
Bay Yacht Club, Shell Point
Sailboard Club and the Ameri-
:can Cancer Society, with the
help of numerous business
:and individuals.
: This two-day event has
'drawn as many as 200 regis-
tered participants and hun-
dreds more spectators from all
Over the southeast. There will
,be races of all kinds, off-shore
racing yachts, dinghies, cata-
*marans, and windsurfers, the
most numerous and possibly,
'the most colorful participants
in the regatta.
, Races are held both Satur--
iday :and Sunday with other
eevents for sponsors, specta-
'tors and participants. Cori-
kcessions, dinner and other
entertainment will be held on
Saturday night and a live auc-
tion will be held on Sunday.


Again this year there will the
Parrothead Parade on Sunday
morning. This latest addition
to the parade came into being
in 2005 and has been huge
success ever since.
The American Cancer So-
ciety receives no government
funding and relies on the
generous support of private
donations. Since the begin-
ning, the Stephen C. Smith
Memorial Regatta Foundation,
Inc. has contributed more
than $300,000, the majority of
which has stayed in the Big
Bend area, providing educa-
tional programs and patient
services to area residents.
Recently I had some free
time, waiting for a phone call,
so I picked up their booklet.
I was utterly amazed at how
much boating information it
included. There were articles
on windsurfing competition,
\a guide to understanding
windsurfer lingo, and learning
to talk like a sailor.
To a windsurfer a "board" is
the thing you stand on; some
boards have a centerboard
and a fin (e.g. a "course board"
or a "transition board") these
boards are typically from 10 to
12 feet long, contain a volume
of between 160 and 300 liters,
and can weigh between 20
and 40 pounds. Some boards
are shorter and lighter and do
not have a centerboard, they
only have a fin these are
called short boards. A board
can have a fin, centerboard,
mast track, and foot straps.
Both organizations use port
(left) and starboard (right). To
a sailboarder "Port," opposite
of starboard, has no rights
when approached by a sail-
ing vessel on the starboard
tack. When standing on board
centerline and staring at the
front of the board, your left
side is the port side. When
sailing forward and your left
hand is closest to the front
end of the'boom (in a normal


sailing stance), one is on the
"port tack."
To sailors, "Port" is the left
side of the boat. In olden times
this was the side opposite the
steering oar used as a rudder.
This was against the dock
when in port. "Starboard"
is the right side of the boat.
Back when, this was the side
on which the "steer board" or
rudder was located,
Sailors have an "aft" is lo-
cated toward the back or stem
of the boat, And their "bow"
is the front of the boat.
When you are down at
Shell Point for the regatta,
be sure and take care of the
hand-out. There is a lot of
good information that all
boaters and would-be boaters
will enjoy.
I just received Carolyn
Treadon's news of Flotilla 12
at St. Marks. It is apparent
that her flotilla was much
busier than Flotilla 13 was at
Shell Point.
Saturday morning started
early not only for many of
our educators, but also for
many boaters in our area.
Beginning at 8:30 a.m., Flotilla
Commander, David Guttman,
and our Public Education Staff
Officer, Larry Kolk, welcomed
students to our About Boating
Safety Class.
We were fortunate to have
space at the Amtrak station
in Tallahassee. Throughout
the day, students were treated
to the knowledge of Larry
Kolk, John Denmark, Chuck
Hickman, Mark Rosen, John
Agens and Carolyn Treadon.
A special thank you also goes
out to Officer Charles Higman
from Florida Fish and Wildlife
Commission who came to
teach the chapter on the Le-
gal Requirements of Boating.
With all of his experience, it
was a treat to be able to have
Officer Higman not only teach
the rules of the road, but also
hear all his great stories
We are pleased to say that
none of our students fell
asleep during class, and all
passed their examsl There are
now 15 safer boaters in our
waterways Remember safe
boating is no accident.


St. Marks News


ST. MARKS
By Linda Walker


Hi neighbors. I don't know
how many of you have iaken time
to just glance at all of the beautiful
flowers that blooming all over our
little town. We sure do have lots of
green thumbs here in St Marks. It
is common knowledge that I was
bom without a green one, but one
that is black. I can't seem to grow
anything but wrinkles. But I do
that in my sleep. I do my best not
to even look at any of my flowers
that are still alive and blooming.
I do not see them therefore
they thrive. I told you before I
don't believe in watering plants
due to my papa's old belief that if
you water them the rroot will not
seek out their own water from the
ground. Theywill just sit there and
wait on you. My neighbors, Jim
and Betty Ward have some azaleas
that are eight feet tall on each
side of their driveway and when
I planted mine the first year, they
bloomed and I was amazed that
I was the only one in town with
black ones. I swear I didn't even
look at them until they bloomed
that year. Of course, they are all
gone now along with my roses
across the front due to my beauti-
ful sixty year old sycamore tree
due to that streak of lighting and
bad storm last year.
Don't tell me that everyone
can grow day lillies, I have planted
them so many times I lost count


and they never showed up. Does
this tell you anything?
Even she who shall remain
nameless can grown anything
with as busy as she stays. Her
plants and flowers just keep on
blooming and growing.
Neighbor alert: Do not and I
repeat, donot ever use a box cutter
to scrape anything you are holding
in your lap. It took me forever to
get my hand to stop bleeding. I
was trying to save time and cut a
straight line. I did do that but it
was into my hand. Perhaps I need
to dye my hair again.
Neighbors, these are special
people to me and they really need
your prayers. They all have cancer
and are still too young to have this
problem.
Please pray for: Billy Brown,
Buddy Johnson, Terry Dickens and
Ed Sorey. You may know some of
these people, but if not, please
pray for them and their families.
Neighbors, I was just thinking,
yes, I do think sometimes, butmy
mouth starts without me now
and then. Anyway, I was think-
ing about all of the prices getting
higher on everything and I just
wondered why they don't ever ask
us what we can afford to pay for
food. I see a commercial now and
then about shopping at a thrift
store to save money. I haven't
been able to afford those stores
in a couple of years. The cheapest
place to buy clothing is the flea
market if you have to struggle to
make it through the month.
They have name brands and


some really nice clothing up
there, as well as tools, furniture
and more. The last tire I went
to a thrift store they wanted $15
for a pair of shoes. It is probably
nothing to a lot of you, but I don't
even get to go to the big grocery
stores. That's a lot:ofmoneyto me.
I just think if they stop cuttingthe
everyday people out of jobs and
cut their salary in half, we might
be okay. Remember, this is just my
personal opinion.
Let's wish everyone who has
a birthday this month Happy
Birthday!
I found some of my old col-
umns last night and I have been
writing this column for almost
nine years. I can't get out and
about like I used to so I never
know what's going on. I really
have some rough days as far as
my health.
I almost forgot to tell Josh
Crabtree how proud his grandma
Betty Ward was with the work he
did on the sound and stage at the
high school play a couple of weeks
ago. He has grown up so fast and
is such a smart young man. Keep
it up Josh.
On our prayer list please pray
for each other, our soldiers over-
seas and their families and our
Vietnam vets. Pray for our town,
our country and pray for peace.
Pray for those who keep making
things worse for the working
people. Thought for this week:
Let me remember true kindness
is helping another and expecting
nothing in return.


Si


Major
Activity

Minor
Activity


( f Boating Emergencies
Coast Guard Station
Panama City .................................................... (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown .................................................... (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ......................................... (850) 9.06-0540
or ...................................... ........................................... 89 3-5 137
Shell Point (Flotilla 13) ...................................... (850) 926-2606
or ................................................ 926-5654


Coast Guard

Auxiliary Reports

.By Sherrie Alverson


-


-1


Sunday
12:42am
1:12pm
6:57am
7:27pm







Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009

Looking at options with


Wakulla Gardens, board


re-commits to sewer


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
The purpose of the work-
shop was to look at alterna-
tives to the multi-million dol-
lar project to provide sewer
service to Wakulla Gardens.
By the end of the workshop, it
appeared commissioners were
newly committed to moving
ahead with putting in sewer,
The workshop, held on
Monday. April 20, was the idea
of freshman Commissioner
Lynn Artz, who questioned the
wisdom of putting in sewer in
Wakulla Gardens and thereby
allowing the problematic sub-
division to continue growing.
Like several other subdivisions
in the county Magnolia Gar-
dens, Greiner's Addition, and
Lake Ellen Estates Wakulla
Gardens was platted in the
1960s, decades before the
county had zoning.
The small lots, unpaved
roads, and flooding problems
have been a continuing prob-
lem for the county. The previ-
ous board was moving forward
with a. $20 million project
that would provide sewer to
two units of the Gardens as
well as upgrade the county's
Otter Creek sewage treatment
plant to advanced treatment
standards.
The new board, with three
new commissioners, ques-
tioned whether that was the
right choice.
Artz made a comprehen-

FDA issues

pistachio

advisory
By SHELLEY SWENSON
UF/IFAS
Wakulla County Family
Consumer Sciences Agent
Recently I was notified
that the FDA is advising con-
sumer not to eat pistachios
or food products contain-
ing them (such as pistachio
bakery goods and pistachio
ice cream) unless they can
determine that the products
do not contain pistachios
from Setton Pistachio of Terra
Abella, Inc.
A consumer can get infor-
mation about which products
contain Setton pistachios
from the retailer from whom
they purchased the product.
Consumers can also obtain
the latest FDA advice on
pistachio and information
bout what products have
been reclaimed from the FDA
web site. When you consider
all of the merchandise a re-
tailer handles, doing your own
search is much preferred.
Consumers should store
pistachios and pistachio prod-
ucts in their homes away
from children, until it can
be determined whether or
not the products contain Set-
ton pistachios. Salmonella
bacteria have been detected
in pistachios processed by
Setton. The company has
stopped distribution and has
recalled approximately one
million pounds of its prod-
ucts. Salmonella can cause
serious and sometimes fatal
infections in children, frail or
elderly people and others with
weakened immune systems.
Healthy persons infected with
Salmonella often experience
fever, diarrhea, nausea, vom-
iting.and abdominal pain.
Individuals who are experienc-
ing these symptoms should
contact a doctor immediately
or go to the emergency room
for evaluation. To date, no ill-
ness directly connected with
Setton pistachios have been
reported.
Please call the UF/IFAS
Wakulla County Extension
Office, 926-3931, for additional
information.

Senior center
will host dance


The Wakulla County Se-
nior Citizens Center will
host a dance for seniors
on April 24 from 7 p.m.
until 9 p.m. at the cen-
ter. Admission is free. For
more information, call 926-
7145. Refreshments will be
served.


sive PowerPoint presentation
outlining what has been done
with problematic subdivisions
in other parts of the state
- including buying up lots, re-
platting subdivisions to have
less dense population and
more open space, and creat-
ing a community with a town
center. She also discussed
alternatives to sewer such
as wastewater wetlands and
clustered drainfields.
Commissioner Mike Stew-
art, who returned to the com-
mission in November for a
third term after a four-year
hiatus, at first said that the
priority should be upgrading
the treatment plant, not run-
ning sewer lines to Wakulla
Gardens.
He questioned why the
board couldn't use a portion
of the $20 million loan to
upgrade the plant plus run
the collection line to Shell
Point and return the rest of
the money. Then the county
could focus on dealing with
the stormwater problems in
Wakulla Gardens.
But Dale Dransfield of Eu-
taw Consultants and Bryan
Goff of the state Department
of Environmental Protection's
state revolving fund loan
program explained that the
loan that is pre-approved for
the county if it goes ahead
and applies before the May 15
deadline is for $7.5 million,
and only covers installing sew-


er for Wakulla Gardens units 2
and 5 and the force main.
That's because, they ex-
plained, those are the only
portions of the project that
have been permitted so far by
DEP. The other parts of the
project, such as upgrades to
the sewer plant, have been
held up by the lack of agree-
ment for the re-use of water at
the golf course.
With state money for such
projects scarce, the past board
voted to move ahead with
the project in phases. After
hearing that if they pass up
the state loan they will have
to re-apply and there's a pos-
sibility that the project might
not be funded, a majority of
the board indicated they were
committed to moving forward
with the loan and installing
sewer in Wakulla Gardens.
At the same time, Stewart
and Brock both suggested to
Artz that perhaps her ideas
on alternative solutions could
be implemented in the other
units of the subdivision. .
After Artz's presentation,
the main question commis-
sioners had for her was how,
was the county supposed to
come up with the money to
do those things.
Chairman Howard Kessler
had indicated his belief that
the alternatives Artz had pro-
posed were not feasible, espe-
cially for a fiscally constrained
county like Wakulla.


Marlin Cheerleaders from Premier Athletics display tneir winning Danner.

Marlin All-Stars bring home

a national championship


The Marlin All-Stars Cheer-
leaders held their first competi-
tion in January in Kissimmee.
The group had been practicing
since May 2008.
During the competition the
youth started out strong and
won first place. The senior team
had a tough group of oppo-
nents and ended up in second
place. Throughout the year the
teams went to other regional
cheerleading competitions.
In April, they finished with
a two day national competition
in Destin. The senior team fin-
ished the year strong.bringing
home a National Champion-
ship title.


"Both teams had a great
season and Premier is very
proud of them," said Shadon
Barnes. "Premier would like to
congratulate the following girls
for making school cheerleading
teams."
Chaise Bishop, Avery
LeJeune, Courtney Briggs and
Leann Griner made the WHS
team; Leah Kennedy and Bri-
anna Gubala made the WMS


team, and Kaci Clark made a
varsity team based in Georgia;
If you are interested in All-
Stars, now is the time to sign
up for our 2009-2010 teams.
Join for Marlin Day, April 25,
from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., to learn
more about the all-star program -
and our new team pricing. For
more information, call 926-2920
or visit www.premierathletics.
com.


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So you've decided


to get a cat or dog:


Visit CHAT center

CHAT So you want to get a dog or
df a cat. Where do you start? How
Wakulla do you choose? If you know
that you want a purebred pup
Tai# with specific physical features
aveps and personality traits, your best
bet is to search for a breeder.
il Heide Clifton But if you aren't looking for
a pristine pedigree, you don't
need to go any further than
:your local C.H.A.T. (Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment) of
Wakulla Adoption Center to give a homeless pet a forever home
and save a life.
You can view bur animals online at petfinder.com and search
for CHAT of Wakulla under the organizations tab. This way you
will have a good idea of our adoptable animals before visiting the
adoption center. You may want to call ahead to find out about fees
and adoption procedures or to have an adoption questionnaire
e-mailed to you.
If you have children you may want to visit without them the
first time. This will give you a chance to inquire about animals
you are interested in and to find out if your family is a suitable
'match. We have an area set aside to meet with your prospective
new family member.
You will usually find a good selection of cats, kittens, adult
'dogs of various ages, puppies and even purebred animals, drawn
'from Wakulla Animal Control On average, purebreds account for
'about 25 percent of our dog population. Many pets are waiting
'for new homes because they were obtained by someone with
unrealistic expectations of the time, effort, and money required
for a lifelong relationship with their pet National figures indicate
that about half of the animals in shelters must be euthanized for
Jack of homes.
: Don't look to the Adoption Center with the idea that you can
7get a "free" dog or cat. State law requires that any dog adopted
Is neutered or spayed. Part of your adoption fee will cover the
spay/neuter procedure and rabies vaccinations in addition to vac-
cinations, heartworm/feline leukemia test and worming medicines
already administered while in our care. Your adopted pet will also
biave a registered micro chip. Keep in mind, that no matter what
you pay to acquire a dog or cat, mixed breed or purebred, it is a
Drop in the bucket compared to the long-term costs of maintain-
3ng a healthy pet
: In most cases the CHAT Adoption Center will not have extensive
history of the animals in our care, but our Director/Vet Tech and
adoption counselors who spend a good bit of their time volun-
teering to socialize the animals will be of great help suggesting
a suitable companion for you and your family. Just like people,
not all animals are the same and will act differently in a shelter
environment Most will happily bounce to the kennel door, their
eyes asking if you are here to getthem. Others will act shy and not
come to greet you. They may be missing their owner, or they may
not have had proper socialization. Your adoption counselor again
will be able to give you more information about their behavior.
If you are looking to add a canine or feline companion to your
family, come by the CHAT Adoption Center, 1 Oak Street to meet
our friends or for more information call 926-0890. You may want to
consider volunteering a few hours per week and get to know them
better. Who knows, one of them might want to adopt you.


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009 Page 13A

Commissioners uphold variance for


neighborhood road through wetlands


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Though several county com-
missioners indicated they did
not like the conditional use
granting the Muir Woods de-
velopment approval to build a
road to the subdivision through
a wetlands, they unanimously
voted to uphold it
The hearing, held on April 7,
was frequently contentious as
Muir Woods lawyer Robert Routa
objecting to the procedure and
the way the hearing was being
conducted by County Attorney
Ron Mowrey. But ultimately
Routa's client prevailed because
of the very narrow issue that
commissioners could consider in
making a decision specifically,
the conditional use could only be
revoked if it had become a public
or private nuisance because of
unauthorized, improper or un-
lawful use.
"On the basis of what's been
presented, I don't see where we
have a choice," said Commis-
sioner Alan Brock in explaining
his vote to uphold the condi-
tional use.
The vote to uphold the Muir
Woods conditional use passed
unanimously.
Muir Woods is a planned 47-
unit subdivision on two parcels
of land totaling 28 acres between
Arrah Road and Wakulla Arran
Road, Because the project must
be off a paved road, and Arran
Road is paved at the access point
through the wetlands while
Wakulla-Arran Road is not paved
at its potential access point, the
developer proposed building a
winding driveway to the subdivi-
sion through the wetlands.
Conditional uses go before
the planning commission for
approval. On Sept. 8, the plan-
ning commission rejected the
application by a vote of 4-3. The
planning commission reconsid-
ered the issue at its next meeting
in October and approved it by a
vote of 6-2.
As Routa noted in his dosing
argument, no appeal of the deci-
sion was filed with the county
commission within 30 days


- and he challenged whether it
was legal for the county commis-
sion to hear the issue months
later.
Several citizens spoke against
the conditional use, arguing
that the environmental impacts
outweighed the benefit to the
developer.
Chad Hanson argued that
the conditional use permit went
against the intent of the county's
wetland ordinance, which was
created to protect wetlands.
Chuck Hess, president of
Concerned Citizens of Wakulla,
said he wanted the board to vote
to revoke the conditional use.
"We don't need to destroy more
wetlands to build more houses
we don't need," Hess said.
Clint Boutwell, who owns
property adjacent to the pro-
posed subdivision, argued that
other developers, who are local,
were required to pave Wakulla-
Arran Road up to the entrance
of their subdivisions. Why, he
asked, was the board making an
exception for a developer from
Ft. Lauderdale?
"It's not the duty of the com-
mission to preserve the profit
margin" of the developer, Bout-
well said.
According to the state Di-
vision of Corporations, Muir
Woods LLC is based in Davie
and its two named officers are H.
Collins Forman, Jr. and M. Austin
Forman, both of Ft Lauderdale.
He also asked that commis-
sioners Brock and Stewart recuse
themselves, pointing out that
Brock received $3,600 in cam-
paign contributions and Stewart
got $2,100. 'Tm not suggesting
any impropriety," Boutwell said,
but suggested that Brock and
Stewart shouldrnt vote on the
issue to avoid any appearance
of impropriety.
Later in the hearing, Brock
responded to Boutwell's sugges-
tion, saying he would not recuse
himself explaining that recu-
sal under those circumstances
would "imply that politicians are
bought and sold and I strongly
disagree with that"
Before the hearing got un-


derway, Commission Chairman
Howard Kessler was concerned
about a letter from Routa sug-
gesting that he recuse himself
and complained that Mowrey
had not answered his questions.
Kessler passed the chairman's
gavel to Commissioner George
Green and made a motion that
the Muir Woods conditional use
issue be continued six months,
until October, when the board
will have a new county attor-
ney.
"I have legal counsel with
an adversarial position towards
me," Kessler said of Mowrey. Kes-
sler noted that he is required by
law to vote on issues that come
before him unless there is some
declared conflict of interest.
Routa sent a letter saying Kessler
should not vote on the issues,
Kessler said. "and the county at-
torney has not advised me."
Mowrey answered that the
issue had been discussed at a;
staff meeting, and added that he
found nothing in Routa's letter
that was a potential conflict
Routa's letter, written to Mow-
rey and dated March 2, refers to
e-mails received by Kessler from
a couple in Spring Creek involved
in a lawsuit over property bound-


aries with another project being
developed by the Formans. The
letter alleges that one of the For-
mans has "been associated with
a variety of suspect and, on oc-
casion, illegal financial dealings
in South Florida." The message
contains links to an alternative,
online newspaper with a story
that is critical of the Formans.
Kessler forwarded the e-mail
to activist Hugh Taylor, among
others, and staff, as "an obvious
attempt to slander the family
and engender public and staff
opposition to the Forman family
projects," Routa wrote.
Mowrey said the allegation
by Routa does not have any
evidence that Kessler would per-
sonally benefit in any way from
those projects and so, he said, it
is not a conflict of interest.
Kessler then asked that Mow-
rey's opinion be put in writing,
but Commissioner Stewart sug-
gested that was unnecessary
since Mowrey had just stated his
opinion in a public meeting that
was being recorded.
Commissioner Lynn Artz
withdrew her second to Kessler's
motion to continue the issue
and the motion failed for lack
of a second.


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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009


Wakulla Springs News and Notes


By JEFF HUGO
Special to The Wakulla News
The waters of the Wakulla
River run dark. With more
spring rain than most people
can recall the cold-brewed tea
from the leaves and roots of
the area's forests dominate
the conduits that carry wa-
ter to the mouth of Wakulla
Spring. The water flowing in
the Wakulla is more like the
root beer stained water of the
Sopchoppy than the normally
clear Wakulla River.
S The wildlife does not seem
to be hampered by the change.
The anhingas still have success
skewering'small fish, the mul-
let.still seem to jump for joy,
and the breeding birds have
begun feeding newly hatched
mouths on their nests. Even
a few manatees can be seen
as they surface to breathe or
frolic manatee-style in the
shrouding waters.
The last of the dinner cruis-
es to take in the early evening
activity of the wildlife until
next fall will course the dark
waters on Saturday, April 25.
The cruise will begin at 6 p.m.
with dinner following. The
cost is $29 per person and
includes tax, tip, buffet dinner
and cruise. Please call 926-0700
to reserve your place.
A special treat that evening
will be the music of local trou-
badour Ernest Toole. Toole
writes and performs many of
his own compositions includ-
ing songs about the Sopchop-
py Worm Grutitin' Festival,
the Tallahassee/St Marks Rail-
road, and the Battle of Natural
Bridge. He will entertain visi-
tors in the lodge from 8 p.m. to
9 p.m. Park guests do iot need
to attend the dinner cruise to
enjoy his music.
The conclusion of the din-
ner cruise season signals the
beginning of the early boat
tour season. The first early


Photographers submitted their work for The Wakulla News photo. contest and the
artwork was displayed at the Wakulla Wildlife Festival.


boat tour will begin at 8 a.m.
on Saturday, May 2 (call 926-
0700 to reserve your space) and
will be a great opportunity for
camera buffs.
Frame the ancient cypress
trees draped in silvery Span-
ish moss and silhouetted
in the early morning light.
Zoom in on a great egret or
anhinga feeding its chick. Or
perhaps capture on film a
yellow-crowned night heron
incubating its eggs. Don't for-
get to make arrangements to
,enjoy a sumptuous breakfast
in the,lodge following your
excursibn.
No matter the color of the
water, spring is a superb time
to enjoy the private lives of the
wildlife at Wakulla Springs.

Wakulla Wildlife Festival
Community is a big word.
The definition borders on
the mundane. The Merriam-
Webster Online Dictionary de-'
scribes it as "a unified body of


individuals or the people with
common interests living in a
particular area." But to witness
community in action, or better
yet, to experience community
working together is nothing
short of uplifting.
The Wakulla Wildlife Festi-
val held on April 2 to April 4
was all about celebrating the
"Natural Place to Be." It was an
orchestrated effort to educate
and instill advocacy for the di-
verse ecosystems and heritage
of the Big Bend Region while
working to establish Wakulla
County as a destination for
eco-heritage activities and
education. Thanks to the com-
munity, it was uplifting.
( The coordinator or "mae-
stro" for this community "sym-
phony" was Della Parker-Han-
son. A former president of The
Friends of Wakulla Springs
and current board member,
Della is no stranger to the
sweet melody of organization.
Already in August 2008, she


began to assemble the group
of talented individuals who
would form the Festival Com-
mittee, Representing at least
10 different organizations,
they guided the festival's goals
and budget and donated their
valuable time in planning and
implementation.
Community volunteerism
and sponsorship were the
heart and soul of the festival,
Hundreds of people volun-
teered their skills, ingenuity
and time to make the festival
happen and flow smoothly.
Many thanks must be offered
to the dedicated and knowl-
edgeable tour guides who
opened beautiful vistas, shared
unusual sights and sounds,
and kept safe hundreds of
festival guests.
There were the presenters
who taught us how to enjoy
butterflies and birds in our
backyards, how to create a gar-
den with carnivorous plants,
and how to better understand


nature's complex plumbing visitors, assist with children's
system within the aquifer be- activities, and more. All of
neath our feet. these generous people were
The friendly and knowl- organized by our Park Services
edgeable exhibitors offered Specialist Jackie Turner and
avenues to put into practice our AmeriCorps Member Jen-
lessons learned. Guests could nifer Primm.
discover how to prepare a bear- With the hub of activities
proof garbage can. They could occurring at Wakulla Springs
learn how to incorporate na- State Park on Saturday, special
tive plants into a low mainte- thanks must be given to the
nance garden. And they could lodge and kitchen staffs that
get to know various dubs and prepared the terrace and lobby
organizations who could offer for the festival and organized
fellowship, information and the food for the various recep-
field trips to area wonders., tions. In addition, the park's
Among the wonders at the outstanding maintenance team
festival were the works of art led by Lee Pyles did a superior
enjoyed Friday evening and job in preparing the grounds.
Saturday during the Wildlife Even in these hard times
Art Show held in the lodge, our sponsors were nothing
Cyndi Hunt put together short of amazing. 180 Commu-
a wonderful assortment of nications provided a beautiful'
talent and also coordinated and functional web page. The
the Children's Art Contest. Ra- Inn at Wildwood provided
heena Bascome won first place invaluable service and advice.
in the high school division. The generosity of Progress En-
Kayla Weismantel from Coast ergy and Wakulla Bank made
Charter School won first place the incomparable Georgia
in the middle school division Southern University Bird of
and Bailey Smith from Shadev- Prey and Reptile shows pos-
ille Elementary won first place sible, In addition, Visit Florida,
in the elementary division, the Wakulla County Tourist De-
The Living History Dem- velopment Council. New Leaf
onstrators showed us the Market, The Wakulla News,
hard work and sacrifice that UPI, Homestead Imprinted
went into everyday existence. Sportswear, the Florida Green
The smithy, the spinners, the Guide Association, the Wakulla
butter churner, soldiers and Area Times, Best Western,
others all illuminated not a Heart of the Earth, Wakulla.il
simpler time, but one that' com, Capital City Bank, and.
demanded difficult and often Riversprings Middle School
tedious labor to provide for supported the festival and-
basic needs and security, helped to make it happen. ,,-
The basic needs and secu- Thank you really isn't suf-
rity of the festival could not ficient to express the gratitude
have been met except for the felt for so much done by so
small army of volunteers who many. It is the hope that
came out to set up and take those involved were uplifted
down the festival. Folks do- by the entire experience. It
nated their time to park cars, was a beautiful thing to see
set up tables and chairs, help. a unified body of individuals,
the artists in and out with working together to achieve a
their work, drive tour boats, common goal Yes, community
act as hosts and hostesses, sell is a big word.
food, gather surveys, shuttle


Young Eagles


discover a aviation


An area pilot has riowgiven
more than 200 young people
a free demonstration airplane
ride as part of the EAA "Young
Eagles" program, which is in-
troducing a new generation to
the world of flight.
Among the more than
40,000 pilots around the world
who have donated their time
and aircraft to the effort is
Stephen Balchuck of Crawford-
ville, All pilots in the Young
Eagles program explain the
safe operation of airplanes
and principles of flight before
the short trips. Participating
young people become official
Young Eagles with the flight,
receiving a certificate signed


by the pilot and Young Eagles
chairman Harrison Ford.
The names of the pilots and
the participants are also indud-'
ed in the "World's Largest Log-
book." which is on permanent
display in the EAA AirVenture
Museum in Oshkosh, Wis.,
and online through the Young
Eagles web site.
The Young Eagles Program
was unveiled by the Experimen-
tal Aircraft Association (EAA) in.
July 1992 and has now flown
more than 1.25 million young
people, primarily between the
ages of 8 and 17. EAA is a world-
wide organization with 170,000
members, who enjoy all facets
of recreational flight.


Women undertake cross-country bike tour


While the oldest woman
is 71, the average age of the
women riding their bicycles
across the country is 60 years
bid. The 21 women began
their 3,135-mile bicycle jour-
ney across the United States
from San Diego on March 5,
2009 and will stop at Wakulla
Springs on April 25 and April
,26 They'll be supported by.
WomanTours, Inc., the only
all women bicycle touring,
company in the country.
Several of the women are
cancer survivors and many of
them are raising money for
different causes, including the
fights against Alzheimer's and
breast and ovarian cancers.
The youngest member of the
group recently found herself
without a job in New York
City. She took the opportunity


Buckhorn community news


BUCKHORN
By Ethel Skipper
Charlotte Faith and Deliver-
ance Church will have their
Family and Friend Day at the
livestock pavilion on Sunday,
April 26, at 3 pm. The speaker


will be Pastor Mary Harvey.
Everyone is welcome.
Happy birthday greetings to
DebraiGavin on April 17, from
your mother and family; We
'love you.
, On Tuesday night, April 28,
there will be a one-night revival
at Skipper Temple Church of
Christ beginning at 7 p.m. We


welcome you to come and hear
the word and fellowship with
the saints of God. The host Pas-
tor is Ethel M. Skipper.
Macedonia Church of Christ
will host a Mary E. Greeh Day
fellowship service on Sunday at,
11 a.m. with family and many
friends. The host Pastor Elder
Andrew Morris.


to challenge herself physically is heartening to see women
while working to raise money turn this tough financial pe-
for the Davis Phinney Foun- riod into a time to think of
dation against Parkinson's. It others.


For more information, con-
tact WomanTours at 800-247-
1444 or,www.womantours.
com.


The Wakulla County
Chamber of Commerce
extends special thanks
to all the families
who enjoyed the
FSU Flying High Circus
and the horse training
skills of Trey Young.

The event would not have been
possible without the generous
support of the following sponsors:

Corporate Sponsors -
Embarq, Wakulla Bank, Harvey
Young Farm, St. Marks Powder,
Mowery & Mitchell, P.A.

Big Top Sponsors -
Ameris Bank, Capital City Bank,
University Chevrolet, Rascal Auto,
The Fortune Group, Shields Ma-
rina, Revell's Meat, Gold Dolphin


Ringmaster Sponsors -
Gulf State Bank, Regions Contractors, Super Lube,
Gulf Specimen Marine Lab, Tidewater Construction,
Alan Brock, Francis Casey Lowe


Publicity Partners
The Wakulla News; Oyster Radio; Jerry Evans, Wakulla-Bank, Skip
Young and staff at 3Y Ranch, Wakulla High School NJROTC. Special
thanks to all the folks that helped' organize the event.

When you're out and about please take time to thank
these fine businesses and individuals and remember to
support them by shopping locally.

Sincerely.

Paul Johnson, President
Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce


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Mary's Angels


LH. Carter
From offices of RH. Carter,
Executive Director,
Wakulla County Senior
Citizens Councfl, Inc.
and members of the
senior citizens staff.
The Wakulla County Senior
Citizens Center depends on
volunteers to help serve our
older population. Our annual
"Volunteer Appreciation Lun-
cheon" occurred on April 22.
We honored more than 125
volunteers at the luncheon.
This is a report on a special
group of volunteers who serve
in the senior center. Chef
Mary Harrison grew up in
Seattle, Wash. and completed
her culinary degree in Van-
couver, Canada. She became
our chef in 2007 and has been
blessed with a group of volun-
teers. These volunteers serve
at special functions suchas
banquets, fundraising dinners
and various dinners for busi-
nesses and civic organizations.
She tells me that they are
better trained and have more
experience then those she has
hired in the past. Some have
joked that they are Mary's
Mafia but she insists they are
all angels. I recently attended
a banquet where they served
125 plates in just a few min-
utes. The meals arrived very
warm and delicious.
Mary's Angels include
Eileen Debish who moved
from Miami in 2006 and has
volunteered since. Louis Wil-
liford moved from Oklahoma
in 2006 and has volunteered
since. Harriet Rich moved
from Marathon in 1988 and be-
came a volunteer in the senior
center in 2002, Mary Hampton
moved from Tallahassee in
1971 and has been volunteer-
ing since 2001. Pat Allen and
her husband Don moved from
Macon, Ga. in 2002. They have
been volunteering for Mary
since 2006. Rita Powell moved
from New York in 1973. In
1986, she was employed by
the center and retired in 2005.
Since retirement she has been


-UA


a regular volunteer.
Peggy Bump retired and
moved from Miami in 2006
and has been a volunteer in
the senior center since moving
here. Kitty Strickland moved
from New York in 1997 and
has volunteered in the senior
center since her arrival. Floria
Mathis came to the center in
2001. She moved from Miami.
She has been volunteering
here since. Faye Harrod moved
from Tallahassee in 1993 and
has been volunteering in the
center since 2006.
There are two other seniors
who serve regularly with this
group who were not available
when the photograph was
taken. Lassie Williams moved
from Lake Talquin in 2002 and
has been volunteering with us
since that time. Virginia Davis
grew up in Tallahassee as
has been volunteering in the
senior center since 2007.
Each volunteer expressed
their need for social interac-
tion as a major reason they
come to the senior center,
;Each of them volunteer in


U ,- -'," ,.-- ~ ~ ~ I ~ ~
Trevor Hylton, right, works with senior citizens at their new garden at the senior citizens center in CrawfordvJlle.
-X T _ .
,. .
'" .' .
I `'l'. , ,. ' : ", ': ;; :' .. '
I,. -: I 4 -: ;:":.I"' .. ": ,! .,


Wakulla senior citizens will be able to enjoy some shade under the pergola.


Pergola will bring shade


Garden Designer Betsy Smith.


other areas such as deliver-
ing meals-on-wheels, serving
meals at lunch, washing table
cloths and napkins, washing
dishes and anything else that
they recognize as needed.
There are many more se-
niors who help provide these


services but this group shares
the common goal to help
Mary during special events.
Mary's highest compliment
was that she never asks them
to do anything, "They always
ask me what they can do
next."


By TAMARA BYRNES
Special to The Wakulla News
In December, a local
craftsman, Ray Rich. built
a large outdoor structure at
the Wakulla County Senior




It's O


Citizens Center, to provide
much needed shade for the
senior citizens who visit the
facility.
This pergola will be a
meeting place for people


to enjoy gardening, nature
talks. outdoor entertaining
as well as just a cool place
to rest out of the hot sum-
mer sun.
Continued on Page 2B




Home


KEEP IT CLEAN


Wakulla school children have been taking part in before/after school programs,


Center provides youth service


By DEBBIE VANHORN
Senior Center Staff
The Wakulla County Senior
Citizens Center provides a Before
School and After School Program
(BS/AS)inthe elementary schools
located in Medart Crawfordville,


Shadeville and Riversink. I would
like to thank Superintendent Da-
vid Miller and all the elementary
principals for their support for our
programs. A big thank you goes
to R.H. Carter for his direction
and leadership in dealing with


everything that comes up that
needs a steady hand.
Thanks to all the employees
who work in the program and
make sure the children are safe
and happy in the program.
Continued on Page 2B


I


--.Mmmmwm






Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009


Dear Lee's Place


By KAREN LOCKARD, LCSW
Children's Therapist
DEAR LEE'S PLACE:
Q: My husband and I di-
vorced recently after a 19-year
marriage. He was a chronic
drug abuser and I finally had
enough of the turmoil. My
15-year-old daughter seems to
be having the most difficulty
adjusting to all the changes
(moving, new school, new
friends, etc). I think she is los-
ing weight but she also seems
to be eating all the time. Could
this be a sign of an eating
disorder?
A: One of the most com-
mon ways that people cope
with traumatic events in their
life is with food. This is es-
pecially true for those who
.are experiencing a situation
dealing with grief and/or loss.
Regardless of the type of loss,
food is commonly turned to
as a way to feel better and
cope.
Experiencing a parent's di-
vorce can be a huge loss, even
if it is for the best in the long
run. While adjusting to a loss,
kids and adults often describe
an unexplainable change in
appetite. This is common be-
cause an increase in appetite
or disinterest in food is often
our body's natural response
to stress. Parents of pre-teens
and teenagers often express
concerns that their child is
overeating, consuming un-
healthy foods or not eating
at all. It's no surprise that
we turn to food when we are
experiencing painful feelings
because it works! Foods that
are high in carbohydrates and
sugar actually do make us feel
better temporarily as a result
of increasing our serotonin,
which,is the brain chemical
(hormone) responsible for
Scontrolling o'ur mood and
_fi oir.i unfortunately, these
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initial coping skills may turn Lee's Place would recom-
into a more serious problem, mend a full physical with your
such as an eating disorder, daughter's physician to rule
Eating disorders are cat- out any medical issues that
egorized into three different might be going on and to look
types: anorexia, when the indi- her patterns of weight gain
vidual severely restricts their and weight loss. Do you no-
food intake and quickly begins tice whether she goes to the
losing weight; 2) bulimia, bathroom following a meal
when one binges (eating large or snack? If so, she might
amounts of food at one time) be purging (making herself
and purges (either through vomit).
vomiting, exercise or laxative Have you noticed if she is
use); and binge eating, where using laxatives and if so, how
one overeats and typically often? It is okay to ask her
experiences weight gain. about her eating and weight
One of the theories about in a gentle and nonblaming
the development of eating rianner. You might ask her,
disorders is that they are "I've noticed your eating pat-
about control. Although there terns have changed and you
are many reasons why some- seem to be losing weight. Are
one may develop an eating you trying to lose weight?
disorder, control issues are How are you doing it? I'm con-
often a major part of it. When cerned about whether you are
,individuals experience a loss getting enough healthy food
or, trauma, they often feel for your age and your level of
very out of control. This is activity. Can you give me an
especially true for children idea of what you are eating
and adolescents. For example, most days?"
when a teenager cannot'con- It is also helpful to eat
trol their environment or even meals together so you can see
their feelings, they may seek what she is eating and notice
to find control in other areas her habits around food.
of their life, such as consump- A few sessions with a ther-
tion. Eating disorders may apist that is familiar with eat-
also serve as a distraction for ing disorders might also be
those who are experiencing helpful to rule in or rule out
emotional pain. If, someone a potential problem as well
is thinking about calories all as address any other issues
day or exercising constantly, related to her parents' divorce
they can avoid feeling the and subsequent changes.
overwhelming feelings that Lee's Place, a nonprofit
are the result of their grief and grief and loss counseling cen-
loss. In times of loss, individu- ter, invites you to submit ques-
als often feel extremely empty tions about grief/loss issues
inside and overeating may be to dearleesplace@leesplace.
a way to "fill up," even though org, or 216 Lake Ella Drive,
it only brings temporary relief. Tallahassee, 32303.
Children often feel respon-' Lee's Place is a grief and
sible and even guilty follow- loss counseling center on Lake
ing their parents' divorce. This Ella Drive in Tallahassee. Ser-
may lead to feeling undeserv- vices add :ess all kinds of loss
ing of.basic needs such as induding divorce, death, life
rood, which may then lead to transitions, physical illness,
restricting food intake. trauma and more.


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Pergola
Continued from Page 1B
Funds to build this structure
as well as other projects are
continuously donated by the
residents and businesses of
Wakulla County and we are
amazed at the love and gener-
osity our community shows for
our senior citizens.
In February, a local garden
designer, Betsy Smith, came by
to donate her time to help us
create the gardens surround-
ing the pergola. Betsy's design
included a native plant section,
an herb garden, butterfly garden
and a raised bed vegetable gar-
den. Two weeks later, Master
Gardeners from Wakulla and
Leon County headed up by
Trevor Hylton, came and placed
cardboard on the ground and


shoveled mulch to cover the
existing grass. Some evergreen
shrubs were also planted at
that time.
In early March, the Master
Gardeners returned to the site
and constructed three raised
-beds. The garden soil to fill
these beds was donated by the
Iris Garden Club through their
Garden Therapy program.
On March 31, the Master Gar-
deners returned again to guide
the seniors in planting their
butterfly garden, an herb garden,
flower and vegetable garden
and add shrubs to the native
garden. John Melton, a local
Arborist, will be installing a drip
irrigation system to finish the
project We received donations
of plants that helped create


these beautiful "Community"
gardens so that the seniors will
be able to have an ongoing con-
nection to the beautification of
their own surroundings through
the pure joy of gardening.
Many of these seniors have
had grand gardens in the past but
now live in apartments and do
not have the space to garden.
, This project was made pos-
sible by the donations from:Just
Fruits and Exotics; Betsy Smith;
John Melton; Best for Less Tree
Service; Iris Garden Club; Purple
Martin Nursery; Esposito's Plant
Nursery; Native Nurseries and
Tallahassee Nurseries.
Please feel free to contact us
at any time if you have plants
to donate as this is an ongoing
project


Youth program


Continued from Page 1B
We are open from 6:30 a.m.
to 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.,
Monday through Friday every
day that school is in session.
We are open on non-school
days from 6:30 a.m to 6:30 p.m.
and we meet at the Wakulla
Senior Center. From there we
go on field trips.
We also have a summer
program where we take the
children on field trips every-
day that is open in June and
July from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Before we leave on trips and
after we get back, we do arts
and crafts, fooz-ball and soon
we hope to have a playground
ready for the children while
they are at the senior center.
All of our employees are fin-
gerprinted through the Wakulla
School Board and have a Level
II clearance. They are also drug


tested prior to employment and
then again randomly through-
out the year. We have many
private pay children but we also
accept Early Learning Coalition
students.
We are excited this year to
have been able to include the
Champions Program. This is an
after school physical education
program funded by Capital
Health Plan and provided by


Titus Sports Academy. Next year
they will be back with us. -
The BS/AS Program has
served many families for many
years. We often receive thank
you cards and notes from high
school students and young
adults working or in college.
The Senior Center, Wakulla
schools, students and their
families are all winners in the
BS/AS Program.


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I







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009 Page 3B


Expert answers to your health and wellness questions


Fitness Matters
By RUSSELL BARBARINO
Special to The Wakulla News
Question: There are so many fat-
burning products on the market-are
they helpful or harmful?
, Answer: There are numerous prod-
ucts on the market that contain ther-
mdgenic ingredients, or what most
of us call "fat burners." Ephedrinie,
yohimbine, green tea extract (EGCG),
bitter orange (synephrine) and even
caffeine are examples, and they basi-
cally work by stimulating the central
nervous system. This increases your
"fight or flight" responses, indirectly
providing energy and allowing you to
process calories at a faster rate. Along
with these supposed benefits, there are
also side effects associated with these
ingredients, including increased blood
pressure, heart rate and respiratory


rate. Another potential issue is the fact
that, individually, they don't have a real
dramatic affect. As a result, companies
often combine several of these ingre-
dients into one product and then sell
it as an energy or health supplement.
Unfortunately, we don't know how any
one of these stimulants will specifically
affect you as an individual, let alone
several of them combined together.
So, despite the claims, your best bet is
to pass on these ingredients and the
products that contain them. Instead,
focus on maximizing your training
and nutrition, and speak to a qualified
professional about losing body fat
in the safest and most effective way
possible.
Question: What should I eat or
drink if I only have an hour before a
workout?,
Answer: What to eat before you


exercise should be largely determined
by timing and personal preference.
Generally speaking, a large meal takes
four to five hours to digest, a smaller
meal takes two to three hours, and a
large snack takes one to two hours. If
you don't digest food well enough prior
to an activity, you can end up with a
stomachache and cramping. This often
occurs because blood (which plays a
key role in digestion) is shunted to your
arms and legs during activity, thereby
slowing down the digestive process.
Therefore, if you only have an hour to
fuel yourself, it would probably be best
to stick with a liquid carbohydrate/pro-
tein shake. Liquids are processed faster
than solid foods and will provide the
energy you need in a shorter time-
frame. Keep in mind, we're not talking
about those ice cream-based shakes
from fast food restaurants. We're talk-


ing about a sports nutrition shake that
is designed for active individuals and
athletes. If you want something lighter,
a traditional sports drink would be a
viable option as well. There are a num-
ber of products on the market in each
category, so do some taste-testing to
see which ones work best for you.
Question: Do fad diets work?
Answer: In short, yes... and no.
Most research shows that fad diets do
work, and some of them do so quite
well. The dictionary defines "diet" as
a regimen of eating and drinking spar-
ingly to reduce one's weight, so if the
latest fad diet doesn't elicit some sort
of weight loss, it dearly won't survive
out on the market for very long. The
problem is that fad diets are short-
term solutions to a long-term problem.
They also tend to associate weight loss
success with some gimmick when, in


actuality, decreased calorie intake is
usually the "real" reason for shedding
the pounds. So fad diets are effective
to a degree, but I don't know too many
people that like losing some weight,
gaining it back, and then jumping over
to the next fad to start the process all
over again. The way to lose weight
and keep it off is through persistent
behavior modification and lifestyle
change. If you can make this type of
commitment, you'll be able to leave
the fad diet books on the store shelves
where they belong.
Russell Barbarino is the Club Own-
er/Nationally Certified Strength and
Fitness Professional at Anytime Fitness
in Crawfordville. To submit a question
for future articles, please contact the
author at: CrawfordvilleFL@anytimefit-
ness.com.


Massage therapy for your health


By DIANA V. STRICKLAND,
LMT
Specal to The Wakulla News
In the mid to late 1980s,
Americans were just begin-
ning to discover the benefits
of massage. Many people
thought of massage as a self-
indulgent luxury or only good
for relaxation.
Now, 20 years later, mil-
lions of Americans are expe-
riencing the benefits of mas-
sage therapy to improve their
health. Today, doctors are
more likely to prescribe mas-
sage therapy for their patients,
and now some insurance com-
panies cover massage therapy
or a percentage of it. Clinical


research has shown that mas-
sage is beneficial in relieving
pain, promoting the healing
process and boosting the
immune system. It has been
used successfully in easing
back pain, headaches, chronic
tension and anxiety, and many
other painful conditions.
Some people are hesitant
to seek massage therapy be-
cause they don't know what to
expect or they are afraid it will
hurt. Hesitant people need to
be assured that they can be in
charge of their experience by
communicating their concerns
with the therapist. A good
massage therapist will ask
you about your health history,


areas of discomfort, your con-
cerns and expectations.
.And what about those fears
of pain?' Even deep tissue
massage can be done with a
gentle touch. The goal should
be to use enough pressure
to meet tension in the body
and bring about a release, but
light enough to be comfort-
able for the patient. As the
tension releases, the muscles
will become less tender and
firmer pressure can then be
used. Some patients might
need pillows for support or
to lie in a different position
on the table to be comfort-
able. For instance, a side-ly-
ing position can be used for


those who can't lie face down
comfortably.
Together, you and the mas-
sage therapist can formulate
a plan and adjust each ses-
sion to meet your individual
needs. Adjusting techniques
can make massage therapy ap-
propriate for everyone includ-
ing children, the elderly and
special needs individuals.
If you are looking for a way
to improve your quality of life,
reduce chronic tension, or
ease back pain and headaches,
consider massage therapy.
Your loved ones will be happy
to see you feeling better.


AARP driving class

could save money


Classes are available to
individuals with a valid
driver license age 50 years
or older. Classes are espe-
cially designed for older
drivers and no testing or
"hands-on", driving is re-
quired.
In the state of Florida,
completion of AARP class
will result in a substantial
savings on your Florida
auto insurance for 3 years.
Eight hours of class work
must be completed before
a certificate is issued by
AARP.


The insurance discount
is available only for par-
ticipants with good driv-
ing records for ages 55 and
older.
The classes will be held
in Wakulla County on Tues-
day, May 19 and Wednes-
day, May 20.
Attend two four-hour
sessions from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. both days at the TCC
Wakulla Center located in
Crawfordville.
For more information,
contact Jack Campbell at
421-7568.


TOPS organization offers 10 tips to build your physical wellness


Physical wellness can be
a launching pad to help you
spring energetically into the
warmer months. While it
can be a year-round priority,
Physical Wellness Month is
celebrated in April, making
pointers on physical activity
especially timely.
According to TOPS Club,
Inc. (Take Off Pounds Sen-
sibly), physical wellness in-
volves a healthy lifestyle that
allows people to experience
-daily activities without undue
fatigue or physical stress.
TOPS emphasizes that, re-
gardless of weight, everyone
can benefit from movement
and balanced nutrition. Rath-
er than dictating one single
approach to becoming physi-
cally active, TOPS encourages
members to seek sound ad-
vice and provide support to
each other to establish their
own exercise program.
Many TOPS members from
across the country rely on
walking to become active.
Because walking even a short
distance is attainable' for
most, members can gain a
feeling of accomplishment.
John Gillespie, a TOPS mem-
ber, speaks for many when he


says, "I used to walk four to
five blocks a day. Now I can
do four to five miles a day."
John has lost 95 pounds. Gar-
nette Brunett, another TOPS
member, says, "I started to
really get into walking my
dog. It was easy, and I saw
results immediately." She has
lost 38, pounds.
Amy Goldwater, M.S., edu-
cator, former body-building
champion, and physical fit-
ness expert for TOPS, points
out another benefit of physi-
cal activity: endorphins.
Exercise puts necessary
stress on your body, trigger-
ing endorphins. "These are
extremely important and
can make you feel wonder-
ful," Goldwater says. "It's the
body's natural exercise high
that might also be referred to
as 'being in the zone' or 'hav-
ing a second wind.' The tim-
ing is individual. Endorphins
will kick in sooner during a
workout for some people and
later for others."
Goldwater offers ten tips
to increase physical well-
ness:
SStart an activity slowly
to increase the odds of stick-
ing to it. Easy choices such


as taking the stairs instead
of the elevator can burn a
few extra calories. To begin,
Goldwater advises, take the
elevator up and walk down.
S Make activity a daily
routine. Set a time and keep
a regular rhythm. Goldwater
recommends exercising when
personal energy is the high-
est. For instance, morning
people should schedule their
activity early in the day.
Goldwater encourages
people to vary their work-
outs, especially when lifting
weights. She says it's very im-
portant to let muscles recover
by cross-training, which uses
different muscle groups.
She advises extending
the length of time spent walk-
ing rather than increasing the
speed of walking. Movement
gets the heart pumping and
oxygen flowingto the brain,
which is the desirable body
state to sustain. So remem-
ber: Longer is better than
faster.
Enjoy spring fever. Go
outside to walk, jog, bike,
roller-blade, garden, walk the
dog, or play tennis.
Breathe in fresh air by
simply being outdoors. Gold-


water points out that fresh air
adds oxygen to the body and
improves anyone's energy
level.
Get enough sleep on a
regular schedule. Goldwater
says 7.5 hours is often rec-
ommended, with a standard
sleeping and waking cycle.
When walking, Goldwa-
ter advises, aim for an activ-
ity level between 6 and 8 on
a scale of 1 to 10. If walkers
can chat easily, they need to
pick up some speed, but if
they can't talk at all because
they're out of breath, they
need to slow down.
Keep an achievement
log of physical activity,, list-
ing miles, pace, and progress.
Goldwater says meticulous
recordkeeping might be over-
whelming for some, but even
a simple chart is useful.
': Reward accomplish-
ments. Incentives along the
way can add motivation to'
stick to a goal. Goldwater
notes that any activity you do
will get you on the road to be-
coming physically fit. You can
even do chair aerobics. Also,
she emphasizes, it's never too
late to start.
TOPS Club, Inc. (Take Off


Pounds Sensibly), the 'origi-
nal, nonprofit weight-loss
education and support orga-
nization, was founded more
than 60 years ago to cham-
pion weight-loss support
and success. Founded and
headquartered in Milwaukee,
Wis., TOPS promotes success-
ful weight management with
a philosophy that combines
healthy eating, regular ex-
ercise, wellness education,


and support from others at
weekly chapter meetings.
TOPS has about 170,000 ep-
bers in nearly 10,000 chapters
throughout the United States
and Canada, and several chap-
ters in Europe.
Visitors are welcome to at-
tend their first TOPS meeting
free of charge. To find a local
chapter, view www.tops.org
or call (800) 932-8677 for more
information.


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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009


Brimner, Taylor air views on the radio


Conservative talk radio
Wakulla style has arrived.
Hosted by Larry Taylor and Ed
Brimner, local voices will be
discussing local issues affecting
local taxpayers.
Ed and Larry were both
raised in Wakulla County,
graduated from high school
here, and went on to start
their careers in different places.;
But their love for the county
and the fundamental values
upon which the country was
founded gave them the desire
to share conservative views
with the taxpayers of the com-
munity.
Brimner joined the Air Force
immediately after high school
and ended up making it his
career. Over the years he was
an Air Traffic Controller, Execu-.
tive Officer, and Airport Opera-
tions Flight Commander along
with various other positions
while stationed in Greenland,
Missouri, Virginia, Oklahoma,
Arkansas, and the Azores.


Ed Brimner and Larry Taylor host local radio show.


Thanks to the military, Brimner
was able to earn his Bachelor's
degree from FSU through the
GI bill. After retiring from the
military, Ed and his family
returned to Wakulla County
where he became a Realtor
and broker for his own real
estate company. He recently
completed a term as county


commissioner.
Taylor went to work for the
State of Florida 'immediately
after high school and had the
good fortune to foresee the
wave of the future was in
the computer industry. He
received training in Computer
Operations Management while
working for the state. His work


led him to Orlando to work
at Lockheed Martin Informa-
tion Systems for 14 years. He
returned to Wakulla County
with his family where he went
to work for PC DOCS, which
later became Hummingbird. He
worked for 10 years as Director
of Technical Support Services.
For the last four years he has
worked as an IT Consultant
,with the Florida Department
of Transportation.
Both Ed and Larry were
drawn back to Wakulla County
for its family values, sense
of community, and desire to
contribute to the continued
success of the county, they said.
They have started Wake Up
Wakulla to bring local voices
on local issues affecting the
citizens of our county.
Join them every Saturday
from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m; on WAVE
94.1 FM, as they bring a com-
prehensive view of county is-
sues to the citizens of Wakulla
County.


Picking up litter, recycling at the festival Allana Morgan and
*. Keep Wakulla mosaic trivets, plates and other zines and give them to me. I came to make necklaces as M arcus W orre l mrry
County items. Mosaics are often re- have a stackat home this high," vendors at the festival. In Allana Morgan of Crawford- stown and Ronnie Worrell of
SBeautiful cyled pieces. They can be com- and she brings her hand about this endeavor, time is their ville and Marcus Worrell of Tal- Hosford. He is a 2003 graduate
posed of broken chiha, plates a yard from the ground. main investment. Materials lahassee were married March 14 of Blountstown High School, an
and other bits of glass or pot- "My daughter, Shelby, are recycled, except for that in an intimate ceremony at the Army veteran and is employed
tery. As part of Keep Wakulla gave me a necklace like this bit of crochet string. When Morgan home in Crawfordville. by Lithohaus Printers in Tal-
County Beautiful's mission is for Mother's Day in seventh the necklaces are assembled, The ceremony was performed lahassee.
Marj Law to promote recycling, I like to grade," she continues. The Shelby and Claire spray a cear by Worrell's uncle, the Honor- The maid of honor was Holly
S see mosaics. woman explains how she coat of finish on them to give able Kevin Grover of Calhoun Dodson of Crawfordville. John
Snnchnnnv's Worm Grulnt Moving to another booth, I makes them. First, she takes a gloss and to help make them County. Ward was the best man.


think I'm looking at glass bead
necklaces. No, something's dif-
ferent. I catch the eye of the
vendor.
"What are those things
made of?" I asked her. "They're
made from old magazines," she
replied.
"Unh-huhl" I think. Doesn't
make any sense to me.
"Looks like a bead, feels like
a bead..."
"Reallyl" she says. "A lot of
my friends save their old maga-


ing Festival was a lot offuni Of
course, I was watching to see if
anyone would be cleaning up
items of litter.
Upon arriving, the first per-
son I saw was a man pushing
a rolling cart. Long extended
tongs in one hand, he gathered
trash and tossed it in the cart.
And he didn't grab only the
large pieces. I sa N him pick up
a straw and several cigarette
butts, too.
,;fIt's great to see you pick-
ing up the trash! Thank youl" I
applauded. "Gettin' paid to do
it!" he replied.'
Well, who cares why he was
doing it? I'm excited to know
that the people who put on this
festival thought in advance of
the possible trash problem and
took care of it right away.
Since litter was under con-
trol I start looking for recycling
at the booths.
One vendor was selling


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a strip of colored magazine
paper. She pantomimes rolling
the strip with a toothpick into
a cylindrical ball. She said she
slides out the toothpick and
slides in a piece of crochet
string.
"The challenge is finding
enough of the right color," she
continues. "You roll up a whole
bunch, and try to find 30 that
match"
This is how Shelby Clarke
and her mother, Claire Branch,


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e AI


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strong enough to wear over
and over.
I had a great time at the
festival Those vendors were so
creative. The sun was shining.
Music was playing. People were
welcoming and friendly.
Can't wait to come to Sop-
choppy's next Worm Grunting


The


The bride is the daughter of
Doug and Brenda Morgan of
Crawfordville and Crystal and
Andy Warrington of Paxton. She
is a 2003 graduate of Wakulla
High School and is employed
by Wakulla Bank.
The groom is the son of Greg
and Jody Layfield of Blount-


-I


Wakulla


A reception was held after.
the ceremony. The couple took;
a honeymoon trip to Panama'
City Beach and reside in Tal-
lahassee.
The couple extended a spe-,
cial thanks to the family mem-
bers and friends who helped
make their special day happen.


Phone

(850) 926-7102

Fax

(850) 926-3815


3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., P.O. Box 307,
Crawfordville, FL 32327
www.thewakullanews.com


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009 Page 5B

^ - -- ___ --- - - --- --- - -- --A


Deadline


Monday

11:00 A0.C LAI f IED


926-7102,


35 Cents


A *Per Word



A DS i$8.00

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Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


CATEGORIES 265 Computers and Internet
270 Electronics
100 EMPLOYMENT 275 Home Furnishings
105 Business Opportunities 280 Home Appliances
110 Help Wanted 285 Jewelry
111 Medical/Dental Help Wanted 290 Musical Instruments

112 Office/Administrative Help Wanted 295 Building Materials
113 Construction Help Wanted 300 MISC. FOR SALE
114 Miscellaneous Help Wanted 305 Machinery, Tools & Equipment
115 Work Wanted 310 Firewood Products
120 Services and Businesses 315 Farm & Garden Equipment
125 Schools and Instruction 320 Farm Products & Produce
130 Entertainment 325 Horses
200 ITEMS FOR SALE 330 Livestock, Farm Animals
205 Antiques 335 Pets
210 Auctions. 340 Plants
215 Auto Parts and Accessories 345 artery, Trade
345 Swap, Barter, Trade
220 Cars 350 Wanted to Buy Csh
225 Trucks 355 Yard Sales
230 Motor Homes and Campers 400 NOTICES a
235 Motorcycles and 4-Wheelers 410 Free Items
240 Boats and Motors 415 Announcements
245 Personal Watercraft 40 Card of Thanks
250 Sporting Goods 425 Occasion Cards
255 Guns 430 In Memoriam
260 Business Equipment 435 Lost and Found


440 Personals and Notices
500 REAL ESTATE, HOMES, MOBILES.
S 505 Acreage for Lease
510 Acreage for Sale
515 Apartments for Rent
520 Townhouses for Rent
525 Townhouses for Sale
530 Commercial Property for Rent

535 Commercial Property for Sale
540 Farms for Sale
545 Homes for Sale
550 Homes with Acreage for Sale
555 Houses for Rent
560 Land for Sale
565 Mobile Homes for Rent
570 Mobile Homes for Sale
575 Mobile Homes with Land for Sale
580 Rooms for Rent/Roommates Wanted
585 Wanted to Reqt
590 Waterfront Homes/Land for Sale
595 Vacation Rental
600 Open House



CALL 926-7102 TODAY
Email: classifieds@thewakullanews.net


Legal Notice



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
-2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND .
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 06-18-FC
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, AS TRUSTEE,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RICHARD T. ANDERSON; BARBARA H. AN-
DERSON; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendant(s).
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Motion and Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale
Date dated the 30th day of March, 2009, and
entered in Case No. 06-18-FC, of.the Circuit
Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for
Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMORGAN
CHASE BANK, AS TRUSTEE is the Plaintiff
and RICHARD T. ANDERSON; BARBARA H.
ANDERSON; JOHN dOE; JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. I
will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash
at the FRONT DOOR at the Wakulla County
Courthouse, in CRAWFORDVILLE, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 30th day of April, 2009,'the
following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 5, BLOCK J, SONGBIRD, PHASE II, A
SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3
PAGES 113 THR UGH 116, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS CF WAKULLA COUNTY;
FLORIDA.
In accordance with he American with Disabili-
ties Act of 1990 (AiA), disabled persons who,
because of their disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact the ADA Coordinator at 3056
S Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL
32327 or Telephone'Voice (850) 926-0905 not
later tian five business days prior to such pro-
ceeding.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
fromthe sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 3rd day of April,,2009
BRENT X.THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
April 16,23, 2009



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 65-2009-CA-000047FC
CIVIL DIVISION
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COM-
PANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR JPMORGAN
MORTGAGE ACQUISITION TRUST
2007-CH4 ASSET BACKED PASS
THROUGH CERTIFICATES 2007 SERIES
CH4, -
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROSCOE GRANT, et al,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
ROSCOE GRANT
Last Known Address: 83 Covington Circle,
Crawfordville, FL 32327
Also Attempted at: 182 Magnolia Ridge, Craw-
fordville, FL 32327
Current Residence Unknown
CYNTHIA GRANT
Last Known Address: 83 Covington Circle,
Crawfordville, FL 32327
Also Attempted.at: 182 Magnolia Ridge, Craw-
fordville, FL 32327, 3711 Shamrock W. St.,
Tallahassee, FL 32309 and 2741 Needle Palm
Way, Tallahassee, FL 32309,
Current Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Fore-
closure of Mortgage on the following de-
scribed property:
LOT 57, VILLAS AT COVINGTON PARK, A
SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4,
PAGE 13 OF PUBLIC RECORDS IN WA-
KULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to It, on Marshall C. Watson,
P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120, FT. LAU-
DERDALE, FL 33309 within thirty (30) days
after the first publication of this Notice in THE
WAKULLA NEWS and file the original with the
Olerk of this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the complaint.
I1 accordance with the American with Disabili-
ties Act of 1990 (ADA), disabled persons who,
because of their disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact the ADA Coordinator at 3056
Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordvllle, FL
32327 or Telephone Voice (850) 926-0905 not
lqter than five business days prior to such pro-
cpeding.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court
this 6th day of April, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND'
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Seal, Wakulla.County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
April 16, 23, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE IN THE
1ST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SECOND
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL FOR WAI
JURISDICTIONIpVISION
CASE NO.: 06-22-FC
WELLS FARG
DB STRUCTURED PRODUCTS, INC.
Plaintiff,
Plaintiff
vs.
vs.
JAMEY N. S
IVORY GUYTON JR. A/KA/IVERY GUYTON, SPIVEY, et al.
JR., IF LIVING, AND IF DEAD, THE UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, Defendant(s).
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER N
PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST IVORY TO: JAMEY N
GUYTON JR. A/K/A VERY GUYTON, JR.; SPIVEY and
IRISH OLIVIA GUYTON, IF LIVING, AND IF JAMEY N. S
DEAD, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, SPIVEY, and
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIEN- through, under
ORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES) AND ALL Defendants,
OTHER PA RTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST alive, whether
BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST IRISH heirs, devisee
OLIVIA GUYTON; JOHN DOE AND JANE creditors, trust
DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSES- ants
SION
Current Resic
Defendant(s) known address
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE 43 Fair Way,
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a YOU ARE N(
close a mortg
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure Wakulla Coun
dated March 25, 2009 entered in Civil Case
No. 06-22-FC of the Circuit Court of the 1ST LOT 9, THE -
Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, SUBDIVISIO
Crawfordville, Florida, I will sell to the highest THEREOF R
and best bidder for cash at THE FRONT PAGE 51 OF
DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE at the WA- WAKULLAC
`KULLA County Courthouse located at 3056 WAKULLAC"
Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville, Flor- hs been file
ida, at 11:00a.m. on the 7th day of May, 2009 ren fle
the following described property as set forth in quired to ser
said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: PA.; Plaintif
LOT 17 AND A PORTION OF LOT 18 18820 U.S. I
Clearwater, F
BEGIN AT AN IRON PIPE MARKIG THE 22, 2009orwi
NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 17 OF PAN publication of
CERA, SECTION 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER original with
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN Crawfordville
PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 35 OF THE PUBLIC 32327, either
RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLOR- ney or immedi
IDA SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE fault will be e
SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY demanded in
OF STATE ROAD NO: 61, FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 69 DE- WITNESS my
AGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST this 9th day of
ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY
310.46 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED'
#7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID Cl
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH
18 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 15 SECONDS
EAST 487.87 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED
#7160) LYING ON THE NORTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF AVENUE
MARIA, THENCE RUN NORTH 71 DE- IF YOU ARE
AGREES 09 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST WHO NEEDS
ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY ORDER TO
310.39 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE CEEDING, Y
LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY COST TO YO
RUN NORTH 18 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 18 CERTAIN AS!
SECONDS WEST 494.49 FEET TO THE LETHA WELI
POINT OF BEGINNING. WITHIN 2 W
CEIPT OF TH
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus IF YOU ARI
from the sale, if any, other than the property PAIRED, CAL
owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must
file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 25 day of March, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS.
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Seal, Wakulla County Clerk ,. IN THE
of the Circuit Court) 2ND JUDIC
In accordance with the Americans With Dis- AND F
abilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact Court Administra-
tion at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordvllle, Deutsche Bar
Florida 32328, telephone (850) 926-0905, not Trustee and C
later than seven (7) days prior to the proceed- Loan Trust
ing. If hearing impaired, (TDD)
1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, Plaintiff,
via Florida Relay Service.


CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
KULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 09000052CA
iO BANK, N.A.



PIVEY, JR. A/K/A JAMIE N.



NOTICE OF ACTION
N. SPIVEY, JR. A/K/A JAMIE N.
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SPIVEY, JR. A/K/A JAMIE N.
all unknown parties claiming by,
er or against the above named
who are not known to be dead or
r said unknown parties claim as
as, grantees, assignees, lienort,
itees, spouses, or other claim-

lence Unknown, but whose last
s was:
Crawfordville, Florida 32327
OTIFIED that an action to fore-
age on the following property in
ty, Florida, to-wit:
FAIRWAYS AT WILDWOOD, A
N AS PER MAP OR PLAT
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3,
STHE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
d against you and you are re-
ve a .copy of your written de-
, to it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM,
's attorney, whose address is
Highway 19 North, Suite 212,
:lorida 33764, on or before May
within thirty (30) days after the first
this Notice of Action, and file the
the Clerk of this Court at 3056
SHighway, Crawfordville, FL
before service on Plaintiff's attor-
lately thereafter; otherwise, a de-
nterid against you for the relief
'he complaint petition.
y hand and seal of the Court on
fApril, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
LERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- BECKY WHALEY
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Seal, Wakulla County Clerk.
of the Circuit Court)
A PERsbN WITH A DISABILITY
S ANY ACCOMMODATION IN
PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
OU ARE ENTITLED, AT NOT
OU, TO THE PROVISION OF
DISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT
LS, (850) 926-0905 EXT. 222,
WORKING DAYS OFYOUR RE-
lIS TEMPORARY INJUNCTION.
E HEARING OR VOICE IM-
.L TDD 1-800-955-8771.
April 23, 30, 2009


CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
IAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY
Case #:2008-CA-000156
nk Trust Company Americas, as
Custodian for EqulFirst Mortgage
05-1,


April 16, 23, 2009
Cynthia J. Jones; Fletcher Christian; Deborah
Christian; United States of America Depart-
ment of Treasury; State of Florida, Depart-
ment of Revenue
nDefndant/(s


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 65-2008-CA-000197
DIVISION
SUNTRUST BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.


JUDITH G. SALMA, et al,
Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Fi-
nal Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated
March 23, 2009 and entered in Case No.
65-2008-CA-000197 of the Circuit Court of the
SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA
County, Florida wherein SUNTRUST BANK,
N.A., Is the Plaintiff and JUDITH G. SALMA;
ROGER D. PULLIUM; are the Defendants, I
will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash
at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the
7th day of May, 2009, the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment:
LOT 14, DARSEY VILLAGE, ACCORDING
TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 76, PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA,
A/K/A LOT 14 DARSEY VILLAGE, SOP-
CHOPPY, FL 32358
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the LIs Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this
Court on March 26, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
April 16, 23, 2009


NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
the 23rd day of March, 2009, entered in Civil
Case No. 2008-CA-000156 of the Circuit
Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wa-
kulla County, Florida, wherein Deutsche Bank
Trust Company Americas, as Trustee and
Custodian for EquiFirst Mortgage Loan Trust
2005-1, Plaintiff and Cynthia J. Jopes are de-
fendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash, AT THE FRONT DOOR OF
THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY
319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA AT 11:00
A.AM. on May 7th, 2009 the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 17, 18 AND 19, BLOCK "29", WAKULLA
GARDENS, UNIT NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION AS
PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 41, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN
THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THS LIS PENDENS MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY
WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN
ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO
COST TO YOU, THE PROVISION OF CER-
TAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT
WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056
CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORD-
VILLE; FL 32327 WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS
OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE OF
SALE: IF YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED
CALL: 1-800-955-8771; IF YOU ARE VOICE
IMPAIRED CALL: 1-800-955-8770.
DATED at CRAWFORDVILLE, Florida, this
26th day of March, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)


April 16, 23, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY1"
CASE #: 2008-CA-000208
DIVISION
UNC:
MTGLQ Investors, L.P.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
James Daryl Baker a/k/a James Baker a/k/a
Jimmy Baker
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
the 23rd day of March, 2009, entered in Civil
Case No. 2008-CA-000208 of the Circuit
Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wa-
kulla County, Florida, wherein MTGLQ Inves-
tors, L.P., Plaintiff and James Daryl Baker
a/k/a James Baker a/k/a Jimmy Baker are de-
fendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash, AT THE FRONT DOOR OF
THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY
319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA AT 11:00
A.M. on the 7th day of May, 2009 the following
described property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to-wit:
BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST
QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER
(N 1/2 OF SW 1/4 OF NE 1/4 OF SECTION
EIGHTEEN (18), TOWNSHIP THREE (3)
SOUTH, RANGE ONE (1) WEST AND RUN
NORTH 407 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 100
FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 200 FEET,
THENCE RUN EAST 10 FEET, THENCE
RUN SOUTH 207 FEET, THENCE RUN
EAST 90 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, BEING IN SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 3
SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST.
THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS
ALSO DESCRIBED (BY SURVEY) AS FOL-
LOWS:
BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST
QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER
OF SECTION 18 TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH,
RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES
21 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST 407.00
FEET, THENCE SOUTH 86 DEGREES 36
MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 100.07
FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 12
MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 200.00 FEET,
THENCE NORTH 86 DEGREES 26 MIN-.
UTES 58 SECONDS EAST 10.01 FEET,
THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 21 MINUTES
23 SECONDS EAST 207.00 FEET, THENCE
NORTH 86 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 58 SEC-
ONDS EAST 90.07 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
ALSO:
BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST
QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER
OF SECTION EIGHTEEN (18), TOWNSHIP
THREE (3) SOUTH, RANGE ONE (1) WEST
AND. RUN SOUTH 01.DEGREES 21 MIN-
UTES 23 SECONDS EAST 62.00 FEET TO
THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE MAIN-
TAINED RIGHT OF WAY OF WHIDDON
LAKE ROAD THENCE RUN SOUTH 86 DE-
GREES 26 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST
90.00 FEET ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY,
THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY
RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 23
SECONDS WEST 62.00 FEET, THENCE
RUN NORTH 86 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 58
SECONDS EAST 90.07 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
TOGETHER WITH A DOUBLEWIDE MO-
BILE, YEAR: 1986, MAKE: CATA, HAVING
VIN#: 7484A AND VIN: 7484B AND TITLE
NUMBER 42794583 AND 42793547, PERMA-
NENTLY AFFIXED THEREON.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN
THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LS PENDENS MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY
WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN
ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO
COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF
CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT
WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056
CRAWFORDVILI.E HIGHWAY, CRAWFORD-
VILLE, FL 32327 WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS
OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE OF
SALE: IF YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED
CALL: 1-800-955-8771; IF YOU ARE VOICE
IMPAIRED CALL: 1-800-955-8770
DATED at CRAWFORDVILLE, Florida, this
26th day of March, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
April 16, 23, 2009


NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Stor-
age Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83,
Part IV, that ABC Storage will hold a sale by
sealed bid on Saturday, May 9, 2009 at 10:00
a.m. at 3743 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawford-
ville, FL 32327, of the contents of Mini Ware-
house containing personal property of:
CLIFFORD SUTCLIFFE
B. THOMAS BROWN
ELAINE THORNBURG
CHRISTOPHER GRIFFIN
ANTONIA CARRIN
IRENE HARRELL
SHARA HARVEY
Payments must be made on Friday, May the
8th, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. before the sale date of
May 9th, 2009. The owners may redeem their
property by payment of the Outstanding Bal-
ance and cost by contacting ABC Storage at
508-5177. Or by paying in person at the ware-
house location.
April 23, April 30, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT OF
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FL
FOR WAKULLA C(
Case #

Deutsche Bank National Tr
Trustee for the Certificateh
view Home Loan True
Asset-Backed Certificates, S
Plaintiff,
vs.
Della Tully; Option One Mi
Inc. as successor in interest
Mortgage Corporation
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF S
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVE
Order of Final Judgment of I
March 23rd, 2009, entered
2008-CA-107FC of the Cirdu
Judicial Circuit in and for
Florida, wherein Deutschi
Trust Company, as Trustee
holders of Soundview He
2006-OPT4, Asset-Backed C
2006-OPT4, Plaintiff and D
fendant(s), I will sell to the
bidder for cash, AT THE Fl
THE WAKULLA COUNTY
LOCATED AT CHURCH ST
319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL
A.M. on May 7, 2009 the fo
property as set forth in said
to-wit:
LOTS 1 AND 2, BLOCK 56,
DENS UNIT FIVE, A SUBD
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF,
IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56
RECORDS OF WAKULL4
IDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING
THE SURPLUS FROM TH
OTHER THAN THE PROPE
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 D
SALE.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON Wl
WHO NEEDS ANY ACCO
ORDER TO PARTICIPAIT
CEEDING, YOU ARE EN
COST TO YOU, THE PRO
TAIN ASSISTANCE, PLE
WAKULLA COUNTY COU
CRAWFORDVILLE HIGH.
VILLE, FL 32327 WITHIN 2
OF YOUR RECEIPT OF T
SALE: IF YOU ARE HEA
CALL: 1-800-955-8771; IF
IMPAIRED CALL: 1-800-955
DATED at CRAWFORDVII
26th day of March, 2009.
BREN
CLERK OF THE
BY -s-
AS
Seal, Wa
o




IN THE CIRCUIT COU
SECOND JUDICIAL CI
FOR LEON COUNTY
CASE

SARAH A. HILLMAN
Petitioner
and
CHRISTOPHER SH6LES
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTI
DISSOLUTION OF M
TO: Christopher Sholes
500 6th Street
Palaclos, Texas 77465
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
filed against you'and that yc
serve a copy of your written
to it on Sarah A. Hillman,
611 E. Park Ave. #1, Tal
32301 on or before April 24,
original with.the clerk of thi
Monroe Street, Tallahassee
service on Petitioner or imi
ter. If you fail to do so, a d
tered against you for the re
the petition.
Copies of all court document
eluding orders, are avallab
the Circuit Court's office.
these documents upon requi
You must keep the Clerk of
office notified of your curre
may file Notice of Current
Suprere Court Approved F
12.915.) Future papers in t
mailed to the address on re
office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, F
Rules of Procedure, requires
disclosure of documents and
ure to comply can result in
Ing dismissal or striking of pl
Dated march 13,2009.

Cle
BY s -C
AS
Api


THE 2ND
ORIDA, IN AND
COUNTY


NOTICE OF ACTION


TO:
: 2008-CA-107FC THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FREDA M.
Division MOORE A/K/A FREDA. M. WHITE A/K/A
FREDA MANNING WHITE
ust Company, as LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
holders of Sound- 160 LAUGHING GULL LANE
st 2006-OPT4, CARRABELLE, FL 323228004
aries 2006-OPT4,
CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
mortgage Services, THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFEN-
t to H & R Block DANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
ALE GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
N ursuantto an LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
Foreclosure dated UNKNOWN
in Civil Case No.
it Court of the 2nd CURRENT ADDRESS:
Wakulla County, UNKNOWN
e Bank National
for the Certificate- YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
ome Loan Trust close a mortgage on the following property in
certificates, Series WAKULLA County, Florida:
ella Tully are de-
highest and best COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE
RONT DOOR OF MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST
COURTHOUSE CORNER OF THE WEST HALF OF THE
REET, HIGHWAY NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTH-
.ORIDA AT 11:00 EAST QUARTER OF SECTION 1, TOWN-
illowing described SHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, FRANKLIN
SFinal Judgment, COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT LYING ON
THE CENTERLINE OF COW CREEK ROAD
(STATE ROAD NO. S-370) AND THENCE
WAKULLA GAR- RUN NORTH 39 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 36
VISION AS PER SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTER-
AS RECORDED LINE 2520.31 FEET, THENCE LEAVING
,OF THE PUBLIC SAID CENTERLINE RUN NORTH 04 DEa--
COUNTY, FLOR- AGREES 46 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST
40.13 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENTrI
(MARKED # 1254) LYING ON THE NORTH-
AN INTEREST IN ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID
E SALE, IF ANY, COW CREEK ROAD (STATE ROAD NO.
;RTY OWNER AS S-370), THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES
PENDENS MUST 58 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST ALONG
lAYS AFTER THE SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 682.27
FEET TO A 3 INCH ROUND CONCRETE
MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE
TH A DISABILITY LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY
)MMODATION IN RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 32 ,
E IN THIS PRO- SECONDS EAST 415.41 FEET TO THE WA-
TITLED, AT NO TER'S EDGE OF THE OCHLOCKONEE
VISION OF CER- RIVER FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
=ASE CONTACT FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND
RTHOUSE, 3056AW LEAVING SAID WATER'S EDGE RUN
AY, CRAWFORD- SOUTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 32 SEC-
HIS NOTICE OF ONDS WEST 415.41 FEET TO A 3 INCH
RING IMPAIRED ROUND CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED
YOU ARE VOICE #2919) LYING ON THE NORTHERLY
-8770. RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID COW
CREEK ROAD (STATE ROAD NO. S-370),
LLE, Florida, this- THENCE RUN WEST ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 106.12 FEET
TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED
IT X. THURMOND #1254), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF
CIRCUIT COURT WAY BOUNDARY RUN,NORTH 00 DE-
LETHAM. WELLS GREES 06 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST
DEPUTY CLERK 413.61 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT
kulla County Clerk (MARKED #1254) LYING ON THE WATER'S
fthe CircuitCourt) EDGE OF SAID OCHLOCKONEE RIVER,
THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 01
MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID
April 16,23, 2009 RIVER'S EDGE 105.88 FEET, MORE OR
LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING
has been filed against you and you are re-
IRT OF THE quired to serve a copy of your written de-
RCUIT, IN AND fenses within 30 days after the first publica-
, FLORIDA tion, if any, on Florida Default Law Group;
P.L., Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
NO.: 2009DR778 9119 Corporate Lake Drive, Suite 300,
DIVISION Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original
with this Court either before service on Plain-
tiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once each week
for two consecutive weeks in the The Wakulla
News.
iN B WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court
ON FORG on this 15th day of April, 2009.
MARRIAGE
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
n action has been (Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
n action has been of thoYe Circuit Court)
ou are required to ofthe Circuit Court)
Defenses, if any,
whose address s Any persons with a disability requiring reason-
lahassee, Florida able accommodations should call Clerk of Cir-
2009, and file the cult Court at (850) 926-0905.
s Court at 201 N.
SFL 32301 before April 23, May 7, 2009


medlately thereaf-
efault may be en-
elief demanded in

its in this case, in-
le at the.Clerk of
You may review
est.
the Circuit Court's
ant address. (You
Address, Florida
Family Law Form
his lawsuit will be
cord at the clerk's

lorida Family Law
s certain automatic
d Information. Fail-
sanctions, includ-
eadings.


BOB INZER,
erk of Circuit Court
;YNTHIA McREED
DEPUTY CLERK
l 16, 23, 30, 2009
May 7, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-000127
DIVISION:
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.

FREDA M. MOORE A/K/A FREDA M. WHITE
A/K/A FREDA MANNING WHITE, et al,
Defendant(s).


WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Legal Services
Request for Proposal
Advertisement Number: 2009-011
Advertisement Begin Date/Time: April 3, 2009
at 8:00 a.m.

Board Decisions will be available at:
3093 Crawfordville Highway
196 Ochlockonee Street
Crawfordville, FL 32327
Crawfordville, FL 32326
Sealed responses will be opened at 3093
Crawfordville Highway at 2:00 p.m. on May 1,
2009.
Please direct all questions to:
Debbie DuBose
Phone: 850.926.9500
FAX: 850.926.9006
e-mail: ddubose@mywakulla.com
RFP bid documents will be available at
http://www.mywakulla.com or can be picked
up at both locations listed above after 8:00
a.m. on Friday, April 3, 2009.
Any person with a qualified disability requiring
special accommodations at the bid opening
shall contact purchasing at the phone number
listed above at least 5 business days prior to
the event. If you are hearing or speech im-
paired, please contact this office by using the
Florida Relay Services which can be reached
at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD).
The Board of County Commissioners reserves
the right to reject any and all bids or accept
minor irregularities in the best interest of Wa-
kulla County.
April 9,16, 22, 2009


L i I I









Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009


Defendant(s).
NOTI


Legal Notice


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 65-2008-CA-000230
DIVISION
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COM-
PANY, AS TRUSTEE, IN TRUST FOR THE
REGISTERED HOLDERS OF ARGENT SE-
CURITIES INC., ASSET-BACKED
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2006-M2,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JUNE M. SMITH, et al,
Defendantss.
/
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Fi-
nal Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated
March 23, 2009 and entered In Case No.
65-2008-CA-000230 of the Circuit Court of the
SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA
County, Florida wherein DEUTSCHE BANK
NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY. AS TRUS-
TEE, IN TRUST FOR THE REGISTERED
HOLDERS OF ARGENT SECURITIES INC.,
ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2006.M2, is the Plaintiff and
JUNE M. SMITH; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE
CORPORATION, III; GE MONEY BANK; are
the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF
THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at
11:00AM, on the 7th day of May, 2009, the fol-
lowing described property as set forth In said
Final Judgment:
LOTS 6, LOCK 4 OF WAKULLA GARDENS
UNIT TWO, AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1,
PAGE 42 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
A/K/A 31 SPOKAN TRL, CRAWFORDVILLE,
FL 32327
SAny person claiming an Interest In the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lie Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale,
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this
Court on April 3, 2009.
BRENT X.THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- BECKY WHALEY
AS DEPUTY CLERK
.(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
M0h .-fr-


CE OF FORECLOSURE


Notice is hereby given that the undersigned
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County,
Florida, will on the 7th day of May, 2009, at
11:00 o'clock A.M. at the Front door of the
Wakulla Courthouse located In Crawfordville,
offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the
highest and best bidder for cash, the follow-
Ing-described property situate In Wakulla
County, Florida:
Lot 28, Block 58, Wakulla Gardens, Unit IV as
shown by plat of said subdivision of record on
page 468 plat book no. one of the public re-
cords of Wakulla County, Florida
pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a
case pending in said Court, the style of which
Is indicated above.
Any person or entity claiming an Interest In the
surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure
sale, other than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens, must fire a claim on
same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days
after the foreclosure sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal of said
Court this 26th day of March, 2009.
In accordance with the Americans with Dis-
abilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to particiate In this
proceeding should contact Court Administra-
tion at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville,
Florida 32328, telephone (850) 926-0905, not
later than seven (7)days prior to the proceed-
ing. If hearing Impaired, (TDD)
1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)

April 16, 23, 2009


Board of County Commissioners
Regular Board Meeting
Tuesday, March 17, 2009
The Board of County Commissioners In and
for Wakulla County, Florida met In regular ses-
sion on Tuesday, March 17, 2009'at 6:00 p.m.
with Chairman Howard Kessler presiding.
Present were Commissioners George Green,
Lynn rArtz, Alan Brock and Mike Stewart. Also
present were County Attorney Ron Mowrey,
County Administrator Ben Pingree and Deputy
Clerk velyn Evans.
Invocation provided by Commissioner Kessler
Pledge of Allegiance by Commissioner
Stewart
APPROVAL OF AGENDA


i iBe C.ircuit oun) CD6:03) Commissioner Stewart made a mo-
April 1, 23, 2009 ton to approve the Agenda with the following
modifications: move recognition of Florida
Football Player Jim Tartt to the beginning of
the Agenda; under Commissioner Stew&rt dis-
cusslon Items add (1) Grant for Upper River
Iridn 1ie ( rant fnr sidewalfks (3 Metinn with


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND CTS 6.:District3 rewarding thewiden-
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR Ing of Highway 319; Item 13 s continued for 2
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL board meetings; under County Attorney add
JURISDICTION DIVISION (1) Code Enforcement seeking foreclosure on
Liens (2) Proposed informal mediation regard-
CASE NO:. 652008-CA0110FC ng civil case 07-70CA Snyder. Second by
AURORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC, Commissioner Green. Motion carried unanr-
AURORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC, mously, 5/0 n
mously, 5/0.
Plaintiff, PUBLIC HEARING
vs. (CD6:13) 1. Request Board approval to con-
illiam esr, duct a Public Hearing to consider adopting
William Cesar, at a., Text Changes to Ordinance 06-28 which es-
tablishes and amends flood hazard areas in
Defendantss. certain specific subdivisions, establishes build-
OTICEOFACTION ng elevations In specific flood hazard areas
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE and regulates fill in specific flood hazard areas
TO: WILLIAM CSAR AND U N i M Commissioner Green made a motion to adopt
UTO WILLIAM CESAR AND UNKNOWN the Ordinance with the Text Changes that
SPOUSE OF WILLIAM CESAR amends Ordinance 06-28 and to include the
whose residence is unknown if he/shethey be 29 Datum Vertical Height Data. Second by
living; and if he/she/they be dead, the un- Commissioner Artz. Voting for: Artz, Green
known defendants who may be spouses, and Kessler. Op osed: rock and tewart.
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, Motion carried, 3 /
creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an
interest by, through, under or against the De- AWARDS AND PRESENTATIONS
fondants, who are not known to be dead or
alive, and all parties having or claiming to D6:0) Recontion of Florida Football
have any right, title or interest in the property layer Jim Tartt-ommissioner Kessler
described in the mortgage being foreclosed a
herein. Commissioner Stewart made a motion to pro-
cialm May 19, 2009 as Jim Tartt Day
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action c Wakula Coun2009 Second by Commissioner
to foreclose a mortgage on the following prop- Artz. Motion carried unanimously, 5/0
erty:
LOT 7 BLOCK H THE FARM SUBDIVISION,
PHASE I, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR CD7:08) Green Living Expo March 21,
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT (CD7 9:0 0 a.m. to 4:00 8Mat Rver
BOOK 3 PAGE 93, OF THE ;PUBLIC RE- 009 from 9:0 am to 400 p.m. at Rer-
CORDS OF WAKULLA COU LTY; LORIDA. pring. Miaale ch.ol
- 'CONSENTAbENDIA-
has been filed against you and you are re-CONSENT EN
quired to serve a copy of your written de- (CD7:17) Commissioner Green made a mo-
fenses, if any, to t on DAVID J. STERN ES. (CD7:17)on to approve the Coner Green made a mo-
yt? on to dOW the ConsenfAgenda.ln Its en-
Plaintiff's attorney, whose, address 'is 900 tlrety. Second by Commissioner Brock. Mo-
South Pine Island Road #400, Plantation, FL lion carried unanimously, s/0.
33324-3920 no later than 30 days from the
date of the first publication of this notice of ac- 2 Approval of Minutes March 3, 2009 Regu-
ton) and file the original with the clerk of this lar Meeting
court either before service on Plaintiff's attor-
ney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a de- 3. Approval of Minutes February 23, 2009
fault will be entered against you for the relief Workshop regarding the Tourist Development
dt t e Worksop regarding the Tourist Development
demanded in the complaint or petition filed Council
herein.
heri. 4. Approval of Minutes March 3, 2009 Work-
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court shop to discuss whether to form additional
at WAKULLA County, Florda, this 14h day of Citizen Advisory Committees or Working
April, 2009. Groups


BRENT X.THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- LETHA M. WELLS
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons with dis-
,abilities needing a special accommodation
should contact COURT ADMINISTRATION, at
the WAKULLA County Courthouse at
850-926-3341, 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.


5. Approval of Payment of Bills and Vouchers
submitted for February 26, 2009 -
March 11, 2009
6. Request Board Ratification of actions taken
at the February 23, 2009 Workshop regarding
the Tourist Development Council
7. Request for Ratification of Board discussion
taken during the February 17, 2009 Workshop
to discuss ways to Increase citizen informa-
tiop, Input, & Involvement In County Govern-
ment


(CD8:30) 19. Request Board consideration of b. County Charter Citizens can hire people to
Staff Analysis regardingin-house versus con- go out get petitions to amend the Charter
traced County Attorny functions
0. hppy s. iamo~ ua


Commissioner Stewart made a motion to ap-
prove the RFQ and direct staff to advertise
and formally bid the outsourcing of legal serv-
ices for the fiscal year 2009/2010 with the
Board serving as the Evaluation Committee.
Second
by Commissioner Green. Motion carried
unanimously, 5/0.
(CDa:55) Commissioner Kessler passed the
gavel and made a motion to reconsider the
previous motion. Second by Commissioner
Artz. Voting for: Kessler and Artz. Opposed:
Brock, Green and Stewart. Motion Failed, 2/3.
(CD8:57) 20. Board consideration to utilize
the existing State Contract Lobbying Firm to
lobby relevant state and federal govermental
entitles to leverage Economic Stimulus Fund-
ing on behalf of Wakulla County
,Commissioner Artz made a motion to author-
ize Governance Services to Lobby for Eco-
nomic Stimulus Funding on behalf of Wakulla
County and authorize theChairman to Exe-
cute an Agreement for Servicas funded at no
more than $17,000.00. Second by Commis-
sioner Brook. Voting for: Artz, Brock, Green
and Kessler. Opposed: Stewart. Motion car-
ried, 4/1.
COMMISSIONER AGENDA ITEMS
16. COMMISSIONER ARTZ
(CD9:43) a. Request Board approval to direct
staff to identify ways to increase demand for
Installation of solar hot water heaters in Wa-
kulla County
Commissioner Artz made a motion to approve
directing staff to identify ways to Increase local
demand for solar thermal. 'Second by Com-
missioner Brock. Motion carried unanimously,
5/0.
b. Request Board approval of Amended Action
Plans to Address the. Board's Priorities for
2008/2009 this item pulled prior to the meet-.
ing
17. COMMISSIONER KESSLER
(CD9:51) a. Request Board approval to direct
ctaff tn rluaelnn an an oaninn'tn the Mnmnran-


c. Happy PatracK's uay
Commissioner Green made a motion to ad-
Burn, seconded by Commissioner Brock.
Motion carried unanimously, 5/0.
10:26 p.m. Meeting adjourned.



105 Business Opportuni-
ties



BR11 YOUR O10
PHOTOS TO LIFE!i
I can fix those
wonderful old pictures,
so you can enjoy them
again, and make
copies to share.

Keep the family heritage
alive with restored
photographs

Just $15 per photo.
850-766-7655
dougapple@gmall.com


CLASSIFIED
$8 Per Week!


Apdrl 23, 30, 2009 8. Request Board approval to schedule a
SWorkshop on May 5, 2009 at 5:00pm to facili-
tate discussion with the Parks & Recreation
Board


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2008-FC-178
FINANCIAL FREEDOM SENIOR HOME
FUNDING CORPORATION
Plaintiff,
vs. '
R. FRANK DONALDSON, DECEASED; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF R. FRANK DONALD-
SON; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA;
STATE OF;:FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF
REVENUE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF
HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT;
LAURIE DONALDSON BLANK; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF LAURIE DONALDSON BLANK;
JONIE DONALDSON BETTINGER; GEORGE
MICHAEL (MIKE) DONALDSON; JULIE L.
DONALDSON RINGEISEN, and any unknown
heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other
unknown persons or unknown spouses claim-
ing by, through and under any of the
above-named Defendants,


CITIZENS TO BE HEARD
(CD7:17) 1. Julia Knight Space needs for
the Panacea Marine Biology 4- Club
(CD7:20) 2. Steve Brown Commissioner
Kessler's use of letterhead paper and Sun-
shine Law Violation
(CD7:25) 3. Ralph Thomas National Asso-
ciation of'Counties expressed concerns about
sending five Wakulla County Employees to
Washington and would like to know the costs
to taxpayers
(CD7:26) 4. Victor Spencer Designated
space for the Panacea 4-H Club
(CD7:28) 5. Cypress Rudloe Space for the
anacea 4-H Club
GENERAL BUSINESS
(CD7:31) 9. Request Board approval of the
oast Guard Auxiliary to use space at the Wa-
kulla Station Fir6 Department and Memoran-
dum of Understanding


450 FLORIDA HOMES
including this CRAWFORDVILLE Home

31a Old Courthouse. Crawfordville
S 3 BR. 2 BA. 1440 SF Home .


Agent: Josh Collins
(919) 345-4759 Benham Real Estate Group
Get your next home at the price you set with NO STARTING BIDS. If you're
buying your first home or your 10th, today's housing market and low interest rates
make this an ideal time for you to buyl


UK IALL 1UK A IKtlt BRKUUHUKt

866-519-2837

OPEN HOUSE:
Sat. & Sun.
May 2-3
MARSHALL 1 to 3 PM.

$3,000 down In a cashiers check for each property. 5% premium on each sale.
All sales subject to seller's approval.
LUe BN: H & M # AB110; B. G. Hudson, Jr. Ns; BK3006844 & AU230


,,'I


i l !Illil-r'


I'I l IiT. Gaupin, Broker
Se1 point' Crawfordville
926 7811 926-5111

Florida Coastal Silver Coast
Properties, Inc. Realty

Immaculate-1,827 sq. ft. home on 1.01 acres in Mill IF
Kitchen equipped, beautiful.yard, possible owner final
call for details. Priced at $199,900. MLS# 194849, pr
#2316-W.

This ICS (Insulated Concrete Form) home is the late!
GREENEST construction. From the roof to the floor
home is top drawer and no cost was spared in constri
3BR/2BA casual elegance from the copula and high ceilF
the screened porch, built-in vacuum system and timed di
sprinklers. 1/2 Mile to boat ramp, marina restaurants or
club...and still only 40 minutes from Florida's Capitol. Pri
$359,000, MLS# 194687, property #4401-W.

Adorable 2BR/1BA on stilts located on 2 very private I
acres. Totally remodeled so it seems quite new. Hardwood i
wood burning stove, carport and shed included. New roof in
& A/C system upgraded. Priced at $117,900. MLS# 19
#4604-L.

REDUCED! Close to shopping yet country livingll Nearly 6
-backs up to bird sanctuary. Mobile homes allowed. $6
VLS# 168571, #103-W

"RENTALS*
URNISHED 2BR/2.5 Condo $1,200/month, security depo
Jired. NO PETS #6341W

;HLOCKONEE BAY3BR/2BAfurnished waterfront house.$
month, security deposit required. PETS ALLOWED. #6343W

ASONAL Snug Harbor Townhome available for rent at $
ek, 2-week maximum schedule in any given month. Comr
II, docks on deep-water canal located in a gated commune
TS
**Licensed Real Estate Agents Needed***
ContactTed orThelma
850-926-7811

2009 ISTHE DATETO LOOK, LINGER & RELOCATE,
SO GO FOR THE GOLD
WWW.C21FCPCOM

Ochlockonee Bay 984-5007


110 Help W d 120 Services and Busi-
SHelp Wanted nesses


Commissioner Brock made a motion to ap-
prove the Coast Guard Auxiliary using space
at the Wakulla County Fire Department Sta-
tion 2 (Wakulla Station) and approve the
Memorandum of Understanding. Second by
Commissioner Artz. Motion carried unani-
mously, 5/0.
iCD7:32) 10. Request for Ratification of
board actions taken at the February 17, 2009
First Budget Workshop regarding the develop-
ment of the FY2009/2010 Budget
Commissioner Brock made a motion to Ratify
Board actions taken at the February 17, 2009
First Budget Workshop regarding the develop-
ment of the FY2009/2010 Budget with Staff
bringing back more specific information re-
garding the alternative revenue options to the
Board. Second by Commissioner Green. Mo-
tion carried unanimously, 5/0.
CD7:34) 11. Request Board approval of the
final draft of the Exclusive Agency Agreement
and the final draft Management Plan with Flor-
ida Foresight, Incorporated for the develop-
ment of the Big Bend Maritime Center and
authorization for the Chairman to sign the Op-
tion Agreements
Commissioner Brock made a motion to ap-
prove the final draft. Exclusive Agency Agree-
ment and the final draft of the Management
Plan With Florida Foresight, Inc. for the man-
agement of the proposed Big Bend Maritime
Center and authorize the Chairman to execute
.the Option Agreements for the purchase of the
properties. Second by Commissioner Artz.
otion carried unanimously, 5/0.
(CD8:16) 12. Request Board approval to
authorize the Chairman to sign the Profes-
sional Services Agreement with Golden Con-
struction for Spring Creek/Shell Point Channel
Markers and to approve payment.
Commissioner Artz made a motion to author-
ize the Chairman to sign the Professional
Services Agreement with Golden Construction
for $22,050.00 and authorize payment. Sec-
ond by Commissioner Stewart. Motion carried
unanimously, 5/0.
13. Request Board consideration of staff re-
search and update regarding Hidden Mead-
ows Subdivision
Continued to later date
(CD8:18) 14. Request Board consideration to
draw upon three (3) Irrevocable Letters of
Credit and proceed with the completion of
paving, sidewalk Improvements and park
amenities within the Hidden Meadows Subdi-
vision Commissioner Brock made a motion for
the Board to direct the County Attorney to
draw upon all available Letters of Credit re-
lated to the Hidden Meadows Subdivision and
direct staff to provide the board with a plan to
complete the required Infrastructure Improve-
ments for the Hidden Meadows Subdivision.
Second by Commissioner Stewart. Motion
carried unanimously, 5/0.
(CD8:24) 15. Request Board approval of the
memorandum of Understanding between Wa-
kulla County and Leon County for the use of
the Leon County Transfer Station
Commissioner Artz made a motion to approve
the Memb of Understanding between Wakulla
County and Leon County for the use of the
Leon County Transfer Station. Second by
Commissioner Brock. Motion carried unani-
mously, 5/0.
(CD8:27) 18. Request Board approval to ap-
ply for a Grant through the Floria Department
of Emergency Management Hazard Mitigation
Grant Program (HMGP)
Commissioner Artz made a motion to author-
ize staff to pursue submission of an applica-
tion to the Florida Department of Emergency
Management Hazard Mitigation Grant Pro-
gram and transfer any required match funding
from the County Emergency Reserve. Second
by Commissioner Brock. Motion care
unanimously, 5/0.


dum- of Understanding between Wakulla
County and University of Florida Cooperative
Extension Service University of Florida Coop-
erative Extension Service. This will be for a
County owned building and possible out build-
Ing at the Northeast corner of the intersection
of Clark Drive and Walker Street for the Pana-
cea 4-H Club.
Commissioner Stewart made a motion to di-
rect staff to develop an expansion to the
Memorandum of Understanding presently ex-
Isting between Wakulla County and University
of lorida Cooperative Extension Service.
Second by Commissioner Brock. Motion car-
ried unanimously, 5/0.
(CD9:59) b. Request Board approval of a
Proclamation Desinating March 31, 2009 as
Children's Day in Wakulla County and April 5,
2009 as Parents and Children's Day In Wa-
kulla County
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to ap-
Sprove a Proclamation designating March 31,
2009 as Children's Day in Wakulla County and
April 5, 2009 as Parents and Children's Day In
Wakulla County. Second by Commissioner
Artz. Motion carried unanimously, 5/0.
COUNTYATTORNEY
(CD10:00) a. Code Enforcement and Re-
corded Liens against non-homestead proper-
ties
Commissioner Stewart made a motion to pur-
sue foreclosing on the five-recorded liens that
are not homestead property as per the Code
Enforcement Ordinance. Second by Commis-
sioner Brock. Motion carried unanimously,
5/0.
(CD10:07) b. 07-70CA Snyder Case/Division
Street In Panacea
Commissioner Stewart made a motion for
Commissioner Artz to be the Board represen-
tative on the informal mediation/meeting re-
garding the Snyder Case. Second by Commis-
sioner Green. Motion carried unanimously,
5/0.
COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR
(CD10:09) a. Town Hall Meeting at Wakulla
Springs on March 25, 2009 at 6:00 p.m.


(CD10:1) b. Ochlockonee Bay Trail -
one-half of the grant monies have gone to
South Florida, everyone Is working diligently to
have the monies returned to this project so
that it can be completed
DISCUSSION ISSUES BY
COMMISSIONERS
(CD10:13) Commissioner Stewart
a. CTST- sidewalks
Commissioner Brock made a motion for the
Chairman to send a letter of support to pursue
a grant for'this project. Second by Commis-
sioner Artz. Motion carried unanimously, 5/0.
b. CTST Upper Wakulla Bridge
Commissioner Brock made a motion for the
Chairman to send a letter of support to pursue
a grant for this project Second by Commis-
sioner Ariz. Motion carried unanimously, 5/0.
c. D.O.T. Meeting In Chipley
Commissioner Brock made a motion to ap-
prove Commissioner Stewart attending a
D.O.T. meeting in Chlpley with CTST mem-
bers and as a representative of the Board to
speak with D.O.T. Officials regarding 319
safety Issues. Second by Commissioner Artz.
Motion carried unanimously, 5/0.
(CD10:23) Commissioner Brock
a. Resolution from Franklin County regarding
Nets


78/55
Mainly
sunny.
Highs in the
upper 70s
and lows in
the mid 50s.


Sunrise:
7:02 AM
Sunset:
a-no mu


7'




83157
Sunshine.
Highs in the
low 80s and
lows in the
upper 50s.



Sunrise:
7:01 AM
Sunset:


83/57
Sunshine.
Highs in the
low 80s and
lows in the
upper 50s.



Sunrise:
7:00 AM
Sunset:


83/55
Partly
cloudy.
Highs in the
low 80s and
lows in the
mid 50s.


Sunrise:
6:59 AM
Sunset:


82/57
Partly
cloudy.
Highs in the
low 80s and
lows in the
upper 50s.


Sunrise:
6:58 AM
Sunset:


Florida At A Glance


80.62


77161


Tampa I
82/62


Area Cities

earwater 82 62 sunny
Crestview 79 53 sunny
Daytona Beach 83 60 sunny
Fort Lauderdale 86 72 ptsunny
Fort Myers 86 63 sunny
Galnesvllle 81 56 sunny
Hollywood 87 70 ptsunny
Jacksonville 80 62 sunny
Key West 79 74 pt sunny
Lady Lake 82 58 sunny
Lake City 79 55 sunny
Madison 78 56 sunny
Melbourne 82 62 sunny
Miami 85 71 ptsunny
N Smyma Beach 81 60 sunny


National Cities
Si S


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Houston
Los Angeles
Miami


69 47 ptsunny
59 43 rain
61 40 sunny
87 62 mst sunny
73 45 mst sunny
85 62 mst sunny
77 55 ptsunny
85 71 ptsunny


cla, m 83 57 sunny
Orlando 84 60 sunny
Panama City 77 61 sunny
Pensacola 77 61 sunny
Plant City 85 59 sunny
Pompano Beach 87 69 pt sunny
Port Charlotte 84 60 sunny
Saint Augustine 79 60 sunny
Saint Petersburg 79 66 sunny
Sarasota 80 61 sunny
Tallahassee 79 54 sunny
Tampa 82 62 sunny
Titusville 82 60 sunny
Venice 81 62 sunny
W Palm Beach 84 67 pt sunny



Mina - psAnC y


Minneapolis
New York
Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


68 51 ptsunny
58 44 rain
95 64 pt sunny
76 51 mst sunny
55 41 cloudy
70 50 pt sunny
57 45 rain


Moon Phases







Last New First Full
Apr 17 Apr 25 May 1 May 9



UV Index

Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
4/22 4/23 4/24 4/2k. 4/26


Very High Very High Very High Very High Very High

The UV Index is measured on a 0- 11 number scale, 0 11
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.


Experienced dock builder. Must
be able to run a crew. For more
information, call Mike at
850-519-3684.

Professional Relations
Representative
Will serve as a liaison between the
agency and the healthcare community
for the Gadsden/Liberty and Wakulla
Franklin area.
Cultivate, develop and enhance
contractual and care relationship with
hospitals, nursing homes, ALF s and
third party payers.
Ensure all referral sources have current
information regarding our programs
and services.
Provide formal and informal education
opportunities with physicians, phy-
sician office staff, hospital's social
workers and discharge planners and
third party payers.
Communicate health care issues to
clinical staff to enhance service
delivery.
B.A. in a relevant field, and/or 5 years
of experience in related activities.
Minimum 1 years marketing, profes-
sional relations and/or sales
experience. Clinical experience prefe-
rred. Excellent communication and
public speaking skills a must. RN
licensure preferred but not required
Great benefit package!
Interested candidates can apply in
person at 2889 Crawfordville Hwy,
Suite C, Crawfordville, FL 32327 or
by faxing a resume to: 850-325-6290
or email your resume to
elba@bigbendhospice.org
EOE/DFWP/ADA
Smoke Free Workplace



Big Bend
Hospice


Affordable Handyman Services.
Interior/Exterior painting, cleaning,
soft/pressure wash, cool seal, car-
pentry and many other odd jobs.
References avail. Bobby/Carol
Lowered rates! 850-926-2462
850-459-1071.

ALL ABOUT...
CONCRETE LANDSCAPE
blocks plants
bricks sod
pavers tractor work
call JOSEPH FRANCIS
850-556-1178/ 850-926-9064

ALTERATIONS All Kinds. Please
call for quotes (850) 508-5294.

Bella's Bed & Biscuit
Doggie Daycare. Overnight board-
ing. Extended stays. Kennel free
home environment. Lots of love &
pampering. 519-4529 or
926-1016.

C & R Tractor/Backhoe Services,
large tract and residential site
clearing rock, dirt, and road base
hauling, call Crandall
(850)933-3346.

Crawfordville Self Storage 3291
Crawfordville Hwy. Climate con-
trolled and regular storage,
24-Hour Video surveillance. Easy
access. 5x10 thru 10x20.
850-228-7197.

Custom Concrete Services
specializing in slabs, engineered
foundations, driveways, patios,
footers, pool decks. Licensed and
insured. Call anytime.
Mike Smith 519-3684


In home child care 6-weeks to 4
yrs. old. References. Meals and
snacks provided. Call 926-6347.


P


Today's Weather

I S S

Wed Thl Fr S at Sun
4/2 -4/23 4/24 4/25 ,`4/26


of







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009 Page 7B


120 Services and Busi-
nesses


"L A


265 Computers and
Internet

Used IBM ThinkPad Notebook
computer. Excellent condition,
features galore, loaded with Soft-
ware Price (firm): $425 Call John


B0 GB & SMALL 850-508-3011. Several available.
Got the D EAL 275 Home Furnishings
of DEALSI __-
Placement to Site $170 Queen Pillow-Top Mattress


:I

3ulf to Bay pool cleaning service.
certifiedd pool-tech owner/opera-
or. Serving Wakulla and Franklin
counties $90/mo.+chemicals.
350-251-9985 or 850-984-3278.













MUNGE'S TREE SERVICE
Professional Work done at
Affordable Rates
24-Hr Emergency Service
850-421-8104
Physical Therapy in your own
backyard
TOSPT In Crawfordville
Call 926-8555
to schedule an appointment



ronesoneaioitenance
AfMGAPrters3, ce
Pressure washing, clean-ups,
repairs & maintenance I
Hgh quali ry wri for
SBlue Colar pnces 850-933-238


TRACTOR WORK
850-814-3229
bushhog work
dirt work



cgouras@comcast.net


VAUSE CONSTRU(IN, LLC
850-984-9988 '.I
850-559-487

Wesley_Vouse@yahoo.com


Warrenroperty Services
Lawn Service, Yard
work, Tractor work,
Bush hogging.
CALL PHILLIPI
Si 850-519-1853]


225 Trucks

997 Docge Dakota: Air, all
3wer, red, 133,000 miles, runs
'eat, velour seats, $3,000.
O0-962-7820.
230 Motor Homes and
Campers I

achman Camper, 1998, 21 ft.
ean and in very good condition.
.ady to use. $4500 (negotiable).
all 850-508-4052.

60 Business Equipment

USED
RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT
Many items to select from.
850-814-3229.

Wakulla
Realty


Sonya Hall
Lic. Real Estate Broker
"Specializing in Wakulla Co."
(850) 926-5084

FOR RENT:
4Br 2Ba Hs $1200
mo. + Sec. Dep.
3Br 2Ba Duplex
$825 mo. + Sec. Dep.
2- 3Br 2Ba TwnHs
$825 mo. & up
+ Sec. Dep.
2 3Br 2Ba Hs $800
mo. + Sec. Dep.
3Br 2Ba SWMH $700
mo. + Sec. Dep.
3Br 2Ba SWMH $675
mo. + Sec. Dep.
2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs
$775 mo. + Sec. Dep.
2Br 2Ba Duplex
$725 mo. + Sec. Dep.


Set. Unused in plastic w/warranty.
222-9879. Delivery avail.
2 Pc Full/twin mattress sets in
sealed plastic NEW $129 ea. set.
Can Deliver. 545-7112.
5 piece SOLID WOOD Pub SET -
$225. NEW IN BOX. 222-9879.
Delivery available.
A NEW 100% LEATHER Sofa,
Loveseat & Chair Set. Espresso,
Solid oak foundation. No vinyl.
Never used. Still in crates. $1100
for set. 425-8374, can deliver.
Beautiful SOLID WOOD 8-pc
Queen Canopy Bedroom Set.
Gorgeous! Dovetail Drawers, NEW
in boxes. Sacrifice $1499.
222-7783. Delivery is available.
Bedroom: 6 piece set, all new.
Sacrifice $550. 545-7112. Delivery
is possible.
Brand new 3pc King mattress set.
Still in wrapper $269. Can deliver.
222-7783.
Complete 5-piece SECTIONAL
Living Room set: sofa, loveseat,
wedge, chair & ottoman. $1399 for
whole set! Hardwood foundation,
lifetime warranty, new in crate, de-
livery avail. 222-9879.
NEW Curio Display Cabinet. Still
boxed. $199.'425-8374.
Wrought.Iron Becd$199. NEW, in
box. 545-7112.


340 Plants I

NICE PLANTS
Boxwoods 3.95/up
Azaleas 4.95/up
We offer many varieties of
plants. We also landscape.
POWELL NURSERY
4410 Crawfordville Rd.
Tallahassee
a77-3509


355 Yard Sales

25 Sale, Friday Saturday,
8AM-2PM. 165 P.A. Sanders Rd.,
Sopchoppy.


Antique wicker, other vintage
stuff, household items. We are
cleaning out the shed. Saturday,
' 8AM-1 PM, 4Dan Miller Rd., signs
at Bloxham and 319.


Songbird 55 Cardinal Court. April
25th, 8AM-12N. Furniture, house-
hold items, toys, clothing, books
and a little bit of everything!

SUPER
s YARD SALE
Small kitchen appliances,
dishes, crystal, housewares,
S new and used clothes, toys,
books, tapes, cosmetics, some
furniture, bake sale, etc.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF
WAKULLA STATION
945 Woodville Hwy.
FRIDAY/SATURDAY April 24 and 25
7 AMUNTL-RAIN OR SHINE


9


VENDORS NEEDED!
Sale Table space available for
your crafts, garage sale, or flea
market Items at the 1st Annual
Community Garage Sale Perry
KOA, May 9th 8AM-12N. $10/per
space. This event Is a fundraiser
to provide financial support to
send children with cancer to
summer camp.
Call KOA Office to reserve today!
850-584-3221





435 Lost and Found


Golden Retriever found on Shell
Point Hwy, Friday April 17th.
Please call 926-3318 or 251-4166.


500 Real Estate



PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it ille-
gal
to advertise "any preference, limi-
tation, or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or national ori-
gin or an intention to make any
such preference, limitation or dis-
crimination." Familial status in-
cludes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing the custody of
children under the age of 18.
This newspaper will not accept
any advertising for real estate
that is a violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To com-
plain of discrimination call HUD
toll free at 1-800-669-9777. The
toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


LENDER


515 Apartments for Rent|
lils~p~mmr~ g


1BR/1BA $600/mo.
ONE MONTH FREE!
416 B. Teal Lane, between the
Hospitals off Miccosukee Road.
1BR/1iBA full size, very nice and
clean, private area, new carpet, full
kitchen, indoor laundry w/washer &
dryer, large bedroom with walk-in
closet, large bathroom with 5' vanity
& sink top, nice covered front patio,
metal blinds. Quadruplex with easy
parking. Senior citizen discount.
Must seelOne-oftthe bek,13 BB
units.around. Call 325-20 00.







FOR RENT
1, 2 AND 3 BEDROOMS
$675- $850

Call 926-1134
for more information.


Brain


I I


4?


530 Comm. Property forh
Rent

DOWNSIZING
Several H n, ,
frontage
office
spaces
available.
Great atmosphere All rents, plus sales
tax, incl. all utilities, trash p/u, full kitchen
use, and clean restrooms. Cleaning of
common area. Rates starting at $300/mo.
First and last month's rent. Call 926-4511.
SPECIAL: 1st MONTH FREE
W/13-month lease.

Woodville Retail
Space Available
Fitness Studio-1000/sf
(Wall to wall mat & mirrors)
Retail -12507sf
(Storefront w/back storage)
Two-Bay Garage-1200/sf
Divided Office Space-1074/sf
Lewiswood Center
421-5039

545 Homes for Sale

3BR/2BA built 2007. 100% financ-
ing at 4% interest. 37 John David
Dr. Short walk to Lake Ellen.
Solid-poured concrete, 9X
stronger, 3X more energy-efficient
than standard wood construction.
850-443-3300.
550 Homes w/ Acreage
for Sale


3 3B R/2 BA
modular home on 1/2 acre
Extra room w/fireplace. Many
beautiful walkways,
fountains, grapevines & .
worksheds. Carport and
garage. Off Hwy 20 on Big
Richard Rd. $61,900.00.
850-926-4511 for more info.


2BR/2BA, Crawfordville. Com-
pletely renovated, huge yard.
'$800/mont + deposit. Includes all
appliances. Call 850-926-2819.


3BR/2BA Custom-built 2007. 37
John David Dr. Short walk to Lake
Ellen. Energy-efficient "green
house" $850/month. Rent-to-own,
owner's finance options.
850-443-3300.


3BR/2BA Mysterious Waters,
walking distance from river. Open
floorplan, excellent condition.
Must see!! $900/mo. Call
850-926-1385.
Crawfordville, clean, large 2 Bed-
room, 2 Full Bath Duplex $675/per
month. Call Linda 850-926-0283.


I


Furnished cottage, Crawfordville.
2BR/1BA, kitchen, Liv/Din area.
CHA & W/D. No pets/smoking.
$650/mo. plus $650/security dep.
(850)926-2293.
Wakulla riverfront community'
w/gated park, boat ramp & dock.
Upscale 2BR/1.5BA, on wooded
acre lot, hardwood floors, fire-
place, skylight, 6-burner Genn-Air
stove, wrap around porch.
$900/month+$700/deposit. Call
850-926-4217,850-459-9774.

560 Land for Sale

2-acre lot for sale near new
Shadeville School, corner of Steel
Court and Spring Creek Hwy. (On
city water). 850-556-1178.


Ochlockonee Bay, Knotty Pine St.
off Surf Rd., 1 mile from Marina.
Lots 19 & 20. Price reduced!
850-984-0192.

PRICE REDUCED!!
Woodville, 1.6 acres.
Corner lot. COse enough to
town, but very private.
$40,000 negotiable.
850-545-1355
565 Mobile Homes for
Rent

2BR 1 BA
2BR 2 BA
3BR 2 BA
$500 $550 per month
deposit required
in St. Marks Crawfordville area.
BRASHTON INVESTMENT
PROPERTIES, LLC
850-251-8338


2BR/1BA M/H Sopchoppy area
Ochlockonee River. $400/month +
deposit. Call 850-570-9943 and
850-962-2358.


3BR/2BA S/W M/H on 12 acres,
gated. 20 Cajer Posey Rd., Craw-
fordville. Call 850-251 -0285.

590 Waterfront Homes/
Land


George's Lighthouse Pointe
Unit A-3, 19 Mashes Sand Road,
Panacea, Condominium Unit.
1BR/1BA, LR, DR, CHA. Front
porch faces pool & tennis court.
Back porch faces marina & view
of bay (Both 12x30). Gated
Community w/beautiful new
landscaping. 825 sq. ft. H&C.
850-545-5057. $229,900


Call and enter a

Classified Ad

Only $8 in









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Wakilla










Denise Folh

classifieds@thewakullanews.net


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loo8Navajo-Trail __/
Dir: Hwy. 319S, L Lower bridge, L Spring.Creek
Hwy., R Navajo, Home.on Left.

Call Susan Jones BlueWater
S566-7584 Realty Group



555 Houses forRent Trying to sell something?






WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 23, 2009
I' '


Make A Difference

at VolunteerWakulla

function April 25


Wakulla County businesses become part of Wakulla Ambassadors program.

Wakulla Ambassadors finish program


The first members of
Wakulla businesses became
"Wakulla Ambassadors" re-
cently at TCC's Wakulla Cen-
ter. Businesses leading the
way in helping the Wakulla
County Workforce become
the friendliest workforce
in Florida included: The
Inn at Wildwood, Century
21 Realty, Shell Point Re-
alty, Eyesavers, and the
Wakulla County Library. As


members of the Wakulla
County Chamber of Com-
merce, these businesses
participated in this program
at no cost, thanks to the
Chamber's Burt Poole Schol-
arship Fund.
Ambassador candidates
enjoyed an evening of ap-'
preciation of the wonderful
benefits of living in Wakulla
County, and shared laugh-
ter about personal experi-


ences.
They departed with a
packet of maps and bro-
chures about the highlights
of our area. The program is
supported by the Wakulla
County Chamber of Com-
merce, the Wakulla Econom-
ic Development Council, the
Wakulla Tourist Develop-
ment Council, Workforce
Plus and Tallahassee Com-
munity College.


The next Wakulla Ambas-.
sador Program is scheduled
for April 28 from 6 p.m. to
9 p.m. at the TCC Wakulla
Center.
The registration fee for
the general public is $50,
and Wakulla County Cham-
ber of Commerce members
will have their registration
fee covered by the Burt
Poole Scholarship fund. To
register, call 922-6290.


Mental health forum produces large turnout


By DANA PECK
Special to The Wakulla News
Confronting the stigma of
mental illness, rehabilitating
mentally ill offenders and of-
fering hope for the mentally ill
uninsured got a one-of-a-kind
hearing in Wakulla County
Judge Jill Walker's courtroom
on April 3.
About 35 judicial system of-
ficials, social service and men-
tal health care professionals.
attorneys and National Alli-
ance on Mental Health (NAMI)
representatives teamed up in
unprecedented numbers for
the courtroom conference led
by Walker.
"I think we need to start
opening our eyes," Walker
said. "Many people we see
coming through the court
system initially present them-
selves with alcohol or drug
addictions, but are in truth
self-medicating to deal with
mental health issues.
"This meeting is a positive
ieap in addressing the real
problem."'Walker said.
High on the list of accom-
plishments was a proposal
for the judiciary to establish
a partnership with NAMI that
would allow court-ordered
attendance for offenders at
NAMI education, counseling
and support programs.
"We've got something here
that will really, really work,"
said Charlie Creel second vice-
president of NAMI Wakulla.
Wakulla County Assistant
State Attorney Jack Campbell
was on board with the part-
nership after hearing NAMl's
commitment to keep the judi-


ciary informed on the partici-
pation and progress of those
attending the programs.
One of the stumbling
blocks identified by Walker
in sentencing offenders to
mental health care has been
the requirement fora medical
diagnosis of mental illness.
Walker said that mentally ill
offenders frequently have no
money for a diagnosis.
Inevitably a significant
number of those without a
diagnosis wind up in prisons
or jails about 250 million, ac-
cording to a 1999 U. S. Bureau
of Justice Statistics report.
Dr. Jim Hilyer, a retired psy-
chologist in Wakulla County,
is working to alleviate what
he sees as unacceptable prob-
lemsfaced by those uninsured
or underinsured.
Hilyer said it is not uncom-
mon for uninsured'parents
coping with a mentally ill
child to be advised that the
only way to secure medical
help is to call the police and
get their child in the criminal
justice system. "There is 'a
much better way to do. this,"
Hilyer said.
Hilyer has volunteered to
work with as many as five
Wakulla County clients in
need of psychological therapy,
and is trying to establish a
consortium of psychologists
to work pro bono "with no
more than one client at a
time."
-Also in attendance at the
courtroom conference were
attorneys Lynn Thompson
and Steven Glazer, and Ralph
Harmsen, administrator of the


SOFF The Eatin' Path o,
u:m*^^ Entry Form' [ ,
S Please drop off form at
any participating Eatin' Place
I
Name
Address

City
State, Zip
Phone
e-mail
- -- ---- ---- ---- -- ---


Substance Abuse and Mental
Health Program of the Florida
Department of Children and
Families (DCF).
Harmsen told the group
that DCF is a partner with
NAMI throughout the state
and would be willing to work
with NAMI Wakulla, including
offsetting copying costs for
education and informative
materials that would be dis-
tributed in Wakulla County.
Another obstacle on the
road to recovery is the stigma,
of mental illness.
Rose Delaney, a NAMI
Florida representative and
newcomer to Wakulla County,
described how the stigma's
prevalence in society delays,
therapy.
Delaney said people are
more willing to acknowledge
having family members who
are substance abusers than
acknowledge family members
with a mental illness.
Not so for the courtroom
conferees. When Delaney
asked for a show of hands of
those who would openly dis-
cuss family members in need
of mental health care, hands
went up quickly..
Walker interpreted the re-
sponse as a healthy sign for
Wakulla County.
"Many are willing to step


beyond the stigma to find the
treatment their loved ones
need," she said.
NAMI Wakulla, which was
organized in January, is devel-
oping programs in Wakulla
County that include the peer-
to-peer program a learning
program for those who want
to maintain mental health
recovery, and the family-to-
family program an education
course for families caring for
those with severe mental ill-
ness, and NAMI Connection,
a recovery support group for
those living with mental ill-
ness.
For more information, call
NAMI Wakulla at 926-1033.
Professional health care
providers willing to volunteer
their help, e-mail Dr. James
Hilyer at fitness_center@msn.
com.








Please

Recycle


Hudson Park -





12: PM -


2:00 PM


joining VolunteerAKULLA to help


MakeA Dffeence!


Visit VolunteerWakulla.org & Learn how you can VOLUNTEER


On Saturday April 25, Vol-
unteerWAKULLA will host its
second annual "Make a Dif-
ference Day" featuring simul-
taneous community service
events (Park
Improvement, Library
Landscaping, Keep Wakulla
Beautiful, Forest Cleanup and
others).
Individuals and organiza-
tions may sign-up on-line at
www.volunteerwakulla.org
or come to Hudson Park at 8
a.m. to learn how to become
involved. After the service
activities are completed,
a free meal door prizes, and
community celebration, held
at 12:30 p.m. at the park, will
complete the day's planned
events.
You might be asking your-
self, "What is a Volunteer
Center and what does it mean
to me other than just on Make
a Difference Day?"
Everyday VolunteerWAKUL-
LA.org will connect.you to
local service opportunities in
Wakulla County. Volunteer-
WAKULLA and the associated
web site use the professional
support of VolunteerLEON,
Volunteer Florida, Hands On
Network, and others. As a
Volunteer Center member,


"t.HwalnIanwjciG. -'- Swing W..ull Cint4 For Mo, Thaln CetuW

Tb)e hahtulla 1Ei





Coastal Restaurant
0000
Home ofAl-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken

Thursday Mornings
Look for Your Complimentary
copy of TOe Wakulla aRetus
(free with any full Breakfast Order)

Hungry Man Breakfast $99


.4.


Breakfast Pltter $29
$19"Breakfast Special

984-2933
1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea


I.




'~*

4'











hie


Crgbi'~w.*43t, A.
fP~


MA A DIFFERENCE DAY!
IV~u~jn ~l~V~r~AVn


SJoin your neighbors and help your community

as : I SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009


And help Make A Difference!

8:00 AM to 2:00 PM

- Select a volunteer location (or go

directly to the volunteer site of your

organization)

Lunch and celebrate Wakulla! Lunch

will be provided for all participants

Enjoy your day and dtank you for


you use these services to re-
cruit volunteers to help with
needs identified through your
church, service cub or busi-
ness. By signing up on-line you
can broadcast your solutions
or community events and "call-
out" to motivated workers for
assistance.
Periodically during the
year, the center will provide
Wakulla County with special-
ized training for both volun-
teers and those who utilize
the services of volunteers. By
combining our efforts into one
center we are becoming more
efficient in responding to the
needs in our community.
Volunteers are essential to
Wakulla County citizen's way
of life. We all reap the benefits
when working together and
it's much more than what busi-
nesses, agencies, and govern-
ments receive from volunteers.
Volunteers gain valuable work
experience while engaged
in services, which provide
career stepping-stones for the
future. As a volunteer you can
increase skill sets while help-
ing your neighbors.
For more information about
"Make a Difference Day" please
call 251-0939 or 509-7063.




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