Title: Wakulla news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00209
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville, Fla
Publication Date: February 19, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028313
Volume ID: VID00209
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Full Text







Wakulla Wildlife and Photo

Contest Information

Please turn to Page 1B


anakulla


Published Weekly,
Read Daily


Our 114th Year, 7th Issue


War Eaglte

advance to


Please turn to Page 6A


Thursday, February 19, 2009


Impact fees may reappear in fall


ByWILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
After holding several meetings to
gather input from citizens, county
commissioners held a workshop
last week to share their views and
worked out a compromise on the is-
sue which is, basically, to leave the
current moratorium in place through
September and re-impose the fees at
a lower rate.
It marked a continuing sense of
cooperation among these commis-
sioners, even with their different.


views, to find compromise that they
can all sign off on.
Even some audience members
at the workshop, held Tuesday,
Feb. 10, expressed appreciation for
the commissioners giving so much
thought to the issue and to citizens'
opinions.
The past board voted 3-2 in Sep-
tember to waive county impact fees


for one year in an effort to jump-
start some construction to help the
building trades. County impact fees
amount to $3,589 on a single-family
home. (School impact fees were also
part of the moratorium at dose to
$7,000 on a single-family home but
district officials have indicated the
money isn't currently needed for
school construction,)


Commissioner Mike Stewart sug-
gested he would support a re-imposi-
tion of county impact fees, but not at
the past level. After a discussion on
the importance of the various capital
costs involved, the board seemed to
agree in principal to impact fees of
around $1,527.
After hearing concerns from other
commissioners that fire protection


and Emergency Medical Services
were a priority, Stewart suggested
that the board impose 100 percent of
the impact fee for fire and EMS, but
only 50 percent of the fees for roads,
and only 25 percent of the,fees for
law enforcement, corrections, library,
and recreation.
The commission could revisit
impact fees,' Stewart said, "when
prosperity returns to the county,"
and make a determination to raise
or lower the fees.
Continued on Page 5A


Panacea

paving

concludes


Wakulla County officials
recently completed road pav-
ing projects in Panacea.
The county commission
sponsored work was com-
pleted by the Public Works
Department on Fishing Fool
Street, Tower Road, and Chat-
tahoochee Street.
In 2002, the road paving
matrix was developed as a
guiding document used by
Public Works.to determine
the order of road paving proj-
ects.
As the county population
increased, paving projects'
have become more complex
due to the cost of construction
and right of way issues, said
County Administrator Ben Pin-
gree. But a significant number
*of paving projects have been
completed.
Wakulla County is excited
to see the progress being
made in this area, he added.
Continued on Page 5A


Black

heritage is

celebrated
By KEITH BLACKMAR
kbladcmar@thewakullanews.net
'February is Black History
Month and the Wakulla Chris-
tian Coalition will host a cel-
ebration Saturday, Feb. 21 at
Hudson Park in Crawfordville..
The event will include an 11
a.m. parade and activities in
the park that will continue
until 4 p.m.
The coalition sponsors two,
high school scholarships that
are awarded to graduating
seniors each May. The Arthur
L Andrews Memorial Banquet
is the major fundraiser for
the scholarships. It will be
held.'at 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 20
at the Wakulla County Senior
Citizens Center.
Continued on Page 3A


Inside

This Week
Comment&Oplnlon.....Page 2A
Week in Wakulla..........Page 2A
Church Page 4A
Sports Page 6A
School Page 7A
People Page BA
Outdoors ................Page 10A
Almanac.................. Page 11A
Sheriff Page 12A
Wakulla Wildlife...........Page 1B
Community...............Page 2B
Business Page 3B


Ii


Commissioner Howard Kessler, right of podium, Mayor John Marks, center, and Brian Desloge, left of Marks.


Getting Our Piece of the Pie


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla County officials have joined
forces with public officials in Leon,
Jefferson and Gadsden counties in
an effort to acquire federal stimulus


Brian Desloge makes a point.


money.
The public officials included Wakulla
County Commission Chairman Howard
Kessler, Tallahassee Mayor John Marks.
Leon County Commission Chairman
Brian Desloge and many others.
The group presented a $1.1 billion
economic stimulus package, that if
funded, would create nearly 16.000 jobs
in the four county region.
Jefferson County Commission Chair-
man Eugene Hall and Gadsden County
Commissioner Douglas Croley also
spoke about the importance of job cre-
ation and regional partnerships.
"As the debate and wrangling of the
stimulus package continues on Capitol
Hill, we have convened as regional
partners to identify critical needs of our
area which are 'shovel ready' and will
put people back to work," said Commis-
sioner Desloge. "The partnership that
you see is vital in illustrating the com-
mitment that we all share in sustaining
and improving the quality of life in our
community."


Commissioner Kessler applauded
the regional efforts as a more effective
method for area communities to receive
stimulus money.
"To my knowledge, we are the only
ones in Florida and perhaps the nation,
doing this." said Kessler. "It gives us
much strength rather than doing it as
an individual entity. It is a great step for-
ward in working with our neighbors."
Wakulla County Administrator Ben
Pingree said Wakulla County's slice of
the stimulus proposal is $42 million of
the $1.1 billion.
"We've been very involved in this
process," he said. "I'm cautiously op-
timist about it. It is unprecedented. It
is desperately needed and we're going
after it." The other exciting aspect of
the project is that "Wakulla County has
a meaningful role at a regional table"
which will "benefit Wakulla County
citizens." he said.
The projects have been grouped into
six categories.
Continued on Page 5A


County

budget

to be lean
By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla- County Com-
missioners and staff are
excited about possible fund-
ing through a four county
Regional Economic Stimulus
program request to the fed-
eral government.
But while county officials
are waiting for answers about
funding of projects from
Washington, D.C., what kind
of budget year can county
residents expect?
Wakulla County Admin-
istrator Ben Pingree said
county officials and residents
can expect the 2009-2010 bud-
get year to be another lean,
difficult year.
"The key this year is to try
and hold the line again," said
Pingree of spending. "This
budget year it's all going to
hit." Pingree was speaking of
lower anticipated property
assessments due to the real
estate slump.
Lower property appraisals
will result in few tax dollars
coming into the county cof-
fers.
The first of what will be
many workshops on the new
budget was held Tuesday,
Feb. 17. The budget process
will continue right up until
the new budget year begins
on Oct. 1.
Two public budget hear-
ings are held in September
when residents can question
how their tax dollars are be-
ing spent.
Pingree said staff has
been instructed to seek as
many grants as possible to
help supplement general
revenue tax collections.
Continued on Page 5A


St. Marks unhappy

about stimulus


Warm Hearts, Wet Clothes


CHAT volunteers and supporters brought
animals to the Rotary Valentine's Celebration
in an effort to get some of the shelter animals
adopted on a dark and rainy Valentine's Day
Saturday, Feb. 14. The CHAT group was one
of the parade "units" that braved the terrible
weather conditions to take part in the annual


event. The rains stayed away long enough for
the parade to pass without the participants or
spectators getting completely soaked. Despite
the weather, the event turnout at Hudson Park
was pretty strong. For more photographs from
the Valentine's Day event, please turn to Page
12A. (Photo by Denise Folh)


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
While many rejoiced at
the economic stimulus proj-
ects created by the county,
St. Marks city commissioners
wanted to know why they and
the City of Sopchoppy weren't
included.
County Administrator Ben
Pingree apologized to the St.
Marks city commissioners at
their meeting on Thursday,
Feb. 12, but said the county
commission was thinking of
all of Wakulla County.
A regional consortium of
local governments worked
together to lobby for funding
of "shovel-ready" projects as
part of President Obama's
economic stimulus plan.
"I apologize for not having
Zoe (Mansfield, St. Marks city
administrator) or yourself at
the table," Pingree said to
Mayor Steve Dunbar.


"We were totally excluded,"
said Mayor Dunbar. When Pin-
gree denied it, Dunbar added:
"The proof's in the pudding.
There's nothing for St. Marks
in there."
City commissioners noted
that the materials for the ap-
proved projects had a map of
Wakulla County showing only
Crawfordville the unincorpo-
rated county seat. The cities of
St. Marks and Sopchoppy were
not shown.
Pingree did vow to work
with the cities in upcoming
project submissions.
One project suggested by
City Commissioner Chuck
Shields is to pave some of
Old Plank Road up as far as
the state prison at the county
line. The paved road would
provide an additional escape
route during hurricane evacu-
ations, Shields said.
Continued on Page 3A


Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century


Two Sections


50 Cents


Revised fees may arrive in September


WMAW-W'# 14 a7m
i 7m,,7uiimus--i aMARP,








Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 19, 2009


Reflections of Valentine's Day


By JUDY CONLIN
Special to The Wakulla News
Having lived as long as I
have, I've had the opportunity
to observe many Valentine's
Days. I have also observed
many of the complaints from
the female half of relation-
ships regarding this holiday.
Valentine's Day seems to
raise the expectations of this
particular cohort. Visions of
hearts, flowers and romance
fill their heads and somehow,
they expect that their male
counterparts are sharing these
same thoughts. In truth, most
males are just wrestling with


Editor, The Newss
On Tuesday, Feb. 10,1I took
a geology class at TCC. By
the end of the class, I was not
the only one in the room who
was depressed. Knowledge is
so important, and many of us
do not have the time to sit in
an evening class to learn more
about our environment. That
is why we rely on our county
officials to make the right de-
cisions for our county.
And, I suppose, our county
officials, rely on "experts" to
help them make decisions
that will affect Wakulla's resi-
dents, our environmental
health, tourism, and fishing.
But what do we, the people,
know about our water? Did
you know that, 90 percent of
the water that we drink in
Florida comes from our aqui-
fer systems?
Did you know that our
water is threatened and that
you can make a difference? I
- am not a scientist, but in my
simple explanation, here it is.
As the earth evolved, Wakulla
County was under the ocean
for a very long period. That is
why we have so much lime-
stone under our soil. The Flori-


what it is they must do to
get through this date without
committing a major blunder.
Their chance of success less-
ens significantly with age.
Young men still have some
romance in them and are
eager to please the apple of
their eye. Young women are
more accepting of tiny tokens
of affection. Most older men
have already conquered their
woman- and are comfortable
that their wooing chores are
done. Grab and go is their
preferred method of choosing
a suitable gift. Older women,
however, now losing much of
their youthful bloom, need
grander gestures to validate
their lovability. This is what
causes some unhappy Valen-
tine's Days.
It is not enough for me to
point out problems. I am here
to help all men everywhere
avoid making mistakes on this
big day. Read on, men. You are
so lucky to have me.
First, here are some things
you must NEVER say:
I would have gotten you


dan aquifer system, which is
comprised of limestone,
stores our drinking water.
Our limestone is not pro-
tected by a layer of clay, or
any other feature. When rain
water, fertilizer, gas, oil,,sew-
age, pesticides or any "run off'
falls on the ground, it goes
into the ground, then into
the limestone, and straight
down to our aquifer, which
is the source of water for our
springs, and ultimately, that is
the water that we drink.
All of these "run off' poi-
sons are changing the springs
(our drinking water) ecology.
We have an increase in
nutrients in the water, which
increases the algae, which
changes the entire makeup of
the springs, which increases
the invasive species, which
alters the springs habitat.
Consumptive uses of ground-
water can eventually cause
a decrease in flow of the
springs, or in some instances,
have caused springs to cease
flowing entirely.
Our spring water is starting
to become salty. Once that
happens, what will we do? We
can't fix it.


Letters Policy
The Wakulla News welcomes your letters, but we request
that you adhere to the following guidelines:
Letters should not be longer than9300 words,
They must include the writers name, home address and
telephone number. (Only name and. town will be listed; the
breast is used solely for the purpose of verification.)
Writers may be limited to one letter per month, depend-
ing upon space limitations.
With very few exceptions, anonymous letters will not
be published.
Letters can be sent via mail or e-mail to kblackmar@
thlewakullanews.net), or they can be dropped off at our
Crawfordville Highway office. The Wakulla News reserves
the right to edit all letters.


The Wakulla News (USPS 644-640) is published weekly at
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla
News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
General Manager: Tammie Barfield.................... tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Editor: Keith Blackmar kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Reporter: William Snowden wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton................estanton@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey...................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net
Bookkeeping: Sherry Balchuck accounting@thewakullanews.net .
Classifieds/In House Sales: Denise Folh.............. classifieds@thewakullanews.net
Circulation: Gary Fazzina circulation@thewakullanews.net

Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable
one year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $26 yr. $14.50 1/2 yr., Out of County $35 yr. $19 1/2 yr.
Out of State $40 yr. $22 1/2 yr..


chocolates but I noticed you've
put on a few pounds.
We've outgrown Valen-
tine's Day. It's for kids.
I got these paper roses
for you. Real ones don't last.
I would have gotten you
something from Victoria's Se-
cret, but I noticed you've put
on a few pounds.
Let's go out for dinner
some other time. It's too
crowded on Valentine's Day.
Pick out something you
need and I'll pay for it.
I thought I'd pick up a
pizza on Feb. 14. That way we
won't have to pay a babysit-
ter.
I would have served you
breakfast in bed, but I noticed
you've put on a few pounds.
I didn't think you'd want
jewelry since you never go
anywhere to wear it.
I got you this bag of
candy. If you got it in a heart
shaped box with lace and rib-
bons, it cost twice as much for
the same amount.
Why didn't you tell me
you wanted a heart charm


We have more than 18 mil-
lion people in Florida. Tampa
has already run out of fresh
drinking water from their
aquifers. '
We pump more than one
trillion gallons a year out of
our aquifers. We are pulling
more water out of our aquifers
in one year than the aquifers
can take in. That means a few
things, but, we are mining wa-
ter, and what water we have,
should be protected.
Our instructor, Harley
Means, said that we can each
do something to help. Each
one of us who is on a septic
tank should, at the very least,
have our septic tanks pumped
out regularly and keep them
properly maintained.
We should try to tie up to
the central sewage system as
soon as we can afford to. Do
not pour hazardous things
down your kitchen drain.
Items like oil or grease or
other hazardous chemicals.
Don't flush medicines down
the toilet. Someone else's
antibiotic's, or other medica-
tions, can get into your drink-
ing water.
When fertilizing your yard,


.bracelet rather than a free
carwash?
This is a really dandy can
opener,
I know you'll like what I
got you. I got the same thing
for my secretary and she
loved it.
I know you'll like what
I got you. I got the same
thing for my Mom and she
loved it.
You already know how I
feel about you. I married you,
didn't I?
So what should you get
that lady in your life? It really
doesn't matter as long as you
show you really care. Some
remarks that surely will help
your cause are:
You are as beautiful today
as the day I met you.
I love you more today
than ever.
You look like you've lost
a few pounds.
Happy Valentine's Day.
Nurse Judy/Judy

Judy Conlin and her alter
ego write from Havana.


use the right type of fertil-
izer. Some have pesticides
in them.
Follow the manufacturers
instructions. More fertilizer is
not necessarily better. If you
don't really need to use fertil-
izer, don't You can also protect
the aquifer by planting trees,
flowers and bushes that are
drought tolerant. Do not plant
non-native species of plants.
The plants that naturally live
in this region do not need fer-
tilizer or additional water.
. We-should encourage our
stay officials to not permit
agricultural endeavors, like
cattle, chicken farms, dairies,
and intensive row cropping,
in sensitive areas where their
sewage directly influences and
pollutes our drinking water, as
in the Suwanne River Basin.
If everyone pitches in, and
if we each make a few small
changes on a daily basis, it
will go a long way toward
protecting our drinking water
and our precious springs. The
problem is not going away,
but, you can make a
difference
Sue Damon
Crawfordville


Financial crisis


required swift,


thoughtful action


By CONGRESSMAN
ALLEN BOYD (D-FL)
On Sept. 18, -after months
of emphasizing the strength of
our economy, President Bush
did an about-face and asked
Congress for a $700 billion
blank check to bail out Wall
Street and put a stop to the
impending financial crisis. I
believe that the President's
request for Congressional ac-
tion is a direct result of years
of his Administration's irre-
sponsible fiscal and monetary
policies that have now come
to a head. '
In addition to reckless bor-
row-and-spend fiscal policies
over the last eight years, this
Administration steered an
unwise monetary policy that
artificially propped up the
financial markets through low
interest rates and a lack of
regulation. At the same time,
many homeowners held the
false assumption that home
equity would continue to rise
at unprecedented, historic
rates. The intersection of these
two bad acts is where we find
ourselves today. Members of
Congress from both parties,
including myself, flatly re-
jected the President's bailout
proposal. However, many of
us recognized that the credit
crunch is hitting all sectors
of our economy, including
the people and businesses in


North Florida, and swift but
careful, thoughtful action was
needed on a more responsible
financial rescue package that
better protected the taxpay-
ers.
During discussions about
a financial rescue plan, I met
with many economic experts
from all different schools of
thought and ideologies about
the consequences of action
versus inaction. These experts
all agreed that the conse-
quences of inaction would be
devastating: local banks would
no longer be able to provide
home, car, or student loans to
people with good credit or to
small businesses, and personal
retirement accounts would be-
come seriously vulnerable.
We depend on banks and
financial institutions to protect
our life savings, expand our
businesses, finance major fam-
ily purchases, and send our
children to college. I realize
that spending hard-earned tax
dollars to stabilize the banking
industry, an industry in which
we are all financially linked, is
not popular. However, I believe
the alternative, which was to
do nothing, could lead to a
scenario reminiscent of the
Great Depression, and this is
a situation in which I believe
Congress had no choice but
to act.
Continued on Page 3A


Boudreaux never does anything the easy way.

Hanging in there


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
The joys of kitty-hoodl
During these darker, difficult
economic times I find myself
relying on my animals to
provide some degree of en-
tertainment.
Wakulla County Library
Director Doug Jones recently
shot a photograph of my
Wakulla County Animal Shel-
ter buddy, Boudreaux, when
my acrobatic cat was show-
ing Doug how he can survive
the recession. My other cats
are more camera shy and not
quite as much of a photo-
graphic "ham."
A Tallahassee craftsmen
built Boudreaux's kitty tower
and ended my long search for
a new and interesting way to
entertain my felines.
Two of my cats love the
top shelf and will even sit up
there together when neither
feels like it is their turn to
move somewhere else. The
tower is slightly larger than six
feet tall and my felines have


to pay attention when they
decide to disembark.
In other matters on my
mind:
I was impressed by the
presentation created by the
regional economic stimulus
group. I am pleased that local
governments are finally work-
ing toward a common goal.
The group includes officials
from Wakulla, Leon, Jefferson
and Gadsden counties.
I am also impressed by
what I hear is a concerted ef-
fort by the county commission
to work together for common
goals. That is long overdue
as well.
I don't have children
in the school system here
anymore, but I am concerned
about where the state legisla-
ture is going with the budget
- cutting plans.
The Wakulla school system
has many dedicated educators
and we need to continue help-
ing them educate children.
Keith Blackmar is Editor
of The Wakulla News


For online community calendar
visit www.thewakullanews.com
and click on calendar.

WEEK IN WAKULLA
Thursday, February 19, 2009
CANCER SUPPORT GROUP meets at the Crawfordville
United Methodist Church's Education Center at 7 p.m. For
more information, call 926-6050.
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB meets at Posey's Up the Creek
in Panacea at noon.
CONCERNED CITIZENS OF WAKULLA (CCOW) meets at
the public library at 7p.m. The speaker will be County
Commissioner George Green.
QUIT SMOKING CLASS will be held at the health
department from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The class
continues weekly for five weeks.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.
VFW BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road
from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Friday, February 20, 2009
AA meets at the American Legion Building next to the
Women's Club in Crawfordville with an open meeting at
8 p.m. There are also open meetings
FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public
library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. -
GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa's Episcopal
Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
PARKINSON'S SUPPORT GROUP meets at the senior center
at 1 p.m.
PICKIN' 'N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at the
senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
Saturday, February 21, 2009
AARP TAX AIDE is offered at the public library from 9:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
BLACK HISTORY CELEBRATION will be held at Hudson
Park beginning with a parade at 11 a.m. and activities until
4 p.m. (For more, see story on Page 1A.)
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordville
Highway at 5 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.
SWINE SHOW AND SALE will be held at the livestock
pavilion beginning at 10 a.m. The pig scramble will be held
at 11:30 a.m. Barbecue will be served at noon. Awards will
be presented at 1 p.m. (For more, see story on Page 3A.)
Sunday, February 22, 2009
MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA meets at First Baptist
Church of Crawfordville at 7 p.m.
Monday, February 23, 2009
DEPRESSION AND OLDER ADULTS, part of the Savvy
Senior program, will be held at the senior center at 10:30
a.m. Dr. Esaias Lee of Capital Health Plan will speak, joined
by former WCTV host Anna Johnson.
Tuesday, February 24, 2009
AARP TAX AIDE is offered at the public library from 4 p.m.
to 7 p.m.
BOOK BUNCH, for pre-school and home school families,
meets at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP meets at the senior center at
12:45 p.m.
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordville
Highway at 7 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.
VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW
Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
WHS PARENT NIGHT will be held at the high school
media center from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Information will
be available on Advanced Placement and Dual Enrollment.
Wednesday, February 18, 2009
AA meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.
AARP TAX AIDE is offered at the senior center from 1 p.m.
to 4 p.m.
BETTER BREATHERS meets at the senior center at 1 p.m.
BLACK HISTORY PROGRAM will be held at the senior center
at 11 a.m. Guest speaker will be Bossie Hawkins.
BOOK BABIES, for infants and toddlers, will be held at the
public library at 10:30 a.m.
BOOK NOOK. for children in grades K-5, is 10:30 a.m. and
1 p.m.
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior citizens center
at 10:30 a.m.


Understanding Wakulla water and


how you can make a difference








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 19, 2009 Page 3A


Financial crisis


Continued from Page 2A
With all of the party lead-
ers and the Administration at
the table, Congress completely
overhauled the President's
initial request and crafted a
bipartisan bill that included
strong taxpayer protections
and increased oversight. The
legislation is designed to al-
low the federal government
to turn a profit on the assets
it acquires and sells. Thanks
to the Blue Dog Democrats,
any assets that the plan fails
to recoup will be repaid to the
taxpayers in full by the finan-
cial industry.
I supported the first bill
that came before the House
of Representatives because I


firmly believe that a responsi-
ble injection of funds into the
market is necessary to protect
our homes, our businesses, our
healthcare coverage, our pen-
sions, and our hard-earned tax
dollars. Despite having biparti-
san support and being crafted
by leaders in both parties, this
bill failed in the House by a
very close vote.
Instead of working to make
a better bill, the Senate added
$152 billion in tax relief to the
rescue plan, of which $110 bil-
lion was not paid for and must
be borrowed. Not paying for
our priorities is a large part of
what got us in this financial
mess in the first place. This
bill deserved to be considered


on its own merit and should
not have been loaded down
with other priorities that only
compounded our financial
problems.
While I was extremely dis-
pleased with the Senate's
fiscal irresponsibility, I voted
for the second financial rescue
package because our financial
and economic outlook had not
changed, and I believe that ac-
tion was necessary to avert a
financial crisis and in the best
interest of the people of North
Florida. My concerns lie not
with Wall Street, but with the
people, businesses, and local
governments in North Florida
and around the country that
depend on loans and lines of


credit from banks.
It is no secret that we have
serious challenges before us as
a nation, and the financial res-
cue bill only treats the symp-
toms of years of reckless fiscal
and monetary policies by this
Administration coupled with a
lack of oversight by Congress.
We must also fix our under-
lying fiscal and monetary
problems. Our short term and
long term fiscal and monetary
problems demand immediate,
bipartisan attention from our
next President and the next
Congress. As always, I remain
committed to tackling these
serious challenges, for the
strength and well being of our
great nation.


Swine Show hogs will fill arena on Feb. 21


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
There will be youths and
hogs strutting their stuff Sat-
urday, Feb. 21 as the Wakulla
County Extension Service and
Youth Fair Association host.
the annual Wakulla County
Swine Show and Sale.
The 2009 edition of the
show is the 43rd show at the
extension office arena.
The day will begin with
with a 10 a.m. youth swine
show and be followed by an


11:30 a.m. pig scramble. The
barbecue will be served at
noon and the awards ceremo-
ny will begin at approximately
1 p.m.
The schedule of events
actually begins on Friday,
Feb. 20 when the extension
office accepts hog entries for
weigh in.
Swine record books are due
by 5 p.m. on Friday. At 6 p.m.,
the 4-H and FFA Swine Judg-
ing registration begins. The
Swine Judging Contest begins


at 6:30 p.m.
Wakulla County Extension
Director Scott Jackson said 31
youths will be showing 44
hogs. The 2009 show will be
the second for Jackson since
he replaced longtime Director
Dale Bennett.
Jackson said Gulf County
youths will be involved in the
swine judging contest.
Wakulla Bank, Gulf State
Bank and Publix rotate awards
each year as they purchase
the grand champion hog, the


reserve grand champion and
the weight class winners. Each
corporate sponsor handles
one of the three award catego-
ries on a rotating basis.
Two youths decided early
in the swine show process to
show three hogs.
The event will take place
just down the road from the
African American Heritage
Parade and Celebration at
Hudson Park.


St. Marks stimulus


Continued from Page 1A
It would also offer an al-
ternate route for commuters
coming south from Capital
Circle who could use Tram
Road rather than Woodville
Highway.
Later, after Pingree left,
citizen Mike Pruitt, who is on
the city's Waterfronts Florida
committee, held up the map
that showed just Crawfordville
and said, "There's got to be
some way to get St. Marks on
the map."
Dunbar suggested it wasn't
going to happen "until the
county lets us out of the wood-
shed."
"I don't think they are going
to let us out of the woodshed,"
Pruitt answered.
Shields said that' he was
friends with Leon County Com-
missioner Bryan Desloge and
would contact him to find out
how St. Marks got left off the
list.
In another matter, city com-
missioners discussed what to
do about Posey's, the old wa-
terfront restaurant condemned
in 2004 after suffering damage
from flooding.
The city commission has
been considering tearing down
the building because of the
potential danger posed by the
derelict building. Shields noted
that the front glass panes are


broken and worried that a
child could be killed climbing
in there, as well as concern that
a fire could start in there and
burn down other waterfront
buildings.
Pruitt, though, asked the city
to allow the Waterfronts com-
mittee to study the issue and
that perhaps warning signs,
warning tape and fencing could
be put up to keep people out.
"Posey's name is a brand,"
Pruitt said. "It is an asset the
city benefits from." Can the
building be moved? Can it
be saved? Can the facade be
saved?
Dunbar asked how long
Pruitt wanted to consider the
matter, noting the building has
been abandoned for four years,
and the city has no money
to mitigate the danger. The
building is about to fall down,
Dunbar said, and it could fall
down tomorrow.
John Guhter, owner of the
building along with Daphne
Beckham, said he would like to
accommodate the city in what-
evever is in the city's best inter-
est. But Gunter said he did not
have the financing to remodel
or improve the building.
"I think the city's been very
concerned and very restrained
on letting it stand this long,"
Gunter said.


Boyd votes for federal stimulus plan


U.S. Congressman Allen
Boyd (D-North Florida) voted
for the final stimulus package
in the House of Representa-
tives, after successfully fight-
ing to streamline the bill and
lower the cost from the origi-
nal House version Friday, Feb.
13. The final stimulus package
includes $320 billion in spend-
ing initiatives compared to
$544 billion in the original
House stimulus bill,
"I voted against the original
stimulus bill in the House
because I knew that we could
do better and develop a stimu-
lus bill that was smarter and
includes provisions that will
truly stimulate and strengthen
our economy," said Congress-
man Boyd. "While the final
stimulus bill isn't perfect, it's a
better bill, and it's only better
because many of us, including
myself, were firm in our calls
to cut the extra, unstimulative
spending and put the focus on
provisions that are temporary,
targeted, and timely."
At the insistence of Con-
gressman Boyd and the Blue
Dog Coalition, the final stimu-
lus bill was streamlined to
include critical investments in
transportation infrastructure
and water and sewer projects,
as well as smart tax relief for
families and small businesses.
The stimulative provisions
advocated by Congressman
Boyd include:
Transportation infrastruc-
ture investments to improve
roads, bridges, flood control,
dean water projects, and other
infrastructure projects.
Education infrastructure
for school modernization,
renovation, and repair.
Grants to states for job
training and workforce devel-
opment.
Critical Investments in
rural communities such as
broadband services and waste-
water projects.
Congressman Boyd and the
Blue Dogs also were successful
in removing unstimulative and
even unnecessary provisions

Motorcycle

rally is set

The first motorcycle rally of
2009 will be held on Friday,
Feb. 20 and Saturday, Feb. 21
at Pat Thomas Park on Lake
Talquin. The Canopy Road
Cruisers Motorcycle Club is
the sponsor.
On Saturday at 9:30 a.m.,
there will be a two hour
guided tour. There will be
vendors, games, door prizes,
cash prizes and a grand prize
of tires and free mounting
donated by Tallahassee Power
Sports West.
Registration is $10 for the
weekend and $7 for Saturday
only. Campsites are available.
All bikes are welcome. For
more information, go to www.
canopyroadcruisers.com.

CLASSIFIED.
$8 Per Week!


from the final stimulus bill,
such as:
Funding to sod the Na-
tional Mall.
A tax break for movie
producers to buy motion pic-
ture films.
Funding for smoking ces-
sation activities.
The final stimulus package
is expected to create or save
approximately 8,300 jobs in
the 2nd District of Florida
alone and more than 200,000
jobs throughout the State of
Florida.
The bill also gets money
into the hands of Americans
who are going to spend it
quickly through temporary tax
provisions, such as the expan-
sion of the Earned Income Tax
Credit and the increase of the
refundable portion of the child
credit. Additionally, it increas-


es unemployment benefits
and provides more funding for
food stamps and a one time
payment to recipients of Social
Security and veterans receiv-
ing disability compensation
and pension benefits. Finally,
the stimulus bill helps'small
businesses quickly recover
costs of new capital invest-
ments by extending the bonus
depreciation for businesses
making investments in plants
and equipment in 2009.
"While I supported this
stimulus package, I also want
to be very dear and upfront
with the people I represent
- this stimulus package is not
a cure-all for our serious eco-
nomic problems," said Boyd.
"In order to strengthen our
economy in the short and long
run, we must get serious about
fiscal responsibility and get on


a path toward fiscal sanity. If
we don't do this and continue
to deficit spend, then the level
of our national debt the likes
of which we have never seen
before will be worse than the
current recession. I am eager
to tackle our long-term finan-
cial problems head on, and
I am hopeful that President
Obama's Fiscal Summit in the
coming weeks will be the first
step to laying out a framework
to fiscal responsibility."


850.224.4960

www.fsucu.org


* U U.




b


Heritage
Continued from Page 1A
The guest speaker- is Dr.
Osifield Anderson, a retired
Florida A and M University
professor. Tickets are $30 each
or two for $55, For tickets, call
Melanie Bruce at 926-7506.
The theme of the parade
and event is Diverse Com-
munities.
There will be local enter-
tainment including Trafton


Harvey, children's games,
information booths and food
vendors.
Organizers are also work-
ing with the Wakulla County
Health Department to encour-
age African Americans to quit
smoking or not to start the
habit,
For more information or to
become a part of the parade,
call 926-7506 or 656-2578.


<4 FULL SERVICE HAIR SALON '



(cts & #10or
Specializing in:
REDKEN Color Cn:
Hi-Lites & Lo-Lites
Hair Extensionsa n-0
Facial Waxing
Perms 926-8319
Men. \\omen & Children Cuts & Styles
"-^oaei i~ygqptujr0asia'nxl wo'^alieo~'


Crawfordville Animal Hospital "A
is very excited to be in Crawfordville. care
Their doctors and their staff are looking forward to
providing the best quality and personalized care for your
pets-at a reasonable cost. They are a family veterinar)
clinic that specializes in small animal care for dogs, cats,
rabbits and birds. They have a very practical approach
to diagnostics and pay close attention to detail. It is I
a full service veterinarian hospital with facilities for
hospitalized patients, diagnostics, including x-ray and
laboratory services. Any surgical needs can- be met
such as. bone fractures, eye surgeries and c-sections.


ll animals deserve exemplary
and our goal is to help provide
the care your pet deserves"


7Featuring All You Can Eat!


I.


Sunday 11:30 a.m. 2 p.m.

FRIED SHRIMP


$999'
with cheese grits
and coleslaw


Open Everyday
Breakfast: 7:30 10 a.mn.
Lunch: 11:30 2 p.m.
Dinner: 6 8 p.m.
Special Good through Feb. 22







K.


Operated by The Florida P


550 Wakulla Park Drive
Wakulla Springs, FL 32327

926-0700
ark Service


E&atL EPta"-& Arobata
Sua~2s aMnLK


9TaWa1 Caizy iJoci, -(P.c^.

c'to'Xrnzy c1t-facw

926-8245 3042 Crawfordville Hwy.
Crawfordville, FL
www.francielowe.com


Accepting Applications
Come and have an informative look
at the day to day operations of the
sheriff's office. It's FREE!

Starts March 3 May 19, 2009
Tuesday: 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m.
Wakulla County Sheriff's Office
15 Oak St., Crawfordville, FL
Please Call 926-0821'
or visit our website at wcso.org for further
information and an application.
Deadline Feb. 26, 2009


CUAWV"IROVIJ,1,U


I


, I


;


t A I


I








Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 19, 2009


Obituaries


Rayford V. Bagley
Rayford Virdoe Bagley, 86,
of Tallahassee died Wednes-
day, Feb. 11.
At his request, no memorial
services are planned. Inter-
ment will be in the Florida Na-
tional Cemetery in Bushnell.
A retired Air Force Master
Sergeant, he served as a radio
operator on a B-29 flying 26
missions in the Pacific The-
ater during World War II. In
retirement, he liked to paint,
enjoyed traveling and was a
member of the NRA. He was
also a lay preacher and mem-
ber of the Church of Christ
at Wakulla. Known as a man
with a strong will, but a lov-
ing heart, he will be "greatly
missed.
Survivors include a son,
James Bagley and daughter-
in-law Carol of Tallahassee; a
daughter, Ann Bagley of Valdo-
sta, Ga. a former wife, Frances
Cowart Bagley of Valdosta.
Ga.; and two grandchildren,
James Brennan Bagley and
Kimberly Ann Bagley, both of
North Carolina.
Culley's MeadowWood
Funeral Home in Tallahassee
was in charge of the arrange-
ments.

James Blankenship
James Blankenship, 62,
of Panacea died Wednesday,
Feb. 11 after a long fight with
cancer.
A native of Mississippi, he
was a construction worker,
Survivors include a lifelong


friend, Lillie Lee of Panacea; a
stepdaughter, Lorna Conner
and husband Richard of Craw-
fordville; a stepson, Huey Lee,
Jr. of Clearwater; a brother,
Howard Blankenship and wife
Addie of Wynonna, Miss.; a
daughter, Katherine Renea
Sullivan and family of Missis-
sippi; a son, James Blanken-
ship, Jr. and family of Missis-
sippi; five step-grandchildren;
four grandchildren; and two
close friends, Vicky and family
and Dennis Wilson,
Harrey-Young Funeral
Home in Crawfordville was in
charge of the arrangements.

Anthony J. Bradwell, Jr.
Anthony Jerome Bradwell,
Jr., 25, of Crawfordville died
Sunday, Feb. 8.
A memorial service was
held Saturday, Feb. 14 at Little
Salem Missionary Baptist
Church.
He was a roofer for Semi-
nole Roofing.
Survivors include his moth-
er. Lynderia Jones and Pastor
Kenneth B.; his father, An-
thony J. Bradwell, Sr. and Jan;
his fiance, Latoya Brannen,
and his unborn child; two
brothers. Antonio Bradwell
and Christopher Bradwell; two
sisters, Qunikiya Thomas and
Akieya Chamber; and a host of
other relatives and friends.
Strong & Jones Funeral
Home in Tallahassee was in
charge of the arrangements.


Eddie L. Farmer II Survivors include her hus-
Eddie Lee "Sam Bam" Farm- band of 43 years, Jasper Mus-
er III, 33, of Crawfordville died gray of Crawfordville; a son,
Saturday, Feb. 14 in Crawford- Jeremy Musgray; two grand-
ville. children, Jermaay Musgray
A wake will be held Friday, and Asia Musgray; three broth-
Feb. 20 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. ers, William Scott, Michael A.
at Strong and Jones Funeral Scott and Joseph Scott; two
Home Chapel in Tallahassee. sisters, Carol Ann Scott and
The funeral service will be Shirley Scott; two uncles, Tom
held Saturday, Feb. 21 at 1 p.m. Brown and William Brown, Jr.;
at Thessalonia M.B. Church in a host of nieces and nephews
the Hyde Park community of and extended family; and she
Crawfordville. played a vital part in the lives
Survivors include his par- of Reginald Martin, Jerry Carr
ents, Eddie Lee Farmer, Jr. and III, Shayla Couch and Emanuel
Dale and Peggy McMillian and Scott; the nieces and nephews
Lawrence; a devoted fiance, she helped raise.
Cynthia Johnson; a brother, She was born July 15, 1949
Keith D. Farmer and Hideko; to William and Jeanette Scott,
four sisters, Pamela E. White She was a faithful Christian
and Harold, Andria "Nikki" and a lifelong member of
Farmer, Bernice Anthony and Maranatha Seventh-Day Ad-,
Harris and Shamika Igles and ventist Church where she was
Thomas; his paternal grand- very much involved and truly
parents Beatrice Farmer and passionate of women's min-
the late Eddie Lee Farmer, Sr.; istries. She was also a com-
his maternal grandparents, munity service leader, usher
Lula Mae Ward and the late board director, Sabbath School
Lee Ward; and a host of uncles, superintendent, and a gave
aunts, nephews, nieces and great dedication to hospitality.
friends. She devoted 19 years of hard
Strong and Jones Funeral work to the Wakulla County
Home in Tallahassee is in School Board's food service
charge of the arrangements. and retired in 2007. She held
her career and the people and
Gloria S. Musgray students she met through
Gloria "Tee-Tee" Scott Mus- her career dose to her heart.
gray, 59, of Crawfordville died Gloria enjoyed cooking and
Tuesday, Feb. 3 in Crawford- entertaining. She looked for-
ville. ward to spending her summer
The funeral service was vacations on the campground
held Sunday, Feb. 15, at Mara- and lived to make sure that no
natha Seventh-Day Adventist one ever went hungry on her
Church in Tallahassee, three week junior camp trip.


Since her diagnosis, she coor-
dinated "Gloria and the Gang."
She encouraged women to be
serious about breast cancer
awareness. She walked many
miles for her cause.
Strong & Jones Funeral
Home in Tallahassee was in
charge of the arrangements.
Tracy C. Parker
Tracy Carrie Parker, 29, of
Sopchoppy died Thursday,
Feb. 12,
The funeral service will be
held at a later date.
Survivors include her moth-
er, Tammy Sanders and hus-
band Alga of Sopchoppy,
Harvey-Young Funeral
Home in Crawfordville was in
charge of the arrangements.

Betty J. Revell
Betty Jean Revell, 78, of
Sopchoppy died Thursday,
Feb. 12.
Graveside services will be
at held at 11 a.m. Saturday,
Feb. 21, at West Sopchoppy
Cemetery.
She was born Nov. 19,
1930, to Guy and Grace Revell.
She was a longtime Wakulla
County resident -who retired
from the State of Florida
in 1995 and had resided in
Sopchoppy until her death.
She was a descendent of two
pioneer families. Her paternal
grandparents were Nelse and
Ranza Tause Revell and her
maternal grandparents were
Mac and Shelly Lawhon.
Survivors include a son,
Shawn Oxendine; two grand-


children, Chad Oxendine and
Hannah Oxendine; a brother,
Guy Revell; three nieces, Leigh
Graves, Beth Revell and Al-
lison Green; an aunt, Peg
Buckwalter; an uncle, Rob Roy
Ashmore; and a cousin, Brad
Ashmore.
Harvey-Young Funeral
Home in Crawfordville is in
charge of the arrangements.
Ralph P. Smith
Ralph Palmer Smith, 28, of
Crawfordville died Monday,
Feb. 9 in Crawfordville.
The funeral service was
held Friday, Feb. 13 at Har-
vey-Young Funeral Home in
Crawfordville. In lieu of flow-
ers, donations may be sent to
the Florida Commerce Credit
Union Kids Club account for
his surviving children.
He was a loving father,
brother and son who will be
sorely missed by his family
and friends.
Survivors include his
parents, J.R. and Brenda K.
Smith of Crawfordville; three
children, Gage Smith and
Kade Smith and mother Amie
Boulineau, all of Crawford-
ville, and Christian Smith
and mother Candi Scott of
Tallahassee; a sister, Marla
Dykes of Maiden, N.C.; three
brothers, Jerrod Smith and
wife Sheileen, Blake Smith
and Jay Smith, all of Crawford-
ville; several nieces, nephews.
aunts, uncles and cousins.
Harvey-Young Funeral
Home in Crawfordville was in
charge of the arrangements.


Peace Corps announces 35 percent increase in applications


The Peace Corps Atlanta Re-
gional Office announced that
applications from Florida in-
creased 35 percent for the 2008
program year, (611 applica-
tions) compared to 2007 (454);
and 27 percent compared to
29Q Vationally. applications
hN-e ased ,16 percent
fi this number of ap-
plications we will be able to
nominate from a larger pool of
qualified Florida residents to
volunteer in the 76 countries


are embracing national service
to help others around the
world."
Peace Corps attributes the
'increase to a number of fac-
tors, including:
Promotion of its age 50+
campaign, which has broad-
ened, its applicant pool to
include baby boomers who are
retired or simply looking for a
change in life.
A growing idealist gen-
eration wanting to be socially


where we now serve,"' said responsible by making a differ-
Dave' Leavitti public affairs ence in the world and helping
specialist.: "It is heartening America leave a positive image
that so many Floridians today overseas,

Qdincy show tickets are oi


"Parade the Musical" opens
at the Quincy Music Theatre
on Feb. 22. Tickets are avail-
able now by calling (850) 875-.
9444 or visiting the theatre
box office between 5 p.m. and
7 p.m. Monday through Friday
or by purchasing online at


www.qmtonline.org.
Ticket prices are $16.50 for
adults, $13.50 for students and
seniors. The show runs Feb.
20 through Feb., 22 and Feb.
27 through March 1.
The lead actor of "Parade
the Musical," Anthony Meth-


SSopchoppy Sopchoppy
United Church Of Christ
U t U11Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Methodist Sunday.Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worshi.................... 10:30 a.m.
Church Evenln Worshp .............p.M.
I r. Wednesday: Bible 8tudy...7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
orsh 1 1 aim *Visitors are welcome!
Worship I I a.m.' Home Bible Courses available...
Pastor Brett Templeton please call for details,
850-962-251 1i 962-2213


St. Elizabeth ,
Ann Seton
Catholic li
Mass 9 a.m. Sunday
.Sunday School 10 a.m.
Father James MacGee, Pastor
:3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
926-1797


\s Church
1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98
Holy Eucharist
10:30 am
Sunday School Provided
The Reverend Roy Lima
926-1742


E Hwy319 Medart,
SOffice 926-5265
l Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Ci Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
AWANA 4:00 p.m.
Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mission Is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org


Universities and colleges
have re-engineered their cur-
riculums to focus more on
global political and economic
challenges, thus stimulating
more interest in Peace Corps
and the career advantages it
provides for recent grads.
Current job market.
The Southeast Region is
comprised of Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, South
Carolina, Tennessee, Puerto
Rico, and the Virgin Islands.
In program year 2008, 692 ap-
plicants were nominated for
Peace Corps service. Specific
state/territory data is available

n sale now
vin first appeared on the QMT
stage in "Bye Bye Birdie."


SWakulla United
Methodist Church
^ Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School for all ages-10 a.m.
Sunday Worship -11 a.m.
Wednesday Service 7 p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor Jama Hexny Rinebart


upon request.
Although it is not a require-
ment for service, the majority
of volunteers who have served
in the Peace Corps since its
founding 47 years ago have
been college graduates. Cur-
rently, 94 percent of Volunteers
have at least an undergradu-
ate degree, with nine percent
possessing a graduate-level
degree.
As the Peace Corps ap-
proaches its 50th anniversary,
its service legacy continues to
promote peace and friendship
around the world. -
Historically, more than

CLASSIFIED
$8 Per Week!
Christ Church
Anglican

Sunday
8:30am Service
9:30am Adult Bible Class
10:30am Children's Class
10:30am Service
Nursery available
Thursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study
Wednesday 6:30 pfn Supper and
Children, Youth and Adult Bible Classes
850-745-8412
4340 Crawfordville Highway


Oiivcavev- th~e, '/Okrece/,


FlIsr
I BApTIST ChuRch



3086 Crawfordville Hwy.
(South of the Courthouse)
Church Office: 926-7896
www.fbccrawfordville.org
or
(youth) www.crosstraining.org


SUNDAY


Early Worship
Sunday School
Morning Worship
Evening Worship


8:30 a.m.
9:45 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
6:00 p.m.


WEDNESDAY


Fellowship Meal
(call for reservations)
Prayer/ Bible Study
IMPACT (Youth)
Children's Events


6:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
6:30 p.m.


117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy


Sunday School 94A5 AM
Church Office Morning Worship 11AM
962-7822 AWANA CLUB 5PM
Evening Worship 6 PM

Wednesday 7 PM Prayer Meeting,
Youth a Children's Programs F
Dr. Bill Jenkins, Pastor
David Alien, Associate Paster/Student Minister
Randy Anderson, Minister of Music
Jerry Evans, MIke Crouch, Bernie Kemp Musicians


195,000 volunteers have helped
promote a better understand-
ing between Americans and
the people of the 139 countries
in which they have served.
Applications to serve in the
Peace Corps have increased
16 percent this past year, the
Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
Crawfordville
Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey

Sunday School.....................10a.m.
Sunday Worship............. 11 a.m.
Evening Worship..... ..... 6 p.m.
Wednesday Service.............7....7 p.m.
& Youth Service.......................7 p.m.
Royal Rangers 7 p.m.
Missionettes 7 p.m.

Trinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS -
Web site:
Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Vicar Bert Matlock
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557


largest boost in the last five
years. Currently, 7,876 Peace
Corps Volunteers are serving
in 76 countries. Peace Corps
Volunteers must be U.S. citi-
zens and at least 18 years of
age. Peace Corps service is a
27-month commitment.

Ockiockonee
a- ay
United
Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship 9 a.m.
Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
Pastor f rett Zempleton
(850) 984-0127


Panacea Park

Baptist Church
24 Missions Read, Paacea
Sunday School I0 a.s.
Worship 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 p.m.
Pastor, Jerry Spears


Crawfordville United

Methodist Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 926-7209
Ochlockonee&Arran Road 'Come Grow With Us' www.crawfordville-ame.org













Who is the latest

Wakulla Wavemaker?"

Tune in daily at

2 p.m. and 6 p.m.





THE WORD IN PRAISE



WAKU 94.1 FM www.wave94.com
926-8000 (fax: 926-2000)








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 19, 2009 Page 5A


Stimulus Package Impact fees


Continued from Page 5A
They have been labeled:
climate and energy effi-
ciency; road, bridge and
transportation infrastruc-
ture; other infrastructure;
most vulnerable (hospitals);
water projects; and school
construction and repair.
Wakulla County projects
identified in the project
include:
Three U.S. Highway
319 turn lane projects to
improve traffic flow on
the highway. The project is
listed at $2.9 million.
Another $1 million
would go toward a compre-
hensive stormwater study
in the county. The study
would address the most
cost effective practices to
protect public and environ-
mental health.
The Wakulla County
Courthouse expansion is
included at $4.2 million.
The project would create an
additional 9,500 square feet
of space including a new
courtroom. The state Court
Administrator would like
to add an additional judge
in the county to help with
couit case flow.
'Two bridge construc-
tion projects are includ-
ed. The Buckhorn Creek
subdivision bridge will be
replaced along with Sy-
frett Creek bridge on Smith
Creek Highway. The cost of
the two new bridges is $3.1
million.
The county is seeking-
$3 million for the construc-
tion'of an expanded trans-
fer station and closure of
the Class III landfill at the


existing landfill/transfer
station in Crawfordville.
A community center/
EMS/fire facility would be
a centrally located Public
Emergency Facility for co-
ordination and communica-
tions during times of emer-
gencies. The project would
cost $5.3 million.
Phase 1 of the Wakulla
Gardens sewer plant and
sewer expansion would cost
$10 million of the total of
$22 million for the project.
Phase 2 of the project
is the remaining $12 mil-
lion. Phase 1 includes the
rehabilitation of the exist-
ing lift stations and instal-
lation and modification of
new and existing sewer
lines and force mains.
Phase 2 includes adding
the Wakulla Gardens com-
munity to the sewer system
and upgrading of the sew-
age treatment plant to 1.6
million gallons per day.
In the proposal, Wakulla
officials also point out that
they have existing funds
available for the various
projects such as $1.7 million
for the sewer and $550,000
for the courthouse renova-
tion.
"We must be clever on
how we go forward with
it," Kessler concluded. "Now
we have to actively stay on
top of this and stay in con-
tact with the governor and
Washington. We're ready as
a unit. This group worked
well together."
Photographs courtesy of
the Leon County Commis-
sion Public Infortmation
office.


Panacea paving


Continued from Page 1A
The three roads were in-
cluded in the top 20 ranking
of roads to be paved in the
matrix and were selected by the
board at the Aug. 20,2008 board
meeting be paved in fiscal year
2008/09.
The paving project consisted
of 2.55 miles of paving, clearing,
widening of right of ways and
implementing drainage im-
ptqyexpents.; This project was
funded from the one cent sales
tax in the amount of $257,820.
"Wakulla County is a fis-
cally constrained county and
it is challenging for us to fund
infrastructure," said Commis-
sioner Howard Kessler. "The
citizens voted to tax themselves
with the one cent sales tax paid
going toward the paving of
these neighborhood roads. The
citizens now benefit and will
continue to see their tax dollars
put'to good use. The completed
road paving of Fishing Fool,

Seatrout is

closed
. On Feb. 1, the recreational
harvest season for spotted
seatrout in North Florida
closed for one month to help
maintain spotted seatrout
abundance.
The harvest and possession
of spotted seatrout is prohib-
ited Feb. 1 to March 1.

Pleascyc


Tower and Chattahoochee
Roads is another example of
how the county is responding
to its citizens' needs."
There are several other
Wakulla County road projects
that are nearing completion,
Replacement of the Skip-
per Bay Bridge and the pav-
ing of Lawhon Mill Road are
two projects. The Skipper Bay
Bridge was destroyed by Tropi-
cal Storm Dennis in 2004 iaid
the board received $30,000
from the Federal Emergency
Management Agency (FEMA) to
replace the wooden bridge. The
project is 85 percent complete
and is estimated to be open to
traffic by March 1. The Lawhon
Mill Road project is 65 percent
complete and is estimated to be
completed in early April 2009.
"Stay tuned for additional
information on these and other
projects currently in progress,"
said Pingree.


Continued from Page 1A
"The numbers are a good
starting place," said Com-
missioner Alan Brock, who
indicated his support for
the fees to resume when the
moratorium ends.
It was Commissioner Lynn
Artz who pushed the discus-
sion, offering up a three-page
proposal that looked at stud-
ies on the economic effects
of impact fees and a couple
of different recommendations
- including a suggestion that
the county consider deferring
the collection of some impact
fees from when a building
permit is applied for to when
a certificate of occupancy is
sought. Deferring the pay-
ment of some fees to the end
of construction might help
some builders, she said.
Artz stressed the results of
an academic study that deter-
mined that impact fees have


a positive effect on housing
prices and job growth. While
saying the results may appear
anti-intuitive, Artz pointed to
the study's conclusion that
impact fees resulted in higher
housing prices not because
they drive up building costs
- but because consumers are
willing to pay more for ser-
vices supported by the fees,
.It was also recommended,
she said, that "In tough eco-
nomic times, don't waive,
defer" impact fees.
At the point in the discus-
sion where Stewart said he
could support 25 percent of
the old charge for impact
fees as adequate, Chairman
Howard Kessler indicated his
concern that a "big box store"
could come into the county
and not pay its fair share of
impact fees.
Stewart was chairman of
the board when Wal-Mart


came to Crawfordville and he
championed that big box store
- and Kessler noted the argu-
ment that such stores bring in
lots of revenue to the county
through sales tax.
Stewart said he understood
Kessler's argument, and asked
if the board could impose 100
percent of impact fees on com-
mercial development but put
residential fees at 25 percent.
Attorney Heather Encinosa,
who has advised the board
on its impact fee assessment,
recommended against that,
saying commercial and resi-
dential needed to be assessed
at the same rate.
Asked for his comments,
Commissioner George Green
said, "I don't see business
picking up. We have been in
this downturn for some time
and from what I hear, it's
going to be quite some time
before things pick up.


"Why rush and bring back
impact fees?" Green asked.
"Rather than take our time."
Stewart asked the board
not to go to 100 percent of the
assessment for impact fees,
but Brock said he supported
100 percent for fire and EMS,
that the money was much
needed.
Artz supported that, saying
she would support more fire
protection and EMS over law
enforcement,
Kessler answered that with
a quip to Artz that, "If you
are going to maintain that
position, watch your speed
limit."
The issue will come back
before commissioners at their
first meeting in March, when
staff will present a report on
what was discussed at the
workshop and lay out an ac-
tion plan.


County Budget


Continued from Page 1A
The county also has plans
to continue to lobby the state
legislature for funding and
work with the Small County
Coalition to address issues or
concern to smaller counties.
In addition, the adminis-
trator said, efforts have been
made to cut or merge depart-
ments whenever possible to
become more efficient.
County commissioners may
not face the severe budget cuts
that school board officials are
facing. "The county commis-
sion is a little less exposed to
the state revenue cuts," said
Pingree. "But we will continue
to tighten our belts. We do
have exposure to legislative
cuts. It is going to be a tough
year. The last two years have
seen the largest reduction in


the millage rate in the history
of Wakulla County."
He added that county of-
ficials hope to keep the mill-
age rate down even with less
revenue coming in.
Pingree said he was pleased
with the county's recently en-
acted garbage and recycling
plan. Wakulla County is "pig-
gybacking" the recycling of
construction and demolition
debris with Leon County and
using a local business in Mar-
pan in Woodville. The result
will be a 60 percent increase
in the percentage of materials
being recycled at the Wakulla
transfer station.
In addition, the county has
agreed to a waste agreement
with Leon County that allows
Wakulla to take advantage of a
cheaper and closer waste dis-


posal options in Tallahassee.
Wakulla had been driving
local garbage to Marianna for
disposal. Pingree estimated
that the garbage cost savings
will be $100,000.
"We will continue to pur-
sue better options to make
ends meet," he said. Staff
members have had to step
up their work performance


because "nobody is immune
from severe recession."
"I'm very pleased and hon-
ored to work for our new
commissioners," Pingree con-
cluded. "They have set high
goals for themselves and'in
the first 100 days have already
pushed through a number of
significant issues."


"For All Your Construction Needs"



.850-980-2821
i CBC#1253204


PENSION& DAVIS, PA
ATTORNEYS
Al Penson Mary Ellen Davis
Donna Biggins Jennifer Sweeting Adam Cowhey
* Family Law Real Estate Transactions and Matters
* DUI/Criminal Defense Commercial Transactions
* Civil Litigation and Business Law
* Estate Planning Construction/Lien Law
and Probate of Estates Administrative Law/Licensing

926-6003
17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville
The hiring of an attorney Is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisement.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualificabons and experience.


Crawfordville Location
2628 Crawfordville Hwy.
Crawfordville, FL 32327
850.926.5211

Tallahassee Location
1989 NE Capital Circle, Ste. 13
Tallahassee, FL 32308
850.656,2110


SFDIM *All loans subject to credit approval.


GEO-ENERGY
Since 1985
CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:


MacCLEAN
WATER TREATMENT
SYSTEMS

* SALES & SERVICE


L COMPLETE LINE
OF EQUIPMENT

WE SOLVE
JUST ABOUT
ANY WATER PROBLEM
926-8116


Sfmerts


Bank

www.amerisbank.com


ow'Mortg* age





Rates are not





a Dream,,





You must act now, Don't

miss out on this great

opportunity to refinance

at historically low rates!



Reduce your payment



P Save money



Put more cash in

your pocket


Till,
















Softball girls open

regular season
The Wakulla Lady War Eagle softball team lost two one-run
games to open the 2009 season under Coach Tom Graham.
Madison County topped Wakulla 10-9 in Madison and Florida
High defeated WHS 2-1 in Medart.
Wakulla could not overcome two big innings, a six run and
a three run Madison outburst where the Cowgirls scored all
but one of their runs.
Sarah Gregory was the losing pitcher. She pitched four
innings and struck out five while walking five. She was 2-4
at the plate with two RBIs. Mandy McClendon was 1-3 with
an RBI.
Wakulla scored in every inning except two, but still could
not come up with enough offense,
Mandy McClendon was the losing 'pitcher against Florida
High. Rebecca Rivers led the offense with a hit and an RBI.
Jessica Wilde had a hit and scored the run. Chelsea Sanders
had a double.
The district portion of the schedule began Feb. 17 at East
Gadsden. Lincoln hosts Wakulla Thursday, Feb. 19 and North
Florida Christian hosts the Lady War Eagles on Friday, Feb.
20.
Panama City Bay will come to Medart on Monday, Feb. 23
and Chiles comes to town on Feb. 24.


Fundraiser is planned


On Saturday, March 7, the
Cal Ripken League Baseball
Jamboree and annual fund-
raiser will be held at the rec-
reation park in Medart.
A $5 hamburger plate with
all the trimmings, including


chips and a drink, will be
served from 11 a.m. until 2
p.m.
Come out and support your
local youth baseball program
and see the future stars of
tomorrow


www.thewakullanews.com


Wrestlers to go to state championship


.By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Six Wakulla War Eagle wres-
tlers will be attending the State
Championships in Lakeland
Feb. 19 through Feb. 21 at the
Lakeland Center.
Wakulla will take two re-
gional champions from the
competition in Bradford County.
Coach John Wainwright said he
is optimistic that his squad will
do well in the final competition
of the year.
Clay County won the region-
al tournament while Wakul-
la placed second, Suwannee
County finished third and Jack-
sonville Bolles placed fourth.
Tre McCullough won the
125 pound class with a 4-0
record. He won his final match
12-2 against Suwannee.
Scotty Varner placed first
in the 135 pound class with a
4-0 record. He won by pin in the
final match against Suwannee.
Mookie Forbes placed sec-
ond at 103 pounds. The senior
lost to Suwannee in the finals
and finished 3-1.
Garrett Barco placed third
at 145 pounds. He was 4-1 in
Starke.
Tyler Hill placed third at
119 with a 4-1 record.
Travis Hinsey placed third
at 130 and was 5-1 in the
meet.


Brandon Carden lost 10-9 in
his final match at 152 and nar-
rowly missed an opportunity
to go to state. Luke Taylor lost
a match at 171 that would have
sent him to state. Cole Woofter
competed at 189. Tyler Corbett
lost a close match at 215 that
would have sent him on. Heavy-
weight Travis McCullough also


competed and made great
progress.
Forbes and Barco are the
only seniors on the team and
Wainwright said he has never
lost more than two seniors each
season as he has had to build
the program from the ground
level.
Forbes goes to state with


a record of 42-5 while Barco is
49-7, McCullough is 43-2, Hinsey
is 30-20, Hill is 44-10 and Varner
is 49-3.
"We feel good," said the
coach. "The kids are ready
and I hope we have numerous
players. Our kids are solid and
they could place high if they
step it up."


Wakulla Line Drive places second


The Wakulla Line Drive 11U travel baseball
team has begun their 2009 baseball season.
The team traveled to Cordele, Ga. last weekend
to participate in the 2009 Presidents Weekend
Grand Slam tournament.
The weekend started against The Diamond
Jaxx in a four inning win. The team moved
to a very competitive game against the Stixx
out of Atlanta. It ended in a loss for the Line
Drive. This seeded them in second place for
Sunday's games.
Sunday brought more dreary weather and
more challenges. The Young Guns put up a
fight but ended up losing to the Line Drive.
The championship game did not go the teams'
way and they ended with a loss and second


place tournament finish.
The Wakulla Line Drive 11U team consists
of: Jake Bryan, Jake Webb, Jacob Thomas, Jacob
Plouffe, Dylan Causseaux, Dylan Welch, Nick
Lentz, Reid Strickland, Michael McGlamry,
and Austin Stephenson. The coaches are Andy
Bryan, Darrin McGlamry, James Plouffe and
John Lentz.
The team is currently looking for sponsors.
Anyone interested in sponsoring The Wakulla
Line Drive 2009 season please call Andy Bryan
at 556-5853.
Line Drive is also looking for two new
players. Anyone interested in frying out may
contact Andy Bryan at 556-5853.oPlayers must
not turn age 12 before May 1, 2009.


A4fG4..a.t..



MBK~~fIM ofl;^ynmf lM


Coach Lindsey Evans, Maggie Ogden, Meredith Flanders, Skyler Taff, Coach Jones,


Three lifters attend state finals


and 140 pounds on the dean
and jerk for a total of 265
pounds.
Taff bench pressed 115 and
clean and jerked 135 for a to-
tal of 250 pounds in the 169
pound weight class.
Ogden bench pressed 130
pounds and clean and jerked
125 for a total of 255 pounds


in qualification matches. Og-
den lifted in the 183 pound
weight class.
Windy Taff is coach of the
Lady War Eagle weightlifting
team.
"We had a great time and
were proud to represent
Wakulla High at the Finals,"
said Coach Jones.


Wakulla High School quali-
fied three Lady War Eagle
weightlifters for the State
Championship Weightlifting
meet.
They are: junior Meredith
Flanders, sophomore Skyler.
Taff and senior Maggie Og-
den.
The lifters left Friday, Feb.
13 for the meet on Saturday,
Feb. 14 at RiverRidge High
School in New Port Richey.
Flanders lifted in the 139
pound class. She lifted 125
pounds with the bench press

SLet Me
r Customize
a Routine

Sessions: For You!
Week to Week, By the Month
or Long Term
Gena Davis
Personal Trainer
926-7685 or. 510-2326


TALLAHASSEE~LEON

Federal Credit Union

CONVENIENT ATM LOCATION
S* ^ Corner of Crawfordville Hwy.
Ini / t BH and Mike Stewart Lane

At Wal-Mart in Crawfordville
'. Next to gas pumps
576-8134 *press 3
. - Located In the North Pointe Center, Crawfordville
m HOpen: Monday Friday 9 am 5 pm
.. : Always Working to Serve Our Members

FR Ef rT C e b r


Black Ice Watch $86.95


3-Pack
Golf
Balls
$11.95


Official BCS DVD $24.95


Gator Bait's "
National
Champions
Magazine
$11.95


Framed
Mirror
$44.99


Order online at www.ShopGatorBait.net
or call 1-800-782-3216


WHS wrestlers did well at regionals and six will go to State,


OTeam Uniforms/T-Shirts, Hats & Bags
OScreen printing & Embroidery








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 19, 2009 Page 7A


Wakulla High School will present spring production


Auditions were held re-
cently at Wakulla High School
for the annual spring drama
production. This year the
students will be presenting
Tim Kelly's "It Was a Dark and
Stormy Night." Many students
auditioned for the show and
Director Susan Solburg was
able to Double-Cast most of


the parts, so that a multitude
of students would get the
chance to shine in this "spoof"
of the old spooky murder
mysteries from the 1920s and
1930s.
The setting of the play
has been changed from Mas-
sachusetts to South Carolina
as Solburg didn't think most


Wakulla High students would
be able to pull off a "Boston"
accent. The story surrounds an
old "Wayside Inn" that has not
been in use for years until Old
Ebenezer Saltmarsh has one
of his'"spells" and puts an ad
in the newspaper for a young,
pretty, un-married "Nursel"
The applicants start show-


ing up and the madness and
mayhem begins. With a cast
of crazy cousins, an ancient
uncle, and a hired girl who
doesn't know who or what
she is, the fun just never stops
as one hapless individual after
another shows up on this dark
and stormy night. "You'll need
some Dramamine to keep up


with all the coming and go-
ing," said Solburg.
The Stagecraft Class is pull-
ing out all the stops to build a
big spooky old "Inn" with all
the necessary props. "Make
plans now to join in the fun,"
she said.
The show opens to the pub-
lic on Thursday, Friday and


Saturday, March 26 through
March 28 at 7:30 p.m. and
again on Sunday March 29
at 2:30 p.m. Doors open 30
minutes prior to curtain where
tickets can be purchased. The
cost for students is $4 and for
adults $6. Refreshments will
be sold at intermission.


Rainwater harvest is beneficial


WHS students took home first place in Model U.N. competition.

WHS Students win U.N. again


By TERESA MURPHY
Special to The Wakulla News
The Wakulla High School
Model United Nations Team
did it again: First place at the
Tallahassee Southern Model
U.N. (TSMUN) competition,
Tallahassee Community Col-
lege was the sponsor for this
event, which was held at the
Capitol.
This year, WHS social
studies teachers Shelby Wil-
liams and Teresa Murphy
took their largest team to
date 36 students to
represent six countries. The
competition lasts about
10 hours and the students
really enjoyed the opportu-
nity to sit in the House and
Senate chambers and learn
their way around the long
and winding hallways of the
state Capitol.
The Wakulla Team was
comprised of the following
dedicated and outstanding
students: Kelsey Alyea, Matt
Andrews, Kaylee Chatham,
Amanda Council, Caitlyn
Chrisco, Brittany Dybiec, Jay
Eglar, Audrey Erwin, Kimber-
ly Franklin, Lauren Gentry,
Brian Glavey, Marshall har-
vey, Brandi Hebert, Tiffany
Huba, Frankie Humphries,
Kerri Johnson, Malcolm
Kelly, Ryan Leigh, Katie Lily,
Katelyn Maille, Laura Mc-
Cann, Amanda McCullers,
Cassi McFarland, Mary Kate
Murphy, Paul Murphy, Eric
Parks, Kyle Patterson, Cara
Raker, Amanda Ricks, Alyssa
Show, Thomas Spivey, Tra-
vis Thompson, Carole Toler,
Clay Watts, and Christian
Wilkes. Friday, Feb. 13th
turned out to be a lucky day
for the team. -
The team began prepar-
ing for the competition in
October. The students spent
hours learning about their
assigned country, while also
researching to select topics
for their specifically assigned
committee: the General As-
sembly, the World Health
Organization, the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization,
the Security Council, or the
U.N. Development Program.
Vietnam won first place,
also known as the Outstand-
ing Delegation Award. The
United Kingdom of Great
Britain and Northern Ireland
won a second place award
for Distinguished Delega-


tion. Two teams, Ethiopia
and Yemen, won third place
awards, Honorable Delega-
tion.
Students representing
Israel and Cuba did an amaz-
ing job and made tremen-
dous contributions to the
TSMUN competition.
The team was given a real
boost when Ryan Leigh, Kyle
Patterson, Amanda Ricks,
and Carole Toler won recog-
nition for writing outstand-
ing position papers, which
is also a requirement of the
students attending TSMUN.
The position paper must


address their country's posi-
tion on current world issues
and make recommendations
for resolving the problems.
The award ceremony con-
cluded with Paul Murphy
winning the scholarship
selection program and Tif-
fany Huba selected as the
scholarship alternate.
The Wakulla students
were so organized and ar-
ticulate when speaking and
debating. We were very
fortunate to have such a
responsible group of stu-
dents representing Wakulla
County.


Annual all-breed dog show
Saturday and Sunday, Feb 21st and 22nd,
at the N. Florida Fairgrounds
Over 1,300 dogs will be competing in Conformation,
Agility. Obedience and Rally with many of the same
dogs that competed at Westminster being present.
$5 for adults and children over 12
children under 12 Free.
The shows will start at 8 AM and culminate with the awarding
of Best In Show at approximately 5 PM each day.
www.orkc.com or call 850-222-2218 for further information
b -. , .. . . .


Lucy is a Labradoodle-Mix between
Labrador and Standard Poodle. She is
non-shedding, and these guys are
quite expensive when buying from a
breeder. She has a very sweet
personality despite the scruffy
appearance. Lucy is about 1 1/2 years
old and would love to find a loving
home to call her own. To see Lucy or
any of our adoptable pets, or to find
out about volunteering come by the
Adoption Center,
1 Oak St. in Crawfordville or visit
www.chatofwakulla.org.


By HEIDI HOLCOMB
Coordinator, 2009 Green Living
Expo & Education Fair
Rain Barrels are hot these
days and water conservation
and saving money are some
obvious benefits to rainwater
collection. Thrift is also "in"
and if you are a city dweller
rainwater collection can be an
excellent way to decrease your
monthly water bill and have
fun while you're doing it. Water
that you would have drawn
from the tap for incidental uses
could be drawn from a less
expensive alternative; one you
can decorate
Rain barrels use a simple
technique to store rooftop run-
off for reuse for landscaping
and other non-potable uses. By
catching the runoff from your
home's rain gutters you can
capture several gallons from
a single rain event. The larger
the surface area of your roof,
the more your rain barrel will
collect.
There are many ways in
which to utilize a rain barrel
for incidental water needs. For
example, water now stored can
be utilized during drought, peak
water delivery times or when
water restrictions have been im-
plemented. In addition, stored
rainwater can be used for any
number of household uses such
as lawn irrigation, vegetable and


flower gardens, houseplants, car Too busy attending other
washing, and filling door ponds workshops at the expo or arrive
and birdbaths. too late to attend the rain barrel
To learn more about the ben- workshop? Pick up a handful of
efits of rain barrels or to have tickets and enter the rain barrel
the opportunity to build one, raffle. Win one of four beautiful-
attend the Rainwater Harvest- ly locally hand painted rain bar-
ing Workshop from 9:30 a.m. rels. Tickets are $2 each or three
to 11:30 a.m. at the upcoming tickets for $5. There will also be
Sustainable Big Bend Green a plastic pot recycling tree raffle
Living Expo and Education Fair this year. If they weren't already
March 21 at Riversprings Middle green enough, Just Fruits and
School. Learn in your home Exotics will be donating a 6-
and landscape. Build your own foot ready to plant beautiful
rain barrel with instruction and Weeping Mulberry Tree. These
materials provided. There is a trees produce berries that are
cost of $35 for materials payable 'great food for wildlife. A ticket
at the registration desk upon will be given for every five pots
arrival. Materials are available donated to the recycling effort.
for only 20 rain barrels, but What a great excuse to clean
anyone may listen and watch. out your shed. The winners of
Presenter Carrie Stevenson is a both raffles will be announced
Florida Yards and Neighborhood at 2 p.m. and prizes will need
Program Agent, UF/IFAS Escam- to be picked up by 3 p.m. from
bia County and is a wealth of' raffle central.
knowledge on this subject.


FOREIGN CAR

REPAIR



926-5254

*e n






DArcy raziero Owner

Serving Wakulla & Surrounding
Counties for over 30 years
Lic # MV15601
60 Holiday Dr. Crawfordville, FL 32327


Join Us For The 43rd annual



a Wakulla Countg


J 1 wine. Show & Sale
















.. l :f"-
E7O M2 Susan Payne Turner with 2008 Class Winners















MEMBER FDIC








Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 19, 2009


Happy first birthday GOP plans to honor African Americans


I,


-. ..


Ava F. N. Pope

Daughter i
Adalyn G. Moore
Warren and Anna Moore
of Crawfordville announce
the birth of their daughter,
Adalyn Grace Moore, on
Feb. 7 at Tallahassee Memo-
rial Hospital. She weighed 8
pounds, 7 ounces and mea-
sured 20.9 inches in length.
Maternal grandparents
are David and Charlie Car-


The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's
(DEP) Florida Park Service will
host a number of historic re-
enactments and living history
demonstrations throughout
February and March. Visitors
are invited to experience
the past by attending reen-
actments of Florida's Civil
War battles, Seminole battle
skirmishes, cavalry demon-
strations, artillery shows and
medical treatment demonstra-
tions.
"Floridians and visitors
alike can learn about Florida's
unique history and culture
by visiting a state park," said
Florida Park Service Director
Mike Bullock. "Witnessing
demonstrations and reenact-'
ments is a great way to get
outdoors and learn about the
state's natural and cultural
resources."
Living history events pres-
ent a live representation of
past events or periods, includ-
ing folk life demonstrations,
pioneer skills demonstrations,
military encampments, weap-
ons firing and battle reenact-
ments. The Florida Park Ser-
vice manages more than 2,000
historic and archaeological
resources within state parks,
including seven National His-
toric Landmarks,
The 32nd Annual Reenact-
ment of the Battle of Natural


Classified Ads
As Little As
$8 A Week


Happy first birthday to
Ava Faith Nichole Pope on
Feb. 17. She is the daughter
of Richard and Christina
Pope of Crawfordville.
Maternal grandparents
are Ross and Debbie Lee of
Southport. Paternal grand-
parents are Laura and Gerry
Greenwood of Crawford-
ville.
Maternal great-grand-
parent is Ed Lee of Car-
rabelle.
Ava also has three sib-
lings,.Richard Pope, Jr.,
Dalson Pope and Alayna
Pope.


is born
raway of Sopchoppy. Paternal
grandparents are Paul and
Mary Pat Moore of Tallahas-
see.
Maternal great-grandpar-
ents are Lou Harrison of
Sopchoppy and Albert Locke
of Pensacola. Paternal great-
grandparents are Wilfred
Varn of Tallahassee and the
late Betty Jean Varn.


Bridge will be held at the
Natural Bridge Battlefield
Historic State Park, Saturday,
March 7 and Sunday, March 8,
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The Reenactment of the
Battle of Natural Bridge com-
memorates the 1865 Civil War
confrontation that preserved
Tallahassee as the only Con-
federate capital east of the
Mississippi River to avoid
Union control. On Saturday,
civil war reenactors will pres-
ent a Confederate-Union skir-
mish, cavalry demonstrations,
artillery shows and medical
treatment demonstrations.
The official Opening Ceremo-
nies and Dedication, spon-:
sored by the United Daughters
of the Confederacy, will begin
Sunday at 1:45 p.m., followed
by a full-scale reenactment of
the Battle of Natural Bridge
at 2:30 p.m. Admission is free
and donations are accepted.
For more information, call
(850) 922-7007.
For more information on
Florida State Parks, visit www.
floridastateparks.org.


In honor of Black History
Month, the Wakulla County Re-
publican Party will be hosting
a showing of the video "A Rich
Legacy of Empowerment" The
history of African Americans
and the Republican Party.
The program will be held
at Hudson Park Pavilion in
Crawfordville Saturday, Feb. 21
at noon.
Black History Month is a
time to observe the many con-
tributions African-Americans
have made to our nation's cul-
ture, science, industry, arts and
public service. It is also a time
to recall that the involvement
of Republicans and the African-
American community has been
a long and proud one.
In 1861 President Lincoln
signed the Emancipation Proc-
lamation that freed the slaves.
The Republicans of the day
worked to pass the Thirteenth
Amendment, which outlawed
slavery, the Fourteenth, which
guaranteed equal protection
under the laws, and the Fif-
teenth, which helped secure
voting rights for African-Ameri-
cans.
Timeline of African-Ameri-
can Republican History:


1862 Lincoln is the first
president to meet with a group
of Black leaders.
1864 The Republican Na-
tional Convention makes the
abolition of slavery a plank in
its platform.
1868 Oscar J. Dunn be-
comes Lieutenant Governor in
Louisiana.
'1870 Hiram R. Revels be-
comes the first African Ameri-
can Senator; elected to fill U.S.
Senate seat formerly held by
Jefferson Davis,
Joseph H. Rainey, South
Carolina, becomes the first Afri-
can American Congressman,
Alonzo J. Ransier is elected
to the U.S. Congress.
1875 Blanche K. Bruce of
Mississippi becomes the first
African-American. elected to a
full term in U.S. Senate.
1884 John R. Lynch is
the frist African-American to
preside over the Republican
National Convention; gives the
keynote address.
1954 President Eisenhower
appoints J. Ernest Wilkins as
Assistant Secretary of Labor.
1960 Jackie Robinson, the
first black Major League Base-
ball player, endorses Nixon for


Health Department


can help you quit
The Wakulla County Health ages .26 and over si
Department (WCHD), in part- rettes, 6.7 percent sm
nership with the Big Bend Area 1.8 percent use chewi
Health Education Center, is and snuff, 20 perce
offering the citizens .of Wakulla posed to. secondhand
County an opportunity to par- cars, and 10 percent a
ticipate in a new Quit Smoking in the home.
NOW1 class. Individuals who are Do not let yourself
thinking about quitting smoking one be a part of these
or who have made the decision Come and learn front
to quit are invited to attend the we all learn to cope
first session on Thursday, Feb. nicotine addiction an
19. Meetings will be held for habit once and for all
five Thursdays in a row, with a information, to pre-i
graduation held the final night to be placed on a con
The classes are also advertised the next meeting, ple,
on the WCHD website: www. class coordinator, To]
wakullahealth.com. The date of at 926-2558 ext 154.
the next meeting is Thursday,
Feb. 19 from 6:30 p.m. until 7:30
p.m. at the health department,
48 Oak Street in Crawfordville.
In America today, tobacco "W ha-
stands out as the agent most
responsible for avoidable ill-
ness and death. Millions of % e y
Americans consume this toxin
on a daily basis. The 2006 Florida
Adult Tobacco Survey reported
17.4 percent of Florida adults


Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes
Repairs Sales Service
All Makes and Models

LC.#RA62516 (850) 926-3546 mm


noke ciga-
loke cigars,
ng tobacco
nt are ex-
d smoke in
re exposed

f or a loved
e statistics.
i others as
e with the
nd kick the
1 For more
register, or
tact list for
ase call the
nya Hobby


President.
1966 Edward Brooks (MA)
is the first African-American
elected to U.S. Senate by popu-
lar vote.
1968 Arthur A. Fletcher is
appointed Assistant Secretary
of Labor; he will be a candidate
for Chairman of the Republican
National Committee in 1976
and appointed Chairman of
the U.S. Commission on Civil
Rights in 1990.
1975 President Ford ap-
points William T. Coleman
Secretary of Transportation.
1981 President Reagan ap-
points Clarence Pendleton Jr. as
Chairman of the US Civil Rights
Commission.
1982 President Reagan
appoints Clarence Thomas as
Chairman of the Equal Em-
ployment Opportunity Com-
mission.
1989 President Bush ap-
points Louis Sullivan as Sec-
retary' of Health and Human
Services.
President Bush appoints
General Colin Powell as Chair
of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of
Staff.
President Bush appoint
Condoleeza Rice as Director of
Soviet and Eastern European
affairs with the National Secu-
rity Council.


1991 President Bush ap-
points Clarence Thomas to U.S.
Supreme Court.
1998 House of Representa-
tive elects J.C. Watts (OK) to
be Chairman of the House of
Representatives.
2001 President George W.
Bush appoints General Colin
Powell as the Secretary of State;
Roderick R. Page as the Secre-
tary of Education; Condoleezza
Rice as Advisor of the National
Security Council; Claude Allen
as the Deputy Secretary of
Health and Human Services.
2002 For the first time in
history, Black Republicans hold
the Lieutenant Governor posi-
tion in two states at the same
time, Lt. Gov, Michael Steele
(MD) and Lt. Gov. Jeanette
Bradley (OH); six African Ameri-
cans were elected to state-wide
offices.
2004 President George W.
Bush appoints Alphonso Jack-
son as the Secretary of Housing
and Urban Development.
2009 Former Maryland Lt.
Gov. Michael Steele is elected
the first black Republican Na-
tional Committee chairman in
an election by the RNC during
their winter meetings
Gordon McCleary is the
head of the Wakulla County
Republican Party.


=-""

JOYCE C. lILL[ND[R

Certified Public Accountant

Electronic Filing of Tax Returns Available
(At No Extra Charge When We Prepare The Return)
Accounting.
Tax Preparation & Planning
Corporation
Partnership
Estate
Fiduciary


4432 Crawfordville Hwy.
_. Crawfordville, FL 32327


(850) 926-8272
(850) 926-8273t '


BEWAR of nlin insrerspromsingupt'-70


A EMBROIDERED &


SCREEN PRINTED

4 ES"N T-SHIRTS *CAPS


926-2211 SETS* POLOS






"When my Mom's health kept declining
I felt helpless until Big Bend Hospice
got involved. They controlled her pain
o 7 and told me what to expect as the illness
progressed They took away the fear."
Based on patlenufamilv sur.ev responses


When you need us, Big Bend Hospice is...



Call us for more information.

i d tn e lo-
wwbg.,hooceo


Save "up to 70%" on your
home insurance.


Buying a 10% deductible will
save 10% on your premium.


The ONLY way to achieve "too good to be true"
savings like this is to eliminate coverage or
misapply discounts.


A higher deductible, if permitted by your bank
or lender, will lower your premium. BUT if
your $200,000 home suffers up to $20,000 in
hurricane damage, YOU GET NOTHING!


Not true. Many companies will keep a
You can cancel your policy portion of your premium. Also, it can
anytime, with no penalty be extremely difficult to replace your
policy during hurricane season.

Carrying full replacement If you DON'T carry the required amount
cost is unnecessary since the of replacement coverage, even small
chance of total loss is unlikely, claims will be reduced and you may
violate your mortgage requirements.


Your premium will be lower
with online insurers that
don't use insurance agents.

You can save money with
online insurers that don't
use "local" agents.


Florida law requires ALL insurers to use
licensed agents. THERE ARE NO EXCEPTIONS.

Online companies spend your premiums
on expensive advertising, direct mail,
phone operators, and Internet systems -
sometimes more than 15% of your premium.
You pay more and get less service.


bait- switch

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^B^^ shoBtaiKiRTlwiref~com.n^^^^


Independent Insurance F MATA
Agents of Tallahassee F W


*chlce


DEP will host annual

Civil War battle


t!? My claim wasn't paid?

promised I was covered!"








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 19, 2009 Page 9A








Judge reduces bond in case of former FHP.trooper


Charlie Odom
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
The Wakulla County state
trooper charged with sexual
battery by a law enforcement
officer had his bond reduced
to $75,000 after a hearing last
week in Tallahassee.
Charlie Odom was brought
into the courtroom in a blue
Leon County Jail uniform,
chained hand and foot, and
hung his head during much
of the hearing. He did not
speak.
The bond reduction hearing


was held at the Leon County
Courthouse on Friday, Feb.
13, before Leon Circuit Judge
James Hankinson. The hear-
ing had been scheduled for
Wakulla County on Thursday,
Feb. 12, but was changed after
Wakulla Circuit Judge N. Sand-
ers Sauls recused himself.
In reducing the bond, Judge
Hankinson set out special con-
ditions for Odom if he does
make bail including that he
not possess any firearm or am-
munition, that he be subject to
GPS monitoring, and no victim
contact,
Wakulla County Judge Jill
Walker set the bond amount at
Odom's first appearance. She
was also the judge who signed
warrants to arrest Odom and
to search his home.
Testimony at the hearing
from Wakulla Sheriff's De-
tective Jason Newland indi-
cated that, after the alleged
sexual encounter with Trooper
Odom, she slit her wrists in an
apparent suicide attempt.
Newland also testified that
Odom told him this was the


second such complaint made
against him. Aftex the hear-
ing, Meggs would not discuss
whatever that complaint was,
saying only, "It'll all come out
later."
It was also noted that
Odom's home computer,
which was seized by law
enforcement, contained more
than 1,000 pornographic im-
ages. There was no indication,
however, that this was child
porn or involved the victim
of the alleged sexual bat-
tery. FDLE is apparently still
analyzing the images on the
computer,
While Judge Hankinson
noted that the computer porn
was apparently nbt a part of
the alleged crime, he did re-
strict Odom from any Internet
access, saying that the porn
was "a risk factor of concern
to the court."
Odom's wife Rita testified
at the hearing that she was
financially unable to come up
with enough money or col-
lateral to meet her. husband's
original $250,000 bond.


Mike Harrison of Harrison
Bail Bonds told the court
that he had worked with Rita
Odom, but his insurance com-
pany refused to take the bond
because of the high amount.
Defense attorney David
Kemp of the Don Pumphrey
law firm, which is represent-
ing Odom, argued to the court
that a bond of more than
$50,000 was tantamount to no
bond at all.
In setting the bail at
$75,000, Judge Hankinson
noted Rita Odom testified
that she could get a $9,000
personal loan more than
enough to make payment on
a bond of that amount.
State Attorney Willie
Meggs asked that the bond
remain at $250,000 because
of the nature of the offense.
"This defendant was placed
in a position of tremendous
trust by the public and he
has violated that public trust,"
Meggs said. "He was a law
enforcement officer, a person
we should be running to, not
running from."


Meggs said that as a result
of allegations, Odom has put
other officers in danger and
inspired a fear in citizens
about pulling over for a blue
light.
"I agree with the state, this
is a very serious offense," the
judge said. "However, at this
time, Mr. Odom is presumed
innocent."
Judge Hankinson added
that he believed there is little
likelihood that Odom would
flee the jurisdiction of the
court, but a bond of $75,000
would be large enough that, if
Odom did flee, a bail bonds-
man would seek to bring him
back.
Detective Newland said
that when le interviewed
Odom about the alleged inci-
dent, the trooper's response
was, "Now you want to know
what really happened?"
Odom also reportedly said:
"That's the last time I stop
and help someone in Wakulla
County."
According to the arrest
report, Odom stopped a fe-


male on Shadeville Highway
on Jan. 28 for going 59 in a
55 mph zone. She admitted
to having been drinking, and
he ran her license and found
it had been suspended. She
claims that Odom told her
to follow him to the parking
lot at Savannah's in Wakulla
Station, where he reportedly
took a picture of the woman's
breasts 'with his cell phone
and later allegedly received
oral sex.
Computer and radio re-
cords obtained from FHP
indicated that Odom had run
the woman's tag and license,
Newland said. Odom's next
radio contact was an hour
later. The log indicates Odom
drove 72 miles that day.
The day after the alleged
battery, Odom appears on
the surveillance videotape at
Wal-Mart, where the victim
worked, walking in, appar-
ently looking for her, and
walking out.
A number of Odom's
friends and family also ap-
peared at the bond hearing.


Sheriff's Report


Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office officials are investigat-
ing a grand theft reported Feb.
12 by Terry IK Crum of Craw-
fordville, according to Sheriff
David Harvey.
The victim reported the
theft of items from his work-
shop. The missing items in-
cluded a miter saw, outboard
motor and torque wrenches.
The property was valued at
$1,335. Det. John Zarate in-
vestigated,
In other activity reported
by the Wakulla County Sher-
iff's Office during the past
week:
On Feb. 12, Bradley A.


Newkirk of Panacea and Dol-
lar General reported a grand
theft. The victim reported that
someone stole $5,282 from the
store bank deposits over a sev-
eral day period. A suspect has
been identified and the case
was sent to the Criminal In-
vestigations Division. Deputy
Nick Petowsky and Det. Scott
Powell investigated.
On Feb. 12, Deputy Vicki
Mitchell responded to a brush
fire at Northwood Lane in
Crawfordville. The Crawford-
ville Fire and Rescue respond-
ed to the fire which covered
three different properties on
Northwood Lane. Firefighters


got the blaze under control
and Deputy Mitchell deter-
mined that the fire started as
a result of an unattended burn
pile. A water pump shed was
damaged on property owned
by Charles A. Patrick. The
neighboring property suffered
grass damage. The Florida
Division of Forestry also inves-
tigated the "illegal burning."
No citations were issued by
the sheriff's office.
On Feb. 11, Jerrell M.
Metcalf of Panacea reported
a theft of a mailbox. Debra
Metcalf went to check her
mail after arriving home and
discovered that the box was


missing. The victim does
not know if the mail was
delivered before the box was
stolen from the post. The box
is valued at $20. Deputy Vicki
Mitchell investigated.
On Feb. 13, law enforce-
ment officials have not deter-
mined the official cause of
the Sunday, Feb. 8 house fire
that killed Anthony Jerome
Bradwell, 25, of Crawfordville.
Undersheriff Donnie Crum
said fire officials are looking
into the possibility that the
fire started in the kitchen,
perhaps due to an electrical
problem. The fire was deter-
mined not to be suspicious


in nature.
On Feb. 15, Gary J. Oliver
of Crawfordville reported a
burglary at his home. The
victim heard noise inside his
home as he approached it. He
found the rear door ajar and
tracks in the area. A window
screen was cut and the win-
dow was open. Damage was
estimated at $100. Sgt. Eddie
Wester investigated.
On Feb. 16, Troy A. Tully
of Crawfordville reported a
fraud as someone used his
debit card in Tampa. The total
of bogus charges on the card
was $480. Sgt. Mike Kemp
investigated.


On Feb. 16, Christina
N. Gromley of Crawfordville
reported a fraud as someone
removed $655 from her bank
account. An electronic check
was used to take money from
her account. Deputy Nick
Petowsky investigated.
The Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office received 810
calls for service during the
past week.
Note to our readers: The
people who are reported as
charged with crimes in this
column have not yet been to
trial and are therefore inno-
cent until proven guilty.


Parents to meet at

Wakulla High School


Wakulla High School will
host a Parent Night on Tues-
day, Feb. 24 and Thursday, Feb.
26 in the school media center
from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Par-
ents and students are invited
to attend these informational
sessions to learn more about
Advanced Placement classes
and Dual Enrollment.
Additionally, WHS will
introduce a new program
entitled AVID. Parents and
students should come to
either of these presentations
to get ready for scheduling
their students for next year's


classes.
Parents and students will
learn what Advanced Place-
ment (AP) and Dual Enroll-
ment are and who is eligible
to sign up for these classes,
Participating in either pro-
gram is an excellent educa-
tional resume addition, and
both programs allow students
to earn college credit while
still enrolled in high school.
If parents have questions,
they may contact Melisa Tay-
lor at taylorm@wakulla.kl2.
fl.us.


Free trees available


Now's the time to start think-
ing about the spring planting
season, and the Arbor Day Foun-
dation is offering an ideal way for
everyone to plant trees when the
weather warms up.
Every person from Florida who
joins the Arbor Day Foundation
in February will receive 10 free
Eastern redbud trees.
The 10 free Eastern redbud
trees are part of the nonprofit
Foundation's Trees for America


campaign.
The trees will be shipped post-
paid at the right time for planting
between March 1 and May 31 with
enclosed planting instructions:
To become a member of the
Foundation and receive the free
trees, send a $10 contribution to
TEN FREE EASTERN REDBUD
TREES, Arbor Day Foundation, 100
Arbor Avenue, Nebraska City, NE
68410, by Feb. 28, or go to www.
arborday.org.


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
A 33-year-old Crawfordville
man died in a one vehicle
accident Saturday, Feb. 14 at
4:56 a.m. on U.S. Highway 319
south of New Light Church
Road, according to the Florida
Highway Patrol (FHP).
Eddie Lee Farmer III was
driving a 1997 Cadillac south
on the highway during inclem-


ent weather. For unknown rea-
sons, Farmer left the highway
onto the west shoulder. The
left side of the Cadillac col-
lided with a large tree and the.
vehicle came to final rest in
the area of the collision.
The driver was pronounced
dead at the scene. FHP of-
ficials have not determined
whether the accident was
alcohol related. The vehicle


Farrington Law Office


Deirdre A.

Farrington, Esq.

68-B Feli Way
Crawfordville, Florida 32327
(850) 926-2700
Fax (850) 926-2741
farringtonlaw@embarqmail.com


suffered $8,000 worth of dam-
ages. A seatbelt was in use at
the time of the accident.,
The Wakulla County Sher-
iff's Office, Wakulla Coun-
ty Fire Rescue and Wakulla


EMS assisted at the accident
scene.
FHP Trooper S.A. Lolley
was the crash investigator and
Corporal J.B. Woodward was
the homicide investigator.


L AYLOR ACCOUNTING, LLC.


11


Dedicated to providing professional client-centered, accounting,
audit, and tax services.
Make Taylor Accounting part of your winning business team today!
LLCs, Corporations, Partnerships, Non-Profit, & Individuals
Auditing & Accounting
Business Start-up & Advisory Services
Bookkeeping & Payroll
Tax Planning & Preparation
QuickBooks Assistance
Certified QuickBooks ProAdvisor
Member Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce
Overwhelmed by ever increasing
paperwork and administrative tasks?
Rest assured Taylor Accounting can
handle those stressful details so you can
focus on what's important: your business!

c1m1B1 Karen Taylor, CPA J'


ft-


m_


I 850-591-9131
PO Box 1662
Crawfordville, FL 32326
karentaylorcpa@hotmail.com


5O


0 .
..-. *-- .3


wk I


or ubstribt for les...
In County $26 yr. $14.50 1/2 yr.
Out of County $35 yr. $19 1/2 yr.
Out of State $40 yr. $22 1/2 yr.


Annual Hirican Hmerican Heritage


Parade & Celebration


Saturday, February 21, 2009


Parade begins at 11


Festivities in Hudson Park 11 4

Children's Games

Entertainment

Information Booths

Food Vendors


Parade entrants being accepted call 656-2578 or 926-7506


Feb. 14 traffic accident results in


another death on Wakulla highways


m


LI. 4


4Lt


30tar Pet. 30rar Pet.








Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 19, 2009








Some toys can be dangerous to both dogs and cats


CHAT
of
Wakulla


gets

Heide Clifton

There is always something
to worry about. We always
worry about lead-based toys for
children from China and other
toys that are just not suitable


because they can cause harm
to children through choking,
swallowing, etc.
Not to long ago a rather
scary report about a Lab mix
that had a terrible encounter
with a ball made the news.
While chewing on the ball it
effectively sucked his tongue
into the hole in the ball. The
ball (a pimple ball with a bell)
did not have a second hole
preventing the vacuum effect
from happening. The animal
came .up to a,person whim-


pering with the ball in his
mouth. They tried to remove
the ball but the tongue had
swollen and the ball could not
be released.
After being taken to an
Animal Medical Center to
have the ball removed it was
discovered that all circulation
to the tongue was cut off and
the poor dog could not put the
tongue back in his mouth. The
vets tried their best, but had
to amputate the tongue. The
owner had to teach the dog


to eat and drink and adjust
to a life without a tongue. The
animal went through horrific
pain and the owner was stuck
with the bill of $5,000. It has
been documented that this
animal was not the only dog
that suffered from the use of
that particular toy.
After they started recalling
children's toys made in China
due to the levels of lead in
them, Consumer Affairs.com
hired a lab to test cat and dog
toys from Wal-mart. Other


agencies did the same with
toys from Petsmart, Petco, the
Dollar stores, etc. They found
that many of the dog and cat
toys made in China included
lead and chromium, some in
very high dosages. No one
is sure just what prolonged
exposure to these can do to
dogs, but in the short term
symptoms are loss of appe-
tite, diarrhea, and aggressive
behavior.
Let's face it, there are no
100 percent safe toys for our


dogs. The key is to supervise
your dog's playtime with toys.
Play with the dog and the toy.
There are many interesting
articles on dangerous toys
on the web and they are well
worth exploring.
Just to let everybody know,
this year's rose-sale to benefit
CHAT and the Wakulla Animal
Shelter will be held on April
18 and April 19. Go to www.
cha.tofwakulla.org for the de-
tails and the list of roses.


FWC makes changes

to WMA quota system


At its meeting in Destin,
the seven members of the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission (FWC)
voted in favor of proposed
recommended changes to its
Wildlife Management Area
(WMA) Quota Hunt Permit
Program. An amendment to
the new rules provides that
the changes will no longer
be in effect after 2012, unless
the Commission reauthorizes
these changes or approves an
extension.
For more than a year, a Quo-
ta Hunt Stakeholder Working
Group, consisting of FWC staff
and members of the hunting
public, worked on developing
a new set of rules to improve
the state's regulation of hunt-
ing on WMAs.
Public meetings also were
held throughout the state and
much input was received on
how to make the quota permit
system better.
The changes are needed to
improve hunter recruitment
and retention and more fairly
distribute public hunting op-
portunities.
Under these new rules,
which become effective for
the 2009-10 hunting season,
-all quota permits will now
be nontransferable, including
those for mobility-impaired
hunters. The only exceptions
are on Holton Creek WMA and'
deer dog hunts on Blackwater
WMA, where there will be no
changes.
Florida was the only state
in the country that previously
allowed its big-game quota
permits to be transferred from
one person to another.
"It is time to improve the
system and become consis-
tent with others," said Chair-
man Rodney Barreto. "We are
looking forward to working


with our stakeholders on
continued improvements of
our system."
Besides making quota per-
mits nontransferable, the rules
give hunters more choices for
more types of public hunts.
For hunters who like to use
bows and muzzleloaders, they
will now be able to put in for
five archery hunts and five
muzzleloading gun hunts, as
opposed to only five archery
or muzzleloading gun hunts.
And with the increase in
people wanting to hunt wild
hogs, the rules allow hunters
five choices for hog hunts,
and they still have the ability
to apply for five general gun
hunts (for deer and wild hogs)
as well.
The rules also establish a
new guest permit, whereby a
quota permit holder can take
someone hunting with him,
if that person applies under
the quota permit holder's
customer ID number.
. Stipulations of the guest
permit require that the quota
permit holder and his guest
enter and exit the WMA to-
gether, share the same vehicle
and share a single bag limit.
In addition, the quota permit
holder must be on the area
when the guest is hunting,
and in cases where a WMA
has zone tags, both people
must hunt in the same zone.
Because of the current
number of hunters permitted
on certain hunts and to allow
for the addition of the new
guest permit, the rules reduce.
some of the established quo-
tas on only eight of the 105
WMAs with quotas.
Those WMAs are Croom,
KICCO, Hickory Hammock,
Upper Hillsborough River, An-
drews, Twin Rivers, Joe Budd
and Dexter/Mary Farms.


Swine drawing set


A ticket drawing will be
held for several prizes at the
annual Swine Show Saturday,
Feb. 21.
A Swine Show Quilt, made
by Sherri Hood, Wakulla Coun-
ty 4-H Agent, is a prize.
Ticket drawing tickets are
available at the Extension Of-
fice and the day of the Swine
Show.


Tickets are a $1 donation to
the Wakulla County Youth Fair
Association and are eligible to
win not only the quilt, but a
cut and wrapped whole hog,
a cut and wrap service for a
portion of beef, and 10 pounds
of pork sausage,
The quilt will be on display
through Saturday at the Exten-
sion Office.


PUBLIC NOTICE
In accordance with Section 121.055, Florida
Statutes, Wakulla County Board of County
Commissioners intends to designate the
following position to the Senior Management
Service Class in the Florida Retirement
System:
Administrative Coordinator


Located at St. Marks Marine
INEw 2009 BOATs ARE HERE!
5 MAR ] We Serice All Makes & Models
1N 850-925-1100 Locally Owned
S RUINE Open: Monday Saturday 1OAM- 6PM
M M ir W ,O 483 Port Leon Dr., St. Marks, FL 32355
:Fast Turn-Around : Visit Our Website To See Our Complete Inventory
Instant Credit Approval www.stmarine.com
Financing With Very W
Low Interest Rates O YAMAHA NW--MA W ,
V B P $,999


Archery tournament set for schools


Florida's second annual National
Archery in the Schools Program state
tournament will take place during the
last two weeks of February.
Thirty-five of the 157 participating
schools from around the state will
compete in the virtual tournament,
which will allow students to shoot in
their own schools' gymnasiums and
mail in their scores.
Last year, 592 youths from 28
schools competed in the tournament.
This year, registration numbers have
topped 750 participants.
"Winning teams will be selected in
three grade levels with trophies and
medals awarded to the schools and
team members. The highest-scoring
girl and boy in the tournament will
each win a Mathews-Genesis bow and
a Morrell target," said Steve Robbins,
the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva-


tion Commission's (FWC) coordinator
for the program.
Last year's winning teams were
Flagler Palm Coast High School, Daniel
Jenkins Academy Middle School (Polk
County) and Altha Elementary School
(Calhoun County).
Florida's program, a cooperative ef-
fort between the FWC and the Florida
Department of Education, teaches
international-style target archery in
4th to 12th-grade physical education
classes.
"Physical education teachers un-
dergo eight hours of basic archery
instructor training, and the students
enjoy a'two-week archery component
in their class," Robbins said.
In 2004, Florida became the 24th
state to offer the training that was de-
veloped by the Kentucky Department
of Education and the Kentucky Depart-


ment of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
"The National Safety Council rates
archery more accident-free than every
popular ball sport, including tennis
and golf. Archery enables students
to learn a safe, lifetime skill they can
practice almost anywhere. More than
3.5 million students have participated
in the program
internationally since its inception
in 2002, and there have been no ac-
cidents," Robbins said.
For more information about getting
local schools involved in the National
Archery in the Schools Program, con-
tact Steve Robbins at (386) 758-0525 or
Steven.Robbins@MyFWC.com.
"This is all about the kids, and who
knows? Your child may possess the
talent to become a future Olympic
archery champion," Robbins said with
a grin.


Grouper season closures set to help species


The recreational harvest
season for red and black
grouper in Gulf of Mexico
federal waters closed Feb.
15 and will reopen on March
15. Federal waters extend
beyond nine nautical miles
offshore of Florida in the
Gulf.
The recreational harvest of


ff


red and black grouper is still
allowed in Gulf state waters
inside the nine-nautical-mile
line under existing Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission bag and
size-limit regulations.
The recreational harvest
season for gag grouper from
all Gulf waters off Florida


WUIM
A


GilBSON AUTOMOTIVEE SERVICE
G. Scorn GIBSON
AUTOMOTIVE SPECIALIST
*G OVER 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE
AVA L 850-926-2430
MV69886


NOTICE OF PUBLIC

MEETING

1. Adoption of Transportation Concurrency
Application Review Fees


Applicant:


Wakulla County


Proposal: Adopt Transportation
Concurrency Management
System's Concurrency
Application Review Fees
Hearings Required:
County Commission 04/07/09 @ 6:00PM


closed on Feb. 1 and will
reopen on April 1.
The commercial harvest
season for gag, red and black
grouper in all Gulf waters
off Florida, except Monroe
County waters, closed on
Feb. 15 and will reopen on
March 15. The commercial
harvest season for gag and


black grouper in all Atlantic
waters off Florida, including
all Monroe County waters,
closes March 1 and will re-
open May 1.
These season closures will
reduce the harvest of grou-
pers and help rebuild the
population of these species.


www. thewakullanews. com

SGatortrax Services LLC
Professional Property Maintenance
: L General Landscaping Hauling Recycling
850-545-6760
www.gatortraxservices.com
Please Recycle
Licensed-Insured i
Rodney True Owner
Member-Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce


NOTICE OF HEARING
The Wakulla County Legislative Delegation
will be holding a public hearing in
Crawfordville, Florida, on Tuesday, February
24, 2009 at 6:00 PM. The hearing will be
held in the County Commission Chambers:
located at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL.
All residents and elected officials are invited
to attend. This hearing will allow the citizens
the opportunity to meet their legislators,
discuss concerns, ask questions and offer
comments for upcoming 2009 Legislative
Session.
Reply to: 228 Senate Office Building
404 South Monroe Street
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100
(850) 487-5004


Saturday, Feb. 28 7 p.m.

Historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium
Featuring

SOUTHBOUND BAND

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

W SWIFT WATER
Also Appearing

Suzie Elkins Ken & Teresa Skipper
Tickets $8 962-3711
. "For more information go to www.wakulla.com
"Click on Arts_&_Entertainment









THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 19, 2009 Page 11A


O E850 -224-4960 www. fsucu .org


F O breditI a 1MORTGAGES-FREECHECKING ~ AUTO LOANS ~ CREDIT CARDS


For tides at the following
Gulf Coast W ee Aadd to Dog Island Listings
fj i Gulf Coast Weekly Almanac / /

Tide charts by February 19 February 25
ZihuaSoftware, LLC February

St. Marks River Entrance City of St. Marks Shell Po


Date High Low High Low High
Thu 0.0 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.8 ft. 2.3 ft.
Feb 19, 09 6:11 AM 12:57 PM 5:13 PM 11:08 PM
Fri -0.2 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.5 ft.
Feb 20, 09 7:01 AM 1:16 PM 6:41 PM
Sat 2.5 ft.' -0.3 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.2 ft.
Feb 21, 09 12:11 AM 7:38 AM 1:39 PM 7:25 PM
Sun 2.7 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.9 ft.
Feb 22, 09 12;53 AM 8:09 AM 2:02 PM 8:01 PM
Mon 2.9 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.8 ft. 0.6 ft.
Feb 23, 09 1:29 AM 8:36 AM 2:25 PM 8:33 PM
Tue 3.0 ft. -0.4 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.3 ft.
Feb 24, 09 2:03 AM 9:00 AM 2:46 PM 9:05 PM
Wed 3.1 ft. -0.3 ft. 3.1 ft. 0.1 ft.
Feb 25, 09 2:37 AM 9:23 AM 3:06 PM 9:37 PM


St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 0.0 ft. 1.7 ft. 1.9 ft. 1.9 ft.
Feb 19, 09 4:46 AM 12:05 PM 3:48 PM 10:16 PM
Fri -0.2 ft. 1.9 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.1 ft.
Feb 20, 09 5:36 AM 12:24 PM 5:16 PM 11:19 PM
Sat -0.3 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.3 ft.
Feb 21, 09 6:13 AM 12:47 PM 6:00 PM
Sun 2.3 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.0 ft.
Feb 22, 09 12:01 AM 6:44 AM 1:10 PM 6:36 PM
Mon 2.4 ft. -0.5 ft. 2.4 ft. 0.6 ft.
Feb 23, 09 12:37 AM 7:11 AM 1:33 PM 7:08 PM
Tue 2.5 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.5 ft. 0.3 ft.
Feb 24, 09 1:11 AM 7:35 AM 1:54 PM 7:40 PM
Wed 2.6 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.1 ft.
Feb 25, 09 1:45 AM 7:58 AM 2:14 PM 8:12 PM


Date High Low High Low High
Thu 0.0 ft. 2.1 ft. 1.9 ft. 2.5 ft.
Feb 19, 09 5:07 AM 12:21 PM 4:09 PM 10:32 PM
Fri -0.2 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.6 ft.. 2.7 ft.
Feb 20, 09 5:57 AM 12:40 PM 5:37 PM 11:35 PM
Sat -0.3 ft. 2.6 ft. 1.3 ft.
Feb 21, 09 6:34 AM 1:03 PM 6:21 PM
Sun 2.9 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.0 ft.
Feb 22, 09 12:17 AM 7:05 AM 1:26 PM 6:57 PM
Mon 3.1 ft. -0.5 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.7 ft.
Feb 23, 09 12:53 AM 7:32 AM 1:49 PM 7:29 PM
Tue 3.2 ft. -0.5 ft. 3.2 ft. 0.4 ft.
Feb 24, 09 1:27 AM 7:56 AM 2:10 PM 8:01 PM
Wed 3.3 ft. -0.4 ft. 3.4 ft. 0.1 ft.
Feb 25, 09 2:01 AM 8:19 AM 2:30 PM 8:33 PM


Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 0.0 ft. 1.6 ft. 1.4 ft. 1.9 ft.
Feb 19, 09 5:18 AM 12:13 PM 4:20 PM 10:24 PM
Fri -0.1 ft. 1.8 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.0 ft.
Feb 20, 09 6:08 AM 12:32 PM 5:48 PM 11:27 PM
Sat -0.2 ft. 2.0 ft. 0.9 ft.
Feb 21, 09 6:45 AM 12:55 PM 6:32 PM
Sun 2.2 ft. -0.3 ft. 2.1 ft. 0.7 ft.
Feb 22, 09 12:09 AM 7:16 AM 1:18 PM 7:08 PM
Mon 2.3 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.3 ft. 0.5 ft.
Feb 23, 09 12:45 AM 7:43 AM 1:41 PM 7:40 PM
Tue 2.4 ft. -0.3 ft. 2.4 ft. 0.3 ft.
Feb 24, 09 1:19 AM 8:07 AM 2:02 PM 8:12 PM
Wed 2.5 ft. -0.3 ft. 2.5 ft. 0.0 ft.
Feb 25, 09 1:53 AM 8:30 AM 2:22 PM 8:44 PM


points
s: Carrabelle
Apalachicola
Cat Point
Lower Anchorage
West Pass


High Tide
28 Min.
1 Hr., 53 Min.
1 Hr., 13 Min.
1 Hr., 36 Min.
1 Hr., 26 Min.


int, Spring Creek


Date High Low High Low High
Thu 0.0 ft. 2.2 ft. 2.1 ft. 2.5 ft.
Feb 19, 09 5:04 AM 12:18 PM 4:06 PM 10:29 PM
Fri -0.2 ft.' 2.4 ft. 1.8 ft. 2.8 ft.
Feb 20, 09 5:54 AM 12:37 PM 5:34 PM 11:32 PM
Sat -0.4 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.4 ft.
Feb 21, 09 6:31 AM 1:00 PM 6:18 PM
Sun 3.0 ft. -0.5 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.1 ft.
Feb 22, 09 12:14 AM 7:02 AM 1:23 PM 6:54 PM
Mon 3.1 ft. -0.5 ft. 3.1 ft. 0.7 ft.
Feb 23, 09 12:50 AM 7:29 AM 1:46 PM 7:26 PM
Tue 3.3 ft. -0.5 ft. 3.3 ft. 0.4 ft.
Feb 24, 09 1:24 AM 7:53 AM 2:07 PM 7:58 PM
Wed 3.4 ft. -0.4 ft. 3.4 ft. 0.1 ft.
Feb 25, 09 1:58 AM 8:16 AM 2:27 PM 8:30 PM


Dog Island West End

Date High Low High Low High
Thu -0.4 ft. 1.8 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.2 ft.
Feb 19, 09 4:20 AM 1:24 PM 3:01 PM 8:24 PM
Fri -0.4 ft. 1.9 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.2 ft.
Feb 20, 09 5:13 AM 1:33 PM 4:27 PM 9:47 PM
Sat -0.4 ft. 1.9 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.2 ft.
Feb 21, 09 5:56 AM 1:50 PM 5:23 PM 10:59 PM
Sun -0.4 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.3 ft.
Feb 22, 09 6:32 AM 2:06 PM 6:06 PM 11:57 PM
Mon -0.3 ft. 2.0 ft. 0.9 ft.
Feb 23, 09 7:01 AM 2:19 PM 6:44 PM
Tue 2.3 ft. -0.2 ft. 2.0 ft. 0.7 ft.
Feb 24, 09 12:48 AM 7:25 AM 2:28 PM 7:18 PM
Wed 2.2 ft: -0.0 ft. 2.1 ft. 0.5 ft. .
Feb 25, 09 1:37 AM 7:45 AM 2:38 PM 7:51 PM


Low Tide
25 Min.
2 Hrs., 38 Min.
2 Hrs., 31 Min.
2 Hrs., 3 Min.
2 Hrs., 39 Min.







First
March 3



., ,.

Full
March 10






Last
March 18


New
Feb. 24


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
7:10am 7:55am 8:40am 9:25am 10:10am 10:50am 11:30am
7:35pm 8:20pm 9:05pm 9:50pm 10:30pm 11:10pm 11:50pm
1:05 am 1:50 am 2:35 am 3:20 am 4:05 am 4:50 am 5:25 am
1:20pm 2:05pm 2:50pm 3:35 pm 4:25 pm 5:05 pm 5:45 pm


Sunrise
Sunset
Moon rise
Moon set
Brightness


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
7:13 am 7:12 am 7:11 am 7:10 am 7:09 am 7:08 am 7:07 am
6:29 pm 6:29 pm 6:30 pm 6:31 pm 6:32 pm 6:32 pm 6:33 pm
3:38 am 4:24 am 5:06 am 5:43 am 6:16 am 6:47 am 7:16 am
1:42 pm 2:37 pm 3:34 pm 4:31 pm 5:28 pm 6:25 pm 7:23 pm
36% 30% 24% 17% 11% 5% 2%


- I Boating Emergencies -

- Coast Guard Station
Panama City (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown ........ (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
St. M arks (Flotilla 12) .......'............................... (850) 906-0540
or.. 893-5137
Shell Point (Flotilla 13) (850) 926-2606
or 926-5654



Coast Guard

Auxiliary Reports

By Sherrie Alverson


Editor's Note: This column,
'due to the combination of activi-
ties, was written jointly by your
columnist, Sherrie Alverson,
Flotilla 12's reporter, Carolyn Tre-
adon, and her husband, Duane
Treadon, who is an appointed
officer on the District staff.
Members from all nine divi-
sions in the Eighth Coast Guard
District attended a three day
conference at Fort Walton Beach,
Thursday through Saturday.
On Sunday, members from all
seven flotillas within Division
1 attended its meeting at the
same hotel.
The Eighth District includes
'New Mexico and stretches east-
ward past Flotilla 12 at St. Marks
and on to the Econfina River.
Division 1 covers the eastern
most area and as far west as the
Alabama line.
On Thursday, the District
Board and Executive Committee
(EXCOM) (which included Rich
Rasmussen of Flotilla 12 who
is now District Captain-East,
.(former Rear Commodore-East)
attended planning meetings
and discussed issues facing our
Seas.
Friday began bright and early
for the District Board, elected
district officers and staff and
the appointed officers. Once
gain, Rich Rasmussen was pres-
ent and joining him was Duane


Treadon, who is the District
Communication Services staff
officer.
The business meeting was
completed by noon. That after-
noon the first class of Incident
Command Systems 210 course
was presented and the students
received their certificates upon
the successful completion of
the course. Flotilla 13 members,
Lynne Reese and Sherrie Alver-
son received their certificates at
a previous conference.
The ICS 210 course, as it is
known, is required for pursuing
the Marine Safety Ribbon as it
is an introduction to the basics
of responding to a disaster, large
or small, Other requirements
for the Marine Safety Ribbon
include Introduction to Marine
Safety, Introduction to Marine
Safety and Environmental Pro-
tection and the Good Mate pro-
gram. All three of these classes
were offered Saturday.
A record breaking 91 Auxil-
iarists attend the Introduction
to Marine Safety class, given by
Lieutenant Steve Caskey. This
class is designed for the active
duty and must be taught by a
trained Marine Science officer.
The exam is also proctored and
no notes are allowed!
At the awards banquet that
night, 42 members received
their Marine Safety Training


Captain Poulin addresses
auxiliary members.
Ribbon, including Flotilla 12's
Rich Rasmussen, Tim Ashley,
Bob Asztalos, David Guttman,
Chuck Hickman and Rob Purvis.
As stated before, this type of
training is critical to our local
area since the closest active
duty station is Coast Guard Sta-
tion Panama City to the west or
Coast Guard Station Yankeetown
to the east. Both of them are 90
air miles away. Properly trained
Auxiliarists from Flotilla 12 at
St. Marks and Flotilla 13 at Shell
Point can be on scene much
sooner, to assess the situation
and damages and report it to
the Coast Guard station.
Flotilla 13 members attend-
ing both District conference
and Division meeting included
Flotilla Commander and Vice
Commander, Mae Waters and
John Sykes and Sherrie Alver-
son. They attended various
workshops, many of them in-
cluding: Communications, Navi-
gation Systems (formerly known
as ATONS, Aids to Navigations),
Operations, Public Education
and National Safe Boating Week.
Bob Surdakowski, Flotilla 12,
also attended the conference/
meeting and was kept busy
with classes.
Saturday night, preceding the
Awards Banquet, we attended
the wedding of our Director of
Auxiliary, Captain James Mont-
gomery and Remi Navarro. For
them to share this special mo-
ment in their lives with us was
heartwarming. The wedding
was spectacular and elegant
was another suitable adjective.
The bride was beautiful, and
gorgeous, too. There was no
doubt that the groom was a
happy man.
For us Jim Montgomery was
not only the Director of Aux-
iliary, but was also our friend.
He has supported the Auxiliary
in untold ways. Not only is he
respected by all, but loved by
many. At the banquet later that
evening, the guest speaker was
Rear Admiral Joel Whitehead,
Commander Eighth District.
During the awards portion,
Tim Ashley, Bob Asztalos, Rich
Rasmussen and Duane Treadon -
were surprised to receive a Team


Commendation award for their
hard work in planning and
working the FSU Flyover back
in November. Other members
were called, but were not able
to be there to receive the award.
Those awards will be presented
at the next Flotilla meeting.
Also a surprise was Division
1 being chosen the Division of
the Year, which occurred under
the leadership of our Rich Ras-
mussen. Just think, there are
nine divisions in our district
and our Division was chosen
the best.
Sunday morning was a time
for strong coffee as we began
bright and early after such a late
night at the banquet. Especially
the Flotilla Commanders who
met with their call-out authori-
ties at the three Coast Guard Sta-
tions in the Division at 7 a.m.
BOSNR Chuck Bush is in
charge of Coast Guard Station
Panama City is the man who
authorizes orders for both Flo-
tillas 12 and 13. We are very
fortunate as we share a excellent
working relationship with "our
Coasties."
The Division board and staff
gathered for the business meet-
ing. Each Flotilla Commander
and Staff Officer was given three
minutes to give a condensed
version goals and accomplish-
ments since their last meeting.
The Division Publication Officer
praised Flotilla 13's newsletter,
Lucky 13. Linda Buytendorp is
the editor. Only one other flo-
tilla publishes a newsletter. We
were honored to have with us
Captain Jim Montgomery from
the DIRAUX office and Captain
Steve Poulin, Deputy Com-
mander of Sector Mobile.
The theme of the morning
was the important role the
Auxiliary plays in assisting the
Active Duty in meeting their
goals and objectives. It is very
nice to feel so appreciated, es-
pecially for both of our Flotilla's
that are so far from an active
duty station!
Remember safe boating is
no accident.


Meeting to address


condition of Springs


and septic tanks


By BRUCE RITCHIE',
Special to .The Wakulla News
With Tallahassee seeking
federal money to upgrade
its sewage treatment, plant,
Wakulla Springs supporters
now are focusing more atten-
tion on the threat to ground-
water posed by septic tanks.
Wakulla Springs has be-
come choked with weeds and
algae in the past decade as ni-
trogen levels in groundwater
increased. Scientists say nitro-
gen sources include Tallahas-
see's sewage treatment plants,
septic tanks, fertilizer use and
dirty stormwater runoff.
. Wakulla and Leon counties
along with Tallahassee and
the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection are
sponsoring a workshop next
week on reducing pollution
and restoring the health of
Wakulla Springs.
The workshop will focus on
septic tanks in the region, said
Dan Pennington, a workshop
organizer and planner with
the 1000 Friends of Florida
environmental group in Tal-
lahassee. The workshop will
explore the many options
for maintaining septic tanks
by companies, agencies or a
hybrid of the two.
"Nobody has made any
choices or any selections,"
Pennington said. "What could
come out of the workshop is
an agreement by local gov-
ernments to look at these
management utilities as an
option."
In 2006, Tallahassee agreed
to upgrade its two sewage
treatment plants to reduce ni-
trogen in wastewater sprayed
on crops at the city's South-
east Farm in southern Leon


County.
Wakulla County in 2007
began requiring advanced
septic systems countywide for
new homes and began requir-
ing them last year to replace
failing septic tanks in existing
homes. Those "performance-
based" systems in Wakulla
County cost perhaps $3,000
to $5,000 more than standard
septic systems, according to
the Florida Department of
Health.
In a few areas of the coun-
try, wastewater utilities have
been established to inspect
and maintain advanced sep-
tic systems or to even own
them while charging custom-
ers a monthly fee for their
upkeep.
The Wakulla County Com-
mission has discussed septic
tank maintenance options, but
the issue hasn't been fleshed
out, Commission Chairman
Howard Kessler said.
"We certainly don't want a
bunch of improperly function-
ing performance-based septic
systems in place harming our
environment," Kessler said.
"Some form of oversight is
needed, and that's also being
looked at."
The workshop, which costs
$30 and includes a lunch, will
be held Feb. 25 and Feb. 26 at
the Tallahassee Automobile
Museum, 6800 Mahan Drive
at Interstate 10 and U.S. High-
way 90.
For more information, go
on the Web to www,lOOfof.
org or call 1000 Friends of
Florida at 222-6277.
Bruce Ritchie is an indepen-
dent journalist based in
Tallahassee.


Caskey, Patton, Whittington, Bush, Montgomery and Poulin at the meeting.


Major
Activity

Minor
Activity


David Guttman and Jeff Brooks









Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 19, 2009


Wakulla County celebrates Valentine's Day


Clockwise from top right,
Patrick Green, Jr. keeps Patrick
Green out of the raindrops
on his tractor. Emma Lou and
George Johnston show their
colors and their The Wakulla
News bouquet Chad Patterson
enjoyed the candy and bubble
gum during the parade. Senior
Center Queen Lassie Williams
in the parade vehicle. Ashley
Makenna Woodall keeps a
puppy dry as the rain moved
through the area. (Photos
by Denise Folh and Lynda
Kinsey).


Barber Shop & Salon

^ 926-4080
Indulging Options 'l
Always FREE Advice with Any Service
His & Her's Barber Shop & Salon (Amross from Gulf Coast Lumber)

Capital Health Plan
Proudly Presents


Attorneys want to re-notice

the MSBU fee settlement


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Because of the court's con-
cerns that the notice of pro-
posed settlement did not
reach all property owners who
paid the special assessment
for ambulance service, lawyers
for the class and the county
want to send out supplemen-
tal notices.
Current Wakulla County
property owners received
notice of the proposed settle-
ment of the lawsuit in their
2008 tax bills. Wakulla Circuit
Court Judge N. Sanders Sauls
raised concerns that many
people who owned property
during the years 1999 to 2002
may have sold their land and
not received notice.
Wakulla County had
charged a Municipal Benefit
Service Unit for Emergency
Medical Service. The Florida
Supreme Court, looking at an
MSBU from Madison County,
determined that the special
assessment was an illegal tax
because land receives no ben-


efit from ambulance service.
(MSBUs for fire service have
been upheld as legal by the
court.) .
, Attorney William Owen,
who represents the taxpayers
who filed the lawsuit against
Wakulla County seeking a
refund of the MSBU money,
told the court at a recent court
hearing that he had contacted
an information technology
firm that could access old De-
partment of Revenue records
and had determined there
were 4,653 parcel owners who
did not receive notice of the
proposed settlement,
Owen estimated it would
cost $2,000 to $3,000 to send
out those notices.
It was proposed that those
additional notices could go out
by Feb. 25, and a new deadline
of April 15 was given for those
people to decide whether to
join in the lawsuit.
The notice that is sent gives
property owners a number of
choices: they can opt in and be
represented by the class action


attorneys, they can opt-out
and file their own lawsuit or
opt-out and not seek a refund.
Those who do nothing are
counted as having opted-in.
As a proposed settlement
to the case, the county ne-
gotiated a $750,000 refund
for those who paid the $35
annual assessment between
1999 and 2002 with a payment
of $18 for each of those years.
(It would actually appear as
a credit for most property
owners.)
A sticking point in nego-
tiations has been the court's
refusal to accept the amount
of attorney's fees that were
discussed by the parties, with
Judge Sauls saying he would
be the one to determine what
fees will be paid.
* On Tuesday, Feb. 17, the
parties filed a joint motion for
supplemental notice indicat-
ing they had found some com-
mercial and industrial land-
owners who paid the MSBU
and may be entitled to a
refund.


A monthly program for older adults who want to learn more about
creating and maintaining healthy, happy, and active lifestyles.

ioin us Monday, February 23, at 10:30am

at the Wakulla Senior Center
(33 Michael Drive, Crawfordville, FL)
Featuring


Depression and Older Adult#


i I


Presented by: Esaias Lee, MD


Dr. Lee is a staff physician at
Capital Health Plan. *

Anna is one of the most familiar
faces in Tallahassee as the former
morning host for WCTV's "Good
Morning Show."


I '


--- Please RSVP to 850-523-7333. -


Some things get better with ag*

Capital Health Plan is one of them.

"A Capital Health

P L A N


Lions will host March festival


The Crawfordville Lions
Club is looking forward to
their St. Patrick's Day Festival
on Saturday, March 14 at Hud-
son Park.
There will be a parade with


first, second and third place
prizes for the best floats. The
parade will start at 10 a.m.
There will also be many arts
and craft booths, exhibits and
food booths. For booth and


parade applications contact
any Crawfordville Lion's Club
member c- call (850) 766-
3944. Buddy Wells and Anne
Ahrendt display the festival
banner.


00


An Independent Licensee of the
Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association


This event is educational only and information regarding the plan will not be
available. If you have questions, please call Capital Health Plan seven days a
week, 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., at 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY
850-383-3534 or 1-800-955-8771).












r r
A
I


Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 19, 20


Wildlife photography Brought to you by


Obe Wakulla itu4 and our readers.


Wildlife anxious for

springtime to arrive


After a brief hiatus, our
popular Wakulla Wildlife
photography page is back.
Actually, residents have been
busy submitting photographs
throughout the winter. We
publish as many as space
permits.
This week herons, ducks
and turtles are in the spot-
light as our water creatures
share their beauty with the
community.
Clockwise from the top
right picture, Leslie Thornton
submitted a photograph of
two Great Blue Herons entic-
ing each other with an appar-
ent mating ritual.
The pair of birds seem to be
mirror images of themselves.


Judy Cooke is a dedicated
volunteer with the Florida
Wild Mammal Association
(FWMA) and she has captured
many interesting creatures
that have made their way into
the FWMA facility for treat-
ment of ailments. Her latest
contribution is a Diamond-
back Terrapin who seems to
be very curious about his new
surroundings.
Miranda Whaley submit-
ted a smaller Wakulla County
turtle, the Suwannee Cooter,
trying to move around in-
conspicuously while carrying
around its home and shell.
Ron Piasecki found and
photographed a cooperative
American Widgeon on Wakul-


la waters and also discovered
a Tricolored Heron, top left,
while visiting the St. Marks
National Wildlife Refuge.
Photographers are remind-
ed that the Second Annual
The Wakulla News Wildlife
Photography Contest is open
until Friday, Feb. 20. The
entry information for adults
and youths is contained in
the advertisement below our
non-contest submissions this
week.
The grand prize is a one
night stay. at the Portofino
Island Resort and Spa in Pen-
sacola Beach. Other prizes
include cash and a gift sub-
scription to The News. ,
--Keith Blackmar, Editor.


009








Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 19, 2009









Remember to take care of your skin


By COURTNEY L. ROZANSKI
Special to The Wakulla News
Did you know that your
skin is your body's largest
organ? It can soak in many
types of toxins and chemicals
because of it's large surface
area.
This exposure can result
in disease since these com-
pounds can slowly accumulate
within the pores and into the
body. When imbalance and
toxic overload occur within
the body the skin reveals
these unhealthy results. Sadly
unknown, according to envi-
ronmental researchers, many
over the counter cosmetics
and skincare products, in-
cluding some of the upscale
department store lines, con-
tain chemicals that have been
linked to causing cancer, en-
docrine disrupters, allergies,
developmental and reproduc-
tive toxicity, and cellular level
changes.
My curiosity was peaked
having researched so many
illnesses and reports on this
matter, which have led me
into creating an exciting and
much needed line of skincare.
cosmetics and hair care. These
unique products consist of
natural ingredients that feed
the.kin rather than irritate or
smother it. Just as the organs
within our body need to be
nourished to run properly, our
skin needs to be fed nourish-
ment that will encourage heal-
ing, not disease. My implicit
mission is to educate and
stimulate individual natural
beauty and health, thereby
helping to decrease the many
illnesses that are occurring to-
day. Though skincare is a mere
portion of what you can do to
maintain good health, I would
also like to mention that there
are other ways in which you
can begin to make a difference
in your life.
A diet free of preservatives
and nutrition-less fast food
and prepackaged meals is a
start. A lifestyle commitment
to "eat to live" and not "live to
eat" and to provide your body
with nutrition that it is starv-


ing for. We live in a society
seeking comfort in foods and
many other external sources.
If we look within ourselves we
can be our own best doctor
and nurturer. Listen to your-
self, nurture yourself in ways
that will increase your health
in mind, body and spirit.
In conjunction with diet,
exercise is also important.
Keeping the body in top physi-
cal shape to better handle the
stress of'everyday living is
very important.
Take excess stress out of
your life. Stop making excuses
and take action to decrease
unwanted stress. Start telling
yourself you live in a happy,
healthy environment until the
vision is made vital becoming
your reality.
Surround yourself with
people who are positive and
who truly care about you and
your well being.
Do something creative
or something that makes you
feel worthy and fully alive.
As I introduced this story,
treating your skin with care
is beneficial, as it reflects the
condition or state of your
total health and is the one


last barrier between you and
the outside world and all of
the elemental stress that sur-
rounds us.
Only use products that
won't cause you harm. Take
the liberty to research ingredi-
ents and be aware that many
advertising campaigns are
merely strong words backed
by large financial compa-
nies which make you believe
some products are best for
you, when in fact reading the
ingredient content reveals
ingredients such as Methyl-
paraben, Propylparaben, and
Oxybenzone (to name only a
few) that have been proven to
cause.you harm. Many harm-
ful ingredients are present
not only in your skincare but
deoderants, perfumes, cos-
metics, shampoos and many
other products we use on a
daily basis.
Imagine over time how this
can affect you when your skin
absorbs 60 percent of what it


comes into contact with. Luck-
ily, we live in an age where we
are empowering and educat-
ing ourselves. We have the
venues to speak our mind
and make a difference. If you
would like to research more
on this subject you may visit
www.cosmeticdatabase.com
or www.safecosmetics.org.
Lastly, know that you are
but a piece of a very large and
mysterious world. A spiritual
filled life and purpose to play
your part is what our entire
journey is about. Find your
part in this very short walk
of life, make a difference, take
footsteps that begin to pave
a road of remembrance. Let
your road be one that curves
into tomorrow and disappears
into the vast and infinite sky
to shine a light onto others
who are beginning to take
their steps for the very first
time. It is never too late to
respect and love yourself and
absolutely love your life. Be
thankful for who you are and
for your unique purpose in
this lifetime,
If you want to start to.make
a difference by changing the
products you are using, please
join me at my Grande Preview
of a unique skincare series,
Courtney Laine, Inc., that will
be held at Dazzles Hair Stu-
dio, 158 Ochlockonee Street
in Crawfordville, on Saturday,
Feb. 28, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Come experience the euphoria
of 100 percent essential oils,
natural based cleansers and
hair care. They are products
that are luxurious and encour-
age health and proper bal-
ance. Most importantly, they
are products that have been
made with heart and soul to
consciously want you to be
healthy.and have a natural
glow. All of these products
are PH balanced and packaged
with love. Hope to see your
smiling face


Mr. and Mrs. Rob Lawhon


Stephenie Matthews


and Lawhon marry


Stephenie Matthews of
Tallahassee and Rob Lawhon
of Tallahassee where married
Nov. 15, 2008 at the Inn at
Wildwood in Medart. Suzie
Sadler, Notary Public, per-
formed the ceremony.
The bride is the daughter
of Ken Matthews of Sop-
choppy and the late. Elaine
Matthews.
The groom is the son of
Mitchell and Pam Lawhon of
Sopchoppy.
The maid of honor was
Sarah Hamilton of Crawford-
ville.
The bridesmaids were Ann
Barfield, of Tallahassee and
Talana Dugger of Crawford-
ville.
The ring bearers were Fish-
er Lawhon and Lake Lawhon,
both of Sopchoppy, and Austin
Hamilton of Crawfordville.


The flower girls were Han-
na Rawlings of Fanlew and
Cameron Collier of Tallahas-
see.
The ushers were Michael
King, Jr. and Matt Payne, both
of Crawfordville.
The Welcoming Party was
Kayla Rudd, Meagan Rudd and
Makayla Payne, all of Craw-
fordville. They passed out pro-
grams to guests and guided
them to the ceremony.
The best man was Mitch
Lawhon of Sopchoppy. The
groomsmen were Carey
Lawhon of Sopchoppy and
Mike King of Crawfordville.
A reception was held at
The Inn at Wildwood. The
couple took a honeymoon
to Ocho Rios, Jamaica and
reside on Lake Talquin in Tal-
lahassee.


Advertisement

Senior Citizens, Federal

Government Assistance

is Now Available


Senior citizens who are at
least 62 years old and own
a, home, can now borrow
against the equity in their
home, utilizing the money
for just about anything, with-
out ever having to repay the
debt. They can continue liv-,
ing in the home for the rest
of their lives without the bur-
den of making monthly pay-
ments.
There is never a risk of
losing their home and they
are free to sell or refinance
the home, without penalty, at
any time. All money received
is tax free and has no effect
on Social Security or retire-
ment income.
This is now possible thanks
to a Home Equity Conver-
sion Mortgage created by the
Federal Government's De-
partment of Housing and Ur-
ban Development, also know
as HUD.


This money can be used to:
1. Payoff an existirig
mortgage
2. Pay for medical expenses
3. Supplement income
4. Supplement savings
5. Make repairs to the home
6. Provide financial assistance
to family members
7. Establish a line of credit
that can be used if needed
in the future
8. Vacation and travel
A free report reveals how
citizens of Wakulla County
can utilize this opportunity
to ease financial burdens for
themselves, or their loved
ones courtesy of this United
States Government insured
assistance program.
For more information, call
the Consumer Awareness ho-
tline for a free recorded mes-
sage, anytime 24 hours a day
at 1-888-812-3156,
ext. I.


The TALLAHASSEE MEMORIAL HEART & VASCULAR CENTER is in the forefront nationally for cardiovascular treatment.
Behavioral Health Center | Bixl(t r nrc,,crnv C-ontor I Cancer CenterI Diabetes Center | Heart &Vascular Center NeuroScience Center
Orthopedh. ,c utL,- i . L, i uLon Center | Surgery Center I Womren's & Children's Services


Advertisement


Courtney Rozanski displays some of the products.

















Riversprings excels in math battle Wakulla High School
I ORf-I #HfN jON t- M On j


FAMU-FSU College of Engineering

___ ___ __


From left, Carson Foote, Jessica Trombini, Rami Mclver, Jonathan Chunn,
Dylan Wallace, Will Walker, Kaylynn Perry, and Jake Walker


The 2009 Riversprings
Middle School MathCounts
Team placed sixth among 15
competing middle schools
at the annual Big Bend
MathCounts Competition


held Saturday, Feb. 7, at the
FAMU/FSU College of Engi-
neering in Tallahassee.
The competition included
timed individual and team
competitions as well as an


entertaining Cipher round
in the afternoon that was
open to parents, coaches and
spectators.
Jake Walker was the
team's top individual scorer,


followed by Rami Mclver
and Jonathan Chunn. Walker
finished 27th in a field of
nearly 150 of the Big Bend
Region's elite mathematics
competitors.
The Riversprings Middle
School team included first
year members Chunn, Car-
son Foote, McIver, Jessica
Trombini, Walker, and Will
Walker and returning veter-
ans Kaylynn Perry and Dylan
Wallace.
Team coaches were Brian
Dow and John Kane, 8th
grade teachers at River-
springs Middle School.
The day-long event fea-
tured team photos, competi-
tions, and a pizza luncheon,
and closed with a Mathlete
awards ceremony.
The event was hosted by
the MathCounts Commit-
tee of the Big Bend Chapter
of the Florida Engineering
Society and was sponsored
by the National Society of
Professional Engineers, Na-
tional Council of Teachers
of Mathematics, the CNA
Foundation and Engineer-
ing firms from around the
country.


Wakulla Elementary school lunch menu


ELEMENTARY LUNCH
MENU
FEBRUARY 2009
Make it Wholel Why?
Whole grains have more
fiber, vitamins, and miner-
als than refined (processed)
grains. Fiber helps with
digestion and also helps
prevent heart disease and
some cancers.
What? Whole grains in-
clude the entire kernel of the
grain, whether it's oat, rice,
or wheat. Products labeled
"enriched" have vitamins
added to try to make up for
nutrients lost in processing.


Where? You'll find whole
grains in. breads, cereals,
pasta, and rice.
Note: Look for a whole
grain on the ingredient list
or at least two grams of fiber
on the nutrition label.

Wednesday. Feb. 18
Taco Salad
Whole Kernel Corn
Applesauce & Milk

Thursday, Feb. 19
Chicken & Rice
Seasoned Turnip Greens
Cornbread
Banana & Milk


Friday, Feb. 20
Ham & Cheese on Bun
Tater Tots
Fruit cup & Milk
Monday, Feb. 23
Pizza
Whole Kernel Corn
Apple Wedges & Milk
Tuesday, Feb. 24
Chicken & Cheese Wrap
Breaded Okra
Peach Cup & Milk
Wednesday, Feb. 25
Spaghetti & Meat Sauce
Tossed Salad
Yeast Roll
Banana & Milk


Thursday, Feb. 26
Beans & Franks
Carrot Sticks with Dip
Yeast Roll
Applesauce
Milk
Friday, Feb. 27
Chicken Nuggets
Seasoned Green Beans
Biscuit
Orange Wedges
Milk


11L15L5 uiLuIrY proyraii


The Wakulla High School
Black Culture Club, in its first
year of existence, will be host-
ing their First Annual Black
History Program themed,
"Change, where do we go
from here?"
The program will be held
in the Wakulla High School
auditorium on Saturday, Feb.
28 at 6 p.m.
The featured guest speaker
will be Dr. Debra Barnes, As-
sistant Principal at Lincoln


High School, Prophesy School
of the Art, Essence Dancer
Theatre and Step Show done
by the Tallahassee Alumnae
Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta
Sorority, Inc. and the Upsilon
Psi Chapter (FAMU) of Omega
Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.
There will also be a choir
comprised of Wakulla High
School students performing
musical selections.
For more information, call
Simeon Nelson at 528-3182.


Host families needed


Foreign high school students
are scheduled to arrive soon for
academic semester and year
homestay programs, and the
sponsoring organization needs
a few more local host families.
The students are anxiously
awaiting news of their new
families. This is the last chance
for these young ambassadors to
fulfill their life-long dreams.
According to Pacific Intercul-
tural Exchange (P.I.E.) President
John Doty, the students are all
between the ages of 15 and 18
years, are English-speaking, have
their own spending money, carry
accident and health insurance,
and are anxious to share their
cultural experiences with their
new American families. P.I.E. cur-
rently has programs to match al-,
most every family's needs, rang-
ing in length from one semester
to a full academic'year, where the
students attend local public and
private high schools.
P.I.E. area representatives
match students with host fami-
lies by finding common inter-
ests and lifestyles through an
informal in-home meeting. Pro-
spective host families are able
to review student applications
and select the perfect match.


As there are no "typical" host
families, P.I.E. can fit a student
into just about any situation,
whether it is a single parent,
a childless couple, a retired
couple or a large family.
For the upcoming programs,
P.I.E. has students from Ger-
many, the former Soviet Union,
Venezuela, Argentina, Brazil,
Hungary, Korea, Mexico, Aus-
tralia. China, and many other
countries. P.I.E. is also partici-
pating in two special govern-
ment-funded programs to bring
scholarship students from the
newly independent states of
the former Soviet Union as well
as predominantly Islamic coun-
tries such as Yemen, Syria, Jor-
dan, Morocco, Kuwait, Iraq and
Qatar to the United States.
Wakulla area families inter-
ested in learning more about
student exchange or arranging
for a meeting with a community
representative may call P.I.E.,
toll-free, at 1-866-546-1402. The
agency also has travel/study
program opportunities avail-
able for American high school
students as well as possibilities
for community volunteers to
assist and work with area host
families, students and schools.


I I
ahvid Hinson
New Construction Manager


SallPat s.WellGetThemAll! '


2226 808 Dane Moses
1225 Commerce Blvd., Midway Buisiness Leader


TOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICE EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICE
"Ask Us About "We Stand Behind Our Warranty" ,-
ProShield Complete!" "p ,l7n:
Service Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing Available
Serving The Residents Of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.
Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla South Georgia '1.In ,


Jack's "B" Quick

*Boarding Kennel


Over 12 years ofi
professional experience


* Large Play Yards
* Bathing & Nail Trim
* Controlled Environment
* Indoor/Outdoor Runs
* All Sizes and Breeds
90 Capt. James Street,
Crawfordville, FL 32327


Call Rita today to make
your reservation




www.jacksbquick.com


` OFF (
ZOOM Your Way to Teeth
a Brighter Smile Whitening
Your Choice OR f sor,
S, schedule
Done in our office with only one visit or \r
in the Comfort and Privacy of your own home.

TOTAL CARE DENTAL

926-7700
www.totalcaredental.org
An exam and x-ray are required for new patients. *Patient may request a
rcfund of any other services provided within 72 hours of responding to this ad.
Tom Wollschlager
2167 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville D.M.D.
% Monday 7:45 4:30 Tuesday & Wednesday 8:15 5 Thursday 8:15 3 /


We'll Beat any price on new tires.
All major brands

-New & Used Tires-
-Money Tight? We have used tires in stock-
Sets Pairs Singles Over 5000 in stock
Over 30 years experience in the tire business! 600


038


Seeing Red?

Do you see red when you open your utility bills?
Are you wondering how you're going to pay your
heating bills this winter or your cooling bills this summer?

Weatherizing your home will help save money
by making your home more energy efficient.

Get Some Relief!

The U.S. Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance program is
the nation's core program for delivering energy efficiency services to low-
income households. Professionally trained Weatherization crews perform
on-site home energy audits using state of the art equipment to identify out-
side drafts and inspect heating and cooling systems for efficiency. Weath-
erization crews install insulation, seal off air leaks, make modifications to
(or replace) existing heating and cooling systems and make minor repairs
to ensure safety. Once installed, these energy saving measures will help to
reduce your heating and cooling cost for years to come.

You may qualify! So call or come by:
Wakulla County Weatherization Department
11 Bream Fountain Rd. Crawfordville FL 32327

(850) 926-6292


Weatherization Works in Florida


)AUL'S-
JE S LSmJai] PS0TmL


7&w Yta4te~
~ -~ my
-9 fl,,.a, ,
(D(~
~ ?.d 32.5'27
', ~weoe4('i'~O44tc~r3#g4

~ g50-926-655/


OpnMondy6-Friay :00am g6:0 p

L6atrdy ySppintmenonl


If


I"














35 Cents

APer Word



ADS $8.00
Minimum


Deadline


Plonday


11:00 ACLA88f IED

926-7102


Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


CATEGORIES
100 EMPLOYMENT
105 Business Opportunities
110 Help Wanted
111 Medical/Dental Help Wanted
112 Office/Administrative Help Wanted
113 Construction Help Wanted
114 Miscellaneous Help Wanted
115 Work Wanted
120 Services and Businesses
125 Schools and Instruction
130 Entertainment
200 ITEMS FOR SALE
205 Antiques
210 Auctions 4o r
215 Auto Parts and Accessories
220 Cars
225 Trucks
230 Motor Homes and Campers
235 Motorcycles and 4-Wheelers
240 Boats and Motors
245 Personal Watercraft A i
250Sprting Goods PP" BspingosEqp
255 Guns Eupe
260 Business Equipment


265 Computers and Internet
270 Electronics
275 Home Furnishings
280 Home Appliances
285 Jewelry
290 Musical Instruments
295 Building Materials B
300 MISC. FOR SALE
305 Machinery, Tools & Equipment
310 Firewood Products
315 Farm & Garden Equipment
320 Farm Products & Produce
325 Horses
330 Livestock, Farm Animals
335 Pets
340 Plants
345 Swap, Barter, Trade
350 Wanted to Buy
355 Yard Sales
400 NOTICES
410 Free Items
415 Announcements
420 Card of Thanks
425 Occasion Cards
430 In Memoriam
435 Lost and Found


440 Personals and Notices
500 REAL ESTATE, HOMES, MOBILES
505 Acreage for Lease
510 Acreage for Sale
515 Apartments for Rent
520 Townhouses for Rent
525 Townhouses for Sale
530 Commercial Property for Rent
535 Commercial Property for Sale
540 Farms for Sale
545 Homes for Sale
550 Homes with Acreage for Sale
555 Houses for Rent
560 Land for Sale
565 Mobile Homes for Rent
570 Mobile Homes for Sale
575 Mobile Homes with Land for Sale
580 Rooms for Rent/Roommates Wanted
585 Wanted to Rent
590 Waterfront Homes/Land for Sale
595 Vacation Rental
600 Open House



CALL 926-7102 TODAY
Email: classifieds@thewakullanews.net


Legal Notice


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 00-5PR
IN RE: GUARDIANSHIP OF
Lelia Andrews,
An alleged Incapacitated person.


NOTICE OF UNCLAIMED FUNDS
Pursuant to section 755.534, notice Is
hereby given that unclaimed funds exist in the
above-described guardianship. If you have a
claim to funds in this guardianship, please
contact the Clerk of Court for Wakulla County,
3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327. If no claim Is made for these
funds within six (6) months of date of this no-
ticed was first published (February 19, 2009),
the funds will be deposited with the Chief Fi-
nancial Officer for the State of Florida.
Dated this 10th day of February, 2009
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHEI LE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
February 19, March 19, 2009





IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 00-7PR
IN RE: GUARDIANSHIP OF
Evie Heath,
An alleged incapacitated person.


NOTICE OF UNCLAIMED FUNDS
Pursuant to section 755.534, notice is
hereby given that unclaimed funds exist In the
above-described guardianship. If you have a
claim to funds in this guardianship, please
contact the Clerk of Court for Wakulla County,
3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327. If no claim is made for these
fund within six (6) months of date of this no-
ticed was first published (February 19, 2009),
the funds will be deposited with the Chief Fi-
nancial Officer for the State of Florida.
Dated this 10th day of February, 2009
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court).
February 19, March 19, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 06-18-FC
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, AS TRUSTEE,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RICHARD T. ANDERSON; BARBARA H. AN-
DERSON; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendant(s).


RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Motion and Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale
Date dated the 2nd day of February, 2009,
and entered in Case No. 06-18-FC, of the Cir-
cuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for
Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMORGAN
CHASE BANK, AS TRUSTEE is the Plaintiff
and RICHARD T. ANDERSON; BARBARA H.
ANDERSON; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. I
will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash
at the FRONT DOOR OF COURTHOUSE at
the Wakulla County Courthouse, in CRAW-
FORDVILLE, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the
12th day of March, 2009, the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit:
LOT 5, BLOCK J. SONGBIRD, PHASE II, A
SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3
PAGES 113 THROUGH 116, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
In accordance with the Americans with Dis-
abilities Act of 1990 (ADA), disabled persons
who, because of their disabilities, need special
accommodation to participate In this proceed-
ing should contact the ADA Coordinator at
3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL
32327 or Telephone Voice (850) 926-0905 not
later than five business days prior to such pro-
ceedings.
Any person claiming an Interest in the surplus
from the sale, If any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 3rd day of February, 2009
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
February 19, 26, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-000136-FC
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. SUCCESSOR
BY MERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME
MORTGAGE, INCL.
Plaintiff,
vs.
GREG P. STEMBRIDGE; ERIN B. STEM-
BRIDGE; and all unknown parties claiming by,
through, under or against the herein named
Defendant's, who are not known to be dead or
alive, whether said unknown parties claim as
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, llenors,
creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claim-
ants; TENANT # 1 and/or TENANT #2, the
parties intended to account for the person or
persons in possession; FLORIDA COM-
MERCE CREDIT UNION
Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: GREG P. STEMBRIDGE and ERIN B.
STEMBRIDGE, and all unknown parties claim-
ing by, through, under or against the above
named Defendants, who are not known to be
dead or alive, whether said unknown parties
claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other
claimants
Current Residence Unknown, but whose last
known address was:
78 Pueblo Trail, Crawfordvllle, Florida 32327
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following property In
Wakulla County,. Florida, to-wit:
LOTS 57 AND 58, BLOCK "6", WAKULLA
GARDENS, UNIT 2, A SUBDIVISION AS PER
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM,
P.A., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is
18820 U.S. Highway 19, North, Suite 212,
Clearwater, Florida 33764, within thirty (30)
days after the first publication of this Notice of
Action, and file the original with the Clerk of
this Court at 3056 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville, FL 32327, either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereaf-
ter; otherwise, a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In the complaint
petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on
this 3rd day of February, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
February 12, 19, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-0049FC
DEUTSCHE BANK TRUST COMPANY
AMERICAS FORMERLY KNOWN AS
BANKER'S TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUS-
TEE AND CUSTODIAN FOR MORGAN
STANLEY MSA 2007-NC3 BY: SAXON
MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC. F/K/A MER-
ITECH MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC. AS ITS
ATTORNEY-IN-FACT,
Plaintiff,
vs.
REGINA BURROWS, et al,
Defendant(s)


/ SAMUEL S.
KNOWN SI
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE GRANTEES,
ALL PARTIES
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an UNDER OR
Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated KNOWN N
February 2, 2009, and entered in Case No. AND IF DE
65-2008-CA-0049FC of the Circuit Court of DEAD OR Al
the Second Judicial Circuit In and for Wakulla SPECTIVE I
County, Florida in which Deustche Bank Trust DEVISEES,
Company Americas formerly known as CREDDITO
Banker's Trust Company, as Trustee and Cus- CLAIMING
todian for Morgan Stanley, MSCA 2007-NC3 THOSE UNI
by: Saxon Mortgage Services, Inc. f/k/a Mer- AND ALL CL
itech Mortgage Services, Inc. as its TIES, NATU
attorney-in-fact, is the Plaintiff and Regina WHOSE EX
Burrows, Mortgage Electronic Registration KNOWN, CL
Systems, Inc., as nominee for New Century ABOVE NAI
Mortgage Corporation, are defendants, I will DANTS OR
sell to the highest and best bidder for cash HAVE ANY F
in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County THE PROP
Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, COMPLAINT
Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County,
Florida at 11:00 a.m. EST on the 12th day of Defendants.
March, 2009, the following described property
as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure:
TO SAMUEl
LOT 21, EDGEWOOD, A SUBDIVISION, AC- NAMED DEF
CORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT WHOM IT M
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
2, PAGE 83, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF YOU ARE Ni
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 105 tie to the follow
ZION HILL ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL Florida:
32327
Lot 45, BlocI
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus subdivision
from the sale, If any, other than the property corded in pla
owners as of the date of the Lis Pendens must Records of V
file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
has been file
Dated In Wakulla County, Florida this 3rd day to serve a c
of February, 2009. any, to the E


BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
In accordance with the Americans With Dis-
abilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact Court Administra-
tion at 3056 Crawfordvllle Hwy, Crawfordville,
Florida 32328, telephone (850) 926-0905, not
later than seven (7) days prior to the proceed-
Ing. If hearing Impaired, (TDD)
1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.
February 19, 26, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY GENERAL
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 08-195-FC
CITIBANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE
POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT
DATED AS OF NOVEMBER 30, 2001 SE-
RIES 2001-01
Plaintiff
vs.
MARK JOSEPH ARIES; PATRICIA A. ARIES;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF PATRICIA A. AR-
IES; and UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS, TEN-
ANTS, OWNERS, AND OTHER UNKNOWN
PARTIES, Including, If a named defendant Is
deceased, the personal representatives, the
surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, and all other parties claiming by,
through, under or against that defendant, and
all claimants, persons or parties, natural or
corporate, or whose exact legal status is un-
known, claiming under any of the above claim-
ing under any of the above named or de-
scribed defendants
Defendants)


NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the
Order or Final Judgment entered in this cause,
in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida,
I will sell the property situated in Wakulla
County, Florida, described as:
LOTS 14,, 15, ANAD 16 OF DONELLA
HEIGHTS, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGAE 5 OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder,
for cash, at the front door of the Wakulla
County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville High-
way, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on
March 5, 2009.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN
THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS,
MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF
COURT WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
DATED this 29th day of January, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
In accordance with the American With Disabili-
ties Act, persons needing a special accommo-
dation to participate in this proceeding should
contact the A.D.A. Coordinator not later than
seven (7) days prior to the proceeding via the
Florida Relay Service at 1-800-955-8771.
I HEREBY CERTIFY that a copy of the forego-
ing has been mailed to Enrico G. Gonzalez,
Esquire, 6255 east Fowler Avenue, Temple
Terrace, Florida 33617; and Mark Joseph Ar-
ies and Patricia A. Aries, 174 Pixie Circle,
Crawfordville, Florida 32327 this 29th day of
January, 2009.
February 12, 19, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 09-26-CA
MICHAEL J. MALOY
Plaintiff,
vs.


SIBLEY; AND IF DEAD HIS UN-
POUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
JUDGMENT CREDITORS, AND
IS CLAIMING BY THROUGH,
AGAINST HIM; AND ALL UN-
ATURAL PERSONS IF ALIVE
AD OR NOT KNOWN TO BE
LIVE, THEIR SEVERAL AND RE-
UNKNOWN SPOUSES HEIRS,
GRANTEES, AND JUDGMENT
RS, OR OTHER PARTIES
BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER
KNOWN'NATURAL PERSONS;
AIMANTS, PERSONS OR PAR-
URAL OR CORPORATE, OR
ACT LEGAL STATUS IS UN-
AIMING UNDER ANY OF THE'
MED OR DESCRIBED DEFEN-
PARTIES OR CLAIMING TO
RIGHT, TITLE, OR INTEREST IN
ERTY DESCRIBED IN THIS


NOTICE OF ACTION
L S. SIBLEY, OTHER ABOVE
PENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS
AY CONCERN:
OTIFIED that an action to quiet ti-
owing property in Wakulla County,

k 8 of the Town of St. Marks, a
as per map or plat thereof re-
it Book 1, Page 53 of the Public
fakulla County, Florida.
d against you. You are required
opy of your written defenses, if
action on Frances Casey Lowe,
orney, whose address Is 3042
Highway, Crawfordville, FLorida
r before date not less than 30
ie first publication, and file the
the clerk of this court either be-
on plaintiffs attorney or immedi-
ervice; otherwise, a default will be
nst you for the relief demanded in
t or petition.
26th day of January, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
LERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)

February 5, 12, 19, 26, 2009


plaintiff's att
Crawfordville
32327, on o
days after th
original with
fore services
atelly after se
entered agair
the complaint
Dated on the

C


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 08-201-FC
BARTOW MYERS,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MICHAEL SCOTT LAWRENCE A/K/A
SCOTT LAWRENCE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF MICHAEL SCOTT LAWRENCE; AND
TENANTS OR UNKNOWN PARTIES IN
POSSESSION,
Defendants.
/
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to
a Final Judgment of Foreclosure After Default
and for Attorney's Fees and Costs entered in
the above-styled cause on January 29, 2009,
in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida,
I will sell the property situate in Wakulla
County, Florida, described more fully below, at
public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for
cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse,
3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville,
Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on
March 5, 2009.
All that certain property situated in the County
of Wakulla, and the State of Florida, being de-
scribed as follows:
PARCEL IDENTIFICATION NUMBERS:
09-3S-01 E-000-05154-006 & 011
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION
9, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST,
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN
THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES
37 SECONDS EAST 1336.56 FLET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 02 SEC-
ONDS EAST 1650.30 FEET TO AN OLD
IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DE-
GREES 17 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST
719.92 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES
40 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST 262.00
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT AND
THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN THENCE
NORTH 39 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 56 SEC-
ONDS EAST 378.99 FEET TO AN IRON
PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 86 DEGREES
51 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 920.68
FEET TO AN IRON PIPE LYING ON THE
EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF A CITY OF TAL-
LAHASSEE POWERLINE EASEMENT,
THENCE RUN SOUTH 10 DEGREES 40
MINUTES 41 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE
EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID EASE-
MENT 314.27 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID
EASEMENT, RUN NORTH 86 DEGREES 51
MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 1220.47
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
SUBJECT, HOWEVER, TO A CITY OF TAL-
LAHASSEE POWERLINE EASEMENT LYING
ACROSS THE EASTERLY PORTIONS OF
HEREIN DESCRIBED, SAID EASEMENT BE-
ING 150 FEET IN WIDTH.
ANY LIENHOLDER CLAIMING AN INTER-
EST IN THE SURPLUS FUNDS FROM THIS
SALE, IF ANY, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN
60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
DATED this 30th day of January, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
February 12, 19, 2009


Notice of Final Agency Action Taken by the
Northwest Florida Water Management District
Notice is given that stormwater permit number
470 was issued on February 11, 2009, to N.
G. Wade Investment Company for construc-
tion of two roadway connections with north
bound and south bound turn lanes and associ-
ated drainage system on Woodville Highway
(S.R. 363) south of Commerce Blvd., south of
Woodville.
The file containing the application for this per-
mit is available for inspection Monday through
Friday (except for legal holidays), 8:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m. at the Northwest Florida Water Man-
agement District's ERP Office, The Delaney
Center Building, Suite 2-D
2252 Killearn Center Boulevard, Tallahassee,
FL 32309.
A person whose substantial interests are af-
fected by the District permitting decision may
petition for an administrative hearing in accor-
dance-with Sections 120.569 and 120.57 F.S.,
or may choose to pursue mediation as an al-
ternative remedy under Section 120.573, Flor-
ida Statutes, and Rules 28-106.111 and
28-106.401-404, Florida Administrative Code.
Petitions must comply with the requirements
of Florida Administrative Code, Chapter
28-106 and be filed with (received by) the Dis-
trict Clerk located at District Headquarters, 81
Water Management Drive, Havana, FL
32333-4712. Petitions for administrative hear-
ing on the above application must be filed
within twenty-one (21) days of publication of
this notice or within twenty-six (26) days of the
District depositing notice of this intent in the
mail for those persons to whom the District
mails actual notice. Failure to file a petition
within this time period shall constitute a waiver
of any rights) such persons) may have to re-
quest an administrative determination (hear-
ing) under Sections 120.569 and 129.57, F.S.,
concerning the subject permit. Petitions which
are not filed in accordance with the above pro-
visions are subject to dismissal.
Because the administrative hearing process is
designed to formulate final agency action, the
filing of a petition means that the District's final
action may be different from the position taken
by it in this notice of Intent. Persons whose
substantial interests will be affected by any
such final decision of the District on the appli-
cation have the right to petition to become a
party to the proceedings, the accordance with
the requirements set forth above.
February 19, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2008-FC-193
COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC.
Plaintiff,
vs.
LIONEL HUFFMAN A/K/A LIONEL D. HUFF-
MAN; BETTIE JEAN HUFFMAN A/K/A BET-
TIE J. HUFFMAN, and any unknown heirs de-
visees, grantees, creditors, and other un-
known persons or unknown spouses claiming
by through persons or unknown spouses
claiming by, through and under any of the
above-named Defendants, and under any of
the above-named Defendants,
Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County,
Florida, will on the 5th day of March, 2009, at
11:00 o'clock A.M. at the Front door of the
Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville,
offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the
highest and best bidder for cash, the follow-
Ing-described property situate in Wakulla
County, Florida:
Lot 47 of EASTGATE SUBDIVISION (unre-
corded) and being more particularly described
as follows: Commence at a concrete monu-
ment marking the Northeast corner of Lot 59
of the Hartsfield Survey of lands in Wakulla
County, Florida and run South 72 degrees 30
minutes 30 seconds West along the North
boundary of Lot 59 a distance of 2365.0 feet
to a concrete monument; thence South 17 de-
grees 52 minutes 45 seconds East 1050.52
feet to a concrete monument marking the
Northeast corner of said EASTGATE SUBDI-
VISION; thence along the North boundary of
said EASTGATE SUBDIVISION run South 72
degrees 40 minutes 45 seconds West 1000.00
feet; thence run South 17 degrees 51 minutes
45 seconds East 155.58 feet to the centerline
of a 50 foot roadway easement (Eastgate
Way); thence run North 72 degrees 40 min-
utes 45 seconds east 225.00 feet to the Point
of Beginning. From said Point.of Beginning
continue North 72 degrees 40 minutes 45 sec-
onds East 75.00 feet along said. centerline
(Eastgate Way); thence South 72 degrees 40
minutes 45 seconds West 75.00 feet; thence
run North 17 degrees 51 minutes 45 seconds
West 155.58 feet to the Point of Beginning,
containing 0.27 acres m ore or less.
Subject to a 25 foot roadway easement along
the Northern portion of said property.
And being described in a recent Survey pre-
pared by Edwin G. Brown & Associates, Inc.,
Dated Aug 25, 2005, Job No. 05-557, as fol-
lows Commence at the Northeast comer of lot
59 of the Hartsfield survey of lands Wakulla
county Florida, thence run south 72 degrees
30 minutes 30 seconds West 2365.00 feet,
thence run South 17 degrees 52 minutes 45
seconds East 1050.52 feet, thence run South
72 degrees 40 minutes 45 seconds West
1001.10 feet to a point laying on the Easterly
right of way of Griffin Road, thence continue
along said right of way south 17 degrees 51
minutes 45 seconds East 180.58 feet to a
point also laying on the Southerly right of way
of Eastgage Way, thence leaving said Griffin
Road right of way and continuing along said
Southerly right of way of Eastgate Way run
North 72 degrees 40 minutes 45 seconds East
224.98 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING;
thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING;
continue along said right of way North 72 de-
grees 40 minutes 45 seconds East 74.99 feet,
thence leaving said right of way run South 17
degrees 52 minutes 32 seconds East 130.63
feet, thence run South 72 degrees 32 minutes
31 seconds West 75.03 feet, thence run North
17 degrees 51 minutes 20 seconds West
130.81 feet to the POINT of BEGINNING con-
taining 0.23 acres more or less. '
pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a
case pending in said Court, the style of which
is indicated above.
Any person or entity claiming an interest in the
surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure
sale, other than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on
same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days
after the foreclosure sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal of said
Court this 30th day of January, 2009.
In accordance with the American With Disabili-
ties Act, persons with disabilities needing a
special accommodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact Court Administra-
tion at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville,
Florida 32328, telephone (850) 926-0905, not
later than seven (7) days prior to the proceed-
ing. If hearing impaired, (TDD)
1-800-955-8771 or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
February 12, 19, 2009


Notice of Intent to Apply
The Wakulla County Board of County Com-
missioners in complying with the requirements
of 7CFR1780.19(a) intends to apply for a
Transfer Station Wakulla/Grant from Rural De-
velopment through the U.S. Department of Ag-
riculture Rural Utilities Service for the general
area listed:
The application will address the need for a
Transfer Station to be constructed in Wakulla
County, Florida, a, the existing Lower Bridge
Landfill site location.
Questions and comments related to this appli-
cation may be directed to Cleve Fleming, Pro-
ject Manager, 340 Trice Lane, Suite 201,
Crawfordville, Florida 32327, 850-926-7616,
Fax: 850-926-2890.
All concerned citizens are urged to respond.
By: Howard Kessler, Chairman
Attest: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court
February 12, 19, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 65-2008-CA-0060FC
DIVISION
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
vs.

RICHARD BATEMAN, et al,
Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated
the 2nd day of February, 2009 and entered in
Case NO. 65-2008-CA-0060FC of the Circuit
Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and
for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, is the Plaintiff and
RICHARD BATEMAN; HELEN BATEMAN;
are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER
OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE
at 11:00AM, on the 5th day of March, 2009,
the following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment:
FORMER PROPERTY OF HELEN E. HAR-
WELL (ALSO HELEN HARWELL) IN BLOCK
"D", BLOCK "B" AND A 50 X 150 FOOT
STRIP OF LAND, FORMERLY THE NORTH
END OF JOHN DAVID DRIVE, LYING BE-
TWEEN THE WEST BOUNDARY OF BLOCK
"B" AND THE EAST BOUNDARY OF BLOCK
"D" OF LAKE ELLEN PROPER, AN UNRE-
CORDED SUBDIVISION IN THE NORTH-
EAST QUARTER OF SECTION 26, TOWN-
SHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, AS FOL-
LOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT 2528.0
FEET NORTH AND 1600.00 FEET WEST OF
THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION
26, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST,
SAID POINT BEING THE SOUTHWEST
CORNER OF BLOCK "D" OF SAID UNRE-
CORDED SUBDIVISION, RUN THENCE
NORTH ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF
HENRY DRIVE 250.0 FEET; THENCE RUN
EAST 450.0 FEET TO THE WEST BOUND-
ARY OF MERWYN DRIVE, THENCE RUN
SOUTH, ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF
MERWYN DRIVE 150.0 FEET, THEN RUN
WEST 250.0 FEET TO THE EAST BOUND-
ARY OF BLOCK "D" THEN RUN SOUTH
100.0 FEET TO THE NORTH BOUNDARY
OF PEGGY STREET THEN RUN 200.0 FEET
ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF
PEGGY STREET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, IN THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF
SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE
2 WEST. AND BEING DESCRIBED IN A RE-
CENT SURVEY PREPARED BY JAMES
THURMAN RODDENBERRY, DATED JUNE
4, 1992, JOB NO. 92-237, AS FOLLOWS: BE-
GIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT
(FOUND) MARKING THE INTERSECTION
OF THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY
OF HENRY DRIVE WITH THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF PEGGY
STREET SAID POINT BEING 2528.00 FEET
NORTH AND 1600.00 FEET WEST OF THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 26,
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WA-
KULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE
RUN NORTH ALONG THE EAST
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID
HENRY DRIVE 250.03 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT (FOUND), THENCE
LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY
RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 15
SECONDS EAST 450.83 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT (FOUND) LYING ON
THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF
MERWYN DRIVE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00
DEGREES 06 MINUTES 12 SECONDS
WEST ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY 150.05 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT (FOUND), THENCE LEAVING
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN
NORTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 53 SEC-
ONDS WEST 250.30 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT (FOUND) LYING ON
THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF
JOHN DAVID DRIVE, THENCE RUN SOUTH
00 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 52 SECONDS
EAST ALONG THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY OF SAID JOHN DAVID DRIVE
100.14 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT
(FOUND), LYING ON THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF PEGGY
STREET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 58 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST
ALONG THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY OF SAID PEGGY STREET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING
A/K/A 20 PEGGY STREET, CRAWFORD-
VILLE, FL 32327
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the LIs Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this
Court on February 3, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
February 12, 19, 2009


PUBLIC NOTICE
Wakulla Soil & Water Conservation District
Meeting
PLACE: Wakulla County Extension Bldg.
DATE: February 26
TIME: 6:30 P.M.
CONTACT: Joe Duggar at 926-3774

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-000042
AURORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC
Plaintiff
vs.
MAUREEN K. CARDUCCI A/K/A MAUREEN
CARDUCCI; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MAU-
REEN K. CARDUCCI A/KA/ MAUREEN
CARDUCCI, IF ANY; ANY AND ALL UN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY
THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE. WHETHER SAID UN-


Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 19, 2009


Classified Ads For

As Litde As $8 A Week










THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 19, 2009 Page 5B


Legal Notice j


KNOW-N PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC.; BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.;
JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN
Defendants)


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated January28, 2009 entered in Civil Case
No. 65-2008-CA-000042 of the Circuit Court of
the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA
County, CRAWFORDVILLE, Florida, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for cash at THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE at
the WAKULLA County Courthouse located at
3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY in
CRAWFORDVILLE, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on
the 5th day of March, 2009 the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Summary
Final Juudgment, to-wit:
LOTS 18 AND 19, BLOCK "9", GRINER'S AD-
DITION TO THE TOWN OF CRAWFORD-
VILLE A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must
file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 29th day of January, 2009
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons with dis-
abilities needing a special accommodation
should contact COURT ADMINISTRATION, at
the WAKULLA County Courthouse at,
1-800-955-8771 9TDD) or 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.
February 12, 19, 2009

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 652009CA000011 CAXXXX
U.S. BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,
V.
LISA BETH HAPNEY, et all.
Defendantss.


NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LISA BETH HAPNEY; ___ UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF LISA BETH HAPNEY,
and all unknown parties claiming by, through,
under or against the above named Defen-
dants, who are not known to be dead or alive,
whether said unknown parties claim as heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, credi-
tors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants
Current Residence Unknown, but whose las
known address was:
150 Ted Lott Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following property in
WAKULLA County, Florida, to-wit:
LOTS 21 AND 22 BLOCK "0", MAGNOLIA
GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP
OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 1, PAGE 37 OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a a copy of your written de-
enses, if any,,fto it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM,
P.A., Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
18820 U.S. Highway 19 North, Suite 212,
Clearwater, Florida 33764, within thirty (30)
days after the first publication of this Notice of
Action, and file the original with the Clerk of
this Court at 3056 Crawfordville, Highway,
Crawfordville, FL 32327, either before service
on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereaf-
ter: otherwise, a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the complaint
petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on
this 9th day of February, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRUlIT'COUAt"
BY -s- MICHELLE'CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY
WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN
ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO
COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF
CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT
LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT. 222,
WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RE-
CEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARY INJUNCTION.
IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IM-
PAIRED, CALL TDD 1-800-955-8771.
February 19, 26, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY
CASE NO. 65-2008-CA-000140
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.
Plaintiff,
RICHARD L. BATEMAN A/K/A RICHARD
BATEMAN et. al.
Defendant(s)


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Fi-
nal'Judgment of Foreclosure dated January
28, 2009, and entered in Case No.
65-2008-CA-000140, of the Circuit Court of
the Second Judicial Circuit in and for WA-
KULLA County, Florida, wherein BANK OF
AMERICA, N.A., is a Plaintiff and RICHARD L
. BATEMAN A/K/A RICHARD BATEMAN;
HELEN BATEMAN; UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2 are the Defendants. I
will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash
at Front lobby, Crawfordville Cour'house,
3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL
32327, at 11:00 a.m. on March 5, 2009, the
following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment, to wit:


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-000255
Division
BANK OF NEW YORK, ETC..


BRIAN LICATA A/K/A BRIAN T.
LICATA, ET AL.,


Former property ol Helen E. Harwell (also Defendant(s).
Helen Harwell) in Block "D", Block "B" and a
50 X 150 foot strip of land, formerly the North
end ofl John David Drive, lying between the
West boundary of Block "B" and the East N
boundary of Block "D" of Lake Ellen Proper an
unrecorded subdivision n n the Northeast Quar- TO: BRIAN LI
ter, of Section 26, Township 4 South, Range 2 CURRENT RE
West, as follows: Beginning at a point 2,528.0 LAST KNOWN
feet North and 1600.00 feet West of the 5927 MANCH
Southeast corner of Section 26, Township 4 TAMARAC, FlI
South, Range 2 West, said point being the
Southwest corner of Block "D" of said unre- You are notifi
corded subdivision, run thence North along mortgage on t
the East boundary of Henry Drive 250.0 feet; County Florid
thence run East 450.0 feet to the West bound-
ary of Merwyn Drive, thence run South along LOT 16 AND
the West boundary of Merwyn Drive 150.0 BLOCK 12,
feet, then run West 250.0 feet to the East CRAWFORDV
boundary of Block "D" then run South 100.0 OF THE PUB
feet to to the North boundary of Peggy Street COUNTY, FLI
then run 200.0 feet along the North boundary
of Peggy Street to the Point of Beginning, in commonly kn<
the Northeast Quarter of Section 26, Township FORDVILLE,
4 South, Range 2 West. you and you
AND BEING DESCRIBED IN A RECENT Gaour wrcitten d
SURVEY PREPARED BY JAMES THURMAN Spectr, Foyli
RODDENBERRY, DATED JUNE 4, 1992. ney, whose ac
JOB NO. 92-237, AS FOLLOWS: Florida 33601
the first date o
Begin at a concrete monument (found) mark- wih the Clerk
ing the intersection of of the East right-of-way ice on the Phl
boundary of Henry Drnve with the North thereafter; oth
right-of-way boundary of Peggy Street said against you I
point being 2528.00 feet North and 1600.00 Complaint.
feet West of the'Southeast corner of Section
26. TownShip 4 South, Range 2 West, Wa- Dated the 9th
kulla County, Florida and thence run North
along the East right-of-way boundary of Henry
Drive 250.03 feet to a concrete monument CL
(found), thence leaving said right-of-way 'B
boundary run South 89 degrees 57 minutes 15
seconds East 450.83 feet to a concrete monu-
ment (found) lying on the West right-of-way
boundary of Merwyn Drive, thence run South
00 degrees 06 minutes 12 seconds West If you are a pe
along the West right-of-way boundary 150.05 any accommc
feet to a concrete monument (found), Ihence this proceeding
leaving said righth-of-way boundary run North you, to the p
89 degrees 53 minutes 53 seconds West Please contact
250.90 feet to a concrete monument (found) Courthouse, 1
lying on the West right-of-way boundary of 488-1357 with
John David Drive, thence run South 00 de- of this notice;
grees 02 minutes 52 seconds East along the paired, call 1-
West right-of-way boundary of said John
David Drive 100.14 feet to a concrete monu-
ment (found) lying on the North right-of-way
boundary of Peggy Street, thence run North
89 degrees 58 minutes 45 seconds West
along the North right-of-Way boundary of said A
Peggy Street to the POINT or BEGINNING.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus WAKULLA C
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the is pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the sale, if any, Ro
other than the property owner as of the date Bo
of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
Adverti
-BRENT X. THURMOND Adverti
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Febru
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK Board Di
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk 309,
of the Circuit Court) Cr.

19
February 12,19, 2009 Cr
CrC


CALL FOR BIDS
Made by Peter R. Brown Construction, Inc.
(CG-C036285), the Construction Manager for
the Sopchoppy City Hall, Sopchoppy, FL.
Bid Packages:
2A Sitework
2B Landscaping
3A Concrete
5A Steel
6A General Trades
6B Cabinetry
6C Rough Carpentry
6D Wood Trusses
7A Insulation
7B Siding
7C MetalRoof
8A Doors, Frpmes, & Hardware
8B Glass & Glazing
9A Gypsum
9B Acoustical Celling
9C Tile
9D Carpet & Vinyl
9E Painting and Wall Covering
15A HVAC
15B Plumbin
I" EiLir;.:.T
PREQUALIFICATION: All Bidders must be
pre-qualified at the time of bid opening in ac-
cordance with the bid package.
BID DOCUMENTS: Bid documents will be
available from Peter R. Brown Construction,
Inc., 1424 Piedmont Drive East, Tallahassee,
FL 32308. For information about obtaining bid
documents, call Peter R. Brown Construction,
Inc. at 850-668-4498 or fax request to
850-668-6790.
DATE AND TIME: Bids will be received and
sealed until 2:00p.m. March 12, 2009, at 1424
Piedmont Drive East, Tallahassee, FL 32308.
Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud.
PROPOSAL: Bids must be submitted in full
and in accordance with the requirements of
the drawings, project manual and bid pack-
age.


PRE-BID CONFERENCE:
vited to attend the pre-b
March 5, 2009, at 2:00 pm,
Drive East, Tallahassee, FL



Ci AS SI


Sealed respc
Crawfordville
ary 27, 2009.
Pleas
P
e-mail:
ITB bid doc
www.mywaku
picked up at
Crawfordville,
Wednesday, F
Any person w
special accord
shall contact L
listed above
the event. If
paired, please
Florida Relay
at 1.800.955.8
The Board of
the right to re
minor irregular
kulla County.


NOTICE OF ACTION
CATA A/K/A BRIAN T. LICATA
ISIDENCE UNKNOWN
N ADDRESS
ESTER WAY
LORIDA 33321
ed that an action to foreclose a
the following property in Wakulla
la:
THE WEST 1/2 OF LOT 17,
GREINER'S ADDITION TO
VILLE AS PER PLAT BOOK 1,
VLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
dRIDA.
own as 52 EVANS AVE., CRAW-
FL 32327 has been filed against
are required to serve a copy of
defenses, if any, to it on Michelle
rt of Kass, Shuler, Solomon,
e & Singer, P.A., plaintiff's attor-
ddress is P.O. Box 800, Tampa,
, (813) 229-0900, 30 days from
if publication, and file the original
of this Court either before serv-
aintiff's attorney or immediately
lerwise, a default will be entered
for the relief demanded in the

day of February, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
.ERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Y -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
irson with a disability who needs
idation in order to participate in
Ig, you are entitled, at no cost to
provision of certain assistance.
ct David N. Berrien, Leon County
Tallahassee, Florida 32301 (850)
in 2 working days of your receipt
If you arehearing or voice im-
800-955-8771.
February 19, 26, 2009


Advertisement Detail
(AMENDED)


COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
>ck Landing Dock and
at Ramp Construction
Invitation to Bid
segment Number 2009-007
isement Begin Date/Time:
iary 5, 2009 at 8:00 a.m.
decisions will be available at:
) Crawfordville Highway
awfordville, FL 32327
6 Ochlockonee Street
awfordville, FL 32326
inses will be opened at 3093
Highway at 2:00 p.m. on Febru-

ie direct all questions to:
Debbie DuBose
hone: 850.926.9500
FAX: 850.926.9006
ddubose@mywakulla.com
uments will be available at
illa.com. Specifications can be
3093 Crawfordville Highway,
, FL 32327 after 8:00 a.m. on
february 5, 2009.
ith a qualified disability requiring
mmodations at the bid opening
purchasing at the phone number
it least 5 business days prior to
you are hearing or speech im-
s contact this office by using the
Services which can be reached
1771 (TDD).
County Commissioners reserves
eject any and all bids or accept
rarities in the best interest .of Wa-

February 12, 19i2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO.: 65-2007-CA-000116FCXXXX
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COM-
PANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR FREMONT HOME
LOAN TRUST 2005-1 ASSET-BACKED CER-
TIFICATES SERIES 2005-1
Plaintiff
vs,
CAROL GLAVEY; JAMES GLAVEY, ANY
AND AL I IINKN OWN PART ES CLi AIMING


a i BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
All Bidders are in- THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFEN-
id conference on DANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
at 1424 Piedmont 'DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
L32308. KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
February 19, 2009 GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC.: JOHN DOE AND JANE
DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSES-
SI F r S SION


L J' % %J V^I I I L %-.7P

For as little as

$8 Per Week!


Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated January 27, 2009 entered in Civil Case
No. 652007CA000116FCXXXX of the Circuit
Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for
WAKULLA County, CRAWFORDVILLE, Flor-
ida, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at FRONT DOOR at the WAKULLA
County Courthouse located at 3056 CRAW-
FORDVILLE HIGHWAY in CRAWFORD-
VILLE, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 5th day of
March, 2009 the following described property
as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment,
to wit:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST COR-
NER OF SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE
NORTHWEST QUARTER (SE CR. OF SW
1/4 OF NW 1/4) OF SECTION SIXTEEN (16),
TOWNSHIP THREE (3) SOUTH RANGE ONE
(1) EAST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AND RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES WEST
243.34 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 37 DE-
GREES WEST 356 FEET, THENCE' RUN
SOUTH 53 DEGREES WEST 465 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 37 DE-
GREES WEST 200 FEET, THENCE RUN
SOUTH 53 DEGREES WEST 120 FEET,
THENCE SOUTH 37 DEGREES EAST 200
FEET, THENCE NORTH 53 DEGREES EAST
120 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING,
BEING IN SECTION 16, TOWNSHIP 3
SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST. SAID LAND BEING
OTHERWISE DESCRIBED AS LOT 5,
BLOCK "B", OF A PLAT OF SURVEY OF
THE PROPERTY OF B.H. ROGERS MADE
BY BOYLE, WAMSLEY AND POOLE, SUR-
VEYORS, AS SHOWN BY MAP THEREOF
OF RECORD ON PAGE 76, OF DEED BOOK
52 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WA-
KULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the is pendens, must
file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 29th day of January, 2009
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons with dis-
abilities needing a special accommodation
should contact COURT ADMINISTRATION, at
the WAKULLA County Courthouse at,
1-800-955-8771 9TDD) or 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.
February 12, 19, 2009


105 Business Opportuni-L
5 ties


BRING YOUR OW

PHOTOS TO IIFE!!
I can fix those
wonderful old pictures
so you can enjoy them
again, and make
copies to share.

Keep the family heritage
alive with restored
photographs

Just $15 per photo.
850-766-7655
dougapple@gmail.com



110 Help Wanted




Administrative

Assistant/Billing Clerk
Will be responsible for interaction
with customers, financial data entry
and reporting, maintaining billing
files, and managing the Project's
computerized work order system.
Must have experience with billing
systems and financial management.
Must have working knowledge of,
Microsoft Excel and Microsoft-Word:.
Compensation is commensurate
with experience. Full benefits are
available including health, dental,
life insurance, employer
contribution 401(k) plan, paid time
off, sick leave, and holidays.
ESG Operations, Inc. is an equal
opportunity employer and a certified
Drug Free Workplace.'
Send resumes and references to':
ESG Operations, Inc.
Attn: Employment
340 Trice Lane
Crawfordville, FL 32327
mailto:employment@esginc.net
Fax 850-926-2890


Defendants)


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE .IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a


28 Savannah Forest 17 S Summer wind Circle
3BR/2BA home w/spacious open floorplan. Watch the deer from your backporch
Tile flooring in kitchens and bathrooms. Co- in this split 4BD/2BA plan on 5.03
rian countertops in kitchen. Cozy up on cold acres. Updated kitchen and master
nights with a gas fireplace. Master bedroom bath, laminate flooring in living and
has his & hers walk-in closets. Master bath c master. Need storage--owners
has shower stall, whirlpool tub and his a leaving 2 1 0x1 0 storage sheds, 8x10
her sinks. Inside utility room & 2-car garage. workshop and 1 0x1 0 dog kennel.
Home is on 1-acre that is fully cleared. workshop and 10xl0 dog kennel.
Call Susan to preview. $129,900. Call Elaine Gary.
Lot 3 or 4Whiddon Lake Road/ j New Construction
Almost 11 acres with beautiful hardwoods in 1288 sq.ft., 3BR/2BA awesome floor-
flood zone C located in north Crawfordville. plan with laminate cherry wood flooring.
Easy commute to Tallahassee with a country Master bedroom with large walk-in
setting. A total of 4 tracts are available for closet and master bath completely tiled.
$99,000. each. That's the price of most 5 acre Deck in backyard. Over 200 sq.ft. of -- --
tracts. Located behind Edgewood subdivi- ., attic storage. Home can be purchased on 50x100 lot or 100xl00 lot.
sion. Call Dawn Reed for more information. Call Susan for more information.

hSusan 2543 Crawfordville Blue ater
Jones Hwy, Suite 1 Gl i n
Elaine 566-7584 Dawn Check out Realty Group
Gary Reed www.Wakullalnfo.com 850-926-8777
509-5409 294-3468 www.BluewaterRealtyGroup.com



kl IgThe Farm $269,500
12 Carriage Drive, Crawfordville, FL
Immaculate 2255 Sq. Ft. 4 BR/2 BA
home. Beautifully landscaped back-

pool/waterfall. Lots of extras wood
106 W. 5th Ave. floors in main living area, fireplace, Call
Tallahassee, FL 32303 Savannah Forest sunroom, master suite w/trey ceilings, Donna Card
(850) 222-2166 tel. $39,900. 1+ ac. tracts off deluxe master bath, security system, 850-508-1235
www.wmleeco.com Wakulla Aaron Rd. and much more. .I Mi


Steeplechase $79,900 to $99,900. Carmen Rocio 2 ac. lot off ***Brand New Subdivision***
5 ac. wooded tracts. Horse friendly! Shadeville Hwy near Carmnen Maria -$29,900.
Subdivision has underground electric Wakulla Station. $64,900. Lots up to 1 ac. in size.
and water. 2 acre tract with large Underground electric and Wa-
Located off of Lower Bridge Road. hardwoods in Beechwood ter. Conveniently located to

Walkers MI11 Subdivision offShadeville Tallahassee and Lake Talquin.
$57,900. 2 ac. lots, located on Hwy. $52,900.**Affordable & Convenient.** 8 Lost Creek Trail
Lower Bridge Road ReTwo 5+ acre tracts off MontejLo $34,900 3BR/2 5BA located on 10 picturesque
SlarsCrossinRehwinke Rd w arge trees on Located off Belair Road. Under- acres minutes from downtown Craw-
Seiars Crosslng the back of properties & a small fordville. This brick home features a
$59,900. 1+ ac lots pond. Can be ground electric, water, & sewer g. family room w/fireplace and French
North Wakulla Co.. purchased together Convenient to Tallahassee, S doors overlooking porch & screened
On Ace High Stable Rd. $134,750 and $136,250. Marks Bike Trail, and all the sur- inground pool area. With many extras.
rounding recreational areas. Must See. $299,900


FIREFIGHTER

Wakulla County

Fire Department
The Wakulla County Board of
Commissioners in conjunction with the
Wakulla County United Firefighters
Association is seeking qualified
applicants for Flex/On-Call Firefighters.
Successful applicants will perform a
variety of fire and rescue functions
including but not limited to
extinguishing fires, entering burning
buildings to rescue trapped occupants,
extricating individuals from wrecked
vehicles, maintaining fire trucks and
equipment, conducting fire hydrant
inspections, developing pre-fire
management plans, assisting with
school fire safety presentations and
other related duties and responsibilities.
Will work under the supervision of a fire
department officer and will work closely
with volunteer fire chiefs and volunteer
firefighters throughout the county.
Applicants must be at least eighteen
years of age, graduation from high
school or equivalent, able to pass a
medical physical examination, able to
pass an endurance and agility test, be
a non-user of tobacco products for at
least one-year immediately preceding
date of application, possess a valid
Florida Driver's license, possess a
State of Florida Firefighter II
certification. A minimum of three years
experience as a paid and/or volunteer
firefighter is preferred.
To apply, send a Wakulla County
application to: Human Resources, P.O.
Box 309, Crawfordville, FL 32326,
Applications may be obtained by
visiting our website at
www.mywakulla.com or at the
Administrator's office at 850-926-0919.
Drug screening is required. Veteran's
preference will be given to qualified
applicants. Wakulla County is an
Affirmative Action / Equal Opportunity
Employer. This position offers no
benefits in the way of leave time or
insurance. Salary will be based on
qualifications and experience, with a
minimum starting hourly rate of $10.67.
Applications must be received by 5:00
p.m. on Friday, February 20, 2009.



Maintenance Manager
Wakulla County, Fla.
ESG is currently recruiting a
Maintenance Manager for our
Wakulla County, Florida project.
Maintenance. Manager Res-
ponsible for the planning,
development, implementation,
administration and evaluation of all
maintenance activities for the water
and wastewater system of the
Public Works Department.
Requirements Requires a high
school diploma & 5 yrs
progressively responsible exp. in
the functional area of electrical
maintenance. Candidate should be
familiar with control logic and plc
programming.
Experience with pump maintenance
and repairs, control' panel and
electronic components, and welding
also required. Must have FL
Driver's License and maintain.
Word, Excel, and PowerPoint *exp.
preferred. Class A Commercial
Driver's License preferred. Florida
Electrician License preferred.
Compensation .is commensurate
with experience along` with a
generous benefits and bonus plan.
Full benefits are available, including
health, dental, life insurance,
employer contribution 401(k) plan,
paid time off, sick leave,, and
holidays. Relocation assistance is
offered.
ESG Operations, Inc. is an equal
opportunity employer and a certified
Drug Free Workplace.
Send resumes and references to:
ESG Operations, Inc.
Attn: John Eddlemon
1815 Satellite Blvd, Suite 103
Duluth, GA 30097
Please email resumes to:
employment@esginc.net
Please fax resumes to:
678-475-9293


APALC/HEf


Apalachee Center Inc. is a Joint
Commission Accredited behavioral
health center dedicated to assisting
consumers with mental health and
addiction services. We are making
a difference in our community by
empowering our clients to manage
their illness and take back control
of their lives. We are recruiting for
the following available positions:
Recovery Specialist II (2393)
Qualifications: Bachelor's degree
with a major in psychology, social
work, counseling, or other related
human services field and one year
of related professional experience;
prior work experience with adults
experiencing serious mental illness
required.
Responsibilities: Facilitating
linkages between clients and their
families and appropriate
community support services;
providing case management
services, including assessing
client's goals, plans and other
duties as assigned.
To view a complete listing of our
opportunities, please visit our
website: www.apalacheecenter.org
Applications are received in person
or mail to:
Human Resources 2634-J Capital
Circle N.E., Tallahassee, FL 32308
Pre-Hire Drug Screen & FDLE
background check
An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative
Action Employer
Drug-Free Workplace

120 Services and Busi-
nesses

Affordable Handyman Services.
Interior/Exterior painting, cleaning,
soft/pressure wash, cool seal, car-
pentry and many other odd jobs.
References avail. Bobby/Carol
Lowered rates! 850-926-2462
850-459-1071.

ALL ABOUT...
CONCRETE LANDSCAPE
blocks plants
bricks sod
pavers tractor work
call JOSEPH FRANCIS
850-556-1178 / 850-926-9064

Black Top Millen #2: $260.00;
Driveway Rock $490.00; Road
Base $365.00; Fill Dirt: estimate;
Top soil: estimate. 1.0-Wheeler
Dump Truck, Crawfordville Area.
Call Paul for more info:
850-528-6722.

Wakulla Sparkles, LLC
cleaning service
Licensed & Insured
References available
S Residential
Commercial
Move-In,
Move-Out



850-590-7853
CALL FOR A FREE ESTIMATE
wakullasparkles@yahoo.com


130 Entertainment



BEREAN CHRISTIAN
BOOKSTORE

15% OFF ALL NOVELS
3016 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY.
850-926-6009


W T Gaupin, Broker

hell point Crawfordville
926-7811 926-5111

Florida Coastal Silver Coast
Properties, Inc. Realty

PRETTY SHADED 1 26 ACRES with Doublevide Mobile Home 3B8
2BA home features a front deck and large garage or workshop Cloc,
10 schools. Recreation Park. golf courses, boating & fishing #5129i
MLS# 186187 REDUCED TO $95.000

TAKE A WALK ON THE CONVENIENT SIDE, 1424 sq ft 3BR/2
townhome is located in the heart 01 Crawtordville Full appliance
age. rear patio has an electric awning S is privacy tenced Comm
pool S clubhouse #901W, MLS# 186619 priced at $123.500

WELL MAINTAINED and roomy 4BR'2BA doublewide mobile home
.56. acres |MOL) teatur ng open giving area and split bedroom floor
fireplace, storage building., front & Dackd. dec~ Great location at a
price, $94.900 #909-W. MLS# 191252'

WALK THE KIDS to the park. library or sctiool This 3BRi2BA M
home on a lenced 1 1 acie boasts a spll.1-loor plan. spacious kitchen,
and large deck A greal family opportunity at $115.000 Ask for pr
#2203-W. MLS# 162630

.-ARDWOODS. PINES & PASTURE' Peaceful & convenient, The pe
prescription for your dream home location' Build on this beautrtul 6 74
(mol) parcel and enloy the added bonus of me adlaceni Si Marks bike Ir
#112-W. MLSw 140695 pnced at $79.900

"RENTALS"
SHELL POINT 2BR.2BA ground level home w pool Long term $1.
monlh with applicable deposits Shonrterm lease available call office
details NO PETS

3BR'2BA Crawtordvile home in galed community $1 500'month security
posil required r2221W NO PETS

FURNISHED 2BR.2 5 Condo $1.200'monin. security deposit ieuired.
,. PETS #6341W

OCHLOCKONEE BAY 3BR 2BA furnished watertont house $1.000/mon
; secure deposit required PETS ALLOWED #6343W

- SEASOINAL Snug Harbtor Townriome avaiiariie ior rent 31 $1 500 week 2-
maximum schedule in any given m.nth Communiry pool docks on deep-wa_.
* canal located ,n a gated community NO PETS

'"Lcensed Real Estate Agents Needed"
Contact Ted orThelma 850-926-7811

2009 ISTHE DATE TO LOOK, LINGER & RELOCATE,
SO GO FOR THE GOLD WWW.C21FCP.COM

Ochlockonee Bay 984-50073








Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 19, 2009


230 Motor Homes and
Campers

Dutchmen Camper. 35 ft. 1993.
Very good condition. Asking
$5,800. Call 850-926-2187.

275 Home Furnishings

$170 Queen Pillow-Top Mattress
Set. Unused in plastic w/warranty.
222-9879. Delivery avail.
2-Tone sofa/loveseat/swivel chair
& ottoman set. $1199 for whole
set. Never used and still in boxes.
Stain-resistant, hardwood founda-
tion, lifetime warranty, new in
crate, del avail. 545-7112.
A Brand new 3pc King mattress
set. Still in wrapper $269. Can de-
liver. 222-7783.
A new 100% LEATHER Cigar
Back & Rolled armed Sofa,
Loveseat & Large Storage Otto-
man. Espresso, Solid oak founda-
tion. No vinyl. Never used. Still in
crates. Asking $1575 for set.
425-8374, can deliver.
Bedroom: Complete Designer 7
piee set, all new. Sacrifice $849.
545-7112. Delivery is possible.

FOR AV N=
Round dining table w/leaf, 4 chairs,
(white wash) $125. Entertainment
center (white wash) $25, Coffee table
(white wash) $10. Lt. Cherry Chest of
drawers $75. Triple dresser w/mirror
$100. King size sleigh bed, mattress
& box spring $100. Floor lamps (2)
$10/ea. Beanie Babies (stuffed
animals) $1,00/ea.. Lots of household
items! Call 850-926-3417.

DINNETTE SET: SOLID WOOD ta-
ble with 4 chairs $150. New in
Box 222-9879.
Simmons BeautyRest mattress set
BRAND NEW still in sealed plas-
tic. Full warranty. $499. Call
222-7783.
Solid Wood Sleigh Bed $250.
NEW, in box. 545-7112.

335 Pets

(5) Zebra finches: 3 males, 2 fe-
males, with 2 cages. Reproduce
frequently, with low maintenance.
$50 for everything. Call 925-4732.
Get hook, round, & tapeworms.
Rotate Happy Jack tapeworm tab-
lets and Liqui-Vict.(tag). SOP-
CHOPPY HARDWARE (962-3180)
www.happyjackinc.com.

340 Plants

Spruce up your
landscape with fresh
PINE STRAW
GREAT PRICE!
$ 00 ALE
Free delivery


510-0170

355 Yard Sales

Moving Sale! Saturday, Feb. 21
and Sunday, Feb. 22; 8AM-until...
Everything must go! Furniture,
huge selection of DVD's and
more...
Saturday, Feb. 21.. 9AM-2PM.
Household goods, furniture, appli-
ances, women's clothing X-Lg.,
57 Wakulla Circle, Ochlockonee
Bay (in back/under carport)
Saturday, February 21,
6AM-12PM. 15 Ross Drive (behind
Walmart). Tons of clothes (kids,
men's, women's) toys, furniture,
household items.
This is the Biggie! From furniture,
to collectibles. Friday, Saturday
and Sunday at 3131 Shadeville
Road.

410 Free Items

Free Office Space for right busi-
ness on Hwy. 319, Sopchoppy.
400 sq.ft. w/bathroom to code.
Call 850-962-2456.


500 Real Estate


PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it ille-
gal
to advertise "any preference, limi-
tation, or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or national ori-
gin or an intention to make any
such preference, limitation or dis-
crimination." Familial status in-
cludes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing the custody of
children under the age of 18.
This newspaper will not accept
any advertising for real estate
that is a violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To com-
plain of discrimination call HUD
tollfree at 1-800-669-9777. The
toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


LENDER

515 Apartments for Rent|

Keep your rental property clean to
attract potential renters. Call Wa-
kulla Sparkles. Licensed and in-
sured, references available. Call
850-590-7853.
[530 Comm. Property forR
Rent

ASK ABOUT OUR
MOVE-IN SPECIALS
Self Storage Units
~ Boat/RV Storage
~ Retail Space Available
~ Locks, Boxes & More
Stow
Away
Center

850-926-5725
www.stowawaycenter.com

*GRADE-A OFFICE SPACE!*
Hwy. frontage offices avail. Great at-
mosphere. Rent + tax includes:
utilities, trash p/u and kitchen use.
Common area cleaned. 1st and last
month's rent. One month free with
13/mo lease. Call 926-4511 for info.
CALL (850) 926-4511

Woodville Retail
Space Available
Fitness Studio-1000/sf
(Wall to wall mat & mirrors)
Retail -1250/sf
(Storefront w/back storage)
Two-Bay Garage-1200/sf
Divided Office Space-1074/sf
Lewiswood Center
421-5039

545 Homes for Sale

$137,500. Owner will pay $2,500
to Realtor. Property sold "as-is"
w/Buyer paying ALL closing costs.
1,800 SqFt., 4BR/2BA, 23 Neeley
Road. Nick at 850-766-7750.

HURRICANE
RESISTANT
Must see this amazing Hurricane
Resistant House!!!
Solid poured concrete walls, 9 times
stronger than standard wood
construction. 3X more energy
efficient. 3BR/2BA 1,204 Sq.Ft. Just
a short stroll down to gorgeous Lake
Ellen. 39 John David Dr. $139,900.
Lease purchase, owners financing
options. Call 850-443-3300.

Modular home for sale or rent:
3BR/2BA w/family room and sun-
room. 3-worksheds, carport, ga-
rage, beautiful walkways, grape-
vines in fenced-in yard. Tallahas-
see, off Hwy. 20. For rent:
$800/month. For sale $61,900.
Call 850-926-4511.


gIn Cjf t CPe4 Rel, Im. (7\
(850) 926-8038 (850) 926-2390 fax
520 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL
LYNNANDDAVID.HOMESANDLAND.COM
Lynn Cole-Eddinger "Best Vafue David Hoover
Broker 545-8284 Realtor 519-7944
lynncole5228@msn.com -PiCk of the week- dhoover2@hotmail.com


LYNN AND DAVID'S PICK OF THE WEEK!!
Open Sunday,

105 Walker Creek Drive
Shell Point
Absolutely the best buy
on the coast! $394,900
Si for this 3 bedroom, 2 1/2
bath 1610 sq. foot home in Shell Point on deep water
canal with seawall & dock. Front & back porch both
have spectacular views. Home is seconds from the Gulf
of Mexico, walking distance to the beach, and sitting on
a 70x181 deep lot. Made for entertaining w/large great
room, inside utility room, workshop, lots of parking area,
and kitchen with breakfast bar. This home is waiting for
your cosmetic touches! Come by and see us on Sunday!


I 555 Houses for Rent i


10 Maxson Rd, Wakulla Gardens
Beach Style Duplex
in Wakulla
Top unit 2BR/1BA,
w/Hardwood Firs., large
screened porch. $825/mo.
includes utilities. Call Bob
at 850-545-6010.

2BR/2BA Canal-front Gulf Bay
view. 1,250sq.ft. custom home.
Deep-water canal and dock.
$750/unfurnished; $850/furnished.
$300/security. No pets or smok-
ing. 850-545-2312.

Brand new 3BR/2BA houses in
Logan's Ridge with garage. Call
850-926-5088.

Crawfordville, clean, large 2 Bed-
room, 2 Full Bath Duplex $675/per
month. Call Linda 850-926-0283.

ENERGY EFFICIENT HOUSE!
3BR2BA Gorgeous house.
Built in 2007. Solid poured
concrete walls, energy efficient,
private fenced yard, 1,200 Sq.Ft.
short walk to beautiful Lake Ellen.
$950/month. 39 John David Dr.
Lease purchase, owners finance
option available. 850-443-3300.


Ochlockonee Bay


Realty


Alligator Point! 3BR/3BA gor-
geous home in gated community.
1800/month, $1800/security. No
Pets. No Smoking.
Pine Street/Alligator Pointl Clean
2BR/1BA. $575/month, $575/se-
curity. No Pets. No Smoking.
3BR/2BA home on St. Marks
River. $1000/month $1000/secu-
rity. No Pets. No Smoking.
Crawfordville/Linzy Mill!
4BR/2BA, 1600 sq.ft.
$1,575/month. $1,575/security.
No Pets. No Smoking.
2BR/1BA home in Crawfordville on
five acres. $750/month. No Pets.
No Smoking.
Panaceal 2BR/1BA duplex.
$500/month. $500/security. No
Pets. No Smoking.
Panaceal Commercial building on
Hwy 98. $850/month. $850/security
Beachfront- Alligator PointI
Gorgeous 2 story, 4BR/3.5BA,
3700 sq.ft. unfurnished home.
$3000/month $3000/security. No
pets. No smoking.
Ochlockonee Bay! Bayfront
3BR/1 BA block home. $750/mo.
$750/security. No pets.
No smoking.
Beachfront 2BR/2BA 'on Alligator
Point. $1300/month. $1300/secu-
rity. No Pets. No Smoking.
2BR/1 BA in Lanark/Franklin
County! $600/month. $600/secu-
rity. No Pets. No Smoking.
Mashes Sand Rd! 3BR/1 BA on
bay. $775/month. $775/deposit.
No Pets. No Smoking.
Commercial building on busy
Hwy. 98/Panacea for rent.
$550/month. $550/security.
Commercial office in Medart! 2
Room office on Hwy. 319.
$700/month. $700/security.
Ochlockonee Bay Realty
850-984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com

Sopchoppy on canal 2BR/iBA
house on stilts, 500/Dep. 650/
Rent., 6-month lease.
N Medart, very kool 1BR/1BA
house on 5 'acres, fenced
500/Dep. 650/month.
N Wakulla Co., 2BR/1 BA Mobile
home on pond 650/month 500/
Dep.
Revell Realty, Inc 962-2212


Wakulla




Sonya Hall
Lic. Real Estate Broker
"Specializing in Wakulla Co."
(850) 926-5084
FOR RENT:
4Br 2Ba DW $850 mo
$750 Sec Dep
3Br 2Ba Hs $1350 mo
$1000 Sec. Dep.
3Br 2.5Ba $1100 mo
$1000 Sec. Dep.
3Br 2Ba Hs $950 mo.
$800 Sec. Dep.
3Br 2Ba Hs $850 mo.
$800 Sec. Dep.
3Br 2Ba Hs $800 mo.
$700 Sec. Dep.
2Br 2Ba Duplex $750 mo.
$500 Sec. Dep.
3Br 2Ba Duplex $850 mo.
$500 Sec. Dep.
2Br 2Ba Hs $850 mo.
$700 Sec. Dep.
2Br 1 Ba w/office $700 mo.
$500 Sec. Dep.
2Br 2Ba SWMH $600 mo.
$550 Sec. Dep.
3Br 1.5Ba SWMH $600 mo.
$550 Sec. Dep.
2Br 1Ba SW $425 mo.
$400 Sec. Dep.


560 Land for Sale


I


LAND FOR SALE
60x120 lot
close to Wakulla River,
Shell Point, & St. Marks
for $11,500
w/owner financing.
Broker/Owner
10.84 acres
on Whiddon Lake Road,
wooded, private, mobile
homes allowed. More
acreage available. Asking
$99,000
Brown Donaldson
Road
5.19 high & dry acres.
$69,000
Country Club Drive
Lot overlooking golf
course in private, gated
community $99,900
Crawfordville Hwy.
1.74 commercial acres,
north of Bloxham, asking
$245,000
East Ivan Road
2.30 acres, paved road,
$53,900,
make offer

A Coastwise
w Realty
(Inc.
850-926-8038
Woodville, 1.6 acres corner lot.
Close enough to town, but very
private. $45,000 negotiable.
850-545-1355.
565 Mobile Homes for
Rent
2BR/1BA M/H Sopchoppy area
Ochlockonee River. $425/month +
deposit. Call 850-570-9943 and
850-962-2358.
2BR/1BA, "Expando" Bedroom
and Living Room. $500/month +
security, deposit. $300. Call
850-728-6496 and 850-766-0170.
2BR/2BA M/H, in Sopchoppy on
large corner lot. $485/mo. + secu-
rity deposit. Call 850-566-4124.
3BR/2BA, Deluxe model D/W on
nice lot. Master bath-deluxe
model w/large tub. f.r., I.r., d.r.
and formal d.r. $850/mo. 1st., last,
plus security nego. Call
850-926-4511.
Canal Front, Shell Point!
\$850/month, 2BR/2BA, furnished,
boat dock, gated community, no
pets or smoking. 850-926-8795.


S Selling

Something?

Classified

Ads For

As 11ttle

As $8

A Week

926-7102
L J


(DRItP


5N~


rarb


or *ub5tritb rfor l....
In County $26 yr. $14.50 1/2 yr.
Out of County $35 yr. $19 1/2 yr.
Out of State $40 yr. $22 1/2 yr.


For Sale or Lease

Killearn Townhouse

Shamrock N. #B-5 Beautiful Corner Lot
Brick, 2BR/1.5BA, Fireplace, Patio,

$149,500 (Lease $900 mo.)
Call (850) 294-9144 Anytime







BlueWater


Realty Group


Sfiari 7Ed>on


Call Shari Edingtoni Today...

933-6364

cA Aewv Ced Of S ence

Eh in l~alTte!


Realtor


rE


U


Coawt&U& ReaM4, Ie.
(850) 926-8038 (850) 926-2390 fax
520 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL

Congratulations

Top Producer Jan. 2009



David

.\ Hoover

Realtor

519-7944
Sdhoover2@hotmail.com

Coastwise Realty, Inc. would like to Thank
"The King of Real Estate" David Hoover,
for making Coastwise Realty the Top Producing
Real Estate Company in Wakulla County with over
$1,000,000 sales volume in the 1st six weeks of 2009.


SOIar |! rar |?!








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 19, 2009 Page 7B


Twelve month program to help Wakulla Go Green


With the arrival of 2009, many of
us will make New Year's resolutions
that focus on personal goals. Every-
thing from shedding a few pounds
to saving more money makes the list
of popular resolutions around this
time of year.
"The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection (DEP) is
encouraging Floridians to consider
resolutions that have a positive
impact not only on themselves but
also on the state's environment,"
said DEP's Director of Sustainable
Initiatives Deas Bohn. "If every Flo-
ridian adopts a few of these ideas
throughout the year, they can make
a huge difference in our efforts to
protect the environment."
The following is a month-by-
mronth list of simple "green" resolu-
fions for 2009:
JANUARY: Ecycle With the
holidays came many new electronics
under the tree but it is important not
to dispose of the old gadgets in your
garbage. Instead consider recycling
- recycling unwanted electronics to
recover and reuse the product itself
or materials like copper, steel, glass
that the product contains. Some
6ther tips include: keeping old tele-
visions for games, videos or DVDs;
donating working televisions to a
charitable organization or giving
them .to a friend; or offering televi-
sions through a local "freecycle"
group, at http://www.freecycle.org,
Nearly two million tons of used
electronics, including computers
and televisions, are discarded each
year, and an estimated 128 million
cell phones are retired from use an-
nually. For more tips on recycling
electronics visit http://www.dep.
state.fl.us/waste/categories/elec-
tronics/default.htm.
: FEBRUARY: Spend More Family
Time Outdoors February is hiking
And trails month. So why not plan an
environmentally friendly outing, like
a family bike ride on one of Florida's


award winning trails? DEP's Office of
Greenways & Trails (OGT) manages
eight state trails, which were recently
named Best State Trails by American
Trails. OGT also maintains five rail-
trails, which are railroad tracks re-
stored and converted to recreational
trails for hiking, biking and skating.
To find a trail near you visit www.
dep.state.fl.us/gwt/.
MARCH: Save on Water Usage -
With Spring approaching, March is a
great time to make changes at home
that conserve water. By replacing a
typical 3.5-gallon toilet with a 1.6 gal-
lon model, a family of four will save
more than 11,000 gallons of water
per year. Also, take shorter showers
and replace showerheads with an ul-
tra-low-flow version. Repair dripping
faucets by replacing washers one
drop per second wastes 2,700 gallons
of water per year. For more water
conservation tips visit www.dep.
state.fl.us./drought/tips.htm
APRIL: Celebrate the Earth April
22nd is the 39th anniversary of Earth
Day. This year take a moment to
look at how to reduce waste at home~
by recycling.
One recycled aluminum can
saves enough energy to power a tele-
vision or computer for three hours or
a 100-watt light bulb for 20 hours,
Recycling one glass bottle saves
enough energy to light a 100-watt
light bulb for four hours.
Recycling a one-gallon plastic
milk jug will save enough energy
to keep a 100-watt bulb burning for
11 hours.
Recycling a one-foot high stack
of newspapers saves enough electric-
ity to heat a home for 17 hours.
In 2008, Governor Charlie Crist
signed the Energy, Climate Change,
and Economic Security Act of 2008
that establishes new statewide
recycling goals of 75 percent to be
achieved by the year 2020. To learn
more visit www.dep.state.fl.us/
waste/recyclinggoal75.


MAY: Add a Green Twist to Spring
Cleaning May is Clean Air Aware-
ness month, and it is a perfect time
to switch to green cleaners that help
the environment as well as the air
we breathe. Consumers can create
home-mixed cleaners that are equal-
ly as effective as traditional products,
and safer for people and the environ-
ment. For those who don't have time
to make their own cleaners, there are
now hundreds of environmentally
friendly products widely available
through stores and the Internet.
Important safety and environmental
features of these products include
being non-toxic, biodegradable,
made from renewable resources and
petroleum-free. DEP offers a number
of Green Cleaning tips and recipes
at www.dep.state.fl.us/pollutionpre-
vention/green_cleaning.htm
JUNE: Implement Eco-Friendly
Boating Practices National Boating
and Fishing Week takes place every
June. With more than a million reg-
istered boaters in Florida, this is a
perfect time of the year to implement
eco-friendly maritime practices such
as: using phosphate-free, biodegrad-
able and non-toxic cleaners; using
oil absorbent material to catch drips
from the fuel intake and the vent
overflow; and using marina pumpout
stations and rinsing holding tanks
regularly. Florida's Clean Marina
Program provides boaters and ma-
rinas more tips on environmentally
friendly practices at www.dep.state.
fl.us/cleanmarina/.
JULY: Travel Green Leaving home
doesn't mean travelers should stop
being environmentally conscien-
tious. Florida has nearly 400 hotels,
motels and bed and breakfasts that
are designated members of DEP's
Florida Green Lodging Program. The
program was established in 2004 to
recognize and reward environmen-
tally conscientious lodging facilities
in the state. Beyond staying at a
designated property, travelers can


also learn how to be a green guest
by visiting http://www.dep.state.
fl.us/green/travel.htm.
AUGUST: Enjoy a Florida State
Park Staycation With a downturn in
the economy and families trying to
save more money, the term "stayca-
tion" became a new addition to the
American vocabulary. In addition to
being affordable, the staycation can
also reduce your carbon footprint.
The perfect staycation can be found
at any of Florida's 160 state parks.
From mermaids at Weeki Wachee
Springs State Park to manatees at
Blue Springs State Park, from the
lush gardens of Maclay State Park
to the beaches of Caladesi Island
State Park Florida's state parks
have something for everyone's
interest, and the regular entrance
fee for most state parks is $4.00 per
carload of two-to-eight people, $3.00
for one person in a car and $1.00 per
pedestrian or bicyclist. To find a state
park in your backyard visit www.dep.
state.fl.us/parks
SEPTEMBER: Participate In Coast-
al Cleanup Every September thou-
sands of Floridians take part in In-
ternational Coastal Cleanup Day. It is
estimated that litter and debris harm
more than one million seabirds and
100,000 marine mammals and turtles
every year. Help by participating in
a coastal cleanup effort near you.
Some of the most dangerous items
to sea life during the coastal cleanup
include: monofilament fishing line,
fishing nets, bags, balloons, traps)
(crab/lobster/fish) plastic sheeting/
tarps, rope, six pack holders, strap-
ping bands and syringes. For more
information on coastal cleanup go
to www.dep.state.fl.us/cmp
OCTOBER: Make the Switch
- October is energy awareness
month, a month where consumers
are reminded to make wise energy
choices. The easiest way to save
energy is to switch from traditional
incandescent light bulbs to compact


fluorescent bulbs that reduce energy
consumption, generate less air pol-
lution and reduce greenhouse gas
emissions. If every household in
Florida changed just one light to
an ENERGY STAR product, savings
would total more than $37 million
in energy costs annually. In addi-
tion, Florida could save up to 351
million kilowatt-hours of electricity
per year, which is enough energy
to light all the households in Tal-
lahassee for nearly three years, and
prevent almost 540 million pounds
of greenhouse gas emissions each
year. For more energy tips visit
www.dep.state.fl.us/green/tips/tips,
htm#home.
NOVEMBER: Have a Green
Thanksgiving Thanksgiving is a
holiday steeped with tradition, but
why not start a new tradition by
having a green celebration? Reduc-
ing impact on the environment is
something for which everyone can
be thankful. Here are a few tips on
giving thanks to the environment:
use homemade decorations; carry
reusable bags when you go grocery
shopping; at dinner, use cloth nap-
kins that can be washed and used
again; and shop online on Black
Friday in the comfort of your home.
You'll save on emissions as well as
hassle.
DECEMBER: Decorate Green- In-
stead of buying plastic and glass
holiday decorations, try making
your own ornaments that can be
reused or recycled. Create ornaments
made from old greeting cards or
cookie dough, garlands made from
strung popcorn or cranberries, and
potpourri made from kitchen spices
such as cinnamon and cloves.
The DEP staff wishes the people
of Florida a safe, happy and green
New Year. For more "green" tips, visit
www.dep.state.fl.us/green/tips/.


FWC to hold meetings on captive wildlife, rehabilitation


The Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) is holding two public
meetings to discuss changes
to the existing rules on cap-
tive wildlife and wildlife
rehabilitation in Florida,
and the development of a
new rule on captive wildlife
sanctuaries,
The first meeting is Feb.
24, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.,


at the Department of Ag-
riculture and Consumer
Services, Division of Plant
Industry, 1911 S.W. 34th St.,
Gainesville.
The second meeting is
Feb. 25, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., at
the Kissimmee Civic Center,
201 E. Dakin Ave., Kissim-
mee:
Both meetings are open
to the public.


The public is invited to
comment during the meet-
ings or to submit comments
in writing. Comments can be
e-mailed to rulechanges@
MyFWC.com; type "Captive
Wildlife" on the subject
line. Comments may also be
submitted by mail to' Capt.
Linda Harrison, FWC Divi-
sion of Law Enforcement,
Investigations Section, 620


S. Meridian St., Tallahassee,
FL 32399-1600.
The deadline for submit-
ting written comments is
at the close of business on
March 13. Public comments
previously submitted have
been documented and do
not need to. be resubmit-
ted.
For a copy of the agen-
da, contact Harrison at the


above address or call at
488-6253.
Additional information
can be found at https://
www.flrules.org/Default.asp
and MyFWC.com/calendar
http://myfwc.com: calen-
dar_CaptiveWildlifeWork-
shop.htm.
Anyone requiring spe-
cial accommodations to
participate should advise


the FWC's Office of Human
Resources, 850-488-6411, at
least five days prior to the
meetings. If you are hearing-
or speech-impaired, contact
the FWC using :the Florida
Relay Service at 800-955-
8771 (TDD) or 800-955-8770
(voice).
CLASSIFIED
$8 Per Week!


Brain


Teasers


- 9

3


6 7


4. .040 4040 40 4


1


* m pab-40
*0s qw

a*al
-


"Copyrighted Material l


t e Syndicated ContentW

y Available from Commercial News Providers"
A A I


* 0


9 1


* 4


4

43)


*AD tg 4ftMW- - 4OMGO-O
m M40 d o p -qm 4w m- o -
- .* m aor= w- a mob0 m a e
as q 40dbmm *mmea
- oo eb m 00 400 m- .m
- 4m m w a-o-. wo-ooqm
qw o a0x mw -Omb
- ffm


** ** See
O O o 00.O



O 00.0 **
O O O




* * *
* **** *
0 .0 00006
e o e


S

0~

~1


hi


i


*


* ~


* -
*


no 41M -WP






40 ju



4sh.

*4w-


b

S


m *

- ~- -


0. -


0


- a
I


--
a.
- -
0-~ -
* m -.
I


f -


a m


d. 4 -m
q -0-
amp


* a.
~



- -

-


* *


*









2009


Penalties eyed for Blue Crab violations


The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commis-
sion (FWC) proposed a draft
rule on Thursday, Feb. 5, that
would establish penalties for
violating requirements of the


Blue Crab Effort Management
Program. The FWC developed
this program to manage the
use of traps in Florida's com-
mercial blue crab fishery.
The proposed administra-


FWC releases preliminary

2008 mortality data


Smooth Sailing.
All of Wakulla County has been waiting for this scene to
be created on the coastline. The wind took a break and
the. seas calmed to smooth glass. Boaters have been able
to enjoy the water without ski parkas. For the record, the
first day of spring is Friday, March 20,


United Way can help


The United Way of the Big
Bend is offering free tax help
for people who meet income
requirements.
The service is available
through April 15 to residents of
Leon, Gadsden, Jefferson and
Wakulla counties whose house-
hold income is $56,000 or less.
The Volunteer Income Tax
Assistance program is part of


the United Way's BEST program.
(BEST stands for Believe, Earn,
Save and Thrive.)
Amanda Clements, vice presi-
dent of strategic initiatives, said
eligible families can get as much
as $4,824 from one tax credit and
possibly more from another.
To find dates and times for
the service, visit theBESTproject


Group to help hungry


Men's Fraternity of Wakulla
in conjunction with area church-
es, Volunteer Wakulla and area
agencies are seeking locations
and partners for food distribu-
tion locations to help needy
families in the community.
Currently, they are seeking
to identify locations that pres-
ently distribute food and/or
other needed items to families
in need. If your church, dub or
organization has any kind of
distribution process please call
508-2560 or MensFraternityof-
Wakulla@byHISgrace.cc.
A Task Force and Steering
Committee are investigating the
possibility of having strategically
located Food Pantry's throughout
the county to meet the needs of
local residents. Additionally,
plans are being developed to
have drop-off points at churches
and area supermarkets for dona-
tions to help support the food
distribution locations. Plans
are also underway to establish
community gardens capable of

Hike is set
Wakulla Springs State Park
will host a Forest Ecology Hike
on Saturday, March 7 from 10
a.m. until noon. The event is
free with park admission.
Explore the unique forest
ecology, plants and animals
on the two hour hike. Guests
are invited to enjoy breakfast
before the event or lunch af-
ter it in the historic Wakulla
Springs Lodge.


growing vegetables for fresh
vegetable distribution through
these locations. Training and
instructions for planting and
cultivating home or community
gardens is available. Please con-
tact Men's Fraternity of Wakulla
at 508-2560 or MensFratemityof-
Wakulla@byHISgrace.cc or the
Wakulla Extension Office 926-
3931 or sswenson@ufl.edu.


Biologists with the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission's (FWC) Fish and
Wildlife Research Institute
documented 337 manatee
carcasses in state waters in
2008. The low number of red
tide-related mortalities last
year helped the number of
documented manatee deaths
remain below the five-year
average of 357.
Watercraft strikes and peri-
natal (newborn) deaths were
the two most commonly docu-
mented manatee mortality
categories in 2008. The num-
bers for both categories were
above the five-year average.
Biologists documented 90'
watercraft-related deaths and,
a record high of 101 newborn
deaths.
Biologists report that a
variety of factors could have
contributed to the high num-
ber of newborn deaths in
2008. These factors include
the possibility that there were
more manatee births or that
biologists recovered a higher
proportion of manatee calf


carcasses.
The FWC uses trends in
mortality figures to monitor
ongoing and emerging threats
to the manatee population.
Throughout the year, FWC
researchers, managers and law
enforcement staff work closely
together to evaluate mortality
data and identify necessary
actions. FWC law enforcement,
in cooperation with partner
agencies, uses knowledge of
local boating habits, well-post-
ed speed zones, and up-to-date
manatee information to focus
on-the-water enforcement op-
erations. Enforcing manatee
protection zones and inform-
ing boaters about manatee
conservation is a priority for
the FWC.
To report a dead or injured
manatee, call the FWC Wildlife
Alert hotline at 888-404-FWCC.
For additional information
about manatee conservation,
visit MyFWC.com/manatee.
For more information on
manatee mortality research,
visit http://research.MyFWC.
com/manatees.


Quit the smoking habit


Florida State University
and the Anxiety Beahavioral
Health Clinic are coming to
Crawfordville to offer a free
smoking cessation program
to Wakulla residents.
They are looking for par-
ticipants between the ages of


18 to 65. Participants have the
opportunity ,to earn up to $142
by participating.
The program will be held
March 19 at 7 p.m. with an
introductory meeting at the
YMCA Camp Indian Springs
dining hall.


Green will speak to CCOW,


Concerned Citizens of
Wakulla (CCOW) will hold its
monthly meeting on the third
Thursday of the month at 7
p.m. at. the Wakulla County
Library. The February meet-


www.thewakullinews.com Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century

lt, Bha uIa &





Coastal Restaurant
0000
Home of 411-U-Can Eat Seafood& Chicken
Thursday Mornings
Look for Your Complimentary
copy of TlOj? Waulla _Atew
(free with any full Breakfast Order)

Hungry Man Breakfast$59
Breakfast Platter $249
S. $199 Breafast Special o


984-2933 .
1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea .
u N-,


Sustainable Big Bend -3rd Annual

Green Living Energy Expo a&

Education Fair


March 21,2009

Riversprings Middle School
800 Spring Creek Hwy., Crawfordville


Show your support for Gr~n Living and Saving Energy!
To be a sponsor, volunteer or to reserve exhibit space
call Heidi Holcomb at 926-7643 or
Pam Portwood at 850-926-2415 today!

Discover hundreds of the best products,
services, and ideas that piomute sustainability!
Educational workdoops, children's activities, vtenuouu
and exhibitors, entertainment, and so much more.
0 0
Find ways to create a simple, healthy life!


ing will be held on the Feb.
19. This month George Green
will join CCOW for a question
and answer session from the
membership. The meeting are
open to the public.


tive penalties are authorized
by Florida statute (Section
379.366, F.S.) and would apply
to violations such as untagged
traps, trap molestation, illegal
barter of tags and trap theft.
The proposed rule would
standardize penalty assess-
ments by creating a tiered
system that allows the penal-
ties to be assessed relative to
the severity of the violation
and the number of previous
violations up to a statutory
maximum. This rule would be


consistent with existing rules
establishing administrative
penalties for the stone crab
and spiny lobster fisheries.
A final public hearing on
the proposed rule will be held
during the next FWC public
meeting in April.
More information regarding
the draft rule is available on-
line at MyFWC.com/commis-
sion/2009/Feb09/docs/2009_
Feb_9B_DR_BlueCrabCivilPen-
alties_Presentation.pdf.


acting restaurants
umname today!


- OFF The Eatin' Path oa,,
,a^ Entry Form S ,,
Please drop off form at U
any participating Eatin' Place
SName
Address
*I
City
State Zip
I
Phone
*e-mail
S-.-------------


.~'K*.
~ ,~f "


"Join me and become

a member of a CHP

Medicare Advantage Plan."


Capital Health
P L A N

4 An dependent Lcensee ofthe
S BlueCross and BlueShieldAssociation


Plan to attend a SEMINAR to LEARN
MORE about CHP Advantage Plus
and CHP Preferred Advantage.

Call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512
to RSVP or for more information.

(TTY/TDD: 850-383-3534 or 1-800-955-8771)
8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week
or visit us at: www.capitalhealth.com/medicare



Seminars will be held at the
Capital Health Plan Health Center located at
1.491 Governor's Square Blvd. at 10:00 a.m. on:


Friday, March 13
Friday, March 27





i y * '' r : i .; S *


Paid Endorsement. Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract.
For accommodations of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call the
numbers above. A sales representative will be present with information and
applications. Benefits may change on January 1, 2010.
H5938_2009_1008_043_101908


Friday, February 27
Tuesday, March 10





. ...




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs