Title: Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00205
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville, Fla
Publication Date: January 22, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00028313
Volume ID: VID00205
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Full Text































Manatees send their winter greetings


Sea cows visit, decide to stay


By DAVID DAMON
Special to The Wakulla News
It was midday, the fog had
lifted and it was sunny and warm
at Wakulla Springs State Park. The
manatees were up early and had
already made their leisurely swim
down river. They had congregated
in the narrow passage a mile down
river where the Jungle Cruise cuts
through a narrow channel and
heads back up river along the other
bank.
To the delight of those on board,
there were so many manatees in the
warm shallow channel that the boat
had to make a U-turn and head back
up river the same way it came, to
be sure to avoid collisions with the
lumbering giants. On a typical day,
an adult manatee will spend six to
eight hours eating from 10 to 15
percent of their body weight daily
in vegetation, that's around 100 to
150 pounds of vegetation!
The rest of the day they spend
traveling or resting. While resting
they are able to hold their breath
for 30 seconds to as long as 20 min-
utes before coming to the surface
to exhale and get another breath.


The spray and noise as they exhale
made them easy to spot for those
on the Jungle Cruise. As passengers
unloaded, many headed to the dive
platform hoping to get another
glance at the manatees. They were
talking about all the manatees
they'd just seen down river, how big
they were and just how amazing it
was to see them.
Many had never seen a mana-
tee before and they were thrilled.
On this afternoon there were no
manatees in the spring area to be
found, they were all down river for
the afternoon, but they would be
back to the warm spring waters
later in the day.
Two days before it was very dif-
ferent in the spring area. These
gentle giants had put on a show
to the amazement of everyone in
the spring area. Smaller, younger
rWc~ees were swimming with the'
oN p< larger ones of up to 1,200
podud adults.
Sticking their heads up, they
looked around and came almost
half way out of the water at times.

Continued on Page 5A


Wakulla Springs State Park officials have been delighted that manatees have decided to stay in
Wakulla County. This manatee plays under the swimming area boundary.


Swimming, splashing of the manatees have upstaged the popular Springs alligators.


Budget news getting worse


Families of manatees have delighted park visitors on the boat tours.


Board, Talquin discuss sewer


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla County Superintendent of
Schools David Miller is an optimistic person
as a rule. But the state legislative battle over
education dollars has Miller deeply con-
cerned; The state budget woes are the worst,
he said, in his 36 years as an educator.
With local budget cuts already between
$2.5 million and $3 million, the school dis-
trict is bracing for what could be additional


cuts of five to 12 percent for the 2009-2010
school year.
So far, the district has been able to en-
dure the cuts by digging into the reserve
fund. However, the most recent cuts have
brought the reserve down to the point
where the county will not be able to endure
similar cuts in the new budget without
addressing the elimination of positions or
programs.
Continued on Page 5A


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
With the state Department of Enviro-
mental Protection having extended the
period for comments on Talquin Electric
Cooperative's request for a new permit
for.its Shell Point Wastewater Treatment
Plant, the board voted to tell DEP that it
supports allowing Talquin's plant to con-
tinue for a while, but does not support al-
lowing the facility to upgrade or expand.


The county and Talquin have been in
negotiations for a while over getting the
utility to hookup to the county's sewage
system.
The county is planning to improve its
sewage treatment to advanced levels, and
contends that shifting treatment of efflu-
ent from the coastal area around Shell
Point will help protect the surrounding
waters.
Continued on Page 5A


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Impact fees aired again


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
County commissioners held a
workshop last week to gather more
information on impact fees and,
again, heard from builders and devel-
opers who urged the board to keep the
moratorium in place.
Unlike the recent stakeholder
meeting, held before Christmas, this
workshop, held Monday, Jan. 12, attor-
ney Heather Encinosa, of the Nabors,
Giblin, Nickerson law firm which did
legal work on the county's impact fee
ordinance, gave a presentation on the
background on the fees.
After the 30-minute presentation,
builder after builder got up to make
many of the same points especially
the contention that impact fees are
inherently unfair to those new hom-
eowners moving into the community,
and that the formula for calculating the
impact fees failed to take into account


the disproportionate share of property
taxes that new residents pay compared
to longtime property owners.
Mortgage specialist Ralph Thomas
distributed copies of his information
sheet, which he titled "The Truth
About Impact Fees in Wakulla County,"
and which featured full-color graphs
and pie charts.
Thomas also contended that the
budget for local government has grown
faster than the population. Since 2002,
he said, the Wakulla population had
increased 20 percent while the county
budget had grown 200 percent.
"It should track," he asserted. "Not
a one-to-one correlation. But it should
track."
Developer Ted Gaupin was more
blunt in his assessment about county
government. "I've never seen so many
running around in offices doing what
a few did five years ago."
Continued on Page 5A


05 '.'"' "" '"";
!.4 Photo by Marty Di

Whooping Cranes follow the leader to St. Marks. Story on Page 3A.








Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 22, 2009



Comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895


January is a strange month


NURSE JUDY'S NOOK
By JUDY CONLIN
January is a strange month.
It ushers in a New Year and
this year it also ushers in a
new president. It ushers in a
raft of resolutions, which will
quickly be broken. It ushers
in Elvis Presley birthday cel-
ebrations. It ushers in Martin
Luther King Day. It ushers
in thoughts of ice skating,
snowmen and sledding. (Well,
in Florida those are only
thoughts since the last snow-
fall was a long time ago.)
In North Florida, January
is a real enigma. One day we
are told to cover our plants
and keep pets in because it
is going down to the freezing
temperatures. The next day it
is up near the 80s. One day we
have a roaring fire in the fire-


place. The next day we have
to run the air conditioner.
Having spent all fall putting
summer clothes away and
getting out winter duds, I am
constantly hunting something
appropriate to wear. Still, I am
able to cope. It is Nurse Judy,
who can't.
"What did you do with
my shorts?" she asks. "I'm
too hot."
"I don't know," I reply. "I
put them away somewhere
until spring. You're too old
to be wearing short shorts
anyhow."
What do you mean too
old? I look great in shorts,"'
she pouts.
You have ugly varicose
veins," I point out, feeling she
needs to face the truth.
"Speak for yourself," she
retorts. She does have a point
there.
Here, wear these Capri
pants," I say. "They'll be cool."
It has taken me two days to
find them under the bed in
the spare room. They have a
few dust balls plus some cat
hair clinging to them, which
I unsuccessfully try to brush
off.
But, the only shirt I can


find has long sleeves," she
complains.
I grab the long sleeved
shirt, stuff it somewhere and
begin searching for some light
sleeveless ones. I think I re-
member giving a box of sum-
mer shirts to the thrift shop.
Still, the search continues. I
finally find one and carry it
triumphantly to the grumpy
Nurse Judy. The temperature
has now dipped and she
wants the long sleeved shirt
back. I have no idea where I
put it. "Wear a jacket," I say
shortly.
"Where is my jacket?" she
wails.
I throw up my arms in de-
spair. I no longer know if it's
a summer jacket or a winter
jacket she needs. I have no
idea where it might be.
"Wear a sweater." I shout.
She puts on a Nurse Judy
black sweater, trimmed in
pearls and rhinestones, with a
few bows and bells on it. With
her denim sleeveless shirt and
plaid Capri pants, she looks
ridiculous and she knows it.
She blames me.
"You could take over the
job of storing seasonal cloth-
ing," I tell her, but I know she


won't. I always get the un-
pleasant jobs. Come to think
of it, I get all the jobs,
"Just stay in the house for
this strange month," I say.
"After all, spring really begins
in North Florida in February."
I'm praying the weather won't
turn really cold in the mean-
time, because I suddenly re-
member giving her brand new
pink ski jacket with the faux
white fur to the coat drive. If
she misses that, I'll be in big
trouble despite the fact that
she's never been skiing a day
in her life. She likes to wear
it just because she thinks it
makes her look chic.
"Would you like to borrow
something of mine?" I ask
sweetly trying to divert her
'attention.
"Not on your life," she
retorts. "I wouldn't be caught
dead in your frumpy things.
I'm hoping for a frosty morn-
ing so I can wear my ski jacket.
You do know where that is,
don't you?"
Oh my. How many days are
left before spring?
More later,
Judy
Nurse Judy and her alter
ego write from Havana.


Raising dogs for propagation is wrong


Senator Lawson


disappointed by


state lawmakers


, Senate Democratic Leader
Al Lawson (D-Tallahassee) on
Wednesday, Jan. 14 released the
following statement on the Sen-
ate vote on the Special Session
budget cuts:
"Since 2008, Senate Demo-
crats have been urging the
Republican leadership of this
state to take a step back and
reconsider the axe they were
preparing to yield on Florida's
elderly, her children, her criti-
cally ill, her disabled and poor,
her struggling middle class. We
pointed out again and again that
there were ways to avoid many
of these service and program
cuts though these alternatives
might make a few special inter-
ests unhappy.
"Rather than dose corporate
loopholes and reexamine cer-
tain sales tax exemptions that
would help shrink the budget
gap and blunt some of the pain
aimed at those least able to ab-
sorb it, the leadership chose to.
ignore our proposals, and boost
even more the financial burden
on those who have already
borne the greater brunt of it.
Rather than move toward tax
fairness, they opted to maintain


the lopsided status quo.
"My fellow members of the
Caucus could not in good con-
science support these actions.
We could not abide abdicating
our Constitutional obligations to
fully fund public education, forc-
ing local property owners once
again to cover the deficit. We
could not justify cutting the sole
life lines keeping some of our
weakest residents alive. And we
could not join the bandwagon
proclaiming the importance of
our universities and critical gov-
ernment services on the front
end, while pink slips were the
result on the back end.
"There were viable options
we offered that could have made
a difference. No tax hikes would
have been required, no fee or
fine increases would have been
necessary and no deep cuts
to education or vital services
would have been taken.
"Unfortunately for the people
of Florida, they chose the wrong
one.,"
On Jan. 15, lawmakers ap-
proved $2.8 billion in cuts with
schools and social services the
hardest hit areas.


Editor, The Newss
As a newly anointed vet-
erinarian, I went back to live
and practice veterinary medi-
cine near my birthplace in
Memphis, Tenn. In my clinic
on more than one occasion I
heard, in my waiting room, the
voices of the other moms
in, the neighborhood of my
youth explaining to my clients
my childhood shenanigans. I
do not remember participating
in most of the transgressions
which they recalled, but I
belieVed them. I still feared
th*lm'mbecause in our neigh-
borhood any mom had full'
authority to help ensure that
you "turned out" alright. They
were apparently granted this
authority by virtue of theory
of universal momhood.
: I preface my story with
these thoughts so that the
reader can understand from
where I come. I am very lucky.
I am lucky because I have been
able to enjoy a very fulfilling
life doing what, apparently,
I was meant to do. 'For that
stroke of good fortune I will al-
ways be grateful. I am grateful
to my mom and all moms, for
love, compassion and always
teaching me what was right


and what was wrong.
It is therefore, with great
consternation and personal
sadness that I must tell the
story of a local tragedy. It
is a story of man's disre-
gard for compassion, decency
and understanding of ani-
mal welfare. It is about my
struggle to understand how a
human, with 99.9999 percent
of the same genetic makeup
as me, can treat 200 little dogs
like they were wilted cabbages
in a forgotten garden.
A puppy mill is what they
call it. I believe that it is wrong
to raise dogs solely for the
purpose of propagation of
their kind for profit. But that
is only my opinion. I can't say
that, in the eyes of the law, it
is wrong. I will say however,
without reservation, that what
I have seen in this case has
inflicted one of the most
painful wounds my spirit has
endured.
They live their entire lives
in shoddy little cages in a
filthy, cluttered, overgrown
yard. They are exposed to
the hot steamy summer days
wearing overgrown, matted
fur coats. They are forced to
endure the long cold, windy


Letters Policy
The Wakulla News welcomes your letters, but we request
that you adhere to the following guidelines:
Letters should not be longer than 300 words.
They must include the writers name, home address and
telephone number. (Only name and town will be listed; the
" reast is used solely for the purpose of verification.)
Writers may be limited to one letter per month, depend-
ing upon space limitations.
With very few exceptions, anonymous letters will not
,be published.
Letters can be sent via mail or e-mail to kblackmar@
thewakullanews.net), or they can be dropped off at our
Crawfordville Highway office. The Wakulla News reserves
the right to edit all letters.


The Wakulla News (USPS 644-640) is published weekly at
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville; FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla
News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
General Manager: Tammie Barfield........................tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Editor: Keith Blackmar kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Reporter: William Snowden wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton................estanton @thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey ...................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net
Bookkeeping: Sherry Balchuck iccounting@thewakullanews.net
Classifieds/In House Sales: Denise Folh.............. classifieds@thewakullanews.net
Circulation: Gary Fazzina circulation@thewakullanews.net

Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable
one year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $26 yr. $14.50 1/2 yr., Out of County $35 yr. $19 1/2 yr.
Out of State $40 yr. $22 1/2 yr..


winter nights on a rusty wire
bottom pen. They don't ever
get to be "dogs." They are
just animals called dogs. They
don't know the comfort of
compassion. They never hear
a soothing voice of under-
standing and support. They
never know the warmth of
friendship. These little dogs
are just like mine and yours
except they are sentenced to
a life of misery for a crime'
they never committed. They
are innocent in every sense
of the word. But, apparently
they are not d6gs at all. They
are property.
That is what it amounts to
I guess. A court must dissect
the evidence, consider the
statutes, property owner's
rights, the political climate
of the community and the
meaning of "inhumane." In
the meantime, throughout the
discussions, mediations, brief-
ings and behind the scenes
negotiations, these desperate
little dogs suffer on. Day-af-
ter-day, week after miserable
week, while the owner argues
that his dogs are treated as
well as most. '
I don't hate this man, I
don't even dislike him. It


seems to me that somewhere,
somehow he and others like
him, just never took the op-
portunity to look upon this
world through the eyes of an-
other creature. That opportu-
nity will never be forced upon
you, however all one has to do
is ask for the chance. You must
climb down off of your lofty
perch at the top of the food
chain and listen to the voices
of the other creatures that
breathe the same air that you
do. You have to ask yourself,
"In what way are my actions
or inactions responsible for
the misery of others?" And,'
most of all, you have to care
when the answer is appar-
ent.
My mom and the voices of
most of the moms involved
in my upbringing have been
quieted by life's end. But,
as I write this, I hear them
again. They say that the mes-
sage of right and wrong hand-
ed to me has been delivered
millions of times by millions
of moms to their children
as well. Perhaps it is time to
make a little noise for the little
creatures.
Norm Griggs, DVM
Crawfordville


Water is Wakulla

County cash drawer


Editor, The News:
To the tax man, why do
we, the citizens of this county,
have a deficit on the books
of the tax collector. We have
the largest cash drawer in the
world sitting off of Highway
267.
It is called the Ed Ball
Wakulla Spring. As a county
we could, should and must
go into the bottled water busi-
ness. With our poor economy,
tax income will be horrible.
The federal government
is going to help big business
with its stimulus packages
and they will not trickle down
to us for several years. Every
day water and cash trickles
out into the bay from our
spring.
The state is cutting out a
billion dollars from its budget


and as I write this letter and
by the time this letter is pub-
lished in The Wakulla News
billions of gallons of cool,
fresh, great tasting pure water
will flow out into the bay. It
will be a very easy process to
get the county to put money
into the pockets of the school
board, the sheriff's office, the,
health department, the hu-
mane society, the public works
department and every citizen
who pays taxes here.
For the good old boys who
run things around here not
to get this project underway
is plain ignorant or maybe
they are just plain lazy and
do not have our best interests
at heart.
John Pierotti
Wakulla Station


Accident witness needed


Editor, The Newss
My name is Linda Camp-
bell. I was involved in a
major car accident on Nov.
15, 2004 on State Road
369 across from the work-
out place Curves. I am a
registered nurse who was
visiting my aunt Wanda
Wimberly who has lived in
Crawfordville for 25 years.
I suffered major injuries
which resulted in perma-
nent disability. I am desper-
ately trying to find anyone
who may have witnessed


the accident or may have
passed by the accident
scene shortly after it oc-
curred.
If anyone has any in-
formation, please contact
either me or Wanda Wim-
berly as soon as possible.
My contact information
is (912) 865-2405. Wanda's
information is 926-6242.
Her work number is 926-
7837, at Sassy Sue's.

Linda Campbell
Statesboro, Ga.


Tax help is available


Taxpayers with low and mid-
dle income levels 4#hose age
60 and older may rg-ve free tax
return assistance from an AARP
Tax-Aide. The help will be held
from Feb. 1 to April 15.
The assistance is offered on
Tuesday and Saturdays at the
Wakulla County Library. The
Tuesday help is offered from 4
p.m. until 7 p.m. and the Satur-
day help is offered from 9:30 am.


until 12:30 p.m.
The assistance is also avail-
able at the Wakulla County Se-
nior Citizens Center on Wednes-
days from 1 p.m. until 4 p.m. For
shut-ins, call Gordon Anthony
at 570-4949 for other arrange-
ments.
Bring all your tax information
and your income tax return from
the previous year.


Thank you for helping
Editor, The Newss very lucky to have survived.,
It's great to be home. While So thanks are in order:
the .-reports of ,ny demise in Thanks to the people who
the traffic accident are exagger- stopped to, render assistance
ated, the reports of the black- and call for help. Thanks to the
and-blueness all over my body sheriffs deputies, the firefight-
are not. With my chest looking ers, both career and volunteer,
like the butt of the fourth man FHP and EMS.
on a three-man bobsled, I feel Continued on Page 3A

WEEK IN WAKULLA

Thursday, January 22, 2009
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB meets at Posey's Up the Creek
in Panacea at noon.
DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP meets at the health
department at 6:30 p.m.
GRIEF LUNCH AND LEARN will be held at the TCC
Wakulla Center from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Noting that
there have been 10 deaths of local people younger than 30
during the past two years, the program will be "When
Young People Die: How to help grieving parents and
friends" facilitated by Rev. Candace McKibben and grief
counselor Melanie Lachman. The event is free.
MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA, a fellowship of men
who gather to share and support one another in the quest
for authentic manhood, meets "outback" (behind)
Cornerstone Ministries at 6:30 p.m. For more information,
call at 508-2560.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.
VFW BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road
from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Friday, January 23, 2009
AA meets at the American Legion Building next to the
Women's Club in Crawfordville with an open meeting at
8 p.m. There are also open meetings
ALZHEIMER'S SUPPORT GROUP meets at the senior center
at 1:30 p.m.
FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public
library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa's Episcopal -
Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
PICKING' 'N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at the
senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
Saturday, January 24, 2009
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordville
Highway at 5 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.
Sunday, January 25, 2009
MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA meets at First Baptist
Church of Crawfordville at 7 p.m.
Monday, January 26, 2009
CHINESE NEW YEAR
Tuesday, January 27, 2009
BOOK BUNCH, for pre-school and home school families,
meets at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP meets at the senior center at
12:45 p.m.
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordville
Highway at 7 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.
VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW
Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Wednesday, January 28, 2009
AA meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.
BETTER BREATHERS GROUP meets at the senior center at
1 p.m.
BOOK BABIES, for infants and toddlers, will be held at the
public library at 10:30 a.m.
BOOK NOOK, for children in grads K-5, is 10:30 a.m. and
1 p.m.
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior citizens center
at 10:30 a.m.
LINE DANCING will be held at senior center at 2 p.m.































Visitors in St. Marks watch as the cranes finally make their way to the coast. Photo
by Bruce Ritchie.


Cranes were worth the wait


By BRUCE RITCHIE
Special to The Wakulla News
Mike and Carole Robertson
woke their two daughters at
4:30 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 17 and
ate breakfast snacks while
driving from Tallahassee to
St. Marks to see seven whoop-
ing cranes being led by an
ultralight aircraft to Wakulla
County.
As many as 2,000 people
may have lined the St. Marks
River to see the birds fly over
at about 8:45 a.m. The birds
were being led to the St. Marks
National Wildlife Refuge as
part of an effort to re-establish
an eastern flock of the endan-
gered whooping cranes, of
which there are only 387.
Carole Robertson said they
brought their daughters to St.
Marks to experience the his-
toric moment. She also said
the event changed her own life
by encouraging her to help the
refuge build a three-acre pen
site to hold the birds.
"I see it as making a differ-
ence and stepping up to the
plate doing my part -- and
I feel really good about that,"
she said. "I know for me, this
was the journey I needed to
take. And I'm very happy to
share it with my children. Be-
cause one day we're going to
be gone and the kids are gong
to be the ones taking over."
.,Fourteen cranes began theii
journey Oct. 16 from the Nece-
dah National Wildlife Refuge
in central Wisconsin. Half were
led to St. Marks and the other
half were continuing toward


Chassahowitzka National Wild-
life Refuge in Central Florida.
The cranes were expected
to arrive in early December
but the journey was slowed by
winds and bad weather. They
arrived in Jefferson County,
east of Tallahassee Thursday,
Jan 15.
Their handlers were poised
to take off from Jefferson Coun-
ty Friday but were grounded
by winds, disappointing a
smaller crowd than the one
that showed up Saturday be-
fore sunrise.
The crowd, most with bin-
oculars or cameras, stretched
along about a mile of the St.
Marks River from the old Span-
ish fort to the small commer-
cial district. But the birds didn't
show up until about 8:45 a.m.,
as the first of three ultralight
aircraft appeared above the
tree line.
The seven birds and aircraft
flew directly over the crowd
at about 1.000 feet before dis-
appearing to the west, amid
applause muffled by gloved
hands.
The birds will be kept away
from visitors in a closed area
so they can develop wild in-
stincts, refuge officials said.
"It was terrific," said Carole
Robertson's 10-year-old daugh-
ter, Diana. "It was exciting. It
was one of the best things of
my,life seeing'these cranes-"
Joyce Baker of St. Marks
said seeing the birds may have
been a once-in-a-lifetime op-
portunity for residents.
"Everything is a big deal for


St. Marks not that much goes
on down here," she said. "I like
it that way."
By late February or early
March, the birds are expected
to return on their own to cen-
tral Wisconsin. They can make
the trip back on their own in
less than 10 days, said Joe Duff,
a pilot with the group Opera-
tion Migration.
The non-profit group still
is seeking about $15,000 in
donations to pay for the trip,
which costs about $250,000.
The pilots and other team
members answered questions
for about 80 people after the
birds passed over.
"Everybody says, 'How do
you stay warm (while flying)?'
You don't you just get cold,"
Duff said. "You put up with it
... It's just two hours. You can
hang by your thumb for two
hours."
There were only 16 whoop-
ing cranes remaining in 1941
and they migrated between
Canada and Texas. The Whoop-
ing Crane Eastern Partnership
in 2001 established the flock
migrating between Wisconsin
and Florida.
The eastern flock now con-
tains 73 birds, not counting the
14 young cranes in the "Class
of 2008," Duff said. Another 30
birds that don't migrate live in
Central Florida.
For, more on Operation Mi-
gration, go its web site'at www.
operationmigration.org.
Bruce Ritchie is an indepen-
dent journalist based in
Tallahassee.


Annual service remembers King


By WILIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
With the Martin Luther King,
Jr. holiday observed on the eve of
the inauguration of the nation's
first African-American president,
the historical significance was
not lost on the two dozen people
who turned out to observe King's
contribution.
Minister Rodney Smith noted
that when King was assassinated
in 1968, "some thought that was
the end of the dream." But what
King provided was hope, Bell said,
and the inauguration of Obama
is the "fulfillment of Dr. King's
dream."
"We have hope," Smith told
the audience at Thessalonia Mis-
sionary Baptist Church in the
Hyde Park community. "There is
always hope."
The main speaker for the
evening was Rev. Joseph Francis,
who said this was an opportunity
to put race aside. "Don't worry
about color black, white, green


or red. There are only two types
of people: saved and unsaved.
We're not going to Glory as black
or white."
He expressed some disappoint-
ment at the small turnout for the
observance. "I look around tonight
and this church should be full of
people."
Francis recounted that at the
time of King's assassination, he
was a marine in Vietnam. And
he remembered the bad days of
segregation, "We've been through
it," he said. "Go into public fa-
cilities and there's colored-this and
colored-that and white here and
colored there we know about it,
we came through it"
But Francis added, "Right don't
have no color."
Dr. King recognized that the
church should be at the center of
the struggle for vil rights, Francids
said. God called him to duty, and
King responded.
"As we go into this new presi-
dency, we need to all join hands,"


Francis said, to come together,
united. And he urged Christians to
serve as an example to others.
After his often fiery speech,
Francis dosed with a surprise.
Standing at the podium with a
wry smile, he said. "In my last
words, I must reveal to you what?
- I'm a Republican." The audience
gasped a bit in reaction, and the
service moved on.
Deacon Bossie Hawkins of the
host Thessalonia church gave the
welcome. Pastor Frederick Bell
of Thessalonia presided over the
service, and Elder Eddie Franklin
gave the invocation. Deacon Nor-
man Jones urged people to live
their dream.


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 22, 2009 Page 3A


Green Living Expo to have


money saving workshops
By SHELLEY SWENSON to do so in a Home Compost- granted are now being re-
UF/IFAS Wakulla County ing workshop. evaluated in terms of how
Extension Agent A class on the process we can stretch our resources.
The 2009 Big Bend Green of Making Cheese and Yogurt I remember my mother drying
Living Energy Expo and Edu- will be offered. Greater nutri- plastic bags on the clothes
cation Fair will include work- tion can be obtained from line so that they could be re-
shops that cover topics ad- food if we eat the food as used. Butter tubs were washed
dressing how to stretch food close to its original form as so that they could be used
dollars. It's time to look cre- possible, to store leftovers. Leftovers
atively at using food products This concept will be were certainly incorporated
in different ways. offered in a Raw Food work- into future meals. Habits that
A Goat Milk Product shop. once were considered foolish
Workshop is planned where As many of us seek al- need to be considered as we
candles will be made by the ternatives for salts and the live through these difficult
participants to take with expense of purchased herbs financial times. I believe that
them. and spices, why not learn we will re-learn, survive, and
Becoming aware of and how to grow your own in the even thrive as we accept the
utilizing food products that workshop entitled Container- challenge of making the
are available in Florida or ized Herb Garden. necessary adjustments to our
bordering states helps cut Interest is re-surfacing lifestyles.
the cost of serving a meal tre- on safely preserving foods. Plan to attend the Expo
mendously. This issue will be A review of safe, proper tech- on March 21 at Riversprings
addressed in a Shopping Close niques and winning recipes Middle School. Look for ad-
to Home workshop, will be offered in Preserving ditional news articles that will
We can learn to return the Harvest workshop. follow and consult the event
food to the soil and naturally America is facing a new web site at: www.greenlivin-
make it richer and learn how era. Things that we took for genergyexpo.com.


Taylor gives thanks
Continued from Page 2A just past, let's reflect on what
I'm back home with a bust- service really means-regular
ed sternum and nothing more folks, some volunteers, doing
serious probably because of what needs to be done just
the prompt and professional because it needs to be done.
help I received at the scene. Without regard. And those
As we think back to the folks did it well.
Martin Luther King holiday I pray the person in the oth-


er car will get well. But what
I've learned is never again will
I start my day thinking that I
have this "plan."

Hugh Taylor
Crawfordville


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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 22, 2009


Church


Obituaries


EPA will


Wilmer Cassiday
Wilmer Cassiday, 77, of
Crawfordville died Saturday,
Jan. 17 in Crawfordville.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to the Florida
Wild Mammal Association, 198
Edgar Poole Road, Crawford-
ville, FL 32327. The family will
receive friends on Saturday,
Jan. 24 from 2 p.m. until 6 p.m.
at their home.
A native of Red Bay, FL,
he lived in Crawfordville for
14 years after moving from
DeFuniak Springs. He retired
from the U.S. Air Force as a
SR Master Sgt. He was a build-
ing inspector with Walton
County.
Survivors include his father,
Dudley Cassiday; a son, Bruce
Cassiday; two daughters, Linda
McConnell and husband Terry
and Kathleen Mackie and hus-
band Billy; a sister, Lillie Miller;
three grandchildren, Kelly,
Holly and Terra; and six great-
grandchildren, Jacob, Mason,
Lillian, WYatt, Alexandria and
Madeline.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville is in charge of
the arrangements.

Ernestine Dawson
Ernestine Dawson, 66, died
Jan. 7 in Tallahassee.
The funeral service was
held Saturday, Jan. 17, at St.
Paul Primitive Baptist Church
in Crawfordville with burial at
Walker Cemetery.
She was a seafood proces-
sor for Metcalf.
Survivors include a son,
Andrew Dwayne Dawson; two
brothers, Sylvester Williams
and Alice and Trace Williams
Gladys and a sister, Mary Jean
Kelly.
Strong & Jones Funeral
Home in Tallahassee was in
charge of the arrangements.

Ethell Furr
Ethell Furr, 90, of Hosford,
died Friday, Jan. 16 in Hosford.
A native of Smith Creek, she
lived in Liberty Couhty most of
her life. She was a homemaker
and was of the Methodist faith.
The most important thing in
her life was her children.
A graveside service was
held Saturday, Jan. 17, at Good
Hope Cemetery with Reverend
Tommy Sumner officiating.
Survivors include a son,
Lamar Furr and wife, Janice
of Tallahassee; three daugh-
ters, Marcell Flanagan and
husband, Lester of Hosford,
Daphine Blackburn and hus-
band, Windle of Vienna, Ga.,
and Debra Coon of Telogia; five
grandchildren; and 13 great-


Panacea Park'

I Baptist Church
24 Mission Road, Panacea
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Worship 11 a.m.
LWed. Prayer Meeting 7 p.m.
Pastor, Jerry Spears

Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
Crawfordville
Pastor,

926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday.School........................ 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship...................... 11 a.m.
Evening Worship.................6 p.m.
Wednesday Service.............7 p.m.
& Youth Service...............7.... p.m.
Royal Rangers 7 p.m.
Missionettes 7 p.m.


grandchildren.
Adams Funeral
Blounstown was in
the arrangements.


Home in
charge of


Grover G. Godwin
Grover Garland Godwin, 66,
of Tallahassee died Jan. 18.
The funeral service will be
held at 11 a.m. Thursday, Jan.
22 at Faith Holiness House of
Prayer, 726 Woodville Highway
in Crawfordville. Memorial
contributions may be made to
Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan
Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL
32308.
A native and lifelong resi-
dent of Tallahassee, he was a
carpenter and an outdoorsman
who loved nature and enjoyed
studying history.
Survivors include his moth-
er, Lois Kelly; four sons, Billy
-Godwin and Stacy, Cleve God-
win and Noel, Troy Godwin
and Heather and Jeffrey God-
win; two daughters, Theresa
Snyder and Robin Godwin
and Tommy; three brothers,
Dilworth Godwin and Linda,
Danny Metcalf and Donnie
Metcalf and Carolyn; a sister,
Janice White; 17 grandchildren;
and six great-grandchildren.

Dennis E. Holcomb
Dennis Earl "Smokie" Hol-
comb died Sunday, Jan. 11.
A memorial service was
held in his honor Wednesday,
Jan. 21 at Bradfordville First
Baptist Church in Tallahassee.
Donations in Smokie's
memory may be made to the
children's organization, Girls
and Boys Town. 3555 Common-
wealth Boulevard, Tallahassee,
FL 32303, or www.BoysTown-
NorthFlorida.org or by calling
850/575-6422, or the charity of
your choice.
Smokie was born in Akron.
Ohio and graduated with a
Master's degree in Fisheries
Science from the University of
Michigan. After graduation he
moved to Florida and began a
career with the State of Flor-
ida at the Florida Game and
Freshwater Fish Commission.
Smokie retired in 1995 after
31 years of dedicated service
as Director of Fisheries.
Survivors include his wife of
16 years, Bonnie Sue Holcomb;
two children from a previous
marriage, Toby Holcomb and
Heidi Holcomb and Stephen;
his step-children, Bill Jr. Hosay
and Susan, Susan Renee Hosay,
and Robert Hosay and Laura;
and grandchildren, Joy Wester,
Joseph Thomas, Hannah and
R.J. Hosay and Faolan and Bren-
nan Adams. Other survivors
include his brother-in-law J.B.


Wakulla United
Methodist Church
Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School for all ages -10 a.m.
Sunday Worship -11 a.m.
Wednesday Service 7 p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart


117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy


Sunday School 945 AM
Church Office Morning Worship 11 AM
962-7822 AWANA CLUB 5PM
Evening Worship 6 PM

Wednesday 7 PM- Prayer Meeting,
Youth & Children's Programs
Dr. Bill Jenkins, Pastor
Daid Allen, Associate Pastor/Student Minister
Randy Anderson, Minister of Music
Jnry Evans, Mike Crouch, Bernie Kemp Musicians -


Hillard, and nieces and neph-
ews Kim Lewallen and James,
Jason and Amber Lewallen,
Cindy Welgoss, Marcia Balme-
dier and Jim Hale.

Fred N. Lively
Fred "Blimp" Nelson Lively,
57, of Carrabelle died Sunday,
Jan. 18.
The funeral service will be
held at a later date.
Survivors include three
sons, Freddie Kilgore of East-
point, Jonathan Kilgore of
Crawfordville and Jimmy
Kilgore of Perry; a daughter,
Tina Kilgore of Crawfordville;
two brothers, Donald Lively of
Carrabelle and Harrison Lively
of Panacea; a sister, Marie Bill
of Carrabelle; and six grand-
children.
Independent Funeral Home
in Quincy was in charge of the
arrangements.

Samuel E. Mock, Sr.
Samuel Elbert Mock, Sr., 68,
of Wakulla County died Sun-
day, Jan. 18 at his home.
The funeral service were
held Wednesday, Jan. 21 at
White Primitive Baptist Church,
with burial at Woodville Cem-
etery. Memorial contributions
may be made to Big Bend
Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center
Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308, or
the Gideons International, P.O.
Box 615, Tallahassee FL 32302.
A native and lifetime Wakulla
County resident, he loved to
hunt, fish, go to church and
loved l~is family very much. He
was a Baptist and member of
White Primitive Baptist Church
in Woodville.
Survivors include his wife,
Janice Mock; three sons, Sam-
uel David Mock and Terrie
of Tallahassee, Samuel Elbert
Mock, Jr. and Kristie of Talla-
hassee" and Fazel M. Munshi
and Erin of Charleston. S.C.; a
daughter, Debbie Ann Mock of
Tennessee; a brother, William
W. Mo k, Jr. of St. Marks; four
sisters, Jewell Bell, Frances Bea-
sley, Bobbie Jean Harrison, all
'of Tallahassee aiid Helen Ward
of St. Marks; and six grandchil-
dren, Samantha Mock, Hannah
Mock,, Connor Mock, Ethan
Mock, Majid Alasami and
Aiden Munshi.
Beggs Funeral Home in Tal-
lahassee was in charge of the
arrangements.

Dr. Richard D. Rutledge
A memorial service for Dr.
Richard D. Rutledge, 63, of
Crawfordville, was held Jan. 18
at Antioch Baptist Church, 5605
Gum Road, Tallahassee.
Bro. Richard passed away on


Ocktockonee

lay
United
Methodist
Church,
Sunday Worship 9 a.m.
Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
Jastor ftett 'Cempleton
(850) 984-0127


December 26 in Jacksonville. and love.
He was Pastor of Antioch Bap- Surviv
tist Tallahassee and employed Debra; a
by TSA at Tallahassee Airport. brother, E
Survivors include his wife, three sist
Mary; two daughters, Kim and Trish; thr
Amy; three granddaughters; Ryan an
and two siblings. Memorial grandchil
contributions may be made Harvey
to The Gideons International in Crawfo
c/o Antioch Baptist Church, the arran
5605 Gum Road, Tallahassee,


FL 32304.

Kenneth P. Shiver
KennethPhilip "Phil" Shiver
of Carrabelle died Sunday,
Jan. 18.
Family will receive friends
from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednes-
day, Jan, 21, at Harvey-Young
Funeral Home in Crawfordville.
Family will receive friends
from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday,
Jan. 23, at Kraeer Funeral Home
in Pompano Beach. The funeral
service will be at 11 a.m. Satur-
day, Jan. 24 at Kraeer Funeral
Home, with burial at the City
of Pompano Beach Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to Florida Sher-
iffs Boys Ranch, P.O. Box 2000,
Boys Ranch, FL 32060, and The
Nature Conservancy, 10326
N.W. Longleaf Drive, Bristol,
FL 32321.
He was born and raised in
Pompano Beach and served
honorably in the United States
Navy, after which he became a
Pompano Beach lifeguard. He
served on the Pompano Beach
Fire Department for 24 years
and was fireman of the year for
the State of Florida in 1976. He
retired from his job as assistant
fire chief in 1983 and moved to
the North Florida Gulf Coast.
He spent many years fishing
from his dock and enjoying his
grandchildren.
Survivors include his wife
of 51 years, Delores Shiver; his
children, Kenneth Phillip and
Sharon Shiver, Laurel and Bob
Egan, Bartow Jefferson and
Marie Shiver and Matthew
Warren Shiver; his brother,
Larry Shiver; sisters Sylvia and
Dale Gallagher arid Coral and
John Tribble; his aunt, Evelyn
Jacquess; grandchildren, Kath-
erine, Phillip, Sarah, Christina,
Morgan and Victoria; and many
nieces, nephews and cousins.

James C. Story
James C. Story, 57, of Wood-
ville died Jan; 17, three days
short of his birthday.
A celebration of life will be
held at 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 24
at Horn Springs Hunt Camp.
He was a loving father, hus-
band and brother who leaves
behind a legacy of friendship

-1 Saint Teresa
Episcopal
Church
1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98
Holy Eucharist
10:30 am
Sunday School Provided
The Reverend Roy Lima
926-1742


t~seotwvel e 04t17Pzenace,1


FIRst
S BAPTist ChuRch



3086 Crawfordville Hwy.
(South of the Courthouse)
Church Office: 926-7896
www.fbccrawfordville.org
or
(youth) www.crosstraining.org


SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY


Fellowship Meal
(call for reservations)
Prayer/ Bible Study
IMPACT (Youth)
Children's Events


6:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
6:30 p.m.


0 Hwy 319 Medart,
E lOffice 926-5265
SI Early Worship 8:30 a.m,.
S d [JSunday School 9:45 a.m.
0 Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
AWANA 4:00 p.m.
Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org


ors include his wife,
daughter, Becky; a
)elbert and wife Julie;
ters, Linda, Reva and
ee stepsons, Nathan,
d Matt; and seven
dren.
y-Young Funeral Home
Drdville is in charge of
gements.


William E. Watts
William Ernest "Bill" Watts,
65, of Crawfordville, formerly
of Tahoe City, Calif., Louisville,
Ky. and Covington, Ky., died
Jan. 14.
The funeral service will be
held at 2 p.m. at St. Teresa Epis-
copal Church, 1255 Rehwinkel
Road, Crawfordville, on Jan. 31,
with a celebration of his life to
follow at Wilwwood Country
Club. In lieu of flowers, contri-
butions may be made to Big
Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan
Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL
32308.
He was a cattle buyer in Lou-
isville and became successful
in real estate and as a charter
fisherman in California and
Florida. He served as a para-
trooper in the 82nd Airborne
of the United States Army. He
loved to golf and fish.
Survivors include his wife
of 23 years, Donna Olsen
Watts of Crawfordville; two
sons, Wm Brian Watts and
Jamie Watts; two daughters,
Jenny Watts and Wendy Trot-
ter; two step-daughters, Kim
Campbell and Kelly Hutchin-
son; 14 grandchildren, April,
Aarron, Maddie, Chase, Ali,
Anna, Haley, Jake, Austin,
Chris, Mariah, Caleb, Tate and
Jack; a great-grandchild, Ethan;
three brothers, Mike Watts,
Greg Watts and Jeff Watts; and
four sisters, Carol Hildebrand,
Barbara Peace, Joan Work and
Jean Crane.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.

Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worship................... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .............5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details,
962-2213


Trinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Vicar Bert Matlock
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557


assess

cleanup
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
The Environmental Protec-
tion Agency and the state
Department of Environmental
Protection recently met at the
St. Marks Refinery to discuss
the possibility of cleaning up
the site, St. Marks City Com-
missioner Phil Cantner said
last week.
The city has been pursuing
a brownfield designation for
the site so that it could be
used for. some other public
purpose in this case, the
city is exploring use of the
property to generate electricity
from solar panels.
Cantner said at the city
commission on Thursday, Jan.
8, that EPA indicated to him
that it is going to hire a con-
tractor to assess how i much
cleanup is needed a step
closer to making the project
a reality.
"One thing that really
sealed the deal was the plan
to use the site as a solar farm,"
Cantner said, noting the politi-
cal appeal of the project.
St. Marks Refinery is cur-
rently in bankruptcy. The State
of Florida spent millions of
dollars on a cleanup of the site
a few years ago, after dioxins
and other hazardous chemi-
cals were found in the soil.
The facility was formerly
used to refine petroleum from
Venezuela, brought by barge to
St. Marks, into jet fuel. Later
the plant was taken over by
Seminole Asphalt, and the
company had numerous envi-
ronmental violations. Part of
the deal for St. Marks Refinery
buying the facility was that it
would not be held liable for
pre-existing violations.


* Christ Church
SAnglican

Sunday
8:30am Service
9:30am Adult Bible Class
10:30am Children's Class
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Talquin sewer


Continued from Page 1A
At the commission meet-
ing on Tuesday, Jan. 6, board
members expressed disap-
pointment with Talquin's lack
of cooperation, noting that the
utility has been exceptionally
difficult in any negotiations
with the county.
"Talquin has just not been
stepping up to the plate,"
Chairman Howard Kessler
said. "The present situation
just does not seem tenable."
Commissioner Mike Stew-
art suggested that Talquin
should pay far more than the
$300,000 to $700,000 in capac-
ity fees for hooking up to the
county system more along
the lines of $1 million to $4
million, he said.
The Talquin treatment
plant is located in Oyster
Bay, where it operates with
evaporation pits rather than a
sprayfield since it is so close
to the water.
Shell Point resident Ron
Piasecki, who serves on the


county's infrastructure com-
mittee, said residents are up-
set how much Talquin charges
to tap on to its system- saying
it was between $6,000 and
$10,000. Residents want to
pay no more than county resi-
dents, who are charged $3,850.
Additionally, Talquin does not
run its lines to every home in
the area some are still served
by septic tanks in that sensi-
tive beachfront area.
County Public Works Direc-
tor Cleve Fleming said that
the county's treatment plant
at Otter Creek does have the
capacity to take the daily flows
from Talquin now.
Currently, the county's av-
erage daily flow is 400,000
gallons. The plant can treat
600,000 gallons. Talquin's
average flow is about 36,000
gallons.
But, Fleming said, the prob-
lem is the commitment the
county has made for future
development projects. With
the construction and real


estate market in a downturn,
it hasn't been a problem with
little or no construction going
on, Fleming said. But should
that change, the county could
face a squeeze.
Consultant Dale Dransfield
suggested it was time for the
county to consider sunsetting
those commitments to reserve
capacity unless a developer
has paid the $3,850 tap fee per
lot and to only commit after
the fees have been paid,
As for the Talquin permit
request, the board agreed to
ask that Talquin be allowed to
operate the treatment plant on
its current operating permit,
and then give Talquin a date-
certain that it has to hook on
to the county system.
"It's been a priority to clean
up the bays and shut down
that plant," County Adminis-
trator Ben Pingree said,
"I want to keep the pres-
sure on them," Stewart said.


Impact fees


Continued from Page 1A
After arguing about dis-
proportionate property taxes,
builder John Shuff said that the
county should use Municipal
Service Benefit Units and Taxing
Units basically, special assess-
ments or fees for service so
that everybody in the county
was equally charged for growth.
He mentioned a stormwater fee,
a fee for fire. "Fee us to death, if
you will," Shuff said.
Randy Merritt questioned
some of the data used by the
consultants to calculate impact
fees such as the cost for roads
set at $1.6 million a mile, or
the number of fire calls being
worked out to a need for three
new firetrucks at $300,000


apiece.
Encinosa responded that,
as far as the figure for roads, it
wasn't simply the cost to pave
a mile of road, it was the total
cost of construction for a road,
based on numbers from the
state Department of Transporta-.
tion for this district.
Paul Johnson of the Chamber
of Commerce passed out a story
from the Naples News indicat-
ing that the Collier County Com-
mission will consider reducing
that county's impact fees, which
are reportedly among the high-
est in the state.
Johnson noted that the
Chamber supported the mora-
torium on impact fees, which
was passed by the former board


with the expressed intent of
generating work for construc-
tion tradespeople.
In dosing comments, Chair-
man Howard Kessler indicated
he was speaking specifically to
the Chamber in asking why,
with the number of houses
built and standing empty in
the county, would it be wise
to encourage more residential
growth.
Kessler also commented on
the state's new concurrency
requirements that have the po-
tential to shut down all growth
if infrastructure is not in place.
Without impact fees to pay for
it, how should the county get
the money?


Big Bend Hospice hosts grief luncheon


Big Bend Hospice of the
Big Bend will host a free Grief
Lunch and Learn Thursday, Jan.
22, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
at the TCC Wakulla Center in
Crawfordville, 5 Crescent Way.
InAhe past two years there
haye be i more' t1ia 10 deaths
of ,bung peopWinder age 30
in Wakulla County, To provide
help to local ministers, school
counselors, and others in the
county who work with the
grieving parents and friends,'
the theme of the free luncheon
is I'When Young People Die:
How to help grieving parents
and friends." The presentation
will be facilitated by Rev. Can-
dace McKibben and Melanie
Lachman, Grief Counselor of
Big Bend Hospice.
Pam Allbritton, of BBH Com-
munity Relations organized this


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 22, 2009 Page 5A

Manatees


Continued from Page 1A
Their faces look a little like
a walrus with whiskers and no
tusks. One manatee was swim-
ming along the float line with a
flipper in the air, scratching the
algae on its thick wrinkled skin.
In several groups of two and
three, they were playing like
puppies at times.
On several occasions, a huge
splash from their powerful
tails could be seen from these
normally docile, slow moving
giants. Then, what seemed like
slow motion because of their
enormous size, gently holding
each other with their flippers,
they gracefully moved around
the spring. It was quite the
show.
Sitting at the .computer look-
ing through the downloaded
photographs from that day,
details that are often difficult
to see with the naked eye, .are
frozen on the computer screen.
Four nails, much like our own
fingernails, are visible on the
end of their hand-like flippers.
Deep scars and recent gashes
can also be dearly seen. They are

Budget


Continued from Page 1A
Miller, Leon County Superin-
tendent Jackie Pons and repre-
sentatives from Escambia, Bay,
Okaloosa, Franklin, Jefferson,
Hamilton and Gadsden counties
attended a summit in Tallahassee
Tuesday, Jan. 13 to discuss budget
concerns.
"Some of the districts are
in worse shape than others,"
said Miller. "But it is bad for
everyone."
The school district survived
the January legislative special
session but the "elephant in the
room" remains the regular ses-
sion in March, said Miller,
"We will get through this year
by tapping into our reserves," he
said. "March, that is what every-
body is concerned about Every
district has a different situation,
but it is pretty dire in every dis-
trict. Things are pretty dire across
the state."
A frustrated Miller said the
time has arrived for residents to

PEOPLE
SERVING
te akPEOPLE

TeVW akuia fhtls


ItI


a reminder of the dangers that
the manatees face to get to the
relative safety of the springs.
These are the lucky mana-
tees. They survived the impact,
but many do not. These scars
and gashes are often the result
of collisions with powerboats.
As the slow moving manatees
surface for air they can be sliced
from propellers or killed upon
impact. Propeller guards can
help, but it is the high speed
impact from powerboats and
personal watercraft that most
often kills the manatee. Cold
stress, red tide and other natural
causes are also detrimental to
the manatees.
Most importantly, the de-
struction of the manatees' natu-
.ral habitat, whether from devel-
opment, commercial interests
reducing the volume of water
from springs or from the pollu-
tion of our coastal and ground-
water, everything contributes
to the alarming death toll of
manatees in Florida.
It was a photographers dream
on that day in early January. For
those of us who were there that


"rise up and tell the legislature
we're not going to take cuts on
education."
Projected state education
budget cut numbers have ranged
from $3.3 billion to $5 billion,
according to Miller.
"We're trying our best not
to impact jobs," he added. "But
it doesn't appear to be a rosy
scenario to say the least."
Wakulla county is one of the
top growing counties in florida.
Growth in Wakulla County
has helped the school district
endure some of the budget
shortfall. But Florida growth
has slowed greatly, according to
Florida Department of Education
statistics.
Fifty-three of the 67 counties
in Florida experienced a decline
in enrollment during the October


day, we felt very fortunate. With
education and the enforcement
of laws to protect these endan-
gered mammals, maybe we will
see it again one day and for
generations to come.
In this current climate of
budgetary cutbacks, volunteers
are needed more that ever at our
state parks. Anyone can work as
a volunteer at Wakulla Springs
State Park.
Also, you can help by becom-
ing a member of the Friends of
Wakulla Springs. Annual dues
are only $20 a year. Either way,
you will be helping to protect an
incredible natural resource that
is in our own back yard.
For information on how
to become a member or to
help Wakulla Springs, please
visit: Friends of Wakulla Springs:
http://www.wakullasprings.
org/projects.html.
For more information on
Wakulla Springs State Park:
http://www.wakullacounty.org/
wakulla-5,htm. For more infor-
mation on manatees, go to Save
The Manatee Club:http://www.
savethemanatee.org/.


FTE funding count.
Wakulla County was one of
the 14 counties that experienced
growth. Wakulla ranked first in
the state with the highest per-
centage of growth at two percent.
Wakulla also ranked fifth in the
state in overall growth with 100
new students over the previous
year.
Miller said that Wakulla's
steady growth has insulated the
county from budget woes in the
past, but growth will not insulate
the county from state five to 12
percent budget cuts.
"I think we're in for a lot more
extensive (economic) downturn,"
Miller concluded. "We may be
18 months away from turning
around. We will survive and we
will persevere and keep doing
good things for kids."


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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 22, 2009


People


Master Gardener program to be offered Officials gear up for


By L. SCOTT JACKSON and
TREVOR HYLTON
UF IFAS/FAMU/Wakulla County
Cooperative Extension Service
Would you like to learn
more about landscaping and
gardening in our area? It is
time to apply for the 2009
Master Gardener Volunteer
Program offered by University
of Florida/Wakulla County Ex-
tension, The nine week course
will be offered beginning
Feb. 18 through April 15. The
deadline for registration is
Feb. 16. Basic training classes
will be each Wednesday, via
interactive video, and locally
supplemented with learn-
ing activities at the Wakulla
County Agricultural Center, 84
Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville.
Class times are from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m., with sessions both in
the classroom and in the field.
Registration will be limited to


the first 20 people.
To participate in the Master
Gardener Program, please visit
our web site at http://wakulla.
ifas.ufl.edu and click on the
Master Gardener Program.
Complete the class application
and mail it to 84 Cedar Avenue,
Crawfordville, FL: 32327, at-
tention Cathy. If you prefer to
have the information and ap-
plication mailed to you, please
call 926-3931, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
Monday through Friday.
The Master Gardener Pro-
gram is taught by University of
Florida Extension Researchers,
Specialists, and local County Ex-
tension Agents. It is a wonder-
ful way to learn from Florida's
foremost experts about local
gardening. By participating in
the program, you are agreeing
to serve as a volunteer who
will help us teach others about
gardening and lawn care in an


environmentally friendly way.
You will embark on a unique
learning experience through
completing several types of
volunteer work.
First, you will learn as you
volunteer in the Wakulla Ex-
tension Office for 40 hours
over the following year an-
swering various garden/land-
scape questions by walk-ins
or on the phone. In addition,
Master Gardeners work in
our demonstration gardens
15 hours. This is a hands-on
experience where you will be
exposed to new plants and
innovative ideas. The dem-
onstration garden workday is
normally the third Monday of
the month, from 9:00 -12:00.
It involves physical activities
such as spreading mulch, prun-
ing, weeding, planting, and the
normal activities that make up
gardening/landscaping. Finally,


you will agree to work 14 hours
per year on special community
activities (giving talks to civic
groups, writing columns, mak-
ing landscape consultations,
working with 4-H youth, etc.).
These special assigned ac-
tivities will be matched to suit
your personality and skills. Six
hours continued education per
year is also required. The total
volunteer hours required is 107
over an eleven month period
(this includes your training
hours). After your certification
you will be required to serve
a minimum of 35 hours per
year to maintain your Master
Gardener certification.
The cost of the program,
including study materials and
lunch is $150 per person or
$225 for couples. For more in-
formation or questions contact
L. Scott Jackson or Cathy Frank
at 926-3931.


Driver safety class to be offered to seniors


Completion of an AARP Driver Safety and no graded test. Cost of materials made to
Class can qualify drivers age 55 and is $12 per person for AARP members Tallahass
older with a good driving record for a and $14 for non-members. dates on
mandatory three-year automobile insur- The two-day AARP Driver Safety class telephone
ance discount. Tailored to the special will be held Wednesday and Thursday, minded
needs of mature drivers, the eight-hour Feb. 18 and Feb. 19 from 10 a.m. to 2 informant
class teaches how to compensate for p.m. each day at the TCC Wakulla Cen- net, go c
normal age-related changes. It is a class- ter, 5 Crescent Way, Crawfordville. To or call M
room only refresher with no driving register mail a check or money order

Area clergy invited to Hospice luncheon


Big Bend Hospice Chaplains gather, fellowship and to discuss
invite area clergy and other lead- issues that impact them in min-
ers in the congregation to attend istering to those who are dying,"
a special luncheon at 12 p.m. on said Rev. Candace McKibben,
Tuesday, Feb. 3, at Big Bend Hos- Big Bend Hospice Pastoral Care
pice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Coordinator. "At this quarterly
Tallahassee. meeting Wendy Vargo, MSW, Big
"We have planned a very Bend Hospice Grief and Loss
special time for our clergy to Department Manager, will speak
FSU Marine Lab hosts talk
On Thursday, Jan. 22, from 7 Hope" -- the next lecture in
p.m. to 9 p.m., The Florida State the lab's ongoing series of free
University Coastal and Marine public lectures on coastal and
Laboratory will host "Florida's marine conservation. The Jan.
Coral Reefs: Threats, Decline, 22 talk will be given by John
Management and Signs of Bruno of UNC Chapel Hill.

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BACKHOE and DUMPTRUCK TRAINING
offered at a reduced cost through EWD at
Tallahassee Community College.
Classes start February 2nd
Backhoe $159 Dump Truck $54


on Meeting the Bereavement
Needs of Your Congregants." The
meeting is open to all clergy in
Leon, Jefferson, Madison, Taylor,
Wakulla, Franklin, Liberty and
Gadsden counties.
RSVP to McKibben by Jan. 30
at 878-5310, X250 or candace@
bigbendhospice.org.


AARP, 417 Audubon Drive,
;ee, FL 32312. Include the class
n check memo line and your
.e number so y6u can be re-
a few days before the class. For
ion either e-mail smmcpe@att.
inline to www.aarp.org/drive,
:el in Tallahassee at 893-5845.

Kessler will

host meeting
Wakulla County Commis-
sioner Howard Kessler will
host a Town Hall meeting in
the board chambers Tuesday,
Jan. 27 at 7 p.m. There will
be an open agenda and light
refreshments.


another regatta


The Stephen C. Smith Re-
gatta, is scheduled for April
24 to April 26 at Shell Point to
benefit the American Cancer
Society in the memory of Ste-
phen Smith. Smith was a local
sailor who died from leukemia
at the age of 29.
The memorial event is pre-
sented by the Apalachee Bay
Yacht Club, Shell Point Sail-
board Club and the American
Cancer Society. The event in-
cludes offshore racing yachts,
dinghies, catamarans and
windsurfers.
Races are held on Friday,
Saturday and Sunday. The
public is invited to participate
in the live auction on. Sunday
afternoon. Last year, the SCSR
donated $16,000 to the Ameri-
can Cancer Society,
This year organizers are
sponsoring a "Parrot Head
Parade" on April 26 which
will feature a lighthearted,
friendly competition to see
who can decorate their boat in


the most outrageous tropical
fashion. Any boat powered
by a motor (including sailing
auxiliaries-under power only)
can enter for a registration fee.
The registration fee will vary,
depending upon the boat and
the type of entry. Please contact
Joeann Vescky at 926-1051 for
information or for registration.
Participants will be judged by a
team of experts on how much
effort they put in to promoting
the legend of Jimmy Buffett
and the Parrot Heads. The
parade will start at noon on
Sunday.
Each year the Regatta has
drawn as many as 200 regis-
tered participants and hun-
dreds more spectators from all
over the southeast. Since it's in-
ception, the SCSR Foundation,
Inc. has been able to contribute
more than $200,000, the major-
ity of which has stayed in the
Big Bend area providing edu-
cational programs and patient
services to area residents.


Happy first birthday


Grayson S. Stevens


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Dec. 7, 2007. He is the son of
Chad and Elizabeth Stevens of
Crawfordville.
Maternal grandparents
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Richard Kalmbach. Paternal
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Rod Stevens of Destin.

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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 22, 2009 Page 7A


Sc hool


WHS NJROTC unit prepares for meets


By CORY PEARCE
WHS NJROTC
The first semester of the
2008-2009 school year was
memorable to all the students
at Wakulla High School. This
was especially true for the
cadets of Wakulla's War Eagle
Navy. Under the leadership of
Aaron Gibbs and Rebecca Stew-
art, the Naval Junior Reserve
Officer Training Corps experi-
enced a highly successful first
semester.
The year began with a mini-
boot camp, where the new
cadets, raw and unrefined,
were trained to peak physical
condition and developed a
mental state befitting JROTC
cadets. They were also taught
the basics of drill and given
the general knowledge of the
Navy.


At the conclusion of the
boot camp, the leaders of
the unit were selected, Aaron
Gibbs was honored as the first
semester Commanding Officer
and Rebecca Stewart shared
the honor as the unit's Execu-
tive Officer. The Commanding
and Executive Officers' respon-
sibilities include ensuring
all cadet leaders are properly
trained and faithfully carrying
out their duties and planning
and coordinating the schedule.
Under Gibbs and Stewart, more
than 100 cadets contributed
over 1,300 hours of community
service to Wakulla County and
more than 50 cadets were ac-
tive participants on our seven
extracurricular teams.
Caitlin Chrisco, Skyler War-
ren, and Chet Kilgore were
selected as the Operations,


Administration, and Supply
Officers respectively. They
maintain the bulk of the unit's
massive recordkeeping func-
tions and also have a hand in
making decisions for the unit.
Brian Glavey, Rebecca Folsom,
and Josh Soderlund were ap-
pointed to the assistant posi-
tions under the previously
mentioned officers.
Under the guidance of Cadet
Lieutenant Commander Gibbs
and Cadet Lieutenant Stewart,
the War Eagle Navy captured a
third place finish at the Lake
Howell Field Meet where some
of the most prestigious units in
the state competed. This plac-
ing grants WHS a position at
the State Championship Field
Meet in March.
Many entertaining events
were held such as the Olympic-


nic (a full day of fun competi-
tions), a Phat-Phat party and
the annual Christmas dance
where the second semester
Commanding and Executive
Officers were announced.
Leading the unit now is Ca-
det Lieutenant Commander
Jay Egler assisted by Cadet
Lieutenant Cynthia Howell.
We have high expectations for
them as well as for the entire
unit under their leadership.
Major events ahead include
two more field meets, the Navy
Ball, the Dining In, the end-
of-year award ceremony, and
more. There's no time to rest
on our past laurels if we hope
to earn our eighth consecutive
Distinguished Unit Award, the
highest honor an NJROTC unit
can achieve.


DEP's LIFE program

reaches milestone


The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's (DEP)
Learning in Florida's Environment
(LIFE) Program, recently reached
a major milestone. More than
5,000 students and teachers now
have more scientific knowledge
and a greater understanding of
Florida's natural environment
"Educating more than 5,000
students and teachers statewide
is an important and significant
accomplishment for such a young
program," said DEP Secretary
Michael W. Sole. "The LIFE pro-
gram is not a curriculum, but a
process that builds on lessons
learned over decades of scien-
tific research, going beyond the
traditional field trip, beyond
classroom walls, allowing stu-
dents to explore Florida's unique
natural communities and gain a
broader understanding of their
environment and the importance
of protecting it"
Started in 2004, the LIFE
program now includes 12 sites


around the state, with the 13th
site to begin in Columbia County
this month, making it the single
largest field-based, middle-schooL
environmental science program
in the state.
LIFE program sites include
Wakulla Springs State Park and
Leon Sinks Geological Area in
Leon County.
The LIFE program with its
combination of field-based learn-
ing for students and continuous
professional development for
teachers provides both immedi-
ate and long-term benefits for
partner schools.
Prior to each field experience
students are given a ten question
test about the topics covered in
the upcoming field labs and then
retested following the outdoor
activities to see if an increase in
understanding took place. Based
on initial data from LIFE program
sites during the 2005-2007 period.
student post test scores increased
by an average of 60 percent


Reeves graduates

Summa Cum Laude


Sandra Reeves graduated
Summa Cum Laude with a 4.0
GPA from Tidewater Commu-
nity College in Virginia Beach,
Va. on Dec. 19. Reeves is on the
Presidential Honor Roll and
the National Dean's List, and is
a member of the International
Honor Society, and an officer
in the Phi Theta Kappa Soror-
ity. She has been accepted
to Old Dominion University


for the Fall 2009 semester to
pursue a Bachelor's degree
in Accounting and Business
Administration,
Reeves, a 1996 graduate of
Wakulla High School, is the
daughter of Gale and Gary
Taylor of Crawfordville and
the late Terry Harris of Sop-
choppy and resides in Virginia
Beach with her husband, Chris
Reeves and daughter, Kirsten.


Crawfordville Elementa-
ry School students raised
$2,444.07 this year to help
the American Heart Associa-
tion. The top three fundrais-
ers were: Aiden Fox, who
brought in $200, Allyson Davis
who raised $160 and Lindsey
Cooley who raised $150.
The money raised will be
donated to the American Heart
Association to fund lifesav-


ing research and educational
programs. Heart disease is
the nation's number one killer
and stroke is the third leading
cause of death, in addition
to being the leading cause
of serious disability. Coach
Camp and Coach Strickland
thanked all the students at
Crawfordville Elementary for
their participation and giving
of their time to help others.


Blood drive planned
The Wakulla County Sheriff's Office will host a blood
drive with the Southeastern Community Blood Center. The
event will be held Friday, Jan. 30 from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m.
All registered donors will receive a red fleece travel blanket.
Donors must present a picture identification at the time of
donation,
For more information or to register, call Major Larry Massa
at 926-0821.

WHS SAC meeting set
The next Wakulla High library. All students, parents
School SAC meeting will be and community members are
held on Tuesday, Jan. 27 from welcome to attend.
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the WHS


Health task force officers are named


Three new officers will lead
the Wakulla Health Care Task
Force in 2009. Joe Sharp, Jody
Smith, and Kim Tucker will
be installed as officers at the
group's next meeting on Tues-
day, Jan. 27 at 6 p.m. at the
Wakulla Library. The meeting is
open to the public. Local health
care providers and health-re-


lated organizations and agencies
are encouraged to attend.
Joe Sharp will assume the
duties of Task Force Chair.
Sharp, a former health care ad-
ministrator, brings a wealth of
experience to the position. Be-
fore retiring to Wakulla County,
Sharp served as Leon County's
Director of Health and Human


Services from 2001to 2006. Most
recently, working as a consul-
tant, he helped Gadsden County
acquire the funding to reopen
their hospital. Sharp pledged
to continue the work of the Task
Force to increase access to medi-
cal care in Wakulla County.


Jody Smith, RN, MBA, the
new Administrator of the
Wakulla Health Department,
will serve as Task Force Co-Chair.
Kim Tucker, Public Information
Officer for the Health Depart-
ment, will step into the Secre-
tary position.


Elliott serves the Navy
Navy Lt. j. g. Marcus A. Orion aircraft flown by VP-4 are
Elliott, whose wife, Stacie, is a proven overland asset in the
the daughter of Valeta Taylor Global War on Terror,
of Crawfordville, along with Working with the Army, Air
members of Patrol Squadron Force, Marines, and in combina-
4 (VP-4) "Skinny Dragons" sta- tion with multi-national forces,
tioned at Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, VP-4 provides intelligence, sur-
are currently deployed to the veillance, and reconnaissance
Fifth Fleet area of operations, support for ground troops.
Ali Air Base, Iraq, in support of Since Sept. 11, 2001, VP-4 has
Operation Iraqi Freedom. 'participated in multiple deploy-
VP-4 replaced Patrol Squad- ments in support of Operations
ron 9 (VP-9) following its sev- Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Free-
en-month deployment and dom-Afghanistan, and Endur-
assumed its sister squadron's ing Freedom-Philippines.
mission in Iraq. For more information on
Traditionally used for anti- VP-4, go to http://www.vp4.
submarine warfare, the PC-3 navyrmil.


Notice of Public Hearing


For the 2008-2010 legisla-
tive term, new State Repre-
sentative Leonard Bembry
(D-Greenville), has been given
committee assignments that
he says will make him effec-
tive in protecting constituents
of House District 10.
He will serve as a member
on the Natural Resources
Appropriations Committee,
the Agriculture & Natural Re-
sources Policy Committee, the
Economic Development Policy
Committee, and the State &
Community Colleges & Work-
force Policy Committee.,
Bembry expressed his joy
in the appointments and said,
"I am excited that Speaker
Sansom has placed this con-
fidence in me. With my long-
time background in farming
and business, I feel I can ef-
fectively steer solid ideas by
working with my colleagues
to make good things happen
for the state."
Rep. Bembry has also filed
his first House Bill for the 2009
Legislative Session. It is HB


109 and is titled Clinical, Coun-
seling, and Psychotherapy
Services. The legislation will
assist licensed clinical social
workers to better monitor
the mental health of their
clients and be able to get
additional help for their cli-
ents by waiving confidential
communications under some
circumstances.
Bembry commented, "Fil-
ing my first bill is very excit-
ing. I am proud to be able to
serve the citizens of Florida in,
this capacity where I believe I
can make a difference.
"In this time of economic
hardship, our families are
struggling. Such stress will
oftentimes make someone
think in a way that they would
not under more normal condi-
tions. Protecting our citizens is
paramount."
The 2009 Legislative Ses-
sion will begin on March 3;
however, legislators will be
in Tallahassee from Jan. 5 to
Jan. 16 for a Special Session on
the budget.


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The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to
consider the following applications and has scheduled Public
Hearings regarding the following before the Wakulla County
Planning Commission on Monday, February 9, 2009, beginning at
7:00 PM and before the Wakulla County Board of County
Commissioners on Tuesday, March 3, 2009, beginning at 6:00
PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public
hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west
of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida
32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony.
1. Application for Site Plan: SP08-19
Applicant: Florida Power Corporation
Proposal: construct administration building
Tax ID Number: 24-4s-02w-000-02053-000
Existing FLU Map: Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4)
Existing Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0360B
Parcel Size: 10.4+/- acres
Location: southwest comer of Crawfordville Highway
and Millender Road
Hearings Required: Planning Commission 02/09/09 @ 7:00PM
County Commission 03/03/09 @ 6:00PM


764 Shadeville Rd. MV#53695






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926-8245 3042 Crawfordville Hwy.
Crawfordville, FL
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2. Application for Site Plan:


SP08-21


Applicant: River of Life Church, Inc.
Proposal: construct church office
Tax ID Number: 13-4s-02w-000-01934-000
Existing FLU Map: Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4)
Existing Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0225B
Parcel Size: 10.69+/- acres
Location: northwest corner of Crawfordville Highway
and Donaldson Williams Road
Hearings Required: Planning Commission 02/09/09 @ 7:00PM
County Commission 03/03/09 @ 6:00PM
3. Application for Comprehensive Plan Amendment: CP08-06
Applicant: Pine Creek, LLC
Proposal: amend future land use map from
Agricultural to Rural 2
Tax ID Number: 35-5s-03w-000-01274-003
Existing FLU Map: Agricultural (FLUE Policy 1.2.2)
Proposed FLU Map: Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4)
Existing Zoning: AG (Section 5-25, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "A15" & "B" zones on Panel 0350D
Parcel Size: 80.95+/- acres
Location: southwest comer of Curtis Mill Road and
Sopchoppy Highway
Hearings Required: Planning Commission 02/09/09 @ 7:OOPM
County Commission 03/03/09 @ 6:00PM
Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record files
may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community
Development Department located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any
person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a
verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented
at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call
the Board Office at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes.
The Board Office may be contacted at (850) 926- 0919 or TDD 926-7962.


Crawfordville school

raises $2,444 for AHA


New Rep. Bembry is

given committees


ts Our


A








Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 22, 2009


Sports


Wakulla seniors, coaches take

part in game against Georgia


Wakulla High School was
well represented at the Flor-
ida-Georgia North-South Bor-
der War in Thomasville, Ga.
Saturday, Jan. 3. War Eagle
football coaches Scott Klees
served as the Florida head
coach while Chris Tomaini
was the defensive coordina-
tor and James Vernon was
the offensive line/defensive
end coach.
The game was designed to
give senior players exposure if


Young WMS Lady Wildcat soccer team returns 15 players.

WMS ends season undefeated


The Wakulla Middle School
girls soccer team completed
the 2008 season undefeated.
They faced many strong oppo-
nents including: Riversprings
Middle School,
Taylor County Middle
School, Trinity Catholic,
and Florida State University
School.
The young team included
five eighth graders, four sev-
enth graders, and 11 sixth
graders. Captains, who were
selected by their peers, were
Madison Harris and Savanna


Harris. Madison Harris re-
ceived the Best Striker Award,
finishing the season scor-
ing 14 goals. Nicolette Anico
received the Most Valuable
Player award, playing stop-
per and successfully shutting
down the opponent's offense.
Most Improved Player went to
Savanna Harris who had four
assists as a forward.
The Best Defensive Player
was given to Haley Brown,
who as a sixth grader, fought
hard defending the Wildcat
goal as rookie goalie.


The 2008 soccer team in-
cluded, left to right, first row,
Lili Broadway, Madison Harris,
Savanna Harris, and Kasey
James, 2nd row: Josie Brooks,
Allison Barrow, Marina Petran-
dis, Amber Winkler, Ramsey
Lynn, Nicolette Anico, Chloe
Clark, and Carley Csonka. 3rd
row: Coach Lauren Miller,
Aleyda Plagge, Hannah Lanier,
Shelby Shiver, Haley Brown,
Rebekah Kowalczyk, Christine
Mathers, Sierra Andrews, and
Coach Patti Broadway. Not
pictured: Brooke Busby.


WHS weightlifters attend qualifier


Coach Windy Taff and her Wakulla Lady
War Eagle weightlifters attended a Section-
al Qualifier at Leon and had 14 girls place
in the top three in their weight class which
qualified them to go to the final qualifier
in Altha on Jan. 27. If they place top three
in Altha they will advance to state.
The following lifters are in the running
for state berths.
Shelby Davis took second place in
the 101 pound class with a total weight
of 140.
Amanda Council took second place in
the 110 class with a total of 195.
Jordyn Brooks took third place in the
110 class with a total of 185.
Jasmine Casey took second place in
the 119 class with a total of 195.
tw-Ahley Braswell took third place in the


119 class with a total of 190.
Haley Clark took second place in the
129 class with a total of 195.
Christina Mathis took third place in
the 129 class with a total of 195.
Meredith Flanders took second place
in the 139 class with a total of 245.
Kim Franklin took second place in the
154 class with a total of 205.
Tara Vatter took third place in the 154
class with a total of 200.
Skyler Taff took first place in the 169
weight class with a total of 250.
Sarah Gregory took second place in
the 169 class with a total of 205.
Maggie Ogden took first place in the
183 class with a total of 260.-
Summer Stokley took first place in the
199 class with a total of 225.


Wrestlers place second in tourney


The Wakulla War Eagle wres-
tling team had a strong showing
in Suwannee County as Coach
John Wainwright's squad took
second place behind Durant in
the nine team Billy Saylor Tour-
nament in Live Oak.
Wakulla forfeited two weight'
classes, 130 and 160, but had 10
wrestlers place in their weight
classes.
Mookie Forbes placed sec-
ond at 103 as he lost to Suwan-
nee 2-0 in the final. Dakota
Bush competed at 112, but did
not place.
Tyler Hill won the 119 class
while Tre McCullough placed
first at 125, Robert Douin com-
peted at 135. Scotty Varner won
the 140 pound class and Garrett
Barco was second at 145. He lost
6-4 in the finals in the "match of
the tournament."
Brandon Carden placed third
at 152 and Luke Taylor placed
third at 171 as Wainwright
has seen improvement from
many of his less experienced
wrestlers.
Cole Woofter placed fourth
at 189 while Tyler Corbett placed
second at 215, defeating the Lin-
coln wrestler along the way. Tra-
vis McCullough placed fourth at
heavyweight. Wainwright called
his heavyweight's performance
"a big surprise" and hopes he

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they have not committed to a
college program.,Wakulla se-
niors Zach Klees, Jordan Zuhl,
Kendrick Hall, Jamel Gavin
and Lee Smalls took part in
the game. The other Florida
schools represented included
North Florida Christian, Rick-
ards, FAMU, Chiles, Godby,
Madison, East Gadsden, Jef-
ferson and Lincoln.
Florida led 3-0 at halftime
and had another touchdown
drive stall on fourth down


at the Georgia one yard line.
Three Florida turnovers in the
second half turned the game
into a 51-3 loss. Only one
touchdown was scored on the
Florida defense. Two fumbles
and an interception were re-
turned for touchdowns.
A banquet was held with
a speaker to help recognize
and lead the players through
the recruiting process. Florida
hopes' to host the game in
2010 at Gene Cox Stadium.


Baseball team will host fundraiser


The first annual Houston
Taff Memorial Alumni Baseball
Game will be played Saturday,
Feb. 7 at Houston Taff Field at
Wakulla High School.
The fundraiser includes a
seven inning game with the
alumni playing against the
2009 Wakulla War Eagles, and
a Homerun Derby competi-


tion. Any former Wakulla War
Eagles interested in participat-
ing should contact Coach Mike
Gauger.
In addition, the team will
be selling a chicken dinner
with potato salad and baked
beans. All proceeds will ben-
efit the Wakulla High School
baseball team. The dinner


is $8. The fee for playing in
the game is $10 and $10 for
participating in the Homerun
Derby. The derby will start
at 10 a.m. and the game will
begin at noon.
For more information, con-
tact Coach Mike Gauger at
MDGJR33@yahoo.com or 926-
7125.


War Eagles slip by Chiles


By SCOTT COLUNS
Special to The Wakulla News
The Wakulla War Eagle basket-
ball team topped Chiles 63-62 be-
hind Ant'tony Mills' 22 points and
20 points by Tavarus McKinney.
Wilton Booth added 10 points.
McKinney and Mills combined
for 19 rebounds. The contest
was played at Wakulla Tuesday,
Jan. 13.
Wakulla lost to Lincoln by
a score of 81-67. The game was
played at Lincoln High School


on Thursday, Jan. 15 and it was
the fourth time this season the
Trojans defeated the War Eagles
in boys basketball.
Ant'tony Mills led the War
Eagles with 20 points, Tavaris
Booth had 12 points and Tavarus
McKinney had 12 points and 10
rebounds.
The following night, the War
Eagles hosted John Paul i and lost
a 60-59 thriller which came down
to John Paul's stifling defense be-
ing able to hold Wakulla to only


12 fourth quarter points and stop
them in the waning seconds of
the game to preserve the win.
Tavarus McKinney led all
scorers with 22 points and 11
rebounds, while Wilton Booth
had 17 points and Tavaris Booth
had eight.
Wakulla dropped to 5-9 on the
season and plays Maday, Mosley
and Franklin next week, which
includes a 7 p.m. home game on
Friday night versus Mosley.


Lady War Eagles drop two games


The Wakulla Lady War
Eagles dropped two district
games against Rickards and
East Gadsden last week.
Rickards beat Wakulla 64-39
as Taylor Washington scored
14 points and Artigua Kilpat-
rick added 12, Kiara Harvey
scored eight.


East Gadsden topped
Wakulla 58-43. WHS was led
by Jeterrica Brown's 13 points.
Harvey and Kilpatrick scored
nine points each. Washington
added six. Taylor Eglton and
Kelsey Lee combined for six
points.
Wakulla hosted Arnold


Tuesday, Jan. 20 and will travel
to Taylor Jan. 21 and East
Gadsden on Jan. 23.
Marianna will host Wakulla
on Jan. 26 and Blountstown
will host WHS on Jan. 29. The
district tournament begins
Feb. 2. Wakulla is 12-9 overall
and 3-5 in district games.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 22, 2009 Page 9A


Sheriff's Report


Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office officials investigated a
Jan. 14 grand theft and bur-
glary reported by Patricia E.
Isman of Crawfordville, accord-
ing to Sheriff David Harvey.
A stove was taken out of a
rental home in Crawfordville.
The stove is valued at $350.
Deputy Ryan Muse investi-
gated.
In other activity reported by
the Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office during the past week:
On Jan. 14, Kim L. Poole
of Crawfordville and Bridle
Wood Apartments reported a
forgery against the business.
Sgt. Fred Nichols collected
copies of alleged forgeries and


information from the company
accountant. A suspect has
been identified.
On Jan. 15, Lt. Jimmy Ses-
sor charged Jeremy Michael
Beech, 22, of Woodville with
DUI, refusal to submit to a
breath test and resisting an
officer without violence after
Sessor allegedly spotted him
driving erratically on Highway
365. An FWC officer also wit-
nessed the incident. Beech had
been driving on the highway
when he allegedly ran down
into a convenience store park-
ing lot and back onto the
highway.
Law enforcement officials
stopped Beech at a residence


nearby. Beech allegedly be-
came argumentative and Ses-
sor was unable to perform the
field sobriety test.
A companion in the vehicle
was arrested on unrelated
warrants.
On Jan. 16, Helen C. Saba
of Crawfordville reported a
criminal mischief at Karol's
Korner. A suspect, who was
identified, allegedly wrote on
the bathroom ceiling. The graf-
fiti was created with a marker
and Deputy Jeremy Johnston
discovered a marker on Gary
Lee Kile, 19, of Crawfordville,
when he investigated. Kile
was charged with criminal
mischief. Det. Ward Kromer


also investigated.
On Jan. 16, John N. Tay-
lor of Panacea and the parks
and recreation department
reported a vehicle burglary.
Scratches were discovered on
a county vehicle as someone
attempted to enter it. Deputy
Ben Steinle investigated.
On Jan. 18, Sabrina Lynn
Call of Crawfordville reported
a vehicle burglary. A purse
was stolen from an unlocked
vehicle. The total valued of
the purse and contents was
$143. Deputy Jeremy Johnston
investigated.
On Jan. 19, David P. Fun-
derburke of Crawfordville
reported a criminal mischief


to a hunting tent. Two cuts
had been made in the tent
and damage was estimated
at $300. Deputy Mike Crum
investigated.
On Jan. 16, David A.
Vaillancourt of Crawfordville
reported a fraud as he received
mail informing him about
automotive credit checks. A
potential suspect has been
identified. Deputy Brad Taylor
investigated.
On Jan. 17, Jarion 0.
Gavin of Tallahassee reported
a fraud. Several unauthorized
transactions were made on
his account. The fraud totaled
$274 and may have been made
in Arkansas. Deputy Ben Stein-


le investigated.
On Jan. 19, Tabitha L.
Mathers of Panama City re-
ported a fraud. Someone used
her name to obtain two pre-
scriptions. The drugs had been
picked up at a drug store in
Crawfordville. Deputy Nick
'Petowsky investigated.
The Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office received 743
calls for service during the
past week.
Note to our readers: The
people who are reported as
charged with crimes in this
column have not yet been to
trial and are therefore inno-
cent until proven guilty.


Accidents injure one.
Two vehicle accidents in south of U.S. Highway 319.
Wakulla County last week criti- The truck was a total loss
cally injured one motorist while and the victim was not wearing
two other individuals escaped a seatbelt. Charges are pending.
serious injury, according to the Corporal Mike Cross was the
Florida Highway PatroL crash investigator and Corporal
On Jan. 19 at 9:20 p.m., Jamerson B. Woodward was the
George Franklin, Jf., 55, of Sop- homicide investigator.
choppy, was critically injured On Jan. 18, Johnny A. Dale,
in an alcohol related crash. FHP 46, of Bryceville, Fla. escaped
officials said. Franklin was travel- injury on Forest Road 344 when
ing south on Otter Creek Road his vehicleleft the road due to me-
exceeding the posted speed limit chanical problems and overturned
when he failed to negotiate a right into a body of water.
curve. The 1993 Ford truck rotated The vehicle collided with a
dockwise as it entered the curve. signpost and concrete bridge
The vehide left the east shoulder before becoming partially sub-
of the road and struck an oak tree merged. A passenger, Daniel D.
with the front part of the vehicle. Bryan of Jacksonville, suffered
The driver was transported to minor injuries.
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital The 1987 Ford truck suffered
by Lifenet helicopter. The acci- $5,000 worth of damages. There
dent scene was 4.5 miles east of were no charges filed. Trooper
Sopchoppy, four-tenths of a mile Scotty Lolley investigated.

Two deputies dismissed


Two Wakulla County depu-
ties were dismissed after being
involved in an incident that
allegedly violated the sheriff's
office general order of "conduct
unbecoming an officer."
Deputy Pam Veltkmap, 23, and
Deputy Casey Whitlock, 25, have
both appealed the sheriffs office
decision to terminate them. The
incident took place Jan. 6, accord-
ing to Major Maurice Langston.
A hearing on the matter is ex-
pected to be held later in January.
Details of the allegations will not

BUCKHORN
By Ethel Skipper

Happy anniversary to Mr.
and Mrs. Edward Burn on Jan.
26 from your friends at Skip-
per Temple Church.
Our prayers and concerns
go out to all the sick and shut-
in, those in the hospital, nurs-
ing homes, jails, prisons, and
we pray for our world leaders
everywhere.
There will be a service in
honor of Rev. Ossie B. Rosier
on Jan. 30 at St. Paul Primitive
Baptist dChurch. The speaker
will be Elder Anderson of Tal-
lahassee. The public is invited
and everyone is welcome.
Host pastor is Elder Raymond
Sanders, Jr.
If you would like your
news reported, contact me at
962-7838.


Birth
Autumn C. McKenzie
Robert and Suzie McKenzie
of Crawfordville announce the
birth of their daughter, Autumn
Corabelle McKenzie, on Dec. 22
at Tallahassee Memorial Hos-
pital. She weighed 8 pounds,
7 ounces and measured 19.7
inches in length.
Maternal grandparents are
Calvin and Kim Osborne of
Crawfordville. Paternal grand-
parent is Julie Henderson of
Crawfordville.
Maternal great-grandparents
are the late James "Buck" Vernon
and Audrey "Sue" Vernon, the
late Delma Osborne and E.L.
Gramps and Amy Osborne of
Crawfordville. Paternal great-
grandparents are the late Au-
drey "Boots" Henderson and
Cecil and Viola Henderson of
Sopchoppy.
Autumn joins a sister, Au-
drey, age 2.

Benefit planned
There will be a benefit fish
fry for Jim and Ann Cooper on
Saturday, Jan. 24 at the Pana-
cea Volunteer Fire Department
from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
The proceeds will help
them pay for medical expens-
es. Jim will be undergoing
surgery on Jan. 26 of at Shands
in Gainesville.


become public until after the ap-
peals process is completed, said
Langston. Langston declined to
say where the alleged incident
took place.
Whitlock began his employ-
ment on April 12, 2005 and Velt-
kamp began her employment on
June 11, 2004. ,
The sheriffs office has had to
draw from other certified staff
to put on the road to cover the
manpower shortage while the ap-
peals are being heard, Langston
concluded.

Skipper Temple Church
invites everyone to the Sec-
ond Annual Women's Con-
ference this week, beginning
Friday, Jan. 23, at 7 p.m. You
don't want to miss these
great preaching and teaching
women evangelists Margie
Miller, Annie Grady, Fran-
cella Wilson, Lucille 'Brown,
Maryanna Matthews, Doris
Robinson, Prophetess Monica
Diggs, Marvette Donaldson,
Elouise Snead, and Evangelist
Joann Burns. On Saturday, Jan.
24, registration will begin at
9 a.m. Around-the-table work-
shop speaker will be pastor
Elmira Davis, Elder Patricia
Harrison, and Evangelist Chin-
esta Skipper.
A special thanks to Clary's
Funeral Home, Quincy, which
donated lunch and refresh-
ments, Chairman Evangelist
Glenda Simmons, co-chair-
man Moe Charlene Green, and
the Women's Department.


Commission hires lobbying firm


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
The county commission
hired Governance Services as
its lobbying firm, after Chair-
man Howard Kessler pulled
the matter from the consent
agenda so that citizen Dana
Peck could express her objec-
tions.
Governance Services got
the contract to represent
Wakulla County at $39,500
a year. The firm's lobbyists
include former Tallahassee
Mayor Scott Maddox, former
state House Speaker and Sen-
ate President Mallory Home,
and state House Speaker and
U.S. Ambassador Don Tucker,
for whom the the Tallahas-
see-Leon County Civic Center
was renamed to the Donald L.
Tucker Center.
Peck's objections on Tues-
day, Jan. 6, included that the
price of $39,500 was a steep
price to pay in a tight budget
year when there might have
to be staff lay-offs. She said
Maddox and other members


of Governance Services were
not registered as lobbyists and
suggested that meant they had
no experience and objected
that the board "rejected a
well-established firm" that
had agreed to work for $6,500
less.
Peck also contended that
Governance Service's contract
that allowed for $3,000 to be
spent for federal lobbying
was beyond the scope of the
county's advertisement for a
lobbyist which specified only
state lobbying.
The Request For Proposals
for a lobbying firm and the
choice of Governance Services
was done by the prior board.
At that meeting in November,
former County Commissioner
Maxie Lawhon expressed his
concern about choosing a lob-
byist for the next board, and
former Chairman Ed Brimner
responded that the incoming
board would have enough to
learn about the job without
picking a lobbyist and lacked
the experience to know what


to look for.
In response to Peck's con-
cerns, it was noted that the
lobbyists with Governance
Services have extensive gov-
ernment and legislative ex-
perience. It was also noted
registering with the state is
not a license to lobby rather,
a lobbyist registers after a cli-
ent has hired him.
Commissioner Mike Stew-
art did question the provision
about the firm lobbying for
the county in Washington,
D.C. The contract said that the
county would pay $3,000 to
cover travel and other expens-
es for the firm to do that.
County Administrator Ben
Pingree and Maddox both indi-
cated that the offer of federal
lobbying was thrown in by
the firm as a sweetener to the
deal. Pingree noted that Presi-
dent-elect Obama's proposed
economic stimulus plan might
well be such a matter.
The board changed the
language to read "up to $3,000"
and specified that the lobby-
ist traveling on behalf of the
county should only be travel-
ing on county business.
"I think there's plenty of
checks in there," freshman


commissioner Lynn Artz said
of Stewart's concerns. "People
to help us at the federal level
is a good thing."
At a workshop on legisla-
tive priorities held before the
commission meeting, most
of the focus was on the pos-
sibilities of the federal money
- especially as the state's bud-
get revenues continue to sink,
leaving billions in shortfalls.
Pingree noted that Obama
has proposed spending up-
wards of $700 billion to $1
trillion to try to jumpstart
the sagging economy. He
suggested three projects the
county should pursue are
stormwater planning, waste-
water treatment, and intersec-
tion improvements on U.S.
Highway 319.
"The government wants
projects that will put people to
work," Chairman Kessler said.
Such projects were frequently
referred to as "shovel-ready."
Stewart hammered home the
importance of widening 319.
Lobbyist Maddox reported
that the State of Florida, meet-
ing in a special session in
Tallahassee over the budget
problem, was looking at some
$2.3 billion in shortfalls.


The Wakulla County Sher-
iffs Office will host a blood
drive with the Southeastern
Community Blood Center. The
event will be held Friday, Jan.
30 from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. All
registered donors will receive


Braving the cold for trees
Despite the cool temperatures, or enjoying some funnel cake,
a crowd of several hundred seafood, hot dogs, or fried green
people bundled up and enjoyed tomatoes. A "how-to" workshop
the Arbor Day Festival Saturday, was held on building a green
Jan. 17. At any given time there house with lumber and PVC pip-
was a number of people visiting ing, and the children's activities.
the booths, lining and signing Above, Zhao Si Heng enjoys bal-
up for the free tree giveaways, loons. (Photo by Gary Fazzina)



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For more information or
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NOTICE

The City of St. Marks
Board of Commissioners Election
Wednesday, February 18, 2009
7:00 am 7:00 pm
The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port
Leon Drive, Phone (850) 925-6224.
Persons needing special access
considerations should call the City Office at
least 24 hours before the date for
scheduling purposes.


WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSIONERS' SCHEDULE FOR
WORKSHOPS, PUBLIC HEARINGS, & MEETINGS
2009 CALENDAR

(To be held in the Commission Chambers)


January 20, 2009
February 3, 2009

February 3, 2009
February 17, 2009
February 17, 2009


February 17, 2009
March 3, 2009


March 3, 2009
March 17, 2009


March 17, 2009
April 7, 2009
April 21, 2009
May 5, 2009
May 19, 2009


Regular Board Meeting
Workshop: To Discuss Commissioner
Travel Budgets
Regular Board Meeting
Workshop: 1st Budget Development
Workshop: To Discuss Ways to Increase
Citizen Information, Input & Involvement
in County Government
Regular Board Meeting
Workshop: To Discuss Forming and
Staffing Additional Citizen Advisory
Committees or Working Groups
Regular Board Meeting
Workshop: To Discuss the Proposal
for a Faith-Based Publicly Funded Project
(Leon-Wakulla Development Corp)
Regular Board Meeting
Regular Board Meeting
Regular Board Meeting
Regular Board Meeting
Regular Board Meeting


6:00 P.M.

5:00 P.M.
6:00 P.M.
3:00 P.M.


5:00 P.M
6:00 P.M.


5:00 P.M.
6:00 P.M.


5:00 P.M.
6:00 P.M.
6:00 P.M.
6:00 P.M.
6:00 P.M.
6:00 P.M.


All Workshops, Public Hearings and Ccmmission Meetings are open to the public. Wakulla County
does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age or handicapped
status in employment or the provision of services. Handicapped individuals may receive special
accommodations with one working day's notice as per section 286:011(6) F.S. If special
accommodations are required, please call Debbie DuBose, Executive Assistant to the County
Administrator at (850) 926-0919.


Give blood during

WCSO blood drive


l_.








Page 10A THE WAIULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 22, 2009


Outdoors


Birds are an evolutionary miracle and a gift from God


BY GEORGE WEYMOUTH


Birds are a gift from God, an
evolutionary miracle, or both.
Whatever you believe, we all
marvel at their songs, their
ability to survive brutally cold
winters and most of all, their
amazing ability to fly. How
many times have we all stood
staring up at a bird soaring
above us and contemplated
how neat it would be to be
able to fly.
And I'm sure like myself,
you've all dreamed of flying.
Plus in the last few decades.
it has been pretty well estab-
lished that they may actually be


living dinosaurs, technically not
all dinosaurs actually became
extinct
It's mind boggling when you
contemplate on the subject. I
rarely see a flock of pelicans
slowly flapping by in their
undulating V-shaped lines, that
I don't think of the dinosaur
Pterodactyls, the extinct flying
reptile. In many ways birds
are just glorified reptiles. In
fact, the majority start out like
reptiles and cold blooded crea-
tures, before they miraclusly
switch over to warm blooded
creatures. It takes the Wood


Stork roughly three days to
become a warm blooded bird
after hatching,
Birds like snakes have quad-
rate bones, a bone that sits
between the jaw bone (or in
the case of birds the lowe;
mandible), and the skull. Since
most long billed birds like her-
ons have rather flexible lower
mandibles, that can expand
outwards sideways, along with
the quadrate bone, which also
drops the lower mandibles
down from the skull. They can
gulp down whole fish, even
rather large ones. Most of my
readers have seen an anhinga
swallow a full sized bream/
bluegill, or a cormorant gulp
down a mullet. That's because
the lower mandibles drop
down and out, thanks mostly
to the quadrate bones.
Our Brown Pelican has such
long flexible lower mandibles
that when they hit the water,
after a 40 foot dive for fish,


their throat pouch catches
about two gallons of water and
causes the lower mandibles to
bow out into a complete hoop.
Hopefully for the pelican some
fish are in the pouch. Almost
instantly the two lower man-
dibles snap back together and
are brought back up to the up-
per mandibles or beak, trapping
the fish. Cormorants, like a few
other birds, have a hinge which
allows the upper bill to actually
flex upwards, so the lower and
upper bill, both flexl
Cormorants and other birds
that inhabit salty seas and
coastal areas, just about all
have a salt gland that circles
the bony eye socket, so if you
find a birds skull, and you see
the impression of a salt gland
around the eye, you can be
assured it's a seabird of some
species. Some seabirds, like
petrels and shearwaters (which
occasionally occur of our coast)
have long tubes running along


the top of their upper beak
and are therefore referred to as
"tube nosed seabirds."
These tubes are actually
extensions of their nostrils giv-
ing them unbelievable smell-
ing abilities. Remember, most
birds can hardly smell anything
(vultures would of course be
another exception).
Yet it has been proven that
some tube nosed oceanic birds
can pick up the oily scent of
huge schools of "bait fish"
constantly being ripped apart
by bigger predatory fish, as far
away as 500 miles across vast
oceans. Like.reptiles, birds also
have scales on their legs.
Some like the Golden Eagle
have feathered legs, and only
the scaly feet exposed. Others
like our herons, have the en-
tire leg exposed. And, they're
not bending their knees the
wrong way, which I'll explain.
If you want to have a compan-
ion pretend they are a bird. I'll


guarantee it'll be very amusing!
Have them lean over and at
the same time flex their knees,
bringing their torso down to
rest between their thighs. Their
torso should now be horizontal
and cradled in their thighs, just
like with a roasted turkey or
chicken.
The knees are right next to
the body and what we often
call a bird's knees, are actually
their heels Now have your
friend, while in this awkward
position, raise themselves up
on their tippy-toes, and they'll
be standing just like a bird,
except that the bones in birds
feet have all fused into one
longer bone, bringing their heel
up to where our knees would
approximately be. The legs of
a bird swing from the knees
which are located under the
center of birds body, right be-
low where the wings attach to
the body. It provide the proper
center of gravity.


Cold weather takes a bite out of the fishing opportunities


From The Dock
BY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL


The cold weather last week
knocked the fishing in the
head around here, or at least
for me. With the extremely
cold weather we had last week
I just knew the fish were going
to be in the Audcilla River. Wen-
dell Burton and I went down
in his boat and my neighbor
and a friend went in theirs. The
first bad sign was when we
stopped at J.R.'s store. When
I saw J.R., he just shook his
head. He told us the fish just


weren't in the Aucilla or at least
nobody was catching any. He
said one person had been to
the Econfina and caught some.
We decided to head on to the
Aucilla and the second bad
sign was when we got there
and there were only trucks and
trailers in the parking area. I
have been down there when
the weather got like this and
there would be 100 boats. We
caught two trout and two reds
and the other boat caught one


trout. We didn't talk to anyone
who caught anything at all.
We headed to the house and
the other boat pulled out and
went to the Econfina. They
should have followed us home.
They said they caught one
trout down there, I think one
problem was we had no move-
ment of water all day and the
water temperature in the river
was 52 degrees which is pretty
darn cold.
I talked with Mike Hopkins
and he said only three boats
went out this weekend and
they went after grouper. He
only talked to one person who
came in and they had three
grouper and some big rock
bass and grunts. He said no-
body has been doing anything
in the bay.
Gary Redding of Shell Point


Meeting of aging will be held
The Area Agency on Aging at 10:30 a.m. The meeting will Florida 32308.
for North Florida, Inc. will be held at the Area Agency on The meeting is ope
hold its Board of Directors Aging for North Florida, 2414 public
Meeting on Thursday, Jan. 22 Mahan Drive, Tallahassee,


*n to the


caught a nice redfish in the
canal behind his house last
week and within five minutes
everyone around him had a
shrimp in the water. He must
have caught the only one
around because nobody else
got a bite. Dwayne Broadway
has been taking his daughter
and they have been catching
some nice black sea bass in the
deep holes in Oyster Bay.
Remember that trout sea-
son doses Feb. 1 and reopens
on March 1. According to MY-
FWC.com, the regulations for
grouper in the Gulf of Mexico
are as follows: 22 inch length

-W ESGN &
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on Gag grouper, you can have
up to two in your five grouper
aggregate and state and federal
waters are dosed February and
March. Same size on Black
grouper and you can have five
black grouper in your five grou-
per aggregate. Federal waters
closed from Feb. 15 through
March. 15. For red grouper, the
size limit is 20 inches. You can


have one per person within the
five grouper aggregate in fed-
eral waters and two per person
in the five grouper aggregate
in state waters. Federal waters
dose Feb. 15 until March 15.
Remember to leave that
float plan and be careful out
there. Good luck and good
fishing!


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 22, 2009 Page 11A


FSP11


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For tides at the following points


High


Gulf Coast W weekly Alm anac add to Dog Island Listings: Carrabelle 28 H
S/ Cat Point 1 Hr
Tide charts by January 22 January 28 Lower Anchorage 1 Hr
Zihua Software, LLC January 22 January West Pass 1 Hr

s River Entrance City of St. Marks '..- Shell Point, Spring Creek


hTide
lin.
r., 53 Min.
r., 13 Min.
r., 36 Min.
r., 26 Min.


Low Tide
25 Min.
2 Hrs., 38 Min.
2 Hrs., 31 Min.
2 Hrs., 3 Min.
2 Hrs., 39 Min.


Date High Low High Low High
Thu -0.4 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.8 ft.
Jan 22, 09 6:17 AM 1:00 PM 5:38 PM 11:43 PM
Fri -0.6 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.4 ft.
Jan 23, 09 6:57 AM 1:27 PM 6:26 PM
Sat 3.0 ft. -0.7 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.1 ft.
Jan 24, 09 12:26 AM 7:30 AM 1:54 PM 7:05 PM
Sun 3.1 ft. -0.7 ft. 2.9 ft. 0.9 ft.
Jan 25, 09 1:02 AM 8:00 AM 2:20 PM 7:41 PM
Mon 3.2 ft. -0.7 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.7 ft.
Jan 26, 09 1:36 AM 8:26 AM 2:45 PM 8:15 PM
Tue 3.2 ft. -0.7 ft. 3.1 ft. 0.5 ft.
Jan 27, 09 2:08 AM 8:50 AM 3:09 PM 8:49 PM
Wed 3.2 ft. -0.6 ft. 3.2 ft. 0.3 ft.
Jan 28, 09 2:42 AM 9:14 AM 3:32 PM 9:24 PM


Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay

Date High Low High Low High
Thu -0.3 ft. 1.8 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.1 ft.
Jan 22, 09 6:28 AM 12:52 PM 5:49 PM 11:35 PM
Fri -0.4 ft. 1.9 ft. 1.0 ft.
Jan 23, 09 7:08 AM 1:19 PM 6:37 PM
Sat 2.2 ft. -0.5 ft. 2.0 ft. 0.8 ft.
Jan 24, 09 12:18 AM 7:41 AM 1:46 PM 7:16 PM
Sun 2.3 ft. -0.5 ft. 2.1 ft. 0.7 ft.
Jan 25, 09 12:54 AM 8:11 AM 2:12 PM 7:52 PM
Mon 2.4 ft. -0.5 ft. 2.3 ft. 0.5 ft.
Jan 26, 09 1:28 AM 8:37 AM 2:37 PM 8:26 PM
Tue 2.4 ft. -0.5 ft. 2.3 ft. 0.4 ft.
Jan 27, 09 2:00 AM 9:01 AM 3:01 PM 9:00 PM
Wed 2.4 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.4 ft. 0.2 ft.
Jan 28, 09 2:34 AM 9:25 AM 3:24 PM 9:35 PM


Date High Low High Low
Thu -0.4 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.5 ft.
Jan 22, 09 7:21 AM 1:36 PM 6:42 PM
Fri 2.6 ft. -0.5 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.3 ft.
Jan 23, 09 12:19 AM 8:01 AM 2:03 PM 7:30 PM
Sat 2.8 ft. -0.6 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.0 ft.
Jan 24, 09 1:02 AM 8:34 AM 2:30 PM 8:09 PM
Sun 2.9 ft. -0.7 ft. 2.7 ft. 0.8 ft.
Jan 25, 09 1:38 AM 9:04 AM 2:56 PM 8:45 PM
Mon 2.9 ft. -0.7 ft. 2.8 ft. 0.6 ft.
Jan 26, 09 2:12 AM 9:30 AM 3:21 PM 9:19 PM
Tue 3.0 ft. -0.6 ft. 2.9 ft. 0.5 ft.
Jan 27, 09 2:44 AM 9:54 AM 3:45 PM 9:53 PM
Wed 3.0 ft. -0.5 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.3 ft.
Jan 28, 09 3:18 AM 10:18 AM 4:08 PM 10:28 PM


St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.

Date High Low High Low High
Thu -0.4 ft. 1.8 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.2 ft.
Jan 22, 09 5:56 AM 12:44 PM 5:17 PM 11:27 PM
Fri -0.6 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.4 ft.
Jan 23, 09 6:36 AM 1:11 PM 6:05 PM
Sat 2.3 ft. -0.7 ft. 2.1 ft. 1.1 ft.
Jan 24, 09 12:10 AM 7:09 AM 1:38 PM 6:44 PM
Sun 2.4 ft. ; -0.7 ft. 2.2 ft. 0.9 ft.
Jan 25, 09 12:46 AM 7:39 AM 2:04 PM 7:20 PM
Mon 2.5 ft. -0.7 ft. 2.3 ft. 0.7 ft.
Jan 26, 09 1:20 AM 8:05 AM 2:29 PM 7:54 PM
Tue 2.5 ft. -0.7 ft. 2.4 ft. 0.5 ft.
Jan 27, 09 1:52 AM 8:29 AM 2:53 PM 8:28 PM
Wed 2.5 ft. -0.6 ft. 2.5 ft. 0.3 ft.
Jan 28, 09 2:26 AM 8:53 AM 3:16 PM 9:03 PM


Date High Low High Low High
Thu -0.5 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.8 ft. 2.9 ft.
Jan 22, 09 6:14 AM 12:57 PM 5:35 PM 11:40 PM
Fri -0.6 ft. 2.6 ft. 1.5 ft.
Jan 23, 09 6:54 AM 1:24 PM 6:23 PM
Sat 3.0 ft. -0.7 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.2 ft.
Jan 24, 09 12:23 AM 7:27 AM 1:51 PM 7:02 PM
Sun 3.1 ft. -0.8 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.0 ft.
Jan 25, 09 12:59 AM 7:57 AM 2:17 PM 7:38 PM
Mon 3.2 ft. -0.8 ft. 3.1 ft. 0.8 ft.
Jan 26, 09 1:33 AM 8:23 AM 2:42 PM 8:12 PM
Tue 3.3 ft. -0.8 ft. 3.2 ft. 0.5 ft.
Jan 27, 09 2:05 AM 8:47 AM 3:06 PM 8:46 PM
Wed 3.3 ft. -0.6 ft. 3.3 ft. 0.3 ft.
Jan 28, 09 2:39 AM 9:11 AM 3:29 PM 9:21 PM


Dog Island West End

Date High Low High Low High
Thu -0.7 ft. 1.8 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.2 ft.
Jan 22, 09 5:42 AM 2:36 PM 4:35 PM 9:51 PM
Fri -0.8 ft. 1.9 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.2 ft.
Jan 23, 09 6:26 AM 2:51 PM 5:35 PM 10:54 PM
Sat -0.8 ft. 1.9 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.2 ft.
Jan 24, 09 7:03 AM 3:08 PM 6:20 PM 11:50 PM
Sun -0.7 ft. 1.9 ft. 1.1 ft.
Jan 25, 09 7:35 AM 3:24 PM 6:59 PM
Mon 2.2 ft. -0.6 ft. 1.9 ft. 1.0 ft.
Jan 26, 09 12:39 AM 8:01 AM 3:37 PM 7:35 PM
Tue 2.2 ft. -0.5 ft. 1.9 ft. 0.8 ft.
Jan 27, 09 1:25 AM 8:21 AM 3:48 PM 8:10 PM
Wed 2.1 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.0 ft. 0.6 ft.
Jan 28, 09 2:11 AM 8:39 AM 3:59 PM 8:47 PM


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
8:20am 9:10am 9:55 am 10:40am 11:20am --:--am 12:35 am
8:45 pm 9:35pm 10:20pm 11:00pm 11:45pm 12:10pm 12:55pm
2:15 am 3:00 am 3:50 am 4:40 am 5:15 am 6:00 am 6:50 am
2:30pm 3:25pm 4:05 pm 4:55 pm 5:35pm 6:20pm 7:10 pm


Sunrise
Sunset
Moon rise
Moon set
Brightness


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
7:32 am 7:31 am 7:31 am 7:31 am 7:30 am 7:30 am 7:29 am
6:05 pm 6:06 pm 6:07 pm 6:08 pm 6:09 pm 6:10 pm 6:11 pm


4:54 am
2:56 pm
24%


5:43 am
3:49 pm
18%


6:28 am
4:46 pm


7:08 am
5:43 pm


7:43 am
6:40 pm
0%


8:15 am
7:37 pm
6%


8:45 am
8:33 pm
12%


i This weekend, we heard
Several gunshots off of-Shell
'ofrt.-Many hunters use vessels
for migratory bird hunting or
to get to their favorite hunting
grounds. If you are using your
vessel to hunt, you should re-
member the following safety
advice-
Understand that you are still
responsible for obeying all boat-
ing laws and should follow all
safe boating rules. Take extra
precautions to avoid capsizing or
swamping your vesseL Be aware
that small, flat-bottom vessels are
pronie to capsizing or swamping.
Keep weight low and distribute
gear evenly in the vessel Do not
exceed the vessel's capacity. Nev-
er crowd too many people or too
much gear into one small hunt-
ing boat Take only well-trained
dogs on board a small vessel. An
excited dog could easily capsize a
vesseL Keep the dog lying on the
bottom, positioned in the center
of the vessel Take precautions to
avoid hypothermia in case you
do capsize.
Wear a life jacket (PFD) at all
times while on the water. PFDs
come in a variety of styles, includ-
ing camouflage vests and float
coats. Always check the weather
and stay as dose to the shore as
possible.
Never fire shots or release ar-
rows until the vessel is stopped,
the motor is turned off, and the
vessel is secured or properly
anchored. Always remain seated
when shooting. Of course, you
must possess a valid hunting
license, tags, and permits for
whatever you are hunting. Be
aware of laws regarding transport


of firearms in a vessel. Ensure
that all firearms are always un-
loaded with the safety on and
are secured in a gun case when
they are being transported in a
vessel Special precautions and re-
sponsibilities are required when
hunting from a vessel.
Remember-If you fish or
hunt from a boat, you are not
only an angler or a hunter, but
also a boater.
The first BoatSmart course
for 2009 is being organized and
will be held at Shell Point in
February. This class is given by
the Coast Guard Auxiliary and
held at Shell Point Station, 1557
Shell Point Road, 16 miles south
of Crawfordville on beautiful
Apalachee Bay. This is a general
boating course and will pres-
ent basic information that all
good boaters should know. This
course is required by the state of
Florida to get a license for people
younger than 21 years old. All
new auxiliarists must have taken
this course to become "Basically
Qualified (BQ)."
The class is a one day class
and will start at 9 a.m. and con-
tinue through to 5 p.m. Those
who choose e to take the test may
be there until 6 p.m. A tentative
date is being set for Saturday,
Feb. 21. Some requests have been
made for a multi-part course held
on a week-night, but this is still
under discussion. If you have
a group of people who need a
BoatSmart boating safety course,
please call us and we will be glad
to teach it. Reservations and ad-
ditional information for Boating
classes can be made by calling
John Edrington at 926-2606.


Boating Emergencies
Coast Guard Station
Panama City .. (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
St. M arks (Flotilla 12) ... ............................. (850) 906-0540
or 893-5137
Shell Point (Flotilla 13) (850) 926-2606
or 926-5654


The Florida BoatSmart Course
consists of six parts. "Know Your
Boat, Before You Get Underway,
Operating Your Boat Safely, The
Legal Requirements of Boating,
Boating Emergendes...What To
Do, and Enjoying Water Sports
With Your Boat,
Lunch will be brought in from
Subway Sandwich. Snacks and
drinks are provided. In order to
cover the cost of the course mate-
rials and the lunch, we charge $15
for an individual and $10 for each
additional family member.
Since this is the start of a new
season, I thought that I would
explain how you can join the
auxiliary and what you need to
do to volunteer your boat and/
or your time for a worthwhile
endeavor.
What is the Auxiliary?
The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
is the civilian arm of the Coast
Guard. In 1996, Congress enacted
the "Auxiliary Authorization Act"
to enable the Auxiliary to assist
in performing any Coast Guard
function, power, duty, role, mis-
sion, or operation authorized
by law. Even though we assist,
the auxiliary is excluded from
combat missions and law en-
forcement.
The Auxiliary has more than
36,000 members, of which more
than 8,000 are women. While the
Coast Guard recruits teenagers,
most of us auxiliarists are a bit
older. The average age is about


60 and there are 11 members
over 1001
How can you join the aux-
iliary?
In many organizations that
are social, all a member has to
do is to pay dues. The auxiliary
is a little different. Volunteers
in the auxiliary must meet five
general requirements to become
a member. A member must be a
U.S. citizen at least 17 years.of age,
have useful talents or facilities,
pass a Initial Entry Qualification
Course, commit to support the
policies of the Commandant of
the Coast Guard, and submit to a
background check by the Depart-
ment of Homeland Security.
Carolyn Treadon reports for
Flotilla 12:
Our trusted Flotilla Staff Of-
ficer for Member Training Mark
Rosen has set up our first big
training event of the year. On
Saturday, Jan. 24, members will
have the opportunity to get
the required one hour refresher
course for Team Coordination
Training as well as the Opera-
tions training. We all stand to
benefit from the expertise of our
instructors and prepare to meet
the challenges we may face in the
coming year. Last week's landing
in the Hudson River reminds all
of us that we need to be ready for
the unexpected and prepared to
rise to the challenges set before
us. Remember, Safe Boating is
no accident


Couple exchanges

vows in Arran


Mr. and Mrs. Chase Wells


Danny and Wendy Riggs of
Ft. Walton Beach and Bobby
and Karen Wells of Crawford-
ville announce the marriage of
their children, Jessica Amber
Gilmore and Robert "Chase"
Wells. Jessica and Chase en-
joyed an' intimate at-home
ceremony and reception at
the Wells' home in Arran on
Saturday, Jan. 17. River of Life
Pastor Henry Jones, conducted
the ceremony. Following their
honeymoon to The Smokey
Mountains they will reside in
Crawfordville.
Jessica is an FSU graduate
and continues her education


as she completes her last year
of eligibility as an FSU softball
player. Chase is a graduate of
WHS and has received his AA
and Fire Standards from TCC.
He is a specialist in the Florida
Army National Guard and is
anticipating Middle East de-
ployment this spring.
Jessica plans to coach soft-
ball and teach math upon re-
ceipt of her second Bachelor's
degree. Chase expects to be
overseas with the Army for
approximately one year and
plans to pursue a career in law
enforcement upon his return
home.


Two ties and Florida High surprise


Coaches Wallace and Gregg with the graduating senior players on Senior Night.


By JOHN REICH
Special to The Wakulla News
A pair of draws with Godby,
2-2, and Rickards 4-4 by the
Wakulla boys soccer team
shook up the district stand-
ings during the last week of
district matches.
Goals by Brandon Maloy
(Gage Martin assist) and Jef-
frey Bryan (Wayne Murray)
and six saves by War Eagles
goalkeeper Matt Reich kept
the match at a draw.
The tie spoiled Godby's
chances of moving into sec-
ond in the district pairings
and earning a bye-week.
After a lone goal by Wakul-
la's Travis Harrell (Jacob Blume
assist), Rickards scored four
straight goals during the next


50 minutes of physical. play.
Despite trailing 4-1, the War
Eagles fought back by scor-
ing three goals within five
minutes.
Sam Hicks (Austin Lentz
assist), Austin Lentz (Travis
Harrell assist), and Travis Har-
rell (Morgan Henry assist)
stunned the Raiders. Wakulla
goalkeeper Matt Reich col-
lected 12 saves.
The War Eagles traveled
Friday to play a non-district
match against an overcon-
fident 7-5-2 Florida High
squad. Just 38 seconds into
the match, Morgan Henry (as-
sist) launched a deep throw-in
as Travis Harrell easily flipped
the ball over the shocked
goalkeeper. Before the half


ended, Morgan Henry hit net-
ting after a penalty kick as
Wakulla would hold onto the
2-0 shutout. Goalkeeper Matt
Reich collected five saves.
With the win and two draws,
the War Eagles moved up to
3-13-2 overall.
The Rickards game was
Senior Night and at the end of
the game the five graduating
seniors and their parents were
honored on the field.
Coach Robert Wallace and
Assistant Coach Don Gregg
posed with seniors, # 4 Will
Harvey, defender, # 14 Dylan
Andrews, midfielder, # 17
- Jake Blume, defender, # 18
- Sammy Hicks, defender, and
GK Matt Reich goalkeeper..


St. Mark,


First
Feb. 2






Full
Feb. 9


Last
Feb. 16


New
Jan. 26


Major
Activity
Minor
Activity


Coast Guard

Auxiliary Reports

By Jim McGill


=old


-I


m -- v









Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 22, 2009

Former WHS Valedictorian

Myhre receives Bronze Star


U. S. Army Staff Sergeant
Richard Myhre of Crawford-
ville was recently awarded
the Bronze Star Medal and his
third Army Commendation
Medal at award ceremonies
held on Dec. 11 and Dec. 13
at FOB Falcon in southern
Baghdad.
SSG Myhre began his de-
ployment to Iraq in November
2007 as a Sergeant and Sniper
Team Leader assigned to the
Reconnaissance/Sniper Pla-
toon HHC 2-4 INF, 10th Moun-
tain Division. Between De-
cember 2007 and March 2008,
he planned and conducted
more than 100 missions. These
missions provided informa-
tion that gave commanders
a better picture of the Opera-
tional Environment in the East
Rashid District of Baghdad.
In March 2008, Myhre was
selected for promotion to Staff
Sergeant and assumed the du-
ties of a Reconnaissance Squad
Leader. In May 2008, while the
Platoon Sergeant was on R&R,
he was assigned to serve as
the Platoon Sergeant.
During this time under SSG
Myhre's leadership the platoon
was selected to transition from
their Reconnaissance/Sniper


role into a Precision Assault
Platoon. The.platoon was spe-
cially trained by former Special
Operations soldiers to conduct
raids designed to capture High
Value Targets (HVTs).
From May through Decem-
ber 2008, SSG Myhre's platoon
conducted more than 80 raids
across the entire Rashid Dis-
trict, which is approximately
one-fifth of Baghdad. They
successfully captured over
40 HVTs who were senior
leaders in insurgent and ter-
rorist organizations such as
Al-Qaeda, Jaysh Al Mahdi and
Hezbollah. The information
gathered from these raids and
the interrogations of the HVTs
lead to the severe disruption
of Anti-Coalition forces and
significantly improved the se-
curity of Baghdad. SSG Myhre
was awarded the Bronze Star
Medal for exceptionally meri-
torious service throughout
the deployment by Major
General Geoffrey Hammond,
Commander of the Multi-Na-
tional Division-Baghdad.
The award was presented
by Lieutenant Colonel Timo-
thy Watson, SSG Myhre's Bat-
talion Commander.
On Dec. 10, the platoon was


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
New appointees and alter-
nates to the Wakulla County
Planning Commission were
sworn-in, and Mike Falk, Jr. was
chosen again as chairman.
Clerk of Court Brent Thur-
mond conducting the swearing-
ceremony before the start of the
planning commission meeting
on Monday, Jan. 12.
The appointments to the
planning commission are.
Falk and alternate Zach
Schatzman by District 1 County
Commissioner Alan Brock;
Josephus Shingles and al-
ternate Norman Jones by District
2 Commissioner George Green;
Chris Russell and alternate
Jim Stokley by District 3 Com-
missioner Mike Stewart;
Robert Alessi and alternate
Mary Cortese by District 4 Com-
missioner Howard Kessler;
Chuck Hess and alternate
Michael Keys by District 5 Com-
missioner Lynn Artz;
plus member-at-large Helen
Franklin; representing St Marks,
Pam Shields, who was chosen
as vice-chair; Dale Rushton rep-
resenting Sopchoppy; and the
non-voting school board repre-
sentative is Jimmie Dugger.
The only items before the
planning commission were an
application for a variance for
the minimum lot size for a 1.72
acre lot with a home off Arron
Strickland Road and a change of
zoning for a 5.42 acre parcel that
includes the 1.72 acre property,
The planning commission voted
both requests down. Both will
go before the county commis-
sion at its Feb. 3 meeting for a
final decision.
The two homes were part of a
Family Enclave Agreement with
the county commission from
2003, in which the board granted
a variance for the property to
have another home, typically
a trailer, for a family member.
Assistant County Administrator
for Planning Lindsay Stevens
said that such agreements are
made on a case-by-case basis to
allow a family to take in another
family member to deal with
health or financial problems for
a limited time. In this case, the
Family Enclave Agreement was
granted on a year-to-year basis.
It was renewed in 2004, but not
after that.
Sometime later, the property
owner had the land surveyed,
breaking it into two lots, and
it was sold. One of several
problems is that there was no


given the mission to capture a
Joint Special Operations Task
Force HVT who was suspected
to be in southern Baghdad.
Within minutes, SSG Myhre's
platoon planned the mission
and departed FOB Falcon.
While in the midst of rush
hour they successfully identi-
fied, ambushed and detained
the target without a single
shot being fired. For his tacti-
cal expertise and the ability
to execute a complex mission,
SSG Myhre was awarded the
Army Commendation Medal
by Colonel Theodore Martin,
Commander of the 1st Brigade
4th Infantry Division.
SSG Myhre is assigned to
the 4th Brigade 10th Moun-
tain Division at Ft. Polk, La.
that has just returned from
a 13 month deployment to
Iraq.
He is a graduate of the
University of Florida and was
Valedictorian of his class at
Wakulla High School.
Before enlisting in the Unit-
ed States Army he taught and
coached at Wakulla Middle
School and Wakulla High
School.
He is the son of Bob and
Judy Myhre of Crawfordville.


P and Z members sworn in


OFF Th
Out Enl
Please di
any participi
Name
Address

City
State Zip
Phone
e-mail
I_


approval for the subdividing
of the property, and it doesn't
meet the size requirements for
its agricultural zoning.
The 1.72 acre lot is below
the two-acre minimum required
for Rural Residential, thus the
request for a variance; and a
change of zoning sought by
both of the owners on the five
acre tract
Jaime Baze, owner of the
smaller tract, said she and her
husband thought they were
purchasing at two-acre lot when
they bought it.
The problem was apparently
found when the property own-
ers wanted to pull permits the
Baze family for a porch for their
home, and the owner of the
larger tract, Frank Deweese, who
wanted to pu't up a pole barn.
Neither can get a permit without


a resolution to the issue.
Chairman Falk and other
planning commissioners asked
Deweese if he would consider
selling a little more than quar-
ter-acre to Baze to. solve one
problem.
"As far as selling part of my
land," Deweese said, "it just kind
of rubs me the wrong way."
The planning commission
voted both requests down, and
Falk urged the two parties to
"Please work something out
before this gets to the county
commission."
Stevens warned that both
property owners face the issue
of not being able to pull permits
and should they have an issue,
such as central heat going out,
neither would be able to pull a
permit to fix it


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Hello, Dolly! will be 2009 show
Tom Egler, left, and Dennis Fiorini "clown it up" at Hello, Dollyl play practice with
Michele Ingram and Mina Sutton, right.


One of America's best-loved
musicals, Hello, Dollyl, will be
presented by Wakulla Com-
munity Theatre March 13, 14,
and 15 at Sopchoppy School
Auditorium.
Hello, Dollyl was the first
major Broadway show pro-
duced by the Community
Theatre in 1994. Reba Mason,
founder of the Wakulla Com-
munity Theatre, who directed
the 1994 show, is also direct-
ing this production. Joining
Mason as assistant director
and choreographer is Amy
Boland, former assistant direc-
tor of Thomasville Music and
Drama Troupe.
Playing the leading role of
Dolly is Mina Sutton, popular
theatre member who has
played many leading roles
during the Theatre's 17 year
history. Dolly is a matchmaker
who when asked what she
does for a living replies "Some
people paint, some sew...,
meddle."
Hello, Dollyl is the story
of Levi's efforts to marry


T


Horace Vandegelder (Louis
Hernandez), the well known
half-a millionaire, and send
his money circulating among
the people like rain water, the
way her late husband Ephraim
Levi taught her.
Along the way she also suc-
ceeds in matching up a New
York hatshop owner, the wid-
ow, Mrs. Irene Malloy (Laura
Hudson), with Vandegelder's
head clerk, Cornelius Hackel
( Dennis Fiorini); Cornelius'
assistant Barnaby Tucker (Tom
Egler) with Mrs, Malloy's as-
sistant Minnie Fay (Katelyn
Fiorini), and the struggling
artist (Gary Crum), with Van-
degelder's niece Ermengarde
(Michele Ingram).
Other supporting characters
are Gene Lambert (headwaiter
Rudolph), and Earnestina (Lu-
cile Graham).
They are supported by
a talented ensemble which
includes Rena Crum, Caro-
lyn Lambert, Leah McManus,
Jowanna Harvey, Terri Egler,
Mary and Buddy Updegraff,


A


Alicia Wellman., Marilee Moss-
er, Frances Quigg, Nora Gavin,
and Brian and Kristin Dow.
The production staff in-
cludes Mike Mason, sets and
lighting; Mike Sherlock, sound
tech; Carolyn Lambert; sets,
costumes, and props; Mar-
ian Revell, stage manager;
Cori Revell, prompter; Tiffany
Conn, stage crew; and Terri
Price production.
Tickets to the public will go
on sale Feb. 23,
Special reserved seating
in the front center section is
available to Theatre Angels.
Angels are friends of the
Theatre and for their contri-
bution of $100 a couple, they
receive two reserved tickets
to the opening night show
and their names appear in the
program as Theatre Angels, For
information about becoming
Theatre Angels call Marian
Revell at 926-7801, or Reba
Mason at 962-3804. The Friday
and Saturday shows begin at
7:30 p.m. The Sunday matinee
is at 3 p.m.


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Section B


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 22, 2009


First District Court of Appeal returns case to county


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
The First District Court
of Appeal issued an order
reversing the murder convic-
tion and sentence of Jerry Joe
Davis. finding that the trial
judge erred in giving the jury
the standard jury instructions
on manslaughter. The appeal
court ordered the case back for
a new trial.
The reversal and remand
is due to a decision in a simi-
lar case in which the appeal
court found that standard jury
instructions on manslaughter
are potentially confusing to
a jury, who may believe that
an intent to kill is an element
of the crime. That case, deal-
ing with a manslaughter case
from Duval County, has been
certified as a question of great
public importance and sent
to the Florida Supreme Court
for review.
Davis, who is now 76 years
old, was found guilty in a
trial in March 2007 of second
degree murder for killing his


wife, Julia Davis, and was
sentenced to 20 years in state
prison.
In December 2004, Davis,
a retired airline pilot, filed a
missing persons report with
the Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office, saying that his wife of
42 years, who was mentally
ill, had disappeared from their
Crawfordville home. Julia
Davis's body was found in ru-
ral Alabama and she was later
identified through an internet
group of volunteers who try
to match up missing persons
with unidentified bodies. In
an interview in February 2005
with law enforcement officers
to tell Davis that his wife's
body had been found, he con-
fessed to having killed her.
Trial testimony indicated
that, on Dec. 10, 2004, over
morning coffee, the couple
began bickering over their
dogs, and Julia Davis alleg-
edly picked up a knife in a
threatening way and he took
the knife away from her. Then
she came up behind him and


hit him in the head with a
vase. Enraged, he grabbed a
towel with grouper weights in
it and hit her in the head, and
then got a computer cord and
strangled her to death while
telling her, "You're not going
to hurt me anymore."
The couple had two adult
sons, both of whom begged
the court at their father's May
2007 sentencing to let them
take their father home.
The State of Alabama bur-
ied Julia Davis as a Jane Doe
in a pauper's grave.
The First District Court
of Appeal rejected a motion
for a new trial from Warren
Kilpatrick.
Kilpatrick was found guilty
in April 2008 of sale of con-
trolled substance and sen-
tenced to 15 years in prison.
He was also found in violation
of his probation on a 2003
charge of sale of controlled
substance and given a 15 year
prison sentence, concurrent.
Kilpatrick had appealed
claiming that the trial court


erred in .rulings, including
admitting into evidence a
tape recording of Kilpatrick
allegedly selling crack cocaine
to Heather Revell, who was
wired to record the transac-
tion for law enforcement.
Revell, 24, who has a child by
Kilpatrick, agreed to help law
enforcement in exchange for
help with charges she faced
for manufacturing metham-
phetamine.
Revell disobeyed orders
from her police handlers,
and left the area where the
drug deal was supposed to
occur, driving instead to the
end of County Road 22. The
tapes indicate Revell buying
crack from Kilpatrick and then
smoking it. She then drove
back through Sopchoppy and
dropped off Kilpatrick at his
house.
Revell testified against Kil-
patrick at his violation of pro-
bation hearing. He was found
in violation and, when the
new charges were set for trial,
Revell reneged on her deal


with the state and refused to
act as a witness against him.
She was later sentenced to 15
years in prison. On Jan. 7, an
amended order in her case
was filed that suspended her
prison sentence after five
years, with credit for 767 days
served, to be followed by two
years of drug offender proba-
tion and then eight years of
regular probation.
A 21-year-old Crawford-
ville man who crashed into


vodka and a plastic cup with
a drink in the console.
An identification check re-
vealed DiLorenzo's license had
been suspended for failure to
pay a traffic ticket.
In court, DiLorenzo ac-
cepted a plea offer from the
state with the usual first-time
DUI conditions, including nine
months probation, $948 court
costs, 50 hours community
service, six months driver li-
cense revocation, and a 10 day


a deputy's patrol car was in vehicle impound.
court on Thursday, Jan. 8, to Wakulla County Judge Jill
plead to DUI charges. Walker dismissed two tickets
According to court docu- given to DiLorenzo that morn-
ments, in the early morning ing one for open container
hours of Nov. 16, Douglas and another for improper
Martin DiLorenzo backed into backing finding those mat-
a Wakulla County Sheriff's ters were part of the probable
marked patrol car on Whiddon cause for the DUI.
Lake Road. The Florida High- DiLorenzo told the court
way Patrol responded to the that the vehicle he was driv-
accident and a breathalyzer in- ing that night wasn't his, and
dicated DiLorenzo had a blood a restitution hearing was set
alcohol level of .110 a level for Jan. 27 to determine how
of .08 is considered drunk in much he owes for damages
Florida. The trooper also alleg- to the vehicle and for the
edly found an open bottle of sheriff's car.


Court Shorts


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Walter and Joicelyn Powers
recently won a lawsuit against
the Wakulla River Club over
access to mote than 100 acres
of property adjacent to River
Plantation.
"The court would be com-
pelled to find that the Pow-
ers have a valid easement,"
said Wakulla Circuit Judge N.
Sanders Sauls in a ruling from
the bench after a one-day trial
before him on Dec. 12.
Residents of River Planta-


tion had challenged the use of
the gated community's private
road when the Powers indi-
cated plans to develop their
property. At the bench trial,
attorney Brant Hargrove, who
represented"the River Club,'
argued that the Powers have
other possible access to their
land rather than on the gated,
private road.
"River Plantation was al-
ways intended to be... a gated
community in a contained
geographic location," Hargrove
told the court.


But, reviewing the old plats be subdivided into five tracts
of River Plantation, Judge Sauls of 20 acres each.
noted specific access points to More than a dozen resi-
the Powers tract in easements dents of River Plantation
between adjacent lots. attended the trial and they
The judge also noted that appeared disappointed in
the articles of the River Club the result. There was talk as
provided special memberships they left the courtroom that
to the original development perhaps the River Club should
partners that were assigned to take down the gate and deed
the Powers when they bought the road to the county and
the land. let the county maintain it if
The judge determined that, other homeowners could use
based on the number of mem- the road without specifically
berships the Powers were having to pay for its upkeep.
entitled to. that their land may In other matters of the.


court:
Fannie N. Robbins filed
a negligence lawsuit against
Family Dollar Stores claiming
that she was injured during a
visit to the Crawfordville store
in March.
The complaint, filed Dec.
23, alleges that there was
wood or a pallet at the end of
a shopping aisle without an
elevated pennant or warning
device to alert shoppers of its
presence.
"As a direct and proximate
result of the (Family Dollar's)


negligence,... Fannie Robbins
became entangled on the
wood or pallet causing her to
fall," the complaint said.
The complaint alleges that
Robbins suffered bodily in-
jury with pain and suffering,
disability, disfigurement and
other damages.
Robbins is represented
in the lawsuit by the Tal-
lahassee law firm of Boorks,
LeBouef, Bennet, Foster and
Gwartney.


Jury finds for truss company in


lawsuit with Wakulla homeowner


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net\
Needing only a short time
for deliberation after a two-
day trial, a six-person jury
returned a verdict finding for
a truss company against a
homeowner who had refused
to accept delivery of custom
trusses.
The jury found that ho-
meowner Thomas Sumter
owed Wakulla .Truss more
than $16,500 for trusses for
the 5,000 square foot home
Sumter was constructing. Af-
ter Sumter refused to accept
delivery or pay for the materi-
als, the truss company placed
a lien on Sumter's property,
He responded with a law-
suit against the company for


slander of title. The company and went about repairing the
counter-sued him for unjust slab with a new cap.


enrichment for not paying for
the trusses.
Trusses are the supports
that hold up a building's
roof.
A six-person jury and one
alternate heard testimony in
the case during a two-day
trial that began on Monday,
Jan. 5.
Testimony at the trial indi-
cated that Sumter contacted
Wakulla Truss vice-president
Jerry Larson in December 2005
in preparation for building
a home. When construction
began on the home, the initial
contractor reportedly poured
a slab that wasn't level, and
Sumter fired the contractor


That contractor, though,
prior to being fired, had in-
structed Wakulla Truss to
begin building the trusses for
the house, anticipating that
he would need them in two
to three weeks. Wakulla Truss
built the trusses, and the com-
pany was informed about the
problems with the slab. After
90 days without being able to
deliver or get payment for the
trusses, the company notified
Sumter that it would file a lien
against him.
In response, Sumter denied
having ordered the trusses,
and said the company had
failed to come out and mea-
sure the slab to ensure proper


measurements. He apparently
got trusses built by another
truss company.to finish con-
struction.
Sumter was seeking $25,000
in damages a claim rejected
by the jury.


Fire Rescue Report


By JIM POSEY
As the new year has Came
upon us and dry and cool
weather is here, we need to
be very careful of our outdoor
fires. The frost has killed
much of our green grass and
vegetation.
There is very little protec-
tion from a small fire becom-
ing an out of control fire. If


you are burning outdoor fires
please keep in mind the liabil-
ity of that fire. The fires have
to be no larger than an eight
foot cube. It must be yard
trash only, no household rub-
bish Fires must be manned
at all times. They must be out
before dark. If you have any
questions please contact the
Florida Dept. Of Agriculture.


Basic handgun course taught
The Wakulla County Sher- right handgun and more. 962-3687. To register, contact
iff's Office Training Section You must be able to legally Major Larry Massa at 926-0821
is offering a basic handgun own and possess a handgun. or e-mail Imassa@wcso.org
course. The program will be If you have your own hand- This course will be taught
held Jan. 30 from 9 a.m. until gun please bring it'with you by law enforcement firearms
5 p.m. The cost is $40. and approximately 100 rounds instructors, is limited to 15
This Basic Handgun course of ammunition. students, and can be utilized
will include the following top- If you do not own a hand- for the concealed carry license
ics: handgun safety; handgun gun, please contact Sgt. Fred application.
nomenclature; choosing the Nichols or Deputy Ed Tyer at








Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 22, 2009


People


European trip delayed, price reduced


Jerry Johnson, Brandon Alyea at Shell Point.


First responders are

trained at Shell Point


On Thursday, Jan. 8, the
Apalachee Bay Volunteer Fire
Dept. at Shell Point Beach held
First Responder training.
The DOT standard curricu-
lum of 60 contact hurs was
instructed by FF/EMT Jerry
Johnson and FF/EMT Brandon
Alyea, for 20 volunteers.
First Responders, frequent-


ly neighbors, are .often the
first person to arrive at the
scene. The training emphasiz-
es EMS system actiation, how
to provide immediate care for
life threatening injuries and
illnesses, to control the scene
and prepare for the arrival of
the ambulance and other EMT
personnel,


WCHS receives grant


Native American leader Wil-
liam Augustus Bowles, a free
agent who named himself chief
of the Muskogees, sought to cre-
ate an independent state within
Spanish Florida called the Creek
Nation or Muskogee. Bowles'
interactions with British, Span-
ish. and United States forces in
Florida are the subject of a new
exhibit and public program the
Wakulla County Historical Soci-
ety will produce.
The project director is histo-
rian Dr. Madeleine Carr, joined
by Dr. Joe Knetsch (Bureau of
State Lands, DEP) and Dr. An-
drew Frank (FSU Dept. of His-
tory). The exhibit will be titled
"William Augustus Bowles: A
Man Without a Country" and
it will present the changing
relationships in the Spanish


Borderland located along the
Wakulla River.
The Wakulla County His-
torical Society received a $6,000
award to fund this project from
the Florida Humanities Council
(FHC), a state affiliate of the
National Endowment for the
Humanities. FHC is an indepen-
dent nonprofit organization that
funds public programs through-
out the state of Florida.
FHC-funded programs ex-
plore Florida's history, folklore,
environment, literature, music
and art.
The traveling exhibit will
open in November at the San
Marcos de Apalache State His-,
toric Park and will-move to the
Wakulla County Library and
the Wakulla Courthouse dur-
ing 2010..


Last month, the shelter was
filled with puppies Wakulland some

Tail
of the CHAT volunte ers

Susan Yelton ]

Choosing a pet's namescan
be both fun and nerve-rackingl
Last month, the shelter was
filled with puppies and some
of the CHAT volunteers got
really creative selecting names
for the pups. One litter was
named for Santa's reindeer.
They were probably re-named
by their adoptive families, but
we had fun naming them.
If you have ever adopted
from CHAT, you know that
we give all the shelter animals
names and a number so we
can keep track of them and
also register them on Pet-
finder.com. But what a puppy
really needs is name that they
can recognize and has some


By SUZANNE CAMP
The 13 day trip to Italy and Greece
which was originally scheduled for June
2009 has been postponed for a year until
June 2010. Many people had expressed
interest in the trip, but were not able to
come up with the money in the time al-
lotted. In an effort to be able to include
as many people as possible and make
it more affordable, the date was moved
ahead one year.
This exciting trip will take participants
to many historical landmarks as well as
on a Greek Island cruise. The group leader
of the trip is Bob Wallace who is assisted
by Suzanne Camp and Bob Blanton. Al-
though geared toward high school and
college students, teachers or other adults
with an interest in cultural and educa-
tional experiences through international
travel are welcome to participate. Middle
school aged students be accompanied by
a parent or guardian.
The trip is entitled Italy and Greece
with Cruise, but it also takes an excursion
into Turkey. This trip includes a three
day island cruise around the Greek isles.


Some highlights include visiting St. Peter's
Basilica and the Sistine Chapel in Vatican
City, the Colosseum, Pantheon and Trevi
Fountain in Rome, a visit to Pompeii
which is one of the richest archaeo-
logical sites in the world, the temple of
Apollo and the Delphi museum, climb the
Acropolis to view the majestic Parthenon,
visit the temple of the Olympian Zeus, a
cruise with ports of call to several Greek
isles, a visit to Ephesus and the house of
the Virgin Mary where she is believed to
have lived her last years.
Because of the date change, there has
been a price decrease. The current student
cost for this is $3,776 and the adult cost
is $4,341. All prices include round trip air
fare, hotel accommodations with double
occupancy for adults and four students per
room, breakfast and dinner daily, except
on the cruise where three meals daily
are included, all transportation includ-
ing chartered bus, ferry and cruise ship,
bilingual tour guide who accompanies
the group for the entire trip, as well as
local tour guides in specified areas, and
entrances to exhibits, museums, etc.,


which are listed on the trip. Lunch on.
10 of the days, souvenirs and tips are not
included.
The trip is organized by EF Educa-
tional Tours. Go to http://www.eftours.
com/IAG for more information and a
detailed itinerary. The tour number is
698520. Signup has already begun. There
is a one time lifetime membership fee of
$95 which is the minimum signup fee.
The initial deposit of $400 is due 30 days
from the time of signup, unless you want
to pay it at the time you sign up. Once
you have registered, your program fee is
locked in. Until you have signed up, the
program fee is subject to change. The
closer to the date it gets, the price gener-
ally increases. If you have any questions
or are interested in going on one of the
trips, contact one of the sponsors via
e-mail or phone at the numbers listed
below for instructions on how to sign
up. Bob Wallace at rdwallacel@comcast.
net or 877-3111, Suzanne Camp at camps@
embarqmail.com or call 926-1550 (home)
or 251-9620 (cell), or Bob Blanton at 671-
4737 or bcet4fsu@aol.com.


Choose a name for your pet with care


meaning to you and your fam-
ily. Before you set off searching
on an endless list of names,
you need to think about this
new addition. Is he/she a fam-
ily pet, a watchdog, a working
dog, etc.?
If this is a family pet and
the children are very young,
you will probably find that
they like the names from
Walt Disney movies or from
television. Snoopy, Princess,
Tiger or whatever is popular
at the time. Getting together
as a family and letting the
children offer names they
like helps them to bond with
the new pet, but you might
need to also offer suggestions.
Some names just don't fit an
animal's personality. A gentle,
Golden Retriever puppy is not
likely to be Darth Vader.
Now, if you are single, or
have a partner who is as cre-
ative as you are, it can be a lot


of fun naming your new pet.
Nothing is expected of you
and you have a wide range of
ideas to choose from. Themes
offer all types of possibilities.
Are you a lawyer? How about
Justice, Torts, Judge, or Jury?
Are you a sports nut? Well
then, there is Bronco, Bullet,
and Speedy. George Wash-
ington had some of the most
creative names for his hunting
dogs, Drunkard, Tipler and
Tipsy. Fox huntirng at Mt. Ver-
non must have included a lot
of drinking of alcohol.
If none of these ideas ap-
peal to you, here are some
helpful tips in choosing a
name for your dog:
1. Choose a dog name that
your pet can recognize easily.
Pets respond best to one or
two syllable names, such as
Brandi or Rose.
2. Select a dog name that
is easy to say and to call,


not something like Dudley
Puddles.
3. Avoid names that sound
like commands and members
of the family. Sit, stay, come,
fetch or down are all common
commands, A sound like Roe
sounds too much like no and
it would be difficult for your
dog to determine which you
were saying.
4. Study your dog's behav-
ior before naming him. It helps
you pick out just the right
name. Check for personality,
appearance and affection to
see if your chosen name fits.
No matter what you name
your pet, have them chipped
by your veterinarian. The small
cost is worth it. You never
know when your new pet will
find its way off your property.
With a chip, it has a good
chance of being reunited with
you. And please spay/neuter
your pets.


iphassee's .g..

.ft. MChevrolet Malibu LT $ 7,888
2002 Nissan Xterra $ 8,888
-2005 Chevrolet Cobalt $ 8,888
,4 2004 Suzuki Verona $ 8,888
2006 Chevy Aveo $ 8,998
5DRH 'B, .A, i| 16 8,99
2001 Ford Explorer Sport Trac $ 8 88
U-i" 4 1 S. 8,988
2006 Chevrolet Colorado $ 9,888
2005 Chevrolet Trailblazaer LS $ 9
4.1 :*U- (V L':'ML' $ 9,888
2002 Honda Accord Coupe EX-V6 $10,888
2003 Chevrolet Trailblazer LTZ 10,888
UW5. 4:1 11 r. -,3, S 10,888
2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo O 988
2005 Chrysler PT Cruiser Conv Touring s 1,888
2006 Saturn Ion $ s 888
4.3r 1^31'1 .'ll.: T,.", .$i1 1,888
2007 Kia Optima LX $ 1
2005 Chevy Equinox LT $11,888
200 Chevy Impala s 1,888
1 C L.:.CO- $11,888
2007 Kia Optima 1,
40BA ...w, 1> ..... $11,888
2008 Chevy Aveo LT 12,888
DoA& IS L W-i1 M. .ni 1.'X;riMI'm $p 12,888
2004 Ford Mustang Convertible $1 8
Laermf ll iulomu'tl" ii. ,'if.rjr re E-31H & $ 12 88
2005 Chevrolet Impala LS
LBOW. AUJf .L I i m ..... $12,888
2004 Chevrolet Suburban LT $13 888
,207Dodge Grand Caravan SXT $13,888
2006 Nissan Altima S $13, 888
PDWr 63w s 1 l8& ,t .. C.TG ,i',te $ 1 ,8
2008 Pontiac G6 0GT 1
O4DR LAM, HR $14,888
2008 Chevy =HHR l
Z003.Mini Cooper $14, 888
07 Frd Ranger $14,888
Ae. ftAad $14,888
OWNCLa$iet HHR LT $14,888
08 Chevrolet Uplander Van $14,888
S06 Chevrolet Trailblazer LS $14,888
007Chrysler Town & Country $14,988

sAM ,C corolFa $14,988
9,Dodgse Charger SXT $15,888
1098 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe $ 15888
imns oI.p hTm Fjib l. 5 000


2008 Mazda 3
:I i .. -) ., I, ..I -
2004 Ford F150 Crew Cab XLT
2008 Chevy Malibu LS
2008 Chevy Impala LT
2007 Jeep Commander
2008 Chevy Malibu
N- ,, L ,:i: l....,21,-
2007 GMC Canyon SLE
2008 Chevy HHR LT
2008 Mazda Tribute
2006 Mazda Monte Carlo
L-:,10-] 1I m M-1-- L aU,-f
2008 Chevrolet Equinox
2007 Chevrolet Sitverado 500 'Crew Cab LT
2006 GMC Envoy Denali XL
I 6 I.]RO Ala...
2006 Dodge Magnum R/T
2006 Chevrolet Sliverado.1500 Crae Cab LT
2009 Toyota Camry
2005 T'yote 4-Runner Limited,
Lmt Boilt. D U
2008 GMC Envoy SLE
jh.it.mWhna Lowhd1d 6rF Misi
2068 Chevy Impala LTZ
2007 Dodge Nitro RIT
HaTil Ldwtiiri AW-1y LijADTD


mn of

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2005 Ford F1SO Crew Cab Lariat 88
2006 Dodge Chrysler R/T 20,888
HntLOlW 9..i$20,888
2008 Chevrolet Trallblazer 20,888
Lajma, R.oi WhMali..16K .M11i 9$20,888
2008 Chevy Malibu $20,988
2007 Mazda Mazdaspeed 6 $20,888
1, . 1;, `.P i-- 3-' L14$i20,888
2008 Volkswagen Beetle Convertible A
P.-0 T,) ... 1....-2,W ....... i ....10 .. -2 0 ,888
2006 Ford F250 Crew Cab XLT $22,88
2008 Chevorlet 3500 Express 23,888
,l. CIN ..i .... W 'ILL, $23,888
2007 Chevrolet C1500 Crew Cab LTZ 25,888
1.1 L-.-1, $ S25,888
2008 Acura RDX $27 888
2007 Chevrolet Suburban LT $28,888
2007 Chevrolet Tahoe Z71 $29 888
2008 Infinity G37-S 35,888
2007 Chevy Corvette $4, 888
I. -T... $44,888*W *W W


CHAMION.



CHEVROLET9O
ww*camiochvyco


I


I


I











THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 22,2009 Page 3B


Deadline





11:00 A LAbSSif I[ED

926-7102


35 Cents

A 1Per Word



ADS $8.00
Minimum


Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


CATEGORIES
100 EMPLOYMENT
105 Business Opportunities
110 Help Wanted
111 Medical/Dental Help Wanted
112 Office/Administrative Help Wanted
113 Construction Help Wanted
114 Miscellaneous Help Wanted
115 Work Wanted'
120 Services and Businesses
125 Schools and Instruction
130 Entertainment
200 ITEMS FOR SALE
205 Antiques
210 Auctions
215 Auto Parts and Accessories
220 Cars
225 Trucks
230 Motor Homes and Campers
235 Motorcycles and 4-Wheelers
240 Boats and Motors. &
245 Personal Watercraft -
250 Sporting Goods
255 Guns
260 Business Equipment


265 Computers and Internet
270 Electronics
275 Home Furnishings
280 Home Appliances
285 Jewelry
290 Musical Instruments
295 Building Materials I
300 MISC. FOR SALE
305 Machinery, Tools & Equipment
310 Firewood Products
315 Farm & Garden Equipment
320 Farm Products & Produce
325 Horses
330 Livestock, Farm Animals
335 Pets
340 Plants
345 Swap, Barter, Trade
350 Wanted to Buy 40
355 Yard Sales
400 NOTICES
410 Free Items
415 Announcements
420 Card of Thanks
425 Occasion Cards
480 In Memoriam
435 Lost and Found


440 Personals and Notices
500 REAL ESTATE, HOMES, MOBILES
505 Acreage for Lease
510 Acreage for Sale
515 Apartments for Rent
520 Townhouses for Rent
525 Townhouses for Sale
530 Commercial Property for Rent
535 Commercial Property for Sale
540 Farms for Sale
545 Homes for Sale
550 Homes with Acreage for Sale
555 Houses for Rent
560 Land for Sale
565 Mobile Homes for Rent
570 Mobile Homes for Sale
575 Mobile Homes with Land for Sale
580 Rooms for Rent/Roommates Wanted
585 Wanted to Rent
590 Waterfront Homes/Land for Sale
595 Vacation Rental
600 Open House



CALL 926-7102 TODAY
Email: classifieds@thewakullanews.net


Legal Notice




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-CA-100 FC
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSEPJH R. BOWMAN, et al.,
Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to
the Final Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of which is in-
dicated above.
I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the WAKULLA County Courthouse,
3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327, on the 19th day of February,
2009, at 11:00 a.m., the following described
property as set forth in said Order or Final
Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 50, THE GROVE PHASE II, A SUBDIVI-
SION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED N PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 14 OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Property Address: 68 SAND PINE TRAIL,
CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN
THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE IF ANY
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
ORDERED AT WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, this 10th day of DECEMBER,
2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
January 15, 22, 2009






NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION


Notice is given pursuant to Section 328.17
Non-Judicial Sale of Vessels, that Lynn
Brother's Docks will hold a sale by sealed bid
on February 7, 2009 at 9:00 a.m. at 28 Lynn
Circle, St. Marks, FL. 850-925-6083.
1984 Chris-Craft Commander 333
I.D. CCHDW105M84C-33
Reg.# FL3282DK
Owner Leroy M. Means
January 22, 29, 2009




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
FILE NO.: 2008-CP-107-PR
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CHARLES E. HOOK,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DE-
MANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified: that an Order of
Summary Administration And Other Relief has
been entered in the Estate of Charles E.
Hook, deceased, File Number
2008-CP-107-PR, by the Circuit Court for Wa-
kulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the
street address of which is 3056 Crawfordville
Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327; that
the decedent's date of death was March 17,
2008; that the total value of the non-exempt
assets of the estate Is approximately
$7,015.38; and that the name and address to
whom it has been assigned by such prder Is:
Deborah G. LaGrasse
32 Lainey Lane
Crawfordville, Florida 32327
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTI-
FIED THAT: *
All creditors of the estate of the decedent
and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than
those for whom provision for full payment was
made in the Order of Summary Administration
And Other Relief must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLI-
CABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
.January 15, 2009.
Person Giving Notice:
Deborah G. LaGrasse
:32 Lainey Lane
*Crawfordville, Florida 32327
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
Terrence T. Dariotis
Attorney at Law
Florida Bar No. 190057
Post Office Box 16005
Tallahassee, Florida 32317-6005
(850) 523-9300
January 15, 22, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 08-205-FC
WAKULLA BANK, a Florida banking
corporation,
Plaintiff,
'v.

KURT WILLIAM WOLTERS; GINA
KAY WOLTERS; AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;
AND GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC,

Defendants.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a
Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January
6, 2009, entered in Case No. 08-205-FC of
the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit
in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein
WAKULLA BANK, a Florida banking corpora-
tion, is the Plaintiff, and KURT WILLIAM WOL-
TERS; GINA KAY WOLTERS; AND ALL UN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; AND GREEN
TREE SERVICING, LLC are the Defendants,
the undersigned will sell to the highest arid
best bidder for cash at the front doot of the
Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawford-
ville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, at 11:00
o'clock a.m. on February, 12, 2009 the follow-
ing described property as set forth in said Fi-
nal Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit:
Commence at a St. Joe Paper Company con-
crete monument marking the Southwest cor-
ner of Lot 64 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands
in Wakulla County, Florida, and run North 72
degrees 43 minutes 15 seconds East along
the South boundary of said Lot 64 (as monu-
mented) a distance of 1940.00 feet to a re-rod
(marked #4261) marking the POINT OF BE-
GINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING
continue North 72 degrees 43 minutes 15 sec-
onds East along said South boundary (as
monumented) a distance of 1533.12 feet to a
re-rod (marked #4261), thence run North 17
degrees 39 minutes 43 seconds West 603.09
feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence run
South 72 degrees 59 minutes 50 seconds
West 50.4.40 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261),
thence run North 39 degrees 41 minutes 58
seconds West 415.49 feet to a re-rod (marked
#4261), thence run South 72 degrees 45 min-
utes 10 seconds West 380.60 feet to a re-rod
(marked #4261), thence run North 17 degrees
17 minutes 06 seconds West 900.76 feet to a
re-rod (marked #4261) lying on the Southerly
right-of-way boundary of Running Deer Lane,
thence run South 72 degrees 41 minutes 13
seconds West along said right-of-way bound-
ary 241.83 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261),
thence run North 17 degrees 17 minutes 06
seconds West along the Westerly right-of-way
boundary of said Running Deer Lane 60.00
feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence leav-
ing said right-of-way boundary run South 72
degrees 51 minutes 36 seconds West 243.90
feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261),
thence run South 17 degrees 17 minutes 06
seconds East 1951.01 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING containing 40.00 acres, more or
less.
Less and except the following:
Commence at a St. Joe Paper Company con-
crete monument marking the Southwest cor-
ner of Lot 64 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands
in Wakulla County, Florida, and run North 72
degrees 43 minutes 15 seconds East along
the South boundary of said Lot 64 (as monu-
mented) a distance of 1940.00 feet to a re-rod
(marked #4261), thence run North 17 degrees
17 minutes 06 seconds West 579.85 feet,
thence run North 72 degrees 42 minutes 54
seconds East 100.00 feet to a re-rod (marked
#7160) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING.
From said POINT OF BEGINNING run North
17 degrees 17 minutes 06 seconds West
616.05 feet to a re-rod (marked #7160),
thence run North 72 degrees 42 minutes 54
seconds East 135.73 feet to a re-rod (marked
#7160), thence run North 17 degrees 17 min-
utes 06 seconds West 70.00 feet to a re-rod
(marked #7160), thence run North 72 degrees
42 minutes 54 seconds East 71.64 feet to- a
re-rod (marked #7160), thence run North 31
degrees 57 minutes 36 seconds East 72.36
feet to a re-rod (marked #7160), thence run
North 72 degrees 42 minutes 54 seconds East
100.03 feet to a re-rod (marked #7160),
thence run North 17 degrees 17 minutes 06
seconds West 30.00 feet to a re-rod (marked
#7160), thence run North 72 degrees 42 min-
utes 54 seconds East 60.00 feet to a re-rod
(marked #7160), thence run South 17 de-
grees, 17 minutes 06 seconds East 236.15
feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence run
North 72 degrees 45 minutes 10 seconds East
380.60 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261),
thence run South 39 degrees 41 minutes 58
seconds East 415.49 feet to a re-rod (marked
#4261), thence run South 17 degrees 16 min-
utes 45 seconds East 25.64 feet to a re-rod
(marked #7160), thence run South 72 degrees
43 minutes 15 seconds West 924.76 feet to
the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 10.00
acres more or less.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, If any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Is pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after sale.
DATED this 9th day of January, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
January 22, 29, 2009



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 08-207-FC
WAKULLA BANK, a Florida banking
corporation,
Plaintiff,


KURT WILLIAM WOLTERS; GINA
KAY WOLTERS; AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;
AND GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC,

Defendants.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a
Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January
6, 2009, entered in Case No. 08-207-FC of
the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit
in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein
WAKULLA BANK, a Florida banking corpora-
tion, is the Plaintiff, and KURT WILLIAM WOL-
TERS; GINA KAY WOLTERS; AND ALL UN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; AND GREEN
TREE SERVICING, LLC are the Defendants,
the undersigned will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at the front door of the
Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawford-
ville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, at 11:00
o'clock a.m. on February, 12, 2009 the follow-
ing described property as set forth in said Fi-
nal Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit:
Commence at a St. Joe Paper Company con-
crete monument marking the Southwest cor-
ner of Lot 64 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands
in Wakulla County, Florida, and run North 72
degrees 43 minutes 15 seconds East along
the South boundary of said Lot 64 (as monu-
mented) a distance of 1940.00 feet to a re-rod
(marked #4261), thence run North 17 degrees
17 minutes 06 seconds West 579.85 feet,
thence run North 72 degrees 42 minutes 54
seconds East 100.00 feet to a re-rod (marked
#7160) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING.
From said POINT OF BEGINNING run North
17 degrees 17 minutes 06 seconds West
616.05 feet to a re-rod (marked #7160),
thence run North 72 degrees 42 minutes 54
seconds East 135.73 feet to a re-rod (marked
#7160), thence run North 17 degrees 17 min-
utes 06 seconds West 70.00 feet to a re-rod
(marked #7160), thence run North 72 degrees
42 minutes 54 seconds East 71.64 feet to a
re-rod (marked #7160), thence run North 31
degrees 57 minutes 36 seconds East 72.36
feet to a re-rod (marked #7160), thence run
North 72 degrees 42 minutes 54 seconds East
100.03 feet to a re-rod (marked #7160),
thence run North 17 degrees 17 minutes 06
seconds West 30.00 feet to a re-rod (marked
#7160), thence run North 72 degrees 42 min-
utes 54 seconds East 60.00 feet to a re-rod
(marked #7160), thence run South 17 de-
grees, 17 minutes 06 seconds East 236.15
eet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence run
North 72 degrees 45 minutes 10 seconds East
380.60 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261),
thence run South 39 degrees 41 minutes 58
seconds East 415.49 feet to a re-rod (marked
#4261), thence run South 17 degrees 16 min-
utes 45 seconds East 25.64 feet to a re-rod
(marked #7160), thence run South 72 degrees
43 minutes 15 seconds West 924.76 feet to
the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 10.00
acres more or less.
Together with a 20.00 foot wide access ease-
ment being more particularly described as fol-
lows:
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the is pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after sale.
DATED this 9th day of January, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)

January 22, 29, 2009





IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 65-2007-CA-000098-FC-XXXX
COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC.
Plaintiff,
vs.
TAMI HURLEY, et al.,
Defendants,


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure in-
cluding Award of Attorney's Fees and Costs
dated January, 12, 2009, entered in Case no.
65-2007-CA-000098-FC-XXXX of the Circuit
Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for
Wakulla County, Florida wherein COUNTRY-
WIDE HOME LOANS, INC. is the Plaintiff and
TAMI HURLEY and ___ HURLEY, un-
known spouse of TAMI HURLEY, if married;
JOHN DOE and JANE DOE is/are Defen-
dants, will sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash, at in the City of Crawfordville, Florida
at 11:00 o'clock a.m., on Wednesday, the 12th
day of February, 2009, the following described
property, as set forth in said Summary Final
Judgment of Foreclosure Including Award of
Attorney's Fees and Costs, to-wit:
Lot 10 of CRESTWOOD FIRST ADDITION,
according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 2, at Page 7, of the Public Records
of Wakulla County, Florida.
Dated this 12th day of January, 2009
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
January 22, 29, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-500-DR
DIVISION
Donovan Patrick McCulley
Petitioner,
and
Minor Child
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
STEP PARENT ADOPTION
To: David Rager
2025 Stallion Avenue
Tallahassee, FL 32309
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has
been filed against you and that you are re-
quired to serve-a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on Donovan Patrick McCul-
ley, whose address is 35 Nelson Rd., Craw-
fordville, FL 32327 on or before February 2,
2009, and file the oinal with the ginal with the clerk of this
Court at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Craw-
fordville, FL 32327 before service on Peti-
tioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to
do so, a default may be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this case, in-
cluding orders, are available at the Clerk- of
the Circuit Court's office. You may review
these documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office notified of your current address. (You
may file Notice of Current Address, Florida
Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form
12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be
mailed to the address on record at the clerk's
office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law
Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and information. Fail-
ure to comply can result in sanctions, Includ-
ing dismissal or striking of pleadings.
Dated December 30, 2008
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
January 8, 15, 22, 29, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 08-CA-157
BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SELOUS ESTATES, LLC. A FLORIDA COR-
PORATION, et al.,
Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to
the Final Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of which is in-
dicated above.
I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse at
3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327, on the 12 day of February,
2009, at 11:00 a.m., the following described
property as set forth in said Order or Final
Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 27, TRADEWINDS, A SUBDIVISION AS
PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 7, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA,
FLORIDA.,
TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN BOAT
SLIP DESCRIBED AS LOT 32, BLOCK D,
MARINA VILLAGE OF PANACEA, RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 47, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN
THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
ORDERED AT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA, this 7th day of January, 2009
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
January 22, 29, 2009



LEGAL NOTICE
Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Stor-
age Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83,
Part IV that Seminole Self Storage will hold a
sale by sealed bid on January 30, 2009 at
10:00 a.m. at 2314 Crawfordville Hwy., Cra-
fordville, Florida 32327, of the contents of
Mini-Warehouse containing personal property
of:
CASSANDRA THOMAS
JEFFREY METCALF
ANGEL TAYLOR
Before the sale date of January 30, 2009. The
owners may redeem their property by pay-
ment of the Outstanding Balance and cost by
mailing it to 2314 Crawfordville Hwy., Craw-
fordville, Florida, 32327, or by paying in per-
son at the warehouse location.
January 15, 22, 2009



INVITATION TO BID
The Wakulla County Sheriff's Office Is accept-
ing written bids from all qualified and inter-
ested parties for a Motor Vehicle Fleet Full
Service Oil Change Contract. Parties inter-
ested In preparing a response to this bid need
to go to www.wcso.org and complete the re-
quirements set forth in the attached docu-
ments.
January 15, 22, 2009


NOTICE OF ACTION
CASE NO.: 2007-10942

BEFORE THE BOARD ON NURSING
IN RE: The license to practice nursing of
Ladonna L. Rewis, C.N.A.
45 Otter Lake Road, Apt. 108
Panacea, Florida 32346
LICENSE NO.: C.N.A. 114051
The Department of Health has filed an Admin-
istrative Complaint against you, a copy of
which may be obtained by contacting, Walter
Widener, Assistant General Counsel, Prose-
cution Services Unit, 4052 Bald Cypress Way,
Bin #C65, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3265,
(850) 245-4640.
If no contact has been made by you concern-
ing the above by February 19, 2009, the mat-
ter of the Administrative Complaint will be pre-
sented at an ensuing meeting of the Board of
Nursing in informal proceeding.
In accordance with the Americans with Dis-
abilities Act, persons needing a special ac-
commodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact the individual or agency send-
ing this notice no later than seven days prior
to the proceeding at the address given on the
notice. Telephone: (850) 245-4640,
1-800-9558771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770(V),
via Florida Relay Service.
January 15, 22, 29, 2009
February 5, 2009


SECTION 00020
INVITATION TO BID
SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSIONERS ,
SOPCHOPPY TRAIN DEPOT RESTORA-
TION
CLEMONS, RUTHERFORD & ASSOCIATES,
INC.
2027 THOMASVILLE ROAD
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32308
PHONE (850) 385-6153
You are invited to bid on a General Contract,
including mechanical and electrical work for
the historic restoration of the Train Depot in
Sopchoppy, Ft. The construction consists of
approximately 1,200 sq. ft. of renovations. All
Bids must be on a lump sum basis; segre-
gated Bids will not be accepted.
All Bidders are to submit with Bid Package, a
properly executed "Contractor's Qualification
Statement" AIA Document A-305 which is to
include a current financial statement, an expe-
rience, competence and performance report,
and references from at least three prior pro-
jects similar In size and scope, along with the
name of a contact person on each of those
projects.
Clemons Rutherford & Associates will receive
sealed bids until 2:00 PM on Thursday, Febru-
ary 5, 2009 at the offices of Clemons Ruther-
ford & Associates, 2027 Thomasville Road,
Tallahassee, Florida. Bids received after that
time will not be accepted. Bids will be opened
publicly and read aloud at 2:01 PM of the
same date.
Copies of the Bidding Documents may be ex-
amined at the Architect's office,
Clemons, Rutherford & Associates
2027 Thomasville Road
Tallahassee, Florida
(850) 385-6153
at F. W. Dodge, 1311 Executive Center, Suite
108, Tallahassee, Florida. Drawings will be
available after 12:00 noon on Monday, Janu-
ary 19, 2009.
General Contractors and Mechanical, Plumb-
ing and Electrical Subcontractors may obtain
copies of the Bidding Documents at the Archi-
tect's office in accordance with the Instructions
to Bidders upon depositing the sum of
. $150.00 for each set of Documents. Contrac-
tors will be limited to two (2) sets of Bidding
Documents and Mechanical, Plumbing and
Electrical Subcontractors will be limited to one
(1) set, Bidders may receive bid documents in
one of the following manners: (1) bring deposit
check and pick up bid documents at te Archi-
tect's office; (2) mail In deposit check and bid
documents will be shipped by UPS ground
$15.00 C.O.D. to cover shipping and handling;
or (3) mail in deposit check and include a
separate check of $8.00 for handling and your
FedEx or UPS account number for shipping.
Other interested parties may purchase com-
plete sets of Bidding Documents for the sum
of $150.00 for each set, which is non-refund-
able.
Bidders may obtain a refund of their deposit
by returning the complete Bidding Documents
In good condition no later than ten (10) calen-
dar days after the opening of Bids. Bidders
who do not submit a Bid will forfeit their de-
posits unless Bidding Documents are returned
n good condition three (3) days prior to the
BI Opening.
A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held
for General Contractors on Tuesday, January
27, 2009 at Sopchoppy City Hall, 100 Munci-
pal Way, Sopchoppy, FL 32358. All questions
at the Pre-Bid Conference by General Con-
tractors and Subcontractors shall be pre-
sented on the "Request for Clarification" form.
See Section 00100 Instructions to .Bidders.
Bid Security in the amount of five percent (5%)
of the Bid must accompany each Bid In accor-
dance with the Instructions to Bidders.
A letter from a bonding company must accom-
pany each bid, stating that the bidder is capa-
ble of obtaining all bonds required by the Con-
struction Documents.
The Sopchoppy City Commissioners reserves
the right to waive Irregularities and to reject
any and all Bids.
January 15, 22, 29, 2009



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO.: 65-2007-CA-000130-FC-XXXX
CITIMORTGAGE, INC.
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
MICHAEL T. LILLIMAN; TANYA E. LILLIMAN;
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFEN-
DANT(S WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE


UIAU JU.M ALIVr, vvrln5Il-crl OAIu IUN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC.; JOHN DOE AND JANE
DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSES-
SION DEFENDANTS)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated January 13, 2009 entered in Civil Case
No. 65-2007-CA-000130-FC-XXXX of the Cir-
cuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for
WAKULLA County, Florida, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at THE
FRONT DOOR at the WAKULLA County
Courthouse located at 3056 CRAWFORD-
VILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, in,
Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 12 day of Febru-
ary, 2009 the following described property as
set forth In said Summary Final Judgment, to
wit:
PARCEL 6
A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE WEST HALF
OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF LOT 58
OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF THE
LANDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA;
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF ,
THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST
QUARTER OF LOT 58 OF THE HARTSFIELD
SURVEY OF THE LANDS IN WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA- THENCE RUN ALONG
THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID NORTH-
EAST QUARTER OF LOT 58 (ALSO BEING
NORTH BOUNDARY OF KIRKLAND ES-
TATES), NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES
30 SECONDS EAST, 563.63 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT BEING THE
POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE HEREIN DE-
SCRIBED PARCEL; THENCE CONTINUE
ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY NORTH
72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 30 SECONDS.
EAST, 436.21 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT; THENCE RUN ALONG THE
EAST BOUNDARY OF THE WEST HALF OF
SAID NORTHEAST QUARTER OF LOT 58,
NORTH 17 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 50 SEC-
ONDS WEST, 536.62 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 72
DEGREES 01 MINUTES 59 SECONDS
WEST, 443.56 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE
OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY; THENCE
RUN ALONG SAID CENTERLINE SOUTH 17
DEGREES 58 MINUTES 01 SECONDS
EAST, 142.72 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE
OF A 60.00 FOOT CUL-DE-SAC; THENCE
CONTINUE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 58 MIN-
UTES 01 SECONDS EAST, 390.22 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING; CONTAINING
5.40 ACRES MORE OR LESS.
SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING:
A 60 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT LYING
30 FOOT EACH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING
DESCRIBED CENTERLINE:
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT
IN THE OLD ARRAN ROAD MARKING THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE WEST
HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF
LOT 58 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE
RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 43
SECONDS EAST 515.50 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE CENTER-
LINE TO BE DESCRIBED HEREIN. FROM'
SAID POINT OF BEGINNING: THENCE RUN
SOUTH 17 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 36 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 483.83 FEET; THENCE RUN
SOUTH 35 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 28 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 100.12 FEET; THENCE RUN
SOUTH 17 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 01 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 1,016.27 FEET TO THE CEN-
TER OF A 60 FOOT CUL-DE-SAC AND THE
END OF THE CENTERLINE DESCRIBED
HEREIN.
THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY BE-
ING SUBJECT TO A 200 FOOT TRANSMIS-
SION LINE TO THE FLORIDA POWER COR-
PORATION.
SUBJECT TO THE TERMS AND CONDI-
TIONS OF DECLARATION OF COVENANTS
AND RESTRICTIONS DATED ON THE 31ST
DAY OF AUGUST, 1982, AND RECORDED
IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 90, PAGE
588 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WA-
KULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the lis pendens,
must file a claim within 60 days after the sate.
Dated this 13 day of January, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
January 22, 29, 2009




Notice of Recelot of Stormwater Application
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to
Chapter 373, Florida Statutes and Chapter
62-346, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.),
the following application for an Individual
Stormwater Permit has been received by the
Northwest Florida Water Management District:
Application #572 received December 31,
2008, from the Florida Department of Correc-
tions for construction of an 8,899 sq. ft.
Bachelor Officer Quarters building and storm-
water management system at the existing Wa-
kulla Correctional Institution at 110 Melaleuca
Dr., Crawfordville.
Interested persons may comment upon these
applications or submit a written request for a
staff report containing proposed agency action
regarding the application by writing the North-
west Florida Water Management District's
ERP Office, Suite 2-D, The Delaney Center
Building, 2252 Killearn Center Blvd., Tallahas-
see, FL. Such comments or requests must be
received by 5:00 p.m. within 14 days from
date of publication.
No further public notice will be provided re-
garding these applications. Persons wishing
to remain advised of further proceedings or to
receive a copy of the Technical Staff Report
should request that in writing to the address
above or by e-mail to
ErpPermits@nwfwmd.state.fl.us.
Substantially affected persons are entitled
to request an administrative hearing, pursuant
to Title 28, Florida Administrative Code, re-
garding the proposed agency action by sub-
mitting a written request after reviewing the
staff report.
January 22, 2009


8 23 17 NONvuvn.new. SALE O S


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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 22, 2009


Legal Notice



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 65-2008-CA-000198
DIVISION
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
vs.

ROBIN WHITMIRE, at al,
Defendantss.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure
dated December 11, 2008 and entered In
Case No. 65-2008-CA-000198 of the Circuit
Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and
for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Is the Plaintiff and
ROBIN WHITMIRE; THE FLOWERS SUBDI-
VISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIA-
TION, INC.; are the Defendants, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash at
FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the
19th day of February, 2009, the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment:
LOT 6, THE FLOWERS, PHASE 1, A SUBDI-
VISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
ASRECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES
49-52, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WA-
KULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
'A/K/A 54 VIOLET LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE,
FL 32327
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, If any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within sixty (60) days after
the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the
seal of this Court on January 13, 2009.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
January 22, 29, 2009



NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice Is hereby given that the following vehi-
cle will be sold for towing and storage, charges
pursuant to F.S. 713.78
Date of sale: February 6, 2009 at 9:00 a.m.
Vehicle:
2000 Chrysler Van
VIN: 2C4GJ44G3YR671481
All sales to be held at Hobby Brothers Truck
and Auto Salvage
1502 Shadeville Rd.
Crawfordvllle, FL 32327
850-926-7698


~~jjtiess


APALHEE


Apalachee Center, Inc. is a Joint
Commission Accredited
behavioral health center
dedicated to assisting consumers
of mental health and addiction
services. We are making a
difference in our community by
empowering our clients to
manage their Illness and take
back control of their lives. We are
recruiting for the following
available positions:
Recovery Specialist
Qualifications:
Bachelor's degree with a major in
psychology, social work,
counseling, or other related
human services field and one
year of related professional
experience; prior work experience
with adults experiencing serious
mental illness required.
Responsibilities:
Facilitating linkages between
clients and their families and
appropriate community support
services; providing case
management services, including
assessing client's goals, plans
and other duties as assigned.
To view a complete listing of our
opportunities, please visit our
w e b s i t e :
www.apalacheecenter.org
Applications are received in
person or mail to: Human
Resources 2634-J Capital Circle
N.E., Tallahassee, FL 32308
Pre-Hire Drug Screen & FDLE
background check
An Equal Opportunity/
Affirmative Action Employer
Drug-Free Workplace

114 Miscellaneous Help
Wanted


IV


January 22, 2009 Do you Love Me?
pportuni- Say it in the News. $5 for every 10
words in your LOVE MESSAGE!
850-926-7102 or
classifieds@thewakullanews.net


120 Services and Busi-
I nesses


A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING
Free Estimates
Licensed John Farrell
926-5179
566-7550

ALL ABOUT...
CONCRETE LANDSCAPE,
blocks plants
bricks sod
pavers tractor work
call JOSEPH FRANCIS
850-556-1178 / 850-926-9064


BACK FORTY TRACTOR
SERVICE Bushhogging, Box-
blading Driveway. Larry Carter
Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931,
850-694-7041. Licensed/Insured.
Certified Med-Tech/Home Health
Aid, will care for your loved one.
15-yrs. experience, excellent ref-
erences. Best rates around!
850-933-9162.
CJ's Lawn Services & More
(Ask about the more!)
850-421-9365 (If we don't answer,
please leave message)


BRIG YOUR OL
PHOTOS TO LIFE!!
I can fix those
wonderful old pictures
so you can enjoy them
again, and make
copies to share.

Keep the family heritage
alive with restored
;L '. photographs

SJust $15 perphoto.
850-766-7655
dougapple@gmail.com



110 Help Wanted


NOW hiring P/T Janitor. Hours 4
p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday to Friday.
Call Chuck Harper 850-528-7295


Part-time help needed for the care
and feeding of non-venomous
snakes. Please call 850-926-6248.


Social Worker
This full-time position is based out
the Carrabelle office and covers the
Franklin county team. Must have a
Master's degree in Social Work.
Two years of hospice experience
preferred.
Professional Relations
Representative
Part-time; 20 hrs per week. This
position will educate and assist
referral sources with all aspects of
hospice care. B.A. in a health care
service field or RN licensure
required. Minimum' 2 years
marketing, professional relations
and/or sales experience with a
minimum of 5 years clinical
experience preferred. Excellent
communication and public
speaking skills a must.
Great benefit package!
Interested candidates can apply in
person at 2889 Crawfordville Hwy,
Suite C, Crawfordville, FL 32327
or by faxing a resume to: 850-325-
6290 or email your resume to
elba@bigbendhospice.org
EOE/DFWP/ADA
Smoke Free Workplace


106W. 5th Ave.
Tallahassee, FL 32303 Savannah Frest
(850) 222-2166 tel. $39,900. 1 ae. tracts off
www.wmleeco.com Wakulla Aaron Rd.


Steeplechase $79,900 to $99,900.
5 ac. Wooded tracts. Horse friendly
SfUbdivision has underground electric
and water.
Located off of Lower Bridge Road.
Walkers Mill
$57,900. 2 ac. lots, located on
Lower Bridge Road.
Sellrs Crossing
$59,900. 1+ ac lots
North Wakulla Co..
On Ace High Stable Rd.


In-home daycare, Crawfordville,
has openings. 6wks & up. Before
& after school kids welcome. Rea-
sonable rates. Call 926-3547 or
879-4010 for more Information.


Wakulla Sparkles, LLC
Cleaning service
Licensed & Insured
References available
Residential
Commercial
Move-In,
Move-Out


850-590-7853
CALL FOR A FREE ESTIMATE
wakullasparkles@yahoo.com

125 Schools and Instruc-L
tions

Michelle Snow
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
926-7627
Music lessons of all types for all
ages.


130 Etertain


250 Sporting Goods


320 Farm Products & 510 Acreage for Sale
I Produce | I |


Boiled peanuts (green) $3.00/Lb.
Blanched peas and farm fresh
eggs. Raker Farm 926-7561.

340 Plants


Do You Love Me?
Say it in the News. $5 for every 10
words in your LOVE MESSAGE!
850-926-7102 or
classifieds@thewakullanews.net


270 Electronics


I Do You Love Me?


Say it in the News. $5 for every 10
words in your LOVE MESSAGE!
850-926-7102 or
classifieds@thewakullanews.net

415 Announcements


iment .
Do You Love Me? :
Say it in the News. $5 for every 10
words in your LOVE MESSAGE!
850-926-7102 or
classifieds@thewakullanews.net

S275 Home Furnishings
bn s Do You Love Me?
$160 brand name queen mattress Say it in the News. $5 for every 10
S set, unused with warranty, words in your LOVE MESSAGE!
222-7783 850-926-7102 or


Do you Love Me?
Say it in the News. $5 for every 10
words in your LOVE MESSAGE!
850-926-7102 or
classifieds@thewakullanews.net

210 Auctions


abalauction.com
ESTATE TRUST
COINS,
INTERNET ONLY
850-510-2501 AB2387


235 Motorcycles and 4-
: Wheelers ,


Hardly used electric bicycle. Runs
18-miles/per/hour. Road-ready,
looks like 10-speed. Must see!
Really neat. No driver's license


100% Leather Living Rm. Set,
Lifetime Warranty. NEW, still in
crate. List $1999. Let go for $649.
545-7112. Can deliver.
5 piece 100% MicroFiber Living
Room set complete with tables
$599, All New in boxes. Delivery
available. 222-7783.
6-piece, Pub Table & chairs, solid
wood. New in crate. List $1200,
Take $449. 425-8374

A new Queen Orthopedic Pillow-
top Mattress Set in sealed plastic
$279.. Warranty. Can deliver.
850-222-7783.
Canopy Bed Brand New in box.
$129. 222-9879.

Cherry New Queen sleigh 7-pc
bedroom set $2,400 value, must
sell $1,000. 425-8374 Delivery
available.
FULL mattress sets $150. TWIN
mattress sets $125. All NEW.
545-7112. Delivery available.


needed. $350/firm 850-933-9162
d300 Misc. for Sale
240 Boats and Motors ,
2 -1, o-6--l-yu o o


2000 EDGEWATER
18.5 FT.
with V-6 Mercury,
Aluminum Trailer.
EXTREMELY CLEAN!
$8,500
CALL 352-527-3555


Fisn for stocKing your pond or
lake. Coppernose bluegill, shell-
cracker, channel catfish, mos-
quitofish, and grass carp. Call
(850)547-2215.

310 Firewood Products


YOURNEWSPAPER

4{ PEOPLE

S SERVING Do You Love Me?
s PEOPLE Say it in the News. $5 for every 10


words in your LOVE MESSAGE!
850-926-7102 or
classifieds@thewakullanews.net


The Farm- s269,500
12 Carriage Drive, Crawfordville, FL
Immaculate 2255 Sq. Ft 4 BR/2Z BA
home. Beautifully landscaped back-
yard with a privacy fence & screened
pool/waterfall. Lots of extras wood
floors in main living area, fireplace,
sunroom, master suite w/trey ceilings,
deluxe master bath, security system,
and much more.


Carmen Rocio 2 ac. lot off
Shadeville Hwy near
Wakulla Station. $64,900.
2 acre tract with large
hardwoods in Beechwood
Subdivision off Shadeville
Hwy. $52,900.
Two 5+ acre tracts off
Rehwinkel Rd. w. large trees on
the back of properties & a small
pond. Can be
purchased together.
$134,750 and $136,250.


***Brand New Subdivision***
Carmen Maria -$29,900.
Lots up to 1 ac. in size.
Underground electric and Wa-
ter. Conveniently located to
Tallahassee and Lake Talquin.


Call
Donna Card
850-508-1235
gl a',


**Affordable & Convenient**
Montelo $34,900,
Located off, Belair Road. Under-
ground electric, water, & sewer.
Convenient to Tallahassee, St
Marks Bike Trail, and all the sur-
rounding recreational areas.


classifieds@thewakullanews.net

435 Lost and Found

Lost 16 ft. aluminum extended
ladder fell off truck between Smith
Creek and St. Marks Powder
Plant. If found, please call Daryl at
962-9952 or 926-3836.

500 Real Estate









PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it ille-
gal
to advertise "any preference, limi-
tation, or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or national ori-
gin or an intention to make any
such preference, limitation or dis-
crimination." Familial status in-
cludes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing the custody of
children under the age of 18.
This newspaper will not accept
any advertising for real estate
that is a violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To com-
plain of discrimination call HUD
toll free at 1-800-669-9777. The
toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.



LENDER


I mommom


850-926-5725
www.stowawaycenter.com


Great-Location! 1,200sq.ft. Craw-
fordville Hwy. adjoining The Wa-
kulla News. Three offices, recep-
tion, waiting area, large kitchen.
$1;000/mo. Call 926-6289 or
421-2792.

* GRADE-A OFFICE SPACE*
Hwy. frontage offices avail. Great at-
mosphere. Rent + tax includes:
utilities, trash p/u and kitchen use.
Common area cleaned. 1st and last
month's rent. One month free with
13/mo lease. Call 926-4511 for info.
CALL (850) 926-4511

Woodville Retail
Space Available
Fitness Studio-1000/sf
(Wall to wall mat & mirrors)
Retail -1250/sf
(Storefront w/back storage)
Two-Bay Garage-1200/sf
Divided Office Space-1074/sf
Lewiswood Center
421-5039

545 Homes for Sale



FOR SALE / FOR RENT
FOR LEASE TO OWN
4BR/2BA, on 3 lots in Wakulla
Gardens at 23 Neeley Road.
1800sq.ft. Completely
Renovated
Call Nick at 850-766-7750


NOBLIN, INC.
MA'IORS
Real Estate Sales
& Rentals
2650-1 Crawfordville Hwy.
Office: (850) 926-2994
www.coldwellbankerwakulla.com


S I r TGal"pnBirloker
Shell oi Crawfordville
926-7811 926-5111
Florida Coastal Silver Coast
Properties, Inc. Realty
CONTRACTOR'S DELIGHT! Fi\e separate high
dri buildable 60\ 120 lots Great % isibilit from Sprin
Creek Highway! Lis-ting #4.' 11.4X10,.4809 &4802
Priced front $ 1.000

THE AFFORDABLE DREAM! Wake up to beauti
living for real world d price. Gated commumnt just off
Ochlockonee Sopchopp. RjI ers. County maintained
launch adjoins proper on the South side. Prices start
at $185,000 for these dream come true building lots for'
upscale coastal homes Property #3050VW.
RENTALS
SNUG HARBOR To\wnhome a\ ailable for rent at $1.5
month, secanty deposit required Communmt pool, docks
deep-water canal located in a gated community. NO PETS.

SHELL POINT 2BR 2BA ground letel home % pool.
Long term 1 51,00 month % iLh applicable deposits. Short--
term lease asallable -- call office for details NO PETS
FULRNISHED 2BR 2 5 Condo $1.200 month. secunrN
deposit required. NO PETS #634\\
SHELL POINT BEACH. unfurnished 3BR 2BA home on"
K deep-hater canal $L1.000, month. secuntr deposit required.
NO PETS #3-4t12-%k

OCHLOCKONEE BAY 3BR 2BA furnimshed waterfront
s: house $1.000 month. ;ecuntr deposit required PE TS
~ALLOWED H6343\\

SEASONAL Snug Harbor To%%nhome available for rent at.'
$1.5110t \week. 2-v.eek nm.\iinum schedule in an,, given month.
lommunit. pool. docks on deep-u aicr canal located in a gat
unit, No PETS

.2009 IS THE DATE TO LOOK. LINGER & RE-.LCA
SO GO FOR THE GOLD!
, \\ \\ \ C1 -C(PC )OMN

Ochlockonee Bay 984-5007


Five Star Plumbing
Big Bend, Inc. ) ak llla Ato W

Commercial #
& Residential .,ni
Service -01p

Billy B. Rathel, Jr.
850-544-5062
850-421-1237 Fax
plumbingfjive.star@yahoo.com-
Lic#CFC1427547 State Certified
Harold Burse Stump Grinding December 2006
926-7291. Top Producer








Linda Pitz
&510-3191
(502-7(850
a.MI www.shell


Very nice 5 acre treed pasture lot
for your new home.
Close to Crawfordville yet private.
$129,000 919-880-6152 (Alltel).

515 Apartments for Rent


Efficiency apartment (1BR/living
room) for rent. Electric/water In-
cluded. $550/mo. References re-
quired. Near Wakulla Middle
School. Call 926-5575 or
459-7162.

Fantastic view from wrap deck.
Shell Point studio apartment has
full size kitchen, huge bath, W/D,
and king Murphy bed. Fully fur-
nished. $600/month plus utilities,
6-month lease. 850-591-3306.

Large room for rent, with bath,
fridge & microwave. On Wakulla
river. Separate entrance.
$85/week. Utilities included.
850-926-2783.
1530 Comm. Property for
Rent

ASK ABOUT OUR
MOVE-IN SPECIALS
-~Self Storage Units
~ Boat/RV Storage
~ Retail Space Available
~ Locks, Boxes & More
SStow
Away


I -- Emmod











555 Houses for Rent


10 Maxson Rd, Wakulla Gardens
Beach Style Duplex
in Wakulla
Top unit 2BR/1BA,
w/Hardwood Firs., large
screened porch. $825/mo.
includes utilities, Call Bob
at 850-545-6010.

2BR/1BA house, 161 Hickory
Ave., Crawfordville. $500/month,
$300 deposit. Call 850-570-0575
or 850-528-7295
2BR/1BA in Wakulla Gardens. 59
Chicopee. New 2006 home. Tile,
carpet, new appliances, washer,
rocking chair porch, nice yard.
$725/mo for 12-month lease (ne-
gotiable). Land Lots and Homes
850-556-6694
4BR/2BA + office. Hardwood
floors, near the Courthouse on
one acre. $1,100 + deposit. Call
850-933-1608.
Crawfordville, 1,500 sq.ft.
2BR/1.5BA on 1.4 acres. New
A/C, plus fireplace. Call Jack at
850-926-3813.
Crawfordville, clean, large 2 Bed-
rooms, 2 Full Bathrooms, Duplex.
$675/per month. Call Linda at
850-926-0283.
Crawfordville. Close, private, cozy
2BR/1BA on fenced 5 acres.
$750/mo. 919-880-6152 (AIItel).

FOR SALE / FOR RENT
FOR LEASE TO OWN
4BR/2BA, on 3 lots in Wakulla
Gardens at 23 Neeley Road.
1800sq.ft. Completely
Renovated
Call Nick at 850-766-7750

HOME IN WAKULLA RIVER
WATERFRONT COMMUNITY
Beautiful 3BR/2.5BA Home on wooded 3/4
acres in Wakulla River Waterfront commu-
nity. Only 30 minutes to Tallahassee. Home
features: Hardwood floors, beautiful wood-
work throughout. Cathedral ceilings and sky-
lights in most rooms. Wood burning fireplace.
Two huge master suites w/walk-in closets
one w/Jacuzzi tub, large den w/built-in
book-shelves/possible 3rd bedroom.
Wrap-around porch & large screened-in
porch. New energy efficient appliances, gas
stove, dishwasher & refrigerator, large capac-
ity washer & dryer. 800Osq.ft. workshop, sec-
ond driveway for RN/V & boat. Wakulla River
access via community boat launch and dock.
$1250/mo.+deposit. 850-926-4217


RENTALS
2BR/1 BA Single Duplex
$700/mo. First, last, $250
deposit
2BR/1BA Home $750/mo.
First, last, $250 deposit..,
3BR/2BADuplex ''
$800/mo., $800 security. Pet
friendly.
4BR/2BA DW/MH on 5 acres
$850, $850 deposit.
3BR/2BA Wakulla Gardens
home. No smoking.. No cats.
$800, $800 deposit.
3BR/2BA Townhome.
No pets, no smoking. $880,
,.$880 deposit.
COMMERCIAL:.
900 sq. ft. $750/mo. + tax.
First, last, deposit.
1800 sq.ft. $1,350/mo.+tax.
First, last, deposit.

BlueWater
Realty Group

850-926-8777
www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com


Two Panacea homes in excellent
conditions. 2BR/1BA, hardwood
floors, washer/dryer hook-up,
porches., $550 & $575 + deposit.
Call 850-926-4217


Wakulla-]





Lic. RealEstateBroker
"Specializing in Wakulla Co."
(850) 926-5084
FOR RENT:
3Br2BaHs
w/1 Car Garage
$925 mo + Sec. Dep.

3Br 2BaTwnhs
$900 mo. + Sec. Dep.
(Pool Access)


2Br 2Ba DUPLEX
$750 mo. + Sec. Dep.

3Br 2Ba DWMH $825 + Sec.
Dep. (Lake Access)

3Br 2Ba SWMH $525
+ Sec. Dep.

2Br 1 Ba Hs w/sunroom
$625 + Sec. Dep.

2Br 1Ba Hs
w/1 Car Carport
$600 + Sec. Dep.

2Br 1Ba Hs $500
+ Sec. Dep.


Ochlockonee Bay




Realty

Alligator Pointl 3BR/3BA gor-
geous home in gated community.
1800/month, $1800/security. No
Pets. No Smoking.
Pine Street/Alligator PointI Clean
2BR/1BA. $575/month, $575/se-
curity. No Pets. No Smoking.
3BR/2BA home on St. Marks
River. $1000/month $1000/secu-
rity. No Pets. No Smoking.
Crawfordville/Linzy Mill!
4BR/2BA, 1600 sq.ft.
$1,575/month. $1,575/security.
No Pets. No Smoking.
2BR/1BA home in Crawfordville on
five acres. $750/month. No Pets.
No Smoking.
Panacea! 2BR/1 BA duplex.
$500/month. $500/security. No
Pets. No Smoking.
Panacea! Commercial building on
Hwy 98. $850/month. $850/security
Beachfront- Alligator Pointl
Gorgeous 2 story, 4BR/3.5BA,
3700 sq.ft. unfurnished home.
$3000/month $3000/security. No
pets. No smoking.
Ochlockonee Bay! Bayfront
3BR/1BA block home. $750/mo.
$750/security. No pets.
No smoking.
Beachfront 2BR/2BA on Alligator
Point. $1300/month. $1300/secu-
rity. No Pets. No Smoking.
2BR/1BA in Lanark/Franklin
County! $600/month. $600/secu-
rity. No Pets. No Smoking.
Mashes Sand Rd! 3BR/1 BA on
bay. $775/month. $775/deposit.
No Pets. No Smoking.
Commercial building on busy
Hwy. 98/Panacea for rent.
$550/month. $550/security.
Commercial office in Medart! 2
Room office on Hwy. 319.
$700/month. $700/security.
Ochlockonee Bay Ffealty
850-984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com


Move-In and/or Move-Out clean-,
ing services. Licensed and in-
sured, references available. Wa-
kulla Sparkles 850-590-7853

560 Land for Sale

124.7 acres, 5, 10, 18.9 & 99.7
acre tracts. 2+ miles of creek front,
including Smith Creek. Full
kitchen, two bunkhouses, wood-
shed. $5,500/acre 984-0044

Beautiful, untimbered, mature
wooded 20-acre tract. Easy ac-
cess from Hwy 98. Reduced
$125,000. Call Susan McKaye,
owner/agent (850)510-2477. Och-
lockonee Bay Realty.
www.hardwoodhammock.com
565 Mobile Homes for
Rent

2BR/1BA S/W Wakulla Gardens,
Good condition. Available now.
$475/mo.+deposit 850-322-9952

2BR/2BA 14X70 M/H. Central
A/C, gas heat. Located off E. Ivan
Road/Glover Lane. No pets. Gar-
bage/water furnished. References
required. $600/mo.+$400/deposit.
Call 850-926-1428, leave mes-
sage.


2BR/2BA D/W fenced, secluded.
Four miles south of Woodville.
$650/mo. first, last and security.
850-574-4354.

3BR/1BA M/H. 235 Webster.
Screened porch, 1 acre, fenced
yard, great shape. Call today!
$625/mo. 12-month lease (nego-
tiable). Land Lots and Homes
850-556-6694

3BR/2BA 24X48 M/H w/Jaccuzi
tub, very clean, garbage/water fur-
nished. Total electric. Located off
E. Ivan Rd./Glover Lane. No pets.
References required.
$725/mo.+$450/deposit.
850-926-1428 leave message

3BR/2BA, Deluxe model DWAN on
nice lot. Master bath-deluxe
model w/large tub. f.r., I.r., d.r.
and formal d.r. $850/mo. 1st., last,
plus security. Call 850-926-4511.

4BR/3BA, fenced, carport, nice.
Off Wakulla Beach Rd. & Hwy. 98.
$675/mo., first, last and security.
850-574-4354.

LAKE FRONT ON LAKE ELLEN
,3BR/2BA DWMH $675/mo. In-
cludes garbage & water. Next
door to owner. No pets or smok-
ing. 566-0403


Older S/W M/H 2BR/1BA in Sop-
choppy $375/mo.+$200/deposit.
850-251-3359.

575 Mobile Homes w/
Land

For sale/rent to own Panacea, 27
Chehaw. Very nice 2001 Palm
Harbor D/W w/1176sqft. 3BR/2BA
in excellent condition. $69,000,
850-926-9540

For Sale: 3BR/2BA, 1,000sq.ft.
D/W M/H on 1/2 acre lot. New
paint, floors, appliances, etc,
Great location. Completely remod-
eled. Must see! $64,900. Call
850-926-4511 for more informa-
tion

For-sale/rent-to-own-Panacea, 15
Chehaw 3BR/2BA home on 3 lots,
over 1230sqft., many upgrades,
concrete block dbl-garage 21x30
w/11x21 room/full-bath, $129,900,
850-926-9540.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 22, 2009 Page 5B



.lt W akuOlla 1CruS


Is Available For Purchase


At The Following Locations:


IN CRAWFORDVILLE
Crawfordville Post Office
Beall's Outlet
Food Mart
Karol's Korner Petro
Stop N Save
CVS Pharmacy
Dux Liquors
Glenda's Country Store
Huddle House
Lee's Liquor/Sky Box
Sports Bar
Mack's Country Meats
Michele's Convenience Store
Myra Jeans
Petty's BP
Murphy's
Wal-Mart
Wakulla Springs Lodge
Winn Dixie

IN PANACEA
Bayside Grocery Store
Tobacco & Beverage E-Z Serve
Crum's Mini Mall
posey's up the creek

IN OCHLOCKONEE BAY
Jay Food Mart
Mashes Sands BP
Hamaknockers oasis

IN SOPCHOPPY
Express Lane
Lou's Bait and Tackle
Sopchoppy Grocery


IN MEDART
Inland Store
Best Western
Wildwood INN
Petro

IN ST. MARKS
BoLynn's
Express Lane

IN WOODVILLE
Ace Hardware
Bert Thomas Grocery
Gas Mart
IGA Grocery Store
Los Amigos
Gulf Coast Lumber

IN TALLAHASSEE

Circle K (Capital Circle &
C'ville Highway)
Publix (Capital Circle &
C'ville Highway)

IN WAKULLA STATION
Wakulla Station BP
Stop N Save
Wakulla station pharmacy

AND ELSEWHERE
Spring Creek Restaurant
Stop N Save (Bloxham
Cutoff/H'way 319)
Stop N Save (H'way 98/
Spring Creek Road)


More Locations Coming Soon!


Teasers


. -


* e o









Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 22, 2009


Comiriruwn iy New



SCancer support group forms


A Wakulla County sinkhole is featured in 2009 Florida Forever calendar.


Wakulla featured in calendar


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
The Florida Forever calen-
dar for 2009 featuring pho-
tographs of sensitive lands in
need of protection includes
a picture of a sinkhole in,
Wakulla County.
The sinkhole is located on
a tract of land owned by the
Ferrell family, and has been
under consideration by the
state for purchase. The prop-
erty is pocked with sinkholes,
many of which are direct con-


nections to the aquifer, and
appear to be directly in the
path of the underground flow
of water from Leon Sinks to
Wakulla Springs.
Noted photographer James
Valentine took the shot of the
Wakulla County sink.
Springs ambassador Cal
Jamison said he took Valen-
tine to the Ferrell property
last fall and spent a day pho-
tographing sinks there.
Other photographers who
donated time for the project


include Clyde Butcher, Jeff
Ripple, John Moran, Carlton
Ward, Jr., Connie Bransilver
and Eric Zamora.
The calendars are available
through the University Press
of Florida online for $15 at
www.upf.com.
Sales of the calendars will
help fund educational out-
reach supporting Florida For-
ever and Legacy Institute for
Nature and Culture's conserva-
tion photography fellowships
and scholarships.


Find a reason to quit smoking


If you smoke cigarettes and have been
thinking about quitting, get ready. Quitting
smoking on Feb. 14 could win you a prize.
(plus extra kisses on Valentine's Day)l
Interested? Quit & Win brochures will
soon be available from local health care
providers, including the Wakulla County
Health Department, and at public places
such as the Wakulla County Library.
The Wakulla Health Care Task Force
and Wakulla County Health Department


will kick off this exciting county-wide
contest.
There will even be a Quit & Win booth at
the Valentine's festival in Hudson Park on
Saturday, Feb. 14. As a last resort, you can
sign up there. Ideally, you will have signed
up weeks earlier and prepared yourself to
quit successfully on Sunday, Feb. 15.
There's never been a better time to quit.
Quit smoking on Feb. 14 and get a chance
to win prizes.


By MARJ LAW
Wakulla County
Cancer Support Group
The first meeting of the
Wakulla County Cancer Sup-
port Group was held Thursday,
Jan. 15 at 7 p.m. at the Craw-
fordville United Methodist
Church. Meetings will be held
the third Thursday of each
month.
When I heard that c-word
for the first time, my brain
kind of turned off. That's why
it's good to bring someone
with you when you have the
least inkling that you might
be about to hear really bad
news.
Does real bad news always
come as such a shock? I didn't
quite believe I was hearing
what' I thought I heard. Then
I wondered, asking the physi-
cian, "Okay, what are you going
to do about it?" We were in a
huge cancer center. I figured
the doctor had his own set
of favorite treatment plans. It
didn't work that way.
He told me the name of the
cancer they had located. It had
a long name, which I didn't
recognize so it didn't sink in.
The doctor went on to tell me
why he wasn't certain what
kind of treatment would help.
The cancer was in hip, spine
and shoulder bones.
But it hadn't originated in


the bone. It was created else-
where and then traveled to
bone. Unfortunately, testing
only showed bone involve-
ment and did not show where
the cancer had originated.
"Chemotherapy is often suc-
cessful when cancer is in soft
tissue," he added, "but it isn't
very successful in removing
bone tumors."
He seemed to be thinking
aloud... maybe if they used
a lot of chemotherapy, the
chemo would destroy the origi-
nating cancer cells... maybe
if they used a whole lot of
chemo, it would be successful
in destroying tumors in the
bone as well.
"What?" I wondered. "How
come he doesn't know exactly
what to do? He's supposed to
fix things!"
It's frightening.
Suddenly there's no road
map. No one knows precisely
what to do, but you do know
that the length of your life is
hanging on your decision.
This is why we're starting
up a cancer support group here
in Wakulla County. Cancer is
a life-changing, frightening
thing. It involves not only the
patient, but the patient's fam-
ily or caregiver as well.
Most people don't know
what it's like to see their loved
ones turn pale when they


are told the bad news. Most
people haven't had to walk by
a room to find their loved one
huddled, hiding in a corner,
crying. This support group
welcomes these caregivers.
Cancer is not unique to
women, men get it, too. The
support group is for men and
women and it is for those
who have any type of can-
cer. The support group is for
those who have been treated
and for those.who are going
to be treated. It's for cancer
survivors.
It's for those people who
have been treated, but who
have been told that they will
always have it, and it may recur
at any time.
Support group members
will decide whether they want
to get together to talk, whether
they would like to bring in
guest speakers, or whether
they would like to exchange
news of possible cancer pre-
vention. Whatever issues are
important to the group will be
addressed. The group will be
run by the needs and desires
of its members.
If you would like to become
a member of this group, or if
you would just like to visit,
you are welcome. If you have
a need to talk to another mem-
ber, call Marge Kinder at 926-
6050 or Marj Law at 228-4909.


Stone Age Festival slated at park


The Florida Department of Environmental
Protection's Ochlockonee River State Park will
host the Second Annual Stone Age and Primi-
tive Arts Festival on Feb. 6 from 9:30 a.m. until
1 p.m. The festival continues on Feb. 7 and Feb.
8 from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m.
Visitors will experience "hands-on" learning
as experts demonstrate techniques that were
used thousands of years ago in day-to-day life.
Visitors will also see projectile point fash-
ioning, also known as flint-knapping, which is
the art of chipping stone into tools, bow and


arrow construction, basket weaving, early pot-
tery methods and more.
According to archeological research, Ochlock-
onee River's rich history of humans interacting
with nature goes back 12,000 years.
Admission is the regular park entrance fee
of $3 per carload of up to eight people and $1
per pedestrian or bicyclist. The admission fee
includes access to all events. For more informa-
tion, visit www.floridastateparks.org. The park is
located at 429 State Park Road in Sopchoppy.


,ow',w', ;' .hemaiullanei t.nel Sening WIakula County For More T n A Century







Coastal Restaurant

Home ofAll- U- Can Eat Seafood & Chicken
Thursday Mornings
g Look for Your Complimentary
copy of ij)e Wahtulla 1ebui
-. (free with any full Breakfast Order)

Hungry Man Breakfast $529
Breafat PLatter $249
$199BreaIast Special .

"0 984-2933
1305Coastal Hwi. 98, Panacea



Sustainable Big Bend 3rd Annual

Green Lving Energy Expo &

Education Fair


March 21, 2009

Riversprings Middle School
800 Spring Creek Hwy., Crawfordville


Show your support for Green Living and Saving Energy!
To be a sponsor, volunteer or to reserve exhibit space
call Heidi Holcomb at 926-7643 or
Pam Portwood at 850-926-2415 today!

Discover hundreds of the best products,
services, and ideas that promote sustainability!
Educational workshops, children's activities, vendors
and exhibitors, entertainment, and so much more.
0 0o o
Find ways to create a simple, healthy life! (


Capital Health Plan
Proudly Presents .


A monthly program for older adults who want to learn more about
creating and maintaining healthy, happy, and active lifestyles.

'Iin us Monday, January 26, at 10:30 a.m.

at the Wakulla Senior Center
(33 Michael Drive, Crawfordville, FL)
Featuring

Recharge Yourself with

Personal Health Resolution
Presented by: Tequila Hagan, BSES, MSM


Tequila is the Capital Health Plan
Wellness Program Coordinator.

Anna is one of the most familiar
faces in Tallahassee as the former
morning host for WCTV's "Good
Morning Show."


--- Please RSVP to 850-523-7333.-


Some things get better with ag*

Capital Health Plan is one of them.


SCapital Health
Ct P L A N


An Independent Licensee of the
Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association


This event is educational only and information regarding the plan will not be
available. If you have questions, please call Capital Health Plan seven days a
week, 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., at 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY
850-383-3534 or 1-800-955-8771).


00




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