Title: Wakulla news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00201
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville, Fla
Publication Date: December 18, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States of America -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028313
Volume ID: VID00201
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Full Text

3-DIGIT 326
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o B 10 07ROX ii TY OF FL


W ak ulla


Our 113th Year, 51st Issue


Thursday, Dec. 18, 2008


Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century


Two Sections

50 Cents


Chrlstmas I


OurCounty




































.






















The 2008 Christmas season is well underway. In Panacea, top, elves Gus Graves, Caleb
Harper, Nick Harper, Tori Hatch, Molly Harper, Will Bailey, Reid Smith, Sam Smith and
Santa girls Kirsten Moore and Lauran Hatch added to the spirit at the Panacea Christ-
mas tree which was illuminated Dec. 13. They were also in Crawfordville where Olivia
Tillman, above, visited with Santa Claus Dec. 12 at the Wakulla County Sheriff's Office
Volunteer Group Christmas event. More than 400 children met with Santa and received
stuffed animals and goodie bags. Prizes were also given away. Guy Revell's horse and
buggy opened both events and Santa Claus attended the Christmas in Sopchoppy event
Dec, 13 as well. Mrs. Claus took time out of her busy schedule to visit with children in
Crawfordville. Lee Graves organized the elves and Santa's helpers.


'Puppy Mill' case

goes before judge
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN Lower Bridge Road property
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net of Wallace and Cathy Bailey in
Wakulla County Judge Jill September after receiving a com-
Walker heard more than a half- plaint of a possible puppy mill
day's testimony in the alleged in operation. Though reportedly
"puppy mill" case last week, finding "deplorable" conditions,
and said from the bench that officers were reluctant to seize
the testimony showed that, with the animals because the county
150 dogs, the owners, probably animal shelter is incapable of


had too many dogs to properly
care for.
But Judge Walker did not
make any final decision at the
hearing on Tuesday, Dec. 9, say-
ing it appeared some progress
had been made at the kennel
and requesting that both the
owners and county animal con-
trol officials go photograph the
operation the next day.
County animal control of-
ficers and deputies went to the


housing so many dogs.
Crawfordville veterinarian
Dr. Faith Hughes that many of
small dogs yorkies, maltese
and similar breeds at the ken-
nel had extremely matted hair
and some of the water bowls
were green with algae and had
various stages of mosquito larva
in them, indicating that the
bowls had been untended for
some time.
Continued on Page 5A


State files attempted murder

charges; woman shot in face


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
The State Attorney's office
filed a number of attempted
murder charges against Hens-
ley Duncan, the man who shot
his girlfriend in the face in No-
vember during an argument
over custody of their child.
According to court docu-
ments, Duncan, 30, was having
a violent dispute with Ashley
,Hereford, 23, over custody of
their daughter, Kirra Duncan,
on Nov. 22, Hereford was sit-
ting in her car with the baby
when Duncan allegedly shot
her in the face with a .223
caliber deer rifle.
Reportedly, Hereford's face
and eyes have been damaged
beyond repair. The child was


also injured in the face by
fragments that lodged in her
face.
Duncan admitted to shoot-
ing Hereford and was tak-
en into custody by Wakulla
County Sheriff's Deputies
on a charge of attempted
murder. He has been held
in the Wakulla County Jail
on a $100,000 bond and has
filed. paperwork claiming he
is indigent 'so that he can
be represented by the Public
Defender's office.
The official charges filed on
Thursday, Dec. 11, are for three
counts of 'attempted murder
- one count for allegedly try-
ing to kill Hereford, another
for allegedly committing .an
act which could have result in


the death of the baby, and the
third count is that when he
made the alleged attempt to
kill Hereford, he shot Kirra. If
found guilty of those charges,
he could face a life in prison
under the state's 10-20-Life law
on gun crime which provides
for a life sentence if someone
is shot with a firearm in the
*commission of a felony.
Duncan is also charged
with shooting into an occu-
pied vehicle, a second-degree
felony punishable by 15 years
in prison.
Assistant State Attorney
Jack Campbell, who filed the
charges, called the case "grue-
some."
Continued on Page 5A


2008: It's no picnic out there


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Panacea resident Burl Vaughn has
worn many hats in his 53 years in
Wakulla County. But his most recent
endeavor may help residents cope
with the economic uncertainty -
of 2009.
Vaughn. 71, and his son.,
David, 43, have created
23 different models of .
wooden picnic tables at '
Vaughn's old paint and J
body shop on U.S. High-
way 98. Burl Vaughn h
The tables provide Burl with an opportunity
to stay busy and productive in his semi-retired
life. Two local businesses, Hook Wreck Hen-
ry's and Angelo's Restaurant, appreciate the
Vaughn craft as Hook Wreck Henry's has one
Vaughn made picnic table at the establishment
and Angelo's has seven at the newly rebuilt
coastal landmark.
"With the economy going kaput, I knew
people were going to need to have a place
to sit around and party," said Burl. "I never
thought it (economy) would get as bad as it
has."
Burl works, with David to design the tables


and they work together to create "kid-
die style," which Burl enjoys, and "big
bruisers," that David likes. They seat
10 or 12 people at a time.
"With the economy taking a slug
I figured people are going to need to
picnic out more," he said. Austrian
Spruce is a favorite wood. ma-
terial for the work that has
been underway for "seven
or eight months. h
,-"It's enjoyable, he
said. "Your imagination
can take you anywhere
as been busy. you want to go. With hard
times coming, people have to go some-
where."
Vaughn has provided some magical work
on a playhouse for his grandchildren and
his wife, Helen, has complemented his work
by providing many plants and a fish pool to
complete the landscape.
Helen said she felt she was always the
most artistic member of the family until Burl
unveiled a heart shaped picnic table with
matching seats. "What have you been hid-
ing all these years?" Helen asked Burl of his
creative side.
Continued on Page 5A


Picnic tables of all shapes and sizes dot the floor of the Vaughn garage.


Ten boats braved the cold and took part in the annual St. Marks Boat Parade Satur-
day, Dec. 13. Many visitors enjoyed the parade inside the warmth of their vehicles.


Published Weekly,
Read Daily


I1







: Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 18, 2008



Comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895


Continuing to march r1MES ARE -r vG6 FoR f4/BOY WIS CRTA ,4S

on with the news


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblachmar@thewakullanews.net
This week we are working
on our 51st issue of 2008 which
means that we have two more
issues to go before we reach
2009. I know that there are
only 52 weeks in a year, but we
:-have an extra week because we
publish early the final week of
the year to allow our subscribers
,to get the paper before the New
Year's Day holiday.
The second issue of 2008 was
my first as editor after Landmark
promoted me from news editor.
under the former publisher.
It seems a little hard to be-
lieve we have covered that much
ground in the past months but
my'calendar has never lied to
me.
We are also coming up on
the third anniversary of the
sale of the newspaper from the
Phillips family this summer.
During the past 2/12 years we
:' have tried to update the look
.of the newspaper and get the
community more involved in
the operation.
We have had some marvel-
.yous contributions from the
community from the writing
and photography standpoint.
SWe really appreciate that.
I have had a request from the
community that made a lot of
sense to me.
The writer, askedrme, to e-
quest the names and'addresses
of Wakulla County residents
serving in the military over-
seas. This information could
be published on a semi-regular
basis and readers could send
good wishes or packages to;
the soldiers. Anyone interested
in participating can send their
soldier's information to me at
kblackmar@thewakullanews.
net.
The newspaper business,
like everything else, has been
operating during a difficult eco-
* nomic time. But the good news
is that community weeklies will
always have a place in the heart
of those who live in smaller


places.
Only the smaller community
newspapers have the time and
desire to reach into all areas of
the county and provide a wide
range of coverage. We have at-
tempted to do that despite less
manpower. Stories have ranged
from St. Marks to Sopchoppy to
Crawfordville to the state prison
and we have also attempted to
highlight the activities of our
senior citizens and special folks
through features. We will con-
tinue to complete that mission
in 2009.
I have always found it in-
teresting that the print media
(that would be us) has always
been more forthcoming about
information about our industry,
The broadcast media (televi-
sion folks) has been quick to
report on the developments in
the newspaper industry. The
stories have been all over the
flood of cable news programs
that are littered over the cable
television dial.
Television and radio have
not been as quick to talk about
revenue streams and the impact
of the economy on their indus-
tries. Everyone in the media is
still attempting to determine
the most effective way to use
the Internet.
The Wakulla News
launched a web site during
the months that followed the
newspaper sale from the Phil-
lips family.
It has come in handy as a
place to post photographic slide
shows, videos, polls and stories.
It also gives newspapers an op-
portunity to post breaking sto-
ries in between the publication
times. If you haven't visited our
web site, it is www.thewakul-
lanews.com.
All of the hard work, stress,
the two 2008 elections, recounts,
special sections, a few gray hairs,
a few lost hairs and we're still
50 ceztsl -
We will be coming out
early the next two weeks. Dead-
lines are pushed up a day and
the paper will appear in the
news racks Tuesday, Dec. 23 and
Tuesday, Dec. 30 to allow the
post office the chance to mail
the papers to subscribers in time
for the Thursday holidays,
Everyone at The Wakulla
News wishes Wakulla County
a wonderful holiday season.
Thank you to those dedicated
writers who submitted articles
for. the paper. You are the life
blood of The News.
Keith Blackmar is Editor of
The Wakulla News.


Thanks for helping out


Editor, The Newss
Cauzicancare yard sale was
a blast A special thanks to Bud
and Betty Drake, Nancy Russell
and family, Sherri Dean, and Pami
Lesley for there donations. '
Charlene Spears, Darlene
Walker and Phyllis Miller worked
very hard. And thanks to my
son, Kenneth, and my daughter,
Brandi, for working so hard to
help me get all the sale items


together.
Thanks to my son for cook-
ing and serving lots of sausage
dogs. Thanks to Woodville Ace
Hardware for letting us use that
wonderful Trager Grill and the
use of your parking lot to hold
our yard and food sale. Thanks
Wakulla County and thanks Leon
County.'
Bonnie Brinson
Cauzicancare Rescue


.TOt akulla '0tbu'
The Wakulla News (USPS 644-640) is published weekly at
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla
News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. ,
General Manager: Tammie Barfield....................tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Editor: Keith Blackmar kblackmar@thewakullaneWs.net
Reporter: William Snowden wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton................estanton@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey............ kinsey@thewakullanews.net
Bookkeeping: Sherry Balchuck accounting@thewakullanews.net
Classifieds/In House Sales: Denise Folh..............classifieds@thewakullanews.net
Circulation: Gary Fazzina circulation@thewakullanews.net

Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable
one year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $25, Out of County $30
Out of State $35. Out of Country on Request


Nurse Judy's Nook


By JUDY CONLIN
and her alter ego Nurse Judy
Every so often, my job
takes me to the Wakulla Edu-
cation Center in Crawfordville.
Whenever this happens, Nurse
' Judy'begins pestering me to
stop at the newspaper office
and see if they would like to
run my column. 'Why should
I do that?" I ask her.
"I have lots of friends in
St. Marks, Alligator Point,
Crawfordville, Panacea, and
Shell Point," she said. "I know
they'd love to hear about me
and my exploits."
"I beg your pardon," I said.
"No one in those places knows
you. Some know me, but they.
have known me as a profes-
sional nurse and as a serious
person who works hard and
has many responsibilities.
They do not know that you
are my silly alter ego, who
constantly turns my life up-
side down."
"Well,' then they must be
very bored," she said, "because
the professional you is pretty
dull. I am the fun part of this
partnership."
This banter has gone back
and forth for months. I finally
ran off a copy of my resume
and threw it and some old ar-
ticles in my car. Then I did not


go to Crawfordville for quite
a period of time. Last week
I was scheduled there once
again. After work, I started
home, and the pestering be-
gan, getting louder and more
persistent by the minute. I
finally gave in and stopped at
The Wakulla News. I gathered
up the resume, now dog-
eared and stained, and threw
some of the articles into my
briefcase. Feeling extremely
foolish as I stood at the recep-
tion desk, I tried to explain
the purpose of my mission.
The kind lady in attendance
must have taken pity on me,
because she ushered me over
to the editor's desk,.
I handed the completely
unprofessional looking re-
sume over to Editor Keith
Blackmar, and explained that
I wrote a weekly column
for The Havana Herald. He
pushed the sad resume to the
side of his desk and began
asking questions about Nick
Bert and about Billy Blackman,
who used to work for the
Herald. Apparently all. news-
papermen know each other
and are friendly. We talked
for a few minutes and then he
asked what kind of a column
I wrote. Now this is a difficult
question to answer under any
circumstances, but with Nurse
Judy kicking me under the
desk, and me wanting to make
a good impression, I did not
want to confess that it is sim-
ply the nonsensical ramblings
of a mature lady.
At this point, Nurse Judy
grew impatient and opened
my brief case so I could hand
over some columns :for the
editor, to look, at. They were
poking out awkwardly in all
directions because of the way


Holiday closures, deadlines
Wakulla County will celebrate Christmas Day on Thursday,
Dec. 25 as St. Nick is celebrated across the nation. The school
district and county commission offices will be closed for the
holidays on Thursday and Friday, Dec. 25 and Dec. 26, Many
businesses will be closed during the holiday weekend. The
Wakulla News will be closed on Christmas Day and New
Year's Day.
The newspaper was published early during the holiday
weeks. Subscribers will receive their newspaper in the mail
on Wednesday, Dec, 24. The paper will be on the newsstands
on Tuesday afternoon, Dec. 23. Readers can also. check our
web site, www.thewakullanews.com, for news, sports and
other information,
The same holiday publication schedule will be in place the
week of Dec. 29.
On the Wednesdays before Christmas and News Year's
Day, The Wakulla News office will close at 3 p.m. (perhaps
a little earlier) so that our staff can enjoy the holidays with
their loved-ones.

Letters Policy
The Wakulla News welcomes your letters, but we request
that you adhere to the following guidelines:
Letters should not be longer than 300 words.
They must include the writers name, home address and
telephone number. (Only name and town will be listed; the
reast is used solely for the purpose of verification.)
Writers may be limited to one letter per month, depend-
ing upon space limitations.
With very few exceptions, anonymous letters will not
be published.
Letters can be sent via mail or e-mail to kblackmar@
thewakullanews.net), or they can be dropped off at our
Crawfordville Highway office. The Wakulla News' reserves
the right to edit all letters.


I had tossed them in. As I
went to grab a handful to give
him, they squirted into the air
and all over the floor. I was
mortified. Nurse Judy laughed.
Mr. Blackmar and I scurried
around retrieving them.
Quickly he said, "Send me a
column and we'll give it a try."
I tried to make a graceful exit,
but it was difficult with stray
columns floating around and
Nurse Judy chortling happily
in my wake.
Back in the car, Nurse Judy
said, "That went well didn't
it? I think he liked your writ-
ing.,"
Since I had never seen him


read a word of those scattered
columns, I was doubtful. I
rather thought he was trying
to take control of the chaos
in his workplace by getting
rid of the two of us. I did not
mention this to my beaming
alter ego, however. After all, I
was beaming myself, because,
without even being prompted,
Mr. Blackmar had promised
to pay me exactly the same
amount that Nick Bert does.
You can't get a better deal than
that. Or can you?
More later,
Judy
Author Judy Conlin
writes from Havana


WEEK IN WAKULLA .
Thursday, December 18, 2008
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB meets at Posey's Up the Creek .i`
in Panacea at noon.
MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA, a fellowship of men
who gather to share and support one another in the quest'
"for authentic manhood, meets "outback" (behind)
Cornerstone Ministries at 6:30 p.m. For more information,
call at 508-2560.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.
VFW BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road
from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ,
Friday, December 19, 2008
EARLY RELEASE DAY for students of Wakulla County
Schools as Winter Break begins.
AA meets at the American Legion Building next to the
Women's Club in Crawfordville with an open meeting at
8 p.m. There are also open meetings
FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public
library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa's Episcopal
Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
PARKINSON'S SUPPORT GROUP meets at the senior center
at 12:45 p.m.
PICKIN' 'N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at the
senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
Saturday, December 20, 2008
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordville
Highway at 5 p.m. For more information: call 224-2321.
Sunday, December 21, 2008
MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA meets at First Baptist
Church of Crawfordville at 7 p.m.
Tuesday, December 23, 2008
BOOK BUNCH, for pre-school and home school families,
meets at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP meets at the senior center at
12:45 p.m.
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3240 Crawfordville 1
Highway at 7 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.
VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW
Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. .
Wednesday, December 24, 2008
CHRISTMAS EVE
County Offices will be closed
Thursday, December 25, 2008
MERRY CHRISTMAS!

Church services set


Candlelight service
The Seafarer's Chapel in Shell
Point will hold a candlelight
service on Christmas Eve at the
Apalachee'Bay VFD at 7 p.m.
Everyone is welcome.

Christmas Eve services
The Christ Church Anglican
will hold two services on Christ-
mas Eve.
The first service will be-
gin at 7 p.m., and include the
Children's Christmas Pageant.
The second service will be the
traditional "Midnight" worship,
with candlelight.
Christ Church is located at
4340 Crawfordville Highway.

Lutheran worship
Faith Lutheran Church in
Tallahassee will be hosting a


worship service and Bible class
on Sunday, Dec. 21, at 6 p.m.
at the Wakulla County Library.
For more information, contact
Pastor John Gensmer at Faith
Lutheran Church, 383-1125.

Trinity Lutheran
Trinity Lutheran Church will
host a candlelight Christmas eve
service at 7 p.m. as the church
celebrates the Nativity with a
candlelight 'service, live music
and a message entitled "The
Christmas Touch."
The church will also cel-
ebrate the Lord's Supper and
dose with the singing of the
traditional hymn Silent Night.
The church is located at 3254
Coastal Highway, across from
Wakulla High School, For more
information, call 926-7808.









More Letters to the Editor


We're a bunch of crabs pinching


ourselves on way to the cooker


Editor, The News:
On Tuesday, Dec. 11, I
was asked to resign from
the Panacea Waterfronts
Florida Partnership Com-
mittee by Chairman Walt
Dickson who accused me
and David Lansford of going
outside the committee and
expressing our views on the
Rock Landing Dock. "What's
said at Waterfronts stays in
Waterfronts," he said and the
others agreed.
Thinking that was a bit to-
talitarian, I refused to resign.
Then with a drum roll of a
10-3 vote, I was ousted from
the committee.
I now have the honor of
being the only person in
history ever booted out of
the State of Florida's Water-
fronts Florida Partnerships
program.
Over the past decade, as
Chair of the Waterfronts
Partnership Waterfront's
environmental committee, I
have done my best to edu-
cate and inform the other
members and visitors of the
pressing issues that threaten
the environment and quality
of life on our coast.
In 1999, when the commit-
tee first began, I presented 14
years of data that the highly
endangered Kemp's Ridley
Sea turtles were swallowing
hooks and being caught in
Dickerson Bay and urged that
the proposed Woolley Park
Fishing Pier enact sea turtle
protection program.
I was warned by the mov-
ers and shakers that they
were .going to run over me
and build the dock anyway.
In the end, the county was
forced to comply with the
U.S. Endangered Species Act
and follow the law-at least
on paper.
When the Waterfronts


Committee first began, Rich
Johnson, the other member
of the' Environmental Com-
mittee, and I often joked that
we had to have our backs.
to the wall, because of the
hostile environment.
Often Ben Withers, who
was in charge of getting both
the permits, writing the bids
and building the dock, (pretty
unusual, huh?) appeared and
made verbal attacks on me.r
Rich Johnson at one point
was actually threatened by
other members with physi-
cal harm.
But as the years passed,
we got to know one another
and relationships improved.
As the beaches were closed
. from fecal coliform bacteria
which hurt tourism, the
Environmental Committee
brought in speakers, worked
with state and country offi-
cials, and clean water groups,
and I even looked forward to
the meetings. When it was
clear we needed a new dock
at Rock Landing, I joined
in urging DEP to grant the
permits, and urged the FWC
to fund it.
For a while I thought my
words about food chains
and how trees and wetlands
were an important part of
maintaining water quality
and enhancing productivity
of the bay were being well
received. We discussed eco-
tourism, and how good fish-
ing brought dollars into the
community, but fish needed
clean water and good habi-
tats and they agreed. Once
I even managed to get the
Partnership to come to the
aquarium on a field trip. I
didn't mind spending count-
less hours researching the
scientific literature so I could
provide the members on the
negative impacts of artificial


lighting on birds, sea turtles in turn, have done much
and other wildlife. So yes, to enhance the economy of
after attending a hundred Panacea, not only with the
monthly meetings, often at money that Gulf Specimen
considerable inconvenience brings into the community,
at 11 a.m. on the second 'but with our media public-


Tuesday of every month
at Posey's Beyond the Bay
Restaurant, I was angered
when I learned that while
I was away, the Partnership
blithely voted to cut the trees
at the Rock Landing Dock.
Walt Dickson used to joke
that he'd wait until I was out
of town to cut them-well, it
wasn't a joke.
Saying they wanted to
see the trees cut down right
away just to show people
that something was hap-
pening without the benefit
of tree specialists made no
sense. In a few hours they
made a beautiful little park
far less beautiful.
I understand their fear as
economy collapses and they
see Panacea shrivel up into a
ghost town. The real estate
bubble has popped, cutting
the trees, and trashing the
landscape won't bring it
back. This is a time when
we should all be working
together, but once again I use
the analogy that we're like
a bucket of crabs, pinching
each other as we head for the
cooker when we should be
trying to get out together.
I have lived in Panacea for
44 years now, and I'm tired
of the fight that started the
day I arrived. Sometimes I
think we're a dysfunctional
family. I will always appreci-
ate the Waterfront's Florida's
applause when Gulf Speci-
men Marine Laboratory won
the prestigious International
Chevron Texaco Conserva-
tion Award in 2004 and their
concern when. they learned
that my wife had cancer. I,


ity that has ranged from the
Wall Street Journal, New
York Times, Southern Living,
National Geographic, Smith-
sonian, Sports Illustrated,
Audubon Magazine, Natural
History, and my appearances
on the NBC Today Show,
Good Morning America, CNN
and endless documentaries
on my books and the lab that
are too numerous to list.
Even though the Panacea
Waterfronts Partnership vio-
lated its rules and did not
provide the members with 10
days notice nor did they spell
their cause for my removal in
writing, Anne has asked that
I not appeal it to the Florida
Department of Community
Affairs that governs them,
but let their decision stand.
I will respect her wishes, but
I reserve the right to appear
at their meetings, no longer
as a member of the Panacea
Waterfronts Partnership, but
as a member of the commu-
nity to learn what they're
planning to do next.
I urge other citizens to at-
tend also and thank God that
the Waterfronts Partnership
Committee does not have
any real government power
and can only act as advisors
to the Wakulla County Com-
mission. I will continue work-
ing with Panacea's 4-H kids,
do my best to protect our
environment and make Gulf
Specimen Marine Laboratory
a major and sustainable ma-
rine educational facility and
an attraction that will serve
as an anchor for ecotourism
in Wakulla County.
Jack Rudloe
Panacea


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday Dec. 18, 2008 Page 9A

Nine day revival


hosted byWLCDI


A nine day revival hosted
by he Wakulla/Leon County
Development, Inc (WLCDI)
was recently held at Mt.
Olive P.B. Church No 2, El-
der Samuel Hayes pastor, in
the Bethel community. The
WLCDI is a not-for-profit,
faith-based organization
which is planning a 10,000
square foot community cen-
ter just north of Riversprings
Middle School on the Spring
Creek Highway and is headed
by Pastor Renita Allen-Dixon
of Ecclesia Outreach Ministry
of the Bethel community.
A spokesperson for the
WLCDI stated' that the pur-
pose of the revival was three-
fold: to raise funds for the
group; to enlighten the com-
munity of the group's exis-
tence and objectives and to
elicit community support.
A total of nine members
of the clergy along with their
congregations brought mes-
sages of encouragement and
support. Some of the topics
of messages were: "What
Must I Do to Be Saved," by
Rev, Frank McDonald of Mt.
Pleasant Missionary Baptist
Church' at Wakulla Station,
and "Now is the Time" by El-
der Bernard Plummer of the
Greater Mt. Trial Primitive
Baptist Church in Buckhorn.
Other pastors and ministers


brought messages: Pastor
Joe Francis of Sweet Home,
Perry; Pastor Frederick Bell
of Thessalonia, Hyde Park;
Minister Stewart Scott of
Miracle Deliverance, Bethel;
Apostle Copeland of Highly
Exhorted; Minister Fred-
die Nelson of tMacedonia,
Sopchoppy. Minister Kirk
Triplett and Minister Morgan
were recognized for their
support.
On Friday during close-
out, Pastor Allen-Dixon ex-
pressed her gratitude for
the community!s support
those present heard that
that the center would be
a place where residents of
all ages would find kindred
spirits and a variety of ac-
tivities for all ages. Planned
activities include GED test-
ing, 24-hour child care, em-
ployment preparation and
supervised sports activities.
She was especially emphatic
in stressing that she desired
the planned center be a "safe
haven" where area youth
could find positive and up-
lifting activities. She thanked
the community and churches
for their initial support and
challenged them to commit
to long term support since
only the initial hurdle in
bringing her vision to frui-
tion had been cleared.


.


RegiFoutsdi OpeK How i am W4tde Bnak!

For: Grades K-s Camps include natrun


Camp Hours: 9:00 A.M. to 4:30 P.M.,
Extend Hours: 7:45 A.M. to 5:45 P.M.
Fee for Each Camp: $35 members
$40 nonmembers
Fee for Extended Hours: $8 day

For more information go to
www.tallahasseemuseum.org
To register call 575-8684 ext. 126


activities, animals,
crafts, games
and more.
Register your child for
one or more of these fun
filled camps while they *
are out of school.


Featuring All You Can Eat!

Sunday 11:30 a.m. 2 p.m. l

FRIED SHRIMP


$999
with cheese grits
and coleslaw


Open Everyday
Breakfast: 7:30 10 a.m.
Lunch: 11:30 2 p.m. -
Dinner: 6 8 p.m.
-m :'A


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON ORDINANCE 2008-2::
MODIFYING SEC. 70 OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES
AN ORDINANCE OF' THE CITY OF ST. MARKS, FLORIDA, ALLOWING THE USE
OF GOLF CARTS, UPON DESIGNATED MUNICIPAL ROADS IN THE CITY OF ST.
MARKS, FLORIDA SUBJECT TO SPECIFIED RESTRICTIONS; PROVIDING FOR
INCLUSION IN THE CODE OF LAWS AND ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR
CONFLICT AND SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVEtDATE.
THE CITY OF ST. MARKS WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING
First Reading Date: November 13 ,2008 at 5:15 pm.
Second Reading Date: January 8th, 2009 at 7:30 pm
Location: 788 Port Leon Drive, St. Marks FL 32355
The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850)
925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Office at least
24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Office may be contacted at
(850) 925-6224.



WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSIONERS' SCHEDULE
FOR WORKSHOPS, PUBLIC HEARINGS, &
MEETINGS
2009 CALENDAR
(To be held in the Commission Chambers)


January 6, 2009

January 6, 2009'

January 12, 2009,

January 13, 2009


January 20, 2009
February. 3, 2009

February 3, 2009
February 17, 2009


Workshop: To Establish the 2009 State and Federal
Legislative Priorities
Regular Board Meeting
Public Hearing: Parks & Recreation Ordinance
Workshop: To Discuss Impact Fees

Workshop: Update to the Board from
the Infrastructure Committee and County Staff to
Include the Historical Subdivisions and Other Issues
Regular Board Meeting
Workshop: To Discuss Commissioner
Travel Budgets
Regular Board Meeting
Workshop: To Discuss Ways to Increase Citizen
Information, Input & Involvement in
County Government


February 17, 2009 Regular Board Meeting


March 3, 2009


March 3, 2009
March 17, 2009


March 17, 2009
April 7, 2009
April 21, 2009


Workshop: To Discuss Forming and
Staffing Additional Citizen Advisory Committees
or Working Groups
Regular Board Meeting
Workshop: To Discuss the Proposal for
a Faith-Based Publicly Funded Project
(Leon-Wakulla Development Corp)
Regular Board Meeting
Regular Board Meeting
Regular Board Meeting


Operated by The Florida ]


550 Wakulla Park Drive
Wakulla Springs, FL 32327
926-0700
Park Service


All Workshops, Public Hearings and Commission Meetings are open to the public. Wakulla
County does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age or
handicapped status in employment or the provision of services. Handicapped individuals may
receive special accommodations with one working day's notice as per section 286.011(6) F.S. If
special accommodations are required, please call Debbie DuBose, Executive Assistant to the
County Administrator at (850) 926-0919.


5:00 P.M.

6:00 P.M.

5:00 P.M. -
7:00 PM.
5:00 P.M.


6:00P.M.
5:00 P.M.

6:00 P.M.
5:00 P.M.


6:00 PM.
5:00 P.M.


6:00 P.M.
5:00 P.M.


6:00 P.M.
6:00 P.M.
6:00 P.M.


c


6


IL







Page4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 18, 2008



Church



Obituaries


Bessie Bell
Bessie Bell, 83, of Tallahassee
died Dec. 8.
The funeral service was held
Saturday, Dec. 13 at Friendship
Primitive Baptist Church in Talla-
hassee with burial at Southside
Cemetery. ,
She was a child care pro-
vider.
,Survivors include three sons
and three daughters, Ernest
Tucker, Clarence Tucker, Sr.,
Gloria Tucker Woody and James,
Joseph Tucker, Bobbie Jean
Tucker Waldon and Charles and
Jenita Tucker Dukes and Fred,
all of Tallahassee; a daughter-
in-law, Vivian Young Tucker
and Detroit; god-daughters, Lula
Mae Tucker Taylor and Sam of
Tallahassee and Frances Tucker
Smith and Leo of Crawfordville;
13 grandchildren, Kimberly
Tucker Hall and Clarence Tucker,
Jr. of Charlotte, N.C., Jeannette
Tucker of Mobile, Ala., Darryl
Tucker, David Ash, Courtney
Dukes, Tameka DuPont, Joseph
Tucker, Ashley Walker-Tucker,
Kadesha Walker-Tucker, Charles
Waldon, Jr., Wesley Waldon, and
Brandon Waldon, all of Tallahas-
see; 10 great-grandchildren; five
sisters: Cornelia Bailey and Inez
Moore of Tallahassee; Minnie
Hill of Palatka; Ruthie Mae Man-
ning and Alice Williams and
Thomas, all of Crawfordville;
a brother, Bryant Bell, Sr. and
Mary of Tallahassee; and a host
of relatives and friends.

Verlie M, Cacciatore
Verlie McCranie Cacciatore,
70, of Tallahassee died Thurs-
day, Nov. 27.
Graveside services were held'
Dec. 1 at Garden of Memories
Cemetery in Tampa,
She was a devoted wife,
mother, grandmother tand the
best aunta'-child could'ever be"
blessed to have. Verlie will be
missed by many friends and,
family who had the pleasure
to gather around her table for a
meal because she was not only
the most talented cooKlbut also
the best friend you could ever
want. "
She was born to John A. and
Kate McCranie on Feb. 12, 1938,
in Tallahassee.
Survivors include her loving,
devoted husband of 53 years,
Joseph Anthony Cacciatore of
Tallahassee; two children, Sha-
ron Sealy and John Cacciatore;
two granddaughters, Amanda
Sealy and Alyssa Cacciatore; four
sisters, Dee Gerrell and Dale,
Iola Ponder and Robert, Kathy
Shiver and Rita Grimsley and
Chet; and numerous nieces and
nephews.


Panacea Park

Baptist Church
24 Mission Road, Panacea
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Worship 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 p.m.
Pastor, Jerry Spears
L /


Flora E. A. Cooksey
Flora Erin Ashburn Cooksey,
87, of Tallahassee died Dec. 10.
The funeral service was held
Saturday, Dec. 13 at the Ivan As-
sembly of God in Crawfordville.
Interment was at Oakland Cem-
etery in Tallahassee, Flowers are
welcome or donations may be
made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723
Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee,
FL 3230
A native of Okaloosa County,
on Nov. 4, 1921, the daughter of
Garland Levi and Willie Mable
Ashburn. Of the 15 children to
whom she gave birth, 13 survive
along with 28 grandchildren,
48 great-grandchildren and two
great-great-grandchildren to
mourn her passing and at the
same time celebrate knowing
she will be reunited with her
loving husband of 65 years the
Reverend Henry Cooksey.
Surviving children are, Clay
Cooksey and wife Betty, Mable
Stafford and husband Bobby,
Mary Mathers and husband
Jasper, Rosa Letchworth and hus-
band Larry, Esther Buzzard and
husband Frank, Libby Costello,
Sharon Carter and husband Dan,.
Martha Ricehouse and husband
Robert, Sam Cooksey, Daniel
Cooksey and wife Gloria, Lemuel
Cooksey and wife Ginger, Phillip
Cooksey and wife Paula, and
Priscilla Vause; five sisters and
three brothers, Ethel Lambrecht,
Syble Daniels, Lois Spiva, Lyndall
Ashbum, Pansy Shoemaker, Billy


Ashburn, David Ashburn, and
Bobby Ashburn.
Abbey-Riposta Funeral Home
in Talahassee was in charge of
the arrangements.

George C. Kilgore
George Clyde Kilgore, 62, of
Spring Creek, died Monday, Dec.
8, in Spring Creek.
The funeral service was held
Friday, Dec. 12 at Shady Sea Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, Spring
Creek with Rev. Billy Spence,
Pastor, and Rev. B.B. Barwick
officiating. Interment followed
at Debra Nell Cemetery, Spring
Creek.
A native of Wakulla County,
he was a member of the Shady
Sea Missionary Baptist Church.
He retired from Big 10 Tire Com-
pany after 35 years and worked
for GCR for four years. He en-
joyed fishing and fireworks with
his family.
Survivors include his wife
of 46 years, Gladys Kilgore of
Spring Creek, a son; Jody Kilgore
and Susan of Crawfordville;
three daughters, Paula Agerton
and Hank, Cyndi Tice, all of
Spring Creek, and Robin Stevens
of Tallahassee, two brothers,
Horace Kilgore of Tavares and
Johnny H. Kilgore of Waycross,
Ga., a sister; Hellen Posey and
Louie of Medart; seven grand-
children, three great-grandchil-
dren; and numerous nieces and
nephews.
ICS Cremation and Funeral


Home in Lake City was in charge
of the arrangements.
Shirley C. Leonard
Shirley Cross Leonard, 72, of
Sopchoppy died Thursday, Dec.
11 in Sopchoppy.
The funeral service was held
Monday, Dec. 15 at Sopchoppy
United Methodist Church with
burial at West Sopchoppy Cem-
etery. In lieu of flowers, memo-
rial donations may be made
to Florida United Methodist
Children's Home, 51 Main Street,
Enterprise, FL 32725.
A native of Bristol, Va., she
had lived in the Sopchoppy area
for 20 years. She was a member
of Sopchoppy United Methodist
Church. Her gentle and nurturing
spirit will be greatly missed.
Survivors include her hus-
band of 53 years, John C. Leon-
ard MI of Sopchoppy; five chil-
dren, Jay Leonard of Sopchoppy,
Suzie Fisher and husband David
of Bristol, Tenn., Mary Spina and
husband Jim of Bluff City, Tenn.,
Paula Harford and husband Kev-
in of Bellefontaine, Ohio, and
Jim Leonard of Urbana, Ohio; 14
grandchildren; two great-grand-
children; a sister, Glenna Cross
Nidiffer and husband Edwin of
Bluff City, Tenn.; and two broth-
ers-in-law, Fred Leonard and
wife Brenda of Bristol, Tenn. and
David Leonard and wife Barbara
of Dandridge, Tenn.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.


Good News

Assembly of God




Sunday the 21st of December at 6:00 P.M.
at Good News Assembly of God ,
2028 Bloxham Cutoff, located one mile east of the
intersection of highways 319 and 267.
: For information calL.926-4065.-
Come join usforthis powerful Christmas presentation
and celebrate this special time of year as we worship
our Lord and Savior..


United
I Methodist

Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship I I a.m.
Pastor Brett Templeton
850-962-2511


Pioneer Baptist
Church (sBc)
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Worship 10:30 am.
Wed .adult, children & youth 7 p.m.
486 Beechwood Drive Crawfordville, FL.
(North of the Lower Bridge Road and
Spring Creek Highway intersection)"
Rev. Dennis Hall, Pastor
850-926-6161


Ivan Assembly of God-
202 Ivan Church Road
Crawfordvitle
Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey
'Coae d WAorship ,th Us"
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School......................... 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship.....................11 a.m.
Evening Worship.....................6 p.m.
Wednesday Service..............7.... p.m.
& Youth Service..........7......... p.m.
Royal Rangers 7 p.m.
Missionettes 7 p.m.

Wakulla United
Methodist Church
Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a,m.
Sunday School for all ages -10 a.m.
Sunday Worship 11 a.m.
Wednesday Service 7 p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor Jasie Henry Rinebhart


~ ay
United
Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship 9 a.m.
Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
;astoI ~tett empletox
(850)984-0127t -

Trinity
Lutheran ..
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Vicar Bert Matlock
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557


Alex Metcalf
Alex Metcalf, 77, of St Augus-
tine died Tuesday, Dec. 9 in St.
Augustine.
A graveside service was held
Saturday, Dec. 13 at Panacea
Cemetery.
A self-employed crab process-
ing plant worker, he was a U.S.'
Navy veteran and a member of
the Holiness Church faith. He
moved to St Augustine 42 years
ago, coming from Panacea.
Survivors include his wife of
53 years, Lillie Tucker Metcalf
of St. Augustine; two sons,
David Metcalf of Crawfordville
and Nolan Metcalf of Havana;
four daughters, Faye Rodgers
of Hastings, Vonne Lalone and
husband Barney, Lois Mishoe
and husband Arthur and Irene
Thornton and husband Ronnie,
all of St. Augustine; two broth-
ers, Hardy Metcalf and wife Judy
of Panacea and Charles Metcalf
and wife Eunice of Sopchoppy;
a sister, Sally Guerra of Missis-
sippi; 15 grandchildren; and 17
great-grandchildren; and many
other family and friends.
: Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge of
the arrangements.
Jess C, Palmer, Jr.
Jess Clower Palmer, Jr., 69, of
Crawfordville died Wednesday,

Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worship................10:30 a.-.
Ewvening Worship............. 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details,
962-2213


1255 Rehm
At the corner of Reh
Holy Eu
10:3C
The Reveren
926-


Church
winkel Rd.
winkel Rd. & US 98
charist
Sam
id Roy Lima
1742


Dec. 10 in Tallahassee.
Burial will be at Oakland
Cemetery at a later date.
A native of Tallahassee, he
moved to Crawfordville in 1979.
He graduated from Leon High
School and was a member
of Holy Comforter Episcqpal
Church in Tallahassee. He
a self-employed computer pro-
grammer who graduated from
Florida State University. He was
a member of the NRA, a musi-
cian and a traveler at heart, He
served in the United States
Marine Corps.
Survivors include his soul
mate, Boots Hodges; two sons,
O'brian Palmer and wife Blithe
of Palatka and Jess Palmer IlI
and wife Stephanie of Citra;
two brothers, George Palmer
and wife Sybil of Tallahassee
and William Palmer and wife
Jackie of Knoxville, Tenn.; a
sister, Patricia Palmer Bothwell
and husband John of Ocala;
three grandchildren, Dakota,
Logan and Mackenzies and four
nephews. r
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Tallahassee was in charge of
the arrangements.

More Obituaries on Page SA

Christ Church
Anglican'

Sunday
8:30am Service
9:30am Adult Bible Class
10:30am Children's Class
S10:30am Servide
Nursery available
Thursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study
Wednesday 6:30 pm Supper hnd
Children, Youth and Adult Bible Classes
850-745-8412
4340 Crawfordville Highway


8t Elizabeth
Ann Seton
Catholic C"i
Mass.9a.,m.Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.,,,
Father lames MacGee, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
926-1797


Crawfordville United

Methodist Church,
Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11:0O a c
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 926-720, ,
Ochlodsne & Aran Road 'Coe Grow With US' ww..c..rawdfaordyl


Crawf6rdville United!

Methodist Church

S -On Christmas Eve 7:00 PM,
Traditional Candlelight Service
11:00 PM
Lessons & Carols
Candlelight Service
Featuring our Chancel Choir and
several soloists
-< <


FiRST.
BAptiSl ChuRch
- ('. I t ...r I x i 11,


3086 Crawfordville Hwy.
(South of the Courthouse)
Church Office: 926-7896
www.fbccrawfordville.org
or
(youth) www.crosstraining.org


SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.'
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY


Fellowship Meal
(call for reservations)
Prayer/ Bible Study
IMPACT (Youth)
Children's Events


6:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
6:30 p.m.


5585 Crawfordville Hwy.
Tallahassee, FL 32305
Owned & Operated By Wesley Schweinsberg
Son of the Late Harold Schweinsberg
Office: (850) 421-7211 Mobile: (850) 510-3983
Call and Compare... You'll Save Time & Money
S Quality & Service


Hwy 319Medart,
Office 926-5265
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
S0 Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
AWANA 4:00 p.m.
h vYouth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mission is: Loving God and Lovlig Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day. '
www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org


117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy
Church Office 962-7822
ChlStinas Cantata
December 21, 11:00am
SullavSclOlS45AlM AWIACIBII SP
Merlg WorsiplAM Eveulig WiersMig 6 M
WsInuSavIPM Pray Need"g,


BaviluaMle AsseclatPpoo str/Stlluisnt Btr
0lin amers Minister sof Msisc
lJery EvatMR@NslrustkeUleKewp-MuslMsn E L


Who is the latest

Wakulla Wavemaker?"

Tune in daily at

2 p.m. and 6 p.m.





THE WORD IN PRAISE



WAKU 94.1 FM www.wave94.com
926-8000 (fax: 926-2000)


w-scove,- the, ,0& ee//








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday Dec. 18, 2008 Page 5A


Attempted murder


Hensley S. Duncan is
accused of shooting his
girlfriend in the head on
Saturday, Nov. 22.
;Coninued from Page 1A
Duncan called 911 that
night to report a shooting,
and iwheln deputies arrived
they found Duncan cradling
Herefprd, who was bleed-
ing profusely. According to
the probable cause affidavit,
Dunca was hysterical, saying
that he, didn't know the gun
was loaded.


At first, Duncan reportedly
told officers that Hereford had
shot herself, that she was
looking at his rifle and it ac-
cidentally went off, and then
that she was holding the rifle
for him and it went off, and
that he was taking the rifle
in the house and handed
it to her and it accidentally
went off.
He allegedly admitted in an
interview at the sheriff's office
that he and Hereford had been
having a heated argument
about custody 'and she got
in her vehicle to leave. She
reportedly backed out of the
driveway for a few minutes
and then returned.
Duncan reportedly went
and got in his SUV and caused
a head-on collision that caused
body damage to Hereford's ve-
hicle so that the doors would
not fully open. He backed his
car away, and the two report-
edly began talking again, and
then Hereford attempted to
leave a second time and Dun-


can began kicking the doors
on both sides of Hereford's car
and walked across the hood.
Duncan then allegedly
went and got his .223 deer
rifle with a mounted scope
and pointed it at Hereford. He
allegedly told officers that in
an attempt to intimidate her
he pulled the trigger, and the
rifle fired. He claimed he did
not know it was loaded. The
child was in the front passen-
ger seat of Hereford's car.
After he allegedly shot
Hereford, Duncan returned
the rifle to his SUV and then
went and got the child out of
the car and took her into the
house and placed her in her
crib. Then he went back to
the car and began to attempt
first aid on Hereford while
calling 911.
Court records indicate that
the .223 bullet entered Here-
ford's face near the upper ca-
nine and shattered on impact.
Bullet fragments were located
throughout her face.


Puppy mill case


Continued from Page 1A
Cathy Bailey denied that
her d os had suffered from
neglect; saying that the rainy
weather before September
had thrown off her groom-
ing schedule and admitted
that the fur of some of the
dogs may have been mat-
ted. She also acknowledged
that prior to the visit from
animal control, her dogs had
not received regular rabies
vaccinations, Asked why she
hadn't done that, she looked
embarrassed but admitted, "I
didn't know I needed to."
Bailey also testified that
many pf the problems had
been taken care of: the auto-
matic watering system had
been extended to the runs
where some dogs had water
bowls; all of the dogs were
now groomed; and most
had received rabies vaccina-
tions.
. Saying that it sounded as
if isme improvements had
been made since September,
J dge Walkek-difected animal
cIntrol and tthe' Baileys 'to
5. I ; ... -


go the kennel the next day
and take photos. She then
directed the attorneys in the
case to file their proposed
resolutions within 15 days,
but noted it was unlikely she


would be able to rule during
the holiday season.
Judge Walker did say that,
based on testimony and
evidence at the hearing,
that there had been a lack
of proper, reasonable care for"
the dogs. "Right now, based
on the testimony of the.vet-
erinarian, you've got way too
many dogs out there for one
person."
Wallace Bailey was very
combative when he was
cross-examined by County
Attorney Ron Mowrey, often
mocking Mowrey's tone in
his response. At one point.,
holding up a picture of a
dog food bag with roaches
in it, Mowrey asked. Bailey if
he felt that was acceptable.
"Dogs don't care if they eat
coaches," Bailey, obviously
;irritated, answered tersely.
"Probably Iike them hick-


ens do."
In a less tense moment,
Bailey said, "The animals
are not being mistreated in
any way. They are not being
neglected. They have a nice
home."
Dr. Hughes and animal
control officer Kenny Carni-
vale both testified that they
were "overwhelmed" when
they saw the Bailey dog
operation.
Carnivale said he was
distressed to see all the
cages lined up and that it
was very noisy with 150 dogs
barking.
Hughes shared that feel-
ing. "I was, in, shock to see
the number of cages," she
said. She also questioned
the reason for one family to
own 150 small-breed dogs,
saying it was unlikely that
number of dogs could receive
proper care and socialization
with just the Baileys tending
them. "Not just for the valu-
able puppies, but the adults
as. well,"' she said.


The Vaughns build a special heart shaped table with matching seats.

No picnic out there


Continued from Page 1A Pigott referred to Vaughn as
The tables also give the, "The Maverick" long before
Vaughns time to reflect on John McCain attempted to get
their own family as both into the White House with the
David, a real estate entrepre- same moniker. If there is one
neur, and Mike, a multi-busi- thing Helen has learned in 48
ness owner including Mike's years of marriage it is that Burl
Limousine, have both passed is "unpredictable.".
age 40. Burl met Helen, a Wakulla
Helen wallpapered the County native, after returning
playhouse which includes from military service. "I've
television, air conditioning been here all my life," she
and a telephone. She also con- said.
verted a swimming pool into Vaughn still has many
a fish pond. Her landscaping 'political ideas including us-
includes large fish and flowers ing the former Harbor House
from all over. "I love my flow restaurant as a logical location
ers," she said. for the Big Bend Maritime
The Vaughn family now, Museum since it is unused
includes three grandchildren and on the water. His political
and two great-grandchildren. ideas sometimes cause Helen
Burl was a Wakulla County to roll her eyes as she hopes
Commissioner from 1990 to for peace and quiet with
1994 and said he was pleased her neighbors in her golden
to be able to leave the county years.
in better financial condition
than he found it. He still
enjoys following county poli-
tics.
"No, I don't miss it," said
Helen loudly and quickly. Burl h.1
and Helen have nearly 50years
of marriage together and they 1
seem to be able to' complete
each other's sentences.
Burl was born in Illinois -r .-
and grew up in California _-
before moving to Wakulla i;J
County in 1955.
"I'm still an outsider," he .-'
joked. "What the heck do you A T-
have to do to be considered T
part of the county." "
Helen_ said late .Wakulla 'GIFT WRAP
County Commissioner John .. oN FTR. R10-6 -


Burl and Helen have operat-
ed a paint and body shop, the
first car lot in Wakulla County,
a restaurant and 20 years of
being a florist. Burl was also
the head of the Panacea Cham-
ber of Commerce and fought
for free local calls to places
inside and outside the county
that were once toll calls.
David's mathematical mind
has helped Burl complete
some elaborate designs. They
will also do custom plans for
customers.
"We just build picnic tables
for people and we've got a lot
to. choose from," said Burl.
"It's something to do and it's
a lot of fun."
"They are not just picnic
tables," Helen concluded.
"They're works of art." The
Vaughns can be reached at
984-5664 ,


GIFT CERTIFICATES
. 10-5 1616 C u % FORD' l.i.l: Hls v.


U
U


"Join me and become

a member of a CHP

medicare Advantage Plan.".


Health
P L A N


An Independent Ucensee of the
Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association


Plan to attend a SEMINAR to LEARN
./ MORE about CHP Advantage Plus
and CHP Preferred Advantage.

Call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512
to RSVP or for more information.

(TTY/TDD: 850-383-3534 or 1-800-955-8771)
8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week
or visit us at: www.capitalhealth.com/medicae


'I"
Ii,.


Seminars will be held at the


Capital Health Plan Health Center located at
1491 Governor's Square Blvd. at 10:00 a.m. on:

Tuesday, December 23
Friday, December 26
Tuesday, December 30



om things get better with age.

Cap ta ealt Plan is one of them.

Paid Endorsement. Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract.
For, accommodations of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call the
numbers above. A sales representative will be present with information and
applications. Benefits may change on January 1, 2010.
H5938 2009_1008_043_101908


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tv is Bringing


BW Insile!

Warm Up Your Mornings

With A Fresh Brewed Cup Of

Bean Buds Coffee From Any

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 18, 2008


Sports


Lady Eagles back to winning Wrestlers finish fifth in tourney


By JESSI BISHOP
WHS Coach from her blog
WAKULLA 1,
PANAMA CITY BAY 1
Brooklynn Tindall scored the
only goal on an assist from Ra-
chel Capps. Shay Barwick made
18 saves in goal and Wakulla
improved to 7-7-1 overall and
3-2-1 in district contests.
WAKULLA 5, GODBY 1
This may have been the
most uncomfortable game ever,
played in a wind-driven rain
with a temperature that started
in the high 40s and dropped,
about 10 degrees by the end.
The field was muddy and the
game was sloppy, but there
were several great moments.
Mandy McClendon had a goal
on a free kick that was a long
range work of art, a laser from
about 35 yards that US National
Team goalie Hope Solo couldn't
have stopped. It was Mandy's
second goal of the season and
worth the wait. Brooklynn
Tindall also got in on the goals
tonight, netting her team-lead-
ing ninth, and Rachel Capps,
who was denied a goal after
a lot of hard work early in
the game and had to settle
with the assist on Tindall's
goal, got a goal of her own in
the second half. But perhaps
best was the play of Norma
Woodcock, who, coming off the
bench, sparked the team with


two goals to earn player of the
game honors. Hopefully it will
be the first of many times you
hear "player of the game goes
to Norma Woodcock" over the
next several years.
MACLAY 2, WAKULLA 0
This game was a good back
and forth struggle, with both
the War Eagles and the Ma-
rauders stringing together
good passing combinations
and getting good attacking
momentum in the first 20 min-
utes. Neither team wanted to
take over the game, and while
Maclay was the stronger team
at the end of the first half, our
defense wasn't letting anything
through. We went to the break
tied 0-0.
We had trouble finding
anyone who wanted to shoot
the ball tonight. The entire
defense played tough tonight,
but the player of the game was
unquestionably senior center
back Amanda McCullers, who
dominated the defensive mid-
dle. Shay Barwick had 13 saves
to give her 80 on the year.
The JV team notched their
second win of the season,
beating Maclay 1-0 on another
goal by Chelsea Sanders. Holly
Peacock picks up her first shut
out of the season and the JV
squad improved to 2-3 on the
season.


WAKULLA 0, TAYLOR COUN-
TY 0 (Taylor 3-2 on PKs)
We dominated this game,
but as has been true all season,
had trouble getting enough
good shots off, and on the
few occasions we did shoot,
we couldn't finish. We liter-
ally played almost the entire
second half in Taylor's half of
the field, and much of it put-
ting balls into the box. Taylor's
keeper made a couple of good
saves, but mostly we had trou-
ble pulling the trigger.
Amanda McCullers and
Kristine Gallamore hit their
PKs, but Taylor's keeper saved
two others. Tough way to lose
because we were the better
team in this one for 80 min-
utes. But they were better in
the shootout.
MANATEE 3, WAKULLA 0
(CHILES TOURNEY)
We had a great start to the
Chiles tournament, though
the score doesn't show it. We
'played 60 minutes of great soc-
cer. We had an unfortunate 10
minute stretch when Manatee
got all three of their goals, but
the score definitely doesn't
reflect our effort or how close
this one really was. In the first
half, we played stellar soccer,
with junior goalkeeper Shay
Barwick particularly shining,
making several big-time saves.


Lincoln slips by Wakulla, 70-58


By SCOTT COLLINS
Special to The Wakulla News
The boys varsity basketball
team will host a tournament
at Wakulla High School on
Jan. 2 and Jan. 3. The teams
playing will be Cape Coral
Mariner, Panama City Beach
Arnold, Franklin County and
Wakulla. The tournament
schedule will be released at a
later date. Also, the War Eagles


will play in the Elks Lodge
Tournament on Dec. 19 and
Dec. 20 at Lincoln and John
Paul II. The top two teams
will square off at Lincoln on
Dec. 21. All games will start
at 7 p.m.
The boys varsity basket-
ball team lost a home game.
to Lincoln on Friday, Dec. 12
by a score of 70-58. The War
Eagles jumped on Lincoln


early and led 15-2 late in the
first quarter. However, Lincoln
went on a 27-2 run before the
War Eagles came roaring back
and cut the score to 35-33
just before the half. Tavarus
McKinney scored 23 points
and had 12 rebounds while
Wilton Booth scored 11 points
including three three-point
field goals. The team fell to
2-2 on the season.


Wakulla tops Taylor County by 20


Coach Casey Godwin's
Wakulla Lady War Eagle basket-
ball team lost to Rickards but
beat Taylor County last weekto
improve to 7-4 overall. The team
is 2-3 in district contests.
Rickards won 55-48 with a
strong second half. Wakulla led
by three points at halftime.
Artigua Kilpatrick scored 15
points and had three steals.
Taylor Washington had nine
points. Kelsey Lee added six


points and pulled down eight
rebounds to go with two as-
sists. Kiara Harvey had six
points, eight rebounds and two
assists. Nese Jackson, Taylor
Eglton and Jatericka Brown
combined for 12 points. Brown
had six rebounds and Eglton
had five steals.
Wakulla topped Taylor 67-
47 with a big first quarter and
strong second half. Kilatrick
scored 20 points. Harvey added


14 while Washington had 13
and Eglton scored 10. Brown
chipped in with seven and Lee
had four points.
Kilpatrick and Harvey had
five steals while Brown, had
seven rebounds, Harvey had
six, Kilpatrick five and Lee
four.
Wakulla played Franklin
County Dec. 16 and will take
part in the Maclay Tournament
Dec, 19 through Dec. 22.


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
With illnesses ripping
through the ranks of the Wakul-
la War Eagle wrestling team,
Wakulla placed fifth at the
Capital City Classic Tournament
at Chiles last week. Wakulla and
Coach John Wainwright were
also robbed of points as tour-
nament officials accidentally
advanced a defeated wrestler
at the expense of 215 pounder.
Tyler Corbett. Corbett failed
to move on in the wrestling
competition despite not losing
a match. Wainwright declined
to discuss how angry he was
about the. mistake and the de-
feated wrestler being allowed to
continue, but he was disgusted
with the opposing coach.
"The kids were sick," said
Coach Wainrwright. "It went
through the whole team. We're
out of shape as a team, but we'll
have two-a-days during Christ-
mas and get back at it."

SALife
,Changing
S Gift...
...Look better
Feel better, Live healthier
Gena Davis
Personal Trainer
9 r6-7685 or 510-2326


Tre McCullough won the
tournament despite being ill
during the competition. He
was 4-0.
Wakulla did not have a wres-
tler at 103, but Mookie Forbes
finished fourth at 112 with a
3-1 mark.
Travis Hinsey was 5-2 and,
placed fifth at 119. Tyler Hill was
sick at 125 and failed to place.
At 135, Seth Hyman wrestled
the first place and third place
finishers in a rugged draw. At
140, Scotty Varner placed second
at 3-1.
Garrett Barco placed third
at 145 with a 5-1 record. Chase
Maxwell wrestled at 152. Mi-
chael Howard wrestled at 160.
Luke Taylor was the War Eagle
at 171. Cole Woofter wrestled


at 189. Logan Barwick followed
Corbett at 215 as the1WHS
heavyweight. 1I
Niceville won the to rna-
ment followed by OclI For-
est, Suwannee, Linccl and
Wakulla. There were 2, teams
competing.
On Friday and Saturday, Dec.
19 and Dec. 20, Wakulla will
travel to Fort Walton Beach for
Beast of the Beach Christmas
Duals before starting again in
January at the Suwannee Tour-
nament Jan. 9 and Jan. 10.
Wakulla Bank Vice President/
CFO Susan Payne Turner and
Community Relations Officer
Jerry Evans joined the team to
celebrate a recent tournament.
Wakulla Bank was a sp nsor of
the team's Dec. 5 tourney.



T-Shirts Starting at


850-926-2079
"4416 Cra.wfordvile Hwy Crawfordvie, FL. 32327.


I


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING on ORDINANCE 2008-1
MODIFYING SECTION 46 OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF
ST. MARKS, FLORIDA, PROHIBITING UNNECESSARY, EXCESSIVE, AND
ANNOYING NOISE FROM ALL SOURCES SUBJECT TO ITS POLICE
POWERS, AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
THE CITY OF ST. MARKS WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING
First Reading Date: November 13, 2008 at 5:15 pm
Second Reading Date: January 8th, 2009 at 7;30 pm
Location: 788 Port Leon Drive, St. Marks FL 32355
The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone
(850) 925-6224. Persons needing,special access considerations should call the City
Office at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Office may
be contacted at (850) 925-6224.


The Thomas Clark

Family wishes your

family a very

Merry Christmas and

Happy New YearH


I I.

, .


Susan Payne-Turner, Jerry Evans, Wakulla Bank supported recent tournament.


I,."








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday Dec. 18, 2008 Page 7A


War Eagle soccer team drops three games in tourney


By JOHN REICH
Special to The Wakulla News
Chances of defending their
2007 Wakulla High School soc-
cer tournament title slipped
away upon the devastating
news 6f an ACL injury and
bursitis endured by starting
goalkeeper Matt Reich. Ag-
gravated during the Panama
City Bay match the previous
Friday,. Reich is expected to
be sidelined at least for the
remainder of the calendar
year.
The third and final battle
of the tournament between
Suwannee and Wakulla ended
up being an emotional roller-
coaster for both squads. Hav-
ing beaten the Bulldogs the
last four consecutive matches,
the War Eagles were deter-
mined to avenge their close


losses earlier to Maclay and
Mosley.
On the other end, Suwan-
nee had lost earlier to Mosley
but had come back from a 3-1
deficit at intermission to upset
heavily favored Maclay. With a
quick strike of his right boot,
Jackson Brown chipped a ball
past Wakulla Goalkeeper Josh
Oliver (12 saves 66 minutes)
to take the lead.
The Bulldogs would add
to their lead during the 16th
minute. Coach Bob Wallace
would switch keepers dur-
ing the 20th minute, placing
Tony. Castellano (0 saves 14
minutes) within the posts.
Fourteen minutes later and
upon racing for a 50/50 ball
with a Suwannee striker, both
players would collide near the
top of the eighteen yard box,


After several minutes and in ute would lead to Wakulla's
obvious pain, Castellano was second goal of the match.
aided to the bench placing' Unable to obtain possession
Josh Oliver back into action. of the ball from Harrell, a frus-
The War Eagles would treated Bulldog defender would
sharpen their talons and send the junior to the ground
strike back with a goal min- within the penalty box. With
utes before intermission. Tra- a confident strike of his boot,
vis Harrell's (assist) diagonal Liam Daniels placed the pen-
pass would leave the Bulldogs alty kick into the netting to
scratching behind their ears bring Wakulla to within one
allowing Austin Lentz to race tally, trailing only by 3-2. '
toward goal. Wakulla would tie the
With a quick outward step match during the 75th min-
past the diving Suwannee ute as Travis Harrell (assist)
Goalkeeper Jake Hayes (3 took charge of a set piece.
saves), Lentz calmly placed Launching the ball, a Bulldog
the ball within the far post. defender missed the sphere
The Bulldogs would quickly as it took an awkward bounce.
take a two goal lead for the Taking advantage, Jeffrey
second time. Bryan placed the ball past the
A square pass from Liam diving keeper and inside the
Daniels to teammate Travis far post.
Harrell during the 54th. min- Still excited in tying the


match, the War Eagles left
the nest unprotected as Su-
wannee's Jackson Brown (as-
sist) sent Paul Ploetner racing
towards goal.
Ploetner placed the ball
within the far post and into
the netting as Suwannee
survived an upset to the War
Eagles.
With the victory, the Bull-
dogs needed help from Ma-
clay to upset Mosley to grab
the tournament trophy. Mos-
ley dominated Maclay 5-1 to
earn the 2008 title.
Wakulla lost the Maclay
game 6-2 as Harrell scored two
goals on assists from Connor
Smith and Jeffrey Bryan. Oli-
ver and Castellano combined
for six saves, Mosley beat
Wakulla 8-0. Oliver had six
saves.


Soccer

players

needed for

U14 league

Soccer players are need-
ed for an age 14 and under
league. Middle school season
is over. Come play soccer at
the recreation park. The sea-
son will start in January and
at least 32 players are needed
to form league. Please call the
rec park if you are interested
at 926-7227.

GETTHE NEWS
DELIVERED
EACH WEEK!
Call 926-7102


TLAHASSEMDCLRVE
"T e s ng e m sti p ra ntf c o o u c s f l m d c l p o e u ei u lf e e iamr f s i n l


DR. JEFFREY JONES
Board Certified Orthodontist


DR. BART CAREY Board Certified Pediatric Dentist


Dedicated to serving the dental needs of infants, children, and adolescents, this highly
respected practice offers comprehensive, gentle dentistry in surroundings that are
comfortable and child friendly. Regular dental exams should start at 12 months of age,
a check-up for braces should be done by age 7, and the average age to start braces is
11 to 13. Orthodontics is not merely for improving your child's smile and bite,
orthodontic treatment is becoming more common for adults with newer technologies
and more cosmetic treatment options. The practice takes pride in their great dentistry,
warm atmosphere and the ability to put children at ease. The editors of this Medical
Review are pleased to feature Dr. Jim Carey, Dr. Bart Carey, Dr. Jeffrey Jones and
their staff for their contribution to our children's dental health.
CRAWFORDVILLE TALLAHASSEE
850 926-1777 www.drscareyandjonts.com 850 893-5177
2001-A Crawfordville Highway 1272 Timberlane Road


I ,I .Westminster Communities of Florida
k, " :- ,- ComeT for the Lifestyle ... Stay for a Lifetime'

IWestminster Oaks
Ideally located on a beautifully wooded campus in Tallahassee,
Westminster Oaks combines established neighborhoods of detached villas with the
comfort and luxury of mid-rise and garden apartment homes. Offering a vast array of
indoor and outdoor activities, their "lock it and leave it" security makes it easy for people
living'there to maintain the active lifestyle they love, without worrying about what's going
on "back home." Westminster Oaks also provides Residential Assisted Living and
Skilled Nursing services. Included in the monthly service fee: Heated Enclosed
Swimming Pool, Scheduled Transportation, Gracious Dining Rooms, On-Campus
Health Resource Center, Wellness Fitness Center, Walking Trails, 24-hour
Security, Club House, Thrift Shop, Bike Paths, a Chapel, and much, much more.
Here is a concept that was designed to motivate and promote independence, dignity
and the vitality of living. This is truly a great place to get the most out of your retirement
years. The editors of this Medical Review are pleased to feature Westminster Oaks as
our Retirement Community of Choice.
850 878-1136
4449 MEANDERING WAY, TALLAHASSEE www.westminsterretirement.com


Comfort


Comforting Solutions for In-Home CareTM
Yes.......you can remain in the comfort and privacy of your own home! This highly
respected company offers homemaker/companionservices as well as personal care
services for assistance with activities of daily living. Comfort Keepers has experienced,
rapid growth since opening their Tallahassee office in 2001. Due to the ever-increasing
need for services in Wakulla County, they have opened a satellite office in Woodville. All
of Comfort Keepers friendly caregivers are screened, bonded and insured for the
peace of mind of their clients. Services range from Companionship, Housekeeping,
Meal Preparation, Respite Care, Grocery Shopping, Errand Service, Bathing,
Feeding, Transfers, Incontinence Care and Much, Much More. Services are offered
from as little as 3-4 hours a shift to 24 hours a day 7 days a week, with all services
tailored to the individual clients needs. The editors of this Medical Review are proud to
recommend Comfort Keepers for the personalized In-Home Care Services they bring
to their clients.
850 402-0051
327 OFFICE PLAZA DRIVE SUITE 105 TALLAHASSEE


Tallahassee Vein & Face Clinic is the vein clinic of Tallahassee. Dr. Charles Kent,
MD, offers VNUS Closure for varicose veins, a treatment covered by most insurances,
that results in rapid relief of the pain, ache, swelling, and even ulceration associated
with venous reflux. Some cases may not warrant VNUS, but rather sclerotherapy or
segmented removal, called ambulatory phlebectomy. Initial consultation usually
involves a detailed, diagnostic ultrasound of the venous system, indicating what
treatment protocol the patient actually needs. Linda Schank, RN, joins Dr. Kent in
offering Thermage as well. This state-of-the-art procedure, which tightens the skin of
the face or even contours areas of the body, has been offered at TVFC for five years.
Every effort is made to give each patient the best result possible, and we are very proud
of our work. Microdermabrasion, and injection of Botox cosmetic continue to be offered
at Tallahassee Vein & Face Clinic. We invite you to take advantage of our expertise.
850 561-8346
2822 REMINGTON GREEN CIRCLE, SUITE 102, TALLAHASSEE
www.veinandface.com


Tallahassee Cardiology
Associates, PA
MICHELLE D. BACHTEL, MD JOSEPH C. BAKER, MD
Providing current, comprehensive health care-in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of
heart problems, Tallahassee Cardiology Associates, PA offers a full range of integrated
cardiac services, from patient education through inpatient care, including: Clinical
Cardiology and Consultation, Echocardiography, Doppler Ultrasound, Exercise
Testing, Holter Monitoring, Nuclear Cardiac Imaging, Cardiac Catheterization,
Coronary Angioplasty, and Intra-Coronary Stenting. The physicians and staff are
committed to exploring new technologies and techniques that provide better ways to care
for their patients, and to treating each patient like a person rather than a diagnosis. Office
hours are by appointment, new patients are welcomed and Medicare and most insurance is
accepted. The editors of this Medical Review are proud to recommend the physicians and
staff at Tallahassee Cardiology Associates, PA for providing the finest cardiac, care that
modern medicine has made available.
Phone 850 656-7265 Fax 850 877-1247
2631 CENTENNIAL BOULEVARD, SUITE 200, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32308


Sudiology
\ Associates
oqJfeorih Sjtsoriv9a
a D Mson of TalMaiassee
ar, Noe & Throat


Do You Nod and Smile
Without Understanding?

OTOLARYNGOLOGY PHYSICIANS &
DOCTORS OF AUDIOLOGY
AVAILABLE ON SITE


Complete hearing aid selection including all technologies for both pediatric and
adult population
Hearing evaluations for newborn, pediatric and adult
Vestibular testing for hearing and balance disorders
Full line of swim molds and hearing protection available
Audiology Associates Of North Florida
A Division of Tallahassee Ear, Nose & Throat
Two Tallahassee Locations:'
1405 CENTERVILLE ROAD, SUITE 5400 or 2626 CARE DRIVE, SUITE 208
(850) 671-5172 www.tallyent.com


TALLAHASSEE

/TEM\ DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING
TALLAHASSEE DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING Tallahassee's Premier MRI & CT Facility.
MRI CT
With excellent imaging in a comfortable, friendly environment, Tallahassee Diagnostic
Imaging brings you the latest advances in this field. Serving our area since 1985, TDI
now offers new equipment, new services, and a recently renovated facility. Every exam
performed at TDI is interpreted by one of the board certified radiologists of Radiology
Associates of Tallahassee. With the largest archive of images in Tallahassee, they
have the capability to burn CD's for patients and physicians, and images are available
to physician's offices via the internet. And at Tallahassee Diagnostic Imaging a caring
staff will work to ensure that your diagnostic'test is simple and painless. So, be sure to
ask your doctor to send you to this highly regarded Imaging Center whenever imaging
is required. The editors of this Medical Review are pleased to feature Tallahassee
Diagnostic Imaging, as our Imaging Center of Choice.
MR and CT www.tdic.org MRI
850 656-2261 850 926-1259
1623 Medical Dr, Tallahassee 15 Council Moore Rd, Crawfordville


CLIFTON J. BAILEY, MD
J. DANIEL DAVIS, MD
F. RAY DOLLY, MD
DAVID Y. HUANG, MD
ALBERTO L. FERNANDEZ, MD
850 878-8714
2617 Mitcham Drive, Ste 102, Tallahassee


CARLOS E. CAMPO, MD
JOSEPH M. GRAY, MD
JOHN S. THABES, MD
MUHANAD A.HASAN, MD
PRAFUL B. PATEL, MD
850-877-1528
1401 Centerville Rd, Ste G02, Tallahassee


Providing current, comprehensive health care in the diagnosis,
prevention and treatment of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine.
i- They specialize in the treatment of: Emphysema, Chronic Bronchitis,
Asthma, Pulmonary Fibrosis, Pulmonary Rehabilitation, Lung &
S Breathing Disorders, Pneumonia, and Sleep Disorders. Appointments
are from referring physicians only, Medicare and most insurance is
accepted and new patients are welcomed. The editors of this Medical
Review are pleased to feature the physicians and staff at Tallahassee Pulmonary
Clinic for the quality of health care they bring to their patients.


The Hour Glass
South East Eye Specialists
In Crawfordville
EDMOND GARDNER, OD


fr The friendly and attentive staff at this highly regarded practice
provides the very highest quality care, including: Family Vision Care, Comprehensive
Eye Health Exams, Care for Glaucoma, Macular Degeneration and Diabetic Eye
Disease, Contact Lenses For Everyone, including; soft, extended wear,
astigmatic, tinted, disposable, & bifocal, and a complete selection of designer
frames. Medicaid, Medicare, CHP, and most Insurances are accepted and they offer locations
in Crawfordville and Tallahassee to serve you. The American Optometric Association
recommends that you see an optometrist at least once a year. Remember, the most
dangerous eye condition is the one that goes undetected. The editors of this Medical
Review are proud to feature The Hour Glass and South East Eye Specialists for
their medical expertise and dedication to quality products and service.
2650-5 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE 850 926-9213
1480 Timberlane Rd, Tallahassee 850 893-4687
1433 E Lafayette St., Tallahassee 850 877-4687
www.thehourglasses.com


n-.'


TALLAHASSEE ORTHOPEDIC & SPORTS
PHYSICAL THERAPY
The Big Bend's Premier Certified Rehabilitation Agency
Announcing: In Crawfordville, the new clinical director, Lori Cate,
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Board Certified Pediatric Dentist


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Page8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 18, 2008


Children share some Christmas spirit Benefit account opened'
A b i tb k t..., h1o b t,* a,,2t W kulla


Taylor Register, Hunter Register, Tami Register with Major Maurice Langston.


Children from Shadeville
and Crawfordville elementary
schools, and the Ray and Terry
Smith family teamed up with
the Wakulla Sheriffs Office to
help make the season brighter


for crime victims of domestic
violence.
The brown bags were deco-
rated by students and the
"Christmas Card To You" in the
bag was written by a Wakulla


Middle School student.
"Children have the ability
to feel the feelings of people
who are hurting," Major Mau-
rice Langston said. "They
teach adults a lesson. 'If you


want to sleep in heavenly
peace, practice compassion
because it heals hurts and
heartaches.' This act of kind-
ness and compassion speaks
volumes of the fine parents
we have in Wakulla County,
because when you think about
it compassion is caught more
than taught. Maybe this will
start a ripple effect through-
out Wakulla County."
The Wakulla County Sher-
iff's Office will place the gifts
in the hands and hearts of
the Sheriffs Victim Advocates.
The Brown Bag Stocking is
stuffed with shampoo, soap,
conditioners, pens, paper,
Christmas Cards, ornaments,
as well as the thoughts and
prayers of the children who
prepared them.
"We would like to join the
Smith Family in thanking
all the fine sponsors," said
Langston.
They are: Wakulla Bank,
Capital City Bank, Score Fed-
eral Credit Union, -Badcock
Furniture, Community Bank,
Ameris Bank, Wildwood Inn,
Best Western .(Crawfordville
and Tallahassee) Holiday Inn,
Cabot Lodge, Hampton Inn,
Hilton Garden Inn, and Home-
wood Suites as well as Winn
Dixie for the bags.


has been set up to assist Billy Bank to assist the family with
Brown, 39, of Crawfordville, as medical expenses arid food
he battles cancer. The account costs. He has two children.


SbBL NURSERY .

ANB TREE FARM'i
S. .% A_


Obituaries
Continued from Page 4A


Patricia P. S& Parks
Patricia Peyton Smallwood
Parks, 72, of Crawfordville,
died Monday, Dec. 8, in Craw-
fordville. The funeral service
was held Friday, Dec. 12, at
St. John's Episcopal Church in
Tallahassee. In lieu of flowers,
please donate to the Pat Parks
Memorial fund (for individuals
who are victims of trauma but
cannot afford counseling) in
care of Big Bend Victims As-
sistance Coalition. Please make
checks payable to BBVAC "for
Pat Parks fund," P.O. Box 1486,
Tallahassee, FL 32302.
A resident of the Tallahas-
see area since 1973, she was a
licensed marriage and family
therapist. She was a kind and
loving woman; and a devoted
wife, mother, and grandmoth-
er, whose love touched many
in the community. She was
loved and will be missed.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Paul Parks; two daugh-
ters, Susan and Rebecca, and
their husbands Ted and Joe;
her grandchild, Zola; two sis-
ters, Madeleine and Innes; and
brother, Hugh.
Fairchild Funeral Home in
Tallahassee was in charge of
arrangements.


Diane A. Wade
Diane Aman Wade, 59, of
Monticello died Thursday, Dec.
11 in Monticello.
The funeral service was held
Saturday, Dec. 13 at Calvary
Baptist. Church in Monticello
with interment at Ebenezer
Church Cemetery. In lieu of
flowers, memorial contribu-
tions may be made to Covenant
Hospice, 1545 Raymond Diehl
Road, Suite 102, Tallahassee,
FL 32308.
A native of Monticello, she
was a bookkeeper at Jefferson
Ace Hardware Store and a mem-
ber of Calvary Baptist Church.
Her greatest rewards were her
grandchildren.
Survivors include two daugh-
ters, Tisa Young and Davy of
Tallahassee and Nicki "Stepha-
nie" Neel and Cliff of Crawford-
ville; a brother, Kevin Aman and
Leah of Monticello; two sisters,
Mary Alice Barclay of Crystal
Fiver and HenryEtta Boatwright
and Jerry of Monticello; and
five grandchildren, Paige Reid,
Riley Young, T.J. Wright, Troy
Neel and Clay Neel.
Beggs Funeral Home in
Monticello was in charge of the
arrangements.


Edwin T. Westcott
Major Edwin T. Westcott,
U.S. Army (Ret.), 84, of Havana
died Thursday, Dec. 11 in Ha-
vana.
The funeral service was held
Monday, Dec. 15 at New Hope
Christian Center in Havana,
with burial and full military
honors at Concord Cemetery,
He was born January 9, 1924,
in Warren Co., Miss. Major
Westcott served in the U.S.
Army for 22 years, where he
received the Purple Heart for
being wounded during combat
as well as the Bronze Star and
Oak Leaf Cluster for valor dur-
ing combat. He moved his fam-
ily to Tallahassee in 1968 and
began working for the Federal
Correctional Institution, where
he worked for 20 years until he
retired in 1988.
Survivors include his wife of
20 years, Frances Jeanette West-
cott of Havana; four daughters,
Ann Cotroneo and Janice West-
cott, both of Crawfordville,
Tina Losciolo and George of
Shreveport, La., and Teresa
Reep and David of Glen Alpine,
N.C.; seven sons, Mike Westcott
and Jenny of Toltec, Ariz., Eddie
Westcott and Marsha of Tal-


Alice S. Ragsdale
Alice Smith Ragsdale, 86, of *
Tallahassee died Dec. 9.
A memorial service was -
held Saturday, December 13,
at First Presbyterian Church
in Tallahassee. In lieu of flow-
ers, the faniy requests that Co
memorials be sent to the First
Presbyterian Church Building 8 W innei
Fund, 110 North Adams St., Tal- .
lahassee, Florida, 32301.
The Smith family were pio-e His name
neers to Gadsden County, rp was drawn
where she was born. She moved from
to Tallahassee from Quincy in E Angelocs
1940. She was Coordinator .i.. .
of the Office of Executive
Clemency and served seven ese restaurants
governors and their cabinets. t aces to ear.
Shedwas past president of the i
Tallahassee Junior Woman's 'this. Thank You!
Club, a charter member of both
the Tallahassee Junior League )tngrestauranrs
and the Baby's Breath Garden %abe today
Circle. She was also an active -? Coastal .."
member of the First Presbyte- sturant ,
rian Church for 68 years.
Survivors include her son,
Burr Augustus Ragsdale III
and Dee of Crawfordville-, two o.
daughters, Nancy Ragsdale-
Murphy and Michael of Talla- s
hassee and Sara Beth Stribling OFF The Eatin' Path o,,.
and Jim of Thomasville, Ga.; el Entry Form" M
seven grandchildren, West I btIQZo
Edwards and Renee, Jackson ny Please rtcpating form atce
Murphy and Kami, Allison i ay p ticipatig atin' Place
Stribling, Clayton Ragsdale, Name
Julie Anna Ragsdale, Nicholas Address
Allen and Natalie Foles; and Address
three great-grandsons, Dylan
Edwards, Mason Edwards and I City
Bryce Murphy.
Culley's MeadowWood Fu- State Zip
neral Home in Tallahassee Phone
was in charge of the arrange-
ments. e-mail
..... ....... ......


lahassee, David Westcott and
Cindy of Lagrange, Ga., Johnny
Westcott and Charlotte of Pan-
ama City, Donnie Westcott and
Shelli of Tallahassee, Patrick
Westcott of Brandon and Car-
roll Owen and Kelly of Citrus
Springs; 20 grandchildren; and
four great-grandchildren.


Thursday Mornings
Look for Your Complimentary
copy of ISjie akulla iretlu
(free with any full Breakfast Order)

Hungry Man Breakfast $529
BreakfastPlatter$249

$1" Breakfast Special

984-2933 .
L 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea,,


Capital Health Plan


A monthly program for older adults who want to learn more ab6ut
creating and maintaining healthy, happy, and active lifestyles.

Join us Monday, Dec. 22 at 10:30 a.m.


at the Wakulla Senior Center
(33 Michael Drive, Crawfordville, FL)


Featuring

Get Smav*

- How to improve your brain

health as you age -
Presented by: Nancy Van Vessem, MD


* "




S! *,*
' .


! ,


1


Dr. Van Vessem is the Chief Medical
Officer for Capital Health Plan.


A..,




U
I
I
I
Ifl
U
I
I


--Please RSVP to 850-523-7333. -

Some things get better with ag&

Capital Health Plan is one of them.

Capital Health
P L A N


a


An Independent Licensee of the
Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association


This event is educational only and information regarding the plan will not be
available. If you have questions, please call Capital Health Plan seven days a.
week, 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., at 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY
850-383-3534 or 1-800-955-8771).







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday Dec. 18, 2008 Page 9A


Sheriff's Report


Wakulla County Sheriff's On Dec. 9, a clerk at
Office officials investigated a Karol's Korner in Crawfordville
Dec. 10 grand theft reported reported a retail theft. Two ju-
by Jeanene H. Thornberry at veniles entered the store and
Trophy, King USA in Craw- one allegedly attempted to
fordville, according to Interim stuff a Gatorade into his pants
Sheriff Donnie Crum. without paying' for it. The
A stainless steel grill was 16-year-old male was issued
reported stolen from the busi- a notice to appear in court.
niess along with an extension Both juveniles were issued a
cord. The total value of the sto- trespass warning. Lt. Jimmy
len property was estimated at Sessor investigated.
$1,150. Deputy Sean Wheeler On Dec. 9, Mensah Aja-
,investigated. naku of Tallahassee reported
a forgery as a suspect, who
In other activity reported by has been identified, cashed
.the Wakulla County Sheriff's his check with a fake signa-
* Office during the past week: ture. Deputy Pam Veltkamp
On Dec. 10, Lt. "Hoppy" investigated:
Strickland, 61, resigned from On Dec. 9, David D.
the sheriff's office. He had Redman of Crawfordville re-
`beeri an,,employee since May ported a fraud as someone
,Z 199,6. Major Maurice Langs- used his Social Security num-
*on said the sheriff's office ber. Two suspects, who have
received an anonymous com- been identified, were using
-plaint that Strickland had Redman's number to obtain
Allegedly bartered with an loans. Deputy Pam Veltkamp
aiunate. investigated.
: During the questioning On Dec. 10, Shelia B. May
.process, trickland submitted of Crawfordville reported a
-lis resignation telling law fraud as a 'suspect used her
Penforcemont officials that he cell phone to make purchases.
had not d ne anything wrong The purchases were valued at
'and wasn't guilty of anything. $149. Deputy Lindsay Allen
Zangston'added that the State investigated.
iAttorney's office will review On Dec. 10, Beneka V.
,the allegation. Strickland was Hancock of Crawfordville re-
a supervisor:in the jail's work ported an identity theft. The
,camp. victim's personal information


Fire Rescue Report

S BY JIM POSEY not mix. There are violent
Special to The Wakulla News consequences when they mix.
.As we all transition from Store them separately from
fall into winter there .are a one another.
Yfew things we need to do to Never store gas, kerosene
Ensure the proper storage of or other flammable materials
.our chemicals over the winter indoors near an ignition or
,months. heat source. Furnaces, heaters,
Most pf us here in North dryers and other sources allow
,Florida have fertilizer for our for fumes to ignite and a fire
yard and/or chemicals for our to get started. Make sure all of
,pools. When putting these your flammable materials are
'away for next spring, make stored properly in approved
,sure you place them where containers. Glass, milk jugs
they will not come in contact and soda bottles are not ap-
with any type of petroleum proved containers.
products. Other chemicals like herbi-
Do not store them under cides and insecticides should
shelves where you store brake be stored in their containers
fuid, transmission fluid, or if possible. If you have to re-
other oils that may leak down move them from their original
(on them. These chemicals do containers, make sure you


Here come whooping cranes


St. Marks National Wild-
life Refuge will be holding
another "Families in Nature"
program with the theme whoop-
ing cranes. A flock of these
magnificent birds will call the
'Refuge their home this winter,
and althoughinclement weather
-has slowed their journey south,
they are on their way.
Refuge Rahger Heather Bevis
will engage children in fun and
exciting activities focusing on
whooping cranes Saturday, Dec.
27. Come any time between 10
a.m. and 1 p.m. to the Refuge
Education Cabin behind the
Visitor Center. Families can
enjoy a scavenger hunt, crafts,
videos and more. Snacks will
Pe provided. There will also be
prize drawings.,
!


Siujredon the corral ,n..If PcnJ .-lj Ba. ,
on Northdur FlondIs Golf Co.uar. Poarino Lln
Resort & Spa offns the ulimatce gt a-A) this wvinici
Starring from just 1172 per night. you'll enjo)
rwo-bedmom Sky Honme accnmmodunnnsa
overlooking thic L nr Imy. one round of pff per d4y.
dal)' beach chair i-tmp. fnns count trim and clnusrT
access to Poirrfir, Adrenturr and ur LufI.m ic
Center Make y1.wi sm cn more rt ardin ,'nh
a rrldxing spa urea'mtnrit.dnrcr ar Tm.ituma and
a rcfrtshing dip in out indoor and ourdoor pool;

Call 888 358.9579 or visit
Porrofinolsland.coml/T08 for reservations.


Upcoming Families in Na-
ture programs will be held on:
Saturday, Jan. 24 "Magnificent
Migratory Birds" and Saturday,
Feb. 28 "Fun with Nature
Photography." For more infor-
mation, call the Refuge at (850)
925-6121.








* S DESIGN.

926-2211
North Pointe Center


FROM

5172*
per night
Two-bedrom Sky Home


'257
per nighr
Thn-dowm Sky Home


was accessed at the University
of Florida. It was discovered
that a South Florida man
was listed under the victim's
Social Security number. She
has received several urtex--
plained bills in the mail. CSI
Melissa Harris investigated
and the university and FBI are
investigating the Gainesville
breach.
On Dec. 11, Kaneisha
N. Ross of Crawfordville re-
ported a fraud as a company
in Canada requested she shop
with alleged funds that had
been sent to her home. The
victim spent approximately
$200 before contacting the
sheriff's office. She had been
asked to send $2,300 of the
$2,800 "check" she received
in the mail to an account in
Canada. Lt. Ray Johnson in-
vestigated.
On Dec. 10, Patrick De-
wayne Barwick, 39, of Pana-
cea was charged with DUI
after Deputy Jeremy Johnston
investigated a domestic com-
plaint involving Barwick. After
investigating the complaint,
the deputy told Barwick not
to drive since he was alleg-
edly intoxicated. Later, Deputy
Johnston spotted Barwick on
the road and conducted a traf-
fic stop and made his arrest.
Barwick was also charged


with knowingly driving on
a suspended driver license.
Deputy Matt Helms also in-
vestigated.
On Dec. 10, Dorothy E.
Mitchell of Crawfordville re-
ported a fraud as she observed
unauthorized activity on her
bank account. The victim re-
ported several hundred dollars
worth of charges. CSI Melissa
Harris investigated.
On Dec. 11, Clayton P.
Taff of Sopchoppy reported a
'fraud as satellite charges were
run up through a credit com-
pany. Deputy Jason 'Brooks
investigated.
On Dec. 10, John Stokes
Joiner, 66, of Crawfordville
was charged with forgery and
uttering forged instruments
after allegedly cashing a sto-
len $100 check. A jail inmate
had reported the theft of his
checks while he was incarcer-
ated. A warrant has also been,
requested on a 26-year-old
female suspect. Deputy, Nick
Boutwell investigated.
On Dec. 15, John Ste-
phens of Crawfordville' re-'
ported a burglary and grand
theft as a suspect. who has
been identified, removed cash,
a cell phone and tools from his'
home. When he approached
,the suspect, the suspect pulled
out a weapon and told Ste--


phens not to come any closer.
The suspect drove away from
the scene. The value of the sto-
len property is $3,045. Deputy
Lindsay Allen investigated.
On Dec. 15, Kevin M. Dan-
iels of Crawfordville reported
the theft of a firearm from his
vehicle. The .22 caliber rifle
was valued at $100. Deputy
Andree Brown investigated.
On Dec. 15, Joseph S.
Bonislawsky of Crawfordville
reported a theft from his
home. A total of $4,015 worth
of camera equipment was
stolen. A forced entry was
discovered. Deputy Andree
Brown investigated.::
, On Dec. 15, Charles Fer-
iell Barwick of Crawfordville
reported a criminal mischief
at'Barwick Crab Company.
Someone used a golf cart to
run over $400 crab traps, val-
ued at $10,000. The traps were
stacked in rows.
During the investigation, a
criminal mischief complaint
was filed by Tyrone Kilpatrick
of Crawfordville after his
mailbox was run over with a
golf cart.' .
Herbert Donaldson of Craw-,
fordville also filed a complaint
about a mailbox being dam-
aged.
Following the investiga-
tion, Jeffery Allyn Saba, 21,


of Crawfordville was charged
with one count of felony
count of criminal mischief
and two misdemeanor counts
of criminal mischief. Deputy
Robert Giddens, CSI Richele
Brooks and Lt. Ray Johnson
investigated.
On Dec. 12, Joshua E.
Brown of Panacea reported a
burglary as a $1,400 lawnmow-
er was stolen from his home.
A suspect has been identified.
Det. Ward Kromer and Deputy
William Hudson investigated,
On Dec. 14, Larry C. Rob-
erts of Sopchoppy reported a
criminal mischief as someone
shot bullet hples in his ;mail-
box. Damage was estimatedat
$20. Deputy William Hudson
investigated. ,
On Dec. 15. Lashana S.
Harris reported a criminal
mischief as someone damaged
her mailbox and knocked over
a garbage can. Damage was
estimated at $30. Deputy An-
drew Vass investigated.
S* The Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office received 753
calls for service during the
past week.
Note to our. readers: The
people who are' reported, as
charged with crimes in this
column have not yet been to
trial and are therefore frino-
cent until proven guilty,..-


Hunter, women's safety courses set


label them with the chemical The Wakulla County Sher-
in them. If you leave them un- iff's Office training section
labeled and forget what is in will host a Hunter Safety
them, they may spill. If it gets course on Jan. 6, Jan. 8, Jan.
ingested, proper treatment 13 and Jan. 15 from 6 p.m. to
could be hampered while the 9 p.m. at the livestock pavilion
chemical is determined, in Crawfordville. Range day
Also there are certain will be Jan. 17 from 9 a.m.
chemicals that don't mix, so to noon. There is no charge
make sure all chemicals are of the course. Anyone inter-'
labeled. If you are in doubt, ested in taking the course may
properly dispose of it. contact Major Larry Massa at

Clipper Style
Cuts -,t,.Cus
Neck Steam
Shalie ,Towels
Hi-liteColor
A rScalP Neck
Massage P IO04, Massage
,T
Waxing 92 -4080 row-lites 0
Always Free Advice with anyService


926-0821 or e-mail to Imassa@
wcso.org.
In addition, a Women's
Safety Course will be held
Saturday, Jan. 24 from 8 a.m.
until 5 p.m. at the sheriff's


office. There will also be time
on the firing range. The cost
of the course is $40. For more
information, contact Major
Massa at 926-0821 or Imassa@
wcso.org.


NOTICE
OF PUBLIC HEARING
The Wakulla County Board of County
Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on
January 6, 2009 at 6:00 p.m. in the
Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd.,
Crawfordville, FL.

Purpose of Hearing
TO ADOPT AN ORDINANCE OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA AMENDING CERTAIN.
SECTIONS OF- CHAPTER 23, WAKULLAU-'
COUNTY CODE, SPECIFICALLY S ECTrON,-;
23.005(a)(19) CONCERNING YARD SALES,
RUMMAGE SALES AND OTHER SALES ON
COUNTY PROPERTY; SECTION. 23.006(a)
REGARDING ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES OR
CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES AUTHORIZED
ON COUNTY PROPERTY; SECTION 23.007(c)
REGARDING REQUESTED WAIVER OF FEES;
AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Any handicapped, visually or hearing.
impaired person or any non-English
speaking person needing special assistance
should contact the Wakulla County Board of
County Commissioners' Office at (850) 926-
0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.


Crawfordville Animal Hospital

is very excited to be in Crawfordville.

Their doctors and their staff are looking forward to providing the
best quality and personalized care for your pets at a reasonable cost.
They are a family veterinary clinic that specializes in small animal
care for dogs, cats, rabbits and birds. They have a very practical
* \ Approach to diagnostics and pay close attention to detail. It is a full
S service veterinarian hospital with facilities for hospitalized patients,
diagnostics, including x-ray and laboratory services.
,i. \Any surgical needs can be met such as bone l ,


frac












4S ^


tures, eye surgeries and c-sections.


"All animals deserve

exemplary care and our goal

is to help provide the care

your pet deserves"


PORTOFINO i
ISLAND i! [ ,J

' *_hme-onght wunimuarm ray nquird. Offer raik on noew mer non N. N 1, o.00 Fb. 28, 2009
. Badon mlilabil~y. Some rnrictiommay apply. Dor no irdude a or rMorfre-


I


owl


Lk- 4Ai


HEDIGURT DM E *ED U T
287CAFODIL HY RWFRVLEF 22


I







PagelOA THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 18, 2008


Outdoors


Strong winds and cold hamper fishing in December


From The Dock
*^, x BY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL


If you fished this weekend
you were probably one of the
only ones who did. The wind
blew and it was extremely cold.
Mike Hopkins said they didn't
have a single boat fish out of
Lanark over the weekend, and
because of the north wind,
there was no way to get out of
their channel.
Guess what? They finally


started replacing the channel
markers at Shell Point, Oyster
Bay and Spring Creek that
were torn down or damaged in
Hurricane Dennis. I won't say
anymore except that it's about
time. I'm out there all the time
and know where I can go and
can't go, but I have heard nu-
merous people new to the area
talk about running aground.


Mike did say he heard they
were catching trout in Cash
Creek and Whiskey George
Creek. They are also catching
some trout and sheepshead
around the bridge in Car-
rabelle, but most of the trout
are small.
Richard Gardner and Tom-
my Owens from Shell Point
fished on Saturday and caught
two legal reds using live shrimp
on the bottom. I asked Richard
where they caught them and
he said right in the corner of
the mouth.
Capt. Luke Frazier at Advan-
tage Marine said he fished out
of the Ochlockonee River State
Park last week and caught a lot
of reds, but most were small.


They used live shrimp and
the Gulp on the bottom at the
mouth of creeks dumping into
the river. Last weekend he said
Les Shope from Thomasville
and a friend went to the Aucilla
and fished. They fished the
creeks and on the flats out of
the Aucilla and did nothing.
They then ran east of the Econ-
fina and were about halfway
between the river and Rock
Island and started catching
trout in about 2V2 feet of wa-
ter. They used Capt. Luke's rig,
Take a Zara Spook and remove
the hooks. Tie a leader about
18 inches behind and attach
a 1/8th or 1/6th ounce lead
head with a grub. Works like
the Cajun Thunder but Luke


says better. They used a white
grub with a pink tail and also
the white Gulp.
The weather this week is
supposed to go into the high
70s and not get cold at night
so the trout around here may
move back to the flats. I'll let
you know next week.
Something you may or may
not be aware of is the affect of
ethanol in gasoline in outboard
engines. According to reports,
you should never use gas with
more than 10 percent ethanol
in it in your outboard. To
prevent problems you should
change your fuel filter more of-
ten and also your water separa-
tor more often. Also, use a fuel
additive that is recommended


by your engine manufacturer.
I have had problems with Sa
small outboard and know df
a neighbor who had problenfs
with a large outboard. Ethandl
was mentioned as a possible
cause for both problems and
both were carburetor problems.
'If you go into Google and
type in Ethanol and outboard
motors it will bring up all the
articles you want to read and
may keep your engine out of
the shop. Everyone is saying
the filters are very important
and that the fuel additive is
probably the most important-
Don't forget to leave that
float plan with someone and
be careful out there.


Holiday season is Turkey Time in North Florida, Wakulla .


BY GEORGE WEYMOUTH


Well it's "turkey time." Ac-
tually, I planned to type this
article about three weeks ago
to coincide with Thanksgiving.
But between a busy schedule
and my computer starting to
act up, I couldn't get to it.
It turned out that it was my
underground phone line that
was shot.
They're in the process of
burying a new line now, so
hopefully I'll get back on my
regular weekly schedule with
my Wakulla Wildlife articles, I
apologize.
The pen fattened turkey
that we dine on during the
holidays is a dumb dough-ball
compared to the true wild tur-
key. Though wild turkeys do
make mistakes, especially the


gobblers in breeding season,
their cunning, keen eyesight
and acute hearing are legend-
ary.
Fortunately for turkey hunt-
ers, turkeys, like most birds
have a poor sense of smell
which allows the hunter to
dose themselves with repellent
to ward off the multitudes of
mosquitoes often encountered
while hunting these wily birds
and remain undetected by
them.
As with many wild crea-
tures, as long as you remain
absolutely motionless, even
while rather colorfully dressed,
they'll often overlook you. But
that is not so with the wild tur-
key. Unless you are completely
camouflaged and motionless,


their sharp eyes will pick you
out in a heartbeat. Even when
in your camo clothing, it's not
uncommon for a turkey to
freeze in its tracks, and stare
at you.
They know something is out
of place Even blinking when
they're up close can spook
them. If you're a quarter of a
mile from a turkey, way down
through a wooded area, and
you so much as cough, it's "bye
bye" turkeyl Seasoned hunters
will tell you stories like "if a
crawdad from his mud hole
cussed a turkey, the turkey,
even though hundreds of yards
away, would come running
through the woods and look
directly down the crawdad's
hole."
That's how good they are at
pin-pointing a sound For an ex-
ample, one time I was hunting
in Three Rivers Management
Area near Kissimmee. I was
in my ladder stand and about
200 yards down through this
pristine oak and cabbage palm
hammock, sneaking past some
cypress trees, came a turkey.
In order to get a shot with my
trusty old recurve bow. I had to


call it in much closer. I waited
until the bird walked behind
a big tree and gave two quick
"yelps" with my diaphragm
call, you hold in your mouth.
Even though I cupped my hand
against the side of my face to
throw my yelping call to the
side, that dam bird nailed my
position instantly.
He sensed my amateurish.
attempt at calling and that my
calls came from the trees, not
the ground (where they nor-
mally use the yelp call). The tur-
key flat out vanished, running
straight away from me keeping
that tree between us.
I was impressed Turkeys are
originally native to the Ameri-
cas, and there are only two spe-
cies. The absolutely beautiful
Oscellated Turkey-Agriocharis
ocellata of the Yucatan penin-
sula, and adjacent Guatemala
and British Honduras, a bird
that shimmers in rainbow col-
ors, and our common American
Turkey-Meleagris gallopavo
of more cryptic colors. Our
species comes in five races or
geographic forms, the Eastern,
found from about Gainesville,
north into all our eastern states


Tag a holiday gift to help Florida's wildlife


A different idea for gift-giv-
ing this holiday season can
help save Florida's unique and
varied fish and wildlife, and it
can be used year-round. The
Florida Department of High-
way Safety and Motor Vehicles
offers gift certificates for any
specialty tag in Florida.
The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission
(FWC) has five different special-


ty license plates. The purchase
of any of these plates helps
in the efforts to preserve and
conserve Florida's wildlife and
natural habitats. Specialty plates
currently available through the
FWC are the Conserve Wildlife
plate with the black bear logo
($15), Go Fishing plate with the
largemouth bass logo ($25),
Protect the Panther plate ($25),
Helping Sea Turtles Survive


plate ($23.) and Save the Mana-
tee plate ($20). An additional
$4.50 will be added at the time
of purchase for administrative
and certificate costs.
The FWC's specialty tag gift
certificates may be purchased
at any authorized motor vehicle
office, such as a state motor ve-
hide office, local tax collector's
office or a licensed tag agent.
A credit will be issued in the


Blue crab closed seasons proposed


name of the gift recipient.
When recipients renew their
license plates and pay the regu-
lar registration fee, they can use
the gift certificate to buy the
specialty tag.
Since most tags are renewed
on the birth date of the regis-
tered vehicle owner, these gift
certificates make great birthday
presents also.
To learn more about the
FWC's specialty plates, visit-
www.WildlffeFlorida.org, or call
800-988-4889.


and Canada; the Osceola race,
found from roughly Gainesville
south to the Keys; the Rio
Grande race, found in Texas,
Oklahoma, Kansas into north-
ern Mexico; the Gould's race is
found in the arid mountains of
southwestern New Mexico and
southeastern Arizona and the
mountains of northern Mexico;
and lastly the Merriam's race of
our western mountains.
The Gould's race is the
rarest and can reach up to 30
pounds. When you've got that
big tom turkey out of the oven
and are in the act of eating it,
perhaps you've wondered why
it and chickens have white and
dark meat. Turkeys, chickens,
grouse, quail, and pheasants,
all belong to the order Galli-
formes. They are ground birds
and walk rather than hop as
tree birds do when on the
ground, When forced to fly


they pull energy directly from
the blood circulating in their
breast muscles, which is soon
depleted, causing them to soop
stop flapping and glide to a
landing.
On the other hand they
walk for hours and prefer tp
run rather than fly, so energy
is provided to the leg musdes
from stored fat through large
conspicuous veins, which gives
the legs the dark meat color.
The breast meat, lacking the
conspicuous veins, is light in
color. Ducks/geese swim and
graze for hours and fly for ofteh
prolonged periods. They have
dark meat throughout. If you
were to eat a hummingbird
you'd find them to be the op-
posite of the chicken as their
breast meat is very dark, while
all they do with their legs is
perch and the leg meat would
be very light.


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The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission
(FWC) proposed a draft rule
Thursday, Dec. 4 that would
establish six regional closed
seasons to the harvest of blue
crabs with traps. These closures
would extend for a period of up
to 10 days each to help efforts
to identify and retrieve lost and
abandoned blue crab traps from'
Florida waters.
Lost and abandoned blue
crab traps have been cited as a
problem in the blue crab fish-
ery because they sometimes
interfere with other fishing
activities and can continue to
trap crabs and fish when they
are not maintained. They are
also unsightly in the marine en-
vironment, can damage sensitive
habitats and pose navigational
hazards to boaters.
It is illegal to tamper with
properly licensed and main-
tained blue crab traps, and lost
and abandoned traps cannot eas-
ily be distinguished from legal
traps, so they often remain in
the water indefinitely. Regional
closures of up to 10 days would
allow authorized groups to col-
lect lost and abandoned blue
crab traps that remain in the
,water after fishermen remove
their working traps during the
closed periods.
After consulting with its
Blue Crab Advisory Board and
receiving input from the public,
the FWC is proposing annual
blue crab harvest closures in
all waters of Hernando County
through Wakulla County from
July 20 to July 29, and all wa-
ters of Franklin County to the
Florida/Alabama state line from
Jan. 5 to Jan. 14.
Except for the St. Johns River


system closure, all of the pro-
posed blue crab trap harvest
closures would extend from the
shoreline out to three nautical
miles and include all inland wa-
ters in the regions. An existing
Sept. 20 to Oct. 4 dosed season
in the Gulf of Mexico from three
to nine miles offshore would be
retained.


The proposed closures would
apply only to standard blue crab
traps. The harvest of blue crabs
by other gear, such as dip nets
and fold-up traps, would still be
permitted during the closures,
A final public hearing on these
rule proposals will take place in
February in Destin.


Winter Session of




YBeginning
L January 5th & 6th
Monday &
'. Tuesday nights
6:30pm
S'r.\vt'orcivillc
1VWorncn's Club
]D 926-4293



Degiqn Crcte


Owned

les,

voters

I matjot

models.
Sat 10-3


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REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
The City of St. Marks is seeking a firm with a Florida Certified Building Official to provide
building inspection services for the City. The firm should include a statement of its
qualifications and a list of professional references. The proposal should provide the City with
a schedule of charges for all residential and commercial plans review and inspections. The
firm must be bonded and insured. The City is willing to negotiate all aspects of the submitted
proposal. Interested firms may obtain more information by contacting the City Manager at
City Hall. All proposals will be accepted at City Hall located at 788 Port Leon Drive St.
Marks, Florida 32355 until January 8th, 2009 by 5:00 pm EST. The City reserves the right to
reject any and all proposals or negotiate with interested parties.


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A








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday Dec. 18, 2008 Page 11A


S Crit nin 850-224-4960 www.fsucu.org

r rdtMIIl el MORTGAGES -FREE CHECKING AUTO LOANS ~ CREDIT CARDS
-=-t --- - - --^ ^ -- --


f/ Tide charts by
Zihua Software, LLC

St. Marks River Entrance


December 18 December 24


e City of St. Marks


~I?
- ~,,t,1-4J -,
'I'f~./


For tides at the following points
add to Dog Island Listings: Ca


/ /


irrabe


Apalach
Cat Poin
Lower A
West Pa


High Tide
lie 28 Min.
icola 1 Hr., 53 Min.
it 1 Hr., 13 Min.
nchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min.
iss 1 Hr. 26 Min.


Low Tide
25 Min.
2 Hrs., 38 Min.
2 Hrs., 31 Min.
2 Hrs., 3 Min.
2 Hrs., 39 Min.


Date High Low High Low High
Thu 2.7 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.7 ft.
Dec 18, 08 5:34 AM 12:18 PM 6:43 PM
Fri 0.8 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.1 ft. 2.7 ft.
Dec 19, 08 12:58 AM 7:01 AM 1:02 PM 7:27 PM
Sat 0.6 ft. 2.1 ft. 1.5 ft. 2.7 ft.
Dec 20, 08 2:22 AM 8:57 AM 1:53 PM 8:17 PM
Sun 0.3 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.7 ft. 2.8 ft.
Dec 21, 08 3:42 AM 10:40 AM 2:57 PM 9:14 PM
Mon -0.1 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.8 ft. 2.8 ft.
Dec 22, 08 4:48 AM 11:48 AM 4:04 PM 10:10 PM
Tue -0.3 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.8 ft. 2.9 ft.
Dec 23, 08 5:41 AM 12:33 PM 5:04 PM 11:02 PM
Wed -0.5 ft. 2.6 ft. 1.7 ft. 3.0 ft.
Dec 24, 08 6:26 AM 1:09 PM 5:52 PM 11:47 PM


Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 2.0 ft. 0.4 ft. 2.0 ft.
Dec 18, 08 5:26 AM 12:29 PM 6:35 PM
Fri 0.6 ft. 1.7 ft. 0.8 ft. 2.0 ft.
Dec 19, 08 1:09 AM 6:53 AM 1:13 PM 7:19 PM
Sat 0.4 ft. 1.6 ft. 1.1 ft. 2.0 ft.
Dec 20, 08 2:33 AM 8:49 AM 2:04 PM 8:09 PM
Sun 0.2 ft. 1.6 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.1 ft.
Dec 21, 08 3:53 AM 10:32 AM 3:08 PM 9:06 PM
Mon -0.0 ft. 1.7 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.1 ft. ,
Dec 22, 08 4:59 AM 11:40 AM 4:15 PM 10:02 PM
Tue -0.2 ft. 1.9 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.2 ft.
Dec 23, 08 5:52 AM 12:25 PM 5:15 PM 10:54 PM
Wed -0.4 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.3 ft.
Dec 24, 08 6:37 AM 1:01 PM 6:03 PM 11:39 PM


Date High Low High Low High
Thu 0.9 ft. 2.5 ft. 0.5 ft. 2.5 ft.
Dec 18, 08 12:46 AM 6:10 AM 1:22 PM 7:19 PM
Fri 0.7 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.5 ft.
Dec 19, 08 2:02 AM 7:37 AM 2:06 PM 8:03 PM
Sat 0.5 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.5 ft.
Dec 20, 08 3:26 AM 9:33 AM 2:57 PM 8:53 PM
Sun 0.2 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.6 ft.
Dec 21, 08 4:46 AM 11:16 AM 4:01 PM 9:50 PM
Mon -0.1 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.7 ft. 2.6 ft.
Dec 22, 08 5:52 AM 12:24 PM 5:08 PM 10:46 PM
Tue -0.3 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.7 ft.
Dec 23, 08 6:45 AM 1:09 PM 6:08 PM 11:38 PM
Wed -0.5 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.5 ft.
Dec 24, 08 7:30 AM 1:45 PM, 6:56 PM


St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 2.1 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.1 ft. -
Dec 18, 08 5:18 AM 11:57 AM 6:27 PM
Fri 0.8 ft. 1.8 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.1 ft.
Dec 19, 08 12:37 AM 6:45 AM 12:41 PM 7:11 PM'
Sat 0.5 ft. 1.6 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.1 ft.
Dec 20, 08 2:01 AM 8:41 AM 1:32 PM 8:01 PM
Sun 0.2 ft. 1.7 ft. 1.7 ft. 2.1 ft.
Dec 21, 08 3:21 AM 10:24 AM 2:36 PM 8:58 PM
Mon -0.1 ft. 1.8 ft. 1.8 ft. 2.2 ft.
Dec 22, 08 4:27 AM 11:32 AM 3:43 PM 9:54 PM
Tue -0.3 ft. 1.9 ft. 1.8 ft. 2.3 ft.
Dec 23, 08 5:20 AM 12:17 PM 4:43 PM 10:46 PM
Wed -0.5 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.7 ft. 2.4 ft.
Dec 24, 08 6:05 AM 12:53 PM 5:31 PM 11:31 PM


Date High Low High Low High
Thu 2.8 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.7 ft.
Dec 18, 08 5:31 AM 12:15 PM 6:40 PM
Fri 0.9 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.7 ft.
Dec 19, 08 12:55 AM 6:58 AM 12:59 PM 7:24 PM
Sat 0.6 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.7 ft.
Dec 20, 08 2:19 AM 8:54 AM 1:50 PM 8:14 PM
Sun 0.3 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.9 ft. 2.8 ft.
Dec 21, 08 3:39 AM 10:37 AM 2:54 PM 9:11 PM
Mon -0.1 ft. 2.4 ft. 2.0 ft. 2.9 ft.
Dec 22, 08 4:45 AM 11:45 AM 4:01 PM 10:07 PM
Tue -0.4 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.9 ft. 3.0 ft.
Dec 23, 08 5:38 AM 12:30 PM 5:01. PM 10:59 PM
Wed -0.5 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.8 ft. 3.1 ft.
Dec 24, 08 6:23 AM 1:06 PM 5:49 PM 11:44 PM


Dog Island West End

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 1.9 ft. 0.1 ft. 2.0 ft.
Dec 18, 08 5:17 AM 11:54 AM 7:07 PM
Fri 0.6 ft. 1.6 ft. 0.5 ft. 2.1 ft.
Dec 19, 08 12:51 AM 6:52 AM 12:28 PM 7:26 PM
Sat 0.3 ft. 1.4 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.2 ft.
Dec 20, 08 2:12 AM 9:05 AM 12:59 PM 7:48 PM
Sun -0.1 ft. 1.5 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.3 ft.
Dec 21, 08 3:21 AM 12:02 PM 1:31 PM 8:13 PM
Mon -0.4 ft. 2.4 ft.
Dec 22, 08 4:21 AM 8:42 PM
Tue -0.6 ft. 2.4 ft.
Dec 23, 08 5:12 AM 9:18 PM
Wed -0.8 ft. 2.1 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.4 ft.
Dec 24, 08 5:59 AM 3:13 PM 4:56 PM 10:01 PM


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
4:25 am 5:15 am 5:55 am 6:35 am 7:15 am 7:55 am 8:40 am
4:50pm 5:35pm 6:15pm 6:55pm 7:40pm 8:20pm 9:05pm
10:35 am 11:25 am --:-- am 12:30 am 1:10am 1:55 am 2:40 am
11:05 pm 11:50pm 12:05pm 12:50pm 1:25pm 2:10pm 2:55 pm


Coast Guard

Auxiliary Reports

By Sherrie Alverson


wSalrday night at Angelo's
;was bristmas party-time for
:Flotill 13. It was a delightful
:evening. Attendance was great,
:.23 members and their guests,
:food was delicious and the
service was great. What more
could you ask for?
There was a very short busi.
ness meeting and the most
important item on the agenda
:was the presentation of a 25-
year service in the Coast Guard
Auxiliary certificate to Lynne
Reese. It was slightly overdue,
like four years.
Lynne joked to Mae that she
should receive her 30-year one
very soon.
The gift exchange was fun.
For the Flotilla's "old timers"
some of the gifts brought back
,many wonderful memories
,as they were framed etchings
drawn by the artist, Ginger Till-
:man. During the period that
Ginger and her husband, Tom,
'lived at Shell Point, they were
'both members of Flotilla 13.
The etching I received was of
'the old Coast Guard Auxiliary
:station at Shell Point. The old
:station was in use from June
1974 to July 1997 when the
'new station was dedicated.
The etching Ginger did of the
nrew station was also one of
the gifts.
'. As I told you last week, this
'is the last half of the "To Be
-Continued" column from last
-Week. Carolyn Treadon had
reported the following:
. This week was jam packed
-full for members of Flotilla 12.
-On Dec. 2, we ran a night time
4Aids to Navigation (ATON) pa-
frol to ensure that lighted buoys
"were lit and that channel mark-
:ers, buoys and beacons were
:"on station" (where they should


be). Mark Rosen was coxswain
with Bob Asztalos, John Den-
mark and Bill Wannall as crew
aboard Coast Runner.
Dec. 6 was our final meeting
of the year. Thanks to the gen-
erosity of John and Janis Gon-
zales, who opened their home
to us, everyone who attended
had a great time After a great
meal, we played our traditional
gift exchange and the theme
was apparently Lighthouses
this year.
The annual flotilla award
was presented. The Gilbert/
Champion Award is an annual
award established in 2005 by
Flotilla 12 in memory of two
founding members, Don Gilbert
and John Champion. Both men
were dedicated Auxiliarists and
exemplified what it means to be
a member of the United States
Coast Guard Auxiliary. This an-
nual award is presented to one
member, who is chosen by our
membership. This year the re-
cipient was Carolyn Treadon.
(A note from Sherrie: If ever
anyone deserved this award it
is Carolyn. She is a very special
person and is thoroughly com-
mitted to the aims and goals of
the Coast Guard Auxiliary.)
Through an update, Carolyn
said, a few members of Flotilla
12 braved the great outdoors
and participated in the annual
St. Marks Yacht Club's Christ-
mas parade. We are asked to
provide assistance in letting
other boaters know the parade
is underway and alerting others
to take caution. This year our
team included Tim Ashley, Da-
vid Guttman, Rich Rasmussen
and Mark Rosen. Thankfully,
the team enjoyed the parade
and was not needed to render
assistance to anyone.


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ATTORNEYS
Al Penson Mary Ellen Davis
Donna Biggins Jennifer Sweeting Adam Cowhey


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The hiring of an attorney is an ImporlanI decision that should not be based solely on advertisement.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and exporlonco,


Sunrise
Sunset
Moon rise
Moon set
Brightness


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
7:27 am 7:28 am 7:28 am 7:29 am 7:29 am 7:30 am 7:30 am
5:40 pm 5:40 pm 5:41 pm 5:41 pm 5:42 pm 5:42 pm 5:43 pm
-:- 12:25 am 1:23 am 2:20 am 3:17 am 4:14 am ,5:11am
12:02 pm 12:32 pm 1:01 pm 1:32 pm 2:05 pm 2:42 pm 3:24 pm
58% 5,1% 44% 38% 32% 26% 20%


SBoating Emergencies
Coast Guard Station
Panama City (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown .. (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
St. M arks (Flotilla 12) ......:.............................. (850) 906-0540
or 893-5137
Shell Point (Flotilla 13) (850) 926-2606
.or 926-5654


Mae Waters recognizes the many years
of service by Lynne Reese.

Soil workshop is slated


The 2009 Building Healthy
'Soils Workshop will provide
relevant knowledge and training
to assist farmers, growers, and
nurseries to reduce dependence
on chemical inputs.
Shepard Smith, President of
Oregon's Soilsmith Services will
be the facilitator. This timely
workshop will actively dem-
onstrate how to make healthy


Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon presents
award to his wife, Carolyn.


www.thewakullanews.com



S D Barber Shoppe

WE HAVE GIFT CERTIFICATES FOR THOSE LAST
-I MINUTE STOCKING STUFFERSII!

4LL t', ."_I HEiE- -T THE b--'b6E-
SHOPPE 400r T41,.-.pLE., H4fAP "-4LO. 'I
iXNH ,01.1 4 .R, XLPI,
fPE TUa \ (,'E sK 4
Walk-ins Welcome
Phone: 926-4282 Open: AA F 9 6, Sat. 9 1
Rose Alley Business Center. 2543 C'ville Hwy. .


WAKULLA URGENT CARE
& DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
FIRST IMPRESSION

P.O. BOX 70 1325 COASTAL HWY. PANACEA, FL 32346
PH: 850-984-3132 / FAX: 850-984-3177

Will be relocating to the following
address by/as of January 1, 2009

WAKULLA URGENT CARE
& DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
FIRST IMPRESSION
P.O. BOX 100 2615 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY., STE. 103,
CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327
PH: 850-926-3140 / FAX: 850-926-3163


compost, compost tea, calculate
compost ratio, and more.
It is set Saturday, Jan. 3 from
10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Crescent
Moon Organic Farm, 145 Cres-
cent Moon Trail, Sopchoppy.
Early registration is $50 per
person and $75 per person after
Dec. 31. For more, contact Jen-
nifer.Taylor@famu.edu, or call
412-5260.


BIG BEND HOSPICE


Wakulla County
O5thANNIYV/ Tree Locations
Ameris Bank
r Crawfordville
Capital City Bank
Big Bend Crawfordville
Hosice, Gulf State Community Bank
Crawfordville
Your Hometown Hospice Wakulla Bank
Licensed Since 1983 Crawfordville
Make a contribution to place an Angel, Bell or Bow
on the Tree of Remembrance in honor or memory
of your loved ones at one of the locations listed.
For more information, call (850) 508-8749.


Sales Hi -.


3232 Craw fordville Hisy. Crawfordville
Owned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lie. i CACI814304


Gulf Coast Weekly Almanac


Shell Point, Spring Creek


First
Jan. 4


. .
*t ,'-.

Full
Jan. 10


Last
Dec. 19


New
Dec. 27


Major
Activity

Minor
Activity


* Family Law


-




I t I ,


Pagel2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 18, 2008


Shell Point sailor pulled from frosty waters at Shell Point


Sailboat sits on its side after capsizing in windy conditions at Shell Point.


Emergency personnel assist sailor Robert Christopher Stinson who nearly drowned.


By DAVID DAMON
Special to The Wakulla News
What had begun as a day of
anticipation over trying out a new
boat, before long, would feel like
a struggle to stay alive on a sunny
Dec. 7 afternoon at Shell Point.
When Robert Christopher
Stinson launched his new Sailfish
at the boat ramp. he was wearing
his wading boots to keep his feet
dry from the chilly water. The
wind was out of the north and
the sun felt warm early in the
afternoon as he headed down
the canal. As he rounded the
point after leaving the canal,


the north wind, which had been
blocked by trees and buildings,
quickly picked up as he cleared
the last structures and headed
toward open water and around
the point.
This was when everything
changed very quickly. Chris found
himself in the cold waters in an
instant. The winds had shift-
ed and the small boat reacted
quicker than he expected and he
capsized. After several minutes
of struggling to right the boat,
he realized he was beginning to
lose energy and started to call
out for help. The weight of his


wet clothing under his life jacket
made it feel as though he was
barely staying afloat. About a
quarter of a mile away we were
kayaking and could barely make
out his calls for help.
As quickly as possible we
paddled to dose the distance. As
I got closer, Chris began swim-
ming across the channel toward
land. He was afraid he could no
longer hold onto the boat as the
cold water was starting to take its
toll, hypothermia was beginning
to set in.
As I approached, I asked him
if anyone else was with him,


I could see a second life jacket he capsized which was fortunate.


floating in the water next to his
overturned bbat. He replied "no"
so I quickly beached my kayak
and helped him out of the water.
Up on the beach I found him a
warm place in the sun out of the
wind. As he quickly got out of his
cold wet clothes, the neighbors
brought towels to wrap him in
along with some dry clothes.
Before long the ambulance, fire
truck, sheriffs deputies and FWC
were all there to make sure Chris
was going to be alright,
Chris had managed to quickly
get out of his wading boots when


He was wearing his PFD and
was near land which was also
very fortunate. He didn't use his
whistle for help which was at-
tached to his PFD which would
have saved him valuable energy
and might also have been heard
further away.
It's easy to dismiss or nev-
er give hypothermia a second
thought in Florida, particularly
on a sunny warm December
afternoon. So far this fall we
have had several nights where
the temperatures hovered or
dipped below the freezing mark.


The nighttime temperature drop
will quickly drop the Gulf water
temperatures to a dangerously
cold level for anyone unfortunate
enough to find themselves swim-
ming for very long, Add to that,
soggy wet sweatshirt, several lay-
ers of waterlogged clothing and
a pair of hip waders and an un-
comfortable situation can quickly
turn deadly. What seemed like a
beautiful sunny afternoon at the
beach could have turned out very
differently than it did.
David Damon is a BSA water-
front instructor and lifeguard
from Crawfordville.


St. Marks board moves ahead with Comp Plan changes


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
The City of St. Marks voted to
move ahead with changes to the
town's comprehensive growth
plan, including new increased
densities.
The city commission voted on
Thursday, Dec. 11, to advertise two
public hearings for final adoption
of the changes. Prior to the meet-
ing the board held a workshop
with consultant Jon Sewell of
Kimley-Hom, the firm that has
helped the city make changes to
its comp plan in anticipation of
some redevelopment.
One project in the wings is
Marina Point, a multi-story, up-


scale condominium and marina
development proposed for the St
Marks River by developer Danny
Miller. One of the changes in the
comp plan is a density of up to
16 units per acre that Miller has
indicated would make the project
financially feasible.
"Not a lot of coastal com-
munities would have gotten
this density," Sewell told the city
commission.
There is also a provision re-
quiring a 25-foot buffer for new
construction that prompted dis-
cussion about the effect on, say,
rebuilding Posey's, It was noted
that the landmark restaurant cov-
ers the entire lot without room


for a buffer.
Sewell responded that the
buffer wouldn't apply to vacant
lots, and in the case of already-
developed lots, there would have
to be substantial improvement,
which he said meant increasing
the impervious surface. As long
as the building was in the same
footprint he said, there would be
no problem.
There was considerable discus-
sion about the city looking for
developers for its redevelopment
plans that include a conference
center to attract visitors and other
development
As part of the overall redevel-
opment plan, the city created a


Community Redevelopment Area
(CRA) to reinvigorate blighted
areas of the town by using taxes
from increased property values in
community improvements.
The city commission is the
the Community Redevelopment
Agency overseeing the expendi-
ture of any funds raised by the
tax plan and the commission
adjourned after conducting city
business and immediately went
into the first meeting of the CRA
Board, adopting its bylaws and
directing a bank account to be
created.
In other matters:
The city commission voted
4-1 to niovre ahead with creating


a city building inspection depart- lone dissenting vote.
ment. Under the proposal being Cantner reported that the
considered, an independent federal Enviro6nmental Protection
company would do building in- Agency indicated it would have a
spections in the city for a share representative coming to the city
of the fees paid by builders, a to look at the St. Marks Refinery
small portion of which would be site to assess it for purchase as a
returned to the city. brownfield site.
Currently, Wakulla County Brownfields are defined as
handles building inspections property for which redevelop-
for St. Marks, although there ment or reuse is complicated by
has been some recent conflicts hazardous substances. The State
between the two governmental of Florida conducted a cleanup
bodies over regulations. of the site several years ago and
Four city commissioners voted St Marks Refinery is currently in
to take the next step, including bankruptcy. The city is interested
Mayor Steve Dunbar, Chuck in using the property for some
Shields, Ron Gagliardi and Phil other use, such as a park.
Cantner. Allen Hobbs cast the


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Section B


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 18, 2008


Wildlife photography Brought to you by


TOIe Yahulta eW and our readers.


Sunrises and sunsets highlight our wildlife photography this week. Actually, we
are concentrating on landscapes around Wakulla County. Clockwise from right,
Tom Darragh of the St. Marks Refuge Photography Association snapped a shot of a
sunset near the St. Marks Lighthouse. The refuge property is enjoyed by many out-
of-towners, but local resident Darragh loves to shoot on the federal property. The
other two submissions are from Betty Parker from the Bottoms Road area in Pana-
cea. Betty shot a sunset in the trees and a silhouette of a bird wading for dinner.


,d 'v


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-








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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 18, 2008


People


Dr. Guhrt provides animal information


of
Wakulla


aggers

Susan Yelton I
It is hard to believe that the
holiday season has begun. I


Birth

Kenadee C. J. Alexander
Richard and Jaclyn Alex-
ander of Pierceton, Ind. an-
nounce the birth of their
daughter, Kenadee Charlene
Jean Alexander, on Nov. 12
in Pierceton. She weighed 4
pounds, 9 ounces and mea-
sured 18 inches in length.


Happy first


have been seeing Santa every-
where. In case you missed the
open house at Crawfordville
Animal Hospital Saturday,
Dec. 6 you missed having your
picture taken with Santa and
meeting Dr. Heidi Guhrt and
her staff. They provided the
community with not only a
festive event, but also much
needed information about


Kenadee has two grand-
mothers, Donna Mosco of
Pierceton and Melinda Alex-
ander.of Panacea..
Kenadee joins three broth-
ers, Braxton, age 8, Jace, age 6
and Landen, age 3,




birthday
Happy first birthday to Jas-
mine Marie Carnivale on Dec.
13.. She is the daughter of Joyce
Marie Carnivale and Reggie
Williams of Crawfordville.
Maternal grandparents are
Katrina Hurley and Chuck Car-
nivale of Crawfordville. Pater-
nal grandparents are Bill and
Rosemary Cox of Virginia.
Maternal great-grandpar-
ents are Joyce Holly and Tony
Carnivale of St. Marks. Pater-
nal great-grandparents are
James and Elsie Williams of
Virginia.


heart worms and the need to
spay/neuter your pets. Even if
you missed the open house, I
suggest you stop by and meet
the new vet in town. From
what I hear, she is providing
an excellent service to pet
owners.
In addition to Santa, the
Sheriff's Office K-9 Unit was


,. ; '

, -z7 A,-?. .


Vendors sought for

Arbor Day event


Artisan and craft vendors
are invited to display their
wares on Saturday, Jan. 17 at
Crawfordville's Fifth Annual
Arbor Day celebration in Hud-
son Park between 10 a.m. and
2 p.m. Nature art and outdoor
items such as gardening tools,
outdoor furniture, and bird
feeders will have considerable
appeal for festival goers.
Green Guides, nurseries,
tree and yard service compa-


nies, and other nature-based
businesses are encouraged
to publicize their services to
this market. Food vendors are
sought as well.
Vendors and exhibitors pay
no fee. Up to 1,000 people are
expected to attend.
To participate as a vendor
or exhibitor, please contact
Lynn Artz at 926-8756 or 320-
2158 or lynn_artz@hotmail.
com.


at the open house giving a
demonstration on how their
dogs are trained and used to
keep our community safe.
They are amazing dogs,
but not exactly a family pet. If
you ever have a chance to see
them perform, don't miss it.
Our last CHAT event of the
year takes place on Dec. 19 at
the Senior Citizens Center. It
is our Annual Christmas Pot
Luck Dinner and the election
of our officers for 2009. We in-
vite the community to join us
for the festive evening, which
begins at 6 p.m. It is chance to
get to know all your friends
and neighbors who volunteer
for CHAT and provide the
community with a valuable
community service.
' And while you are in the
holiday spirit, please remem-
ber all the little critters we
have at the shelter. They need
blankets and towels on these
cold winter evenings. You can
drop off gifts for them any day
of the week. Next time I see
Santa I do have something to
ask him for Christmas. I want
him to tell all those little boys
and girls he visits to please tell
their parents to spay/neuter
their pet so we don't have so
many homeless animals. That
would be the best gift your pet
could ever have.


Petra Schultz, Rick

Ervin exchange vows


Petra Schultz and Rick Ervin
were married on Sept. 27 at
Paradise Ridge in Nederland,
Colo.
The bride is the daughter of
Kay and Fred Hollis of Craw-
fordville and Bill Schultz of
New Orleans, La. The groom is
the son of Jean Ervin of Gree-
ley, Colo, and Paul and Vicky
Ervin of Granbury, Texas.
The bride graduated from


Wakulla High School in 1988.
She also graduated from Flor-
ida State University and the
University of Florida. She is a
pharmacist employed by the
healthcare business of Thom-
son Reuters. The groom is a
graduate of the University of
Northern Colorado. He is an
accountant employed by Au-
rora Loan Services. The couple
is living .in Denver, Colo.


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Mr. and Mrs. Rick Ervin


Veterinarian Dr. Heidi Guhrt shares information on animal surgeries.






THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 18,

Riders help children with Shoebox Run


Bikers from area churches traveled to Live Oak as part of the Shoebox Run.


Mr. and Mrs. Matt Turner


Operation Christmas Child
Shoebox Run was held in
Wakulla County last month.
Participants from the pan-
handle area assembled at
Lake Ellen Baptist Church on
Saturday, Nov. 15 to participate
in the 8th Annual Shoe Box
Run for Operation Christmas


Child.
There were 21 motorcycles
from Wakulla County with
32 riders representing Lake
Ellen Baptist Church, River Of
Life Church, and Sopchoppy
Baptist Church participating in
the ride to the Lake City and
Live Oak areas.


It was the very first ride for
the newly formed bikers from
River of Life.
Part of the Shoe Box Run
included a Shoe Box Party
at the Surrey Place Nursing
Facility in Live Oak where the
residents packed their shoe-
boxes for Operation Christmas


1


Child.
Because of the combined
efforts of bikers across North
Florida, children around the
world will have the opportu-
nity to receive a gift-filled shoe
box and the gospel opportu-
nity to learn about Jesus.


Workshop planned for

Whole Child Jan. 8


The community Whole
Child Wakulla Workgroup will
meet Jan. 8, from 6 p.m. to 8
p.m. (Rescheduled from Tropi-
cal Storm Fay cancellation) at
TCC Wakulla Center.
The group is enthusiastic
about uniting the community
and linking parents with local
resources and providers.
Representative Lorrane
Ausley will be the speaker and
refreshments will be served.
The Whole Child Project
is not another program, but a
philosophy that uses strategic
planning, web-based technol-


Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy R. Wynne

Largent and Wynne

marry at courthouse
Virginia A. Largent of Pan- The bride is the daughter
acea and Jimmy R. Wynne, of Gene and Irene Largent
Jr. of Panacea were mar- of Medart. The groom is the
ried Sunday, Dec. 7 at the son of Jimmy Wynne, Sr. of
Wakulla County Courthouse. Louisiana.
Wakulla County Deputy The couple will live in
Clerk Letha Wells performed Panacea.
the ceremony.


ogy, performance measure-
ment and broad-based com-
munity engagement to build
communities where everyone
works together to make sure
children thrive.
To assist policy makers,
community leaders andiadvo-
cates identify critical issues
related to the well being of
children from birth to age 5
and develop the capacity to
address these issues.
To learn more about Whole
Child Project visit: http://
www.wholechildproject.org.


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Krista Pryor and

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Krista Pryor of Crawfordville and Matt Turner of Crawford-
ville were married Saturday, Nov. 15 at Willow Pond in Jeffer-
son County. Rev. Preston Carter performed the ceremony.
The bride is the daughter of Sonya Pryor of Crawfordville.
The groom is the son of Margaret and Carl Haney of Craw-
fordville.
The maid of honor was Kaitlyn Riemenschneider. The
bridesmaids were Heather Hicks, Samantha Craven, Rachael
Waltman, Jessica Williams, Ashley Hand and Jordan Pryor. The
flower girl was MacKenzie Crockett.
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in January and live in Crawfordville,


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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 18, 2008



People




Wakulla Springs continues to


be winter spot for manatees


Manatee and calf swim at Wakulla Springs State Park.


WAKULLA
SPRINGS NEWS
By Patty Wilbur

In previous years, the man-
atees from this area have
migrated south in search
of warmer water when the
weather turned cold in the
fall. Manatees have a rela-
tively slow metabolism thanks
to their vegetarian diet and
don't tolerate water much
colder than about 68 degrees.
Warm spots like springs are
vital when gulf temperatures
plunge into the 50's.
Many manatees travel to


the spring-fed waters of Crys-
tal River, which has long been
a popular winter refuge. Sever-
al from this area have already
arrived there this fall, accord-
ing to federal biologists.
But Wakulla Springs contin-
ues to be a manatee hot spot.
We've had at least 16 differ-
ent individuals here over the
past few weeks. What's most
intriguing is that many of the
ones who have been showing
up lately are old familiar faces.
Eight of the 12 manatees who
were here last winter (the very
first winter that manatees
stayed at Wakulla Springs) are
here now. Four of these have
returned after being absent
since March, when warmer


water temperatures in the gulf
allowed them to wander. The
calf that was born in the park
during the summer of 2007 ap-
pears to be sticking around for
now, but her mom has gone
back to Crystal River this fall.
It's looking like we'll probably
have manatees at Wakulla
Springs again this winter, but
only time will tell.
There have been other
newer arrivals. Two of those
manatees from last winter
have returned with calves. The
little ones have been a big hit
with everyone who sees them,
You can tell when a riverboat
tour group spots them by the
loud chorus of oohss" and
"aahs". The mother manatees
have been doing a very good
job of keeping the little ones
safe and dose to their sides.
Lucky park visitors have occa-
sionally been able to get great
looks at the pairs napping and
nursing right at the spring.
You never know who you
might see, so come out to
Wakulla Springs to meet
some old and new flippered
friends.
Patty Wilbur is a Park
Ranger at Wakulla
Springs State Park


Barbarino recognized as


President's Council winner


The President's Council on
Physical Fitness and Sports
recognized Russell Barbarino
of Crawfordville as one of
the winners of the National
President's Challenge Gold
Award.
With almost 90,000 Ameri-
cans rising to the challenge
and pledging to become'more
active, the Gold Award win-
ners had to accumulate a
minimum of 160,000 points
to obtain the Gold standard
recognition,
The National President's
Challenge, which kicked off
March 20 was a program
launched by the President's


Council to encourage Ameri-
cans to be more active. Par-
ticipants were able to register
as individuals or with a team
and set goals, and then their
activity and progress were.
tracked,
To complete the challenge,
participants age 18 and older
needed to be active 30 min-
utes' X day, while youth age 6
to 17 needed to be active an
hour a day.
Barbarino is owner of Any-
time Fitness of Crawfordville,
a coed 24-Hour Fitness Center
serving Wakulla County resi-,
dents. He holds a Master's de-
gree from Florida State Univer-


sity in Sports Administration
and a Bachelor's degree from
Kean University in Exercise
Science and Adult Fitness.
In addition, he is a nation-
ally certified strength and
fitness professional through
the National Strength and
Conditioning Association,
Collegiate Strength and Condi-
tioning Coaches Association,
United States, Weightlifting
Federation, Aerobics and Fit-
ness Association of America,
and the International Fitness
Professional's Association
respectively.


Workforce plus receives grant


Florida's Great Northwest,
Inc. announced the award to-
taling $150,000 to six of North-
west Florida's regional Work-
force Development Boards to
fund innovative projects that
focus on addressing specific
workforce needs.
The objective of the pro-
gram is to fund innovative
workforce development, train-
ing, entrepreneurship, and
other industry-specific edu-
cation and training projects
that encourage employment
or employee advancement in
target industries.


The Workforce Innovation
Project grants were awarded
to Northwest Florida's work-
force development boards to
administer and/or provide
the training and related ac-
tivities to assist workers, both
unemployed and employed
and students aged 15 years
or older, in gaining skills and
competencies needed to ob-
tain or upgrade their employ-
ment positions in Florida's
Great Northwest's targeted
industry sectors.
WORKFORCE Plus serves
Gadsden, Leon, and Wakul-


la counties, was awarded a
$27,500 grant that will be
matched with $27,500 in-kind
to further develop target in-
dustry career awareness activi-
ties in the three county career
academies.
"The Workforce Innovation
Program grant will afford our
region the opportunity to
further strengthen the part-
nerships between workforce,
education and the private sec-
tor," said Executive Director
Kimberly Moore.


Boyd votes against auto buyout


Congressman Allen Boyd auto industry has been strug-
(D-North Florida) Wednesday, gling for quite some time, and
Dec. 10 voted against legisla- 'it's very dear that they need to
tion to bailout the U.S. auto make substantive, structural
industry, citing his concern changes so that they can com-
that this bailout will not be pete in a global economy."
beneficial to the taxpayers in The Auto Industry Financ-
the long run. The Auto Indus- ing and Restructuring Act
try Financing and Restructur- would provide up to $15 bil-
ing Act (HR 7321) passed in the lion in short-term bridge loans
House of Representatives by a to aid the U.S. auto industry.
vote of 237 to 170, The Senate Under this legislation, the
rejected the bill. President would designate one
"My top priorities are to or more individuals, known as
grow our economy and protect a "car czar," to hold the car
the taxpayers, and I am not companies accountable for
convinced that bailing out developing and implementing
the U.S. auto industry will do viable long-term restructuring
either of those things," said plans and to ensure compli-
Congressman Boyd. "I believe ance on financing efforts,
that American capitalism is "Our nation is facing seri-
the greatest economic system ous economic challenges, and
in the world, and we have to there is a role for the federal
let the markets work. The U.S. government to play in stimu-


lating our economy," Boyd
said, "However, committing
taxpayer dollars to a specific
industry without any clear
strategy that the money will
be put to good use or repaid
is not the appropriate role for
the federal government."
"I am hopeful that this eco-
nomic downturn will result in
a renewed interest in Wash-
ington to clean up the federal
budget and address our long-
term fiscal challenges," Boyd
continued. "The first step is
for our government to stop
spending more than it has and
start living within its means. I
look forward to working in the
next Congress to implement
fiscal policies that will put our
country back on a path toward
economic prosperity for years
to come."


Schlickelman graduates to TMH


Frederika Schlickelman of
Crawfordville, a Wakulla High
School graduate, graduated
from the registered nursing
program at Tallahassee Com-
munity College on Dec. 11 with


an AA degree, following in the footsteps of
She is the daughter of Gary her mother and sisters who are
and Dawna Schlickelman of employed in the medical field.
Odessa, Mo. and the late Antje She will begin working for
Schlickelman, a former RN in Tallahassee Memorial Hospital
Wakulla County. Fredericka is in January.






THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 18, 2008 Page 5B



School


Five more teachers are Board Certified


The teacher quality move-
ment in Wakulla County has
taken another step forward
following an announcement
by the National Board for Pro-
fessional Teaching Standards
(NBPTS) that Tammi Light, a
fourth grade teacher at Shadev-
ille Elementary School, Brian
Dow an eighth grade teacher
at Riversprings Middle School,
Tina Martindale, a first grade
teacher at Shadeville Elemen-
tary School, Becky Carlan, the
Band Director at Wakulla High
School, and Bobbie Dotson,
a second grade teacher at
Riversink Elementary School,
have achieved National Board
Certification in 2008. There are
also six more Wakulla County
teachers working through the


extensive process.
The Wakulla County School
District continues to lead
Florida school districts with
one of the highest percent-
age of teachers certifying as
National Board Teachers with
the total reaching 11 percent
of Wakulla's teachers.
Superintendent David Mill-
er praised the hard work of
the district staff.
"The time, effort, and dedi-
cation that these teachers
have committed to the educa-
tion profession are commend-
able," he said. "I applaud their
courage and fortitude in pur-
suing this prestigious certifica-
tion, Research supports that
national board certification
is a force in student achieve-


ment and a factor in teaching
excellence."
"Like board-certified doc-
tors and accountants, teachers
who achieve National Board
Certification have met rigor-
ous criteria through intensive
study, expert evaluation, self-
assessment and peer review,"
said NBPTS President and CEO
Joseph A. Aguerrebere.
National Board Certifica-
tion is a voluntary assessment
program designed to recognize
and reward great teachers-
and make them better. While
state licensing systems set
basic requirements to teach in
each state, National Board Cer-
tified Teachers (NBCT@s) have
successfully demonstrated
advanced teaching knowledge,


skills and practices. Certifica-
tion is achieved through a
rigorous, performance-based
assessment that typically
takes one to three years to
complete. Overall, the first-
year achievement rate is about
40 percent, culminating in an
achievement rate of approxi-
mately 65 percent by the end
of the third year.
For more information about
NBPTS and National Board
Certification, visit the NBPTS
web site at www.nbpts.org.
To view the list of all Wakulla
County NBCT's visit www.
wakullaschooldistrict.org and
click on the purple National
Board Certified Teachers tab.


Brittany Meachum, top, Dy'juan Carney work on art,














liversprings Middle:

leading through art


The Riversprings Middle
:hool Art Club is promoting
!ading through art. Students
L the Art Club are designing
:ok posters to be displayed
throughout the library. These
posters center around the
Leme of this year's Teen Read
Feek, "Books With Bite."
The Art Club meets once a
eek after school, and is un-
.r the direction of two artists
id teachers Marlene Adams
id Mina Sutton.


"I am so pleased that the
Art Club is taking on this
project," says librarian Jennifer
Thaxton. "The posters they are
making are really attracting
attention in the library."
Students are working dili-
gently, and the posters will
be displayed in the library
as they are completed. These
posters are a great way to
publicize the many wonderful
books available to students,
Thaxton added.


Student artwork is on display in county


Wakulla County art students
will have their artwork on dis-
play around the county from
December to May.
At main branch of Wakulla
Bank the artwork will include
Tresa Harris, Jessica Mattingly
(COAST), Tyler Tucker, Emma
Hughes (CES), Kenzie Lee, Gab-
by Azzarito (WMS), Jordan
Vaughan (Riversink Elemen-
tary), Brook Roddenberry (RMS)
and Bailey Burgin (WHS).
At Wakulla Bank (St. Marks)
- Allison Metcalf (RMS), Alan
Clinton (WMS).


School District Office -
Ethan Byrd, Taylor Thompson,
Daulton Nettles (RMS), Emily
Adams, Kiana Gray, Nick Lam-
son (COAST), Austin Poppell
(WMS), Justin Hargrove, and
Fred Nichols (CES). '
Senior Citizen Center Henry
Barbree, Libby Inlow (RMS), Re-
becca Fielder, Edmund Concep-
cion (WMS), Maya Kelly (CES),
and Sarah Halbert (COAST).
Wakulla County Courthouse
- Christopher Jackson, Michaela
Meadows (COAST), Ryan Dod-
son, Cameron Jones,. Dominic


Tucker (WMS), Devon Posey,
Juliana Prestia, Kris Messick,
Emily Pilkinton (CES), Brianna
Bryant, Arien Hart, Kieshia
White, Reno Schneider (RMS),
Sage Moore, Tanasha Cooksey,
Bryce Cordle, Hailey Under-
wood, Austin Brumbley, Da-
kota Crews, Lauren Chapman,
Kayla Ingram, Rekenya Wil-
liams, Trenton Jones, Derek
Dhooge, Caroline Johnson,
Adam Shields, Morgan Dickens,
Christopher Newbern, Taylor
Starling, Tyrone Williams, Jenna
Franck, Daniel Hamilton, Daniel


Sloan, Harley Preston. (All from
Riversink Elementary).
Wakulla County Animal
Hospital-Samuel Smith, Sianna
McDonald, Bailey Smith, Taylor
Jones, Stella Treadway, Abby
Tabb, and Rebeka Kounovsky.
(all from Shadeville Elemen-
tary).
Wakulla County Public Li-
brary-Shelby Coleman, Kody
Stelling, Justin Carroll, Mandy
Jinks, Susan Hudson and Mi-
chelle Churchard (all from
Wakulla High).


HEADS TOGETHER

r. SALON

Hairstyles for the Entire family
NAME BRAND BEAUTY SUPPLIES
OWNER/OPERATOR CAROL THOMPSON
43 Holly Ave. Crawfordville, 32327 926-8626


Wakulla County district
students will get out of school
for the Christmas holidays on
Friday, Dec. 19. The last day
of the 2008 portion of the
school year is an early release
day. Teachers will return to
the classrooms on Monday,
Jan. 5 and students go back
to school on Tuesday, Jan. 6
since Jan. 5 is a teacher plan-
ning day.


t-MOw IOR


850.224.4960
www.fsucu.org


Jack's "B" Quick

^ Boarding Kennel


,OAST students

-aise awareness


COAST Physical Educa-
on Coach Alice Grogan
[anned a schoolwide event
!raise awareness to fight
breast cancer, the sixth lead-
ig cause of death among
merican women according
the CDC.
Since October was Na-
onal Breast Cancer Aware-
ess Month COAST students
anticipated in a Balloon
*lease from the PE field on
thursday, Oct. 16.


Everyone was encouraged
to wear pink and each class
released clusters of pink bal-
loons.
The American Cancer So-
ciety provided pink bracelets
for students, faculty and staff
for the event.
"COAST Charter School is
pleased to be a part of the
events taking place across our
country to help fight breast
cancer," said Principal Susan
Flournoy.


Gift Certificates Available
2001 D, Crawfordville Hwy., Next to Wal-Mart HS 5781


Reserve your Pet's Holiday today!
* Large Play Yards Bathing & Nail Trim
* Controlled Environment Indoor/Outdoor Runs,
* All Sizes and Breeds


www.jacksbquick.com
Call Rita today to make your reservation
90 Capt. James Street, Crawfordville, FL 32327



It's more than a Smile


it's a symbol


friendship
youth
success


health
vitality


Total Care


S3Dental

ar' 926-7700
LVI PREFE I D DF TIllI
2167 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville
Mon. 7:45 am 4:30 pm Tues. & Wed. 8:15 am 5:00 pm
Tom Wollschlager, D.M.D. Thurs. 8:00 am 3:00.pm
L-------------


School is

out Dec. 19
.F .T-",.:


GEO-ENERGY
Since 1985
CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:
2 MacCLEAN
WATER TREATMENT
SYSTEMS
SALES & SERVICE
S COMPLETE LINE
SOF EQUIPMENT
Hm WE SOLVE
JUST ABOUT
ANY WATER PROBLEM
926-8116


Seeing Something?
Classified Ads For
As lAttle As $8 A Week
Call Demise today!
926-7102








Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 18, 2008


Deadline

21onday

11:00 A.1.CLAS9FIED

926-7102


35 Cents

Per Word


ADS f $8.00d
klinimum


Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


CATEGORIES
100 EMPLOYMENT
105 Business Opportunities
110 Help Wanted
111 Medical/Dental Help Wanted
112 Office/Administrative Help Wanted
113 Construction Help Wanted
114 Miscellaneous Help Wanted
115 Work Wanted
120 Services and Businesses
125 Schools and Instruction
130 Entertainment
200 ITEMS FOR SALE
205 Antiques
210 Auctions
215 Auto Parts and Accessories
220 Cars
225 Trucks
230 Motor Homes and Campers
235 Motorcycles and 4-Wheelers
240 Boats and Motors
245 Personal Watercraft ;.. --
250 Sporting Goods
255 Guns .
260 Business Equipment


265 Computers and Internet
270 Electronics
275 Home Furnishings
280 Home Appliances .
285 Jewelry
290 Musical Instruments
295 Building Materials
300 MISC. FOR SALE
305 Machinery, Tools & Equipment
310 Firewood Products
315 Farm & Garden Equipment
320 Farm Products & Produce
325 Horses
330 Livestock, Farm Animals
335 Pets
340 Plants
345 Swap, Barter, Trade
350 Wanted to Buy or *,
355 Yard Sales
400 NOTICES
410 Free Items
415 Announcements
420 Card of Thanks
425 Occasion Cards
430 In Memoriam
435 Lost and Found


440 Personals and Notices
500 REAL ESTATE, HOMES, MOBILES
505 Acreage for Lease
510 Acreage for Sale
515 Apartments for Rent
520 Townhouses for Rent
525 Townhouses for Sale
530 Commercial Property for Rent
535 Commercial Property for Sale
540 Farms for Sale
545 Homes for Sale
550 Homes with Acreage for Sale
555 Houses for Rent
560 Land for Sale
565 Mobile Homes for Rent
570 Mobile Homes for Sale '
575 Mobile Homes with Land for Sale
580 Rooms for Rent/Roommates Wanted
585 Wanted to Rent
590 Waterfront Homes/Land for Sale
595 Vacation Rental
600 Open House


CALL 926-7102 TODAY
Email: classifieds@thewakullanews.net


Legal Notice

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA, JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 08-017-DP
IN THE INTEREST OF:
G.W. D.O.B. 12/18/05
MINOR CHILD


NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: UNKNOWN FATHER
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a petition
under oath, has been filed in the above-styled
court for the termination of parental rights and
the permanent commitment of G.W., a male
child born on 12-18-05, In Wakulla County,
Florida to the State of Florida, Department of
Children and Families, Adoption and Related
'Services, a licensed child placing agency, for
subsequent adoption and you are hereby to
be and appear in the above court, before the
Pro Hac Vice Circuit Court Judge Jill C.
Walker at the Wakulla County Courthouse,
2nd Floor, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Craw-
fordville, Florida on Monday, January 12, 2009
at 9:00 a.m. for a Termination of Parental
Rights Advisory hearing and to show cause
why said petition should not be granted. You
must appear on the date and at the time
specified. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY AP-
PEAR AT THE ADVISORY HEARING CON-
STITUTES YOUR CONSENT TO THE TER-
MINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS
CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE:
DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY
LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO THE CHILD
NAMED IN THE PETITION.
WITNESS my hand and official seal as the
Clerk of said Court this 2nd day of December,
2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- BETH DONAWAY
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
December 11, 18, 24, 31, 2008


NOTICE OF SALE'
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the
Final Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of which Is in-
dicated above.
I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse at
3056 Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on the 8th
day of January, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., the fol-
lowing described property as set forth in said
Order or Final Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 25 AND THE WEST HALF OF LOT 26,
BLOCK 14 GREINERS ADDITION TO
CRAWFORDVILLE, ACCORDING TO THE
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON, CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN
THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
ORDERED AT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA, this 20th day of November, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY-S-TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
December 11, 18, 2008


IN'



A(
A


vs
DN




NO


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND na
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR 21
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA 0O
CIVIL DIVISION or
Cc
Hj
Case No.: 08-116-CA Ci
B.
WILLIAM LEONARD TARTT RI
S,
Plaintiff, TI
Sr
vs. HC
PC
VIRGINIA JAMERSON; AND IF DEAD HER K!
UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, wi
GRANTEES, JUDGMENT CREDITORS, AND at
ALL PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, 3(
UNDER OR AGAINST HER; AND DELORISE 3;
DIANE BURKE A/K/A DELORISE DIANE fo
NICHOLS F/K/A DELORISE DIANE LAN- sa
DRUM F/K/A DELORISE DIANE ESTES
F/K/A DIANE DELORISE GRAY, AND IF Lt
DEAD HER UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, SL
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, JUDGMENT TI
CREDITORS, AND ALL PARTIES CLAIMING PI
BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST HER; O
AND ALL UNKNOWN NATURAL PERSONS
IF ALIVE, AND IF DEAD OR NOT KNOWN
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, THEIR SEVERAL :.
AND RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN SPOUSES, er
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, AND m
JUDGMENT CREDITORS, OR OTHER PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER Ds
THOSE UNKNOWN NATURAL PERSONS;
AND ALL CLAIMANTS, PERSONS OR PAR-
TIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR
WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UN-
KNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE
ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFEN-
DANTS OR PARTIES OR CLAIMING TO
HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE, OR INTEREST IN
THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THIS In
COMPLAINT at
a(
Defendants. in
cc
di
NOTICE OF ACTION C
hi
TO: VIRGINIA JAMERSON, DELORISE DI- 8(
ANE BURKE A/K/A DELORISE DIANE
NICHOLS F/K/A DELORISE DIANE LAN-
DRUM F/K/A DELORES DIANE ESTES F/K/A
DIANE DELORISE GRAY, OTHER ABOVE
NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS,
WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
II
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet JL
title to the following property in Wakulla
County, Florida:
C
Lot 82 of the Town of Sopchoppy, Florida,
West Side as per map or plat thereof recorded W
In Plat Book 1 of the Public Records of Wa-
kulla County, Florida.
has been filed against you. You are required v.
to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, R
plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 3042 S
Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida B
32327, on or before date not less than 30 K
days after the first publication, and file the at
original with the clerk of this court either be- ui
fore service on plaintiffs attorney or immedi- de
ately after service; otherwise, a default will be w
entered against you for the relief demanded in di
the complaint or petition, to
TI
Dated: November 6, 2008. in
in
BRENT X. THURMOND R
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSES
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court) N
December 11, 18, 24, 31, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 08-40-FC
AURORA LOAN SERVICES LLC,
Plaintiff,
vS.
AURORA MARRERO, et al.,
Defendantss.


na
2'
si
sc
L(
A
C
Tl
C
a/
V
at
fo
C
vi


I THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND
. ,. FOQ #iAKULLA COUNTY' -
CASE NO.: 08000135FC
CCREDITED'H-OME LENDERS, INC.,
CALIFORNIA CORPORATION
Plaintiff,


ARRELL B. MOORE et. al.
Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Fi-
al Judgment of Foreclosure dated November
5, 2008, and entered in Case No.
8000135FC, of the Circuit Court of the Sec-
nd Judicial Circuit In and for WAKULLA
county, Florida, wherein ACCREDITED
OME LENDERS, INC., A CALIFORNIA
CORPORATION, is a Plaintiff and DARRELL
. MOORE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DAR-
ELL B. MOORE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
AMANTHA MOORE; MORTGAGE ELEC-
RONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.
OLELY AS NOMINEE FOR ACCREDITED
OME LENDERS, INC. A CALIFORNIA COR-
ORATION; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UN-
NOWN TENANT #2 are the Defendants. I
ill sell to the highest and best bidder for cash
Front lobby, Crawfordville Courthouse,
056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL
2327, at 11:00 a.m. on February 5, 2009, the
allowing described property as set forth in
aid Final Judgment, to wit:
OT NO. 2 IN BLOCK "C" OF RIVERSIDE
SUBDIVISION, AS SHOWN BY PLAT
HEREOF OF RECORDED ON PAGE 22, OF
LAT BOOK NO. 1, OF PUBLIC RECORDS
F WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Ar, ir, s.,r, cla m.ng an interest in the sur-
u I,:.,n irn :al. e .1 ar-, other than the prop-
ty owner as of the.date of the lis pendens
ust file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
ated this 25th day of November, 2008
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
accordance with the Americans with Dis-
bilities Act, persons needing a reasonable
accommodation to participate in this proceed-
g should, no later than seven (7) days prior,
contact the Clerk of the Court's disability coor-
nator at 850-926-0905, WAKULLA CO.
THOSE CRAWFORDVILLE, FL, 32327. If
hearing impaired, contact (TDD)
00-955-8771 via Florida System.
December 18, 24, 2008


N THE ClICUT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
ASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-000150-FCXX-XX
NELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,


OBERT E. LEBLANC; __ UNKNOWN
POUSE OF ROBERT E. LEBLANC;
RANDY J. LEBLANC; ____ UN-
NOWN SPOUSE OF BRANDY J. LEBLANC;
id all unknown parties claiming by, through,
Rider or against the herein named Defen-
ants, who are not known to be dead or alive,
whether said unknown parties claim as heirs,
evisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, credi-
rs, trustees, spouses, or other claimants;
ENANT #1 and/or TENANT #2, the parties
tended to account for the person or persons
possession; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC
REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.
Defendants.
/
NOTICE OF SALE
notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Fi-
al Judgment of Foreclosure dated November
4, 2008, in this cause, I will sell the property
tuated in WAKULLA County, Florida, de-
ribed as:
OT 9, MILLWOOD ACRES, A SUBDIVISION
S PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RE-
ORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 23, OF
HE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
'k/a 61 GREELEAF LANE, CRAWFORD-
ILLE, FL 32327
t public sale, to the highest and best bidder,
or cash, In the front lobby of the Wakulla
ounly Courthouse located at 3056 Crawford-
lle Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00


o'clock a.m., on January 8, 2009.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 24 day of
November, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate In
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.


Please contact Letha Wells, (850)
Ext. 222, within 2 working days of yi
of this temporary injunction. If you a
or voice impaired, call TDD 1-800-9
December 1


926-0905,
our receipt
are hearing
55-8771.
1,18,2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 65-2008-CA-000180
DIVISION
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,

vs.
JANET K. SULLIVAN, et al,
Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Fi-
nal Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated
November 24, 2008 and entered in Case No.
65-2008-CA-000180 of the Circuit Court o( the
SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA
County, Florida wherein SUNTRUST MORT-
GAGE, INC., is the Plaintiff and JANET K.
SULLIVAN; EDWARD F. SULLIVAN; INDY-
MAC BANK, F.S.B.; SONGBIRD SUBDIVI-
SION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION,
INC.; BUNTING NEIGHBORHOOD PROP-
ERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; GAL-
LON UNDERGROUND PROPANE TANK;
are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash pt FRONT FOYER
OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE
at 11:00AM, on the 5th day of February, 2009,
the following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment:
LOT 15, BLOCK D OF SONGBIRD SUBDIVI-
SION PHASE I, AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3,
PAGE 88 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 11 MAGPIE TRAIL, CRAWFORD-
VILLE, FL 32327
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, Qther than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this
Court on November 24, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk.
of the Circuit Court)
December 11, 18, 2008,


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 65-2008-CA-000185
DIVISION
COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
TERESA M. PEARSON, et al,
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Final Judgment of Mortgage. Foreclosure
dated November 24, 2008 and entered In
Case No. 65-2008-CA-000185 of the Circuit
Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and
for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein COUN-
TRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC, is the Plaintiff
and TERESA M. PEARSON; MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,
INCORPORATED, AS NOMINEE FOR
COUNTRYWIDE FINANCIAL CORPORA-
TION; are the Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT
FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 5th day
of February, 2009, the following described
property as set forth In said Final
Judgment:
LOT 123, BLOCK A OF MAGNOLIA GAR-
DENS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
1, PAGE(S) 37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 182 TAFFLINGER ROAD, CRAW-
FORDVILLE, FL 32327
Any person claiming an interest In the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Us Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this
Court on November 26, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
December 18, 24, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 65-2008-CA-000186
DIVISION
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE FOR CMLTI 2007-WFHE2,
Plaintiff,
vs.

MARC DALVERY, et al,
Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure
dated November 24, 2008 and entered in
Case No. 65-2008-CA-000186 of the Circuit
Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and
for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein U.S.
BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUS-
TEE FOR CMLTI 2007-WFHE2, is the Plaintiff
and MARC DALVERY; SHYNIRA DALVERY;
are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER
OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE
at'11:OOAM, on the 5th day of February, 2009,
the following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment:
LOT 5, BLOCK 5 OF WAKULLA GARDENS,
UNIT 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
1, PAGES 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF. WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 15 SUSQUEHANNA TRAIL, CRAW-
FORDVILLE, FL 32327
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within sixty (60) days after
the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this
Court on November 24, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
December 18, 24, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 652007CA000183FC
DIVISION
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA SUCCESSOR
BY MERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME
MORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
PATTI A. CHIPPER, et al,
Defendantss.


NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure
dated October 27, 2008 and entered in Case
No. 652007CA000183FC of the Circuit Court
of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WA-
KULLA County, Florida wherein WELLS
FARGO BANK, NA SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME MORT-
GAGE, INC., is the Plaintiff and PATTI A.
SCHIPPER; WELLS FARGO BANK, NA;
TENANT #1 N/K/A JENNIFER LETES, and
TENANT #2 N/K/A DAVID LETES are the De-
fendants, I will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WA-
KULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at
11:00AM, on the 5th day of February, 2009,
the following described property as set forth In
said Final Judgment:
LOT 33, BLOCK "A", OF AMELIAWOOD,
UNIT 2, PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 26, WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
AND ALSO:
A PORTION OF LOT 34, BLOCK "A" OF
AMELIAWOOD UNIT 2, PLAT BOOK 2,
PAGE 26, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS:
BEGIN AT A FOUND 4 INCH BY 4 INCH
CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 34, BLOCK
"A", AMELIAWOOD UNIT 2, WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN
NORTH 37 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 49 SEC-
ONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 318.19 FEET;
THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 41
MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE
OF 50.83 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 72
DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS
WEST A DISTANCE OF 32.89 FEET;
THENCE RUN SOUTH 31 DEGREES 48
MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE
OF 324.49 FEET; THENCE RUN ALONG A
CURVE CONCAVED TO THE SOUTHEAST
SAID CURVE HAVING A CENTRAL ANGLE
OF 14 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 58 SEC-
ONDS, A RADIUS OF 109.12 FEET, A
CHORD BEARING OF SOUTH 56 DEGREES
17 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST AND A
-CHORD DISTANCE OF 27.45 FEET) AN
ARC DISTANCE OF 27.52 FEET BACK TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
A/K/A 143 MARIE CIRCLE, CRAWFORD-
VILLE, FL 32327
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within sixty (60) days after
the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this
Court on December 4,2008
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
December 18, 24, 2008


WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVITATION TO BID
DATE: 12/04/08
TO: ALL BIDDERS
The Wakulla County School Board invites you
to submit a bid on the following described
items:
BID NUMBER: WCSB # 08/09-06
ITEMS TO PURCHASE:
"FOOD/NON-FOOD ITEMS:
Sealed bids shall be received by The Wakulla
County School Board until: January 21,2009,
4:00 p.m.
All-bids received shall be opened and read
around publicly, at The Wakulla County School
Board Administratie Office, 69 Arran Road,
Crawfordville, Florida, on January 21, 2009,
4:00 p.m.
The bids shall be considered by the Wakulla
County School Board during their regular
scheduled meeting on February 17, 2009
The School Board reserves the right to reject
any and all bids or portions thereof.
Bid forms and specifications may be obtained
from:
WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
GAIL MATHERS, SCHOOL FOOD SERVICE
69 AARON ROAD
CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327
All bids should be sealed and clearly marked
on the outside of the envelope "Sealed Bid,
Bid #08/09-06, FOOD/NON-FOOD ITEMS'
ALL BIDS SHOULD BE MAILED TO:
WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
P.O. BOX 100
CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326-0100
December 11, 18, 2008


105 Business Opportuni-
I ties I


BRING YOUR OLD

PHOTOS TO lIFE!!
I can fix those
wonderful old pictures
so you can enjoy them
again, and make
copies to share.

Keep the family heritage
alive with restored
photographs

Just $15 per photo.
850-766-7655
dougapple@gmail.com



110 Help Wanted


P/T Position for Cardio Fitness In-
structor. Fax resume to
850-681-7763

Wakulla Springs State Park seeks
an experienced painter for a sea-
sonal OPS position. Work will be
limited to completion of specific
projects. Hourly rate of $12 to
$15 per hour depending on expe-
rience. Apply in person at the
Park. Ph 850-926-0700.

111 Medical/Dental Help
Wanted I


REGISTERED NURSE
Permanent Part-time Day Shift
position for Wakulla/Franklin
team. Must have current Florida
RN license. BSN preferred.
Minimum of one year in-patient
nursing experience or previous
Hospice/House Health
experience.
SOCIAL WORKER
This full-time position is based
out the Carrabelle office and
covers the Franklin county team.
Must have a Master's degree in
Social Work. Two years of
hospice experience preferred.

GREAT BENEFIT PACKAGE!
Interested candidates can apply
in person at 2889 Crawfordville
Hwy, Suite C, Crawfordville, FL
32327 or by faxing a resume to:
850 325-6290 or
APPLY ON-LINE at
www.bigbendhospice.org

EOE/DFWP/ADA
Smoke Free Workplace


120 Services and Busi-
nesses


A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING
Free Estimates
Licensed John Farrell
926-5179
566-7550

ALL ABOUT...
CONCRETE LANDSCAPE
blocks plants
bricks sod
pavers tractor work
call JOSEPH FRANCIS
850-556-1178 / 850-926-9064

BACK FORTY TRACTOR
SERVICE Bushhogging, Box-
blading Driveway. Larry Carter
Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931,
850-694-7041. Licensed/Insurecd.


Five Star Plumbing.
Big Bend, Inc.
,L
Commercial A -
& Residential
Service


Billy B. Rathel, Jr.
850-544-5062
850-421-1237 Fax
plumbing_five star@yahoo.com
Lic#CFC1427547 State Certified.


Harold Burse Stump Grinding
926-7291.









lom. [Inno Wny W

112ciriId, Ph n Is V

DI &MW[IT\ ON\ -1-


Michelle Snow
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
926-7627
Music lessons of all types for all t
ages.

Piano, Keyboard, Guitar Lessoni.
All ages & home school. 25 yeai
in Crawfordville. Mary Updegrajf
926-7472. 4


205 Antiques










Antiques and Uniques
61 Rose Street,
Sopchop y, FL 32358
850-962-2550
May the Joy and Hope
That is Christmas Be with
You and Yours.
NEW ITEM:
Sopchoppy Worm
Gruntin HATS, just in
time for gift giving!
wys Something for
Everyone at Sisters!
HOURS
Tuesday Saturday 10a.m.- 5p.


230 Motor Homes and
Campers


1999 38' Newme Dutch Star,
Diesel motorhome e.,c. cond. r&-
cent tires, only. 60,000 miles, a.
ride, 2 heatpump A/C, slide,
leather capt. chairs & sofas.
Plumbed for w/d, corian counter,
blue ox hitch for tow vehicle. Only
$65,000. Call 566-4124.


F
d
c


E
I
c

F
c
c
p
i
L


c
A
F
A
fl
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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 18, 2008 Page 7B


I 235 Motorcycles and 4-
Wheelers

'2005 Honda TRX 400 Big Bear
:4X4. Excellent condition, only 500
miles, garage kept, $4,250 or best
offer. Call Jeff at 850-545-6148.

S275 Home Furnishings |


$159 Queen Pillowtop mattress &
Sbox. Manufacturer wrapped, war-
.ranty 3.222-7783. Delivery available

:$499 Sofa/loveseat Microfiber set.
'Still in crate, never used. Can de-
.liver 545-7112. Must move this
"week!

S8pc King size bedroom set. Solid
.wood dovetailed drawers. New
still in packaging. Worth $4k give
,away $1499. Can deliver:
'425-8374.

-A new Queen Orthopedic Pillow-
,top Mattress Set in sealed plastic
;$290. Warranty. Can deliver.
,222-9879

Brand New King Pillowtop mat-
tress set, still in plastic w/war-
ranty. $299 425-8374. Can deliver

'Formal dining room table, 6 chairs
and china cabinet. New, in boxes.
,$750. Can deliver. 545-7112

Full $139/Twin $99 mattress
w/matching boxspring. Brand
New with warranty. Delivery avail-
able 222-7783.

MUST SACRIFICE: Pub Table Set,
Solid Wood, Brand New $149.
545-7112

Sofa & Loveseat 100% all Leather,
matching set, must sell, $799.
'Never used, in crates. 222-7783.
delivery y available

Solid wood sleigh bedroom set.
English Dovetail Drawers. High
Quality Construction Beautiful...
sell $599. Delivery available.
425-8374

280 Home Appliances


Used A/C (window & wall): electric
heat or heat-pump, 8,000
BTU's-$129, 18,000 BTU's $250.
Also P-Tac Hotel units available.
850-528-5603
320 Farm Products &
Produce

Boiled peanuts (green) $3.00/Lb.
Blanched peas and farm fresh
eggs. Raker Farm 926-7561.

335 Pets



Adopt a pet from the animal
shelter:

Dogs:
German Shepherd mix
Lab mixes
Terrier mix
Hound mixes
Chow/Shep. mix
Min Pin mix
Chihuahua mixes
*Bassett/Lab mix, very cute
;Boxer mix
.Basenji mix
'-Many other nice mixes.
,:Come and take a look.

-"Duppies:
'Lab/Shepherd mix, beautiful
;,hep/Bulldog mixes
,'Fox Terrier/Boston Terrier.mixes.
:',(beautiful, will be available on
lan, 12, 2009)

,4ice cats and kittens.

'"HAT Adoption Center:


Monday closed
Tuesday through Wednesday
& Friday: 11:00AM to 4:30PM
Thursday: 11:00AM to 7:00 PM
Saturday: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM
Sunday: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM
www.chatofwakulla.org


1 355 Yard Sales


Yard-sale every day until Christ-
mas! Weekends: 8:00am-'til dark,
weekdays: 12:00n-'til dark. 87
Brown Blvd. (off Cajer Posey). Fol-
low signs. 850-745-0557.

435 Lost and Found


Lost man's wedding band with
sunken diamonds. Call
850-528-7429. Reward offered.











Missing Black/Tan German Shep-
herd. We have lost our family pet,
Xena.. please help if you see her.
She has never been away from
home and ran out without her col-
lar!! However, we bought her with
a microchip ID. She is a nervous
dog and tends to eat everything,
including bushes. My son is dev-
astated; they are best friends. I
will be forever grateful to the per-
son who finds her!! Please call
Courtney at 544-6598 if you spot
her!! Thank you!!

500 Real Estate


PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it ille-
gal
to advertise "any preference, limi-
tation, or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or national ori-
gin or an intention to make any
such preference, limitation or dis-
crimination." Familial status in-
cludes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing the custody of
children under the age of 18.
This newspaper will not accept
any advertising for real estate
that is a violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To com-
plain of discrimination call HUD
toll free at 1-800-669-9777., The
toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.



LENDER

515 Apartments for Rent|


By TMH on Teal Lane, 1BR/1BA
$660/mo., December-Free. New
carpet, wood floors and paint. Full
kitchen, indoor washer/dryer in-
cluded. 850-567-4401.
530 Comm. Property for
Rent' I

GRADE-A OFFICE SPACE!*
Hwy. frontage offices avail. Great at-


B(BC

STORAGE

MINI-WAREHOUSES

BOATS RV'S

519-5128 508-5177
2 miles South of Courthouse
on Hwy. 319 in Crawfordville
24 Hour Access Video Surveillance


Woodville Retail
Space Available
Fitness Studio-1000/sf
(Wall to wall mat & mirrors)
Retail -1250/sf
(Storefront w/back storage)
Two-Bay Garage-1200/sf
Divided Office Space-1074/sf
Lewiswood Center
421-5039



545 Homes for Sale


S HARTUNG AND
NOBLIN, INC.
REALTORS

Real Estate Sales
& Rentals
2650-1 Crawfordville Hwy.
Office: (850) 926-2994
www.coldwellbankerwakulla.com


555 Houses for Rent


10 Maxson Rd, Crawfordville
Investor's Speciall
Beach style duplex in Wa-
kulla. Bottom unit 2BR/1 BA,
w/tile floors. Top unit
2BR/1 BA, w/Hardwood Firs.
Each unit rents for
$895/mo. includes utilities.
Call Bob at 545-6010.

2BR/1.5BA Fully furnished,
2-storyt All appliances. Spacious
grounds. $700/month, plus de-
posit. Call 850-528-4341.

2BR/1 BA in Wakulla Gardens. 59
Chicopee. New 2006 home. Tile,
carpet, new appliances, washer,
rocking chair porch, nice yard.
$725/mo for 12-month lease (ne-
gotiable). Land Lots and Homes
850-556-6694

2BR/1BA, 13 Tram Circle on ca-
nal, $650/mo. + deposit. Call
850-962-2212. Revell Realty.

2BR1BA Duplex, 457 Emmet
Whaley Road, on paved road.
$625/month. 850-778-6550

3BR/2BA /Cochise Street,
$725/mo. 2BR/1BA Broken Bow,
$625/mo. Lease purchase avail-
able. No pets. Call 850-926-8795.

4BR/2BA + office. Hardwood
floors, near the Courthouse on
one acre. $1,100 + deposit. Call
850-933-1608.


TFT. Gaupin. Brokerer
SS ell point Crawfordville
926-7811 926-5111
SFlorida Coastal Silver Coast
Properties. Inc. Realty
BUllLDER'S OWN!! Cui.:.m bull brck home iih all tie bell
& wtiile 'BR2B \ 2.11i0 q n o1 InOing area, 9-13 il (cilng
c,'.cr, m,..lding, dramalick f.,er. .:.uble fireplace, floaung floor min.
Li ing r,'.m. Kilch,.n. Dnig r'room. ile baLh, large %,rap-around'
sireered po'rh., .cr garage. aid more locaied on 2 i(5 acres closeA
',cho.:,l Priced at $320.00W0 f I .}-, ILSs 18'.55 i

LARGE CAPE COD r, le ho.:me ferures 4BR'3B A, large kitcheZ
ft'anmily r,,.m tR ih replace. dnig room. had"odJ floor.. all appli-
ances.. rap ar.:.urJd purh and .j 2car garage :.n 5.01 acres .#56W,11
IMLS# ISlX01i pnied at $3301,0)0.

THIS HOME HAS IT ALL! )BR 2BA home in great locaton in Ct
lord.ille leatures Pcr'.' f.. rrg irin, LR. DR. Ktichern. sphi bedroom
all Kichern appliuce Delu,.e .5\.a41.) reened pauo ilthi SpanishTil
looir, h.i lub 2 Tx\ ALD., ind much more Man's shed, pnacy Ifenedl
bach ard \| mJI- .c' '!2iI-\i|, IMLS#t 1t..5120 priced at $199,500.

FISH. RELAX. \ND REPEAT! The perfect retreat b, an%,:,ne's stan-
daud.' Ti,.. i. a. hi a Naluire urrN:.u,- hid I.lll.w Fl:.'rid, '.cmpou
iTi -il BR 21BA .:,er _' t.01.1 q ri 'Crrecred p-,..rcn .'panr iinng n,:,ri LoiLso
i,['ra'-. C Se' ,J,.lucJd 2 icre, luhl:, .ireed a J !.loaded %ih pd ,rri Read) for
your li.;lng, hurtinrig |& u-i plain iun ouuring' #4 l.il. M1LS# 153'1)25.
priced at $220.001).
RENTALS
SNUG HARBOR Townhome available for rent at $1.500/month. secu.
dcp:."itl required Commuir., pool. dcks or, dep-.,ater canal located in
gatel .,rmnunit, Ni''PETS

FURNISHED 2BR'2.5 Condo $1.2001month. wecunry depoit requuIed.i
NO PETS ,l#6 3-i

SHELL POINT BE ACH. unirumi.hed 3BR.2B \ home on deep- aer caq
$Sl.UUImonth. :-curi\, de:posu required NO PETS #340-2.W

OCHLOCKONEE BAI IBR 28.\ luriishedi .atertroni house $1,000/
month. ei.urii dep..s ruequ.cd PETS ALLOWED #r," \\W.


mosphere. Rent + tax includes: SEASON XL- Snug Harbor Toenhome a.iljkable for rent ai $1.500/%eel
utilities, trash p/u and kitchen use. 2-c rr a,.,.mum dcdul,. ,rn, ~, ,,,,rtlh Communim pool.dockso
Common area cleaned. 1st and last .
month's rent. One month free with .deep-.ikaler carjl l.-cahied .,a aled .cimmuni NO PETS
13/mo lease. Call 926-4511 for info. -' s'""' i' THE DA1TE T,) L-,'Ok. LLNCER & RELOCATE.
CALL (850) 926-4511 GO F,-,R THE COLD,
61Nco ,6a rn ...j..-5q.
Sopchoppy Free Office Space for Ochlockonee Bay 984-5007
right business. Call 850-962-2456


Cozy cottage In Panacea,
2BR/1BA recently remodeled.
Hardwood floors, screened porch,
washer/dryer hook-up.
$625/month + deposit. Call
850-926-4217

Crawfordville. 3 or 4BR/2BA. W/D
hookups. Excellent condition.
Huge fenced yard. $750/mo.
850-228-0422.

Beautiful 2BR/1 BA House in Wa-
kulla Gardens. Front
porch, wood floors, appliances &
blinds $800 mo+Sec. Dep/Credit
Check.
3BR/2BA House on pilings. Walk-
ing distance to beach, large
screen porch, appliances, carpet,
city water/sewer. $750mo+Sec
Dep/Credit Check.
Call Kai 519-3781. Coldwell
Banker Hartung & Noblin, Inc.
Property Management.

Upscale 2BR/1.5BA on secluded
wooded lot In Wakulla river com-
munity with park, dock and boat
ramp, wrap-around porch, car-
port, large washer/dryer/storage
room, hardwood-floors, Gen-Aire
6-burner stove, fireplace and sky-
lights throughout.
$900/mo.+$700/deposit.
850-926-4217

One mile from Dickerson Bay boat
ramp in Panacea. 2BR/1BA
w/washer/dryer hook-up. Hard-
wood floors, porches, excellent
condition. $585/mo.+deposit.
850-926-4217.


Move-In with little or No deposit.
$600/mo. 3BR/1BA, needs clean-
ing and small repairs. 1-Year lease
w/good credit. 850-926-8239
(leave message).


Today's Weather



Wed12T1" F 9 1 ,Sat .S -
12/17 '1118 12/19 12/20 12/21


79/54
Mix of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
upper 70s
and lows in
the mid 50s.


Sunrise:
7:28 AM
Sunset:


77/54
Partly
cloudy.
Highs in the
upper 70s
and lows in
the mid 50s.


Sunrise:
7:28 AM
Sunset:


75/54
Times of
sun and
clouds.
Highs in the
mid 70s and
lows in the
mid 50s.

Sunrise:
7P29 AM
Sunset:


72/52
Consider-
able cloudi-
ness. Highs
in the low
70s and
lows in the
low 50s.

Sunrise:
7:29 AM
Sunset:


69/38
Few show-
ers. Highs in
the upper
60s and
lows in the
upper 30s.


Sunrise:
7-30 AM
Sunset:


Florida At A Glance
li--- T k BHH --- **' ^A .'."'. zM' fl.'IW


The Farm- 5269,500
12 Carriage Drive, Cranrordv-lle, FL
Immaculate 2255 2.1 Ft 4- EF'J2 BA.
home. ?-iutifull',' l.i':cared back-
yard with a privacy fence & screened
pool/waterfall. Lots of extras wood
floors in main living area, fireplace,
ur.-:,rr, na:t-r :uitc e "r.'Lrey c eiling-,
1lu.': m .-ter btath, : :rity :y .em.
and much more.


Savannah Forest
$39,900..1 ac. tracts off
Wakulla Aaron Rd.


Steeplechase $19,900 to $99,900.
5 ac. wooded tracts. Horse friendly
Subdivision has underground electric
and water.
Located off of Lower Bridge Road.
Walkers Vill
$57,900. 2 ac. lots, located on
Lower Bridge Road.
Sellars Crossing
$59,900. 1+ ac lots
North Wakulla Co..
On Ace High Stable Rd.


Carmen Rocio 2 ac. lot off
Shadeville Hwy near
Wakulla Station. $64,900.
2 acre tract with large
hardwoods in Beechwood
Subdivision off Shadeville
Hwy. $52;900.
Two 5+ acre tracts off
Rehwinkel Rd. w. large trees on
the back of properties & a small
pond. Can be
purchased together.
$134,750 and $136,250.


***Brand New Subdivision***
Carmen Maria -$29,900.
Lots up to 1 ac. in size.
Underground electric and Wa-
ter. Conveniently located to
Tallahassee and Lake Talquin.


Call
Donna Card
8S-5008-1235
',W..


**Affordable & Convenient.**
Montejo $34,900
Located off Belair Road. Under-
ground electric, water, & sewer.
Convenient to Tallahassee, St.
Marks Bike Trail, arid all the sur-
rounding recreational areas.


Area Cities

Clearwater 80 56 pt sunny
Crestview 81 53 pt sunny
Daytona Beach 79 58 pt sunny
Fort Lauderdale 80 67 pt sunny
Fort Myers 82 .56 pt sunny
Gainesville 83 53 pt sunny
Hollywood 78 62 pt sunny
Jacksonville 78 57 pt sunny
Key West 75 67 pt sunny
Lady Lake 83 54 pt sunny
Lake City 80 53 pt sunny
Madison 81 57 pt sunny
Melbourne 78 58 pt sunny
Miami 76 65 pt sunny
N Smyrna Beach 79 57 pt sunny

National Cities

Atlanta 68 55 rain
Boston 37 32 mixed
Chicago 24 17 cloudy
Dallas 66 62 cloudy
Denver 31 18 pt sunny
Houston 72 63 cloudy
Los Angeles '57 42 pt sunny
Miami 76 65 pt sunny

Moon Phases


I citH LoCo 0


Ocala 84
Orlando 80
Panama City 77
Pensacola 74
Plant City 84
Pompano Beach 78
Port Charlotte 83
Saint Augustine 73
Saint Petersburg 76
Sarasota 78
Tallahassee 79
Tampa 81
Tltusville 79
Venice 82
W Palm Beach 77


Minneapolis
New York
Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny.
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny


-8 flurries
38 rain
37 rain
35 rain
26 sunny
29 cloudy
46 rain


Full Last New First
Dec 12 Dec 19 Dec 27 Jan 4


UV Index
Wed Thu Fit Sat Sun
12/17 12/18 12/19 12/20 12/21
3 | 1 : 4 I 3 I 3 3
Moderate Moderate Moderate Moderate Moderate
The UV Index Is measured on a 0 11 number scale, n 11
wilh a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.


106 W. 5th Ave.
Tallahassee, FL 32303
(850) 222-2166 tel.
www.wmleeco.com


II


r-


.1


Liy i o on.







Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 18, 2008


555 Houses for Rent


Ochlockonee Bay




Realty
Alligator Point! 3BR/3BA gor-
geous home in gated community.
1800/month, $1800/security. No
Pets. No Smoking.
Pine Street/Alligator Point! Clean
2BR/1BA. $575/rionth, $575/se-
curity. No Pets. No Smoking.
Crawfordville/Linzy Mill!
4BR/2BA, 1600 sq.ft.
$1,575/month. $1,575/security.
No Pets. No Smoking.
2BR/1BA home in Crawfordville on
five acres. $750/month. No Pets.
No Smoking.
Panaceal Commercial building on
Hwy 98. $850/month. $850/security
Beachfront- Alligator Point!
Gorgeous 2 story, 4BR/3.5BA,
3700 sq.ft. unfurnished home.
$3000/month $3000/security. No
pets. No smoking.
Ochlockonee Bay! Bayfront
3BR/1 BA block home. $750/mo.
$750/security. No pets.
No smoking.
Beachfront 2BR/2BA on Alligator
Point. $1300/month. $1300/secu-
rity. No Pets. No Smoking.
2BR/1BA in Lanark/Franklin
County! $600/month. $600/secu-
rity. No Pets. No Smoking.
Mashes Sand Rd! 3BR/1 BA on
bay. $775/month. $775/deposit.
No Pets. No Smoking.
Commercial building on busy
Hwy. 98/Panacea for rent.
$550/month. $550/security.
Commercial office in Medart! 2
Room office on Hwy. 319.
$700/month. $700/security.
Ochlockonee Bay Realty
850-984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com


560 Land for Sale

124.7 acres, 5, 10, 18.9 & 99.7
acre tracts. 2+ miles of creek front,
including Smith Creek. Full
kitchen, two bunkhouses, wood-
shed. $5,500/acre 984-0044


FOR SALE
Beautiful one acre lot at
Wildwood Country Club and
Golf Course. 177 feet golf course
frontage on hole #6. Spectacular
view!! Heavily wooded with
wild cherry, pine and oak trees,
paved road, city water.
Best Deal in Wakulla County!!
$39,900
Call 850-459-3808

565 Mobile Homes for
Rent

2BR/1BA M/H off Bloxham
Cuttoff. Available now. $575/mo +
$200 deposit. Call 850-210-4664.

2BR/1 BA S/W Wakulla Gardens,
Good condition. Available now.
$500/mo.+deposit 850-322-9952
2BR/2BA Furnished M/H in Me-
dart area on large lot. $400/mo.
plus deposit. 850-349-2224
3BR/1BA M/H. 235 Webster.
Screened porch, ,1 acre, fenced
yard, great shape. Call today!
$625/mo. 12-month lease (nego-
tiable). Land Lots and Homes
850-556-6694
4BR/3BA, fenced, carport, nice.
Off Wakulla Beach Rd. & Hwy. 98.
$675/mo., first, last and security.
850-574-4354.
Available Jan. 3BR/2BA on 5
acres. Fireplace, den, deck.
3-miles south of Woodville. Nice!
$775/mo. First, last & security.
850-574-4354.
LAKE FRONT ON LAKE ELLEN
3BR/2BA DWMH $675/mo. In-
cludes garbage & water. Next
door to owner. No pets or smok-
ing. 566-0403


SW/MH 2BR/2BA, fenced back-
yard, large FT / BK decks, shed,
2.5 acres, no smoking, no pets,
$650/mo. F&L mo., $400sc. dep.
850-926-9914 850-528-2289
570 Mobile Homes for
Sale

For Sale by Owner. 2000 Horton Mi-
rage DW/MH, 24 X 56, 3BR/2BA, Fire-
place, Garden Tub, Washer, Dryer,
Large Refrigerator, Dishwasher in-
cluded; Excellent Condition, Located in
Wakulla Cl Staff Housing Community.
Owner will pay 1/2 Moving Expense;
Asking $28,000; 850-212-2019

580 Rooms for Rent/ i


Beautiful, untimbered, mature I Roommates |
wooded 20-acre tract. Easy ac-
cess from Hwy 98. Reduced Large/Room/Bath for rent. 13x15
$125,000. Call Susan McKaye, w/deck & fridge & microwave. On
owner/agent (850)510-2477. Och- Wakulla river. Separate entrance.
lockonee Bay Realty. $75/week. Utilities included.
www.hardwoodhammock.com 850-926-2783.


590 Waterfront Homes/ ,
Land

George's Lighthouse Pointe
Unit A-3, 19 Mashes Sand Road,
Panacea, Condominium Unit.
1BR/1BA, LR, DR, CHA. Front
porch faces pool & tennis court.
Back porch faces marina & view
of bay (Both 12x30). Gated
Community w/beautiful new
landscaping. 825 sq. ft. H&C.
850-545-5057. $229,900




Get The


News


Every


Week!

Just $25 per year
in Wakulla County
$30 per year
in Florida
$35 per year
out of state


Call


926-7102


Selling

Something?

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Ads For

As Little As

$8 A Week

926-7102


IN CRAWFORDVILLE
Crawfordville Post Office
Beall's Outlet,
Food Mart
Karol's Korner Petro
Stop N Save
CVS Pharmacy
Dux Liquors
Glenda's Country Store
Huddle House
Lee's Liquor/Sky Box
Sports Bar
Mack's Country Meats
Michele's Convenience Store
Myra Jeans
Petty's BP
Murphy's
Wal-Mart
Wakulla Springs Lodge
Winn Dixie

IN PANACEA
Bayside Grocery Store
Tobacco & Beverage E-Z Serve
Crum's Mini Mall
posey's up the creek

IN OCHLOCKONEE BAY
Jay Food Mart
Mashes Sands BP
Hamaknockers oasis

IN SOPCHOPPY
Express Lane
Lou's Bait and Tackle
Sopchoppy Grocery


IN MEDART
Inland Store.
Best Western
Wildwood INN
Petro

IN ST. MARKS
BoLynn's
Express Lane

IN WOODVILLE
Ace Hardware
Bert Thomas Grocery
Gas Mart
IGA Grocery Store
Los Amigos
Gulf Coast Lumber

IN TALLAHASSEE

Circle K (Capital Circle &
C'ville Highway).
Publix (Capital Circle &
C'ville Highway)

IN WAKULLA STATION
Wakulla Station BP
Stop N Save
Wakulla station pharmacy

AND ELSEWHERE
Spring Creek Restaurant
Stop N Save (Bloxham
Cutoff/H'way 319)
Stop N Save (H'way 98/
Spring Creek Road)


Is Available For Purchase


At The Following Locations:


More Locations Coming Soonl


I





T.J WALLAT NEWS. Thura 1P. MQWQ Pqg QB


Brain


Teasers


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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Dec. 18, 2008

Camp Indian Springs Unemployment benefits are extended

offers winter camp On Friday, Nov. 21, President rently receiving benefits, and ovation Special Claims, P. 0. additional information about


Start the New Year right
with fun and friends at YMCA
Camp Indian Springs. This
holiday season, YMCA Camp
Indian Springs is offering a
Winter Day Camp for first
through sixth grade students.
Dates for the camp are: Mon-
day, Dec. 22, Tuesday, Dec. 23,
Monday, Dec. 29, Tuesday, Dec.
30, Wednesday, Dec. 31, Friday,
Jan. 2 and Monday, Jan. 5.
There will be games, crafts,
nature activities, songs, skits,
and more. Check In at the din-


ing hall between 7:30 a.m. and
9 a.m. Check Out at the dining
hall between 4:30 p.m. and 6
p.m. Campers must pack their
own lunch. Spaces are limited
so reserve your spot now.
Add horseback riding for
the end of the day for an ad-
ditional $15. Call 926-3361 to
add a lesson reservation.
For more information, con-
tact the YMCA Camp Indian
Springs, 2387 Bloxham Cut-Off
Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327.
www.campindiansprings.org.


George W. Bush signed the Un-
employment Compensation
Extension Act of 2008, which
increases the allowed amount
of extended Unemployment
Compensation benefits from
13 to 20 weeks. The Act also
authorizes up to an additional
13 weeks of "Second-Tier"
benefits for states with a total
unemployment rate at or above
6 percent. Currently, Florida
is one of numerous states
authorized for "Second-Tier"
benefits.
Qualified Floridians cur-


who subsequently exhaust
their benefits, will receive the
extension automatically, and
their weekly benefits amount
will remain the same. Individu-
als who do not currently have
an active claim, but may be
eligible for the extension, will
be mailed a notice/application
advising them of the avail-
ability of extended benefits.
An application may also be
printed from www.fluidnow.
com. The application should be
completed and mailed to:
Agency for Workforce In-


Drawer 5350, Tallahassee, FL
32314-5350.
To be eligible for the ex-
tended benefits, an individual
must:
Have filed an Unemploy-
ment Compensation claim on
or after May 2, 2006.
Have exhausted all rights
to regular Unemployment
Compensation benefits.
Have no rights to regular
or extended Unemployment
Compensation benefits in any
other state or Canada.
Citizens who would like


extended Unemployment Com-
pensation benefits, may go to:
www.fluidnow.com, or visit
this link. Extended Unemploy-
ment Compensation Benefits
Information-http://www.flori-
dajobs.org/unemployment/
EUC_2008/EUC_Extension_In-
formation_Sheet 12-2008.doc.

t ,J YOUR EWSPAPER

SERVING
PEOPLE


Top Ten Reasons to Shop Locally

10. Product diversity
Local small businesses select products
based not on a national sales plan, but
on their own interests and the needs and
interests of local customers, which guar-
antees a milh broader range of product
choices that reflect our own community.

9. Competition
A marketplace of small businesses is the
best way to ensure innovation and low
prices over the long-term.


8. Environmental sustainability businesses have three times the impact
Local stores help sustain vibrant, colorful on your community as dollars spent at na-
store-scaping, which is essential to reduc- tional chains. When shopping locally, you
ing sprawl, habitat loss, and air and water simultaneously create jobs, and invest in
pollution. neighborhood improvement and promote
community development.


7. Public benefits and costs
Local stores require comparatively little
infrastructure and make more efficient
use of public services relative to big box
stores and strip shopping malls.

6. Entrepreneurship
Entrepreneurship fuels America's econom-
ic innovation and prosperity, and serves as
a key means for families to move out of
low-wage jobs and into the middle class.

5. Job and wages
Locally owned businesses create more
jobs locally and, in many cases, provide
better wages than chains do.

4. Keeping dollars in the local economy
Your dollars spent in locally-owned


3. Local decision making
Local ownership means important deci-
sions are made locally by people who live
in the community and who will feel the
impact of those decisions.

2. Community well-being
Locally owned businesses build strong
neighborhoods by sustaining communi-
ties, linking neighbors, and by contribut-
ing more to local causes.

1. Protect local character and prosperity
Wakulla County is unique in that it
offers a variety of local art and other
products. By choosing to support local-
ly owned businesses, you help maintain
Wakulla County's distinctive flavor.


*SHEPARD ACCOUNTING, .
& TAX SERVICE
850-926-9802
SERVING THE LOCAL AREA
J FOR 10 YEARS WITH FRIENDLY, .
PROFESSIONAL AND
HERE TO STAY SERVICES!


ta's Real Estate


Elaine Gary Dawn Reed Susan Jones Cristy Rivers
(850) 509-5409 (850) 294-3468 (850) 566-7584 (850) 519-9039

Actively Selling In Tough Markets!!

31 Transactions CLOSED Since 9/01/08

7 Transactions Pending to close before 12/31/08

Bluewater has closed more Wakulla County real estate
transactions than any company throughout 2008
(114 units / $14,157,050)

Full time, experienced, honest Realtors committed
to producing in challenging markets!


CALL US WITH ANY REAL ESTATE QUESTION

Thank You For Making Us

The # I Real Estate Company in Wakulla!




BlueWater "

WalfsRealt V-.Grouv *mmo


We would like to encourage


Remember when you shop at home


Chat's the best easot of aU to shop


www.wakullacountychamber.com


It




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