Title: Wakulla news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00198
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville, Fla
Publication Date: November 26, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States of America -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028313
Volume ID: VID00198
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Full Text








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Published Weekly,
Read Daily


Uakulla


Our 113th Year, 48th Issue


Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008


Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century


Two Sections


50 Cents


Mary Ann and Ray Somera outside Le Puy on Day 2.


N.G.Wade project gets



Preliminary plat and


Srezoning approval


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
The once-controversial N.G.
Wade sustainable community
was approved by a 4-1 vote at
the final meeting of commis-
sioners Ed Brimner, Maxie
Lawhon, and Brian Langston.
The project will include 300
single-family units, 50 multi-
family units, plus 157,500
square feet of retail space and
42,000 square feet of office
space on nearly 600 acres just
off Woodville Highway near


the Leon County line.
Brimner had requested the
Wade proposal be fast-tracked
so that he could vote for it at
his final meeting as a commis-
sioner on Monday, Nov. 17.
The whole project was
subject to substantial nego-
tiations after the county ap-
proved it five years ago and it
was challenged at the Division
of Administrative Hearings for
not being in compliance with
the county's comprehensive
growth plan. The various par-


ties agreed to a settlement
proposal that dealt with the
controversies of the project,
reducing its size and creating
numerous restrictions.
Five years ago, the county
commission had to move its
meeting to the courthouse
to hold the crowd wanting
to speak for and against the
N.G. Wade project. No citizens
spoke on it at the planning
commission meeting last
month.
Continued on Page 5A


A different kind of pilgrim


By TAMMIE BARFIELD
tbarfieldithewakullanews.net
Usually when we think of pilgrims we
think of European colonists or the first pil-
grim Thanksgiving. But there is another kind
of pilgrim: the kind of person who removes
themselves from the stress and fast pace of
day-to-day life as most of us know it, and
embarks on a fascinating and difficult jour-
ney to the El Camino de Santiago in Spain,
Le Chemin du St. Jacques in France, or the
"Way of St. James," as it is translated from
both languages.
Mary Ann and Ray Somera, of Ochlock-
onee Bay, are two pilgrims who set out on
just that type of escape. Twice. Their journey
actually began in September 2005, when
they walked approximately 600 miles on
the El Camino de Santiago pilgrimage to
the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela
in Galicia, Spain where tradition has it that
the remains of the Twelve-Apostles of Saint
James the Great are buried.
The "Way of St. James" has existed for
more that 1.000 years. It was one of the most
important Christian pilgrimages during me-
dieval times. There are 12 pilgrimage routes
to Santiago de Compostela, consisting of
ancient, Roman roads and bridges that reveal
their age as they are traveled from many cit-
ies in Spain and France. The earliest records


Ray Somera enjoys Monistrol d' Allier.


of visits paid to the shrine dedicated to St.
James at Santiago de Compostela date from
the 8th century, in the time of the Kingdom
of Asturias.
The earliest recorded pilgrims from be-
yond the Pyrenees visited the shrine in the
middle of the 10th century.
On Aug. 31, the Someras began the sec-
ond part of their incredible adventure. Le
Chemin du St. Jacques, beginning in Le Puy
en Velay, France, and ending back in Spain
on Oct. 6. In Le Puy, they stayed in a guest
accommodation of the Cathedral of Le Puy,
which dates back to the 10th century, and
is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Mary Ann
and Ray said they felt as though they were
living in the Middle Ages while staying
there. They walked on narrow, cobble-stoned
streets and from their room looked out large
wooden shuttered windows over the red-
tiled roofs of Le Puy. Farmers in the area of
Le Puy have been growing lentils for more
than 2,000 years, they said.
Among the first fellow pilgrims they met
was a retired Japanese Classical Literature
professor, Massa; Jean-Louise from Paris;
Thomas, from Switzerland, a grandparent
like the Someras; and Petra, from Austria.
Both Petra and Thomas walked from their
respective homes to Le Puy. Petra would
be continuing the 1,000 miles to Santiago,
Spain, the route Mary Ann and Ray walked in
2005. Thomas had told them that the section
from Geneva to Le Puy was quite beautiful.
One of the wonderful parts of the Chemin
for the Somera's was meeting people from
so many different countries, and they had
yet to begin their journey.
The morning before they began their
journey, they attended mass and received
the Pilgrim's Blessing from the priest. The
next day, they lit a candle in the Le Puy
Cathedral at sunrise, then walked down
the 165 steps to street level and began Le
Chemin through France. The Someras said
the French people they met were delightful
and eager to help them, speaking in English
when they looked bewildered, and helping
them with their French as they struggled for
the right words.
They said the weather was glorious for
most of their journey. Of the 36 days they
walked, only two days were rainy.
Continued on Page 5A


Thomas, Miller and Scott get


four more years with kids


The Wakulla County School
Board conducted their official
swearing in ceremony Tues-
day, Nov. 18, and inducted
Superintendent David Miller
and School Board members
Mike Scott and Greg Thomas
in office for another term.
The traditional ceremony was
held much like it has been for
the past 25 years. Superinten-
dent David Miller begins his
14th year and fourth full term
in office. He was originally
appointed in 1995 by Gover-
nor Lawton Chiles, replacing
the late Roger Stokley.
His wife, Delores, held
the Bible while he took his
oath. Miller said, "I stand
proudly beside this school
board. They unselfishly make
decisions to do what is in
the best interest of our stu-
dents."
District 2 School Board
member Mike Scott begins
his fourth term in office.
He was joined by his wife,


Greg Thomas, David Miller, Mike Scott were sworn in.


Nikki and his pastor from
Lake Ellen Baptist Church.
Scott said,
"I am looking forward to
four more years of commit-
ment and dedication to the
school district."
District 4 School Board
Member Greg Thomas begins
his third term and he was


joined by his wife, Kristi and
his, grandmother.
Thomas shared with the
audience that his grandfather
and great-grandfather both
served as Wakulla County
School Board members in the
early 1900s.

Continued on Page 5A


Report: Gas prices lower


traffic on U.S. Highway 319


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Credit the rise in gas prices
with lowering the traffic on U.S.
Highway 319, a consultant on a
traffic study told county com-
missioners.
Jon Sewell of Kimley-Horn
told county commissioners at
their meeting last week that
traffic volume during peak times
had been close to exceeding
acceptable levels prior to the
steep increase in the price of gas,
which led drivers to significant
changes in behavior.
Those behaviors included


fewer car trips and more car-
pooling and led to a trend of
10 to 20 percent decrease in
traffic volume across the state,
Sewell said.
As gas prices have fallen,
there has yet to be a return to
old car behaviors, Sewell said,
perhaps reflecting the continued
downturn in the economy.
Sewell pointed to a graph in
the traffic report that showed
sharp spikes in the number of
trips per hour during morning
and evening rush hours, evi-
dence of commuters using the
road to go to work in Tallahas-


see and return that night.
While four-laning will "have
to happen" to relieve the con-
gestion, Sewell said, the report
recommends some interim ef-
forts to help with the problem,
including coordinating signals
at the stoplights on the road,
and improving the intersections
- especially at Bloxham Cutoff
where traffic is heaviest.
Chairman Ed Brimner noted
that additional turn lanes are
planned at that intersection,
with construction to begin in
May 2009.
Continued on Page 5A


"' VIS
In side



Week in Wakulla..........Page 2A
,Church ...;....................P.ge 4A
Sports.................... Page 6A
.People..........................Page 7A
Business...................Page 8A
Sheriff ......................Page 16A
Outdoors ................Page 10A
Almanac.....................Page 11A
Wakulla Wildlife.........Page 20A
Senior Citizens............Page 1B
School..........................Page 3B


Commission has

three new members


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Three new county commis-
sioners were sworn-in for four
year terms in a ceremony at
the old courthouse on Tues-
day, Nov. 18.
Newly elected commission-
ers Alan Brock, Mike Stewart.
and Lynn Artz took the oath
of office in front of a crowd
of about 100 people on a cool,
breezy afternoon.
Wakulla County Judge Jill
Walker swore-in each com-
missioner individually and
then led a meeting in which
Commissioner Howard Kes-
sler was unanimously selected
as chairman of the board, with
Commissioner George Green


as vice-chair.
Judge Walker was also
honored by Chamber Presi-
dent Dave Buckridge, who
presented her with a plaque
for her leadership of the
canvassing board during the
recent recount.
The judge commented that,
while the recount was chal-
lenging, she was confident
that every vote was counted.
After the ceremony, the
new board gathered in front
of the steps of the old court-
house for a photograph and
then mingled with well-wish-
ers at a reception.
The first board meeting
will be held on Dec. 1. Their
retreat will be held Dec. 8.


Board members Howard Kessler, Mike Stewart, Alan Brock, Lynn Artz, George Green.


I








Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008



Comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895


Thinking about the


news business,


Christmas, too


By KEITH BLACKMAR
,kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
On another section of the
comment and opinion page,
I have included a brief in-
terview the Florida Press As-
-sociation recently published
with Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher Gerry Mulligan of
Crystal River.
Gerry is not only the pub-
lisher of his Citrus County
daily newspaper, but serves
,as publisher of the dozen or
so Florida newspapers that
.make up Florida Newspapers,
.Inc., a division of Lankmark
Media Enterprises, Inc., which
purchased The Wakulla News
,from Stacie Phillips and Shan-
non Joiner and the Wakulla
:Publishing Company in July
.2006.
Gerry has been involved
with the Citrus newspaper
since it was a weekly although
I will resist the temptation
to make a joke about Gerry's
mentor being Ben Franklin. I
never know when he might
be reading our newspaper or
checking out our web site.
Our General Manager Tam-
mie Barfield was a senior in
high school and working at
the Citrus Co. paper when
,Gerry arrived on the scene.
I was also a senior in high
:school although I was in New
:England at the time.
Both Crystal River, Citrus
:County and Wakulla County


have changed drastically since
the disco days of the late
1970s.
I wanted to share Gerry's
interview because he talks
openly about the newspaper
business and where the indus-
try is going.
We find here at The News
we experience many of the
same things he does when we
visit with Wakulla residents.
Soon we will be publish-
ing our Christmas issue. I
know that it is just Thanks-
giving, but I must get a start
on the holiday season or be
crushed at the end.
I am asking the community
to submit a favorite Christmas
memory or photograph for
inclusion in the newspaper
that will be published right
before Christmas. We have
received some warm and en-
joyable memories in the past
and hope to receive even more
this year.
Think of it as good therapy
to avoid the economic blues
during the 2008 holiday sea-
son.
We also plan to publish
some of the letters to Santa
that we receive from the
school district. Hopefully,
Santa hasn't had to cut back
on his reindeer with the belt
tightening that has been going
on in the corporate world.
I will also include favorite
recipes if you have something
that is a holiday tradition for
your family. We have also
included holiday poems or
perhaps a favorite photograph
that makes the holiday season
special.
Fire up the computer and
e-mail me at kblackmar@
thewakullanews.net or drop
it by our office instead. The
deadline for receiving the
material is Dec. 10. Hope
everyone has a wonderful
holiday season!
Keith Blackmar is Editor
of The Wakulla News.


;Editor, The News:
SOur school family at
'Wakulla Pre-Kindergarten
:would like to thank our Pre-
'K parents and the commu-
nity for the overwhelming
support during Woodville
:ACE Hardware's Cowgirl for
Kids fundraiser. It was a
wonderful success Our new
playground will soon be a
:reality thanks to all of you.
We would like to take
:this opportunity to thank
our sponsors individually:
Woodville ACE Hardware;
'McIver Floor, Sanding and
SInstallation; Carriage House
Salon; B & B Steel; Sperry


and Associates; Southern
Farrier; Auto Trim Design
and Sign; Southern Com-
fort Restaurant; Gulf State
Community Bank; Shepard
Accounting and Tax Service;
Nicole Singleton-Pampered
Chef; Emily DeLisle-Us-
borne Books: Kathy Watters-
Jewelry Designs; Posh of
Sopchoppy; Scratch Cakes;
Kristin McCoy-Kristin Ann
Purses; Ashley Anderson;
Mary Fort; Melinda Young;
Harry Dutton; Jodi Mclver-
Hair of Grace.
Wakulla Pre-K staff
Crawfordville


..,dlh8


Copyrighted Material


S Syndicated Content


, Available from Commercial News Providers


p


A)


Where are newspapers headed?
Where are newspapers headed?


An interview with Florida
Press Association Board mem-
ber Gerry Mulligan
By Staff Reporter
Florida Press
Gerry Mulligan arrived at
the Citrus County Chronicle
in 1978 as the newspaper's
editor.
"I planned .on like two
years," he laughed when asked
about how long he figured to
be there.


Three decades later, it is still
home. He became publisher in
1990, and still holds that title
today. A graduate of St. Leo's
University, he worked on the
college newspaper there, and
then at the Brooksville Sun
Journal before landing at the
Chronicle. He is very active in
the community, sitting on the
board of directors for the local
United Way and Chamber of
Commerce.
1. Your best piece of advice
to someone starting out in
the newspaper business today
would be...
"Begin your career with a
small newspaper so you get
some experience in all areas
of the business. And make
sure that experience includes
involvement in the online
area."
2. I spend most of my work
day...
"Talking with customers
and employees and develop-


ing strategic plans to grow the
business."
3. The best piece of news-
papering advice I ever received
was...
"Get the heck out of the
office and talk with real read-
ers and advertisers. You don't
understand customers by sit-
ting in your office."
4. These are the things I like
to do when I'm not worried
about making deadline...
"I have written a column
for the Sunday paper for the
last 30 years. While I mostly
end up writing it at night at
home, it's still a rewarding way
to connect with readers."
5. We're weathering the
current economic newspaper
downturn by...
"Reducing expenses and
developing new strategies to
grow revenue."
6. The most unique or origi-
nal idea we make more money
on than people think is...
"Even though we are a small
community daily (30,000 circ)
we have zoned our community
with four smaller weekly pa-
pers. The zones are unique to
,their communities and provide
a place for very local news and
for Mom & Pop advertisers to
do business with us."
7. I should have won the
Florida Press Association
Blooper of the Year award
for...
"Announcing at our politi-
cal forum that the Tampa Bay
Bucs were beating the Boston
Red Sox in the American
League Playoff game. Forum
attendees threw fruit at me."
8. I see the role of newspa-
pers today...
"As changing, but remain-
ing the same. Metro newspa-
pers have got to get back to
the roots of providing local
news and advertising informa-
tion. We need to be the mar-
ketplace for information and
advertising that is important
to local communities. Our core


Going the extra mile


Editor, The Newss
Thank you election work-
ers.
Now that our latest elec-
tion has officially concluded,
I feel that it is appropriate
to recognize those individu-
als who worked tirelessly
during the General Election,
as well as during the subse-
quent recount procedures.
These stewards of democ-
racy ensured that the admin-
istration of the elections
process was carried forward
in a professional manner.
The following list of em-
ployees and volunteers was
provided by the Supervisor
of Elections Office:
Lorie Green, Alsie Strick-
land, Bobbie Stephens, Allie
Hawkins, Paul Davenport,
Loyce Vause, Betty Glover,
Mickey Cantner, Annie Shep-
herd, Kittie Loftin, Patsy Hal-


ey, Claudia Glover, Rhonda
Taylor, Gail Finley, Gloria
Melton, Stacy Roddenberry,
Melissa Roberts, Thelma
Hawkins, Laura Greenwood,
Cheryll Olah, Carolyn Lam-
bert, and Rena Crum. Sherida
Crum and the Canvassing
Board should be recognized
for their unwavering acts
of duty during this process
as well.
To the above noted indi-
viduals, thank you for your
service to the citizens of
Wakulla County. Your duti-
ful actions truly exemplify
the meaning of working for
the Good of The Group. In
conclusion, please know
that these efforts have not
gone unnoticed nor unap-
preciated.


strength is local and it will be
difficult for Yahoo, Google or
television to drill as deep as
we can. We need to play to
remember our strengths."
9. When people tell me
newspapers are a dying breed,
my response is...
"No way. Our business is
changing. The delivery model
will look different but the
core role we play is critical
to our marketplace and our
country. A professional and
independent press is more


important today than ever.
We have to be flexible in how
we get news and informa-
tion to readers, but the need
will always exist. When the
railroad business dried up, it
wasn't because people didn't
need transportation. They
just found a faster and more
efficient way to get what
they wanted. Consumers will
always need the information
we gather we just have to
make sure we understand the
business we are in."


WEEK IN WAKULLA

Thursday, November 27, 2008 ,
HAPPY THANKSGIVING
Friday, November 28, 2008
AA meets at the American Legion Building next to
the Women's Club in Crawfordville with an
open meeting at 8 p.m. There are also open
meetings
FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the
public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa's
Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to
8:30 p.m.
PICKING' N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held
at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also
on Tuesday)
Saturday, November 29, 2008
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 56 Lower
Bridge Road, at 5 p.m. For more information,
call 224-2321.
SOPCHOPPY OPRY will be held at the
Sopchoppy High School auditorium beginning at
7 p.m. Scheduled performers include Hoot
Gibson, Judy Foster and James and Pat Ray, as well
as hosts Southbound Band. It's the last show
of 2008.
Sunday, November 30, 2008
MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA meets at First
Baptist Church of Crawfordville at 7 p.m.
Monday, December 1, 2008
COUNTY COMMISSION meets in the
commission boardroom at 6 p.m.
Tuesday, December 2, 2008
BOOK BUNCH, for pre-school and home school
families, meets at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
CONGRESSIONAL STAFF from the office of U.S.
Rep. Allen Boyd will be at the commission
complex from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. to discuss
issues of local concern.
MOOSE LODGE #2510 meets at the lodge in
Panacea at 7:30 p.m.
VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at
the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Wednesday, December 3, 2008
AA meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road
at noon.
BOOK BABIES, for infants and toddlers, will be
held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
BOOK NOOK, for children in grads K-5, is 10:30
a.m. and 1 p.m.
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior
citizens center at 10:30 a.m.





Happy

Thanksgiving to


Wakulla County


from the staff at


be Pakutllua _AQets5


Chris Russell
Crawfordville


I'Community offered

great support for

Pre-K function


be Vakttula etas
The Wakulla News (USPS 644-640) is published weekly at
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla
News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
General Manager: Tammie Barfield........................ tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Editor: Keith Blackmar....................................kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Reporter: William Snowden................................ wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net
Graphic Artist: Eric Schlegel .................................eschlegel@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey ...................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net
Bookkeeping: Sherry Balchuck ..........................accounting@thewakullanews.net
Classifieds/In House Sales: Denise Folh.............. classifieds@thewakullanews.net
Circulation: Gary Fazzina................................... circulation@thewakullanews.net
Copy Editor: Karen Tully
Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable
one year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $25, Out of County $30
Out of State $35. Out of Country on Request


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More Letters to the Editor


Thanks for taking part

in democratic process


Editor, The News:
My Sincere Thanks!
The 2008 elections are
finally over and I would like
to thank all of my supporters
and also the citizens who did
not support me. We live in a
Democratic society and your
right to vote and support the
candidate of your choice is
one of our greatest liberties.
I would like to thank the
Canvassing Board, especially
Judge Jill Walker, their staff
and Supervisor of Elections
Sherida Crum who worked
tirelessly during a tough re-
count process.
Although the outcome was
not as I had hoped, I urge my
supporters to come together
to help unify our community


and put this race behind us.
We all have different back-
grounds, faiths, jobs and is-
sues, but we all have one thing
in common. We all care deeply
for Wakulla County. We need
to work together to keep our
community safe for our chil-
dren and our families. That is
our number one priority.
I would like to thank my
wife, Cheryl, my daughter Hill-
ary, and my extended family
for their hard work, effort and
dedication throughout this
long campaign.
The race is now over and
I wish Sheriff David Harvey
the very best in the coming
months and years ahead.
Charlie Creel
Crawfordville


Letters


Want to send a
Letter to the Editor?
kblackmar@
thewakullanews.net


Loads of thanks for the honor


Editor, The News:
Loads of thanks are sent
to the Rotary Club of Wakulla
County for the wonderful
dinner given in my honor on
the evening of Nov. 20 at the
Senior Citizens Center.
Not only do I greatly appre-
ciate the compliment of being
chosen for their first "Distin-
guished Citizen Award." but
I appreciate even more the
tremendous amount of work
that was expended to bring
the whole dinner about with
the Rotarians doing all the
Clarification
A story in the Nov. 13 edi-
tion of The News indicated a
list of voters who may not live
at the address given on their
voter registration card was
provided to the canvassing
board by citizen Dana Peck
on behalf of candidate Jimmie
Doyle. Peck produced the list
and provided it to Supervisor
of Elections Sherida Crum
several weeks prior to the
election: Doyle gave the list
to Crum and County Judge Jill
Walker on Oct. 31, when the
canvassing board convened
to begin opening absentee


work, set-ups and cooking
A better job could not have
been done. I do not know
all the names of those who
helped but I do know they did
a beautiful job.
The young people, mem-
bers of Wakulla High School's
NJROTC under Mike Stewart's
direction, were wonderful, po-
lite and efficient servers.
My thanks flow to every-
one who participated. I was
especially touched to see so
many who cared enough to
come and when my precious

ballots for the Nov. 4 general
election.

Correction
A story in last week's pa-
per about notices mailed out
regarding the class action law-
suit over the county's special
tax assessment for ambulance
service stated that some of the
proposed settlement money
was set aside for attorney's
fees. That is incorrect: the
judge in the case will deter-
mine appropriate attorney's
fees at a later date.


pastor of many years, Bro.
Clyde Owen and his dear wife,
Patsy Owen, came in spite of
recent health problems, I was
overwhelmed.
Again, thanks to the Rotar-
ians for all they do for the
community, and to the many
who were involved in the
production of a wonderful and
blessed evening. Thank you
and God bless you all!
Betty Green
Crawfordville

Thank you
Editor, The News:
The Glynwood Crum family
thanks the community for their
thoughts and prayers. The sup-
port that we have received has
been greatly appreciated and
your expression of sympathy
will always be remembered.
Special thanks to the county
fire department and Ambulance
Service for their special tribute.
Also our love and thanks to
Pastor B.B. Barwick, Panacea Full
Gospel Assembly and Bro. Mau-
rice Langston for a memorable
Funeral Service.
Crum Family
Panacea


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008 Page 3A

Watch for early deadlines

during 2008 holiday season


Wakulla County will cel-
ebrate Turkey Day on Thurs-
day, Nov. 27 as Thanksgiving
is celebrated across the na-
tion. The school district and
county commission offices
will be closed for the holidays
on Thursday and Friday, Nov.
27 and Nov. 28. Many busi-
nesses will be closed during
the holiday weekend. The
Wakulla News will be closed
on Thanksgiving Day.


The newspaper was pub-
lished early this week. Sub-
scribers will receive their
newspaper in the mail on
Wednesday, Nov. 26. The pa-
per will be on the newsstands
on Tuesday afternoon, Nov.
25. Readers can also check
our web site, www.thewakul-
lanews.com, for news, sports
and other information.
Since Christmas and News
Year's Day also fall on Thurs-


days this holiday season,
we will observe the same
holiday publication schedule
the weeks of Dec. 22 and
Dec. 29.
On the Wednesdays before
Thanksgiving, Christmas and
News Year's Day, The Wakulla
News office will close at 3 p.m.
(perhaps a little earlier) so that
our staff can enjoy the holi-
days with their loved-ones.


'Tennessee' has been big

help with Rock Landing Dock


Editor, The News:
The Department of Com-
munity Affairs' Waterfronts
Florida Program offers help
to all local coastal govern-
ments in Florida to revitalize
their working waterfronts by
providing resources for plan-
ning. In addition, the program
designates selected communi-
ties to receive technical and
limited financial assistance
through the Waterfronts Flor-
ida Program.
The Waterfronts Florida
Program was created by the
Florida Coastal Management
Program in 1997 to address
the physical and economic
decline of traditional working
waterfront areas. The Panacea
Waterfronts Florida Partner-
ship was established in 2002.
On July 10, 2005, Hurricane
Dennis hit Wakulla County
and devastated many of our
small coastal communities.
Rock Landing Dock in Panacea
was already structurally un-
sound and needed work, but
the dock sustained more dam-
age than could be repaired.
Panacea Waterfronts Flori-
da was working on a grant to
repair the dock at that time.
When it became obvious
the dock would have to be
torn down and rebuilt, the


Waterfronts committee and
the program manager for the
county, Pam Portwood, began
to pursue a grant which would
allow Rock Landing Dock to
be rebuilt.
During that time David
Lansford began attending
the Waterfronts meetings
and showed an interest in
the dock and its design. As
it turned out, David Lansford
was an engineer with con-
siderable skills. The Panacea
Waterfronts Florida Partner-
ship was about to see just how
fortunate they were that "Ten-
nessee," as he is known, had
made Panacea his home.
When one is in the process
of pursuing a grant, noth-
ing is going to go smoothly.
Such was the case with Rock
Landing Dock. Through the
trials and tribulations, "Ten-
nessee" faced the challenges
and hurdles placed before the
Panacea Waterfronts Florida
Partnership during the grant
process and delivered a dock
design that met the criteria for
grant approval. The Panacea
Waterfronts Florida Partner-
ship wishes to thank "Ten-
nessee" for his perseverance
and commitment to our com-
munity.
All Panacea Waterfronts


Florida Partnership members
volunteer their time to the
community. We value the time
and effort spent to make the
Rock Landing Dock a viable
project. The dock will guaran-
tee public access to the wa-
terfront area and enhance our
traditional fishing economy
which has suffered due to the
loss of the dock.
Many thanks to Commis-
sioner Howard Kessler, County
Administrator Ben Pingree,
Parks and Recreation Director
Ray Gray, Program Manager
Jennifer Langston, Assistant
County Administrators Tim
Barden and Lindsay Stevens,
Grants Administrator Eva
Thorpe, and other staff for
hanging in there with us
when the going got tough.
Again, with Ray Gray build-
ing the parking lot and putting
the construction of the dock
out to bid, we want to thank
Dave "Tennessee" Lansford
for his services to the county
and the Panacea Waterfronts
Florida Partnership. The com-
munity of Panacea is looking
forward to the day the dock is
finished and back in use.
Walt Dickson
Chairman
Panacea Waterfronts
Florida


www. thewakullanews.net


Se'r t


anaIkfuL ..


To babe reabers like ou...






We thank you Wakulla County for



allowing Tte aakaulla Jetu, to be a part



of your tradition



for more than



100 years.


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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008



Church


Obituaries


Joseph W. Bronson
Joseph Warren Bronson,
Sr., 83, of Sopchoppy died
Friday, Nov. 21, at his home in
Sopchoppy.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to Big Bend
Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center
Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308.
Visitation was held Sunday,
Nov. 23, burial was in Tarpon
Springs.
He was a veteran of WW II
and the Korean Wars where he
served in both the Army and
Navy to protect his country
and family. He was a member
of the Sopchoppy Church of
Christ. He retired from Florida
Power after 36 years of service
after which he moved to Sop-
choppy where he resided for
19 years. He was a loving hus-
band to his wife of 59 years,
Gelette and a great father and
grandfather.
He is also survived by three
sons. Warren Bronson and
wife Rosemary, Tim Bronson
and wife Glenda and Scott
Bronson and wife Robin; and
six grandchildren, Christy, Tif-
fanny, Mitch, Drew, Tiffini and
Brittney.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.

Marion Y. Brown
Marion Yvonne Brown, 61,
of Tallahassee, died Saturday,
Nov. 15, at Tallahassee Memo-
rial Hospital.
A memorial service was
held at 1 p.m. EST Saturday,
Nov. 22, at the Kingdom Hall
of Jehovah's Witnesses, 4010
W. Orange Ave. Tallahassee,
FL 32310.
A native of Bainbridge, Ga.,
she moved to Tallahassee
when she was 10 years old. She
retired after 25 years of dedicat-
ed service at the Florida State
Hospital in Chattahoochee.
She was a dedicated servant of
Jehovah for 23 years, baptized
Dec 15, 1985.
Survivors include her moth-
er, Dorothy Brown of Talla-:
hassee;.-,twro daughters, Sonji
Sigles,,and Pamela Brown,
both of Tallahassee; four broth-
ers, Charles Brown, Michael
Brown, Kenneth Brown and Jef-
frey Brown, all of Tallahassee;
two sisters, Cynthia Simmons
of Crawfordville and Linda
Brown Brewer of Chicago; two
grandchildren, Jamika Blair
and Jordan Walker of Tallahas-
see; and a host of relatives and
friends.


Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
Crawfordville
Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey
"Come& Wforhip itrh Us"
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School......................... 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship ...................... 11 a.m.
Evening Worship......................6 p.m.
Wednesday Service .................7 p.m.
& Youth Service ........................ 7 p.m.
Royal Rangers......................... 7 p.m.
M issionettes.............................. 7 p.m .


Panacea Park

Baptist Church
24 Mission Road, Panacea
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Worship 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Neeting 7p.m.
Pastor, Jerry Spears


Trinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
'Web site:
Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Vioar Bert Matlock
Church 926-7808 Prp-Shool 926-5557

Pioneer Baptist
Church JSBC)
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.
Wed. adult, children & youth 7 p.m.
486 Beechwood Drive Crawfordville, FL
(Nolfh of the Lower Bridge Road and
SSpring Creek Highway intersection)
Rev. Dennis Hall, Pastor
850-926-6161


Ronald L. Clark
Ronald L. "Ronnie" Clark,
59, of the Juniper community
died Tuesday, Nov. 18.
The funeral service was
held Friday, Nov. 21, at Provi-
dence Baptist Church, with
burial at the church cemetery.
Memorial contributions may
be made to the American Can-
cer Society, AMC Hope House,
2121 S.W. 16th St., Gainesville,
FL 32608.
A retired U.S. Postal Service,
worker he served in the U.S. Air
Force during the Vietnam War.
He was a member of Provi-
dence Baptist Church and care-
taker of Providence Cemetery.
Survivors include his daughter,
Alice E. Hobbs and husband
James E. Hobbs, Jr. of Craw-
fordville; three grandchildren,
Emily, Madison and Ethan; a
brother, Gary Clark and wife
Michelle of Juniper; and a host
of nieces and nephews.

Earl F. Hall
A memorial service will
be held for Earl F. Hall on
Sunday, Nov. 30 at 2:30 p.m. at
the Wakulla United Methodist
Church, 1584 Old Woodville
Road in Wakulla Station.

Mary Lou Johnson
Mary Lou Johnson, 85, of
Panacea, died Wednesday, Nov.
19, in Tallahassee.
The funeral service was
held on Sunday, Nov. 23, at
Harvey-Young Funeral Home in
Crawfordville. She was interred
at Florida National Cemetery
in Bushnell with her late hus-
band, Thomas Blair Johnson.
A native of West Virginia,
she was raised by relatives in
Ligonier, Pa., and attended Li-
gonier High School. She moved
to the Fort Lauderdale area in
the 1940s and married Thomas
Blair Johnson on June 20, 1953.
She moved to the Panacea area
in the mid 1990s. She was
very active in the Presbyterian
church and taught Sunday
School.
Survivors include her son,
Thomas N. Johnson. III two
nephews, Art Johnson and
Glenn Johnson; and her hus-
band's brother and sister-in-
law, George and Peggy John-


son.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.

William F. McNeff
William Frederick "Fred"
McNeff, 63, of Tallahassee died
Sunday, Nov. 16, in Tallahas-
see. The funeral service was
Thursday, Nov. 20 at Culley's
MeadowWood Funeral Home
in Tallahassee with burial at
Roselawn Cemetery. Memorial
contributions may be made to
the American Lung Associa-
tion.
A native of Ft. Lauderdale,
he was a longtime resident
of Tallahassee. He retired af-
ter 39 years of service with
Pitney Bowes Company as an
engineer.
Fred was a loving and giv-
ing person. He was selfless
and humble and will always
be remembered for putting his
family first.
Survivors include his be-
loved wife of 36 years, Mary
Helen Roberts McNeff of Tal-
lahassee; a son, Shawn Mc-
Neff and significant other
Lora Branca of Tallahassee;
two daughters, Brandi and
Greg Pert of Tallahassee and
Christine Ryan and Jim of Lex-
ington Park, Md.; three sisters,
Marjorie and George Brooks
of McDonough, Ga., Patty and
Jimmy Davis ofJonesboro, Ga.,
and Judy Wallace of Forest
Park, Ga.; six grandchildren,
Brittany Pert, Colby Pert, Brook-
lyn Pert, Christopher Pryce Mc-
Neff, Daniel Ryan and Michael
Ryan; and numerous nieces
and nephews.
Culley's MeadowWood Fu-
neral Home in Tallahassee
was in charge of the arrange-

- Saint Teresa)
Episcopal
Church
1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98


Holy Eucharist
10:30 am
The Reverend Roy Lima
926-1742


f- Crawfordville United

Methodist Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 926-7209
Ochlockonee & Arran Road "Come Grow With Us' "www.crawfordville-umc.org

Hwy 319 Medart,
akeElle Office 926-5265
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
S a Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
0 Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
p AWANA 4:00 p.m.
Ur CYouth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org






S------ -


a,



Who is the latest

Wakulla Wavemaker?"

Tune in daily at

2 p.m. and 6 p.m.





THE WORD IN PRAISE



WAKU 94.1 FM www.wave94.com
926-8000 (fax: 926-2000)


ments.
Mary L. Shaw
Mary L. "Tipper" Shaw, 101,
of Tallahassee died Monday,
Nov. 17, in Tallahassee.
Graveside services were
held Thursday, Nov. 20 at
Roselawn Cemetery. Memorial
contributions may be made
to the Goodwood Founda-
tion, 1600 Miccosukee Road,
Tallahassee, FL 32308, or to a
favorite charity.
A graduate of Leon High
School, she attended Florida
State College for Women,
where she was a member of
the Alpha Delta Pi sorority. She
was also the first president of
the Tallahassee Cotillion Club.
Mrs. Shaw was born April 9,
1907, in Tallahassee. Her par-
ents were Dexter M. and Letitia
Rawls Lowry.
Survivors include her son,
Frank Shaw, Jr. and Sarah of
Tallahassee; two daughters,
Letitia McClellan of Tallahas-
see and Leewood and Richard
Anderson of Gainesville; six
grandchildren, Jackie Simmons
of Sopchoppy, Tish Simmons
Earp Brand, Frank.and Fran
Shaw III, Sally and Jerry Hyde,
all of Tallahassee, Rick and
Elizabeth Anderson and Bruce
Anderson of Jacksonville; 10
great-grandchildren, John and
Yolanda Simmons of Hayes-


Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worship................... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .............5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details,
962-2213


Sopchoppy
-United
SMethodist
S Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship I I a.m.
Pastor Brett Templeton
850-962-251 I1

S
St. Elizabeth U
Ann Seton
Catholic Churhl
Mass 9 a.m. Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Father James MacGee, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
926-1797 .


Wakulla United
Methodist Church
Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School for all ages- 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship 11 a.m.
Wednesday Service 7 p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart


ville, Ala., Mary Simmons of
Chiefland, Bert and Kris Earp,
Sarah Earp and Mike Grant,
Sarah Bishop Hyde, Sam and
Jack Hyde, Frank Shaw IV
and Carol Frances Shaw, all
of Tallahassee, and Richie
Anderson of Jacksonville; six
great-great-grandchildren, Mi-
chael Simmons of Hayesville,
Ala., Ramsay, Michael and
George Grant and Thomas and
Everett Earp, all of Tallahassee;
a sister-in-law, Rebecca Shaw
of Quincy; a nephew, Dexter
Lowry of San Francisco; and
a first-cousin, Mary Frances
Foster of Tallahassee.
Culley's MeadowWood Fu-
neral Home in Tallahassee
was in charge of the arrange-
ments.

Edward M. Stahl
Edward M. "Eddie" Stahl,
82, of Tampa died Nov. 7.
Burial took place Nov. 11, at
Myrtle Hill Cemetery, Tampa.
Memorial contributions may
be made to American Lung
Association, 8950 Dr. MLK, Jr.
St., Suite 205, St. Petersburg,
FL 33702.
He spent three years in
the U.S. Coast Guard and one
year in the U.S. Navy. His U.S.
Postal Service career spanned
over 41 years. After retirement

Ocflockonee


United
Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship 9 a.m.
Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
Sustor ferett CZermpeton
(850) 984-0127


SFiRst
BappISt ChURch



3086 Crawfordville Hwy.
(South of the Courthouse)
Church Office: 926-7896
www.fbccrawfordville.org
or
(youth) www.crosstraining.org


he spent the next 22 years in
real estate.
Survivors include his wife
of 60 years, the former Shirley
Posey of Medart; two sons,
Kendall T. Stahl of Tampa and
Terrance and Sherrill Stahl;
three grandsons, Brian Stahl,
Corey Stahl and Kevin Stahl,
all of New York; and his aunt,
Ettamae J. Brown of Tampa.
Continued on Page 13A

Allen joins

Sopchoppy

church
David Allen and his wife,
Carol, and children, Gracie,
Zachariah and Daniel, started
his ministry at Sopchoppy
Southern Baptist Church Sun-
day, Nov. 23 by bringing the
message in both the morning
and evening services. It was a
blessing to hear him bring the
Word, church members said.
Brother David came to
Sopchoppy from Ridgewood
Baptist Church in Orange
Park. "His new church family
would like to welcome him to
Sopchoppy," church officials
said.
Christ Church
Anglican

Sunday
8:30am Service
9:30am Adult Bible Class
10:30am Children's Class
10:30am Service
Nursery available
Thursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study
Wednesday 6:30 pm Supper and
Children, Youth and Adult Bible Classes
850-745-8412
4340 Crawfordville Highway


SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. :
WEDNESDAY
Fellowship Meal 6:00 p.m.
(call for reservations)
Prayer/ Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
IMPACT (Youth) 7:00 p.m.
Children's Events 6:30 p.m.


117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy


Church Office


Sunday School 9A5 AM
Morning Worship 11 AM


92-/7822 AWANA CLUB 5PM
Evening Worship 6 PM

Wednesday 7 PM Prayer Meeting, U
Youth & Children's Programs
Dr. Bill Jenkins, Pastor
Randy Anderson, Minister of Music
Vicki Anderson, Youth Director
Jerry Evans, Mike Crouch, Bernie Kemp Musicians


S















0:


Berean

Christian Bookstore
3016 Crawfordville Hwy *rCrawfordville, FL 32327
926-6009
(Between Printing on Demand and Pet Stop)

Come by and let us know what you would like in
your local Christian Bookstore

November ONlY

10% of dl in-stock tem:

P' lus on
November 28, 2008
Day after Thanksgiving sale
Special Hours 8:00 ain 'til 9:00 pm

40% off all audio books

15% off select gift items

15% off all Christmas items

. 10% off all in stock Bibles


A'secooe/, r/ie M _e /'t_,ce.










THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008 Page 5A


Division of Elections Pilgrims


rejects coi
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
The Department of State
rejected five complaints filed
by Wakulla County resident
Dana Peck about how the
Nov. 4 general election was
conducted.
In a letter released last
week, Assistant Attorney Gen-
eral Mark Matthews, general
counsel to the department,
wrote to Peck that, despite
not finding any evidence of
wrongdoing, "As a result of
your complaint, the supervisor
of elections' office in Wakulla
County will be subject to
dose observation and specific
guidance regarding appropri-
ate election administration
activities."
Also, prior to the August
primary election, the Division
of Elections sent observers to
monitor the election because
of a number of complaints
from Anne Ahrendt, the Re-
publican candidate for prop-
erty appraiser who lost her bid
in the general election. The
report on the observations of
the primary election indicated
there were no major problems,
but did find instances where
poll workers were either in-
adequately trained or per-
formed the required protocols
poorly.
That report also indicated a
concern about how much reli-
ance the local elections office
has on Inspired Technologies
to deal with technical issues,
such as uploading election
results and the functioning of
voting machines.
As far as Peck's complaints,
she alleged possible impro-
prieties in the voter rolls and
voting irregularities at the
Sopchoppy precinct during
the General Election. The


mplaints
elections' office determined
there was a lack of specificity
to show a criminal violation,
but the state would continue
to look into whether Super-
visor of Elections Sherida
Crum practiced regular voter
purges.
Peck submitted a list of vot-
ers to the supervisor whose
addresses, she claimed, were
abandoned houses or vacant
lots.
Crum has responded to
the allegation saying she can
send out notices to those ad-
dresses, but she cannot purge
those voters if they show up
to vote.
Peck also claimed there
was a conflict of interest in
Inspired Technologies work-
ing for the supervisor's of-
fice at the same time as the
company was on contract to
the Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office especially when the
sheriff's race came down to a
narrow margin and was sub-
ject to a recount. The response
to Peck was that the hiring of
personnel is the perogative
of the Supervisor of Elections
and that any allegations of
ethical breeches should be
sent to the state Ethics Com-
mission for investigation.
Peck also claimed the elec-
tions' office was dosed during
business hours during the
election process. That allega-
tion is outside the scope of
the office, Matthews wrote,
but added that, if Peck is as-
serting that "the closing of the
office was done to perpetrate
fraud or misconduct that sub-
stantially places the result of
the election in doubt, it may
be appropriate to file a contest
of elections action."

Continued on Page 13A


Thomas, Miller, Scott


Continued from Page 1A
His great-grandfather
walked from Curtis Mill to
school board meetings, a
distance of approximately
20 miles, and spent the
night with the local judge
before walking home the
next day.
Mr. Thomas said, "I am
grateful for the opportunity
that the people of Wakulla
County have given me to
serve our children for four
more years."
Superintendent David
Miller also recognized the
2006-2008 Chairman of the
School Board, Jerry Evans
and presented him with
a plaque."Jerry Evans is a
great government official.
He is a great role model for


our students," Miller said.
"It has truly been an
honor for me to serve. I
humbly thank you and ap-
preciate your support to not
only our school board but to
our entire school district,"
Evans added.
The School Board elected
Becky Cook as the chair-
person for the 2008-2010
term and Mike Scott as the
co-chair. The School Board
agreed to conduct meetings
on the third Monday of the
month at 5:45 p.m. unless
Monday falls on a holiday
and the meeting will then
take place the following
Tuesday. Other days will
be set aside as needed for
workshops.


Continued from Page 1A
It was cool at night, prob-
ably down in the 40s, and
days were stunning with tem-
peratures staying around 75
degrees. And they said there
were no bugs, ants, roaches,
mosquitoes or noseeumsl
On the fifteenth day
of their pilgrimage, they ar-
rived in Carjac where they
found an Internet station in
a French bistro. They sent
messages out to friends and
family while using a French
keyboard, and with every
stroke they thanked native
Wakulla Countian Ashley
Kinsey for the French lessons
they received in preparation
for their trip. While in Carjac,
they stayed in the gite com-
munal, which is a hostel for
pilgrims and walkers.
The Somera's began
their third week of walking
the Chemin, having walked
about 200 kilometers aver-
aging about 20 a day which
took about eight hours. Here
in Florida they walk about
20 kilometers 12 miles in
approximately four hours.
The area of Southern France
where they were walking is
very mountainous, requiring
more time, energy and dedica-
tion.
The rural country-
side was beautiful farm land.
They walked thru ancient
medieval villages staying in
gites, farmhouses, convents,
a monastery, and an English
stone tower built during
the Hundred Years War. They
enjoyed the food at every ref-
uge fresh baked bread every
day, cheeses from the local


farms, regional dishes like al-
ligot (mashed potatoes with
cream and cheese), and fruit
tarts, all accompanied by great
regional wines. Sometimes
the meals were provided and
sometimes they cooked with
fellow pilgrims.
Daily language was halting
French, a little English, some
Spanish, and sometimes a
mixture of all three. They
walked with the other pil-
grims they had met in Le Puy,
such as Petra from Austria,
and Frederik from Paris. Mary
Ann chuckled about Frederik
saying he seemed to be walk-
ing mostly for his love of al-
ligot. She said he told them
of the history of the region
as they walked along. Their
new friend Andrew, who was
from London, kept their spir-
its up with his typical British
humor when their feet ached.
There were many more pil-
grims from France and other
countries, but they saw no
other Americans walking the
French route. They stopped in
many centuries-old chapels,
churches and cathedrals and
lit candles to remember those
who have passed on.
They reached the half-way
mark near a small, ancient
hilltop village Lauzerte.
While on the trail to Lauzerte,
they met an Australian couple
who told them of the finan-
cial crisis on Wall Street. And
when they told others along
the way that they were from
Florida, they received the lat-
est news on what hurricanes
were brewing. People wanted
to know where they lived and
if their house and family were


okay. For most of the way
along the Chemin, there was
no access to news, which ul-
timately was a blessing. They
really enjoyed getting their
news the way the pilgrims in
the Middle Ages must have
received their news, by word
of mouth.
Mary Ann and Ray made it
to St. Jean Pied-a-Port, which
was the final destination for
the French "Chemin" or Way.
They were in good shape,
but very tired. They had
walked the 750 kilometers
(500 miles) in 34 days. At that
point, they rested for a day
only then to embrace their
last great challenge to walk
over the Pyrenees, which is
the mountain border between
France and Spain. They would
arrive in the town of Ronces-
valles, where they began the
El Camino de Santiago three
years ago. They had chosen
to take the "Napoleon Route"
over the Pyrenees for the two-
day hike, which is the route
Napolean and his armies
took when he invaded Spain.
Unfortunately for Napoleon,
he was defeated and had to
retreat back into France. The
Somera's were hoping for a
better fate.
Once at Roncesvalles, they
had connected both the French
and Spanish pilgrimages they
had walked completing 1,600
kilometers, or 1,000 miles of
walking through France and
Spain. Although it was raining
the last two days and getting
colder, they said it was quite
a spectacular "ending...at the
beginning." After conclud-
ing their fantastic pilgrimage


N.G. Wade


Continued from Page 1A
Only a few had comments
on it in front of the county
commission: Realtor Bob Dan-
zy praised it as a well-thought
subdivision; citizen Larry Rob-'
erts questioned the ability to
provide fire protection; and
Concerned Citizens of Wakulla
President Chuck Hess called it
one of the best developments
he had ever seen, but with
5.000 lots approved for homes
in the county, questioned the
need to approve more.
Tommy Lovett, whose land
is adjacent to the project,
complained that the re-align-
ment of Commerce Boulevard
by N.G. Wade would ruin his
catfish pond with runoff.
Attorney Bob Routa, who
represents the company on
the project, said he had been
walking along the beach that
morning asking himself if
there was anything he had left
out of the presentation to the
planning commission. Think-


ing of the morning's headlines
of layoffs at Citigroup and the
dosing of Quincy Farms, he
said that for the developer to
continue on to the next phase
of development the next
phase is tied to creating jobs
within the community.
Engineer Eliot Varnum
called it a "traditional neigh-
borhood" with front porches
and sidewalks. He noted that
40 percent of the project will
be left in open space.
Lindsay Stevens, assistant
county manager for plan-
ning, read off a long list of
conditions that the company
agreed to, which included
monitoring wells to ensure
no degradation of water qual-
ity is occurring as a result of
development and pay $35,000
to the Capital Region Trans-
portation Planning Agency for
a traffic study of the Woodville
Highway Corridor.
Commissioner Howard
Kessler, who cast the lone


vote against the project, said
the Multiple Listing Service
has 414 homes for sale in the
county, 113 of which were
built in 2007 and 60 built in
2008.
"The question is," Kessler
said, "do we need to go ahead
with any action that will pro-
duce more development?"
Kessler also warned that
while the project may pass
this vote, it may fail when it
comes back before the board
when it's time to start build-
ing houses. "That is a chance
the developer is taking," he


through the south of France,
then connecting it to their'
first camino, they remained
a few days in Spain in the
northern, basque area in the
cities of Bilboa and Santander.'
Ray found his family's name'
on the oldest street in Bilboa'
- La Calle Somera.
In addition to people un-'
dertaking the camino as a'
religious pilgrimage, there'
are many travelers and hikers'
who walk the route for non-re-
ligious reasons. I asked Mary'
Ann and Ray why they chose
to walk the two caminos,
whether for spiritual enrich-
ment, exercise or something
else. They said there were a-
couple of reasons.
"We couldn't think of a
better way, nor a less expen--
sive way, to travel through-
the countryside of Spain and:
France, meeting people from
all walks of life on the same-
journey for different reasons,'
and visiting ancient villages'
with such rich history and
tradition," Mary Ann said.
They added that their expe-
riences with the people they
met along The Way were very,
personal and inviting.
Many travelers who have'
walked the camino consider
it a spiritual adventure to
remove themselves from the
bustle of modern life. The
experience is like a retreat
for many modern "pilgrims."
Quoting Allison Raju from
one of the guide books they
studied before taking their
journey, the Somera's said of
their experience, "The camino
begins with the feet and ends
with the heart."

Gas prices

Continued from Page 1A
Sewell praised the commis-
sion's efforts to work out some
sort of alternate transportation
through the City of Tallahassee's
bus service, Star Metro, to see
if some commuter service was
possible.
Commissioner Howard Kes-
sler, who had asked that the item
be pulled from the board's con-
sent agenda for discussion, asked
Sewell to determine what Level
of Service the highway was at in
that "valley" between the rush
hour peaks the time around
noon on workdays. Sewell said
he would get the answer and
report back


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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008


Sports


Mustangs and Bulldogs finish with Super Bowl victories

I I Mustangs win, 14-12 while Bulldogs capture title, 30-0


*. ,-~ .L ** 'r.(.--. k'


The 2008 Pee Wee Division Mustangs won the Super Bowl.


The Bulldogs won the Super Bowl in the Junior Division.


The 2008 youth tackle foot-
ball season ended Saturday,
Nov. 15 at the Wakulla rec-
reation park with the Super
Bowl Games.


In the Pee Wee division, a team trophy. After a week of
the regular season first place playoff games the top seeded
team was the Cougars and the Cougars played the third
second place team was the seeded Mustangs for the final
Warriors. Each team received game of the season.


In a tough battle, the Mus-
tangs won the Super bowl
game 14-12. Each team mem-
ber received a trophy.
In the Junior division, the


Bulldogs won that division the Seminoles and finished a
with an undefeated season. close first half leading 6-0. But
The Gators placed second for the game finished at a score
the season. In the Super Bowl of 30-0. Each team member
game, the Bulldogs played received a trophy as well.


Punt, Pass and Kick to the

Jacksonville football game


Local athletes competed
for chance to advance to
team Championship for the
NFL Punt, Pass and Kick com-
petition.
Hunter Phillips, Tyler Ki-
nard, Shane Davis, Kaycee
Britt and Jake Bryan all com-
peted on Sunday, Nov. 2 at
recreation park in Medart.
Each athlete had one punt,
pass and kick and the athlete
with the longest distance,
based on distance and accu-
racy, won the age division.


Tyler Kinard and Shane
Davis won at the sectional
competition and will now
advance to the Team Cham-
pionship to the held at Jack-
sonville Municipal Stadium,
Sunday, Nov. 23, when the
Jacksonville Jaguars play the
Minnesota Vikings.
Tyler and Shane will com-
pete during the pregame
where they will receive foot-
ball clothing from the NFL.
After the pregame compe-
tition they will participate in


the halftime show, throwing
the football as their names
are announced to the fans.
Winners in Jacksonville
will have their scores com-
pared to the other NFL teams
and the four highest winners
in each age division will
advance to compete in an
AFC playoff game later in
the season.
CLASSIFIED
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Hunter Phillips, Tyler Kinard, Shane Davis, Kaycee Britt and Jake Bryan competed.


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Ride for kids in the County

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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008 Page 7A



Sports



Soccer team takes part in tournament Swimmer Briggs


By JOHN REICH
Special to The Wakulla News
The War Eagles endured
a very rough week with four
matches i- five days including
the Lincoln Tournament in
Tallahassee.
The War Eagles were given
their first four goal loss, 5-1,
since Dec. 8, 2006 (vs. Bay) as
Panama City Bay took quick
advantage of Wakulla's poor
defensive communication.
The Tornadoes ripped
through the Wakulla defense
leaving irreparable damage.
The lone bright spot for
the War Eagles came during
the 46th minute on a direct
kick after a Bay defensive
foul. From a 45 degree angle
and approximately 25 yards
out, Liam Daniels' blast sailed
past goalkeeper Chris Trotter
(3 Saves) and inside the near
post.
After sixty minutes and the
substitute of goalkeeper Matt
Reich (6 Saves), the barrage of
shots on frame continued as
Wakulla keeper Tony Castel-


lano (6 Saves) made his first
appearance in goal and played
well.
Lincoln beat Wakulla 4-0 in
the tournament.
Handed their second four
goal loss within three days,
the War Eagles failed to place
a shot on frame until the 58th
minute and missed an open
net during the 76th minute.
Goalkeepers Matt Reich (5
Saves) and Tony Castellano
(3 Saves) endured 22 shots in
the defeat.
Despite playing their sec-
ond match and Eastside play-
ing their first match of the
evening, the War Eagles put
forth a tremendous showing
in a 2-0 loss.
Both teams battled for pos-
session of the ball at midfield
for the first twenty minutes of
play limiting each opponent to
only three shots. After discov-
ering weaknesses, both teams
squandered numerous scoring
opportunities throughout the
remainder of the first half.
Wakulla defenders Rhett


Harvey and Wayne Murray
made several key defensive
stops during the first half as
both teams only managed
two shots on frame during
a highly contested first half
of play.
Wakulla's Ben Anderson
nearly gave the War Eagles the
lead during the 54th minute
with a blistering shot from
20 yards out, only for it to hit
squarely off the woodwork
and cleared from harms way
by the Ram defense.
Goalkeeper Matt Reich had
10 saves.
The War Eagles and the
Wildcats consolation match
provided the spectators a
highly spirited contest as
neither squad wanted to leave
Tallahassee without at least a
win. Wakulla fell 3-2.
Liam Daniels sent a hard
shot toward goal only for
the sphere to be cleared by
a Wildcat defender. Travis
Harrell (unassisted) left no
doubt sending the ball past
goalkeeper Erick Alidor (4


Saves) and into the back of
the onion bag.
Harrell's goal ended Wakul-
la's scoreless drought at 200
minutes.
Goalkeeper Matt Reich had
seven saves.
The War Eagles tied the
match at two apiece.
Awarded a corner kick dur-
ing the 79th minute, Wakulla's
Travis Harrell (assist) sent an
arching ball into the box as
an unmarked Tyler Horner
placed the ball perfectly past
goalkeeper Chad Clark (0
Saves) with a hard strike from
his forehead.
The Wildcats broke the tie
and moments later, the final
whistle sounded giving the
War Eagles a five game los-
ing streak since opening the
season with a 2 0 victory over
Panama City Beach Arnold.
Although residing only 30
minutes away, it was quite
disheartening for the Wakulla
players to find the bleachers
filled with more parents from
Gainesville and Pensacola.


WHS Wrestlers top Lincoln Trojans


Coach John Wainwright
and his WHS grapplers beat
Lincoln, but dropped matches
against Clay, Chiles, Lowndes,
Ga. and Lynn Haven Mosley
last week. Wakulla is still
missing wrestlers and for-


feited four weight classes.
Scotty Varner and Tyler
Hill were undefeated at 140
and 125 pounds respectively.
Garrett Barco had only one
loss at 152. Chase Maxwell
competed at 160, Dakota Bush


wrestled at 112 for the JV.
Travis Hinsey wrestled at 112
for the varsity. Seth Hyman
and Cameron Crum were at
135 and 130 respectively. Cole
Woofter wrestled at 189 while
Branden Carden was at 145


and Michael Howard was at
171. Mike Aikens and Robert
Douin wrestled at 104 JV and
145 respectively. Wakulla will
host the Wakulla Duals Dec.
5 and Dec. 6 when the team
returns from the holiday.


Sports Roundup


WHS Football
The 2008 WHS football
season came to a close with
a 44-7 first round playoff loss
to Panama Cty Beach Arnold
on the road Friday, Nov. 21.
Wakulla took a 7-3 lead fol-
lowing a trick pass play from
quarterback Zach Klees to
Casey Eddinger and on to Lee
Smalls. The play covered 73
yards. But Arnold tok over the
game from there, scoring the
next 41 points and controlling


the game.
Wakulla finished the season
with a record of 5-6. Arnold
moves on to play Godby.
Girls Basketball
The team lost to NFC 58-51,
but defeated Franklin 58-33
and Bay 53-50.
Taylor Washington had 17,
Artigua Kilpatrick added 16
and Taylor Eglton added 10
against Franklin. Kilpatrick
and Jeterica Brown combined
for 23 rebounds.


Eglton had 14 against Bay
along with Kilpatrick. Wash-
ington added 13. Kilpatrick
had 12 rebounds and Kelsey
Lee added 10. Wakulla hosted
Madison Nov. 25 and will host
Blountstown on Dec. 1 and
Taylor Dec. 2.
Boys Basketball
Coach Jay Hipps and his
War Eagles opened the season
Nov. 25 at John Paul II. The
first home game of the year
will be Dec. 4 against Jeffer-


son. Lincoln comes to Medart
on Dec. 12.
Girls Soccer
WHS beat Godby 8-0, but
fell to Lincoln 3-0.
Scoring for Wakulla were
Rachel Capps three times,
Megan Rollins, Brooklynn Tin-
dall twice, Mary Kate Murphy
and Stevie Roberts. Norma
Woodcock had two assists and
Mandy McClendon had one.
Rollins played well in the loss
to Lincoln.


of RMS nationally

ranked in two events


Riversprings Middle School
swimmer Joey Briggs was
named to the 2008 United
States Top 20 Swimmers List.
Briggs ranks 8th in the 50
freestyle and 20th in the 100
freestyle.
The Area Tallahassee Aquat-
ic Club has nine swimmers
listed in the first installment
of the 2008-2009 National
Top 10 Preview List as of Nov.
4. ATAC's nine swimmers
recorded a total of 32 times
on the preview list. Cece Wil-
liams led ATAC with 10 indi-
vidual times, including Top 5
rankings in the 200 yard free-
style (4th), 1000 yard freestyle


(3rd) and 400 yard individual
medley (4th). Hunter Hinson
recorded 4 Top 5 times 100
yard backstroke (5th), 100
yard butterfly (5th), 200 yard
butterfly (4th), and 400 yard
individual medley (5th).
Joey Briggs, an 8th grader
at Riversprings Middle School,
trains with ATAC in Tallahas-
see due to the lack of public
pools in Wakulla County.
His training schedule re-
quires him to be in the pool
from 5 a.m. to 7 a.m., before
school several days a week,
and from 4:45 p.m. to 7 p.m.
everyday after school.


Adult baseball league

is being considered


Initial efforts are underway
for the development of an
adult baseball league in the
Big Bend area of North Florida.
In this planning phase, there
would be two divisions, with
possible expansion in the
future.
Possible teams in the West-
ern Division would be from
Marianna, Chipley, Port St. Joe,
Bonifay, Graceville, Malone,
Panama City, Lynn Haven and
Blountstown. Potential teams
in the Eastern Division would
be from Tallahassee, Quincy,
Chattahoochee, Wakulla, Mon-
ticello, Apalachicola, Bristol
and Lanark Village.
Results from contacts made
to date have been extremely
positive and exciting for the
future of this league.


Two key meetings have
been set to discuss the league's
formation. For the Western
Division, the meeting will be
held Saturday, Dec. 6, at 10
a.m., CST, at Jim's Steak House
in Marianna (US 90 West).
For the Eastern Division,
the meeting is set for Satur-
day, Dec. 13, at 10 a.m., EST,
at the Apalachee Restaurant
in Bristol (SR 20 East).
Representatives from all
designated areas, including
interested parties from other
areas, are urged to attend the
meeting in the respective
division.
For more information,
please call Harold W. Bailey,
229-662-2066 or 850-524-2151.


CLASSIFIED As Low As $8 Per Week!
Call 926-7102


OPEN HOUSE and FESTIVAL


Saturday, December 6th from 11AM to 3PM


ALL PROCEEDS TO SUPPORT OUR LOCAL HUMANE SOCIETY C.HA.T.


Look for the Big Blow Up Dog

on Crawfordville Hwy across from Azalea Park

and join u for a day of fun and pexitement!


1:30 PM POLICE DOG DEMO

S 2PM 3 PM MICROCHIPS $20 (Reg. $34) Meet and
\ for a shelter donation Receive El
($10 members and $20 nonmembers) Dem
Demos L
DRAWING for (4) Annual Vaccinations
(regularly priced at $89 to $95) Raffles an
* and (5) cat Neuters (regularly priced at $40)
Every 1/2 hour we will announce a winner!


S\ PET SAFETY First Aid Talk and Tips
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REFUGE HOUSE How to Identify animal cruelty.
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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008


Business


Posh, an eclectic shopping experience


Posh, according to one
definition, means "smart, styl-
ish, fashionable, elegant and
classy!" But, in addition to this
definition, the shop named
"Posh," located at 114 Munici-
pal Ave., in Sopchoppy, is also
committed to empowering
both producer and consumer
alike.
Owner Debra E. Dix, a li-
censed massage therapist who
also holds a Master's degree in
social work from Florida State
University, wanted to open
a retail store which offered
unique and original products
and gifts that were either
Fair Trade certified, or locally
crafted. Fair Trade certification
ensures that a product is made
in an ethical and conscious
way, where workers are being
paid a fair living wage, and a
focus is being placed on sus-
tainable practices.


In other words, there are
no "sweatshops" involved in
the Fair Trade industry. Addi-
tionally, Dix wanted to offer a
place where local artisans and
musicians, could display and
sell their work to the commu-
nity, and those who were just
passing through.
"We have so many talented
artists and musicians in this
area," said Dix. "I wanted to
provide a place that would
help support these people and
showcase their fine work."
Opened in December 2007,
Posh now offers unique and
original products at a price you
can afford. Additionally, Posh
works with people locally and
globally to promote high qual-
ity, handcrafted items, to allow
the consumer to purchase in
a conscious and sustainable
manner. Posh allows layaway
for customers, along with


pre-purchases for some hand-
crafted items.
Our mission is: "Helping
You, To Help Yourself, While
Helping Others," said Dix.
Every purchase from Posh is
a purchase in the "right direc-
tion" toward sustainability and
a promotion for purchasing
both locally and Fair Trade.
In addition, Posh tries to pur-
chase "clean" products that
will not end up hurting people
or the environment. "In a chal-
lenging economy, we all need
to be helping each other," said
Dix. "And with an increasing
need to become aware of how
the toxins we consume and
dispose-of in landfills impact
our lives and our environment,
it is important to become edu-
cated step-by-step, on how we
all can do a better job at sup-
porting practices that benefit
our health and welfare."


Posh sells organic, Fair Trade,
chocolate, coffee and tea, hand-
crafted jewelry (beads, pearls,
and gold/silver), glasswork,
wind chimes, Follananis Pup-
pets, non-toxic cosmetic, bath
and body products, global and
local music, handcrafted cards,
fine art and art prints, baskets,
hand milled olive oil and glyc-
erin soaps, medicinal honey,
some organic food and health
products, and holiday orna-
ments, cards and decorations
for the upcommg season.
The hours of operation are:
Wednesday and Thursday, 11
a.m. until 6 or 7 p.m.; Friday
and Saturday, 11 a.m. until 9
or 10 p.m., Massage Therapy
is offered by Massage from
the Heart, by appointment.,
For more information, phone
962-1010 or 528-5838.


Chelsea Dix-Kessler with handcrafted items at Posh,


Realtors elect officers for 2009
The Wakulla Realtor Coun- man is the president-elect for nell is Affiliate Director with
cil recently elected a new slate 2010 and Wakulla Council Amerifirst Home Mortgage.
of officers for 2009. Director for 2009. Sonya Hall is secretary and
The president is Penny Jeanne Porter was the past Doris Harrington is treasurer.
Lane McKinney. Michael Welt- president in 2008. Mary Dar-







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All of the online
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FOOTER BOARD Your ad will rotate with 5 other ads
when the page is refreshed.728 x 90 pikcls or 21.8 picas x 2.7 picas x 72 ppi

Copyright 2008. All rights reserved. The Wakulla News is a iI, ,...i k .',no I O ,Ni\ ,.3-ll xs.Jngll, publication.
S h.-ula N (es ,Nes Sports. l,,tertain ie t N il ormatin I or iksulla C ty. L .nd the surrounding area..;
/The Wakulla New.s News,. Sports. Entertainment and information for Wakulla County. FL and the surrounding area.


S50-926-


4wo AW4










Group Reef Relief is holding


a 'Holiday Online Auction'


r The group Reef Relief, which in St. Marks, and a half-day in the panhandle should be a great cause. Bidding v
las worked to protect coral canoe rental worth $50 at T-n-T worried about reefs think very competitive after T
irefs, is holding a "Holiday Canoe Rental. of where all those wonderful giving. The auction wil
(nli; e Auction" an online "I decided this year to try to grouper and red snapper come December 15 and itex
fundraiser for the group. recruit some local businesses from" livered to winning bid(
SThe auction items up for to get some exposure and Johnson put up for auction time to put under the t
1ld Inclu(c1 some donations interest in our area and have a kayak trip with him at the St. Reef Relief has par
fo&m some local businesses, some fun," said Reef Relief Marks Refuge. with the business comr
including $15 admission for President Paul Johnson of The online auction currently in Key West and the I
t'orto Gulf Specimen Marine Crawfordville. "The response has over 400 items worth more Keys to help protect cor;
Laboratories in Panacea, a $50 has been terrific, with over a than $160,000 and generates for over 20 years. The I
4ft certificate to Hook Wreck dozen donations so far. From thousands of hits a day at its Keys are one of the ecoto
Ifenry's restaurant in Panacea, kayak trips, restaurant and bar website at reefrelief.org. capitols of the world -
one night stay at the Inn, tabs and dive equipment, our "It's a great way to have number-one dive desti
3t Wildwood and a round of local businesses have stepped some fun Christmas shopping and largest charter bo;
1lf 'the Wildwood Country up to help reefs and put our from your computer for some wilderness guide fleet
ub valued at $175, a $25 gift area on the map in a positive pretty unusual and interesting world.
riificate from Riverside Cafe way. If you wonder why we gifts," Johnson said, "and for

Unemployment continues upward climb
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN County with a 13.0 percent job- labor force increased to 16,245 Gainesville MSA at 4.7 p
asnowden@thewakullanews.net less rate, followed by Flagler people of which 15,396 were and the Ft. Walton Beac
AS with the unemployment County at 10.5 percent, St. Lucie employed and 849 were un- at 5.1 percent were low
rite'in Florida and throughout at 10.2, and Okeechobee at 10.0 employed.
the nation, Wakulla County's percent. The agency reported In September, the Wakulla
unemployment rate continued that Hendry's high unemploy- labor force consisted of 16,069
to increase in October. The ment is due mainly to sea- people, of which 15,272 were
state reported unemployment sonal declines in agriculture employed and 797 were un-
at 7.0 percent, while nation- and related industries, while employed.
ally the rate was 6.5 percent, the other counties are being The number of jobs in Flor-
and the local rate was at 5.2 impacted by construction and ida is down 156,200 compared
percent, according to the state manufacturing declines, to a year ago. Construction ac-
Agency for Workforce Innova- With the rise in local un- counts for almost 40 percent of
rion. -employment, Wakulla County job losses in the state.
Wakulla County's jobless went up to ninth on the list The Tallahassee Metro-
rate has been on a steady in- of lowest unemployment rates politan Area, which includes
Cease, up from 4.8 percent in in the county. Those with Wakulla, Leon, Jefferson and
August. 5.0 percent in Septem- lower unemployment were Gadsden counties for the pur-
ber, and 5.2 in October. Walton County at 4.5 percent; pose of market analysis, had an
Workforce Innovation re- Alachua County at 4.6 percent, increase in the overall unem-
ported that 7.0 percent is the Franklin and Sumter counties ployment rate in October, up
highest unemployment rate in at 4.8 percent; and Leon and to 5.2 percent from 5.0 percent
Florida since December 1993. Liberty counties at 4.9 percent in September. The local MSA
Four counties reported double- followed by Lafayette at 5.0 continued to have one of the
digit unemployment in Octo- and Okaloosa at 5.1. lowest jobless rates of the 23
ber, the highest was Hendry In October, the Wakulla MSAs in the state. Only the


Trusteria.com updates web site


: Trusteria.com, a regional digi-
tal networking service company
that facilitates business between
consumers, businesses and non-
Erofits, has announced a major
redesign for its web site.
S"We were so anxious to begin
meeting the demand for this
kind of service that we got the
site up and running as quickly as


possible," said Mike Campbell,
President. "Now that it is run-
ning smoothly and hundreds of
regional businesses and consum-
ers have utilized its features, we
decided it was a perfect time to
improve its aesthetics and make
it even more user-friendly."
Trusteria.com helps busi-
nesses do more business in the


region and increases interaction
between businesses and non-
profit organizations in Leon,
Wakulla, Franklin, Madison,
Taylor, Jefferson. Gadsden and
Liberty counties.
Trusteria.com is located in
Tallahassee. For more informa-
tion, call 877-8885 or visit www.
trusteria.com.


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008 Page 9A

Weltman writes

real estate courses


vill get
hanks-
1 close
ns de-
ders in
ree."
tnered
unity
Florida
al reefs
Florida
tourism
as the
nation
at and
in the




percent
h MSA
er.


Michael Weltman wrote a
course for the Talahassee Board
of Realtors and will be teaching
two courses for the group.
The courses include an intro-
ductory and advanced course on
refinancing, purchasing, and using
equity to buy investment property,
rentals or land.
The program will be an official
endorsed TBR course printed in
the new 2009. A Real Estate Educa-
tion Program book will be given
to all 2,200 members so that they
can plan their education courses
for the year.
It will also be discussed at the
next education forum of Education
Directors at their next meeting
in Orlando so that DGL board
(Dixie-Gilchrist-Levy board), Lake
City Board and GACAR (Gaines-
ville-Alachua County Association
of Realtors) and other boards
can take part in the course that
Weltman will teach at their local


boards in the Panhandle and
North Florida.
"Once the course is taught one
time, I will apply to the State of
Florida DBPR to have the course
granted three CE credit hours for
realtors so that they can take this
course in Florida and get CE for
their license renewals," said Welt-
man. "This has taken almost one
full year to get this off the ground
and I am very excited about it
and its prospects for the future.
As realtors learn more about how
reverse mortgages can revive their
business and assist them and their
families and clients in buying or
refinancing real estate and helping
them get more contracts and clos-
ings to help this industry during
these turbulent times."
Michael J. Weltman, MBA, CSA,
SRES, CSFP, is a realtor, broker,
instructor with Land Lots and
Homes.com LLC, Financial Con-
sulting Services Group.


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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008


Outdoors


Winter pays Wakulla County a visit despite calendar i


From The Dock
BY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL


Last week, Wakulla County
lost another great citizen. Glen-
wood Crum passed away and he
will be missed by a lot of peo-
ple. I met Glenwood through
my dealings with Panacea
Harbor Marina. He was always
smiling and happy though you
knew he was probably in some
kind of pain. He would always
apologize when the price of
gas went up, though it wasn't
his fault. A friend of mine from
Tifton, Tom Riddle, said when
he was leaving his boat at the
marina to head offshore, Glen-
wood would always call him on
the radio before he left for the
evening to make sure they were


doing well. He loved to catch
those silver trout at the mouth
of the Panacea channel, and
now every time I go by there
I'll think of him.
Well, you would think it's
winter, although we still have
about a month of fall before
winter hits. Hopefully, last week
wasn't a sign of things to come.
The water temperature dropped
into the lower 50s last week,
but should warm up some this
week.
Now is the time to go to
the Aucilla River and start fish-
ing at the ramp and work your
way down.
I would start drifting down


the river and as soon as I
caught a trout or red, I would
anchor and fish the area for
a while. Many times you can
anchor in one spot and never
have to move. Before you get
to the river though, stop by
J.R.'s Store and ask him where
the fish are. J.R. generally has
shrimp and plenty of the hot
lures for the river. West Pass
should also be good and the
creeks around the mouth of the
Aucilla. There's a pretty good
boat ramp at the Aucilla, but
it's hard getting a big boat in
and out on a low tide. Whatever
type of boat you fish out of
there be extremely careful. The
river is full of rocks and some
just under the surface. The dif-
ference in rocks and oyster bars
is that rocks don't move when
you hit them.
The Econfina should also be
holding plenty of trout right
now. They also have a good
ramp and there aren't as many
rocks, but there are enough


that you better be careful. Good
lures for the Aucilla and Econ-
fina this time of year are Rattlin
Redfin in gold/black or silver/
black, Mirrolures and the Gulp
under the Cajun Thunder. Live
shrimp also works very well.
Another good spot right
now is up the Ochlockonee
River from the head of the bay
to the Ochlockonee State Park.
Look for deep holes when
creeks come into the river and
look for downed trees. Live
bait on the bottom typically
works very well and don't be
surprised to catch trout, reds,
channel catfish, freshwater
bass, bream and sheepshead
in the same hole on the same
bait. Another method for fish-
ing the river is slow trolling
sinking Mirrolures, small crank
baits and RattleTraps. Trout or
stripers are probably going be
what's going to bend your rod
when doing this.
The St. Marks and Wakul-
la rivers are already holding


sheepshead and reds and
should now be holding trout.
It's been a long time since
I've seen trout come up into
the St. Marks like they used
to years ago. Fish the deep
holes in the bend of the River
with shrimp on the bottom or
cast a jig and fish it real slow,
tipped with a piece of shrimp.
One of the local fishermen,
Michael Smith usually catches
a lot of trout fishing a grub on
the bottom and fishing it as
slow as you can without calling
it sitting still. Plenty of silver
trout will also move into the
St. Marks and when you find
one you'll usually find a bunch.
The Wakulla will be holding
plenty of reds this time of year
and some big sheepshead in
the holes between Shell Island
Fish Camp and the U.S. 98
bridge. East River, at the mouth
of the St. Marks, should also
be a pretty good spot to try
right now. You can put in at
the Lighthouse and it's just a


short distance to the mouth of
East River and there are plenty
of deep holes in it that will
hold trout.
Mike Hopkins said very few
people fished this past week-
end and those who went off-
shore went to about 35 feet of
water and caught plenty of sea
bass and some grouper. Inshore
is about as slow. The trout that
are being caught are up in the
Carrabelle River though he did
say Whiskey George Creek is
probably holding trout no.v
Mike said it's hard to give
good report when nobody is
fishing. The wind and cold
kept most people at home b1
the fire.
Remember to know youfi
limits and leave that float plah
with someone. I hope you and
your family have a nice Thanksb
giving and if you're going t'
be on the road this week be
extremely careful. Good luci
and good fishing
c^


FWC discusses freshwater turtles


Hearing "loud and clear" the
concerns raised by turtle scien-
tists about freshwater turtles,
the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC)
has fast-tracked its process for
managing the freshwater turtle
harvest in Florida and welcomes
all input.
"The concern shown for the
freshwater turtles in Florida
has registered with us loud and
dear," said Ken Haddad, execu-
tive director of the FWC. "As a
result, we have accelerated our
process to develop the best pos-
sible strategies for turtles. We
will take a few months to gather
the facts; then we can build on
consensus."
Haddad said the FWC cer-
tainly appreciates all the input
received from turtle scientists,
fishermen and others on fresh-
water turtle harvest, and the
agency will continue to welcome
their insight as it moves rapidly
toward developing' a manage-
ment strategy.
"This cooperative attitude
will ensure that we develop the
very best policy for freshwater
turtles," Haddad said.
The FWC passed a new rule
in September that limits the
harvest of wild Florida fresh-
water turtles to five per day per
person. Each fisherman with a
commercial license is allowed to
harvest an additional 15 Florida
softshell turtles per day, for a
total of 20. The FWC will moni-
tor and enforce the current rule


to ensure the turtles are being
adequately protected.
"The recently passed rule pro-
vides an interim period to give
us time to understand the issue
and verify information," Haddad
said. "We have moved up our
schedule and are working rapidly
to pass a new management strat-
egy that will ensure appropriate
regulations by June."
FWC's rule-making requires
specific steps to provide proper
public due process. The FWC
will seek input over the next few
months. Staff will present the


proposed management strategy
at the Commission's April meet-
ing. Commissioners will vote on
the final plan and regulations at
June's meeting.
The best months (September
and October) for harvesting
freshwater turtles have passed in
Florida. During cooler weather,
turtles move at a much slower
pace and eat less food, making
them difficult to harvest. In ad-
dition, May 1 begins the dosed
season for harvest of the Florida
softshell turtle which goes until
July 31.


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freshwater turtles," Haddad s
"We don't see the situation a
emergency, especially in light
the seasonal slow down."



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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008 Page 11A


S S iFREE 850-224-4960 www.fsucu.org

fru~ t li c MORTGAGES~ -FREE CHECKING eAUTOLOANS ~CREDITCARDS
-^e=' fi -


Gulf Coast Weekly Almanac


BE Tide charts by
Zihua Software, LLC

St. Marks River Entrance


Date High Low High Low
Thu 3.4 ft. -0.5 ft. 3.1 ft. 1.5 ft.
Nov 27, 08 12:41 AM 7:52 AM 2:21 PM 7:22 PM
Fri 3.4 ft. -0.5 ft. 3.1 ft. 1.5 ft.
Nov 28, 08 1:12 AM 8:28 AM 2:54 PM 7:56 PM
Sat 3.4 ft. -0.4 ft. 3.1 ft. 1.4 ft.
Nov 29, 08 1:43 AM 9:02 AM 3:29 PM 8:31 PM
Sun 3.4 ft. -0.3 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.4 ft.
Nov 30, 08 2:15 AM 9:36 AM 4:05 PM 9:08 PM
Mon 3.3 ft. -0.2 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.4 ft.
Dec 1, 08 2:49 AM 10:10 AM 4:43 PM 9:50 PM
Tue 3.2 ft. -0.1 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.5 ft.
Dec 2, 08 3:25 AM 10:46 AM 5:23 PM 10:37 PM
Wed 3.0 ft. 0.1 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.4 ft.
Dec 3, 08. 4:08 AM 11:25 AM 6:07 PM 11:34 PM


Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay

Date High Low High Low
Thu 2.6 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.1 ft.
Nov 27, 08 12:33 AM 8:03 AM 2:13 PM 7:33 PM
Fri 2.6 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.1 ft.
Nov 28, 08 1:04 AM 8:39 AM 2:46 PM 8:07 PM
Sat 2.6 ft. -0.3 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.0 ft.
Nov 29, 08 1:35 AM 9:13 AM 3:21 PM 8:42 PM
Sun 2.5 ft. -0.2 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.0 ft.
Nov 30, 08 2:07 AM 9:47 AM 3:57 PM 9:19 PM
Mon 2.5 ft. -0.2 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.1 ft.
Dec 1, 08 2:41 AM 10:21 AM 4:35 PM 10:01 PM
Tue 2.4 ft. -0.1 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.1 ft.
Dec 2, 08 3:17 AM 10:57 AM 5:15 PM 10:48 PM
Wed 2.3 ft. 0.1 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.1 ft.
Dec 3, 08 4:00 AM 11:36 AM 5:59 PM 11:45 PM


November 27 December 3


City of St. Marks


Date High Low High Low
Thu 3.2 ft. -0.5 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.4 ft.
Nov 27, 08 1:17 AM 8:56 AM 2:57 PM 8:26 PM
Fri 3.2 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.3 ft.
Nov 28, 08 1:48 AM 9:32 AM 3:30 PM 9:00 PM
Sat 3.2 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.3 ft.
Nov 29, 08 2:19 AM 10:06 AM 4:05 PM 9:35 PM
Sun 3.1 ft. -0.3 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.3 ft.
Nov 30, 08 2:51 AM 10:40 AM 4:41 PM 10:12 PM
Mon 3.1 ft. -0.2 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.3 ft.
Dec 1, 08 3:25 AM 11:14 AM 5:19 PM 10:54 PM
Tue 3.0 ft. -0.1 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.3 ft.
Dec 2, 08 4:01 AM 11:50 AM 5:59 PM 11:41 PM
Wed 2.8 ft. 0.1 ft. 2.7 ft.
Dec 3, 08 4:44 AM 12:29 PM 6:43 PM


St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.

Date High Low High Low
Thu 2.7 ft. -0.5 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.5 ft.
Nov 27, 08 12:25 AM 7:31 AM 2:05. PM 7:01 PM
Fri 2.7 ft. -0.5 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.4 ft.
Nov 28, 08 12:56 AM 8:07 AM 2:38 PM 7:35 PM
Sat 2.7 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.4 ft.
Nov 29, 08 1:27 AM 8:41 AM 3:13 PM 8:10 PM
Sun 2.6 ft. -0.3 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.4 ft.
Nov 30, 08 1:59 AM 9:15 AM 3:49 PM 8:47 PM
Mon 2.6 ft. -0.2 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.4 ft.
Dec 1, 08 2:33 AM 9:49 AM 4:27 PM 9:29 PM
Tue 2.5 ft. -0.1 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.4 ft.
Dec 2, 08 3:09 AM 10:25 AM 5:07 PM 10:16 PM
Wed 2.4 ft. 0.1 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.4 ft.
Dec 3, 08 3:52 AM 11:04 AM 5:51 PM 11:13 PM


For tides at the following points
add to Dog Island Listings: Ca
/ Ap
.Ca
;. ,, ., Lom


irrabelle
alachicola
at Point
wer Anchorage
est Pass


High Tide
28 Min.
1 Hr., 53 Min.
1 Hr., 13 Min.
1 Hr., 36 Min.
1 Hr., 26 Min.


Low Tide
25 Min.
2 Hrs., 38 Min.
2 Hrs., 31 Min.
2 Hrs., 3 Min.
2 Hrs., 39 Min.


-- -.. --:J :, Shell Point, Spring Creek


Date High Low High Low
Thu 3.5 ft. -0.6 ft. 3.2 ft. 1.7 ft.
Nov 27, 08 12:38 AM 7:49 AM 2:18 PM 7:19 PM
Fri 3.5 ft. -0.5 ft. 3.1 ft. 1.6 ft.
Nov 28, 08 1:09 AM 8:25 AM 2:51 PM 7:53 PM
Sat 3.5 ft. -0.5 ft. 3.1 ft. 1.6 ft.
Nov 29, 08 1:40 AM 8:59 AM 3:26 PM 8:28 PM
Sun 3.5 ft. -0.4 ft. 3.1 ft. 1.5 ft.
Nov 30, 08 2:12 AM 9:33 AM 4:02 PM 9:05 PM
Mon 3.4 ft. -0.2 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.6 ft.
Dec 1, 08 2:46 AM 10:07 AM 4:40 PM 9:47 PM
Tue 3.3 ft. -0.1 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.6 ft.
Dec 2, 08 3:22 AM 10:43 AM 5:20 PM 10:34 PM
Wed 3.1 ft. 0.1 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.6 ft.
Dec 3, 08 4:05 AM 11:22 AM 6:04 PM 11:31 PM


Dog Island West End

Date High Low High Low High
Thu -0.6 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.8 ft. 2.8 ft.
Nov 27, 08 7:28 AM 4:11 PM 6:39 PM 11:51 PM
Fri -0.6 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.8 ft.
Nov 28, 08 8:02 AM 4:43 PM 7:13 PM
Sat 2.8 ft. -0.5 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.7 ft.
Nov 29, 08 12:30 AM 8:36 AM 5:13 PM 7:49 PM
Sun 2.7 ft. -0.5 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.7 ft.
Nov 30, 08 1:12 AM 9:08 AM 5:42 PM 8:30 PM
Mon 2.7 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.6 ft.
Dec 1,08 1:57 AM 9:40 AM 6:11 PM 9:18 PM
Tue 2.5 ft. -0.3 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.5 ft.
Dec 2, 08 2:45 AM 10:12 AM 6:39 PM 10:17 PM
Wed 2.4 ft. -0.2 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.3 ft.
Dec 3, 08 3:37 AM 10:47 AM 7:07 PM 11:26 PM


I-
First
Dec. 5






Full
Dec. 12





Last
Dec. 19


New
Dec. 27


T T T T T


Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
11:30am --:--am 12:50am 1:45am 2:35 am 3:25 am
11:55pm 12:25 pm 1:15pm 2:10pm 3:00 pm 3:50pm
5:15am 6:10am 7:00 am 7:55am 8:45 am 9:35 am
5:40pm 6:35 pm 7:30 pm 8:25pm 9:15pm 10:05 pm


Coast Guard

Auxiliary Reports

By Sherrie Alverson


Auxiliarists are special peo-
ple. Who else would brave the
cold weather and icy winds to
qualify, or remain qualified, to
donate many volunteer hours
out on the water caring for
their fellow boaters?
I am afraid the weather-
man was not my favorite
person Saturday morning. I
had spent quite some time
coordinating crew testing by
a QE (Qualified Examiner in
the boat crew program.) This
particular testing requires two
Auxiliary vessels with a mini-
mum of two people on board
(coxswain and crew member).
If the boat is larger, another
crew person is required.
SFortunately, only four were
required Saturday. Jim McGill
was the coxswain and John
Edrington the crew on one
boat. On the other, Reel Time,
there was owner/coxswain
Ron Piasecki with Glenn
Edrington crewing.
A touch of humor while
we were waiting for everyone,
this creature from outer space
arrived on a motorcycle and
waddled into the station.
As he began undressing, out
popped Glenn. I have a hunch
that riding a motorcycle is
colder than crewing on a
boat, but he was prepared
for both.
Back to people on the wa-
ter, Frank Stephens, QE from
Flotilla 15, and the two train-
ees, Rick Yood from Flotilla
12 and Yvette Graham from
Flotilla 13, so we ended up


with seven people on the
water and one radio operator
at the Shell Point Auxiliary
Station. You may have heard
some of their transmissions,
those prefixed with "This .3 a
drill. This is a drill."
What made it even more
unusual was that Yvette Gra-
ham came over from her
winter home in Lake City
and Frank Stephens drove
over from Panama City. As I
said, Auxiliarists are a special
breed.
Also this weekend, at the
other end of Division 1 (Ala-
bama/Florida line) two new
Flotilla Commanders-Elect, Da-
vid Guttman from Flotilla 12
at St. Marks and Mae Waters
from Flotilla 13 at Shell Point,
attended the Commander's
Academy held at the Naval
Base in Pensacola. The classes
were conducted in the meet-
ing rooms at the Naval Mu-
seum and the students were
able to enjoy the displays.
When I talked to Mae Sun-
day evening, she was enthusi-
astic about both the Academy
and the Museum. It is delight-
ful to listen to Mae when
she is recalling something
interesting and I suspect she
is going to find being Flotilla
Commander is not only a chal-
lenge, but also an interesting
phase in her life.
Many of our members will
be going away for Thanksgiv-
ing, and others will have fam-
ily and friends in for the holi-
day. We wish everyone a safe


and happy Thanksgiving.
Next on the Auxiliary cal-
endar is Change of Watch on
Sunday, Dec. 7.
Traditionally it is held at
the St. Andrews Bay Yacht
Club, in Panama City. All
elected officers (Flotilla Com-
manders and Vice Command-
ers) and appointed staff offi-
cers will be administered the
oath of office. However, they
will not assume the duties
of the office until the first of
January.
It is a very special time, as
it is the only Division meeting
that is fellowship oriented.
True, some official business
will be conducted, but there is
time to visit with friends you
usually get to see only two or
three times a year.
This is a plea to all 2009
officers in Division 1 to send
in their reservations.
See your Flotilla Command-
er or Vice Commander for all
details.
Ron Piasecki received the
following report in layman's
terms regarding the FSU Red
Tide project that both Flotillas
12 and 13 have participated
in.
"I used three ml of sample
(which is quite a lot when
you consider we're looking at
microscopic organisms) so we


can be reasonably sure that
if the red tide dinoflagellate
Karenia brevis is present in
the water column we will find
at least a few cells if even if its
population size in the water
column is very low.
Considering we looked
at 10 samples (and hence 30
ml of Gulf water) we can be
reasonably certain that this
dinoflagellate is not present
in our waters.
A total of 3 dinoflagel-
late cells belonging to Cera-
tium furca were found which
means that populations of
this species are virtually non-
existent.
Also, this dinoflagellate is
not a red tide species as it for-
tunately produces no toxins.
The dominant algae in all
the samples are the diatoms
and all species present in the
samples are non-toxic.
These are good algae be-
cause they contain high con-
centrations of lipids which can


Run Season


be passed up the food chain
to fatten up shrimp, scallops,
and fish.
The base of the food chain
in Gulf waters are the micro-
scopic diatoms. Every so often
conditions allow dinoflagel-
lates to outcompete diatoms
and build up large popula-
tions, but this has not been
the case since the red tide
outbreaks that occurred west
of St. Joe Bay during the fall
of 2007.
The bottom line is that the
samples contained no cells
of Karenia brevis, just a few
dinoflagellate cells belonging
to species that are not toxic,
and an abundance of diatoms
which are so important in Gulf
food chains. This is exactly
what we want to see in every
sample the CGAUX collects."
With this Happy Ending we
will close the column.
REMEMBER SAFE BOAT-
ING IS NO ACCIDENT


Quota hunt

changes

proposed
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) staff will present draft
recommendations for improv-
ing to the Wildlife Manage-
ment Area Quota Hunt Permit
Program at the Commission's
next meeting, Dec. 3 in Key
West.
These proposed rule chang-
es address several issues, in-
cluding permit transferability,
guest permits and other chang-
es to the current program.
If approved in concept, rules
will be considered for final
adoption at the Commission's
February meeting in Destin
and would become effective
for the 2009-10 hunting sea-
son.


I FulLne fTralerPar


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Boyd supports Amtrak service


Heide Clifton. Butch Nutting, Myra Jean Nutting and Lesley Baker with checks.

Presidential cookie sales


turn into sweet surprise for


two service agencies


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
The final votes have been
counted and the winner of
the 2008 Presidential race
was a tie.
The Wakulla County Ani-
mal Shelter/CHAT and Florida
Wild Mammal Association
(FWMA) both received $200
donations from Myra Jean's
Bakery in Crawfordville.
The donations were the
result of 50 cents from the sale
of each Presidential cookie go-
ing to charity. Wakulla County
jumped on the idea and pur-
chased more than 750 cookies
from bakery owners, Myra
Jean and Butch Nutting.
Myra Jean began the Presi-
dential cookie campaign on
Sept. 11 and wrapped it up
on Nov. 4. The idea origi-
nated from the Retail Bakers
of America organization as a
way to chart the presidential
campaign.
In Wakulla County, Repub-
lican John McCain received


more votes than President-
Election Barack Obama on
Nov. 4. But in the cookie
contest, there were 450 cook-
ies sold with the likeness of
Obama and 301 sold with
McCain's likeness.
Myra Jean joked that the
Obama campaign headquar-
ters were close to her bak-
ery which may have helped
Obama's totals.
But nationally, the cookie
sales followed a similar pat-
tern to the Nov. 4 General Elec-
tion which resulted in Obama
winning the 2008 campaign
for the White House.
"We'll do it again," said
Myra Jean. "It was fun and a
distraction from the politics."
Heide Clifton of CHAT ac-
cepted the check for her orga-
nization and Lesley Baker ac-
cepted the check on behalf of
the FWMA and Chris Beatty.
Clifton said the money
will be put toward purchasing
medications for the animals.
"There are some real nice


Charger-] Visa
I To O Mastercard
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people in this county," she
said. While Clifton was ac-
cepting the check, plumber
Allan Loftin was completing
plumbing work for the orga-
nization as a donation. Both
CHAT and FWMA rely heavily
on the generosity of residents
to survive.
Butch Nutting thanked his
customers for taking part in
the cookie campaign and his
employees for promoting the
event with customers,
The donation to FWMA
will help Beatty continue to
serve injured wild animals in.
the county.


The i

Wahulla

I _J


Congressman Allen Boyd
(D-North Florida) announced
that the President withdrew
his veto threat and signed
the Railroad Safety Enhance-
ment Act of 2008 (HR 2095),
which would require Amtrak
to submit a plan to Congress
for restoring passenger rail
service between New Orleans,
La., and Sanford, Fla. The
North Florida corridor has
not been served by Amtrak
since the close of Amtrak's
Sunset Limited service after
Hurricane Katrina.
"I am pleased that the Pres-
ident dropped his veto threat
and signed this important
bill into law," said Congress-
man Boyd. "Since the close of
Sunset Limited, I often hear
from constituents about the


possibility of restoring pas-
senger rail service to North
Florida. This study will get the
ball rolling on ways to restore
this service that will most
benefit the people of North
Florida and help to make train
travel an affordable option in
our region."
The language in HR 2095
requires Amtrak to submit
a plan to Congress that will
include a projected timeline
for restoring service between
New Orleans and Sanford, as
well as the associated costs
for reinstating this service. In
developing the plan, Amtrak
will consult with represen-
tatives from the states of
Florida, Louisiana, Alabama,
and Mississippi, railroad car-
riers whose tracks may be


used for such service, and rail
passengers.
Prior to its closing in 2005,
Sunset Limited's North Florida
stops included Crestview,
Chipley, Tallahassee, Madison,
Lake City, and Jacksonville.
Amtrak recently reported
a ridership record for Fiscal
Year 2008, which ended on
Sept. 30, with 28.7 million pas-
sengers, largely due to high
gas prices.
"Amtrak provided a valu-
able service to many Floridi-
ans," Boyd stated, "In this time
of rising fuel costs, passenger
rail service would provide
the people of North Florida
with more transportation op-
tions and add an important
economic development tool
to the area."


2-1-1 awarded re-accreditation


2-1-1 Big Bend, Inc. (for-
merly known as Telephone
Counseling & Referral Service
- TCRS) was recently awarded
a five year re-accreditation by
the Alliance of Information
and Referral Systems (AIRS).
Furthermore, its volunteer
recruitment and hotline coun-
selor training program was
recognized by AIRS as a na-
tional "best practice."
The agency is one of 98


similar programs that are
accredited by AIRS in the
United States and Canada.
The national accreditation
program added several new
criteria since 2-1-1 Big Bend
first became accredited in
2003, including standards re-
lated to disaster preparedness
and crisis intervention.
"Our staff spent the past
year completing extensive
documentation and imple-


meeting program enhance-
ments to earn this re-accredi-
tation. I am very proud of
our agency's accomplishment
and the recognition of our
volunteer program," said 2-1-
1 Big Bend President, Randy
Nicklaus, "As a result of this
process, we are more pre-
pared than ever to help our
community, especially in the
area of suicide prevention and
disaster response."


Christmas Bonus *
at the


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A dance party to benefit Frends of Wakula Springs
Live music by

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Friday, December 5th, 8:00-10:30pm

Wakulla Springs State Park Lodge

Admission $15/Individual or $25/Couple

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*A Buffet Dinner
is available at the
Lodge between
6:00 and 8:00 pm
(not included in
admission price)

*Want to stay
overnight?
The Lodge is
offering a special
room rate of
$79 (plus tax).
Call 926-0700
to make your
reservations.


I M. Sp cctiia,








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008 Page 13A


Election complaint


Continued on Page 5A
Peck also claimed that ob-
servers were required to sign
an oath to watch the canvass-
ing board perform the recount.
"Although requiring public ob-
servers to sign the form you
described would not violate
any applicable provision of
the Florida Election Code, it
clearly would be inappropri-
ate. The Department does
not sanction any procedures
that unreasonably restrict
the public's right of access to
such meeting. If a person was
denied access to the recount
for refusal to sign this form,


this may form the basis of a
violation under Government
in the Sunshine law."
In an interview last week,
Judge Jill Walker, who chairs
the canvassing board, noted
that an elections' employee
did mistakenly pass around
a clipboard with an oath for
sign-in. The oath is for those
who are observers in the ballot
counting room and is basically
a pledge not to disturb any
materials. On election night,
it is typical for the sheet with
the oath to be passed around
amongst everyone present to
see ballots being counted at


the recount, the employee
apparently assumed it would
be required for the numer-
ous observers and passed it
around until several citizens
complained that they were
signing a pledge that they had
witnessed no fraud.
Ahrendt sent a several-page
letter to the Department of
State claiming past election
improprieties such as an al-
legation of ballot-stuffing in
that the Sopchoppy precinct,
late to come in four years ago
and with just enough votes
to re-elect a county commis-
sioner over a challenger. The


margin in that race was three
votes.
Ahrendt also laid out a
web of relationships that she
claimed appeared improper
- for example, that Nick Routa,
the technician for Inspired
Technologies which handles
technical issues, is the son of
attorney Robert Routa, who
represents numerous pro-
growth clients.
The observers report of the
primary election found no
major problems.
Overall, observers found
poll workers and elections
staff to be professional, cour-


teous and dedicated to per-
forming their duties. However,
a number of instances suggest
that poll workers were either
inadequately trained or poorly
executed voting protocols
or polling place procedures
including poll closing. Those
poll workers who did not fol-
low procedures should not be
hired again. Areas of focus for
poll worker training including
but not limited to:
1. Posting of notices includ-
ing voting rights.
2. Procedures for allowing
persons who fail or forget to
bring photo or signature iden-


tification to vote a provisional
ballot.
3. Laws on voting on touch
screen versus optical scan
machines.
4. Clearly marking the no-
solicitation zone.
5. Following proper proto-
cols for closing polls including
properly securing voting ma-
chines and chain-of-custody
documentation.
The observers also sug-
gested that the supervisor
and other staff become cross-
trained to reduce the reliance
on Inspired Technologies.


Obituaries Tallahassee man charged in attempted
Continued from Page 4A


Rodney L. Crosby
Rodney Lane Crosby, 59, of
Crawfordville died Nov. 21, at
his home in Wakulla County
where he lived close to his
family for several years,
A memorial services will be
held, Saturday, Nov. 29, at 10
a.m. at Harvey Young Funeral
Home in Crawfordville. In lieu
of flowers, donations may be
made to a Wakulla Bank ac-
count set up for the family and
memorial services or donated
to your favorite charitable or-
ganization in his name.
A native of Biloxi, Miss. he
was a resident of Savannah,
Ga., he was a Vietnam vet-
eran. After leaving the Navy,
he became a long-time truck
driver for Trailer Bridge Truck-
ing Company. He traveled
for many years until he was
forced to retire due to medical
conditions. He spent the rest
of his life devoting himself
to being the best husband,
father, grandfather and friend
he could be. Rodney never
met a stranger and never met
anyone he could not make
smile.
Survivors include his wife
of 19 years, Theresa Crosby;
his mother, Pearl Gregory; two
daughters, Leigh Key and hus-
band Jerry and Heather Starr; a
brother, Woodrow Crosby; and
a sister, Janet Canady.
Harvey-Young Funeral
Home in Crawfordville is in
charge of the arrangements.

Etta M. C. Pelt
Etta Mae Council Pelt, 90, of
Crawfordville died on Sunday,
Nov. 23, surrounded by her,
family.
,The funeral service will be
Wednesday, Nov. 26, at 11 a.m.
at River of Life Church with
burial at Pelt Cemetery. Visita-
tion will be Tuesday, Nov. 25,
from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at River
of Life Church.
In lieu of flowers, contribu-


U


tions can be made to Big Bend
Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center
Blvd. Tallahassee, FL 32308.
She was born July 7,1918 in
Crawfordville and lived here
all of her life. She was a lov-
ing, devoted wife, mother and
grandmother. She loved to go
to church, Pickin' and Grinnin'
at the Senior Citizens Center,
work in her garden and going
fishing.
In WWII, she trained at
Lively to work on sheet metal
and was a "Rosie the Riv-
eter" working on planes in
Orlando.
Survivors include a son,
Willie Pelt and Janis; four
daughters Etta Jo Oliver and
Ralph, Vera Wirick, Brenda
McCarthy and Gene and Car-
men Sapp and Broward; 12
grandchildren; 19 great-grand-
children and many nieces and
nephews.
Harvey-Young Funeral
Home is in charge of arrange-
ments,


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
A 30-year-old Crawfordville
man faces charges of attempt-
ed second degree murder and
shooting into an occupied
vehicle in connection with a
Saturday, Nov. 22 disturbance
at 187 Sunset Lane in Craw-
fordville, according to Sheriff
David Harvey.
As the investigation contin-
ued into early Sunday morn-
ing, at approximately 12:15
a.m., Hensley S. Duncan, was
charged.
Duncan was allegedly in-
volved in a disturbance with
his girlfriend, Ashley Hereford,
22, of Tallahassee at 187 Sun-
set Lane, located on the east
side of Wakulla County. The
disturbance apparently oc-
curred outside the residence.
Duncan called the Wakulla


Big Bend Hospice
and the
Wakulla County
Advisory Council
invite you to attend the

S200S ez ice at

XtI I ('il ( I/ ({ f lCL

Friday. December 5
6:30 PMl
Hudson Park
Crabfordville

Come light a candle and honor
Sa loved one. This time of
healing and remembrance is
open to e\ervone.


A Free Press
Your Key
To Freedom


Your Hometoin Hospice
Ucensed Since 1983
i For more info. call
Pam Allbntton: (850) 508-8749


County Sheriff's Office, stating
his girlfriend had accidentally
shot herself in the face with a
rifle. After Paramedics arrived
on the scene and transported
the victim to Tallahassee
Memorial Hospital, Detective
Jason Newlin and Detective
Scott Powell transported Dun-
can to the Sheriff's Office for
questioning. Evidence was
also collected at the scene.
After interviewing Duncan
at the Sheriff's Office, he was
arrested and booked into the
Wakulla County Jail due to
inconsistencies in his story
and the evidence inside the
vehicle. She had been shot
with a .22 caliber weapon.
The victim was taken to Tal-
lahassee Memorial Hospital in
critical condition and under-
went surgery. Her condition
was later upgraded to stable.



Sustainable

Green Li

E


Duncan and Hereford have
a one year old child together.
The child was turned over to .
state officials until she can be
turned over to relatives.
The investigation included
Lt. Ray Johnson, Lt. C.L. Mor-
rison, Det. Jason Newlin, Det.
Scott Powell, Captain Chris
Savary, Captain Randall Taylor,
Sgt. Eddie Wester and Deputy
Robert Giddens.


More law enforcement
news on Page 16A and Hensley S. Duncan is
Page 17A accused of shooting his
girlfriend in the head on
Saturday, Nov. 22.

KEEP AMERICA BEAUTIFUL MONTH



KEEP. IT CLEAN



le Big Bend 3rd Annual

giving Energy Expo &

education Fair -


Riversprings Middle School
800 Spring Creek Hwy., Crawfordville


Show your support for Green Living and Saving Energy!
Call Christy Cherry at 850-728-0008 to sponsor the Expo!!
To volunteer at the Expo, call Heidi Holcomb at 850-926-7643.
Reserve your exhibit space today by calling
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Discover hundreds of the best products,
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Educational workshops, children's activities, vendors
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Find ways to create a simple, healthy lifel


second degree murder of girlfriend







Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008


People


Holidays expose pets to potential hazards Eden Springs has


CHA7T
Wakulla




SSusan Yelton
There is nothing better
than gathering with friends
and family for the holidays:
eating, drinking, and sharing
stories.
While enjoying this time
of the year, we hope you will
remember that your furry
friends are going to be ex-
posed to potential hazards
that certain foods and decor
can pose.
I know how easy it is to
slip your dog a few pieces of
"people food" when they are
giving you that special look or
give you their paw. My dogs
can be absolutely obnoxious
when we have a house full of
guest for dinner.
But caving in to your pet's


wants is not in their best inter-
est. Any change of diet, even
for one meal, can give your
dog or cat severe indigestion
and diarrhea. So please don't
give your pets holiday left-
overs and try to keep them out
of the garbage. Poultry bones
can splinter and cause block-
ages, while greasy, spicy and
fatty food can cause stomach
upset.
If your plans include adult
holiday beverages, be sure to
place unattended alcoholic
drinks where pets can't reach
them. If a large amount is in-
gested, your pet can become
weak and very sick. It might
taste good going down, but
the end result could be an
emergency trip to a veterinary
hospital.
I know we will have some
chocolate desserts at my
home on Thanksgiving. And
that means I will have to keep
an eye on my dogs while I am
baking. Chocolate, especially
baker's chocolate and dark


chocolate can be potentially
poisonous to animals, espe-
cially dogs.
Symptoms of significant
chocolate ingestion may in-
clude vomiting, diarrhea,
hyperactivity and increased
thirst and urination, as well as
abnormal heart rate/rhythm.
Candies containing the
sweetener xylitol can be poi-
sonous to dogs. Even in small
amounts it can cause a sudden
drop in blood sugar, which
leads to lack of coordina-
tion, seizures and even liver
failure.
In my family, it would not
be Thanksgiving without a
retell of the "Skeeter Story,"
a tale about my brother's cat.
Not all cats like Thanksgiving
or a lot of strange people in
their home. Skeeter fit that
category of cat.
Several years ago, we cel-
ebrated Thanksgiving at the
brother's home in Chicago.
At the end of the day, when
we could not find Skeeter, our


worry was that he somehow
got out the door when the
children were coming and
going.
For almost two days there
was no sign of Skeeter. When
he finally surfaced, he had
been hiding in a cabinet
drawer where my sister-in-law
kept her dish towels. We will
never know how he got there,
but the moral of the story is
please take extra care of the
emotional needs of your cats
when you have a house full
of company. Many of them
really don't like all the noise
and confusion.
And when Thanksgiving
Day winds down, what bet-
ter way to end the day than
taking a leisurely walk with
your dog. I know they will
enjoy the exercise and if you
ate as much as I will, it sure
helps with the diet. On behalf
of all of us at CHAT I extend
our best wishes for a Happy
Thanksgiving.


Some signs do not comply with rules


A recent investigation by
County Code Enforcement of-
ficials determined that many
signs throughout the county
do not comply with the cur-
rent sign ordinance. Lately,
Code Enforcement has been
working with citizens on an
action plan to address these
issues, said Code Enforcement
Officer Jaime Baze.
Code Enforcement is con-
centrating on the short term
signs in the entire county.
"Short term" signs are por-
table, short term attention


Relay even
The Wakulla Bank Commu-
nity Room was transformed hi
into a miniature version of Re
the Wakulla High School track Li
when Relay for Life held its ei
*fall kick off event Thursday, e3
'Nov. 13. Representatives
'from 15 teams and numerous
committee volunteers staged
a mini-Relay, cramming 18
hours into one with entertain-
ment, walking, refreshments,
and prizes.
Event Chair Dalynda Vause
announced this year's theme
during the kick off event,
"Spotlight on the Oscars."
Representatives from the fol-
lowing registered teams were
in attendance: Ameris Bank,
Wakulla Bank, Wakulla Pre-K,
Shadeville Elementary, River-
springs Middle School, Craw-
fordville United Methodist,
Hot Mammas, two Wal-Mart
teams, sheriff's office volun-
teers, Spirit of Hope, Links in
Life, The Academy, Gulf State
Community Bank, and the
Wakulla High School Rotary
Interact Club.
According to Relay com-
mittee member Linda Stalvey,
"The 2009 Wakulla goals are
to raise $50, 000, to have 40
teams participate, and to
honor 110 survivors during
the event." Monthly meetings
will begin Jan. 8.


getting devices, pennants
and flags. This is a friendly
reminder to all property own-
ers who use a short term sign.
Sign users must apply for a
temporary use permit from
the Planning and Community
Development Department
located at 3093 Crawfordville
Highway, by Dec. 1, or remove
the sign from the property.
A copy of the sign ordi-
nance is published on the
county's web page under Code
Enforcement section of the
Wakulla County Building Divi-


t is held
For more information;
ow to participate in the
elay event, please co
inda Stalvey at Istal
nbarqmail.com or 297-
xt. 3707.


about
S2009
ntact
vey@
0588,


sion at www.mywakulla.com
or you can obtain a copy at
the Planning and Community
Development Department.
If you have any questions
please contact Jaime Baze,
Code Enforcement at 926-7636
Monday through Friday dur-


ing the business hours of 8
a.m. to 5 p.m.
"Thank you for your co-
operation and help us keep
Wakulla County a beautiful
place to live," Baze conclud-


new administrator


Eden Springs Nursing and
Rehab Center in Crawfordville
is pleased to announce the
recent hiring of their new
administrator, Chuck Cascio.
Cascio has more than 15 years
of healthcare experience.
Cascio received his Bach-
elor's degree in Accounting,
graduating from Louisiana
State University in 1985. He suc-
cessfully completed the Admin-
istrator in Training program in
1993 with Beverly Enterprises
in Atlanta, Ga. He then moved
to Houston, Texas in 1994 to
learn long-term acute care be-
fore transferring to Tallahassee
in 1996.
From 2001 to 2006, he gained
vast knowledge of long-term
care operations as regional
vice president for Sea Crest
Healthcare management. Cas-
cio formerly served two terms
as the administrator at Heritage
Healthcare Center in Tallahasse
from 1996 to 1999 and again
from 2006 to mid 2008.
On a personal note, he
lives in Tallahassee with his
wife and eight children. He is
an avid LSU Tiger fan. Chuck
is very active in church and
family activities. He stated he
is very excited about his new-


est career venture, he said he
loves the wonderful natural
environment Wakulla County
provides as a backdrop for
Eden Springs.
He stated that there are
three distinctive attributes of
Eden Springs that sets it apart
from the other nursing and
rehab centers.
The kind and caring
staff.
The personal touch pro-
vided by staff for the residents
and their families.
The special sense of com-
munity that exists within the
facility.
Cascio looks forward to
meeting with the citizens of
Wakulla County. He is very
interested in discussing the
specific ways Eden Springs can
continue to be an active com-
munity partner and collaborate
with local agencies. Specifi-
cally, in providing innovative
services to effectively serve
and meet the special needs
of Wakulla's elderly citizens
and provide them with the
world class geriatric health care
they deserve. Chuck cordially
encourages everyone to con-
tact him at 926-7181 to share
thoughts and ideas.


Senior @ Seven
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COUNTY%.'
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Wellness Exams HOSPITAL


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healthier life for your pet.

Dogs & cats should be carefully monitored from day one, especially after the
age of 7, which is like 44-56 in human years. From puppy to adulthood, you
should be monitoring for common diseases like heartworm, thyroid disease,
intestinal parasites and, most importantly, renal disease. As dogs and cats
age, just like you, arthritis can become a crippling problem. Early
detection can really help extend your pets life.

*Take the Test! Early Detection Questionnaire*


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Change in activity level

_Change in appetite or weight

_ Change in attitude

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Sneezing

_Incontinence

_ Lumps or bump under skin

_ Shaking head

_ Constipation, diarrhea

Noticeable decrease in vision

_Confusion

_ Change in sleep patterns


November is Pet Senior Wellness Month


*Schedule your pet's Senior Wellness Workup
and receive 20% off wellness testing.*

Good until Dec. 31


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can provide additional information about
the benefits of early detection.
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REPORT OF POST ELECTION
CERTIFICATION VOTING
SYSTEM AUDIT ACCORDING TO
RULE 1S-5.026

Precint 12 and Constitutional Amendment
No. 6 was randomly drawn and audited

YES 915
NO 492
UNDERVOTES 174
QUESTIONABLE 1

Results had one No vote as questionable.


NOTICE OF SPECIAL
MEETING 2008 BOARD
PRIORITY ANNUAL
RETREAT
THE WAKULLA COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
WILL HOLD A SPECIAL MEETING
MONDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2008
FROM 12:00NOON 4:00P.M.
AT THE WAKULLA SPRINGS LODGE
DOGWOOD CONFERENCE ROOM
LOCATED AT
550 WAKULLA PARK DRIVE

(850) 926-0700
FOR MORE INFORMATION
PLEASE CONTACT JESSICA WELCH,
OFFICE OF POLICY & PUBLIC INFORMATION
AT (850) 926-0919
Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-
English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the
Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners' Office at (850)'
926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.


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their elves, will arrive on a gift, courtesy of the sheriff's
horse drawn carriage courtesy volunteers.
of Guy Revell. All children will have an
Because oftheelfknownas opportunity to win a com-
Ben Withers, there willbe spin puter. Two bikes will also
art and face painting as well as be given away, one for a boy
Coo Coo the Clown with his and another for a girl. The
magic balloons, a train ride only thing they have to do to
and Moonwalkers inflatables. win is be there. The drawing
All children who visit Santa will take place shortly before
will be given one free family 8 p.m.
picture with him and a small


Service of Remembrance set


Big Bend Hospice and the
Wakulla Advisory Council
will host their annual Service
of Remembrance on Friday,
Dec. 5 at 6:30 p.m. at Hudson
Park, 21 Ochlockonee Street,
Crawfordville.
"This will be my very first
Service of Remembrance in
Wakulla County," said Pam
Raker Allbritton. "I am really
looking forward to it, espe-
cially the candle lighting cer-
emony where I can say aloud
the names of loved ones who


have passed before me."
The Service also features
music and words of comfort.
The Trees of Remembrance are
adorned, for a donation, with
gold ribbons, porcelain bells
and angels, each bearing a per-
sonal handwritten message,
providing an opportunity
to recognize and remember
those who are close to our
hearts. Refreshments will be
available following the cer-
emony which is free and open
to everyone in the community.


Donations made go directly to
providing care, comfort and
hope to Big Bend Hospice
patients and their families
in Wakulla, and can be made
at the following locations:
Ameris Bank, Crawfordville,
Capital City Bank, Crawford-
ville, Gulf State Community
Bank, Crawfordville, Wakulla
Bank, Crawfordville.
For more information,
please contact Pam Raker
Allbritton at (850) 508-8749 or
pamal@bigbendhospice.org.


FWMA News and Notes


By JUDY COOKE Hospital, Shepherd Spring
Special to The Wakulla News Animal Hospital or may be
FWMA BINGOI Bingo has purchased by calling FWMA
started and it's great fun. at 363-2351.
Come join us Thursday night FWMA is out of newspa-
and bring a friend. We will pers. If you save newspapers
take a break Thanksgiving for recycling, please consider
Thursday but be back at it the donating them to FWMA in-
first three weeks in December. stead. You can drop them by
Join us from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. FWMA located at 198 Edgar
at Hamaknockers Oasis. It's a Poole Road in Crawfordville.
great way to have some fun Also, if anyone has any
and support the animals of green pine cones, please con-
FWMA at the same time. sider taking them to FWMA.
The FWMA Annual Christ- Green pine cones are getting
mas Tree sale is underway, harder and harder to find and
Trees are decorated and ready we could really use any you
to go. They are $15 each. The can find.
trees are live Red Cedars, two Remember to mark your
to three feet tall and potted calendars for the FWMA an-
in a half gallon pot. Each is nual meeting. It will be held
uniquely decorated with a va- on Saturday, Jan. 17 at 11 a.m.
riety of colors and ornaments, at the Inn at Wildwood. This
These make excellent gifts for meeting will be to discuss the
friends, family, neighbors and events of 2008 and our plans
co-workers. for 2009.
They are currently available This meeting is open to the
at Wakulla County Animal public. There will be a pot luck
Subscribe to
~1e l Wakulla 9 et-s7
Call Gary at 926-7102


luncheon. Bring your favorite
dish to share. Please RSVP to:
flwildmammal@yahoo.com
If any or all of these activi-
ties interest you and you'd like
to help out, please contact
Chris at 363-2351 or me at 984-
9980 or e-mail: fwmalover@
yahoo.com.
If you'd like more informa-
tion about FWMA or want to
be in contact with the group,
please send a message to:
fwmalover@yahoo.com.


Santa is coming to Craw-
fordville on Friday, Dec. 12.
between 5 p.m. and 8 p.m.
The Wakulla County Sher-
iff's Office volunteers and the
Wakulla County Parks and
Recreation Department are
bringing Santa and Mrs. Claus
to Azalea Park in Crawfordville
for the annual Christmas in
the Park celebration. Santa
and Mrs. Claus, along with


Tallahassee Democrat Al
Lawson on Monday, Nov. 17
was unanimously elected
Leader of the 14-member
Senate Democratic Caucus.
Senator Charlie Justice (D-
St. Petersburg) was similarly
chosen as Senate Democratic
Leader Pro-Tempore, the Cau-
cus' second in command.
"I'm deeply honored by
the choice of my colleagues
to lead this Caucus for the
next two years," said Senator
Lawson, who takes over not
just as the Senate Democrats'
24th Leader, but only the
second African American to
ever serve in the position.
"We face monumental chal-
lenges in our state, and we
will do everything possible to
safeguard our issues and our.
commitment as Democrats to
the people of Florida."
Among the priorities out-
lined by Lawson were pres-
ervation of adequate funding
to education, and continued
medical assistance to seniors,
children, and the poor. "Our
children and our seniors re-
main our weakest link," he
said. "We must continue to
pledge our assistance in medi-
cal care for those least able to
fend for themselves in these
hard economic times. Florida
should not become the 21st
century's incarnation of Dick-
ens' 19th century London."
Lawson also identified
protection of the state's envi-
ronment as a top issue, and
urged greater investment in
green technologies to jump
start Florida's economy. "Not


7Go Green


a new administration.
"We are fortunate to rep-
resent a state of determined
people who work hard and
expect the same in return. Let
us set our sights on resolving
the problems we face and
move our state in the direc-
tion the people have charted.
Let the change Floridians
unequivocally endorsed on
Nov. 4, 2008, begin in these
hallways today."

Happy first

birthday


only will our beaches, our
water, and our forests remain
pristine beacons to tourists
throughout the world but
new technology in clean in-
dustries will provide a shot in
the arm to Florida's economy
that remains too focused on
tourism to bring in needed
jobs and revenue."
Too long the target for
political purposes, Lawson
urged the state's Republican
leadership to rethink the im-
portance of state employees.
"The people who serve our
state are among the most
dedicated and the least ap-
preciated. From police officers
to child welfare investigators,
nursing assistants to motor
vehicle agents, they are the
threads that knit together the
government services on which
we all depend."
Noting the gridlock that
often impedes the delivery of
meaningful legislative solu-
tions, Senator Lawson urged
the state's leaders to reconsid-
er past methods and choices,
priorities and direction and to
heed the choice made by the
majority of Floridians. "The
presidential election which
just concluded was not just
historic, it was breathtaking,"
said Lawson. "If we learned
nothing else, it is the power
of the people to unite when
lawmakers cannot. It is the
ability of the citizens to force
change when their representa-
tives refuse. Right here, right
now, we have a fresh oppor-
tunity to harness the hope
and expectations inherent in


Happy first birthday to
Hunter Weeks on Nov. 17. He
is the son of Erika Weeks of
Medart and Gary Weeks of
Sopchoppy.
Grandparents are Sherry
and Wayne Willis of Sop-
choppy and Luther Sweigert
of Pennsylvania. He has a
memaw, Shari Hunt, and a big
brother, Cooper.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008 Page 15A

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008

Court Shorts


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.
net
A lifelong resident of
Wakulla County who had
worked for the school board
for 30 years was acquitted
at his jury trial of a charge
of attempting to buy crack
cocaine.
Oscar Nichols. who worked
at the district bus barn on the
Wakulla High School campus,
was surrounded by friends
and family in the courtroom
after his acquittal on Wednes-
day, Nov. 19.
Wakulla Circuit Judge N.
Sanders Sauls found there
was no evidence of an at-
tempted crime except Nichols'
own statements made to of-
ficers, which is not sufficient
for conviction of a crime.
The testimony at the trial
indicated that, on Sept. 3,
2007, Labor Day, Deputy Nick
Boutwell went to the high
school after receiving a tip
about a drug deal. He drove
up and found Nichols and a
reputed drug dealer standing
at the bed of the man's truck
talking. Boutwell watched the
men talk for a few minutes
and then went over to them,
searching the truck he found
crack cocaine in a BC Powder
envelope and $75 in Nichols'
pocket, afid another $1,000 in
Nichols' wallet.
Deputy Boutwell is now
a detective in the narcotics
unit.
Capt. Cliff Carroll arrived
on the scene and, after Nich-
ols had been given his Mi-
randa warning by Boutwell,
Nichols allegedly admitted
his intention to buy crack
cocaine.
"You're not doing crack,
are you?" Capt. Carroll said
he asked Nichols. No, he said
Nichols answered, saying
he was going to buy it for
his step-daughter, who has
a drug problem, because he
didn't want her out on the
street.
"I've known Oscar all my
life." Undersheriff Donnie
Crum testified, explaining


why Nichols came to his of-
fice to meet with him about
the case. Crum said Nichols
told him that he was trying to
keep his daughter away from
crackhouses, but Crum said
the criminal case was beyond
him at that point and that he
should meet with prosecu-
tors in the State Attorney's
office.
Attorney Christopher Nor-
ris, who represented Nichols
at the trial, made a motion
for a judgment of acquittal
contending there was no
evidence presented beyond
the defendant's admission.
"There has to be an attempt
coupled with an act," Norris
argued. "Preparation is not
enough."
Judge Sauls agreed. "There
is no act beyond standing at
the back of the pickup truck
talking about it," the judge
said.
To show there was an ac-
tual attempt to buy drugs, the
judge said, there had to be
some act "beyond just think-
ing or talking about it."
The man with him in the
truck who was allegedly in
possession of the drugs, has
been found incompetent to
criminal charges because of
mental issues and has been
sent to Florida State Hospital
in Chattahoochee.
A woman with an admit-
ted drug problem, released
from jail in August with a
five year suspended prison
sentence hanging over her
head, violated her probation
almost as soon as she was
let out. She failed to report
to her probation officer in
August, and when her proba-
tion officer went looking for
her at the Tallahassee address
where she said she lived, was
told she had taken off.
The woman, Shipley Smith,
34, was picked up on a war-
rant as an absconder on Oct.
3. At her violation of proba-
tion heating, Smith said she
knew she was supposed to
contact her probation officer
as soon as she was out, but
testified that she thought she


had 30 days to do it.
The man she was living
with at the time, report-
edly told her probation officer
back in August that she "took
off." Asked where she might
be, he replied: "Maybe she's
in Frenchtown."
Wakulla Circuit Judge N.
Sanders Sauls found by a
preponderance of the evi-
dence that Smith had violated
her probation, and that it
was willful and substantial.
"You can't supervise people
(on probation) when their
whereabouts are unknown,"
the judge said.
Assistant State Attorney
Jack Campbell asked for the
five year suspended prison
sentence to go into execution.
Smith has criminal history
that includes 18 prior mis-
demeanors, including pros-
titution. Arrested by a Tal-
lahassee Police detective last
year, she allegedly claimed
he raped her, Campbell said,
and served time in the Leon
County Jail.
"She's a manipulator." the
prosecutor said. "She's a drug
addict."
Judge Sauls noted that
Smith had pleaded to charges
in December 2007 and was
already in violation of her
probation a month after her
release. At her August VOP
hearing, Smith begged for an-
other chance from the court,
saying she had recently been
diagnosed as bi-polar and was
trying to set her life aright.
"I'm sorry that this de-
fendant is not amenable to
probation," Sauls said, and
Smith began to weep. "The
sentence will be carried into
execution" ordering her off
to prison.
Terry Lee Carden, 39, was
sentenced to the minimum-
mandatory of seven years in
prison for the manufacture
and trafficking of metham-
phetamine.
The sentence brought tears
of joy to Carden's family. He
had been facing a maximum
of life in prison, and Assistant
State Attorney Jack Campbell


had asked that he be sen-
tenced to 30 years in prison as
a habitual felony offender.
At a sentencing hearing in
October. Judge Sauls made a
finding that Carden met the
criteria as a habitual felony
offender. There was some
question whether the court
had any option under the law,
or must sentence him to life
in prison. The hearing was
continued until Thursday,
Nov. 13 to research the issue
further.
Being found a habitual fel-
ony offender brings harsher
criminal penalties.
After Sauls announced the
sentence, Campbell asked for
a clarification: was Carden
sentenced as a habitual of-
fender?
Sauls hedged his answer.
"Basically, I've sentenced
him," the judge said. "I'm not
sure I can answer the state."
A man and woman
facing drug charges after a
raid by the sheriff's Special
Weapons And Tactics team
were in court contending
that evidence against them
should be thrown out be-
cause the search warrant was
for a neighboring trailer. The
couple, Antonio Franklin, 28,
and Lakenya Harris, 29, had
moved from a trailer at 139
Grapevine Road next door to
one at 142 Grapevine after
their air-conditioner had gone
out a day or so before the
SWAT raid.
Testimony by officers at
the motion hearing, held
Thursday, Nov. 13, indicated
they planned the pre-dawn
raid on July 4 after investiga-
tion determined drugs were
being sold at the home. The
SWAT team entered the trailer
at 139 Grapevine and set off
a Flash-bang device, intended
to disorient people, but found
no one inside.
Capt. Cliff Carroll, head of
the sheriff's narcotics unit,
said he talked with neighbors
who told him that Franklin
and Harris had moved to the
next trailer.
Officers said a car was


attempting to drive away
from that trailer and they
stopped it and took Harris
into custody.
Sgt. Fred Nichols, who
serves on the SWAT team,
was headed toward the trailer
at 142 Grapevine and re-
ported-in that he could hear
somebody running through
the house and then bolt out
the back. "What do you want
us to do?" he asked his supe-
riors. "Go get 'em," was the
answer radioed back.
Deputy Joe Page used a
dog to track one of the men,
later identified as Reginald
McKinney. Franklin was taken
into custody at a later time.
Sgt. Nichols said that mem-
bers of the SWAT team en-
tered the trailer to be sure
nobody else was inside and
allegedly saw drugs in the
house. He radioed in that
information and Capt. Carroll
reportedly told the team to
back out and get a warrant
for a search.
Attorneys Elizabeth Peskin,
representing Franklin, and As-
sistant Public Defender Blair.
Boyd, representing Harris,
argued that officers did not
have probable cause for a
search of the neighboring
trailer and that any evidence
they found was improper and
should be thrown out.
Judge Sauls found, how-
ever, that the search was
pursuant to probable cause
and that the officers had a
warrant for the defendants
on felony charges. "Pursuit
of felons likely to flee is an
exigent circumstance." the
judge said.
A 38-year-old man with
a history of drug abuse and
sexually exposing himself
was sentenced to four years
in prison, with the prison
term suspended as long as
he completes four-and-a-half
years of probation.
The man, Christopher
Langston, was in court on
Thursday, Nov. 13, to be sen-
tenced for a violation of pro-
bation on cocaine charges by
violating an injunction and re-


peatedly walking in to a Craw-
fordville restaurant where his
ex-wife was eating, as well as
having a road rage confronta-
tion with some teenagers on
U.S. Highway 98 near the St.
Marks Express Lane.
"Your honor," he told the
court at his sentencing, "I'm
aware that I have made some
poor decisions." His attorney,
Elizabeth Peskin, called his
violations some "bumps in
the road" and asked that
Langston's probation be re-
instated.
"You can call them 'bumps
in the road,'" Judge Sauls an-
swered. "But these 'bumps'
are dangerous to others."
In the road rage incident,
Langston pulled onto High-
way 98 at Lower Bridge Road
and accelerated at a high rate
of speed behind a car being
driven by an 18-year-old wom-
an. The woman slowed down
as he approached, and as he
passed her she made a rude
gesture which prompted
him to begin tapping his
brakes. Near St. Marks Pow-
der and the Express Lane, he
stopped in the middle of the
highway and began yelling at
the woman. A young man in
the car with her got out, and
Langston challenged him to
fight. Langston got back in
his vehicle, but followed the
car around the Villages of St.
Marks and was later stopped
by deputies.
In the restaurant incident,
pick up a to-go order and saw
his ex-wife with the couple's
son and the ex-wife's boy-
friend at a booth. He report-
edly walked toward the table,
stopped, walked outside the
restaurant, and came back in
a couple of times. He said at
his VOP hearing that he was
overcome with emotion at
seeing his son.
Assistant State Attorney
Jack Campbell went through
Langston's criminal history,
which included arrests for
exposing himself to young
women in 1994 in Virginia
Beach, Va.
Continued on Page 17A


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008 Page 17A


Sheriff's Report


Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office officials investigated
a grand theft of the con-
tents of a vehicle reported
by Jonathan L. Allen of
Crawfordville on Nov. 19.
according to Sheriff David
Harvey.
Tools and electronics,
valued at $2,425, were re-
ported stolen. The truck was
left unlocked. Deputy Casey
Whitlock investigated.

In other activity report-
ed by the Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office during the
past week:
On Nov. 20, Marc Bow-
erman of Tallahassee re-
ported a grand theft of a lap
top computer from Wakulla
High School. The computer
was owned by Lively Tech-
nical Center and is valued
at $600. Deputy Jeff Barteld
investigated.
On Nov. 20, Patrick A.
Harvey of Sopchoppy report-
ed a criminal mischief as
someone broke out the win-


dows of his mobile home.
Evidence was collected at
the scene. Deputy Casey
Whitlock investigated.
On Nov. 20, Richard N.
Spooner of Crawfordville re-
ported a criminal mischief.
Two bicycles were moved
around on the property and
the tires were cut. Damage
was estimated at $100 and
suspects have been identi-
fied. Deputy William Hud-
son investigated.
On Nov. 20, Michael
V. Gatlin of Crawfordville
reported a grand theft of
a firearm. The victim was
involved in a motorcycle
accident and attempted to
locate his personal property
after being released from
the hospital. He said he lost
a 9 mm firearm. The weapon
is valued at $350 and was
entered in the NCIC/FCIC
computer. Deputy Vicki
Mitchell investigated.
On Nov. 21, Deputy
William Hudson investi-
gated a complaint of shots


being fired in Crawfordville
at the intersection of U.S.
Highway 98 and Red Oak
Lane. A witness helped law
enforcement officials dis-
cover a suspect vehicle and a
traffic stop was initiated by
Deputy Hudson. Sgt. Danny
Harrell observed a firearm in
the vehicle and blood spat-
tered on the trunk.
A whitetail doe was ob-
served in the trunk along
with a spotlight. Three male
subjects, Edward Clayton
Brogdon, 34, Joseph Brooks
Douglas, 34, and Max Ran-
dall Dunn, 50, all of Craw-
fordville, are discovered to
be convicted felons. They
were arrested for hunting
with a light at night, killing
a doe fawn or baby deer,
discharging a firearm from a
vehicle and possession of a
firearm by a convicted felon.
In addition, Deborah Ann
Hardy, 42, of Crawfordville,
faces the same charges with
the exception of the felony
firearm charge.


On Nov. 19, Audry A.
Warnick of Crawfordville
reported a fraudulent use of
her credit card. The card had
been used for a $1,000 wire
transfer at Western Union.
Another credit card had bo-
gus charges from a hotel in
St. Augustine. Deputy Vicki
Mitchell investigated.
On Nov. 19, Phyllis Su-
zanne Edwards of Crawford-
ville reported a credit card
fraud. Two charges from
Canada were discovered on
her credit card. The charges
totaled $78. Deputy William
Hudson investigated.
On Nov. 23, Robert L.
Henderson of Crawfordville
met Deputy Lindsay Allen
at the Wakulla EMS station
in Crawfordville after ac-
cidentally shooting himself
in the foot. The victim was
cleaning a .22 caliber rifle
when it went off and shot
his left foot. Deputy Allen


and Lt. Ray Johnson inves-
tigated the accident scene
and found no signs of foul
play.
On Nov. 21, Deputy
Lindsay Alien responded
to a structure fire on Otter
Lake Road in Panacea. Karla
Wood of Panacea reported
the fire in a bedroom of her
home. Wood and two male
juveniles escaped injury.
Fire Chief Jason Honeybone
said the fire was electrical
in nature. Damage was esti-
mated at $10,000. The state
Fire Marshal was also called
to the scene to investigate.
On Nov. 23, Brandon L.
Boxberger of Crawfordville
reported a burglary of his
home. A cell phone and
currency, valued at $400,
was taken. The home was
in disarray when the victim
returned. Deputies Sean
Wheeler and Jason Brooks
investigated.


On Nov. 22, Valda C.
Cook of Crawfordville re-
ported the theft of wallet
from Winn-Dixie as she
shopped. She reported $76
worth of personal property
being taken from the shop-
ping cart. Deputy Brad Tay-
lor investigated.
On Nov. 22, Kenneth
Todd Carlton of Crawford-
ville reported a theft at Wil-
wood Country Club. A total
of $40 worth of gasoline
was stolen from the main-
tenance shed. A suspect has
been identified. Deputy Ben
Steile investigated.
The Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office received 675
calls for service during the
past week.
Note to our readers: The
people who are reported as
charged with crimes in this
column have not yet been to
trial and are therefore inno-
cent until proven guilty.


Court Shorts


Continued from Page 16A
On several occasions since
1996 in Leon County where he
would go to the Florida State
campus in a car and pleasure
himself in front of co-eds.
Campbell said Langston has
issues controlling his impuls-
es, and that even years after
receiving on-going treatment,
continues to have difficulty
controlling himself.
Langston was on proba-
tion in Wakulla County after
he was arrested on an out-
of-county warrant and, while
being booked into the jail,
baggies with cocaine residue
were found in his boot and
socks. The weight of the co-
caine was only one-tenth of a
gram, but possession of any
amount of cocaine is a felony
in Florida.
SA 48-year-old crane opera-
tor who sold all his belong-
ings and was basically living
in a tent expecting he would
be sent to prison, got off


with a suspended five year
prison sentence as long as
he can complete 20 years of
probation.
Last month, Bill Taylor
entered a plea straight up
- that is, without any sort of
agreement with the state to
charges of attempted murder
with a firearm, kidnapping to
terrorize with a firearm, ag-
gravated battery with a deadly
weapon, and shooting within
a building. He was arrested
in June 2007 for grabbing his
then-girlfriend out a car, drag-
ging her into the house, where
he shot at her, beat her and
choked her.
Defense attorney Adam
Ruiz acknowledged that what
happened "could have been a
lot worse" that night. At past
court appearances, Taylor has
indicated his defense would
be that he lost control as part
of a bad reaction to some pre-
scription medications.
Assistant State Attorney


Jack Campbell called Taylor
"a ticking bomb" and noted
that, on the night of the as-
sault, Taylor shot the bed
with the victim on it, shot a
picture frame, and beat her.
Campbell asked the court to
sentence Taylor to five years
in prison followed by a life
term of probation.
The victim has appeared
at numerous hearings in the
past, mostly requesting that
any court order that Taylor
have no contact with her be
lifted. Ruiz told the court that
he asked her not be in court
for the sentencing. When
Campbell said the pre-sen-
tence investigation indicated
that Taylor intends to marry
the woman, Ruiz said he ad-
vised Taylor to stay away from
her because "she's part of the
problem."
As part of the sentence,
Judge Sauls ordered Taylor to
take all reasonable efforts to
avoid the woman.


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Page 18A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008

U.S. Post Office pleased with

performance in North Florida


The North Florida District
met the national on-time per-
formance scores for the deliv-
ery of First-Class Mail during
the fourth quarter of fiscal year
(FY) 2008. The fourth quarter
covers July, August and Sep-
tember 2008.
Since 1990, the Postal Ser-
vice has contracted with an
independent agency to ob-
jectively measure First-Class
Mail service performance.
IBM Global Business Services
reviews and measures the
delivery performance of First-
Class Mail from the time it is
deposited into a collection
box or lobby mail chute until
it is delivered to a home or
business.


"These successful delivery
scores are the product of postal
employees who work together
to give the American public
the best service possible," said
Southeast Area Vice President
Terry Wilson. "Customers can
rely upon the Postal Service
to meet all their shipping and
mailing needs."
"We continue to make every
effort to exceed our custom-
ers' expectations," said North
Florida District Manager,
James Nemec.
National fourth quarter of
FY 2008 delivery service scores
for all three categories of mail
the Postal Service tracks are:
Overnight service, 97
percent on-time for the second


consecutive quarter.
Two-day service, 94 per-
cent on-time and,
Three-day service, 93 per-
cent on-time.
With the beginning of the
new fiscal year, the Postal
Service has implemented new
service standards with a new
measurement system which
will result in expanded and
more accurate guidelines for
customers on how long it
should take for the Postal Ser-
vice to deliver different types
of mail from origin to desti-
nation. The first reporting
of the new service standards
will occur early next year fol-
lowing the conclusion of the
first quarter of FY 2009.


Springs hosts Big Kahunas


WAKULLA
SPRINGS NEWS
By Jeff Hugo

It was an evening I still
remember, the last Friday in
November of 2007. Friends
and neighbors from all over
Wakulla County came together
under the painted cypress ceil-
ing of Wakulla Springs Lodge.
If there had been ideological
differences among the attend-
ees they melted away beneath
broad smiles as they danced
to the 1960s and 1970s rock
of the Big Kahunas. Through
the gracious generosity of the
Big Kahunas and the sponsor-
ship of the Friends of Wakulla
Springs, the event proved to
be a major fundraiser for the
park's citizen support organi-
zation.
Of the people I spoke with
following the event, I received
the impression that they had
hoped this party supporting
Wakulla Springs could have
gone on and on. Or at very
least, been repeated on a
monthly or quarterly basis.


But the demands of real life
too often interfere with its
joys. And now a year has
passed. It's time to break out
the "creature" lights once
again and prepare for the re-
turn of the Big Kahunas.
The evening of celebration
will begin at 8 p.m. on Friday,
Dec. 5 in the Wakulla Springs
Lodge. The cost for the event
is only $15 per person or $25
per couple. The funds will
benefit projects the Friends
of Wakulla Springs provide
for the park.
The Big Kahunas are a mag-
nanimous group of attorneys
and professionals from the
Tallahassee area who donate
their time and talent to help
worthy causes. As was evident
from last year's event, they
were a band that wanted to
have fun and make it possible
for people to dance.
There was even a special
appearance by the Creature
from the Black Lagoon. No,
it wasn't a re-showing of
the movie made at Wakulla
Springs more than 50 years
ago, but a special appearance
by the "Creature" himself,


fresh from the swamp. Need-
less to say, many of the ladies
had to have a spin around the
dance floor with this unusual
guest.
If that wasn't special
enough, a number of the
partygoers made the evening
a singular experience by en-
joying dinner in the Ballroom
Restaurant of the Lodge. The
fine food and service of the
dining room was a great start
to the evening's festivities.
Those who were visiting from
greater distances found they
could enjoy a guest room in
the lodge for a special dis-
counted price (only $79) if
they mentioned that they had
come for the dance.
Dinner along with special
room rates will be available
once again on Friday evening
Dec. 5. Please be certain to
give the front desk a call at
(850) 926-0700 to make your
reservations for dinner and/or
your room.
Put on your dancing shoes
and come prepared to have a
great time, in a great place, for
a great cause.


By BARBARA HINES
Special to The Wakulla News
A dinner was held to honor
Betty Green Thursday, Nov. 20.
The Rotary Club sponsored
the event at the Senior Center
in Crawfordville.
More about the event is
in the newsletter from Bar-
bara Hines. You can see the
newsletter if you go to google-
groups.com and enter Wakulla
Historical Society.
Why not bookmark or add
this page to your favorites?
That way you can keep up
with what is going on with
the Wakulla folks interested
in all of our history.
This is also a plea for some-
one who has some time at
home to help send out letters.
From time to time about 80
letters are mailed to members
who do not have e-mails. The
envelopes, labels and stamps
are provided, and the contents
as well. Madeleine Carr is
the corresponding secretary
who will need help doing
this between January and
August next year while she
is off teaching U.S. history to
Chinese college students in
China.


Please visit us at Christmas volunteer.
in Sopchoppy and tell every- 12-9-2008: Board meeting
one about this. at 5:30 p.m. at the library. No
Mays L. Gray was guest general meeting.
speaker at our November 12-13-2008: Christmas in
meeting. He discussed his Sopchoppy. We will be selling
most recent book, "A Letter WCHS merchandise. Contact
From Lincoln". It is an amaz- Madeleine Carr to volunteer
ing story of the rescue of (carrmadeleine@yahoo.com)
a young woman, Elizabeth 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Come and
Smith, from Newport dur- see the gingerbread house
ing the Civil War. If you are (and buy the siding).
interested in purchasing his 1-13-2009: Board meeting at
book please let me know, and 5:30 p.m., General meeting at 7
I will forward a message to p.m. Sammy Tedder, musician
Mr. Gray. will be presenting
We will not be having a Happy Holidays and Happy
general meeting in December New Yearl
due to the holidays. However, For all the veterans who
we will be meeting on Jan. 13 were not at the November
at 7 p.m. at the library, meeting, I would like to thank
It is going to be a great you for your service to our
meeting to get the New Year country Also, if you ordered
off to a fun and exciting start, a Heritage Book for a Christ-
Our presenter is going to be mas gift, Betty Green will be
musician Sammy Tedder. Until sending out gift certificates
then, have a safe and wonder- for you to give your loved
ful holiday season. one, the books will be here,
Upcoming Events: but possibly not in time for
12-6-2008: Fall Fling at the Christmas.
library from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. If you ever need to contact
We will be selling WCHS me for any reason, feel free.
merchandise. Contact Bar- Email:barbarahines20@yahoo.
bara Hines (barbarahines20@ com, Phone: 850-421-2283.
yahoo.com or 850-421-2283) to


Sexual predator changes address
The Wakulla County Sher- Sutcliffe was originally Sutcliffe is NOT WANTED.
iff's Office is required to re- released from the Florida For more information, con-
lease information regarding Department of Corrections in tact the Wakulla County Sher-
the movement of registered April 2002 for a sexual crime iff's Office Persons Crimes
sexual predators living in involving a child less than 10 Unit at 926-0820 or 926-0844,
Wakulla County. Clifford W. years of age. This information or visit the Florida Depart-
Sutcliffe recently moved to is being released in accordance ment of Law Enforcement
243-B Otter Lake Road, Pana- with Florida Statute 775.21 for web site at www.offender.fdle.
cea. notification purposes only. state.fl.us.

Share the road with others


The Florida Department
of Highway Safety and Motor
Vehicles is kicking off a public
awareness campaign, called
Share the Road, to remind mo-
torists to use courtesy when
driving and to watch out for
pedestrians, bicyclists and mo-
torcyclists. After all, the road
belongs to everyone.
"Florida's roadways are
busy with more than 18 mil-


lion residents and approxi-
mately 88 million visitors each
year," said Electra Theodor-
ides-Bustle, executive director
of the Department of Highway
Safety and Motor Vehicles. "As
more of us explore cost-saving
and environmental-conscious
commuting options, it is im-
portant that we are aware and
considerate to everyone on
the road. Share the Road is a


basic reminder of driver cour-
tesy and safety."
At any given time, Florida
hosts millions of passenger
cars and trucks, thousands of
buses hauling children and
groups of adult workers and
visitors, thousands of large
commercial trucks and trail-
ers hauling heavy loads of
products.


Smile Makeover Package.


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embarrassed to meet new people? Do you feel your smile
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tions? Many people who have suffered their entire life can
now easily overcome this with a smile makeover. The time
is now to experience your own life changing smile. We have
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The holidays are coming quick so call now to change your
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Looking Forward To Seeing You
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^^^(850)926-6241 \^^^ ORM^^^^B


Historical Society News


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S-WV __L .







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008 Page 19A


YMCA Camp Indian Springs helps parents save


money and get ready for summer camp


Though temperatures are
just starting to get chilly around
most of the country, YMCA
Camp Indian Springs reminds
parents that it is never too early
(or too late) to start looking for
fun activities for kids to do this
summer, including camp.
As the pioneer of "sleep-
away" camp, YMCAs have been
serving communities for more
than 150 years and YMCA
Camp Indian Springs is a won-
derful choice for parents who
are looking for a safe and fun
place to send their kids this
summer.
"Children are our greatest
treasures and greatest responsi-
bility," said A.L. Ferreira, Camp
Executive Director. "YMCA


camps help kids have fun, grow
positively, meet healthy role
models and learn good values.
We not only provide memories
that last a lifetime, but we also
assure parents that their kids
are in good hands."
"Our early registration pe-
riod has begun," said Ferreira.
Early registration is offered
each year and basically ex-
tends this year's fees for 2009.
"It will be an average of $40
savings per child per session
for our overnight camp experi-
ence," said Ferreira. Interested
families may visit the YMCA
Camp Indian Springs web site
at www.campindiansprings.
org for dates and rates and
the convenience of registering


on line.
According to the American
Camp Association, more than
11 million children and adults
attend camp each year. Activi-
ties include swimming, exciting
trips and overnights, horseback
riding, archery, sailing, canoe-
ing, tennis, arts and crafts,
fishing, street hockey, rock
climbing, soccer, basketball,
volleyball, family evenings and
theme days. But determining
when children are ready to
go to camp and finding the
best match can be difficult for
parents.
"Good camps fulfill a par-
ent's No. 1 concern-safety-
while supplying experiences
and lessons in character and


friendship that parents can't
provide on their own." Ferreira
said. "Good camps also pro-
vide a positive and inclusive
atmosphere in which to grow
that satisfies a child's need to
belong."
The YMCA Camp Indian
Springs offers the following
helpful tips to help parents
choose the best camping expe-
rience for their child:
Know your options. When
looking for a camp, parents
should start with the Ameri-
can Camp Association (ACA),
which accredits camps across
the country to ensure they
meet the highest standards.
YMCA camps are accredited by
the ACA.


Know your budget. Re-
member, camp does not have
to be expensive. Camps are
available for every price range,
and some YMCA camps offer
scholarship assistance.
Know your wants. Fami-
lies should consider what they
want for their child from the
camp experience, e.g. a fun va-
cation from school or a chance
to build new skills. YMCA
camps vary, with some highly
structured and others offering
kids greater flexibility in setting
schedules.
Know your child's readi-
ness. On average, 8-year-olds are
ready for "sleepover" camp. To
ease the transition, kids should
experience sleeping over at a


friend's or relative's house at
least one night before going
to overnight camp. Day camps
are another option available for
children of all ages.
Know the camp. Review
camp brochures or web sites.
Call to ask staff questions
about activities, policies and
special needs for your child.
Seek references from other
families whose children have
attended the camps you are
considering.
Know your child's wants.
Don't forget to include your
child in the decision-making
process. Visit the camp with
your child and take a tour to-
gether before making a final
decision.


Florida DEP continues restoration of rivers, lakes, estuaries


Florida has marked an-
other significant milestone
in its comprehensive strategy
to address waterbody restora-
tions around the state. As part
of the Total Maximum Daily
Load (TMDL) Program and the
on-going initiative to set water
quality goals for impaired wa-
terbodies, Florida Department
of Environmental Protection
(DEP) Secretary Michael W.
Sole has approved the estab-
lishment of specific reduction
targets for 20 waterbodies.
This latest round of pollutant
reductions have been adopted
for'waters located in the St.
Marks/Ochlockonee River,
the Suwannee/Santa Fe River,
and the Everglades West
Coast Basins. These limits
have also been approved by
the Environmental Protection
Agency under federal law.
"It is a great tribute to the
diligent work of our scientists
and staff, working in coopera-
tion with multiple groups of
interested stakeholders, that
we have completed these
complex and challenging
water quality goals" said Sole.


"This effort highlights the
joint commitment by DEP
and the people living in these
watersheds to the local envi-
ronment and will be the foun-
dation for restoration, water
quality improvements, and
healthier natural systems."
Under the federal Clean
Water Act, each state in the
nation must identify impaired
rivers, lakes and estuaries for
clean-up. TMDLs are then
developed for each impaired
waterway. A TMDL is the
maximum amount of a spe-
cific pollutant a waterbody
can absorb and still meet
its designated uses, such as
fishing, swimming, shellfish
harvesting, or as a source
of drinking water. In 1999,
Florida adopted a nationally-
recognized law (Florida Water-
shed Restoration Act, Section
403.067, F.S.) and program to
govern TMDL development
and implementation within
the state. Florida has devel-
oped more than 40 TMDLs
in 2008.
As the next step, the state
is working with federal and


local governments, water
management districts, public
and private utilities, industry,
agriculture and environmen-
tal groups to develop, adopt
and implement Basin Manage-
ment Action Plans (BMAPs).
A blueprint for restoration,
BMAPs lay out the actions
to be taken to reduce pollut-
ant loadings and restore a
water body. The plans may
include activities that will
promote improved farming
practices and land use plan-
ning, and increase wastewater
and stormwater treatment to
reduce pollution.
Additionally, together with
its sister federal, state, and
local government agencies,
DEP is improving water qual-
ity through the continued
enforcement of long-standing
environmental regulations,
technical assistance and an
annual investment of hun-
dreds of millions of dollars
to build water infrastructure,
acquire conservation lands,
and restore waterways.
To protect Florida's pre-
cious water resources, it is


important to develop alterna-
tive means of meeting public
demand for water as well as
restore the state's waterbod-
ies. Since 1999, Florida has
invested more than $3.5 bil-
lion to upgrade and improve
water and wastewater facili-
ties and dean up stormwater
pollution, funding about 2,100
projects statewide. Since 1999,
the State Revolving Fund Pro-
grams have committed more
than $2.2 billion, including
more than $150 million last
year, to plan, design and build
wastewater facilities across
the state.
TMDLs have been ap-
proved for the following:
Basin
Waterbody
Ochlockonee-St. Marks
River Basin
Munson Slough
Juniper Creek
Swamp Creek
Black Creek
Everglades West Coast
Basin
Henry Creek
Henry Creek Marine
Imperial River


Lake Trafford
Gordon River Extension
Cocohatchee River Estu-
ary
Suwannee-Santa Fe River
Basin
Alligator Lake
New River
Suwannee River, Santa
Fe River, Branford Spring,
Falmouth Spring, Fanning
Spring, Manatee Spring,


Royal Spring, Ruth Spring and
Troy Spring.
Copies of the final TMDL
reports listed below are avail-
able at: http://www.dep.state.
fl.us/water/tmdl/final_tmdl.
htm.
For more information on
water projects throughout
Florida, visit www.dep.state.
fl.us/water.


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Page 20A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008


The a
Wakulla


Wildlife pho-

tography

Brought to you by

Tje Wakulla i etu
and our readers


Lee McHugh took a series of photographs recently while at the Florida Wild Mammal
Association (FWMA) in Crawfordville. The FWMA always has a menagerie of guests at
Chris Beatty's facility off Edgar Poole Road.
Posing for pictures during this visit were, clockwise from the top: a bald eagle, a
barred owl, a great horned owl, a fawn hiding behind a tree, a pelican thinking about
a snack and a technician feeding an injured hawk at the facility.
Beatty has overcome a lack of funding, a loss of an important grant and a serious
fire and loss of her home during the past two years.
But FWMA continues to fight on and hold fundraisers and a festival to make sure
the facility remains open. Beatty refuses to give up her goal to take in and care for
the sick and injured wildlife in Wakulla County. If you would like to help the Beatty
family and the volunteers who make up FWMA, send a contribution to FWMA. Their
web site gives great detail on what the organization needs and how you can help out
or volunteer.
The web site is www.wakullawildlife.org. The street address is 198 Edgar Poole Road,
Crawfordville, FL 32327. The web site contains a list of items FWMA needs.


Season!



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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008 Page 21A


Wakulla County recycling not onlyWakulla Middle


saves you money it is patriotic


By KAREN BUSEN
Special to The Wakulla News
Materials which are ob-
tained largely from foreign
sources, such as tin and oil,
enrich another country, not
the United States. The abil-
ity to obtain these resources
nmy be easily interrupted by
political, natural, or economic
occurrences. This hurts com-
panies in our country which
rely on these items to operate,
transport, or create products.
When we recycle as many of
these materials as possible
we decrease our reliance on
foreign suppliers.
Most of us do not consider
that the plastics we use on a
daily basis are primarily made
from petroleum. Recycling

Have you
By KAREN BUSEN
Special to The Wakulla News
SHave you ever heard of the
oil peak? It is described as the
point at which the rate of oil
production reaches its high-
est rate and then goes into
decline. That means that at
a-certain point even though
niDre oil can be extracted,
tlt amount available to us
declines, the cost of oil and
itsproducts increases, and the
length of time between petro-
lem discovery and delivery
lengthens.
"A gentleman named M.
K~ig Hubbert created this the-
osy in 1956 and then used it
to create the Hubbert Model,
waich has since been used
b the petroleum industry
atd political and economic
entities to predict when the
World economic oil peak
vould occur. Reports from
various sources, including the
petroleum industry, report
that this peak has occurred
ahd that oil production is in
decline.
:-Why is this important to
uts? Oil and gas production
were the impetus which


Your source for
. Wakulla County
S news!

Iave something
pin your mind?

Send it to

TOe Wakulla M ets

SKeith Blackmar,
"- Editor
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net


plastics cuts down on petro-
leum usage and conserves our
domestic oil supplies.
It is important to consider
the costs of waste disposal.
We pay for products them-
selves and for their packaging.
Any products or packaging
which are discarded go into
landfills, which are very ex-
pensive to buy, operate, and
close. These landfills are paid
for with our taxpayer money.
Reusing products instead
of discarding them can save
you money. Rags can largely
replace paper towels and pre-
packaged cloths. Plastic food
containers can be used for
potting plants and for storage
of non-food items.
Try to think of a possible


creative use for an item before
you throw it out.
Remember that even if
you do not want something it
may be desirable to someone
else. Sell, trade, or donate
used items. Your old kitchen
table may be a blessing to
another family. Additionally,
donated items are often tax
deductible.
Avoid containers that can
not be recycled. Their disposal
costs you money. Consider
replacing plastic items with
glass or metal, which do not
degrade to harmful byprod-
ucts as plastic may.
Join the movement to mini-
mize non-reusable packaging
by not buying products which
use it, by letting producers


know you do not want it,
and by informing elected of-
ficials you know that this is
an important issue to you as
a voter.
Recyclable materials can
be transformed into reusable
materials locally, which can
give rise to new local busi-
nesses and jobs, stimulating
the economy.
Recycling does not take
much time or effort. It does
require the forethought and
the responsibility to consider
the consequences of our ac-
tions.
The Green Living and En-
ergy Expo and Education Fair
will be held Saturday, March
21 at 9 a.m. at Riversprings
Middle School.


ever heard of the oil peak?


drove the industrial revolu-
tion. Petroleum products
are the basis not only for
transportation, but also for
utilities, fertilizers, cleaning
products, cosmetics, pharma-
ceuticals, plastics and even
some food products. It is
impossible to exaggerate the
extent to which they influ-
ence modern human lives.
Even before the current
economic crisis it was pre-
dicted that rising demand
for oil and gas and falling
production would cause an
increase in petroleum costs
which would precipitate just
such a crisis. This scenario
was raised during the Carter
administration, and largely
dismissed.
Unfortunately, it is human
nature to avoid unpleasant
truths and calls for hard
work and sacrifice when a
problem does not appear to
be imminent.
Historically, we can see


that it often requires a disas-
ter to force us to act.
We are all hurting now.
Goods, services and products
are more expensive.
Food, a necessity for hu-
man existence, is rising in
cost every day.
Even immediate action to
switch to alternative fuels
and ingredients for products
will take time, but if we do
not begin to address this is-
sue immediately it will only
prolong the suffering.
There are a multitude of
resources from which we can
choose. One benefit of using
many different resources is
that we can produce, develop
and use them locally, or at
least regionally. This imme-
diately cuts down on costs
for transportation. It also
can produce new industries
and jobs. One of the biggest
benefits of this approach is
strategic. Our reliance on
petroleum exposes us to ma-


PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice to consider the re-imposition of the
collection and assessment of impact fees
within the area of Wakulla County at the
regularly scheduled Board meeting on
December 1, 2008 commencing at 6:00 p.m.
in the Board of County Commission
Chambers, 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Fla.
All citizens are invited to attend.



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nipulation by foreign powers
and to terrorist attacks on
shipping, pipelines, refineries
and workers.
Keeping our sources of
energy and products in our
own country and distribut-
ing them regionally largely
prevents these strategic prob-
lems.
Large-scale change such
as this will require a massive
national effort.
Americans are capable of
such an effort, as we have
shown in the past. The time
for waiting has passed. It is
time to begin.
Find out more about what
you can do at The Green Liv-
ing and Energy Expo and Edu-
cation Fair Saturday, March
21 at 9 a.m. at Riversprings
Middle School.


School band has


a busy semester


The Wakulla Middle School
band has been very busy
during the fall semester. The
eighth grade band played at
four football games and also
participated at a high school
game along with the RMS
band on eighth grade involve-
ment night.
They provided several won-
derful patriotic selections for
the school's Veterans' Day
Assembly where the trumpet
players also performed a stir-
ring rendition of Taps at the
conclusion of the program.
The seventh grade band
played with the eighth graders
at a pep rally and a football
game. The sixth grade band
recently performed an out-
standing fall semester concert
and also played a daytime
performance for the residents
at Eden Springs.
Laura Hudson, the WMS
band director, said they were
very impressive after playing
just a few months and she is
excited to watch them grow
as musicians.
The seventh, eighth and
jazz bands will present their
fall semester concert on Tues-
day, Dec. 2 at 7:30 p.m. Admis-


sion is free and everyone is
invited to attend. They will
be performing many holiday
selections on this festive
concert. The eighth grade
band will also perform at the
Wakulla Senior Center on
Wednesday, Dec. 10 at 10:30
a.m. The seventh graders will
be playing for the children
of the Sopchoppy Education
Preschool on Thursday, Dec.
11 at 10 a.m.
"I am so fortunate to have
so many talented students in-
volved in the band program,"
says Hudson. "I look forward
to sharing their musical skills
with our community."
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Page 22A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008

Sopchoppy merchants hope to draw shoppers to community,


Select merchants in the
Sopchoppy/Buckhorn area are
offering a chance for residents
to win free gas and food.
A punch/signature card,
listing each participating busi-
ness, can be picked up at all
Sopchoppy/Buckhorn par-
ticipating businesses, at The
Wakulla News, around the
county and in surrounding


counties.
For a complete list of loca-
tions where the card may be
found, contact Debbie Dix
at 528-583S or email h-r at
posh_faeryi,'yahoo.com.
A drawing will be held on
Dec. 13, after Christmas in
Sopchoppy, to determine the
winner of a gift certificate for
free groceries, and a gift cer-


tificate for free gasoline. The
value of each gift certificate
will be a minimum of $75
(depending on participation,
and printing fees).
Once residents pick up one
of the punch cards, all they
need to do to be eligible for
the drawing is to go around
to each business listed on the
card, (addresses and phone


numbers will be on the card),
and get that business to sign
the card; no purchase neces-
sary. Then, you may drop off
the card at "Posh," located at
114 Municipal Ave. in down-
town Sopchoppy, and you
will be entered into the draw-
ing to win free gas and free
groceries.
Cards should be available


beginning Friday, Nov. 29.
Most businesses are open
Wednesday through Saturday,
from 12 p.m. onward, and
many open earlier, so this
would be the best time to get
your entire card punched all
at once.
Participating businesses in
the Sopchoppy/Buckhorn area,
so far, include: Scratchcakes;


Sopchoppy Tire; Clip Art; TLC
Baby & Discount; Sopchoppy
Hardware; Sister's Antiques &
Uniques; The Sopchoppy IGA,
Lou's Bait & Tackle; Posh/Mas-
sage from the Heart; The Frog
& Hummingbird Co., Inc./The
Paul Butterfield Fund and
Society; Insurance Group of
North Florida; and Backwoods
Bistro.


Sustainability in Wakulla County


By KAREN BUSEN
Special to The Wakulla News
Look up the term "sustain-
ability" on the Internet and
you will find many different
definitions, most of them
related to issues of ecology.
But in the strictest sense, sus-
tainability simply means the
ability to carry on those ac-
tivities that feed and support
us in such a way that we can


maintain our resources.
This is not a new issue for
humanity, even though it is
often presented as a novel
concept. For most people from
the beginning of our time on
earth it has been our only is-
sue, and still is such for large
parts of the globe.
Will I have sufficient food,
water and shelter to keep me
and my family alive, not just


today but in the future? How
does my world operate, so
that I know how best to live
in it? Can we fashion a good
life from what is available, or
are there changes we need to
make? If conditions change,
how will we react in a manner
which will allow us to sustain
ourselves?
Multitudes of questions
arise from this simple con-


cept. Issues of sustainability
must include moral and social
values as well as material ones
because the way we use our re-
sources has a vast and imme-
diate effect on our own lives,
those of our loved ones, and
on everything around us.
The need to sustain our
lives in the most desirable
fashion is often forgotten
when people live in times


of plenty, but when we live
in times of scarcity the facts
must be addressed. Our task is
to do so with knowledge and
responsibility.
In following articles, I will
present ideas about saving
money, evaluate how our ac-
tions impact our own lives
and the welfare of our neigh-
borhoods, our county, and
our nation, consider how our


decisions play out in view of
our moral positions, and at-
tempt to determine what we
may leave to those who come
after us.
Learn more about the im-
pact you have on our envirot-
ment at the Green Living arid
Energy Expo and Education
Fair Saturday, March 21 at 9
a.m. at Riversprings Middle
School.


Mighty Mullet Festival




'C ~ ".A _

a a ~


A Panacea Christmas


The Fourth Annual "A Pana-
cea Christmas" will be held
Saturday, Dec. 13. The event is
being organized by the Panacea
Waterfronts Partnership.
Activities include Christmas
shopping all day followed by a
boat-on-trailer parade, decorated
golf carts, a tree lighting after
the parade, Christmas caroling
around the tree with B.B. Barwick
and Friends, refreshments, prizes
and a Tour of Lights featuring lo-
cal businesses and homes.
The parade begins at 6:30 p.m.
Applications for the parade or
tour are available at the Wakulla
Welcome Center in Panacea.
The lights celebration has a
$50 prize for the best decorated


business and home. The parade
has $50 prizes for best boat on
a trailer, best pontoon/float/
shrimp boat and $50 for the best
golf cart.
The prizes are being donated


by the Blue Crab Steering Com-
mittee.
For more information about
the parade or celebration of
lights, call Paige Killeen at 570-
7916.


. ..3appy. IT'-- nsgv

Happy Thanksgiving


Two of Wakulla's most famous residents, ack Rudloe, David Harvey at the festival.
Two of Wakulla's most famous residents, Jack Rudloe, David Harvey at the festival.


Sheriff David Harvey was
one of the coastal celebrities
who "Put on the Ritz" Saturday,
Nov. 22, Fishy Fashion style -at
the Mighty Mullet Maritime
Festival in Panacea.
Among those modeling the
very latest Forgotten Coast
haute couture were, Harvey


and his wife Rhonda, a phar-
macist; Wakulla Bank Presi-
dent Walter C. Dodson, Jr.,
and his wife Susan, a Realtor;
Shelly Swenson, Family and
Consumer Science Agent, Uni-
versity of Florida Extension
Office, Crawfordville; Ivanhoe
Carroll, realtor and Director of


Animal Control, Wakulla Coun-
ty; Arlene Petrandis, Angelo
& Sons Restaurant; plus teen
and preteen Hannah Tinsley
and Jenna Paige Strickland.
For more fashions, go to www.
thewakullanews.com or see
the Dec. 4 issue of The News.
Photo by Lynda Kinsey.


May gocdbess accthe faithfuCmen
andwomen, the hard-working
pastors, and the wondcerfulchurches
of WakulCa County that are sharing
the GospeCmessage this season. We
Cove you, ancdareprayingfor you.



Happy Thanksgiving









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Purchase gingerbread siding


After the immense push
during the summer to com-
plete the first floor of the
Wakulla County Museum
and Archives, fall brought a
pronounced slow-down.
Many small challenges
were encountered in complet-
ing and opening the archival
portion of the former county
jail.
The Historical Society's rep-
lica cracker house (based on
the former Linzy cottage) will
transform into a gingerbread
house for the Sopchoppy
event.
"We hope that we'll sell
the gingerbread siding off
the cottage," explained Mad-
eleine Carr. "Myra Jean's is
.baking special gingerbread
just for the occasion. This will


become an annual part of the
Sopchoppy tradition."
While volunteers are busy
attending to real life situations,
the Wakulla County Historical
Society has also gathered new
items it will be selling at the
Christmas in Sopchoppy festi-
val Dec. 13.
The collector Christmas
tree ornament this year fea-
tures Wakulla Springs Lodge.
Ornaments from previous
years, with images of the light-
house, the old courthouse,
etc. are still available in a very
limited supply.
More historic Wakulla
County images are woven
into the ever popular afghans,,
which will also be available at
the booth in Sopchoppy.
Money is being raised to-


ward the Heritage Park and
the museum restoration and
framed photographs of the
county's rapidly disappearing
homes will be sold.
Carr explained that the
focus hasn't moved from com-
pleting the first floor renova-
tions at the jail.
"We have to be realistic
with the few hands we have
available during the busy fall
and winter months," she said.
" It will be a period of time un-
til we can open the first floor
to geneaological researchers
and possibly have a museum
store as well."
Carr added efforts will
continue to bring history to
the community and to raise
funds.


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008 Page 23A

Crafters plan to join together
A group of diverse craft- Tupleo Drive in Crawford- per, beads, mosaics, clay,
ers is forming to teach and ville at 11 a.m. Lunch will be smithing and other crafts
display their creations in a provided. Interested persons are invited.
gallery setting in the Wakulla should bring a sample of For more information,
area. their work. contact Christine Huff at
An organizational meeting Those who work in wood, 926-3442.
has been set for Jan. 24 at 162 leather, quilts, textiles, pa-

FSU and Florida battle in Tallahassee
FSU and Florida will battle on Saturday, Nov. 29 in Tallahassee at 3:30 p.m. on ABC televi-
sion, Channel 27. WTNT radio will also broadcast the game on 94.9 FM. FSU is 8-3 and ranked
20th in the BCS poll while Florida is 10-1 and ranked fourth in the BCS poll.


Some investments never lose their value


Invest in Yourself Today


Volleyball team seeks players High quality education
with affordable tuition


The Wakulla Storm is seek-
ing players for a traveling
team.
The team is open to any
interested players who want
to play on the 2009 team.
Tryouts will be held Sat-
urday, Dec. 6, at 9 a.m. until
approximately noon at the


WHS gym.
Anyone interested in
playing club volleyball with
Wakulla Storm needs to at-
tend practice Dec. 6.
Teams will be formed
based on interest, age and
skill. If there are not enough
interested players, teams will


Children can mail letters to Santa
- The Wakulla County Parks Christmas. Santa's elves will call the correct home. Children
and Recreation Department return a phone call to the child are also invited to send lette
is once again sponsoring the through the holidays. The last to Santa for publication in tk
Letters to Santa Claus mail- day to,put letters in the mail- Dec. 23 issue of The Wakul
box in front of the Wakulla box is Friday, Dec. 19. News. You can drop them by o
County Courthouse. Children Don't forget to put your send them by e-mail to: kblac
are invited to write Santa and telephone number on the note mar@thewakullanews.net
tell him what they want for to santa to allow the elves to.
I I


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Thank you for voting.
Thank you for your patience
during the recount.
Thank you for electing me your
County Commissioner.


I I seek your suggestions and your
help as volunteer advisors.

S, : Let me hear from you ...
Cal1 728-7218
Email lartz@mywakulla.com
Visit www.lynnartz.com



ta imnn ap v campaign i appreciate the work of the Supervisor of

positive campaign. 14 diligene of the canvassing
I thank Jim tokey and water the election I am grateful for the mydiligeneal advisorsnaing
ri.-,ioS office duringaBoard thankful to MY


the recoul"-' who hel
I remain deeply grateful to everyone who helped
re ,main dee l rto my campaign, especialy
with or contributed to my mpaign especi
m oy family, my campaign treasurer, my campaign
advisors, and those few dedicated volunteers who
advisors, andahoe n heru Ywaved to

built and installed signs, cheerfully ved to
commuters, and held signs at voting sites.


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CountY Commission, District 5
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Page 24A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008


State will purchase 54 acres at Natural Bridge


Governor Charlie Crist and
the Cabinet approved the
purchase of 54.74 acres of
land adjacent to the Natural
Bridge Historic State Park in
Leon County to the protect the
springs and karst features and
the Civil War battlefield.
Wakulla Springs Ambas-
sador Cal Jamison, who has
walked the property and was
at the Cabinet meeting along
with the Rakestraw family
who own the land, said the
tract goes from Natural Bridge
to the St. Marks Rise at the
county line.


There are numerous swal-
lets on the property, Jamison
said, which are streams that
enter and cave system and
re-emerge.
The price was reported at
$4.2 million and is expected to
close by mid-February.
"This important purchase
is a part of the Florida First
Magnitude Springs project
and one of the top projects
on the Florida Forever priority
list," said Florida Department
of Environmental Protection
Deputy Secretary Bob Ballard.
"This acquisition ensures that


the geological, historical and
cultural integrity of this prop-
erty and the surrounding wa-
ter resources are preserved for
Floridians and visitors from
all over the world to enjoy for
years to come."
The property is also the site
of Florida's second largest Civil
War battle. It is listed on the
National Register of Historic
Places and cited as one of the
Top 10 endangered Civil War
sites in the United States by
the Civil War Preservation
Trust.
In 1865, during the final


week of the Civil War, the
Battle of Natural Bridge pre-
served Tallahassee as the only
Confederate Capitol east of
the Mississippi that did not
surrender to Union forces.
Today, important historical
and cultural, resources can be
found on the property dating
from the Paleo-Indian period
(10,000 B.C.) to the Civil War.
The property will eventually
be managed by DEP's Division
of Recreation and Parks as part
of the Natural Bridge Historic
State Park.
This Florida Forever project


focuses on land that provides
increased protection for Flori-
da's First Magnitude Springs
that discharge more than 100
cubic feet of water per second.
Florida's springs, scattered
through northern and central
Florida, draw from the Floridan
aquifer system, which is the
state's primary source of drink-
ing water. Springs, with clear,
continuously flowing waters,
are among the state's most im-
portant natural resources and
are famous attractions. This
acquisition brings the Florida
First Magnitude Springs proj-


ect closer to completion, with
7,844 acres of the 14,081 acre
project remaining.
Originally established in
1999, the 10-year, $3 billion
Florida Forever program is the
largest land-buying initiative
in the nation, conserving en-
vironmentally sensitive land,
restoring water resources and
preserving important cultural
and historical sites. More than
two million acres throughout
the state have been placed
in public ownership under
Florida Forever and its prede-
cessor program,


True speaks at Green Lodging conference Thanksgiving Dinner


Jeff True, event coordinator/manager
of the Wildwood Resort attended the
first annual Green Lodging Conference
held in Gainesville Nov. 10 through Nov.
12. Members of the conference planning
committee visited the Inn at Wildwood
in July, and asked True to be a guest
speaker at the conference. The Inn at
Wildwood was designated a green hotel


by the Green Lodging Association in
April 2006, and was the 14th hotel in the
state to get the certification.
True prepared a presentation based
on the challenges of becoming and
maintaining a green facility. After the
presentation to 200 attendees there was
a question and answer forum. During the
three day conference there was a variety


of vendors, staff from Visit Florida, staff
from the Green Lodging Association, and
Department of Environmental Protec-
tion. Representatives from many new
hotel properties were on site to learn
about becoming green and to bring back
information to help them move forward
in the green initiative.


Construction ceases over Thanksgiving
To ease traffic congestion rected construction contrac- Thanksgiving weekend, strictions from Thursday, Nov.
along the roads in Northwest tors working on state roads There will be no work on 27 through Sunday, Nov. 30 to
Florida, the Florida DOT di- to cease operations during the state roads requiring lane re- make it easier for travelers.


will be held Nov. 25


Wakulla Bank is proud to be
among the sponsors of a com-
munity Thanksgiving dinner on
Nov. 25 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.
at the Wakulla County Senior
Citizens Center. The dinner
is free of charge and open to
all Wakulla County residents
regardless of age.
"This is our second commu-
nity-wide Thanksgiving dinner,"
said R.H. Carter, Wakulla County


Senior Citizens Council Director.
"Last year we served over 350
people and this year we expect
to serve as many as 500. We
invite everyone to come out and,
enjoy this festive event."
The menu features turkey,
dressing and all the trimmings,
plus pie. For more informa-
tion, please contact Carter at
850/926-7145 or wakcosrcit@
embarqmail.com.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008


Wakulla Senior Citizen Center honors those who served


By JOAN E. SMITH,
WCSC Public Relations Writer
Wakulla County citizens with U.S.
military backgrounds attended a fes-
tive celebration held at the county
Senior Citizens Center on Thursday,
Nov. 6.
Pictured are: seated left to
right:
Fernal Cobon, LT. King, Ellie Char-
boneau, Jimmy Strickland, Richard
Hartman and Robert Blankenship.
Standing: left to right:
Dick Bickford, Frank Newman,
Buddy Smith, Bob Thomas, Gene,
Woods, Jimmie Reed, Leo Plaisance,
Charles Smith, Walter Donaldson,
Archie Mills and Ted Lehmann.
The Wakulla County Senior Citi-
zens Center hosted an event to hon-
or those with a military background.
Everyone attending the event had
the opportunity to share their story
before an open microphone.
Many veterans shared words of
courage, hope, joy, and Thanksgiv-
ing.
Meanwhile, others chose to
share an emotional experience
which brought tears to the eyes of
listeners.


At times it was tears of laughter,
and at other times, it was tears of re-
membrance. A few citizens received
comforting words as they embraced
neighbors with a big brotherly/sis-
terly hug.
After hearing the stories guests
could hardly look into the individuals
eyes without seeing the courageous,
fully uniformed solder. Although not
in uniform, the unseen image clearly
revealed this was a group of solders
proudly wearing their decorated
uniforms with honor.
As visitors looked at the smiling
faces as the photographer prepared
to shoot the photograph, they found
someone in the group with the like-
ness of a neighbor, brother, dad, or
grandfather, and the lone female
appeared to have the likeness of
mothers, sisters or friends. Even
though they occupy those roles,
they also wear another courageously.
They hold the role of serving in the
five military branches of the United
States of America.
To all those serving our country,
past, present and future, THANK
YOUI


Wakulla County senior citizen veterans.


We Need to Be Aware and Prepared for Alzheimer's Disease


By E. DOUGLAS BEACH
Secretary of the Department
of Elder Affairs
To mark November as National
Alzheimer's Awareness Month,
researchers, advocates and public
officials across Florida will come
together for a variety of recogni-
tion activities. These events are
important reminders of the devas-
tating effects this disease has on
hundreds of thousands of Florid-
ians and countless caregivers and


loved ones.
As meaningful as this special
month is, it seems clear that seniors
and their loved ones fully recognize
Alzheimer's debilitating effects. As
advocates for elders and their care-
givers, we must make November
more than a recognition month it
should also be a month of action.
As many as a half-million Flo-
ridians are currently afflicted with
Alzheimer's disease. Most Florid-
ians enjoy planning for their future


in the Sunshine State, but those
affected by Alzheimer's have to
prepare themselves for the next
memory lapse, the next bout of
uncertainly or confusion. That is
their reality each day, and it's why it
is so important that we take action
to prevent and slow this disease in
older Floridians.
Studies have shown that a
healthy and active lifestyle can pro-
tect bodies from many diseases. The
mind is also able to defend itself


by engaging in frequent social and
intellectual stimulation. Dr. David
Snowdon, one of the world's lead-
ing experts on Alzheimer's disease,
was able to show that an active
intellectual life may actually protect
individuals from this disease and
other forms of dementia.
To determine a dearer picture of
how Alzheimer's affects individu-
als, Dr. Snowdon studied almost
700 Catholic nuns and examined
several time periods in each sister's


life. The results led the researchers
to conclude that individuals who
engaged in regular intellectual
activity, even in their youth, were
less likely to show the symptoms
of Alzheimer's disease later in life.
The need for social intellectual and
physical activity will become even
more pronounced over the next few
years as millions of baby boomers
reach retirement age.
Continued on Page 2B


Caregivers/Sitters


Des ol left with Freeman Lowell.
Desi Folh, left with Freeman Lowell.


By JOAN E. SMITH,
WCSC Public Relations Writer
When faced with the chal-
lenging role of assisting and
being the sole caregiver for a
parent or spouse, that person
may question: Am I strong
enough? Am I doing enough?
Should I hire someone?
Caregivers, you are not
alone. The Wakulla County
Senior Citizens Council, Inc.
extends a heartfelt concern
for you and your family. The
center offers numerous net-
working opportunities.
One possibility, open to
caregivers, is to join a local
support group. Lots of brain-
storming goes on in these


meetings. If you would like to
attend a support group in our
area, please call Pat Ashley at
984-5277. Pat joins with other
members, and they facilitate
the Wakulla Alzheimer and
Dementia Support Group
monthly meetings. One of
the support group members
shared her story.
Denise Folh, team-member
of The Wakulla News, said
although she did attend the
support group meetings at the
senior center, due to her work
schedule she attends meet-
ings at the library or meetings
held at Ameris Bank.

Continued on Page 2B


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Senior Citizens, Federal

Government Assistance

is Now Available


Jerylene Howard at the Senior Center,

Enjoy Thanksgiving


By R.H, CARTER
Senior Center Director
One morning, I was in-
volved in a serious issue that
demanded my thoughts.
As I walked through the
dining room, one of the se-
nior ladies, Jerylene Howard,
stopped me and said that I
looked stressed.
She asked that I sit with her
while she sang to me. She be-
gan singing, "You don't know
just how blessed you are....you
have eyes to see, a mind to
think and feet to walk, blessed


you are....blessed you are."
I said, "Thanks, I needed
that." Her melodious voice
brought a feeling that would
reduce stress in anyone. As
she talked, her laugh became
so contagious that everyone
at the table began to laugh.
It was obvious that she was
a perfect subject for Thanks-
giving.
Jerylene Odessa Andrews
was born two days before
Christmas in 1925. Her mother
died six months later.
Continued on Page 2B


Senior citizens who are at
least 62 years old and own
a home, can now borrow
against the equity in their
home, utilizing the money
for just about anything, with-
out ever having to repay the
debt. They can continue liv-
ing in the home for the rest
of their lives without the bur-
den of making monthly pay-
ments.
There is never a risk of
losing their home and they
are free to sell or refinance
the home, without penalty, at
any time. All money received
is tax free and has no effect
on Social Security or retire-
ment income.
This is now possible thanks
to a Home Equity Conver-
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Federal Government's De-
partment of Housing and Ur-
ban Development, also know
as HUD.


This money can be used to:
1. Payoff an existing
mortgage
2. Pay for medical expenses
3. Supplement income
4. Supplement savings
5. Make repairs to the home
6. Provide financial assistance
to family members
7. Establish a line of credit
that can be used if needed
in the future
8. Vacation and travel
A free report reveals how
citizens of Wakulla County
can utilize this opportunity
to ease financial burdens for
themselves, or their loved
ones courtesy of this United
States Government insured
assistance program.
For more information, call
the Consumer Awareness ho-
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at 1-888-812-3156,
ext. 1.


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Page 2B -- THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008


Alzheimer's disease Caregivers


Continued from Page 1B
Although prevention is es-
sential in the fight against Al-
zheimer's disease, we cannot
overlook the seniors and their
caregivers who are already
struggling with it. Family care-
givers for elders who have de-
mentia often have additional
concerns and stress about
their loved one's deteriorating
status. Each caregiver's brave
and selfless actions increase
the quality of life for the
senior under his or her care.
However, these caregivers also


need respite so that they can
continue to provide the high-
est quality of care.
If you need help, there may
be a program or service that
fits your needs.
This recognition month
comes at the start of the holi-
day season, reminding us that
now is the time to cherish the
precious memories we have,
even as we make new ones.
On behalf of everyone here
at the Department of Elder Af-
fairs, I wish you a healthy and
happy holiday season.


Thanksgiving


Continued from Page 1B
They lived near Wakulla
in a community called Ca-
seys. She was raised by her
mother's sister. The aunt
who raised her was Agnes
Triplett. Agnes was married
to Walter Triplett. Jerylene
grew up in Hyde Park. Her
Aunt Agnes was an institu-
tion in our county's history.
She taught in Medart, Craw-
fordville, Hyde Park and
Shadeville. Jerylene attended
school in Hyde Park and
finished in 1942. She mar-
ried Columbus Howard. He
joined the Army that same
year and never returned to
live with her.
During her school years
life was hard. Before school,
she picked clover for the
hogs and did many chores.
She never had new clothes
and was sometimes teased
about her clothing and a
pair of shoes that she had re-
paired with wire. She worked
in restaurants in St. Marks for
35 years and drove a school
bus for one year. During
this period, she raised four
children Barbara, Sandra,
Voncilla and Michael.
Jerylene began attending
the senior center six months
before we moved to our cur-
rent senior center. Several
times during our conversa-
tion she talked about how
much she loved our staff
and other seniors. The staff
.,nd seniors would always
Fall when she was absent.
She only talked about what
people did for her. I don't

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think she really understands
what she does for others.
She could not understand
why I would want to write
about someone with such a
meager life.
This person yields such
a beautiful story. Jerylene
Odessa (Andrews) Howard
has lived a very ordinary
life. Financial resources were
almost nonexistent in her
life. She is probably the only
person anywhere who lives
in a home constructed for her
family and given to them by
Seminole Asphalt. The only
time she had in her life to
travel out of state was a trip
to Thomasville, Ga.
With this background, she
loves everybody. Everyone
who visits with her for more
than three minutes will fall
in love with her. She brings
smiles and kind feelings to
everyone. She is an ambas-
sador for God, the beauty of
life and our senior center.
She experiences Thanksgiv-
ing every day of her life and
expects nothing in return.
The happiness and peace
that she enjoys every day is
a goal that many seek for a
lifetime and never find.
This Thanksgiving is a
beautiful opportunity to give
thanks for all you have and
not worry about all those
other things. It's a perfect
time to join your family and
friends and discuss all that
we enjoy.


Continued on Page 1B
Denise's story is filled with
love, hope, and blessings. It
reflects back to an event that
caused a tremendous impact
in her life.
After both parents lost their
independence, Denise wanted
to provide for their needs, so
she moved them to Crawford-
ville. Eventually, this restricted
her independence, too.
Like other caregivers, De-
nise discovered relief and pri-
vate time for herself only came
on those days her parents par-
ticipated in the activities at the
senior center. Denise believes
the safe and positive environ-
ment at the center definitely
had some health benefits for
her parents.
"I have come to realize,
after a while, that our seniors
need the contact with other
people other than their own
family members," Denise said.
"When my mom reached the
point of 'no return' (this was
during the time when her
parents were unable to at-
tend activities at the center) I
noticed my dad seemed to be


bored and edgy at times. One
day I asked him, what I could
possibly do to make his life
a little happier? He said, "Go
back to the senior center. But,
he didn't want to go without
my mom, so he stood by her
until the end,"
After reflecting on these
things, she said, "This con-
firms my theory that the
senior center provides a place
to meet others and it provides
a pleasant place for seniors to
go and have fun."
On Tuesday and Fridays,
it's not unusual to see Denise's
dad, Desiderio "Desi" Folh,
walk into the Senior Center
with the assistance of his
friend, Freeman Lowell. Com-
plication from a traumatic
stroke caused Desi's visual
impairment, said Denise, but,
he receives excellent care as
a resident at Eden Springs in
Medart.
During one of Desi's visits
to the center, he was asked
about his family. He smiled
and spoke fondly of his daugh-
ter, Denise, and his son who
lives in the Miami area. When


asked if he liked to dance, he
responded, "Who me? Nol
No professional dancing not
for me."
Later, his answer changed
after he understood dancing
for fun. "Yes, maybe for fun.
Yes, for fun." Desi occasionally
allowed his native language,
Spanish, to shadow his second
language, English. This hap-
pened when he pronounced
the letter "J." It rolled off his
tongue with an 'ha' sound.
After the interview, I'm proud
to say, his gentle smile grasped
my heartstrings and captured
my friendship. It is a true
joy to see Desi walk into the
room.
The Folh family wanted to
leave us with the following
words of thanks and appre-
ciation.
In the words of Denise Folh,
"We must not forget about the
sitters at the senior center.,
like Jeannette and others who
are extraordinarily patient and
loving and always willing to
make everyone around them
feel right at home.
"Anne and Mercy W. who


provided me with help during
a time when I needed it most.
Hoss, I appreciate having the
help and transportation for
my father while I'm at work. I
will never forget these things.
I miss everyone at the center.
It's like Bill (the musician) said
once, 'this place is a little slice
of heaven.' "
For anyone interested, the
senior center freely provides
a public sitters list. It can be
received by e-mail or fax.
Although the center pro-
vides the list, it is up to each
family to conduct interviews
and background checks of the
potential sitter. It is advised
that before you hire any indi-
vidual, you follow three steps:
check former employers, do a
background check with the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement, and check the
Children and Family Abuse
Registry.
Remember, the Wakulla
Senior Center offers various
services and networking op-
portunities for families. If we
can be of service to you please
call, 926-7145.


YMCA Camp Indian Springs

earns ACA-Accredited camp status


The American Camp Associ-
ation (ACA) announced that
YMCA Camp Indian Springs
has received ACA-Accredited
Camp status for 2009.
"ACA Accreditation means
that YMCA Camp Indian
Springs submitted to a thor-
ough (up to 300 standards)
review of its operation by the
ACA from staff qualifica-
tions and training to emer-
gency management and
complied with the highest
standards in the industry,"
said Cindy Moore, National
Standards Commission. "Par-
ents expect their children to
attend accredited schools.
They also deserve a camp
experience that is reviewed
and accredited by an expert,


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independent organization,"
Moore said.
"YMCA Camp Indian
Springs and ACA form a part-
nership that promotes sum-
mers of growth and fun in
an environment committed
to safety," said A.L. Ferreira,
Camp executive Director, "ACA
accreditation demonstrates
our commitment to qual-
ity camp programming. I am
extremely proud of our staff
and prouder to say that we are
the only resident/day camp
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counties to obtain this accredi-
tation." (FSU's Reservation is
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School



School District dismissed


from desegregation lawsuit


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
After more than 40 years,
the Wakulla County School
District has received notifica-
tion of Unitary Status. What is
Unitary Status?
Unitary Status means the
school district has fulfilled
its affirmative desegregation
obligations under the 14th
Amendment and an Order for
Dismissal had been executed
by the U.S. Department of
Justice.
Segregation of Wakulla
County schools was ordered
in the late 1960s and the court
document was dated Aug. 7,
1970.
Superintendent David
Miller said the school district
discovered that the case could
be dismissed three years ago,
but it would cost taxpayers
money to pursue the issue
themselves.
The county waited until the
federal government brought
the case to them to avoid any
cost to taxpayers, he said.
The Civil Rights Division of
the U.S. Department of Justice
reviewed the county's socio-


economic situation in Janu-
ary 2008 and gave the school
district an approval of meeting
federal requirements.
According to federal statis-
tics and enrollment numbers
from the school district, the
school system had 1.585 stu-
dents in 1968-1969, with 68
percent white and 31 percent
African American. This year,
the school district has 5,200
students with 85 percent of
them white, 11 percent African
American and four percent a
mix of other races.
Assistant Superintendent
Jimmie Dugger said the num-
ber of African American stu-
dents has decreased very
little over the years, but the
percentage has shrunk as new
growth in Wakulla County has
been primarily white.
The school board was not
required to take any action on
Superintendent Miller's infor-
mation item on the agenda.
In other matters before the
Wakulla County School Board
on Monday, Nov. 17:
The board approved three
expulsions of male students.
A 15-year-old and a 16-year-old


were expelled from Second
Chance School for possess-
ing and taking narcotics on
a school bus. Both boys were
treated at Tallahassee hospi-
tals after taking the pills.
The third student, age 14
and a freshman at Wakulla
High School, was expelled for
making threats against the
school. Law enforcement of-
ficials were forced to inspect
the school for a bomb after
the student threatened to
cause bodily harm to others.
Nothing was found.
The students will be out
of their schools for the rest
of this school year and next
year as well. The parents of
the students signed waivers
agreeing not to challenge the
action of the board.
The board approved a
W.A.I.T. Training Program
grant through the Depart-
ment of Health. The program
addresses abstinence and sex
education at the middle and
high school levels. The eight
day, non-religious program,
will be administered in De-
cember and March.


District honors two teachers


and a school bus employee


November Teachers of the
Month: Riversprings Middle's
Janet H. Weber and Crawford-
ville Elementary's Sue Griffin
were recognized with Employ-
ee of the Month: School Bus
Driver Classie Franklin at the
Monday, Nov. 17 school board
meeting.




F7~7]


Sue Griffin


Janet Weber


Janet Weber began her
career in education at Shadev-
ille Elementary as a fifth grade
teacher. However, she has
been teaching sixth grade at
Riversprings Middle School
since 2003. Team teaching is
an instructional organization
Weber loves.
My team-teacher, Cay Arant,
and I share one large room and
have a great time co-teaching
every class together," said We-
ber. "We possess very similar
ethics and feel at ease encour-
aging one another, throughout
the day, in an effort to create
the most effective learning
experience possible for our
students."
Weber credits her friend and
school board member, Becky
Cook, for encouraging her and
having faith in her ability to
teach. Janet added, "With the
support of my friend, Becky
Cook, I obtained my educator's
certification so I could teach in
the best county in the State of
Florida."
Principal Dod Walker said
Weber is a valuable member
of his faculty.
"The Riversprings family
is proud to have Janet Weber
represent us as the Wakulla
County Teacher of the Month,"
he said. "Janet does an out-
standing job and fills many
roles. She has led our School
Improvement Team for the
past two years and has written
articles for the View and the
Superintendent's Report. She
stands above the crowd as an
excellent teacher. She is always
ready to help her colleagues,
her students and her friends
whenever they are in need.
Janet Weber is a valuable asset
to RMS."
Weber grew up in Talla-


hassee and graduated from
Rickards High School. She
also attended and graduated
from Tallahassee Community
College and Florida State Uni-
versity.


For the past 24 years Sue
Griffin has been the media
specialist at Crawfordville El-
ementary School. Her dedica-
tion and desire to continually
improve are some of the main
reasons she was selected as
the November Teacher of the
Month.
"The most enjoyable part of
my job is connecting a student
with a book he/she can read.
Ordering and receiving new
media, especially books, is very
enjoyable. Students love new
books," said Griffin.
Griffin received her Mas-
ters in Library Science from
FSU. She graduated from the
Woman's College of Georgia
with her Bachelor's degree in
Elementary Education. With
childhood roots in Georgia,
Griffin stated that she moved
to Wakulla County because of
the reputable school system.
Principal Angie Walker
added, "Sue Griffin has been
instrumental in bringing read-
ing to a higher level and help-
ing Crawfordville students and
teachers 'Kick it up a Notchl'
Mrs. Griffin is creative, patient,
kind, flexible and shows a love
for working with children. Her
greatest desire is to find that
perfect book which a sets a stu-
dent on fire for ready. Mrs. Grif-
fin richly deserves the honor of
being selected by her peers as
Teacher of the Month."
Her career began in Albany,
Ga. as a librarian and then pro-
ceeded to Louisiana where she
taught junior high. Before mov-
ing to Wakulla County, Griffin
worked as a bookkeeper for
the Leon District Media Center.
She is a member of the Florida
Reading Association, SAC Com-
mittee and PTO Council. Griffin
plans to retire this year. The
Crawfordville Cougars will miss
her dearly, said Walker.


Meeting is planned
A School Advisory Council in the library. The public is
meeting will be held at Wakul- invited to attend.
la High School on Thursday,
Dec. 4 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.


Transportation Coordi-
nator Pat Jones recognized


Classie Franklin


Classie Franklin, one of her
employees.
"Clas',ie Franklin is a lady
with special talents. She is
one of those people who dem-
onstrates compassion and is
always ready to listen and
address the needs of her stu-
dents," said Jones. Classie
Franklin has worked with the
Wakulla County School District
since 1981 and this month is
recognized as the Employee of
the Month.
Franklin has worked as a
para-professional and school
bus driver at St. Marks, Gretch-
en Everhart, Medart Elemen-
tary and Crawfordville Elemen-
tary. When asked what she
finds most enjoyable about her
job she replies, "Experiencing
the life of handicap children.
They find what's right with
the world and they keep on
smiling day after day." Working
with special needs students is
a special calling for Classie. She
adds, "It is very exciting to see
a students' face when I say I'm
glad you came to school today.
It is a wonderful experience to
know I made a positive differ-
ence in the life of a child."
Classie attended Buckhorn
Elementary .and graduated
from Shadeville High School.
She grew up in Sopchoppy
and attended Lively Vocational
School in Tallahassee.
Pat Jones added, "Classie
Franklin is an asset to the
transportation department. She
is organized, responsible, and
enthusiastic. Now only is she
knowledgeable when working
with special needs students
but she is compassionate and
flexible. It is my pleasure to
recognize her as the employee
of the month."
Superintendent David
Miller noted that all three of
these outstanding employees
recognize the importance of
developing relationships and
rapport with Wakulla County
students.


GET THE NEWS
DELIVERED
EACH WEEK!
Call 926-7102











Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008


Deadline


9-onday


11:00 AM.C A9ID

926-7102


35 Cents


Per Word



ADS $8.00
Minimum


Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


CATEGORIES
100 EMPLOYMENT
105 Business Opportunities
110 Help Wanted
111 Medical/Dental Help Wanted
112 Office/Administrative Help Wanted
113 Construction Help Wanted
114 Miscellaneous Help Wanted
115 Work Wanted
120 Services and Businesses
125 Schools and Instruction
130 Entertainment
200 ITEMS FOR SALE
205 Antiques
210 Auctions
215 Auto Parts and Accessories
220 Cars
225 Trucks
230 Motor Homes and Campers
235 Motorcycles and 4-Wheelers
240 Boats and Motors -
245 Personal Watercraft .' -
250 Sporting Goods ---
255 Guns '
260 Business Equipment


265 Computers and Internet
270 Electronics
275 Home Furnishings
280 Home Appliances
285 Jewelry
290 Musical Instruments B
295 Building Materials _
300 MISC. FOR SALE
305 Machinery, Tools & Equipment
310 Firewood Products
315 Farm & Garden Equipment
320 Farm Products & Produce
325 Horses
330 Livestock, Farm Animals
335 Pets
340 Plants
345 Swap, Barter, Trade
350 Wanted to Buy
355 Yard Sales
400 NOTICES
410 Free Items t
415 Announcements
420 Card of Thanks
425 Occasion Cards
430 In Memoriam
435 Lost and Found


440 Personals and Notices
500 REAL ESTATE, HOMES, MOBILES
505 Acreage for Lease
510 Acreage for Sale
515 Apartments for Rent
520 Townhouses for Rent
525 Townhouses for Sale
530 Commercial Property for Rent
535 Commercial Property for Sale
540 Farms for Sale
545 Homes for Sale
550 Homes with Acreage for Sale
555 Houses for Rent
560 Land for Sale
565 Mobile Homes for Rent
570 Mobile Homes for Sale
575 Mobile Homes with Land for Sale
580 Rooms for Rent/Roommates Wanted
585 Wanted to Rent
590 Waterfront Homes/Land for Sale
595 Vacation Rental
600 Open House



CALL 926-7102 TODAY
Email: classifieds@thewakullanews.net


Legal Notice



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-102-FC
CIVIL DIVISION
JOSEPH C. BARRY, JR. and BETTY G.
BARRY,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
KENNETH J. WOODS, JR., ELLA WOODS,
His Spouse Parties Claiming Interests By,
Through, Under or Against Named Defendant
to this Action, or Having or Claiming to Have
any Right, Title, or Interest in the Property
Herein Described, and DAIMLERCHRYSLER
SERVICES NORTH AMERICA LLC, f/k/a
CHRYSLER FINANCIAL COMPANY LLC.
Defendants.


NOTICE OF-FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Final
Judgment After Default dated October 30,
2008, in the above-style cause, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash in the Front
Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse,
Crawfordville, Florida, on Thursday, Decem-
ber 4, 2008, at 11:00 a.m., the following de-
scribed property:
Lot 7 Block "D", Raker Addition to Crawford-
ville, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof
recorded in Plat Book, 1, Page 13, of the
Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida.
Together with:
That certain Double Wide Mobile Home, ID#
537168T4136A&B.
DATED ON October 30, 2008.
BRENT X.THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
November 20, 26, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-163-FC
CIVIL DIVISION
ALFRED S. SHRIVER and
DEANNA L. SHRIVER, Husband and wife,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
TONY HACKNEY and TINA JOINER,
CACH, LLC, CAPITAL ONE BANK,
SUnknown Parties Claiming Interests By,
Through, Under or Against Named
Defendants to this Action, or Having
or Claiming to Have any Right, Title,
or Interest in the Property Herein Described,
Defendants.
I____________ ,
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Final
Judgment After Default dated November 10,
2008, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash in the
Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Court-
house, Crawfordville, Florida, on Thursday,
December 11, 2008, at 11:00 a.m., the follow-
ing described property:
LOT 21, WALKERS CROSSING
Commence at a concrete monument marking
the Northeast corner of the Southwest quarter
of Section 8, Township 3 South, Range 1
West, Wakulla County, Florida, and thence
run North 89 degrees 54 minutes 47 seconds
West along the North boundary of the south-
west corner of Section 8, a distance of
1,520.41 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue
North 89 degrees 54 minutes 47 seconds
West along said boundary 177.00 feet, thence
run South 00 degrees, 07 minutes, 22 sec-
onds West 360.00 feet, thence run South 89
degrees 54 minutes 47 seconds East 198.19
feet to the centerline of a 60.00 foot roadway
easement, thence run North 03 degrees 14
minutes 47 seconds West along said center-
line and an extension thereof 360.61 feet to
the POINT OF BEGINNING.
SUBJECT TO a roadway and cul-de-sac
easement over and across the Southeasterly
part thereof.
TOGETHER WITH 1996 DYNAS Mobile
Home ID Nos. H810119GL and H810119GR,
Title Nos. 82639857 and 82640115.
Dated on November 10, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
November 26, December 4, 2008

NOTICE
In the Apalachicola National Forest, fee
changes from $3 per vehicle to $5 per vehicle
are proposed for day use at Silver Lake and
Camel Lake Recreation Areas and for camp-
ing at Hickory, Mack, and Whitehead Land-
ings. Day use fees at Hickory, Mack, and
Whtehead Landings would be discontinued.
Submit comments to cbriggs@fs.fed.us or call
850-926-3561 ext. 6509 by December 5, 2008
November 26, 2008



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.:08-166-FC
UCN: 652007CA000166XXXXXX
LASALLE BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR
RESIDENTIAL FUNDING COMPANY, LLC.,
Plaintiff,


vs.
DANNY C. LANFAIR; ANGELA K. LANFAIR;
et al.,
Defendants.


RE-NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to
an Order or Summary Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated June 9, 2008 and an Order Re-
setting Sale dated November 7, 2008, and en-
tered in Case No. 08-166-FC UCN:
652007CA000166XXXXXX of the Circuit
Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for
Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Lasalle
Bank,'N.A. as Trustee for Residential Funding
Company, LLC. Is Plaintiff and Danny C. Lan-
fair; Angela K. Lanfair, Unknown Tenant No.
1; Unknown Tenant No. 2; and All Unknown
Parties Claiming Interests By, Through, under
or Against a Named Defendant to this Action,
or Having or Claiming to Have Any Right, Title
or Interest in the Property Herein Described,
are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash in the Front Foyer of the
Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawford-
ville Highway, Crawfordville. FL 32327 in Wa-
kulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the
11th day of December, 2008. the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Order or
Final Judgment, to-wit:
LOTS 1 AND 2 BLOCK 1, WAKULLA GAR-
DENS, UNIT TWO, A SUBDIVISION AS PER
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST
IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF
ANY,- OTHERS THAN. THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on Novem-
ber 7, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
November 20, 26, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-000179
DIVISION:
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.

JOSEPH A. CRUNK, et al,
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
JOSEPH A. CRUNK
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
90 REHWINKEL ROAD
CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 323270000
CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFEN-
DANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a rrortgage on the following property in
WAKULLA County, Florida:
LOTS 20,21,22,23,24,25 AND 26, BLOCK 26,
GREINER'S ADDITION TO CRAWFORD-
VILLE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.TOGETHER WITH A
2001 SKYLINE DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE
HOME, ID'S 32620638MA AND 32620638MB
has been filed against you'and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses within 30 days after the first publica-
tion, if any, on Florida Default Law Group,
P.L., Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
9119 Corporate Lake Drive, Suite 300,
Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original
with this Court either before service on Plain-
tiff's attorney or immediately Ihereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint or peti-
tion. .
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court on thislOth day of November, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
November 20, 26, 2008



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 08-192-FC
21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff.
vs.
BRUCE TUMBLESON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF BRUCE TUMBLESON; TONY C. TUM-
BLESON; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS.
IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE
RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDI-
TORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND
ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE
NAMED DEFENDANTSS; EQUITY ONE, INC.
D/B/A EQUITY ONE FINANCIAL SERVICES


COMPANY; AMERICAN GENERAL HOME
EQUITY, INC.; WHETHER DISSOLVED OR
PRESENTLY EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH
ANY GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDI-
TORS, LIENORS, OR TRUSTEES OF SAID
DEFENDANTS) AND ALL OTHER PER-
SONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER,
OR AGAINST DEFENDANTS) UNKNOWN
TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: BRUCE TUMBLESON; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF BRUCE TUMBLESON; IF LIV-
ING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED,
AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UN-
KNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND
TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS:
Whose residence are / is unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY required to file your an-
swer or written defenses, if any, in the above
proceedings with the Clerk of this Court, and
to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiff's at-
torney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra,
9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL
33619-1328, telephone (813) 915-8660, fac-
simile (813) 915-0559, by December 25, 2008,
the nature of this proceeding being a suit for
foreclosure of mortgage against the following
described property, to wit:
LOT 8, WINDSONG, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 85, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
To include a:
2002 Merit, VIN FLHML3B161125524A and
88596733
2002 Merit, VIN FLHML3B161125524B and
88596843
A/K/A
139 WINDSONG CIRCLE N
CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327
If you fail to file your answer or written de-
fenses in the above proceeding, on plaintiff's
attorney, a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the Complaint or
Petition.
DATED at WAKULLA County this 10th day
of November, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
In accordance with the Americans With Dis-
abilities Act of 1990, persons needing a spe-
cial accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact the ASA Coordinator
no later than seven (7) days
prior to the proceedings. If hearing impaired,
please call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD), or
1-800-955-8770 (voice), via Florida Relay
Service.
November 26, December 4, 2008


JOSEPH R. BOWMAN, et al.,
Defendantss),


NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order or Final Judgment Scheduling Foreclo-
sure Sale entered on November 10, 2008 in
this case now pending in said Court, the style
of which is indicated above.
I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash in the WAKULLA County Courthouse,
3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327 at 11:00 a.m., on the 11th day
of December, 2008, the following described
property as set forth in said Order or Final
Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 50, THE GROVE PHASE II, A SUBDIVI-
SION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 14 OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
'a/k/a 68 SAND PINE TRAIL, CRAWFORD-
VILLE, FLORIDA 32327
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN
THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
ENTERED at WAKULLA County, Florida,
this 12th day of NOVEMBER, 2008
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
November 20, 26, 2008


IN
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low


IN THE CIRCUITCOURT OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GR
PROBATE DIVISION CR
,TH
CASE NO: 08-99PR OF
PROBATE DIVISION CO
TH.
IN RE: ESTATE OF AN
RIA
JULIA ELIZABETH BARWICK
Deceased. witl
ten
NOTICE TO CREDITORS elt,
Rei
The administration of the estate of Julia see
Elizabeth Barwick, deceased, File 08-99PR is fror
pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla orig
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address fore
of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Craw- ate
fordville, Florida 32327. The names and ad- ent
dresses of the co-personal representatives the
and the co-personal representatives' attorney
are set forth below. Dat
All creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and per-
sons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate, including unmatured, contingent St
or unliquidated claims must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED. WE
This date of the first publication of this no-
tice is November 20, 2008.
vs.
Co-Personal Representatives:
Margaret A. Falk VAL
P.O. Box 315
Panacea, FL 32346
Dellie Louise Fedorak
P.O. Box 910
Panacea, FL 32346
Attorney for
Co-Personal Representatives: Finr
Frances Casey Lowe date
Crawfordville, Florida No.
Florida Bar No. 521450 the
3042 Crawfordville Highway KUL
PO Box 306 FAF
Crawtordville, Florida 32326 RIE
(850) 926-8245 sell
FR(
November 20, 26, 2008 COt


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-CA-100FC
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE. INC..
Plaintiff,
vs.


the
desc
Judi
LOT
TAT
THE
PAG
WAI
WIT
#HI-
A/K)
FL3

plus


THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
IDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2008-204-FC
GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC,
VA CONSECO FINANCE
RVICING CORP.,
30 Turbine Drive, Suite 200,
pid City. SD 57703,
Plaintiff,


:FANY A. DEGENNARO,
AWN THOMAS, and
SET ACCEPTANCE, LLC,
Defendants,


NOTICE OF ACTION
: TIFFANY A. DEGENNARO
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has
en filed against you in the Circuit Court,
unty of Wakulla, State of Florida, to fore-
se certain real property described as fol-
's:
LOTS 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10, BLOCK "10",
REINER'S ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF
AWFORDVILLE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT
EREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1,
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
'UNTY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH
AT CERTAIN 2001 FLEETWOOD HOMES,
NIVERSARY 40 X 28 MOBILE HOME, SE-
iL NUMBER FLFLY70AB28754AV21.
You are required to file a written response
h the COurt and serve a copy of your writ-
defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padg-
Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 2810
mington Green Circle, Suite A, Tallahas-
e, Florida 32308, at least thirty (30) days
m the date of first publication, and file the
ginal with the clerk of this court either be-
e service on Plaintiff's attorney or immedi-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default will be
ered against you for the relief demanded in
complaint.
ed this 5th day of November, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
November 20, 26, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-000106
DIVISION
LLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,


LERIE L. REDFEARN, et al,
Defendant(s).
/-
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
al Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure
ed October 27, 2008 and entered in Case
65-2008-CA-000106 of the Circuit Court of
SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WA-
LLA County, Florida wherein WELLS
1GO BANK, NA, is the Plaintiff and VALE-
L. REDFEARN; are the Defendants, I will
to the highest and best bidder for cash at
ONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA
JNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 a.m., on
11th day of December, 2008, the following
cribed property as set forth in said Final
gmrent:
T 16, BLOCK A OF TWIN LAKES ES-
'ES, UNIT NO. 1, AS PER MAP OR PLAT
IREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2,
jE 16 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
KULLA COUNTY FLORIDA. TOGETHER
'H MOBILE HOME THERE IN VIN
12513, TITLE #68114469
'A 186 JER-BE-LOU CIRCLE, PANACEA,
12346
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
from the sale, if any, other than the prop-


erty owner as of the date of the Lis Penderis
must file a claim within sixty (60) days after
the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this
Court on November 7th, 2008.
BRENT X.THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
November 20, 27, 2008




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY
CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-000211
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CYNTHIA L. BISHOP A/K/A CYNTHIA B.
CASTRO A/K/A C.B. CASTRO A/K/A C.L.
BISHOP, at. al.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CYNTHIA L.
BISHOP AK/A CYNTHIA B. CASTRO A/K/A
C.B. CASTRO A/K/A C.L. BISHOP
Whose residence is: 155 DOROTHY LOOP,
CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 & 33 SHELL
ISLAND RD., ST. MARKS, FL 32327
If alive, and if dead, all parties claiming inter-
est by, through, under or against UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF CYNTHIA L. BISHOP A/K/A
CYNTHIA B. CASTRO A/K/A C.B. CASTRO
A/K/A C.L. BISHOP and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title or interest in
the property described herein.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Fore-
closure of Mortgage on the following de-
scribed property:
LOT(S) 6, BLOCK B OF WAKULLA FOREST
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 54,
ET SEQ., OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
a/k/a 155 DOROTHY LOOP CRAWFORD-
VILLE, FL 32327
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on Nwabufo Umunna, At-
torney for Plaintiff, whose address is 2901
Stirling Road, Suite 300, Fort Lauderdale,
Florida 33312 within 30 days after the first
publication of this notice and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either before serv-
ice on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the reliefdemanded in the
complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court
this 17 day of November 2008
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
November 26, December 4, 2008




WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
Professional Planning & Engineering
Consultant Services
Request for Qualifications
Advertisement Number: 2008-019
Advertisement Begin Date/Time:
November 21, 2008 at 5:00 P.M.
Board Decisions will be available at:
3093 Crawfordville Highway
Crawfordville, FL 32327
and
196 Ochlockonee Street
Crawfordville, FL 32326
Responses will be opened at the above ad-
dress at 2:00 p.m. on December 19, 2008.
Please direct all questions to:
Deborah DuBose
Phone: 850.926.9500
FAX: 850.926.9006
e-mail: ddubose@mywakulla.com
RFQ specifications can be found at
www.mywakulla.com in
the County Bid
section.
Any person with a qualified disability requiring
special accommodations at the bid opening
shall contact purchasing at the phone number
listed above at least 5 business days prior to
the event. If you are hearing or speech im-
paired, please contact this office by using the
Florida Relay Services which can be reached
at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD).
The Board of County Commissioners reserves
the right to reject any and all bids or accept
minor irregularities in the best interest of
Wakulla County.
November 26, December 4, 2008


Board of County Commissioners
Regular Board Meeting
Monday, October 20. 2008
The Board of County Commissioners of Wa-
kulla County, Florida met in regular session
with Chairman Ed Brimner presiding. Present
were George Green. Howard Kessler, Brian
Langston and Maxie Lawhon. Also, present
were County Attorney Ron Mowrey, County
Administrator Ben Pingree and Deputy Clerk
Evelyn Evans.
1. SEQ CHAPTER \h \r CONFIDENTIAL
COUNTY ATTORNEY-CLIENT MEETING
In accordance with Chapter 286.011(8), Flor-
ida Statutes, the Board of County Commis-
sioners will hold a confidential meeting com-
mencing at approximately 5:00 p.m. on Octo-
ber 20, 2008 for approximately One (1) hour,
to discuss the below described pending litiga-
tion, Those in attendance will be each mem-
ber of the Board of County Commissioners.
Chairman Edward E. Bnmner. Vice Chairman


Howard Kessler, Brian P. Langston, George
Green, and Maxie Lawhon, County Attorney
Ronald A. Mowrey and Stephen E. Mitchell of
Mowrey & Mitchell, P.A., County Administrator
Ben Pingree and an official Court Reporter.
Wakulla County Circuit Court Case
#03-93-CA; Randolph Nelson and Mary L.
Nelson, his wife: Willie Jackson and Jose-
phine C. Jackson, his wife; and C. A. Harrison
etcalf and Yvonne P. Metcalf, his wife, indi-
vidually and on behalf of a class of all other
similarly situated, Plaintiffs v. Wakulla County,
Florida, a political subdivision of the State of
Florida, Defendant;
Wakulla County Circuit Court Case
#07-70-CA; Robert D. Snyder, M. D., P.A.,
Plaintiff, v. Wakulla County, Florida, a political
subdivision of the State of Florida, Defendant;
and Wakulla County Circuit Court Case
#08-102CA; Madeleine Hirsiger Carr, Plaintiff
v. Wakulla County Board of County Commis-
sioners, Defendant.
(The Attorney/Client confidential meeting
started at 5:30 p.m. with the Regular Board
Meeting re-convening at 6:16 p.m.)
Invocation provided by Elder Gavin from Piney
Grove Baptist Church.
Commissioner Lawhon led in the pledge of al-
legiance to the flag.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
(CD6:10) Commissioner Lawhon made a mo-
tion to approve the Agenda with the following
changes, under Commissioner Green add (1)
Rescinding Board vote from last meeting as to
Sthe canceling of the November 3, 2008 Board
Meeting, item (10) Request Board approval to
spend funds from the Wakulla County Drug
Trust Fund has been pulled, add item (18)
Board approval to declare the expenses re-
lated to the printing and distribution of the
Charter County Brochure to serve as a public
purpose, under County Administrator add (1)
Transition of new Corfmissioners. Second by
Commissioner Langston. Motion carried
unanimously, 5/0
AWARDS AND PRESENTATIONS
(CD6:13) Proposed Home Rule Charter-
Benjamin Pingree, County Administrator
Presentation on Charter issue.
CONSENT AGENDA
(CD6:33) Commissioner Langston made a
motion to approve the Consent Agenda in its
entirety. Second by Commissioner Green.
Motion carried unanimously, 5/0.
2. Approval of Minutes October 6, 2008
Regular Meeting
Approved
3. Approval of Minutes October 6, 2008
Workshop to Discuss Paving of Forest Road
#13.
Approved
4. Approval of payment of Bills and Vouchers
submitted for October 2, 2008 October 15,
2008.
Approved
5. Request Board approval of the tuition and
travel expense to attend the Florida Associa-
tion of Counties 2009 Legislative Conference.
Approved
6. Presentation of the Community Rating Sys-
tem Annual Progress Report for Board accep-
tance.
Approved
7. Request approval of road closing for Wa-
kulla County Christian Coalition Black History
Celebration and Parade The parade is Feb-
ruary 21, 2009.
Approved
15. Request for Board approval of a Resolu-
tion to accept the Small County Road Assis-
tant Program (SCRAP) Grant Funds and
authorize the Chairman to execute the Con-
tract.
Approved
CITIZENS TO BE HEARD
(CD6:34) 1. Hugh Taylor Comments by
Board Members, negative website, and the
need for change in County Government.
(CD6:36) 2. Chuck Hess speaking on be-
half of CCOW and the votes from the October
6, 2008 meeting regarding commercial strip
centers and the potential traffic problems that
will be a result of that action.
(CD6:38) 3. Dana Peck decisions that the
Board will be making on November 17, 2008.
(CD6:39) 4. Paul Johnson Speaking in op-
position of a Charter form of Government.
(CD6:40) 5. Dalynda Vause Speaking in
opposition of a Charter form of Government.
(CD6:44) 6. Billy Pigott Speaking in opposi-
tion of a Charter form of Government.
(CD6:46) 7. Susan Payne Turner Speaking
in opposition of the Charter and feels that this
process has moved too quickly.
(CD6:48) 8. Chuck Turner Speaking in op-
position of the Charter and feels that Commis-
sioner Kessler should not park his vehicle with
the Charter sign in front of Commission Build-
ing.
PLANNING AND ZONING
(CD6:51) 8. Application for Change of Zoning
and Preliminary Plat R08-07 & PP08-02
Request to rezone a 586.45+/- acre parcel
from AG (Agriculture), RR-1 (Semi Rural Resi-
dential) and PUD (Planned Unit Development)
to PUD (Planned Unit Development). This
property is located on the north and south of
Commerce Boulevard, west of Woodville
Highway. The owners are N. G. Wade Invest-
ment Company, Winco Utilities, Inc., and Wa-
kulla County BOCC. The agent is Robert
Routa.
1st of two hearings
(CD7:21) 9. Application to Adopt the Capital
Improvements Element Text Amendment to
the Comprehensive Plan, CP08-05
Commissioner Lawhon made a motion to
adopt the Capital Improvements Element Text
Amendment to the Comprehensive Plan,
CP08-05 for submittal to DCA by December
31, 2008. Second by Commissioner Lang-
ston. Motion carried unanimously, 5/0.
GENERAL BUSINESS
10. Request Board approval to spend funds
from the Wakulla County Drug Trust Fund
This item pulled prior to the meeting.
(CD7:30) 18. Board approval to declare the
expenses related to the printing and distribu-
lion of the Charter County Brochure to serve
as a public purpose.
Commissioner Kessler made a motion for ap-
proval to declare the expenses related to the
rnnting and distribution of the Charter County
brochure to serve as a public purpose at a
cost of $4,215.64. Second by Commissioner
3reen. Voting for: Kessler and Green. Op-
posed: Langston, Lawhon and Brimner. Mo-
tion Failed, 2/3.
(CD7:39) 11. Ratification of the Board ac-


i











THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008 Page 5B


Legal Notice


ions taken at the September 22, 2008 Work-
shop to Discuss the Proposed Comprehensive
Sewer Ordinance
Commissioner Lawhon made a motion to ratify
the actions from the September 22, 2008
Workshop on the proposed Comprehensive
Sewer Ordinance. Second by Commissioner
Green. Motion carried unanimously. 5/0.
(CD7:46) 12. Ratification of the October 6,
2008 Workshop regarding paving of Forest
Road #13
Commissioner Lawhon made a motion to ratify
the information that was obtained from the Oc-
tober 6. 2008 Workshop regarding paving of
Forest Road 13. Second by Commissioner
Kessler. Motion carried unanimously. 5/0.
(CD7:52) 13. Request Board approval to ad-
vertise to amend Florida Municipal Code
Chapter 23 Parks and Recreation Ordinance
Commissioner Green made a motion for ap-
roval to advertise a Public Hearing to amend
lorida Municipal Code Chapter 23 Parks and
Recreation Ordinances. Second by Commis-
sioner Langston. Motion carried unanimously,
5/0.
(CD7:53) 16. Request Board approval to ac-
cept quote for asphalt overlay and new paving
at Courthouse and BOCC Building
Commissioner Green made a motion to ac-
cept the quote for $75,805.00 for the asphalt
overlay and new paving at the Courthouse
and BOCC Building. Second by Commis-
sioner Langston. Motion carried unanimously,
5/0.
(CD7:57) 17. Request Board approval of a
One (1) Year Contract for Networking Serv-
ices with Inspired Technologies, Inc.
Commissioner Langston made a motion to ap-
prove the one-year contract for networking
services from Inspired Technologies, Inc.
Second by Commissioner Kessler. Motion
carried unanimously, 5/0.
COMMISSIONER AGENDA ITEMS
14. Commissioner Kessler
(CD8:01) (a) Request Board Approval to
adopt a Resolution supporting the proposed
changes to the Consultant's Competitive Ne-
gotiation Act Commissioner Kessler made a
motion to adopt a Resolution supporting the
proposed changes to the Consultant's Com-
petitive Negotiation Act. Second by Commis-
sioner Green. Motion carried unanimously.
5/0.
(CD8:06) (b) Request Board approval to
schedule Workshops for new incoming BOCC
for November 24, 25, and 26 Commissioner
Kessler made a motion to schedule Work-
shops for new incoming Commissioners. Sec-
ond by Commissioner Green. Motion and
second withdrawn. This item will be on the
next Board Agenda.
Commissioner Green
(CD8:10) a. November 3, 2008 Board Meet-
ing Commissioner Green made a motion to re-
scind the action that was taken on October 6.
2008 regarding the canceling of the November
3, 2008 Board Meeting. Second by Commis-
sioner Kessler. Voting for: Green and
Kessler. Opposed: Brimner, Langston and
Lawhon. Motion Failed, 2/3.
(CD8:17) b. Performance based septic tanks
Commissioner Green made a motion for staff
to bring information back to the Board regard-
ing a waiver for sewer when a
performance-based septic tank is in place and
in good working order. Second by Commis-
sioner Kessler. Motion carried unanimously,
5/0.
COUNTY ATTORNEY 0
COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR
(CD8:22) a. Transition of new Commission-
ers
Judge Walker will be available for a Swearing
in ceremony for new Commissioners on Tues-
day, November 18, 2008 at the old wooden
Courthouse.
(CD8:25) b. Rock Landing
Ray Gray gave a briefing on the Rock Landing
Project.
DISCUSSION ISSUES BY COMMISSION-
ERS


(CU8:32) Commissioner Kessler own Hall
Meeting on Tuesday, November 25, 2008
from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at the County Commis-
sion Chambers and Voting for Home Rule
Charter.
(CD8:32) Commissioner Lawhon No to
Home Rule Charter
(CD8:33) Commissioner Langston Request-
ing that the Traffic Safety Team lac;, into
speeding on Cajer Posey Road and staff
working with Ms, Councill regarding an off
road vehicle for use in the FH 13 area.
(CD8:35) Commissioner Green 0
(CD8:35) Commissioner Brimner clarifica-
lion regarding his tractor in a local parade.
Commissioner Brimner in fact rode on the
County float and then went to the back of the
line and drove his tractor in the same parade.
There being no further business to come be-
fore the Board, the meeting was adjourned at
8:45 p.m.
October 20, 2008
November 26, 2008



LEGAL NOTICE
WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
INVITATION TO BID
THE WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COM-
MISSIONERS INVITES YOU TO SUBMIT A
BID ON THE FOLLOWING:
BID NUMBER: 2008-021
BID OPENING DATE AND TIME:
DECEMBER 11, 2008 AT 2:05 P.M.
ITEM: SCALE REPLACEMENT AT LOWER
BRIDGE LANDFILL
THE WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS SHALL RE-
CEIVE SEALED BIDS UNTIL 2:00 P.M. DE-
CEMBER 11, 2008.
ALL BIDS SH-OULD BE CLEARLY MARKED
AS SEALED BID, WITH THE BID NUMBER,
OPENING' DATE AND TIME, AND MAILED
TO WAKULLA COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS AT
340 TRICE LANE, ROOM 201, CRAWFORD-
VILLE, FL 32327.
A PUBLIC BID OPENING WILL BE HELD AT
THE WAKULLA COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS
DEPARTMENT, ROOM 201, CRAWFORD-
VILLE, FLORIDA ON DECEMBER 11, 2008
AT 2:05 P.M.
SPECIFICATIONS MAY BE OBTAINED
FROM WAKULLA COUNTY PUBLIC
WORKS, 340 TRICE LANE, ROOM 201.
CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327, TELEPHONE
850-926-7616. CONTACT PERSON IS
BRENT PELL.
THE WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COM-
MISSIONERS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO
REJECT ANY AND ALL BIDS OR PORTIONS
THEREOF.
November 26, December 4, 2008



120 Services
and Businesses


Wakulla Sparkles, LLC
cleaning service
residential & commercial
licensed & insured
850-590-7853
% wakullasparkles@yahoo.com


105 Business
Opportunities


BACK FORTY TRACTOR
SERVICE Bushhogging, Box-
blading Driveway. Larry Carter
Owner/Oneratnr .85n-925-7931


BRIN G YOU OI 850-694-7041. Licensed/Insured.
Custom Cabinetry Remodeling,
PHOTOS TO LIFE!! Trim, Doors, Floors, Painting, At-
I can fix those lantis Trim & Cabinets LLC
wonderful old pictures 850-508-9719
so you can enjoy them Five Star Plumbing
again, and make
copies to share. Big Bend, Inc.

Keep the family heritage Commercial
alive with restored & Residential ,- ,
photographs Service


Just $15 per photo Billy B. Rathel, Jr.
dougapple@gmail.com 850-544-5062
850-421-1237 Fax
plumbing_five_star@yahoo.com
110 Help Wanted Lic#CFC1427547 State Certified
Harold Burse Stump Grinding


Big Top Supermarket, Panacea
now accepting application for
cashier/stock person. Apply in
person. Must have drivers license
and able to pass drug test.

Church Pianist needed, contact
Gloria Crum for information at
850-962-9021.
111 Medical/Dental
Help Wanted

An enthusiastic part-time dental
assistant/PR person is needed for
our Crawfordville office 2 days/wk.
Dental experience and excellent
people skills required. Fax resume
to Drs. Carey and Jones at
850-893-5788
120 Services
and Businesses

A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING
Free Estimates
Licensed John Farrell
926-5179
566-7550

Affordable Handyman Services.
Interior/Exterior painting, cleaning,
soft/pressure wash, cool seal, car-
pentry and many other odd jobs.
References avail. Bobby/Carol
926-2462 459-1071.

ALL ABOUT...
CONCRETE LANDSCAPE
blocks plants
bricks sod
pavers tractor work
call JOSEPH FRANCIS
850-556-1178/ 850-926-9064


926-7291.








ECLECTIC, S I[IC








Registered Family Daycare has
one opening. All meals and
snacks provided. References
available. M-F 16-yrs. experience
850-926-6347

Tender loving child care for your
newborn or infant in my Medart
home. Call 850-926-9460
125 Schools and
Instructions

Michelle Snow
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
926-7627
Music lessons of all types for all
ages.

240 Boats and Motors


2004-21' Key Largo, 115 hp Ya-
maha, $14,500. It can be seen at
Jerry's Bait and Tackle (Woodville .
Hwy). Call 850-556-5906


275 Home Furnishings


$160 brand name queen mattress
set, unused with warranty,
222-7783

100% Leather Living Rm. Set,
Lifetime Warranty. NEW, still in
crate. List $1999. Let go for $649.
545-7112. Can deliver.

5 piece 100% MicroFiber Living
Room set complete with tables
$599, All New in boxes. Delivery
available. 222-7783

6-piece, Pub Table & chairs, solid
wood. New in crate. List $1200,
Take $449. 425-8374

A new Queen Orthopedic Pillow-
top Mattress Set in sealed plastic
$279. Warranty. Can deliver.
850-222-7783

Canopy Bed Brand New in box.
$129. 222-9879

Cherry New Queen sleigh 7-pc
bedroom set $2,400 value, must
sell $1,000. 425-8374 Delivery
available.

Complete solid wood bedroom
set. Brand new! Top Quality.
Dovetail Drawers. Beautiful. Must
See. $499. Can deliver 545-7112

FULL mattress sets $150. TWIN
mattress sets $125. All NEW.
545-7112. Delivery available.

NASA Visco Memory Foam mat-
tress set NEW in plastic w/war-
ranty. List Value $1400 Sacrifice
$599. Del. available 222-9879


305 Machinery
Tools & Equip


94 Jeep Wrangler, 4X4, 4 cylinder,
5-speed.
94 Ford Ranger XLT Extended
Cab, utility bed, 6 cylinder,
4-speed, automatic transmission.
88 GMC 3500 one ton dually.
6X14 Dual axle utility trailer.
2310 Ditch witch w/backhoe and
trailer.
1220 Ditch witch walk behind with
trailer. Call 926-7794 or 510-2049

320 Farm Products
& Produce I


Boiled peanuts (green) $3.00/Lb.
Blanched peas and farm fresh
eggs. Raker Farm 926-7561.


(under the big oak tree)
NOV.23 thru DEC. 20
9 a.m. 'til 5 p.m.
S Fresh produce, greens,
collards, mustards and
turnips. Call for pre-wash
and chopped greens.
HOMEMADE PIES
(apple, pecan, sweet
potato and peach)
ace our order at
..50-668-6901


C C


o 4
a a


d -


IPrc b aa


E

4a~


Cowgirl Up!! $315,000
Small horse operation on 5 ac
fenced and crossed fenced 7
stall barn. 3Br/2Ba home w/
pool. #190433
Joi Hope 210-7300 Marsha Hampton 445-1906

Immaculate! Just reduced
to $134,900 3Br/2Ba on
/2 Acre in great area. New
Ceramic tile, all appliances, -
pretty fenced yard. #186956
Jeannie Porter 566-4510

Over 2 Acres in Lloyd!
$95,000 1999 Manuf.
Home of 1456 Sq.Ft. 3Br/
2Ba. New A/C and D/W.
See it today! #190494
Marsha Hampton 445-1906

3Br/2Ba Townhome! "
$89,900 Two story in good I -
condition. '1. Floor Master
Bedrm, high ceilings & all :A .
appliances. Comm. Pool
& pretty grounds. Must be
sold! #186840 Lionel Dazevedo 284-6961


HARTUNG AND
NOBLIN, INC.,
REALTORS
Real Estate Sales and
Property Management.


7 ; Big, Bright, and Beautiful
$239,900 New 3Br/2Ba Brick
home on 4 acre, nice trees,
paved rd., laminate wood
.. floors, 2 car gar. The dream
home you've been looking for. #187186 Call Joi
Hope 210-7300

Quality Construction
Corner Lot! $139,900
3Br/2Ba, high ceilings, nice
floor plan, Garage, Storage
Shed, Privacy fencing & nice landscaping. #188114
Joi Hope 210-7300

Getaway in Panacea $164,000
SR 3Br home is on pilings, off
-&, grade, partially
-fB, SFum. Open Kitchen & covered
front porch. Beautiful interior!
#183019 Mike Gale 567-2227

Warm 3Br/2.5Ba on .
pond. $224,900 High "
Beam ceilings for space &
light. Wood floors, 2C Gar.
Cuddle at one of 2 fireplac-
es. Immaculate! #186187 Lionel Dazevedo 284-6961


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SThe Online Tools
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The Experienced
Agents
- You Need!
@


www.coldwellbankerwakulla.com
2650-1 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327
850-926-2994 Phone 850-926-4875 Fax
Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated


Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours.
The Coldwell Banker

Wakulla Real Estate Team.

"He is a wise man who does not grieve for
the things which he has not, but rejoices
for those which he has. "-Epictetus


Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008


330 Livestock,
Farm Animals


Swine Show Pigs for sale, $125
each. Call 850-926-1910

335 Pets


Meet Stryker, a roughly 2 ? month
old black Lab mix. Stryker and his
sibling who was named Riggs,
were found in the National Forest
by a hunter at roughly 5 weeks of
age, and he was kind enough to
bring them in. He has been nursed
back to health and is doing very
well, but would love to have a
home he can call his own, and
someone to love and spoil him. He
is all puppy, very playful and
sweet! Please come see him at
the CHAT Adoption Center 1 Oak
Street in Crawfordville, or call
926-0890 for more information
about our adoptable animals or
how you can help as a volunteer
or foster parent for our needy
friends!
Three 13-weeks old Chihuahuas.
They have all puppy shots,
wormed, mother/father on prem-
ises. $250/each. Call
850-575-3664, 850-570-4058 (In
Tallahassee)

Deadlines

News:
10 a.m. Monday
for all items
submitted by fax,
mail or in person.
Noon Monday for
all items submitted
by e-mail.

Advertising:
Noon Friday for all
ads requiring proof.
4 p.m. Friday for all
legal notices.
S4 p.m. Friday for all
real estate ads.
*11 a.m. Monday for
Classified Ads.
Noon Monday for
all other advertising.


S 500 Real Estate


PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it ille-
gal
to advertise "any preference, limi-
tation, or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or national ori-
gin or an intention to make any
such preference, limitation or dis-
crimination." Familial status in-
cludes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing the custody of
children under the age of 18.
This newspaper will not accept
any advertising for real estate
that is a violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To com-
plain of discrimination call HUD
toll free at 1-800-669-9777. The
toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


MQUL NWSINC
LENDER R


520 Townhouses for Renl


Camelot Park 27-C Guinevere Ln.
Beautiful Crawfordville 3BR/2BA,
like brand new, freshly painted,
new carpet, new refrigerator, gor-
geous view of pool. $750/mo+de-
posit. Kristen Scovera Keller-Wil-
liams aqent/owner 850-443-2460


530 Comm. Property forL
Rent


Great-Location! 1,200sq.ft. Craw-
fordville Hwy. adjoining The Wa-
kulla News. Three offices, recep-
tion, waiting area, large kitchen.
$1,000/mo. Call 926-6289 or
421-2792.





STORAGE

MINI-WAREHOUSES
BOATS RV'S

519-5128 508-5177
2 miles South of Courthouse
on Hwy. 319 in Crawfordville
24 Hour Access Video Surveillance


545 Homes for Sale

Charming 2BR/1BA, sunroom,
wood burning stove, 2 acres,
barn/workshop, horses allowed.
Brenda Hicks Realty
926-2080/251-1253.
MUST-SEE! 3BR/2BA 2-car ga-
rage, 1 acre, near schools and golf
course. Priced to sell $169,900.
Possible owner financing.
850-926-9254


Classified Ads For As Little As $8 A Week


r,


555 Houses for Rent

10 Maxson Rd, Crawfordville
Investor's Special!
Beach style duplex in Wa-
kulla. Bottom unit 2BR/1BA,
w/tile floors. Top unit
2BR/1BA, w/Hardwood Firs.
Each unit rents for
$895/mo. includes utilities.
Call Bob at 545-6010.


2BR/1BA Duplex for rent near
courthouse and Crawfordville
school. $600/mo.+deposit. Call
850-566-7391
2BR/1BA in Wakulla Gardens. 59
Chicopee. New 2006 home. Tile,
carpet, new appliances, washer,
rocking chair porch, nice yard.
$725/mo for 12-month lease (ne-
gotiable). Land Lots and Homes
850-556-6694
2BR1BA Duplex, 457 Emmet
Whaley Road, on paved road.
$625/month. 850-778-6550


0o: 3ZM:I.7cJ a


L IA N C E
R E A L T Y C O M P A N Y

Make it Yours!
New construction
3/2 with 1,270 sq. ft.
Upgraded fixtures &
carpet, stainless ap-
pliances, custom cabinetry and more. Contract now to
pick colors and add your personal touch! $119,900


Think A-Boat It!
.Illiii* You could be enjoying
illllbeautiful sunsets at Shell-
I point in this 3 Bedroom,
S,^,' 3 Bath home w/ 50 ft.
dock. Gated neighbor-
hood. On the water! $480,000 susancouncil.com


Woodville Area,
4 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 2.5
Acres, Too Cute! Well
Maintained and private r
location. $110,000
FHA Qualified susan-
council.com


Start Here!
with this well main-
tained home on .67
acres in town. 3 Bed-
room/2 bath at unbe-
lievable price $58,000.
Call for financing info. susancouncil.com
Susan Council Mike Wahl
Owner/Broker See All Alliance f. Listings Realtor
850-251-1468 alliancerealtycompany.com 850-258-3338


Donna
Dickens
524-0473


Bill Ginny Mike
Turner Delaney Delaney
510-0283 566-6271 524-7325


Kenny Susan Teresa
Lovel McKaye Shepherd
519-2510 510-2477 567-6776

w. ^ r3I


Curtis
Benton
22-58921


Wetherton
(706) 244-5961


Mariko Chaviano
Beach Rentalsl
Advertising


Custom home wlover 1270 sqft Perfect home for family or Ochlockonee Bay! Modern Panacea! Brand new mobile Great 2B R2BA for 1st time
'(H&C) sqft 9' ceilings, vacation! Close to deepwater home In "Old Florida" setting. home, 2BR/2BA with Florida homebuyers or owner seeking
3BRI2BA, custom Oak cabinets. boat ramp w/ in-ground pool. Large screened front, rear room, large wooden deck, low maintenance home in nice
Metal roofwl Hardy board sid- Sits on 1 of 2 lots. Great for deck and Is priced well below CHA. Will make a great fish- neighborhood. 1048sq.ft.,
ing. On large lot in great area entertaining or just lounging appraisal. 2 additional lots ing get away w/boat ramps carpet and vinyl flooring, built
near boat ramps and deep wa- the days away. Just also available. Owner/Agent nearby! Just $89,0000. in 2005. Priced to sell at just
ter. Just $149,000. 574WAH $249,000. 612WAH. Just $199,000. 617WAH 670WAH. $100,900. 686WAH.


Mill Creek Rd! 3BR/2.5BA on
2 acres close to Nat'l Forest.
1400 sqft wlhuge living rm
and master bedroom. Offers
must be pre-approved. Short
Sale! Just $164,S00.
725WAH.
LMI- -


Ameliawoodl 1372sqft,
3BR/2BA wlupdated flooring,
fixtures and stainless steel
appliances. Close to down-
town Crawfordville on peace-
ful half-acre tract. Just
$139,000. 724WAH.


Sopchoppy! Updated 3BR Large 3BRJ2BA DWMH In Crawfordville! Fantastic home Ochlockonee Bayl Unique Eagles Ridge! Perfect for first
home with adjoining lot, new north Wakulla County! w/20X24 building for storage "Old Florida" style cottage time homebuyerlretlree. Hard-
vinyl siding, flooring, 2 large 1624sqft on gorgeous 5 acre or shop, boatladditional vehicle w/partial bayview. Less than wood floors, vaulted ceiling,
decks and a fireplace. Property tract! Vaulted ceiling, split cover, above ground pool, hot a block to the bay and boat ceramic tile and custom cabl-
is very private and close to floor plan, large bedrooms, tub, huge family rm wlfireplace, ramp. Close to beaches, nets in kitchen and baths. Nice
rivers, parks and boat ramps. fireplace. Just $128,000. fence and security fence. Must restaurant and shopping. backyard in beautiful neighbor-
Just$139,000. 727WAH. 728WAH. See! Just$194,900. 734WAH. Listed at $129,900. 740WAH. hood. $136,000.00. 742WAH.


Ochlockonee Bay! Handyman
special on beautiful bayfront
lot. Sold "As Is" for lot value.
1456 sqft, 2BR/2BA, 2 car
carport, storage/shop and
large porch. Just $450,000.
221WWH.
( 3 ",,. -, b


Amazing river lot on Sop-
choppy! Over 500' river front-
age, 3.11 quiet acres and par-
tially cleared for your new
home. Has 1BR efficiency,
dock, river launch and gazebo.
All for $149,000. 241WWH.

Ochlockonee Bay Realty:


Panacea: 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy.
k- ,11,


Mashes Sands Rd! Bayfront
home with Old Florida flavor.
3BR/2BA block home wl large
sleeping sun porch. All on
gorgeous lot with twisted
Oaks on Ochlockonee Bay.
Just $499,900. 248WWH.


10 Acre Estate in Brook Forest.
5,000+sqft (H&C) log home, 51
6BR/5.5 BA, fireplace, 2 kitch-
ens, hardwood floors, base-
mentlexerclse rm.loffice, in-
ground pool, hot tub & morel
Just$ 799,000.00 741WAH.


Spring Creek! Gorgeous water-
front 3701sqft, 3 or 4BR14.5BA
home wlexerciselgame room,
office, custom cabinets, fire-
place, top of the line every-
thingi On 2.5 lots wldeep water
boat slip. $925,000 252WWH.


& I-1-1 I.,_ .I I -
Ochlockonee Riverfront!
1600sqft, 3BR/2.5BA wl large
screened porch, vaulted ceil-
ings, hardwood flooring, cus-
tom cabinets, new dock on
river and all on 3.67 acreal
Must Seel $775,000. 262WWH.


PO Box 556 Panacea, FL 32346 www.obrealty.com obr@obrealty.com
Panacea, FL 32346 Crawfordville: 850-926-9260 2851 Hwy. 319 Crawfordville, FL 32327 "'W
Krii'


Woodville Retail
Space Available

* Fitness Studio-1000/sf
(Wall to wall mat & mirrors)
* Retail -1250/sf
(Storefront w/back storage)
STwo-Bay Garage-1200/sf
SDivided Office Space-1074/sf

Lewiswood Center
421-5039


Realty







Joelea Josey
Office
Manager


Lora Boston
P.A. to Marsha
Tucker


Rick
Whitworth
509-0085


Jim
Hallowell
566-5165


Susan
Brooks
545-6678


Teresa
Beidler
519-3766


Cathy
Mathews
519-0960


J


I


i HARTUNG AND
JoiH NOBLIN, INC.,
Joi Hope REALTORS
Broker-Associate 210-7300
Real Estate Sales and Property Management.
My name is Joi Hope. I am a real estate Broker Associate
with Coldwell Banker here in Crawfordville.
I wanted to take this opportunity to let the public know
that even in these troubled times there are some very
good loans available to help local buyers stop throwing
away their money on rent and settle the family into a
home of their own.
Buy a home with only $500 down!
1. First time home buyer loans with down payment and
closing cost assistance.
2. Florida Housing Bond loans with up to $10,000 in assistance for
qualified buyers. You do not have to be a first time home buyer.
3. Rural development loans with 100% financing.
4. FHA loans with 5% down
5. VA Loans with 100% financing
6. HOP loans with up 35% assistance for qualified buyers
So please do not think that the banks are not doing
any loans, that isfarfrom the truth! Call me today for
more inJbrmation on these and other loans. All it takes
one phone call to be on your way to having a
HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS!!
Many homes are available today; brand new homes
with 2 3 & 4 bedrooms, a 4 bedroom in the Farm,
3 bedroom in the Hammocks, 5 ac horse operation,
mobile home on one acre for $99,900 & one on 71/2 ac.
for $115,000. You want it, we got it.

Leasing for only $8 per sq. ft. triple net!
New Professional Office Complex
for Lease in Crawfordville
200 sq. ft. to 2,800 sq. ft.
Wakulla Garden Lots, 4 ac at Wakulla Station,
& /2 ac lot in The Villages of St. Marks
call 210-7300, email joi@joishouses.com, or drop by
the office and lets talk. Now is the time to buy, homes
are priced to sell and the interest rates are low.'
www.coldwellbankerwakulla.com
2650-1 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327
r 850-926-2994 Phone 850-926-4875 Fax
L Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated MAL$.


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555 Houses for Rent

3BR/1BA house near schools.
Small pet okay. $550/month plus
deposit. Call 850-728-6496 or
850-766-0170
3BR/1BA, Fenced yard. Down-
town Crawfordville. $650/mo.
926-8239 leave message.
Cozy cottage in Panacea,
2BR/1BA recently remodeled.
Hardwood floors, screened porch.
$625/month + deposit. Call
850-926-4217
Home on Acreage. Convenient
North Wakulla location, 2BR/2BA,
new appliances and flooring, large
front porch, 3 fenced acres
$700/mo., security deposit
850-926-2080, 850-251-1253


LAND LOTS AND HOMES
call 850-556-6694
HOMES FOR RENT
235 WEBSTER
$550 3/1 MOBILE
OFF LOWER BRIDGE
49 SPOKEN
$700mo. 2/1 HOME
WAKULLA GARDENS
5 JUNIPER
$1100mo. 3/2 HOME
HAMMOCKS SUBDV.
TEXT: ACCEPTIV
TO:98344
8 OPSREY
$1200mo. 2/2.5 HOME
$244,900 FOR SALE
MYSTERIOUS WATERS
TEXT: ACCOAST
TO: 98344
CALL 556-6694
LAND LOTS AND
HOMES.COM LLC
FOR MORE INFO.
Security Deposit = Rent
Amount
$50 application fee also
Beautiful 2BR/1BA House in Wa-
kulla Gardens. Front
porch, wood floors, appliances &
blinds $800 mo+Sec Dep/Credit
Check.
3BR/2BA House on pilings. Walk-
ing distance to beach, large
screen porch, appliances, carpet,
city water/sewer. $750mo+Sec
Dep/Credit Check.
3BR/1BA House. Just a few
blocks from Gulf, fishing & boat-
ing, $650+Sec. Dep/Credit Check.
Call Kai 519-3781. Coldwell
Banker Hartung & Noblin, Inc.
Property Management.
Osprey's, eagles, herrons/enjoy
the great outdoors. 2BR/2BA
home with large porch. Walking
distance to Wakulla River..Access
to community park, dock and boat
landing. $850/mo. witlhelp with
first and last month. 926-6289
Sopchoppy Riverfront. 3BR/2BA
w/2 screened porches, fireplace.
$1,000/mo. 850-766-1449.
ONE LINE FILLER


Oclilckonte Bay




Realty
Alligator Point! 3BR/3BA gor-
geous home in gated community.
$1800/month, $1800/security. No
Pets. No Smoking.
Pine Street/Alligator Point! Cute
2BR/1BA MH. $575/month,
$575/security. No Pets. No Smok-
ing.
Crawfordville/Linzy Mill!
4BR/2BA, 1600 sq.ft.
$1,575/month. $1,575/security.
No Pets. No Smoking.
2BR/1BA home in Crawfordville on
five acres. $750/month. No Pets.
No Smoking.
Panacea! Commercial building on
Hwy 98. $850/month. $850/security
Beachfront- Alligator Pointi
Gorgeous 2 story, 4BR/3.5BA,
3700 sq.ft. unfurnished home.
$3000/month $3000/security. No
pets. No smoking.
Ochlockonee Bay! Bayfront
3BR/1 BA block home. $750/mo.
$750/security. No pets.
No smoking.
Beachfront 2BR/2BA on Alligator
Point. $1300/month. $1300/secu-
rity. No Pets. No Smoking.
2BR/1BA in Lanark/Franklin
County! $600/month. $600/secu-
rity. No Pets. No Smoking.
Mashes Sand Rd! 3BR/1BA on
bay. $775/month. $775/deposit.
No Pets. No Smoking.
Commercial building on busy
Hwy. 98/Panacea for rent.
$550/month. $550/security.
Commercial office in Medart! 2
Room office on Hwy. 319.
$700/month. $700/security.
Ochlockonee Bay Realty
850-984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com


560 Land for Sale

124.7 acres, 5, 10, 18.9 & 99.7
acre tracts. 2+ miles of creek front,
including Smith Creek. Full
kitchen, two bunkhouses, wood-
shed. $5,500/acre 984-0044
5 gorgeous acres located near
Crawfordville Elementary. No sub-
division gives freedom to build the
home of your choice.
Brenda Hicks Realty
926-2080/251-1253.
Beautiful, untimbered, mature
wooded 20-acre tract. Easy ac-
cess from Hwy 98. Reduced
$125,000. Call Susan McKaye,
owner/agent (850)510-2477. Och-
lockonee Bay Realty.
www.hardwoodhammock.com
565 Mobile Homes for
565 Rent i

2BR/1BA S/W Wakulla Gard-ns,
Good condition. Available now.
$500/mo.+deposit 850-322-9952


3BR/1BA M/H. 235 Webster.
Screened porch, 1 acre, fenced
yard, great shape. Call today!
$625/mo. 12-month lease (nego-
tiable). Land Lots and Homes
850-556-6694
LAKE FRONT ON LAKE ELLEN
3BR/2BA DWMH $675/mo. In-
cludes garbage & water. Next
door to owner. No pets or smok-
ing. 566-0403
570 Mobile Homes for
Sale

For sale by owner. 1998 DW/MH,
24X48, 3BR/2BA. Yard sodded,
privacy fence on 60X120 highway
lot in Wakulla Gardens.
850-545-5965
580 Rooms for Rent/
Roommates

Panacea Motel. Comfortable
rooms $45/per night. Weekly
Rentals Available: $150-$200 per
week. Wireless Internet, pets wel-
come. Call (850)984-5421.
590 Waterfront Homes/
Land

George's Lighthouse Pointe
Unit A-3, 19 Mashes Sand Road,
Panacea, Condominium Unit.
1BR/1BA, LR, DR, CHA. Front
porch.faces pool & tennis court.
Back porch faces marina & view
of bay (Both 12x30). Gated
Community w/beautiful new
landscaping. 825 sq. ft. H&C.
850-545-5057. $229,900


106 W. 5th Ave.
Tallahassee, FL 32303
(850) 222-2166 tel.
www.wmleeco.com


Steeplechase $79,900 to $99,900.
5 ac. wooded tracts. Horse friendly!
Subdivision has underground electric
and water
Located off of Lower Bridge Road
Walkers Mill
$57,900. 2 ac lots, located on
Lower Bridge Road
Sellas Crossing
$59,900. 1+ ac lots
North Wakulla Co..
On Ace High Stable Rd.


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008 Page 7B




A Subscription to...




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For One Year Subscription,

Use This Convenient Form!



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Name

Address



City, State, Zip



Phone

TheFarm -$289,900
12 Carriage Drive, Crawfordville, FL
Immaculate 2255 Sq. FL 4 BR/2 BA
home. Beautifully landscaped back-
yard with a privacy fence & screened
pool/waterfall. Lots of extras wood


loors in main living
sunroom, master suit
deluxe master bath,
and much


***Brand New Subdivision***
Carmen Maria -$29,900.
Lots up to 1 ac. in size.
Underground electric and Wa-
ter. Conveniently located to
Tallahassee and Lake Talquin.


g area, fireplace, Call
te w/trey ceilings, Donna Card
security system, 850-508-1235
more. .1 i

**Affordable & Convenient**
Montelo $34,900
Located off Belair Road. Under-
ground electric, water, & sewer.
Convenient to Tallahassee, St.
Marks Bike Trail, and all the sur-
rounding recreational areas.


Carmen Rocio 2 ac. lot off
Shadeville Hwy near
Wakulla Station. $64,900.
2 acre tract with large
hardwoods in Beechwood
Subdivision off Shadeville
Hwy. $52,900.
Two 5+ acre tracts off
Rehwinkel Rd. w. large trees on
the back of properties & a small
pond. Can be
purchased together.
$134,750 and $136,250.


Brain


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Savamnah Forest
$39,900. 1 ac. tracts off
Wakulla Aaron Rd.


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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008


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Introducing a revolution in banking: your very own banker.


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More than your bank. Your banker.


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