Title: Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00193
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville, Fla
Publication Date: October 23, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States of America -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00028313
Volume ID: VID00193
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Full Text













FACE-TO-FACE wCH

Special Election Section, Inside







ha uulla


THE2562
A I2562 10--"-08 94P 33T
BUNIVERSITy OF FL TlIPbRARy
PO BOX 117007 **B010
20 SMA UNIVERSITY OF FL
UGAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007
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Published Weekly,
Read Daily


Our 113th Year, 43rd Issue


Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008


Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century


Three Sections

50 Cents


Wakulla teachers ratify contract


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
The Wakulla County School Board
and Wakulla Classroom Teacher's As-
sociation (WCTA) agreed to the sec-
ond year of their three year contract
and ratified the 2008-2009 teacher
salary schedule Monday, Oct. 20.
Teachers approved the salary
schedule by an 84 percent to seven
percent margin despite not getting a
raise in pay from the county. County
officials added another teaching ex-
perience step, step 24A, but did not


add any more money to the salary
ladder.
Assistant Superintendent Jimmie
Dugger said the school district did
agree to pay the additional health
insurance costs for teachers.
The salary ladder includes a step
zero for rookie teachers who make
$33,500 if they have a Bachelor's
degree and $35,700 if they have a


Master's degree. The salary ladder
tops off at $52,500 for 24 years of
experience and a Bachelor's degree
and $54,700 for the same number of
years with a Master's degree.
Teachers who have specialist
degrees get $2,700 added to the
Bachelor's degree salary and indi-
viduals with doctorate degrees add
$3,200 more to the Bachelor's degree


salary at their experience level.
Dugger said the district was faced
with "a very difficult situation this
year" as they negotiated the teacher
contract.
Pat Thomas of Shadeville Elemen-
tary School is the WCTA president
and Brooke Mohr of Medart Elemen-
tary School and the WCTA team were
present at the Oct. 20 meeting to


discuss the ratification vote and the
concerns of the teachers.
Mohr said 286 teachers voted
in favor of the contract while 23
said no and one teacher turned in
a blank ballot. Another 32 teachers
did not vote.
Mohr said most of the teachers
supported the contract due to "job
security." She passed out a list of
teacher comments to the board
that expressed the concerns of the
district's instructional staff.
Continued on Page 5A


N.G. Wade d iCharter issue

plan steps" M R, dominates meeting


forward
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
The Sustainable Commu-
nity being proposed by N.G.
Wade Investments had its
first public hearing in front
of county commissioners
this week and the main
objections were the impact
on traffic and that it's being
fast-tracked.
A handful of citizens spoke
on the issue at the county
commission meeting on Mon-
day, Oct 20.
Chuck Hess, who heads
Concerned Citizens of Wakulla
(CCOW), gave credit to the
commission for "raising the
bar" on development with
the project. "But," he said,
"my problem is traffic, traffic,
traffic."
With 5.000 buildable lots
already approved throughout
the county, commissioners
were now voting to add an-
other 500.
Continued on Page 8A


Motorcycle

crash kills

woman

By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
A 46-year-old Panacea wom-
an was killed in a motorcycle
accident on Otter Lake Road
Friday, Oct. 17, at 5:45 p.m.,
according to the Florida High-
way Patrol.
Tresea L. Simmons was
operating a 1997 Honda motor-
cycle east on Otter Creek Road
when she entered a curve to
the right. She failed to negoti-
ate the curve and entered the
north shoulder, losing control
of the motorcycle and striking
a tree with the front of the
motorcycle.
Continued on Page 5A


Brice WilhlamRon, len Choquette, Dalton Williams, Brooke Roddenberry and Alex
Baldwin help with the project by raking their garden.


Veggies from where?


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net


* A new vegetable garden is in place
and ready for the children at Trinity
Lutheran Preschool to experience how
vegetables are grown.
In years past Trinity staff have
planted flower and butterfly gardens
that have been been enjoyed as stu-
dents watch the blooming flowers and
caterpillars miraculously emerging as
butterflies.
As the preschoolers prepared for
studying healthy eating, this year Trin-
ity staff put in the vegetable garden.
"Many life lessons and good habits
can be learned in a garden," said Sara
McElroy, Preschool Director. "This fall
we have planted cabbage, lettuce, tur-
nips, broccoli, carrots and cauliflower.
The children are so excited to actually
eat something that they have grown
themselves."
Angie Mclnnes, a preschool parent,
and her father Bill Pacetti, built the
garden boxes for us and Mclnnes also
provided the seeds and plants.
"Come by and see the garden at our.
Fall Festival and Fish Fry on Friday. Nov,
7." McElroy said. "Coastal Restaurant


will be serving mullet dinners from 5
p.m. to 8 p.m. for $8 a plate. We wil
also have a bake sale. Games, contests
hay rides, music, and raffle drawing!
will begin at 6:30 p.m."
For more information about this
fun family event, please call Trinity
Lutheran Preschool at 926-5557.


Annie Mclnnes, Brynna Paiano plant


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
The issue of whether or not
the county should approve a
charter was a primary topic
at this week's county com-
mission meeting with the
county administrator giving a
presentation on it, numerous
citizens and commissioners
speaking for and against, and
an "informational pamphlet"
to be published and mailed-
out by county government
ultimately rejected by com-
missioners.
The cost of the pamphlet
was less than $4,500 well
within County Administrator
Ben Pingree's spending limit
without commission approval.
But when the invoice was
Submitted to Clerk of Courts
... Brent Thurmond's office for
Payment, Thurmond bucked,
worried that it was an elec-
tioneering document. Pingree
took the matter to the board
in an abundance of caution to
ask that they declare it to be
5 for a public purpose.
l But commissioners rejected
,the spending for the pamphlet
5 at their meeting on Monday,
Oct. 20, voting down a motion
s to approve 2-3.
y "I won't be voting for this
today," Commissioner Brian


Langston said. "Early voting
started today. It's too late."
Commissioner Maxie
Lawhon also voted against
it, commenting that he is op-
posed to the county charter
and that he hopes to talk as
many people as he can into
voting against it.
Earlier in the meeting,
Pingree gave a 15-minute pre-
sentation on the charter issue,
during which the lights in the
boardroom were dimmed so
that the projection would be
seen better by the Comcast
audience.
A number of citizens from
the county's business commu-
nity spoke against the charter,
including Paul Johnson, who
contended the county has
not grown to the extent that
it requires a new form of gov-
ernment.
"It's re-inventing the wheel
with a couple of new spokes,"
Johnson said.
Belinda Vause expressed
concern that' the charter is-
sue had been pushed through
without adequate investiga-
tion. There was no compre-
hensive study done, she said,
and no statement on its poten-
tial impacts which include
new taxes.
Continued on Page 5A


Man is gagged,

bound, sentenced to

45 years in prison
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN about wanting to fire his
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net court-appointed lawyer and
Travis McKinney, a 28-year- get his violation of probation
old man with an extensive hearing continued so he could
criminal history, was ordered hire a private attorney.
bound and gagged in court McKinney absconded from
last week for being disruptive Wakulla County in 2004 after
and was subsequently found he had been placed on proba.
in violation of his probation tion for drug charges and was
on drug charges and was sen- captured in July of this year
tenced to the maximum of 45 by the U.S. Marshals and the


years in prison.
McKinney was ordered
gagged on Wednesday, 'Oct.
15, after he became agitated


North Florida Violent Fugitive
Task Force at a motel in Tal-
lahassee.
Continued on Page 5A


Inside

This Week
Comment&Oplnion.....Page 2A'
Week in Wakulla..........Page 2A
Church .........................Page 4A
Sports ....................Page 14A
Sheriff ..........................Page 9A
People..........................Page 7A
Outdoors .................Page 10A
Almanac.....................Page 11A
School........................Page 13A
Community..................Page 1B
Letters to the Editor ...Page 2B
Saluting Women..........Page 4B


Coastal Explorers


Wakulla County 4-H youth
continue to learn about and
appreciate the county and the
environment.
4-H Club Updates
SSea Searchers were busy
traveling to St. Marks on Satur-
day, Sept. 27, to participate in
the Coastal Explorers program
with Lori Nicholson at the
St. Marks National Wildlife
Refuge. They also had a guest
speaker Saturday, Oct. 11, at
the Wakulla Library. Dr. Kevin
Craig talked about animal
defenses and showed the


children several live examples
of animals that have interest-
ing and effective defense
strategies.
Target Smashers and Arts
and Crafters will have their
next meeting from 10 a.m.
until 2:30 p.m. at the exten-
sion office arena on Oct. 25
to work on their fair projects.
Anyone interested in shooting
sports and joining the clubs
are welcome to attend.
Continued on Page 1B


Lori Nicholson of St. Marks Refuge shares knowledge of coast with Sea Searchers,


ne


84 percent agree to no payraises


i
i
i

1

r


Jr


,1















Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008



Comment & Opinon

Established in Wakulla County in 1895


We won't print


negative letters in


the Oct. 30 paper!


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Wowl Wakulla County can
write letters. Thanks to every-
one who has taken the time
to submit a letter to the editor
during the past several weeks.
Many of them were support-
ing candidates, while others
were designed to blow holes
in the balloons of people they
do not support.
In the Oct. 30 issue, we will
not print the negative letters
since the target of those let-
ters will not have a chance to
respond to the letters before
the Nov. 4 General Election.
We will still print political


letters as long as they speak
positively of the candidates.
My former boss, Stacie Phil-
lips, who sold the newspaper
in 2006 had a wonderful way
of putting it when addressing
this issue. I think I will steal
from her since she said it so
well.
"We take a great deal of
pleasure in announcing there
will be NO negative letters to
the editor or advertisements
in next week's issue of The
Wakulla News."
Since it is the final issue
before the election, candidates
for office would not be able to
respond to attacks.
"It may be hard for some
of the candidates and their
supporters to only say posi-
tive things about themselves
or their candidate of choice
but that's the only option,"
she said. "Although some of
the back and forth accusations
may have drawn some interest
at first, basically we feel our
readers will thank us."
Stacie would be pleased
that things haven't changed
much on the political front
since she retired.
Keith Blackmar is
Editor of The Wakulla
News.


Editor, The News.
'' v Over the past few months,
"the Board of Directors of the
Wakulla County Chamber of
Commerce has listened to pre-
sentations from professionals
who know and understand
Charter Government.
These presentations have
featured the advantages and
disadvantages of Wakulla
County becoming a Charter
County.
After much thought and
discussion, the Board of Direc-
tors of the Chamber has voted
not to support the Charter.
The board feels that overall
the benefits do not outweigh
the changes of becoming a


Charter County. .
'We also feel that the large
majority of the citizens of
Wakulla County are not aware
of the proposed Charter and
as citizens we should be better
informed and educated before
making such a change. The
process of putting Home Rule
Government on the Nov. 4
ballot has moved too quickly.
Before voting, the board en-
courages you to ask questions
about how this Charter will
impact you as a citizen of
Wakulla County.
Dave Buckridge
President
Wakulla County Chamber of
Commerce


I've Been Thinking...About Passages


By MARJ LAW
Special to The Wakulla News
I was one of the last there
on Friday. It's not that it
was a remarkable occasion,
because it wasn't. And it
wasn't that I felt the structure
itself to be of any particular
historic or architectural im-
portance. It might be, but
then again, it might not. It
was simply the dosing of the
old post office building.
Newcomers to our county
will never drive down U.S.
Highway 319, turn at the
courthouse and turn again
across from the old Craw-


fordville School to get to
the Post Office. They will
never push open the doors
and exchange "good days"
or other pleasantries in that
tiny room on Towles Road
with their friends.
And it's not a huge memo-
rable occasion. It doesn't
rate an "ou sont les neiges
d'antan?" that famous line
in Catch-22 signifying that
sweet and slightly melan-
cholic feeling of the passage
of time.
But it was a passage. And
I think it's important to rec-
ognize the passages in our


lives. Each time we make a
memory of an occasion, or
when we make an occasion
of an event, it serves as a
marking tool of that day in
our minds. This way, weeks
and months don't just slide
by. When someone wonders
what you did last Friday, you
can respond that on Friday
you met your friend Andy at
the Post Office, the very last
full day it would be open to
the public.
Having the ability to share
this passage with another
friend or resident of our
county gives us a sense of


community. It gives us a con-
nection to our world outside
the county as well. It reminds
us of shared past discussions
of the current events.
As we recognize our pas-
sages, we can see our lives in
terms of a series of events.
Some are more important
than others, but just remem-
bering them lends them all
importance.
So, it's Monday. The new
post office opened on Oct. 6.
I think I'll drive on over.
Marj Law writes from
Crawfordville.


Living peacefully at Lake Jackson


Editor, The News,
My where does all the
time go? It seems like just
yesterday when I first moved
to Wakulla County in 1997 as a
single parent to put my kids in
the schools. Little did I know
God had a few things for me
to learn especially when I
decided to try and make a dif-
ference in bringing light and
wisdom by running for Wakul-
la County Property Appraiser
in 2000. I had just gotten my
degree and graduated with
honors as a member of the
Golden Key Honor Society at
FSU and only been a licensed
Realtor for four years when I
discovered that we weren't in
Kansas anymore, Toto.
The election results were
not in my favor, but I won all
the same. I saw a tremendous
problem and attempted to
uncover it, but was tricked,
ridiculed and disrespected.
Later it came out as true.
When you grunt for worms,
they sure come to tle surface
and I was able to put folks in


the file category where they
belong.
But God our watchtower
knows who you are and when
you read this you know who
you are. That was then and
this is now.
Although I still have a
home in Wakulla County and
still intend to vote this elec-
tion, I now live peacefully
near Lake Jackson. My son
who was tormented by those
who would have liked to crush
him. He is now a successful
singer/songwriter touring the
country on his tour bus with
his songs climbing the charts
everyday.
I have two beautiful healthy
grandsons by my daughter
who married a Marine and
is now working law enforce-
ment in the great State of
North Carolina. I have moved
on with goals to obtain a law
degree and hopefully retire in
the Smoky Mountains with a
hot tub and a fireplace.
Despite the odds. God saw
me through and I am thank-


It's wise move to

support Buddy Wells

Editor, The News:
This letter is intended to explain why I support Henry
"Buddy" Wells for the position of Wakulla County Supervisor
of Elections.
I have known Buddy for more than 23 years having worked
with him at St. Marks Powder, fished with him on many oc-
casions, and worshiped with him. In all of these activities,
Buddy has always displayed impeccable work effort, honesty,
and humility.
His work at St Marks Powder required him to be very ac-
curate and to keep very detailed records of his duties. In all
of the years':that he worked at the plant he handled every
assignment in a conscientious and professional manner. His
work effort and attendance on the job have always been above
average, which, has been appreciated by his fellow workers
and supervisors. The above mentioned traits and job perfor-
mance make him a natural for the difficult and detailed job
of supervisor of elections.
I know there are other candidates vying for this position
and they are all good solid citizens, but I firmly believe because
of the above mentioned attributes, Buddy is by far the most
qualified person for this difficult position.
Buddy is a solid family man. He is faithful in his church
and a leader in civic groups in which he has participated. With
Buddy, "What you see is what you get" and I like very much
what I get with himl
Captain Luke Frazier
Sopchoppy


Preserve what we

have in Wakulla


Editor, The Newss
Another part of this coun-
ty's beauty gone to business?
What about the business
of enjoying and showing
gratitude, respect for our good
fortune?
How about preserving and
protecting the land we've been
so blessed to share? We boast
about the wildlife and nature's
abundance to everyone else,


yet we're selling it piecemeal
to the, highest commercial
bidder amongst ourselves?
It's time to stop talking out
of both sides of our mouths,
Wakulla.
Highway 319 is our main
commercial strip, we don't
need to add anything more.
Sonia Guerra
Crawfordville


Jones will get my vote


Editor, The News%
It is with great pleasure
that I speak to my fellow
Wakulla County voters about
a wonderful opportunity we
all have to vote for a dedicated
public servant who is very in-
telligent, well educated and ca-
pable of doing an excellent job
at anything he undertakes.
Doug Jones is running for
supervisor of elections.
Mr. Jones, as we all know,
has done a truly outstanding
job with our beautiful Wakulla
County Library. He has brought
it from four small rooms and a


huge storage area to our large
and efficient library of which
we are very proud.
He has been active in many
organizations which are ben-
eficial to Wakulla County and
has been extremely successful
with this work. You can be
sure that he will do an excel-
lent job with anything he
undertakes,
A vote for Doug Jones is a
vote for a job which will be
well accomplished.
Mary Butera
Sopchoppy


ful that he never once left my
side. His protection and angels
wings, along with the best
prayer partner in this county
were invaluable. But I shall
always remember a dark time
in Wakulla County and carry
its lessons in my heart. My
book "Wontkillya County" has
been started and sent to my
editor for review.
A friend of mine told me
they must restore banks which
are the backbone of America.
But I disagreed that the hard
working men and women
were the backbone. I have a
solution for our crumbling
economy and it includes our
current high interest credit
card and banking system
failing.
They have brainwashed us.
Politicians promise to reduce
taxes but we have the power
in our own hands to get back
to the barter system reduc-
ing taxes. They could take
all that bailout money and
pay off a lot of hard work-
ing folks homes instead -of


putting it in the pockets of
a greedy few. Those are just
two immediate solutions to
our tired working class and
would certainly stimulate our
economy quickly.
Aside from the dirty poli-
tics, there are a lot of great
folks in Wakulla who have
been used and brainwashed
by those in control. You didn't
listen to me about the plights
in the property appraiser's
office in 2000 which were
very real.
You probably won't listen
to me now. But it's good to
know we still live in a country
where we can freely express
our opinion.
Be sure and vote in No-
vember like you're supposed
to do.
.Jenny, Anne, Jimmie and
Lynn, my hat's off to you and
all those who went before like
Howard, John and Kimberly.

Kimberly Rose Wheatley
Medart


www.thewakullanews.com


WEEK IN WAKULLA


Thursday, October 23, 2008
CANDIDATE FORUM, sponsored by the Wakulla
County Chamber of Commerce, will be held at the
senior center from 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB meets at Posey's Up the
Creek in Panacea at noon.
MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA. a fellowship of
men who gather to share and support one another
in the quest for authentic manhood, meets "outback"
(behind) Cornerstone Ministries at 6:30 p.m. For
more information, call at 508-2560.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at 12 noon.
VFW BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran
Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Friday, October 24, 2008
AA meets at the American Legion Building next to
the Women's Club in Crawfordville with an open
meeting at 8 p.m. There are also open meetings
ALZHEIMER'S SUPPORT GROUP meets at the senior
center at 1:30 p.m.
FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the
public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa's
Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
PICKIN' 'N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at
the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on
Tuesday)
SENIOR CITIZENS DANCE will be held at the senior
center from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Admission is free and
refreshments will be served.
Saturday, October 25, 2008
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 56 Lower Bridge
Road, at 5 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.
SOPCHOPPY OPRY will be held at the Sopchoppy
'Auditorium at 7 p.m. Scheduled performers include
The Ghost Riders, Suzie Elkins and Southbound Band.
WINTER SPORTS REGISTRATION will be held at the
recreation park in Medart from 8 a.m. to noon.
Sunday, October 26, 2008
MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA meets at First
Baptist Church of Crawfordville at 7 p.m.
Monday, October 27, 2008
WAKULLA MIDDLE SCHOOL ADVISORY COUNCIL will
meet at 2:30 p.m. For more information, contact
Angie Gentry at gentrya@wakulla.kl2.fl.us.
Tuesday, October 28, 2008
BOOK BABIES, for infants and toddlers, will be held at
the public library at 10:30 a.m. .
DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP meets at the senior center
at 12:45 p.m.
VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the
VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Wednesday, October 29, 2008
AA meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road
at noon.
BOOK BUNCH, for pre-school and home school
families, meets at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
BOOK NOOK, for children in grads K-5, is 10:30 a.m.
and 1 p.m.
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior citizens
center at 10:30 a.m.
"TOUGH GUISE," a film and discussion sponsored by
Refuge House as part of Domestic Violence
Awareness Month, will be held at the public library
at 6 p.m. Hors d'oeuvres will be served at 5:30 p.m. The
film "Tough Guise" looks at the relationship
between representations of masculinity in popular
culture and its connection to domestic violence.


Chamber says just


vote no to county


charter issue


Letters Policy
The Wakulla News welcomes your letters, but we request
that you adhere to the following guidelines:
Letters should not be longer than 300 words.
They must include the writers name, home address and
telephone number. (Only name and town will be listed; the
reast is used solely for the purpose of verification.)
Writers may be limited to one letter per month, depend-
ing upon space limitations.
With very few exceptions, anonymous letters will not
be published.
Letters can be sent via mail or e-mail to kblackmar@
thewakullanews.net), or they can be dropped off at our
Crawfordville Highway office. The Wakulla News reserves
the right to edit all letters.


Te Wakulla Rtaoa
The Wakulla News (USPS 644-640) is published weekly at.3119
Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News,
P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
General Manager: Tammie Barfield ........................ tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Editor: Keith Blackmar...............................................kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Reporter: William Snowden ....................................wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton...........advertising@thewakullanews.net
Graphic Artist: Eric Schlegel................................... advertising@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey...................... Ikinsey@thewakullanews.net
Bookkeeping: Sherry Balchuck............................accounting@thewakullanews.net
Classifieds/In House Sales: Denise Folh................classifieds@thewakullanews.net
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Copy Editor: Karen Tully
Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one
year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $25, Out of County $30
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I














THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008 Page 3A


We must work toward unified Wakulla County


Editor, The News:
There's been a lot recently about the "na-
tives" who "protected" the county and "new-
comers" who "ruined" it. How there are new
people who arrived here and "created many of
the problems that now face our county... You
(newcomers) ... are much more to blame than
the natives here." (quoting a recent letter). The
refrain goes, "How dare newcomers move here
and tell us how to do things? We sold you a
house and now you want a voice?"
Huh?
First the newcomer thing. Some personal
history might help: My family's been in the
area since the 1820s. Fifty years ago, I was in
Wakulla every weekend visiting grandma. I
moved to Wakulla County in 1989. I left, then
came back, owning property here all the time.
Does that make me a newcomer?
Yep.
Know why? I don't think like "them." I
don't think it's wise to approve homebuilding
more dense than the land can handle, pollut-
ing our water. Or allow myriad businesses
along Highway 319, making commutes longer
by half. Or steal our water, or reserve county
jobs for the right--or the white--people. So,
I'm a "newbie."
But, new people who think like "them"
are not considered newcomers at all. Want a
bottling plant? You're a "good ole boy." Want
to build 10 homes to the acre without sewer?
You're in-though you live in Leon Countyl
Magic, huh? Doesn't make sense? Sure it does-
the term is "oligarchy," which is "a government
in which a small group exercises control espe-
cially for corrupt and selfish purposes." And


it's not necessarily law-breaking corruption,
but the "departure from the original of what
is pure or correct." Like screwing up where
we live. Corruption of someplace fragile, not
necessarily by the "good ole boys" but that
which Lisa Saavedra's "GoodOldBoycracy"
letter speaks to-oligarchy.
There's a small group who control this
county for their own benefit, regardless of
where they came from, when they came or
who they're related to. If this were the 17th
century, they would be the feudal lords Mike
Keys recently wrote about. If this were Stalin-
ist Russia they'd be the commissars, in the
segregationist South, they'd be the Bull Con-
ners of the "GoodOldBoyocracy." Ms. Saavedra
alluded to. It's great if you think like them, not
so great otherwise.
So, no matter when you arrived or whom
you're related to, you might be a newcomer
if:
You thought they said the impact fee
moratorium was for "helping trades people"
then wondered why trades people weren't
helped but moneyed interests were.
You thought it strange that hiring the
white guy instead of the more qualified Afro-
American was wrong and defending that suit
was money stupidly spent.
You think all that PR money spent by
the sheriff and superintendent of schools
could be better spent on services, rather than
re-election.
You were sold on Wakulla because it's
"cheaper," then found out you didn't have
the basics-paved roads, sewer, fire protection,
storm water protection or decent home insur-


ance-which made things more expensive for
you, but saved them a ton.
You think it's strange that the sheriff
hired two sitting commissioners' wives.
You think that stealing a common re-
source, like water, isn't right.
You've tried to swim at Shell Point Beach,
but found it closed most of this year and
wondered why.
You favor a home rule charter to give
yourself more voice, wondering why anyone
would say it's been "rushed."
You've sat at the traffic light at "Mike
Stewart Way" by Wal-Mart, wasting gas and
wondering why it wasn't located south of
Crawfordville.
You think it's impolitic that the upcom-
ing commission meeting the day before the
election was cancelled.
You think an untaxed 50-acre property
controlled by the "powers-that-be," should be
taxed as required by the Department of Rev-
enue, not left untaxed generating no money
for the county.
Enough reasons yet, you newcomer you?
The commissioners pulled or allowed all
this then declined to run for re-election and
we're supposed to vote for their clones? This
"straight ticket" nonsense just to protect the
oligarchy? The status quo around here has
perpetuated itself far too long. It's time for a
change. A real change.
It's simply in our interest. Let's take a break
from the oligarchs.
We have great candidates available, older,
wiser who happen to be all women, who can
be full-time commissioners, with maturity and


integrity, who have lived here, paid property
taxes here, built lives here and put their money
where their mouths are- they walk the walk.
Those three men on the commission have cor-
rupted our quality of life and left us so far in
the hole it's going to be tough digging out.
So it's time for qualified people. This isn't a
game, getting another chance because you've
"changed" or a stepping stone to higher office.
Realistically, the guys have screwed things up
so let's let the ladies have their chance.
We all have a right to the place.we've cho-
sen, regardless of when we came, what color
we are, who we're related to. We all have the
right to our voice and vote. I was told by one
"good ole boy" (who happened to be a woman
and not here all that long) that my voice
shouldn't count because I didn't pay the taxes
she did, something a segregationist poll-taxer
might appreciate, but I didn't.
That kind of thinking has got to stop. We
cannot afford more of the same.
It's time to say, "we live here too." And the
best way to say that is by electing commis-
sioners and constitutional officers who are
not connected through self-interest and the
powers-that-be. Candidates who are here for
the quality of life and want that quality pro-
tected and improved. People who could care
less when we came here, what color we are,
who we know, what kind of money we have
and what family we belong to.
Other, than, of course, the Wakulla fam-
ily.
Hugh Taylor
Crawfordville


School advertisements have been misleading to public


Editor, The News:
There are times when a can-
didate for office will provide
information in the form of a
political advertisement which
misleads the public. The Re-
publican candidate for school
superintendent did just that
in the advertisement in the
Oct. 9 issue of The Wakulla
News.
.She quoted two documents:
the Wakulla County School
District Five Year Facilities
Plan and the Wakulla County
School Impact Fee Report, July
2006. Neither of her quotes


can be found in the docu-
ments cited.
There are two ways to
finance the building of a sec-
ond high school. The first is
by using the Special Facilities
process which the district has
used to build the last three
schools. This process requires
projections for growth using
the Capital Outlay FTE Fore-
cast which is published each
year by the Department of
Education. The current capac-
ity at Wakulla High School is
1,450 students. To be eligible
to receive special facility fund-


ing requires a minimum of 100
students per grade level over
the school capacity of 1,850
students. The 2008 Forecast
projects the number of stu-
dents at the high school level
in School Year 20182019 will
be 1,522 or 328 students short
of being eligible for funding.
In short, a second high school
cannot be built using Special
Facilities funding in the next
10 years.
The second way to build is
through a bond issue which
would have to be approved by
the voters. To build a second


high school to house 925 stu-
dents, or one half the students
required to be eligible for Spe-
cial Facilities funding, is esti-
mated to cost $40 million. (Re:
Wakulla County School Dis-
trict 2008-2009 Facilities Work
Plan page 14). The bond issue
would require between two
and three mills for 20 years
with the interest costing $20
million. The total cost to the
taxpayers of Wakulla County
would be approximately $60
million. This would also leave
525 student stations unused at
WHS which is not a good use


of taxpayer dollars.
The Wakulla School Dis-
trict is required by Florida
Statutes to complete a Five
Year Facilities Work Plan each
year. The plan projects growth
for 20 years. The 2008-2009
Facilities Work Plan (page 14)
shows a second high school
will be needed in the period
2017-2027. Neither Florida
Statutes nor the Facility Work
Plan requires the district to
have the foresight to identify
where growth in the county
is projected and secure land
before it is needed. Planning


ahead reduces the cost of land,
which escalates over time and
when property owners know
you are in the market to buy.
The district currently has the
land to meet growth at all
grade levels for the next 20
years.
This is planning at its best,
for the entire district not just
a second high school. This is
the planning David Miller will
continue to provide as your
superintendent
Jimmie Dugger
Crawfordville


Look at the candidates like they are running a business


Editor, The News:
; When thetime rplls around
to make local voting decisions,
looking at the voting process
as a business decision can be
helpful
Our county government is
in fact the business of run-
ning the county. As citizens,
taxpayers, and voters, we can
think of ourselves as owners


or stockholders with the hold-
ers of county positions being
our employees.
In the business world, we
would not consider terminat-
ing an experienced employee
simply because another per-
son applied for the job. There
should be a very good reason
to fire an experienced em-
ployee.


Yet, in the contested county
races that have an incumbent
our voting decision is actually
whether or not to triinate
the person now in the job.
The incumbents in these
races are obviously experi-
enced in the position, with
their job performance well
known. The challengers are
somewhat of an unknown


quantity.
In the. upcoming, election,
why would I want to fire our
sheriff? He is widely recog-
nized as one of the best sher-
iffs in the state
Why would I want to fire
our property appraiser? He was
just elected two years ago for
what is normally a four year
term.


Why would I want to fire
our superintendent of schools?
People move to our county
in order to utilize our school
system.
I see no reason to terminate
Sheriff Harvey, Donnie Spark-
man, or David Miller, and will
be voting for them, hoping for
their continued employment.
Now I can focus on which


of the job applicants is best
qualified in the county,, qi-
missioner and supervisor of
elections races. No: n.ado
consider firing anyone here.
The county commissioners
that would have been subject
to firing are not standing up
for re-election.
Larry Hess
Shell Point


Jones is my choice for supervisor


Editor, The News:
Doug Jones is my choice
for supervisor of elections. He
has been the dedicated head
librarian who efficiently used
the budget in the growth of
the library.
The quality longterm staff
are so upbeat and helpful. He


has been supportive of several
community services, as well
as working with the Friends
of the Library.
Doug has worked with Su-
pervisor of Elections Sherida
Crum for years, and he has the
experience to step right into
the elections office to keep it


friendly and up-to-date.
He knows many of the
businesses to call to keep
equipment in top shape. He
knows many Wakulla County
residents and will. enjoy an-
swering questions from voters
and helping others become
voters.


Doug will continue to work
hard, be trustworthy, and
approachable in the supervi-
sor of elections office, as he
has been for all us library
customers.
Sheri Potter
Crawfordville


Men can lift up and help each other


Editors The News:
While I thank Mr. Keys for
reading the article entitled
"Men need each other" (Oct.
2,2008, Comment & Opinion),
I'm glad that he took the time
to respond his opinion.to
mine. I felt it deserved a re-
sponse. I'm sorry if you could
not 'tolerate my religious be-
lief in the Bible as the inher-
ent Word of God or the 'divine
word of a supreme being.'
But as the page suggests it
is the "Comment & Opinion"
page of the newspaper. How-
ever to misread or change
the wording, as his article
suggests, to reach a conclu-
sion that the author was a
racist would surely suggest
his thinking to be more racist
than that of the author, this
was obvious by his state-
ment.
As to the equality of both
men and women, that same
book tells us of their equality
as the two become "one flesh"
(Gen 2:24). It also leads us to
believe there is a difference


(beyond the physical) that al-
lows women to be 'a helper'
(Gen 2:18) as evidenced by the
difference in thought patterns
and communication. Women
'think' differently from men
and that allows them to be
"our helper." (The adage 'two
heads are better than one'
could certainly be applied
here).
In addition, instructions
and responsibility were given
to man'prior to the formation
of woman' (outlined in the
second chapter of the first
book of recorded history if
one chooses to believe that re-
,corded record). As for "it either
is or isn't" and "if this Bible is
the first, last, and only word to
guide our relationships..."
I'm thankful we have that
guide. All of our laws and mor-
al convictions and the founda-
tion of this great country are
founded on the principles of
that great book. If there are
errors in thinking it's not be-
cause the Bible is misleading,
it's because man has allowed


himself to wander away from
the teaching of Scripture. Bib-
lical instruction teaches that
the man should teach the
woman biblical truths, who in
turn would teach the children
and they their children (Deut.
Chapter 4) so that generations
to come could abide by that
guide to living.
The article was not about
equal treatment of law, pay,
work or even authority in rais-
ing our families, it was about
men sharing with each other
(somewhat like the two heads
being better than one thing).
It was about sharing and
learning from each other,
realizing we're not alone. Our
concerns and situations are
similar to each others and
talking about it to one another
can help.
It was about supporting
and encouragirtg one an-
other, lifting each other up
and challenging each other
to be better men, fathers and
husbands. Yes, it was about
men 'side-stepping' our re-


sponsibilities in leadership
and forcing women to pick
up the slack. Thank God, they
dol It was not about a 'right of
ownership,' it was about the
responsibility to be the leader
of the family;
As for the article being 'a
waste of ink and trees for The
News to promote this 'Stone
Age, Middle Eastern-inspired
garbage,' I'm glad we have the
freedom in this country to be
able to voice our comments
and opinions in a forum such
as this, the freedom to choose
to believe what we want or
don't want to believe. That
same freedom to choose to
believe in a Supreme Being, a
God who created us and loves
us so much He sent His Son to
pay the price that He set, for
our disobedience.
Steve Smith,
Coordinator
Men's Fraternity
of Wakulla
Crawfordvllle


Second Annual Sopchoppy Classic Car Cruise


Once again it's time for the
Annual Sopchoppy Classic Car
Cruise. This year's event will
take place on Saturday, Oct. 25,
from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. The high-
light of the event is a cruise
through downtown at 3 p.m.,
so come on down and line
the sidewalks of Rose Street,
as the rumble of cars and


bikes take you back in time as
the classics parade their way
around the little town.
Backwoods Bistro is once
again going to bring back
the old fashioned feeling
by cooking up hot dogs and
hamburgers and top it off with
ice cream sundaes for dessert.
They will also be collecting


canned food goods for dona-
tion to the local food charity.
Sister's and other down-
town businesses are going to
join in on a sidewalk sale to
keep cruisers and spectators
busy during the afternoon.
At the end of the day,
awards and prizes will be
given out to "Cruisers," and


the coveted Papa Don Award
will be awarded to the Top
Cruiser,
Come on down and see
classic cars and motorcycles,
eat some traditional food,
shop around and enjoy some
good old fashioned family
fun.


After careful review


and consideration
Editor, The News:
Over the years I have seen politicians come and go. I was
glad to see some of them come and others go; The county
has come so far and yet has farther to go. I remember when
there were very few paved roads in the county. There were
no McDonald's, Winn-Dixie, Wal-mart or others. The cost of
adding these and other luxuries have come at a price. It how
takes longer to get from one place to another due to increased
traffic on the roadways. The county's infrastructure has not
kept pace with its growth. Increased population growth almost
always accompanies an increase in environmental concerns.
However, as I reflect on where we are and where we have
been as a county, I am well pleased. Could we have done
some things differently? Yest I also realize that there will be
challenges ahead and we must get beyond thecurrent divisive
nature of our local politics. To meet these challenges we must
work with and not against each other. We must move toward
the middle and away from the extremes (left or right). It is
with this in mind that I extend my support to the following
candidates for County Commissioner: Alan Brock, Mike Stewart
and James Stokley.
Randy Nelson, Ph.D ,
Crawfordville

Building new high

school now unsound


Editor, The Newst
I have known both Super-
intendent David Miller and
candidate Andrea Carter for
more than 25 years, working
for the Wakulla County School
District and C.O.A.S.T. Charter
School.
After viewing the Carter
campaign web site and read-
ing recent ads, I have a serious
concern about her claim that
a new high school is needed
right now and believe the
promise to build a new high
school is financially unsound.
There are two ways to build
a new school. A school district
can follow the state guidelines
and receive the majority of
funds needed from the state.
The Wakulla County School
District has done this and
provided our community with
three new schools. Mrs. Carter
pledges to build a new high


school now. To do so would
require a local bond issue
approved by Wakulla County
voters. The construction costs
of $40 million dollars and the
interest, all the responsibility
of Wakulla County citizens,
could total $60 million.
The Carter proposal would
be a tax burden for decades
and irresponsible at any time.
Mr. Miller has demonstrated
the ability to create the best
educational opportunities and
facilities for our community
with intelligent financial plan-
ning for today and the future. I
would ask all voters in Wakulla
County to consider this dis-
tinct difference between'the
candidates and their approach
to fiscal responsibility.
Tim O'Donnell
Teacher
Sopchoppy,
Education Center













Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008


Church


Obituaries


Patricia Q. Cheshire
Patricia Quick Cheshire, 66,
of Tallahassee died Thursday,
Oct. 16 in Tallahassee.
The funeral service was held
Saturday, Oct. 18 graveside at
Beth Page Cemetery.
A native of Tallahassee, she
was a homemaker, a Southern
Baptist and a member of New
Life Church in Woodville.
Survivors include her son,
Buddy Cheshire of Quincy;
two daughters, Linda Gray and
Mark and Lisa Cheshire and
Robert Smith, all of Crawford-
ville; seven grandchildren; and
three great-grandchildren.
Beggs Funeral Home in Tal-
lahassee was in charge of the
arrangements.

Wesley L. Dinsford
Wesley Lee Dunsford, 52 of
Crawfordville died Monday,
'Oct 13, in Tallahassee.


Memorial services were
held Thursday, Oct. 16, at Har-
vey-Young Funeral Home in
Crawfordville.
He was born in Fort Myers,
and lived most of his life in this
area. He was a truck driver.
Survivors include a one
son, Christopher Dunsford of
Crawfordville; a daughter, Anita
Bunn and husband Ernest of
Port Arthur, Texas; his mother,
Frances Walker of Jacksonville,
Texas; two grandchildren, Jas-
mine and Christie Dunsford:
his step-mother, Elizabeth
Dunsford; a brother, Michael
Dunsford of Tallahassee; and
two sisters, Beverly Davis and
Sharon Bonner, both of Texas.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.

Carlette D. Gray-Taylor
Carlette "Carla" Denise Gray-


Taylor. 42, of Tallahassee died
unexpectedly Tuesday, Oct. 14,
in Tallahassee.
The funeral service was
held Friday, Oct. 17, at Evan-
gel Assembly of God Church,
where she attended all her life
and was a member. In lieu of
flowers, the family requests
memorials be made in Carla's
memory to Tallahassee Teen
Challenge, 4141 Apalachee Park-
way, Tallahassee, FL 32311.
A lifelong resident of Tal-
lahassee, she was a much
loved and cherished daughter,
mother, sister, aunt, cousin and
friend. She enjoyed spending
time with family and at the
beach, comedy shows and mov-
ies. She was a very talented
writer and wrote poems for
family and friends. She loved
to act and performed in many
drama skits. She had a quick
wit that everyone loved.


Gavins saluted at Founder's Day


Mary Ann and Reverend Clarence C. Gavin

Leavins will perform
Born with muscular dys-
trophy, Stephanie uses her
handicap as an opportunity
to inspire and encourage audi-
ences all across the country.
For more, call 926-1513.


Stephanie Leavins, gospel
concert soloist will minister
in song and testimony, Sunday
Oct 26 at 1fa.m. at Mt. Beasor
SPrimitive Baptist Church.


S- Crawfordville United

Methodist Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 926-7209
Ochlockoee & Arran oad 'Come Grow ithl Us' www.crawfordvlle.umc.org


5711of/'onweontmen/t fe tice'
5585 Crawfordville Hwy.
Tallahassee, FL 32305
Owned & Operated By Wesley Schweinsberg
Son of the Late Harold Schweinsberg
Office: (850) 421-7211 Mobile: (850) 510-3983
Call and Compare... You'll Save Time & Money
Same Quality & Service


S Hwy 319 Medart,
k Ele Office 926-5265
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
0 noH Sunday School 9:45 am.
D Mo'ing Worship 11:00 a.m.
AW NA 4:00 p.m.
SYou Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeelleabaptistchurch.org


Shadeville residents Rev-
erend Clarence C. Gavin and
Minister Mary Ann Gavin of
Shadeville were recognized
by the First Genesis Baptist
Church in Rochester, N.Y. for
founding the church. Found-
er's Day was held Sunday,
Aug. 17 at the church.
Reverend Dr. Fredrick John-
son, Sr. is church pastor.

GETTHE NEWS
DELIVERED
EACH WEEK!
Call 926-7102


Trinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Vicar Bert Matlock
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557

Wakulla United
Methodist Church
Sunday Contemporary Service 830 a.m.
Sunday School forall ages- 10 .m.
S Sunday Worship -11 a.m.
Wednesday Service 7 pm.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor jain Henry Ri'ebart


Pioneer Baptist
Church (SBC)


Sunday School
Sunday Worship


9:15 a.m.
10:30 a.m.


Wed. adult, children & youth 7 p.m.
486 Beechwood Drive Crawfordville, FL
(North of the Lower Bridge Road and
Spring Creek Highway intersection)
Rev. Dennis Hall, Pastor
850-926-6161


Survivors include her par-
ents, Dennis and Patsy Gray of
Tallahassee; her children, Ra-
chel Denise Taylor and Joshua
Dennis Taylor, both of Craw-
fordville; her sister, Ramsey
Hughes and husband Heath of
Tallahassee; her grandparents,
Parks and Delois Gray of Tal-
lahassee; two nieces, Grace
Hughes and Hope Hughes,
both of Tallahassee; and nu-
merous uncles, aunts, cousins
and friends.
Beggs Funeral Home in
Tallahassee was in charge of
arrangements.

Hulon A. Mitchell
Hulon Andrew "Andy"
Mitchell, 38, of Tallahassee
died Saturday, Oct. 18, in Tal-
lahassee.
The Funeral service was
held Tuesday, Oct. 21, at Bevis
Funeral Home in Tallahassee.

Morris will


Pastor Andrew Morris


1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98
Holy Eucharist
10:30 am
The Reverend Roy Lima
-926-1742


Och lockonee
--
United
Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship 9 a.m.
Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
Vastor frett '"empleton
(850) 984-0127


Panacea Park

Baptist Church
24 Mission Road, Panacea
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Worship 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 p.m.
Pastor, Jerry Spears


_t/ccove/- t/e, Q w, ence./
FISUNDAY
'FRS Early WorshipN 8:30 a.m.
BApIsT ChuRct Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
SDiscipleship Training 7:00 p.m.
3086 Crawfordville Hwy.
(South of the Courthouse) WEDNESDAY
Church Officet 926-7896 Fellowship Meal 6:00 p.m.
www.fbcc.embarqspace.com (call for reservations)
Children's Events 6:30 p.m.
Student Worship 7:00 p.m.
Prayer/Bible Study 7:00 p.m.


117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy


Church Office
n~eol *70nd


Sunday School 9:45 AM
Morning Worship 11 AM


6o 2-782 AWANA CLUB 5PM
Evening Worship 6 PM

Wednesday 7 PM- Praver Meeting, A
Youth a Children's Programs
r. Bill Jenkins, Pastor
Randy Anderson, Minister of Music
Vicki Anderson, Youth Director
Jerry Evans, Mike Crouch, Bernie Kemp Musicians


Memorial contributions may
be made to Woodland Hall
Academy, 5746 Centerville
Road, Tallahassee, FL 32309.
'A native and lifelong resi-
dent of Tallahassee, he was a
self-employed computer repair
specialist and received his
degree in Computer Science
from Thomas College. He was
an avid fisherman, a lover of
music and an accomplished
amateur juggler.
Survivors include his wife,
Amber Mitchell of Tallahas-
see; a daughter, Kinsley Ann
Mitchell of Tallahassee; a sister,
Michelle Fischman of Sunrise;
and his maternal grandmother,
Louise Gray of Crawfordville.
Bevis Funeral Home in Tal-
lahassee was in charge of the
arrangements.

Tresea L. Simmons
Tresea Lynocholia "Cougar"

be honored
The Macedonia Church of
Christ Written in Heaven will
host a 21st Pastor's Anniversary.
The services will begin on Oct.
21 at 7:30 p.m. at Skipper Temple
Church. On Oct. 23 at 7:30 p.m.,
St John P.B. Church Rev. Ray-


missionary
Baptist Church
90 Mt. Pleasant Lane,
Wakulla Station
Pastor Rev. Dr. Frank McDonald, Jr.
421-8900
Sunday School Each Sunday... 10 a.m.
1" & 3" Sun. Worship ..........11 a.m.
Wednesday Service ............... 7 p.m.
(Prayer Meeting and Bible Study)
ur Mission "To be a change agent in
the community for the glory of God."


U 8:30am Holy
Eucharist Rite One
9:30am Youth & Adults
10:30am Sunday School
10:30am Hply.Eucharist ,
Nursery care available
850-745-8412
4340 Crawfordville Highway


Simmons, 46, of Panacea died
Friday, Oct. 17, in Panacea.
The funeral service was
held Tuesday, Oct. 21, at Har-
vey Young Funeral Home in
Crawfordville.
A native of Jacksonville, she
moved to Panacea from Dixie
County in March. She was a
self-employed medical tran-
scriber and was a veteran of the
United States Marine Corp.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Daniel F. "Freddy" Sim-
mons; two sons, Justin A. Sim-
mons of Panacea and Daniel
F. Simmons, Jr. of Tallahassee;
her granddaughter, Rachel
Simmons of Tallahassee; and
a brother.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.


mond Sanders will speak.
On Oct 24, the Youth Night
speaker will be Elder F. Nelson.
On Sunday, Oct 26, at 11 a.m. a
service will be held with Mis-
sionary Mary Kelly speaking.
Everyone is invited to attend.


St. Elizabeth
Ann Seton
Catholic C
Mass 9 a.m. Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Father James MacGee, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
926-1797

Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road,
IMmll H Crawfordville
Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey
-- Ac W-rdip "k Us-
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School...................1.... 10 a.m:'
Sunday Worship ...................... 11am.
Evening Worship.......................6 p.m.
SWednesday Service. .. ..... f
& ou.?h Ser.i . .'pm
Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m.
M issionettes ..............................7 pan.


IN CONCERT

Sunday, October 26


7:00 p.m.

Panacea Full Gospel Assembly


Who is the latest

Wakulla Wavemaker?"

Tune in daily at

2 p.m. and 6 p.m.





THE WORD IN PRAISE



WAKU 94.1 FM www.wave94.com
926-8000 (fax: 926-2000)


"- 8:30am Holy
Eucharist Rite One
9:30am Youth & Adults
10:30am Sunday School
10:30am Holy Eucharist
Nursery care available
850-745-8412
4340 Crawfordville Highway


105,













THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008 Page 5A


McKinney gagged


Continued from Page 1A
Wakulla Circuit Judge N.
Sanders Sauls allowed McK-
inney to dismiss attorney
Adam Ruiz. but told McKin-
ney if he did so he would
have to represent himself at
the hearing. "You have no
right to another appointed
counsel," the judge said.
When McKinney argued
that he wanted to hire a
private lawyer, Judge Sauls
told him he had been in
the Wakulla County Jail for
five months and that was
adequate time to have hired
a lawyer.
McKinney protested that,
calling out loudly in the
courtroom: "This is not le-
gall Yall cannot tell me this
is legal" He would not be
quiet when ordered by the
judge, and, surrounded by
uniformed bailiffs and plain-
clothes detectives, he was
taken from the courtroom.
"Gag himl" Judge Sauls or-
dered. "I want him gagged"
After tending to other
court matters, McKinney was
brought back in the court-

Contract
Continued from Page 1A
"We hope for a dialog, not
a monolog," said Mohr of
contract negotiations.
"No one is happy with
the contract," said Mohr,
who added that educators
are concerned about losing
a year of additional earning
power toward their retire-
ment.
The comments from teach-


room chained to a rolling
desk chair and gagged with
duct tape. He was pushed
to thedefense table where
Ruiz sat.
Judge Sauls then cited the
law to McKinney that says
courts have three options
when dealing with disrup-
tive behavior in the court-
room: to cite the person for
contempt of court, remove
the person from the court-
room until they agree to act
properly, or to have them
bound and gagged. "The
defendant has necessitated
the need to be bound and
gagged."
McKinney had managed
to work his gag off his face
by then. He answered ques-
tions put forward by the
judge in trying to ascertain
if McKinney was capable of
representing himself, then
began to loudly say: "This is
racist stuff, man! You ain't do
this to a white boy, manl"
McKinney was re-gagged
with duct tape, wrapped
around his mouth. He then
began struggling with offi-


ers had a wide range.
"No, I reject the proposal.
Unacceptable."
"Did the school board
members take a pay cut?"
"I'm glad I have a job."
"Cut the air conditioning
costs by warming up the
classrooms."
"And just how many as-
sistant superintendents does
Wakulla County need? Ap-


cers, complaining he couldn't
breathe. He subsequently
calmed and, when asked if
he wanted to dismiss his
attorney, told the court, "I
want to fire himl" Ruiz got
up from the defense table
and left the courtroom.
McKinney was left having
to defend himself, even as
the judge warned him of the
disadvantages of represent-
ing oneself in court.
Assistant State Attorney
Jack Campbell presented
evidence that McKinney was
charged with his initial vio-
lation of probation in 2006,
that in July of that year he
was arrested in suburban At-
lanta on drug and weapons
charges under the name of
his cousin, Reginald McKin-'
ney, and after his capture in
Tallahassee and transport to
Wakulla County, additional
charges were filed against
him for smuggling contra-
band into the jail and threat-
ening a correction officer.
McKinney was identified
as the leader of a home-
grown gang known as KBI


parently too many to fund
steps for teachers."
"District employees
should shoulder the burden
of the budget crisis with us
by not receiving a raise."
In addition to regular
salaries, the board approved
the salary supplements for
extra duties such as athletic
coaches and club sponsors.
The supplements are based


UFO, which stands for Kant
Be Identified/Unknown Fu-
ture Outlaw.
Sheriff David Harvey took
the stand to testify that McK-
inney is an unusually dan-
gerous criminal. "He's very
violent, very dangerous," the
sheriff said.
As a juvenile, McKinney
was dealing crack in the old
Jack Crum Trailer Park in
Medart when a Panacea man,
Corey Ingram, allegedly tried
to rip off McKinney.
McKinney and other ju-
veniles beat Ingram and
another man, who was never
convicted, allegedly shot
Ingram to death.
That incident gave McKin-
ney "street cred," Campbell
said. "It meant you don't try
to rip off Travis McKinney."
In 2002, McKinney was
involved in the beating of
Brad Hutchinson, a bouncer
at the Chocolate City club
near Wakulla Station, and
drive-by shooting at the club.
He and another man were
stopped after a chase with
Wakulla County deputies


on a percentage of the base
salary. The WHS head foot-
ball coach and WHS ath-
letic director get the highest
supplement percentage at 15
percent.
"Staff recommends ap-
proval of the teacher con-
tract." said Dugger. The
board voted unanimously
to approve the contract.


that required putting spike
strips in the road to blow
out the car's tires.
Once he was picked up
by the Violent Fugitive Task
Force, McKinney allegedly
began using girlfriend Ka-
trina Runyon to drop off
tobacco, called "rip" in jail
lingo, at the recreation park
in Medart where jail inmates
were working. Detectives
intercepted phone calls be-
tween McKinney and Runyon
discussing drop-off locations
and, knowing when more
would be coming in, had
the work crew that included
another McKinney cousin,
Clifford McKinney, put in a
holding cell.
Detective Scott Delbeato
described watching other
inmates sit and doze in the
holding cell, but not Clifford
McKinney, who appeared to
be desperately uncomfort-
able and clutching his stom-
ach as though suffering from
cramps. Later, McKinney
passed several containers
of tobacco that were seized
by officers.


Clifford McKinney smug-
gled the rip into the jail by
stuffing it into holders made
from the fingers of latex
gloves, tying them off with
string, and inserting them
into his body.
Campbell asked the court
to order McKinney to serve
45 years in prison, the maxi-
mum under the state sen-
tencing code. "If I could ask
for more, I would," Campbell
said.
Throughout the VOP hear-
ing, when the court would
ask McKinney if he wanted
to ask questions of wit-
nesses or present a defense,
he would simply answer, "I
want a fair trial."
Sauls sentenced McKin-
ney to a 45 year prison term
by stacking three 15-year
prison sentences, ordering
them to be served consecu-
tively.
As McKinney was being
taken from the courtroom,
Sheriff Harvey commented,
"The judge sent a message
today."


Motorcycle
Continued from Page 1A
The motorcycle came to rest on its right side facing north.
Simmons came to rest on the north shoulder of Otter Lake
Road facing south. She was pronounced dead at the scene.
The motorcycle suffered $5,000 worth of damage in the
accident one mile west of Highway 98. She was wearing a
helmet. FHP officials said the cause of the crash is still under
investigation.
The Wakulla County Sheriff's Office and the Wakulla
EMS Unit assisted the FHP at the scene. Corporal Brandon
S. Overstreet was the FHP crash investigator and homicide
investigator.


County charter


Continued from Page 1A
"The charter is not the end," Vause
said, "it's the beginning." It's not what
the charter says right now, she added,
but what it can become.
Susan Payne Turner echoed that,
calling a charter form of government
"a monumental change for our coun-
ty." More time should be invested in
the issue before it's put before voters,
she said.
Chuck Turner used the opportunity


to speak to complain about Commis-
sioner Howard Kessler's truck being
parked in front of the commission
complex next door to the Supervi-
sor of Elections office with a large
sign in the back promoting passage of
the charter. Turner said he opposed
political signs being put on public
property for a candidate or issue, and
said Kessler would be objecting if it
were the other way around.
On the issue of printing a pamphlet


Sopchoppy City Clerk Jackie Lawhon
said she opposed tax dollars being
spent on a document that essentially
supported passage of the charter. If
the board was truly interested in hav-
ing an informed electorate, Lawhon
said. they would provide both sides
of the issue, pro and con.
She argued that, under the charter,
a county commissioner contacted by a
citizen about a concern could not di-
rectly go to any county employee other


than the county administrator. That
means, she said, if somebody's ditch
blows out and they call their county
commissioner, the commissioner
couldn't say call the road department
and ask them to check it out
Commissioner Kessler countered
that the scenario Lawhon presented
was exactly what was supposed to
be happening now that requests go
through the county administrator, not
directly to county employees as is


required under Florida Statutes.
During commissioner discussion
items, Kessler brought the charter is-
sue up again, speaking directly to the
television camera, telling voters that
the charter issue appears on the lower
right-hand comer of the ballot after all
the constitutional amendment items.
"Vote yes," he said.
Called next for his discussion
items, Commissioner Lawhon said:
"Vote nol"


Historical society

meets, elects officers
The Wakulla County Historical Society held their annual
meeting on Tuesday, Oct 14, at the Wakulla Springs Lodge.
Outgoing President Betty Green was honored for her long dedi-
cated service to the organization, new officers were elected,
Sand guest speaker, Dr. Joe Knetsch, Historian for the Division of
State Lands, presented a program on the History of the Forbes
Purchase. Approximately 60 people were in attendance.
Barbara Hines, Project Archeologist with PBS&J was elected
President for the 2008-2009 year. Cathy Frank of the Wakulla
Extension Office was elected Vice President. Other officers
elected were Dorothy Gray as Recording Secretary, Madeleine
Carr as Corresponding Secretary, and Arlan Bowen as Trea-
surer.
Board members for the upcoming year include, Jim Calhoun,
Terri Gerrell, Carolyn Harvey, Cal Jamison, Doug Jones, Tanya
Lynn, Murray McLaughlin, Renee Parrish, John Roberts, John
Y. Roberts, Sherrie Stokes, Eugene Streety, Linda Thompson,
Ron Thompson, and Brent Thurmond.
i The Wakulla County Historical Society meets at 7 p.m. on
the second Tuesday of each month at the Wakulla County
,Public Library where an informative program on local history
is presented. The public is invited to attend.


ATTENTION:

All Wakulla

County Citizens

If you have proof that you were legally
Right in your case that was brought
before in the circuit court of the Sec-
ond Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla
County, Florida, and you did not re-
ceive Justice and you have proof that
you were in the right. Please come
forward now, don't be afraid. It's time
that there be legal justice for all Wakulla
County citizens, past, present & fu-
ture. Please send a certified copy of
your case showing proof that your legal
rights to justice were taken from you,
your information will be kept confiden-
tial, until we all join together to pursue
to get justice for all. Please add your
Phone #, Address & sign your name.


Justice for All
P.O. Box 1504

Crawfordville, FL 32326


'-'I


14 & -DAVID F.



Present

The Ultimate Challenge Bull Riding Tour


BULLBASH 2008


Saturday November 1st

7:00 pm each night

3Y Ranch at Harvey Young Farm
Crawfordvlle, FL

Colt Starting Demo by Troy Young begins at L:80pm

Tickets: $20.00

Call (850) 558-0444


Prooeeds benefit:


Wakulla High Sohool NJROTC
Big Bend Homelebs Coalition


Kids under 12 Free


i r ~o-\\~I
ii
rr .. -.~













Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008


People


St. Marks will host Halloween event


ST. MARKS
By Linda Walker

Hi neighbors. No offense,
but I do love this weather
we've been having. It is start-
ing to feel like holiday weath-
er. Yes, I know she who shall
remain nameless is freezing
right about now, but she is
blessed without all of this
extra padding I have.
Having grown up in Atlanta
about a hundred years ago, I
went into climate shock when
I first I came to St. Marks. I re-
member one Christmas down
here it was about 87 degrees.
Where was the snow and ice?
I have come to accept that
everyone gets a turn at most
things and the cold weather
is my turn.
It was fantastic weather
for our annual St. Marks River
Festival and the people just
kept on coming down. The St.
Marks Fire Department wants
to thank all of the sponsors
who were so kind to help
out. There were thousands
of people down here and ev-
erything went great. We are a
small town, but we do things
up big. You don't have to wait
for a special event to come
and enjoy our beautiful little
town. We have restaurants
that serve just about any
kind of food you could want.


Now we have the St. Marks
Smokehouse and Oyster Bar
and Ronnie Gagliardi can
cook up some mean barbecue.
We have a pizza place that I
can't remember the name of,
but friends of mine, Ann and
George, say it is worth going
back for more.
Don't forget that the Light-
house Seafood also cooks
fresh seafood as well as sell-
ing it to you to take home and
cook yourself. A lot of new
restaurants have opened up
this past year. The Channel
Marker Deli, run by Danny
and Lynn Sellars is a good
place to eat, too.
You just need to come on
down and see for yourself.
But please don't try to change
anything. You'll love it just
the way it is.
Neighbor alert We do
have a dog poop law in St.
Marks, which means if you
put your dog out and it poops
in someone else's yard, you
are supposed to clean it up.
We do have a leash law in St.
Marks. Have you ever seen
an animal get hit by a car?
It is heartbreaking. If you
love your pet, please keep it
secured and safe.
Listen up people Do not
forget the annual St. Marks
Halloween event on Oct. 31 at
the St. Marks Fire Department
on Shell Island Road. The fire


department does this every
year for our local kids. They
will also have the haunted
hayride again this year. The
fun will begin at 7 p.m. on
Friday, Halloween night.
Donations are needed
so please take candy, treats,
cupcakes, or donate money
to help make this extra spe-
cial. This is to help keep St.
Marks kids safe and even al-
low grownups who just might
want to get up in that hay
wagon. Let's make this year's
event the best ever.
Neighbors, I have been
told that Dale Carraway fi,
nally shaved I did send him
word that I was coming with
help to get the job done.
Good for you, Dale.
I want to give you a word
of caution. Remember those
12-packs of soft drinks that
are often on sale?
Well, I thought I had lost
my mind. (No smart remarks).
I thought this is great, what
a deal I got home to find
out that they no longer have
12 cans in there. Now you
get eight. I know times are
tough, but they will be hear-
ing from me.
Thank you to whoev-
er brought the gas prices
down.
Friends, I just found out
tonight that little Billy Brown
has cancer in one of his kid-


neys. He is going to Shands
for surgery. Please pray for
him and his family. I keep tell-
ing you, we never know.
His mom and stepdad are
Tim and Dianne Willams.
On our prayer list, please
remember little Billy Brown,
Newell Ladd, Thelma Murphy,
Alex and Gazzie Hobbs, Bud-
dy Johnson, Nettie, Junior and
Gordon Strickland, Alysha Va-
lencourt, Kent Murphy, Dottie
Lynn, Debra Vallencourt, Jane
Marshall, Barnard Sessions,
Alice Knowles, Jerelene How-
ard, Pam Lawhon, Margaret
Pelt and me.
Also, pray for all those
not named here. Pray for our
families, our town, our troops
overseas and their families,
and pray for peace.
Before I forget, we need
to wish these special people
happy birthday: Katie Wol-
verine on Oct. 26 and almost
grown up, Brandie Mans-
field.
Neighbors, if you have
news, get it to me at 925-
0234 or leave a note in our
drop box at Joy's (Bo Lynn's
store).
Thought for this week: Let
me remember that staying
mad at someone else is let-
ting that person control me.
How much time do I want to
waste?


Poole Scholarship fund gets $7,500


WORKFORCE plus and the
Wakulla Chamber of Com-
merce announced the addition
of $7,500 to the Burt Poole
Scholarship Fund.
The Burt Poole Scholarship
Fund was established in 2006
in honor of the late Lt. Col.
U.S. Air Force Retired Burton
T. Poole. While active in the
chamber, Lt Colonel Poole vol-
unteered often by answering
phones, writing letters and
assisting with events.


The $7,500 contribution
made by WORKFORCE plus,
will be utilized to enhance and
continue the Ed2Go classes
provided by the chamber
through the Tallahassee Com-
munity College Wakulla Cen-
ter. Classes are free for cham-
ber members and include such
topics as: Intro/Intermediate
Powerpoint, Intro/Intermedi-
ate Excel, Intro/Intermediate
Access, Accounting Funda-
mentals, A-Z Grantwriting,


Creating Web Pages, Creating
a Successful Business Plan and
much more.
"WORKFORCE plus is com-
mitted to supporting the
growth and education of
our local business commu-
nity through' training," said
Kimberly A. Moore, CEO of
WORKFORCE plus. "As a re-
sult, we believe that this do-
nation is a significant invest-
ment towards ensuring that
businesses thrive in Wakulla


What's Happening?


Memorial breakfast
Wakulla County Memorial
VFW Post 4538 invites the
public to enjoy a free pancake
and sausage breakfast.
The breakfast will be held
on Veterans' Day, Nov. 11, from
6 a.m. until 9 a.m., at the post
which is located one mile west
of the county courthouse at
475 Arran Rd., Crawfordville.
Fair pageant
The North Florida Fair Associa-
tion will hold its fifth annual Miss,


Ms. and Mrs. North Florida Fair
Pageant on Saturday, Nov. 8 dur-
ing the annual fair in Tallahassee.
The pageant is open to girls and
women of all ages. Pageant direc-
tors, Stacy Holley of Crawfordville
and Kim Fiorini of Tallahassee, are
pleased to announce that as a result
of continuous support from the
community, the pageant will once
again be able to give gift bags and
custom pageant T-shirts to all of the
contestants. In addition, each little
girl, age 8 and under, will receive a
rhinestone tiara just forpartidpating.


I I
I We'lCut& Special! ,-j ,n
Wrap Your 5 Packs of Meat I ( l
Livestock and I9 9 Q Q ,
SSpecial Orders 926450 \
J 1285 Spring Creek Hwy.


The pageant committee's goal is to
make the event positive experience
for al Two overall winners wil also
be crowned. The deadline to enter
the pageantwithoutbeing subjected


County."
WORKFORCE plus strives
to provide leadership and
support for a workforce de-
velopment system throughout
Gadsden, Leon and Wakulla
Counties. Together with nu-
merous community stakehold-
ers, world-class employees
and proactive educational
providers, WORKFORCE plus
works to enhance the eco-
nomic development of the
community.



to the $15 late fee is Friday, Oct 24.
Late entries will be accepted until
Sunday, Nov. 2. All contestants must
preregister. For entry information
and to download an entry form


000000


Mr. and Mrs. Matthew W. Thompson

Kipp and Thompson

exchange vows
Rachel Alena Kipp of Craw- Crawfordville. The flower girl
fordville and Matthew Wayne was Haley Roberts of West
Thompson of Crawfordville Virginia, niece of the bride.
were married Aug. 8 at the Inn The ring bearer was Alex
at Wildwood. Christine Helms Thompson of Crawfordville,
performed the ceremony. brother of the groom.
The bride is the daughter of The best man was John
Scott and Lori Fry of Crawford- Schilling of Crawfordville.
ville. The groom is the son of The groomsmen were Chad
Jim and Sandy Thompson. Slayton of Crawfordville, and
The maid of honor was Jason Fry, James Fry and
Melissa Roberts of Crawford- Michael Thompson, all of
ville, cousin of the groom. The Crawfordville, brothers of the
bridesmaids were Riane Schil- bride.
ling and Jennifer Roberts, both A reception was held at
of Crawfordville, and Lori Beth the Wakulla Shrine Club. The
Whiley and Amber Roberts of couple took a honeymoon trip
West Virginia, sisters of the to Oklahoma and are living in
bride. The junior bridesmaid Crawfordville.
was Annabelle Slayton of

Reunions


Green
The 37th Annual Green Re-
union will be held Saturday,
Oct. 25 at the home ofJodie and
Sarah Tatum, 429 Whiddon Lake
Road in the Ivan community.
Family and friends are in-
vited to attend and enjoy the
fellowship, fun and food.
A basket lunch will be served
at noon. Paper goods and ice
will be provided. Plan a special
day of visiting and recalling
memories.


visit http//www.northfloridafair.
com/pageants.php, or if you would
like to speak to one of the directors,
you may call 5456090 or 528-1187.


Whaley
The Whaley Family Re-
union will be held Sunday,
Oct. 26, at 1 p.m. at the family
picnic area off Purify Bay Road.
The reunions started before
World War I. The family will
furnish fried mullet and oys-
ter stew as well as the paper
goods.
4-H induction
Wakulla County 4-H of-
ficers from all clubs will be
inducted into office during
a ceremony at the Extension
Office on Monday, Oct. 27, at
6:30 p.m. Officers and their
families are invited to attend
along with any interested dub
members.


000000


Donnie Sparkman


WAKULLA COUNTY


PROPERTY APPRAISER


*Certified Florida Appraiser*

-Experienced

-Dedicated

Re-Elect someone who has always ,

worked with the public concerning

land and values...and who will ,

CONTINUE TO WORK FOR YOU! /


I WILL CONTINUE TO KEEP THE CITIZENS OF WAKULLA COUNTY AT THE FOREFRONT
OF ANYTHING I DO. I WILL CONTINUE TO BE RESPECTFUL, HELPFUL, ACCESSIBLE, AND
LISTEN TO YOUR CONCERNS. I HAVE THE KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE IN DEALING WITH
LAND, DEEDS, DESCRIPTIONS, LAND VALUES, TAXES, ETHICS AND THE ABILITY TO
COMMUNICATE WITH THE PUBLIC.

AS YOUR PROPERTY APPRAISER I WILL CONTINUE TO PROVIDE EFFICIENT,
COURTEOUS AND FAIR SERVICE TO ALL! I WILL CONTINUE TO WORK TO IMPROVE THE
OFFICE, WEB SITE AND TAX ROLL AND SEE TO IT THAT THEY SERVE THE PUBLIC IN THE
BEST POSSIBLE WAY.



SI will treat you with courtesy and respect.
I will provide fair and equitable property values.
I have the knowledge and skills to perform the responsibilities and
duties of this office. I would appreciate your vote!


Political Advertisement Paid for and Appioved By Donnic R. Sparkmaln, Democrat for propertyy Appraiser


Re-Elect


MW"


MMMM09













THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008 Page 7A


KWCB Hazardous Waste Day was the largest in history


Saturday was a busy day!
Household Hazardous Waste
Day at 340 Trice Lane was
one of our county's busiest
activities. We counted more
than 330 vehicles participating
in the event and from them we
collected more than 14 pallets
of paint, 542 tires, half a semi
truckload of electronics and
fluorescent bulbs, and one
small corn snake.
Beginning at 8 a.m., our
commissioners, ESG person-
nel (they handle our pub-
lic works), Jefferson County
Solid Waste officials, Wakulla
County Sheriff's Office, and
Keep Wakulla County Beauti-
ful members worked together
to bring Household Hazardous
Waste Day (HHWD) to our
residents.
Only it all started much
earlier than expected
As early as 7:15 a.m., on
Saturday, two vehicles were
parked in the driveway of our
public works building. Mem-
bers of Keep Wakulla County
Beautiful (KWCB), were busy
putting out signs, tents, tables,
and give-aways in prepara-
tion while ESG and Jeffer-
son County personnel moved
dumpsters, pallets, and trucks
in place. We explained to our
first guests that we wouldn't be
able to begin the event until 8
a.m., as planned. The two men
didn't care. They just wanted
to be first in line. They hap-
pily discussed football while


we set up.
By 8 a.m., the line of vehicles
continued around the building.
We directed residents to drive
into the east entrance of the
building on 340 Trice Lane, to
continue all the way around
the building and to depart out
the west entrance. Over the
past 10 years, ESG and KWCB
people have worked together
to figure the fastest way to
help our residents unloaded.
This year, ESG's Nannette Watts
suggested moving the cars and
trucks into two streams: one
stream past the "Tires" semi,
and the other past the "Elec-
tronics" truck. Both streams
then merged at the "Paint" tent
Chemist Rosemary Bottcher
waited at the paint tent, where
she took the rest. The "rest"
included fertilizers, pesticides,
oven cleaners, solvents, and
unknown liquids.
Breaking the vehicle stream
into two lines worked very
well. I asked one resident who
had been at the very end of
one the lines if she had waited
a long time. She said that it
hadn't taken long at all. Other
residents praised us on how
efficient we were, how happy
they were to see several post-
ers announcing the event, how
grateful they were to get rid of
the wastes, and on how well-
managed the entire HHW day
turned out to be.
We were, of course, happy to
hear such positive responses.
Something else nice that came
out of working HHW day was
that Lisa Galocy, of the De-
partment of Environmental
Protection, gave us 200 special
cloths that will dean windows
and chrome without any harsh
products. We passed them
out to our participants until
they were gone. We also gave


away KWCB"s "little green
bags." Little green bags are
like tote bags we take to the
supermarket to use instead of
plastic bags. KWCB had 1,000
of them made up to give to our
county residents, and we gave
away the last of our supply at
HHW day.
Richard Russell and Wal-
Mart were responsible for
the semi truck that came to
take tires. Once again, Rich-
ard made it possible for our
county to accept up to 10 tires
per household. Scott Langston
had recently offered to help
at this event, and he brought
two friends to assist him at the
Tires truck. Scott, his friends
and Jackie Chadwell (from
Wal-Mart) spent the entire five
hours of the pickup event sling-
ing 542 heavy tires into the
truck. I was really impressed
with them.
Sheriff Harvey's trustee in-
mate work crew made a huge
difference, too. Eight men and
women from this crew took
a quick "crash course" from
Rosemary on where to place
the various paints, solvents,
aerosols, acids and so forth.
They worked hard and fast so
that the line of cars and trucks
kept moving. Because almost
every car had at least one and
often dozens of items to be
sorted here, it's critical that this
line move quickly. It did. We
really appreciated the help of
the sheriffs work crew.
HHW Day is so large that it
takes a lot of volunteers. KWCB
President Don Henderson
came, as did KWCB Directors
Bruce Ashley, Doug Jones, and
Paul and Tina Johnson. Jess
Nichols, of Emerald Waste
Services, helped KWCB at the
Welcome Station. Alan Brock
volunteered, too, offloading ve-


Nannette Watts collected hazardous waste in liquor bottles.


hides and lugging paint cans at
the Paint tent. Cleve Fleming's
son, Patrick, assisted Christian
Codd, of Coolcat Inc., at the
Electronics tent. Cleve Flem-
ing, Nannette Watts, and Kevin
Rose were there from ESG, mak-
ing sure everything went off
easily. Please give thanks to all
of these volunteers, as well as
to Sheriff Harvey and to Scott
Langston and friends Walt
Dodson and Zach Wiginton.
The most interesting thing
found was a bottle of elemental
mercury. I asked Rosemary why
someone would have mercury.
She replied that a dentist might
have used it in fillings, and it
is also used in labs making in-
struments like barometers and
blood pressure machines.
I heard a yelp at the Paint
tent and watched as one vol-


unteer grabbed his hand away
from a truck bed.
"It's a snake" he yelled.
Rosemary peered over the
bed and reached in.
"It's a corn snake," she ex-
plained as it coiled around
her fingers. She decided it
wasn't hazardous waste, and
let it go.
Household Hazardous Waste
Days are growing. In 2006, 109
vehicles came. In 2007, we
counted 173 in January, and
later in November of 2007, we
had 128. (I think it rained that
day.)
In March, we counted 286.
This time, we had 330 vehides
come to HHW day. I asked
ESG's manager Cleve Fleming
why he thought the numbers
were rising.
"More people have an un-


Fiorini will perform at Downtown Getdown


Katelyn Fiorini, who
last spring portrayed "Liesl
Von Trapp" in the Wakulla
Community Theatre's pro-
duction of The Sound of
Music and has been cast to
play the part of "Minnie"
in next spring's production
of Hello Dolly, has made
it to the Top 12 in Capital
City Bank's "I Want to be a
Star" contest in Tallahas-
see. Katelyn will perform
Friday, Oct. 24 at the Down-
town Get Down along
with two other finalists.
The performances will be
videotaped and available
for viewing the next day.
To vote for Katelyn and to
see her performance, visit
www.ccbstars.com from
Oct. 25 to Nov. 6, and cast
your vote. The winner of


this leg of the competition
will be announced the fol-
lowing Friday, Nov. 7 at
the Downtown Get Down.
One vote is allowed per
computer. The winner will
advance to compete again
during the Downtown Get
Down on Nov. 14. The
final competition will be
held on Nov. 28, the night


before the Florida State-
Florida football game.
Katelyn, who now resides
in Tallahassee, was a resi-
dent of Wakulla County for
10 years and has been at-
tending church in Wakulla
County all of her life. Kate-
lyn is the granddaugifeiof
Bill and Betty Atkinson of
Crawfordville.


Rosemary Bottcher with
corn snake.
derstanding of what we take
at Household Hazardous Waste
Day," he replied. "The commu-
nity understands the purpose
of this, and what we are ac-
complishing."


- APersonal
i Trainer Is An
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&Effective
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Your Workout!
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Personal Trainer
926-7685 or 510-2326


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Cutting and Styling, coloring and foiling. Working
with families from the little ones to the very mature.
Talking and getting to know people and helping them
with their own hair style.
Walk-ins Welcome
Phone: 926-4282 Open: M F 9 6, Sat. 9 1
Rose Alley Business Center, 2543 C'ville Hwy.


Another Obama rally slated


The Wakulla Women for
Obama will host a rally
Saturday, Oct. 25 from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. in Azalea
Park in Crawfordville.
This rally will be an op-
portunity for supporters
to meet one another and
for undecided voters to
find out more about the
candidate.
Policy literature and
brochures will be avail-
able as well as buttons,
bumper stickers and yard
signs.


Volunteers from the to assist with early voting.
Wakulla for Obama Head- Everyone is welcome to
quarters will be available attend.


My Top Ten Priorities:

*Protect our environment

*Spend tax payers money wisely

*Enhance existing infrastructure to support old
and new development

*Re-energize our road paving projects through the
existing one cent sales tax initiative

*Improve Hwy. 319 corridor from Crawfordville
to Leon County

*Expand and improve our recreational facilities

*Make our county offices citizen friendly

*Park and Ride mass transportation system to and
from Tallahassee Area

*Be available to my constituents 24/7

*No New Taxes without voter approval
Remember you can vote for all commission
races regardless of district.
ILIKEMIKESTEWART.COM
Political Advertisement Paid For and Approved By Mike Stewart, Democrat for County Commissioner, District 3


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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008


N.G. Wade


Continued from Page 1A
And while one requirement
as a "Sustainable Community"
under the county's comp plan
is that 15 percent of the vehi-
cle traffic must be confined to
the development, that leaves
85 percent presumably added
to Woodville Highway.
Citizen Larry Roberts blast-
ed the board for fast-tracking
the development, noting that
the final vote for approval
will come at the next meet-
ing, Nov. 17 which is the


last meeting for three com-
missioners who are stepping
down from the board.
"Three of you are eager to
get this done and not leave
it to the next board," Roberts
added.
The N.G. Wade project went
to the planning commission
just a week earlier, on Oct.
13, where it was approved.
A couple of meetings ago,
Chairman Ed Brimner said he
wanted to fast-track the issue
rather than letting the project


follow the usual course for
planning items appear at
the next month's commission
meeting, and then another
month. Calling it a defining
issue of his tenure on the
board, Brimner said he wanted
to vote for the issue before he
leaves office.
Roberts also noted that
commissioners Brian Langs-
ton and Maxie Lawhon each
received a $500 donation to
their election campaign four
years ago from N.G. Wade, and


another $500 from attorney
Robert Routa, who represents
the company. "Mr. Brimner,
you got left out."
Commissioner Howard
Kessler spoke out against the
fast-tracking as well. "I'm not
speaking against the project,"
Kessler said. "I'm speaking
against the process."
The project itself unlike
five years ago when it was
first brought before the board
- has drawn very little fire. A
settlement agreement negoti-


ated as part of the subsequent
legal challenge addressed
most of the controversial is-
sues such as reducing the
environmental impact.
As currently designed, the
586-acre tract will be a mixed-
use development with 300
single-family units, 50 multi-
family units, three commer-
cial/office lots with 157,000
square feet of commercial/re-
tail space and 42,000 square
feet of office space.
Forty percent of the acreage


will be left in a natural state.
There are considerable restric-
tions and conditions on the,
project, including a stringent
requirement that develop,
ment of phases is contingent
on creating jobs within the
community to meet its traffic
requirements.
Engineer Eliot Varnum en-
visioned the project as being
like a traditional neighbor-
hood featuring houses with
porches and a sidewalk out
front.


Campaign contributions and expenditures


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Candidates for local office filed
contribution and expenditure re-
ports on Oct. 3, covering the period
Sept. 13 to Sept. 26.
COUNTY COMMISSION
DISTRICT 1
Alan Brock, Democrat, reported
a total to date of $27,806.59 in mon-
etary contributions and $25,682 in to-
tal expenditures. Contributions dur-
ing the two-week period were $3,000
and included $100, Bruce Millender,
Eastpoint; $200, Three Y Ranch at
Harvey-Young Farm; $500, Frank
Shaw, Tallahassee; $100, McDaniel
Consulting, Tallahassee; $500, Miles
Forman. Davie; $500, Silver Oaks
Mobile Home Village, Davie; $500,


Jennifer Forman, Ft. Lauderdale;
$500, J. Donald Nichols, Nashville,
Tenn.; $100, Robert Routa.
Virginia "Jenny" Brock, NPA, re-
ported a total of $8,660 in monetary.
contributions and $7,282 in total
expenditures. Contributions during
the two-week period were $1,725
including a $1,000 loan from the
candidate. Other contributions were.
$200, David Moynahan, Tallahassee;,
$100, Crystal Wakoa; $100, Susan
Cerulean; $25, Charles J. Hardee III,
Tallahassee; $250, Al Shylkofski; $50,
Capt. Franklin Adams, Naples.
COUNTY COMMISSION
DISTRICT 3
Jimmie Doyle, NPA, reported a
total of $15,790 in monetary contri-
butions and $13,455 in total expendi-


tures. Contributions during the two-
week period were $3,580, including a
$2,000 loan from the candidate, and
$201 in-kind, and included $24.92
in-kind office supplies from Rose
Delaney; $20, Kent Mayer; $50, Alan
Lauer, Panacea; $300, Karen Murrell;
$25, Lorna Tweedie; $100, Jacqueline
Green; $100, Crystal Wakoa; $100,
D.F. Monyahan, Tallahassee; $50,
L. Buytendrop; $100, Susan Ceru-
lean, Tallahassee; $100, W.C. Lewis,
Carrabelle; $100, Jane C. Fletcher,
Brooklin, Me.; $5, Susie Rizzo: $100,
Aaron Mitchell, Clanton, Ala.; $75,
Earl Enge; $20, W.H. Petty, $25, Marcia
Bjerregaard; $35, Michael Keys; $50,
Palmer Carr; $50, James S. (last name
not legible); $50, Patricia Collins; $25,
Karen Johnson; $100, Al Shylkofski;


$177, Hugh Taylor and Mary Cortese,
in-kind meet-and-greet supplies.
Mike Stewart, Democrat, reported
a total of $9,250 in contributions and
$5,350 in total expenditures. Contri-
butions during the two-week period
were $2,550 and included $100, Oleta
Lawhon, Sopchoppy; $100, Bruce
Millender, Eastpoint; $500, David
Vincent, Tallahassee; $500, Jennifer
Forman, Ft. Lauderdale; $500, Miles
Forman, Davie; $500, Silver Oaks
Mobile Home, Davie; $100, Robert
Routa, $250, Steve Brown, Panacea.
COUNTY COMMISSION
DISTRICT 5
Lynn Artz, NPA, reported a total of
$14,990 in contributions and $14,303
in total expenditures. Contributions
during the two-week period were


$5,425 and included $5,000 from the
candidate, $100, David Moynahan,
Tallahassee; $100, Crystal Wakoa;
$100, Sue Cerulean, Tallahassee;
$100, Al Shylkofski; $25, Charles J,
Hardee III, Tallahassee,
Jim Stokley, Democrat, reported
a total of $6,030 in contributions
and $3,957 in total expenditures,
Contributions during the two-week
period included $200, Ray Boles;
$500, N.G. Wade Investments; $200,
Village Enterprises; $50, Agnes Lord;
$500, Miles Forman, Davie; $500, Col;
lins Forman, Jr., Davie; Silver Oaks
Mobile Home Village, Davie; $200,
Three Y Ranch at Harvey-Young Farm;
$100, Bruce Millender, Eastpoint-
$100, Right Angle Construction of
Panacea.


SHERIFF
Charlie Creel, NPA, re-
ported a total of $43,220 in
contributions and $40,446 in
total expenditures. Contribu-
tions during the two-week
period were $3.500 and in-
cluded $2,500 from the can-
didate, and $100 from Albert
Marshall, Tallahassee.
David Harvey (incum-
bent), Democrat, reported a
total of $114,420 in contribu-
tions, and $89,894 in total
expenditures. Contributions
during the two-week period
were $11,380 plus $1,000
in-kind donations and con-
tributions of $100 or more
included $100, Palmer Proc-
tor, Tallahassee; $100. Judy
Meggs, Tallahassee; $100,
Bruce Ashley; $100, Alan
Lamarche; $250, Larry and
Lucy Lassiter; $100, Harlan


and Barbara Moore, Tal-
lahassee; $100, Byron and
Linda Price; $200, David
and Margaret Tuplin; $500,
Sherry and Russell Rainey,
Tallahassee; $500, Rainey
Investment Properties. Pana-
cea; $100, John and Sue
Anderson; $250, Emerald
Coast Services; $500, Walter
Dodson; $100, William M.
Lee Company: $200, Richard
Chichetti, DMD, Tallahassee;
$200, Shields Marina, St.
Marks; $200, North Florida
Financial, Tallahassee; $250,
McLaughlin Real Estate LLC,'
Tallahassee; $250, The For-
estry Company, Perry; $250,
Kim Williams, Tallahassee;
$100, Dr. T.A. Askins; and
$100, Earl A. Sapp. Tallahas-
see.

SUPERINTENDENT OF


Goldenetz Getyour fl
.. I- a a .,a


Dewey Goldenetz
A Remembrance Day will
be held for the late Dewey
Goldenetz on Saturday, Oct.
,25, beginning at 1 p.m. at
'the St. Marks River Cantina.
Guests afre asked to bring a
covered dish.
Goldenetz owned and oper-
ated Dewey's in St. Marks for
27 years. He sold the business
four years agq. He had been
living in Crawfordville until
his recent death. The event is
open to the public.


Get Ready for Flu Seasoni
WHERE: The Wakulla Coun-
ty Health Department, 48 Oak
Street, Crawfordville
WHEN: Thursday, Oct. 30
TIME: 8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.
and 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
COST: No charge for Medi-
care Part B (please bring Medi-
care card) $21 for all others
including, Medicare HMO's.
The Wakulla County Health
Department (WCHD) recog-
nizes fall as the historical
beginning of influenza (flu)
season and urges Wakulla
County residents who have


Contact: .-<'- -
Pam Raker Allbritton -. ..


SCHOOLS
Andrea Carter, Repub-
lican, reported a t6tal of
$39,779 in contributions
and $39,015 in total expendi-
tures. Contributions during
the two-week period were
$15,079 including $15,000 in
loans from the candidate.
David Miller (incumbent),
Democrat, reported a total
of $47,309 in contributions
and $43,925 in total ex-
penditures. Contributions
during the two-week period
were $3,050 and included
$3,000 in loans from the
candidate.

SUPERVISOR
OF ELECTIONS
Traci Brown Cash, NPA,
reported a total of $7.500 in
contributions and $6,735 in
total expenditures. Contribu-


fu shots
not already done so to get
their flu shots today.

Top 3 reasons to
get flu vaccines

Prevent influenza-related
death
Prevent severe illness
Protect other people
For directions to our office
or any other questions, please
call (850) 926-3591 or visit
www.wakullahealth.com.


. r
^.. --


%XL IWUI
Team Ready!

S-r


tions during the two-week
period were $700 and were
$200, Frances Lowe; $500,
Ronald Book, Aventura.
Douglas Mengle Jones,
NPA, reported a total of
$4,255 in contributions and
$2,696 in total expenditures.
Contributions during the
two-week period were $138
in-kind donations.
Scott Langston, NPA, re-
ported a total of $6,345 in
contributions and $5,971 in
total expenditures. Contribu-
tions during the two-week
period were $750 and were
$250, Walt Dodson; $500,
Winston and Yvonne How-
ell, Tallahassee.
Charles Prout, Republican,
reported a total of $2,200 in
contributions and $1.797 in
total expenditures. Contribu-
tions during the two-week


period were $200 loan from
the candidate.
Henry Franklin Wells,
Democrat, reported a total
$9,515 in contributions and
$9,212 in total expenditures.
Contributions during the
two-week period were $653
and included $403 in loans
from the candidate and
$250, Mark Callaway.

PROPERTY APPRAISER
Anne Ahrendt, Repub-
lican, reported a total of
$8,365 in contributions and
$5,230 in total expenditures.
Contributions during the
two-week period were $250
and included $125, James
Carey, Tallahassee; $100,
Teresa Harrell.
Donnie Sparkman (incum-
bent), Democrat, reported a
total of $7,650 in contribu-


Let's use our common sense
solve our problems.

* We need to get an operational audit done Immedi
Identify outmoded policies and procedures that a
the county a lot of money
Develop new policies and procedures for maximum
efficiency and economy
Be sure that those policies and procedures are ap
properly
* Make planning for the future a top priority by -
Holding monthly planning sessions and making it
the public to get involved
Asking before making all decisions: "What effect
this have on Wakulla County five years fron


Protect Wakulla's Charact

Promote Wakulla's Prospei


ELECT


JIMMIE


DOYLE
FOR

A COUNTY%


COMMISSION

DISTRICT 3
(850) 926-7869
Jlmmledoyle@gmall.com
www.JlmmleDoyle.com
112 Old Still Road, Crawfordvllle, FL
32327


tions and $2,472 in total
expenditures. Contributions
during the two-week period
were $900 and included
$500, John Anderton, Pana;
cea; $100, Debra Russell;
$200, Three Y Ranch at Har;
vey-Young Farm.


October 23, 1931
The Family of
Beatrice Leverne
Robinson
would like to invite
friends and family to her
77th Birthday Party on
October 26, 2008.
The Party will be held at
18 Robinson Hill Drive at
3:00 p.m.


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Political advertisement paid for and approved byJimmie Doyle, No Party Affiliation, for Wakulla County Commission, District 3


JIMMIE DOYLE

says:


cJ yNatinL





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LIuc. 00,6 (850) 926-3546 M


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Friday, October 31, 2008

Wildwood Country Club

All Proceeds Will Benefit Big Bend Hospice Sponsorships
Patients in Wakulla County are Available
Patients in Wakulla County R Yntir


S


er membered













THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008 Page 9A


Sheriff's Report


. The Wakulla County Sher-
iffs Office was contacted by
the vice unit of the Tallahas-
see Police Department to noti-
fy them that a Federal Express
package containing marijuana
had been intercepted and
it was to be delivered to a
Wakulla County address.
On Thursday, Oct. 16, a
Tallahassee police officer dis-
guised as a FedEx driver went
to the address to.deliver the
package.
In the back of the FedEx
van were Capt. Randall Tay-
lor, detectives Nick Boutwell,
Scott Rojas and Scott Powell,
and Deputy Richard Buckley
along with three Tallahas-
see officers. The plan simply
called for taking into custody
whoever signed for the pack-
age.
The officers went to 74
Country Way and the dis-
guised FedEx driver made con-
tact with a female who signed
for the package and was
detained without incident.
She said the delivery was for
her roommate, who told her
he was expecting a package,
and she had no knowledge of
what was inside.
:Edward London, 27, arrived
at the home and, after being
advised of his rights, report-
edly told officers that he had
ordered the cannabis from an


unknown person in Texas. He
was arrested on a charge of
possession of more than 20
grams of cannabis, a third-de-
gree felony, punishable by up
to five years in prison.
In other activity reported
by the Wakulla County Sher-
iff's Office this week:
A Sopchoppy resident
reported someone shot an ar-
row into a company truck.
Deputy Robert Giddens re-
sponded to a call on Monday,
Oct. 20, and reported that a
2008 Ford Ranger parked be-
hind the house had a "black
arrow with green and white
feathers stuck in the side
of the driver's side door in
the middle about two inches
down from the window.
Only the very tip of the
arrowhead seemed to have
penetrated the door. The
arrow's angle was close to be-
ing parallel to the ground."
The case is ongoing.
A couple who went to
a party on Saturday night,
Oct. 18, reported that other
party guests damaged their
vehicle by pounding on the
driver's door and breaking a
side mirror.
Reportedly, the 22-year-
year-old woman and her 24,
year-old boyfriend went to
a party and the female got
into an altercation with a


26-year-old woman. As the
couple were leaving the party,
several people allegedly beat
on the door of the 2001 Ford
Expedition causing dents, and
an unidentified male grabbed
the side view mirror, and left
it hanging by wires.
Deputy Andrew Vass re-
ported damage to the vehicle
of $1,000. The case is still
open.
On Thursday, Oct. 16, a
landlord reported someone
had taken all the wiring, the
air conditioner, the stove and
the heating unit out of an
abandoned mobile home on
Crawfordville Highway.
The landlord said he was
going to replace the mobile
home with another one as a
rental unit and wasn't worried
about the stolen wiring, but
he said the air conditioner
had a value of $700, and the
stove and heater were .each
worth $100.
A neighbor reportedly saw
a truck at the mobile home
and got the tag number. The
case is ongoing. Deputy Sean
Wheeler investigated.
Deputy Lindsay Allen an-
swered a call in St. Marks on
Thursday, Oct. 16, about some
stop signs being run over and
some other signs shot with a
shotgun. I )
The deputy found the stop


sign at the intersection of Fire
Escape and Old Fort Road had
been pushed over by a ve-
hicle, and five other stop signs
pushed over as well one of
which had a tire track on the
sign. A speed limit sign was
shot, and several 20 gauge
shotgun shells were found
at the scene. The parking
delineators at the boat ramp
were damaged, and a portable
toilet had been struck by a
vehicle.
Citizens reported hearing
a crash during the night and
seeing a white truck with sev-
eral lights on the front and a
loud exhaust.
From 9:20 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
the night before, the sheriff's
office received four calls com-
plaining of shots fired from a
vehicle. The estimated value
of the damaged property was
put at $800.
Anne Ahrendt, a candi-
date for property appraiser,
reported two political signs
that were bolted to the dock
at her home on the Wakulla
River had been stolen.
Deputy Ryan Muse re-
sponded to the call on Tues-
day, Oct. 14, and found two
cross-braces that supported
the signs had been broken.
The deputy also found six
empty beer cans, reportedly
left by the suspects.


A Crawfordville man
reported the theft of several
lawnmowers and parts from
his yard on Saturday, Oct. 18.
The 66-year-old victim re-
ported two riding lawnmow-
ers were taken, and four or
five frames of push mowers
were taken the day before.
The man was unable to pro-
vide any make, model, or
serial, numbers for the equip-
ment, but described one rid-
ing mower as having 14-inch
car tires as rear wheels.
A 42-year-old Crawford-
ville man reported the theft of
his medication from his home
after a domestic disturbance
on Sunday, Oct. 12.
The man reportedly left
the home for the night and
went to Georgia to stay with
a friend, returning on Mon-
day, Oct. 13, with a deputy to
escort him in the home. The
man said that his prescription
medication, Klonopin, an anti-
depressant, was missing.
The man took his property
from the home and went back
to Georgia.
A woman reported her
newspaper box was taken and
thrown across Lower Bridge
Road into the woods. The
victim reported on Thursday,
Oct. 16, that it had been taken
down twice in two days.
A man on Lonnie Raker


Road in Crawfordville report-
ed his mailbox was vandal-
ized on Sunday, Oct. 19.
The man told Deputy Wil-
liam Thomas Hudson that his
mailbox had been removed
from the supporting post and
was on the ground. Deputy
Hudson reported no damage
to the mailbox finding it had
only been removed from the
post.
A 21-year-old woman re-
ported the theft of the ampli-
fier for her car sound system
on Tuesday, Oct. 14.
The victim said the 250
watt JL Audio amplifier was in
her car at 9:30 p.m. the night
before. When she was driv-
ing the car that day, she said
she noticed the subwoofers
weren't working and thought
it might be a loose wire. Look-
ing, she realized the amplifier
was gone.
The woman told Deputy
Nicholas Petowsky that she
never locks her car.
The sheriff's office report-
ed 966 calls for service this
week.
Note to readers: Those
people who are reported as
charged with crimes in this
column have not yet been to
trial and are therefore inno-
cent until proven guilty.


Driving classes can save senior citizens money,
'Florida law requires all au- The eight-hour classes teach Two-day classes will be in Rd., on Wednesday and Thurs- 9 am. to 5:30 p.m. at the Tal-
tomobile insurance companies how to compensate for normal Tallahassee from 9 a.m. to 1 day, Nov. 19 and Nov. 20 as well lahassee Police Training Center
give drivers 55 and older with age-related changes so seniors p.m. each day at Westminster as in Crawfordville from 10 a.m. behind the Tallahassee Mall on
a good driving record a manda- can continue driving safely. The Oaks, 4449 Meandering Way, to 2 p.m. each day, at the TCC Saturday, Dec. 13.
tory discount for three-years on cost is $10 per participant for on Thursday and Friday, Nov. 13 Wakulla Center on Wednesday To register mail a check pay-
completion of the AARP Driver materials. There is no driving or and Nov. 14 and at Cherry Laurel and Thursday, Dec. 3 and Dec. 4. able to AARP in the amount of
Safety Class. graded test. Retirement, Mahan at Concord A one-day class is available from $10 per participant to AARP, 417


Audubon Dr., Tallahassee, 32312.
Include phone number and the
dates of the desired class on-the
check. Checks are not deposited
until after attendance. For more
information go to www.aarp.
org/drive or call 893-5845.


ADVERTISEMENT


Intimidation is alive and well in

UudT


Z by Charlie Creel

Many people have written letters to
bThe' Wakulla News on whether or not the
tactics of intimidation are used in our
county. Sheriff Harvey wrote a letter
stating that if you believe in such rumors
you also believe in the tooth fairy. Sheriff
Harvey knows better. Intimidation in
this election process is alive and well in
Wakulla County.
These are not rumors. This intimidation
is not being done by road patrol deputies
that you see every day in marked patrol
cars. This intimidation is being carried
out by some members of the sheriff's
Command Staff.
Recently citizens have come to me with
accounts of intimidation and harassment
they have experienced. They are reluctant
to complain publicly because they have
been threatened with losing their jobs,
their social security, and their property
(yes, I did say social security; I was
speechless when a couple shared that with
me). Even worse, some citizens say they
won't speak out because they are afraid
for their safety.
However, some have overcome their
fears of speaking out. They have given me
permission to tell their stories. I thank
them for their courage.
One woman told me that two weeks ago
she was threatened that she would be
fired from her job if she didn't remove a
campaign sign from her yard.
Another citizen, who had read about
intimidation in DOO D 00 10D 0E] 1 was
intimidated while she was employed by
Sheriff Harvey. Mary Pitts, who just
retired from the Sheriff's Office, said


she was pulled into the office of a major
on the sheriff's Command Staff and
chastised because she was seen talking to


me at an openi-invitation
event for all candidates
at Hudson Park. This is
intimidation at the highest
level.
*An article in O [ mE D 0EID
DDI001000 E[00IOFl
this summer reported on
intimidation involving


one of Sheriff Harvey's stiR
majors. He visited cer-
tain businesses and tried
to intimidate them for having certain
campaign signs on their property. The
major would not comment when asked
about the accusation.
For years, a dark cloud has hovered over
Wakulla County politics. Those in powerful
positions have abused their power. They have
allowed intimidation to become a driving
force and have used fear to control the
citizens of our county. During the 12 years
I've lived in Wakulla County and during
the 8 years I patrolled its roads as a Florida
Highway Patrol Trooper, I have been told
over and over about the many ways Sheriff
Harvey has abused the power of his office. I
have seen it for myself. It's time it stops!
According to Florida law, you cannot lose
your job for enforcing your right to vote.
(See Florida Statutes below.) These statutes
protect you from "voter intimidation." A
violation is a third degree felony! I have even
had citizens tell me they were afraid of losing
their social security or even their property
if they supported the wrong candidate. Far-
fetched? If you go door to door, as I have,


you will learn that intimidation is alive and
well in.Wakulla. This has to stop!
Why does this continue to happen in
2008? This is not the 1960's. It
I E] 0[n i was not right then, and it's not
] right now, or ever.
Citizens of Wakulla County,
O DIF00D 1 YOU have the right to free
ED 0L E E speech. You have the right to
SEDITI W10 stand up for what you believe
Sus e eint in. If we give in to the corrupt
ts i i iet nature and bullying tactics of
bs 0 those who want to abuse their
positions and power, then we
can only blame ourselves! It
is time for you not to be afraid to vote
however you choose; to place a sign in your
yard for a candidate you wish to support;
and to openly support a candidate you
believe in and wish to vote for.
Remember, Sheriff Harvey as well as
other elected officials are public servants.
This means they are "Working for Each
Citizen." You are not working for them.
When you, the citizens of this .county,"
elect someone, the Sheriff included, it is a
contract for a certain number of years, and
you the voters make the decision whether
or not to renew that contract.
It is a very difficult time in Wakulla
County and the United States. We are at
war; our economy is terrible and fewer jobs
are available; we do not need added stress
or fear from our local authorities. I assure
you, as Sheriff, I will lead with honesty and
integrity and not' with an abusive hand to
intimidate the people who have given me an
opportunity to be THEIR SHERIFF.
It's time for a change in leadership and I
would appreciate your vote on November 4th.


Florida Statutes Section 104.0515(3): "No person, whether acting under color of law or otherwise, shall intimidate, threaten, or coerce, or attempt to intimidate, threaten, or
coerce, any other person for the purpose of interfering with the right of such other person to vote or not to vote as that person may choose, or for the purpose of causing such
other person to vote for, or not vote for, any candidate for any office at any general, special, or primary election held solely or in part for the purpose of selecting or electing
any such candidate." Florida Statutes Section 104.0515(5): "Any person who violates the provisions of this section is guilty of a felony of the third degree, punishable as
provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083, or s. 775.084." AnVERTNEMENT


Political advertisement paid /or and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Affiliation, for Sheriff


0 010 [13E

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F1 DDOUDDE


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LIIIUIIILY















Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008


Outdoors


Winds keep blowing, fishing season approaches fall


SFrom The Dock

"BY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL


I was out of town most of
last week and from what I un-
derstand it was pretty breezy
over the weekend. These cool
mornings should make the
fish start thinking about mov-
ing off of the flats to the creek
mouths.
I talked with Mike Hopkins
and he said fishing was slow
over the weekend and there
were very few fishermen. Al
Smyte went out grouper fish-
ing and caught some short
grouper and some nice red
snapper in 45 to 50 feet of
water. Some trout are being


caught and a few Spanish and
reds. Look for reds and floun-
der around the docks.
Teresa at Jerry's said she
was hearing that trout were
being caught around the Rock
Garden and down around
Gray Mare Rock. They will
have the monthly Seatrout
Tournament Sunday.
Dale Evans at Advantage
Marine said Michael Fox has
been catching reds, flounder
and sheepshead up the Och-
lockonee River using shrimp.
Quite a few stripers are also
being caught up there.


In talking with people who
have been around here a long
time, they say the shrimp
are up in the creeks off the
Ochlockonee and that's why
the fish are up there. Fish the
deep holes in the bends of the
river and around the mouth of
the creeks from the state park
to the bay.
Mike, Jr. at Mike's Marine
said he was talking to some
folks who caught a lot of trout
on the flats off Piney Island
last week and he is also hear-
ing of lots of fish being caught
in the Ochlockonee.
On Monday last week, I
fished with Butch Wiggins
and his son and John Mosley
and we caught and released
about 20 nice reds and caught
a few trout and flounder. We
caught almost everything on
live shrimp under the Cajun
Thunder, but Butch caught a
few fish on the gulp on the


bottom and under the Thun-
der. On Wednesday last week,
I went to Marsh Harbour in
the Bahamas on business
and on Thursday fished for
bonefish. I caught seven and
missed a couple and the fel-
low with me caught one on
a fly and missed several. Con-
ditions were pretty good but
it was tough putting the fly
where you wanted it with the
wind we had. I used a spin-
ning reel and shrimp since he
was fly-fishing and believe me
they do like that shrimp. Put
it three feet in front of their
nose and they aren't going to
pass it up. On Saturday, one of
the people with us went out
and conditions were perfect.
There was no wind and bright
sunny skies. He caught 19 on
the fly and said he probably
missed at least that many. If
you ever get the opportunity
to fish for bonefish, don't pass


it up. That initial run is abso-
lutely incredible. You don't
think they are ever going to
stop running.
I have people asking me
all the time what the size
limits on fish are and you're
always hearing people on
the VHF radio asking for size
limits and bag limits. If you're
caught with short fish or over
the limits, ignorance of the
law isn't going to keep you
from getting a ticket. You can
go into FWC web page and
print out the regulations and
you should keep them with
you. The Florida Fishing Lines
magazine is a good source
for all the limits and seasons
and can be printed off of the
Internet. A lot of people will
be fishing in the creeks and
rivers in the near future and
one of the fish you may catch
is a sheepshead. They aren't
the easiest fish to clean, but


they are very tasty. The size
limit is 12 inches and you can,
keep 15. Although the size
limit is 12 inches, there is very
little meat on a fish that big.
Flounder will also be caught
in the creeks and they also
have a 12-inch minimum and
the bag limit is 10 per day.
Black drum have a size limit of
14 to 24 inches and bag limit
of five fish. One of those five
fish can be over 24 inches.
Another fish that is typically
caught in the cooler months is
silver trout (also referred to by
some as gray or white trout)
and whiting. There is no size
or bag limit on these fish and
generally when you catch one
you will catch a bunch.
Remember to leave that
float plan and be careful out
there. Good luck and good
fishing!


Bear adventures and some amazing stories!


My friend was alarmed.
He'd found a bunch of sticks
(some fairly large) and smaller
debris, pulled up over a dead
deer carcass. Some animal had
gone to a fair effort to hide
this deer, (probably shot by
a bow hunter, who'd failed
to find it), and the only crit-
ter we could come .up with
that would drag sticks as big
around as your wrist, would
be a Florida Panther.
He'd come across this cache
during the morning and had
.ct his hunting efforts off
~gly,to. return to camp and
eieet me to.discuss his find. It
had unnerved him somewhat,
when he stood by the cache,
and it dawned on him that a
panther possibly had hidden
the deer, and might be nearby
guarding it. It sent the "hairs
on the back of his neck up."
We later came to the conclu-


sion that since the Florida
Fish and Game claims "there
are no wild panther in that
part of the state," it had to
have been a very big bobcat.
While doing taxidermy,
I have personally mounted
two particularly large male
Bobcats, much larger than
normal. In looking back, un-
doubtedly it had been a large
male Bobcat's cache! That find
was years ago in the Three
Lakes Management Area near
the Kissimmee River.
.When I first started work-
ing.for the'Divisiop of Forestry
in.the Tate's Hell State Forest,
in Franklin County, I pictured
myself walking around in
the forest armed with a big
knife to fight off the bears
and snakes, But now, nearly
three years later, I realize my
imagination had gotten car-
ried away. I've seen 28 bears


in Tate's Hell and they all
seemed to be terrified of us
and our state trucks. I have,
on many occasions, walked
up to fallen, partially rot-
ten trees, that have had the
bark and grub infested wood
ripped away by bears as they
searched for goodies.
More than once I've found
where a bear dug up a Yel-
lowjacket nest, and scattered
the waxy combs over the
ground. They scraped their
claws on trees to ocean them.
I've also seen palmettos flat-
tened where bears were look-
ing for berries, and sometimes
the terminal bud, creating the
newest frown.
I've also seen where cab-
bage or Sable Palm have had
the whole top torn open to get
to the Hearts of Palm that we
eat occasionally.
In Tate's Hell, and on our
Apalachicola National Forest
roads, I've seen hundreds,
perhaps thousands of piles of
bear scat in the last few years.
Most are four to eight inches
wide, rather loose and full of
seeds. Right now I'm seeing
their poop full of Persimmon
seeds. In early summer they
feed a lot on blackberries, and
their droppings are full of


that fruits seeds. These berries
grow along the forest roads
where you'll not only see nu-
merous scats, but often view
the bears themselves!
While bow hunting in
North Georgia where wild
hogs and bear are also found,
we were tipped off that if you
probe the scat with a stick,
you can almost instantly tell if
it is from a bear or a hog. The
bear's is basically scentless,
while the hog's, when probed,
will immediately give off that
horrible swine yard smell. It's
truel My bow hunting buddy,
Neal Elder of Sarasota, and
I use "traditional bows" (re-
curves, longbows, etc.), and
while hunting in North Geor-
gia where there are not only
Black Bears, but (introduced)
Russian Boars, we felt some-
what intimidated, especially
when we also learned just
how strong bears really are.
The mountains up there are
loaded with White Oaks, and
the fall before we'd hunted
on Pigeon Mountain they had
one of the largest "mast" crops
ever recorded. I generally hunt
barefooted, or in stockings,
but that fall the big White
Oak acorns were so abundant
on the ground it was really un-


comfortable to walk without
foot protection.
It was like walking on
marbles. The following fall
though, the oaks just weren't
putting out their usual crop
of acorns, and the hungry
bears, trying to put on fall fat,
just couldn't wait for the oak's
fruit to drop. The bears were
climbing these oaks to get to
the acorns. When we shimmy
up a tree (where there are no
limbs) we wrap our arms and
legs around the tree's trunk,
and hunch our way awkwardly
upwards, and it ain't easy.
These bears would clamp
onto the side of these oaks
(some about 30 inches at the
base), with their front paws,
using their unbelievable chest
strength, and literally bound
up these oaks, using the hind
foot daws to dig into the tree's
bark like a pole climber uses
his spikes.
Even the cubs we observed,
were climbing the oaks-some
around 80 feet tall-in a matter
of seconds! And, when they'd
reach the canopy, even the big
old momma bear would walk
way out on the tree's limbs to
get to the acorns on the end
of the branches. Most of these
oaks were on mountain sides,


and though the oak may have
been 80 feet tall, the limb the
bear walked boldly out onto
might be more than 100 feet
above the ground.
Yet they showed no caution
or fear of height. What really
amazed us though, was what
they'd do next. These bruins
would reach out and grab an
oak limb, as big around as your
forearm, and pull it toward
them to get to the acorns,
usually breaking it. When fin-
ished, they'd drop the branch,
and proceed to pop another
branch. The forest floor under
these oaks actually looked like
a tornado had struck the area.
There were limbs all over the
place and some trees were
practically denuded of limbs!
If you've ever tried to break
a green oak limb, even one
a half inch in diameter, or
smaller, you'll find it hard to
grasp the strength these bears
have to break limbs three
inches thickly :!'
These are some of the
signs I've found in relation to
our native Black Bear, other
than their tracks. Next week,
we will continue on animal
signs.


More Letters...We don't really believe in fairy tales


Editor, The News:
Reading Sheriff Harvey
and his staff's rebuttal let-
ters published in response
to letters to the editor has
prompted me to wonder if it
wouldn't be better for us to
all believe in fairy tales. The
truth certainly is being "hid-
den" ftom the public. I am
convinced that all of us who
live in Wakulla can't be visu-
ally impaired or deaf we just
somehow have decided that
it's okay for us to be deceived,
intimidated, and provided
with empty promises.
For those who believed
prior articles on the testi-
mony of the sheriff office's
employees and others stating
that there has been no intimi-


dation; that's fine go forth
and believe in fairy tales. Af-
ter all, you do have the right
to believe in what or whom-
ever you want. However, for
those of us who have actually
personally experienced the
current political tactics of
the incumbent, we know the
truth and know better.
Having received a number
of phone calls, including di-
rect calls from a major (third
in command), and received
four different visits from capi
tains and a sergeant, and even
being asked "exactly what
would it take for you to re-
move Creel signs and repaint
the large graphic depiction
of your support for Charlie
Creel," I know first hand


what attempted intimidation
is. Luckily, I remembered we
live in the United States, and
know our freedom of speech
rights, and our constitutional
right to support whatever
candidate we want for what-
ever political office we wish
to support.
Why is it that candidates
can't simply run a political
campaign based on honesty,
integrity and ensure they and
their staff abide by require-
ments set forth in Florida
Statutes.
Why not seek the support
of voters based on what has
been accomplished and what
the candidate stands for, in-
stead of spending time trying
to convince others to remove


signs and discontinue sup-
porting an opponent.
I wonder how many
Wakulla County residents
will support a candidate who
wants to spend the next four
years decreasing energy and
water consumption in the jail.
After all we wouldn't want in-
mates to drink dean water or
flush the toilets, or certainly
don't want inmates washing
deputy and high ranking
officials vehicles every day.
We definitely want to use
taxpayer dollars to have staff
meetings to remind officers
to decrease the lights, since
officers, not inmates are the
ones that control the electric-
ity consumption in the jail.
Keeping our community safe,


I'll speak about sheriff


especially our children, used
to be more important than
counting how many toilets
are flushed in the jail or how
many lights are left on.
Lisa C. Saavedra
Crawfordville


Editor, The News:
In response to the flattering
letters about Sheriff Harvey:
If Sheriff David Harvey paid
me $62,000 a year plus health
and retirement benefits, I too
would write flattering letters
about him, as his employee
did in last week's The Wakulla
News.
But to find out how Sheriff
Harvey spends our tax dollars,
we need to check the facts.
Facts show Sheriff Harvey's
budget has increased more
than 100 percent over the past
five years while Wakulla Coun-
ty grew by 20 percent. Check
Wakulla County's budgets.
Facts also show that Sheriff
Harvey has repeatedly refused
to follow Florida law and let the
public look at his books. In 2004,
his refusal was so disturbing that
a Wakulla County citizen's group
discussed it at a press confer-
ence and sent a complaint to
the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement.
Sheriff Harvey has even


refused to show his books to
a county commissioner who is
elected to get the facts before
voting on our property tax
rates. The commissioner felt
compelled to hire an attorney
to force the sheriff to follow
the law.
Last year the sheriff played
more money games. He said he
had a "secret" federal "mandate"
for an "extra $400,000." Facts
showed there was no mandate
and no secret.
This year Sheriff Harvey
went back on his word to cap
his spending like other Wakulla
County officials. At the last
budget minute, Harvey asked
for $214,000 more and offered
a sketchy need for the money.
Two of the three commission-
ers voting to give the sheriff
the extra money have wives on
Harvey's payroll.
If you want to believe a loyal
well-paid employee, okay, but if
you want truth, check the facts.
D. Peterson
Crawfordville


BY GEORGE WEYMOUTH


GETTHE NEWS
DELIVERED
EACH WEEK!
Call 926-7102














THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008 Page 11A


IPT ) 850-224-4960 www.fsucu.org

S..... 11...... MORTGAGES -FREECHECKING AUTOLOANS -CREDICARDS

/ For tides at the following points High Tide Low Tide
/ Gulf Coast W e kly Alm anac add to Dog Island Listings: Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min.
G Lulf Coast Wee l y Alma c Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min.
Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min.
Tide charts by October 23 October 29 LowerAnchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min.
Zihua Software, LLC West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min.

St. Marks River Entrance City of St. Marks -ll Shell Point, Spring Creek

Date High Low High Low High Date High Low High Low Date High Low High Low High
Thu 1.8 ft. 3.1 ft. 0.8ft. 3.1 ft. Thu 1.6 ft. 2.9 ft. 0.8 ft. Thu 1.9 ft. 3.2 ft. 0.9 ft. 3.1 ft.
Oct 23, 08 4:07 AM 10:26 AM 5:22 PM 11:40 PM Oct 23, 08 5:11 AM 11:02 AM 6:26 PM Oct 23, 08 4:04 AM 10:23 AM 5:19 PM 11:37 PM q'
Fri 1.3 ft. 3.3 ft. 1.0 ft. Fri 2.9 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.9 ft. Fri 1.4 ft. 3.3 ft. 1.0 ft. -
Oct 24, 08 5:28 AM 11:51 AM 6:12 PM Oct 24, 08 12:16 AM 6:32 AM 12:27 PM 7:16 PM. Oct 24, 08 5:25 AM 11:48 AM 6:09 PM
Sat 3.3 f 0.7 ft. 3.4 ft. 1.1 ft. Sat 3.1 ft. 0.7 ft. 3.2 ft. 1.0 ft. Sat 3.4 ft. 0.8 ft. 3.5 ft. 1.2ft. First
Oct 25, 08 12:17 AM 6:25 AM 12:50 PM 6:51 PM Oct 25,08 12:53 AM 7:29 AM 1:26 PM 7:55 PM Oct 25, 08 12:14 AM 6:22 AM 12:47 PM 6:48 PM Nov. 5
Sun 0.3 ft. 3.5 ft. 1.3 ft. Sun 3.2 ft. 0.3 ft. 3.3 ft. 1.1 ft. Sun 0.3 ft. 3.6 ft. 1.4 ft.
Oct 26, 08 6:11 AM 12:37 PM 6:24 PM Oct 26, 08 12:25 AM 7:15 AM 1:13 PM 7:28 PM Oct 26, 08 6:08 AM 12:34 PM 6:21 PM
Mon 3.6 ft. -0.0 ft. 3.5 ft. 1.4 ft. -Mon 3.4 ft. -0.0 ft. 3.3 ft. 1.3 ft. Mon 3.7 ft. -0.0 ft. 3.6 ft. 5 ft. '"'
Oct 27, 08 12:18 AM 6:52 AM 1:18 PM 6:53 PM Oct 27, 08 12:54 AM 7:56 AM 1:54 PM 7:57 PM Oct 27,08 12:15 AM 6:49 AM 1:15 PM 6:50 PM_____
Tue 3.7ft. -0.2 ft. 3.5 ft. 1.5 ft. Tue 3.5 ft. -0.2 ft. 3.3 ft. 1.3 ft. Tue 3.8 ft. -0.2 ft. 3.6 ft. 1.6 ft. ,
Oct 28,08 12:45 AM 7:29 AM 1:55 PM 7:20 PM Oct 28, 08 1:21 AM 8:33 AM 2:31 PM 8:24 PM Oct 28, 08 12:42 AM 7:26 AM 1:52 PM 7:17 PM ___
Wed 3.7 ft. -0.3 ft. 3.5 ft. 1.5 ft. Wed 3.5 ft. -0.2 ft. .3.2 ft. 1.4 ft. Wed 3.8 ft. -0.3 ft. 6 ft. 1.6 ft.
Oct 29, 08 1:11 AM 8:05 AM 2:30 PM 7:47 PM Oct 29, 08 1:47 AM 9:09 AM 3:06 PM 8:51 PM Oct 29, 08 1:08 AM 8:02 AM 2:27 PM 7:44 PM Full
Nov. 13

Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Dog Island West End

Date High Low High Low High Date High Low 'High Low High Date High Low High Low High
Thu 1.3 ft. 2.3 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.3 ft. Thu 1.7 ft. 2.4 ft. 0.8 ft. 2.4 ft. Thu 1.6 f 2.6 ft. 0.6 ft.
Oct 23, 08 4:18 AM 10:18 AM 5:33 PM 11:32 PM Oct 23, 08 3:46 AM 10:10 AM 5:01 PM 11:24 PM Oct 23, 08 3:53 AM 9:32 AM 4:50 PM
Fri 0.9 ft. 2.4 ft. 0.7 ft. Fri 1.2 ft. 2.5 ft. 0.9 ft. Fri 2.5 1.3 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.9 ft Last
Oct 24, 08 5:39 AM 11:43 AM 6:23 PM Oct 24, 08 5:07 AM 11:35 AM 5:51 PM Oct 24, 08 12:02 AM 5:02 AM 11:28 AM 5:37 PM Nov. 19
Sat 2.5 ft. 0.5 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.8 ft. Sat 2.6 ft. 0.7 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.1 ft. at 26 ft. 0.9 f2.6 ft. 1.1 ft.
Oct 25, 08 12:09 AM 6:36 AM 12:42 PM 7:02 PM Oct 25, 08 12:01 AM 6:04 AM 12:34 PM 6:30 PM Oct 25, 08 12:16 AM 5:56 AM 12:56 PM 6:15 PM
Sun 0.2 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.9 ft. Sun 0.3 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.2 ft. Sun 0.5 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.8 ft.
Oct 26, 08 6:22 AM 12:29 PM 6:35 PM Oct 26, 08 5:50 AM 12:21 PM 6:03 PM Oct 26, 08 5:42 AM 1:06 PM 5:48 PM 11:41 PM
Mon 2.7 ft. -0.0 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.0 ft. Mon 2.8 ft. -0.0 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.4 ft. Mon 0.2 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.9 ft.
Oct 27, 08 12:10 AM 7:03 AM 1:10 PM 7:04 PM Oct 27, 08 12:02 AM 6:31 AM 1:02 PM 6:32 PM Oct 27, 08 6:23 AM 2:05 PM 6:15 PM 11:54 PM
Tue 2.8 ft. -0.2 ft. 2.6 ft. 1.1 ft. Tue 2.9 ft. -0.2 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.4 ft. Tue 0.0 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.8 ft.
Oct 28, 08 12:37 AM 7:40 AM 1:47 PM 7:31 PM Oct 28, 08 12:29 AM 7:08 AM 1:39 PM 6:59 PM Oct 28, 08 7:01 AM 2:58 PM 6:39 PM New
Wed 2.8 ft. -0.2 ft. 2.6 ft. 1.1 ft. Wed 2.9 ft. -0.3 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.5 ft. Wed 3.0 ft. -0.1 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.9 ft. Oct. 28
Oct 29, 08 1:03 AM 8:16 AM 2:22 PM 7:58 PM Oct 29, 08 12:55 AM 7:44 AM 2:14 PM 7:26 PM Oct 29, 08 12:10 AM 7:35 AM 3:46 PM 7:01 PM


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday WednesdayThursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
Major Sunrise 7:44 am 7:45 am 7:46 am 6:47 am 6:47 am 6:48 am 6:49 am
Activity 7:55 am 8:35 am 9:15 am 9:55am 10:35am 11:15am --:-am Sunset 6:57 pm 6:56 pm 6:55 pm 5:54 pm 5:53 pm 5:52 pm 5:52 pm
Activity 8:20pm 9:00pm 9:40pm 10:20pm 10:55pm 11:40pm 12:05pm
Minor Moon rise 2:38 am 3:39 am 4:38 am 4:36 am 5:33 am 6:31 am 7:29 am
nor 1:50 am 2:35 am 3:15am 3:55 am 4:35 am 5:10am 5:55am Moonset 3:57 pm 4:28 pm 4:57 pm 4:26 pm 4:56 pm 5:29 pm 6:05rpm
Activity 2:10pm 2:50pm 3:30pm 4:05pm 4:50pm 5:25pm 6:15 pm Brightness 37% 31% 24% 17% 11% 4% 2%


Boating Emergencies
Coast Guard Station
Panama City ............................ ........................... (850) 234-4228
SCoast Guard Station
Yankeetown .......................................... ........ (352) 44(7-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
St. Marks (Flotilla 12) .......................................... (850) 906-0540
or ...... ..................... ................ 893-5137
Shell Point (Flotilla 13) ........................................ (850) 926-2606
or ................................................. ...... 926-5654



Coast Guard

Auxiliary Reports

By Sherrie Alverson


The Division Conference
held on Panama City Beach
last weekend was not only ed-
ucational, but enjoyable. There
:was time for fellowship, the
auxiliary cornerstone which
is said to make the team work
:and bind the organization
together. Attendance was also
noteworthy. Representatives
Trom all eight Flotillas in
.Division 1 were present and
'participated in the various
training exercises, workshops
.and new courses that were
present.
SThe local Flotilla 19, hosted
the highly successful event. I
"know the Division Captain,
lRich Rasmussen, and his vice,
,'eff Brooks (who happens to
be a member of the host Flo-
tilla), received many favorable
comments.
S Coast Guard personnel
vere the instructors. The Aux-
iliary is truly fortunate to have
Coast Guard leaders who are
willing to devote this amount
of time and effort.


Friday was devoted to a
search and rescue exercise
staged out of the Coast Guard
Station, Panama City. Al-
though those who partici-
pated returned to the hotel
quite weary, they all reported
it was exceptionally worth-
while training.
Saturday was devoted to
workshops or new course
classes all conducted by Coast
Guard personnel, CWO Ashley
Gordon, Assistant Director
of Auxiliary and Operations
Training Officer, from New
Orleans, CWO Chuck Busch,
Officer Charge of Coast Guard
Station in Panama City.
During the evening the
awards banquet was held
and there were many, many
awards presented. More about
them later.
Our guest speaker was
Capt Steven Poulin, Deputy
Commander, Sector Mobile,
who gave us a clearcut brief-
ing of changes coming down
the pike for the Coast Guard


Bob Asztalos, Tim Ashley and Duane Treadon at Coast Guard meeting.


under Homeland Security. He
was an excellent speaker,'and
one who was familiar with our
area. He and his wife, Sherry,
have a daughter attending
FSU.
As I have said before, the
Coast Guard family, which
includes the regular Coasties,
the reserves and the auxiliary,
is dose-knit. When we work,
we work, but then we share
a very special camaraderie
- which often includes our
children.
A quick look at the agenda
Sunday morning told you it
was going to be allwork and
no play. It is amazing how
much retainable information
can be crammed into four
hours.
The result of the election of
new division officers was Jeff
Brooks, Flotilla 19, the current
Vice Captain will move up and,
"Mo" Davis, the present FC-14
will step into the number two
spot.
Although all officers are


elected, sworn in at the Di-
vision Change of Watch in
Panama City on Nov. 7, they
will not take over duties of
their office until Jan. 1, 2009.
At that time there will also be
some changes in titles. The
Division Captain will become
Division Commander and his
right-hand man will be Divi-
sion Vice Commander.
As I mentioned in a prior
column, the Rear Commodore
will assume new title District
Captain, Vice Commodore
will become District Chief of
Staff.
The title Commodore re-
mains the same as does the
flotilla officer, Flotilla Com-
mander and Flotilla Vice Com-
mander.
Members of local flotillas
attending were: Flotilla 12 at St
Marks Rich and DeeDee Ras-
mussen, Tim Ashley, Bob Asz-
talos, Mark Rosen, Duane and
Carolyn Treadon. From Flotilla
13 at Shell Point Lynne Reese
and Sherrie Alverson, and


from Flotilla 1-10 at Sneeds -
Garland and Shannon Pender-
graph, Bill and Dawn Kitchens,
Ed and Mary Zapata and two
of their newer members, John
and Stephanie Brooks.
Carolyn Treadon also filed
the following report on Flo-
tilla 12 news:
On Saturday, we will have
two patrol vessels on duty
as several of our members
need to re-qualify as crew.
Jim McGill, the QE (Qualified
Examiner) from Flotilla 13, will
conduct the testing.
Congratulations to Tim
Ashley, who just returned
from Seattle where he at-
tended the AUXSEA school He
passed with flying colors and
is now the second member
of our Flotilla to receive this
qualification! Chuck Hickman
attended earlier in the sum-
mer and Bob Asztalos will be
attending later this fall.
Remember safe boating is
no accident.


Quota turkey hunt worksheets available


Hunters looking to do
some turkey hunting on
"most of Florida's wildlife
,management areas during
*the 2009 spring turkey
'season need to apply
for quota hunt permits
'beginning 10 a.m. (EDT),
:Tuesday, Oct. 28.
SQuota hunt permit
,worksheets are available
:now from the Florida Fish
:and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) online
:at MyFWC.com/hunting
,under "Quota Hunts" and
'at all FWC regional of-
fices.
SApplicants must apply
through the FWC's Total
JLicensing System. Hunt-
ers may apply online at


www.wildlifelicense.com
or present their complet-
ed worksheets to any tax
collector or license agent,
and they can submit it
for you.
All applicants, regard-
less of when they apply,
have the same chance of
being selected, as long as
they submit their applica-
tions within the applica-
tion period. Applicants
must apply by 11:59 p.m.
(EST), Thursday, Nov. 6, to
be included in one of two
random drawings.
Hunters who were in-
cluded in the random
drawing last year but were
not issued a quota hunt
permit will be included in


this year's first drawing,
known as the "preference
drawing."
"When you submit your
application, you will re-
ceive a receipt showing
the hunts you have ap-
plied for and your prefer-
ence status," said FWC
quota hunt coordinator
Eddie White. "If you are
eligible for the preference
drawing, your receipt will
indicate 'Preference: Yes.'
Those not eligible for the
preference drawing will
be included in the second
drawing."
Hunters also may apply
as a group. A group leader
must first apply to create
the group. The group's


number will be printed on
the group leader's receipt.
Each person wishing to
join the group must sub-
mit his own application
using the unique group
number assigned to the
leader.
If chosen, applicants
will receive, by mail, a
spring turkey quota hunt
permit before Phase 1 of
the selection process be-
gins Dec. 3.
Applicants not chosen
in Phase I may re-apply
during Phase 2 on a first-
come, first-served basis
for any hunts not filled
and will still be eligible
for the preference drawing
next year. Applicants may


check to see if they were
successful by clicking on
"Check Permit Availability
and Drawing Results" at
MyFWC.com/hunting af-
ter Nov. 20.
For more information
on how to apply for spring
turkey quota hunt permits,
visit the Hunting section
of MyFWC.com.


WWW.

thewakul-

lanews.com


Freshwater

turtle rules

begin
An additional rule restrict-
ing the harvest of freshwater
turtles goes into effect on
Oct. 23. The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) passed the rule
at the September Commission
meeting.
This restriction limits the
harvest of wild Florida fresh-
water turtles to five per day
per person. Each fisherman
with a commercial license
will be allowed to harvest an
additional 15 Florida softshell
turtles per day, for a total of 20
turtles per day.
"Florida softshell turtles
lay more eggs than any other
freshwater turtle in North
America, and this species of
freshwater turtle has sustained
much higher harvest levels for
many years," said Bill Turner,
an FWC amphibian and reptile
specialist. "Over the next year
we will be collecting informa-
tion and working with our
stakeholders to determine
the best strategy for conserva-
tion of freshwater turtles in
Florida."
This rule has been passed
to protect freshwater turtle
populations while the FWC de-
velops a long-term comprehen-
sive strategy for sustainable
use of amphibian .and reptile
populations. Recent reports
of unusually large freshwater
turtle harvests coincide with
reports that the demand for
freshwater turtles as food and
pets has increased.
The additional rule limits
the number of turtles that
may be taken from the wild,
not from turtle farms or other
aquaculture facilities. Farmed
turtles represent more than 90
percent of the total freshwater
turtles exported from Florida.
No changes have been made to
the number of turtles people
may possess; the existing lim-
its still apply.
Furthermore, rules about
selling or buying turtles have
not changed.
"We expect to bring the
strategy for freshwater turtles
back to the commission in one
year," Turner said. "We listened
to the public, experts and fish-
ermen and will continue to do
so during the whole process."
This additional restriction
to the existing rules is an in-
terim measure while the FWC
works on a long-term strategy
for conservation of these spe-
ces.















Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008


Community


Hurricane Gustav animals land in Wakulla County


dogs at the CHAT adoption




center the last few weeks. We
have had some of the most
Wakulla





beautiful little pups I have
& a1gers

Susan Velton ]


It heen in gaining putime pped


off by their owners. One day,
the drop box at theCHA adoptnimal
shelter the las filled weeks.ith a lit-
have ha of five Labrador Retrievermost
beautiful little pups I have
seen in a long time dropped
off by their owners. One day,
the drop box at the animal
shelter was filled with a lit-
ter of five Labrador Retriever
puppies and the next day,
there were more pups. I just
wish people would bring
them to our front door in-
stead of leaving us to guess
their age, health, etc.


Cute as they are, more
puppies just mean we have to
make room in an overcrowd-
ed shelter. We still have some
beautiful cats and dogs that
were evacuated from Gulf
Coast animal shelters prior to
Hurricane Gustav. It may not
be common knowledge, but
animal shelters in our area
work together to provide a
safe haven for animals that
are at risk because of a hur-
ricane.
.Animal Control staff res-
cued about 50 animals that
came from shelters in Gus-
tav's path. Between their
staff and CHAT volunteers,
many of the dogs and cats
were placed with local res-
cue groups or were adopted.
However, we still have some
wonderful dogs and cats from
the group who are at the


CHAT adoption center and
need a home.
The cats we have must have
been house cats, because they
are all healthy and very lov-
ing. It is our understanding
that their original owners had
to give them up when they
put them in a shelter prior to
evacuating their home. Many
cats, as well as dogs, were
never reclaimed. You have to
wonder what happened to
their owners. Did they have
a house to return to.
Beacon, a beautiful Choco-
late Lab who was rescued, is
about a year old, and can't
figure out why he is not ad-
opted. We thought we had a
home for him with a woman
from Ft Lauderdale, but she
changed her mind about
adopting a large dog. Our
adoption rate for a pure bred


dog is a lot less than from a
breeder. Puppies and kittens
are cute, but there are a lot of
advantages when you adopt
an older animal.
The Wakulla Paws in Pris-
on dogs (WPIP) just graduated
and the good news is that
almost all of them were ad-
opted before they graduated.
A new class has begun and
they will graduate on Dec.
22, just in time for Christmas.
The three who still need a
home, Eva, Gypsy and Lady,
as well as the class of new
dogs, can be seen on our Web
site, www.chatofwakulla.org.
Anyone interested should call
Cathy Sherman at 264-4511 or
the CHAT adoption center at
926-0890.
Next month is National
Animal Shelter Appreciation
month. Animal Control staff


and CHAT volunteers hope
you will stop by and get to
know us. The adoption center
and animal shelter is not just
a place, "next to the jail." We
would like to show you how
we are trying to make your
county a humane and caring
place for animals that need a
second chance in life. Except
for the closing of the CHAT
adoption center on Monday,
we are open every day.
If you come see us, staff
would be glad to describe the
provisions in the new animal
control ordinance, provide
you with literature about
animal care, give you a tour of
the facility, and provide an ap-
plication for free spay/neuter
for your pet. The new animal
hospital in the county, Craw-
fordville Animal Hospital, is
accepting the vouchers for


spay/ neuter that are funded
by Leon County Humane So-
ciety. So, you no longer have
to travel to Tallahassee to use
the voucher.
In the next few weeks, we
will be telling you all about
our Home 4 the Holiday
events. We have joined a
national adoption campaign
that IAMS and the Helen
Woodward Animal Center
have sponsored for the past
10 years. Since its inception
the campaign has found
homes for more than two,
million orphaned pets.'Our
annual goal of 800 adoptions
is still our target,.Stay tuned;
for some great events that
CHAT volunteer Petra Shuff is
organizing to get our pets lov-
ing homes. Please come get a;
voucher to neuter your pet.


Wakulla County activities


Panacea Haunted House
The Second Annual Pana-
cea Fire and Rescue Haunted
House will be held Oct. 24, Oct.


25 and Oct. 31 starting at 7 p.m.
at the fire house.
The event will feature new
rooms and characters. The


organization will be serving
hamburgers and hot dog plates
while also holding a silent cake
auction and a 50/50 drawing.


Admission to the haunted
house is $5 for adults and $2.50
for children. The dinner plates
are $5 each.


Sammy shows off his Halloween horns.

Sammy, other cats

look for a new home


I'm Sammy and I was res-
cued from a Louisiana shelter
when Hurricane Gustav threat-
ened our area. I, along with a
few other cats and dogs, were
transported to Panama City
and then taken in by Animal
Control in Crawfordville and
CHAT. As you can see, I am
very patient. I let my CHAT


friends dress me up for Hal-
loweenl I am neutered and
de-clawed, so I need to be an
inside cat. I am very loving
and a great companion!
For more information on
Sammy or other animals in
need of loving homes, please
call the CHAT Adoption Center
at 926-0890.


Make sure ballot makes it
Wakulla Supervisor of Elections Sherida Crum reported
that in some cases absentee ballots have not been received
by voters or have not been received by her office after being
mailed back to her.
Crum asked those individuals who have either requested,
a ballot or who have mailed one back to make sure it has
been received. Call her office at 926-7575 to check on absentee
ballots.
"We want everybody's vote to count," said Crum.



Selling Something?
Classified Ads For

As Litte As $8 A Week
CallDenise
926-7102


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Name
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www.thewakullanews.com


Men's Auxiliary
The Wakulla County Memo-
rial VFW Post 4538 is hoping
to form a Men's Auxiliary to
the Veterans; of Foreign Wars
of the United States. The Men's
Auxiliary is a fraternal, patriotic,
historical and educational orga-


Trinity fundraiser
By SUSIE RIZZO
On Oct 11, Trinity Lutheran
Church hosted a very success-
ful Octoberfest fundraiser.
Because of community sup-
port, Trinity Lutheran is now
eligible for some matching
funds from Thrivent for Lu-
therans.
"Many thanks to the follow-
ing local merchants who donat-
ed items for raffle: Advanced
Auto Parts, Beall's, Badcock,


nization that assists the Veterans
of Foreign Wars of the United
States.
If you are a husband, wid-
ower, father, grandfather, son,
grandson, brother or half-broth-
er, and are at least 16 years of
age, or a person eligible for


Cakes by Amy, Carrabelle IGA,
Carrabelle Junction Sandwich
Shop, Crawfordville Ace Hard-
ware, Crooked River Grill, Dom-
ino's Pizza, Forgotten Coast,
Frank's Bait & Tackle. Huddle
House, Lindy's, Myra Jean's,
Spencer Taylor 55 Gal. Drum
Grill, Spring Creek Restaurant,
Subway, Susie's Beadazzling
Delights, Walgreen's. Wal-
Mart, Wildwood Golf Course,
Winn-Dixie," said Susie Rizzo,
Evangelism Chairperson. Trin-


membership in the Veterans
of Foreign Wars of the United
States, then they want to hear
from you.
You may contact the Com-
mander of VFW Post 4538, Nor-
man 0. Peak at (850) 544-3356 or
any VFW member on the street,


ity Lutheran Church. "The Pink
Shoelaces (Jay and Shannon
Egler) provided live music
and a good time was had by
all. Thanks to all the yard sale
shoppers, raffle ticket buyers
and the folks who purchased
the scrumptious food made by
church members."
Residents can enjoy another
mouth-watering meal at Trinity
Lutheran Church when the Pre-
school hosts their annual fall
fundraiser on Nov. 7. A raffle,


or by calling or stopping by the
post Post hours are Tuesdays
and Thursdays (except holidays),
5 p.m. until 8 p.m. The post
phone number is (850) 926-4538
and is located one mile west of
the county courthouse at 475
Arran Rd., Crawfordville.


hay ride, bake sale and games
will be held from 6:30 p.m. to
8:30 p.m. Folks can enjoy a
delicious $8 fish dinner catered'
by the Coastal Restaurant To-
go dinners can be picked up
starting at 5 p.m. Call the pre-
school at 926-5557 to purchase.
tickets. To find out more about
Trinity Lutheran by visiting the
website www.lutheransonline.
com/trinityofwakulla..


ELECT CHARLIE



CREELFOR SHERIFF




M V t


The 20,000 Florida law
enforcement officers
of the Fraternal Order
of Police, Florida State
Lodge, have endorsed
me as the best choice
for Sheriff of Wakulla
County.


Former Lt. Governor Buddy MacKay, one
of Florida's most respected statesmen,
wrote: "During my term as Lt. Governor
and brief term as Governor I had the honor
and great pleasure of working closely with
Charlie Creel. Charlie would make a great
Sheriff for the people of Wakulla County."


The endorsement I value most comes

from YOU,

the citizens of Wakulla County.




fora la ca


Contact Charlie at (850) 926-1184
charliecreel@gmail.com


Political advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Affiliation, for Sheriff


_
















THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008 Page 13A



School


Firearm safety adds to course


W.W. 7---r
Teacher Lindsey Evans stands next to a paper target with Sheriff David Harvey be-
hind the target. WHS students are Scott Homan, Ryan Kennedy, Jake Blume,
Tiffany Gilmore, Jason Davis and.Paige Lease.


Wakulla County High School
Teacher Lindsey Evans,who
teaches the Criminal Justice
Course at WHS, recently met
with Sgt. Fred Nichols of the
Wakulla County Sheriffs Of-
fice.
Evans asked Sgt. Nichols
if it would be possible for
students to participate in the
Sheriffs Office Firearms Safety
Course and the Introduction
to Firearms Course taught by
Nichols and Deputy Ed Tyre.
Evans, along with her students


from the Criminal Justice
Course, met with Sgt. Nichols
at the Wakulla County Sheriffs
Office Law Enforcement Train-
ing Center/Range, on Oct. 13.
It is located in Otter Creek. The
class began at 7 a.m. and lasted
for two hours. The class con-
sisted of the Firearms Safety
Course and the Introduction
to Firearms Course. After the
two classes were completed,;
the students were allowed to
fire the guns at the range. The
weapons students fired were


under the direction of Sgt.
Nichols. The guns included
a .45 caliber handgun, 9 mm
handgun, a 12-gauge shotgun
and a .223 caliber AR15 rifle.
The students shot at paper
silhouette targets like the one
displayed in the photo. Sheriff
Harvey praised Evans and the
students for passing the fire-
arms safety courses.
Due to the increased aware-
ness of firearm safety, acci-
dents have steadily declined
in the United States.


Students visit on Mentoring Day
92 percent of (general)
consumers felt more favorably
toward companies that hired
poNder individuals with a disability.
rks Po er 87 percent prefer to do busi-
NSt. MaL D AIC r AN ness with these companies.
A GENERAL DYNA (Center for Social Develop-
ment and Education, Jan.31,
2006)
For people aged 16 to
64, only 56 percent of people
with disabilities are employed
compared with 73percent of
non-disabled people. (U.S.
Census, 2000).


Henry Wells of St.Marks Powder, Justin Cronin of WHS
Henry Wells of St.Marks Powder, Justin Cronin of WHS


By SUE BELFORD
Special to The Wakulla News
This year, as in the past two
years, Wakulla County busi-
nesses welcomed students on
Disability Mentoring Day, Oct.
15, with open arms. Sixteen
high school students with dis-
abilities were matched with
local professionals based on
their career interests. They
spent the day with these
mentors observing job re-
sponsibilities and getting a
better idea of the workplace
environment.
The rewards to both men-
tor and student can be life-
long. In 2007, DMD connected
nearly 20,000 job-seekers with
disabilities with thousands of
employers in more than 300
locations in every U.S, state
and territory and in more than
20 countries worldwide. DMD
is a truly unique program that
allows companies to actively
engage in two issues affect-


ing citizens today, Corporate
Social Responsibility and Posi-
tive Employment Initiatives.
Education and exposure are
keys to overcoming the bias
that still exists today toward
people with disabilities.
Recently, Wakulla High
School started an after-school
program called High School/
High Tech, to link these
students with academic re-
sources, career development
opportunities and on-the-job
experiences that will enable
them to meet the demands
of the 21st century workforce.
This a nationwide program
that has been shown to reduce
the dropout rate, increase
post-secondary education,
increase employment rates
and iriprove their overall self-
esteem.
Facts about People with Dis-
abilities and Employment:
One in every five Ameri-
cans has a disability.


Gavin graduates
Thais Gavin graduated
from Centura College in
Norfolk, Va., on Aug. 15.
She received an Associate
of Occupational Science
Medical Assisting degree
with a concentration in
clinical.
She was on the Direc-
tor's List with a grade
point average between 3.92
and 4.0. Gavin retired from
the U.S. Navy after 15 years
as a Petty Officer Second
Class. She is the daughter
of Clarence and Mary Ann
This Gavin Gavin of Shadeville.



It's O ury n r e


KEEP IT CLEAN


Crawfordville Elementary School students help the community Go Greenl

Students learn about recycling


Energy efficiency is a hot
topic not only in this year's
election, but also in local
classrooms. At Crawfordville
Elementary School, Miranda
Bowen's third grade class
is studying the Earth's re-
sources.
Students have talked about
and explored the pros and
cons of current energy sources
and alternate energy sources.
Working together as a class,
students brainstormed ways


to save electricity and gas at
home and in the classroom.
The class even created and
used a solar oven to cook pop
tarts.
As a cumulative project,
students were challenged to
go home and build something
they could use out of their own
household trash. They rose to
the occasion and presented
the class with a unique collec-
tion of items. Some students
created guitars and basses out


Shadeville Class of 1967
The Shadeville High School Wakulla Springs State Park and
Class of 1967 will hold a reunion revisit memories of 41 years
dinner on Saturday, Nov. 1. since graduation. The Class of
Classmates can enjoy dinner at 1967 was the last graduating


of tissue boxes, shoe boxes
and rubber bands. Pencil hold-
ers made from cans, flower
pots made from egg cartons,
and even a cereal box book
bag were among the projects
shared on Friday, Oct. 10.
As a class, they learned
about recycling and reusing
products that otherwise would
be thrown away. They've be-
come an energy and resource
savvy group of children, said
Bowen.



gr6up of seniors at Shadeville
High School The class gradu-
ated 14 students. The late Rufus
Williams was the principal


E ps lme


ir,-rnT


Notice of Public Hearing

The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will consider the
following applications and has scheduled Public Hearings regarding
the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on
Monday, November 10, 2008 beginning at 7:00 P.M. and in front of
the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday,
November 17, 2008, beginning at 6:00 PM, unless otherwise noted
below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County
Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran
Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend
and present testimony.






2











1. Application for Variance: V08-21
Applicant: John.W. & Kathryn C, Bailey,
Proposal: continue a non-conforming pet kennel
Tax ID Number: 00-00-052-000-09895-000
Existing FLU Map: Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4)
Existing Zoning: RR-5 (Section 5-26, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0250-C
Parcel Size: 7.93+/- acres
Location: 1035 Lower Bridge Road
Hearings Required: Planning Commission 11/10/08 (ia 7:00 PM
County Commission 12/01/08 @ 6:00PM


2. Application forShort Form Final Plat:SF08-08
Applicant: Apalach Timberlands II, LLC
c/o T&L Development, LLC
Agent: Edwin Brown & Associates
Proposal: 9 lot residential subdivision
Tax ID Number: 31-2s-02e-000-05863-002 & 32-2s-02e-000-05865-000
Existing FLU Map: Agriculture (FLUE Policy 1.2.2)
Existing Zoning: AG (Section 5-25, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" & "A" zones on Panel 0125-B
Parcel Size: 197.57+/- acres
Location: East side of Old Plank Road, south of the County
Line
Hearings Required: County Commission 12/01/08 @ 6:00PM

Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record
files may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community
Development Department located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any
person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim
transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said
hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the
Board Office at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The
Board Office may be contacted at (850) 926- 0919 or TDD 926-7962.


Avoid Long Lines


Vote Early


Vote Early at the Elections Office
Oct 20 Nov 1
(Mon Sat, 9am 5pm)

Vote Early from Home
Request an absentee ballot today.
Call: 926-7575


Vote for smarter growth,
public transit, and better planning.


Vote for


Lynn Artz

for County Commissioner

www,lynnartz.com
926-8756 OR 320-2158
lynnartz@hotmail.corr

Political advertisement approved and paid for by Lynn Artz,
No Party Affiliation, for Wakulla County Commission, District 5.


I
















Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008


Sports


WHS Cross Country team


comes home with trophy i


Riversprings and Wakulla Middle School athletes have built a bond.


Teams have learned to play


together due to budget woes


The War Eagle Cross
Country Team had another
great race last weekend
at the Bay High meet in
Panama City. The girls
brought home the first place
championship trophy. The
top runners included Em-
ily McCullers with a time
of 22:16, Sydney Nutting
(22:26), Alina McCullers
(22:48), and rounding out


the top four was Chelsea
Thompson (23:19).
The boys had an awesome
showing, also, placing third
in the team standings.
The boy's top times came
from Scott Kelly (18:12),
Will Harvey (19:53), Adam
Carr (20:02) and Cody James
(21:06).
Susan Hansen, Tyler Un-
ger, Kendalin Burns, Shawn


Morris, Rachel Capps, Bry-
an Brown, Cora Atkinson,
Josh Allen, Kayla Love, Josh
Soderland, Allison Carr, Josh
Smith, Abigail Carr and Zack
Dutton round out this very
dedicated team of runners.
The teams' next race will
be the Panhandle Champs
Meet Saturday, Oct. 25, in
Marianna.


The Riversprings Lady
Bears had a winning 2008-
2009 season with five wins,
three losses, and a second
place finish at the WHS tour-
nament.
There were three veteran
players who played three
years at RMS: Kendall Sulli-
van, Courtnie Fricchione and
Jordan Pryor. The remainder
of the team consisted of one
eighth grader, eight seventh
graders, and two sixth grad-
ers. The majority of the team
had never played on any type
of volleyball team prior to the
beginning of the season. All


players had the opportunity
to get in a great deal of game
playing time during the sea-
son showing an improvement
in their overall performance,
and acquiring the skill-set and
experience needed to become
better players in future years.
Coach Cay Arant and Coach
Mandy Butler entered the
season with budget cuts that
required decreasing the num-
ber of games, scheduling
doubleheader matches to be
played in conjunction with
WMS as well as changing our
mode of transportation to
include all travel with WMS.


Approaching these changes
with apprehension proved
fruitless because the season
turned out fantastic as all the
coaches from RMS and WMS
became acquainted with one
another and the students from
both schools formed stronger
friendships as they demon-
strated healthy competition.
The volleyball team would like
to thank all faculty and staff,
administrators, friends, family,
and patrons who supported
our team this season.
Cay Arant and Mandy But-
ler are the volleyball coaches
at Riversprings.


Seasons and dates are not applicable on WMAs. For specific WMA regulations, obtain individual WMA brochures published annuallyfor each area.


Fall Turkey Nov.27-302008 Nov.8,2008-Jan.4,2009 Nov.8,2008- Jan.4, 2009 No.fall harvest of turkeys allowed in Holmes County.
Dec. 13,2008-Jan. 18,2009 Nv. Season limit includes turkeys taken during all archery, crossbow, muzzleloading gun
Quail and Gray Squirrel Nov. 8,2008 March 1, 2009 Nov.8, 2008-March 1,2009 Nov. 8,2008 -March 1,2009 and fall turkey seasons combined
SSeason and possession limit in Holmes County is one turkey.


Dec. 1,2008 March 1,2009
March 21 April 26, 2009


Dec. 1,2008- March 1, 009
March 21 April 26, 2009


Dec. 1,2008 -March 1,2009
March 7- April 1 2,2009


Wild hogs, rabbits, raccoons, opossums, skunks, nutrias, beavers and coyotes may be taken
year-round. Except for Holmes County where there is no fall harvest of turkeys allowed. **
Spring turkey season is limited to March 15-17 in Holmes County.



MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING SEASON DATES


Daily bag limits for deer:
pTwo antlered deer during crossbow, muzzleloading gun and general gun season
mOne antlered deer and one antleriess'deer, or two antlered deer, during antlerless deer
season
*Two antlred deer, or two antlerless deer, or one antlered and one antlerless deer, during
archery season
*Regardless of the season, sex of deer or number of antlerless deer permits, harvesting more
than two deer per day Is prohibited. The possession limit is four deer.


The dally bag limit for doves has increased from 12 to 15 per day.
Canada geese may be taken statewide during the September season.
Migratory game birds
Migratory game birds are all wild species of ducks, geese, brant, coots, gallinules,
rails, snipe, woodcock, and mourning and white-winged doves. There is no open sea-
son in Florida on brant, purple gallinule or harlequin duck. Other migratory game birds
may be taken only during seasons specified in this digest or the brochure Migratory
Game Bird Regulations for Waterfowl and Coot Seasons.
Rail and common moorhen
Season: Sept. 1 Nov. 9, 2008
Shooting hours: One-half hour before sunrise to sunset
Bag limits:
Clapper and king rails daily limit 15, possession limit 30 (singly or in aggregate)
Sora and Virginia rails daily limit 25, possession limit 25 (singly or in aggregate)
Common moorhen daily limit 15, possession limit 30
Purple gallinule no open season
Mourning and white-winged dove
Season: First phase Oct. 4 27, 2008
Second phase Nov. 15 30, 2008
Third phase Dec. 13, 2008 Jan. 11, 2009
Shooting hours: First phase-Noon to sunset. Second and third phase--One-half hour
before sunrise to sunset.
Bag limit: 15 doves daily, 30 in possession (singly or in aggregate)
Snipe
Season: Nov. 1,2008 Feb. 15, 2009
Shooting hours: One-half hour before sunrise to sunset
Bag limit: Daily limit eight, possession limit 16
Woodcock
Season: Dec. 20, 2008 Jan. 18, 2009
Shooting hours: One-half hour before sunrise to sunset
Bag limit: Daily limit three, possession limit six
Crow regulations
Season: Aug. 9 Oct. 26, 2008 Saturdays and Sundays only and Nov. 11, 2008
- Feb. 18, 2009.
Shooting hours: One-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset
Bag limit: No bag or possession limits
Permit, stamp, and license requirements: None
The daily bag limit for wood ducks has been increased from two to three.


The daily bag limit for scaup is as follows:
One bird from Nov. 22-30, 2008 and
Dec. 6, 2008- Jan. 5, 2009
Two birds from Jan. 6 Jan. 25, 2009
Canvasback season is closed during the 2008-2009 hunting season.
Canada goose season Is now statewide.
Waterfowl and coot
Open Season: First Phase: Nov. 22-30,2008.
Second Phase: Dec. 6, 2008- Jan. 25,2009.
Shooting Hours: One-half hour before sunrise to sunset. '
Bag Limit:
Duck The daily bag limit of ducks is six. The six-duck limit shall consist of no more
than one black duck; one mottled duck (Florida duck); one fulvous whistling-duck;
one pintail; two redheads; three wood ducks; one scaup*; four scoters; and four ml- ,
lards (no more than two of which may be females). All other species of duck (except '
canvasbacks and harlequin ducks) may be taken up to the six-duck daily limit. The
possession limit is two days' bag limit.
*the scaup daily bag limit increases from one to two during the last 20 days of the
season (Jan. 6- 25, 2009).
Taking or attempting to take canvasbacks or harlequin ducks is prohibited.
Coot The daily bag/possession limit is 15/30.
Merganser The daily bag/possession limit is 5/10, only 2/4 of which may be
hooded mergansers
Light geese (snow, including blue, and Ross) Daily limit 15; there is no possession limit.
Limited waterfowl and coot
Leon County and Lake Miccosukee In Leon and Jefferson counties--Waterfowl
hunting Is permitted only on Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays during the open
season and on Nov. 27 and 28, Dec. 25 and 26, 2008, Jan. 1,2, and 19, 2009. Lake,
Talquin In Gadsden and Leon counties and the Ochlockonee River are open to hunt-
Ing every day during the regular waterfowl season.
During the open season, waterfowl hunting is permitted only on Wednesdays, Satur-
days and Sundays in the state waters of the Gulf of Mexico In Hernando County north
of Raccoon Point and east of Saddle Key as designated by posted signs.
Canada goose
Open Season: First Phase: Nov. 22-30, 2008.
Second Phase: Dec. 1, 2008-Jan. 30, 2009. Canada geese may be taken statewide.
Shooting Hours: One-half hour before sunrise to sunset.
Bag Limit: The daily bag limit/possession limit is 5/10 Canada geese; Taking or at-
tempting to take brant or geese (except as described above) is prohibited.


Youth Waterfowl Hunting Days
Saturday, Jan. 31 and Sunday, Feb. 1,2009. Children under the age of 16, super-
vised by an adult 18 years of age or older, may hunt waterfowl, coots and common
moorhens. The dally bag and possession limits for waterfowl, light and Canada geese
are the same as during the regular season. The daily bag/possession limit for scaup
during Youth Waterfowl Hunting Days Is 2/4. Only children under 16 may hunt. Adult
supervisors are prohibited from hunting while accompanying youths during the Youth
Waterfowl Hunting'Days,
Gray Squirrels and Quail may be taken statewide by permitted falconers Oct. 1,2008
- March 31,2009.
Rabbits may be taken year-round.
Daily bag and possession limits:.


Species'
Quail
Gray squirrel
Rabbit


Daily bag limit
2
12
12


Possession limit
4


Spring turkey season
Wildlife management area regulations can differ
Season dates: Central Zone March 21 -April 26, 2009 Northwest Zone March 21
- April 26, 2009 (except Holmes County where the season is March 21 --April 5,
2009)
License and permit requirements: Hunting license and turkey permit
Legal to take: Bearded turkeys or gobblers
Shooting hours: One-half hour before sunrise to sunset. On WMAs, wildlife and -
environmental areas and public use areas, shooting hours are one-half hour before
sunrise to 1 p.m.
Dally bag and possession limits: Dally limit one, season and possession limit two
(except in Holmes County season limit one)
Fall turkey season
Wildlife management area regulations can differ
Season dates: Central Zone Nov. 8, 2008 Jan. 4, 2009
Northwest Zone Nov. 27-30, 2008 and Dec. 13, 2008 Jan. 18, 2009

-K. Kawasaki
Same Day Fianng Available
=B =m ftt F


The Lady War Eagles ran their way to meet trophy.


Bobcat and Otter
Spring Turkey *


-


I










. . . ... . . . . . . ..~~`~ ~~


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008 Page 15A


Wakulla schools partner with College Board


Riversprings Middle School,
Wakulla Middle School, and
Wakulla High School have been
selected to participate in the
Florida Partnership with the Col-
lege Board.
Instigated by Superintendent
David Miller, Wakulla County
was chosen for this program that
helps schools offer rigorous and
relevant curriculum preparing


students for college.
"While we have already grown
our Advanced Placement courses
at Wakulla High School to 10
classes, it is also important to
find new ways to start offering
courses at a younger age and to
increase our ability to inspire
groups of students who may not
have thought about college," said
Superintendent Miller.


The College Board is the entity
for such college essentials as the
Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT),
the Pre-SAT National Merit Schol-
arship Qualifying Test (PSAT/
NMSQT), the American College
Test (ACT), and Pre-Advanced
Placement and Advanced Place-
ment courses for possible college
credit taken in high school.
Joining with the Florida De-


apartment of Education, this part-
nership with the College Board
helps students reach their full
potential. Advanced academic
success is encouraged for all
students, with additional sup-
port for minorities and other
underrepresented college popu-
lations.
Through on-going professional
development and extensive use


of data, teachers, counselors,
and administrators can provide
better services to students and
parents.
"By continually exploring new
ways to cultivate a culture of
academic success, we help more
and more students achieve their
dreams," Superintendent Miller
concluded.


National.School Lunch Week observed Riversprings students


The Florida Department
of Education recently began
its celebration of National
School Lunch Week (NSLW).
The national celebration cen-
ters on the award-winning
Vote for School Lunch cam-
paign, which gives children
the chance to learn about and
vote for their favorite school
lunch. In addition to the cam-
paign, schools around the
state will concentrate efforts
on educating students and
parents about the benefits
of healthy food choices and
physical fitness activities.
"A nutritious and balanced
lunch can have a tremendous
impact on not only the well-


being of students, but their
overall academic performance
as well," said Education Com-
missioner Dr. Eric J. Smith. "As
children participate in the ac-
tivities of this week's celebra-
tion, they will learn to make
healthy food choices and have
fun while doing it."
As part of NSLW, children
can participate in the Vote
for School Lunch campaign,
which establishes popular and
healthy school lunch meals
as candidates for President of
School Lunch. This year's can-
didates represent a variety of
nutritious foods and include
the 2007 winner Biff Burger,
2006's winner Pete Pizza, and


three new contenders that
were designed and submitted
by students: Gloria Grilled
Cheese, Larry Lasagna and Pe-
tunia Pita Pocket. Candidates
campaign on the nutritional
benefits of their school meal
versions as well as their physi-
cal fitness and extracurricular
activities.
Votes for each candidate
were collected from Oct. 13
to Oct. 17, and the winner
will be announced on Oct.
24. Individuals interested
in learning more about the
candidates should visit www.
VoteForSchoolLunch.org.
During NSLW, fun events
and activities will be held


throughout the state to help
celebrate the benefits of the
National School Lunch Pro-
gram (NSLP). Established in
1946, the NSLP is the largest
of the federal child nutrition
programs, with 29 million chil-
dren served lunch every day
in more than 99,000 schools.
For more information about
Florida's Food and Nutrition
Management Program, visit
http://www.fldoe.org/FNM/.


learn about Springs

Riversprings seventh graders participated in the Wakulla
Springs Watershed (LIFE PROGRAM) from Oct. 6 to Oct. 10.
Students studied the physical and chemical characteristics of
water by performing tests on samples that they had gathered
from different locations at Wakulla Springs. This will become
part of a yearly sampling that students will do. The goal of the
program is for students to become more informed about the
impact of what is added to our water system upstream, speak
to their parents about what they have learned and create a
more informed community here in Wakulla County.


JV football team crushes Taylor


The Wakulla War Eagle
junior varsity football team
defeated Taylor County by a
score of 53-6 on Thursday, Oct.
16 at J.D. Jones Stadium.
"Our guys were expecting a
tough game that would come
down to the fourth quar-
ter, but we were aggressive
throughout and things went
our way from the beginning,"
said Coach Scott Collins.
Will Thomas had three first
quarter touchdown runs and
piled up 159 yards rushing in
the first quarter as the War
Eagles took a 34-0 first quar-
ter lead. Marshane Godbolt
added a 76 yard touchdown


run and ended up with 136
yards rushing.
Deonte Hutchison had
a rushing touchdown and
ended the game with an in-
terception return for a touch-
down. Ryan Kimbrell added
87 yards rushing and a seven
yard touchdown run. Kicker
Will Harod, snapper John Ban-
nister and holder Hunter Link
combined to score an extra
point and break a drought of
11 consecutive misses on extra
point attempts.
"The kicking of an extra
point has been a sore spot
for us all year, and these
three young men have put


Gridiron Club will

host a fundraiser
The Wakulla Gridiron Club will host a fish fry on Oct. 30
from 4 p.m. until 7 p.m. at the WHS fieldhouse. The dinner
includes fried mullet, two sides and a beverage. Tickets are $6
and may be obtained from varsity football players and coaches.
There will also be tours of the fieldhouse.

FSU hosts Virginia Tech
Fresh off a Thursday night victory in Raleigh, N.C., the
Florida State Seminoles will host Virginia Tech in Tallahassee
on Saturday, Oct. 25 at 3:30 p.m. ABC television, WTXL Channel
27, will broadcast the game along with WTNT radio, 94.9 FM.
FSU is 5-1 overall and 2-1 in the Atlantic Coast Conference.
Virginia Tech is 5-2.

Winter sports registration

WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT
2008 WINTER SPORTS REGISTRATION
REGISTRATION DATE: SATURDAY 10/25/08
REGISTRATION TIME: 8:00 AM TO 12:00 PM
REGISTRATION DEADLINE: SATURDAY 10/25/08,12:00 PM
REGISTRATION PLACE: MEDART RECREATION PARK OFF US
98. AGE DETERMINING DATE:SEPTEMBER 1ST
Youth Soccer
COST IS $40.00 PER CHILD
AGES 6 & UNDER DIVISION Players must be 5 prior to
9/1/08 and may turn 7 on or after 9/1/08
8 & UNDER DIVISION Players must be 7 prior to 9/1/08
and may turn 9 on or after 9/1/08
10 & UNDER DIVISION Players must be 9 prior to 9/1/08
and may turn 11 on or after 9/1/08
12 & UNDER DIVISION Players must be 11 prior to 9/1/08
and may turn 13 on or after 9/1/08
14 & UNDER DIVISION Players must be 13 prior to 9/1/08
and may turn 15 on or after 9/1/08
*14 & Under Division will be a 6 on 6 league. It will start a
little later than all the other
Soccer divisions and WILL NOT interfere with Middles
School Soccer Teamsll
Practices may start in November and continue into Decem-
ber. Games will Degin in January after the winter holidays and
run for approximately 6 weeks. Soccer practices and games will
be held at Medart Recreation Park. Games will be held in the
evenings on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, or Satur-
day mornings. Practices times are usually similar but are at the
discretion of the coach of each individual team.
Youth Basketball
COST IS $40.00 PER CHILD
AGES: 6 & 7 Division -Player must be 6 prior to 9/1/08 and
may turn 8 on or after 9/1/08.
(The 6&7 division will practice in November and games will
start in December and the season will hopefully end before
the winter holidays.)
8 & 9 Division Player must be 8 prior to 9/1/08 and may
turn 10 on or after 9/1/08
10, 11, & 12 Division Player must be 10 prior to 9/1/08 and
may turn 13 on or after 9/1/08
Basketball practices and games will be held at the middle
schools or Old Crawfordville Elementary Gymnasium. Practices
may start in November and continue into December. Games
will begin in January after the winter holidays and run for ap-
proximately 6 weeks. Games will be held in the evenings on
Monday, Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, or Saturday mornings.
Practices times are usually similar but are at the discretion of
the coach of each individual team.
There must be at least 30 players registered in order for the
basketball leagues to start. If this requirement is not met then
-refunds will be given to registered players.


an enormous amount of time
and effort into improving."
said Collins. "Needless to say,
our entire team was inspired
and excited when the referees
lifted both hands and signaled
good."
On defense, Justin Helmad-
ollar had 12 tackles, Brandon
Buzby had 11 and Tamarick
Holmes had seven to lead the
team. Defensive linemen An-
thony Lanier and Nick Walker
chipped with six tackles each
and Taylor County's rushing
attack never got going.
The team will play at God-
by on Thursday, Oct. 23 at 7
p.m.


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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008



Comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895



Local politics bring out the worst in people


Editor, The News:
On Friday, Oct. 17, I was out
on Highway 319 in front of the
used car lot across from Wal-
Mart waving signs in support
of my son, Charlie Creel, who
is running for sheriff. I had
parked my car on a piece of
vacant property that used to
be the Harvey Estates Mobile
Home Park. There were no
signs stating no parking or
no trespassing, so I did not


think anything about parking
there.
After being there for about
45 minutes, a man pulled up
(whom I would later learned
was a Michael Harvey) and
began to scream at me as he
rapidly approached me. He
wanted to know who the car
belonged to and I told him it
was mine. As I approached
my car, he followed me and
continued to yell at me while


I was trying to move my car.
I could not imagine that park-
ing my car on the right of way
and part of his property could
cause this person to use such
fowl language and act in such
an erratic way. I was not aware
that the property belonged to
Mr. Harvey, but I did move my
car as quickly as I could.
,Now that days have passed,
I can only reflect on this
unfortunate incident. Why


would a grown man come
charging at a senior citizen,
screaming, while at least 20
people and the motoring
public witnessed this entire
scene, including some small
children. I now understand
that Mr. Harvey is related to
the current sheriff, but he
could have simply approached
me and asked as a gentleman
that I please remove my car,
instead of using loud abusive


language for all to hear and
making such a scene. I have
never been accosted like that
in all of my 81 years.
If this was about politics
I really think it is a shame. I
made a mistake and am truly
sorry for parking on your lot.
I did not see any signs stating
that I couldn't. I ask all citizens
to please behave appropriately
when you are supporting your
candidate. We all want our


candidate to be elected, but
let's not lose our sense of re-
spect for our fellow citizens.
Mr. Harvey, I truly am sorry
for parking on your lot. How-
ever, that is no reason for you
to behave in the manner that
you did-using foul language
and screaming at an elderly
person is not the way to han-
dle a misunderstanding.
Virginia Creel Barnes
Crawfordville


We don't need to vote in favor of county charter issue


Editor, The News: and served the citizens of
If it ain't broke. Wakulla County for two terms
In a few days I will be go- as your Clerk of the Circuit
ing to the polls where I will Court. Friends have been ask-
be exercising my right to vote ing me about this proposed
for the leaders of our nation, charter, so I have done a little
state, and county. Also, I will study on the charter and I
have the opportunity to vote decided to write this letter.
on some referendum issues at (See proposed charter at www.
the state level and a rare vote mywakulla.com).
on a local referendum item, a I can sum up my concerns
charter for Wakulla County. by saying that I do not be-
I want to thank Mr. Pingree lieve our constitutional coun-
for his informative letter last ty needs a charter form of
week. government. Although this
I have taught history and proposed charter is a basic
government, served for 31 charter, it does two things that
years in the school system, I consider unnecessary at this


time. It sets up our county,
which has a population of ap-
proximately 30,000, to operate
as if it had a population many
times that and it permanently
sets up a very powerful and
required function of a County
Administrator. Currently, if the
county commission chose to
cut back expenses and use a
county coordinator like most
of the smaller counties in Flor-
ida, it could do so. As I view
section 3.4 it makes a perma-
nent concentration of power
in a County Administrator. It
would have a chilling effect
on a local citizen approach-


ing his own elected official.
the one he grew up with, he
knows his kids by name, and
perhaps goes to church with. I
see this section directing this
citizen to instead go to a non-
elected County Administrator
to handle his problems or
concerns.
This basic charter opens
the door to later amend-
ments which could completely
change the manner we elect
and keep our constitutional
officers.
What would you think
of having an appointed tax
collector, sheriff, property


appraiser, clerk of court, and
supervisor of elections, all
appointed by the county com-
missioners?
As I was getting ready to
retire as your clerk in 1996, I
met with five candidates for
clerk and explained to them
some of the duties of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court and
the importance of having and
maintaining independence
and autonomy i.e., the checks
and balances that our consti-
tution provides. It grieves me
that someday under a charter,
this constitutional function
could possibly become an ap-


pointed position.
I see no solutions to our
wonderful small county's chal-
lenges that could be solved
from a charter, but I do see
that a charter is an opening to
the possible future loss of our
ability to maintain a separa-
tion of checks and balances.
I can not and will not ever
vote to take away or lessen
the "say-so" of local voters by
concentrating more power in
an unelected official.
J. Harold Thurmond
Former Clerk of Court of,
Wakulla County (1989-1997)
Crawfordville


Former student falls through the cracks at Wakulla High School


Editor, The News:
As I watch the election for
superintendent of schools
several thoughts and con-
cerns come to mind since I
am a product of the current
administration. As a graduate
of Wakulla schools, I have
quite a history under David
Miller's leadership, from be-
ing an elementary student
during his tenure as principal
at Shadeville Elementary to
graduating from high school
while he was superintendent
of schools.
The first time I met him
face-to-face was when I was
in the third grade. I noticed
that the word committed
was misspelled on the sign
in the front of the school.


I approached Mr. Miller to
point this error out in hopes
of getting it fixed, but was
dismissed being sharply told
that I was wrong. Having
never excelled at spelling,
I assured him that I had
looked it up and it was in-
deed wrong, but he insisted
I was mistaken and sent me
on my way.
Later that year r noticed
that the misspelled portion
of the sign had been taken
down and went to Mr. Miller
to thank him for fixing the
problem, but he again dis-
missed me, insisting that it,
was never wrong.'He claimed'
that a storm had damaged
the sign and it was just being
repaired not changed. It was


a very defeating situation,
especially for someone just
developing a desire to learn.
The next experience I had
with Mr. Miller was through
my brother, Zachariah. He
had competed in the science
fair while in middle school
and had placed first in the
school, regional, and state
science fairs and won a trip
to Space Camp.
In attending the state
science fair, he had learned
that high school students
could go on to national and
international science fairs
and could win four year
scholarships to MIT and
other prestigious colleges, as
well as paid internships with
NASA. Zach also wanted to


continue his research on the
Effects of Electromagnetic
Fields on Drosophila mela-
nogaster (the fruit fly). But,
when he got to Wakulla High
he was told that they did not
participate in the science fair,
so he would not be able to
do so. He did not stop there.
He convinced the administra-
tion that they would not have
to help him with anything
more than submitting the
paperwork. The paperwork
had to come from the school
administration, so Zach could
not do that himself.
He worked so hard, spend-
ing his own money on the
supplies, measuring the elec-
tromagnetic fields, looking at
all those tiny flies. Wakulla


High would not even lend
him a binocular microscope;
he had'to get that from the
middle school. They did ev-
erything to thwart him, but
he finished.
With pride he took his
project to the Capital Re-
gional Science Fair where he
was met with the crushing
news that he could not com-
pete because Wakulla High
School had not submitted his
paperwork.
The science fair adminis-
trators were kind enough to
let him display his project
and present it to the judges,
but could not let him re-
ceive any awards or move
on to state, national, or in-
ternational science fairs. The


judges were amazed at the
complexity of his two year .
project and told him that he .
would have taken first place .
overall if his registration had .
been submitted. My brother,
Zach, never pursued science
again, turning his talents,
instead, to the field of com-
puter sciences.
David Miller only served
one year as the principal
of Wakulla High School,
but that was one year too
many for my brother, Zach.
Will his continued tenure as
Superintendent of Wakulla 2
Schools be one year too many..
for your son or daughter or
grandchild?
Justin Kramer
Crawfordville


Candidate must learn about the budget before building it


Editor, The News:
As I read the paid adverto-
rial placed in this newspaper
by Mr. Creel last week (the one
which included his recalcula-
tions of the sheriff's law en-
forcement budget), a thought
came to me:
If Mr. Creel wants to take
control of a complex taxpayer
budget he should first take it
upon himself to understand
the budget. If he finds he
doesn't understand it, he
should take the time, initiative,
and responsibility to speak'
with the CPA who heads the
sheriffs fiscal division before
he publishes misinformation
in the newspaper.
Had he been better in-


formed, he would have known
that the law enforcement bud-
get is just one of many bud-
gets the sheriff's office takes
responsibility for and the ad-
ditional budgets managed by
the sheriff's office are actually,
by Florida Statute, the respon-
sibilities of the county. In fact,
in most Florida counties, the
jail, animal control, tMS-911,
Emergency Management, and
other budgets are managed by
the counties separate from
the sheriff's budget.
I know this because I have
worked closely on a volun-
teer ("unpaid") basis with.
the sheriff's office for several
years developing the annual
report and calendar. I have


taken the time to educate
myself on their mission, goals,
and how the budget in this
county works.
What is stressed to read-
ers on the first spread of the
annual report every year is
that the sheriff's office re-
sponsibilities include many
different budgets (including
Corrections, Animal Control,
E-911, Emergency Manage-
ment, Homeland Security, to
name some), in addition to
the law enforcement budget.
He is either unaware of the
complexities of the budget or
is, unwilling to educate him-
self: Otherwise, why would
he print deliberate misinfor-
mation regarding the cost of


"law enforcement" in Wakulla
County. By the way, I called
the sheriffs office which pro-
duced the following numbers:
Total cost of law enforcement
is $5,167,635, divided by the
population of 29,726 is $174.
Speaking of the Sheriffs
Office Annual Report and cal-
endar, since I am the volunteer
who worked with the sheriffs
office to develop the piece,
I'm happy to set the record
straight.
The reports are designed
to serve as handy, year-long
reminders of the services
available to the citizens of
Wakulla County. As for the
cost, look down at the bot-
tom of any spread to see the


sponsors who purchased ad-
vertising space, ensuring that
this important information is
distributed to Wakulla County
households. Partnering with
local businesses who shoul-
der costs is another way the
sheriffs office has generated
revenue without burdening
the taxpayers. It's parallel to
the football program at Wakul-
la High School. Sponsors buy
ads, they get their names
printed, and the process pays
for the document.
It's fitting that I write this
letter in October. A glance at
this month's Annual Report
and calendar spread high-
lights some of the\ways the
sheriffs office saves taxpayer


money. At the bottom of the .
page. Sheriff Harvey explains
his fiscal responsibility and
invites readers to call for
more information. Enlighten-
ing reading in view of the
controversy.
In the future, I'm sure the
sheriffs office would welcome
any questions or calls before
additional inaccurate "adver-
torials" and letters are pub-
lished. I feel certain anyone
in the department would be
glad to help with facts.
This is America. We have a
right to free speech. But let's
all be sure of our facts before P
we exercise that righi.t o, '
Carol McEwan
Panacea


Traci Brown Cash will make outstanding supervisor of elections


Editor, The News: workload.
I first met Traci Brown There are so many posi-
Cash 10 years ago at vari- tive things to say about Traci
ous.school functions for our Brown Cash. Over the years,
children. She always had a our families have become
smile on her face and noth- close and her boundless en-
ing but kind words to say. I ergy and positive attitude al-
remember she was working, ways amazes me. She proves
volunteering, being a mom this time and again when she
and studying to be a CPA. works, literally, all night long
In my opinion, that's quite a 'to ensure she has met her


various tax deadlines for her
clients. She never quits until
the job is complete and done
correctly.
I think one of the best
tributes that can be given for
Traci was when my daughter
had to write a speech on the
person she most admired.
Of all the world leaders,
family members, war he-


roes, and people of history
she chose Traci. I have to
admit my feelings were a
little hurt that it wasn't me,
but I couldn't disagree with
her choice. She wrote about
Traci's work ethic, integrity,
leadership abilities, values,
and optimistic approach to
all aspects of life.
Through the years I've seen


Traci balance her job, family;
and adversities, as well as all
the organizations for which
she gladly volunteers. No
matter what obstacles are
thrown her way she is al-
ways dedicated. Whether it's
meeting a deadline, needing
to be in three places at once,
finding the best solution to a
dilemma, or to cheer on her


Everyone should have a voice in our politics


Editor, the News:,
Recently, I read with as-
tonishment and disbelief
the letter from Kerry Gaby. I
simply cannot believe that,
since I, and many others,
are not from a long Wakulla
County lineage, or have not
married in to that lineage, or
are not a "prominent" busi-
ness owner, that I should not
have a voice in our County's
politics.
I was raised in a univer-
sity town in northwest Ohio,
where I, and my children,
were exposed to many cul-
tures and people from all
over the United States and
the world.
I moved to Wakulla Coun-


ty with my daughter and
my now-deceased husband,
because we sincerely loved
the quiet way of life in this
part of Florida. This was in
1999.
Several years later, I was
termed a "transplant" by a
county commissioner.
Now, it seems I am not sup-
posed to have any thoughts
on our county government,
nor any say as to what is
happening, simply because
I was not born and raised in
Wakulla County.
I guess my significant
other and I are supposed
to pay our property taxes,
support our local businesses
with our hard-earned dollars,


support our local schools by
being involved in their fund-
raising efforts, yet sit quietly
by while those who meet
the "criteria" set forth by
Kerry Gaby's letter speak out
and hold those duly-elected
posts of Wakulla County's
government. I was under the
impression that we lived in a
Democracy,, where we could
vote for those we felt to be
the best qualified and ask
questions of those we have
elected.
When I was called a
"transplant" several years
ago, it "ruffled my feathers",
but I thought that was only
one person's opinion, which
they are entitled to in this


great country of ours. Now,
since I don't have that all-
important Wakulla County
"pedigree," am I not allowed
to express an opinion or take
part in Wakulla County day-
to-day politics?
Am I expected to just "sit
by" while those with the
county lineage make all of
the decisions for me? What
happened to "by the people,
for the people"?
Perhaps us "low" resi-
dents on the "caste" totem-
pole should allow those on
the "high" end of the "caste"
totem-pole to pay our taxes
for us, since we apparently
are not considered to be
good enough Or, perhaps


we should take our property
tax dollars and the support
of our local businesses else-
where?
I never thought I would
see this type of thinking
here in Wakulla County, but
it appears I was wrong in
my thinking. We do not live
in a foreign country, where
the everyday hard-working
citizens cannot speak their
minds or have a say. After
all, didn't our fore-fathers
say "by the people, for the
people" and "every man is
created equal"?

Susan (last name and com-
munity on file)


family she always does it
with a smile, enthusiasm and "
a never quit attitude.
Remember to vote for "
Trad Brown Cash for Wakulla
County Supervisor of Elec-
tions on Nov. 4.
Michelle Franckhauser
Crawfordville'



Get The

News .

Every

Week!

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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008 Page 17A


Stokley will make an excellent county commissioner


Editor, The Newss
Wakullans, lend me your
ears. Folks, we are in one of
the most critical periods of
time since the "Great Depres-
sion." Gas and grocery prices,
housing costs, car costs and
other goods and services
are at an all-time high and
something has to be done to
correct the problem.
Tradesmen, craftsmen, and
technicians are suffering tre-
mendous hardships because
of the downward spiral of the
economy. In turn, this creates
an equal burden on all other
segments of society.
We need individuals in
government who will have
the ability to address the
issues we are facing. One
of the individuals who has
the ability to do just that is


Jim Stokley, the candidate
for County Commissioner
District 5.
Stokley is a person whom
I have known for many years.
He is a Christian and dedi-
cated family man. He is an
individual who I consider to
be one of the most honest
and hard working persons I
have ever met.
A lifelong resident of
Wakulla County, Jim was
born and raised in the Ivan
community. After graduating
from Wakulla High School
in 1978, he met and married
Carol Smith of Sopchoppy,
where they have lived and
raised their children. Both
of Jim's great-grandparents
(Quiggs and Stokleys) settled
in Wakulla County prior to
1900, making him a "Century


family" twice.
Jim operates his own in-
surance company in Sop-
choppy. As a small busi-
ness owner he knows the
challenges that face other
small business owners. He
knows that Wakulla County
is growing and that means
additional services will be
needed and that we desper-
ately need other businesses
to locate here so we can build
our workforce. Working lo-
cally, our citizens will not
have to, face the long com-
mute to our adjoining Leon
County. By keeping things
local, we can spend our hard
earned money 'locally and
help our economy-not some-
one else's.
SJim simply wishes to man-
age and balance positive


growth (residential, com-
mercial and clean industrial)
harmoniously with local
ecology and infrastructure
to maintain and preserve the
pristine quality of our county
and our high quality of life.
Jim is for managed develop-
ment and is very sensitive in
preserving the environment
for future generations.
Jim Stokley's opponent
(Lynn Artz) favors no growth
policy. She complains about
congestion, pollution; noise,
unsightly development and
replacement of green space
with cement slabs. Her poli-
cies would lead to popula-
tion loss, eroding tax base,
racial imbalance, deteriorat-
ing housing and increasing
proportions of poor and aged
who require social services.


As a result of Artz's policies
we would see higher crime
rates, greater poverty, larger
numbers of people on public
assistance, fewer home own-
ers and a larger percentage of
minority residents than the
county is gaining in popula-
tion. Moreover, the per capital
cost of county government
is higher in counties losing
population and those coun-
ties must impose heavier tax
burdens on their citizens. In
fact, population decline may
cause increased taxing and
spending indirectly because
the people left behind in the
county are poorer, unskilled
and are in need of more
costly social services than
those who moved out.
As a "no growther," Mrs,
Artz favors policies of restric-


tive zoning laws, costly re-
quirements placed on build-
ers and developers, higher
charges for sewer and water
hook-ups to new homes and
businesses, strong pollution
control ordinances which in-
cude almost all industry and
opposition to street widen-
ing, tree cutting or highway
construction, etc.
Voters, in a time of up-
heaval in the market we do
not need Mrs. Artz's type of
government. For all the above
mentioned reasons, I am
asking that you vote for Jim
Stokley on Nov. 4. A vote for
Stokley is a vote for progress
and will stretch the dollar in
your pocket.
Leon Nettles
Crawfordville


Former commissioner endorses candidate in District 1


Editor, The News:
The choice is now becoming
clear to me as I study the two
candidates who will be running
against each other in November for
District 1 county commissioner. It'll
be Brock versus Brock. They aren't
related at all. One of them is my
neighbor and her name is Jenny.
I aniconfident that Jenny Brock
knows what is needed to steer


county commission decisions to
the advantage of all the people in
Wakulla County.
Jenny isn't just a neighbor here
on the St. Marks River. I've experi-
enced her at county commission
meetings many times when I was
serving as "your servant." She
probes and asks questions. She
might not have gotten answers to
her overriding interest in protect-


ing our groundwater. Why don't
we have a stormwater management
plan?
We both like to fish. She's an
outdoors woman with a head for
math. I should know because I had
her for a tutor while in college. She
has no agenda other than want-
ing to represent your local issues.
There's no political party pushing
her and her independence is what


appeals to me.
In contrast with Alan Brock,
Jenny will not vote to transfer wa-
ter out of the county. Jenny will not
vote for projects such as N.G. Wade
properties of up to 20 houses per
acre. Allen Brock may support both
of these issues.
I didn't mention that Jenny is an
avid hunter who can dot the eye at
hundreds of feet and she has been


a member of the National Rifle As-
sociation (NRA). Jenny is the only
woman in Wakulla County that I
know who can field dress a deer.
To all my past supporters, I
thank you for all you've done for
me. More importantly, go to the
polls on Nov. 4 and let's get behind
Jenny.
Leon Nettles
Crawfordville


Strength of our country is the diversity of ideas


Editor, The News:
Have you watched the
Wakulla County Commis-
sion meetings on television
or heard them discussed
around town? The meetings
are full of politics, divisive-
ness, and an us versus them


mentality that is not good
for Wakulla County.
It is the politics of ex-
tremism that grows more
extreme by people not will-
ing to discuss other ideas
and only seeking friends
and associates that already


agree with them. It is a
problem facing the nation,
but clearly seen here lo-
cally, too.
When I look at our can-
didates running for the
county commission this
cycle, there is only one


that appears to be trying
to reach out to more than
just his current friends. The
candidate is Alan Brock. His
whole campaign is focused
on taking his experience at
mediation and using it to
unite his home community.


He wants to bring together
the business and environ-
mental community for all
of us to prosper.
I have known him since
I moved to Wakulla almost
20 years ago. He is a natural
leader, with a vision of a


well planned community
that we can all get behind.
That is why I am support-
ing him, and I encourage
you to do the same.
Terri Jay
Shadeville


Charlie Creel will provide change we need I like Charlie Creel!


Editor, The News:
My name is Darwin I. Harvey, Sr. I have lived in Wakulla most of my life. In 1980, David (Harvey) came to my home cam-
paigning. He asked me to vote for him, then we reminisced about the family along with other matters. I was excited to have
a Harvey at the helm of the Wakulla County Sheriff's Office. Now, 28 years later, I have noticed that my excitement has turned
to concern about David Harvey as he has become more lax in the past few years. As a resident (not a family member), I feel
it is time to pass the torch to someone who's more flexible and will listen to the people of Wakulla County. I think it's time
for a change, a fresh mind and new ideas for a changing Wakulla. I know that Charlie Creel is that change.
Darwin L. Harvey
Sopchoppy
i0 i_... \;' -


Editor, The News:
I am a supporter of Char-
lie Creel. I can give a list of
personal reasons why, but
I'm not. I'm just going with
what I've seen in the years
I've been in Wakulla. Yes,
David Harvey has a good
record as sheriff. And as
.the years have gone by, Da-


vid has gotten comfortable
and relaxed. It is time for
a change. Someone with
excitement and energy is
needed for this fast chang-
ing county.
Debra A. Harvey
Sopchoppy


We should continue to treat our natural resources properly


Editor, The News:
-.remember a day when
a hard working Wakulla boy
could pull in at the upper
bridge boat landing, walk
along the bridges' public
walkway and take a dive into
the beautiful blue waters on
a hot summer day.
Times have changed. The


waters are now green and
the hard working Wakulla
boy or girl I used to see at
upper bridge have been re-
placed by folks who don't
have respect for themselves,
the river, the environment, or
public or private property.
I took my watercraft up
to upper bridge last Thurs-


day and retrieved 13 fresh
beer cans along the edges of
the river. I have witnessed
with my own eyes scores of
folks floating on cheap pool
floats and inner tubes calling
themselves tubers tossing
beer cans and bottles into
our beloved river. I have also
watched them burn cigarette


holes in those cheap pool
rafts and let them float on
down river into the Gulf.
A favorite stopping place
of these miscreants is our
private park at Mysterious
Waters.
Residents who live here
have been accosted and
threatened by people who


are tubing or picking up
people at our private park
and dock too many times.
I have to agree with David
Harvey's letter to the county
commission in the paper
last week.
However Ithink a lot could
be done by regulating the
kind of craft that is allowed


on the river. I also think that
the best way to handle the
situation at upper bridge is
to fix the vandalization of
upper bridge and the river as
soon as it is noticed Don't
give this element a chance to
grab hold and thrive.
John Melton
Crawfordville


Vote no to Home Rule Charter


Editor, The News: Rule Charter? Don't we already
In,these times of economic have Home Rule through the
stress, why would we want to elected officials of the county?
continue with a high salaried po- There are 12 pages to the
sition as called for in the Home Home Rule Charter. There are


things included in the document
that are definitely not good for
the county. How many citizens
have had a chance to become
familiar with the information,


let alone have a chance to decide
good or bad points?
If the charter passes, the
official in the managerial posi-
tion will be able to select what


information about the county he
chooses to share with the county
commission. Also, the position
is a permanent position. So,
how could that be a good thing?


Please vote no on the Home Rule
Charter.

Mr. and Mrs. Bryant Loyed
Crawfordville


Commissioner Stewart has served his time


Editor, The News:
When I read Mike Stewart's
ad apologizing for his past
performance as a county com-
missioner in The News last
week, I agreed that he should
apologize.
The man had eight years
as a county commissioner to
serve and respect citizens of
this county and we voted him
out of office for good reason.
Mr. Stewart described himself
in his ad as being "unfriendly,
too strict, demanding, and


biased." Mr. Stewart is correct
and he has offended many,
but more so, he has left a huge
imprint on this county and the
county is no better for having
had him in office for eight
long years.
He said he was "ruling with
an iron thumb and that he
had "zeal." His "zeal" was in
the contempt for those he
was supposed to serve. His
"zeal" was in voting against
an item, and reversing himself
later. His "zeal" came from


shuffling the citizen's speaker
cards, and making the speak-
ers write if they were "for or
against" an item, and then
choosing only a select few to
speak on the item.
The "needed order" that
Mike Stewart said that he
wanted in the board meetings
was to not deal with citizen
concerns. If the citizens were
gone, the meetings would
have been much more pleas-
ant for Mr. Stewart. He has
some nerve to say that he


wanted "order" in the board
chambers. He had good peo-
ple thrown out of the chamber
for voicing their opinions,
concerns, and solutions.
He simply did not want to
hear what these people, who
took time away from their
families and their work, had
to say.
And Mr. Stewart should
not hide behind the military
as an excuse for being called
a "horrible dictator." Growing
up in a military family, I know


first-hand that most in the
military can manage to be civil
and open minded and would
be appalled at Mr. Stewart's
behavior and his reference
to the military. As a matter
of fact, those in the military
have fought and died for one
of our basic rights, freedom
of speech.
Mike is right. He cannot
go back and change his past,
nor the damage that he
caused both the citizens and
the county. He is also right,


Wakulla County can be a bet-
ter place to live, but not with
Mike Stewart as one of, o ir
county commissioners. The
man had years as a county
commissioner to respect citi-
zens of this county and they
,voted him out of office for a
good reason.
Has the zebra really changed
his stripes? I don't think so.
Sue Damon
Crawfordville


Sorry to interrupt this amusing election season


Editor, The News:
Friends and neighbors, I am
sorry to interrupt this most
amusing political season but
there is a situation run amok
in Wakulla County that begs
your attention.
An honorably discharged
Vietnam veteran is being un-
fairly prosecuted by the State
Attorney's office. This good
man is being charged with
felony animal cruelty after
defending himself against a
dog attack. What makes this a


ridiculous case is the fact that
the dog attacked him near his
own front door, in the middle
of his two acre piece of land,
miles from the dog's home.
I appeal to the sensible
people of Wakulla to not allow
the prosecutor to walk silently
down this misguided path. In
addition to being a grotesque
miscarriage of justice, this case
exemplifies the application of
tort responsibility that leads to
frivolity, clogged courtrooms
and wasted taxpayer dollars.


Further, it is reminiscent of the
days when a man was fined for
beating his children, but hung
for stealing a horse.
Let's demand the state
attorney's office put effort
into development and enforce-
ment of responsible domestic
animal ownership laws rather
than prosecution of victims
such as my neighbor.
It is the dog's owners who
are guilty of the crime here by
knowingly allowing theirlarge,
male, un-neutered dog to roam


about other people's property
and become a nuisance while
in pursuit of available mates.
They blatantly disregarded the
kindergarten fact that a male
dog hot on the trail of nature's
call is not thinking like a ra-
tional creature and cannot be
trusted to behave as if it were
at home.
If a felony is to be charged
it is easy to see that it should
be against the dog's owner
(on behalf of my neighbor)
who was repeatedly, callously


subjected to the fear and
uncertainty caused by their
dog's presence in his yard.
I ask you, had the dog been
hit by a car crossing the road,
would you be supporting their
cry to prosecute the driver the
way you are supporting their
cry now?
Ultimately, only my neigh-
bor and the dog know what
passed through their minds
the instant they caught sight
of one another that day back
in June. Who knows, perhaps


the dog was just jumping out
from behind a bush to give
him a big, 'ole doggie hug.
One thing is for sure though.
I would not want to stand in
his shoes, on his property
that day, waiting those eternal
three to four seconds trying to
decide. "Is my face about to get
licked or is my throat about to
get ripped out?."
Karen S. Terrones
Crawfordville


Thank you for the support at our time of loss


Editor, The Newss
The family of Doris Revell
Sanders would like to take this
time to express our apprecia-


tion to our family and friends
for all the visits, cards, prayers,
food, flowers and donations in
her memory during the loss of


our mama. A special thanks
to Big Bend Hospice, Harvey-
Young Funeral Home, Brother
Ronnie Metcalf, Brother B.B.


Barwick, Brother Bruce Taylor,
and Sister Carolyn Wright.
May God bless each of you.
Deb, Monty, Janie,


Millie, Buck, and
families
Sopchoppy


CLASSIFIED
$8 Per Weekl


J I


r I -















Page 18A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008


Court Shorts


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
A man who violated his
house arrest by taking his kids to
fireworks on the Fourth of July
will pay for his mistake by serv-
ing five years in state prison.
Travis Carter. 24, was on com-
munity control for possession
of methamphetamine and had
been given a five-year prison
sentence that was suspended.
At a prior violation of probation
hearing, Wakulla Circuit Judge
N. Sanders Sauls warned Carter
that he was being given one
more chance and if he violated
again he could pack his tooth-
brush for his trip to prison.
At a hearing on Wednesday,
Oct. 15, Carter and other family
members begged for lenience,
saying that Carter's mother had
promised to take the two chil-
dren to fireworks but became
sick that day. Unable to resist his
children's pleadings, Carter took
the kids to the festival and was
spotted by a probation officer.
Probation Officer Nina Ray-
boun testified that she saw
Carter in the crowd, told him
he wasn't supposed to be away
from his home, and he needed
to immediately return there.
After a warrant was issued for
Carter for violating the terms
of his house arrest, he turned
himself in to the jail
"I've lost everything because
of this drug," Carter told the
court in an emotional speech. "I
lost my kids. I lost my honor. I
lost my business that was once
thriving. I lost my truck. I almost
lost my house."
"The state recognizes this
isn't the most serious violation
ever," Assistant State Attorney
Jack Campbell, who prosecuted
the case, told the court However,
it was his second violation, and
Carter sneaking out of his house
to take his kids to fireworks
amounted to a betrayal of the
trust placed in him.
Judge Sauls rejected the fam-
ily's plea for another chance,
saying he was tired of hearing
people on probation try to
explain that they had a good
reason not to do what they are
supposed to do. "That's why
he was given a suspended sen-
tence," the judge said. "So that


he would think twice before he
went out and violated."
Ordered to five years in
prison, Carter turned to his fam-
ily in the courtroom gallery, who
left weeping.
A defense attorney said
he has reason to believe that a
woman he is representing on
charges of aggravated battery
causing great bodily injury is
now incompetent to proceed.
The woman, Teresa Thorn-
ton, 36, has severe emotional
problems that require medica-
tion. She became pregnant last
year and stopped taking her
medication, worried it would af-
fect the baby, and became unbal-
anced and severely attacked her
mother. When law enforcement
arrived at the scene, Thornton
locked herself in. a bathroom
and cut off a large portion of
her tongue.
She was found incompetent
to proceed and taken to Florida
State Hospital in Chattahoochee,
had her baby, and was deter-
mined to have regained her
competency. (Her child is a ward
of the state and has been placed
in a foster home.) Thornton
returned to the Wakulla County
Jail where she has been held for
five months.
The state made a plea offer
several months ago to Thornton
that it would accept time served
in the case if she would sign
over all her parental rights to
the child. Thornton has not so
far accepted the plea deal.
At a hearing on Wednesday,
Oct. 15, attorney Adam Ruiz,
who represents Thornton, told
the court that a confidential
evaluation had been done that
determined Thornton was now
incompetent to proceed.
"If she's not competent, she
doesn't need to be sitting in
the Wakulla County Jail," Judge
Sauls said. Without objection
from prosecutor Campbell, the
court said it was sign an order
to send her back to Florida State
Hospital for treatment
A defendant found guilty
by a jury several weeks ago of
manufacturing and trafficking
methamphetamine had his
sentencing hearing continued
after it became apparent that,
having had Terry Lee Carden


pronounced a habitual felony of-
fender, he would face a manda-
tory sentence of life in prison.
Prosecutor Campbell told the
court at the hearing on Thurs-
day, Oct. 16, that life was not
the sentence he was seeking, but
rather wanted a 30-year prison
term. Under the sentencing
guidelines, Carden, 39, scored
68 months to 45 years in prison,
with a minimum-mandatory
of seven years in prison and a
$100,000 fine. Having a defen-
dant declared a habitual felony
offender typically doubles a
prison term, and Campbell had
told the court that Carden would
have a maximum exposure to 90
years in prison.
Prior to the continuance be-
ing given, family members and
friends all asked the court not to
sentence Carden to a long prison
term, saying he had a drug prob-
lem and needed treatment.
Carden has had 28 prior ar-
rests since 1986, and has been on
probation nine times, according
to court records.
His attorney, Steven Glazer,
told the court that, "Basically,
everything he's done was drug-
related."
That was disputed, noting
that Carden has had several ar-
rests for robbery and burglary
- crimes apparently done to
sustain his drug habit.
A man charged with prowl-
ing Cherokee Sink back in June
with a Rambo-style knife was in
misdemeanor court on Thursday,
Oct 16, to agree to psychological
treatment.
Adrian Freeman, 28, was
originally charged with felony
aggravated assault with a deadly
weapon without intent to kill.
but was reduced to a misde-
meanor charge of carrying a
concealed weapon.
Freeman served 63 days
in jail on the charge, and has
been getting treatment since
his release.
In court, the state offered a
deferred prosecution agreement
to drop the case if Freeman
stays out of trouble for a period
of time.
Wakulla County Judge Jill
Walker presided over misde-
meanor court


Letter...Traci Cash has the


experience for the job


Editor, The News;
The supervisor of elections
position is the link for our
voices to be heard and our
votes to be counted. One can-
didate in the race for supervi-
sor of elections stands out as
the ideal individual to bring
integrity, honesty, knowledge
and strong ethics to the posi-
tion. That candidate is Traci
Brown Cash.
As a licensed Certified
Public Accountant (CPA),
Traci's strong educational
background gives her the abil-
ity to organize records, main-
tain confidentiality and keep
abreast of state and federal
requirements. Traci's experi-
ence working with the Florida


Senate provides her with an
understanding of how to in-
corporate new legislation into
current rules. Traci's skills will
be a benefit to the supervisor
of elections position.
Traci Brown Cash has a
long record of service to this
county and has volunteered
countless hours for us. She is a
proven leader who has served
our children and families by
participating in PTAs, School
Advisory Councils and the
Academic Boosters. In addi-
tion, Traci is active in many
civic organizations, including
our Chamber of Commerce
and the Wakulla Business
and Professional Women's
Association.


Rep. Boyd speaks


U.S. Represental
Congressman Allen Boyd
(D-Monticello) said last week
that recovery from the coun-
try's economic meltdown will
not come from the multina-
tional corporations, but from
small, family-owned business-
es. Besides the economy, Boyd
said that the energy problem
is another crisis the federal
government must face, with
Americans using 25 percent of
the world's oil but only having
two percent of the oil reserves.


tive Allen Boyd
The nation needs to take a
"shotgun approach" to find-
ing solutions, he said, such as
developing renewable sources
of energy and, with the larg-
est reserve of coal, learn how
to use it more cleanly. Boyd
made the comments as guest
speaker at the Small Business
Appreciation Luncheon held
at Harvey-Young Farm on
Friday, Oct. 17. Several dozen
local businesses participated
in the event.


I have known Traci all her
life and, along with many.
others, have witnessed her
strong ethics and faith. Each
decision she makes and action
she takes is based on doing
the right thing, no matter how
tough the action may be.
A vote for Traci Brown Cash
is a vote for integrity, honesty,"
knowledge and experience. It'
is also a vote that will truly
benefit Wakulla County.
I hope you will join me in'
making our voices heard by-
casting a vote in November'
and electing Traci Brown Cash
as Supervisor of Elections.
Melanie Woofter
Crawfordville


Senior

citizens'

events

Health and safety program

Tallahassee Memorial Neu-
roScience Center presentsZ
Headsmartz, a complimentary
Fall Prevention program foi
seniors, a health and safety
program created by the Brainm
Injury Association of Florida tco
educate about fall prevention
and reducing the risk of injury;.
This interactive presentation:
will incorporate video clips
and audience participation in:
a game show format.
The event.will be held
Wednesday, Nov. 12, from 11
a.m. to 12 noon at the Senior
Citizens Center in Crawford,
ville, 33 Michael Drive.

Senior Dance

The Wakulla County Senior
Citizens Center will host a
dance for all county senior
citizens on Oct. 24 from 7
p.m. until 9 p.m. Admission is
free and refreshments will be
served. For more information,
call 927-7145.















THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008 Page 19A



Business


Unemployment continues to rise in Wakulla County


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla's unemployment
rate continued to climb in
August, now up to 5.0 percent
from 4.8 percent in August.
But it's still one of the lowest
jobless rates in the state, ac-
cording to the state Agency for
Workforce Innovation.
Florida's jobless rate con-
tinued to be higher than the


national average in September
at 6.8 percent. The national
unemployment rate remained
steady at 6.1 percent.
It is the highest unemploy-
ment rate in Florida since
October 1994. Four counties in
the state reported double-digit
unemployment in September,
the highest was Hendry Coun-
ty with a 14.1 percent jobless
rate. The Agency for Work-


force Innovation reported that
Hendry's high unemployment
is due mainly to seasonal
declines in agriculture and
related industries.
Even with a rise in lo-
cal unemployment, Wakulla
County ranked fourth for
lowest unemployment. Those
with lower unemployment
were Walton County at 4.0
percent; Alachua, Franklin and


Sumter counties at 4.5 percent;
and Leon and Okaloosa at 4.8
percent.
In September, the Wakulla
labor force increased to 16,069
people, of which 15,272 were
employed and 797 were un-
employed.
In August, the labor force
consisted of 15,687 people, of
which 14,934 were employed
and 753 were unemployed.


The number of jobs in
Florida is down 115,500 in
September compared to a year
ago. Construction accounts for
40.5 percent of job losses in
the state.
The Tallahassee Metro-
politan Area, which includes
Wakulla, Leon, Jefferson and
Gadsden counties for the
purpose of market analysis,
also had a decrease in the


overall unemployment rate
in September, actually drop-
ping to 5.0 percent from 5.3
percent in August. The local
MSA continued to have one of
the lowest jobless rates of the
23 MSAs in the state. Only the
Gainesville MSA at 4.6 percent
and the Ft. Walton Beach MSA
at 4.8 percent were lower.


St. Marks River Festival


- ,'-*.. ',
.. : .:. :4 ,


Monster trucks dwarf visitors at the City of St. Marks River festival.
Hundreds of people turned out for the St. Marks River Festival held in St. Marks on Sat-
urday, Oct. 18. The event featured music, classic cars, drag racing cars, big monster trucks,
vendors selling food and souvenirs, and local restaurants serving up fresh stone crab to mark
the opening of stone crab season. Over at Fort San Marcos de Apalache, re-enactors from dif-
ferent periods of the fort's history gave visitors a glimpse into the past, from the Spanish to
North meets South as re-enactors remember the War Between The States. Andrew Jackson to the Civil War and later. (Photo by William Snowden)


Commuter Services announces Commuter Choices Week


Despite recent decreases,
gas prices throughout the
country have risen between 20
percent and 40 percent during
the past year. Unfortunately,
personal incomes have only
grown an average of 2 percent
to 3 percent. When you add
concerns over the growth in
greenhouse gas emissions,
urban sprawl, and dependence
on foreign oil, transportation
anfincreasingly important
topic nationally and in our
Community.
: In an effort to address these
problems, Commuter Services
Of North Florida, the Florida
Department of Transportation,
the Capital Region Transpor-
tation Planning Agency, and
other area agencies are proud
to announce the return of
Commuter Choices Week, Oct.
27 through Oct. 31. This year's
theme is "Change Your Tune"
and encourages commuters to
fry an alternative form of trans-
portation to get to and from
vork if only for one day.
: Various events will be held
to increase awareness and use
of alternative forms of trans-
portation including carpool-
ing, public transit, walking,
bicycling, and telework. Some
Wakulla County residents
might think their options are
limited, but they are available.
: According to Jeff Horton, Ex-
ecutive Director of Commuter
Services of North Florida, long-
listance commuters feel the
pain of driving to and from
work more than most com-
mauters.
- "The more a person has to
drive to get to and from work,
the more it costs. Fuel costs
more, and the often over-
*t'


looked costs of maintenance
and vehicle depreciation also
add up."
The 2000 U.S. Census Data
found that almost 60 percent of
Wakulla County residents work
in Leon County. ForCrawford-
ville residents who work in Tal-
lahassee, the average commute
is approximately 40 miles per
day or more than 10,0)0 miles
per year. Even at today's fuel
prices, such a commute costs
approximately $1,400 per year.
When AAA's estimated costs
for maintenance and deprecia-
tion are added, the cost jumps
to almost $5,000 per year.
Fixed-route public transit
is currently unavailable to
Wakulla County residents, but
carpooling and telework are
great options for county resi-
dents, says Horton. Carpool-
ing with just one other person
can reduce annual commuting
costs by 50 percent; a four-
person carpool could reduce
annual commuting costs by 75
percent.
For persons who are inter-
ested in joining or forming a


carpool or vanpool, Commuter
Services of North Florida offers
a free ridematching service that
identifies and matches com-
patible carpool partners. As
an added benefit, anyone par-
ticipating in a carpool at least
three days per week qualifies
for Commuter Services' Guaran-
teed Ride Home Program.
This free program provides
a taxi ride home if an emer-
gency arises and you need to
get home quickly without your
carpool partnerss. This service
is also available to work com-
muters who use public transit,
bicycling, or walking.
Commuter Services also
promotes telework or working
from home as an attractive
option for many commuters.
Working from home just one
day per week can save the aver-
age Wakulla County commuter
almost $1,000 per year, and
more and more employers are
encouraging their employees to
telework as both an employee
benefit and a way to reduce
operational costs.
Commuter Choices Week


is a great opportunity to try
a commute option, and many
employers throughout the area
are supporting the efforts of


friendship
youth
success


,Tom Wollschlager, D.M.D.


their employees to find a more
economical and environmen-
tally-friendly way of getting to
and from.


For more details, including
a complete schedule of events,
www.commuterservices.org or
call 1-888-454-RIDE.


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NO MATCH NO VOTE RULE
There appears to be reports circulating that provide incorrect information
relating to voting regulations. The reports that indicate that a person's
information such as address) on the identification presented at the polls
must exactly match the information on the person's voter registration record
are false. The identification at the polls is used solely to confirm the
voter's identity not to verify the voter's ID number or address. The
photo on the ID is compared to the person standing before the poll worker
and the signature is matched against the signature that the voter puts on the
precinct register when he or she signs in to vote.

The otherr must ,ore in the precinct where the.N Ic. regardless of whether that
address is on their ID. If they have no\ ed \ without updating their voter registration
record, the. should contact the super. isor of elections to see where the polling
place is located for their new address. The individual should then go to the new
pol'ig place and they can do an address change at the polls.


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Page 20A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008


Horse-A-Ween 2008


Overall winner Hunter Revell, age 2 1/2.


The Wakulla County Horse-
man's Association held it's
annual Horse-A-Ween and
Festival Saturday, Oct 18. The
events were geared toward
children of all ages. Many
games were held for those
who don't even own a horse.
"If you didn't attend be-
cause you don't have a horse,
you missed out on a lot of
fun," said Trade Churchard.
Games offered for the little
ones included the fishing
booth, duck pond and face
painting. Calf roping and
raffles were held throughout
the day. Visitors discovered
that just watching the riders
and their games was very
entertaining.
The riders and their horses
played games such as Bare
back Bucks, the cake walk,
musical horses, flag and toilet


paper races. The overall winner was 2
A horse and rider costume 1/2-year-old Hunter Revell.
contest yielded creative cos- The event was emceed by
tumes for the rider and their Evelyn Ashley and Bobbie
horses. Several age categories Conel.
were offered. Join the Wakulla Horse-
In the Pee Wee division: man's Association at the
First Place-Hunter Revell Wakulla County Extension
age 2 1/2, Horse Son. Office Horse Arena the third
Second place-Austin Revell, Saturday of each month for
age 5 1/2, Horse- Sandman. Western speed events. Regis-
8- 12 Age group tration is held at 10 a.m. The
First place Todd Porter, show starts at noon. Conces-
age 10 Horse-Fancy. sions available.
Second Place- Kaitlyn The Wakulla County Horse-
Boykin, Age 8, Horse-Cutter. mans Association (WCHA)
Third-Nicholas Harper, age donated 25 percent of their
11, Horse-Lucas. proceeds from the Horse-O-
13 17 Age group Ween to the Wakulla County
First place-Erica Wilson, age 4-H Horsemasters Club. "The
15, Horse-Onyx. 4-H'ers are extremely grateful
Second-Michelle Churchard, for their generosity. Thank
age 16, Horse-Trigger. You," said Churchard. Wakulla
Third-Alyssa Porter, age 14, 4-H Horsemasters Organiza-
Horse-Dude. tional Leader.


Swine Show seeking participants
The Wakulla County Youth Fair Association, in cooperation with the Wakulla
County 4-H program, willbe hosting the 43rd Annual Swine Show on Saturday,
Feb. 28. Interested participants and volunteers are encouraged to contact Sherri
Hood at the Extension Office to receive information regarding this year's show
schedule and requirements.
Anyone interesting in sponsoring a participant or helping a child raise a
show hog is asked to please contact the Association President, Todd Carlton at
528-5206. ., .. .


Opening Day at the polls-

Oct. 20...Election 2008


Ninety-five-year-old Annie
B. Spivey was first in line to
cast her vote at the early vot-
ing poll on Monday, Oct. 20.
"I've seen so much in my
life. I am so glad I have lived
long enough to vote in this
election," she said. Annie
made plans last week with
her family and friends for as-
sistance in getting her to the
polls. I just have to vote for
my man, Barack Obama."
Kim Kramer, who just met
Annie last week, got to the
Supervisor of Elections Office
at 7:45 a.m. to save her a place
at the head of the line. "This
was so special for her.
It was worth an hour of
my time to make sure that
she could be first in line."
Kramer commented she
At right, Voters line the
hallway of Supervisor of
Elections Crum's office
KIDS RALLY HELD
On Saturday Oct. 18, Laurel
Keyes, 9, held a Kids Rally for
Obama in Crawfordville. As
an ardent Barack Obama sup-
porter, Laurel wanted to do
something to show her support
since she cannot yet vote.
Doug Jones, a candidate for
supervisor of elections, attend-
ed. "I thought this would be a
good opportunity to educate
the kids in the voting process,"
said Jones. "I registered the
kids and then provided them
with optical scan ballots so that
they could cast their ballots."
Group to per
The Ghost Riders with
members Jonathan Price, Tony
Rizzo, Mac McWaters, Herman
Mathers, Dick Bickford and Doc
Mathers are Southbound Band's
special guests for the 90th Edi-
tion of the Sopchoppy Opry on
Saturday, Oct. 25 at 7 p.m. in the
historic Sopchoppy High School
Auditorium. Also appearing will
be Tallahassee's "Sweetheart of
Country" Suzie Elkins and trum-
peter David B. "Satchmo" Miller.
For more information or tickets,
call 962-3711.


Annie B. Spivey is assisted to cast her ballot.
also is asking all of her the long lines at the polls on
friends and family to get out election day .
to vote early to help reduce


form at Sopchoppy Opry


The Ghost Riders Band will"perform.


As your Sheriff, my job is to keep you safe, keep our streets safe and to keep our community safe.







I am pleased to report that the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) has recently issued a report

showing that during the past five years and despite our growth the crime rate in Wakulla County

continues to go down. Our crime rate is down and the actual number of violent crimes are also down!


* The overall crime RATE is down 28%

over the past 5 years, according to

the FDLE Uniform Crime Report.

* The ACTUAL number of indexed

crimes from 5 years ago is also down.


4 The criimereports from FDLE tell us that our programsae'W ori
Make our County one of the safest in the state. I am so grateful f
Continued support of our citizens who give us the tools and the siu
to be among the most effective law enforcement agencies in the st
S-SheriffDqd
--. .^ ,,: .a. .. i. .,i, ,


VOTE TO KEEP WAKULLA COUNTY SAFE... '


VOTE SHERIFF David HARVEY U
Political advertisement paid for and approved by David Harvey, Democrat, for Sheriff













Section B




Community New


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008


Wakulla 4-H youths
Continued from Page 1A City Council Delegates
Horsemasters partici- Genna Knight and Lydia
pated in Horse-O-Ween on Lloyd
Saturday. Oct. 18, in conjunc- Target Smashers
tion with the Wakulla County President Weston Mc-
Horseman's Association. The Cuen
drill team is a new part of Vice President Gage
the club and both welcomed Fenner
members on Oct 18. Secretary Alleashia
Pony Pals are entering Wright
hand-crafted horse origami Treasurer Daniel Sullivan
projects for the North Florida Reporter Chayton Bussey
Fair. Horsemasters
Pana"Sea"ers went out President Jamie Trindell
seining with Cypress Rudloe Vice President Tyler Gil-
on Saturday, Oct. 4, and are bert
preparing to travel to the Ma- Secretary Kelsey Alyea
rine Ecology Event on Nov. 14 Treasurer Alicia Porter
in Kissimmee. County Council Delegate
Anyone who is interested Alyssa Porter
in helping this group travel to Historian Lindsay Shef-
Central Florida in November field
is asked to contact the Exten- Recreation Leader Mi-
sion Office. chelle Churchard
Kapra Kids are still milk- Pony Pals
ing goats and learning to President Levi Fincher
make goat's milk soaps and Vice President Sarah
crimes. They will be hosting Smith
a fundraiser some time before Secretary Jada Lassiter
Christmas. They invite resi- Treasurer Rianna Bi-
dents to get holiday lists ready lodeau
and be prepared to enjoy their Kapra Kids
products. President Kyle Weaver
Kim Bartnick's class will Vice-President Emily
be starting their Bottle Biology Brown,
projects soon and have been Secretary/Treasurer Aus-
learning about the water cycle tin Meadowcroft
and river ecology. Reporter/Historian Cait-
Margy Callaghan's, Diane lyn Weaver
Driggers' and Megan Crom- Kim Bartnick's Class
bie's classes have been learn- The Green River Club
ing about food production and President Riley Craig
traditional Florida cultures Vice President Miracle
as they relate to water and Potter
rivers. Secretary Abigail Strick-
Each of the classroom dubs land
as well as the community Treasurer Kayla Rossetti
clubs,elected officers and they Reporter Ja'Mecia Rosier
are as follows: Margy Callaghan's Class
Sea Searchers The Otter Club
President Balin Jernigan President Kaylee Meyers
Vice President Rafael For- Vice President Destiny
tier Bradley
Secretary Riley Craig Secretary Brianna Harvey
Treasurer Rebecca Kelley Treasurer Gabe Dantzler
Pana"Sea"ers Reporter Emily Lawrence
President Charlie Sand- Diane Driggers' Class
ers President Madise\ Mil-
Vice President Colbi King lership
Secretary Kelsie Largent Vice President Michael
Treasurer Bryan Knight Roddenberry
Reporter Dalten Wood Secretary Marc Greene
Historian William Treasurer Emmylou Cha-
Wynne son
Parliamentarian Casey Reporter Shaleigh Mercer
Wynne Megan Crombie's class
Sergeant-at-Arms Macie President Axel Arrington
Wynne Vice President Michael
Recreation Leader Har- Royce
rison King Secretary Haleigh Martin
Refreshments Leader Starr Treasurer Kam Rosier
King Reporter Cori Chaganis


4-H programs teach environmental stewardship


Kim Bartnick's class is learning about river ecology.
~i


Megan Crombie's class learned about Florida cultures.


Diane Driggers' class learned about food production. Margy Callaghan's class learned about water and rivers.


4-H youths win $100 by collecting butts


Thirty-eight members ofvarious 4-H
clubs and their families all pulled to-
gether to win the "Pick Up Your Butts"
contest at the Keep Wakulla County
Beautiful event on Sept. 20.
Each of the clubs contributed their
bags of cigarette butts that they col-
lected and the total was close to a


pound and a half of litter. The prize of
$100 will go to help fund camp schol-
arships and their community service
project for Christmas.
In addition to picking up cigarette
litter, collectively, the 4-H clubs col-
lected more than 28 garbage bags
of trash and construction debris


from the roadsides in Panacea from
Woolley Park to Hook Wreck Henry's
restaurant.
After cleaning up, the participants
enjoyed the hot dogs and snacks and
were personally invited to tour the
Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratory free
of charge.


Armed with trash bags, 4-H youths look for garbage to
collect during the annual Coastal Cleanup event,


TMH will host program for seniors
The Tallahassee Memo- health and safety program of injury. This interactive The event will be held
rial NeuroScience Center created by the Brain Injury presentation will incorpo- Wednesday, Nov. 12, from 11
presents Headsmartz, a Association of Florida to rate video clips and audi- a.m, to 12 noon at the Senior
complimentary Fall Preven- educate about fall preven- ence participation in a game Citizens Center in Crawford-
tion program for seniors, a tion and reducing the risk show format. ville, 33 Michael Drive.


The Sea Searchers get a close-up view of a sea urchin
with Dr. Kevin Craig.


I














Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008



Comment & Opinon

Established in Wakulla County in 1895



Harvey is compassionate and professional


Editor, The Newss
I am a retired law enforcement
officer, administrator and trainer
of more than 40 years, and Wakulla
County is my home. Throughout
my career, I became associated
with many Florida sheriffs as well
as other state and local law enforce-
ment officers and agencies. Since I
have so many friends and associates
in the law enforcement arena, I was
reluctant to get too involved until I
heard Commissioner Kessler's scath-
ing public attacks on Sheriff Harvey.
Sheriff Harvey, a compassionate man


of integrity, has honorably served
and protected the citizens of our
county for 30 years.
I have heard the commissioner
previously refer to the Sheriff's
Office as "a cookie monster" and
simply chalked it off to his obvious
lack of understanding of the role of
the profession of law enforcement
in a modern society. I now realize
that not only was I correct about this
lack of knowledge, but also that his
attacks against our sheriff are of a
far more personal nature and that he
is trying to lead a charge, to unseat


the "Dean of Florida's Sheriffs."
In July, I was asked to speak at the
Florida Sheriff's Summer Conference
in Orlando. This is a semi-annual
two or three day "training session"
for the 67 Florida sheriffs to keep
them current on the latest trends
and issues in law enforcement and
Homeland Security. As a Wakulla
County resident, I swelled with pride
to witness first-hand the genuine
professional respect and admira-
tion shown to Sheriff David Harvey
by his law enforcement peers.
As a "professional," I can as-


sure everyone that the best law
enforcement administrator is one
with "experience and compassion,"
and Wakulla Countians are truly
blessed to have Florida's most ex-
perienced sheriff, David Harvey, to
"serve and protect" them,
As a final comment, I want to
'say that, if Commissioner Kessler
thinks that the sheriff's budget will
decrease under a law enforcement
agency that is unionized, he will
have a rude awakening. It is a proven
fact that law enforcement budgets
and expenses are higher in union-


ized agencies such as TPD, FWC and
FHP. It is also a fact that officers who
work for "unionized" agencies typi-
cally use less "understanding and
discretion" in dealings with local
citizens who might otherwise get
a "warning" for a minor infrac-
tion from a deputy who answers to
an experienced, compassionate sher-
iff. If Commissioner Kessler gets his
way, the local folks lose, and the big
city union bosses win. It is they who
are supporting the opposition.
Major Alan Lamarche (Retired)
Shell Point


Harvey is a full-time sheriff who cares Mulligan would serve


Editor, The News:
My name is Windy Jones
and I am a Physical Educa-
tion teacher at Wakulla High
School and I am also David
Harvey's niece. After reading
the last five editions of The
Wakulla News I felt obligated
to share my thoughts on my
uncle and the Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office.
As an educator, I take of-
fense to the criticism the
Sheriff's Office is receiving
in reference to the proactivity
with the youth of our county.
Briefly I will list some of the
services I have seen first-hand
from our School Resource Of-
ficers.
Deputy Billy Jones com-
pleted an instructor's course
for the Sheriffs Youth Ranch
Teenage Driving Challenge.
Wakulla has had several stu-
dents go to Pat Thomas Law
Academy and participate in


this challenge. Our School
Resource Officers mentor
students on a daily basis.
Each of these SROs had to at-
tend basic SRO school where
they were trained to mentor,
counsel, and work with our
youth.
The Wakulla County Sher-
iff's Office has a program
called SAVE, which stands
for Substance Abuse Violence
Education. With this pro-
gram all elementary school
students participate and are
prepared for the challenges of
middle school. Our Sheriff's
Office does something called
static displays. This is where
the deputies put on K-9 dem-
onstrations, SWAT demonstra-
tions, Boater Safety courses,
etc. Wakulla High Criminal
Justice students were able to
go the firing range and learn
about gun safety. School Re-
source Officers work with


the guidance counselors on a
daily basis. They speak with
classes on all sorts of issues
facing our youth today. Our
Sheriff's Office is without a
doubt working to help prepare
the youth of this county to
make good choices.
David Harvey has commit-
ted more than 30 years of his
life to serving the citizens of
Wakulla County. He is not only
our sheriff, he is our friend.
Recently I lost my father to
cancer. Uncle David was by
my family's side from the
time my dad was diagnosed
until the time he took his last
breath. How many times has
he been there for your fam-
ily? How many times has he
helped your family through
tough times? Urge the people
of Wakulla County to vote for
someone who is compassion-
ate about all of the citizens of
this fine county. I am sick of


'reading the negative letters
about the sheriff. I have lived
here my entire life and I am
proud of my sheriff and what
he stands for.
My father, Houston Taff,
can't cast his vote for David
Harvey this year, but he would
urge you to do the right thing
and vote for someone who
cares about Wakulla County.
Vote for experience, com-
mitment, dedication, loyalty
and compassion. Sheriff Da
vid Harvey is a proven leader
who has dedicated his adult
life to serving the citizens of
Wakulla County. Let's also
remember, you don't get the
title Dean of Florida's Sher
iffs without being a full-time
sheriff. David Harvey is a full
time sheriff and the State of
Florida's Sheriffs Association
has acknowledged this.
Windy Taff
Crawfordville


Stokley should be next commissioner


.Editor, The News:
At a time when honesty is
of short supply in our country,
I would like to tell the people
of Wakulla County about
. Jimmy Stokley, our candidate
-..for county commissioner Dis-,
i.n.cf 5. I have known him


since the day he was born.
His parents lived next door to
us. Times were tough as they
raised their family, but with
hard work and a lot of love
Bill and Mary taught Jimmy
the value of honesty. As I
saw iim grow up, I could see


a personality emerging that
showed he cared for others.
He became a husband and
father who loved his family
very much. He took care of his
home and community in ways
that would make this county
a better place to live.


Jimmy has never promised
me anything he did not fulfill
I believe I can depend upon
him to make decisions thai
will make us all proud to be a
parr tf,Wakulla County.
John and Norma Whiddon
Crawfordville


Vote no to question of Home Rule


Editor, The News:
Charter governments have
been established in a few coun-
ties' in the State of Florida. My
county, Columbia, is one of
thos counties. To the best of
my knowledge, Columbia is the
smallest county to adopt this.
form of government
I was appointed to our origi-
nal Charter Commission. What
happened within our commu-
nity was a small group of people
thought that Charter govern-
ment was the way to operate our
County government, thus the
commission was formed,
I would say that 90 percent
of my county had no idea what
charter government was, and
would further venture to say
that that same percentage is
still unaware of the far reaching
effects of charter government
today. Our charter brought no
significant change to our county
government It did bring change,


but that change was a split be-
tween friends and families.
There are some things that
only charter government can
bririg to your county, and some
of those things are not good
for you. For some offices it can
take away your right as a voter,
your voice in your community,
your right to freely choose the
candidate of your choice.
It takes power away from
your elected county commis-
sioner and places it in the hands
of an unelected county manager,
This means when you want to
complain about services you are
not getting you cat't go to the
person you elected, you must go
to the county manager.
Charter government might
work well in very large counties
if that form of government is set
up and planned well, but smaller
counties will experience short-
falls, services will begin to fade,
control will be shifted to one


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person, the voice of the voter
essentially will not be heard.
I don't live in your county and
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Editor, The Newss
I am not an economist, just a retiree with my wife trying
to live out our savings. It looked pretty good for us until
recently.
Now with the financial collapse, we may even have to go
to work, probably as a Wal-Mart greeter because of no recent
work experience, unless something is done to turn the crisis
around.
Of course I do not know what the solution is, but I do know
that the people in Congress are the last one's who need to
f get involved.
Congress is exactly the cause of this crisis as Henry Paul-
son (Treasury Secretary) said in his testimony to the Senate
last week.
For years Congress has been pressing the financial institu-
tions to grant home loans to people for the purchase of homes
f that more than likely they would not be able to repay. So now
these same congressmen have voted on a $700 billion bail out
plan for these institutions to buy these defaulted loans with
federal tax money (actually borrowed money).
I hear Congressman Frank and Senator Dodd demanding
that Congress must have oversight of the bailout of these
institutions.
I wonder where the oversight was during the build up to
this crisis and who thinks that it will be any better in the fu-
ture. Maybe it was because Senator Dodd is the largest receiver
Sof campaign contributions from Freddie and Fannie.
This election year we should replace all congressmen who
t supported this $700 billion bailout, this includes Congressman
Allen Boyd of the Second District. Mark Mulligan is running
against him. He is against this Wall Street bailout, and he
has my vote.
Geno Tetreault
Tallahassee


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008 Page 3B


Cash is the best choice for supervisor of elections


Editor, The News:
Wakulla County has many candi-
dates running for office who seem to
be qualified and true to their convic-
tions. However, one who stands out
above the others is one I have had
the pleasure of knowing and working
with on many occasions, Traci Cash.
Traci was born and raised in
Wakulla County, went to college to


become a CPA, and chose to remain
in Wakulla County to begin a success-
ful career and raise a family. She is
dedicated, involved, and generous.
Traci Cash has worked in the school
system as a volunteer for as long as
I have known her.
She has generously given her time,
her resources, and her knowledge
over and over again. She was a large


part of the first middle school PTO
in our county and still serves as trea-
surer for Wakulla Middle even though
her children have been in high school
for several years. She has participated
with fundraisers, charity events, and
community functions. Traci has been
relentless with her support to the
community of Wakulla County.
She not only has a successful ca-


reer and stays actively involved, she
has a husband and two children who
all require devotion and commitment.
She has managed her family, her busi-
ness, her community involvement,
and her friendships with success in
all areas. Traci Cash is a person who
has shown commitment to Wakulla
County for many, many years. Luck-
ily, we have the privilege of having


her run for supervisor of elections
and being the best choice for the
position. Traci has my vote and my
gratitude for all that she has done
for our community. I could never ask
for a more honest, kind, and giving
person than Traci. I commend her
and recommend her.
Angie Walker
Crawfordville


It's a privilege working for Miller


Johnson has


Editor, The News:
I have had the privilege,
every day for the past 28
years, of working with the
students, teachers, staff, and
administrators of the Wakulla
County School System. What
an exciting place to be an
educator and feel supported
in making a difference in a
child's life. This support is
what Superintendent David
Miller is all about.
An important way he sup-
ports education in Wakulla
County is to advocate-for us
throughout the state. He has
made Wakulla a forerunner in
education. Other districts call
us on a regular basis to tour
our schools, find out about our


programs, and ask us how we
sustain such high academic
achievement year after year.
A few specifics I attribute to
him include:
Encouraging the expan-
sion of Advanced Placement
and Dual Enrollment courses
for college credit. AP classes
have grown from one to 10 of-
ferings under his leadership.
Instigating a partnership
with the College Board for
our middle schools and high
school to receive ongoing
support for minorities and
underrepresented students
to foster a culture of making
college a reality.
Hosting Florida's Com-
missioner of Education to


come and listen to Wakulla
High School students and
then advocating for the high
school grading system state-
wide to include more than
FCAT scores. As a strong state
leader, Superintendent Miller
was instrumental in chang-
ing the high school grading
policy starting in 2009-2010
to include graduation rate,
college entrance exam scores,
Advanced Placement courses,
and Ready-To-Work creden-
tials. Only 50 percent of the
grade will come from FCAT
scores.
Forging new and relevant
21st century Career and Tech-
nical Education (vocational)
programs to prepare students


for high-skill, high wage, high
demand jobs.
I have seen first-hand an
educator who has never asked
any of us to work harder than
he is willing to work himself.
He is the first to arrive and
the last to leave every day. I
am proud of the "A" school
district we are and the in-
numerable ways in which we
constantly strive to improve.
Our school district does not
stay an "A" by resting on its
laurels, but by preparing for
the future under the proven
leadership of Superintendent
David Miller.
Beth O'Donnell
Assistant Superintendent
for Instruction
Crawfordville


We are proud to support David Miller


Editor, The News:
As lifelong educators we
have more than 70 years of
combined service to the stu-
dents of Wakulla County, and
have served four different
superintendents. During this
time we have had the privilege
of working with David Miller
as fellow teachers, coaches,
club sponsors, assistant prin-
cipals, principals and finally as
district administrators work-
ing directly under Mr. Miller's
supervision.
When we first started work-
ing for the Wakulla County
School Board, one of the
most frequently asked ques-
tions was "Where is Wakulla
County?" Now, under the
leadership of David Miller, the
most frequent comment is
-j They have great schools." The
school district did not earn
this reputation by chance, but
largely through the leadership
of David Miller.
David Miller truly lives by
the district motto, "Commit-
ted to Success." He expects no
less from himself or his staff.
He has dedicated his entire
adult life to the education
of the children and youth of
Wakulla County. He has the
personality and great ability
to motivate and to make all
employees feel as if they are
part of a wonderful, successful
team. And under his coach-
Sing, they are. David is fiercely
loyal to the students, faculties,
staffs and administrators of
the school system. He takes
every accomplishment, victory
and even defeat very person-


ally. That's because he cares
so much about the welfare of
our students and the entire
school system. If you know
David, and very many of you
do, you know these things to
be true. We have been greatly
disappointed by the personal
attacks on Mr. Miller by his
opponent's supporters, but as
former social studies teachers
we understand the negative
side of politics.
Aside from his personal
characteristics, David Miller
is an extremely qualified,
sharp professional who sets
high standards and constantly
challenges his fellow admin-
istrators, teachers and staff
members to find new and
better ways to do things. Our
school district is blessed with
the most dedicated, qualified
and high performing instruc-
tional and non-instructional
staffs in the state. Even so,
Mr. Miller continually sup-
ports each person's efforts to
improve his or her knowledge
and skills.
Above all, David Miller has
consistently demonstrated his
ability both to predict and to
satisfy the future needs of the
school district. This ability has
been proven many times in
the areas of school facilities,
technology, curriculum and
instruction, school safety,
and human resource develop-
ment. Students at each grade
level are offered innovative
and challenging academic,
vocational and special area
programs that are limited
only by budget realities aid


the need to follow state and
federal requirements.
It takes keen foresight and
great leadership to meet the
ever changing financial needs
of the school district and at
the same time maintain its
fiscal integrity. It is this fiscal
integrity that has allowed our
district to weather financial
storms without having to re-
sort to large employee layoffs
as other districts have.
Experience and supervi-
sory skills count. During the
last 13 years. Mr. Miller has
led a school district of nearly
5,000 students, more than 600
employees and nine school
sites that enjoy a reputation
of being one of the best in
the state. On the other hand,
his opponent's most recent
school leadership role is listed
as co-founder, directors and
principal of COASTtCharter
School, a K-8 school with
never more than 150 students
that is currently busing in 48
percent of its students from
Leon County.
David Miller is an educa-
tional leader who looks to
the future. He is a facilitator
of change who has helped
us grow to be better than we
already were when he became
superintendent. Under his
leadership the school system
will continue to grow, and
Wakulla County youth will
be well prepared for future
success.
On a recently released
DVD, a former Wakulla Middle
School teacher would have
you believe that it was Mr.


Miller's opponent's participa-
tion in the planning of Wakul-
la Middle School that made it
a model middle school. There
is a great deal of difference
between planning a program
and implementing a program.
Wakulla Middle School was
not an overnight sensation.
The recognition that it earned
was due to the leadership of
the first principal, Roger Stok-
ley. Mr. Stokley assembled
an excellent faculty and staff
and created a positive environ-
ment where elementary and
secondary teachers worked
cooperatively to create and
enhance Wakulla County's
version of the middle school
concept. The first year that
WMS was fully functioning
with sixth, seventh and eighth
graders was the 1981-82 school
year. Mr. Miller's opponent
resigned from the Wakulla
County School System in 1981
and did not return to our sys-
tem until 1991. The teacher
featured in the DVD came to
work at WMS in 1988. I (Bob)
worked at WMS from 1980
to 1997.
We will be proud to cast
our votes for David Miller onr
Nov. 4.
Bob and Judy Myhre
Crawfordville


helped turn page


Editor, The News:
My name is Larry C. I live
in Crawfordville and I want
to share with the community
that today I am clean for one
year. This is the first time in
15 years of using drugs and
alcohol that I can say that
and my family and I owe this
to the hidden and unappreci-
ated gift of having Joanna
Johnson and her skills in this
community.
I was ordered by the court
to attend her program and I
resented it for a while until
one day it clicked and I real-
ized I could do this and I could
live a clean and sober life. I
attend AA now and my family
and I are so grateful for this
extraordinary woman and the
small program hidden away
here in Crawfordville.
I had attended four previ-
ous programs and I never ex-
pected that in my hometown
would be the most effective
12 step program that help me
change my life and most im-
portantly the way I think and
make decisions.
It really bothers me that
this community does not
recognize the contribution
she makes to all of us. Our
families and community ben-
efit every day from the con-
tribution she makes and her
passion about recovery.
It was dear from my dad


in court that she fights an
uphill battle with the State
Attorney's office. They do
not support her or her pas-
sion for treatment and that's
a real failure in our system.
The Assistant State Attorney
wants everyone who drinks or
uses drugs to go to prison. He
never sees treatment as an op-
tion which only benefits each
of us and saves the taxpayers
the cost of incarceration. I was
one of the lucky ones who
got the chance to go into her
program.
If someone ever needed to
have this community's respect
and gratitude it is Mrs. John-
son. So let me be the first to
publicly say thank you, you
change lives.
It is my one year sobriety
birthday and I want to share
this with her. Thank you from
Larry, Barbara and Beckie.
Larry C.
Crawfordville
(Last name on file)


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Artz will work hard on the board


SEditor, The News:
Wakulla County residents
Please know that Lynn Artz is
,an interested, knowledgeable,
'caring, hardworking person who
is running for our county com-
mission. We have had an oppor-
tiiity to know Lynn through the
efforts of'the Wakulla Heritage
Project (a part of the Wakulla His-
torical Society) and most specifi-
cally the efforts to save the Linzy
House originally located on
the Wal-Mart property. Besides
participating in our meetings
by providing good suggestions
and volunteering for various
tasks, Lynn physically assisted
in the "take apart to save and re-
Smove" the Linzy House. We had
dedicated volunteers and Lynn
worked as hard as the physically
fit men to take apart and load
the house lumber on trailers. Jim
and I believe she will bring the

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008



National Busiqess WonZeq s Week


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
This week The Wakulla News and Wakulla
Professional & Business Women's Assoc. is
honoring female members of the Wakulla
County business community as part of Na-
tional Business Women's Week, which runs
from' Oct. 20 through Oct. 24.
President Herbert Hoover first recognized
the work of women in 1928. We are happy
to recognize, celebrate and acknowledge
the accomplishments of working women in
Wakulla and everywhere.
The women who have been recognized
were submitted by their friends or family.
We have five women working at The
Wakulla News who deserve to be recog-
nized.
STammie Barfield is our general manager.
In her position, she keeps an eye on the bot-
tom line and works with the corporate office
to make sure the newspaper is operating
in the black. She also helps me implement
ideas for the editorial/news portion of the


Lynda Kinsey is our advertising repre-
sentative and provides photographs from
some of the events we cover. In her posi-
tion she helps clients reach their customers
through effective advertising planning. Her
photographs provide us a perspective that
only Lynda can provide.
Sherry Balchuck serves the newspaper
as our bookkeeper. She makes sure all of
the necessary paperwork is completed and
handles requests from our corporate office
in Kentucky.
Denise Folh serves as our classified
and legal notice advertising representative.
Denise has direct contact with many of the
walk-in and telephone customers and is bi-
lingual, something that comes in handy with
out-of-town advertisers in South Florida.
Karen Tully (not pictured) serves as our
copy editor. She has worked with the news-
paper as a graphic artist and, as a Wakulla
County native, has a wonderful recollection
of names and stories about our history.
We salute the women on our staff and all
the women in business in Wakulla County.


operation.
,' ,., ,.
?., ; ,


Leading the Campground


Salutint WYakUtlta

OutstandiMng omen

Bringing you The News


Jasmine's leadership, her idea, and her art work
along with a supportive group effort. In spite of
her youthful age, she mothers many campers
who visit Holiday Campground extending her
love and concern.
In addition to the campers, Jasmine is well
known in Wakulla County and holds the reputa-
tion of love of friends and family, being a good
wife, a good mother and a smart hard worker
who excels in everything she does. Yes, Jasmine
Noelani Tucker McMillan Is a Wakulla County
woman who means business. Good business.
Submitted by Jean B. McMillan


Wakulla County is very fortunate to have
Jasmine Noelani Tucker McMillan as one of its
business leaders. Jasmine relocated to Wakulla
County in 1988 and graduated from Wakulla
High School. At age 17, she commenced employ-
ment with various medical offices rising through
the ranks to serve as billing administrator for
Tallahassee Primary Care Associates for four
years and Pathology Associates in Tallahassee
for three years.
Jasmine is married to Derek Finley McMillan
and is a mother to three, Finley Tucker, Lily No-
elani, and Brett Derek. Jasmine enjoys spending
time with her family and children. She enjoys be-
ing outdoors especially at the beach, swimming,
exercising and fishing. Jasmine embraces life.
In September 2003, Jasmine took on the role
of manager of Holiday Park & Campground in
Ochlockonee Bay. She brought years of office
experience and skills. During her five years
at the campground Jasmine has created much
fun and frivolity for the campers by promot-
ing special events, establishing holiday events
including fireworks for the 4th of July, Memorial
Day and New Year's Eve, catering luaus, and
establishing the campground as a fun place for
daily, weekly, and monthly campers as well as
camping group rallies. When Jasmine entered
Holiday Park and Campground in the Blue Crab
Festival Parade the campground float won first
place. This accomplishment was the result of


SClockvdie ibmI T.hiii Tie Bffild,'Sherry Balchick, Lynda Kinsey and Denise Folh.


Dedicated Bank Professional


Ca pital City Bank Wakulla President
Amy Geiger is dedicated to all she does,
professionally and personally.
She has a husband, Sam, and two boys,
Brandon and Austin. She is the most
dedicated individual I have ever seen.
She is loyal to the Red, White and Blue.
She is an active volunteer in the commu-
nity and has been working two offices of
the bank since March of this year.
Her attitude is always positive and ,'
I've'never seen her have a bad day. If i S B.
she can't put her all into something i
she doesn't 'feel like it has been done
to the fullest. She wants to help any-
one who comes her way, whether that
means staying late or meeting them on
the weekend, she puts people first. It
:isa true privilege to know her. Anyone
who knows Amy knows she is one of
Wakulla's best Women in Business.
Submitted by Kathy Crosby Capital City Bank's Amy Geiger



W/4e have many wonderful and

productive women in our community.

Congratulations to you all.

-Jenny rock
Jenny Brock:
First female chair of the Board of Directors of the Florida Wildlife Federation
:. Past Chair of Math Dept Leon High School.
Chairperson Florida Wildlife alert committee Member
Florida Directors National Wildlife Federation.
Poli.ilical AJdernisemen paid for arid approved b .lenini Brock.
No Pnirt \lialijon, for \%altkIla Count, Comm vision. Dilrici I
V % Ar 4.--RWV ,y 77:~-.- 'U ,


SLook for my campaign DVD in your mailbox soon
or see my website at www.voteandreacarter.com
Contact me: voteandrea@gmail.com
Campaign HO: 3047 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 926-1111
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Dr. Andrea Carter, Republican for Superintendent of Schools


Celebrate
National Business
Women's Week
Oct. 20 24


Special Discount
Celebrating
Wakulla Women
7 in Business


and


Wakulla


"Read All
About It"


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008 Page 5S


Nafioqal Busiqess Wonleq's Week


Salutin WOaktulla'

Outstanding Women


Keeping Wakulla fit and trim


Jennifer Barbarino


I am writing this letter to
submit Jennifer Barbarino's
name for my favorite "Woman
Who Means Business in Wakul-
la County." Jenny is not only
a professional Pharmaceutical
Sales Representative working
with Wyeth Pharmaceuticals
in Wakulla County and the
surrounding areas, but is also
owner of Anytime Fitness of
Crawfordville, a 24-hour co-ed
fitness center serving Wakulla
County residents.
On top of all this, Jenny is a
nationally recognized certified
strength, fitness, and nutrition
professional helping people of
Wakulla County achieve their


goals through administering
personal fitness, wellness, and
nutrition programs.
When Jenny is not working,
she is raising two young boys
ages three and five months.
Jenny graduated from Flor-
ida State University with a
Bachelor's degree in Recre-
ation, Leisure Services and
Fitness Administration, while
also competing as a scholar-
ship athlete on the Florida
State women's swimming
team. She also holds a Master's
degree in Sports Management
from Auburn University.
Submitted by
Russell Barbarino


Giving back

to her Community
I am grateful for this opportunity to share with you
the many reasons why I admire my mother, Linda
Boles. As most of you know, Linda and her
husband, Ray Boles own Rascal Auto Sales in
Crawfordville, which they opened in 1985.
She has also devoted numerous hours
of hard work to help many people
in Wakulla County. She has been a
leader in our community through the
years as an active member of Habitat
for Humanity, Professional Busi-
ness Women's Association, Keep
Wakulla County Beautiful. United
Way of the Big Bend, and Wakulla
County Senior Citizens
Linda Boles is truly the most
wonderful woman I know. She
taught me the importance of
honesty, self-respect, optimism,
and forgiveness. She has been my
teacher, my advisor, and my best
friend throughout life. She is truly
the most caring and nurturing person
and with this has instilled in me the
value of enduring commitment to our
family. Her positive influence has inspired
me to be the very best I can be. I am so proud
to be her daughter.
Submitted by Amy Weaver
Linda Boles




Election has critical women's issues

Get-Out-the-Vote for National Business Women's Week 20081 Make sure women are at
the polls on Election Dayl
According to Business and Professional Women/USA, policies of the leadership voted
in November's national election will be critical to working women and families. With life-
changing decisions such as health care, education, pay equity and financial security at stake,
we must educate women and get them (and their networks and families) to the polls in
November.
Women are key in this year's historic election. BPW/USA urges everyone to educate their
local representatives on the issues that are important to women They encourage women to
vote early and make sure their friends, neighbors and relatives vote in November.
The objectives of National Business Women's Week@ (NBWW) are:
To promote full participation and equity for women in the workplace;
To publicize the achievements of business and professional women on the local, state
and national level;
To publicize the objectives and programs of BPW/USA as they relate to, the millions of
business and professional women across the country.


I would like to recognize Jackie Lawhon as one
of Wakulla County's most admired Women in
Business. She has served as the Clerk of the City
of Sopchoppy since her appointment to the posi-
tion in 1979. Her responsibilities as clerk extend
into areas that include duties associated with city
administrator, finance director, planner and city
ambassador. Overseeing the budget and financ-
ing of the city, public records management, and
handling zoning and citizen requests are all a part
of her daily responsibilities.
She serves as cerk to the city commission and
is responsible for the agendas and minutes along
with a myriad of other duties.
Acting on behalf of the commission, she rep-
resents the board on many committees including
the Wakulla County Citizen's Advisory Commit-
tee for Infrastructure Development, the Wakulla
County Mitigation Committee, the Wakulla County
Emergency Management Committee and the Cor-
ridor Management Entity (CME) of the Big Bend
Scenic Byway.
Professionally, Lawhon demonstrates the judg-
ment, initiative and integrity befitting a public ser-
vant She is committed to performing her respon-
sibilities with a high standard of professionalism
and caring. In January 2008, she earned the pres-
tigious Master Municipal Clerk certification from
the International Institute of Municipal Clerks.
With a membership exceeding 10,000, Lawhon
was only the 576th derk to earn this designation.
She was nominated for the 2008 Florida Clerk of
the Year Award sponsored by the Florida Cities of
Excellence Awards Program. She was one of the
five finalists. She is a member of the International
Institute of Municipal Clerks and the Florida As-
sociation of City Clerks (FACC). She was installed
in June as the Second Vice President of FACC after
having served two years as the Director from the


One of Wakulla County's most distin-
guished women in business is Susan Payne
Turner. Susan started working at Wakulla
Bank when she was sixteen years old while
attending high school. She continued to
work part-time as a Loan Department As-
sistant while attending TCC and FSU. She
then graduated with a Bachelor of Science
in 1989 and was offered a position at the
bank as Community Relations Officer. This
position brought her great satisfaction, as it
enabled her to "give back" to the commu-
nity. She continued to stay very involved in
many community activities. Over the years,
Susan continued to expand her knowledge
base, and was promoted to Vice President-
CFO. In 1998 she completed studies from
the Graduate School of Banking at LSU and
in 2005 she received her Masters in Business
Administration.
Susan Payne Turner is a lifelong resident
of Wakulla County. Her childhood was very
family-centered with God at the core. She was
brought up to live by the proverb, "Do unto
others as you would have them do unto you".
Susan's parents instilled a strong disciplinary
foundation that molded her into the person
she is today. She values these lessons and
feels that they contributed to her strong sense
of work ethics. Susan is married to Chuck
and has one son. She is very family oriented
and enjoys family get-togethers and spending
her spare time relaxing as a family unit.
Susan's community service and commit-
tee work include having been President and
serving on the board for many organiza-


Clerk Jackie Lawhon
Northwest District In addition, she serves on the
Board of Directors of Wakulla Professional and
Business Women as the immediate past president
She is an active member of the Medart School
Advisory Committee. In addition, she was trained
as a first responder in 1995 and is still serving the
community in that capacity.
Bornand raised in Wakulla County, she is proud
to share that her grandchildren are the seventh
generation to live on their land in Sopchoppy.
Even though Jackie has been a devoted employee
to the City of Sopchoppy for 29 years, her faith
and family are first in her life. She and husband,
Wayne, are happy and feel blessed that they are
able to live surrounded by their parents, three
sons and grandchildren. Actively serving in the
Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church, Jackie also
teaches children and sings in the choir.
Submitted by Linda Boles


ausan rayne turner
tions. In the past Susan has been President
of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce,
Wakulla Professional & Business Women's
Association, Optimist Club and was also
Treasurer of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful.
Susan is currently a member of the Wakulla
County Chamber of Commerce, Coastal
Optimist Club, Wakulla County Youth fair
Association and Keep Wakulla County Beau-
tiful She is on the Board for United Way of
the Big Bend Wakulla County, Wakulla County
Senior Citizens Council Wakulla Professional
& Business Women's Association and TCC
Foundation.
Submitted by Linda Boles


SThe Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce
will host a


for individuals seeking office during the Nov. 4 General Election.
The event will be open to the public

Thursday, Oct. 23, from 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
at the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center,
33 Michael Drive in Crawfordville.
'This community forum will provide an opportunity for our
cdtiens to come see hear and meet the more than 17 candidates
for seven public offices in our county" said David Buckridge.
S | President of the Wakulla Chamber of commerce._


Positions and Their Candidates Include
Individuals running for office in the General Election will be joined
by the winners of the Aug. 26 primary.
Supervisor of Superintendent
Elections of Schools
raci Cash, Doug Jones, Dr. Andrea Carter
Langston, Charles Prout David Miller


d Buddy Wells.
Sheriff VOTE Property Appraiser
Charlie Creel Anne Ahrendt
David Harvey Donnie Sparkman
County Commission Seats


Y


an


district I District 3 District j
Ian Brock Jimmie Doyle Lynn Artz
nny Brock Mike Stewart Jim Stokle:
'These elections will help guide the future of
our county or years to come." sald Buckridge. "Its
Important that people know who they aw voting for."

The event will e jointly hosted by
A-=-


Tbe ~lakulla et sl is a promotional sponsor of the event.
For more information, call the chamber office at 926-1848.


Serving Sopchoppy


Lifelong banking and

community service


Crawfordville Pet Pals, LLC
Loving care for your pets in your home

850-519-3095


Licensed & Insured


'


Tt
Scott


CIio d?




!BuciM O






926-8245 3042 Crawfordville Hwy.
Crawfordville, FL
www.francielowe.com


D
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Jet


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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008


Deadline


2-onday

11:00 A.MCLA S9[I[D

926-7102


35 Cent&

Per Word



AD 5 $8.00.
Minimum


Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


CATEGORIES
100 EMPLOYMENT
105 Business Opportunities
110 Help Wanted
111 Medical/Dental Help Wanted
112 Office/Administrative Help Wanted
113 Construction Help Wanted
114 Miscellaneous Help Wanted
115 Work Wanted
120 Services and Businesses
125 Schools and Instruction
130 Entertainment
200 ITEMS FOR SALE
205 Antiques
210 Auctions r
215 Auto Parts ard Accessories
220 Cars
225 Trucks
230 Motor Homes and Campers
235 Motorcycles and 4-Wheelers
240 Boats and Motors .i
245 Personal Watercraft .. I
250 Sporting Goods E-u- -e
255 Guns
260 Business Equipment


265 Computers and Internet
270 Electronics
275 Home Furnishings
280 Home Appliances
285 Jewelry
290 Musical Instruments
295 Building Materials
300 MISC. FOR SALE
305 Machinery, Tools & Equipment
310 Firewood Products
315 Farm & Garden Equipment
320 Farm Products & Produce
325 Horses
330 Livestock, Farm Animals
335 Pets
340 Plants
345 Swap, Barter, Trade
350 Wanted to Buy 6s
355 Yard Sales
400 NOTICES
410 Free Items
415 Announcements
420 Card of Thanks
425 Occasion Cards
430 In Memoriam
435 Lost and Found


440 Personals and Notices
500 REAL ESTATE, HOMES, MOBILES
505 Acreage for Lease
510 Acreage for Sale
515 Apartments for Rent
520 Townhouses for Rent
525 Townhouses for Sale
530 Commercial Property for Rent
535 Commercial Property for Sale
540 Farms for Sale
545 Homes for Sale
550 Homes with Acreage for Sale
555 Houses for Rent
560 Land for Sale
565 Mobile Homes for Rent
570 Mobile Homes for Sale
) 575 Mobile Homes with Land for Sale
S 580 Rooms for Rent/Roommates Wanted
585 Wanted to Rent
L 590 Waterfront Homes/Land for Sale
595 Vacation Rental
600 Open House



CALL 926-7102 TODAY
Email: classifieds@thewakullanews.net


Legal Notice


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 08-188-FC
CU MEMBERS MORTGAGE, A DIVISION OF
COLONIAL SAVINGS, F.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DAVID A. MARTINDALE II; THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF DAVID A. MARTINDALE II;
STACIE MARIE LYNCH F/K/A STACIE M.
MARTINDALE; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF STACIE MARIE LYNCH F/K/A STACIE M.
MARTINDALE; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFEN-
DANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DE-
CEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGN-
EES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUS.
TEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST
THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN
TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendantss.


NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DAVID A. MARTINDALE II; THE UN-
SKNOWN SPOUSE OF DAVID A. MARTIN-
DALE 1I; STACIE MARIE LYNCH F/K/A STA-
CIE M. MARTINDALE; THE UNKNOWN
ESPOUSE OF STACIE MARIE LYNCH F/K/A
STACIE M. MARTINDALE; IF LIVING, IN-
CLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED, AND
IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UN-
KNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND
TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS;
Whose residence are/is unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY required to file your an-
swer or written defenses, if any, in the above
proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to
serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiff's attor-
ney, Law Ofices of Daniel C. Consuegra,
9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL
33169-1328, telephone (813) 915-8660, fac-
simile (813) 915-0559, by November 22, 2008,
the nature of this proceeding being a suit for
foreclosure of mortgage against the following
described property, to wit:
LOT 1, BLOCK A, CRESTWOOD, ACCORD-
ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 57, OF
THE -PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A
.78 PINEWOOD STREET
CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327
If you fail to file your answer or written de-
fenses In the above proceeding, on plaintiff's
attorney, a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the Complaint or
Petition.
Dated at WAKULLA County this 15th day of
SOctober, 2008.
S' .: BRENTX. THURMOND
,, ...CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
In accordance with the American with Disabili-
ties Act of 1990, persons needing a special
Accommodation to participate in this proceed-
ing should contact the ASA Coordinator no
later than seven (7) days prior to the proceed-
ings. If hearing impaired, please call (800)
: 955-9771 (TDO) or (800) 955-8770 (voice), via.
Florida Relay Service
October 23, 30, 2008


WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
Professional Planning & Engineering
Consultant Services
Request for Qualifications
Advertisement Number: 2008-017
Advertisement Begin DateTime:
October 15, 2008 at 5:00 P.M.

Board Decisions will be available at:
3093 Crawfordville Highway
Talahassee, FL 32327
Responses will be opened at the above ad-
dress at 2:00 p.m. on November 7, 2008.
Please direct all questions to:
Deborah DuBose
Phone: 850.926.9500
FAX: 850.926.9006
Se-mail: ddubose@mywakulla.com
RFO specifications can be found at www.my-
wakulla.com In the County Bid section.
Any person with a qualified disability requiring
special accommodations at the bid opening
shell contact purchasing at the phone number
listed above at least 5 business days prior to
the event. If you are hearing or speech im-
paired, please contact this office by using the
Florida Relay Services which can be reached
at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD).
The Board of County Commissioners reserves
the right to reject any and all bids or accept
minor Irregularities in the best interest of Wa-
kulla County.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 2007-40-FC
DIVISION
HSBC BANK USA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.

ANTHONY STEWART, at al,
Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated
October 7, 2008 and entered in Case NO.
2007-40-FC of the Circuit Court of the SEC-
OND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA
County, Florida wherein HSBC BANK USA,
N.A., is the Plaintiff and ANTHONY
STEWART; JEANNIE STEWART: ACCRED-
ITED HOME LENDERS, INC. SUCCESSOR
BY MERGER TO AAMEES FUNDING COR-
PORATION; are the Defendants, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash at
FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the
13th day of November, 2008, the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment:
LOT 30 OF EASTGATE SUBDIVISION (UN-
RECORDED) AND BEING MORE PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT. -CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF
LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 30 MIN-
UTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE
NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 59 A DIS-
TANCE OF 2365.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES
52 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 1050.52
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
SAID EASTGATE SUBDIVISION; THENCE
ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID
EASTGATE SUBDIVISION RUN SOUTH 72
DEGREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS
WEST 1000.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF
WAY BOUNDARY OF A COUNTY ROAD
(GRIFFIN ROAD); THENCE ALONG SAID
RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY SOUTH 17 DE-
GREES 51 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST
466.75 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE A 50
FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT (MIDWAY
COURT); THENCE ALONG SAID CENTER-
LINE NORTH 72 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 45
SECONDS EAST 300.00 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM'SAID POINT
OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DE-
GREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST
100.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DE-
GREES 51 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST
155.59 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DE-
GREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST
100.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DE-
GREES 51 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST
155.59 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.
SUBJECT TO A 5 FOOT ROADWAY EASE-
MENT ALONG THE NORTHERN PORTION
OF SAID PROPERTY.
A/K/A 24 MIDWAY COURT, CRAWFORD-
VILLE, FL 32327
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNES9 MY HAND and the seal of this
Court on October 9, 2008.
BRENTX. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- BECKY WHALEY
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
October 16, 23, 2008

NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 83, PART IV
Notice Is given pursuant to Florida Self-Stor-
age Faciltiy Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83,
Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will
hold a sale by sealed bid on Friday, October
31, 2008, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville
Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse con-
taining personal property of:
Lisa Henning
Before the sale dale of Friday, October.31,
2008, the owners may redeem their property
by a payment of the outstanding balance and
cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville
Hwy.
October 16, 23, 2008

PUBLIC NOTICE
AT&T Is reviewing an existing 255' lattice wire-
less communication tower located at 169 Fire
Escape Rd, St Marks, FL 32355 for the pur-
pose of renewing its license with the FCC. If
you have any concerns of any historic proper-
ties that might be adversely affected by this
tower; please write to Doug Butler, Trileaf
Corp., 2700 Westhall Ln., Ste. 200, Maitland,
FL 32751, (407) 660-7840. Please Include the
tower location and the location of the historic
resource that you believe might be affected.
October 23, 30, November 6, 2008


NOTICE


Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Jeffrey
October 23, 2008 CraIg Praschak, please contact Claudia San-
toyo at 504-561-7798, 601 Poydras St. Suite
2490, NO LA 70130.
October 23, 30, November 6, 2008


NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION


Notice Is given pursuant to Section 328.17
Non-Judicial Sale of Vessels, that Lynr
Brother's Docks will hold a sale by sealed bid
on November 7, 2008 at 10:00 a.m. at 28
Lynn Circle, St. Marks, FL. 850-925-6083.
1984 Chris-Craft Commander 333
I.D. CCHDW105M84C-33
Reg.# FL3282DK
Owner Harold Warren


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL
JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2007-CA-000152
INDYMAC BANK F.S.B.
Plaintiff,


HARRY SPEAR A/K/A HARRY L. SPEAR;
KIMBERLY R. SPEAR; ANY AND ALL UN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY
THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS: JOHN
DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS IN POSSESSION
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated October 7, 2008 entered in Civil Case
No. 2007-CA-000152 of the Circuit Court of
the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA
County, Crawfordville, Florida, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at the Front
Door at the WAKULLA County Courthouse lo-
cated at 3056 Crawfordville Highway in Craw-
fordville. Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 13th day
of November, 2008 the following described
property as set forth in said Summary Final
Judgment, to-wit:
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF
LOT 20, BLOCK "H", WILDWOOD ACRES,
UNIT NUMBER 2 AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 78 OF THE OFFICIAL RE-
CORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE NORTH-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF JEAN DRIVE;
THENCE RUN NORTH 23 DEGREES 37
MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 215.70 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE
FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN
NORTH 66 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 00 SEC-
ONDS EAST 204.96 FEET TO A ROD AND
CAP; THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREE 37 MIN-
UTES 02 SECONDS WEST 817.75 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 29 MIN-
UTES 52 SECONDS EAST 291.52 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 04 MIN-
UTES 26 SECONDS WEST 987.75 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 76 DEGREES 33 MINUTES
04 SECONDS WEST 477.98 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 19 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 52 SEC-
ONDS EAST 128.50 FEET; THENCE SOUTH
18 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 08 SECONDS
WEST 197.46 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 14
DEGREES 54 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST
128.50 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 09 DE-
GREES 05 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST
106.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 29 DE-
GREES 05 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST
81.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES
54 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST 106.50
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 02 DEGREES 35
MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 142.00
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 54
MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST 211.50
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 18 DEGREES 54
MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST 112.00 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 62 DEGREES 23 MINUTES
02 SECONDS EAST 69.00 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 51 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 02 SEC-
ONDS EAST 178.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH
64 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 02 SECONDS
EAST 160.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 56 DE-
GREES 38 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST
74.84 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE
SOUTH 23 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 19 SEC-
ONDS EAST 365.73 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 20.56
ACROSS MORE OR LESS.
TOGETHER WITH A 20 FOOT WIDE AC-
CESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT BEING
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS:
BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF
LOT 20, BLOCK "H", WILDWOOD ACRES,
UNIT NUMBER 2 AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 78 OF THE OFFICIAL RE-
CORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON T HE NORTH-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF JEAN DRIVE;
THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGIN-
NING RUN NORTH 23 DEGREES 37 MIN-
UTES 19 SECONDS WEST 215.70 FEET TO
A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 66 DE-
GREES 15 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST
20.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES
37 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 215.70
FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE NORTH
RIGHT OF WAY OF JEAN DRIVE; THENCE
RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY SOUTH
66 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST 20.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING.
AND
BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT.
MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF
LOT 20, BLOCK "H", WILDWOOD ACRES,
UNIT NUMBER 2 AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 78 OF THE OFFICIAL RE-
CORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE NORTH-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF JEAN DRIVE;
THEN E FROM SAID POINT OF BEGIN-
NING RUN NORTH 23 DEGREES 37 MIN-
UTES 19 SECONDS WEST 215.70 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 66 DEGREES 15 MIN-
UTES 00 SECONDS EAST 204.96 FEET TO
A ROD AND CAP; THENCE SOUTH 23 DE-
GREES 37 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST
275.65 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 66 DE-
GREES 22 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST
60.00 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE
SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF JEAN
DRIVE, SAID POINT ALSO, MARKING THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 19, BLOCK
"C" OF SAID WILDWOOD ACRES UNIT
NUMBER 2; THENCE RUN NORTH 23 DE-
GREES 37 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST
59.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT
LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY OF JEAN DRIVE; 144.94 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 1.10
ACRES MORE OR LESS.
SUBJECT TO A 20 FOOT WIDE ACCESS
AND UTILITY EASEMENT BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS:
BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF
LOT 20, BLOCK "H", WILDWOOD ACRES,
UNIT NUMBER 2 AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 78 OF THE OFFICIAL RE-
CORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE NORTH-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF JOAN DRIVE;
THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGIN-
ING RUN NORTH 23 DEGREES 37 MIN-
UTES 19 SECONDS WEST 215.70 FEET TO
A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 66 DE-
GREES 15 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST
20.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES
37 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 215.70
FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE NORTH-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF JEAN DRIVE;
THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY
SOUTH 66 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 00 SEC-
ONDS WEST 20.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, If any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the lis pendens,


must file a claim within 60 days after the sale
Dated this 9 day of October. 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- BECKY WHALEY
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
October 16, 23,2008

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-000199
DIVISION:
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION,
AS TRUSTEE FOR FIRST FRANKLIN
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2006-FF12, MORTGAGE PASS
THROUGH CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2006-FF12,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CARLOS CAMPA A/K/A CARLOS F. CAMPA,
et al,
Defendantss.


NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DAPHNE LAURIE
LAST UNKNOWN ADDRESS:
36 ANNA DRIVE
CRAWFORDVILLE. FL 32327
CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFEN-
DANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following property In
WAKULLA County, Florida:
LOT 16, BLOCK B. AMELIAWOOD SUBDIVI-
SION, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO
THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses within 30 days after the first publica-
tion, if any, on Flonda Default Law Group,
P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address Is
9119 Corporate Lake Drive, Suite 300,
Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original
with this Court either before service on Plain-
tiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint or peti-
tion.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court on this 9th day of October, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- BECKY WHALEY
AS DEPUTY CLERK
S(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk'
of the Circuit Court)
October 16, 23, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 08-45-PR
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Emily Alyse Hardy,
Deceased

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Emily Alyse
Hardy, deceased, whose date of death was
April 12, 2008, and whose Social Security
Number Is 133-76-2920, Is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which Is Wakulla
County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordvllle Hwy.,
Crawfordvllle, FI 32327. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of this notice Is
required to be served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims with
this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL,
BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTAND-
ING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
: OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice Is
October 23, 2008.
Personal Representative:
Luann Dough
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Tracy P. Moye
Florida Bar No. 0782361
Moye Law Firm
P.O. Box 10313
Tallahassee, FL 32302
Telephone: (850) 224-6693
October 23, 30, 2008


October 23, 30, 2008 vs.


NORTHWEST FLORIDA WATER
MANAGEMENT DISTRICT GIVES
NOTICE OF PROPOSED AGENCY ACTION
The District gives notice of its Intent to issue a
stormwater permit to William A. McArthur,
President, N. G. Wade Investment Company,
on November 20, 2008.
The project, Longleaf Plantation of Wakulla, is
located approximately 3.5 miles south of
Woodville and is accessed from Woodvllle
Hwy. by way of Commerce Blvd. The permit
would authorize the construction of 13 storm-
water management facilities and establish-
ment of 5 vegetated natural buffers that shall
serve as the stormwater system for this.154
acre mixed use development, of which only
the residential portion is being developed at
this time, consisting of 300 single family lots
and 11 multi-family lots, roadways, and Infra-
structure.
The file containing the application for the
above listed permit Is available for Inspection
Monday through Friday (except for legal holl-
days), 8.00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the Northwest
Florida Water Management District Tallahas-
see Field Office, Suite 2-D, The Delaney Cen-
ter Bldg., 2252 Killeam Center Blvd., Tallahas-
see, FL 32309. The Didtrict will take action on
the permit application listed above unless a
petition for an administrative proceeding
hearing) is filed pursuant to the provisions of
ns 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes
Chapter 28-106 and 62-346.090(2)(|), Florida
Administrative Code (F.A.C.).


Company name and length of time in bu-l'
ness.
CompAy Iocatlon.
AvalaHty of time to start and complee pMo-
ject within Ownetrs requirements :
Insurance carrier and applcable coverage.
Qualifications of staff to be utilized on ths pro-
ject with names, short resumes, lengthoft
with firm and previous clients served.
Names of five (5) clients with phone numbers
and contact person, .
Description of previous experience, to include .
budget, final cost, time schedule, change or-
ders, etc.
Your company's past experience with sDnillr
projects

A Pre-Proposal Conference will be held on
November 4 2008 at 10.00 AM at the exMtng
Sopchoppy City Hall.
No calls or visits to the Spchoppy City Con-
mission or officials please, R al request
to Clemons, Rutherford & Associates, Inc., A-
tention: Greg Kelley, (850)385-6153. Al re-
quests will be responded to n wdting to 1a in-
terested firms.
October 23, 30, No embr 6, 2000


100 Employment


A person whose substantial interests are or Administrative Assistant
may be affected has the right to request an
administrative hearing by fling a written peti- .Wakl la Contty -
tlon with the Northwest orida after Manage- Fr armet
ment District (District). Pursuant to Chapter Fire Deprtm nt
28-106, F.A.C., the petition must be filed (re-
ceived) either by delivery at District Headquar- The Wakulla County Board of Corn-
ters, 81 Water Management Drive, Havana, missioners is seeking qualified ppli-
FL 32333-4712 or by e-mail with the District
Clerk at agency.clerk@nwfwmd.state.fl.us, cants for a Full-Time (40 hrs per wk)
within twenty-one (21) days of newspaper Administrative Assistant within the
publication of the Notice of Proposed Agency Fire Department. General office
Action. A petition must comply with Sections skills and computer skills in Micro-
120.54(5)(b)4. And 120.569(2)(c). Florida
Statutes F.S.), and Chapter 28-106, F.A.C. soft Word and Excel are necessary.
The District will not accept a petflon sent by
facsimile (fax), as explained below. Mediation Qualified applicants should be able
pursuant to Section 120.573, F.S., is not avail- to perform a variety of duties in a
able. busy,.rofessional office. Tbeappli-
A person whose substantial interests are or cant will act as a receptionist, answer
may be affected has the right to a formal ad- in-coming calls, maintain office
ministrative hearing pursuant. to Sections files, process office related'invoices,
120.569 and 120.57(1). F.S., where there is a
dispute between the District and the party re- perform routine payroll and human.'
garding an issue of material fact. A petition for resource functions, compose routine
formal hearing must also comply with the re- correspondence and perform a vin -
quirements set forth in Rule 28-106.201, etyofotherduties as assi ed Will
F.A.C. A person whose substantial Interests etyootherdtiea.as signed, Will
are or may be affected has the right to an In- work closely and under the general
formal administrative hearing pursuant to Sec- supervision of the Firt Chief.
tlons 120.569 and 120.57(2), F.S., where no
material facts are In dispute. A petition for an Applicants must have a Bachelor's
informal hearing must also comply with the re- Applicants must ar of adminir
quirements set forth In Rule 28-106.301, Degree and one year of adminasti'-.
F.AeC. tive experience OR a High School
Diploma, or an acceptable ecuiva
A petition for an administrative hearing Is lenc diploma, and 4 years of work
deemed filed upon receipt of the complete pe lencdiploa 4 years owotc
tition by the District Clerk at the District Head- experience in secretarial and cleical
quarters in Havana, Florida. Petitions received work. Must be able to operate a a-
by the District Clerk after 5:00 p.m., or on a riety of office equipment including
Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, shall be cooper, fax printers, and cal tors.
deemed tiled as of 8:00 a.m. on the next regu- faxprirsand
lar District business day. The District's accep-
tance of petitions filed by mail is subject to To apply, send a Wakulla County'
certain conditions set forth in the District's application to: Human Resources,
Statement of Agency Organization and Opera- P.O Box 309, Crawfordvill, FL
tion (Issued pursuant to Rule 28-101.001, .
Florida Administrative Code), which is avail- 32326. Applications may be. ob-.
able for viewing at www.nwfwmd.state.fLus. trained by visiting.our website at
These conditions Include, but are not limited www.mywakulla.com or at the Ad-
to, the petition being In the form of a PDF file ministrator's office at 850-926-0919.
and being capable of being stored and printed
by the District. Further, pursuant to the Dis- Drug screening is reqir Vetetins
trct's Statement of Agency Organization and preference wll be given to qualified
Operation, attempting to file a petition by fc- applicants. Wakulla County is an Af-
simile Is prohibited and shall not constitute fil- irative Actionl Equal Opportunity
Ing Emloyer. Salary will bebasedoon
Failure to file a petition for an administrative qualifications an experience, with a
hearing within the requisite time frame shall minimum starting salary of.,
constitute a waiver of the right to an adminis- 25507.00 annually. A tins
trative hearing. (Rule 28-106.111, F.A.C.). b25,507.00 annuellyd App:lcat0ons
must be received by 5:00 p.m. on'
The right to an administrative hearing and the Friday, October 31, 2008.
relevant procedures to be followed are ov-
emed by Chapter 120, Florida Statutes, C ap-______. I
ter 28-106, F.A.C. Because the administrative .
hearing process Is designed to formulate final _sine
agency action, the filing of a petition means 105 Business rt l
the District's final action may be different from ..
the position taken by It In this notice. A person tis "
whose substantial interests are or may be af-
fected by the District's final action has the right
to become a party to the proceeding, In accot-
dance with the requirements set forthabove....
Octobe23.2008 I BlRII YI


REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
FOR
CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT
SERVICES FOR
SOPCHOPPY CITY HALL
CITY OF SOPCHOPPY, FLORIDA

INTRODUCTION
The Sopchoppy City Commission Is request-
ing written proposals from qualified construc-
tion firms to provide professional At-Risk Con-
struction Management Services for the Budg-
eting and Construction Phase on the new pro-
posed City Hall Facility.
It is the Sopchoppy City Commission's Inten-
tion to employ the Construction Firm at Risk to
provide overall Project Construction Manage-
ment, Cost Benefit Studies If needed, Informa-
tion Management, Construction of Scope of
Work and overall Project Management during
the Construction on a cost plus a fee basis,
with a guaranteed maximum price.
PROPOSAL INSTRUCTIONS AND GEN-
ERAL INFORMATION
Proposal Submissions: Submit five (5) copies
of a written proposal no later than November
10, 2008 at 12:00 Noon to:
Clemons, Rutherford & Associates, Inc.
2027 Thomasville Road
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
Attention: Greg Kelley
Proposals must be responsive to the require-
ments and questions of the Request for Pro-
posal. '
Reservations: The Sopchoppy City Commls-
sion reserves the right to reject any and all
proposals, to negotiate changes in the new
scope of work or services to be provided, and
to otherwise waive any technicalities or Infor-
malities.


PROMTOS uM
I can fixthose
wonderful old pictures
so you can enjoy them:
again, and make
copies to share.

Keep the family heritage
alive with restored
photographs

Just $15 per photo.
850-766-7655
dougapple@gmall.com'



VOTE NcCAU I MMI
McCAIN-PALIN.coM
JPAMERICA.COM ,
Paid calawtsenpiiorb CkP
21 5MagHRN Ridgey, C ral0LR3237
lpendepndmtlyf1yCnadldth ec.Thttism *



110 Help Wanted


NOW HIRINGI Busy real estate


Method of Selection: Proposals will be re- company needs full-fnmea.gif 'ts.
viewed by the Sopchoppy City Commission Real estate license is required.
which will recommend a ranking of .firms. a '. ntact Ochlocktnee RB~ay
Upon acceptance of the recommendation, ne- CO t OChOCk.neeO
gotlations or bids will or may be entertained. 850-984-0001 or 850-926-9260, '
Please respond by including, but not limiting obr@obrealty.com
your response, to the following: www.obrealtV.cqm


23 8.17 NON-JUDIC S


a

















110 Help Wanted


ELECT

CHARLIE


':


FOR

SHERIFF


1 *
Political advertisement paid for and
approved by Charlie Creel,
SNo Party Affiliation for Sheriff


Elect Jimmie Doyle
for County Commission

She's Dedicated
She Cares

Political advertisement paid for and
approved by Jimmie Doyle, No Party Affili-
ataion. for County Commission District 3

Work from home, must have com-
Sputer, 2000 or newer, high speed
intemet to make business oriented
Information calls. 850-984-0236
S(Jesse).
S111 Medical/Dental Help
Wanted

An enthusiastic part-time dental
assistant/PR person is needed for
our Crawfordville office 2 days/wk.
-DLJntal'experience and excellent
people skills required. Fax resume
to Drs. Carey and Jones at
S850-893-5788
120 Services and Busi-
S nesses.

SA'1 'PRESSURE CLEANING
i Free Estimates
Licensed John Farrell
926-5179
566-7550
A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING
Free Estimates
SLicensed John Farrell
926-5179
566-7550
Affordable 'Handyman Services.
SInterior/Exterior painting, cleaning,
Ssoft/pressure wash, cool seal, car-
pentry and many other odd jobs.
C Refererinces avail. Bobby/Carol
i 926-2462 459-1071.
SAIR CON OF WAKULLA
SHeating and Cooling


SGary Limbaugh 926-5592
! 3232 Crawfordville Highway
Service, Repair, Installation
FL Lic. #CAC1814304

ALL ABOUT...
CONCRETE lANDSCAPE
S blocks plants
S bricks sod
, .pavers tractor work
Scall JOSEPH FRANCIS
850-556-1178 / 850-926-9064
,, ANYTIME ELECTRIC
SSpecializing in repair and service,
residential and commercial,
. homes and mobile homes.
24-hour service. Mark Oliver,
ER0015233. 421-3012.
tEACK FORTY TRACTOR
i SERVICE Bushhogging, Box-
f blding Driewaay. Larry Carter
Owner Operator 850-925-7931,
r850-694-7041. Licensed/Insured.
Bella's Bed & Biscuit Doggie
D daycare. ,'. '
Overnigi t boarding. Extended
stays. Kennel free home environ-
; ment. Lbts of love & pampering.
926-1016 be 519-4529.
SHarold Burse Stump Grinding
S926-7291.






S 106 W..5th Ave.
'Tallahassee, FL 32303 Savan
0 (850) 222-2166 tel. $45,900.
wWw.wmleeco.com Wakull

Steeplechase $96,900 to $109,90
S5 ac wooded tracts, Horse friendly
Subdivision has underground electric
and water,
These lots are conveniently located t
0 Tallahassee, schools, and coast.





-- ,t_.


C & R Tractor/Backhoe Services,
large tract and residential site
clearing rock, dirt, and road base
hauling, call' Crandall
(850)933-3346.
CJ's Lawn Services & More
(Ask about the more!)
850-421-9365 (If we don't answer,
please leave message)

CJ's Lawn Services & More
(Ask about the more!)
850-421-9365.
(If we don't no answer, please
leave message).

CNA will care for a
your loved ones in
their home or i';
facility. References
Available.
Contact .
850-933-3687

Five Star Plumbing
Big Bend, Inc.

Commercial -
& Residential:, ".....--','
Service *

Billy B. Rathel, Jr.
850-544-5062
850-421-1237 Fax
plumbing_fivestar@yahoo.com
Lic#CFC1427547. State Certified















Jack's B-Quick Boarding Kennel:
Large play yards, controlled envi-
ronment, indoor/outdoor runs, all
sizes/breeds. Two blocks from
bike-trail. www.jacksbquick.com
850-576-5552
KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR
Commercial, residential and mo-
bile homes. Repair, sales, service,
installation. All makes and mod-
els. Lic. #RA0062516. 926-3546.
Lawn service, tractor work, bush
hog, residential and commercial.
Warren Property Services. Call
Phillip 519-1853
Mr. Stump
Stump Grinding
Quick Service
Cellular: 509-8530
Service Enterprises Property
Maintenance Services, painting,
pressure washing, dryi wall and
wood rot repair, roofs and gutters
cleaned. Rental and "For Sale"
Property Make Readies and Main-
tenance.
Call for estimates and references
850-491-2812 or send e-mail
servicenterprises@gmail.com


MUNGET'U S
TREE SERVICE !
AVAILA B 24/7
FIREWOOD
U-Pick/We Deliver
LICENSED / FULLY INSURED i
L850-421-810 9




IRe-Elect

SHERIFF 9



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!




Registered Family Daycare has
one opening 18-months 4-years.
All meals and snacks provided.
References available. M-F 16-yrs.
experience 926-6347


Soft Wash, Pressure Washing, Etc.
Docks, Driveways, Fences, Patios,
Roofs, Painting, Wood Seal
PICTURE PERFECT, LLC
Licensed and Insured
850-528-1404

125 Schools and Instruc-
tions

Michelle Snow
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
926-7627
Music lessons of all types for all
ages.


Antiques and Uniques
(I Rose Srecct, Sopchoppy
"Clasic Car Cruise
Specials Side
Walk Sale"
850-962-2550
Open: Tuesday Saturday 10 ant. 6 pm.




210 Auctions



www.abalauction.com
Automotive
Literature, Parts
Manuals and
Magazines.
online now!
AB 2387


225 Trucks


2003 Dodge Grand Caravan.
Great on gas! 6cyl. Seats 7, power
windows, seats and doors. Re-
cently tuned up. $4,700, obo Call
850-926-4511


2004 Suzuki Grand Vitara, manual
transmission, V-6, 5-speed, 2.5 li-
ter, 5-door, red w/silver trim. Great
looking, good condition, 52,200
miles. Asking $11,500. Call
850-509-7630


int Crawfordville
|11 926-5111



ST. Gaupin, Broker
Florida Coastal Silver Coast
Properties, Inc. Realty

www.c21fcp.con

Real Estate Shopping "24/7"

Today's Buys Are

Tomorrow's Best


Investments
Take a look then give us a call!


Ochlocknee Bay
984-5007


Wakulla Station
421-3133


p5.


Multi PropertyAuction
TWednesday, November 5th,. oo8 at 2:oop.m.
Properties s50 & 509 will sell froi- Property o8 @ 2 p.m.

CertifiedRealEstateAuctions.com


PrpetY50 16+- crs mprt 59 /2/-Ace o


*Prime Corner Lot w/Commercial
Building, Zoned C-2
*Over 580 +/- Ft. of Road Frontage
*Daily Traffic Count 8.000 CPD


*Corner Lot
*Zoned C-3 Commercial use

.380 +/- Ft. Total Road Frontage
*High visibility


'Corner of SR-363 and US-98 a.

I Register
ad 2 i and C-
1_CBid Online!




Wakulla County, FL

s


mna
1I
la/

0.








I
to


hForest
ac. tracts off
Aaron Rd.


Walkers Mill
$69,900. 2 ac lots, located on
Lower Bridge Road.


Carmen Rocio 2 ac. lot off
Shadeville Hwy near
Wakulla Station. $64,900.

2 acre tract with large
hardwoods in Beechwood
Subdivision off Shadeville
Hwy. $52,900.
Two 5+ acre tracts off
Rehwinkel Rd w. large trees on
the back of properties and a
small pond Can be
purchased together.


Sellars Crosshng
$65,900. 1+ ac lots
North Wakulla Co..
On Ace High Stable Rd.


***Brand New Subdivision***
Carmen Maria -$34,900.
Lots up to 1 ac. in size.
Underground electric and Wa-
ter. Conveniently located to
Tallahassee and Lake Talquin.



*i ad u


Call
Donna Card
850-508-1235
.. .. -.m I.


**Affordable & Convenient.**
Montelo- $34,900
Located off of Belair Road. City
of Tallahassee underground elec-
tric, water, & sewer. Convenient
to Tallahassee, St. Marks Bike
Trail, and Wakulla Springs.


U-

0

0


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bGN
40 i
do ...
GP.


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- 0


* --


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* *


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*e.
** -


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008 Page 7B

205 Antiques


-- Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers 4


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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008


240 Boats and Motors


ELECT

CHARLIE


':

JE


'3:mlr


FOR

SHERIFF



Political advertisement paid for and
approved by Charlie Creel,
No Party Affiliation, for Sheriff

250 Sporting Goods



Re-Elect

SHERIFF
A DAVID r.


KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!


275 Home Furnishings

$155 2pc Queen plushtop mat-
tress set. New in plastic w/war-
ranty. Can deliver. 545-7112.
100% Leather 5-pc Living Room
Set. New, lifetime warranty, sacri-
fice $749. (delivery available).
425-8:37 .. ...
3 Piedr'ei'ing' Rbom Set. New
100% micro fiber, stain resistant.
List $1999, Let go for $649, deliv-
ery available. 222-7783
A new Queen Orthopedic Pillow-
top Mattress Set in sealed plastic
$290. Warranty. Can deliver.
222-9879
Beautiful Queen solid wood 7-pc
bedroom set w/dovetail drawers.
Still in boxes. $2400 value, must
sacrifice $999 222-7783
Brand New full mattress set, $139
or Twin set $119 w/warranty.
222-9879
Cherry Dining table, china cabinet
& Chairs. Deep, rich finish, boxed.
List $1800, take $799. 425-8374
Complete solid wood bedroom
set. Brand new! Top Quality.
Dovetail Drawers. Beautiful. Must
See. $499. Can deliver 545-7112
New Pillowtop King Mattress Set
w/warranty. $289. 425-8374. Can
deliver.


Solid wood 5-piece Pub Set. New
-in boxes. $199. 222-7783.
305 Machinery Tools &
I Equip |

94 Jeep Wrangler, 4X4, 4 cylinder,
5-speed.
94 Ford Ranger XLT Extended
Cab, utility bed, 6 cylinder,
4-speed, automatic transmission.
88 GMC 3500 one ton dually.
6X14 Dual axle utility trailer.
2310 Ditch witch w/backhoe and
trailer.
1220 Ditch witch walk behind with
trailer. Call 926-7794 or 510-2049

310 Firewood Products


Re-Elect ]

SHERIFF



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!


320 Farm Products &
Produce e

Boiled peanuts (green) $3.00/Lb.
Blanched peas and farm fresh
eggs. Raker Farm 926-7561.

335 Pets

Get hook, round, & tapeworms.
Rotate Happy Jack tapeworm tab-
lets and Liqui-Vict(r@.(tag). SOP-
CHOPPY HARDWARE (962-3180)
www.happyjackinc.com.


Adopt a pet from the animal
shelter:
Dogs:
Catahoula, Blue Heeler mix
German Shepherd mix
Golden Retriever/Lab mix
Red Bone Hound
Terrier mix
Boxer mix
Hound mixes
Lab mixes
Min Pin mix
Chihuahua mix
Border Collie
Lab, brown
Basenji mix
Many other nice mixes.
Come and take a look.
Puppies:
Lab mixes, black
Lab/Bulldog mixes
Nice cats and kittens.
CHAT Adoption Center:
Monday closed
Tuesday through Wednesday
& Friday: 11:00AM to 4:30PM
Thursday: 11:00AM to 7:00 PM
Saturday: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM
Sunday: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM
www,chatofwakulla.org


| .


Rescued Kitty Sammy needs a
new home -- I'm Sammy and I
was rescued from a Louisiana
shelter when hurricane Gustav
threatened our area. I and a few
other cats and dogs were trans-
ported to Panama City and then
taken in by Crawfordville Animal
Control and CHAT. As you can
see, I am very patient; I let my
CHAT friends dress me up for Hal-
Iloween! I am neutered and
de-clawed, so I need to be an in-
side cat. I am very loving and a
great companion! For more info
on Sammy or other animals in
need of loving homes, please call
the CHAT Adoption Center at
926-0890.

355 Yard Sales


Elect Jimmie Doyle
for County Commission

Common Sense
Proven Dedication

Political adrtsement paid for and approved
by Jmmie Doyle, No Party Affllation for County
Commission District 3

Four-Family Sale, Lost Creek
Land Development, 4851 Coastal
Hwy, Saturday, October 25,
8AM-4PM. 2004-Iarley Davidson,
dishwasher, furniture, DVD play-
ers, electronics, clothes, much
more!
First Annual Old Courthouse
Square Community Yard Sale.
Saturday, Oct. 25, 8:00a.m.-until...
Also food and bake sale. Down-
town Crawfordville. High Dr. next
to Courthouse. Look for signs.
3-Family Yard Sale in Crawford-
ville. 2 Ponderosa Drive off East
Ivan Road. The Grove subdivision.
Saturday October 25 8a.m.-12
noon.
Moving Sale! Friday and Saturday.
Lots of stuff: fumiture, electronics,
home furnishings... much more.
98 Chinook Trail, Wakulla Gar-
dens, 926-4530


Each puzzle is divided Into nine sections, and each section
has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with
numbers 1 to 9.You may not repeat any numbers in any one of
the nine sections that you've already used elsewhere in that
section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each
horizontal line of nine squares, and In each vertical column of
nine squares. The puzzle Is completed when you correctly fill


every square.

8 L 8 1 9 Z6 9 1 .
9 I. r 8 8 6 S .
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9 V 6 9 L L C 8 Z
L 6 9 8 C L 1 1 9-
L 8 V 8 9 9Z S 66
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6 L 8L I0 8 9 Z
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tiS L C 9 6 8


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435 Lost and Found I


ELECT

CHARLIE



























FOR


ACROSS
1. Major composition
5. Out of kilter
10. Some roll call
votes
14. Goat cheese
15. Alfalfa's "Our
Gang" heartthrob
16. Donuts,
mathematically
17. Mellow brass
19. Bean grown for
sprouts
20. Metallic quality
21. "Yerdern _I"
23. XXX part
26. LAX posting
27. Locales for
sedges and reeds
28. Temptress's asset
30. The haves have it
31. Like an epee's
point
32. Shrewd
33. Gave a thumbs-
up to
36. Reply to "Shall
we?"
37. Bulgaria's capital
38. On the briny
39. SASE, e.g.
40. Bird in a Poe
classic
41. Bishop's topper
42. One with a cure
44. Instigate
45. Dry as a desert
47. Bert Bobbsey's
twin
48. Guitar innovator
Paul
49. Was gaga over
50. Burger unit
52. Rhett Butler's last
word
53. Vacation spot on
the shore
58. James, winner of
a posthumous
Pulitzer
59. Houston pro
60. Pipe problem
61. The Virgin Is., e.g.


500 Real Estate


I I -
Female dog pug/beagle mix with
white chest and front paws.
Found September 12 in Wakulla
County on Hwy 61. Call
850-562-1887.
Lost cat in Garner Circle area.
Black, floppy ear. Reward! Call
926-2819
Lost Chihuahua near the Craw-
fordville Walmart. Blind in one eye.
Can't hear too well. Missing since
10/08. Call 850-926-1714






t


Running on empty?
Refuel gasoline-powered equipment
well away from sparks or flames.
buildings and foliage, and make
sure the motor has cooled down
before you fill the tank.


+ c-
Crc ~L


American Proille Hometown Content
62. Make even
shorter, say
63. MacLachlan of
"Twin Peaks"

DOWN
1. On vacation
2. capital income
3. Beehive State
tribesman
4. _serif
5. Stick like glue
6. Bill, host of "Real
Time"
7. One of a set of
clubs
8. Camera type,
briefly
9. _winds
(California
phenomenon)
10. Maximally
11. Lodging for young
travelers
12. Banks in
Cooperstown


I 510 Acreage for Sale


I -


5S 56 57 ,;




081019

40. Like proverbial
hen's teeth
41. Billing period,
often
43. One bringing
home the bacon
44. Sailor's measure
of depth
45. Nobelist with
Begin
46. Pithy saying
47. Mollusk shell
material
50. Garden walkway
51. The "sun" in
"sunnyside up"
54. Language suffix
55. One-eighty
56. _ammonlac
57. out (barely
make)


13. Coaches give
them
18. Visual aid in a
presentation
22. Airport that serves
Paris
23. Postpone, as a
motion
24. Partner of Burns
25. Bobby Thomson's
1951 blast,
notably
27.'"_ Black" (1997
sci-fi spoof)
29. Young (tykes)
30. Piece of Necco
candy
32. Witches' group
34. New Hampshire
college town
35. Feathered
missiles
37. Restaurant area
with a sneeze
guard
38. Align the cross


PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it ille-
gal
to advertise "any preference, limi-
tation, or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or national ori-
gin or an intention to make any
such preference, limitation or dis-
crimination." Familial status in-
cludes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing the custody of
children under the age of 18.
This newspaper will not accept
any advertising for real estate
that is a violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To com-
plain of discrimination call HUD
toll free at 1-800-669-9777. The
toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


(tQIL n tNIc
LENDER


Brain Teasers


1 2

34 5 1 6


2 7


6 8 5

91 87

2. 6 1

1 4


5 3 4 2 6

9 8


n


I


L-


Re-Elect I

SHERIFF 1



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!
.. ,, ,I ,~ m:, ,



520 Townhouses for Rent


3BR/3BA Townhome $850/mo +
$500/deposit. Call 850-509-4388


Camelot Park 27-C Guinevere Ln.
Beautiful Crawfordville 3BR/2BA,
like brand new, freshly painted,
new carpet, new refrigerator, gor-
geous view of pool. $750/mo+de-
posit. Kristen Scovera Keller-Wil-
liams agent/owner 850-443-2460













THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008 Page 9B


530 Comm. Property forh
Rent
Commercial building on busy
Hwy. 98/Panacea for rent.
$550/month. $550/security. Och-
lockonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001.
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com
For lease: 2-story commercial
building on 2 lots. 1680 sq.ft. in
Panacea, $1,200/month, $1,200
deposit 850-984-5800
Reduced-Great-Location!
1,200sq.ft. Crawfordville Hwy. ad-
joining The Wakulla News. Three
offices, reception, waiting area,
large kitchen. $1,200/mo. Call
926-6289 or 421-2792.
Mini-Warehouse Spaces for lease,
8X10 and 10X12 now available.
Come by or call Wakulla Realty,
926-5084.

NBC
STORAGE

MINI-WAREHOUSES
BOATS *RV'S

519-5128 508-5177
2 miles South of Courthouse
on Hwy. 319 in Crawfordville.
24 Hour Access Video Surveillance
Woodville Retail
Space Available
Fitness Studio-1000/sf
(Wall to wall mat & mirrors)
Retail -1250/sf
S(Storefront w/back storage)
Two-Bay Garage-1200/sf
Divided Office Space-1074/sf
Lewiswood Center
.421-5039

S555 Houses for Rent


2BR/1BA in Wakulla Gardens. 59
Chicopee. New 2006 home. Tile,
carpet, new appliances, washer,
rocking chair porch, nice yard.
$725/mo for 12-month lease (ne-
gotiable). Land Lots and Homes
850-556-6694
2BR/1BA on 1/2 acre. Dining and
living room, w/fireplace in great
room. $725/mo. + $1,025 deposit.
850-926-5088
3BR/1BA house near schools.
Small pet okay. $650/month plus
deposit. Call 850-728-6496 or
850-766-0170
3BR/2BA $850/mo. Like new con-
ditions. Deposit and references re-
quired. No pets or smoking. Call
850-926-8795
4BR/2BA Crawfordville area. Rent
$1,500. No pets or inside smok-
ing. References and credit check
required. Call 933-1608.
Bay-front 3BR/2BA on Mashes
Sands. Partially furnished.
$875/month. $875/security. No
Pets. No Smoking. Ochlockonee
Bay Realty: 850-984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com
CRAWFORDVILLE. Walk to gro-
ceries, Split 3-2-1, fenced.
$975/mo.+deposit. Call 385-3175.
In Wakulla Gardens: 4BR/1.5BA
$800/mo. (first, last & deposit).
ACE High Stables Road: 3BR/2BA
w/19X29 game room w/pool table,
18X36 in-ground pool, mostly fur-
nished on 4 acres. $1,100/mo.
(first, last & deposit). Call
850-847-7723
Large 3BD/2BA Home, 5 acres,
2-car garage, office/sunroom, din-
ing room, fireplace, security sys-
tem. Near Riversink Elementary.
$1,095/mo.+deposit. 926-5859 or
508-7337.
Ochlockonee Bay




Realty
Alligator Pointl 3BR/3BA gor-
geous home in gated community.
$1800/month, $1800/security. No
Pets. No Smoking.
Pine Street/Alligator Point! Cute
2BR/1BA MH. $575/month,
$575/security. No Pets. No Smok-
ing.
Crawfordville/Linzy Mill!
4BR/2BA, 1600 sq.ft.
$1,575/month. $1,575/security.
No Pets. No Smoking.
2BR/1BA home in Crawfordville on
five acres. $750/month. No Pets.
No Smoking.
Panacea! Commercial building o.
Hwy 98. $850/month. $850/security
Ochlockonee Bay! Bayfront
3BR/1BA block home. $750/mo.
$750/security. No pets.
No smoking.
Beachfront 2BR/2BA on Alligator
Point. $1300/month. $1300/secu-
rity. No Pets. No Smoking.
2BR/1BA in Lanark/Franklin
County! $600/month. $600/secu-
rity. No Pets. No Smoking.


560 Land or Sale 590 Waterfront Homes/
I ILand


124.7 acres, 5, 10, 18.9 & 99.7
acre tracts. 2+ miles of creek front,
including Smith Creek. Full
kitchen, two bunkhouses, wood-
shed. $5,500/acre 984-0044

124.7 Acres, all or part. 5, 10, 18.9
& 99.7 acre tracts. 2+ miles of
creek front, including Smith Creek.
Includes full kitchen, two bunk-
houses, woodshed. Make offer.
984-0093.

Beautiful, untimbered, mature
wooded 20-acre tract. Easy ac-
cess from Hwy 98. Reduced
$125,000. Call Susan McKaye,
owner/agent (850)510-2477. Och-
lockonee Bay Realty.
www.hardwoodhammock.com


Re-Elect
SHERIFF
DAVID F,

KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!
,, .,, .. ? .


565 Mobile Homes for
Rent

2004 14X70 M/H 2BR/2BA, very
nice on 1 acre in Panacea. Paved
road. $500/mo. + $350/deposit.
Call 850-984-2774

2BR/2BA (North Wakulla) M/H, re-
modeled, city water, garbage
service; included $525/mo.
+$250/deposit, no pets 926-5326

2BR/2BA Furnished in Medart
area on large lot. $400/mo.
850-349-2224

3BR/1.5BA MH on acreage I
w/pond, central heat & air, clean
and roomy. No smoking.
$700/mo. $300 security deposit.
352-493-2232.


3BR/1BA M/H. 235 Webster.
Screened porch, 1 acre, fenced
yard, great shape. Call today
$625/mo. 12-month lease (nego-
tiable). Land Lots and Homes
850-556-6694

3BR/2BA S/W M/H on 12 acres,
gated. 20 Cajer Posey Rd., Craw-
fordville. Call 850-841-0222

3BR/2BA well-kept doublewide,
Lake Ellen on 1/4-acre lot. $750
first, last and security deposit.
Pets ok, but extra. 850-570-0506.

3BR/2BA well-kept doublewide,
Lake Ellen on 1/4-acre lot. $600
first, last and security deposit.
Pets ok, but extra. 850-570-0506.

DW/MH 3BR/2BA near Lake Ellen.
$750/mo. (first, last, deposit). No
indoor pets. Call 850-421-8044


George's Lighthouse Pointe
Unit A-3, 19 Mashes Sand Road,
Panacea, Condominium Unit.
1BR/1BA, LR, DR, CHA. Front
porch faces pool & tennis court.
Back porch faces marina & view
of bay (Both 12x30). Gated
Community w/beautiful new
landscaping. 825 sq. ft. H&C.
850-545-5057. $229,900




Re-Elect
SHERIFF 4


KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!



595 Vacation Rental


r~ -'---~


23 Knotty PinelOchlockonee Bay! 55 Tower Rdl Custom home wl over
Modem home In "Old Florida" set- 1270 +/- (H&C) sq. ft. 9' ceilings,
ting. Large screened front, rear deck ceiling fans. 3BR/2BA, kitchen and
and Is priced well below appraisal. 2 bath has tile flooring wl custom Oak
adjacent Homesteaded lots with cabinets. Metal roof w/l Hardy board
water & sewer available at $50,000 siding. All on large lot In great area
each. OwnerAgent Just $199,000. near boat ramps and deep water. Just


The


Wakulla


Deadlines


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all items submitted by

fax, mail or in person.

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all items submitted

by e-mail.




Advertising:




SNoon Friday for all

ads requiring proof.

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legal notices.

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real estate ads.

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*Noon Monday for all

other advertising.


a
^-----^^^


HARTUNG AND
NOBLIN, INC.,
REALTORS
Each Oc is I lnduepndenty
Owned end Operated.


Sw @
The Online Tools You Want,
The Experienced Agents
You Need!

Gardens of Saralan
$199,900 Two Model homes to
choose from. Spacious rms.,
split plan, gas fireplace! 1808
sq.ft. Clubhouse & Trails.
# 169400 Lentz Walker 528-3572


Buy in "The Farm"
$245,000 4 BR/2 BA, 2 car ga
rage, ac lot, 2003 Seminole
Builder's model 1934 sq ft
Family Home #189476
Call Joi Hope 210-7300


Investors Price Reduced!
$169,000 3 Manuf. Homes on
Acre each. Spacous 3Br/
2Ba. S. Leon Co. on Sugar
Pine Ct. 100% Occupancy.
#189704 Don Henderson
510-4178


Showplace
w/Workshop!
$395,000 4BR/2BA 2.5+
Ac.,wood floors, custom cabi-
nets, luxury bath, screen porch
& deck, 2600+ Sq.Ft. #189434
Kai Page, GRI, CNS, CMS
519-3781
www.coldwellbankerwakulla.com
2650-1 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327
[B 850-926-2994 Phone 850-926-4875 Fax
*T Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated MIS.
I II


Re-Elect
SHERIFF n


KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!


67'1
~ `i











Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008


Refuge will host monarch butterfly event


Fall is in the air and so are
the migrating monarch but-
terflies, making their 2,000
mile trip to the mountains of
Central Mexico. This amazing
phenomenon passes through
the Gulf Coast of Florida
beginning around the third
week in October, and may be
observed along the coast at
the St Marks National Wildlife
Refuge.
The refuge will be hosting
its 20th annual celebration of
the migration on Saturday,
Oct. 25, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The event will be filled with
the wonder of individuals of
all ages learning about tagging
the monarchs, holding but-
terflies in their hands inside
the live butterfly tent, charting
their own "migration," mak-
ing butterfly crafts, talking
with Emory University mon-
arch butterfly researchers and
other exhibitors, taking tours
and walks and much more.
Everything is open to the pub-
lic as space allows, except for
the guided auto tours. Refuge
officials ask individuals to call
925-6121 after Oct 1 to reserve
a space on the tour vans.
Unlike other animal migra-
tion, each monarch butterfly
is on its own. There is no
parent to follow. Its annual
journey is a complex, inher-
ited behavior pattern, not a
learned process. Migrating
monarchs are usually those
who hatch out in late summer.
The young females do not de-
velop productive ovaries and
so do not mate until they fly
south. Monarchs have a four
inch wingspan and weigh

Kendrick

is honored
The Florida Farm Bureau
Federation recognized Sens.
Carey Baker and Larcenia
Bullard and Reps. Mary Bran-
denburg and Will Kendrick as
Legislators of the Year for 2008
for their leadership, vision and
support of Florida's agriculture
industry. The awards were
presented at the Federation's
meeting'Oct 8 at the Peabody
in Orlando.
' s ;s the state's general ag-
ricultural organization, we are
pleased to recognize these
legislators for their efforts to
support the state's second-
largest industry," said Ben
Parks, Florida Farm Bureau's
director of state legislative
affairs.
Sen. Baker represents Dis-
trict 20, which includes Lake,
Marion, Seminole, Sumter,
and Volusia counties. He has
a solid history of working for
agribusiness in the legislature,
according to Parks.
Sen. Bullard represents
District 39, which includes
Broward, Collier, Hendry, Mi-
ami-Dade, Monroe and Palm
Beach counties. During her
years in the legislature, Larce-
-nia has remained a dedicated
supporter of the agricultural
-industry. She is completing
her second term as Vice Chair
of the Senate Agricultural
Committee.
Rep. Brandenburg repre-
sents House District 89 in
Palm Beach County, where
she chairs the county legisla-
tive delegation. With a family
history in dairy farming, she
is a friend of the agricultural
community.
Rep. Kendrick represents
House DiStrict '10, which
stretches across 10 North Flor-
:ida counties. He was named
as vice chair of the House
Agriculture Committee his
freshman term in office.
"From his early days he
showed himself to be a great
friend and a strong supporter
of our industry," Parks said,
"as well as an outspoken
guardian for his rural constitu-
ency."
In his last two years, Ken-
drick served as Chair of the
Committee on Conservation
and State Lands and as a mem-
ber of the Environment and
Natural Resources Council and


Policy and Budget Council.
Over the years, Kendrick
has worked with Farm Bureau
on numerous issues. He has
proven to be a leader and a
fighter. He consistently stands
his ground on issues affecting
any aspect of agriculture, from
property rights to the budget
and all points in between. He
is well known for his passion
for protecting rural communi-
ties.


one gram (1/5 the weight of a
penny). They travel with cold
fronts, often at speeds of 10 to
30 m.p.h., covering 80 miles a
day. They may fly at 3,000 feet
and higher and will "fall out"
on the goldenrod and salt-
bush, blooming down at the
lighthouse, and feed hungrily
for their long trip.
Volunteers have been tag-
ging the St. Marks monarchs
for many years, hoping a few
would complete the trip to
Mexico. So far, only two have
been recovered at the winter-


ing site. The research will
continue this fall, with tagging
volunteers checking to see if
any St. Marks monarchs will
be observed either migrating
through Apalachicola to the
west or Cedar Key to the east.
Anyone out in Apalachee Bay
or on St. Vincent NWR who
observes migrating monarchs
is asked to let refuge officials
know by calling 925-6121 or
by e-mail at saintmarks@fws.
gov.
Sadly, this great migra-
tion is in trouble. The nectar


sources monarchs need for
migration and the milkweed
plants they need for their
caterpillars are being replaced
by development.
Anyone living on the Gulf
coast should leave shrubs
and trees at the water's edge
for migrating monarchs and
birds. Please plant nectar and
milkweed plants in your yard
for monarchs and other pol-
linators.


'I-


There is no cost for any __ :
of the tours or programs.
However, the regular entrance Monarch butterfly visits St. Marks Refuge




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