Title: Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00192
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville, Fla
Publication Date: October 16, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States of America -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028313
Volume ID: VID00192
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Full Text









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War Eagles TopChiles
Please turn to Page 14A


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Wakutllta


Published Weekly,
Read Daily


Our 113th Year, 42nd Issue


Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008


Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century


Two Sections

50 Cents


Wade project approved without protest


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
What a difference five years and
an administrative challenge make.
Five years ago, the Wakulla Coun-
ty commission voted to approve the
N.G. Wade "Sustainable Community"
at a meeting held at the courthouse
to handle the crowd of people who
wanted to speak on it. There were
several administrative challenges to
the project through the state Depart-
ment of Administrative Hearings.
Over the next several years, a


settlement agreement was negoti-
ated that modified the project.
Fast forward to the county Plan-
ning and Zoning Commission meet-
ing on Monday, Oct. 13, where N.G.
Wade Sustainable Community was
on the agenda. Dozens of citizens
were in the meeting, but none to
speak on N.G. Wade.
In fact, it took less than 20 min-


utes for the planning commission to
approve the project, sending it on for
consideration by the county commis-
sion on Monday, Oct. 20, and Nov. 17.
The vote was 7-1, with the lone vote
against cast by planning commis-
sioner Tracy Forester, who expressed
concern about traffic impacts.
Planning commissioner Robert
Alessi, one of the named plaintiffs


challenging the project several years
ago, voted for approval.
After being locked up in legal
challenges for five years, the N.G.
Wade sustainable community has
a new design that answers many,
if not most, of the past objections
that made the original project so
controversial.
The 586-acre tract, located on


Woodville Highway just south of
the Leon County line, is a mixed-
use development that is proposed
to have 300 single-family homes,
50 multi-family units, and three
commercial/office lots with 157,500
square feet of commercial space for
retail shops and 42,000 square feet of
office space. About 50 percent of the
land will be left undeveloped.
The plan creates an entirely differ-
ent threshold for development.
Continued on Page 18A


St. Marks

may grab

refinery
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
With the parent company
of St Marks Refinery in bank-
ruptcy, the City of St. Marks
is considering working out
some sort of deal to take over
the site.
The 55-acre refinery prop-
erty underwent a multi-mil-
lion dollar cleanup through
the state Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection several
years ago. Most of the storage
tanks were dismantled and
removed by DEP, along with
truckloads of contaminated
soil. A few tanks still remain,
but the site is overgrown with
weeds, abandoned and un-
used. "An eyesore" is how it's
usually described by residents
of St. Marks, as the refinery
is situated just off Port Leon
Drive, the main road coming
into town.
City Commissioner Phil
Cantner reported at the com-
mission meeting on Thursday,
Oct. 9, that there are grants
available to finish the cleanup
off the land, and that once
cleared and dean, it could be
put to some low impact use
- he said he saw it as perhaps
a solar power facility.
With the refinery's parent
company in bankruptcy, City
Attorney Charles McMurry
reported that he had been
in touch with the company's
trustee. "He actually wants to
get rid of the property to us,"
McMurry said. The drawback?
The trustee doesn't want to
give the city the deed to the
land, just all the shares of St.
Marks Refinery.
Cantner had contacted a
grant writing company that
expressed interest in draft-
ing a proposal to submit for
federal funding at no charge
to the city.
There are other potential
stumbling blocks in going
forward: Since 2004, tax liens
on the property have been
auctioned off worth $171,000.
Continued on Page 5A












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MIeeting of the Minds


I


Candidates Alan Brock, Jenny Brock, Jimmie Doyle, Mike Stewart, Lynn Artz, Jim Stokley seek votes.


Board candidates share views


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
The county commission candidates
sounded a lot alike in their positions
given at a forum last week all six
of the candidates vying for the three
seats agreed that the main issues
were creating jobs and protecting the
environment
The candidates faced off at a forum
sponsored by Concerned Citizens of
Wakulla (CCOW) and held at the public
library on Tuesday, Oct. 7. Moderator
Karla Brandt asked the candidates
questions submitted from the audience
before the forum began.
The hour-and-a-half forum was struc-
tured so that the two candidates for
each district seat were given a question,
one would answer, the other would
respond, then the first would respond
to that. Then Brandt would move to
the next pair of candidates. Given the,


format of the forum, not all candidates
were asked the same questions.
The candidates are: for the District
1 (St. Marks-Wakulla Station) seat,
Democrat Alan Brock and NPA Jenny
Brock; District 3 (Crawfordville region),
NPA Jimmie Doyle and Democrat Mike
Stewart; and District 5 (Sopchoppy
,region), Lynn Artz, running NPA, and
Democrat Jim Stokley.
(Voters from across the county will
be able to vote in all three district
races.)
There seems to be a public percep-
tion, and perhaps it is an oversimplifi-
cation, that the Democratic candidates
are pro-growth, the independents are
pro-environment.
All of the candidates agreed and
stated in one form or another that what
makes Wakulla County special is the
public lands the state and national
forests and wildlife refuge that preserve


Home Hemodialysis


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Health issues related to his
kidney transplant 21 years ago
had Ochlockonee Bay resident
and Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office Major Donnie Crum
feeling poorly.
Three day per week dialysis
treatment in Tallahassee had
him feeling run down while
stressing out his wife, Alicia.
But things have changed in
the Crum household. Donnie
and Alicia no longer make
the long trip to Tallahassee
since they were selected to
use a Home Hemodialysis
machine.
Now Crum takes part in
home treatments six days
each week, but the treatments
are easier on his body and
don't require a long drive to a


the natural beauty of Wakulla. It's what
brings people here, they said.
All agreed that those lands should
be protected.
On jobs, all indicated a support
for the idea of creating jobs in the
county.
Artz said she was for creating "green
jobs" that wouldn't harm the environ-
ment, and offered the idea of people
doing some sort of labor as payment
for property taxes.
Stokley spoke of the county's eco-
nomic crisis and the lack of local jobs
for people, saying he sees that in the
commuters on the road. "Wakulla
leaves every morning and comes back
every afternoon," he said, "and I think
that's a shame."
"I do believe we can have growth
and still protect the environment,"
he said.
Continued on Page 5A


Stone crab

season

to open
The commercial and recre-
ational harvest season for stone
crab claws in Florida opens on
Oct. 15. The season will remain
open until May 16.
Stone crab caws must be at
least 2 3/4 inches in length to
be harvested legally, and claws
may not be taken from egg-
bearing female stone crabs.
Recreational harvesters are
allowed to use up to five stone
crab traps, and there is a daily
bag limit of one gallon of claws
per person or two gallons per
vessel, whichever is less.
More information regard-
ing the recreational harvest of
stone crab claws may be found
online at MyFWCcom/marine/
recreational/recstonecrab.htm.
Commercial stone crab regu-
lations and licensing informa-
tion is also available online
at MyFWC.com/marine Com-
mercial_Fisheries_Information.
htm.

Vote early

and avoid

the rush
Wakulla County Supervisor
of Elections Sherida Crum
encourages voters to cast their
ballots early for' the Nov. 4
General Election.
Absentee ballots are avail-
able now and early voting
will take place from Oct 20
to Nov. 1, excluding Sundays,
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in her
Crawfordville office.
Crum and her staff have
sent out more than 2,000 ab-
sentee ballots and registered
more than 18,400 voters over-
all. She and her staff have reg-
istered more than 500 voters
in the past month alone.


clinic in Leon County.
The results have the Crums
happy and hoping that Don- ,
nie will be a candidate for ,
another kidney transplant in
early 2009.' .
The family was put through '
an intensive training program Y 3 -
to learn how to administer the i f
treatment themselves. All of r
the necessary materials that
go with his treatment are *
shipped to their home,
Another aspect that has ....
Donnie excited is the portable
dialysis machine which will al-
low the family to go to North
Carolina to see relatives for
Christmas.
The machine treats Don-
nie's blood and pulls toxins
into a filter.,
Continued on Page 5A Alicia, Donnie Crum, pet, Bella, spend six days a week with home dialysis machine


3"
, E, ) I..


Gaupin request faces stiff opposition


~et~~














Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008



Comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895


It has been an


October to make


your head spin


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
I must admit, I have no
idea where to start with my
column this week. The last
few weeks have been a whirl-
wind of activity both locally
and on the national scene.
Should I write about national
politics and the soon to be
Stock Market Crash of 2008?
Perhaps there are some ob-
servations to be made about
the local political races.
The fall sports season
is well underway and foot-
ball, baseball, basketball and
hockey are all going on at the
same time..
Wakulla County Admin-
istrator Ben Pingree and I
will continue to operate on
less than normal quantities
of 'sleep as we follow our be-
loved Red Sox for another run
at the World Series title.


How strange that we must
get through the Tampa Bay
Rays and not the New York
Yahkie. I'kifrw Steve Glazer
is disappointed in his Yankee
prf2Fis;'but you can't blame
it on Joe Torre anymore. They
are not as fun to hate now
that owner George Stein-
brenner has given way to his
son, Hank.
It is just too bad that the
Tampa Bay Rays didn't change
their name a few years ago.
That seems to be all it took
to make the playoffs.
The hurricanes of Septem-
ber seem to have given us a
break.for October and it ap-
pears that finding a tank of
gasoline for the old truck is
not as difficult as it was for a
few weeks.
We should be celebrating
the falling gas prices as the
price per barrel is as low as it
has'been in a while. But I find
it difficult to celebrate that as
I watch my retirement fund
go down-the toilet. I guess I
should be pleased that I still
can afford to drive to work
and pleased that I have a
a1. eas av a


work to drive to.
So with that all out of
the way, a few other things
popped into my mind.
I really want to tip my
hat to the folks in St. Marks.
The Wakulla News has been
covering activities in the
small community and I am
impressed with the dedica-
tion and desire to make the
town a great place by the city
commission.
When you consider that
the city commissioners vol-
unteer their time to a com-
munity they care about, I am
doubly impressed. Keep up
the good work in St. Marks. I
have a feeling the community
will be able to reach the goal
of making it a sought out
destination.
I really appreciate the
community becoming active
in the 2008 election campaign
with a wide variety of letters
to the editor. The blizzard of
letters gives us all kinds of
opinions and it is interesting
to read the views of others.
We have to draw the line
in the Oct. 30 issue since
candidates will not have the
opportunity to respond to
potentially negative letters. I
will not print letters that are
negative toward candidates
in that issue. It is only fair to
them to have time to respond
to a negative letter writer.
The Oct. 23 issue of The
Wakulla News will contain a
question and answer special
section from all of the local
candidates on the Nov. 4
General Election ballot.
I have to say that I have
been impressed by the an-
swers to my questions. Each
candidate received three ques-
tions, answered them and
met my deadline last week.
I want to thank the can-
didates for taking the time
to put so much thought into
the answers and for send-
ing them back to me by the
deadline.
I think our readers will
enjoy reading the responses.
Look for the special section
tabloid in the Oct. 23 issue.
It comes out only a few days
after early voting begins for
those voters who have not
made up their minds. For the
record, there are a total of
17 local candidates running
for three county commission
seats, sheriff, supervisor of
elections, superintendent
of schools and property ap-
praiser.
I love the fall months,
but I am ready for the elec-
tion season to wrap up. It
has been about as hectic as
any election season as I can
remember.


www.thewakullanews.net


More Letters to the Editor on Pages 2B, 3B


Republican magic act: Keep the


American public in the dark


Editor. The Newss
I met my husband in Ma-
con, Ga. and he invited me to
a former gas-station turned
nightspot. This was not a
fancy nightspot as it turned
out. It was the hangout for
area magicians just down the
block from Capricorn Record-
ing Studios.
Both places performed il-
lusions. While I understood
the mechanical illusions of a
sound recording mixing board,
the visit to the magicians'
hideaway left me scratching
my head.
One year my husband's
fascination with magic tricks
took us into a centuries old
magic shop in London op-
posite the British Museum.
The small storefront held
promises of eye-popping and
crowd stopping tricks and he
was bent on acquiring some
knowledge in there.
I wasn't allowed in the
back. As I waited, my husband
was given the key to perform-
ing an astonishing magic trick
he had bought.- Years later
he revealed what it was. But
that first day, on the train
into the suburbs to stay with
my cousin and her kids, he
practiced. Then, my cousin
was the first to witness his
vanishing act.
The response: "You put the
fear of God in me." And that
from an 11-year-old boy.
One thing I learned about
magicians is that performing
the trick or illusion is all about
distraction. As a magician
performs the act something is


purposefully included to dis-
tract the viewer to the point
where the illusion or trick is
not perceived.
A really big-time magician
will employ an assistant to
distract. It could be a pretty
woman with alluring gestures
and a winning smile who is an
innocent bystander perform-
ing her job. Or it could be a
dancing monkey or a squawk-
ing macaw.
As a consequence of know-
ing how these performanc-
es work, I tend to look for
those distractions rather-than
whether a magician pulls
a mile of scarves from his
mouth or makes a person
disappear. It's all fraud, don't
you know.
And last week, because I
have learned over the years
to recognize such distracting
devices, it came to me as an
epiphany that the Republi-
can Party is orchestrating a
three-ring magic show. The
Wall Street Journal calls the
bungling of the conserva-
tive Republican government
"breathtaking."
Today, the editorial con-
tinued, "we are surrounded
by the wreckage." The trick
was to keep the public in the
dark about the consequences
of all the bungling that hap-
pened during the conserva-
tive Republican government's
watch.
Yet we are overlooking that
the Republican candidate has
only hocus-pocus to offer. By
the time John McCain waves
his magic wand his cynical,


Miller is best candidate


Editor, The Newss
I served as a member of
the Wakulla County School
Board for 24 consecutive years.
During that time I had the
privilege of observing David
Miller as a teacher, a coach,
an administrator and as a Su-
perintendent. David Miller is
a good listener. He is a great
leader. He has the foresight
to see the growth and to
understand the potential for
Wakulla County.
It was a difficult time when
Roger Stokley got sick. We had
a lot of goals and we were
headed in the right direction.
As soon as I found out that
David Miller was the candi-
date to take over as Superin-
tendent in 1995, I was relieved.
David Miller is thoughtful and
makes sure that the students
always remain the priority.
David Miller values all em-
ployees. He knows it takes
a team working together to
be successful. He has picked
us up and taken us to new
heights.
Education, legislation and
state requirements change
so rapidly it is imperative
that our superintendent is
someone who is current, has


stayed involved, can review
and assess new legislation
and determine exactly how to
best meet mandates. Whether
it is hard times or good times,
Wakulla schools continue
to improve while moving
forward.
I have watched surround-
ing counties struggle under
,the threat of being taken,
over by the Department Of
Education because of financial
difficulties. Year in and year
out, day in and day out, the
Wakulla County School Dis-
trict meets and exceeds state
averages and maintains fiscal
responsibility. We are doing a
lot of things the right way. I
am confident Wakulla County
Schools will continue to reach
new heights under the leader-
ship of Superintendent David
Miller.
David Miller is the best
candidate to lead the Wakulla
County School DIstrict into
the future. I am supporting
Superintendent David Miller
and will certainly do so on
Nov. 4. Keep Wakulla kids first
and vote for Superintendent
David Miller.
Mike Falk
Panacea


smiling assistant will have
distracted the masses to the
point that they will have
missed how the party sells its
snake oil to the gullible who
want to trust what they see.
In a flashing signal of des-
peration the Republican presi-
dential campaign is endors-
ing the idea that we should
believe what we hear. I would
suggest that you look at the
assistant much more closely.
A good magician's assistant
does not discredit the magic
act but rather confirms that


the magician has powers
beyond understanding. If we
allow this kind of theater to
continue in the White House,
in the words of the Wall Street
Journal: "By electing her to
the high office she seeks, we
are encouraging her to bungle
everything that comes her
way."
Magicians have a role in
our society. Just please, not in
the White House.
Madeleine H. Carr
Crawfordville


WEEK IN WAKULLA
Thursday, October 16, 2008
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB meets at Posey's Up the Creek
in Panacea at noon.
MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA, a fellowship of men
who gather to share and support one another in the quest
for authentic manhood, meets "outback" (behind)
Cornerstone Ministries at 6:30 p.m. For more information,
call at 508-2560.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at 12 noon.
VFW BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road
from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Friday, October 17, 2008
AA meets at the American Legion Building next to the
Women's Club in Crawfordville with an open meeting at
'8 p.m. There are also open meetings
FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public
library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa's Episcopal
Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
GOLF TOURNAMENT, sponsored by the Wakulla
County Weatherization Department, will be held at
Wildwood Country Club beginning at 8:30 a.m. Fee is $50
per person and includes a buffet lunch.
PARKINSON'S SUPPORT GROUP meets at the senior center
at 1 p.m.
PICKIN' 'N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at the
,senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
Saturday, October 18, 2008
HORSE-O-WEEN and FALL CARNIVAL, presented by the
Wakulla County Horseman's Association, will be held at
the livestock pavilion from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. There will
be a horse and human costume contest at 10 a.m., speed
events at noon, a pinata at 3 p.m., plus face painting and
carnival games throughout the day.
HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE DAY will be held at the
Trice Lane Annex, 340 Trice Lane, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Businesses must sign up in advance by calling 926-3153
for disposal from noon to 1 p.m.
KIDS FOR OBAMA RALLY will be held at Azalea Park from
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Bring a covered dish to share for lunch.
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 56 Lower Bridge Road, at
5 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.
ST. MARKS RIVER FESTIVAL will be celebrated throughout
St. Marks from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
WALK-A-THON, a two-mile walk to benefit Epilepsy
Association of the Big Bend, will be held at the Wakulla
Station trailhead from 10 a.m. to noon. Registration will
begin at 9 a.m. The walk will be led by the Tallahassee
Rollergirls roller derby team.
WINTER SPORTS REGISTRATION will be held at the
recreation park in Medart from 8 a.m. to noon.
(Also Saturday, Oct. 25.)
YARD SALE, to benefit the Wakulla Pregnancy Center, will be .
held at center from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The center is located
at 886 Woodville Highway in Wakulla Station, next to the
Kast Net restaurant.
Sunday, October 19, 2008
MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA meets at First Baptist
Church of Crawfordville at 7 p.m.
Monday, October 20, 2008
COUNTY COMMISSION meets in the commission.
boardroom at 6 p.m.
SCHOOL BOARD meets in the school administration
building at 5:45 p.m.
Tuesday, October 21, 2008
BOOK BABIES, for infants and toddlers, will be held at the
public library at 10:30 a.m.
CANDIDATE FORUM, sponsored by Concerned Citizens
of Wakulla (CCOW), will be held at the public library from
7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The forum will include candidates for
property appraiser, sheriff, school superintendent, and
supervisor or elections.


I'


we ~3akura ~e~s


The Wakulla News (USPS 644-640) is published weekly at
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla
News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfoirdville, FL 32326-0307.
General Manager:,Tammie Barfield........................ tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Editor: Keith Blackmar.......................................kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Reporter: William Snowden................................ wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton............advertising@thewakullanews.net
Graphic Artist: Eric Schlegel.............................advertising@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey ...................kinsey@thewakullanews.net
Bookkeeping: Sherry Balchuck..........................accounting@thewakullanews.net
Classifieds/In House Sales: Denise Folh.............. classifieds@thewakullanews.net
Circulation: Sherry Balchuck.............................. circulation@thewakullanews.net
Copy Editor: Karen Tully
Publisher Emeritus: William.M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable
one year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $25, Out of County $30 .
Out of State $35. Out of Country on Request















THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008 Page 3A


Come to the source for information about budget


Editor, The News:
I am very concerned about po-
litical comments made about the
Wakulla County Sheriff's Office's
budget. I have been the Sheriff's
Office Finance Director for the past
eight years. Prior to working for Sher-
iff Harvey, I worked seven years for
a public accounting firm preparing
taxes and auditing nonprofits and
government agencies.
It has been very difficult for me to
sit at county budget meetings or read
in The Wakulla News erroneous facts
about the Sheriff's Office budget. I
have looked past these comments
for the past few years, mainly be-
cause the individuals making them
never seem to have anything nice to
say about anything. However, today
I am fed up with the politics.
First, I want to clarify, and feel
ridiculous that I would even have
to say this, that anyone who would
like to see "a line-by-line accounting
of the sheriff's office spending" is
welcome to come by. Our records


are open to everyone and always
have been. The only reason anyone
would not know how the money at
the sheriff's office is spent is because
they haven't asked. We have always
complied with all county reporting
requirements and are here to comply
with your requests as well. There is
so much to know, with six budgeted
departments and more than 165
employees.
I have personally made an open
invitation to Dr. Kessler mpny times
to view any of our financial docu-
ments. We have also invited him to
visit our communications center and
ride with our deputies. He has not
come by yet. When he does, he will
find a hard working, underpaid force
that is prudently spending taxpayer
dollars.
Secondly, I feel Sheriff Harvey
should not be attacked for accepting
the reinstatement of cut funds from
his current budget. Sheriff Harvey's
decision was made for financial rea-
sons. It was made for the safety of


the citizens of Wakulla County. Dr.
Kessler's decision to attack him for
this is for pure political reasons. We
felt the ramifications of the cuts were
just too severe.
Sheriff Harvey told me, "No mat-
ter who is in office, this money will
be needed." I respect him for that;
Did it hurt him politically? Only
to those who have chosen not to
learn the truth. Those who know
the finances of the WCSO, know the
money is needed and is being well
spent.
Last week, Dr. Kessler made the
decision to not support the SWAT
team. At the onset of the budget pro-
cess, the county administrator gave
everyone the direction to become
less dependent on the county's Gen-
eral Fund. Our SWAT team has done
just that by generating money from
a course they teach. It was for pure
political reasons that Dr. Kessler was
the only county commissioner who
choose not only to vote no, but also
to attack Sheriff Harvey once again.


Lastly, on more than one occasion
I have heard or read in print the
statement regarding the WCSO bud-
get increasing by over 100 percent in
the past five years. This statement
is incorrect. The fact is the WCSO
General Fund budget has increased
by 46 percent in the past five years.
I find this reasonable considering
the population growth of over 20
percent and inflation rate of over
2.5 percent a year. I would also like
to brag on our agency by saying that
for the eight years I have been here
and many years before, the Sheriff's
Office has received a perfect audit
report.
Sheriff Harvey has brought so
much to the Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office. Last year, the WCSO received
more than $600,000 in grant and
contract money. We administer three
grants for the youth of the county, of-
fering programs that include alcohol
and drug prevention and mentoring
to at risk youth, just to name a few.
There is so much that Sheriff


Harvey does for the community that
goes unrecognized. He has always
been very supportive of any recom-
mendations that I may make and I
feel very fortunate to be working
for him. So the next time you hear
a negative comment regarding the
Sheriff's Office budget, please con-
sider the motive of the speaker.
I have heard so many incorrect
statements. However none of these
speakers have ever asked me to vali-
date their comments. I wonder why?
I see every check that is disbursed
from the Sheriff's Office, and I can
assure you that these expenditures
are reasonable, allowable and serve
a public purpose. I am available to
answer any questions that any of
you may have regarding the Wakulla
County Sheriff's Office budget.

Mary Dean Barwick,
Certified Public Accountant
Crawfordville


U.S. Government should sell off assets


Editor, The Newss
Let's compare the U.S. Gov-
ernment to a multi-millionaire
with multiple assets who
becomes broke. What does he
do? He sells his assets to satis-
fy his debts. The U.S. taxpayers
own untold millions of acres
of federal land. They should
sell enough of this asset to
get out of this financial messl
They should overrule the eco-


terrorists and do something
that will benefit U.S. citizens
including allowing drilling for
our oil wherever it is located.
The government calls this a
bailout. I call it nationalizing.
What is next?
The Democrats, Barney
Frank, Chuck Schumer and
others, are pointing their
finger at the Bush administra-
tion who in 2003 tried to get a


reform bill through congress,
but it was defeated by Barney
and Chuck and their Demo-
cratic allies. If they want to
blame someone, just look in
the mirror.
The root of this disaster
started with the Carter ad-
ministration with a federal
law forcing banks and other
lending institutions to provide
loans for affordable hous-


ing, that was later labele
sub prime loans. The loar
went to people who coul
not afford the payments an
everyone knew it. If Obama
elected president, before h
term expires, the United State
of America will be changed t
The United Socialist States
America (USSA).
James Johnson
Crawfordville


School did not prepare me for working world


Editor, The News:
I grew up in Wakulla Coun-
ty schools, and for the past
four years drove every day
from the outskirts of Craw-
fordville to Wakulla High
School just for a diploma. My
goal was to begin working
as a farrier after graduation.
I have never been interested


in going to college, so I found
a trade that I enjoy and can
make good money with. Go-
ing to school was always a
challenge and my interests
never had anything to do with
being in school. The classes
at Wakulla High were never
for me and if it wasn't for
carpentry, and finally being


able to go to work for half a
day my senior year, I probably
wouldn't have graduated. My
whole family has gone to
Wakulla schools and it is sad
how little opportunity there
is for students like me, who
already had a job lined up. I
had some good teachers at
Wakulla High School, and I


don't want to offend the]
or anyone else who work
hard to see me graduate, but
do not think Wakulla school
prepared me for the working
world.
Justin J. Morgan
2008 Graduate
Crawfordville


Don't make changes for the sake of change


Editor, The News: If the officials have not of change without cause or
In America with a free provided the service and sup- reason. There needs to be
Democracy, elections are and port necessary, have failed to purpose for change.
should be a time of focus, utilize resources and finances Conversely, if nothing is
interest and excitement by prudently, or tley have acted wrong, and, in fact, an agency
the voting public. It is the inappropriately, then elections or an elected official is recog-
time we hold our public of- are the time for change. nized for success and)good
ficials accountable for how It is wrong, however, to ap- performance, then there is no
they have performed, or not proach elections as a change need for change. The elected
performed, agent simply for the purpose official should be recognized


It is as simple as A-B-C-D

Editor, The News:
Change is as simple as A-B-C-D.


and rewarded by voters to con
tinue their respective efforts
Changes in public office a
often needed, but only if it
deserved. Remember the ol
adage,"If it ain't broke, don
fix itl"
Leanne Sanders
Crawfordville


Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary defines "change" but we can put a face to this definition.
Ahrendt To replace with another.
Artz To make a shift from one to another.
Barack Obama To make radically different.
Brock, Jenny To undergo a modification.
Carter To make a shift from one to another.
Creel To give a different position or direction.
Doug Jones To make different in some particular way.
Doyle To undergo transformation, or substitute.
Remember A-B-C-D on Nov. 4 and vote for change. Candidates were not born in Wakulla, so that would be real change
Karen Knowles
Crawfordville


Thanks for the support at time of loss


Editor, The News:
The family of Cherrie L.
Whaley and A.P. "Al" Whaley,
Jr. would like to say thank you
for the prayers and support we
received during the loss of our
beloved "mammy" and the ill-
ness and loss of A.P., Becky's


soulmate and our all-round
great dad.
We would especially like
to express our gratitude to
Big Bend Hospice, American
Legion Post #82 (Lanark), Lake
Ellen Baptist Church, Pastor
Keith Wallace, Harbor Breeze


Assisted Living Facility and 'time we had with mammy and
Harvey-Young Funeral Home. daddy (Al). They are greatly
We could not have made it -missed.
through without those of you Becky Whaley,
who rallied around us and Jo Ann Taylor,
helped so much during that Lynn Mayfield,
stressful time. Jud Miller,
We are truly grateful for the Kelly Hall and families


Who needs telephone calls from candidates?


Editor, The News:
I am receiving unsolicited
pre-recorded calls (866-346-
2708) from the Obama cam-
paign' telling me how bad


John McCain's health' care
program is for me. My home
phone number is on the Na-
tional and State of Florida, Do
Not Call Registry.


.I have better things to do
than to be bothered with
these unsolicited, irritating
intrusions in my live. Is this
an example of the disrespect


Barak Hussein Obama has for.
our rights of privacy?
Alan Lamarche
Crawfordville


Donation would have gone to non-profit


Editor, The News:
In response to Fred Nich-
ols,
Sir, first let me say I com-
mend you for supporting your
administration. If you are
happy to work for Sheriff Har-
vey then I tip my hat to you. I
also respect you as a brother
in law enforcement.
In your response to my
last article you stated "we
did not send money to the
fallen officers foundation in
Washington."
That would lead the read-
ers to believe I was asking
you to send money to "Wash-
ington." Fred, your sheriff
was not asked to send money
to Washington. I wanted to
set the record straight.
In May 1997, the Police
Unity Tour was organized


in an effort to bring about
public awareness of law en-
forcement officers who have
died in the line of duty and
to honor their sacrifices,
Additionally, it assists the
National Law Enforcement
Officer's Memorial Fund
with monetary support. This
mission is primarily accom-
plished through an annual bi-
cycle trek from various points
across the United States to
the Memorial, located in
Washington, D.C.
I am happy to say the
proceeds do not go to "Wash-
ington" as you have stated.
They go to a non-profit orga-
nization called The National
Law Enforcement Memorial
to honor fallen law enforce-
ment officers from all over
the country.


Last year it supported 187
fallen officers from our great
state. You see, Fred, the Law
Enforcement Memorial Fund
is a non-profit organization.
The Police Unity Tour is
a non-profit organization of
.law enforcement officers that
raise funds and awareness for
the Memorial because it is
not governmently funded.
.As a Wakulla County resi-
dent that makes me a part
of this community. As a law
enforcement officer and a
resident of this county I re-
quested help from the sheriff
of my community.
I did not ask the sheriff
to send money to Washing-
ton. I asked him to support
a good cause being headed
by law enforcement officers
who live in his community. I


knew that if I could get the
sheriff to support this cause,
I could educate people about
our fallen heroes 'and how
they could get involved and
support them.
I was reaching out to Sher-
iff Harvey because we lost
an officer in our community
and I thought he would jump
at the chance to support
this cause in his commu-
nity. Through your response
I understand now it was not
important enough for his
consideration because it was
not at a local level.
You see, Fred, that is why I
would be proud to call Char-
lie Creel sheriff because he
supports law enforcement at
all levels.
Sean Wyman
Crawfordville


Sometimes the older

d boots beat the newer
Is
Id Editor, The Newss
id Recently, my wife bought me a new pair of boots. When I
is asked her why she thought it necessary, she told me my old
is boots looked worn out and I needed a change. I explained to
es her in defense of my old boots, that they were comfortable
to and they did their job just fine.
of She then explained to me how she had paid good money
for the boots and I should at least try them on and wear them
for a few days. Well, I did, and they were not comfortable and
felt awkward.
I put them in the back of the closet and told her when my
old boots let me down then I might try the new ones again.
The reason I have written this letter is to remind the vot-
m ers of Wakulla County that elected officials, like good boots,
*d should not be thrown out just for the sake of change. We
t I have elected officials in our county who have done a great job
ls leading their respective departments from small operations
ig to what we have now.
As elected officials, I expect them to lobby for as much of
the county budget as they need. If they did not lobby for the
funds to finance their respective departments, then maybe
that department needs stronger representation.
Running for political office is not a popularity or beauty
contest. Look at the candidate's qualifications, especially their
Education and personal history. Ask yourself, what have they':
done in their personal life and what is their educational I
n- background? What will prepare them to head one of our
s. county departments? What are their realistic visions for the
re department's future?
is Also, look at the incumbent's history. What have they
Id accomplished for theiragency? An incumbent has to runon,
I't their past accomplishments and /or failures.
So folks, if we vote in a mistake on Nov. 4. we cat ptq
the mistake in the back or the closet like I did my new boots.
We've got to wear them for four years. So please, do your
homework and let's make the right decision during our up-
coming election.
Fraiser Martin
Panacea


Board must address


problems at bridge
The following letter was jumping off the bridge could.-
sent to Wakulla County Com- easily jump into a boaters/.
mission Chairman Ed Brimner fisherman boat while landing.
and The News. Also, these two groups seem
Editor, The News to be at odds when alcohol is
Chairman Brimner: involved.
The Wakulla County Sher- It is also important to note
iffs Office has been experienc- that both groups seem to very
ing ongoing problems at the much enjoy recreating at this
Wakulla River on Highway site.
365 and I have written several In any case, it is my recomn
previous letters, which are at- mendation, that- the board ,
tached. As previously stated, immediately take action,,to
we have received numerous first either close the ramp and
complaints, some of which fence off the bridge and road- ,
are criminal, including but way or to acquire the adjacent
not limited to the,following: land for ,a park and.provyide
littering; alcohol consumption safe parking ind facilities for;
by minors; assault and bat- bathrooms and a boat ramp.
tery; destruction of measuring The fence should be.erect-
equipment, and I' could go ed to stop the litter, decrease
on. Some of these calls have crime, divert hazardous be -
resulted in arrests of indi- havior and disconftir ise swim
viduals and they have been ming at this location, which
transported to the Wakulla may save someone's life.,
County Jail. I want to make It very clar
SThe above described prob- that the sheriffs officetan re-
lems are creating a safety spbnd and does respond to all
hazard and a very dangerous calls at this location and will
environment at this location continue to do so. However,
that needs the immediate at- this will not, and I emphasize
tention of the board. will not, solve this issue. The
There seems to be. two traffic safety,committee has
different groups using this made numerous recommenda-
location. One I would classify tions and I suggest the board
as a boaters/fisherman group, immediately take action. The
and the other as a swim- liability to the county and the
rmers/young' partying group, dangers to our citizens are of
Frequently these two groups utmost urgency,
seem to come into conflict David F. Harvey
and fights occur. Swimmers Sheriff, Wakulla County


Letters Policy
The Wakulla News welcomes your letters, but we request
that you adhere to the following guidelines:
Letters should not be longer than 300 words.
They must include the writers name, home address and
telephone number. (Only name and town will be listed the
reast is used solely for the purpose of verification.)
Writers may be limited to one letter per month, depend-
ing upon space limitations.
With very few exceptions, anonymous letters will not
be published. I '
Letters can be sent via mail or e-mail to kblackmar@'
thewakullanews.net), or they can be dropped off at our,
Crawfordville Highway office. The Wakulla News reserves (
the right to edit all letters.














Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008


Church


Obituaries
Beatrice S. Farmer
Beatrice Simmons Farmer,
81, of Crawfordville died Sun-
day. Oct. 5.
The funeral service will be
held Saturday, Oct. 18 at 2 p.m.
at River of Life Church. Burial
will be at Walker Cemetery.
A native of Wakulla County,
she was born Sept. 15, 1927.
Her parents were the late
James "Jim Shine" and Luvida
Allen Simmons.
Survivors include three
sons, Eddie Lee Farmer, Jr. and
Dale, LC. Farmer and Sherry,
and Michael Loggins and La-
wana; five daughters, Wilma
Hall and Mose, Lessie Sapp
and Todd, Brenda Forbes and
Carl, Tammy Bowdry of Craw-
fordville and Vivian Watts of
Beauford, S.C.; 17 grandchil-
dren; 33 great-grandchildren;
two great-great-grandchildren;
and a host of nieces, nephews,
cousins and friends.
Strong and Jones Funeral
Home in Tallahassee is in
charge of the arrangements.

Leon M. Herndon
Leon Merida Herndon, 55,
of Sopchoppy died Tuesday,
Oct. 7, in Tallahassee.
The funeral service was
held Monday, Oct. 13, at
Sopchoppy Southern Baptist
Church.
He has lived in this area
five years, coming from Ho-
mosassa. He was of the Bap-
tist faith. He retired from the
U.S. Navy after 30 years of
service. He worked as Public
Works Director of the Island.
Diego Garcia in the Indian
Ocean. He loved to hunt and
loved spending time with his
family.
Survived by his wife of 35
years, Linda Herndon of Sop-
choppy; two sons, Joe Hern-
don, Diego Garcia and Jesse
Herndon, all of Sopchoppy; a
daughter, Sharyn Trawick and
husband William of Wiggins,
Miss.; two brothers, Maurice
HeI~docn' nd wife Elaine 'o
Sophoppy and Marin Hern-
don' of Crawfordville; two
sisters, Anita Gonzalez and
husband Edward of Inverness
and Doylene Kelly and hus-
band Arlo of Crawfordville; six
grandchildren. Josh Herndon,
Tiffany Herndon, Cheyenne
Trawick, Dakota Trawick, Lo-
gan Trawick and Jessica Allen;


N'


a great-grandchild, Cadence
Herndon; and many nieces
and nephews.
Harvey-Young Funeral
Home in Crawfordville was in
charge of the arrangements.

Arthur J. Lee
Arthur J. "Buster" Lee, 78,
of Quincy died Friday, Oct. 3,
in Tallahassee.
The funeral service was
held Tuesday, Oct. 7, at Fel-
lowship Baptist Church in
Tallahassee, with burial at
Roselawn Cemetery in Tal-
lahassee.
Memorial contributions
may be made to Brewer Lake
Baptist Church Building Fund.
P.O. Box 545, Day, FL 32013 or
Antioch Baptist Church, 284
McCall Bridge Road, Quincy,
FL 32351 or the American
Heart Association, 2851 Rem-
ington Green Cir., Tallahassee,
FL 32308.
A native of Taylor County,
he was raised in Mayo, and
moved to Tallahassee in 1948.
He moved to Quincy upon his
retirement. He retired as an
accountant with the City of
Tallahassee and was a Driv-
ers License Inspector for the
Florida Department of Mo-
tor Vehicles. He was also an
owner of Colonial Liquors in
Tallahassee.
He was a member of Brew-
er Lake Baptist Church, was a
life member of B.P.O.E., Lodge
#937, a member of the Loyal
Order of Moose Lodge #1075,
a member of the American
Legion and the Farm Bureau
of Lafayette County and a
veteran of the United States
Army.
Survivors include his wife,
Annette B. Lee of Quincy; five
sons, Harold Lee and June,
Richard Lee and Hui and Bart
Wells and Becky, all of Talla-
hassee, and Terry Wells and
Jay Lee, both of Quincy; two
daughters, Cricket Lee of Tal-
lahassee and Cathy Griner and
Craig of'Havana; twd sisters,
Mary Barclay and Donnie of
Greenville and Edith Lee of
Tallahassee; his "adopted"
brother, Hansel Scarbrough
and Vivian of Tallahassee; 12
grandchildren, Erica Lee and
Brian, Nick Lee and Felesity,
Adam Lee, Michele Lee, Crissy
Lee and Brian, Clay Wells, Ash-
ley Lafferty and Jarrett, Nicole


- Crawfordville United

Methodist Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 926-7209
Ochlockonee & Arran Road 'Come Grow With Us' www.crawfordville-ame.org

Weekend Meeting
at

New Home Baptist Church
786 Sopchoppy Hwy (US 319)
850-545-9910
With Evangelist Darrell Weaver
Oct,. 17th., 18th. @7:30pm &
19th. @11:00am & 6:00pm



kIA1oActuen ment tfe
5585 Qrawfordville Hwy.
Tallahassee, FL 32305
Owned & Operated By Wesley Schweinsberg
Son of the Late Harold Schweinsberg
Office: (850) 421-7211 Mobile: (850) 510-3983
Call and Compare... You'll Save Time & Money
Same Quality & Service


Lee and Chris, Elizabeth Wells,
Jenny Lee, Lauren Lee and Lee
Griner; one great-grandson,
Jackson Lee; two sisters-in-
law, Mary Ellen Lee and Joyce
Lee; and two brothers-in-law,
Mardie Owens and Jimmy
Buchanan.
Bevis Funeral Home of Tal-
lahassee was in charge of the
arrangements.

Deborah W. H. Marten
Deborah Whaley Hawkins
Marten, 56, of Tallahassee
died Thursday, Oct. 2, in Tal-
lahassee.
Graveside funeral services
were held on Saturday, Oct. 4,
at Lake Ellen Baptist Church
Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to Big Bend Hos-
pice. 1823 Mahan Center Blvd.,
Tallahassee, Florida 32308 or
Sopchoppy Southern Baptist
Church Building Fund, 117
Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy,
Florida 32358.
"Debbie" was born in Ft.
Lee, Va., on Dec. 9, 1951 to Wil-
liam E. Whaley and Helen Eu-
banks Whaley. She graduated
from Wakulla High School and
attended Tallahassee Junior
College.
Debbie lived in Tallahassee
before moving to Clearwater
and Albany, Ga. She resided
in Tallahassee for the past 16
years and was a member of
Sopchoppy Southern Baptist
Church.
Survivors include her son,
Paul Jackson "Jack" Hawkins
and wife Maribel, and grand-
daughter, Hayden Elizabeth
Hawkins of St. Petersburg;
her mother, Helen Whaley
of Crawfordville; a brother,
Stan Whaley of Tallahassee; a
sister, Denise Whaley Crabtree
and husband Dennis; two
nephews, Jacob and Spencer
Crabtree of Dunedin; several
aunts, uncles and cousins;
and a wonderful caregiver,
Lyn Tharpe, and her daughter
Jamie Smith and their families
who were Debbie's caregivers


SWakulla United
Methodist Church
Sunday Contemporay Senice 8:30 am.
Sunday School forall ages -10 am.
Sunday \orship- 11 am.
Wednesday Senice 7 p.m.


1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor Janic Henry Rinebart


Pioneer Baptist
Church (SBC)


Sunday School


9:15 a.m.


Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.
Wed. adult, children & youth 7p.m.
486 Beechwood Drive Crawfordville, FL.
(North of the Lower Bridge Road and
Spring Creek Highway intersection)
Rev. Dennis Hall, Pastor
850-926-6161


and best friends for the past
11 years.
Harvey-Young Funeral
Home in Crawfordville was in
charge of the arrangements.

Paul T. Presnell
Paul Thomas "Tom"
Presnell, 85, of the Hardaway
community died Saturday,
Oct. 11.
The graveside service was
held Tuesday, Oct. 14, at Mt.
Pleasant Cemetery, in Mt.
Pleasant, Fla.
A lifelong resident of the
Hardaway Community, he
was a member of Greensboro
Baptist Church and served in
the Army during World War II
in the European Theatre.
Survivors include his wife
of 67 years, Louvenia Presnell
of the Hardaway community; a
son, Paul "Tommy Presnell, Jr.
of the Hardaway community;
a brother, Perry M. Presnell of
Crawfordville; and a host of
nieces and nephews.
Independent Funeral Home
in Quincy was in charge of the
arrangements.

Glendell O.Young
Glendell Oliver Young,
73, of Thomasville, Ga. died
Wednesday, Oct. 8, in Thom-
asville.
The funeral service was
held Saturday, Oct. 11, at Har-
vey-Young Funeral Home in
Crawfordville with burial at
Friendship Cemetery in Craw-
fordville. Memorial contribu-
tions may be made to Hospice
of Thomas County. Ga.
She was a native of Spring
Creek and was a member
of the Panacea Full Gospel
Church. She was a home-
maker.
Survivors include her hus-
band of 54 years, Leonard


f Panacea Park1


Young of Thomasville, Ga.;
a son, William Young of St.
Marks; a daughter, Patricia
White of Tallahassee; a broth-
er, Parnel Oliver of Tallahas-
see; a sister, Dannie Langston
of Wakulla Station; 11 grand-
children; and 13 great-grand-
children.
Harvey-Young Funeral
Home in Crawfordville was in
charge of the arrangements.


Worship

Center

hosts events
The Christian Worship
Center, 3922 Coastal Highway
in Crawfordville, will host a
revival with speaker T.R. Wil-
liams from Five Points, Tenn
through Oct. 17 at 7 p.m.
nightly.
On Oct. 25, a building
fundraiser, car wash, bake
sale and peanut boil will be
held at Wakulla Realty near
Winn-Dixie.
On Oct. 26, the Pastor Ap-
preciation Day in honor of
Steve and Malissa Taylor will
be held along with recognition
for the late Steve Harrell and
Catherine Harrell, senior pas-
tors. Dinner on the grounds
will be held following the
morning services.


FIRST
Bapssl Chulch
I,


3086 Crawfordville Hwy.
(South of the Courthouse)
Church Office: 926-7896
www.fbccrawfordville.org
or
(youth) www.crosstraining.org


SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Fellowship Meal 6:00 p.m.
(call for reservations)
Prayer/ Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
IMPACT (Youth) 7:00 p.m.
Children's Events 6:30 p.m.


Church

News

Blessed

Hope hosts

revival
Blessed Hope of the Liv-
ing God Ministry will host
a revival Wednesday, Oct. 15
to Friday, Oct. 17 at 7 p.m.
nightly. The church will also
host a fish fry and chicken
dinner on Saturday, Oct. 25 at
11 a.m. Proceeds will benefit
the church.
The church is located at
1455 Woodville Highway and
Grady Harper is pastor.

Keep Wau(lla
County Beautfu


Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worship ..................10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .............5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details,
962-2213
r I


Sopchoppy Trinity
-United Lutheran

Methodist Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Church Web site:


Af -m


*B saint ieresa
Baptist Church Episcopal
24 Mission Roa, Paacea church
Sunday School 10 a.m.
1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
W 6u_ At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98


Worship I ia.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 p.m.
Pastor, Jerry Spears




ePreabyterme t
3383 Coastal Hwy.
1/3rd mile east of Wakulla High School
9:30 a.m. Bible Study
10:30 a.m. Worship Service
10:45 a.m. Children's Sunday School
Nursery Provided
926-4569
www.wakullapres.org
: IA4


fus N
tare resut Alway PWd a /
Vi.W 4ey#oiw ,a stor


Holy Eucharist
10:30 am
The Reverend Roy Lime
926-1742


Ocklockonee

0 ay
United
Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship 9 a.m.
Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
Pastor Orett Zempleton
(850) 984-0127


Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Vicar Bert Matlock
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557


I missionary
Baptist Church
90 Mt. Pleasant Lane,
Wakulla Station
Pastor Rev. Dr. Frank McDonald, Jr.
421-8900
Sunday School Each Sunday... 10 a.m.
1s & 3" Sun. Worship ..........11 a.m.
Wednesday Service ....... 7 p.m.
(Prayer Meeting and Bible Study)
ur Mission "To be a change agent in
the community for the glory of .God.


St. Elizabeth -
Ann Seton
Catholic C
Mass 9 a.m. Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Father James MacGee, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
926-1797

Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
n||| | Crawforville.
Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey
C~ dIn* N"Nr'," Vs"
926-IVAN(4826):
Sunday.School....................... 10a.m.
Sunday Worship......................11 a.m.
Evening Worship......................6 p.m.
Wednesday Service ................. 7 p.m.
& Youth Service....................7 p.m.
Royal Rangers..................... p.m.
Missionettes .................... ...... 7 p.m.


Who is the latest

Wakulla Wavemaker?"

Tune in daily at

2 p.m. and 6 p.m.





THE WORD IN PRAISE



WAKU 94.1 FM www.wave94.com
926-8000 (fax: 926-2000)


~sjcoa,',,r ~t~e' i4,/&ec


U 8:30am Holy
Eucharist Rite One
9:30am Youth & Adults
10:30am Sunday School
10:30am Holy Eucharist
Nursery care available
850-745-8412
4340 Crawfordville Highway


Hwy 319 Medart,
Office 926-5265
SEarly Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
AWANA 4:00 p.m.
Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.


Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org


117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy


Sunday School 9:45 AM
Church Office Morning Worship 11 AM
962-7822 AWANA CLUB 5PM
Evening Worship 6 PM

Wednesday 7 PM Praver Meeting,
Youth & Children's Programs
Dr. Bill Jenkins, Pastor
Randy Anderson, Minister of Music
Vicki Anderson, Youth Director
Jerry Euans, Mike Crouch, Bernie Kemp Musicians


-.j


i


E 4
cp0
Church^
















Home Hemodialysis


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008 Page 5A

Candidates


Continued from Page 1A
The couple was trained to
use the machine in July and
began the home treatments
in August. Crum had been in-
volved in Leon County dialysis
treatments sinLe January.
"I just want people in
Wakulla County to know
that this kind of treatment is
available," said Donnie. "It is
new to this area. There is a
tremendous cost savings as
well as mileage in going to
the clinic three times a week.
At the clinic, you go on their
time. At home, you do dialysis
around your life."
Donnie has been able to
continue his administrative
work at the sheriff's office
since his home treatment
takes place in the late af-
ternoon and early evening
hours.
The Crums have created a
dialysis room in their home
since Donnie gets to spend
three to fours hours in treat-
ment each day.
As CHP patients, the Crums
have most of their expenses


paid by insurance.
Alicia has a degree in crimi-
nology and is in her third year
teaching English at Wakulla
High School, but she speaks
and acts like a medical tech-
nician as she administers her
husband's treatments.
"He has his energy and
appetite back," she said. "The
machine is pretty easy to
use."
"It has put some normalcy
back in my life," said Donnie.
"I feel so much better. It's like
night and day."
Crum said his coworkers at
the sheriffs office have been
very supportive and he is
pleased to be able to continue
to work.
Donnie joked that he is
able to take a day off from
treatment and take Alicia "on
a date" to Tallahassee.
"He was getting very home-
bound and depressed," said
Alicia of Donnie's health prob-
lems. "He likes fo work."
"It's really working out well
for me," he said. "I can work
at the office and at home."


Eighth grade daughter, Nata-
lie, also takes part in some of
the dialysis functions and has
been understanding that her
parents might miss some of
her sporting events because
they have dialysis time com-
mitments on most days.
"People can come and visit
with me and you can watch
your own television and be
with your family," said a
pleased Crum.
Alicia sounds like she has
been to medical school be-
cause she attended the inten-
sive training to learn how to
use the Divita A Home Dialy-
sis machine.
"It's been a long struggle,"
she concluded. "We've had a
few other (health) obstacles."
"It takes a dedicated part-
ner" to complete the treat-
ments, added Donnie as he
settled in his comfortable
chair with Alicia nearby taking
blood pressure readings and
dog, Bella wagging her tail for
attention nearby. "I've learned
a whole lot about this by go-
ing on the Internet."


St. Marks Refinery


Continued from Page 1A
The City of Tallahas-
see, which owns adjoining
property where the Purdom
Power Plant is located, won
a default judgment against
the refinery for pollution
that has seeped onto its
land. But Tallahassee has
no interest in the land itself,
only recouping the costs of
the cleanup of its land.
"It won't be cheap to fin-
ish the cleanup that DEP
started," Cantner warned.
"It will be hundreds of thou-
sands (of dollars), not mil-
lions."
Should St. Marks get the
land, state law holds that the
city couldcnot be held liable
for any pollution prior to its
ownership.
McMurry suggested the
city commission consider
an ordinance to declare the
refinery site a brownfield
- that is, a industrial pol-
luted site to strengthen
the grant application. Such

Kids Rally

set Oct. 18
Laurel Keys stopped by the
Wakulla County for Barack
Obama Headquarters to pick
up some Barack Obama for
President stickers, and yard signs
with her mom, Kellie. While
there, they asked if the Wakulla
County for Barack Obama cam-
paign would be holding any
kids rallies? The answer was
that none were planned. They
decided to help organize one.
So Laurel is announcing a
kids rally Saturday, Oct. 18 in
Azalea Park from 11:30 a.m. until
1:30 p.m. It will be a covered
dish rally to get the children and
their parents involved. Please
bring some good healthy food,
balloons, and any Barack Obama
signs to place around the park.
For more information, please
call the Wakulla County for
Barack Obama HQ at 926-1100.


F Y.I.
Your Tax Dollars
1 student = $7,952.42
2 Administrators & their :
secretaries = $628,943.99
.. Is this Putting Kids First?
I think NOT! Look at your Tax Bill.
Can you afford David Miller?
I think NOT!
PaMPomtlaseur ertpaidtby o TBasr rftd,
P.O. fo 1478, a. Fe, raw L 33226, kdepnder*yof aMl cndld,8
Thsadilwsgmetwasnat aoedlbyimnycandiat .









'-7A-D ESI6N. s
926-2211
North Pointe Center


a brownfield declaration
would require two adver-
tised public hearings to give
the company or other party
a chance to object, the at-
torney said.
The commission voted to
move forward with the grant
proposal and the ordinance.
Even if the move should
falter at some stage say
that the holder of one of the
tax liens should push for a
tax deed to the property it
would still leave the city in a
better posture to get the site
cleaned up than it has now.
And at this point, there's
not much cost to city to pro-
ceed beyond its attorney fees
and advertising.
"It's a win-win situation,"
Mayor Steve Dunbar said.
The 55-acre tract was used
as a refinery for decades.
beginning in the 150s. Oil
from Venezeula was brought
by barge to the site, which
has frontage on the St. Marks
River, and refined into jet


fuel. The facility was oper-
ated as Seminole Refinery
for years, mostly producing
asphalt.
A few years ago, after
some fishermen on the river
noticed suspicious fluids
running from a creek on the
property and called in a re-
port to DEP, the state agency
found extensive pollution
on the site: petrochemicals
associated with refining as
well as dioxins, tanks held
fluids though they were
supposed to be empty, and
a large "wart pond" on the
back of the property where
asphalt byproducts were
dumped.
St. Marks Refinery had
bought the site in the 1980s
with assurances from the
state it would not be held
responsible for pre-existing
pollution there. SMR was
later purchased by American
International Petroleum Cor-
poration. In 2004, AIPC filed
for bankruptcy protection.


You must be a Wakulla Resident
for at least.the last year.
WHERE: Ameris Bank
WHEN: Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2008
TIME: 6:30 P.M. enter through back door
Bring paperwork to verify your income,
dependants, savings and expenses, driver's
licenses for all drivers and social security cards
for everyone that will live in your home.
If you have questions please call:
Brenda Posey 926-5211 Linda Boles 926-6222


Habitat for Humanity
of Wakulla

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Advertisement


Continued from Page 1A
Jenny Brock offered up
ideas like petro-algae farms
to produce biofuel and spoke
of wood pellet fuel to gener-
ate electricity. "We need to
diversify," Brock said, warning
that the county had become
focused on only one industry:
building houses.
Alan Brock said the com-
munity had become polarized
between the business commu-
nity and environmentalists, a
split that forced the thinking
that it had to be all one way or
the other. "Everybody has the
same vision (for the county),"
he said, and offered himself
as someone able to bridge
that gap and find common
ground.
Stewart said the natural
beauty of Wakulla draws peo-
ple. "People want to live here,
so you've got to protect that
growth."
On the impact fee morato-
rium, the female candidates
all disagreed. The men, while
expressing admiration for the
intent, all insisted it was done
wrong.
On the issue of approving a
charter, Jenny Brock and Doyle
said they supported it, while
Alan Brock said there were
pros and cons to each but the
process had been unnecessar-
ily rushed, and Stewart said he
was against it and that most
voters didn't understand the
full impact of the charter. (Artz
and Stokley were not asked
the question.)
On the issue of relieving
heavy traffic on U.S. 319, Artz
said she supported some
form of public transit, such as
working with the City of Tal-
lahassee to get express vans or
buses to and from Tallahassee
so that commuters could con-
nect with city buses there.
Stokley said it was time
for residents to consider car-
pooling. His wife, he said, has
commuted to Tallahassee for
work for 30 years. The widen-
ing of U.S. 319 is an issue that
needs to be taken to legisla-
tors at the state capitol and
say, "Look, something's got to


First Reading Date:
Second Reading Date:
Location:


give," Stokley said.
Stewart said that after he
left the commission, the U.S.
319 Widening Committee
fell apart. The four-laning of
the road has now dropped
from the state's 10 Year Plan,
Stewart said, adding that the
only way something is going
to happen with that project is
if local officials and Wakulla
citizens are "jumping up on
desks" at the Capitol.
Jenny Brock, in a ques-
tion about energy costs, also
suggested some form of bus
service to Tallahassee, adding
that she's aware of fuel cell
buses used in Washington,
D.C.
Alan Brock also indicated
his support for some form of
mass transit for commuters,
but warned that, realistically,
the numbers may not show it
to be economically feasible.
Jenny Brock, a retired school
teacher, presented herself as
an environmentalist, seeking
innovative solutions to the
county's problems,
Alan Brock, executive direc-
tor of a nonprofit early child-
hood development program
called Whole Child Leon,
promoted himself as someone
who could bring the various
parts of the community to-
gether and touted his youth
as an asset.
One area where the two
offered different, but not nec-
essarily conflicting, views was
for stretch on Crawfordville
Highway between Wal-Mart
and Bloxham. Jenny Brock was
critical of a look of strip malls
along the road, and said there
needed to be secondary roads
on any commercial develop-
ment there to get traffic off
U.S. 319. Alan Brock viewed
the area from Wal-Mart south
to the courthouse as having'
become a sort of "commercial
hub" and that it was a proper


area for development.
It was a repentant Stewart,
who served eight years on
the board before losing to Ed
Brimner four years ago, who
offered himself as someone
who had made mistakes in
the past, had learned from
those mistakes, and would do
things differently. He didn't
offer any specific mistakes he
had made, saying "It would
take too long," but on the is-
sue of a water bottling plant
in the county, said he would
listen more to the science and
scientists in making a deci-
sion. He touted his experience
as allowing him "to hit the
deck running" if elected.
Doyle, a self-described
"thorn in the side of the
county commission," pre-
sented herself as someone
who would work very hard
and represent everyone on
the board.
Artz, a retired cardiologist,
presented herself as one who
is concerned about the envi-
ronment and who wants to
seek out what she sees as the
vast wealth of knowledge that
county residents have and put
them work on coming up with
ways to solve the county's
problems.
Stokley, a retired industrial
firefighter for St. Marks Pow-
der, sees himself as fortunate
to live and work in Wakulla
County, whose very first job
was working as a ranger at
Ochlockonee River State Park,
and who described how every-
day he sees the people coming
in and out of St Marks Pow-
der, the workers, whom he
described as "people pursuing
their dreams."
The forum was recorded
for broadcast by Comcast-The
next,broadcast is set for Fri-
day, Oct. 17, on cable channel
21 from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.


October 9, 2008 at 7:30 pm
October 30, 2008 at 5:15 pm
788 Port Leon Drive,
St. Marks FL 32355


The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone
(850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City
Office at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes.
The Board Office may be contacted at (850) 925-6224


CORRECTION
In the October 9th, 2008 edition of The Wakulla News the
political ad "F.Y.I." on' page 8-A did not include the political
disclaimer. This ad was a paid political advertisement paid for by
Donna Sanford, P.O. Box 1478, Crawfordville, FL 32326. The
advertisement was not approved by any candidate.


NEED A NEW HOME?


Come see ifyou qualify
for Habitat for Humanity's
Housing Program!


/Keep David dfi9


Millerds
OUR
School Superintendes


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING on PROVIDING FOR THE
ESTABLISHMENT OF A REDEVELOPMENT TRUST FUND

ORDINANCE 80-1 PROVIDING FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT
OF A REDEVELOPMENT TRUST FUND FOR COMMUNITY
REDEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE COMMUNITY
REDEVELOPMENT AREA; PROVIDING FOR
ADMINISTRATION OF THE REDEVELOPMENT TRUST
FUND; DETERMINING THE TAX INCREMENT TO BE
DEPOSITED IN THE REDEVELOPMENT TRUST FUND;
ESTABLISHING THE BASE YEAR FOR DETERMINING
ASSESSED VALUES OF PROPERTY IN THE COMMUNITY
REDEVELOPMENT AREA FOR TAX PURPOSES;
PROVIDING FOR THE ANNUAL APPROPRIATION OF THE
TAX INCREMENT BY TAXING AUTHORITIES IN THE
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AREA; APPOINTING THE
GOVERNING BODY OF THE COMMUNITY
REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY AS THE TRUSTEES OF THE
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT TRUST; EXEMPTING
CERTAIN SPECIAL DISTRICTS FROM THE ANNUAL
REQUIREMENT TO APPROPRIATE INCREMENT REVENUES
TO THE REDEVELOPMENT TRUST FUND; REPEALING
INCONSISTENT ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.

THE CITY OF ST. MARKS WILL HOLD A PUBLIC
HEARING


40e%












Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008


People


Wallace and Wright will marry St. Marks will be busy with


Stephen T. Wright and Amanda J. Wallace

Support groups car


Cancer Support Group
There are 16 cancer support
groups in Leon County, most
of which pertain to a specific
type of cancer. There are no
support groups in Wakulla
County but one will be estab-
lished under the umbrella of
all types of cancer, and not
be limited to a specific one
- i.e., lung, prostate, ovarian,


Gastric bypass surgery
A new support group is
forming for people who have
had Lap-Band (Laparoscopic
Obesity Surgery) or gastric by-
pass surgery to discuss lifestyle


breast, etc.
If you are interested in
joining a support group for
patients, survivors, spouses
and caregivers, please call
Marge Kinder at 926-6050.
Two meeting sites have
been offered and this group
will meet monthly to dis-
cuss individual concerns and
health issues. Information


changes, nutrition, recipes and
other topics of interest.
The meetings are planned
for the third Tuesday of each
month beginning Oct. 21 at
11 Mimosa Street in Craw-


Jim and Teresa Porter of
Crawfordville and Eugene
and Karren Wallace of Boyn-
ton Beach announce the
engagement and upcoming
marriage of their daugh-
ter, Amanda J. Wallace of
Crawfordville, to Stephen
Thomas Wright of Craw-
fordville. He is the son of
Tommy and Jan Brown of
Crawfordville and Richard
and Terry Wright of New
Port Richey.
The bride-elect is a 2005
graduate of Wakulla High
School and is employed by
Wakulla Realty and East
Coast Connection. Her fi-
ance is a 2005 graduate of
Wakulla High School and is
employed by Commercial
Roofing.
The wedding will be held
at 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 8
at Sopchoppy City Park.
All friends and family are
invited to attend.

1 help
will also be included pertain-
ing to lifestyle guidelines
for the prevention of cancer.
Guest speakers will be in-
vited.
Date, time and location
will be announced. There
will be no cost involved to
attend just be there for
each other.


fordville, next to Stan's Barber
Shop, at 6:30 p.m.
For more information, con-
tact Rita Haney, MSW, at 926-
2039.


Waste day will be held on Oct. 18
Hazardous Waste Day will ferson County Solid Waste, hazardous wastes. Disposal
be held on Oct. 18, at 340 Wal-Mart and Keep Wakulla will begin at 8 a.m. and end at
Trice Lane, located next to County Beautiful. Large signs 1 p.m. Businesses may come
the Ambulance Service. The will point to the entrance and in between 12 p.m. and 1 p.m.
event is coordinated by the people will direct you where and must sign up in advance
county commission, ESG, Jef- to get rid of your household by calling 926-3153.






JIMMIE DOYLE

THE DOYLE VISION *

Practical ideas to make Wakulla County
an even better place to live
Adopt and put into action a comprehensive stormwater
management plan to protect our bays and beaches,
support out local fishermen, and enhance ecotourism
Improve and expand public safety services
widen cell phone coverage
shorten response times for emergency vehicles
install fire hydrants in subdivisions
build additional fire stations
Aggressively seek ways to reduce road congestion
mass transit to Tallahassee
parking for carpoolers
Advocate a fair and consistent road paving priority list


Protect Wakulla's Character

Promote Wakulla's Prosperity

ELECT
M UM I

JIMMIE

9. I
DOYLE
FOR

COUNTY


COMMISSION

DISTRICT 3
(850) 926-7869
jimmiedoyle@gmail.com
www.JimmieDoyle.com
112 Old Still Road, Crawfordville, FL
32327

Political advertisement paid for :lnd approvedd byJimmic Doyle, No Iarty Affiliation, for Wakulla County Commission, District 3


Halloween, festival activities


By LINDA WALKER
Hi neighbors. Yep, I made
it again in time to get our col-
umn in the paper. Miracles do
happen. Is it just me or did the
local columns used to be on the
fourth page in the paper? As I
get older I tend to get things
mixed up so I got out an old
paper and sure enough there
it waste All local columns were
on the third or fourth page.
You know there just aren't that
many community columns be-
ing written anymore.
I do appreciate all of the
calls I get when I don't write
our column and the nice calls
I get when I do write it. Thank
you all very much.
I honestly, never in my wild-
est dreams, ever thought about
not being able to do all of the
things I used to do a hundred
years ago. I kind of had an idea
that I would slow down, but
not come to a screeching halt.
I am thankful that I can still
write oui column and do some
things. Now, if I just could win
the Lottery and take care of all
of us little people, in a manner
of speaking, I think I could deal
with not being able to ride
a Harley anymore or ride on
the back of the fire truck. But,
I am blessed with friends and
two cats and that's more than
most have.
Friends, we lost another
one of our own this past week
and his family lost a great dad.
Dewey, past owner of "Dewey's
Deli and Store," passed away
due to a heart attack. He was
stopped at the red light up
the road and had his youngest
daughter, Jamie, in the car with
him. Thank God there was a
deputy sheriff behind them.
Dewey had so many friends
and we will all miss one of St.
Marks' legends. Our thoughts
and prayers go out to his family
and closest friends.


I keep telling people to take
time for those that you care
about or take time for family
even if you don't like them. You
never know if you'll get another
chance. You do not want a fun-
eral to be the only place you
get to tell someone you love
them or that you're sorry about
something.
Listen up people Do not
forgett this coming Saturday,
Oct. 181 It is the St. Marks
River Festival Day. It will be
celebrated all over town with
a re-enactment down at the old
San Marcos Fort. The fun, food,
all of the many vendors, arts
and crafts, and games for the
kids will begin at 9 a.m. until 6
p.m. If you have never been to
one of our festivals, you haven't
seen anything yetl
Come on down and find out
why we all love our little piece
of heaven and fight so- hard
to keep it like it is. You will
get more smiles and see more
down home people than you've
ever read about.
We love visitors and enjoy
doing things to show off our
town. The new boat ramps are
outstanding and as promised,
all the trees were replanted.
There will be so much to do
that you aren't going know
how to act. Just enjoy yourself
and tell your friends about our
annual festival.
Don't forget our St. Marks
Fire Department Halloween
doings for our local kids. We
will have the haunted hayride
as well as treats and goodies for
the kids. It will start at 7 p.fh. on
Friday, Halloween night, Oct 31.
Donations are needed of candy,
cupcakes, treats and anything
you think will help to make this
special for the kids.
Donations can be dropped
off at City Hall or the St Marks
Fire Station on Shell Island
Road. You can call fire depart-


ment members for more infor-
mation, or call "Our Ethel" at
City Hall.
I just have to send angel
wings out to the two gentlemen
who helped me get back in my
car and put my Pepsi inside my
car. Sometimes, aw shoot, every
time I drive my car my foot and
legs don't want to work right.
Anyway, God bless you both.
I told you that angels come
in all shapes, sizes and colors.
I even have an angel who gets
my garbage can out to the road,
but I don't know who it is. But,
I thank you.
Let's wish these special
people happy birthday: Mike
Register on Oct. 20, Ashley
Bowen on Oct. 20, Betty Ward
on Oct. 23, and all those not
on our list.
A very happy anniversary to,
sorry I'm late, Pam and Chuck
Shields on Oct. 3, Eddie and
Mary Ward on Oct. 15, and
Gene and Elma Cutchin on
Oct. 20.
On our prayer list this week
please remember, Dewey's
family and friends, Ethel's
sister, and her family, Dale
Carraway, Newell Ladd, Marga-
ret Pelt, Jane Marshall, Sharon
Blair, Thelma Murphy, Nettie,
Junior and Gordon Strickland,
my brother, John and his fam-
ily, Jim, Betty, Eddie and Mary
Ward, Pam Lawhon, Alysha Va-
lencourt, Jerelene Howard, Sam
Donaldson, John Kirby, Barnard
Sessions, and all of those not
named here.
Pray for my nephew, Lil' Bud-
dy Johnson and please pray for
me. Pray for our troops overseas
and their families. Pray for our
town, our families, our country
and pray for peace.
Thought for this week:
Please let me remember
that even though I can't do the
things I want to, I can still do
the things I need to.


Editor, The News:
First, I would like to
agree with Robert Seidler's
commentary published in
last week's The Wakulla
News. I agree with his
observation that the
water bottling plant
could have helped
brand Wakulla Coun-
ty across the state,
nation and world, as
well as setting a new
and higher standard
for merging business
and environmental'
prudence.
I commend D.P. and Ruth
High for their efforts to build
the most environmentally
friendly water bottling plant
yet known. The Highs love
Wakulla County and wanted
to bring business here. They
wanted to help our economy
and improve ourwater supply
through much-needed retro-
fitting of our septic tanks.
We absolutely need to
save Wakulla Springs, and we
need money to do this. The
proposed bottling plant was
a logical way to find those
resources.
I appreciate all of their
efforts and I am sorry to see


their dreams and goals for
Wakulla crushed by a. vocal
minority who dearly do not
know the Highs at all.
Everyone is aware that
more than 60 percent of
Wakulla County is state- or
federally-owned property.
We should embrace green
businesses. We should
not chase away the people
who are willing to go above
and beyond what the law
requires. ,
I have never met people
so willing to work with the
community as the Highs.
Many well-meaning citizens
appear to have been misled
into overlooking the great
opportunity to work with
people who genuinely care
about Wakulla County and
Wakulla Springs., ,
The Highs were sincerely
committed to seeking a
compro-mise that everyone
could support. As a result
of the recent uproar and
personal attacks upon the
Highs, they have decided to
completely withdraw their
proposed zoning change
request.
This is not a victory
for Wakulla County or our
water. What a shame.
Alan Brock
Active Member,
Big Bend Sierra Club
Wakulla Station


Page 2A-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1. 2007

Comment & Opinion
ADVERTISEMENT
This ad paid for by Mary Cortese and Hugh Taylor, 1357 Lower Bridge Rd. and not approved by any candidate or party.
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ADVERTISEMENT .-':.



BOTTLED



WATER?
Water plant's critics ruined a good concept













THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008 Page 7A


P ."'K *


Election information is available at the library


SI Doug Jones
The library is proud to
serve the citizens of Wakulla
County meeting their infor-
mation needs. Our 16 pubic
access Internet computers
have been very busy of late
with patrons who are look-
ing for jobs, typing resumes,
or enjoying the library's high
speed connection to play
their favorite online game.
Many citizens are also
using library computers to
research candidates, consti-


tutional amendments, county
charters, and other infor-
mation to help them make
important decisions in the
upcoming election.
In the important presi-
dential contest, the library
offers several different books
by John McCain and Barack
Obama. McCain's "Faith of
My Fathers" and his memoir
"Worth the Fighting For"
have both been very popular.
Similarly, Obama's "Change
We Can Believe In," "The Au-
dacity of Hope" and "Dreams
from My Father" have been in
high demand. The library has
several copies of each title,
including audio versions of
some of these titles.
For insight into the vice-
presidential candidates we
have Kaylene Johnson's "Sar-


ah: How a Hockey Mom
Turned Alaska's Political Es-
tablishment Upside Down"
and Joe Biden's "Promises to
Keep: On Life and Politics."
Another interesting title
for review is the reference
source "Obama vs. McCain:
Voting Records of Barack
Obama & John McCain for the
109th and 110th Congress."
In addition, we have several
other books about each candi-
date, some for, some against,
some with a"conservative
point of view, some with a
liberal persuasion. We strive
for a balanced collection
where all points of view are
expressed.
For local races, we do not
have any books written by
the candidates, but most
candidates have web sites


which patrons can visit at our
public access computers. We
do have publications put out
by the Florida Department of
State, Division of Elections
on the Proposed Constitu-
tional Amendments as well
as a special edition of "The
Florida Voter" published by
the League of Womeri's Vot-
ers of Florida with informa-
tion about the constitutional
amendments.
A great source of informa-
tion about local candidates
can be had by attending any
or all of the upcoming events
where voters can see and hear
local candidates for office
give speeches and answer
questions.
On Tuesday, Oct. 21, CCOW
and the Wakulla Watershed
Coalition will host a can-


didate forum for Property
Appraiser, Sheriff, Superinten-
dant of Schools, and Supervi-
sor of Election candidates.
The event takes place at the
library from 7 to 8:30 p.m.
On Wednesday, Oct. 22,
the League of Women Vot-
ers of Tallahassee will host
"Bandwagon 2008" for Wakul-
la County candidates. This
event takes place at 7 p.m. at
the WFSU-TV studio in Tal-
lahassee.
On Thursday, Oct. 23,
two events take place at the
Wakulla County Senior Citi-
zens Center. The Rotary Club
sponsors a candidate forum
for all local candidates begin-
ning at noon (lunch may be
purchased for $7). That eve-
ning, the Wakulla Chamber
of Commerce hosts a forum


featuring all local candidates.
This event is cosponsored by
the Chamber, Lions, Optimist
and Rotary Clubs and will
take place from 7 p.m. to
9:30 p.m.
The CCOW event at the
library and an earlier CCOW
event featuring the six can-
didates running for county
commission will both be
broadcast on Comcast Chan-
nel 21 at various dates and
times. The Bandwagon 2008
event will be rebroadcast on
Comcast Channel 4 (4FSU)
and WFSU.org. Please con-
sult your local listings for
the dates and times of broad-
cast.
In addition. The Wakulla
News will have a full election
supplement in next week's
newspaper (Oct. 23).


We have the answer for hazardous waste disposal


Where will you be going
with your extra tires this
weekend? Why, to Household
Hazardous Waste Day, that's
where
Yes, this Saturday is House-
hold Hazardous Waste Day.
Come to 340 Trice Lane be-
tween 8 a.m. and 1p.m. This
Hazardous Waste Day is a
bit different because we will
ask everyone to enter on the
south entrance of the public


works building. We'll have
lots of people and signs to
give you directions. You'll
be able to drive completely
around the building to the
other side. This will enable
everyone to avoid parking on
the side of Trice Lane.
Now, about those tires.
Richard Russell, the manager
of our local Wal-Mart store,
has worked it out so that we
may bring them again. This
is a huge financial help to
our county and its residents.
Dealers and commercial busi-
ness owners are not allowed
to come for the tires.
Is there a limit?
Yes! Each household
can bring up to 10. This
should help to ocean up our


backyards of those mos-
quito-breeding tires that hold
standing water.
The other major item that
sometimes we forget is the
compact fluorescent bulb.
Yes, this is the lightbulb with
the extra wide base: the one
that saves a whole lot of en-
ergy. And they do save energy
and they really do last a long
time. They are considered
hazardous waste because
there is some mercury inside
each bulb.
Of course, paints, solvents,
pesticides, fertilizers, pool
chemicals, oven cleaners,
harsh household cleaners,
drain openers, and those
bottles we store in the garage
when we forgot what we


placed inside of them, are
welcome at Household Haz-
ardous Waste Day. Rosemary
Bottcher, the chemist who is
coming, is able to discern the
contents and dispose of the
bottles correctly.
This Household Hazardous
Waste Day is a coordinated
effort between our commis-
sioners, Jefferson County
Solid Waste personnel, ESG
personnel, Keep Wakulla
County Beautiful members,
Wal-Mart and Richard Rus-
sell, some local volunteers,
and our sheriff's office.
In the past, prisoner vol-
unteers have been provided
by Jefferson County. Recently,
their rules have changed, and
they are now unable to come


to this event. We asked for
assistance from Sheriff David
Harvey.
Now, our own sheriff's
office is providing the prison-
ers who have volunteered to
help offload the contents of
our trucks and trunks. They
will be trained by Rosemary
Bottcher where to place each
item, and they'll be super-
vised by sheriff's officers at
all times. Other volunteers
who will assist in offload-
ing the contents of vehicles
will be residents of our com-
munity.
So. tidy your shelves, dig
in your sheds and garages,
and clean out your closets
of the household hazardous
wastes you don't plan on us-


ing again. Your home will be
a safer place without them,
and we will make sure they
are disposed of correctly.
Some products brought
to us seem unopened or
practically new. If they are
still useful, a "free" table will
be located near the paint
disposal site. Residents may
take these items to use them
up.
A lot of volunteers are
working together to make
Household Hazardous Waste
Days a great service to our
county. Put aside your cans
and bottles tonight. Place
them next to the door. This
will serve as a reminder to go
to Trice Lane on Saturday!


Classic cars invade Sopchoppy


A Classic Car Cruise willbe from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. The
held in downtown Sopchoppy Classic Car Cruise starts at 3
on Saturday, Oct. 25 from 1 p.m. Grandstand judging will
p.m. to 5 p.m. be held at 4:30 p.m.
There are no entry fees. Ice Cream sundaes will be
Brjng..acanned good to be available at Backwoods Bistro.
eligible for a door prize. The downtown shops will be
Registration will be held .open..


For information contact,
David Earle at 570-1569, Winky
Jenkins-Rice at 962-3394, or
Kathy Lambert at 925-5640.
The event is sponsored by
the Downtown Sopcloppy
businesses.


Parental workshops are planned
The Florida Center for Pre- The workshop starts Oct. will be held on Tuesday for
vention Research is sponsor- 21 at 6:30 p.m. at the Wakulla the five consecutive weeks.
ing a Guiding Good Choices County Extension Office, 84 For addition information,
parent workshop in corpora- Cedar Ave. Crawfordville. The please contact either Jo Barks-
tion with two Wakulla lead- parent workshop consist of dale 509-7063 or Rita Haney
ers. five lessons and each lesson 926-2039.


Hospice celebrates anniversary
Big Bend Hospice, your Museum, 6800 Mahan Dr., a cash bar, light refreshments
hometown hospice, is cel- Tallahassee. and dancing.
ebrating their 25th Anniver- Local favorites the Acme For tickets or for more in-
sary on Oct. 18 at 7:30 P.M. at Rhythm and Blues Band will formation contact 701-1375 or
the Tallahassee Antique Car rock the house as guests enjoy www.bigbendhospice.org.


Go ahead...

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008


Wakulla County Sheriff's Office granted re-accreditation


Wakulla County Sheriff David Harvey, Commissioner George Green and Wakulla law
enforcement officials display plaque in Crystal River,


Sheriff David Harvey went to
Crystal River recently where he,
Commissioner George Green,
Major Maurice Langston and Cap-
tain Steve Willis sipped coffee at
the Plantation Dining Room
and talked about the upcoming
"Law Enforcement Accreditation
Review" which would determine
whether or not the Wakulla
County Sheriff's Office would
receive the stamp of approval
from the state's prestigious com-
mission on professional law
enforcement accreditation.
Tension and apprehension
were high the morning before
one of the largest sheriffs of-
fices in the state applied for
reaccreditation and was turned
down by the entire corrections
commission.
At 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, Oct.
8, Wakulla County Commissioner
George Green and Sheriff Harvey
and his accreditation team en-
tered the panel review consisting


of Putnam County Sheriff Dean
Kelly, South Daytona Police Chief
William Hall, Lauderhill Police
Chief Kenneth Pachnek, Indian
River County Commissioner Gary
Wheeler and The Honorable G.
Keith Cary, Judge, 20th Judicial
Circuit.
The examination assessor
stated, "I recommend full accredi-
tation for the Wakulla County
Sheriffs Office in Law Enforce-
ment. This agency scored 100
percent during the assessment.
I've been doing them for many
years now, it was the shortest,
most professional accreditation
process I've ever experienced,"
said Lieutenant Michelle Mor-
ris, Assistant Chief of Police for
Sebastian Police Department.
The commission wanted
to know about the "Women's
Protection and Safety Course"
in which nearly 400 women
have been trained in lethal and
non-lethal systems for personal


protection.
"If a woman in Wakulla Coun-
ty tells you to step back, you best
step back," said Sheriff Harvey.
"You could be pepper sprayed,
tasered, or bulleted and obited'
if you pose an obvious threat to"'
one of our graduates"!
Commissioner Dean Kelly,"'
Sheriff of Putnam County, made'
a motion that Wakulla County
be reaccredited for a third con-'
secutive time, which passed-;
unanimously.
Sheriff Harvey said "accredita- ,
tion is one of the best risk man-,
agement tools law enforcement.
professionals have available to,
them today. Millions of dollars,,
are saved each year as attorneys..
think twice about taking on an
accredited law enforcement and
correctional agency in civil law-.
suits for things such as excess,
use of force, false arrest and 1
could go on and on."


WCSO Command Statistics


Command Staff Meeting -
Sept 17, 2008
Division Of Law Enforcement
- Capt Chris Savary
Uniform Patrol
Special Operations
Calls 808
Traffic Stops 15
Arrests 46
Traffic Crashes
Area Checks 1,021
Assists to Road Patrol 27
Traffic Stops 226
Business Checks 12
Offense Reports Filed 101
Arrests 6
C.OP.S. 227
Offense Reports 6
Calls to Service 57
COP.S. 4
Special Notes:
Thanks to Trooper Simmons
for assistance concerning the
burglary and shooting on a recent
Sunday night
Criminal Investigations Divi-
sion Capt Randall Taylor
Cases Assigned 36
Cases Closed 19
Special Notes:
-,,Leads Exhausted 8
Detectives worked on a bur-
glary case involving air condi-
tioning.
Inactive Cases Three units
stolen from a homeowner's ga-
rage. The suspects were located
located while returning a U-Haul
to Medart.
Warrants Issued 6
Arrests 14
Interviews with witnesses
and suspects led the detectives
to a self storage unit in Tallahas-
see. Fifth-eight A/C units along
with 106 wall thermostats were
recovered. The total value of the
recovered items was $37,994.
One suspect has been arrested,
warrants have been requested for
two other suspects and one sus-


pect is still under investigation.
Evidence Section
Items Taken Into Custody
128
Items to FDLE 0
Items from SAO 1
Items Returned to Owner 4
Items Research for Destruc-
tion 123
Crime Scene Investigation
Crime Scenes Processed 8
Call Outs 2
Training Sgt Fred Nichols
Deputies Trained 2
Civilians 20
Records/Civil/Warrants -Capt
Connie Porter
Civil Warrants
Summons Received 49
Warrants Received 44
Summons Served 48
Warrants Served 14
Subpoenas Received 71
Warrants Recalled 4
Subpoenas Served 52
Writs Received 1
Injunctions Received 2
Writs Served 2
Injunctions Served 26
Writs Recalled 5
Felony Registrations 1
Probable Cause Arrests 53
by other agencies 17
Records
Special Notes:
Citations 17
Records is in the process of
purging files. Closed cases will
not have a file, however informa-
tion from dosed cases are being
scanned after final disposition.
Capt Willis asked about looking
into how electronic data can be
purged.
Trespass Warnings 1
Check/Reports 248
Offense Reports 103
Field Interviews 1
Oak Street Work Orders 2
Pounds Trash Recyded 9,700
Cardboard 860


Trash 8840
IT Service Calls
CID 7
Corrections 9
Special Notes.
Road Patrol 11
The evidence fence has been
completed and secured. Please
remember to keep cigarette butts
and trash off the ground. make
sure the trash around the Sally
Port area gets in the trash trailer.
Communications 8
Accreditation 12
Finance 5
Division of Corrections- Major
Jared Miller
Security Capt Willis
Local Inmates 188
Special Notes:
ICE Inmates 144
The doors off the lobby lead-
ing to Dispatch will be locked at
all times. If anyone other than
WCSO employees meeting in the
EOC room, Capt Willis or Capt
Martin need to be contacted so
they can arrange escort to the
room. The final report for the jail
assessment has been received.
DOC Inmates 13
Federal Inmates 2
Inmates Booked 244
Inmates released 162
Warrants Served in Jail 15
Support Services Capt Mar-


Inmates on Work Release 20
Inmates on Trustee Status 15
Meals Served 1,041
Medical Transports 9
ICE Transports 10
Inmates in Work Camp 16
Court Security
People Through Courthouse
2,230
Trials/Hearings Worked 460
Inmates to Court 9
Division of Communiy Ser-
vices Major Larry Massa
Litter Control
Roadway Trash Removed
15,320
Special Notes:


Litter control will complete the
state contract
and start a contract with the
Forestry Service. Litter control par-
ticipated in the Coastal Cleanup.
Division of Open Government
& Public Information- Major Mau-
rice Langston
Victim Advocates
Victims Served 48
Number of Services 130
School Resource Officers
Calls for service 146
Arrest 3
Counseling 48
Hours 37
Parent Contact/C.OP.S. 49


Investigation Hours 30
Animal Control Capt Steve
Ganey
Animals taken in 63.
Animals euthanized 21
Animals tranquilized 1
Calls for service 51
Emergency Management Di-
rector Scott Nelson
Communications
Calls Answered 5,209
E-911 Calls 375
WCSO Service Calls 2,552
EMS Service Calls 111
Fire Service Calls 104
Other Service Calls 247


ni~ l rr~mn~p~h'' c mi
~2,d)In mm-~~ora ~Ef~
'-it. EWEa GD -rlh o


David -Ids irSt


Miller
SChool Supintende
chOol Superintended


ELECT CHARLIE



CREELOR SHERIFF






I will change the future for youth in our county by

giving them worthwhile opportunities.

Explorer program

Mentoring program
for at-risk youth

Teen driving
program

Babysitter training
course, including
CPR training

Include youth in a
county-wide Citizens
Advisory Committee




Children are our greatest resource.


If we don't invest wisely in children today, then tomorrow we will
find ourselves exactly where we are today building more jail space.


For our youth,








Contact Charlie at (850) 926-1184
charliecreel@gmail.com

Political advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Affiliation, for Sheriff














THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008 Page 9A


Court Shorts


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN settlement and representation
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net by the class-action attorneys.
Notices of the class-action The settlement agreement
lawsuit on the ambulance negotiated by Wakulla County
MSBU is supposed to go out and the class-action lawyers
to property owners at the calls for property owners who
end of the month with their paid the Municipal Service
tax bills. Benefit Unit $35 assessment
Property owners will have between 1999 and 2003 to get
until Dec. 15 to mail in their a refund of $18 per year, before
intent to elect in to the class deduction of attorney's fees
action lawsuit, opt out, or and costs.
object. Taxpayers are to re- An order for preliminary
ceive either a pre-printed or approval signed by Wakulla
stamped envelope to mail Circuit Judge N. Sanders Sauls
back their response. Those calls for the parties to adver-
who do nothing will be con- tise notice of the lawsuit in
sidered to have voted for the The Wakulla News for four


consecutive weeks beginning
on Oct. 30.
In 2002, the Florida Su-
preme Court found that MSBUs
to pay for Emergency Medical
Service is unconstitutional be-
cause land receives no benefit
from ambulance service. The
court has upheld the legality
of MSBU assessments for fire,
contending land does benefit
from that service.
A hiring is set for January
2009 to determine whether
the settlement should be
considered and given final ap-
proval as fair, reasonable and
adequate.


In other court matters:
A conditional judgment
was entered by Wakulla Coun-
ty Judge Jill Walker in a small
claims lawsuit filed by Envi-
sion Credit Union against Jim
Stokley and his wife Carolyn
over a Visa line of credit.
The Stokleys agreed to pay
$100 a month to pay off the
$6,400 judgment that includes
more than $5,000 in principal
for the unsecured credit.
According to the complaint
on file in the courthouse, the
Stokleys failed to make pay-
ments on the credit line in
January 2008 and the bank


elected to accelerate payments
under the terms of the loan.
Envision filed the small claims
lawsuit against the Stokleys
in July.
Stokley, a retired firefighter
at St. Marks Powder, is a can-
didate for county commission
in District 5.
"It was a problem and we
reached an agreement that we
could both live with," Stokley
said.
A complaint for eviction
was filed against A to Z Em-
broidery and Silk Screening
from the Bay Springs strip mall
in Crawfordville.


According to the complaint,
A to Z stopped paying its $682
a month rent in February and
are eight months in arrears, for
a total of $4,876 plus interest.
A to Z Embroidery is not
a legal entity but a fictitious
name registered by Debbie
Williams who, along with
Mark Williams, have been do-
ing business as A to Z.
Jamm Up Investments LLC
filed the complaint. According
to the state Division of Corpo-
rations, Jamm Up is managed
by Malcom and Joyce McNeill
of Tallahassee.


Sheriff's Report


A 1997 Toyota Camry was
reported stolen from a Sop-
choppy home and later recov-
ered in Jacksonville. The 68-
year-old victim pressed grand
theft auto charges against her
37-year-old son and his 28-year-
old friend.
The two men, Eric Maxwell
and his friend Isaiah Coe,
reportedly said that Maxwell,
who is blind, got the car keys
and gave them to his friend at
midnight on Saturday night
to drive him to Huddle House
to get something to eat. Max-
well is legally blind from an
accident and can't drive. His
friend is from South Florida
and is reportedly unfamiliar
with the area. The two men
said that Maxwell fell asleep-
and that Coe, lost, continued
to drive, trying to get back to
Maxwell's house.
Maxwell awoke at some
point and Coe told him they
were in Seminole County and
they ended up going through
Jacksonville.
The mother called the
Wakulla County Sheriff's Of-
fice on Sunday, Oct. 12, after
she realized her car was miss-
ing around 9 am. A warrant for
the arrest of the two men was
issued at that time.
The car was reported sto-
len on the national crime
information computer, and
the Jacksonville Sheriff's Of-
fice reported having found
the vehicle at the Main Street
Bridge with the doors locked.
The vehicle was towed to a
car lot
The woman called the sher-
iff's office on Monday, Oct 13,
to report her son and Coe were

Teens

Take the

Wheel
: The Florida Department of
Highway Safety and Motor Ve-
hices launched a web site for
teen driver safety at www.Ta-
keTheWheel.net
; The new Web site, created by
teens for teens, challenges young
drivers to take charge when
they take the wheel. DHSMV
announced the new web site at
Leon High School with students
and other special guests.
: "The Department is proactive
in our focus on safe driving, and
we continue to reach out to teen
drivers and their parents through
outreach initiatives like Take the
Wheel," said Executive Direc-
tor Electra Theodorides-Bustle.
"This teen-based Web site is the
first of its kind in Florida as it
is interactive and allows teens
drivers to share their experiences
with peers. We encourage driver's
education instructors to use it as
a tool, too."
" Vehicle crashes are the lead-
ing cause of death among teenag-
ers in our state and the nation. In
Florida alone, more than 36,000
teen drivers were involved in
cashes last year. Also in 2007,
more than 479 people were killed
in an accident where a teen was
driving.
: "Learning good driving habits
fipm the beginning is essential,"
said Director of the Florida High-
way Patrol, ColonelJohn Czernis.
"{t is up to parents, teachers, law
enforcement officers."


at her home and she wanted
them to leave. Deputy Pam
Veltkamp put both suspects
in handcuffs, read them their
rights, and asked them what
was going on. They told their
version of events about get-
ting lost.
The mother said she want-
ed to press charges and the
two men were arrested for
grand theft of a vehicle, a sec-
ond-degree felony.
A woman on Marie Circle
reported a possible burglary
on Sunday, Oct. 12, after she
arrived home the night before
and found her bedroom win-
dow broken and the blinds
stretched out. The 19-year-old
woman rushed next door to
her mother's house.
Deputy Lindsay Alien asked
why the woman had waited
until 1:30 p.m. of the following
day to report the matter. The
woman said it was because her
mother was under heavy medi-
cation and needed her support.
The mother advised her the
next day to call deputies.
The victim said she believed
the break-in may have been
done by her former boyfriend,
who she broke up with a
couple of months ago but
has been trying to get back in
touch with her since then.
A vacant home on Em-
mett Whaley Road was found
to have had the air condition-
ing unit stolen. `? ''' :'
The home has been vacant
since the occupants passed
away in July. The daughter
comes by to periodically check
the house, and on Saturday,
Oct. 11, she noticed the power
was off. She called to check


with Progress Energy and was
told to flip the power switch
on the breaker box. When she
went outside to do that, she
noticed the air conditioning
unit was gone. The unit was
valued at $1,000.
Deputy Lindsay Allen noted
that the theft appeared to have
been taken recently since food
in the refrigerator was still
cold.
A homeowner on Red-
man Road in Crawfordville
called to report a loud noise
at an abandoned house on
Saturday, Oct. 11.
The homeowner was stand-
ing on her front porch when
she heard a crash and saw two
white males in black clothing
running away from a vacant
house.
Deputy Jason Brooks re-
sponded and found a window
broken at the house, but no
other damage.
A Crawfordville man re-
ported fraudulent activity on a
business account on Thursday,
Oct. 9, that he believes was
done by a former business
partner.
The man, who owns a busi-
ness that manufactures water
purification systems, suspected
a disgruntled former business
partner of stealing more than
$50,000 from the business.
The man's partner had alleg-
\edly written checks from the
company checking accouirit
sent to a JPMorgan Chaseac-
count in Arizona that the man
suspected as being false.
The man, who does busi-
ness in South America, said
that clients in Ecuador claimed
to have sent in checks for near-,,


ly $20,000 that were cashed
but did not go through the
business account.
Deputy Mike Crum inves-
tigated.
A Crawfordville man
reported some unauthorized
transactions on his bank ac-
count on Friday, Oct. 10.
The man found four transac-
tions made on his bank debit
card that included: $1.06 at a
Taco Bell in Carol City on Oct.
7; $50 at Hollywood Hills U in
Hollywood Hills on Oct 7; $194
at Athletes Foot in Miami on
Oct. 7; and $1.07 at Burger King
in Carol City on Oct. 10.
Deputy Robert Giddens
took the report.
A homeowner on Sam
Marks Road reported the theft
of more than $300 worth of
power tools on Thursday,
Oct 9.
The victim said that he
first became aware that some
items were missing from his


back porch several days earlier,
including an air compressor,
a 50-foot extension cord, a
12-volt battery charger, and a
Dewalt chuck-less drill with
charger.
A Panacea man reported
the theft of gas from the air-
boat in his yard on Wednesday,
Oct. 8.
The man told Deputy Casey
Whitlock that he noticed his
dog was barking unusually
loud at 3 a.m., as though
somebody was in the yard.
He checked the boat and said
about 20 gallons of gas had
been taken.
Deputy Whitlock noted that
the boat had an electric fuel
pump and that the key was in
the ignition, and surmised that
the suspect removed the fuel
line and turned the ignition
switch to pump out the gas.
A possible suspect was
identified. The matter was
turned over to Criminal Inves-


tigations Division for further
investigation.
A homeowner on Re-
hwinkel Road reported the
theft of three Barack Obama
political signs on Thursday,
Oct. 9. Deputy Mike Crum
investigated.
A 72-year-old man on
Otter Lake Road reported the
theft on Sunday, Oct. 12, of
a half-gallon bottle of home-
made wine, a pint of vodka,
and a five gallon gas can from
his carport.
Deputy Ben Steinle inves-
tigated.
The Sheriff's Office report-
ed 924 calls for service this
week.
Note to readers: Those
people who are reported as
charged with crimes in this
column have not yet been to
trial and are therefore innocent
until proven guilty


What is the FCAT?

1. Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) is given to every
public school.student in Florida each year in grades 3-10. It mea-
sures student's mastery of Sunshine State Standards in reading and
math. Science and writing are tested at three grade levels only.
There is no testing of history, geography, civics or any other sub-
ject area.

2. A minimum FCAT score in 10th grade reading is required for
graduation from high school. Aside from that requirement, the
FCAT Is not used for college admission, or for any other purpose
that benefits students.

3. Student scores on the FCAT is the only criteria Florida uses to
assign school grades.

4. A good school grade is important, but it does not represent the
complete education we want for our students. Nearly half of our
10th graders and three out of four of our black 10th graders are
reading below grade level.


WE CAN DO BETTER!

FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE: Ready for Work
Ready for College and
Ready for Life,

Elect Dr. Andrea Carter, Superintendent of Schools


Look for my campaign DVD in your mailbox soon

or see my website at www.voteandreacarter.com

Contact me: voteandea@gmail.com
Campaign HO: 3047 Crawfordville Hy., Crmwfordville, FL 32327 926-1111

Political advertisement paid for and approved by Dr. Andrea Carter, Republican for Superintendent of Schools


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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008


Outdoors


The perfect county to follow tracks of our favorite critters


WaBkuGa WbT




BY GEORGE WEYMOUTH


In my last article I briefly
discussed how to "read" tracks
by their "pressure points" and
that the best time to study
them is when the sun is low
and casts a shadow in the
imprint, causing it to stand
out better. Ideally if you see
a critter cross a sandy lane,
that's the perfect time to com-
pare tracks.
If, for instance you've seen
a number of doe Whitetail
Deer crossing back roads, and
studied their tracks, when a
buck crosses, you'll note his
tracks are somewhat different.
Perhaps his cloven hooves
are spread more, and the dew


claws press deeper into the
soil. A big buck, especially if in
rut, will often drag his hooves,
and the hind hooves will,
when placed in the imprint of
the front ones (called "direct
registering") will often be
slightly inside the front hoof
imprints. In other words, the
weight of the buck's antlers,
and the swollen neck (while
in rut) force the front legs out
somewhat, so the hind hoof
imprints will land slightly
inside the front ones. An old
doe who's had a number of
fawns will have slightly wider
hips, and her hind hooves will
place slightly wider than the


front hooves.
In addition, a young deer
has such spring in its step
the hind hooves will often
step slightly ahead of the
front hooves, whereas a older
deer may actually set its hind
hooves down behind the front
ones, perhaps a quarter of an
inch or so.
Hog hooves leave a similar
imprint in the soil, and to
the untrained eye look the
same, but there is a dramatic
difference and once it's been
pointed out to you, you'll re-
member the difference for a
long time. Hog coven hooves
are somewhat duller at the tip,
and curve inward, more than a
deer's, and are slightly spread
apart more, too,
Their dew claws just about
always show and are also
spread out more. Not being
long-legged like deer the
tracks themselves will be
closer, too. They've not got
the longer stride of a deer.
Since archery season opens
in our northwest zone Oct.


18 for deer, hog and turkey
and a few other critters, being
able to decipher tracks can
be very rewarding. Becoming
familiar with the creatures of
your neighborhood can be
very gratifying especially if
you've found the tracks of a
beastie you didn't know lived
near you. How about finding
the tracks of an 11 foot gator
living near you in a local pond.
You probably know that every
inch of a gator's nose equals
a foot of it's length. So, if you
see the head of a large gator
that has surfaced, and it looks
to have a nose about eight
inches long, chances are it's an
eight footer. The same "rule of
thumb" applies to their hind
foot track. The front foot of an
alligator has five toes that are
only slightly webbed, but the
hind foot's four toes are fully
webbed, and by measuring it's
total length, again in inches,
it will tell you how long it is
in feet.
A 12 foot old bull gator
will leave a 12 inch hind foot


imprint. Beaver in our area get
easily up to 50 pounds, and
like the gators, have a fully
webbed hind foot, and a hand
that looks very similar to a
gator's front foot. But when a
beaver crosses a muddy area,
it will partially obliterate the
inside of the foot prints as it
drags its flat wide tail.
That is not the case with
the alligator. The alligator
walks in that bowlegged di-
nosaur manner, with the body
elevated. They sway their tail
from side-to-side leaving an
undulating tail dragging mark
between their foot prints Our
river otter tends to bound
across roads looking from
the distance like a large inch
worm measuring the width
of the road as they bunch
up their body for the next
bound.
In doing so, they'll slap
the ground momentarily with
their tail. Our nine-banded
Armadillo walks and leaves
a tail dragging mark, usually
about three-quarters of an


inch in width. The opossum
has a tail about the same
size, but as it walks it tends to
bounce its unique prehensile
tail too. The tracks of these
two "forest finks" are totally
different. The possum's front
foot looks exactly like a cute
little baby's hand with the
fingers spread out, while the
hind foot imprint shows (if
the conditions are right) a
distinctive, opposing big toe,
that protrudes at a right angle
to the hind foot.
The armadillo's feet are
strongly clawed, especially
the front feet which show
the impressions of three long
claws for digging. Often when
examining tracks closely, one
may have to get down on your
hands and knees. With hunt-
ing seasons about to start,
I'd advise anyone studying
tracks to wear a florescent
orange vest or at least a high
visibility orange cap. Whether
it's a millipede or a big Black
Bear, tracking can be fun..Go
for itll


Winds blow many anglers back to shore


From The Dock
BY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL


Other than the fact that the
wind blew all day Saturday
and Sunday, it was pretty nice.
The wind kept most people
from going offshore, but the
weather forecast was for light
winds and plenty of people
headed to the coast only to
turn around and head back
home. A few diehards did
head out a few miles and then
turned around.
Mike Hopkins said very
few people fished on Satur-
dayr :rid Sunday and those
who headed offshore didn't
get very far before turning
around. Glen Moon, who
has a place on Dog Island,
was able to get out to about
30 feet of water and they
caught eight or 10 grouper
and some red snapper. One
customer hooked two big
cobia while fishing on Turkey
Point Shoals, but was unable
to land either before the line
broke. Reds are still being
caught off Lanark Reef and
around the docks. Live bait
or gold spoons will work. Top
water baits also worked early
and late. Trout fishing contin-
ues to be fair with some nice
fish being caught and lots
of shorts. Shiner tails fished
under a cork seems to be the
best bait right now. Top water
early and late is working and
some are being caught on
live shrimp and the Gulp. The
best color in the gulp is root
beer. Flounder are also being
caught at the mouth of the
river and around the docks.
Allen Hobbs at Shell Island
Fish Camp said most of his
folks are heading west out of
the river right now and fish-
ing in close to shore on the
high tide for trout. For you
folks who don't own a boat
and don't want to go to the
expense of hiring a guide,
Shell Island has some good

Park hosts event
An evening cruise and din-
ner will be hosted by Wakulla
Springs State Park on Satur-
day, Oct. 25 at 6 p.m. Treat
someone special to a romantic
cruise on the Wakulla River
followed by a dinner served
in the comfort and charm of
the historic Wakulla Springs
Lodge.
The cost is $29 for adults
and $18 for children age 12
and younger. Reservations are
suggested. For more informa-
tion, call 926-0700.


boats for rent and Alan will
always head you in the right
direction to catch fish.
Capt. Chris Oaks continues
to be successful with his off-
shore fishing and here are a
few of his recent catches. He
took the Frank Williams party
from Tallahassee and they
came in with their limit of
30 grouper. He also took the
Couch Ready Mix Concrete
party and they came in with
their limit of 25 grouper. On
Friday, he took the Donald
Hartley party and they came
in with 21 grouper and Chris
said they threw back lots of
snapper since they were in
federal waters.
On Sunday, Team Seatrout


had a tournament and despite
the high winds some nice fish
were caught. Adran Godwin
and Chase Lanway weighed in
five fish totaling 13 pounds, 13
ounces to take first place. Jeff
Pettis and Bo Raker finished
in second place with a total
weight of 9 pounds, 10 ounces
from five fish. Steve Taylor
and Ashley Mock took third
with 9 pounds, 7 ounces. The
next seatrout tournament is
Oct. 26.
On Friday, I fished with
the Kevin Walsh party from
Macon, Ga. and we got our
limit of reds, some nice trout,


flounder and Spanish. We
probably caught five trout
that were 14 4 inches long.
We caught almost everything
on live shrimp though we
did catch a lot of small trout
on the Gulp under the Cajun
Thunder. Saturday was about
as tough as I have seen in
a while. We ended up with
our limit of reds and nothing
else. We only threw back a
few small trout and not very
many of them.
Remember to leave that
float plan with someone and
know your limits. Good luck
and good fishing


October 20, 2008


Regular Board Meeting


November 17, 2008 Regular Board Meeting


November 17, 2008






December 1, 2008

December 8, 2008


Public Hearing:
Amend Section 5-7 of the
Wakulla County Code, Which
Addresses the Approval
for Certain Temporary Uses

Regular Board Meeting

Board Retreat
Wakulla Springs Lodge


6:00 P.M.

6:00 P.M.


6:00 P.M.





6:00 P.M.


12:00Noon -
4:00 P.M.


All Workshops, Public Hearings and Commission Meetings are open to the public. Wakulla
County does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age or
handicapped status in employment or the provision of services. Handicapped individuals may
receive special accommodations with one working day's notice-as per section 286.011(6) F.S. If
special accommodations are required, please call Debbie DuBose, Executive Assistant to the
County Administrator at (850) 926-0919.


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Al Penson Mary Ellen Davis
Donna Biggins Jennifer Sweeting D Adam Cowhey
Family Law Real Estate Transactions and Matters
DUI/Criminal Defense Commercial Transactions
Civil Litigation and Business Law
Estate Planning Construction/Lien Law
and Probate of Estates Administrative Law/Licensing

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17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville
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WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSIONERS' SCHEDULE
FOR WORKSHOPS, PUBLIC HEARINGS, & MEETINGS
2008 CALENDAR
(To be held in the Commission Chambers)


- Jl


li)















THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008 Page 11A
I


www.fsucu.org


U I U I I U, IIl WII N MORTGAGES -FREE CHECKING ~ AUTO LOANS ~ CREDITCARDS


Gulf Coast Weekly Almanac

Tide charts by October 16 October 22
Zihua Software, LLC


St. Marks River Entrance


Date High Low High Low High
Thu 4.2 ft. -0.6 ft. 3.8 ft. 1.5 ft.
Oct 16, 08 2:47 AM 9:47 AM 4:25 PM 9:37 PM
Fri 4.3 ft. -0.6 ft. 3.5 ft. 1.7 ft.
Oct 17, 08 3:18 AM 10:32 AM 5:14 PM 10:11 PM
Sat 4.3 ft. -0.4 ft. 3.2 ft. 1.9 ft.
Oct 18, 08 3:53 AM 11:23 AM 6:07 PM 10:48 PM
Sun 4.2 ft. -0.1 ft. 2.9 ft. 2.0 ft.
Oct 19, 08 4:33 AM 12:21 PM 7:10 PM 11:33 PM
Mon 3.9 ft. 0.2 ft. 2.7 ft.
Oct 20, 08 5:21 AM 1:32 PM 8:28 PM
Tue 2.1 ft. 3.5 ft. 0.5 ft. 2.7 ft.
Oct 21, 08 12:36 AM 6:26 AM 2:55 PM 9:51 PM
Wed 2.1 ft. 3.2 ft. 0.7 ft. 2.9 ft.
Oct 22, 08 2:15 AM 8:14 AM 4:16 PM 10:55 PM


Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 3.1 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.1 ft.
Oct 16, 08 2:39 AM 9:58 AM 4:17 PM 9:48 PM
Fri 3.2 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.6 ft. 1.2 ft.
Oct 17, 08 3:10 AM 10:43 AM 5:06 PM 10:22 PM
Sat 3.2 ft. -0.3 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.4 ft.
Oct 18, 08 3:45 AM 11:34 AM 5:59 PM 10:59 PM
Sun 3.1 ft. -0.1 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.5 ft.
Oct 19, 08 4:25 AM 12:32 PM 7:02 PM 11:44 PM
Mon 2.9 ft. 0.2 ft. 2.0 ft.
Oct 20, 08 5:13 AM 1:43 PM 8:20 PM
Tue 1.5 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.4 ft. 2.0 ft.
Oct 21, 08 12:47 AM 6:18 AM 3:06 PM 9:43 PM
Wed 1.5 ft. 2.4 ft. 0.5 ft. 2.1 ft.
Oct 22, 08 2:26 AM 8:06 AM 4:27 PM 10:47 PM


City of St. Marks

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 3.9 ft. -0.5 ft. 3.5 ft. 1.4 ft.
Oct 16, 08 3:23 AM 10:51 AM 5:01 PM 10:41 PM
Fri 4.0 ft. -0.5 ft. 3.3 ft. 1.6 ft.
Oct 17, 08 3:54 AM 11:36 AM 5:50 PM 11:15 PM
Sat 4.0 ft. -0.4 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.7 ft.
Oct 18, 08 4:29 AM 12:27 PM 6:43 PM 11:52 PM
Sun 3.9 ft. -0.1 ft. 2.7 ft.
Oct 19, 08 5:09 AM 1:25 PM 7:46 PM
Mon 1.8 ft. 3.6 ft. 0.2 ft. 2.5 ft.
Oct 20, 08 12:37 AM 5:57 AM 2:36 PM 9:04 PM
Tue 1.9 ft. 3.3 ft. 0.5 ft. 2.5 ft.
Oct 21, 08 1:40 AM 7:02 AM 3:59 PM 10:27 PM
Wed 1.9 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.7 ft.
Oct 22, 08 3:19 AM 8:50 AM 5:20 PM 11:31 PM


St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 3.2 ft. -0.6 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.5 ft.
Oct 16, 08 2:31 AM 9:26 AM 4:09 PM 9:16 PM
Fri 3.3 ft. -0.6 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.7 ft.
Oct 17, 08 3:02 AM 10:11 AM 4:58 PM 9:50 PM
Sat 3.3 ft.. -0.4 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.8 ft.
Oct 18, 08 3:37 AM 11:02-AM 5:51 PM 10:27 PM
Sun 3.2 ft. -0.1 ft. 2.3 ft. 2.0 ft.
Oct 19, 08 4:17 AM 12:00 PM 6:54 PM 11:12 PM
Mon 3.0 ft. 0.2 ft. 2.1 ft.
Oct 20, 08 5:05 AM 1:11 PM 8:12 PM
Tue 2.1 ft. 2.7 ft. 0.5 ft. 2.1 ft.
Oct 21, 08 12:15 AM 6:10 AM 2:34 PM 9:35 PM
Wed 2.0 ft. 2.5 ft. 0.7 ft. 2.2 ft.
Oct 22, 08 1:54 AM 7:58 AM 3:55 PM 10:39 PM


For tides at the following points High Tide
add to Dog Island Listings: Carrabelle 28 Min.
Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min.
Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min.
SLower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min.
West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min.

w^ Shell Point, Spring Creek

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 4.2 ft. -0.6 ft. 3.9 ft. 1.6 ft.
Oct 16, 08 2:44 AM 9:44 AM 4:22 PM 9:34 PM
Fri 4.3 ft. -0.6 ft. 3.6 ft. 1.8 ft.
Oct 17, 08 3:15 AM 10:29 AM 5:11 PM 10:08 PM
Sat 4.4 ft. -0.5 ft. 3.3 ft. 2.0 ft.
Oct 18, 08 3:50 AM 11:20 AM 6:04 PM 10:45 PM
Sun 4.2 ft. -0.1 ft. 3.0 ft. 2.2 ft.
Oct 19, 08 4:30 AM 12:18 PM 7:07 PM 11:30 PM
Mon 4.0 ft. 0.2 ft. 2.8 ft
Oct 20, 08 5:18 AM 1:29 PM 8:25 PM
Tue 2.3 t. 3.6 t. 0.6 t. 2.8 ft.
Oct 21, 08 12:33 AM 6:23 AM 2:52 PM 9:48 PM
Wed 2.2 ft. 3.2 ft. 0.8 ft. 2.9 ft.
Oct 22, 08 2:12 AM 8:11 AM 4:13 PM 10:52 PM


Dog Island West End

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 3.3 ft. -0.1 ft. 2.9 ft. 2.0 ft.
Oct 16, 08 2:03 AM 9:05 AM 5:23 PM 8:39 PM
Fn 3.5 ft. -0.2 t. 2.8 ft. 2.1 ft.
Oct 17, 08 2:32 AM 9:54 AM 6:37 PM 9:02 PM
Sat 3.6 ft. -0.1 ft. 2.7 ft. 2.2 t.
Oct 18, 08 3:07 AM 10:53 AM 8:07 PM 9:20 PM
Sun 3.5 ft. -0.0 ft.
Oct 19, 08 3:50 AM 12:05 PM
Mon 3.4 ft. 0.1 ft.
Oct 20, 08 4:43 AM 1:28 PM_
Tue 3.1 ft. 0.3 ft. 2.6 ft.
Oct 21, 08 5:53 AM 2:47 PM 11:31 PM
Wed 2.0 ft. 2.8 ft. 0.4 ft. 2.5 ft.
Oct 22, 08 2:10 AM 7:30 AM 3:54 PM 11:46 PM


Low Tide
25 Min.
2 Hrs., 38 Min.
2 Hrs., 31 Min.
2 Hrs., 3 Min.
2 Hrs., 39 Min.


I-

First
Nov. 5


4..

Full
Nov. 13


Last
Oct. 21


New
Oct. 28


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
7:40 am 7:40 am 7:41 am 7:42 am 7:42 am 7:43 am 7:44 am
7:04 pm 7:03 pm 7:02 pm 7:01 pm 7:00 pm 6:59 pm 6:58 pm


8:16 pm
9:41 am
89%


9:10 pm
10:53 am
82%


10:11 pm
12:02 pm
74%


_________ I _________ I I


11:18 pm
1:05 pm
66%


1:59 pm
59%


12:26 am
2:45 pm
52%


1:33 am
3:24 pm
44%


4 Boating Emergencies
Coast Guard Station
Panama City ................................................. (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
St. M arks (Flotilla 12) .......................................... (850) 906-0540
or ........ .................... .. .................................... ...... 893-5137
Shell Point (Flotilla 13) ........................................ (850) 926-2606
or ................................ ...... ......... .............. 926-5654


Coast Guard

Auxiliary Reports

By Sherrie Alverson


Flotilla 13 held its October
meeting Saturday evening at
their Shell Point Auxiliary Sta-
tion. We were in luck, food-
wise. A barbecue was held
under the station, earlier
in the evening, catered by
Mack's Meats.
There were several left-
over "to go" dinners and ice
tea which was donated to
Flotilla 13. We wish to thank
Mack's Meats. The food was
delicious. If you get a chance
to enjoy one of their meals,
take advantage of it.
Attendance at our meeting
was on the lean side. If the
members had known about


the barbecue it could have
been a different story.
Michael Longanecker, Flo-
tilla 13 Commander, was
out of town so Mae Waters,
Vice Commander, conducted
the meeting. Others sharing
the evening were: Frans and
Linda Buytendorp, Marc Lip-
sius, Ron and Angret Piasecki,
John Sykes, your reporter and
Dorothy Edrington, our Hon-
orary member.
The main item on the
agenda was finalizing plans
for the North Florida Fair
that will be held at the fair-
grounds in Tallahassee from
Nov. 6 through Nov. 16. Sched-


uling personnel to staff the
Coast Guard Auxiliary booth
is a bit difficult when our
membership is smaller. We
are grateful that Flotilla 12
will be helping man the aux-
iliary booth.
About a year ago, Frans
and Linda Buytendorp be-
came members of Flotilla
13. In that same time frame,
Linda also became a member
a little known organization
called Guardian ad Litem of
the Big Bend. Their mission
is to advocate for the best
interests of children who
are alleged to be abused, ne-
glected, or abandoned, and
who are involved in court
proceedings.
The services provided are:
Provide children with
legal representation and ad-
vocacy service.
Preserve children's physi-
cal safety and emotional well-
being and protect children
from further harm.
Make verbal and writ-
ten recommendations for
children's permanent place-
ment in a stable and nurtur-
ing home environment.
Members attend trials,
hearings, and mediations.
Sometimes the people in
this program have not com-
mitted a crime. It is simply a
matter of circumstances and
poverty. As Linda said, "We


attempt to give them a hand
up so that they may be self-
sufficient."
Before our meeting, Linda
had asked Mae if she could
be included on the agenda
so she could speak on behalf
of a single mother with four
young children who is now
being helped by the Guardian
ad Litem program.
Linda reported they had
been able to move her from
a rat/roach infested tiny
trailer into a larger, clean,
mobile home. Now they are
in dire need of a sofa, table
and chairs, lamps, end tables,
and more.
As the readers will remem-
ber, the Seafarers Chapel
shares our building, and
they have volunteered to
provide some financial aid
to purchase items that aren't
donated. But knowing the
Shell Point area as well as I
do, I believe as soon as they
hear of this woman's struggle
to provide for her children,
offers of furniture will pour
in. Then the chapel's money
can be used for other urgently
needed things such as bed-
ding, towels, clothing and
perhaps dishes.
Readers, please contact
Linda Buytendorp at 926-
5525 or e-mail fjbljb@nettally.
com. Linda just e-mailed me
the web site to the national


organization, CASA (Court Gill's, Jim and Ouida and her
Appointed Special Advocate.) mother, Helen Branan, went
http://www.nationalcasa. to Scotland for a nephew's
org. Now, our readers can wedding.
learn even more about the As reported last week,
good this organization is pro- Yvette Graham, has returned
grammed to accomplish, to her winter home in Lake
But for now, if you have City. I should have added,
any furniture you can donate, but not for long. She, too, is
call Lynda Buytendprp,at overseas. She is touring Rus-
926-5525. sia by boat.
And now, back to the Coast It seems this running away
Guard Auxiliary. for a while has spread to Flo-
Next weekend will be the tilla 12. Carolyn Treadon, their
Division 1 Fall Conference reporter, stated in her e-mail
in Panama City, Friday to that she was "out of town
Sunday, Oct. 17 to Oct. 19. this weekend." As I have been
Flotilla 19, Panama City Beach unable to reach he husband,
is hosting it. Duane, it is a good bet that
The agenda indicated there he and their daughter, Gabby,
will be many things of inter- went with her.
est. Also, there are work- Carolyn's report, "Not
shops, some of which are much to report this week
mandatory. And also there from Flotilla 12. We had a
will be time to visit with safety patrol out on the water
other auxiliary friends that on Sunday, Oct. 12. Coxswain
we get to see only two or Mark Rosen along with crew
three times a year. Bob Asztalos, Steve Hults and
Mae said as she called the Bill Wannall went out on a
meeting to order, "The roof five hour tour.
may cave in first time that They checked out the local
both John Edrington and Jim marina areas and monitored
McGill weren't at the meet- safety in the rivers. With the
ing." And they weren't the upcoming Division Meeting
only ones missing, next weekend in Panama City,
John and son Glenn and we will not have a patrol boat
Bob Morgan went on a lei- out. That is all I have for this
surely tour of England and week.
Ireland. A visit to the Edring- Remember Safe Boating Is
ton Castle was one their No Accidentl
scheduled stops. The Mc-


Amendment 4 is supported by Wild Kingdom's Jim Fowler


Wild Kingdom's Jim
Fowler urges Amendment 4
support at FWC meeting to
protect wildlife.
Jin Fowler, former host
of the television series "Mu-
tual of Omaha's Wild King-
dom," spoke at the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conser-
vation Commission (FWC)
meeting recently in support


of proposed Constitutional
Amendment 4.
During the FWC's meet-
ing in Jacksonville, Fowler
represented a coalition of
about 70 conservation aind
outdoor recreation groups,
pushing for passage of the
amendment that would pro-
vide incentives for landown-
ers who conserve their prop-


erty for wildlife habitat.
Earlier this week, Fowler
teamed up with the Florida
Wildlife Federation, the Na-
ture Conservancy, Audubon
of Florida and the Florida
Chamber of Commerce at
a press conference in Tal-
lahassee to draw attention
to the proposed amend-
ment and urge support for


it among voters.
The FWC's seven-member
board of Commissioners
unanimously passed a reso-
lution in June, expressing
support for the proposed
amendment.
The amendment, to ap-
pear on the general election
ballot in November, would
encourage landowners to


set aside land for conserva-
tion easements or practice.
proactive conservation to
benefit all Florida wildlife,
including the panther and
black bear. If 60 percent of
voters approve the amend-
ment, it will become part
of the Florida State Consti-
tution.
The resolution notes that


Florida's population may
double to 36 million people
within the next 50 years. It
says development will claim
millions of acres of wilder-
ness and erode the state's
rich legacy of outdoor rec-
reation if officials fail to
address growth projections
with wise and creative solu-
tions.


Amberjack, triggerfish changes


Dove hunt permits on sale


The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) on
Thursday, Sept. 18 pro-
posed raising the min-
imum harvest size for
greater amberjack and
gray triggerfish in Gulf of
Mexico state waters.
The FWC is proposing
these rule changes to
be consistent with new
regulations in Gulf federal
waters, which extend be-
yond nine nautical miles
offshore of Florida.
Federal fisheries man-
agers recently implement-
ed a stock rebuilding plan


for greater amberjack and
gray triggerfish in Gulf
federal waters.
Greater amberjack in
the Gulf are considered to
be overfished (low stock
abundance) and undergo-
ing overfishing (excessive
harvesting pressure), and
gray triggerfish in the
Gulf are considered to be
undergoing overfishing.
The FWC is proposing
rule amendments consis-
tent with the Gulf federal
regulations by increasing
the recreational minimum
harvest size for greater
amberjack from 28 to 30


inches fork length and
increasing the commercial
and recreational minimum
harvest size for gray trig-
gerfish from 12 to 14
inches fork length in Gulf
state waters.
A final public hear-
ing on the proposed rule
amendments will be
held in December in Key
West.


Read The Wakulla News
online ats
www.thewakullanews.net.


Daily dove hunt permits $35, which entitles one adult
went on sale Sept. 18 for spe- and one youth (under age 16)
cial-opportunity dove fields to hunt together, but allows
throughout the state, the only one daily bag limit of
Florida Fish and Wildlife Con- birds to be harvested between
servation Commission (FWC) them.
announced. Permits are available for the
Worksheets are available following special-opportunity
from FWC regional offices and public dove fields: Allapattah
at MyFWC.com/hunting under Flats (Martin County 25 daily-
"Special-Opportunity Work- use permits), Brown Farm (Hol-
sheets." Sportsmen may apply mes County 12 daily-use per-
for these permits at www. mits), CaravelleRanch(Putnam
wildlifelicense.com, by calling County 40 daily-use permits),
1-888-HUNT-FLORIDA (486- Combs Farm (Baker County- 10
8356), at county tax collectors' daily-use permits), Frog Pond
offices or license agents. (Dade County 37 daily-use
The cost for the permit is permits), Fussell Farm (Polk


County -12 daily-use permits),
and North Newberry (Alachua
County- 17 daily-use permits).
Sportsmen also have the
option of buying a $10 Youth
Permit at the same time they
purchase a Dove Hunt Permit.
This entitles the youth (under
age 16), while hunting under
the supervision of the adult
permit holder, to harvest his
own daily bag limit of birds.
For more information on
how you and your family can
get involved in these unique
special-opportunity dove
hunts, visit MyFWC.com/spe-
cial/dove.


850-224-4960


Major
Activity

Minor
Activity


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
12:45am 1:55am 3:00am 4:10am 5:15am 6:20am 7:10am
1:20pm 2:25pm 3:30pm 4:40pm 5:45pm 6:45 pm 7:35pm
7:00am 8:05am 9:10am 10:20am 11:25am 12:00am 12:55 am
7:30pm 8:40pm 9:45 pm 10:55 pm --:--pm 12:30pm 1:20pm


Sunrise
Sunset
Moon rise
Moon set
Brightness


I I


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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008


Nea w


Medart Assembly of God youth complete their walk in Tallahassee,

Medart Assembly of God youth

support national challenge


In 2004, two men walked
100 miles through the moun-
tains, deserts and cities of
Arizona for Speed the Light.
Through the heat, rain, snow
and pain they walked. They
raised $4,500.
They were willing to walk
so a missionary wouldn't
have to.
On Oct. 4, Medart Assem-
bly of God's youth program,
Ignited Student Ministries
(ISM) took that challenge.
Youth Pastor Matt Ray led
20 members of the church
on a walk from Medart As-
sembly of God to the state


capitol (25 plus miles). Un- their walk. They would like
der this national campaign to thank all of their corporate
set out by the Assemblies sponsors and donors: Trophy
of God Youth Department, King, El Jalisco, Any Time Fit-
"All Will Drive," members of ness, Sunshine Pools, Langs-
the church walked so mis- ton Pool Techs, Down Under
sionaries wouldn't have to. Dive Center, Process Servers
The campaign is to inspire Inc., Wakulla Bank, Badcock
1,000 youth leaders to walk Home Furniture & More,
26 miles. This would col- Withers Construction Inc.,
laboratively equal walking Gulf Coast Metal Systems,
more than the circumference Dazzles, Rascals Auto, and
of the earth (24,901 miles). ESG Operations Inc.
The money raised would go If you would like to con-
to help missionaries meet tribute to this cause, please
transportation needs. Ignited call Pastor Matt Ray at 926-
Students were able to raise 7940 or visit, www.allwill-
more than $1,700 during drive.com.


CCOW will host Oct. 21 forum
On Tuesday, Oct. 21, candidates for property appraiser, sheriff, superintendent of schools
and supervisor of elections will participate in the second of two forums put on by Concerned
Citizens of Wakulla, Inc. CCOW is very pleased to announce that all the candidates in this
year's races for Wakulla County offices have accepted CCOW's invitation to participate. The
Wakulla Watershed Coalition is co-sponsoring the event.
The forum will be held from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Library. Everyone
is invited to come to the library at 6:30 p.m. to meet the candidates. Refreshments will be
served. The event is free and open to everyone.
The format will be similar to that of CCOW's 2004 and 2006 forums. Questions submit-
ted in advance by members of sponsoring organizations will be written on slips of paper
and put into a hat. The moderator will pick questions at random. Each candidate will have a
set amount of time to answer his or her question. Audience members are invited to submit
questions in writing.
Comcast has agreed to record the event for later broadcast. According to Stefanie Bowden
of Comcast, technical difficulties are hampering the broadcast of the first forum, which was
held on Oct. 7 for county commission candidates. She said that the broadcast of the Oct. 7
forum will be rescheduled as soon as the problems are solved.
Please call 877-7661 or send an email to contactccow@gmail.com for more information?
about the Oct. 21 event. ,
Hospice Latest cookie poll -
hosts clergy has Obama in lead
Big Bend Hospice invites
area clergy to attend a special The latest numbers have Myra Jean's in Crawford-
luncheon on Tuesday, Oct. 21, been reported from the na- ville has been selling the
from noon to 1:15 p.m at Big tionwide cookie poll for presi- cookies and reports that 568
Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan dent of the United States. A Obama cookies have been
Center Blvd., Tallahassee. total of 29,943 cookies have purchased and 316 McCain
"We have planned a very been sold with Barack Obama cookies have been purchased
special time for our clergy to on them. Democrat Obama in Wakulla County.
gather, fellowship and to dis- has been counted 16,943 times
cuss issues that impact them or 57 percent of the time. W alk A
in their ministry," said Rev. Republican John McCain has V I r "
Candace McKibben, Big Bend been counted 12,600 times or
Hospice Pastoral Care Coordi- 43 percent of the time. Then set
nator. "At this quarterly meet-
ing Paul Malley, President of The first AnnualWalk-A-Thon
Aging With Dignity, will speak Nelso s will willtake place atthe Tallahas-
about the Five Wishes docu- see-St Marks Historic Railroadz
ment, and the table topic will be honored State Trail on Saturday, Oct 18,
be how we help congregants at the Wakulla Station trailhead'
plan. Rocky Mount Church of from 10 am. to noon.
The meeting is open to all Christ honored Pastor Derrick Registration will begin at 9
clergy in Leon, Jefferson, Madi- Nelson's wife, Gloria Nelson, a.m. for the walk-a-thon.
son, Taylor, Wakulla, Franklin, with an appreciation ball held The two-mile walk to benefit
Liberty and Gadsden coun- at the Wildwood Restaurant Epilepsy Association of the Big
ties. To make reservations for on Saturday, Oct. 11, and will Bend will be led by-the Talla-
the luncheon, please contact honor Pastor Nelson with an hassee Rollergirls roller derby
Rev. Candace McKibben at appreciation program at Rocky team. The event will feature
Big Bend Hospice as soon as Mount Church of Christ, 58 face painting;live musicaswell
possible. Her email address Dogwood Road on Sunday, as the trailhead's Boundless
candace@bigbendhospice.org Oct. 19, at 11 a.m. Elder Fred- Playground.,-
or you may call her at (850) erick Bell and Thessalonia M. Two mountain bikes with
878-5310 ext. 250 or toll free B. Church in Crawfordville.will helmets will be raffled off at
at (800) 772-5862. Please feel .render the service. Dinner will the event, and Tishirts and pizza
free to bring other clergy or be served. Everyone is invited coupons will be available for
staff guest. to attend. purchase. *


^'J The Wakulla Count Chamber of Commerce
will host a


Sfor individuals seeking office during the Nov. 4 General
The event will be open to the public


Election,


Thursday, Oct. 23, from 7 p.m. to 9s30 p.m.


at the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center,
33 Michael Drive in Crawfordville.
SThis community forum will provide an opportunity for our
citizens to come see, hear and meet the more than 17 candidates
for seven public offices in our county," said David Buckridge,
President of the Wakulla Chamber of Commerce.


Positions and Their Candidates Include
Individuals running for office in the General Election will be joined


by the winners of the Aug. 26 primary.
)r of Superintendent
is of Schools


Traci Cash, Doug Jones,
Scott Langston, Charles Prout
and Buddy Wells.

Sheriff
Charlie Creel


Dr. Andrea Carter
David Miller


Property Appraiser
Anne Ahrendt


David Harvey Donnie S
County Commission Seats


District 1
Alan Brock
Jenny Brock


m tiam


District 3
Jimmie Doyle


Mike Stewart J
These elections will help guide the future of
our county for years to come," said Buckridge. "It's
important that people know who they are voting for."

The event will be jointly hosted by
Q .


L


iparkman


district 5
ynn Artz


im Stokley


*


OPTIMIST
TurMucno4MU.


C9et Wakulla .et~Ps is a promotional sponsor of the event.
For more information, call the chamber office at 926-1848.


www.thewakullanews.com


P A

i^b i^-


C1


Supervise
Election


*


'W- a


(a t
'h ,


~-lfCIII


Id


41
*"7^


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008 Page 13A








,ari.. Shadeville Elementary School

students learn about fire safety


Superintendent Miller, teacher Marc Bowerman with WHS TV Production students

WHS television production

develops into popular

technical education choice


TV Production has devel-
oped into an extremely popu-
lar Career and Technical Edu-
cation (CTE) program taught
at Wakulla High School. The
teacher is Marc Bowerman, an
instructor at WHS from a part-
nership with Wakulla County
Schools and Lively Technical
Center arranged by Superin-
tendent David Miller with
Leon County Superintendent
Jackie Pons.
The program consists of
three or more CTE courses in
which students learn the ins-
and-outs of the technology of
filmmaking.
Career and Technical Edu-
. cation (CTE), formerly known
as vocational education, has
long thrived at Wakulla High
School. "Students are pre-
pared for both careers and
college when they participate
in one of the eight programs
offered at WHS that can lead
to a Bright Futures Vocational
Gold Seal Scholarship," said
Superintendent David Miller.
In his seventh year as a
certified CTE instructor, and


his second year at WHS, Bow-
erman brings a wealth of
experience to his students. He
has 23 years in the film, tele-
vision and video production
business with state, regional
and national credits from ABC,
NBC, CBS, FOX, CNN, History
Channel. Court TV, and PBS.
His awards include a region-
al EMMY, national platinum
and gold producer awards,
Ft. Lauderdale Film Festi-
val awards, and local ADDYs
(print), and independent Inter-
net (Ourstage) awards.
Why teach? With all that ex-
perience, he wanted to pass on
his knowledge to students.
"Students know film, tele--
vision, and music, so this
program helps create an al-
ready familiar connection to
the technology o( computers,
a tool that will help them in
their future education and
work," said Bowerman.
In Bowerman's first year
at WHS, he created an after-
school group that learned
the art of creative indepen-
dent filmmaking with a lim-


ited crew and budget. He also
graduated a student who was
accepted into the prestigious
FSU film school.
This year students are busy
producing public service an-
nouncements for the com-
munity.
Their love for the class is
evident.
"This class has been the
highlight of my public educa-
tion career," says senior Paul
Murphy.
Drama teacher Susan Sol-
burg had the idea to start
the popular TV Production
class years ago. Her tireless
work with the WHS Drama
program now consumes most
of her time. But because of her
foresight, TV Production has
blossomed from one class into
a full-time program.
Bowerman understands the
art of teaching. "I become a
better teacher if my students
are willing to learn," he said.
"If I can encourage them to be
more confident in themselves,
even in failure, the learning
comes easier,"


WCSO will use WMS for exercise


The Wakulla County Sher-
iff's Office will be training at
Wakulla Middle School on
Saturday, Oct. 18, to ensure
quick and safe response to
school emergencies by law
enforcement personnel.
The exercise will take place
on the school's campus from 8
a.m. to 4 p.m. The training will
take place inside and outside
the school and will include
students, personnel from

Schools prc

disability a\
Tanya English, Executive
Director of Exceptional Student
Education announced, "Wakulla
County School District has des-
ignated the first two weeks of
October as Disability History
and Awareness Weeks. This is
a result of a bill passed by Gov-
ernor Crist in 2008 and allows
schools to provide information
about disability history and
promote the awareness of the
contributions of individuals
with disabilities."
"We are proud to participate
in promoting awareness of
disability history and contribu-
tions of individuals with dis-
abilities and to designate the
first two weeks in October 2008
as Disability History and Aware-
ness," said Superintendent Da-
vid Miller. "Both disabled and
non-disabled children benefit
from diversity education."
In a continued effort to pro-
mote inclusion and disability
awareness the school health
program provided a delightful
heart-warming book, Friends at
School to all kindergarten and
first grade classrooms. Super-
intendent David Miller visited
a Crawfordville Elementary
School kindergarten classroom
and read Friends at School to


Wakulla County School Board,
the Wakulla County Sheriffs
Office, Florida Department of
Law Enforcement, the Leon
County Sheriff's Office and
surrounding law enforcement
agencies. I
The Wakulla County Sher-
iff's Office is alerting citizens
to the training exercise so
as not to create alarm. The
sheriff's office has had Opera-
tion School Safety Exercises in

)mote

awareness
Amber Stallings' class,
"The book illustrates the
true meaning of the word inclu-
sion and shows that given the
opportunity, children readily
accept diversity. The book em-
phasizes in a relaxed, natural
way that even though some
children may look different
and have different abilities, all
children like to do the same
things," added Miller.
One of every five Americans
is a person with a disability. A
person may be born with a dis-
ability. A person may acquire a
disability through an accident
or illness. A person may acquire
a disability simply as a part
of growing older. It was not
until 1975, with the passage
of the federal Education for
All Handicapped Children Act,
that school-aged children with
disabilities had a right to a free
appropriate public education,
Florida started the first special
education class in 1926 in Jack-
sonville.
Now, approximately 400,000
students identified with dis-
abilities are participating in
Florida's public education and
are graduating and going on
to postsecondary education or
employment.


the past at various schools in
the county.


George Hernandez, Emily Hughes, and Makenna
Martindale with a firehouse friend.


Fire hose

is popular
Shadeville's kindergarten,
first grade and second grade
students enjoyed the annual
visit from Wakulla County's
Station 08 Firefighters Tues-
day, Oct. 7 during Fire Pre-
vention week. Our students
learned about the importance
of knowing their home ad-
dress, how to Stop-Drop-and
Roll, staying low to avoid
smoke inhalation, never going
back into a burning building,
practicing "EDITH" or exit
drills in the home, never play-
ing with matches or lighters,
and how a firefighter who
may come to save you would
look and sound. Some very
brave children had an oppor-
tunity to use the fire hoses to
spray a large stream of water.
One of the highlights of the
morning was a visit from
"Sparky." "Fire prevention is
so important to the safety of
our children, and we thank
the firefighters who took time
out of their busy schedules
to share their expertise with
our students." said principal
Susan Brazier.


Nine WHS students recognized

for work on AP exams


Nine students at Wakulla
High School have earned AP
Scholar Awards in recognition
of their exceptional achieve-
ment on AP Exams.
The College Board's Ad-
vanced Placement Program
(AP) provides motivated and
academically prepared stu-
dents with the opportunity
to take rigorous college-level
courses while still in high
school, and to earn college
credit, advanced placement,
or both for successful perfor-
mance on the AP Exams. About
18 percent of the 1.6 million
students worldwide who took
the AP Exams performed at a
sufficiently high level to also
earn an AP Scholar Award.
The College Board recog-
nizes several levels of achieve-
ment based on students' per-
formance on AP Exams.
At Wakulla High School
three students qualified for
the AP Scholar with Distinc-
tion Award by earning an aver-


age grade of at least 3.5 on all
AP Exams taken, and grades
of 3 or higher on five or more
of these exams. These stu-
dents are: Michael Andrews,
Elizabeth Butler and Samuel
Myrick.
Two students qualified for
the AP Scholar with Honor
Award by earning an average
grade of at least 3.25 on all AP
Exams taken, and grades of 3
or higher on four or more of
these exams. These students
are Christina Brydebell and
Kyle Kilinski.
Four students qualified for
the AP Scholar Award by com-
pleting three or more AP Ex-
ams with grades of 3 or higher.
The AP Scholars are Meghan
McCallister, Nina Reich, Elliot
Seidler and Virginia Weiss.
Through 37 different col-
lege-level courses and exams,
AP provides motivated and
academically prepared stu-
dents with the opportunity to
earn college credit or advanced


placement and stand out in
the college admissions pro-
cess. Each exam is developed
by a committee of college
and university faculty and AP
teachers, ensuring that our
exams are aligned with the
same high standards expected
by college faculty at some of
the nation's leading liberal
arts and research institutions.
AP is accepted by more than
3,600 colleges and universities
worldwide for college credit,
advanced placement, or both
on the basis of successful AP
Exam grades. This includes
more than 90 percent of four-
year institutions in the United
States. Research consistently
shows that AP students who
score 3 or higher on AP Exams
(based on a scale from 1 to
5, with 5 being the highest)
typically experience greater
academic success in college
and higher graduation rates
than students who do not
participate in AP.


BIG BEND HOSPICE


GOLF TOURNAMENT



Friday, October 31 2008


Wildwood Country Club


All Proceeds Will Benefit Big Bend Hospice ponsorships
are Available
Patients in Wakulla County Get Your
Get Your


Contact:

Pam Raker Allbritton


Team Ready!













Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008


Sports


War Eagles continue winning streak against Chiles


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla War Eagle Football
Coach Scott Klees hoped his
offense, defense and special
teams would put a complete
game together early in the
2008 season.
But after struggling through
five games, Wakulla finally
made their coach happy, excel-
ling in all facets of the game
in a 23-2 victory over Lawton
Chiles High.
The War Eagles did not
wait until the end of the game
to pull out a victory.
WHS left no doubt who
would win the game as Chiles
struggled all night to move
the football. The War Eagles
refused to help their opponent
by limiting their mistakes.
"We played a complete
game," said Klees. "From top
to bottom, offense, defense
and special teams. We did a
great job of throwing, catching
and running."
The only mistake for
Wakulla was a safety when
Harold Williams was tackled


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmai@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla Lady War Eagle Bas-
ketball Coach Casey Godwin is
excited about the opportunity
to be a head coach at the high
school level after helping out
the program as an assistant
for two years. WHS had an out-
standing 21-7 record last year
under Coach Nate Jackson, but
Jackson has joined Erica Bunch
as an assistant coach on the
junior varsity, while Chandra
Godwin is the assistant under
her husband.
Godwin was an outstanding
athlete at Wakulla High School
when she was known as Chan-
dra Manning.
Coach Jackson started with
a strong group of freshmen
players and watched them
grow up and graduate last
season.
Godwin will miss Kiara Gay
and Jameiha Maxwell who
signed volleyball scholarships
at Pensacola Junior College and
Gulf Coast Community College
respectively. The team also lost
Amanda Henderson, Jessica
Forest, Terrion Webster and
Sandi Dunlap. Six of the eight
varsity players are gone.
But Godwin said .he will
build his team around junior
Artigua Kilpatrick. and sopho-
more Taylor Eglton.
Kilpatrick has played bas-
ketball since seventh grade at
Wakulla Middle School and has
been a starter on the WHS var-
sity since her freshman year.
"I think it's going to be a
good season," she said. "We
have some good younger play-
ers who have a lot of talent."
Godwin is sharing Kilpatrick
with Coach Erica Bunch of the
volleyball program. She also


in his own end zone.
Wakulla had already dented
the scoreboard for 10 points
by the time Chiles picked up
the two point safety.
Morgan Henry kicked a
32 yard field goal in the first
quarter and quarterback Zach
Klees connected with Lee
Smalls on a 35 yard pass in the
second quarter. Henry booted
the extra point.
Smalls scored on a 13 yard
pass from Antonio Kilpatrick
in the third quarter to increase
the lead to 16-2. Kendrick Hall
rumbled 71 yards in the fourth
quarter for the final touch-
down of the game. Casey Ed-
dinger added the extra point
kick as Klees decided to give
Eddinger some kicking expe-
rience.
Zach Klees was 10-19 for 150
yards and a touchdown while
Casey Eddinger was 1-4 for 15
yards. The quarterbacks did
not throw an interception.
Kendrick Hall led the run-
ning game with six rushes
for 87 yards and a touch-
down. Mookie Forbes had five


Kilpatrick will lead

Lady War Eagles


plays softball for Coach Tom
Graham. Her favorite sport is
basketball, she said. "This is
my first year in volleyball. I've
really enjoyed it."
Godwin said Kilpatrick is
leading the Big Bend in blocks
this season.
"She's going to be all over
the court for us," said Godwin.
"She'll bring the ball up court
for us or post up."
Taylor Washington and Ki
Myrick will join the varsity
from the junior varsity last sea-
son. Kiara Harvey, a freshman,
may crack the line-up on varsity
as Kilpatrick did.
"We have a tough district,"
said Godwin. Wakulla placed
second to East Gadsden last
season and plays with Rickairds,
Panama City Bay, Godby and
Panama City Beach Arnold.
Shane Momier will serve as a
volunteer assistant coach.
Wakulla will open the season
by hosting a Pre-Season Classic
Nov. 15 in Medart against
Aucilla Christian, Blountstown
and Madison County.
"We're going to set the bar
high. I want to get the com-
munity back involved in female
athletics," Godwin said. "They
work hard. We need to support
the kids."

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rushes for 45 yards, Lorenzo
Randolph had six rushes for
38 yards, Kendell Gavin had
eight rushes for 39 yards and
E.J. Forbes had three rushes
for 24 yards.
Smalls had three catches
for 56 yards and two scores.
Harold Williams had two
catches for 30 yards. Lorenzo
Randolph had three catches
for 38 yards, Mookie Forbes
added two catches for 30 yards
and Kendell Gavin had one
catch for 23 yards.
The offensive players of the


Jamel Gavin


game were Michael Wise, who
graded out to 84 percent, and
quarterback Zach Klees.
Defensively, Tyler Schmidt
had an outstanding game with
12 tackles, two caused fumbles
and two sacks. He was named
defensive player of the game
along with defensive back
Jamel Gavin who graded out
at 91 percent and had nine
tackles. "Cairo" Edwards had
an interception for the Wakul-
la defense.
"It was by far our best game
of the year," said Klees.
The coach said he was


Tyler Schmidt


proud of Mookie and E.J.
Forbes and Kendrick Hall
who missed practice time due
to the death of their grand-
mother. Klees said the players
overcame a difficult situation
and played very well. "I'm re-
ally proud of them," said the
coach.
Wakulla has an open week
and will watch game films and
run early in the open week.
Klees will give his players
Friday off.
Godby will visit Medart
on Friday, Oct. 24 in a district


Zacn liees


showdown. The Cougars are
5-0 and will play Chiles this
week.
All of the remaining games
are district contests except the
Madison game. Godby has a
good offense, good defense
and has strong skills position
players.
Wakulla improved to 4-2
overall and remains 1-0 in
district games.
Klees said he is feeling
good about the team as his se-
niors have begun to produce.


Micnael wise


I've had my eye on


Lynn Artz

for 9 years.

She's an awesome Mom.


She'll make an awesome

County Commissioner for the

people of Wakulla County.


Check out her website: www.lynnartz.com




L N R TZ Political advertisement approved and paid for by Lynn Artz (Chase's Mom),
For County Commission, District 5 No Party Affiliate, for Wakulla County Commissioner, District 5.


Re-Elect 000000


Donnie Sparkman


WAKULLA COUNTY


PROPERTY APPRAISER


*Certified Florida Appraiser*

-Experienced

-Dedicated

Re-Elect someone who has always

worked with the public concerning

land and values...and who will

CONTINUE TO WORK FOR YOU!


I WILL CONTINUE TO KEEP THE CITIZENS OF WAKULLA COUNTY AT THE FOREFRONT
OF ANYTHING I DO. I WILL CONTINUE TO BE RESPECTFUL, HELPFUL, ACCESSIBLE, AND
LISTEN TO YOUR CONCERNS. I HAVE THE KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE IN DEALING WITH
LAND, DEEDS, DESCRIPTIONS, LAND VALUES, TAXES, ETHICS AND THE ABILITY TO
COMMUNICATE WITH THE PUBLIC.

AS 'YOUR PROPERTY APPRAISER I WILL CONTINUE TO PROVIDE EFFICIENT,
COURTEOUS AND FAIR SERVICE TO ALL! I WILL CONTINUE TO WORK TO IMPROVE THE
OFFICE, WEB SITE AND TAX ROLL AND SEE TO IT THAT THEY SERVE THE PUBLIC IN THE
BEST POSSIBLE WAY.


SI will treat you with courtesy and respect.
SI will provide fair and equitable property values.
I have the knowledge and skills to perform the responsibilities and
duties of this office. I would appreciate your vote!


Political Advertisement Paid for and Approved By Donnie R. Sparkman, Democrat for Property Appraiser


'


. Coach Casey Godwin and Artigua Kilpatrick


We stock camo clothes, deer altracrant
scents, archery & black powder sup-
plies, dove seats, treestands and more.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008 Page 15A


Wakulla Middle School Wildcats run past Taylor County


Wildcat Fred Cummings runs away from Taylor County defenders.
The Wakulla Middle School Tuesday, Oct. 7. Ball control The Wildcats had an out-
Wildcats defeated a tough and a stingy defense lead to standing night running the
Taylor County Bulldog team the 38-22 victory, ball. The big Wildcat running

Florida High slips by JV Eagles


duo of Fred Cummings and
Kevin James combined for
a total of 252 yards on the
ground. Brandon Nichols also
contributed with a run of 18
yards and a second for four
yards. Two runs by Dustin
Roberts netted another nine
yards for a total of 283 run-
ning yards racked up by the
team.
The offensive line has
continuously improved, said
Coach Bobby Wells, led by
Chris Griffin, Justin Fisher, Ca-
leb Weaver, Logan Taylor, Ca-
leb Brown, and Clay Morrison.
Contributing to the offensive
running game at wide receiver
were, R.J. Montgomery, Vonte
Ervin, and Sheldon Johnson,
They provided big blocks
opening up the defense for
the WMS running attack.
Sheldon Johnson had an
outstanding game, said Wells.
He returned a Bulldog kickoff
73 yards for a touchdown.
Sheldon also had an inter-


ception which he returned
30 yards stopping a Bulldog
drive.
On defense, the Wildcats
had to stop a talented Taylor
County team. "Taylor brought
two running backs and a re-
ceiver who were as good as
anyone we have played this
year," said Wells. The WMS
defensive front eight made
the necessary adjustments
to slow down the Bulldogs'
tough ground game.
Defensive ends, Logan
Taylor, Caleb Weaver, Sean
O'Berry, and Zach Harrell did
a good job containing Tay-
lor County's Wing-T offense,
while the WMS defensive
secondary held Taylor to only
two receptions.
A fifth quarter was played
offering both teams the op-
portunity to look at next
year's stars. The fifth quarter
defense was filled with high-
lights starting with big hits
provided by Bryan Nichols at


linebacker and Hunter Hurst
at nose guard,
The offensive line included
Devin Griffin, Thomas Bar-
wick, Tyler Carrier, and David
Sapp. On the defensive side
of the ball, Cole Henderson,
Dustin Lynch, Garrett Clark,
Tucker Pearce, and Preston
Pitman showed real promise
for next year's team, the coach
added.
Kaleb Atkins, Malik Thom-
as and Patrick Harvey pro-
vided the excitement in the
offensive backfield as the
WMS Wildcats readies for
next year.
The Taylor win means
Wakulla Middle School has
won its side of the .middle
school conference while Riv-
ersprings won the other. The
rematch is scheduled for Oct.
30. Wakulla Middle School
will meet Riversprings at J.D.
Jones Stadium to see who
takes home the trophy as
conference champs.


Bears fall to Madison County


The Wakulla War Eagle
Junior Varsity football lost a
hard fought game to Florida
High on Thursday Oct. 9
at Florida High Field. After
four first half turnovers and
a touchdown called back
because of an illegal block
behind the play, the team was
down 20-0 at the half.
"We have been our own
worst enemy lately," said


head coach Scott Collins when
asked to give an explanation
as to how the team could sta-
tistically dominate a game
and not win it. "Our main
problem has been first half
turnovers, but we are working
on it and the guys are deter-
mined to improve."
Wakulla had more than 500
yards of offense while holding
Florida High to 311. The final


FACT:
WHS is an "A" rated Florida
DOE school with the 2nd high-
est high school point total in the
Big Bend and in North Florida.
FACT:
WHS 2007-2008 10th graders
ranked #1 in the Florida FCAT
Writing.

FACT:
WHS 2007-2008 9th and 10th
graders ranked #2 in the Florida
FCAT Math.
FACT:
WHS 2007-2008 ACT and SAT
college entrance exam scores
were above the state average.
SAT scores were also above the
national average.
FACT:
WHS offers 10 rigorous Ad-
vanced Placement courses in
English, math, science, social
studies, music and art with op-
portunities for college credit.


score was 34-26.
Will Thomas led the team
on offense by rushing for 295
yards and four touchdowns.
On defense, Brandon Busby
led the team with 10 tackles
and Justin Helmadollar had
eight. The team plays host to
Taylor County on Thursday,
Oct. 16 at J.D. Jones Stadium
with a 7 p.m. kick-off.


Cross country runners excel


The Wakulla High School
Cross Country participated in
the St George Island "Oyster
Spat '08" 5K race on Saturday,
Oct. 11. Although this was
an "off' week for regularly
scheduled school meets, the
team made a great showing
at this public race.
The age 15 and under girl's
category was dominated by
WHS freshman Emily Mc-
Cullers, Chelsea Thompson,
and Alina McCullers, bringing
home first, second and third


place ribbons respectively.
In the 15 and under boy's
race. WHS Freshman Cody
James nabbed a second place
ribbon. In the 16 to 20 boy's
age category, WHS runners
Ben Mathers, Liam Daniels,
and Brian Brown took first,
second and third places.
Rounding out the outstand-
ing showing for the War
Eagles were Shawn Mor-
ris, Kendalyn Burns, Kayla
Love, Kristie Hodges, Cora
Atkinson, Josh Soderland


and Rachel Capps. In an
exciting finish to this open
race, WHS Head Coach Paul
Hoover finished first overall
for all participants. The team
was thrilled for their coach
and the excitement was dou-
bled when Assistant Coach
Greg James and "Mrs. Coach"
Myrna Hoover, finished with
top times as well. "It was a
great day of racing and team
bonding at St. George Island,"
the coaches said.


FACT:
WHS students can take dual
enrollment college courses for
free while in high school at
TCC, FAMU, and FSU; TCC
also offers college classes at the
WHS campus.
FACT:
WHS Career & Technical
Education (formerly vocational)
programs all lead to Bright
Futures Vocational Gold Seal
Scholarships; eight programs of
more than 30 classes are offered
at WHS (Medical Academy, Ac-
counting, Web Design, Carpen-
try, Digital Design, TV
Production, Culinary, Criminal
Justice); students have access to
many more programs for free at
Lively Technical Center.

FACT:
WHS 2007 Graduation Rate
was 82.5%. (The State was
72.4%.)


Political Advertisement paid for and approved by David Miller,
Democrat, for Superintendent


On Thursday, Oct. 9, Riv-
ersprings Middle School suf-
fer,ed their first setback of
the season against Madison
County. The Bears came out
strong in the first half, build-
ing a 12-6 halftime lead and
gaining 150 yards of offense
to Madison's 85. The Bron-
cos came out in the second
half with a steady barrage of
fresh legs and chewed up 246
yards on the ground. In the
end, Madison came out on
top 30-18.
The Riversprings offense
was led by the quarterbacking
tandem of Dalton Norman
and James Douin. Norman
was 6-16 for 76 yards and
one touchdown, while Douin
was 2-6 for 30 yards and one


I.


touchdown. The Bears leading
receiver was Mikal Cromartie,
who had six receptions for 83
yards and one touchdown.
Dalton Norman had a 13 yard
touchdown reception from
James Douin.
The leading rushers for
RMS were Demetrius Lindsey,
who picked up 45 yardsbon 13
carries with one score, Dillon
Norman, 26 yards on four
carries, and Dalton Norman,
who also had 26 yards on
four carries. Mikal Cromartie
also had the knock 'em back
block of the night, crushing a
Madison linebacker.
The Bears were led on de-
fense by Dillon Norman. Nor-
man had six tackles, four of
them for loss, and a fumble re-


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cover. Norman was followed
closely on defense by Mikal
Cromartie, James Douin, and
Demetrius Lindsey. Cromartie
had five tackles and a forced
fumble, Douin pitched in with
five tackles, two assists, and
a forced fumble, and Lindsey
added five tackles, three as-
sists, two forced fumbles, and
a fumble recovery. Quintis
Wardlow and Jonathan Chunn
also played well defensively.
Chunn had the decleater hit
of the night on defense.
The Bears have an open
date before playing Taylor
County at J.D. Jones Stadium
on Thursday, Oct. 23. The
game will be played at 7
p.m. and there will be a fifth
quarter.


sw

MarkKenyon
Owner/Sales


lla Christian School
e Difference that Lasts a Lifetime"

SWakulla County Veteran's Day Parade.
ap 10:00 am, Saturday November 8,2008


^ ..^ ENTRY FORM

Your community group or organization can become a vital part in showing your support for our
troops and honoring our local Veterans. It will be a very special way to pay tribute to all Veterains
and active duty military. The event will benefit local Veteran's groups and Wakulla Christian School.
*The theme for the 2008 Veteran's Day Celebration is "HONORING
ALL WHO SERVED"
*Parade entries are strongly encouraged to decorate in a patriotic theme,
prizes will be awarded following the official Veterans Day Ceremony
*Full details of the Parade Order and your Position in the Line of March
will be sent to you by November 4th. 2008

The parade will line up at 9:00 a.m. and start promptly at 10:00 a.m. As Parade Coordinator,
I, Cynthia Thomas, will guide everyone into position. Pre-registration is necessary to ensure
sufficient space for your Parade unit and minimize traffic congestion. A donation for register-
ing would be appreciated and will benefit local Veterans!

Name of Organization:


Contact Person


Fax #:


Phone:


E-mail


Contact Address

To register your Parade float contact:
CYNTHIA THOMAS
Cynthia(@,amerifirstdirect.net
Fax: 926-4554
Mobile: 251-0439


Call up your friends and challenge them to make a better
float than yours! If you have any questions don't hesitate
to email or call me, I'll be glad to help!
Sincerely,
Cynthia Thomas
Veteran's Day Celebration Coordinator


Facts About Wakulla HighSchool



Facts About Wakulla High School


I


I


nTrnF7?Stores


I:

















Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008


Pingree offers view of proposed county charter


Editor, The News;
Within a matter of days,
citizens from across this great
county will have the opportu-
nity and privilege of voting on
the structure of their primary lo-
cal government service provider
- Wakulla County government.
The question that is on the Gen-
eral Election ballot is, whether
the voters in our community
wish to adopt a "charter" form
of county government.
Essentially, citizens will de-
termine whether they wish to
capture the maximum allowable
local "home rule" authority al-
lowed under state law and, in
so doing, provide a structured
mechanism to give your govern-
ment officials direction on how
to meet the unique challenges
we face here at home. In this let-
ter, I intend to provide citizens
additional factual information
on what this charter proposal
does and does not do, as is my
responsibility as county admin-
istrator. Determining whether
these facts are "pros" or "cons"
is each of our responsibility
and one I know we each take
seriously. I will also provide my
personal thoughts on the pro-
posal as a fellow citizen of this
county and one who has worked
on charter issues professionally
for nearly a decade.
In the end, pass or fail, it is
my sole objective that we all
become well informed in decid-
ing the structure of our primary
local government a structure
that will last for generations to
come. Answering such a ques-
tion is precisely what will occur
on Nov. 4 and it is a pleasure
for me to submit this informa-
tion intended to aide each of
you with your decision-making
process.
"What is a county charter
and what is the basic need for
it?" Simply put, a charter is a
"mini-constitution" that pro-
vides guidance to your county
government officials and can
be modified over time by voter
approval to meet emerging local
needs that may arise later, but
can't be foreseen today. This is
very similar to the amendments
to the Florida or even United
States'Constitution that have
taken place over many, many
years. The charter is the tool
that provides a local framework
for county government to meet
local needs and demands for


service.
Each of Florida's 67 counties
has been created by the State
of Florida during the past 140
years to provide basic local ser-
vices (such as law enforcement,
courts, roads, tax collection and
election services). Different from
cities, which each have a local
"charter" to guide their leaders,
each county is a political sub-
division of the State of Florida
and takes significant guidance
from the state. For a majority
of this time, each of Florida's
counties was largely rural and
did not need additional local
authority to meet local needs.
However, and especially during
the last half century, counties
like Wakulla have become the
primary local service provider
for citizens. Each decade coun-
ties tackle new programs and
services specifically designed
to meet local needs, such as
community development, fire
and EMS, healthcare, library and
parks services. This increased
demand over time for locally
provided services has increased
the need for additional "home
rule" authority to let voters
guide their elected officials from
the grass roots level about the
services they desire.
Accordingly, 40 years ago
state voters approved a consti-
tutional amendment providing
basic home rule authority to
all county governments. Most
significantly, that action also
allowed counties to take up the
maximum allowable home rule
authority by adopting a charter
form of government. Since that
time, 19 counties with nearly 80
percent of the state's population
have approved a local charter to
meet the unique needs of each
county. Similar to the proposal
for Wakulla County, each charter
must be locally approved by the
voters and, as such, contain ele-
ments that reflect the priorities
of the citizens in each county.
"What are the some of the
key attributes of any county
charter?" Often, state law dif-
ferentiates the powers of charter
counties and non-chartered
counties when conveying the
intent or applicability of vari-
ous laws; In short, the state
often confers-the most allow-
able-power of self-government
upon those counties that have
adopted a home rule charter
such as what is proposed in


Notice of Public Hearing

The Wakulla County Board of County
Commissioners proposes to. adopt the
following by ordinance and has scheduled
Public Hearings regarding the following before
the the Wakulla County Board of County
Commissioners on Monday, November 17,
2008, beginning at 6:00 PM,, unless
otherwise noted below or as time permits.
All public hearings are held at the County
Commission Chambers located west of the
County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road,
Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested
parties are invited to attend and present
testimony.


AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AMENDING THE WAKULLA COUNTY
LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE PART 1,
SECTION 5-7 PROVIDING FOR
TEMPORARY USES, INCLUDING
PROVISIONS FOR PURPOSE AND
INTENT, PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY AND PROIVDING FOR
AN EFFECTIVE DATE.


1. Land Development Code Text Amendment:


TA08-01
Applicant:
Proposal:

Hearings Required:


Wakulla County
amend Section 5-7, LDC
regarding Temporary Uses
County Commission
11/17/2008 @ 6:00 PM


Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any
related public record files may be viewed at the
Wakulla County Planning and Community
Development Department located at 3093
Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8
AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any
person desiring to appeal a decision of a County
Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is
made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said
hearings. Persons needing special access
considerations should call the Board Office at least 48
hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The
Board Office may be contacted at (850) 926- 0919 or
TDD 926-7962.


Wakulla County. In my opinion,
state law also "hamstrings"
counties that have not passed a
charter on some issues, such as
equality in CRA creation, which
can have a negative impact on
the citizens in those counties.
Regardless, the following are
the key attributes of approving
a county charter:
Enhanced citizen partici-
pation in and control of the
government process.
Increased flexibility avail-
able to citizens for management
of their government.
Increased accountability
of the local government to the
people.


Additional means of solv-
ing local problems particularly
when a unique set of circum-
stances exists.
Establishment of a Charter
Review Commission to periodi-
cally review the charter and to
propose amendments for citizen
consideration.
Increased responsiveness
of local government to its citi-
zens.
Maximization of allowable
home rule authority for every
citizen to guide their county
government's actions from the
county level.
"How did Wakulla County's
Charter proposal come about


Notice of


Public Hearing

The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to adopt the following
by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings regarding the following before the the
Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, November 17, 2008,
beginning at 6:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public
hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County
Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are
invited to attend and present testimony.


I. Application for Change of Zoning & Preliminary Plat R08-07 & PP08-02
Applicant: N. G. Wade Investment Company, Winco Utilities, Inc.,
and Wakulla County BOCC
Agent: Robert Routa
Engineer of Record: GPI Southeast, Inc.
Proposal: Rezone to Planned Unit Development and create
mixed use plat
Tax ID Numbers: 34-2S-01E00-04998-004; 34-2S-01E-000-04998-001;
34-2S-01E-000-04998-002; 33-2S-01E-000-04995-001;
04-3S-01E-000-05012-000,; 03-3S-0 IE-000-05007-000,
33-2S-0E-000-04995-027; 34-2S-01E-000-04998000;
35-2S-01E-00Q-05000-000, ..;t ..
Existing FLU Map: Northeast Wakulla County Sustainable Community
(FLUE Policy 1.2.9.1), Rural- tFLUE Policy 1.2.4)
Public Facilities (FLUE Policy 1.2.13)
Existing Zoning: AG, RR- & P.U.D. (Sections 5-25. 5-27, & 5-50 LDC)
Proposed Zoning: PUD (Section 5-50)
FEMA Flood Info.: "C" & "A" zones on Panel 0125-B
Parcel Size: 586.45 +/- Acres
Location: Commerce Boulevard and Woodville Highway
Hearings Required: County Commission: 11/17/2008 @ 6:00 PM

2. Application for Change of Zoning & Preliminary Plat: R08-01 & PPO7-06
Applicant: Muir Woods, LLC
Agent: Thurman Roddenberry
Proposal: rezone to planned unit development
Tax ID Number25-3s-02w-000-01615-001 & 36-3s-02w-000-01770-002
Existing FLU Map: Urban I (FLUE Policy 1.2.5)
Existing Zoning: R-l (Section 5-30, LDC)
Proposed Zoning: PUD (Section 5-50, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0225-B
Parcel Size: 28.65+/- acres
Location: north side of Arran Road,
east of Wakulla Arran Road
Hearings Required: County Commission 11/17/08 @ 6:00PM
County Commission 12/01/08 @ 6:00PM


3. Application for Short
Applicant:
Agent:
Proposal:
Tax ID Number:
Existing FLU Map:
Existing Zoning:
FEMA Flood Info:
Parcel Size:
:Location:
Hearings Required:


Form Final Plat:


SF08-07


G&A Lloyd, LLC
Edwin Brown & Associates
13 lot residential subdivision
15-3s-01e-000-05189-001 & 22-3s-01e-000-05408-000
Agriculture (FLUE Policy 1.2.2)
AG (Section 5-25, LDC)
"C", "B" & "A" zones on Panel 0275-B
313.85+/- acres
South of Bloxham Cutoff, east of
Woodville Highway and the City of Tallahassee Powerline
County Commission 11/17/08 @ 6:00PM


4. Application for Final Plat: FP08-04
Applicant: Wakulla Bank
Agent: Thurman Roddenberry
Proposal: replat lots 21 & 22 of Commodore Commons
Tax ID Number: 00-00-076-275-10250-21A & 00-00-076-275-10250-22A
Existing FLU Map: Urban 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6)
Existing Zoning: R-3 (Section 5-32, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0250-B
Parcel Size: 1.70+/- acres
Location: 60 thru 88 Country Way
Hearings Required: County Commission 11/17/08 @ 6:00PM


5. Application for Final Plat: FP08-05
Applicant: Parrish & Suzanne Barwick, Ferrell Barwick, Ben Withers
Steven & Kimberly Morgan
Proposal: create 6 lot subdivision
Tax ID Number: 00-00-080-000-11508-018, 00-00-080-000-11508-020,
00-00-080-000-11508-017, 00-00-080-000-11508-016,
00-00-080-000-11508-019, 00-00-080-000-I 1508-013,
Existing FLU Map: Rural 1 (FLUE Policy 1.2.3)
Existing Zoning: AG (Section 5-25, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" & "A" zones on Panel 0250-B
Parcel Size: 32.98+/- acres
Location: north side of JK Moore Road
Hearings Required: County Commission 11/17/08 @ 6:00PM


6. Application for Change of Zoning: R08-15
Applicant: WRJ Sales, Inc.
Agent: GPI Southeast, Inc.
Proposal: rezone to general commercial
Tax ID Number: 25-4s-02w-000-02122-000 & 25-4s-02w-000-02125-000
Existing FLU Map: Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4)
Existing Zoning: RR-I (Section 5-27, LDC)
Proposed Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0360-B
Parcel Size: 7.69+/- acres
Location: South side of Coastal Highway, west of Jack Crum Road
intersection
Hearings Required: County Commission 11/17/08 @ 6:00PM


7. Application for Variance: V08-15
Applicant: WRJ Sales, Inc.
Agent: GPI Southeast, Inc.
Proposal: setback variance
Tax ID Number: 25-4s-02w-000-02122-000; 25-4s-02w-000-02114-001;
25-4s-02w-000-02114-000; 25-4s-02w-000-02125-000
Existing FLU Map: Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4)
Existing Zoning: RR-I (Section 5-27, LDC)


and how involved were citizens
in that approval process?" Begin-
ning in February 2008, the board
began formally exploring the
process for adopting a charter.
Numerous workshops, public
forums-and meetings were held
for the constitutional officers,
community leaders and inter-
ested citizens to attend. These
meetings provided background
information, analysis of what
a charter form of government
would mean to Wakulla County,
an overview of the process nec-
essary to approve a charter and
the key elements included in a
charter during which input was
sought and included.


In April, the board directed
staff and a contracted expert
consultant to draft a simple
charter that presented Wakulla
County government structure as
in current form. Two required
public hearings were held on
the adoption of the Wakulla
County Charter and the ordi-
nance was approved. The ballot
question was then sent to the
Supervisor of Elections for in-
clusion on the General Election
ballot in November. It is critical
to underscore that this process
builds up to the citizen's vote
this General Election.


Continued on Page 17A


Proposed Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0360-B
Parcel Size: 8.68+/- acres
Location: South side of Coastal Highway, west of Jack Crum Road
intersection
Hearings Required: County Commission 11/17/08 @ 6:00PM

8. Application for Site Plan: SP08-15
Applicant: WRJ Sales, Inc.
Agent: GPI Southeast, Inc.
Proposal: expand mobile homes sales
Tax ID Number: 25-4s-02w-000-02122-000; 25-4s-02w-000-02114-001;
25-4s-02w-000-02114-000; 25-4s-02w-000-02125-000
Existing FLU Map: Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4)
Existing Zoning: RR-I (Section 5-27, LDC)
Proposed Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0360-B
Parcel Size: 8.68+/- acres
Location: South side of Coastal Highway, west of Jack Crum Road
intersection
Hearings Required: County Commission 11/17/08 @ 6:00PM


9. Application for Varianc
Applicant:
Proposal:
Tax ID Number:
Existing FLU Map:
Existing Zoning:
FEMA Flood Info:
Parcel Size:
Location:
Hearings Required:


ce:


V08-16


Michael Maloy
wetland setback variance
20-3s-01e-166-05398-CL1
Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4)
RR-1 (Section 5-27, LDC)
"A" zone on Panel 0250-B
2+/- acres
River Plantation Road
County Commission 11/17/08 @ 6:00PM


10. Application for Variance: V08-17
Applicant: William T. Gaupin, et al
Agent: Vernon D. Hope, Innovative Civil Engineering
Proposal: wetland setback variance
Tax ID Number. 00-00-121-156-11964-110
Existing FLU Map: Urban 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6)
Existing Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "V20" zone on Panel 0390-B
Parcel Size: 11.68+/- acres
Location: Harbour Point Drive
Hearings Required: County Commission 11/17/08 @ 6:00PM
11. Application for Flood Variance: FV08-01
Applicant: William T. Gaupin, et al
Agent: Vernon D. Hope, Innovative Civil Engineering
Proposal: flood variance
Tax ID Number 00-00-121-156-11964-110
Existing FLU Map: Urban 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6)
Existing Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "V20" zone on Panel 0390-B
Parcel Size: 11.68+/- acres
Location: Harbour Point Drive
Hearings Required: County Commission 11/17/08 @6:00PM-


12. Application for Site P
Applicant:
Agent:
Proposal:
Tax ID Number
Existing FLU Map:
Existing Zoning:
FEMA Flood Info:
Parcel Size:
Location:
Hearings Required:


lan:


SP08-16


William T. Gaupin, et al
Vernon D. Hope, Innovative Civil Engineering
Marsh Harbor Marina Clubhouse
00-00-121-156-11964-110
Urban 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6)
C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
"V20" zone on Panel 0390-B
I 1.68+/i acres
Harbour Point Drive
County Commission 11/17/08 @ 6:00PM


13. Application for Variance: V08-20
Applicant: William T. Gaupin, et al
Agent: Vernon D. Hope, Innovative Civil Engineering
Proposal: setback variance from mean high water
Tax ID Number: 00-00-121-156-11964-110 .
Existing FLU Map: Urban 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6)
Existing Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "V20" zone on Panel 0390-B
Parcel Size: 11.68-+- acres
Location: Harbour Point Drive
Hearings Required: County Commission 11/17/08 @ 6:00PM

14. Application for Change of Zoning: R08-16
Applicant: Richard Gowdy
Proposal: rezone to general commercial
Tax ID Number 07-3s-01w-000-04317-000
SExisting FLU Map; Agriculture (FLUE Policy 1.2.2) i
Proposed FLU Map: Commercial (FLUE Policy 1.2.7)
*Existing Zoning: AG (Section 5-25, LDC)
Proposed Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" & "A" zones on Panel 0250-B
Parcel Size: 9.8+/- acres
Location: west side of Crawfordville Highway
Hearings Required: County Commission 11/17/08 @ 6:00PM


15. Application for Appeal to the Board of Adjustment: BOA08-02
Applicant: Jon G. & Donna L. Shierling
Proposal: appeal the Planning Department's action
Tax ID Number: 16-3s-01e-000-05206-005
Existing FLU Map: Agriculture (FLUE Policy 1.2.2)
Existing Zoning: AG (Section 5-25, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0275-B
Parcel Size: 20.0+/- acres
Location: 90 Acorn Trail
Hearings Required: County Commission 11/17/08@ 6:00PM


16. Application for Change of Zoning: R08-13
S Applicant; Thuyman Roddenberry
Proposal: rezone to general commercial and multi-family
Tax ID Number: 00-00-077-000-10365-000
Existing FLU Map: Urban 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6)
Existing Zoning: AG (Section 5-25, LDC)
Proposed Zoning: C-2 & R-3 (Section 5-38 & 32, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0250-B
Parcel Size: 36.69+/- acres
Location: east side of Crawfordille Highway,
south of Hammaknockers
Hearings Required: County Commission' 11/17/08 @ 6:00PM


17. Application for Site Plan:
Applicant: Lew
Proposal: con
Tax ID Number: 00-(
Existing FLU Map: Rur
Existing Zoning: C-2
FEMA Flood Info: "C"
Parcel Size: 5.0+
'Location: wes
soul
Hearings Required: Cou


SP07-08
sis Properties.
imercial building addition
00-089-000-11615-002
l 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4)
(Section 5-38, LDC)
&"A" zones on Panel 0250-B
+W- acres
t side ofCrawfordville Highway,
th of Council Moore Road
inty Commission 11/17/08 @ 6:00PM


SCopies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record files miy be
viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department
located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM
M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County
Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits
presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call
the Board Office at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board
Office may be contacted at (850) 926- 0919 or TDD 926-7962,


*;t .














THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008 Page 17A


County Charter


Continued from Page 16A
Not only were citizens
involved in the development
of the proposed charter, our
county citizens will be the
sole judge on its passage on
Nov. 4 or any amendment
thereafter. Remember, a char-
ter is by the people and for
the people. Most importantly,
it is only approved or modi-
fied by the people, as well.
What are the Key Attributes
of the Wakulla County Char-
ter Proposal?" The proposed
charter includes much of the
same government structure
that we have today, as that
was much of the input from
across the community that
the board received in devel-
oping this proposal. Citizens
said they wanted to retain


the ability to elect their same
constitutional officers (sheriff,
clerk of court, etc.) and they
wanted five county commis-
sioners elected in partisan
elections.
That is all preserved in the
proposed charter. In fact, very
significant thresholds for any
future charter amendment
attempt (three times higher
than any other charter county
in the state) were also includ-
ed, largely as a mechanism
to protect the governmental
structure that exists today.
Accordingly, most of county
government will remain the
same today as will the rela-
tionship between the county
and its two cities.
The other attributes worth
noting are:


Amendments to the
Charter can be proposed di-
rectly by the people through
a new petition initiative pro-
cess (will still require voter
approval).
Greater flexibility to ini-
tiate county ordinances that
meet local needs.
Individual county com-
missioners may be recalled by
process for misconduct.
Zero additional authority
for the county administrator.
Zero authority taken away
from any constitutional of-
ficer.
As stated in the previ-
ous section, what is derived
from the Wakulla County
charter proposal is enhanced
governmental flexibility and
accountability to the citizens


alongside an improved struc-
ture for input from the citizens
to their county government.
The charter also embodies the
maximization of allowable
home rule authority here at
the local level. And, under the
adopted charter ordinance,
it also strongly protects the
structure of county govern-
ment that is enjoyed today
with very high thresholds to
protect against the ease of any
future change.
While I (personally) find
these thresholds to be very
high and I also seriously
doubt any future charter pro-
posal would have such sub-
stantial protections for the
existing basic governmental
structure (should this propos-
al not succeed), I do strongly


support the passage of this please check out your county
charter to bring your local web site at www.mywakulla
government closer to you and com.
to be most reflective of your On behalf of the entire
priorities, board, I encourage you to be
In summary, I have pre- come educated on this subject
sented you with a significant and exercise your right to vote
amount of information on in November. In the mean
this subject to be sure, but time, it remains my pleasure
this is a very important is- to serve each citizen of thi;
sue that will be before the great county as we constantly
citizens for your action. The strive to increase the quality
county wants to insure that it and efficiency of your count'
is an informed electorate that government.
makes this very important Please feel free to contact
decision, me at 926-0919 or at benpin
For additional information gree@mywakulla.com should
on the proposed Wakulla you have any questions or i
County Charter and other I can be of assistance to yoi
related information on char- in any way.
ter governments, applicable Benjamin H. Pingree, MPA
Florida Statutes, and a list of Wakulla County
other Florida charter counties, Administrator


Another County Charter view


Editor, The News:
Recently I received the
sample ballot for the upcom-
ing election on Nov. 4. One
of the items to vote on is the
Proposed Home Rule Charter
for Wakulla County. This is not
a vote on whether to become
a charter-ruled county, but is a
vote for specific charter.
This charter is 12 pages
in length and can be viewed
at the Wakulla County Com-


mission web site, mywakulla.
com. Another valuable web
site to get information from is
the Florida counties web site,
fl-counties.com.
Becoming a Home Rule
Charter county means, among
other things, that we as the
electorate can enact, amend,
and repeal county ordinances
and we have the ability to re-
call county commissioners. In
general, I support the efforts


for Wakulla County to become
a Home Rule Charter county
but I disagree with one provi-
sion in this particular charter.
Reviewing the other 19
Florida counties that have ad-
opted home rule illuminates
the one glaring difference in
our proposed charter and all of
the others. None of the other
charters calls for more than
10 percent participation of the
electorate to enact, amend or


repeal a local county ordinance.
The same percentage apply for
registered electors to change a
charter amendment.
At the second and final
public meeting regarding our
proposed charter, the elector-
ate participation requirements
to enact, amend or repal local
ordinance and and charter
amendments from a reason-
able eight percent overall elec-
tor participation and eight per-


cent electorate participation in
three districts to a 30 percent
overall electorate participation
and 30 percent participation
in all five districts. This seems
onerous to me.
Since one the the prime sell-
ing points for home rule char-
ters is to put local government
decisions in the electorate's
hands, this new requirement
level strips this benefit from
the realm of reality.


While I support Wakulla
County becoming a Home
Rule Charter county, I do not
think this is the charter to
pass. Vote "No" to this issue on
Nov. 4 and let's get reasonable
percentages of electorate par-
ticipation drafted in a revised
charter that does deliver all the
benefits Home Rule offers.

Rob Ross
Crawfordville


Dangerous dogs issues fall back on the sheriff


Editors The Newss
Four years ago when my
husband and I moved here to
our beautiful five acre property,
we encountered problems with
aggressive dogs next door to
us. Our property is fenced but
three dogs from the neighbor's
property persisted at the fence,
snarling and biting at my dogs
through the fencing. I contacted
the Animal Control Division of
the Wakulla Sheriffs Office.
I was told by the director at
that time, Gail Obenland, that
nothing could be done. This
problem persisted for six months
and many times more I called
Animal Control seeking help
because I was fearful that some-
thing terrible would happen.
Each time I was met with the
same response. "It's a civil mat-
ter, we can't do anything." Much
later I learned there is a leash
law in Wakulla County and by
allowing their dogs to run free
on their unfenced property, my
neighbor was in violation of the
law. Was as my sheriff there to


keep me safe?
Several months later two
of the neighbor's dogs dug
under my fence, accessed my
property and attacked my dog
nearly chewing off his front leg.
This was the most frightening
and horrific incident I have ever
experienced in my life. No one
from the Wakulla Sheriffs Office
would come here to take a report
They told me to call Animal Con-
trol in the morning. Where was
my sheriff to keep me safe?
Subsequently I learned that
while Gail Obenland was the
Director of Animal Control her
own daughter Heather, was one
of the main officers working
there, too. In a meeting with
Major Larry Massa, Community
Affairs Head, I voiced my protest
that the attacking dog was never
declared "dangerous."
I also learned that someone
in Animal Control was good
friends with my neighbor who
owns the attacking dogs. Now
it was becoming very dear that
I am the "nobody" who deserves


only intimidation and I certainly
got a lot of that
I see now why Wakulla Sher-
iff David Harvey does not work
to keep me safe.
Nothing punitive was done
to the people responsible for my
badly injured dog and I accrued
$2,000 in veterinarian bills. My
neighbors were not fined for al-
lowing their dogs to run loose or
for allowing their dogs to access
my property and badly injure
my dog.
Does David Harvey deserve
to continue as sheriff of Wakulla
County? On July 4 of that year at
about noon, the same neighbors
began igniting fireworks that
eventually led to a super aerial
display that could have rivaled
the professional show put on at
the coast Falling missiles were
landing all over my property. It
was very dry and I feared a fire
could start It was very loud as
well. I restrained myself from
calling the Sheriffs Office until
9 p.m. When I did call the non-
emergency number to report this,


I was told. "Well, it is the fourth
of July and we are not respond-
ing to any fireworks calls until
after 11 pm."
It is absolutely against the
law to ignite any fireworks that


fly into the air. And my sheriff
will not respond? Sheriff David
Harvey and his department have
continually shown me no effort
or desire to keep me safe in
Wakulla County.


Sheriff David Harvey will not
be getting my vote in the upcom-
ing election.
Susan Sentman
Crawfordville


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING on
RESOLUTION 2008-13 APPROVING A COMMUNITY
REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

THE CITY OF ST. MARKS WILL HOLD A PUBLIC
HEARING


First Reading Date: October 9, 2008 at 7:30 pm
Second Reading Date: October 30, 2008 at 5:15 pm
Location: 788 Port Leon Drive,
St. Marks FL 32355

The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F;
Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call
the City Office at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes.
The Board Office may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING on RESOLUTION
2008-15 DESIGNATING THE AREA WITHIN THE
BOUNDARIES OF THE CITY OF ST. MARKS LOCATED
AT 627 PORT LEON DRIVE, ST. MARKS, FLORIDA, A
BROWNFIELD AREA FOR ENVIRONMENTAL
REHABILITATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE

THE CITY OF ST. MARKS WILL HOLD
A PUBLIC HEARING

First Reading Date: October 30, 2008 at 5:15 pm
Second Reading Date: November 13, 2008


Location:


at 7:30 pm
788 Port Leon Drive,
St. Marks FL 32355


The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F;
Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should
call the City Office at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes.
The Board Office may be contacted at (850) 925-6224


Woody's



Farmers Market
2480 Crawfordville Hwy.
Next to Farm Bureau, across from Mexican Restaurant

DELICIOUS


VINE RIPE TOMATOES


WE Now HAVE FLORIDA CITRUS...

* NAVAL ORANGE TANGERINES

* RUBY RED GRAPEFRUIT


5 lb. bag

Baking

Potatoes

$299


Pumpkins

Galore


Large

Baking

Potatoes


2/$1

Hot Boiled
P-Nuts
Syrups
Pepper Sauces
and
So Much
More


Large


Bell Peppers


2/$1

Cucumbers


2/$1


All Sizes Open: Mon. Sat. 9-7 Closed Sunday


e
e-
t
e

s
Y
y
y
t
1-
I-
f
u















Page 18A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008


Wade


Continued from Page 1A
Before the sustainable com-
munity, called Longleaf Plan-
tation, can move to the next
phase, the sustainable com-
munity has to create jobs.
Engineer Elliott Varnum of
GPI Southeast told planning
commissioners that Long-
leaf was given a "traditional
neighborhood design." There
are sidewalks in front of
the houses and houses with
porches. "It's a community
instead of a development,"
Varnum said.
Among some of the fea-
tures of the project are lim-
ited clearing of lots, a pervi-
ous pavement to be used in
the commercial areas, nature
trails, centrally located park
and ride, and advanced waste-
water treatment with water
re-use for irrigation.
Each home will have a
minimal footprint, and half
of each lot will be left in a


natural state.
Assistant County Admin-
istrator Lindsay Stevens said
planning staff recommended
approval of the project with
some additional conditions,
which included:
The re-alignment of Com-
merce Boulevard;
Contribution of $35,000
to the Capital Regional Trans-
portation Planning Agency for
a traffic study;
An annual monitoring
report of traffic capture with a
requirement that no less than
15 percent of traffic should be
retained within the develop-
ment or else the development
will be stayed for not less than
12 months;
A water management
permit;
And E-911 road names.
The project has been fast-
tracked by the county commis-
sion. Usually items are heard
by the planning commission


one month, go to the county
commission the next month,
and, if necessary, go to a
second public hearing in the
third month.
The N.G. Wade project is to
have its first hearing by the
county commission at the up-
coming meeting on Monday,
Oct. 20, only a week after the
planning commission review,
and after the county's Nov.
3 meeting was cancelled be-
cause Commissioner Brian
Langston will be out-of-town
- put on the agenda for a final
vote at the Nov. 17 meeting.
The item that did draw doz-
ens of citizens was a request
for variances by developer Ted
Gaupin to expand his Marsh
Harbor Marina at Shell Point
with a clubhouse, restroom,
and pool.
Of the three requests, the
restroom variance got one
vote from a planning com-
missioner with seven voting


against, and the other two
were unanimously rejected.
Shell Point residents stri-
dently objected to the plan,
saying the road that provides
access to Marsh Harbor is
private, gated, and owned by
the Snug Harbor Homeowners
Association. Members of the
homeowners association ex-
pressed concern about liability
for any traffic accidents on the
one-lane dirt road.
Assistant County Admin-
istrator Stevens noted that
planning staff recommended
denial of the requests, view-
ing them as an expansion of
a non-conforming use since
a marina is not an approved
use under the C-2 commercial
zoning that the property is
currently zoned.
Engineer Joe Hope, repre-
senting Gaupin, contended
that Marsh Harbor is not
actually a "boatyard" but a
membership organization,


which means it is not a non-
conforming use. He said the
problem had been compound-
ed by naming the facility a
"marina."
Resident Ed McIntyre not-
ed that Gaupin had appeared
before the planning commis-
sion in the past with plans for
a 66-unit hotel, then a boat
storage facility which were
later withdrawn from consid-
eration. Those proposals were
all made, McIntyre insisted, by
the developer as he shopped
for variances to add more
value to the property so it
could be sold.
"It's a sham," McIntyre told
the planning commissioners.
"He has no intention of build-
ing it."
Planning Commissioner
Pam Shields said she had
no problem with a variance
for a restroom, if it was built
with breakaway walls and a
turnoff valve so that it would


have minimal impact during
storms. Shields cast the lone
vote for the restroom vari-
ance.
Shields did note, though,
that she questioned why the
restroom, clubhouse and pool
would all be constructed sepa-
rately when it appeared they
should all be close together,
"I've never spent as much
time on one issue as I've
spent on this one," Shields
commented.
Planning commissioner
Robert Alessi said the marina
was already a non-conforming
use, there was no reason to
add to that with additional
variances.
"Everything Mr. Gaupin has
brought to us is pie-in-the-sky,
man," Alessi said.
The issue is scheduled to
come before the county com-
mission on Nov, 17.


Big Bend Hospice golf Health Department fights tobacco use


tournament slated


On Friday, Oct. 31, Big Bend
Hospice will sponsor a golf
tournament at the Wildwood
Country Club in Crawfordville,
to raise money for patient care
in Wakulla County. Four man
teams are $400 and individual
players are $125. Golfers will
begin the morning with a
breakfast at 7:30 a.m. followed
by a shotgun start at 8:30 am.
Lunch will also be served and
door prizes will be awarded.
"Participating in this tour-
nament is a wonderful way
to help our patients here in
Wakulla County." said Regina
Compton, RN, Team Manager
for Wakulla and Franklin coun-


ties. "So many of our patients
have special needs or requests
that are not covered under the
hospice benefit such as ramps,
hot water heaters, special din-
ners out, window air condition-
ers or bringing in out of town
family to say their goodbyes.
This fundraiser will allow us to
help fill these needs."
Sponsors for the event in-
clude Harvey-Young Funeral
Home, Sheriff David Harvey,
Rotary of Wakulla, Charlie and
Cheryl Creel, The Wakulla News
and AirCon of Wakulla. Contact
Pam Raker Allbritton at 508-
8749 for more information or to
register for the tournament.


The Wakulla Coun-
ty Health Department
(WCHD) is partnering with
the Wakulla County School
Board (WCSB) and the FSU
College of Nursing in an
attempt to reduce the use
of tobacco by youth.
On Wednesday, Oct.
15, presentations were
made to all of Ms. Bouie's
classes at Wakulla High


School (WHS) regarding
tobacco use and its effects
on your body, now and
long-term.
Adolescents tend to live
in the here and now. They
forget that what you do to
your body now has serious
long-term effects, even if
you can't see those effects
now. This anti-tobacco pre-
sentation was developed


as a result of a needs as-
sessment the FSU College
of Nursing students con-
ducted in Wakulla County.
This needs assessment
revealed that tobacco use
was very prevalent as 37
percent of the Wakulla
County population uses
tobacco.
This percentage is high-
er than the state average


for use of tobacco.
"If we can educate our
youth about the dangers
of tobacco use, we feel
they can help to influence
their friends and family
by saying no to tobacco,"
health department offi-
cials said.


Golfers win District


The Wakulla War Eagles won
the 2008 District 3-1A Golf Tour-
nament with 301 score Monday,
Oct. 13 at Wildwood Country
Club.
Maclay, Florida High, North
Florida Christian. Robert F Mun-
roe, Port St Joe, Rickards, FAMU
High and Godby followed behind
WHS.


The top scorers for WHS
included Stone.Cowie and Cody
Sapp with scores of 74, Warren
Hess with a 75, Conner Smith
with a 78 and Spencer Smith
with an 86.
The Lady.War Eagles placed
second behind Mdclay with a
418 to Maclay's 406. NFC placed
third.


United Way begins campaign


2008 Wakulla County United
Way Chair Ben Pingree announced
this year's campaign goal during
the annual kickoff last week.
"We need participation," he
said.."If everyone would give a
little we could help our commu-


nity tremendously." Your local
United Way needs your help. If
you would like to participate by
giving, advocating or volunteering
please contact Alison Dodson, at
487-2087 or Alison@uwbb.org.
provides


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Family owned & operated, Kenneth and Abbie Shiver
1353 Coastal Hwy., Panacea


To- he Citizens of Wakulla Coun ,

In recent weeks you've no doubt seen my name in the editorial section of the local newspaper.
Much of what you have seen has been negative and though I feel that many of the words spoken
against me have been unfounded, I am glad that I live in a country where folks have the right to
\ oice their opinion without fear of retribution. My critics have called me "unfriendly, too strict, de-
manding, biased" and the list goes on. To those critics and to anyone else that my demeanor or my
style of leadership has offended, I would like to take this opportunity to offer a sincere apology. It
was never my intention to offend anyone or belittle anyone. I love this county and wish only to
see it thrive and continue to be the wonderful place in which to live and work.

I have been accused of "ruling with an iron thumb" during my previous terms as County
Commissioner. Again, I apologize if that is the way I came across. Sometimes in my'zeal for
this county I found myself frustrated by individuals who I felt were attempting to derail any
attempts made by the commission to establish order in our meetings. It seemed to me that if
we could establish order in our meetings, then perhaps everyone would have an opportunity
i .to voice their opinion and we would still be able to accomplish the tasks that we were elected
to do ... to vote on important issues concerning our county. Instead we were spending all our
time listening to the same individual's voice the same opinions over and over and we were
out of time before we could ever vote. I still feel that our Commission meetings need order,
however I sincerely apologize to anyone that I offended in my attempt to bring that needed
order. Offending you was never my intention.

My critics have compared me to horrible dictators. Though this criticism hurts the most,
allow me again to apologize if that is the way I came across. I am retired military and I
S loved serving our country in our US Navy. The military has a way of getting in your blood
and I'm sure that my military training does come across in my personality. I don't smile a lot
when I'm out in public ... not the way that most politicians do. When I'm in serious thought,
it shows on my face. When I feel passionate about something ... and I couldn't be more pas-
sionate about this county if I tried ... then I come across as very serious and even sometimes
have been perceived to be mad. That is simply my zeal coming through. But it is that same zeal
that will work tirelessly for you to bring controlled growth and an infrastructure to support that
growth in this county. I cannot promise to always have a smile on my face, but I can promise to
work hard for the people of this county.

If you want a commissioner who will be all smiles, all the time, and pretend that being a commis-
s Iioner is all about charming the public, then I am not your candidate. However, if you want someone
ho will give it his all, who will work tirelessly and someone who will listen to you and keep the
counties best interests at heart ... then vote for me. A wise man once said, "You can never change your
past, but you can always change your future". I cannot go back and change the things in my past. But
v. working together, I believe that we can see Wakulla County thrive and be that place where you want to
live and work ... and just be.

c5incerely,

Mike Stewart "'







"Political advertisement, paid for aTd :
approved by Mike Stewart, Democrat, for
County Commissioner District 3














THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008 Page 19A


Wakulla School District doesn't need new leadership


Editor, The News:
I haven't lived in Wakulla
County all of my life. My fam-
ily moved here a little over
three years ago. Although I
have now changed careers, I
previously taught school in
another state.
Since moving here I have
been impressed with the or-


ganization and performance
of the Wakulla County School
System. When I compare it to
school systems in other places
that I have lived, it quickly rises
to the top. Based on what I
have observed, this reputa-
tion has been built over time
through commitment, dedica-
tion and strong leadership. I


believe that David Miller has
played a vital role in the build-
ing of this reputation.
I met Mr. Miller briefly over
a year ago. Since that time he
has never failed to recognize
me and call me by name.
He has earned many awards
through his service to educa-
tion across the state, but when


We must prepare for new high school


Editor, The News:
This letter responds to
Mike Crouch's letter in the
Oct. 9 issue of The News in
regard to my position on a sec-
ond high school. I have never
said that we need a second
high school immediately, only
that we begin now to plan
for a second high school in
Wakulla County.
The fundamental ques-
tion regarding a second high
school for our district is how
many students will be too
many at Wakulla High School?
I have already answered that
question. As principal of WHS,
I convinced the superinten-
dent and school board that
we needed to expand the
facility sooner than they had
planned. In designing the
new addition, which opened
in 1996, we decided that the
maximum size of our high
school should be 1,400 to
1,500 students. That is why
the capacity of WHS is 1,450
students.


We now have an enroll-
ment of 1,320 at WHS. Having
spoken with thousands of vot-
ers over the past few months,
I believe most do not want to
see our high school grow to
accommodate 2,000 students,
as Mr. Crouch suggests. This
may be an acceptable size for
a high school in South Florida,
but not in Wakulla County.
Rather than expand the exist-
ing building again to provide
additional capacity, I believe
we need to have a second
high school ready when the
enrollment of WHS reaches
1,700 to 1,800 students. When
will that be? No one knows for
certain. There are two sets of
predictions about enrollment
that we could use, but they
are just that predictions. The
common sense approach is to
begin planning now what we
want in a second high school
before there is a pressing
need to provide one. That is
the approach we used to de-
velop Wakulla Middle School,


which became a national
model because we involved
many educators and citizens
in a comprehensive planning
effort to develop a state-of-
the-art learning environment
for students. We should do
the same for a second high
school.
The fears Mr. Crouch ex-
presses about "dividing the
county" were also expressed
before we opened our second
middle school. They have
not been realized. Our Navy
Jr. ROTC program opened at
WHS when we had 800 plus
students. I know because as
WHS principal, I initiated the
NJROTC program. Two high
schools of 800 to 900 students
each make more sense for
our rural school district than
a mega-school of 2,000. This
approach will provide safer,
more personal learning envi-
ronments for our students.
Andrea F. Carter, Ph.D.
Candidate for
Superintendent of Schools


Business owner loses business


Editor, The News:
Intimidation has no place
in our county, state, or our na-
tion, when it appears it must
be eliminated.
It's a crying shame that
our youth can go overseas
and fight a war, yet they can't
rent a hotel room in Wakulla
County. You tell me this isn't
right.
My niece was married on
Sept 20 here in Wakulla Coun-
ty to a young man home on
leave from Iraq, due to depart
again for his return trip in
two days.
They decided to wait on
a rear honeymoon until he
returns next year. They go
to this local hotel and are
refused service. Why? They
wanted to pay cash for their


room and were told that they
needed a credit card so the
hotel would have "security"
for damages. They produced a
credit card in my niece's name,
again "refused, this time they
are told they must be at least
21 years of age. My niece's
husband produces a copy of
their marriage license and his
military ID and they are still
refused. They are both over 18
years of age.
Here's the problem. My
nephew is serving our country,
yet the people he is defending
us from are right here in our
own county, We, as everyday
hardworking citizens of the
United States, can't get half
the help they need,
Our county lost\revenue
due to this so called intimida-


tion, as the couple was rented
a room in Tallahassee and
even given several discounts.
The sad thing is, it was the
very same hotel chain and
they paid cash for it.
You have been reported to
the Better Business Bureau,
Wakulla Chamber of Com-
merce, and the Department
of Business and Professional
Regulations, and word of
mouth is sure to dampen your
business. We as parents try to
teach our children to respect
others regardless of race or
nationality, but respect is a
two-way street. You have to
give it in order to receive it.
Sherri McLendon
Formerly of Wakulla
Dothan, Ala.


Group supports Doyle, Artz, J. Brock


Editor, The News:
This year's commission
elections are especially im-
portant as Wakulla County
has an historic opportunity
to preserve and protect its
wonderful and unique rural
atmosphere, while at the same
time allowing for responsible,
manageable growth and good
government.
If Wakulla's citizens truly
want their community to con-
tinue to be an alternative to
Tallahassee they should chose
commissioners who are not
beholden to special interests
with a different agenda. The
Big Bend Group of the Sierra
Club is enthusiastically sup-
porting three Wakulla candi-
dates for county commission
this year.
The three candidates have
proven records of positive
community involvement and
interest in good government.
They are Jimmie Doyle, Lynn
Artz, and Jenny Brock. Citizens
can trust them to be on the
right side of important issues
such as impact fees, the bud-
get, and septic tanks.


The opposing candidates
in at least two of those com-
mission races also have a
proven record. In the case of
Mr. Stewart it was an auto-
cratic and impetuous attitude
which was seen during the
N.G. Wade Comp Plan hear-
ing at the courthouse a few
years back.
In the case of Jenny's oppo-
nent, a troubling example was
his support for the proposed
water bottling plant near
Wakulla Springs when Mr.
Brock sent a letter to this very
paper signed "Active Member,
Big Bend Sierra Club" when
indeed the Big Bend Group
on whose board I sat unani-
mously opposed the proposed
bottling plant.
The Big Bend Group dis-
agrees with both his position
and the implication he was
either "active" in our group
(he was not.) or that we too
supported the plant (we do
not).
By contrast Jimmie Doyle,
Lynn Artz, and Jenny Brock
have been working hard for
Wakulla for years already.


Boyd will be speaking
Congressman Allen Boyd will Farm, off Rehwinkel Road, be-
be the keynote speaker at the ginning at noon.
Wakulla County Small Business Boyd (D-Monticello) will be
Appreciation Day luncheon. speaking about small business
The event is set for Friday, issues and give a Washington,
Oct. 17, at the Harvey-Young D.C. update.




For Obiamna

Rally
In Support of Barack Obama

lwl:ridaw %^ l 1: I

1J, l:j3,u) IrQ qgmgj

Azalea Park Crawfordville
Bring a healthy Obama08
covered Dish. am a ....
Paid Political Advertisement paid for by Terry Kramer, 50 Melody Lane, Crawfordville, FL
32327 Independently of any candidate. This advertisement was not approved by any candidate.


From Arbor Day (Lynn), to the
Wildlife Alert Program (Jenny)
to fiscally sound government
(Jimmie), these candidates
have done so much good even
without being elected. Vote
for them, hire them, you won't
be disappointed.
Ron Capron
Group Chair
Big Bend Sierra Club


1


I


SHERIFF
(Vote for One)
0 David F. Harvey DEM
Charlie Creel NPA


he receives praise for the ac-
complishments of the schools
he always points back to the
teachers and the students as
the reasons for the success.
I know that school systems


across the state are facing
major challenges through the
next few years from changes
in the economy. I, for one, am
not willing to risk my vote on
an unknown when I have the


ability to choose proven lead-
ership. I will vote for David
Miller for Superintendent of
Schools.
Andy Bowman
Crawfordville


ADVERTISEMENT

How much does Wakulla

County law enforcement

really cost you?

by Charlie Creel


Sheriff Harvey in public
forums, presentations and
advertisements has been
stating that the Wakulla
County Sheriff's Office
(WCSO) has the lowest
"law enforcement" budget
per capital of any law
enforcement agency in the


Big Bend. He even
far to say that
it could be the
lowest in the
state or even the
country.
Where does
Sheriff Harvey
get his figures?
Taxpayers can
only guess
because Sheriff
Harvey does not
say.
But taxpayers do
to guess when we sa


goes so


Your real
law enforce
$353 for ei
woman, a
in Wakulla
not the $17
Harvey coi
clai


n't have
y that at


least one out of every two of
your property tax dollars in
this county goes to Sheriff
Harvey's office. The source
of that information is the
Wakulla County budget.
It's also a fact to say that
Sheriff Harvey has refused
over the years to account
in detail for his spending,
and when refusals haven't
worked, he has resisted
explaining where the money
goes.
Now, during this
campaign, Sheriff Harvey
has come up with some
powerfully impressive
statements that his spending
may be the lowest on law
enforcement per person
in the country, but that's
false.
If we are as generous as
generous can be for Sheriff


Harvey and his calculations,
we could take the $10.5
million he will receive this
year for his budget, and
divide that money by the
29,726 men, women, and
children in Wakulla County.
The answer is $353. So the
real per capital cost to the
citizen is $353 per person,
not the $175
cost for Sheriff Harvey
continues to
cementis claim.
claim.
very man, We really
nd child don'tknowhow
SCothe dollars are
County, spent or how
75 Sheriff the Wakulla
ntinuesto C o u n t y
m. Sheriff's Office
compares to
other counties.
What I can guarantee is that
when I am your sheriff, you
will know where your money
is going.
As your sheriff, one of my
first orders of business will
be to get a full comprehensive
audit from the Florida
Auditor General's Office of
the finances in the sheriff's
office, and I will make the
results available to anyone
who is interested.
Furthermore, when it's
time to ask you, the citizens,
for tax money to pay for
law enforcement, my books
will always be open to you.
Instead of trying to keep
the books a secret, I will
encourage people in this
county to examine them so
that they can see that their
money is needed and is spent
wisely.
I ask for your support now
and your vote on Nov. 4.


IjtjITWAL fS6SMOEID


SHERIFF
(Vote for One)
41 David F.Harvey DEM
O Charlie Creel PA


Pai eectonerng om uniatonpai fr b.Szane mih,249S.rono. D., raforvilC FL3227
Advertsemet no apprved y an canddateor p rty.


ADVERTISEMENT
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Affiliation, for Sheriff


SHERIFF
(Vote for One)
0 Davd F. Harvey OEM
4 Charfe Creel NPA


00 0 I Il ,


1% -- w


I
















Page 20A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008

Thank you for the support during the campaign for sheriff


Editor, The News(
As a candidate for sheriff
of Wakulla County, I would
like to take this opportunity
to thank all of the citizens,
volunteers and businesses
who have helped make our
"meet and greet" events so


successful. The outpouring
of support and encourage-
ment from the citizens of this
county is more that I could
have asked for. Wherever I go,
I am surrounded by well-wish-
ers, encouraging my efforts.
I'd also like to thank Chris


and Rita Sadler. The Coastal
Restaurant and Tim Rose
and Lisa Saavedra, owners of
Mack's Meats for their support
and providing delicious food
to make these events possible
and successful.
To all of the citizens who


came and allowed me the op-
portunity to spend time with
each of you and hear your
comments and concerns for
Wakulla County, I thank you.
I started several months
ago to try and unseat the
incumbent sheriff of Wakulla


County. I knew that I would
have to rely on people like
you, the people from the
grassroots level. I truly ap-
preciate your support and
contributions to my campaign.
As I have said many times, I
believe we all share a stake in


Wakulla County's future, and
as your sheriffI will make that
future a safe one,
Thank you again for all of
your support.
Charlie Creel
Crawfordville


Lynn Artz was an important part of this committee


Editor, The News: dozed to make way for parking
In the winter of 2005, I lots that looked like fields of
put together a group of inter- black asphalt.
ested citizens to draft a Tree Wakulla County was being
and Landscape Ordinance clear-cut at an alarming rate
for Wakulla County. Many to make way for new devel-
of us felt that Crawfordville opment.
was being poorly developed, The Tree and Landscape
where clear-cutting was the Ordinance Committee was
rule and there was little or diverse and included both
no landscaping. Existing old ends of the spectrum from
growth oaks were being bull- "tree huggers to developers."


The meetings were
announced in The Wakulla
News and were open to the
public. Lynn Artz saw the ads
and showed up every week
on her own initiative to listen
and make suggestions,
It quickly became clear
that Lynn Artz, our newest
volunteer would become an
important part of this commit-
tee. Week in and week out for


almost a year, we
worked through the de-
tails, trying to find common
ground. Sometimes it was
easy, often it was not.
SLynn Artz had a nack for
thinking "outside the box."
She
often had a valuable per-
spective that others of us had
failed to see. I saw this on a
regular basis over the course


of that year. I believe that
Lynn Artz will be an asset
and a valuable and dedicated
member of the Wakulla Coun-
ty Commission. Thanks to
the hard work and dedication
of Lynn Artz, Kathy Shirah,
Audrey Alessi, Glen Campbell
(Purple Martin Nursery), John
Shuff, Melissa Corbett, Ted Gil-
bert (Just Fruits and Exotics),
Julia Hanway, Nancy Myers,


Tim Jordan and Bob Kerns,
Wakulla County is just a little
bit nicer place to live. I cannot
imagine a better group of in-
dividuals working together to
find a solution to a problem.
Lynn Artz has my vote.
David Damon
Chairman,
Tree and Landscape
Ordinance Committee
Crawfordville


Scott Langston is a go-to-guy


Editor, The News:
I have had the good fortune
to work with Scott Langston
for the last six plus years. I am
the Section Manager for Plans
Review of the Bureau of Fire
Prevention. As
colleagues, we work on is-


sues together, and Scott has
shown that he is a go-to-guy,
when we are faced with diffi-
cult Statute and code interpre-
tations. Many times we
speak with citizens of the
state and typically they are not
happy, because a fire official


may impose a code provision
that will cost several thou-
sands of dollars.
While the answer that we
give may not be the one they
want to hear, Scott always
treats them with compassion
and dignity. Not only does he


exemplify hard work,
dedication and dependabil-
ity in his job, he is also a very
good person at heart.
There have been numerous
times that Scott has gone out
of his way to help his fellow
co-workers, without excep-


tion. He is as good a guy and
co-worker you could ask for. I
have no doubt that he would
make a great supervisor of
elections. If I lived in Wakulla,
he would definitely have my
vote. If you want someone
who is


dedicated, trustworthy,
and can be counted on every
time, you should vote for Scott
Langston on Nov. 4. You won't
be sorryl
Bill Fowler
Tallahassee


Teacher could have made better use of her time


Editor, The Newss
As a business owner in
Wakulla County, I thought hard
about writing this letter, but as
a fellow citizen. I realized that
the taxpaying citizens of this
county deserve to know what
has happened to me.
I am the owner of Root 319
Cuts & Color in Crawfordville.
Quite some time ago, one
of my co-workers began hav-
ing trouble with her teenage
daughter. She had sought help
from the high school teachers,
administration and eventu-
ally the Superintendent David
Miller.


She got no help from any
of them. The daughter was a
good student at school, but
outside of school she was mak-
ing some very poor choices. I
watched the situation between
mother and daughter deterio-
rate over the course of a year.
In no way was her family situ-
ation dealt with or involved
in the daily operations of my
business.
About two weeks ago, a
concerned friend handed me
an e-mail that was circulated
by a WHS teacher.
It had been dispersed
throughout Wakulla High


School, via the Wakulla County
School e-mail system. In this
e-mail, the teacher slandered
my business and linked me
to the situation between my
co-worker and Wakulla High
School.
As a taxpayer, this infuriates
mel This e-mail was distrib-
uted on county time, using
school resources. This means
that my tax dollars (and yours)
were spent by a member of
the Wakulla High School staff
spreading malicious and false
gossip. It seems that this teach-
er should have other things to
do during her work day, like


teach her students. The e-mail
was brought to the attention
of the Superintendent's office,
but I have never even received
a phone call. Instead, a very
weak and insincere apology let-
ter (addressed to my husband)
was delivered to me. I was told
that a retraction would be sent
to everyone who received the
first letter, but that has not yet
happened.
I feel that the letter was
only written in an effort to
"keep peace" with me. Neither
the teacher, principal or the su-
perintendent seem to be truly
sorry, nor have they given the


slightest thought to the impact
that this situation has had on
my business and livelihood.
Over the years, I have heard
stories of other people being
treated with this type of dis-
regard by our school system
but now it has happened to
me and I am completely disap-
pointed. Now that I have been
personally treated this way
I understand why so many
people think their needs to be
a change.
Our children and parents
deserve to have people in
charge who are eager to listen
and make changes when a situ-


ation arises within one of our
schools. That is simple respect.
For those of you who patronize
my business regularly, I thank
you. I am not worried that
you will take seriously any of
the ratings of a woman who
obviously has too much spare
time during the school day. For
those of you who have thought
about coming in, please know
that I do my absolute best to
keep gossip and name-drop-
ping out of all conversations in
order to maintain the integrity
of my business.
Melissa Millender
Sopchoppy


Doug Jones will make a fine supervisor of elections


Editor, The News:
Doug Jones has been a
resident and administrator
of Wakulla County's Public
Library for more than 20 years.
During that time he has con-
tinually built and improved
our library services to meet
the demands of a fast growing
and more diverse citizenship.
Through innovative and cost
effective programs, he has
provided a center for educa-
tional, cultural and commu-
nity awareness necessary for
people to improve and enrich
their lives and our commu-
nity. From after-hours children


programs, literacy, computer,
job-training, bookmobile and
other initiatives,\our county
and'its citizens have definitely
benefited from his dedicated
public service and progressive
supervision of our county's
library services. Over the years
he has also volunteered his
time as a local poll worker.
Doug Jones has now de-
cided he would like to serve
our county in the elected of-
fice of supervisor of elections.
He comes to this office well
equipped, both profession-
ally and personally. Having
worked as an administrator


for the county for many years,
he knows how to operate a
government office, staff, and
budget to the benefit of the


1'*S~I ~T~~1


people's business. Having
known Doug Jones for many
years, I also know of his high
level of honest, maturity, and


integrity that will help guide
the election process in our
county to the benefit of us all
Doug Tbnes is the rightl erson


for this job. You can trust your
vote with him.
Paul G. Johnson.
Crawfordville


SPink Shoelaces i
Good Music Food & Drinks


* Grant Peeples

* Frank Graham


Come support the Florida Wild Mammal Association
Proceeds will be used to rehabilitate injured
and orphaned wildlife.


K! U


Concerned Citizens of

'WakuCla, Inc.


and the Wakulla Watershed Coalition

invite you to the

'2008 CANDIDATE FORUM

FOR

CANDIDATES FOR PROPERTY APPRAISER, SHERIFF,

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS, AND

SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21

AT THE
WAKULLA COUNTY LIBRARY, 4330 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY.
from

7:00 8:30 P.M.

JOIN US AT 6:30 FOR REFRESHMENTS
This event is free and open to everyone.
For more information, please email contactccow@gmail.com
or call 877-7661.
CONCERNED CITIZENS OF WAKULLA, INC.
P.O. BOX 713, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326


Silent Auction Photo Cohtest
70's Costume Contest















Section B


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008


Cobaainsnmty News



County celebrates improved boat ramp in St. Marks


St. Marks City Commissioner Chuck Shields, FWC official Pat Harrell, City Manager Zoe Mansfield and St. Marks
Mayor Steve Dunbar cut the ribbon for the new boat ramp.


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
State and local officials
turned out last week for


the official opening of
the redesigned St. Marks
River Boat Ramp at Fort
San Marcos de Apalache in


St. Marks.
Built with $445,000 in
state money over four
years, the facility now has


two boat ramps, a new
floating dock to tie-off on,
and a reconfigured parking
lot with lots of parking for


trucks with boat trailers.
At the ribbon-cutting,
held on Thursday, Oct.
9, St. Marks Mayor Steve
Dunbar praised those who
worked to bring the proj-
ect to fruition, and said
the new boating facility
is a proud addition to the
city.
State Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commis-
sion engineer Mamoud
Madkour, who headed the
agency's Boating Access
Infrastructure Section, ap-
proached then-Mayor of St.
Marks Chuck Shields about
getting money to re-do the
ramp. The Florida Boating
Improvement Program fo-
cused its efforts on small
counties where there is a
high level of boating-relat-
ed activities, and especially
where there is a lot of use
by residents from outside
the county.
In the case of St. Marks,
it is the closest access to
the Gulf of Mexico from
Tallahassee, and on week-
ends the boat ramp is full.
The grant money had to
"flow through" Wakulla
County, it couldn't go di-
rectly to the city.
For years, parking was
a problem at the ramp,
with vehicles and trailers
parked all along Old Fort


Road. St. Marks residents
noted that the first few
vehicles to arrive early
at the ramp would park
in such a way as to block
parking for others, and just
exacerbated an already bad
situation.
Pat Harrell, who is the
current boat access coordi-
nator for the FWC, praised
the state Department of
Environmental Protection
for offering a 99-year lease
to the city for property
that enabled the parking
area to be enlarged. The
graveled lot features blue
plastic posts that stand
up vertically to mark the
spaces.
"This is one of the best
projects I have ever been
involved in," said Ray Gray,
county parks and recre-
ation director. "The con-
struction began in March
of this year, it came in
right on budget, and it got
completed on time because
the Wakulla County Board
of County Commission-
ers, the City of St. Marks
and the FWC collectively
worked together to get the
job done."
St. Marks City Manager
Zoe Mansfield thanked her
city hall staff and the city's
volunteer firefighters for
their work on the project.


Wakulla Springs State Park is serving disabled residents


WAKULLA
SPRINGS NEWS
By Jeff Hugo

Special to The Wakulla News
I saw a poster recent-
ly that said "America's
People...America's Talent...
America's Strengthl"
The current instability
of the economy masks the
pervading truth in the
foregoing words. It isn't
America's money that is
the country's true strength;
it is the talent and imagina-
tion of its citizens.
America's talent is not
bound by disability. Even
though nearly one-fifth of
America's population has
a permanent disability,
people with disabilities
contribute and inspire ev-
ery day.
Unfortunately, their ef-
forts often meet "walls"
that prevent or inhibit par-
ticipation. The Americans
with Disabilities Act (ADA)
has been implemented
to remove impediments
that keep America from
reaching its full potential.


Shoe Box

Run to help

children
Wakulla County residents
are invited to take part in the
Eighth Annual North Florida
Shoe Box Run for the benefit
*of Operation'Christmas Child.
Operation Christmas Child is
a project of Samaritan's Purse
and provides toys, school
supplies, toiletries and other
items to underprivileged chil-
dren in foreign countries.
The Wakulla County stag-
ing area is Lake Ellen Baptist
Church in Medart. The ride
will begin at 7:30 a.m. on Sat-
urday, Nov. 15.
The motorcycle operation
will continue on to Live Oak
to Suwannee Station Baptist
SChurch. For more information,
contact Colleen Ruehl at 556-
1787 or e-mail her at jcruehl@
aol.com.
Ruehl said the program is a
non-denominational event.


The Department of En-
vironmental Protection's
Florida Park Service is
determined to take steps
to enable every visitor to
feel included and welcome
to participate.
October is Disability
Awareness Month. It is a
good time to reflect on
the progress that has been
made and to plan for con-
tinued improvement.
At Wakulla springs State
Park we are actively en-
gaged in both. Wakulla
Springs is graced with
miles and miles of magnifi-
cent hiking trails. Since Fall
2006, the park's trails have
been Universal Trail As-
sessment Process certified.
Data regarding the trails
has been gathered and up-
loaded to http://www.trai-
lexplorer.org/tew/home.
cfm so that users have the
opportunity to determine
accessibility issues from
anywhere. In celebration
of National Public Lands
Day (September 27, 2008),
many volunteers were out
maintaining and improving
these trails.
In 2008, the park has


constructed two picnic
shelters at the park. Both
shelters are in close prox-
imity to accessible parking
with a sidewalk that leads
to each. There is a grill
located adjacent to each
shelter for ease of access.
We have improved the
number, size, and designa-
tion of our accessible park-
ing spaces. The process
involved the redesign of
existing spaces, appropri-
ate painting and sign dis-
play. Crosswalks have also
been appropriately painted
and marked.
Our wheelchair acces-
sible Limpkin tour boat has
placed the natural beauty
of the Wakulla River within
reach of those with mobil-
ity impairment. The Braille
coded and refurbished
outdoor sound posts, on
the back patio of the wa-
terfront visitor center, in-
clude all of our guests in
the river's past and present
sights and sounds.
The lodge continues to
offer a telephone.type-
writer (TDD) to its hearing
impaired guests. Lodge
Manager John Ahler has


Wakulla Springs is actively assisting citizens with disabilities to enjoy the park.


indicated that plans are who serve our guests. We
in the works to establish realize that we have a jour-


an ADA accessible rest-
room on the main floor
of the lodge. Future plans
also include one or two
guest rooms accessible to
.individuals with mobility
issues.
Perhaps our greatest
resources as we proceed to
make universal accessibil-
ity a reality are the people


ney to make to become
fully accessible. We value
.the often innovative sug-
gestions received from our
guests that allow us to im-
prove our service to them.
Our courteous and helpful
staff is appreciative and
strives to implement what
often is good counsel.
Disability Awareness


Month is a great time to
take stock in how far we
have come and how we
can best continue on the
journey to maximize the
experiences and imagina-
tion of all our park visitors.
Every improvement made
not only benefits people
with disabilities, but al-
lows all visitors to enjoy
the park through every
stage of their lives.













Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008



Comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895



Campaign financing: We get what we deserve


Editor, The News:
Every two years we have
the opportunity to make a
difference in our community
by our vote. Sometimes we
are voting for President, and
other times for governor. In
every election cycle we have
the opportunity to vote for
local officials. In all instances
we get what we deserve.
This year we must elect
local Constitutional Officers,
school Superintendent, and
county commissioners from
three of the five districts.
I worked in the federal
government for more than 27
years where federal employees
could not participate in parti-
san campaigns. We could not
publicly support candidates
for political office. In addition,
we were not permitted to give
our bosses money, gifts, or
donations for any occasion, no
less political campaigns. Every
task performed as a federal
official was held open to the
public view. There was a very
strong code of conduct and
we could not have the slight-
est appearance of a conflict of
interest.
Why do the sheriff and the
superintendent of schools ac-
cept campaign donations from
subordinate employees?


How do the employees feel
about being asked to contrib-
ute to their bosses' campaign?
What if they say "No?" Will
they face some kind of retri-
bution or will they be treated
differently if they chose not
to contribute? Can you afford
not to donate even if you don't
want to?
Donating to a political can-
didate, who also happens
to be your boss, can create
an air of conflict. Laws and
regulations precluding such
donations protect employees
from coercion and also protect
the candidate from conflicts of
interest.
I have been contacted by
Dr. Andrea Carter, who is a
candidate for Superintendent
of Schools and she has stated
that she has not solicited nor
accepted campaign contribu-
tions from school district
employees. She sent a letter
spelling out her position on
this issue to each school
district employee residing in
Wakulla County.
Charlie Creel, a candidate
for sheriff, has also indicated
that he has not solicited nor
accepted any campaign con-
tributions from employees of
the sheriff's office.
These are two candidates


that place character and ethics
above the need for campaign
funds.
Earlier this year I prepared
a "Donation Pledge" for can-
didates running for county
commission. Candidates could
pledge not to accept donations
in excess of $200 from people,
or organizations that currently
held contracts with Wakulla
County or individuals or com-
panies that might appear be-
fore the board with planning
and zoning requests.
I received signed pledges
from Lynn Artz, Jimmie Doyle
and Jenny Brock. Candidate
Mike Stewart took strong ex-
ception to this proposal and
Alan Brock indicated he could
not sign such a pledge. Jim
Stokley has indicated that he
is still considering.this request.
However, during September he
did accept two $500 donations
from a builder and a developer
in Wakulla County. So I guess
this means he would not live
by the pledge.
Over the last few months,
the sheriff has used hard
earned county funds for three
ads in The Wakulla News
promoting the sheriffs office
with each ad costing more
than $1,000 each. With tight
budgets, why should taxpayer


money be spent promoting
this office?
Each week the sheriff's of-
fice is allowed free space in
The Wakulla News to write
about issues concerning their
office. In addition, each month
the sheriff is given a free
column in the Wakulla Area
Times to speak about the of-
fice. Isn't this enough press to
explain what the office does?
Why is there so much waste of
the taxpayer's money?
In addition, does the sher-
iff's office really need to be
self-promoting in the form
of a very expensive, full color
calendar for every household
in Wakulla County? How much
does this calendar cost the
citizens? It makes one think
they have a full time public
relations staff just for this
purpose.
This week, in The Wakulla
News, I received a copy of the
Wakulla County School Dis-
trict's annual report. This very
lovely, 16-page color report
was sent to more than 4,000
subscribers of The Wakulla
News. No wonder our school
property taxes are so high.
One would think that with
high unemployment, high
insurance rates and high taxes
our school board would find


better ways to spend taxpayers
money. I wonder if this had
not been an election year if
this report would have been
sent out, at taxpayer expense
with The Wakulla News.
I can well see the schools
sending home this kind of
report, black and white on
plain paper, with the students,
or by request of the taxpayer
or placed on the school board
web site. But this really takes
the cake.
I would like to know how
much money this report has
cost the taxpayers.
Each month the Superin-
tendent of Schools writes a
column for the Wakulla Area
Times. Why couldn't he have
used this month's free column
to discuss the annual report?
We now have school prin-
cipals and assistant principals
publicly endorsing the re-
election of their superinten-
dent. What, motivated them
to become partisan political
people?
I think the time has come
for us to demand much more
from public officials we elect
and entrust to spend our pre-
cious tax dollars. We should
seek out those individuals
who have demonstrated the
highest level of ethics and


morals through dedicated
leadership. After all, we are
entrusting them to wisely use
and manage our hard earned
tax dollars,
Voters must hold all elected
officials and their employees
to higher standards than have
been demonstrated so far dur-
ing this local campaign,
There is time for voters to
question all candidates before
Nov. 4.
For the next few weeks
take the opportunity to talk
with our candidates in person.
Please ask or call the candi-
dates and ask them about
some of the issues I have
raised. Let them personally tell
you their thoughts on these
very important issues.
Then when you vote on
Nov. 4 remember, "We deserve
the government we get, for we
elect them."
The next four years are criti-
cal years for the management
and operation of our school
system and county govern-
ment.
Let's elect only' those can-
didates who demonstrate and
maintain the highest level of
standards, ethics and good
conduct.
Ron Piasecki
Shell Point


We can no longer tolerate intolerant religious beliefs


Editor, The Newss
We can no longer tolerate
intolerant religious beliefs,
and The Wakulla News was
negligent in this respect by
allowing a forum last week
for one author who wrote the
following:
"Men have become so pas-
sive in what we do that we've
pushed women into roles of
leadership and responsibility
that are rightfully ours [men's].
God gave the responsibility of
taking care of the world and
everything in it to the man....
If the truth were known, the
women would much rather we
men took charge...to make the
decisions..."
My wife, who is my equal,
not a subservient helper,
made the observation that
if you replace "women" with
"African-American" and "men"
with "whites," no responsible


newspaper would have given
such a racist author free press.
You can try this experiment
right now at home without ac-
tually hurting anyone reread
the passage and insert whites
and blacks in the appropriate
places. If that's not obvious,
you might as well stop read-
ing now.
To make the point perfectly
dear, all people of both sexes
have the same basic rights and
responsibilities within and to
society.
I presume the coordinator
for the Men's I fraternity of
Wakulla and other members
have cultivated their world-
view through careful study of
a text written by a group of
desert patriarchs thousands
of years ago. For some people,
every word in that book is
inerrant and undeniably true,
the divine word of a supreme


Tully retires from military


Chief Petty Officer Robert
W. Tully retired from the U.S.
Navy on Sept. 30 after 20 years
of service.
After completing boot camp
at the Naval Station in Orlando,
he received air crew and rescue
swimmer training at NAS Pen-
sacola. After technical school
in Millington, Tenn., he was
transferred to San Diego for
more advanced training.
His tours of duty included
San Diego (helicopter squad-
rons), the aircraft carriers USS F.
D. Roosevelt and the USS Harry
S. Truman. He also served at
the Fleet Combat Training
Center in Virginia and had two
tours of duty in Iraq and drug
operations off Panama.

ALL NEW FOR 2008!
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After completing four years
of service in Mayport, Fla., he
retired and moved back to
Wakulla County.
Tully is the son of retired
Air Force Master Sgt. Robert
M. Tully of Medart and Nellie
Tully of Panama City.

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equal work, or any authority
in raising their families.
You can't pick out the
psychopathic doctrines and
choose only the moderate
ones, because otherwise, you
could choose not to believe
any one thing the Bible says
about the role of women in
society. It's all or nothing
if you're a fundamentalist,
brother.
This is not the world my


being transcribed through
men. Well, it either is or isn't,
and if this Bible is the first,
last, and only word to guide
our relationships with other
humans, the passages I quoted
above aren't the only thing we
can learn about treatment of
women from the good book.
Apparently the Men's Fra-
ternity thinks that women
don't really want equal treat-
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children live in or will inherit.
And I think it was a waste of
ink and trees for The News
to promote this Stone Age,


Middle Eastern-inspired gar-
bage.
Michael Keys
Crawfordville


SFarrington Law Office


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Fax (850) 926-2741
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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oca;. l, .',~ Page 3B


Riversprings staff supports the superintendent


Editor, The News:
We would like to let the
citizens of Wakulla County
know why we are strong sup-
porters of David Miller in his
campaign to continue leading
our schools into the future.
He visits Riversprings regu-


larly and always has time to
speak and listen to any em-
ployee or student who wishes
to speak to him. Mr. Miller
supports our school in every
aspect whether it be a band
concert, drama performance,
or football, baseball, volley-


ball, soccer game or any other
function that we might have
at Riversprings Middle School.
He takes time out of his busy
schedule to support our every
endeavor at Riversprings. He
listens to our concerns and
suggestions and proves that


we are all equally important in
his eyes. We trust Mr. Miller
with our own children and
grandchildren's future and
you should also. Please vote
for David Miller on Nov. 4
and keep kids first in Wakulla
County.


Linda Camp, Sandy Moore,
Delinda Harrell, Missy
Hudson, Judy Carnes, Judy
Stephens and Denise
Smith
Front Office Staff
Riversprings Middle
School


Riversprings teachers support the superintendent


Editor, The Newss
We are writing on behalf
of our Superintendent of
Schools. Mr. David Miller.
Mr. Miller is the kind
of leader and role model
anyone would love to see
representing our students
and teachers. In the years
that we have been teach-
ing at Riversprings Middle
School. Mr. Miller has always
been very attentive to the
issues we face as teachers;
invariably offering solutions


and willing to "see-things-
through" on our behalf.
Mr. Miller personally vis-
its our classrooms several
times throughout the school
year, seeking our input on
critical issues and dedicated
to working with us to con-
stantly improve our level
of instruction. In addition,
during those visits he works
with the students and asks
their input on issues impor-
tant to them.
You also see Mr. Miller


attending our schools' sport-
ing events and extra-curricu-
lar activities, such as band,
drama, spelling bee, etc.,
and he is always supportive
of the athletes' efforts. He
makes a point of learning
their names and encourages
them to continue playing at
the middle school level so
their skill-set will improve
enough to enable them to
play at the high school level
(which could eventually lead
to college scholarships).


This is the David Miller
we know. We will be sup-
porting him on Nov. 4.
Riversprings Middle
School Teachers:
Marlene Adams
Keith Anderson
Cay Arant
Jonele Bird
Amanda Butler
Kristen Dow
Brian Dow
Catherine Harris
Louie Hernandez
Joey Jacobs


John Kane
Chad Linville
John Madden
David McBrayer
Charlotte McCormick
Emily Peterson
Scott Rossow
Shannon Smith
Donna Sullivan
Mina Sutton
Bill Taylor
Trey Thaxton
Jennifer Thaxton
Janet Weber


Buddy Wells put needs of others in front of himself


Editor, The News: is seeking the Supervisor of of himself. His character or helping neighbors with from Buddy Wells being your
In an era of politicians Elections Office for Wakulla can only be matched by an home repairs, to sharing his next Supervisor of Elections.
playing partisan politics and County. outstanding work ethic. He campaign with students to Steve Faintich
putting their career ahead In the 20 years we have always has time to help a learn how government and Sr. Director of Sales and
of their constituents, it is known each other, Buddy friend in need, whether it campaigning works. Marketing
refreshing to know that a always stops and puts the is jump starting a dead bat- The citizens of Wakulla St. Marks Powder
great man like Buddy Wells needs of others first ahead tery of a stranded motorist, County would greatly benefit

FCAT practice has replaced regular high school teaching


Editor, The News:
In 2007, I graduated from
Wakulla High School after
spending 10 years in Wakulla
County schools. During my
time I experienced a lot of
wonderful teachers, and I will
always appreciate their hard
work, enthusiasm, and dedica-
tion. Alternatively, I also saw
how frustrating their jobs
could be when they had to
deal with teaching to a test.
I have thought about a
career in teaching, but I don't
want a career in FCAT prep.
FCAT practice should not
replace teaching and the test
should not be the only mea-


surement of student's abili-
ties. Good FCAT scores only
mean the district receives a
little more money, and a pass-
ing grade. By my senior year I
had passed all the portions of
the FCAT, but I still had to do
FCAT worksheets, and daily
questions, even though I was
not going to be tested. The
FCAT dominated everything
in high school, and after our
school made a "D" because of
FCAT scores, it only got worse.
The next year everything was
different Instead of going to
four classes one day and four
the next, the school crammed
seven 45-minute classes into


one day, which meant carry-
ing twice as many books for
a shorter amount of time. It
also meant more time in the
hallways, which took away
from class time. Our bad
FCAT scores meant that lab
time had to be cut from sci-
ence classes. There was just
enough time to get ready to
work, and then time to dean
up. We had seven classes
worth of homework every
night instead of just four. Oh,
and FCAT practice all the time.
The weeks leading up to the
test were nothing but FCAT.
There's nothing like the good
'ole FCAT to strip the zest out


of learning.
Academics have always
been important to me, but life
and work experience are the
factors that have really shaped
my education and perspective
on the world. In school I had
a hard time seeing how the
subjects I was supposed to
learn were relevant to my life.
Two years out, and I'm still
wondering. I know I don't
do well on tests, and I know


there are many more students
like me. The test is irrelevant
to what matters in real life.
I know Dr. Carter personally
and I am well aware of her
priorities and values, and I
think she would be a healthy
change for our school system.
I will be supporting her on
Nov. 4.
Courtney Danzey
Crawfordville


Dining in the Dark will be held
The 4th Annual Paula Bailey scored by the Florida Institute table for eight.
Dining in the Dark will be held of Rehabilitation Education To buy tickets donat
Sunday, Oct. 19, from 5 p.m. to (FIRE) to benefit the visually at www.firesight.org o
8 p.m. at the University Center impaired. check to FIRE, 1286 Ce(
Club. Ticket cost is $55 for indi- ter Dr. Tallahassee, 32
The event will be spon- viduals or $600 for a reserved r


e online
r mail a
dar Cen-
:301.


NOTICE OF

LAND USE CHANGE

The Wakulla County Board of County
Commissioners proposes to adopt the
following by ordinance and has scheduled a
Public Hearing regarding the following before
the Wakulla County Board of County
Commissioners on Monday, November 17,
2008, beginning at 6:00 P.M., unless otherwise
noted below or as time permits. All public
hearings are held in the County Commission
Chambers located west of the County
Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to
attend and present testimony.

AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AMENDING, REVISING, AND
REPLACING IDENTIFIED PORTIONS
OF THE FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT
AS IDENTIFIED IN ORDINANCE
NUMBER 95-30, THE ADOPTION
ORDINANCE FOR THE WAKULLA
COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE GROWTH
MANAGEMENT PLAN, AS ADOPTED BY
THE BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS ON NOVEMBER 30,
1995; PROVIDING SEVERABILITY; AND
PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

1. Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment
Application: CP 08-01

Applicant: Wakulla County
Proposal: text change to Future Land
Use Element
Hearings Required: County Commission
11/17/08 @ 6:00PM
Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related
public record files may be viewed at the County Planning
Department located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850)
926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a
County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is
made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said
hearings. Persons needing special access considerations
should call the Board Office at least 48 hours before the date
for scheduling purposes. The Board Office may be contacted
at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.


WANTED

HELP ROUND-UP THE FOLLOWING

NOTORIOUS HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTES















PAINT OIL SOLVENT

And gang members Fuel, Batteries, Antifreeze, Automotive Fluids,
Pesticides, Pool Chemicals, Cleaners, Flourescent Lamps, Acids,
Drain Cleaner, Spray Cans, Computer Parts (and other punk pollutants)

Tires? YES! (Limit 10 per household)
Wal-Mart Inc. is sponsoring a tire pickup-
At the Trice Lane location as part of the Round-Up. \
No Dealers, No Commercial Business or Disposal Companies.

If you find these villains hiding out in your home,
round them up and bring them in.

Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day
Small businesses must register in advance
Saturday, October 18 8 a.m. 1lp.m.
340 Trice Lane
Small Business 12 p.m. 1 p.m.
Not accepted: explosives, blohazardous or radioactive materials



REWARD'

Put Hazardous Waste in its place. Keep Wakulla County Beautifull
For more information, please call 926-3153.
This service coordinated by Wakulla County Solid Waste,Jefferson County
Solid Waste and Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, Wakulla County
Commissioners, tiu :. . ... She. if~ s l..l. .e and ESG.


I ..1


t"












Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008


People


Thomas to celebrate 86th birthday, store celebrates 60 years

Annie Lee Thomas will 177..f
celebrate her 86th birthday .A
on Saturday. Oct. 18. The
month of October also marks '
the 60th year in business
for Bert Thomas Grocery.
Annie Lee Thomas and her
late husband. Bert, operated LIM
the grocery and she now i i" "
runs the store with family
members.
The Thomas family invites
the public to stop by and .l .
wish Thomas well on Oct. 18
and from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. E
visitors may have a free ice ..
cream cone with Mrs. Thom- '"
as to celebrate her birthday ..,
and the 60 years and count-
ing of being in business. Annie Lee Thomas Bert Thomas Grocery has become a Big Bend region landmark over the past six decades.


Jessica Dodson will

marry Peter Kassees


essa M.- Dodson and Per E.
Jessica M. Dodson and Peter E. Kassees


Tony Dodson and Trenda
McPherson, both of Crawford-
ville, announce the engagement
and upcoming marriage of
their daughter, Jessica Michelle
Dodson, to Peter Eassa Kassees.
He is the son of Jay and Peggy
Kassees of Tallahassee.
The bride-elect is a 2006
graduate of Wakulla High


School and is employed with
the Executive Office of the
Governor. Her fiance is a 2004
graduate of North Florida Chris-
tian School and is employed as
a correctional officer at Wakulla
Correctional Institution.
* A Nov. 1 wedding is planned
in Crawfordville. The couple will
also reside in Crawfordville.


Brandi Edmondson

to wed Dusty Long


Wakulla driver makes UPS Circle of Honor


UPS recently announced
that 25 elite drivers from
Florida are among 692 nation-
wide newly inducted into the
Circle of Honor, an honorary
organization for UPS drivers
who have achieved 25 or more
years of accident-free driving.
One of the honorees, David
Hudson, is from Crawford-
ville and the "sage drivers'
achieved more than 25 years
on the road without an ac-
cident.
Florida boasts 214 active
Circle of Honor drivers with
a combined 6,023 years of
accident-free driving. Andrew
Nesbitt of Miami is Florida's
senior safe driver, with 38


years of accident-free driving.
Nationwide, 4,582 active
UPS drivers are members
of the Circle of Honor. Col-
lectively they've racked up
129,632 years and more than
five billion safe miles during
their careers, or the equivalent
of 10,000 trips to the moon
and back.
"UPS puts a premium on
safe driving methods and
training and these drivers
reflect that commitment," said
Rocco Romanella, president,
UPS Southeast Region. "I'm
very proud of these drivers.
To go at least a quarter of a
century without an accident is
a testament to how seriously


our drivers, and trainers, take
safety."
Nationally, the most sea-
soned UPS Circle of Honor
driver is Ron Sowder of UPS's
Kentucky District, with 46
years of driving without an
accident. Thomas Camp of the
Michigan District is next in
line with 45 years of safe driv-
ing. Eight others have logged
at least 40 years without an
accident.
UPS's 112,450 drivers are
among the safest on the roads,
logging more than 2.5 billion
miles a year and averaging
less than one accident for
every million miles driven.
There are 4,816 total UPS driv-


ers in Florida.
UPS has invested approxi-
mately $53 million in 2008 on
safety training and employs
its own comprehensive driv-
ing course called "Space and
Visibility." New UPS tractor-
trailer drivers receive 80 hours
of classroom and on-the-road
training, and UPS delivery
truck drivers receive 20 hours
of classroom and on-the-road
defensive driving training be-
fore operating equipment De-
livery drivers also are required
to complete three safety ride
evaluations during their first
22 days on the job.


Commercial Residential
nInsured Licensed d
SEmergency Storm Cleanups

.Mowing -Edging *Cars, Appliances
*Recycling 'Trinmning Construction Debris
*Junk Hauling *Planting *Mulch
-Weeding
Landscape Maintenance
Junk/Household
Fall is approaching use6 Z6
us for Fall cleanup 5


Vc &Y


Present

The Ultimate Challenge Bull Riding Tour


BULLBASH 2008


Brandi L. Edmondson and Dusty E. Long


Judy Edmondson and Tim
Hormuth of Tallahassee and
Ron Edmondson of Crawford-
ville announce the engagement
and upcoming marriage of their
daughter, Brandi L. Edmondson
of Crawfordville, to Dusty E.
Long of Crawfordville. He is the
son of Diane and Rick Eaton
of Dunn, N.C. and David Long
and Janet Austill of Pearlington,
Miss.


The bride-elect is a 2002 grad-
uate of Wakulla High School She
attended Chipola Junior College
and is employed by Tallahassee
Neurology Associates. Her fiance
is a 2001 graduate of Colquitt
County High School in Georgia
and is employed as a commercial
and charter fisherman.
The wedding will be held
at 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 1 at St
George Island State Park.


GlaSOn AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE
G. Scorr GIBSON
AUTOMOTIVE SPECIALIST
OVER 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE
850-926-2430
MV69886












c O Joandatonaw

926-8245 3042 Crawfordville Hwy.
Crawfordville, FL
www.francielowe.com


Saturday November 1st

7:00 pm each night

3Y Ranch at Harvey Young Farm
Crawfordville, FL

Colt Starting Demo by Trey Young begins at 5:30pm

Tickets: S20.00

Call (850) 558-0444


Proceeds benefit:


Wakulla High School NJROTC
Big Bend Homeless Coalition


Kids under 12 Free


Crawfordville Pet Pals, LLC
Loving care for your pets in your hohne

850-519-3095


Licensed & Insured


DAVID F i_^

XHARi~vEY












THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008 Page 5B



People


Quiggs honored as Century Pioneer Farm


State offers

designation
This PropertV Is Dlesignated As A Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services Secretary Charles H.
fEN1TURY PIONEER Bronson recently honored the
SMILY FARM decendents of Wakulla Farm-
ers Eddie and Monty Quigg
by recognizing the Quiggs
as a Century Pioneer Farm
Family.
In his presentation, Bron-
son said "In recognition of
the endurance and stability
." the Quigg Family has contrib-
..... "uted to farm life and the rich
heritage of Florida agriculture
over the past century. I am
truly honored to make this
award."
Jim Stokley, grandson of
Eddie and Monty Quigg, re-
ceived the honor from Secre-
1 tary Bronson. (Photo by Don
Quigg grandson Jim Stokley stands next to state designation sign. Pace).


Autumn Splendor flower show planned


The Iris Garden Club of
Wakulla is celebrating it's
30th anniversary and is spon-
soring Wakulla's Autumn
Splendor, a small standard
flower show. The titles for the
show include: Fall Foliage and
Fun, Cornucopia of Design
Delight, Blowing in the Wind,
Halloween Happenings and
Awesome Autumn.
The show will be held on
Tuesday, Oct. 21 and is open
to the public from 3 p.m. to 7


p.m. at Tallahassee Commu-
nity College in Crawfordville.
Admission is free and anyone
may enter the show. There
will be dozens of horticulture
examples to show what plants
can be grown in this area to
crate a colorful autumn land-
scape. Anyone wanting to
learn about plants or design is
welcome to stop by. The show
will be judged and awards
given by nationally accredited
flower show judges.


Three local floral design-
ers have been invited to par-
ticipate in the show. Kristi
Sanders with Wakulla Florist
& Gift Shop, Geri Yamrose and
Hanna Gaile with Northern
Lights Floral at The Shops At
My Secret Garden, and Lynn
Barfield with Front Porch Cre-
ations Florists will each pre-
pare a display for the show.
The Iris Garden Club meets
monthly to hear various speak-
ers discuss topics of interest to


local gardeners. Iris Garden
Club activities include land-
scape work at the library, but-
terfly and vegetable gardens at
the COAST Charter School in
St. Marks, and landscaping for
Habitat for Humanity houses
in the county.
For information about the
flower show or the Garden
Club, please contact Jeannie
Brodhead at j.brodhead@att.
net


Driver safety classes are scheduled


Florida law requires all
automobile insurance compa-
nies give drivers 55 and older
with a good driving record a
mandatory discount for three
years on completion of the
AARP Driver Safety Class.
The eight-hour classes teach
how to compensate for nor-
mal age-related changes so
seniors can continue driving
safely. The cost is $10 per par-
ticipant for materials. There
is no driving or graded test.
Two-day classes will be in
Tallahassee from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. each day at Westmin-
ster Oaks, 4449 Meandering
Way on Thursday and Friday,
Nov. 13 and Nov. 14: and at
Cherry Laurel Retirement,
Mahan at Concord Rd., on


Wednesday and Thursday,
Nov. 19 and Nov. 20; as well
as in Crawfordville from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. each day, at
the TCC Wakulla Center on
Wednesday and Thursday,
Dec. 3 and Dec. 4. A one-day
class is available from 9 a.m.
to 5:30 p.m. at the kallahas-


see Police Training Center
behind the Tallahassee Mall
on Saturday, Dec. 13.
To register, mail a check
payable to AARP in the
amount of $10 per partici-
pant to AARP, 417 Audubon
Dr., Tallahassee, 32312. In-
clude phone number and the


dates of the desired class on
the check. Checks are not
deposited until after atten-
dance. Further information
is online at www.aarp.org/
drive or call 893-5845.


Mr. and Mrs. Matthew W. Thompson

Kipp and Thompson

exchange vows


Rachel Alena Kipp of Craw-
fordville and Matthew Wayne
Thompson of Crawfordville
were married Aug. 8 at the Inn
at Wildwood. Christine Helms
performed the ceremony.
The bride is the daughter of
Scott and Lori Fry of Crawford-
ville. The groom is the son of
Jim and Sandy Thompson.
The maid of honor was
Melissa Roberts of Crawford-
ville, cousin of the groom. The
bridesmaids were Riane Schil-
ling and Jennifer Roberts, both
of Crawfordville, and Lori Beth
Whiley and Amber Roberts of
West Virginia, sisters of the
bride. The junior bridesmaid


was Annabelle Slayton of
Crawfordville. The flower girl
was Haley Roberts of West
Virginia, niece of the bride.
The ring bearer was Alex
Thompson of Crawfordville,
brother of the groom.
The best man was John
Schilling of Crawfordville.
The groomsmen were Chad
Slayton of Crawfordville, and
Jason Fry and James Fry, both
of Crawfordville, brothers of
the bride. ,.a:
A reception was held at
the Wakulla Shrine Club. The
couple took a honeymoon trip
to Oklahoma and are living in
Crawfordville.


Reunions will be held


Revell
The 59th annual reunion
of the Revell family will take
place at the Sopchoppy City
Park on Sunday, Oct. 19.
This reunion began in 1949
and descendants of James
Alexander Revell, Celia Strick-
land Revell and Laura Clem-
ons Revell continue to gather
together from all across the
country.
The business meeting will
begin at 11:30 a.m. Everyone


is asked to bring a covered
dish.
Tucker
The Tucker family reunion
will be held Oct. 18, at Sop-
choppy City Park at 10 a.m.
Lunch will be served at
12 noon, so come early and
bring your favorite vegetable,
dessert and tea. The meat will
be provided by Kit Tucker and
family.
For more information, call
Brenda Mathers at 926-4691.


Coronation: 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
in the Lunchroom
Booths open 3:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.


winner At Our Famous "BINGO"


Qualified and Experienced Honesty

and Trust Worthy Your Hope for

the Future ofWakulla County

"FAIRNESS & LEADERSHIP WE CAN BELIVE IN"

As your Property Appraiser, I promise to:

Provide Truthful and Accurate Answers

to All Your Questions & Concerns

Make sure that Your Taxes are
as Low As They Go!


Wakulla County needs change and Mrs. Ahrendt is
the right person for the job. She is above Wakulla
politics as usual, she will do the right thing and put
service to you before her self interests. She has the
right combination of experience, education and per-
sonal integrity to be Property Appraiser.


Fair assessments result in

Lower Taxes for All!

For more information about Anne Ahrendt
for Wakulla County Property Appraiser
www.anneahrendt.com
Cell (850) 528-0895 e-mail: anneahrendt@comcast.net

Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Anne Ahrendt, Republican, for Wakulla County Property Appraiser


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,. Waxing 926-4080 Low-lites
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*sMrs. & Ms. "MT

fora Mnorida iPageanut
Saturday, November 8, 2008
Deadline to Enter: October 24th
Open to girls and women of all ages!
Email: MissNFFpageant@aol.com
Phone: 528-1187 or 545-6090
All contestants ages 8 and under will receive a
rhinestone tiara and a goody bag!
...a fun & positive experience for all!


I


















Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008


Deadline


"onday


11:00 AYLA1f IEDA

926-7102


Per Word
35 Cents





S$8.00
Minimum


Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


CATEGORIES
100 EMPLOYMENT
105 Business Opportunities
110 Help Wanted
111 Medical/Dental Help Wanted
112 Office/Administrative Help Wanted
113 Construction Help Wanted
114 Miscellaneous Help Wanted
115 Work Wanted
120 Services and Businesses
125 Schools and Instruction
130 Entertainment
200 ITEMS FOR SALE
205 Antiques
210 Auctions 4o 1
215 Auto Parts and Accessories
220 Cars
225 Trucks
230 Motor Homes and Campers
235 Motorcycles and 4-Wheelers
240 Boats and Motors
245 Personal Watercraft .
250 Sporting Goods
255 Guns
260 Business Equipment


265 Computers and Internet
270 Electronics
275 Home Furnishings Ma
280 Home Appliances
285 Jewelry
290 Musical Instruments
295 Building Materials
300 MISC. FOR SALE
305 Machinery, Tools & Equipment
310 Firewood Products
315 Farm & Garden Equipment
320 Farm Products & Produce
325 Horses
330 Livestock, Farm Animals
335 Pets
340 Plants
345 Swap, Barter, Trade
350 Wanted to Buy
355 Yard Sales
400 NOTICES
410 Free Items
415 Announcements
420 Card of Thanks
425 Occasion Cards
430 In Memoriam
435 Lost and Found


440 Personals and Notices
500 REAL ESTATE, HOMES, MOBILES
505 Acreage for Lease
510 Acreage for Sale
515 Apartments for Rent
' 520 Townhouses for Rent
525 Townhouses for Sale
530 Commercial Property for Rent
535 Commercial Property for Sale
540 Farms for Sale
545 Homes for Sale
550 Homes with Acreage for Sale
555 Houses for Rent
560 Land for Sale
565 Mobile Homes for Rent
570 Mobile Homes for Sale
575 Mobile Homes with Land for Sale
580 Rooms for Rent/Roommates Wanted
585 Wanted to Rent
590 Waterfront Homes/Land for Sale
595 Vacation Rental
600 Open House



CALL 926-7102 TODAY
Email; classifieds@thewakullanews.net


Legal Notice


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 02-102-GU
IN RE: GUARDIANSHIP OF
WMe Baldwin,
An alleged incapacitated person.


NOTICE OF UNCLAIMED FUNDS
Pursuant to section 755.534, notice Is
hereby gven that unclaimed funds exist in the
abov-described guardianship. If you have a
claim to funds in this guardianship ease
contact the Clerk of Court for Wakulla County,
3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327. If no claim is made for thee
funds within six (6) months of date of this no-
ticed was first published (October 16, 2008),
the funds will be deposited with the Chief Fi-
ncial Officer for theStae of Florida.
Dated this th day of October, 2008
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
October 16, November20, 2008



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 05-21-GU
IN RE: GUARDIANSHIP OF
James Robinson,
An alleged incapacitated person.


NOTICE OF UNCLAIMED FUNDS
Pursuant to section 755.534, notice Is
hereby given that unclaimed funds exist In the
above-described guardianship. If you have a
claim to funds in this guardianship, please
contact the Clerk of Court for Wakula County,
3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327. If no claim Is made for thee
funds within six (6) months of date of this no-
ticed was first published (October 16, 2008),
the funds will be deposited with the Chief F-
nancial Officer for the State of Florida.
Dated this 9th day of October, 2008
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY-s- MICHELLE CHRISTENSEN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakula County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
October 16, November 20, 2008



STATEMENT OF NON-DISCRIMINATION
Talquln Electric Cooperative, Inc., is the recipi-
ent of federal financial assistance from the Ru-
ral Utilities Service, an agency of the U.S. De-
partment of Agriculture, and is subject to the
provisions of Tile VI of the Civil Rights Acts of
1964, as amended, Section 504 of the Reha-
bilitalion Act of 1973, as amended, the Age
Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, and
the rules and regulations of the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture which provide that no per-
son in the United States on the basis of race,
color, national origin, age, or handicap shall
be excluded from participation in, admission or
access to, denied the benefits of, or otherwise
be subjected to discrimination under any of
his organization's programs or activities.
The person responsible for coordinating this
organization's non-discrimination efforts is
Kenneth A. Cowen, Director of Administrative
Services. Any Individual, or specific class of
individuals, who feels that this organization
has subjected them to discrimination may ob-
tain further Information about the statutes and
regulations listed above from and/or file a writ-
ten complaint with this organization; or the
Secretary, U.S. Department of Agriculture,
Washington, D.C. 20250, or the Administrator,
Rural Utilities Service, Washington, D.C.
20250. Complaints must be filed within 180
days after the alleged discrimination. Confi-
dentiality will be maintained to the extent pos-
sible.


October 16, 2008


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA
COUNTY
announces their regularly scheduled school
board meeting to which all interested persons
are Invited.
DATE : Monday, October 0, 2008
TIME : The regular meeting will
be held at 6:45 p.m
PLACE: School Board Room
69 Arran Road
Crawfordville, Florida
PURPOSE: Regular school board meeting.
An executive session on teacher contract ne-
gotiations will be held after the meeting.
For further information please contact:
Superintendent's Office
Wakulla County Schools
P.O. Box 100,69 Arran Road
Crawfordville, FL 32326


LOGIC AND ACCURACY
The Wakulla County Canvi
meet in the Ballot Accountin
the Supervisor of Elections
Crawfordville Hwy, on Wed
15, 2008 at 2:00 p.m. to cert
tabulating equipment. All ca
and press are Invited to attend


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AN FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-121-FC
GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK,
a State-Chartered Bank,
Plaintiff,
vs.
OBIE PAUL NOONKESTER, Deceased, the
Estate of OBIE Paul NOONKESTER, his un-
known spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, and all others claiming by and
through OBIE PAUL NOONKESTER, De-
ceased, ELLEN GILMORE, MAXINE BIDDLE,
TINY EASLEY, and JOE NOONKESTER, be-
lieved to be the heirs of OBIE PAUL
NOONKESTER, believed to be the heirs of
OBIE PAUL NOONKESTER, DECEASED,
UNKNOWN TENANTS 1, 2, and 3, and MIKE
CARTER,
*Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure After De-
fault dated September 18, 2008, in the
above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at the Lobby of the
Clerks Office of the Wakulla County Court-
house, Crawfordville, Florida, on Thursday,
October 23, 2008 at 11:00 a.m., the following
described property:
Lots 1, 2 and 3, Block "A', Page Park (unre-
corded) being more particularly described as
follows:
Commence at the Northwest Corner of the
Southwest Quarter of Section 9, Township 3
South, Range 1 East, Wakulla County, Flor-
ida; thence run South 00 degrees 18 minutes
37 seconds East 336.56 feet; thence South 89
degree 55 minutes 02 seconds East 1650.30
feet; thence South 00 degrees 17 minutes 55
seconds East 1319.92 feet; thence South 89
degrees 40 minutes 43 seconds East 593.27
feet to a concrete monument for the POINT
OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF
BEGINNING run North 00 degrees 13 minutes
39 seconds East 143.90 feet to a concrete
monument lying on the Southerly right of way
line of Alma Drive; thence run along said right
of way line as follows: South 89 degrees 41
minutes 37 seconds East 99.84 feet to a con-
crete monument; thence run South 89 de-
grees 40 minutes 43 seconds East 174.66 feet
to a concrete monument; thence South 35 de-
grees 49 minutes 41 seconds East 132.89 feet
to a point marking the Intersection of said right
of way line with the Northerly right of way line
of State Road Number 365; thence leaving
said right of way line of Alma Drive run along
said Northerly right of way line South 54 de-
grees 34 minutes 56 seconds West 62.30 feet
to a a concrete monument; thence leaving
said right of way line run North 89 degrees 43
minutes 23 seconds West 302.09 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 1.05
acres more or less.
Subject to a 10 foot wide roadway and utility
easement lying over and across the Northerly
and Northeasterly 10 feet described thereof.
Dated on September 23, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
October 9, 16, 2008


NOTICE OF SALE PUI
CHAPTER 83, Pi
Notice is given pursuant to
age Faciltiy Act, Florida Stat
Part IV that Crawfordville
hold a sale by sealed bid or
31,2008, at 10:00 a.m. at 3:
Hwy. of the contents of Min
training personal property of:
Lisa Hennin
Before the sale date of Frii
2008, the owners may rede
by a payment of the outstan
cost by paying In person at 3
Hwy.
Oc

ATTENTION: Northwest Fl
tlon Corridor Authority Meetli
The next meeting of The
Transportation Corridor Au
changed and will now be h
October 16th, 2008 at 10:00
Sandestin Golf and Beach R
aid Coast Pkwy West, Des
person requiring special ac
participate In this meeting Is
the Corridor Authority at leas
the meeting by contacting Ar
850-215-4081 or by email
man@hdrinc.com.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT O
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
WAKULLA COUNTY,
CIVIL ACTIC
CASI

HSBC BANK USA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.

ANTHONY STEWART, at al
Defendantss.


13th day of November, 2008, the following de-
scribed property as set forth In said Final
Judgment:
LOT 30 OF EASTGATE SUBDIVISION (UN-
RECORDED) AND BEING MORE PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF
LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 30 MIN-
UTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE
NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 59 A DIS-
TANCE OF 2365.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES
52 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 1050.52
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
SAID EASTGATE SUBDIVISION; THENCE
ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID
EASTGATE SUBDIVISION RUN SOUTH 72
DEGREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS
WEST 1000.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF
WAY BOUNDARY OF A COUNTY ROAD
(GRIFFIN ROAD); THENCE ALONG SAID
RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY SOUTH 17 DE-
GREES 51 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST
466.75 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE A 50
FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT (MIDWAY
COURT); THENCE ALONG SAID CENTER-
LINE NORTH 72 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 45
SECONDS EAST 300.00 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT
OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DE-
GREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST
100.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DE-
GREES 51 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST
155.59 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DE-
GREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST
100.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DE-
GREES 51 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST
155.59 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.
SUBJECT TO A 5 FOOT ROADWAY EASE-
MENT ALONG THE NORTHERN PORTION
OF SAID PROPERTY.
A/K/A 24 MIDWAY COURT, CRAWFORD-
VILLE, FL 32327
Any person claiming an Interest In the surplus
from the sale, If any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Us Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this
Court on October 9, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- BECKY WHALEY
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
October 16, 23, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-000199
DIVISION:
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION,
AS TRUSTEE FOR FIRST FRANKLIN
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2006-FF12, MORTGAGE PASS
THROUGH CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2006-FF12,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CARLOS CAMPA A/K/A CARLOS F. CAMPA,
et al,
Defendant(s).


RSUANT TO
ART IV NOTICE OF ACTION
Florida Self-Stor- TO: DAPHNE LAURIE
utes, Chapter 83,
Self Storage will LAST UNKNOWN ADDRESS:
n Friday, October 36 ANNA DRIVE
291 Crawfordville CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327
I-Warehouse con-
CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
g ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
day, October 31, ING BY,'THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
em their property THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFEN-
ding balance and DANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
1291 Crawfordville DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
tober 16, 23, 2008 GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
orida Transporta- UNKNOWN
ng Update
northwest Florida CURRENT ADDRESS:
thority has been UNKNOWN
eld on Thursday,
I a.m. CST at the YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
esort, 9300 Emer- close a mortgage on the following property In
stin, Florida. Any WAKULLA County, Florida:
commodations to
I asked to advise LOT 16, BLOCK B. AMELIAWOOD SUBDIVI-
t 48 hoursprior to SION, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO
nber Perryman at THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED
at Amber.Perry- IN PLATBOOK 2, PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA.
October 16, 2008
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written de-
F THE SECOND senses within 30 days after the first publica-
I AND FOR tlon, If any, on Florida Default Law Group,
FLORIDA P.L., Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
IN 9119 Corporate Lake Drive, Suite 300,
Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original
E NO. 2007-40-FC with this Court either before service on Plain-
DIVISION tiff's attorney or Immediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint or peti-
tion.


WITNESS imy hand and the seal of this
Court on this 9th day of October, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- BECKY WHALEY
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk


S______"_ I of the Circuit Court)
October 16, 2008 NOTICE OF RESCHEDLED October 18, 23, 2008
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
TEST NOTICE Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
October 7, 2008 and entered In Case NO. WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL
mssing Board will 2007-40-FC of the Circuit Court of the SEC- JURISDICTION DIVISION
g Room located In OND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA
office at 3115-B County, Florida wherein HSBC BANK USA, CASE NO.: 2007-CA-000152
Inesday, October NA., is the Plaintiff and ANTHONY
ify accuracyof the STEWART; JEANNIE STEWART; ACCRED- INDYMAC BANK F.S.B.
ndidates,citizens ITED HOME LENDERS, INC. SUCCESSOR
nd. BY MERGER TO AAMEES FUNDING COR- Plaintiff,
PORATION; are the Defendants, I will sell to
October 16,2008 the highest and best bidder for cash at vs.
FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:OOAM, on the HARRY SPEAR A/K/A HARRY L. SPEAR;


KIMBERLY R. SPEAR; ANY AND ALL UN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY
THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN
DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS IN POSSESSION
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated October 7, 2008 entered In Civil Case
No. 2007-CA-000152 of the Circuit Court of
the 2ND Judicial Circuit In and for WAKULLA
County, Crawfordville, Florida, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at the Front
Door at the WAKULLA County Courthouse lo-
cated at 3056 Crawfordville Highway in Craw-
fordville, Florida, at 11,00 a.m. on the 13th day
of November, 2008 the following described
property as set forth In said Summary Final
Judgment, to-wit:
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF
LOT 20, BLOCK -H', WILDWOOD ACRES,
UNIT NUMBER 2 AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 78 OF THE OFFICIAL RE-
CORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE NORTH-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF JEAN DRIVE;
THENCE RUN NORTH 23 DEGREES 37
MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 215.70 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE
FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN
NORTH 66 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 00 SEC-
ONDS EAST 204.96 FEET TO A ROD AND
CAP; THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREE 37 MIN-
UTES 02 SECONDS WEST 817.75 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 29 MIN-
UTES 52 SECONDS EAST 291.52 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 04 MIN-
UTES 26 SECONDS WEST 987.75 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 76 DEGREES 33 MINUTES
04 SECONDS WEST 477.96 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 19 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 52 SEC-
ONDS EAST 128.50 FEET; THENCE SOUTH
18 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 08 SECONDS
WEST 197.46 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 14
DEGREES 54 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST
128.50 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 09 DE-
GREES 05 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST
106.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 29 DE-
GREES 05 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST
81.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES
54 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST 106.50
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 02 DEGREES 35
MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 142.00
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 54
MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST 211.50
FEET* THENCE SOUTH 18 DEGREES 64
MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST 112.00 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 82 DEGREES 23 MINUTES
02 SECONDS EAST 69.00 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 51 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 02 SEC-
ONDS EAST 178.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH
64 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 02 SECONDS
EAST 160.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 56 DE-
GREES 38 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST
74.84 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE
SOUTH 23 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 19 SEC-
ONDS EAST 365.73 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 20.56
ACROSS MORE OR LESS.
TOGETHER WITH A 20 FOOT WIDE AC-
CESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT BEING
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS:
BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF
LOT 20, BLOCK "H", WILDWOOD ACRES,
UNIT NUMBER 2 AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 78 OF THE OFFICIAL RE-
CORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON T HE NORTH-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF JEAN DRIVE;
THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGIN-
NING RUN NORTH 23 DEGREES 37 MIN-
UTES 19 SECONDS WEST 215.70 FEET TO
A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 66 DE-
GREES 15 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST
20.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES
37 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 215.70
FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE NORTH
RIGHT OF WAY OF JEAN DRIVE; THENCE
RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY SOUTH
66 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST 20.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING.
AND
BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF
LOT 20, BLOCK "H", WILDWOOD ACRES,
UNIT NUMBER 2 AS RECORDED'IN PLAT,
BOOK 2, PAGE 78 OF THE OFFICIAL RE-
CORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE NORTH-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF JEAN DRIVE;
THENC E FROM SAID POINT OF BEGIN-
NING RUN NORTH 23 DEGREES 37 MIN-
UTES 19 SECONDS WEST 215.70 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 66 DEGREES 16 MIN-
UTES 00 SECONDS EAST 204.96 FEET TO
A ROD AND CAP; THENCE SOUTH 23 DE-
GREES 37 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST
275.66 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 66 DE-
GREES 22 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST
60.00 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE
SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF JEAN
DRIVE, SAID POINT ALSO MARKING THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 19, BLOCK
"C" OF SAID WILDWOOD ACRES UNIT
NUMBER 2; THENCE RUN NORTH 23 DE-
GREES 37 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST
59.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT
LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY OF JEAN DRIVE; 144.94 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 1.10'
ACRES MORE OR LESS.
SUBJECT TO A 20 FOOT WIDE ACCESS
AND UTILITY EASEMENT BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS:
BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF
LOT 20, BLOCK "H", WILDWOOD ACRES,
UNIT NUMBER 2 AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 78 OF THE OFFICIAL RE-
CORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE NORTH-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF JOAN DRIVE;
THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGIN-
NING RUN NORTH 23 DEGREES 37 MIN-
UTES 19 SECONDS WEST 215.70 FEET TO
A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 66 DE-
GREES 15 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST
20.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES
37 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 215.70
FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE NORTH-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF JEAN DRIVE;
THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY
SOUTH 66 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 00 SEC-
ONDS WEST 20.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
Any person claiming an Interest In the sur-
plus from the sale, f any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the is pendens,


must file a claim within 60 days after the sale
Dated this 9 day of October, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- BECKY WHALEY
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
October 16, 23, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2007-FC-179
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION,
AS TRUSTEE FOR FIRST FRANKLIN
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-FF9
Plaintiff,
vs.
JEFFREY K. NICHOLS.A/K/A JEFFREY
KEVIN NICHOLS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JEFFREY K. NICHOLS A/K/A JEFFREY
KEVIN NICHOLS A/K/A JEFFERY KEVIN
NICHOLS, and any unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, and other unknown per-
sons or unknown spouses claiming y,
through and under any of the above-named
Defendants,
Defendant(s).


AMENDED NOTICE OF
S FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that the under-
signed Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla
County, Florida, will on the 30th day of Octo-
ber, 2008, at 11:00 a.m. at the Front lobby of
the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawford-
ville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to
the highest and best bidder for cash, the fol-
lowing-described property situate in Wakulla
County, Florida:
TRACT 7 (1.21 ACRES)
COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF
THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 49
OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS
OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH
THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, AND
THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 29
MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID
SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY
1,660.43 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO
THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHEAST-
ERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE
WITH A RADIUS OF 11,391.20 FEET THRU
A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 51
MINUTES 30 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 170.65 FEET, THENCE RUN
SOUTH 16 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 39 SEC-
ONDS EAST 210.00 FEET, THENCE RUN
NORTH 73 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 27 SEC-
ONDS EAST 10.65 FEET, THENCE RUN
SOUTH 16 DEGREES 06 MINUTES EAST
140.49 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING
CONTINUE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 06 MIN-
UTES EAST 187.44 FEET, THENCE RUN
NORTH 74 DEGREES 26 MINUTES23 SEC-
ONDS EAST 76.75 FEET, THENCE RUN
SOUTH 16 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 45 SEC-
ONDS EAST 23.37 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE,
THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 40
MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 183.26 FEET,
THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 06
MINUTES WEST 208.53 FEET, THENCE
RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 27
SECONDS WEST 260.01 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 1.21
ACRES, MORE OR LESS.
TOGETHER WITH A FIFTEEN (15) FOOT
ACCESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF
THE WEST BOUNDARY LINE OF LOT 49 OF
THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THE
SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY.
OF U.S. HIGHWAY 98, THENCE RUN
NORTH 73 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 55 SEC-
ONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1,660.43 FEET
TO A STATE ROAD DEPARTMENT CON-
CRETE MONUMENT MARKING A POINT OF
CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN
NORTHEASTERLY. ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG
SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 11,391.20
FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DE-
GREES 51 MINUTES 30 SECONDS FOR AN
ARC DISTANCE OF 170.65 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT AND THE POINT
OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BE-
GINNING, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DE-
GREES 05 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST
210.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DE-
GREES 06 MINUTES EAST 155.49 FEET,
THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 41
MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 15.00 FEET,
THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 05
MINUTES WEST 155.49 FEET THENCE
RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 39
SECONDS WEST 210.00 FEET MORE OR
LESS, TO THE SOUTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGH-
WAY 98, AND THENCE RUN WESTERLY
ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY 15.00 FEET, MORE OR LESS,
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
pursuant to the Final Judgment entered In a
case pending In said Court, they style of which
Is Indicated above.
Any person or entity claiming an interest In
the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclo-
sure sale, other than the property owner as of
the date of the Ls Pendens, must file a claim
on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days
after the foreclosure sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal of said
Court this 30th day of September, 2008.
In accordance with the Americans With Dis-
abilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to participate In this
proceeding should contact Court Administra-
tion at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvllle,
Florida 32328, telephone (904) 928-0905, not
later than seven (7) days prior to the proceed-
Ing. If hearing Impaired, (TDD)
1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.
BRENT X.THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
October 9,16, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 08-66-FC
UCN: 652008CA000066XXXXXX
CITIBANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE
FOR THE MLMI TRUST SERIES 2007-HE2,
Plaintiff,


VS.


CARLA H. PATTERSON, et al
Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
.Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclo-
sure dated September 25, 2008, and entered
in Case No. 08-66-FC UCN:
652008CA000066XXXXXX of the Circuit
Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida,
wherein CITIBANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR
THE MLMI TRUST SERIES 2007-HE2 Is
Plaintiff and CARLA H. PATTERSON; PAT
PATTERSON; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1;
UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS
BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A
NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR
HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY
RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROP-
ERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants,
I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at in the Front Foyer of the Wakulla
County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville High-
way, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at Wakulla
County, Florida, at 11 00 am. on the 30th day
of October, 2008, the following described
properly as set forth in said Order or Final
Judgment, to-wit:
COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE
MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST
CORNER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 3
SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN
NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 27 SEC-
ONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST BOUND-
ARY OF SAID SECTION 7, A DISTANCE OF
674.17 FEET TO AN OLD. CONCRETE
MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST
156.70 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT
ON THE EASTERLY MAINTAINED
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF WHIDDON
LAKE ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DE-
GREES 30 MINUTES 51, SECONDS EAST
ALONG SAID EASTERLY MAINTAINED
RIGHTH-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 210.00 FEET
TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE
RUN NORTH 14 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 25
SECONDS EAST. ALONG SAID EASTERLY
MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY
122.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. FROM SAID POINTOF BEGINNING,
CONTINUE NORTH 14 DEGREES 52 MIN-
UTES 25 SECONDS EAST. ALONG SAID
EASTERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY 149.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 41 MINUTES 038SECONDS EAST
331.49 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES
09 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 224.25
FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 78 DEGREES
02 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST 378.56
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CON-
TAINING 1.50 ACRES, MORE OR LESS.
ALSO:
1970 KNOX MOBILE HOME IDl
G9C643BRF07840 TITLE NO. 4209997
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN
THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY AS OF THE
DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on Septem-
ber 30, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
October 9,16, 2008


Approved Minutes
Approved 10/06/08
Board of County Commissioners
Regular Board Meeting
September 22, 2008
The Board of County Commissioners for Wa-
kulla County met in regular session on Mon-
day, September 22, 2008 with Chairman Ed
Brimner presiding. Present were Commission-
ers George Green, Howard Kessler, Brian
Langston and Maxie Lawhon. Also present
were County Attorney Ron Mowrey, County
Administrator Ben Pingree and Deputy Clerk
Evelyn Evans.
Invocation was provided by Commissioner
Green. Pledge of Allegiance to the flag led by
Commissioner Brimner.
(CD5;52) APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Commissioner Langston made a motion to ap-
prove the Agenda with the following changes,
under the Consent Agenda pull Items 5, and
11, under County Attorney add update on two
pending lawsuits that have been filed against
the County. Second by Commissioner
Kessler. Motion carried unanimously, 5/0.
(CD6:00) PUBLIC HEARING
SCD5:53) 1. Second Public Hearing to adopt
nal Millage and Budget for FY2008/2009.
Chairman This Is the second of two required
public hearings on the Wakulla County Rnal
Budget for Fiscal Year 2008/2009. If you wish
to speak during the public hearing portion of
this meeting, please step forward at the appro-
priate time.
The proposed aggregate Mlllage rate Is 8.000
mills which Is 6.83% under the aggregate
rolled-back Millage rate of 8.5866 mlls Is due
to the maintenance and enhancement of the
current level of countywide service provision.
Now the County Administrator will read the
Millage rate into the public record.
CountyAdministrator The.proposed county-
wide Mlllage rate is 8.0000 mills which Is
6.83% under the countywide rolled-bAck Mil-
laga rate of 8.5866
mais, '-'
Chairman I'm opening up the flooror a mo-
tion to begin the public hearing, "
Commissioner Langston made a motion to


L



















the design. Second by Commissioner Law-
hon. Voting for: Langston, Lawhon and
Green. Opposed: Kessler. Motion carried,
3/1.


(CD7:34) 13. Ratification of the September 2,
upenll lme Inui iu uuyipi ilie puuii iiaring. 2008 Workshop on the Site Location and De-
Second by Commissioner Kessler. Motion sign Concept of the Community Center, and to
Scarred unanimously, 5/0. seek board direction regarding the Community
Center Proiect


SAt this time the individuals that have turned in
a speaker card to the clerk are allowed to
speak 1) Larry Roberts 2) David Harrison 3)
Dana Peck 4) Ron Piasecki 5) Chuck Hess
All speakers have been heard and Commis-
sioner Langston made a motion to close the
Public hearing. Second by Commissioner
Lawhon. Motion carried unanimously, 5/0.
Note: The public must be allowed to speak
and ask questions prior to the adoption of any
measures by the Board.
Chairman Florida Statutes requires the
Board to address the Millage rate before ad-
dressing each budget. The Board must vote
on each Millage rate and budget separately. I
will now entertain the following motions:
Commissioner Langston made a motion to ap-
prove the final FY2008/2009 Countywide Mil-
lage rate of 8.000 mills. Second by Commis-
sioner Lawhon. Motion carried unanimously,
5/0.
Commissioner Langston made a motion to ap-
prove the final FY2008/2009 Countywide
budget of $46,397,741.00 inclusive of recom-
mended changes to reduce the position of the
budget related to impact fees as reflected in-
Attachment #4. Second by Commissioner
Lawhon. Commissioner Langston amended
his motion to reflect a final FY2008/2009
Countywide budget of $46,612,536.00 inclu-
sive of recommended changes to reduce the
position of the budget related to impact fees
as reflected in Attachment #4 and includes the
increase of $214,795.00 into the Sheriff's
budget with the monies coming out of the
Rainy Day Fund and must be used for ac-
creditation. Commissioner Lawhon seconded
the amended motion. Voting for: Brimner,
Langston and Lawhon. Opposed: Kessler and
Green. Motion carried, 3/2.
Speakers 1) Dana Peck 2) Larry Roberts 3) Al
Shylkofski 4) Hugh Taylor
Break Chairman Brimner absent at this point.
Vice-Chairman Green chaired the meeting
from this point.
AWARDS AND PRESENTATIONS
(CD6:49) 2. Domestic Violence Awareness
Month Refuge House
SCommissioner Langston made a motion to ap-
prove the Proclamation declaring October
2008 as Domestic Violence Awareness Month
in Wakulla County. Second by Commissioner
Lawhon. Motion carried unanimously, 4/0.
CONSENT AGENDA
SCommissioner Langston made a motion to ap-
prove the Consent Agenda with the exception
of items 3, 5, and 11 that are pulled for discus-
sion. Second by Commissioner Lawhon. Mo-
tion carried unanimously, 4/0.
3. Approval of Minutes September 2, 2008
Regular Meeting
Pulled for discussion see below.
4. Approval of Minutes September 2, 2008
Workshop to Discuss the Wakulla
County Travel & Expense Procedures Manual
Approved
5. Approval of Minutes September 9, 2008
Special Meeting
Pulled for discussion see below.
6. Approval of Minutes September 9, 2008
Workshops to Discuss the Courthouse Addi-
tion/Renovation Project and to Discuss Board
Approval of the Site Location & Design Con-
cept of the Community Center
Approved
S7. Approval of Payment of Bills and Vouchers
Submitted for August 28, 2008 September
17, 2008
Approved
S8. Update to the Board on the Cooperative
SAgreement between Wakulla County and the
'Department of Agricultural Services for Fire
SProtection (forest)
Approved
9. Update to the Board on the Value Adjust-
ment Board Organizational Meeting
Held on August 27, 2008
Approved
10. Request for Board Appointment of the
Wakulla County Representative to the Big
'-Bend Health Council Board of.Directors .
Approved Appointed Jodi Smith.
11. Board Approval of the 2009 Board Meet-
ing Calendar/Holiday Schedule
Pulled for discussion see below.
(CD 6:55) CONSENT ITEMS PULLED FOR
DISCUSSION
3. Approval of Minutes September 2, 2008
SRegular Meeting
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to ap-
Sprove the minutes, with a note that there were
no recommended changes under attachment
1 on August 18th off-premises signs work-
Sshop. Second by Commissioner Langston.
Motion carried unanimously, 4/0.


Commissioner Langston made a motion to rat-
ify the actions from the September 2, 2008
Workshop, approve the Trice Lane location,
approve Option 2 design concept based on
funding level with the 19,800 sq. ft building, di-
rect staff to pursue a set of plans and further
cost analysis, authorize preparation of RFP for
Contract Management Board Direction, and to
look at the future needs of Fire and EMS.
Second by Commissioner Lawhon. Motion
carried unanimously, 4/0.


Commissioner Kessler requests this item be
continued to next Board Meeting.
b) Commissioner Kessler will be holding a
Town Hall Meeting on September
30, 2008 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at the Wel-
come Center in Panacea.
COUNTY ATTORNEY
(CD8:00) Two new law suits have been fled
against the County Harvey v. Wakulla
County, this Is an appeal that was denied, the
complaint will be answered, and the P&Z tran-
scripts are being reviewed. Carr v. Wakulla
County, Impact Fee moratorium, response will
be filed In October.
COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR
(CD8:03) Thank you to staff and citizens for
all of their work on the budgetary process.


(CD7:42) 14. Request Board Approval of the
Wakulla County Health Department Core Con- DISCUSSION ISSUES BY COMMISSION-
tract for FY2008-2009 ERS


Commissioner Lawhon made a motion for ap-
proval of the Wakulla County Health Depart-
ment Core Contract for FY2008-2009. Second
by Commissioner Langston. Motion carried
unanimously, 4/0.
(CD7:44) 15. Request for Board Ratification
of actions taken in the Mosquito Control Pro-
gram
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to ratify
the actions taken in the Mosquito Control Pro-
gram and authorize the chairman to retro-ac-
tively execute the DACS/Wakulla County Mos-
quito Control Grant Documents. Second by
commissioner Langston. Motion carried
unanimously, 4/0.
(CD7:44) 16. Request for Board Ratification
of Jody Smith to the Administrator position for
the Wakulla County Health Department
Commissioner Langston made a motion to rat-
ify Jody Smith to the Administrator position for
the Wakulla County Health Department. Sec-
ond by Commissioner Lawhon. Motion carried
unanimously, 4/0.
(CD7:47) 17. Update on the Tourist Develop-
ment Council activities and request Board ap-
proval of a Resolution authorizing the current
Council Members
Commissioner Lawhon made a motion to ap-
prove the Resolution appointing Jerry Evans,
Sherrie Miller and JackieYoungstrandas Tour-
ist Development Council Members. Second by
Commissioner Kessler. Motion carried unani-
mously, 4/0.
(CD7:49) 18. Ratification of Wakulla County
Travel & Expense Policy Workshop and Ap-
proval of the proposed Travel & Expense Pol-
icy
Commissioner Langston made a motion to rat-
ify the September 2, 2008 Workshop and ap-
prove the proposed.Travel & Expense Policy
for Wakulla County with an amendment on At-
tachment 1 page 5, that reads the following
guidelines should shall be used when approv-
ing requests for travel. Second by Commis-
sioner Lawhon. Motion carried unanimously,
4/0.
(CD7:57) 19. Request Board Approval to ad-
vertise for a Public Hearing on November 3,
2008, to amend Section 5-7 of the Wakulla
County Code, which addresses the approval
process for certain Temporary Uses
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to ap-
prove advertising a Public Hearing for Novem-
ber 3, 3008 to amend Section 5-7 of the Wa-
kulla County Code, which addresses the ap-
proval process for certain temporary uses.
Second by Commissioner Langston. Motion
carried unanimously, 4/0.
(CD7:58) 20. Request for Board approval of
an Interagency Agreement between the Wa-
kulla County Board of County Commissioners,
the Wakulla County Property Appraiser and
the Wakulla County Sheriff for the consolida-
tion of GIS Services.
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to ap-
prove the Interagency Agreement between the
Wakulla County Board of County Commission-
ers, the Wakulla County Property Appraiser
and the Wakulla County Sheriff for the consoli-
dation of the County's GIS services into the
Property Appraiser's Office. Second by Com-
missioner Langston. Motion carried unani-
mously, 4/0.
(CD7:58) 21. Request Board approval to
submit a State Aid to Libraries Grant Applica-
tion for FY08-09 & authorize the Chairman to
sign
Commissioner Lawhon made a motion to ap-
prove submittal of the State Aid to Libraries
Grant Application for FY08/09 and authorize
the Chairman to execute the application. Sec-
ond by Commissioner Langston. Motion car-
ried unanimously, 4/0.
(CD7:58) 22. Request for Board acceptance
of the State Housing Initiative Program (SHIP)
Annual Reports
Commissioner Lawhon made a motion to ac-
cept the State Housing Initiatives Program
(SHIP) Annual Reports and Certification and
submit per Florida Statutes. Second by Com-
missioner Langston. Motion carried unani-
mously, 4/0.
(CD7:59) 23. Request Board Approval to Ac-
cept the 2008 Streamlined Annual Public
Housing Agency (PHA) Plan and Certifications
Commissioner Kessler made a motion for ap-
proval of the 2008 Streamlined Annual PHA
Plan and Certification. Second by Commis-
sioner Langston. Motion carried unanimously,
4/0.
COMMISSIONER AGENDA ITEMS
(CD7:59) 24. Commissioner Kessler


5. Approval of Minutes September 9, 2008 a) Asking the Board to request a Review by
Special Meeting the State of Florida Attorney General
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to ap-
'prove the minutes from the September 9,
2008 Special Meeting. Second by Commis-
sioner Langston. Motion carried unanimously,
S4/0.
11. Board Approval of the 2009 Board Meet-
ing Calendar/Holiday Schedule "
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to table
this item until next Board r-. -
Meeting. Second by Commissioner Langston. \ .
Motion carried unanimously, 4/0.
CITIZENS TO BE HEARD
(CD6:57) 1. Al Shylkofski Concerned about
the Sheriff and budget process, questions the
need of victim advocates for the Sheriff since
there are advocates at the state level and (-
feels that two of the commissioners should
Shave recused themselves from voting on the
Budget since their spouses are the victim ad-
Svocates in the Sheriff's Office.
(CD6:59) 2. Hugh Taylor Concerned about
the Sheriff and budget process, polluted In ve st in
beaches, commute time on 319, local traffic
and poor people working in the building trade.
',.(CD7:02) 3. Dana Peck Next Tuesday there
Sis a Town Hall Meeting at the Welcome Center
' in Panacea from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. IS
GENERAL BUSINESS
(CD7:03) 12. Board approval of the next Coastal Gems Real E
.stage for the Courthouse Addition/Renovation C astal Gems Real E
project 3102 Coastal
SCommissioner Kessler made a motion to table
this item until the second meeting in Decem- Crawfordvil
ber. Motion dies for lack of 2nd.


Commissioner Langston made a motion to ap-
prove the scope with chiller system as pre-
sented at the workshop on September 9, 2008
and direct the Architect to move forward with


Cell 1-(85


(CD8:03) Commissioner Langston Thank
you to the Sopchoppy City Commissioners for
looking at the possibility of an EMS Station in
Sopchoppy.
There being no further business to come be-
fore the Board, Commissioner Lawhon made
a motion to adjourn and a second was made
by Commissioner Kessler. Motion carried
unanimously, 4/0.
8:15 p.m. adjourned.
6
105 Business Opportuni-
ties |



BRING YOUR OLD

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so you can enjoy them
again, and make
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Keep the family heritage
alive with restored
photographs

Just $15 per photo.
850-766-7655
dougapple@gmail.com



VOTE McCAIN* PALIN 08
McCAIN-PALIN.coM
JPAMERICA.COM
Paid political advertisement paid for by Rick Parks,
219 Ma nolia Ridge, Crawfordville, FL 32327
independently of any candidate. This advertisement
want approved by any candidate.


110 Help Wanted



Elect Jimmie Doyle
for County Commission


Practical ideas.
Positive attitude!
S*****

Polcal a erisementpaidforand appoaed by
wilek Dotle No Party Affilation.
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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008 Page 7B



Get The News Every Week!

Just $25 per year in Wakulla County

$30 per year in Florida

$35 per year out of state



Call 926-7102


Like St. Marks? #178665 4 Acre Homesite
j Acre $42000 $35,000 #185703-2;004$W90,000
Call Joi Hope 210-7300 www.coldwellbankerwakulla.com CaIl Joi Hope 210-7300

C 2650-1 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 '
[B 850-926-2994 Phone 850-926-4875 Fax
Each Office is Inspcndendy Owned nd Operated IS.


Legal Notice














Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008


110 Help Wanted


ELECT

CHARLIE


'E


FOR

SHERIFF



Political advertisement paid for and
approved by Charlie Creel,
No Party Affiliation, for Sheriff


111 Medical/Dental Help
Wanted

An enthusiastic part-time dental
assistant/PR person is needed for
our Crawfordville office 2 days/wk.
Dental experience and excellent
people skills required. Fax resume
to Drs. Carey and Jones at
850-893-5788
I I


Five Star Plumbing
Big Bend, Inc.

Commercial
& Residentiralv ,=
Service

Billy B. Rathel, Jr.
850-544-5062
850-421-1237 Fax
plumbingfive_star@yahoo.com
Lic#CFC1427547 State Certified
Harold Burse Stump Grinding
926-7291.















Jack's B-Quick Boarding Kennel:
Large play yards, controlled envi-
ronment, indoor/outdoor runs, all
sizes/breeds. Two blocks from
bike-trail, www.jacksbquick.com
850-576-5552
Lawn service, tractor work, bush
hog, residential and commercial:
Warren Property Services. Call
Phillip 519-1853


120 Services and Busi-
nesses 125 Schools and Instruc-L
I tions I


A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING
Free Estimates
Licensed John Farrell
926-5179
566-7550
Affordable Handyman Services.
Interior/Exterior painting, cleaning,
soft/pressure wash, cool seal, car-
pentry and many other odd jobs.
References avail. Bobby/Carol
926-2462 459-1071.

ALL ABOUT...
CONCRETE lANDSCAPE
blocks plants
bricks sod
pavers tractor work'
Call JOSEPHr FRANCIS
850-556-1.178 / 850-926-9064
BACK FORTY TRACTOR
SERVICE Bushhogging, Box-
blading Driveway. Larry Carter
Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931,
850-694-7041. Licensed/Insured.
Bella's Bed & Biscuit Doggie
Daycare.
Overnight boarding. Extended
stays. Kennel free home environ-
ment. Lots of love & pampering.
926-1016 or 519-4529.
CJ's Lawn Services & More
(Ask about the more!)
850-421-9365.
(If we don't no answer, please'
leave message).

CJ's Lawn Services & More
(Ask about the more!)
850-421-9365 (If we don't answer,
please leave message)


CNA will care for
your loved ones in
their home or
facility. References
Available.
Contact
850-933-3687


, I


Michelle Snow
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
926-7627
Music lessons of all types for all
ages.
Piano, Keyboard, Guitar Lessons.
All ages & home school. 25 years
in drawfordville. Mary Updegraff
926-7472.

205 Antiques







Antiques and Uniques
"Something for Everyone"
61 Rose Street,
Sopchoppy, FL 32358
850-962-2550
HOURS
LTusJay Saturday 10a.m. 5 pm.


225 Trucks

2003 Dodge Grand Caravan.
Great on gas! 6cyl. Seats 7, power
windows, seats and doors. Re-
cently tuned up. $4,700, obo Call
850-926-4511
235 Motorcycles and 4-
Wheelers

Harley Davidson 2004 Sportster
1200 with Jet-Kit, screaming "ea-
gle pipes". Removable high back
rest with Harley logo. 2,072 miles.
Excellent condition, garage kept.
Burgundy/chrome $7,200. Call
850-926-2213


250 Sporting Goods


Re-Elect "
SHERIFF F



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!
a g


275 Home Furnishings


$155-2pc Queen Plushtop mat-
tress set. New in plastic w/war-
ranty. Can deliver. 545-7112
$290 New Queen Orthopedic Pil-
lowtop mattress set in sealed
plastic, warranty. Can deliver.
222-9879.
5 piece bedroom set. Brand new in
boxes, $469, can Deliver,
425-8374.
All new pillowtop king mattress
set, w/warranty, $349, 545-7112,
can deliver.
Beautiful Queen Cherry Wood
7-pc Sleigh Bed Set w/dovetail
drawers. Still in boxes. $2400
value, must sacrifice $999
222-7783
Brand New Full Mattress set, $139
or Twin set $124 w/warranty.
425-8374.
Cherry dining table, china cabinet
& chairs. Deep, rich finish, boxed.
List $1800, take $799. 425-8374
CHERRY Sleigh Bed with NEW
mattress set $399. Can deliver
545-7112
King bed frame/nightstand,
loveseat, dresser, entertainment
center, much more. Small items:
baby stroller, car seat, HP printer
and more. 850-926-3887
Solid Wood 5 piece Pub Set -
NEW in boxes. $199 425-8374


106 W.5th Ave.
Tallahassee, FL 32303
(850) 222-2166 tel.
www.wmleeco.comn


LIVING ROOM SET. NEW, life-
time warranty, sacrifice $549, (de-
livery available). 545-7112


310 Firewood Products
I ~-~ =j


320 Farm Products &
Produce

Boiled peanuts (green) $3.00/Lb.
Blanched peas and farm fresh
eggs. Raker Farm 926-7561.

335 Pets


Adopt a pet from the animal
shelter:
Dogs:
Catahoula, Blue Heeler mix
German Shepherd mix
Golden Retriever/Lab mix
Terrier mix
Boxer mix
Hound mixes
Lab mixes
Min Pin mix
Chihuahua mix
Chihuahua
Basenji mix
Many other nice mixes.
Come and take a look.
Puppies:
Lab mixes, black
Lab/Bulldog mixes
Nice cats and kittens.


p.


Savannah Forest
$45,900. 14 ac. tracts off
Wakulla Aaron Rd.


Steeplechase $96,900 to $109,900.
5 ac. wooded tracts. Horse friendly
Subdivision has underground electric
and water.
These lots are conveniently located to
Tallahassee, schools, and coast


I mU


CHAT Adoption Center:
Monday closed
Tuesday through Wednesday
& Friday: 11:00AM to 4:30PM
Thursday: 11:00AM to 7:00 PM
Saturday: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM
Sunday: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM
www,chatofwakulla.org


DOG OF THE WEEK
Eva is about one year old and a
very sweet German Shepherd mix.
She will graduate from the 2nd
class of Wakulla Paws in Prison
October 17th. She has basic obe-
dience training, is crate and house
trained, spayed, and up to date on
her shots. Please call the CHAT
Adoption Center 926-0890 if you
are interested in visiting with Eva.
She would make a wonderful com-
panion and a great play mate for
your children

355 Yard Sales

105 Hickorywood Drive. Saturday
Oct. 18, 8a.m.-4 p.m. Household
goods, clothes, furniture, collecti-
bles, antique doors. 3-miles East
of Crawfordville, Hwy-61.

Two Family yard sale. Lots of
items, an old oak table and other
furniture some antiques. Dining
room table and chairs, dressers,
some vintage collectibles, clothes
and lots more. Fri. & Sat. Oct.
17th & 18th @ 41 and 44 Wild-
wood Drive 8a.m. 3p.m.
(850)926-9106 or (850)926-5575


Walkers Mill
$69,900.2 ac. lots, located on
Lower Bridge Road.


Carmen Rocle 2 ac. lot off
Shadeville Hwy near
Wakulla Station. $64,900.

2 acre tract with large
hardwoods in Beechwood
Subdivision off Shadeville
Hwy. $52,900.
Two 5+ acre tracts off
Rehwinkel Rd w. large trees on
the back of properties and a
small pond. Can be
purchased together


FOR

SHERIFF



Political advertisement paid for and
approved by Charlie Creel,
No Party Affiliation, for Sheriff

Antique child's desk, window
treatments and lots more. At mini
warehouse, next door to Myra
Jeans. Saturday, October 18,
8AM-12Noon

Multi-Family Sat., October 18,
8:30a.m. to noon. 96 Taff Drive
(behind Winn-Dixie). Dryer $40,
Treadmill (like new) $60, lots more!
Too much to list. Rain o.k.


Sellars Crossing
$65,900. 1+ ac lots
North Wakulla Co..
On Ace High Stable Rd.


***Brand New Subdivision**
Carmen Maria -$34,900.
Lots up to 1 ac. in size.
Underground electric and Wa-
ter. Conveniently located to
Tallahassec and Lake Talquin.


Call
Donma Card
850-508-1235
u [,


"Affordable & Convenient**
Montelo- $34,900
Located off ofBelair Road. City
of Tallahassee underground elec-
tric, water, & sewer. Convenient
to Tallahassee, St Marks Bike
Trail, and Wakulla Springs.


Coovriahted Material


*.*


A Syndicated Content
* Available from Commercial News Providers


Donna Bill
Dickens Tumer
524-0473 510-0283

*. ..


Kenny
Lovel
519-2510






Jim
Wetherton
(706)244-5961


Glnny
Delaney
566-6271


Mike Tim Jordan Marsha Tucker
Delaney Broker Broker
524-7325 567-9296 570-9214

Ochlockonee Bay


Josh Alan
Brown Reese
528-6385 567-4860


Prestorr Nancy
Strickland Strickland
508-3296 508-2902



M,"11


Cathy Susan Teresa ,Curtis Jim Susan Teresa
Mathews McKaye Shepherd Benton Hallowell Brooks Beldler
519-0960 510-2477 567-6776 228-5821 566-5165 545-6678 519-3766
S Panacea Realty Crawfordville
146 Coastal Hwy. 2851 C-ville Hwy.
Office: 850-984-0001 Office: 850-926-9260
Fax: 850-984-4748 Fax: 850-926-9150
Lora Boston JoeleaJosey Mariko Chaviano
P.A.to Marsha show You Any Property On Thoe Mark e MOffice Beach Rentalsl
Tucker Manager Advertising

=2. r I.


Crawfordvlllel Well kept home In
NE Wakulla County. Large bed
rooms wlwalk In closets, garden
tub In master, deck on side, two
greenhouses with electricity and
water. Land alone Is worth the price.
Just $127,900. 729WAH


Tarplnel Gorgeous, new custom home
Features open design w/10' ceilings,
red Brazilian cherry floors, gourmet
Kitchen w/ glazed birch cabinets, gran
Ite counter and stainless steel appil
ances. Hanger Is 48x40 and backs up
to the taxiway. Elevator shaft Is In
eluded. Just $350.000. 731WAH.


Lanark Beachl Beautiful house on
Dog Island Sound In Lanark Beach.
3BR/2BA with hardwood and ceramic
tile floors, 9' ceilings, custom oablnets
In kitchen, large covered old Florida
style porch. Elevator, large store
agelworkshop under home. Just
$499,000. 188FWH


Sopohoppyl Double wide on beautiful
Sopchoppy River with 2.74 ac. MOL,
with 189 feet on the river. Lots of up-
grades which Include hard coat,
stucco exterior, fire place, ceramic tile.
Coll sting agent for security code for
entrance. Just 149,000. 266WWH.

nohronhbrealtv. om


ELECT

CHARLIE


Re-Elect N
SHERIFF N



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!


Re-Elect U

SHERIFF M



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!


Point ealty,





CongTa t ons!
September 2008 September 2008
Top Lister Top Producer








,Mi-s Linda Pitz Tori Callan
510-3191 510-1523 ki
(850) 926-8120
www.shellpointrealty.com


l PO B 556 P FL 32346 wwwo m


-L


-L


. Ochlockonee Ba
y
Reat .


-14


imiiiimm


i














THE WAKULLA NES y


355 Yard Sales

Saturday 8:00a.m.-2:00p.m. Three
Family Sale. Behind Winn-Dixie, at
35 Hummingbird Lane. Furniture,
vacuum cleaner, printer, fax ma-
chine, shutters, stapler gun, sew-
ing machine, and more

Wakulla Christian Gigantic Sale!
Please support Wakulla Christian
School Saturday, October 18,
2008, 7:00A.M. on the school
grounds. 1391 Crawfordville Hwy,
near Bloxham-(267) Baby and
household items, electronics, fur-
niture, holiday decor, clothes and
a whole lot more. Signs

415 Announcements



Re-Elect

SHERIFF
A nVto F


KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!


500 Real Estate


PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it ille-
gal
to advertise "any preference, limi-
tation, or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or national ori-
gin or an intention to make any
such preference, limitation or dis-
crimination." Familial status in-
cludes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing the custody of
children under the age of 18.
This newspaper will not accept
any advertising for real estate
that is a violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To com-
plain of discrimination call HUD
toll free at 1-800-669-9777. The
toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


2L 1
LENDER

510 Acreage for Sale



Re-Elect
SHERIFF


*HARM
KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!



515 Apartments for Rent

Shell Point Studio Apartment.
Fantastic view. Full kitchen, W/D,
huge bath, king murphy bed, fully
furnished. Available November.
$650/mo., plus utilities. 6-month
lease. 850-591-3306

520 Townhouses for Rent|

Camelot Park 27-C Guinevere Ln.
Beautiful Crawfordville 3BR/2BA,
like brand new, freshly painted,
new carpet, new refrigerator, gor-
geous view of pool. $885/mo+de-
posit. Kristen Scovera Keller-Wil-
liams agent/owner 850-443-2460
530 Comm. Property for
Rent

For lease: 2-story commercial
building on 2 lots. 1680 sq.ft. in
Panacea, $1,200/month, $1,200
deposit 850-984-5800


Reduced-Great-Location!
1,200sq.ft. Crawfordville Hwy. ad-
joining The Wakulla News. Three
offices, reception, waiting area,
large kitchen. $1,200/mo. Call
926-6289 or 421-2792.


.BC
STORAGE

MINI-WAREHOUSES
BOATS RV'S

519-5128 *508-5177
2 miles South of Courthouse
on Hwy. 319 in Crawfordville
24 Hour Access Video Surveillance


Woodville Retail
Space Available
Fitness Studio-1000/sf
(Wall to wall mat & mirrors)
Retail -1250/sf
(Storefront w/back storage)
Two-Bay Garage-1200/sf
Divided Office Space-1074/sf
Lewiswood Center
421-5039

545 Homes for Sale

3BR/2BA Brick home + older
rental home on 10 acres, 1-mi. So
of Courthouse on Council Moore
Rd. $525,000. 443-6127.
555 Houses for Rent


ELECT

CHARLIE




C









IE









L

FOR

SHERIFF



Political advertisement paid for and
approved by Charlie Creel,
No Party Affiliation, for Sheriff

2BR/1BA house with
fireplace/deck with access to Wa-
kulla River $750.00/mo. First and
last month. Call (850)926-2783.
2BR/1BA in Wakulla Gardens. 59
Chicopee. New 2006 home. Tile,
carpet, new appliances, washer,
rocking chair porch, nice yard.
$725/mo for 12-month lease (ne-
gotiable). Land Lots and Homes
850-556-6694
2BR/1BA on 1/2 acre. Dining and
living room, w/fireplace in great
room. $725/mo. + $1,025 deposit.
850-926-5088


3BR/1BA, includes kitchen appli-
ances, heat and A/C, 51 Faith
Ave., Sopchoppy $600/mo. + de-
posit. Call 850-962-1994
3BR/1BA house near schools.
Small.pet okay. $650/month plus
deposit. Call 850-728-6496 or
850-766-0170
3BR/2BA $850/mo. Like new con-
ditions. Deposit and references re-
quired. No pets or smoking. Call
850-926-8795
4BR/2BA Crawfordville area. Rent
$1,500. No pets or inside smok-
ing. References and credit check
required. Call 933-1608.


Coaae k Re4a,. l I
(850) 926-8038 (850) 926-2390 fax '
520 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL
For the best real estate experience
call Lynn or David
Lynn Cole-Eddinger David Hoover
Broker 545-8284 Realtor 519-7944
lynncole5228@msn.com ,.-. MIS. dhoover2@hotmail.com
NEW LISTINGS
River Plantation Road
Only 2.5 acre tract in Hunter's Glen and priced to sell!
Gorgeous acreage w/lots of trees, close to Wakulla River,
St. Marks, & Shell Point. Private, beautiful, peaceful
homesite. Asking $79,900
82 ALLEN HARVEY STREET
Three brick duplexes in downtown Crawfordville on nice
size lots. Each apartment has kitchen, great room w/french
doors overlooking covered patio and spacious backyard,
two roomy bedrooms, one bath, and front porch. Great
opportunity for investor. Each duplex sits on it's own lot.
Possible room for 4th duplex. Asking $450,000
WOODLAND DRIVE
One acre lot w/septic tank, power pole, well, & shed
ready for your home or mobile home. Beautiful trees,
close to schools, rec park, & library. Asking $35,000

"Coastwise Realty, Inc. would like to congratulate David Hoover
for being the TOP PRODUCER for September 20081"


3BR/2BA Brick Home on 3 Acres -
2 outbldgs for storage/shop. Ru-
ral setting, but close to
town/schools. Easy commute to
Tall. $850/mo.+deposit. Available
Nov. 15. Call 850-566-4124.


3BR/2BA Crawfordville/Magnolia
Ridge on 1/2 acre. Quiet, secured
gated community. Split plan,
fenced, garage, fireplace, deck.
$1,250/mo.+deposit. Call
850-509-0929


Crawfordville, cozy 2BR/1BA on
fenced 5 acres. Close yet private.
$750/mo. Alltell 919-880-6152


Furnished cottage, Crawfordville.
2BR/1BA, kitchen, Liv/Din area.
CHA & W/D. No pets/smoking.
$650/mo. plus $650/security dep.
(850)926-2293.


In Wakulla Gardens: 4BR/1.5BA
$800/mo. (first, last & deposit).
ACE High Stables Road: 3BR/2BA
w/19X29 game room w/pool table,
18X36 in-ground pool, mostly fur-
nished on 4 acres. $1,100/mo.
(first, last & deposit). Call
850-847-7723


Large 3BD/2BA Home, 5 acres,
2-car garage, office/sunroom, din-
ing room, fireplace, security sys-
tem. Near Riversink Elementary.
$1,095/mo.+deposit. 926-5859 or
,508-7337.

Ochlockonee Bay




Realty
Alligator Point! 3BR/3BA gor-
geous home in gated community.
$1800/month, $1800/security. No
Pets. No Smoking.
Pine Street/Alligator Point! Cute
2BR/1BAMH. $575/month,
$575/security. No Pets. No Smok-
ing.
Crawfordville/Linzy Mill!
4BR/2BA, 1600 sq.ft.
$1,575/month. $1,575/security.
No Pets. No Smoking.
2BR/1 BA home in Crawfordville on
five acres. $750/month. No Pets.
No Smoking.
Panaceal Commercial building on
Hwy 98. $850/month. $850/security
Ochlockonee Bay! Bayfront
3BR/1BA block home. $750/mo.
$750/security. No pets.
No smoking.
Beachfront 2BR/2BA on Alligator
Point. $1300/month. $1300/secu-
rity. No Pets. No Smoking.
2BR/1BA in Lanark/Franklin
County! $600/month. $600/secu-
rity. No Pets. No Smoking.
Commercial building on busy
Hwy. 98/Panacea for rent.
$550/month. $550/security.
Commercial office in Medart! 2
Room office on Hwy. 319.
$700/month. $700/security.
Ochlockonee Bay Realty
850-984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com


Medart: Centrally located
2BR/1BA home. Lots of character
w/cypress, stonework, exposed
beams, loft and large front
porches. Located on 4 quiet
acres, lawn care and water in-
cluded. Perfect for singles or a
couple. No smokers. Small pets
considered. References. 1 yr
lease. $725/mo. First, last and
deposit. 251-4166


Brain


1 2 3_ 4

4 5 6

3 7 2

8 2 1 4
7 1

9 6 2

3 1 9

2 4 3

7 6 8 5
Each puzzle Is divided Into nine sections, and each section
has nine blank squares. Fill In all 81 squares on the puzzle with
numbers 1 to 9.You may not repeat any numbers in any one of
the nine sections that you've already used elsewhere In that
section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once In each
horizontal line of nine squares, and In each vertical column of
nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly fill
every square.
9 9 V 9 6 I L ""


suo!lnlos


Reduced Rental!! 2BR/1.5BA
2-story furnished house, very pri-
vate. Within Sopchoppy city limits.
Many extras. $690/mo+deposit
(negotiable). 850-528-4341 or
850- 962-9312

560 Land for Sale

124.7 acres, 5, 10, 18.9 & 99.7
acre tracts. 2+ miles of creek front,
including Smith Creek. Full
kitchen, two bunkhouses, wood-
shed. $5,500/acre 984-0044


Beautiful, untimbered, mature
wooded 20-acre tract. Easy ac-
cess from Hwy 98. Reduced
$125,000. Call Susan McKaye,
owner/agent (850)510-2477. Och-
lockonee Bay Realty.
www.hardwoodhammock.com


Re-Elect

SHERIFF



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!
'.., : .

565 Mobile Homes for
Rent
2BR/1BA S/W Wakulla Gardens,
Good condition. Available now.
$500/mo.+deposit 850-322-9952


2BR/2BA (North Wakulla) M/H, re-
modeled, city water, garbage
service, included $525/mo.
+$250/deposit, no pets 926-5326
3BR/1.5BA MH on acreage
w/pond, central heat & air, clean
and roomy. No smoking.
$700/mo. $300 security deposit.
352-493-2232.
3BR/1BA M/H. 235 Webster.
Screened porch, 1 acre, fenced
yard, great shape. Call today!
$625/mo. 12-month lease (nego-
tiable). Land Lots and Homes
850-556-6694
3BR/2BA D/W on 1/2 acre off
Lower Bridge Rd. W/D available.
$800/mo. First month; deposit (ne-
gotiable). No pets. 850-926-9174
3BR/2BA well-kept doublewide,
Lake Ellen on 1/4-acre lot. $750
first, last and security deposit.
Pets ok, but extra. 850-570-0506.


Shell Point
926-7811 aI


3BR/2BA well-kept doublewide,
Lake Ellen on 1/4-acre lot. $600
first, last and security deposit.
Pets ok, but extra. 850-570-0506.


LAKE FRONT ON LAKE ELLEN
3BR/2BA DWMH $675/mo. In-
cludes garbage & water. Next
door to owner. No pets or smok-
ing. 566-0403


Near Ochlockonee State Park and
Sopchoppy. Like new 2BR/2BA
M/H, large covered deck, 5+
acres, nonsmoker, no pets
$495.00 + security (850)962-2456

590 Waterfront Homes/
Land


George's Lighthouse Pointe
Unit A-3, 19 Mashes Sand Road,
Panacea, Condominium Unit.
1BR/1BA, LR, DR, CHA. Front
porch faces pool & tennis court.
Back porch faces marina & view
of bay (Both 12x30). Gated
Community w/beautiful new
landscaping. 825 sq. ft. H&C.
850-545-5057. $229,900





Re-Elect

SHERIFF



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!
... in. -T n 'a ,.ir.. ,
.. -, 5.. .. T I ...i


595 Vacation Rental






Re-Elect

SHERIFF H

*HARVEY
KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!


www.c2 fcp.com

Real Estate Shopping "24/7"

Today's Buys Are

Tomorrow's Best

Investments
Take a look then give us a call!


Ochlocknee Bay Wakulla Station
984-5007 421-3133 .


600 Open House


ELECT

CHARLIE


FOR

SHERIFF


*
Political advertisement paid for and
approved by Charlie Creel,
No Party Affiliation, for Sheriff



Classified

Ads For

As Little

'As $8

A Week



Wakulla
Realty,


Sonya Hall
Lic. Real Estate Broker
"Specializing in Wakulla Co."
(850) 926-5084
FOR RENT:
4Br 2Ba House
$750 mo + Sec. Dep.
Avail. Oct. 15
3Br 2Ba House
$925 mo + Sec. Dep.
3Br 2Ba House
$825 mo + Sec. Dep.
(1 Car Garage)
3Br 3Ba Twnhs
$875 mo + Sec. Dep.
2 3Br 2.5Ba Twnhs
$850 mo + Sec. Dep.
3Br 2.5Ba Twnhs
$800 mo + Sec. Dep.
3Br 2Ba DWMH
$850 mo + Sec. Dep.
3Br 2Ba DWMH
$650 mo + Sec. Dep.
3Br 2Ba SWMH
$650 mo + Sec. Dep.

2Br 2Ba SWMH
$550 mo + Sec. Dep.


Teasers


ACROSS
1. Bow known as
the "It" girl
6. Con (with
vivacity)
10. Brit's baby buggy
14. Executive's staff
15. Melon exterior
16. Gaucho's
weapon
17. Newcomer on the
Hill
20. London's End
21. "Thought you'd
never "
22. Atlas feature
23. A Ponderosa
brother
25. Tear to bits
27. Superstition for
second-year
players
32. Poor, as excuses
go
33. "We Try Harder"
company
S34. Tool for
Minnesota Fats
35. Trumpeter's
accessory
36. Gives a whipping
to
38. Refueling spots
39. He dethroned
Foreman
40. Revolver inventor
41. They often end in
"-ite"
42. Firm's recent hire,
perhaps
46. Recipe amts.
47. Greasy spoon
sign
48. Waker-upper
51. Compadre
52. Not great
56. Some price
breaks
60. It's chopped liver
61. Hawaiian port
62. Divas's
showstoppers
63. Floored it


64. Yoked pair
65. Aquarium beauty
DOWN
1. Place for Java
2. Trevi Fountain
coin of yore
3. Sidewalk-stand
quaffs
4. Place to
recuperate
5. Hibachi residue
6. Brand of metal
polish
7. Place to do figure
8's
8. Shoo- (easy
winners)
9. "To a..." poem
10. Lunchbox
sandwich, for
short
11. Goes bad
12. Natural soother
13. Place to trade


18. Hot Lips and
Radar worked at
one
19. Dress to the _
24. Unlock, to a poet
25. Be footloose
26. A dwarf planet
27. Subbed with the
band
28. Powerful ray
29. More aloof
30. Wacko
31. Signs like an
illiterate
32. "Little" girl of
comics
35. Capt.'s superior
36. Abbr. in business
names
37. Mountains
crossed by
Hannibal
38. Word on an air
pump


40. Kramer
("Seinfeld" role)
41. Windsor's prov.
43. "Did my best"
44. Be logical
45. Locker room
powder
48. Hieroglyphics
serpents
49. Clear a hurdle
50. Start the pot
51. Lot of loot
53."Sit 1": Fonzie
54. Film rater's unit
55. Greek peak
57. Greek P
58. Fort_, NJ
59. Feed bag morsel


I -


THE WAKULLA NEWSThursday,


Oct. 16. 2008 Page 9B


<


I














Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008


Officials celebrate grand opening


of Wakulla Forest trails system


Wakulla State Forest (WASF), man-
aged by the Florida Division of Forestry
(DOF), hosted a grand opening of the
newly developed Trailwalker hiking trail
and Trailtrotter multiuse trail The trail
opening was on held Oct. 4
at the WASF pavilion ." '
located off of -.
High way
207.


Picnicking is available at the parking area
pavilion located off of SR 267.
A diverse crowd of state lands users
attended the event. Users who traversed
,_'. _,. -J :' ....p7 .


wide va-
riety of recre- -00
national opportuni- keslig,
ties await visitors at WASF. Miller.da
a d sAar")Line, and


Hiking, horseback riding, biking,
picnicking, birding and nature study can
be enjoyed. The WASF Trails feature one
designated Trailwalker and one Trailtrot-
ter trail. The Nemours Hiking Trail loop is
a 1.75 mile trail which traverses through a
mixed pine/hardwood forest, pine planta-
tion, and a hardwood/cypress slough. The
Double Springs Mulit-Use Trail loop is 4.5
miles in length.'
Riders and hikers should expect an
amazing trail that will include low water
crossings, inclines, and winding trails.
For those hikers and riders who prefer
exploring off the marked trails, 19 miles of
service roads transect the Wakulla Tract.


..... ~*uy uregory, (noru s; ---
the trails for the first time
included equestrian users from the South-
ern Trail Riders Association, hikers from
Leon and Wakulla counties, hunters, and
even a longhair miniature dachshund.
The ribbon was cut by Doug Kiesling, the
first hiker to hike the Nemours Hiking
Trail. After traversing the trails users were
invited to converse with DOF personnel
to discuss management activities on the
forest, wildland fire prevention, and ben-
efits of Florida's Forest. Food and drinks
were provided courtesy of Randy Gregory,
Wakulla Forest Area Supervisor.
WASF is composed of one main tract in


Wakulla County and one smaller tract in
Leon County. Since 1999, WASF has been
managed by the DOF using the multiple-
use concept, which balances environ-
mental. recreational and resource use
needs. Emphasis is given to
preservation of water
quality by pro-
tecting the
con-


duits
Io '" that lie
,e below the
S N teP state forest and
ass' supply Wakulla Springs,
ecosystem restoration, and outdoor
recreation.
The DOF currently manages more than
one million acres of forested land. Man-
agement of state forest provide a number
of benefits.
These benefits include economic stabil-
ity by attracting businesses and tourist,
production of over 5,000 consumer prod-
ucts, hunting opportunities on Wildlife
Management Areas, promoting wildlife
habitat, clean water and air, and recre-
ational opportunities.
For more information, please visit
http://www.fl-dof.com.


Wakulla Health Department offers flu shots


The Wakulla County Health
Department (WCHD) recog-
nizes fall as the historical
beginning of influenza (flu)
season and urges Wakulla
County residents who have
not already done so to get
their flu shots today.
In Florida, the disease usu-
ally peaks in late January
or February and continues
through March. It is impor-
tant to start vaccinating early
and1 to continue flu vaccina-


tion throughout the winter
months and beyond.
"Floridians still die from
diseases that are easily pre-
vented by safe and effective
vaccines," said Charles Alexan-
der, Chief of the Department
of Health Bureau of Immuni-
zation. "Children, adolescents
and adults should be screened
for recommended vaccines at
every medical visit."
Parents and caregivers can
contribute to the safety and


well-being of children by hav-
ing them immunized.
Flu vaccine shipments are
arriving in providers' offices.
and now is the time to arrange
for your annual flu vaccina-
tion. The influenza vacdne is
readily available this year, and
all able individuals are encour-
aged to receive the vaccine.
The WCHD will have two
flu shot clinics in October.
These clinics will be held
at the WCHD, located at 48


Oak Street, Crawfordville, on
Thursday, Oct. 16 and Thurs-
day, Oct. 30. The clinics will be
open from 8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.
and again from 1 p.m. to 3:30
p.m. There will be no charge
for Medicare Part B (please
bring Medicare card) and $21
for all others including. Medi-
care HMO's. For directions to
the health office or any other
questions, please call (850)
926-3591 or visit www.wakul-
lahealth.com.


Triggerman pleads,

gets 25 years prison


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Jesse Chrysler, a 19-year-old
Panacea man charged with
being the triggerman in an
April 2007 murder, accepted
a plea bargain from the state
last week, pleading to charges
of second-degree murder and
burglary of a conveyance while
armed in exchange for a sen-
tence of 25 years in prison.
According to the probable
cause in the court file, Chrysler
and co-defendant Christopher
Hartsfield, both of whom were
17 at the time, were charged
with first degree murder for the
murder of Zeke Spencer Gossett
in April 2007. Gossett, who was
22 years old, reportedly heard
something outside his Jer-Be-
Lou Circle home in the middle
of the night and went out to
investigate. He was shot several
times and, mortally wounded,
Gossett staggered across the
yard to the doorway of his
mobile home calling for his
mother then died in her arms.
Apparently, Hartsfield had
broken into Gossett's truck
and stole some DVDs, worth
less than $100. Gossett came
outside and confronted one or
both of the boys and Gossett
and Chrysler tussled as Harts-
field ran away and Chrysler
pulled a gun and shot Gos-
sett.
Hartsfield is set for trial later
this month.
In an emotional hearing
on Tuesday, Oct. 7, Gossett's
mother and sister made state-
ments to the court about their
loss. Amber Gidden, his sister,
broke down in tears as she
spoke of the lives affected by
the killing.
"There was no reason for
him to die the way he did,"
Gidden cried.
Gossett's mother, Gayla
Espiritu, was more restrained.
She said at the hearing that
she was grateful to have had
22 and a half years with Zeke.
"I lost my son," she said, "and
I lost my friend."
"Thank God I was with him


and he was not alone" when
he died, Espiritu said.
The good that came from the
event was that she has drawn
closer to God, Espiritu said,
adding that she has forgiven
Chrysler, though she wanted
him to go to prison for what
he did, and expressed sorrow
for Chrysler's family.


Jesse Chrysler


Chrysler was emotionless
throughout the hearing. He was
dressed in an orange jail jump-
suit, chained hand and foot,
with his head and face shaved,
He sat at the defense table with
his attorney, Assistant Public
Defender Ines Suber.
About a dozen family and
friends sat in the gallery be-
hind Chrysler, including a min-
ister who counseled family.
In a plea deal negotiated by
Assistant State Attorney Jack
Campbell, Chrysler was al-
lowed to plea to a lesser charge
of second degree murder, the
count of armed burglary as
charged, and a charge of ag-
gravated battery was dropped.
In exchange, Chrysler got a
sentence of 25 years in prison
with credit for 527 days served
while he's been held in jail
awaiting trial. Chrysler will not
be eligible for gain time, which
gives inmates additional credit
as they serve time,
While the two were charged
with first degree murder, Camp-
bell had made it dear he would
not be seeking the death pen-
alty because of the boys' age..


Capital Health Plan
Proudly Presents


A monthly program for older adults who want to learn more about
creating and maintaining healthy, happy, and active lifestyles.

Join us Thursday, October 23,

10:00 to 11:00 a.m.
at the Wakulfa Senior Center
(33 Michael Drive, Crawfordville, FL)

Featuring

The Power to End Stroke#
Presented by: Tequila Hagan, BSES, MSM


Tequila Hagan is the Capital Health Plan
Wellness Program Coordinator.







--.- Please RSVP to 850-523-7333.-

Some things get better with age.

Capital Health Plan is one of them.



SCapital Health
P L A N

T An Independent Licensee of the
S s Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association

This event is educational only and information regarding the plan will not be
available. If you have questions, please call Capital Health Plar s.seen days a
week, 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., at 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY
850-383-3534 or 1-800-955-8771).


KEEPING WAKULLA COUNTY





SAFE I

When I first became your sheriff, Wakulla County was one of the
safest counties in Florida. Over the years our community has grown
significantly... but I am pleased to let you know that our county is
still one of the safest in the state. As your sheriff, it's my job to keep
you safe and I am proud of the work we have done for you

Crime is Down
* The overall crime RATE is down 28% over the past 5 years, according to
the FDLE Uniform Crime Report.
* The ACTUAL number of indexed crimes from 5 years ago is down by over
100 reportable crimes.
* Our community is still one of the safest in the state.
Population is Growing
* Our population has soared by nearly 20% in the past five years.
* In the past five years, our calls for service have more than doubled from
30,300 in 2002 to 60,700 last year.
Costs are Low
* We operate a jail that pays 75 percent of its operating costs by renting
empty beds to the State and Federal law enforcement agencies.
. Our per capital cost to the citizen is about $175 per person.
* That is less than the cost of law enforcement in Franklin, Gadsden, Jeffer-
son, Taylor or Leon counties,


YOUR SHERIFF
Political advertisement paid for and approved by David Harvey, Democrat, for Sheriff.




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