Title: Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00191
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville, Fla
Publication Date: October 9, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States of America -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028313
Volume ID: VID00191
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

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Wakultla


Published Weekly,
Read Daily


Our 113th Year, 41st Issue


Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008


Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century


Two Sections

50 Cents


Kessler criticizes sheriff over budget, gun range money;

Lawhon questions his political motivation


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
A request by the sheriffs office to
use money generated by a women's
safety program for special training for
sheriffs deputies led to more questions
about the sheriffs budget from Com-
missioner Howard Kessler comments
that were criticized by other board
members as politicking.
The sheriff's office submitted a
request to commissioners at the Mon-
day, Oct 6 meeting to use $4,200 of
the $6,990 generated by the women's
firearm course to go towards training
for the department's Special Weapons
And Tactics (SWAT) team training.
Money for SWAT had been cut from
the sheriffs budget.
Kessler criticized Sheriff David
Harvey for reneging on a deal to cut
$214,000 from the sheriffs office bud-
get After agreeing to the cuts, Sheriff


Harvey appeared at the commission's
final hearing on the budget and asked
that the money be replaced, and that it
should come from the more than $1.2
million in the reserve fund created by
renting beds in the Wakulla County
Jail to state and federal agencies. Har-
vey said at that meeting that the loss
of the money would jeopardize his
department's accreditation.
In an article in last week's The
Wakulla News, Harvey said that he had
made $183,000 in other budget cuts to
his department, including $39,000 in
overtime pay, an animal control posi-
tion, and two paid holidays.
"The sheriff has never cut his bud-
get as he was asked to do in the budget
process," Kessler contended. "This
money now being requested for the
SWAT team would normally go back
to the general fund."
Kessler questioned the wisdom of


some of the budget cuts the sheriff
indicated he had made, saying: "I
personally am concerned when I see
spending by the sheriff's department
for billboards and large advertisements,
while at the same time he's cutting
overtime for deputies."
Kessler also questioned the pri-
orities of the sheriffs office, and said
he would not vote for the requested
spending until the sheriff supplied a
line-by-line accounting of his spend-
ing.
When Kessler finished his com-
ments, Commissioner Maxie Lawhon
quipped: "Was that a paid political
advertisement for Charlie Creel?"
Creel, a retired Florida Highway
Patrol trooper, is challenging Harvey's
bid for re-election.
Commissioner Brian Langston com-
mented that he would vote in favor of
the spending request "no matter who's


sheriff."
The women's safety course was
started after the December 2007
murder of Cheryl Dunlap. The course
taught women firearm safety and
self-defense and included time on the
law enforcement gun range. The fee
charged was $30 per participant, with
$10 of that going for gun range mainte-
nance. The sheriffs office reported that
257 people participated in the program,
generating nearly $7,000.
Board cancels Nov. 3 meeting
County commissioners voted to can-
cel their Nov. 3 meeting and move the
business on that agenda to the meeting
scheduled for two weeks later.
Cancelling the meeting was sug-
gested by Commissioner Brian Langs-
ton, who said he had two reasons for
making the request: he will be out of
town, and the meeting is on the eve of
the Nov. 4 General Election. Langston


said that the meeting would likely
devolve into politicking.
Among the issues that had been
scheduled for Nov. 3 was a final vote on
the N.G. Wade Sustainable Community.
Chairman Ed Brimner fast-tracked that
item so that, after the Oct. 13 planning
commission vote, it will come before
commissioners at their Oct. 20 meet-
ing for a preliminary vote. Brimner,
Langston and Commissioner Maxie
Lawhon are all stepping down from
the board.
Commissioner Howard Kessler
asked Langston why not just move
the meeting to Nov. 18, which is
when three new commissioners will
be sworn-in.
Assistant County Administrator
Lindsay Stevens said that some items
would have to be re-advertised in the
newspaper, but there was sufficient
time to do that


Boyd

votes for

rescue

plan

Despite disapproval and
serious misgivings with the
changes made by the Senate,
Congressman Allen Boyd (D-
North Florida) voted for the
Economic Rescue Plan (HR
1424) in the House of Repre-
sentatives in order to avert a
financial crisis, stabilize the
financial markets, and pro-
tect the American taxpayers.
Earlier, the Senate added $152
billion in tax relief to the res-
cue plan, of which $110 billion
was not paid for and must be
borrowed.
"Not paying for our priori-
ties is a large part of what got
us in this financial mess in the
first place," said Congressman
Boyd. "Instead of working to
make a better bill, the Senate
has made our financial situa-
tion even worse. It defies all
logic that the Senate would
effectively compound our fi-
nancial problems in a bill that
is meant to avert a financial
crisis. This bill, possibly the
most important bill that many
in Congress, including myself,
will ever have to vote on,
deserved to be considered on
its own merit and should not
have been loaded down with
other priorities. Unfortunately,
the Senate did not give us that
choice.
"While I am extremely
displeased with the Senate's
fiscal irresponsibility, our fi-
nancial and economic outlook
has not changed.
Continued on Page 5A






Comment&Opinibn...Page 2A
Weekin Wakulla ..'... Page 2
u ch .........................Page

Almanac.......... Page A
Outdoors ....... .......".... .. A

School ......... ............Page. 13A
Spots.. .. .Page 15A
Letters tQ the Edl.or..Page,16Ai
nSheri, .... .. Page A,
Wakull a Widl .Page 1 B'
. letters to.the Edito .Page 2B





.L 8 21.. .- l .
6 84578 21 5 0


Wakulla County residents have had a
worrisome summer as hurricanes have vis-
ited the area and economic concerns have
livened up the 2008 national election for
president.
But not everyone is concerned about na-
tional economics, foreign policy statements
and global warming. A playful dolphin
seemed to be enjoying life off of Shell Point
recently as the mammal leaped out of the
water with pleasure.
The creature seemed to understand the
meaning of putting on a special act as the
sun was setting off the Wakulla County
coast.


Former deputy is arrested

Sfor theft of air conditioners


Former Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office Deputy
James Plouffe faces theft
charges in recent case.


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Former Wakulla County Deputy James
Plouffe has been arrested and charged with
allegedly stealing commercial air condition-
ing units.
According to the arrest report, Plouffe and
his partner in a real estate business allegedly
got some individuals to steal $35,000 worth
of commercial air conditioning units on Sept.
2 that were stored in the garage of a vacant
house on Zion Hill Road.
A deal to sell the equipment to an indi-
vidual known as "Shug" for $1,000 per unit


fell through because, reportedly, Plouffe kept
driving by the scene in his car as his partner
Daniel Hart, 32, tried to make the deal and it
made Shug nervous. Afterward that, Plouffe
allegedly negotiated a deal to fence the equip-
ment to someone known as "Bird" for $380
per unit.
Hart was arrested the next day, Sept. 3, on
charges of burglary and grand theft and admit-
ted to his involvement. He led investigators
to the Tallahassee storage center where the
units had been left until the deal with "Bird"
could be finalized.
Continued on Page 5A


Kessler

backs off

Brimner

inquiry

By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
After discovering some sort
of technical glitch with the
county government server,
Commissioner Howard Kes-
sler backed off from his in-
tention to call for a criminal
investigation into whether
Chairman Ed Brimner violated
the Florida Public Records law
by failing to turn over all his
e-mails when requested.
Kessler had originally
planned to bring the issue
up two weeks ago but didn't
because Brimner left the meet-
ing early due to illness. When
the issue came up on the
agenda on Monday, Oct. 6,
Kessler prefaced it by saying
he had been searching for his
own past e-mails and was un-
able to find them.
"There appears to be a
problem with retention of
county records our our county
server," Kessler said. "I know
when I tried to get my e-mails,
I have no confidence in what
I found."
County Administrator Ben
Pingree confirmed that and
said that he had met with the
county's information technol-
ogy company about remedy-
ing the problem.
"It did come to my atten-
tion when Dr. Kessler was
trying to ping his own e-mail,"
Pingree said. "We have a plan
of action (to fix it) that's going
to cost some money."
Continued on Page 5A

Crash kills

one motorist
By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
A 31-year-old Crawfordville
man was killed in a two ve-
hicle accident Saturday, Oct.
4 at 9:43 p.m. at Highway
61 and Oak Ridge Road in
Leon County, according to the
Florida Highway Patrol.
Craig S. Tolson was a pas-
senger in a vehicle driven by
Rachell L. Sheffield, 22, of
Crawfordville. Sheffield was
seriously injured in the ac-
cident.
Continued on Page 5A


l


~5eb3s'















Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008




Comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895



Lasting sports memories African-American educators


of Skip, Gene and P.T.


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Baseball is a game meant for
radio. It's slow-paced, doesn't
require a lot of description, and
there's plenty of time for an
announcer to go off on digres-
sions. An announcer I always
enjoyed listening to was Skip
Caray, who died a few weeks
ago.
Caray's broadcasts of Atlanta
Braves games were notable for
his wry sense of humor. I al-
ways chuckled when he made
up names and hometowns for
fans who caught foul balls.
And his droll references to "the
Jones boys" when referring to
Chipper and Andruw cracked
me up.
I suppose he will always
be most remembered for his
description of the seventh
game of the National League
Championship Series against
the Pittsburgh Pirates when
slow-running Sid Bream scored
front second on a single.
"Two balls, one strike," went
Caray's call. "What tensions The
runners lead. A lot of room in
right center. If he hits one there,
we can dance in the streets.
The 2-1. Swung. Line drive left
field One run is in. Here comes
Bream. Here's the throw to the
plate. He iiiiisssss.... Safel Braves
winl Braves win! Braves win!
Braves winl"
Football, on the other hand,
doesn't lend itself so easily to
verbal description. The action
is fast and visual and a perfect
match for television. After every
play, there's an analysis of what
worked, what.didn't, from cam-
eras offering different angles.
That said, I do enjoy listening
to Gene Deckerhoffs broadcasts
of FSU football games. He does a
good job of describing the game
at' paIyers'- though I do find
myslf'dashing to a TV (during
teevised games, obviously) to
catch a replay if it's something
that's set Deckerhoff to scream-
ing. (Unfortunately for me, I live
in a house full of women who
don't appreciate the importance
of sports. Something about the
double-X chromosome, I think.


So, even if the game is televised,
I must plead with teenagers to
switch the channels, please,
just so I can watch the replay,
I promise you can go back to
watching "Flava of Love"/"The
Hills"/"America's Next Top
Model." Often, by the time I've
found the remote control and
the whining stops, I've missed
the play anyway.)
Deckerhoff is unapologeti-
cally partisan, often referring to
the Seminoles as "we," and ex-
pressing disappointment when
things go against the team.
For years he was joined by
Peter Tom Willis, a former FSU
quarterback who had a brief pro
career, and whose color com-
mentary was often obvious but
at least offered with passion.
DECKERHOFF (with his Ted
Baxter-like delivery): He's hit
HARD at the 20, slapped on
his bottom and made to cry
like baby. You're not going to
have much success trying to
go up the middle against that
defense, PT.
PETER TOM (with his heavy
North Florida accent): Right you
are, Gene.
In what was perhaps the
strangest exclamation in sports
broadcasting, when an FSU
player would score, PT would
cry out: "I SEE you, (name of
player)l" Again, it was passion
that Peter Tom offered, not
actual broadcast talent.
Unfortunately for Peter
Tom's career as a broadcaster,
he actually started to do some
analysis of what was wrong
with the football team as, over
the past few years, it went into
a death spiral. During the wan-
ing years of Bobby Bowden, the
twice-national champion coach
been reduced to wearing his
Nike-sponsored clothing and
standing on the sidelines ask-
ing other coaches what's going
on. He now coaches like the
Queen of England rules Britan-
nia as a once-powerful figure
reduced to figurehead.
Gone from the playbook
are the trick plays and special
teams play that defined the real
Bobby Bowden years when he


was in charge. (After a decade
and a half, bring back the "pun-
trooskie.") FSU was also known
for its incredibly fast athletes,
think Deion Sanders and Char-
lie Ward, back when Bobby used
to actually recruit players.
During the decline of Bobby,
Peter Tom apparently stopped
drinking the FSU Kool-Aid and
started criticizing the team's
play and its coaching. A fre-
quent refrain throughout last
year from PT was, "I just don't
understand what we're doing."
The university controlled
broadcast company fired Peter
Tom during the spring, telling
him he was too negative.
They hired William Floyd
to do color analysis, replacing
Peter Tom.
As a fullback on FSU's 1993
National Championship team,
and a pro football player for sev-
en years, Floyd certainly knows
how to play the game. Unfortu-
nately, he doesn't do a terrific
job of explaining it, or offering
any insights, or otherwise add-
ing anything to the description
of the game. He's frequently
silent, mumble-mouthed when
he does speak and, most an-
noying, when FSU has a good
play you can't hear Deckerhoff's
description of what happened
for Floyd yelling like a fan in
his living room.
During a recent game, the
broadcast went something like
this:
DECKERHOFF: He's hit HARD
at the 20... Uh-oh, FUMBLEI
WILLIAM FLOY>D Wool Wool
Yeahl
DECKERHOFF: There's a
fumble, who has the ball?
WILLIAM FLOYD: Did you
see that hit?
DECKERHOFF: The officials
say... WE HAVE ITI Seminoles
RECOVER
WILLIAM FLOYD: Wool All
right Yeah!
Unlike listening to Skip Ca-
ray do a Braves game, listening
to Deckerhoff and company do
a football game does not give
one the feeling that you're lis-
tening to one of broadcasting's
best describe the action.


Attention Wakulla candidates!


I am getting ready to put
together the special tabloid
section devoted to the local
political candidates involved
in the General Election Tues-
day, Nov. 4. If you are a candi-
date'who received questions


from me in the mail, please
return your answers.
Voters will have a chance
to see how the candidates
responded to the questions
from The Wakulla News in
the Oct. 23 issue. If you have


not sent your answers back
to me, please send them to
kblackmar@thewakullanews.
net today. Don't be left out
because your opponents)
won't be. Thank you.
Keith Blackmar
Editor


Cash is the

top choice
Editor, The Newss
It is my pleasure to endorse
Traci Brown Cash for Supervi-
sor of Elections. I have known
Traci Brown Cash and her fam-
ily since moving to Wakulla
County in the early 1980s.
She is a loving and caring
wife, mother, and a wonder-
ful friend.
Traci Brown Cash is quali-
fied for the position of Su-
pervisor of Elections. She has
a degree in Accounting and
Finance, and owns a success-
ful, private CPA practice. With
the demands of her business
she is always learning new
material, finding ways to
improve, and is up to date
with the latest technology. In
addition, she volunteers many
hours to our community, and
is also a member of numerous
organizations.
Traci Brown Cash is a dedi-
cated leader and an inspira-
tion to all who know her.
She is dependable, has the
initiative, and is sensitive to
the needs of our county. She
will go above and beyond the
call of duty. I know she will
be a magnificent Supervisor
of Elections, and will serve
our county with the utmost
courtesy and professionalism
that our people and county
deserve. She has my vote,
and I hope she has yours on
Nov. 4.
Ernie Jaworski
Crawfordville


offer rich body of knowledge


Editor, The News:
I am a Wakulla County native and Wakulla
High graduate, Class of 1983. In 1994, I was hired
as a business education teacher at Wakulla High
School by Principal Dr. Andrea Carter. I held that
position until 2000, when I left the district for
employment with University of North Carolina
and Leon County Schools, respectively.
Returning to my native county to work as a
teacher, cub sponsor, coordinator, and associa-
tion president, was the greatest gift I could have
possibly given back to a community I cherish.
I had a desire to stay and would gladly have
stayed with the Wakulla County School District.
It is my home, but it became apparent to me
that I would never have the opportunity for an
administrative position, even though I hold a
doctorate in education.
As an African-American woman, former Af-
rican-American woman association president
and coordinator over the largest diverse celebra-
tion held in Wakulla County Schools for seven
consecutive years, I saw the "good, the bad, and
the ugly." More so, I saw the handwriting on
the wall, so to speak. There were few minority
teachers at the time, and virtually no minority
administrators. The situation has only worsened
over the years. Lack of diversity in positions of
leadership communicates a message louder
than words. Admittedly, I am still disturbed and
even embarrassed at the percentages of minor-
ity leaders in Wakulla County School District I
believe, in education, all children should be well
represented at all levels, and I know, a decade
later, this is not the case. According to the Inside
Higher Ed, June 2007,19 to 21 percent of African-


American graduates who attended a college
or university majored in education; suggesting
there are disproportionate numbers of African-
American administrators representing African-
American students available for our schools in
Wakulla County and even our nation. Recently,
I had the opportunity to speak with some of my
former students, particularly minority students.
According to minority students currently enrolled.
in Wakulla County Schools, they need to see that
the American dream works for them and their
white classmates, who will also benefit from a
diverse staff.
I now hold the position of assistant principal
at Lincoln High School in Tallahassee. The Leon
County School District, which competes for tal-
ent in the same labor market as Wakulla County,
has no difficulty employing a highly diverse and
highly qualified staff at the teaching and admin-
istrative levels. We have a strong leader who
promotes, supports and embraces diversity at all
levels. The public needs to know that qualified
minority professionals (especially in education)
are, and have been, available. In Wakulla County
Schools, we have not been valued.
There is such a rich body of knowledge that
African-American educators contribute to the
classroom and district I certainly hope that the
school leaders, students, and abiding citizens will
truly become the "change" they want to see in
Wakulla County Schools.
Deborah Barnes, Ph.D.
Assistant Principal,
Lincoln High School
Tallahassee


Editor, The News:
Lately, in some political
circles there has been talk of
building a new high school
in Wakulla County. Some of
the stated reasons are because
of perceived overcrowding at
Wakulla High School and the
rising cost of fuel for getting to
and from after-school activities.
On the surface, these sound
like good reasons for building
a new school in the very near
future, but it is important to
look at how a new school will
affect our students and our
community.
Last year, Wakulla High
School opened with 1,277 stu-
dents. This year, there was one
less student at school on open-
ing day. The state projections
for the next high school are for
enrollment to remain relatively
flat for the next five years and
steady growth for the follow-
ing five years. Enrollment at
our middle and elementary
schools confirm the accuracy
of state figures. We are cur-
rently meeting the Classroom
Size Amendment standards
without using any portables
and without floating teachers
to use other classrooms that
are unoccupied when teachers
have a planning period.
If we built a new high school
in the next five years we would
have two high schools with an
enrollment of approximately
625 students at each school.
This drop in size would se-
verely hinder the class choices
our students now have. Our
current size allows us to offer
10 Advanced Placement col-
lege courses. Those AP classes
would all but disappear in the
two new high schools. ROTC
is required to have at least
100 students in the program
in order to continue at any
high school. This year ROTC
has 130 students. We would
not be able to offer ROTC at
either high school. Many of
our sports programs like golf
and cross-country would not
be offered at the smaller high
schools. Clubs and after-school
programs would decrease and
other opportunities now of-
fered in our curriculum would
not be sustainable.
We should enjoy the time
we have when all of our stu-
dents attend one high school.
There will be a day in the
future when we will have to
build a second school. When
that day comes our county
will be split forever. My senior
year in high school a new high
school opened. My best friend
went to the new school and
I remained at Titusville High
School. From that day on, we
became North Titusville and
South Titusville. Our sense of
community changed too, as
students became rivals instead
of classmates. Our school had
grown to 2,000 students and


we had no choice but to build
a new high school. Splitting
the school at 2,000 students al-
lowed many of the programs to
remain intact because we had
1,000 students at each school
There really is so much
more to education than just
test scores. That sense of com-
munity pride we have in our
sports teams, band, ROTC,
drama, academic teams, and
service organizations at Wakul-


la High is important to all of us,
but I am also very proud that
our students achieved the only
"A" grade for any rural high
school in North Florida. Much
of what we are able to achieve
is because we are large enough
to offer so many choices for our
students.
Mike Crouch
Principal
Wakulla High School


WEEK IN WAKULLA

Thursday, October 9, 2008
YOM KIPPUR
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB meets at Posey's Up the Creek
in Panacea at noon.
MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA, a fellowship of men
who gather to share and support one another in the quest
for authentic manhood, meets "outback" (behind)
Cornerstone Ministries at 6:30 p.m. For more information,
call at 508-2560.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at 12 noon.
ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION meets at city hall in St.
Marks at 7:30 p.m.
VFW BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road
From 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Friday, October 10, 2008
AA meets at the American Legion Building next to the
Women's Club in Crawfordville with an open meeting at
8 p.m. There are also open meetings
BIG BEND HOSPICE Advisory Council meets at the Ming
Tree at 1 p.m.
FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public
library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa's Episcopal.
Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
"HACKING DEMOCRACY," a documentary about the
vulnerability of electronic voting machines, will be
presented by Concerned Citizens of Wakulla (CCOW) at
the public library at 7 p.m. It's free.
PICKIN''N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at the
senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
Saturday, October 11, 2008
ALZHEIMER'S SUPPORT GROUP meets at Ameris Bank at
10 a.m.
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 56 Lower Bridge
Road, at
5 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.
OCTOBERFEST FUNDRAISER will be held at Trinity
Lutheran Church, across from Wakulla High School, with a
pancake breakfast at 8 a.m., and a bake sale and yard sale
to follow, and an Octoberfest lunch of bratwurst,
sauerkraut, German potato salad and Black Forest cake.
Sunday, October 12, 2008
MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA meets at First Baptist
Church of Crawfordville at 7 p.m.
Monday, October 13, 2008
COLUMBUS DAY Banks will be cosed.
PLANNING COMMISSION meets in the commission
boardroom at 7 p.m.
SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION meets at city hall in
Sopchoppy at 6:30 p.m.
VFW meets at the post on Arran Road at 7 p.m.
WAKULLA CHRISTIAN COALITION will meet at the public
library at 7 p.m.
Tuesday, October 14, 2008
BOOK BABIES, for infants and toddlers, will be held at the
public library at 10:30 a.m.
VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW
Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
WAKULLA HISTORICAL SOCIETY will hold its annual
dinner meeting at Wakulla Springs Lodge at 7 p.m. A
buffet dinner will be served. Speaker will be Dr. Joe
Knetsch, historian with the bureau of state lands.
Wednesday, October 15, 2008
AA meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.
BETTER BREATHERS meets at the senior center at 1 p.m.
BOOK BUNCH, for pre-school and home school families,
meets at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
BOOK NOOK, for children in grads K-5, is 10:30 a.m. and
1 p.m.
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior citizens center
at 10:30 a.m.


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Crawfordville Highway office. The Wakulla News reserves
the right to edit all letters.


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New high school not answer yet















THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008 Page 3A


Vote no to county charter ballot item on Nov. 4


Editor, The News:
As a citizen and concerned voter in
Wakulla County, I find it impossible
to remain silent any longer. This letter
is long overdue. In a few weeks, the
voters of Wakulla County will be faced
with making the decision to vote yes
or no to a county charter.
Over the past couple of days I
have asked several people I know
how they feel about the charter and
if they know how they will vote on it.
Too many of the people I have asked
have replied with the question. "What
charter?"
"The one that we have to vote on
next month. The one you can go to
the Wakulla County web site and read
about. The one that only the people
for it are talking about. The one that
if the county commissioners and the
county administrator have their way
will be thrust upon us before we have
a chance to study it and ask questions
about it"
As I mentioned before, this Charter
will be on our ballot next month. On
the ballot the verbiage looks very
simple andthe question is only seven
lines or 74 words long. (The actual


charter document is 12 pages long).
The ballot verbiage was adopted
on Aug. 4, 2008, by the county com-
missioners, five men elected to repre-
sent the citizens of Wakulla County,
who have not provided the citizens
of Wakulla County with a comprehen-
sive study or a public interest impact
statement. You may ask what these
two items are. The study would have
looked at the operations of our county
government and who provides them.
It would have provided information
on whether the conduct by the cur-
rent county government was satis-
factory or in need of improvement,
whether it is in need of reorganization
and if so, whether the reorganization
requires a charter. The public interest
impact statement would explain to
the citizens why we need a charter
and how it will affect government
powers, functions and revenues.
I feel our county commissioners
have failed us in pushing the charter
on us in November without providing
the study and impact statement to us
first. My question to the commission-
ers is, "What is the hurry?" Charter
county government may be in the


best interest of Wakulla County, but
how can we possibly determine that
if a study has not been conducted?
How do we know the 12 page docu-
ment we will be voting on next month
is the charter we need? The study
should be conducted prior to writing
the document not after we put it in
place. I believe our commissioners
and administrator have the cart before
the horse.
Even worse, it is my understanding
that while the charter itself does not
change the functions and operations
of our county government, the charter
allows you to do certain things that
you may not be able to accomplish
without it. Proponents of the charter
will persuade you with the idea that a
charter will empower you as a citizen.
Yes, that is true, through a proposed
"recall" provision for example. How-
ever, it will, at the same time, give the
commissioners the power to increase
our taxes by levying municipal public
service taxes and communication
service taxes. There are additional
ramifications as well. We may like
ideas such as a recall provision and
the ability for citizens to initiate or-


dinances; however, we may not like
the idea of the possibility of increased
taxes. By voting yes to the charter,
we have eliminated the shield that
prevents the undesirable matters from
ever coming up. The ballot language is
misleading in its simplicity because it
does not disclose all the subject mat-
ter that can be included in a charter.
It makes it sound like a simple name
change that will preserve our current
form of government but allow recall
and the proposal and adoption of
ordinances by voter initiative and ref-
erendum. Adopting this charter could
open a Pandora's Box that may not be
in the best interest of the citizens of
our county and that cannot happen
as long as we continue to have no
charter.
All counties in Florida currently
operate under Home Rule, powers
of self-government granted by state
constitution. There are two forms of
Home Rule, non-charter and charter.
Out of the 67 counties in Florida, only
19 have charters (according to the
county's web site). Wakulla County
would be the smallest and most rural
county with a charter. We must make


sure it is in our best interest before
we vote yes.
We must make sure we understand
all the ramifications before we put it
in place. After it is there, it will be too
late. If we adopt a charter, we must
make sure it is in the form best for
our county.
I implore you to gather all the in-
formation you can possibly put your
hands on before you vote yes. And I
implore the county commissioners
and staff to give us all the information
we need, both pro and con, about the
ramifications of such a charter. I beg
you to look at all the pros and cons.
If you don't understand what you are
voting on, please vote no.
We must hold our county com-
missioners and county administrator
accountable now and require them to
educate us on all the consequences
before we allow them to change our
form of government. Please vote no
until a study and impact statement
have been provided to the citizens so
we can make an educated decision.
Dalynda Vause
Crawfordville


Superintendent is a proven leader


Editor, The News:
As administrators in the
Wakulla County School Dis-
trict, we know the importance
of having an experienced
and proven leader as super-
intendent. David Miller has
provided the leadership nec-
essary for Wakulla County to
continue to be among the top
performing school districts in
the State of Florida.
David Miller has the expe-
rience and dedication that our
children deserve including:
35 total years experience
with the Wakulla County
School District.
14 years as a principal in
the Wakulla County School
District.
13 years as superinten-
dent of the Wakulla County
School District.
7 years as a teacher in


the Wakulla County School
District.
1 year as an assistant
principal in the Wakulla
County School District.
It's this kind of leadership
experience and dedication
to Wakulla County that our
school district needs. It's
this kind of experience and
dedication that enables our
district to create a vision
that will allow our students
to reach new heights and
surpass previous accomplish-
ments.
David Miller has fostered
an educational environment
that allows for maximum
school success. The Wakulla
County School District was
designated by the State of
Florida as an "A School Dis-
trict" for the 2007-2008 school
year. This is the third time our


district has been awarded this
honor. Our school district has
also been recognized as one
of the "Top Ten Performing
School Districts" in the State
of Florida. David Miller was
also voted "Superintendent
of the Year" in 2004. These
are just a few indications that
our schools are successful.
For these and many other
reasons, families continue to
move to Wakulla County from
all over the country. Testimo-
nies from these families are
a constant reminder of how
fortunate we are to have such
a great school system.
On Nov. 4, Wakulla County
voters will be asked to make
a decision that will affect our
most precious resource, our
children. The Wakulla County
School District continues to
provide a world-class educa-


tion that will benefit our
students in years to come.
We ask that you vote for
our kids. We ask that you
vote for the most qualified,
experienced and dedicated
candidate for superintendent,
David Miller.
Michelle Baggett, Asst.
Principal of RMS
Randy Barnes, Asst. Princi-
pal of WHS
Mike Barwick, Asst. Princi-
pal of WMS
Sunny Chancy, Asst. Prin-
cipal of WHS
Dee Ann Hughes, Asst.
Principal of SES
Laura Kelley, Asst. Princi-
pal of CES
Sharon Kemp, Asst. Princi.
pal of MES
Melinda Young, Asst. Prin-
cipal RES


Obama is bright light at the end of tunnel


Editor, The News: -
There seems todbe no good
economic news for those of
us who live and work here in
Wakulla County. Our county
commissioners are at each
other's throats over economic
issues, county millage rates are
going up, school millage rates
are going up, jobs are going
away, and our paychecks and
Social Security checks don't go
nearly as far as they did even a
few weeks ago. And now we're
on the hook for a $700 billion
dollar Wall Street bailout.


But I do see onebright spot.
In November, we have the
opportunity to vote with our
heads, our wallets and pock-
etbooks. We need to put our
own economic interests and
those of our families first.
Barack Obama has gone on
record that he will reduce tax-
es for all of us making under
$250,000 a year. I don't know
about you, but that sure as
heck covers me. In fact, Obama
tax cuts should benefit most
everyone in Wakulla, where
average annual per capital per-


sonal income is $25,154.
For example, according to
tax experts at both the Urban
Institute and the Brookings In-
stitution, if you make $19,000
or less you will save $567
under Obama's plan, but only
$21 under John McCain's plan.
If you earn between $37,600
and $66,400 you'll save $1,118
under Obama, but just $325
under McCain.
And, as President, Obama
will work to, eliminate federal
income tax for seniors making
less than $50,000 a year. That's


great news for my fellow retir-
ees here in Wakulla.
What about McCain? If you
plan to be among the wealthi-
est one percent of taxpayers,
making $600,000 or more, you
should consider voting for Mc-
Cain. He would cut your taxes
$48,860, while Obama would
raise them $93,709.
On Nov. 4, it's time we vote
ourselves a little economic
good news.
Michael Delaney
Panacea


Artz is energetic, thoughtful and attentive


Editor, The News:
Last winter and spring
I helped to organize The
Green Living Energy Expo
and the Green Home Tour
here in Wakulla County.
Having never done anything
quite like this, I had some
apprehension. It was un-
founded.
Lynn Artz was on that
committee as well. She was
always energetic, thoughtful
and attentive to other's ideas
and perspectives. Clearly
passionate about children's


health and education needs,
her lifelong commitment
to addressing these issues
were in evidence as she pro-
posed creative and dynamic
workshops for them at the
Expo. If obstacles arose, her
calm and encouraging de-
meanor provided a catalyst
to move ahead. She has a
way of envisioning a plan,
organizing people, negotiat-
ing compromises and think-
ing innovatively that made
working with her a joy. She
never rushed to make deci-


sions that were expedient,
but always thoughtfully
weighed all the implications
and consequences. This is
the kind of leadership that
we need on the county com-
mission.
We need someone who.
listens, does the research
and proposes no nonsense,
logical and easily imple-
mented strategic plans for
Wakulla County.
Her focus on environmen-
tally sound and sustainable
development goes hand


in hand with a need for a
comprehensive stormwater
management plan.
Remember Fayl. Making
our local government build-
ings and infrastructure more
energy efficient saves us tax,
money and helps to preserve :
our local resources.
Lynn Artz has been listen-
ing. Now is the time to elect
a candidate who is looking
out for all the citizens of
Wakulla County.
Kathryn Gibson
Crawfordville


Outsiders often bring new, refreshing ideas


Editor, The News:
Last week, Kerry Gaby who
married into a prominent
building and banking family,
defined "outsiders" for us and
implored us to, "Let the na-
tives of this county make the
decisions] for its future."
According to her, "outsid-
ers" moved into Wakulla
County to leech off the locals,
steal all the good waterfront
property, and reinvent gov-
ernment. These "outsiders"
are the polar opposites of
"Natives."
"Natives" have a multi-gen-
erational history in the county,
usually own a lot of land, and
had formed a perfect society
that was run by a noble and
perfect government right up


until the time the outsiders
came inside, screwing up the
whole delicate balance.
It's much like the myth
of the noble savage, except
those Native Americans had to
give way to the true Wakulla
natives landowningg white
people) 190 years ago.
Call me naive, since I don't
count as native, but I think
of myself less as an outsider
than as an American.
An American is free to live
where he chooses and vote
for anyone I like, regardless
of their pedigree, and who
thinks it is civic responsibility
to engage in the democratic
process at the local level. And
I don't think I'm alone when I
say, I'll be damned if anyone


thinks I'll just pay my taxes
then shut up while a small
confederation of elitist devel-
opers, bankers, lawmen and
lawyers do their best to ruin
all that is good about Wakulla
County.
Successful communities
cherish and preserve their
history to maintain a sense
of place within an increas-
ingly Wal-Mart-ized American
landscape.
At the same time, com-
munities grow, thrive, and
provide a high quality of life
by incorporating new ideas
from citizens of diverse back-
grounds. Think of "university
towns" throughout the coun-
try that have become some
of the most attractive places


to live and raise a family- not
in spite of the "outsiders,"
but because of them and
their new solutions to old
problems.
Ms. Gaby tells us that we
need a ruling class exclusively
made up of the landed gentry
within Wakulla's 635 square
mile confines. I don't think
so.
In 2008, this is a ridiculous,
regressive and arrogant idea.
If it was the year 1508, we'd
call it "feudalism."
As for me, I don't really
want to be a serf in some kind
of retro-nativist fiefdom, but
thanks for asking anyway.
Michael Keys
Crawfordville


Poinsettia fundraiser will help local dancer
Editor, The News: plans to purchase poinsettias, support Electric. Dancer's Name. CHAR-
My daughter's dance academy I am asking that they consider Michelle Wilson, ITY WILSON. Parent's Name:
has again been selected to dance purchasing them from Charity. Crawfordville MICHELLE WILSON.
at the College Championship Charityis an A student at Wakulla Angela Bowden's Dance Elec- Contact Number: (850) 443-
Game. As one of many fundrais- Middle School and an all around tric Dance Academy, $9 each. The 0797.
ers, they are selling poinsettias. pleasant girl. The order form price includes sales tax. Please Delivery Date
If anyone in the community is attached. Thank you for your make checks payable to: Dance November 29, 2008.


Buddy Wells is

the top choice for


elections supervisor


Editor, The Newss
I would like to take this
opportunity to recommend
Henry "Buddy" Wells for the
position of Supervisor of Elec-
tions in Wakulla County.
I grew up in the same
Wakulla community with
Buddy and also attended
church with him and his fam-
ily for many years. Buddy is a
dependable and enthusiastic
individual with true integrity.
He isn't afraid to make tough
decisions, and if elected as Su-


pervisor of Elections, I believe
he will serve in this position
in a respectable and profes-.
sional way.
The right to vote is a privi-
lege. I truly believe Henry
"Buddy" Wells will maintain
and ensure that the citizens of
Wakulla County be guaranteed
fair and impartial elections. I
support Henry "Buddy" Wells
for Supervisor of Elections.
Earl Vause
Crawfordville


Creel is the best...


choice for sheriff
Editor, The News: I am very excited about the
My name is Chuck Cook, a Explorer program (a program-
resident of Sopchoppy. I am that allows kids to 'shadow"
writing this letter to show my deputies while on' duty) tit
support for Charlie Creel as Charlie will implement
our next sheriff. I have known Any program that allows
Charlie for approximately 11 our kids an opportunity to
years, and during that time immerse themselves in an
have come to lean on Charlie activity that will provide a
as a friend and a mentor, positive influence,and take
Charlie has earned my utmost them away from some of the
respect and my confidence in negative activities that are
his ability to guide our county around every corner, we need
in the path that will continue "to support with every esolice
to make Wakulla County a we have.
place where people choose to Charlie will use the sher-
raise their families. iff's office as a portal that
I will go on record saying will allow kids td see the
that Wakulla County has some importance of,law enforce-
of the best road deputies in ment and obeying the law.
the State of Florida. Many of these kids may even
The problem is, our depu- decide to join the ranksoof
ties sometimes lack the ad- one of our state's various law
ministrative support needed enforcement agencies. This is
to effectively do their jobs. just one exampl'of how the
As a "state certified" law Explorer program'will allow
enforcement officer with 30 kids to take from ur county's
years of road experience, resources andthen"giveback"
Charlie knows the struggles someday.
that officers deal with on a As with any organization,
daily basis. whether it be a sheriffs of-
No one likes to receive a fice, a business, or a hunting
citation or be charged with a club, when the upper echelon
crime, but everyone has to be remains the same for a long
responsible for their actions, period of time, ideas become
Accountability is at an all- stale and jobs become rou-
time low in our country, and tine. This is no one person's
without accountability that fault, it is just a fact of human
starts at our sheriff's office nature. ...
and ends with our citizens, I believe we live in the'
Wakulla County will fall from greatest county in Florida,
greatness. As is statiscally surrounded by some of the
proven, as the population bf greatest families, that-inhabit
our county rises, so will the the earth. Charlie will bring
crime rate, some fresh ideas 'and new
Road deputies are our first strategies that will assure
line of defense against crime Wakulla County continues to'
and need to be confident that 'be a place that we are all proud
decisions made by them on to call home. I will be voting
the scene will be backed by 'for Charlie Creelon Nov. 4 and
their administration. Charlie urge my friends and neighbors
will give them this confi- to do the same.
dence. Chuck Cook
As someone who is very in- Sopchoppy
volved in our county's youth,

Ring found during

fundraising event
Editor, The News: away.
Last weekend Wakulla Line The player realized the.
Drive held a fundraiser at the woman had dropped a ring
corner of Crawfordville High- into the bucket in addition,
way and Wakulla Arran Road to the money. We would re-
in front of the McDonald's. ally like to give her.the ring
Between 10:15 a.m. and 11 back.
a.m. a very nice young woman She can claim it by email-
in a small white car stopped ing me at webb0502@gmail.
and told one of the players com.
she would give them all the Thank youl
money she had in the bottom Kim Webb
of her purse. She then pulled Crawfordville














Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008


Church


Obituaries


Matthew J. Boyd
Matthew James Boyd, 18, of
Tallahassee died Saturday, Sep-
tember 27, of injuries resulting
from an automobile accident
near Capitola.
The service was held Wednes-
day, Oct. 1. at Good Shepherd
Catholic Church in Tallahassee,
with burial at MeadowWood
Memorial Park following the
service.
A native and lifelong resident
of Tallahassee, he attended Lin-
coln High School and was in
his second year at Tallahassee
Community College. He loved
and enjoyed life to its fullest,:
enjoying the companionship of
friends and family, whether fish-
ing, cooking or watching ESPN
SportsCenter.
Survivors include his parents,
Mary Beth McCann and Jon
Anderson of Tallahassee, and
Jim and Laure Boyd of Shell
Point: two sisters, Stacy Boyd of
Tallahassee and Lindsay Martin
of Crawfordville; two brothers,
J.P. Bell of Tallahassee and Chris
Anderson of Havana; his pa-
ternal-grandmother, Ann Boyd
of Tallahassee; his maternal
grandparents, Patrick and Veron-
ica McCann of Cocoa Beach: his
step-grandparents, Barbara and
Allan Noetzel of Denton, Texas,
and Adair Akers of Tallahassee:
two nephews, Caleb Martin and
Brandon Marsh: and a niece,
Naomi Martin.
Bevis Funeral Home in Tal-
lahassee was in charge of the
arrangements.

Dewey F. Goldenetz
Dewey Frederick Goldenetz,
65, of Crawfordville died Sunday,
Oct 5, in Tallahassee.
Funeral services will be at 2
p.m. Friday, Oct 10, at Harvey-
Young Funeral Home in Craw-
fordville. Family will receive
friends from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday,
Oct 9, at the funeral home. In
lieu of flowers, donations maybe
made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723
Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee,
FL 32308-5862.
Born and raised in Wapakone-
ta, Ohio, he joined the Air Force
in 1966 and was discharged in
1970. From 1970 to 1973, he lived

St. Elizabeth
Ann Seton i.

Catholic Church
Mass 9 a.m. Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Father James MacGee, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
926-1797


in Celina, Ohio, and then moved
to Orlando. In 1979 he moved to
St. Marks. opening the St. Marks
Country Store. What began as a
grocery store eventually turned
into a local watering hole af-
fectionately known as Dewey's.
Dewey was always quick to help
a stranger and he considered
everyone a friend. In 2005 he
retired, selling the store. He spent
the past few years gardening and
spending time with his children
and grandchildren.
He is survived by two daugh-
ters, Heather Chapman and
husband Vance of Crawfordville
and Jamie Goldenetz of Tallahas-
see; a brother, Edward Goldenetz
and wife Lena of St. Marys, Ohio;
two sisters, Claudia Bender and
Kendra Ferrall and husband Greg
of St Marys; three grandchildren,
Madison, Lauren and Jordan
Chapman; and a host of family
and friends.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville is in charge of
the arrangements.

Deborah W. H. Martin
Deborah Whaley Hawkins
Martin, 56, of Tallahassee died
Thursday, Oct 2, in Tallahassee.
Graveside funeral services
were held on Saturday, Oct. 4,
at Lake Ellen Baptist Church
Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to Big Bend Hos-
pice. 1823 Mahan Center Blvd.,
Tallahassee, Florida 32308 or
Sopchoppy Southern Baptist
Church Building Fund, 117 Curtis
Mill Road, Sopchoppy, Florida
32358.
"Debbie" was born in Ft Lee,
Va., on Dec 9, 1951 to William
E. Whaley and Helen Eubanks
Whaley. She graduated from
Wakulla High School and attend-
ed Tallahassee Junior College.
Debbie lived in Tallahassee
before moving to Clearwater
and Albany, Ga. She resided in
Tallahassee for the past 16 years
and was a member of Sopchoppy
Southern Baptist Church.
Survivors include her son.
Paul Jackson "Jack" Hawkins and
wife Maribel, and granddaughter,
Hayden Elizabeth Hawkins of St
Petersburg: her mother, Helen


\/ Church
1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98


Holy Eucharist
10:30 am


The Reverend Roy Lima
926-1742


- Crawfordville United

Methodist Church

Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 926-7209
Ochlockonee & Arrn Road "Come Grow With Us' owww.crawfordville-umc.ors

,i;secooe" tfe e 4/Ar ence/


l" /BApills ('luRc



3086 Crawfordville Hwy.
(South of the Courthouse)
Church Office: 926-7896
www.fbccrawfordville.org
or
(youth) www.crosstraining.org


SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Fellowship Meal 6:00 p.m.
(call for reservations)
Prayer/ Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
IMPACT (Youth) 7:00 p.m.
Children's Events 6:30 p.m.


Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church
117 Curbs Mill Road, Sopchoppy
962-7822

HOMECOMING
October 12,2008
Sunday School 9:45 AM 10:15 AM
'Morning Worship & .Prise through Music & Song
^l 0^:, 3 :30AM
11^0 -,I-a'Wore.|p through Word
) ,re M avLe tangston






ha lV;'.ta mCll b hilKe su. ', '
sp HNk y

.P


Whaley of Crawfordville; a broth-
er, Stan Whaley of Tallahassee; a
sister, Denise Whaley Crabtree
and husband Dennis: two neph-
ews, Jacob and Spencer Crabtree
of Dunedin; several aunts, uncles
and cousins; and a wonderful
caregiver, Lyn Tharpe, and her
daughter Jamie Smith and their
families who were Debbie's
caregivers and best friends for
the past 11 years.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.

Thomas G. Raley
Thomas "Tom" G. Raley, 68,
of Tallahassee died Sunday, Sept
28, at his residence.
A Memorial Service was
conducted Thursday, Oct. 2, at
Culley's MeadowWood Funeral
Home in Tallahassee. In lieu of
flowers,, the family requests me-
morial contributions be made to
Big Bend Hospice.
A native of Water Valley, Miss.,
he was born on Feb. 1, 1940, and
was preceded in death by his
parents, Leonard and Lillie Mae
Wright Raley. He worked for Pub-
lix for more than 30 years in the
Miami Division prior to moving
to Tallahassee in 1990. He contin-
ued working for Publix for many
years. He was a veteran of the U.S.
Navy and was stationed in Alaska
in the early 1960s. He was a past


missionary
Baptist Church
90 Mt. Pleasant Lane, -
Wakulla Station
Pastor Rev. Dr. Frank McDonald, Jr.
421-8900
Sunday School Each Sunday... 10 a.m.
1V & 3" Sun. Worship ..........11 a.m.
Wednesday Service ............... 7 p.m.
(Prayer Meeting and Bible Study)
Our Mission "To be a change agent In
the community for the glory of God."


Panacea Park

Baptist Church
24 Mission Road, Panacea
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Worship 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 p.m.
Pastor, Jerry Spears


Wakulla United
Methodist Church
Sunday Contemporav Senrice 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School for all ages -10 a.m.
Sunday Worship 11 a.m.
Wednesday Service 7 p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
PastorJanice Henry Rinehart


member of the Kiwanis and an
avid sports enthusiast He was
also a member of Northwood
Baptist
Survivors include his wife of
41 years, Sandra Kimball Raley;
two sons, Travis and Veronica
Raley of Tallahassee and Scott
Thomas Raley of Wakulla County:
two brothers, James Raley of
Memphis, Tenn., and Roy Lee
Raley of Eustis; a sister, Flora
Mae Mills of Water Valley, Miss.;
five grandchildren, Terry, Tyler,
Caitlin, Molly and Brittney; and
numerous nieces and nephews.
Culley's MeadowWood Fu-
neral Home in Tallahassee was in
charge of the arrangements..

Doris R. Sanders
Doris Revell Sanders, 72, of
Otter Creek died Oct 4, at her
home surrounded by her family
and friends.
The funeral service was held
Monday, Oct 6, at Nichols-Revell
Family Cemetery in Otter Creek.
Contributions can be made to Big
Bend Hospice 1723 Mahan Center
Blvd. Tallahassee FL 32308.
A native of Otter Creek, she
was a lifelong resident of Wakulla
County and a homemaker.
Survivors include two sons,
Monty Revell of Sopchoppy and
Buck Sanders and wife Angel of
Medart: three daughters, Debra
Simmons of Medart Janie Sand-


Och lockonee

ray
United
Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship 9 a.m.
Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
lPastor (ret Zempleton
(850) 984-0127


Pioneer Baptist
Church (SBC)
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.
Wed. adult, children & youth 7 p.m.
486 Beechwood Drive Crawfordville, FL.
(North of the Lower Bridge Road and
Spring Creek Highway intersection)
Rev. Dennis Hall, Pastor
850-926-6161

Trinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Vicar Bert Matlock
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557


ers of Crawfordville and Millie
Dixon and husband, Don of Tal-
lahassee; a sister, RubyTaylor and
husband James of Panacea; two
sisters-in-law, Margaret Nichols, of
Sopchoppy and Beatrice Nichols,
of Crawfordville, a brother-in-law,
Emmett Revell of Sopchoppy; her
former husband Jim Sanders of
Crawfordville; 12 grandchildren;
and two great-grandchildren.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.

Mary W. Wright
Mary Watson Wright, 78, of
Tallahassee died Oct. 4 in Tal-
lahassee.
The funeral services were
held Wednesday, Oct 8, at For-
est Heights Baptist Church with
burial at Woodville Cemetery.
Memorial contributions may be
made to Forest Heights Baptist
Church
A native of Woodville, she was
a lifelong resident of Tallahas-
see. She graduated from Florida
State University with a Masters
degree. Her professional career
included teaching for 18 years in
the classroom, 10 years serving as
Assistant Principal at Oak Ridge

Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
t Crawfordville
Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey
"Co. A Wnip Wilh Us"
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School........................10 a.m.
Sunday Worship ...................... a.m.
Evening Worship......................6 p.m.
Wednesday Service .................7 p.m.
& Youth Service...................... 7 p.m.
Royal Rangers ....................... 7 p.m.
M issionettes ..............................7 p.m .

Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 am.
Worship.....................10:30 am.
Evening Worship .............5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call tfor details,
962-2213


Wa td a

Prefbytri t
3383 Coastal Hwy.
1/3rd mile east of Wakulla High School
9:30 a.m. Bible Study
10:30 a.m. Worship Service
10:45 a.m. Children's Sunday School
Nursery Provided
926-4569
www.wakullapres.org


St 1

(rts X)
Vgt. Z" q'4 m d wd, de4M
'MW %4c 4 5Wand lad ad P&O4)d,
Ww'yfwtGM a Yeki~t kl 'hc ^.


Elementary School, and eight
years as Principal of Oak Ridge
Elementary. She retired after
36 years of service. Mary was a
member of the Daffodil Garden
Club, Alpha Delta Kappa, Florida
Retired Educators Association
and the Tallahassee Lions Club.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Joe Wright of Tallahassee;
a son, Joey Wright ofTallahassee;
two daughters, Susan Christie
and husband Kris of Crawford-
ville and Mary Ellen Anderson
and husband Rex of Monticello;
five brothers and their wives,
Thomas and Betty Watson of
Tallahassee, Donald and Carol
Watson of Fairhope, Ala., and
Billy and Carolynn Watson, Jerry
Wayne and Carol Watson, and
Maurice and Mary Watson, all
of Woodville; an aunt, Helen
Chester Vickers; and numerous
cousins, nieces and nephews.
Culley's MeadowWood Fu-
neral Home in Tallahassee was in
charge of the arrangements.



Mornings

8:30am Holy
Eucharist Rite One
9:30am Youth & Adults
10:30am Sunday School
10:30am Holy Eucharist
Nursery care available
850-745-8412
4340 Crawfordville Highway


STRONG

& JONES

Funeral Home, Inc.
551 West Carolina St.
Tallahassee, FL 32301

Gracious,
Dignified Service

sLva 224-2139
Day or Night
Pre-Arrangements
Silver Shield
Notary
DARRELL L.LAWRENCE
LINN ANN GRIFFIN
J. GRIFFIN
Licensed Funeral Directors


~/aod~s Jfoonuenit fenit/'ce
5585 Crawfordville Hwy.
Tallahassee, FL 32305
Owned & Operated By Wesley Schweinsberg
S6n:of thd Late Harold Schweinsberg
SOffice: (850) 421-72.1 Mobile: (850) 510-3983
Call anid Compare... You'll Save'Time & Money
Same Quality & Service


Hwy 319 Medart,
OElffice 926-5265
lEarly Worship 8:30 a.m.
D 0 Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
0 Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
SAWANA 4:00 p.m.
U Youth Zone Time 430p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org


Who is the latest

Wakulla Wavemaker?"

Tune in daily at

2 p.m. and 6 p.m.





THE WORD IN PRAISE



WAKU 94.1 FM www.wave94.com
926-8000 (fax: 926-2000)












THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008 Page 5A


Rescue plan


Continued from Page 1A
"We are still staring down
a disastrous financial situ-
ation that requires action,"
Boyd said. "The intent of this
financial rescue plan is not to
bail out Wall Street; it is to
protect the regular folks and
businesses in North Florida
and around the country that
depend on loans and lines of
credit from banks.
If we experience a financial
meltdown, we will not have ac-
cess to home, car, and student
loans, regardless of whether
we invest and even if we have
not made bad decisions in our
own personal finances. That
is an unacceptable situation
and one that would crush the
American Dream."
The Economic Rescue Plan
would give the Treasury De-
partment the authority to
borrow $350 billion to pur-
chase troubled assets, which it
would sell at a later date. The

Deputy
Continued from Page 1A
Plouffe, 41, was a lieutenant
with the sheriff's office until
last year when he had an off-
duty confrontation with some
young people at the Crawford-
ville McDonald's related to the
alleged harassment of his son
on an ATV. As a disciplinary
measure, Plouffe was re-as-
signed from road patrol to
corrections and subsequently
fired when he didn't show up
for the new assignment.
Plouffe was arrested on
Sept. 24 on charges of grand
theft more than $20,000, a sec-
ond-degree felony punishable
by up to 15 years in prison,
and burglary of a structure,
a third-degree felony punish-
able by a maximum of five
years in prison. Plouffe was
released on his own recogni-
zance but is required to wear
a GPS monitoring device and
was ordered to have no con-
tact with his co-defendants.
According to the arrest
report, the homeowner of the
house on Zion Hill Road ar-


Treasury Department would
be provided an additional
$350 billion, if needed, only
after Congressional authori-
zation.
More importantly, the Eco-
nomic Rescue Plan includes a
provision championed by Con-
gressman Boyd and the Blue
Dog Coalition to recoup pos-
sible taxpayer losses. The Blue
Dog recoupment provision
directs a future President to
deliver a plan after five years
to recover any potential re-
maining costs from Wall Street
firms, not the taxpayers.
The Economic Rescue Plan
also:
Limits excess compensa-
tion for CEOs and executives
and recovers bonuses paid to
executives who promise gains
that turn out to be false or
inaccurate.
Includes four separate
independent oversight enti-
ties or processes to protect


rived sometime after the com-
mercial units had been stolen.
Neighbors said they saw some
men in a U-Haul truck loading
up the units. One neighbor
asked the two men what they
were doing, and they said they
were there at the request of a
friend to remove the air con-
ditioning units from a house
being foreclosed.
Deputy Jason Newlin went
to the U-Haul Center in Craw-
fordville and found a truck
had been rented to a 33-year-
old man with a commercial
driver license who had been
approached by Hart with an
offer of a couple-hundred
dollars to transport the equip-
ment.
Plouffe and Hart, who is
also known as Daniel Wilson,
are partners in a company
called Quality Properties of
North Florida, with Plouffe
listed as president. In the
company's Articles of Incor-
poration, on file at the state
Division of Corporations, it
states that the company is or-


the taxpayer, such as the es-
tablishment of a new Special
Inspector General within the
Treasury Department.
Increases the FDIC de-
posit insurance limit from
$100,000 to $250,000 through
2009.
"I know that many of my
constituents are angry, and
so am I," said Boyd. "While
many may disagree with my
vote in support of the finan-
cial rescue package, I owe the
people of North Florida my
best judgment, and I believe
that a vote in support of the
financial rescue plan, despite
its flaws, to be in the best
interest of the people and
businesses in North Florida.
The consequences of doing
nothing would be disastrous
for the people and for our
country.
"We have serious chal-
lenges before us as a nation,
and this financial rescue bill


ganized for "any and all lawful
business."
The arrest report indicates
that Plouffe had approached
Hart about the Zion Hill
house, allegedly telling Hart
he thought the air condition-
ing units there were stolen
and that he and Hart should
remove them from the house
and sell them.
Plouffe reportedly made
contact with the homeowner
and tried to do an emergency
short sale of the house, seek-
ing according to the report
- to take possession of the
house before the air condi-
tioning units were removed
by their rightful owner. When
that fell through, Plouffe took
the man with the commercial
drivers license and Hart, who
has no valid license, to the
U-Haul to rent a truck. Hart
was then dropped off at the
office and another man was
picked up to help load the
truck with the air conditioning
equipment.
After loading the equip-


only treats the symptoms of
years of reckless fiscal and
monetary policies it is the
tip of the financial iceberg."
Boyd stated. "We must also
fix our underlying fiscal and
monetary problems. This
President not only helped
cause this financial crisis
because of his irresponsible
fiscal and monetary policies;
he also has been asleep at the
switch when it comes to fixing
these problems.
The Blue Dogs and I look
forward to working with our
next President to improve our
fiscal and monetary policies
through responsible budget-
ing and increased oversight
and regulation. Our short
term and long term fiscal
problems demand immediate,
bipartisan attention from our
next President and the next
Congress."


ment, the two men allegedly
met Plouffe and Hart off Sprin-
ghill Road in Tallahassee and
then drove to meet the man
known as Shug at a location
off Lake Bradford Road. Re-
portedly, Shug became ner-
vous and broke off the deal
when Plouffe kept driving by
the scene in his black Ford
Mustang.


When that came to noth-
ing, Plouffe used his camera
phone to take pictures of the
equipment in the truck and
the four men went to Fourth
Quarter to meet with "Bird"
about buying the equipment.
Bird said he needed more time
before buying the equipment,
and the men reportedly put
the units into a space at Or-


ange Avenue Self Storage.
The next day, Hart was ar-
rested and charged.
The two men who were
hired to drive and load the
truck have not been charged.
In fact, the State Attorney's
office filed a "No information"
on one of the men, meaning it
was dropping charges, though
no formal charges had ever


I a-tgsnijg L^
IG dC nS r3 )r i (smaIi

hr guI


Keep David JidS Fist


Miller
ol OUR
School Superintendevvt


Kessler-Brimner
C' ontilnued from Page iA '
Kessler was on the agenda to seek approval from the board
to request the State Attorney's office look into\whether Brim-
ner had failed to comply with the law and pursue criminal
charges if warranted. The matter was brought about by citizen
Karla Brandt's request that Brimner turn over e-mails during
dates in June. He eventually turned over 39 e-mails. Brandt
obtained an e-mail from citizen Palmer Carr in which Brimner
indicated he was using his personal laptop in an effort to
avoid frivolous record requests.
Before the matter came up, Brimner passed the chairman's
gavel to Commissioner George Green. After Kessler's discus-
sion of computer problems, Brimner said: "Let me state un-
equivocally, I provided all official e-mails."
Brimner noted that personal e-mails were exempt from
public record requests.
"I fully understand the law and I've complied with the law,"
Brimner said. He then laid into Kessler for actions he described
as divisive and disrespectful towards fellow commissioners.
He accused Kessler of having "surrogates in the audience"
who complain about board actions and said the divisive-
ness went as far as refusing to ride on the county float in a
parade.
"You have to have your own float," Brimner said, adding he
didn't know whether it was because Kessler had to be different
or thought he was better than other members of the board.
"It's just getting tiresome," Brimner said.

'iF\ www.thewakullanews.


I FOI.IA 0 or n
4 'WI _________|__________


My Mom, Lynn Artz, is amazing!

She...
* Helps people
* Takes care of kids
* Sticks up for animals
* Plants trees
* Cleans up messes


And. won't put up
with shenanigans!


Please vote for my Mom, .

Lynn Artz.

We need her on the

County Commission.
Political advertisement approved and paid for by Lynn Artz (Chase's Mom),
No Party Affiliate, for Wakulla County Commissioner, District 5.


D II


Credit URInon

850.224.4960
www.fsucu.org


GIBSON

AUTOMOTIVE

SERVICE


G. SCOTT GIBSON
AUTOMOTIVE SPECIALIST
OVER 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE
850-926-2430
MV69886


With your support, I will use my 30+ years of
law enforcement experience to -
Be a full-time sheriff
Stop irresponsible spending
Get a comprehensive, in-depth audit, and use it to rebuild the budget
Use your tax dollars wiselv and efficiently, and make
the sheriff's budget open and transparent
Move deputies out from behind desks and back into our neighborhoods
Make net\ programs for our )outh a top priority
Start a mentoring program for at-risk youth
Agressi\el\ battle the drug problem And unlawful use of alcohol by minors
Keep the department's workforce stable by keeping currently trained
deputies on staff
Create a count) -%ide Citizens' Advisor. Committee with members
representing all ages (including high-schoolers and young adults) to bring
Sour concerns to the sheriff's office


For a change... ELECT CHARLIE CREEL FOR SHB
P.O. Bo\ 1677. Crawfordville. FL 32326-1677 (,5I) S 926- 118rlif charliee il.com .charliecreel.com


Political dtertlremcnl pacd for ajnd approted h\ Cha.rlie Ciel. No Part', Alllialhon. for Sherl[l


Motorist
Continued from Page 1A
Paul H. Nichols, 35, and Charles S. Scott, 60, both of Craw-
fordville, were injured in the second vehicle, Scott was injured
seriously.
According to FHP officials, Sheffield was driving eastbound
on Oak Ridge Road in a 1986 Toyota and stopped at a stop
sign at Highway 61.
Nichols was driving a 2001 Chevrolet truck northbound on
Highway 61 when Sheffield pulled in front of him. The front
of the Chevrolet struck the right front of the Toyota in the
intersection. The force of the crash rotated both vehicles and
they collided into each other a second time.
The Toyota came to rest facing southward in the south-
bound lane of the highway. The truck was driven off the road
following the crash, FHP officials said.
Tolson was pronounced dead at the scene. Sheffield and
Scott were transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital by
the Leon County EMS unit.
The Toyota suffered $8,000 worth of damage and the
Chevrolet suffered $12,000 worth of damage. Sheffield and
Tolson were not wearing seatbelts, while Nichols and Scott
were wearing their seatbelts.
Charges in the accident are pending, FHP officials said. The
Leon County Sheriff's Office and the Tallahassee Fire Depart-
ment assisted at the scene.
FHP Trooper Michael E. Uzzell was the crash investigator
and Corporal Shaw was the homicide investigator.












Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008


People


"Tough Guise" will It's Showtime Features Lorna Bracewell


discuss reasons for

domestic violence


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Refuge House will present
"Tough Guise." a film and
discussion looking at the
relationship between repre-
sentations of masculinity in
our culture and its connection
to violence
The event is set for Oct. 28
at the public library beginning
at 6 p.m. Hors d'oeuvres will
be served at 5:30 p.m. The
film and discussion are being
presented as part of Domestic
Violence Awareness Month.
The film, made by anti-
violence educator Jackson
Katz, looks at violence in a
society where manhood is
often defined as an expres-
sion of dominance, power
and control. Those images are


reinforced in popular culture
through movies, television
and music.
"What the media do is help
to construct violent masculin-
ity as a cultural norm,"' Katz
says in the film. "In other
words, violence isn't so much
a deviation as it is an accepted
part of masculinity.
"One of the major con-
sequences of all this," Katz
says, "is that there has been a
growing connection made in
our society between being a
man and being violent."
Girls and women often
validate the bad boy postur-
ing, Katz notes, choosing
men who appear violent and
dangerous.
A discussion of the film
will follow the screening.


The Big Bend Sierra Club has
announced its endorsements
of candidates for the Wakulla
County Commission races. In
District 1, Jenny Brock has been
endorsed along with Jimmie
Doyle in District 3 and Lynn
Artz in the District 5 race.
In the District 1 race, the Big
Bend Sierra Club also endorsed
Jenny Brock due to her long-
standing strong commitment
to the enjoyment and protec-
tion our natural resources.
Brock has been a frequent voice
on local issues facing Wakulla
County and will make a solid
commissioner, officials said.
Brock will face Alan Brock,
the winner of the August pri-
mary in the General Election.
Jimmie Doyle, District 3
commission candidate, has a
long history of publicly voicing
her commitment to good gover-
nance and fiscal responsibility.
These ideals lay the foundation
for her commitment to support
planned, responsible growth
that does not strain the local
services.
Doyle will also be a strong
supporter of our local public

Boat ramp

ribbon cutting

A ribbon-cutting and dedi-
cation ceremony for St. Marks
boat ramp will be held Thurs-
day, Oct. 9 at 11:30 a.m. at the
Old Fort ramp in St. Marks.
The boat ramp is very popu-
lar with boaters and other
outdoor recreationists from
the area. Because of its popu-
larity, long waits for launching
and parking were a common
problem.
The expansion of the boat
ramp includes a new two-lane
boat ramp with boarding dock,
an expanded and improved
parking lot, a restroom and
signage. The grant award went
to the county.

ALL NEW FOR 2008!
WAKULLA &LEON
COUNTIES
STREET GUIDE
MAPBOOK
Available from:
HARVEST PRINTING
& COPY CENTER
1612 Capital Cir. N.E.,
Tallahassee, FL 32308
Phone
(850) 681-2488


GEO-ENERGY
Since 1985
CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:
S MacCLEAN
WATERTREATMENT
SYSTEMS

LEASING
SALES & SERVICE
COMPLETE LINE
SOF EQUIPMENT

WE SOLVE JUST ABOUT
ANY WATER PROBLEM
926-8116


lands and other natural re-
sources. She faces Mike Stewart
in November.
In the District 5 race, Lynn
Artz will make an excellent
commissioner with her well-
rounded experience in numer-
ous areas through her com-
munity volunteering activities,
officials said. Most importantly,
Artz has a strong understand-
ing of the issues affecting water
quality and the health of the
springs. Artz will bring to the
commission fresh ideas that
will include perspectives from
all sides.
The Big Bend Sierra Club is
an affiliation of the national
Sierra Club and encompasses
nine surrounding counties in-
cluding Wakulla and Franklin
The Sierra Club is the largest
and oldest environmental orga-
nization in the country. There
are more than 1,200 members
in the Big Bend Sierra Club
including more than 70 in
Wakulla County.


Frcom the De.,sk
ql the" Public
Library




Doug Jones
A special performance by
singer/songwriter Loma Brace-
well will take place at the library
on Thursday, Oct. 9 at 7 p.m.
Bracewell brings her folk rock/
acoustic/folk musical talents
to Wakulla for a concert sure
to please a wide audience. The
program is sponsored by the
State of Florida, Department of
State, Division of Cultural Af-
fairs, the Florida Arts Council,
and the National Endowment
for the Arts.
A native of the Tampa Bay
area, Bracewell is a seasoned
singer-songwriter with a power-
ful and distinctive alto voice, a
fresh and timely perspective on
life, and a resume that reads like
that of someone twice her age.
She has performed more than
1,000 engagements, has released
five full-length CDs on her own
label Braced Well Records, and
has toured Europe three times.
Bracewell's thoughtful origi-


nal songs and her fresh spins
and insightful commentary on
a wide variety of cover tunes
have endeared her to audiences
and critics alike. The 24-year-old
singer/songwriter has toured
extensively in the United States
and Europe and shared stages
with artists such as Amy Grant,
Melissa Ferrick and Heart.
Chrissie Hynde, after watch-
ing Bracewell play an opening
set for her band, The Pretenders,
called her "a beautiful person
and a spirited player."
Bracewell is also an educator
and an activist who understands
how the power of music can
unite people for a cause. She is
the founder, sponsor and host
of "On this Earth: Art to Inform,
Enlighten and Empower," a
series of concerts embracing
themes of racial justice, sexual
justice and religious tolerance.
Not content to simply sing
about the issues that obsess her,
Bracewell also lectures at col-
leges and universities through-
out the United States on topics
such as gender inequality and
violence against women. Her
workshop, "Love 101: Rethink-
ing love, sex and power" was
voted a Top Ten Session at the
Florida Junior and Community


Horse-O-Ween slated


The Wakulla County Horse-
man's Association will present
it's Annual Horse-O-Ween &
Fall Carnival Saturday, Oct 18,
from 10 anm. to 10 p.m. with 12
hours of"Frightful Excitementi"
A horse and human costume
contest will be held at 10 a.m.
There will be fun for the
whole family during WCHA's
regular noon Speed Show.
Games are $2 each and
the costume contest is $5.
The games include horse-n-
rider, egg-n-spoon race, and
the wheelbarrow race. All age
groups are invited at 10 a.m.
Cake walk, pipe cow roping,
children games at 12 p.m.
Bare back buck, sack race, flag
race, three legged race. musical
horses. Pifiata at 3 p.m. (kids
up to 7 years old), toilet paper
race, face painting and carnival
games throughout the day.
There will be $1 raffles and an
open concession stand.


For more information, call
Karen at 421-3714 or Tracie
528-2588. The event will be
held at the Livestock Pavilion,
Crawfordville Horse Arena (be-
hind Azalea Park next to Fire
Department).


Lorna Bracewell at Elevate Coffeehouse, St Petersburg,
Photo by Cliff Rice.


Colleges 2006 SGA state confer-
ence. In 2006, Bracewell spoke
at the Florida Coalition Against
Domestic Violence state confer-
ence and served on a panel at
the National Communication
Association national confer-
ence.
Bracewell is a member of
the Florida State Touring Pro-
gram and the Southern Artistry
Registry two recognition of her
outstanding contributions to
the arts and education in Florida
and the Southeast U.S.


Recently, she was an Interna-
tional Songwriting Competitionr
Semi-Finalist in her category in
the International Songwriting
Competition for her song "On
this Earth." This was truly an
International competition, with'
entrants from Ireland, Australia,
England, The Netherlands, Swe-
den, Canada, Germany, and the'
United States.
For more information about
the program, please contact'
Doug Jones at 926-9685.


1983-


Dear Ms. Newsome,


It is with heartfelt sympathy that Loffer condolences to you for the loss of daughter, Jessica. Since there are no words that
could possibly give justice to your loss, I hope that it is acceptable to say that I am very sorry.

As we discussed at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, this letter contains information about the recipients of Jessica's gift. It
may be difficult for you to read now, but I hope that in the weeks and months ahead you will be comforted by the knowl-
edge that your daughter has helped others.

Jessica's lungs saved the life of a 61-year-old man from New Jersey. He has suffered from an enlarged heart. He is mar-
ried and has five children and multiple grandchildren. Upon transplantation, Jessica's heart showed excellent function and
the recipient has already been discharged to home. His medical team is pleased and expects the organ function to remain


excellent.

Jessica's liver saved the life of a 55-year-old man from Georgia. He suffered from liver cancer and had been hospitalized
while awaiting his transplant. He is married and has two children. He has been discharged home and his medical team
remains confident that he will make a full recovery and return to a much improved quality of life.


Your daughter's left kidney was transplanted into 46-year-old man from Florida. He suffered renal failure because of until we see you again, your beautiful
diabetes and had been awaiting a kidney transplant since August 2007. He is married and has two adult sons. He en- smile and spirit will keep us going,there
joys biking and youth ministry. He is no longer requiring hemodialysis and his medical team is confident he will make will never be another one like you,
a full recovery. we love and think of you everyday.
Twinkle, Twinkle little star
Jessica's right kidney and pancreas were donated to a 45-year-old man from central Florida. He suffered from diabetes We Love you always
and had been requiring dialysis three times a week for over a year. He is married, has two small children and enjoys Mo Kyli, Seed
boating and camping with his family. He has been discharged home, no longer requires dialysis and his medical team is Mom, Kayli, & Spee
confident that he will continue to recover.

On behalf of LifeQuest and this fortunate recipient, I would like to say thank you. Your courageous decision to honor your ,
daughter's decision to donate life in the midst of your grief is a true reflection of your family's generosity and compassion.
Although I did not know Jessica, I will remember her as a generous and giving person.

det patience o0 her work in you all gooD is slow to {uit.
V5ear you trials without complaint, Call each man your frienD.
Save your strength for patience wait not to waste in teats, wAmen.

V^~~~ G-^**'*^^'!:s=:^^('"''"^


Big Bend Sierra Club

endorses Wakulla

board candidates


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008 Page 7A


People


It's Wakulla Hazardous Waste Day time again!


Have you been saving your
compact fluorescent bulbs so
you can get rid of them at Haz-
ardous Waste Day?
Well, that's good because
we're about to have another


onel On Oct. 18, Household
Hazardous Waste Day will be
held at 340 Trice Lane, located
right next to the ambulance
service.
This is a coordinated effort
of your county commission-
ers, ESG, Jefferson County
Solid Waste, Wal-Mart and
Keep Wakulla County Beautiful.
Large signs will point you to the
entrance and people will direct
you where to get rid of your
household hazardous wastes.
Disposal will begin at 8 a.m.
and end at 1 p.m. Businesses


may come in between 12 and
1 p.m. and must sign up in ad-
vance by calling 926-3153.
Winter is coming, so it's a
great time to clean out your
closets, shed and garage of all
those sort-of empty cans of
stuff you've kept even though
you may not remember the con-
tents. It doesn't matter if you
can't recall what's in the cans.
Chemist Rosemary Bottcher
knows how to figure out what
you bring.
Will we be taking tires again?


Yesl
Once again, Richard Russell
of Wal-Mart has arranged to
send us a semi-truck to take
tires right there at Trice Lane
beside the hazardous house-
hold waste items. Richard has
gone to some great lengths
to help us this way, so please
say "thank you" the next time
you see him. There is a limit
of 10 tires per household at
this event.
You can get rid of old paint,
solvent, pesticides, fertilizers,


oven cleaners, aerosol cans,
fluorescent bulbs, batteries, old
gas, old oil, pool chemicals, and
so much more. Have you looked
at your shelves recently? Are
you wondering about those
new compact fluorescent bulbs?
They are also considered haz-
ardous wastes, so don't forget
to bring them.
Old electronics can come,
too. Do you have an old com-
puter that cost a bundle, but
you know is now obsolete?
Did you keep it because of the


original cost? Well, take it off
the shelf now and get rid of
it. The computer will never be
new again, and is not attractive
as a doorstop.
For the next two weeks, we'll
have ads in The Wakulla News
to remind you of Household
Hazardous Waste Day. Again,
it's on Saturday, Oct. 18 from 8
a.m. until 1 p.m. Put your cans,
bottles and bulbs into the car
on Friday, and you'll be ready to
get it over with early on Satur-
day. We'll be looking for youl


Boyd votes for

Florida tax relief


Congressman Alien Boyd (D-
North Florida) voted for fiscally
responsible legislation to extend
and expand tax incentives for
renewable energy, spur American
innovation and business invest-
ment and provide tax relief for
Florida's families. The Renewable
Energy and Job Creation Tax Act
(HR 7060) also extends the state
sales tax deduction through 2009,
allowing the people of Florida to
include the tax deduction in their
2008 and 2009 tax returns. Unlike
the Senate version of the bill, this
legislation is fully paid for and
would not add to the deficit
"I am proud to support this
fiscally responsible and fair tax
relief package, which will invest
in a renewable energy future and
put money back in the pockets
of North Florida's families," said
Congressman Boyd.
"The House of Representa-
tives has proven time and time
again that it is possible to provide
sensible tax relief without adding
to the deficit or sending the bill
to China."
To help reduce our depen-
dence on foreign oil, HR 7060
would increase the production of
renewable fuels and renewable
electricity and encourage greater
energy efficiency. The legislation


extends and expands tax incen-
tives for renewable electricity,
energy, and fuel, as well as for
plug-in hybrid cars and energy
efficient homes, buildings, and
appliances.
In addition to the sales tax
deduction, the bill would ex-
tend other expiring temporary
tax provisions, including the
research and development credit
the deduction for out-of-pocket
expenses for teachers, and the
deduction for qualified tuition
expenses. HR 7060 also provides
more than $3 billion of additional
tax relief for individuals through
an expansion of the refundable
child tax credit
"This bill extends important
energy, business, and individual
tax incentives in a responsible
way that does not require the
United States to borrow ad-
ditional money from foreign
countries," Boyd stated. "In this
financial climate now more
than ever before we must pay
for our priorities. I encourage
the Republicans in the Senate,
including Florida's Senator Mel
Martinez, to join with us in doing
what is morally and fiscally right
- stop bucking fiscal responsibil-
ity and start supporting fiscally
responsible tax relief"


Fight fuel costs with homebrewed biodiesel


As farms and communi-
ties search for ways to cope
with high and fluctuating
energy costs, some are suc-
cessfully making their own
fuel from agricultural prod-
ucts or byproducts.
Small Farm Sustainable
Biofuels Workshops provide
a series of alternative bio-
fuels education and hands-
on training sessions at
the grassroots level. These
learning sessions are pro-,
vided to equip rural and
urban farming populations
toward a thriving sustain-
able development.,
If you have completed
a beginners' biofuels class
come out and participate in
the Intermediate- Advanced
level Biofuels Workshop/
Trouble Shooting Session
that will take place on Oct.
14, at Crescent Moon Or-
ganic Farm in Sopchoppy.
The renowned Maria Alo-
vert will be the facilitator.
Maria 'Girl Mark' Alovert is
a biodiesel production tech-
nology consultant based in
North Carolina.
Registration is $20 per
person, including lunch.
Registration deadline is
Oct. 10.
The Oct. 19 event will be


Restiulc Ice Sami Puior CakeSh(


Enjoy Full Service Family Dining at Fast Food prices &
Supporter a local business while your at it.


held from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Successful small farmer
Jack Simmons of Crescent
Moon Organic Farm will


talk about the sustainability
of alternative biofuels at the
small farm level. The event
includes an organic meth-


ods farm tour. Registration
is $20 at Crescent Moon Or-
ganic Farm, Crescent Moon
Trail, Sopchoppy.


WAKULLA COUNTY
NOTICE OF FAIR HOUSING ORDINANCE
This is to advise you that the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners
has passed a fair housing ordinance which prohibits discrimination in the sale,
rental, and financing of dwellings, and in other housing-related transactions,
based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status, and handicap.
The County's fair housing ordinance includes provisions for citizens' complaints
if they feel they have been discriminated against, and provisions to investigate
complaints, and, if they deem the complaint is justified, to ask the state's attorney
to prosecute the persons) the complaint is made against. Additionally, the
County periodically evaluates all the local ordinances and the practices of the
local lending institutions, realtors, and apartment complexes to insure all are in
compliance with state and federal fair housing laws. If you have any questions or
concerns relating to Wakulla County's fair housing ordinance, you may contact
Eva Thorpe, Grants Coordinator, at 850-926-9500. If you think your rights have
been violated, you may write a letter or telephone the following HUD office:
Mid-Atlantic Office
Fair Housing Hub
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
The Wanamaker Building
100 Penn Square East
Philadelphia, PA 19107-9344
Telephone 215-656-0662 or 888-799-2085
Fax 215-656-3419 TTY 215-656-3450
E-mail: Complaints_office_03@hud.gov







JIMMIE DOYLE

THE DOYLE PHILOSOPHY, PART 3 *

We All Deserve To Be Treated Fairly

By Our Government
All people are created equal and should be treated equally.
SA code of ethics for the County Commission and all its
employees should be adopted and enforced.
Our public records policy should contain procedures for
preserving, requesting and releasing public records, including
emalls.
All speakers at public meetings should' be allocated equal time
to express their opinions, even If doing so requires continuing
Meetings until the next day.
County Commission meetings should be held in rooms with
enough space for the number of people expected to attend.
All County Commission meetings should be held after 5 p.m.
Meeting agendas should be posted in public places throughout
the county, such as fire stations.

Protect Wakulla's Character.

Promote Wakulla's Prosperity

ELECT


JIMMIE


DOYLE
FOR

COUNTY,


COMMISSION

DISTRICT 3
(850) 926-7869
Jimmiedoyle@gmail.com
www.JimmleDoyle.com
112 Old Still Road, Crawfordville, FL
32327

Political advertisement paid for and approved byJimmie Doyle, No Party Alfillation, for Wakulla County Commisslon, District 3


I














Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008

Gardening event set for Oct. 18 Obituaries
C- tnfim id frnm


Damayan's Second Annual
Autumn Splendor, Garden
Tour Benefit is Oct. 18, and
will showcase a celebrity
speaker, Sharon Lovejoy, an
award winning garden writer
and New York Times syndi-
cated author of seven books.
Lovejoy has appeared on
countless radio and television
shows, and has published
articles for magazines includ-
ing Woman's Day, American
Horticulturalist and The Herb
Companion.
Damayan's mission is to
educate communities and pro-
mote ecological literacy and
healthy living through hands-
on, organic gardening. They
are committed to improving
the quality of food available
to low-income citizens and
school children through fam-
ily gardens, community gar-


dens, and edible schoolyards.
In addition to providing a
means of consuming healthy
and wholesome foods, Dama-
yan garden programs encour-
age self-reliance, leadership,
and systematic thinking in
its students, participants, arid
volunteers.
The fundamental concept
behind the Damayan Garden
Project is "to not simply worry
about another's hunger, but
to treat it as your own." They
are asking community lead-
ers, businesses, and citizens
to help them in their effort
to feed the Tallahassee com-
munity with fresh, organically
grown food.
Your contribution to Dama-
yan recognizes you or your
business as an integral part
of improving the health and
quality of life for citizens


in our community. In addi-
tion, Damayan is a non-profit
501(c)(3) corporation, so any
donations made are tax-de-
ductible.
Tickets are $35.00 each and
include: lecture with Sharon
Lovejoy, a self guided tour
and continental breakfast.
Tickets can be purchased at
Tallahassee Nurseries, Native
Nurseries and Esposito's in
Tallahassee, Purple Martin
Nurseries in Crawfordville
and Just Fruits and Exotics in
Medart.
Lovejoy will be speaking at
United Church of Tallahassee,
1834 Mahan Dr., Tallahas-
see, Oct. 18, at 10 a.m. A self
guided tour will follow from
12 p.m. to 4 p.m.
For more information go to
www.damayan.org.


Local mosquito fight continues


Tropical Storm Fay brought
Wakulla County much needed
rain. But with the rain came a
lot of unwanted mosquitoes.
If you would like to have
your house sprayed for adult
mosquitoes please call the
Wakulla County Health De-
partment (WCHD) at 926-2558,
extension 159.
When calling, please leave
your name, a return phone
number in case the WCHD has
questions, and the physical
address of the location need-
ing spraying. The address
will be added to the location
list for the next spraying in
the area.
Residents can also do this
online at the WCHD's web


site www.wakullahealth.com.
Alternatively, you can also tell
the WCHD if you don't want
to be sprayed, via the above
number or web site.
The way the adult spray-
ing program works is that
the WCHD will only spray
the homes that request the
spraying. "We respect that not
all people in our county want
spraying done," officials said.
"Therefore, we would encour-
age you to speak with your
neighbors and get them to
call in requests, too. This will
make the application more
effective when spraying an
area. On average, we are able
to complete your spray request
within three to five days."


"Also, if you have swells or
shallow ponds that are hold-
ing water for more than four
days, we will come out and
apply larvicide (to kill the
mosquito larva). This larvicide
will not harm fish or other
vertebrates. It is effective for
up to 180 days, thereby giving
a chance for the water to dry
up or be absorbed into the
ground."
On the web site residents
may tell WCHD about any
wild bee hives near an address
of which you are aware. Near
these address they will be
very diligent about spraying at
times that will have the least
affect on the hive(s).


Gulf Specimen features turtles


Gulf Specimen Marine Lab
in Panacea has added new ex-
hibits at the facility, according
to facility director and owner
Jack Rudloe.
The exhibits include a sec-
tion on What Sea Turtles Eat
with a green sea turtle model,
a hawksbill sea turtle and
sponge exhibit with a model
of the turtle, a leatherback
turtle and jellyfish exhibit,


models of a Kemps Ridley
sea turtle and turtle sculptor
Tom McFarland's loggerhead
hatchling diorama.
The program is part of the
Florida Sea Turtle License
Plate Grant Program.
The lab hours are 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. Monday through Friday,
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday
and 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. on
Sunday. Adults are $7.50 and


children up to age 11 are $5.
Children under age 3 are free.


On Friday, Oct 17, at the
Harvey-Young Farm, the
Wakulla Democratic Executive
Committee, the local branch
of the Florida Democratic
Party, is hosting an event for
everyone to celebrate the
Democratic ticket
Tickets are just $50 and will
be available at the WCDEC
Headquarters behind Piz-
za Hut in Crawfordville or
from any WCDEC member or
Democratic Candidate. Con-
gressman Allen Boyd is the
keynote speaker, but many
other Democratic stars have
been invited and are expected
to attend.
"The Democratic Commit-
tee believes that it is impor-
tant that we elect candidates
who are proud to run with
party affiliation as Demo-
crats," DEC officials said. "Lo-
cally, we support continuing
the work that our incumbent

Voters continue
to buy cookies
The cookie results are rolling
in. Myra Jean's Cake and Ice
Cream in Crawfordville is one
of many bakeries nationally
selling John McCain and Barack
Obama sugar cookies in antici-
pation of the General Election
for president on Nov. 4.
The results, through Friday,
Oct. 3, had Obama in the lead
at Myra Jean's by a margin of
243 to 132. Nationally, Obama
has the lead 11,836 to 8,874
as 20,710 cookie votes were
purchased.
For up-to-date results, go on-
line to http://www.rbanetcom/
2008cookiepoll.htm#Results.
Bakeries participating in the
cookie poll are also listed.

F.Y.I.

"Last year David Miller
spent $1,362.93 of
-your tax money on FOOD.
'if teachers want food for
a get-together, it comes out
of their own pocket.
He also charged you $12,717,
for his organization dues.


candidates have accomplished
and support electing three
new Democratic candidates
for the county commission
and the Democrat for Supervi-
sor of Elections.
"Our committee also works
to elect Democrats to the
state and federal levels of
government. The Democratic
Party promotes a progressive
platform of protecting the
environment, supporting our
local business community,
and bringing more jobs to
Wakulla County."
For more information check
out our website www.wakul-
lademocrats.org.


DPrn, A


LtIIIIIIU IIUI U I Mj, a -r-a I


Charles D. Canellas
Charles Dexter Canellas,
64, of Panacea died Monday,
Oct. 6 in Tallahassee.
He had lived in Wakulla
County for 15 years after
moving from West Virginia.
He was retired from the U.S.
Marine Corps and loved to
fish and collect coins. He
loved his dogs.
Survivors include his wife
of three years, Carol Canellas
of Panacea; a brother, Jonny
Canellas of Maryland; two
half-brothers, Sonny Canellas
and Mike Canellas of Beck-
ley, W.V.; two half -sisters,
Gertrude Hartley and Derma
Marina, both of Beckley, W.V.;
and a very close friend, Pat-
rick Rentz.
Harvey-Young Funeral
Home in Crawfordville was
in charge of the arrange-
ments.

Craig S, Tolson
Craig Samuel Tolson, 31, of
Crawfordville died Saturday,
Oct. 4, of injuries sustained
in an automobile accident.
A memorial service was
held Wednesday, Oct. 8, at
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville.
A lifelong resident of the
area, he was a graduate of
Wakulla High School. He
loved computers, animals,
yardwork and reading, and
was a collector.
Survivors include his
mother and stepfather, Deb-
ra and Mike Gatlin of Craw-
fordville; a brother, Thomas
Austin Long of Crawfordville;
a sister, Kaylee Tolson of
Ocala; his maternal grandpar-
ents, Joyce Lovett of Blacks-
hear. Ga. and Donald Brown
of Waycross, Ga.; and his
paternal grandmother, Callie


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Simpson of Tallahassee.
Harvey-Young Funeral
Home in Crawfordville was
in charge of the arrange-
ments.

Ivan Church

hosts

Homecoming
Pastor Cooksey and the
church family extend an
invitation to the public to
hear Nashville's own male
gospel group, Ernie Couch
& Revival.
The group will be minis-
tering at Ivan Assembly of
God's Homecoming 2008.


The service will begin at 11
a.m. with lunch being served
after the morning service.
The Church is located at 202
Ivan Church Road.
Ernie Couch & Revival ex-
emplifies what good gospel
music is all about. This live
band performs their music
in a unique blend of styles
to ensure everyone present
enjoys the concert. EC&R
is well known across the
United States and Canada for
its high-energy brand of live
music. Many describe the
group as refreshingly differ-
ent, and a lot of fun.
For more information,
please contact Ivan Assembly
of God at 926-4826.


NOTICE OF

PUBLIC HEARING

'Ihe Wakulla County Board of County
Commissioners proposes to adopt the
following by ordinance and has scheduled
a Public Hearing regarding the following
before the Wakulla County Board of
County Commissioners on Monday,
November 3, 2008, beginning at 6:00
PM, unless otherwise noted below or as
time permits. All public hearings are held
in the County Commission Chambers
located west of the County Courthouse at
29 Arran Road, Crawfordvillc, Florida
32327. Interested parties are invited to
attend and present testimony.

1. Comprehensive Plan Text
Amendment Application:
CP 08-01


Applicant:

Proposal:


I earnings Required:


Wakulla County

text change to Future
Land Use Element

County Commission
11/03/08 -a) 6:00PM


Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any
related public record files may be viewed at the
Count\ Planning Department located at 3093
Cral Cord ville High\Hwa.. Cra wfordville. FL
32327. 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F: Phone (850) 926-
3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of
a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript
or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits
presented at said hearings. Persons needing
special access considerations should call the"
Board Office at least 48 hours before the date for
scheduling purposes. The Board Office may be
contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.


Charlie would like to meet you and your family.

OU-





,,.,* ~' sm nr


Democratic party-

seeks new voters


PSSl 4 *2-XI"LA














THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008 Page 9A


Sheriff's Report


A man who reported the
theft of tools and a rifle from
a shed at his Summerwind
Circle home, had his property
recovered a couple of days
after making the report.
The victim in the case called
the sheriff's office on Saturday,
Oct. 4, after he noticed his gas-
powered drill next to his fence.
He checked his other property
and noticed other missing
items from a shed, including
a Browning pump-action .22
Magnum rifle; a green air com-
pressor with 50 feet of blue air
hose; a Makita circular saw;
and a DeWalt Sawzall recipro-
cating saw. Deputy Nicholas
PetowsRy reported the value
of the items at $1,025.
The next day, Petowsky
reported he was contacted by
Leon County Sheriff's Deputy
Darrin Wood, who said he
had recovered two of the four
stolen items the Mikita and
DeWalt saws and that a
suspect was enroute to him
with the air compressor. Two
suspects were named.
On Monday. Oct. 6, Wood
contacted Petwosky to report
that the .22 Magnum rifle had
been located, and that the
person in possession of it said
he had purchased it on Sept.
26 at the County Line Bar. The
purchaser was unable to name
the person he bought it from.
but said he was confident he
could identify the seller in a
photo lineup.
The case is ongoing.
In other activity reported by
the sheriff's office this week:
A woman reported that
her blue 1965 Ford Galaxie
sedan had been taken and had
likely been crushed for scrap.
On Friday, Oct. 3, the wom-
an went to the sheriff's office
to report that, back in March.
the Galaxie had been taken to
Herring Circle in Crawfordville
where a man had agreed to do
some work on it. The man was
sent to prison, though, before
completing the work, and the
last time she saw the car was
in August.
In late September, the wom-


an said she learned that the
Galaxie had been sold to Hol-
lis Hopkins, who is in the car
parts business. On her way to
file a report with the sheriff's
office, she said she got a call
that Hopkins wanted to meet
with her.
During the conversation
with Hopkins, the woman
reportedly was told that "Your
car is probably in Japan" and "I
messed up, I crushed your car."
She gave Hopkins an estimate
of the car's value and he asked
for "two or three days to get
my financing." Several days
later, she contacted him and
Hopkins asked for a few more
days. After that time passed,
she said, she has not heard
from him.
Reportedly, Hopkins' son,
Heath Hopkins, wrote a bill of
sale to a 49-year-old Tallahas-
see woman who sold him the
car. The car was reportedly
crushed around the first of
September. The value of the
antique car was put at $6,000.
A woman shopping at
Winn-Dixie on Sunday, Oct. 5,
reported her purse stolen from
her grocery cart. The victim
was reportedly distracted by
a woman who approached
her and began talking about
packages of cheese. When
the woman abruptly left, the
victim realized her purse was
gone.
Deputy Andrew Vass got
a description of a man and
woman from the victim and
a cashier who saw a "scruffy"
white male and white female
leave the store in a rush. The
male was described as in his
30s, thin, unshaven, around
five feet, 10 inches tall. The
woman was described as very
tan, with brown hair, medium
build and cradling a purse.
The victim said her purse
contained $23.50 in cash,
credit and debit cards, check-
book, keys, and a Nokia cel-
lular phone.
On Monday, Oct. 6, Detec-
tive Jason Newlin looked at
the videotapes from store's
security cameras, but reported


there was no clear view of the
suspects.
Later in the day. Deputy
Eddie Wester was contacted
about a purse found on the
side of the road. A man said
he saw the purse while exiting
the convenience store at U.S.
Highway 319 and Bloxham
Cutoff and retrieved it and
called law enforcement.
The victim in the Winn-Di-
xie purse snatching confirmed
it was hers. The only items
missing, she said, was her cash
and cell phone.
Deputy Jeremy Johnston
reported observing a white
car traveling west on Highway
61 at a high rate of speed on
Wednesday, Oct. 1, around
8:15 p.m. The deputy's radar
indicated the car was going
58 miles per hour in a 45 mph
zone. He pulled the vehicle
over at the intersection of
61 and Big White Oak Drive
and reportedly saw a bag of
marijuana on the floorboard
behind the passenger seat.
Deputy Johnston asked the
driver of the car, William L.
Baxley, 52, if he had marijuana
in the car. Baxley reportedly
answered, "no." The deputy
told Baxley that he could see
marijuana in plain view in the
car and advised him that he
now had probable cause to
search the car.
Johnston allegedly found
a plastic bag with a green,
leafy substance consistent
with marijuana and a silver
pipe. He issued a Notice to
Appear citation for Baxley to
appear in misdemeanor court
in November on a charge of
possession of less than 20
grams and possession of drug
paraphernalia. Johnston also
gave the man a verbal warning
for the speeding.
The marijuana was weighed
at the sheriff's office and
amounted to 6.5 grams.
Less than an hour later
at the same location, Deputy
Johnston observed a white car
traveling on Highway 61 that
his radar registered going 62
mph in a 45 mph zone. The


k Dear Voters.

I believe I possess the qualiies necess.r to help mo'\e our countN
for\ ward As a proven leader and pioblenm seoler. I amn e.agei to apple\
my experience in coping ith the man\ issues facing our county.
Haj inmg served as a \V\akulla CountI Conlmisioner for t'o term
before. I already\ undeist.ind the workin. of the boatd and loc.il go \-
ernnent. Being boin and rii'.ed heie. I desper.itel. \\ ant to 'ee oui
rural %Ja) of life maintained The challenge for all of u,' i'1 to a.chMlCe
this by controlling the ine\iiable grom\\h. I am confident thai. our Iural
\ai of life c.in be maint.iined while e iniain.gin beneficial gro\thi
while e some na \-,a.ler \\ ill b.ilk :it ni interest. in the counts. I
can assure \ou m\ heart i,, here in \\kull.i Count\. During ins :ib-
sence from the board omer the pa.,l foiL \enr'.. I hWae had ample time
to reflect on nany of the decisions I mide a,, commissioner While
I kno\ I accompli-shed man% good thlngs for the count. I also real-
ize there are mand things I could ha e done much different. You
live and learn and gain valuablee u indom and insight. I kno\ \\hat
Amendment One is going to do to our small county, and I believe
that resourceful thinking, not mone\. is the ans\\er In its current
fragmented s.ate. the board Is ineffecue in iits pursuit of the county's
business. I %\ant to help create a sense of unitN, harmony, and under-


1.1.


standing between the commissioners. \While disagreement can be
Healthh. I believe it's possible to eitrict the best elements of all ideas''
. presented b\ all concerned and make decision that are best ar for the fo :[
C Count. It's impossible to make everyone happy. but I believe that a- ,
San elected official \ou must do \\hat's best for the counts in the long.
." run For the pat 15 Nears I ha'e t.iught l
youngg leader, in out high school l
the %.alue of character and a
instilline in them the ideals
of' honor and commitment. I
belie\te \\ith all my heart that
there are no higher ideal
S' than that of one',, ch.iracles l
and inteernts. Thi, i., the main.
,'teaon I c.ln be II an ',set to
our local goei nmenit buds. ,
Thank )ou for N oUn suppou

Sinc r6

Mike Stewart




"Political advertisement. paid for and approved b hi Mlke
Ste\%art. Democrat, for Count\ Commis.sioner District 3


,fy),b,' %.. ,,. ,
.,,?..; -,:! -... ..',, ,


car was pulled over at the in-
tersection of 61 and Big White
Oak Drive.
According to the incident
report, Johnston noticed a
smell of burnt marijuana com-
ing from inside the vehicle. He
asked the driver, Renee Gid-
dens, 35, of Chattahoochee, if
she had marijuana in the car.
She answered, "No," and the
deputy informed her that he
had probable cause to search
her car because of the smell of
marijuana.
Department of Transpor-
tation Officer John Schilling
arrived on the scene and
watched Giddens as Johnston
searched the car and allegedly
found a marijuana roach and a
pack of rolling papers. When
Johnston confronted her with
what he found, Officer Schil-
ling allegedly saw her take
her hand out of her pocket
and drop a plastic baggie on
the ground and step on it.
Johnston had the woman lift
up her foot and recovered the
baggie.
He issued Giddens a Notice


to Appear in misdemeanor
court on charges of possession
of marijuana less than 20
grams and possession of drug
paraphernalia, and gave her a
verbal warning for speeding.
The marijuana was weighed
at the sheriff's office and
amounted to 4.0 grams.
On Saturday, Oct. 4,
Deputy Casey Whitlock was
working routine traffic enforce-
ment at County Line Road and
Ashley Hall Road when he saw
a green Pontiac sedan with a
headlight out. He conducted
a traffic stop and allegedly
observed the driver slip into
the backseat. There was a pas-
senger in the passenger seat.
Deputy Whitlock reportedly
approached the car and asked
the passenger for ID, and then
asked if he was driving the
vehicle. The passenger said he
didn't know.
The alleged driver of the
vehicle was in the backseat
pretending to be asleep and
ignoring Whitlock's request
for a driver license. When
he finally identified himself


as Robert Sims and his birth
date, the deputy ran it through
dispatch, and it came back that
his license was suspended for
failure to pay traffic fines.
Sims reportedly said he
was aware of the suspension,
and was arrested and taken
into custody for driving while
license suspended or revoked,
a misdemeanor.
County park officials
reported criminal mischief on
Thursday, Oct. 2, after discov-
ering someone shot a hole in a
restroom door at the Levy Bay
boat ramp in Panacea.
Deputy Lindsay Allen re-
ported that there was a large
hole in the center of the door
with other small holes around
it, consistent with a shotgun
blait.
The sheriff's office report-
ed 972 calls for service this
week.
Note to our readers: The
people who are reported as
charged with crimes in this
column have not yet been to
trial and are therefore inno-
cent until proven guilty.


ADVERTISEMENT

Cutting employee benefits

while defending a "luxury"

budget item: It's WRONG.

by Charlie Creel


Questions about the sheriff's
budget have led me to make the
following pledge: As your sheriff,
1 will call for a full comprehensive
audit of the Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office spending as soon
as I am sworn in. I intend to break
with practices of the past.
As 1 continue my door-to-door


campaign for sheriff
of Wakulla County,
many residents are
bringing up questions
about Sheriff David
Harvey's last-minute
request for an extra
$214,000 of our tax
dollars.
Sheriff Harvey
(like the other
constitutional offi-
cers) had made a deal


to keep his


budget request to this year's levels,
but, in a surprise move, Sheriff
Harvey came before the County
Commission meeting Sept. 22 and
told commissioners he would have
to cut his accreditation program
for the jail if he didn't get an
extra $214,000.
The sheriff tied the housing
of federal prisoners to Florida's
accreditation for county jails. For
those of you who might not know,
Wakulla County is supposed to
get additional revenue for housing
federal detainees criminal aliens
awaiting deportation.
Commissioner George Green'
put the important question directly
to Sheriff Harvey by asking him
if failing to get theextra $214,000
would make the'jail immediately
lose its accreditation. The sheriff
said, "...essentially it would, yes."
Sheriff Harvey's statement to
the County Commissioners for
more money is false, and here are
the reasons why:
First, jails for federal prisoners
must meet U. S. jail standards -
National Detention Standards not
Florida jail standards. It is false
for Sheriff Harvey to suggest that
Florida accreditation would affect
the federal detainee program.
Second, the Wakulla County jail .
was accredited this summer for
another three years until October


2011. It is false for Sheriff Harvey to
say that not getting an extra $214,000
this year would have an immediate
effect on accreditation.
Third, Sheriff Harvey himself
is the chairperson and one of six
directors of the Florida Correc-
tions Accreditation Commission.
As chairperson and director of the
Corrections Ac-
creditation Commis-
larvey sion, no one knows
es better than Sheriff
County's David Harvey that
- and his statements to
property the county.. com.-
Smissioners were false.i
ers Last week's Wakulla
nation. News reported that
Sheriff Harvey said
he had cut his budget


by eliminating two paid county holi-
days for sheriff's office personnel,
$39,000 in overtime, and uniform dry
cleaning expenses for employees.
Now think about this: Sheriff
Harvey wants extra money to protect
a program that even he said is a
"luxury," while, at the same time, he
wants to cut spending that benefits
his own employees.
As your sheriff, I will manage
your money differently.
I will not misrepresent the facts
in order to get extra money from
Wakulla County's homeowners -
ourifamilies and business owners,
and I will put the employees of the
Wakulla County Sheriff's Office
before "luxury" spending.
Again, I make the following
pledge: I intend to break with
practices of the past.
My goal is to establish an open
administration.
I will open my budget for everyone
to see, not just a small "inside"
group, and I will be committed
to spending your money wisely,
efficiently, fairly and honestly.
Most importantly, I will be
truthful and open when I come
to the County Commission for
money. When county departments
are asked to cut, I will share in the
cost-cutting and do my part to use
your money wisely.
I ask for your support now and
your vote on Nov. 4.


ADVERTISEMENT
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Affiliation, for Sheriff
': :b'


Sheriff
owt
Wakulla (
residents
especially
tax payer
an expla


-mp
NMI,


S I .














Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008


Outdoors


Fall has arrived and brought along some windy conditions


From The Dock
BY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL


Fall is definitely in the air
and the fall air brought some
wind this past weekend. De-
spite the wind, plenty of fish
are being caught
With the water tempera-
tures dropping into the high
70s, grouper will start moving
in closer to shore and can be
caught trolling large Rapalas
or Mann's Stretch Baits. Reds
will start bunching up inshore


and trout will start moving in
around the oyster bars and
then up into the creeks. I was
talking with Mike Falk, Jr. the
other day and he said a lot of
the oldtimers are saying it's
going to be be a cold winter.
If that is the case the St.
Marks and Aucilla rivers may
support very good fishing this
winter. That's a while away
and now you need to concen-


trate on the flats and in close
around the oyster bars.
Ken Hobbs at Shell Island
Fish Camp was telling me last
week that their guides were
catching a lot of big trout and
had been fishing both east
and west of the Lighthouse.
They are using mostly live
shrimp and the Gulp.
Capt. Chris Oaks had a par-
ty of three out last week and
they came to the dock with 14
grouper, three amberjack and
a 45 and 52 pound cobia. Not
a bad trip.
Mark and Louise Prance
were out last week and as
soon as Louise dropped her
bait to the bottom she got cut
off. Mark had just finished rig-
ging his rod so he handed it


to her while he rerigged her.
As soon as she dropped down
she hooked into a big fish.
Twenty minutes later a 27-
pound cobia was in the box.
Tom Waites told me they
fished from shore late on Fri-
day and caught 24 and 25-inch
reds and some small trout.
They were fishing live shrimp
on the bottom.
On Tuesday, I went out
with Mark and Louise Prance
and we stopped and fished
a bunch of bait and bird on
the way out. The only thing
we caught were ladyfish. On
our way in we noticed some
Spanish jumping through the
bait so we stopped again and
this time caught a bunch of
Spanish. There was bait as far


as you could see and Spanish
everywhere. We started with
the Gulp and I switched over
to a small spoon and that's
what the Spanish wanted be-
cause it was about the same
size as the glass minnows that
they were feeding on. It was
flat calm and we were on the
first of the falling tide.
Last Wednesday, I took
Gary Redding from the neigh-
borhood out to see if he could
catch his first red. We used
live shrimp and we ended up
catching and releasing 11 reds
over 23 inches. Gary's first red
was about 10 inches long but
his next four were all over 23-
inches. He had never caught a
Spanish either, but on the way
in the fish just weren't there


like they had been the day
before. We were on our way in
and one of our neighbors, Ali-
cia Tatum was fighting what
looked to be a 26 or 27 inch
redfish. Her mother got the
net under it and she sure had
a big smile on her face.
Capt. James Burke told me
the trout were really biting
down around the Aucilla. His
brother Eddie was out last
week and he and his wife
came in with their limit of
trout and most were over 18
inches.
Remember to take those
kids fishing and know your
limits. Don't forget to leave
that float plan with someone.
Good luck and good fishing
How about those Nolesl


Land mammals leave tracks in the sand


BY GEORGE WEYMOUTH


BY GEORGE WEYMOUTH


There are about 35 land
walking mammals in the Big
Bend region and a number of
other reptiles, amphibians,
birds and insects that leave
their footsiee" imprints in the
sandy soil of our numerous
paths, lanes and cleared areas.
Reading their tracks can be an
art, a true skills Most hunters
and truly outdoor-oriented
people can identify the most
common and conspicuous
tracks: deer, raccoon, turkey
and perhaps even the differ-
ence between a medium-sized
dog and an adult bobcat.
Turkey hunters know how to
separate a tom's track from a
hen's, and many deer hunters
feel they can tell the sex of a
whitetail by the tracks and
possibly they can.
Clearly the best time to
study tracks is directly after
seeing the animal crossing
a road or just after sunrise
or before sunset. Then the
light's angle from the sun is
low enough to really show
the faintest of tracks. The toe
pads leave a definite shadow
and the animal's movement
or purpose can better be
understood by the way the
creature's weight displaces
the earth, which in turn will


be highlighted.
The ridges of sand around,
in front, or to the rear of a
track can tell us a lot As an
example, if a deer's track sud-
denly vanishes or ends, there
is a chance that by back track-
ing (how's that for a puni) you
will find a unique disturbance
of dirt at the last set of tracks,
and you will be able to see
when the deer decided to leap
to the left of the road and
in turn put more pressure in
the right side of its track as it
launched off to the left The
extra ridges of sand pushed
up by an animal's weight as
it changes direction are called
"pressure points" by a skilled
tracker.
A sudden stop or start, an
abrupt turn, extra weight, such
as a buck with an exception-
ally big horned rack putting
more weight on his front
hooves, can all be determined
by pressure points. Pressure
points can be skid marks,
kicked up dirt or sand, or the
sand being higher on one
side of the track, maybe even
cracked from being displaced
so vigorously.
When you find a set of
fresh tracks along the shoul-
der of a lane where vehicular


traffic won't wipe them out,
especially if you saw the crea-
ture make them, make a circle
around the track and then
study the track over the next
few days to see how it ages. As
it ages, the soil will eventually
level back out. If made in wet
clay, it may look fairly fresh
weeks later until rains finally
flatten it
Wind and sun will dry the
edges of even deep tracks and
in a matter of hours, in sandy
soil especially, the tracks
of even a heavy critter will
start leveling back out. Often
breezes will blow minute dirt
particles into the tracks as the
sand settles. These fragments
of leaves, flowers, pollens,
etc., will remain there even
after the soil has flattened
back out
So, if you've circled an
exceptionally nice track and
brought someone to show
it to, and all that remains is
the faint outline of a circle
you have made in the sand,
you can still show the circled
track by carefully scraping
the surface sand away from
the spot where you assume
the track is. Use the flat back
of your pocket comb, a stiff
plastic credit card from your
wallet, or whatever you can
come up with that has a flat,
sharp, straight edge. A 12-inch
ruler would be perfect
What happens is, as you
scrape away the top sand, the
track will once again be seen
perfectly outlined by the dark-
er pollens and minute little
dirt particles that have settled
into the track's impression.


Turkey hunters soon learn
to separate the track of a Great
Blue Heron or Great Egret from
a turkey's. Both will search out
frogs and other small prey by
walking around prairie and
cypress ponds and sloughs.
Like the smaller inch-long
tracks of the Bob-White Quail,
the turkey's hind toe barely
registers. On the other hand,
the heron-type birds that usu-
ally feed in water need a long
hind toe to support them on
the soft, muddy bottoms.
Some small mammals don't
register all of their toes either.
Our native Black Bear, for
instance, makes a bigger toe
mark with what would be our
little toe than it does with its
big toel In a sense then, the
big toe is on the outside of
the hind foot and sometimes
the inner hind foot toe barely
shows.
This is also true of the
rarely observed minks and
weasels: their thumb and
big toe often barely show in
their tracks. Of course, many
animals do actually have, in a
sense, a thumb and/or possi-
bly what could be called a big
toe, but they have moved over
millions of years apparently
up the leg, and have become
dew daws, so obvious on cats
and dogs, therefore failing to
show in their tracks.
Most mature doe deer and
their young rarely touch the
ground with their dew daws,
but a heavy bodied buck usu-
ally does, especially when he's
got a big rack and massive
neck while in rut


Hunter safety course offered in Leon County


The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission
(FWC) is offering a free hunter
safety course in Leon County.
The course will be in the
second-floor conference room
of the Farris Bryant Building,
620 South Meridian St. in Tal-
lahassee. Instruction will take
place 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Oct 14,
16, 21 and Oct 23. The range


portion of the class will be on
Oct. 25.
Children under 16 must
be accompanied by an adult
at all times. Students are
encouraged to bring a pencil
and paper with them to take
notes.
The hunter safety course is
required for anyone born on or
after June 1, 1975 to purchase

abltat for Humanit'
"Re-Store"
Shadeville Highway
926-4544
Open Taes. Sat. 9 a.m. 5 p.m.


a Florida hunting license. The
FWC course satisfies hunter
safety training requirements
for all other states and Cana-
dian provinces.
People interested in attend-
ing this course can register
online and obtain information
about future hunter safety
classes at MyFWC.com/hunt-
ered or by calling the FWC's


regional office in Panama City
at 850-265-3676.


Garden Herbs have

miraculous powers
By NANCY GEORGE sionflower, mint, thyme, and
Ornamental Horticulturist rose petals are good choices.
Since the beginning of his- Sachets will sweeten linens.
tory, the garden has been Lavender tucked into pillows
celebrated with the concept encourages restfulness.
that herbs have miraculous Herbs can be used in almost
powers. every way including hair prod-
There is a fascinating story ucts and skin care as well as
in every culture, from simple herbal salves that are fun to
people to philosophers that make and helpful in arthritis
holds these beliefs and em- and first aid treatments. Do a
braces the wisdom, that herbs little research; there are count-
help people in their daily lives, less books available that give
There are nearly as many ways useful information on how you
to incorporate herbs into a can safely use the plants that
garden, as there are herbs to you've gathered or grown.
choose from. Whether used Edibles
for flavorings, teas, fragrances Until recently, herbs were
or medicines, most herbs are the only medicines available. It
simple to grow, demanding is comforting to know that as
little while giving a lot we add herbs to enhance the *
What to Buy / Plant flavor of food, we are promot-
In addition to flower gar- ing health at the same time.
dens, there are healing gardens Garlic is said to be effective
and wholesome kitchen gar- in the treatment of colds. Tea
dens. It's a good idea to have made from rose hips is high in
a few herbs easily accessible vitamin C. Lemon grass tea is a
to the kitchen door, so you natural sedative. Drink in the
can snip a few to add while evening to enjoy a good night
cooking. sleep. Simply cut a few stalks., ;
A strawberry jar is perfect wash and boiling water, remove.
for this. Planting a different grass, sweeten to taste.
herb in each pocket keeps Pests
them controlled and available. Planting herbs as compan-
We all know the benefits of ion plants in your vegetable
aloe vera to sooth burns and and flower garden is a time-
stings, but cutting away each honored way of deterring
edge and the removing the pests. Chrysanthemums re-
green skin reveals a thick clear pel many insects, coriander
gel that has no taste when discourages aphids, lavender
eaten; and is very cost effective repels moths, basil deters flies
in comparison to buying aloe and tansy dissuades ants.
vera juice. Collect several vari- For Fun
eties of herbs such as: lemon Some of the old folklore
verbena, pineapple sage, and about herbs include: carrying.,
lemon balm to make a refresh- basil in your pocket to attract
ing iced beverage. money, and the tradition of
Uses hanging several ears of Indian
Place a bag of herbs in a corn on the front door before
warm bath to relax and en- Thanksgiving to ensure a pros-
hance beauty: lavender, pas- perous, wealthy year to come.


gBQ a SPORTS 3M
460 Coastal Hwy., Ochlockonee Bay, FL 32346
(850) 984-8130

NEW WINTER HOURS:

OPEN Fill. SUN. II A.M. CLOSE


SFriday night is "Ladies Night"

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Friday nights: Live Bands, Karaoke and DJ. icaifor info)

Saturday Nights: Live Bands

Sunday: Juke Box Beer Pong & Games


FISH FRY


Saturday, October 11 3:00 6:00 p.m.

3 Gavin Rd.

Free campaign event


Andrea Carter for

Superintendent of Schools,

Wakulla County

Campaign website: www.voteandreacarter.com
Contact me: voteandrea@gmal.com
Campaign HO: 3047 Crawodville Hwy., Crawfidvile, FL 32327 926-1111
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Dr. Andrea Carter, Republican for Superintendent of Schools


*MION. TIJURS.: CLOSED TO THE PUBLIC
(PVIl lLATI E PARTIES -ONI.Y!)


-A


r-


I















THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008 Page 11A
I


FSVCrilt U


ie 850-224-4960 www.fsucu.org

II II MORTGAGES -FREECHECKING NAUTOLOANS NCREDITCARDS


Gulf Coast Weekly Almanac


Tide charts by
Zihua Software, LLC

St. Marks River Entrance


Date High Low High Low
Thu 2.1 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.8 ft.
Oct 9, 08 4:32 AM 10:35 AM 5:36 PM
Fri 3.1 ft. 1.8 ft. 3.2 ft. 0.7 ft.
Oct 10, 08 12:09 AM 5:42 AM 11:46 AM 6:19 PM
Sat 3.3 ft. 1.3 ft. 3.5 ft. 0.7 ft.
Oct 11, 08 12:39 AM 6:29 AM 12:39 PM 6:56 PM
Sun 3.5 ft. 0.8 ft. 3.7 ft. 0.8 ft.
Oct 12, 08 1:05 AM 7:09 AM 1:25 PM 7:29 PM
Mon 3.7 ft. 0.3 ft. 3.9 ft. 0.9 ft.
Oct 13, 08 1:30 AM 7:47 AM 2:10 PM 8:02 PM
Tue 3.8 ft. -0.1 ft. 4.0 ft. 1.1 ft.
Oct 14, 08 1:54 AM 8:25 AM 2:54 PM 8:33 PM
Wed 4.0 ft. -0.4 ft. 4.0 ft. 1.3 ft.
Oct 15, 08 2:19 AM 9:05 AM 3:39 PM 9:05 PM


Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay

Date High Low High Low
Thu 1.6 ft. 2.2 ft. 0.6 ft.
Oct 9, 08 4:43 AM 10:27 AM 5:47 PM
Fri 2.3 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.4 ft. 0.5 ft.
Oct 10, 08 12:01 AM 5:53 AM 11:38 AM 6:30 PM
Sat 2.5 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.5 ft.
Oct 11, 08 12:31 AM 6:40 AM 12:31 PM 7:07 PM
Sun 2.6 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.8 ft. 0.6 ft.
Oct 12, 08 12:57 AM 7:20 AM 1:17 PM 7:40 PM
Mon 2.7 ft. 0.2 ft. 2.9 ft. 0.7 ft.
Oct 13, 08 1:22 AM 7:58 AM 2:02 PM 8:13 PM
Tue 2.9 ft. -0.1 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.8 ft.
Oct 14, 08 1:46 AM 8:36 AM 2:46 PM 8:44 PM
Wed 3.0 ft. -0.3 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.0 ft.
Oct 15, 08 2:11 AM 9:16 AM 3:31 PM 9:16 PM


Major
Activity

Minor
Activity


For tides at the following points
add to Dog Island Listings: Carrabelle


/ /


October 9 October 15


City of St. Marks


Date High Low High Low
Thu 2.7 ft. 1.9 ft. 2.8 ft. 0.7 ft.
Oct 9, 08 12:05 AM 5:36 AM 11:11 AM 6:40 PM
Fri 2.9 ft. 1.6 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.6 ft.
Oct 10, 08 12:45 AM 6:46 AM 12:22 PM 7:23 PM
Sat 3.1 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.3 ft. 0.6 ft.
Oct 11, 08 1:15 AM 7:33 AM 1:15 PM 8:00 PM
Sun 3.3 ft. 0.7 ft. 3.5 ft. 0.7 ft.
Oct 12, 08 1:41 AM 8:13 AM 2:01 PM 8:33 PM
Mon 3.4 ft. 0.3 ft. 3.7 ft. 0.8 ft.
Oct 13, 08 2:06 AM 8:51 AM 2:46 PM 9:06 PM
Tue 3.6 ft. -0.1 ft. 3.7 ft. 1.0 ft.
Oct 14, 08 2:30 AM 9:29 AM 3:30 PM 9:37 PM
Wed 3.7 ft. -0.4 ft. 3.7 ft. 1.2 ft.
Oct 15, 08 2:55 AM 10:09 AM 4:15 PM 10:09 PM


St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 2.1 ft. 2.3 ft. 0.8 ft. 2.4 ft.
Oct 9, 08 4:11 AM 10:19 AM 5:15 PM 11:53 PM
Fri 1.7 ft. 2.5 ft. 0.7 ft.
Oct 10, 08 5:21 AM 11:30 AM 5:58 PM
Sat 2.6 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.7 ft. 0.7 ft.
Oct 11, 08 12:23 AM 6:08 AM 12:23 PM 6:35 PM
Sun 2.7 ft. 0.8 ft. 2.9 ft. 0.8 ft.
Oct 12, 08 12:49 AM 6:48 AM 1:09 PM 7:08 PM
Mon 2.9 ft. 0.3 ft. 3.1 ft. 0.9 ft.
Oct 13, 08 1:14 AM 7:26 AM 1:54 PM 7:41 PM
Tue 3.0 ft. -0.1 ft. 3.1 ft. 1.1 ft.
Oct 14, 08 1:38 AM 8:04 AM 2:38 PM 8:12 PM
Wed 3.1 ft. -0.4 ft. 3.1 ft. 1.3 ft.
Oct 15 08 2:03 AM 8:44 AM 3:23 PM 8:44 PM


Sunrise
Sunset
Moon rise
Moon set
Brightness


~"A1


Apalachicola
Cat Point
Lower Anchorage
West Pass


High Tide
28 Min.
1 Hr., 53 Min.
1 Hr., 13 Min.
1 Hr., 36 Min.
1 Hr., 26 Min.


Shell Point, Spring Creek


Date High Low High Low
Thu 2.3 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.9 ft.
Oct 9, 08 4:29 AM 10:32 AM 5:33 PM
Fri 3.2 ft. 1.9 ft. 3.3 ft. 0.8 ft.
Oct 10, 08 12:06 AM 5:39 AM 11:43 AM 6:16 PM
Sat 3.4 ft. 1.4 ft. 3.6 ft. 0.8 ft.
Oct 11, 08 12:36 AM 6:26 AM 12:36 PM 6:53 PM
Sun 3.6 ft. 0.9 ft. 3.8 ft. 0.8 ft.
Oct 12, 08 1:02 AM 7:06 AM 1:22 PM 7:26 PM
Mon 3.7 ft. 0.4 ft. 4.0 ft. 1.0 ft.
Oct 13, 08 1:27 AM 7:44 AM 2:07 PM 7:59 PM
Tue 3.9 ft. -0.1 ft. 4.1 ft. 1.2 ft.
Oct 14, 08 1:51 AM 8:22 AM 2:51 PM 8:30 PM
Wed 4.1 ft. -0.4 ft. 4.0 ft. 1.4 ft.
Oct 15, 08 2:16 AM 9:02 AM 3:36 PM 9:02 PM


Dog Island West End

Date High Low High Low
Thu 1.9 ft. 2.8 ft. 0.6 ft.
Oct 9, 08 4:07 AM 9:10 AM 4:49 PM
Fri 2.8 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.8 ft. 0.6 ft.
Oct 10, 08 12:26 AM 5:05 AM 10:41 AM 5:32 PM
Sat 2.8 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.8 ft. 0.8 ft.
Oct 11, 08 12:44 AM 5:50 AM 11:59 AM 6:10 PM
Sun 2.8 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.0 ft.
Oct 12, 08 12:58 AM 6:29 AM 1:07 PM 6:44 PM
Mon 2.9 ft. 0.7 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.3 ft.
Oct 13, 08 1:11 AM 7:06 AM 2:11 PM '7:16 PM
Tue 3.0 ft. 0.4 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.5 ft.
Oct 14, 08 1:25 AM 7:43 AM 3:13 PM 7:46 PM
Wed 3.2 ft. 0.1 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.8 ft.
Oct 15, 08 1:41 AM 8:22 AM 4:16 PM 8:13 PM


SBoating Emergenciesr
Coast Guard Station
Panama City ..................................................... (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown ...................................................... (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
St. M arks (Flotilla 12) .......................................... (850) 906-0540
or ................................................. ....... 893-5137
Shell Point (Flotilla 13) ........................................ (850) 926-2606
or ........................................... ......... 926-5654



Coast Guard

Auxiliary Reports

\ By Sherrie Alverson


Yvette Graham, Flotilla
13, monitored the radios at
the Shell Point Coast Guard
Auxiliary Station on Satur-
day. She reported that it was
a very quiet day. Without a
doubt, this boating season,
Yvette has donated more
hours to the auxiliary than
anyone else in the Flotilla.
The sad part is that she
departed for her "winter
home" in Lake City on Sun-
day afternoon. But there is
a good side, too. She will be
back in mid-April and will
again take over Saturday
radio duty. She is, indeed, a
dedicated and a wonderful
person.
Flotilla 13's October meet-
ing will be held Saturday,
Oct. 11, at the CG Auxiliary
Station at Shell Point. At-
titude adjustment is at 6:30
p.m., the business meeting
will be held at 7 p.m., fol-
lowed by a delicious buf-
fet.
Members are invited to
attend as well as guests in-
terested in joining the Coast
Guard Auxiliary.
As Flotilla 13 had an ex-
tremely quiet week, I am
going to share with you an
article regarding recreational
boating safety written by an
unknown author.
Congress, in 1971, ordered
the Coast Guard to improve
recreational boating safety.
In response, the Coast Guard
drew up a set of rules. These
rules fall into two groups:
rules for your boat and rules
for the equipment.
In addition to the fed-
eral rules, there are state
and local laws you must
follow. They sometimes go
beyond Coast Guard require-
ments. As with other laws,
ignorance is no excuse. The
boaters must become aware
of their state and local laws
and regulations.


Equipment your boat
must have:
Your boat must comply
with the law. It must be
registered or documented,
have a proper identification
number, and be equipped
correctly. Some equipment
requirements depend on the
length of your vessel.
Your boat's registration:
If you have a power boat,
register or document it be-
fore you use it on navigable
waters. These waters are
those which provide a road
for transportation between
two or more states or to
the sea. They also include
the territorial waters of the
United States. Most states
require registration for boats
on state waters.
Some states do not re-
quire all boats to be regis-
tered. They may exempt
racing boats, documented
yachts, ship's lifeboats, and
public state and municipal
boats.
On the other hand, some
states require registration
of non-power driven boats.
Check with your local au-
thorities if you have a ques-
tion. Register your boat in
the state where it is usually
kept.
In all states, except Alas-
ka, registration is done by
the states. In Alaska, the
U.S. Coast Guard does the
registration. If you move to
a new state, your old regis-
tration is generally good for
60 days.
You must have your reg-
istration certificate aboard
your boat when you use it.
A copy will not suffice. You
will receive a citation if you
are boarded and do not have
the original with you.
Your registration certifi-
cate has a number on it. This
number is a sequence of two
letters, up to four numerals


and two letters. The first
two letters are for your state.
Paint or permanently attach
your number to both sides
of the forward half of your
boat. Do not display any
other number there.
Your boat's number must
be easily read. The letters
must be plain block char-
acters and must read from
left to right. Use a space
or hyphen to separate the
prefix and suffix letters from
the numerals.
The color of the letters
and numbers must contrast
with their background, and
they must be at least three
inch high.
You must renew your
registration each year. At
that time, you will receive a
new decal or decals. Put the
decals either before or after
your number as required by
your state. You must remove
old decals.
Carolyn Brown Treadon
reported on Flotilla 12
news.
We held our monthly
meeting this week and had a
good turnout. With 11 mem-
bers present, we had a lot to
talk about. Tim Ashley dis-
cussed our upcoming Coast
Guard Fly Over at the Nov.
15 FSU Homecoming game.
Tim has worked very hard
to make this event a success
and it has many surprises in
store for those attending.
Mark Rosen continues to
work hard to provide our
membership with training
opportunities. We are hop-
ing to have a few boats out
on the water for re-qualify-
ing several members by
month's end.
Steve Hults discussed the
success he and Bob Asztalos
had on a ramp day. Sixteen
boats were inspected and
many new contacts were
made including our two visi-
tors, Rich and Liz Marsella.
John Denmark shared
that more than 20 visits
were made to our local sup-


porters to stock our display
racks. With hunting season
opening soon for some
game, special attention was
made to stock information
specifically for safety while
hunting from a boat.
David Guttman was not
able to be at our meeting,
but had sent word he is talk-
ing to several interested in-
dividuals about our Flotilla.
Rich Rasmussen talked
about our upcoming Divi-
sion Meeting and encour-
aged members to attend not
only for the fellowship but
for the many training op-
portunities available.
Duane Treadon, Flotilla
Commander, swore in one
of our newest members, Rob
Purvis. Rob is a student at
FSU and a great asset to our
Flotilla. Welcome aboard.
We hope you enjoy your ride
with usl
Bob Asztalos received his
'certificate and ribbon for
earning his crew qualifica-
tion.
Harry Stacy received his
certificate for earning the
communications specialist
qualification. Carolyn and
Duane Treadon received
their certificates for patrol
specialist qualification.
As the meeting drew to
a close, Tim Ashley shared
that at the recent District
Meeting held in Dallas,
Texas, our Division Captain,
Rich Rasmussen, was elected
as the new District Captain,
formerly known as Rear
Commodore, East (RCO-E).
His area of responsibility
will include three Divisions:
1, 3 and 8. Rich's term as
Division Captain ends this
year and we are very proud
to see him moving up in
the auxiliary leadership
Congratulations, Rich.
Our next monthly meet-
ing will be held on Nov. 1.

REMEMBER SAFE BOAT-
ING IS NO ACCIDENT.


Duane and Carolyn Treadon


Rob Purvis and Duane Treadon
Rob Purvis and Duane Treadon


Harry Stacy and Duane Treadon

Gag grouper rule change


The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission
(FWC) on Thursday, Sept. 18
proposed rule amendments for
gag grouper in Gulf of Mexico
state waters to be consistent
with anticipated regulations in
Gulf federal waters.
SIn addition, the FWC is pro-
posing to allow Florida rec-
reational anglers to harvest
more red grouper in Gulf state
waters.
A recent stock assessment
indicated that Gulf gag grouper
is undergoing overfishing (ex-
cessive harvesting pressure) and
harvest levels must be reduced.
Interim federal regulations to
address this situation are ex-
pected to be implemented in
January in Gulf waters beyond


nine nautical miles offshore,
and the FWC is proposing gag
grouper rule amendments for
state waters that are consistent
with the federal regulations.
These rules would establish
a two-fish per person recre-
ational daily bag limit for gag
grouper within the five-grouper
aggregate limit in Gulf state
waters, and prohibit the recre-
ational harvest of gag grouper
from Gulf state waters from Feb.
1 through March 31. Currently,
recreational fishers in the Gulf
are allowed to keep up to five
gag grouper daily, and there is
no recreational dosed season.
A final public hearing on
these proposed rule amend-
ments will be held in December
in Key West


Low Tide
25 Min.
2 Hrs., 38 Min.
2 Hrs., 31 Min.
2 Hrs., 3 Min.
2 Hrs., 39 Min.


-

First
Nov. 5



. ..

Full
Oct. 14





r-
Last
Oct. 21


New
Oct. 28


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
7:50am 8:30am 9:15am 9:55am 10:35am 11:20am --:--am
8:15pm 8:55pm 9:35pm 10:20pm 11:00pm ll:45pm 12:15pm
1:45am 2:30am 3:10am 3:50am 4:35am 5:15 am 6:00 am
2:05 pm 2:45 pm 3:25 pm 4:10 pm 4:50pm 5:35 pm 6:25 pm


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
7:35 am 7:36 am 7:36 am 7:37 am 7:38 am 7:38 am 7:39 am
7:12 pm 7:11 pm 7:10 pm 7:09 pm 7:08 pm 7:06 pm 7:05 pm
4:10 pm 4:43 pm 5:14 pm 5:44 pm 6:16 pm 6:51 pm 7:30 pm
2:17 am 3:16 am 4:15 am 5:16 am 6:18 am 7:22 am 8:30 am
62% 68% 75% 82% 89% 96% 97%


Bob Asztalos and Duane Treadon













Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008


11L :0
CrjiiIumty News


Saturday, Oct. 4 was a
day of feasting, festivity,
and focusing on the voter
registration effort. Friends
and neighbors from.all over
Wakulla County came togeth-


Residents support Obama campaign


here in Wakulla and it looks
like we will surpass that
goal."
When asked about Wakul-
la's first Presidential Cam-
paign Office, Joan Hendrix
explained, "We started out as
five individuals who showed
up in Tallahassee to volun-
teer, but then came up with
the idea of starting our own
office down here. While I
was searching for donated
office space, the others were
buying supplies with their
own money." The office is
now manned by more than
50 regular volunteers who
do everything from phone
calling to walking neighbor-
hoods.
"We are just a group of
people who are committed to
seeing Barack Obama elected
as President," said Kramer. "I
want everyone to be better
off in four years than we are
today."
Also volunteering were
10 members of the Wakulla
High School Young Demo-


er for a final voter registra-
tion drive. Chef Otis cooked
up 145 of the finest barbecue
meals, while volunteers for
tlie Obama Campaign made
phone calls, registered vot-


ers, handed out signs, and
entered data.
"The election is in full
swing." Kim Kramer re-
marked. "We set a goal of
registering 100 new voters


crats.
If anyone has questions
concerning the campaign or
would like to volunteer, they
can stop by the office, e-mail
the campaign at WakullaFo-
rObama@hotmail.com, or
call 926-1100.


Wakulla Christian to honor vets


Wakulla Christian School
is working with the Wakulla
County Veteran's Service
Office to announce the Sec-
ond Veteran's Day Parade
and Celebration to Support
bur Troops and Honor our
Veterans.
The festivities will be
held on Saturday, Nov. & at
Hudson Park. This will be an
all day event with activities
to include a parade, rides,
games and food.
A patriotic concert and
entertainment will be held
all afternoon. Families with
active duty family members
are invited to decorate their
vehicle with his or her name
and ride in the parade. Or-
ganizations, dubs and busi-
inesses are also invited to


enter a patriotic float.
Trophies will be awarded
for the best floats. A "Wall
of Honor" will be erected at
Hudson Park where families
may post pictures of the
loved ones so the commu-
nity can express apprecia-
tion for their service to the
country.
Congressman Alan Boyd
will serve as the Festival
Grand Marshall and the Key-
note Speaker for the celebra-
tion. Congressman Boyd
served as a rifle platoon
leader for the 101st Airborne
Division in Vietnam from
1970 to 1971.
All public officials, agen-
cies, schools, clubs, busi-
Snesses, Veteran's families,
and citizens are invited to


Rep. Allen Boyd
be in this great parade and
to show your patriotism.
Please contact the Event Co-
ordinator, Cynthia Thomas,
at 251-0439 or e-mail to Cyn-
thia@amerifirstdirect.net.


Go ahead...
Bite into that apple!
With new mini dental implant technology
you can enjoy secure eating comfort again

In one short procedure you can have a
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2167 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville
Mon. 7:45 am 4:30 pm Tues. & Wed.-8:15 am -5 pm
Thiirs. 8:15 ani 3 pim


Tom Wollshlager, D:.M.D.


The Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce
will host a


for individuals seeking office during the Nov. 4 General
The event will be open to the public


Election.


Thursday, Oct. 23, from 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.


at the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center,
33 Michael Drive in Crawfordville.
"This community forum will provide an opportunity for our
citizens to come see, hear and meet the more than 17 candidates
for seven public offices in our county," said David Buckridge,
President of the Wakulla Chamber of Commerce.


Positions and Their Candidates Include
Individuals running for office in the General Election will be joined
by the winners of the Aug. 26 primary.
Supervisor of Superintendent

Elections of Schools


Traci Cash, Doug Jones,
Scott Langston, Charles Prout
and Buddy Wells.

Sheriff
Charlie Creel
David Harvey
County C
District 1
Alan Brock
A Jenny Brock


I'


J


'Dr. Andrea Carter
David Miller


VOTE Property Appraiser
Anne Ahrendt
Donnie Sparkmanr
commission Seats
District 3 District 5
immie Doyle Lynn Artz
Mike Stewart Jim Stokley


/ These elections will help guide the future of
our county for years to come." said Buckridge. "It's
important that people know who they are voting for."


The event will be jointly hosted by



be Wakulla e~to is a promotional sponsor of the event.
For more information, call the chamber office at 926-1848.


Kim Kramer, right, greets a voter at new Obama headquarters.


GETTHE NEWS
DELIVERED
EACH WEEK!
Call 926-7102


*


44!
~~ I


*





4I


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Section B


Wildlife

Photography
Brought to you by
Tor M)AiII' fjrtWS
and our readers




The i

Wakulla
W WS


This week Wakulla
Wildlife selections feature
winged wildlife. Neil and
Lois Hostnick took the but-
terfly and the two middle
bird photographs on their
travels around Wakulla
County. Frank Thornton
took the bottom picture of
waterfowl at mealtime. As
the seasons change, the
photographic opportunities
also change. Our readers
are invited to submit their
wildlife or other special
photographic images to
The Wakulla News Editor
Keith Blackmar at
kblackmar@
thewakullanews.net.
Thank you to those
who have already
submitted their work.


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008


fi RI







.' y ' ^ ^ -'

-- --
C..r -'~
Lir P.1>














Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008



Comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895


Your dream can come true!


Editor, The Newss
Wouldn't it be nice if
Wakulla County had a county
Commission that had no
ulterior motives. Just think
what good could be done if
they worked together and
focused on improving living
conditions and services for
the citizens of the county.
We are very fortunate to
have three smart, dedicated
women who are candidates
for you to consider to be
elected new county commis-
sioners.
Jenny Brock is an out-
standing retired math teach-
er. What skill could be more
useful, as the county faces the
financial crises that will result
from the removal of impact
fees? Jenny is also an avid
outdoors person, and great
defender of Wakulla's wildlife


habitat so that our children
can enjoy this beautiful area.
If you want a balanced county
budget, and our natural re-
sources preserved, you will
vote for Jenny.
Jimmie Doyle is a retired
business executive. What
skill could be more useful in
bringing an analytical and
fiscally conservative perspec-
tive to making decisions
about Wakulla's future? She
has been a tireless advocate
for having an audit of our
county's business operations.
As taxpayers, we should show
our support by voting for
Jimmie.
Lynn Artz is a retired
doctor. What skill could be
more useful as we all struggle
with providing and paying
for quality health care for
our family? Lynn has been an


ardent supporter of improv-
ing health care services for
Wakulla citizens and espe-
cially our children. With her
background in public health,
she also has the skills to
protect the quality of our wa-
ter-perhaps Wakulla's most
precious resource.
Wouldn't it be great to
have our beaches open back
up, and stay open. As voters,
we can help clean up our wa-
ters by voting for Lynn.
Wouldn't it be great to
have these three talented
leaders, who have great ex-
perience and no ulterior mo-
tive, to work for us to make
Wakulla County a better place
to live. You can trust them to
be respectful, hard-working
and sympathetic commis-
sioners.
You can make this dream


Editor, The News:
I have been listening to a
lot of politicians lately, as all
the world has.
I have heard a lot of words
used, some useful and some.
useless. I have not heard the
word "integrity" used in many
conversations.
When I thought of that
word, I immediately thought
of Jiimmie Doyle, the candidate
fox County Commission in
District '`3
Vi, knew what:' the: word
meant, of course, but looked it
up in my dictionary anyway.
Webster defines integrity
as firm adherence to a code of
moral or artistic values, "also
see honesty."
I looked up honesty to
see what ole Webster had
to say about that. He says
fairness, straightforwardness
of conduct, adherence to the
facts. I thought, there is that
phrase again "adherence to
facts" .
":I :thought to myself,
that's Jimmie Doyle. I almost
expected to see her name next
to integrity and honesty.
If it isn't right, Jimmie
Doyle won't do it. There will
never be a road, bridge or
building named after Jimmie
Doyle, unless it is honoring
her for outstanding, honest

GETTHE NEWS
DELIVERED
EACH WEEK!
Call 926-7102


achievement that she acquired
while working for the citizens
of Wakulla County.
If you want to know more
about Jimmie, just look in your
dictionary. It may not be under
"J" but it describes her to a "T"
under "I" for integrity.
Irene Treadway
Crawfordville


Artz would be a


good county


commissioner


Letters


come true by voting for them.
It's up to you.
Jack Leppert and Dorothy
Routh
Crawfordville


Where are the Wakulla County Republicans?


Editor, The News:
Well, I must sayl I have
been living in Wakulla
County for a year and a
half now and can honestly
say that it seems like the
Republican voters have gone
into hiding.
Seeing three to four
Republicans together at
any event is rare. What has
happened? I know for a fact
that there are thousands of
registered Republicans in this
county, but when there are
community events, fish fries
and political rallies, it's only
the Democratic candidates
that are front and center.
We have three fine
candidates who are running
as Republicans in this


election, Andrea Carter for
Superintendent of Schools,
Anne Ahrendt running for
Property Appraiser, and
Charles Prout running for
Supervisor of Elections.
I have been to their web
sites and read the campaign
literature 'and must say I
am excited at what I see. I
think all fellow Republicans
in Wakulla County will be
happy to learn more about
the details and the campaign
promises these fine
candidates have to offer.
This search for
Republicans in the area has
put me on a mission. If you
are a registered Republican
in Wakulla County or soon to
be a registered Republican,


or just curious, and want
to know more about our
candidates, please e-mail
me at gmanmac@gmail.
com and I will volunteer
to help organize a "Meet


the Republican candidates"
here in Wakulla County, and
contact each of you for details
and event information.
Gordon McCleary
Crawfordville


Editor, The News:
Political elections stir
varying opinions. I have
always admired those.
willing to put their hat in
the ring, being subjected
to public examination
of finances, sometimes
maligning gossip and
perhaps even ridicule.
We have had many good
people in Wakulla County
run for office, some were
elected, some were not. I
thank God that we have the
opportunity to choose.
I do want to speak in
support of one candidate
for the county commission,
not because I do not think
her opponent is a good
man, but because I have
found her to be an excellent
organizer, a tireless worker
with a positive attitude
toward whatever task is
ahead of her and a person


of great dependability.
Lynn Artz has been a
tremendous help to our
Heritage Village Committee
in trying to lay the
groundwork for a wonderful
project of creating a public
park using some of our old
houses to portray the way
of life of our forefathers.
She is one who does not"
waste time, but cuts right
through to making an effort
to complete whatever the"
goal happens to be. She has'
certainly been active in our
community for a number
of years, setting up the
Arbor Day Activities and
always willing to pitch in
on a worth while project. I
strongly recommend Lynn
Artz for the job of Wakulla
County Commissioner.
Betty Green
Crawfordville


Sheriff could help Leon with consolidation


Editor, The Newss
Consolidation.
What is going on in Leon
County?
Apparently, under the
strain of budget crunches
they have resurrected the
age-old argument of consoli-
dation. And of course, the
largest issue on the table
will be the consolidation of
law enforcement services.
In the process, we can be
certain they will commis-
sion studies and see if and
how it could work. Perhaps
they will look all across the
country for answers.
Truth is that they really


Correction
Due to incorrect informa-
tion provided to The News,
in the Oct. 2 issue, Larry
Birkhead, the father of Anna
Nicole Smith's baby, was mis-
identified in a feature on the
Emmy awards. We regret the
error.


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Crawfordville, FL
ww w.francielowe.com
www.fi-ancielowexcom


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Ieep David ds First

Miller

School Superintendet


don't have to look too far.
They should take a look
at what we are doing here in
Wakulla County where we al-
ready have consolidated law
enforcement under Sheriff
David Harvey.
If they look to Wakulla
they will see enormous cost
savings to taxpayers. In fact
our cost per person for law
enforcement is the lowest
in the Big Bend at $175 per
person. But we shouldn't let
the low cost fool anyone. We
are a well-run, professional
and fully accredited Sheriff's


Office and were the very
first rural county to achieve
that high standard. Even as
Wakulla County grows, our
crime rate is lower than it
was five years ago. Accord-
ing to the state, Wakulla
County is still one of the saf-
est counties in the state. Of
course, our elected Sheriff
David Harvey has had a lot
to do with that, the way he
runs his office like a busi-
ness, the way he combines
new technology with a per-
sonal touch and the way he
demands high standards of


his employees.
So, if our neighbors to the'
north have questions about
how to save money and im-
prove law enforcement, we:
have answers. They don't
need to fly or drive very
far. They can join us for a
cup of coffee at the Wakulla
Springs Lodge, take in the'
fresh country air and see
how we've gotten it done
just down the road.
David D. Buckridge
President
Ameris Bank
Crawfordville


Wakulla Professional and Business Women's Association
and TIJe akufllla Zebu recognize.


ri#tt$t'n4t ^H Wness


Ine~, eek!s


Bc9tter 20 24, 2008

Wakulla

Celebrateounty

Women in Business by sending us a

photo and info ofyour favorite Woman

Who Means Business in Wakulla County

and we'll feature her in our


section appearing in...

S3 October
t ji ,-k 23rd2 issue


&Y. of


What's that word

again? Integrity!














THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008 Page 3B


Our probation and court system need to be fixed


Editor, The News:
The State of Florida Probation
System is broken and unfair. Crime is
awful all over our country. I believe an
absence of good paying jobs, income
and education is the greatest cause.
In Florida, the probation system is
broken and must be repaired. So far,
no one has been able to answer my
questions or won't. Great system. The
standard answer from a government
office today is, it's not my job or I
don't know. I'll transfer you to some-
one else who doesn't know either.
If you are on probation in Florida,
it is a life sentence. Their signs read
"zero tolerance" they mean just that.


No matter what you are on probation in county court, pleaded no contest
for, which means everything from and paid the $250 court cost. My son
peeing on the side of your toilet to was automatically violated for state
the worse offense, you are violated probation for just getting the sum-
for state probation. You have no mons, not whether he was guilty of
chance to do good. Jay walking, traffic the infraction or not. That makes no
ticket, anything, you pay for that in difference. Put that in your pipe and
county court then pay with your life smoke itl Now faced with a violation
in circuit court. of state probation in circuit court, he
My son, a slow learner through could be sent to state prison for three
school, who needs the support of his years minimum.
parents and friends to help with seri- We are a sick country. In 20 years
ous problems, like dealing with our or less, this land will not be fit for
government, was issued a summons humans to function in.
to appear in county court for a mis- The people who started this so-
demenor fishing violation, catching called policy must be half a person,
too many bay scallops. We appeared being sawed in half from head to


toe. Hardened criminals are being
made out of normal people making
normal mistakes. Jails and prisons
are over capacity. The court system
is overwhelmed and the revolving
probation door is spinning out of con-
trol. The state is out of money. Who,
if anyone, has the guts to straighten
this mess out?
We certainly have not seen any
guts from our legislators to back
down off their mistake. I guess it's up
to the courts who will have to strike
their messes down.
I offer a challenge to our
legislators. Put 10 of them on state
probation for three years.


At least half of them will fail to com-
plete their probation successfully. Off
to prison they go to pay for violating
the probation laws they passed.
Get involved. Call your state sena-
tor and representative nowl Save our
state by demanding action nowl
Let's begin with the 2009 legisla-
tive session. Please help, don't sit on
your hands. Let us strive for a sepa-
rate court to judge minor offenses
resulting in a violation of probation.
Every single act should not be a viola-
tion of probation.
Jack Collins
Sopchoppy


Stewart has the character and heart needed


Editor, The News,
Mr. Rudloe made it sound like a nega-
tive thing in a recent issue of the paper
by strongly implying that Mike Stewart
treated the county's citizens like his
NJROTC cadets. Having worked alongside
Mr. Stewart for more than 12 years, includ-
ing the entire eight years he was a com-
missioner. I firmly believe he DID treat
the county's citizens like his cadets. But
there's nothing negative about that. Mike
treats every cadet with the utmost dignity
and respect. He has very high expectations
for each one, and he holds them account-
able for their actions. He is quick to com-


mend those who are doing their best, and
he doesn't hesitate to admonish those
who deserve it. He takes very seriously
his chosen role to help build character in
our future leaders. He fully appreciates the
keen ability of teenagers to spot a fraud,
so he does everything within his power
to live the ideals he espouses.
I believe I know Mike Stewart's char-
acter and his heart better than anyone
except maybe his wife. I served as his
sounding board for many issues that
came before the board during his eight
years and got to hear all about the com-
mission meetings afterwards. I know that


he labored over most of the decisions
the board had to make. Many times he
shared with me both pros and cons re-
garding each matter not knowing ahead
of time how he would vote. Contrary to
what some have said, I know that Mike
Stewart's sole motivation in every deci-
sion he made as a county commissioner
was what was best for the county. I don't
know Jack Rudloe, so I can't speak for his
motivation in attacking Mr. Stewart as he
did. But he obviously doesn't know Mike
Stewart very well either.
Ron Huddleston
Crawfordville


Miller leads with head, heart and every fiber


Editor, The News:
I had the honor and privilege of
serving on the Wakulla County School.
Board for 12 years under the leadership
of two superintendents. Roger Stokley
and David Miller.
I am writing to clarify a misnomer
that was written about Mr. Miller and
the loyalty oath. The loyalty oath is in
place to remind everyone of the impor-
tance of being loyal to their students, to
their classroom, to their team, to their
school and to their school system. It is


irritating to think that someone would
stoop so low and suggest otherwise.
To obtain and maintain a successful
school system it takes everyone work-
ing together as a team.
The Wakulla County School District
personnel support David Miller because
he supports them. It's just that simple.
The Wakulla County School District is
a team in sync.
Superintendent David Miller empha-
sizes the importance of every person on
the school district team. That's because


he knows and understands what it
takes to obtain "The Best of the Best"
status.
Superintendent David Miller puts his
head, his heart and every fiber of his
body into leading the Wakulla County
School District.
I totally support David Miller. Change
for the sake of change is ludicrous. Keep
David Miller our superintendent
Jimmy Smith
Crawfordville


Alan Brock has a proven track record


Editor, The News:
One of the best and most rewarding
experiences of my life was working
in the Executive Office of Governor
Lawton Chiles on his revolutionary
anti-smoking campaign,
This program took a lot of risk and
recognized the importance of working
with young people. Our office hired
three teenagers to serve as teen con-
sultants and spokespeople.
It was there that I met Alan Brock. He
was one of those three students hired
to work on our program. We hired Alan
because of his student leadership and
civic involvement in Wakulla County


At first, I have to admit, I had my
doubts about the Executive Office of
the Governor hiring teenagers still in
high school. But Alan quickly proved
his worth.
He is smart, well spoken and char-
ismatic. He is passionate about public
health and more than a decade later he
continues to be an advocate on these
issues. \
Alan has that same commitment for
Wakulla County. Alan is passionate
about Wakulla, our environment and
planning for our future. Alan is skilled
at bringing partners together. He has a
vision for Wakulla and our future, pro-


Old school would be good community ce


Editor, The News:
Given the cooperation of the
Wakulla County School Board
and the county commission, we
have a well located facility that
could be converted to a Commu-
nity Center. The old Crawford-
ville Elementary School has an
auditorium, gym, cafeteria and a
large play area. The auditorium
could also serve as a place for
county commission meetings.
The Sopchoppy community,
with help from the school board,
uses the old school site for con-
certs and other activities.
Over the last six years, I
have suggested this to all of
our commissioners. The three
that responded, dismissed the
idea, saying the school board
would never cooperate. I find
this unbelievable since we, the
taxpayers, own the property.
Who could possibly object?


In the eight years that I have
followed commission actions, it
seems that the majority mem-
bers seem immune to ideas
from citizens concerned enough
to attend the meetings. Three of
our candidates are concerned
citizens who have attended
many meetings and offered
ideas. If elected, I believe they
will listen to the voters.
Candidates, sitting commis-


sioners and school bo
bers, please let the vo


tecting our environment and bringing
jobs, walkable and shopping-friendly
community centers and respect for all
citizens.
Alan is the only candidate for the
county commission willing to work
with all citizens of Wakulla for our
future. Alan is young, but he is expe-
rienced, and we need his energy and
vision. He and his peers are our future.
Please join me and cast your vote for
Alan Brock for the Wakulla County
Commission.
Mae Waters
Shell Point


nter
ard mem-
ters know ne-yI i e


your response to this cost sav-
ing idea, and whether you will
fully explore it Should you veto
the idea, please tell us why.
Best wishes to all candidates.
It takes courage, energy and
a thick skin to campaign, and
even more if elected
Royce V. Jackson, Sr.
Crawfordville


Jones feels office

should be non-partisan


Editor, The News
My husband, Doug Jones,
is running for Supervisor of
Elections. Several people have
asked about his running in
the "No Party Affiliation (NPA)
Group" or "No Party Affiliation
Party."
I am writing this letter with
the hope of clarifying this issue.
"No Party Affiliation" is not a
"group" or "party." It merely
means that the candidate is
running without representing a
specific party, such as Democrat
or Republican.
Doug is a registered Demo-
crat (which is public record), but
he believes that the elections
office should be non-partisan
(as it is in Leon County)-that is,
that there should be no politics
in the conduct of elections or
in the voter registration pro-
cess. Rather, the Supervisor of


Elections should represent and
support persons of all political
parties, in a non-partisan way.
This view is certainly consistent
with the Doug Jones I know,
who always treats everyone
with respect and fairness.
We have certainly not had
a problem with this issue in
Wakulla County with Sherida
Crum as supervisor, where hon-
est and fair elections have been
the hallmark of her tenure in
office. But, in the recent past,
Florida's Chief Elections officer
was the statewide campaign
chairman for a presidential can-
didate, which led to problems,
as we know.
I hope this clarifies the
"NPA" issue-and I hope you
vote for Doug Jones on Nov. 4.
He will make you proud.
Jane Jones
Crawfordville


Birth


Mandalyn H.E. Trumbull
John Trumbull, Jr. and Adri-
enne Raulerson of Panacea
announce the birth of their
daughter, Mandalyn Harleigh-
Elise Trumbull, on Sept. 25 at
Capital Regional Medical Cen-
ter. She weighed 8 pounds, 9
ounces and measured 20 1/4
inches in length.
Maternal grandparents are
Heidi and Benjamin Rauler-


son, Sr. of Jacksonville. Pater-
nal grandparents are Frances
and John Trumbull, Sr. of
Panacea.
SMaternal great-grandparent
is Kay Wynn of Jacksonville.
Paternal great-grandparent is
Beverly Trumbull of Panama
City and Clark Nichols of
Sopchoppy.
Mandalyn joins a sister.
MaKenna Trumbull, age 1.


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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008


Community


St. Marks News special events


ST. MARKS
By Linda Walker

Hi neighbors. Yep, it's me
against I will try my best to
keep our column going but just
bear with me if I miss a week
sometimes. When the doctors
told me the nerve damage was
progressive, I was really think-
ing maybe in 10 or 20 years. I
don't get out a whole lot since
walking or driving just makes
me scream out loud. But, hey,
it could be worse, right?
Those of you who have
known me for the past hun-
dred years are probably glad
to have a reprieve from my
mouth.
It seems almost impossible
to me, but it is getting dose to
Halloween time. Our St Marks
Volunteer Fire Department
is going to host the annual


Halloween doings at the fire
station starting at 7 p.m. on
Friday, Oct. 31 along with the
spooky hayride.
They can really use do-
nations of candy, cupcakes,
treats and more. They can be
dropped off at our Town Hall
or the St. Marks Fire Station on
Shell Island Rd. Why not start
being a part of the fun things
in our little community, make
new friends and see what St.
Marks is all about. We care
about each other and help
each other.
Neighbor alertl Don't forget
that our annual St. Marks River
Festival will be held on Oct. 18.
There will be a re-enactment
down at the old fort along with
arts and crafts, food vendors,
games for the kids, antique cars
and so much more.
It will begin at 9 a.m. and
continue until 6 p.m. Don't for-
get the St. Marks River Festival


will be on Saturday, Oct. 18. I
will do my best to be there
this year.
Friends, please remember
Dale Carraway in your prayers.
He was helping others as usual
and had a seizure in the middle
of the road. Had it not been for
God and Tommy Clore, Dale
would have gotten run over.
Some people still do not know
what that big red fire truck is
or the rescue truck, either. I do
believe that means stop Dale
is doing better, but had about
20 stitches in his face. He is
slowly mending.
Listen up people Please
be extra careful driving down
Shell Island Rd. There are kids,
who for some reason, think it
is funny to run back and forth
in front of trucks and cars.
Just keep an eye out when
you come barreling down this
road.
. I was asked to tell whom-


ever it may concern that Jim
and Jamie Ward have all of
their permits required to build
the deck on the back of their
home. So consider yourself
told. By the way, Jim and Betty,
it looks great.
Congratulations to Jane
Marshall and Barnard Ses-
sions for getting better every
day. I ran into them at differ-
ent times and they both have
have serious health problems.
But they also have the best at-
titudes about it. Barnard, you
can quit gaining weight now.
Jane, you are just the right
size. We will keep praying for
both of you.
I want to congratulate Rita
of Wakulla Pharmacy on her
new granddaughter. Her son,
Marcus, and wife Sarah Abar-
banel, are the proud parents of
a 6 pound, 11 ounce girl, born
Tuesday, Sept. 30. They named
her Amaya (night rain). Good


for you Marcus on already
changing those fun diapers.
I don't think Grandma Rita is
back down to earth yet, but she
is so proud.
I am proud of my daughter
Melodee and her daughter
Lauren. They are both going to
college. I told you I was older
than dirt.
Neighbors, don't you just
love our new garbage cans?
You can actually see them if
your headlights hit them. They
are easier to handle.
I manage to get mine out to
the road about once a month,
but I was blessed with a mir-
acle so I don't have to worry
about that anymore. It sounds
terrible but I always think of
Bob Carey on garbage day. He
always got my can out to the
road.
Now let's wish these special
people happy birthday: Jason
ward on Oct. 2, Kendrick Eien-


stien Sellars on Oct. 14, and
happy anniversary to Keith and
Tammy Ward on Oct. 5.
On our prayer list please
pray for my nephew, Lil' Buddy
Johnson, fighting for his life
against cancer, Barnard Ses-
sions, Jane Marshall, Thelma
and Kent Murphy, Newell
Ladd, Gazzie and Alex Hobbs,
John Kirby, Nettie, Junior and
Gordon Strickland, Dale Car-
raway, and all of those not
named here. Let's pray for each
other and our families. Pray for
our troops overseas and their
families. Pray for our town, our
country and pray for peace.
Thought for this week:
Let me not complain about
my pain, instead let me be
thankful I am still here to
feel it.
Oops! forgot to wish Jim
Ward's daughter, Pam Lawhon
happy birthday on Sept. 27.


Buckhorn News A happy ending for a Franklin County dog


BUCKHORN
By Ethel Skipper
A thought for the week- The
age of information technology
has brought us amazing devices
to store, sort and process data.
High speed access to the
Internet puts a world of infor-
mation literally at our finger-
tips. Indeed, with IT gadgets
at home, at work, and in our
pockets, the average person is
fed more data in a day than he
can hope to analyze or even
remember.
In this glut of information,
there is a severe shortage of wis-
dom. It is widsom that enables
us to filter, evaluate and use the
information we receive. True
wisdom comes from God and
results in numerous benefits.
Happy is the man who find-
eth wisdom, and the man that
getteth understanding..
S.Wisdom is more valuable
than wealth or fame. The wise
understand that money can buy
comfort and ease and pleasure
but it can't buy happiness. Wis-
dom is more precious than all
the other merchandise on offer
in the global marketplace, for
it alone leads to true blessings.
The fear of the Lord is the begin-
ning of wisdom.
We are happy to see the
weather change. We've had
enough of the love bugs.


Our prayers and concern
goes out to all the poor and
needy, the lonely, sick and shut-
in, those in the jails, prison,
hospital, and let us pray for
peace in the world.
On Sunday, Oct. 5, at Skipper
Temple Church, the October
birth month members held
a service. Guest speaker was
Elder Edward Burn from Craw-
fordville.
Beginning on Wednesday
night, Oct. 8, through Friday
night. Oct. 10, will be the pas-
tor anniversary week, nightly at
7:30 p.m. Friday night, St John
Primitive Baptist Church Pastor
Rev. Raymond Sanders will be
at the pulpit: Thursday night, it
will be Macedonia Church Elder
A. Morris; and Elder Brigham
from Blountstown will be in
charge on Wednesday night
On Friday night, St. Mark
P.B. Church in Tallahassee and
Shiloh Church of Christ in
Quincy the Right\Reverend C.
Burney will be the speaker. On
Sunday, Oct. 12, at noon, the
church with family and friends
will celebrate and appreciate
our pastor. Speaker will be Rev.
Rodney Smith assisted by Evan-
gelist Glenda Simmons. You are
welcome to fellowship with us
Happy belated birthday to
Crystal Green on Sept. 19 and
Nathaniel Smith on Sept. 25.
Happy birthday to Charlene
Green, Deacon Archie B. Sim-
mons, and to Chinesta Smith
on Oct. 18.


Wakulla

Tail
Eaggers

I Susan Yelton I
I am really going to date
myself when I say what we
need today, is for the radio
stations to start playing Anne
Murray's 1983 song "Little
Good News."
If you are like me, "we sure
could use a little good news
today." All of us at Animal
Control and CHAT have not
had the best of times the last
few months.
But every now and then,
someone touches our life and
makes what we do worth-
while.
You don't know Scooter,
but I want to tell you his
story because it reminds us
that there are some wonderful
folks out there who are caring
and trying to make the world a
better place for all of us.
Early last June, Judy Miller
appeared at the CHAT adop-
tion center with a pitiful
looking hound dog who we
named Scooter. Judy is one
of the managers of SeaSide
Village development in Car-
rabelle and she found the
dog abandoned outside one
of the model homes. The dog


was dirty, hungry, had a cut
ear and was "scared to death"
of people.
Judy had tried to give him
to the humane society in
Franklin County, but they are
a "no kill" shelter and had no
room for Scooter. She came
to us asking if we would take
care of him and find him a
home.
We are used to having
people give us hound dogs
at the end of hunting season
or they just leave them in the
drop box. But Judy was differ-
ent. She really cared about the
dog she rescued. She brought
him boxes of toys, called us
regularly, tried to find him a
home, and asked us to please
not euthanize him.
Time passed and no one
looked at Scooter. So. by the
end of September, we had to
make a hard decision. It was
time to call Judy and tell her
that time was up for Scooter.
Being the caring person
she is, she asked us to give
her a week to get him out of
the shelter. As she told us,"I
would have adopted him my-
self but I travel back and forth
so much from California that
it wouldn't be fair to him since
he needs a lot of exercise and
care." But on the other hand,
leaving him behind was not
an option.
So last week, Judy made
arrangements to fly Scooter to


her California home and find
him a family who would give
him good care. Fortunately, it
is the time of the year when
Delta will transport dogs. We
got all the necessary paper
work together, patted Scooter
goodbye, hoped he had a good
flight and wished him well.
He was a little groggy when
he arrived Saturday morning
in San Francisco and Judy
called to find out if there
was something wrong with
him. We told her we thought
it was just a little jet lag. He
also tried to escape from the
airport when she was moving
him from the baggage area to
her car, but that is another
story.
I wish I could include all
the pictures Judy has recently
sent us. Scooter, who is now
called Cooper, is living the
good life in Novato, Calif.
with a wonderful family. Her
best friend's daughter adopted
him. Julie and her husband
Kiley have three adorable
children ranging in age from


3 through 9 and have been
looking for a hound dog for
some time. You see, Scooter
is a rare breed in Northern
California. I know this is hard
for us to imagine, living in
North Florida. Maybe we can
start a Hound Dog Haven in
California since we have so
many wonderful hound dogs
at the shelter?
If you want to read more
"little good news" I suggest
you go to www.seasidevil-
lagefl.blogspot.com and read
Judy's blog about Scooter and
his new life in California.
The story is a refreshing
change from all the political
and economic news of the
day and gives you hope that
there really are some wonder-
ful folks out there, who want
to "do the right thing."


Ready, set, go digital TV!


David Hinterschied, general
manager at WTLH-TV Fox 49,
will speak to members of the
Crawfordville Senior Center
on Oct. 16 at 11 a.m. about
the upcoming switch to digital
television (DTV).
On Feb. 17, 2009, all televi-
sion stations in the country
will turn off their analog sig-
nal and broadcast in a digital
format only. It is important
to know how this transition
will affect you and what steps
you can take to ensure that
you are prepared to receive a
digital broadcast signal when
the transition occurs.
The digital transition will
affect more than 34 million
households across the coun-
try, including over 600,000
households in Florida. Nearly
one in seven households
will be affected in Wakulla
County. Only television sets
with built-in digital tuners or


those that are connected to
cable or satellite will continue
to receive programming after
February 17, 2009. All other
televisions receiving only free
local broadcasting will go
static on this date.


This presentation will in-
form viewers of the steps
necessary to ensure digital TV
reception, which will provide
them with clearer pictures,
more channels and better
sound quality.


-PA
BPENSON&DAVIS,PA.
ATTORNEYS
Al Penson Mary Ellen Davis
Donna Biggins Jennifer Sweeting Adam Cowhey
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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008 Page 5B



People



Coventry Farms shares award with


Big Bend Hospice officials





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Alice Buford, Owner of Coventry Farms, Carla Braveman, President & CEO of Big
Bend Hospice, Linda Humbert, Stable Management Magazine and Lynne Johnson,
Pfizer Animal Health.
For the past several years, Farms went one step further. was $10,000; $5000 to be
:oventry Farms and Oak Leaf They entered a "Giving Back" donated to the equine facility
arms have hosted a horse essay contest sponsored by and $5000 to be donated to
how and luau, and proceeds Pfizer Animal Health ,and the charity of choice.
rom the event have been StableManagementmagazine, Coventry Farms chose
donated to The Caring Tree and wonl The essay contest The Caring Tree Prograr
programm of Big Bend Hospice, is all about how those in the of Big Bend Hospice, which
local nonprofit agency equine business "give back" provides grief support tc
providing physical, spiritual to the community, either children and teens who have
nd emotional support to locally or globally, through lost a loved one, to receive
individuals with a life limiting horse shows for charity the $50001 At a celebration al
lness. organizations, housing Coventry Farms on Tuesday
This year, Alice Buford rescued horses, etc. The prize September 30th, Pfizel
nd Martha Bolt of Coventry for the winner of the contest Animal Health and Stable


Management representatives
presented checks to Alice
Buford of Coventry Farms and
to Pam Mezzina, representing
The Caring Tree Program.
The winning essay,
entitled "It Takes a Barn to
Help a Grieving Child," was
written by Alice and Martha,
with assistance from Pam
Mezzina and Laura Glenn of
Big Bend Hospice. The essay
included information about
the first horse show and
luau which was organized
by Coventry Farms barn
members to help offset
the medical expenses of
one of their own, who was
diagnosed with a brain tumor
in 2002. They raised $4000
and decided to continue the
annual horse show and luau
in an effort to give back to
those who had lost a loved
one. Alice Buford, Coventry
Farms owner/trainer, is also
a social worker who has
witnessed how Hospice care
touches the lives of patients,
their families, and their
friends. She has provided
the venue for the event, the
spirit and the opportunity for
our small horse community
to step up and give back!


Majesty and Douglas Strickland

Stricklands celebrate


Doug and Maj (Majesty)
Strickland celebrated their
50th wedding anniversary with
a five-day cruise to Cozumel,
Mexico, over the Labor Day
weekend.
They were joined on the
cruise by their three children:
Kim (Thurman) Roddenberry,
Kelly (David) Wright, and Bo
(Heather) Strickland, and four
of their five grandchildren:
Brooklyn Roddenberry,
Kelsey, Karlee and Bailey
Strickland (and Gustav, no


relation). Grandson Becton
Roddenberry was unable to
attend. Kelly and David live in
Crawfordville and the others
live in Sopchoppy.
Doug and Maj were
married on Sept. 11, 1958,
in Thomasville by Judge
Fleetwood. When Doug asked
the judge what he owed, the
judge responded (jokingly) to
pay whatever he felt the bride
was worth. Doug took him
seriously and said it just about
ruined him financially.


Kessler conducts latest town hall meeting in Panacea


The Wakulla Welcome Cen-
ter in Panacea was the site
where citizens met to take
part in another of the continu-
ing series of Commissioner
Howard Kessler's Town Hall
Meetings. Many local political
candidates were in attendance
as well as a surprise visit from
the candidate for the State of
Florida House of Representa-
tives District 10, Don Curtis.
Rock Landing Dock was
universally addressed by all
the Panacea citizens. They were
frustrated with the amount of
time that has gone by without
construction beginning. The
permitting process has been
very slow. Leaders of Panacea


expressed the need to have
the dock completed and ready
for use by March 2009 for
the spring season. The local
economy is hurting and when
visitors do not have a usable
dock to launch their boats,
they are not coming down,
citizens said. With the loss of
three large restaurants over
the last several years, Harbor
House, The Oaks and more
recently The Landing, Panacea
is struggling economically.
The completion of the Rock
Landing dock is considered
vital for Panacea's economic
stability. Ben Pingree, County
Administrator, and Cleve Flem-
ing, Director of Public Works,


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Tech@Night

Technology Workshops

The TCC Wakulla Center*
will premier different training workshops
Sept 11 Dec 11

Join us 6 9 p.m.
at the TCC Wakulla Center

$25 each workshop
Schedule & registration online at
www.tcc.fl.edu/tech@night
or call 201-8760


*Classes also available on TCC's main campus, TCC Capitol Center,
TCC's Quincy House or PatThomas Law Enforcement Academy


were both in attendance and
will help in moving the project
forward with the help of Parks
and Recreation Director Ray
Gray and volunteer citizens.
Emotions rose when the
medical care facilities started
to be discussed. The citizens
expressed concern over a prac-
tically new health clinic, built
in large part with the county
support and grant money, that
is not serving all the citizens
of Panacea or county. They
pointed to the older clinic


across the street where Dr.
David Keene provides care.
Keene's parking lot is always
full while the North Florida
facility is sometimes empty.
Citizens expressed their frustra-
tion about having health care
providers such as Dr. Gene
Charbeneau and others being
unable to treat citizens. The
bottom line is that there is a
problem with health delivery
and care in Panacea and county
staff has been asked to look
into the health care delivery in
Panacea, said Kessler.
Tower Road and Chatta-
hoochee will be paved.
Although the movement
on the Ochlockonee Bike Trial
is slowly moving, the project
is going forward. Surveying is
being done for the resurfacing
of Mashes Sands Road under
the State SCRAP program.
Sidewalks for Panacea, espe-
cially for citizens with limited
mobility and in the Summer
Trace Apartments area, were
discussed. Sidewalks to the
health facilities and the shop-
ping areas are needed for the
health and safety of citizens.
The concept of moving
or transferring oysters from
areas of polluted waters to
unpolluted waters so that the


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oysters can become purified
and suitable for harvesting
was discussed. This would be a
possible economic incentive for
the Panacea shell fishermen.
Traffic calming devices on
neighborhood roads were dis-
cussed and recommended to
be referred to the traffic safety
committee.
The sand that is dogging
both the Mashes Sands canal
and the Sunrise canal is about
to be cleared. That is great
news for those who launch at
Mashes Sands and for those liv-
ing on the Sunrise Canal Cleve
Fleming was given kudos for


his leadership on this project
Three areas of concern were
identified including inadequate
dock parking space, people
parking their cars and trail-
ers improperly, and lack of
enforcement relating to how
and where cars and trailers
are being parked. This a very
important issue that needs
resolved, said Kessler. Ray Gray
will be addressing this issue in
the next few days.
The next town hall meet-
ing will be held Nov. 25, in,the
county commission chambers
on Arran Road.


County Administrator Ben Pingree discusses matters with residents.


Sl NfIrWSES Statement of OwnArhip, Mnagemwnt and Crculation
s.sTEEvR. (AN APeriodicals PubcatlonsExce$pRequeerPublicadons)
The Wakulla News 644 4I 16 i4 I 912412008
* MtF..F..ql I M.., 1.. Bneolhl iMiiee Kmr2 *oi
Weekly

P. 0. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326 G --
1850-926-7102 -



Florida Newspapes, LLC 150 West Brambleton Ave. Norfolk, VA 23510
EWI---- ***
Keith Blackmar, Editor, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordvlle, FL 32326 -

Tammle Barfeld, General Manager, P. 0. Box 307, Crawfordvllle, FL 32326



Florida Newspapers, LLC 150 West Brambleton Ave., Norfolk, VA 23510
Landmark Community Newspapers, LLC P.O. Box 49, Shelbyvllle, KY 40066-0549


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The Wakulla News 9/11/2008 19


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3232 Crawfordville Hw; :. Crawfordville ..
Owned & Operated by -Ga yi 1'I 8ii-t.T Ci804I i


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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008


Deadline

"londay

11:00 A.CLAilD

926-7102


35 Cents

AD 3Per Word


ADS $8.00
Minimum


Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


CATEGORIES
100 EMPLOYMENT
105 Business Opportunities
110 Help Wanted
111 Medical/Dental Help Wanted
112 Office/Administrative Help Wanted
113 Construction Help Wanted
114 Miscellaneous Help Wanted
115 Work Wanted
120 Services and Businesses
125 Schools and Instruction
130 Entertainment
200 ITEMS FOR SALE
205 Antiques
210 Auctions
215 Auto Parts and Accessories
220 Cars
225 Trucks
230 Motor Homes and Campers
235 Motorcycles and 4-Wheelers
240 Boats and Motors
245 Personal Watercraft -,
250 Sporting Goods
255 Gunss Equ
260 Business Equipment


265 Computers and Internet
270 Electronics
275 Home Furnishings
280 Home Appliances
285 Jewelry
290 Musical Instruments
295 Building Materials
300 MISC. FOR SALE
305 Machinery, Tools & Equipment
310 Firewood Products
315 Farm & Garden Equipment
320 Farm Products & Produce
325 Horses
330 Livestock, Farm Animals
335 Pets
340 Plants
345 Swap, Barter, Trade
350 Wanted to Buy 0
355 Yard Sales
400 NOTICES
410 Free Items
415 Announcements
420 Card of Thanks
425 Occasion Cards
430 In Memoriam
435 Lost and Found


440 Personals and Notices
500 REAL ESTATE, HOMES, MOBILES
505 Acreage for Lease
510 Acreage for Sale
515 Apartments for Rent
520 Townhouses for Rent
525 Townhouses for Sale
530 Commercial Property for Rent
535 Commercial Property for Sale
540 Farms for Sale
545 Homes for Sale
550 Homes with Acreage for Sale
555 Houses for Rent
560 Land for Sale .
565 Mobile Homes for Rent
570 Mobile Homes for Sale
575 Mobile Homes with Land for Sale
580 Rooms for Rent/Roommates Wanted
585 Wanted to Rent
590 Waterfront Homes/Land for Sale
595 Vacation Rental
600 Open House



CALL 926-7102 TODAY
Email: classifieds@thewakullanews.net


Legal Notice



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 07-165-FC
SUNTRUST BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JONATHAN ROY HOBBS a/k/a
JONATHAN R. HOBBS, an individual;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JONATHAN
ROY HOBBS a/k/a JONATHAN R. HOBBS;
AND JOHN DOE and JANE DOE,
as unknown tenants) in possession,
Defendants.


NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to
a Final Judgment of Foreclosure of SunTrust
Bank entered in the above-styled case, I will
sell the property situated in Wakulla County,
Florida, on October 23, 2008, at 11:00 a.m., at
the Wakulla County Courthouse, front lobby,
3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale. The legal description of the property be-
ing sold is described as:
LOT 3, MILLER PARK, A SUBDIVISION AS
PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 84 OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA
DATED this 22nd day of September, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons in need of
a special accommodation to participate in a ju-
dicial proceeding at a Wakulla County Court-
house should contact the Americans with Dis-
abilities Act (ADA) Coordinator no later than
two business days before the proceeding. The
telephone number is 850-926-0905.
October 2, 9, 2008




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AN FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-121-FC
GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK,
a State-Chartered Bank,
Plaintiff,
vs.
OBIE PAUL NOONKESTER, Deceased, the
Estate of OBIE Paul NOONKESTER, his un-
known spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, and all others claiming by and
through OBIE PAUL NOONKESTER, De-
ceased, ELLEN GILMORE, MAXINE BIDDLE,
TINY EASLEY, and JOE NOONKESTER, be-
lieved to be the heirs of OBIE PAUL
NOONKESTER, believed to be the heirs of
OBIE PAUL NOONKESTER, DECEASED,
UNKNOWN TENANTS 1, 2, and 3, and MIKE
CARTER,
Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure After De-
fault dated September 18, 2008, in the
above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at the Lobby of the
Clerks Office of the Wakulla County Court-
house, Crawfordville, Florida, on Thursday,
October 23, 2008 at 11:00 a.m., the following
described property:
Lots 1, 2 and 3, Block "A", Page Park (unre-
corded) being more particularly described as
follows:
Commence at the Northwest Corner of the
Southwest Quarter of Section 9, Township 3
South, Range 1 East, Wakulla County, Flor-
ida; thence run South 00 degrees 18 minutes
37 seconds East 336.56 feet; thence South 89
degrees 55 minutes 02 seconds East 1650.30
feet; thence South 00 degrees 17 minutes 55
seconds East 1319.92 feet; thence South 89
degrees 40 minutes 43 seconds East 593.27
feet to a concrete monument for the POINT
OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF
BEGINNING run North 00 degrees 13 minutes
39 seconds East 143.90 feet to a concrete
monument lying on the Southerly right of way
line of Alma Drive; thence run along said right
of way line as follows: South 89 degrees 41
minutes 37 seconds East 99.84 feet to a con-
crete monument; thence run South 89 de-
grees 40 minutes 43 seconds East 174.66 feet
to a concrete monument; thence South 35 de-
grees 49 minutes 41 seconds East 132.89 feet
to a point marking the intersection of said right
of way line with the Northerly right of way line
of State Road Number 365; thence leaving
said right of way line of Alma Drive run along
said Northerly right of way line South 54 de-
grees 34 minutes 56 seconds West 62.30 feet
to a a concrete monument; thence leaving
said right of way line run North 89 degrees 43
minutes 23 seconds West 302.09 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 1.05
acres more or less.
Subject to a 10 foot wide roadway and utility
easement lying over and across the Northerly
and Northeasterly 10 feet described thereof.
Dated on September 23, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
October 9, 16, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 08-25-FC
DIV
CITIZENS BANK WAKULLA D/B/A AMERIS
A/K/A AMERIS BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MAGNOLIA PARK DEVELOPMENT,
LLC, et al.,
Defendant(s)


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN-pursuant to a
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure en-
tered herein, I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash in the Lobby of the Wakulla
County Courthouse at 11:00 a.m. on the 16th
day of October, 2008, the following described
property:
A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 1,
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WA-
KULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AS RECORDED
IN OR BOOK 239, PAGE 243, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA: *
BEGIN AT AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB
MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF
THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE
SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF, SECTION 1,
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WA-
KULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE
RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUND-
ARY OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF
SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER 1181.43
FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN
NORTH 88 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 28 SEC-
ONDS EAST 311.75 FEET TO TO AN IRON
PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES
35 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 310.09
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT,
THENCE RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 05
/ MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 181.23 FEET
TO AN IRON PIPE ON THE SOUTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE
ROAD NO. S-374, SAID PIPE LYING ON A
CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHERLY,
THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY ALONG
SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3541.02
FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 08 DE-
GREES 33 MINUTES 27 SECONDS FOR AN
ARC DISTANCE OF 528.88 FEET, THE
CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 85
DEGREES 32 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST
528.38 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DE-
GREES 14 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST
1363.73 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89
DEGREES'54 MINUTES 59 SECONDS
WEST 1190.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING.
LESS AND EXCEPT, THAT PORTION OF
THE ABOVE-REFERENCED PROPERTY
WHICH WAS TRANSFERRED V IA THAT IN-
STRUMENT RECORDED UNDER O.R.
BOOK 654, PAGE 674, PUBLIC RECORDS
OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
AND, LESS AND EXCEPT THAT PORTION
OF THE ABOVE-REFERENCED PROPERTY
WHICH WAS TRANSFERRED VIA THAT IN-
STRUMENT RECORDED UNDER O.R.
BOOK 677, PAGE 231, PUBLIC RECORDS
OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this
Court on September 22, 2008.
INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES NEEDING
A REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING
SHOULD CONTACT THE COURT ADMINIS-
TRATORS OFFICE, AS SOON AS POSSI-
BLE, TELEPHONE: 850-926-0905; OR, IF
HEARING IMPAIRED: 1-800-995-8771 (TTD);
OR 1-800-955-8770 (V), VIA FLORIDA RE-
LAY SERVICE.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -S- BECKY WHALEY
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
October 2, 9, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 08-91-FC
HORACE MALOY
Plaintiff,
vs.
CEDRIC GAY; ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGN-
EES, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SUCCES-
SORS IN INTEREST, AND UNKNOWN
CLAIMANTS
Defendants.
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER
F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with
the Default Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated September 18, 2008 in the above-styled
cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash on October 23, 2008 at 11:00 a.m. at
the Wakulla County Courthouse Lobby, 3056
Crawfordville Hwy. FL.
Lot 1, Block 8, Unit II, Wakulla Gardens,
Crawfordville, Florida; Parcel ID Number:
00-00-034-009-08513-000
Dated September 22, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- BECKY WHALEY
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
October 2, 9, 2008


Notice is hereby given that the next meeting of
The Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor
Authority will be held on Thursday, October
16th, 2008 at 10:00 a.m. EST in the Apalachl-
cola Courthouse Annex, located at 34 Forbes
Street, Apalachicola, Florida. Any person re-
quiring special accommodations to participate
In this meeting Is asked to advise the Corridor
Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting
by contacting Amber Perryman at
850-215-4081 or by email at Amber.Perry-
man@hdrinc.com.
October 9, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2007-FC-179
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION,
AS TRUSTEE FOR FIRST FRANKLIN
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-FF9
Plaintiff,
vs.
JEFFREY K. NICHOLS A/K/A JEFFREY
KEVIN NICHOLS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JEFFREY K. NICHOLS A/K/A JEFFREY
KEVIN NICHOLS A/K/A JEFFERY KEVIN
NICHOLS, and any unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, and other unknown per-
sons or unknown spouses claiming by,
through and under any of the above-named
Defendants,
Defendant(s).


AMENDED NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that the under-
signed Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla
County, Florida, will on the 30th day of Octo-
ber, 2008, at 11:00 a.m. at the Front lobby of
the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawford-
ville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to
the highest and best bidder for cash, tne fol-
lowing-described property situate in Wakulla
County, Florida:
TRACT 7 (1.21 ACRES)
COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF
THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 49
OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS
OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH
THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, AND
THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 29
MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID
SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY
1,660.43 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO
THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHEAST-
ERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE
WITH A RADIUS OF 11,391.20 FEET THRU
A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 51
MINUTES 30 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 170.65 FEET, THENCE RUN
SOUTH 16 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 39 SEC-
ONDS EAST 210.00 FEET, THENCE RUN
NORTH 73 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 27 SEC-
ONDS EAST 10.65 FEET, THENCE RUN
SOUTH 16 DEGREES 06 MINUTES EAST
140.49 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING
CONTINUE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 06 MIN-
UTES EAST 187.44 FEET, THENCE RUN
NORTH 74 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 23 SEC-
ONDS EAST 76.75 FEET, THENCE RUN
SOUTH 16 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 45 SEC-
ONDS EAST 23.37 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE,
THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 40
MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 183.26 FEET,
THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 06
MINUTES WEST 208.53 FEET, THENCE
RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 27
SECONDS WEST 260.01 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 1.21
ACRES, MORE OR LESS.
TOGETHER WITH A FIFTEEN (15) FOOT
ACCESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF
.THE WEST BOUNDARY LINE OF LOT 49 OF .
THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THE
SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY
OF U.S. HIGHWAY 98, THENCE RUN
NORTH 73 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 55 SEC-
ONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1,660.43 FEET
TO A STATE ROAD DEPARTMENT CON-
CRETE MONUMENT MARKING A POINT OF
CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN
NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG
SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 11,391.20
FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DE-
GREES 51 MINUTES 30 SECONDS FOR AN
ARC DISTANCE OF 170.65 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT AND THE POINT
OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BE-
GINNING, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DE-
GREES 05 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST
210.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DE-
GREES 06 MINUTES EAST 155.49 FEET,
THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 41
MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 15.00 FEET,
THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 05
MINUTES WEST 155.49 FEET, THENCE
RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 39
SECONDS WEST 210.00 FEET, MORE OR
LESS, TO THE SOUTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGH-
WAY 98, AND THENCE RUN WESTERLY
ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY 15.00 FEET, MORE OR LESS,
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
pursuant to the Final Judgmententeered in a
case pending in said Court, they style of which
is indicated above.
Any person or entity claiming an interest In
the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclo-
sure sale, other than the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim
on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days
after the foreclosure sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal of said
Court this 30th day of September, 2008.
In accordance with the Americans With Dis-
abilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to participate In this
proceeding should contact Court Administra-
tion at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville,
Florida 32328, telephone (904) 926-0905, not
later than seven (7) days prior to the proceed-
ing. If hearing Impaired, (TDD)
1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
October 9, 16,2008


LOGIC AND ACCURACY TEST NOTICE
The Wakulla County Canvassing Board will
meet in the Ballot Accounting Room located in
the Supervisor of Elections office at 3115-B
Crawfordvllle Hwy, on Tuesday October 15,
2008 at 2:00 p.m. to certify accuracy of the
tabulating equipment. All candidates, citizens
and press are Invited to attend.
October 9, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2008-39-FC
GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC.
F/K/A BOMBARDIER CAPITAL INC.,
7406 Fullerton Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32256,
Plaintiff,
v.
RODNEY B. THIEME,
DARLENE THIEME and
FORECLOSURE ADVISORS, LLC
Defendants,


NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant
to Plaintiff's Final Summary Judgment Of
Foreclosure entered In the above-captioned
action, I will sell the property situated In Wa-
kulla County, Florida, described as follows, to
wit:
BEGIN AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING
THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE
NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTH-
WEST QUARTER OF SECTION 18, TOWN-
SHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA (ALSO BEING THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 53 OF
RAINBOW ACRES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 1. PAGE 66-A OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA), AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DE-
GREES 55 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST
ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID
LOT 53 AND A PROJECTION THEREOF
(SAID PROJECTION BEING THE EAST
RIGHTH-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A 50.00
FOOT COUNTY ROAD) 701.23 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT IN THE CENTER
OF A 30.00 FOOT ROADWAY, THENCE
LEAVING SAID EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 80 DEGREES 11
MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE
CENTER OF SAID 30.00 FOOT ROADWAY
315.49 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT, THENCE LEAVING THE CENTER OF
SAID ROADWAY RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES
35 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST 768.26
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT,
THENCE RUN NORTH 87 DEGREES 24
MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 285.83 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1999
GENERAL, D4456, 60 X 24, SERIAL NUM-
BER GMHGA1099923685AB
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder,
for cash at the front lobby, Wakulla County
Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Wakulla
County, Florida 32327, at 11:00 A.M. (CST),
on the 23rd day of October, 2008
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -s- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
October 2, 9; 2008








IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-000152
TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE
CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANDREA M. NALL
A/K/A ANDREA NALL, at al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
GEOFFREY NALL
Last Known Address: 101 King Bee Drive,
Crawfordvllle, FL 32327
Also Attempted at: 1400 Gardenia Avenue,
Killen TX 76543; 1008 Lansberry Ct., #A, Klt-
leen TX 76549 and 8400 Krause Rd., Pensa-
cola, FL 32506
Current Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for
Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following de-
scribed property:
LOT 69, BLOCK A, MAGNOLIA GARDENS,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RE-
CORDED IN DEED BOOK 59, PAGE 261, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH
THAT CERTAIN 2007 FLEETWOOD MOBILE
HOME, SER. NO. GAFL675AB78594-CD21.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, If any, to It, on Marshall C. Watson,
P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address Is
1800 NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT.
LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 on or before Octo-
ber 31, 2008, a date which is within thirty (30)
days after the first publication of this Notice
and file the original with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or
Immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint.
In accordance with the Americans with Dis,
abilities Act of 1990 (ADA), disabled persons
who, because of their disablitles, need special
accommodations to participate In this pro-
ceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator
at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordvllle,
FL 32327 or Telephone Voice (850) 926-0905
not later than five business days prior to such
proceeding.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court this 22nd day of September, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -S- BECKY WHALEY
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
October 2, 9, 2008
-I


Attention Comcast Customers: Effective
Wednesday, November 12th Comcast will
make the following programming changes to
the Wakulla Channel Lineup add Fox News
HD Ch. 428, Speed HD Ch. 450 and FX HD
Ch. 451 to the HD Lineup; add ION Life Ch.
181, Qubo Ch. 183, and Bloomberg Ch. 251
to the Digital Uneup; move ION (Ch. 15 to Ch.
178) and Style (Ch. 71 to Ch. 118) to the Digi-
tal Starter Lneup; Reposition TV Guide from
Ch. 72 to Ch. 15.
October 9, 2008





IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 08-66-FC
UCN: 652008CA00066XXXXXX
CITIBANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE
FOR THE MLMI TRUST SERIES 2007-HE2,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CARLA H. PATTERSON, et al
Defendantss.

NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO .
CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclo-
sure dated September 25, 2008, and entered
In Case No. 08-66-FC UCN:
652008CA0000066XXXXX of the Circuit
Court In and for Wakulla County, Florida,
wherein CITIBANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR
THE MLMI TRUST SERIES 2007-HE2 Is
Plaintiff and CARLA H. PATTERSON; PAT
PATTERSON; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1;
UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS
BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A
NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR
HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY
RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROP-
ERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants,
I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at In the Front Foyer of the Wakulla
County Courthouse. 3056 Crawfordvitlle High-
way, Crawfordvllle, FL 32327 at WekuTla
County, Florida, at 110 a.m. on the 30th day
of October, 2008, the following described
property as set forth In said Order or Final
Judgment, to-wit:
COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE
MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST
CORNER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 3
SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN
NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 27 SEC-
ONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST BOUND-
ARY OF SAID SECTION 7, A DISTANCE OF
674.17 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE
MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST
156.70 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT
ON THE EASTERLY MAINTAINED
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF WHIDDON
LAKE ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DE-
GREES 30 MINUTES 51, SECONDS EAST
ALONG SAID EASTERLY MAINTAINED
RIGHTH-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 210.00 FEET
TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE
RUN NORTH 14 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 25
SECONDS EAST. ALONG SAID EASTERLY
MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY
122.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING,
CONTINUE NORTH 14 DEGREES 52 MIN-
UTES 25 SECONDS EAST. ALONG SAID
EASTERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY 149.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 41 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST
331.49 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES
09 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 224.25
FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 78 DEGREES
02 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST 378.56
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CON-
TAINING 1.50 ACRES, MORE OR LESS.
ALSO:
1970' KNOX MOBILE HOME ID#
G9C643BRF07840 TITLE NO. 4209997
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN
THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY AS OF THE
DATE OFTHE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
DATED at Crawfordville, Florlda, on Septem-
ber 30, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -a- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
SOctober 9, 16, 2008


Public Notice
Wakulla Soil & Water Conservation District
Meeting
PLACE: Wakulla County Extension Bldg.
DATE: October 23
TIME: 6:30 P.M.
CONTACT: Joe Duggar at 926-3774

105 Business Opportuni-
1ties


BRING YOUB OlD

PHOTOS TO IFE!!
I can fix those
wonderful old pictures
so you can enjoy them
again, and make
copies to share.

Keep the family heritage
alive with restored
photographs

Just $15 per photo.
850-766-7655
dougapple@gmail.com


110 Help Wanted




ELECT

CHARLIE


FOR


SHERIFF




Political advertisement paid for and
approved by Charlie Creel,
No Party Affiliation, for Sheriff

Ameris Bank seeks full time teller
for the Crawfordville Area. Teller
experience preferred. Provides
customer service, processing both
business and individual banking
transactions; manages cash fund
and cross-sells bank services. Ac-
cepts cash items from customers
for deposit. Handles withdrawal
and deposits from savings. Takes
Installment and credit card pay-
ments. Job Involves considerable
customer contact and requires'
sales skills. Send resumes to
hr.cr@amerlsbank.com


..............................
SElect Jimmie Doyle
for County Commission


: Your FULL-TIME
commissioner.
****
klic atWment paid forand approved by
S lunmmle Dole. No Party AmionAftl
for County Commisson Dlstr 3
oooooooooooo


New Veterinary Clinic Hwy 98 and
Spring Creek Rd. Is seeking expe-
rienced office/vet assistant.
FT/PT. Send your resume to
Shepherd Spring Animal Hospital .
4815-A Coastal Hwy., Crawford-
ville, FL 32327. 850-926-1475

NOW HIRINGI B.sy rqal estate
company needs full-time agents
Real estate license 1,,required.
Contact Ochlockonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001 or 860-926-9260
obr@obrealty.com ,
www.obrealty.com


I


For Sale:
TWO BLONDES LIQUORS & GIFTS
* Retail Package & Gift Store
* Liquor License includes
consumption on premises
Local coastal resort area in
Panacea
Turn key operation

(850) 509-4945 or
kbatklns@aol.com


*


1

















THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008 Page 7B


111 Medical/Dental Helph
Wanted

An enthusiastic part-time dental
assistant/PR person is needed for
our Crawfordville office 2 days/wk.
Dental experience and excellent
people skills required. Fax resume
to Drs. Carey and Jones at
850-893-5788


NHC

HOMECARE
Quality Care is Our Business
CONTRACT
PHYSICAL
THERAPIST
Are you interested in being
part of a partner-friendly envi-
ronment? Why drive to Tallahas-
see when you can work in the
county due to gas prices?
Our Crawfordville Homecare
program is a Medicare home
health agency seeking a contract
physical therapist who wishes
to join a team "that makes a
difference: caring for our
homebound patients in Craw-
fordville and surrounding areas.
Interested candidates may fax
their resume to 850-926-2551
Attn: Edie Rowell,
Administrator EOE/DFWP



NHC
HOMECARE
Quality Care is Our Business
RN / DIRECTOR
OF NURSING
National HealthCare Corpora-
tion, one of the nation's largest
long-term healthcare providers
since 1976, is seeking a
RN/Director of Nursing in our
Crawfordville HOMECARE
PROGRAM.
Nursing management and/or
homecare experience is required.
Must be able to handle
fast-paced work environment.
Good communication, analytical
skills, and ability to handle mul-
tiple tasks necessary.
Partner-friendly work environ-
ment where quality of service is
valued. Excellent compensation
package including benefits.
Interested candidates may fax
their resume to 850-926-2551
Attn: Edie Rowell EOE/DFWP


114 Miscellaneous Help
Wanted


Experienced, mature Barber/Styl-
ist with own clientele, 926-4080
120 Services and Busi-
nesses

A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING
Free Estimates
Licensed John Farrell
926-5179
566-7550


106 W.5th Ave.
Tallahassee, FL 32303
(850)-222-2166 tel.
www.wmleeco.com


1.-1


A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING
Free Estimates
Licensed ~ John Farrell
926-5179
566-7550
Affordable Handyman Services.
Interior/Exterior painting, cleaning,
soft/pressure wash, cool seal, car-
pentry and many other odd jobs.
References avail. Bobby/Carol
926-2462 459-1071.
AIR CON OF WAKULLA
Heating and Cooling
Gary Limbaugh 926-5592
3232 Crawfordville Highway
Service, Repair, Installation
FL Lic. #CAC1814304

ALL ABOUT...
CONCRETE lANDSCAPE
blocks plants
bricks sod
pavers tractor work
call JOSEPH FRANCIS
850-556-1178/ 850-926-9064

All Your Animals LLC Pet sitting.
Straight from the heart care.
Equine expert experienced -
reliable 850-510-5798.
www.allyouranimals.com
ANYTIME ELECTRIC
Specializing in repair and service,
residential and commercial,
homes and mobile homes,
24-hour service. Mark Oliver,
ER0015233. 421-3012.
BACK FORTY TRACTOR
SERVICE Bushhogging, Box-
blading Driveway. Larry Carter
Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931,
850-694-7041. Licensed/Insured.
Bella's Bed & Biscuit Doggie
Daycare.
Overnight boarding. Extended
stays. Kennel free home environ-
ment. Lots of love & pampering.
926-1016 or 519-4529.
C & R Tractor/Backhoe Services,
large tract and residential site
clearing rock, dirt, and road base
hauling, call Crandall
(850)933-3346.
CJ's Lawn Services & More
(Ask about the more!)
850-421-9365 (If we don't answer,
please leave message)

CJ's Lawn Services & More
(Ask about the more!)
850-421-9365.
(If we don't no answer, please
leave message).


Harold Burse Stump Grinding
926-7291.


205 Antiques


Jack's B-Quick Boarding Kennel:
Large play yards, controlled envi-
ronment, indoor/outdoor runs, all
sizes/breeds. Two blocks from
bike-trail. www.jacksbquick.com
850-576-5552


KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR
Commercial, residential and mo-
bile homes. Repair, sales, service,
installation. All makes and mod-
els. Lic. #RA0062516. 926-3546.


Lawn service, tractor work, bush
hog, residential and commercial.
Warren Property Services. Call
Phillip 519-1853


Mr. Stump
Stump Grinding
Quick Service
Cellular: 509-8530


Porter Painting, LLC.
Residential/Commercial. New
construction, remodeling, interior,
exterior, cabinetry refurbishing,
fences. Free local estimates. In-
sured, Workers Comp certified
850-519-0416


Antiques and Uniques
"Somiellhiin for Everyone"
6 1 Rose Street,
Sopchoppy, ,L 32358
850-962-2550
HOURS



220 Cars

1979 OLDS Delta 88 Royale, runs
good, fair shape, Classic 350,
Must see to appreciate, $2,200 or
B.O., 926-8083

225 Trucks

2003 Dodge Grand Caravan.
Great on gas! 6cyl. Seats 7, power
windows, seats and doors. Re-
cently tuned up. $4,850, obo Call
ArcnQr._r,1 I4-l*


Bedroom: Complete Designer
7-Pc Set, all new. Sacrifice $849.
545-7112. Can deliver.
CHERRY dining table and 6 chairs
- all NEW boxed at factory. $499.
Call 425-8374.
Micro-Fiber sofa/loveseat. $549.
Earthtone, hardwood frame, war-
ranty, new in .crate, delivery avall-
able. 545-7112.
Queen Orthopedic Pillowtop NEW
mattress set in sealed plastic. Full
warranty. Sacrifice $289. Can de-
liver. 425-8374.

310 Firewood Products



Re-Elect

SHERIFF



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!
vWwycrtStwrhrif, t=raftf


U 320 Farm Products &
230 Motor Homes and L Produce
Campers I Produce
Campers


1986 Winnebago LaSharo mini
motor home. Very nice, low mile-
age, automatic, 4-cylinder, gas
turbo, 15-18mpg. $5000. Can be
seen at Panacea RV Park Call
229-294-2818, 229-485-7808
850-556-0615


250 Sporting Goods


Re-Elect

SHERIFF N



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!
Witc^ Anwr~wnO~~ina rfpJmld~ro a
Onrrf Hywf fpt vu l w C


275 Home Furnishings

$159 Queen Pillowtop mattress
set, unused in plastic w/warranty.
222-9879. Delivery available.


Green Peanuts for boiling, hand
picked and pot ready. Blanched
peas and farm fresh eggs. Raker
Farm 926-7561.

335 Pets

My name is McGruff and I am six
months old. I am of German
Shepherd/Wolf and Rottweiler de-
cent. All my brothers and sisters
were adopted leaving me very
lonely. I am very loyal and protec-
tive. I would like to be adopted by
a family that has an older child
and need to be able to play and
run. I love chewing on and play-
ing with old soccer balls and have
been taught to sit and lay down.
926-5970


Adopt a pet from the animal
shelter

Dogs:
Catahoula, Blue Heeler mix
German Shepherd
Lab mix, yellow
German Shepherd mix
Golden Retriever/Lab mix


Terrier mix
Pointer mix
Lab mixes
Catahoula mix
Min Pin mix
Chihuahua mix
Basenji mix
Many other nice mixes. Come ar
take a look.


Puppies:
Lab/Chow mixes, very cute
Lab puppy mixes, very cute

Nice cats and kittens.

CHAT Adoption Center:
Monday closed
Tuesday through Wednesday
& Friday: 11:00AM to 4:30PM
Thursday: 11:00AM to 7:00 PM
Saturday: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM
Sunday: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM
www,chatofwakulla.org


4, -.


As you can see, I am a good
sport, but could you please rescue
me? My name is Karen, and I am
a 4 month old Bull Terrier/Lab mix
with a wonderful disposition! I love
to play, and don't mind being
dressed up from time to time.
Won't you come by the Adoption
Center on 1 Oak Street and adopt
me. I would really love to have a
place I can call my forever homel!
For more information on Karen or
any of our furry friends available
for adoption call (850) 926-0890 ,
or available dogs from the second
class of "Paws in Prison" call
Cathy Sherman (850) 264-4511.


355 Yard Sales


i


Two Family yard sale. Lots of
items, an old oak table and other
furniture some antiques. Dining
room table and chairs, dressers,
some vintage collectibles, clothes
and lots more. Fri. & Sat. Oct.
10th & 11th (850)926-9106 or
(850)926-5575
Multi-Family sale. Household, of-
fice, clothes, electronics, toys. 440
Harvey Mill Road. Saturday 8a.m.
- until...


2 Pc Full/twin mattress sets in
sealed plastic NEW $129 ea. set.
Can Deliver. 545-7112.


125 Schools and Instruc- 3 pc King pillowtop matt set.
Brand new in wrapper $269. Can
tions deliver. 222-7783.


Michelle Snow
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
926-7627
Music lessons of all types for all
ages.


Walkers Mill
$69,900. 2 ac. lots, located on
Lower Bridge Road.


Carmen Rocio 2 ac. lot off
Shadeville Hwy near
Wakulla Station. $64,900.

2 acre tract with large
hardwoods in Beechwood
Subdivision off Shadeville
Hwy. $52,900.
Two 5+ acre tracts off
Rehwinkel Rd. w. large trees on
the back of properties and a
small pond. Can be
purchased together.


5 piece bedroom set. Brand new in
boxes, $449. Can Deliver,
425-8374.
BEAUTIFUL CHERRY solid wood
sleigh bed & mattress. New. $369.
222-9879.


Call
Donna Card
850-508-1235
..9 .


***Brand New Subdivision*** **Affordable & Convenient**
Carmen Maria -$34,900. Montejo $34,900
Lots up to 1 ac. in size. Located off ofBelairRoad. City
Underground electric and Wa- of Tallahassee underground elec-
ter. Conveniently located to trick, water, & sewer. Convenient
Tallahassee and Lake Talquin. to Tallahassee .L 1.Tarks Bike
Trail, and WlakJlla Springs



,' :.'- -
: .


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Re-Elect

SHERIFF



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!
. ,. .r i . '


Five Star Plumbing
Big Bend, Inc.
P O
Commercial L
& Residential -
Service

Billy B. Rathel, Jr.
850-544-5062
850-421-1237 Fax
plumbingive_star@yahoo.com
Lic#CFC1427547 State Certified


Savannah Forest
$45,900. 1+ ac. tracts off
Wakulla Aaron Rd.


Sellars Crossing
$65,900. 1+ ac lots
North Wakulla Co..
On Ace High Stable Rd


N- L L
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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008


355 Yard Sales


ELECT

CHARLIE


'3


FOR

SHERIFF


*
Political advertisement paid for and
approved by Charlie Creel,
No Party Affiliation, for Sheriff

43 Holly Avenue, Saturday, Octo-
ber 11 from 8:00a.m.-until...
Three Family Sale: Home decor,
bed & bath accessories, furniture,
tons of clothes, shoes (adult, teen
and toddler)
Friday/Saturday 8a.m.-4p.m.
Clothes 10/ea., grab bags
500/ea., shoes 25(/ea., box-sale
$1.00/up. Lots of other cheap
stuff. 165 P.A. Sanders Rd., Sop-
choppy.


Saturday and Sunday 159 Trice
Lane. Furniture, toys, clothes, pool
covers, pressure washer.


Trinity Lutheran Church, across
from WHS Hwy. 98 Assorted
treasures, raffle, food & games,
baked goods and music, 8-2
415 Announcements



Re-Elect
SHERIFF

*HAREYM
KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!


420 Card of Thanks


A Huge Thank You From The Wa-
kulla High School Navy Junior
ROTC -- The War Eagle NJROTC
Booster Club, in conjunction with
Posey's Up The Creek, sponsored
our 16th Annual Fish Fry on Sep-
tember 26th. The Booster Club
worked with many businesses and
members of the community to
present this scrumptious event.
This is one of our largest fund
raising events each year, and this
year was a record-setting year. So
we would like to thank each one
of our contributors for all their
help!!! Adams Produce, Ameris
Bank, Angelo's Backwoods Bistro
Bistro at Wildwood, Brian Lang-
ston, Coca-Cola Company, David
Moss, Donna Kent, Ed Brimner El
Jalisco, Envision Credit Union,
Farm Bureau Ins., George Green,
Gulf State Bank, Hardee's, Hook
Wreck Henry's, Hoss, Huddle
House, Mary Wisner, Maxie Law-
hon, Mike Barwick, Myra Jean's,
Noah Posey, Party Tents & More,
Publix, Riverside Cafa, Seineyard,
Sonic, Sopchoppy Grocery,
Spring Creek Restaurant, Subway,
Two Nichols Restaurant, Wakulla
Bank, Wal-Mart, Winn Dixie,
Woodville IGA


500 Real Estate


PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it ille-
gal
to advertise "any preference, limi-
tation, or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or national ori-
gin or an intention to make any
such preference, limitation or dis-
crimination." Familial status in-
cludes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing the custody of
children under the age of 18.
This newspaper will not accept
any advertising for real estate
that is a violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To corn-
plain of discrimination call HUD
toll free at 1-800-669-9777. The
toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


SNc e f

510 Acreage for Sale


Re-Elect
SHERIFF



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!
{esweaw nt US DU.wwttar

515 Apartments for Rent

Shell Point Studio Apartment.
Fantastic view. Full kitchen, W/D,
huge bath, king murphy bed, fully
furnished. Available November.
$650/mo., plus utilities. 6-month
lease. 850-591-3306


S520 Townhu530 Comm. Property for
S520 Townhouses for Rcnt 0 Rent I


Camelot Park 27-C Gulnevere Ln.
Beautiful Crawfordville 3BR/2BA,
like brand new, freshly painted,
new carpet, new refrigerator, gor-
geous view of pool. $885/mo+de-
posit. Kristen Scovera Keller-Wil-
liams agent/owner 850-443-2460


Commercial building on busy
Hwy. 98/Panacea for rent.
$550/month. $550/security. Och-
lockonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001.
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com
For lease: 2-story commercial
building on 2 lots. 1680 sq.ft. in
Panacea, $1,200/month, $1,200
deposit 850-984-5800


*GRADE-A OFFICE SPACE!*
Hwy. frontage offices avail. Great at-
mosphere. Rent + tax includes:
utilities, trash p/u and kitchen use.
Common area cleaned. 1st and last
month's rent. One month free with
13/mo lease. Call 926-4511 for info.
CALL (850) 926-4511


Mini-Warehouse Spaces for lease,
8X10 and 10X12 now available.
Come by or call Wakulla Realty,
926-5084.


n Ii- 10-DAY SALES EVENT

October 10"l-19 .
Bringing more buyers and sellers together.
Take advantage of this opportunity to save thousands
R \-on the purchase of your new home. ,., .c
These homes are open during this special time of reduced ,ar
prices. Coll the Sales Professional listed for your tur. ,,,,,1..1..
...... .. . ,1 n .-

Tastefully Space! Privacy! 5+ Acres!
Decorated! $ -5,0 $173,000
$139;900 $133,000 5Br/2Ba has tile floor-
Immaculate ing, newer appliances
3Br/2Ba on Acre & fresh paint! Country
in great area. New Ceramic tile, All appliances, pretty yet only 10 miles to the
fenced yard. #186956 Call Jeannie Porter 566-4510 Capitol. #184080 Call
Lionel Dazevedo 284-6961


FOR SWING & SLIDE SET
$19;900 $174,900
NEW 3BR/2BA FAM-
ILY HOME IN THE HAM-
MOCKS. BACKYARD B-B-
Q'S, CHILDREN PLAYING,
NEAR SCHOOLS, CHURCH-
ES & SHOPPING. #185783 CALL Joi HOPE 210-7300


34 Acre of Counti
$269;000$242,900 Living
in the country just does
not get better. New, brick.
home city water, paved
street, big trees, laminated
floors, tray ceilings. #187186
Call Joi Hope 210-7300


Quality Construction Corner Lot!
$59;900 $158,900
3Br/2Ba, high ceil-
ings, nice floor plan,
Garage, Storage Shed,
Privacy fencing & nice
landscaping. #188114 Call Joi Hope 210-7300


HARTUNG AND
NOBLIN, INC.
REALTORS
www.coldwellbanker.com


TOP AGENTS FOR SEPTEMBER 2008
'OP SALES TOP LTSTER TOP PRODUCER


lope Jeannie Porter Ed McG
ASSOCIATE CRS, GRI, CeMS Realt
7300 445-1906 524-49
850-926-2994 Phone 850-926-4875 Fax
2650-1 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327
Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated


ruffey
or
940


MLS.


5 4 Acre Homesite
_____#185703-te"006$90,000l
www.coldwellbankerwakulla.com Cal Joi Hope 210-7300
2650-1 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327
[R 850-926-2994 Phone 850-926-4875 Fax -.
A Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated MLS,


S -
*~~:yjdclIqs


Joi H
BROKER A
210-7


..tB.


Emli


I


- -

















THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008 Page 9B


530 Comm. Property for
Rent




STORAGE

MINI-WAREHOUSES
BOATS RV'S

519-5128 *508-5177
2 miles South of Courthouse
on Hwy. 319 in Crawfordville
24 Hour Access Video Surveillance

Woodville Retail
Space Available
Fitness Studio-1000/sf
(Wall to wall mat & mirrors)
Retail -1250/sf
(Storefront w/back storage)
Two-Bay Garage-1i 200/sf
Divided Office Space-1074/sf
Lewiswood Center
421-5039

545 Homes for Sale

3BR/2BA Brick home + older
rental home on 10 acres, 1-mi. So
of Courthouse on Council Moore
Rd. $525,000. 443-6127.
3BR/2BA Cypress wood home on
1.75 acres in National Forest. 100
yds. from Ochlockonee River and
public boat ramp. Central Heat &
A/C, fireplace, screened porch,
2-car-garage w/storage $125,000.
850-962-5820

555 Houses for Rent



ELECT

CHARLIE


2BR/2BA immaculate home on
quiet secluded wooded lot. Tile
floors, ceiling fans, Porches. No
smokers. $695/month. Deposit
and lease. 850-926-3318


4BR/2BA Crawfordville area. Rent
$1,500. No pets or inside smok-
ing. References and credit check
required. Call 933-1608.

Bay-front 3BR/2BA on Mashes
Sands. Partially furnished.
$875/month. $875/security. No
Pets. No Smoking. Ochlockonee
Bay Realty: 850-984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com

Crawfordville, like new. Large
2BR/2 Full Baths Duplex $675/mo.
Call Linda 850-926-1467

Ochlockonee Bay





Realty
Alligator Point! 3BR/3BA gor-
geous home in gated community.
1800/month, $1800/security. No
Pets. No Smoking.
Pine Street/Alligator Point! Cute
2BR/1BA MH. $575/month,
$575/security. No Pets. No Smok-
ing.
Crawfordville/inzy Mill!
4BR/2BA, 1600 sq.ft.
$1,575/month. $1,575/security.
No Pets. No Smoking.
2BR/1BA home in Crawfordville
on five acres. $750/month. No
Pets. No Smoking.
Canal-front 3BR/1BA on Blue
Heron/Mashes Sands.
$695/month. $695/security. No
Pets. No Smoking.
Beachfront 2BR/2BA on Alligator
Point. $1300/month. $1300/secu-
rity. No Pets. No Smoking.
2BR/1BA in Lanark/Franklin
County! $600/month. $600/secu-
rity. No Pets. No Smoking.
Commercial building on busy
Hwy. 98/Panacea for rent.
$550/month. $550/security.
Ochlockonee Bay Realty
850-984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com

Medart: Centrally located
2BR/1BA home. Lots of character
w/cypress, stonework, exposed
beams, loft and large front
porches. Located on 4 quiet
acres, lawn care and water in-
cluded. Perfect for singles or a
couple. No smokers. Small pets
considered. References. 1 yr
lease. $725/mo. First, last and
deposit. 251-4166


124.7 Acres, all or part. 5, 10, 18.9
& 99.7 acre tracts. 2+ miles of
creek front, including Smith Creek.
Includes full kitchen, two bunk-
houses, woodshed. Make offer.
984-0093.
Beautiful, untimbered, mature
wooded 20-acre tract. Easy ac-
cess from Hwy 98. Reduced
$125,000. Call Susan McKaye,
owner/agent (850)510-2477. Och-
lockonee Bay Realty.
www.hardwoodhammock.com


565 Mobile Homes for
Rent
2BR/1BA M/H off Bloxham Cuttoff.
Gas, heat and range, central a/c
washer/dryer. $250 deposit
$575/mo. Pets o.k.! 850-210-4664

2BR/1BA S/W Wakulla Gardens,
Good condition. Available now.
$500/mo.+deposit 850-322-9952
2BR/2BA (North Wakulla) M/H, re-
modeled, city water, garbage
service, included $525/mo.
+$250/deposit, no pets 926-5326
3BR/1.5BA MH on acreage
w/pond, central heat & air, clean
and roomy. No smoking.
$700/mo. $300 security deposit.
352-493-2232.
3BR/1BA M/H. 235 Webster.
Screened porch, 1 acre, fenced
yard, great shape. Call today!
$625/mo. 12-month lease (nego-
tiable). Land Lots and Homes
850-556-6694
3BR/2BA D/W on 1/2 acre off
Lower Bridge Rd. W/D available.
$800/mo. First month; deposit (ne-
gotiable). No pets. 850-926-9174
3BR/2BA well-kept doublewide,
Lake Ellen on 1/4-acre lot. $750
first, last and security deposit.
Pets ok, but extra. 850-570-0506.
3BR/2BA well-kept doublewide,
Lake Ellen on 1/4-acre lot. $600
first, last and security deposit.
Pets ok, but extra. 850-570-0506.
Crawfordville 3BR/2BA brick M/H
$800 per mo. Plus security. Forest
Realty 850-926-7043
LAKE FRONT ON LAKE ELLEN
3BR/2BA DWMH $675/mo. In-
cludes garbage & water. Next
door to owner. No pets or smok-
ing. 566-0403


Near Sopchoppy State Park like
new 2/2 mobile home large cov-
ered deck 5+ acres, nonsmoker,
no pets $495.00 + security
(850)962-2456
580 Rooms for Rent/
Roommates

Looking to share house in gated
community. A quiet and beautiful
setting. $600/mo.+half utilities.
Must pass background screening.
850-510-9662


590 Waterfront Homes/
Land I


George's Lighthouse Pointe
Unit A-3, 19 Mashes Sand Road,
Panacea, Condominium Unit.
1BR/1BA, LR, DR, CHA. Front
porch faces pool & tennis court.
Back porch faces marina & view
of bay (Both 12x30). Gated
Community w/beautiful new
landscaping. 825 sq. ft. H&C.
850-545-5057. $229,900




Re-Elect

SHERIFF M
DAVID F


KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!
*', f*_ t/I, ; o t,' .; i ; '"" 1 t, ?* r, m '


595 Vacation Rental



Re-Elect

SHERIFF



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!
Owtfa paw Sr, fcfar


600 Open House


ELECT

CHARLIE


ADVERTISE YOUR
OPEN HOUSE UNDER
THIS CATEGORY
for as little as

$8.00

or$12.00
WITH A PHOTO
call 926-7102 for details


FOR

SHERIFF



Political advertisement paid for and
approved by Charlie Creel,
No Party Affiliation, for Sheriff ; .".


Bond Money, Ship Money FL Assistance Money

Priced to Sell!

71 Surf Rd

3 bed 2 bath home
-on .31 acre. Com-
pletely updated over
last 4 years. New
tile, appliances, siding, carpet, baths, air conditioner
and septic pump. Fenced back yard on paved road
with the Wildlife Refuge on 3 sides. Close to Sop-
choppy, fishing and hunting areas. #1996 $89,900

p CaII 926-8120
M... MS, www.shellpointrealty.com'"n


FOR

SHERIFF


*
Political advertisement paid for and
approved by Charlie Creel,
No Party Affiliation, for Sheriff
2BR/1BA house with
fireplace/deck with access to Wa-
kulla River $750.00/mo. First and
last month. Call (850)926-2783.
2BR/1BA in Wakulla Gardens. 59
Chicopee. New 2006 home. Tile,
carpet, new appliances, washer,
rocking chair porch, nice yard.
$725/mo for 12-month lease (ne-
gotiable). Land Lots and Homes
850-556-6694
2BR/1BA on 1/2 acre. Dining and
living room, w/fireplace in great
room. $725/mo. + $1,025 deposit.
850-926-5088
Crawfordville, cozy 2BR/1BA on
fenced 5 acres. Close yet private.
$750/mo. Alltell 919-880-6152

Wakulla
Realty'


Sonya Hall
Lic. Real Estate Broker
"Specializing in Wakulla Co."
(850) 926-5084
FOR RENT:
4Br 2Ba Hs
$750 mo + Sec. Dep.
Avail. Oct. 15

3Br 2Ba Hs
$925 mo + Sec. Dep.

3Br 2Ba Hs
$850 mo + Sec. Dep.
(1 Car Garage)

3Br 3Ba Twnhs
$875 mo + Sec. Dep.

2 3Br 2.5Ba Twnhs
$850 mo + Sec. Dep.

3Br 2.5Ba Twnhs
$800 mo + Sec. Dep.

3Br 2Ba DWMH
$850 mo + Sec. Dep.

3Br 2Ba DWMH
$650 mo + Sec. Dep.

3Br 2Ba SWMH
$650 mo + Sec. Dep.

2Br 2Ba SWMH
$550 mo + Sec. Dep.


I


38Chickat Tr. $99,000.
ROCK BOTTOM PRICE!!!! 3BR/2BA ,split
plan, rocking chair front porch, large master
bedroom with large walking closet, and trey
ceilings. Livingroom has cathedral ceilings,
city water, indoor laundry room, and all on an over sized lot. Selling as
is with the right to inspect.Will consider lease/purchase, call Dawn.


i


Reduced Rental!! 2BR/1.5BA
2-story furnished house, very pri-
vate. Within Sopchoppy city limits.
Many extras. $750/mo+deposit
(negotiable). 850-528-4341 or
850- 962-9312


321 Rehwin


$169,0
-Mooe-in ready. this 3B1
.-,-. acre n ith recent update
en. a c. rloortrcg and paint Large garagerorkshop Conw
od n and c,-,,, Alko ailable for rent for $i900 r month


560 Land for Sale

124.7 acres, 5, 10, 18.9 & 99.7
acre tracts. 2+ miles of creek front, Elaine
including Smith Creek. Full Gary
kitchen, two bunkhouses, wood- Gary
shed. $5,500/acre 984-0044 509-5409


Brain


1 2 3

3 4 5

6 7

8 6 3

4 5 6 8 2 9

92 1

2 3

'7 9 6

1 5 8

Each puzzle Is divided into nine sections, and each section
has nine blank squares. Fill In all 81 squares on the puzzle with
numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of
the nine sections that you've already used elsewhere In that
section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once In each
horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of
nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly fill
every square.


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C 9 96 6 e E t 9 9L
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suo!inlos


Susan
Jones
566-7584


ACROSS
1. Islands greeting
6. Trimmed down
11. Toss in
14. Co-Nobelist of
1978
15. Quickly, to
Shakespeare
16. Lea low
17. Quit for the day
19. Hoo-ha
20. Dance at some
weddings
21. Prefix with con
22. Big name in furs
24. Make
homogeneous,
maybe
26. La (old car)
28. "Quietl"
32. In the works
34. Solo for Bocelli
35. Ipanema's locale
36. Deliver a tirade
37. Assaulted like
Moe
39. The second "36"
of 36-24-36
40. Onassis, in
headlines
41. Game in which
Mr. Boddy has
been murdered
42. Oater assembly
43. Debate heatedly
against
47. Marina sights
48. Classic Welles
role
49. Feeds, in a sty
51._-relief
52. Gag response, In
entertainment
mags
56. Wine and dine,
say
57. Conclude
negotiations
successfully
61. Escort's offering
62. Permeate
63. More dire
64. USO show
attendees


222 Tillis Lane $205,900.
Final Reduction! Builders Blowout!! "The Richland"
built by Advanced Builders. 3BR/2BA with 1627 sq.
ft. on .82 acres. This beautiful home offers, ceramic
tile, carpeting, formal dining room, gas fireplace,
kitchen with bar overlooking living areas, cathedral ceilings, planter ledges, covered
back porch, 2 car garage, and much more. This is a must see. Call Cristy or Elaine.


kel Road Pueblo Trail $138,000
Quality built New construction 3BR/2 5BA, 1-car garage
)00. All i ppliances included Masjer Bedroom do"nil:airs
R;2BA home on I %,th adduninal nromi upsiair' Chemrry 'iod Lanumnate
Including kitch- loonng throughout nnme. tile in bathr.ooms and some
enernllv liocied to carpel Malter Bath has uled jacLzzi lub tith his & her
h Call Elaine 'inks MNlaler bedroom has nice walk-in closet E tra atmi
Ssiorage and deck in backyard Call Susan for more details
-BlueWater Dawn
Realty Group R .
850-926-8777 Reed
www BueaterRealtyGroupcom 294-346Cristy
2543 Crawfordville Hwy. Suite 1 Rivers
Check out www Wakullalnro.com 519-9039 )A


65. Take the tiller
66. Get melodramatic

DOWN
1. "The Nazarene"
author Sholem
2. "Mission:
Impossible" theme
composer
Schifrin
3. The nose knows
it
4. Might possibly
succeed
5. Cleaned one's
plate
6. Thin and delicate,
like baklava
layers
7. Lhasa (small
dog)
8. "Go, team!"
9. Green's prefix
10. "Scarface"
director Brian


11. Far from
professional
12. Bird clubbed to
extinction
13. Way in or out
18. Condo division
23. _-mo replay
25. King found in
1922
26. "No problem"
27. Like the Sahara
28. Concordes
caused them
29. Like the old
bucket of song
30. Much of a
bartender's
Income
31. Vacuum hookup
32. Fast-shrinking
Asian sea
33. Casino card
game
37. Whodunit's
essence


a oa
080921
38. Sharers' word
39. Conrad Hilton's
realm
41. Auto frame
42. Grenade pull-out
44. Keystone
lawman
45. Roller Derby
player
46. Do the laundry
49. Pirates' haul
50. Petty of "A
League of Their
Own"
51. Smurf-colored
53. Prefix with drome
54. Like McDonald's
food
55. Run for it
58. CPR giver
59. "Honest"
nickname
60. Ram's mate


Re-Elect

SHERIFF



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!


Teasers


-


-"


oi l -"


















Society to hold dinner meeting


The Wakulla County Historical Society
will host its annual dinner meeting at
Wakulla Springs Lodge on Oct. 14 at 7
p.m.
It is suggested that members and
guests arrive earlier to allow seating be-
fore the buffet dinner is served. Society
officers will be chosen for the 2008-09
business year before the introduction
of our featured speaker, Dr. Joe Knetsch,
historian with the Bureau of State Lands.
Dr. Knetsch is well-known as an interest-
ing speaker and prolific writer of Florida
history, primarily of the Seminole Wars.
He has also done much research regarding
the Forbes Purchase in Wakulla County
and how the Supreme Court ruling influ-
enced Wakulla history and the demise of
the Town of Magnolia. The society has
had Dr. Knetsch as a speaker before and is
pleased that he will be speaking again.


Yard of the Month winner

The Panacea Waterfronts Committee has selected the home and yard of Melanie and Grady Gibbs as
the October Yard of the Month. The Gibbs family lives on Levy Bay Road.


The society is also looking forward to
opening the Wakulla County Historical
Museum and Archives in the Old Jail
before year's end. "We are excited and
further information will be forthcoming,"
said Betty Green,
The Wakulla Heritage Village com-
mittee is at work and will hold its next
meeting on Oct. 16 at 6:30 p.m., at the
library. Interested citizens are welcome
to attend. This is a long-range project
which is worthy of much support. The
third endeavor is the production of the
book, The Heritage of Wakulla County, FL.
"We are still hoping to receive the books
before Christmas and will keep the public
posted," Green said. Tickets are $25.
For information concerning any of the
Historical Society's events please feel free
to call or write Betty Green, 926-7405, or
bgreen@nettally.com.


Moms in Touch meets weekly
Moms In Touch Inter- Moms in Touch is a group administrators.
national holds meetings of two or more moms who For more information,
every Wednesaday from meet for an hour each week call Sharon Fox at 590-6227
9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at the to pray for their children, or e-mail at shudsonfox@
Wakulla County Library. their schools, teachers and yahoo.com.




















Sdhiol News


s- WHS special education


i students bowl up a storm


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008 Page 13A


Fran Councill with Wakulla varsity and junior varsity cheerleaders.

WHS cheerleaders give back


The 2008-2009 Wakulla
High School junior varsi-
ty and varsity cheerleaders
wanted to give back to the
community and determined
that helping the Wakulla
County EMS program would
be a good way to do so.
The squads got together
and gave Wakulla EMS of-
ficials stuffed animals Oct. 1
to pass out to victims in time
of need. EMS Director Fran


Council accepted the dona-
tion from the students.
The junior varsity cheer-
leaders include Captain Blair
Tucker, Captain Jasmine
Casey, Kelsey Weems, Mary
Warren Adkinson, Brooke
Edwards, Becca Pearce, Holly
Harper, Hailee Clark, Em-
ily Stewart, Crystal Womble,
Amanda Piland, Chelseyn
Cogland, Cassi McFarland.
Chelsi Taff. Olivia Tooke,


Kaiya Sharpio and Coach
Bethany Evans.
The varsity squad includes
Captain Kimberley Franklin,
Co-Captain Amanda Council,
Shelby Cash, Lanie Mills,
Meci Brown, Kristen Frank-
lin, Rachel Aderhold, Izzy
Mohrfield, Ashley Harrington,
Shelbi Davis, Lauren Hanner,
Meredeth Flanders, Daphne
Sapp, Angel Black and Coach
Lori Sandgren.


Pre-K strives for world record


av-Ma, Z LIE,'


L.
-... .


Wakulla students show off their bowling skills as they prepare for the Olympics.


By Keith Cline
WHS Correspondent
On Wednesday, beginning
Sept. 17, more than 80 Wakulla
County athletes at all grade
levels, began participating in
Special Olympics bowling.
The lanes saw more athletes
and teachers this year than
there were celebrities at the


2008 MTV Video Music Awardsl
This year's location was Capital
Lanes in Tallahassee. This awe-
some new bowling alley was
rebuilt due to a fire several
years ago. The kids bowled
better than they ever bowled
before. Kandi Jo Bonin, a high
school student with develop-
mental disabilities, was taught


the "happy strike" dance by
Mrs. James and Ms. Gigi, two
of our teacher's assistants. On
the way back, the bus was filled
with tired but happy students.
Participation in these games,
as well as the track events in
the spring, allow a student to
be eligible to travel to the state
games in Orlando in May.


National 10-Day sales event set


Superintendent David Miller reads to young Wakulla County Pre-K students.


A vital part of the Wakulla Pre-
K mission includes early literacy.
On Thursday, Oct 2, students at
the District Pre-Kjoined hundreds
of thousands of children and
adults around the world in setting
a world record by all simultane-
ously reading the book Corduroy,
by Don Freeman. Superinten-
dent David Miller joined in the
activities by reading Corduroy to
a Pre-K class. "Reading stories to
our littlest learners is one of my
greatest pleasures. It is important
to take time to read to our chil-
dren and listen to them read. It's
crucial to the growth model" said
Superintendent Miller.
The initiative is as a part of the
Jumpstart's Read for the Record,
a campaign designed to bring at-
tention to the importance of early
education. By encouraging hun-
dreds of thousands of children
and adults to read the same book
on the same day, Jumpstart aims
to break a world record and to
make early education a national
priority.
"When I heard about Jump-
start's program to beat the Guin-
ness World Record, it sounded
like something that our pre-k
students would enjoy" said Kim
Dutton, Pre-K Principal

Forum will

be televised
Comcast has informed Con-
cerned Citizens of Wakulla
that CCOW's Candidate Forum
for county commission, held
at the Wakulla County Library
on Oct 7, will be broadcast on
Cable Channel 21 from 4 p.m.
to 5:30 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 10,
Saturday, Oct. 11, Tuesday, Oct.
14 and Friday, Oct. 17.

McCain rally set
A McCain/Palin Rally in the
Park will be held on Saturday,
Oct 18 from noon to 2 p.m. in
downtown Crawfordville. More
information on this event will be
announced in the coming week.
Get out the vote "calling all
voters" Saturday and Sunday, Oct
25 and Oct 26. Details will be
forthcoming. An election night
party will be held on Nov. 4.
(Details forthcoming).


Wakulla County Coldwell
Banker Hartung and Noblin
today announced it will help
bring home buyers and sell-
ers together in the Wakulla
area market by joining a bold
national Coldwell Banker
initiative that may help jump-
start the U.S. real estate mar-
ket. Starting on October
10, 2008, the nation's oldest
residential real estate brand
will kick-off its first-ever na-
tional 10-Day Sales Event.
The Coldwell Banker 10-Day
Sales Event will run nationally
through Oct 19.
"Here in Wakulla, the 10-


Day Sales Event is especially
timely. Our participating
home sellers feel that a home
priced properly to sell will
generate much more interest,"
says Chip Hartung of Coldwell
Banker Hartung and Noblin.
"We're seeing other signs of


market improvement, such as
a reduction in listings. Plus,
we're hearing loud and dear
from many of our sellers
that they're comfortable with
lowering their listing prices
if it means getting offers and
selling quickly."


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joining the Capital Health Plan Medicare program.
If you live in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, or Jefferson County
and have Medicare Part A and Part B, please call
1-877-247-6512 (850-523-7441) or TTY 1-800-955-8771
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up for a meeting to learn more about the Capital Health Plan
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each meeting. You also can speak to a sales representative
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Tallahassee, FL 32308, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday
through Friday.
Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare
contract. For accommodations of persons with disabilities,
please call one of the numbers above.


H51-938_2008 0807_0.04_080807 .


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I















Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008


Sports


War Eagles score twice in final two minutes for victory


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
For all but the final two
minutes of the Wakulla War
Eagle-Blountstown Tiger
football game, it appeared
that the War Eagles would
fall in the road contest. But
two touchdowns in the fi-
nal minutes helped Coach
Scott Klees' squad escape
a Friday, Oct. 3 Calhoun
County disaster.
Wakulla topped the Ti-
gers 16-6 in a defensive
struggle that featured lots
of turnovers.
Coach Klees said his team
was fortunate to commit
turnovers deep in Blount-
stown territory which kept
the Tigers from mounting
an offensive threat.


The Tigers scored in the
second quarter on a blocked
punt. Klees said the Wakul-
la special teams unit contin-
ues to struggle.
The defense, however,
came to the rescue for
Wakulla, and kept the of-
fense in position to win
the game.
"The defense carried us,"
said Coach Klees. "They
were unbelievable. The
gave up one completed
pass and 77 yards on the
ground."
Wakulla had a difficult
time taking advantage of
the defensive effort be-
cause four fumbles gave
the Tigers extra chances to
mount an offense.
Two fourth down pass-


es to Lee Smalls helped
Wakulla create just enough
offense to win.
Wakulla cut the 6-0 defi-
cit to 6-2 when the Tigers
took a safety in the third
quarter.
Smalls caught a 17 yard
touchdown pass from quar-
terback Casey Eddinger to
finally give Wakulla a 9-6
lead in the fourth quarter.
Kendell Gavin returned an
interception 45 yards for
the final points for WHS.
Morgan Henry added two
extra point kicks.
Wakulla fumbled the
ball three times inside the
Blountstown 10 yard line as
the offense was attempting
to break the goal line.
Smalls was named the


offensive and defensive
player of the game for his
efforts. Smalls had five
catches for 78 yards and
one touchdown on offense
and four tackles and two
interceptions on defense.
Tre McCullough was the
offensive knock 'em back
award winner.
"The whole defense
played well," said Klees.
"Thank God they were on
their game. Against Rick-
ards, the offense was on the
top of their game. Hopeful-
ly, we can put it all together
this week."
Klees said safety Anto-
nio Kilpatrick had a strong
game and blocked a punt.
Wakulla quarterbacks Zach


Klees and Casey Eddinger
completed eight passes
for 100 yards. Gavin was
the leading rusher with 44
yards. Kendrick Hall had
two catches for WHS.
Wakulla will host Tal-
lahassee Chiles on Friday,
Oct. 10. The Timberwolves
are 0-4 on the season, but
Klees said a performance
like the Blountstown game
will end in War Eagle de-
feat.
"We have to play better,"
said Klees. "If we play like
we played against Blount-
stown, they (Chiles) will
beat our eyes out."
Wakulla improved to 3-2
overall and remains 1-0 in
district play.


player of the game against
Blountstown

www.thewakullanews.com


Cross country runners show

speed at invitational


The WHS cross country
boys and girls teams com-
peted at the FSU Invitational
on Saturday, Sept. 27, at the
Miccosukee Greenway in
Tallahassee.
This was one of the largest
and most prestigious meets
in the state and this year
attracted more than 45 high
schools from around the
state and Georgia. The girls
team was paced by Sydney
Nutting who ran 22:20 over
the 5K (3.1 miles) distance to
place 94th overall.
She was followed closely
by freshman Emily McCull-
ers who ran 22:47 and placed
109th overall.
Others placing in the top
seven for WHS were Chelsea
Thompson (24;12), Susan
Hansen (24:33), Britany
Bentley (25:02), Alina Mc-
Cullers (25:40) and Kendalin
Burns (26:40). The boys team
was led by Scott Kelly who
ran 18:18 and placed 143


overall.
Adam Carr ran second
for WHS in 19:10 and Ben
Mathers rounded out the
top three at 19:54. Others
finishing in the top seven for
were Liam Daniels (20:13),
Will Harvey (20:13), David
Melton (21:02) and Cody
James (21:04).
The team competition
was extremely competitive
and included schools of
all classifications, from 1A
to 4A, and included many
of the top programs in the
state.
The WHS girls placed a
solid 29th with a team av-
erage time, for the top five
runners, of 23:44. The boys
placed 38th and had a team
average time of 19:49.
"This was a huge meet
and probably the stiffest
competition our kids will
face all year," said Coach Paul
Hoover. "It was a good learn-
ing experience for them and


I was pleased, overall, with
their performance. It shows
us were we are making good
progress and those areas
that we need to improve
in. Many of our runners
ran their season best times,
which is what we were hop-
ing for. We are looking for
improvement from week to
week, so that by the time we
get to Districts next month,
we will be competitive.
Senior Susan Hansen had
an especially good race and
improved her all-time per-
sonal record by almost a
minute in the race and Emily
McCullers, Cora Atkinson,
Liam Daniels, Will Harvey.
David Melton. Brian Brown
and Joshua Smith improved
their season best times by
over one minute, which in a
5K is a lot."
The teams will next com-
pete on Oct. 18 at Bay High
School in Panama City.


Bears end Marianna winning streak


SWhen the Riversprings
football team traveled to Mari-
anna on Sept. 30, they knew
they would be matching up
against a good football team.
The Bullpups of Marianna
had two undefeated seasons
under their belts and were
working on a third, with a
4-0 start this season. The 2-0
Bears have high aspirations
themselves for the season,
and refused to be victory
number 18 in a row for Mari-
anna. In the end, the Bears
posted a 30-8 victory over the
Bullpups.
The Bears had a huge
offensive night from Mikal
Cromartie. Cromartie caught
two passes for 48 yards and
a touchdown, and added a
42 yard touchdown run. De-
metrius Lindsey and Dillon
Norman were leading rushers
for the Bears. Lindsey had 48
yards on nine carries with
two touchdowns and Norman
picked up 31 yards on eight
carries with a touchdown.


Quarterback James Douin was
3 of 5 passing for 48 yards
with one touchdown and one
interception. Quarterback Dal-
ton Norman also completed 3
of 7 passes for 35 yards.
Riversprings also had out-
standing nights blocking from
Brett Buckridge, Jonathan
Chunn, and Jacob Walker,
Coach Joe Jacobs said.
As usual, the RMS defense
came up big. Marianna's first
scoring drive marched 99
yards against the Bears, but
the rest of the night belonged
to the "killer paw" defense.
Demetrius Lindsey led the
way on defense with 12 tack-
les, two assists, and an in-
terception. Mikal Cromartie
chipped in seven tackles, two
assists, a forced fumble, and
an interception returned 65
yards to set up a Bear touch-
down. Dillon Norman had six
tackles, a forced fumble, two
fumble recoveries, and an in-
terception. Bubba Murray had
five tackles, many for loses,


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and constantly disrupted the
Marianna backfield all night,
as well as a forced fumble.
James Douin also played
strong defensively, provid-
ing five tackles and a forced
fumble. Michael Sarvis and
Terry Wilkins turned in out-
standing efforts.
Coach Joe Jacobs said, "Our
offensive yardage output was
low, because our defense
gave us great field position
all night. We had a short
field most of the night. Coach
Shannon Smith does a great
job with our defense."
The Bears next game
will be Thursday, Oct. 9 at J.D.
Jones Stadium against Madi-
son County. The Bears will be
facing their third straight un-
defeated opponent. The game
will be played at 7 p.m.


The Case for a Second High School

in Wakulla County


1. Current enrollment at WHS is 1,320 students.


2. Capacity of WHS is 1,450 students.

(Florida Inventory of School Houses).


3. The school district has no plans for a second high
school until 2026!

(Wakulla County School District Five Year Facilities Plan).


4. Projections for comprehensive planning purposes

project enrollment at WHS of 1,620 in 2010-2011.
(Wakulla County School Impact Fee Report. July 2006)


5. As your Superintendent of Schools, I will begin

planning for a second high school now so that we

will have a new building ready to avoid

overcrowding at the current WHS facility.


Look for my campaign DVD in your mailbox soon

or see my website at www.voteandreacarter.com

Contact me voteand~a@gmail.com
Campaign HO: 3047 Omwfbrdvilee Hwy., Cmwfordville,FL 32327 926-1 111
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Dr. Andrea Carter, Republican for Superintendent of Schools


Saturday, Oct. 11


9:00 a.m. 2:00 a.m.

Orientation and Introduction to

Field Trip Adventures

Field trips to Florida Wild Mamal, Wakulla Springs,

Division ofForestry, Gulf Specimen Marine Lab

0 and many other natural places in our community

AtTallahassee Community College,Wakulla Center

S5 Crescent Way, Crawfordville, FL
Y Website: www.tcc.fl.edu/greenguides
0"ded 196 Contact Numbers: Jo Barksdale 509-7063


"Forwwo Girbq














THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008 Page 15A


Sports


Winter recreation sports registration Meeting will be held
fnr C.al Rinklrn


WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS
& RECREATION DEPART-
MENT
2008 WINTER SPORTS REG-
ISTRATION
REGISTRATION DATES:
SATURDAY 10/18/08 & SATUR-
DAY 10/25/08
REGISTRATION TIMES: 8:00
AM TO 12:00 PM
REGISTRATION DEAD-
LINE: SATURDAY 10/25/08,
12:00 PM
REGISTRATION PLACE:ME-
DART RECREATION PARK OFF
US 98
AGE DETERMINING DATE:
SEPTEMBER 1ST
Youth Soccer
COST IS $40.00 PER
CHILD
AGES 6 & UNDER DIVI-
SION Players must be 5 prior
to 9/1/08 and may turn 7 on
or after 9/1/08
8 & UNDER DIVISION Play-
ers must be 7 prior to 9/1/08
and may turn 9 on or after
9/1/08
10 & UNDER DIVISION
- Players must be 9 prior to


9/1/08 and may turn 11 on or
after 9/1/08
12 & UNDER DIVISION
- Players must be 11 prior to
9/1/OS and may turn 13 on or
after 9/1/08
14 & UNDER DIVISION -
Players must be 13 prior to
9/1/08 and may turn 15 on or
after 9/1/08
*14 & Under Division will
be a 6 on 6 league. It will start a
little later than all the other
Soccer divisions and WILL
NOT interfere with Middles
School Soccer Teamsll
Practices may start in No-
vember and continue into
December. Games will begin
in January after the winter
holidays and run for approxi-
mately 6 weeks. Soccer prac-
tices and games will be held
at Medart Recreation Park.
Games will be held in the eve-
nings on Mondays, Tuesdays,
Thursday, Fridays, or Saturday
mornings. Practices times are
usually similar but are at the
discretion of the coach of each
individual team.


Youth Basketball
COST IS $40.00 PER
CHILD
AGES: 6 & 7 Division -Player
must be 6 prior to 9/1/08
and may turn 8 on or after
9/1/08.
(The 6&7 division will prac-
tice in November and games
will start in December and
the season will hopefully end
before the winter holidays.)
8 & 9 Division Player must
be 8 prior to 9/1/08 and may
turn 10 on or after 9/1/08
10, 11, & 12 Division Player
must be 10 prior to 9/1/08
and may turn 13 on or after
9/1/08
Basketball practices and
games will be held at the
middle schools or Old Craw-
fordville
Elementary Gymnasium.
Practices may start in Novem-
ber and continue into Decem-
ber. Games will begin
in January after the winter
holidays and run for approxi-
mately 6 weeks. Games will


be held in the evenings on
Monday, Tuesdays, Thurs-
days, Fridays, or Saturday
mornings. Practices times are
usually similar but are at the
discretion of the coach of each
individual team.
There must be at least 30
players registered in order for
the basketball leagues to start.
If this requirement is not met
then refunds will be given to
registered players.
All players, basketball and
soccer, must provide proof of
health insurance or purchase a
policy for an additional $7.50.
All leagues are coed. If any
person is interested in coach-
ing or officiating any of the a
above sports, please contact
the recreation department. For
questions or more information
call 926-7227.


IV1% VPlll I llf 'l I

baseball league


The annual meeting of the
Cal Ripken Baseball League
will be held Oct. 12, at 2 p.m.
in the Library Annex.
The Cal Ripken League
is for players ages 9 to 12.
This league is a combination
of the previous two leagues
known as the Major 70 or
Little League, and Minor Cub
or Cub League.
At the annual meeting the
new Constitution and Bylaws
of the Cal Ripken Baseball


League will be reviewed and
the new board will be elected.
Any adult wishing to serve as
either a board member or man-
ager of a team should contact
Jennifer Briggs at mbriggs@
tampabay.rr.com, and plan on
attending the annual meeting.
Volunteers will be required to
complete and pass the Florida
Department of Law Enforce-
ment (FDLE), background
check. This can be picked up
at the Recreation Park.


Soccer meeting slated
There will be a parent meeting for WHS boys soccer on Mon-
day, Oct. 27 at WHS Room 304 at 7 p.m. It is kindly requested
that parents attend this informative meeting.


Punt, Pass and Kick contest

will be offered next week


Boys and girls, ages 8 to
15, come test your skills at
punting, passing and kick-
ing the football competition
which will be held at Medart
Recreation Park on Tuesday,
Oct. 14 at 6 p.m. at Field 8.
Each participant will have
one punt, pass and kick the


distance will be measured by
accuracy as well as distance.
Winners will advance to a
sectional competition held
in November. Those win-
ners will receive three free
tickets
to a Jaguars game and
compete for the team cham-


pionship at Jacksonville Mu-
nicipal stadium.
Cost is free. Players need
to bring a copy of their
birth certificate. No cleats
allowed.
For more information,
please call Noreen Britt at
926-7227.


Golfers continue outstanding play


The Wakulla War Eagle
golf team topped Maclay,
Florida High and FAMU High
at a recent match at Wild-
wood Country Club. Wakulla
scored a 140 to 159 for Ma-
clay, 169 for Florida High and
222 for FAMU High.
Spencer Smith shot a 33
along with Stone Cowie.


Cody Sapp added a 37 along
with Conner Smith and Wil-
liam Davis.
The Lady War Eagles
placed second behind Chiles
and ahead of Lincoln. Chiles
scored a 197 to 200 for WHS
and 224 for Lincoln.
The match was held at
Wildwood. Devon Lowe


shot a 46 while Rebecca
Rivers added a 49, Hannah
Lovestrand shot a 50 and
Brooklynn Tindall shot a
55.


Tourney will be held


The Wakulla County Weath-
erization Department will be
hosting a golf tournament to
celebrate its annual Weath-
erization Day. The tourna-
ment will be held on Oct.
17 at 8:30 a.m. at Wildwood
Country Club. The registra-
tion fee is $50 per person and
includes a buffet luncheon.
The proceeds will go toward
performing weatherization on
low income family homes in
Wakulla County and to help
bring awareness of energy
conservation.


For more information, con-
tact Mr. Robin Dias at 926-6292
or rdias@mywakulla.com.

,4; A Personal
-. Trainer Is An
1 Affordable
&Effective
Way to Maximize
Your Workout!
Gena Davis
Personal Trainer
926-7685 or 5-10-2326


J t h ^kfcas



BACKHOE and DUMPTRUCK TRAINING
offered at a reduced cost through EWD at
Tallahassee Community College.
Classes start October 20th
Backhoe $159 Dump Truck $54


This training offers industry-recognized certification through
the National Center for Construction Education and Research.


What we v


career in 1973. David Mille


d vi- M ill* r .. S -** a basc .--- p




David Miller..
r, "


vant in a Superintendent of Schools!
True Public Service David Miller haspassionately'
spent the last 35 years in service to, the Wakul(a County "
School District, to his community and to his church..
Experience When It Matters Most David
S1. Miller has extensive experience and training as the Chief
Executive Officer of a school district. He has attended
and received credentials from FSU, FAMU and Vanderbilt
University.
S Dedication David Miller has been visible and support-
ed academic programs, student activities, athletic events,
performing arts and ROTC programs since he began his
r has visited more than 2,800 classrooms and attended more than 1,000 extra-curricu-


lar events as Superintendent.
Proven Leadership in Wakulla County and throughout the
State of Florida as one of the senior Superintendents in Florida.


David Miller You knowhim! You trust him!
Experience, Service, Pedication.

[| *WHS, FSU, FAMU Graduate
*Recipient of Flagler College, Doctor of Laws,
I Florida 2004 Superintendent of the Year


LLD, Honorary Degree


*Chairman of the Small School District Council Consortium since 1995
*Past President of The Florida Association of District School Superintendents
*Florida Army National Guard
*Former Teacher, Coach, Assistant Principal, Principal
*Member, Rotary Club
*Member, Crawfordville United Methodist Church






Political Advertisement, paid for and approved by David Miller, Democrat, for Superintendent.


"My experience, both in andout of the class-
room, schools, athletic fields and board rooms,
has taught me the importance of a quality school
system for every student and for our community.
That's why I have spent my entire career working
for continuous improvement for Wakulla County's'
educational system."
Superintendent Miller














Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008



Comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895



Students had hoped to honor those lost on Sept. 11


Editor, The Newss
9-11: the day we are sup-
posed to "Never Forget." That
day shook our whole world.
On that day we came togeth-
er, as individuals, as families,
and as a country. However,
on the seventh anniversary
of this tragic day some did
forget. At our own Wakulla
High School there was no
moment of silence in honor
of those lost, those injured,
or those affected. People gave
their lives to this country to
save others and for what?
So we, the people that
were affected could forget


a few years later and never
acknowledge their bravery
again? There are entire days
of excused absences from
school to honor moments
in history and all we ask is
for one minute, 60 seconds
of your time to let the stu-
dents of Wakulla High School
say their silent thank yous.
Many of the students were
offended by this, so it was
brought to the attention of
the principal who said "I
had no e-mail saying it was
required we have a moment
of silence," and how this has
affected our generation more


than his.
In this county we have kids
who have graduated, and will
be graduating,, from the high
school who have and will
put their lives on the line. So
since Mr. Crouch didn't have
a moment of silence, we de-
cided to take it a step further
and contacted the Wakulla
County School Board, where
we were directed to send a
letter to our Superintendent,
David Miller.
However, before a letter
could be written David Miller
was spotted at one of the
Wakulla football games. Four


students talked to him about
the situation. Throughout
the conversation they were
spoken down to and it was
clear that this concern was
not one he shared.
All that we ask is for a mo-
ment of silence to be taken
on 9-11 from here on out. It is
well understood that the day
has passed and there is noth-
ing more we can do about
that, but you can't erase a
memory.
The school system teaches
us to stand up for what we
believe in and when we
stand up they tell us to sit


down. Our grandparents, par-
ents, and teachers tell us we
are the future of tomorrow
and we have to improve this
country that's at war and has
a suffering economy. So while
we as students try to bring a
little peace to the world in a
small school system our lead-
ers are telling us 9-11 is a day
that is forgettable.

Regan Franckhauser
Lauren St. Hillier
With the support off
Lauren Pigott
Amber Hart
Taylor Biener


Bobby Morales
Kara McLaughlin
Rachel Aderhold
Josh Allen
Tiffany Bordwell
Caitlyn Crisco
Aaron Gibbs
Christina Hannah
Kelsey Harrell
Brooke Hill
Michael Hudson
Chase Land
Zach LeJeune
Erica Pyles
Nick Singleton
Ryan Smith
Maggie Ogden


Sheriff Harvey recognized our courageous heroes


Editor, The News:
This is in response to Mr. Wymans
letter to the editor about Sheriff
Harvey and Fallen Law Enforcement
Officers.
Mr. Wymans is wrong. Sheriff
Harvey did recognize these cou-
rageous heroes, but it was done
and well attended at the Wakulla
Sheriff's Office and not in Washing-


ton D.C. Sheriff Harvey knows how
important it is to spread appreciation
for our fallen firefighters, emergency
medical technicians and law enforce-
ment officers, but it's best done in
the community he represents.
To be clear, we didn't send money
to the fallen officer's foundation in
Washington. We have plenty of mon-
ey going to Washington as it is.


Instead, the sheriff has supported
countless local programs. He has
supported the children's burn center
through the Shriners. He has helped
fund scholarships through the Ro-
tary Club and the Optimist Club.
He has participated in fundraising
activities for Citizens For Human
Treatment of Animals (C.H.A.T.), the
Refuge House, Citizens in Support


of Others and countless other non-
profit organizations. He has assisted
the Lions Club with their eyeglasses
program. He's a proud supporter of
the War Eagle football team and
the War Eagle cheerleaders. David
Harvey's even gone so far as to per-
sonally provide medicine, money,
and house repairs for folks who
couldn't afford it themselves. And


those are just a few examples.
David Harvey may not have
supported the foundation the way
Mr. Wyman's wanted, but he has
supported this community and the
people in it. And he's done it in a
way we can all be proud of. I'm proud
to call him my sheriff.
Fred Nichols
Sopchoppy


Dr. Andrea Carter deserves our wholehearted support


Editor, The News:
I am giving my wholeheart-
ed support to Dr. Andrea Carter
for Wakulla County's Superin-
tendent of Schools. I have noth-
ing against Mr. Miller, in fact I
want to express my gratitude to
him for lifting his predecessor's
ban which refused to let teach-
ers bring their classes to Gulf
Specimen Marine Lab.
Fortunately there were a few
teachers like Walter Scott who
taught at the Sopchoppy School
who openly defied the ban.
Mr. Scott loved science and,
without help from the schools,
he put on great science fairs in
the 1960s and early 70s at his
own expense. He encouraged
his students to go onto college.
Rhonda Harvey told me she,
became a pharmacist because
of his encouragement.
When Mr. Miller lifted his
predecessor's ban after he
took office, hundreds of young
Wakulla students in elementary
school began visiting Gulf Spec-
imen Marine Lab. They have
continued to do so for the past
20 years or so until this year
when budget cuts killed their
field trips. Unfortunately high
school students were never
encouraged or allowed to come,
although four years ago when
they were eating lunch at the
Landing's Restaurant in Pana-
cea, I managed to convince the
coach to let them come in for
a free tour which the students
loved. If there were more visits
from high schoolers maybe
there would be fewer teenage
pregnancies because the stu-
dents might have watched sea
urchin fertilization experiments
in progress and could see what
happens under the microscope
when sperm meet egg. Wedo
get other high school classes
coming to our lab, some from
200 hundred miles away, so I
know it can be done.
It's crazy not to expose
Wakulla high school students
to technology, or to let them
take advantage of the scien-
tific assets in this region. How
many trips have they made to
Wakulla Springs, or to the St.
Marks National Wildlife Refuge,
or the FSU Marine Laboratory,
or the FSU High Magnetics
Field Lab? .
I'm supporting Dr. Andrea
Carter because I believe she will
help bring science back into our
schools and better prepare our
students to be more competi-
tive in this technology driven
world. We don't need a lot of
charts and graphs showing
that FCAT scores and student
interest declines the longer
they stay in school. Maybe
hormones play a part, maybe
it's the day-after-day dullness of
boring classes that numbs the
mind and reduces the scores,
I don't know. I do know that
science fairs played very impor-
tant part in my education and
stimulated my interest in the
world around me.
I am saddened by the fact
that Wakulla High has done
away with its science fair pro-
gram. If it were not for local,
regional and state science
fairs that were taking place in


1960s, when I was a high school and educational institutions.
student at Leon High, I doubt Having a high school with-
there would have been a Gulf out a science fair program is
Specimen Marine Lab. Forty reprehensible. We have an
plus years ago my research abundance of natural resources
project "Leaf Movements of the here with some of the richest
Wild Sensitive Pea" made me marine life communities in the
the second place winner in the world, yet knowledge of these
State Science Fair. And while I treasures is not part of Wakulla
didn't become a botanist, the High's curricula. National Geo-
scientific discipline and contact graphic and other scientific
with experts at Florida State media have covered the emer-
University gave me the skills gences of mating horseshoe
to start the little marine lab crabs coming to the beaches
in Panacea. It enabled me to of Mashes Sands, yet never has
publish an article on my work there been a single school bus
in Scientific American in 1961, filled with kids sent down to
which helped teach me to write the beach to witness it. There
and publish other works. are vast migrations of monarch
I'm proud of the fact that butterflies that pass through St.
Gulf Specimen helped discover Marks enroute to Mexico and
new anti-cancer drugs from the are seen by tourists who come
sea, and that mor& than 300 to witness it, but not our high
scientific papers were written school students. Many of these
over the decades based around teenagers might like to go into
the marine animals and plants wildlife science, or aquaculture
that we supplied to scientific or environmental protection if


NOTICE OF

LAND USE CHANGE

The Wakulla County Board of County
Commissioners proposes to adopt the following by
ordinance and has scheduled a Public Hearing
regarding the following before the Wakulla County
Board of County Commissioners on Monday,
October 20, 2008, beginning at 6:00 PM, and
unless otherwise noted below or as time permits.
All public hearings are held in the County
Commission Chambers located west of the County
Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to
attend and present testimony.

Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment Application:
CP08-05

AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF
COUNTY i COMMISSIONERS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AMENDING, REVISING, AND
REPLACING IDENTIFIED PORTIONS OF
THE CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS
ELEMENT AS IDENTIFIED IN
ORDINANCE NUMBER 95-30, THE
ADOPTION ORDINANCE FOR THE
WAKULLA COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE
GROWTH MANAGEMENT PLAN, AS
ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS ON NOVEMBER 30,
1995; PROVIDING SEVERABILITY; AND
PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

Applicant: Wakulla County
Proposal: revise the Capital
Improvements Element
Hearings Required: County Commission
10/20/2008 @ 6:00 PM

Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public
record files may be viewed at the County Planning Department
located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8
AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to
appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim
transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented
at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations
should call the Board Office at least 48 hours before the date for
scheduling purposes. The Board Oflice may be contacted at (850)
926-0919 orTDD 926-7962.


they knew about it.
Sometimes when I'm in
a sour mood, I believe the
government and school ad-
ministration of Wakulla County
doesn't want that to happen.
Someday Wakulla students
could be learning how to create
petroleum from plankton, how
to raise shrimp from larvae, and
farm oysters. They could study
how natural products from the
forests and sea can be used for
medicines, and develop better
math and literary skills while
doing so. With a multi-million
dollar plus budget, surely this
is possible. Their short-sighted
building boom has led to eco-
nomic collapse, the old ways no
longer work, and we must look
to our youth to fix it. For that


reason, I hope that Dr. Andrea
Carter gets elected, but if she
doesn't, I hope this letter will
be a wake up call for our school


system to bring back our high
school science fair programs
Jack Rudloe
Panacea,


0 A






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ADVERTISEMENT

DOES ALAN BROCK SUPPORT

WATER BOTTLING IN

WAKULLA?


Water plant's critics and goals for Wakulla crushed by a
ruined a good concept vocal minority who clearly do not
Know the Highs at all.
Everyone is aware that more
than 60 percent of Wakulla County
is state- or federally-owned
First, I would like to agree with is state- or federall-o ed
Robert Seidler's commentary pub- property. We
lished in last week's The Wakulla green businesses. We should not
News I agree with his observation chase away the people who are
willing to go above and beyond
that the water bottling what the law requires.
plant could have helped I have never met people so
brand Wakulla County willingtoworkwith the community
brand Wakulla County
as the Highs, Many well-meaning
across the state, nation citizens appear to have been
and world, as well as misled into overlooking the great
setting a new and high- opportunity to work with people
who genuinely care about Wakulla
er standard for merging county and Wakulla Springs.
business and environ- The Highs were sincerely
mental prudence, committed to seeking a compro-
I commend D.P. and Ruth High ise that everyone could sup-
for their efforts to build the most port. As a result of the recent
environmentally friendly water uproar and personal attacks upon
bottling plant yet known. The e Highs, etey ithdraw thei
Highs love Wakulla County and to completely withdraw their
wanted to bring business here. proposed zoning change request.
They wanted to help our economy This is not a victory for
They wanted to help our economy Wakulla County or our water,
and improve our water supply What a shame.
through much-needed retro-fitting Alan Brock
of our septic tanks,
We absolutely need to save Active Member,
Wakulla Springs, and we need Big Bend Sierra Club
money to do this. The proposed Wakulla Station
bottling plant was a logical way to
find those resources.
I appreciate all of their efforts Page 2A-THE WAKULLA NEWS,
and I am sorry to see their dreams Thursday, March 1, 2007



Comment & Opinion

ADVERTISEMENT
This ad paid for by Al Shylkofski 85 Walden Rd., Mary Cortese and Hugh Tlylor. 1357 Lower Bridge Rd. and not approved by any candidate or party.













THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008 Page 17A

Lynn Artz is a highly qualified candidate m


Editor, The News:
In November you will be
given a chance to elect a most
highly qualified commissioner
for your county government. I
would like to share with you
just one area of service and
dedication, among many. that
Dr. Lynn Artz has given to this
county over the years.
I first met Lynn about six
years ago when I was weeding
and pruning the area at the en-
trance to the library. She came
out of the building, introduced
herself and offered to help me.
While working, I told her of of

Thanks for
Editor, The News;
The War Eagle NJROTC
Booster Club, in conjunction
with Posey's Up The Creek,
sponsored our 16th Annual
Fish Fry on Sept. 26. The Boost-
er Club worked with many
businesses and members of
the community to present
this scrumptious event. This is
one of our largest fundraising
events each year, and this year
was a record-setting year. So
we would like to thank each
one of our contributors for all
their help
Adams Produce
Ameris Bank
Angelo's
Backwoods Bistro
Bistro at Wildwood
Brian Langston
Coca-Cola Company
David Moss

I like Buddy
Editor, The News:
I would like to offer my sup-
port for Henry (Buddy) Wells as
Supervisor of Elections. Buddy
has proven his integrity and his
work ethic I believe that he will
bring continued trust to an office
that is often under severe scru-
tiny, and that he will maintain
the high level of service that Mrs.
Crum has provided throughout
the years. Buddy's reputation
is solid, and his ability to work
with people is a necessary asset
for the position. I will cast my
vote for him.
Beth Mims
Crawfordville


our Iris Garden Club, of which
I was president at the time, and
our involvement in many com-
munity activities. She was par-
ticularly interested in our Junior
Gardeners at C.O.A.S.T. Charter
School and offered to donate
some trees from her yard for
the project. The two of us dug
the trees and they were planted
at the school. She assisted with
our gardening projects and the
program still flourishes. Lynn
joined the garden club and re-
mains one of its most depend-
able and enthusiastic workers,
helping to maintain the library

supporting
Donna Kent
Ed Brimner
El Jalisco
Envision Credit Union
Farm Bureau Ins.
George Green
Gulf State Bank
Hardee's
Hook Wreck Henry's
Hoss
Huddle House
Mary Wisner
Maxie Lawhon
Mike Barwick
Myra Jean's
Noah Posey
Party Tents & More


landscaping, an on-going club
activity.
Lynn has been an outstand-
ing organizer for large commu-
nity efforts that have been ex-
tremely successful. She helped
establish our first Crawfordville
Arbor Day in the Park which is
now an annual January event
dispensing educational materi-
als on environmental concerns
as well as information on the
best trees for this area. So far
about 3,000 trees have been
donated to citizens of Wakulla
during these events and each
year she sees that another tree

NJROTC
Publix
Riverside Cafe
Seineyard
Sonic
Sopchoppy Grocery
Spring Creek Restaurant
Subway
Two Nichols Restaurant
Wakulla Bank
W a 1 M a r t
Winn Dixie
Woodville IGA
Sincerely,
Captain Ron Huddleston
Lieutenant Mike Stewart
And The Wakulla High
School NJROTC Cadets


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is planted in Hudson Park.
Lynn contributed plants for
some of the landscaped areas
at the courthouse and she has
donated time and resources
as the garden club landscaped
Habitat for Humanity houses.
She has worked with the local
high school in selecting stu-
dents for garden club scholar-
ships to SEEK (Save the Earth's
Environment through Knowl-
edge) summer conference at
the U. of F.
These are just glimpses of
Lynn's commitment to this
community. She is always


cheerful, cooperative and a very
hard worker. She listens careful-
ly and offers creative solutions
when needed. I'm sorry I had
to move away from the county
to be closer to medical facilities,
but I know you will be in good
hands when you elect Lynn
Artz. She understands all the
issues of this growing county
and will analyze and help solve
problems in a calm and rational
manner, as she continues her
endeavors to "Keep Wakulla
Beautiful"
Hilda Starbuck
Formerly Crawfordville


A True Story

A Letter From

Lincoln

The Rescue of Elizabeth Smith From St.
Marks/New Port, Florida During The Civil War

By
Mays Leroy Gray






Book Preview


A Letter From Lincoln
By Mays Leroy Gray

Read all About it! A fascinating story! President Lincoln
rescues Elizabeth Smith from the South As the Civil War
explodes.

On April 12, 1861 Confederate artillery bombarded Fort Sum-
ter and the Civil War Began.

Seven days later on April 19, 1861, President Lincoln ordered
a Federal naval blockade of all Southern seaports. The Union
strategy of Gulf Blockading ships began to shut-off any vessels
serving Confederate States from transporting materials, men,
arms, and food to and from those ports. Thus, the Union's
stranglehold of Southern states effectively lasted four years
until the end of the Civil War April 9, 1865.
Sometime prior to the Ft. Sumter attack, Elizabeth Smith had
traveled to New Port, Wakulla County, Florida. With hostili-
ties and military action escalating on a daily basis, she found
herself trapped in a Southern coastal town behind Confederate
lines and sandwiched between the Confederate seashores and
the Union Naval Blockade unable to return to her home in the
North.

With this background of early Civil War action, an unpreten-
tious drama unfolds 45 days after the outbreak of the Civil War.

We find the President of the United States, through the Secre-
tary of the Navy, Gideon Welles, ordering the US Navy and US
Navy Chain-of-Command, to find and rescue a "lady" from a
small coastal town along the Gulf of Mexico in North Florida
- as President Lincoln said in his own words, "to have her
brought away from there."

Just who was Elizabeth Smith? Where was she from? And
lastly did she remain in Florida, or was she rescued and
returned to the North?

*The Elizabeth Smith drama is an untold story
which has been quietly sleeping for 147 years.
*A Civil War story, the book is filled with drama
and action; and is another example of Abraham
Lincoln's compassion.
*The book includes 37 archival photographs, many
unpublished.
*More than three (3) years of careful research by
the Author has gone into this work.
*During the past years, the Author has written and
published 104 historical articles featured in area
newspapers and magazines as well as the
publication of two books.
*If you are a Civil War buff, this book is a
must-read.
*The book is recommended reading for adults as
well as children and will be a fine addition to the
family library.
Book Order Form
A Letter From Lincoln
Springhill Published Company
PO Box 658
Woodville, FL 32362-0658
(850) 925-6599 (Office)
(850) 933-0644 (Cell)
Price Per Book: $30.00
(Including Shipping & Handling)


Name:
Address:
City: State:
Telephone: ( 2
Quantity Am
"A Letter From Lincoln $
---- $
Book Cost $
7% Sales Tax $
(Florida residence only)


Zip:

nount Enclosed


Total $


MEET THE




SHERIFF


E HIS FAMILY


13


OCTOBER


FROM 5 TO 8 P.M.


at Posey's Steamroom


Free Seafood Dinner & Entertainment


Sponsored By Noah Posey
Politicial Contributions may be sent to Post Office Box 1293, Crawfordville, FL 32326
Paid political advertisement paid for and approved by David Har vey, Democrat for Sheriff













Page 18A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008

We take offense at the cheap shots thrown at our team


Editor, The News:
We believe in modeling
good sportsmanship. We be-
lieve in taking the high road.
We believe in team spirit. We
are the coaches of Wakulla
Middle School.
For the record, we take of-
fense to the cheap shots that
the opponents of our superin-
tendent have decided to throw
at our team.


When we were hired by our
school principals to teach and
coach we were informed of
required background checks,
state certification require-
ments and employee orienta-
tions. Fortunately, we also had
the opportunity to meet one-
on-one with Superintendent
David Miller. The purpose of
our meeting with him was
clear from the beginning. Da-


vid Miller chooses to welcome
all new teachers to Wakulla
County personally.
He said, "Congratulations,
you've signed on with a great
outfit." He told us that his of-
fice is one of support. He told
us that his office door remains
open to us. He told us that
he looked forward to visiting
our classrooms and athletic
fields.. (David Miller has vis-


ited classrooms and extra
curricular activities thousands
of times.) And, yes, he told us
the importance of loyalty. He
emphasized how important it
was for each of us to be loyal
to our community, to the kids
of Wakulla County and to the
education profession.
We are a valued member
of the Wakulla County School
Districts team. We believe we


make a positive difference. We
know we work for one of the
finest school districts on the
world stage. It is an honor to
support Superintendent David
Miller. He has proven to be
worthy. He is dedicated. He
is loyal to the students, the
teachers, the staff members,
and the community of Wakul-
la County. When we cast our
secret ballot it will be to keep


David Miller Our Superinten-
dent of Schools.
The Athletic Coaches
of WMSI
Jordan Brown
Jeri Jump
Jessica Mapes
Bill Peck
Deborah Randell
Josh Sandgren
Michael Sweatt
Bobby Wells


Consider recent facts about Sheriff


Editor, The Newss
Considering recent facts,
can Wakulla County citizens
trust Sheriff David Harvey?
Last year, in his budget re-
quest, Harvey asked commis-
sioners for an extra $400,000.
That's equal to about 400
families' property taxes.
Harvey said he needed
the increase because the fed-
eral government had ordered
him to hire six extra cor-
rectional officers to comply
with federal jail standards
for housing prisoners. But
when questioned about the
$400,000, Harvey refused to
make the report public, say-
ing it had to be kept secret.
The facts were different.
There was no federal order
for extra jail guards, and the
jail inspection report was
not secret, it was posted by
the federal government on
the web for anyone to see.
Now in this year's budget
negotiations. Harvey initially
agreed to give up his request
for a 3.8 percent increase in
funding and keep his budget


in line with reductions made
by Wakulla County's other
elected officials.
But, at the last minute,
Harvey went back on his
word. He told county com-
missioners at a public hear-
ing that he needed an extra
$214,000, and said if he
didn't get the money, the
county jail could lose its ac-
creditation.
Again, the facts are dif-
ferent.
When a commissioner
pressed Harvey for details
about his request, Harvey
acknowledged that just this
summer the jail had been
accredited for the next three
years by a commission "set
up by the state."
Harvey didn't tell the com-
missioners or the listening
public that he heads this
"accreditation commission"
as chairperson.
Furthermore, the Florida
Corrections Accreditation
Commission is not a state
commission, as Harvey sug-
gested. It is a private non-


profit corporation, registered
as a charitable organization,
and Harvey is one of its six
directors.
The way the commission
operates is for county sher-
iffs (about half of Florida's 67
counties) to pay thousands
of tax dollars in dues in
order to be accredited. The
accreditation is voluntary by
counties, not required.
Harvey said without the
money, he would have to
cut positions and that could
make the jail lose its ac-
creditation. But Harvey also
had to acknowledge that not
all the $214,000 was for em-
ployee positions and that he
really could shift funds and
make cuts in other places.
As a side note, Harvey's
employee in charge of jail
standards resigned this sum-
mer after Wal-Mart com-
plained that she allegedly
took bags of goods out of
the store without paying for
them. Harvey let her leave
with 10-days extra pay and
no written investigation.


Harvey also failed to sub-
mit to the Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement,
an investigative report as
required by law after the
incident, according to Stella
DeVaney, an FDLE law-en-
forcement compliance in-
vestigator.
Ask yourselves why Har-
vey has to spend $89,894.95,
to get re-elected in a very
small county race and per
Randall Taylor's conversa-
tion with my husband re-
garding the Creel signs in
our yard, there would be no
reason for you to "come up
here and clear things up for
me" as your nonsense is as
clear as day.
Now I ask you, consider-
ing these facts, could anyone
put faith in Sheriff David
Harvey?
Suzanne Smith
Crawfordville


HBB^^~f^~^ ^,^ B^M


( (Doug Jones










electdougjones@gmail.com
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Doug Jones, No Party Affiliation, for Supervisor of Elections.




WANTED

HELP ROUND-UP THE FOLLOWING

NOTORIOUS HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTES














PAINT OIL SOLVENT

And gang members Fuel, Batteries, Antifreeze, Automotive Fluids,
Pesticides, Pool Chemicals, Cleaners, Flourescent Lamps, Acids,
Drain Cleaner, Spray Cans, Computer Parts (and other punk pollutants)
STires? YES! (Limit 10 per household)
Wal-Mart Inc. is sponsoring a tire pickup-
At the Trice Lane location as part of the Round-Up.
No Dealers, No Commercial Business or Disposal Companies.
If you find these villains hiding out in your home,
round them up and bring them in.

Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day
Small businesses must register in advance
Saturday, October 18 8 a.m. 1 p.m.
340 Trice Lane
Small Business 12 p.m. 1 p.m.
Not accepted: explosives, biohazardous or radioactive materials



REWARD

Put Hazardous Waste in its place. Keep Wakulla County Beautiful!
For more information, please call 926-3153.
This service coordinated by Wakulla County Solid Waste,Jefferson County.
Solid Waste and Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, Wakulla County
Commissioners, the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office and ESG.


TOTAL

ProS


UIf "'" ,Call Paulls, Well GetThem All



tM.oa M~v r t25 Cormmere Bd., Midway Buisiness Leader
PEST CONTROL SERVICE EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICE
"Ask Us About 'AWe Stand Behind Our Warran ty" PR0S H i,. .-
I A . r K.lc k J I -- A 1I --


Service Agreements to rPit our Needs, financing Availaole
Serving The Residents Of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.
rCS S Monticello Talltohssee Quincy Wakulla South Georgia


_ELECT
S. -' .- i:a- ^ ;,- .. !








SPROPERA

P PRAISE
Ii


Qualified and Experienced Honesty

and Trust Worthy Your Hope for

the Future of Wakulla County

"FAIRNESS & LEADERSHIP WE CAN BELIVE IN"

As your Property Appraiser, I promise to:

Provide Truthful and Accurate Answers
to All Your Questions & Concerns

Make sure that Your Taxes are
as Low As They Go!


Wakulla County needs change and Mrs. Ahrendt is
the right person for the job. She is above Wakulla
politics as usual, she will do the right thing and put
service to you before her self interests. She has the
right combination of experience, education and per-
sonal integrity to be Property Appraiser.


Fair assessments result in

Lower Taxes for All!

For more information about Anne Ahrendt
for Wakulla County Property Appraiser
www.anneahrendt.com
Cell (850) 528-0895 e-mail: anneahrendt@comcast.net

Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Anne Ahrendt, Republican, for Wakulla County Property Appraiser


I-,


CLASSIFIED As Low As $8 Per Week!
Call 926-7102


77-071
















Skipper celebrates 20 years


Pastor Ethel M. Skipper will
celebrate 20 years of pastor-
ship in the Church of Christ
Written in Heaven Corp. In
1988, she began pastoring in
Carrabelle. She served the
faithful there until 2005, when
the church relocated and built
a facility in Sopchoppy on the
same ground Pastor Skipper
has spent most of her life.
Pastor Skipper will honor
members who have been
with the church for 20 years
plus during fellowship on
Wednesday, Oct.8, Macedonia
Church Pastor Morris and


True Holiness Church from
Blountstown Elder Brigham
will pastor; on Thursday. Oct.
9, St. John Primitive Baptist
Church Elder Raymond Sand-
ers and Charlotte Faith and
Deliverance Pastor A. Williams
will speak; on Friday Night,
Oct. 10, St. Marks Primitive
Baptist Church's Right Rev.
Chris Burney will appear. On
Sunday, Oct. 12, at noon, Fam-
ily and Friends Day will be
held. The speaker will be Rev.
Rodney Smith.
The public is invited and
everyone is welcome.


Ethel M. Skipper


M. L. Gray pens a new book


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Local historian Mays Leroy
Gray has a new book that
deals with a little-known part
of the Civil War: the rescue
of a woman trapped in New
Port at the outbreak of the
Civil War.
The book is "A Letter from
Lincoln: The Rescue of Eliza-
beth Smith from St. Marks/
New Port, Florida During the
Civil War."
Gray's book begins with a
note from President Lincoln
to the Secretary of the Navy
asking that, if possible, Miss
Elizabeth Smith be rescued
from the Town of New Port.
This comes just over a month
after Confederate troops fired
on Ft. Sumter and Lincoln
ordered a naval blockade of
the south.
The records are scarce on
who Smith was and why she
had come to New Port, lead-
ing Gray to speculate: "In all
probability, Elizabeth Smith,
a northerner from Vermont,
who arrived at St. Marks and
New Port sometime in the lat-
ter part of 1860, came to visit
friends and acquaintances
at New Port and to enjoy
Florida's warmth and natural
wonders."
Beyond that, she is a rela-
tive of a justice on the Illinois
Supreme Court, a friend of
President Lincoln, who in-


Mays Leroy Gray
tercedes on the lady's behalf
asking for assistance.
Details of the rescue are so
sketchy that the book is really
about the Town of New Port
and Daniel Ladd, a cotton bro-
ker and merchant from Maine
who built the town into a
thriving commercial center.
Gray offers interesting facts
about New Port before the
Civil War it had a popula-
tion of 1,500 people, and was.
the original county seat of
Wakulla County in 1844 prior
to the destruction of Port Leon
by a hurricane.
Gray writes of the pre-
war town that "Ladd and his
investors operated a wide
range of activities including a
sawmill, turpentine distillery,
iron foundry, machine shop,
cotton press mill, a general
store, ice company, cottonseed
oil company, spoke factory,
the Wakulla and Washington
hotels, a drugstore, several


saloons, two newspapers, a
bank, river wharves and ware-
houses, and a shipping line
which included the steam-
boat, Spray. Public buildings
in New Port included the
Wakulla County Courthouse,
a town hall, a post office, a
school house, three churches
and a theatre."
When the war came, Ladd
supported the Confederacy
and his Spray became a block-
ade runner and gunship. In
skirmishes; before the Battle
of Natural Bridge in 1865, Con-
federates set fire to the bridge
so the Federals couldn't cross
and set fire to some buildings
in New Port that they didn't
want to fall into Yankee hands
and the whole city burned up.
Unable to cross the St. Marks
River at New Port to attack St.
Marks and then march north
to Tallahassee, the Union sol-
diers headed to Natural Bridge
where they were eventually
repulsed.
"Letter from Lincoln" is
brief and features numer-
ous period photographs and
maps.
Gray is a prolific writer of
articles about the history of
Wakulla County for publica-
tions including The Wakulla
News. "Letter from Lincoln"
is his third book. His two
earlier books both dealt with
the World War II ship USS St.
Augustine.


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008 Page 19A



WE SIAD BEHIND OUR SOUIIERS


U


~rnrr


FEMA storm update
Wakulla County and Household Assistance:
Total registration with $142,221.86.
FEMA: 84. Dollars approved Gadsden County
by FEMA for Individual Total registration with
and Household Assistance: FEMA: 91. Dollars approved by
$110,916.14. FEMA for Individual and House-
Jefferson County. hold Assistance: $59,448.25
Total registration with Statewide (for all 23 coun-
FEMA: 76. Dollars approved ties declared for Individual
by FEMA for Individual Assistance) Registrations with


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Re-Elect


Donnie Sparkman


WAKULLA COUNTY


PROPERTY APPRAISER

*Certified Florida Appraiser*-

-Experienced

-Dedicated

Re-Elect someone who has always

worked with the public concerning

land and values...and who will

CONTINUE TO WORK FOR YOU!


I WILL CONTINUE TO KEEP THE CITIZENS OF WAKULLA COUNTY AT THE FOREFRONT
OF ANYTHING I DO. I WILL CONTINUE TO BE RESPECTFUL, HELPFUL, ACCESSIBLE, AND
LISTEN TO YOUR CONCERNS. I HAVE THE KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE IN DEALING WITH
LAND, DEEDS, DESCRIPTIONS, LAND VALUES, TAXES, ETHICS AND THE ABILITY TO
COMMUNICATE WITH THE PUBLIC.

AS YOUR PROPERTY APPRAISER I WILL CONTINUE TO PROVIDE EFFICIENT,
COURTEOUS AND FAIR SERVICE TO ALL! I WILL CONTINUE TO WORK TO IMPROVE THE
OFFICE, WEB SITE AND TAX ROLL AND SEE TO IT THAT THEY SERVE THE PUBLIC IN THE
BEST POSSIBLE WAY.


SI will treat you with courtesy and respect.
SI will provide fair and equitable property values.
I have the knowledge and skills to perform the responsibilities and
duties of this office. I would appreciate your vote!

Political Adverlisement Paid for and Approved By Donnic R. Sparkman. Democrat for Property Appraiser


0


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I















Page 20A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008


C(*iQmmyriity News
#Q Mrr)L___ My_ _____________AN,


Models and organizers, Sam Buckridge, Toni Courtier, Susan Dodson, Amy Geiger,
Rhonda Harvey, Melanie Weltman, Barbara Coppola, Wanda Wimberly, Wanda Stok-
ley, Walt Dickson, Larry Massa, Dr. Quill Turk, Bill Versiga and'Michael Weltman.

Coastal Opti mists raise

money for scholarships


The Wakulla Coastal Op-
timist Club hosted the 2008
Fashion Extravaganza on Fri-
day, Oct. 3 at the Wakulla
Shrine Club. The event fea-
tured Sassy Sue's fashions and
benefitted the club's scholar-


ship endowment. More than
100 people attended the event
which included a live auction
and male and female models.
Pictured are the models
and organizers, Sam Buckridge,
Toni Courtier, Susan Dodson,


Amy Geiger, Rhonda Harvey,
Melanie Weltman, Barbara
Coppola, Wanda Wimberly,
Wanda Stokley, Walt Dickson,
Larry Massa, Dr. Quill Turk,
Bill Versiga and Michael Welt-
man. Photo by Lynda Kinsey.


Sheriff's office gets top rating


Hunt, Walker will marry on Oct. 31
Robert and Barbara Free-
man of Panacea announce the
engagement and upcoming
marriage of their daughter,
Brenda M. Hunt of Panacea,
to Joel E. "Joey" Walker of
Panacea. He is the son of Janet
Anderson of Medart and the
late George Walker.
The couple will exchange
vows on Oct. 31 in Crawford-
ville. All friends and family are
invited to attend a reception
Oct. 31 at 8 p.m. at the bride's
home in Panacea. The couple
is planning a honeymoon
trip to Cozumel, Mexico. The
couple will reside in Panacea.
The bride has a son, Rob-
ert Hunt, and the groom has
two children, Brook Boyd and
Joel E. Walker and Brenda M. Hunt Daniel Noe.

St. Marks NWR hosts family

Events for Wildlife Refuge Week


Fall is in the air and now
is a great time to get outdoors
and explore the St. Marks
National Wildlife Refuge. The
Refuge will be fee-free from
Saturday, Oct. 11 to Saturday
Oct. 18 to enjoy National
Wildlife Refuge Week. Dur-
ing that time, there will be
two "family-friendly events"
to enjoy, for kids of all ages.
The first activity is Family
Discovery Day on Saturday,
Oct. 11 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The refuge staff will be hand-
ing out a scavenger hunt map
to interested visitors, which


will include the traditional
instructions for the hunt as
well as one for GPS and digital
camera users. The hunt will
take visitors all up and down
the Lighthouse Rd. (Co. Rd. 59
south). Folks who complete
the entire hunt will receive a
goody bag.
On Sunday, Oct. 12. from 7
a.m. to 2 p.m., the refuge will
be holding its first ever "Big
Sit!" This bird watching activ-
ity was initiated by the New
Haven (Conn.) Bird Club in
1992 and consists of creating
an imaginary circle, 17 feet in


diameter, and recording bird
sightings during a 24-hour
period. Today, this is an an-
nual, international event and
there are more than 200 circles
registered with Bird Watcher's
Digest, the Big Sitl host, and
more than 750 species of birds
have been recorded during
the Sit The local circle will
be down at the lighthouse
observation deck and every-
one is welcome to join in for
an hour or more. Please call
925-6121 to register and bring
your binoculars if you have
them.


On Oct. 6, the Florida Correc-
tions Accreditation Commission
met in Crystal River for the pur-
pose of granting reaccreditation
to Sheriff David Harvey and the
Wakulla County Sheriffs Office,
Corrections Division.
The Florida Corrections Ac-
creditation Commission as-
sessed the Sheriffs Detention
Facility from Aug. 19 to Aug. 21.
The Corrections Division must
meet 259 individual standards,
152 mandatory standards, as
well as 107 non-mandatory
standards.


The assessment team was
made up of Wanda White of
the Escambia County Sheriffs
Office, Tammy Matthews of the
Okaloosa County Department
of Corrections and Sgt. David
Gray of the Seminole County
Sheriff's Office. The assess-
ment team was given full and
complete access to all agency
facilities and divisions upon
request.
Sheriff Harvey said of the
assessment, "Re-accreditation
reveals the professionalism of
this agency and its employ-


ees. We conduct business and
serve people and the State of
Florida has put their stamp of
approval of the Wakulla County
Sheriffs Office, Division of Cor-
rections. Major Jared Miller, the
Jail Administrator, a graduate
of Florida State University is
a fine example of the profes-
sional leadership throughout
the sheriffs office. Lt Danny
Deal is to be commended also
as our accreditation manger for
an outstanding job of planning
and preparation throughout the
three year process."


FWC passes prohibition on lakes


The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission
(FWC) passed a new rule
Wednesday, Sept. 17 prohibit-
ing anyone from hunting in or
near a permanent duck blind
on four Tallahassee area lakes.
The lakes are Miccosukee, Ia-


monia, Carr and Jackson.
The rule says no one may
hunt ducks, geese, mergansers
or coots within 30 yards of a
permanent blind or anything
that violates Florida Statutes
prohibiting unauthorized con-
struction on state lands. The'


FWC took action to ban water-
fowl hunting from permanent
blinds on the four lakes as a
result of continuing conflict
between the people who build
them and claim ownership of
sovereign state lands and oth-
ers-whosuse the same area.


FOREIGN CAR

REPAIR

< 926-5254


S ecializin In





Arey Brazier Iwner

Serving Wakulla & Surmnrnding
Counties for over 30 years
l i* # MVi56l
60 Holiday Dr. Crawfordville, FL 32327


KEEPING WAKULLA COUNTY




SAFE!


When I first became your sheriff, Wakulla County was one of the
safest counties in Florida. Over the years our community has grown
significantly... but I am pleased to let you know that our county is
still one of the safest in the state. As your sheriff, it's my job to keep
you safe and I am proud of the work we have done for you.

Crime is Down
The overall crime RATE is down 28% over the past 5 years, according to
the FDLE Uniform Crime Report.
The ACTUAL number of indexed crimes from years ago is down by over
100 reportable crimes.
Our community is still one of the safest in the state.
Population is Growing,
Our population has soared by nearly 20% in the past five years.
In the past five years, our calls for service have more than doubled from
'30,300 in 2002 to 60,700 last year.
Costs are Low
'* We operate a jail that pays 75 percent Of its operating costs by renting
empty beds to the State and Federal law enforcement agencies.
* Our per capital cost to the citizen is about $J75 petperson,.,.
* That is less than the cost of law enforcement in Franklin, Gadsden, Jeffer-
, son, Taylor or Leon counties.


YOUR SHERIFF
Political advertisement paid for and approved by David Harvey, Democrat, for Sheriff


Specials


Boneless Catfish Fillet Dinner $7.99

Grouper Sandwich $5.99


-,:Vt Mullet Shrimp Fish Fillet
CNIC Softshell Crab
Devil Crab Patty
Hamburger Hot Dog
Corn Dogs


Open Mon. Sat. 10 a.m. 7 p.m.

Wed.l10 a.m. 2 p.m.

Call Ahead or Drop By


-- - - -


OPME


O co




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