Title: Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00189
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville, Fla
Publication Date: September 25, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028313
Volume ID: VID00189
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Full Text







Our Readers are Writi

rS.e what they are saying on Page
.. .. .. .. t ..o


Sak ulla


Published Weekly,
Read Daily


Our 113th Year, 39th Issue


Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008


Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century


Two Sections

50 Cents


Crawfordville finally gets Post Office


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
The U.S. Postal Service has a
motto about perseverance and deliv-
ering the mail in all types of weather.
But the motto should also include a
section on patience.
Crawfordville Postmaster Dwight
Wells exhibited five years worth
of patience, but his wait is finally
over.
Wells and his staff will be leaving
the old Crawfordville Post Office on
Arran Road for a new 11,000 square


foot facility on Wakulla Arran Road.
The first day in the new building will
be Monday, Oct. 6.
Wells has had to endure federal
budget freezes, changes in building
priorities due to hurricanes damag-
ing other Gulf of Mexico region
facilities as well as changes in Uncle
Sam's priorities, but he never gave
up hope.


Wells said he is excited because
the new facility offers customers a
safer parking area with plenty of
parking spaces. The postal staff will
have their own parking area and will
not need to worry about postal cus-
tomers running over them as they
attempt to load their vehicles with
mail for their routes.
A grand opening of the new facil-


ity at 606 Wakulla Arran Road will be
held about a month after the official
opening.
Wells said post office box custom-
ers will have the same box numbers
that they have always had, but
customers will need to turn in their
old box keys to get replacements
beginning Oct. 6. The post office will
continue to use the same telephone


number of 926-3256.
The new facility has been needed
for many years, but in the five years
since Wells moved to Crawfordville
from Tennessee, the number of
routes have jumped from 12 to 18
as Crawfordville has grown.
Postal employees will start mov-
ing equipment to the new facility on
Sept. 29 and Wells said the moving
process will take several days.
Continued on Page 5A


Political

candidates

speak
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
There were some sharp ex-
changes between candidates
and some pointed questions
from the audience at a candi-
date forum held last week.
Only a handful of citizens
not connected to a candidate
turned out for the forum,
held at the New Bridge Hope
Missionary Baptist Church in
Shadeville on Monday, Sept.
15. The forum was organized
by some African American
ministers as a chance for
office-seekers to-address con-
cerns of the county's African
American community.
Citizen Kerry Cotton, indi-
cating a concern of the Wakul-
la Christian Coalition, asked
the three county commission
candidates their position on
renaming Lower Bridge Road
after Martin Luther King, Jr.
Continued on Page 5A


P and Z

rejects

wetlands

variance
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Members of the Wakulla County
Planning and Zoning Commission
rejected a conditional use variance
for a driveway in a wetland, which
led the developer to ask for a con-
tinuance on his proposed rezoning
fora Planned Unit Development for
a 52-home subdivision.
The problem is, as Community
Developer Director Lindsay Stevens
pointed out, without the variance to
build a driveway through wetlands
to the development, it violates
county requirements that access to
subdivisions must be off a paved
road.
Continued on Page 5A






Commennt&Oplnio.:.Page 2A
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By KEITH BLACKMAR .--. '
kblackmarethewakullanews.net
Myra Jean Nutting of Myra Jean's Cake i;
d Ice Cream Restaurant in Crawfordville is
conducting her own dietary political poll and
providingg revenue for the Wakulla County
imal Shelter at the same time.
Her presidential poll will provide Wakulla
county a sweet treat leading up to the Nov. 4
general Election.
Sugar cookies are on sale at Myra Jean's
establishment and a tote board of cookies sold
informsresidents of how popular JohnMcCain The
and Barack Obama are in the community. e v e n t
Nutting has put a likeness of the presiden- was the idea of t he
tial candidates on each cookie so residents Retail Bakers Association and the associa-
can eat their favorite. Myra Jean's started the tion launched the "National Election Cookie
sugar cookie sale about two Poll."
we e ks "Weekly cookie sales could determine the
ago. winner of the presidential election." associa-
i nation officials said.
S.The MicLean, Va.-based Retail Bakers of
America tRBA) started the national cookie poll I
campaign on Sept. 6 to
f increase community involvement in th
United States presidential election.
Retail bakeries across the country will d
sign cookies to represent both political parties
Cookies in colors of red and blue with images
of the presidential candidates, their name
and political party mascots will be offered t
customers.
Continued on Page 5A
-


Sheriff's budget is

not cut for 2008-09


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
After agreeing to budget cuts
of more than $214,000 from his
budget two weeks ago, Sheriff
David Harvey appeared before
county commissioners to ask
that the board dip into his
"rainy day fund" and restore
his budget.
Sheriff Harvey told com-
missioners at their meeting
on Monday, Sept. 22, that the
money was necessary to main-
tain his department's accredi-
tation. The county budget of
more than $46 million was
approved by a vote of 3-2, with
commissioners Howard Kes-
sler and George Green voting
against due to concerns about
the sheriff's budget.
The so-called "rainy day
fund" is from the more than
$1.1 million in surplus that
the sheriff's office has built up
from leasing bed space in the
jail to state and federal agen-
cies. That money is controlled
by county commissioners and
has been set aside in case of
extraordinary expenses by the
sheriff's office.
The last-minute budget
change appeared to deeply
disturb Commissioner Kessler
who accused Sheriff Harvey of
reneging on a deal in which


his office had identified that
money as money it could cut
At a budget hearing two
weeks ago, Kessler seemed
ready to announce the budget
slice, having negotiated a cut
in the sheriff's budget that had
come about through his meet-
ings with Undersheriff Dale
Wise and the sheriff's budget
director, Mary Dean Barwick.
Chairman Ed Brimner stole Kes-
sler's thunder at that meeting,
announcing that he had been
meeting directly with Sheriff
Harvey and had reached agree-
ment on the $215,000 cut.
This week, Kessler seemed
to be stunned again by a change
in plan although Brimner
seemed to indicate that the
sheriff had communicated
with commissioners individu-
ally about putting the money
back.
When Kessler attempted to
question Mary Dean Barwick
about "What had changed in
the past two weeks?" Brimner
interrupted to'say he would
answer the question, and ex-
plained what goes into ac-
creditation and commented
that he felt taking money out
of the rainy day fund to keep
the department accredited was
a good thing.
Continued on Page 3A


Even with budget

cuts, board says it


still wants
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
County commissioners in-
dicated they want to go ahead
with both the courthouse
expansion as well as plans
to build a community center
for youth despite placing a
moratorium on impact fees,
which had been earmarked
to go towards the courthouse
project.
Clerk of Courts Brent Thur-
mond appeared at the meet-
ing on Monday, Sept. 22, along


projects
with architects from Clemons,
Rutherford and construction
managers from Peter Brown to
get some sort of commitment
from commissioners that they
intend to go forward with the
courthouse project.
Commissioners Brian
Langston, Maxie Lawhon and
George Green indicated they
supported giving a go-ahead
to the architect to work on
finished plans for the court-
house.
Continued on Page 14A


Doing our part to Keep Wakulla Beautiful


By Marj Law come with their grandchil- Bay, but they were too heavy
Keep Wakulla County Beautiful dren. Some of the same volun- and had long nails sticking
On Saturday, Sept. 20, hun- teers come year after year. We out.
dreds of volunteers gathered recognized them, even though "Your safety is our primary
at sites around Wakulla Coun- we only get to see them once concern," said Paul Johnson.
ty to pick up the trash along a year." He and the other Site Captains
our beaches, rivers, sinkholes, Young adults from the decided those particular docks
and low-lying areas. It was a Green Club of Maclay School were too dangerous for our
rewardingly beautiful day to wrestled sections of docks volunteers.
be taking care of our environ- out of the water at Live Oak More volunteers came in
ment. Island. They lifted large blocks a large wave to the site near
"You see the nicest people of Styrofoam on vehicle tops the fort at St. Marks. Many of
at the Cleanup," said Tina to carry to the dumpster at them were Boy Scouts and Girl
Johnson, a Site Captain at Shell Point. Scouts who work this location
Shell Point Beach. "They come More large dock pieces each year.
with their children. They even drifted in the waters of Oyster Continued on Page 3A


Keep Wakulla County Beautiful mascot loves it clean.


New facility five years in the planning


jlew5






Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008



Comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895


We will give you


a chance to hear 70 A&WD / 7mqE:


from candidates .W-O A-4rsa Z


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Judging by the number of
letters to the editor I have
received recently, Wakulla
County is fired up about the
2008 election season. I think
the candidates will be ready
for it all to be over in six
weeks. The Nov. 4 General
Election will be Supervisor of
Elections Sherida Crum's final
election night and I know she
is pleased about that despite
missing some other aspects of
her job. Her tasks have gotten
more difficult since 1984, but
at least she has a nice office in
which to complete her duties.
The 17 candidates who are
still in the race for the sheriff's
post, property appraiser, super-
visor of elections and three
county commission seats, will
have an opportunity to reach
the voters through a special
election section. The Wakulla
News tabloid will be published
on Thursday, Oct. 23, and will
contain three questions for
each candidate to answer.
We will be sending them
in the mail very soon if candi-
dates have not received them
already.
We ask candidates to e-mail
their answers back to me at
kblackmar@thewakullanews.
net as soon as possible. The
answers will be included in
the tabloid which will give
candidates a way to reach a
larger audience than the politi-
cal forums that draw smaller
gatherings.
The deadline to return the
answers to me is Wednesday,
Oct. 8.
In case someone has slept
through the first nine months
of-the-year,-the Sheriff candi-
dates are David Harvey and
Charlie Creel; Property Ap-
praiser, Anne Ahrendt and
Donnie Sparkman; Supervisor
of Elections, Traci Cash, Doug
Jones, Scott Langston, Charles
Prout and- Buddy Wells; Su-
perintendent of Schools, An-
Clarification


drea Carter and David Miller;
County Commissioner District
1, Alan Brock and Jenny Brock;
County Commissioner in Dis-
trict 3, Jimmie Doyle and Mike
Stewart; and County Commis-
sioner in District 5, Lynn Artz
and Jim Stokley.


We had some proofread-
ing technical difficulties last
week and missed a typographi-
cal error in a headline above a
submission from Howard Kes-
sler about politics and alleged
intimidation tactics.
The headline read "Wakulla
County does need intimida-
tion." It should have read,
"Wakulla County does NOT
need intimidation." Sorry
about that folks and Howard.
We love the technological
age, but there have been some
other glitches we are attempt-
ing to address as well. They are
smaller issues that the average
reader may not catch, but drive
me crazy when I see them.
Finally, there won't be any
negative letters to the editor
the last week of October since
candidates won't have time
to respond to anything in the
paper before the election is
held. "
Hopefully our readers will
keep their comments positive
throughout the rest of the elec-
tion season so we can finish
the 2008 campaign season on
a high note.
Keith Blackmar is Editor
of The Wakulla News


In the Sept. 18 edition of The News, a story on the trial of
a man charged with manufacturing and trafficking in meth-
amphetamine included a passing reference to the defendant
being spotted at Mack's Country Meats, where he was using
a pay phone. A deputy spotted the defendant there and later
made a traffic stop that resulted in subsequent drug charges.
There was no implication made or intended that management
of Mack's Country Meats had any knowledge of or in any way
condoned any type of criminal activity on their premises.

Letters Policy.
The Wakulla News welcomes your letters, but we request
that you adhere, to the following guidelines:
Letters should not be longer than 300 words.
They must include the writers name, home address and
telephone number. (Only name and town will be listed; the
reast is used solely for the purpose of verification.)
Writers may be limited to one letter per month, depend-
ing upon space limitations.
With very few exceptions, anonymous letters will not
be published.
Letters can be sent via mail or e-mail to kblackmar@
thewakullanews.net), or they can be dropped off at our
Crawfordville Highway office. The Wakulla News reserves
the right to edit all letters.


Wakulla County Summer of 2008


Elect a responsive county commission


Editor, The News;
To Messrs. Lawhon, Langs-
ton and Brimner, the three
seated commissioners who
chose not to run so they could
spare themselves a humiliat-
ing defeat, I have only this to
say: good riddance
For the first time in years,
we have a chance to elect
commissioners who will be re-
sponsive to the public-provid-
ing we don't vote for ex-county
commissioner Mike Stewart.
Mike's not a bad guy. His
problem is that as an ROTC
high school teacher, he can't
differentiate between his stu-
dents and the citizens who pay
his salary. But when he was in
office; we all saw him become
a tyrant.
He was voted out in the last
election. He left such a sour
taste that people, including
myself, were saying "Anyone
but Stewart."
We elected Ed Brimner to
get away from Stewart's op-
pressive rule. We didn't exactly
jump out of the frying pan into
the fire, but with Brimner, we
landed in a pan of congealed
grease of ineptitude and more
blatant favoritism toward de-
velopers and realtors.
Nature abhors a vacuum,
so with Stewart gone, Maxie
Lawhon quickly took up his
position as tyrant, but he
wasn't nearly as good at it.
New residents who didn't
experience Mike Stewart's
regime, don't know how Mike
Stewart constantly brandished
"Roberts Rules of Order,"
which quickly turned in "Stew-
art's Rules of Control." We can-
not forget the condescending
way he addressed citizens at


meetings, the perpetual sneer
on his face. Dripping words of
contempt, he stifled anyone
who didn't agree with him.
Again and again, Mr. Stew-
art ordered citizens who were
paying his salary with their
hard earned tax dollars to shut
up and sit down.
This authoritarian, self
righteous man created a wall
between the commissioners
and the citizens that exists to
this day. He institutionalized
the little slips of paper that re-
quire citizens three minutes to
be heard on an issue-unless of
course they were developers,
then there was no limits
If you persisted or raised a
point of information during
his mnietings after you had
your chance, he ordered the
police to haul you away.
Mr. Stewart and the three
commissioners who jumped
ship for this election left this
government in shambles.
Houses are getting flooded
out because they gave per-
mits to fill in swamps. Roads
have turned into craters, and
parks fallen into disarray.
Stewart, Lawhon; Langston
and Brimner left a sour taste
behind. This gang of four let
developers tear up the land
and siphoned off our taxes to
support them and created an
obnoxious authoritarian rule.
They put more subdivisions
on the books than anyone in
history that will turn Wakulla
County into a nightmarish
place to live, if they're ever
built. Perhaps they were not all
bad, but as Shakespeare once
said, "The evil that men do
lives after them, the good is oft
interred with their bones."


I'm proud of David Miller


Editor, The Newst
I have dedicated almost
40 years of service to the
Wakulla County School Dis-
trict. I attended Wakulla
County Schools with my
brothers and sisters. My chil-
dren grew up in the Wakulla
County Schools and recently
my oldest grandson gradu-
ated from WHS. Currently,
in my golden years of retire-
ment, I have the privilege
of driving a Wakulla County
school bus.
I am a retired Shadeville
Elementary School teacher
and assistant principal. I was
a teacher during the 13 years
David Miller was principal of
Shadeville and I was an ad-
ministrative assistant during
the short two year stint his
opponent served as princi-
pal, before she resigned.
David Miller is an encour-
ager. He is a visionary. He is
innovative. He has saved the
taxpayers of Wakulla County
more than $30,000,000 with
the construction of River-
springs, Crawfordville and
Riversink schools. Under his
leadership, WHS implement-
ed the continuous improve-
ment model that led them to
an "A" and has added college


prep. courses. He moved
Wakulla County to the fore-
front by obtaining the fourth
full district accreditation in
the state and the 56th in the
world through SACS/CASI,
David Miller leads by
example and sticks with a
project until the end. He
has dedicated 35 years of
pure heart and soul to the
betterment of education in
Wakulla County. He does
not quit.
I am blessed that my
children and grandchildren
attended schools under his
leadership.It gives me joy to
know that our school district
is one of the highest per-
forming school districts in
Florida receiving The Best of
the Best designation. David
Miller has led our schools to
the forefront of education.
We are lucky to have Super-
intendent David Miller. He
is someone we know, He is
someone we trust. My family
and I will be supporting him
at the polls on Nov. 4.
Lessie Crum
Crawfordville

More Letters to the Editor
on Pages 2B, 3B and 4B.


In these hard times, we
need unity, people working to-
gether to solve problems and
not dissent. As transportation
problems grow worse, and the
economy sinks into the cold
grease left behind by Brimner,
Lawhon and Langston, we
need a community dialogue
to solve problems facing us.
We need commissioners who
are willing to listen without
labeling people as "radicals"
and "troublemakers." Enough
insults. Now it's time for our
county to elect three new com-
missioners who will respond
to the will of the people and
do it with respect.


That means not voting for
Mike Stewartl
Jack Rudloe
Panacea


Correction
In the Sept. 18 issue of The
Wakulla News, a headline on
a letter to the editor from
Commissioner Howard Kes-
sler was incorrect. Dr. Kessler
was speaking about political
tactics in the county. The
headline should have read,
"Wakulla County does NOT
need intimidation." We regret
the error.


WEEK INWAKULLA

Thursday, September 25, 2008
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB meets at Posey's Up the Cre.ek
in Panacea at noon.
MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA, a fellowship of men
who gather to share an support one another in
the quest for authentic manhood, meets "outback"
(behind)
Cornerstone Ministries at 6:30 p.m. For more
information, call at 508-2560.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at 12 noon.
VFW BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road
from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL Improvement Committee will
meet in the school library from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
YOGA CLASSES are offered through the Sopchoppy
Educational Center on Thursdays at 4:30 p.m. and
Tuesday at 6 p.m. For information, call Aline Solburg
at 962-2975 or SEC at 962-2151.
Friday, September 26, 2008
AA meets at the American Legion Building next to the
Women's Club in Crawfordville with an open meeting at
8 p.m. There are also open meetings
ACOUSTIC JAM SESSION will be held at Pioneer Baptist
Church annex from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.
ALZHEIMER'S SUPPORT GROUP meets at the senior
center at 1:30 p.m.
FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public
library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa's Episcopal
Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
PICKIN' 'N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at the
senior center from 10 a.m. to nIoon. (Also on Tuesdays)
Saturday, September 27, 2008
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 56 Lower Bridge
Road, at 5 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.
SOPCHOPPY OPRY will be held at the Sopchoppy School
auditorium beginning at 7 p.m. Scheduled performers
include the Purvis Brothers, "Mr. Country" Johnny
Calloway, and Southbound Band.
Sunday, September 28, 2008
MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA meets at First Baptist
Church of Crawfordville at 7 p.m.
Monday, September 29, 2008
ROSH HASHANAH begins at sundown
Tuesday, September 30, 2008
BOOK BABIES, for infants and toddlers, will be held
at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP meets at the senior
center at 12:45 p.m.
TOWN HALL MEETING with County Commissioner
Howard Kessler will be held at the Wakulla
Welcome Center in Panacea from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW
Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
WAKULLA SPRINGS BASIN WORKING GROUP meets in
the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Building in Tallahassee
beginning at 9 a.m.
Wednesday, October 1, 2008
AA meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road
at noon.
BOOK BUNCH, for pre-school and home school families,
meets at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
BOOK NOOK, for children in grads K-5, is 10:30 a.m. and
1 p.m.
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior
citizens center at 10:30 a.m.

www.thewakullanews.com


TOt akulla Re
The Wakulla News (USPS 644-640) is published weekly at
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla
News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
General Manager: Tammie Barfield......................tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Editor: Keith Blackmar.....................................kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Reporter: William Snowden............................ wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton............advertising@thewakullanews.net
Graphic Artist: Eric Schlegel ..............................advertising@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey ...................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net
Bookkeeping: Sherry Balchuck ..........................accounting@thewakullanews.net
Classifieds/In House Sales: Denise Folh.............. classifieds@thewakullanews.net
Circulation: Sherry Balchuck...........................circulation@thewakullanews.net
Copy Editor: Karen Tully
Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable
one year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $25, Out of County $30
Out of State $35. Out of Country on Request





THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008 Page 3A


Wakulla cleanup


Latoya Kilpatrick, Darius Kilpatrick, Alexis Spurlock, Jessica Windham clean road.


Continued from Page 1A
All of a sudden, 15 to 20 cars
pulled up, spilling out children
who knew they were going to
sign in, put on gloves, get data
cards, pencils, bags and then
pick up trash whether it was in
large or small pieces.
Volunteers coming to Wool-
ley Park knew they would be
cleaning along the roads in
Panacea. Since this is a low-ly-
ing area, the potential for storm
surge flooding is great Recent
storms have pushed much of
the litter inland. Even though it
is not a beach area, volunteers
were ready and willing to march
along the sides of the roads to
pick up trash.
We recycled at Woolley Park
and made huge piles of white
bags holding glass, plastic and
cans.
"About 80 percent of the
trash we picked up was able
to be recycled," said Cynthia
Paulsen, who has worked with'
Keep Wakulla County Beautiful
at our Coastal Cleanup for more
than a decade. This year, she

Budget
Continued from Page 1A
When he described the ac-
crediting procedure as some-
thing like an "operational audit,"
it brought laughs from some
citizens, who have long asked for
an operations audii of county
government.
When Brimner commented
to Kessler that he wouldn't allow
the commissioner to "browbeat
an employee," Kessler angrily
responded: "I guess the process
is that you can interrupt me and
speechify while I'm speaking."
Kessler contended the sher-
iff's budget has grown more
than 100 percent over five years,
called it "bloated" and said that,
if accreditation was so important,
the sheriff could make other cuts
in his budget to pay for it;
Sheriff Harvey went to the
podium to state his case that
maintaining accreditation is "a
wise business decision." The on-
going contract to house federal
prisoners is supported by the
county jail being accredited, the
sheriff said.
Commissioner Green asked
if the loss of the money would
cause the department to lose its
accreditation immediately. After
a couple of answers, the sheriff
eventually answered: "Essen-
tially it would, yes."
Green then indicated that he
would vote for the budget, since
without the money the sheriffs
office would lose accreditation.
"That is not an accurate state-
ment," Kessler challenged.
"That's what he said," Green


joined Bill Osborne in organiz-
ing a group of Green Guides and
River Keepers to clean along
the Ochlockonee River. What
began as a small group turned
into more than 30 people. They
ended up returning to the Wool-
ley Park site to get more bags for
all the trash they found.
Lynn Griffen of the Florida
Coastal Management Program
took over the site at Mashes
Sand again this year.
"We had a lot of people
which included a group of Girl
Scouts," reported Lynn. "They
were so cutel They worked
hard and dug a crab trap out of
the sand. They had a real good
time and were really eager. They
wanted bags for their shell col-
lection, tool One of them found
a half-rotted shark tail. I hope
she didn't take it home
"They also found two horse-
shoe crabs which they put back
into the water. They took a lot
of pictures.
"Many of the people who
came to pick up litter live near-
by. It's their backyard and they


answered.
Kessler insisted the sheriff
could make other cuts in his
budget to pay for the accredita-
tion costs.
Citizen Dana Peck complained
that voting on the sheriff's bid-
get was a conflict-of-interest for
Brimner and Commissioner
Brian Langston, both of whose
wives work as victim's advocates
for the sheriffs office.
Brimner, Langston and Maxie
Lawhon voted for the budget
Immediately after the budget
hearing, Brimner left due to
illness and did not return, hand-


want to keep it clean. One lady
from California was visiting
a friend and she came to the
cleanup, too.
"We didn't get as many
cigarettes as before. That was
encouraging
"We found a pallet, a tire
and a lawn chair. Also an oven.
It was small and heavy, so we
thought it might have come
from a boat.
"The wind kept the bugs
away, so it was very pleasant.
However, it was blowing so
hard, we had to make sure our
data cards and sign-in sheets
did not become beach trash.
"The marsh behind the pier
always has a lot of litter. Two or
three teams found fishing gear
and coolers there. Everyone had
been at the site before, so they
knew where to go.
"We all appreciated the Fe-
dEx man who came and gave
us water."
"I found a lot of construction
debris," said Sherrie Mendel-
son, also of the Florida Coastal
Management Program. "My


ing over the gavel to vice-chair
Green.
At the meeting, citizen Larry
Roberts called accreditation "a
re-election talking point and
nothing more.'
The budet also included 'uts
due to the moratorium on impact
fees a reduction of anticipated
revenues of $790,000. County
staffs analysis noted that there
are two projects courthouse
renovations and library expan-
sion that were previously
recommended, but there was
now no money to fund.
The board also approved an


Funkg Fiddler

Furniture, Original Artwork,
Great Jewelry & Home Decor








SSaturday Er Sunday A



1373 Hwy. 98 / Coastal Hwy.
Panacea, Florida
S. . .-. a. .


for "HELLO DOLLY".
Thursday, October 9 N
at 6:30 p.m.,
Historic Sopchoppy School V
Actual show will be held,
March 12, 13 & 14, 2009

For more information contact 4
Director, Reba Mason at 962-38044

Encore of,"Hello' Dolly"p
= 15th year Anniversary


husband and I picked up PVC
pipes and lumber. Of course,
we also found beer bottles and
cigarette butts."
At 10:30 a.m., volunteers
from all the sites came to Wool-
ley Park. Embarq volunteers set
up the lunch tables and served
the hot dogs, chips, cookies and
drinks. This was their tenth
anniversary funding and serv-
ing the Coastal Cleanup Lun-
cheon for Keep Wakulla County
Beautiful (KWCB). As Executive
Director of KWCB, I presented
Embarq's Melanie Becker with a
special plaque for their 10 years
of service.
While some were eating,
and some were playing, Sheriff
David Harvey brought plenty
of excitement for the children.
They admired Capt. Harris
Johnson's and wife Sheila's,
beautiful horse. Capt. Johnson
is part of the Sheriff's Mounted
Posse. The horse loved the at-
tention.
Sheriff Harvey also arranged
for Deputy Mike Helms to bring
the Intimidator, the swift black


car that children climbed into.
Deputy Billy Jones rode in on a
motorcycle, and the kids really
liked that, too.
Children love animals, so
Deputy Matt Helms brought a
dog from the K-9 unit. Fire Chief
Jason Honeybone arranged to
place a fire truck from Panacea
on display, and children got
to see two units from the am-
bulance service, as well. Scott
Nelson, of the Emergency
Management Service, gave away
hurricane maps and discussed
what to do if the weather turns
dangerous.
Waiting for "Weigh Your
Butts" money and "Litter Loot"
can be hard, but this year it was
not, because Sheriff Harvey,
his captains and deputies, the
firemen and the ambulance
personnel made even the wait
exciting,
Finally, KWCB President Don
Henderson climbed on stage
and welcomed everyone. KWCB
Directors Bruce Ashley and Nina
Banister weighed bags of ciga-
rette butts and gave away cash


prizes. The top prize was $100
and 4-H students won. Seven
other winners came away with
"Weigh Your Butts" money. This
contest is used to let our vol-
unteers know that the number
one kind of trash found at these
cleanup is cigarette butts and
items related to smoking.
Sheriff Harvey thanked vol-
unteers for all their hard work.
He encouraged all of us to con-
tinue our work in keeping our
county clean.
Finally, President Don and
Director Bruce gave away Litter
Loot, which is cash prizes for
those who worked.
Jeff Light of Target, gave
away the most Litter Loot:
ten $50 gift certificates. There
were many, many more prizes.
We gave away approximately
65 cash gifts to remind our
young people that they had
a very good day picking up
trash. And years later they will
remember that they worked
hard and played hard and were
part of keeping Wakulla County
beautiful.


ME?
- "mm


Richard Russell and Sarah Marie Russell clean Shell Point Beach.


8.0 millage rate for property in
the county, which represents
a rollback of more than 6.8
percent compared to last year's
tax levy.
The rollback rate is calculated


on the millage rate that would
bring in the same amount of
money as the previous year's
levy with a higher homestead
exemption and other changes
to property taxation, it would


take a millage of 8.586 to bring
in as much money as last year's
taxes.
The total taxable value of
property in the county is ,1.4
billion. . -


08 I In & I ,




An Evening of celebrationn -

The Crowning of

WHS 2008 Homecoming

King and Queen.


Shelby Cash and Ant'tony Mills






Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008

Obituaries


Kathleen Brader
Kathleen "Kitty" Brader of
Crawfordville died Sept. 18,
following a long battle with
Alzheimers.
A memorial service was
held Monday, Sept. 22, at Har-
vey-Young Funeral Home in
Crawfordville. In lieu of flow-
ers, please send donations
to the local Humane Society,
Citizens for Humane Animal
Treatment of Wakulla County,
P.O. Box 1195, Crawfordville,
FL 32326 or to the Humane
Society of the United States,
1624 Metropolitan Circle, Tal-
lahassee, FL 32308.
A native of Ireland, she was
a longtime resident of Craw-
fordville. She immigrated to
the United States from Ireland
at the age of 14 and worked at
Spring Creek Restaurant for
more than 30 years, making
many lifelong friends.
Kitty was known for her
love of animals and spent her
years traveling to and from
work feeding the strays along
the road and taking in as
many of them as she could.
Survivors include her
daughter, Tina Ryan; a grand-
son, Ryan DiCrescenzo; and
great-grandson, Simon Henry
DiCrescenzo.
Harvey-Young Funeral
Home in Crawfordville was in
charge of the arrangements.

Hollis H. Counts
Hollis Howard Counts, 82,
of Tallahassee died Sunday,
Sept. 14.
A memorial service was
held Thursday, Sept. 18 at
Thomas Memorial Baptist
Church in Quincy. Memorial
contributions may be made
to Big Bend Habitat for Hu-
manity, 2921 Roberts Ave.,
Tallahassee, FL 32310.
A native of Starkville, Miss.,
he was born May 19, 1926 to
John Howell Counts and Mary
Davis Counts. He served in
the U.S. Navy during World
War II as a member of the
SeaBees and he was stationed
in the South Pacific. He was
employed by the Ideal Bak-
ing Company. He moved his
family to Tallahassee in 1952
'6 ue&it caret r in sales and
continuedd to work in sales
until his retirement at the

Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worsip................10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .............5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details,
962-2213


Wakulla United
[ Methodist Church
Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 am.
Sunday.School foraHages-o10a.m.
S Sunday Worship -11 a.m.
Wednesday Service -7 p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
S, Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastr Jamice Henry Rinehart


g ] QSainF


Episcopal Church
1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98
Sunday
Sept. 28th
Holy Eucharist

&
Bishop's Visit
10:30 A.M.


age of 78.
Survivors include three
daughters, Carolyn Furcolow,
Donna Scott and Marty and
Kaye Trice and John; eight
grandchildren: and nine great-
grandchildren.
Independent Funeral Home
in Quincy was in charge of the
arrangements.

Angeles Folh
Angeles Folh, 80, of Craw-
fordville died Monday, Sept.
15 in Crawfordville.
The memorial mass will
be held Wednesday, Oct. 1
at 7 p.m. at St. Elizabeth Ann
Seton Catholic Church in Me-
dart. Memorial contributions
may be made to Big Bend
Hospice.
She was employed in real
estate/advertising with Mes-
tre and Connill.
Survivors include her
husband, Desiderio Folh of
Crawfordville; a son, Ulises
Folh and Bertha of Miami; a
daughter, Denise Folh and
Scott Paterna of Crawfordville;
a brother, Emilio Lopez of
Lugo, Spain; a sister, Felisa
Lopez of Madrid, Spain; and
two granddaughters, Michelle
and Catherine Folh.
Strong & Jones Funeral
Home in Tallahassee is in
charge of the arrangements.

Carol E. Mills
Carol Edward Mills, 73,
died Sept. 12.
Carol was a U.S. Army vet-
eran and served during the
Korean War.
He was a recipient of the
Purple Heart and was born on
Jan. 7, 1935.
Survivors include his wife
Ruby Jo Green of Jasper, Ga.;
two daughters, Cardine Evon
Evans and Rodger of Summer-


Panacea Park

Baptist Church
24 Nissios Read, Panacee
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Worship 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 p.m,.
Pastor, Jerry Spears


Pioneer Baptist
Church (SBC)


Sunday School
Sunday Worship


9:15 a.m.
10:30 a.m.


Wed. adult, children & youth 7 p.m.
486 Beechwood Drive Crawfordville, FL
(North of the Lower Bridge Road and
Spring Creek Highway intersection)
Rev. Dennis Hall, Pastor
850-926-6161


St. Elizabeth
Ann Seton
Catholic C
Mass 9 a.m. Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Father James MacGee, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
926-1797


Wakdal
Pre 6yt7riu
3383 Coastal Hwy.
1/3rd mile east of Wakulla High School
9:30 a.m. Bible Study
10:30 a.m. Worship Service
10:45 a.m. Children's Sunday School
Nursery Provided
926-4569
www.wakullapres.org



os es

Tt,. 901 ^/4"d4, PM8W5
u Wtm ;w 5WMi .d 'Ad&i


field and Patricia Ann Rich and
Edward of Alligator Point; four
grandchildren, Lisa Michelle
Walls and Jason of Port St.
Joe, Daniel Kodie Clayton and
Jessacia of Tallahassee, Celina
Ann Sholar and Jeff of Cairo,
Ga., and Edward Charles Rich
and Dina of Amman, Jordan;
a brother, William Lee Smith
and Eva of Ft. White; four sis-
ters, Inez Smith Hollingsworth
and Michael of Thomasville,
Hattie Mae Hurst and Jesse of
Woodville, Sarah Smith Coe
and Eddie of Woodville, and
Lillia Pickell and Claude of
Crawfordville; and four great-
grandchildren, Daniel Hunter
Clayton, Ava Carlise Clayton,
Alecia Gayle Sholar and Dania
Jude Rich.
Bevis Funeral Home in Tal-
lahassee was in charge of the
arrangements.

Euvona J. Tumbleson
Euvona J. "Von" Tumble-
son, 70, of Tallahassee died
Tuesday, Sept. 16, in Tallahas-
see.
The funeral service was
held Friday, Sept. 19, at Abbey-
Riposta Funeral Home Chapel,
with the Rev. Doyle Bell,
pastor of Fellowship Baptist
Church, officiating. Interment


followed in Tallahassee Mem-
ory Gardens. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to Big
Bend Hospice.
A native of Eufaula, Okla.,
she was raised in Humnoke,
Ark., and moved to Tallahas-
see from Stuttgart, Ark., 13
years ago. She was a member
of Rose Chapel Baptist Church
in Humnoke. She retired in
May after 13 years as a teach-
er's aide at the Woodville
School, working with ESE and
pre-K children.
Survivors include her hus-
band of 54 years, Dillard
Tumbleson; three sons, Gene,
Bruce and Rod Tumbleson,
all of Woodville, Fla.; two
brothers, Gary Blankenship
and LaVada and Roger Blan-
kenship, both of Woodville;
two sisters, Lois Sullenberger
and John of Tallahassee and
Sandra Morgan and Kenneth
of Crawfordville; and three
grandchildren, Heather, Allan
and Charity Tumbleson.
Abbey-Riposta Funeral
Home in Tallahassee was in
charge of the arrangements,

Ralph A. Wakeman
Ralph Albert Wakeman,
69, died Friday Sept. 12, in
Crawfordville.

Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
S Crawfordville
Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey
-Come A W~sp "ki Us"
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School..................... 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship................ 11 a.m.
Evening Worship......................6 p.m.
Wednesday Service..............7.... p.m.
& Youth Service...................... 7 p.m.
Royal Rangers...................7.... p.m.
Missionettes ........................... 7 p.m.


5585 Crawfordville Hwy.
Tallahassee, FL 32305
Owned & Operated By Wesley Schweinsberg
Son of the Late Harold Schweinsberg
Office: (850) 421-7211 Mobile: (850) 510-3983
Call and Compare... You'll Save Time & Money
Same Quality & Service


yc doe e ,cel'


FiRST
( BApTIST ChuRch



3086 Crawfordville Hwy.
(South of the Courthouse)
Church Office: 926-7896
www.fbccrawfordville.org
or
(youth) www.crosstraining.org


Church Office


SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Fellowship Meal 6:00 p.m.
(call for reservations)
Prayer/ Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
IMPACT (Youth) 7:00 p.m.
Children's Events 6:30 p.m.


Sunday School 9A45 AM
Morning Worship 11 AM


962-7822 AWANACLUB 5PM
Evening Worship 6 PM

Wednesday PM- Prayer Meeting,
Youth & Children's Programs
Dr. Bill Jenlns, Pastor
Randy Anderson, Minister of Music
Vlcki Anderson, Youth Director
Jerry vans, Mike Crouch, Bernie Kemp- Musicians


Memorial contributions
may be made to Big Bend Hos-
pice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd.,
Tallahassee, FL 32308.
Born in Fredericksburg, Va.,
he traveled the world for 25
years selling franchises. He
served a four year tour in the
armed services.
He was preceded in death
by his wife and two children.
Culley's MeadowWood
Funeral Home in Tallahassee
was in charge of the arrange-
ments.

Rhianna R. White
Rhianna Renee White of
Crawfordville died on Sunday,
Sept. 21, in Tallahassee.
The funeral service will be
held at Crawford Cemetery at
11 a.m. on Friday, September
26.
Rhianna was the daughter
of Ronnie and Nicole White of
Crawfordville and the grand-
daughter of Dosh White and
Mr. and Mrs. Willie D. Al-
len. She was the great-grand-
daughter of Susie Allen. She
leaves behind a sister, Ronecia
White, three god sisters, and
one god brother.


(;ay
United
Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship 9 a.m.
Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
pastor tett Vempleton
(850) 984-0127

Trinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
TrinityLutheranofWakulla.com
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pro-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Les Kimball
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557


Church News
St. Teresa
The Right Reverend Samuel
Johnson Howard, Bishop of the
Episcopal Diocese of Florida,
will make his annual visita-
tion to Saint Teresa Episcopal
Church on Sunday, Sept. 28
at 10:30 a.m. A reception and
congregational meeting will
follow the service of worship.
Wakulla UMC
The Wakulla United Meth-
odist Church will host a yard
and bake sale at the church at
1584 Old Woodville Road in
Wakulla Station.
The event will be held on
Saturday, Oct. 4 beginning at
8 a.m. The church youth will
be holding a cookout.
Baptism Sunday
The second annual Baptism
Sunday will be held at crystal
clear Wakulla Springs Sunday,
Oct. 5 at 3 p.m. The ceremony
is a community-wide, multi-de-
nominational event originally
fashioned after a sister event
held at Ichetucknee Springs
outside of Lake City.
Last October, more than
20 churches were represented
by those attending and wit-
nessed the wonderful baptism
of eight children of God.
Continued on Page 5A



H missionary
Baptist Church
90 Mt. Pleasant Lane,
Wakulla Station
Pastor Rev. Dr. Frank McDonald, Jr.
421-8900
Sunday School Each Sunday... 10 a.m.
1 & 3rd Sun. Worship ..........11 a.m.
Wednesday Service........... 7 p.m.
(Prayer Meeting and Bible Study)
Our Mission "To be a change agent in
the community for the glory of God."


Sunday
Mornings

8:30am Holy
Eucharist Rite One
9:30am Youth & Adults
10:30am Sunday School
10:30am Holy Eucharist
Nursery care available
850-745-8412
4340 Crawfordville Highway


S- Crawfordville United

Methodist Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 926-7209'
Ochlockonw & Arrun Road 'Come Grow With Us' www.crawfordville-amc.arg


I*" -Hwy 319 Medart,
k Elle Office 926-5265
_e Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
0 Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
0 Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
AWANA 4:00 p.m.
Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm ani
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeellenlMptitechurch.org


Who is the latest

Wakulla Wavemaker?"

Tune in daily at

2 p.m. and 6 p.m.





THE WORD IN PRAISE



WAKU 94.1 FM www.wave94.com
926-8000 (fax: 926-2000)


I


-I


d






THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008 Page 5A


Political forum


Continued from Page 1A
Jenny Brock, Jimmie Doyle and
Lynn Artz all indicated their support
for the road renaming.
The three Democratic candidates
for those commission seats Alan
Brock, Mike Stewart and Jim Stokley
- were not at the forum.
(It's not clear if candidates were
notified about the forum by organiz-
ers. According to one citizen, those
who were present only learned of the
event when they saw it listed in The
Wakulla News calendar.)
Candidates for property appraiser
had some sharp exchanges. Chal-
lenger Anne Ahrendt, a Republican
appointed by Gov. Jeb Bush to the
post after the death of longtime
appraiser Ronnie Kilgore, served for
16 months before being defeated in
an election two years ago by Don-
nie Sparkman, a Democrat, for the
remainder of Kilgore's term.
After Ahrendt and Sparkman
listed their accomplishments and
gave reasons why they felt they were
most qualified for the job, they took
questions from those in attendance.
During Sparkman's question period,
Ahrendt asked why, when she was
property appraiser and Sparkman was
county planning director, he opposed
having the county's mapping through


geographic information systems (GIS)
located in the appraiser's office but
now supported it.
There was also a tense exchange
over employee Hank Creech, who was
formerly close to Ahrendt during her
tenure but who remained on when
Sparkman won the job.
But the toughest questioning came
when Superintendent of Schools Da-
vid Miller made a presentation on his
accomplishments and qualifications
for the office. Rev. Derek Howard of
New Bridge pointedly asked Miller,
why no black administrators? no
black school principals? why so few
black teachers?
"I don't think it's a lack of finding
qualified black people," Rev. Howard
said. "I think it's a problem of being
aggressive in recruiting."
Miller responded by saying the
district was making efforts to at-
tract black teachers, which make up
six percent of the district's teach-
ers, while the black population of
Wakulla County is 10 percent. The
school system is open to interns
from Florida State, Flagler College,
and Florida A&M, all of which have
teaching programs, but he said it's
difficult to attract interns to the dis-
trict from the predominantly black
Florida A&M.


Miller noted that the most recent
teacher opening at Shadeville School
brought in 70 applications, none of
which were from black applicants.
"There is perhaps more we can
do," Miller acknowledged, and asked
for the pastors to encourage students
in their congregations to go into edu-
cation and become teachers.
Miller stressed his accomplish-
ments as superintendent, a post he's
held for 13 years since being appoint-
ed to the post after the death of Roger
Stokley. Miller has been unopposed
as superintendent until this year,
with the challenge of Andrea Carter.
Carter said she was running for
two reasons: first, to give voters a
choice; and, second, because she felt
Wakulla has a good school system,
but not good enough for the 21st
century.
Carter said a too-high number of
graduates of Wakulla schools have
to take remedial classes when they
get to the university level, indicating
they are unprepared.
, Miller answered that Wakulla
schools are ranked as one of the top
10 school systems in the state. And
that the quality of the schools are a
major reason for the county's growth.
"It's not just a good system," Miller
said. "It's a great system."


And it's not just Wakulla students
taking remedial classes in college
- that's a universal problem, he said.
But he stressed that Wakulla High
School's test scores are the highest
in the Panhandle Area Education
Consortium, not including Leon and
Bay counties, and that from Okaloosa
County in west Florida to Clay County
to the east and north of Alachua,
Wakulla High School had the second
highest scoring in the state only
Chiles High School in Tallahassee
scored higher. Of 394 high schools
in the state, Wakulla's ranked 41st
overall.
Miller also noted advanced place-
ment courses that allow students to
take college-level classes while still
in high school. It's possible, he said,
to graduate high school with enough
college credits to start college as a
junior.
Carter stressed the need for more
vocational programs, saying kids com-
ing out of school need to have an em-
ployable skill as well as an education.
She noted there were 17 vocational
programs at Wakulla High School in
1972, now there are only eight.
Miller responded that the courses
are not referred to as vocational
- they are called career and technical
programs and that the district has


to offer students courses they are
interested in.
Carter also challenged the lack of
diversity in teaching and administra-
tive staff. "Students," she said, "need
to see all kinds of people."
Candidate for sheriff Charlie Creel,
a retired state trooper, listed the
changes he supports making in the
sheriff's office including an audit
of the department and an expansion
of the narcotics unit to crackdown on
drugs in the county.
Creel also said he supports a
citizen advisory committee to bring
important community issues to the
sheriff's attention.
Sheriff David Harvey did not at-
tend, but sent sheriff's Capt. Bill Poole
to represent him. Poole said the crime
rate over the past five years is down
28 percent while the population is
up 20 percent.
Supervisor of Elections candidate
Charles Prout pointed out that he had
served as a poll worker in Tampa and
understood the election system. Can-
didate Scott Langston said priority
for him would be to look at proposed
legislation to determine its effect on
the county.
Candidates Buddy Wells, Traci
Cash and Doug Jones did not at-
tend.


Patriotic cookies


Continued from Page 1A
Participating bakeries will submit the total number of elec-
tion cookies sold to the RBA offices for tabulation. Results of
the nationwide poll will be announced weekly.
"RBA began the cookie poll for the 2004 election," said RBA
President, Lynn Schurman, co-owner of Cold Spring Bakery,
Cold Spring, Minn. "Cookie sales were very accurate in predict-
ing the winner."
Randall McArthur, President of McArthur's Pastry Cake
Bakery, St. Louis, Mo. said that the cookie poll is "a fun way
to promote the election and get the community involved."
Locally, Myra Jean's Cakes took part in the event as a fun
way to stir up a little election excitement.
"We started getting our cookies baked, decorated with' cute
caricatures of the two presidential candidates and wrapping
each cookie separately," said Nutting. "We are selling our deli-
cious sugar cookies for $1.50 each and each cookie is worth
one vote for your favorite candidate. Unlike the 'real' national
election, you may vote in the cookie poll election as many
times as you want. We could tell immediately this was going
to be fun and exciting when a customer bought six before we


P and Z


Continued from Page 1A
In addition, best practices management require two entrances
to delopme9it. -..
Without access off Arran Road, it presented the problem of
how to get to the Muir Woods project, which is proposed to have
52 homes on 28 acres north of Arran Road and east of Wakulla
Arran Road.
A handful of neighboring property owners objected to the
development over concerns that it would cause flooding on their
land. The driveway through the wetlands off Arran Road, they said,
would only cause more problems with drainage.
Agent Howard;Jablon countered that conditional use permits
for the driveway had been granted by the state Department of
Environmental Protection and the Army Corps of Engineers.
The neighbors clapped when the vote to approve the variance
failed by a vote of 3-4.
There was considerable discussion among planning commis-
sioners about whether rejected variances could not come back up
for a year. County Attorney Ron Mowrey answered that, unlike

Baptism Sundayr
Continued from Page 4A the Wakulla Springs Lodge.
All churches in the com-
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baptism are invited to attend. FARM BU-
Following the baptisms, there
will be fellowship through REAU
a covered dish dinner at the
newly built pavilion, next to

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even had them wrapped. She saw us working on them and
asked what we were making. We explained that this was a
National 'cookie poll' and she ordered six for McCain right
then. The next lady who saw them took one of each, one she
said was a joke for her husband."
Myra Jean's has been in business in Crawfordville since 1985
and is owned by Myra Jean and Everett Nutting of Crawford-
ville. They are located at 2669 Crawfordville Highway.
Anyone interested in getting some of the cookies may call
them at 926-7079.
"We are keeping a tally in store for the customers to see how
the vote is going," said Myra Jean. Signs plead to residents,
"Don't let the 'other guy' win."
Nutting said her business will keep track of the results
right up until election day so Wakulla County can "digest the
results" and see how the county is leaning.
In the early going, Republican John McCain had the early
edge.
Fifty cents of each cookie sold will go to the animal shel-


decisions under the county's Land Development Code such as re-
zonings, there was no such restriction on variances to the county's
wetniid-serdihatfice. It cduldcbe brought up-the month after being
rejected or at every planning commission meeting.
Conditional use variances are granted by the planning com-
mission, and do not go before the county commission for final
approval
The rezoning of the property from R-1 (residential) to PUD would,
if rejected by the county commission, would have to wait a year
before it could be re-introduced. If the matter had moved from the
planning commission, the issue would have been set for hearings
before the county commission in October and November.
Planning Commissioner Robert Alessi recommended that the
proposed rezoning be continued until Jablon could work out prob-
lems with the driveway.
I At that point, several neighbors asked if the planning com-
mission had actually rejected the project, or were commissioners
helping nudge the development toward approval by voting for
the continuance.

www. thewakullanews.com


Post Office


Continued from Page 1A
Despite having two por-
table buildings at the old
post office, the Crawfordville
postal employees did not
have enough working space.
The new building and prop-
erty, which was purchased
three years ago, is federally


owned and includes safe ac-
cess points.
"This facility was truly
needed by the employees and
the customers," said Wells.
"It's time that Crawfordville
and Wakulla County have a
nice facility."


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767129






Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008


Sports


WHS Lady War Eagle volleyball team recognized


Artigua Kilpatrick


Jasmine Green


Kristin Mathers


Lady War

Eagles off

to strong

start


2008 Wakulla Lady War Eagle volleyball team with Coach Erica Bunch.


Wakulla wins three in Panama City tourney


Maya Bateman


Summer Stokely


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
The Wakulla High School
volleyball team has earned an
8-7 record going 3-1 at the Gulf
Coast Community College High
School Tournament in Panama
City, said Coach Erica Bunch.
Before that tournament,


held on Saturday, Sept. 20, the
team won against Bay on Sept
18, lost to Arnold on Sept. 11,
and walloped East Gadsden on
Sept. 9, said Coach Bunch.
The next game on .the
schedule was set for Tuesday,
Sept. 23, against Arnold on
the road.


"The kids have played really
well," Bunch said, adding that
it's a young team.
The team won against Boze-
man, Walton and Navarre, but
lost to Gulf Breeze High School
and finished third.
Artigua Kilpatrick and Sum-
mer Stokley lead the tourna-


ment in the middle for Wakul-
la, and Kara Smith was named
to the All-Tournament Team.
Smith and Kristin Mathers
lead the tournament from the
outsides.
-Tara sists, and Lindsey Rudd led the
team with aces. Sarah Roberts


had the most digs.
Arnold came to Wakulla on
Sept. 11 and won by a score
16-25, 16-25, 18-25.
The girls beat East Gadsden
on Sept. 9 by a score 10-25,
15-25, 18-25. That game was
marked by a number of ace
serves that Gadsden was un-


able to dig out, Bunch said.
Caitlin Lentz had 10 kills,
Maya Bateman had 19 digs, and
Tara Vatter had 23 assists.
Artigua Kilpatrick had five
blocks and five kills, and Sum-
mer Stokely had, four blacks
and three kills.


Cross country teams excel


The WHS boys and girls
cross country teams opened
their season last week by
participating in meets hosted
by Godby and Lincoln high
schools in Tallahassee.
The Godby meet was held
at Phipps Park on Monday,
Sept. 15. At the meet, the
girls team placed fifth and
was paced by senior Sydney
Nutting who ran the 5K (3.1
miles) distance in 22:46 to
finish fifth overall.
The boys team placed sixth
and was led by senior Scott
Kelly who finished in 19:21,
17th overall. The Lincoln meet'
was held on Saturday. Sept.
20, at Tom Brown Park in Tal-
lahassee.
The WHS girls had an ex-
cellent showing and finished
in fourth place. Sydney Nut-
ting again led the way for
the team, running 22:25 and
finishing eighth overall. The
boys team placed sixth and
Scott Kelly was the top WHS
finisher, placing 16th overall
in a good time of 18:36.
At both meets, the other
top WHS girl finishers were
seniors Brittany Bentley,
Susan Hansen and Rachel
Capps, and freshmen Chelsea
Thompson and Emily and
Alena McCullers. The other
top boys were seniors Ben
Mathers and Will Harvey,
juniors Adam Carr and Liam
Daniels, sophomore Shawn
Morris and freshman Cody
James.
"This is going to be an
interesting year for our team,"
said Coach Paul Hoover. "We
have a real mix of experience
and youth on both teams, as
most of our kids are either se-
niors or freshmen. It is going
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to be interesting to see how
good these teams can be. As
expected, all of our runners
ran faster in the second race,
with some improving by as
much as four to six minutes,
which is really a lot for a
5K race. We've got Assistant
Coach Greg James on board


with us this year and he has
been a major help."
The teams will compete
Saturday, Sept. 27, at the FSU
Invitational held at the Micco-
sukee Greenway in Tallahas-
see. The boys race will start
at 8:40 a.m. and the girls start
at 9:10 a.m.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008 Page 7A


WMS Wildcats claw to victory over North Florida Christian


Guard Caleb Weaver, quart
back Vonte Ervin


Briggs

sweeps

invitational

Joey Briggs, an eighth
grader at Riversprings Mid-
dle School, came home with
nine gold medals from the
Tom Kingston Invitational,
Sept. 12 through 14 in Day-
tona Beach.
Briggs won every event
he entered in the age 11 and
12 year old boys division.
Daytona Beach Swim
hosted 405 swimmers from
Florida and Georgia. Making
a special appearance was
Ryan Lochte, recent two
time gold medal and two
time bronze medal swim-
ming winner from the 2008
Beijing Olympics.
Daytona Beach Swim is
his home team when not
swimming for the United
States Olympic Team or
The University of Florida in
Gainesville.
The Area Tallahassee
Aquatic Club (ATAC) finished
first overall as a team.
Individual high point
winriers included John Yam-
bor -Maul, 8 and under boys;
Joey Briggs, 11-12 boys; Cece
Williams, 11-12 girls; Scott
Fortier, 13-14 boys; Lia Lom-
bardi, 13-14 girls; and Hunter
Hinson, senior boys.
A new ATAC team record
was set by John Yambor-
Maul in the boys 8 and
under 50 yard butterfly,
breaking the old record of
the late Mac Crutchfield. A
total of 181 Junior Olympic
and 68 Senior Champion-
ship qualifying times were
set by ATAC swimmers at
the meet,



Golfers

finish on

top

The Wakulla War Eagle
golf team won the Fourth
Annual Big Bend Champi-
onship Tuesday, Sept. 16 at
Wildwood Country Club..
Wakulla shot a 282 while
Leon shot a 297 and Chiles
shot a 302 to become the
top three teams in the com-
petition.
Individually, Spencer
Smith finished second after
shooting a 68. Warren Hess
shot a 70 to tie for third.
Stone Cowie shot a 71 to fin-
ish fifth. Cody Sapp finished
sixth with a 73.
In a recent match, Wakulla
beat North Florida Christian
and Port St. Joe 143 to 180 to
184. Spencer Smith shot a
33 followed by Cowie with
a 34, Hess with a 37, Sapp
with a 37 and Conner Smith
with a 37.
The Lady War Eagles shot
a 223 to place second behind
Leon and ahead of Florida
High.
Devon Lowe shot a 47 fol-
lowed by Hannah Lovestrand
at 57, Rebecca Rivers at 59
Brooklynn Tindall at 60 and
Brianna Lech at 68,



926-3425
926-3655


Bears,Wildcats renew rivalry with

Sept. 23 game. They may clash

again in the 2008 postseason

The Wakulla Middle School Wildcats defeated the North Florida Christian Eagles
Son Sept. 16 by a score of 46-16. The Wildcats started strong and continued to play well
throughout the four quarters and into the fifth quarter of play. The North Florida Chris-
tian defense could not stop the Wildcats. The big lead gave the Wildcats an opportunity
to gain experience throughout their depth chart.
Highlights of the first half included 140 yards of rushing for the Wildcats while hold-
ing NFC to minus 17 yards. Wakulla's first half offense also included a single pass com-
pleted by Dustin Roberts to Sheldon Johnson. The pass gained 30 yards and lead to the
first WMS score. Other first half scoring for the Wildcats included two rushing scores
by Kevin James, one for 65 yards: a punt return of 80 yards scored by Sheldon Johnson;
a rushing touchdown scored by Vonte Ervin followed by a 50 yard interception return
for Vonte's second touchdown.
For the third consecutive week the offensive line controlled the game lead by Caleb
Brown, Chris Griffin, Caleb Weaver, Justin Fisher, Zach Harrell, Clay Morrison and Logan
erback Kaleb Atkins, tackle Justin Fisher and running Taylor. The WMS Wildcats will look for another big defensive stand when they play their
gain yardage against North Florida Christian, cross county rival Riversprings Bears on Sept. 23. Photo by Ken Fields.

War Eagles fall in final seconds; Trinity kicks field goal to win


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
After two lopsided games,
one a victory and one a de-
feat, it figured the Wakulla
War Eagle football team
would be in for a close game
on Homecoming night, Fri-
day, Sept. 19.
Deltona Trinity Christian
provided the opponent and
the heartbreaking finish for
the War Eagles. A last second
field goal pushed the private
school past Coach Scott Klees
and his gridiron gang 30-28,
dropping the War Eagles to
1-2 on the season.
"The offense played real
well," said Coach Klees. "Our
special teams and defense
got us in trouble. It has been
just the opposite of last sea-
son. Our offense has played
more efficiently and our de-
fense needs work."
Wakulla scored four touch-
downs and a field goal in the
game but it was not enough
to secure the win. Trinity
took the ball late in the game
and drove 80 yards to the
Wakulla one yard line before
kicking the winning field
goal from 17 yards out.


Lee Smalls
Wakulla led by as many as
14 points before the defense
tired in the fourth quarter
and Trinity rushed for 200
yards in a 10 minute span.
Lee Smalls was the offen-
sive player of the game with
four receptions for 103 yards
and two touchdowns. Willie
Thomas joined the varsity
from the JV and rushed eight
times for 99 yards and one
touchdown. Kendell Gavin
rushed seven times for 52
yards and a touchdown and
Morgan Henry added a 25
yard field goal. Henry was 1-3
on extra point attempts-and


Jordan Zuhl
the War Eagles missed a two
point conversion.
Kendrick Hall added eight
rushes for 68 yards. Casey Ed-
dinger was 2-11 for 39 yards.
He tossed a touchdown and
threw an interception. Zach
Klees was 5-11 for 86 yards
and a touchdown.
Harold Williams was
named the offensive knock
'em back award winner for


a hard hit.
"The defense is off to a
rough start, but I think they'll
get better," said Klees.
The special teams gave up
a punt and a kickoff return
for touchdowns. I
Jordan Zuhl was named
the defensive player of the
game at defensive tackle.
Zuhl graded out at 96 per-
cent and had seven tackles
and two assists.
Rickards will come to Me-
dart on Friday, Sept. 26 for
the first district game of the
season. Rickards is 1-1 under
Coach Rudy Hubbard with a
victory over Chiles and a loss
against Lincoln.
"Their defense is probably
the best we will face all year,"


said Klees. "They are really,
really special." The Raiders
offense is not as strong as
their defense.
Klees and the coaching
staff hope to get back to win-
ning this week and get off to
a perfect start in the district
portion of games.
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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008







ME sI Students have a reason to read


By KEITH CLINE
Chief Reporter of the
WHS Belford Bunch
Due to the generosity of
several businesses and in-
dividuals, a special class at
Wakulla High School now has
a reason to read.
DeNovo Co. of Houston,
Texas, Reynolds, Smith, &
Hills of Jacksonville, and Mr.
and Mrs. Steve San Miguel of
Crawfordville, have donated
prizes for a reading contest


held by the "Belford Bunch,"
a class of students with de-
velopmental disabilities. The
prizes are two, five-speed
bikes, two DVD players, and
two home stereo systems.
The object is to read to
their parents or any adult ev-
ery night until their voice box
cries out "I surrender" until
the whole book is finished.
The pages are counted and
the students who have read
the most are the winners. The


contest ends on Dec. 1.
Santa Claus will have loads
of competition this year
Left to right: The Belford
Bunch:
Angel San Miguel, Tameron
Timmons, Lacey Buckridge,
Kyle Lazarus, Chris Reeves,
Marcus Kelly, Johnathon
Hurley, Kevin Daw, Melinda
Chester, Elizabeth Merkinson,
Keith Cline, Kandi Jo Bonin,
Sue Belford, and Pam Gay.


Wakulla students assemble outside FSU's Strozier Library

WHS students get taste of FSU


Sixty twelfth grade Advanced
Placement Literature and Eng-
lish Honors students from
Wakulla High School visited
Florida State University Thurs-
day, Sept 4.
Students, along with teach-
ers Dr. Rachel Pienta and Melisa
Taylor, began their day with an
informative talk about college
admissions given by Assistant
Director of Admissions Donna
Bostwick. The talk was followed
by a walking tour of the cam-
pus. The afternoon portion of
the visit included lunch in the
Oglesby Student Union and an
instructional session on how
to do library research using
electronic resources given by
Association University Librarian
Jacqueline Druash.
Students were also given
time to do independent re-
search using Strozier Library's
college-level resources. Ad-
vanced Placement Literature
teacher Dr. Rachel Pienta said,
"This is the third year that the
Advanced Placement Literature
students have started the school
year with a research paper and a
visit to FSU. Students are able to
gain hands-on experience with
college level resources and get
a preview of college life."
By JORDYN BROOKS
WHS Class of 2009
College applications, tuition,
scholarships, and deadlines are
just a few of the many things
running through the minds
of this year's graduating class.
Many decisions are currently
being made that are going to
shape the rest of our lives.
Though with our demanding
schedule of planning our future,
we are still enjoying our present
and remembering our past
Last week, Melisa Taylor
gathered many of her English IV
Honors students along with Dr.


More income at

retirement?


Pienta's Advanced Placement
Literature students and took us
to the campus of Florida State
University. The arrangement
for us was to tour the campus,
explore Strozier Library, and ob--
serve what this university has to
offer. We stepped off our high
school bus and entered into a
whole new world-college. And
let's be honest here, there were
boys, boys, boys or in other
cases, girls, girls, girls, every-
where. There was obviously no
dress code. People streamed
by on bikes and mopeds. We
weren't at Wakulla High any-
more. Of course, as teenagers
this was our initial reaction,
but we knew there was much
more than what appeared on
the surface.
SWe stepped inside the many
walls of FSU, and that's when
many of us realized we were
no longer the Big Fish in the
little pond anymore. When we
recognized that we were now
merely tadpoles, our tour truly
began. We walked from the
office building to the tennis
courts, to the science wing, to
the student union and to every
other brick building in-between.
This pond was much larger than
many of us expected it to be, but
most of us liked it.
Our next destination was
Strozier Library. This place
was full of technology, books,
articles, newspapers, and any-
thing you needed to know.
Many of us were awestruck. It.
was multiple stories, each one
distinctly different from the oth-
ers, making it more convenient
to find what one was looking
for. This was the perfect place
to study for your exams, or the
dialogue for your next play,
sketch for an art class, or to
just cozy up with your favorite
romance novel This library had


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so much to offer FSU's group of
diverse students.
Our next objective was the
student union, or where many
restaurants, stores, and meet-
ing places are joined to create
a. community-like atmosphere.
This is where we enjoyed lunch.
We all split up to get the variety
of the different menus before
being reunited at our seating
place. While we ate, we looked
around in excitement, because
for one day we were freshmen
again, but this time at FSU.
We would watch and see who
was in our group just to make
a face and smile and have our
own little secret. This big world
called college, where things are
so expansive, only seemed to
bring us closer.
We realized the reality of
our senior year is dosing in on
us and maybe for once being a
freshman in high school wasn't
so bad.
We want to take time and
thank Mrs. Taylor and Dr. Pi-
enta for giving so much of their
time to truly care about their
students, along with all the
other teachers at Wakulla High
School We are in our fifth week
of our last year, and many of us
have already learned so much
from you. You have taught us
more than what can be learned
in a text book. You have taught
us about spreading our wings,
exploring the unknown of the
big pond that's out there, about
life, and about decisions that
can affect the rest of our lives.
Class of 2009, our final year is
dosing in. Let's make it the best
year of being the Big Fish.


Left to right: The Belford Bunchs
Angel San Miguel, Tameron Timmons, Lacey Buckridge, Kyle Lazarus, Chris
Reeves, Marcus Kelly, Johnathon Hurley, Kevin Daw, Melinda Chester,
Elizabeth Merkinson, Keith Cline, Kandi Jo Bonin, Sue Belford, Pam Gay

WCS honors grandparents


WCS student Danyelle Dias with her grandparents
Carolyn Olah and Carlos Taff.
The Wakulla Christian Sept. 12. The exciting and fun
School Booster Club hosted celebration was a huge suc-
the First Annual Grandparents cess. Each group of students
Day Celebration on Friday, from 3-K to fourth grade gave

School meetings


The WHS School Improve-
ment Committee will hold a
meeting Thursday, Sept. 25
from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. in library.
It is open to the public.


The Riversink Elementary
Schools Advisory Council will
meet Wednesday, Oct. 8 at 6
p.m. Parents, teachers and the
public are invited to attend.


a special presentation to the
grandparents and "grand-
friends."
Following the program, the
children had an opportunity
to spend the morning with
their honored guests. All
125 children participated in
the event and everyone.,en-
joyed themselves. "This was
a fun visit for the children
and their grandparents and
grandfriends, with snacks
and a delightful presentation
by the students," school of-
ficials said.
"We would like to express
our gratitude to Faye Brainard,
Booster Club Program Coor-
dinator, Cynthia Thompson,
Booster Club Chairman, and
all other volunteers," said Prin-
cipal Jim Pound. "We couldn't
have done it without you."

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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008 Page 9A


Happy first birthdays


Happy first birthday to Sam-
uel Richard Bruce on Sept 4. He
is the son of Richard and Millie
G. Bruce of Crawfordville.
.Maternal grandparents are
Scott and Julie Gaby of Crawford-
ville. Paternal grandparents are
Larry and Sue Bruce of Medart.
Maternal great-grandparents
are Harper and Mary Lou Carter
of Crawfordville, the late Billy
Gaby and the late Wayne and
Doris Buttram. Paternal great-
grandparents are Emma Bruce
of Tallahassee, the late Samuel
Bruce and the late A.J. and Seda


Samuel R. Bruce
V. McLaughlin.


Happy first birthday to
Matthew Austin Taylor on
Sept. 25. He is the son of
Ashley Chapman and Nathan
Taylor of Crawfordville.
Maternal grandparents
are Chris and Mary Ann
Chapman of Crawfordville.
Paternal grandparents are
Damon and Mary Taylor of
Dublin, Ohio.
Maternal great-grandpar-
ents are Marylou Feightner of
Perrysville, Ohio and Warren
and Eileen Chapman of Live
Oak. Paternal great-grandpar-


Matthew A. Taylor
ents are Deloris Girard and
Bobbi Tayor, both of Colum-
bus, Ohio.


Happy first birthday to
Hannah Sophia "Sophie"
Stalvey on Sept. 18. She is the
daughter of Keith and Cothee
Stalvey of Crawfordville.
Maternal grandparents are
Buddy and Janice Tomaini of
Crawfordville and Dicky and
Barbara Bishop of Maitland.
Paternal grandparents are
Norman and Linda Stalvey of
Crawfordville.
Maternal great-grandpar-
ents are Betty Tomaini of
Crawfordville and the late
Army Tomaini and Lauranell


Hannah S. Stalvey
Tidwell of Maitland and the
late Daddy Jug Tidwell. Pa-
ternal great-grandparents are
John and Earlene Pigott of
Crawfordville.


Academic Boosters received a check from members of the Coastal Optimist Club.

Optimists support Wakulla

education through donation


Members of the Wakulla
Coastal Optimist Club present-
ed a $7,500 check to the Wakulla
County Academic Boosters to
place toward scholarships for
local high school seniors.
The large contribution was
made possible through the
efforts of local businesses and
local volunteers,
On Friday, Oct. 3, the Wakul-
la Shrine Center will host the
Fourth Annual Fashion Show
Extravaganza hosted by The
Wakulla Coastal Optimist Club
and Sassy Sue's. Each year the
Optimist Club hosts this event
in an effort to raise money for
scholarships. The club takes
pride in knowing that their


hard work is going back to the
children of the community.
This year the club has re-
served 15 tables for local busi-
nesses to purchase as a sponsor-
ship for $350 per table. Each
table sponsor will receive six
tickets to the event and adver-
tisement. Individual tickets
are on pale for $40 per person.
The tickets include a steak din-
ner and open bar during the
event. The event starts with a
social at 6:30 p.m. followed by
dinner and a fashion show at
7 p.m. then concludes with a
live auction.
Space is limited, so act now
and help the kids of Wakulla
County. For further information


or to purchase tickets or a table,
please contact Melanie Welt-'
man at 926-6751 or Tara Kieser
at 926-7111.
"We hope you will help
us assist kids in making their
future brighter, and know that
'Our Kids Count' in Wakulla
County," officials said. "We
would like to thank you in
.advance for your help with our
scholarship program."
If you are interested in
learning more about what The
Wakulla Coastal Optimist Club
does, be their guest at one of
the next meetings. The club
meets every Thursday at noon
at Posey's Steam Room in Pana-
cea.


Miller and Evans will marry


Donald and Sheryl Miller
of Greensburg, Pa., announce
the engagement and upcoming
marriage of their daughter, Jes-
sica Miller of Sopchoppy and
Greensburg, to Clinton Evans
of Sopchoppy. He is the son


of Richard and Lisa Russell of
Sopchoppy.
The bride-elect graduated
from Greensburg Salem High
School, LaRoche College in
Pennsylvania and the YWAM
Discipleship Training School


for Missions.
Her fiance graduated from
Sopchoppy Elementary School,
Wakulla High School in 2006
and the Internship at Interna-
tional House of Prayer in Kansas
City, Mo. He is a captain having
completed Sea School.
The wedding will be held at 5
p.m., Saturday, Nov. 8 at the Rus-
sell residence. All friends and
relatives are invited to attend.


CCOW to screen film
Concerned Citizens of Wakulla, Inc. (CCOW) has resched-
uled the screening of the Emmy-nominated HBO documentary
"Hacking Democracy," which was postponed due to Tropical
Storm Fay. The movie will be shown at the Wakulla County
Library at 7 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 10. It's free and open to ev-
eryone. The full-length (82-minute) movie will show just how
vulnerable the electronic voting machines are.
"Hacking Democracy," which was nominated for an Emmy
award, exposes the dangers of voting machines used during
America's mid-term and presidential elections. Electronic vot-
ing machines count approximately 90 percent of America's
votes in county, state and federal elections. The technology is
increasingly being used around the world, including in Canada,
the United Kingdom, Europe and Latin America. Filmed over
three years, the film follows the investigations of a team of
citizen activists and hackers as they take on the electronic
voting industry.
"Hacking Democracy" uncovers incendiary evidence from
the trash cans of Texas to the ballot boxes of Ohio, exposing
secrecy, votes in the trash, hackable software and election of-
ficials rigging the presidential recount.
Ultimately proving that our votes can be stolen without a
trace, "Hacking Democracy" culminates in the famous 'Hursti
Hack'-a duel between the Diebold voting machines and a
computer hacker from Finland-with America's democracy
at stake. Leon County Supervisor of Elections Ion Sancho is
featured in the movie.
For more information, please call 877-7661 or e-mail contactc-
cow@google.com.


Raymond J. Day
Happy first birthday to
Raymond Joseph Day on Sept.
18. He is the son of Raymond
and Shannon Day of Ochlock-
onee Bay.
Maternal grandparents are
Joe and Pam McKenzie of
Sopchoppy. Paternal grandpar-
ents are Bill and Karen Day of
Ochlockonee Bay.
Paternal great-grandparents
are Raymond and Clara Love
of Ochlockonee Bay.

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Phone (850) 926-7102


Fax (850) 926-3815


www.thewakullanews.com


Method of Payment
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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008


Outdoors


Fall is in the air, but will fishing be good or will winds blow?


_ ..,




From The Dock

: BY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL
, '. .'


Fall is in the air and now
we need the winds to calm
down a little. The forecast for
the week is northeast winds
through Friday and winds
eventually will die down. You
can still fish inshore, but it
makes it tough if you're go-
ing after grouper. The Sixth
Annual Kingfish Shootout to
raise money for the Leukemia
Foundation is this weekend


and hopefully the winds will
settle down for that. The
Captain's meeting is Friday
night at C-Quarters and all the
information about the tourna-
ment and previous tourna-
ments can be found at www.
cquartersmarina.com.
Jerry's Bait and Tackle held
their make up tournament for
the one canceled due to one of
our storms. Steve Taylor and


Ashley Mock finished in first
place with five trout weighing
10 pounds, 14 ounces. Casey
Cook and John Wiley weighed
in 5 trout for a total of 7
pounds, 10.5 ounces to take
second place. Adran Godwin
and Chase Lanway won third
place with five fish weighing 6
pounds, 14 ounces. Teresa said
other than the tournament
she hasn't seen many fish.
Capt. Luke Frazier at Ad-
vantage Marine said he fished
with Mike Crum out of Pana-
cea two weeks ago Monday,
and caught their limits of trout
and reds. They fished around
the oyster bars near Panacea
to catch their reds and moved
onto the flats to catch their


limit of trout. Luke said they
caught most of their fish
on white Gulp under Cajun
Thunder.
Mark and Louise Prance
fished around the oyster bars
near Shell Point last week and
Mark said they caught four
legal reds and kept two. They
were using live shrimp and
live pinfish on the bottom.
' Mike Hopkins at Lanark
Village said the trout fishing
has really picked up and some
big trout were caught over
the weekend. The area out
from the water tower east of
Lanark and Turkey Point has
been real productive as well
as around Lanark Reef. Due
to the winds, nobody made


it out to fish Dog Island Reef.
Most trout are being caught
on top water plugs, the Gulp
under a Cajun Thunder and on
the D.O.A.
Quite a few Spanish were
also caught close-in and lots
of flounder are being caught,
especially around the docks.
Fish that bait real slow along
the bottom for flounder and
the bite can sometimes be
hard and other times you feel
like you're dragging weeds
or a rag along the bottom. If
this is the feel, set the hook
because many times it will
be the flounder just hanging
on.
Look for reds around the
docks and at Turkey Point.


Quite a few 16 to 18 inch
grouper are also being caught
on the flats and around some
of the docks. Bill English
from the Atlanta area fished
the sunken barge off Lanark
Reef and caught six grouper.
and four of them were legal.
If you can get out, there are
plenty of grouper in the 40.Q
to 60 feet of water. There are
still plenty of cobia around,
but Mike hasn't heard of any
kings being caught.
Remember to leave that
float plan with someone and
be careful out there. Know
your limits and take those
kids fishing. Good luck and
good fishing


Wood storks are some of our


BY GEORGE WEYMOUTH


Years ago, I was fortunate
enough to have the privilege
of being a guide at the newly
opened Corkscrew Swamp
Sanctuary, owned by the Na-
tional Audubon Society. This
huge swamp and surrounding
pine flatwoods was about 30
miles northeast of Naples,
Fla.
It was, and still is, famous
for its stand of virgin cypress
and for being the only large
rookery of remaining Wood
Storks in the U.S. No matter
when I guided there, it was
so pristine my clients were
always awed by the cathedral-
like feel one has as you tip-toe
along the boardwalk, plus,
we'd always see something
unique.
,But;when I guided during
the stork.nesting season they
were really treated. Like many
primitive birds, storks are basi-
cally mute. But when young,


like baby pelicans, (which are
also are mute as adults) they
can be quite noisy.
By leaning over and ex-
haling, they'll make a loud
"whaa" begging call. The two
or three chicks in the nest may
be quiet for hours, but when
they see a parent returning
with potential food they go
bananas.
The returning parent may
be thousands of feet above
the rookery, yet the chicks
know they're about to get fed.
How they know among all the
circling storks over the rook-
ery that one of them is their
parent, has always baffled
biologists.
One fact is well known
about the adults though, in
order to feed their young,
they must time their nest-
ing period to the spring dry
season. When the young start
hatching, if everything is go-


ing right, neighboring ponds,
lakes, sloughs and man-made
ditches will start drying up.
As the young grow over the
weeks, they'll demand more
food, which in ideal years will
work out fine. As the bodies of
water get lower and lower the
fish, crawdads, frogs, snakes,
etc., get more crowded, the
adult can "pig out" on the
sometimes living soup!
As these ponds and ditches
dry up, the adults are often
forced to fly longer distances
to find food for their young,
up to 40 miles. If an unex-
pected late winter front moves
through and dumps tons of
rain and the water levels sud-
denly rise, the whole nesting
season may come undone.
There is not enough to feed
the young storks and they
simply starve to death or fall
out of the nest to another fate.
Generally, the storks nest over
water in mature cypress.
In these dark swampy wa-
ters there are always alligators
of all sizes. They patrol the
rookery waters for potential
predators. Any raccoon that
might be attracted to the
smell and clamor of the rook-
ery birds, and has a desire to
swim to the trees supporting
the nests is certainly doomed


Careful when burning in the yard


Each year during storm and
hurricane season we all expe-
rience an increase in the ac-
cumulation, of yard waste and
debris. To eliminate this debris
many of us turn to outdoor pile
burning.
Tidal surges and flooding
bring with them a large amount
of wet grasses and woody ma-
terial; The Florida Division of
Forestry requests that this de-
bris have adequate drying time
before being lit to insure that
no excessive smoke issues are
created in the area.
Setbacks for open burning
of yard waste: 50 ft. from paved
public road, 25 ft. from your
house, 150 ft. from other occu-
pied buildings and 25 ft. from
any forest. If the pile that you
are burning is greater than 8ft
by 8ft you must call the Divi-
sion of Forestry for a permit at
922-5155,

Professional


If you have any further ques-
tions or need more information
concerning Florida's outdoor
burning laws please contact


the Wakulla area Division of
Forestry office at (850) 421-3102.
Visit us online at fl-dof.com.


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most unique birds
by the alligators. The payoff from getting soaked,
for the gators is an occasional They have a unique way
baby stork "dropping in for feeding, too. They are tac
dinner." feeders, which they accc
Speaking of dinner, when plish by holding their parti,
the parent locks in on the opened upper and lower m
nest as it descends, they'll dibles below the water surf
lower their "landing gear," to wait for their prey to bu
their legs, which slows their into the open gape. Wh
decent. Finally, they land and food is detected they have
all heck breaks loose. The of the fastest reflexes kno
baby storks practically attack in the animal kingdom
the parents to get fed, while they'll snap down on it. (
constantly begging, "Whaa only native stork can feec
Whaa Whaa." ponds covered by float
As with many birds, the aquatic plants, where ot
hatchlings are cold blooded "long legged waders" 1
for about three days, and then herons can't feed. The her
a miraculous transformation can't see below the surf
takes place. They become
warm blooded It takes about ,
three years for them to be-
come sexually mature adults,
Until then, the youngsters
have a fairly well feathered *Mowing *Edging
head. *Recycling *Trimming
But as adults they are na- *Junk Hauling *Planting
ked headed, with blackish -Weeding
skin, hence the names Iron Landscape Maintenance
Head or Flint Head. While Junk/Household
feeding they'll sometimes par- Debris Hauling
tiallyi submerge their head and Fall is approaching use
being bald prevents feathers forFall cleanup


y of
tile
om-
ally
ian-
face
mp
hen
one
own
and
Our
I in
ing
her
ike
ons
ace


through all the floating plants
but the storks stick their bills
through the vegetation and
feed by feel. In bays or open
waters they'll sometimes take
their pinkish feet and pat the
bottom to flush shrimp and
fish toward their open gape.
If that doesn't work they
may "canopy feed" by extend-
ing a wing out, throwing a
shadow over the water to
startle the prey to their trap.
When flying they're the only
large black and white bird,
like the Snow Goose and the
White Pelican, that have a
black tail.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008 Page 11A
I


S850-224-4960 www.fsucu.org

1 MORTGAGES -FREE CHECKING ~ AUTO LOANS ~ CREDIT CARDS


St. Marks


For tides

Gulf Coast Weekly Almanac add to

Tide charts by September 25 October 1
Zihua Software, LLC

s River Entrance City of St. Marks


Date High Low High Low
Thu 3.1 ft. 1.8 ft. 3.6 ft. 0.4 ft.
Sep 25, 08 12:27 AM 5:32 AM 11:50 AM 6:49 PM
Fri 3.3 ft. 1.4 ft. 3.8 ft. 0.5 ft.
Sep 26, 08 1:04 AM 6:36 AM 12:53 PM 7:30 PM
Sat 3.5 ft. 0.9 ft. 3.9 ft. 0.7 ft.
Sep 27, 08 1:35 AM 7:25 AM 1:43 PM 8:04 PM
Sun 3.7 ft. 0.5 ft. 4.0 ft. 0.9 ft.
Sep 28, 08 2:04 AM 8:08 AM 2:26 PM 8:34 PM
Mon 3.8 ft. 0.2 ft. 3.9 ft. 1.1 ft.
Sep 29, 08 2:30 AM 8:47 AM 3:06 PM 9:00 PM
Tue 3.9 ft. 0.1 ft. 3.8 ft. 1.3 ft.
Sep 30, 08 2:54 AM 9:24 AM 3:43 PM 9:24 PM
Wed 3.9 ft. 0.0 ft. 3.7 ft. 1.4 ft.
Oct 1, 08 3:17 AM 9:59 AM 4:19 PM 9:47 PM


Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay

Date High Low High Low
Thu 2.3 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.7 ft. 0.3 ft.
Sep 25, 08 12:19 AM 5:43 AM 11:42 AM 7:00 PM
Fri 2.5 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.9 ft. 0.4 ft.
Sep 26, 08 12:56 AM 6:47 AM 12:45 PM 7:41 PM
Sat 2.6 ft. 0.6 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.5 ft.
Sep 27, 08 1:27 AM 7:36 AM 1:35 PM 8:15 PM
Sun 2.8 ft. 0.4 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.6 ft.
Sep 28, 08 1:56 AM 8:19 AM 2:18 PM 8:45 PM
Mon 2.9 ft. 0.2 ft. 2.9 ft. 0.8 ft.
Sep 29, 08 2:22 AM 8:58 AM 2:58 PM 9:11 PM
Tue 2.9 ft. 0.0 ft. 2.9 ft. 0.9 ft.
Sep 30, 08 2:46 AM 9:35 AM 3:35 PM 9:35 PM
Wed 2.9 ft. 0.0 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.0 ft.
Oct 1, 08 3:09 AM 10:10 AM 4:11 PM 9:58 PM


Date High Low High Low
Thu 2.9 ft. 1.7 ft. 3.4 ft. 0.4 ft.
Sep 25, 08 1:03 AM 6:36 AM 12:26 PM 7:53 PM
Fri 3.1 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.6 ft. 0.5 ft.
Sep 26, 08 1:40 AM 7:40 AM 1:29 PM 8:34 PM
Sat 3.3 ft. 0.8 ft. 3.7 ft. 0.6 ft.
Sep 27, 08 2:11 AM 8:29 AM 2:19 PM 9:08 PM
Sun 3.4 ft. 0.4 ft. 3.7 ft. 0.8 ft.
Sep 28, 08 2:40 AM 9:12 AM 3:02 PM 9:38 PM
Mon 3.5 ft. 0.2 ft. 3.7 ft. 1.0 ft.
Sep 29, 08 3:06 AM 9:51 AM 3:42 PM 10:04 PM
Tue 3.6 ft. 0.1 ft. 3.6 ft. 1.2 ft.
Sep 30, 08 3:30 AM 10:28 AM 4:19 PM 10:28 PM
Wed 3.6 ft. 0.0 ft. 3.4 ft. 1.3 ft.
Oct 1, 08 3:53 AM 11:03 AM 4:55 PM 10:51 PM


St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.

Date High Low High Low
Thu 2.4 ft. 1.8 ft. 2.8 ft. 0.4 ft.
Sep 25, 08 12:11 AM 5:11 AM 11:34 AM 6:28 PM
Fri 2.6 ft. 1.3 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.5 ft.
Sep 26, 08 12:48 AM 6:15 AM 12:37 PM 7:09 PM
Sat 2.8 ft. 0.9 ft. 3.1 ft. 0.7 ft.
Sep 27, 08 1:19 AM 7:04 AM 1:27 PM 7:43 PM
Sun 2.9 ft. 0.5 ft. 3.1 ft. 0.9 ft.
Sep 28, 08 1:48 AM 7:47 AM 2:10 PM 8:13 PM
Mon 3.0 ft. 0.2 ft. 3.1 ft. 1.1 ft.
Sep 29, 08 2:14 AM 8:26 AM 2:50 PM 8:39 PM
Tue 3.0 ft. 0.1 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.3 ft.
Sep 30, 08 2:38 AM 9:03 AM 3:27 PM 9:03 PM
Wed 3.0 ft. 0.0 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.4 ft.
Oct 1, 08 3:01 AM 9:38 AM 4:03 PM 9:26 PM


s at the following points
og Island Listings: Carrabelle
Apalachico
Cat Point
Lower Anc
West Pass


High Tide
28 Min.
la 1 Hr., 53 Min.
1 Hr., 13 Min.
horage 1 Hr., 36 Min.
1 Hr., 26 Min.


Shell Point, Spring Creek


Date High Low High Low
Thu 3.2 ft. 2.0 ft. 3.7 ft. 0.5 ft.
Sep 25, 08 12:24 AM 5:29 AM 11:47 AM 6:46 PM
Fri 3.4 ft. 1.5 ft. 3.9 ft. 0.6 ft.
Sep 26, 08 1:01 AM 6:33 AM 12:50 PM 7:27 PM
Sat 3.6 ft. 0.9 ft. 4.0 ft. 0.7 ft.
Sep 27, 08 1:32 AM 7:22 AM 1:40 PM 8:01 PM
Sun 3.8 ft. 0.5 ft. 4.1 ft. 0.9 ft.
Sep 28, 08 2:01 AM 8:05 AM 2:23 PM 8:31 PM
Mon 3.9 ft. 0.2 ft. 4.0 ft. 1.2 ft.
Sep 29, 08 2:27 AM 8:44 AM 3:03 PM 8:57 PM
Tue 3.9 ft. 0.1 ft. 3.9 ft. 1.4 ft.
Sep 30, 08 2:51 AM 9:21 AM 3:40 PM 9:21 PM
Wed 3.9 ft. 0.0 ft. 3.7 ft. 1.6 ft.
Oct 1, 08 3:14 AM 9:56 AM 4:16 PM 9:44 PM


Dog Island West End

Date High Low High Low
Thu 2.7 ft. 1.9 ft. 3.1 ft. 0.5 ft,
Sep 25, 08 1:34 AM 5:02 AM 10:56 AM 6:23 PM
Fri 2.7 ft. 1.6 ft. 3.1 ft. 0.6 ft.
Sep 26, 08 1:45 AM 6:01 AM 12:24 PM 7:03 PM
Sat 2.7 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.1 ft. 0.9 ft.
Sep 27, 08 1:55 AM 6:49 AM 1:32 PM 7:36 PM
Sun 2.8 ft. 0.9 ft. 3.1 ft. 1.2 ft.
Sep 28, 08 2:04 AM 7:32 AM 2:30 PM 8:02 PM
Mon 2.9 ft. 0.7 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.4 ft.
Sep 29, 08 2:12 AM 8:12 AM 3:23 PM 8:23 PM
Tue 3.0 ft. 0.5 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.7 ft.
Sep 30, 08 2:21 AM 8:48 AM 4:14 PM 8:40 PM
Wed 3.2 ft. 0.4 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.8 ft.
Oct 1, 08 2:34 AM 9:22 AM 5:06 PM 8:57 PM


Low Tide
25 Min.
2 Hrs., 38 Min.
2 Hrs., 31 Min.
2 Hrs., 3 Min.
2 Hrs., 39 Min.







First
Oct. 7






Full
Oct. 14





Last
Oct. 21


New
Sept. 29


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
7:27 am 7:28 am 7:28 am 7:29 am 7:29 am 7:30 am 7:30 am
7:29 pm 7:28 pm 7:26 pm 7:25 pm 7:24 pm 7:23 pm 7:22 pm
3:40 am 4:44 am 5:46 am 6:46 am 7:45 am 8:43 am 9:41 am
5:23 pm 5:56 pm 6:26 pm 6:55 pm 7:25 pm 7:56 pm 8:29 pm
28% 21% 14% 7% 0% 6% 13%


Coast Guard

Auxiliary Reports
By Ron Piasecki


Red Tide not causing

pollution on beaches


Several times this spring
and summer I have had people
stop and discuss the beach
issue with me. It seems that
people have concluded that if
septic tanks and sewage spills
were the problem the county
would have already addressed
this issue. Since the county
is not making an issue about
this problem, people have
concluded that the problems
are related to Red Tide in the
Gulf of Mexico.
As most readers of this col-
umn know, I have been very
active with the Coast Guard
Auxiliary since my wife Angret
and I moved to Shell Point al-
most seven years ago. Last year
I was the Flotilla Commander
and have been busy helping
to collect Red Tide samples
which we send to Dr. Mike Sul-
livan to analyze. In addition, I
am a member of the Wakulla
County Citizens Infrastructure
Development Committee and
we have been active in ad-
dressing septic system and
sewer issues. Therefore, I feel
I have sufficient information
to address both of the above
issues concerning our beach
closures.
First, let's discuss the Red
Tide water sampling program.
This program started a few
years ago and is headed up by
Dr. Mike Sullivan who worked
at FSU. Last year Dr. Sullivan
moved to St. Andrews College
in Ridgeland, Miss.
The program is funded by
the Federal Fish and Wildlife
Service. The Coast Guard


Auxiliary Flotillas from St.
Pete to Pensacola collect water
samples which are sent to Dr.
Sullivan for analysis.
The U.S. Coast Guard autho-
rizes us to travel under govern-
ment orders to collect these
samples and then reimburses
us for the fuel we use in the
collection process.
Flotilla 13 collects both sur-
face and bottom samples. The
surface samples are easy to get.
Just reach over the boat and
scoop up some water. However.
to collect the bottom samples
you must use the water col-
lector.
At Shell Point, we collect
samples in five locations, with
the first being one mile south
of the Tripod (entrance to Shell
Point), and then we move south
one mile each for the other
four collection locations.
We make a chart indicating
the date, time, weather condi-
tions, and sea conditions for
each location where we collect
water samples.
Now the fun part of this is
collecting the bottom samples.
This requires opening the end
of the collector and making
sure it is securely held by a
clamp in the middle of the
collector, This sounds really
simple, but on my last trip I
had Dr. Marc Lipsius, a retired
heart surgeon, and Michael
Longanecker our Flotilla Com-
mander and also a General
Manager of Linen Company
in Pensacola, trying to work
this device. I really wish I had
a video of how much trouble


these two experts had trying
to keep the ends of the collec-
tor open.
After great effort, we would
gently lower this device to the
bottom, and once there, jerk
hard on the rope. This would
release the ends of the collec-
tor and trap the water in the
collector.
Upon retrieval, we would
open the ends of the collec-
tor and fill up the collection
bottles.
After we returned I would
add some preservative solution
to each bottle and pack them
up and ship them to Dr. Sul-
livan for analysis.
This report is designed for
use by the FWRI (Fish& Wildlife
Research Institute) in St. Pete,
and they are familiar with all
the species names I throw
around. These species are mi-
croscopic and hence have no
common names.
The big thing is that there is
no species called Karenia brevis
present in the samples. This is
the toxic red tide species in our
particular region of the Gulf,
so its absence is always very
good news. The dinoflagellates
present in the sample are a very
minor component of the phyto-
plankton assemblage which is
dominated by diatom species.
Except for a few diatom species
they are not toxic. Therefore,
if it weren't for the high fecal
counts the water would be per-
fectly safe for swimming. The
phytoplankton represent the
base of the food chain and the
fact that diatoms dominate is


NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING

The Wakulla County Tourist Development Council will hold a Strategic Plan-
ning Meeting on Thursday, October 2, 2008 at 8:30 A.M. at the St. Marks Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge. The purpose of the retreat is to establish a 5-year Plan
and Annual Action Plan for the Tourist Development Council activities.

For more information, please contact Pam Portwood, Director, Wakulla
County Tourist Development Council at (850) 984-3966 or by email at pport-
wood@embarqmail.com.

Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English
speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla
County Board of County Commissioners' Office at (850) 926-0919 or TDD
(850) 926-1201.


great for all those organisms
which feed on phytoplankton.
Based on this latest report, I
clearly understand that we DO
NOT have a Red Tide problem
at Shell Point.
This leads us to ask what
is the issue about the beaches
and what is being done about
this problem.
As mentioned above, I have
been working with Wakulla
County for the last three years
on infrastructure issues, espe-
cially septic systems and sewer
problems.
I have had discussions with
the company that does the
analysis of collected beach wa-
ter samples for the Department
of Health and they indicated
that during wet times the water
samples show a higher than
normal amount of human fecal
material that would come from
septic systems or overflow
from sewer system.
During dry periods, the fecal
material comes from birds.
This analysis has been re-
confirmed by studies con-
ducted by the University of
South Florida which, last year,


collected water samples from
19 different locations around
Mashes Sands and up through
Sopchoppy.
At Shell Point, Talquin Elec-
tric Cooperative owns, and
operates the sewage treatment
facility that services Shell
Point, Oyster Bay and Spring
Creek. Their sewage treatment
plant is located on Cut-Off
Road. Talquin acquired this sys-
tem from the Taff family years
ago. They have run some new
lines in this area, but have not
run lines by all properties nor
have they ever run lines to Live
Oak Island whose residents
have their properties on septic
systems. At Shell Point, Oyster
Bay and Spring Creek there are
many residents who, for vari-
ous reasons, have chosen not
to connect to the sewer lines
that run past their residences.
There are currently nego-
tiations underway between
Talquin and the Wakulla Coun-'
ty government to have Talquin
connect to the county sewer
system and close their treat-
ment plant on Cut-Off Road.
Included in this agreement will


be the requirement to run sew-
er lines to Live Oak Island and
those roads in this area that
currently do not have sewer
lines available. In addition, part
of the negotiation is to have
connection fees the same as
elsewhere in the county.
Once there is a final agree-
ment, the county will mandite
that all residences itn'LiWe Oai/
Shell Point, Oyster Bay, anid'
Spring Creek connect to the
sewer system.
At this point, there is a draft
agreement between Wakulla
County and Talquin that is bd-
ing considered by the Talquin
Board of Directors. It is antici-
pated that this agreement will.
be presented to the Wakulla
County Commission in the
next few months.
Hopefully, once everyone is
connected to the sewer system
and all septic systems have
been disconnected our beaches
will again be bacteria free and
safe for all citizens to use..
For more information con-
tact me at 926-5049 or by e-rpail.
at ron_piasecki@earthlink.


SSpecializing In
A N YI E IRepair & Service

ELECTRIC Residential &
Commercial

MARK OLIVER Homes &
(850) 421-3012 Mobile Homes Q
24-Hour Service ER0015233 .


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car by going to a car dealership, but the
experience left him feeling confused. He
mentioned this to a co-worker who suggested
he talk to Don Stokes, the AutoAdvisor at
Envision Credit Union. Don learned what
kind of car Charles wanted, found the car,
and had it delivered to Envision. Meanwhile,
Charles joined the Credit Union and applied
for his new car loan. "I am very grateful to
Don" Charles said, "for helping me find Ihe


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Major
Activity
Minor
Activity


Thursday
9:05 am
9:30pm
2:55 am
3:15pm


Friday
9:50 am
10:10pm
3:45 am
4:00pm


Saturday
10:30 am
10:55 pm
4:25 am
4:45 pm


Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
11:10am 11:50am 12:10am 1:00am
11:35pm --:--pm 12:40pm 1:30pm
5:10 am 5:50am 6:25 am 7:15 am
5:25 pm 6:05 pm 6:50 pm 7:50 pm


Sunrise
Sunset
Moon rise
Moon set
Brightness


Boating Emergencies .
Coast Guard Station
Panam a City ........................................................ (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown .........................(352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
St. Marks (Flotilla 12) .................... (850) 906-0540
or .......... ........ ....... ... .. ........................................... 893-5 137
Shell Point (Flotilla 13):............. .... (850) 926-2606
or ......................................................... 926-5654
__


---------------


.,AWL

"0.1. fa






Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008


Sheriff's Report


Wakulla County Sheriff's Office
officials are investigating a grand
theft reported Sept. 18 by a female
Sopchoppy resident, according to
Sheriff David Harvey.
The victim was attempting to use
a debit card at a local store when the
card was not accepted.
She went to the local bank and
discovered that numerous transac-
tions had been made on her ac-
count involving an airline in India.
The charges on the account totaled
$4,398 through 65 transactions. The
case was turned over to the Criminal
Investigations Division. Deputy Ben
Steinle investigated.

In other activity reported by the
Wakulla County Sheriff's Office dur-
ing the past week:
On Sept. 16, Dr. Thomas Askins
reported a burglary at the Sopchop-
py Education Center. A door was
discovered damaged at the school
gym. Damage was estimated at $25.
Deputy Joe Page and CSI Melissa
Harris investigated.


On Sept. 16, Anna R. Moore of
Crawfordville reported a fraud as a
transaction was discovered in her
checking account. The transaction
was for $9.40. Deputy Pam Veltkamp
investigated.
On Sept. 16, Gary W. Matlock
of Crawfordville reported a burglary
at his home. A forced entry was dis-
covered at the home. Deputy Nick
Petowsky investigated.
On Sept. 16, Sandra D. Vearil
of Crawfordville reported a vehicle
theft. A suspect has been identified
and the vehicle was located. Deputy
William T. Hudson investigated.
On Sept. 18, Jeffery M. Johnson
of Crawfordville recovered a license
tag owned by Charles W. Field of Tal-
lahassee. The tag was found on Bob
Miller Road at Ashley Hall Road. It
was registered to a utility trailer. Lt.
Ray Johnson attempted to contact
the owner.
On Sept. 18, David N. Randall
of Crawfordville reported a fraud. A
credit card company informed the vic-
tim that he owed $6,008 and he also


discovered that a suspect, who has
been identified, opened an account
using his identity. The total value of
fraudulent activity is $6,302. The case
was sent to the Criminal Investiga-
tions Division. Deputy Lindsay Allen
investigated.
On Sept. 20, Randy Esser of
Wildwood Country Club reported a
grand theft of gasoline from the club.
The club reported the theft of $703
worth of fuel, a total of 175 gallons.
A chain and padlock, valued at $35,
were also damaged. Deputy Ryan
Muse investigated.
On Sept. 20, Cody W. Claypool
of Crawfordville reported a felony
criminal mischief at the Shell Point
Park. A bathroom sink, valued at
$225, was damaged in the men's
restroom. The sink had been ripped
from the wall and broken. Deputy
Ryan Muse investigated.
On Sept. 20, Jeremy D. Wilkes
of Tallahassee reported a vehicle
burglary at Wal-Mart. A total of 70
compact discs, valued at $1,070, were
taken from the vehicle. Deputies Mike


Helms and William Hudson reviewed
security tapes and arrested Carl Mi-
chael Wharton, 31, of Crawfordville
and Zacharia William Faulkner, 18, of
Crawfordville in the case. The stolen
property was recovered,
On Sept. 20, Michael D. Bailey
of Crawfordville reported a criminal
mischief at his home. An electronic
gate was damaged. Damage was esti-
mated at $25. Deputy Nick Petowsky
investigated.
On Sept. 22, Danny Crider of
Cook Portable Warehouses of Valdo-
sta, Ga. reported a grand theft of a
portable building, valued at $2,545.
The property was taken from Ivan
Church Road. A suspect has been
identified. Deputy Robert Giddens
investigated.
On Sept. 21, Madeleine H. Carr
of Crawfordville reported a criminal
mischief as someone damaged her
mailbox. Damage was valued at
$20. Deputy William Hudson inves-
tigated.
On Sept. 21, Ryan D. Langston of
Panacea reported a vehicle burglary.


Jewelry, valued at $50, was removed.
Suspects have been identified. Depu-
ty Andrew Vass investigated.
On Sept. 21, Phyllis P. Rosier
of Sopchoppy reported a residential
burglary. Clothing, valued at $105,
was reported stolen and suspects
have been identified. Girardeau
Franz Murray, 37, of Sopchoppy was
charged with burglary after allegedly
tossing the clothing at Deputy Ryan
Muse while he was investigating
the case.
On Sept. 21, Tonya M. Law of
Crawfordville reported a criminal
mischief. Suspects were observed
damaging mailboxes in her neighbor-
hood. Her damage was estimated at
$20. Deputy Pam Veltkamp investi-
gated.
The Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office received 650 calls for service
during the past week.
Note to our readers: The people
who are reported as charged with
crimes in this column have not yet
been to trial and are therefore inno-
cent until proven guilty.


Court Shorts


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
A 29-year-old reputed
gang member was sentenced
to 20 years in prison for
violating his probation by
possessing two pistols. The
man, Daniel Marion, had
gone so far as to post pic-
tures of himself and another
man posing with the guns
on his Myspace page.
At a violation of proba-
tion hearing on Thursday,
Sept. 11, Marion claimed
the pictures on his Myspace
page were taken before he
had gotten in trouble with
the law, and that the two
firearms seized at his Volu-
sia County apartment were
different weapons that be-
longed to his girlfriend.
Marion, 29, was placed
on probation in Wakulla
County a year and half ago
for possession of a firearm
by a convicted felon and
aggravated battery on a law
enforcement officer. His pro-
bation had been transferred
t-Volusia County. His proba-
tion-orfficer there, Ernesto
Row, said that, in May, he
received information that he
needed to look at Marion's
Myspace site. When he did,
he saw photos of Marion
and another man with their
faces covered to hide their
identities, in a variety of
poses with pistols.
Department of Correc-
tions officer Christopher
Groves performed the search
with other officers and, in a
safe in the back of the closet,
found a Smith & Wesson .38
caliber revolver and a Sig
Sauer .45 caliber semi-au-
tomatic. Between the cloth-
wrapped weapons, Groves
found Marion's driver li-
cense and his prison ID.
Both Row and Groves
identified Marion as a vali-
dated member of the Gang-
ster Disciples, a violent
street gang. Groves said the
home included a shrine to
Gangster Disciples and was
decorated in the gang's col-
ors. Asked about the color
scheme, Marion reportedly
replied that he just liked
the colors.
Groves was able to iden-
tify Marion in the Myspace
pictures, even with his face
concealed, by the gang tat-
toos on his torso. Appearing


in the pictures with him was
his Volusia County room-
mate Michael Comparetto.
The firearms in the Myspace
picture appear to be the
same: a silver revolver and
a blue automatic.
Comparetto and Mari-
on both testified that the
guns belonged to Marion's
girlfriend, who was only
identified as "Amanda from
Tampa," and claimed the
pictures on Myspace were
taken in late 2003 and were
a Rossi .38 revolver and
Taurus .45 later seized by
Tallahassee police in two
different cases.
Using the background of
the Myspace pictures, Groves
was able to locate where in
the Volusia County house
the pictures were taken,
which meant the photos
were more recent.
Wakulla Circuit Judge N.
Sanders Sauls found, by the
greater weight of evidence,
that Marion had violated his
probation. The hearingthen
moved to what sentence
should be imposed. Guide-
lines were for a sentence
of between 30 months and
20 years.
Assistant Public Defender
Matt Ream asked the court


to use its discretion to put
Marion back on probation.
Marion told the the court
he had done everything he
was supposed to do on pro-
bation. "I had straightened
up," he said.
But Assistant State Attor-
ney Jack Campbell said he
hadn't realized until recently
that Marion was so danger-
ous. "A gangbanger," Camp-
bell said, describing Mari-
on's pictures on Myspace as
an attempt to "advertise and
show off his violence."
An 18-year-old woman
charged with possession of
more than 20 grams of can-
nabis, sought to have the
evidence thrown out, claim-
ing the trooper who found
the pot in her car after a
traffic stop had searched her
car without permission.
Sierra Danielle Carlson
claimed that, after a traffic
stop in March by Florida
Highway Patrol Trooper
Brian Speigner for speeding,
she answered "no" when
asked if he could search her
car. She claimed that Trooper
Speigner, after running her
record through his dispatch
and finding a prior drug of-
fense, told her he was going
to search it anyway.


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Speigner denied the al-
legation. He said he asked
Carlson if he could search
the car and she threw up her
hands and said, "search it."
Speigner allegedly found
two bags of pot under the
front seat weighing 220
grams, almost a half-pound.
Speigner also testified that,
at the jail, after she was giv-
en her Miranda warning that
she had the right to remain
silent, Carlson admitted to
ownership of the drug.
Lt. James Sessor arrived
on the scene at some point
prior to the search to watch
Carlson and her passenger,
Leanne Keith, while Spei-
gner searched the car.
Keith, 19, was called to tes-
tify on Carlson's behalf and
admitted she had "smoked
weed" before the 1:30 a.m.
traffic stop. She denied,
however, that the marijuana
she smoked was the same as
the marijuana found in the


car. "I brought the joint with
me," she said.
Keith's attorney, Assistant
Public Defender Blair Boyd,
was in the courtroom as
his client testified. She had
reportedly been advised
about giving up her Fifth
Amendment right against
self-incrimination prior to
taking the stand.
Judge Sauls rejected the
argument that the search
was illegal, and recommend-
ed that the state attorney's
office investigate Keith for
possible perjury charges.
A man arrested on
a charge of trafficking in
the drug Ecstasy had been
released 'from jail on Aug.
13 after friends posted the
$50,000 bond. But when
Lafreddrick Curry went back
to the jail to pick up his car,
a 1995 Chevy Cavalier, on
Aug. 19, he was arrested on
new charges of drug sale
and possession and held on


a new $100,000 bond.
Curry, a 2007 graduate
off Wakulla High School,
allegedly sold $1,400 worth
of methylenedioxymetham-
phetamine, also known as
MDMA or "Ecstasy" or X, to
undercover narcotics officers
on at least two occasions. Af-
ter he was released from jail
and before the additional
charges were filed, Curry
got an additional charge of
violating his bond by fail-
ing to report to the pre-trial
release office.
His attorney, Ed Harvey,
admitted that the require-
ment to report to pre-trial re-
lease was in the paperwork
Curry received when he was
released from jail, but said
Curry didn't read the papers.
"It was dumb, but it wasn't
willful," Harvey said of the
violation of bond.

Continued on Page 19A


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ADVERTISEMENT


Let's keep our kids from

becoming criminals


by Charlie Creel


We hear about crime every
day, but how does it become a
reality?
Just last week we read in the
paper about a 17-year-old who
committed a burglary, led police


on a high-speed
chase, and shot at
law enforcement
officers.
The boy now
faces prison time,
but a look into
his life shows
that all the signs
of trouble were
there for this boy,
years before all


this happened.
It appears that


he became


withdrawn, failed at school,
and lived the life of a loner-
typical behavior of a kid who
was headed for trouble and
could cause trouble for the rest
of us.
Could he have been saved
from his miserable future?
Could his victims been spared
their pain? And could our
community have avoided the
costs we'll all pay for ignoring
him when he could have been
helped?


This young man would have
been a perfect candidate for
the Sheriff's Office Mentoring
Program for at-risk youth that I
will initiate.
As sheriff, I will start programs


Through
officers, we


and assign re-
sources to iden-
tify young people
who are headed
the wrong way
We're lucky in
Wakulla County
that our county
is not as densely
populated as others,
and troubled youth
come to our atten-
tion a lot sooner.
school resource
can identify these


youth and mentor them with
sheriff's office personnel. It is
similar to the Big Brother/Big
Sister program.
If mentoring can save
just one youth from going to
prison-or worse, killing or
being killed- then we are
accomplishing much more than
what is currently being done.
We all would win.
I ask for your support now and
for your vote on November 4th.


ADVERTISEMENT
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Affiliation, for Sheriff


If mentoring can save just
one youth from going to
prison-or worse, killing
or being killed- then
we are accomplishing
much more than what is
currently being done.


Notice of Planning Commission meeting
to discuss the City of Sopchoppy Evaluation

and Appraisal Report

The Planning Commission for the City of Sopchoppy will conduct a public
workshop on the proposed Evaluation and Appraisal of the City of Sop-
choppy Comprehensive Plan, on Tuesday, September 30, 2008 at 6:30 p.m.
(EDST), or as soon as can be heard in the City Hall, 100 Municipal Avenue,
Sopchoppy, FL. All persons owning property or operating a business within
the City of Sopchoppy are encouraged to attend.

Persons wishing to comment may do so in person at the workshop or by writ-
ing to the City Commission at P.O. Box 1219, Sopchoppy, Florida 32358. A
copy of the Evaluation and Appraisal Report may be obtained by writing to
the above address or calling 850-962-4611.

If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the commission with
respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the indi-
vidual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE:
Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with
Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation to participate
in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting
by contacting Jackie Lawhon at the above address or phone number.


I


MOO"'





THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008 Page 13A


People


Animals enjoy therapeutic massage CCOW will host


ofm
Wakulla
LoUa


ly ge gersd
1Susan Yelton
Have you ever used an alter-
native healing practice for an
ailment, such as a therapeutic
massage? Many different types
of treatments are becoming
popular these days, but most
people don't think of using
them for their pet.
Normally, you get medicine
from your vet and hope for the
best. But the picture seems to
be changing as we learn more
about medical science.
Several decades ago, a wom-.
an named Linda Tellington-
Jones developed a therapeutic
massage technique for animals,
commonly called T-Touch. It is
now widely used to treat a va-
riety of ailments and T-Touch
classes are taught locally. One


of our CHAT members, Eliza-
beth Allshouse, has been using
the treatment for her pets for
the past 17 years and would
like to share her experience
using this alternative healing
practice.
Last July, an article in the
Tallahassee Democrat featured
a story about Lori Carlson and
the T-Touch classes offered
at the Leon County Humane
Society. It was the photo of
the cocker spaniel that initially
caught Elizabeth's attention,
since they are her loves. As she
read the article, she recalled
that T-Touch is a relaxing activ-
ity for both you and your pet
that will endear them to you
forever.
"If you ever felt the constant
pressure of a headache, you
may have massaged your head
in this fashion anyway, and the
same relief can be given your
pets," according to Elizabeth.
Elizabeth Allshouse's story
begins when she experienced
a season with colds and sinus


infections. She said she mas-
saged her head using the T-
Touch technique and decided
to do the same for her Labrador
"nurse," because he decided to
be miserable right along with
her. As she tells us, "Well, he
loved it and I've been doing it
ever since to all my pets. Even
the cat enjoys it. They all seem
to understand that you are
magically erasing away all the
cares of the world."
According to Lori Carlson of
Leon County Humane Society,
the treatment works to reduce
swelling and expel toxins. It
can also greatly improve our
pets' flexibility and muscle
tone. It is not hard to do. It just
takes a little bit of time to take
classes that teach the T-Touch
technique.
When Elizabeth uses the
technique on her pets, she said
she starts with her thumb be-
tween their eyes and works her
way up and then out. She tells
us that every night when they
sit with her, they become like


putty in her hands after just
a few minutes. Whenever she
bathes her dogs, she also gives
them a full body massage,
which is her way of checking
for any lumps or problems.
She said, "It calms them right
down and they just melt in her
hands. Jake loves the touch
and snout massage, Clairanna
loves the neck and tummy
massage." She said nobody in
her critter family likes the paw
pad massage, but she checks
everything out anyway.
Elizabeth suggested that
anyone interested in learning
how to use T-Touch for their
animals should contact Lori
Carlson at the Leon County
Human Society at LCARL-
SON@LCHS.INFO or 224-9193.
Lori has also offered to con-
duct a workshop for Wakulla
residents. We are looking at
a November date and will
let everyone know when the
workshop is scheduled.


Democrats will host fish fry


The Wakulla County Demo-
cratic Executive Committee is
hosting a fish fry "meet and
greet" with all of the local
candidates during lunch on
Saturday, Oct. 4, at Hudson
Park. All Wakulla County
voters and their families are


invited to attend, and the first
300 people will be served for
free. After the first 300 meals,
lunch plates will be available
for $8.
Representatives from each
of the Wakulla Democratic
Party campaigns will attend


this event, including Super-
visor of Elections candidate
Buddy Wells, Superintendent
David Miller, Property Ap-
praiser Donnie Sparkman,
Sheriff David Harvey, and
the three Democratic county
commission candidates, Alan


Brock, Mike Stewart and Jim
Stokley.
There will also be informa-
tion regarding the Obama/
Biden campaign, Congressman
Allen Boyd's campaign, and
Leonard Bembry's campaign
for State House District 10.


Obama opens Crawfordville campaign office


On Thursday, Sept. 18,
the' doors opened on Wakul-
la's newest campaign office:
Barack Obama for President-
The Campaign for Change.
The office is being manned
by volunteers who live and
work in Wakulla County. Joan
Hendrix, Office Coordinator
for the .Wakulla for Obama
campaign, said that she was
thrilled to have an official
qfice. spacac.The campaign
Kad been "operating out of
volunteers' homes and an RV
that was provided by a Craw-
fordville family.
"We will continue using the
RV when we go out on week-


.,f'. '
r O .; ... .. ..,711 ,
loa 011.11 111, IV,


ends to walk neighborhoods,
but our day-to-day work will
happen in this office," Hendrix
continued.
The office is located across
the street from Winn Dixie,
behind the Pizza Hut and next
to the Dominoes Pizza, in unit
27D of the Azalea Drive Shop-
ping Center. One volunteer
was overheard saying, "My
diet will have to go on hold for
the next 48, days." That is all


the time left in this campaign
season. Joan showed off the
bumper stickers, signs and
campaign buttons that the
Wakulla volunteers had pur-
chased. "We want to get a sign
in the yard and a sticker on
the bumper of every Obama
supporter."
The public is invited to a
6 p.m. open house on Friday,
Sept. 26.
Voters can also go to the


office to register to vote or to
see if they can be reinstated
as a voter if their voting rights
have been revoked in the
past.
If anyone has questions
concerning the campaign or
would like to volunteer, they
can stop by the office, e-mail
the campaign at WakullaForO-
bama@hotmailcom, or leave a
message at 254-0711.


candidate .forums
Concerned Citizens of Wakulla, Inc. (CCOW) announced
that all the candidates in the 2008 races for Wakulla County
offices have accepted CCOW's invitation to participate in the
group's 2008 candidate forums. Comcast has agreed to video
the events for later broadcast.
Two forums are scheduled for county commission candi-
dates on Tuesday, Oct. 7 and another for all the other county
offices, including property appraiser, sheriff, superintendent
of schools, and supervisor of elections, on Tuesday, Oct. 21.
Both events are scheduled from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the
Wakulla County Library. Everyone is invited to come to the
library at 6:30 p.m. to meet the candidates. Refreshments will
be served.
Both events are free and open to the public. The
Wakulla Watershed Coalition is cosponsoring both events.
The Big Bend Environmental Forum and the League of
Women Voters are co-sponsoring the October 7 forum.
The format will be similar to that of CCOW's 2004 and 2006
forums. Questions submitted in advance by members of
sponsoring organizations will be written on slips of paper and
put into a hat. The moderator will pick questions at random.
Each candidate will have a set amount of time to answer his
or her question. In the first and last segments of the event,
each candidate will have two minutes to use however he or
she wishes. Audience members are invited to submit ques-
tions in writing.
Comcast has not announced the schedule for broadcast.
CCOW will make this information available as soon as the
schedule is announced. For more information, call 877-7661
or send an e-mail to contactccow@gmail.com.

Happy first birthday


Maternal grandparents are
Tommy and Brenda Hicks
of Crawfordville. Paternal
grandparents are Shirley Rig-
don and Cole Agner, both of
Wakulla Station, and the late
Roy Rigdon.
Maternal great-grandpar-
ents are the late Edward Gor-
don and Mildred Humphries,
formerly of Melbourne. Pater-
nal great-grandparents are the
late Jack and Waunita Rigdon
and the late Homer and Dol-
lie Carraway, all formerly of
Crawfordville.
GET THE NEWS
DELIVERED
EACH WEEK!
Call 926-7102
L -- - - --


Eva C. Rigdon
Happy first birthday to
Eva Cecile Rigdon on Sept.
21. She is the daughter of
Justin and Dawn Rigdon of
Crawfordville.


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2784 COASTAL HWY. MEDART


Notice of Adoption of the CITY OF
SOPCHOPPY Evaluation and Appraisal Report

The City Commission of the City of Sopchoppy proposes to adopt Evaluation
and Appraisal Report reviewing the existing City of Sopchoppy, Comprehen-
sive Plan.

A public hearing on the proposed report will be held on Monday, October 13,
2008, at 6:30 p.m. (EDST), or as soon as can be heard in the City Hall, 100
Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL. More information can be obtained and
the proposed report may be inspected at the City Hall (telephone:
850-962-4611).

Persons wishing to comment may do so in person at the public hearing or by
,writing to the City Commission at P.O. Box 1219, Sopchoppy, Florida
32358.

If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the commission with
respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the indi-
vidual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE:
Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with
Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation to participate
in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting
by contacting Jackie Lawhon at the above address or phone number.


*11111111111111111111IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1111111111111lIll, P :


iC|
0





Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008


Board projects


Continued from Page 1A
Later, they voted to move
forward with plans for a $2.8
million community center.
The courthouse expan-
sion is planned to fill in
the back courtyard area, and
would include an additional
courtroom as well as a secure
sally-port for bailiffs transport-
ing prisoners from the jail to
court. The county commission
would also have a meeting
room at the courthouse.
Based on the vote from
commissioners on the com-
munity center, they approved


going forward with a 19,800
square foot facility with gym
featuring a full basketball
court and volleyball court,
as well as space for meeting
rooms and kitchen. The facility
is to located on county-owned
property on Trice Lane next to
the current ESG office.
County Administrator Ben
Pingree asked the board to
consider future planning with
the facility, perhaps with
space for EMS offices and a
fire station. The most expen-
sive option was for a $5.4 mil-
lion, 48,180 square foot facility


with five fire station bays, and
an EMS station with four bays
and a 32,000 square foot com-
munity center.
Commissioner Howard Kes-
sler urged the board to delay
action on the courthouse
project, saying that the board
needed time to look at its
funding options. He first sug-
gested it be continued to the
second meeting in December
- which is, coincidentally,
when a new board with three
new members will join Kes-
sler and Green.
Kessler said the board is


facing millions of dollars in
upcoming projects a $20
million sewer expansion as
well as the courthouse and
community center projects
- and recommended that com-
missioners should be clear on
how they intend to pay for the
projects before they approve
them.
Several speakers -said that
this was a good time to go
forward with the projects and
that delaying action until a
new board is sworn in could
cost upwards of $100,000 in
higher costs for materials.


Thurmond said he was the community center, with a
concerned that the court- number of different options
house and community center for the center, depending
were being looked at as an on how much they want to
either/or situation. He said he spend.
had been looking at funding Langston made motions on
options, and he and his staff both the courthouse and com-
had come up with a plan to munity center projects, sec-
pay for both projects by bor- onded by Lawhon and joined
rowing against the one-cent in support by Green. Kessler
sales tax money. voted against moving ahead
The county already has with the courthouse project
$544,000 in state money for but for the community center.
the courthouse expansion, Chairman Ed Brimner was not
which is projected to cost present, having left the meet-
$5 million. The county has ing earlier due to illness.
$400,000 in federal money for


HosDice will host bereavement conference Crawfordville disaster


a


Big Bend Hospice will host-
ing its Fourth Annual Bereave-
ment Conference, "Grief: A
Journey to Hope" on Sept.
26, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at
the Tallahassee Community
College Center for Economic
and Workforce Development.
This conference is designed


to provide useful information
and practical strategies for
professionals to use in assist-
ing clients through the grief
process. Many different topics
will be explored throughout
the day including spirituality,
grief in rural cultures, military
loss, pet loss and loss of a child.


A variety of grief related pro-
fessional resources including
books, videos, and music, will
provide an opportunity to learn
new interventions to use with
grieving clients, and facilitate
time to learn from each other's
experiences and insights.
The cost of the conference


is $69 with special rates for
students, or four or more from
the same agency. 6.5 Continu-
ing Education Units will be
offered. Late registration after
Sept. 12 will add $10 to each
category. Contact Lisa Baggett,
878-5310, X433 to register or for
more information.


TCC Green Guide Program is slated


As Tallahassee Community
College's Green Guide certifica-
tion program prepares to begin
its fifth class, on Sept. 22, it has
already made an impression,
especially in Wakulla County.
For one thing, its 60 gradu-
ates have formed a close-knit
professional association for
nature-based tourism, launch-
ing a Web site and participat-
ing in eco-friendly community
projects.
For another, the two-year-
old Green Guide Program was
a 2008 finalist for a Sustain-
ability Florida award, nomi-
nated by Paul G. Johnson, Vice
Chair of the Wakulla County
Chamber of Commerce.
"The Green Guide pro-
gram is essentially a catalyst
between the two 'greens,'"
said Johnson, an environmen-
tal and governmental affairs
consultant. "One is the en-
vironment. The other is the
dollars and the jobs and the
sales and the service taxes it
can generate."


The "two greens" concept
also applies to the lives of the
Green Guides graduates, says
Captain Jo Barksdale, whose
class of guides made a strong
connection. "We just bonded.
We all liked a lot of the same
things. But because of the
class, jobs came my way."
Barksdale, a photographer
as well as a nature-lover, takes
tourists on photographic
expeditions. She also joined
fellow students and staff in
obtaining a U. S. Coast Guard
Captain's License, as did Dr.
Mary Wolfgang, Director of
TCC's Wakulla Center, where
the Green Guide program is
based.
"We've got everything
from hiking, biking and kayak
tours to birding and wildlife
tours," said Wolfgang. "Stu-
dents have come from as far
away as St. Louis, Tennessee
and Orlando."
The Green Guides are part
of a long-term economic de-
velopment plan for Wakulla


County, said Johnson. While
the program has generated
a small number of jobs so
far, the county is working to
become a world-class destina-
tion for travelers who love to
explore the outdoors.
"The plan includes creating
more beds, good restaurants
and shops to draw and ac-
commodate tourists," said
Johnson. "With 70 percent of
land in Wakulla County owned
by the public for long-term en-
vironmental and recreational
sustainability, eco-tourism cre-
ates an opportunity to turn a
local tax liability into a region-
ally sustainable asset.
"We have a great opportu-
nity here, because of the great
diversity of habitat types,"
he added. "From world-class
springs, to rivers, forests,
beaches and gulf waters, all
within an hour's drive. That's
pretty unique. There's not a lot
of places on the planet you can
do that."
The next Green Guide Cer-


tification Class begins on Sept.
22. The program provides 90
contact hours of classroom
and field-based training.
Find out more about the
Green Guide Certification Pro-
gram, call 922-6290 or e-mail


center closes Sept. 18
Two Disaster Recovery Cen- daily until further notice. On
ters in Northwest Florida closed the Web, disaster information
last week. remains available 24 hours a day
The recovery center in Craw- at www.fema.gov.
fordville closed Thursday, Sept. Homeowners, renters and
18, while the center in Tallahas- businesses in declared counties
see ceased operations Friday, should. use the same FEMA toll- .
Sept. 19, state and federal recov- free lines or Web site to register
erv officials announced. for FEMA disaster assistance


The centers served hom-
eowners, renters and businesses
affected by Tropical Storm Fay.
Survivors can still stay in touch
with a recovery specialist by us-
ing the FEMA helpline option at
800-621-FEMA (3362) or the TrY
line for the deaf, hard of hearing
and speech impaired at 800-462-
7585 from 7 a.m. to midnight


programs.
FEMA coordinates the federal
government's role in preparing
for, preventing, mitigating the
effects of, responding to, and
recovering from all domestic
disasters, whether natural or
man-made, including acts of
terror.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008 Page 15A


More Letters to the Editor


Driving down Ed Brimner Boulevard with impact fees


Editor, The Newss
In last week's The Wakulla
News article about the im-
pact fee moratorium, the
paper said, "David Damon
applauded the sentiment of
the moratorium to help lo-
cal tradesman who are out
of work, but suggested that
allowing a big box store like
Lowe's or Home Depot to
come in and build without
paying impact fees doesn't
seem right."
Let me set the record
straight on this, that is not all
I said. I do completely sym-
pathize with the tradesmen
who are out of work, how-
ever, I am totally opposed to
burdening the rest of the tax-
payers with this moratorium.
At the "emergency hearing"
there were several good sug-
gestions that were made by
citizens from both sides, but
they fell on the deaf ears
of Commissioners Brimner,
Langston and Lawhon.
Here are a few: We could
waive impact fees for indi-
viduals building their own
home. Commissioners ig-
nored the $120,000 impact fee
study, paid for by taxpayers, it
stated exactly what the cost
for impact fees should be.
Speakers that evening sug-
gested limits on the number
of homes and a time frame
for completion. The county
is currently being forced to
pick up the tab for poorly
thought out developments
like Wakulla Gardens, to
the tune of $22 million. The
county is already flooded
with homes that sit empty,
both with construction and
rental homes.
Why not put our unem-
ployed tradesmen to work
to build a county civic center
or youth center? It was also
noted that we need to first
address current problems
such as our polluted beaches
that are constantly closed for
swimming and have been for
almost three years.
After hearing all the con-
cerns and options, my sug-
gestion was that the board
hold a workshop to find
a way that would actual-
ly guarantee that our local
tradesmen would be used for
future new construction. If
helping the local tradesmen
was actually what the three
commissioners were trying
to do with this moratorium,
then put it in writing and
protect our tradesmen. When
a large commercial box store
comes to build, where do you
think the labor and materi-
als usually come from? Not
from here.
Why not state that local
tradesmen must be used and
perhaps even local materi-
als such as from Gulf Coast
Lumber. I pointed out that
in Franklin County they did
this with the Summer Camp
development and they stuck
to it. The three commission-
ers, Brimner, Langston and
Lawhon, refused to listen to
any compromise or sugges-
tions, even from their fellow
Commissioners George Green
or Howard Kessler. This
leads me and many others to
speculate on the real motiva-
tion behind this "emergency
moratorium."
What is this really about?
You decide. At a time when
counties are struggling and
cutting budgets to meet the
decline in revenue, does this
makes sense?
Taking at the least,
$800,000 away from such
items as ambulance service,
roads, schools and parks
in one year alone? Making
the taxpayers pay at least
$800,000 in additional taxes
to make up for the money


GIBSON

AUTOMOTIVE

SERVICE


the commissioners took away
from the citizens and the
county is wrong.
At a time when gas prices
are forcing people to re-
consider their commute to
Leon County they are further
burdened with more taxes
and/or lack of services. Does
this make any sense?
It was abundantly clear
that this "emergency morato-
rium" was a done deal before
the meeting ever started.


Unfortunately, it appears
that the local tradesmen
were simply a pawn, they
were played as the sympa-
thy card. It seems that they
have been used by these
three commissioners, to get
the commissioners' agenda
pushed through hastily be-
fore they left office, The only
real emergency seemed to be
that they were running out of
time in office.
Years ago, another short-


sighted board gave Wal-Mart
a huge break on impact fees
and left the taxpayers footing
the bill for Wal-Mart. Why?
Wal-Mart would have come
either way. Giving them a
break on impact fees only
benefitted their very wealthy
stockholders. It made no
sense then, and here we are
doing it again. We have a new
group of commissioners com-
ing in that will, hopefully,
step up to the plate and do


what's best for the entire
county. They will need to
look at the bigger picture and
the quality of life in Wakulla
County, as well as the future
and straighten out this mess
that they will inherit from
the past.
The lack of infrastruc-
ture and poor planning has
brought us to where we
are today. We should have
learned from this.
When Lowe's or Home


Depot shows up for a free
ride, remember who to thank
when your property taxes go
up, not only to pay for this
$800,000 shortfall in 2009,
but for their $1.5 million
dollar impact. Then again, we
will probably have a constant
reminder when we have to
drive down Ed Brimner Blvd.
to get to our new Lowesl
David Damon
Crawfordville


G. ScoTT GIBSON
AUTOMOTIVE SPECIALIST
OVER 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE
850-926-2430
MV69886


bmh6-%j





Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008

Board to consider "ready-for-service" fee FWMA will sponsor a


on tax bills to pay for sewer expansion


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
With the downturn in hous-
ing starts because of the real
estate bust, the numbers no
longer work for the county's
planned $20 million sewer
expansion into some of the
historic neighborhoods like
Wakulla Gardens.
So consultants are recom-
mending that county com-
missioners consider a $15 per
month "ready to serve" fee for
property owners who have a
sewer line available but have
not tapped on. That would
translate to a $180 annual fee
on property owners' tax bills.
At an extended workshop
on the sewer expansion is-
sue prior to the commission
meeting on Monday, Sept. 22,
consultant Dale Dransfield
of Eutaw Utilities noted that
growth within the expansion
area was projected to cover the
costs of the project. Since then,
however, the issuance of build-
ing permits has plummeted.
Only one building permit was
issued by the county in August;
and the last permit for commer-
cial construction was issued in
February.
Commissioners gave no
reaction one way or the other
to the proposal. Since it was a
workshop, they could take no
official action.
Eutaw is currently in the pro-
cess of consolidating the dozen
or so county ordinances on


sewer and sewer-related issues
- some of which have rules that
conflict with each other into
one omnibus package.
One issue that is in conflict,
for example, is an ordinance
that requires residents or busi-
nesses to hook up within six
months to sewer service once
it is available to them. State
law, and another county ordi-
nance, require hook up within
one year.
A staff analysis of the issue
for commissioners noted that,
"Unless the county commission
puts policy in place to require
mandatory connection for any-,
one who has sewer available to
them, and requires the payment
of the appropriate fees, even-
with the "ready to serve fees"
in place, there will not be suffi-
cient revenues to pledge for the
repayment" of the loan.
Other issues discussed were
negotiations with Wildwood
Country Club to take the reuse
water from the planned Ad-
vanced Wastewater Treatment
plant that is part of the sewer
expansion. The golf course will
use the treated effluent for ir-
rigation.
But the talks have hung
up on what fees to charge,
with the country club noting
that it currently spends about
$600 a month to pump water
for irrigation, and indicating a
reluctance to spend more than
that for the reuse water. Drans-
field indicated it would cost


the county three times that for
the county to pump the water
from the treatment plant to the
golf course.
"We need them more than
they need us," County Adminis-
trator Ben Pingree characterized
the negotiations.
The county is dependent on
finding an outlet for its treated
effluent in order to get the
plant permitted, while the golf
course has a never-ending per-
mit to pump up to 1.2 million
gallons of water a day from the
aquifer. Additionally, Wildwood
contends it will have to keep
its pumps on standby in case a
problem keeps the county from
pumping water.
In other sewer issues, Drans-
field reported that talks with
Talquin Cooperative to dose its
Shell Point treatment plant and
connect to the county system
are moving slowly. And Talquin
has indicated it has no interest
in billing its customers for the
county sewer service.
Typically, sewer charges are
calculated as part of the water
used by a home or business,
Talquin has been reluctant to
cooperate with the county on
that.
Panacea Area Water System
has an agreement in which it
collects $3 per water bill to in-
dude the county sewer charges.
But PAWS has been reluctant
to shut off a customer's water
if the sewer bill isn't paid a
consequence the county has


insisted is essential to collec-
tion.
The state Department of
Community Affairs has agreed
to waive requirements for per-
formance-based septic systems
in Wakulla Gardens once the
county has a loan agreement
in place to construct the expan-
sion project.
Additionally, Dransfield not-
ed that the county's sewer rates
have been the same since 1995,
and suggested the board con-
sider revising rates from the $15
a month base fee, plus $2 for
each additional 1,000 gallons,
to a charge of $10.85 a month
plus $3.48 for each additional
1,000 gallons. As well, the cost
would go up annually, tied to
the consumer price index.
Currently, the county has
about 1,900 sewer customers
billed monthly. The average
bill is $26,44, generating annual
revenues of $602,000.
With the proposed billing
formula, the average monthly
bill would increase to $27.46
and generate $625,991.


wildlife photo contest


For everyone who loves
animals and owns a camera,
or loves photography and has
access to wildlife. habitats,
FWMA is sponsoring a wild-
life photo contest.
There are youth and adult
competitions, each with mam-
mal, bird, and insect/other
categories. Contestants may
submit up to two photos in
each category. The entry fee
for adults is $10 for each cat-
egory entered.
Judging will be done by a
panel of local nature photog-
raphers. The winners in each
category will get a personal
tour of FWMA, with the op-
portunity to photograph the
animals, and will receive an
FWMA T-shirt and a free ticket
to the Wood Stork event.
The overall winner will also
receive a $50 certificate from
Tallahassee Camera. Winners


will be notified by Oct. 15f
and will be announced and';
displayed at the FWMA WoodI
Stork Music Festival on Oct. 19
and included in the November,
FWMA newsletter. They will
also be on display at the Innm
at Wildwood in November.,
All photos, space permitting-,I
will be displayed at the Woodi
Stork Music Festival.
Photos must be submitted.1
in an 8 X 10 size on a foam o0t
cardboard backer board. At-.
tach a copy of the entry form
to the back of each photo;
submitted. The photos along'-
with a check for the entry fee;
must be sent to: ,
Judy Cooke, Attri FWMAN
Photo Contest, P.O. Box 233.,
Panacea, FL 32346, with aR
postmark no later than Oct.
5. For more information, e-
mail questions to fwmaeast@,
aol.com.


Singles meet at park
Wakulla County is forming They meet at Azalea Park or0
a singles club. It's open to Saturday between 10 a.m. and
adults seeking a companion, noon. Bring a brunch dish. .


Girls Green Guide Program slated


Fre6 weekend outings and
field trips to the Florida Wild
Mammal Association, Wakulla
Springs, Division of Forestry,
Gulf Specimen Marine Lab and
many other natural places in


the community will be held
during the Girls Green Guide
Program.
It is open to girls ages 14 to
18 at Tallahassee Community
College, Wakulla Center, 5 Cres-


cent Way, Crawfordville.
To participate, come to the
TCC Center on Saturday, Oct.
11, for orientation and an intro-
duction to field trip adventures
from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m.


Kessler to hold town hall meeting
The next Commissioner Howard Kessler Town Hall meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, Sept.
30 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the welcome center in Panacea.
There will be an open agenda and light refreshments. Everyone is welcome to attend.








ST. MAR



Owned
pBARINE .


Wellcraft


,meo lqm "EF dp lrllim NE "mNw wA


ml. 483 Port Leon Dr., St. Marks, FL 32355 ~


The High School Experience


The Vision of the Wakulla County School District, as published in
its Strategic Plan 2007-2012 is as follows:


"A rigorous and appropriate education that results -.
in success for all students"

Most of us would agree that, at the end of 13 years of public schooling, "success"
is a high school student who has both a marketable skill and the academic ,
background to succeed in college. How are we doing in these important criteria?

Fact #1: A smaller percentage of Wakulla students who complete a vocational
program find a job in a field related to their training than either Leon or other
vocational program completers in the state. Source:
www.fldoe.orq/fetpip/sec.asp

Sm 327%
l 20"
08-o
2004 2005 2006
Fact #2: Fewer Wakulla graduates are college-ready (not required to take
remedial courses in college) than graduates from Leon or other high schools
in the state. Source: www.fldoe.orq/articulation/perfcpt/default.asp
0S o4 Leon
66%o0 W69%
U s 63Y State

t40 W'..'L Wak uft^
u a2004 2005 2006
Fact #3: Wakulla students' participation in the Advanced Placement program
is far below the state average and that of Leon County. Source:
www.fldoe.org/evaluation


30 2S 6tat

0 0 _/ ,akuta.
2005 2006 2007
Fact #4 Wakulla students participate in the ACT and SAT testing program in many
smaller numbers than high school students in the state or nation.
Source: www.fldoe.org/evaluation/act-sat-ap




4.
S 0 0o ku ota,


2008 SAT


2008 ACT


The ability of our students to perform and compete at a
world class level clearly needs improvement!
For students who are Ready for Work, Ready for College
and Ready for Life in the 21st century,

ELECT DR. ANDREA CARTER, Superintendent of Schools

Campaign website: www.voteahdreacarter.com
Contact me voteandmea@gmal.com
Campaign HO: 3047 Crawfbodve Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 926-1111
(Political advertisement paid for and approved by Dr. Andrea Carter, Republican, for Superintendent of Schools)


2009
Key Largo 150


ye War Eagle
KeyLargob BO 60
K754 LD










Boat, Motor, Boat, Motor,

CTrailer Complete Trailer

'1499- _12 999
'^t~ '0AO^~^^t1 'Q


483 Port Leon Dr., St. Marks, FL 32355

850-925-1100
. Open: Monday Saturday 10AM 6PM


m


i


A


r





THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008 Page 17A


Business


Abal Auction raises. money


Tammy and Randy Miller recently opened Capt, SeaNile's Pool and Pub,

Captain SeaNile opens for


business
. Capt. SeaNile's Pool and Pub
is now open and located in
Medart next to the old Circle
Js Bait and Tackle, adjacent to
The Thrift Store.
Randy and Tammy Miller,
longtime residents of Wakulla
County, have "put together an
establishment that the resi-
dents of Wakulla County can be
proud of. You wouldn't believe
what you find inside. It's fresh,
new and inviting," they said.
The initial concept of Capt.
SeaNiles Pool and Pub was
developed since the family en-
joyed visiting similar establish-
ments like Snookers, Pockets,
and Halligans in Tallahassee.
After meeting many resi-
dents from the local area in
these establishments, the idea
was tossed around to open
a similar establishment in
Wakulla. When space became
available in the building owned
by Richard and Sharlyne Miller
of Medart Randy jokingly said
"let me open a pool hall" A


in Medart
short time later, Capt. SeaNile's
Pool and Pub was born.
"A lot of people wonder
how the name for the estab-
lishment was selected," said
Miller., "Although typical names
for this type of establishment
would suffice, we were looking
for something unique."
After weeks of. discussion
and frustration, a friend sug-
gested to put a personal stamp
on the establishment. Hence,
the name Capt. SeaNile's Pool
and Pub, derived from the
name of the family boat "SeaN-
ile," reflecting the family's love
for fishing and diving.
Capt. SeaNile's Pool and
Pub features 10 pool tables
with eight to nine foot Big
Gandy drop pocket regulation
tables with tournament grade
cloth for hourly rental and two
quarter seven foot challenge
tables.
There are arcade games with
air hockey, punching, driving,
hunting, a Bose system DSL


area
jukebox, dart machines and
six flat panel televisions posi-
tioned throughout for viewing
sporting and news events.
Capt. SeaNile's Pool & Pub is
also the new home to one of
the local APA (American Pool
Association) teams, "Rak-Pak".
The team members are Crickett
Elliot, team Captain; William
Stafford, Co-Captain; Steve
Blais, Buddy Strickland, Kregg
Elliot, Regina Hancock, Richard
Cook and Nathan Miller.
The team was the winning
APA team during the last APA
session. The APA will be play-
ing on Monday Nights begin-
ning at 7 p.m.
There are a lot of great ideas
for fun coming soon. Currently,
there's Sunday $7 per hour pool
and $7 domestic pitchers, Mon-
day APA League night, Fifth
Street Poker on Wednesday,
Thursday Night pool tourna-
ments, and a great place to be
on Friday and Saturday night


The recent Abal Auction
Real Estate sheriff's forfeiture
vehicle auction provided a
financial success for Sheriff
David Harvey and Abal's of-
fice.
Eight vehicles were sold for
more than $31,000. The auc-
tion provided an additional
benefit to auctioneers Dr. Joe
Abal and Betty Jane Evans.
They received notice from
their web listing server, Auc-
tionZip.com that the Wakulla
Sheriff's Office auction was
the third highest viewed auc-
tion in the State of Florida.
"It was pretty cool to see
the WCSO auction listing next
to our company logo on the
home page of the AuctionZip.
corn site," said Joe Abal. "We
were beat out by an auction
company in Ft. Myers selling
300 pieces of construction
equipment and a Venice Beach
company selling Cindy Craw-
ford's estate furniture.
"When Sheriff Harvey con-
tracted with us, his goal was
to raise money for Wakulla
County and law enforcement
to help augment precious
taxpayer dollars for use in
law enforcement programs.
When the sheriff asked if I
could do that I answered, no
problem. Thank goodness our
most powerful tool is our web
site, Abalauction.com. It's not
like any other web site. It's a
dynamic site pushed by a mar-
keting component to drive the
site," Abal commented.
"The site is primarily set
up for our real estate auctions
because it has extra space for
our complete Digital Property
Information Package (DPIP).
When you come to our on-
line real estate auction you
already know more about
the property than if you just
walked through the property"
Abal said. "The sheriff had an
interesting concept that I felt
was a financial plus for the
county. He wanted to see out-


of-county dollars brought into
Wakulla that would create
an economic benefit for the
county. I knew my national
recognition through the on-
line bidding platform would
drive the bidders."
When Sheriff Harvey asked
for data it impressed everyone
at Abal Auction. The auction
had 69 registered bidders,
with 22 from Crawfordille, 13
from Tallahassee and 29 from
other states, the furtherest be-
ing a bidder from Alaska.
The rest of the bidders
were from other locations in
Florida who purchased two
items. The Harley sold to a
bidder in North Carolina
after being bid on by bidders
from Colorado, Wyoming and
Arkansas.
"That's tremendous reach
for our bidding platform, but
I expected it based on what
we are doing as auctioneers.
During our last real estate auc-
tion in Orlando, I had bidder
calls from the United King-
dom, Montreal and Vancouver,
Canada," said Abal. "That's
just tremendous marketing
and benefits our company
motto, 'a small local company
with global reach.'"
The auction had out of state
bidders coming to Wakulla,
spending their money in the
county which helped with
taxes, cost of services and
money being spent in the
county.
"I believe the sheriff's mis-
sion and goal was realized by


bringing new money into the
county in the form of money
spent for products and ser-
vices," said Abal. "We all thor-
oughly enjoyed working with
the department personnel
and wish to thank Karen Day,
Administrative Director of
WCSO for her help and work
as our contact resource in the
department. She was great to
work with," he stated.
As a final accolade, Dr. Abal
was notified that the Harley
Davidson was featured on
the AuctionZip.com "realized
price" page. The motorcycle
sale was noteworthy for auc-
tioning at full list price as a
used motorcycle.
"Auctions spell action," said
Abal. "The online platform
develops tremendous reach
you don't get at a live event.
In the last 30 .seconds of bid-
ding we had 39 bidders jump
in with higher bids. We had
three people on computers
monitoring the activity it
was crazy."
Abal Auction Real Estate is
a real and personal property
auction company specializing
in the auction system of sell-
ing real estate.
Leave/othliBA 'oourfoot-





Keep W/ako((a
County Beaotel8 (


0 Barber Shopp;e 0
Cosmetologist
Nancy has been a cosmatologist for 21
i years and has been with us for 4 years.
Her specialties include foil highlights,
corrective colors, perms & cuts. Nancy
enjoys cooking, fishing, swimming,
crossword puzzles and boating.
Walk-ins Welcome
Phone: 926-4282 Open: M F 9 6, Sat. 9 1
Rose Alley Business Center, 2543 C'ville Hwy.


JIMMIE DOYLE

THE DOYLE PHILOSOPHY, PART 1 *

Tax Money Is Our Money
It Should Be Used For Our Common Good
Our county's budget for the coming year is over $47 million.
We need to spend a bigger proportion of it for -

Better fire protection
Better services for our youth
Better roads

Where will this money come from? We have highly educated,
well-trained staff in our county administration, and we need to
utilize their knowledge and experience rather than depend so
much on expensive outside consultants. That's a good start.


Protect Wakulla's Character

Promote Wakulla's Prosperity


ELECT


JIMMIE


DOYLE
FOR

COUNTY


COMMISSION

DISTRICT 3

(850) 926-7869
jlimmiedoyle@gmail.com
www.JimmieDoyle.com
112 Old Still Road, Crawfordville, FL
32327

Political advertisement paid for and approved byJimmic Doyle, No Party Affiliation, forWakulla County Commission, District 3


Political advertisement paid for and approved by David Harvey, Democrat, for Sheriff.


KEEPING WAKULLA COUNTY








When I first became your sheriff, Wakulla County was one of the
safest counties in Florida. Over the years our community has grown
significantly... but I am pleased to let you know that our county is
still one of the safest in the state. As your sheriff, it's my job to keep
you safe and I am proud of the work we have done for you.

Crime is Down
* The overall crime RATE is down 28% over the past 5 years, according to
the FDLE Uniform Crime Report.
* The ACTUAL number of indexed crimes from 5 years ago is down by over
100 reportable crimes.
* Our community is still one of the safest in the state.
Population is Growing
* Our population has soared by nearly 20% in the past five years.
* In the past five years, our calls for service have more than doubled from
30,300 in 2002 to 60,700 last year.
Costs are Low
* Our per capital cost to the citizen is about $175 per person.
* That is less than the cost of law enforcement in Franklin, Gadsden, Jeffer-
son, Taylor or Leon counties.


YOUR SHERIFF






Page 18A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008


More Letters to the Editor


Use Truth Detector test to determine smear campaign from the facts


Editor, The News:
With six weeks left in this 2008
campaign, it appears likely that nasty
and baseless attacks on some candi-
dates will be made in an attempt to
sway our votes.
This has been the case in past
elections when smear tactics have
included letters telling tales that are
only partially true. They contain just
enough truth to make the rest of the
untrue story seem real.


These attacks usually occur in the
last couple of weeks of the campaign
as an ambush tactic when the at-
tacked candidate has little time to
refute the charges.
As voters, we should all be on the
lookout for these unfair campaign
tactics. There are truth detectors we
can all use to separate facts from
desperate attempts to smear good
people.
Truth Detector No. 1 Call, e-mail,


or go see the attackers and ask where
they got their information. If their
accusations are true, the attackers
should be able to back them up with
undeniable facts.
Truth Detector No. 2 Call, e-mail,
or go see the attacked candidate and
ask for the facts. If the accusations
are false, the candidate should get
a well-deserved chance to present
the facts.
Truth Detector No. 3 Look at


your own character standards and
ask yourself if the accusations make
a difference in the way the candidate
would do the job. One example that
leaps to my mind is an accusation
that a candidate had a criminal
record. He did; he stole a six-pack
of beer when he turned 18. Would
that make a difference in the way he
did his job? Maybe. He could have
learned a lesson from that experi-
ence that might have made him a


better official.
Many of us hope that the sleaze
attacks will not occur in this year's;
campaign, but reality dictates that:
they're coming,
As voters, we can be prepared and
separate truth from fiction. Above
all, we can refuse to let our votes be
influenced by such tactics.
Dana Peck
Ochlockonee Bay


FWMA will sponsor a photography contest Buddy Wells will make


Editor, The News.
I enjoy the beautiful wildlife pho-
tos that appear in The Wakulla News
and would like to invite those wildlife
photographers in your readership to
participate in the First Annual FWMA
Photo Contest.
Everyone can enter. There are youth
and adult competitions, each with mam-
mal, bird, and insect/other categories.
Up to two photos can be submitted in
each category. The entry fee for adults
is $10 for each category entered and the
entry fee for youth is $5 for each category
entered. .
Winners will be selected by a panel of
local nature photographers; The winner
in each category will get a personal tour
of FWMA where fabulous photo oppor-
tunities abound These six winners will


also receive a T-shirt and a ticket to the
Wood Stork Music Festival on Oct. 19.
The overall winner will also receive a $50
certificate from Tallahassee Camera. Win-
ners will be notified by Oct. 15, and their
entries announced and displayed at the
FWMA Wood Stork Music Festival on Oct.
19, then included in the November issue
of the FWMA newsletter. They will also
be on display at. the Inn at Wildwood
in November.
All photos, space permitting, will
be displayed at the Wood Stork Music
Festival.
Photos must be submitted in an 8 x
10 size on a foam or cardboard backer
board. A sheet must be attached to the
back of each photo submitted stating
name, address, e-mail, phone, adult/
youth, category. FWMA is also hosting


a silent auction in conjunction with the
Wood Stork Music Concert fundraiser on
Oct. 19. All entrants are asked to state if
they want to pick up their photographs
after the contest or donate them to the
auction. Sign the sheet and send (post-
marked by Oct. 5) the photos along with
a check for the entry fee to:
Judy Cooke,Attn. FWMA Photo Con-
test, P.O. Box 233, Panacea, FL 32346.
So, come on, pick out those wildlife
photos you are most proud of and show
them offll
Questions? E-mail Marilyn at fw-
maeast@aol.com.
Marilyn Van Dusseldorp
FWMA volunteer


Carraway family gives thanks


Editor, The News:
The family of Ott Carraway
would like to extend a heart-
felt thank you to everyone
for their kindness, sympathy,

Unemployn


continues t
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla's unemployment
rate continued to increase in
August, up from 4.7 to 4.8 per-
cent, though it remains one of
the lowest jobless rates in the
state, according to the state
Agency for Workforce Innova-
tion. The local unemployment
rate has been on a steady rise
since April.
But the state and national
rates have also been increas-
ing. Florida's jobless rate
was higher than the national
average at 6.8 percent in Au-
gust, up from 6.5 in July. The
national unemployment rate
was 6.1 percent in August from
6.0 percent in July.
Even with the continued
increase, Wakulla County still
continued to have one of the
lowest jobless rates in the
state. Of the 67 counties in the
state, only four had lower un-
employment Walton County
at 3.8 percent, Franklin and
Sumter counties at 4.6 percent,
and Okaloosa at 4.7 percent.
In August, the Wakulla la-
bor force decreased to 15,687
people, of which 14,934 were
employed and 753 were un-
employed.

Merchant tryou
The. Tallahassee Merchants
age 16 and under fast pitch
softball team will hold tryouts
at the Rickards High School

Adult football
The Wakulla County Parks
and Recreation Department is
planning to organize an adult
flag football league if there is
enough interest in the com-


flowers and food. We want
to especially thank Harvey-
Young Funeral Home, Home
Respiratory Solutions, and
the Wakulla County Sheriff's

nent rate


o creep up
In July, the labor force
consisted of 15,896 people, of
which 15,141 were employed
and 755 were unemployed.
The number of jobs in the
state were down 99,100 jobs
since August 2007, with most
of those job losses as a result
of declines in construction,
according to the state.
The Tallahassee Metro-
politan Area, which includes
Wakulla, Leon, Jefferson and
Gadsden counties for the


purpose of market analysis,
also had an increase in the
overall unemployment rate in
August, rising to 5.3 percent
from 5.1 percent in July and
4.5 percent in June. Even with
the increase, the local MSA
continued to have one of the
lowest jobless rates of the 23
MSAs in the state.Only the Ft.
Walton Beach MSA at 4.7-per-:
cent and the Gainesville MSA.
at 4.9 percent were lower.
The highest unemploy-
ment in the state was in,
Hendry County, where the
rate climbed to 14.2 percent
from 13.6 percent in July.
Flagler, St. Lucie and Indian
River counties all reported
unemployment higher than
10 percent.

ts
softball complex on Saturday,
Oct. 4 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.
For more information, call the
coach at 980-3548.


munity.
The cost is $300 per team and
the registration deadline is Sept.
26. Games will be played in Octo-
ber. Call WCPRD at 926-7227.


i PENSION& DAV, PA
ATrORNEYS

Al Penson Mary Ellen Davis
Donna Biggins Jennifer Sweeting Adam Cowhey

* Family Law Real Estate Transactions and Matters
* DUI/Criminal Defense Commercial Transactions
* Civil Litigation and Business Law
* Estate Planning Construction/Lien Law
and Probate of Estates Administrative Law/Licensing

926-6003
17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville
Th hring of an attorney s an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisement.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications end experience


Office.
Ott was a great man who
was well loved and will be
greatly missed. We love you,
daddy.


Cecil Carraway, Sheila Ste-
phens, Brenda Hutto, Megan
London, Blake Carraway
Crawfordville


Notice of Land Use Change
The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will consider the
following applications and has scheduled Public Hearings regarding the
following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday,
October 13, 2008 beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Wakulla County
Board of County Commissioners on Monday, November 3, 2008, beginning
at 6:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public
hearings are held at the County Coinmmission Chambers located west of the
County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested
parties are invited to attend and present testimony.


I.Application for Conditional Use: CU08-08
Applicant:i Dennis & Patricia Jinks
Prosal: construct dock and boardwalk
Fa' ID Number 20-3s-01e-166-05398-C10
ELisnn5 FLU Map Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4)
E using Zonmrg RR-i (Section 5-27, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "A" zone on Panel 0250-B
Parcel Size: 2.95+/- acres
Location: 126 River Plantation Road
Hearings Required: Plannin2 Commission 10/13/08 1 7:00 PM

2.Application for Conditional Use: CU08-09
Applicant: George's Lighthouse Pointe Marina Village Unit 2, Inc.
Agent: Parker Consulting Services, Inc.
Proposal: private boat dock
Tax ID Number: 12-6s-02w-000-03879-AIO10
Existing FLU Map: Urban 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.5)
Existing Zoning: R-3 (Section 5-32, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "V20" zone on Panel 0480-C
Parcel Size: 0.048+/- acres
Location: 9 Mashes Sand Road
Hearings Required: Planning Commission 10/13/08 l 7:00 PM

3.Application for Short Form Final Plat: SF08-07
Applicant: G&A Lloyd, LLC
Agent: Edwin Brown & Associates
Proposal: 13 lot residential subdivision
Tax ID Number: 15-3s-0e-000-05189-001 & 22-3s-01e-000-05408-000
Existing FLU Map: Agriculture (FLUE Policy 1.2.2)
Existing Zoning: AG (Section 5-25, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C", "B" & "A" zones on Panel 0275-B
Parcel Size: 313.85+/- acres
Location: South of Bloxham Cutoff, east of Woodville Highway
and the City ofTallahassee Powerline
Hearings Required: County Commission 11/03/08 @ 6:00PM
4. Application for Final Plat: FP08-04
Applicant: Wakulla Bank
Agent: Thurman Roddenberry
Proposal: replat lots 21 & 22 of Commodore Commons
Tax ID Number: 00-00-076-275-10250-21A & 00-00-076-275-10250-22A
Existing FLU Map: Urban 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6)
Existing Zoning: R-3 (Section 5-32, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0250-B
Parcel Size: 1.70+/-acres
Location: 60 thru 88 Country Way
Hearings Required: Plannina Commission 10/13/08 1 7:00 PM
County Commission 11/03/08 @ 6:00PM
5. Application for Preliminary Plat: PP08-04
Applicant: Parrish & Suzanne Barwick, Ferrell Barwick, Ben Withers,
Steven & Kimberly Morgan
Proposal: create 6 lot subdivision
Tax ID Number: 00-00-080-000-11508-018, 00-00-080-000-11508-020,
00-00-080-000-11508-017, 00-00-080-000-11508-016,
00-00-080-000-11508-019, 00-00-080-000-11508-013,
Existing FLU Map: Rural I (FLUE Policy 1.2.3)
Existing Zoning: AG (Section 5-25, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" & "A" zones on Panel 0250-B
Parcel Size: 32.98+1- acres
Location: north side of JK Moore Road
Hearings Required: Plannina Commission 10/13/08 f 7:00 PM
County Commission 11/03/08 @6:00PM
6. Application for Final Plat: FP08-05
Applicant: Parrish & Suzanne Barwick, Ferrell Barwick, Ben Withers,
..Steven & Kimberly Morgan
Proposal: create 6 lot subdivision
Tax ID Number: 00-00-080-000-11508-018, 00-00-080-000-11508-020,
00-00-080-000-11508-017, 00-00-080-000-11508-016,
00-00-080-000-11508-019, 00-00-080-000-11508-013,
Existing FLU Map: Rural I (FLUE Policy 1.2.3)
Existing Zoning: AG (Section 5-25, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" & "A" zones on Panel 0250-B
Parcel Size: : 32.98+/- acres
Location: north side of JK Moore Road
Hearings Required: Planning Commission 10/13/08 Q 7:00 PM
County Commission 11/03/08 @ 6:00PM
7. Application for Change of Zoning: R08-15
Applicant: WRJ Sales, Inc.
Agent: GPI Southeast, Inc.
Proposal: rezone to general commercial
Tax ID Number: 25-4s-02w-000-02122-000 & 25-4s-02w-000-02125-000
Existing FLU Map: Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4)
Existing Zoning: RR-I (Section 5-27, LDC)
Proposed Zoning: C-2 (Section 5- LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panet 0360-B
Parcel Size: 7.69+/- acres
Location: South side of Coastal Highway, west of Jack Crum Road
intersection
Hearings Required: Planning Commission 10/13/08 a 7:00 PM
County Commission 11/03/08 @6:00PM


great supervisor


Editor, The Newss
I would like to take a mo-
ment to recommend a man for
the supervisor of elections po-
sition of Wakulla County. Hen-
ry (Buddy) Wells is truly a man
of integrity. I have known
Buddy and Letha for at least
10 years or more. During that
time they have been one of
the finest families I know.
Buddy and Letha are a strong
Christian family. Buddy's faith
is in word and in deed.
Buddy is also a servant
in this community. Every
Sunday he gives his time to
minister to the people of the
Eden Springs Nursing Home.
Buddy loves Wakulla County
and has always defended it
against its critics. Buddy is a
hard working man with solid
ethics. For years he has given
exemplary service to the gun
powder plant in St. Marks. His


tenure reveals stability. Buddy
is a down to earth individual, -
although he is very intelligent,
he communicates in a man--'
ner that makes everyone feel
special. Buddy is consistent,
what you see and hear today'
is what you will see and hear'
tomorrow.
Buddy, Letha and their son,
Brandon, are true Wakullans
and will always shine bright
in this county. I can not think -
of a better person to guard,
and guaranty such a wonder-
ful privilege as that of my'
right to vote. I also count it a'
blessing to call Buddy Wells'
a friend.
May God bless Buddy and
Letha Wells and may God:
bless Wakulla County with:
such a man of integrity as our:
supervisor of elections.
Keith Wallace
Crawfordville


8. Application for Variance: V08-15
Applicant: WRJ Sales, Inc.
Agent: GPI Southeast, Inc.
Proposal: setback variance
Tax ID Number: 25-4s-02w-000-02122-000; 25-4s-02w-000-02114-001;
25-4s-02w-000-02114-000; 25-4s-02w-000-02125-000
Existing FLU Map: Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4)
Existing Zoning: RR-I (Section 5-27, LDC)
Proposed Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0360-B
Parcel Size: 8.68+/- acres
Location: South side of Coastal Highway, west of Jack Crum Road intersection
Hearings Required: Planning Commission 10/13/08 6a 7:00 PM
County Commission 11/03/08 @ 6:00PM
9. Application for Site Plan: SP08-15
Applicant: WRJ Sales, Inc.
Agent: GPI Southeast, Inc.
Proposal: expand mobile homes sales
Tax ID Number: 25-4s-02w-000-02122-000; 25-4s-02w-000-02114-001;
25-4s-02w-000-02114-000; 25-4s-02w-000-02125-000
Existing FLU Map: Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4)
Existing Zoning: RR-I (Section 5-27, LDC)
Proposed Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0360-B
Parcel Size: 8.68+1- acres
Location: South side of Coastal Highway, west'ofJack.Crum Road intersection 7.
Hearings Required: Planning Commission 10/13/08 A 7:00 PM
County Commission 11/03/08 @ 6:00PM
10. Application for Variance: V08-16
Applicant: Michael Maloy
Proposal: wetland setback variance
Tax ID Number: 20-3s-01Ie-166-05398-CI I
Existing FLU Map: Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4)
Existing Zoning: RR-I (Section 5-27, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "A" zone on Panel 0250-B
Parcel Size: 2+/- acres
Location: River Plantation Road
Hearings Required: County Commission 11/03/08 @ 6:00PM
11.Application for Variance: V08-17
Applicant: William T. Gaupin, et al
Agent: Veron D. Hope, Innovative Civil Engineering
Proposal: wetland setback variance
TaxIDNumber: 00-00-121-156-11964-110
Existing FLU Map: Urban 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6)
Existing Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "V20" zone on Panel 0390-B
Parcel Size: 11.68+/-acres
Location: Harbour Point Drive
Hearings Required: County Commission 11/03/08 @ 6:00PM
12. Application for Flood Variance: FV08-01
Applicant: William T. Gaupin, et al
Agent: Vernon D. Hope, Innovative Civil Engineering
Proposal: flood variance
Tax ID Number: 00-00-121-156-11964-110
Existing FLU Map: Urban 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6)
Existing Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "V20" zone on Panel 0390-B
Parcel Size: 11.68+/-acres
Location: Harbour Point Drive
Hearings Required: Planning Commission 10/13/08 7:00 PM
County Commission 11/03/08 @ 6:00PM
13. Application for Site Plan: SP08-16
Applicant: William T. Gaupin, et al
Agent: Vernon D. Hope, Innovative Civil Engineering
Proposal: Marsh Harbor Marina Clubhouse
Tax ID Number. 00-00-121-156-11964-110
Existing FLU Map: Urban 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6)
Existing Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "V20" zone on Panel 0390-B
Parcel Size: 11.68+/- acres
Location: Harbour Point Drive
Hearings Required: Planning Commission 10106/08 0, 7:00 PM
County Commission 11/03/08 @ 6:00PM
14. Application for Change of Zoning: R08-16
Applicant: Richard Gowdy
Proposal: rezone to general commercial
Tax ID Number: 07-3s-01w-000-04317-000
Existing FLU Map: Agriculture (FLUE Policy 1.2.2)
Proposed FLU Map: Commercial (FLUE Policy 1.2.7)
Existing Zoning: AG (Section 5-25, LDC)
Proposed Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" & "A" zones on Panel 0250-B
Parcel Size: 9.8+/- acres
Location: west side of Crawfordville Highway
Hearings Required: Planning Commission 10/13/08 Q 7:00 PM
County Commission 11/03/08 @ 6:00PM
15. Application for Appeal to the Board of Adjustment: BOA 08-02
Applicant: Jon G. & Donna L. Shierling
Proposal: appeal the Planning Department's action
Tax ID Number: 16-3s-01e-000-05206-005
Existing FLU Map: Agriculture (FLUE Policy 1.2.2)
Existing Zoning: AG (Section 5-25, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0275-B
Parcel Size: 20.0+/- acres
Location: 90 Acorn Trail
Hearings Required: County Commission 11/03/08 @ 6:00PM
16. Application for Appeal to the Board of Adjustment: BOA 08-03
Applicant: Muir Woods, LLC
Agent: Thunrmnan Roddenberrny
Proposal: appeal the Planning Commission's action
Tax ID Number: 25-3s-02w-000-01615-001 & 36-3s-02w-000-01770-002
Existing FLU Map: Urban 1 (FLUE Policy 1.2.5)
Existing Zoning: AG & RR-I (Section 5-25 & 27, LDC)
Proposed Zoning: PUD (Section 5-50, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0225-B
Parcel Size: 28.65+/- acres
Location: north side of Arran Road,
cast of Wakulla Arran Road
Hearings Required: County Commission 11/03/08 @ 6:00PM


Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record
files may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community
Development Department located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any
person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim
transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said
hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the
Board Office at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The
Board Office may be contacted at (850) 926- 0919 or TDD 926-7962.


I I





THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008 Page 19A


Court Shorts


Continued from page 12A
Ctrry's bond on the, traf-
ficking charge was doubled
to $100,000 meaning that,
if the bail bondsman will re-
main on the original $50,000
bond, Curry must raise
$150,000 to get out of jail.
Curry's friends hired Har-
vey and posted the, original
bond. Judge Sauls appointed
the public defender's office to
represent Curry on the other
charges.
A woman charged with
violating her probation a
fo6trth time was sentenced to
40 months in prison. Tawana
Hodges appeared shocked,
and wept in the courtroom
as she was taken into cus-
tody by baliffs on Thursday,
Sept. 11.
Hodges was originally put
on community control (house
arrest) in February 2006 for
DUI causing serious bodily
injury. Her first violation
was two months later for not
staying at home. In June, the
sentence was modified to be
probation. In August 2006,
she violated her probation
by possessing drugs, commit- I
ting another DUI, and driving
with a suspended license.
She was gent to an inpatient
treatment facility. In January
2007, she tested positive for
cocaine and the violation was
withdrawn and she was sent
to another treatment facil-
ity. Then, on July 3, Hodges
tested positive for cocaine.
Attorney Steven Glazer
asked the court to reinstate
Hodges' probation again and
allow her seek more treat-
ment at another facility.
But Wakulla Circuit Judge
N. Sanders Sauls rejected that.
"This has gone on so long as
to make a mockery of any
attempt at rehabilitation,"
the judge said, commenting
that he believes some treat-
ment therapies that focus on
treating drug addiction as a
disease only leads to people
to a "victim mentality."
"Quite frankly, she had
been given past opportuni-
ties for the sake of her chil-
dren," Sauls said, adding that
nothing would help her until
spe decided ,on.her own to.
stop using drugs.
A 35-year-old man with
a 15 year criminal history was
ordered to serve 10 years in
prison.
Cliff Davis, attorney for
Harry James Scott, told the
court on Thursday, Sept. 11,
that Scott felt like he couldn't
get a decent plea deal from
the state. When the case was
ready for trial, Davis said,
Scott decided to plea to the
charge and "throw himself on
the mercy of the court."


"He has since been advised
of the dangers of that course
of action," Davis said.
"Your honor, I'd like to get
out and stay out," Scott said
to the court.
"I bet you would," Judge
Sauls answered.
The judge then read from
Scott's extensive criminal
history that began with sell-
ing marijuana in 1993 and
worked up to dealing cocaine,
the charge he was arrested
for in 2007 and had been in
jail for since then. There were
numerous driving charges
as well, including several
incidents of driving with a
suspended license.
Warning Scott that the
sentencing guidelines called
for a prison sentence, and
that with his criminal history,
"it's hard to see where he'd
score anything close to the
minimum," the judge recom-
mended Scott consult with
Davis further.
The judge took up another
case then returned to Scott,
and Davis first announced
that Scott would withdraw
.his plea and prepare for trial,
then Scott changed his mind
and said he wanted to be
sentenced.
"It's been a year, your
honor," Scott told the court.
"I don't drink or drug any
more." He asked for the court
to sentence him to proba-
tion.
Assistant State Attorney
Jack Campbell pointed to
Scott's record and said the
only time he's stopped com-
mitting crimes is when he's
in prison.
"He worked himself to this
place," Campbell said. "And
there's not much we can do
with him except warehouse
him for a couple of decades
and hope he's too old to sell
cocaine when he gets out."
Davis asked the court
to consider that Scott isn't
very intelligent and that his
crimes certainly were not
very sophisticated.
Sauls ordered Scott to
serve 10 years in prison and
he recommended that Scott
be given consideration for
vocational programs offered
by the Department of Cor-
rections.
A man charged with
violating his probation on a
fourth DUI by testing positive
for cocaine was ordered to
serve five years in prison.
"I've tried to do everything
I can," said Jason Colson.
"I have no excuse for this
failure."
Colson was sentenced
last year to a year and a day
in prison, and he asked the
court to sentence him to


prison for two years -,which ,,
Assistant State Attorniey Ash-'.
leigh Stowell said was too
lenient since, with credit for
time served in prison and jail,
it would result in him only
actually serving six months.
Sentencing guidelines
called for a prison sentence
of between 16 months and
10 years. Stowell asked the
court to sentence Colson to
four years.
Judge Sauls ordered five
years in prison.
Larry Strickland, a 58-
year-old man charged withI
sale of a controlled substanceI
on school grounds, a first
degree felony punishable
by life, was determined to
be competent to stand trial
after being released from
the Florida State Hospital in
Chattahoochee.
Assistant State Attorney'
Jack Campbell asked the
court on Wednesday, Sept.
10, to put the case on a trial
docket soon "before (Strick-
land) decompensates in jail
and bankrupts the county."
Michael Lott, charged
with violating his pre-trial
release on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic violence,
was taken into custody on an
order to show cause before
Judge Sauls on Wednesday,
Sept. 10, after Wakulla Coun-
ty Judge Jill Walker recused
herself from the case.
Lott tried to tell Judge
Sauls that he had failed to
report to pre-trial release.
because he was in the psy-
chiatric ward at a Tallahas-
seee hospital, but the judge
indicated the matter wasn't
properly before him and he
ordered Lott into custody.
On Thursday, Sept. 11,
dressed in an orange jump-
suit and chains, Lott was back
in court with attorney Joshua
Zelman to accept a negoti-
ated plea. He was adjudicated
guilty and ordered -to serve
12 months probation with
the condition of five days
in jail with credit for four
days served, have random
urinalysis, undergo batterer's
intervention, have no contact
with the alleged victim, and-
to possess no firearms or ai)-
muinition.
A six-person jury sitting
in a misdemeanor DUI trial
on Tuesday, Sept. 16, returned
a not guilty verdict on Brian
Charles.
The jury was out for little
more than an hour for delib-
erations in the case.
Attorney David Kemp,
representing Charles, argued
a motion to limit testimony
before the trial began con-
tending that the Highway
Patrol trooper who made the


stop should not be allowed to
offer his opinion that alcohol
was a factor since he did not
take a breathalyzer reading.
County Judge Jill Walker,
who presided over the trial,
agreed.
The trooper testified that
he believed Charles was
primarily impaired by be-
ing high on marijuana. He
did not ask Charles to take
a breathalyzer, only a urine
test. That urine test showed
the presence of THC, the ac-
tive ingredient in marijuana,
but the tests don't show the
level. Since THC stays in the
system for weeks, it's not a
clear indicator of a person's
immediate intoxication.
Charles reportedly admit-
ted to the trooper, after a
Miranda warning, that he had
consumed a number of beers
before the traffic stop.


Firing range is


open to public


Wakulla County Sheriff
David Harvey has opened
the law enforcement firing
range to the public. The
firing range is located off
Qualify Lane, in the Otter
Creek Community. The fir-
ing range has been open
for nearly 15 years, but has
been for law enforcement
use only: Recently, the range
and facilities were assigned
to Sheriff Harvey to oversee
and manage.
While the firing range
will continue to be a certi-
fied, law enforcement train-
ing range, on Thursdays,
Friday and Saturdays of
the first and third weeks of
each month, the public will
be allowed to schedule visits
to the range. A Range Safety


Officer will be present at the
range when the public is
present to maintain control
and safety.
The range will have 26
positions with various dis-
tances to fire, long guns or
handguns. Clay targets are
planned for the future so
that upland and wetland
hunters may hone their
shooting skills.
There will be an open
house on Sept. 29 from 5
p.m. to 7 p.m. Shooters may
join the range as "charter
members" for a fee of $150.
However, the daily use fee
for the rifle and pistol rang-
es will be set at $10. For
more information, call Sgt.
Fred Nichols or Dep. Ed Tyer
at 962-3687.


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N 1


December 11, 2002 Allen Kennard



Re: Mr. AllenKennard H e A sks D onn


To Whom It May Concern:

Please accept my recommendation of Mr. Allen Kennard without any reservation.


Allen worked as a Correctional Officer for the Wakulla County Sheriff's Office
and was transferred and promoted to the position of Deputy Sheriff in the Patrol
Division.

I have known Allen for approximately five years. While employed, he conducted
and approached his work as a professional. I can unequivocally attest to his
enthusiasm, integrity, and ability. All who know him have the highest regard for
him.

Furthermore, Allen comes from a fine family within Wakulla County.
Unfortunately, during his employment with us, Allen's Father passed away. Alklen
having the strong sense of family unity, stepped up and has made sure his Mother
is taken care of.

There is absolutely no doubt in my mind that Allen will be a valuable asset to ) our
organization. If additional information is needed, please call me.

Since y,



SDonnie Crum, Undersheriff
Wakulla County Sheriff's Office


DAVID F. HARVEY








Paid Politcacher RAdertisement paid f32347 independently of any candidate.mmy
Archer Rd., Perry, Florida 32347 independently of any candidate.


This advertisement was not approved by any candidate.


September 17, 2008

Major Crum,

With all the recommendations and support you have given me in
the past, I am confused by your letter to the editor about me that
was published in last week's Wakulla News. I appreciate the warm
wishes and offers of personal and professional assistance that you
extended to me in that letter. I see that Sheriff Harvey still relies
heavily on your abilities when he is faced with difficult challenges.

Your letter also caused me to reflect back to my father's
untimely passing in August of 2001. I am forever grateful to the
members of the sheriffs office whose kindness helped me cope
with the tremendous grief that I felt. I also recall that Sheriff
Harvey was too busy to attend my father's memorial service.

Like you, I, too, encourage the citizens of Wakulla County to
examine my personnel record. Unlike certain officials, I do not
discourage the public from discovering the truth. My record stood
up to a rigorous background examination that was conducted by my
current employer. The letter from you dated December 11, 2002,
is in my current personnel file. I'think that it is self-explanatory.

Major Crum, please accept my sincerest wishes to you and your
family for good health, happiness, and continued prosperity .

Yours Truly,

Allen Kennard


I Stands By His Record.



ie Crum To Do The Same.


a .






Page 20A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008

Wakulla Line Drive team is a hit


Wakulla Line Drive baseball team nas experienced a winning reeling.


At the Baseball Bonanza
on Sept. 13 and Sept. 14 in
Enterprise, Ala., the players of
Wakulla Line Drive took the
championship.
With nine teams from Flori-
da, Georgia and Alabama in the
tournament, the Wakulla Line
Drive was up against some
new competition and their
biggest tournament yet.
The competition came to
play bringing some big bats.
That didn't deter Wakulla.
They played their kind of
baseball and got the job done.
Jake Bryan and Nate Lee each
brought their own big bats
with home runs on Sunday.
The defense allowed only


seven runs on Sunday with a
clean sweep of all opponents
in a three game day.
Since moving into the 11U
bracket in August the team has
played two tournaments and
conquered their opponents in
both. While the team played
in the 10U bracket they were
in four tournaments placing
second in three and first in
one.
The 2008-2009 Wakulla Line
Drive 11U team is composed of
Dylan Causseaux, Jacob Plouffe,
Jacob Thomas, Jake Bryan, Jake
Webb, Keefer Beaty, Kenzie Lee,
Michael McGlamry, Nathaniel
Lee, Nick Lentz and Reid Strick-
land. The team is backed up


by their cheerleaders, Brayden
Causseaux, Kathryn McGlamry,
Mandalyn Thomas, Summer
Padgett, Hannah Bryan and
Jenna Strickland.
The coaching staff is made
up of Andy Bryan, Darrin Mc-
Glamry, Ike Thomas and James
Plouffe.
Wakulla Line Drive would
like to thank all of their pre-
vious sponsors, the Wakulla
County community and friends
and family. Anyone interested
in sponsoring this award win-
ning team can contact Andy
Bryan at 556 -5853(c) or e-
mail him at wakullalinedrive@
gmail.com or doorproducts@
gmail.com.


Good food from War Eagle Cafe
no, -a aemnewwns 7.7i-7- wM 77 M 71 77


Shirley Bouie, right, takes over the popular WHS Culinary Program.


Wakulla High School re-
cently welcomed Shirley Bouie
as its new Culinary Opera-
tions instructor to continue
the extremely successful pro-
gram of Culinary Operations
1, 2, and 3 classes started by
teacher Pam Evans.
Evans decided on a career
change this year and is teach-
ing pre-kindergarten, her "first
love," after many rewarding
years teaching at WHS.
She started the "War Eagle
Caf6," a full service restaurant
created by transforming the
old WHS cafeteria when the
new, larger cafeteria was built.
She and her students hosted
community luncheons and
catered many events.
Bouie continues the culi-
nary program with enthusi-
asm and experience, district
officials said. WHS Principal
Mike Crouch felt fortunate
to be able to find someone
to keep the program going
strong, as not every employee
would be able to handle the
responsibility of a student-run
restaurant.
"She comes to us with 20
years of experience and a can-


do attitude," said Crouch.
Her background includes
teaching Food and Bever-
age Management to some
of the U.S. troops in South
Korea. She has also worked
in Nutrition and Wellness in
Maryland, Texas and Georgia,
where a Columbus high school
dedicated a scholarship in her
name when she left.
Recently, Superintendent
David Miller visited her class-
room, as he does all new
teachers' rooms each year.
S"I love your students here,"
she told Miller. "They are so
respectful. This is an ideal situ-
ation with the technology and
the space to do this."
Students have a large work
area, complete with a comput-
erized Smartboard and cook-
ing stations for instruction,
that converts to a restaurant
when they are serving guests.
The kitchen is fully equipped
with convection ovens, com-
mercial freezers, and cooking
essentials. Each year a large
portion of the Carl Perkins
Rural and Sparsely Populated
Career and Technical grant
goes to keeping the equip-


Queen Shelby Cash and King Ant Mills at Homecoming.


ment updated.
Bouie has many ideas about
maintaining the success of the
past. She believes any good
program involves the commu-
nity. "I plan to host monthly
cooking classes in the evening.
Also, students will be working
on infomercials about healthy
eating. Already we are work-
ing on casseroles to sell to
teachers who are tired at the
end of the week and would
love to take something home
for dinner ready-made. Bak-
ing is a love of mine, and we
will be selling cakes, pies and
bread for holidays throughout
the year."
"This has been one of our
most popular Career and Tech-
nical programs," said Super-
intendent Miller. "Students
can sign up to take it in ninth
grade and if they complete
the program of three or more
classes, they may qualify for a
Bright Futures Vocational Gold
Seal Scholarship, which pays
for 75 percent of Florida col-
lege tuition. We are fortunate
to have Ms. Bouie's expertise
in continuing this opportunity
for our students."
Cash, Mills
are selected
Homecoming
Queen, King
The Wakulla War Eagle
football game may have ended
on a down note Friday, Sept.
19, but nothing could dampen
the spirit of WHS students
and their parents taking part
in the annual Homecoming
ceremony at halftime of the
game.
Shelby Cash was selected
by her peers at the 2008
Queen and Ant Mills was
voted Homecoming King.
The rest of the senior court
included: Lauren Pigott, Kim
Franklin. Lanie Mills, Kelsey
Harrell, Mookie Forbes, Nic
Singleton, Zach Lejuene and
Eric Posey.
The juniors were: Amanda
Council, Denver Defend, Judd
Messer and Travis Harrell. The
ninth and tenth grades were
also represented.


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'w


EAT RIGHT,
BREATHE EASIER







MANAGING AT


MEALTIME

Because people with chronic
obstructive pulmonary disease
(COPD) have trouble breathing,
preparing and eating meals can be
physically tiring.
"In addition to getting short of
breath, people with COPD fill up
easier than they used to because
it takes that much more energy to
breathe and function, so they get
tired and full faster," says Carrie
Gleeksman, a dietitian at National
Jewish Health in Denver who spe-
cializes in lung diseases.
Here are some tips for making
mealtime easier.
Relax. Rest before meals.
During meals, eat slowly, take
small bites and chew thoroughly.
Breathe deeply during meals.
Use oxygen if you need
it. Having an oxygen tube in the
nose should not affect a person's
ability to eat.
Don't overeat. Eat five or six
small meals throughout the day
rather than two or three large
meals. This will keep your stom-
ach from becoming overly full,
which can make breathing un-
comfortable.
Avoid gas-producing foods.
Foods that tend to create gas
can cause abdominal bloating and
make breathing more difficult.
Steer clear of carbonated bever-
ages, beans, lentils, cabbage, fried
or greasy foods, and other gas-
producing foods.
Ask for help. "Take up neigh-
bors, friends or family members
on their offers to cook meals
like casseroles," Gleeksman says.
"These can be frozen in individ-
ual portions so they are easy to
reheat and eat. This decreases
the energy you have to spend
preparing food." *

americanprofile.com Page 5


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If you have COPD, including chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or both, ADVAIR 250/50 may help. B
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increased breathing problems. ADVAIR may increase your risk of osteoporosis and some eye problems (cataracts or glaucoma). You should have
regular eye exams. Thrush in the mouth and throat may occur. Tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking
ADVAIR. Do not use ADVAIR with long-acting beta2-agonists for any reason. ADVAIR does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms.
Measured by a breathing test in people taking ADVAIR 250/50. compared with people taking either fluticasone propionate 250 mcg or salmeterol 50 mcg.
Maximum effects may take several weeks. Your results may vary.


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Important Information about ADVAIR DISKUS

ADVAI R DISKuS 100/5. 250/so. 500/50
(fillitcasoe propioioie t'. 251, 50190 i, armi d almel I 5 mg inflhiliun podil il
What is the most important infeormabon Ishoud know aboutADVAR DISKUS?
in patents with asthma log-actng beta-agonst medcnes such as salmetero (one of the medications in ADVAR)
may increase the chance of death from asthma problems. In a large asthma study, more patents who used
saimelerol died from asthma problems compared with patents vIo did not use satmetleo So ADVA0R is not for
patients whose asthma is well controlled on another asthlna contoier medicine such as low- to medLium-dose
inaled obosterds orf only need a fast-acting inhaler once in a wele. Tal I wit your doctor about li reK and the
benefits of treating your asthma with ADVAIR.
ADVAIR should not be used to treat a severe attack of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
requiring emergency medical treatment
ADVAiR should not be used to relieve sudden symptoms or sudden breathing problems. Aways hare a fast-
acting inhaler with you to treat sudden breathing difficulty. If you do not have a fast-acting inhaler, contract your
doctor to have one prescribed for you.
What is ADVAIR DISKS?
There are two medicines in ADVAIR: RuPtcasone propionate, an inhaled anti-inflammatory belonging to a group of
meddnes cormmonly referred to as cotcosetroids' an salmeterol, a long-acting, inhaled bronchodiator beloning
to a group of medicine commonly referred to as beta-oaorsos. There ae 3 strengths of ADVAR 100/50, 25050.
500/50.
For Asthma
* ADVAR is approved for the maintenance treatment of asthma in patients 4 years of age and older. ADVAR would
only be used f your doctor decKdes that another asthma contrller medirne alone does not control your asthma
or that you need 2 asthma controller medications
The strength of AOVA]R approved for patients ages 4 to 11 years who experience symptoms on an inhaled
corticesteroid is ADVAIR DISKUS 100/50.. Al 3 strengths are approved for patients with asthma ages 12
years and older.
For Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
COPD is a chronic lung disease that includes chronic bronchts, emphysema, or both. ADVA0R DISKUS is used
tong term. twrce a day to help improve lung function for better breathing in adults with COPD. ADVAR DISKUS
250'50 has been shown to decrease the number of flare-ups and worsening of COPO symptoms (exacerbations)
Who should not take ADVAIR DISKUS?
You should not start ADVAIR f your asthma is becoming signcaty or rapidly worse, which can be life threatening.
Serious respiratory events, including death, have been reported in patients who started taking salmeterol in this
situaon, atnough t is not possible to tell whether salmelerdo contributed to these events, This may also occur in
patients with less severe asthma.
You should not take ADVAR if you have had n allergic reaction to it or any of ts components (salmetero!, fuitcasone
c-1 , ,- ,," ,- ,r, ,, . , , I ,In, ,,,,. r, ",,: ,.,,: -r .,; r,. --, 1 I W, l'.l..
-I, .. .- ..... % ,,,,, -4_ i, h, IIn,,,, ir ir i. ,'
Tell your doctor about the following:
* If you are using your fast-acting inhaler more often or using more doses than you normally do (e g., 4 or
more inhalabons of your fast-acing inhaler for 2 or more days in a row or a whole canister of your fast-acting
inhaler in 8 weeks' time), it could be a sign that your asthma is getting worse. If this occurs, tell your doctor
immediately
* If you have been using your fast-acting inhaler regularly (e.g., four times a day) Your doctor may tell you to
stop the regular use of these medications.
* Pf your peak flow meter results decrease. Your doctor will tell you the numbers that are night for you.
* If you have asthma and your symptoms do not improve after using ADVAIR regularly for 1 week.
* f you have bee on an oral steroid, like prednisone. and are now using ADVAIR You should be very careful as you
may be less able to heal after surgery, infection, or senous injury. It takes a number of months for the body to
recover its ability to make s own steroid hormones after use of of ral steroids. Swrtching from an oral steroid may
also unmask a condition previously suppressed by the oral steroid such as allergies, conjunctivitis, eczema,
arthritis, ano esinophilic conditions Symptoms of an esinophiI condition can include rash, worsening breathing
problems, heart compcatons, and/or feelingof "pins and needles' or numbness in the arms and legs. Talk to your
doctor immediately it you expenence any of these symptoms.
* Sometimes patents experience unexpected bronichospasm ngnt after taking ADVA0R. This condition can be life
threatening andif it occurs, you should immeaniatety stop using ADVA0R and seek immediate medical attenion
* If you have any type of heart dtheae such as crortary artery disease, irregulr heart beat or high bbod pressure,
ADVA0R should be used with caution. Be sure to talk wit your doctor about your condition because saimeterol,
one of the components of ADVAIR. may affect the heart by increasing heart rate and bkod pressure. i may cause
symptoms such as heart fluttering, chest pain, rapid heart rate. tremor, or nervousness
* If you have seizures, overacive thyroid gland, rier problems, orare sensitre to certain medcatons for breathing.
* If your breathing problems get worse over time or if your fast-acting inhaler does not work as well for you while
using ADVAIR If your breathing problems worsen quiclky, get emergency medical care.
* If you have been exposed toorcurrently have chickenpox or measlesor if you have an immune system problem
Patents using medications that weaken the immune system are more likely to get infections than healthy
individuals. ADVAIR contains a cortcosterid (flutcasone proporatel which may weaken the immune system,
Infections like chickenpox and measles, for example, can be very serious or even fatal in susceptible patents
using corticosteroids
How should I take ADVAIR DISKUS?
ADVAIR should be used 1 inhalation, twice a day (morning and evening). AOVAIR should never be taken
more than I inhalation twice a day. The full benefit of taking ADVAIR may take l week or longer.
if you miss a dose of ADVAIR, just skip that dose Take your next dose at your usual time. Do not take two
doses at one time.
Do not stop using ADVAR unless told to do so by your doctor because your symptoms might get worse.
Do not change or stop any of your medicines used to control or treat your breathing problems. Your doctor
will adjust your medicines as needed.
When using ADVAIR, remember
Never breathe into or take the DISKUS' apart.
A* always use the DISKUS in a level position
After each inhalation nrnse your mouth with water without swallowing.
Never wash any part of the DISKUS. Always keep it in a dry place.
Never take an extra dose, even if you feel you did not receive a dose.
Discard 1 month after removal from the fail pouch
Do not use ADVAIR with a spacer device
Children should use ADVAIR with an odult's help as instructed by the child's doctor


Can I take ADVAiR DISKUS with oter medications?
ADVAIR and certain other medicines may interact with each other. Tell your doctor about all the medications
you take. including prescnpion and nonprescription medications, vitamins and herbal supplements
If you are taking ADVAIR DISKUS. do not use other long-acting beto-agonist-conlaning medications, such as
SEREVENT DISKUS or Foradil' Aerolizer, for any reason.
If you take ntonavir (an HIV medication), tel your doctor Ritonavir may interact with ADVAIR and could cause
serious side effects The ant-HrI medicines Novir Soft Gelatin Capsules Norvir Oral Solution, and Kaletra'
contain mntonavir
No formal drug interaction studies have been performed with ADVAR.
In clinical studies, there were no differences in effects on the heart when ADVAnR was taken with varying
amounts of albuterol The effect of using ADVAJR in patients witrn asthma while taking more than 9 puffs a
day of atbuterol has not been studied.
ADVAIR should be used with extreme caution during and up to 2 weeks after treatment with monoamine
odase (MAO) inhibitors or tricyclic antidepressants since these medications can cause ADVAIR to have an
even greater effect on the circulatory system.
Generally, people wi asthma should nottake beta-blockers because they counteract the effect of beta,-agonsts
and may also cause severe bronchospasm. However, in some cases, for instance, following a heart attack,
selective beta-blockers may still be used if there is no acceptable aftemnative
The ECG changes an/dor tow blood potassium that may occur with some duretics may be made worse by ADVAR,
especially at higher-than-recommended doses. Caution should be used when these rugs are used together.
n clinical studies, there was no difference m side effects when ADVAIR was taken with metryxanthines (e.g.
theophyline) or vrth FLONASE (fiutLcasone propionate)
What are other important safety considerations with ADVAIR DISKUS?
Pneumonia: People with COPD taking ADVAIR may have a higher chance of pneumonia. Call your doctor
if you notice any of the following symptoms: change in amount or color of soutum, fever chlls, increased
cough, or increased breathing problems,
Osteoporsis: Lon1g-termn use of inhaled cortostaols may result in bone loss (ostaopoos) Pates who ae t
risk for increased bone loss (tobacco use advanced age, inactive festyle, poor nutriion family history
of osteoporosis, or ong-term use of drugs such as corticateids may have a greater risk wT ADVAIR. If you have
nsk factors for bone loss, you should talk lto your doctor about ways to reduce your risk and whether you should
have your bone density evaluated,
Glaucoma and cataracts: Glaucoma, increased pressure in the eyes, and cataracts have been reported with
the use of inhaled steroids, including fluticasone propyonate, a medicine contained in ADVAIR. Regular eye
examinations should be considered if you are taking ADVAIR
Blood sugar Salmeteroi may affect blood sugar and'or cause low blood potassium in some parents, which could
ead to a side effect like an regular heart rate Significant changes in blood sugar and blood potassium were seen
infrequently in clinical studies with ADVA4R
Growth: Inhaled steroids may cause a reduction in growth velocity in children and adolescents
Steroids: Taking steroids can affect your body's ability to make its own steroid hormones, which are needed
dunng infections and limes of severe stress to your body. such as an operation. These effects can sometimes be
seen voth inhaled steroids (but it is more common with oral steroids), especially when taken ar higher-than-
recommended doses over a long penod of time. In some cases, these effects may be severe, Inhaled steroids
often help control symptoms with less side effects than oral steroids,
Yeast infections: Patients taking ADVR may develop yeast infections of the mouth and/or throat ("thrush")
that should be treated by their doctor.
Tuberculosis or other untreated infections ADVAiR should be used with caution, if aatall. in patients with
tuberculosis, herpes infections of the eye. or otner untreated infections
What are the other possible side effects ofADVAIR DISKUS?
ADVAIR may produce side effects in some patients. In clinical studies, the most common side effects with
ADVAIR included upper respiratory tract infections throat irmtation: hoarseness and voice changes: thrush in the
mouth and throat; bronchis:. cough, headache; nausea and vomiting; infections in the ear, nose, and throat viral
respiratory infections: and muscle and bone pain
Tell your doctor about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away These are not all the side effects
with ADVAR Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.
What iflam pregnant planning to become pregnant or nursing?
Tak to your doctor about the benefits and risks of using ADVR during pregnancy labor, or if you are nursing
There have been no studies of ADVA0R used during pregnancy, labor, or in nursing women. Salmetfori s kton to
inteorfere wth labor cn t is not ke on whethethor ADVAIR is exortetd in breIas mint but other court ereids
have been detected in human breast milk. Futicasone propionte. like other cooesterads. has been associated
vih birth defects in animals Ie g, ceft palae and fetal death). Salmeteron shored no effect on fertility in ra at180
times I, maximum recommended daily dose.
What other important tests were conducted withADVAIR?
Thee is no evidence of enhanced toxicty with AVAR compared wih the componets administered separately. In
animal stdes witn doses much hignerethn those used in humans, salmeterol was aessooated t uterine toumo
Your healtcare professional can tell you more about hev drugs are tested or animals and what the results of nese
te stsoy ay n to your safety,
For more Information on AD VAJR DISKUS
This page is only a bnef summary of important information about ADVA0R DISKUS. For more information, talk to
your doctor. You can also visit wwwADVAUR.com or call 1 8--825-5249. Patients receivinrg ADVA1R DSKUS
should read the medication guide provided by me pharmacist with the prescnpton.
ADVAIR, ADVA4R DISKUS, FLONASE, SEREVENT, and DISKUS are registered trademarks of GlaxoSmithlrKlne.
The following are registered trademarks of their respective manufacturers: Foradil!Astellas Pharma Inc
Aerolizer/Novaris AG: Norvir an Kaletra/Abbhott Laboratories.


Q GlaxoSmithKline
GlaxoSmithlvine
Research Tnangle Park, NC 27709
ADD: 3PI April 2008
@2008 The GlaxoSmithKline Group of Companies All nghts reserved Printed in USA AD4418RO May 2008


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Page 8 americanprofile.com


lany shop vacuum suction heads have an irritaing
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Littleton 1309 .It. Eustis Road
S Coin Comp-ry Littleton NH 03561-3737
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Add a Custom Statehood Display Folder
& Save Over 10% C 53.50 each (!imit 51:$ _

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Create a custom gift for Mom with
family names & birthstones
Give Mom a gift to remember! The STERLING SILVER Family Facets ring
is custom-crafted with family names & Austrian crystal birthsrones (also
available in 18K Gold over Sterling Silver). Choose froni 2 to 7 name/
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Austrian Crystal Birthstones to choose from (indicate stone numbers on coupon):
a* @ 215 ) 0 :,1 9 '- .
01 Jan. 02Feb. 03Mar 04Apre 05 May 06June 07July OBAug. 09Sept. 10Oct 11NNoV. 12Dec.
RING SIZE: Start by wrapping a narrow strip of paper around the knuckle of the appropriate finger. Pull Snugly!
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Mail this coupon to: Limog6s P.O. Box 1728 Des Plaines, IL 60017-1728.
When ordering your Family Facets Name and Birthstone Ring, please indicate your ring finish and
size; then state 2-7 stones (please use stone numbers from birthstone chart) and names (up to 10
characters and spaces each):
Ring Size*:__ Check one: 0 STERLING SILVER RING (WR2)
0 18K GOLD OVER STERLING SILVER RING (WR3)
1. Month: Name:
2. Month: Name:
3. Month:_ Name:
4. Month: Name:
5. Month: Name: __ _
6. Month:---- Name:
7. Month:.......... Name:---
For more than one ring, till out the same information on a sheet of paper and return witl this coupon.
O PAYMENT ENCLOSED. Make check or money order for first installment of $17.49 plus S4.99 S&H (S22.48 total)
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I understand that my account will be billed the full amount of $69.96 plus S4.99 S&H in one installment.
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Address
City_ State____ Zip
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(Continued from page 12)


do everything I can with kids," says Edwards, in his
capacity as a fundraiser and on-camera spokesman
for SCC. "I think that's the most important thing
in our society."
According to Thomas M. Sadler, SCC's executive
director, Edwards has been a huge asset. "Girl to me
represents what this country is all about," says Sadler, 83.
"He's the epitome of a young man to look up to, who's
got all the qualities of what I (.dil a first-class citizen.
Every mom and daddy better wish they had a son like
Carl Edwards. To me, he is an ideal spokesperson. He
never refuses to step up to the plate."


A FAMILY TRADITION
In helping others, Edwards is forwarding a near-
sacred rite that was passed to him early on. Many
people have helped pave the way for the talented
driver, who now sits behind the wheel of the No.
99 racecar for Roush Fenway Racing.
His father, Carl Sr., a "really smart, very good racer,"
according to Edwards, blew dust all over Midwest dirt
tracks in the mid-1970s and early '80s, giving young
Carl an authentic racing pedigree. But Edwards hasn't
forgotten other early mentors, among them his dad's
cousin, NASCAR veteran Ken Schrader.


"He let me come work at his shop for two
summers when I was 16, and that was a really
big deal," recalls Edwards, the 2007 Busch Series
champion. "It really gave me a door into the sport,
an opportunity to see it from the inside."
Edwards names others who contributed to his dream
of becoming a professional racecar driver; among them
is Mike Mittler, who gave Edwards his big break.
"Mike is a self-made man, a guy who does it
like they did it in the old days," says Edwards of
the Foriscell, Mo., machinist and head of MB
Motorsports. "He owns a NASCAR Craftsman
truck, and he gave me a chance to run some races
in 2002. It was in chat Craftsman truck that got
me the opportunity at Roush the following year."
With instant success in the Craftsman Truck
Series, in which he took the checkered flag six times
between 2002 and 2004, another Edwards trademark
was born: the famed backflip after victories. As a
kid, Edwards watched St. Louis Cardinals Hall of
Fame shortstop Ozzie Smith do his crowd-pleasing
backflips on the baseball diamond.
"Then I saw Tyler Walker, the World of Outlaws
driver, do one after a win, and I thought, 'Well, that's
pretty cool!"' says Edwards, who admits that his
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The only oral monthly osteoporosis treatment approved to help prevent fractures
at both the spine and beyond the spine*
*Non-spinal fractures were measured as a group, not separately.
Actonel is a prescription medication to treat and prevent postmenopausal osteoporosis.


Important Safety Information for Actonel" tablets.
You should not take Actonel if you are allergic to any of the ingredients, if you have low blood calcium (hypocalcemia), have kidneys that
work poorly, or cannot stand or :iI, u0 ..-,ri i.:,, 30 minutes. Stop taking Actonel and tell your doctor right away if you experienc- .i ir..:.,,n
or painful swallowing, chest pain, or severe or continuing heartburn, as these may be signs of serious upper digestive problems.
Follow dosing instructions carefully to lower the chance of these events occurring. Side effects may
include stomach pain, upset stomach, or back, muscle, bone or joint pain, sometimes severe.
Tell all your health care providers, including your dentist, about all the medicines that you take. N EW
Contact your doctor for medical advice about side effects, or if you hove questions about Actonel. I '


You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.
'.i:i. .1,.,:,. ,,,.-1 -i.:ir. orcall 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please see Actonel Patient Information on the following page. Actonelcom 1-877 Actonel


Act6nel
(risedronate sodium) tablets
Once-a-Month






Patient Information: ACTONELV (AK-toh-nel) Tablets

ACTONEL (risedronate sodium) tablets 5 mg,
ACTONEL (risedronate sodium) tablets 35 mg, ACTONEL
(risedronate sodium) tablets 75 mg, and ACTONEL
(risedronate sodium) tablets 150 mg for Osteoporosis.
Read this information carefully before you start to use your
medicine. Read the information you get every time you
get more medicine. There may be new information. This
information does not take the place of talking with your
healthcare provider about your medical condition or your
treatment. If you have any questions or are not sure about
something, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist.

What is the most important information I should know
about ACTONEL?
ACTONEL may cause problems in your stomach and
esophagus (the tube that connects the mouth and the
stomach), such as trouble swallowing (dysphagia),
heartburn esophagitiss), and ulcers. You might feel pain in
your bones, joints, or muscles (See "What are the Possible
Side Effects of ACTONEL?").
You must follow the instructions exactly for
ACTONEL to work and to lower the chance of
serious side effects. (See "How should I take
ACTONEL?").

What is ACTONEL?
ACTONEL is a prescription medicine used:
* to prevent and treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal
women.
* to increase bone mass in men with osteoporosis.
* to prevent and treat osteoporosis in men and women
that is caused by treatment with steroid medicines such
as prednisone.
* to treat Paget's disease of bone in men and women.
The treatment for Paget's disease is very different
than for osteoporosis and uses a different dose of
ACTONEL. This leaflet does not cover using
ACTONEL for Paget's disease If you have Paget's
disease, ask your healthcare provider how to use
ACTONEL.

ACTONEL may reverse bone loss by stopping more loss
of bone and increasing bone strength in most people who
take it, even though they won't be able to see or feel a
difference. ACTONEL helps lower the risk of breaking
bones (fractures). Your healthcare provider may measure
the thickness (density) of your bones or do other tests to
check your progress.

Who should not take ACTONEL?
Do not take ACTONEL if you:
* have low blood calcium (hypocalcemia)
* cannot sit or stand up for 30 minutes
* have kidneys that work poorly
* have an allergy to ACTONEL. The active ingredient
in ACTONEL is risedronate sodium. (See the end
of this leaflet for a list of all the ingredients in
ACTONEL.)

Tell your doctor before using ACTONEL if:
* you are pregnant or may become pregnant. We do not
know if ACTONEL can harm your unborn child.
* you are breast-feeding or plan to breast-feed. We do not
know if ACTONEL can pass through your milk and if it
can harm your baby.
* you have kidney problems. ACTONEL may not be right
for you.

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take,
including prescription and nonprescription medicines,
vitamins and herbal supplements.
ACTONEL can interact with other medicines. Keep a list of
all the medicines you take. Show it to all your healthcare
providers, including your dentist and pharmacist, each time
you get a new medicine.


How should I take ACTONEL?
The following instructions apply to all patients taking
ACTONEL:
* Take ACTONEL exactly as prescribed by your healthcare
provider.
* Take ACTONEL first thing in the morning before you eat
or drink anything except plain water.
* Take ACTONEL while you are sitting up or standing.
* Take ACTONEL with 6 to 8 ounces (about 1 cup) of
plain water. Do not take it with any other drink besides
plain water.
* Swallow ACTONEL whole. Do not chew the tablet or
keep it in your mouth to melt or dissolve.
* After taking ACTONEL you must wait at least 30 minutes
BEFORE:
lying down. You may sit, stand, or do normal activities
like read the newspaper or take a walk.
eating or drinking anything except plain water.
taking vitamins, calcium, or antacids. Take vitamins,
calcium, and antacids at a different time of the day
from when you take ACTONEL.
* Keep taking ACTONEL for as long as your healthcare
provider tells you.
* For ACTONEL to treat your osteoporosis or keep you
from getting osteoporosis, you have to take it exactly as
prescribed.
* If you miss a dose of ACTONEL, call your healthcare
provider for instructions.
* If you take more than your prescribed dose of ACTONEL,
call your healthcare provider right away.
* Your healthcare provider may tell you to take calcium
and vitamin D supplements and to exercise.

What is my ACTONEL schedule?
ACTONEL tablets are made in 4 different dosages
(amounts). How often you should take your tablet
depends upon the dosage that your doctor has prescribed
(recommended) for you.
* 5 mg tablets are yellow. One tablet should be taken
every day in the morning.
* 35 mg tablets are orange. One tablet should be taken
once a week in the morning.
* 75 mg tablets are pink. One tablet should be taken in
the morning two days in a row every month.
* 150 mg tablets are blue. One tablet should be taken
once a month in the morning.

If you miss your dose in the morning, do not take it later
in the day. You should call your healthcare provider for
instructions.

What should I avoid while taking ACTONEL?
* Do not eat or drink anything except water before you
take ACTONEL and for at least 30 minutes after you take
it. (See "How should I take ACTONEL?").
* Do not lie down for at least 30 minutes after you take
ACTONEL.
* Foods and some vitamin supplements and medicines
can stop your body from absorbing (using) ACTONEL.
Therefore, do not take anything other than plain water at
or near the time you take ACTONEL.

What are the possible side effects of ACTONEL?
Stop taking ACTONEL and tell your healthcare provider
right away if:
* swallowing is difficult or painful
* you have chest pain
* you have very bad heartburn or it doesn't get better

Possible serious side effects may include:
* esophagus or stomach problems, including ulcers, pain,
or trouble swallowing. Tell your healthcare provider
if you have pain or discomfort in your stomach or
esophagus.
* low calcium and other mineral disturbances. If you
already have one (or more) of these problems, it should
be corrected before taking ACTONEL.


* pain in bones, joints or muscles, sometimes severe. Pain
may start as soon as one day or up to several months
after starting ACTONEL.
* jaw-bone problems in some people, which may include
infection and slower healing after teeth are pulled. Tell
your healthcare providers, including your dentist, right
away if you have these symptoms.

Common side effects include the following:
* back and joint pain
* upset stomach and abdominal (stomach area) pain
* short-lasting, mild flu-like symptoms, which are
reported with the monthly doses and usually get better
after the first dose.

Other possible side effects may include:
* Allergic and severe skin reactions. Tell your
healthcare provider if you develop any symptoms of
an allergic reaction including: rash (with or without
blisters), hives, or swelling of the face, lips, tongue,
or throat. Get medical help right away if you have
trouble breathing or swallowing.
* Eye inflammation. Tell your healthcare provider if you
get any eye pain, redness, or if your eyes become more
sensitive to light.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.
You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

How should I store ACTONEL?
* Store ACTONEL between 68F to 77*F (20C to 25C).
* Keep ACTONEL and all medicines out of the reach of
children.

General information about ACTONEL:
Medicines are sometimes prescribed for conditions that are
not mentioned in patient information leaflets. Do not use
ACTONEL for a condition for which it was not prescribed.
Do not give ACTONEL to other people, even if they have the
same symptoms you have. It may harm them.

What if I have other questions about ACTONEL?
This leaflet summarizes the most important information
about ACTONEL for osteoporosis. If you have more questions
about ACTONEL. ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist.
They can give you information written for healthcare
professionals. For more information, call 1-877-ACTONEL
(toll-free) or visit our web site at www.actonel.com.

What are the ingredients of ACTONEL?
ACTONEL (active ingredient): risedronate sodium.

ACTONEL (inactive ingredients): All dose strengths contain:
crospovidone, hydroxypropyl cellulose, hypromellose,
magnesium stearate. microcrystalline cellulose,
polyethylene glycol, silicon dioxide, and titanium dioxide.

Dose-strength specific ingredients include: 5 mg-ferric
oxide yellow, lactose monohydrate; 30 mg-lactose
monohydrate; 35 mg-ferric oxide red, ferric oxide yellow,
lactose monohydrate; 75 mg-ferric oxide red; 150 mg-
FD&C blue #2 aluminum lake.

ACTONEL" is marketed by:
Procter & Gamble Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
and
sanofi-aventis U.S. LLC
Bridgewater, NJ 08807
APRIL 2008
@2008 Procter & Gamble Pharmaceuticals. Inc.
P&G
Pharmaceuticals T.rIeI A e' / /v-llt IeI,-le Rllealth

sanofi aventis

@2008 Procter & Gamble Pharmaceuticals, Inc.






















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Signature


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9303 MILWAUKEE AVENUE NILES, ILLINOIS 60714

REIRINRVA'iON APP'lICATIONN
YES. Please reserve the "Thomas Kinkade White
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Mr, Mrs. Ms.
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A limited-edition presentation restricted to 95 firing days Allow 4-8 weeks after
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Section B


THE WAKULLA NEWS. Thursday, Sept. 25. 2008


Serving

more than

seniors

Wakul-
la County
Senior Citi-
zens may
serve more
of Wakulla
County's
population
than you
know. We RLH. Carter
regularly From offices of
report in R.H. Carter,
detail the Executive Director,
Wakulla County
many ser- Senior Citizens
vices that Council, Inc.
we provide
for our senior population.
However, we rarely publish
information on the services
we provide for our elemen-
tary school students before
and after school. Joan Smith,
our public relations writer is
publishing information on
some success stories of former
students and the intergenera-
tional activities including the
senior citizens and elemen-
tary students. This article will
provide additional details
about our Before/After School
Program.
Deborah VanHomrn has man-
aged this program for the last
16 years. She possesses strong
leadership skills and has de-
veloped effective management
skills during the time period.
She supervises 12 employees
in the program. Each new
employee is screened by the
Wakulla County School Dis-
trict for Level II clearance.
This includes a background
check of local and FBI records.
Each employee is required. to
participate in procedures and
safety in-service every 90 days.
They are also required to at-
tend classes on CPR and first
aid every two years. Safety-is.
the number one priority in all
training programs and written
procedures,
This program is provided in
the four elementary schools
of our county. It begins at 6:30
a.m. and ends at 6:30 p.m. On
regular school days the stu-
dents leave our program when
classes begin and return when
classes end. Their schedule
includes time for homework
and recreation. On teacher
planning days, spring break,
summer and some holidays,
the students are scheduled
to attend the program for 12
hours. A field trip is sched-
uled for every day that the
students are not in class. Field
trips include parks, swimming,
skating, movies, Wild Adven-
tures, Gulf World, Ship Wreck
Island, and other destinations.
Transportation is provided by
the Wakulla County School
Transportation Department.
We reimburse the school sys-
tem for their costs.
Employees are allowed to
hug students and offer a help-
ing hand. However, if disci-
pline becomes necessary, they
are not allowed to touch a
student. Time-out is the only
discipline measure that we
enforce. If a student does not
adhere to verbal directives por
time-out, they are dismissed
from the program. We do pro-
vide a one-week grace period, if
needed, for the parents to find
alternative programs.
Student enrollment costs
the parents $5.50 for each
morning session and each
afternoon session. Full days
costs $140 per week. Profits
generated by this program
must first be used to meet con-
tractual requirements with the
Wakulla County Schools and
the balance is used to support
senior citizens services. We
also participate in subsidized
childcare provided by Early
Learning Coalition.
The success of this program
is dependent on support of Su-
perintendent David Miller and
the elementary principals.


By JOAN E. SMITH
Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center
Building leaders takes time. The
Wakulla County Senior Citizens Council
is recognizing two former participants
of the before-school and after-school
program, Cynthia Howell and Skyler
Warren.
It is a joy to acknowledge these two
girls and their wonderful accomplish-
ments. They have excelled in their
academic studies and hold positions
of leadership amongst their peers;
the Wakulla High School NJROTC
program.
Without question the 127 students
enrolled in the NJROTC program at
Wakulla High will produce quality lead-
ers for our future. Respectfully, they
follow a code of honor which says: I
shall not steal, nor cheat, nor lie, nor
tolerate those who dol
The self-led group of students faith-
fully practices formal drills after school
monitored by two leaders, Lieutenant
Mike Stewart, US Navy, Retired, and
Captain Ron Huddleston, US Navy,
Retired.
Lt. Stewart said he eagerly stands
by to offer leadership and encourage-
ment to the cadets. He proudly admits
they compete with 56 schools and the
Wakulla cadets have repeatedly placed
in the top five at competitive events.
The purpose of the NJROTC program
is to build leaders. It introduces cadets


to real life opportunities. They actively
use the learned leadership skills at
community events, such as one held on
Sept. 11. Lt. Stewart supervised several
cadets as they performed the raising
of the flag ceremony at the sheriff's
office.
Wakulla High School senior, NJROTC,
Cadet Cynthia Howell currently holds


the second in command position in
her squad. When asked about her life
she openly explained the challenging
process of overcoming some very spe-
cial needs (ADHD). As a result of those
needs, she said they caused her to turn
toward the path of self-discovery.

Continued on Page 2B


NJROTC Cadet and WHS senior Cynthia Howell leads NJROTC unit.


501~
Lcall)


Wakulla youth interact with seniors.


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REFLORA


Seniors help

pass along

traditions


Howell and Ruby Butler

By JOAN E. SMITH
Wakulla County
Senior Citizens Center
The answer comes from
looking at an organization
like the Wakulla County Se-
nior Citizens Council, Inc.
Before the WCSC Council
chooses to implement an
intergenerational program
at the Center, the board
considers its benefits to the
individual and to the com-
munity.
The council understands
the program will empower
participants so they can share
cultural traditions with their
family and with their com-
munity. It will especially
empower them to share with
the younger generation.
One such project at the
senior center is called the
Wakulla County Before and
After-School Program. The
fee-based program is avail-
able in Wakulla County el-
ementary schools. It is for the
benefit of parents of students
enrolled in Pre-K through
fifth grade.
Most young people learn
to actively use leadership
skills during their early child-
hood years. For the past 16
years the WCSC Council has
proudly .witnessed former
participants of the Before and
After-School Program excel
through their leadership
journey.
The WCSC Council congrat-
ulates Wakulla High School
seniors. Graduation is just
around the corner. Be sure
to remember the younger
generation is watching you.
Take time to share your life
story with them.
How can older adults be
involved in passing cultural
traditions on to the younger
generation? Answer: Locate
someone younger than your-
self and be an active, vibrant
influence in their life. Encour-
age them to keep up with
their hard work and listen to
their story. After that, by all
means, share your hopes and
your dreams, teach them your
crafts and talents, and guide
them with your wise council
and wisdom filled stores.


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Building Leaders


Wakulla High School NJROTC Cadets with Lt. Mike Stewart.


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WAKULLA COUNTY ,nrE
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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008

Building Leaders


Continued from Page 1B
Her first years of obtaining
social skills, Cynthia said, was
learned by attending the be-
fore and after-school program
offered by the senior center.
She recalled at the young age
of four learning how to interact
with adults and others in her
age group and older.
Cynthia said the teachers
seemed to understand her
demanding and active ways.
They patiently helped her to
stay focused. She smiled as
she fondly talked about her
teachers.
"Bobbie LeClere was the
sweetest person. Bobbie en-
couraged not only me," said
Cynthia, "but also the others.
She gave us love and helped
us to communicate with self-
assurance and taught us how
to replace self-condemning
thoughts with assertive self-
confident thoughts." Although,
"Ms. Bobbie" passed away
when Cynthia was seven years
old, she said that she'll always
remember that she was such a
sweet woman.
Debbie VanHorn, Program
Director for the before and
after-school program, also in-
fluenced Cynthia's life. Cynthia
said Debbie's warm smile and
her gentleness with the chil-
dren resulted in them feeling
comfortable around her and
that it was safe to talk to her
about anything.
Another person of influ-
ence for the children is Ruby
Butler. Ruby has worked as a
child care worker for the school
program for many years. In her
busy schedule she takes time
to share lunch with her friends


at the senior center, before
she's off to her duties at the
Shadeville Elementary School.
Ruby holds a special place
in Cynthia's heart. While visit-
ing the school (the afternoon
of the interview) Cynthia and
Ruby reunited with a loving
embrace. Later, Cynthia re-
vealed the memorable school
still has the same aroma as
it did in her childhood. She
warmly declared the moment
amazingly "shadows" her with
"happiness in a split second."
She was referring to the joy and
challenges of her childhood
inter-mixed with the joy of
graduating from high school
How fast the memorable days
seem to fly by.
When asked how others
describe her Cynthia said,
"They say I am one with great
determination and full of mo-
tivation, striving to reach my
goals." She said even the small
goals count. In order to reach
the long term goals, you have
to be patient, succeed with
small goals first, then, your
other goals will come to frui-
tion, too. she said.
The ROTC leadership pro-
gram has helped Cynthia to
mature into a fine leader. She
said she still has the same
morals but, the ROTC program
influenced those morals and
made them even stronger.
Among other social skills, the
program also provides the par-
ticipants with many opportuni-
ties to advance with heartfelt
friendship skills.
Another future leader and
cadet is Skyler Warren, Wakulla
High ROTC.
Prior to returning to an


afternoon drill practice, she
pointed out the difference in
her squad and Cynthia's. She
explained that her squad chose
to drill without bearing arms
and Cynthia's group chose to
bear arms.
Cynthia explained the rifle
used by her comrades can be
compared to the type used by
WWII soldiers, however the
one they use is not an active
serviceable weapon.
Lt. Stewart said the guns
are used by the cadets for
marching and drill purposes
only. He also said many of
the cadets choose not to en-
list in the Armed Forces after
graduation. However, Cynthia
is ready to serve and plans to
serve her country in the area
of law enforcement, possibly
detective work.
Building strong leaders takes
time and patience. Wakulla
County has many fine exam-
ples of leadership. The Wakulla
County Senior Citizens Council
congratulates the entire class of
seniors, graduating in 2009.
Thanks to the help of our
parents, teachers, volunteers,
and local organizations, the
people of Wakulla County can
be proud of the next generation
of leaders.
These leaders are rapidly ad-
vancing and they are being in-
spired and raised by supportive
community intergenerational
programs,
The Senior Citizens Council
proudly recognizes Cynthia
and Skyler and all the other
wonderful students attending
the before-school and after-
school program keep up the
good work.


Wakulla principals support Miller


Editor, The News:
Under the leadership
of Superintendent David
Miller, the Wakulla County
School District has con-
tinued to grow and excel.
Many new programs and
opportunities are available
for our students. We attract
and keep excellent teachers
with many more trying to
get,:their foot,in the. do.or.
The Wakulla school system
is envied by districts across
the state. A commonly heard
reason why new residents
continue to move to Wakul-
la County is because of the
quality school system.
We have a team spirit of
cooperation, a can-do atti-
tude, a history of high per-
formance, and a true vision
of success for our students
imbedded in everything


we do.
With 13 years of experi-
ence as the Superintendent
of Schools for Wakulla Coun-
ty, David Miller has proven
himself to be an innovative
and dedicated leader. He
took over in 1995 when we
were under the stress of los-
ing Superintendent Roger
Stokley. Mr. Miller was able
to, support us.during,those
difficult times following Mr.
Stokley's death and ensured
that our school year contin-
ued smoothly.
With David Miller, we
have a superintendent who
stays abreast of new legis-
lation that will. affect our
district, He is recognized as
a leader across the state. Da-
vid Miller's leadership, dedi-
cation to Wakulla's schools,
and. fiscally responsible ad-


ministration are well-known
by all. As principals of the
Wakulla schools, we are
proud to support him for re-
election as Superintendent
of Wakulla County Schools.
Tom Askins, Principal of
SEC
Susan Brazier, Principal
of SES
Mike Crouch, Principal
ofWHS ..
Jo Ann Daniels, Principal
of WMS
Kim Dutton, Principal of
Pre-K
Jackie High, Principal of
RES
Bobby Pearce, Principal
of MES
Angie Walker, Principal
of CES
Dod Walker, Principal of
RMS


Developers give thanks to board


Editor, The News:
Since so many of our
county commissioners do
not receive the Tallahassee
Democrat, I thought it was
important to let them know
that they were thanked in
one column:


"Developers would like
to say two words to the
Wakulla County Commis-
sion: Thanks, cousins."
That came from the Zing
column on Sept. 12. I imag-
ine they must be referring
to the illegal emergency


meeting the three depart-
ing county commissioners
placed on the agenda to take
$800,000 away from the tax-
payers in the county. Thank
you, Zingl
Sue Damon
Crawfordville


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I FOR COUNTY

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DISTRICT 3


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POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY MIKE STEWART
DEMOCRAT FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 3


More Letters to the Editor
Continued from Page 2A

Artz is looking out for our future


Editor, The News:
Lynn Artz is looking to our
future and a more efficient
government to save my tax
dollars. Did you see her ad? By
reducing our fuel and electric-
ity expenses our county could
save as much as $300,000 a
year.
I like her five step program
for saving, but I like the idea of
a commissioner who will help
Wakulla County prepare for the
future green economy even
more. With so many people in
the building trades out of work
and our entire housing devel-


opment industry in decline, it
is clearly time to look to the
future. We must look for a fu-
ture where skills of people in
the construction industry can
be applied to creating more ef-
ficient buildings in our county
and our country.
Rehabilitating old buildings
to new green standards can
pay for itself in five years or
less, according to a study by
Political Economy Research
Institute at University of Mas-
sachusetts-Amherst. After the
payback period, the buildings
continue to use less electricity


and save dollars. This study,
"Green Recovery," shows a
plan to create two million jobs
with 120,000 of those jobs to
be in Florida.
More efficient buildings,
both public and private, can
save all of us dollars and
create more green jobs. Lynn
gets my support. Let's help
our construction industry and
ourselves, too. Lynn listens
and she will work for more
energy efficiency to save our
tax dollars.
Elinor Elfner
Crawfordville


Miller has always had high expectations


Editor, The Newss
It is with pride and enthu-
siasm that I endorse David
Miller, the incumbent, for
Superintendent of Schools
for Wakulla County.
I have known David most
of his life; as well as his
mother, father and two
brothers. He grew up in an
environment of love, yet
with high expectations. His
mother, Dorothy Miller, was
the strongest and best math
and science teacher that I've
ever known. Buck Miller,
David's father, also taught
me several things that still
bring a smile. He demon-
strated the art of making
cane syrup to many classes
of Wakulla County students
and we enjoyed sausage,
homemade biscuits and the
fruits of his labors around
the syrup kettle. He also
introduced me to "vinegar
pie" as we all vacationed in
North Carolina.
It was my pleasure to
teach David in elementary
school in the building his
office now occupies. Even
at the ages of nine and 10,
he was a leader, excellent
student and friend as he
developed lasting relation-
3. d. )


ships with peers that he
still enjoys today. He went
beyond required expecta-
tions, using his time wisely.
I specifically remember his
being in a fourth/fifth grade
instruction and mastering
those skills as well.
In the late 1950s and early
1960s, we didn't have many,
if any, special area teachers.
However, being the music
lover that I am, we sang
often in our classroom.
David had a gift for singing
and learned our patriotic
and folk songs. His love for
music continues to this day
as he shares his talents
through his church choir,
community events and plays
a "mean" trumpet in the
High Mileage Band.
It has been gratifying
to me as I have watched
David mature into an adult
who has continued to use,
further develop and nurture
character and leadership
traits that I recognized in
him as a child. He became
an outstanding teacher and
coach before moving on to
principal. Both my daugh-
ters taught under Mr. Miller
and were impressed with his
dedication and loyalty to his


students and teachers.
We have one of the best
school systems in the coun-
try. That did not just happen!
It is because of the knowl-
edge, hard work, effort, ener-
gy and vision of many. Roger
Stokley was one of those
people. Because of his years
of working closely with Da-
vid Miller and knowing his
qualifications for leadership
and stability, David was his
choice to continue to lead
our county for continued
success when his term was
cut short by cancer. That was
a wonderful choice as dem-
onstrated by test data, pro-
grams that have brought the
high school to new levels,
the addition of new schools
with little cost to taxpayers
and many other accolades.
David has proven to have
the staying power and com-
mitment to keep our school
system at the top.
As voters, you have a
choice to keep this legacy
alive. I urge you to keep
David Miller as superinten-
dent of the Wakulla County
School District.
Jo Ann Council
Crawfordville


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008 Page 3B



comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895



Wakulla County came together during tropical storm


Editor, The News:
Men's Fraternity of Wakulla along
with Volunteer Wakulla Disaster
Relief and Recovery would like to
thank all those who participated in
the relief and recovery efforts during
the recent weather event with Tropi-
cal Storm Fay.
Although we were spared from
what could have been much worse,
the effort and teamwork was exem-
plary. As an eyewitness to the coop-
eration and effort of those involved
at the County EOC (Emergency Op-
erations Center) for several days and
nights, their concern and dedication
was only matched by those in the
field who put forth the "hands on"


work to accomplish the task.
In spite of the rain, wind and
high water, these individuals worked
diligently to inform, assist and rescue
those in harm's way. At times, with
little or no notice of the impending
flow of high water and limited com-
munications, they were there stand-
ing ready to meet the needs.
While working on opposite sides
of our county, the sheriff's office, vol-
unteer firefighters and the National
Guard along with others, worked
hand in glove throughout the day and
night to provide assistance to these
residents making sure all were safe
and out of harm's way.
After what seemed to be endless


hours of sleeplessness and mental
stress their work was not done. The
rise of the rivers from rainwater
upstate and beyond brought with it
more work to protect life and property
as rivers overflowed banks.
A delegation from Men's Fraternity
of Wakulla joined with Volunteer
Wakulla Disaster Relief and Recovery
volunteers to provide sandbags to
those unable to provide for them-
selves and to provide transportation
to those stranded by the rising water
in their community.
Surely the need for citizen volun-
teers was so evident to assist those
who worked endless hours and were
exhausted, yet continued to put forth


all they had.
As the rains subsided and rivers
began to recede, there was still much
to be done. After meeting with the
Salvation Army in Tallahassee, a
delegation from Volunteer Wakulla
and Men's Fraternity of Wakulla went
through the affected areas to assess
the needs and hand out "clean-up
kits" to help residents begin to re-
cover.
While the Property Appraiser's
Office and Building and Zoning De-
partment made overall assessments
of damage to residences, volunteers
from Men's Fraternity and Volunteer
Wakulla provided assistance in tree
and limb removal and temporary


roof repairs.
For many it was just a rainy day or
night, for others it was giving above
and beyond the call of duty. For some
it was stepping out of the norm and
stepping up to the plate when help-
ing really counted. Being "neighbors
helping neighbors."
Our most hardy thanks and ap-
preciation to each of you who had
some small part in protecting our
citizens lives and property during the
recent weather event with Tropical
Storm Fay.
Steve Smith, Coordinator
Volunteer-Wakulla Disaster Re-
lief and Recovery,
Men's Fraternity of Wakulla


We must not

become a police state


Editor. The News:
With reference to the du-
ties of any law enforcement
officer, cop, or keeper of
the peace, that's how it all
began, in the old school.
We have become a coun-
ty out of control with laws,
laws and more laws; for
anything and everything
under the sun. Follow the
book no matter what the
circumstances are. Humans,
thank God, are all different.
That is what makes this
country so great, to be able
to do and think without
the government making
every decision for us. What
has happened to common
sense or something close
to it? You can't drive people
like cattle heading for the
slaughterhouse and suc-
ceed. When we lose site of
judgement, restraint, and
wisdom, we will eventually
lose the battle.
This time in our his-


tory, if we choose not to
deal with any problem, the
only solution appears to
be, "Let's pass another law
to fix the problem." Dream
on, folks! It ain't working.
It only passes the buck and
creates more problems in
other areas.
We must not become a
police state. Each day we
are losing all of the rights
that made this great nation.
Something is eroding our
sense of values from top to
bottom like a cancer.
An example of bad law
enforcement, in my judg-
ment, is the law officer who
tickets someone rushing an
injured person or pregnant
female for medical help.
This type of person lacks
judgment and compassion
and should not be in law
enforcement.
Jack Collins
Sopchoppy


Politics are amazing


Editor, The News:
Politics are amazing.
The candidate who lies the
most, people believe wins,
and the American people
always lose! We have a Black
Democratic candidate for
president, with no experi-
ence, accusing the white


Republican vice-presidential
candidate of having no ex-
perience. Her credentials are
much more impressive than
the Obama checkered past.
James Johnson
Crawfordville


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Leadership and the need for change


Editor, The News:
This year I have heard
countless people say that
is time for change. What I
have heard has surprised
and even shocked me. Peo-
ple have shared their expe-
riences about the current
political races and the treat-
ment they have received
from various candidates.
People have stated that
they have been coerced
and even threatened into
taking down an opposing
candidate's political adver-
tisement. They have been
offered bribes for posting
the candidate's advertise-
ment and been reminded
that they "owe the candi-
date." '
Even worse, they have
been asked to openly sup-
port the incumbent.
I've asked these people
to share their stories and
questioned why they hadn't
done anything or filed a
complaint. Sadly, many told
me that it wouldn't make a
difference as this county is.
"ruled" by the "good-old-
boys."
Recently, after person-
ally experiencing this very
same "political strategy"
by several members of a
certain incumbent's staff, I
decided I could not simply
sit back and do nothing
and decided not to adopt
the "purposeful blindness
or indifference" of some of
my fellow voters.
I wonder if Wakulla has
become an oligarchy (where


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power rests with a small Incumbents promising
elite segment of society), or that they will continue to
an aristocracy (established be of service to the taxpay-
through an internal struggle ers, but when you attempt
over those with the most to contact them or request
status and influence over to meet with them, they
the society), or a plutocracy are not available and never
(ruled by the wealthy or return your call.
power provided by wealth). How many political
I personally have decided speeches have you listened
that Wakulla County has to in which the candidate
become a "GoodOldBoyoc- does not. provide any in-
racy," a term to define the formation to illustrate how
combination of all three of their work will benefit the
the above forms of govern- county?
ment. Candidates talk about
If you are surprised, I the fact that they were born
would encourage each of here and that all their chil-
you to research each can- dren went to school here, or
didate and consider the that they have lived here all
following: their lives, and therefore,
How many of you have this alone makes them the
personally experienced the most qualified candidate.
same type of encounters? Candidates who talk
How many political ad- about their personal past,
vertisements in newsprint but don't share what they
are misleading? intend to do to improve
Candidates taking the services or system, or
credit for saving Wakulla describe what they plan to
County taxpayers dollars or do if elected or re-elected.
establishing a new program, How many of the can-
when in fact the Florida didates have you observed
Legislature appropriated who' use :their position to
the.fAinds' ot 'mandated 'the "bend" the rtiles ftor certain
new program. members of the community
Candidates promising with the "right" last name
to keep our community or have "bent" the rules
safe, when in fact no ac- while in office to benefit
tion has been taken or in- themselves or their family
vestigations completed on members?
many crimes that Wakulla How many of the can-
residents have been victims didates have you observed'
of, nor have any of the lo- use their existing position
cal "crack houses" been to further their political
shut down even though career or use resources from
everyone in the community. a public office for personal
knows that they exist. political posturing and


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gain? It makes me wonder
how many candidates are
using or have county em-
ployees using the following
to assist in their political
campaigns.
The recent primary elec-
tion process also makes
me wonder how is it that
in this day and age of tech-
nological advancements,
we have to manually count
votes due to "paper jams?"
Should we all be worried
about more "paper jams"
in the upcoming election
in November? Should we
be worried as to whether or
.not security will be required
during the manual counting
of votes, and who would be
assigned to provide such
security or supervise the
process?
I sincerely hope that the
local sheriff's office is not
asked to provide security
during any manual counts,
or that incumbents are not
asked to "supervise" the
manual counts. I would hate
to know that our GoodOld-
Boyocracy would not-recog-,
nize this as the "fobgdard-'
ing the hen house'."
Why do so many of us
complain and support the
need for change, but don't
do what we need to do to
effect change? It is time for
all of us to wake up and
be part of the force that
changes the status quo.
Lisa C. Saavedra
Crawfordville


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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008

Those who believe rumors also believe in the tooth fairy


Editor, The News;
Mr. Kessler, in his letter to
the editor last week, said he
didn't like intimidation and
the very idea of intimidation
is offensive. I couldn't agree
morel However, as you read
the letter and get past the
pretend patriotism, you realize
this is a letter of a politician.
not a patriot.


Mr. Kessler writes in his
letter, "People have told me
they have been" (intimidated)
however, no one's told the
sheriff's office of intimida-
tion by deputies." Will the
real complainant please step
forward?
You know, I heard that
State Troopers were writing
tickets to citizens with "Har-


vey" stickers on their vehicles.
I consider that to be like be-
lieving in the tooth fairy. You
can hear everything during an
election year except the Lord's
Prayerd
Fact: We are an accredited
law enforcement agency and
this type of shenanigans is
simply not permitted.
Mr. Kessler, intimidation


saddens and angers us, too.
But sir, if you have credible
knowledge of a crime and
you do not report it, doesn't
that make you a partner in
the crime?
I have learned over the
years there is just enough
truth in every false statement
to make it sound good to the
gullible. Mr. Kessler, people


are not buying into your politi-
cal half-truths and unqualified
accusations and your under-
lying political intimidation
while waving the red, white
and blue.
I'll be the first to thank
your father for his service to
our country, and all of the
other soldiers, past and pres-
ent, who have and are serving


our country. My father, too,
was one of those who fought
on foreign soil. They fought
for what was faithful and true.
What you are doing is neither
faithful nor true.
Sheriff David F. Harvey
Crawfordville


Is Wal-Mart paying their fair share?


Editor, The News: on enviror
As I read about the prob- land along
lems with taxes and services, road. Did it
I am given pause to wonder not! And N
about Wakulla's Wal-Mart. tax breaks.
Wakulla's Wal-Mart was Look at
voted down by the county using data
commissioners in a 3-2 vote. rolls. Wak
After the vote, former commis- was built ii
sioner Mike Stewart changed $153,752 f
his mind because of "new foot or $0.
information," information The market
which was never made public. $9,582,867.
Dozens of residents urged the The Tal
commission to have a referen- on Apalac
dum to see how citizens felt 1997, pays
about putting a big box store on 196,539

Miller has su[
Editor, The News: Wakulla Co
It is always disheartening to has had the
me that as the elections grow ing Mr. Mil
closer and closer the issues get hand his ac
clouded by some of the can- county's scl
didates' efforts to obtain the the unique
votes of the citizens of Wakulla taught for
County. Sometimes the tactics Florida cou
to obtain votes take a negative to Wakulla
turn and that has happened The first
to several of our candidates. If taught me
you doubt that, just re-read the handle mo
letters to the editor of the past that a teac
few weeks. value those
In particular, this letter con- only after t
cerns David Miller, our school County thai
superintendent. I am a retired was a profe


Mentally sensitive
g an over-crowded
t happen? Of course
Wal-Mart was given

some comparisons
from the 2007 tax
ulla's Supercenter
n 2006 and is taxed
or 201,894 square
76 per square foot.
et value listed is

lahassee Wal-Mart
chee was built in
$233,153 in taxes
square feet or $1.19


per square foot. It is assessed
at $12,622,236.
Thomasville Road Wal-Mart
was built in 2003, paid $313,883
in taxes on 215,629 square feet
or $1.46 per square foot. Its
market value is $16,992,736.
Whoalil Why the discrep-
ancy in taxation? Is there some
rhyme or reason for the low
Wakulla tax rate to a store
that can well afford it? Please
do not use the "hiring local
residents" justification since
Tallahassee could use the same
excuse.
There are homeowners who


pay more per square foot than
this store. Shouldn't Wakulla
residents expect to receive
better? It sure would help the
county immensely if Wal-Mart
paid their fair share of taxes.
Did I misunderstand the idea
that everyone should be pay-
ing their fair share?
Can we expect more "fa-
vors" like this if Mike Stewart
is re-elected? Will he continue
to vote blindly for develop-
ment without reason?
Valerie LaHart
Ochlocknee Bay


sported Wakulla teachers


county teacher who
e privilege of know-
ler and seeing first-
Iministration of our
hool system. I am in
position of having
15 years in another
nty before moving
County.
15 years of teaching
how to teach and
ost every situation
:her experiences. I
15 years, butit was
teaching in Wakulla
t I came to feel that I
ssional who was re-


spected by my administrators.
Teaching has many high
moments and, conversely, other
moments that can quickly bring
you to your knees. I can't speak
for other teachers, but I know
from my experience that Mr.
Miller is available to support his
teachers whenever needed. Mr.
Miller treats his employees as
valued individuals as evidenced
by his recognition of them
both in and out of the school
setting.
Mr. Miller knows his
teaching staff. He knows our
strengths and weaknesses and


is always ready to say "good
jobl" Also, let us not forget that
Mr. Miller is on several state-
wide committees and proudly
represents Wakulla County
Public Schools.
Our Wakulla County school
system is one of the highest
rated in the state. This is a re-
sult of Mr. Miller's leadership.
I am proud to say that I
worked for David Miller and
he certainly has my vote on
Nov. 4.
Sherry Robinson
Crawfordville


Three women will be great addition to board


Editor, The News:
Some called it democracy in
action. They're referring to the
commissioners' special meet-
ing where they declared that
a state of emergency existed
in the county and that was
reason enough to repeal the
impact fee.
Soime say that the usual
group of people get up at these
meetings to voice pro or con
opinions. And there are others,
such as some of our democrati-
cally elected representatives,
who say that those voices have
no meaning or bearing on pro-
cedures because the citizens
elected them to carry on the
county's business. If only they
had done that in the past or two
weeks ago.
We've all seen it happen over
and over again. We've had com-
missioners who sit there with
deaf ears as citizen after citizen
opine about this or that.
But others go to these meet-
ings because they mistrust
those representatives. Just who
are they representing? All of
the people in the entire county
or just a few who can make
someone a big fat buck? If the
past 25 years are an example
of how democracy in action
works in Wakulla County then
it is obvious that citizens are
treated like dirt.
We have an opportunity
coming up in a few weeks to
open our eyes wide and see
what has been going on in the
great gamble with our tax dol-
lars. It starts locally and spreads
nationwide.
Voters need to reclaim the
county commission and all of
their local government. Anyone
claiming prior experience as a
county commissioner needs to

Thanks for

thinking

about us
Editor, The News:
The family of Ott Car-
raway would like to extend
a heartfelt thank you to ev-
eryone for their kindness,
sympathy, flowers and
food. We want to especially
thank Harvey-Young Funer-
al Home, Home Respiratory
Solutions, and the Wakulla
County Sheriff's Office.
Ott was a great man who
was well loved and will be
greatly missed. We love
.you, daddy.
Cecil Carraway,
Sheila Stephens,
Brenda Hutto,
Megan London,
Blake Carraway
Crawfordville


be rejected as a step backward., There's no turning back to those
Look at the record. Look, days when commissioners used


at what happened to citizens
during the past 20 years in this
democracy in action.
Ask yourself whether it is
right for citizens who want our
elected officials to follow the
law to, be threatened with ar-
rest inside the commissioners'
board room, or to be treated
like dirt instead of respectfully.


the law as a political weapon.
There are three dear choices
for a clean sweep in county
governance. All three happen
to be women running as inde-
pendent candidates with no
ties to any particular party. All
three are very qualified to lead
the county into a green and
respectful future,


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you exercise your right to select
who will respectfully represent
you and your community's
interest.
Madeleine H. Carr
Crawfordville


Wakulla does NOT

need intimidation
Editor, The News:
Imagine my surprise to read a guest column from
Commissioner Howard Kessler entitled, "Wakulla County
does need intimidation." Really?
It must have been a typographical error and perhaps
it was, but the irony of such an error can hardly be
overlooked,
Mr. Kessler's column begins by reciting a series of
anonymous tales directed at another elected official.
These stories are laced with statements that begin with,
"people told me" and "I've heard" and each goes on to
describe unacceptable acts of voter intimidation.
I, of course, strongly agree with Mr. Kessler that
nobody should ever be intimidated for voting for or
supporting the candidate of his or her choice. That is
our American birthright. I also agree with his right to
freely express his opinion and encourage everyone to be
involved, be vocal, and support whomever they choose
-- free of intimidation. On that we both agree.
But neither he nor I have the right to throw unfounded
anonymous aid "someone told me" allegations around
so carelessly and so maliciously.
To do so lends the appearance of a whisper campaign
of anonymous smears and unfounded allegations. For
sure, anyone can write, "someone told me that Howard
Kessler... (fill in the blank)." That may be how they con-
duct campaigns elsewhere, but let us hope that never
happens here in Wakulla County.
That type of faceless mud slinging doesn't serve our
community nor does it serve our democracy well. In fact,
this type of name calling smacks of the very kind of
intimidation we both deplore. That is why the obvious
typo in the headline of his column, "Wakulla County
does need intimidation" is so ironic.
And you are correct commissioner, too many men and
women died for our right to vote and to hold free and fair
elections. They also died for each of us to have the right
to free speech. But I believe with that freedom comes the
responsibility to not spread false rumors or unfounded
allegations. As we move forward into the thick of elec-
tion season, that too, is worth keeping in mind.

A.J. Smith
Retired Law Enforcement Chief
Apalachicola


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008 Page 5B


People


4-H club works with goats


Kapri Kid's 4-H Dairy Goat
Club held their first 4-H meet-
ing on Sept. 13. To start the
meeting off, the entire club
went to "Volunteer Wakulla"
at the livestock pavilion. Two
of the dairy goats came along,
for residents to see. The group
also handed out flyers about
our dub.
"Some of us judged cook-
ies and some of us just ate
cookies. They were really good
cookies. We got to see puppies
that C.H.A.T. brought down,"


said Caitlyn C. Weaver. "We
got to eat pizza and worked on
learning our 4-H pledges. We
finished our paperwork for the
new year and chose our new
officers."
The President is Kyle Weaver,
Vice-President is Emily Brown,
Secretary/Treasurer is Austin
Meadowcroft, Reporter/Histo-
rian is Caitlyn Weaver.
"We went outside with our
new co-leader Kaycee Meadow-
croft for a showmanship class.
We got our goats and learned


how to set them up for show-
ing," Caitlyn said. "It was really
fun."
The group is excited about
the North Florida Fair that is
coming up and each one of
the members can show eight
goats.
"We would like to thank
Priscilla Weaver for helping us
learn all about the goats and for -
getting all of this together for
us," she concluded.
Submitted by Caitlyn C.
Weaver, age 7.


* Krystal McCollum holds a horseshoe crab at the Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratory,
while Genna Knight points at the crab's underside.

Pana'Sea'ers 4-H club visits lab


Austin Meadowcroft, Kaycee Meadowcroft, Emily Brown, Kyle Weaver, Caitlyn Weaver


By DALTEN WOOD
4-H Club Member, Age 9
On Sept. 9, the 4-H club
held their meeting at the
Gulf Specimen Lab in Pana-
cea. Julia Knight, the club's
head volunteer works for
Jack Rudloe and set it up
to be a great time. She had
refreshments first.
Victor Spencer told us
about what we would see
as we entered the main lab.
That day we learned about
different types of crabs,


starfish, and even sponges.
Did you know you can cut a
sponge in a hundred pieces
and each piece is still a
living creature? We also
saw three nurse sharks,
octopuses, and even a sea
turtle. It was a blast for the
4-H club. We ala watched
the nurse sharks eat and
the 4-H club members


picked up horseshoe crabs.
I can't wait until the next
time we go to the marine
lab to visit all the little
sea creatures in the ocean.
Until then, I look forward
to learning lots of new
things at 4-H. I can't wait
until the next field trip.
Thanks Mrs. Julia. Photo
by Sharon Bijack.


Sopchoppy City Park will host Pow Wow


The Muskogee East of Wow. Daniel 'Vision Seeker'
the Mississippi Village of Thompson, Michele 'Shining
the Descendants will be Spirit' Thompson, Kenneth
sponsoring the second an- 'Single Feather' Allen, Rob-
nual Sopchoppy Intertribal ert 'Chief Owl' Robison and
Pow Wow from Friday, Sept. Cecil 'Fish Eagle' Robison
26 to Sunday, Sept. 28. The attended the most recent
event will take place from 10 school board meeting to
a.m. until 8 p.m. on Friday present the board a check
and Saturday and 9 a.m. to offset the expense of
until 5 p.m. on Sunday at sending the students to the
Sopchoppy City Park. Pow Wow.
ThJe family event will not The, list of.thespopnsors
allow alcohol drugs, weap-for' the school buses in-
ons or profanity. The public clude:-
is invited to attend along Wakulla Bank, Gulf State
with veterans and dancers. Bank, Florida Commerce
The event will feature Credit Union, Irinakiow
dancing, singing, storytell- Enterprises Certified and
ing, entertainment, crafts, Bonded Locksmiths and The
food and vendors. A tra- Village of the Descendants.
ditional Native American More: than 40 dancers
wedding will be held on will perform on Friday and
Saturday afternoon. Saturday. Veterans will also
On Friday students be honored on Friday and
will be attending the Pow Saturday.


Jeter graduates
Army National Guard Pfc. Da-
vid H. Jeter has graduated from
basic combat training at Fort
Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of
training, the soldier studied
many Army aspects. He is the son
of Dave Jeter of Crawfordville.


TorAL PEST CONTwROL


Susan Parker, Brent Thurmond and Mary Jo Wiles

Clerk honors work of employees


Clerk of the Court Brent Thur-
mond recognized employees Su-
san Parker and Mary Jo Wiles.
Parker and Wiles, both Dep-
uty Clerks, were recognized by
the clerk for achieving five years


Female dancers get ready to perform at the 2007 event.


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their valued service to the office
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4'H club works with goats


vo








Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008

NOTICE OF ELECTION

PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS TO BE VOTED ON NOVEMBER 4, 2008
I, Kurt S. Browning, Secretary of State of the State of Florida, do hereby give notice that an election will be held in each county in Florida,
on November 4, 2008, for the ratification or rejection of proposed amendments to the Constitution of the State of Florida.


No. 1
CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENT
ARTICLE 1, SECTION 2
(Legislative)

Ballot Title:
DECLARATION OF RIGHTS

Ballot Summary:
Proposing an amendment to the State
Constitution to delete provisions
authorizing the Legislature to regulate
or prohibit the ownership, inheritance,
disposition, and possession of real
property by aliens ineligible for
citizenship.

Full Text:

ARTICLE I
DECLARATION OF RIGHTS

SECTION 2. Basic rights.--All
natural persons, female and male
alike, are equal before the law and
have inalienable rights, among which
are the right to enjoy and defend
life and liberty, to pursue happiness,
to be rewarded for industry, and to
acquire, possess and protect property;-
except that the owner hil. inhic tamnc.


disposition and possession Uof ral
property by aliens ineligible for-
citizenship may be reg lated sor
prohibited by-law. No person shall b
deprived of any right because of race
religion, national origin, or physical
disability.

No. 2
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT'
ARTICLE I, NEW SECTION
(Initiative Petition)

Ballot Title:
FLORIDA MARRIAGE PROTEC-
TION AMENDMENT

Ballot Summary:
This amendment protects marriage as
the legal union of only one man and
one woman as husband and wife and
provides that no other legal union tha
is treated as marriage or the substan-
tial equivalent thereof shall be valid c
recognized.


Financial Impact Statement:
The direct financial impact this
amendment'will have on state and
local government revenues and
expenditures cannot be determined,
but is expected to be minor.

Full Text:

ARTICLE I, NEW SECTION
DIRLXIWTON bF RIG-HTS

Inasmuch asi marriage is the legal
union of only one man and one
woman as husband and wife, no othe
legal union that is treated as marriage
or the substantial equivalent thereof
,shall be valid or recognized.

'6."3 -" '
CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS 3 AND
ARTICLE XII, NEW SECTION
(Taxation and Budget Reform
Commission)

Ballot Title: "
CHANGES AND IMPROVEMENT
NOT AFFECTING THE ASSESSED
VALUE OF RESIDENTIAL REAL
PROPERTY

Ballot Summary:
Authorizes the Legislature, by
general law, to prohibit consideration
of changes or improvements to
residential real property which
increase resistance to wind damage
and installation of renewable
energy source devices as factors in
assessing the property's value for ad
valorem taxation purposes. Effective
upon adoption, repeals the existing
renewable energy source device
exemption no longer in effect.

Full Text:

ARTICLE VII
FINANCE AND TAXATION

* SECTION 3. Taxes;
exemptions.--
(a) All property owned by a
Smhunicipality and used exclusively b)
it for municipal or public purposes
shall be exempt from taxation. A
municipality, owning property outside
the municipality, may be required
by general law to make payment
to the taxing unit in which the
property is located. Such portions of
property as are used predominantly
for educational, literary, scientific,
religious or charitable purposes may
be exempted by general law from
taxation.
(b) There shall be exempt from
taxation, cumulatively, to every head
of a family residing in this state,
household goods and personal effect:
to the value fixed by general law,
not less than one thousand dollars,
and to every widow or widower or
person who is blind or totally and
permanently'disabled, property to the
value fixed by general law not less
than five hundred dollars.
(c) Any county or municipality
may, for the purpose of its respective
tax. levy and subject to the provisions
of this subsection and general law,
grant community and economic
development ad valorem tax
exemptions to new businesses and
expansions of existing businesses,
as defined by general law. Such
an exemption may be granted
only by ordinance of the county
or municipality, and only after the
electors of the county or municipality
voting on such question in a


referendum authorize the county or
municipality to adopt such ordinances.
An exemption so granted shall apply
to improvements to real property
made by or for the use of a new
business and improvements to real
property related to the expansion of
an existing business and shall also
apply to tangible personal property
of such new business and tangible
personal property related to the
expansion 6f an existing business.
The amount or limits of the amount
of such exemption shall be specified
by general law. The period of time for
which such exemption may be granted
to a new business or expansion of an
existing business shall be determined
by general law. The authority to grant
such exemption shall expire ten years
from the date of approval by the
electors of the county or municipality,
and may be renewable by referendum
as provided by general law.
(d) By general la and subject
to conditions specified flerein, ther-
may be granted an ad valu.- m ta
....exemption to a enable ene...gy
sa rce device and to real property onA
which such devi....e is installed and
operated, to the valu e fixea by genel
law not to exceed the original cost of


the devic, and for tm d pijtlud uft tm
fixed by general law nu t to exceed t en
years.
e L(e) Any county or municipality
, may, for the purpose of its respective
tax levy and subject to the provisions
of this subsectiodu and general
law, grant historic preservation ad
valorem tax exemptions to owners of
T historic properties. This exemption
may be granted only by ordinance
of the county or municipality. The
amount or limits of the amount of this
exemption and the requirements for
eligible properties must.be specified
by general law. The period of time
for which this exemption'may be
granted to a property owner shall be
s determined by general law.'
L(f) By general law and subject
to conditions specified therein,
at twenty-five thousand dollars of the
assessed value of property subject to
or tangible personal property tax stall be
exempt from ad valorem taxation.
SECTION 4. Taxation;
assessments--By general law
regulations shall be prescribed which
shall secure a just valuation of all
property for ad valorem taxation,
provided:
(a) Agricultural land, land
producing high water recharge to
Florida's aquifers, or land used
exclusively for noncommercial
recreational purposes may be
classified by general law and assessed
solely .oI.thebasisofcharac.ter.or use.
(6)' Piuiiant'i to general lw" a "
tangible personal property held for
sale as stock in trade and livestock
r may be valued for taxation at a
e specified percentage of its value, may
be classified for tax purposes, or may
be exempted from taxation.
(c) All persons entitled to a
homestead exemption under Section
6 of this Article shall have their
homestead assessed at just value as
4 of January 1 of the year following
the effective date of this amendment.
This assessment shall change only as
provided in this section herein.
(1) Assessments subject to this
&h2S&fB provision shall be changed
S annually on January 1st of each year;
3 but those changes in assessments shall
not exceed the lower of the following:
a. Three percent (3%) of the
assessment for the prior year.
b. The percent change in the
Consumer Price Index for all urban
n consumers, U.S. City Average, all
items 1967= 100, or successor reports
for the preceding calendar year as
initially reported by the United States
Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor
Statistics.
(2) No assessment shall exceed
just value.
(3) After any change of
ownership, as provided by general
law, homestead property shall be
assessed at just value as of January
1 of the following year, unless the
provisions of paragraph (8) apply.
Thereafter, the homestead shall be
assessed as provided in this subsection
herein.
(4) New homestead property
shall be assessed at just value as of
January 1st of the year following
y the establishment of the homestead,
unless the provisions of paragraph
(8) apply. That assessment shall only
le change as provided in this snhsection
herein.
(5) Changes, additions,
reductions, or improvements
to homestead property shall be
assessed as provided for by general
law; provided, however, after the
adjustment for any change, addition,
reduction, or improvement, the
property shall be assessed as provided
in this suhsectinn herein.
I (6) In the event of a termination
of homestead status, the property shall
s be assessed as provided by general
law.
(7) The provisions of this
amendment are severable. If any of
the provisions of this amendment shall
e be held unconstitutional by any court
of competent jurisdiction, the decision
of such court shall not affect or impair
any remaining provisions of this
amendment.
s (8)a. A person who establishes a
new homestead as of January 1, 2009,
or January I of any subsequent year
and who has received a homestead
exemption pursuant to Section 6
of this Article as of January I of
either of the two years immediately
preceding the establishment of the
new homestead is entitled to have the
new homestead assessed at less than
y just value. If this revision is approved
in January of 2008, a person who


establishes a new homestead as of
January 1, 2008, is entitled to have the
new homestead assessed at less than
just value only if that person received
a homestead exemption on January
1, 2007. The assessed value of the
newly established homestead shall be
determined as follows:
1. If the just value of the new
homestead is greater than or equal to
the just value of the prior homestead
as of January 1 of the year in which
the prior homestead was abandoned,
the assessed value of the new
homestead shall be the just value of
the new homestead minus an amount
equal to the lesser of $500,000 or
the difference between the just value
and the assessed value of the prior
homestead as of January 1 of the year
in which the prior homestead was
abandoned. Thereafter, the homestead
shall be assessed as provided i& ,
s &hsgctin herein.
2. If the just value of the new
homestead is less than the just value of
the prior homestead as of January 1 of
the year in which the prior homestead
was abandoned, the assessed value of
the new homestead shall be equal to
the just value of the new homestead
divided by the just value of the prior
homestead and multiplied by the
assessed value of the prior homestead.
However, if the difference between
the just value of the new homestead
and the assessed value of the new
homestead calculated pursuant to
this sub-subparagraph is greater than
$500,000, the assessed value of the
new homestead shall be increased so
that the difference between the just
value and the assessed value equals
$500,000. Thereafter, the homestead
shall be assessed as provided jmj,
AhQa herein.
b. By general law and subject
to conditions specified therein,
the Legislature shall provide for
application of this paragraph to
property owned by more than one
person.
(d) The legislature may, by
general law, for assessment purposes
and subject to the provisions of
this subsection, allow counties
and municipalities to authorize by
ordinance that historic property may
be assessed solely on the basis of
character or use. Such character or
use assessment shall apply only to the
jurisdiction adopting the ordinance.
The requirements for eligible
properties must be specified by
general law.
(e) A county may, in the manner
prescribed by general law, provide for
a reduction in the assessed value of
homestead property to the extent of
any. increase in.the assessed value of
thai proper ,%hich resulis frorn the
construction or reconstruction of the
property for the purpose of providing
living quarters for one or more natural
or adoptive grandparents or parents
of the owner of the property or of the
owner's spouse if at least one of the
grandparents\or parents for whom
the living quarters are provided is 62
years of age or older. Such a reduction
may not exceed the lesser of the
following:
(1) The increase in assessed
value resulting from construction or
reconstruction of the property.
(2) Twenty percent of the total
assessed value of the Property as
improved.
(f) For all levies other than
school district levies, assessments of
residential real property, as defined
by general law, which contains nine
units or fewer and which is ri9t subject
to the assessment limitations'set
forth in subsections (a) through (c)
shall change only as provided in this
subsection.
(1) Assessments subject to this
subsection shall be changed annually
on the date of assessment provided-by
law; but, those changes in assessments
shall not exceed ten percent (10%) of.
the assessment for the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall exceed
just value.
(3) After a change of ownership
or control, as defined by general law,
including any change of ownership of
a legal entity that owns the property,
such property shall be assessed at
just value as of the next assessment
date. Thereafter, such property
shall be assessed as provided in this
subsection.'
(4) Changes, additions,
reductions, or improvements to such
property shall be assessed as provided
for by general law; however, after the
adjustment for any change, addition,
reduction, or improvement, the
property shall be assessed as provided
in this subsection.
(g) For all levies other than
school district levies, assessments
of real property that is not subject to
the assessment limitations set forth
in subsections (a) through (c) and (f)
shall change only as provided in this
subsection.
(1) Assessments subject to this
subsection shall be changed annually
on the date of assessment provided by
law; but those changes in assessments
shall not exceed ten percent (10%) of
the assessment for the prior year. .
(2) No assessment shall exceed
just value.
(3) The legislature must provide
that such property shall be assessed


at just value as of the next assessment
date after a qualifying improvement,
as defined by general law, is made
to such property. Thereafter, such
property shall be assessed as provided
in this subsection.
(4) The legislature may provide
that such property shall be assessed
at just value as of the next assessment
date after a change of ownership or
control, as defined by general law,
including any change of ownership
of the legal entity that owns the


property. Thereafter, such property
shall be assessed as provided in this
subsection.
(5) Changes, additions,
reductions, or improvements to such
property shall be assessed as provided
for by general law; however, after the
adjustment for any change, addition,
reduction, or improvement, the
property, shall be assessed as provided
in this subsection.
(hI} The legislature byhv general
law and subhiect tn conditions snecified
therein, may nrohibit the consideration
of the following in the determination
of the assessed value of real nronertv
used for residential numoses
(1 Any chance or imnrovement
made for the numose of imnrovine the
nronertv's resistance to wind damage
(21 The installation of a
renewable energv source device

ARTICLE XII
SCHEDULE

Limitation on the assessed value
of real nronertv used for residential

(al The renal of the renewahle
energy source nronertv tax exemption
in Section of Article VII shall take
effect nnon annroval hv the voters.
(h) The amendment to Section
4 of Article VII authorizing the
legislature to nrohihit an increase in
the assessed value of real nronertv
used for residential numnoes as the
result of imnroving the nronertv's
resistance to wind damage or
installing a renewable energy source
device shall take effect January 1_


No. 4
CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS 3 AND 4
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 28
(Taxation and Budget Reform
Commission)

Ballot Title:
PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION
OF PERPETUALLY CONSERVED
LAND; CLASSIFICATION AND
ASSESSMENT OF LAND USED
FOR CONSERVATION



Ballot Summary:
Requires Legislature .to provide
a property tax exemption for
real property encumbered by
perpetual conservation easements
or other perpetual conservation
protections, defined by general law.
Requires Legislature to provide for
classification and assessment of land"
used toronservatoln purposes, and
not perpetually encumbered, solely on
the basis of character or use. Subjects
assessment benefit to conditions,
limitations, and reasonable definitions
established by general law. Applies to
property taxes beginning in 2010.

Full Text:

ARTICLE VII
FINANCE AND TAXATION

SECTION 3. Taxes; exemptions.-

(a) All property owned by a
municipality and used exclusively by
it for municipal or public purposes
shall be exempt from taxation.
A municipality, owning property
outside the municipality, may be
required by general law to make
payment to the taxing unit in which
the property is located. Such portions
of property as are used predominantly
for educational, literary, scientific,
religious or charitable purposes may
be exempted by general law from
taxation.
(b) There shall be exempt from
taxation, cumulatively, to every head
of a family residing in this state,
household goods and personal effects
to the value fixed by general law,
\not less than one thousand dollars,
and to every widow or widower or
person who is blind or totally and
permanently disabled, property to the
value fixed by general law not less
than five hundred dollars.
'(c) Any county or municipality
may, for the purpose of its
respective tax levy and subject to
the provisions of this subsection
and general law, grant community
and economic development ad
valorem tax exemptions to new
businesses and expansions of existing
businesses, as defined by general
law. Such an exemption may be
granted only by ordinance of the
county or municipality, and only
after the electors of the county or
municipality voting on such question
in a referendum authorize the
county or municipality to adopt such
ordinances. An exemption so granted
shall apply to improvements to real
property made by or for the use of a
new business and improvements to
real property related to the expansion
of an existing business and shall also
apply to tangible personalproperty
of such new business and tangible
personal property related to'the
expansion of an existing business.
The amount or limits of the amount
of such exemption shall be specified
by general law. The period of time


for which such exemption may
be granted to a new business or
expansion of an existing business
shall be determined by general
law. The authority to grant such \
exemption shall expire ten years from
the date of approval by the electors
of the county or municipality, and
may be renewable by referendum as
provided by general law.
(d) By general law and subject
to conditions specified therein, there
may be granted an ad valorem tax


exemption to a renewable energy
source device and to real property
on which such device is installed
and operated, to the value fixed by
general law not to exceed the original
cost of the device, and for the period
of time fixed by general law not to
exceed ten years.
(e) Any county or municipality
may, for the purpose of its respective
tax levy and subject to the provisions
of this subsection and general
law, grant historic preservation ad
valorem tax exemptions to owners of
historic properties. This exemption
may be granted only by ordinance
of the county or municipality. The
amount or limits of the amount of this
exemption and the requirements for
eligible properties must be specified
by general law, The period of time
for which this exemption may be
granted to a property owner shall be
determined by general law.
(f) By general law and subject to
conditions specified therein, twenty-
five thousand dollars of the assessed
value of property subject to tangible
personal property tax shall be exempt
from ad valorem taxation.
(g) There shall he granted an
ad valorem tax exemntion for real
nronertv dedicated in nemehiuitv for
conservation nurnoses. including real
nronerty encumbered hv nmerntual
conservation easements or bv other
nernetnal conservation nrotections. as
defined hv general law:
SECTION 4. Taxation;
assessments.--By general law .
regulations shall be prescribed which
shall secure a just valuation of all
property for ad valorem taxation,
provided:
(a) Agricultural land, land
producing high water recharge to
Florida's aquifers, or land used
exclusively for noncommercial
recreational purposes may be
classified by general law and assessed
solely on the basis of character or
use.
(h) As provided byv general law
and subient to conditions, limitations.
and reasonable definitions snecified
therein land used for conservation
nrnoses shall he classified bv
general law and assessed solely on
the basis of character or use.
L(b) Pursuant to general law
tangible personal property held for
sale as stock in trade and livestock
may be valued for taxation at a
specified percentage of its value, may
be classified for tax purposes, or may
be exempted from taxation.
W(c) All persons entitled to a
homestead exemption under Section
6 of this Article shall have their
honsestead.a.sess'd .at jt.t value as
ofJanufiary T ofthe ear follow mg "
the effective date of this amendment.
This assessment shall change only as
provided herein.
(1) Assessments subject to this
provision shall be changed annually
on January 1st of each year; but those
changes in assessments shall not
exceed the lower of the following:
a. Three percent (3%) of the
assessment for the prior year.
b. The percent change in the
Consumer Price Index for all urban
consumers, U.S. City Average, all
items 1967= 100, or successor reports
for the preceding calendar year as
initially reported by the United States
Department of Labor, Bureau of
'Labor Statistics.
(2) No assessment shall exceed
just value.
(3) After any change of
ownership, as provided by general
law, homestead property shall be
assessed at just value as of January
1 of the following year, unless the
provisions of paragraph (8) apply.
Thereafter, the homestead shall be
assessed as provided herein.
(4) New homestead property
shall be assessed at just value, as of
January 1st of the year following
therestablishment of the homestead,
unless the provisions of paragraph
(8) apply. That assessment shall only
change as provided herein.
(5) Changes, additions,
reductions, or improvements
to homestead property shall be
assessed as provided for by general
law; provided, however, after the
adjustment for any change, addition,
reduction, or improvement, the
property shall be assessed as provided
herein.
(6) In the event of a termination '
of homestead status, the property
shall be assessed as provided by
general law.
(7) The provisions of this
amendment are severable. If any of
the provisions of this amendment
shall be held unconstitutional by any
court Of competent jurisdiction, the
decision of such court shall not affect
or impair any remaining provisions of
this amendment.
(8)a. A person who establishes a
new homestead as of January 1, 2009,
or January 1 of any subsequent year
and who has received a homestead
exemption pursuant to Section 6
of this Article as of January 1 of
either of the two years immediately
preceding the establishment of the
new homestead is entitled to have the
new homestead assessed at less than
just value. If this revision is approved
in January of 2008, a person who


establishes a new homestead as of
January 1, 2008, is entitled to have
the new homestead assessed at less
than just value only if that person
received a homestead exemption on
January 1, 2007. The assessed value
of the newly established homestead
shall be determined as follows:
1. If the just value of the new
homestead is greater than or equal to
Athe just value of the prior homestead
as of January I of the year in which
the prior homestead was abandoned,


the assessed value of the new
homestead shall be the just value of
the new homestead minus an amount
equal to the lesser of $500,000 or
the difference between the just value
and the assessed value of the prior
homestead as of January 1 of the year
in which the prior homestead was
abandoned. Thereafter, the homestead
shall be assessed as provided herein.
2. If the just value of the new
homestead is less than the just
value of the prior homestead as of
January 1 of the year in which the
prior homestead was abandoned, the
assessed value of the new homestead
shall be equal to the just value of
the new homestead divided by the
just value of the prior homestead
and multiplied by the assessed value
of the prior homestead. However,
if the difference between the just
value of the new homestead and
the assessed value of the new
homestead calculated pursuant to
this sub-subparagraph is greater than
$500,000, the assessed value of the
new homestead shall be increased so
that the difference between the just
value and the assessed value equals
$500,000. Thereafter, the homestead
shall be assessed as provided herein.
b. By general law and subject
to conditions specified therein,
the Legislature shall provide for
application of this paragraph to
property owned by more than one
person.
L1(d) The legislature may, by
general law, for assessment purposes
and subject to the provisions of
this subsection, allow counties
and municipalities to authorize by
ordinance that historic property
may be assessed solely on the basis
of character or use. Such character
or use assessment shall apply only
to the jurisdiction adopting the
ordinance. The requirements for
eligible properties must be specified
by general law.
.~a(e) A county may, in the
manner prescribed by general
law, provide for a reduction in the
assessed value of homestead property
to the extent of any increase in the
assessed value of that property
which results from the construction
or reconstruction of the property
for the purpose of providing living
quarters for one or more natural or
adoptive grandparents or parents of
the owner of the property or of the
owner's spouse if at least one of the
grandparents or parents for whom
the living quarters are provided is
62 years of age or older. Such a
reduction may not exceed the lesser
of the following:
(1) The increase in assessed,
value resultifig'fr-iom construction or
reconstruction of the property.
(2) Twenty percent of the total
assessed value of the property as
improved.
g&(f) For all levies other than
school district levies, assessments of
residential real property, as defined
by general law, which contains nine
units or fewer and which is not
subject to the assessment limitations
set forth in subsections (a) through
d(c) shall change only as provided
in this subsection.
(1) Assessments subject to this
subsection shall be changed annually
on the date of assessment provided by
law; but those changes in assessments
shall not exceed ten percent (10%) of
the assessment for the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall exceed
just value.
(3) After a change of ownership
or control, as defined by general law,
including any change of ownership of
a legal entity that owns the property,
such property shall be assessed at
just value as of the next assessment
date. Thereafter, such property
shall be assessed as provided in this
subsection.
(4) Changes, additions,
reductions, or improvements to such
property shall be assessed as provided
for by general law; however, after the
adjustment for any change, addition,
reduction, or improvement, the
property shall be assessed as provided
in this subsection.
h(g) For all levies other than
school district levies, assessments
of real property that is not subject to
the assessment limitations set forth
in subsections (a) through f(c) and
,(-f) shall change only as provided
in this subsection.
(1) Assessments subject to
this subsection shall be changed
annually on the date of assessment
provided by law; but those changes
in assessments shall not exceed ten
percent (10%) of the'assessment for
the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall exceed
just value.
(3) The legislature must
provide that such property shall
be assessed at just value as of
the next assessment date after a
qualifying improvement, as defined
by general law, is made to such
property. Thereafter, such property
shall be assessed as provided in this
subsection.
(4) The legislature may
provide that such property shall be
assessed at just value as of the next
assessment date after a change of
ownership or control, as defined by


general law, including any change
of ownership of the legal entity
that owns the property. Thereafter,
such property shall be assessed as
provided in this subsection.
(5) Changes, additions,
reductions, or improvements to such
property shall be assessed as provided
for by general law; however, after the
adjustment for any change, addition,
reduction, or improvement, the
property shall be assessed as provided
in this subsection.






THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008 Page 7B

NOTICE OF ELECTION

PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS TO BE VOTED ON NOVEMBER 4, 2008
I, Kurt S. Browning, Secretary of State of the State of Florida, do hereby give notice that an election will be held in each county in Florida,
on November 4, 2008, for the ratification or rejection of proposed amendments to the Constitution of the State of Florida.


ARTICLE XII
SCHEDULE

SECTION 2S. Pronertv tax
exemntion and classification
and assessment of land used
for connservation nnmnses The
amendment to Section 3 of Article
VII requiring the creation of an
ad valorem tax exemption for real
nronertv dedicated in nermetitv
for conservation nurnoses and
the amendment to Section 4 of
Article VII remliring land used for
conservation numnses to he classified
bv general law and assessed solely
on the hasis of character or use for
numnoses of ad valorem taxation.
shall take effect uinnn annroval byhv the
electors and shall he implemented
hv January 1. 2010. This section
shall take effect unon annroval of the
electors


No. 6
CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 4
ARTICLE XII, NEW SECTION
(Taxation and Budget Reform
Commission)

Ballot Title:

ASSESSMENT OF WORKING
WATERFRONT PROPERTY
BASED UPON CURRENT USE


Ballot Summary:
Provides for assessment based upon
use of land used predominantly
for commercial fishing purposes;
land used for vessel launches
into waters that are navigable and
accessible to the public; marinas
and drystacks that are open to the
public; and water-dependent marine
manufacturing facilities, commercial
fishing facilities, and marine vessel
construction and repair facilities
and their support activities, subject
to conditions, limitations, and
reasonable definitions specified by
general law.

Full Text:

ARTICLE VII
FINANCE AND TAXATION

SECTION 4. Taxation;
assessments.--By general law
regulations shall be prescribed which
shall secure a just valuation of all
property for ad valorem taxation,
provided:
(a' Agricutural lnidlknd '
producing high water recharge to
Florida's aquifers, or land used
exclusively for noncommercial
recreational purposes may be


classified by general law and assessed
solely on the basis of character or
use.
(b) Pursuant to general law
tangible personal property held for
sale as stock in trade and livestock
may be valued for taxation at a
specified percentage of its value, may
be classified for tax purposes, or may
be exempted from taxation.
(c) All persons entitled to a
homestead exemption under Section
6 of this Article shall have their
homestead assessed at just value as
of January 1 of the year following
the effective date of this amendment.
This assessment shall change only as
provided herein.
(1) Assessments subject to this
provision shall be changed annually
on January 1st of each year; but those
changes in assessments shall not
exceed the lower of the following:
(a.) Three percent (3%) of the
assessment for the prior year.
(b.) The percent change in the
Consumer Price Index for all urban
consumers, U.S. City Average, all
items 1967=100, or successor reports
for the preceding calendar year as
initially reported by the United States
Department of Labor, Bureau of
Labor Statistics.
(2) No assessment shall exceed
just value.
(3) After any change of
ownership, as provided by general
law, homestead property shall be
assessed at just value as of January
1 of the following year, unless the
provisions of paragraph (8) apply.
Thereafter, the homestead shall be
assessed as provided herein.
(4) New homestead property
shall be assessed at just value as of
January 1st of the year following
the establishment of the homestead,
unless the provisions of paragraph
(8) apply. That assessment shall only
change as provided herein.
(5) Changes, additions,
reductions, or improvements
to homestead property shall be
assessed as provided for by general
law; provided, however, after
the adjustment for any change,
addition, reduction, or improvement,
the property shall be assessed as
provided herein.
(6) In the event of a termination
of homestead status, the property
shall be assessed as provided by
general law.
(7) The provisions of this
amendment are severable. If any of
the provisions of this amendment
shall be held unconstitutional by any
court of competent jurisdiction, the
decision f such court shal not affect
or impa3r any remaining pro, visions ub
of this amendment
(8)a. A person who establishes
a new homestead as of January
1, 2009, or January 1 of any


subsequent year and who has
received a homestead exemption
pursuant to Section 6 of this Article
as of January 1 of either of the two
years immediately preceding the
establishment of the new homestead
is entitled to have the new homestead
assessed at less than just value. If
this revision is approved ip January
of 2008, a person who establishes
a new homestead as of January 1,
2008, is entitled to have the new
homestead assessed at less than just
value only if that person received a
homestead exemption on January
1, 2007. The assessed value of the
newly established homestead shall be
determined as follows:
(1.) If the just value of the new
homestead is greater than or equal to
the just value of the prior homestead
as of January 1 of the year in which
the prior homestead was abandoned,
the assessed value of the new
homestead shall be the just value of
the new homestead minus an amount
equal to the lesser of $500,000 or
the difference between the just value
and the assessed value of the prior
homestead as of January 1 of the year
in which the prior homestead was
abandoned. Thereafter, the homestead
shall be assessed as provided herein.
(2.) If the just value of the
new homestead is less than the just
value of the prior homestead as of
January 1 of the year in which the
prior homestead was abandoned, the
assessed value of the new homestead
shall be equal to the just value of
the new homestead divided by the
just value of the prior homestead
and multiplied by the assessed value
of the prior homestead. However,
if the difference between the just
value of the new homestead and
the assessed value of the new
homestead calculated pursuant to
this sub-subparagraph is greater than
$500,000, the assessed value of the
new homestead shall be increased so
that the difference between the just
value and the assessed value equals
$500,000. Thereafter, the homestead
shall be assessed as provided herein.
(b.) By general law and subject
to conditions specified therein,
the Legislature shall provide for
application of this paragraph to
property owned by more than one
person.
(d) The legislature may, by
general law, for assessment purposes
and subject to the provisions of
this subsection, allow counties
and municipalities to authorize by
ordinance that historic property
may be assessed solely on the basis
of character or uise. Such-character
or use assessm6 ft shall apple' oAil)
to the jurisdiction adopting thie
ordinance. The requirements for
eligible properties must be specified
by general law.


(e) A county may, in the manner
prescribed by general law, provide
for a reduction in the assessed
value of homestead property to
the extent of any increase in the
assessed value of that property
which results from the construction
or reconstruction of the property
for the purpose of providing living
quarters for one or more natural or
adoptive grandparents or parents of
the owner of the property or of the
owner's spouse if at least one of the
grandparents or parents for whom
the living quarters are provided is
62 years of age or older. Such a
reduction may not exceed the lesser
of the following:
(1) The increase in assessed
value resulting from construction or
reconstruction of the property.
(2) Twenty percent of the total
assessed value of the property as
improved.
(f) For all levies other than
school district levies, assessments of
residential real property, as defined
by general law, which contains nine
units or fewer and which is not
subject to the assessment limitations
set forth in subsections (a) through
(c)'shall change only as provided in
this subsection.
(1) Assessments subject to
this subsection shall be changed
annually on the date of assessment
provided by law; but those changes
in assessments shall not exceed ten
percent (10%) of the assessment for
the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall exceed
just value.
(3) After a change of ownership
or control, as defined by general law,
including any change of ownership of
a legal entity that owns the property,
such property shall be assessed at
just value as of the next assessment
date. Thereafter, such property
shall be assessed as provided in this
subsection.
(4) Changes, additions,
reductions, or improvements to
such property shall be assessed
as provided for by general law;
however, after the adjustment for
any change, addition, reduction, or
improvement, the property shall
be assessed as provided in this
subsection.
(g) For all levies other than
school district levies, assessments
of real property that is not subject to
the assessment limitations set forth
in subsections (a) through (c) and (f);
shall change only as provided in this
subsection.
(1) Assessments subject to
this subsection shall be changed
annually on the date of assessment
provided by law; but those chafiges
in assessments shall not exceed ten
percent (10%) of the assessment for
the prior year.


(2) No assessment shall exceed
just value.
(3) The legislature must provide
that such property shall be assessed
at just value as of the next assessment
date after a qualifying improvement,
as defined by general law, is made
to such property. Thereafter, such
property shall be assessed as
provided in this subsection.
(4) The legislature may provide
that such property shall be assessed
at just value as of the next assessment
date after a change of ownership or
control, as defined by general law,
including any change of ownership
of the legal entity that owns the
property. Thereafter, such property
shall be assessed as provided in this
subsection.
(5) Changes, additions,
reductions, or improvements to
such property shall be assessed
as provided for by general law;
however, after the adjustment for
any change, addition, reduction, or
improvement, the property shall
be assessed as provided in this
subsection.
(hV11 The assessment of the
following working waterfront
nronerties shall he based unnon the
current use of the nronertvy
a I.and used nredominantly for
commercial fishing nnrposes
h. Land that is accessible to the
nuhlic and used for vessel launches
into waters that are navigable
c Marinas and drvstacks that are
onen to the nnhlic.
d Water-denendent marine
manufacturing facilities commercial
fishing facilities and marine vessel '
construction and renair facilities and
their sunnnrt activities.
(21 The assessment benefit
provided by this subhsection is subject
to conditions and limitations and
reasonable definitions as snecified hv
the legislature by general law.

ARTICLE XII
SCHEDULE

Assessment of working
waterfront nronertv --The amendment
to Section 4 of Article VII providing
for the assessment of working
waterfront nrnnertv based on current
use. and this section shall take effect
uon annroval hvy the electors and
shall first anlyv to assessments for
tax years beginning January 1 201"0


No. 8
CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 9
(Taxation and Budget Refprm
Commission)

Ballot Title:
LOCAL OPTION COMMUNITY


COLLEGE FUNDING.


Ballot Summary:
Proposing an amendment to the
State Constitution to require that the
Legislature authorize counties to levy
a local option sales tax-to supplement
community college funding;
requiring voter approval to levy the
tax; providing that approved taxes
will sunset after 5 years and may be
reauthorized by the voters.,

Full Text:

ARTICLE VII
FINANCE AND TAXATION
SECTION 9. Local taxes.--
(a) Counties, school districts,
and municipalities shall, and special
districts may, be authorized by law
to levy ad valorem taxes and may
be authorized by general law to
levy other taxes, for their respective
purposes, except ad valorem taxes
on intangible personal property and
taxes prohibited by this constitution.
(b) Ad valorem taxes, exclusive
of taxes levied for the payment of
bonds and taxes levied for periods
not longer than two years when
authorized by vote of the electors
who are the owners of freeholds
therein not wholly exempt from
taxation, shall not be levied in excess
of the following villages upon the
assessed value of real estate and
tangible personal property; for all
county purposes, ten mills; for all
municipal purposes, ten mills; for
all school purposes, ten mills; for
water management purposes for the
northwest portion of the state lying
west of the line between ranges.-
two and three east, 0.05 mill; for
water management purposes for
the remaining portions of the state,
1.0 mill; and for all other special
districts a millage authorized by law
approved by vote of the electors
who are owners of freeholds therein
not wholly exempt from taxation. A
county furnishing municipal services
may, to the extent authorized by law,
levy additional taxes within the limits
fixed for municipal purposes.
(c1 Cnunties served by an
onen-access nnhlic institution whose
nrimarv mission
and responsibility includes nrovidina
lower level undergraduate instruction
and awarding associate degrees shall
he authorized by law to levy a local
onion sales tax to sunnlement the
fimunding of the institution. The tax
may not he levied unless annmroved hv
the electors of each county served hy
the instigti6on The 4 locath uion'ta"
he reauthorided hv the electors as
nrnvided hv law


The Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce

will host a


for individuals seeking office during the Nov. 4 General Election.
The event will be open to the public

1 Thursday, Oct. 23, from 7 p.m. to 9s30 p.m.

r. i H at the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center,


A. A




4


omw Im


33 Michael Drive in Crawfordville.

"This community forum will provide an opportunity for our
citizens to come see, hear and meet the more than 17 candidates
for seven publc offices in our county," said David Buckridge,
President of the Wakulla Chamber of Commerce.


I

ad


Ti

Scott


Positions and Their Candidates Include
Individuals running for office in the General Election will be joined
by the winners ,of the Aug. 26 primary.

Supervisor of Superintendent

Elections of Schools
raci Cash, Doug Jones, Dr. Andrea Carter

Langston, Charles Prout David Miller

and Buddy Wells.

Sheriff VOTE Property Appraiser

Charlie Creel Anne Ahrendt

David Harvey Donnie Sparkman


District 1

Alan Broc


* Jenny Broc


County Commission Seats

I District 3 D

k Jimmie Doyle L

k Mike Stewart Jir

"These elections will help guide the future of
our county for years to come," said Buckridge. "It's
important that people know who they are voting for."


district 5

ynn Artz

n Stokley


The event will be jointly hosted by

a S

Quimb of Comernm c

Ib Waktullaea Aeus is a promotional sponsor of the event.
For more information, call the chamber office at 926-1848.


A4








I


*


Changed


Ji[


LVA- 50







Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008


Deadline





11:00 CLASlfIED
926-7102


35 Cents

A fPer Word


ADS $8.00
Minimum


Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


CATEGORIES
100 EMPLOYMENT
105 Business Opportunities
110 Help Wanted
115 Work Wanted
120 Services and Businesses
125 Schools and Instruction
130 Entertainment
200 ITEMS FOR SALE
205 Antiques
210 Auctions ,0
215 Auto Parts and Accessories
220 Cars
225 Trucks
230 Motor Homes and Campers
235 Motorcycles and 4-Wheelers
240 Boats and Motors
245 Personal Watercraft ;.
250 Sporting Goods .
255 Guns
260 Business Equipment
265 Computers and Internet
270 Electronics
275 Home Furnishings


280 Home Appliances
285 Jewelry
290 Musical Instruments
295 Building Materials
300 MISC. FOR SALE
305 Machinery, Tools & Equipment
310 Firewood Products
315 Farm & Garden Equipment
320 Farm Products & Produce
325 Horses
330 Livestock, Farm Animals
335 Pets
340 Plants
345 Swap, Barter, Trade
350 Wanted to Buy
355 Yard Sales
400 NOTICES
410 Free Items
415 Announcements
420 Card of Thanks
425 Occasion Cards
430 In Memoriam
435 Lost and Found
440 Personals and Notices


500 REAL ESTATE, HOMES, MOBILES
505 Acreage for Lease
510 Acreage for Sale
515 Apartments for Rent
520 Townhouses for Rent
525 Townhouses for Sale
530 Commercial Property for Rent
535 Commercial Property for Sale
540 Farms for Sale
545 Homes for Sale
550 Homes with Acreage for Sale
555 Houses for Rent
560 Land for Sale
565 Mobile Homes for Rent L :iq
570 Mobile Homes for Sale
575 Mobile Homes with Land for Sale
580 Rooms for Rent/Roommates Wanted
585 Wanted to Rent
590 Waterfront Homes/Land for Sale
595 Vacation Rental


CALL 926-7102 TODAY
Email: classifieds@thewakullanews.net


Legal Notice


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-00113F
DIVISION:
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COM-
PANY AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING
AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS
OF APRIL 1, 2007 SECURITIZED ASSET
BACKED RECEIVABLES LLC TRUST
2007-8R2 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-BR2,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MATTHEW CROUSE, et al,
Oefendant(s).


NOTICE OF ACTION
RACHEL SHANNON ERVIN
F/K/A SHANNON CROUSE
Last Known Address:
82 Broad Street
New London, CT 06320
Current Address:
Unknown
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFEN-
DANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN.
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following property in
Wakula Count, Florida:
LOT 95, THE HAMMOCKS, PHASE 1, AC-
CORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
4 AT PAGES 44 AND 45, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA.
A/K/A 53 JUNIPER DRIVE, CRAWFORD-
VILLE, FL 32327
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses.within 30 days after the first publica-
tion, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff's attor-
ney, whose address Is P.O. Box 23028,
Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with
this Court either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against you for the re-
lief demanded in the Complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court
on this 18 day of August, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -S- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
In accordance with the Americans With Dis-
abilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact Court Administra-
t at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville,
Florida 32328, telephone (904) 926-0905, not
later than seven (7) days prior to the pro-
ceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD)
1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.
September 18, 25, 2008




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 08-40-FC
AURORA LOAN SERVICES LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
AURORA MARRERO, et al.,
Defendantss.

NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the
Final Judgment entered In this case now
pending In said Court, the style of which Is In-
dicated above.
I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse at
3056 Crawfordvltle, Florida 32327, on the 16th
day of October, 2008, at 11:00 a.m., the fol-
lowing described property as set forth in said
Order or Finai Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 25 AND THE WEST HALF OF LOT 26,
BLOCK 14 GREINERS ADDITION TO
CRAWFORDVILLE, ACCORDING TO THE
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON, CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN
THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
ORDERED AT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA, this 15th day of September, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -S- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
September 25, October 2,2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 08-59-FC
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. F/K/A
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROGER D. RANKIN, II, et al.,
Defendantss),

NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order or Final Judgment Scheduling Foreclo-
sure Sale entered on September 9, 2008 in
this case now pending In said Court, the style
of which is indicated above.
I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash in the WAKULLA County Courthouse,
3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327 at 11:00 a.m., on the 9th day of
October, 2008, the following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Order or Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:
LOT 22, BLOCK "J" OF SONGBIRD, PHASE
II, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3,
PAGES 113-116 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
a/k/a: 78 MEADOWLARK DRIVE, CRAW-
FORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN
THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
ENTERED at WAKULLA County, Florida, this
15th day of SEPTEMBER, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -S- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
September 25, October 2, 2008

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
iN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY /
CASE NO.: 2007 CA 000148
DIVISION #:
UNC:
D eutsch Bank National Trust Company, as
trustee for the registered holders of Sound-
veiw Home Loan Trust 2006 EQ2
Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-EQ2
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Martistia Russ and Alicia Russ, Husband and
Wife: Mortgage Electronic Registration Sys-
tems, Inc., as nominee for Equifirst Corpora-
tion; Unknown Parties in Possession #1; Un-
known Parties in Possession #2; If living, and
all Unknown Parties claiming by through, un-
der and against the above named
Defendants) who are not known to be dead or
alive, whether said Unknown Parties may
claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees,
Grantees, or Other Claimants
Defendant(s).

AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated
September 5, 2008, entered in Civil Case No.
2007 CA 000148 of the Circuit Court of the
2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County,
Florida, wherein Deutsche Bank National
Trust Company, as trustee for the registered
holders of Soundview Home Loan Trust 2006
EQ2 Assett-Backed Certificates, Series
2006-EQ2, Plaintiff and Martistia Russ and
Alicia Russ, Husband and Wife are
defendantss, I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash, AT THE FRONT DOOR OF
THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY
319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA AT 11:00
a.m., October 9, 2008, the following described
property as set forth In said Final Judgment, to
wit:
THE EAST 1/2 OF LOT 11 AND ALL OF LOT
10, BLOCK "H" OF MAGNOLIA GARDENS,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK I, PAGE 37 PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN
THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
DATED at CRAWFORDVILLE, Florida, this
5th day of September, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY -S- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
September 18, 25, 2008

NOTICE OF SALE
Notice Is given pursuant to Florida Self-Stor-
age Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83,
Part IV, that ABC Storage will hold a sale by
sealed bid on Saturday, October 11, 2008 at
10:00 a.m. at 3743 Crawfordville Hwy., Craw-
fordville, FL 32327, of the contents of Mini
Warehouse containing personal property of:
DEREK BROWN
T.A. GEODIE
TINA BROWN
KATIE REESE
Payments must be made on October 10th,
2008 by 5:00 p.m. before the sale date of Oc-
tober 11th, 2008. The owners may redeem
their property by payment of the Outstanding
Balance and cost by contacting ABC Storage
at 508-5177. Or by paying in person at the
warehouse location.
September 25, 2008, October 2, 2008

)(


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-000171
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RHONDA KNOLMAYER, et al,
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: RHONDA KNOLMAYER
7 SHAR MEL RE LANE
CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
RONALD KNOLMAYER
7 SHAR MEL RE LANE
CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFEN-
DANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following property in
WAKULLA County, Florida:
LOT 48, BLOCK P OF MAGNOLIA GAR-
DENS, AS PER PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVI-
SION RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE
37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WA-
KULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND
LOT 49, BLOCK P OF MAGNOLIA GAR-
DENS, AS PER PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVI-
SION RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE
37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WA-
KULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses within 30 days after the first publica-
tion, if any, on Florida Default Law Group,
P.L., Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
9119 Lake'Drive, Suite 300, Tampa, Florida
33634, and'file the original with this Court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiff's attorney or
Immediately thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint or petition.
Witness my hand and the seal of this Court
on this 18th day of September, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -S- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
September 25, October 2, 2008

Notice of Sale
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to Flor-
ida Statute 715.109, and Default Judgment
Case No. 08-56-EV dated July 28, 2008, and
writ of Possession dated September 2, 2008,
Wakulla Station Mobile Home Community and
its owners Joan and Robert Sharman, who
live at 56 Sharman Cr., Crawfordville, FL
32327 will dispose of the abandoned mobile
home located at 24 Sharman Cr. Mobile
home Is 12 X 47 and Is white with green trim.
It has no appliances, no cabinets, several bro-
ken windows, no toilet, no a/c or heat and no
floor vents. Also has several broken windows,
holes in ceiling and doors and is infested with
fleas. Mobile home Is too old to be moved
anywhere In the state of Florida.
Joan and Robert Sharman will sell mobile
home for the cost of storage, advertising, and
attorney fees on September 30, 2008.
September 18, 25, 2008

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY
CASE NO.: 2008-CA-0051FC
DIVISION #:
UNC:
Region Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage
Successor by Merger to Union Planters
Bank, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs
Beverly Ann Council as Guardian of Owen
R. Council a/k/a Owen Council; Wakulla Bank
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
August 26, 2008, entered In Civil Case No.
2008-CA-0051FC of the Circuit Court of the
2nd Judicial Circuit In and for Wakulla County,
Florida, wherein Region Bank d/b/a Regions
Mortgage Successor by Merger to Union
Planters Bank, N.A., Plaintiff and Beverly Ann
Council as Guardian of Owen R. Council a/k/a
Owen Council are defendantss, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH
STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORD-
VILLE, FLORIDA AT 11:00 A.M. on Septem-
ber 25, 2008 the following described property
as set forth In said Final Judgment, to-wit:
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
THE SOUTH HALF OF THE NORTH HALF
OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SEC-
TION 12, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2
WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND
THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 08
MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE
EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 12 A
DISTANCE OF 20.00 FEET, THENCE RUN
NORTH 89 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 41 SEC-
ONDS WEST 1434.55 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING: FROM SAID POINT OF BE-
GINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DE-
GREES 08 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST
205.09 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DE-


AGREES 56 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST
212.37, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES
08 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 205.13
FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES
55 MINUTES 41 SECONDS EAST 212.37
FEET.
SUBJECT TO AN ACCESS EASEMENT
OVER AND ACROSS THE NORTHERLY
40.00 FEET THEREOF.
TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR IN-
GRESS AND EGRESS DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS:
THE NORTHERLY 20 FEET OF THE FOL-
LOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: THE
NORTHERLY ONE-THIRD OF THE SOUTH
HALF OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE
SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 12,
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST WA-
KULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN
THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH DISABILITY
WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN
ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO
COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF
CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT
WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056
CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORD-
VILLE, FL 32327 WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS
OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE OF
SALE: IF YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED
CALL: 1-800-955-8771; IF YOU ARE VOICE
IMPAIRED CALL: 1-800-955-8770.
DATED at CRAWFORDVILLE, Florida, this
27th day of August, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -S- TERESA BRANNAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Seal, Wakulla County Clerk
of the Circuit Court)
September 18, 25, 2008

105 Business Opportuni-
ties


BRING YOUROLD

PHOTOS TO LIFE!!
I can fix those
wonderful old pictures
so you can enjoy them
again, and make
copies to share.

Keep the family heritage
alive with restored
photographs

Just $15 per photo.
850-766-7655
dougapple@gmail.com


For Sale:
TWO BLONDES UQUORS & GIFTS
Retail Package & Gift Store
Liquor License includes
consumption on premises
Local coastal resort area in
Panacea
Turn key operation

(850) 509-4945 or
kbatkins@aol.com


110 Help Wanted



ELECT CHARLIE

CREEL





PolitkorI alvtmnt k!paifor and eprovedby
CaldieC Ocl. No Party Alisllron.I'orShmrlff


120 Services and Busi- -
nesses

A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING
Free Estimates
Licensed John Farrell
926-5179
566-7550

ALL ABOUT...
CONCRETE lANDSCAPE
blocks plants
bricks sod
pavers tractor work
call JOSEPH FRANCIS
850-556-1178 / 850-926-9064

All Your Animals LLC Pet sitting.
Straight from the heart care.
Equine expert experienced -
reliable 850-510-5798.
www.allyouranimals.com

BACK FORTY TRACTOR
SERVICE Bushhogging, Box-
blading Driveway. Larry Carter
Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931,
850-694-7041. Licensed/Insured.

Bella's Bed & Biscuit Doggie
Daycare.
Overnight boarding. Extended
stays. Kennel free home environ-
ment. Lots of love & pampering.
926-1016 or 519-4529.

Child care in my home. Crawford-
ville/Woodville area. After school
care for Leon County provided.
13-yrs. experience, CPR-certified.
Kim 556-6125

CJ's Lawn Services & More
(Ask about the more!)
850-421-9365 (If we don't answer,
please leave message)


CJ's Lawn Services & More
(Ask about the more!)
850-421-9365.
(If we don't no answer, please
leave message).


Five Star Plumbing
Big Bend, Inc.

Commercial
& Residential
Service


Billy B. Rathel, Jr.
850-544-5062
850-421-1237 Fax
plumbingjive.star@yahoo.com
Lic#CFC1427547 State Certified
FREE
estimates. Land clearing, bushhog
mowing, stumps, driveways, big or
small. No minimums. 33 years ex-
perience. Richard Miller, cell
933-1118.

Harold Burse Stump Grinding
926-7291.


Floral designer. Experience re-
quired. Please apply in person
with resume at 3070 Crawfordville
Highway.


Elect Jimmie Doyle:
for County Commission


She gets things
done.

Pocl advepisemil id b r aid appr eI owd by


Management PT/FT Sales. Hibbett
Sports is opening soon in Craw-
fordville. Send resumes ATTN DM:
2132 University Mall, Suite 210,
Tampa, FL 33612 or e-mail to
Jason.Hutson@hibbett.com.
Hibbett Sports conducts drug test-
ing. www.hibbett.com


Jack's B-Quick Boarding Kennel:
Large play yards, controlled envi-
ronment, indoor/outdoor runs, all
sizes/breeds. Two blocks from
bike-trail. www.jacksbquick.com
850-576-5552

Lawn service, tractor work, bush
hog, residential and commercial.
Warren Property Services. Call
Phillip 519-1853

Registered Family Daycare has
one opening 18-months 4-years.
All meals and snacks provided.
References available. M-F 16-yrs.
experience 926-6347


Paw's

Dog Grooming

850-984-1211
0 Helen Luper
S Certified Groomer

Hwy. 98 Medart, Florida -
Acrossfrom Medart
Elementary
Call Helen and Sherrie
Today for an Appointment.'!f



Re-Elect

SHERIFF




KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!
















926-2211
North Pointe Center

tionsTit
ols and Instruc-L



Michelle Snow
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
926-7627
Music lessons of all types for all
ages.

205 Antiques


Antiques and Uniques
"Something for Everyone"
61 Rose Street,
Sopchoppy, FL 32358
850-962-2550
HOURS
iTue~day Satmayiav 10 a.m. 5 p.m.


225 Trucks


Hunter Ready. 1986 Ford F-150,
4-speed, 4-wheel drive, mud tires,
dog box, warn winch & bumper,
CB-radio, tool box, good condi-
tion, mechanically sound. $3,500
251-1528

230 Motor Homes and
Campers

1986-Winnebago LaSharo
mini-motor-home. Very nice, low
mileage, automatic, 4-cylinder, gas
turbo, 15-18mpg. $5000. See at
Panacea RV-Park 229-294-2818,
229-485-7808 850-556-0615

240 Boats and Motors



ELECT CHARLIE

CREEL





PPottliltalhrnla'nmetaild for id approvedby
C1fliatcoei. NoFurry A minon.forsherWM


HOME COMFORT
INDUSTRIES
(TNTRAL HEATING & AIR
&
LLLICTRICAL SEAIVICE'S
kill" I ijllillg' Wil-ing for
llicctrical, I'lioncs, TV,
&'

DOW, IS, Slict't'% 0%% IM'S
N,',. 1 1,00 100 14, CACIS 14'io8
(850)926-5790






THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008 Page 9B


250 Sporting Goods


Re-Elect

SHERIFF



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!



275 Home Furnishings


$160 brand name queen mattress
set, unused with warranty,
222-7783

5 piece 100% MicroFiber Living
Room set complete with tables
$599, All New in boxes. Delivery
available. 545-7112

A new Queen Orthopedic Pillow-
top New mattress set in sealed
plastic. Full warranty. Sacrifice
$279. Can deliver. 222-7783.


Bed-King Pillow Top Orthopedic
Mattress Set. Brand new in plas-
tic. Must move, $399. 545-7112.

Bedrm set: New. Solid Wood. 5pc
set still boxed, $489, can deliver
222-7783.

Cherry New Queen sleigh 7-pc
bedroom set $2,400 value, must
sell $1,000. 425-8374 Delivery
available.

Full mattress set. $150 Twin mat-
tress set $125. Both new.
545-7112. Delivery available.

310 Firewood Products


320 Farm Products &
Produce

Green Peanuts for boiling, hand
picked and pot ready. Blanched
peas and farm fresh eggs. Raker
Farm 926-7561.


335 Pets


Adopt a pet from the animal
shelter:
Dogs:
Catahoula, Blue Heeler mix
Lab mix, yellow
German Shepherd mix
Golden Retriever/Lab mix
Terrier mix
Pointer mix
Lab mixes
Walker Hound
Catahoula mix
Min Pin mix
Boston Terrier mix
Chihuahua mix
Many other nice mixes.
Come and take a look.
Puppies:
Lab/Chow mixes, very cute
Lab/Bulldog mixes, very cute
Nice cats and kittens.
CHAT Adoption Center:
Monday closed
Tuesday through Wednesday
& Friday: 11:00AM to 4:30PM
Thursday: 11:00AM to 7:00 PM
Saturday: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM
Sunday: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM
www,chatofwakulla.org


DOG OF THE WEEK
Looking for a new companion to
talk to, play with, and guard your
home and family? Meet Chaz, who
was evacuated from Louisiana to
get him out of the way of Hurri-
cane Gustav. He is very sweet and
wants a good home to call his
own. Just look at those lovely eyes
and tell me you don't want to take
him home?
Come by the adoption center to
visit with our animals or call
926-0890 for more information.

355 Yard Sales


ELECT CHARLIE

CREEL


Potinladvertisement midformidopprovedby
OCred .NoPoanyrhiwIon.forSheriff

Multi-Family Yard Sale on Satur-
day, September 27 from 8 a.m.
until ?? 144 Emmett Whaley Road,
Crawfordville


Saturday September 27, 8:00 a.m.
until... 43 Holly Avenue behind
Sonic. Teen clothes, baby clothes,
furniture, etc...
Yearly sale 136 Edgewvood Drive
8a.m.-2p.m. Saturday. Solid wood
table, stereo, HP inkjet printer,
Memorex keyboard, tools, rugs,
towels, linens, books, youth boy's
clothes, women's 8-10, much
more. All priced to sell!!

410 Free Items

Free to a good home 11-month
old male White English Bulldog,
well behaved. Owner too busy to
provide all the TLC he needs.
491-2391

415 Announcements



Re-Elect

SHERIFF N
DAVID F
*HARvEY
KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!



420 Card of Thanks

We, the family of Ruby Lee White,
acknowledge with deep apprecia-
tion and heartfelt gratitude the
many kind expressions of sympa-
thy and concern shown to us dur-
ing our time of sorrow. May God
richly bless each of you.
--Dosh White & Family

435 Lost and Found

Lost 11-month old male black
cocker spaniel around Wakulla Ar-
ran, near Spring Creek Hwy. Has
tan on face, under neck and paws.
Very friendly. Call Jana
850-363-7232
Small brown female dog, white
chest and front paws. Possible
Boston terrier mix. Found on Hwy
61 on Friday 9/12. Call 562-1887


500 Real Estate, Homes
Mobiles

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it ille-
gal.
to advertise "any preference, limi-
tation, or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or national ori-
gin or an intention to make any
such preference, limitation or dis-
crimination." Familial status in-
cludes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing the custody of
children under the age of 18.
This newspaper will not accept
any advertising for real estate
that is a violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To com-
plain of discrimination call HUD
toll free at 1-800-669-9777. The
toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.



LENDER _

510 Acreage for Sale



Re-Elect

SHERIFF I



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!



520 Townhouses for Rent|

Camelot Park 27-C Guinevere Ln.
Beautiful Crawfordville 3BR/2BA,
like brand new, freshly painted,
new carpet, new refrigerator, gor-
geous view of pool. $885/mo+de-
posit. Kristen Scovera Keller-Wil-
liams agent/owner 850-443-2460
I V


530 Comm. Property for


COVERED BOAT/RV
STORAGE
NOW AVAILABLE
~ Self Storage Units
~ Retail Space Available,
~ Locks, Boxes & More
S Stow.
Away-
Center
850-926-5725
www.stowawaycenter.com


Reduced-Great-Location!
1,200sq.ft. Crawfordville Hwy. ad-
joining The Wakulla News. Three
offices, reception, waiting area,
large kitchen. $1,200/mo. Call
926-6289 or 421-2792.
" GRADE-A OFFICE SPACE!
Hwy. frontage offices avail. Great at-
mosphere. Rent + tax includes:
utilities, trash p/u and kitchen use.
Common area cleaned. 1st and last
month's rent. One month free with
13/mo lease. Call 926-4511 for info.
CALL (850) 926-4511

NBC(

STORAGE

MINI-WAREHOUSES
BOATS RV'S

519-5128 508-5177
2 miles South of Courthouse
on Hwy. 319 in Crawfordville
24 Hour Access Video Surveillance
Store for rent. 1,000 sq.ft.
$495/mo.+deposit. Panacea retail
district 1379 Coastal Hwy. Call
collmanproperties.com 933-2235
Woodville Retail
Space Available
Fitness Studio-1000/sf
(Wall to wall mat & mirrors)
Retail -1250/sf
(Storefront.w/back storage)
Two-Bay Garage-1200/sf
Divided Office Space-1074/sf
Lewiswood Center
421-5039

545 Homes for Sale

3BR/2BA Brick home + older
rental home on 10 acres, 1-mi. So
of Courthouse on Council Moore
Rd. $525,000. 443-6127.
Charming 2BR/1BA, wood and
ceramic floors, wood burning
stove, sunroom, gazebo, work-
shop, 2 acres, fenced. Brenda
Hicks Realty 926-2080/251-1253

555 Houses for Rent

2BR/1.5BA 2-story Country Cot-
tage. Furnished, w/private spa-
cious grounds within Sopchoppy
city limits. Large screened-patio,
W/D, many extras. No smoking.
$750/mo.+deposit(negotiable).
850-528-4341
2BR/1BA house with
fireplace/deck with access to Wa-
kulla River $750.00/mo. First and
last month. Call (850)926-2783.
3BR/1BA house, washer/dryer,
near schools, 1-car carport.
$650/month plus deposit. Call
850-728-6496 or 850-766-0170
4BR/2BA Crawfordville 'area. Rent
$1,500. No pets or inside smok-
ing. References and credit check
required. Call 933-1608.


Crawfordville, cozy 2BR/1BA on
fenced 5 acres. Close yet private.
$750/mo. Alltell 919-880-6152

ELECT CHARLIE

CREEL




Politial advertisemrt pWd for nod approved by
GntieCreel.NoPorlyA Allidon.foShertlff


Historic 3BR/1BA on 3 acres, very
private. No pets, $650/mo.,
$500/deposit. Revell Realty
962-2212

Large 3BD/2BA Home, 5 acres,
2-car garage, office/sunroom, din-
ing room, fireplace, security sys-
tem. Near Riversink Element'ay.
$1,200/mo.+deposit. 926-5859. or
508-7337.

Ochlockonee Bay





Realty
Alligator Point! 3BR/3BA gor-
aeous home in gated community.
1800/month, $1800/security. No
Pets. No Smoking.
Pine Street/Alligator Point! Cute
2BR/1BA MH. $575/month,
$575/security. No Pets. No SmoK-
ing.
Crawfordville/Linzy Mill!
4BR/2BA, 1600 sq.ft.
$1,575/month. $1,575/security.
No Pets. No Smoking. "
2BR/1 BA home in Crawfordville
on five acres. $750/month. ,No
Pets. No Smoking. '
Canal-front 3BR/1BA on Blue
Heron/Mashes Sands.
$695/month. $695/security. No
Pets. No Smoking.
Beachfront 2BR/2BA on Alligator
Point. $1300/month. $1300/secu-'
rity. No Pets. No Smoking.
2BR/1BA in Lanark/Franklin
County! $600/month. $600/sedu-
rity. No Pets. No0Smoking.
Commercial building on busy ?
Hwy. 98/Panacea for rent.
$550/month. $550/security.
Ochlockonee Bay Realty
850-984-0001
www.obrealty.com
I obr@obrealty.com ..


560 Land for Sale

124.7 acres, 5, 10, 18.9 & 99.7
acre tracts. 2+ miles of creek front,
including Smith Creek. Full
kitchen, two bunkhouses, wood-
shed. $5,500/acre 984-0044

5 acres, partially cleared, large
oaks, near Crawfordville Elemen-
tary, build your dream. No restric-
tions. Brenda Hicks Realty
926-2080/251-1253

Beautiful, untimbered, mature
wooded 20-acre tract. Easy ac-
cess from Hwy 98. Reduced
$125,000. Call Susan McKaye,
owner/agent (850)510-2477. Och-
lockonee Bay Realty.
www.hardwoodhammock.com

Ochlockonee Bay Lots 19 and 20,
Knotty Pine Street off Surf Road.
850-984-0192


Crawfordvlllel Large 1700+/- sq.ft. w/ Custom home wl over 1270 +1- (H&C)
3BR/2.5BA. Large open great room sq. ft. 9' ceilings, ceiling fans.
with fireplace, wood and tile floors, 3BR/2BA, kitchen and bath has tile
trey ceilings, oversized garage with flooring w/ custom Oak cabinets.
full attic. Too many upgrades to list- Metal roof w/ Hardy board siding. All
must seel All on manicured % +/- acre on large lot In great area near boat
fenced lot. Short Sale- Bank Approval. ramps and deep water. Just $149,000.


T. Gaupin, Broker
Shell Point Crawfordville
926-7811 926-5111
Florida Coastal Silver Coast
Properties, Inc. Realty
ALL THE BELLS & WHISTLES! 38R-6F 1 : q ii ,rinck
home 3''ears nev dr.amr,alc IC.)er 'i9.1 ,:el. oCv 'rn mold
ing, d o ub le lirep lace c usi ,rri at.r,i 'i: g ,arn c o ur ,. r: living
room in master bedroomT wv.rap ar:.our..:i -.r',:r.. d i,ie p:'rcr and
a 2-car garage' All ir.,, on 2 .1:' a;:re. Pr.:p. ri, i.rVW t.1LSOi
188955 priced at $320,000
WALK TO WAL-MART... Irom tins ccmioriable -'BR -'BA r.ome
sits on a 175x170 lot with est'ablisheo Irui andr IIower,ng iree-
Dressed up by Master craftsman-musi see ic' appre-.aie' #908-
W, MLS# 188952 priced at $99,900, also available lor rent j,
$800/month.
RECIPE FOR RELAXATION Combin.e a -reene.- pirr,t .wilh
shady oaks mix with breathtaking river ve'-. aror, enjoy' 3BR 2BA
furnished home, kitchen equipped on the uCreau.ui' .-,c:' ree
; River. This older home has an inviting flo,.r p: i i.:' Fricedi a
$500,000. Ask to see property #2252W .IlL .: 1-:A08
FIRSTTIER LOT with great views of the 'ui,1 4 ic.i -:,ii c. The
sandy white beach. Close by is Bald Poi-i aie Par.' Sun b.airi..
pick up shells, surf, and fish or just relax' ropepri, B.;4I-.F 1 .ILSB
172807. REDUCED to $249,900.
RENTALS
ATTENTION GAS REBATE W.RENTAL ,BR BA Guil ir...-. n.-.r,ie r,...i-,.. w.
aock Ecri .0,lay "1i7 qYg" a' r-bl,5 ,: ..:n I,:.i r, r, I r clO'PtET'.? i -j. i:,i,'
$1250,monlh Le O .I I'land 35. nm.n Irc.m Ti1lr3 i.i ni ::i t'il
LARGE BRICK HOME ..Tr. -h -LR A i.:,, 1.,, ir, Lr-.uiul H, ., I Pi.. 11r.c .r,
I$1,800 monlh "e.:uil ad p requi.- FET.: ALL,-.'FC- a:40,4'.;
SNUG HARBOR T.:..nrc.T, .ir5. i I.T1. ,,,- ....i it i 500 month i .j,,..i, d .':..:,.
m iJ'l, IjC'PET,
3, BR'2BA Crawfordvilie home .,. S'.1. .:.:.. ..~...', i1.500 monin ;i:*u. , j.posit
reQuired a:2.VJ NO PE T
FURNISHED 2BR 2 5BA Condo $1.200 monin :~.:,.ri, I.,;,:.:,n ,,Qu.3 3 rJO
PETS "' :4 IW
.SEASONAL Snug Harbor Townhome ) ,,itoi- i.). -. .i )i i $1.500 week i e,
maximum i creuul r j iv.r, mrrt CiT..mun, p,,:..:.1 ,3n,:',, 1 : ,-, .1--u A l 5nal
locale d ir, J aimed coTTunn.I NO PE TS


200C8 IS THE DATE TC, LOO: LINGER .- REL:'": aTE'
WWWCV'2FCPF'Ct.1
Ochlockonee Bay 984-5007


Re-Elect

SHERIFF N



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!


CLASSIFIED

As Low

As $8

Per Week!

Call

926-7102


Re-Elect ,

SHERIFF



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!






Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008


565 Mobile Homes for [ 590 Waterfront Homes/
I Rent I Land


2BR/1 BA M/H off Bloxham Cuttoff.
Gas, heat and range, central a/c
washer/dryer. $250 deposit
$650/mo. Pets o.k.! 210-4664

2BR/1BA S/W Wakulla Gardens,
Good condition. Available now.
$525/mo.+deposit 850-656-8252
2BR/2BA (North Wakulla) M/H, re-
modeled, city water, garbage.
service, included $525/mo.
+$250/deposit, no pets 926-5326
2BR/2BA 14X70 M/H in Panacea
on 1 acre. Front & back decks,
storage shed, $600/mo.+deposit.
No pets or smoking. 984-2774
3BR/1 BA M/H Clean and conven-
ient on quiet, paved street in
Panacea. Central heat/air.
$500/mo. and security. No smok-
ing. 352-493-2232, 352-949-5715
3BR/2BA DN/ on 2 lots off Lower
Bridge Rd. W/D available.
$800/mo./First+deposit ready to
occupy on Oct. 15. 850-926-9174
3BR/2BA well-kept doublewide,
Lake Ellen on 1/4-acre lot. $600
first, last and security deposit.
Pets ok, but extra. 850-570-0506.
3BR/2BA well-kept doublewide,
Lake Ellen on 1/4-acre lot. $750
first, last and security deposit.
Pets ok, but extra. 850-570-0506.
4BR/2BA well kept 2100 sq.ft. D/W
M/H on gorgeous 2 acres. New
carpet, tile and a/c. Large kitchen
w/ island bar, front covered deck,
20x30 storage shed, near Wakulla
Springs, 144 Leslie Circle.
$850/mo. Call 443-3300
AFFORDABLE PROPERTIES
926-6035, 926-4801
5BR/2BA D/W M/H on 1/2 acre lot
located on Spring Creek Hwy.
near Mack's Meats, $850/mo.
4BR/2BA D/W M/H on 1 acre lot,
located on Timmons Rd. 2 miles
from Crawfordville, $750/mo.
2BR/1 BA S/W M/H located on
Klikatat Dr., Wakulla Gardens,
chain link fenced yard, $500/mo.
2BR/1 BA S/W M/H, located on
Redman Rd., Wakulla Gardens,
$500/mo.
2BR/1 BA S/W M/H, located on
Maxson Dr., Wakulla Gardens,
$500/mo.
Large 3BR/2BA D/W M/H on 1 1/2
acre lot located in Casora Estates
on Madeline Dr., $850/mo., will
consider rent with option to buy. .
LAKE FRONT ON LAKE ELLEN
3BR/2BA DWMH $750/mo. Next
door to owner. No pets or smok-
inq. 566-0403


vltnu:.FL ,23,j3
(850) 2212-2166 tel.


st"Peeulecase $96,900 to $109,900.


These hos.e' 1andco..


George's Lighthouse Pointe
Unit A-3, 19 Mashes Sand Road,
Panacea, Condominium Unit.
1BR/1BA, LR, DR, CHA. Front
porch faces pool & tennis court.
Back porch faces marina & view
of bay (Both 12x30). Gated
Community w/beautiful new
landscaping. 825 sq. ft. H&C.
850-545-5057. $229,900


595 Vacation Rental I


Re-Elect

SHERIFF



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE*!




Classified

Ads

For

As

Little

As

$8

A Week


point Realty ,



FL Housing
Money Available!

SPOKAN TRAIL
Great 2 bed 1'bath '
home with a kitchen has tile floors and break-
fast bar, dining area with door to enjoy the
backyard. Great starter home and not re-
quired to be 1st time home buyer to receive
FL Housing Money. #1942 $102,500.

Call 926-8120


3 Serving North Florida Big Bend on the Gulf ofMexico to
___ g Florida's Capital 'Tallahassee area. .
r I www.shellpointrealty.com


lot a


600 Open House


3Br 2Ba DWMH
$650 + Sec. Dep.


2Br 1 Ba DUPLX
$615 + Sec. Dep.
I IJ I I I I I I


sellals Crossing Card
$65,900. I + ac lots o85 C08-ard235
North Waku-ll Co.. w
On Ace High Stable Rd.


**tBrand New Subdivislou"*
Carmen Maria -$34,900.
Lots up to I ac. m size.
Underground electric and Wa-
ter. Conveniently located to
Tallalias'ce and Lake Talquin.


"Affordable & ConvenienL'*
Mouteio S34,900


Ir, St~ 1..rk EiC..


ADVERTISE YOUR
OPEN HOUSE UNDER
THIS CATEGORY
for as little as

$8.00

or$12.00
WITH A PHOTO
call 926-7102 for details







Sonya Hall
Lic. Real Estate Broker
"Specializing in Wakulla Co."
(850) 926-5084
FOR RENT:
3Br 2Ba House
$850 mo + Sec. Dep.
(1 Car Garage)


3Br 3BaTwnhs
$875 mo. + Sec. Dep.


3Br 2.5Ba Twnhs
$850 mo. + Sec. Dep.


3Br 2Ba DWMH
$850 + Sec. Dep.


85/65
Sunshine.
Highs in the
mid 80s and
lows in the
mid 60s.


Sunrise:
727 AM
Sunset:
7:30 PM


82/64
Times of
sun and
clouds.
Highs in the
low 80s and
lows in the
mid 60s.

Sunrise:
727 AM
Sunset:
7:29 PM


85/65
Partly
cloudy.
Highs in the
mid 80s and
lows in the
mid 60s.


Sunrise:
728 AM
Sunset:
7:28 PM


Mi:
an
Hit
mi
toI
ir


86/65 87/65
x of sun Mainly
d clouds. sunny.
ghsin the Highs in the
d 80s and upper 80s
ws In the and lows in
id 60s. the mid 60s.


Sunrise:
728 AM
Sunset:
'7-157 DI


Sunrise:
729 AM
Sunset:
7:25 PM


Stones fr and about I



Florida At A Glance


Jacksonville


Tampa .
86'71


Area Cities
I 07arwat f psn ny


Ctiearwater 87
Crestview 86
Daytona Beach 82
Fort Lauderdale 87
Fort Myers 90
Gainesville 82
Hollywood 87
Jacksonville 79
Key West 84
Lady Lake 82.
Lake City 81
Madison 84
Melbourne 83
Miami 86
N Smyrna Beach 81


pi sunny
sunny
rain
t-storm
pt sunny
pl sunny
t-storm
rain
t-storm
pt sunny
pi sunny
mst sunny
t-storm
t-storm
rain


Ocala 84
Orlando 84
Panama City 86
Pensacola 84
Plant City 89
Pompano Beach 87
Port Charlotte 90
Saint Augustine 78
Saint Petersburg 88
Sarasota 90
Tallahassee 85
Tampa 88
Titusville 83
Venice 90
W Palm Beach 87


pt sunny
pt sunny
sunny
sunny
pt sunny
i-storm
pt sunny
rain
pt sunny
pt sunny
sunny
pt sunny
t-storm
pt sunny
t-storm


National Cities


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Houston
Los Angeles
Miami


sunny
mst sunny
t-storm
sunny
mst sonny
pt sunny
mst sunny
t-storm


Minneapolis
New York
Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


ity Hi ptosunny


pt sunny
mst sunny
sunny
sunny
rain
mst sunny
pt sunny


Moon Phases






Last New First Full
Sep 22 Sep 29 Oct 7 Oct 14


UV Index
Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
9/24 9/25 9/26 9/27 9/28

Very High Very High Very High Very High Very High
The UV Index Is measured on a 0 11 number scale, 0 11
wtlh a higher UV Index showing the need for greater ..
skin protection.


Re-Elect

SHERIFF



KEEPING Wakulla County


SAFE!


Savannah Forest
$45,.9001. I1ac. tracts off
Wakulb L-ffaon Rd.


Carmen Rocio -2 ae. lot offW
Shadcmile Hwy near
Wakulla Staton. $64,900.

2 acre tract with large
lihadvoods ai Bccdhwood
Subdivision off ShadeviUc
Hwy. S52,900.
Two 5+ acre tracts ,:r
F.eh'"tr4:el F.4 ; I'rg. tree' on
the b ..: : 'f "pr4 'rti-e anrd .a
,rull p ,rna -.'i ba


I I


L.


A Subscription to...



t Wakulla AfteM

For One Year Subscription,
Use This Convenient Form!


Mail To:

The Wakulla News

P.O. Box 307 Crawfordville, FL 32326



$25 Wakulla County

$30 Out Of County

$35 Out Of State

Mail subscription to:

Name
Address


City, State, Zip


Phone


Today's Weather


Wed Thu I nSat Sun
9/24 9/25 9/26 9/27 9/28


- --


City Hi Lo Cond


N% aikers NIW
$69,904). -' a I.. t: 1 1:.,: at, i .: ri


I





THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008 Page 11B



lbt W3 llkutta A tVI Is Available For


Purchase At The Following Locations:


IN CRAWFORDVILLE
The Wakulla News Office
Ace Hardware
CVS Pharmacy
Dux Liquors
El Jalisco
Food Mart
Karol's Korner Petro
Lee's Liquor/Sky Box Sports Bar
Lindy's Chibken
Michele's Convenience Store
Ming Tree
Murphy's
Myra Jeans
Petty's BP
Post Office
Senior Center
Stop N Save
Walgreen's
Wal-Mart
Winn Dixie

IN PANACEA
Big Top Supermarket
Crum's Mini Mall
The Landing

IN OCHLOCKONEE BAY
Jay Food Mart
Mashes Sands BP

IN SOPCHOPPY
Express Lane
Lou's Bait and Tackle
S ahdbanks
Sopchoppy Grocery


IN MEDART
Best Western
Inland Store
Library
Petro
Wildwood Inn

IN ST. MARKS
BoLynn's
Express Lane
Two Nichols

IN WOODVILLE
Ace Hardware
Bert Thomas Grocery
Gulf Coast Lumber
IGA Grocery Store

IN WAKULLA STATION
Savannah's
Stop N Save
Wakulla Station BP
Wakulla Station Pharmacy

AND ELSEWHERE
Glenda's Country Store
Mack's Country Meats
Spring Creek Restaurant
Stop N Save (Bloxham Cutoff/H'way 319)
Stop N Save (H'way 98/Spring Creek Road)
Wakulla Springs Lodge

IN TALLAHASSEE
Circle K (Capital Circle & C'ville Highway)
Publix (Capital Circle & C'ville Highway)
/


I' U


Br,


0 40 10 -0 40


luml





I .


0 a aq 40 4


I


' = a a ~ a S
~ ~ ~ -
~@** a -
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* S
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ftmm


0 0
0 0

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- ~w







* -~
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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008





..FWMA greets animals displaced by the recent storms. ..., ....

FWMA greets animals displaced by the recent storms


By JUDY COOKE
Special to The Wakulla News
The high wind, hard rains, and
rough water from all the recent storm
activity has taken its toll on the coast-
line, river banks, and seashore bring-
ing many wild creatures in need to
Florida Wild Mammal Association.
Thanks to generous donations from
Progress Energy, The Batchelor Foun-
dation, and many private supporters,
FWMA has been able to open its doors
to take in more than 95 animals in the
last three weeks.
One of the storm victims was a
baby Brown Pelican. Unable to fly to
avoid the rough water, baby pelicans
get tossed about mercilessly. This can
cause injuries as well as exhaustion.
If the young ones are able to make it
to the safety of shore, their mothers,
seeking shelter from the storm them-
selves, may abandon them, and with
no mother around to provide meals,
the young ones will starve.
After a storm, if you're out on the
beaches and you see a Pelican still
covered in white, fluffy down, it is a


baby and possibly needs assistance, wildlife taken in following the recent
Please call FWMA at 363-2351. storms.
A baby wood stork and a Diamond- Photos by Judy Cooke,
back Terrapin were among the other


000


One Meal from


-Ever

lynaUy :,: thatched stage night music on the. back patio
ieSat music perfor- and free wireless internet.
eiepao is frequently Many of the Bistro's patrons
r) ". paies, such reflect on a bygone .era with
ig'par fon stories of Beno Hodges
iie Wi'-cnme to bring and his Sopchoppy Drug Com-
y ,wn b and wine. pany which was the local hub
in,. T1 OBis housed in the of-social activity. The business
f ier Sopchoppy continued until the 1950s when
min I ic down:- 'Corine Hodge opened up a dress
c ppy.The charniing shop, kept the soda fountain
iBilding holds memories and sold over-the-counter goods.
prm.epharmacy, soda This was a favorite hang-out
*cir shop and, more, for the young folk. The first ice
SOutfitters cream in the county was served
Pi. The Rice :from this very location. It was
n the Bistro in No- also an Emergency Alert Center
f2006 adding Saturday during World War II, staffed
4 ....31 '


y Restaurant


with volunteers reporting air-
craft traffic overhead on the first
and only phone in Sopchoppy.
Come join your neighbors
and meet some new folks. Enjoy
a fantastic meal, warm hospital-
ity, and exceptional service in a
true North Florida treasurel
Thanks to our Bistro's pa-
tronsl
Wakulla News 2008 Readers'
Choice Winner Best Dinner
Tuesday Friday 4:00-9:00
p.m. (10:00 p.m. Friday) Satur-
day 11:00 a.m. 1000 p.m. 106
Municipal Avenue Historic
Downtown Sopchoppy
850 962-2220


Backwoods Bistro's Open. Tues. Thurs. 4 p.m. 9 p.m.
(Fri. 10 p.m.) Sat. 11 a.m. 10 p.m. Saturday evening music
on our back patio with thatched dining tables (BYOB)
We thank our Bistro Patronsl 2008 Readers' Choice Best Dinner


UR. 1W F U."R VU U UBER
-':- our" B -. |LIVE MUSiC
SNew Raw Bar
Rw & BIG SCREEN TV
i' Fresh Raw Oysters FOR FoomTBA
t $4 Dozen Every Day SATURDAY
FALLHours: RAW BAR
Mon. Th. -,-' ANGELO'S DOWNUNDER
4:30 P.M. 10 P.M..-: Open Noon- 11 P.M. -
Fr.'4:30 P.M. 11 P.M Daily Specials
Sat 12 P.M. 11 P.M. Private Banquet Rooms
un 12 P.M. 10 P.M. Available
Closed Tuesday Be Sure To See
SThe Jewelry Man
168 for Fine Sterling Silver
and 10 Kt & 14 KLt. Gold
At the Bge Ochlockonee Bay Scenic Coastal Hwy. 98

Hamaknockers Oasis -,1 Rib Platter Dinner

Bayside Dell 1 Seafood Platter

Coastal Restaurant flIl-U-Can Eat

Chicken or Pork Chop Dinner

AIngelo's -.1 #1 Seafood Combo Dinner

El ]allsco Chicken or Beef Fajita

"Backwoods Bistro 1 Entree Special
.. ; ;,, .. =. ...." _


0aCso | OFF The Eatin'Path

... 2 Entry Form
...... $2.99
DRAFT *qD
-4-1 SPECIALS I
- NLY Please drop off form

ROCKS ON at any participating
11 -9 Eatin'Place
- 10


I Name

I Address


City


I State

I Phone


Back%% oo&S Oi;Lroa Upen Iues-Inuis pm pm -OM IF I I I pmi Sai I Ian I m 1pm
Saturdev eewning music on our brick pitio ~itha ihalclied 3imospriere iBYOB,
We thank our Bistro Patrons! 2008 Rcaders' Chokce Winner Bcst Dinner
106 Municipal Avenue Histonc Downio'n S,,p.hoppy 18501 962-2220


Zip


e-mail


Baby wood stork


Friday & Saturday Nights Live Entertainment
Mouth Watering Hand Cut Ribeyes Friday &
3,c t l Saturday Night
". 0 Scr--e Sat. September 27... Part Time Genius
'ee2 Sun. October 4............. Bow Tie Lizard
O 0 1 Sat. October 11......... Locomotive
NO "9O4 U Sat. October 18................. King Cotton
460 Coastal Highway Sat. October 25...................The Moguls
I mile North of Angelos at the County Airport


I Alleal f'll llri talke- lill


i IeIIaI i |||


I




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