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Title: Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00177
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville, Fla
Publication Date: July 3, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States of America -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028313
Volume ID: VID00177
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Table of Contents
    Section A
        Page A 1
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    Section B
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Full Text



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In this issue:

"Meet The Candidates"

Special Section


Three Sections
Published Weekly,
Read Daily,


Our 113th Year, 27th Issue Thursday, July 3,2008

Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century


50

Cents


Daring rescue by

FWC saves bear

from drowning


A weekly radio show is
being recorded at From The
Heart Recording Studio in Sop-
choppy. From The Heart Music
Hour airs every Monday at 7
p.m. and features outstanding
regional musical talent.
Local recording artists are
needed to submit material
for airplay on WOCY 106.5
Oyster County From The
Heart Music Hour. Artists can
go to www.fromtheheartof-
sopchoppy.com From The
Heart Music Hour page and
download the submission,
form. The form can be sent
along with a radio quality CD
recording for consideration to
From The Heart, P. 0. Box 399,
Sopchoppy, Florida 32358.


6 1457 202115


From The Heart Music Hour
was born out of the desire
of Nelle McCall and Rick Ott
of From The Heart recording
studio to obtain radio airplay
for their recording artists and
other local musicians. "Rick
and I met with Rick Pless-
inger of WOCY 106.5 Oyster
Radio seeking to get airplay
for local artists," said McCall.
"From The Heart Music Hour
was a result of that meeting.
The broadcasts began on April
7 and air every Monday at 7
p.m."
"The business of From
The Heart is an ever growing
child," she added. "The ser-
vices now range from record-
ing studio to record label and


agents who have come on
board recently. Hood was fol-
lowed by Family and Consum-
er Science Extension Agent
o Shelley Swenson who began


all points in between."
Located in downtown Sop-
choppy, the recording studio
is housed in the old "Martha
Syfrette Rooming House," a
1923 renovated heart pine
building which creates an
acoustically warm recording
venue.
Artists can record their CD,
have their artwork designed
and the project replicated
without ever leaving the stu-
dio, Ott said.
"With the CD project com-
pleted, the artist needs sound,
staging and lighting for your
live CD release party," added
Ott. "Yes, we can do that too
- using high quality sound
reinforcement gear and my 30


work on Monday, June 30.
Swenson replaced Michelle
Adamski who remains with
the Wakulla County operation
of the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Science through
the University of Florida.
Hood said she is pleased
that Bradshaw will remain as
a 4-H program volunteer even
though she is no longer in the
extension position.
A native of Tallahassee,
Hood has moved to Wakulla
County and said she could not
be more pleased. "It's excit-
ing," she said. "It's the greatest
job for me."
Hood is a former school
teacher who spent eight years
with students in several states
including Florida. She fol-


years experience as a sound
engineer."
From The Heart's "Experi-
ence The Music" rack distribu-
tion network, was originally
setup to promote artists under
the FTH Records label, but it
has grown to include many,
other local artists. Local artists
can contact From The Heart
to discuss rack distribution
of their CD. Retail outlets
from Port St. Joe to Tallahas-
see carry their racks and the
outlets are still growing.
Now with their established
partnership with Oyster Radio
artists can submit their mate-
rial for airplay review to From
The Heart. Each week From
The Heart selects 12 or more
songs from their submitted
material to broadcast on From
The Heart Music Hour on
WOCY 106.5 Oyster Country.
"The history behind From
The Heart was really a no-
brainer," said McCall. "When
I decided to venture into the
music business I didn't go far
for one of the best sound and
recording engineers around,
my husband, Rick Ott. Luckily
for me, he didn't need a whole
lot of convincing since his
love of music flows through
every cell of his body."
Ott earned his reputation
as an excellent live sound
and studio engineer being
involved in hundreds of mu-
sic projects over the past 30
years.
Continued on Page 5A


lowed her teaching career
with a post at the Florida
Department of Health.
Hood traded in her health
data entry for exposure to
children again and is pleased
to be able to put her teaching
experiences to good use'
"We're getting ready for
two camps, Cherry Lake and
pizza camp," she said. "And
I am getting used to every-
thing."
Hood drove Swenson from
Wakulla County to Apala-
chicola to show off the coast-
line to her new Polk County
friend and co-worker. She said
Swenson was impressed with
the natural beauty of the Big
Bend region.
Continued on Page 5A


A 375-pound male black
bear with a penchant for
beachfront browsing was on
dry land Saturday, June 28 af-
ter a Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) biologist pulled the
tranquilized animal from Gulf
of Mexico waters in Florida's
Panhandle.
"I wasn't sure what I was
going to do when I jumped in,"
said biologist Adam Warwick,
who saw the bear struggling
in the warm Gulf waters after
it had been hit with a tranquil-
izer dart.
"It was a spur of the mo-
ment decision," he said. "I had
a lot of adrenaline pumping
when I saw the bear in the
water."
The bear was roaming
through a residential area
Tuesday, June 24 on Alliga-
tor Point, a neighborhood of
about 100 homes.
To prevent bears from wan-
dering into residential neigh-
borhoods, the FWC urges
residents to secure garbage
cans and other sources of food


By WILLIAM SNOWDEI
wsnowden@$hewakullanews.net
Citing rising gas costs,
Wakulla County Commission-
er Howard Kessler asked that
staff be directed to talk with
the City of Tallahassee and
StarMetro about the possibil-
ity of starting a commuter bus
service between Crawfordville
and Tallahassee.
Tallahassee's StarMetro
bus service made a presenta-
tion to commissioners in the
past, but Kessler said that with
gas prices above $4 a gallon,
and many Wakulla County
residents commuting to Tal-
lahassee for work, a commuter
bus service would appeal to
many riders.
At their meeting on Mon-
day, June 23, commissioners
voted 4-0 for staff to enter into
talks about the possibility of
bus service.


that might attract bears.
FWC officials responded to
reports of a bear in the area
and found the animal under-
neath a beachfront home.
Their plan was to move it to
a remote location, back in the
wild.
The tranquilizer dart took
longer than expected to work,
and Warwick said the animal
bolted into the Gulf in an ef-
fort to escape.
Warwick was worried the
bear was already showing the
effects of the immobilizing
drug and that the bear couldn't
swim the four miles to land.
"At that point, I decided to
go in after the bear," Warwick
said. "I wanted to keep him
from swimming into deeper
water."
The animal was about. 25
yards from shore when he
jumped into the water.
"I was in the water swim-
ming toward the bear, trying
to prevent him from swim-
ming into deeper water," War-
wick said.
Continued on Page 16 A


"Park your car at Wal-Mart,"
Kessler said, "hop onto a bus
and sleep, work, or read the
newspaper during the trip
while at the same time mark-
edly reducing the cost of the
commute."
Chairman Ed Brimner
agreed, saying the new buses
in Tallahassee are ultra-mod-
ern with TVs and wi-fi inter-
net access.
In other matters in front of
the Wakulla County Commis-
sion on June 23:
Several dozen people
showed up for a workshop on
Wakulla County's vulnerability
to storm surge to see a presen-
tation by National Weather
Service meteorologist Bob
Goree and state meteorologist
Ben Nelson.

Continued on Page 16A


Artz, Arhendt, final two

candidates, announce


Lynn Artz of Medart an-
nounced her candidacy for
Wakulla County Commissioner
in District 5. Artz is seeking a
seat on the commission "be-
cause I believe in what Wakulla
County can be. I care about the
people of Wakulla and the fu-
ture of our county. We have an
opportunity to preserve what
we value and to develop our
county more wisely. I have the
experience and the knowledge
to help our county grow and
move forward, responsibly.
Continued on Page 5A


Anne W. Ahrendt


Lynn Artz


Anne Woodward Ahrendt,
48, of Crawfordville, former
Wakulla County Property Ap-
praiser, announced she will
seek the office of Property Ap-
praiser. She served as Property
Appraiser for 18 months fol-
lowing the untimely passing
of Ronnie Kilgore in 2005.
During her time in of-
fice, Ahrendt said she made
significant improvements
including:

Continued on Page 16A


Radio sponsor Ron Patrick of Greater Big Bend Music with Rick Ott on the radio


Commuter buses

could ease gas pains


From The Heart Studio dots the Sopchoppy landscape


Hood joins county

as 4-H Coordinator








Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008



Comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895


Letters


Carroll finds

missing dog

for resident
Editor, The News:
I would like to pass on a
story that happened in Wakul-
la County on June 17. Animal
Control Director Ivanhoe Car-
roll received an e-mail from a
William Graham in reference
to his missing dog. The dog
was a rescue animal from Hur-
ricane Katrina. The dog was a
mixed breed brindle dog and
her name was Possum.
Director Ivanhoe Carroll
called Mr. Graham to see
where and when the dog was
last seen. He stated the dog
was last seen at a beach house
on Alligator Point.
Director Carroll called some
of her real estate friends and
gave them a "BOLO" to be on
the lookout for the dog. One
of the realtors called Director
Carroll back stating she had
found Possum at a rental lo-
cation at Alligator Point. The
renters were feeding and tak-
ing care of Possum.
Director Carroll called Mr.
Graham and he was reunited
with his Katrina rescue dog,
Possum.
Director Carroll went above
and beyond her duties to lo-
! cate (this animal. The dog had
already been through enough
"with Hurricane Katrina and
was abandoned when Mr. Gra-
ham graciously took it upon
himself to care for Possum. A
good ending for Possum and
her owner due to the caring
of Director Carroll.
It shows the care and con-
cern Director Carroll has for
animals and that she is willing
to go beyond her normal du-
ties to assist in helping own-
ers locate their companions.
Possum is safe and sound
with her owner and both are
doing fine.
Captain Steven Ganey
Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office
Animal Control Unit Super-
visor

Voters take

degrees more

seriously
Editor, The News:
I find it very interesting
that voters in Wakulla County
are starting to look at and
compare academic credentials


of the candidates running for
political office.
In the past, college degrees
or other academic achieve-
ments have sometimes been
viewed with disfavor or even
distain. Perhaps it was the
election of Dr. Kessler which
sparked the interest in ad-
vanced education as a quali-
fication for office, but I don't
recall his M. D. every having
been a major focus of his
campaign. In any event, voters
need to be wary of candidates'
educational claims in their
advertisements.
Although academic cre-
dentials are an important
consideration in choosing a
qualified candidate for office,
they must be examined care-
fully. An "honorary" doctorate
is not the same as a Ph. D.
and it should not be passed
off as such, since obtaining
a legitimate doctorate degree
often involves years of hard
work, dedication and sacrifice.
An "honorary" degree is just
that; bestowing an honor on
someone who has not actually
met any academic require-
ments for a degree.
In addition, there are vari-
ous "doctorate" degrees as
well as other degrees that can
be obtained without going
through the academic rigors
or even attending classes.
While some of these may
be legitimate online degree
programs through accredited
colleges or universities, many
correspondence degree pro-
grams are not. Others may be
purely "mail-order" degrees
requiring nothing more than
payment for the costs of a
diploma.
Finally, if a candidate has
actually graduated and com-
pleted a program from a col-
lege or a university, they
will state what degree was
awarded. If a candidate claims
they "attended" a community
college or university, it means
that they either dropped out
or flunked out before complet-
ing a degree or program.
Voters should carefully
examine each candidate's
claims. They should make sure
that their academic creden-
tials are legitimate ones.
Kurt Ahrendt
Crawfordville

Community

rallies to

help Society

Editor, The News:
Many thanks to many
people
My thanks and apprecia-
tion are sent to the Chamber
of Commerce for their perse-
verance in the restoration of
the old courthouse and for
allowing me to be a part of
the dedication ceremonies on
June 23.
Not only was I honored but
I really felt that I was repre-
senting my good friend, Mar-
tha McLeod, who would have
been representing her beloved
Papa, Judge McLeod, who
served Wakulla County from
1900 to 1928. The Chamber
and John Shuff deserve much


A Battle on our very own Apalachee Bay


By NELSON MONGIOVI
Special to The Wakulla News
You're out on the Gulf and
suddenly see a winning lot-
tery ticket sail through the
air past your boat (it doesn't
matter how you knew). You
rev up the outboard, point
your bow into the wind and
chase the ticket all afternoon
for 70 miles. Toward the end
of the grueling chase, a friend
appears in his boat, sees
what you're doing, maneuvers
ahead of you and grabs the
winning ticket before you
can get to it. Adding insult
to injury, in the future, when
people hear this story, only
your friend will be mentioned
and nobody will even know
you were there. Now that's a
bad day on the water.
A similar event actually
occurred more than 100 years
ago on Ochlocknee Bay.
The chase for fortune and
fame began early Monday
morning on Jan. 18, 1864. The
prize: a steamship blockade-
runner named Laura attempt-
ing to sneak past the Union's
line and deliver a priceless
supply of Cuban wine, spirits
and cigars to a Confederate
port up the Suwannee River.
Lieutenant Commander
Charles J. McDougal of the
U.S.S. Hendrick Hudson spot-
ted the cunning steamer sit-
ting in the mouth of the
Suwannee, waiting for the
morning fog to burn off. The
Commander wasted no time
going after the boat because,
back then, officers and crew
got a "piece of the pie" when
they captured a ship with valu-
able cargo.
Once the Laura was spot-
ted, like all good smugglers,
she tried to flee the scene. Her
Captain started steaming west
toward the shoals of Ochlock-
nee Bay hoping to find safe


credit for a job well done.
I also want to thank Mad-
eleine Carr and a number of
Waktlla County Historical
Society members who are
working diligently to make
the Wakulla County Histori-
cal Museum and Archives a
reality in the old jail building
across the street from both
courthouses Hampered only
by the lack of funds, our work-
ers are moving forward with
their ideas and labor and tax-
deductible donations for this
worthy cause are sought and
welcomed by the Society, P.
0. Box 151, Crawfordville, FL
32326.
Another round of thanks
to those workers who came
out to the Linzy houses on
Saturday, June 21 to help
dismantle the smaller house
for it to be moved to a local
builder's property for recon-
struction and later placement
in the Wakulla Heritage Park,
which is being planned by
more volunteers.
Jim Calhoun, builder and
lover of old houses, super-
vised the move and had sever-
al determined and dedicated
helpers for the entire day.
Other volunteers came and
worked several hours before
having to leave. Thanks to
all of you. This project needs
funding, too. You may also
make a tax-deductible contri-
bution to WCHS for the Linzy
house.
Thanks, too, to those of you
who have sent in stories for
our historical book. They are
wonderful and we are busily
pulling our book together.
Thanks for the memories
Betty Green
Crawfordville

Please return

school bird

feeder

Editor, The News:
To the person who stole
the beautiful glass apple bird
feeder from the Sopchoppy
Education Center two weeks
ago, please return itl It's not
an expensive feeder, but it is
pretty and adds color to the
front flower bed of the school.
Besides, our hummingbirds
miss itl You can bring it back
in the middle of the night, the
same way you took it, and no


haven in the shallow waters,
McDougal was unrelenting in
his pursuit of Laura, and after
two hours of falling behind,
the Hendrick Hudson finally
got a break in the weather
and started gaining ground.
Once in range, McDougal's
men fired seven shots at Laura
with a 20-pound Parrott rifle
(that's a type cannon named
after Robert Parrott from West
Point not a big South Ameri-
can bird guh). All seven' shots
missed and it was getting
dark. Frustrated and worried
about the "skinny water" off
Mashes Sands, McDougal
thought Laura might actually
get away. And then, off his
starboard bow, and to his sur-
prise, appeared another Union
ship. Remember, they didn't
have VHF radios back then
Commander Charles Will-
comb of the U.S.S. Stars and
Stripes quickly assessed the
situation and slipped in be-
hind Laura or in front of his
comrade; however you want
to look at it. The Stars and
Stripes fired several more
shots and chased Laura into
the Bay. (Their shots missed


one will even know who did
it. If you broke it, you can re-
place it we got it at the hard-
ware store in Sopchoppy.
Cheryl L. Mallow
Sopchoppy Education Cen-
ter & Wakulla Adult Educa.
tion

Thanks for

helping our

youths.
Editor, The Newss
The youth group leaders
and pastor Elder Bruce Taylor
would like to thank everyone
who donated to the youth
group at Mt. Beasor Primi-
tive Baptist Church. We will
be taking the youth to Wild
Adventures Thursday for a
fun day.
Special thanks to Panacea
Full Gospel, Friendship and
Whiddon Lake Church for
donating supplies left over
from Emmet Whaley Appre-
ciation Day. The trip to Wild
Adventures is a reward for the
kids working hard to learn
God's Word.
The kids have learned that
we are not saved by good
works, but we are saved unto
good works.
Mt. Beasor Primitive Baptist
Church Youth Group
Sopchoppy


Dog should

have received

care

Editor, The News:
A Child's PetIl
Nothing can replace the
love for one's duck, dog, cat
or whatever.
A beautiful lab was refused
treatment the moment the
charges were stated and the
dog was in the exam room.
The animal was immedi-
ately deposited in the vehicle.
Where there is a will, there is
a way. Something financial
could or should have been
discussed, some action taken
to relieve the animal's pain.
Where is the heart of kind-
ness and compassion? I mean,
the profit?

Anne Estes and
Carolyn Stewart
Crawfordville


U.S.S, Hendrick Hudson
too: makes you wonder how
they won the war?)
After all the shooting was
over, around 8 p.m., the boot-


ading Sc
get the
files mak
ing; esp


leggers' entire getaway plan correspc
backfired when the ship ran tains Mc
aground on the very sand- and the
bars she was trying to hide about v
around. Once Laura was high booty. '
and dry, Willcomb sent a few sent the
of his men over to "capture Key Wes
the vessel," while McDougal any trot
and his crew sat outside the fine win
bay wondering what all the finally
commotion was out there in Potoma
the dark. that ex
The next morning Will- S. Gran
comb had a few of his crew graphec
row over, bring McDougal his mou
up-to-speed on the evening's And
news and offer him a rowboat during,
ride over to the conquered people
Laura. when s]
Of course, once there, Will- Captain
comb's men were already crew m(
claiming their prize and pretty I heard
much taking credit for the Panacea
entire affair. lottery t
If you Google "Ochlocknee
Bay" to corroborate this story, Nelson
you'll find several accounts of and fisl
the Stars and Stripes vs Laura. Airedal
You'll have to dig deeper into
the Civil War East Gulf Block- Sands.


luadron official files to
rest of the story. The
ke for interesting read-
ecially the post-battle
ondence between Cap-
cDougal and Willcomb
Secretary of the Navy
who should get the
The Navy eventually
e booze and stogies to
&t "for fear of it causing
uble." No doubt, the
ae and Cuban smokes
found their way to
c River area. Maybe
plains why Ulysses
t was always photo-
1 with a big cigar in
ith?
in case you're won-
there were only five
onboard the Laura
he was captured. The
n and fifteen other
embers escaped. Last
they were seen at the
a BP Station buying
tickets.

Mongiovi writes
hes with his
le on Mashes


WEEK IN WAKULLA


Thursday, July 3,2008
ALZHEIMER'S SUPPORT GROUP meets at the public library
at 6 p.m.
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB meets at Posey's Up the Creek
in Panacea at noon.
IT'S SHOWTIME, part of the library Summer Reading
Program, will feature the Walk-About Puppets in "Mr.
Blister's Toy Circus" at the public library at 7 p.m.
MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA, a fellowship of men
who gather to share an support one another in the quest
for authentic manhood, meets at Cornerstone
Ministries "outback" at 6:30 p.m. For more information,
call Steve Smith at 508-2560.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at 12 noon.
SENIOR CITIZEN CELEBRATION of Independence Day will
be held at Hudson Park beginning at 11 a.m. Uncle Sam
will visit,
VFW BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road
from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Friday, July 4, 2008
HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAYI
SOPCHOPPY FOURTH OF JULY will be celebrated with a
parade at 4 p.m., followed by fireworks in the city park at
dark. Park entry is $1. There will be food vendors,
informational booths, political candidates and live music
until the fireworks.
Saturday, July 5, 2008
NA meets at the Torch, 16 Lower Bridge Road, at 5 p.m.
For more information, call 599-2876. The workshop will
discuss Medicare/Medicaid, long-term care planning,
supplement insurance and prescription drug assistance.
Monday, July 7,2008
LIBRARY ADVISORY BOARD will meet at the public library
at 4 p.m.
Tuesday, July 8, 2008
BOOK BABIES, for infants and toddlers, will be held at the
public library at 10:30 a.m.
MOOSE LODGE #25.10 meets at the lodge in Panacea at
7:30 p.m.
VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW
Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Wednesday, July 9, 2008
AA meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.
BOOK BUNCH, for pre-school and home school families,
meets at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
BOOK NOOK, for children in grads K-5, is 10:30 a.m. and
1 p.m.
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior citizens center
at 10:30 a.m.


Something on your mind? Write us a
letter at kblackmar@thewakullanews.net


Letters Policy
The Wakulla News welcomes your letters, but we request
that you adhere to the following guidelines:
Letters should not be longer than 300 words.
They must include the writers name, home address and
telephone number. (Only name and town will be listed; the
reast is used solely for the purpose of verification.)
Writers may be limited to one letter per month, depend-
ing upon space limitations.
With very few exceptions, anonymous letters will not
be published.
Letters can be sent via mail or e-mail to kblackmar@
thewakullanews.net), or they can be dropped off at our
Crawfordville Highway office. The Wakulla News reserves
the right to edit all letters.


u 1aktulla tWi
The Wakulla News (USPS 644-640) is published weekly at
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla
News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
General Manager: Tammie Barfield.....................tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Editor: Keith Blackmar................................... kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Reporter: William Snowden............................ wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton........... advertising@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey ...................kinsey@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales: Kai Page..................................... kpage@thewakullanews.net
Bookkeeping: Sherry Balchuck .......................accounting@thewakullanews.net
Classifieds/In House Sales: Alex Brimner...........classifieds@thewakullanews.net
Circulation: Sherry/Alex.................................. circulation@thewakullanews.net
Proofreader: Karen Tully
Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable
one year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $25, Out of County $30
Out of State $35. Out of Country on Request


I







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008 Page 3A


Letters

Septic tank

issue is

ridiculous
Editor, The News:
I attended a county spon-
sored workshop on June 26
titled Wakulla County Septic
Tank (OSTDS) Stakeholder
Workshop. In attendance
were a number of environ-
mentalists and special inter-
est groups all of which had
their own agenda. When the
moderator asked how many
"citizens" were there only
three hands went up includ-
ing mine.
Let me tell you fellow citi-
zens you must understand
what the county commission
has done and is about to do
concerning the new septic
tank ordinance that quietly
went into effect months ago.
If our "standard" septic tank,
the kind all of us have had
for decades, fails you MUST
install this new unproven
advance treatment system
that will cost between $7,000
and $10,000 plus you will be
REQUIRED to enter into an


agreement with a certified
company to inspect and ser-
vice it at a minimum of twice
a year.
This inspection will cost
us another $500 annually. It
sounds kind of like a swim-
ming pool that you can't get
into. I agree that we need to
address the quality of water
affluent and the number of
septic tanks but, as usual,
the county commissioners
have the cart ahead of the
horse again. They don't even
know if the system is required
throughout the county or just
in environmentally sensitive
areas. Nor do they know what
the current effluent from exist-
ing septic tanks is.
I can see the need for
advance treatment along the
rivers of our county or near
natural spring heads, but do
we need them on high and
dry sand hills? Who can afford
such an unproven albatross? I
know I can't.
What I envision happen-
ing is when existing tanks
fail they will simply make
"home made" repairs illegally
and this will only add to our
contamination problems. I
believe the commission needs
to back up and revisit this
whole concept and evaluate
what we have and what we
need. Let's gather the scien-
tific facts and talk to other
counties and states that have
these systems in the ground
and see if they really do work
and for how long.
If you are concerned as
I am, the next meeting is
in September. I don't know
about you but I'm tired of
government putting more
and more mandatory cost on
me without knowing the full
outcome.
Mike Stewart
Crawfordville


Hurricane program

set at FSU Marine Lab


A program about hurri-
canes will be held at the Flori-
da State University Marine Lab
on July 10. "Hurricanes: Past,
Present and Future," will be
held from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m.
The public is invited to
the next in the series of free
lectures on coastal and ma-
rine life and conservation
held throughout the year at
the Florida State University
Coastal and Marine Labora-
tory, located in St. Teresa, Fla.
Refreshments will be served.
The July 10 lecture will be
presented by Tim LaRow, an
associate scholar scientist in
meteorology at FSU's Center
for Oceanic-Atmospheric Pre-
diction Studies (COAPS)..
LaRow will discuss hurri-
cane activity on the seasonal
time scales. After a brief in-
troduction to hurricanes and
their anatomy, he will make a
detailed presentation on the
major hurricanes that have
made landfall in Florida, ex-
plain the factors affecting sea-
sonal hurricane activity, and
address the issue of global
warming and possible links
to hurricane activity in the
Atlantic.





926-3425 926-3655


Finally, LaRow will issue
various seasonal forecasts for
the 2008 hurricane season.


The Wakulla News office
and many other Wakulla
County businesses will be
closed for the Indepen-
dence Day holiday on Fri-
day July 4. Deadlines have
been moved to help us put
the paper together with one
less day to, work.
The news deadlines are
10 a.m. Thursday, July 3 for


Sopchoppy will host July 4 celebration
The Sopchoppy Fourth of sea Dix-Kessler, (vocals, fiddle "Butterfield Roadhouse," that town. The Sopchoppy Fourth
July is going to be celebrated and guitar), is an upcoming will be something so out-of- of July Parade will begin at 4
on Friday this year Begin- female duo whose music will the-ordinary for this county, p.m., with lineup at 3 p.m.,
ning downtown at 11 a.m., make you smile, while you that you will want to check it and following the parade, the
there will be pony pictures, listen to their amazing vocal out, just out of curiosity. Sopchoppy City Park will open
pony rides, a dunking booth, blends and watch their obvi- If you are a blues-loving for more fun, food, and festivf-
activities for children, food, ous love of performing for a person, and you want to ties. There will be three local
fun, candidates to chat with crowd. Frank Lindamood, the know more about music, bands performing, before the
about local issues, live music "real deal," when it comes to come and meet the new lo- fireworks begin.
and so much more. The event bluegrass and country guitar, cal talent, and find out some The opening ceremonies at
promises to be a fun-filled banjo and vocals, will play "infamous" connections to the park will be held at 5 p.m.
family event after "Calliope." music, that we have right here From 5:15 p.m. to 6:15 p.m., the
Backwoods Bistro will host The Sopchoppy IGA will in our county. Plus, stop by Sopchoppy Southern Baptist
live jazz music by the talented be serving hamburgers and "Sister's Antiques," and our Church Quartet will perform.
Zach Bartholomew from noon hotdogs, and there will be "old fashioned" hardware From 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.,
until 2 p.m. At 2 p.m., "Calli- sales at local shops. "Posh" store, "Sopchoppy True Value the bluegrass band, Cow Lick
ope," meaning "sweetvoices," will have some gift items on Hardware." will perform and the High
will perform country and bluer sale. A brand new shop will "From The Heart," Sopchop- Mileage Band will perform
grass downtown. "Calliope," open in Sopchoppy called, py's local recording studio, country and pop from 7:45
headlining Shannon Egler, "The Frog and The Hum- will be providing "sound" for p.m. to 9:15 p.m. The fireworks
(vocals and guitar) and Chel- mingbird Company, Inc," and the music and parade down- to follow High Mileage.

Traffic signals turned on at Highway 363/267
New traffic signals have been turned on at the intersection of Highway 267 and Highway 363 in Wakulla Station.
At the request of law enforcement and local citizens, effective July 1, the speed limit on SR 267 (Bloxham Cutoff) from
north of Rock Road/Olive Road to south of Card Lane will be decreased from 55 to 45 m.p.h. The 35 mph speed limit signs
on Woodville Highway will be replaced with 45 m.p.h. signs for a section from Terrace Lane to the Methodist Church.
In addition to a speed limit change, the traffic signal at the intersection of SR 267 was activated Tuesday, July 1. The signal
has been in a flash mode for several weeks to alert motorists.
The entire area is being studied for future improvements including the Shadeville Highway intersection with 267.
"As the Vice Chairman of the Capital Region Transportation Planning Agency (CRTPA), I am pleased to report the CRTPA
is studying the whole corridor from Shadeville Highway to Capital Circle," said Commissioner Ed Brimner. "The roads under
study include Old Woodville Highway, Woodville Highway, and the high tension power line running east of Woodville
Highway (not in sight from Woodville Highway)."

Sopchoppy will celebrate Independence Day


The Sopchoppy Fourth of
July is going to be celebrated
on Friday this year Begin-
ning downtown at 11 a.m.,
there will be pony pictures,
pony rides, a dunking booth,
activities for children, food,
fun, candidates to chat with
about local issues, live music
and so much more. The event
promises to be a fun-filled
family event
, Backwoods Bistro will host
live jazz music by the talented
Zach Bartholomew from noon
until 2 p.m. At 2 p.m., "Calli-
ope," meaning "sweet voices,"
will perform country and blue-
grass downtown, "Calliope,"
headlining Shannon Egler,
(vocals and guitar) and Chel-
sea Dix-Kessler, (vocals, fiddle
and guitar), is an upcoming
female duo whose music will
make you smile, while, you


listen to their amazing vocal
blends and watch their obvi-
ous love of performing for a
crowd. Frank Lindamood, the
"real deal," when it comes to
bluegrass and country guitar,
banjo and vocals, will play
after "Calliope."
The Sopchoppy IGA will
be serving hamburgers and
hotdogs, and there will be
sales at local shops. "Posh"
will have some gift items on
sale. A brand new shop will
open in Sopchoppy called,
"The Frog and The Hum-
mingbird Company, Inc," and
"Butterfield Roadhouse," that
will be something so out-of-
the-ordinary for this county,
that you will want to check it
out, just out of curiosity.
If you are a blues-loving
person, and you want to
know more about music,


come and meet the new lo-
cal talent, and find out some
"infamous" connections to
music, that we have right here
in our county. Plus, stop by
"Sister's Antiques," and our
"old fashioned" hardware
store, "Sopchoppy True Value
Hardware."
"From The Heart," Sopchop-
py's local recording studio,
will be providing "sound" for
the music and parade down-
town. The Sopchoppy Fourth
of July Parade will begin at 4
p.m., with lineup at 3 p.m.,
and following the parade, the


Sopchoppy City Park will open
for more fun, food, and festivi-
ties. There will be three local
bands performing, before the
fireworks begin.
The opening ceremonies at
the park will be held at 5 p.m.
From 5:15 p.m. to 6:15 p.m., the
Sopchoppy Southern Baptist
Church Quartet will perform.
From 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.,
the bluegrass band, Cow Lick
will perform and the High
Mileage Band will perform
country and pop from 7:45
p.m. to 9:15 p.m. The fireworks
to follow High Mileage.


NOTICE OF

PUBLIC MEETING
The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners
has scheduled a Public Meeting of the Citizens Advisory
Committee on Infrastructure Development on July 3,
2008 at 9:30 A.M. at the Wakulla County Public Libralfy
at 4330 Crawfordville Highway in 'Cra ford\iil .'F
Interested parties are invited to attend and participate:

Persons needing special access considerations should
call the Wakulla County Administrative Offices at least
48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The
Administrative Offices may be contacted at (850) 926-
0919.



I.MraPT-!ET


ED TO 'CELEBRATE OUR 60TH
ERSARY GRAND OPENING


w-a-


Digital Hearing Aid Sale
FREE Hearing Test
FREE Hearing Aid Demo
FREE Ear Wax Inspection


"Helpful, Caring, Dedicated,
Professional. Ann
& Miracle-Ear Ar
Names I Trust.'


all items faxed, mailed or for all other advertising.
delivered. The deadline is : or more information,
noon Thursday for all items cWl 926-7102.
submitted by e-mail.
The advertising dead-
lines are noon Thursday
for all ads requiring proofs;
4 p.m. for all legal notices
and real estate ads; 11 a.m.
Monday, July 7 for classi- YOUR INVIT
fied ads and noon Monday
0000 ,,ANNIV


INFLATION FIGHTER SPECIALS


2 TWO-BIT BURGERS with FRIES.....................$5
ORIGINAL BURGER with FRIES..........................$6
2 CATFISH with CHEESE GRITS & SLAW ............$8
S2 QUAIL with CHEESE GRITS & SLAW ...............$8

CHICKEN STRIPS with CHEESE GRITS & SLAW....$7

Alon6 with the
BEST SEAFOOb ON THE COAST
&ALL YOU CAN EAT CATFISH & QUAIL!

Tuesday Friday, 5pinm- p; Saturday & Sunday, 12pm mpi -3751


1W60
a. uI3 A Unf


" I tAKS Barry Bldg. Log Cabin
3925 Crawfordville Hwy.
Call For An Appointment
(850) 926-1741 10:30 AM 4:00 PM
= 121 i Anna Johnson WCTV
*Hearing test, cleaning, tune-ups and video otoscopic.inspection are always free. Hearing test is an audiometric test to determine
proper amplification needs only. These are not medical exams or diagnoses, nor are they intended to replace a-physician's care.








ACT NOW




The TCC Wakulla Center is offering a two-part
ACT Preparation course (6 hours of instruction).

Select one of the sessions (all classes 1-4 p.m.):
Tuesday, July 8 and Thursday, July 10
Tuesday, July 15 and Thursday, July 17
Tuesday, July 22 and Thursday, July 24


The fee is $100 plus the
cost of the book


,.--"r.:1

S- For more
information, call the
:, TCC Wakulla Center
.. 922-6290


Our deadlines will change due to

Independence Day holiday


I








Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008


Church


Obituaries


Donald L. Barden
Donald Livingstone Barden,
79, of Crawfordville died Mon-
day, June 23.
The funeral service was
held Friday, June 27 at Harvey-
Young Funeral Home in Craw-
fordville. Burial was at West
Sopchoppy Cemetery. In lieu
of flowers, donations may be
made to Alzheimer Resource
Center of Tallahassee, Inc.,
P.O. Box 35553, Tallahassee, FL
32315 of Harbor Breeze Home
in Carrabelle.
A graduate of Rochester
Institute of Technology in
Rochester, N.Y., he retired as a
fire protection engineer after
37 years with Factory Mutual
Engineering. He loved nature
and being outdoors. He was
an avid antique collector and
also pursued his passion for
genealogy, dating back to the
1700s. He moved to Tallahas-
see and eventually to Craw-
fordville 15 years ago.
Survivors include his wife
of 14 years, Ilene C. Barden
of Crawfordville; two sons,
Robin Barden of Trinity, N.C.
and Blaze Barden of Lawton,
Mich.; three daughters, Dawn
Thomas and husband Greg
of Decatur, Mich., Roxanne
Barden of Keeler, Mich., and
Starr Rife and husband Chad
of PawPaw, Mich.; two step-
sons, Early Duggar and wife
Eva of Tallahassee, and Joe
Duggar and wife Sandy of
Crawfordville; a stepdaughter,
Dot Williams and Clint of
Crawfordville; 12 grandchil-
dren; 11 great-grandchildren;
5 stepgrandchildren; five step-
great-grandchildren; three
sisters, Jo Ann Barber and
husband Herb of Westville,
N.Y., Brenda Wassinks and
husband Hal of Knox, Pa., and
Charlene Bray of Greensboro,
N.C., and several nieces and
nephews.
Harvey-Young Funeral
Home inCrawfordville was in
charge of the arrangements.

Kathleen H. Conklin
"Kathleen Hanson Conklin,
55; of Tampa, formerly of
Crawfordville, died Thursday,


Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worship................10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship............. 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Sunday
Visitors are welcome! V
Home Bible Courses available... p
please call for details, 8
962-2213 8


June 19 in Tampa.
The funeral service was
held Monday, June 23 in
Tampa.
Survivors include her moth-
er, Marvene Hanson of Tampa;
a son, Orlando Hero III and
Robin of Tampa; three grand-
children, Ashley, Antonio and
Orlando IV, all of Tampa; three
sisters, Lisa, Laurel and Rachel,
all of Tampa; six brothers,
David, Terry, Michael, Mark,
Chris and Gary; and several
nieces, including a special
niece, Sarah Davis.

Ray N. Eddy
Ray Nelson Eddy, 64, of
Crawfordville died Thursday,
June 26.
The funeral service will be
held Thursday, July 3 at 11
a.m. at First Baptist Church
of Crawfordville with burial
at Arran Annex Cemetery. In
lieu of flowers, memorial do-
nations may be made to Big
Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan
Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL
32308. Family will receive
friends from 7 p.m. until 9
p.m. Wednesday, July 2 at
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville and Thurs-
day, July 3 from 10 a.m. until
11 a.m. prior to the service at
First Baptist Church of Craw-
fordville.
A native of Corning, N.Y.,
he had lived in Crawford-
ville since 1987, coming from
Brandford. he was a glazer
and retired from Ray's Glass
Service.
. Survivors include, five sons,
Gary Sherman Eddy of Gaines-
ville, Randall Ray Eddy of
Leesburg, La., Russell Donald
Eddy of Crawfordville, Chris-
topher Byron Eddy of Fort
Myers and Donald Ray Eddy
of Eaglesville, Pa.; a daughter,
Rachel May Brammer of High
Springs; three brothers, Ivan
Eddy and George Eddy, both
of Corning, N.Y. and Archie
Eddy of Trenton, Fla.; six
sisters, Marie Peterson and
Marjie Martin, both of Corn-
ing, N.Y., Darline Moore of
Campbell, N.Y., Delinda Dann
of Monterey, N.Y., RoseAnn


Sopchoppy
-United
Methodist
Church
ay School 9:45 a.m.
Worship I I a.m.
astor Brett Templeton
50-962-251 I


3086 Crawfordville Hwy.
(South of the Courthouse)
Church Office: 926-7896
www.fbccrawfordville.org
or
(youth) www.crosstraining.org


SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY


Fellowship Meal
(call for reservations)
Prayer/ Bible Study
IMPACT (Youth)
Children's Events


6:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
6:30 p.m.


Roland of Trenton and Sandy
Van Vliet of Wellsboro, Pa.; a
grandmother, Mary McKinley
of Crawfordville; 14 grandchil-
dren; and a great-grandchild.
Harvey-Young Funeral
Home in Crawfordville is in
charge of the arrangements.

Largaret I. Maitland
largaret Irene Maitland,
77, )f Panacea died Friday,
June 27.
Iii lieu of flowers, memorial
donations may be made to
the Wakulla Animal Shelter,
1 Ok Street, Crawfordville,
FL 312327.
A native of Harvard, Ill., she
hadi lived in Panacea for 19
yeajs after moving from Lou-
isville, Ky. She loved to fish,
cook and spend time with her
grar children.
Survivors include, four
sons, Thomas Maitland of Jef-
fersonville, Ind., Warren Mait-
land of Louisville, Roy M. Mai-
tland of Pensacola and Kevin
Maitland of Georgetown, Ind.;
two daughters, Carolyn Davis
of Louisville and Beverly Grant
of Athens, Ga.; five sisters,
Jeannette Fitzgerald of Athens,
Ga., Jennifer Strickland of
North Carolina, Madelyn Bates
of 9elavan, Wis., and Kathryn
Boyd and Arlene Bates, both
of Nevada; six grandchildren;
and two great-grandchildren.
Harvey-Young Funeral
Home in Crawfordville was in
charge of the arrangements.

Addie Mann
Addie "Lucille" Mann, 96,
of Bainbridge, Ga. died June
27 in Thomasville, GA.
The funeral service was
held Tuesday, July 1 at Evangel


Panacea Park

Baptist Church
24 Mission Road, Panacea
Sunday School 10 a.m.
-Worship 1,a.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 p.m.
Pastor, Jerry Spears


%,o Church
1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98
Sunday School
Holy Eucharist 8:30 am
Youth & Adults 9:30 AM
Children 10:30 AM
Worship 10:30 AM
Reverend John Spicer
926-4288


Church Office
962-7822


Assembly of God in Tallahas-
see with burial at Oakland
Cemetery in Tallahassee.
Lucille resided most of
her life in the Tallahassee
area including Ft. Braden and
Chaires and resided the last
five yets in Bainbridge. In the
1950s, she was a manager of
the Suwannee Store on Adams
Street, Tallahassee and there-
after a homemaker. She was a
member of Evangel Assembly
of God, Tallahassee.
Survivors include her hus-
band of 26 years, E.L. Mann
of Bainbridge; two daughters,
Glenn Dora Cromer and hus-
band Alton of Bainbridge and
Alice Plowmaker and husband
Richard of Blairsville, Ga.;
two stepdaughters Gay Al-
len and Patty Scruggs, both
of Marianna and formerly of
Ft. Braden; a stepson, Dean
Scruggs of Tallahassee; two
sisters, Lottie Mae Mann and
Louise Raker, both of Tallahas-
see; four grandchildren, Janice
Carraway-Eakin and Mike,
Bruce Cromer and Phyllis,
Mark Plowmaker and Doris
and Cindy Miller and Drew;
five great-grandchildren, Me-
gan Carraway London and
Ed, Blake Carraway, Brittany
Cromer, Christopher Plow-
maker and Lindsay Miller; and
several nieces and nephews.
Bevis Funeral Home in Tal-
lahassee was in charge of the
arrangements.

Jane A. Parsons
Jane Ann Parsons, 71, of
Sopchoppy died Thursday,
June 19 at Big Bend Hospice
House in Tallahassee, after a
brief illness.
A memorial service was


Pioneer Baptist
Church (SBC)


Sunday School
Sunday Worship


9:15 a.m.
10:30 a.m.


Wed. adult, children & youth 7 p.m.
486 Beechwood Drive Crawfordville, FL.
(North of the Lower Bridge Road and
Spring Creek Highway intersection)
Rev. Dennis Hall, Pastor
850-926-6161


1 u Wakulia United
"J 'Methodist Church
SSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m
Sunday School for all ages -10 a.m.
Sunday Worship- 11 a.m.
Wednesday Service- 7 p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor Janice Henry Reinhert


Sunday School 9:45 AM
Morning Worship 11 AM
AWANA CLUB 5PM
Evening Worship 6 PM


Wednesday 7 PM Prayer Meeting,
Youth & Children's Programs
Dr. Bill Jenkins, Pastor
Randy Anderson, Minister of Music
Vicki Anderson, Youth Director
Jerry Evans, Mike Crouch, Bernie Kemp Musicians


held Monday, June 23 at Lake
Ellen Baptist Church. In lieu
of flowers, donations can be
made to Brian Parsons Memo-
rial Scholarship, 73 Daughtry
Drive, Sopchoppy, FL 32328
or Big Bend Hospice House,
1723 Mahan Center Blvd. Tal-
lahassee, FL 32308. hospice@
bigbendhospice.org
Born in Lansing, Michigan,
she came to Florida at the age
of 12, and to Wakulla County
in 1969.
Working on and off at the
Credit Bureau of Tallahassee,
and becoming a realtor in
1990, her main job was home-
maker and mother, raising
four children.
Survivors include her hus-
band of 55 years, Clay Parsons
of Sopchoppy; a daughter,
Faith Parsons of Crawfordville;
three sons, Mark Parsons and
wife Karen of Sopchoppy, Kev-
in Parsons and wife Crystal of
Crawfordville and Joel Parsons
of Titusville; her mother,
Ethel Franz of Auburndale; a
brother, Glen Franz and wife
Betty of Lakeland; a brother,
Dennis Franz of Winter Haven;
a sister-in-law, Maria Driver
of New Smyrna Beach; six
grandchildren; and 13 great-
grandchildren.

Roscoe N. Ring
Roscoe Nelson Ring, 82, of
Crawfordville died June 26 in
Tallahassee.
The funeral service was
held Saturday, June 28 at
Crawfordville United Meth-
odist Church with burial at




STRONG

& JONES

Funeral Home, Inc.
551 West Carolina St.
Tallahassee, FL 32301

Gracious,
Dignified Service

SnRwa 224-2139
Day or Night
Pre-Arrangements
Silver Shield
Notary
DARRELL L. LAWRENCE
LINN ANN GRIFFIN
J. GRIFFIN
Licensed Funeral Directors


Roseland Park Cemetery in
Berkley, Mich. In lieu of flow-
ers donations may be made
to Covenant Hospice, 1545
Raymond Diehl Road, Talla-
hassee, FL 32308.
A native of Highland Park,
Mich., he had lived in Craw-
fordville for one year coming
from Tampa. He was of the
Christian faith and very active
in church activities.
Survivors include a son,
Ronnie Ring and wife Tina
of Oakland, Fla.; a daughter,
Laura Dawson and husband
Paul of St. Marks; two broth-
ers, Wayne Ring and Jack
Ring, both of Michigan; four
grandchildren, Rachel hus-
band Josh, Stephanie, Tyler
and Courtney; and four great-
grandchildren, Blake, Alijah,
Layla and Lidia.
Harvey-Young Funeral
Home in Crawfordville was in
charge of the arrangements.
VBS is slated
Crawfordville First Baptist
Children's Ministry will be of-
fering a new approach to VBS
with a one day Bible School from
9 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Saturday,
July 12. Children who have
completed kindergarten through
fifth grade are invited to attend.
For info call, 926-7896.

Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
ICrawfordville
Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey
S"Come & Worsi.p 'Hkh Us"
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School........................ 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................... 11 a.m.
Evening Worship.................6.....6 p.m.
Wednesday Service..............7.... p.m.
& Youth Service .................7......7 p.m.
Royal Rangers....................7.... p.m.
M issionettes ..............................7 p.m .


F Wa"tla
Preyteri
3383 Coastal Hwy.
1/3rd mile east of Wakulla High School
9:30 a.m. Bible Study
10:30 a.m. Worship Service
10:45 a.m. Children's Sunday School
Nursery Provided
926-4569
www.wakullapres.org



(Us h't
da d d /
Th. fteq4awudqe'}mina&,P~t


Crawfordville United

Methodist Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 926-7209
Ochlockonee & Arran eRoad "Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-ame.org
C----^^^E?^^- --------------.^

lo s 10anaflnent Jfe/r cel
5585 Crawfordville Hwy.
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926-8000 (fax: 926-2000)


missionary
Baptist Church
90 Mt. Pleasant Lane,
Wakulla Station
Pastor Rev. Dr. Frank McDonald, Jr.
421-8900
Sunday School Each Sunday... 10 a.m.
11 & 31 Sun. Worship .......... 11 a.m.
Wednesday Service ............. 7 p.m.
(Prayer Meeting and Bible Study)
Our Mission "To be a change agent in
the community for the glory of God."


St. Elizabeth 1 f/ J--
Ann Seton
Catholic Ch
Mass 9 a.m. Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Father James MacGee, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
L 926-1797


Trinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
TrinityLutheranofWakulla.com
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Les Kimball
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557


A'A'CO()eit tMe,i/O(/Ale.vwce /


I lHwy 319 Medart,
Office 926-5265
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Mn Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
D' Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
L' Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org


117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy


i


I









THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008 Page 5A


From The Heart Lynn Artz


Continued from Page 1A
Back in late 1970s, he was
a founding member of Reel
Rock Productions out of Tal-
lahassee, working as FOH en-
gineer for many major artists
such as Liberace, Lawrence
Welk, Chuck Berry, David Al-
len Coe, Skip Ewing and Steve
Warner to name a few. He
also served as Head Techni-
cian on shows for artists such
as George Jones, Kenny Rogers
and Kris Kristofferson. His stu-
dio engineer experience was
gained with many hours spent
in studios such as Flamingo
Studios in Tallahassee, and at
From,The Heart for the past
five years. Ott has acted as
producer, as well as engineer,
on many of the CDs recorded
at Fronm The Heart.
McCall incorporates her
computer skills, experience
as a legal assistant, office
manager, and bookkeeper in
the daily business activities
of From The Heart. She works
directly with her entertain-
ment attorney and keeps the
business schedules and activi-
ties running as smoothly as
possible.
Constantly honing her
skills, in graphic design, she
designs many of their record-
ing,,artists CD covers. She
has gven learned a whole
lot about sound engineering
along the way, she said.
"From The Heart is proud
of all of the artists we have
worked with over the years,"
she said. "Probably one of
their. longest established re-
lationships is with a very tal-
ented songwriter, Ron Patrick.
We have worked on several
projects with him over the
years and his newest project
is almost complete and will
be available soon. Ron is one
of the co-founders of Greater
-Big Bend Music (www.greater-
bigbendmusic.com) and is the
Nishville Songwriters Asso-
ciation International regional
coordinator for this area.
The most recent and inspi-
rational project in the studio
was recorded by Mimi and the
Hearn Dogs, said Ott. "The
band recorded live in the stu-
dio no overdubs and only
a :ouple of second takes," he
slid.
Grant Peeples has recorded
three CDs in the past two
ydars. Two were recorded
eAtirely at From The Heart
and one in collaboration with
another studio, GatorBone

Hood-
Continued from Page 1A
""I love working with kids,"
said Hood. "It's educating at
a less formal level."
Hood taught at Chatta-
hoochee High School in
Gadsden County before
it was consolidated with
Greensboro to become West
Gadsden High School. She
also worked at Florida High,
in the Rickards IB program,
Tallahassee Community Col-
lege and at schools in Mary-
land'and Virginia.
Hood received her under-
graduate degree from Au-
burn and her post graduate
degree from Florida State
University. She is beginning
the process to start up new
4-H clubs and strengthen
the ones that already exist.
Her teaching background is
in chemistry and she hopes
to work chemistry into a 4-H
club as well.
she has become involved
in Volunteer Wakulla and is
planning the First Annual
Cookie Bake-off as an effort
to link her 4-H and volunteer
programs.
"I'd like to grow the pro-


Studios out of St. Augustine.
Recently, From The Heart
recorded and provided all
of their in-house services to
one of our local icons, Mack
(Slim) McElderry releasing his
"Green Floridays" CD. Several
gospel groups have recorded
in the studio. One group, the
Soul Revivals continues to use
their services promoting their
"Bottle of Tears" CD.
Other projects include art-
ists such as Allan Gary with
his Candy Kitchen Blues Band,
Ken Bridges with his One of
Many band, and a Backwoods
Boogie Band project that was
underway which ultimately
became the "Loved Big" CD, a
tribute to William Solburg fea-
turing William on bass guitar.
Younger talented musicians,
The Pink Shoelaces, recorded
their CD at the studio. From
The Heart also provides CD
mastering and recently mas-
tered Sharla June's CD, "Flying
Without My Wings Again"
which was voted in the top
20 Country CDs of the Year
in the "Bring Back Country"
charts. McCalle and Ott real-
ized recently while pulling
CDs for a recent radio show
that they have completed 13
CD projects at From The Heart
in the last 24 months.
Some of their live sound
customers include Sopchoppy
Worm Gruntin' Festival, Pana-
cea Blue Crab Festival, Wakulla
High School, Wakulla Law Day
Luncheon, Wakulla Ducks
Unlimited Fundraiser, Wakulla
Business Appreciation Lun-
cheon, Carrabelle River Front
Festival, Carrabelle Lighthouse
Fundraiser, Wakulla Maritime
Festival (Mighty Mullet) and
many artist's live shows.
"From The Heart is ex-
tremely grateful to WOCY
106.5 Oyster Country for their
support by providing the op-
portunity to air local artists on
From The Heart Music Hour,"
concluded McCall. "Oyster Ra-
dio really deserves a big round
of applause. You don't always
get this kind of support."
For more information about
sponsoring a broadcast or any
other questions relating to
services provided by From
The Heart, call 962-5282, mail
to P. 0. Box 399, Sopchoppy,
Florida 32358, or visit them
on the web at www.fromthe-
heartofsopchoppy.com or
e-mail fromtheheartrecording-
studio@gmail.com.


grams," she said. "There
is so much potential here"
through retired or retiring
teachers.
4-H programs include Tar-
get Smashers, Horsemasters,
arts and crafts and dairy
goats. She also hopes to
build a sewing, quilting and
high school level chemistry
club.
"It is amazing," she said.
"I have had so much fun.
There has been so much
positive response and the
kids have been great."
Hood complimented
Wakulla Extension Director
Scott Jackson for giving her
both direction and the free-
dom to allow her to work
creatively.
Hood plans to conduct
mini seminars to allow
youths to learn about bank-
ing, nutrition and baby-sit-
ting.
While the family and con-
sumer science agent has her
own program, Hood said she
anticipates working closely
with Swenson, Swenson also
plans to relocate to Wakulla
County.


Continued from Page 1A
As commissioner, I will
work for and with our citizens
to shape a more promising
future for Wakulla County."
Artz has followed county
decisions closely and she
said the county can do better.-
"Wakulla County needs smart-
er growth, a government that's
more in touch with its citizens,
efficient use of tax dollars, ef-
fective ways to reduce fuel and
energy costs, and sustainable
economic development that
protects our natural resources
and quality of life," she said.
"We need a strong leader who
has the vision and commit-
ment to pursue a better future
for Wakulla County.
"I bring to the commission
several strengths that are des-
perately needed in our county.
I am a community leader and
planner by nature and profes-
sion. I maintain a long-term
view. If there's one thing our
developing county needs, it is
better long-term planning. We
must learn from the successes
and failures of our own county
and other communities. We
need to be clear on what kind
of county we want to live in
10, 20, even 50 years from
now and clear on how best
to get there. Otherwise, what
we value most about Wakulla
County will erode away and
our dreams for Wakulla County
will never come true."
Because she understands
the importance of citizen in-
volvement for planning and
in solving problems, Artz said
she will seek input from citi-
zens. "I have great respect for
the people of this county. I
will propose several ways to
routinely find out what citizens


value and which alternatives
they prefer. I will tap citizens'
ideas and expertise, and in-
volve citizens as reviewers and
decision-makers. Many people
in our county have valuable
skills and experiences and
often suggest innovative solu-
tions. We should better use
this resource to help solve our
problems and reach our goals,"
she continued.
"I value teamwork, partner-
ships, and collaboration. Our
county government needs
to work more collaboratively
with the other municipalities
in our county. I also favor a
much stronger regional ap-
proach, collaborating with
our neighboring counties on
major issues such as water
and waste management, Emer-
gency Medical Services (EMS),
and transportation."
Though a busy mother,
Artz is involved with many
local organizations, often tak-
ing a leadership role. For four
years, Artz has coordinated the
annual Crawfordville Arbor
Day Celebration. The popular
event has given nearly 3,000
free trees to local residents,
In 2006, Artz worked with a
diverse group to craft a Tree
and Landscape Ordinance,
now in effect, for commercial
property in the county.
Artz chairs the Wakulla
Health Care Task Force. Under
her leadership, this group, in
three years, has conducted
a community needs assess-
ment, developed a strategic
plan, and worked to increase
the availability of urgent care
and diagnostic services in
the county. The group sought
federal earmark funding to
expand county EMS services,


increased the number of pro-
viders participating in the Flor-
ida Shots program, conducted
a community quit-smoking
program (Quit & Win), offered
free sports physical to student
athletes, and published a bro-
chure of medical resources for
visitors and new residents.
Artz is an advocate for chil-
dren and has been active with
the Children's Coalition and
the Wakulla County Coalition
for Youth. She coordinates
an annual statewide environ-
mental conference for teens,
and this summer moved the
conference from the University
of Florida campus to Wakulla
Springs State Park. This move
has helped to put Wakulla
County on the map as a tourist
destination statewide and is
contributing economically to
the county.
Artz is on the Board of the
Friends of Wakulla Springs
State Park, the Planning Com-
mittee for the annual Green
Living & Energy Expo, and was
on the Steering Committee for
,county visioning activities con-
ducted several years ago. She
is a member of the Chamber
of Commerce and participates
on the Economic Develop-
ment Council. Recently, Artz
worked with Historical Society
members and county represen-
tatives to preserve Wakulla's
historic homes and develop a
Heritage Park in Medart.
Artz put herself through col-
lege by working as a resident
assistant and received her,
undergraduate degree from
Penn State University in just
two years. She obtained her
medical degree from the Uni-
versity of Tennessee College
of Medicine, then practiced


medicine briefly, seeing cardi-
ology patients in Memphis and
staffing rural emergency rooms
in Mississippi. Convinced of
the importance of prevention,
however, Artz moved into
public health and obtained a
Masters of Public Health de-
gree from Harvard.
Artz has held faculty ap-
pointments at two Universities,
taught undergraduate and
graduate students, conducted
federally funded research, 2
and authored publications
in professional journals. Her -
focus has been on improving
community health and safety.
From 1988 to 1990, Artz served
as Senior Prevention Policy
Advisor in the Department of
Health and Human Services in
Washington, D.C. Afterwards,
she helped to direct the award-
winning Good Health Program,
which improved health and '
contained healthcare costs
among nearly 4,000 municipal ,
employees in Birmingham, Ala.
She also ran her own business
as a health program consultant Z
for 15 years,
Artz has been married to
Jim Hilyer for 18 years. An
exercise physiologist, Hilyer
has coached football at Mis- -
sissippi State, Auburn Uni-
versity, Washington Redskins
and Alabama-Birmingham. He
is also a licensed psychologist '
and provides sport psychology T
services to the U.S. Paralympic c
Team. Together, they have a'
son, Chase, 8.
"Don't settle for less. Be-
lieve in what Wakulla County
can be. Search with me for
what is possible. Join me in
changing Wakulla County.
With your voice, we can grow
responsibly, together." -'


Rules require tags on passive fishing gear


Passive fishing gear things
like trotlines, crab traps, bush
hooks and other devices that
catch fish in fresh water while
the fisherman isn't present
- have to be tagged with the
owner's name and address
under a new rule.
The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission
(FWC) adopted new rules in
response to public requests
for tighter management of
p-:ssive gear to reduce the loss
of fish and wildlife caught by
lost or abandoned gear and
to reduce navigation hazards
for vessels. It will enable FWC
officers to identify and remove
lost and abandoned gear and
illegally used gear.
The new tagging require-
ment applies to commercial
and recreational trotlines,
bush hooks, set lines, wire
traps, slat baskets, hoop nets,
minnow lift nets, eel traps/
pots, blue crab pots, Carolina-
pots and shotgun pots. It does
not apply to hand-held gear,
such as a rod and reel.
Also, the new rule does
not include specifications for
tagging passive gear, except
to say the owner's name and
address must be legible. The


U 926-3425
926-3655


850.224.4960

www.fsucu.org


new rule applies only in fresh
water. Saltwater fishing is
subject to other rules.
FWC officials said the new
rule is particularly important
during current drought con-


editions that have exposed
numerous traps and baskets
that have been lost or aban-
doned but are still catching
and wasting fish and are a
hazard to boaters.


FWC officers will be work- ,'
ing with fishermen to increase
awareness of the new rules
and enlist help in protecting
resources and promoting pub-
lic safety.


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4 p.m. THUR July 3rd for all legal notices.
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. Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008


Business


Abal Auction expands into Orlando


The Abal Auction Real
Estate group is expanding
its auction program into the
Orlando real estate market.
Already a premium player
in the Tallahassee/Panhan-
dle real estate market, the
auction company has signed
to auction a premium Winter
Park home for a 38 year vet-
eran of service with the U.S.
Department of Treasury and
Homeland Security.
Mr. Davis began his ca-
reer in Miami and after mili-
tary service was transferred
to the Orlando area during
the 1990s.
He settled in Winter Park
and eventually purchased
the four bedroom, three
bath home with pool in the
Winter Park Pines area.
Tallahassee business and
government friends made
him aware of the innova-
tive work being done on the
Internet for buying and sell-
ing at auction so he made
an inquiry of Dr. Joe Abal
and the crew of professional
auctioneers and real estate


brokers at Abal Auction Real
Estate.
Dr. Joe Abal indicated
that "Mr. Davis makes a
great client. He has done his
time and wishes to relocate
to the North Florida area
and didn't want to spend a
lot of time with his house
on the market waiting for
it to sell."
"The auction method of
marketing gives me. an op-
portunity to be actively mar-
keting my home and prop-
erty given today's difficult
market," said Mr. Davis.
"The auctioneers at Abal
Auction developed a com-
prehensive marketing plan
that was extremely aggres-
sive and comprehensive in
reaching buyers.
"Their use of the bidding
platform at www.abalaution.
com makes aggressive use of
the best features of a 29 day
Internet auction followed
by a live webcast auction at
www.proxibid.com.
"This combination as-
sures that I will receive


maximum saturation of my
marketing dollars in reach-
ing bidders."
Auctioneer Abal indicated
"Mr. Davis makes for a moti-
vated seller. He has a home
in which he has built equity
and at the same time agreed
to a comprehensive market-
ing plan which gives his
property exposure locally,
nationally and internation-
ally. The auction method
allows us to bring great
transparency and openness
to the auction event."
Betty Evans, auctioneer
with Abal Auction, oversaw
the development of a com-
plete Property Information
Package (PIP) which was
then merged into the web
site.
The package allows bid-
ders to conduct their due
diligence and homework
on the property right on the
Abal Auction webpage.
The live webcast allows
merging the high Internet
bid into the starting bid at
the live webcast.


This gives all bidders the
'same playing field to raise
their bids online or simply
come to the live auction to
protect their bid.
"Our bidding platform
works equally well for real
estate or personal property,"
said Abal. "Recently we had
a gun and coin auction and
drew bidders from the west
and that included Hawaii.
"I believe with our mar-
keting plan on the Winter
Park real estate auction
should reach the interna-
tional buyer. We have de-
signed within our marketing
plan an international com-
ponent trying to reach out
to those investor/buyers
that want to spend time in
Orlando."
The online auction began
June 24 with registration and
bidding. The live webcast
auction takes place at the
2842 Sandwell Drive, Winter
Park location on July 8 at 11
a.m. with the live webcast
portion of the auction.


Lefsky joins Tastefully

Simple as consultant


Christy Lefsky of Crawford-
ville has become an indepen-
dent consultant with Taste-
fully Simple, Inc., a national
direct-sales company featur-
ing easy-to-prepare gourmet
products.
As a consultant, Lefsky of-
fers the company's gourmet
foods and beverages to guests
at home taste-testing parties.
Guests receive samples, easy'
meal ideas, recipes and serv-
ing suggestions.
"The Tastefully Simple op-
portunity is designed to be
life friendly," says Jill Blashack
Strahan, Tastefully Simple,
Inc. founder and CEO "Con-
sultants find a great deal of
satisfaction through its fun
nature, flexibility, unlimited

Sports New


earning potential and top-
notch products."
Tastefully Simple is an
ideal opportunity for those
seeking new or additional
business options, supplemen-
tary income, more time with
children, or simply control
and freedom, Blashack Stra-
han says.
For more information
about Tastefully Simple prod-
ucts, taste-testing parties or
the business opportunity,
contact Christy Lefsky at fun-
christy0604@yahoo.com
About Tastefully Simple:
Tastefully Simple is the
original national home taste-
testing company featuring
easy-to-prepare gourmet
foods.


Wakulla unemployment rate is down


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla County's unem-
ployment rate was down in
April, and was second lowest
in the state, according to the
state Agency for Workforce In-
novation. For the past several
months, Wakulla County has
had as one of the lowest job-
less rates in Florida.
Unemployment in Florida
was steady in April, at 4.9
percent, and continued below
the national average of 5.0
percent.


Of the 67 counties in Flor-
ida, only Alachua and Walton
counties had lower unemploy-
ment, at 3.0 percent, than
Wakulla's rate of 3.1 percent.
Leon and Liberty counties
also had jobless rates of 3.1
percent.
In April, the Wakulla la-
bor force increased to 15,690
people of which 15,199 were
employed and 491 were un-
employed.
In March, the Wakulla la-
bor force consisted of 15,751
people of which 15,223 were


employed and 528 were un-
employed.
In February, the labor force
consisted of 15,652 people of
which 15,137 were employed
and 515 were unemployed.
The Tallahassee Metro-
politan Area, which includes
Wakulla, Leon, Jefferson and
Gadsden counties for the
purpose of market analysis,
had an overall unemploy-
ment rate of 3.3 percent in
April, second lowest of the 23
MSAs in the state. Only the
Gainesville MSA was lower at


3.0 percent.
The labor force in the Tal-
lahassee metropolitan area
consisted of 186,666 people
in April, of which 180,522
were employed and 6,144 were
unemployed.
The highest unemploy-
ment in the state continued
to be in Flagler County with
a rate of 7.6 percent.
The national unemploy-
ment rate was 5.0 percent in
April, down from 5.1 percent
in March.


FWC issues report on Florida environment


FWC report will examine
Florida's'next half-century.
. The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commis-
sion (FWC) heard a sobering
summary of an unfinished
staff report Wednesday,
June 11 concerning what


might happen in Florida's notes, based on another re.
environment by 2060, unless port by 1000 Friends of Flor-
residents and leaders adopt ida, that the state's human
smart growth strategies, population could double to
The 28-page report, titled 36 million, and millions of
"Florida 2060: What's at stake acres of important wildlife
for wildlife?" should be com- habitats could disappear
pleted later this summer. It beneath development, un-


Hunt season applications available
Applications and informa- Quota Hunts include the follow- applications must be mailed o
tion for the St. Marks National ing: Piney Island Waterfowl and hand delivered to the St. Mark
Wildlife Refuge 2008-2009 hunt Small Game. NQR with $5 application fee pe
season will be available by call- Requests for applications for applicant. The deadline for ap
ing, writing, faxing, or coming by non-quota permits may be com- plications is 4 p.m. Friday, Aug
the refuge office until Aug. 25. pleted by calling 925-6121; Fax, 1. Successfully drawn hunter
Applications may be also be 925-6930; or writing St. Marks should receive a notification
printed from the web site and NWR, PO Box 68, St. Marks, FL letter by mail before Aug. 16
mailed. The deadline for applica- 32355. The refuge is located at Only successful hunters will be
tions is 4 p.m. Monday, Aug. 25. 1255 Lighthouse Rd., three miles notified and will need to send i
Selected hunters should receive south of U.S. Highway 98 near $25 to receive their permit.
a notification by mail before Newport. White-tailed Deer (Archery
Sept. 8. The notification letter St. Vincent National Wildlife Primitive Weapons) application
plus $15 must be returned to Refuge 2008-2009 hunting sea- must be completed and returned
receive the permit, son information will be available with a $25 expanded amenity
Quota Hunts include the by calling, writing, faxing, or fee to the St. Marks NWR office
following: Fall Archery, Gen- coming by the St. Marks Refuge and permits) will be issued. The
eral Gun, Mobility-impaired Gun office through Aug. 1. Applica- deadline for applications is
Hunt, and Spring Gobbler, tions may also be printed from p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 1.
Non-quota hunt permits are the web site. Hunters must apply For info, call 925-56121.
available by calling, writing, or for permits for all hunts.
coming by the refuge office. Sambar Deer quota hunt JVA F VI Fl?|/


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5.
e
n

&i
s
d
y
e
4


less Florida adopts different
growth patterns.
"We're not saying, this is
what will happen; this is
what might happen if Flo-
ridians don't work together
to help shape the future,"
said the FWC's Dr. Thomas
Eason, who summarized the
report. "The answers lie in
the hands of landowners and
residents."
The report will be avail-
able for download at MyFWC.
com when it is finished,


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Trainer Is An
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Workout!
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Stone Cowie, Bill Versiga, Spencer Smith on the links

Wakulla golfers show

their skills on links


Optimist members Bill
Versiga and Quill Turk, not
pictured, traveled to Howey in
the Hills where Spencer Smith
and Stone Cowie participated
in an Optimist International
Junior Golf Championship
that took place June 17 and
June 18.
Stone Cowie placed second


and will be advancing to the
PGA Junior International Tour-
nament in July in West Palm
Beach. They were coached
by Mike Smith. Stone and
Spencer are sponsored by
the Coastal Wakulla Optimist
Club. For further information,
contact Quill Turk at 850-984-
5384.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3


~, W.V

wi..


: Everyone in Wakulla County should have a disaster plan


the Hurricane Tips located through-
out this edition. Please utilize the
information in the development of
your personal family disaster plan.
It is important that each citizen
take steps to protect their property
and assure their safety during di-
sasters.
The first step to protecting your
family is to develop your specific
plan, which includes a process for
evacuation. The county and state


mandatory evacuation zones. Every possible to assure we meet your
major disaster is chaotic as power, needs. However, every citizen has
communications, and access to a responsibility to follow evacu-
resources are strained and in many ation orders and to assure that
cases unavailable. It is important they are prepared to recover from
for every citizen to understand that disasters. Your plan should include
land falling hurricanes in our com- your pets.
munity will be devastating, regard- We cannot shelter pets at the
less of our response capabilities. Animal Shelter, which is located
Every citizen must take steps to within a Category Three storm
prepare for and recover from the surge. When determining where
impacts of hurricanes. Homes and you will go during an evacuation,


to think about your current plan
and the actions you will take in
response to disasters in your com-
munity.
For more information on family
preparedness plans, go to www.
Floridadisaster.org. If you have any
questions, you can contact the Sher-
iff's Office, Division of Emergency
Management at 926-0861 or visit our
web site at www.wcso.org.
As we move through what ex-


have very robust response capa- property are replaceable; we can- consider family friends and motels perts are predicting to be a bu
abilities to meet your needs immedi- not replace lives. Please utilize the that will take pets and plan accord- storm season, I remind all of y.
ately following disasters; however, information in these documents ingly. that it only takes one storm
the only way we can protect you to develop your personal prepared- If you or a family member has be significant to our communi
from life threatening situations is&to ness plan. We need citizens to a special medical need (electricity Hopefully this hurricane season
Scott Nelson remove you from harm's way prior fully understand and plan for their dependent, oxygen dependent, etc.) will end without impacts to o
The Wakulla County Sheriff's to the event, specific vulnerabilities, they should contact the Emergency nation, state, or community.
Office, Division of Emergency Man- The entire county is vulnerable The Wakulla County Sheriff's Management Office for information We all know that it is not if
agement in coordination with The to devastating storm surge meaning Office, along with our partner re- on our special needs registry at storm will impact our county, t
Wakulla News is providing you with that we are all potentially within sponse agencies, will do everything 926-0861. Please take a few minutes when it will occur.


State offers free windstorm inspections to the public


isy
ou
to
ty.
on
our

Fa
but


Homeowners across North
Florida are urged to sign up for
the free windstorm inspections
before the state reaches its goal
of 400,000 free inspections. More
than 340,000 Florida homeowners
have already signed up for the pro-
gram and residents are signing up
at more than 1,000 per day.
The State of Florida, through
the My Safe Florida Home Program
administered by CFO Alex Sink,
is giving way 400,000 free wind-
storm inspections. The program is
funded by the Florida Legislature
for people who own Florida single
family homes.
More than 340,000 applications
have been received so time is of
the essence to see that as many
homeowners "as possible have
the opportunity to receive a free
windstorm inspection.


Homeowners can sign up for a
free inspection simply by calling
Panhandle Windstorm Inspections
(PWI) toll free at (877) 536-0630.
They can also go to www.panhan-
dlewindstorm.com and complete
an on-line application. PWI is an
authorized inspection company in
North Florida with the state My
Safe Florida Home program.
With the advent of peak hur-
ricane season just months away,
homeowners across the state are
taking advantage of this free pro-
gram in record numbers.
The program, which is only
available to single-family detached
dwellings, provides homeowners
with the insurance forms which
could entitle homeowners to
discounts on their homeowner's
insurance. A State of Florida
study showed homeowners are


eligible for, but are not receiving
an average of $282 a year in in-
surance premium discounts. PWI
will provide homeowners with
the necessary documentation to
receive this discount. The program
is totally voluntary and the hom-
eowner decides whether to send
the information to their insurance
company.
In addition to the insurance
documents, the State of Florida
will provide homeowners a "hur-
ricane rating" for their home and
provide recommendations on how
to strengthen their home.
"The Legislature funded 400,000
free windstorm inspections and
once those are completed that
will be the end of it," said Ken
Walton, co-owner of Panhandle
Windstorm Inspections. "This is
a very valuable state program and


North Florida residents should
take advantage before the goal is
reached."
"A free state sponsored inspec-
tion will provide homeowners
with some critical information
about their home and more than
likely save them some money on
their homeowner's insurance,"
Walton concluded.
Under the My Safe Florida
Home free inspection, PWI state
certified-inspectors will assess
seven critical areas of a home. The
inspection takes approximately 45
minutes. The state will provide
an analysis on how safe a home
is today and provide suggestions
on how to strengthen or harden
the home.
While Florida has not had a
major storm in more than two
years, hurricane forecasters are


again predicting an above average
year. Dr. William Gray, who is be-
ginning his 25th year forecasting
hurricanes at Colorado State Uni-
versity, had some grim predictions
for Florida this hurricane season,
which began June 1.
The hurricane forecast team pre-
dicted there is a 45 percent chance
that a major hurricane will make
landfall on the U.S. East Coast, in-
cluding the Florida peninsula.
In addition, they predicted a 44
percent chance that a major hurri-
cane will make landfall on the Gulf
Coast from the Florida panhandle
west to Brownsville.
"We believe the state will run
out of these free inspections in July
or at the latest August," Walton
said. "This will be just in time for
the peak of hurricane season in
late August, early September."


Plan for the protection of your pet


Only 38 percent of U.S. house- will not accept pets. If you can't take
holds have children, but 43 percent your pets with you, arrangements
have pets! Take time now to plan should be made with a clinic or ken-
how you will protect yours during nel that is outside of the evacuation
a'weather emergency, area. These arrangements should
All pet owners should make be made well in advance because
arrangement for their pets if they available spaces fill up quickly as
plan to evacuate. Public shelters 'a storm approaches. If you plan to


take your pets with you, you may food.
want to ask your vet for a mild seda- Water in plastic containers
tive (for the pet) and remember to Medications and health, re-
take these items for their care: cords.


A secure pet carrier of appro-
priate site.
Food/water bowls.
A one-week supply of dry


Leashes (muzzles if neces-
sary).
Newspapers and paper towels
for cleanup.


A favorite blanket.
Many hotels/motels will accept
pets, especially in emergency situ-
ations. If you plan to go to a motel,
determine in advance if pets are
welcome and what, if any, special
rules are applicable.
Continued on Page 10A


1L.











.. ..~. .




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A little preparation
MAKES A BIG DIFFERENCE.
Bottled water. A flashlight and radio. Fresh batteries. Having the
little things ready can make a big difference when a storm hits.
State Farm" can help before as well as after. Contact me for tips on
how to prepare or visit statefarm.com*.


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.....-F T-.... ,A TERTHE ,TOoRM
If ybur well has been covered with flood water, your water may contain disease-causing organisms and may not be
safe to drink. For disinfecting instructions and water testing, pleasecontact the Wakulla County Health Department
at 850-926-2558.
The.rk of food poisoning is heightened when rtelrigerators and oven. are Inoperable; discord ,ny food that has bee
Sat room Itemperature for two hours or more. Just remember -When in doubt, throw it out!
S ] *t '-Keep )our generator outside, ,uay from doors, windowsanid vents. Keep the generator dry,
SHlavr rains and flooding can lead to an increase in mosquitoes, they are most active at sunrise and sunset. Check
arouid your home to rid the area ofrstanding, water, which is where mosquitoes can lay their eggs. To request flee
Online Resources spra. ing and treatment of ponds. Call: 850-Q26-2558, option 4.
Wakllaer lla ualh.com' alth Dpartmnt
Fnli ondisser Wakulla Countn Health Department 85M-926-2558 48 Oak Street Crawfordville. FL 32327


IC


Every year, prior to hurricane season, review your hurricane plan and make
changes as necessary. It should include evacuation plans, where you will|
go, and the route you will take to get there, when you will leave and what
supplies you will take.

If you plan to stay, make sure you have all of the supplies necessary to be
on your own for at least 72 hours. If you are planning to go to an evacuation
shelter, have your shelter supplies kit packed and ready. Make sure you
have all the materials on hand to protect your home. You should also trim
dead wood from trees. Don't forget to make arrangements for pets. Print
and save this page for future reference. You may not have power if a storm
is approaching.

If the storm is threatening the area you should listen to local media for
information and actions to be taken. In addition you should:

Fuel your car. You will need it to evacuate and pumps don't work
without electricity.
Bring in outdoor objects such as lawn furniture, toys and garden tools.
Install your storm shutters or cover windows with plywood and secure
all doors. If you don't cover our windows, remove your screens so
they won't blow away and you can reinstall them after the storm to
keep mosquitoes at bay.
Prepare boats as appropriate.
Turn refrigerators and freezers to the highest settings. Freeze plastic
bottles of water (leave room for expansion).
Turn off small appliances that are not needed.
Turn off LP tanks.
Call an out-of-town friend or relative to let them know of your plans.
Then instruct other family members to call that person for information
about your family after the storm.
Fill sinks and bathtubs with water. Check them for slow leaks.
Get an extra supply of cash. Banks and ATMs may not be operational
immediately after the storm.


If you stay at home during a hurricane you' should take the following
precautions in addition to those mentioned in the Before the Storm
section as the storm approaches;

Stay away from windows and doors, even if they are covered.
Take refuge in a small interior room, closet, hallway or basement
if available. If you live in a two story home, choose a room
on the first floor.
Close all interior doors and brace exterior doors if possible.
Lie on the floor under a table, or another sturdy object.
Some protection is afforded by covering with a mattress during
the height of the storm.
If the eye of the storm passes over, it will be calm for a short period
of time. REMAIN INDOORS! As soon as the eye passes over, winds will
increase rapidly to hurricane force from the opposite direction.
Remain calm. It may take several hours for the storm to pass.




While at home during a hurricane, you should have the following items on
hand. Please remember that if you are in an area that is evacuated, it is
important to leave when the order is issued.

Water Store one gallon of water per person per day for at least 5 days
Food Store at least a 3-day supply of non-perishable food
First Aid Kit One for your home and the other for your car
Tools Basic tool kit for making temporary repairs after the storm
Clothing and Bedding Work boots and gloves, rain gear, blankets or
sleeping bags, lots of towels, hats and sunglasses
Special Items Baby formula, diapers, bottles and medications for children
and adults
Entertainment Games and books for children and adults


* Keep listening to your local radio or TV stations for information.
* If you evacuated, return home only when authorities advise that it is
safe. Make sure you have plenty of gas, and bring any supplies you
may need (batteries, water, non-perishable food).
* Drive only if it is absolutely necessary. Immediately following the
passage of the storm, debris and downed power lines may be covering
roadways making them impassible. Emergency crews will be working to
clear roadways but it may take hours or even days to clear them all.
Avoid sightseeing. Roads may be closed for your protection so if you
encounter a barricade, turn around and go another way.
* Do not drive in flooded areas. Avoid weakened bridges and washed out
roadways. If water is touching the span of the bridge, do not cross over.
* Stay on firm ground. Moving water only six inches deep can sweep you
off your feet. Standing water may be electrically charged from downed
power lines.
* Beware of downed power lines. Lines may be charged and dangerous.
* Beware of snakes, insects or animals driven to higher ground by
flood waters.
* Enter your home with extreme caution. Beware of fallen objects
or damaged roof and wall sections.
* Remove shutters or plywood and open windows and doors to ventilate
or dry your home if necessary. Replace screens if you removed them
prior to the storm.
* Check gas, water and electrical lines and appliances for damage. Do
not attempt to repair damaged gas or electrical lines. Call a professional.
* Do not drink or prepare food with tap water until you are certain it is
not contaminated.
* Avoid using candles or other open flames indoors. The fire department
may not be able to respond if you have a fire. Use a flashlight, glow
sticks or battery-powered lighting.
* Use the telephone to report emergencies only. This includes cellular
phones. An older "corded" phone can be used if your power is out but
you phone lines are up.
* Be especially cautious when using a chainsaw to cut fallen trees.
Ambulances may have difficulty responding to accidents, and roads to
hospitals might be impassable.
* Never connect portable generators to your house. Use them only to run
necessary appliances and plug the appliance into the generator.


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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008

School emergency contact system will

be tested prior to new school year


Superintendent David B.
Miller has deployed the Con-
nect-ED communication service
to provide Wakulla County
School District leaders with the
ability to reach parents, faculty,
and staff with time-sensitive
emergency information within
minutes.
"Today we are forced to pre-
pare for emergency situations
that years ago we never could


have anticipated happening,"
said Superintendent Miller. "We
recognize the important role
that immediate communication
plays in safety."
The Connect-ED system is
used to inform parents and staff
members of school closures
and contingency plans due to
inclement weather, issues aris-
ing from pandemics, or other
late-breaking developments.


"It is crucial that we are able
to notify parents immediately
in emergency situations be-
cause up-to-date communica-
tion helps minimize the spread
of misinformation, restore order
and provide direction," said
Miller.
The Wakulla School District
plans to test Connect-ED prior
to the 2008-2009 school year to
remind parents and students


about the School Open House
schedule as well as check con-
tact information. If you are a
community member who er-
roneously receives a call, please
contact the District office at 926-
0065 and your phone number
will be removed from the ser-
vice immediately. For additional
information please visit www.
wakullaschooldistrict.org.


Be ready for the storm


Tropical Storm Watch
Issued when tropical storm
conditions are possible in the
specified watch area, usually
within 36 hours.
Tropical Storm Warning
Issued when tropical storm
conditions are expected in the
specified warning area, usu-


ally within 24 hours.
Hurricane Watch
Issued when hurricane
conditions are possible in the
specified watch area, usually
within 36 hours. During a hur-
ricane watch, be prepared to
take immediate action to pro-
tect your family and property


in case a hurricane warning
is issued.
Hurricane Warning
Issued when hurricane
conditions are expected in
the specified warning area,
usually within 24 hours. Storm
preparations should be com-
pleted and evacuation under


Note: Due to the amount of
time required. for evacuation
in Wakulla County, evacuation
orders may be issued before
a hurricane watch or warning
have been issued by the Na-
tional Hurricane Center.


Pets


Continued from Page 7A
It is also also a good idea to
photograph each of your pets
and include these pictures
with your health records. All
pets should have current im-
munizations and ensure that
they have a collar with proper
identification.
Service Animals
Though pets are not al-
lowed in public shelters, in
compliance with 28 CFR Part
36, supporting the American
Disabilities Act, service ani-
mals will be allowed in both
general and special needs
shelters.
If You Must Leave Your Pet
At Home
If you have to leave your
pets at home try to secure
them in a safe area of your
home. Otherwise, your pets
may escape and become dis-
oriented as a storm could
alter landmarks and scent
trails. Make sure the pet is


wearing a collar with proper
identification. Remember,
don't leave dogs and cats in
the same space. Even if they
normally get along, things
may change as the storm ap-
proaches. Some other things
to remember are:
Place pets in ventilated
safe rooms without windows
Leave at least a three day
food supply
Leave plenty of water
Leave access to elevated
spaces in the event of flood-
ing
Pet stores sell slow-release
feeders for fish tanks if you
evacuate.
After the storm, walk pets
on a leash until they become
reoriented to their home
and surroundings. Downed
power lines and other debris
pose risks for you and your
pets. Don't let pets consume
food or water that may have
become contaminated.


Storm damage insurance


checklist can help you


The following tips, pro-
vided by the Florida Insurance
Council, Inc. may be helpful
when settling an insurance
claim following a disaster.
Remember, you bought insur-
ance to take care of emergen-
cies and you should be satis-
fied with the way insurance
companies honor their part
of the contract.
Making The Claim
Contact your insurance
agent as quickly as possible.
Let them know about your
losses. If you are relocated
temporarily, provide the ad-
dress and phone number.
The claim process may begin
in one of two ways. Your in-
surance company may send
a claim form for you to com-
plete or an adjuster may visit
your home first, before you are
asked to fill out any forms.
Most homeowners poli-
cies cover additional living
expenses. Your insurance
company should advance you
money if you need temporary
shelter, food and clothing be-
cause you can no longer live
in your home and your clothes
have been ruined. They will
also advance you money if
you need to replace major
household items immediately
to continue living there.
Keep receipts for every-
thing you spend. Make sure
the check for additional living
expenses is made out to you
and not your mortgage, the
bank or other lender. This
money has nothing to do with
repairs to your home and you
may have difficulty depositing
or cashing the check without
their signature.
Make only those repairs
necessary to prevent further
damage to your home or
business. This must include
covering breaks or holes in
the roof, walls or windows
with plywood, canvas or other
waterproof material. Your
insurance company will reim-
burse you for the costs of your


repairs, so keep receipts for
any materials you buy. Do not
have permanent repairs made
without first consulting your
agent. Unauthorized repairs
may not be reimbursed.
Avoid using electrical ap-
pliances, including televisions
and stereos, which have been
exposed to water, unless
a technician has checked
them.
If your car was damaged
and you have "comprehen-
sive" coverage in your auto
insurance policy, you should
also contact your auto insur-
ance company.
Preparing For The Adjust-
er's Visit
An adjuster is a person
professionally trained to as-
sess the damage. The more
information you have about
your possessions the faster
your claim can be settled. You
should already have a com-
plete inventory of the items
in your home that includes
a description of the item,
model and serial numbers (if
applicable) and the original
cost and what it would cost
to replace it.
Make a list of damaged
items. Take photographs of
the damage and put together
a set of records for each item
that includes any old receipts
or bills. Don't forget to list
items such as clothing, sports
equipment, tools, china and
linens, etc.
Don't throw away dam-
aged furniture or other items
because the adjuster will want
to see them.
Identify the structural dam-
age to your home and other
buildings on your premises.
Make a list of everything you
want to show the "adjuster
when they arrive. In some
cases, the adjuster may recom-
mend hiring a licensed engi-
neer or architect to inspect the
property. You should also get
the electrical system checked.
Most insurance companies


will pay for these inspec-
tions.
If possible, get written bids
from reliable, licensed contrac-
tors on the repair work. This
should make adjusting the
claim faster and simpler.
Homeowners insurance
policies usually don't cover
flood damage but they do
cover other kinds of water
damage. For example, they
would generally pay for dam-
age from rain coming through
a hole in the rdof or a broken
window as long as the hole
was caused by a hurricane or
other disaster covered by the
policy. You need a separate
flood insurance policy to cover
flood damage from any rising
water. Contact your insurance
agent regarding your cover-
age and the need for flood
insurance.
If your home was severely
damaged, you may have to
rebuild sections in accordance
with current building codes.
In some cases, complying
with the code may require a
change in design or building
materials and may cost more.
Generally, homeowners Jin-
surance policies will not pay
for these extra costs. Some
insurance companies offer an
endorsement that pays for a
specified amount toward such
changes.
Most insurance compa-
nies will pay for removal of
trees that have fallen on your
home but they will not pay to
remove trees that have fallen
and haven't caused any dam-
age to your home. Neither
will they pay to replace trees
or shrubbery that have been
damaged by the storm,
Now is the time you should
get an "insurance checkup".
Contact your insurance agent
and make sure what your
policy covers and doesn't
cover. After a disaster is not
the time for surprises and
finding out that you are not
covered for losses.


Be prepared with oxygen and

other hurricane supplies


You're prepared You have the water, the
batteries, and the canned foods, but with
hurricane season upon us once again, Home
Respiratory Solutions would like to take this
opportunity to remind our valued oxygen
customers that in the event of a hurricane
or prolonged power outages, it is neces-


sary to notify Home Respiratory Solutions
of their shelter or evacuation plans so that
we can continue to provide outstanding
customer service. If you have any questions
or need assistance planning for these types
of emergencies, please contact our office at
850-926-7122. .. ..


. orphaned or
Keep a copy of hurricane injured wildlife


tracking map

If The Wakulla News special hurricane section looks fa-
miliar, it should. We are publishing it a second time because
we were unhappy with the print job last week which made it
difficult to see the hurricane tracking grid. Hopefully, we will
never need it, but be prepared anyway.


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Scott Nelson leads Wakulla County

Emergency Management operation


The Emergency Manage-
ment Division's responsi-
bilities are to support the
continuity of government;
to coordinate emergency re-
sponse to severe weather, di-
sasters, medical emergencies,
fires, rescues, animal control,
and hazardous materials situ-
ations; to plan for, coordinate
with and support the State of
Florida Emergency Manage-
ment Team and the federal
government during extreme
emergencies throughout the
State and the United States.
Wakulla County's Emer-
gency Management Director
is Scott Nelson. Nelson allows
the Wakulla County Sheriff's


Office to continue excellent
service to the public during
emergencies. He replaced the
retired Joe Blanchard.
The role of Emergency
Management is to assist lo-
cal residents during times of
natural or man-made disas-
ters and to provide backup
resources to all county re-
sponders.
Wakulla County is rec-
ognized by the National
Weather Service as being
"Storm Ready," a designation
awarded to only three coun-
ties in North Florida.
The State of Florida grant-
ed approval to Wakulla Coun-
ty for the "County Emergency


Management Plan" which is
a five year plan to protect the
" citizens, including a special
Terrorism Annex.
Emergency Management
also partners with the Ameri-
can Red Cross in several
important projects. One of
these projects involves the
development of Disaster Re-
sistant Neighborhoods.
Other responsibilities in-
clude the management of the
County's E911 computer and
mapping system. Funding for
the E911 system is through a
separate budget that is sup-
ported by a surcharge added
to the telephone bills for
county residents.


The Wakulla County Sheriff's Office

offers registration for special alerts

including those involving the

Emergency Management Operation.

Go to wwW.wcso.org to sign up.


M2


am" m Please report














FSt& Cre


it


10
Uo


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008 Page 11A
I


850-224-4960


www.fsucu.org


~ MORTGAGES -FREE CHECKING AUTO LOANS ~ CREDIT CARDS


Gulf Coast Weekly Almanac


ijf ys Tide charts by
Zihua Software, LLC

St. Marks River Entrance


Date High Low High Low High
Thu 3.4 ft. 1.9 ft. 4.4 ft. -0.9 ft.
Jul 3, 08 3:53 AM 8:35 AM 2:32 PM 10:01 PM
Fri 3.4 ft. 1.7 ft. 4.4 ft. -0.6 ft.
Jul 4, 08 4:32 AM 9:24 AM 3:21 PM 10:43 PM
Sat 3.3 ft. 1.5 ft. 4.2 ft. -0.3 ft.
Jul 5, 08 5:08 AM 10:11 AM 4:08 PM 11:20 PM
Sun 3.3 ft. 1.3 ft. 3.9 ft. 0.2 ft.
Jul 6, 08 5:41 AM 10:58 AM 4:55 PM 11:53 PM
Mon 3.3 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.5 ft.'
Jul 7, 08 6:12 AM 11:48 AM 5:42 PM
Tue 0.7 ft. 3.2 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.1 ft.
Jul 8, 08 12:21 AM 6:40 AM 12:42 PM 6:35 PM
Wed 1.1 ft. 3.2 ft. 1.1 ft. 2.7 ft.
Jul 9, 08 112:47 AM 7:09 AM 1:46 PM 7:40 PM

Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay
Date High Low High Low High
Tue 2.5 ft. 1.5 ft. 3.1 ft. -0.6 ft.
Jul 1, 08 2:10 AM 7:00 AM 12:35 PM 8:37 PM
Wed 2.5 ft. 1.5 ft. 3.2 ft. -0.7 ft.
Jul 2, 08 3:00 AM 7:55 AM 1:31 PM 9:27 PM
Thu 2.5 ft. 1.4 ft. 3.3 ft. -0.6 ft.
Jul 3, 08 3:45 AM 8:46 AM 2:24 PM. 10:12 PM
Fri 2.5 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.3 ft. -0.5 ft.
Jul 4, 08 4:24 AM 9:35 AM 3:13 PM 10:54 PM_
Sat 2.5 ft. 1.1 ft. 3.2 ft. -0.2 ft.
Jul 5, 08 5:00 AM 10:22 AM 4:00 PM 11:31 PM
Sun 2.5 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.9 ft.
Jul 6, 08 5:33 AM 11:09 AM 4:47 PM
Mon 0.1 ft. 2.5 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.6 ft.
Jul 7, 08 12:04 AM 6:04 AM 11:59 AM 5:34 PM


For tides at the following points
add to Dog Island Listings: Carrabelle


/ /


June 26 July 2

City of St. Marks


Date High Low High Low High
Tue 3.1 ft. 1.9 ft. 3.8 ft. -0.8 ft.
Jul 1, 08 2:54 AM 7:53 AM 1:19 PM 9:30 PM
Wed 3.1 ft. 1.8 ft. 4.0 ft. -0.9 ft.
Jul 2, 08 3:44 AM 8:48 AM 2:15 PM 10:20 PM
Thu 3.2 ft. 1.7 ft. 4.1 ft. -0.8 ft.
Jul 3, 08 4:29 AM 9:39 AM 3:08 PM 11:05 PM
Fri 3.1 ft. 1.5 ft." 4.1 ft. -0.6 ft.
Jul 4, 08 5:08 AM 10:28 AM 3:57 PM 11:47 PM
Sat. 3.1 ft. 1.4 ft. 3.9'ft.
Jul 5, 08 5:44 AM 11:15 AM 4:44 PM _
Sun -0.2 ft. 3.1 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.6 ft.
Jul 6, 08 12:24 AM 6:17 AM 12:02 PM 5:31 PM
Mon 0.2 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.1 ft. 3.3 ft.
Jul 7, 08 12:57 AM 6:48 AM 12:52 PM 6:18 PM


St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.
Date High Low High Low
Tue 2.6 ft. 2.1 ft. 3.2 ft. -0.8 ft.
Jul 1, 08 2:02 AM 6:28 AM 12:27 PM 8:05 PM
Wed 2.6 ft. 2.0 ft. 3.4 ft. -0.9 ft.
Jul 2, 08 2:52 AM 7:23 AM 1:23 PM 8:55 PM
Thu 2.7 ft. 1.8 ft. 3.4 ft. -0.8 ft.
Jul 3, 08 3:37 AM 8:14 AM 2:16 PM 9:40 PM
Fri 2.6 ft. 1.6 ft. 3.4 ft. -0.6 ft.
Jul.4, 08 4:16 AM 9:03 AM 3:05 PM 10:22 PM
Sat 2.6 ft. 1.5 ft. 3.3 ft. -0.2 ft.
Jul 5, 08 4:52 AM 9:50 AM 3:52 PM 10:59 PM
Sun 2.6 ft. 1.3 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.2 ft.
Jul 6, 08 5:25 AM 10:37 AM 4:39 PM 11:32 PM
Mon 2.6 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.7 ft.
Jul 7 08 5:56 AM 11:27 AM 5:26 PM _


Apalachicola
Cat Point
Lower Anchorage
West Pass


High Tide
28 Min.
1 Hr., 53 Min.
1 Hr., 13 Min.
1 Hr., 36 Min.
1 Hr., 26 Min.


Shell Point, Spring Creek


Date High Low High Low
Tue 3.4 ft. 2.3 ft. 4.2 ft. -0.9 ft.
Jul 1, 08 2:15 AM 6:46 AM 12:40 PM 8:23 PM
Wed 3.4 ft. 2.2 ft. 4.4 ft. -1.0 ft.
Jul 2, 08 3:05 AM 7:41 AM 1:36 PM 9:13 PM
Thu 3.5 ft. 2.0 ft. 4.5 ft. -0.9 ft.
Jul 3, 08 3:50 AM 8:32 AM 2:29 PM 9:58 PM
Fri 3.4 ft. 1.8 ft. 4.5 ft. -0.7 ft.
Jul 4, 08 4:29 AM 9:21 AM 3:18 PM 10:40 PM
Sat 3.4 ft. 1.6 ft. 4.3 ft. -0.3 ft.
Jul 5, 08 5:05 AM 10:08 AM 4:05 PM 11:17 PM
Sun 3.4 ft. 1.4 ft. 4.0 ft. 0.2 ft.
Jul 6, 08 5:38 AM 10:55 AM 4:52 PM 11:50 PM
Mon 3.3 ft. 1.3 ft. 3.6 ft.
Jul 7, 08 6:09 AM 11:45 AM 5:39 PM_


Dog Island West End
Date High Low High Low
Tue 3.4 ft. -0.7 ft.
Jul 1,08 11:15 AM 7:56 PM
Wed 3.4 ft. -0.8 ft.
Jul 2, 08 12:17 PM 8:46 PM
Thu 2.7 ft. 2.1 ft. 3.4 ft. -0.7 ft.
Jul 3, 08 5:43 AM 7:28 AM 1:19 PM 9:32 PM
Fri 2.6 ft., 1.9 ft. 3.3 ft. -0.5 ft.
Jul 4, 08 6:03 AM 8:25 AM 2:21 PM 10:14 PM
Sat 2.5 ft. 1.7 ft. 3.1 ft. -0.2 ft.
Jul 5, 08 6:19 AM 9:23 AM 3:21 PM 10:50 PM
Sun 2.5 ft. 1.5 ft. 2.9 ft. 0.1 ft.
Jul 6, 08 6:33 AM 10:23 AM 4:22 PM 11:22 PM
Mon 2.5 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.6 ft.
Jul 7, 08 6:46 AM 11:27 AM 5:26 PM_


Low Tide
25 Min.
2 Hrs., 38 Min.
2 Hrs., 31 Min.
2 Hrs., 3 Min.
2 Hrs., 39 Min.





I
First
July 10





Full
July 18





Last,
July 25


New
Aug. 1


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
6:40 am 6:40 am 6:41 am 6:41 am 6:42 am 6:42 am 6:43 am
8:42 pm 8:42 pm 8:42 pm 8:42 pm 8:41 pm 8:41 pm 8:41 pm


7:03 am
9:37 pm
1%


8:15 am
10:21 pm
9%


9:25 am
10:58 pm
17%


10:30 am
11:30 pm
24%


.1 .1 ________ I I


11:31 am
11:59 pm
31%


12:29 pm

38%


1:26 pm
12:29 am
44%


Boating Emergencies -
Coast Guard Stauon
Panam a Cit ..... ......... ........... ... ... ...... i 50 234-2
Coast Guard Staion
Yankeeto n .. .. ...... ...... ...... ... . 35 447.2 6 -I6)
Coast Guard Au~ilianr
or .. .............. ....8935137
Shell Point iFloiilla 13) ... ............. ....... i Y>26ii 6
or .......................................................................... ..... 926-56 54


Coast Guard

Auxiliary Reports
By Sherrie Alverson
,.S.MArus, Foil.1) .. ;.... .... ,$0 9J-5


June has been an active
month for Flotilla 12 at St.
Marks and Flotilla 13 at Shell
Point. Besides the routine ac-
tivities, two weeks ago there
was a wonderful retirement
celebration for Flotilla 13
members Jack Rosenau and
Tom and Marge Jones,
Last weekend was another
that will go down in history,
lut I will let Carolyn Treadon
!-cover that since it was her
Flotilla 12 that earned all the
accolades.
iShe wrote, "Last week,
mpnibers of Flotilla 12 hosted
the Summer Division Meeting.
It was a great success and that
ig largely due to the hard work
of Tim Ashley and Carolyn Tre-
adon. The meeting was held at
the Staybridge Suites in Tal-
lahassee. The hotel provided
great rooms and a great view
pof a small lake, quite fitting for
an auxiliary meeting
We had representatives
from Pensacola (Flotilla 17),
Destin (14), Panama City (16),
Panama City Beach (19), Apala-
chicola (15), Shell Point (13),
St. Marks 12) and Sneads (1-
10) attending as well as our
^ Rear Commodore East Richard
Clinchy, Immediate Past Divi-
sion Captain, Dallas Cochran,
Division Captain Rich Rasmus-
sen and Division Vice Captain
Jeff Brooks.
Friday afternoon, Flotilla
12 had arranged for a tour of
State Emergency Operations
C enter in Tallahassee. It was
educational and awesome,
all those computers, each
- covering an assigned area.
Each prepared for any type of
emergency.
Friday night members en-
joyed a meal at Marie Livings-
ton's. Fellowship is such an
integral part of the auxiliary.
Saturday we got down to
business. The morning began
wit a workshop on our new
em rgency notification system
that is being developed to


help notify auxiliarists in the
event of emergencies as well
as accounting for members
during the disaster.
Later in the morning Phil-
lip Wieczynski, P.E. the Bureau
Chief for the Bureau of Emer-
gency Response, Division of
Law Enforcement, came to talk
to us about storm response
and emergency management.
He also stressed the role the
auxiliary could play in re-
sponding to disasters as well
as their own personal safety.
We ended our meeting with
the business meeting for the
division. Each Flotilla Com-
mander discussed their suc-
cesses as well as challenges.
Staff officers shared informa-
tion on their positions. We all
learned about some upcoming


U.:
changes in the auxiliary that
will help our organizational
structure mirror that of the


active duty. All in all it was a
busy, but informative day for
all who attended.
Our next Division Meeting
will be held in Panama City, in
late October. More about that
in a later column.
Lastly, a reminder to mem-
bers of Flotilla 12, our July
meeting has been moved to
July 12 due to the holiday
weekend.
Flotilla 13's meeting will
also be on July 12. My ad-
dition to Carolyn's report is
to include those members
attending from our local
flotillas: Our host Flotilla 12,
Tim Ashley, Chuck Hickman,
Steve Hults, Rich Rasmussen,
Dave Suban, Duane and Caro-
lyn Treadon. There may have
been one or two others that I
did not see.


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Friday
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7:50pm


Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
2:10 am 3:05 am 3:55 am 4:45 am 5:30 am
2:35pm 3:30pmin 4:20pm 5:05 pm 5:55pm
8:20 am 9:15 am 10:05 am 10:55 am 11:40 am
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F









Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008


Outdoors


A look back at Wakulla County's softshell turtles


BY GEORGE WEYMOUTH


I'd like to continue re-
plying to Mr. Tidwell's re-
cent letter and photographs
he sent to myself and The
Wakulla News, concerning a
"pretty" turtle and pictures
he took at the St. Marks Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge. It was
a Florida Softshell.
It strikes me as incredible
that in our bay/estuary area
we have Atlantic or Kemps
Ridleys and Loggerhead,
both fairly common. These
sea turtles have their front
limbs modified into flip-
pers and their physiology
demands they live in water
at high salinity. In our bay is
the lovely ornate Diamond-


back Terrapin, a black eyed
turtle who I believe feed noc-
turnally on shrimp, etc. They
live in grassbeds during the
night. They get up to about
eight inches long. They have
black dotted blue skin and
are gorgeous I've got one
I've raised in freshwater, and
she'll actually go bananas
when I scratch her back Yet
in the same estuary areas
on occasion (such as during
periods of flooding) you'll
have a Florida softshell enter
into brackish water. Gener-
ally the softshells are found
only in freshwater. They
range into all freshwater
from ditches to huge lakes,


and from mighty rivers to
tiny streams.
They are mentioned in
last week's article and are
powerful swimmers. When
those fully webbed feet
(which normally are push-
ing against water) are placed
on land they can move the
fleeing turtle toward water
incredibly fast. Softshells are
excellent at instantly bury-
ing under sand or mud, too.
Example: as a young man I
found myself in Illinois dur-
ing squirrel season (late Au-
gust) walking along a swift
gravel bottomed stream. The
creek was about 20 feet wide
and the current was moving
at a brisk walking speed. I
was about 15 feet up on a
bank with my trusty recurve
bow. The other guys in our
camp were legally squirrel
hunting with firearms, but
I was determined to "put
meat on the table" with my
bow, frogs or whatever I saw,
and an adult softshell was
upstream drifting toward


me. I slowly raised (as soft-
shell are excellent eating)
my bowfin and as it passed
by about 25 feet away. I cut
loose. The creek were about
20 inches deep where my ar-
row entered the water. There
was an instant puff of mud
which quickly dissipated,
but the turtle had vanished.
The puff of mud was actu-
ally made by the turtle who
had hurried itself in the mid
level gravel bottom instantly
-,I was amazed These turtles
have long pointed snouts
and very long necks. If their
snout can be extended a foot
from their shell, they'll bury
in a muddy bank in water
about one foot deep. Most
other turtles can absorb oxy-
gen through their anus, but
not the softshell. It appears
they absorb oxygen through
their soft exposed skin while
underwater, slowly gulping
water, circulating in their
throat were oxygen is ab-
sorbed. This is how they
can remain underwater all


FWC resolution supports Amendment 4


The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission
(FWC) unanimously passed a
resolution Thursday, June 12
expressing support for pro-
posed Constitutional Amend-
ment 4.
The amendment, to appear
on the General Election ballot
in November, would create


incentives for landowners to
set aside land for conservation
easements or practice proac-
tive conservation to benefit
wildlife. If 60 percent of vot-
ers approve the amendment,
it will become part of the
Florida State Constitution.
The resolution notes that
Florida's population may


double to 36 million people
within the next 50 years. It
says development will claim
millions of acres of wilder-
ness and erode the state's rich
legacy of outdoor recreation if
officials fail to address growth
projections with wise and
creative solutions.,
"...It is beyond the means of


the government of the Great
State of Florida to purchase all
the natural lands that stand
to be lost to development in
the years to come," the reso-
lution reads. "(Amendment
4)...would offer a meaningful
solution to this issue."


FWC reminds public of closed seasons

on freshwater turtles, report violators


The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission
(FWC) reminds people of the
dosed seasons for harvesting
river cooters and their eggs
from April 15 to July 31 and
soft-shell turtles and their
eggs from May 1 to July 31.
River cooters and soft-shell
turtles are the most frequently
harvested of all Florida turtle
species.


The FWC has received in-
formation that prices for fresh-
water turtles and their meat
have been increasing, which
may cause the black market
for illegally harvested, or
poached, turtles to rise.
Anticipated tighter restric-
tions on harvesting may have
caused the increase in turtle
prices nearly twice what they
typically have been.


The FWC is reconsidering
rules on freshwater turtle har-
vesting after receiving infor-
mation people were removing
hundreds of freshwater turtles
at a time. The more valuable
turtles and turtle meat may
be incentive enough for some
to break the law and harvest
turtles out of season.
The FWC is urging the
public to immediately report


anyone catching and keep-
ing river cooters or soft-shell
turtles this time of year.
To report violations of
freshwater turtle regulations
or any other fish and wildlife
law violations, call the Wildlife
Alert Hotline at 888-404-FWCC
(3922). For guidelines on fresh-
water turtle restrictions, visit
MyFWC.com/codebook.


Leave wildlife alone, urges FWC


This time of year, wildlife
is on the move. Critters, such
as alligators, may be looking
for new bodies of water or
mates; snakes may be search-
ing for prey; bears may be
foraging. While moving from
one point to another, wildlife
sometimes comes face-to-face
with people.
When that happens, the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission (FWC)
urges the people to leave wild
animals alone and just let
them pass through.
The FWC, in the past two
weeks, has responded to two
situations where alligators
have bitten people.
On May 15, the Volusia


County Sheriff's Office re-
ceived a call that an alligator
was at an apartment complex
in Deltona. Officials notified
a licensed alligator trapper,
but in the meantime, a deputy
sheriff attempted to capture
the 8-foot gator himself. The
deputy sustained a bite on
his left leg and had to be air-
lifted to the hospital. Another
deputy shot the alligator sev-
eral times before the trapper
arrived and killed it,
In another incident on May
21, a 4-foot alligator made its
way to a woman's front yard
near Vernon. She called the
Washington County Sheriff's
Office and was told to leave
the alligator alone and even-


tually it would move on. Not
satisfied with this sage advice,
the woman called a neighbor,
who called a 16-year-old neigh-
bor to remove the reptile.
As the young man at-
tempted to catch the gator,
he was bitten on the hand,
Another teenager rushed up
and stabbed the animal, still
clamped down on his friend's
hand. The injured teenager
was treated at an area hospital
and will be fine. The alligator
was destroyed.
Animals looking for new
areas to forage, hunt or mate
do not typically pose a threat
to people. Unfortunately, as
Florida's human population
grows and development oc-


curs in wildlife habitats, con-
flicts will continue to occur.
Wildlife biologists say gen-
erally the best thing to do is
give any wild animal plenty of
space, and in most instances,
the animal will eventually
move on. Untrained people
who step in to resolve con-
flicts with wildlife risk seri-
ous injury or worse. In most
instances, the best thing to
do is leave the animal alone
or call the FWC.
If a potentially dangerous
animal doesn't leave your
yard, or persistently enters
your yard, call FWC's Wildlife
Alert Hotline at 1-888-404-
FWCC (3922).


winter in our northern states
and hibernate, yet in the
summer months they must
occasionally get a breath or
they'll drown.
With the softshells they
simply extend their nose
(while still buried in the
mud) higher and higher
sometimes over a foot un-
til their nostrils reach the
surface. They'll take a few
breaths and then quickly
retract their neck/head back
into the mud leaving only
the eyes and snort protrud-
ing out of the mud, set up
to ambush a passing fish or
whatever.
When digging their nest,
they'll usually nest only a
few feet up a sloping bank
and start digging with their
rear feet throwing the sand
violently from the cavity
with their rear feet. They can
send the sand up to 10 feet.
In fact, this "flying sand" is
what usually gets your at-
tention, before the sighting
of "big momma." The white
eggs are covered with a mu-
cus and are about one inch


in diameter. Roughly 10 to
20 are laid. In a few weeks .
they'll hatch, depending on
sun, rain, drainage, etc. The
young of our Florida soft-
shells are very handsome
with a fairly bold orange/yel-
low streak on their heads
and margin of the shell. Yes,
their shell is soft, especially
toward the rear and there
are no cuts, only leathery
flexible shell.
As mentioned in a re-
cent The Wakulla News
"Outdoor" article, they are
now closed season by the
Florida Game Commission,
from May 1 to July 31. These
turtles and their eggs are
protected. Once again, Mr,
Tidwell thanks for the letter
and photos.
Before I sign off on soft-
shells, I must mention a Nar-
row-headed softshell, Chitra
Indica, found in India, Paki-
stan and Nepal. These get
gigantic, up to six feet and
"are capable of attracting and
sinking small boat." (from
Encyclopedia of Turtles by
Dr. Peter Pritchard.


Apalachicola Paddling

Trail receives national

recognition


The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission
(FWC) announced that the
Apalachicola Paddling Trail
System, located in Franklin
County in the Apalachicola
River Wildlife and Environ-
mental Area, is one of 24 trails
designated by the Secretary of
the Interior as a NationalRec-
reation Trail.
This network of paddling
trails was developed by the
FWC's Office of Recreation
Services. It features approxi-
mately 100 miles of scenic
waterways accessible to boat-
ers, canoeists and kayakers.
with all levels of experience.
The shortest trails are two
miles long, while others are
four to 16 miles and offer
pleasant half or full-day pad-
dling trips.
Paddlers, anglers and bird-
ers can explore the quiet, calm
creeks meandering through
cypress-tupelo swamps or
enjoy vistas of the open bay
and salt marsh.
Those who wish a more
extended backcountry expe-
rience can combine trails to
create two or three-day trips.
Suggested primitive campsites
are shown on the waterproof


trail map available from the
FWC. No fees or permits are
required.
This paddling trail system
was also named one of the
12 most recommended water
trails in the United States for,
2006 by The American Ca-
noe Association and Paddler
magazine.
Liz Sparks, an FWC recre-
ational planner who helped
create the trail, said the agen-
cy is honored the trail is rec-
ognized nationally as a great
destination for a variety of
users who come to enjoy the
area's outstanding scenery
and wildlife-viewing oppor-
tunities.
"We encourage people to
use the trails throughout the
year, but the' fall and spring
offer more comfortable tem-
peratures and fewer bugs,"
Sparks said. "These are also
great months to fish or watch
wildlife and view flowering
plants along the trails."
To receive a free copy of the
Apalachicola Paddling Trail
System map, call 850-488-5520
or go to MyFWC.com and click
on "Outdoor Recreation" to
download copies of individual
trip options.


Please don't feed animals Sailing merit badge class set


In Florida, there's a good
chance you'll get the oppor-
tunity to see wildlife, even
if you live in an urban area.
Raccoons, as well as a va-
riety of other animals such
as bears, alligators, coyotes
and foxes, have been seen
in back yards and strolling
through neighborhoods,
Many people enjoy feed-
ing wildlife because it al-
lows them to have contact
with these animals. Folks
also think they are helping
the critters survive, especial-
ly in an urban area. However,
nothing could be further
from the truth.
"Wild animals come into
neighborhoods because
there is available food, wa-
ter and shelter," said Anni
Mitchell, Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) biologist
in Lake City. "If these con-
ditions didn't exist, the
animals wouldn't be there.
Animals have survived for
a very long time without
people feeding them. They
can continue to survive
without intervention."
There are quite a few


problems that can develop
when people feed wildlife.
Experts believe recent at-
tacks on children by coyotes
in California may be the
result of homeowners un-
intentionally luring wildlife
to their yards by leaving pet
bowls outside or not secur-
ing garbage can lids.
When wild animals begin
to depend on humans for
food, their foraging skills,
can deteriorate. This could
impact their survival, accord-
ing to Mitchell. However,
animals are opportunistic
and will go to the most con-
venient food source avail-
able.
"Who doesn't like a free
meal?" Mitchell asked. "A
huge problem with this is
that animals can gather in
larger numbers than normal
for this food. If one animal
in the group has an illness
or disease, it can spread
throughout the group."
"Another problem is that
the food being fed to ani-
mals is usually inadequate
nutritionally," Mitchell said.
"This 'people food' is 'junk
food' for animals."


at Apalachee Bay Yacht Club


The Boy Scout, Small-
Boat Sailing merit badge is
being offered in the month
of July at the Apalachee
Bay Yacht Club at Shell
Point. This program is
offered by A.B.Y.C. along
with B.S.A. Troop 8 at
Wakulla Middle School.
The sailing class will be
held on two Saturdays in
July, on July 5 and July 19.


Any registered Boy Scouts
who are interested in this
class should call B.S.A.
Troop 8 Scoutmaster and
sailing instructor David
Damon at 251-4166.
If you are not a reg-
istered Boy Scout, join
scouts and take the class.
There is no charge for the
class.


J.D. Enterprises of Tallahassee
24 Hour Emergency Services
SLandscaping
Home Repairs & Remodeling
Concrete Work
3752 Dartford Ia Installing ceiling fans/lights
Tallahassee,FL32311 and muchmore!
Cell: (850) 510-9681
Email:
JD ENTERPRISES16@YAHOO.COM

Open House

29 Susquehanna
Date: July 5
12pm-2pm
July 6
2pti-4pm

Directions: Left on Lower Bridge, Cross
Spring Creek Hwy, Left on Mohave, Right
on Susquehanna.


Call Susan Jones
566-7584


BlueWater
Realty Group


p


A








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008 Page 13A



People


Panacea Yard of Month selected


Raymond and Wendy home selected as Yard of
Moore of 97 Jer Be Lou the Month. The program
Blvd. in Panacea had their is sponsored each month


by the Panacea Waterfronts
Committee.


Kipp is engaged to Thompson

Scott and Lori Fry of
Crawfordville announce the
engagement and upcoming
wedding of their daugh-
ter, Rachel Allena Kipp of
Crawfordville, to Matthew
Wayne Thompson of Craw-
fordville. He is the son of
Jim and Sandy Thompson
of Crawfordville.
The bride-elect is a 2006
Wakulla High School gradu-
ate who is employed at the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement.
S. Her fiance graduated
from Wakulla High School
in 2005. He is employed at
the Wakulla County Sher-
iff's Office.
The wedding will be held
Saturday, Aug. 9 at noon at
the Inn at Wildwood with
a reception immediately
following at the Wakulla
Shriner's Club. All friends
and relatives are invited to
attend.
Matthew W. Thompson and Rachel A. Kipp


Births
Sophia G. Jacobs
Walt and Samantha Jacobs
of Otter Creek announce the
birth of their daughter, Sophia
Grace Jacobs, on June 14 at
Tallahassee Memorial Hospi-
tal. She weighed 9 pounds,
2 ounces and measured 21
inches in length.
Maternal grandparents are
Samuel and Stacy Holley of
Crawfordville. Paternal grand-
parents are Joseph and Wilma
Jacobs of Crawfordville.
Maternal great-grandparent
is Grace Hall of Crawfordville.
Paternal great-grandparent is
Winnie Pitts of Panama City.
Sophia joins a sister, Ga-
briella Jacobs, age 4, anda
brother, Nathaniel Jacobs,
age 1.
Logan M. Wallace
Brian and Amanda Wallace
of Crawfordville announce the
birth of their daughter, Logan
McKennah Wallace, on May 28
at Tallahassee Memorial Hos-
pital. She weighed 7 pounds,
3 ounces and measured 19
inches in length.
Maternal grandparents are
Nathan and Nell McPherson of
Crawfordville. Paternal grand-
parents are Keith and Mary
Wallace of Crawfordville.
Maternal great-grandpar-
ents are Neal and Andrea
McPherson of Tallahassee.
Paternal great-grandpar-
ents are Charles and Carolyn
Kennison and Marlin and
Kay Wallace, all of Denham
Springs, La.
James M. Cooper
Murray and Beth Cooper
of Tallahassee announce the
birth of their son, James Mur-
ray "Jamie" Cooper on May 17
at Tallahassee Memorial Hos-
pital. He weighed 9 pounds, 8
ounces and measured 21 1/4
inches in length.
Maternal grandparents
are Leon and Sue Burnett of
Tallahassee, formerly of Craw-
fordville. Paternal grandpar-
ents are Phillip and Julia Ann
Cooper of Tallahassee.


Happy first

birthday
Maternal grandparents are
Jane P. Lee of Tallahassee and
the late Jimmy Wayne Lee, for-
merly of Sopchoppy. Paternal
grandparents are Ron and Jane
Wolk of North Canton, Ohio.
Maternal great-grandpar-
ents are the late Sinclair and
Clote Powell and the late Ivy
Grant and Jettie Lee. Paternal
McKenna J. Wolk great-grandparents are Thelma
Stanley of South Carolina, the
Happy first birthday to late Eugene Haven Stanley
McKenna Jane Wolk on June and the late George and Loise
22. She is the daughter of Wolk.
Brian and Jodi Wolk of Craw-
fordville.

Booths celebrate

20 years together


Victoria and Wilton Booth, Sr.
Victoria and Wilton Booth, Sr. of Sopchoppy will celebrate
their 20th wedding anniversary on Thursday, July 3. The
couple has two sons, Wilton Booth, Jr. and Tavaris Booth,
both of Sopchoppy.
They pray that the Lord will continue to bless their mar-
riage and their children.


TALLAHASSEE COMMUNITY COLLEGE


4~*






.In today's economy, many families are concerned about the

academic future of loved ones who soon hope to enter college.
TCC IS A PROVEN PATH TO GET THERE.

IProviding Access:
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Embry-Riddle and Saint Leo, advisers can assist students in developing
academic plans that promote success in the transfer process to these,
5r, and many other institutions
i-,.:* The College provides more than $20 million in scholarships and finarnlial
.% aid to students each year.
TCC offers options for busy adults, including Web-based ,lasses and
Evening classes.

Ensuring Success:
TCC offers extensive out-of-classroom support for Situdents The College s
Learning Commons opens its coors in August 2008.
"-,,* An early-warning system alerts stLrdeuits and advisers when students show
Althe first sign of falling behind.
Students can develop electronic learning plans that help them identity their
goals and map out a course of study to achieve those goals.
Students who succeed in TCC's College Success program have higher mention
rates and higher success rates ill their classes.
,. ,;CO. .


Register today for Summer and Fall classes.
GoToTCC.com or call (850) 201 -TCC1



7-ii








Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008


People


A- 11 DOT turns on light at dangerous

Highway 363/267 intersection


Back row, Coach Donnie Battle, Jettery Barnes, Jake Walker, Brett BucKriage, coacn
Jeff Collins, Dalton Norman, Coach Darrell Norman, and Dalton Dugger..
Middle row, Jack Battle, Chris Allen, Colton Pelt, and Jacob Walker.
Front row, Josh Collins, Garrett Johnson, Chase Maxwell, and Dillon Norman,

Babe Ruth team wins to advance


The Wakulla County Babe
Ruth age 14 and under All-Stars
won the District 2 baseball title
last week.
Wakulla won the 2008 Dis-
trict 2 championship with a
team that included: back row,
Coach Donnie Battle, Jeffery
Barnes, Jake Walker, Brett Buck-
ridge, Coach Jeff Collins, Dalton


.f,


Norman, Coach Darrell Nor-
man, and Dalton Dugger.
Middle row, Jack Battle,
Chris Allen, Colton Pelt, and
Jacob Walker.
Front row, Josh Collins, Gar-
rett Johnson, Chase Maxwell,
and Dillon Norman.
The Wakulla Babe Ruth
League hosted the 2008 District


2 Playoffs at the Medart Recre-
ation Park on June 27 and June
28. Taylor (Perry) and Wakulla
County teams were represented
in tournament play.
The 2008 Wakulla 14u Team
kicked off the tournament with
a 5-1 defeat against the Perry
All-Stars.
Despite rain delays, Wakulla
returned on Saturday with a 10-
6 victory over Perry and swept
the series to take the District 2
Championship.
Wakulla will represent the
district in the North State
Playoffs which will be held in
Fort Caroline from July 17 to
July 20.
The uniform sponsors in-
clude, Ameris Bank, Capital
Hitch, and Buddy Abbott Con-
tracting, Inc.
In order to offset the play-
ers' tournament expenses, the
team needs additional spon-
sors. Please contact Darrell
Norman at 556-6563 to make a
donation.


New traffic signals have been turned
on at the intersection of Highway 267 and
Highway 363 in Wakulla Station.
At the request of law enforcement and
local citizens, effective July 1, the speed
limit on SR 267 (Bloxham Cutoff) from
north of Rock Road/Olive Road to south
of Card Lane will be decreased from 55 to
45 m.p.h. The 35 mph speed limit signs on
Woodville Highway will be replaced with
45 m.p.h. signs for a section from Terrace
Lane to the Methodist Church.
In addition to a speed limit change, the
traffic signal at the intersection of SR 267
was activated Tuesday, July 1. The signal
has been in a flash mode for several
weeks to alert motorists.
The entire area is being studied for fu-
ture improvements including the Shadev-


ille Highway intersection with 267.
"As the Vice Chairman of the Capital
Region Transportation Planning Agency
(CRTPA), I am pleased to report the CRTPA
is studying the whole corridor from
Shadeville Highway to Capital Circle,"
said Commissioner Ed Brimner. "The
roads under study include Old Woodville
Highway, Woodville Highway, and the
high tension power line running east of
Woodville Highway (not in sight from
Woodville Highway)."
State officials have added traffic sig-
nals at the intersection of both Highway
267 and U.S. Highway 319 and Highway
267 and Highway 363 following a num-
ber of fatal crashes over the past several
years.


Mr. and Mrs. Joshua Shane Rai

Cornwell and R

exchan e vows
Angie M. Cornwell o Craw- of Tallahassee
fordville and Joshua Shane men were Ga
Racca of Tallahassee were mar- of Crawfordvi
ried June 21 at the Blairstone of Tallahassee
Club House. Ralph Hoffman A reception
performed the ceremony. Blairstone Clul
The bride is the daughter couple took a h
of Paula Cornwell and Vincent to Helen, Ga.
Cornwell of Crawfordville. in Tallahassee
The groom is the son of Mr.
and Mrs, Michael Racca of
Tallahassee. Offi<
The matron of honor was
Jessica Herron of Woodville. D. Sa
The bridemaids were Tara
Racca of Tallahassee and Lau- Attorne
ra Dickenson of Panama City.
The ring bearer was Clinton Wills, Trus
Purdue and the flower girl was Family La
Kateland Herron.
The best men were Aarron Custody, Con
Racca and Josh Racca, both Incorporation


Moms in Touch
Moms and grandmothers
are invited to an informational
brunch to learn more about
Moms In Touch International
on Tuesday, July 29, from 11
a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Wakulla
County Library in Crawford-
ville.
For more information, call
Sharon Fox at 290-6227 or
visit the MITI website at www.
MomsInTouch.org.


cca

acca


e. The grooms-
.rrett Cornwell
lle and Wilson
was held at the
b House and the
honeymoon trip
They are living


ce Of

hinders
y At Law
sts, Estates,
aw-Divorce,
tracts, Deeds,
n, Development


Open House
26 Dreamwood Stables


Beautiful 5 acres with
remodeled home,
close to beaches.
Call Heather Land
251-0180


Date: July 5

Time: 12pm-2pm

Directions: 319 S,
Left at Medart Library
on Emmett Whaley,
Left on Dreamwood
Stables.

BlueWaterJ
Realty Group


BUTTONS MO t




This Week's Special-
Mullet Dinner $5.99
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Mullet Shrimp Fish Fillet
Softshell Crab s
.C Devil Crab Patty gOo
,X q Hamburger Hot Dog O GCO
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Call Ahead or Drop By! .
Hou rsOpen- Mon. Sat. 10 a.m. 7*p.m
Wed. 10 a.m. 2 p.m.

Thursday, July 3 Closed For Youth
Group Day Open at 10 A.M. July 4


Permits, Environmental
Law, General Litigation
Owner:
Doris "Dallas" Sanders
2181 Crawfordville Hwy.
Crawfordville, Florida
Phone: (850) 926-3942
Fax: (850) 926-9044
24 Minute First
Consultation $32







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008 Page 15A


Sheriff's Report


Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office officials arrested a 21-
year-old Crawfordville man
in connection with a theft at
the Crawfordville Wal-Mart,
according to Sheriff David
Harvey.
Orlando Hero IV was
charged with shoplifting/re-
tail theft on June 26. Deputy
Brad Taylor received a call
regarding two intoxicated
men inside the store. After
investigating, the deputy re-
covered computer games and
other items valued at $124
from inside Hero's clothing.
Cannibis was also recovered
at the scene and Hero was
charged with possession of
less than 20 grams of mari-
juana. Deputy Robert Giddens
and Lt. Sherrell Morrison also
investigated.

In other activity reported by
the Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office during the past week:
On June 27, Charmayne
G. Chouinard of Crawfordville
reported a residential burglary


at her home. The victim re-
ported the loss of $200 worth
of personal property. Deputy
Brad Taylor investigated.
On June 25, Michael J.
Leonardo of Crawfordville re-
ported the theft of automotive
equipment valued at $340. A
suspect has been identified.
Deputy Jeff Barteld investi-
gated.
On June 25, Herman
Howard of Crawfordville re-
ported the theft of $100 worth
of change from his home. Det.
John Zarate investigated.
On June 25, Andrea F..
Carter of Crawfordville re-
ported the theft of a campaign
sign valued at $40. The sign
had been attached to the side
of her campaign headquarters.
Deputy Lindsay Allen inves-
tigated.
On June 25, Melanie M.
Alexander of Crawfordville
reported a criminal mischief.
A mailbox on the victim's
property was damaged. It was
valued at $25. Deputy Lindsay
Allen investigated.


On June 24, law enforce-
ment officials conducted a
check of the detention fa-
cility and discovered that
Franklin Homer Ricketson,
26, of Sopchoppy and Terrell
Harley, 24, of Tallahassee were
found to be in possession of
contraband. A cell phone and
tobacco were discovered un-
der Franklin's bunk. Harley's
bed contained loose tobacco.
Both men were charged with
introduction of contraband
into a detention facility. Lt.
C.L Morrison and others in-
vestigated.
On June 23, Amy R.
Tidwell of Crawfordville re-
ported a residential burglary.
Jewelry and medicines, valued
at $215, were reported miss-
ing. Deputy Vicki Mitchell
investigated.
On June 23, Karen K. Mor-
gan of Crawfordville reported
the theft of $65 worth of cop-
per wire from Joe Morgan Elec-
tric. The wire was taken from
a work site. Deputy Casey
Whitlock investigated.
On June 22, Mary W.
Waltman of Crawfordville re-
ported a residential burglary.
More than $500 was taken


from a plastic jar at her home.
The money was recovered
from the suspect, Jeffrey Louis
Waltman, 43, of Crawfordville,
following witness informa-
tion. He was charged with
burglary and grand theft.
Deputies Lindsay Allen and
James Plouffe investigated.
On June 30, Garcie Wil-
liamson of Crawfordville re-
ported a grand theft of a
cell phone, valued at $500.
The phone may have been
taken or fell out of the victim's
truck. Deputy Joe Page inves-
tigated.
On June 30, Joey N.
Melton of Panacea reported a
burglary at his home. A forced
entry was discovered and
damage was estimated at $80.
CSI Melissa Harris and Deputy
Jason Brooks investigated.
On June 29, Michelle
Marie Truxell, 23, of Crawford-
ville was taken into custody in
connection with retail theft
at Winn-Dixie after she alleg-
edly bagged $597 worth of
groceries without paying for
them. The suspect was locked
in the restroomwhen law
enforcement officials arrived.
The suspect became ill once


she was taken to the jail and
received medical attention.
A grand theft warrant was
requested in the case. Deputy
Pam Veltkamp and Sgt. Jud
McAlpin investigated.
On June 28, Wal-Mart
officials reported the theft of
a $758 computer as a suspect,
who has been identified,
walked out of the store with-
out paying for it. Deputy An-
dree Brown investigated.
On June 29, Howard
C. Hagan of Crawfordville
reported a vehicle theft. The
vehicle was reported stolen by
a friend who was keeping on
eye on the victim's property.
A suspect has been identified.
Deputies Mike Crum and An-
dree Brown investigated.
On June 29, Ashley S.
McCranie of Crawfordville
reported the theft of her wal-
let from her home. A suspect
has been identified. Deputy
Andree Brown investigated.
On June 29, Donna Mar-
tin Chatham of Crawfordville
reported the theft of cam-
paign signs. Ten signs, valued
at $50, were stolen from Craw-
fordville. Lt. Jimmy Sessor
investigated.


On June 28, Charles Fowl-
er of Crawfordville reported a
criminal mischief as three so-
lar lights were damaged at his
home. Damage was estimated
at $30. Deputy Vicki Mitchell
investigated.
On June 28, Michael C.
Ames of Crawfordville re-
ported a vehicle burglary. A
GPS system was stolen while
the vehicle was in the shop for
repairs. The stolen property is
valued at $250. Deputy Andree
Brown investigated.
On June 28, Harold H.
Strickland of Crawfordville
reported a theft of three signs,
valued at $15, from his prop-
erty. The signs were personal
signs owned by Strickland and
a campaign sign from Sheriff
David Harvey. Deputy Nick
Petowsky investigated.
The Wakulla County Sher-
iff's Office received 819 calls
for service during the past
week.
Note to our readers: The
people who are reported as
charged with crimes in this
column have not yet been to
trial and are therefore inno-
cent until proven guilty.


Fire Rescue Report


Last week, Wakulla County
firefighters responded to two
fire alarms, one miscellaneous
fire, three vehicle accidents,
four downed electric power
lines and 19 medical first
responder emergency inci-
dents.
Fireworks Safety Tips
A toddler holding a spar-
kler makes for a good photo,
but the scene can quickly


turn tragic. Chief Jason Hon-
eybone, Wakulla County Fire
Rescue Department, urges all
parents to please make sure
children are old enough to
understand the dangers of
fireworks before handling
them. There should always be
adult supervision.
Fireworks caused an esti-
mated 9,200 injuries through-
out the country in 2006 that


required emergency room
treatment according to the
U.S. Consumer Product Safety
Commission. About 70 percent
of those injuries happened in
the month surrounding July
4.
Firecrackers accounted for
the most injuries followed by
sparklers. Sparklers accounted
for one-third of injuries to chil-
dren younger than five.
Use fireworks outside only.
Always have a hose or bucket
of water nearby. Don't alter
or combine fireworks. Never


relight a "dud" firework. Wait
20 minutes and then soak it in
a bucket of water. Spectators
should keep a safe distance
from the fireworks shooter.
The shooter should wear safe-
ty glasses. Don't drink alcohol
before shooting off fireworks.
Only people over the age of 12
should be allowed to handle
sparklers of any kind.
Be sure your family uses
only legally sanctioned fire-
works this holiday and please
use them in a safe manner.


WCSO, FHP checkpoint results in citations


The Florida Highway Patrol
released enforcement totals
for the Comprehensive Road-
side Safety Checkpoint which
was held on Friday, June 27
from 10 p.m. until 2 a.m. on
June 28.
The operation was con-
ducted on U.S. 319 north
of State Road 267 in the vi-
cinity of Glenda's Country


Store. Enforcement totals
from the Comprehensive
Roadside Safety Checkpoint
included: Enforcement Totals:
442 Vehicles Checked; Total
Citations Issued: 53; Driving
Under the Influence Arrests:
3; Misdemeanor Arrests: 6;
No Valid Driver License: 2;
Open Container Citations
Issued: 3; Seatbelt Citations


Issued: 3; Warnings Issued:
24; Faulty Equipment Notices
Issued: 30.
The operation is part of a
long-term enforcement part-
nership between the Flori-'
da Highway Patrol and the
Wakulla County Sheriff's Of-
fice that focuses on priority
traffic safety issues to help
reduce deaths and injuries on


Wakulla County roadways.
Motorists are urged to
contact the Florida Highway
Patrol or local law enforce-
ment officials when reporting
an impaired, aggressive, or
dangerous driver by dialing
*FHP (*347) from their cell
phones and they may remain
anonymous,


Guardian Ad Litem needs more volunteers


Due to budget cuts, the Guardian ad
Litem Program has fewer staff to assist
the 80 abused and neglected children
'who are Wakulla County residents and
in desperate need of a court and com-
munity advocate. Interested citizens,
who want to make a profound difference


in the life of a local child, are encour-
aged to sign up for the free pre-service
training.
The training will be held at the TCC
Wakulla Center in Crawfordville. The
time is 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on July 15,
July 17, July 22 and July 24. A total of


30 hours of training is required, which
may include reading, interviews, court
observation and practice activities. Call
to register soon. Contact Leigh Merritt,
Assistant Circuit Director at, Leigh.Mer-
ritt@gal.fl.gov or call 606-1200.


Beware of scams from Florida prisons


Victor W. Lessoff, Special
-.Agent in Charge (SAC) of the
Tampa Field Office of IRS
Criminal Investigation and
Walter A. McNeil, Secretary
of the Florida Department
of Corrections announce a
new cooperative effort to
combat the ongoing attempt
by Florida prison inmates to
illegally obtain Federal income
tax refunds,
When referring to refund
crimes committed by prison-
ers SAC Lessoff states; "The
prosecution of income tax
refund crimes committed by
prison inmates is important,
Not only do these individuals
seek to violate the tax laws,
but inmates who file false
returns are almost always


assisted by someone in an of-
ficial capacity or in the general
public who has access to se-
cure personal ID information
and the services of the postal
and banking systems. Partici-
pants in prison refund scams
commit crimes against the
nation's tax system, but they
also defraud the'penal, postal
and banking systems. IRS-CI is
committed to the investigation
and prosecution of individuals
in every walk of life who seek


to abuse the federal income
tax system and corrupt the
nation's infrastructure."
Secretary McNeil states fur-
ther: "The Florida Department
of Corrections will continue
to assist the Internal Revenue
Service's investigators with all
the resources at our disposal
to stop tax refund scammers
in our prison system from de-
frauding the government and
taxpayers like you and me."
For Additional Information


Woman stabs mother,

cuts off her own tongue


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net

A 36-year-old Crawfordville
woman was found competent
to proceed with the criminal
case against her for stabbing
her mother on New Years
Day. The mother survived
her wounds and the woman,
Teresa Thornton, barricaded
herself in a bathroom after
deputies arrived on the scene
and cut off most of her own
tongue with scissors.
After spending several
months at Florida State Hos-
pital in Chattahoochee, Thorn-
ton was in court on Thursday,
June 12, before Wakulla Circuit
Judge N. Sanders Sauls for a
first appearance and for the
finding that she is now com-
petent and is able to under-
stand the seriousness of the
charges against her and assist
in her defense.
Thornton faces charges
of aggravated battery with a


deadly weapon causing great
bodily harm, a second degree
felony punishable by up to 15
years in prison.
Information presented in
open court indicated that
Thornton went off her psychi-
atric medications after becom-
ing pregnant. As a result of the
decompensation, she became
irrational and attacked her
mother.
In court, Thornton stood
quietly beside her attorney,
Adam Ruiz, and responded to
questions from the court with
simple "yes" answers.
Both Ruiz and Assistant
State Attorney Jack Camp-
bell, who's prosecuting the
case, indicated concern that
Thornton remain on her medi-
cations. Judge Sauls ordered
her to remain in custody at
the Wakulla County Jail until
resolution of her case. Thorn-
ton is being kept on suicide
watch at the jail.


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will sponsor a POLITICAL RALLY

on.SATURDAY, JULY 26 at 5 p.m.

at the Crawfordville Woman's Club clubhouse. *


ALL CANDIDATES INVITED TO PARTICIPATE.
.f t i " O


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for candidates and citizens to dialogue about .

o* issues facing WakullaCounty. ,

FOOD ENTERTAINMENT SPEECHES CANDIDATE BOOTHS

For more-information please call
S4 CWC President Elnita Burke at 926-3159,
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or Tammie Barfield at The Wakulla News"office, 926-7102. .


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J 04







Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008

Drowning Bear'


Commuter buses


Continued'from Page 1A
"He was now losing function
(an effect of the drugs) in his
arms and legs, and was obvi-
ously in distress."
Warwick said he tried to
splash and create commotion
in an attempt to get the bear to
head back to the shore.
"Instead, the dearly confused
bear looked at me as if he was
either going to go by, through
or over me and at times he even
looked as if he was just going
to climb on top of me to keep
from drowning."
Warwick said that after a
few minutes the bear reared
up on his hind legs as if to
lunge at him, but instead fell
straight backwards and was
submerged.
"At that point I knew I had
to keep the bear from drown-
ing," he said.
"After a few seconds the
bear popped his head up out of
the water and thrashed around
a bit, but could obviously no
longer keep his head above
water."
Warwick kept one arm un-
derneath the bear and the other
gripping the scruff of its neck
to keep the bear's head above
water. Warwick said he walked
barefoot over concrete blocks
.crusted with. barnacles in thq
4-foot-deep water as he tried to
guide and use the water to help
,float the bear back to shore.
He said he cut his feet on
the barnacles and the bear
scratched him once on the
foot, but he was otherwise
uninjured.
Area resident Wendy Chan-
dler said Warwick looked like a
lifeguard, pulling a tired swim-


FWC Biologist Adam Warwick assists the drowning bear.
Photo provided to FWC courtesy of Becky Bickerstaff


mer to shore.
During Warwick's trek, FWC
Officer Travis Huckeba and a by-
stander with a boat approached
Warwick and the bear in the
water. The bear was startled
and Warwick lost his grip until
the boat backed off. Warwick
said the bear's buoyancy made
his job less difficult
"It's a lot easier to drag a
bear in 4-foot water than move
him on dry land," he said.
When Warwick and the bear
made it to shore, "A bystander
arrived out of nowhere with
a backhoe and, with some
assistance, we were able to
load the bear into the bucket
and then into an FWC truck,"
Warwick said.


Thad Brett a general contrac- said. "We're real glad to have
tor who lives in the area and the FWC come out and help us
had a backhoe for work he was with these bears, and we were
doing to .his house, said his real glad the bear was going to
wife had seen the commotion be relocated."
and told him Warwick was try- The bear was transported
ing to get the bear out of the to the FWC Tate's Hell office
water, and Warwick and FWC's Ron
"I knew how hard it would Copley relocated the bear to
be to get that bear out" Brett the Osceola National Forest
said. "I could see he was about near Lake City.
waist-deep in the water, and "He was going up under
I came down with the back- people's houses, probably try-
hoe." ing to cool off,"
Brett said he positioned Chandler said. "Kids were
the bucket of the backhoe in going up and down the stairs
the water so the bear could be and anything might have hap-
'lifted out and moved to the opened. We're all pulling for the
truck bed. bear to get adjusted in his new
"It's good to have good guys home."
like (Warwick) around," Brett


Anne Ahrendt


Continued from Page 1A
Moving to its new modern
facility; overcoming two Ad-
ministrative Orders from the
Department of Revenue saving
the Homestead Exemption for
Wakulla homeowners; made
the office more accessible
to the public through the
mywakullapa.com web site, e-
mail access and an improved
telephone system; put in place
financial safeguards; provided
for employee education; insti-
tuted performance standards
as well as boosting employee
morale.
She said she also insti-
tuted automatic homestead
exemption renewal; off-site
office hours for the taxpayers'
convenience; and the hiring
of an employee to perform
GIS parcel mapping in-house,
providing a large savings to
taxpayers.
"I am proud of these ac-
complishments and flattered
that others attempt to take
credit for them," she said. "I
was compelled to run for of-
fice due to the degradation
of office systems and the
lack of fairness and equity
in the assessments since I
left office. "Wakulla County
should have experienced a
dramatic increase in revenues
resulting from Wal-Mart's $9.5
million addition to the real
property tax roll. Instead, we
are seeing a huge decline in
revenues, which will require
a tax increase to generate the
same revenues as last year. I
want to know what happened
to this commercial revenue
windfall."
She added that she is con-
cerned by the discrepancies in
assessed values on the Prop-
erty Appraiser's web site com-
pared to the Tax Collector's
web site.
"People want to know
what's going on with these dis-
crepancies," she said. "When
someone gets an unfair or il-
legal break on their taxes, the
rest of the taxpayers have to
make up the difference with
an increase in their tax burden
and that is not fair.
"There will be some indi-
viduals angry at me for point-
ing this out and they will use
their positions to discredit
me. My job will be to provide
fairness and equity to all. If
one person gets a break on
his taxes, all his neighbors
should get the same tax break.
I firmly believe that the ma-
jority of Wakulla citizens are
ready for change and I will
represent them with integrity
and honesty."
Ahrendt said she intends to
institute a number of new in-
novations when elected. Some
of her proposals include: to ini-
tiate automatic renewals on all
exemptions and agricultural
classifications; advocate cre-


ation of a "Heritage" classifica-
tion so that families who have
owned waterfront properties
for generations won't have to
sell their family treasures just
to pay taxes; eliminate costly
"keying errors" by adding an
audit component to office
systems; have a Special Mag-
istrate conduct the Value Ad-
justment Board proceedings-at
no cost to Wakulla County-to
get the politics out of property
assessment; expand GIS map-
ping systems for coordinated
use by all county offices and
utilities.
Ahrendt's qualifications
include a background in real
estate and appraisal; finance
and office administration.
She graduated from Florida
State University with a B.S. in
Business and took coursework
in Public Administration, Ad-
ministrative Law and Budget-
ing and Urban and Regional
Planning.


She has completed the edu-
cation requirements for the
"Florida Certified Appraiser"
designation from the Interna-
tional Association of Assess-
ing Officers and Department
of Revenue.
Ahrendt worked for the
State of Florida for 17 years
as a Financial Analyst. She
worked in the real estate
industry for Century 21, First
Realty and St. Joe Company.
Ahrendt is active in commu-
nity organizations including
the Business and Professional
Women's Association, the
Chamber of Commerce, Keep
Wakulla County Beautiful and
she is the treasurer for the
Crawfordville Lion's Club. She
is also a member of Wakulla
Presbyterian Church, an Elder
and a member of the New
Church Development Commit-
tee for the Florida Presbytery.
Her husband, Kurt, is an
attorney employed with the


Chamber Will send in an

order for brick pavers


The Wakulla County
Chamber of Commerce is
getting ready to order pavers
at the old wooden court-
house walkways. An order
will be placed on July 10.
Since the chamber must
order in increments of 100
pieces it may be a little
while for the next order.
All proceeds will go to-
ward the unpaid construc-
tion costs for the renovation
of the old courthouse.
The pavers should be
installed by October. For


more information, contact
Petra Shuff at 926-1848 or
petra@wakullacountycham-
ber.com.


Leave Wothing But
Your Footprints




Keep Wak if(a
County Beautifuj


Office of the Attorney Gen-
eral. They have one son, John,
a fifth grader at Shadeville
Elementary School.


Continued from Page 1A
The two noted that Wakulla County's bowl-like shape,
and the shallowness of Apalachee Bay makes the county one
of the most vulnerable places to flooding and damage from
storm surge. In a Category 2 or 3 hurricane, water might reach
Crawfordville.
While the county has suffered heavy storm damage from
hurricanes in the 1800s, the past century has seen relatively
minor damage. In the 1840s floods and a tidal wave destroyed
Wakulla County's first county seat at Port Leon.
Modeling done of the floodwaters that hit Wakulla as part
of Hurricane Dennis in July 2005 revealed a phenomenon
previously unknown, in which high water built up along the
coast in South Florida as the storm moved on a northward
track and surged into Apalachee Bay flooding the coast with
10 to 12 feet of water.
With negotiations between the county and Wakulla
Expo Association broken off, Kessler asked that efforts be
made to find another location near Crawfordville for a youth
Community Center.
The county has some federal money to build a community
center and, given the talks with the Expo Association for
the county to take over the Civic Center project, it had been
proposed that some of that land be used as a site for the
community center.
But with questions swirling about the finances and tax
status of the Expo Association, negotiations stopped.
Kessler noted that there had been discussions about us-
ing county land at the recreation park in Medart, but he sug-
gested that was too far away from the population center of
Crawfordville.
Kessler brought up a resolution for the board's approval
that supports establishing a winter whooping crane colony
in Wakulla County.
The idea was hailed by other commissioners for its poten-
tial to bring in birders and eco-tourists to the area.
Brimner reported that Tallahassee City Commissioner
Debbie Lightsey had proposed a regional stormwater sympo-
sium that would include Wakulla County as well as Tallahas-
see, Leon County and the state Department of Environmental
Protection.

New VA Center opens


Congressman Allen Boyd
(D-North Florida), a veteran
of Vietnam, celebrated the
impending opening of the
new veterans' clinic in Mari-
anna, at a recent dedication
and ribbon cutting ceremony.
The new community-based
outpatient clinic (CBOC) in
Jackson County opened for
full services in June.
In January, the VA an-
nounced that the location for
the CBOC in Jackson County


would be at a former medi-
cal practice office building
located at 4970 Highway 90,
just east of the State Road 71
intersection.
"I am proud of this new
veterans' clinic, but more
than that, I am proud of the
veterans it will serve," said
Congressman Boyd. "Our vet-,
erans deserve the best care we
can provide, as close to them
as we can provide it." i,


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I









Section B


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008


Wakulla third grade summer reading camp

in full swing at Medart Elementary School


The students in the Wakul-
la third grade reading camp
were immersed in reading
instruction using the SRA Ka-
leidoscope program, coupled
with other research-based
instructional materials. Stu-
dents rotate between small
group instruction, literacy
centers and monitored inde-
pendent reading. They also
participate in reading games,
computer-assisted instruc-
tion and read-aloud times.
Superintendent David
Miller recently spent an af-


ternoon visiting the reading
camp. "The goal of the camp
is to provide intensive read-
ing instruction to accelerate
the reading achievement of
the students," he said. "The
teachers do a great job mak-
ing every minute count for
these third graders."
The Summer Reading
Camp began June 11 and
extends through July 17. The
camp is offered to address
the reading needs of third
grade students. There are
currently 24 third graders


participating. Transporta-
tion, breakfast and liinch are
provided for the students
as they spend 5 VI hours
each day receiving valuable
instruction.
Beth Mims, Executive Di-
rector of Curriculum shares,
"Informal assessment is
daily and ongoing. Student
achievement is formally
measured through the state
provided portfolio assess-
ment and the SAT9, which
is given on the last day of
Summer Reading Camp."


Youth sailing programs are

scheduled at Shell Point


tialey's nnal product couia nave made a lot or cole slaw
Haley Bennett's 13 pound cabbage grew from a starter plant she received through
Shadeville Elementary School third grade teacher Rhonda Traweek, The huge cab-
bage was cut for cooking on Father's Dayl Haley's grandparents, Floyd and Ethelle
Robinson of Crawfordville, helped her care for her cabbage. Haley's parents are Kris
and Amy Bennett of Crawfordville.


Summer Voluntary Pre-K

Program Thrives at WEC


Wakulla School District
pre-kindergarten programs
may house the youngest
students at ages 3, 4 and 5,
but there's important learn-
ing going on every day of
the week, including in the
summer.
The state-funded Voluntary
Pre-Kindergarten program at
Wakulla Educational Center
is up to six classrooms this
summer, the largest group yet
with 51 students. All classes
have certified teachers, with
a 10-to-1 student to teacher
ratio. Summer VPK prepares
students who will be new to
kindergarten in the fall.
From June 5 through July
31, students will be working
on readiness skills, letter
recognition, counting, social
skills, and school routines.
"It's a long day, but it's a


good tool to get our students
ready for kindergarten," said
teacher Tina Martindale.
Wakulla School District
has regular school year pre-
kindergarten programs that
include VPK, School Readi-
ness, Exceptional Student
Education (ESE), and Head
Start. Both the Wakulla Edu-
cation Center (WEC) and the
Sopchoppy Education Center
(SEC) house Pre-K students.
With the school year Pre-
K programs reaching more
than 300 students each year,
Wakulla County Superinten-
dent David Miller said, "The
more we do for our littlest
learners, the more successful
they will be in elementary
school."
New Pre-K principal Kim
Dutton thinks that the sum-
mer VPK program is ben-


eficial. "Our teachers are
dedicated to providing their
students with the neces-
sary skills they need to be
prepared," she said. "Success
starts here at Pre-K."
For more information on
the Wakulla Pre-Kindergarten
programs, call 926-8111.


Senior citizens who are at
least 62 years old and own
a home, can now borrow
against the equity in their
home, utilizing the money
for just about anything, with-
out ever having to repay the
debt. They can continue liv-
ing in the home for the rest
of their lives without the bur-
den of making monthly pay-
ments.
There is never a risk of los-
ing their home and they are
free to sell or refinance the
home, without penalty, at any
time. All money received is
tax free and has no effect on
Social Security or retirement
income.
This is now possible thanks
to a Home Equity Conver-
sion Mortgage created by the
Federal Government's De-
partment of Housing and Ur-
ban Development, also know
as HUD.


This money can be used to:
1. Payoff an existing
mortgage
2. Pay for medical expenses
3. Supplement income
4. Supplement savings
5. Make repairs to the home
6. Provide financial assistance
to family members
7. Establish a line of credit
that can be used if needed
in the future
8. Vacation and travel
A free report reveals how
citizens of Wakulla County
can utilize this opportunity
to ease financial burdens for
themselves, or their loved
ones courtesy of this United
States Government insured
assistance program.
For more information, call
the Consumer Awareness ho-
tline for a free recorded mes-
sage, anytime 24 hours a day
at 1-888-812-3156,
ext. 1.


Advertisement


The Apalachee Bay
Yacht Club at Shell Point
will be sponsoring summer
youth sailing programs in
an effort to get the youth
in Wakulla and surrounding
counties actively involved in
sailing.
Sailing is a fun way to get
kids outdoors, on the water
and out of the house. They
will learn about the weather,
currents and tides as well
as basic sailing along with
some basic racing skills.
This is one sport where
size seldom matters when
it comes to winning a race.
The smallest child may
be the one who takes the
trophy home at the end of
the day.
B.S.A. Small-Boat Sail-
ing merit badge class.
The Boy Scout, Small-Boat


Sailing merit badge is being
offered in the month of July
at the Apalachee Bay Yacht
Club at Shell Point. This pro-
gram is offered by A.B.Y.C.
along with B.S.A. Troop 8 at
Wakulla Middle School.
This sailing class will be
held on two Saturdays, July
5 and July 19. Any registered
Boy Scouts who are inter-
ested in this class should
call Troop 8 Scoutmaster
and sailing instructor David
Damon 251-4166.
If you are riot a registered
Boy Scout, join scouts and
take the class. There is no
charge for the class.
A.B.Y.C. Sailing class for
all boys and girls.
Apalachee Bay Yacht Club
will also be offering their
own youth sailing program
for boys and girls ages 9 to


15 in the month of July. It
will be taught by Kate Mor-
gan and John McBride.
You do not need to be a
member of the Apalachee
Bay Yacht Club to take the
class. The class is scheduled
for July 18 to July 20, Part 1;
and July 25 to July 27, Part
2. There is a fee of $150 for
the class.
For more information, call
John McBride at 570-3467.
The youth sailing pro-
grams will also include more
sailing in August along with
the A.BY.C. Youth Sailing
Regatta.
It is a fun day of cooking
out at the beach and youth
sailboat races complete with
trophies. For more informa-
tion, call Damon or Mc-
Bride.


Students graduate from college,

named to Dean's List
Florida Gulf Coast University
LeWanna LaShori Harvey of Crawvfordville graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree
in Criminal Justice studies from the College of Professional Studies at Florida Gulf Coast
University in Fort Myers. Harvey graduated from FGCU on June 24.
Samford
Many Florida residents were named to the Dean's List for the spring semester at Samford
University in Birmingham, Ala. They include Lindsay Nicole Wise of Panacea.
To qualify for the honor, a student must have earned a minimum 3.5 grade point average
out of a possible 4.0 While attempting at least 12 credit hours of coursework.
Samford, with an enrollment of 4,485 students from 49 states and 27 foreign nations, is
Alabama's largest privately supported college or university.


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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008


People


Leader Mark Murray, Travis Harvey Henderson, Sheanna Wright, Assistant Leader
Marketta Murray, Wayne Murray, Layne Williams, Assistant Leader Rusty Eddy

Target Smashers compete well


The Wakulla County 4-H
Target Smashers Shooting
Sports Club participated in
the 4-H State Archery Match
held in Ocala earlier this year.
The event is an annual compe-
tition for counties in Florida
with 4-H Archery programs.
Each participant receives a
ranking by place within 4-H
Shooting Sports.
Representing Wakulla
County in the Senior Instinc-
tive Recurve Division, Wayne
Murray placed second and
Sheanna Wright placed 24th.
In the Intermediate Instinc-
tive Recurve Division, Lane


Williams placed third. In the
Junior Instinctive Compound
Division, Travis Harvey Hen-
derson placed third.
"Congratulations to these
individuals who had a reward-
ing experience and for those
who put forth time and effort
at the event. I am very proud
of all of our archers, they
all did a good job," said 4-H
Leader Mark Murray.
"This program is a great
program and there is always
room for more youth who
would like to join," said 4-H
Agent Sherri Hood. "The 4-H
program not only offers ar-


chery, but also offers Shotgun
and Air Rifle for the youth.
One of the main philosophies
of the club is to become not
only a championship archer,
but also a championship
person."
Target Smashers is open
to youths ages 8 to 18. Any-
one interested in joining the
Target Smashers club, or any
other 4-H club, please con-
tact the new 4-H Extension
Agent, Sherri Hood. She may
be reached at the Wakulla
County Extension Office at
926-3931.


Durrance to perform in Tallahassee
Wind-up Nashville Record- The single has been receiv- Durrance at Famous Dave's on
ing Artist, and former Wakulla ing a positive response from July 2. Teddy Gentry will be
County resident Eric Durrance listeners, radio and media. making a special appearance
has recently released new Durrance is now living in there as well. Eric will also be
music. The single is called Havana and is attempting to playing a free concert at Tom
"Angels Fly Away" and is pro- become a fixture in the Coun- Brown Park on July 4 with
'duced by Teddy Gentry of the try Music Industry, the Georgia Satellites and The
supergroup Alabama. Fans can meet and greet Atlanta Rhythm Section.

Animals also lose their hair


Wakulla

gers

Susan Yelton]
Did you ever adopt a puppy
that started to lose its hair? Or
maybe your dog had a litter
of pups and when they were
ready for adoption they began
to look strange?-
Well, they might have had
a normal skin fauna that is
present in a small numbers
of healthy animals, Demodex
mites, which are microscopic
parasites that live in your pet's
hair follicles and skin glands.
The cause of your pet's hair
loss and skin infection could
be this condition and you
should consult your veterinar-
ian for treatment if you see
any signs of skin loss in a
young dog.
We have recently been
treating a few of the dogs
-t our adoption center for
this condition and providing
adoptive families, with the
following information about
Demodex.
Puppies and kittens are


born without Demodex mites,
but acquire them from their
mothers wHen they nurse.
In most animals, these mites
cause no skin problems and
the mites become normal skin
inhabitants. However, the im-
mune system of some animals
allows the mites to proliferate
unchecked. The mites are not
contagious to people or pets
unless the other pets have
poor immune systems.
The signs of Demodex
are usually found in young
animals, particularly dogs less
than one year old. Veterinar-
ians recognize the signs by
hairless areas usually found
on animal's head, neck or
front legs. Bacterial skin in-
fections are common and fre-
quently severe. You will find
that your pet is also scratching
his skin a lot.
In order to diagnosis the
problem, your veterinarian
will perform a skin scraping
and have to examine the
results with a microscope:
Sometimes a blood test is
necessary in order to help
your veterinarian diagnose
conditions that suppress the
animal's immune system.
Oral medication is usually
prescribed for treatment.


The treatment will last at
least six weeks and many
times longer. Once the hair
has regrown, your veterinar-
ian will perform another skin
scraping to make sure the
mites are all gone. It is very
important to have the final
skin scraping so that the medi-
cations are not discontinued
too early. If your pet has a
bacterial skin infection, your
veterinarian may also pre-
scribe medicated shampoo.
The few pups at the shelter
that had this condition are on
the mend and we hope you
will come see some of our
great dogs and cats that are
available for adoption. We are
not perfect, but our goal has
always been to have healthy
animals for adoption.
For your pets, remember, it
is summertime and the bugs
love your pets. If you keep
your dog outside, please pro-
tect them from the heat, give
them their heart guard and
flea meds, and provide them
with plenty of clean drinking
water.
We wish all our readers a
very happy July 4. We will be
closed that day, but open on
Saturday, July 5 from noon to
6 p.m.


Morgans will celebrate their 50th
On July 5, Wayne and Kath-
leen Morgan of Crawfordville
will celebrate their 50th wed-
ding anniversary at the Wakul-
la County Senior Citizens
Center in Crawfordville. -
They met in a bowling alley
in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
in March 1958, fell in love and
were married in July of that
year. They had five male chil-
dren, Danny, Tommy, Jimmy,
Wayne, Jr., and RIcky. They ) .
moved to Florida and settled
in Wakulla County in 1970,,
where they raised their boys. .
Wayne retired from Pipelin-
ers 798 Local Union in 1999 /
after 41 years as a welder, 20
of which he served as Presi- 4
dent of their Union. He is now f
chief welding inspector. Kathy
worked in retail and has been
a happy homemaker for 50
years. She is also very active
in their church and choir at St.
Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic
Church in Medart. Family and
friends from all over the U.S. Kathy and Wayne Morgan
and Canada will join them.

Morgans 25th anniversary announced

S Tom and Peggy Morgan
will celebrate their 25th
.~_ wedding anniversary with a
joint celebration with Tom's
I parents.
The couple was married
.Sept. 4, 1983 at Wakulla
Springs Park. Tom is em-
-, played as a Welding Inspec-
-. tor and both Tom and Peggy
own and operate a banquet
facility and restaurant and
".. storage facility with their
S -- children, Rusty and James.
SThe couple has two boys,
Thomas Russ Morgan of
a Michigan and James Mor-
,. gan of Michigan, and a
grandchild, Alexis Desiree
Morgan.
A special joint party will
be held Saturday, July 5 to
celebrate Tom & Peggy's 25th
Anniversary and Kathy and
Wayne Morgan's 50th wed-
-. ding anniversary. It will be
held at the Wakulla County
Senior Citizens Center in
Crawfordville from 2 p.m.
to 7 p.m.
Tom and Peggy Morgan

Molly Strickland Peck works in cancer lab


Molly Strickland Peck, the
daughter of Helen and Albert
Strickland of Crawfordville,
is a biological scientist with
the University of Florida De-
partment of Urology. In her


work, she demonstrates the
process of working with cell
culture media in the Urol-
ogy Cancer Immunotherapy
Lab at the UF Cancer and
Genetics Institute where


vaccines are created by a
patient's own stem cells to
fight prostate cancer. She is
a 2000 graduate of Wakulla
High School.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008 Page 3B


Courts and Law Enforcement Activity


WCSO Command Statistics


Wakulla County Sheriff's Of-
fice command statistics for the
past reporting period following
the June 11 Command Staff
meeting. The next Command
Staff meeting will be held June
25 at 9:30 a.m. in the EOC.
Division of Law Enforce-
ment
Uniform Patrol Captain
Chris Savary
Statistics were given for the
last two weeks:
770 Calls for Service; 53 Ar-
rests; 1,232 Area/Business Secu-
rity Checks; 353 Traffic Stops; 102
Offense Reports.
Special Operations Traf-
fic/ K-9/ Bike Squad
49 Traffic Stops; 3 Traffic
Crashes; 6 K-9 Deployments; 13
Assists to Road Patrol; 149 Busi-
ness Checks; 7 Arrests; 6 Offense
Reports.
Criminal Investigation:
Person & Property Crimes-
Captain Randall Taylor
Statistics for the past week:
37 Cases Assigned; 11 Closed;
2 Cases dosed with leads ex-
hausted; 7 Arrests; 1 Inactive; 8
Warrants Requested; 519 Pend-
ing Cases.
Evidence Section;
104 Items taken into custody;
0 Items submitted to crime lab;
10 Request from SAO; 3 Items
returned to owner; 0 Vehicles
seized or Buyback; 63 Items re-


searched for Destruct Order.
Special Notes: SWAT-Thurs-
day June 5, Captain Taylor, Team
members Rojas and Kromer went
to the Wakulla County High
School Bus Garage where they
met by school bus employees.
While there, they studied the
layouts of all the buses and took
extensive photos that can be
used in training.
WCSO will be developing a
training presentation for patrol
and school resource. Further
bus security meetings with the
school district will be sched-
uled.
WCSO have been receiving
reports of high volume gas thefts
from boats in Shell Point. With
little evidence in the cases, CID
printed and distributed more
than 100 flyers in the commu-
nity. CID and the Florida Game
and Fish Commission officers
did surveillance in the area for
approximately a week with nega-
tive results. Heightened patrols
have been established with the
bike squad.
CID made three arrests for in-
troduction of contraband into the
jail. Through intelligence gained,
detectives were able to intercept
tobacco being concealed and
transported in a trustee's private
body part. Detectives were able
to link a co-conspirator and the
female suspect who delivered


the tobacco to the recreation
park. All three parties have been
charged.
Located prior arrested Travis
McKinney in Henry County, Ga.:
Carrying concealed weapon, pos-
session of firearm during felony,
sale and possession of ecstasy,
sale and possession of meth.,
theft by purchasing stolen prop-
erty, DWLSR. Arrested as Regi-
nald McKinney. Contacted Henry
County D.A. who advised case
has been rescinded and charges
placed on Travis McKinney to
include his criminal history. Ad-
ditional charges of perjury and
false name to be added.
On June 4, WCSO and LCSO
conducted a search warrant
on Travis McKinney's storage
shed in Leon County. During
the search a stolen large screen
television was recovered. Other
items were confiscated pending
further investigation.
Crime Scene:
3 Crime Scenes Processed; 1
call-outs.
Training:
3-# WCSO employees
14-citizens
Special Notes: The Training
Section is temporarily working
with the Bike Unit and has the
range under construction. If
further information is needed
please contact Sgt. Fred Nich-
ols,


Street Crimes Captain Cliff
Carroll
6 # of Cases
2 # of Arrests
$1,000- amount of illegal
drugs
2 # Vehicles seized or buy-
back
Division of Administration-
Director Karen Day
Human Resources:
3 Applications Processed;
7 Gun Permits; 1 New Hires; 1
Volunteers; 0 Separations; 2 Em-
ployments; 0 Transfers; 0 Work-
ers Comp. Claims; 8 Fingerprints
scanned; 0 Vehicle Claims.
Civil Section:
22 Summons Received; 21
served; 37 Subpoenas Received;
61 served; 16 Injunctions of
which 10 were served; 9 Felony
Registrations,
Warrants Section:
47 Warrants Received; 17
Served/0 Recalled; 0 Writs Re-
ceived; 5 Served/113 Recalled;
47 Probable Cause Arrests; 11 by
other agencies.
Records Section:
88 Citations (55 Uniformed
Traffic Citations, 3 DUI, 30 Warn-
ings); 7 Trespass Warnings; 216
Local Record Checks & Reports;
110 Offense Reports: 7 Field
Interviews.
Courts/Judges are recalling
all misdemeanor writs. They will
no longer issue misdemeanor


writs. Instead they will suspend
the persons drivers license and
send fees owed to a collection
agency.
Fleet/Building Manage-
ment:
13 Vehicle Work Orders Com-
pleted; 9 Administrative Build-
ing Work Orders Completed;
4 Animal Shelter Work Orders
Completed; 22 Jail Work Orders
Completed; 1 Oak Annex Work
Orders Completed; 8,120 Pounds
of Facility Trash Recycled.
IT Service Calls: 70
Division of Corrections-
Major Miller
Security-Captain Martin
300 Inmates of which 165 are
local, 124 ICE, 272'DOC, 4 Federal,
117 Inmates Booked In and 136
Released, 22 Warrants Served in
the Jail.
Support Services-Captain
Willis
28 Inmates on Work Release;
26 Trustees; 900 Meals a day
served; 7 Medical Transports; 15
INS Transports; 18 Inmates in
Workcamp.
Court Security-Bailiff Sec-
tion-Captain Bill Poole
1,844 People through court-
house; 210 Trials/hearings
worked; 15 Court Transports.
Special Notes: Lt. Bradford
will start a training program for
civilians who sign out inmates.


The mandatory training will be
2 to 3 hours.
Division of Community
Services-Major Massa
Litter Control
11,500 pounds of trash re-
moved from the roadways.
Division of Open Govern-
ment & Public Information-Major
Langston
Victim Advocates
Laurie Langston served 38
Victims with 93 services and Tina
Brimner served 43 Victims with
115 services.
Animal Control-Captain
Steve Ganey
89 Animals Taken-in and 89
Animals put to sleep.
SRO-Assigned to Road Patrol
for the summer
0 # Civil Citations, 0 Class-
room hours, 0 Overtime hours, 14
Reports, 373 Calls for Service.
Emergency Management-
Director Nelson
1 Plans reviewed/updated; 0
New plans developed; 2 Exercis-
es, drills, tabletops performed; 1
Training opportunities offered to
stakeholders; 1 Training opportu-
nities provided/attended; 4 Pub-
lic presentations; 9 Stakeholders
meeting held/attended.
Communications
2,951 Calls for Service; 332
911 Calls.


I


4


*1


WCSO graduated another class of students at the 23rd Citizens Academy

Citizens learn about WCSO operations
The 23rd Wakulla County with 15 people attending. The Robin Cave, Barbara Cronan, dine Beck and William Petty.
Sheriff's Office Citizens Acade- next Citizens Academy will be Pauline Beckham, Donna Gar- Sheriff David Harvey and
my graduation was held at the held starting Sept. 9. Anyone rett, Ashley Garrett, Anna Major Larry Massa served as
sheriff's office on May 20. The interested in attending may Lewis, Ralph Lewis, Ann Petty, instructors.
award ceremony was held at 7 contact Major Larry Massa at Carolyn Grimes, Steven Mus-
p.m. in the Emergency Opera- 926-0821. grove, Cody Watts, Nancy W
tion Center conference room The graduates included: Watts, Jeanette Saitta, Jeral-

Brown pleas to stealing $21,000 from Rotary rWI


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By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
A Crawfordville woman
who became part of the local
business community repre-
senting herself as the wife of
the Winn-Dixie store manager
pleaded no contest last week to
charges of grand theft, uttering,
and forgery.
As part of a negotiated plea,
the woman, Bonnie Brown,
was ordered to serve five years
probation with a condition of
120 days in the Wakulla County
Jail with credit for 30 days
served, and make restitution to
the Crawfordville Rotary Club.
The plea was heard by Wakulla
Circuit Judge N. Sanders Sauls
on Thursday, June 12.
Within 60 days of her re-
lease from jail, Brown is to be-
gin making monthly payments
of $412 a month to the Rotary
Club. She must also pay $1,480
in court costs and fines.
Brown had adjudication


withheld, meaning she will
have no criminal conviction on
her record.
Brown was in court with
Maurice Burgess, the former
manager at the Crawfordville
Winn-Dixie. The couple had
represented themselves as
husband and wife to the com-
munity, although it was later
found out after the couple's
arrest that Burgess was still
married to a woman in another
state.
In 2006, Burgess was elected
treasurer of the local Rotary
Club, and his duties included
keeping the club's books and
writing checks to pay the club's
bills. In March 2007, Rotary offi-
cers discovered that $23,750.27
was missing.
A fraud examiner at Burgess'
trial testified that Brown be-
gan cashing checks written to
herself beginning Oct. 31, 2006
and continued through March
2007. Burgess told investigators


he had no knowledge of the
fraud. He had suffered a stroke
in November 2006 and was
traveling to the Mayo Clinic for
treatment in the months after,
as well as trying to continue
his duties at the grocery store.
Brown pleaded to one count
of grand theft over $20,000, a
second-degree felony punish-
able by up to 15 years in prison,
and 11 counts of forgery and 11
counts of uttering, third degree
felonies punishable by up to
five years in prison, meaning
she faced a total maximum
sentence of up to 125 years in
prison.
Judge Sauls also consented
to allowing Brown's probation
to be transferred to North
Carolina.
Assistant Public Defender
Matt Ream represented Brown
in the case. Assistant State
Attorney Ashleigh Stowell
prosecuted.


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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008

Library programs continue to excite children Bay scallop season


Last week was a busy week
both in and out of the library.
The two "Weekly Outings"
were well attended. On Thurs-
day, 49 folks received a guided
tour of the Gulf Specimen Ma-
rine Lab by the lab's founder,
famous author and marine
biologist Jack Rudloe.
On Tuesday, 43 folks trav-
eled up to Tallahassee and
visited the Mary Brogan Art
Museum, where they enjoyed
the hands on science dem-
onstrations and the wonder-
ful planetarium. Storyteller
Mama Koku appeared at "It's


Showtime" last Friday night
and another huge crowd was
on hand to enjoy her special
brand of African Folk Tales.
On Thursday, July 3 at 7
p.m., "It's Showtime" features
the Walk-about Puppets in a
return engagement present-
ing "Mr. Blister's Toy Circus."
The production is presented
in a European puppetry style
where the puppeteer is in
full view and participates in
the action as an actor. Picture
a gigantic pop up book as
the elaborate set and as the
pages are turned the set is
transformed and you get the
idea.
Fun and laughter are the
order of the day when Mr.
Blisters' Toy Circus comes
to town. See the incredible
performing toys go through
their paces, Madame MooMoo
queen of the unicycle, Steenko
the circus strongman and


morel There's even a singing
dogl All are expertly presented
by Master of Ceremonies, Mr.
Blister. This is a variety per-
formance using Marionettes
and Hand and Rod Puppets
and is suitable for younger
audiences, Pre-K through the
second grade. As an adult who
saw last years performance of
"Goldilocks," I promise adults
will enjoy it as well. The per-
formance will be followed by
a short question and answer
time.
Mark your calendars now
for the July 10 performance of
Kate Carpenter at the library.
This event is not listed in the
Summer Reading Program bro-
chure distributed to all school
children in May. "Mrs. Kate"
will be sharing her family
friendly folk song and stories
beginning at 7 p.m.
The new schedule for com-
puter classes is now up on


our web site, www.wakul-
lalibrary.org. There is a full
array of classes offered in July
including beginner classes in
Windows XP I- Introduction
to Computing; Excel I; Arrange
Files & Folders I; Download &
Organize Digital Photos I; and
Family Tree Maker I.
On Thursday, July 9, from
1:30 to 4:30 p.m., an opportu-
nity to join the world of blog-
ging arrives when "Google
Blogs" will be offered.
All classes are free and led
by Certified Instructor Deanna
Ramsey. Pre-registration is
required as each class is lim-
ited to 12 students. For more
information, please consult
the web site or call the library
at 926-7415.
The Library Advisory Board
is scheduled to meet at the
library in the conference room
at 4 p.m. on Monday, July 7.


Senior citizens are targets of fraud


opened on July 1


The recreational harvest
season for bay scallops began
July 1 and continues through
Sept. 10. Open scalloping
areas on Florida's Gulf Coast
extend from the west bank of
the Mexico Beach Canal in Bay
County to the Pasco-Hernando
county line near Aripeka.
Bay scallops may be taken
only within the allowable har-
vest areas. It is illegal to pos-
sess bay scallops while you're
in or on state waters outside
the open harvest areas, or to
land bay scallops outside the
open areas.
There is a daily limit of two
gallons of whole bay scallops
in the shell or one pint of
bay scallop meat per person
during the open season. In
addition, no more than 10
gallons of whole bay scallops
in the shell or one-half gallon
of bay scallop meat may be
possessed aboard any vessel
at any time.


Residents are allowed to
harvest bay scallops only by
hand or with a landing or dip
net, and bay scallops may not
be harvested for commercial
purposes.
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) biologists review the
status and health of the bay
scallop fishery each year.
"We are seeing recovery
of scallop populations along
the west coast of Florida
relative to their status in the
early 1990s," said Bill Arnold,
an FWC research scientist.
"Harvesters should adhere to
scallop-fishing regulations, es-
pecially the daily bag limit."
You also should collect
only the amount of bay scal-
lops you are willing to clean.
More information on bay
scallops is available online at
MyFWC.com/marine/bayscal-
lops.htm.


Wakulla scams.
County Senior MUTUAL GRANTS, INC.
Center from Kitchener, Ontario
mailed a letter dated May
OWat 28, 2008 to one of our cli-
ents advising them of a
$50,000 grant that had been
awarded to them. Enclosed
RH. Carter with the letter was a check
By R.H. Carter for $1,856.67. The senior
Wakulla County Senior Citi- called them as advised in
zens Council Director the letter and was asked
Swindlers who attempt to send them a check for
to defraud the public target the $1,856.67 so they could
senior citizens with their receive a certified check
scams. Recently, there has for $45,000. She brought
been an increase in these the correspondence to us
and learned that it was a
Bardin graduates from

Flagler College

Rachel Christan Bardin of St. Marks was awarded a Bach-
elor of Arts degree in Communications from Flagler College
in St. Augustine. Bardin graduated Magna Cum Laude and
was one of more than 400 Flagler seniors at the spring com-
mencement ceremony held April 26 on the college campus
in St. Augustine,


Senior citizens celebrate

holiday with a party

The Wakulla County Senior Lunch will be provided
Citizens Center will have a July along with door prizes and
4 celebration for local senior Uncle Sam will visit. Gospel
citizens at Hudson Park on music will be part of the en-
Thursday, July 3 at 11 a.m. tertainment.


'T31 'inO TIreams
One Member at a Time


Construction Loans

are our Specialty


scam.
NORTH AMERICAN
GRANT, INC. from Sud-
bury, Ontario mailed a let-
ter to this same individual
dated June 5, 2008 that was
the same as the first and
had an attached check for
$2,995.67. Both letters had
identical signatures on
them. The husband of the
lady who received these
letters was so convinced
that they were legitimate
and became so upset that
he had to increase his anti-
anxiety medication.
Another senior client
received a call from GRANT
WRITERS RESEARCH NET-
WORK from Raleigh, N.C.
advising him that they
would obtain a grant to pro-
vide $30,000 to $50,000 for
home repairs if he would
authorize payment of $995
by phone on his credit card.
He did make the payment
and soon received a packet
of papers that asked for
everything about him in-
cluding his Social Security
number for the grant. After
that, they. advised him that
they wanted $265 per page
for them to prepare thou-
sands of grants for him. He
has lost $995.
'E ^ Please report
orphaned or
Injuredwildlife
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WORKIRCE and Wakulla Senior Citizen

Center are Giving Back to Wakulla
Courtney Parker and Stephanie Cmehil have been hard at work at the Wakulla Senior
Citizen Center. Courtney and Stephanie, both participants in the WORKFORCE plus
Giving Back to Wakulla are working to gain on-the-job experience that can be utilized as
they continue on their career planning path.
"Both students have been a pleasure to have at our Center. Their desire to learn and be
a part of our daily activities is unmeasurable," says RH Carter, Executive Director of the
Wakulla Senior Citizen Center. In its third year, the Giving Back to Wakulla program is
excited to have the involvement of local organizations such as the Senior Center who has
employed students each year of the program.
Courtney Parker, who moved to Wakulla at five is excited
to moving to Wakulla High School. She enjoys giving back
to our community through helping with both youth and our
older population. At the Wakulla Senior Citizen Center, she
is learning office skills as well as providing activities for the
residents and visitors. Coutney's long-term goal is to be a "
Physical Education Teacher in the Wakulla County School
District.

Stephanie Cmehil, a member of the National
Junior Honor Society, shows her spirit of giving back
by participating in the Wakulla Coastal Clean-up. As
an 8th grader, she was awarded perfect attendance,
AB Honor Roll and Most Improved. Stephanie has
a deep love of the natural beauty of Wakulla and
takes pride in knowing that just the little bit she can
do, can go along way. She is taking the experiences
she is learning at the Wakulla Senior Citizen Center
-to guide her into her future career plans.
"There are no substitutes for the knowledge and experience that will be gained by each student," says
Kimberly A. Moore, WORKFORCE plus CEO. "WORKFORCE plus commends each participating
employer for their willingness to assist in molding our next generation of workers."


Another senior paid $200
to receive winnings of $2
million from another coun-
try. Later she was informed
that she must pay $1,500
to get her winnings across
the border. After other re-
quests she determined that
this was a scam, but still
believed the lady on the
phone was so sweet and
nice. Her husband wants to
send more money because
he believes it for real.
Those of us who grew up
during the war or shortly
thereafter have an inclina-
tion to believe in people.
However, there are people
who will take advantage
of our older population. If
you receive any phone call
or letters that promise you
financial gain and you have
not worked for that benefit
then you must question it,
even if it appears legiti-
mate. Have it reviewed by
law enforcement, senior
center staff, an attorney,
someone you know at a
bank or anyone else that
you know and trust before
you pay a dime. There are
many people who are try-
ing to defraud you of your
money and that number is
growing.


SEEK students picked


The Iris Garden Club is
sending three local students
to a statewide environmen-
tal conference called SEEK
(Save the Earth's Environ-
ment through Knowledge).
The annual summer confer-
ence is attended by teenagers
from across Florida who are'
interested in nature and envi-
ronmental issues. This year's
conference will be held at
Wakulla Springs State Park.
The Iris Garden Club will
send Lauren Gentry and
Kelsey Harrell to the first
conference session during
July 6 to July 9. Mollie Whid-
don will represent Wakulla
County at the second session
from July 13 to July 16. The
Iris Garden Club has awarded
each student a scholarship
that covers their conference
fee, meals, and lodging for the
four day conference.
SEEK is sponsored by the
Florida Federation of Garden
Clubs. Conference activities
include presentations, work-
shops, field trips, and infor-
mation about careers in envi-
ronmental science. Field trip
destinations this year include


St. Marks National Wildlife
Refuge, Gulf Specimen Marine
Lab, FSU's Coastal and Marine
Lab and the Apalachicola Na-
tional Forest.
After the conference, Lau-
ren Gentry, Kelsey Harrell and
Mollie Whiddon will share
what they have learned with
others in Wakulla County.
Lauren, who aspires to a ca-
reer in environmental law or
journalism, said she would
like to write an article for the
newspaper. Kelsey is consider-
ing majors in marine biology,
zoology or environmental
science. Vice-president of the
WHS Environmental Club,
Kelsey plans to use what she
learns at SEEK to raise aware-
ness at her school and expand
the Environmental Club.
In 2007, a SEEK scholar-
ship was awarded to Chelsea
Collins. Wakulla High School
science teacher Ann Kennedy
helped to publicize the schol-
arships and identify interested
students all four years. Former
scholarship winner Lucy Cart-
er will returnhto help conduct
a workshop on Green Living at
this year's SEEK conference.


I











THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008 Page 5B
A


Deadline 35 Cen




11: .CLASSlfIlED ADS$8.00

926-7102 iinimu


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100 EMPLOYMENT
105 Business Opportunities
110 Help Wanted
115 Work Wanted
120 Services and Businesses
125 Schools and Instruction
130 Entertainment
200 ITEMS FOR SALE
205 Antiques
210 Auctions
215 Auto Parts and Accessories
220 Cars
225 Trucks
230 Motor Homes and Campers
235 Motorcycles and 4-Wheelers
240 Boats and Motors
245 Personal Watercraft --
250 Sporting Goods
255 Guns
260 Business Equipment
265 Computers and Internet
270 Electronics
275 Home Furnishings


280 Home Appliances
285 Jewelry
290 Musical Instruments
295 Building Materils
300 MISC. FOR SALE
305 Machinery, Tools & Equipment
310 Firewood Products
315 Farm & Garden Equipments
320 Farm Products & Produce
325 Horses
330 Livestock, Farm Animals
335 Pets
340 Plants
345 Swap, Barter, Trade
350 Wanted to Buy
355 Yard Sales
400 NOTICES
410 Free Items
415 Announcements
420 Card of Thanks
425 Occasion Cards
430 In Memoriam
435 Lost and Found
440 Personals and Notices


500 REAL ESTATE, HOMES, MOBILES
505 Acreage for Lease
510 Acreage for Sale
515 Apartments for Rent
520 Townhouses for Rent
525 Townhouses for Sale
530 Commercial Property for Rent
535 Commercial Property for Sale
540 Farms for Sale
545 Homes for Sale
550 Homes with Acreage for Sale
555 Houses for Rent
560 Land for Sale
565 Mobile Homes for Rent
570 Mobile Homes for Sale
575 Mobile Homes with Land for Sale
580 Rooms for Rent/Roommates Wanted
585 Wanted to Rent
590 Waterfront Homes/Land for Sale
595 Vacation Rental



CALL 926-7102 TODAY
Email: classifieds@thewakullanews.net


Legal Notice


IN-THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 07-90-FC
DIV.
CITIZENS BANK WAKULLA D/B/A AMERIS,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
SHARON KAY WILLIAMSON A/K/A SHARON
KAY KINSER A/K/A SHARORN K. WILLIAM-
SON LOTT, et al.,
DEFENDANT (S)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Summary final Judgment of Foreclosure en-
tered herein, I will sell to the highest and best
bider for cash in the lobby of the Wakulla
County Courthouse, Crawfordville, Florida at
11:00 a.m. on the 31 day of July, 2008, the fol-
lowing described property:
Parcel #1
Commence at an iron pipe marking the South-
west comer of Lot I, Block "C" South of Tully's
survey of Panacea, Florida as per map or pint
thereof recorded in Plat Book I of the Public
Records of Wakulla County, Florida and
thence run South 08 degrees 40 minute:l East
60.00 feet to an iron pipe on the Southerly
right-of-way boundary of Rock Landing Street,
thence run North 83 degrees 38 minutes 00
Seconds! East along said right-of-way bound-
ary 417.00 feet, thence run 'South 06 degrees
22 minutes 00 seconds East 150.00 feet,
thence run South 80 degrees 31 minutes 1]
seconds West 104.26 feel, thence run South
88 degrees 25 minutes 38 seconds West
75.00 feet, thence run South 84 degrees 17
minutes 44 seconds West 47.85 feet, Thence
South 00 degrees 34 minutes 05 seconds
East 103.22 feet, thence run South 84 de-
grees 28 minutes 36 seconds West 180.61
eet, thence run South 07 degrees 39 minutes
12 seconds West 20.01 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGIN-
NING thence run North 83 degrees 35 min-
utes 47 seconds East 419.31 feet, thence run
North 25 degrees 09 minutes 13 seconds East
56.43 feet, thence run North 81 degrees 51
minutes 48 seconds East 143.21 feet, to the
approximate mean highwater line of Dickson
BAy, thence run along said mean highwater
line as follows: South 21 degrees 45 minutes
17 seconds East 72.87 feet, thence South 20
degrees 16 minutes 53 seconds East 44.74
feet, thence South 06 degrees 26 minutes 41
seconds West 66.95 feet, thence leaving said
mean highwater line run South 88 degrees 08
minutes 30 seconds West 77.85 feet, thence
run North 70 degrees 57 minutes 02 seconds
West 32.01 feet, thence South 83 degrees 38
minutes 30 seconds West 621.96 feet to the
Easterly right-of-way boundary of Wakulla
Avenue, thence run North 06 degrees 21 min-
utes 30 seconds West along said right-of-Way
boundary 48.42 feet, thence run North 83 de-
Srees 38 minutes 30 seconds East 122.56
el, thence run North 07 degrees 39 minutes
12 seconds.W#st 57.84 feet, to the POINT OF
BEGINNING.eontaining,1.86 acres, more or
less.
TOGETHER with access over and across,
above and thru the following described Access
Easement. Commence at an iron pipe marking
the Southwest corner of Lot 1, Block "C" South
of Tully's survey of Panacea, Florida as perm
map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1 of
the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida
and thence run South 08 degrees 30 minutes
East 60.00 feet to an iron pipe on the South-
erly right-of-way boundary of Rock landing
Street, thence run North 83 degrees 38 min-
utes 00 second East along said right-of-way
boundary 417.00 feet to the POINT OF BE-
GINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING
continue North 83 degrees 38 minutes 00 sec-
onds East along said right -of-way boundary
30.00 feet, thence run South 06 degrees 22
minutes 00 seconds East 223.03 feet, thence
run South 25 degrees 09 minutes 13 seconds
West 53.47 feet, thence run South 83 degrees
35 minutes 47 seconds West 2.04 feet, thence
'run North 06 degrees 22 minutes 00 seconds
West 268.61 feet to the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.
SUBJECT to and reserving to others, access
over, across, above and thru the following AC-
CESS EASEMENT: Commence at an iron
Spe marking the Southwest corner of Lot 1,
lock "C" South of Tully's survey of Panacea
Florida as per map or plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book 1 of the Public Records of Wakulla
County, Florida and thence run South 08 de-
grees 40 minutes East 60.00 feet to an iron
ipe on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of
ock Landing Street, thence run North 83 de-
grees 38 minutes 30 seconds East along said
right-of-way boundary 417.00 feet, thence run
South 06 degrees 22 minutes 00 seconds
East 268.61 feet to the POINT of BEGIN-
NING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING
thence run North 83 degrees 35 minutes 47
seconds East 2.04 feet, thence run North 25
degrees 09 minutes 13 seconds East 53.47
feet, thence run South 06 degrees 22 minutes
00 seconds East 152.16 feet, thence run
South 83 degrees 38 minutes 30 seconds
West 568.54 feet to the Easterly right-of-way
boundary of Wakulla Avenue, thence run
North 83 degrees 38 minutes 30 seconds East
538.53 feet, thence run NOrth 06 degrees 22
minutes 00 seconds West 58.16 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING.
And
Parcel #2
An undivided one-half interest in Lot 2, Block
"S" Agua de Vida Subdivision as shown per
map or plat thereof recorded Plat Book 1,
Page 12 of the Public Records of Wakulla
County, Florida.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this
Court on June 26, 2008.
"Americans with disabilities act (ADA) notice.
INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES NEEDING
A REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING
SHOULD CONTACT THE COURT ADMINIS-
TRATORS OFFICE, AS SOON AS POSSI-
BLE, TELEPHONE: OR, IF HEARING IM-
PAIRED, 1-800-995-8771. (TTD); OR
1-800-955-8778 (V), VIA FLORIDA RELAY
SERVICE.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY -S- TERESA BRANNAN
DEPUTY CLERK
DALE G. WESTLING, SR., ESQUIRE
331 EAST UNION STREET
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 32202
TELEPHONE: 904-356-2341
Attorney for Plaintiff
July 3, 10, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 08-57-PR
IN RE: ESTATE OF
OTIS CARRAWAY,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of OTIS
CARRAWAY, deceased, whose date of death
was April 25, 2008, is pending in the Circuit
Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which Is 3056 Craw-
fordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. The
name and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is
required to be served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims with
this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DE-
CEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
DANIEL W. DOBBINS .
Attorney for Michelle Carraway Woods
Florida Bar No. 0263176
Daniel W. Dobbins, P.A.
1330 Thomasville Road
Tallahassee, FL 32303
Telephone: (850) 222-1910
Fax: (850) 224-2666
Personal Representative
Michelle Carraway Woods
c/o Daniel W. Dobbins, P.A.
1330 Thomasville Road
Tallahassee, FL 32303
July 3, 10, 2008
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 652008CA000019FC
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE FOR BANC OF AMERICA FUND-
ING 2007-4,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
LAURA PERUZZI, ET AL.,
DEFENDANTS)
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: LAURA PERUZZI; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF LAURA PERUZZI; STUART W. DREYER;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF STUART W.
DREYER
whose residence is unknown if helshe/they be
living; and if he/she/they be dead, the un-
known defendants who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an
interest by, through, under or against the De-
fendants, who are not known to be dead or
alive, and all parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or interest in the property
described in the mortgage being foreclosed
herein.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the following prop-
erty:
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
LOT 19, BLOCK "A", BUCK FOREST, A SUB-
DIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 87
THROUGH 89 OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS
OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID
POINT ALSO LYING ON THE WESTERLY
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF QUAIL RUN TRAIL;
THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY
LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 63 DEGREES
28 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST 5.04
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT;
THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES 22 MIN-
UTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1812.37 FEET
TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE
CONTINUE NORTH 24 DEGREES 20 MIN-
UTES 40 SECONDS WEST 210.83 FEET TO
A ROD AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 24 DE-
GREES 20 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST
393.45 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF
WAY LINE RUN SOUTH 65 DEGREES 39
MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST 721.12 FEET
TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON
THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A
150 FOOT WIDE CITY OF TALLAHASSEE
TRt\NSMISSION POWERLINE; THENCE
RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE
SOUTH 24 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 21 SEC-
ONDS EAST 213.71 FEET TO A ROD AND
CAP; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF
WAY LINE RUN NORTH 65 DEGREES 20
MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST 363.20 FEET
TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE SOUTH 24
DEGREES 20 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST
181.80 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE
NORTH 65 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 30 SEC-
ONDS EAST 357.95 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 5.00 ACRES
MORE OR LESS.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on DAVID J. STERN, ESQ.
Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 900
South Pine Island Road #400, Plantation, FL
33324-3920 no later than 30 days from the
date of the first publication of this notice of ac-
tion and file the original with the clerk of this
court either before service on Plaintiffs attor-
ney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition filed
herein.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court
at WAKULLA County, Florida, this 2ND day of
June, 2008.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: -s-Teresa Brannan
DEPUTY CLERK
June 26, 2008
July 3, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-121-FC
CIVIL DIVISION
GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK,
a state-Chartered Bank
Plaintiff,
vs.
OBIE PAUL NOONKESTER, Deceased, the
Estate of OBIE PAUL NOONKESTER, his un-
known spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, and all others claiming by and
through OBIE PAUL NOONKESTER, De-'
ceased, ELLEN GILMORE, MAXINE BIDDLE,
TINY EASLEY, and JOE NOONKESTER, Be-
lieved to be the Heirs of OBIE PAUL
NOONKESTER, Deceased, UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT NO. 1, UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2, UN-
KNOWN TENANT NO. 3, and MIKE CARTER,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO DEFENDANTS, OBIE PAUL NOONKE-
STER, DECEASED, THE ESTATE OF OBIE
PAUL NOONKESTER, HIS UNKNOWN
SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
CREDITORS, AND ALL OTHERS CLAIMING
BY AND THROUGH OBIE PAUL NOONKE-
STER, DECEASED, ELLEN GILMORE, MAX-
INE BIDDLE, TINY EASLEY, AND JOE
NOONKESTER, BELIEVED TO BE THE
HEIRS OF OBIE PAUL NOONKESTER, DE-
CEASED, UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1, UN-
KNOWN TENANT NO. 2, UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT NO. 3, AND MIKE CARTER, AND ALL
PARTIES HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE
ANY RIGHT TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE
PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED:
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following property in
Wakulla County, Florida:
Lots 1, 2 and 3, Block "A," Page Park (unre-
corded) being more particularly described as
follows:
Commence at the Northwest Corner of the
Southwest Quarter of Section 9, Township 3
South, Range 1 East, Wakulla County, Flor-
ida; thence run South 00 degrees 18 minutes
37 seconds East 336.56 feet; thence South-
89 degrees 55 minutes 02 seconds East
1650.30 feet; thence South 00 .degrees 17
minutes 55 seconds East 1319.92 feet; thence
South 89 degrees 40 minutes 43 seconds
East 593.27 feet to a concrete monument for
the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said
POINTOF BEGINNING run North 00 degrees
13 minutes 39 seconds East 143.90 feet to a
concrete monument lying on the Southerly
right of way line of Alma Drive; thence run
along said right of way line as follows: South
89 degrees 41 minutes 37 seconds East 99.84
feet to a concrete monument; thence run
South 89 degrees 40 minutes 43 seconds
East 174.66 feet to a concrete monument;
thence South 35 degrees 49 minutes 41 sec-
onds East 132.89 feet to a point marking the
intersection of said right of way line with the
Northerly right of way line of State Road Num-
ber 365; thence leaving said right of way line
of Alma Drive run along said Northerly right of
Way line South 54 degrees 34 minutes 56 sec-
onds West 62.30 feet to a concrete monu-
ment; thence leaving said right of way line run
North 89 degrees 43 minutes 23 seconds
West 302.09 feet to the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, containing 1.05 acres more or less.
Subject to a 10 foot wide roadway and utility
easement lying over and across the Northerly
and Northeasterly 10 feet described thereof.
(Parcel ID #:
09-3S-01 E-177-05154-A01 &A02&A03).
has been filed against you. You are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to the Complaint on Mary Ellen Davis, the
Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is Penson
& Davis, P.A., 17 High Drive, Suite C, Post Of-
fice Box 1720, Crawfordville, Florida 32326,
on or before July 25, 2008, and file the original
with the clerk of this court either before service
on the Plaintiff's attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default may be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.

Dated ON June 16, 2008.
Brent X. Thurmond
Clerk of Court
By: -s- Teresa Brannan
As Deputy Clerk
June 26, 2008
July 3, 2008
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 08-40-FC
AURORA LOAN SERVICES LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
AURORA MARRERO, eat al.,
Defendant(s).,
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order or Final Judgement Scheduling Foreclo-
sure Sale entered on 6/26/08 in this case now
pending In said Court, the style of which Is In-
dicated above.
I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash in the'WVAK LLA County Courthouse,
3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327 at 11:00 a.m., on the 28th day
of August, 2008, the following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Order or Final Judge-
ment, to-wit:
LOT 25 AND THE WEST HALF OF LOT 26,
BLOCK 14 GREINERS ADDITION TO
CRAWFORDVILLE, ACCORDING TO THE
MAP OR PLAT THEREOFF, RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
alk/a: 76 HOMAN POINTE,
CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN
THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
ENTERED at WAKULLA County, Florida, this
26 day of JUNE, 2008
Brent X. Thurmond
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Wakulla, Florida
By: -s- Teresa Brannan
As Deputy Clerk
July 3, 10, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR Wakulla
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 08-83-FC
Household Finance Corporation III
a Delaware corporation,
Plaintiff
vs.
VERNON HOWELL & ROBERTA HOWELL
and all unknown parties claiming by, through,
under and against the above named Defen-
dant who are unknown to be dead or alive
whether said unknown are persons, heirs, de-
visees, grantees, or other claimants; TENANT
I/UNKNOWN TENANT; and TENANT If/UN-
KNOWN TENANT, in possession of the sub-
ject real property,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: VERNON HOWELL
121 Purify Bay Road
Crawfordville, Florida 32327
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for
foreclosure has been filed against you regard-
ing the subject property with a legal descrip-
tion, to-wit:
DEED301-711:
COMMENCE AT A GOVERNMENT CON-
CRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 92 OF THE
HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WA-
KULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE
RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 33
SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY
BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 92 A DISTANCE
OF 660.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 13 DEGREES,
29 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 664.92Z
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT,
THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 28
MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 704. 11 FEET
TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE
RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 04
SECONDS WEST 1569.73 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT
OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 17 DE-
GREES 26 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST
421.87 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES
51 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST 683.70
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT,
THENCE RUN SOUTH 14 DEGREES 49
MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 143.86 FEET.
THENCE RUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 29
MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 633.51 FEET
THENCE RUN NORTH 44 DEGREES 14
MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 208.87 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAIN-
ING 5.85 ACRES, MORE OR LESS.
DEED 301-709:
COMMENCE AT AN IRON PIPE MARKING
THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 92 OF
THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND
THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 52
MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE
WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 92 A DIS-
TANCE OF 629.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 14 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST
ALONG SAID WEST BOUNDARY 620.74
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT,
THENCE RUN NORTH 76 DEGREES 58
MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 635.3 I FEET
TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE
RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 40
SECONDS EAST 130.71 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH
73 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 26 SECONDS
EAST 394.82 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DE-
GREES 46 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST
44.01 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT
ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY OF A COUNTY GRADED ROAD
FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM
SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE
NORTH 73 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 09 SEC-
ONDS EAST 300.06 FEET TO AN OLD CON-
CRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH
14 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 06 SECONDS
EAST 143.86 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE,
THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 54
MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 249.21 FEET
TO AN IRON PIPE ON THE EASTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID
COUNTY GRADED ROAD. THENCE RUN
NORTH 34 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 16 SEC-
ONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY 150.60 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 0.90 ACRES,
MORE OR LESS.
and you are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on Gary I. Gas-
sel, Esquire, Plaintiff's attorney, whose ad-
dress is 2191 Ringling Boulevard, Sarasota,
Florida 34237 within 30 days from the first
date of publication and file the original with the
clerk of this court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the Complaint.
Dated this 16 day of June, 2008.
CLERK OF THE COURT
By: -s- Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
June 26, 2008
July 3, 2008

NOTICE OF ACTION
BEFORE THE BOARD OF NURSING IN RE:
The license to practice nursing of
Clara Curies, C.N.A
P.O. Box 981
Crawfordville, Florida 32326
CASE NO.: 2006-29621
LICENSE NO.: C.N.A. 55528
The Department of Health has filed an Admin-
istrative Complaint against you, a copy of
which may be obtained by contacting, Robert
Fricke, Assistant General Counsel, Prosecu-
tion Services Unit, 4052 Bald Cypress Way,
Bin #C65, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3265,
(850) 245-4640.
If no contact has been made by you concern-
ing the above by July 17, 2008, the matter of
the Administrative Complaint will be presented
at an ensuing meeting of the Board of Nursing
in Informal proceeding.
In accordance with the Americans with Dis-
abilities Act, persons needing a special ac-
commodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact the individual or agency send-
ing this notice not later than seven days prior
to the proceeding at the address given on the
notice. Telephone: (850) 245-4640,
1-800-955-8771(TDD) or 1-800-955-8770(V),
via Florida Relay Service.
June 12, 19, 26, 2008
July 3, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO: 08-50PR
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HENRY CLYDE MCCARTHY
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Henry
Clyde McCarthy, deceased, File 08-50PR is
pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Craw-
fordville, Florida 32327. The name and ad-
dress of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney Is set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and per-
sons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate, including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Frances Casey Lowe
Crawfordville, Florida
Florida Bar No. 521450
3042 Crawfordville Highway
PO Box 306
Crawfordville, Florida 32326
(850) 926-8245
Personal Representative:
Clyde Eugene McCarthy
116 Carmel Lane
Crawfordville, FL 32327
July 3,10, 2008
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAP-
TER 83, PART IV
Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Stor-
age Faciltiy Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83,
Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will
hold a sale by sealed bid on Friday, July 19,
2008, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville
Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse con-
taining personal property of:
Jason Morgan
Irene Home
Before the sale date of July 19, 2008, the
owners may redeem their property by a pay-
ment of the outstanding balance and cost by
paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy.
July 3, 10, 2008
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAP-
TER 83, PART IV
Notice Is hereby given pursuant to "Florida
Self Storage Facility Act Florida Statutes,"
Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center
will hold a sale by sealed bid on Thursday,
July 17, 2008 at 11:00 am at the junction of
Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the
contents of a Mini Self Storage unit containing
the personal property of:
Patti Hodge
Jake Rathel
Cynthia Rathel
Before the sale date of July 17, 2008, the
owners may redeem their property by pay-
ment of the outstanding balance and costs by
paying In person at the Stow Awa Center,
2669 Spring Creek Hwy, -Crawfordville, FL
32327, ,
June 26, 2008
July 3, 2008
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
PROTECTION
NOTICE OF PROPOSED AGENCY ACTION
The Department of Environmental Protection,
gives notice of its intent to issue a Formal De-
termination of the Landward Extent of Waters
of the State (File No. FD-65-0276077001) to
Florida Department of Transportation, District
3 for, c/o Gunter Ecological Consulting Com-
pany, LLC, for a 273-acre tract the property lo-
cated in Sections 20, 29, 30, 31, in Township
2 south, Range 1 west and Sections 5, 6, ,
17, 18 In Townshi 3 south, Range 1 west,
Wakulla County, located on Highway 319
starting at the Wakulla County / Leon County
line and running approximately eight and a
half miles. The Department's file on this matter
is available for public Inspection during normal
business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Mon-
day through Friday, except legal holidays, at
the Department of Environmental Protection,
Wetlands Evaluation anJ Delineation Section,
Mall Station 2500, Room 530, Bob Martinez
Center, 2600 Blair Stone Road, Tallahassee,
Florida 32399-2400.
Persons whose substantial interests are af-
fected by the above proposed agency action
have a right pursuant to Section 120.57, Flor-
ida Statutes, to petition for an administrative
determination (hearing) on the proposed ac-
tion. The petition must contain the information
set forth below and must be filed (received) in
the Departmentis Office of General Counsel,
3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Tallahassee,
Florida 32399-2400, within 21 days of publica-
tion of this notice. A copy of the petition must
also be mailed at the time of filing to the for-
mal determination petitioner at the address in-
dicated. Failure to file a petition within the 21
days constitutes a waiver of any right such
person has to an administrative determination
(hearing) pursuant to Section 120.57, P.s.
he petition shall contain the following infor-
mation: (a) The name and address, and tele-
phone number of each petitioner, the Petition-
er's name and address, the Departmentl s File
Number and the county in which the project is
proposed; (b) A statement of how and when
each petitioner received notice of the Depart-
ment's action or proposed action; (c) A state-
ment of how each petitioner's substantial inter-
ests are affected by the Department's action
or proposed action; (d) A statement of material
Ifacts disputed by petitioner, if any; (e) A state-
ment of facts which petitioner contends war-
rant reversal or modification of the Depart-
ment's action or proposed action; (f) A state-
ment of which rules or statutes petitioner con-
tends require reversal or modification of the
Department's action or proposed action; and
(g) A statement of the relief sought by peti-
tioner, stating precisely the action petitioner
wants the Department to take with respect to
the Department's action or proposed action.
If a petition is filed, the administrative hearing
process is designed to formulate agency ac-
tion. Accordingly, the Department's final action


may be different from the position taken by It
in this Notice. Persons whose substantial in-
terests will be affected by any decision of the
Department with regard to the formal determi-
nation have the right to petition to become a
party to the proceeding. The petition must
conform to the requirements specified above
and be filed (received) within 21 days of publi-
cation of this Notice in the Office of General
Counsel at the above address of the Depart-
ment. Failure to petition within the allowed
time frame constitutes a waiver of any right
such person has to request a hearing under
Section 120.57, F.S., and to participate as a
party to this proceeding. Any subsequent in-
tervention will only be at the approval of the
presiding officer upon motion filed pursuant to
ule 28-5.207, F.A.C.
July 3, 2008

110 Help Wanted



WAKULLA CHRISTIAN
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
(Just N of Crawfordville)
Wishes to employ
experienced and certified
Kindergarten Teacher
and a Pre-school
Teacher with CDA.

For an appointment
with Principal Jim Pound
Call,850-926-5583 -
or fax resume to:
850-926-5825.

120 Services and Busi-
nesses


Always True

Landscaping
Licensed & Insured
Commercial & Residential
Contact Erica or
Antonio Franklin
933-7645 or 933-5813
No Job too Big or Small
"Always true to you"




Angel's Cleaning Service
Commercial & Residential. "Too
many small jobs, not enough
hands." Contact: Angel @
850-459-4004. Licensed.

Babysitting'in my home. Medart
area. Call Teresa Porter.
850-508-9423.

Bella's Bed & Biscuit Doggie
Daycare.
Overnight boarding. Extended
stays. Kennel free home environ-
ment. Lots of love & pampering.
926-1016 or 519-4529.

CNA will care for
your loved ones in
their home or
facility. References
Available.
Contact r'
850-933-3687 1


Five Star Plumbing
Big Bend, Inc.

Commercial .'
& Residential
Service


Billy B. Rathel, Jr.
850-544-5062
850-421-1237 Fax
plumbing ivestar@yahoo.com
Lic#CFC1427547 State Certified
FREE
estimates. Land clearing, bushhog
mowing, stumps, driveways, big
or small. No minimums. 33 years
experience. Richard Miller, cell
933-1118.

| J.D. Enterprises
of Tallahassee

24 Hour Emergency Services
Landscaping
Home Repairs & Remodeling
Concrete Work
Installing ceiling fans/lights
and much more!

Email:
JD_ENTERPRISES16@ YAHOO.COM
Cell: (850) 510-9681
3752 Dartford Ln. Tallahassee, FL 32311


its


rd









Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008


120 Services and Busi-
nesses


Fal,+g r g ii) -,fo


-4(850)



For the b
CLOS C
MLynn Cole-Eddinger


I Paw's
Dog Grooming
850-984-1211
v Helen Luper
Certified Groomer

Hwy. 98 Medart, Florida ..:
Across from Medart
Elementary
Call Helen and Sherrie
Today for an Appointment!!!


Pitman Lawncare Services. No job
too big or too small. Call Page @
933-7317.


Tractor

Services
Bush Hogging & Grading
933-2982 or 224-2982








Underwater
Salvage & Recovery
0 Services

A UmileduIIty Courteous Service
Corporafln Reasonable Rates
31 Years Experience

Scott Scanland0

H: 850.421-5639 C: 850-228-5360
SSquid@embarqmail.com


926-8038 (850) 926-2390 fax
rawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL
est real estate experience
call Lynn or David
David Hoover


Broker 545-8284 r Realtor e 519-7944
lynncole5228@msn.com ,P. ILSo. dhoover2@hotmail.com
SHORT SALE!
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY
JULY 6, 1-3PM
48 Magnolia Ridge,
Crawfordville
Come by and see this lovely
1557 sq. foot home in fam-
ily friendly neighborhood.
Three bedrooms, two baths, living room with vaulted
ceiling and fireplace. Spacious kitchen equipped with
all appliances, split bedroom plan with private master
suite. Master bath has walk-in tiled shower and jacuzzi
tub. Two car garage, landscaped yard, and deck to grill
out on. Priced at $199,000 but will submit all offers to
bank for approval.

Direction: Heading south from Tallahassee on Hwy. 319 take
right at Wakulla Arran Road (McDonalds), left on Magnolia
Ridge, home on right.


106 W. 5th Ave.
Tallahassee, FL 32303
(850) 222-2166 tel.
www.wmleeco.com


Piano, Keyboard, Guitar Lessons.
All ages & home school. 25 years
in Crawfordville. Mary Updegraff
926-7472.

200 Items For Sale


The Thrift Store: Washer, china
cabinet, several couches, double
door refrigerator w/ice maker, lots
of household items, towels,
sheets, comforters. 4360 Craw-
fordville Hwy. 926-2900.

220 Cars

A GIFT FROM HEAVEN
Are you Sick and Tired of being
Sick and Tired? Read My Story on
www.mymonavie.com/stmarks.

225 Trucks

For Sale. 94 F150 XL pickup,
6-cylinder, 5-speed. Great condi-
tion. Asking $3,100. Call
926-4511.


2006 Fleetwood Yuma
Pop-Up Camper
Like new, used 5 times,
purchased boat, must sell.
Queen bed, full bed, refrig.,
heater, dining table converts to
extra bed, Back-up 12V battery,
2-bumer gas stove, awning,
independent brakes, Paid $8,000.
Asking $4,900 OBO. Will tow
easily behind light pickup or SUV.
Call Scott 850-421-5639 or
850-228-5360.


275 Home Furnishings


$160 brand name, queen mattress
set, unused with warranty,
222-7783.

100% Leather Living Rm Set, Life-
time Warranty. New, still in crate.
$849, 545-7112. Can deliver.

A New Queen Orthopedic
Pillow-top mattress set in sealed
plastic. Full warranty. Sacrifice
$279. Can deliver. 222-7783.

Bed-King Pillow Top Orthopedic
Mattress Set. Brand new in plas-
tic. Must move, $449. 545-7112.

Bedrm set: New. Solid Wood. 5pc
set still boxed, $499, can deliver
222-7783.


6- V' Canopy Bed Brand New in box.
$125. 222-9879.


L_ ic. Real Estate Broker
,F6.G. Crawfordville Hwy.

t (850) 926-7043

(850) 926-2898 Fax

www.Forestrealty@earthlink.net

COMMERCIAL- Hwy 319 -1.21 Ac.
151' on Hwy $275,000

SMITH CREEK SOPCHOPPY 33.60 Acres Convenient
to the Apalachicola National Forest. Priced at $6,000/acre.

OCHLOCKONEE RIVER (2) Parcels with a total of 22
Acres MOL and approx. 540 feet on river. Asking $400,000.

BOB MILLER ROAD Partially cleared 13.32 Acres in North
Wakulla County. Asking $165,000 (Motivate Seller)

Tradewinds Subdivision Ochlockonee Bay -
Residential Lot in a boating community.
Amenities include club house, pool and fishing pier.
Lot also comes with Deeded Boat Slip. $259,000

LANARK FAIRWAY PARK SUBD. -
Bank Foreclosure 1 Ac homes only, $64,900


-


Great Amenities at Budget Price!
New Construction by Mike Scott Construction, Inc. A spacious 1515 sq. ft.
home located in beautiful Savannah Forest The home features vaulted
ceilings and hardwood floors inr inh hIrirg area Lray ceilings andhis/her closets in
the master bedroom, tile in the bahro:,rrn bri :k an-L Hardie board exterior, a
sprinkler system, and a large 2 car gra'ge u.jtcher, ha: r.-fnfer;t.r "'rth lmrrakr, rmooLh :.p electric
self-cleaning range, microwave range hood, and dishwasher. Many extras throughout home including an 11' x
17' patio, plant sh-l-ie: in the kit.-he-n *:erling fanr,; Lihr-.ugiho.ut, r1 1 IIGF.E 53,500 Allowance! $189,900.
CALL ABOUT SPECIAL FINANCING PACKAGE! New Leasing Option: Up to 12 Months;
$2,500 non refundable deposit; $1,150.00 monthly leasing amount.


'r. Ii


***New Subdivisions***
All subdivisions have underground
electric and water.
Carmen Maria $34,900.1 ac.
tracts near Lake Talquin.
Savannah Forest $45,900. 1d4 ac.
tracts off Wakulla Aaron Rd.
Sellars Crossing $65,900.
1+ ac lots in North Wak.
Steeplechase $79,900 to $109,900.
5 ac. wooded tracts. Horse friendly
Walkers Mill $69,900.
2 ac. lots, located on
Lower Bridge Road.


Carmen Rocio 2 ac. lot off
Shadcville Hwy near
Wakulla Station. $64,900.
2 acre tract with large
hardwoods in Beechwood
Subdivision off Shadeville
Hwy. $52,900.

Two 5+ acre tracts off
Rehwinkel Rd. w. large trees on
the back of properties and a
small pond. Can be
purchased together.
$134,750 and $136,250.


Wakulla Gardens
50 Cayuse Dr.
NEW CONSTRUCTION!
Affordable Housing at its best!
1178 sq. ft. home with
3BR/2BA. Features include
spacious family room, vaulted
ceilings and wood flooring in
the living area, carpet and
vinyl flooring in bedrooms
and bathrooms, a front porch,
and much more!
$116,900.


mm II El


125 Schools and Instruc- 230 Motor Homes and
tion CampersnI


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Call
Donna Card
850-508-1235
M a .ur


5306 Montejo Dr.
New Construction!.
HOP approved funding
available SOON! Reserve NOW!
1219 sq. ft. home in Montejo Sub-
division, Tallahassee. 3BR/2BA
with brick and Hardie board exte-
rior, garage, deck,
custom trim package, knockdown
finish walls, ceiling fans, vaulted
ceilings in living room, fully
equipped kitchen, and more!
$149,900.


Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers


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Nancy Diane (vt>.,4
Strickland Chason 7 ) /f f/
508-2902 559-8545



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Ne4w Construction in Crawfordvillel
3BR/2.5BA Mike Johnson home
w/1846sqft, master suite, ceramic tile
In bathrooms, custom cabinets and
more on .34 acres. Great location
and many upgradesI Must see for
... $249,900. 544WAH
M ,I,, ^Ochlockonee Bay I


Come home to a beautiful country
setting on a 3.67 acre tract
3Br/3Ba, 2868 sqft. cedar siding
metal roof Island kitchen wl ceramic
tile throughout, fireplace, vaulted
ceiling, Won't last Just $269,000
/ 718WAH


Atlee Rdl 3BR/2BA doublewlde.
2085 sq.ft, completely customized
wlhardwood flooring, fireplace, metal
roof, large front porch, large back
porch, 2 car carports and2 sheds and
all on large .79 acre lot Just
$119,900. 678WAH


23 Knotty PIne/Ochlockonee Bayl
Modem home In "Old Florida" setting
Large screened front, rear deck and is
priced well below appraisal. 2 adjacent
Homesteaded lots with water & sener
available at $50.000 each. Owner/Agent
Just$199,000. 617WAH ,m


Realtv: PO Box 556 Panacea. FL 32346 www.obrealtv.com obrfd)obrealtv.com


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r-


Dining Room Beautiful cherry ta-
ble, 6 chairs, lighted china cabi-
net. Brand new in boxes, can de-
liver. Must move, $799. 222-99M .
Full Mattress set. $125. Twin mat-
tress set. $100. Both New.
545-7112.
320 Farm Products &
I Produce

Peas & butterbeans for sale.
We shell. Call Payne Farm
926-7383.
330 Livestock, Farm L
Animals I

Dwarf Nigerian dairy goats. Pure
bred. Great pets, dairy, or brush
clearing. $50 and up. 962-9354 or
binkwms@gmail.com.

335 Pets

Get rid of hook, round, & tape-
worms. Rotate Happy Jack tape-
worm tablets and Liqui-Vic.(tag).
SOPCHOPPY HARDWARE
(962-3180)
www.happyjackinc.com.
Adopt a pet from the animal shel-
ter:

Dogs:
Lab mix, yellow
Chihuahua mix
Husky mix
Shepherd mix
Terrier mix
Hound mixes
Lab mixes
Bulldog mixes
Many other nice mixes. Come and
take a look.


Puppies:
Labmrixes, black
Shepherd/Border Collie mix

Nice cats and kittens.

Wakulla County Animal Shelter
CHAT Adoption Center
www.chatofwakulla.org
Monday closed.
Tues. through Fridays:
Noon to 4:30 PM-
Saturdays: Noon to 6:00 PM
Sunday: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM

355 Yard Sales


Yard Sale. Saturday July 5th
8AM-3PM. Huge three family yard
sale. Four miles East of Crawford-
ville off Hwy 61 on White Oak Dr.
Golf Cart, 4-Wheeler, several lawn
mowers, saltwater fishing gear,
boat accessories, antique washing
machine, refrigerator and a lot of
small antiques. Ladies' clothes
and men's clothes. Collection of
CD's and DVD's. Tools, toolbox
and electric tools. No early buz-
zards. Canceled if raining,

YARD SALE: Home decor,
clothes, tools, toys, electronics,
and more. July 5th 8am-4pm. 14
Walker Street Panacea (indoors).

435 Lost and Found


Large.Brown Hound dog found at
Summerwind Subdivision (so. of
Woodville). He is old, well taken
care of and lost. Please call Chris
at 574-4354.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008 Page 7B


435 Lost and Found


Lost Male Dog. Brindle Pitbull.
white markings. 65 Lbs., name
Scout. Had on FSU Collar. Re-
ward!! 528-8112


500 Real Estate, Homes
Mobiles


PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it ille-
gal
to advertise "any preference, limi-
tation, or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or national ori-
gin or an intention to make any
such preference, limitation or dis-
crimination." Familial status in-
cludes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing the custody of
children under the age of 18.
This newspaper will not accept
any advertising for real estate
that is a violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To com-
plain of discrimination call HUD
toll free at 1-800-669-9777. The
toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


Woodville Retail
Space Available
* Fitness Studio-1000/sf
(Wall to wall mat & mirrors)
* Retail -1250/sf
(Storefront w/back storage)
* Two-Bay Garage-1200/sf
* Divided Office Space-1074/sf
Lewiswood Center
421-5039

545 Homes for Sale


Horticulturist's home, corner lots
$150,000, w/0.56 acre, 2BR/1BA,
carport, fireplace, underground
gas tank, 4-miles S Capitol, Hwy
319 S. 850-877-8110.
LEASE TO OWN OR FOR SALE.
On 3 lots in Wakulla Gardens. 23
Neeley Rd. 1800 sq. ft. 4BR/2BA.
Renovated. ONLY $149,900. Call
Nick 766-7750.
New construction. House for sale
by owner. 139 Shadow Oak Cir.
3BR/2BA custom home on
1/2-acre lot, 2,256 sq.ft. 445-5300
or 509-6910.
PRICE REDUCED
FOR SALE Very well main-
tained1200 sq. ft. 3BR/2BA
House on 1 acre in Craw-
fordville off paved road. 1
mile from Wal-Mart. Storage
Shed. Partial Privacy Fence.
All appliances stay. $148,900
OBO. Will pay half of clos-
ing costs. 850-251-2289.


565 Mobile Homes for
Rent 1

2 BR/1 BA w/ Expando bedroom &
living room, $550 plus deposit.
(850)728-6496 or (850)926-9513.
2BR/1BA singlewide w/addition
on 1/2-acre 4 miles from Hwy 27
and Lake Jackson; 1-mile from
Ocholochonee River in Gadsden
Co. $550/first, last mo. rent and
$550/security deposit. Pets ok but
extra. Broker Owner 570-0506.
2BR/1BA SWMH. Open floor plan.
$525/mo., plus deposit. Wakulla
Gardens. 656-8252.
3BR/2BA doublewide on 1/4-acre
in Medart area Wakulla. Walking
distance to Lake Ellen. $750 first,
last mo. rent and $750/security
deposit. Pets ok but extra. Broker
Owner 850-570-0506.
3BD/2BA Doublewide. Nice neigh-
borhood. $750/mo. $500 deposit.
Call 850-509-5517.
3BR/2BA SW in Panacea. On
small lake, facing wildlife refuge.
$600/mo. $300/deposit. No pets.
References required. 926-2358 or
566-2880.
ON LAKE ELLEN
3BR/2BA DWMH $900/mo. Next
door to owner. 1st, last, & sec
dep. No pets. 566-0403


4 BR/2BA DW on 2 Acres, com-
pletely renovated, nice & well
maintained neighborhood. Near
Riversprings Middle School and
Shadeville Elementary. 144 Leslie
Cir. $900/mo. 850-443-3300.

Two Mobile Homes For Rent
S. Leon County off Hwy 319.
3BR/2BA with den & Large
kitchen w/island. $800/mo.
Crawfordville Hwy- 319.
3BR/2BA Triple-Wide on 1 acre
w/fenced backyard, Lg kitchen,
decks, fireplace & family room.
$850/mo. First, last & security
deposit. No inside smoking, no
indoor pets. Call 926-4511.

Welcome Home. 4BR/2BA. CHA,
fireplace, W/D hookups, dish-
washer, on 1 acre. 2511 Coastal
Hwy, Medart. $895/mo. 228-7197.

570 Mobile Homes for S
Sale I


MOBILE HOME FOR SALE! Must
move. Excellent condition. 1996
2BR/1BA Fleetwood Mobile
Home, 14x50. Range, refrigerator,
CHA included. By appointment
only. $14,000 or best offer
926-7065.


515 Apartments for Rent1 555 Houses for Rent


Efficiency apartment (1BR/living
room) for rent. $550/mo.
Electric/water included. Refer-
ences required. Near Wakulla Mid-
dle School. Call 926-5575 or
459-7162.


530 Comm. Property for/
Rent


COVERED BOAT/RV
STORAGE
NOW AVAILABLE
~ Self Storage Units
~ Retail Space Available
Locks, Boxes & More
Stow

Away
^^ Center
850-926-5725
www.stowawaycenter.com

GRADE-A OFFICE SPACE!
Hwy. frontage offices avail. Great at-
mosphere. Rent + tax includes: utili-
ties, trash p/u and kitchen use. Com-
mon area cleaned. 1st and last
month's rent. One month free with
13/mo lease. Call 926-4511 for info.
CALL (850) 926-4511

Great Location! 1,200 sq.ft. on
Crawfordville Hwy. adjoining The
Wakulla News. Three offices, re-
ception area, waiting area, large
kitchen. $1,400/mo. Security de-
posit required. Call 926-6289 or
421-2792.


VBC

STORAGE

MINI-WAREHOUSES
BOATS RV'S

519-5128 508-5177
2 miles South of Courthouse
on Hwy. 319 in Crawfordville
24 Hour Access Video Surveillance


Wakulla
Real


Sonya Hall
Lic. Real Estate Broker
"Specializing in Wakulla Co."
(850) 926-5084
FOR RENT:
4Br 2Ba DWMH
$850mo + Sec. Dep.

3Br 2Ba DWMH
$900mo + Sec. Dep.
(On Deep Water Canal)

3Br 2Ba House
$1100mo + Sec. Dep.
(1 Car Garage)

3Br 2Ba House
$975mo + Sec. Dep.
(2 Car Garage)

3Br 2Ba House
$900mo + Sec. Dep.
(1 Car Garage)

3Br 2BaTwnHs
$900mo + Sec. Dep.

3Br 2Ba DWMH
$850mo + Sec. Dep.

3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs
$825mo + Sec. Dep.


2BR/1BA home in Crawfordville.
$750/month. No Pets. No Smok-
ing. Ochlockonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001 www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com.
3BR/2BA in Mysterious Waters.
$775/rent & deposit. No Pets. Call
Larry at 386-6116.
3BR/2BA on 1-acre w/pool. Blox-
ham Cutoff. 5 miles from Riversink
Elementary/Shadeville.
850-442-3474.
CRAWFORDVILLE. Split 3, 2, 1.
Fenced, $1,025/mo. plus dep(s).
385-3175.
Medart: Centrally located
2BR/1BA home.
Lots of character w/cypress, stone-
work, exposed beams, loft and
large front porches.
Located on 4 quiet acres, lawn
care and water included. Perfect
for singles or a couple.
No smokers. Small pets consid-
ered. References. 1 yr lease.
$725/mo. First, last and deposit.
251-4166
ON LAKE ELLEN
3BR/2BA DWMH $900/mo. Next
door to owner. 1st, last, .& sec
dep. No pets. 566-0403

560 Land for Sale

3.1 Acres w/utilities
Prime location. 1/2 to 4
miles-Elementary, middle, & high
schools. On private road. Very
nice area to raise family.
618-838-5508 or 618-783-3107
Leave message if needed.
Beautiful 1-acre plus. Had MH re-
moved. Yard, driveway, shed,
septic tank all still there. Just put
your home on & ready to go.
$36,900 o.b.o. 926-2900.


www.coldwellbankerwakulla.com
2650-1 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327
I 850-926-2994 Phone 850-926-4875 Fax ,
Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated IuS.
V^---------------------- A.


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Shell Point
926-7811 L u1II


Florida Coastal
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926-7102
926-7102


Crawfordville
926-5111

Silver Coast
Realty


REDUCED!!! This truly unique property has undergone a recent
renovation! It's central location, gulf view and end of canal dockage makes
this 3BR/2BA home on two lots, one of Shell Point's prime properties.
Because it is "grandfathered" zoning, it has every access to ground level
activities & living. #3402-W, MLS# 163537 now priced at $750,000.

LOVELY 3BR/2BA SOUTHERN STYLE HOME located in the exclusive
gated community of Magnolia Ridge North. A beautiful landscaped yard
surrounds the house and the back yard overlooks the community green area
- NOT ANOTHER BACK YARD! Approx. 15 miles from Tallahassee and
15 minutes from the coast and Wildwood Golf Course. #2221-W, MLS#
165061 now priced at $226,000.

SECOND HOME SOLUTION! 1/8th Share under "Fractional Ownership".
This exquisite coastal home on both Gulf AND canal is fully furnished and
includes golf cart and dock for your boat. You can own an eighth (six weeks
a year) and enjoy tropical breezes, fishing, sailing or just relaxing! Private
storage for each owner and management to take care of it all. Take your
elevator to all floors and enjoy! $160,000. Listing #2607W, MLS# 182972.

PRETTY SHADED 1.26 ACRES with Doublewide Mobile Home.
3BR/2BA with front deck and a large garage or workshop. Close to schools,
recreation park, golf course, boating and fishing! #5129-W, MLS# 186189
priced at $105,000.

3BR/2BA MODULAR HOME on fenced 1.1 acre (MOL). Split floor plan,
spacious kitchen, den, large deck on front! Close to schools, Recreation Park
& public library. #2203-W, MLS# 162630. Price REDUCED to $115,000.

RENTALS

LARGE BRICK HOME with 4BR/3BA available for rent in beautiful
River Plantation Subdivision. $1,800/month, security deposit required.
PETS ALLOWED #6404W

Snug Harbor Townhome available for rent at $1,500/month, security
deposit required. Community pool, docks on deep-water canal located in a
gated community. NO PETS

3BR/2BA Crawfordville home in gated community $1,500/month, security
deposit required. #2221W NO PETS

2BR/2BA Furnished/Turn Key rental. NO PETS. Available July 1".
$ 1,350/month with applicable deposits Long term only. # 6337W

FURNISHED 2BR/2.5 Condo $1,200/month, security deposit required.
NO PETS #6341W

2BR/1BA Furnished mobile home available for rent. $500/month,
security deposit required. #6344 NO PETS

SEASONAL Snug Harbor Townhome available for rent at $1,500/
week, two-week maximum schedule in any given month. Community pool,
docks on deep-water canal located in a gated community. NO PETS

2008 IS THE DATE TO LOOK, LINGER & RELOCATE, SO GO FOR
THE GOLD!
WWW.C21FCP.COM


George's Lighthouse Pointe
Unit A-3, 19 Mashes Sand Road,
Panacea, Condominium Unit.
1BR/1BA, LR, DR, CHA. Front
porch faces pool & tennis court.
Back porch faces marina & view
of bay (Both 12x30). Gated
Community w/beautiful new
landscaping. 825 sq. ft. H&C.
850-545-5057. $229,900
M C


Teasers


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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 3, 2008

Linzy House is torn down to


be moved and restored


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Volunteers turned out Satur-
day, June 21, to help take apart
the Linzy house so that it can be
moved to the home of builder
Jim Calhoun for restoration
and, ultimately, included in
the Wakulla Heritage Project's
w. planned park.
The house was in danger
of collapsing because of rot,
especially in the floor joists and
flooring. The front porch had al-
ready given way, and the rusted
tin roof had crumpled over.
The house was built by Ross
and Amy Linzy around 1930
on the land where Wal-Mart is
located. About 20 years later, the
couple built and opened Linzy's
store, an important part of the
old Ivan community.
Watching the house being
taken apart, Calhoun noted that
it was made of cypress wood,
not heart pine, and pointed out
the saw marks on some of the
boards from when the lumber


Some of the Linzy House required a good swift kick Volunteers take the Linzy House down section by section to be moved


was milled. The grayed, weather-
beaten exterior of the old house
was suffering from rot, and
there was some termite damage
- though Calhoun wryly ob-
served, "It's so old the termites
have about given up."
The two-room cracker house
had no electricity, no running


water or plumbing. The Linzys
raised four children in the
house, and eventually converted
the back porch into a bedroom,
and later added a kitchen, din-
ing room and pantry.
There were still some items
in the house: curtains on the
front windows, which turned


out to be vinyl tablecloth cut
for curtains; and clothes in the;
backroom, still on hangers, jeans,
and shirts and some homemade
dresses. Dirt daubers had made
nests in some of the clothes.
In 2005, Wal-Martpaid for the
Linzy house to be moved across
the street next to the home of


Ross Linzy's father. That house
was built in the 1890s and some-
time in the 1950s had asbestos
shingle siding added.
Kelley Linzy Harvey, the
granddaughter of Ross Linzy,
and her husband Bill Harvey
lived in the older house for
five years in the mid-1980s. The


Crawfordville man faces life in prison after guilty
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN custody for his sentencing in the mother reportedly said at the Assistant State Attorney Jacki she-said case and she didn't want
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net August, at which he could face time, "but I love that man." Campbell, who prosecuted theI to put her daughter through it if
It took less than 45 minutes life in prison. A family friend had found case, presented several young a jury might not believe her.
of deliberations for a jury to Rogers was found guilty of the girl's diary and read an entry girls who claimed to have been The mother in that case also
return a guilty verdict against molesting a girl during the time that indicated she was being molested by Rogers: a young said that Rogers had gone to a
Michael Rogers, a Crawfordville when she was six, seven, eight sexually abused and turned it girl from North Carolina who VA hospital in New York to seek
man charged with sexual battery years old while he was living over to the mother. Another was Rogers' stepdaughter in counseling for his problems.
on a child under 12 years old. with the girl's mother. The family friend made an anony- an earlier marriage that ended The Wakulla County victim
: Rogers, 58, sat impassively as victim, now 15, gave emotional mous report to the abuse hotline amid allegations he had sexually eventually confessed to her best
the verdict was read on Thurs- testimony in which she said and an investigator from the abused her when she was a pre- friend that she was sexually
day, June 19, after a two-day trial, that she once told her mother Department of Children and teen. That girl's mother said the abused. That confession was
Wakulla Circuit Judge N. Sanders she was being molested, but her Families interviewed the child, choice was made not to pursue prompted when the best friend
Sauls, who presided over the mother refused to believe her. "I who then denied anything had criminal charges because she noticed the girl had a strong
trial, ordered Rogers taken into want to believe my daughter," happened, was advised that it was a he-said, reaction after she read a graphic


Emergency vehicles displayed at Wal-Mart


Wakulla County Sheriff Da-
vid Harvey and the men and
women of the Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office will host a law
enforcement and emergency
response display on Saturday.
July 19 from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m.,
at the Wal-Mart parking lot.
The event will include a


display of emergency response disasters.
vehicles and other law enforce- The sheriff's team will be
ment equipment. Residents available to answer questions
will have the opportunity to regarding hurricane prepared-
talk one-on-one to public safety ness, boating safety, Keep
professionals and have a hands- Wakulla County Beautiful, Ani-
on experience with the spe- mal Control & Citizens for Hu-
cialized equipment utilized in man Treatment of Animals or
major natural and man-made other public safety concerns.


Additionally, members of
the SWAT Team, K-9 team, "The
Intimidator" Monte Carlo, Mo-
torcycle Unit and Crime Scene
Unit will be on-site.
Hot dogs and drinks will
be free and served by law en-
forcement professionals and
volunteers.


novel with an episode of at-
tempted rape. After a year or so,
the best friend went to a school
teacher who brought in other
professionals, and the girl finally
admitted what happened.
Another family friend, who
had lived with the victim and
her family for a while, also said
she was sexually battered by
Rogers. In her testimony, the
woman said she had a conversa-
tion with the girl in which they


exterior of the home, though
covered now with the shingles,
was the same board and bat-
ten as the other house. Inside
are dark beadboard walls. The
kitchen was detached by a
breezeway that was eventually
dosed in.



verdict
both confessed their abuse by
Rogers but did not report it to
anyone else.
As for the defense, attorney
Steven Glazer said it was a matter
of "been there, done that" in
that the state abuse investigator
had found no evidence of sexual
molestation in 2002. It was also
argued that the girl's claims of
abuse were an effort to break
up Rogers and her mother so
she wouldn't have to move to
South Carolina. In his dosing
argument, Glazer referred to it
as "a motive to lie."
In his closing argument,
Campbell referred to the "feat of
strength" required by the victim
to testify in a courtroom full of
strangers and in front of the man
who sexually abused her.
When the jury came back
with its verdict, the victim and
her family were in the courtroom
and they held hands and leaned
on each other.


PROFESSION


. . . . .




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