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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00173
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville, Fla
Creation Date: May 29, 2008
Publication Date: 1969-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States of America -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33429964
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00173
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Full Text






The flakulla News honors the flakulla High School graduating
Class of 200S with a special section inside this issue.


Our 113th Year, 22nd Issue


Thursday, May 29, 2008


W 2^ lC... : - .. ...... .. . ,C -I ,IT
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200 SMA UNIVERSITY OF FL
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007





S50

50


Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century


Cents


St. Marks community


A meeting discusses

S. .y city revitalization
' " By WILLIAM SNOWDEN ity study would answer ques-
i , wsnowden@thewakullanews.net tions about size and scale.


H r a a i l l lla a a
Houston Taff with members of the Wakulla High School Rebels baseball team that played in the Final Four


Contributions of Taff

will be remembered

with field naming


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Former Wakulla High
School Rebel baseball coach
and alligator trapper Houston
E. Taff was honored by the
Wakulla County School Board
Monday, May 19 as the board
passed a proclamation naming
the Wakulla War Eagle base-
ball field Houston Taff Field.
The proclamation was read by
Chairman Jerry Evans.
The War Eagles hosted a
special ceremony prior to a
regional playoff game to pay
tribute to Coach Taff. With an
audience consisting of Hous-
ton Taff, his family, current
and former baseball players
and friends, Superintendent
David Miller officially recog-
nized his former coach from
the 1960s.
"It is important to recognize
tradition and pay homage to
those who give to others, es-
pecially youngsters, like me, a
hand up," said Superintendent
Miller. "It is an honor to pay
tribute to Coach Taff."
Houston Taff responded,
"What an honor to have my
name represent such a beauti-
ful place that means so much
not only to me, but to so many
players and parents."
Miller reflected on the time
when he was a baseball player
and Coach Taff took their team
to the 1968 playoffs. With
David Miller catching, David
Harvey pitching and Butch
Taff in the outfield, Coach
Taff made WHS history, as
their team made it to the State
Final Four.
Many of the players Taff
coached were present to honor
their baseball coach. The group
of former athletes filled part of
the boardroom with more gray
hair and a little more weight
than duringtheir playing days.
The memories were still fresh





Comment & Opinion..;Page 2A
.Week in Wakulla.'..a.Page 2A
rChurch ... . . : .... ;Page 4A
People ..............:;:..:...Page 6A
:Sports :g:........:..Page 8A:
. Sheriff ..'......... .... .Page 9A�
Outdoors :.7....:.:.Page 10A
Almanac2.::.. ............Page 11 A
Senior Living....:;....Page 1 B.
Sc6hool.......... Page 2B & 6B






6 184578 20215 o


in their minds. "Coach Taff
made a baseball club out of
us. I'll never forget the State
Tournament," former athlete
Bobby Porter said. Scott Gaby
joked that Coach Taff kept
his players on their toes. "You
never knew who the starters
were," he said. "I appreciated
being a part of Coach Taff's
team. He taught us life lessons
we carried through our lives."
Gaby worked hard to get all
of the living players together
for the board meeting. A
small number of players have
passed away including former
Property Appraiser Ronnie
Kilgore.
The current War Eagle base-
ball players were able to ex-
perience a trip down memory
lane at a ceremony at the base-
ball complex.
"I remember when the
baseball field was nothing
but a peanut field," said Coach
Taff. "We had home team
advantage too. Our guests
just couldn't handle the sand
gnats."


About 75 people attended
the public presentation of
the St. Marks Waterfronts
Florida Committee on plans
for revitalization - and gave
a positive response to what
they heard.
The presentation, held at
the St. Marks Yacht Club on
Tuesday, May 20, featured a
PowerPoint presentation on
marketing the town as a his-
toric and natural destination,
with the goal of revitalizing
the once-thriving port with
-a conference center to attract
other commercial develop-
ment.
Committee Chairman Billy
Bishop said that three con-
sulting firms had been inter-
viewed a day earlier to look at
the financial feasibility of the
conference center proposal.
Committee member Mike
Pruitt added that the feasibil-


The redevelopment plan is
being driven by the desire of
residents to control the future
of the town, Pruitt said, with
the people coming up with
the plan, picking the devel-
oper, and determining where
it's built and how it's built.
The town's fortunes have
shifted in the past 50 years,
when St. Marks was a bus-
tling little town that attracted
weekend visitors for boating
and food, and the petroleum
industry provided jobs for
residents. The oil industry has
been shutting down in town:
Murphy Oil's operation is only
minimal, St. Marks Refinery
is closed and is tied up in
litigation over environmental
contamination at the site that
the state cleaned up, and the
tank farms that were in the
center of town have been
taken down.
Continued on Page 13A


Windy T. Jones, daughter Colby, Houston and Beth Taff


Harvey Stokley remembered
the state playoffs against a top
Tampa Catholic pitcher who
threw the ball very hard. Stok-
ley said he was ready to swing
at the first pitch he saw. But
the Tampa player hit him with
a fast ball pitch. "He didn't
know where he (Stokley) was
for a little while after that,"
joked Porter. "That's right,"
smiled Stokley as he shook his
head at the memory.
The 2008 WHS District
Championship baseball team
presented Coach Taff with a
framed jersey with Houston
"Cat" Taff engraved on the
frame and a signed baseball.
Sheriff David Harvey, a top


pitcher on the team, applaud-
ed the field naming as well.
"Houston Taff's knowledge of
baseball is phenomenal and
his contribution to this county
has been unsurpassed."
Superintendent Miller con-
cluded the official naming
ceremony by stating,"We love
you Coach Taff. We respect
you. You taught us all to
carry ourselves with class. You
taught us dedication. You al-
ways arrived early and stayed
late for your boys. We have
carried that same philosophy
through our lives as we have
coached others and pursued
our careers."
Continued on Page 13A


S arU,/- ~ I -'W A I , t . - .|
War Eagle baseball players took time to honor the first coach at WHS


David Miller
Thirty-five year educator
David B. Miller announced
his candidacy for the office of
Wakulla County Superinten-
dent of Schools, running as a
Democrat Having served as
superintendent for the past 13
years. Miller brings a wealth
of experience to the position.
"Ensuring that the children
of Wakulla County have an


Dr. William Proctor, Superintendent David Miller, Dr. John Bruno

Flagler College gives

Miller honorary degree


Wakulla County Superin-
tendent of Schools David
Miller was awarded a Doctor
of Laws honorary degree from
Flagler College by Chancellor
and State Representative Dr.
William L. Proctor at the May
19 school board Meeting. Dr.
Proctor serves on the seven-
member Florida Board of Edu-
cation and was the President of
Flagler College for 30 years. He
addressed the standing room
only crowd in the school board
chambers and said, "David
Miller is held in the greatest es-
teem and affection across the
state. He is highly respected
among superintendents across
the state who regularly seek


his advice, as do I. His advice
has proven to be wise and
is always in the best interest
of students and the teaching
profession."
Dr. Proctor impressed upon
the audience how David Mill-
er's influence extends from
Wakulla County through a
variety of professional orga-
nizations throughout Florida.
He also expressed tremendous
gratification to Miller regarding
his role in the establishment of
the Flagler teacher education
program. "I rely heavily on
David Miller's advice regard-
ing legislative policy," said
Proctor.
Continued on Page 13A


Miller jumps into race


enriching education second to
none is my lifelong pursuit,"
he said. "I draw on varied
experiences from our accred-
ited pre-kindergarten program
through adult education."
Miller puts his words into
action as evidenced by Wakul-
la County Schools earning an
"A" School District rating in
2007 from the State of Florida.
Scores for 2008 show Wakulla
High School sophomores first
in the state in FCAT Writing.
In addition, WHS freshmen
were first in the state for the
2007 FCAT Math, and the 2007
eighth graders were first in
the state in Reading.
In 2006, Wakulla County
was first in Florida for dosing
the achievement gap between
black and white students in
Reading and third in Math.


Miller holds the following
degrees and qualifications:
Doctor of Laws, LL.D., Fla-
gler College; Chief Executive
Office Leadership Diploma,
Vanderbilt University; Special
Qualifications Certification
for Superintendents; Masters
of Education in Educational
Administration, Florida A &
M University; and Bachelor
of Science, Florida State Uni-
versity.
He has served as Superin-
tendent of Schools from May
1995 to the present. Prior
to that, he was Principal of
Wakulla High School in 1994-
1995. From 1981 to 1994, he
successfully demonstrated
his leadership as Principal
of Shadeville Elementary
School.
Continued on Page 13A


Sandy Cook, the former manager of Wakulla Springs State
Park who recently retired, was honored at the county com-
mission meeting on Monday, May 19. Commission Chairman
Ed Brimner praised Cook for her 37 year career with the state
park service, the last 16 of which were spent at Wakulla
Springs. "I don't think it could be overstated what you've
done for Wakulla Springs and Wakulla County," Brimner
said. Cook said she was humbled by the recognition, and
gave credit for much of the efforts to preserve and protect
the springs to others, saying she was "just the person in
charge and there for the ride."


Saa uIla


jrbe

Three Sections
Published Weekly,
Read Daily








Page 2A - THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2008




=Comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895


'Topping The News'...


Memories of a former reporter /


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla and Franklin coun-
ties lost a one-of-a kind indi-
vidual in late April with the
passing of Rene Topping of
Carrabelle. Rene lived a rich
and diverse life from her days
growing up in the United
Kingdom to becoming a World
War II war bride, to living in
Tucson, Ariz. and finally set-
tling in Carrabelle in the late
1970s.
Rene was instrumental
in bringing me to Wakulla
County. She was married to
my mother's brother, Bob, and
knew and worked for the late
Bill Phillips, editor/owner of
The Wakulla News. Phillips
was seeking help for his fledg-
ling newspaper in Franklin
County, The Franklin County
News.
She had been writing and
reporting for the Carrabelle
and Apalachicola Times before
being lured to Bill's newly
started publication. She stayed
with the Franklin County
News until it ceased opera-
tions in 1984.
I left the Upper Peninsula of
Michigan and the freezing cold
of Traverse City in July 1983 to
experience Florida humidity
and heat first-hand.
I focused my duties on both
the Wakulla and Franklin pa-
pers until the Franklin paper
dosed down and Bill Phillips
needed me to fill a void in
Crawfordville. The rest, as
they say, is history for me.
Time marches on and we
have lost both Bill and Mar-
jorie Phillips and now Rene,
too. She loved the interac-
tion with her neighbors and
enjoyed seeking the truth for
her reporting.
I have included one of
Rene's columns, "Topping The
News," from 1983. She wrote
about every subject under the
sun. Many of the columns fea-
tured something amusing that
my unce and her husband Bob
had done. I always chuckled
when reading the columns
wondering what Bob thought
about his personal life being a
regular news item for us.
Here is just one of the sam-
ples of her work. Ironically, I
found one quickly that talked
about reporting.

By RENE TOPPING
Being a newspaper reporter
means several things to me.
First, you have to be born
with an ever-abiding curiosity


about things that are happen-
ing around you. Some people
call this being "nosey." News-
paper people call it "Getting
the News."
Then you have to have an
ever-abiding purpose to tell ev-
erybody else what is going on.
It seems to me the whispered
conversations in the cafes may
be fun for a few participants.
The newspaper brings it all
alive for everyone.
You have to like people. I
mean, really like people. As a
reporter, your telephone book
is filled with names. In the
newspaper business, we call
them "sources." And just who
is a source? Why, everybody
At one time or another there
are stories to be told that
concern and involve just about
everybody in a small area such
as this.
You have to try real hard
not to be judgmental of those
people you come into contact
with. To learn to report, what
they are saying, and doing,
and not try to interject how
you feel about those things.
You have to learn to write
about sad things that have
happened to people you know
and like. To report the death
of a friend, sometimes even
the arrest and conviction of
someone you watched grow
up, and that's no easy matter.
It is sometimes even like
being a cat with very long
whiskers. When those whis-
kers brush against something,
no matter how insubstantial
it may at first seem; like the
cat you stop, and you look,
and you listen very carefully.
Sometimes, it is not more than
a tenseness in answering a
question that was not there
before. It is probably news.
Stories happen at all times
of the day and night. A re-
porter is always at the ready.
You learn to keep the camera
bag packed with the spare roll
of film and the newly charged
batteries. You keep the car
with enough gas to get you
at least a few miles down the
road.
Your stories chronicle the
living history of the town
you live in. It is a bit scary to
realize that someday, 50 years
down the road, someone,
somewhere, will still produce
a yellowed clipping with your
byline, and will read what you
saw and reported that day.
Sometime, I hear myself
described as "the media." This
sort of throws me because that


Letters Policy
:The Wakulla News welcomes your letters, but we request
That you adhere to the following guidelines:
* Letters should not be longer than 300 words.
* They must include the writers name, home address and
telephone number. (Only name and town will be listed; the
reast is used solely for the purpose of verification.)
* Writers may be limited to one letter per month, depend-
ing upon space limitations.
* With very few exceptions, anonymous letters will not
be published.
Letters can be sent via mail or e-mail to kblackmar@
thewakullanews.net), or they can be dropped off at our
SCrawfordville Highway office. The Wakulla News reserves
the right to edit all letters.


self same "media" is often
described as being all power-
ful and one of the reasons
the country is in the mess it
is in today, that is if it is in a
mess. I can hardly believe that
I make that much of a dent on
people's lives. Yet, then again,
someone tells me I touched
their heartstrings with a little
something I wrote or I made
them laugh. I like that.
I have even heard that a
newspaperman or woman
should be able to view events
and never let emotion enter
into themselves. They should
be able to stand by and just
simply report the passing
scene without it moving them
even one little bit.
I had to write a story just re-
cently about a sweet little girl
who was burned over 75 per-
cent of her body. I had taken
her picture not too long before
and she had held out her arms
for a hug, and to give me a wet
kiss. I wrote the story and I
cried inside for the little one
and all her family. Of course, I
was not dispassionate.
A very good reporter passed
away on Wednesday, July 20
(1983) when Frank Reynolds
died. And several times that
good reporter showed his
emotions. He was a kind and
considerate man and he was
also a very good reporter. I
like to believe that he, too,
felt the pain and cared about
the people he reported on. I
believe that made him one of
the best.
I think Frank Reynolds truly
liked the job he was doing.
And a lot of his peers said
nice things about him. A lot
of people like myself watched
him and enjoyed the way he
reported events. I'm sorry he
has gone from the scene.
I like my job. Because of it,
I have shared a lot of joys and
sorrows. I feel I am now much
more aware of the things that
are happening around me.
And fifty-two weeks out of
each year my words, for bet-
ter or worse, help fill up the
blank newsprint that becomes
each week's Franklin County
News.
That's what it means to be
a reporter.
Somewhere Rene Topping
is probably keeping somebody
straight about something.
Thanks for the memories,
Renel

Keith Blackmar is Editor
of The Wakulla News


Meeting Wakulla County's infrastructure need for the future.

Wakulla County is a special place
Editor, The News: also the three volunteer fire- I witnessed that day when I
I have only lived here for men who took more than an needed help. Thank each one
six months, so I hardly know hour of their time that day in of you for your concern and
anyone in this town. On Tues- this hot weather to help me for helping me that day. God
day. May 20, I locked my keys get the door unlocked when I bless.
inside my truck at the Dollar had no way of knowing who
General in Panacea, and I to contact for help. Debbie Brantley
would personally like to thank I thank God that there are Ochlockonee Bay
the concerned citizens and nice caring people as the ones


in the planning and execution
of the event.
We appreciate all of our
sponsors, especially Julia Han-
way (Patron of the Arts), for
providing us with the funds
for the countywide perfor-
mance, Celebration of the
Arts.
Our Sponsors were Arte
Mexico, Iris Anne's, Michelle
Snow's School of Music, Ro-
tary Club, Sopchoppy Lions
Club, Harvey-Young 'Funeral
Home and Wakulla Bank. The
'Friends of the Arts,' donators,
silent auction sales and door
admission went toward four
scholarships for Wakulla High
School students who are ma-
joring in the Arts. The winners
this year for visual arts were
Caitlyn Culbertson, Nadine
Tang, and Rebecca Williams
and Chelsea Schlegel won for
drama.
We are excited to make
the Celebration of the Arts an
annual event. Proceeds from
the event will enable us to
give the four Scholarships at
Wakulla High school to stu-
dents who are majoring in one
of the arts. Our thanks to all of
the people who supported our
endeavor by attending.
Sally Chandler
Celebration of the Arts


Springs run
County helps was success
celhrate art


,vlUNIU I L* LU l L

Editor, The News:
We would like to applaud
all to the students, parents,
teachers, administrators, com-
munity members, sponsors,
and 'Friends of the Arts' who
made the Seventh Annual
"Celebration of the Arts" a
success. We especially would
like to thank our administra-
tors for keeping the arts in
our schools, even through the
financially difficult years.
We appreciate that you real-
ize the importance of the arts
in the future of our students
and our country. The musi-
cal and drama performance
groups showcased by the
students were of high quality.
The artwork sold at the silent
auction was selected for cre-
ativity. It was professionally
framed, exhibited, and sold.
Wakulla High School's Hol-
ly Thomas and was a great
Mistresses of Ceremonies.
Our hats are off to Diane
Perez, who is president of the
Arts Coalition and the coordi-
nator of the Celebration of the
Arts. The following teachers
provided the audience with
enjoyable entertainment or
a chance to purchase original
student artwork: Carol Belanc-
sik, Jennifer Brooks, Sarah
Brown, Becky Carlan, Sally
Chandler, Connie Cooper, Wal-
ter Cooper, Stephanie Hatch,
Laura Hudson, Kristin Dow,
Mike Smith, Michelle Snow,
Susan Solburg, Mina Sut-
ton, Kelly Tidwell and Cassie
Tucker. All of our teachers
worked as a cooperative group


Editor, The News:
On Saturday, May 17, the
Friends of Wakulla Springs
State Park held their second
annual 5K Run to benefit
the park. The runners were
able to see parts of Wakulla
Springs State Park that are not
normally open to the general
public. They ran through the
old growth forest and pristine
areas of Wakulla Springs. Par-
ticipants commented on the
quality of the course and the
professional manner in which
the run was managed.
We would like to thank the
Gulf Winds Track Club who ran
the actual operations of the run
for us. Also, we would like to
thank all of our sponsors. We
appreciate the fresh fruit from
Publix, one of our Platinum
Sponsors, as well as the sup-
port from Capital Health Plani
another Platinum Sponsor,
who gave out water bottles and
health information to all who
attended this event. We also
would like to thank, Ameris
Bank, Target Copy, Coastwise
Realty, Microtype Graphics,
Wakulla Bank, Wakulla Realty,
Wakulla.com and The Wakulla
News for their support as well
as the volunteer students from
the NJROTC at Wakulla High
School.
All funds raised from this
event will be returned to the
Wakulla Springs State Park by
the Friends organization. We
are looking at a wide range
of needs for the park such as
new tour boats, updating the
kitchen stove, installing new
park benches, new pavers, and


WEEK IN WAKULLA

Thursday, May 29,2008
BOOK NOOK, for children in grades K-5, will be held at
the public library at 10:30 a.m.
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB meets at Posey's Up the Creek
in Panacea at noon.
GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP meets at the senior center from
12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA, a fellowship of men
who gather to share an support one another in the quest
for authentic manhood, meets at Cornerstone
Ministries "outback" at 6:30 p.m. For more information,
call Steve Smith at 508-2560.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at 12 noon.
TOWN HALL MEETING with Commissioner Howard
Kessler will be held in St. Marks at the COAST Charter
School from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
VFW BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road
from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
YOGA CLASSES are held Tuesdays and Thursdays at the..
Crawfordville Women's Club at 6:30 p.m. For information or
Sto register, call 926-4293.
Friday, May 30, 2008
LAST DAY OF SCHOOL
AA meets at the American Legion Building next to the
Women's Club in Crawfordville with an open meeting at
8 p.m. There are also open meetings Sunday at 6 p.m.,
Monday for women at 6 p.m., and Wednesday at 8 p.m.
GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa's Episcopal
Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
GRADUATION will be held at J.D. Jones Stadium at Jerry
SReynolds Field at 7:30 p.m.
PICKIN' 'N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at the
senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
Saturday, May 31,2008
EMMETT AND CELIA WHALEY APPRECIATION DAY will be
held at Hudson Park from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The event will
feature gospel music and singing, and free hamburgers and
hot dogs. It's sponsored by Panacea Full Gospel
Assembly, and Mt. Beasor, Friendship and Whiddon Lake
Primitive Baptist churches.
NA meets at the Torch, 16 Lower Bridge Road, at 5 p.m. For
more information, call 599-2876.
PANACEA KIDS FISHING CLINIC, for children between the
ages of 4 and 16, will be held at Woolley Park in Panacea
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Monday, June 2, 2008
COUNTY COMMISSION will meet in the commission
boardroom at 6 p.m. A workshop on regional planning
council will be held at 5 p.m.
Tuesday, June 3, 2008
BOOK BABIES, for infants and toddlers, will be held at the
public library at 10:30 a.m.
MOOSE LODGE meets at the lodge in Panacea at 7 p.m.
TWILIGHT TALES, bedtime stories for children, will be read .
at the public library from 7 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Children are
encouraged to wear pajamas and bring a stuffed animal.
VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW
Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Wednesday, June 4,2008
AA meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.
BOOK BUNCH, for pre-school and home school families,
meets at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior citizens center
at 10:30 a.m.


several other major renovation
projects.
Being a state agency, in the
times of tight budgets, Wakulla
Springs State Park will never
receive the level of funding
from the state to continue
to make this park one of the
premiere parks in Florida. It is
only through events such as
this and the generous dona-
tions of citizens that the park
will be able to maintain this
status. To become a Friend
of the Park, please visit www.
wakulasprings.org.
Again, we thank everyone
who volunteered and donated
funds in support of the 5K Run
for Wakulla Springs and we
look forward to an even larger
event next year.
Ron Piasecki
President, Friends of
Wakulla Springs
State Park


Groups propose changes
for global warming
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Eight environmental groups
have joined together to sug-
gest policy changes to meet
the challenges of global warm-
ing in Florida. Among the
recommendations are for the
state to require local coastal
governments to consider seal-
level rise when amending their
comprehensive growth plans.
The groups are urging state
agencies to develop planning
tools and strategies for local
governments to protect coastal
wetlands and beaches in an era
of rising seas.
The groups' report includes
recommendations for local,
state and federal government
policy changes that should be
made to deal with the impacts
of global warming.


Ebte Wakulla Metnui
The Wakulla News (USPS 644-640) is published weekly at
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla
News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
General Manager: Tammie Barfield........................tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Editor: Keith Blackmar....................................... kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Reporter: William Snowden................................ wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton........... advertising@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey .................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales: Kai Page....................................kpage@thevakullanews.net
Bookkeeping: Sherry Balchuck ..........................accounting@thewakullanews.net
Classifieds/In House Sales: Alex Brimner...........classifieds@thewakullanews.net
Circulation: Sherry/Alex..................................... circulation@thewakullanews.net
Proofreader: Karen Tully
Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable
one year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County - $25, Out of County - $30
Out of State - $35. Out of Country on Request


i

i
l








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2008 - F
A16,11-----W El. 7 I


School district should allow field

trips to Gulf Specimen Marine Lab


Editor, The News:
The walls of Gulf Specimen
Marine Lab are covered with
the drawings of children, of
sharks, sea turtles, starfish and
fish, and notes of appreciation
saying how much they enjoyed
their visit. Every day school
buses roll up, and happy ex-
cited children pour out into the
pavilion to get an orientation
lecture, before heading off to
the touch tanks, or going down
to the Living Dock and pulling
up crab traps, or going out in
the marsh and pulling nets to
explore the abundance of ma-
rine life. There are schools from
Leon County, Gadsden, Franklin,
Bay and other surrounding
counties, but Wakulla County is
rarely among them. The reason
we're told is there's no money
for buses, transportation or the
$5 per student group admission.
One teacher had booked 10
field trips for her kindergarten
classes, and promptly withdrew
it, even though the school is
only four miles away.
Two decades ago, the Wakul-
la County school superintendent
ordered teachers
not to bring their classes
to Gulf Specimen Marine Lab.
Although the reasons were
never stated, I was fighting the
development oriented power
structure and environmental
education was an anathema. It
wasn't just Gulf Specimen that
was singled out, the St. Marks
National Wildlife Refuge, which
also has a good environmental
education program, also saw
few students from Wakulla. Kids
took bus rides to the Jackson-
ville Zoo, they went to shopping
malls in Tallahassee, but never
saw Wakulla Springs.
Then the administration
changed, teachers were no lon-
ger prohibited from bringing
their classes to us. However,
even after numerous invitations,
school Superintendent David
Miller has yet to visit us. If he
were to come; he's likely to see
50 to 100 happy, excited children


picking up hermit crabs and live
sea shells in our touch tanks,
and screaming with delight as
the sharks and sea turtles cruise
by in the big concrete pools. He
would see our walls covered
with illustrations, photographs,
and text blocks, and hear our
staff deliver lectures on marine
life. For the little ones, we
talk about "Sponge Bob" and
"Nemo." For the older ones,
we talk about the environment
and the need to take care of
the ocean, to understand the
ecosystems, and not to litter
which destroys the food chain.
For the .high schoolers, we
talk about the cancer research
we're involved with, and how
we've provided toadfishes and
sponges that were sent into
outer space aboard the space
shuttle.
More than 1,300 schools and
research laboratories depend on
the specimens that we supply,
and over the past forty years
more than 300 scientific papers
have been published in referred
journals that cite the contribu-
tions of Gulf Specimen. If the Su-
perintendent of Schools and the
Wakulla County School Board
were to drop in, they might
meet a teacher from Cairo, Ga.
who has been bringing her
elementary school down"here
for the past 19 years She won't
mince words, telling them that,
in her opinion, we offer the best
field trip in the region. Hope-
fully all this might convince
them that the kids in our county
need to know more about the
place they live, the water they
drink, the seafood they eat and
empower them to protect our
rapidly diminishing resources.
We must look to the future. If
the world's going to survive, it
has to depend on kids. Wakulla
County has an opportunity with
Gulf Specimen, FSU Marine Lab,
Wakulla Springs and the St.
Marks Refuge to have one of the
best environmental education
programs in the country. Oth-
ers travel long distances to see


them (we just had a class from
Jackson County visit last week)
but for Wakulla schools these
could be cheap and easy field
trips because they are so close.
We need new minds and
ideas to solve the problems
facing our society, with new
approaches to energy. Students
could learn where oil comes
from, and how it was gener-
ated by the same lipid rich
phytoplankton that exists in the
ocean today, and how it might
one day be farmed to produce
petroleum. We would like to
tell them about the German
scientists who discovered that
the snapping shrimp we pro-
vided, and how they discovered
that their oversized snapping
claw generates hydrogen and
causes underwater explosions
with tremendous heat and
light. Some child, hearing the
explosive snap, and seeing the
model we hope to build, might
design a new piston based on
that claw that could power our
vehicles one day and give us
relief at the gas pump. Right
now, we can show how Gulf
Specimen is already a pioneer
in using geothermal energy to
heat and cool our aquarium and
saving big on our utilities. There
are many things we can do,
including helping our teachers
with their literacy and creative
writing programs. I would be
be happy to share the letters
that the Nobel Prize winning
author John Steinbeck wrote to
me encouraging me to go on
with my vision of starting Gulf
Specimen Marine Lab. We could
even deliver lectures on how
we published eleven books and
articles in National Geographic,
Smithsonian, Sports Illustrated
and other magazines over the
years. For this future to happen,
we must first bury the hatchet,
put aside old disputes, and join
together to teach our students
about their environment with a
new spirit of cooperation.
Jack Rudloe..
Gulf Specimen Marine Lab


Maritime Center project is funded


The Department-of Com-
munity Affai'rd today an-
nounced that its Florida
Communities Trust program
will be able to fund three
additional land acquisition
projects, thanks to effective
negotiations that reduced
the cost of other acquisitions
approved last year. The
three newly funded grants
will direct almost $7.9 mil-
lion to purchase property
in Apalachicola, Wakulla
County and New Smyrna
Beach. When local matching
funds are added, more than
$12 million will go toward
the purchase of land for
public recreation and open
space areas.
Each year Florida Com-
munities Trust (FCT) awards
grants to cities, counties and
non-profit environmental
organizations to acquire and
preserve land for parks and
recreation areas. Working
with $66 million in available
funds, the FCT Governing
Board last year approved 20
grants throughout the state.
Appraisals and negotiations
resulted in lower purchase
prices than originally pro-
jected, freeing up funds for
the three additional acquisi-
'tions.
"The partnership between
Florida Communities Trust
and local communities has
helped protect dozens of our
state's natural, cultural and
historical resources so they
can be enjoyed by Floridians
and visitors alike," said DCA
Secretary Tom Pelham. "It's
particularly gratifying that
in a time of tight budgets
we have found a way to do
even more to help protect
local treasures."
The Wakulla Countyl proj-
ect to be funded with a FCT
grant is:


The Big Bend Maritime
Center in Wakulla County,
located on Dickerson Bay
in the coastal community
of Panacea. The six-acre
property is adjacent to an
existing county park and in-
cludes a residence that will
be converted into a maritime
history museum. The county
will construct a nature trail,
fishing pier, wildlife obser-
vation platforms, and picnic
pavilions. for the public to
enjoy. The county applied
for a grant of $3.9 million,
with no local matching funds
required.
"Wakulla County is very
excited about the project,"
said Tim Barden, director
of the county's Office of
Management and Budget.
"This is a worthwhile project
and we are looking forward
to providing a maritime
museum to the citizens of
Wakulla County and the Big
Bend Area."
Florida Communities
Trust is a state land acqui-
sition grant program that
has provided more than
$687 million to local gov-
ernments to preserve parks
and recreational space. The
Department of Community
Affairs helps meet the needs
of Floridians by investing
in communities and work-
ing with them to plan and
manage growth. For more


SafurdoU. Juj 5S
2008
10 am. to 2 p.m.
Hudson Park


information regarding the
Department and the,Florida
Communities Trust program,
please visit www.dca.state.
fl.us.


First Place:
Second Place:
Third Place:


Residents gathered at the courthouse to remember county veterans

Wakulla remembers the fallen
By WILIJAM SNOWDEN on a flak jacket and camo" spontaneous applause from
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net and preparing to fight for the audience.
"For some, Memorial Day freedom. The comment drew Continued on Page 5A
is just another Monday," said
Sheriff David Harvey, noting A. T. C ARTE
that some view it as another C.O.A.S.. CHARTER SCHOOL
three-day weekend or the be-
ginning of summer or start of
beach season or a chance to go
party at the White Trash Bash.
It wasn't that long ago, Harvey
said, that beaches in Europe Home
and the Pacific were covered A FEW OPENINGS
with the bodies of dead Ameri- Of
can soldiers. The ARE AVAILABLE FOR
"I'm here for the same rea- Stingrays-
son you are," he said. "Toays 2008-2009
remember."
A large crowd turned out for REGISTRATION
the Memorial Day ceremony
on the courthouse grounds on Grade PK - 8th
Monday, May 26, where Sheriff
Harvey was the guest speaker. CALL Free Public School and VPK
He quoted from the closing 925-6344 StrongAcademics
of Lincoln's Gettysburg Ad-
dress: "We here highly resolve Character Development
that these dead shall not have
died in vain - that this nation, Dance * Art
under God, shall have a new Music * Technology
birth of freedom - and that WAKULLA Hands-On Environment
government of the people, by
the people, for the people, shall COAST
not perish from the earth." CHARTER Marine Aquarium
of the 57 signers of the Dec- & Butterfly Gardens
laration of Independence, five SCHOOL
were captured by the British Junior Garden Club
and tortured as traitors, nine 48 Shell
died of wounds or hardship, Island Road Bus Transportation Available
two lost sons in the Coptinen- PO.. Box 338 ,- .i :%, de
taltArmy, and a dozen had their St. Marks National School Lunch Pr6gramnfreex
homes pillaged. Florida or reduced breakfast and lunch
"Right now," Harvey said, 32355 Applications Available
"a soldier in Iraq is putting


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Notice- Dr. Ralf H. Miller, Optometrist
has moved his practice
from Crawfordville to Tallahassee.
All patient records are at his new office.
4067 Lagniappe Way.
(Near Bucklake Rd. & Mahan Dr.)
His phone number is 850-219-2513
Give him a call!
^~ ^







Page 4A - THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2008


Church


Obituariet
Zachary R. Barber
Zachary Ryan Barber, 24, of
Bristol died Monday, May 19.
The funeral service was
held Saturday, May 24 at The
Church of Jesus Christ of Lat-
ter-Day Saints in Bristol, with
burial at Rock Bluff Cemetery
in Rock Bluff Community in
Liberty County. In lieu of flow-
ers, memorial contributions
can be made to Wewahitchka
Search and Rescue, P.O. Box
966, Wewahitchka, FL 32465.
Zac was a native and life-
long resident of Liberty Coun-
ty and graduated from Liberty
High school in 2002. He served
with the United States Army
in Operation Iraqi Freedom,
serving in Afghanistan. After
he returned home, he gradu-
ated from the Pat Thomas Law
Enforcement Academy, and
had worked for the Blount-
stown Police Department
and Calhoun County Sheriff's
Office. He loved the outdoors
and to hunt and fish.
Survivors include his wife,
Miquelina Barber, and soon
to be born daughter, Rosalina;
his father and mother, Jackie
and Kathy Barber of Rock
Bluff community; a sister, Dee
Corry, and her husband John
Allen of Tallahassee; his niece,
Anna Lynn, and nephew,
Tripp; father- and mother-in-
law, Rene and Mary Solano of
Blountstown; brothers-in-law,


missionary
Baptist Church
90 Mt. Pleasant Lane,
Wakulla Station
Pastor Rev. Dr. Frank McDonald, Jr.
421-8900
Sunday School Each Sunday... 10 a.m.
1t & 3rd Sun. Worship ..........11 a.m.
Wednesday Service ............. 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting and Bible Study)
Our Mission - "To be a change agent in
the community for the glory of God."

Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
- rner of Winthrop & Byrd-St.
Sunday: Bible Stud) ...9:30 a.m.
Worship................ 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .............5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details,
962-2213


St. Elizabeth


Ann Seton
Catholic C0hrch
Mass 9 a.m. Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Father James MacGee, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
926-1797

Wakulla
United Methodist Church
Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School for all ages - 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship - 11 a.m.
Wednesday Service- 7 p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor Drew Standridge


N * Church
1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98
Sunday School
Holy Eucharist 8:30 am
Youth & Adults 9:30 AM
Children 10:30 AM
Worship 10:30 AM
Reverend John Spicer
926-4288


Waku&ld
Prebyterit
3383 Coastal Hwy.
1/3rd mile east of Wakulla High School
9:30 a.m. Bible Study
10:30 a.m. Worship Service
10:45 a.m. Children's Sunday School
Nursery Provided
926-4569
www.wakullapres.org
V,9 ISi 2



(d'ze f 44S '/dcnu,1
steoa Are Atlways Welcome!
Dr. Nnfey %oiW.ea, Partoa
wim 7t ffteawi idiiAad.


Alex Solano and Nick Macias;
a sister-in-law, Maren So-
lano; his paternal grandfather,
Gordy Barber; and a host of
aunts, uncles, and other loving
family members.
Bevis Funeral Home in Tal-
lahassee was in charge of the
arrangements.

John F. Brinkman
John Frederick Brink-
man, 61, of Tallahassee died
Wednesday, May 14 in Tal-
lahassee.
A celebration of John's life
will take place at Shell Point
in the early fall. In lieu of flow-
ers, the family suggests dona-
tions be made in memory
of John Brinkman to Coastal
Conservation Association,
Florida Chapter, 6919 Portwest
Drive, Suite 100, Houston, TX
77024.
John fought an incredible
battle against cancer and
never gave up hope. He will
be greatly missed by his many
friends, work colleagues, fish-
ing buddies and the "NAS-
CAR-Fixed Income Group."
He was born March 22, 1947,

Ochlockoonee
G ay
United
Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship 9 a.m.
Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
Vastor frfett Vempleton
(850) 984-0127

Trinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy., 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
TrinityLutheranofWakulla.comi
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Les Kimball
Church 926-7808 * Pre-School 926-5557


in Munich, Germany, to John
and Barbara Brinkman.
John joined the United
States Army in August 1966,
and, upon being discharged
in 1968, moved to Atlanta,
Ga., where he completed his
education at Georgia Tech Uni-
versity. He was employed by
MARTA in the engineering de-
partment and retired in 2002.
He was a project manager for
Parson Brinkerhoff, oversee-
ing various construction and
environmental projects. He
was an avid fisherman, and
his home in Shell Point, Fla.,
was the perfect environment
for his retirement. John will
be buried next to his father
at the National Cemetery in
Houston, Texas.
Survivors include his moth-
er, Barbara Brinkman; a sis-
ter, Bobbie Nau of Houston,
Texas; his daughter, Estella
Carpenter, and son-in-law, Bo;
and granddaughter, Lannie
Carpenter of Dacula, Ga.


Panacea Park

Baptist Church
24 Mission Road, Panacea
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Worship 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 p.m.
Pastor, Jerry Spears


_1h




3086 Crawfordville Hwy.
(South of the Courthouse)
Church Office: 926-7896
www.fbccrawfordville.org
or
(youth) www.crosstraining.org


t Crawfordville United

Methodist Church
Sunday% School 9:4 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Tons Rostnhburgcr 926-7209






[. (z')PP
ou-hern
. BA PT IST CHURCH
117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy


Church Office


Sunday School 9A45 AM
Morning Worship 11 AM


962-7822 AWANA CLUB 5PM
Evening Worship 6 PM

Wednesday 7 PM - Prayer Meeting,
Youth a Children's Programs
Dr. Bill Jenkins Pastor
Randy Anderson, Minister of Music _
Vicki Anderson. Youth Director
Jerry Evans. Mike Crouch, Bernie Kemp - Musicians


/aRvleh -7

WaveMakers
'-, ' " - J


r.I
I.r i'.


Who, is the latest

Wakulla Wavemaker?"

Tune in daily at

2 p.m. and 6 p.m.





THE WORD IN PRAISE



WAKU 94.1 FM - www.wave94.com
926-8000 (fax: 926-2000)


Joseph D. Castro
Joseph Daniel Castro, 15,
of Crawfordville, died Thurs-
day, May 22 in Tallahassee.
The funeral service was
held on May 28 at Pine
Grove Baptist Church in
Greensboro. Interment was
at Pine Grove Cemetery
in Greensboro. He was a
native of Tallahassee and
loved basketball, fishing and
hunting.
He was of the Baptist
faith and a member of Pine
Grove Baptist Church.
Survivors include his fa-
ther, David Castro of Craw-
fordville; a brother, Patrick
Scott Castro of Crawford-
ville; his grandmother, Juan-
ita Castro of Tallahassee;
three uncles, Butch Watkins
and Nancy of Havana; Ben
Castro and Wanda of Sneads
and Jack Castro and Sharon
of Valdosta, Ga.; four aunts,
Debbie Davis and Harold of


Pioneer Baptist
Church (SBC)
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.
Wed. adult, children & youth 7 p.m.
486 Beechwood Drive * Crawfordville, FL.
(North of the Lower Bridge Road and
Spring Creek Highway intersection)
Rev. Dennis Hall, Pastor
850-926-6161


SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Fellowship Meal 6:00 p.m.
(call for reservations)
Prayer/ Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
IMPACT (Youth) 7:00 p.m.
Children's Events 6:30 p.m.


Greensboro, Anna O'Connor
and Frank of Greensboro,
Kathy Mullins and Roger
Jenkins of Bristol and Mari-
lyn Fuller of Niceville; and a
number of cousins.
Beggs Funeral Home in
Tallahassee was in charge
of the arrangements.

Continued on Page 5A

Sopchoppy
-United
Methodist
Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship I I a.m.
Pastor Brett Templeton
850-962-251
^ -- ^^ ^


Spread
The Word
"Church News" is a
free service of
The Wakulla News.
Call 926-7102
for info.

Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
I5ss.6OUEss or n I Crawfordville
SPastor,
Daniel Cooksey
"Come & Worship With Us"
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School......................... 10a.m.
Sunday Worship .................... 11 a.m,
Evening Worship.......................6 p.m.
Wednesday Service ........7.....7 p.m. -
& Youth Service.........................7 p.m.
Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m.
M issionettes ..............................7 p.m .


GRACE Baptist Church who verybo04 a

S_pndity deviceses; 1-1,-t... l.rd .llH H| ).
9:.Wam Sunday School tall ages) (Ph '92"-3217)
lU.4.,ani Morning X uorship \X ednesd. Ig4yc.cS
(Chldren's lhuI Chic , dii Praier 'Bibhl Study
6.0il0mn Life Support Groups i � I -ui Looud \ ouh
, n' F I-e uu . hip .hldrc\n' Ministn
I. edi',< t L.mn d h intr Ii. J.t.l.ll 1 & Contemporary
, ~rd ,. .h . -histiin Music
Chihlr n'.h Mini tr l'.itor. (,.n ruucker


Hwy 319 Medart,
Office 926-5265
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
0 C; O i3 Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
ED Morning Worship II 00 a.m.
V , l Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
FteLning Worship 6:00 p.m.
SWednesday Services 7:00 p.m.

Our Miilon is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a fail: strong in the Word of God, warm and
in ilng. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching C'hildren, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.,
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
wvw.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org, .


, 0 you're n biteb!







_ , .N _ .".'



















Elder Emmett & Mrs. Celia Whaley



appreciation mapt

Join us in honoring Elder Emmett Whaley & his

loyal wife Celia for their 60 years of service to

our Lord & Savior, Jesus Christ and to Wakulla
County!


Saturday, May 31, 2008 ~ 11am- 2pm

Hudson Park ~ Crawfordville


Gospel Music & Singing

Free Hamburgers & Hotdogs


Event co-sponsored by Panacea Full Gospel Assembly Church
& Mt. Beasor, Friendship & Widdon Lake Primitive Baptist
Churches


izivcaver 6z- ence/


I I






THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2008 - Page 5A


Obituaries


Continued from Page 4A
Annie J. B. Miller
Annie Jo Baker Miller, 99,
of Whigham, Ga. died Sun-
day, May 25 in Whigham,
Ga.
The funeral service was
held Tuesday, May 27 at
Eastside Baptist Church.
Officiating were Dr. Jimmy
Voyles, Dr. Paul Jones, and
Aubrey Corbett. Interment
followed in Greenwood
Cemetery. Bill Harrell, Keith
Miller, Johnny Roberts, Mi-
chael Moxley, Clay Corbitt,
Daniel Broome and Dan
Broome served as pallbear-
ers. Members of the East-
side Keenagers and Faithful
Three Sunday School Class
served as honorary pallbear-
ers. Memorial contributions
may be made to Eastside
Baptist Church Building
Fund, P. O. Box 49, Cairo,
GA 39828.
SA native of Wakulla Coun-
ty, she was born Oct. 5, 1908,
to Sylvester and Theresa
Robena Ezell Baker. On Jan.
5, 1930, she married Lewis
Benjamin Miller, who pre-
ceded her in death on April
30, 1987. She worked many
years at Watson-Scott and
then retired from the Fabric
Department at T.G.& Y. She
was a faithful member of
Eastside Baptist Church.
Survivors include her
children, Louis B. Miller, Jr.
of Thomasville, Mary Jo M.
Harrell of Whigham, Jackie
M. Voyles and husband Dr.
Jimmy Voyles of Norman
Park, and Jimmy D. Miller
and wife Faye of Cairo; her
grandchildren, Johnny Rob-
erts, Kittie Tipton, Phillip
Roberts, Debbie Harrell Cor-
bitt, William C. "Bill" Harrell,
Jr., Jenni M. Broome, Keith
Miller, Beverly V. Moxley,
Tawny Browning, and Tracy
Thomas; 16 great-grandchil-
dren; and special caregivers,
Mae Demps and Minnie
'Vick.
Heritage Funeral Home in
Cairo, Ga. was in charge of
the arrangements.

Clyde K. Sanders
SClyde K. Sanders, 79, of
Sela,. Ala., died Thursday,
May 22.
The funeral services were
held Saturday May 24 at








Credit nilon

850.224.4960

www.fsucu.org


Pineview Memory Gardens
with Lawrence Brown-Ser-
vice Funeral Home directing.
Visitation was Friday, May
23 at Lawrence Brown-Ser-
vice Funeral Home.
Survivors include his wife,
Jewel Dean Posey Sanders:
three daughters, Brenda G.
Ward, Kathy Blanton, Susie
Nuberry; four sons, Clyde L.
Sanders, Robert E. Sanders,
Philip M. Sanders, and Da-
vid W. Sanders; four sisters,
Perlie M. Revell, Dorothy J.
Kelly, Peggy A. Porter, and
Viola Henderson; two broth-
ers, James M. Sanders and
Mackey Sanders; four step-
children, Wayne Nichols,
Lawrence Nichols, Fraince
Johnston, and Kathy Co-
chran; nine grandchildren,
and 17 great-grandchildren.
Lawrence Brown-Service
Funeral Home was in charge
of the arrangements.

Minnie D. West
Minnie Donaldson West,
68, of Tallahassee died Tues-
day, May 20 in Tallahassee.
The funeral service was
held Saturday, May 24 -at
Paul Russell Road Church of
Christ, with burial at South-
side Cemetery.
A native of Crawfordville,
she was a member of Church
of Christ, Paul Russell Road.
She was a cook at St. Marks
Restaurant.
Survivors include her
husband, Earl West of Tal-
lahassee; a son, Earl West,
Jr. of Cross City; four daugh-
ters, Sharon Garrison of
Jacksonville, Patricia Martin
of Fayetteville, N.C., and
Earlene Geathers and Renee
West, both of Cross City; five
sisters, Mary Donaldson of
California, Lucille Griggs
of Apalachicola, Josephine
Bradley of New York City,
Jenny Triplett of Tampa
and Margie Randolph of
Crawfordville; an aunt, Ella
Taylor of Wakulla; 10 grand-
children; three great-grand-
children; and a host of
nieces, nephews, cousins
and friends.
Strong and Jones Funeral
Home in Tallahassee was
in charge of the arrange-
ments.


County approves new Memorial D

fire services agreement Continued ,rom Page 3A


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Commissioners approved
a new fire services agreement
that has the effect of putting
County Fire Chief Jason Hon-
eybone over the volunteer
firefighters.
The old agreement relied
exclusively on the Wakulla
County United Fire Fight-
ers Association (WCUFFA)
as the administrative and
supervisory authority of the
county's volunteer firefight-
ers and fire departments.
Chief Honeybone was hired
two years ago to oversee fire
operations, though the county
continued to operate under
the old agreement with of-
ficial authority resting with
WCUFFA.
Commissioners approved
the new agreement without
objection at their meeting on
Monday, May 19.
There was some contro-
versy over the matter. espe-
cially after citizen Dana Peck
charged commissioners with
approving a contract that they
were unfamiliar with.
"Before you put your name
in ink on an agreement, you
should know exactly what it
says," Peck said, and noted
that the contract referred to
policies that shall be devel-
oped and explained in the
future.
Peck also said the contract
represented a power grab by
the county and a takeover of
a revenue stream. She also
said the ISO fire rating was
worsening for certain areas of
the county because of a loss
of volunteers at the depart-
ments.
The Insurance Service Or-


Opry will be

held May 31

Johnny Sims and daughter,
Callie, are Southbound's spe-
cial guests at the Sopchoppy
Opry on Saturday, May 31 at
7 p.m. in historic Sopchoppy
High School Auditorium. Also
appearing are Skip Johns &
The Even Money Band along
with Mollie Lynn. For ticket
information, call 962-3711.


SIf you have not yet made plans to attend, do so now!
Please contact Donna Burton Savary @ 850/926-9119 or
Sdlsavary98@yahoo.com for more information.

.You can also see detailed information at www.wakulla.com


Choose Y


cOUIIy uommissionerIiiiu1 rcu
ganization (ISO) rates fire is not free but comes at a high
departments based on their of our fallen soldiers," he said
equipment, communications country such as ours. God bles
and dispatch, and water sys- Commission Chairman Ed I
tem and distribution. Those several combat veterans in the
ratings are used by insurance at Normandy, served in Vietnax
companies in determining The sacrifices made by those v
rates for homeowner's insur- people, he said.
ance. Lower ISO rates translate county Commissioner Howa
into lower insurance rates. for all of the veterans who serve
David Harrison, president said, "who served with Genera
of WCUFFA, disputed Peck's not for these men and women
claims, that ISO hasn't done a The sheriff's color guard st(
review of Wakulla since 1991. erans of Foreign Wars put the
Harrison added that the wreath before the memorial s
money from the Municipal "This memorial is dedicated to
Services Benefit Unit for fire honor of the brave veterans of
protection still went to the lives in the service of our court
departments. "I don't quite Specialist Taylor Wagner of
understand how it's been a trumpet as the wreath was 1
hijacked," he said.
Harrison also said that
most volunteer chiefs and Birth
firefighters supported the new
agreement. Kelvin E. Webster, Jr.
Chief Honeybone said that Kelvin and Beverly Webster
some policies are in place, announce the birth of their son,
some are still being devel- Kelvin Eugene Webster, Jr. on
oped, but that none of them May 19 at Tallahassee Memorial
were included in the contract Hospital. He weighed 8 pounds,
because they are subject to 8 ounces and measured 21 1/4
change, unlike the terms of inches in length.
the contract. Maternal grandparents are
There has been a loss of Bob and Lorraine Porter of
volunteer firefighters at coun- Spring Creek. Paternal grand-
ty stations, and a difficulty in parents are Eddie Lee Webster
attracting new volunteers. Part 'and wife Mary of Crawfordville
of that appears attributableto and Marita Arnett and husband
the state's requirement'that James of Sopchoppy.
volunteer firefighters have 160 Maternal great-grandparents
hours of training a year - a are are Linda Faye Barwick and
requirement that Honeybone Charles of Thomasville, Ga.,
said could go up to 250 hours Albert Porter and Theresa of
soon. Spring Creek, Charles Metcalf
"That might almost be a and Eunice of Sopchoppy and
hurdle too high for these vol- Beverly Bryer and Clarence of
unteer firefighters;"- Commis-_ Bradford, Maine. Paternal great-
sioner Howard Kessler said of grandparent is Rosa Scott of
the training requirements. Sopchoppy.
Kelvin, Jr. joins a sister, Al-
ycia, age 2.


ay


rge Green noted that freedom
price. "We honor the families
. "We are fortunate to live in a
;s America."
Brimner noted that there were
audience, soldiers who landed
n, participated in the Gulf War.
veteranss is not known by most

ird Kessler said he was thankful
ed. "Thankful for my father," he
il Patton all through Europe. If
I, I might not be here today."
ood by as members of the Vet-
flag at half staff, and placed a
stone. That stone is inscribed:
the lasting memory and sacred
Wakulla County who gave their
entry "
Tallahassee played "Taps" on
placed.


Reunion set
The 11th family reunion
of the Bill and Sally Langston
will be held on Saturday, May
31 at Sopchoppy City Park. All
friends and family are invited
to attend.

In Service
Arron M, Riley
Army Pvt. Arron M. Riley has
graduated from the Infantry-
man One Station Unit Training
at Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga.
The training consists of Basic
Infantry Training and Advanced
Individual Training.
During the nine weeks of ba-
sic combat training, the soldier
received training in drill and
ceremonies, weapons employ-
ment and more. Riley is the son
of Kathy Crane of Panacea. He
is a 2007 WHS graduate.
Please report
orphaned or
injured wildlife
E * 926-8308


TOP-NOTCH PERSONNEL

As your Superintendent of Schools, I commit

to you that every open position in the district will

be widely advertised and every effort will be made

to solicit a broad applicant pool so that each

position is filled with the best qualified person for

the job. Our students deserve no less!
(Political advertisement paid for and approved by Dr. Andrea Carter, Republican for Superintendent of Schools)





'BS Adventure




/Lf_____IT.


/ / Come join our Free
Trail Ride for a Great
S adventure in Vacation
Bible School

"Cactus Canyon." .
For Ages : 3 years - 5th Grade*
Sun. June 8th - Thurs. June 12th ; "
6:00 - 9:00pm


Commencement & Family Fun Night on
Friday June 13th, 6:00 - 9:00pm

EHwy 319, Medart
r Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
SSunday School 9:45 am.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
i Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 pjn.
For more information, call Church Office at 926-5265


Come join us for VBS on
Outrigger Island! - '
Classes for PreK - h Grade
Sunday June 1 -
Friday June 6 Pioneer Baptist Church
6 PM - 9 PM 4,,86 Beechwood Drive
Crawfordville
1300 yards north of the
Lower Bridge Road
A light meal is provided. and Spring Creek Intersection)
There is no cost to attend.
A Telephone 926-6161 for more information.


Wakulla Springs
BAPTISi 1CX-1
June 22-26 6:00-9:00pm
June 27 Family Night @ 7:00pm


Ages 3 years - kids


Snacks provided

1391 Crawfordville Hwy
For more information or to register please
contact PJ Piland 509-3263


River of Life Vacation Bible School
June 16-20


For additional information call 962-9331 *


Szioupcnuppy outuenlll *
Baptist Vacation
Bible School


Sunday, June 22nd -
Friday, June 27th * 6:00-9:00 p.m.
Contact the church at 962-7822 for more information.






Page 6A - THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2008


People


Matt Turner and Krista Pryor


SWakulla Bank raises money for Relay For Life


ing manager at Woodville
Ace Hardware since 2004. Her
fiance has been employed at
Residential Elevators of Craw-
fordville since 2004.
The wedding will be held
May 2, 2009 at 5 p.m. at Wil-
low Pond in Monticello. All
friends and relatives are in-
vited to attend.


Youths learn about the

work of their parents


*15,
�'9aF YAP
------ ---
LAW d'


Parents gave children a view of an average day at work


DeMarcus Lindsey drills core sample from pine tree


This year's Take Your Child
to Work Day was held April
24 and the St. Marks Nation-
al Wildlife Refuge fire crew
hosted six children: Demarcus
Lindsey and Bridgette Smith
(Shadeville Elementary), Seth
and Brody Aguilera and Brad-
ley Lord (Crawfordville El-
ementary) and Patrick Titus
(Swift Creek Middle School).
The fire crew kids started
the day by checking the fire
equipment for fire readiness.
As the dry, hot weather
of late spring increases the
chance for wildfires on the
refuge, all vehicles, pumps,
hoses, and equipment must
be inventoried and in perfect
operating order.
Later in the morning, the
kids went to Port Leon Road
and assisted the fire crew with
seeding the recently reworked
road bed. After lunch at Plum


C-r-amw0


Orchard Pond, the kids went
to several of this years' pre-
scribed fires to assist with
some fire effects monitoring.
They learned that pre-
scribed fire is a valuable tool
for enhancing native plants
and ecosystems as well as
protecting our natural areas
from damaging wildfires.
"The refuge staff enjoyed
having the students on-site,
helping out and I think the
students have a much better
appreciation for what their
parents do, especially getting
up early to start work at 7:30
a.m.," said Refuge Ranger
Robin Will.
In addition, other refuge
kids came to work that week
including: Kristi Reinman, Tia
Nicholson, Larkin Keys and
Laurel Keys. Their parents are
not involved in the fire crew.


i....."................ ....
SFree Internet *
* Late Hours *
*Gourmet Coffee

(850) 926-3652
* . * * . . I - *


Wakulla Bank employees took part in a successful ACS fundraiser
Wakulla Bank employees took part in the American Cancer Society's Relay For Life "Cruisin' for a Cure" event on April 18
and April 19. Bank employees used a 1950s themed booth and raised approximately $5,000 for the 2008 Relay fundraiser. The
booth and program was part of the ACS overnight benefit at the Wakulla High School track for the fight against cancer.


Neighbors can help their Neighbors


For the last several weeks
Men's Fraternity of Wakulla
and men from several area
churches have joined forces
with Rotary Clubs and Abil-
ity 1st, the Center for In-
dependent Living, in being
"Neighbors Helping Neigh-
bors," Construction of seven
wheelchair ramps have been
completed in Wakulla County
since Feb 23 by men willing to
donate their time and talent.
According to Lisa Raleigh,
chair of the Rotary's Ramp Upl
Project, funds for the ramps
were made available through
donations and grant money
from Rotary International.
Qualified recipients' names
& addresses were provided
by Ability 1st, to determine
needs and locations for each
build. Area men joined with
Men's Fraternity of Wakulla
to provide the manpower to
build the ramps.
Pipe fitters, plumbers, ap-
pliance repairmen, pastors,
mechanics, specialists, retir-
ees, office workers, business
owners, lawyers and univer-
sity professors, young and


old, all pitched in. Members
from First Baptist Church in
Crawfordville, Lake Ellen Bap-
tist Church, Wakulla Springs
Baptist Church, Cornerstone
Ministries, St. Teresa Episco-
pal Church and Sopchoppy
Southern Baptist Church as
well as men not affiliated
with any particular church
pitched in to lend a hand on
each project.
"Members of our commu-
nity can now lead richer and
fuller lives as a result of the ef-
forts of these men" said Steve
Smith, Coordinator of Men's
Fraternity of Wakulla, a faith
based organization of men
from different backgrounds,
education, and vocations who
support, educate and encour-
age one another through car-
ing and sharing their talents
and abilities. As a result, men
become better husbands,
fathers and brothers while
helping friends and neighbors
in need, "Neighbors helping
Neighbors," their motto is
"Serving God, Fanily & Com-
munity, one man at a time".
The group meets each


NBC

STORAGE

Mini-Warehouses - Boats - RV's
519-5128 * 508-5177

GARAGE SALE
*New Stock, Many New Items*
New & Used Children's Clothing,
Tools & Housewares
June 7, 2008
8:00 AM - 3:00 PM
NO EARLY BIRDS!
2 Miles South of Courthouse, Crawfordville



^ M/det and
,eet for

�/ Sheriff

Da yid Harvey


Everyone/is invited to attend an
open house for Sheriff David Harvey
hosted Joanna Johnson on Friday
Jun 6, 2008 at 8:00 pm at 90
Mysterious Waters, Crawfordville,
FL. Sheriff Harvey will also be
available for questions and concerns.

For additional information please call
Joanna Johnson at 926-4953
Paid Political Advertisement Paid for by Joanna Johnson, 90 Mysterious Waters, Crawfordville, FL
32327 and approved by David Harvey, Democrat, for Sheriff of Wakulla County


week in a facility provided by
Cornerstone Ministries, "Out-
back" in a doublewide mobile
home conducive to such a
gathering. With no member-
ship fees, the group operates
on a donation basis to cover
the incidental expenses of
operating the fraternity. In
addition to the fellowship and
comradery of men, they have
a cookout once a month and a
family gathering once a quar-
ter where families can meet
families and get involved in
some 'old fashioned play time'
as a family. Opportunities and
participation in family activi-
ties in a Christian atmosphere
are encouraged. Single parents
are encouraged to attend and
participate. A visit to their
website, www.byHISgrace.cc/
MensFraterityofWakulla, will
keep one abreast of meeting
times, location and activities.
The website is updated
frequently as activities and
information is added to meet
the needs of our ever-chang-
ing community.


Just in time for the First
Annual Make A Difference
Day on May 10, sponsored
by Volunteer-WAKULLA, the
ramp project highlighted what
making a difference can mean
in the lives of people in need.
Having access to get out of
their homes and lead a some-
what active life means so
much to many confined by
limited mobility.
Volunteers are active all
over our county. Millions of
Americans volunteer using
their time, talents and com-
passion to make a difference
in the lives of others.
Our County Administrator
Benjamin Pingree and Wakul-
la County Commissioners, as
well as many local businesses,
are very supportive of volun-
teer activity in our county.


C)


A Free Press
Your Key
To Freedom


BOAT LETTERING

While You Wait!

i-- ( aFL NUMBERS I
I NAMES,
L STRIPING$^

Let The Professionals Fix You Up!
-DESIGN &


SIGNS
850-926-2211

THE CITY OF ST. MARKS
WILL HOLD A PUBLIC
HEARING


Date:
Location:


June 12, 2008 at 7:30 pm
788 Port Leon Drive,
St. Marks, FL 32355


FIRST READING

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING on an Amendment
to Change Sec. 74-60, 74-61, 74-62, 74-106, 74-107 of
Chapter 74 Code of Ordinance of THE CITY OF ST.
MARKS, FLORIDA, Changing Water and Sewer Rates,
and Increasing Related Connection Fees

ORDINANCE 77, AMENDMENT #1

AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE
CHANGING WATER AND SEWER RATES, AND
INCREASING RELATED CONNECTION FEES; AND
PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon
Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Persons needing
special access considerations should call the City
Office at least 24 hours before the date for
scheduling purposes.
The Board Office may be
contacted at (850) 925-6224


Krista Pryor will

marry Matt Turner


Sonya Pryor of Crawford-
ville announces the engage-
ment of her daughter, Krista
Pryor of Crawfordville, to Matt
Turner of Crawfordville. He is
the son of Carl and Margaret
Haney of Tallahassee.
The bride-elect is a 2005
graduate of Wakulla High
School. She has been receiv-






THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2008 - Page 7A


People


Meister and Gillson

will marry in August
�- ' .7,: I'- , , "� i '.,


Mr. and Mrs. Garret Sloan


Traci Morales and

Sloan exchange vows


Traci Morales of Crawford-
ville and Garret Sloan of Chi-
pley were married on March
22. The bride is the daughter
of Miguel and Julie Morales
of Crawfordville. The groom
is the son of Greg and Phyllis


Sloan of Chipley.
Traci is a 2003 graduate of
Wakulla High School, Garret
is a 2005 graduate of Florida
State University with a degree
in Psychology. The couple
lives in Chipley.


St. Marks is home to a

new Eagle Scout


.~-






Charles C. Coshatt
Since becoming a Cub Scout
in 1999, Charles Clayton Coshatt,
19, has always kept his sights
on becoming an Eagle Scout.
On Saturday, May 24, his vision
came true.
Coshatt, of Boy Scout Troop
4 of St. Marks, was honored at a
Special Eagle Scout ceremony at
the Pickin Parlour in Crawford-
ville. To earn Scouting's highest
award, Coshatt had to earn 21
merit badges, serve as a leader
in his troop, and complete a ma-
jor community service project.
Coshatt's service project took
place at Eden Springs Nursing
home. He planned and led
scouts and adults in the build-
ing of an outdoor shelter for
the residents of Eden Springs.
The shelter is a 12x20 open
sided structure that is used by
the residents and their families
to be able to be protected from
the elements. The residents
and staff were very grateful for
this new covered area and it


has enabled them to enjoy the
outdoors in all kinds of weather.
The project came together with
the help of Boy Scout Troop
4, Coshatt's leadership, Eden
Springs staff, Wakulla County
Health Department staff as well
as friends and family.
The Troop extends its heart-
felt thanks to the community
and everyone who supported
Coshatt in his pursuit of this
major accomplishment.
Coshatt has been a member
of Troop 4, chartered by a group
of concerned parents, for seven
years. He has served the troop as
Patrol Leader, Senior Patrol Lead-
er, and Assistant Senior Patrol
Leader. He also served as Den
Chief to Den 6, Pack 4, also of
St. Marks, for five years. Coshatt
also worked for five summers at
Camp Wallwood, two of which
he was an Area Director for the
Ecology Lodge.
"It is obvious to say that
Troop 4 is very proud of my son
earning his Eagle Rank, first and
foremost because he completed
a difficult journey and because
he is the very first Eagle Scout
from Troop 4," said his mother,
Penny.
Now Coshatt is an adult
leader for the troop. He wants
to help guide the younger scouts
and his younger brother, Shawn
Coshatt, to earn their Eagle
Scout rank.


WHS grad helps save lives


Molly Strickland Peck, the
daughter of Helen and Albert
Strickland of Crawfordville, is a
biological scientist with the Uni-
versity of Florida Department of
Urology. In her work, she dem-
onstrates the process of working
with cell culture media in the
Urology Cancer Immunotherapy





926-3425 * 926-3655


Gentlemen's
Tea Tree 3
S Experience

- Haircuts,
S Tea Tree Shampoo
- ~- Scalp Massage
- Tea Tree
- Conditioner /
SSteam Towe
- ~ Neck Massage
~= -Neck Shave'f
" ? (optional)


926-4080
I His & Her's Barber Shop & Salon
Across from Gulf Coast Lumber


Lab at the UF Cancer and Genet-
ics Institute where vaccines are
created by a patient's own stem


*r. -i


Roxanne Meister, former-
ly of Leon County, and Kevin
Gillson, both of Saratoga
Springs, N.Y. announced
their engagement and up-
coming marriage.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Jone and Har-
old Meister of Fairbury. Her
fiance is the son of Helen
Gillson of Sarasota Springs
and the late Neil Gillson.
She graduated from Fair-
bury-Cropsey High School,
Fairbury and Illinois Cen-


tral College in Peoria. She
is employed at Orthopedic
Medicine Center.
He graduated from Sara-
toga Springs High School
and Spartan School of Aero-
nautics in Oklahoma. He
is employed as a senior
customer service engineer
at Rockwell Collins Com-
mercial Systems.
An August wedding
is planned in Saratoga
Springs.


Fire victim needs help


A benefit bank account
has been set up to assist
Tina Joiner following a se-
vere house fire that occurred
at her Crawfordville home
on Thursday, May 15. The
family needs many items
including cash contribu-
tions. Anyone who wishes
to donate to assist the fam-
ily may do so at any Wakulla


Bank branch. For more in-
formation, call Tina Joiner
at 519-2160.
Joiner was able to escape
the fire when four-year-old
Bryson Hackney yelled to
her about the smoke and
woke her up. Tina grabbed
Bryson and they were able
to get out of the house with-
out any injuries.


Beattys host open house


The Beattys of Florida
Wild Mammal Association-
will be hosting an open
house to thank the com-
munity for helping them
rebuild their home after the
terrible fire in September
2007. They would like to
invite everyone to join them
on Saturday, June 7 from 11
a.m. to 3 p.m.


In lieu of house warm-
ing gifts, Chris and Mike
would appreciate donations
to FWMA as the center has
had a very difficult year in
2008.
Anyone who would like
to help with food or organiz-
ing the party, please contact
Gill at (850) 544-0659.


Othan and Lila Ruth Porter

Porters celebrate their

60th anniversary


Othan and Lila Ruth Porter
celebrated their 60th wedding
anniversary on May 28. The
Porters plan to commemorate
the anniversary by going out
with family on Saturday, May
31, for dinner.
The couple, who are from
Wakulla County, were married
in Thomasville, Ga. in 1948 by
a justice of the peace. "We ran
away and got married," said
Lila Ruth Porter. "You had to
have a blood test and a wait-
ing period (in Florida), so we
ran away so we didn't have
to wait."


Birth
Daliyah L. Greene
Tara and Gerald Greene of
Crawfordville announce the
birth of their daughter, Dali-
yah Lynna Greene, on May 12
at Tallahassee Memorial Hos-
pital. She weighed 7 pounds,
4 ounces and measured 18 1/2
inches in length.


GULF STATE

Commun


F D 1 C


would like to thank you Wakulla County for selecting us

as the recipient of the Wakulla County Chamber of

Commerce 2008 Large Business Excellence Award


Crawfordville
(850) 926-8338
Apalachicola
Carrabelle


2190 Crawfordville Highway
Crawfordville, FL 32327

121,


Eastpoint
St. George Island
world wide on the web
www.gscb.com


Both are retired, he as a
chemist with the State of
Florida and later working as
a glassblower, she worked at
Lewis State Bank and later for
Wakulla County Schools. They
enjoy fishing and have a place
in the mountains.
The couple has four chil-
dren, six grandchildren, three
great-grandchildren and
another on the way. One
son serves aboard the U.S.S.
Nimitz, based in San Diego.
A grandson serves in the Na-
tional Guard. Other members
of the family are local.


Maternal grandparent is
Ramona Curry of Tallahas-
see. Paternal grandparents
are Cephus and Shelly Greene
and Barbara Loggins, all of
Crawfordville.
Paternal great-grandparent
is Hazel Greene of Crawford-
ville.
Daliyah joins two brothers,
Dayton, age 8, and Dakota, age
19 months.


AM


I --


Roxanne Meister and Kevin Gillson


NOTICE OF

PUBLIC MEETING

June 5, 2008 at 9 am

At the Commission Complex
conference room at 3093
Crawfordville Highway in
Crawfordville, FL

The Wakulla County Board of County
Commissioners has scheduled a Public
Meeting of the Citizens Advisory Committee
on Infrastructure Development. Interested
parties are invited to attend and participate.
Persons needing special access
considerations should call the Wakulla
County Administrative Offices at least 48
hours before the date for
scheduling purposes.
The Administrative Offices may be contacted at
(850) 926-0919.


Lordy, iordy -

look who's 40!


.- rappy irhdoay


\ ' ,: . ti oe, a l i ,



,- 'Family .


nkf�







Page 8A - THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2008


Sports


Coach Michael Sweatt and his players finished third in tournament

Wakulla Shooters impress at tourney


The Wakulla Shooters
boys basketball team placed
third in the Florida Sun-
shine Classic in Jackson-
ville.
The tournament had a
total of 10 age 14 and under
basketball teams and two
brackets to divide them up.
The 14 and under Shooters
defeated the Jacksonville
Blacktop YBOA team May 18
by a score of 59-42 to take
third place in the tourna-
ment. The Shooters were
trailing at halftime 23-18,
but outscored Blacktop 41-
19 in the second half.
Ryan Henderson led all
scorers with 27 points to
go along with his nine re-
bounds and five steals in the
final game. Mikal Cromartie
and Tamerick Holmes com-
bined for 22 of the Shooter
points. Cromartie also had
10 rebounds with three
steals while Holmes had
three blocked shots, two
steals, and four rebounds.
Greg Thomas had seven
points and Evan McCoy
had three points with five
rebounds. Jeffrey Miller and
Marshane Godbolt had a
great defensive game.
:The boys. played their
hearts ouf all' weekend
long and every player on
the team contributed to
help come out with a third
place trophy and one step
closer to their State Tourna-
ment that will be held June
6 to June 8 in Ft. Myers,"


said Coach Michael Sweatt.
"Teams that place in the
top four at the State Tourna-
ment will get an automatic
bid to the National Tourna-
ment played in Polk County
on June 28 to July 5."
"All of the players seemed
to come together at this
tournament just in time
for the state tournament,"
said the coach. "We have
been working hard since
mid-February."
The 13 players are Dionte
Hutchinson, Marshane God-
bolt, Zach Tallman, Mikal
Cromartie, Evan McCoy,
Clayton Greene, Tamarick
Holmes, Vonte Ervin, Ryan
Henderson, Malik Thomas,
John Brown, Greg Thom-
as, and Jeffrey Miller. The
Shooters are coached by
Michael Sweatt.
Coach Sweatt and the
Wakulla Shooters team
thanked the parents, do-
nators, and sponsors who
have helped contribute to
make this team possible.
The sponsors include:
Wakulla Bank, The Best
Value, Subway, River ofLife,
Lowery Masonry, Brown's
Insulation Company, and
North. Florida Women's,
Clinic.



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Summer soccer
The Wakulla High School
girls' soccer program an-
nounced that the annual sum-
mer ball program will begin
on Tuesday June 3. Junior
varsity and varsity coaches will
supervise organized play and
skills development on Tuesday
evenings on the high school
practice fields from 6:30 p.m.
to 8:30 p.m. All girls who will
be attending ninth through
twelfth grade at Wakulla High
School during the 2008-2009
school year and who would
like to play soccer are welcome
to participate. Students must
have an up-to-date physical
on file with the school to be
eligible. Rising ninth grader
may submit paperwork on the
first night of practice.
Students should come prop-
erly attired to play. Players
must wear soccer cleats and
shin guards. Individual water
bottles are required. Insect
repellant is highly recom-
mended.
For more information, please
contact Dr. Rachel Sutz Pienta
at 321-3582 or dr.sutzpienta@
yahoo.com. Practices will be
held from June through July.
Practices will be canceled dur-
ing inclement weather.


NOTICE OF

LAND USE CHANGE -
The Wakulla County Board of County.Commissioners proposes to adoptthe following
by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings regarding the following before the
Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday June 9,2008, beginning at
7:00 PM and the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday,
July 21, 2008, beginning at 6:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time
permits. All public hearings are held in the County Commission Chambers located
west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327.
Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony.


1. Application for Variance:


Applicant:
Agent:
Proposal:


Tax ID Number:
Existing FLU Map:
Existing Zoning:
FEMA Flood Info:
Parcel Size:
Location:
Hearings Required:


2. Application for
Applicant:
Proposal:
Tax ID Number:


V 08-09


Randy J. & Sheila D. Crum
Corey Crum
replace existing mobile home with new
mobile home within a zoning district that
does not allow mobile homes
12-2s-03w-063-00746-000
Rural 1 (FLUEPolicy 1.2.3)
R- (Section 5-30, LD.C)
"C" & "B" zones on Panel 0350-B
4.55+/- acres
91 Cherokee Drive, Sopchoppy
Planning Commission 06/09/08 @ 7:00 PM
County Commission 07/21/08 @ 6:00 PM

Variance: Y ,08-10
James and Amanda Morrison
Construct addition within required rear setback
00-00-035-011-09480-005


Existing FLU Map: Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4) -
Existing Zoning: R-1 (Section 5-30, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0250-B
Parcel Size: 0.114+/- acres
Location: 106 Cochise Street, Wakulla Gardens Unit 4
Hearings Required: Planning Commission 06/09/08 @ 7:00 PM


3. Application for Zoning Change:


Applicant:
Agent:
Proposal:
Tax ID Number:
Existing FLU Map:
Existing Zoning:
Proposed Zoning:
FEMA Flood Info:
Parcel Size:
Location:


R08-08


Marlene S. Jefferies
Elyane or Sheldon H. Huebner
rezone to rural residential
19-3s-01w-000-04526-004
Urban 1 (FLUE Policy 1.2.5)
RR-5 (Section 5-26, LDC)
RR-1 (Section 5-27, LDC)
"C" zone on Panel 0250-B
2.94+/- acres
Three Sisters Road


Hearings Required: Planning Commission 06/09/08 @ 7:00 PM
County Commission 07/21/08 @ 6:00 PM


4. Application for Conditional Use:


Applicant:
Agent:
Proposal:
Tax ID Number:
Existing FLU Map:
Existing Zoning:
FEMA Flood Info:
Parcel Size:
Location:


CU08-06


H. Collins Forman, Jr. and Jennifer Cargill Forman
Robert Routa
construct elevated driveway within wetland
14-5s-03w-000-01063-000
Rural 1 (FLUE Policy 1.2.3)
RR-1(Section 5-27, LDC)
"A-9" zone on Panel 0350-B
7.45+/- acres
Park Avenue, south of Sopchoppy City Park


Hearings Required: Planning Commission 06/09/08 @ 7:00 PM


Sudden impact is seeking
players to fill out softball rosters


The Sudden Impact fast-
pitch softball program is look-
ing for players to be a part of
four age group teams, age 12
and under, age 14 and under,
age 16 and under and age 18
and under. The age 14 and 16

Footballers fall
The 2007-2008 sports sea-
son came to a close with the
playing of the spring jambo-
ree at Gene Cox Stadium in
Tallahassee on Friday, May
23.
Wakulla dropped two
halves of action against Lin-
coln and Chiles, 41-14 and
27-14 respectively.
The War Eagle coaching
staff uses the spring games
to play everyone and work
on fundamentals rather than
worrying about the score.
Coach Scott Klees said his
players showed a strong ef-
fort.
Wakulla was led by Ken-
drick Hall, Zach Klees, Casey
Eddinger, Lee Smalls and
Lorenzo Randolf.
The games will count on
the 2008 schedule in August.


'F


5. Preliminary Plat Application:


Applicant:
Proposal:
Tax ID Number:
Existing FLU Map:
Existing Zoning:
FEMA Flood Info:
Parcel Size:
Location:

Hearings Required:


year old group is playing as
a combined team at the pres-
ent time.
Anyone interested in play-
ing may contact Coach Mike
at 980-3548.

Graves is all-star
Wakulla baseball player
Cameron Graves played in the
FACA All-Star games on May
23 and May 24 in Sebring.
Graves had four hits in eight
at-bats including seven RBIs,
four runs scored and two
homeruns. He played first
base and designated hitter. He
was the team MVP. Graves will
be playing at Gulf Coast Com-
munity College in the fall.

If you haven't
S been able to do
it on your own...
you're not alone!

I CAN HELP!

Gena Davis
Personal Trainer
926-7685 or 510-2326


PP07-01


Charles Harvey
6-lot subdivision
00-00-041-000-09778-000
Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4)
RR-1(Section 5-27, LDC)
"A and C" zones on Panel 0250-B
27.30 +/-acres
South of Shadeville Road; West side
of Hickorywood Drive
County Commission 07/21/2008 i 6:00 PM


CU08-05


6. Application for Conditional Use:
Applicant: John McGough


Agent:
Proposal:

Tax ID Number:

Existing FLU Map:
Existing Zoning:
FEMA Flood Info:
Parcel Size:
Loca ion
Hearings Required:


GPI Southeast, Inc.
.construct elevated driveway
and bridge within wetland
00-00-114-000-11764-000 &
00-00-115-000-11879-000
Urban I (FLUE Policy 1.2.5)
r-1 (Section 5-30, LDC)
"V20" zone on 0380-B
24.05 :+1--acres
West of Spring Creek Highway and Cut off Road
Planninnt Commission 06/09/08 @ 7:00 PM '


7. Application for Conditional Use:


Applicant:
Agent:
Proposal:
Tax ID Number:
Existing FLU Map:
Existing Zoning:
FEMA Flood Info:
Parcel Size:
Location:
Hearings Required:


CU08-02


Clarence Hallman
Rita Chadwell
operate pet kennel
20-2s-0le-207-04917-034
Rural 1 (FLUE Policy 1.2.3)
AG (Section 5-25, LDC)
"C" zone on 0100-B
8.08 +/- acres
90 Captain James Street
Planning Commission 06/09/2008 @ 7:00 PM


8. Application for Temporary Use: TU 08-07
Applicant: Jerry Moore
Agent: D N D Fireworks
Proposal: Fireworks Sales
Tax ID Number: 25-4s-02w-000-02097-003
Existing FLU Map: Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4)
Existing Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0360-B
Parcel Size: 1.37+/- acres
Location: 3180 Coastal Highway
Hearings Required: Planning Commission 06/09/08 @ 7:00PM
County Commission 06/23/08 (a 6:00PM

9. Application for Temporary Use: TU 08-08
Applicant: Robert Voorting
Agent: Bryan Thomas Fireworks
Proposal: Fireworks Sales
Tax ID Number: 19-3s-01w-193-04524-B03
Existing FLU Map: Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4)
Existing Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0250-B
Parcel Size: 1.279+/- acres
Location: 2235 Crawfordville Highway
Hearings Required: Planning Commission 06/09/08 @ 7:00PM
County Commission 06/23/08 a 6:00PM


10. Application for Board of Adjustment:
Applicant: Chris and Kay Alward
Proposal: appeal Planning Department's
decision to deny site plan
Tax ID Number: 31-3s-01e-217-04975-0A6
Existing FLU Map: Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4)
Existing Zoning: AG (Section 5-25, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0100-B
Parcel Size: 5.01+/- acres
Location: 101 Sunset Lane


BOA 08-08


Hearings Required: County Commission 06/21/08 a( 6:00PM

Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record
files may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 3093
Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/
F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a
County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the
testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special
access considerations should call the Board Office at least 48 hours before
the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Office may be contacted at
(850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.


I


-~I~~`~~~~~ ~~~^I~~---~-~~--~-~ '-- -~~~~-~








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2008 - Page 9A


Sheriff's Report


A woman reported the loss
of her wallet at the drink coun-
ter at McDonald's and, shortly
thereafter, three people were
arrested and charged with run-
ning up more than $1,100 on
the victim's debit card, accord-
ing to Sheriff David Harvey.
On Sunday, May 25, the
victim called deputies to re-
port that she left her black
cigarette case wallet by the
fountain drink machine. When
she realized she had left it, she
returned to the restaurant to
find the wallet gone.
Deputy Robert Giddens
responded to the call and a
witness told him that he had
seen a young female take the
wallet and leave. The restau-
rant manager reported that
she knew the young woman
as Whitney Molina.
Lt. Ray Johnson traced Mo-
lina, who is 19 years old, to
an address on Marie Circle
in Crawfordville. Inside the
home, Johnson noticed a wal-
let on an end table matching
the description of the victim's
missing wallet. Asked whose
wallet it was, Molina replied it
belonged to her friend Alison
Hakwins, who was there in the
home. When Hawkins, who is
18, was asked if it was hers,
she said no.
Johnson picked up the wal-
let to look for identification
and found several items with
the victim's name on it, as well
as some of Molina's cards.
According to the report, the
two women were informed of


their constitutional right to
remain silent and then Molina
said she, her boyfriend Robert
Fitzgerald, and Hawkins found
the wallet at McDonald's. They
asked if someone left their
wallet on the drink counter,
and then decided to take it.
The three went to Wal-Mart
and bought clothes and elec-
tronics, and then filled up the
car they were driving, which
belonged to Hawkins.
Molina, Hawkins and
Fitzgerald, 19, were arrested
and charged with grand theft
and fraudulent use of a credit
card, both of which are third
degree felonies. The total
amount charged to the victim's
debit card was $1,186.
The property allegedly pur-
chased with the victim's credit
card was retrieved and includ-
ed a Sony CyberShot camera,
a Sit'n Float, Sony Playstation,
Samsung cell phone, four bi-
kini outfits, four DVDs, and a
Playstation game.
In other cases reported by
the Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office last week:
* A man on Renee Street
in Crawfordville reported a
catalytic converter stolen from
a Chevrolet truck he was work-
ing on. The victim had noticed
a catalytic converter also miss-
ing from an E350 mini bus
parked in front of the truck.
With soaring metal pric-
es, catalytic converters have
become valuable to thieves
because they contain three
to seven grams of platinum,


which is selling for more than
$2,000 an ounce.
On Tuesday, May 20, Dep-
uty James Plouffe responded
to the call and looked under
the truck and bus and noticed
the exhaust pipes had been
cut a with hack saw, "and the
fresh-cut shine of metal was
still visible."
At the scene was the boy-
friend of the victim's daughter
who Deputy Plouffe reported
he had arrested a few months
earlier for allegedly stealing a
catalytic converter.
Detective Scott Powell,
upon receiving the case, con-
tacted junk and scrap metal
dealers to ask about recent
sales of catalytic converters,
and a recycled metal dealer
reported he had bought one
from a man he knew as "Jack"
who drove a silver Dodge
truck. Following the lead,
Powell determined that it was
the son of victim's girlfriend,
who lived in a house behind
his mother.
When questioned by Pow-
ell, the man called his mother
and asked her to drop the case
and he would replace the miss-
ing converters. On Thursday,
May 22, the victims signed
non-prosecution forms and
the case was closed.
* On Sunday, May 25, a
woman in Spring Creek re-
ported the theft of two rocking
chairs from her porch.
Deputy Brad Taylor investi-
gated and found damage to a
screen door at the home where
it appeared the perpetrator
had applied force to the door
to push it open enough to trip


the hook latch. Part of the bot-
tom of the door was broken
as a result.
One neighbor noticed a
truck in the area on Friday,
May 23. The chairs were val-
ued at $125 each. The investi-
gation is ongoing.
* The Wakulla County Pub-
lic Library reported the theft of
numerous DVDs on Thursday,
May 22.
Deputy Casey Whitlock
responded to the call and
interviewed librarian Richard
Joiner, who reported that the
cases of 15 DVDs were found
behind a bookcase and the
actual DVDs were missing. The
value of DVDs was $219. Two
suspects were identified. The
case is ongoing.
* A man reported the theft
of $350 worth of copper wire
from his Shephardwood Drive
home on Wednesday, May
21. The victim told Deputy
Nick Petowsky that he had
stored the copper wire under
a fiberglass boat in a green
recycling box.
* The Kangaroo store on
Woodville Highway reported
a gas drive-off on Sunday,
May 25.
The store manager reported
the drive-off happened the day
before, when two men in a
Dodge truck pulled up to the
gas pumps. One man went
inside while the other waved
for her to turn on the pump.
When the truck was fueled
with $120 worth of gas, the
man inside walked out and
the two men drove off.
The store manager reported
she found the truck later in the
day at the St. Marks boat ramp


and left a note saying they
owed the store $120.
Deputy Jason Brooks inves-
tigated. The case was turned
over to the Criminal Investiga-
tion Division.
* A Shell Point man report-
ed the theft of80 to 90 gallons
of gas from his boat's fuel tank
on Wednesday, May 21.
The victim's 31-foot boat
was moored at his dock on a
canal across the street from his
residence. The fuel, valued at
$340, appeared to have been
siphoned off.
The victim also said he had
left his truck parked on the
canal side of the street and ap-
proximately 10 gallons of gas
was missing from it as well.
Deputy Casey Whitlock
investigated and, based on evi-
dence at the scene, surmised
that the perpetrator used a
boat to enter the canal and get
the gasoline.
An anonymous source re-
ported to Whitlock that two
men had bought an electric
fuel pump from a marine store
a day before. The case was
turned over the CID for further
investigation.
* A home on Mashes Sands
Road was reported burglarized
on Wednesday, May 21, and
Deputy Andrew Vass arrived
on the scene to find an open
door at the house, which ap-
peared to have been kicked
open.
Inside, Deputy Vass found
opened dresser drawers in the
bedrooms. Electronic devices
- TV, VCR, DVD player - were
not disturbed.
A cigarette butt at the scene
was collected by the crime


scene investigator, Deputy
Melissa Harris.
The homeowner was con-
tacted and said she had last
been in the home on April
30.
The case remains open.
The Wakulla County Sher-
iff's Office received 888 calls
for service during the past
week.
Note to our readers: The
people who are reported as
charged with crimes in this
column have not yet been to
trial and are therefore pre-
sumed innocent until proven
guilty.


Park plans eyed
The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection, Divi-
sion of Recreation and Parks
invites the public to a public
meeting.
The meeting will be held on
Thursday, June 12 at 7 p.m. in
the Sopchoppy City Hall, 100
Municipal Avenue.
The meeting will involve
the presentation and discus-
sion of the proposed manage-
ment plan for Ochlockonee
River State Park. A copy of
the management plan will be
available at the park for review.
Electronic versions of the plan
are available upon request by
e-mailing: BryAnn White at Bry-
Anne.White@dep.state.fl.us.
A copy of the agenda may
be obtained by contacting
Kevin Patton, Park Manager at
962-2771. You may also contact
Patton for more information by
e-mail at Kevin.Patton@dep.
state.fl.us.


Teenager dies in Leon car crash


On Wednesday May 21, at ap-
proximately 3 a.m., Leon County
Sheriff's Office deputies respond-
ed to a single vehicle crash near
the intersection of Tram Road
and Four Oaks Boulevard.
During the initial crash in-
vestigation, deputies found the
driver, Joseph Castro, 15, of
Crawfordville, injured but able
to stand and talk, according to
Public Information Officer Sgt.
Tony Drzewiecki.
The on-scene crash investiga-
tion revealed Castro was travel-
ing west on Tram Road when
he collided with the eastbound
shoulder of the road, causing his
vehicle to flip over. Due to his
injuries, Leon County Emergency
Medical Services responded


to the scene and transported
Castro to Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital. No passengers were in
the vehicle with Castro.
On May 22, Castro died at
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital.
Leon County Sheriff's Office


Traffic Homicide Investigators
have been assigned to investi-
gate the cause of the crash and
an autopsy will be conducted to
determine the cause of death,
law enforcement officials con-
cluded.


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.-- PROPERTIE
PROPERTIES


Here's your chance to participate in 1!t Wakulla ttrsu Readers' Choice Con

e Wakulla t seWs is asking you, our readers, to participate

in the Readers' Choice Contest to find out Wakulla County's favorites!

Tell us your favorites for your "Readers' Choice" by filling out the official entry ballot in this ad. As a thank you, we will enter


all qualified ballots in a random drawing for $100 in Cash.


One entry per person. Please follow these guidelines:


All ballots should be clearly printed. The business name must be clear
Your nominations must fit the appropriate category. Use the official e


ly dental
entry bal


test!










lled.
llot.


I~~N~~ews


All ballots must be received at The Wakulla News office by 4:00 p.m., June 30, 2008.
Ballots may be mailed to: The Wakulla News, P. 0. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326, or you
may drop off the ballot at The Wakulla News office at 3119-A Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville.

Send your nominations today. Then watch for results in the July 24th


2008 edition of The Wakulla ietIWO!


II


Reader's Choice Categories:
Animal Care: Miscellaneous: *MN $10
Pet Care, Childcare
Grooming & Supplies Clothing and Gifts Setrd.
Storage Centers Mail your official entry form and Submit y comp ntry
Automotive: Dance Studio completed ballot to: entered in the drawing to 100 inCash
Auto Engine Repair Photographer
Auto Body Shops Hotel
Used Car Dealer _Hardware T__e Walkula ebtS
c/o Readers' Choice Contest
Financial Services: Personal Services: P. . Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326
Bank Barber Shop
Credit Union Hair Salon
Mortgage Company Nail Care _ OR drop it off at The Wakulla News office: 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville.
Tanning
Food and Beverage Name Address
Liquor Store Professional Services:
Grocery Accountant
Ice Cream/Snacks Attorney City State Zip
Bakery Doctor
Dentist
Health and Fitness DentistPhone Email Age
Gym Recreation:
Massage Therapist Marina Are you a current subscriber to The Wakulla News? Yes No
Chiropractor Fishing Charter
Fitness Instructor/Trainer Bait & Tackle *Entries must be handwritten on official entry ballot from The Wakulla News.
Boat and Sorry, no computer generated ballots, mechanical reproductions, photocopies, carbon copies,
Homes and Land Motor Repair illegible entries or ballots with answers that are not true and/or relevant will be accepted.
Builder Canoe/Kayak Rental *At least 25% of the categories must be filled out.
Real Estate Company Scuba *Only one entry per person. Ballots not meeting these requirements will be voided.
Title Company *All ballots must be received by The Wakulla News by 4:00 p.m. on June 30, 2008. Send entire ballot to The
Surveyor Restaurant: Wakulla News "Readers' Choice Contest", P. 0. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326
Lawn Care/Landscaping Atmosphere or bring it to our office at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville. (No purchase required.)
Lawn Care/Landscaping Atmosphere Winning entry will be drawn by a representative of The Wakulla News.
Nursery/Garden Center Breakfast *All entrants agree to publication of their name, home town, and photograph without additional compensation.
Flooring Lunch Announcement of the winner will appear in the "Readers' Choice"
Plumbing Dinner ,special section to be published in the July 24'" edition of The Wakulla News.
Electrician Service *_ Employees of The Wakulla News and their families are not eligible to win. Not intended for residents of states
A/C-Heating Entertainment where prohibited by law. Winner must be 18 years of age or older.
Painter *All ballots that do not meet this criteria will not be counted.
Tree Service Use the area beside
Pool Care- each category to list THIS AD IS YOUR OFFICIAL BALLOT & ENTRY FORM.
Home Cleaning Service _your favorite business. Please complete and return to The Wakulla News by 4:00 p.m. June 30, 2008.


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Land & A
Wakulla Gardens Lots s
5 Acres, Arianna Cove
4 Acres, Running Deer
Lots on Buckhorn Cre
4.5 Acres, North Waki
20 Acres on Bob Mille
28 Acres on Bob Mille
48 Acres on Bob Mille
Wakulla Riv
1.58 acres with fishing


III


III


II1


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Page 10A - THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2008


Outdoors


Children will have a chance to learn about the sport of fishing


Teaching kids a lifelong
hobby and appreciation for
our marine environment, as
well as providing a fun family
outing are the goals for the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission's (FWC)
Kids' Fishing Clinic.
The FWC, the St. Marks Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge, Wakulla
County, St. Marks Refuge As-


sociation and the Sport Fish
Restoration Program will host
a free Kids' Fishing Clinic for
children between the ages. of
4 and 15 on Saturday, May 31.
Registration will begin at 11
a.m. and close at 2 p.m. The
clinic will be held at Woolley
Park in Panacea.
The free clinic enables
young people to learn the


basics of environmental stew-
ardship, fishing ethics, angling
skills and safety. In addition,
environmental exhibits will
offer participants a unique
chance to experience Florida's
marine life firsthand. Kids'
Fishing Clinics have several
goals, but the main objective
is to create responsible marine
resource stewards by teaching


children about the vulnerabil-
ity of Florida's marine ecosys-
tems. In addition, organizers
hope to teach fundamental
saltwater fishing skills and
provide participants a positive
fishing experience.
Fishing equipment and bait
will be provided for kids to use
during the clinic, but organiz-
ers encourage children who


own fishing tackle to bring it.
A limited number of rods and
reels will be given away to
participants upon completion
of the clinic.
If conditions allow, kids
will have the opportunity to
practice their new skills and
fish from the pier. This event
is a catch-and-release activity,
and all children must be ac-


companies by an adult.
Individuals or companies
interested in helping sponsor
this event or volunteer at the
clinic should contact Lori Nich-
olson with the USFWS at (850)
925-6121 or the FWC's Gus
Cancro at (850) 488-6058. To
find out more on taking a kid
fishing, go to www.MyFWC.
com/Marine/FishingClinics.


Prepare for hurricane season with plan


By SHERIFF DAVID HARVEY
and SCOTT NELSON
Wakulla County EOC
As we enter what is fore-
casted to be another active
hurricane season, it is im-
portant for every resident to
prepare for the potential of a
land-falling hurricane. It is im-
portant to note that Wakulla
County has the highest storm
surge in the nation. This was
underscored by Tropical Storm
Dennis, which made landfall
150 miles to our west. Even
though Dennis made land-
fall in the same general area
as Hurricane Ivan, it caused
more than 10-feet of storm
surge locally, damaging and
destroying several coastal
homes. Wakulla County has
an extended coastal shelf that
allows water to pile up and
move inland. Our entire coun-
ty falls within the surge zone
for category 4 and 5 storms.
Surge is not the only danger
that we face from hurricanes.
Hurricanes spawn tornadoes,


cause flooding, and produce
high sustained winds, all of
which are deadly.
We encourage each of you
to develop specific family di-
saster preparedness plans for a
response to hurricanes. If you
have access to the Internet,
you may go to http://www.
floridadisaster.org/ and after
answering a few questions you
will have a completed plan.
Some decisions that you will
have to make are should I go
or should I stay. Those house-
holds that fall within coastal
areas (south of 98 or 319) and
in low lying areas prone to
coastal flooding along the St.
Marks, Wakulla, Sopchoppy,
and Ochlocknee rivers will be
under a mandatory evacuation
for any land-falling tropical
storm or category one storm.
Individuals living in manufac-
tured homes will be ordered
to evacuate as well. For larger
hurricane events, the storm
surge potential may require
a countywide evacuation. We


Kerryn Seward and Larry Harmon of Millcreek Plantation in
Thomasville , Ga. were guests of Alan Lamarche on a recent
Spanish mackerel fishing trip out of Shell Point.
A 58 pound cobia ate Karryn's live shrimp intended for a
mackerel. Following an intense 30 minute battle, the big Cobia
was brought to gaff.
was brought to gaff.


encourage you to pay close
attention to mandatory evacu-
ation orders. When the order
is issued, it is time to leave,
not time to pack. The order
is given in time to clear the
region of traffic prior to an
event. If you wait until the last
minute the likelihood of being
caught in traffic for extended
periods of time is high.
Before a hurricane, you
should develop your plan,
know your need'to evacuate,
consider your need to regis-
ter for special needs shelter
(residents with special medi-
cal needs), fill your bathtub
with water, fill containers
with water (one-gallon per
day per person and pet), fill
your vehicle gas fank, acquire
cash, and develop your disas-
ter supply kit. It is important
that you prepare to be self
sufficient for a minimum of 72
hours. Your disaster kit should
include all the essentials
for you and your family and
pets for this period of time,


including medication. For
more information on devel-
oping your kit and Hurricane
Preparedness you can get a
copy of the Hurricane Survival
Guide from the Sheriff's Office
or from our web site at www.
wcso.org.
The Wakulla County Sher-
iff's Office, county and volun-
teer fire departments, EMS,
Public Works and other sup-
port and response agencies
are continually preparing to
support your needs in re-
sponse to disasters and will
be available during and after
disasters. However, it is impor-
tant that every citizen prepare
to meet their needs in the first
few days after major events,
We hope to have another
uneventful hurricane season,
but with hurricanes, it is not
if, but when one will make
landfall in our area. If you
have any questions or need
assistance, please feel free to
contact us at 850.926.0800.


Horse camp is offered


This summer, Circle C Ranch
will be offering a weekly horse
camp for boys and girls ages 6
to 14. "Camp Catch-a-Dream"
is available to both beginners
and intermediate riders. The
camp hours are from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m., Monday through
Friday, with special arrange-
ments available for before and
after camp hours.
The. camp is $225 per week,
with family and multiple week
discounts. It will include basic
horsemanship and riding
skills, grooming and care of
horses, crafts, games, and
more. Also available is individ-
ual and group lessons, pony
parties, and trail rides.
Nancy Culp, owner, is cer-
tified in equine assisted phi-

Springs event
Wakulla Springs State Park
will host an early boat tour on
Saturday, June 7 at 8 a.m. The
cost is $8 for adults and $6
for children. Reservations are
suggested. Visitors will enjoy
the early morning sights and
sounds of the Wakulla River.
For more information, call
926-0700.


losophy and equine assisted
growth and learning. Applica-
tions are available on the web-
site at www.cirdecranch50.org
or by e-mail at cirdecranch50@
yahoo.com. Be sure to ask
about "camperships." For
more information, contact
Nancy Culp at 850-778-6505.


_GIBSON

AUTOMOTIVE

SERVICE
"de.


Project Graduation
John Wilson, chief operating officer of DISC Village, presented
a check for $1,000 to Sheriff David Harvey for this year's Project
Graduation on May 27. This is the 25th year of the event, in
which students are transported to Fun Station in Tallahassee
for an evening of fun and prizes. The contribution was made
on behalf of Big Bend Regional Prevention's "Keep Kids Drug
Free" state-wide campaign. "Every year we raise $3,000 or
$4,000 for (Project Graduation)," said Sheriff Harvey. "This will
be a big shot in the arm."
Red snapper sport season opens
The recreational red snapper rules. The bag limit for sport
fishing season in the Gulf of anglers has been lowered from
Mexico reopened on April 15 four fish daily per person to two
and will remain open until Nov. fish, and the captain and crew
1..There have been significant of for-hire vessels may not keep
changes to Gulf red snapper the recreational bag limit.


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Monday 7:45 - 4:30 * Tuesday & Wednesday 8:15 - 5 * Thursday 8:15 - 3 D.M.D.


I








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2008 - Page 11A


LFSU redit Unio


Gulf Coast Weekly Almanac/


/ ~ Tide charts by
Zihua Software, LLC

St. Marks River Entrance


Date High Low High Low High
Thu 0.9 ft. 3.3 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.9 ft.
May 29, 08 3:34 AM 10:09 AM 4:41 PM 10:54 PM
Fri 1.2 ft. 3.4 ft. 0.5 ft.
May 30, 08 4:35 AM 10:54 AM 5:48 PM
Sat 3.1 ft. 1.4 ft. 3.6 ft. -0.1 ft.
May 31, 08 12:16 AM 5:33 AM 11:37 AM 6:45 PM
Sun 3.3 ft. 1.6 ft. 3.9 ft. -0.6 ft.
Jun 1, 08 1:23 AM 6:26 AM 12:19 PM 7:39 PM
Mon 3.5 ft. 1.8 ft. 4.1 ft. -0.9 ft.
Jun 2, 08 2:20 AM 7:14 AM 1:02 PM 8:30 PM
Tue 3.5 ft. 1.9 ft. 4.3 ft. -1.1 ft.
Jun 3, 08 3:13 AM 8:00 AM 1:47 PM 9:20 PM
Wed 3.5 ft. 1.9 ft. 4.4 ft. -1.1 ft.
Jun 4, 08 4:02 AM 8:43 AM 2:32 PM 10:09 PM


Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 0.6 ft. 2.4 ft. 0.7 ft. 2.2 ft.
May 29, 08 3:45 AM 10:01 AM 4:52 PM 10:46 PM
Fri ' 0.8 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.3 ft.
May 30, 08 4:46 AM 10:46 AM 5:59 PM
Sat 2.3 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.7 ft. -0.1 ft.
May 31, 08 12:08 AM 5:44 AM 11:29 AM 6:56 PM
Sun 2.5 ft.. 1.2 ft. 2.9 ft. -0.4 ft.
Jun 1, 08 1:15 AM 6:37 AM 12:11 PM 7:50 PM
Mon 2.6 ft. 1.3 ft. 3.1 ft. -0.7 ft.
Jun 2, 08 2:12 AM 7:25 AM 12:54 PM 8:41 PM
Tue 2.6 ft. 1.4 ft. 3.2 ft. -0.8 ft.
Jun 3, 08 3:05 AM 8:11 AM 1:39 PM 9:31 PM
Wed 2.6 ft. 1.4 ft. 3.3 ft. -0.8 ft.
Jun 4, 08 3:54 AM 8:54 AM 2:24 PM 10:20 PM_


May 29 - June 4


City of St. Marks


Date High Low High Low High
Thu 0.8 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.7 ft.
May 29, 08 4:38 AM 10:45 AM 5:45 PM 11:30 PM
Fri 1.1 ft. 3.2 ft. 0.4 ft.
May 30, 08 5:39 AM 11:30 AM 6:52 PM
Sat 2.9 ft. 1.3 ft. 3.4 ft. -0.1 ft.
May 31, 08 12:52 AM 6:37 AM 12:13 PM 7:49 PM
Sun 3.1 ft.. 1.5 ft. 3.6 ft. -0.5 ft.
Jun 1, 08 1:59 AM 7:30 AM 12:55 PM 8:43 PM
Mon 3.2 ft. 1.6 ft. 3.8 ft. -0.8 ft.
Jun 2, 08 2:56 AM 8:18 AM 1:38 PM 9:34 PM
Tue 3.3 ft. 1.7 ft. 4.0 ft. , -1.0 ft.
Jun 3, 08 3:49 AM 9:04 AM 2:23 PM 10:24 PM
Wed 3.2 ft. 1.7 ft. 4.1 ft. -1.0 ft.
Jun 4, 08 4:38 AM 9:47 AM 3:08 PM 11:13 PM


St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 0.9 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.3 ft.
May 29, 08 3:13 AM 9:53 AM 4:20 PM 10:38 PM
Fri 1.1 ft. 2.7 ft. 0.5 ft.
May 30, 08 4:14 AM 10:38 AM 5:27 PM
Sat 2.4 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.8 ft. -0.1 ft.
May 31, 08 12:00 AM 5:12 AM 11:21 AM 6:24 PM
Sun 2.6 ft. 1.6 ft. 3.0 ft. -0.6 ft.
Jun 1, 08 1:07 AM 6:05 AM 12:03 PM 7:18 PM
Mon 2.7 ft. 1.7 ft. 3.2 ft. -0.9 ft.
Jun 2, 08 2:04 AM 6:53 AM 12:46 PM 8:09 PM
Tue 2.7 ft. 1.8 ft. 3.3 ft. -1.1 ft.
Jun 3, 08 2:57 AM 7:39 AM 1:31 PM 8:59 PM
Wed 2.7 ft. 1.8 ft. 3.4 ft. -1.0 ft.
Jun4, 08 3:46 AM 8:22 AM 2:16 PM 9:48 PM


Sunrise
Sunset
Moon rise
Moon set
Brightness


850-224-4960 www.fsucu.org

~ MORTGAGES -FREECHECKING ~ AUTOLOANS ~ CREDIT CARDS


For tides at the following points
add to Dog Island Listings: Carrabelle


Apalachicola
Cat Point
Lower Anchorage
West Pass


High Tide
28 Min.
1 Hr., 53 Min.
1 Hr., 13 Min.
1 Hr., 36 Min.
1 Hr., 26 Min.


" Shell Point, Spring Creek

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 0.9 ft. 3.3 ft. 1.1 ft. 2.9 ft.
May 29, 08 3:31 AM 10:06 AM 4:38 PM 10:51 PM
Fri 1.2 ft. 3.5 ft. 0.5 ft.
May 30, 08 4:32 AM 10:51 AM 5:45 PM
Sat 3.2 ft. 1.5 ft. 3.7 ft. -0.1 ft.
May 31, 08 12:13 AM 5:30 AM 11:34 AM 6:42 PM
Sun 3.4 ft. 1.8 ft. 3.9 ft. -0.6 ft.
Jun 1, 08 1:20 AM 6:23 AM 12:16 PM 7:36 PM
Mon 3.5 ft. 1.9 ft. 4.2 ft. -1.0 ft.
Jun 2, 08 2:17 AM 7:11 AM 12:59 PM 8:27 PM
Tue 3.6 ft. 2.0 ft. 4.4 ft. -1.2 ft.
Jun 3, 08 3:10 AM 7:57 AM 1:44 PM 9:17 PM
Wed 3.5 ft. 2.0 ft. 4.5 ft. -1.1ft.
Jun 4, 08 3:59 AM 8:40 AM 2:29 PM 10:06 PM


Dog Island West End

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 0.7 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.7 ft. 1.9 ft.
May 29, 08 2:27 AM 9:52 AM 4:24 PM 10:57 PM
Fri 1.1 ft. 2.7 ft. 0.2 ft.
May 30, 08 3:18 AM 10:14 AM 5:19 PM
Sat 2.1 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.9 ft. -0.2 ft.
May 31, 08 12:53 AM 4:12 AM 10:39 AM 6:10 PM
Sun 2.4 ft. 1.8 ft. 3.0 ft. -0.5 ft.
Jun 1, 08 2:34 AM 5:06 AM 11:08 AM 7:01 PM
Mon 2.6 ft. 2.0 ft. 3.2 ft. -0.7 ft.
Jun 2, 08 3:55 AM 5:58 AM 11:43 AM 7:52 PM
Tue 2.7 ft. 2.1 ft. 3.3 ft. -0.8 ft.
Jun 3, 08 5:01 AM 6:47 AM 12:26 PM 8:44 PM
Wed 2.7 ft. 2.2 ft. 3.4 ft. -0.8 ft.
Jun 4, 08 5:56 AM 7:33 AM 1:16 PM 9:36 PM


On May 1, Yvette Graham
,returned to Shell Point to
spend the summer with us.
She winters in her Lake City
home, but when Spring rolls
around the peaceful lure of
Shell Point catches up with
her and she heads north.
Since her return she has
been one busy gal. In fact, I
think she has been involved
in every activity that Flotilla 13
has participated. I could add
"also the Apalachee Bay Yacht
Club and Seafarers Chapel.
On Saturday, she manned
the radios at the Coast Guard
Auxiliary Station Shell Point.
Although we did not have a
'patrol vessel on duty,
Yvette felt area boaters
deserved an extra pair of
,ears in case they had a real
emergency.
For those on duty Sunday
it was an uneventful day
even though the patrol team
covered the extended patrol
area.
Yvette also reported that
.there were no calls for assis-
tance Flotilla 13's patrol team
was James Taylor as Coxswain
with Glenn Edrington and
Michael Longanecker as his
crew. The patrol vessel was
the Edrington's Amma.
Again, it was Yvette as the
Watchstander. But this time
there was another person in
the radio room, John Sykes
III, our newest member who
showed up unannounced to
start his on-the-job training.
I have a hunch you will
probably be hearing about it
in the months and years to
come.
Actually, everyone on duty
Sunday demonstrated their
dedication to the Coast Guard
Auxiliary.
Of course, Glenn Edrington
went a step further. Besides
being an auxiliarist, he is a
Navy Reservist and was called
to active duty.
But it wasn't long until he
was assigned duty with the
Army working onan Air Force
Base in the Middle East. He
has just returned home.
James Taylor has been an
Auxiliarist since November
1995 and has always been


-iu t R M
-w!� J


926-3425
926-3655


there when asked to do any
auxiliary duty. He ts married
to Edith Edrington Taylor,
brother-in-law to Glenn, and
son-in-law to John Edrington.
The readers are familiar
with the name John Edring-
ton. John was a military man
with hours of search and res-
cue experience as a pilot.
This was such a blessing to
our flotilla when he joined the
Auxiliary. He has proved that
he is a very good Auxiliary
recruiter as his whole family,
except daughter Vicki who
lives out of state, is involved.
John was Flotilla Commander
in 1997 and 1998,and again
in 2006.
Somehow I got sidetracked.
John Edrington was not on
patrol Sunday.
It was Michael Longan-
ecker, our present Flotilla
Commander. He has also
shown his dedication to the
Auxiliary.
He has an extremely de-
manding job, mostly out 'of
town, and when he does get
home he should be resting,
but no, he drives down to
Shell Point to check out the
station and pull whatever
duty that needs to be done.
Monday was celebrated
as Memorial Day. You know
who was sitting there with
the mike in her hand, Yvette
Graham. There doesn't seem
to be anyone available for
patrol.
Unfortunately, your report-
er is suffering from lack of


telephone service, both house
and cell. That does not make
for good news coverage. The
best I can do is to pass on an
e-mail I received from Ron Pi-
asecki, immediate past Flotilla
13 Commander.
The e-mail read, "Just re-
ceived a telephone call from
Jody Campbell notifying me
that someone has stolen 300
gallons of gasoline from two
boats docked in the canal
south of Cedar Island. (Shell
Point) With the price of ma-
rine gas around $4 per gallon
this amounts to $1,200.
"We should all keep watch
on our boats and you may
want to also remove anything
else of value from your boats
docked in our area.
S"Have the sheriff's number
handy and be ready to shine
spotlights on your boats if you
hear any activity. This is also
a good time to watch out for
you neighbors in case some-
one is trying to steal anything
from their boats."
Other e-mails received
shortly after Ron's indicated
there have been thefts of elec-
tronic equipment, too.
Now is definitely the time
to look out for out for our fel-
low boaters.
REMEMBER SAFE BOAT-
ING IS NO ACCIDENT.


Yvette Graham


Fire Rescue Report


The fire rescue service
is one of the most diverse
and challenging professions
known. It is this diversity
that inspires most men and
women to enter the service,
both as volunteer and career
employees. Today's firefighter
is trained to extinguish fires,
provide emergency medical
care, respond to hazardous
materials accidents, natural
disasters and a variety of
other emergency and non-
emergency situations. How-
ever, being a firefighter is not
for everyone It is not for the
meek or timid, or for those
who lose control of their emo-
tions in time of stress.
You need more than a de-
sire to help others. You need
courage and dedication, as-
sertiveness and a willingness
to learn new skills and face
new challenges. It is a job that
will test your diplomacy and
psychological skills, as well as
your ability to size up a situa-
tion and deal with it,
You will experience a wide
range of emotions and re-
sponses and you will be ex-
pected to react to them in a
calm and professional man-
ner. You will be expected to
maintain a positive public
image at all times. You will
have to train constantly to
meet these challenges.
Most volunteer fire depart-
ments throughout Wakulla


County are in serious need of
additional volunteer firefight-
ers. Shortages are particularly
acute at the volunteer fire
departments located at Shell
Point, Ochlockonee Bay and
Medart.
If you are interested in be-
coming a volunteer firefighter
or simply want more informa-
tion about the service, please
contact Chief Honeybone at
519-0567, Lt. Lamarche at 519-
2426 or the volunteer fire chief
near where you live.

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Major
Activity

Minor
Activity


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
7:25am 8:05am 8:50am 9:40am 10:35am 11:35am 12 10am
7:50pm 8:30pm 9:20pm 10:10pm 11:05pm --:--pm 12:45pm
1:25 am 2:05 am 2:45 am 3:35 am 4:25 am 5:20 am 6:25 am
1:35pm 2:20pm 3:00 pm 3:50pm 4:45 pnr 5:45 pm 6:55 pm


Coast Guard

Auxiliary Reports

By Sherrie Alverson


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday
6:37 am 6:36 am 6:36 am 6:36 am 6:36 am 6:35 am
8:32 pm 8:33 pm 8:33 pm 8:34 pm 8:34 pm 8:35 pm
2:39 am 3:10 am 3:44 am 4:22 am 5:08 am 6:02 am
3:06 pm 4:10 pm 5:17 pm 6:29 pm 7:43 pm 8:57 pm
42% 35% 28% 20% 12% 4%


A' Boating Emergencies -'

Coast Guard Station
Panama City ...... .......................................... (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown ..................................................... (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
St. Marks (Flotilla 12) .................... (850) 906-0540
or .................................................. .............. ................. 893-5137
Shell Point (Flotilla 13) ................... (850) 926-2606
or ............................................ ................................. 926-5654


John Sikes


Lawnm Care Service
*FREE Estimates
*Residential
*Commercial . '
*Licensed & Insured

James Payne
850-223-1099
386-804-7716


---
rxi~7


arrie


Low Tide
25 Min.
2 Hrs., 38 Min.
2 Hrs., 31 Min.
2 Hrs., 3 Min.
2 Hrs., 39 Min.







First
June 10






Full
June 18






Last
June 26





0
New
June 3


SWednesday
.6:35 am
8:35 pm
7:06 am
10:03 pm
4%







Page 12A - THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2008


CHAT visits Expo
People who are in the busi-
ness of animal welfare need a
break every so often. Several
CHAT members, at their own
expense, attended the 2008
Humane Society Expo in Or-
lando from May 13 through
May 17. The event was held
within the Disney complex.
Everybody had a great
time. However, it was not all
fun and games. We attended
classes every day and took a
great deal of fresh information
with us. Organizations from
all over the United States, Can-
ada and Europe attended this


Heide Clifton


meeting. Some of the speakers
were part of organizations that
had millions of dollars at their
disposal and we had many
of the humane societies and
shelters that were the size of
our facility with very small
budgets. I must say that we
did not meet any group or


Group hopes to save McLaughlin house


While Murray McLaughlin
was away enjoying his recent
retirement, his family's
historic homestead in Med-
art came within inches of being
demolished. Members of the
Wakulla Heritage Project found
a front end loader parked in
front of the old home and
learned that permits were be-
ing obtained to tear it down.
The developer who owns
the land wants the old house
removed. Swift action by Betty
Green, President of the Wakulla
County Historical Society, Ben
Pingree, County Administra-
tor, Brent Thurmond, Clerk of
Court, and other members of

Happy first
Ic . '
.wk .


the Wakulla Heritage Partner-
ship have given the house a
14-day reprieve.
McLaughlin's homestead is
one of about 20 historic build-
ings that will form the basis
for a Heritage Park in Medart.
The Heritage Park will be lo-
cated, along with an equestrian
center and wildlife facility on
county land that has been set
aside by the county commis-
sion. The historic buildings are
awaiting the park's site plan to
be developed and grant fund-
ing to be obtained before they
can be moved to the Heritage
Park.
Unfortunately, time is run-

birthday
bie Moody of Crawfordville.
Maternal great-grandpar-
ents are Jack and Juanita Yawn
of Tallahassee and Ernest and
Ethleen Waldrop of Pensac-
ola. Paternal great-grandpar-
ents are Franklin and Dorcus
Moody and Ted and Ora Lott,
all of Crawfordville.


L i. " :: , -
^ *.- - -

ning out for the McLaughlin
house. The Wakulla Heritage
Project has 14 days to move
the house. Marshall Spears has
offered use of his property as
a temporary home. Freeman
Pigott is willing to move the
house.
To speed up the move, Jim
Calhoun rolled up his sleeves
and rounded up volunteers.
Nelson Martin, John Roberts,
Phil Pruitt, and Cal Jamison
worked alongside Calhoun
for several days last week.
They removed the home's two
brick chimneys and encircling
wooden porch. They removed
the breezeway connecting the


kitchen to the main house,
separating the two structures
for transport. They also re-
moved a cherry tree and other
landscape obstacles.
The McLaughlin house
was built in the late 1880s by
George Washington Tully who
also built the recently restored
wooden courthouse and the
restored Raker/Hudson house
behind Wakulla Bank. John and
Annie Carraway McLaughlin
bought the house in the early
1900s and raised their fam-
ily there. The house is one of
Wakulla's most historic remain-
ing homes, having played an
important role in the lives of
several well-known families in
the Medart area.
Time will run out on Tues-
day, June 3. Thanks to the work
done by Heritage Project volun-
teers, Freeman Pigott now says
he can move the house within
14 days. Money must be raised
to pay the moving costs so that
another of Wakulla's historic
treasures will not be lost.
To help save the house,
please send a tax-deductible
contribution (in any amount)
to: Wakulla County Historical
Society (to save McLaughlin
House), P.O. Box 151, Craw-
fordville, FL 32326. For more
information, contact Betty
Green at 926-7405 or bgreen@
nettally.com.


Sopchoppy election cancelled


The'City of Sopchoppy
will not hold a city com-
mission election this year
after Eddie Evans and Bob
Greener were the only two
candidates to qualify for
the two open commission
seats. The election would


have been held on June 10
if more than two candidates'
had qualified. Qualification
ended on-May 16.
Next year, seats held by
Martha Evans, Colleen Skip-
per and Richard Harden will
be on the ballot.


VolunteerWakulla

event was successful


individuals we did not relate
to and many of our problems
are the same, no matter how
big or small the organizations
are. Many discussions dealt
with the subject of early ster-
ilization. Dogs and cats can be
spayed/neutered as early as
eight weeks. Some vets think
that it is entirely too early.
In order to receive any grant
money for spay/neuter CHAT
will have to go along with the
concept of early spay/neuter.
The Humane Society of
America served dinners and
lunches that were totally
vegan. There is nothing wrong


with that concept. Now, I have
to confess, that I am not ex-
actly a vegetarian. I could sit
here and write that I enjoyed
every bite of every meal that
week. Oh well, some things
are better unsaid.
The Expo itself had many
new interesting items to look
at, from pet oriented software
systems to coin-operated dog
washes. The 2009 HSUS Expo
will be in Las Vegas.
Watch out for some upcom-
ing news about CHAT and the
shelter. It will be exciting.
Please, spay/neuter your ani-
mals.


54 FWayC :rda135vt the dF
NO LOCAL

JUDGES/.




GROSRW


EllaWren G. Moody
Happy first birthday to
EllaWren Grace Moody on
May 27. She is the daughter
of David and Karen Moody of
Crawfordville.
Maternal grandparents are
Willard and Joyce Waldrop of
Crawfordville. Paternal grand-
parents are Johnny and Deb-


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On Saturday, May 10,
VolunteerWAKULLA held
the First Annual Make A
Difference Day at Hudson
Park featuring simultaneous
community service events.
The event was a success
with a total number of 70
volunteers contributing 210
hours of service. "Volun-
teerism is alive and well in
Wakulla County, without it
we couldn't survive," com-
mented Commissioner Ed-
ward Brimner.
The volunteers landscaped
and cleaned the library and
courthouse grounds, assisted
the Animal Shelter in prepar-
ing pets for adoption, cleaned
and maintained YMCA Camp
Indian Springs, installed fenc-
ing and performed mainte-
nance at Hickory and Azalea
parks, constructed arts and
crafts for the senior citizens,
finished constructing an ac-
cess ramp, worked gardening
vegetables for senior diabet-
ics and served as volunteer
hosts and event coordinators
at Hudson Park.
Make A Difference Day is
the largest national day of
helping others -- a celebra-


tion of neighbors helping,
neighbors, and everyone.
can participate. Volunteer-,
WAKULLA was established
to connect community group ,
needs with volunteers' in-
terests. The Wakulla County
Commission is supportive of
the increased volunteering
activities in the county.
VolunteerWAKULLA would
like to thank the local busi-
nesses and agencies that
contributed to the success
of "Make A Difference Day,"
They include: Ace Hardware,
Ameris Bank, Auto Trim,
Big Bend Health Network,
Frito Lay, Gulf Coast Lumber,
Hamaknocker's, Hardee's,
Lindy's, McDonalds, Myra
Jean's, Pepsi, Premier Auto,.
Red Cross, Sonic, Subway,.
TCC Wakulla, Brent Thur-;
mond, Wakulla Bank, Wal-,
Mart, Winn-Dixie, Wakulla,
Extension, Iris Garden Club,
CHAT, Native Plant Soci--.
ety, sheriff's office, CCOW,
school board, Parks & Recre-
ation, VolunteerLEON, Volun-
teerFLORIDA, Camp Indian.
Springs, Wakulla Library and:
Harvest from the Heart.


i:


r,.




---;1
~3����-�R;�~�







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2008 - Page 13A


Miller
Continued from Page 1A
His first leadership posi-
tion was in the dual role of
WHS Assistant Principal and
Athletic Director from 1980-
1981. Miller taught science
and driver's education, and
coached at Wakulla High
School from 1974 to 1980,
already having taught elemen-
tary school in 1973-1974.
Superintendent Miller's
guidance is valued statewide.
His knowledge of the legisla-
tive process and his advocacy
for small and rural districts
make him a well-respected
state leader. Notes Senator
Al Lawson, "Superintendent
Miller has worked on build-
ing an education system that
is looked at as a model for
many."
He was one of the first
superintendents to embrace
an innovative process, making
Wakulla.County fourth in the
state and 56th in the world
to earn District Accreditation
from the Southern Associa-
tion of Colleges and Schools
in 2006.
As Chairman of the Small
School District Council Con-
sortium, Miller grew its mem-
bership from 22 to 42 districts,
empowering small and rural
districts to collectively unite
as the third largest group after
Dade and Broward counties.
This leadership was noted by
his peers as he was voted the
2004 Florida Superintendent
of the Year from the Florida
Association of District Schools
Superintendents.
Miller's fiscal responsibility
also makes quality education
in Wakulla County a reality.
"Sound financial planning
with an experienced district
staff is enabling us to weather
the next few years of eco-
nomic downturn without as
severe an impact on education
as other counties are experi-
encing," he said.
His researched planning
and responsible use of state
and local funding ensures
that there are no students in
grades K-12 in portables or
overcrowded schools due to
building the new Riversink

St. Marks
Continued from Page 1A
It was the dosing of Posey's
Oyster Bar that marked the
end of an era for the town.
The restaurant, a riverfront
landmark, was a major draw
for tourists and day-trippers
from Tallahassee. But the
building was condemned as
unsafe after suffering struc-
tural damage in the flooding
from Hurricane Dennis in
July 1995.
Recreational boating was
still a draw, and continues to
be, at the local marinas and
with the public boat ramp
that is the closest access to
open water for boaters in Tal-
lahassee.
But, as Bishop noted at a
past meeting, St. Marks is the
only waterfront city in Florida
that has actually lost popula-
tion over the past decades.
The conference center is
intended to draw business
groups, the attraction being
not only the center itself but
the recreational opportunities
- boating, fishing, wildlife
viewing and other eco-tourism
- as well as the small town,
laid back feel of St. Marks and
its history as the second old-
est city in Florida.
Pruitt noted that a recent
Wall Street Journal story
showed that spending for
business conferences totaled
$76 billion last year - an
amount that has increased
every year, even in the eco-
nomic downturn. "We just
want part of that" $76 billion,
Pruitt joked. "Part of a billion
would be just fine for us."
What's envisioned, Pruitt
said, is a conference center
complex and cottages for
guests, with space for perhaps


75 to 100 people. Each confer-
ence traveler typically spends
a $1,000 per person on those,
trips.
The audience watched a
movie on the history of St.
Marks from the 1527 visit of
Spanish explorer Panfilo de
Narvaez, who was attacked


Elementary School. Observes
Miller, "We have a low stu-
dent-teacher ratio and all
students are in a safe learning
environment."
Under Miller's leadership,
Advanced Placement college-
level courses at Wakulla High
School have grown from one
class in 2000 to 11 classes in
2008. Advanced Placement
course offerings range from
English, math, science, and so-
cial studies to art and music.
"I support the hard work of
our teachers and administra-
tors. For example, participa-
tion in Special Olympics has
grown from a few students
to over 70 children over the
past years," he said. "Our pre-
kindergarten program of over
300 students prepares chil-
dren for school by building a
solid educational foundation
for them."
Adds Miller, "The WHS Aca-
demic Brain Bowl team recent-
ly placed first in the state. Our
Career and Technical classes
all have evolved into Bright
Futures Vocational Gold Seal
Scholarship programs leading
to industry certification and
articulated college credits. I
am enthused every day by
exploring limitless possibili-
ties for our children. "
A lifelong resident of
Wakulla County, Miller comes
from a long line of educators
including his grandfather
and his mother. He has
been married to wife Dolores
since 1972. They have three
children: Derek, Danielle and
husband Franci, and Dylan.
Superintendent Miller has a
vested interest in the future
of the Wakulla County school
system with two grandchil-
dren: Dominic, who attends
the Wakulla Education Center
pre-kindergarten program, and
Isabella, age 2.
"I recognize the importance
of all our employees working
as a team to create the best
possible learning environ-
ment for our students. With
experience from the past and
commitment to constant im-
provement, I hope to continue
serving as superintendent of
our high performing school
district," he concluded.

by the Apalachee indians and
whose soldiers built a raft to
escape to Mexico; Hernando
de Soto, who came through
the area searching for gold;
later, the construction of Fort
San Marcos at the confluence
of the St. Marks and Wakulla
rivers to protect the northern
missions; the establishment
of the Panton, Leslie and Co.
store and, later, as John Forbes
& Company, was ceded 1.2 mil-
lion acres of lands from the
indians as repayment of store
debt, land stretching from St.
Marks to Apalachicola; Wil-
liam Augustus Bowles and
the seizure of the fort and
the creation of the State of
Muscogee; the invasion by An-
drew Jackson and the taking
of the fort in an excursion to
quell the cross-border raids by
Florida natives into Georgia,
and the hanging of two British
men as spies: the first railroad
in Florida, the Tallahassee-St,
Marks Railroad; the civil war
and the union blockade of St.
Marks, and the Battle of Natu-
ral Bridge; and, after the civil
war when the fort was used as
a hospital for sailors suffering
from Yellow Fever.
To bring more attention to
the history of St. Marks, the
committee recommended cre-
ating a sister city relationship
with St. Augustine and having
promotional events, such as a
motorcycle ride, between the
two cities.
Audience members ap-
peared overwhelmingly sup-
portive of the whole concept,
though they did express con-
cerns about certain aspects of
the plan - how would the city
handle an increase in treating
sewage effluent? What about
the increase in car traffic?
"Something's going to hap-


pen in downtown St. Marks,"
Bishop assured the crowd,
noting that at the interview
of the consultants, told of the
idea, they reacted by saying,
"Yes, if."
"Consultants have four an-
swers," he explained. "'Yes, if'
- 'Yes, but' - 'No, if - and 'No,
but.' And we got a 'Yes, if.'"


Flagler
Continued from Page 1A
Dr. Proctor, a State Repre-
sentative from St. Augustine,
and Dr. John Bruno, Dean of
the Tallahassee Community
College branch of Flagler
College, donned Miller with
the symbolic doctoral hood
of the college and presented
him with his diploma. Dr.
John Bruno holds a Ph.D. in
Curriculum and Instruction
and has been involved in
teacher training since 1991.
"This is quite an unex-
pected honor," stated Miller.
"Our school system is a big
fan of Flagler College. They
prepare interns well through
their College of Education,
many of whom are products
of the Wakulla County school
system. In fact, several Fla-
gler graduates have been
hired as teachers here."
Proctor served as Presi-


dent of Flagler College in St.
Augustine for 30 years. On
the State Board of Educa-
tion for several years, Proc-
tor developed a relation-
ship with Miller. Proctor
solicited Miller's views on
many educational issues
as Miller is one of the se-
nior superintendent's in the
state, not only of small and
rural districts, but also of
all Florida school districts.
Superintendent Miller said
he values the partnership the
Wakulla School District has
with Flagler College. He has
honed the relationship by
participating with Wakulla
staff and teachers in the an-
nual Flagler College strategic
planning meeting. Miller
delivered the commence-
ment address at Flagler's
May graduation ceremony
and was honored by Flagler's
President William T. Abare,
Ph.D., and Chancellor Wil-
liam L. Proctor, Ph. D.


Taff Mike Harvey, David Harvey,
TaffMark Hudson, Merwyn Jones,
Continued from Page 1A Bobby Porter, Butch Taff, Mike
Roddenberry, Thurmond Rod-
The 1968 players present denberry, Clint Nazworth and
for the ceremony included: David Miller.
Keith Linton, Harvey Stok- District administrator Karen
ley, Mitchell Lawhon, Tyler Wells contributed to this
Gray, Bobby Tully, Scott Gaby, report.





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Page 14A - THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2008


Crum and Cavallaro

will depart WHS

with mixed feelings


James Crum plays keyboard with Gigi Cavallaro


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla High School senior
James Crum and ESE Career
Coach Gigi Cavallaro will both
be leaving WHS this week.
Both student and teacher
have mixed emotions about
the end of their time at the
high school.
Crum, an ESE student, will
graduate and not return for
additional time at WHS. Ca-
vallaro is a victim of the state
budget cuts. Her position is
funded by a grant that was not
funded by the legislature.
Crum's passion is music.
He plays a variety of instru-
ments, sings and writes tunes.
He performs in church and in
the classroom.
Cavallaro said Crum's mu-
sic "tugs at the soul and brings
a tear to your eyes."
His keyboard filled the
classroom with music on a
recent school day, but he also
plays the tuba, bass guitar,


piano, regular guitar and "a
little bit of drums."
He works at The Landing
and assists in the WHS kitch-
en where he is paid for his
work. Crum said he hopes to
go to Tallahassee Community
College and major in music.
His eventual goal is to be a
music teacher.
As a 7-year-old, he was
turned on to music. "I was
just listening to the radio and
I was inspired," said Crum. "I
wanted to play. My grandfa-
ther got me a keyboard and I
started playing."
Cavallaro joked that Crum
"has a huge family" who sup-
port his work. His parents
are Johnny and Lori Crum of
Crawfordville.
As a child, Crum earned
the nickname "Bird" due to
his skinny "bird legs." The
nickname has stuck from his
early childhood,
The 19-year-old has played
baseball at the recreation park


and helped out his sister with
the Wakulla Middle School
Band. He has served as a
teaching assistant at Medart
Elementary School, focusing
on his music.
"My music is really impor-
tant to me," he said. "I want
to go to Nashville and start a
band." Crum's focus is gospel
music.
"We have a very special
friendship," said Cavallaro.
"Any time James comes in the
room he lights it up. He's a
real inspiration to me."
The budget cuts will touch
not only employees like Ca-
vallaro, but the students as
well.
"It's very, very sad to me,"
she said. "I would do it for
free if I could. It means that
much to me." Music therapy
teacher Michelle Snow has
made a great impression on
the students in Sue Belford's
ESE class. Snow won't be re-
turning to her post either, said
Cavallaro.
"Michelle Snow has been
instrumental in the lives of
these students," said Caval-
laro.
Belford's classroom is of-
ten buzzing with activity as
students enjoy the interaction
with Snow as she teaches her
music. The hallways of WHS
masked an odor of a stink-
bomb that had been set off
on a recent May school day.
But Belford's students make
and sell chocolate chip cook-
ies and her classroom had
the sweet smell of chocolate
inside.
Crum said he is excited
about the May 30 commence-
ment exercises.
"I'm just concerned about
the students getting the ser-
vices they need," said Caval-
laro.
For one final day, James
Crum and his classmates will
be members of Belford's Soa-
rining Eagles.


Lighthouse program concludes

Big Bend Maritime lecture series


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Andrew Edel, dressed in a
historically correct lighthouse
keeper's uniform from the
1920s, gave a presentation on
"Lighthouses of the Big Bend"
to cose out the Big Bend Mari-
time Museum's lecture series.


Edel, who works at the St.
Marks National Wildlife Ref-
uge where he is involved in
preservation of the St. Marks
Lighthouse, is also president
of the Tallahassee Historical
Society. He spoke on Thursday,
May 22, at the TCC Wakulla
Center.
He talked about the history
of lighthouses at Dog Island,
Cape San Bias, and Cape St.
George - and especially St.
Marks. Combined with a sub-
sequent lecture on history of
the area, which had to be cut
short because of time, Edel's
program covered the region's
rich history - from the Spanish
conquistadors to the Civil War
and later.
The first lighthouse in the
area was at Fort San Marcos,
where the Spanish constructed
a 75-foot high wooden tower
from which they burned a


torch, reportedly visible from
the Gulf, Edel said.
An interesting visual in
Edel's PowerPoint featured a
overlay of the hurricanes that
have struck the area: a hur-
ricane in 1851 destroyed the
lighthouse at St. George, Dog
Island and Cape San Blas, and
damaged St. Marks - though
it was protected by a 10 foot
high, six feet thick, and 165 foot
long seawall. (That seawall was
likely made from limestone
taken from Fort San Marcos.)
In 1758, during the Spanish
era at the fort, the whole garri-
son of 40 soldiers was drowned
by a 10-foot wave from a hur-
ricane. In an 1837 hurricane,
a 10-foot wave killed eight
people in St. Marks. An 1843
hurricane with a 10-foot surge
wiped out Port Leon, located
between the lighthouse and St.
Marks, though the lighthouse
survived the storm.
The St. Marks Lighthouse
was first built in 1829 by Win-
slow Lewis but was rejected
by St. Marks Custom Collector
Jesse Williams for having hol-
low walls. Calvin Knowlton
was brought in to rebuild the
lighthouse and it was first lit
in 1831.
In the 1840s, the lighthouse
was suffering from erosion and
was subsequently moved to its
present location.
In examining myths about
the lighthouse, Edel noted
that one is that the lighthouse
was located 200 yards out in
Apalachee Bay, which was
then solid land but had been
lost to erosion. There's no evi-
dence of erosion at that point,
Edel said, and discussed the
finding of a human skull sev-
eral years ago, near the current
boat cut, where archaeologists
subsequently found buckshot
and bottles dating from the


1830s. Also found was an
old marker with the letters,
U.S.L.H.E. - United States Light
House Establishment, as the
Lighthouse Service was known
in the 1830s - that Edel said
confirms that that was the area
where the lighthouse was first
located.
Some other legends about
the lighthouse included that
Confederates had buried the
lenses in the swamp to keep
the Union blockade ships
from using the light. Edel said
that historic evidence shows
only that Daniel Ladd and his
ship Spray were contracted
to remove the lenses and
transport them to a St. Marks
warehouse. Whether the lenses
continued to be stored there or
were actually buried is unclear,
Edel said. :
Equally unclear is another
story that the Confederate
forces had tried to blow up
the lighthouse to keep it from
falling to the Union. The only
evidence of that, Edel said, is a
single line written in the light-
house log years after the war.
Confederates claimed that the
lighthouse was damaged by
Union forces shelling a rebel
battery, which had been firing
on the blockaders. Whatever
the cause of the damage, the
lighthouse had to be sibstan-
tially rebuilt after the war.
Edel also talked about the
lighthouse keepers and their
families.
The St. Marks Lighthouse
was automated in 1960. The
U.S. Coast Guard, which took
over lighthouses in 1939, has
agreed to turn over the light-
house to the U.S. Fish and Wild-
life Service, which oversees the
refuge, and Edel said he's hope
ful that the deed will actuallP
be transferred this year. '.'


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2008
Section B



(Vakulla CountU Senior Citizens Celebrate Life


It has been a wonderful
learning experience during
my tenure working with the
senior citizens of Wakulla
County. First and foremost,
their most pressing need is so-
cial interaction. I have learned
so much about the negative
influences of isolation and
loneliness. Our senior center
continues to provide more
and more services. But pro-
viding them with a place for
seniors to meet and share life
with each other is the most
valuable service we provide. In
our recent celebration of Cinco
de Mayo, their response to the
Mariachi Band surprised all
of us. It was a new learning
experience that brightened
their lives. Mother's Day cel-
ebration brought out the kind,
friendly feelings that touches
every heart. Wal-Mart donated
a large supply of orchids that
enabled the seniors to make
corsages for every mother.


From offices of R.H. Carter,
Executive Director,
Wakulla County Senior
Citizens Council, Inc. and
Joan E. Smith, PR writer for
the Senior Center.
The City of St. Marks has
begun an initiative to plan
and design their community
in order to meet their needs
and desires. As a Community
Redevelopment Agency, they


will determine the kinds of
businesses that will come and
how they will be constructed.
They are embracing the con-
cepts of building green. I've
had the opportunity to discuss
"communities for a lifetime"
with some of their planning
committee and they are very
interested in making their
community senior friendly. I
seek opportunities to promote
senior friendly communities.
Every action that enhances
this concept and brings im-
proved lifestyles to the entire
community is positive.
The Wakulla News has
helped us tremendously by
publishing information on se-
nior living in Wakulla County.
Our county continues to im-
prove our living environment
for our older population. We
are indebted to everyone who
helps promote this cause.


4/fw

-f'


Mariachi band entertains at senior center for Cinco de Mayo

Caring Today Magazine, Home Instead

Announce Caregiver Essay Contest
The Home Instead.Senior Care office serving Leon, Gadsden and Wakulla counties has
announced Caring Today magazine's third annual "Give a Caregiver a Break" essay contest to
honor family caregivers for their tireless service and dedication. The contest is sponsored by
Home Instead Senior Care and will award $16,000 in free caregiving services to the winning
essay writers,
In 500 words or less, non-professional family caregivers can relate their caregiving experi-
ences, including the challenges they've faced, how they've embraced their role as a caregiver for
a senior loved one and inspired others, all demonstrating how a Home Instead CAREGiverSM
could make a difference. Entries can be submitted until a deadline of July 16. Typed entries
may be submitted online at www.caringtoday.com/hicontest or by mail to Caring Today, 34
Sherman Court, Fairfield, CT 06824. Complete rules can be found in the May/June issue of
Caring Today or online at www.caringtoday.com or www.homeinstead.com.
The grand Prize is $5,000 of free care from Home Instead Senior Care, the world's largest
provider of non-medical companionship and home care for seniors.

Contract Bridge is offered


The game of Bridge is played
with 52 cards (1 deck) divided
equally among four (4) people.
These four players partner off
to form two teams. The four
players sit around a table with
partners opposite one another.
The compass directions are
often used to refer to the four
players, aligned with their seat-
ing patters: South and North
form one partnership and East
and West form the other.
Much of bridge's popularity
owes to the possibility that it
can be played in tournaments.


Competitions in duplicate
bridge range from everyday
ones in numerous small dubs
to World Championships and
Olympiads. Bridge is also
gaining in popularity amongst
school age children.
Contract Bridge is also re-
ferred to as duplicate because
the. same bridge hand (arrange-
ment of cards) is duplicated
at most of the tables playing.
This allows a fair comparison
of playing skill and reduces
"luck of the cards". In this way,
every hand, whether good or


bad, is played in competition
with others playing the identi-
cal cards, and the element of
skill is heightened while that
of chance is reduced.
The local Crawfordville Con-
tract Bridge group has a lot of
fun and they sincerely invite all
interested persons to come to
their next meeting. For more
information please contact
Shirley Anne at 926-1637. The
Contract Bridge group meets
every Monday, 1:00 P.M., at
the Wakulla County Senior
Citizens Center.


Senior citizens get exercise dancing and have fun at the same time

Mothers share their wisdom

during their special time


Golden Wisdom From
Mother's to Mother's
Wakulla County Senior
Center Mothers born in the
years of 1910 to 1949
Note: Women's Rights rec-
ognized: First, Women voted
in 1920
Billie Stradleigh, mother of
two: encourages mothers to
love your children and take
good care of them.
Fran Botkin, mother of five:
although she admits it has
been a long time, she sug-
gested, "Don't make the same
mistakes my generation made.
Maybe we tried too hard to
please everybody. Your work
is cut out for you - but just
remember to be patient."
Dee Goffinet, mother of
three: Know your friends, re-
member, you will be judged by
the people you associate with,
so, don't drink or be around
drinkers.
Jerylene Howard, mother of
four; reveals five things chil-
dren need to know: children
need boundaries; money man-
agement - If you don't have
the money then don't go into
the stores; anger management
- before getting into a fuss,
choose to walk away; caution:
boys who consistently hang
around girls usually come to
no good; and disobeying par-
ents can result in life changing
consequences.
Pearl Kempton, mother of
one: mothers guard your time.
In my day it was important for
mothers to be with their chil-
dren. Although, it was hard
at the time. I quit a real good
job so I could stay home and
raise my son. I never regretted
that decision. Spend quality
time with your young ones.
Put your warm arms around
them and love them. Another
important thing to do: go to
church and Sunday School
with your children.
Dottie Dubisky, mother
of five: wisely advises young
mothers to take time for their
own health needs. Stay away


Planning for a strong, healthy and


supportive
The involvement of older
adults is vital for any com-
munity to thrive and prosper.
Florida isn't the only state to
take notice of older adults' pow-
erful contributions; cities across
the nation are celebrating Older
Americans Month as well
Every May, the Administra-
tion on Aging proclaims Older
American Month to honor old-
er adults and the professionals,
family members and citizens
who care for them. This year's
theme is "Working Together for
Strong, Healthy and Supportive
Communities." This theme ad-
dresses the opportunities we
have to create better care and
reinforce healthier societies for
all ages.
Often agencies attempt to
build a better environment
by starting from the top and
finishing with the bottom.
However, anyone who has ever


local community


E. Douglas Beach
Secretary,
Florida Department
of Elder Affairs
worked in the construction
field knows that it is impossible
to build a house starting with
the top brick of the chimney.
At the Department of-Elder
Affairs, we are committed to


constructing a rich and vibrant
society starting with a strong
foundation: seniors.
Our goal is not to simply
help seniors age in place, but
rather to construct an envi-
ronment where seniors can
enjoy Florida's unparalleled
amenities. That is why we have
been partnering with AARP to
expand our Communities for a
Lifetime initiative. This initia-
tive empowers local leaders to
improve their communities for
residents of all ages.
I realize that the department
cannot complete this mission
without the participation of
older Floridians. Therefore, I en-
courage you to continue giving
of your time and talents each
day to make Florida's communi-
ties stronger. With a growing
population of involved and en-
ergetic seniors, Florida's future
is looking even brighter.


It's OuIr oriy gme


from drinking. Never abuse
your children. Fathers are
encouraged to provide for
their families and be kind
and loving to their children
and their mother. The most
important thing: parents show
your children how much you
love them.
Lillian Neeley, mother of
eight: remembers the impor-
tance of praying a lot and
the importance of using a lot
of patience while raising her
children.
Betty Robertson, mother
of eight: humorously advised,
don't have kids. Seriously,
children need to know their
momma is always there for
them, but they also need to
understand that a mother has
her limits, too. Teach respect
and give respect. Some call it
tough love.
Lily Muse, mother of three:
admits motherhood takes a
lot of love. Plus, the occasional
use of a stern discipline belt
helps to raise strong and
healthy children. Teach them
good moral values. Show
them by respecting others and
they will respect themselves.
Provide them with a good
education,
Mary Randolph, mother
of seven: teach children right
from wrong and pray a lot.
Floria Mathis, mother of
five: motherhood is our gift
from God. It is a joy to be a
mother. Wisdom teaches that
every penny you don't spend
is one that you don't have to
earn.
Esther Pelt, mother of
three: listen to your children.
Let them know you really care.
Be active with what is going
on in their lives. Tell them
how special they are and how
much you love them.
Pat Allen, mother of two:


Fran Botkin
being a mother is the great-
est joy in my life. I remember
my mother told me, "Start out
the way you can hold out." In
other words, start out by rais-
ing your children in a Godly
home and they will rise up to
honor you and you'll both be
able to hold out during the
growing years.
Rebecca Addison, mother
of six, mothers, just give your
children plenty of love.
Marjorie McPherson, moth-
er of two: suggested that
young married couples not
wait too long to have chil-
dren because grandma's want
grandchildren before they get
too old to enjoy them.
'Elouise Manning, mother
of one: develop healthy habits
and don't smoke.
Jeannette Dirk, mother
of six: tenderly recommends
mothers to choose their bat-
tles carefully and to get plenty
of rest. Sleep when the babies
sleep.
Closing remarks by Betty's
husband, Robert "Bob" Rob-
ertson: "Life is like a wagon
wheel. It goes around and
around. There is nothing new
under the sun so have fun
and enjoy life. But remember
at the end, we'll all answer to
our Heavenly Father."


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VOTE '08

SHERIDA CRUM
Supervisor of Elections
WAKULLA COUNTY
850-926-7575
Email: scrum@wakullaelection.com
Website: www.wakullaelection.com
Early Voting begins 2 weeks prior to each election, please contact tre office for Ioctiorrs.
REGISTRATION CLOSES 29 DAYS BEFORE EACH ELECTION.
PHOTO & SIGNATURE ID REQUIRED AT POLLS. (101.043 .S.)


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Page 2B - THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2008


School


FCAT reading scores rank

Wakulla third graders at the top


cNDAW _e 5MAY 2

Pay to Uie
(Aker of Ally

United States Navy Xzid ----Dolars

r � , Cm-ROICS4An A,.cr -


Wakulla County third grade students
topped the State of Florida on Florida Com-
prehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) Reading
for 2007-2008.
"This ranking reinforces the hard work we
know the teachers and students are doing in
the classroom every day," said Superintendent
David Miller. "I am elated that everyone in
our school system unites in the common goal
of raising expectations for our students and
it shows."
Wakulla had a 338 point average score com-
pared to the state's average for FCAT Reading
of 313. Eighty-six percent of Wakulla's third
graders scored on or above grade level, as
compared with the state at 72 percent.
In FCAT Math, Wakulla third graders ranked
sixth in the state at 351 points, with the state
average at 333. Eighty-eight percent scored at


or above grade level, as compared to the state
at 76 percent. Wakulla ranked second in math
for students at or above grade level.
Third grade reading and math FCAT scores
are released before the rest of the grade levels'
scores. Third grade is the only year for Florida's
mandatory retention of students who score a
Level 1 in reading on a scale of 1 to 5.
A third grade Summer Reading Camp will
be offered for students who scored a Level 1
beginning June 11. Parents will be notified
soon if their child needs to attend, district
administrators said. Students will have a
chance to retest at the end of the Summer
Reading Camp to qualify for promotion to
fourth grade.
Only Calhoun County scored higher than
Wakulla County in math from the Big Bend
region.


Captain Huddleston, David Miller, Rochelle Bennett, Lt. Mike Stewart

Bennett accepts scholarship


to attend The Citadel


Wakulla High School senior
Rochelle Bennett received ap-
proximately $290,000 in schol-
arships Thursday, May 15. She
did not accept the U.S. Army
offer, but chose the U.S. Navy.
Her actual scholarship mon-
etary total is approximately
$200,000.
She also received a Wakulla
Boosters Headstart Schol-


arship in middle school,
Comcast Cable "Leaders and
Achievers Scholarship," and
the "NJROTC Scholarship."
Bennett was presented a
check for $180,000 by Capt.
Ron Huddelston, Wakulla
School Superintendent David
Miller and Lt. Mike Stewart at
the annual NJROTC Awards
Ceremony. The check repre-


sented her four year Navy
Academic Scholarship.
Bennett is going to attend
The Citadel (Military College
of the South) in Charleston
S.C. She is planning to major
in Chinese and looking for-
ward to a career in the Navy as
an Intelligence Officer.


FCAT scores available online


The Department of Educa-
tion has developed a website,
www.fcatparentnetwork.com,
which allows parents to ac-
cess their child's FCAT scores
online. FCAT Parent Network
letters were sent home with
progress reports in April. This
letter provides parents with
the log-in and password neces-
sary to view their child's FCAT
scores. Contact your child's
school if you did not receive a
FCAT Parent Network letter.
Fourth, eighth, and tenth
grade FCAT Writing+ scores


and FCAT Retake scores are
currently available on the web
site. Third grade scores are
expected to be posted during
the week of May 26.
Parents will receive kinder-
garten, first, and second grade
Stanford 10 scores, fourth
grade FCAT Writing+ scores,
and third grade FCAT scores
with final report cards. Eighth
and tenth grade FCAT Writ-
ing+ scores will be sent home
with students on May 22.
'the Department of Educa-
tion will not send the district


fourth through tenth grade
FCAT scores, and eleventh
grade science scores until after
school is out. However, par-
ents may access their child's
scores on the FCAT Parent
Network web site during the
week of June 9. FCAT scores
will be sent home with stu-
dents when they return to
school on August 18.
If you would like to pick
up a copy of your child's test
scores prior to August 18,
contact his/her school after
June 16.


Butler awarded National Merit

Scholarship to Sewanee


Elizabeth D. "Lizzie" Butler
of Carrabelle and Wakulla
High School received the Na-
tional Merit University of the
South Scholarship to attend
college and pursue a career
in engineering.
The University of the
South in Sewanee, Tennes-
see, is owned by the Episco-
pal Church. Its Liberal Arts
College of 1,000 men and
women, School of Theology,
and Sewanee Academy are lo-
cated on a 10,000 acre domain
on the Cumberland Plateau.
It participates in the 3-2 plan
with leading engineering
schools, and has a notable
record of entrance of gradu-


Students a
By KEITH CLINE
WHS Correspondent
Seven Wakulla High
School students with dis-
abilities partied like rock
stars on Friday, May 9, at the
University Center in Doak
Campbell Stadium.
Ashley Hummel, Lacey
Buckridge, Michael Cozzy,
Kyle Smith, Anthony Lind-
sey and Chris Reeves were
surprised by Symantha
Buckridge when she pro-
vided the group with a
limousine ride to the WHS
Junior/Senior prom. James
Crum met the students at
the event.
According to Lacey Buck-
ridge, "Riding in the limo
was awesome. The seats
were really comfortable!" It
was the first prom for every-


ates into graduate school.
The university is a member of
the College Athletic Confer-
ence where Butler hopes to
play soccer.
More than 2,800 winners
of National Merit Scholar-
ships financed by colleges
and universities were an-
nounced last week by Na-
tional Merit Scholarship Cor-
poration (NMSC). Officials of
each sponsor college selected
their scholarship winners
from among Finalists in the
2008 National Merit Scholar-
ship Program who plan to at-
tend their institution. These
awards provide between $500
and $2,000 annually for up


to four years of undergradu-
ate study at the institution
financing the scholarship.
Another group of scholars
will be announced in July,
bringing the total number
of college-sponsored Merit
Scholarship recipients in the
2008 competition to about
4,600. This year 194 higher
education institutions are
underwriting Merit Scholar-
ship awards through the Na-
tional Merit Program. Spon-
sor colleges and universities
include 115 private and 79
public institutions located in
43 states and the District of
Columbia.


lanced the night away
one except Michael Cozzy their legs cried "uncle." By
who had attended two oth- Monday, the juniors and
ers. When they arrived at seniors had recovered from
the prom they danced until the night of their lives.


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The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisement.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience.


Jeffery Barnes, Jonathan Chunn, Ashlan Eddy, Joseph Briggs and Mitchell Darnell

Duke honors the Best, Brightest


county middle school students


Wakulla County seventh
grade students were recog-
nized at the Duke University's
Talent Identification Program
(TIP), state ceremony May
15.
From Riversprings Middle
School were: Joey Briggs,
Jonathan Chunn, Ashlan Eddy
and Jessica Trombini. From
Wakulla Middle School were:
Jeffery Barnes, Mitchell Dar-
nell, and Anthony Tyner.
Each year, Duke Universi-
ty's TIP program invites the
best and brightest seventh
grade students to take the
ACT or SAT along with college
bound high school students.
Seventh grade students
who meet Duke TIP program's
challenging criteria are recog-


nized for their high scores on
these tests.
This year more than 66,000
seventh graders in the Duke
TIP 16 state region tested.
The students selected are
in the prestigious group of
the top four percent of Florida
seventh graders with the
highest scores and were in-
vited to the Duke TIP, 28th
Annual Seventh Grade Talent
Search, Florida Recognition
Ceremony at the Stephen C.
O'Connell Center Arena, at
The University of Florida in
Gainesville.
The middle school stu-
dents included: Jeffery D.
Barnes, Jonathan A. Chunn,
Ashlan P. Eddy, Joseph P.
Briggs and Mitchell L. Darnell.


Unable to attend the picture
taking were Jessica Trombini
and Anthony Tyner.

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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2008 - Page 3B


Deadline


Monday


..CLASilfiED
926-27102


35 Cents

Per Word



ADi $8.00
Minimum


Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


CATEGORIES
100 EMPLOYMENT
105 Business Opportunities
110 Help Wanted
115 Work Wanted
120 Services and Businesses
125 Schools and Instruction
130 Entertainment
200 ITEMS FOR SALE
205 Antiques
210 Auctions
215 Auto Parts and Accessories
220 Cars
225 Trucks
230 Motor Homes and Campers
235 Motorcycles and 4-Wheelers
240 Boats and Motors
245 Personal Watercraft ,
250 Sporting Goods
255 Guns
260 Business Equipment
265 Computers and Internet
270 Electronics
275 Home Furnishings


280 Home Appliances
285 Jewelry
290 Musical Instruments
295 Building Materials
300 MISC. FOR SALE
305 Machinery, Tools & Equipment '
310 Firewood Products
315 Farm & Garden Equipment '
320 Farm Products & Produce _ .
325 Horses
330 Livestock, Farm Animals
335 Pets
340 Plants
345 Swap, Barter, Trade
350 Wanted to Buy ., c.a.ESAL
355 Yard Sales
400 NOTICES ' A
410 Free Items WrGALE
415 Announcements
420 Card of Thanks
425 Occasion Cards
430 In Memoriam
435 Lost and Found
440 Personals and Notices


500 REAL ESTATE, HOMES, MOBILES
505 Acreage for Lease
510 Acreage for Sale
515 Apartments for Rent
520 Townhouses for Rent
525 Townhouses for Sale
530 Commercial Property for Rent
535 Commercial Property for Sale
540 Farms for Sale
545 Homes for Sale
550 Homes with Acreage for Sale
555 Houses for Rent
560 Land for Sale
565 Mobile Homes for Rent I.i I
570 Mobile Homes for Sale
575 Mobile Homes with Land for Sale
580 Rooms for Rent/Roommates Wanted
585 Wanted to Rent
590 Waterfront Homes/Land for Sale
595 Vacation Rental



CALL 926-7102 TODAY
Email: classifieds@thewakullanews.net


Legal Notice


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 07-180-FC
INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES,'
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIEN-
ORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST
BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST RICH-
ARD L. BATEMAN, SR., DECEASED; RICH-
ARD L. BATEMAN, JR.; VICTOR BATEMAN;
CINDY LOU BATEMAN; UNKNOWN PER-
SON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUB-
JECT PROPERTY;
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION
To the following Defendant(s):, ALL UN-
KNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER
PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST RICHARD
L. BATEMAN, SR., DECEASED
(RESIDENCE UNKNOWN)
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for
Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following de-
scribed property:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST COR-
NER OF SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 5
SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN WEST.
ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID
SECTION 11 FOR A DISTANCE OF 363
FEET OT A POINT AND THIS IS THE POINT
OF BEGINNING. FROM.SAID POINT OF BE-
GINNING, THENCE RUN SOUTH PARALLEL
TO THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID
SECTION 11 FOR A DISTANCE OF 600
FEET, THENCE RUN WEST PARALLEL TO
THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SEC-
TION 11 FOR A DISTANCE OF 363 FEET TO
THE EAST BOUNDARY OF A STREET,
THENCE RUN NORTH PARALLEL WITH
THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SIAD SECTION
11 FOR A DISTANCE OF 600 FEET TO THE
SOUTH BOUNDARY OF A STREET,
THENCE RUN EAST ALONG THE NORTH
BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 11 FOR A
DISTANCE OF 363 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. LYING IN THE NORTHEAST
QUARTER OF SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 5'
SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
SUBJECT TO A 16.5 FOOT ACCESS EASE-
MENT ALL THE WAY ACROSS THE SOUTH
AND WEST BOUNDARIES FOR INGRESS
AND EGRESS TO LAND TO THE SOUTH OF
SAID TRACT AND A CURVATURE ON THE
NORTHWEST AND SOUTHWEST COR-
NERS SUFFICIENT, BUT NOT MORE THAN
30 FEET FROM THE MIDDLE POINT OF
SAID STREET, FOR A TURNING RADIUS
FOR SAID INGRESS AND EGRESS EASE-
MENT.
a/k/a 9 STONEY LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE,
FLORIDA 32327
has been filed against you. You are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Kahane & Associates, P.A., Attor-
ney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1815 Griffin
Road, Suite 104, Dania Beach, FLORIDA
33004 within thirty (30) days after the first pub-
lication fo this Notice and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either before service on
the Plaintiffs' attorney or immediately thereaf-
ter; otherwise a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the complaint.
This notice is provided pursuant to Administra-
tive Order No.2.065.
In accordance with the Americans With
Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a dis-
abilities who needs any accommodation in or-
der to participate in this proceeding, you are
entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact the Court Ad-
ministration at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Craw-
fordville, Florida 32327, Phone Nb. (850)
926-0905, within 2 working days of your re-
ceipt of this notice or pleading; If you are hear-
ing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD), if
you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770
(V) (Via Florida Relay Services).
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court
this 19 day 9f May, 2008.
Brent X. Thurmond
As Clerk of Court
By: -s- Teresa Brannan
As Deputy Clerk
May 29, 2008
June 5, 2008
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA

Case No.: 2008 DR 000253
Douglas J. Smith,
Petitioner
and
Brian David Ramatowski
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
FOR STEPPARENT ADOPTION
TO: Brian David Ramatowski
Last Address Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been
filed against you and that you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any,
to it on DOUGLAS J. SMITH, whose address
is 10033 N. Natural Wells Drive, Tallahassee,
FL 32305 on or before May 22, 2008, and file
the original with the clerk of this Court at 301
South Monroe, Tallahassee, FL 32302, be-
fore service on Petitioner or immediately
thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may
be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the petition.

Dated: May 20, 2008

CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: -s- J. Gibson
Deputy Clerk
May 8, 15, 22, 29, 2008
; ' UR NEWSPAPER

: 7 PEOPLE

- SERVING

ii PEOPLE


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 07-145-FC
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE IN SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST
TO BANK ONE AS TRUSTEE IN SUCCES-
SOR IN INTEREST TO BANK ONE AS;
TRUSTEE FOR CREDIT SUISSE FIRST
BOSTON MBS2002-26,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.


II


WAKULLA C
COMMISSION
ROOF REPL
HOUSING DE
The Wakulla
invite bids froi
eral Contracti
Wakulla Cour
for the Buildin
A copy of thi
tainted from t


ANITA BASHORE, ET AL., Recreation De
Crawfordville,
DEFENDANTSS.
Sealed bids v
NOTICE OF ACTION County Comm
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE Crawfordville
32327 or Pos
I: JUANITA BASHORE; UNKNOWN Florida 32326
HOUSE OF JUANITA BASHORE 2:30 p.m. EST
ose residence is unknown If he/she/they be
ng; and if he/she/they be dead, the un- All bidders ar
own defendants who maY be spouses, both building
rs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, County Com
editors, trustees, and all parties claiming an schedule a tir
rest by, through, under or against the De- questions pie
idants, who are not known to be dead or 850-228-9650
ve, and all parties having or claiming to "mailto:John.'
ve any right, title or interest in the property lor@wcprd.co
scribed in the mortgage being foreclosed
rein. A public bid o
of County Cc
)U ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action 3093 Crawfo
foreclose a mortgage on the following prop- Florida 32327
ty: 2008.
T 20, WALKER'S CROSSING, (UNRE- Sealed Bids
)RDED): COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE mailed to:
)NUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST
)RNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER Wakulla
= SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH,
,NGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, Invit
ORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 F
AGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS Craw
EST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF
E SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID Or deliver to:
ACTION 8 A DISTANCE OF 1,040.00 FEET
) THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM 3093
ID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE Crav
)RTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SEC-
IDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTH BOUND-
:Y 480.41 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03
AGREES 14 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST WAKULLA
8.00 FEET TO THE CENTERPOINT OF A RIGHT TO RE
JL-DE-SAC HAVING A RADIUS OF 50.00 CATIONS, TC
)OT RADIUS, THENCE RUN NORTH 73 OR IRREGUI
AGREES 30 MINUTES 1.9 SECONDS TION PROC
ST 471.60 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH CONTRACT
DEGREES 59 MINUTES 04 SECONDS THE COUNTY
ST 163.29 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
NNING. TOGETHER WITH A DOUBLE ROOF REP
DE MOBILE HOME VIN#EJ05834A AND AND H
N#EJ05834B
s been filed against you and you are re- PURPOSE
red to serve a copy of your written de- Wakulla Cour
1ses, if any, to it on DAVID J. STERN, ESQ. placing the ro
intiff's attorney, whose address is 801 S and the Housi
diversity Drive #500, Plantation, FL 33324
later than 30 days from the date of the first BID DEADLII
blication of this notice of action and file the Bids must be
ginal with the clerk of this court either be- June 5, 2008.
e service on Plaintiff's attorney or immedi-
ly thereafter; otherwise a default will be en- SCOPE OF W
ed against you for the relief demanded in The Scope of
Complaint or petition filed herein, foam moisture
boots and ver
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this per colored sl
urt at WAKULLA County, FLorida, this 15TH tern with soffit
y of May, 2008. specifications
of County Cc
ERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT quality.
: -s-Teresa Brannan
PUTY CLERK Questions reg
be addressed
W OFFICES OF DAVID J. STERN or 850-926-72
TORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
0 South Pine Island Road, Suite 400 ROOF SPECI
ANTATION, FL 33324 The installed
ing and constr
ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
TH DISABILITIES ACT, persons with dis- EQUAL OPPi
ilities needing a special accommodation HOUSING, H
would contact COURT ADMINISTRATION, at TION.
e WAKULLA County Courthouse at
0-926-3341, 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or IN TH
100-955-8770, via FLorida Relay Service. WAKU
PM
May 22, 29, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-44-CA
SARA GRAHAM, a married woman,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROY SUMNER, Deceased, his unknown
spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors,
and all others claiming by and through ROY
SUMNER, and OLEN SUMNER, his unknown
spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors,
and all others claiming by and through OLEN
SUMNER,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO DEFENDANT, ROY SUMNER, Deceased,
his unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grant-
ees, creditors, and all others claiming by and
through ROY SUMNER, and OLEN SUMNER,
his unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grant-
ees, creditors, and all others claiming by and
through OLEN SUMNER.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action pursu-
ant to the FLorida Enforcement of Foreign
Judgments Act, Section 55.501, et sea., Flor-
ida Statutes (2007),and rule 1,570(d),
Fla.R.Civ.P., to establish a Foreign'Judgment
of Divorce as a Judgment of the Florida Court,
and pursuant o Sections 65.061 and 95.16,
Florida Statutes (2007, to quiet and confirm ti-
tle of Plaintiff, SARA GRAHAM, in and to
lands located in Wakulla County, Florida:
Lots 1 and 2 in Block 38, Unit III of Wakulla
Gardens, a subdivision of Record on Page 43
of PLat Book 1, of the Public Records of Wa-
kulla County, FLorida
(Parcel Identification No.:
00-00-043-010-09337-000)
has been filed against you. You are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Mary Ellen Davis, the Plaintiffs' at-
torney, whose address is 17 High Drive, Suite
C, Post Office Box 1720, Crawfordville, Florida
32326, on or before June 23, 2008, and file
the original with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on the Plaintiffs' attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint.
DATED ON May 5, 2008.
Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court
By: -s- Teresa Brannan
As Deputy Clerk
May 15, 22, 29, 2008
June 5, 2008


INVITATION TO BID
BID NO. 2008-009
COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY
NERS
CEMENT FOR BUILDING AND
APARTMENTSS
County Commissioners hereby
m Certified and Registered Gen-
ors, licensed to do business in
ity to bid on Roof Replacement
g and Housing Departments.
e bid specification may be ob-
he Wakulla County Parks'and
apartment, 79 Recreation Drive,
F132327
will be received at the Board of
issioners Office, located at 3093
Highway, Crawfordville, Florida
t Office Box 309, Crawfordville,
until Thursday, June 5, 2008 at
T.
re strongly encouraged to view
roofs and the roof of the Board of
mission office complex. To
ne to view and for all technical
ease contact John Taylor at
Sor by e- mail at HYPERLINK
Taylor@wcprd.com" John.Tav-
m.
opening will be held at the Board
commissioners Office located at
rdville Highway, Crawfordville,
Sat 2:30 p.m. EST on June 5,

should be clearly marked and

a County Board of County
Commissioners
action to Bid# 2008-009
'ost Office Box 1263
fordville, Florida 32326


3 Crawfordville Highway "*
wfordville, Florida 32327


COUNTY RESERVES THE
EJECT ANY AND ALL QUALIFI-
) WAIVE ANY INFORMALITIES
RARITIES IN THE QUALIFICA-
ESS AND TO AWARD THE
IN THE BEST INTEREST OF
IY.
LACEMENT FOR BUILDING
HOUSING DEPARTMENT
SPECIFICATIONS

nty is seeking proposals for re-
ofs on the Building Department
ng Department offices.
IE
dated no later than Thursday,

fORK
Work will require laying a ? inch
e barrier to the existing roof, new
ntilation, then installing new cop-
tanding seam metal roofing sys-
, fascia and eve drip metal. Roof
and design must continue Board
commissioners appearance and

larding the specifications should
to John Taylor'at 850-228-9650
'27: fax 850-926-1083.
FICATIONS
roof must meet all Florida build-
*uction Codes
ORTUNTIY EMPLOYER, FAIR
HANDICAP ACCESS JURISDIC-

E CIRCUIT COURT OF
LLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
ROBATE DIVISION


CASE NU: 08-44PR
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF SYLVIA JOYCE DUR-
RANCE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Sylvia
Joyce Durrance, deceased, File 08-44PR is
pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Craw-
fordville, Florida 32327. The name and ad-
dress of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney is set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and per-


sons having claims or dems
dent's estate, including unm
or unliquidated claims mus
with this court WITHIN 3 I
THE DATE OF THE FIRS
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FOREVER BARRED.
Attorney-for Person
Fra
Cr,
Florid
3042 Cra
Crawfordv

Personal Representative:
Ricky Royce Durrance
3609 Somme Avenue
Norfolk, Virginia 23509


Approved 05/19/08
Board of County Commissio
Regular Board Meeting
Monday, May 5, 2008
The Board of County Comr
kulla County met in regular
day, May 5, 2008 with Chai
presiding. Present were
George Green, Howard Ke
ston and Maxie Lawhon. Al
County Attorney Ron Mowr
istrator Ben Pingree and De
Evans.
Invocation provided by Past
Medart Assembly of God Ch
Pledge of Allegiance led t
Brian Langston


Approval of Agenda
(CD5:46) Commissioner Lawhon made a mo-
tion to approve the Agenda with the following
changes, item (22) Consideration of Airport
Layout Plan to follow Citizens to be Heard,
Commissioner Kessler requested to add two
announcements under Awards and Presenta-
tions. Second by Commissioner Kessler. Mo-
tion carried unanimously, 5/0.
Awards and Presentations
1. Volunteer Wakulla - Scott Jackson, Wa-
kulla County Extension Office
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to
adopt a Resolution declaring Saturday, May 8,
2008 as "Make a Difference Day" in Wakulla
County, Florida. Second by Commissioner
Langston. Motion carried unanimously, 5/0.
la. Commissioner Brimner - Recognition of
Sandy Cook, Retired Park Manager for Wa-
kulla Springs State Park - tabled until next
meeting so that Ms. Cook could be present.
Commissioner Kessler - Informed the citizens
that Wakulla Springs is a great Tourist Attrac-
tion and that the landfill recycling area has
been expanded and many different items are
now accepted at the landfill. Commissioner
Kessler thanked the citizens of Panacea for
taking pride in their yards and recognized the
past recipients of the "Yard of the Month"
award.
Consent Agenda
(CD6:02) Commissioner Kessler made a mo-
tion to approve the Consent Agenda.
Second by Commissioner Green. Motion car-
ried unanimously, 5/0.
2. Approval of Minutes - April 21, 2008 Regu-
lar Meeting Approved
3. Approval of Minutes - April 21, 2008 Work-
shop to Discuss the Road Matrix & the "Non
Political" Method of Continuing to Pave Neigh-
borhood Roads
Approved April 21, 2008 Workshop
4. Approval of Payment of Bills and Vouchers
Submitted for April 17, 2008 - April 30, 2008
Approved payment of bills and vouchers sub-
mitted for April 17-30, 2008.
5. Approve to Designate May 18-24, 2008 as
Emergency Medical Services Week
Approved designating May 18-24, 2008 as
Emergency Medical Services Week
6. Request Board Approval to Reschedule
Workshop to Discuss the Existing County
Off-Premises Sign Regulations & Proposed
Changes to Section 6-18, Wakulla County
Code to August 18, 2008 at 5:00p.m.
Approved re-scheduling Workshop to 5:00
p.m. on August 18, 2008 for the County
off-premises sign regulations.
Citizens to be heard
(CD6:06) 1. Dana Peck - The County needs
to move forward with a Community Center
with the location in the heart of Crawfordville.
Ms. Peck questions whether the $400,000.00
that the County received last year and desig-
nated for a Community Center will have to be
returned because construction has not started.
(CD6:08) 2. Ron Piasecki - President of
Friends of Wakulla Springs, thanks to Board
for hosting the joint meeting in April with Offi-
cials from Leon County and announced that
Sandy Cook will be an active member of
Friends of Wakulla Springs.
(CD6:09) 22. Consideration of Airport Plan
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to ac-
cept the.projects identified in the Airport Lay-
out Plan contingent on full FDOT funding and
authorize staff to advertise for a professional
airport engineer with further direction for the
staff to codify the easements. Second by
Commissioner Langston. Motion carried
unanimously, 5/0.
"The easements will be on the eastern side of
the airport and the western side of Tarpine
Subdivision.
Planning and Zoning
(CD6:33) 7. Application for Temporary Use:
TU08-03
Request for the temporary use of a 7 day car
sale on a 3.03+/- acre parcel located at 2201
Crawfordville Highway, between Petty's BP
Station and Goodwill. The applicant is Susan
Payne Turner and R.H. Carter and the agent
is Freddie Deinzer.
Commissioner Langston made a motion to ap-
prove Temporary Use Application TU08-03,
subject to staff recommendations: to retain all
vehicles, tents and supporting equipment
within the boundaries of the property line;
nothing including cars to be located in the right
of way of Crawfordville Highway; no spotlights,
displays or balloons that will generate a traffic
hazard on the highway; and port a potties to
be located within the boundaries of the subject
property. Second by Commissioner Green.
voting for: Brimner, Green, Langston and
Lawhon. Opposed: Kessler. Motion carried,
4/1.


Minds against dece- (CD6:47) 8. Application for Variance:
atured, contingent V08-06
t file their claims
MONTHS AFTER Request for a variance to allow the continua-
T PUBLICATION tion of an existing non-conforming use of a
mobile home park within a zoning district that
FILED WILL BE does not allow for mobile homes. This 5.12+/-
acre parcel is located at the end of Hickory
Avenue and Fleetwood Circle. The applicant is
lal Representative: Robert S. Hattaway.
dances Casey Lowe
awfordville, Florida Commissioner Kessler made a motion to ap-
da Bar No. 521450 prove the application for Variance V08-06 to
wfordville Highway permit the continuing use of a vested,
PO Box 306 non-conforming use of a mobile home park,
ville, Florida 32326 within a R-1 zoning district with a 20-year sun-
(850) 926-8245 set. Second by Commissioner Green. Motion
carried unanimously, 5/0.
(CD6:55) 9. Application for Short Form:
SF08-03
Request to plat a 26-lot subdivision to be
May 22, 29, 2008 known as Plank-Hill Farms located on the
west side of Old Plank Road at the
Wakulla/Leon County Line. The applicant is
Youpi Farms, LLC and the Agent is Edwin
ners Brown & Associates.
Commissioner Langston made a motion to ap-
prove the proposed Short Form Subdivision of
Plank Hills Farms, contingent upon cul-de-sac
easements being extended to the property
missioners of Wa- lines. Second by Commissioner Green.
session on Mon-
rman Ed Brimner Voting for: Brimner, Green, Langston and
Commissioners Lawhon. Opposed: Kessler. Motion carried,
ssler, Brian Lang- 4/1.
Iso, present were
ey, County Admin- General Business
puty Clerk Evelyn
(CD7:08) 10. Request for Board Approval of
a new agreement with the Florida Department
or Jeff McFalls of of Revenue pertaining to Service of Process
urch and Writ of Bodily Attachments, covering state
fiscal years 2008-2011
by Commissioner


Commissioner Kessler made a motion to ap-
prove the Agreement with Florida Department
of Revenue for Service of Process and Writ of
Bodily Attachments performed by the Sheriff's
Department. Second by Commissioner Law-
hon. Motion carried unanimously,.4/0. (Com-
missioner Langston abstained and filed a con-
flict form)
(CD7:10) 11. Authorization and direction for
Commission and staff involvement in the Wa-
kulla County OSTDS and Decentralized
Wastewater Systems Management Program -
Phase III
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to
authorize staff involvement in the Wakulla
County OSTDS and Decentralized Wastewa-
ter Systems Management Program, Phase III.
Second by Commissioner Langston. Motion
carried unanimously, 5/0.
(CD7:16) 12. Request for approval and
authorization from the Board for the use of
county property to develop a natural walking
trail with Department of Health donation.
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to ap-
prove use of county-owned land, adjacent to
the Wakulla County Health Department for a
natural walking trail using the $5,500 donated
by the Wakulla County Health Department.
Second by Commissioner Lawhon. Motion
carried unanimously, 5/0.
(CD7:17) 13. Request board approval for ap-
pointments to the Library Advisory Board
Commissioner Lawhon made a motion to ap-
prove the respective recommended appoint-
ments to the Library Advisory Board. Second
by Commissioner Kessler. Motion carried
unanimously, 5/0. (District 1 - Fred Hollis, Dis-
trict 2 - Patricia Thomas, District 3 - Molly
Clore, At Large - Marj Law, At Large 2 - Sue
Belford)
(CD7:20) 14. Board consideration of funding
mechanisms available to provide infrastructure
improvements to the historic subdivisions of
Greiners Addition, Magnolia Gardens, Lake
Ellen Estates and Wakulla Gardens
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to ac-
cept the staff's report and schedule a Work-
shop for Saturday, May 17, 2008 at 10:00 a.m.
Second by Commissioner Green. Motion car-
ried unanimously, 5/0.
(CD7:29) 15. Request board approval to ad-
vertise bids for a new roof for the Housing and
Building Department
Commissioner Kessler made a motion for ap-
roval to advertise bids for a new roof for the
housing and Building Department. Second by
Commissioner Langston. Motion carried
unanimously, 5/0.
(CD7:29) 16. Board approval of the recom-
mended mid-year adjustments to the FY
2007-2008 Budget
Commissioner Langston made a motion for
approval of the recommended mid-year ad-
justments to the FY 2007-2008 Budget. Sec-
ond by Commissioner Kessler. Motion carried
unanimously, 5/0.
(CD7:30) 17. Consideration of adoption of an
Indigent Deaths & Disposition of Unclaimed
Bodies Policy
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to
adopt the Indigent Death and Disposition of
Unclaimed Bodies Policy. Second by Com-
missioner Langston. Motion carried unani- *
mously, 5/0.
(CD7:31) 18. Request for Board Approval to
purchase a John Deere 650J Dozier
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to ap-
prove the purchase a John Deere 650J Doz-
ier. Second by Commissioner Langston. Mo-
tion carried unanimously, 5/0.
(CD7:32) 19. Request for Board Approval to
purchase shop equipment upgrades
Commissioner Langston made a motion to ap-
prove purchase of shop equipment upgrades.
Second by Commissioner Green. Motion car-
ried unanimously, 5/0.
(CD7:32) 20. Request for Board Authoriza-
tion to accept the bid and approve the pur-
chase on the Computerized Sign Fabrication
Machine
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to ac-
cept the bid from Advanced Cutting Systems
for $7,895.00 and approve the purchase of the
Computerized Sign Fabrication Machine.
Second by Commissioner Langston. Motion
carried unanimously, 5/0.
(CD7:34) 21. Ratification of Board Direction
on pursuing Charter County Government
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to di-
rect staff to draft a simple charter that pre-
sents Wakulla County Government as found in
current State law and direct staff to engage
Kurt Spitzer & Associates as consultants on
this endeavor. Second by Commissioner
Green. Motion carried unanimously, 5/0.
'please note, Kurt Spitzer is a single source
provider, therefore the bid process is waived.
(CD7:46) 24. Rebuild of the Elevator due to
constant breakdown status
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to ap-
prove the proposal to rebuild the Courthouse
elevator to include the accelerated work
schedule. Second by Commissioner Lang-
ston. Motion carried unanimously, 5/0.
County Administrator
(CD7:57) 23. Acceptance of a Status Report
regarding the Reorganization of County Staff
and confirmation of three reclassifications re-
sulting in savings of $25,000.00
Commissioner Langston made a motion to ac-
cept the status report on the reorganization of
County staff and confirmation of Tim Barden
and Lindsey Stevens as the two new Assistant
County Administrators as presented tonight
and downgrade the approved/budgeted posi-
tion of Deputy Administrator to a
Purchasing/Human Resources Coordinator
within OMB that may also be utilized for other
OMB activities. Second by Commissioner
Green. Motion carried unanimously, 5/0.
(CD8:07) Discussion Issues by Commission-
ers
Commissioner Green - 0
Commissioner Kessler - Requesting staff to
help Dr. Keene in Panacea in his endeavor to
become a rural class clinic, which will enable
him to receive slightly higher payback of gov-
ernment insurance. Requested input from Un-
dersheriff Dale Wise regarding No Wake Zone
enforcement.
Commissioner Lawhon - 0
Commissioner Langston - 0
(CD8:12) Commissioner Langston made a
motion to adjourn. Second by Commissioner
Lawhon. Motion carried unanimously, 5/0.
Meeting adjourned at 8:20 p.m.
May 29, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY
Case #:05-CA-21-FC
Division #:
UNC:
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, AS TRUSTEE
F/K/A THE CHASE BANK MANHATTAN
BANK SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO THE
CHASE MANHATTAN BANK N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROBBY BUTLER AND LEONE BUTLER, HIS
WIFE; CAPITAL CITY BANK
SDefendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
May 19, 2008, entered in Civil Case No.
05-CA-21-FC of the Circuit Court of the 2nd
Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County,
Florida, wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK,
AS TRUSTEE F/K/A THE CHASE BANK
MANHATTAN BANK SUCCESSOR IN IN-
TEREST TO THE CHASE MANHATTAN
BANK N.A., Plaintiff and ROBBY BUTLER
AND LEONE BUTLER, HIS WIFE are defen-
dant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash, AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE
WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE LO-
CATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY
319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA AT 11:00
A.M. on June 19, 2008 the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment,
to-wit:
LOTS 10 & 11, WAKULLA SPRINGS ACRES,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 103 OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY.
TOGETHER WITH DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE
HOME, YEAR: 1993, MAKE: FLEET, VIN#
GAFLN05A19696CW & GAFLNO5B19696CW,
PERMANENTLY AFFIXED.THEREON.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTING . .
THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact Wakulla County Courthouse,
3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL
32327 within 2 working days of your receipt of
this notice of sale: if you are hearing impaired
call: 1-800-955-8771; if you are voice impaired
call 1-800-955-8770.
Dated at CRAWFORDVILLE, Florida, this
19th day of May, 2008.
Brent X. Thurmond
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Wakulla County, Florida
By: -S-Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff:
Shapiro & Fishman, LLP
2424 North Federal Highway
Suite 360
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
May 29, 2008
June 5, 2008
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Stor-
age Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83,
Part IV, that ABC Storage will hold a sale by
sealed bid on Saturday, June 14th, 2008 at
10:00 a.m. at 3743 Crawfordville Hwy., Craw-
fordville, FL 32327, of the contents of Mini
Warehouse containing personal property of:
MARJORIE HARMON
REBECCA SHEA
HEIDI MELTON
GREG EATON
Payments must be made on May 13th, 2008
by 5:00 p.m. before the sale date of May 14th,
2008. The owners may redeem their property
by payment of the Outstanding Balance and
cost by contacting ABC Storage at 508-5177.
Or by paying in person at the warehouse loca-
tion.
May 29,, 2008
June 5, 2008
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 08-000001-FC
THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE
FOR EQUITY ONE INC. MORTGAGE/PASS
THROUGH CERTIFICATE SERIES #2005-6
Plaintiff,
v.
DARNELL RANSOM; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF DARNELL RANSOM; and all un-
known parties claiming by, through, under or
against the herein named Defendants, who
are not known to be dead or alive, whether
said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trus-
tees, spouses, or other claimants; TENANT #1
and/or TENANT #2, the parties intended to ac-
count for the persons in possession
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 1,
2008, in this cause, I will sell the property situ-
ated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as:
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF
LOT 53 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF
LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND PROCEED NORTH 17 DEGREES 27
MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE
WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 53 A DIS-
TANCE OF 396.00 FEET, THENCE RUN
NORTH 72 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 27 SEC-
ONDS EAST 662.20 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT (RLS#4261) MARKING THE
POINT OF BEGINNING FROM SAID POINT
OF BEGINNING THENCE CONTINUE
NORTH 72 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 27 SEC-
ONDS EAST 635.77 TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT (RLS#4261) ON THE WEST-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF
STATE ROAD NO. 363 (ALSO KNOWN AS
LOWER BRIDGE ROAD.) THENCE RUN
NORTH 52 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 26 SEC-
ONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 556.77 FEET
TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (RLS#4261)
THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 24
MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 243.44 FEET
TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (RLS#4261),
THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 27
MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 396.00 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.


. . . . . . .








Page 4B - THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2008


Legal Notice

alkla 935 LOWER BRIDGE RD., CRAW-
FORDVILLE, FL 32327
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder,
(or cash, in the front lobby of the Wakulla
County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawford-
ville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, at 11:00
a.m., on June 5, 2008.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the lis pendens
must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated at CRAWFORDVILLE, Florida this
1st day of May, 2008.
Brent X. Thurmond
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: -s-Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY
WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN OR-
DER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEED-
ING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO
YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN AS-
SISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT LETHA
WELLS, (850)926-0905 EXT. 222, WITHIN 2
WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF
THIS TEMPORARY INJUNCTION. IF YOU
ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL
TDD 1-800-955-8771.


through third grade in' a facility owned or
leased and operated by a business. The De-
partment of Education 2008-2009 average
class size requirement is eighteen students.
Eighteen is also the minimum average class
size to achieve the effective, efficient use of
the taxpayer's educational and fiscal re-
sources. Proposals that commit to meeting
the maximum and minimum class size criteria
or that provide for reimbursement to the Wa-
kulla County School District for any loss in
FTE educational funding revenues resulting
from the failure of the business to achieve the
minimum enrollment will receive the highest
consideration. Students in need of or enrolled
in special programs or that require special
services can best be served at the Wakulla
County Schools that offer those programs and
services identified in the students' individual
educational plan. Parents shall be responsi-
ble for providing all transportation to and from
school or to other WCSD facilities'during, be-
fore and after school for the students enrolled
in A Business-Community (ABC) School.
Florida Business-Community (ABC) Schools
shall comply with the constitutional class size
requirements. Facilities to house a Florida
Business-Community (ABC) School must
comply with the State Uniform Building Code
for Educational Building Construction adopted
pursuant to section 1013.37, Florida Statutes,
and must meet state and local health, environ-
mental, and safety laws and codes.
ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS: This package
can be requested by mail at Wakulla County
School Board, Post Office Box 100, Crawford-
ville, Florida 32326 or by calling
850-926-0065.


May22,29,2008 DOCUMENT COST: $1.50


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
69 Arran Road
Crawfordville, Florida 32327
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
A Business-Community (ABC) School
Program,
Wakulla County
RFP# 08/09 - 01
The School Board of Wakulla County requests
Interested parties to submit formal sealed
bids/proposals for the above referenced bid.
SCOPE OF WORK: The School District of
Wakulla County, Florida is seeking proposals
from qualified businesses with operations in
Wakulla County, Florida interested in partner-
ing with the District in A Business-Community
(ABC) School Program. The proposal is for
the Business to provide the facility, including
the associated operating and upkeep ex-
penses, in which the Wakulla County School
District (WCSD) will provide an educational
program for the children of the business' em-
ployees for 6.5 hours per day or as consistent
with the Wakulla County School Board
(WCSB) approved elementary school hours
and calendar. A Business-Community (ABC)
School is defined as a public school offering
instruction to students from kindergarten










CANAL' FRONT
70' frontage on the beautiful Log
Creek Canal in Spring Creek.
Cleared and ready to build. Will
build to suit. Gorgeous view will be
hod by you when you build up in
the air with your new home,
Only $199,000.
SHELL POINT BEACH
Ground Level house on the Canal
overlooking Oyster Bay, within
walking distance of the Beach.
50' x 150' lot with 25' strip on the
canal. Price slashed to $325,000
for quick sale. The lot next door is
also available.

DOCK AND CANAL ACCESS
Spring Creek, 100x100 foot lot with
easement to Log Creek Canal.
Easement is right across the street-
Ircm h Ih'-.T1 Only $125,000.

RICH AND TROPICAL FOLIAGE
adorn this lot in Spring Creek.
Only $75,000.


HARDWOODS AND DOGWOODS
adorn these lots in Wakulla
Gardens.
Next to each other on Neely St.
Only $15,500 each.

DEVELOPERS AND
LAND MAGNETS!
Please call for our latest
acquisitions.
Buyers: I would love to show
you homes in the area. Wakulla,
Franklin and Liberty Counties.
Please Call for an appointment.

Carol Ann Williams
27 years experience in the Real
Estate Business.
1-877-709-5014 .: .
Toll Free
or 926-2811 lc-:'�
(850)566-9293
Cells.


www.coastalgems.com


BID BOND: None
PRE/BID PROPOSAL CONFERENCE:
Pre-Proposal Conference
Tuesday, June 10, 2008
10:00 A.M.
Wakulla County School Board Administrative
Offices
Conference Room
69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327
DUE DATETIME: June 24, 2008 2:00 P.M.
Eastern
The School Board of Wakulla County, Florida
must receive bids no later than said date and
time. Bids received after such time will be re-
turned unopened.


CONTACT: JIMMIE L. D
850-926-0065


Plea
orp
injul
9


105 Business Opportuni-
ties


TALLAHASSEE
FLOWER SHOP
FOR SALE
(850) 544-9602


110 Help Wanted


CJIS GROUP, Inc. is seeking ap-
plicants for a full time Research
Analyst in Medart (starting salary
20K to 24K). Professional office
experience is required with excel-
lent writing, telephone and com-
puter skills. Applicants must have
excellent references and atten-
dance record. Benefits in-
clude paid holidays, Group Health
and 401K. E-mail resume to lou-
ise@cjisgroup.com.

Experienced painters wanted. Call
Jim (850) 926-2400.

Experienced Short Order Cook
Wanted. Apply in person at The
Riverside Cafe in St. Marks.


I


JGGER GREAT JOB IN WAKULLA
COUNTY for secretary, reception-
May 29,2008 ist. Friday afternoons off. Terrific
June5,2008 clients. Legal experience pre-
ase report ferred. Apply in person Monday,
phaned or Tuesday, and Wednesday 11:00
red wildlife a.m. to 2:00 p.m., at 17 High
26-8308 Drive, Suite C, Crawfordville.


S Xpoint Realty, .











.
Marie Circle
Immaculate home with stainless steel appliances,
laminate & tile floors. 3 bed 2 bath home, over
1500 sq ft, has large screen porch, storage shed and
landscaped yard. #1311 $159,900
Coastal Hwv./Spring Creek Hwy. * 850-926-8120 i
MiS. www.shellpointrealty.com iLES


* Top Agents * BUILDING HOMES FOR THE HEART

for April 2008 < OF OUR COMMUNITY


-- W^5\ I


Top Lister
Dawn
Reed,
GRI, CeMS,
294-3468


Top Pro
Leni
Walk
Realt
528-3!


2650-1 Crawford
Crawfordville

850-926-29
850-926-4


ducer Top Sales
tz Dawn
er, Reed,
or GRI, CeMS,
572 294-3468


HARTUNG AND
NOBLIN, INC.
REALTORS�

Iville Highway,
, FL 32327

)94 Phone
$875 Fax


Il II


I,

*ruikenChasem
I i. 4E BCCIL05RS
Lic.#r CBC-059560


NAUIMANN
. . . - -


t's all about you. BrackenChase is
about building dreams. We are building
a foundation for those at.the heart of our
community. Let us show you that our
communities are designed with you in mind.


Come visit a BrackenChase community and you will understand why we sold
more homes in 2007 than in 2006, and why it is so important to us that we build
the finest homes for those who build our community.


THE PARK I ACRE LOTS FROM $49,990 * HOMES FROM $199,990
Pr isine wooded property in the heart of Wakulla County. The Park is a unique Conservation Community
Ihal features one plus acre home sites surrounded by 464 acres of Conservation land with miles of marked
nature trails abundant wildlife, unique topographic features and a "Field Of Dreams"
baseball field and playground area for homeowners.

THE VILLAS AT COVINGTON PARK HOMES FROM $149,990 '
S Looking lor the perfect place to downsize? Villas at Covington: Crawfordvilles . l , ~
newest low mainreance, comfortable living community just steps from the Wakulla
(ournr (ourthours. Elegant single level 2 & 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom townhomes just under 1500
square feer. Our homes are loaded with extra features, designer interiors and a two car garage.

For more information please call our Sales Associate:
Pam Cuda, Realtor, 528-2465 * The Naumann Group, 325-1681
N AU M A N N G R O U P .C O M


Lic. Real Estate Broker
� ( T - Crawfordville Hwy.

fOKpR T (850) 926-7043

1 (850) 926-2898 Fax
www.Forestrealty@earthlink.net

TRADEWINDS SUBD.- Boating community on Ochlockonee
Bay - Bay view lot (Lot 25) w/Boat Slip - $259,000

SMITH CREEK - SOPCHOPPY - 33.6
Wooded Acres - $6,000/acre.

BOB MILLER ROAD - Partially cleared 13.32 acres in
North Wakulla County. Asking $165,000

HARVEY MILL ROAD - 3 Acre Tract, homes only.
Starting at $110,000 Each

FAIRWAY PARK SUBD. - LANARK VILLAGE -
1 Acre zoned for homes only - $64,500

WAKULLA RIVER ESTATES - 2 Lots, minutes from the.
Wakulla River and St. Marks. $12,000 each or 2 for $20,000

FISH COVE SUBD. - SOPCHOPPY - 3 BR/2BA
New home, many up-grades and located
just off the Ochlocknee River. $249,900

THE PINES SUBD. - 3BR/2BA MH - In-ground Pool
and fenced acre. $135,000

WAKULLA GARDENS - 3BR/2BA Home, on 2 lots,
overlooking large pasture. 1,150 sq. ft., porches,
large outbuilding, and more. $130,000

DEER RUN - SOPCHOPPY- Older M/H "As Is" condition
located on 5 acres. Asking $79,900


Bill Turner Ginny Delaney
510-0283 566-6271


Mike Delaney
524-7325


Tim Jordan
Broker
567-9296


Marsha Tucker
Broker
570-9214


Josh Brown Alan Reese Preston Strickland
528-6385 567-4860 508-3296


oyou Any Property on The

4te cop Ochlockonee Ra


Kenny Lovel Jim Wetherton
519-2510 (706)244-5961

Panacea
146 Coastal Hwy.
Office: 850-984-0001
SFax: 850-984-4748


Cathy Mathews
519-0960


Realty


Teresa Beidler Donna Dickens
519-3766 524-0473

Crawfordville
2851 C-ville Hwy.
Office: 850-926-9260
Fax: 850-926-9150


PO Box 556 Panacea, FL 32346 www.obrealty.com obr@obrealty.com


Realt/


Nancy Strickland
508-2902


Jim Hallowel
566-5165


Manager Advertising


Susan Brooks
545-6678







Susan McKaye
510-2477


Diane Chason Carmen Wesley Curtis Benton
559-8545 294-8215 228-5821


LPN or Medical Assistant
Tallahassee Memorial Family
Medicine-Wakulla
LPN or Medical Assistant desired for
Family Medicine Clinic. Position as-
sists physicians in providing nursing
care. Physician office experience is
preferred. Full time position with
great TMH benefits. Candidates
may apply at www.tmh.org or by
calling a Recruiter at 850-431-5786.
Drug Free Workplace/EOE
M/F/V/D
NOW HIRING! Busy real estate
company needs full-time agents.
Real estate license is required.
Contact Ochlockonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001 or 850-926-9260
obr@obrealty.com
www.obrealty.com
120 Services and Busi-
nesses

A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING
Free Estimates
Licensed - John Farrell
926-5179
566-7550
Mr. Stump
Stump Grinding
Quick Service
Cellular: 509-8530


AIR CON OF WAKULLA
Heating and Cooling
Gary Limbaugh 926-5592
3232 Crawfordville Highway
Service, Repair, Installation
FL Lic. #CAC1814304
All about concrete. Joseph Fran-
cis. 850-556-1178 or
850-926-9064.
ANYTIME ELECTRIC
Specializing in repair and service,
residential and commercial,
homes and mobile homes.
24-hour service. Mark Oliver,
ER0015233. 421-3012.
BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERV-
ICE
Bushhogging, Boxblading Drive-
way. Larry Carter Owner/Opera-
tor. 850-925-7931,
850-694-7041. Licensed/Insured.
Bella's Bed & Biscuit Doggie
Daycare.
Overnight boarding. Extended
stays. Kennel free home environ-
ment. Lots of love & pampering.
926-1016 or 519-4529.
C & R Tractor/Backhoe Services,
large tract and residential site
clearing rock, dirt, and road base
hauling, call Crandall
(850)933-3346.


Compost for sale. 850-556-1178
or 850-926-9064.

Five Star Plumbing
Big Bend, Inc.

Commercial -
& Residential �I .
Service 6

Billy B. Rathel, Jr.
850-544-5062
850-421-1237 Fax
plumbingfive_star@yahoo.com
Lic#CFC1427547 State Certified
FREE
estimates. Land clearing, bushhog
mowing, stumps, driveways, big
or small. No minimums. 33 years
experience. Richard Miller, cell
933-1118.
Harold Burse Stump Grinding
926-7291.
KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR
Commercial, residential and mo-
bile homes. Repair, sales, service,
installation. All makes and mod-
els. Lic. #RA0062516. 926-3546.
Pitman Lawncare Services. No job
too big or too small. Call Page @
933-7317.


L3-~~a�.,*ien of ~hConts 00 SaUBuinssExelnae!ha f�::


V~"'"~L""~' U~J




~\~i~j~4s~i~Piejpl~f/~G2


rwu-i









THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2008 - Page 5B


120 Services and Busi-
nesses


Bed-King Pillowtop Orthopedic
Mattress Set. Brand new in plas- 515 Apartments for Rent
tic. Must move, $449. 545-7112.


m


Need Cash?
Got Junk Cars, Trucks, & Scrap?
I Buy Scrap Metals!!
850-838-JUNK (5865)
State Certified Scales.

We do alterations, embroidery,
monogramming, sewing in my
home. Call April @251-3323.
125 Schools and Instruc-d
tion

Michelle Snow
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
926-7627
Music lessons of all types for all
ages.

Summer Music Lessons.
Learn to play guitar, bass or
drums. Call (850)491-7501 or
playguitar2day@aol.com or more
info. Mike McCarty.

200 Items For Sale


Have timber to sell. 164 Lee Miller
Rd. 926-3758. Give me a call!

225 Trucks


1993 Jeep. Good tires, runs great.
Lots of miles. $1,500. 509-8000.

For Sale. 1994 Ford F150 pickup.
Great shape, two gas tanks. Ask-
ing $3,750. Call 926-4511.
235 Motorcycles and 4-
Wheelers

2003 Yamaha V-star custom.
Many extras. Must sell. $5,500
OBO. Ask for Daniel or Michelle.
962-4049 321-0650. Call for de-
tails.

2006 Yamaha Scooter 250 (Mor-
phous). 1,600 miles. Mint condi-
tion, ready to ride. $3,500. Call
926-2720.

275 Home Furnishings


$150 Queen pillowtop mattress
set, unused with warranty.
222-7783.

$399 New NASA Visco Memory
Foam mattress et with warranty.
Can deliver. 222-9879:

100% Leather Living Room Set.
Lifetime Warranty. New, still in
crate. $849 OBO. 545-7112. Can
deliver.
5 piece 100% MicroFiber Living
Room set $599, All New in boxes.
Delivery available. 222-7783.

6 piece, Pub Table, solid wood &
upholstery chairs. New in crate.
List $1300, Take $599. 425-8374.

A Queen Orthopedic Pillowtop
new mattress set in sealed plastic.
Full warranty. Sacrifice $279. Can
deliver. 222-7783.


L


Bedroom: Solid Wood 4 pc set
still boxed, $499, can deliver.
Brand new! 222-7783.

Cherry-New Queen Louis Phillip
sleigh 7pc bedroom set. $2400
value, must sell $999. 425-8374.
Delivery available.

Dining Room-Beautiful cherry ta-
ble, 6 chairs, lighted china cabi-
net. Brand new in boxes, can de-
liver. Must move, $799. 222-9879.

Full mattress set. $125. Twin mat-
tress set. $100. Both New.
545-7112.

320 Farm Products &
Produce

You pick vegetables & farm fresh
eggs. Raker Farms. 926-7561.


335 Pets


Yorkie puppies for sale. Regis-
tered. 5 months old. Ready for
shots. 556-3710.


355 Yard Sales


Garage Sale. Sat, May 7th. 8-3.
ABC Storage. No early birds.

Multi-family Yard Sale. 8-12. 108
Hickory Wood Dr. Some collecti-
bles, clothing, too much to list.

NEIGHBORHOOD YARD SALE
The Grove off of East Ivan. Sat.,
June 7, 2008. 7:00 a.m. to 1:00
p.m.

Now accepting applications for
experienced short order cook.
984-9994.

Yard Sale. Sat. 8-until. Bag sale.
Small bags $3, large bags $5.
Panacea. Turn at post office and
follow signs.

500 Real Estate, Homes
Mobiles


PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it ille-
gal
to advertise "any preference, limi-
tation, or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or national ori-
gin or an intention to make any
such preference. limitalion or disr
crimination." Familial status in-
cludes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing Ihe custody of
children under the age of 18.

This newspaper will not accept
any advertising for real estate
that is a violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To com-
plain of discrimination call HUD
toll free at.1-800-669-9777. The
toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


lu&L IEND t
LENDER


GRADE-A OFFICE SPACE!
Hwy. frontage offices avail. Great at-
mrosPrpere Renl t , Ia ncluaes utili-
ties, trash p.u anad itchen use. Com-
mon area cleaned. Isi and last
mor th's rent. One month free with
13/mo ease. Call 926-J511 for info.
CALL (850) 926-4511
Mini-Warehouse Spaces for lease,
8X10 and 10X12 now available.
Come by or call Wakulla Realty,
926-5084.


Beachfront 2BR/2BA on Alligator
Point. $1300/month. $1300/secu-
nty. No Pets No Smoking. Och-
oickonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001 www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com

Canal-front 3BR/1BA on Blue
Heron/Mashes Sands.
$775month. $775/security. No
Pets. No Smoking. Ochlockonee
Bay Realty: 850-984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obrt@obrealtv.com


r-


J.RiDwLon oArr1TMErrTh

NEW IN CRAWFORDVILLE
1,2 AND 3 BEDROOMS
Great location and great prices
with Large Club House, Pool and
work out facility
Ask about our specials!ll
926-1134

520 Townhouses for Rent


Crawfordville! 3BR/2BA Town-
home in Camelot Subdivision with
community pool. $885/month
$885/deposit No Pets. No Smok-
ing. $50.00 move in bonus!! Och-
lockonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001 www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com
New 3BR/2BA One story town-
house in Crawfordville, Conven-
ient location, All appliances in-
cluded, screened porch, fenced
backyard, $975 Monthly Phone
850-309-7790 or 850-933-2870.

Two Story 2BR/2BA townhouse in
Crawfordville, with Sunroom, Con-
venient location, $775 Monthly.
Phone 850-390-7790 or
850-933-2870.
530 Comm. Property forh
Rent |

Commercial building on busy
Hwy. 98/Panacea for rent.
$550/month. $550/security. Och-
lockonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001.
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com
COVERED BOAT/RV
STORAGE
NOW AVAILABLE
~ Self Storage Units
~ Retail Space Available
~ Locks, Boxes & More
Stow
Away
Center

850-926-5725
www.stowawaycenter.com

For rent - 2500 sq. fool building.
ith 3 bays
$4,000.00 a month
2315 Crawfordville Hwy
A\ ailable TImmediaiely.
Contact Tom at 850 222-5823


Great Location! 1,200 sq.ft. on
Crawfordville Hwy. adjoining The
Wakulla News. Three offices, re-
ception area, waiting area, large
kitchen. $1,400/mo. Security de-
posit required. Call 926-6289 or
421-2792.


NVBC

STORAGE

MINI-WAREHOUSES

BOATS *RV'S

519-5128 * 508-5177
2 miles South of Courthouse
on Hwy. 319 in Crawfordville
24 Hour Access * Video Surveillance

Woodville Retail
Space Available

* Fitness Studio-1 000/sf
(Wall to wall mat & mirrors)
* Retail -1250/sf
(Storefront w/back storage)
* Two-Bay Garage-1200/sf
* Divided Office Space-1074/sf

Lewiswood Center
421-5039

545 Homes for Sale


FOR SALE. On 3 lots in Wakulla
Gardens. 23 Neeley Rd. 1800 sq.
ft. 4BR/2BA. Renovated. ONLY
$154,900. Call Nick 766-7750.

New construction. House for sale
by owner. 139 Shadow Oak Cir.
3BR/2BA custom home on
1/2-acre lot, 2,256 sq.ft. 445-5300
or 509-6910.

555 Houses for Rent


2BR/1BA in Lanark/Franklin
County! $600/month. $600/secu-
rity. No Pets. No Smoking. Och-
lockonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com

3BR,2.5BA on 1 acre surrounded
by National Forest. $900'mo &
$750 deposit (deposit neg. for
clean up). 528-1687.

3BR/2BA for rent. $800/mo. Sop-
choppy. Revell Realty 962-2212.

Bay-front 3BR/2BA on Mashes
Sands. Partially furnished.
$875'month. $875.'secunty. No
Pets. No Smoking. Ochlockonee
Bay Realty: 850-984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com


T. Gaupin, Broker
Shell Point Crawfordville
926-7811 926-5111
Florida Coastal Silver Coast
Properties, Inc. Realty

LARGE BRICK HOME with
4BR/3BA available for rent
'in beautiful River Plantation
Subdivision. $1,800/month
and $1,800 security depos-
it. #6404W

Snug Harbor Townhomes
available for rent at $1,500/
month with $1,500 appli-
cable deposits. Community
pool, dock on deep-water
canal located in a gated com-
munity.

3BR/2BA Crawfordville home
in gated community $1,500/
month with $1,500 applica-
ble deposits. #2221W

2BR/2BA Home on canal w/
dock. $1350/month avail-
able June 1st with applicable
deposits. No Pets/No Smok-
ing. #6337-W

FURNISHED 2BR/2.5 Condo
$1,200/month available June
1st with $850 security de-
posit. No Pets. #6341W

3BR/2BA Crawfordville home
available for $975/month
& $975 security deposit.
#6402W

3BR/1 BA Brick home in cen-
tral location. $775/month
with $1;000' security depos-
it. #6403W

2BR/1BA Furnished mobile
home available for rent.
$500/month with $500 se-
curity deposit. #6344

Ochlockonee Bay
984-5007


Great Amenities at Budget Price!
New Construction hy Mike Scon Construction, Inc. A. .i:, cous 1515 sq
ft horme located in beautiful Sararin.,h For.ct Te home ifacrire; tj. uli- I
ceilings and hardwood fl.:.ors In the- hi.irng area tray ceilings aid lhi h;r k Ic: -ts in
I gg i l j Athe matter bedroom, tile t i the bathror.orr, b:rik and Hardie board e:-terior a
106 W. 5th A e. prinkler- ysterre and a large 2 car garage ili.:heri has refngeratcor -'nlt i.:rmaker.sm no)th tc.p uleL.-tn
Taaha , FL , ellf clearirip range, mlcrr; a.e range ho.-d, and di:hv'.'-jher I.lanv exrras Lhroughoul h:orre irI.: lu.drin anr 11' X Donna Card
0Tallah) 2see, F2 323 1' patio, plant shelie: n trhe kitchen, .:elliri f aim thr-.:ugh .ut, andi 1.1,F-E 850-508-1235
www.wrneeo.om . $3,500 Allowance! $189,900. CALL ABOUT SPECIAL FINANCING PACKAGE!


S***New Subditisions***
__All 'ubdi-lr ons ha'e underround
0 ' electric and water
Carmen Maria - 534,900. 1� ac.
tracts near Lake Talquin.
Savannah Forest - $45,900. 1 ac.
HARTUNG AND "%.M tracts off Wakulla Aaron Rd.
NOBLIN, INC. Your Perfect Partner Sellars Crossing - $65,900.
REALTORS� for Real Estate! 1+ ac lots in North Wak.
- New Constructn C ! Steeplechase - $96,900 to $109,900.
- New Construction Coming! : a. w.oded tract Horne 'riendlyl
:-: - - . $140,000 4Br/2Ba 1,465 Sq. Walkers Mll - $69,900.
D'E- 7O'C 0fiTm " Ft. New Home near Down- 2 : ct. located con
"- town Crawfordville. #184244 Low.vr Bridge F.oad
Dawn Reed 294-3468

Panacea Park $120,000 Great I B r
rental, close to boat access, fishing
& shopping. 2 blocks from Gulf.
Newly Renovated. #178723 Lentz 12 3
Walker 528-3572
2
Investment near Crawfordville -
$50,000 Beautiful 1 Acre with 6 1
Mature trees. 3Br/2Ba Manuf.
Home Needs some TLC. 6 8
* #179681 Marsha Hampton
S445-1906 5

9 7
63 Ridgeway Court- 6 3 4
$98,000 Nice 2,029 Sq.
Ft. DWMH, 3Br/2Ba, 7
Split floor plan, wood
decks, fireplace, V acre. 8 9 6.
FHA Financing Available. Each puzzle is divided Into nine sections,
#184578 Don Henderson has nine blank squares. Fill In all 81 squa
numbers 1 to 9.You may not repeat any n
510-4178 the nine sections that you've already use
section. Also, you can use each number 1
horizontal line of nine squares, and In eac
~ OPEN HOUSEE ~nine squares.The puzzle is completed wh
every square.
Gardens of Saralan \L . 9 6 s
open every Saturday and Sunday from 2 pm to 4 pm 6 9 9 1 C L i ti
Directions: 319 S, Left on Wakula Arran Rd. approx. I mile on left. . 8 zL S E 6 9
S_ 8 _ 9 _ 8L -,-L 6 ". 6 o
9 L& . t 6 7 8 9 SHvLa
www.coldwellbankerwakulla.com C 6 , 8 S I 9 L :
2650-1 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 9 L S . L 6 9 "
[1. 9s 6 L 9 8 8 t 1 LS o
850-926-2994 Phone 850-926-4875 Fax 9 9 6: ~ Te 1. 9 Ls z -
....... Av a s


Carmen Rocio - 2 ac. lot off
Shadeville Hwy near
Wakulla Station. $64,900.
2 acre tract with large
hardwoods in Beechwood
Subdivision off Shadeville
Hwy. $52,900.
Great Potential for
Commercial Zoning!
t pro:'imtely 7 7 ar7e of
beajulful wooded parcel with
acces- to Hwy 93 and Jack
Crnum Road in .ledrt Bric:k
home included $499,900


'ain


1 4

5

7 8

3

6

2.

1

6

3
, and each section
res on the puzzle with
umbers in any one of
d elsewhere in that
1-9 only once in each
ch vertical column of
hen you correctly fill


suo!lnios


Wakulla Gardens
50 Cayuse Dr.
NEW CONSTRUCTION!
Affordable Housing at its best!
1178 sq. ft. home with
3BR'2BA. Features include
spacious family room, vaulted
ceilings and wood flooring in
the living area, carpet and
vinyl flooring in bedrooms
and bathrooms, a front porch,
and much morel
$116,900.


5306 Montejo Dr.
New Construction!
HOP approved - funding
available SOON! Reserve NOW!
1219 sq. fl. home in Montejo Sub-
division, Tallahassee. 3BR/2BA
with brick and Hardie board exte-
rior, garage, deck,
custom trim package, knockdown
finish walls, ceiling fans, vaulted
ceilings in living room, fully
equipped kitchen, and more!
$149,900.


Teasers


ACROSS
1. Garbage hauler
5. Little white lies
9. Pie-in-the-face
sound
14. Aesop's also-ran
15. New York stage
award
16. Hurler Satchel
17. Make English, in
form
19. Shop talk
20. Ms. Shore,
hitchhiking?
22. Not exactly a
brainiac
23. Bo Derek's score
24. Goblet part
27. Emissions
watchdog org.
30. Court figures,
briefly
32. " had it!"
33. Pres. Jefferson
37. Poet's planet
39. Some Muslims
41. Zookeeper's
words to a cat in
a mud puddle?
44. String player of
old
45. "Tic Tac Dough"
win
46. Cereal-pitching
tiger
47. "_ Beso"
48. Get-up-and-go
50. Gen-_
(boomer's kid)
52. Ring officials,
briefly
54. Pro-Second
Amendment org.
56." Irish Rose"
61. Talking bird with
a hit record?
65. Spread open
67. San Marino or
Andorra
68. Mount the
soapbox
69. "No guarantees"
70. Author Bagnold


Amt.. P.rom no Con-,a
71. "The
Highwayman"
poet
72. David Bowie's
_ Dance"
73. Becomes solid
DOWN
1. Pottery fragment
2. Tippy craft
3. Grinder's
instrument
4. Joins with a torch
5. Convergence
points
6. Footnote abbr.
7. "Carmen"
composer
8. Sign on a new
lawn
9. Reach across
10. Law firm aides,
for short
11. Attack vigorously


12. Make of
(succeed in)
13. Vietnamese
holiday
18. Words of
understanding
21. Where the Old
Woman lived
25. Perrier rival
26. Having an open
weave
28. Ominous sign
29. Sculptures, oils,
etc.
31. Drag to court
33. Liv of
"Armageddon"
34. Monopoly buy
35. Like a foul ball
into the stands
36. Reagan-era mil.
program
38. Abbr. meaning
"no liquor
provided"


40. Clear after taxes
42. WWW access
enabler
43. Courteney of
"Friends"
49. Word before
scream or fear
51. Smashes into
53. Election Day list
55. Ouzo flavoring
57. Data storage
units
58. Totally ridiculous.
59. "... your cake and
_, too"
60. Loses one's fur
62. Salts' assents
63. Minute or mile
64. Be off the mark
65. Trinity figure
66. Country club
teacher


Medart: Centrally located
2BR/1BA home.
Lots of character w/cypress, stone-
work, exposed beams, loft and
large front porches.
Located on 4 quiet acres, lawn
care and water included. Perfect
for singles or a couple.
No smokers. Small pets consid-
ered. References. 1 yr lease.
$775/mo. First, last and deposit.
251-4166

Ochlockonee Bay/Mashes Sands
Rd: 3BR/1BA home on Ochlock-
onee Bay. $775.00/month,
$775.00/security. 1 year lease, no
pets and no smoking.
850-984-0001.
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com.

Ochlockonee Bay/Surf Rd.
3BR/2BA partially furnished home.
$875/month, $875/security. One
year lease, no pets and no smok-
ing. 850-984-0001. www.obre-
alty.com obr@obrealty.com.

Waterfront Home, Ochlockonee
Bay 2BR/2BA, dock, CH&A, W/D,
no smoking, $950, 850-228-8977.


Available June 1. 3BR/2BA in Lake
Ellen. $750/mo. First and last, plus
security deposit. Owner Broker
850-570-0506.
Double-wide, 3BR/2BA, fireplace,
den. Nice area, nice yard.
$850/mo. 1st, Last & Security.
No inside smoking or pets. Call
926-4511.
For Rent: 3/2 DWMH on one quiet
acre near Crawfordville Elem. With
new carpet and paint. $950/Mo+
First. No Pets. 90 Bear Lane. Call
528-0263 or 556-4070.
570 Mobile Homes for
Sale

1984 Peachtree DWMH w/fire-
place, 10x24 screen room.
3BR/2BA split plan. Shingle roof
replaced-2002. 1,248sq.ft. 'living
area. Recent carpet/laminate
wood flooring. Stove/dishwasher
2-years old. Must be moved. Ask-
ing $15,000. Serious inquiries
please contact Becky
(8501926-8338/(850)926-3454.


560 Land for Sale |[
1* j L lofl^


124.7 Acres, all or part. 5, 10, 18.9
& 99.7 acre tracts. 2+ miles of
creek front, including Smith Creek.
Includes full kitchen, two bunk-
houses, woodshed. Make offer.
984-0093.
50x100 Lot in Wakulla Gardens
Nice, level lot on Sioux Tr.
Not in flood zone
$9,000 OBO
Seller is Licensed FL
R.E. Broker
Call 850-445-0828

Beautiful, untimbered, mature
wooded 20-acre tract. Easy ac-
cess from Hwy 98. Reduced
$139,000. Call Susan McKaye,
owner/agent (850)510-2477. Och-
lockonee Bay Realty.
wwW.hardwoodhammock.com
For Sale by Owner

2.53 acres in 1400 block of
Shadeville Hwy. 1 mile from
Riversprings Middle School
& Shadeville Elementary, 3
miles from Wakulla River, 4
miles from Crawfordville, 10
miles from Shell Point
Beach. Talquin Water &
Power onsite. $67,500.

850-926-7071

Lots 19 & 20 w/water and sewer.
Knotty Pine St. off Surf Rd. One
mile from Marina. 984-0192.
565 Mobile Homes for h
Rent

3BR/2BA newly renovated
Mobile Home on 5 private
wooded acres. Fireplace and I
large 16' x 24' screened back
porch. Large carport would fit
boat & RV.
First, lasi, & security
Credit check required.
No pels or smoking. $825/mo.
Available June 1st.
Call 850-926-6766


-4







Page 6B - THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2008


School


Pearce and Mallow are recognized by school board for talents


Jan Pearce, the May 2008
Wakulla County Teacher of
the Month, began her career
in 2003 teaching Pre-K at the
Wakulla Education Center. She
has been a kindergarten teach-
er at Crawfordville Elementary
School since 2006.
"Mrs. Pearce has demon-
strated exceptional leadership
and instructional skills in the
short time she has been at
Crawfordville. She is first to
volunteer her time and ideas
for Sunshine, PBS, and SAC.
She demonstrates a can-do
spirit and makes colleagues,
parents and children feel
valued through positive com-
munication," said Principal
Tanya English.
Pearce is a graduate of
Wakulla High School, Talla-
hassee Community College
and Florida State University.
Prior to teaching school, she
worked at FSU and later was
appointed as Pre-K school
secretary at WEC.
"During my five years as


Jan Pearce
secretary at Pre-K, I fell in
love with the faculty, staff
and young students in the
program. I watched, listened
and learned all I could about
the importance of early inter-
vention and early childhood
education," Pearce said.
Pearce successfully com-
pleted the Florida Depart-
ment of Education's Alterna-
tive Teaching Certification
Program. She shared, "As a


kindergarten teacher I have
the honor of helping to mold
and shape my students to be
lifelong learners; to look at the
world with curiosity and won-
der and to look at others with
compassion and respect. I love
to celebrate my students' ac-
complishments whether it
is reading a word, painting
a picture, writing a sentence,
tying a shoe, losing a tooth or
making a new friend."
Pearce credits Annie Ruth
Perryman, Alice Stokley, Beth
Mims and her husband Bobby,
for providing the support and
encouragement needed to be
successful. She is passionate
about early intervention and
early childhood education,
"The key to teaching young
children is to make learning
magical and memorable. I love
creating 'learning magic' for
my students," she concluded.
Cheryl Mallow, the May
Employee of the Month, has
been the Sopchoppy Educa-
tion Center secretary since


Cheryl Mallow
2002. Prior to 2001, she was
a CDA, teacher assistant and
substitute teacher for the
Wakulla Pre-K program. Mal-
low fondly remembers the day
Annie Ruth Perryman offered
her a position to work with
Gail Lipford, "my friend and
my mentor."
Cheryl Mallow was born
and raised in Hillsborough
County. She attended Hills-
borough Community College
in Tampa. However, Mallow is


quick to note, "I think I work
in the best school district in
the state. My job includes
working directly with the
Second Chance Program, the
Adult Education Programs, the
Exit Option Program and the
Pre-K Program. The variety and
challenge of the job makes it
enjoyable."
The only staff members
at Sopchoppy Education Cen-
ter are Dr. Tom Askins and
Cheryl Mallow. "The most
exciting time for me is gradu-
ation. I'm always excited to
see how proud our students
are when they succeed," adds
Ms. Mallow. She is involved
in all aspects of the program.
From ordering the diplomas
to ordering the cake, from
picking up goodies to printing
the programs, from securing
graduation robes to playing
the piano, from offering con-
gratulations to cleaning up
after the event.
When not juggling all of
her duties as Sopchoppy sec-


retary, Cheryl Mallow is busy
serving on the technology
committee, the textbook com-
mittee, the Christian Motor-
cycle Association, the Lake
Ellen 3:16 riders and the Lake
Ellen Music Ministry.
Dr. Tom Askins, Sopchoppy
Administrator, applauds Mal-
low as well. He adds, "In a
small school setting one al-
ways wears a lot of hats, but
Cheryl does it in the extreme.
She manages all of the fol-
lowing: registrar, inventory
manager, safety and security
liaison, radio operator, data
entry, pre-k facilitator, adult
education monitor, bookkeep-
er, purchasing agent, technol-
ogy specialist, nurse, social
director, the voice of SEC,
music director, and principal's
secretary. She works through
her lunch and still manages to
serve her family and keep me
out of trouble. No wonder she
has acquired the nickname
of "Hydra of Yellow Jacket
Avenue."


WHS students receive


scholarships


Rashard Mills Vinson Stevens


Two Wakulla High School
seniors received the county's
first scholarships from Com-
munities in Schools (CIS)
of Leon County, Dollars for
Scholars Program.
Reshard Mills and Vinson
Stevens were awarded $500
each during the Third'An-
nual Communities in Schools
awards program on May 14
at Sittig Hall in Tallahassee.
Chosen from a large field of
applicants from all Tallahas-
see high schools, Mills and
Stevens were two of only 12
scholarship recipients this
year. "These students have
done something that makes
us all so proud," said Keynote
Speaker Jackie Pons. Wakulla
County Superintendent of
Schools David Miller agreed,
saying, "These gentlemen are
great examples of how hard
work and commitment pay
big dividends."
The seniors were honored
again at Wakulla High School's
awards ceremony on May 15.
Principal Mike Crouch said,
"On behalf of WHS, I am
proud to recognize Wakulla's
inaugural CIS award winners
and their efforts in the class-
room and community."


Mills is the son of James
and Brenda Mills. After gradu-
ation, he hopes to attend Tal-
lahassee Community College
or FAMU. He is interested in
criminal justice, but is also
contemplating a career as an
electrician. Mills plans to fur-
ther his knowledge and skills
to help him meet his goals.
Stevens is the son of Sylvia
Miller and Mike Stevens. After
graduation, he would like to
attend Lively Technical Center.
He is undecided regarding his
future field of study, however,
technology is a possibility.
Since CIS was started in
Leon County in 1997, it has
raised $50,000 and in the last
three years has awarded 24
scholarships. CIS has also
donated over $2.5 Million
in services to Leon County
Schools.
Communities In Schools
(CIS) is a private, nonprofit
organization that connects
community resources from
public and private sectors
with at-risk students. CIS
utilizes the power of part-
nerships to serve students,
schools and communities. For
more information, please visit
www.cisleon.org.


CHAT, FWC share

dog information
Members of Citizens for
Humane Animal Treatment
(CHAT) recently visited with
S- Medart Elementary School to
S explain their goals and dis-
.'-- i ' cuss how students can help
curb the number of unwanted
S animals in the community.
Teacher Laura Lawhon and
some of her kindergarten
students visited with Lady, an
a. .animal shelter dog.
In addition, on Tuesday,
April 29, the Medart Mustangs
enjoyed a demonstration by
Florida Wildlife Commission
K-9 Officer Jeff Bababuta and
his furry friend, Mack. Laura
Lawhon and her students
were among the crowd gath-
ered behind the school to see
the helicopter take off. School
officials thanked the FWC
and pilots, Frank Utermohlen,
David Calianno, and Jaira
Students learned McKeown who helped make
about animal shelter the event a fantastic day for
dogs at event the students and staff.

Habitat for Humanity
"Re-Store",
Shadeville Highway
92 6-4 5 44
Open Tues. - Sat. - 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.


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