Title: Wakulla news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00168
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: April 24, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028313
Volume ID: VID00168
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Full Text



*.*********************3-*DI*T 326
2562 10-01-08 327 24S
UNIVERSITY OF FL LIBRARY **B010
PO BOX 117007
200 SMA UNIVERSITY OF FL
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007
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are focused on a conference center


Pope Benedict XVI leaves aircraft and meets President Bush and family

Evans helps welcome Pope

Benedict XVI at Andrews A.F.B.
Crawfordville resident and 2007 Wakulla High School graduate David Evans, far
left, got a front row look at President George W. Bush and Pope Benedict XVI last
week when the Pope began a visit to the United States with a stop at Andrews Air
Force Base on April 15.
Evans is serving in the United States Coast Guard and is part of the Presidential
Honor Guard. Evans and other members of the military honor guard lined the red
carpet and provided a welcome for the Pope as he landed in his Italian jet at the
air field. Other branches of the military are also represented in the Honor Guard.
Evans was accepted into the Coast Guard in November 2007. He is based in Al-
exandria, Va. He is the son of Sherry and Kenneth Paul Balchuck of Crawfordville
and Donald Edward Evans of Tallahassee. Photo by Reuters.


The City of St. Marks is looking at
the feasibility of creating a conference
center to attract visitors to the river-
front community. The plan would
also call for using the old Posey's
property to create a public plaza on
the waterfront.
The revitalization plans were dis-
cussed at a meeting of the St. Marks
Waterfront Florida committee on
Tuesday, April 15, and presented to
the city commission at a workshop
before their April 10 meeting.
The waterfront committee is plan-
ning a public meeting on May 20 to
put the idea before citizens. The meet-
ing will be held at the St. Marks Yacht
Club beginning at 6:30 p.m.
The revitalization plan is the basis
for the city's proposed Community
Redevelopment Area which is a pro-
vision in state law that allows local
governments to use property tax rev-
enues in certain targeted areas. Under
a CRA, property tax values would be
frozen, and any increase in taxes due
to increase in the land's value over 30
years would go to St. Marks to pay for
the redevelopment effort.


ing gate.
Tom Ankerson, a professor at the
University of Florida's law school,
was at the waterfront committee
meeting with several law students
who are studying the comprehen-
sive growth plans of communities
that have received the Waterfronts
Florida designation. After hearing
the project plans, Ankerson called it
an interesting idea. "It's something a
developer would propose," he said,
"and here you have citizens making


these proposals.,"
Mike Pruitt, a member of the wa-
terfronts committee, responded that
the citizens of the community want
to control development rather than
sitting back and seeing what develop-
ers bring in.
A feasibility study still must be
done on the proposal, and Durwood
Jackson, another member of the com-
mittee, indicated such a study would
cost upwards of $25,000.
"We are the only coastal commu-
nity that has lost population over
the past 20 years," said waterfronts
chairman Billy Bishop, explaining the
impetus for the CRA.
The goal with the conference cen-
ter is to create a location for regional
business meetings for groups of up to
100. The attraction would be the laid-
back, small town feel of St. Marks and
the area eco-tourism. New jobs would
be created in service and support
industries, as well as the opportunity
for small businesses to open that
catered to these visitors. The vision
for St. Marks is one where people
stroll through the walking areas, the
waterfront and boardwalk.
Continued on Page 13A


Board votes to table charter


issue for more investigation


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Commissioners tabled the
issue of pursuing a county char-
ter, directing staff to meet with
constitutional officers and city of-
ficials to discuss their concerns.
The City of St. Marks' efforts
to create a Community Rede-
velopment Area (CRA) using its
taxing authority was pointed to
by County Administrator Ben Pin-
gree and Commissioner Howard
Kessler as the primary reason for
needing to establish the county
as a charter government to pro-
tect the county's interests.
Pingree indicated he was con-


cerned that the city's CRA will
have "a huge fiscal impact on
the county." He recommended
that the county spend $10,000
to hire Kurt Spitzer & Associates
to advise the board on drafting
a charter,
Reportedly, Pingree has fig-
ures that indicate the St. Marks
CRA would cost the county $160
million in lost tax revenues over
40 years. The city's own figures
show a much slower growth in
tax values. Additionally, city offi-
cials have indicated a willingness
to make some sort of payment
to the county especially to cover
the cost of law enforcement.


That idea was not discussed at
the meeting.
St. Marks City Commissioner
Chuck Shields and other city offi-
cials arrived just as the issue was
being discussed and urged com-
missioners not to spend money
on a consultant if the only mo-
tive was to stop St Marks' plans.
The city will have its CRA in place
by June, Shields said, while the
county must hold a referendum
for voters to approve a proposed
charter the earliest date would
be the August primary, although
the November general election
would be likeliest.
Continued on Page 14A


Langston visits with Debbie DuBois and Parks and Recreation Director Ray Gray

Langston works on special projects


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla County Adminis-
trator Ben Pingree likes to use
baseball analogies to describe
the Wakulla County Commis-
sion operation. After hiring
most of his support team last
year, mirigree hired someone
in January he calls his "utility
infielder" to handle special




This Week
Comment & Opinion.. Page 2A
Church......................Page4A
People -........................Page 6A
School ......................... Page 7A
j Sports .........................Page 8A
Outdoors ..................Page 10A
Almanac............ .......Page 11A
Sheriffs Report........Page 2A
Senior Living-.....Page 1P Ba
People-----------.Page 2B
Flower Photo's..........Page 8B







16 184578 2021 10


projects.
Jennifer Cook Langston is
the Special Projects Coordi-
nator, a person who can be
multi-talented and serve Pin-
gree as his utility infielder, a
staff member who can do a
number of tasks well.
Langston. arrived for the
job at the beginning of the
year after Pam Portwood re-
signed and Pingree split the
duties of her office. Langston
was hired to do the special
projects and Eva Thorpe was


hired to be the county grants
coordinator.
"We needed someone who
could put out fires, not fall
under specific departments,
but could touch a lot of ar-
eas," said Pingree. "She has
been a great addition. Her
plate is overflowing." Thorpe
was added in the Office of
Management and Budget with
Director Tim Barden and as-
sistant Colleen Skipper.

Continued on Page 13A


Staff directed to work

on contract with Expo


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
County commissioners voted 3-
2 for staff to continue negotiations
with the Wakulla Expo Association
to create a partnership to adminis-
ter a proposed civic center.
The deal would also include
three acres of land to be leased to
the county for a youth community
center.
Besides sticking points in the
contract negotiations whether
the county would have two seats
on the civic center board or a
majority the biggest problem
appeared to be questions about
whether WEA is a non-profit or-
ganization.
Analysis of that question left


staff in a position of being unable
to confirm WEA's status, said Coun-
ty Administrator Ben Pingree. He
also indicated that while the group
has submitted many requested
documents, it has not provided
proof that it is indeed a recognized
charitable organization.
Commissioner Brian Langston,
who has championed and pushed
the issue of the community center,
indicated he was disturbed by the
WEA's lack of ability to prove its
non-profit status. He voted along
with Chairman Brimner and Maxie
Lawhon for staff to go back to WEA
and bring back a final contract for
the board to vote up or down.

Continued on Page 14A


Meeting House Sink

Our View:The State of Florida

should buy the Ferrell property


The State of Florida has shown a dedication to
preserving Wakulla Springs with the purchase of
land where the aquifer is most vulnerable.
There is still a missing piece, however. The more
than 1,000 acre tract owned by the Ferrell family
that has 71 known karst features, including 12 karst
windows, five known locations of the cave system
on the property, and two swallets where surface
water flows directly underground and probably


directly into the aquifer.
One of the sinkholes on the property has a
confirmed connection to the Leon Sinks-Wakulla
Springs cave system. A diver swam from Greyhound
Sink into the cave system and tied his dive line to
the divers' line put down when they made their
historic swim to connect Wakulla Springs and
Turner Sink.
Continued on Page 13A







Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008



Comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895


Supporting favorite

candidates in 2008
^ By KEITH BLACKMAR being killed.
'" blackmar@thewakullanews.net LOOKING BACK AT
'The 2008 election season FIVE YEARS AGO-2003
1s"rapidly approaching which Three Crawfordvil
ineans political supporters will ers, Colby, Tully and Trc
scion be preaching the virtues of man, were sent off to wa
tiheir favorite candidates. With er as President George
im'6re offices up for election this sent troops to Iraq. T
year and a retiring constitutional are the sons of Donnie
officer, the number of candidates Sparkman of Crawfordv
'will also increase. Some gas statio:
SA Minnesota newspaper pub- running low on fuel as
lisher recently required his read- rationed fuel shipment
ers to pay for letters to the editor the beginning of the Ira
ih support of specific candidates. LOOKING BACK AT
*Wiile we won't ever use the paid YEARS AGO-1998
lttfer tactic to slow the intensity Committee memi
4arid frequency of letter-writing ready to clear property a
ainhpaigns, we do experience a sign for the proposed
i'i similar increase in letters Expo Center. Rep. Janeg
'oAb6ut candidates as the summer and Don Coker of the
'nonths approach. Department of Agricult
-:We welcome letters to the edi- attended the ceremony.
t) fand will not charge someone Omaha. Neb. firm
expressres their opinions. Some teams announced plans
jiewspapers, including one about a facility at Opportun:
'25 miles north of us, have been CSG selected Wakulla
"charging to run obituaries, over sites in South C
': While it raises some revenue North Carolina, Penns
fof'the paper, I dislike the idea and Georgia.
fif taking advantage of a family LOOKING BACK AT
- the time of mourning. I have YEARS AGO-1993
found that family members ap- Wakulla Middle
Preciate not having to fork over teacher Queen Webs
their checkbook at the sad time honored with the Ida
of a relative's death. In exchange Distinquished Educato
for the free death notice, I re- for her contributions
serve the right to edit them for school system and n
length and content, students.
,I would ask that those indi- Wakulla County
viduals who decide to write let-. sioners began discus
ters in support of their favorite eliminate the unmanned
candidates this year keep the dump sites. Eventually, t
letters short and to the point. ty pulled the unmanned
Letters questioning other can- off the sides of the roai
dicates will not be accepted if LOOKING BACK AT
tjie candidate does not have the YEARS AGO-1988
opportunity to respond to the County officials tu
concerns before voters go to the the Otter Creek sewage
ballot box. That deadline may ment plant. The plan
turn out to be a little earlier this residents in Ochlocko
year since voters can cast their and Panacea.
ballots about two weeks prior The Wakulla Count
to the August primary and No- Board was required to im
member General Election. Happy an asbestos abatement
(am.iaigning everyone! remove the substance
-..Here is another look back of the district facilities.
at stories we covered over the LOOKING BACK AT.
years. These stories broke during YEARS AGO-1983
Ole month of April. Many of the R.H. Carter was ap
stories I pulled from the archives Assistant Superinten
are from my own files. Schools to fill in for Dr.
: LOOKING BACK AT APRIL- Whaley while Whaley re
O)NE YEAR AGO-2007 from surgery. Whaley w
A 22-year-old Panacea man to a Tallahassee hosp
was killed in a late night shoot- heart surgery.
g. Zack Spencer Gossett was Governor Bob
1lled outside his home. Jesse appointed Elnita Burk
Aaron Chrysler, Jr. and Christo- pervisor of Elections tc
lher Lee Hartsfield were charged Nell Russ. Burke replace
ic the slaying. on July 2. Burke would
Sheriff David Harvey recog- 1984 election to Sherid
nized Thomas Tidwell and Aus- who has been in the off
In Miller for assisting Jackson that time.
kllbritton Hampton who was Keith Blackma
he victim of a dog bite attack, Editor of The Wa
The actions of the two individu-
qls saved the young victim from News.

Thank you for caring

editor, The News: phone calls, food, condo
'; We, the family of the late courtesies and other var
fona Lavon Hawkins, Sr., would of kindness during our
like to express our sincere appre- bereavement.
qiation to everyone. Thank you The Hawkins family
f6r the cards, flowers, prayers, Quincy


ow hm o o spm9'v


T APRIL-

le broth-
)y Spark-
.r togeth-
W. Bush
he boys
and Rita
ille.
ns were
s dealers
s due to
aq war.
APRIL-10

bers got
and erect
WakuUa
ale Boyd
e Florida
:ure also

CSG Sys-
to locate
ity Park.
County
Carolina,
sylvania

APRIL-15

School
ter was
S. Baker
r Award
s to the
minority

Commis-
ssion to
d garbage
he coun-
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d.
APRIL-20

Lrned on
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nee Bay

y School
nplement
plan to
from all
APRIL-25

appointed
dent of
William
recovered
'as taken
pital for

Graham
e as Su-
replace
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lose the
da Crum
ice since

r is
akulla


lolences,
rious acts
r time of


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Syndicated


Content


Availafro Comerial News Providers"
Available from Commercial News Providers"


Wakulla County Commissioners and staff wrestle with the charter county issue


County wins

booby prize

Editor, The News:
Parks and Recreation Direc-
tor Ray Gray and the Wakulla
County Commission should be
awarded the booby prize for
building an unsightly outhouse
in the middle of Circle Point on
the Levy Bay Road in Panacea.
Commissioner Maxie Lawhomrn
introduced the agenda item on
March 19, 2007 and the rest of the
commission voted unanimously
for it. Until this eyesore, which
the county agenda of March 19,
2007 called a' "permanent self-
composting restroom facility".
hereafter known as PSCRF, was
erected,
Levy Bay was one of the best
scenic vistas in the county. It
was easy to drive down to Circle
Point, collect your wits and enjoy
nature as you gazed out over the
landscape of winding creeks,
green marshes, watched mullet
jump and wading birds feed
around the oyster bars of Levy
Bay. Now Ray Gray's unsightly
block 'outhouse squats in the
middle of the road, spoils the
mood and the view, and even
worse, creates a public safety
hazard.
When I complained, Gray
stated in a letter to Ben Pingree,
the County Administrator, "Re-
garding the accidents that have
occurred at this facility since its
construction, both have been
vehicles leaving the roadway
and entering the bay area. Nei-
ther of these have involved the
restroom facility."
Interesting, in all my years of
living in Panacea, I don't recall
vehicles plowing off into the'
marsh in a month long period.
I don't know the details but
maybe something startled them,
like maybe a monolithic rect-
angle looming up from the dark-
ness. The fact is that there was
no need for a PSCRF on Circle
Point. People pull their boats in
and out and go on, although it's
harder now since you have to go
around it.
There's not a citizen I've spo-
ken to who is happy with that
raw block eyesore, especially
when they hear that it costs
taxpayers $6,100. I have heard
residents thinking that we hold
a public demolition, using sledge
hammers to take it down before
someone gets hurt. The county
commission should come to its
senses, pay more of our hard-
earned money, hire Gray's favor-
ite contractor and use a bulldozer
and dump trucks to remove it.
Gray's Outhouse is not only
a traffic menace, it's guaranteed
to become a health hazard, espe-
cially since the stinking mess sits
in a low spot that has a history
of turning into a soggy, muddy
bog when it rains. I have been
unable to find out exactly who
ended up with the money, but
it really doesn't matter, it was a
mistake and bad judgment on
the commission's part.
There are so many pressing


needs these days, and sc
money to go around, ou
missioners must use
judgment.
The "Permanent Sell
posting Restroom Facilit
blighted the scenic vi
beautiful Levy Bay, and i
anteed to look and smel
worse when the vandal
homeless people get th
with it. We need to presei
scenic nature of our coas
doesn't Wakulla County
its FEMA money and replay
bridge that was washed a'
Hurricane Dennis? Then
again visitors, bird watched
fishermen will be able to
the beauty of Skipper Bay
,, Helpus, ppmissioners
harm us, and tear that st
PSCRF down!
Jack Rudloe
Panacea
Mow around t)
flowers
Editor, The News:
Hurrah for the count
ployee who mowed arou
many patches of wildfl
between Highway 98 anc
Point last week.
Marcia Bjerregaard
Shell Point
Thanks to

Lamarche
Editor, The News:
We are the American
nal Justice Association, L
Alpha Epsilon, the Profes
Criminal Justice Fraternit
Florida State University.
After winning nun
awards at our regional co
tion in the fall, we were i
to compete on the nation
in Kansas City, Mo., A
through April 11.
As future leaders in cr
justice, it greatly benefits
have the chance to co
against the best chapter
around the nation, La
Alpha Epsilon of FSU is
ful for benefactors such
Plantation Security Cor
(PSI), who helped spons
trip. Major Alan Lamarci
President, has support(
FSU School of Criminolol
particularly the Criminal
Association, LAE, in an el
further our studies in cri
ogy. The generosity of P
Major Lamarche enable
fraternity to receive ad'
training and compete in
such as crime scene inv
tions, firearm precision, p
agility, and intelligence
while in Kansas City.
Coleman Dale Wells
Crawfordville

Help us find

Editor, The News:
I am a longtime reside
Crawfordville. My husbar
born here and his parent
born here. I came to lo
quaint town and the I
within. Almost everyone
call you by name, and see
be ready to lend a helpin
at whatever was needed.


o little
r com-
better

f-Com-
y" has
sta of
s guar-
11 even
Is and
rough
rve the
t. Why
spend
ace the
way by
n once
ers and
enjoy
t.


One night a man knocked
on the door. He had found
someone's pig and was trying
to find the owner. Those are the
true people of our sleepy little
community. Life was good, calm,
and peaceful. But as others have
found our community they have
started to change what we are,
forgetting this is our community
and we are willing to share. It
hurts to see the way some of
you are.
On March 28, my tiny white
poodle wandered out of my yard.
I called some friends and we


searched for two days and nights.
to no avail. We are quite certain
someone picked her up.
My mother is 97 and our little
one was her companion and gave
her a reason to face each day.
Now life for her is very empty.:
She spends most of her days wor-
rying about our little one.
Please, if you know anything
about her or if you have her, join
our community and find your
heart and return her to us.
Pat Harvey
Crawfordville


WEEK IN WAKULLA


s, don't Thursday, April 24, 2008
sinking BOOK NOOK, for children in grades K-5, will be held at
the public library at 10:30 a.m.
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB meets at Posey's Up the Creek
in Panacea at noon.
GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP, through Big Bend Hospice, meets
he at the senior center at 12:30 p.m.
MARITIME TRAIL LECTURE SERIES will feature maritime
archaeologist Michael Faught speaking on Florida during
the Ice Age through historic times. The lecture will be held
ty em- at TCC Wakulla at 7:30 p.m. A pre-lecture social will be
nd the held beginning at 7 p.m. The event is hosted by the Big
lowers Bend Maritime Center.
d Shell MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA, a fellowship of men
who gather to share and support one another in the quest
for authentic manhood, meets at Cornerstone
Ministries "outback" at 6:30 p.m. For more information,
call Steve Smith at 508-2560.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at 12 noon.
TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet at the
Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea at 8:30 a.m.
Crimi- VFW BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road
ambda from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
,sional YOGA CLASSES are held Tuesdays and Thursdays at the
ssifrom Crawfordville Women's Club at 6:30 p.m. For information or
to register, call 926-4293.
Lerous Friday, April 25, 2008
impeti- AA meets at the American Legion Building next to the
invited Women's Club in Crawfordville with an open meeting at
al level 8 p.m. There are also open meetings Sunday at 6 p.m.,
Ipril 6 Monday for women at 6 p.m., and Wednesday at 8 p.m.
ALZHEIMER'S SUPPORT GROUP meets at the senior center
criminal at 1:30 p.m.
s us to PICKIN' 'N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at the
mpete senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
s from Saturday, April 26, 2008
ambda BRENDA HOLLEY BENEFIT DINNER will be held in the
grate- Wakulla Collision Center parking lot beginning at 11 a.m.
as the Fried fish and pulled pork dinners will be served for $10.
mpany Holley has third stage Lyme disease and needs financial
sor our help with treatment costs.
he, PSI CRAWFORDVILLE ELEMENTARY SPRING FESTIVAL will be
ed the held at the school from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. The event will
gy, and feature a silent auction, cake walk, gift baskets, a sweet.
Justice shop and more.
effort to NA meets at the Torch, 16 Lower Bridge Road, at 5 p.m.
iminol- For more information, call 599-2876.
?SI and SOPCHOPPY OPRY will be held at the Sopchoppy High
ed our School auditorium beginning at 7 p.m. Scheduled
vanced performers include the Kenny Hill Band. Tickets are $8.
i areas STEPHEN C. SMITH MEMORIAL REGATTA will be held at
vestiga- Shell Point throughout the weekend. The event is a
hysical fundraiser for the American Cancer Society.
testing Sunday, April 27, 2008
STEPHEN C. SMITH MEMORIAL REGATTA continues at
Shell Point, including a Jimmy Buffet and Parrot Heads
parade at noon.
Tuesday, April 29, 2008
dog BOOK BABIES, for infants and toddlers, will be held at
the public library at 10:30 a.m.
TWILIGHT TALES, bedtime stories for children, will be read
dent of at the public library from 7 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Children are
nd was encouraged to wear pajamas and bring a stuffed animal.
ts were Wednesday, April 30, 2008
yve the AA meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.
people BOOK BUNCH, for pre-school and home school families,
e could meets at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
med to BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior citizens
g hand center at 10:30 a.m.


W






TOh walla P635s
The Wakulla News (USPS 644-640) is published weekly at
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla
News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
General Manager: Tammie Barfield.....................tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Editor: Keith Blackmar....................................kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Reporter: William Snowden.............................wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton........... advertising@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey ...................kinsey@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales: Kai Page..................................... kpage@thewakullanews.net
:Bookkeeping: Sherry Balchuck .......................accounting@thewakullanews.net
Classifieds/In House Sales: Alex Brimner...........classifieds@thewakullanews.net
Circulation: Sherry/Alex................................. circulation@thewakullanews.net
Proofreader: Karen Tully
Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable
one year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $25, Out of County $30
Out of State $35. Out of Country on Request











Wakulla Springs protection zone


expansion approved by board


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
County commissioners voted
to expand the Wakulla Springs
Protection Zone, increasing its
size five times over, representing
explorations and connections
made by cave divers in establish-
ing underground links between
sinkholes and the springs.
The board voted unanimously
to expand the area at the com-
mission meeting on Monday,
April 21.
The ,purpose of the zone is
to protect the water quality at
Wakulla Springs from degrada-
tion by chemical discharges,
and has requirements for the
handling or storage of regulated
substances such as gasoline and
pesticides.
The Wakulla Watershed Coali-
tion had suggested the change in
the fall of 2007 after numerous
studies, such as dye traces, and
cave exploration by divers had
established that vulnerable wa-
tersheds were much larger than
the original springs protection
zone ordinance.
Chad Hanson, president of
the watershed coalition, praised
the board for its action, noting
that the newly expanded zone is
five times the size of the original
zone, and much of the protection
zone is publicly owned lands.
Hanson also added that the
recent meeting of county com-
missioners from Wakulla and
Leon counties as well as officials
from the City of Tallahassee
at Wakulla, Springs to discuss
efforts to develop a regional ap-
proach to springs protection was
much-needed. He suggested that


such meetings become annual or
semi-annual events.
Madeleine Carr, also a mem-
ber of the watershed coali-
tion and Friends of Wakulla
Springs, noted that divers with
the Woodville Karst Plain Proj-
ect are moving their equipment
to begin exploring the Spring
Creek springs. Be prepared, she
told commissioners, to expand
the springs protection zone as
divers and scientists explore that
cave system.
In other matters before the
board:
Chairman Ed Brimner pre-
sented a memo to fellow com-
missioners suggesting that staff
be directed to investigate the
cost of hiring an in-house attor-
ney to represent the county.
The contract with the county's
current law firm, Mowrey &
Mitchell, expires in September
2009, and Brimner said that a
transition plan should be in
place before the contract ends.
Ron Mowrey, who has represent-
ed Wakulla County for decades,
has said he has no interest in
renewing the contract.
Brimner also noted that legal
bills for representation by Mow-
rey's firm totaled nearly $400,000
for the past 14 months. That's
in addition to nearly $30,000 for
work by the Nabors, Giblin and
Nickerson law firm.
"It is time for Wakulla County
to explore hiring a full-time attor-
ney," Brimner wrote. "A county
attorney and legal assistant
should be much less expensive
than the current process we are
using."
Commissioner Howard Kes-


sler agreed that "This is a very
costly service we're getting," and
said he supported advertising
for a new attorney. He added
that he wanted to transition to
a new attorney without waiting
for Mowrey's contract to expire
next year.
Brimner answered that his
motion was not about getting
rid of Mowrey, rather it was
about a smooth transition. In
his three and a half years on
the board, Brimner said, it was
typical that an expiring contract
would be brought up a month
or two before it ended, leaving
commissioners with no room
for choices. He also noted the
search for an administrator took
nine months and suggested it
could take longer to hire a new
attorney.
Commissioner Brian Langs-
ton indicated concerns about the
feasibility of hiring an in-house
attorney and withdrew his sec-
ond, which was replaced by a
second from Maxie Lawhon, and
ultimately cast the lone dissent-
ing vote against Brimner's idea.
A resolution for the county
to stop buying bottled water
passed 3-2.
Commissioner Kessler
brought up the subject, saying
the board should encourage the
adoption of sustainable behav-
iors. Plastic single-serving water
bottles are wasteful, Kessler said,
noting that 40 million gallons of
oil are used to produce the plas-
tic bottles, plus the additional
petroleum needed to transport
bottled water.
Kessler suggested that county
offices drink tap water rather


than bottled water.
Brimner noted, however, that
some of the older offices such
as the commission meeting room
itself has no other water taps
except for the bathroom sinks.
He suggested that an exception
be made for the large-size water
bottles used in water coolers.
Citizen Chuck Hess spoke in
support of Kessler's proposal,
"We have some the best water
in the state," Hess said. "We can
really make a statement." Com-
missioner Lawhon joked: "If we
pass this, what's it going to look
like when we get into the bottled
water business?"
"This is the craziest thing
I've ever seen," Commissioner
Langston said of Kessler's pro-
posed resolution. He questioned
whether the objection was to the
water in the bottles or the plastic
bottles, noting that there is no
controversy about Coke being
sold in plastic bottles, and that
the soda is 97 percent water.
It was also clarified that the
resolution would not prohibit
the public from bringing plastic
water bottles into county of-
fices.
The resolution passed with
the support of Kessler, Brimner
and George Green. Langston and
Lawhon voted against.
"I'll buy the bottled water for
the employees," Lawhon said in
an aside to Pingree.
Pamr Portwood was ap-
proved as the new director of the
Wakulla County Tourist Develop-
ment Authority, replacing long-
time director Bonnie Holub.


Tax Collector will host online delinquent t


Wakulla County Tax Collector
Cheryll Olah is conducting the
2008 tax sale online this year
rather than holding the sale
in person in late May. Property
owners had until March 31 to
pay their tax bills without fac-
ing a three percent penalty in
April. ,
Property owners who fail
to pay their taxes in April will
face additional delinquent tax
advertising costs as well as the
possibility of having their parcels


go through the delinquent tax
sale process.
Olah said she plans to ad-
vertise the delinquent tax roll
May 8, May 15 and May 22 in
The Wakulla News. Individuals
interested in taking part in the
tax sale may register through
the tax collector's office and
attend' online training, sessions
April 29, May 6, May 13, May 15
and May 20 from 10 a.m. until
11 a.m. The training sessions
are free and will be held in the


county commission chambers.
Individuals who are unable to
attend the classes may visit
the tax collector's office and
get help with the process from
Olah's staff. Bidding will take
place between May 8 and May
29 at midnight. Registration for
the tax sale 'will begin April 28
as participants will be asked to
pay a fee.
Olah said her office mailed
out approximately 6,200 second
notices to property owners who


99


^ *r m 18TH ANNUAL- .


www.carrabelle.org

SATURDAY, APRIL 26-1 0:OOAM TO 6:00pM

SUNDAY, APRIL 27- 10:00AM TO 4:00PM

Fine Art & Crafts Seafood

Wildlife Exhibits Kid's Zone Paddling Events

Sand Sculptors Pet Parade Fishy Fashions

Live music by:
The Alabama Blues Brothers and Locomotive

Festival located on Marine Street along Carrabelle's Riverwalk
For information call The Carrabelle Area Chamber of Commerce
(850) 697-2585
Sponsored in part by Coastal Community Bank, Crystal Bay Health & Rehab Center, Forgotten
Coast Magazine, Gulf State Community Bank, Progress Energy, WCTV6, Carrabelle Palms RV Park, ,/ '
Forgotten Coast TV, Liberty Communications, Pepsi of Tallahassee, St. James Bay
Golf Course, and the Franklin County Tourist Development Council


have not paid their taxes. With
Wakulla County growth and a de-
sire by individuals to acquire real
estate for less money, the 2007
sale sold all of the delinquent
tax parcels except the ones that
were struck off to the county by
law. Those parcels are property
that have Homestead Exemption


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008 Page 3A

You'll like what you see

at the Wakulla Library


Please join the Wakulla Coun-
ty Commissioners in celebrating

From the Desk
of the Public
Library




Doug Jones

Library Appreciation Week. It
is celebrated during the week
beginning April 21. This action
coincides with Governor Charlie
Crist declaring the month of April
Library Appreciation Month in
Florida and the American Library
Association declaring the week
of April 13 to April 19 National
Library Week. Library Apprecia-
tion Week in Wakulla County was
adopted by a resolution passed
at the county commissioners at
their meeting on April 21.
Libraries and library cards
are indeed worth celebrating.
There is perhaps no greater free
resource available to the public
than public libraries and the
free library cards they issue.
The library card is the key that
unlocks a world of information
for all individuals.
Of course nothing is really
free. The Wakulla County Pub-
lic Library is supported by ad
valorem property taxes, State
Aid to Public Libraries, and con-
tributions from the Friends of


Wakulla County Public Libra~r
The library's preliminary budget
request for next year asksJfqr
$225,000 in property tax dol-
lars, a 15 percent reduction from
this year's funding. Assuming,
population of about 30,000, this
is about $7.50 for every man,
woman and child in the county.
Looked at another way, for the
price of small paperback book
this investment provides free ac-
cess to a multitude of programs
for children, adults and families,
free computer classes, high speed
Internet access and public com-
puters, the latest best sellers anQ
a library collection of more than
42,000 books, 2,700 videos and
DVDs, and 1,500 audio books!''
The Friends of the Wakulla
County Public Library are begji4-
ning a new membership drjv
during May. The Friends h'e
traditionally provided ab',iit
$10,000 per year toward our
library services. Next year the
hope to provide $20,000 and pir
up some of the slack from the
reduction in ad valorem property
taxes. Please help them in this
endeavor by joining their organi-
zation. Memberships start at$5
and donations in any amount are
always welcome. Membership
applications can be requested
by calling 926-7415 or sending an
e-mail to friends@wakullalibrary.
org. In the meantime, come and
check out your public library.
I think you will like what you
seel


WW II museum to open-
Across from the Highway 98 museum is planned to house
Carrabelle Beach site, where the important Camp Gordon
WWII amphibious landings were Johnston collection of wartiriie
practiced in 1944 and '45, a new artifacts.
The purchase and rezonirtg
tax l Iof 1.3 beachfront acres was re'
lax sale cently completed. Preliminary
plans have been drawn for a ne"w'
on them and are valued under building designed to resemble'
on them and are valued under one of the historic landing craft


Those who have not received
a tax bill but were expecting one,
may contact the tax collector's
office to see what happened to
the bill. For more information,
call 926-3371.


FARiM


926-3425- 926-365&T


4


926-2587 421-1290


Residential Limited Commercial


Serving All of Wakulla County

Commited to Quality and Friendly Service!.


Locally Owned and Operated by John Johnson

"Together, We are Keeping Wakulla Beautiful"


-%


I


I- -,-








Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008


Church


Obituaries
Linda S. Bohanon
Linda Sue Bohanon, 57, of
Nashville died Monday, April 7
at Berrien County Hospital.
Services were held Thurs-
day, April 10 at Purvis Funeral
Home.
She was born August 18, 1949
in North Carolina.
Survivors include her mother,
Sara Graham of Crawfordville; a
stepfather, Stan Matuszczak of
Panacea; two sons, Jimmy Boha-
non of Adel and Mike Bohanon
of Rincon, Ga.; four daughters
and sons-in-law, Tammy and Al-
lan Bristol of Adel, Sara Meeler of
Hawkinsville, Angie and Damon
Wood of Adel, and Lana and
Craig Siska of Adel; a brother,
Tommy Buffin; three sisters,
Toni Hyde of Newnan, Ga., Di-
ane Sprayberry of Panacea and
Margaret Adair of Cordele, Ga.; 16
grandchildren, Michael Bohanon,
Danny Bohanon, Christopher
James Meeler, Kristy Gandy,
Jaimie Merck, Nikols Folsom,
Sammi Siska, Kimberly Bristol,
Cody Bristol, Kayla Bristol, Terry
Wood, Courtney Abrams, Toby
Patterson, Cameron Bristol, Tom
Meeler, and Amanda Burkett;
four great-grandchildren; and
a previous spouse, Elton Folds
of Adel.
Purvis Funeral Home was in
charge of the arrangements.

Justin L. Council
Justin Levi Council, 27, of Craw-
fordville died Sunday, March 30,
2008, in Accra-Ghana, Africa.
A memorial service was held
Saturday, April 19 at Harvey-
:Young Funeral Home in Craw-
fordville. Memorial contributions
may be made to SunTrust Bank,
'c/o Ann Black, 3520 Thomasville
,Road, Fourth Floor, Tallahassee,
"PL 32309. Please make checks
payable to Madison Council.
A lifelong resident of Craw-
fordville, he was a U.S. Navy
veteran. He was an avid fisher-
;man, loved boating and was a
millwright.
He is survived by his wife
of 8 1/2 years, Jessica Council;
;two sons, Justin Levi Council II
4nd Mason Cole Council, both
:of Crawfordville; a daughter,
Madison Leigh Council of Craw-
fordville; his mother, Joy Brown
and husband Terry of Ponce de
Leon; two sisters, Nicole Council


St. Elizabeth
Ann Seton
Catholic C h
Mass 9 a.m. Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Father James MacGee, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
926-1797


Or0 ockonee


United
Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship 9 a.m.
Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
(5astof )tett 9Templeton
(850) 984-0127


and Brittany Brown, both of
Ponce de Leon; his mother-in-
law, Cindy Miller and husband
Wendell; and his father-in-law,
Greg Bowling.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.

Leon Crum
Leon Crum, 89, of Sopchoppy
died Sunday, April 20 in Sop-
choppy.
The funeral service was held
Wednesday, April 23, at Roberts
Cemetery in Franklin County.
A native of Sopchoppy, he
liked his vegetable garden and
fishing. He loved his grandkids.
He was of the Holiness faith,
a commercial fisherman and a
retired Chevrolet mechanic.
Survivors include his wife of
71 years, Frances "Deanie" Crum
of Sopchoppy; a daughter, Martha
Ann Porter and husband Edwin
of Sopchoppy; 13 grandchildren,
22 great-grandchildren, and 12
great-great-grandchildren; and
numerous friends and family.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.

Harold R. Elcoate
Harold Ross "Bear" Elcoate of
Crawfordville died Monday, April
14 in Tallahassee.
Private funeral services are
planned. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be
made to the Wakulla County
Animal Shelter, 15 Oak Street,
Crawfordville, FL 32327.
A native of San Francisco, Ca-
lif., he had lived in Crawfordville
since 1994. Bear enjoyed people,
pool and bartending as well as
the outdoors and tending to his
yard. His passions included his
dog, "Danger."
Survivors include his mother,


Pioneer Baptist
Church (SBC)
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.
Wed. adult, children & youth 7 p.m.
486 Beechwood Drive Crawfordville, FL.
(North of the Lower Bridge Road and
Spring Creek Highway intersection)
Rev. Dennis Hall, Pastor
850-926-6161

Trinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
TrinityLutheranofWakulla.com
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Les Kimball
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557


B^------ ----
Aolitinent Jzowicel
5585 Crawfordville Hwy.
Tallahassee, FL 32305
Owned & Operated By Wesley Schweinsberg
Son of the Late Harold Schweinsberg
Office: (850) 421-7211 Mobile: (850) 510-3983
Call and Compare... You'll Save Time & Money
Same Quality & Service


alu Elle


hurco


Hwy 319 Medart,
Office 926-5265
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.


Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org


Mary B. Elcoate of Crawfordville;
a sister, Judy Parker of Crawford-
ville; a nephew, Faxon Kalama
of Crawfordville; and a niece,
Jaelynn Kalama of Hawaii.
Fairchild Funeral Home in
Tallahassee was in charge of the
arrangements.

Burwell C. Harrison
Burwell Connor Harrison, 83,
of Tallahassee died Tuesday,
April 15.
Services were held at St. John's
Episcopal Church Friday, April 18
with interment at The Episcopal
Church of the Ascension in Car-
rabelle Saturday, April 19. In lieu
of flowers, contributions may be
made to Ascension Camp Weed
Scholarship Fund, P.O. Box 546,
Carrabelle, FL 32322.
A native of Tallahassee, he
was born on December 22, 1924
and educated in Leon County
schools, having graduated from
Leon High in June 1942. He
enlisted in the U.S. Navy and be-
came a naval aviator in May 1943.
After returning from World War
II, he married Betty Lewis and
graduated from The University
of the South, Sewanee. Tenn. He
became a senior vice president
of the Lewis State Bank, creating
"Bill the Bank," a predecessor of
MasterCard; was responsible for
the Computer and Data Process-
ing Center, and later worked
with Florida Bankers Association
to promote Electronic Funds
Transfer and the automated
clearing-house effort statewide
in Florida.
He retired in 1983 and resided
in Lanark Village. He was a char-
ter member of Holy Comforter
Episcopal Church, Tallahassee,
and an active layman at the
Church of the Ascension, Car-
rabelle. He was also an Eagle

'Skipper


Sunday Services:
11:30 Worship
10:30 Sunday School
Tuesdays:
17:30 Prayer Meeting
Pastor Ethel Skipper
0962-7838
165 Surf Rd., Sopchoppy

g Saint Teresa
Episcopal
Church
1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98
Sunday School
Holy Eucharist 8:30 am
Youth & Adults 9:30 AM
Children 10:30 AM
Worship 10:30 AM
Reverend John Spicer
926-4288
v-~ y


Scout and a member of Rotary
International. Survivors include
his wife of 61 years, Betty Lewis
Harrison; his children, Sarah
Harrison of Norfolk, Va., Kathy
Whitehead and husband Scott
of Williamsburg, Va., Fran Wil-
liams and husband Hugh "Bud"
of Lakeland, Lewis Harrison and
wife Jane of Virginia Beach, Va.,
Frank Harrison and wife Jill of
Brandon, David Harrison and
wife Jennifer of Crawfordville,
and Mary Douglas Lewis Wilgus;
a special niece who lived with
the family, and her husband, Bob,
both of Tallahassee; 16 grandchil-
dren, J.B. Samuel, Ben Samfiel,
Sarah Teresa Morlock, Douglas,
Patrick, Sterling Whitehead, Eliza-
beth Benson, Hugh Williams,
Sally Doyle, Julie Harrison; Frank
Harrison, Doug Harrison, Connor
Harrison, Andrew Harrison, Betsy
Holloway and Holly Holloway;
three great-grandchildren, Au-
drey Samuel, Cadence Morlock,
and Ella Benson; his sister, Betty
Harrison Lewis and husband
Cheever, of Lanark Village; as
well as numerous nieces and
nephews, cousins, and lifelong
friends.

William P. Horn
William P. Horn, 71, of Tal-
lahassee died April 18 in Tal-
lahassee.
Graveside services were held
Tuesday, April 22 at Tallahassee
Memory Gardens. In lieu of flow-
ers,/the family requests donations
be made to Eden Springs Nursing
Home in William's name.
A native of Talladega, Ala., he
was born Jan. 27, 1937 and he re-
sided in Tallahassee for the past
35 years. He worked as a painter
until his retirement. He resided
at Eden Springs Nursing Home
the past several years.


Panacea Park

Baptist Church
24 Mission Road, Panacea
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Worship 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 p.m.
Pastor, Jerry Spears


Wakulla
United Methodist Church
Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship 11a.m.
Wednesday Service 7 p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor Drew Standridge


Ochtockoice & Arran Road 'Come Grow With Us" www.crawfordville-umc.org


qRAC'E Baptist Church


Whwem EvEwyleey i4
Samae"dy c LH.iBody!
803 Crawfordville Hwv.
(Pih.926-3217)
iedneaday Services:
7pmr Adult Prayer/Bible Study
Live Out Loud Youth
Children's Ministry
Traditional & Contemporary
Christian Music
Pastor: Gary Tucker


Survivors include a son, Wil-
liam Horn of Montana; sister,
Almetta Horn of Tallahassee;
several grandchildren, a lov-
ing nephew, Donald Horn and
wife Evelyn, who has been his
caretaker for the past 20 years,
of Tallahassee; and two great-
nephews, Jeffrey Whittaker of
Tallahassee and Horn and wife
Lynne of Manfred, Ala.
Abbey-Riposta Funeral Home
in Tallahassee was in charge of
the arrangements.

Steve A. Jerger
Steve Allen Jerger, 49, of Talla-
hassee died Monday, April 14.
The funeral service was held
Saturday, April 19 at St. Mary
Primitive Baptist Church in Tal-
lahassee with burial at Southside
Cemetery,
He was a member of St. Mary
Primitive Baptist Church, where
he served on the usher board. He
was a custodian for Cobb Clean-
ing Service.
Survivors include a daughter,
Chantay Jerger; his fiance, Linda
Meadows of Tallahassee; two chil-
dren he raised, Shawante Mitchell
of Atlanta and Garry Meadows of
Tallahassee; four sisters, Lynett
Harvey Riley and Alfred of Long
Beach, Calif., Jessena Kilpatrick
and Joseph and Mable Wimberly
and Corker, all of Crawfordville,
and Maggie Jerger of Tallahassee;
two brothers, Chranzie Jerger, Jr.
of Tallahassee and John Spell
and Lilly of Midway; three grand-
children; a special niece, Tawana
Jerger; and a host of uncles, aunts,
nieces and nephews.
Strong & Jones Funeral Home
in Tallahassee was in charge of
the arrangements.


Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worship....................10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship............. 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study... 7 p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details,
962-2213


FiRST
BApiisi ChuRch



3086 Crawfordville Hwy.
(South of the Courthouse)
Church Office: 926-7896
www.fbccrawfordville.org
or
(youth) www.crosstraining.org


Ethelle C. Moore
Ethelle Core Moore, 90, of
Tallahassee died Thursday, April
17 at her home.
The funeral service was held
Monday, April 21 at Bevis Funeral
Home in Tallahassee with burial
at Oakland Cemetery.
A native of Wakulla County,
she was a lifelong resident of the
area. She was a sales associate
at Miller's Bootery for 32 years,
followed by several years at
Mendelson's Department Store
and the Storkette at the North-
wood Mall.
Survivors include her daugh-
ter, Jo Ann Frasier of Tallahas-
see; her loving companion of
many years, Travis Hiers of Tal-
lahassee; four grandsons, Dennis
Frasier and Keith Frasier, both
of Tallahassee, David Frasier of
Destin and Phil Frasier of the
Philippines; and nine great-
grandchildren.
Bevis Funeral Home in Tal-
lahassee was in charge of the
arrangements.

More Obituaries on
Page 5A

Service slated
Pastor Steve and Malissa
Taylor of the Christian Worship
Center on U.S. Highway 98 next
to the Inn at Wildwood, will
host Homecoming on Sunday,
April 27. A morning service will
be held at 11 a.m. Dinner on
the grounds will follow with a
sing afterwards. Local talent is
welcome to attend.


WatkudA
Pr /byt riaift
3383 Coastal Hwy.
1/3rd mile east of Wakulla High School
9:30 a.m. Bible Study
10:30 a.m. Worship Service
10:45 a.m. Children's Sunday School
Nursery Provided
926-4569
www.wakullapres.org





DI. ancyf 'ortnmd, Pastf


SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Fellowship Meal 6:00 p.m.
(call for reservations)
Prayer/ Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
IMPACT (Youth) 7:00 p.m.
Children's Events 6:30 p.m.


Schedule of Services
* Sunday 11 a.m.
* Wednesday 7 p.m.
* Thursday Ladies
Bible Study 10 a.m.
2263 Curtis Mill Rd.
Sopchoppy, FL 962-3774
Pastor John S. Dunning
(From Rhema Bible Training Center)


Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
M$OEMUE F GO Crawfordville
Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School........................ 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship...................... 11 a.m.
Evening Worship.....................6 p.m.
Wednesday Service............7...7 p.m.
& Youth Service......................7 p.m.
Royal Rangers.....................7...7 p.m.
M issionettes............................ 7 p.m.


Crawfordville United

SMethodist Church

Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 926-7209


_________________ in

J/ks~caae,~L Ae ~j~z~ence'/


Hallowed Be Thy Name

Church of God Presents...






community outreach


FOOD FUN
FELLOWSHIP

Saturday, April 26, 2008
Hudson Park
Crawfordville, FL
10AM-2PM


Who is the latest

Wakulla Wavemaker?"

Tune in daily at

2 p.m. and 6 p.m.





THE WORD IN PRAISE



WAKU 94.1 FM www.wave94.com
926-8000 (fax: 926-2000)


I








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008 Page 5A


Obituaries
Continued from Page 4A


Betty R. Pearce
Betty Rentz Pearce, 89, of
Crawfordvlle died Thursday,
April 17 in Crawfordville.
The funeral service was held
Monday, April 21 at Crawford-
ville United Methodist Church
.with burial at Pearce Family
.CemeterS in Hilliardville. Me-
morial contributions may be
made to Crawfordville United
SMethodist Church, 176 Och-
lockonee Street, Crawfordville,
FL 32327 or a charity of your
choice.
-, A native of Boyetteville, Ga.,
-she had been a resident of
Crawfordville since 1974. She
was a member of Crawfordville
.United Methodist Church for
more than 30 years. Her family
was her number one priority.
.She was a member of many
service organizations during
Usher lifetime. She loved cooking
:and gardening.
a Survivors include two sons,
.Randy Pearce and Jill of Craw-
ifordville and John Pearce and
VMeredith of Indian Harbor
Beach; a son-in-law. Ronnie Pep-
per of Atlanta, Ga.; a daughter,
Pat Brooks and Bob of Mont-
.gomery, Ala.; 13 grandchildren,
Robert "Bobby" Pearce and
Jan, Mary Katherine Westmark
and Jay, Timothy (Timmy)
Pearce and Erika, Scott Pearce
and Heather, Eric Pepper and
Sharon, Jack Pepper and Deb-
bie, Betsy Grugin and Steve,
Michele Fisher and Dean,
'Tara Burke and Ryan, Mae-
'gen Pearce, Meredith Pearce,
SCraig Pearce, and Tyler Pearce;
`and 16 great-grandchildren; a
;good friend and caregiver, Ida
-Moore; and numerous special
'friends.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
'in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.
f Debra H. Roberts
Debra Heck Roberts, 52, of
',Crawfordville died Wednesday,
;April 16 in Tallahassee.
Tho funeral service was
,held !Friday, April 18 at St.
pMarks First Baptist Church
with burial in Tennessee.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
,contributions may be made to
ig Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan
Center Blvd,' Tallahassee, FL
^::\- :.' *:i .


A native of Myrtle Point,
Oregon, she had been a resi-
dent of Crawfordville since
1973. She was a member of
River of Life Church. She loved
her family, fishing, gardening
and cooking and was a project
manager for P.B.S.& J.
Survivors include her hus-
band of seven years, Dwayne
Roberts of Crawfordville; a
son, Shawn Brown of Craw-
fordville; a daughter, Bettina
Brown of Crawfordville; three
stepdaughters, Kristen Roberts
of Belleview, Fla., Amanda
Roberts of Statesville, N.C.,
and Rebecca Roberts of Tal-
lahassee; a brother, Greg Heck
of Speedwell, Tenn.; a sister,
Brenda Venable of Tazewell,
Tenn.; her parents, Dorwood
and Peggy Heck of Lafollette,
Tenn.; two grandchildren, De-
wayne Reynolds, Jr. of Craw-
fordville and Dylan Allen
Uptain of Statesville, N.C.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.

Otis Screws
Otis Screws, 86, of Tallahas-
see died Friday, April 18 at his
home.
The graveside service with
full military honors was held
Tuesday, April 22, at Oakland
Cemetery. Memorial contribu-
tions may be made to Big Bend
Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center
Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308 or
the American Cancer Society,
241 John Knox Road, Tallahas-
see, FL 32303.
A native of Louisville, Ga.,
he had been a resident of Tal-
lahassee since retiring from
the United States Army in 1965.
He retired as a Army Master
Sgt. He was a veteran of World
War II and the Vietnam War.
He later retied from the Leon
County School Board. He was
a member of Woodville First
Baptist Church.
Survivors include his wife,
Eunice Screws; two sons, Cliff
Screws of Tallahassee and
Larry Barber of Bainbridge,
Ga.; a daughter, Evelyn Ann
Shaw of Naples, Fla.; and five
grandchildren.
Bevis Funeral Home in Tal-
lahassee was in charge of the
arrangements.


Officials discuss

problems of community


Eight members became Stephen Ministers K

Stephen Ministers Are.

Commissioned


On Sunday, April 6, eight
members of St. Teresa Episcopal
Church were commissioned as
Stephen Ministers. Each of the
church members completed
50 hours of instruction with
Stephen Leaders Fr. John Spicer
and Loraine Sundburg. They are
now available to provide quality
Christian care to people facing a
crisis such as the loss of a loved
one, illness, spiritual crisis or any
of the life events that can cause
disruption or distress.
Stephen Ministers are avail-
able to people of any religious
affiliation or to those with no
affiliation. St. Teresa's ministers
can be reached by calling 926-
4288 or by e-mail at st-teresa@
nettally.com.
The commissioned members


include Guy Revell, Loraine Sun-
dburg, Mary Lou Martin, Rachel
MacDougal, Susan Lidondici,
Patty Applegate, Roberta Phillips
and Michael Wheeler. Fr. John
Spicer leads the congregation.'

Have something.

on your mind?:

Send it to



Keith Blackmar,
Editor
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net


Wakulla Presbyterian Church
recently held its first forum to
bring together community lead-
ers to discuss issues affecting
Wakulla County.
Tina Brimner representing the
Victims Advocacy program of the
Wakulla County Sheriff's Office,
Kathy Asbell of Refuge House,
School Superintendent David
Miller, Ed Tyre from the Wakulla
County Sheriffs Office, Doug
Jones from Wakulla County
Library, County Commissioner
Howard Kessler, Buddy Wells,
representing the Crawfordville
Lions Club, and Brian English
of the Crawfordville Rotary Club
were present. The forum was


moderated by Anne Ahrendt.
Items discussed centered
predominately on issues with
youth, coordination among the
various social service agencies
and ways volunteers can assist
in meeting these needs.
Wakulla Presbyterian Church
hopes that this will be the first
of many discussions designed
to bring leaders and citizens to
discuss issues in a non-threaten-
ing environment. For further
information or to be included in
these discussions, please contact
Rev. Dr. Nancy Forinash, Pastor,
926-4569 or Anne Ahrendt, 926-
6653.


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SUNDAY, APRIL 27TH



Come join us for an 'Old Fashioned' Church Service.
Dress in any 'ole fashion' era you choose.
We will have a southern gospel worship service,
old fashion sermon, baptism at the river,
dinner on the ground, softball & horseshoe games.
For more info please contact the church office at 962-782z
117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy, Florida


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I lb







Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008

hI Happy first

I birthdays


Kris Whitten accepts certificate from Jere Moore

Health Department

recognized for shots


On behalf of the Wakulla
'County Health Department,
Immunization Nurse Kris Whit-
ten accepted a Certificate of
,Achievement from the Florida
Department of Health, presented
by Jere Moore, Chairman Leon
County Immunization Coalition.
The certificate was presented be-
cause the Wakulla County Health
Department had 100 percent of
its infant clients fully immunized
by age two in 2007.
The state Department of
Health set a goal of having 90
percent of the infants in the state
fully immunized at age two by
2010. County health departments
in the Big Bend far exceeded that
goal in 2007.
In Wakulla and Gadsden
counties, 100 percent of the 2-
'year-old clients had been fully
:immunized. In Jefferson, the to-
'tal was 92 percent. Leon County
has two clinics and the Munici-


Kenny Hill Band
The Kenny Hill Band will make
its Sopchoppy Opry debut on
Saturday, April 26 at 7 p.m. in the

Holley

benefit is

planned
There will be a benefit dinner
held for Brenda Holley on Satur-
day, April 26 starting at 11 a.m.
in the Wakulla Collision Center
parking lot on U.S. Highway 319
in Crawfordville.
Holley has third stage Lyme
'Disease and needs help with
treatment costs which run in
excess of $2,000 per week. There
will be fried fish and pulled pork
dinners, live music and raffles.
The meals are $10 per plate.

Meeting is set
The Area Agency on Aging for
North Florida, Inc. will hold its
Advisory Council and Board of
Directors meeting on Thursday,
April 24, at 10 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.,
respectively. The meeting will be
held at the Area Agency at 2414
Mahan Drive, Tallahassee. The
meeting is open to the public.




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pal Way clinic reached 98 percent
and the clinic on Old Bainbridge
Road reached 94 percent.
In a ceremony leading up to
Infant Immunization Week, April
21 through April 26, Certificates
of Achievement from the state
Department of Health were
presented to each of the county
health departments. Certificates
for private physicians who fully
immunized more than 90 per-
cent of their patients by two in
2007 will be presented later in
the year.
To be fully immunized by two,
infant should have four Dipthe-
ria-tetanus-pertusis (whooping
cough), four polio, one measles-
mumps-rubella,'three haemophi-
lus influenza type b, three hepa-
titis, and one varicella (chicken
pox) shots. Parents should con-
sult their physician or county
health department concerning
dates shots are due.


historic Sopchoppy High School
auditorium as Southbound Band's
special guest. Also appearing will
be H.J. Kuntry and Dennis Pritch-
ett. For tickets, call 962-3711.


Adrianna K. Stokley
Happy first birthday to Adri-
anna Kathleen Stokley on April
17. She is the daughter of Jona-
than Stokley and Deloria Stokley
of Crawfordville.
Maternal grandparents are
Carl and Joanne Stokley of Craw-
fordville. Paternal grandparents
are Grace Dye of Crawfordville
and Jose Gonzalez of Texas.
Maternal great-grandparent is
Gladys Slayton of Crawfordville.


Kiersten L. Henry
Happy first birthday to Kier-
sten Leigh Henry on April 24.
She is the daughter of William
Henry, Jr. and Jamie Moore of
Tallahassee.
Maternal grandparents are
Judy Gagliano and Thomas
Moore of Crawfordville, Paternal
grandparents are Becky French of
Tallahassee and William Henry,
Sr. of Warrior, Ala.


Kyle J. Talbot


Annual rose sale is a success


So, you decided to get a dog.
Well good for you and congratu-
lations. Now there is a word of
warning. Whatever you do, don't
run out to the pet store, kennel
or humane society and bring
home the first puppy that strikes
your fancy.
Consider this first: The dog
you choose to share your home
will have a life span of approxi-
mately 15 years. It is important
to think carefully about what
you want from a breed or an
individual dog according to your
own special needs. ,
The first step is to analyze
your lifestyle. Give some consid-
eration to your lifestyle, living
conditions, working pattern and
the way you spend your leisure
time. You should also consider
the size of your family and why
you want a dog.
Here are the questions you
Kyle J. Talbot
Happy first birthday to Kyle
J. Talbot on April 25. He is the
son of Robbie and Kellie Talbot
of Crawfordville.
Maternal grandparents are
Jim and Leslie Yeomans of Craw-
fordville. Paternal grandparents
are Bob Talbot of Crawfordville
and Diane Hartsfield of Talla-
hassee.
Maternal great-grandparents
are Fay Johns, the late Rick
Johns, Edwin "Gene" Yeomans,
Shirley and Wayne Eastman and
Norman Rowe, all of Bradenton.
Paternal great-grandparents are
Sarah Hartsfield, the late J.C.
Hartsfield of Tallahassee and
the late Adrienne and Joe Talbot,
formerly of Orlando.

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should think about: 1.Why do
I want a dog? 2. Where do you
live, city or country? 3. What size
house and yard do you have? 4.
Do you have children? 5. What
are your working hours and
will the dog spend many hours
alone? 6. How much money can
you spend on a dog? 7. Are you
interested in a purebred or a
mixed breed?
The answers will be in the
research you are willing to put
in before making a decision.


Sanders family reunion set
The Nat and Gladys Sand- come at 10 a.m. or 11 a.m for the
ers family reunion will be held all day event.
Saturday, May 3 at Ochlockonee
River State Park in, the Curtis A Free Press
Mills community. The event will A Free Press
feature a covered dish dinner at Your Key
approximately 12 p.m. Family
and other relatives are asked to To Freedom


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We service all major makes and models.


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5263 SW Capital Circle
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Al Penson Mary Ellen Davis
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The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be basedsolely on advertisement.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience.


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Technology Workshops

The TCC Wakulla Center will premier different
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March 20- July 3.

join us 6 9 p.m.
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Schedule & registration online at
www.tcc.fl.edu/iti orcall 201-8760


There are dogs for companion-
ship, dogs for protection, dogs
that are good with kids and so
on. Spending a little time on re-
search will pay off in a big way
when you are ready to make the
final decision on the animal you
would like to commit to.
The rose sale fundraiser for
2008 was a great success and real
gardeners are never 1put off by
a little bit of rain. We had a lot
of traffic considering the rainy
weather. We made approximate-
ly $3,500 this year andhave a few
roses left. If you are interested
in acquiring one, please call me
at 926-3849. :
Please, have your 'animals
spayed/neutered' Wet need to
cut down on the unxwnted lit-
ters of cats and dogs. Np matter
how hard we try, there are never
enough homes for all the ani-
mals in the care of the shelter.
*i








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008 Page 7A


School


Twenty-two WHS students recently traveled to England, France, and Italy

WHS students enjoy their Euro trial


The 2008 Wakulla High School
European trip was a "smashing
success," accordidng to school
officials. Students and school
officials left Wakulla County for
their tour, March 31 to April 9.
The trip was summed up with
the words of the school courier,
Elizabeth Boyce, as she gave the
students good wishes and good-
' byes in the Rome airport. "This
group has been wonderful. You
are a credit to your school, your
parents, and your teachers!"
4 "Everyone would have been
so proud of the students as they
represented our county and our
country, by demonstrating their
intelligence and their depend-
able character," said teacher
Teresa Murphy.
Twenty-two WHS students
traveled to England, France, and
Italy to visit a variety of historical
sights with chaperones, Cassie


Tucker, shirley Core and Teresa
Murphy. Highlights of the trip
included, Westminster Abbey,
viewing an original copy of
the Magna Carta, Stonehenge,
Cantertury Cathedral, a perfect
ferry ride from the Cliffs of Do-
ver to Calais, France, the Palace
of Versailles, the Eiffel Tower,
Cathecral of Notre Dame, and
the Louvre Museum in Paris, a
memorable train ride to Rome,
the ruins of Pompeii, beautiful
Sorrento, and finally the Sistine
Chapel and the Vatican, then the
Colosseum and the ruins of the
Roman Forum.
"Everyone survived the ex-
tremely rigorous trip and de-
veloped great leg muscles from
walking many miles, and climb-
ing many, many steps," said
Murphy. "The meals that the
students experienced were also
an education. When beans were


served for breakfast in Ei
and duck was served for
in France, many student
thrilled that they had p
snacks in their luggage. T
to all who helped us p
for this trip and kept us i
prayers."
During a cold morn
Stonehenge the studen
their picture taken.
See above, Front row:
Hansen, Kim Weaver, R
Folsom, Bridget Burke, C
Schlegal, Erica Pyles, and
MacDonald.
Back row: Scott Kell
Hicks, Brett Wilson, Will
and Tyler Unger, Kyle Cra;
Smith, Paul Murphy, Clay
Dyan Talbot, Zach Dutton,
Toler, Laura McCann, M
Andrews, and Trisda Seri


Honors biology students explore Northern California


ing in a giant land. I can't believe
these trees were here before
Jesus was born."
The students' hard work in
the mountains paid off, and
finally they were able to enjoy
an afternoon of skiing, snow-
boarding and snowball fighting.
In Yosemite, all 45 students and
chaperones made the three mile
hike to Vernal Fall, where a se-
ries of stone steps leads through
misty rainbows to the waterfall's
edge. From there, two-thirds of
the group braved snow and ice
in a hike to the top of 1,900 ft.
Nevada Fall!
While the students' first look
at San Francisco was on foot over
the two mile Golden Gate Bridge,
once back in the city, the group
enjoyed a motor coach tour of
historic areas, including China-
town, the Presidio, the Haight
Ashbury district and, of course,
Lombard Street and the Full
House house. They also visited
the science Exploratorium, the
renowned de Young Art Mu-
seum, Monterey's world-famous
aquarium, Santa Cruz's beaches
and Henry Cowell Redwoods
State Park, home to a centuries-
old Redwood Grove. The trip
culminated for golfer Spencer
Smith especially in a quick tour
of the Pebble Beach Lodge and
Golf Course.
And the best part of the
whole trip? Well, it depends on
whom you ask. For some, it was
Blanton and Mike Deerman's de-
fense of the Mark Twain stump
against an onslaught of 41 teen-
age snowball hurlers. The stump
is a 1,350-year-old sequoia, felled
in 1891 after two men spent 13
days sawing it. For others, it
was the chance to experience
California's diverse ecology and
culture firsthand. For the rest,
it was the opportunity to plant
the seeds of conservation and
preservation for Earth's most
magnificent resources.
After 10 days together and
as Chris Eichler said, "the chance
of a lifetime" parting was bitter-
sweet. While happy to see their
families, many students, includ-
ing Kelsea McCown, proclaimed
their feelings about the Pacific
coast. "Thanks for bringing us
here Mr. B. This trip was better
than my trip to Germany."

ing family. What will she miss?
"The 250 smiling faces everyday
I fed for breakfast, joking with all
the kids who came through my
line at the high school. The kids
are what I will miss the most and
the ladies I worked with, and my
bosses, Gail Mathers, Suzanne
Moses and Audrey Randolph."


Imagine yourself surrounded
by 1,000-year-old giant sequoias,
your eyes steadily scaling 100,
200, then 300 feet to find the
tops of these ancient wonders.
Words fill your ears: "Raise yoir
hand if you hugged a tree today"I
,Now imagine a sea of hands
i shooting skyward and 41 voice;
resounding in unison. "That's
good, because if you didn't hug
one today, your children might
not be able to." The voice you
i'hear is that of Bob Blanton,
WHS Honors Biology teacher and
advocate of conserving Earth's
.precious resources.
On March 30, thanks to the
Remarkable support of local busi-
nesses, private donors and par-
,ents, Blanton led 41 awe-inspired
,sophomores on the school's
Sixth Annual Honors Biology Ex-
:pedition to Northern California.
Many, like Liam Daniels, were
'simply amazed. "These trees are
enormous!" he said. "I really love
'this place, and before I die I'm
going to come back."
The students enjoyed the ad-
venture of a lifetime in Sequoia
and Kings Canyon and Yosemite
National Parks. They took part
in biological and geological
:activities throughout the trip.
From estimating water levels
with snow pack measurements
in Kings Canyon, to identifying
the glacial formation of Yosemite
Valley, students also completed
more/than 50 pages on the ecol-
ogy of the Sierra Nevada Moun-


The Wakulla County School
District will lose Wanda Lawhon
Russ after 34 years of service
later this year. Russ served as a
lunchroom cashier for 34 years
and has also driven a bus for
three decades. She was educated
in the Wakulla County Schools
"like my kids."
* Serving the school district
"has been my life," she said.
"The experience has been won-
derful and I will never forget


tains. "I learned more here in
one day than I would in a whole
week at school," said Taylor Cul-
lifer. Classmate Evan Waggamon
agreed. "I learned plenty.about
the ecosystem and how it was af-
fected if just one of the elements
was removed."
Much like Wakulla County,
California's economy depends
on the health of its natural eco-
systems, so 'taking snow depth
measurements has been a Cali-
fornia practice since the 1930s.
The information gathered from
these and other measurements
gives authorities an idea of how
much water they can expect for
agriculture. Land use managers
use the data to study long term
affects of snow pack and water
on California's natural commu-
nities.
A month ago, the students
trekked through the muddy
Apalachicola National Forest to
study bald and pond cypress
trees. They compared the cy-
press found in rural Wakulla
County to the giant sequoias
and redwoods, which grow only
in California's Mediterranean
climate of sunny summers and
snowy winters. The sequoias
grow naturally only on the west
slope of the Sierra Nevadas, most
often between 5,000 and 7,000
feet. After millions of years, only
75 groves of what naturalist John
Muir called "the Big Trees" still
exist. "These trees are hugely"
said Austin Lentz. "It is like be-


Russ to retire from district


the experience of working with
Wakulla County Schools."
Highlights of her career in-
cluded the graduation of her
twin daughters, Sheryl Taylor
and Sherrie Smith, as well as
granddaughter, Tiffany Taylor.
"I've touched a lot of lives
and the kids all remember me
as Aunt Wanda, starting on Bus
20 to Bus 110," she said.
Russ will be spending her
time relaxing, fishing and enjoy-


Cyber Safety Program Slated


The Wakulla County School
District supports Cyber Safe-
ty Programs in secondary
schools.
Wakulla Superintendent
of Schools David Miller rec-
ognized the importance of
promoting Internet safety in
the school system.
"In today's age of techno-
savvy. students, the prolifera-
tion of Internet videos, and the
wide use of YouTube, MySpace
and Facebook, it is essential
that kids, teens and adults
receive training in the proper
procedures and dangers of the
) Internet," said Miller. "Our en-
vironment is changing rapidly.
ngland, The critical factor is equipping
dinner students, teachers, parents and
ts were administrators with solid in-
packed formation based on facts."
hanks For those reasons, Attorney
Tepare General Bill McCollum's Cyber
in your Safety Program has been in-
i troduced in Wakulla's schools
ling at this spring. Attorney General
is had McCollum is expected to visit
I Riversprings Middle School
Susan in May to present the Cyber


becca
jielsea
Chellie

y, Sam
larvey
ze, Josh
SWatts,
, Carole
Iichael
es.


Safety message, along with the
child predator cybercrime unit,
to students.
The main message is "Safe
Surfing. Keep Florida safe from
shore to digital shore."
"We want our students to
learn valuable information
about protecting themselves
while surfing the internet,
safeguarding personal infor-
mation such as telephone
numbers and addresses and
avoiding potentially dangerous
situations," added Miller. "Our
students need to learn how
to protect themselves online
while playing games, surfing
the Internet and having fun.
There are risks associated
with these new advances in
technology; however, there are
also positive ways in which
technology can be used."
According to http://myflori-
dalegal.com, more than 77 mil-
lion children regularly use the
Internet. The Federal Internet
Crimes against Children Task
Force said Florida ranks fourth
in the nation in the volume


of child pornography. Nation-
ally, one in seven children
between the ages of 10 and 17
have been solicited online by
a sexual predator. On Oct. 1,
2007, the CyberCrimes against
Children Act of 2007 went into
effect, making Florida one of
the leading states in the nation
with laws against cybercrimes
that target children.
The Safe Surf initiative has
been endorsed by Tampa Bay
Buccaneers kicker Matt Bryan
and professional surfer and
eight-time world champion
Kelly Alter. Additional informa-
tion, facts and myths of online
risks, avoiding cyberbullies
and safety tips are available at
the following web-sites:
www.safeflorida.net/safesurf
www.netsmartz.org/
http://offender.fdle.state.
fl.us/offender/homepage.do
www.safestepsfla.net/
www.familywatchdog.us/
www.missingkids.com/
www.escapeschool.com.


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Gage Martin takes measurements of snow depths


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I







Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008


Tracksters end 2008 season


Patrick Stewart, parents and coaches attended the signing

Stewart signs with Warner So.


Wakulla War Eagle Soccer
Coach Bob Wallace will miss
Patrick Stewart on the field next
season, but the talented senior
is moving on to an NAIA college
scholarship and Warner South-
ern College in Lake Wales. The
Royals' Head Coach Kurt Bienias
was in Medart Friday, April 18 to
sign Stewart.
Stewart was joined by WHS
Assistant Coach Don Gregg and
his parents, Brenda and David
Stewart.
Stewart said he is excited to
be continuing his favorite sport
and get most of his education
paid for by Warner Southern.
Stewart played four years at
Wakulla High School and three
more at Riversprings Middle
School. He was the most valu-
able player at RMS each season
and the leading scorer and of-
fensive MVP for the War Eagles
this season. "They have a pretty
excellent program," said Stewart


during his signing ceremony.
"It's just wonderful," said his
mother. "It fulfills his dream."
David Stewart said his son was
looking for an opportunity to
continue his playing career and
to play with teammates who
have the same passion for the
game. He hopes to major in
physical therapy and minor in
coaching, said David Stewart.
Coach Bienias said he stresses
structure and discipline in his
program and Stewart will do
well. The coach is planning to
take advantage of Stewart's
speed and strength at the striker
or forward position. Bienias
said he likes players who seize
their scoring opportunities and
don't make extra passes inside
the goal-mouth area. It is criti-
cal that Stewart is also a strong
student and has done well with
standardized tests since Warner
Southern stresses academic suc-
cess as well as athletic.


Wakulla wins district


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
An injury to ace pitcher Bri-
anna Fordham forced Wakulla
Lady War Eagle Softball Coach
Tom Graham to turn to sopho-
more Mandy McClendon in the
Class 4A, District 2 Tournament
at Rickards last week. McClen-
don stepped in and won two
games as the Lady War Eagles
won another district title.
* Wakulla beat Rickards 6-2 and
Godby 4-1 to allow the team to
host Milton in the first round of
the state playoffs. Milton visited
Wakulla on Tuesday, April 22.
"She did a heck of a job,"
said Graham of McClendon.
"She showed a lot of poise."
McClendon started the year on
fthe junior varsity and Graham
brought her up to varsity games
on days when the junior varsity
*was off. She worked her way
:into varsity playing time as the
,season continued.
Graham said McClendon has
:shown a consistent pitching
,form and dashed any hopes
;Godby had of winning the dis-
,trict title. Wakulla made only two
,errors behind McClendon in the
two games.
"The Rickards game was
a tougher game than I really
thought it should have been,"
said Graham. Wakulla led 3-2 in
the sixth inning before breaking
open the contest.
McClendon gave up two runs,
two hits and three walks while
striking out three. "She had re-
ally good composure," said the
coach.
Ashley Spears provided the
offense with a 2-3 day with a
run scored, double and an RBI.
Lacey Crum was 2-3 with a run


scored and a stolen base. Brook-
lynn Tindall was 1-2 with two
runs scored, a homerun and two
RBIs. Hannah Lovestrand was 1-3
with an RBI. Ki Myrick was 1-3
and Karlyn Scott walked, scored
a run and stole a base.
Godby watched Wakulla
struggle early against Rickards
and had hopes for a victory. But
McClendon gave up only four
hits while striking out seven and
not walking anyone.
"She was even better in this
game and she got better as the
game went along. The team
got more confident in her and
we played good defense," said
Graham.
Wakulla scored three runs in
the first inning and kept Godby
off balance. "The quick start took
the air right our of them," said
Graham. Wakulla added another
run in the fourth inning. Godby
never really challenged Wakulla
after scoring its only run.
Six different players had
hits for Wakulla. Crum was 1-3
with a double and a run scored.
Lovestrand was 1-3 with a run
scored, RBI and a stolen base.
Scott was 1-3 with an RBI. Chel-
sea Collins was 1-3 with a run
scored, Megan Rollins was 1--3
with a triple and a stolen base.
Myrick was 1-2 with an RBI.
Spears had a walk and Artigua
Kilpatrick had a stolen base.
Wakulla defeated Milton dur-
ing the Lincoln Tournament. If
Wakulla beats Milton, the team
will play the winner of the
Navarre-Godby game on Friday,
April 25.
Wakulla improved to 20-6
overall and finished district play
undefeated at 12-0.


Phenomenal Women of Vision
~ Empowering to achieve greater heights ~

The ladies of Phenomenal Women of Vision, Inc.,
would like to extend a heartfelt thank you to all of
our sponsors who so graciously supported our 2008
Women's Empowerment Conference. It was our goal
to provide the conference free of charge and it was
with-the support of these local businesses
that we were able to do so.
Wakulla Bank,
Gulf State Community Bank
Mandy's Hair & Nails Salon
Lindy's Chicken
Chili's Grill & Bar

We'd like to thank all of the ladies (and
gentlemen) that attended the conference as
we hope that you were enlightened in some
i way. And a very special thank-you goes out
S I to Jeff, Wendy and staff at The Bistro and
SThe Inn at Wildwood. Our every need at the
conference was attended to with courtesy and
/ professionalism at all times. Thank you 'all!


Warner Southern discovered
Stewart through the kick5.com
web site which promotes out-
standing high school players.
"He was probably one of our
top two players we've ever had
here," said WHS Coach Bob Wal-
lace. "Academically, I think he'll
succeed."
David Stewart joked that Wal-
lace will miss his expertise at the
concession stand next season. "I
probably cooked 98 percent of
the hamburgers," he said.
Warner Southern is a school
of approximately 1,000 students
who play soccer in the fall.
"Patrick will be playing with
lots of international students,"
Bienias said. "They love it."


Members of the WHS track
team who qualified at the Dis-
trict level advanced to compete
at the Regional track meet on
Wednesday, April 16 at Bolles
High School in Jacksonville.
The boys 4 x 800 meter relay
team of Ben Anderson, Brandon
Maloy, Steven Urling and Adam
Carr (Shawn Morris, alternate)
led off for the War Eagles and
ran a good time of 9 minutes and
12 seconds to finish a respect-
able 10th place.
Terrion Webster finished 11th
in the 100 meter run in 13.06 sec-
onds and Brittany Bentley also
placed 11th in the 3200 meter
run in a time of 13 minutes 49
seconds.


Sydney Nutting, orre again
was the top finisher for:he team
and just missed advanchg to the
state meet by finishing sixth in
the 800 meter race.
"She ran an excellentrace and
a lifetime best time ol 2:25.07,
which qualifies as a 'Floida Elite
Time' for that distance,' said As-
sistant Coach Paul Hooier. "We
were pleased with the dforts of
our kids at the Regional neet, es-
pecially Sydney who hac a break-
through race. Of course, we had
hoped she would advance to
the state meet, but the tme she
ran was even more important.
To make it to the elitelevel is
a real milestone and gives us
a great foundation to build on


next season."
WHS Tennis
The 2008 Wakulla War Eagle
tennis season ended in Gulf
Breeze on Tuesday, April 15, but
not before Wakulla had an 11-1
season.
Gulf Breeze beat Wakulla 7-0.
Jared Lowe played first seeded
singles and lost 6-2 and 6-2.
Second seeded Will Harvey lost
6-3 and 6-3. Third seeded Caleb
Fisher lost 6-1 and 6-2.
Fourth seeded Rhett Harvey
lost 6-2 and 6-3. Fifth seeded Brett
Wilson lost 6-1 and 6-0. In the
doubles competition, first seeded
Lowe and Will Harvey lost 6-1 and
6-2. Second seeded Fisher and
Wilson lost 6-1 and 6-0.


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NOTICE OF

LAND USE CHANGE
The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to adopt
the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings regarding
the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on
Monday May 12,2008, beginning at 7:00 PM and the Wakulla County
Board of County Commissioners on Monday, June 2,2008, beginning
at 6:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public
hearings are held in the County Commission Chambers located west of
the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327.
Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony.


1. Application for Home Occupation H008-01
Applicant: Kathleen Jensen Hinchee
Proposal: operate counseling business from residence
Tax ID Number: 24-5s-02w-057-03086-003
Existing FLU Map: Urban 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6)
Existing Zoning: R-l (Section 5-30, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "V20" zone on Panel 0370-C
Parcel Size: 0.14 +/- acres
Location: 3 Quiet Cove Lane
Hearings Required: Planning Commission 05/12/08 @ 7:00 PM


County Commission 06/02/08 @ 6:00 PM


2. Application for Final Plat: FP 08-01
Applicant: Buckhorn First, LLC
Agent: Edwin Brown & Assoc.
Proposal: plat 84 lot residential subdivision
Tax ID Number: 04-5s-02w-000-02554-000, 04-5s-02w-000-
02603-000, 04-5s-02w-000-02595-000, 04-5s-02w-000-02596-
000, 04-5s-02w-000-02598-000, 04-5s-02w-02597-000
Existing FLU Map: Urban 2 & Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6 & 1.2.4)
Existing Zoning: PUD (Section 5-50, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C & A" zones on Panel 0355-B & 0360-B
Parcel Size: 29.35+/- acres
Location: South side of Sopchoppy Highway and
John Mills Road
Hearings Required: Plannini Commission 05/12/08 @ 7:00 PM


County Commission 06/02/08 @ 6:00PM


3. Application for Final Plat: FP 08-01
Applicant: Buckhorn First, LLC
Agent: Edwin Brown & Assoc.
Proposal: plat 2 lot commercial subdivision
Tax ID Number: 04-5s-02w-000-02554-007, 04-5s-02w-000-
02554-002, 04-5s-02w-000-02552-000, 04-5s-02w-000-02551-
001, 04-5s-02w-000-02551-000, 04-5s-02w-000-02554-003, 04-
5s-02w-000-02554-000, 04-5s-02w-000-02550-000
Existing FLU Map: Urban 2 & Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6 & 1.2.4)
Existing Zoning: PUD (Section 5-50, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C & A" zones on Panel 0355-B & 0360-B
Parcel Size: 4.94+/- acres
Location: South side of Sopchoppy Highway and John
Mills Road
Hearing s Renuired: PlanninR Commission 05/12/08 @ 7:00 PM


County Commission 06/02/08 @ 6:00PM


4. Short Form Subdivision Application:SF 08-04
Applicant: Mossy Oak Preserve
Agent: Thurman Roddenberry
Proposal: 4 Lot subdivision


Tax ID Number:
Existing FLU Map:
Existing Zoning:
FEMA Flood Info:
Parcel Size:
Location:

Hearings Required:


35-5s-02w-000-03564-001
Urban 1 (FLUE Policy 1.2.5)
RSU-1 (Section 5-28, LDC)
"B" and "A15" zones on Panel 0370-B
48.03+/- acres
West side of Coastal Highway, and adjacent,
to Southpoint Restaurant & Supply
County Commission 06/02/08 @ 6:00 PM


5. Application for Variance: V 08-07
Applicant: Marsh Harbor Marina, Inc. & William T.
Gaupin, ET AL
Proposal: wetland setback variance
Tax ID Number: 00-00-121-000-11964-003 &
00-00-121-156-11964-110
Existing FLU Map: Urban 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6)
Existing Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "V20" zone on Panel 0390-D
Parcel Size: 13.46+/- acres
Location: Harbour Point Drive
Hearings Required: County Commission 06/02/08 @ 6:00 PM

6. Application for Variance: V08-08
Applicant: Jessie Hill
Agent: Florida Environmental and Land Services, Inc.
Proposal: wetland setback variance
Tax ID Number: 20-3s-01e-154-05398-B05
Existing FLU Map: Rural 2 (FLUE Pclicy 1.2.4)
Existing Zoning: RR-1 (Section 5-27, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "A" zone on Panel 0275-B
Parcel Size: 1.337+/- acres
Location: Lot 5, Block B of River Plantation Estates
Hearings Required: County Commission 06/02/08 @ 6:00 PM

7. Application for Zoning Change: R08-04
Applicant: Floyd Roberts
Agent: Thurman Roddenberry
Proposal: rezone to multi-family
Tax ID Number: 00-00-055-000-09929-01E
Existing FLU Map: Urban 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6)
Existing Zoning: AG (Section 5-25, LDC)
Proposed Zoning: R-3 (Section 5-32, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0250-B
Parcel Size: 9.99+/- acres,
Location: 20 Cajer Posey Road
Hearings Required: Planning Commission 05/12/08 @ 7:00 PM
County Commission 06/02/08 @ 6:00 PM

8. Application for Temporary Use: TU 08-05
Applicant: Angelo Petrandis
Agent: Mike's Fireworks
Proposal: Fireworks Sales
Tax ID Number: 12-6s-02w-000-03879-001
Existing FLU Map: Urban 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6)
Existing Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "V20" zone on Panel 0460-B
Parcel Size: 2.41+/- acres
Location: 49 Coastal Highway at the Mashes Sands BP
Station
Hearings Required: Planning Commission 05/12/08 @ 7:00 PM
County Commission 06/02/08 @ 6:00PM


9. Application for Temporary Use: TU 08-
Applicant: Glenda's Country Store
Agent:' Mike's Fireworks
Proposal: Fireworks Sales
Tax ID Number: 29-2s-01 w-051-04122-000
Existing FLU Map: Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4)
Existing Zoning: C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0100-B
Parcel Size: 0.95+/- acres
Location: 525 Crawfordville Highway at Glenda's
Country Store


06


Hearings Required: Planning Commission 05/12/08 @ 7:00 PM
County Commission 06/02/08 @ 6:00PM

Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record files may be
viewed at the County Planning Department located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8,AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any
person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim
transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings.
Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Office at
least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Office may be
contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.


I


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008 Page 9A I


Sports


Baseball team stumbles to the finish line


Tartt named to award list


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
It wasn't the way Wakulla
War Eagle Baseball Coach Mike
Gauger envisioned preparing for
the district tournament. The War
Eagles dropped the final three
regular season games against
Thomasville Brookwood, Taylor
County and Springfield Ruth-
erford last week. Despite the
losses, the War Eagles are the
top seeded team in the district
tournament and will serve as
tourney hosts.
Gauger said he hopes his team
can reverse the results when the
tournament begins. "I had hoped
for a better week heading into
districts,": said the coach.
Wakulla will play the winner
of the Panama City Beach Arnold-
Rickards game on Wednesday,
April 23 at 7 p.m. Rickards and Ar-
nold played on Tuesday, April 22.


Godby also received a first round
bye and will play the winner of
the East Gadsden-Panama City
Bay winner prior to the Wakulla
game. The championship game
will be played at 7 p.m. Friday,
April 25 in Medart.
Brookwood Academy scored
two runs in the first inning and
five more in the second to top
Wakulla 7-4. Rodney Golden was
the starting pitcher and loser. He
pitched two innings and gave
up seven runs, five of which
were earned, five hits and three
walks while striking out one bat-
ter. Robbie Coles pitched three
innings and walked one while
striking out five. Shay Barwick
pitched an inning and had three
strikeouts.
Wakulla had eight hits in-
cluding two by Ryan Leutner
and two by Ryan Smith. Austin
Lentz, Nick Baxter, Robbie Coles
and Cameron Graves had hits as


well. Leutner, Lentz and Barwick
had RBIs.
Taylor County scored five
runs in the second inning and
four more in the fourth to hold
off Wakulla 9-8. Ryan Smith was
the starting pitcher and gave
up five runs and six hits while
walking two and striking out
one. Robbie Coles pitched two
innings and walked three. Rance
McBratney pitched two frames
and gave up four runs, two hits
and four walks while striking
out one.
Graves was 2-2 with a run
scored and four RBIs. Ryan Smith
was 2-3 with two runs scored and
two RBIs. Coles was 1-4 with a
double and a run scored.'
Springfield Rutherford
topped Wakulla 7-1 by scoring
in four of the seven innings. Brad
Crisp pitched five and one-third
innings and gave up five runs,
four earned, and nine hits while


striking out three. Ryan Cross
pitched two-thirds of an inning
and Shay Barwick pitched an
inning giving up two runs and
three hits.
Graves had two hits and sin-
gle hits were recorded by Austin
Lentz, Ryan Cross, Logan Runyan
and Ryan Smith.
"We weren't ready to play
baseball on Monday and Thurs-
day," said Gauger. "That was my
fault. Rutherford is a good team.
They made so many plays."
Ryan Smith was named the
District 2, Class 4A Player of the
Year. Smith is a junior pitcher
and shortstop. Cameron Graves
was selected to play in the FACA
state all-star game. Graves is a
senior first baseman.
Wakulla had victories over
Brookwood and Taylor County
earlier in the season. The War
Eagles dropped to 16-9 overall
and finished 8-2 in district play.


Wakulla High School

announces Honor Court


Sopchoppy resident and Flor-
ida Gator football senior Jim
Tartt was named to the Outland
Trophy Watch List. The award
is given by the Football Writers
Association of American to the
best offensive lineman in col-
lege football. The preseason list
includes 70 candidates.
Tartt has played 30 games for


the Gators and started 29 of them
at left guard. His career start total
is the highest among any active
member of the team. He was All-
SEC second team last season and
started all 13 Florida games.
The award has been given to
the best interior lineman since
1946. The 2008 award will be an-
nounced on Dec. 11 in Orlando.


Alex Brimner with FSU President T.K. Wetherell


Alexandra "Alex" Brimner of
Crawfordville will graduate from
Florida State University Cum
Laude on Friday, April 25.
Alexandra and FSU President
T.K. Wetherell posed for pictures
following FSU's Spring 2008 Hon-
ors Medallion Ceremony. This
spring, FSU had 198 graduates
who earned an Honors Medal-


lion. Brimner began FSU in the
fall of 2004 and is graduating
with a Bachelor of Arts in Cre-
ative Writing.
She will continue working
with The Wakulla News as she
decides what direction her life
will take in the next few years.
She is the daughter of Ed and
Tina Brimner of Crawfordville.


Two weightlifters place


The Wakulla War Eagle weight-
lifting team placed tied for 17th
at the state championships in
Daytona Beach. Mookie Forbes
finished fourth at 119 pounds'


with a total lift of 390 pounds,
Tim Dawson placed sixth in the
heavyweight division with a
total lift of 685 pounds.


In a matter of weeks, Wakulla
High School will graduate the
students from the Class of 2008.
The top students are honored
each year with membership
in the 2008 Honor Court. The
court was recently announced
by school officials.
The students include top
ranked Valedictorian Michael
Andrews, second ranked Salu-
tatorian Elizabeth Butler, third
ranked Meghan McCallister,
fourth ranked Kyle Kilinski, fifth
ranked Christina Brydebell, sixth
ranked Elliot Seidler, seventh
ranked Karlyn Scott, eighth


The COAST Charter School
will host a "Big Money Bingo"
fundraiser at the school on Fri-
day, April 25 at 5:30 p.m. There
will be two cash jackpots of $250
and more than $1,000 in cash
and prize packages. The dona-
tions are being provided by a
number of area businesses.


Sandy Cook retirement party will be held


A retirement party will be held for former
Wakulla Springs State Park Manager Sandy Cook
on Saturday, May 31. A social hour will be held at
5:30 p.m. and stories and dinner will follow. An
open bar and dancing will follow with FPS Band.


This Ad Sponsored By
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The cost is $20 per adult and $8 per child. Orga-
nizers ask individuals to RSVP by May 15. Checks
may be made out to Wakulla Springs Flower Fund
and sent to Linda Lewis at 550 Wakulla Park Drive,
Crawfordville, FL 32327.


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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008






From The Dock 0
BY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL


What an absolutely gorgeous
weekend. It was a little breezy, well
actually a lot breezy. Saturday was
picture perfect until the afternoon.
Lots of people were on the water
despite the wind on Saturday and
lots of fish were caught
Mike Hopkins at Lanark Village
said they were busy all weekend
and plenty of fish were caught.
One of his customers went out
and had one of his engines quit so
they had to stay in dose. Despite
the engine trouble and fishing
in dose, they caught their limit
of grouper bottom fishing and
trolling. Quite a few kings were
caught, but he didn't hear of any
cobia. Spanish are still all over Dog
Island Reef and on the East End of
St. George and West End of Dog
Island. Branch Mahaffey fished at
St George with sand fleas and did
extremely well on pompano. Trout
are still being caught in the same
places as last week and live shrimp
and the Gulp are. doing the trick.
Bob Robertson bought a kayak
and has just about quit using his
big boat He's been catching a lot
of trout and reds just east of the


Winter cold fronts will stop soon,
or pass mostly north of the Big
Bend, leaving us with hardly any
rain. Gradually, as the land mass
heats more and more, thunder-
storms will form and by mid-May
they'll become almost daily occur-
rences. For now, we are entering a
dry period, between winter rains
and summer storms, and the result
is flooded rivers and lakes are set-
tling down, fishing can really be
good (before deer and yellow fly
season), and days are pleasant and
not too hot
It's the perfect time to enjoy
fresh water areas, and in the process,
you are going to see turtles basking
on logs and swimming.
In last week's Wakulla Wildlife I
discussed about half of the 26 to 28
species of turtles found in or around
Wakulla County. These included
the huge Alligator Snapper, the
Common Snapper, the Loggerhead,


mouth of the Carrabelle River near
the range marker.
Tammy at Jerry's Bait and Tackle
said they had their redfish tour-
nament on Saturday and had a
good turnout Will Tomlinson and
Walker Havell took first place with
two 26 V2 inch reds weighing a total
of 12 pounds, 2 V/ ounces. Scott
Anderson and Ted Fannin finished
second with two reds weighing 11
pounds, 5 ounces. Jerry Everton
and Colby Hough took third place
with two reds weighing 9 pounds,
5 ounces. In other reports, David
Posey and three of his friends
fished out of Carrabelle near Dog
Island and caught four limits
of grouper trolling and bottom
fishing. Capt. Eric Keyser and his
friend, Colby, fished the Aucilla
River area and caught two large
reds using topwater plugs.
Dale Evans at Advantage Ma-
rine said they had a family outing
at Jack Wingate's Fish Camp on
Lake Seminole and caught quite a
few bass. He and Capt. Luke Frazier
fished together and caught their
fish through the lily pads. Other
members of the group used lizards


Stinkpot and Razorback Musk tur-
tles, and the Eastern Mud Turtle. I
wrote about the rare Spotted Turtle,
the Florida, Eastern, Three-toed and
Gulf Coast Box Turtles, as well as the
Barbour's Map. The Barbour's Map
could be lumped into the group of
aquatic turtles often referred to by
locals as "streaky necks." These are
rather pretty turtles seen sunning
on fallen trees/logs. They're often
rather shy and are not so "bitty"
as the snappers, musks and muds.
You could say ugly turtles have an
ugly nature while the more attrac-
tive ones are gentler. These are the
cooters and sliders.
There's a dramatic difference in
the size of adults and the females of-
ten dwarf the males. Adult, "streaky
neck" males have long front feet
claws which they flutter in front of
the female's head.
The species seen in dear, spring
fed rivers is mostly the Suwannee


and Bangolures. Dale said one of
the fish had already spawned or
it would have probably weighed
more than nine pounds.
One thing that is great about
my job, besides being able to fish
all the time, is you meet a lot of re-
ally great people. Several years ago
Jeff May and his wife Kay fished
with me. They fell in love with the
area and bought a boat and started
fishing here a lot. They just recent-
ly bought an offshore boat and Jeff


has been catching lots of grouper.
On Thursday, Jeff May, Buck Smith,
Keith Booker, Ricky Myrick, Kevin
Pope, Tim Boggs, Tony Simpson
and John Edgar came down from
the Atlanta area and fished the
flats and offshore on Sunday.
These guys are all either U.S. Mar-
shals or Special U.S. Marshals and
just super nice folks. They caught
quite a few trout on the flats de-
spite the windy conditions and on
Sunday Jeff, Buck, Keith, Ricky and


BY GEORGE WEYMOUTH


Cooter. The female gets very large
for the genus, Chrysmys, with a
shell up to 16 inches long. They
are unique in that she makes three
nest cavities. Two are decoys in
which she'll lay only a few eggs,
and between those two she'll make
her main cavity to lay the majority
of her eggs.
Another species which often,
especially when young, has lots of
red on the belly with reddish bars
running up the sides of the carapace


(top shell) is the Florida Red-bel-
lied Turtle. A really easy species to
identify is the Yellow-bellied Turtle
which has a large yellow blob right
behind the eyes covering about one-
third of the side of the turtle's head.
They're found in the Ochlockonee
and still water ponds.
Another species that is found in
ponds and rivers (other than spring
fed) is the Florida Cooter. The un-
derside is unmarked except for dark
hollow cirdes (called doughnuts) on


Kevin went offshore to about 60
feet of water and came back with
24 grouper to about 34 inches.
They used live pinfish and LY's on
the bottom. Jeff said it was a great
day except for the ride back. They
took quartering seas the whole
way back and I believe he kissed
the dock when he got back. I look
forward to seeing them back in
Wakulla County fishing.
On Saturday, I fished with Bud
Drake, Jim Davis and Gale Evans.


the underside of the carapace. This
species is very shy and is seldom
seen up dose.
The Chicken Turtle often wan-
ders overland and frequents shallow
ditches and temporary pools. It has
a lot of stripes on the head and
limbs but stands out by having a
bold yellow band on the forelegs,
and when viewed from the rear, it
has "striped pajamas," right-vertical
stripes or bars on their rear. The
Yellow-belly has these markings
as well.
The most unusual characteristic
of the Chicken Turtle is its long
chicken-like neck which protrudes,
while ever searching for food, al-
most like a snake, way ahead of the
shell and legs, as it stalks through
weedy shallow ponds.
One other aquatic turtle with
lots of streaks on its fleshy areas has
been introduced by the pet trade
and that's the Red-eared Slider. You


Trout fishing was tough for most
of the morning but on the -high
tide I was able to find some reds.
We caught and released everything
we caught that day and we thrPw
back about 15 nice reds and Jim
had three of more than 26 inches.
Bud, who turns 85 on his .nxt
birthday, told me to tell everyone
he caught more fish than anybody
and maybe twice as many. He did
catch a bunch of nice reds ,tid
about a 4-foot bonnethead slirk
which took us all around the
boat. He told me when he got in
that this would probably be his
last fishing trip because he was
having problems with his balance
on a boat. I take people in their
40s and 50s who have worse bal-
ance than he did. I sure hopeihe
was just kidding because I sure do
want to fish with him again. ,On
Sunday, I fished with Joe Fovwler,
Jack Boyt and Doug Bennett, 1igh
school classmates from Chambliee
Ga. They didn't want to keep any
trout so we put everything 've
caught back. I wanted to put them
on those nice reds but they just
didn't cooperate on Sunday. We
did release about 60 or so trout of
which probably 30 were keepers
and five of those were more than
22 inches. We also caught some
Spanish and a 28-inch cobia. Every-
thing was caught using live shrimp
under a Cajun Thunder.
Remember to leave that flat
plan, know your limits and tale a
kid fishing. Good luck and good
fishing

can be fined if you are caught releas-
ing one of these critters into water-
ways, as they're interbreeding and
displacing our native turtles. There
easy to identify as they have a bold
red mark on the side of the headS As
I recall, in order to buy one, starting
in 2007 you must acquire a permit
from he Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission. ,
Have you ever seen a turtle with
blue skin? Well, we've got one inour
bays. It's a turtle that can tolerate
fresh water (in captivity), but prefers
brackish water and is found in eptu-
aries. I'm referring to the beautiful
Diamondback Terrapin. This species
is on the decline (as are so many
others) but is of special concern to
biologists because of its decreasing
numbers. It has blue gray skin with
black specks and and attractive
sculptured shell, jet black eyes and
bold yellow jaws-a realbeautyl;


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Jeff May party caught grouper on their Wakulla fishing trip













































































Coast Guard

Auxiliary Reports

\4 By Sherrie Alverson
This was one of those "oh- duty for visitors.
oh" days when I sit down in Mae Waters added that the
front of my computer and tele- flotilla will be sponsoring a
phone. From Flotilla 13 staff vessel safety examination day
at Shell Point, I came up "No one day in May. The date will
News." Don't worry, I kept tell- be announced,
ing myself, Carolyn will have a And now, some excerpts
long, long report on Flotilla 12 from the How to Boat Smart
activities. Well, I was wrong, booklet issued by the Florida
But before we add Carolyn's Marine Patrol and the Florida
report, I do have a very good Game and Fresh Water Fish
report on Ron Piasecki's knee Commission.
replacement. I spoke with An- Did You Know that Plea-
gret recently and she sounded sure boating as a family sport
so happy and relieved that Ron is continuously growing in
is doing so well. He is in rehab popularity? Another DYK (Did
now and must exercise, exer- You Know.) Any boat equipped
cise and exercise some more. with propulsion is a motorboat
Ron is ready to come home, and that motorboats are divid-
but his doctors and therapists ed into four classes according
do not agree with him. to length. Class A -- Less than
The e-mail from Carolyn 16 feet; Class 1 16 feet to less
Brown Treadon said, "I am than 26 feet; Class 2 26 feet
hoping that you have some to less than 40 feet; and Class
info for this week as it was' 3 40 feet to 65 feet.
slim pickings for us. Wish I DYK that: boat hulls are
had more, but if I don't get it, either displacement hulls or
I can't pass it on." planing hulls. Displacement
Mae Waters, Flotilla 13 Vice hulls move through, while a
Commander, reminded me that planing hull is designed to
the flotilla will have a Safety skim on top of the water and
Booth Saturday, April 26 at the can travel at a much higher
Stephen C. Smith Memorial speed.
Regatta at Shell Point Beach. The displacement hull re-
Whenever you aren't busy quires very little power to
watching races visit our booth, move through the water. Large
chat with our auxiliarist on trawler yachts, fishing boats
duty, and pick up some free and large sailboats are dis-
literature about safe boating. placement hull boats. They can
Next week, on Saturday, May move through the water with
3, Flotillas 12 and 13 will staff small, economical engines
another Safe Boating booth. or sail power. An example of
More free literature and more the five most common hull
chat time with auxiliarists on designs are flat bottomed,


Panacea, FL 984-501
ONE STOP SHOPPING




Over 3,000 Rods & Reels In Stockl
Open Every Day 5:30 a.m. 9 p.m.


round bottom, vee, deep vee
and multi-hull.
Another one of those DYK.
(Did You Know) According to
the booklet I am quoting, more
than half of the recreational
boats in this country are less
that 16 feet and more than 90
percent are less than 20 feet.
Small utility boats and jon
boats are widely used for fish-
ing in protected waters. Most
of the runabouts are made of
fiberglass or aluminum and are
powered by outboard motors.
They can be used for fishing,
water skiing and cruising.
A cruiser is larger in size and
offers more accommodations.
They generally start at 18 feet
in length and go up to 50 or 60
feet or more.
Personal watercraft. are
small, agile boats powered
by an inboard engine and jet
pump mechanism. The Coast
Guard considers them as Class
A Inboard Boats and therefore
subject to the same laws and
requirements as larger and
more conventional boats.
Canoes, Kayaks and In-
flatables: The popularity of ca-
noes, kayak and inflatables in
paddling sports has increased
rapidly. They can be equipped
with small outboard motors,
but most are manually pro-
pelled with paddles and oars.
Next are sailboats which
come in all shapes and designs
for a variety of use. While un-
der sail alone they are covered
by their own rules and regula-
tions, but when they start their
motors, even while still under
sail, they are governed by mo-
torboat rules and regulations.
Last, but definitely not least
in our area of the Big Bend, is
the sailboard which is defined
as a cross between a surfboard
and a sailboat. And they are
funi
And that, Dear Readers, is
your tid-bit of information for


Florida's wildlife viewing brings

welcome revenue to the state


Florida's rich and varied land-
scape and wildlife offer a wide array
of opportunities for residents and
tourists. While many Floridians
enjoy wildlife viewing in their back
yards or dose to home, almost a
quarter of a million tourists with
wildlife-watching plans travel to
Florida each year, making Florida the
No. 1 destination in the country for
wildlife viewing.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC) re-
leased a report showing the valuable
economic contribution to the state
from resident and visitor wildlife-
viewing activities. The report,
"The 2006 Economic Benefits
of Wildlife-Viewing Recreation in
Florida," prepared by Southwick
Associates, Inc., uses data from the
"2006 National Survey of Fishing,'
Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated
Recreation" from the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service and the U.S. Census
Bureau.
In 2006, 3.3 million Floridians
viewed wildlife at or near their
homes, and 1.6 million Floridians
and tourists traveled around Florida
for the sole purpose of wildlife view-
ing. These viewers generated more
than $3 billion in total economic
impact throughout Florida. Retail
sales account for approximately $1.8
billion of this total.
While other areas of the economy
may'be experiencing a downswing,
the FWC's report finds retail sales
for wildlife-viewing activities have
almost doubled from $1.575 billion
in 2001. Overall, 4.2 million people
participated in some form of wildlife
viewing in Florida in 2006.
fle FWC provides further oppor-
tunities for wildlife viewing through
projects such as the Great Florida
Birding Trail, a 2,000-mile, self-guided
highway tour, unifying 445 birding
sites throughout Florida.
Free guidebooks containing direc-
tions and maps make wildlife view-


today. ing a simple task for residents and
REMEMBER SAFE BOATING visitors alike.
IS NO ACCIDENTI "The total economic impact of


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Utilities & Transportation Phone: 850-926-6534
Clearing & Right of Way Maintenance Survey Lines Fax: 850-926-6529
Highways Power & Gas Lines Canals & Waterways Cell: 850-528-1743


wildlife viewing in Florida is strong
and growing, almost doubling in
the past five years," said Ken Had-
dad, executive director of the FWC.
"We hope this report underscores
that conserving habitat for fish and
wildlife can be a valuable means
of sustainable economic develop-
ment."
The annual economic impact of
recreational hunting, fishing and
wildlife viewing in Florida tops $11
billion, according to the FWC.


FWC cautions
boaters to watch for
migrating manatees
Manatees are on the move as
Florida waters begin to warm up,
and the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC)
cautions boaters to be on the lookout
for migrating manatees.
Manatees are especially vulner-
able in spring and fall when they
travel along the Gulf and Atlantic
coasts. Kipp Frohlich, leader of the
FWC's Imperiled Species Manage-
ment Section, said boaters can help
manatees have a safe migration by
staying in marked channels, wear-
ing polarized sunglasses to improve
vision, obeying posted boat speed
zones, using poles, paddles or trolling
motors when in dose proximity to
manatees and having someone help
scan the water when under way.


Regatta


slated

The Stephen C. Smith Regatta
is scheduled for April 26.. and
April 27 at Shell Point for the
benefit of the American Canter
Society in the memory of Ste-
phen Smith. Smith was a local
sailor who died from leukemia
at the age of 29.
The memorial event is spon-
sored by the Apalachee Bay
Yacht Club, Shell Point Sailboard
Club and the American Cancer
Society. The event includes off-
shore racing yachts, dinghies,
catamarans and windsurfers.
This year a "Parrot Head
Parade" will be held on April
27, which will feature a light-
hearted, friendly competition to
see who can decorate their boat
in the most outrageous tropi-
cal fashion. Any boat powered
by a motor (including sailing
auxiliaries-under power only)
can enter for a registration fee.
The registration fee will vary,
depending upon the boat and
the type of entry. Please contact
Joeann Vesecky at 926-1051 for
registration information. Partici-
pants will be judged by a team of
experts on how much effort they
put in to promoting the legend
of Jimmy Buffett and the Parrot
Heads. The parade will start at
noon on Sunday.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008 Page 11A


gi i r850-224-4960 www.fsucu.org

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6 a a^d


Boating Emergencies
'Coast Guard Station
Panama City ......................................... (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown ........................... (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
St. M arks (Flotilla 12) .......................................... (850) 906-0540
or .................................................................................. 893-5137
Shell Point (Flotilla 13) ...................... (850) 926-2606
or ..................................................................................... 926-5654







Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008


Sheriff's Report


Motorists arrive at the scene shortly after the fire began


Wakulla County Sheriff's Office
officials arrested a 42-year-old Craw-
fordville woman in connection
with an undercover narcotics bust
on Wednesday, April 16, according
to Sheriff David Harvey.
The Narcotics Unit served a
search warrant at the home of
Brenda Jean Merritt and discov-
ered marijuana growing inside the
home. Eighteen plants and soil
were discovered in a closet. The
plants were four to five inches tall
with fluorescent lights suspended
above them.
Marijuana cigarettes were recov-
ered in the home along with drug
paraphernalia. Merritt was charged
with possession of marijuana with
intent to sell and producing mari-
juana. The contraband was seized.
A total of 346.6 grams of marijuana
was recovered in addition to the
'plants. She was arrested without
incident, the sheriff said.

In other activity reported by the
Wakulla County Sheriff's Office


during the past week:
The Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office continues a series of warn-
ings about fraud. Several fraud
cases have occurred in Wakulla
County lately. The perpetrators
have been using these scams to
get money from residents, access
credit cards and bank accounts, and
possibly stealing identity.
Several people have been asked
to cash money orders, checks, and
travelers checks. For example,
residents receive $1,000 worth of
money orders from a person com-
mitting fraud. All that is required
is cash them and send 90 percent
($900) of the money back to them
and you get to keep the other 10
percent ($100) for your trouble. The
person committing fraud will tell
you that he can't cash the check
in his country due to civil war,
money exchange rates, or some
other excuse. This is a scaml The
money orders, checks, and travelers
checks are counterfeits. Once your
financial institution discovers that


they are counterfeit and have no
actual value, they will hold you ac-
countable and expect you to repay
them the full amount ($1,000). If
you receive any of these counter-
feits, destroy them or contact the
Wakulla County Sheriff's Office
and turn them over to a deputy for
destruction.
Remember, if it is too good to
be true...it is.
Contact information: To report a
crime call-Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office at 850-926-0800.
If defrauded on-line, contact the
FBI cyber crime complaint center at
www.ic3.gov.
If you are a victim of identity
theft, call the Federal Trade Com-
mission at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-
382-4357) or contact them on-line
at www.ftc.gov.
To verify if a business or char-
ity is legitimate, contact the Better
Business Bureau at www.bbb.org.
On April 15, Aron K. Dehart
reported the theft of copper from
a cellular tower. The wire, owned
by Verizon Wireless, was valued
at $1,000. Sprint and Nextel also
reported similar cases of stolen
copper. Deputy Andree Brown
investigated.
On April 17, Allen Hobbs of
St. Marks reported a grand theft
of fishing equipment from boats
at Shell Island Fish Camp. Deputy
Sean Wheeler identified five vic-
tims, but the value of the stolen
property is still to be determined.
On April 17, Anne Van Meter
Kessler of CHAT reported the theft
of $61 from the CHAT drop box.
Captain Steve Ganey investigated.
On April 17, Karlene B. Deware
of Crawfordville reported a burglary
at her home. The victim reported
the theft of household appliances
and other items valued at $619.
Deputy Ward Kromer investi-
gated.
On April 17, Darren W. Archer


Man gets 15 years in shooting case


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakallanews.net
A Panacea man ordered to serve
15 years in prison for shooting his
neighbor was in court last week
asking that his sentence be set
aside, claiming he had been ad-
vised by his lawyers that he would
only have to serve five years.
James Jacobs, 26, asked for
his sentence to be set aside in a
hearing held on Thursday, April
16, saying he had suffered from
Theffective counsel. Jacobs claimed
that his attorneys, Lane Smith and
Anthony Cammarata, had told
him that a "wink-wink, nod-nod"
sentencing deal had been worked
out with the Wakulla prosecutor,
Jackie Fulford, in which she would
ask the court to sentence Jacobs
to 15 years but would not object
to any lower sentence the judge
might impose.
Fulford did reduce the charge
from second-degree murder, pun-
ishable by a maximum term of life
in prison, to manslaughter, with a
maximum sentence of 30 years, in
exchange for Jacobs' plea.
Wakulla Circuit Judge N. Sanders
Sauls denied the motion, saying
that when a defendant comes
in his court wanting to enter a
straight-up plea that is, a plea
of guilty or no contest to a charge
without any sort of negotiated
deal with the prosecution, which
leaves the sentence solely in the
hands of the judge Sauls said he
always makes sure the defendant
understands the ramifications. And
Sauls pointed to a transcript of
Jacobs' sentencing that in his plea
colloquy with Jacobs in which
a defendant is advised that he is
giving up certain constitutional
rights by entering a plea that he
purposefully asked Jacobs if he
had been advised he would serve
any less prison time than ordered
by the court, to which Jacobs had
answered no.
Before Sauls sentenced Jacobs,
he called for a recess after making
a strident statement to Jacobs to
understand that whatever sentence
was ordered would be solely the
judge's decision.
In their testimony, the lawyers


said they discussed different op-
tions with Jacobs and his family
- and Smith said he was fully ready
to take the case to trial. Jacobs, he
said, had repeatedly told him he
didn't want to do any time in jail
or prison and the only way to ac-
complish that was to go to trial and
get a not guilty verdict or a finding
that the death was accidental and
excusable homicide.
Assistant State Attorney Jack
Campbell called the allegations of
some "wink-wink, nod-nod'" deal
an attack on the integrity of the
attorneys and the court.


Jacobs was charged with murder
for the death of Brian Holdiness
in 2003. Jacobs claimed it was an
accident. He told law enforcement
his deer rifle was leaning against
a wall, slipped and, as he tried
to grab it, it fired and a bullet hit
Holdiness, who was out mowing.
The prosecution contended that
evidence showed Jacobs had the
rifle out tracking Holdiness. He
may have pulled the trigger believ-
ing the rifle was unloaded, only to
have it fire. Holdiness, 24, was dead
when the paramedics arrived.


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McKINNEY
PROPERTIES


of Crawfordville reported a criminal
mischief at his home as someone
threw a fire extinguisher into his
pool. The extinguisher had been
discharged. Deputy James Plouffe
investigated.
On April 15, William Leon-
ard Tartt of Sopchoppy reported
a criminal mischief as someone
damaged his Gator sign which
was valued at $50. Deputy Nick
Petwosky investigated.
On April 15, Jackie M. Lawhon
of Sopchoppy reported a vehicle
burglary as someone broke into
three City of Sopchoppy vehicles.
Radios, valued at $90, were stolen.
Deputy Nick Petowsky investi-
gated.
On April 17, Kimberly D.
Tucker of Crawfordville reported a
fraud case involving a relative's So-
cial Security number. The number
had been used by five other people
in Dade County. Deputy Robert
Giddens investigated.
On April 17, Leroy C. Parker of
Crawfordville reported the theft of
checks from his vehicle. The checks
had been cashed locally for more
than $140. Jesse Lamar Parker, 24, of
Crawfordville was charged with ut-
tering a false instrument and theft
and taken to the county jail. Deputy
Robert Giddens investigated.
On April 17, Christina L. Rivers
of Crawfordville reported a fraud
as the victim received a counterfeit
check from a renter. Deputy Sean
Wheeler and Deputy Ryan Muse
investigated.
On April 15, George D. Rob-
erts of Crawfordville reported a
vehicle burglary as someone stole


his check book. A suspect, who
has been identified, attempted
to cash his check at a Tallahas-
see bank. Deputy Casey Whitlock
investigated.
On April 15, Windy L. An-
derson of Crawfordville reported
a credit card offense as someone
created an out of country credit
transaction on her account. A $545
charge was created in Europe.
Deputy Mike Crum investigated.
On April 18, Tony Rehor of
Winn-Dixie reported a grand theft
as an employee allegedly failed
to scan items through the check
out lane. Through video, Shannon
Lashea White, 21, of Crawfordville
was charged with grand theft of
more than $400 worth of merchan-
dise. She also allegedly admitted
purchasing stolen cigarettes from a
former employee and selling them
for $2 a pack on the street. Deputy
Nick Petowsky investigated.
On April 21, Donna J. Pitre of
Crawfordville reported a vehicle fire
at the intersection of U.S. Highway
319 and Highway 267. The victim
parked the vehicle on the side of
the road after hearing odd noises
and smelling smoke. The fire was
caused by a faulty fuel pump. Dam-
age was estimated at $1,500. Deputy
Lindsay Allen investigated.
On April 19, Lt. Ronald Mitch-
ell assisted the Florida Highway
Patrol in arresting Darren Rae
Jones, 24, of Crawfordville on felony
charges. The suspect broke away
from law enforcement officials
as they were attempting to make
a felony arrest. The K-9 "Gunny"
was used to track the suspect and


Fire Rescue Report


Last week, county firefighters
responded to two structure fires,
three brush fires, one miscella-
neous fire, six vehicle accidents
and 22 medical first responder
emergency incidents.
On April 12, county, Craw-
fordville and Panacea Fire De-
partments responded to a very
serious vehicle accident on U.S.
Highway 98. Firefighters were
able to extricate patients within
about six minutes of their ar-
rival on scene. Unfortunately,
there was a fatality due to this
accident.
On April 14, county and Craw-
fordville departments responded
to a kitchen fire at 1269 Spring


$


Creek Highway. On arrival, it
was determined that the resi-
dent had extinguished most of
the fire except some that had
extended into the attic. Firefight-
ers extinguished the remainder
of the fire.
On April 19, county and Craw-
fordville departments responded
to another kitchen fire at 76
Shawnee Trail. On arrival, fire-
fighters found that the resident
had extinguished the fire. Fire-
fighters assisted the homeowner
by using smoke evacuation fans
to clear smoke from the house.
It is occasionally necessary
for firefighters, when battling a
structure fire, to lay fire hoses


I


located him in a wooded area.
The dog was allowed to bite the
suspect when he allegedly refused
to comply with law enforcement
instructions to surrender. Jones
was captured and taken to the
county jail. The K-9 bit the suspect
in the hip and buttock area. Captain
Chris Savary and Sgt. Jud McAlpin
investigated.
On April 19, Ralph T. Motes
of Crawfordville reported a grand
theft of $2,400 worth of lawn equip-
ment from his property. A suspect
has been identified. Deputy Nick
Petowsky investigated.
On April 20, Stanley M. West
of Crawfordville reported a theft
at Riverside Cafe in St. Marks. The
victim reported the theft of $500
worth of beer from the cooler and
$100 damage to the cooler. Lt. Ron-
ald Mitchell investigated.
t On April 20, Kay L. Webster
of Crawfordville reported a theft
of a television, lamps and goblets
from her home. The property was
valued at $255. Deputy Andrew
Vass investigated.
On April 21, April L. Wardof
Crawfordville reported a theft at
Murphy Oil Company. A suspect
stole a $45 prepaid phone card after
the clerk activated it. He ran from
the .scene. Deputy Lindsay Allen
investigated.
The Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office received 774 calls for service
during the past week.
Note to our readers: The people
who are reported as charged with
crimes in this column have not yet
been to trial and are therefore in-
nocent until proven guilty.

across a road from a hydrant to
where the fire is located. When
this occurs it is vitally impor-
tant that drivers not drive over
these fire hoses. Driving over
fire hoses is, in fact, a violation
of Florida law. But, more impor-
tantly, driving over a fire hose
could damage the fire hose caus-
ing it to burst. A burst fire hose
could easily jeopardize firefight-
ers whose lives often depend on
an uninterrupted water supply.
When a firefighter is inside: a
burning building, his or her pri-
mary means of protection is the
ability to keep a steady stream
of water on the blaze.
On behalf of all the county's
firefighters, if you are driving
and see fire hoses across a road,
please turn around and find an-
other route to your destination.


/MO.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008 Page 13A


Langston
Continued from Page 1A
"They have done a really good
job in tough budget times." said
Pingree, who added that his bud-
get staff has been able to provide
a smooth implementation of the
budget during difficult times
of tax reform. The office did an
outstanding job in 2007-2008
and Pingree said the crew will be
tested again in 2008-2009.
Langston joined her two
younger sisters, Janet and Nata-
lie, and her parents, Larry and
Phyllis Cook, in operating the
family Christmas tree farm in the
Arran community. She graduated
from Wakulla High School in
1993 and went to college at Tal-
lahassee Community College and
Florida State University where she
'received a Bachelor's degree in
,merchandising.
She worked for a credit bureau
before moving on to the Florida
House of Representatives as a leg-
islative analyst. Her work experi-
-ence took her to Governor Charlie
Crist's office before she accepted
the county job.
Langston's background is in
. intergovernmental relations and
she spends her time researching
issues for the board as well as
working with the legislature and
county lobbyists to address issues
of concern to the county.
"I have a knack for the legisla-
tive process," she said.
Langston serves as Enterprise
Zone Coordinator as well as co-
ordinating special projects. She
'tracks bills in the state legislature
-including issues of property tax
-reform, growth management, li-
'brary funding and infrastructure
'needs.
"It's a very busy time," said


Langston of the 2008 Legislative
Session. "We rely on our lobbyists
and partner with the Florida As-
sociation of Counties. We have a
lot of eyes and ears helping."
Langston is also available to
the county commissioners to ad-
dress policies and procedures and
research of issues.
Langston has been active in the
community during her youth. "I
always had a desire to come back
and I am very excited about this
opportunity. I love working with
people."
Some of the assignments from
the county commission have in-
cluded the chartered county issue,
natural gas service, road naming
policy, Wakulla Expo property
acquisition and other research
and analysis.
Langston said some of her
research includes issues that have
been explored in the past, but the
passage of time has changed some
viewpoints.
"It's great to get a chance to
work on things in the county,"
Langston concluded. "We can
have a quicker impact on people
here than at the state level."
"Jennifer was an excellent
applicant," Pingree concluded. "I
was really impressed with her
experience and pleased she had
an interest in coming back to the
county."

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Sink
Continued from Page 1A
The Northwest Florida Water
Management District is already
moving ahead with purchasing 12
acres of wetlands on the property.
The acquisition of the remain-
ing lands would provide a critical
link in the protection of the aquifer
and Wakulla Springs, and provide
a greenway corridor of protected
state and federal lands stretching
from the airport in Tallahassee to
the fort in St. Marks and the St.
Marks National Wildlife Refuge.
John Ferrell, Jr., who inherited
700 acres of the property, said
that it had been his father's wish
for the state to get the land. He
said two past offers made by the
state, however, were so low that
his father viewed them as almost
insulting.
Ferrell is a willing seller. "I'm
ready if they want to do some-
thing," he said of the state,
A tour of the property with
Springs Ambassador Cal Jamison
showed a line of karst features and
a cavern system that extends in a
line from Leon Sinks to Wakulla
Springs.
Jamison noted that the property
has been protected and kept in a
natural wooded state and won't
require restoration work unlike


Association
To report
orphaned or injured


some of the planted pine tracts
the state has recently purchased
and which rangers are struggling
to return to native hardwood or
longleaf pine habitat.
The Ferrell property adjoins
both the Apalachicola National For-
est and Wakulla Springs State Park
lands. Across Wakulla Springs Road,
east of the Ferrell tract, is Wakulla
State Forest which adjoins Wakulla
Springs. It's a short distance along
Bloxham Cutoff or Shadeville Road
to the St. Marks Trail which leads to
Fort San Marcos and the St. Marks
National Wildlife Refuge.
Purchase of the property would
also provide direct access for
Wakulla Springs State Park to
the Turner Sink Tract, which is
landlocked by private lands. The
only current access is provided
through the goodwill of a private
landowner.
Some of the features on the Fer-
rell land are stunning: a lime-rock
outcropping over Greyhound Sink
that provides a beautiful view of
the water or a good place to jump
in. A log wagon rolled into Blue
Sink decades ago, found by divers,
and hung up on the side of the
sinkhole, has been recovered and
is being restored by the state. A ra-
vine found by Jamison, and named
Ferrell Swallet by him, starts as a
slight depression and deepens over
a length of 200 yards to become a
20 feet deep hole where water runs
into visible fissures in the rock.
It is important for the preserva-
tion of Wakulla Springs that this
missing piece be added to state
lands.


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St. Marks
Continued from Page 1A
St. Marks would be promoted as
a retreat, not a resort, said commit-
tee member Elinor Elfner.
One way the city is trying to
encourage this is by working out
deals with property owners. For ex-
ample, the proposed location of the
riverfront park would be created by
offering the property owners the
possibility of transferring the unit
density of the waterfront to other
inland property making that in-
land property more valuable.
The city is also going through
comp plan changes, such as cre-
ating a mixed-use land use that
would have both residential and
retail uses. That land use is being
sought for the proposed Marina
Point development, with a density
of 16 units per acre residential in
addition to retail store space.
The Pity of St. Marks has been in
decline for several decades. It was
once dependent on heavy commer-
cial activity barges bringing in oil
for refining and tank farm storage
- in addition to fishing and recre-
ational boating. With the exception



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of the Purdom Power Plant, most
of those heavy industries have left
the area.
One of the main attractions to
St. Marks was Posey's restaurant
- a hole-in-the-wall eatery that
gained a national reputation for its
coastal charm, and is represented
by numerous artists. But the tidal
surge from Hurricane Dennis that
flooded St. Marks in July 2005 re-
vealed serious structural damage to
the Posey's building. The owners
tried to re-open, but the building
was eventually condemned.
Under the proposed CRA, the
committee is recommending sal-
vaging the Posey's building mov-
ing it to another location, not on
the waterfront. One goal of new
development is to focus on the
town's history, which stretches
back to 1527 and the disastrous
visit of conquistador Panfilo de
Narvaez and his troops, who were
ravaged by sickness and the native
Apalachee indians until they built
a boat and set out on Apalachee
Bay for Mexico. Later, the Spanish
established Fort San Marcos at the
confluence of the St. Marks and
Wakulla rivers.


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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008


Charter
Continued from Page 1A
"They've jumped on a high-
speed train," Kessler said of the
city's plans, "and we want to drag
our feet."
Shields, Sopchoppy City Clerk
Jackie Lawhon and Clerk of
Courts Brent Thurmond all urged
commissioners to have a meet-
ing to discuss the implications
of changing Wakulla County's
government from constitutional
to charter.
Under the Florida constitu-
tion, counties are a subdivision
of the state with certain powers
and a government structure
functioning with certain created
posts clerk, tax collector, sher-
iff, for example. Under a charter
form of government, voters can
approve a new structure some
counties have taken the clerk's
constitutional function as county
bill payer and created a position
like a chief financial officer.
Of 67 counties in the state, 19
have charter governments. Most
are more metropolitan areas. If
Wakulla County were to approve
a charter, it would be the small-
est county in the state by far
to do so.
Staff has proposed a "starter
charter" in which the structure
would remain exactly the same
- constitutional officers would
still maintain their elected posi-
tions and functions. The concern
as expressed by Kessler and
Pingree is the plan for St. Marks
to freeze the tax valuation of


properties in the city and any
increase for the term of the 30-
year CRA would go to St. Marks
to pay for the revitalization. That
leaves the county in the position
of paying to provide services to
St. Marks without receiving the
increased tax revenues.
Shields told the board that
St. Marks, formerly an indus-
trial town, has seen the end
of the petroleum refining and
storage businesses in the town:
St. Marks Refinery is gone, Mur-
phy Oil is closed, and Stratus
Petroleum has taken down its
tank farm.
Now, Shields said, there are
three marinas in town and three
or four restaurants. And those
businesses are dependent on
weekend activity the town
is basically dead on weekdays,
he said.
Kessler's motion, which had
been seconded by Commissioner
George Green for discussion, to
go ahead with the charter and
hire the consultant was voted
down 1-4, with only Kessler
voting for it. A motion by Com-
missioner Brian Langston and
seconded by Maxie Lawhon to
table the issue for staff to meet
with other officials and bring it
back passed unanimously.
During a break called after
the vote, Pingree huddled with
Shields and St. Marks Mayor
Steve Dunbar and revitalization
committee member Durwood
Jackson. Shields and Pingree
each stridently stated their po-
sitions.


Visitors to the reunion enjoy a meal at their old school

Sopchoppy H.S. Reunion held


Students of all ages converged on
Sopchoppy High School for the popular
reunion on Saturday, April 12. Coming
by airplane, car and even bus, from as
far away as California, Texas, Wisconsin
and Missouri, approximately 300 alumni
attended the "historic" reunion.
Built in 1924 and accredited in 1928,
Sopchoppy High School was the first


high school in Wakulla County.. There
are no graduates still living from the
Class of 1928, but Eloise Kemp Strickland
of Sopchoppy was recognized as a 1929
graduate. The oldest graduate attend-
ing the reunion was Lottie Stalnaker
Roddenberry, a 1931 graduate. The next
reunion will be the second Saturday in
April in 2010.


The Sopchoppy High School Class of,
1958 celebrated 50 years with a dinner-at
The Landing in Panacea on Friday, April-
11. Two class members could not attend-
and two others are deceased, but other-
wise the attendance was nearly perfect.;
The alumni attending included Roger
Eubanks, Robert Beasley, Edwin Brown,'
Coney Smith, Rowena Grimes Bazo, Edgar
Pigott, Dolores Simpson Pigott, Frasier
Martin; Mary Ellen Willis Whaley, Zula'
Crum Smith, Sandra Langston, Strick-
land, Elizabeth Roberts Smith, Glyhwood'
Crum, and JoAnn Strickland Catoe. -


Expo
Continued from Page 1A
Pingree seemed to be looking
for more direction from the board
on issues that he and WEA had
negotiated back-and-forth with
proposals and counter-proposals.
Citizen Dana Peck, who along
with Jimmie Doyle and others,
first brought up the issue of WEA's
status and whether the group
should have been paying local
property taxes on its land for the
past decade, said she had a letter
from the state Department of Rev-
enue indicating the group is not
a 501(c)3 non-profit, and said the
state Department of Agriculture's
Division of Consumer Affairs was
l~oking-into, oentrbutions-made
to the group -which she said
had pulled its web site soliciting
donations.
The county should take its
$400,000 grant for a youth center
and locate it on county land some-


where rather than continuing to
try to negotiate with the WEA,
Peck said.
Citizen Larry Roberts was more
critical of the WEA, saying he be-
lieved the group was well aware
that it did not have tax-exempt
status. "I don't trust these people,"
Roberts said, adding he thought
they were disingenuous.
Brimner defended the WEA,
noting that the group had been
"pretty severely chastised" in
citizen comments. He said he took
offense at the suggestion that the
WEA "is trying to beat us out of
something or do something il-
legal."


PUBLIC NOTICE

The Wakulla County Housing Department has re-
ceived funding for the Low Income Home Energy Assis-
tance Program (LIHEAP) for the contract year March 1
- 31, 2009. We will be accepting calls for appointments
starting May 7, 2008, from 8:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m.
Monday Friday.

To be eligible for the LIHEAP Program each household
must provide proof of a home energy obligation for their
household, proof of income and social security cards of all
household members. The application process will.be complet-
ed once the required information has been received.

If your utility bill is in someone else's name, that
individual must live in the household and you must pro-
vide proof of this in order to receive assistance.
Crisis Assistance: You must have a disconnect notice or your
utility must have been disconnected in order to be qualified for Crisis
Assistance; "past due notices will not qualify you for assistance".
Priority will be given to Senior citizens, disabled people and house-
hold with children five years old and under.
Please see Mrs. Annie Brown, for assistance at: (850) 926-8677


Near all of the Class of 1958 returned to celebrate a 50 year reunion

BIG BEND MARITIME CENTER PRESENTS.
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By Dr. Michael Faught
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S... Panamerican Consultants, Inc.
Thursday, April 24
Social: 7:00 7:30 Program" 7:30 8:30
Tallahassee Commi tyCopllege...
Wakulla Center in Crawfordville

U.S. Highway ?319. .
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Discussion is free and opento the public
A Five-part Lecture Series made possible by grants from The Florida
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Benefit for Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park, Inc.
q,KUL (Gulf Winds Track Club Co-Host)
"Date: Saturday, May 17, 2008
Sp Location: Wakulla Springs State Park, Wakulla County
(22 miles south of Tallahassee)
Distance & Race Times: 1 Mile Fun Run 8:30 a.m.
S( 5K Run 9:00 a.m.
Fees: Pre-Registration (by 5/16) $12; Day of Race $15
Family (2 shirts) $25; Fun Run $5; No shirt option $7


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Run for Wakulla Springs Official Entry Form


Name (Fir


(Last


)


Address


City


(Zip) e-mail


Phone


Emergency contact


Phone
Registration (Check One and underline M or F)


[ 70+ M/F j 69-65 M/F [L 60-64 M/F LI 55-59 M/F


L 50-54 M/F L 45-49 M/F [L 40-44 M/F


Li 35-39 M/F Li 30-34 M/F LI 25-29 M/F [L 20-24 M/F Li 15-19 M/F L] 10-14 M/F [L 9 and under


T-shirt size: LI small


LI medium I large


El X-large


The first 200 registrants will receive a T-shirt. To guarantee a t-shirt consider pre-registering.
Day of race registration begins at 8 a.m. at the bathhouse at the park.

Waiver: In consideration of your permission to participate in Run for Wakulla Springs, on behalf of myself, my heirs, executors and assignees, I hereby
waive and release any and all rights and claims for damages which I may have against the organizers of the race, the park, as well as any other person
connected with the run for any and all injuries that I may suffer while participating in the event. I know that running a road race is a potentially hazardous
activity. I agree to abide by all decisions of the race officials relative to my ability to safely complete this run.
Signed Date
Phone Registration: 926-0700
MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO FRIENDS OF WAKULLA SPRINGS STATE PARK, Inc.
Mail to: Run for Wakulla Springs, Wakulla Springs State Park, 550 Wakulla Park Drive, Wakulla Springs, FL 32327-0390
For more information, visit wakullasprings.org for up-dates


ag') -11


)sts







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008 Page 15A


Communi


SHi neighbors. It looks like it's _
my turn again for cooler weather. ST. MARKS NEWS
You folks have had too many
warmish days here lately and By Linda Walker
I was starting to sweat a. little
wondering if it was ever going
to cool off again before the real angels you will ever met. He got
summer arrived. Of course, she out in the rain and changed my
who shall remain nameless is tire in no time at all.
still wearing long sleeves and The fact that I didn't have
sweaters, and probably long- a jack or tire tool would have
johns, if the truth be told. If it perturbed most guys, but not
gets below 90 degrees she starts this one. He had all he needed.
freezing. But she has no extra I just want to thank all three of
padding like some of us, so I do the angels who cared enough to
understand, come out in the rain to help me
-:Neighbors, every now and and follow me back home.
then I just have to talk about Angels wings to the out-of-
the angels that run around down towner driving that huge truck
here in our little town taking and pulling a long boat and
care-of all of us. They were out trailer who turned around after
in.fill force on a recent Saturday. passing me. He offered to help.
I ,Was headed out of St. Marks, People ask why I like living in
which is not my favorite thing to St. Marks. Now you don't need
do-to start with, but sometimes to even ask.
I just have to. Listen up people Whoever
I'm tooling along in my old turned over the portable toilet at
clinker and wouldn't you know the fort, shame on you. What if
i, get a flat tire. It was not your mom had been inside.
one of those loud kabooms but Thank you to whoever is
kind of a little flap, flap now planting all the palm trees up
a d then. and down our main road. It looks
. Tmew what was wrong when beautiful. Can you plant them all
I realized my steering wasn't the way to Highway 98?
quite right. I pulled off the road It was good to hear that Aly-
gnd it starts raining. I get out to sha Valencourt is doing so well
s0e -what's going on. With my at her new job and loving going
c4r you never know. I saw the through the police academy
flat tire and got back inside out training school. She will go far.
cathe rain. My cell phone won't These things do happen when
pi" up a signal inside the car. you least expect it.
6Sot's back out in the rain to call Congratulations to Johnny
fit help. I called the head angel and Rita Reams on their mar-
down here and there was no one riage on April 10. It has been a
tiund, but she, called me back long time coming. May God bless
i6iEe minutes! to tell me help you both and your families.
1j.Won the way, Neighbors, another angel was
-These two angels do not want taken home last week when Bev-
their names in the paper this erly Ann Rodgers passed away.
time, but they are the sweetest She was my niece by marriage

Reunions-Sanders


The Nat and Gladys Sand-
ers-family reunion will be held,
Saturday, May 3 at Ochlockonee
River State Park in the Curtis
Mills community. The event will
feature a covered dish dinner at
approximately 12 p.m. Relatives
are asked to come at 10 a.m. or
11 a.m. for the all day event..


The John Henry and Mary
Jane Sanders family reunion
will be held Saturday, May 3 at
11 a.m. at Ochlockonee River
State Park. All descendants and
friends are welcome to attend.
Guests are invited to bring a cov-
ered dish and join the fun.


and had always seemed like a
little girl to me. She was so tiny.
She had a heart transplant a cou-
ple of years ago at the same time
that Sandy Chapman had hers.
They were at Shands, together.
Beverly left behind four children,
Nicki, Crystal, Shane and David.
Beverly will be cremated at her
request. She could not get life
insurance and the kids have no
way to pay for this. If you would
like to make a donation in her
name to Harvey-Young Funeral
Home, please do so. You will
be blessed for your kindness.
Please keep her children in your
prayers. Neighbors, please re-
member that sometimes people
are on our prayer list for reasons
other than sickness.
Let's wish these people happy
birthday: Anthony"The Great"
Hobbs on April 17, Steve Sim-
mons on April 19, Tom Clore on
April 21 and Robyn Sernito on
April 21. A special happy anniver-
sary to Daniel and Christie Ward
Scarborough on April 18.
On our prayer list, please
remember Newell Ladd, Debbie
Roberts, Thelma Murphy, Jim
and Eddie Ward, Pam Lawhon,
Jerelene Howard, Sam Don-
aldson, Darrell Hershey, Jewel
Franklin, Nettie, Gordon and
Junior Strickland, Barnard Ses-
sions, Jane Marshall, Betty Smith,
Beverly Rodgers' children, Nancy
Nichols and me.
Pray for all of those individu-
als not named here. Pray for each
other, our town, our soldiers
overseas and all of those who
were in Vietnam. Pray for peace
and pray we all start seeing more
angels at work.
Thought for this week: Let
me remember that when I stay
angry at someone, I am letting
that person control my life.
Do you have news? Get it to
me at 925-0234, or put a note
in our drop box at Bo Lynn's
store.

GET THE NEWS
DELIVERED
EACH WEEK!
Call 926-7102


On Sunday, April 27, Macedo-
nia Church of Christ will host
the annual May E. Green Day
at 11 a.m. We welcome you to
come and fellowship with us.
The guest speaker will be Elder
Tracy Bake from Grand Ridge,
Fla. The host pastor is Elder
Andrew Morris.
Our prayers and concern go
out to all the sick and shut-in,
those in the hospital, nursing
home, jail, prison, schools, and
the community that we live in.
We wish a belated birthday to
Jasmine Rollins, Leona Langston,
Latota Smith, and Glynis. Happy
birthday to Michelle Moore and
Isiah Hines, Sr. on April 22.
A three night revival will be
held at the Extension Office, 30
Cedar Ave., Crawfordville, May 2,
May 3 and May 4. Services begin
at 7:30 p.m. nightly, and at 6 p.m.


BUCKHORN
By Ethel Skipper

on Sunday. Pastor Alice Williams
and Evangelist Pamela Johnson
will deliver the service. Everyone
is welcome to this Holy Ghost
Revival. Cedar St. is across from
Sonic in Crawfordville.
Women's Day at Skipper
Temple Church, 165 Surf Rd.,
Sopchoppy, will be observed
on Sunday, May 4, at 3 p.m.
The speaker will be Evangelist
Joanna Edward. Everyone is
welcome.
Burney Temple Church will
host Family and Friends Day
Service on Sunday, April 27, at 11
a.m. in Apalachicola. Elder Clif-
ford Williams will be in charge
of services. Deaconess Butler ex-


tends a welcome to everyone.
The Lily of the Valley No. 190
Order of Eastern Star celebrated
their chapter's 48th anniver-
sary. The only charter member
remaining in the chapter is
Brother Joseph Williams who
is the Worthy Patron. He is a
faithful activity member. Grand
Officers visiting the anniversary
were Area Deputy Sister Gladys
Johnson Samuel and Brother
Leander Harvey, Past Grand W.P.
of Tallahassee. The members
had a candle ceremony remem-
bering all past member of the
Order. Eastern Star Elder Ethel
M. Skipper and Elder Rodney
Smith were guest speakers. Sing-
ing was presented by the O.E.S,
Choir. Thanks to all members
and Christian friends,


Archaeologist To Present program


Florida as you've never known
it -- all the way back to the last
Ice Age -- will be brought to life
Thursday, April 24, as part of the
Big Bend Maritime Center's free
public lecture series.
The program at Tallahassee
Community College's Wakulla
Center, just south of Crawford-
ville on U.S. Highway 319, will
begin at 7:30 p.m. following a
complimentary 7 p.m. pre-lecture
social.
Dr. Michael Faught, senior
maritime archaeologist with
Panamerican Consultants, Inc.,
Tallahassee, will provide histori-
cal insights into the Big Bend's
rich history from the last Ice Age
through historic times.
"We'll be making some stops
along the way to better under-
stand the effects of sea level rise
over large areas of what used to
be a much larger Florida," said
Faught. "From archaeological
sites underwater on the conti-
nental shelf to sites known in
and around our local rivers, the
special part of the world has a
hidden record of Paleo-Indians
and the Europeans that fol-
lowed."


Faught, an oft publisher writ-
er, is also a board member and
treasurer of the Archaeological
Research Cooperative and former
assistant professor at Florida
State University. He holds a B.A.,
M.A. and Ph. D in anthropology
from the University of Arizona.
The five-part lecture series,
"The Maritime Trail," began in
January. The public presenta-
tions are made possible by a
grant to the Big Bend Maritime
Center (BBMC) from the Florida
Humanities Council. The 2008


guest speaker series will con-
clude on May 22 with "Light-.
houses of the Big Bend."
The series is being cospon-
sored by a Florida Coastal Man-
agement Grant from the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Ad-
ministration and by Tallahas-
see Community College, which!
is providing the facility. KC,
Smith, BBMC board member.
and Florida Heritage Education
Coordinator for the Museum of
Florida History in Tallahassee, is
also coordinating the series. .


WHS Honor Court


In a matter of weeks, Wakulla
High School will graduate the
students from the Class of 2008.
The top students are honored
each year with membership in
the 2008 Honor Court. The court
was recently announced by school
officials.
The students include top ranked
Valedictorian Michael Andrews, sec-
ond ranked Salutatorian Elizabeth
Butler, third ranked Meghan McCal-
lister, fourth ranked Kyle Kilinski,
fifth ranked Christina Brydebell,
sixth ranked Elliot Seidler, seventh


ranked Karlyn Scott, eighth ranked;
Virginia Weiss, ninth ranked Stuart
Smith, 10th ranked Lyle Allbrigh-
ton, 11th ranked Megan Seber and
12th ranked Forrest Perry.
The Junior Marshalls and Ush-
ers form the potential Honor Court
for 2009. They include: #1 Amanda
McCullers, #2 Lauren Gentry, #3, Su-
san Hudson, #4 Rance McBratney,
#5 Joshua Golden, #6 Kimberly
Franklin, #7 Julian Egler, #8 Holly
Thomas, #9 Travis Thompson,
#10 Rebecca Folsom, #11 Hannah
Lovestrand and #12 Scott Kelly.


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INDUS Tms mE







Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008


Pat Jones and family members were recognized at Relay


Relay For Life

Wakulla High School hosted
the annual American Cancer
Society Relay For Life last week
and 17-year cancer survivor Pat
Jones was honored as the Hon-
orary Surviving Chairperson for
the Relay for Life in Wakulla.
The Relay for Life overnight
event is designed to celebrate
survivorship and raise money
for research. It was held at the
Wakulla High School track Friday
and Saturday, April 18 and April
19. Pictured with Pat are her
granddaughter, Crystal Womboe,
daughter, Angel Lewis, grand-
daughter, Amber Womboe, and
grandson, Hunter Lewis.


,4 j

A big crowd turned out in Sopchoppy on Saturday evening, April 19, to watch a performance of
The Sprockets, a pair of European circus-comedy performers Scott Harrison, who is English,
and Issabelle Feraud (Izzy), who is French who have traveled the world for 10 years in a green
double-decker bus with their son, Theo. The audience enjoyed the 45-minute show of stunts and
gags, and afterwards admired the bus top speed 32 mph which featured photos of the family's
travels. The next day, the Sprockets performed in Carrabelle, and will make their way northward
over the next month before returning to Europe via freighter. (Photo by William Snowden)


o


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Thomas Johr

Recycling

center gets

a facelift
e Have you visited the recycling
center lately? You may be sur-
prised!
: Phase 1 of the facelift is com-
plete and Phase 2 is in progress.
You should see it, because it is
not only functional, but attractive
as well.
The first part of the facelift
is the access road to recycling.
Recycling personnel created a
one-way drive-through road. That
means you won't have to wait
any longer for someone to exit
as we're entering. Since it is more
efficient, dumping off our recy-
clables will take less time. Also,
the new drive-through is covered
with gravel. Now, we won't get
muddy even on rainy days!
Phase 2 is beautification of the
area. Our new Recycling Coordi-
nator, Don Morgan and I visited
Brandy Cowley-Gilbert of Just
Fruits to find out what plants will
thrive in the landfill conditions.


ison places a railroad tie aroun

Keep Wakulla

Beautiful





Marj Law

Because part of Keep Wakulla
County Beautiful's mission state-
ment is to promote recycling, we
asked to be involved with the
recycling improvement program.
Brandy suggested and donated
some native plants that will sur-
vive the full sunlight and some-
times drought-like conditions
at our landfill. We planned a 12
foot by 24 foot garden beside the
gravel road. Garden plants include
two crepe myrtles, nine roses, and
about 14 junipers. The Natchez
Crape Myrtles (Lagerstroemia
Indica) have white flowers in the
spring and have a long bloom-
ing period. At maturity, they will
grow to be about 20 feet high.
The Red Knockout roses will
bloom all summer long. They are
very hardy and are resistant to


d the garden
diseases and insects.
Finally, the Nana Juniper
plants (Juniperus Procumbens)
will spread and provide a green
ground cover all year long. They
grow to be about 1 foot high and
will spread to 3 feet wide.
The planting will provide red
and white color in the spring, and
then the red will continue during
the summer. The green back-
ground will remain green all year
long so that even in the winter,
the garden will be attractive.
The final part of the recycling
center facelift will be the signs on
the recycling bins. The new signs
will be large at 4 feet by 4 feet and
will state specifically what items
should go in each bins. Each sign
will have a different color turtle,
too. This way, we'll be able to
recognize each bin by color or
by words.
We're working with the Wakul-
la County Chamber of Commerce
for a ribbon-cutting ceremony
scheduled for Friday, April 25 at
10 a.m. Come to see a recycling
center that looks nice and is easy
to usel


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WAKULLA NEWSTh d A 8


Section B .....----



Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life


Age is an Asset Sharing wisdom and experiences


By E. Douglas Beach, Ph.D.
Older adults and youth face
many challenges. Young people
often face difficulty in navigating
adolescence, while older adults
can be challenged by loneliness
and isolation from their com-
munity. Together, young and old
are assets to the community and
can offer support to one another
through meaningful interaction.
By sharing knowledge, experi-
ence and skills through inter-
generational connections, entire
communities can benefit.
Intergenerational programs
allow us to address critical social
problems and build stronger
communities. Older adults are an
invaluable source of support for
young people who may need a
friend to help them mature into
responsible adults. By working
with older adults on community
projects or by reaching out to
elders who are in need of as-
sistance, young people develop
important life skills.
Intergenerational programs
exist for this purpose. They
unite older adults and youth to
address critical social problems
together, and in turn, build
stronger communities. I believe
every person in a community
benefits when older and younger
generations address problems
together.
An 18-month study of more
than 950 young people at various
Big Brothers Big Sisters agencies
found that youth who received


E. Douglas Beach
Secretary,
Florida Department
of Elder Affairs
mentoring were 46 percent less
likely to begin using illegal
drugs, 53 percent less likely to
skip school, and overall, they
were more confident in their
performance in school work
and demonstrated improved
relationships with families. The
results were even more telling
among minority youth. The
study showed that 70 percent of
mentored minority youth were
less likely to begin using drugs.
Older adults who participate
in intergenerational programs
benefit from new, positive re-
lationships with youth and
children in their community. Vol-
unteer work increases a senior's
sense of purpose. By spending


XXX


By JOAN E. SMITH, P.R.,
Wakulla County
Senior Citizen's Center


Early Friday morning, March
28, one friendly little goose
decided to display its pres-
ence at the Wildwood Country
Club. Staff members ques-
tioned, "Where did the web-
footed bird come from?" Some
of them agreed with Adam,
they'd not noticed it until that
morning.
Although the fog had set in,
the professional staff didn't
worry because they knew it


would be a beautiful day for
the annual fundraiser golf tour-
nament endorsed by Wakulla
Bank, Sheriff David F. Harvey,
and the Wakulla Senior Citi-
zens Council.
Thanks to the cooperative
work of Jerry Evans, Susan
Turner, Nell Rozar and Shelly
Homan, the registration pro-
cess was completed in record
time. Later that morning, 72
players gathered around the
field to listen to the welcom-
ing address presented by R.H.
Carter. Then, for some un-
known reason, just as Sheriff


time tutoring an elementary stu-
dent or mentoring a young adult,
an elder has a chance to transfer
his or her knowledge, skills and
values to the next generation.
Intergenerational programs help
seniors remain involved in the
community as well as provide
personal satisfaction that comes
with volunteering.
At the Florida Department of
Elder Affairs, we are dedicated
to creating an environment that
provides choices, promotes in-
dependence and enables older
Floridians to'remain in their
communities for a lifetime.
Through a partnership between
the department's Communities
for a Lifetime initiative and
AARP, we are bringing genera-
tions together to meet the needs
of all individuals throughout
their lives. This innovative pro-
gram focuses on enhancing op-
portunities for people of all ages
to, continue living in their own
communities throughout their
lives by encouraging partner-
ships and collaborations to meet
identified needs.
A new partnership between
the Department of Elder Affairs
and Big Brothers Big Sisters of
Florida called Intergenerational
Connections...Little Moments,
Big Magic will bring youth
and elders together and foster
mutually beneficial relation-
ships as Big Brothers Big Sisters
volunteer groups provide minor
home repair services to elders


David Harvey began his talk,
the unskilled goose chose this
very inappropriate moment to
make its loud, dull, explosive
vocal cry. The brief chuckle
boomeranged through the
crowd.
As each team finished play,
they turned in their scorecards
to the pro shop. The teams
were invited to enjoy a deli-
cious lunch buffet prepared by
the Wildwood restaurant. Lat-
er, after the meal, Wildwood's
Pro Shop Director of Golf, Pete
Sands, presented the prizes.
Johnson Insurance Agency
- Team One, prevailed through
the competition and won the
first place position in the First
Flight. Not to be outdone, the
Johnson Insurance Agency
- Team Two, masterfully slid
into first place of the Second-
Flight. The first place winner
of the Third Flight went to the
Wakulla Bank Team One.
The highlight of the event
was not the presence of the
goose. The highlight was the
people. People reaching peo-
ple, as one unit, hand-in-hand,
extending the chain of hope.
Hope was demonstrated dur-
ing this event and it will con-
tinue to provide hope for the
care needs of our senior popu-
lation. Thank you, Wakulla
County


in their community. Volunteers
will provide manual labor, such
as caulking around windows,
minor house painting, porch
repairs, yard work and general
home cleanings. These home
repair activities are vitally impor-
tant to seniors because they can
extend the time they are able to
remain in their own homes and
can divert the need for them to
enter a nursing home.
The Intergenerational Con-
nections...Little Moments, Big
Magic program kicked off in
February 2008 arid targeted four
cities: Tampa, Orlando, Jackson-
ville and Pensacola. The project
will expand statewide during
National Volunteer Week begin-
ning on April 27. ,
Florida's elders remain an
invaluable resource. They are
Florida's "secret weapon," and
they can make a difference in
the lives of younger people. To-
gether, young and old alike are
important assets and by offering
support to one another through
meaningful intergenerational
connections they create stronger
communities.
E. Douglas Beach, Ph.D., was
appointed as Secretary of the
Florida Department of Elder
Affairs on February 13, 2007.
Secretary Beach has worked in
the aging network for more than
12 years.


Eden Springs

Rehab care
By JOAN E. SMITH, P.R.,
Wakulla County
Senior Citizen's Center
The Restorative Care Program
at Eden Springs is designed with
utmost concern for the wellness
of each person. Often, after a
hospital stay, individuals need
extra help setting goals and mak-
ing decisions about their personal
care needs. Eden Springs offers a
place of restoration,
"Restorative care will actually
help individuals with the task bf
maintaining their predetermined
levels of independence and since
it comes after the occupational,
speech, and physical therapy
sessions, it benefits the progress
made in physical therapy" said,
Fred Holmes, Eden Springs Rehab
Director.
Marjorie Hamilton, LPN, Restor-
ative Care Coordinator, excitedly
shared, "I enjoy coming to work
every day." She also said it was
a joy to work with her staff and
the restorative groups at Eden
Springs. She affectionately calls
her active Eden Springs residence
group "All Stars."
"We need helpers for our
Men's Club and Women's Club.
These dubs schedule events and
look for ways to give back to the
community. They collect clothes
or do other charitable projects,"


she said. "Volunteer helpers are
always welcomed."
Eden Springs has a great team
and staff. They show compassion
and demonstrate the desire to
help individuals overcome some
of the difficulties of life and be
restored to their homes and com-
munity.
"It's comforting to know Eden
Springs Rehab facility is here in
the county. I'd like to thank the
Eden Springs staff of Tess Coe-
tzee, MSW, Social Services; Fred
Holmes, Rehab; and Marjorie
Hamilton, Restorative Care, for al-
lowing me to visit with them to
tour the Rehab Center."
Eden Springs Rehab has an
open-door policy and enjoys
showing off the facilities. For
more information, call or stop by
the office at 4679 Crawfordville
Hwy. Their number is 926-7181.


SENIOR ACTIVITIES
Wakulla County Senior
Citizens Center Weekly Classes
Craft Workshops
Cards and Table Games
Bingo
Tai Chi
Brain Gym
Line Dancing
Watercolor Classes
Exercise Classes
Computer Classes
Better Breathers Class
Yoga
Tuesday and Friday
Weekly Activities-
Pickin' & Grinnin' Band
Second Thursday Monthly-
Gospel Sing-A-Long
Plus other daily activities. For
more information, please contact
Diane Lanter, Activities Director,
at 926-7145.


Shingles stays active in the community


By ALEX BRIMNER
Of The Wakulla News
Joe Shingles was born in the
Bethel community in 1927 to
Rosa and Henry Shingles, Sr. As
a child he attended Bethel El-
ementary School and graduated
from Shadeville High School. He
spent his younger days sitting
in the front yard of his family's
home pnd dreaming of his future.
There were no lawns in his com-
munity, so he would draw in the
sand, determined to do better for
himself than what he could see
around him.
"I wanted to one day make
$10,000 a year," he said. "What I
saw in the community has been
the driving force that pushed
me."
Although his father died when
he was nine years old, as a farmer,
he left his tools of survival behind
for his son. "Farming was a matter
of survival," Shingles said. "Peo-
ple raised most of their food." He
took his cue from his father, and
made the steps in attaining his


dreams, graduating from FAMU
in 1949 with a major in vocational
agriculture and a minor in admin-
istration and supervision.
The next year, he accepted a
position as principal at Buckhorn
Elementary, but was drafted
into the military before he even
signed the contract. He took the
officer candidate school test and
was sent to school at Fort Ben-
ning. He put in to go overseas
as a regimental commander, but
was denied because of the need
for officers at home. One year
later, his enlistment ended and
he returned home.
He continued his education,
earning a Master's degree, and
completing summer work at
Tuskegee. He decided to return
to Wakulla County to teach. He
spent two years as principal at
Buckhorn and was the Assistant
Principal at Shadeville High,
teaching vocational agriculture as
well. He chose to stay in Wakulla
County even though he had
several offers that paid more. "I


was concerned for Wakulla and
the people in Wakulla," Shingles
said, "plus the fact I didn't like
cold weather."
He stayed in the county, and
has been actively participating in
as much as possible ever since,
"The conditions in Wakulla hadn't
changed," he said. "My goal was
to improve the conditions."
. Shingles spent four years on
the Board of Trustees at Tallahas-
see Community College and has
been a part of organizations such
as Habitat for Humanity, Wakulla
County Christian Coalition, and
CItizens Against Unjust Systems,
where he helped students in
the fight with the Wakulla High
School administration several
years ago.
It was a race-based issue that
caused the walk-out at WHS. A
young student was not allowed to
sing his rap song a second time
after it was heard at a school as-
sembly, prompting the students
to walk out in protest. The mem-
bers of Citizens Against Unjust


Systems took on their plight
when the administration gave
them all detention and counted
them absent for that day. With
the help of a prominent law firm,
the organization was successful in
the battle. "There have been some
improvements in race relations,"
Shingles said. "It never was as bad
as it was portrayed."
Today, Shingles works just. as
hard as he ever has. "You retire
so you can go to work," he said.
"If I'm not doing something in
the field, I'm doing something
else." He spends his time on the
80 acres he owns, checking on
his hogs or riding on the tractor
to look at the fields.
"I have exactly no need for all
this junk here," he said, "but I
wanted my children to want to do
for themselves." He and his wife
have four grown children and sev-
eral grandchildren. Shingles has
given them the model to follow,
hard work and determination to
do better.


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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008


People


.... Children will have a

. .. chance to drop a line


David Clayton Poole and Samantha Guthrie

Samantha Guthrie and

David Poole will marry


' Edward Guthrie of Crawfordville
and Joseph and Kai Page of Craw-
fordville announce the engagement
and upcoming marriage of their
daughter, Samantha Guthrie of
Crawfordville, to David Clayton
-"Clay" Poole of Tallahassee. He is
,the son of David and Cathi Poole
of Tallahassee.
The bride-elect graduated from
Wakulla High School in 2005 and
-received an A.A. degree from Tal-


lahassee Community College. She
is pursuing a career in sports
nutrition.
Poole graduated from Wakulla
High School in 2003 and received
a Bachelor's degree in Biology
from Florida State University. He
is a manager of Lifeway Christian
Bookstore.
The wedding will be held at 6:30
p.m. Saturday, July 26 at The Retreat
at Bradley's Pond in Tallahassee.


Tonya Lively and Jamison Rogers

Tonya Lively, q

Rogers will


exchange

vows
Junior and Barbara McMillan of
Bainbridge, Ga. announce the en-
gagement and upcoming wedding
of their daughter, Tonya Lively of
Crawfordville, to Jamison Rogers
of Crawfordville. He is the son of
Chuck and Margaret Purvis of Och-
lockonee Bay and Fenton Rogers of
Tallahassee.
The bride-elect and her fiance
are both employed by the Wakulla
County Emergency Medical Services
Department.
The wedding will be held at 3
p.m. Saturday, May 10 at the Inn at
Wildwood. All friends and relatives
are invited to attend.








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By TONI COURTIER
Special to The Wakulla News
The fiist Saturday in June is re-
served for the Children's Fishing
Tournament with the weigh-in
and festivities held at Panacea's
Woolley Park. This year, on June
7, the annual event will start at 7
a.m. at the Port Panacea Marina.
The last tournament fleet boat
will leave the dock at 8:30 a.m.,
so don't be late and don't miss
the boatli
Children not going out on a
family boat or with one of the
fleet of volunteer captains may
fish from any safe location and
bring their catch to Woolley
Park. Weigh-in will begin at 10
a.m. and stop at 1 p.m., with no
exceptions. Children must be in
line before 1 p.m. in order for
their fish to qualify. The two
divisions are fresh water; which
includes bass, pan fish, catfish
and saltwater, including white
trout, speckled trout, Spanish
mackerel, redfish, flounder, and
whiting. Since this is an inshore
event, no offshore, or reef spe-
cies will be weighed. This means
grouper, snapper, and amberjack
will not qualify. In addition
there will be no sharks, no rays,
no hard head, and no sail catfish
considered.
All participants from the age


The James W. Stokley, Jr. fam-
ily of Wakulla County was one
of five Florida families to receive
the Century Pioneer Family Farm
designation.
Florida Agriculture and Con-
sumer Services Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson announced
that five Florida properties quali-
fied for recognition as Century
Pioneer Family Farms. Recogni-
tion in this program means the
families have maintained contin-
uous ownership of the property
for at least 100 years.
"These families have been able
to retain ownership of their land
through the Great Depression,
diseases, droughts, freezes and
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My owners could not afford to give me the
proper care, so they brought me here.
I am a year old lab mix, neutered male with
lots of energy and love to give.
Since I am an active
boy, I need a fenced
yard and exercise.
If you are
looking for a
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consider me.
Almost forgot,
I am up to date
on my "shots".
If interested, visit or call
the animal shelter.
Phone 926-0890.
Please have your pets
spayed or neutered. Thank you.


of 3 to 15, will receive a T-shirt
and goody bag as well as a hot
dog lunch with chips and a
drink. There will be games ga-
lore and trophies, too. Last year
the organizers gave away tackle
boxes and fishing poles. The
big giveaway is a trip to Wild
Adventures for a family of four
and includes some spending
cash and a parking pass.
As is true with so many volun-
teer events, we are always look-
ing for sponsors. Your contribu-
tion of $100 will help ensure the
success of this event and we'll
even print your name or com-
pany name on the back of the
T-shirtl Enough thanks cannot
be bestowed upon Ben Withers
for his continued and unwaver-
ing, strong support of our annual
tournament. He truly is a reason
we are able to continue offering
this wonderful fun day to all the
children of our community.
Please send your contribu-
tion to: Wakulla Children's Fish-
ing Tournament, P.O. Box 349,
Panacea, FL 32346-0349. The
alternate date is the following
Saturday, June 14 if it rains on the
first Saturday, June 7. To inquire
about becoming a volunteer fleet
boat captain or for additional
information, call Steve Carlson
at (850) 570-2146.


Richie L. Sanders, Jr. and Julia K. Whited

Julia Whited, Sanders

plan to marry in May


0
0
e
r:
L
is
S
fi
is


the urbanization of Florida," F
Bronson said. "That is a great
tribute to the many generations
of these families."
The Stokley property is 17
acres of pine trees and is part of
the old Grimes Bay property.
Since the program began 25
years ago, 144 family farms have
received the Century Pioneer
Family Farm designation. The
program is administered by the :
Florida Department of Agricul- :
ture and Consumer Services with
assistance of the Florida Agricul-
tural Museum.


Bret and Rhonda Hammond
of Crawfordville and Joel Whited
of Tallahassee announce the
ngagement and upcoming mar-
iage of their daughter, Julia K.
Whited of Gainesville, to Richie
. Sanders, Jr. of Gainesville. He
s the son of Richard and Pat
anders of Crawfordville.
The bride-elect graduated
rom Wakulla High School and
s enrolled at the University of
lorida where she is pursuing


a career in veterinary medicine.
She is employed as a Vet Tech at
the Millhopper Veterinary Medi-
cal Clinic in Gainesville.
Her fiance is a graduate 'f
Wakulla High School and Full Sail
in Orlando where he received an
A.A. degree in the recording arts.
He is employed at the CBS televi-
sion station in Gainesville as,a
master control operator.
The couple plans to marry
in May.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008 Page 3B


WCSO Command Statistics


Wakulla County Sheriff's Of-
fice bi-weekly minutes of the
Sheriff's Command staff meeting
from April 2:
Uniform Patrol
814 calls for service; 31 arrests;
654 security checks; 172 traffic
stops; 86 offense reports filed;
147 citations; 148 warnings.
Criminal Investigations-
Personal and Property
Crimes
36 new cases assigned; 16
cases closed; 3 inactive cases; 3
* arrests; 6 warrants requested; 582
pending cases.


Evidence Section
135 articles seized; 16 items
submitted to FDLE Crime Lab;
4 requests from State Attorney's
Office; 3 items/property returned
to owner; 311 items researched
for Destruct Order.
Street Crimes
(Narcotics/Vice)
9 cases; 1 arrest.
Communications
4,878 calls for service; 519 911
calls; 1,888 deputy created CAD
calls; 1,360 citizen CAD calls; 189
other WCSO CAD calls.
Civil


53 summons received and 50
Served; 84 subpoenas received
and 26 served; 10 injunctions
received and 7 served; 2 felony
registration.
Warrants
50 warrants received and 30
served and 0 recalled; 23 writs
received and 12 served and 3
recalled; 43 probable cause ar-
rests.
Fleet/Maintenance
17 vehicle work orders com-
pleted; 15 administrative building
work orders completed; 9 animal
shelter work orders completed; 5
jail work orders completed; 3 Oak


Annex work orders completed;
11,310 pounds of facility trash
recycled; 81 IT service calls.
Jail Corrections
Security
321 inmates incarcerated; 135
inmates held for immigrations;
37 inmates held for Department
of Corrections; 4 federal inmates
held (other); 164 inmates booked
in and 69 released; 29 inmates on
Work Release; 25 trustees work-
ing on county property; 24 Work
Camp inmates; 2,069 people
screened entering the court-
house; 282 trials/hearings; 25
inmates transported to court.
Community Services
Litter Control picked up 10,125
pounds of trash from the road-
ways with 7 volunteer hours.


Open Government &
Public Information
Records
163 local records checks; 107
offense reports.
Victim Advocates
32 victims served with 99
services.
Animal Control
14 animals reclaimed by own-
ers; 67 adoptions; 227 animals
taken in; 152 animals eutha-
nized; 142 calls for service for
Animal Control officers; $9,383
collected.
The Wakulla County Sher-
iff's Office has hired Michelle
McLaughlin as an Animal Control
Officer and she will be assigned
kennel duties to assist with sick
animals, as well as answer ACO


calls. Michelle is a K-9 handler
and has two search and rescue
dogs that she uses. She has also
taught dog obedience as a volun-
teer at the shelter.
Emergency
Management
A request has been submit-
ted to prepare a Request for
Proposal for the construction of
a new tower. The Comprehensive
Emergency Management Plan
has been approved by county
administration and will be on
the agenda for April 21 county
commission meeting.
Resource Officers
25 calls for service; 6 warrants;
3 offense reports; 3 supplemental
reports; 32 hours of classroom
instruction.


Court takes up 'false light' defamation


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
A question asked several
times by different Supreme
Court justices at last week's oral
arguments on "false light"cases
was whether truth is a defense.
In one of the two cases before
the court, there is no dispute
that what was printed by the
Pensacola News Journal in a
series of stories about business-
man Joe Anderson was true. But
Anderson won an $18 million
judgment against the newspa-
per claiming that the facts were
skewed to present him in a false
light specifically that the news-
paper made it appear through
innuendo that he murdered his
wife when he shot her to death
in what was determined to be a
hunting accident.
Anderson's case was dis-
missed by the First District
Court of Appeal after it was
determined that the lawsuit was
filed after the two year statute of
limitations had lapsed,
The other case heard by the
court on Thursday, March 6,
was brought by a South Florida
woman, Edith Rapp, who filed a
lawsuit against the organization
Jews for Jesus after her stepson


wrote in the group's newsletter
that she was a convert to Chris-
tianity. The case was dismissed
by the trial court, and the Fourth
District Court of Appeal upheld
that decision but sent the ques-
tion up to Supreme Court of
whether "false light" should be
recognized under Florida law.
"My concern," said Justice
Barbara Pariente, "is if you can
sue somebody for making a
true statement, then it poses a
significant challenge to the First
Amendment and a free press."
But attorneys for Anderson
and Rapp argued that what the
law should look at is the emo-
tional distress caused.
Under current Florida law,
to defame a person, false state-
ments must be published with
reckless disregard for the truth
and with actual malice.
In Rapp's case, attorney Bruce
Silver argued that it wasn't neces-
sary for his client to be defamed
- he insisted that some courts
might not even recognize being
called a Christian as defamation.
But, though it may not cause
harm to one's reputation, it
causes emotional distress.
"As long as it's true," asked
Justice Charles Wells, "just sim-


ply true, don't we have protec-
tion under the Constitution to
say what we want to?"
"It's a high price to pay," an-
swered Silver.
"But aren't we supposed to be
a society with a thick skin?" asked
Justice Harry Lee Anstead.
Pariente asked if it was a de-
fense against false light if it was
shown that Rapp had recited the
sinner's prayer and prayed with
her stepson.
Attorney Bruce Rogow, argu-
ing for Anderson, said that the
Anderson case is the "quintes-
sential false light case." There is
no dispute that what was printed
is absolutely true, and he had to
go back to a case from the 1840s
when novelist James Fenimore
Cooper sued New York Tribune
editor Horace Greeley and Gree-
ley wrote of Cooper, "He will
not like to bring it (the lawsuit)
in New York, for we are known
here, nor in Otsego, for he is
known there" imputing that
Cooper was of bad character.
Attorney Robert Bernius,
representing Gannett, argued
that the claim of false light by'
Anderson's attorney was merely
"an end-run around the statute
of limitations on libel." He con-


Contributions and expenditures


- Wakulla County candidates
.for political office met an April
10 deadline to file their latest
contribution and expenditure
campaign treasurer report sum-
mary. The summary covered any
campaign activity from Jan. 1
through March 31.
SHERIFF
David Harvey reported con-
tributions of $30,870 during the
reporting period, $1,620 in-kind
and a total contribution amount
to date of $56,770. He spent
$18,873.58 during the reporting
period and his total expendi-
tures are also $18,873.58.
Charlie Creel raised $8,665
during the reporting period and
$75.40 in-kind. His total contri-
butions are the same $8,665.
He has spent $4,995.49 during
the reporting period which is
the same amount he has spent
Overall.
CLERK OF THE COURT
Brent Thurmond filed a waiv-
er of report due to not having
'campaign account activity during
the reporting period.
TAX COLLECTOR
Cheryll Olah filed a waiver
of report since she did not have
lany campaign activity in her
account.
COUNTY COMMISSION DIS-
TRICT 1
E. Alan Brock reported $2,580
in contributions during the
reporting period and $783.19


of in-kind services. He spent
$440.67. His contributions and
expenditures to date were the
same.
Virginia "Jenny" Brock re-
ported $3,065 worth of contribu-
tions and $17.94 worth of in-kind
services. Her total contributions
to date were $3,765.. She spent
$1,918.54 during the reporting
period and has spent $2,023.25
to date.
SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS
Dr. Chinesta Skipper-Smith
reported $200 worth of contribu-
tions during the reporting period
and the same amount overall.
She spent $179.93 during the
period and overall.
Dianne Roberts Gerrell raised
$100 during the period and over-
all. She spent $41.05 during the
period and overall. She has since
dropped out of the race.
Charles Prout raised $125 and
$60 in-kind services during the
reporting period and overall. He
spent $46.50 during the report-
ing period and overall.
Traci Brown Cash has raised
$2,150 during the period and
overall and $196.07 of in-kind
services. She spent $880.23 dur-
ing the period and overall.
Broward Sapp raised $200
during the period and overall. He
spent $194.74 during the period
and overall.
Henry Franklin Wells raised
$5,379.20 during the reporting


period and overall. He also re-
ported $100 in-kind services. He
spent $4,128.47 during the period
and overall.
Donna Martin Chatham
raised $3,336 during the period
and overall. She had $498.36
in in-kind services. She spent
$2,707.98 during the period and
overall.
Carl Herold raised $5,000
during the period and overall.
He spent $2,962.70 during the
period and overall.
* Scott Langston raised $1,000
during the period and overall. He
has not spent any money.
PROPERTY APPRAISER
Donnie Sparkman raised $800
during the period and overall. He
spent $16.70 during the period
and overall.
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 3
Jimmie Doyle raised $4,550
during the period and overall.
She also raised $59.96 through
in-kind services during the pe-
riod and overall. Doyle spent
$2,226.44 during the period and
overall.
Mike Stewart raised $700
during the reporting period and
overall. He spent $463.20 during
the period and overall.
The next reporting date is July
25. It covers campaign activity
from April 1 to July 18.


tended that the claim of false
light was added to Anderson's
amended complaint after his
attorneys determined that the
two-year statute of limitations
had already run.
Justice Raoul Cantero ques-
tioned how an editor looking
at the article beforehand would
have known what to take out.
And, he added, "Why doesn't the
public have the right to know?"
Several newspapers and the
First Amendment Foundation
filed friend-of-the-court briefs in
the cases arguing against false
light and claiming it would have
a chilling effect on free speech.
"What a complicated web
we end up with," said Justice
Anstead.
It's not clear when the court
will rule.

Fundraiser set
The COAST Charter School
will host a "Big Money Bingo"
fundraiser at the school on Fri-
day, April 25 at 5:30 p.m. There
will be two cash jackpots of $250
and more than $1,000 in cash
and prize packages. The dona-
tions are being provided by a
number of area businesses.
There will be $5 cash jackpot
Bingo game cards and $2 game
cards. The school is located at 48
Shell Island Road in St. Marks.
For more information, call 925-
9950.


Genealogy meeting will

ha haldri n Mai 1


IJV I, I IVlI %Jl I IV
If you are into genealogy, you
want to be sure to plan to attend
the First Annual Spring Seminar
sponsored by the Wakulla Gene-
alogy Group, which will be held
Saturday, May 10 from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m., with lunch provided for
those in attendance.
There is a registration fee of
$30 due by April 25. The registra-
tion fee includes lunch.
Speakers for this event will
be Deanna Ramsey of Tallahas-
see, Jack Butler and Mary Esther
Raker, both of Crawfordville.


"l y IW
Deanna is a well known coim-
puter and genealogy instruct6r
in our area. Jack and Mary Esther
are excellent genealogists with
particular interests and exper-
tise in varying areas of Wakulla
County history.
For more information, contact
Carolyn Harvey at 926-7031 or
46frog@comcast.net. You may
also contact Renee' Parrish at
926-1987 or rmparrish57@em-
barqmail.com.


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CATEGORIES

100 EMPLOYMENT
105 Business Opportunities
110 Help Wanted
115 Work Wanted
120 Services and Businesses
125 Schools and Instruction
130 Entertainment
200 ITEMS FOR SALE
205 Antiques
210 Auctions
215 Auto Parts and Accessories
220 Cars
225 Trucks
230 Motor Homes and Campers
235 Motorcycles and.4-Wheelers
240 Boats and Motors
245 Personal Watercraft
250 Sporting Goods
255 Guns
260 Business Equipment
265 Computers and Internet
270 Electronics
275 Home Furnishings


280 Home Appliances
285 Jewelry
290 Musical Instruments
295 Building Materials

300 MISC. FOR SALE
305 Machinery, Tools & Equipment
310 Firewood Products
315 Farm & Garden Equipment
320 Farm Products & Produce
325 Horses
330 Livestock, Farm Animals
335 Pets
340 Plants
345 Swap, Barter, Trade
350 Wanted to Buy
355 Yard Sales
400 NOTICES
410 Free Items
415 Announcements
420 Card of Thanks
425 Occasion Cards
430 In Memoriam
435 Lost and Found
440 Personals and Notices


500 REAL ESTATE, HOMES, MOBILES
505 Acreage for Lease
510 Acreage for Sale
515 Apartments for Rent
520 Townhouses for Rent
525 Townhouses for Sale
530 Commercial Property for Rent
535 Commercial Property for Sale
540 Farms for Sale
545 Homes for Sale
550 Homes with Acreage for Sale
555 Houses for Rent
560 Land for Sale
565 Mobile Homes for Rent I
570 Mobile Homes for Sale
575 Mobile Homes with Land for Sale
580 Rooms for Rent/Roommates Wanted
585 Wanted to Rent
590 Waterfront Homes/Land for Sale
595 Vacation Rental



CALL 926-7102 TODAY

Email: classifieds@thewakullanews.net


Legal Notice


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY
GENERAL CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 65-2008-CA-9-FC
HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III
Plaintiff
vs
LES W. HOWARD; RHONDA J. HOWARD;
HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION 111; and
UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS, TENANTS, OWN-
ERS, and OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, includ-
ing, if a named defendant is deceased, the per-
sonal representatives, the surviving spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties
claiming by, through, under or against that defen-
dant, and the several and respective unknown as-
signs, successors in interest, trustees or other
persons claiming by, through, under or against
an' corporation or other legal entity named as a
defendant, and all claimants, persons or parties,
natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status
is unknown, claiming under any of the above
named or described defendants
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Order
or Final Judgment entered in this cause, in the
Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell
the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida,
described as:
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE
WEST ONE-HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST
QUARTER OF LOT 55 OF THE HARTSFIELD
SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 32
MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 232.38 FEET TO
AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DE-
GREES 30 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 53.45
FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160)
MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM
SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 16
DEGREES 55 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST
291. 99 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160),
THENCE RUN SOUTH 87 DEGREES 41 MIN-
UTES 21 SECONDS EAST 241.85 FEET TO
ARE-ROD (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE
WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF
CAJER POSEY ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH
02 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST
ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY
150.34 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4664),
THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 41 MIN-
UTES 12 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 242.57 FEET TO A
RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH
72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST
345.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCEL BEING THE
SAME PARCEL AS DESCRIBED IN O-FFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 69, PAGE 92 AND A POR-
TION OF THAT PARCEL AS DESCRIBED IN OF-
FICIAL RECORDS BOOK 357, PAGE 577 OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH A 30.00
FOOT WIDE INGRESS AND EGRESS EASE-
MENT LYING OVER AND ACROSS THE
SOUTHERLY 15.00 FEET THEREOF AND BE-
ING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE
WEST ONE HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUAR-
TER OF LOT 55 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY
OF 'LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 32 MINUTES
03 SECONDS EAST 232.28 FEET TO AN IRON
PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 30
MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 229.95 FEET,
THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 54 MIN-
UTES 28 SECONDS EAST 51.14 FEET,
THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 55 MIN-
UTES 31 SECONDS EAST 45.79 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 16 DEGREES
55 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 15.89 FEET
TO ARE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE CON-
TINUE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 31
SECONDS EAST 15.89 FEET, THENCE RUN
SOUTH 87 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 21 SEC-
ONDS EAST 236.70 FEET TO THE WESTERLY
RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF CAJER POSEY
ROAD, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON A CURVE
CONCAVE TO THE WESTERLY, THENCE RUN
NORTHERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY
BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS
OF 1965.38 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL AN-
GLE OF 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 02 SEC-
ONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 2.30 FEET,
CHORD BEING NORTH 01 DEGREES 28 MIN-
UTES 21 SECONDS EAST 2.30 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919),
THENCE RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 03 MIN-
UTES 31 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT
OF WAY BOUNDARY 27.70 FEET, THENCE
LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY
RUN NORTH 87 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 21
SECONDS WEST 247.02 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for
cash, at the front door of the Wakulla County
Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Craw-
fordville, Florida at 11: 00 a .m. on May 5, 2008.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE
DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT WITHIN
60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
Dated this 15 day of April, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: -s- Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
April 24, 2008
May 1,2008
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 2007-FC-36
COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC.
Plaintiff,
vs.
LINDA J. ERDMAN A/K/A LINDA J. ERDMANN;
ROBERT ERDMAN; and any unknown heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown
persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through
and under any of the above-named Defendants,
Defendants.


AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the undersigned
CLerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County,
Florida will on the 8 day of May, 2008, at 11:00
a.m. at the Front Lobby of the Wakulla Court-
house located In Crawfordville, offer for sale and
sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder
for cash, the following-described property situate
in Wakulla County, Florida:
Lot 20, RIVER SINK ESTATES, (UNRE-
CORDED);
Commence at a concrete monument marking
the northwest corner of Section 29, Township 2
South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida,
and then run South 00 degrees 23 minutes 00
seconds East along the Westerly boundary of said
Section 29 a distance of 1717.98 feet, then run
North 89 degrees 50 minutes 00 seconds East
684.53 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said
Point of Beginning, continue North 89 degrees 50
minutes 00 seconds East 228.00 feet, then
run North 00 degrees 23 minutes 00 seconds
West 191.00 feet to the Southerly Right-of-
Way for San Marcos Drive, then run South 89 de-
rees 50 minutes 00 seconds West along said
ight of Way 228.00 feet, then run South 00 de-
grees 23 minutes 00 seconds East 191.00 feet to
t.e Point of Beginning, being otherwise described
as lot 20, RIVE SINK ESTATES.
pursuant to the Final Judgment entered In a case
pending in said Court, the style of which Is indi-
cated above.
Any person or entity claiming an interest in
the surplus, If any, resulting from the foreclosure
sale, other than the property owner as of the date
of the Us Pendens, must file a claim on same with
the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclo-
sure sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal of said
Court this 8th day of April, 2008.
In accordance with the Americans With Dis-
abilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a
special accommodation to participate In this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at
3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida
32327, telephone (850) 926-0905, not later than
seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing
impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Brent X. Thurmond
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: -s-Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
April 17,24, 2008
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY
GENERAL CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 65-2008-CA-000041
HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC.
Plaintiff
vs
KENNETH DAVID MERKISON; KRISTINA MO-
REE MERKISON; AND UNKNOWN OCCU-
PANTS, TENANTS, OWNERS, AND OTHER UN-
KNOWN PARTIES, including, if a named defen-
dant is deceased, the personal representatives,
the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, and all other parties claiming by,
through, under or against that defendant, and all
claimants,' persons or parties, natural or corpo-
rate, or whose exact legal status is unknown,
claiming under any of the above named or de-
scribed defendants,
Defendants
NOTICE OF SUIT-PROPERTY
TO: KENNETH DAVID MERKISON
KRISTINA MOREE MERKISON
UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS, TENANTS, OWN-
ERS, AND OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES
Residence: Unknown
Mailing Address: Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the following property
in Wakulla County, Florida:
LOT 29, BLOCK "J" OF SONGBIRD, PHASE II, A
SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3,
PAGES 113-116 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you, KENNETH DAVID
MERKISON KRISTINA MOREE MERKISON UN-
KNOWN OCCUPANTS, TENANTS, OWNERS,
AND OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, and you are
required to serve a copy of your written defenses,
if any to it, on the Plaintiff's attorney, whose name
and address is ENRICO G. GONZALEZ, P.A.,
6255 East Fowler Avenue, Temple Terrace, Flor-
ida 33617, and file the original with the clerk of the
above-styled Court no later than 30 days from the
date of the first publication of this Notice of Action,
otherwise, a judgment may be entered against
you for the relefdemanded In the Complaint or
Petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court
on April 7, 2008.
Brent X. Thurmond
Clerk of the Court
By: Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans With Disabili-
ties Act, persons needing a special accommoda-
tion to participate in this Hearing should contact
the A.D.A. Coordinator not later than seven (7)
days prior to the proceeding at the Florida Relay
Service at 1-800-955-8770.
April 17,24,2008
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 07-158-CA
ERIC MILLS and DARLENE MILLS,
Plaintiff,
vs.
WILLIAM BRADWELL; GERTRUDE FARMER;
WELLINGTON FARMER; HAROLD FARMER;
JERWERLINE FARMER; JUANITA FAYE RACK-
LEY; CELESTINE HARVEY; MAMIE'LEE
HAYES; AND CUTHBERT FARMER, JR.,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: WILLIAM BRADWELL; GERTRUDE
FARMER; WELLINGTON FARMER; JERWER-
LINE FARMER; CELESTINE HARVEY, THE UN-
KNOWN HEIRS OF WILLIAM BRADWELL AND


THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF GERTRUDE
FARMER,
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a complaint for Quiet
Title for the following property:
A strip of land reaching from the North boundary
to the South boundary and bounded west by the
West boundary line hereof of the Northwest Quar-
ter of the Southwest Quarter of Section Three of
Township Three South of Range One West, and
of sufficient width from East to West side of said
strip which width shall not vary In any place to
make said strip contain fifteen and one-half acres
of land (15 1/2) said land lying and being situate in
Wakulla County, Florida.
Wakulla County Parcel ID No.
03-3S-01W-000-04259-000
has been filed against you and others, and you
are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, If any, to It on DANIEL E. MANAUSA,, ES-
QUIRE, SMITH, THOMPSON, SHAW &
MANAUSA, P.A., Plaintiff's attorneys, 3520 Tho-
masville Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida
32309-3469, no more than thirty (30) days from
the first publication date of this notice of action,
and file the original with the Clerk of this Court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiffs attorneys or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
DATED this 15th day APRIL, 2008.
BRENT X. THURMOND
By: Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
APRIL 24, 2008
MAY 1, 8, 15, 2008
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 07-25-FC
DIVISION
U.S. BANK N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RENAL A. ZAMORA, at al,
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Fi-
nal Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated April
14, 2008 and entered In Case no. 07-25-FC of the
Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit In
and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein U.S.
BANK N.A., is the Plaintiff, and RENAL A. ZA-
MORA; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRA-
TION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR SE-
CURED FUNDING CORP.; FLORIDA HOUSING
FINANCE CORPORATION; FOX RUN HOME-
OWNERS ASSOCIATION OF CRAWFORD-
VILLE, INC.; _, AN UNKNOWN PERSON IN
POSSESSION OF THE SUBECT REAL PROP-
ERTY are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF
THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at
11:00AM, on the 22 day of May, 2008, the follow-
Ing described property as set forth in said Final
Judgment:
LOT 20, FOX RUN, A SUBDIVISION AS PER
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 75 OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
A/K/A 117 Fox Run Cir, Crawfordville, FL 32327
Any person claiming an Interest in the surplus
from the sale, If any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the LIs Pendens must file
a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court
on April 17, 2008.
Brent X. Thurmond
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: -s-Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk

AprI 24, 2008
ay 1, 2008
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 652007CA000188FC
DIVISION

WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
VLADIMIR A. BAGUR, et al,
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Fi-
nal Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated April
14, 2008 and entered in Case No.
652007CA0000188FC of the Circuit Court of the
SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA
County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK,
NA, is the Plaintiff, and VLADIMIR A. BAGUR;
SONIA PI FANE; are the Defendants, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT
FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 19 day of June, 2008,
the following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment:
LOT 22, VILLAS AT COVINGTON PARK, A SUB-
DIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 13 OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 52 COVINTGON CIRCLE, CRAWFORD-
VILLE, FL 32327


Any person claiming an Interest in the surplus
from the sale, If any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the LIs Pendens must file
a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court
on April 15, 2008.
Brent X. Thurmond
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: -s-Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk


S24, 2008
ay 1,2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 652008CA000014FC
DIVISION
REGIONS BANK DBA REGIONS MORTGAGE,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARTIN H. MILER III, at al,
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Fi-
nal Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated April
14, 2008 and entered in Case No.
652008CA000014FC of the Circuit Court of the
SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA
County, Florida wherein REGIONS BANK DBA
REGIONS MORTGAGE, Is the Plaintiff, and MAR-
TIN H. MILLER III; TENANT #1 N/K/A LYNDA
MCCRAL are the Defendants, I will sell to the
hi hest and best bidder for cash at FRONT
FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE at 11 00AM, on the 15 day of May, 2008,
the following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment:
LOT 17, OF BLOCK 12, OF WAKULLA GAR-
DENS, AS PER PLAT MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39 OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
A/K/A 53 BROKEN BOW TRAIL, CRAWFORD-
VILLE, FL 32327
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, If any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file
a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court
on April 15, 2008.
Brent X. Thurmond
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: -s-Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
April 24,2008
My 1, 2008

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 652008CA000015FC
DIVISION
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
TERRY SAPP, et al,
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Fi-
nal Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated April
14, 2008 and entered in Case No.
652008CA000015FC of the Circuit Court of the
SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA
County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK,
NA, is the Plaintiff, and TERRY SAPP; NICHOLE
SAPP; TENANT #1 N/K/A LEITA KEMP N/K/A
LEITA KEMP are the Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT
FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 15 day of May, 2008,
the following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment;
LOTS 9 AND 10, BLOCK P. OF MAGNOLIA
GARDENS, AS PER PLAT MAP THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37 OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
A/K/ 30 TED LOTT LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL
32327
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, If any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file
a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS.my hand and the seal of this Court
on April 15, 2008.
Brent X. Thurmond
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: -s-Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
April 24, 2008
May 1, 2008
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 652007CA000163XXXXXX
AURORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANTHONY T. SCOTT; et al.
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure
dated April 15, 2008, and entered in Case No.
652007CA000163XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in
and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Aurora
Loan Services, LLC is Plaintiff and ANTHONY T.
SCOTT; SHERRY SCOTT; MORTGAGE ELEC-
TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. MIN
NO. 100137900005115840; THE FARM HOME-
OWNERS' ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTER-
ESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A
NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR
HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT,
TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY
HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for cash at In the
Front Foyer of the Wakulla County Courthouse,
3056 Crawfordvlle Highway, Crawtordville, Flor-
ida 32327 at Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00
a.m. on the 22nd day of May, 2008, the following
described property as set forth in said Order or Fi-
nal Judgment, to-wit:

LOT 29, BLOCK "F", THE FARM SUBDIVISION,
PHASE I, A SUBDIVISION AS PER PLAT
THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3,
PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WA-
KULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN
THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF
THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A


I W


CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on APRIL 17,
2008.
BRENT X THURMOND
As Clerk, Circuit Court
By: -s-Teresa Brannan
As Deputy Clerk
April 24, 2008
May 1, 2008
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 07-123-FC
HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION,
AS TRUSTEE FOR NOMURA ASSET ACCEP-
TANCE CORPORATION MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2006-AFI
PLAINTIFF
VS.
ANTHONY SCOTT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
ANTHONY SCOTT II; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER,
AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVID-
UAL. DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; CAMELOT TOWN-
HOMES OF WAKULLA, INC.; CAMELOT TOWN-
HOMES OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYS-
TEMS, INC.; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS
UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION
DEFENDANT(S)

RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order Granting the Motion to Reset Foreclosure
Sale dated March 26, 2008 entered in Civil Case
No. 07-123-FC of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Ju-
dicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Craw-
fordville, Florida, I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the Front Door of the WAKULLA
County Courthouse 3056 Crawfordville
Highway,Crawfordville, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on
the 1 day of May, 2008 the following described
property as set forth In said Summary Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:
LOT 37, CAMELOT, A SUBDIVISION AS PER
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 3, PAGE 122 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
BRENT X.THURMOND
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons with disabili-
ties needing a special accommodation should
contact COURT ADMINISTRATION, at the WA-
KULLA County Courthouse at 850-926-0905,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) orl -800-955-8770, via
Florida Relay Service.

APRIL 17, 24, 2008
LEGAL NOTICE
WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
INVITATION TO NEGOTIATE (ITN)
THE WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS INVITES YOU TO SUBMIT
AN OFFER ON THE FOLLOWING:

ITN NUMBER: WC2008-007
ITN SUBMISSION DATE AND TIME: MAY 8,
2008 AT 12:00 P.M. EST (NOON)
SPRING CREEK/SHELL POINT CHANNEL
MARKER PROJECT
THE WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS SHALL RECEIVE SEALED
OFFERS UNTIL 12:00 P.M. EASTERN STAN-
DARD TIME (NOON), MAY 8, 2008.
ALL OFFERS MUST BE CLEARLY MARKED AS
SEALED INVITATION TO NEGOTIATE WITH
THE ITN NUMBER, OPENING DATE AND TIME
AND SUBMITTED TO:
WAKULLA COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR
3093 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY
CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327
A PUBLIC OPENING FOR THE PURPOSE OF
RECORDING ALL OFFERS RECEIVED WILL BE
HELD AT THE WAKULLA COUNTY ADMINIS-
TRATOR'S OFFICE, 3093 CRAWFORDVILLE
HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, MAY
8, 2008 AT 12:00 P.M. EST (NOON). AN
EVALUATION TEAM WILL RANK THE OFFERS
AND PRESENT THE TOP RANKED OFFERORS
TO THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSION-
ERS FOR APPROVAL IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE SCHEDULE IN THE INVITATION TO NE-
GOTIATE DOCUMENT.
A COPY OF THE INVITATION TO NEGOTIAE
DOCUMENT AND PROJECT SPECIFICATIONS
MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE COUNTY'S
WEBSITE, HYPERLINK
"http://www.mywakulla.com" www.mvwakulla.com.
OR BY CONTACTING MS. SHERYL MOSLEY,
PARK FACILITIES COORDINATOR, WAKULLA
COUNTY PARKS AND RECREATION DEPART-
MENT AT HYPERLINK
"mailto:sheryl.mosley@wcprd.com" lsheryl.mos
lev@wcord.com or at 850/926-7227. ALL QUES-
TIONS MUST BE DIRECTED IN WRITING TO
MS. SHERYL MOSLEY AT THE EMAIL AD-
DRESS ABOVE, BY FAX TO 850/926-1083, OR
TO 79 RECREATION DRIVE, CRAWFORD-
VILLE, FLORIDA, 32327.
THIS IS AN OPEN, COMPETITIVE PROCURE-
MENT PROCESS GOVERNED BY S. 287.057,
FLORIDA STATUTES. NO PHONE INQUIRIES
WILL BE ACCEPTED AS VALID REPRESENTA-
TIONS OF THIS PROCESS.

THE WAKULLA COUNTY EDARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO
REJECT ANY AND ALL BIDS OR PORTIONS
THEREOF.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JU.
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA '
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 2008-06-F(
GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC, F/K/A GREENr
TREE FINANCIAL SERVICING CORP.
1400 Turbine Drive
Rapid City, South Dakota 57703,
Plaintiff,
V.
ROBERT ROBISON, JR., DEANNA E. ROBISOfN
FIDELITY PUREWATER D/B/A IONICS FIDEL-,
ITY PUREWATER, ASSET ACCEPTANCE, LLC:
EXTERIOR SYSTEMS, INC. dba
NORANDEX/REYNOLDS DISTR CO., ASHLEY
ALUMINUM, LLC, d/b/a CAMERON ASHLEY
BUILDING PRODUCTS, f/k/a ASHLEY ALUMI-
NUM, INC., and TAYLOR'S BUILDING SUPPLY,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant
to Plaintiff's Final Summary Judgment Of Foreclo-
sure entered in the above-captioned action, I will
sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Flor-
ida, described as follows, to wit:

TRACT 4, TURKEY TRACTS (UNRECORDED)
COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONU-
MENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER
OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE
1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA,EAND-',
THENCE RUN NORTH-00 DEGREES'25 MIN'-
UTES 38 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST
BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 4 A DISTANCE
OF 2457.03 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 35
MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE
WEST BOUNDARY 484.37 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGIN-
NING CONTINUE NORTH 00 DEGREES 35 MIN-.
UTES 20 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID WEST
BOUNDARY 350.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DE-
GREES 09 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST
609.58 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DE-
GREES 14 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 320.
02 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES
09 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 106.17 FEET,
THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 14 MIN-
UTES 32 SECONDS EAST 30.00 FEET,
THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 09 MIN-
UTES 44 SECONDS WEST 718.17 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
TOGETHER WITH A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY
EASEMENT DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS.
A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT LYING
30 FEET ON EACH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING
DESCRIBED CENTERLINE:

COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONU-
MENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER
OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE
1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND
THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 25 MIN-
UTES 38 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST
BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 4 A DISTANCE
OF 2457.03 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT, THENCE RUN NORTH, 00 DEGREES 35
MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID
WEST BOUNDARY 484.37 FEET, THENCE
LEAVING THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID
POINT OF SECTION 4, RUN SOUTH 89 DE-
GREES 09 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST
718.17 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING
OF SAID CENTERLINE. FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES -
09 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 1836.75
FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 14
MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 401.17 FEET TO'
THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY,
OF STATE ROAD 267 AND THE TERMINATION;
POINT OF SAID CENTERLINE.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1997
HOMES OF MERIT, BAY MANOR MOBILE
HOME, 28 X 66, SERIAL NUMBER
FLHMLCB102515540AB.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for
cash at the front lobby, Wakulla County court-
house, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Wakulla County,
Florida 32327, at 11:00 AM (EST), on the 8th day
of May, 2008.

Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: -s-Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
April 17, 24, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
File Number: 08CP000017P,
Probate Dvislo
IN RE: ESTATE OF MAVADELLE M. INLOW:
formerly known as MAVADELLE HESS FISHER,
Deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary
Administration has been entered In the estate of
Mavadelle M. Inlow, formerly known as Mavadell.
Hess Fisher, deceased, File Number::
08CP000017PR, by the Circuit Court for Wakulla,
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawford-
ville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the
person giving notice and his attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against the decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice Is served'
within three months after the date of the first publi-
cation of this notice must file their claims with thisd
Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS,
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA,
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AF.
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF-
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and person'
having claims or demands against the decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED,
The date of the first publication of this Notice Is
April 24, 2008.


April 24, 2008 Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
May 1, 2008 Delrdre A. Farrington, Attorney


Paste 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008


:t








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008 Page 5B


Legal Notice

Florida Bar No. 488690
68- Feli Way
Crawfordville, Florida 32327-2173
Telephone: 850/926-2700
Person Giving Notice:
Charles Alvin Hess
112 Lake Ellen Circle
Crawfordville, Florida 32327
April 24, 2008
May 1, 2008

110 Help Wanted

C IS GROUP, Inc. is seeking appli-
cants for a full time Research Analyst
in'Medart (starting salary 20K to
24,<). Professional office experience
is required with excellent writing,
telephone and computer skills. Appli-
cabts must have excellent references
arn attendance record. Benefits in-
clude paid holidays, Group Health,
de4ital, and 401K. E-mail resume to
loQise@cjisgroup.com.
Dibsel & Equipment Mechanic
needed with tools & transportation.
Roberts Sand Company. Call (850)
627-7263. A drug free workplace.

Experienced Short Order Cook
Wanted. Apply in person at The Riv-
erside Cafe in St. Marks.




~ 1'



qrayhic .Artist


The Wahulla Qpetusi
is seeking an experienced
graphic artist to assist in the de-
sign, development, layout and
updating of ads and pages.
Qualifications include ability to
work within design programs in-
cluding but not limited to In-
Design, Photoshop and Illustra-
tor. Must be proficient in under-
standing basic page concepts,
font/art balance, proofreading,
producing ads from basic draft
information, and applying color
to ads and pages. This position
is open to individuals seeking
part-time or full-time employ-
ment. Some night and weekend
work may be required. Full-time
employees will be eligible for
complete benefits package and
paid holidays.

Applicants may apply in person
at The Wakulla News,
3119 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville, FL
or
Email resume to
classifieds(thewakullanews.
net or
fax to (850) 926-3815.

Cali,(850) 926-7102 for more
information.


NOW HIRING! Busy real estate com-
pany needs full-time agents. Real
estate license is required. Contact
Ochlockonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001 or 850-926-9260
obr@obrealty.com
www.obrealty.com
SEEKING A CAREER IN REAL ES-
TATE? Call Jeannie Porter with ques-
tions. Confidential! Coldwell Banker
Hartung & Noblin (850) 926-2994.




Florida a
Wild Mammal
Association
To report
orphaned or injured
wildlife, please call
926-8308


Bill Turner
510-0283

[E---


Ginny Delaney
566-6271


TALLAHASSEE
^ COMMUNITY
COLLEGE


DIRECTOR OF
INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY
SUPPORT SERVICES
MP6DIT01
Competitive Salary
Information Technology
Open until filled
To be fully considered,
receipt of applications must
take place prior to
5/9/08

Visit the College's website at
HYPERLINK "http://www.tcc.fl.edu"
www.tcc.fl.edu for position details,
employment application, and appli-
cation process. For ADA accom-
modations notify Human Re-
sources; (850) 201-8510, fax
201-8489, TDD 201-8491 or FL Re-
lay 711. Submit mandatory Talla-
hassee Community College em-
ployment application to Human Re-
sources TCC, 444 Appleyard Dr.,
Tallahassee, FL 32304-2895; or
email HYPERLINK "mailto:hum-
res@tcc.fl.edu" humresflDtcc.fl.edu.
Human Resources hours 8 A.M. 5
P.M., Mon Fri.
An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative
Action Employer


115 Work Wanted

Handy man Own truck & tools,
wood rot & painting, pressure wash-
ing. Wakulla area. Call Bobby at
(850)926-2462.
120 Services and Busi-


A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING
Free Estimates
Licensed John Farrell
926-5179
566-7550
AIR CON OF WAKULLA
Heating and Cooling
Gary Limbaugh 926-5592
3232 Crawfordville Highway
Service, Repair, Installation
FL Lic. #CAC1814304
All about concrete. Joseph Francis.
850-556-1178 or 850-926-9064.
ANYTIME ELECTRIC
Specializing in repair and service,
residential and commercial, homes
and mobile homes. 24-hour service.
Mark Oliver, ER0015233. 421-3012.
BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE
Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway.
Larry Carter Owner/Operator.
850-925-7931, 850-694-7041. Li-
censed/Insured.
Bella's Bed & Biscuit Doggie
Daycare.
Overnight boarding. Extended stays.
Kennel free home environment. Lots
of love & pampering. 926-1016 or
519-4529.
We do alterations, embroidery,
monogramming, sewing in my home.
Call April @ 251-3323.


106 W. 5th Ave.
Tallahassee, FL 32303
850-222-2166 tel.
www.wmleeco.com
***New Subdivisions"
All subdivisions have
underground electric and wat
Carmen Maria $34,900. 1
tracts near Lake Talquin.
Savannah Forest $45,90
1 ac. tracts offWak. Aaron]
Established Commiunity!
Sellars Crossing S65,900
1+ ac lots in North Wakulla
Steeplechase $96,900 t
$109,900. 5 ac. wooded trac
Horse friendly!
Walkers Mill $69,900.
2 ac. wooded lots, located o
Lower Bridge Road.


Mike Delaney Tim Jordan
524-7325 Broker
567-9296


Kenny Lovel
519-2510


Panacea
146 Coastal Hwy.
Office: 850-984-0001
Fax: 850-984-4748


Cathy Mathews
519-0960


Nancy Strickland Diane Chason Carmen Wesley Curtis Benton
- 508-2902 559-8545 294-8215 228-5821


C & R Tractor/Backhoe Services,
large tract and residential site clear-
ing rock, dirt, and road base hauling.
call Crandall (850)933-3346.


Coastal Carpentry & Trim, Inc.
Rot-repair to renovation. Top quality
work only. Mike & Zach Schatzman.
519-2293 or 926-5730.

Compost for sale. 850-556-1178 or
850-926-9064.

Custom Concrete Services
specializing in slabs, engineered
foundations, driveways, patios, foot-
ers, pool decks. Licensed and in-
sured. Call anytime.
Mike Smith 519-3684, 519-0798.

Harold Burse Stump Grinding
926-7291.







Fa sigi W


Jim Hallowell Joelea Josey
566-5165 Office
Manager


KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR
Commercial, residential and mobile
homes. Repair, sales, service, instal-
lation. All makes and models. Lic.
#RA0062516. 926-3546.


Mr. Stump
Stump Grinding
Quick Service
Cellular: 509-8530

Need Cash?
Got Junk Cars, Trucks, & Scrap?
I Buy Scrap Metals!!
850-838-JUNK (5865)
State Certified Scales.



Five Star



Big Bend, Inc.
Commercial & Residential Service
Billy B. Rathel, Jr.
850-544-5062
850-421-1237 Fax
plumbingfive star@yahoo.com
Lic CFC1427547 State Certified


Mariko Chaviano
Rentals
Advertising


Teresa Beidler
519-3766







Susan McKaye
510-2477


S220 Cars


The weather is right for the top down!
1996 blue Chevy Camaro converti-
ble, leather seats, good stereo.
$3,500 OBO. 926-6289.


$149 Queen Pillowtop mattress and
box. Manufacturer wrapped, war-
ranty. 222-7783.


$499 sofa & loveseat Microfiber set.
Still in crate, never used. Can deliver
545-7112.


12 inch NASA Visco Memory Foam
240 Boats and Motors mattress still in box. New w/war-
Sranty. $799. 222-9879.


Windward 21 sailboat. Trailerable.
Shallow draft. Swing keel. Large
cockpit. Fast. Excellent family day
sailer. Custom trailer. $2,900 OBO.
850-926-2139.
265 Computers and Inter-h
net

Apple MAC G-4 Computer. Com-
plete system: 19" flat panel monitor,
speakers, software and peripherals.
Purchased new: 2003. Mint condi-
tion. $350 OBO. 321-5976.

275 Home Furnishings

Cherry sleigh bed-Solid Wood, Brand
New in box, $250. 222-9879.


7pc King size bedroom set. Solid
wood dovetailed drawers. Pillowtop
mattress set included. New, still in
packaging. Worth. $4k give away
$1,500. Can deliver: 425-8374.

A Mattress Set: New Queen Orthope-
dic Pillowtop in sealed plastic. Full
warranty. Sacrifice $279. Can deliver.
222-7783.
Dining Room-Deep cherry: table, up-
hostered chairs, lighted china cabi-
net. Brand new in boxes, can deliver.
Must move, $850. 545-7112.

Full $125/Twin $100 mattress w/
matching boxspring. Brand New
w/warranty. Delivery available
222-7783.


125 Schools and Instruc-
tion

Michelle Snow
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
926-7627
Music lessons of all types for all
ages.

200 Items For Sale


Accordion Storm Shutter, 82 in. wide
by 59.5 in. high, all hardware &
tracks, ready to install. $250.
926-2341.


Great Amenities at a Budget.Price!
Spacious 3BR/2BA 1515 Sq. Ft. home lo-
cated in Savannal Forest. Features vaulted
(f 'Aceilings and hardwood floors in living area,
Stray ceilings and his & her closets in master
bedroom, ceiling fans, fireplace, plant Call
shelves, brick and Hardie board exterior, sprinkler system, patio & more! Donna Card
MLS#: 173587. $3,500 offered in closing costs. $189,900. CALL ABOUT 850-508-1235
SPECIAL FINANCING PACKAGE! [t
Carmen Rocio Perfect Wakulla Gardens
opportunity >> lowest priced lot! 2 50 Cayuse Drive
ac. lot offShadeville Hwy near New Construction!
ac. Wakulla Station. $64,900. 1178 sq. ft. home
2 acre tract with large with 3BD/2BA. 5306 Montejo Drive
0 hardwoods in Beechwood Features include a oe 1 ft
0 Subdivision off Shadeville Hwy. spacious family H p 9 s ft
Rd. $52,900.room, capet and home in Montejo
Two 5+ acre tracts off vinyl flooring, Subdivision, Tallahassee.
a. Rehwinkel Rd. with large trees on vaulted ceilings in 3BR/2BA with brick and
the back ofpropertiesnd. the living area, a Hardie board exterior,
tsand $136,a small 250. front porch, and deck, custom trim pack-
S $3,7 an $136,250.... much more! age, knockdown finish
Contract now and walls, ceiling fans, vaulted
n pick your colors! ceilings in living room,
$116,900. and more! $159,900.


Marsha Tucker
Broker
570-9214


S O ''You Any Property On 7 The

Ochlockonee Bay
^ ,.- ^


Shell Point
926-7811 IW 4


Florida Coastal
Properties, Inc.


Crawfordville
926-5111

Silver Coast
Realty


T. Gaupin, Broker
SECOND HOME SOLUTION! 1/8th Share under "Fractional Ownership". This
exquisite coastal home on both Gulf AND canal is fully furnished and includes
golf cart and dock for your boat. You can own an eighth (six weeks a year) and
enjoy tropical breezes, fishing, sailing or just relaxing! Private storage for each
owner and management to take care of it all. Take your elevator to all floors and
enjoyl $130,000. Listing #2607W, MLS# 182972.

ALL UPDATED and renovated 1930's style with modern convenience.
Peaceful and quiet with lots of privacy. Fully furnished plus mower, bike,
etc. everything stays. Pool table and walk-in closet in Master, other bed-
room is very modern with separate shower. Underground hurricane shel-
ter, hurricane shutters, whirlpool tub in Master bath. Kitchen equipped, I
new bathroom, screened porch and outside storage. Come by and see this
private utopia. Listing #110W, MLS# 183385. Priced at $175,000.

ALL BRICK CONTEMPORARY HOME features 3,000 sq. ft 4 bedrooms,
3 baths (5th bedroom could be an office) ceramic tile flooring throughout,
foyer, fireplace, 9' ceilings, custom trim work, formal dining room, eat in
kitchen, French doors open to patio and large in ground pool on 4.25 acres.
Listing #102W, MLS# 148583 priced at $399,900.

VERY NICE Doublewide mobile home with large, screened porch, boat
dock on deep-water canal. Located in gated, golf cart community with
access to pool, tennis and clubhouse. Reduced to $325,000. Listing
#3003W, MLS# 161598.

NORTH WAKULLA COUNTY is the location of this manufactured home
featuring 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, fireplace, split floor plan, front deck and
situated on a fenced 1-acre comer lot. Priced at $78,000. Listing #6201W,
MLS# 169067

RENTALS
LARGE BRICK HOME with 4BR/3BA available for rent in beautiful River
Plantation Subdivision. $1,800/month and $1,800 security deposit.

TWO 2BR/2.5BA TOWNHOMES with sleeping loft on deep-water canal
with community pool in the peaceful gated community of Snug Harbor
each available for $1,500/month with $1,500 security deposit. 1 Available
NOW. 1 Available June 1st.

3BR/1 BA Brick home in central location. $775/month with $1,000 security
deposit.

2BR/1BA Furnished mobile home available for rent. $500/month with
$500 security deposit.

2008 IS THE DATE TO LOOK, LINGER & RELOCATE!
WWW.C21 FCP.COM

Ochlockonee Bay
984-5007


Lic. Real Estate Broker
Crawfordville Hwy.

(850) 926-7043
(850) 926-2898 Fax

www.Forestrealty@earthlink.net

COMMERCIAL- Hwy 319-1.21 Acres -
151 ft. on Hwy $275,000

SMITH CREEK SOPCHOPPY 33.6
Convenient to the Apalachicola National Forest.
Priced at $6,000/acre.

BOB MILLER ROAD Partially cleared 13.32 acres in
North Wakulla County. Asking $165,000

LANARK- FAIRWAY PARK SUBD. Bank Foreclosure -
1 acre Homes Only $64,900
RENTAL NWinth County Location 3BR/2BA M/H
$650/mo. plus security.


Josh Brown Alan Reese Preston Strickland
528-6385 567-4860 508-3296


/ Crawfordville
2851 C-ville Hwy.
Office: 850-926-9260
Fax: 850-926-9150


Realty


PO Box 556 Panacea, FL 32346 www.obrealty.com obr@obrealty.com





Realty


Recipient of Wakulla County's 2007 Small Business Excellence Award!


m







Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008


275 Home Furnishings

-Futon, never used, in box, $199. (can
deliver). 425-8374.
New King Pillowtop Chiropractic
;Rest Mattress Set, still sealed w/war-
yanty. $299. 222-9879.
:Pub Table Set, Solid Wood, Brand
flew $99. 850-545-7112.
S320 Farm Products &
Produce
Fresh Mushroom Compost, small
.oad of field dirt, red mulch, potting
soil, delivery available. Call
:i850)926-3280 or (850)445-3681.
1 335 Pets

'Adopt a pet from the animal shelter:
,Dogs:
j-ab mix, yellow
German Shepherds, purebred
-Terrier mix
"Hound mixes
Lab mixes
'Bulldog mixes
-Boxer mix
ZAmerican Bulldog
i any other nice mixes. Come and
take a look.
Puppies:
ZLab mixes
pointer mix
Pottie mix
lab/Bulldog mixes
Chihuahua, young adult
*Adult cats.
Registered Puppies for sale. Selec-
lion of small breeds. Call 926-9217
Or 528-6990.
355 Yard Sales

Multi-family garage sale. Sat., April
26, 8AM-2PM. Clothing, books, furni-
ture, fishing, guy stuff. 1524 Shell
Point Rd.
435 Lost and Found

_ost black & tan basset beagle
,bound puppy. Lost in parking lot of
inew dollar store in Crawfordvile.
.lease call 926-7793.
500 Real Estate, Homes
Mobiles

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference, limi-
tation, or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status or national origin or
an intention to make any such pref-
erence, limitation or discrimination."
Familial status includes children un-
der the age. of 18 living with parents
or legal custodians, pregnant wom-
en and people securing the custody
of children under the age of 18.
This newspaper will not accept any
advertising for real estate that is a
violation of the law. Our readers are
hereby informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are
available on an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of discrimination
call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777.
The toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


OPPORTUNITY
510 Acreage for Sale

124.7 Acres, all or part. 2+ miles of
creek front, including Smith Creek.
Includes full kitchen, two bunk-
houses, woodshed. Make offer.
984-0093.
520 Townhouses for Rent

Crawfordville! 3BR/2BA Townhome
in Camelot Subdivision with commu-
nity pool. $885/month $885/deposit
No Pets. No Smoking. $50.00 move
in bonus!! Ochlockonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001 www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com
New 3BR/2BA One story townhouse
in Crawfordville, Convenient location,
All appliances included, screened
porch, fenced backyard, $975
Monthly Phone 850-309-7790 or
850-933-2870.
Two Story 2BR/2BA townhouse in
Crawfordville, with Sunroom, Con-
venient location, $775 Monthly.
Phone 850-390-7790 or
850-933-2870.
530 Comm. Property for h
Rent I
1,200 sq.ft. on Crawfordville Hwy ad-
joining The Wakulla News. Three of-
fices, reception area, kitchen.
$1,400/mo. First & last month rent,
plus security deposit. Available May
15. Call 926-6289 or 421-2792.


Commercial building on busy Hwy.
9,8/Panacea for rent. $550/month.
$550/security. Ochlockonee Bay Re-
alty: 850-984-0001.
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com
Mini-Warehouse Spaces for lease,
8X10 and 10X12 now available.
Come by or call Wakulla Realty,
926-5084.


GRADE A
OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT
Several hwy frontage offices avail.
Great atmosphere. Rent plus tax in-
cludes: all utilities, trash p/u and full
kitchen use. Common area cleaned
twice weekly. 1st and last month's rent.
One month rent free with 13/month
lease. Call 926-4511 for info.
CALL (850) 926-4511



ABC
STORAGE
MINI-WAREHOUSES
BOATS RV'S
519-5128 508-5177
2 miles South of Courthouse
on Hwy. 319 in Crawfordville
24 Hour Access Video Surveillance

Keep Wakco(a
County Beautifu(


-1 1


Subscribe to

ht l akulla tcbtu5 926-7102


COVERED BOAT/RV
STORAGE
Now AVAILABLE
~ Self Storage Units
~ Retail Space Available
Locks, Boxes & More
Stow
Away
Center
850-926-5725
www.stowawaycenter.com


545 Homes for Sale |

FOR SALE. On 3 lots in Wakulla Gar-
dens. 23 Neeley Rd. 1800 sq. ft.
4BR/2BA. Renovated. ONLY
$154,900. Call Nick 766-7750.
Walkers Crossing, North Crawford-
ville. 3BR/2BA Doublewide, 2-acres,
completely remodeled, Hardiboard
exterior, ceramic tile baths, wood
floors, new fixtures, backdeck. By
owner. $92,000. Owner financing.
850-567-9972.
555 Houses for Rent

115 Cochise Street, 2Bd/2Ba
$775.00 per Month
41 Mohawk 2Bd/1Ba $675.00 per
Month
$50.00 Early Pay discount available
Deposit and References required No
Pets call (850)926-8795
154 Trice Lane in Crawfordville!
Gorgeous 3BR/2BA. $950/month.
$950/security. No Pets. No Smoking.
Ochlockonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealtv.com
2BR/1BA home in Wakulla Gardens
area, utilities included, $795 per
month. Call Bob @ (850)545-6010 or
(850)893-2115.
2BR/1BA house. $450/mo.
$300/dep. Call Tim @ 926-3094.
2BR/1 BA in Lanark/Franklin County!
$600/month. $600/security. No Pets.
No Smoking. Ochlockonee Bay Re-
alty: 85.0-984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com
2BR/1BA split level on Sopchoppy
River. Large screen porch, private
pond, woods & wildlife. $850/mo.
Pets considered. 962-2849.


The "Willow"
4BD/2BA 1,540 sq. ft. on
.41 acres. Split plan, custom
cabinets, cathedral ceilings
& more. Available now.
$174,900
Other models


and lots
available.
Call today
for details.


NEW CONSTRUCTION

6 Pueblo Trail- Quality Built
1,260 sq. ft. 3BR/2BA, awesome
floorplan with laminate wood flooring.
Great master bedroom with large
walk-in closet and master bath
completely tiled. Call now to pick colors. $ 118,500

Additional Lots & Plans Available

28 4 BlueWater
Susan Jones Group,
(850) 566-7584 Realty Group Quality Built Homes






These are some of the finest properties Alli-
ance Realty Company has listed for sale... each
one of these properties is special and unique
in it's own way. For more information please visit
www.alliancerealtycompany.com

41 Benton Road
Crawfordville, MLS# 182778 Beautiful Home on
3.44 acres, completely remodeled with custom
built cabinetry in dining room and baths. Plantation
shutters, porcelain tile in kitchen dining room, bonus
room & screened porch. Berber carpet in living room and bedrooms, Stainless steel ap-
pliances (2006) large laundry room, fireplace, all new interior and exterior paint. 3 BR/2
BA + bonus room for office/bedroom or playroom. Large workshop (wired) &
2 vehicle garage. Horses allowed. $259,900

Spring Creek, MLS# 179484
Unique and beautiful water front lot in Spring Creek, a
nature lover's dream. Head out to the bay or open waters
of the Gulf for excellent fishing, kayaking, swimming and
boating. This lot is cleared and has city water and sewer,
along with a power pole. Ready for you to enjoy this wonderful spot reminiscent of what
Florida was, and still is! Just 25 miles south of Tallahassee, located next to a small
private marina and boat ramp. This is the best deal on the water!!! $150,000

69 Crawford Avenue, MLS# 24583 Enjoy the
Great Country Feel in this 3BR/2BA home on 5 acres.
Private yet close to town, this home features beautiful
hardwood floors, large kitchen with interior separate
laundry, and spacious family room with fireplace.
French doors lead out to a screened in porch and deck
surrounding above ground pool. Enjoy the bounty from the organic garden and the fruit trees.
The yard is fenced for children and pets. Bring your horses too! Just Listed at $215,000

73 Benton Road, Crawfordville, MLS# 176013
Best Price for 5 acres in town. Quality built block
house on 5 acres near downtown Crawfordville. Home
features large kitchen and dining area, family room
with wood-burning stove, 3 BR, 2 BA with an extra room can be used as either a 4th bedroom
or office/study. Outside laundry rm/workshop, shed, carport, fenced backyard and horses
are allowed too! New interior paint through out home. This home is waiting for a new owners
personal touch to make it shine. $159,000

MLS. Susan Council 850-251-1468 Mike Wahl 1-850-258-3338 03


E A T Y CO M P A N Y


2 Community
Parks w/Ponds,
Bike & Walking Trails
Street Lights, Underground
Utilities and Sewer System

Homes Starting at
$159,000

OPEN SUNDAY
2:00-4:00
Dir.: Lower Bridge Rd. to
Left on Mallard Pond Circle.


Contact: Elaine Gary
850-509-5409
Elaine@BlueWaterRealtyGroup.com


]


U4iK'W f'ii -i- *; '.


The "Spruce"
3BR/2BA 1,328 sq. ft. on .41
acres. Split plan with L-shaped
bar in kitchen, vaulted ceilings
& more. $159,900
Please Note: Photo of
previously built home.


BlueWater.
Realty Group


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See All Alliance
Listings at
susancouncil.com


Congra tula tions

Top Producer and Top Lister

March 2008


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008 Page 7$1


555 Houses for Rent


3BD/2BA, 2 story brick 1400sq. ft.
home, with tile floors, pool. Down-
!own Crawfordville. $900.00 per
V/lonth with $900.00 Deposit.
1850)544-1984.
Alligator Point- 3BR/2BA on Alligator
Harbor! Completely furnished, newly
renovated and clean. $975/month in-
Zludes $200.00 towards utilities.
$975/security. No Pets. No Smoking.
Ochlockonee Bay Realty:
t50-984-0001
vww.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com
pay-front 3BR/2BA on Mashes
Gands. Partially furnished.
4875/month. $875/security. No Pets.
No Smoking. Ochlockonee Bay Re-
alty: 850-984-0001
www.obrealty.com
vbr@obrealty.com
"eachfront 2BR/2BA on Alligator
Point. $1300/month. $1300/security.
No Pets. No Smoking. Ochlockonee
gay Realty: 850-984-0001 www.ob-
realty.com obr@obrealty.com
)3anal-front 2BR/1BA on Sunrise
tLane/ Mashes Sands. $900/month.
:$900/security. No Pets. No Smoking.
Dchlockonee Bay Realty:
'850-984-0001 www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com
Canal-front 3BR/1BA on Blue
Heron/Mashes Sands. $775month.
$775/security. No Pets. No Smoking.
pchlockonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001 www.obrealty.com
:pbr@obrealty.com
Crawfordville, like new large 2 bed-
l'oom, 2 full bath duplex. $675 per
month. Call Linda 926-1467.
-OR RENT 3BR/2.5BA w/hardwood
floors (1600sf) on 1-acre surrounded
.by National Forest on Mill Creek
Road. Available May 1, 2008
'$1,175/mo. $750/dep. 528-1687.
,Ochlockonee Bay/Mashes Sands Rd:
*3BR/1BA home on Ochlockonee
Bay. $775.00/month, $775.00/secu-
)rity. 1 year lease, no pets and no
smoking. 850-984-0001.
'www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com.
Ochlockonee Bay/Surf Rd. 3BR/2BA
partially furnished home.
$875/month, $875/security. One
year lease, no pets and no smoking.
850-984-0001. www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com.
Rent To Own 3/2 New Home in
Crawfordville. $925/Month with 2K
bown. No Inside Smoking and No
Pets. (850)445-1227.
560 Land for Sale

3 50x100 adjacent lots in Wakulla
Gardens, Unit 1. $11,500 each.
926-9710.
Beautiful, untimbered, mature
wooded 20-acre tract. Easy access
from Hwy 98. Reduced $139,000.
Call Susan McKaye, owner/agent
(850)510-2477. Ochlockonee Bay
Realty.
www.hardwoodhammock.com
565 Mobile Homes for
Rent
2BR/1.5BA on Spring Creek Hwy.
$400/mo. $400/deposit. 926-5192 or
321-6889.
2BR/2BA MH, Wakulla Gardens
w/utility shed. $650/mo., $500/sec.
dep. 850-251-6375.
2BR/2BA rent or lease option to buy.
SWMH. Wakulla Gardens. A/C &
dishwasher. Available May 1st.
$550/mo. plus deposit. 656-8252.
or Rent. 3BR/1BA Mobile home.
Near boat ramp on Surf Road.
$650/mo. 984-3263 or 567-3315.
VIedart-2BR/2BA singlewide on
2-acres. Close to schools and rec-
reational park. $580/mo., $580/de-
Posit. No Pets. Available May 1.
251-9902 or 926-1588: Taking appli-
cations.



LRealty

Sonya Hall
Lic. Real Estate Broker
"Specializing in Wakulla Co.'
"(850) 926-5084
FOR RENT:
3BR 2BA House
$1,400mo + Sec. Dep.
(2 Car Garage)

3BR 2BA DWMH


565 Mobile Homes for
Rent


MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
Clean & well-maintained. S.
Leon-1 DWs near Bloxham
Cutoff. 3 bed/2 bath, front and
rear porches. Nice private yard.
Family room and new carpet.
For rent or lease-purchase op-
tion. No inside smoking or pets.
1st, last and security deposit.
Call 926-4511 for info.


570 Mobile Homes for Sale|

Mobile
Solutions
Buy/Sell
Used Mobile
Homes
850-258-3338
Mike Wahl
580 Rooms for Rent/Room-h
mates I


* *


Show her how much she means

to you with a Mother's Day ad in

The Wakulla (c

News. IP&', A D(^


Just


Roommates Wanted to share Deadline:
4BR/2BA home in Sopchoppy.
$400/mo. includes all. 962-2477. Pub
OUR NEWSPAPER
PEOPLE Call I
PEOPLE or e


"IT ALt L TAFWSPAPERLs
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N(

Th W
eWakulla
county I-

The Wakulla County


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$25


April 30--
lication Date: May 8

ynda, Kai or Alex at 926-7102

ail: classifieds@thewakullanews.net


3-


BUILDING HOMES FOR THE

HEART OF OUR COMMUNITY


NOTICE OF

PUBLIC

MEETING

Board of County


Commissioners has scheduled a Public
Meeting of the Citizens Advisory Committee
on Infrastructure Development on May 1,
2008 at 9 A.M. in the Commission Complex
conference room at 3093 Crawfordville


Highway in Crawfordville, FL.


Interested


parties are invited to attend and participate.

Persons needing special access considerations
should call the Wakulla County Administrative
Offices at least 48 hours before the date for


scheduling purposes.
Offices may be contacted


The Administrative
at (850) 926-0919.


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Available fromCommercial News Providers"-


Availabe rom'Comm0rcial News Providers"


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tell her

how much you care.
T- 11- A *" -% .%


$1,100mo + Sec. Dep.
(In Shell Point)

3BR 2BA House
$1,100mo + Sec. Dep.
(2 Car Garage)

3BR 2BA House
$1,100mo + Sec. Dep.
(1 Car Garage)

2BR 2BA Duplex
$750mo + Sec. Dep.


.1 .


o o






Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2008


Spring arrived with many blooms throughout Wakulla County as our
colder winter weather gave way to warmer temperatures. The flowers
are, clockwise from the top, Oxalis, a Toad Lilly, Soap Aloe, Louisiana
Iris and lilies. All of the photographs were taken by The Wakulla News
Editor Keith Blackmar except the white lilies. They were snapped by
Ron Piasecki. We welcome submissions of flowers and landscapes
which we will publish from time-to-time. We know that Wakulla County
is not just about our waterfowl
and wildlife. Submissions can be
e-mailed to kblackmar@thewakul-
Slanews.net. Have a pleasant spring
because hurricane season is just
around the corner.


k^,ii~ -r A;Sti T -


000


2 Meal from


:aurant


Great Weather for Outdoor Dining "On The Decks"


Chef Owned
& Operated
for
3 Generations


Weekday Special
Tues.........Fall Off the Bone
Rib Special
$2 off Dinner
Wed... Famous Smoked Wing
500 Each All Day
Thurs .....Delicious Smoked
Half Chicken w/2 Sides


g B SPORTS BA
Is fd(a i s 1~ahdy 1 J I Live Entertainment
ifWI @ M Friday Night Karaoke
Pick up Your Customer Sat., April 26...... Part Time Genius
Sat., May 3...............Honeybone
Is Appreciation Gift Card Sat., May 10.............Wayne's World
984-8130 at. May17..................Locomotive
40 Coastal HiSat., May 24................................. EU
460 Coastal Highw ay a 3 . . .* . .T
$2 Off 1 mile North of Angelo's at the Airport Sat., May 31 .... ....................... TBA
A


m nar' o
Open Saturday
& Sunday
Fresh Raw Oysters
$4 Dozen Every Day
Spring Hours:
Mon., Wed., & Thurs.
.. 4:30 p.m. 10 p.m.
Fri. & Sat. Noon 11 p.m.
SSun. Noon 10 p.m.
Closed Tuesday
When school is out...
We will open 7 days
Lunch & dinner

984-5168


At the Bridge Ochlockonee Bay Scenic Coastal Hwy. 98


Coastal 4-
Restaurant
Home of the
A -U-Can at
Seafood& Chicken
lj"Breakfst
Kids & Small Portion Meals
Steak Pork chops o Sandwiches
Homemade Onion Rings
Homemade Desserts
MOBILE CATERING
984-2933
)pen:6a.m.-9p.m.. ClosedTues. & Wed.
1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea
0000
IOQ I


Open 7


*, ;< .- ^./* -^ ^ i "
" ~ ~ ~ 1 ?'/;.'1 % ^**v ^.s ^N ~ ~ l


ockers Oasis 1 Rib Platter Dinner


Bayside Deli 1 Seafood Platter

Coastal Restaurant All-U-Can Eat


Chicken or Pork Chop Dinner


ingelo's 1 #1 Seafood Combo Dinner

Savannah's 1 Seafood Buffet (Fri. or Sat. only)


Paysat5A.M.







Fri. 6 Sat. Night
All you can eat seafood buffet


55 and older 6
Corner of Hwy. 267, Woodville Hwy. in Wakulla Station
----------------------------------------- --------------,
OFF The Eatin' Path
V1 Entry Form ,

Sat any participating I
Eatin" Placea


N--------------- --------------------I
* I
C Addresss __------------------I

*----------------------------------------I
City ______ ________
SState ---- Zip --------------
SPhone ________ __----------------- I
e-mail ____
-6.


Where Recipes
are born
not copied


MAY
LIVE Music
ON THE
WEEKENDS
Daily Specials
Private Banquet
Rooms Available
Be Sure To See
The Jewelry Man
for Fine Sterling Silver
and 10 Kt & 14 Kt. Gold


,f RVM~matftgii




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