Title: Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00161
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville, Fla
Publication Date: March 6, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028313
Volume ID: VID00161
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

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By MADELEINE H. CARR ., as a scientist for Floridca State,'
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their love for riding, animals and lot of fun."
music in between Mischa's work Contlxued an Page.!3




J.


Inside


This Week supervisor of elections


Comment & Opinion.....Page 2
Week In Wakulla............Page 2
Community..................Page 3
Church .........................Page 4
People..........................Page 6
Sports ...........................Page 8
Outdoors ...................Page 10
Almanac.....................Page 11
Sheriff's Reporl...........Page 12
Classifieds............. Page 15-17


6 8457


Broward Sapp, 52, of Craw-
fordville announced this week
that he intends to run for the
office of Supervisor of Elec-
tions. Sapp is a 32-year man-
agement employee of Embarq
Communications Company
and served 24 years as the
Embarg engineer for Wakulla
County.
"I moved to Wakulla County
34 years ago when I married
Carmen Pelt of Crawfordville.
We have two children, Cody, a
junior at Wakulla High School,
and Amy, who is married
to Clint Bull." Sapp has two
grandsons, Hunter and Bran-
don Bull.
"I believe I have a calling to
serve the people of Wakulla
County," he said. "My past


urowara sapp


work experience in the county
and knowledge in the com-
munications field would be
beneficial to the office by uti-
lizing the latest technologies.


If elected, I will work diligently
to find new and innovative
ways to increase voter partici-
pation.
"My family and I are mem-
bers of River of Life Church.
My other community involve-
ments include serving as past
executive director at Wildwood
Country Club, and president
of the men's golf associa-
tion, instructor and president
of Wakulla Jr. Golf, and a
member of Crawford Masonic
Lodge #294 and Marzuq Shrine
Club.
"I would like to thank the
many voters who supported
me during my past campaign
for school board and ask for
your continued support in this
new endeavor."


Teacher Jeffrey Duggar charged with murder

in death of 15-month-old child at his home


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
A popular teacher known for
his caring for students was arrest-
ed and charged with the murder
several months ago of a 15-month-
old child he was keeping.
Jeffrey Duggar, 38, who worked
with ESE kids at Wakulla High
School and Sopchoppy Education
Center, was arrested on a charge
of willful homicide. The child died
at Duggar's home on Dec. 29. An
autopsy concluded that the child
did not die of asphyxiation, as
Duggar had claimed, but from
blunt force trauma to the head.
At a first appearance on Tues-
day, March 4, Assistant State At-
torney Ashleigh Stowell said the
state intended to submit the case
to a grand jury meaning Duggar
could face an indictment for first
degree murder and the possibility
of a death sentence, if convicted.
The first appearance hearing,
held electronically before County
Judge Jill Walker, ended with Dug-
gar requesting that his attorney
- he said his family intends to
hire Tallahassee attorney Tony
Bajoczky be present to argue
for bond. in his case. The state is
asking for no bond. Judge Walker
set a hearing for the next day.
Superintendent of Schools
David Miller said the murder
charge came as a shock. "We had
no indication of any mistreatment
of kids" being taught by Duggar,
Miller said. "We never had any
complaints."
Duggar had been a teacher
with the district since 1996.
"He was very popular with the
kids he taught," Miller said.
As a result of the murder


charge, Miller suspended Duggar
from his teaching position. It is
the second suspension for Duggar:
in 2006, he was suspended after
he was charged with tampering
with a witness for allegedly pres-
suring a student to drop claims of
a sexual relationship with another
Wakulla High School teacher. The
charge against Duggar was eventu-
ally dropped.
In that case, though, a 37-year-
old ESE teacher, Elaine Turner,
pleaded in October 2007 to a
felony charge of sexual activity
with a 16 year old and was sen-
tenced to 30 days in jail plus 150
days in the sheriff's work camp
as a condition of 10 years proba-
tion. A 25-year-old teacher's aide,
Qunikiya Thomas was charged
with a sexual relationship with a
16-year-old student and ordered to
serve four years of sexual offender
probation.
The 2006 charges against Dug-
gar stemmed from a phone call at
his home in which the student al-
legedly involved with Turner was
talking with other students there.
Duggar took in some troubled
kids from the community to give,
them a stable environment and
discipline.
In the pending murder case,
Duggar claimed he and and the
child, James Hurley III, had fallen
asleep on Dec. 29 while watching
TV and that he awakened with
the child kicking, pressed under
him. He called paramedics, but the
child died the next day.
The child's mother, Crystal
Sanders of Sopchoppy, used to
allow her son to stay at Duggar's
Whiddon Lake Road home, and
the child had been with Duggar


since Christmas Eve, according to
the arrest report.
As a result of the autopsy, the
medical examiner determined
that blunt force trauma was the
cause of death, and found a large
amount of bruising on the child's
head and face, reportedly caused
during the time the child was in
Duggar's care. The bruising was
consistent with that of an abused
child, according to the report.
The child had bleeding under
the skin from a blunt trauma-to
the head that caused hemorrhag-
ing in his eyes and optic nerves,
the arrest report said. The child
also had an injury to his neck
caused by a direct blow, and his
sexual organs were bruised.
According to the arrest report,
Duggar said in interviews with
sheriff's detective Scott Rojas that
a friend and his son had come
over that evening and that James
was acting normal and playful.
Told in an interview that the
medical evidence showed that the
child died not from asphyxiation
but from head trauma, Duggar
reportedly maintained that he
did not know what happened
to James and that he did not do
anything to him. When he was
told that the child appeared to
have been abused, Duggar said he
didn't know what had happened
and asked to speak with an at-,
torney. The interview was ended
and Duggar was arrested.
"Duggar was the only person
around at the time James received
the injuries that caused his death
and the only person around at
the time with the ability to injure
James so severely," Rojas wrote
in his report. "James has a his-


jerf uuggar
tory of being injured while under
Duggar's care and supervision.
James had an unusual amount of
injuries, concentrated on the head
and face area, that occurred while
under Duggar's care."
The child's stepfather was
James Hurley, Jr. of Sopchoppy.
The father was Troy Williams.
At his first appearance, con-
ducted electronically between
the judge's chambers and the jail)
Duggar was dressed in an orange
jumpsuit and appeared haggard.
He told the court that he wanted a
bond and asked that his attorney
be present.
A first appearance is an op-
portunity for a person accused of
a crime to appear before a judge
to have the case reviewed as to
whether probable cause exists for
a a criminal charge, to make sure a
defendant has an attorney if they
want one and appoint a public
defender if they are indigent, and
to set a bond.
A person charged with mur,
der is not necessarily entitled to
bond.


Hilton indicted for first-degree murder in


Leon County for Dunlap slaying


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
A Leon County grand jury re-
turned an indictment last week
against Gary Michael Hilton for
the murder of Crawfordville
nurse Cheryl Dunlap in Decem-
ber.
Dunlap, 46, disappeared on
Dec. 1, and her abandoned car
was found near the Wakulla-
Leon county line. Dunlap's dis-
membered body was found two
weeks later by hunters in the
Apalachicola National Forest.
Hilton, a 61-year-old drifter
from Atlanta, is currently in jail
in Marietta, Ga., after entering a
plea to the murder of a 24-year-
old hiker in exchange for a life
sentence. He is also the suspect


in the slaying of a North Carolina
couple.
The grand jury indictment
unsealed on Thursday, Feb. 28,
in Leon County, charges Hilton
with premeditated murder, kid-
napping, grand theft auto for
stealing Dunlap's car, and grand
theft for using Dunlap's ATM
bank card.
Assistant State Attorney Jack-
ie Fulford said that a determina-
tion has yet to be made whether
the death penalty will be sought
against Hilton.
It's also not clear when Hil-
ton will be extradited back to
Florida, Fulford said, noting that
with'Hilton in the custody of
the Georgia prison system, the
extradition process requires the


agreement of both governors. Hilton last week in an effort to
Leon County Judge James speed up extradition.
Hankinson signed a warrant for

Spring forward with

Daylight Saving Time


Daylight Saving Time will return
to Wakulla County a little earlier
than normal in 2008 after President
George W. Bush signed the Energy
Policy Act of 2005 on Aug. 8, 2005.
Wakulla and most of the rest of the
United States will lose an hour of
sleep over the weekend. .
If Monday rolls around a little
quicker than normal, it's because an
hour of sleep will be lost between
Saturday night and Sunday morn-
ing. Wakulla County will "spring
forward" during the early morning
hours as the time will change on


Sunday, March 9 at 2 a.m. Daylight
Saving Time once began in April.
Residents are reminded to set
their docks ahead one hour Satur-
day night The change will length-
en the time it stays light at the end
of the day while the morning will
remain dark a little longer.
Standard Time will be be return-
ing a little later in the fall Clocks
will be set back on Sunday, Nov. 2
when Wakulla County "falls back"
an hour. In past years, Standard
Time used to return in late Octo-
ber.


Workshop addresses

area beach erosion


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
The beach at Mashes Sands
suffered erosion of as much as
six to 12 feet a year recently.
Erosion at Shell Point beach has
averaged about two feet a year.
At a workshop held last
week. Wakulla County Com-
missioners were presented
with several possible options
to refurbish the beaches with
new sand and jetties or other
anchors in an effort to slow
down the erosion.
Commissioners took no ac-
tion on Tuesday, Feb. 19, at a
workshop prior to the start of
their regular meeting. The work-
shop was attended by officials


from the state Department of
Environmental Protection as
.well as the engineer who devel-
oped the beach study, Michael
Dombrowski, P.E., and staff from
MRD Associates.
Several members of the'
board indicated a concern about
the cost of the projects most
notably commissioner Maxie
Lawhon who questioned spend-
ing hundreds of thousands or
even millions of dollars on a
project and how long the beach
repairs could be expected to last.
Consultants answered perhaps
as long as 10 to 15 years, or
maybe just until the next big
storm.
Continued on Page 13


Broward Sapp to run for


w








tage 2 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 6, 2008




Comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895


Sewer was a

goal at the time

Editor, The News:
, This letter is in response to
the Feb. 28 article about county,
schools and developer sewer
line extensions, and more spe-
cifically, to the statement that
school officials would have
sought grant funding for the
needed sewer extension, "but
were relying on a letter from
past county Public Works Direc-
tor Randy Merritt that assured
them that the sewer line would
be in place for the school to tie
irito." The following is a verba-
tim copy of the letter that was
provided for the Wakulla County
Schools regarding the sanitary
sewer availability for the new
school project:
"July 28, 2006
- Wakulla County School
Board
; Crawfordville, FL
- Subject: Sewer Availability
- Wakulla County New North
E elementary School
: Mr. Duggar:
.- It is anticipated that central
sanitary sewer will be available
f. the Wakulla County new
elementary school site within
one year. The sewer force main
f scheduled to be extended
ly a developer adjacent to this
site, and will therefore make
sewer available to this proposed
school located near the corner
of Crawfordville Highway and
Bloxham Cutoff, parcel number
05-3S-01W-000-04286-000. If you
have any questions, feel free to
contact me at 926-3153.
Sincerely,
Randy Merritt, P.E.
VWNA Project Manager
Wakulla County Public
Works"
: This memo is not an assur-
ance that sewer would be avail-
ble, but rather a statement of
tie facts at the time. At the time
*Ais memo was written, there
Was a permit application sub-
mitted by the developer for an
8-inch sewer line that was nec-
essary to serve all future phases
of the Flowers Subdivision. The
construction of the proposed 8-
inch sewer line would have pro-
vided adequate reserve capacity
to serve the new school. In ad-
dition, my anticipation of sewer
construction was based on past
history that the county would
riot grant final plat approval of
a subdivision and issuance of
building permits without meet-
ing the contingent requirements
of approval, namely central
sewer being available.
, In the unprecedented, case
of the Flowers Subdivision,
final plat approval was granted


and building permits were is-
sued without sewer availability
while the developer pursued
grant funds to help pay for the
extension of the sewer line and
negotiated with the county to
form a development agreement
to partially reimburse the devel-
oper for the cost of the sewer
line extension from the Wal-
Mart to the Flowers Subdivision
site. Grant funds were not able
to be obtained, a development
agreement was not negotiated,
and economic conditions have
changed in the housing market.
These series of events have lead
to the present new school sewer
situation, not the memo above.
It is not my desire to fault
anyone for the current situa-
tion, but as I was mentioned by
name in your article as a main
culprit in causing the lack of
sewer service to the new school,
I thought it prudent to tell my
side of the story. It sounds like
the involved parties have found
an acceptable solution for this
situation that is fair to everyone,
and I congratulate them.
Randy Merritt
Crawfordville


We must never

kill our music

Editor, The News:
There are two bills filed in
the legislature requiring a daily
physical education class for all
middle school students. In the
Senate, the bill is SB 0610 by
Senator Constantine (Seminole
and Orange) and in the House it
is HB 757 by Representative Da-
vis (Duval) and is co-sponsored
by Rep. Homan (Temple Terrace).
All efforts to oppose this bill are
needed as the immediate result
for schools on a six period day
will be the elimination of music,
visual arts, and other electives
for grades 6 to 8.
I feel so fortunate to work
in Wakulla County where the
arts are strongly supported
by our Superintendent, David
Miller, our school board, and
the administrations in each of
our schools. Our school system
views the arts as an important
part of what makes up the
"whole child." It provides an
avenue of creativity, self expres-
sion, and self worth that is so
important in child development.
Our two middle schools are cur-
rently on a seven period day, but
that does not make us safe from
this legislation. Currently, 40 per-
cent of my students are in state
mandated remediation classes
for reading or math. This is done
during one of their two elective
periods. If a new mandatory


Letters Policy
The Wakulla News welcomes your letters, but we request
that you adhere to the following guidelines:
Letters should not be longer than 300 words.
They must include the writers name, home address and
telephone number. (Only name and town will be listed; the
reast is used solely for the purpose of verification.)
Writers may be limited to one letter per month, depend-
ing upon space limitations.
With very few exceptions, anonymous letters will not
be published.
Letters can be sent via mail or e-mail to kblackmar@
thewakullanews.net), or they can be dropped off at our
Crawfordville Highway office. The Wakulla News reserves
the right to edit all letters.


) aktMIa eto
The Wakulla News (USPS 644-640) is published weekly at
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla
News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
General Manager: Tammie Barfield.....................tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Editor: Keith Blackmar....................................kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Reporter: William Snowden.............................wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey ...................kinsey@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales: Kai Page....................................... kpage@thewakullanews.net
Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton........... advertising@thewakullanews.net
Graphic Artist: Jessi Smith..............................advertising@thewakullanews.net
Bookkeeping: Sherry Balchuck .......................accounting@thewakullanews.net
Classifieds/In House Sales: Alex Brimner...........classifieds@thewakullanews.net
Circulation: Sherry/Alex.................................. circulation@thewakullanews.net
Proofreader: Karen Tully
Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable
one year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $25, Out of County $30
Out of State $35. Out of Country on Request


P.E. requirement is passed, all
of those students would be re-
moved from the band program.
Do we really want to remove
music from a child's schedule
when studies have proven that
it promotes brain growth and
greatly reduces the chance of
their dropping out of school
before graduation?
Now is the time to speak
out against these two bills that
have not been properly thought
through or planned for in this
legislative session. The imme-
diate implementation of these
bills would shut down the arts
programs for middle school
children on a six period day and
seriously cripple the programs
of those on a seven period day.
This would lead to the elimina-
tion of high school programs
which depend on classes at the
middle school to begin building
skills and techniques for stu-
dent success at the high school
level. The wording of these bills
does not even call for certified
P.E. teachers. That uncertified
teachers may be responsible for
instruction dramatically reduces
the effectiveness of the effort.
In addition, the bill does not
even provide additional funding
to put this new requirement in
place.
As a 25 year veteran teacher,
I understand the importance
of providing our children with
a well-rounded education. I
also understand the growing
problem of obesity in children
and realize that steps must be
taken to protect their health
and educate them in how to
care for their bodies. This "quick
fix" legislation is not the an-
swer. I encourage everyone to
contact Senator Al Lawson and
Representatives Will Kendrick
and Marti Coley to ask for their
opposition this legislation. The
future of our children depends
on youl
Laura Hudson, Band Director
Wakulla Middle School


Coley is way

off the mark

Editor, The News:
Your Feb. 28 issue carried a
letter from Rep. Marti Coley that
solidly underscores the need
for better science education in
Florida schools, assuming that
the good representative from
Marianna is a product of such.
Coley asserts that the Feb.
19 adoption of the new science
teaching standards by the state
Board of Education strengthens
our schools' science curriculum,
which indeed it does, albeit not
for the reason Coley cited.
Coley wrote that the new
standards "will teach evolution
as a scientific theory, not as
scientific fact."
This is patently untrue, as
even a simple reading of the
new standards readily proves.
The scientists who helped
frame the new standards agreed
to modify the word "evolution"
with the words "scientific theory
of' as purely a political move to
sidestep a religiously motivated
effort to kill the proposed new
standards outright.
All of these framers (68 in to-
tal) well know that just like any
other scientific concept-from
gravity to quantum mechan-
ics-evolution is both a fact and
a fact-based scientific theory.
They also realized that their
compromise would keep non-
scientific, religion-based no-
tions such as creationism and
intelligent design out of science
classrooms.
Coley is unfortunately one
of millions of Americans who
simply don't grasp the mean-
ing of the word "theory" when
the word is used in science-it
hardly means the same as in
casual usage, as in "Joe has a
theory that it's going to rain
tomorrow."
Coley and her ilk also think
evolution subverts Christianity
by somehow taking God out of
creation, which is equal non-
sense as any theologian worthy
of the name will readily affirm.


Evolution theory has lots to
say about the origin of species,
but absolutely NOTHING to say
about the origin of life. My (non-
scientific) theory is that Coley
doesn't understand the differ-
ence in the two-or much care.
Frank Stephenson
Tallahassee


Thanks for all

the assistance

Editor, The News:
I write you from California
today, where I am on a lunch
break at the Young Democrats
of America Winter Conference.
I wanted to thank those of you
who came out to vote today
in the Congressional District
2 DNCC Delegate selection
Caucus.
Today Mary Mooney and I
were elected as delegates to the
Democratic National Committee
Convention (DNCC) in Denver
this summer. Details are still
being worked out in regards to
the Florida delegation getting
recognized again, but if it is, we
will be there. I appreciate all of
you who came out today, and
all of you who sent your warm
regards.
Fellow Young Democrat
Corinne Rubin was also elected
as a delegate today.
Thanks for all of your help
Alan Brock
Wakulla Station

Yard sales can

be even better

Editor, The News:
Thanks to all the people
who have yard sales on the
weekends. It's really entertain-
ing and fun, and you meet the
nicest people. I do have a few
suggestions that might help the
person giving the sale and the
person buying. When you adver-
tise your sale, please give good
directions so we can find you.
Make your signs large and leg-
ible with the address so we can
read it without pulling over and
getting out to read the sign.
Don't forget that putting
that sign out when it's damp
will make the ends curl up. For
the buyers, try not to park on
people's grass if you can help it.
Buyers watch where you park. I
got hit last weekend. At the end
of the day, sellers please pick
your your signs.
A note about Hudson Park: I
think it's big enough for every-
one. When there's a show going
on, why not let people that have
things to sell use one end. What
would it hurt.
Mary Pitts
Panacea


Get over vote

on amendment

Editor, The News:
In reference to Commissioner
Chairman Ed Brimner's letter
on wakulla.com entitled "Did
Crist Pull a Fast One on Wakulla
County?"
May I remind you that it was
the people of Florida and not
Governor Chist who voted for
and approved Amendment One;
Get over it.
How does it feel to have
someone bigger than you tell
you how it is going to be? When
times are hard we have to adjust
our budgets so why should
it be any different for county
governments? The people who
determine these things may just
do it again when it's time for
re-election for Wakulla County
Commissioners who have made
bad choices.
I toast to the people's choice
for all those times I contacted
Wakulla County officials and
heard nothing back on numer-
ous issues.
Kimberly Wheatley
Broker/President, CRS
Premier Properties of
North Florida, Inc.


Sometimes things
just stink

Editor, The News:
A friend said that the other
day as we talked about recent
events at the last county com-
mission meeting. The commis-
sioners were gently musing
about this year being the last


time the Rotary Club gets Hud-
son Park for free. Unfortunately,
at least one other group maybe
only one other group, I do not
know -- paid full rental. That
group was the Wakulla County
Christian Coalition, an Afro-
American group raising money
for scholarships. Just your basic


WEEK IN WAKULLA
Thursday, March 6, 2008
BOOK NOOK, for children in grades K-5, will be held at
the public library at 10:30 a.m.
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB meets at Posey's Up the Creek
in Panacea at noon.
MEN'S FRATERNITY OF WAKULLA, a fellowship of men who .
gather to share an support one another in the quest for
authentic manhood, meets at Cornerstone Ministries
"outback" at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call Steve
Smith at 508-2560.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at 12 noon.
ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION meets at city hall in
St. Marks at 7:30 p.m.
VFW BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road ,
from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
YOGA CLASSES are held Tuesdays and Thursdays at the
Crawfordville Women's Club at 6:30 p.m. For information
or to register, call 926-4293.
Friday, March 7, 2008
AA meets at the American Legion Building next to the
Women's Club in Crawfordville with an open meeting at
8 p.m. There are also open meetings Sunday at 6 p.m.,
Monday for women at 6 p.m., and Wednesday at 8 p.m.
PICKIN' 'N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at the
senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
Saturday, March 8, 2008
AARP TAX ASSISTANCE will be available at the public library
from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
ALZHEIMER'S SUPPORT GROUP meets at the Ameris Bank in .
Crawfordville at 10 a.m.
HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE DAY will be held at
NA meets at the Torch, 16 Lower Bridge Road, at 5 p.m.
For more information, call 599-2876.
SOPCHOPPY COMMUNITY-WIDE YARD SALE will be held
in Sopchoppy from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Sunday, March 9, 2008
DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME BEGINS Set clocks back one hour..
Monday, March 10, 2008
SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION meets at city hall in
Sopchoppy at 6:30 p.m.
WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION meets at the
public library at 7 p.m.
VFW meets at the post on Arran Road at 7 p.m.
Tuesday, March 11, 2008
AARP TAX ASSISTANCE will be available at the public
library from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.
BOOK BABIES, for infants and toddlers, will be held at the .'
public library at 10:30 a.m.
COUNTY COMMISSION will meet in the commission
boardroom at 6 p.m. A workshop on rules of procedures
for meetings will be held at 5 p.m.
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TASK FORCE meets at TCC Wakulla at noon.
TWILIGHT TALES, bedtime stories for children, will be read
at the public library from 7 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Children are
encouraged to wear pajamas and bring a stuffed animal.
WOMEN'S SAFETY AND PERSONAL PROTECTION, a lecture ,
by Sheriff David Harvey and Major Larry Massa, will be held
at the Crawfordville Woman's Club from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Refreshments will be served
Wednesday, March 12, 2008
AA meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.
AARP TAX ASSISTANCE will be offered at the senior center
from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
BOOK BUNCH, for pre-school and home school families,
meets at the public library at 10:30 a.m. t ..
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior citizens center
at 10:30 a.m.


bit of unfairness, eh?
Yep. Plus, there's more.
Right after, Commissioner
Brian Langston presented an
agenda item "advanced" by a
"citizen" about a road-naming
policy. Not knowing the "citi-
zen" but knowing Brian's way
- voting for every project adding
more traffic to 319 while seeking
a flex-time pass for himself at
his real job, then lying about it
at a BOCC meeting-I sure don't
trust the "citizen" bit. If I were
to take out my sword of specu-
lation and sling it around, I'd
say it's a way to keep the issue
of naming Lower Bridge Road
from consideration and a vote
this Spring, when it will be up
again for consideration.
See, they have a policy. It was
let citizens present an idea and
vote on it. But because of the
upcoming election the 2 (Langs-
ton and Brimner) of the 3-2 just
can't stand to take a stand. But
there is an answer. Look, when
m'dog gets to being stinky, do-
ing stinky things in stinky ways
I have a solution.
"GitO You stinky mutt, youl
GO A-W-A-YI" Well, these ac-
tions stink.
And it's time to send them
away.

Hugh Taylor
Crawfordville and
Tallahassee


Thanks for the

helping hand

Editor, The News:
The family of Odell Thomas
would like to thank everyone
who had a part in making Feb.
23 and March 1 benefit fish fry
and yard sale a huge success.
Special thanks go to My Way
Seafood, D.L. Thomas Seafood,
and Marcus Pilkinton for donat-
ing the mullet; the Seineyard
restaurant and the Wharf restau-
rant for cooking and donating
the trimmings that went with


the delicious fish dinner. The
family would also like to thank
everyone who gave monetary
donations, yard sale items and
the time they gave to help us. out
at the benefit.
Thanks to Ray Gray and the
Parks and Recreation Depart-
ment for the use of the pavilion
at Hudson Park, and Panacea
Volunteer Fire Department for
the use of their grounds and also
to Wakulla Bank, Wakulla News
and Wakulla.com for advertising
this for us.
God has richly blessed our
family with such wonderful'
caring friends and family and
we want to thank each of you
from the bottom of our hearts
for all that you did. We are truly
blessed to live in such a wonder-
ful and caring community. May
God bless each and every one
that had a part in this..
Linda Camp
Crawfordville


Family gives

thanks to all

Editor, The News;
The family of Shanna D.
Hurley would like to say thank
you to our family, friends, and
community for all the prayers,
food, cards and flowers in our
time of loss.
Robert Hurley & Family
Crawfordville



Correction

An item in last week's Sher-
iff's Report about a female in-
mate on work release charged
with smuggling contraband
into the jail indicated that she
was employed as a manager at
the Hardees restaurant in Craw-
fordville. The information was
outdated: the woman is not a
current employee of Hardees.






THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 6, 2008 Page 3


Communi


W -


. Hi neighbors. Are we having
beautiful weather? There are
still some of us who think it
is not hot enough to discard
sweatshirts and sweaters. Nope.
it isn't me. I love this breezy
weather myself. I am thankful
we aren't having all of that snow,
ice and flooding that is going
on ip other parts of the world.
Some people are still going
through droughts. I am thankful
even though it was a little too
warm this past weekend.
Angel wings to John, our
postmaster, for working very
hard to get extra lighting at the
post office at night. Some people
do pick up their mail after dark
and it's kind of spooky and you
don't feel safe going into a dark
building.
Listen up people! Please re-
member that our St. Marks River
boat ramp and pavilion park will
be dosed March 3 until May 31.
They will be remodeling and
repairs, upgrading the public
restrooms and fixing the park-
ing area. This is going to be of
benefit to all of us.
This is what I was talking
about when I suggested improv-
ing what we already have here
instead of changing our beauti-
ful little town. You don't have
to agree with me or even like
the way I write our column, but
the opinions written here are
my own. Remember when the
business up the road promised
to replant the trees that were
uprooted? I think three or four
were replanted and the rest of


Wakulla hosts
opening day
The Wakulla County Parks and
Recreation Department would
like to cordially invite the public,
county employees, and all elected
officials to the official start of the
youth baseball/softball season on
Saturday, March 8, at 9 a.m.
At the opening day ceremony,
the Wakulla County Parks and Rec-,
reation Department will be honor-
ing the Commander family and


ST. MARKS
By Linda Walker

the scenery is boats. But it's just
my opinion, people.
Anytime a new business
comes to town, it takes away
from our local businesses that
have been here for years. Some
progress is good. We do have
drinkable water now and a sewer
system plus garbage pickup. We
have street lights in some places
and for the most part we all
know our neighbors and look
out for each other.
We never agree on everything
and never will. But it hurts my
heart when I see a beautiful
piece of land just scraped down
to the bare earth. I would love
to see more trees planted and
efforts made to preserve what
is one of the last little village
towns left in the U.S.A.
Congratulations to Sharon
Gallup on her retirement after
working 33 years for the revenue
service. You aren't going to know
how to act girl.
Neighbors, I don't know what
is going on with our cable com-
pany but my bill has doubled
since we got the company we
have now. Nothing on my cable
has changed or been added to,
just a bigger bill. What gives
with this?
We want to wish a late but
heartfelt happy anniversary to
Jim and Betty Ward on Feb. 22.
They both have had the flu and


others for their contributions to-
wards the youth baseball program
and Medart Recreation Park.
Following the dedication, the
"First Pitch" will be thrown at
9:30 a.m. and the season will be
officially underway. The Cal Rip-
kin League will use this day as a
fundraising event to help support
the baseball program. They will be
selling chicken dinners for $5. The
Wakulla County Parks & Recreation
Board will be selling hamburgers
and hotdogs to raise money for
Medart Park Improvements.


now Jim is going to have cataract
surgery. Take the mirrors down
Betty, he's going be able to see
clearly now.
A late but special happy
birthday to"Little Miss America,"
Alexis Strickland on Feb 28. She
is now one year old and the most
beautiful little girl. Her proud
parents are Mary and Shane
Strickland.
Now let's wish all of these
special people happy birthday:
Madison Chapman on March
3, Christina Hanna on March 4
(Two Nichols Restaurant), Kathy
Hogan on March 6, Misty Dew
on March 5, Marilyn Moore and
Zoe Mansfield on March 7, Sheila
Brown on March 8, Joe Ward on
March 9, Connie Cutchins on
March 10 and happy 50th birth-
day to Dwayne Roberts on March
9. I don't think he is 50 years old.
Happy birthday to Steven Coul-
liette on March 6.
On our prayer list please re-
member, Newell Ladd, Thelma
Murphy, Terry Loniver, Benita
Triplett and her family, due to
the loss of her brother, Jett,
Yvonne Tuttin, Betty Ward's
daughter-in-law, Nettie, Gordon
and Junior Strickland, Betty
Smith, Jayne Marshall, Jewell
Franklin and pray for all of those
not named here. Pray for our
families, neighbors, our town,
country and pray for peace.
If you have news, get it to me
at 925-0234 or put a note in our
drop box at Bo Lynn's store.


Also on this day, Babe Ruth
Commissioner Noreen Britt will be
hosting the Aquafina Major League
Baseball Pitch, Hit and Run Compe-
tition. This event measures player's
abilities in three categories: hit-
ting, running and throwing. The
competition is open to all children
between the ages of 7 and 14. Age
determining date is July 17, Win-
ners will advance to the regional
event and possibly.the national
event. This event will be held from
at 10 a.m. to noon on Field #3 at
the recreation park.


A thought for
the week- This is BUCK]
the day that the
Lord has made. By Ethel
Let us rejoice
and be happy
in it. Make full use of every day.
Help those you can, be kind to
those you come in contact with,
treat your neighbor as yourself,
have a pure heart, love one
another, and love without fear.
Love has no fear. It is kind, it is
patient, it does not envy, it does
not boast, it is not proud. Love
is forgiving, and love will never
fail you.
Our prayers and concerns go
out to all .the sick and shut in,
those in the hospitals, the com-
munity, the prisons, the jails, the
unsaved, and those in need of
prayer everywhere.
Services will be held at Skip-
per Temple Church, 165 Surf Rd.,
Sopchoppy, on March 21 at 10
a.m. A pre-Easter program will be


HORN
I Skipper


presented on
Good Friday.
There will be
several speak-
ers with the


theme "The
Last Words of Jesus." Easter
Sunrise Service will be held
Sunday, March 23 at 5:30 a.m. On
Friday, March 7 at 7:30 p.m. the
Tallahassee District Church of
Christ Written in Heaven Choir
will have a singing a Skipper
Temple Church. You can fellow-
ship with us each Sunday at
11:30 a.m.,Sunday School at 10:30
a.m., and each Tuesday night at 7
p.m. in Bible study and prayer.
We wish a happy birthday to
the following people in March:
Deaconess Alberta Hines (24),
Missionary Eva Mae Johnson
(27), Deacon Meriddie Rosier
(15), Mother Bobbery Ann Ros-
ier, Mother Mildred Godbolt,
Deacon James Green and Sister
Vertie Forest.


amES


24 Flavors Including Fat-Free & Sugar-Free
Delicious Gourmet Coffee Free Internet Access
SMuffins Fudge Soft Drks


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0 6


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Merita Buy 1/Get 1
Bread FREE


18 Pack
Busch


$870
Cans


T-bone Steak $49


Boneless
Pork Chops


T-bone Steak $389


Quarter Loin
Chops 8 .


Whole Chicken 791.


~COCJD Th~ i>~YP~ ~


Leg Quarters

40. 10 Ilb. Bag


12 Pack Pepsi
Cans


2 for

$550o
IJ TI


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Boneless $229
Sirloin Chops b.


Pork $249
Cube Steak $ b.



Whole Chicken 994.


10 lb. Bag $590

Leg Quarters J


USDA Approved


USDA Approved
Family owned & operated,
Kenneth and Abbie Shiver
1353 Coastal Hwy., Panacea


-


I I I ill


RMS baseball
The Riversprings Middle School
baseball team improved to 5-1 with
wins over Madison, Taylor and
Franklin County. Jordy Montague
picked up the win against Madison
on Feb. 19.
Jake Walker pitched three strong
innings in relief to seal the 5-3 win.
Travis Hinsey and Dillon Normanx
each had clutch hits and Jake Walk
er added a single and two RBIs.
On Monday, Feb. 25, RMS defeat-
ed Taylor County 6-5. Jake Walkei
pitched four innings for the win.
Lefthander Travis Hinsey finished
the game. Brandon Morgan led the
offense with a double and a two
RBI single.
On Thursday, Feb. 28, RMS traV-
eled to Franklin County beating
them 19-4. Conner Smith was the
winning pitcher giving up no hitsg
Conner Smith, Jordy Montague,
and Dalton Norman all had thrde
hits each. RMS improved to 5-1 ohn
the season.


- .


WUH&C-1I


~iPimp


m


mm~[C


p


$1-99g


~a~po~-~







Page 4 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 6, 2008


Church


Obituaries
Jimmy Browning
Jimmy Browning, 66, of Craw-
fordville, died Sunday, March 2
in Crawfordville.
The funeral service was held
Wednesday, March 5, at Heritage
Assembly of God, Tallahassee,
with burial at Woodville Cem-
etery.
He was born in Woodville
alnd was a lifelong resident of
the area. The family requests
that in lieu of flowers memorial
contributions may be made to
the Building Fund of Christian
Worship Center. He was the
plant manager with Metcalf Crab
Company.
Survivors include his wife,
Kathy Strickland Browning; two
sons John Thomas Browning of
Perry and James M. Browning
of Crawfordville; two daughters,
Kathy R. Morgan and Tonia
Browning both of Perry; five
grandchildren; his mother, An-
hie Maude Browning of Wood-
ville; and three brothers Glen
Browning, Wayne Browning,
and Michael Browning, all of
Woodville.
Culley's MeadowWood Fu-
neral Home in Tallahassee was
in charge of the arrangements.
Gracie M. Funderburk
Gracie Metcalf Funderburk, 87,
of Panacea, died Sunday, March
2 in Tallahassee.
The funeral service will be
at 2 p.m. Thursday, March 6, at
Panacea Cemetery. Family will
receive friends and relatives at
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville, Wednesday,
March 5, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
, A lifelong resident of Pana-
cea, she was a homemaker who
loved the outdoors, especially
gardening and her flowers. She
attended Panacea Full Gospel
Church.
Survivors include eight daugh-
ters, Sarah Clifton of Panacea,
'Audrey Evans of Sopchoppy,
Clara Allen of Panacea, Ellie Har-
yell of Englewood, Pat Harvey
,of Tallahassee, Pamela Holley
aof Panacea, Penny Barton of
iCrawfordville and Ashley Keith
'of Jacksonville; three sons: Gene
Tunderburk of Waycross, Ga., Phil-
lip Funderburk of Crawfordville,
and Paul Funderburk of Panacea;
one brother, Frank Metcalf of
Shell Point; 31 grandchildren,
many great-grandchildren; and



St. Elizabeth "
Ann Seton ..
Catholic Ch irh
Mass 9 a.m. Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Father James MacGee, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
L 926-1797


OckMockonee
M' t t
Say
United
Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship 9 a.m.
Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
Pastor f~Iett templeton
(850) 984-0127

Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
ASBaIuliOT Crawfordville
\ Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey
"Cotmne & Worship fnth Us"
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School.................... 10 a.m.
Sunday W orship...................... 11 a.m.
Evening Worship..... ............6 p.m.
W wednesday Service..................7 p.m.
& Youth Service....................7 p.m.
Royal Rangers....................... 7 p.m.
M issionettes ..............................7 p.m .


two great-great-grandchildren.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville is in charge of
the arrangements.

Rona L. Hawkins, Sr.
Rona Lavon Hawkins, Sr., 45,
of Quincy, died Thursday, Feb. 21,
in the Sopchoppy area.
The service was held Saturday,
March 1, at Deliverance Temple
First Born Church in Chatta-
hoochee, with burial at Mt. Olive
PB Church Cemetery, Sopchoppy.
The family received friends and
relatives on Friday, Feb. 29, at
Bradwell Mortuary, 18300 Blue
Star Hwy., Quincy, Fla.
Born June 4, 1962 in Talla-
hassee to Weldon W. Hawkins
and Willie Mae Mills, he was a
Florida Ranger (retired) and was
schooled in the Wakulla County
public school system.
Survivors include his wife,
Tammy Ann Hawkins of Quincy;
a son, Rona L. Hawkins, Jr. of
Sopchoppy; two daughters, Eliza-
beth Clary (and husband Gary)
of Sopchoppy, and Sharonda Mc-
Neil of Quincy; a brother, Carlton
Hawkins of Crawfordville; five
sisters, Beverly H. Jefferson (and
husband Donald) of Crawford-
ville, Selena Gaines of Tallahas-
see, Shirlyne Everett (and hus-
band Cyrus) of Tallahassee, Alisa
Johnson of Crawfordville, Angela
Barfield (and husband Pierre) of
Crawfordville; a ganddaugher,
Arianna; and grandsons, Gary
and Jordan Jamal Hatten (and
wife Bonnie). He was preceded
in death by his mother, Willie
Mae Mills.
Bradwell Mortuary in Quincy
is in charge of the arrange-
ments.

Kayron G. Moorhead
Kayron Guy Moorhead, 86,
who resided at Penney Retire-
ment Community (PRC), Green
Cove Springs, since 1999, died
March 2.
A memorial service was held
Sunday, March 9 at Penney Me-
morial Church, Penney Farms,
FL, with the Rev. Donald Sco-
field officiating. Interment will
take place at Panacea Com-
munity Cemetery on March 10
with Rev Ed McNeely presiding.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
donations may be made to the
Penney Retirement Community
Butterfly/Flower Garden Fund


Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worship ................... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .............5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m.
v.s..or ar wecoe


(PO Box 555, Penney Farms. FL
32079-0555; the Leukemia/Lym-
phoma Society of North Florida
Chapter,or the Community Hos-
pice of NE Florida.
She was the youngest of 11
children born to Walton Bruton
and Roberta Jurney Guy, born
October 2, 1921, in Hooks, TX.
Kay graduated from Presbyterian
College, Charlotte, NC, with a
nursing degree and served as
an Army Nurse from 1944-1947,
and attained the rank of First
Lieutenant. She married Edgar
H. Moorhead, an Air Force Of-
ficer, in 1947, and lived in many
locations around the world
during his 23 year career in the
Air Force. In addition to raising
three children, she also worked
in several capacities as a nurse
and health educator. She en-
joyed the family's assignments
overseas and in the US, and
continued to travel with her hus-
band and family after retirement.
Her greatest joy was being with
her family. Her hobbies included
reading, gardening, cooking,
crossword puzzles, the Red Hat
Club, Women Veterans' activities,
and travel. The Butterfly Garden
at PRC was her passion. She was
a lifelong Christian, and joined
the Presbyterian Church when
she married.
Survivors include her two
daughters, Janet and Edward C.
Olson and Nancy and Dennis D.
Dewey; a sister, Eloise Wood of
Paris, Ohio; six grandchildren;
three great-grand-children; and
many nieces and nephews, who
all gave her much happiness.
Helm Funeral Home in Green
Cove Springs was in charge of
the arrangements.

Margaret M. Suber
Margaret McPherson Suber,
85, of Tallahassee died Friday,
Feb. 29 after a courageous battle
with cancer.
A memorial service was held
at Culley's MeadowWood Fu-
neral Home in Tallahassee on
Monday, March 3. In lieu of flow-
ers, the family requests that con-
tributions be made to Big Bend
Hospice. Margaret was born in
Englewood on Dec. 29, 1922. She
moved to Gadsden County as a
child and lived there until 1991


Sopchoppy
S United

S Methodist
Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship I I a.m.
Pastor Brett Templeton
850-962-2511


Vsistors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details, p Ochlockonee
962-2213 Bi But
Spinin \Vr,.,ught Christian Center

PanaceaParA Word ofFaith Church
(fPaacaPar F7


Baptist Church
24 Mission Road, Panacea
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Worship 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 p.m.
Pastor, Jerry Spears


t GRACE
BAPTIST CHURCH
"Where everybody is somebody in His body."
Sunday School............ 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ............10:45 a.m.
Life Support Groups .............6 p.m.
Wednesday Evening ......... 6:30 p.m.
.':t:r Ga TuL 'l I
926-3217 1


Schedule of Services
* Sunday 11 a.m.
* Wednesday 7 p.m. I IM
* Thursday Ladies .
Bible Study 10 a.m.
2263 Curtis Mill Rd.
Sopchoppy, FL 962-3774
Pastor John S. Dunning
(From Rhema Bible Training Center)


when she moved to Westminster
Oaks. She was an LPN as well
as a dedicated wife and mother.
She was a member of Woodland
Presbyterian Church in the Saw-
dust community.
Survivors include her son,
Bill and Terry Suber of Sanford;
her daughters, Janet and Denny
George of South Barrington, Ill.,
Martha and Rick Lewis, and Sue
Laing, all of Crawfordville; grand-
children, Meg McClellan, Dan
Blount, Mac McClellan, Brian
and Hagan Suber, Jamey and
Beth George, Sam and Bobbie
Blount, Kimm George and Becky
George; great-grandchildren,
Gabe Blount, Haley Blount, Ellie
George, Anna George and Becton
Suber; and her sister, Jeanette
Barnwell of Arcadia.
Culley's MeadowWood Fu-
neral Home in Tallahassee was
in charge of the arrangements.

Betty L. Walker
Betty L. Walker, 72, of Madi-
son died Friday, Feb. 29 in
Madison. The funeral services
were held Sunday, March 2 at
Beggs Funeral Home, Madison
Chapel. Burial was in Oak Ridge
Cemetery, Madison.
A native of Madison County,
Florida, the daughter of the late
Belton and Mary Lou Buchanan,
she was a homemaker and a
United States Postal worker for
14 years. She was a member of
the United Methodist Church.
She loved to spend time play-
ing games on her computer. She
was a devoted wife, mother and
grandmother.
Survivors include her husband
of 55 years, Norman Walker, Jr. of


Wakulla
United Methodist Church
Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship- 11 a.m.
Wednesday Service 7 p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor Drew Standridge

Pioneer Baptist
Church (SBC)
Sunday School 9:15 an.m
Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.
Wed. adult, children & youth 7 p.m.
486 Beechwood Drive : Crawfordville, FL.
(North of the Lower Bridge Road and
Spring Creek Highway intersection)
Rev. Dennis Hall, Pastor
850-926-6161


Wa~kud1
Pre byte-ria
3383 Coastal Hwy.
1/3rd mile east of Wakulla High School
9:30 a.m. Bible Study
10:30 a.m. Worship Service
10:45 a.m. Children's Sunday School
Nursery Provided
926-4569
www.wakullapres.org
It1t 4


S U a K'


,70m Heaw t ad Wead da in G4d.


Crawfordville United

Methodist Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 926-7209
Ochlockonee & Arran Road 'Come Grow With Us" www.crawfordville-umc.org


tt L BAPTIST CHURCI-
117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy


Church Office
962-7822


Sunday School 9:45 AM
Morning Worship 11 AM
AWANA CLUB 5PM
Evening Worship 6 PM


Wednesday 7 PM Prayer Meeting, l,
Youth & Children's Programs
Dr. Bill Jenkins, Pastor
Randy Anderson, Minister of Music
Vicki Anderson, Youth Director
Jerry Evans, Mike Crouch, Bernie Kemp Musicians


Madison; five children, Barbara
Strickland and husband Kenny
of Crawfordville, Allan Walker
and wife lann of Hahira, Ga.,
Cheryl Ballenger and husband
David of Madison, Vicky Vickery
and husband Kenny of Pinetta
and James Walker of Pinetta;
two brothers, Glen Buchanan of
Pinetta, Gene Buchanan and wife
Ann of Gainesville; a sister, Becky
Haskell and husband Bobby
of Madison; six grandchildren;
three great-grandchildren; and a
host of nieces and nephews.
Beggs Funeral Home in Madi-
son County was in charge of the
arrangements.


Church

News

Arts and crafts

festival a success
The Second Annual Arts and
Craft festival, sponsored by The
Wakulla Presbyterian Church
was held at Hudson Park on
Saturday, March 1. The Wakulla
Presbyterian Church Out-Reach
Committee thanked Wal-Mart,
Ace Hardware, Hardee's of Craw'-
fordville and El Jalisco #3 for do'
nating items that were auctioned
at the festival.


WMS softball wins


The Wakulla Middle School
Wildcat softball team defeated
Riversprings Middle School on
Feb. 11, 7-2. The Lady Wildcats
came out with a strong first
inning and never trailed in the
game.
The winning pitcher and
catcher combination for the
game was Michael Cooper, 2-0
on the mound, and Chelsea
Sanders.
Courtney Flowers, Kristen
Taylor and Sanders were all 2-3
at the plate. Cooper and Danielle

Meeting is set

The Wakulla High School
Gridiron Club will host a meet-
ing on Tuesday, March 11 at
6:30 p.m. at the Wakulla High
School Weight Room. Everyone
is invited to attend.

Trinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
TrinityLutheranofWakulla.com
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Les Kimball
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557


Office Of

D. Sanders

Attorney At Law
Wills, Trusts, Estates,
Family Law-Divorce,
Custody, Contracts, Deeds,
Incorporation, Development
Permits, Environmental
Law, General Litigation
Owner:
Doris "Dallas" Sanders
2181 Crawfordville Hwy.
Crawfordville, Florida
Phone: (850) 926-3942
Fax: (850) 926-9044
24 Minute First
Consultation $32


Gray were both 1-3.
"WMS played, excellent de-
fense when needed and held
the Lady Bears to five scoreless
innings," said Coach Jeri Jump.
The coaches and players were
pleased with the victory.
"Riversprings is the best tearn
we play every year," said Jump.
"It is always very good to get a
win when you play them."

Time to play

The Aquafina Major League
Baseball Skills Compettiion will
be held Saturday, March 8 from 10
a.m. until noon at Field 3 at the
recreation park in Medart.'
Players, ages 7 to 14, will be
tested on their pitching, batting
and running skills. The event is
free. For more information, call the
recreation park at 926-7227.

Saint Teresa
Episcopal
U Church
1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98
Sunday School'
Holy Eucharist 8:30 am
Youth & Adults 9:30 AM
Children 10:30 AM
Worship 10:30 AM
Reverend John Spicer
926-4288


Rona L. Hawkins, Sr.
June 4. 1962 -
Feb. 21. 2008
I would like to acknowledge all
ol the man\ acts ol kindness
[shown to us during the passing
'? oll our loved one.


U u - .1

~'?ovr ie,Al'elce.


FiRST
Bp.BAPTiT C(.huRCth



3086 Crawfordville Hwy.
(South of the Courthouse)
Church Office: 926-7896
www.fbccrawfordville.org
or
(youth) www.crosstraining.org


SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 a.in.
Sunday School 9:45 a.in.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Fellowship Meal 6:00 p.m.
(call for reservations)
Prayer/ Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
IMPACT (Youth) 7:00 p.m.
Children's Events 6:30 p.m.


Providence Christian Academy
A ministry of Providence Bible Church,
located two miles northeast of Crawfordville,
has openings for students in grades K-12.
Scholarships available for ESE and
low-income families.
Call 926-2456, 926-1326 or 274-1583.


Notice of Nondiscriminatory Policy as to Students
Providence Christian Academy admits students of any race, color,
national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and
activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school.
It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic
origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies,
scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other
school-administered programs.


0 Hwy 319 Medart,
Office 926-5265
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
O[ [ Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
E IMorning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
1u c bEvening Worship 6:00 p.m;
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org


I' I


I~- ---







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 6, 2008 Page 5


People


For many children, the fam-
ily pet is their best friend, a
companion who provides uncon-
ditional love, but also teaches
them about friendship, respon-
sibility and loyalty. While most
family pets are a cat or a dog,
other small animals can also
make a wonderful addition to
a family. No matter what the
choice, it is not good enough to
get a pet, "for the kids." A pet
is not a temporary playmate for
children, but a lifelong family
member, who depends upon the
entire family,
Many of the little children
who come to the shelter with
their parents have no fear of
animals and just assume a dog
is going to love to be hugged. It
is not in their paradigm to con-
sider that the dog may become
frightened and act out.
, In adopting an animal, you
want your child to be safe around
his pet. While many experts rec-
ommend a child be at least six
years old before a dog/cat is
brought into the house, a par-


SCHAT
of
Wakulla


KSusan Yelton

ent is probably the best judge of
their child's maturity to be ready
for a pet.
Puppies are always thought
of as a wonderful pet for a child
because "they can grow up to-
gether." That is not always the
case. Because puppies and kit-
tens are fragile and require a lot
of attention, they may not be the
best choice in a household with
young children. Puppies also like
to play, which could mean that a
friendly nip turns out to be a big
bite on a small child. Depending
upon your family situation, a
mature dog may be the best pet
for your child.
When you get your pet at
home, it is only natural that ev-


eryone will want to play with it.
New pets are like a new toy. To
protect both your child and your
pet, it is important to help your
child see the world through the
pet's eyes. Even the most docile
animals have limits. You can
help your child understand that:
Pets need space and may not
always want human attention.
Pets can become upset with too
much stimulation and will give
a warning sign. And, teasing an
animal can make it angry.
When-bringing your pet
home, they will need some time
to adjust to their new surround-
ings and feel safe. Animals at the
shelter always need some time
to adjust to their new home.
Unless they have been living
in one of our foster homes, we
estimate it takes shelter dogs
about two weeks to adjust from
their current situation to a life
with a family.
Sometimes we forget that
pets have to adjust to new rules,
new smells, new food and at-
tention from humans. Allowing


Third graders receive dictionaries from Rotary


The Rotary Club of Wakulla
County decided to make literacy a
focus for the 2007-08 year, and re-
cently headed up a project which
put a dictionary into the hands of
each third grader in the Wakulla
County school system.
Representatives from the Ro-
tary Club visited third grade class-
rooms in each elementary school,
.Crawfordville, Shadeville, Medart,
and C.O.A.S.T. Charter School and
presented each student with their
very own dictionary.
The dictionary project was
:conceived by Rotarian Garth
.Smelser. The dub enthusiastically
:embraced the idea, and diction-
,aries were ordered, along with
bookmarkss explaining the Rotary
:Four-Way Test.
The inside cover of the dic-
tionanies was stamped with the
'Rotary, seal and a place for the
'students to write their names.
Smelser lead presentations in
"each third grade classroom, aided
-by several other Rotarians includ-


ing, President JoAnne Strickland,
Doug Jones, Amy Geiger, Marj
Law and Mary Katherine West-
mark. Smelser's wife, Julie Fitz-
patrick, also helped out with the
presentations.
Smelser and Fitzpatrick used
several different games and ac-
tivities to introduce the children
to the different parts of their
dictionaries.
The students were asked to
locate words at random in the
dictionaries, and were then asked
to share their word with the
rest of the class, along with its
definition.
Students enjoyed browsing
through the planet, sign-language,
and state information sections,
and had an especially good time
trying to pronounce the longest
word in the English language.
The club received thank you
notes from all the schools, in-
cluding one from a Crawfordville
student who said, "Thanks for the
awesome dictionary. I will use the


dictionary for math and spelling.
I like to learn about the planets.
I wonder how long it takes a
meteor to hit the ground. The
dictionary game is fun to play."
Another student had this to
say: "Thank you so much for the
dictionary. It helps me a lot and
my brother likes it too, so thank
you!"
"Each class had the opportu-
nity to spend time discovering
what dictionaries are all about
and the world of language that
dictionaries offer," said Smelser.
"With each word they looked up,
the students grew more and more
excited about learning new defini-
tions. It was an honor to represent
the Rotary Club and a pleasure to
see the kids so thrilled with their
new dictionaries."
Rotary President JoAnne Strick-
land was equally pleased with
how well the dictionaries were
received by the students.
"I was so glad I had the op-
portunity to be a part of the pre-


sentation team," said Strickland.
"I could not have imagined the
excitement expressed by the
teachers and the students. The
students were very enthusiastic
in learning about their new dic-
tionaries. Garth Smelser did an
excellent job in presenting the
dictionaries to the students and
showing how useful a dictionary
can be in all their classes. We are
very proud to be able to promote
this project and hope to continue
it in the years to come."


Wakulla property recognized as

Century Pioneer Family Farm


children to help plan where it's
new "friend" is going to sleep,
what it needs to eat, and how
to take care of it, is all part of
your child learning how to be a
responsible caretaker. Those first
few weeks with the child and pet
have the potential to be wonder-
ful teachable moments.
If you have spent the time
thinking through why you want
a pet, and find the right match
for your family, it is an exciting
day. In some cases, that can take
a long time. We maintain a "wish
list" at the shelter, so if you have
done the hard work, and have
decided what is best for your
family, please give us a call at
926-0890. If we don't have want
you want, we would love to put
you on our "wish list."
And as always, remember to
spay/neuter your child's new
"friend." That too, can be a teach-
able moment for your child. The
operation not only reduces pet
overpopulation, but can also
make your pet healthier, calmer
and more affectionate.


Florida Agriculture and Con-
sumer Services Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson announced
that a Wakulla County property
qualified for recognition as a
Century Pioneer Family Farm.
Recognition in this program
means the families have main-
tained continuous ownership
of the property for at least 100
years.
The family who qualified are
the heirs of the William and Cor-
nelia Harden family in Wakulla
County.
"The family has been able to
retain ownership of their land
through the Great Depression,
diseases, droughts, freezes and
the urbanization of Florida,"
Bronson said. "That is a great
tribute to the many generations
of these families.
The 100-acre Harden property
is mostly surrounded by Na-
tional Forest land and is used for
vegetable gardening and timber
production.
Since the program began 25
years ago, 139 family farms have
received the Century Pioneer
Farm designation. The program
is administered by the Florida
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services with assis-
tance of the Florida Agricultural
Museum.


Since joining the TCC family in the Fall
of 2003, Thompkins has served on the
Academic Affairs committee, Quality
Enhancement Plan committee, several
departmental committees, has helped
develop leaching strategies for his
peers and is currently the Chairperson
of the English Program. In all of these
positions, Thompkins has positively
impacted the quality of instructions
students receive at TCC
"I really love the Interjaction with students,
Snot just (leaching) the subject matter but
advising as well. I try to give back as much
as I have received." said Ihompkins.
Recently, Thomrpkiri tas beI n w.irlrkin
with a group of faculty to improve
students' transition from college
preparatory courses to standard
credit courses
Thompkins has made it a personal
goal to ensure that when a student
leaves his first-year writing college
class, that student is fully prepared lor
the next English class heishre takes
"I'm excited about the collaboration
between Academic Support and the[
English Program. Sucri efforts to define
common goals can only increase student
success," he said.
Thompkins received a B A and M S
from Florida A&M University and
completed his Ph.D al Florida State
University in 2007. E


Priority advisir.g and registration tor current students for lhe
2i'00 Summer and Fall semesters will take place March 3 -
April 1 Register early for the best course selection by:
* Going I,: TCC Passport, My Schedule tab and
*Cnhecl-ing your advising and registration status, then
*Scheduling an a.ppointlient to see your adviser, or
rei,.:; 'er lfor clacsse
Don't forget to check your TCC e-mail for additional
advising and registration information! Questions? Call
the Student Success Center at (850) 201-8440.


Women's History Month
T(. cordiallyy invites you to the 200.:- Women's History Month
Ctlebratiri.n, "Wioimee s Anr, Wmrnen's Vision." The event will
is Monday, March 1, beginning at noor.n in the Center for
LE on.nic 1 & Worktorc.e Development, Room 105 Our keynote
speaker i, Florida Supreme Court Justice Peggy OuLnce.


Alumni Reception
Selling all TIC ( graduates' Come out to thle TCC On the Pla-a
Aluirnlli Recepltion Wednesday. March 26, thom 5 6 30 p.m
it The i,'lar,' rogan Mui.eum ol Art .? Science. ?.50 Southr
iijval :.treetl
To RSVP and get directions, visit http://alumni.tcc.
fl.edu and click on "TCC On the Plaza" in the calendar,
call (850) 201-6065, or e-mail alumni@tcc.fl.edu.


Art Exhibit
The Fuie Art C:Iierv present it 10 9 A Phoilograpiic:
E. biitiit rn leaiturin nine phi:otographers. each with ten
in ,'.1-; on jirplay The pphotos are a di verse collection oIt
ge,-,er etinricirv and prihoto enic tile: ,sh,:w.a..ing a rnivnr i1
(t li)lp Ical:Irin': 1I l(: -Ieinpora.rv photography "10 A A
Pli tocir iphir: .l ititin will be at TiC throughri Marcin r
,iiil:,.-'in, I. :. -Spring Bre.a'. Marcn 10-14. the e hiit will
ri-pipen and r ibe on lr;i.pilav Iinroulgn March C0 The Fine Art
ii -, ller', 1: I open rom ni niir to i4 p.mn Monday through Friday
,' ,fl,' Ig'Ii n I: tree
The Fine Art Gallery is located in the Fine & Performing
Arts Center at Tallahassee Community College.


All classes held at the TCC Wakulla Center


Ecotourism Classes
Mammals and Reptiles in
Wakulla County
' i..jlurd i y .1.r :'- ,
.8 n ri:o'i, i 2'.

Ecosystems Workshop
Tuei-da, r.tr, rh 1
6 9 p rr I.2._'

St. Marks Refuge Field Trip II-
Panacea and Wakulla Units
'.-.iurd,, r.1:rch 1'7.
aI r 1 r, i.-l'

Ecotourism Promotion-
Using PowerPoint
r.1 cl,ii, jrnlir 17
i- ri ':1 "_"'I


Tech @ Night Courses
QuickBooks 2008: Getting Started,
Setting up QuickBooks and
Working with Lists
TIul .idaij ,1r: 11 20
i;, ': p il 't., 0

QuickBooks 2008: Working with
Bank Accounts, Using other Accounts
Entering Sales
Thrur:d.:rv' 1.3r,:l,


QuickBooks 2008: Receiving Payments,
Making Deposits, Entering and Paying Bills
ThuI .d ;, -'.[, il 3'


For more information, call
(850) 201-8760.


APPLEYAI D DRIi .11n TA iLLAHASSEE, FLORIDA111 320 (5) 0 lI, -'l Y 1,oWW .C.F'


PUBLIC NOTICE

The Wakulla County Housing
Department will accept applications for
the Section 8 Voucher program
beginning March 17, 2008
Sand ending
March 31, 2008.

W akulla We will take applications
county from 9:00 to 12:00
Housing each day.


For more information about
the program or to apply for.
membership into the program,
contact Richard Gunnels at gun--
nelr@doacs.state.fl.us or (85Q)
488-3022, or visit http://www.
florida-agriculture.com/market-
ing/century_pioneers.htm.


Sopchoppy

reunion to

be held

The next Sopchoppy High
School Reunion will be held
Saturday, April 12, at the his;
toric school beginning at 1 p.m,
You don't have to be a graduate
of SHS to attend. In addition
to graduates, anyone who has
ever taught or worked there is
welcome.
Many efforts have been
made to update alumni name
and addresses. If anyone knows
of someone who did not re-
ceive reservation information,
please contact Callie Quigg,
60 Mathers Farm Road, Craw-
fordville, FL 32327, or call 926-
7373.


.AL AL







Page 6 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 6, 2008


Household

Hazardous

Waste Day is

Sat., March 8
Household Hazardous Waste
JHHW) Day is coming up, so
grab your old tires and come
to 340 Trice Lane this Saturday,
March 81
I'll bet you're asking, "Did we
hear her right? Did she say tires?
Tires???
It's truel
; We are going to take old
tiresl
Richard Russell, manager of
Wal-Mart, has found a way to
absorb the cost of the tires this
'Household Hazardous Waste
:Day. He'll send them to a com-
pany to be shredded into mulch
for gardens, into ground cover for
;playgrounds, and more.


So, residents of Wakulla Coun-
ty won't have to pay to dispose
of their tires. (Businesses are not
included in the free tire disposal
program.)
The tire event is a new and ex-
citing addition to the usual items
we get rid of on HHW days. It all
came about when, one day, Rich-
ard and I were chatting. He asked
me what Wal-Mart could do
that would be good for Wakulla
County. We discussed the prob-
lem of tires, and how residents
often expressed the hope that we
would take tires on HHW days.
Unfortunately, the associated
cost has made it too expensive
for our county budget.


The Dixie Theatre presents


SDixie Does
!" On Friday and Saturday, March
:"7 and March 8, the Dixie Theatre in
.Apalachicola will present The Dixie
'Does Nashville V. This year's fund-
raiser for the Dixie Theatre boasts a
-host of talented songwriters.
;.' Performing Friday will be
:' harlie Black who has been named
Songwriter of the Year three times
;.and has written songs for Anne
:Murray, Alan Jackson, Reba McEn-
:!ire, Roy Orbison, Charlie Rich and
:many others.
:,l He will be joined by Dana Hunt
Black, who had her first number
'one song with George Strait's
"Check Yes or No." She has written
songs for Suzy Boggus, Clay Walk-
er, Tracy Byrd and Alan Jackson, as
,well. She and Charlie reamed up
-.to write the title song for George
Strait's recent platinum album
,"Somewhere Down In Texas."
SAlso performing Friday will
be Steve Bogard. Steve had a Top
<20 R&B hit on James Carr's "Free-
"dom Train" and two cuts for Rita
%Coolidge. He has written songs
for Marty Robbins, Conway Twitty,


Thomas Ralph Clore

.Happy First

Birthday
* Molly Tucker Clore and Eric
:Clore announce the first birthday
:of their son, Thomas Ralph Clore.
,"He was born Feb. 27, 2007.
; Maternal grandparent are
'Agnes and Gene Darby and the
late Ralph Tucker, Jr., of Craw-
-fordville. Paternal grandparents
;are Jackie and Tom Clore of St.
,Marks.


Nashville V


Waylon Jennings, Tanya Tucker,
Diamond Rio, and Alabama, to
name a few. Steve has written
eight number one country songs
including George Strait's "Carried
Away" and "Carrying Your Love
With Me," Rascal Flatts' "Prayin' for
Daylight," Jack Ingram's "Wherever
You Are," and Dierks Bently's "Ev-
ery Mile A Memory".
On Saturday, the amazing line-
up continues with David Lee. His
hits include T erri Clark's "This Old
Heart," Lee Ann Womack's "Now
You See Me, Now You Don't," and
"Before I Knew Better" performed
by Brad Martin. David's first Num-
ber One song was "19 Somethin"'
recorded by Mark Wills. David
has written for Trace Adkins, Tim
McGraw, Faith Hill, Montgomery
Gentry, and many more.
Also performing will be Ed
Hill, who has dozens of BMI per-
formance awards. He was Song-
writer of the Year in 2006 and was
nominated for Piano Player of the
Year by the Academy of Country
Music.
Hill has had hit songs on the
charts for three decades, having
written for Martina McBride, Tim
McGraw, Faith Hill, George Strait,
Reba McEntire, LeAnn Rimes, Ras-
cal Flatts, Trisha Yearwood, Kenny
Chesney, Trace Adkins, Sara Evans,
Lee Ann Womack, Gary Allen,
Montgomery Gentry, John Michael
Montgomery, Tracy Lawrence, Clay
Walker, Aaron Tippin, and more.
Travis Meadows has appeared
with such blues performers as Sam
Myers and Fingers Taylor. He has
received numerous accolades for


Birth
Bailey Alyse Spears
Lucas and Kaci Spears of
Noble, Oklahoma, announce the
birth of their daughter, Bailey
Alyse, who was born Thursday,
Feb. 21, at Moore Medical Center.
She weighed eight pounds and
is 21 inches in length.
Maternal grandparents are
Fred and Jenee Armstrong of
Blair, Oklahoma. Paternal grand-
parents are John Dayton and
Charlene Spears of Crawford-
ville.
Bailey joins a sister, Reece
Taylor Spears, aged 3 years.


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(850) 926-6079 (850) 893-8811
7 High Drive, Courthouse Square
In the office of Lynn Alan Thompson


his songwriting, including a 2001
ASCAP award and eight Top 20 hit
singles in the Christian market.
Well-known in songwriter's circles
in Nashville,
Meadows is an unforgettable
performer whose well-crafted
songs and raw vocal ability are
unparalleled. Luke Laird, a singer/
songwriter, currently writes for
Universal Music Publishing Group,
and his songs have been recorded
by Lee Ann Womack, Carrie Under-
wood, Tim McGraw, Rascal Flatts,
Jedd Hughes, and Emily West to
name a few.
Nashville's best songwriters
bring their music to this intimate
and acoustically superior Theatre.
Don't miss these magical shows.
Performances are at 8 p.m. both
days. For ticket information, call
the Dixie Theatre Box Office at
(850) 653-3200.


Richard didn't say much, but
he called two days later, hav-
ing worked out the dilemma.
It seems there aren't as many
companies that shred and re-use
old tires as there are old tires
However, Richard did locate one
of these, and came to terms with
them for our tires. It's good for
residents and good for Wakulla
County, tool Waste tires are a real
problem. Besides being unsight-
ly, those situated outdoors collect
water and breed mosquitoes.
On Saturday, as other HHW
days, we'll take paint, solvents,
fluorescent bulbs, oven cleaners,
pesticides, weed and feed prod-
ucts, batteries, old oil, computer
parts, televisions, and pool chem-
icals. The hours are 8:30 a.m. until
1:30 p.m. Business owners need
to register in advance by call-
ing Nannette at 926-3153. 12:30
p.m. until 1:30 p.m. is the time
for business owners to arrive.
This saves causing a potential
bottleneck.
Our county commissioners,


w w w .am erisbank.com *Only at participating VISA" merchants. Minimum balance to open is $100.00.


people from Jefferson County
Solid Waste, ESG, Keep Wakulla
County Beautiful, and now Wal-
Mart are working together to
bring HHW day to us. Chemist
Rosemary Bottcher will be on-
site supervising the placement
of hazardous items.
Do you have liquid in a bottle
that looks evil but you can't
remember what you put in it?
Carry it to HHW day. Rosemary
will be able to determine what
.you placed in that bottle. Do
you have a bomb or incendiary
device? Don't bring it! And don't
touch itl Call the Sheriff's Office
at 926-0800. Someone will come
to your house and take it away
for you.
Household Hazardous Waste
Day is a great time to clean up
those shelves in the garage. So,
collect those strange bottles and
smelly bags and come to the
HHW event. We'll put signs by
the entrance so you won't have
any difficulty finding us.

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March 10 at 1 p.m. at the
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located at 311 James Avenue.
The public is invited to attend.
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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 6, 2008 Page


People


_Covenant will host event


Covenant Hospice will be tak-
ing part in the inaugural National
Healthcare Decision Day (NHDD)
set for Wednesday, April 16. Cov-
enant is organizing an Advance
Care Planning seminar from 6:30
p.m. to 8 p.m. on NHDD at the
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital
Auditorium located at 1300 Mic-
cosukee Road.
NHDD is an opportunity for
healthcare providers, professionals,
chaplains, attorneys and others to
highlight the importance of ad-
vance healthcare decision-making.
A committee of local profes-
sionals and Covenant Hospice
employees is planning activities
that will provide free information
and tools for the public to complete
written advance directives, known


as a living will.
Although several states have ad-
vance directive awiaeness events,
only a small minority of Ameri-
cans have their wishes in writing.
NHDD addresses the importance
of advance healthcare planning.
For more information, please visit
www.nationalhealthcaredecision-
day.org or www.covenanthospice.
org.
Celebrating 25 years of keeping
the promise, Covenant Hospice
is a not-for-profit organization
dedicated to providing compre-
hensive, compassionate services
to patients and loved ones during
times of life-limiting illnesses. The
focus of Covenant Hospice is to
enable its patients to live, as fully
and comfortably as possible, to


Crop disaster assistance


Ernest and Marilyn Coles

0Coles celebrate

" Ernest "Einie" and Marilyn friends.
C:oles will celebrate their 50th The "camping b
wedding g anniversary on Satur- over to their thrE
i'ay. March 22. They met in June and six grandchild
-i956 when Ernie was in the in the southeastern
_oyali Air Force and stationed Michigan. The exte
.close 'to Marilyn's hometown also have motor hc
*,'of Ramsey in England's south- They have serve
,eastern region, members in mai
They emigrated to the Unit- camping groups
e-d States in July 1965 for Ernie making friends wh
,to work in the automobile in- but they also enj
!'dustry in Detroit. They moved and talking to peo
1!to the suburbs in 1968 and fordville.
'nemaf'ed there for 32 years. Their second 1
SEmre retired from Jack Roush trip will begin Mz
i acifig Laboratories in Livonia, take them back to
9I4ich.'in January 1997. They visit family and fi
sold their home and moved to will move on to R
Alligator Point. a cruise ship and
In 1998, they moved to Mag- Turkey, Cyprus and
nolia Ridge in Crawfordville. they will ride cam
'They have traveled to nearly the desert to see
every state in the union using pyramids.
their motor home to meet new

Chamber of Comme


I raises funds
The Wakulla County Cham-
'ber of Commerce and the Court-
,house Restoration Committee
are pleased about the prospect
! of offering a piece of history.
The purchase of a brick from
'the construction of the origi-
.nal wooden courthouse, first
:erected in 1893-1894, allows
,residents to hold history in
their hand.
These bricks, uncovered dur-
ing the renovation and recent
move to relocate the courthouse
,!to its present space, were the
Foundation of the courthouse.
There are only a limited num-
;ber of these handmade bricks
.available, but the stories they
:hold are numerous.
When turpentine was king,
these bricks were there. When
The Wakulla News was formed,
:these bricks were there. When
:the community once known as
Lost Creek changed its name to
-Arran, these bricks were there.
: Each brick will come with a
,'Certificate of Authenticity and
:include a brass face plate.
These fragile bricks, hand
:made so many years ago, are
,being gently cleaned by hand
:today to try and preserve as
:many as possible.
: A personalized engraved
paverr, to be placed around the
newly renovated courthouse
'landscape, is also available for


50


)ug" spilled
ee children
ren who live
n region of
ended family
homes.
ed as board
ny of their
and enjoy
ile traveling,
oy meeting
ple in Craw-
honeymoon
arch 17 and
England to
:iends. They
ome aboard
visit Greece,
Egypt where
nels through
the ancient


3rce


purchase.
They are limited to three
lines of text, 17 spaces total
per line. All funds raised will
go toward the continuing ef-
forts to restore this significant
structure.
Call the chamber of com-
merce at 926-1848 for more
information about the charges
which range from $75 to $150.

926-3425 926-3655



^^^^ 11. I^ I


The U.S. Department of Agri-
culture announced that eligible
farmers and ranchers who suf-
fered livestock, livestock feed
and crop losses that occurred
before Dec. 31, 2007, can apply
to receive disaster payments
immediately.
On Dec. 26, 2007, President
Bush signed the Consolidated
Appropriations Act, 2008 (2008
Act). The 2008 Act amends cer-
tain sections of the U.S. Troop
Readiness, Veterans' Care, Ka-
trina Recovery, and Iraq Ac-
countability Appropriations Act,
2007, which allows agricultural
producers who suffered losses
for crops planted before Feb.
28, 2007, or eligible livestock or
livestock feed losses between
Jan. 1, 2005, and Feb. 28, 2007, to
apply for disaster payments un-
der the Crop Disaster Program
(CDP), Livestock Compensation
Program (LCP) and Livestock
Indemnity Program (LIP). The
2008 Act extends CDP, LCP and
LIP payments to eligible farm-
ers and ranchers who suffered
2007 crop, livestock and live-
stock feed losses throughout
the 2007 crop year before Dec.
31,2007.
The Farm Service Agency
(FSA) is now accepting applica-


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tions and making payments
for quantity losses before Dec.
31, 2007, under CDP. FSA is
currently issuing LCP and LIP
payments for losses up to Feb.
28, 2007, and will soon issue
payments for losses incurred
during the remainder of 2007.
FSA will conduct sign-up and
begin making payments for
quality losses under CDP this
spring. More information about
CDP, LCP and LIP is available
online -at; http://disaster.fsa.
usda.gov/.


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NOTORIOUS HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTES














PAINT OIL SOLVENT

And gang members Fuel, Batteries, Antifreeze, Automotive Fluids,
Pesticides, Pool Chemicals, Cleaners, Fluorescent Lamps, Acids,
Drain Cleaner, Spray Cans, Computer Parts (and other punk pollutants)
t Can We Bring Tires?
Richard Russell of Wal-Mart says: YES!
Wal-Mart, Inc. is sponsoring a tire pickup!
Wakulla County Residents Only
No Businesses Please

If you find these villains hiding out in your home,
round them up and bring them in.
Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day
Small businesses must register in advance
Saturday, March 8 8:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m.
340 Trice Lane
Small Business 12:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m.
Register In Advance
Not accepted: explosives, biohazardous or radioactive materials



REWARD

Put Hazardous Waste in its place. Keep Wakulla County Beautiful!
For more information, please call 926-3153 or 926-0830.
This service coordinated by Wakulla County Solid Waste,
Jefferson County Solid Waste and Keep Wakulla County Beautiful,
Wakulla County Commissioners and the Wakulla County Sheriff's Office


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Page 8 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 6, 2008

Wakulla County Baseball:

SMAa Legacy Lives On


Lizzie Butler to play

soccer for Sewanee


Wakulla High School senior
Lizzie Butler will continue her
soccer career at Sewanee: The
University of the South, in Ten-
nessee.
Butler signed to play with the
Tigers at a ceremony at Wakulla
High School on Feb. 26.
Butler capped a stellar career
at Wakulla with a senior season
in which she scored a team-lead-
ing 21 goals in 23 games and was
the team's assists leader with
nine. In four years at Wakulla,
Butler scored an incredible 75
goals in 79 games and was a
four-year varsity captain.
She was named to the Tal-
lahassee Democrat's All-Big
Bend First Team last year and
was awarded the Most Valuable
Player and Offensive Player of
the Year awards by the War Eagle
coaches this year..
"Sewanee is getting a great
player and a great all-around kid,"
said Wakulla head coach Jessi
Bishop. "She'll be a great addi-
tion to any team. But Sewanee's

Lifewalk slated
The Wakulla Pregnancy Cen-
ter's 2nd Annual LIFEWALK is
slated for Saturday, March 8 at
Wakulla Springs State Park. Reg-
istration begins at 8:30 a.m. and
the walk begins at 9 a.m. There
will be music, food, balloons and
face painting for the kids, and
the beauty of Wakulla Springs,
so come out and join us as we
walk for Life this Saturday.
Yoga classes set
The Sopchoppy Educational
Center will be offering Yoga
classes on Tuesday at 6 p.m. and
Thursday at 4:30 p.m., beginning
March 4. Beginners are welcome.
For more information, please call
Alaine Solburg at 962-2975 or SEC
at 962-2151.


gain is definitely our loss. We're
really going to miss her contri-
butions on the field, and miss
her just being a part of the
program."
Bishop also praised Butler's
leadership, helping a young team
improve.
"Having Lizzie on the field is
almost like having an extra coach
out there," Bishop said. "She's a
great leader, and that adds so
much to her game."
Butler is also an eight year
veteran of the Tallahassee United
Futbol Club. It was playing for
her travel team where she caught
the eye of Sewanee Coach Dylan
Harrison.
Butler has also been selected
to play in the Florida Athletic
Coaches Association All-Star Clas-
sic in Port Saint Lucie in March.
More than just a stand-out
soccer player, Butler is a superb
student and was named this
year's Wakulla High School
Wendy's High School Heisman
School Winner and is a National
Merit Scholarship Finalist.
Butler is the daughter of Da-
vid and Eugenia Butler.





926-3425 926-3655


A


By CAITLIN FLEMING
Special to The Wakulla News
In Wakulla County, one would
be hard-pressed to find a child,
parent or relative who hasn't been
involved at the recreation park in
Medart at one time or another. On
any given Saturday, the parking lot
is full of kids, parents, and support-
ive citizens enjoying the games.
Many former players, myself in-
cluded, have an array of colorful
jerseys still in their closets, each
one full of memories. The "Rec
Park" has grown exponentially
since I was kid playing sports and
its history began with the work of
a man who 'saw a need and made
something happen.
Bonnah H. Commander, still
known to some as "Uncle Buddy,"
loved kids and loved sports. In the
mid 1970s, after moving back to
his native Wakulla from Atlanta,
he saw that there was nowhere
for kids to play baseball and de-
cided that the youth of this county
needed the opportunity to play.
Buddy's sister, Nancy, recalls that
Buddy was the kind of man who
would give away the shirt off his
back or buy a snack for a hungry
child with his last dollar. When he
decided that the kids of Wakulla
County deserved the chance to
play in an organized league, he
jumped in feet-first as he set out to
accomplish this grand task.
J.C. Beaty recalled that someone
gave Buddy a dollar to start the
program and he took the rest from
there. There were no facilities or
equipment when Buddy was just
getting started so the kids played
on the high school fields with
borrowed and donated equipment.
Buddy knew a lot of people and he
used his contacts from working at
Pebble Radio Station in Tallahas-
see to get the necessary equipment
for the kids. Nancy remembered
how the trunk of Buddy's car was
completely stuffed with baseball
equipment and that he would pick
up half the team in his car and
his wife would get the rest in hers
so they could drive their team to
the field.
Derricke Gray, the current Presi-
dent of the Little League Baseball
Association, actually played during
that first year in 1974. He was 11.
"I still remember the games and I


still have my jersey," said Gray. "We
played at the high school baseball
fields and there wasn't a pitching
mound or a fence. [That first year]
was a big deal because we had
never had the chance to play in an
organized game."
A few years after Buddy had
gotten the baseball program up
and running, Wakulla County
purchased the current property
of the Medart park. The space
behind the main office was forest,
and Fields 1, 2, and 3 were a corn
field, recalls Larry Bruce, the first
director of the Wakulla Parks and
Recreation Department. In 1980, as
the baseball program that Buddy
had started flourished, the Medart
Recreation Park had five baseball
fields and two football fields. Now
there are nine baseball fields Larry
Bruce had never imagined the way
the Recreation Department would
grow, and Buddy would have been
honored to see how the baseball
program has grown, how many
lives he has touched.
"Buddy believed in the youth
of Wakulla more than any other
man." said J.C. Beaty, and Buddy's
legacy surely lives on.
On Saturday, March 8, there will
be a relocation ceremony for Buddy
Commander's memorial to the
newly renovated Fields 4, 5, 6, and
7. At 9 a.m., Buddy and the program
he started will be honored prior to
the kickoff game of the 2008 Little
League baseball season.
Come join the festivities along
side the kids, parents, and relatives
of 40 Little League Baseball teams,
and enjoy the first game of the
season. Also, I urge you to take a
moment to ponder the magnitude
of the recreation program and its
explosive growth in the past few
years and appreciate the efforts
of a big hearted man who was
the cornerstone of the baseball
program in Wakulla County.

^'. Bathing Suit
Season
S Is Right
Around
The Comner_-' 41
Gena Davis
Personal Trainer
926-7685 or 510-2326

GET THE NEWS
DELIVERED
EACH WEEK!
Call 926-7102


rFORGEt,


ORDER YOUR

Banners

T-Shirts

Magnetic Signs

St. Patrick's Day Celebration
Saturday, March 15


4* DESIGN&0

926-2211
North Pointe Center


/


Reesie


K


.My name is Lauren and I
am 11 years old.
I volunteer at the Wakulla
County Animal Shelter
to help dogs like Reesie
find a good home. Reesie
looks like a miniature St.
Bernard, but she is
actually full grown. She
is about a year old and
has all of her shots. She is
heartworm negative and
has been spayed. She is
very smart, playful and friendly. My mom and I have
been able to crate train Reesie and she sleeps in her
crate every night. She is housebroken and loves to
go for a walk or spend time in the backyard with our
other two dogs. She also likes to watch TV. Her
favorite is Animal Planet. Reesie has spent most of
her life in the shelter, so she is afraid of things and
noises she has never heard or seen before. She gets
scared when she hears the dishwasher running or
sees a school bus. When she gets scared, she wants
to go back inside the house or her crate where she
feels safe. She is such a sweet dog and needs a family
that can give her love and security.
If you think you can give Reesie a loving home,
please call the Wakulla County
Animal Shelter at 926-0890


We're Epd ing..an
TW.mo Meeocal Home6nr anJ Demands


Winning entry will be displayed at The Wildlife Festivaai

All entries must be RECEIVEDby,'the The Wakulla News by: Monday,
,March 31, 2008.-Judges will choose winnersin the Best Wildlife Photo cjtegor). '
F PRIZES will be awarded as follows: Best of Sho\\ $50 in Cash plus Two .
;Nights/3 Days at the Sandestin Golf and Beach Resort in Destin. Hondri ..
2nd Place $25 in Cash; 3rd Place -A Gift Subscription to The \\aklulla N\i' .
C -all (850) 926-7102 1tor form or rule. -. -
- .'.* -. -- *- "- "-, ,. -,- :.m C. .,,:, ,=- L.-


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 6, 2008 Page 9 '


Sports


WHS Softball


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
The Wakulla Lady War Eagle
softball team used timely hitting,
good pitching and strong defense
to win four games and run out
to a 6-1 record during the past
two weeks. Coach Tom Graham's
squad is also 3-0 in district games.
Two games against East Gadsden
and Wewahitchka were rained out
and will be made up later in the
season.
;* An away game against East
Gadsden ended in a 16-2 Wakulla
wip. Brianna Fordham pitched two
innings and struck out three in
winning the contest. Sarah Gregory
pitched three innings of relief and
gave up a hit, two unearned runs,
a walk and a strikeout.
:Coach Graham said nearly every
gaine featured hits from just about


WHS Baseb
By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
The Wakulla War Eagle baseball
team split six games over the past
two weeks as Coach Mike Gauger
and his diamond squad beat God-
by, Maday and Florida High, but
dropped three dose games against
Alachua Santa Fe, Panama City Bay
and Springfield Rutherford.
,* Wakulla was on top of Godby
9-3:! and hung on for a wild 12-10
victory. Godby hit two homeruns
and built a 10-9 lead before Wakulla
scored three runs in the bottom of
the sixth inning. "That was exciting
to score that many runs on them,"
said Coach Gauger.
Wakulla had 12 hits including
two each by Cameron Graves, Ryan
Smith, Logan Runyan and Jordan
Miller. Ryan Leutner, Austin Lentz,
Cory Eddinger and Chad Herold
had one hit each.
Leutner started on the mound
and pitched four innings. He
yielded six runs and eight hits with
three walks and two strikeouts.
Coiy Eddinger pitched an inning
and was the winning pitcher. He

WHS Tennis
In a lucky scheduling break, the
Wakulla War Eagle tennis team
managed to play three matches
last week before the rainy weather
slowed down the rest of the spring
sports scene at WHS.
The War Eagles swept matches
against Madison County and
Godby, while not losing a set. The
Lady War. Eagles won their first
match of the season over Godby
without losing a set.
The War Eagles improved to 3-0
and the Lady War Eagles improved
Sto 1-1.
,Coach Teresa Harrell said her
male squad played six singles
matches against Madison and
won them all. There were three
doubles matches and WHS won
all of them.
Top seeded Will Harvey won 8-1
while second seeded Travis Harrell
was an 8-4 winner. Brett Wilson
wdn the third seeded match 8-0.
Fouirth seeded Rhett Harvey won
his match 8-0. Liam Daniels won
8-3 at fifth seeded singles. Tyler Un-
ger played a sixth seeded singles
match and won, 8-4.
;Will Harvey and Harrell were
the top seeded doubles team. They
won 8-5. Wilson and Rhett Harvey
won the second seeded doubles
8-6 and Daniels and Unger won
third seeded doubles, 8-2.
In the Godby match, Will Har-
vey was a 9-7 winner. Jared Lowe
won 8-1 at second singles. Caleb
Fisher was an 8-1 winner at third


every player. Brooklynn Tindall
was 2-3 with two runs scored, a
double, triple and three RBIs. Ford-
ham was 2-3 with two runs scored
and two stolen bases. Karlyn Scott'
was 2-2 with two runs scored, a
double, homerun and five RBIs.
Chelsea Collins was 2-2 with
three runs scored and two RBIs.
Gregory was 2-2 with a run scored
and two RBIs.
Ashley Spears had a hit, scored
a run and had an RBI. Megan Rol-
lins was 1-1 with an RBI. Hannah
Lovestrand was 1-3 with a run
scored and two RBIs. Lacey Crum
was 1-2 with two runs scored and
Ki Myrick was 1-2 with two runs
scored.
Wakulla pounded Rickards
22-0 behind Fordham who pitched
three innings. She struck out four
and gave up one hit. Gregory
pitched two innings and had three


gave up four runs, two hits and two
walks while striking out a batter.
Ryan Smith picked up the save with
a perfect seventh inning.
Wakulla pounded Maclay 11-1.
Smith had three hits and Leutner,
Eddinger, Kyle Daniels and Shay
Barwick had individual hits.
Rance McBratney pitched three
innings for the win. He gave up
an unearned run, one hit and one
walk while striking out five. Rob-
bie Coles and Barwick finished
with three innings of work. They
combined to walk four and strike
out seven. "It was 3-1 until the fifth
inning," said Gauger. "We took
advantage of their mistakes in the
last two innings."
Wakulla fell behind Santa
Fe 6-2 before making the game
close. Miller, Eddinger and Lentz
had two hits each and Leutner
and Runyan had hits as well. Ryan
Cross was the starter and loser.
He pitched four innings and gave
up five earned runs and nine hits.
He walked two and struck out
two. Brad Crisp pitched well for
an inning and Robbie Coles also

singles. Harrell and Brett Wilson
won 8-1 and 8-1 respectively in
the fourth and fifth seeded singles
matches.
Will Harvey and Lowe won 8-0
in doubles and Fisher and Harrell
won 8-1.
The Lady War Eagles topped
Godby 7-0. Nina Reich won first
seeded singles, 8-0. Jessica Vamer
won 8-1 at second seeded singles.
Jessie Mohr won 8-0 at the third
seed.
Fourth seeded Ginny Weiss
won 8-0 and fifth seeded Jen
Roberts won 8-0. In doubles, Reich
and Varner won 8-1 and Mohr and
Kelsey Harrell won 8-0 at second
seeded doubles.


strikeouts.
Tindall was 2-4 with three runs
scored, a double, two RBIs and two
stolen bases. Rollins was 2-4 with
three runs scored, two RBIs and
two doubles. Collins added a 2-3
day with two runs scored and two
RBIs. Myrick was 2-2 with a stolen
base and two runs scored. Everyone
else in the lineup had a hit.
The Panama City schools did
not provide much competition ei-
ther. Unbeaten Panama City Beach
Arnold fell to Wakulla 13-0.
Fordham pitched a no-hitter
with five strikeouts. She missed
a perfect game by a walk and an
error.
Ashley Spears was 3-4 with two
RBIs. Tindall was 2-4 with two runs
scored, two RBI and a double. Scott
was 2-3 with two RBIs and two runs
scored. Hannah Lovestrand was 2-4
and scored two runs. Everyone else
in the lineup had one hit.
Panama City Bay fell to Wakul-


pitched. "We didn't play very well,"
said Gauger. "We didn't have a very
good approach to the hitting game
and we made some baserunning
mistakes."
Wakulla lost to Bay 3-2 in
eight innings. A War Eagle error in
the sixth inning allowed Bay to tie
the game and another error in the
eighth inning won the contest for
the Tornadoes.
WHS had four hits including
two from Cameron Graves and
one each from Eddinger and Coles.
McBratney started the game and
pitched five innings. He gave up
one earned run and four hits while
walking four and striking out two.
Crisp lost the game after pitching
two innings. He gave up three hits,
but no earned runs. Shay Barwick
faced two batters and struck out
one and walked the other. "It was
a hard loss, like the Leon game,"
said Gauger.
Rutherford topped Wakulla
9-8. Runyan and Smith had two
hits each and Eddinger had a
double. Cross started the game
and pitched two innings. He gave
up four earned runs and eight hits
with a strikeout. Coles pitched
four innings and gave up two hits
The WHS girls beat Florida High
Tuesday, Feb. 26 and lost to the
Rickards girls on Feb. 28 in Medart.
The girls doubles team of Jessie
Mohr and Kelsey Harrell won 8-
1. Jessie Mohr, Ginny Weiss and
Jenn Roberts all won their singles
matches. Nina Reich and Jessica
Varner lost their doubles against
Florida High.
On Feb. 28, the WHS boys beat
Florida High 4-3 in Tallahassee. On
Feb. 29, the boys beat Rickards at
home. Suwannee County hosted
both WHS squads on March 3 in
Live Oak. The matches were moved
from March 4 due to weather
concerns.


la by the same 13-0 score. Gregory
pitched five innings and won her
first game. She gave up one hit
while walking two and striking
out seven. She was 3-4 at the plate
with a double, two RBIs and two
runs scored.
Fordham was 3-4 with a run
scored, RBI and three stolen bases.
Mandy McClendon was 2-2 with
two runs scored and a double. Col-
lins was 2-2 with a run scored and
an RBI. Myrick was 2-3 with two
runs scored, a double and three
RBIs. Everyone in the lineup had a
hit except one.
Wakulla traveled to Rickards
for a March 4 contest and will
host Madison County on March
5. Panama City Beach Arnold will
come to Medart on March 7.
"I'm pleased with where we're
at," said Coach Graham. "We're
getting better and we're hitting the
ball well, playing good defense and
getting good pitching."


and an unearned run. He had four
strikeouts. Smith lost it after giv-
ing up a run and three hits while
striking out one. An error helped
Rutherford score the winning run.
Florida High fell to Wakulla
11-1. Brad Crisp won the game with
six innings of work. He gave up a
walk and had four strikeouts.
Smith was 3-4 with three runs
scored and two RBIs. Runyan was
2-3 with two runs scored and an RBI
against his former school. Cory Ed-
dinger was 1-3 with three RBIs and
a double. Freshman Casey Eddinger
had a hit.
Wakulla traveled to Rickards for
a March 4 district contest and will
host Panama City Beach Arnold
March 7 in another district contest.
Wakulla and Florida High will play
again on March 13. The War Eagles
improved to 5-4 overall and 1-1 in
district games.


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TNews: 7.:*59- P7 -
* Noon Thursday, March 13 for all items.,.
submitted by e-mail.

Advertising: ..
Noon Wednesday, March 12 for all ads
requiring proof.

, Noon Friday, March 14 for ads
not requiring proof Call 926-7102 As for L


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WklUU COUNTY

PAEKU AND


DEPARTMENT

The Wakulla County Parks and Recreation {"'(
Department would like to cordially invite the
public, county employees, and all elected
officials to the official start of the youth
baseball/softball season.
The opening day ceremony for most leagues will commence on
Saturday, March 8th, 2008 at 9:00 A.M.. At this time the Wakulla
County Parks and Recreation Department will be honoring the
Commander family and others for their contributions towards
the youth baseball program and Medart Recreation Park.
Following the dedication, the "First Pitch" will be thrown at
9:30 A.M. and the season will be officially underway. The Cal
Ripkin League will use this day as a fundraising event to help
support the baseball program. They will be selling chicken
dinners for $5.00 a meal. The Wakulla County Parks &
Recreation Board will be selling hamburgers and hotdogs
to raise money for Medart Park Improvements.
Also on this day, Babe Ruth Commissioner Noreen Britt will
be hosting the Aquafina Major League Baseball Pitch, Hit and
Run Competition. This event measures player's abilities in three
categories: hitting, running and throwing.
.,f* The competition is open to all children
between the ages of 7 and 14. Age
determining date is July 17th. Winners will
advance to the regional event and possibly
the national event. This event will be held
from at 10:00 AM to 12:00 Noon on Field #3
at Medart Recreation Park.






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Page 10 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 6, 2008


Outdoors


From The Dock
BY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL


It was another beautiful week-
end, lots of people were on
the water and lots of fish were
caught. Trout season opened
back up on Saturday, but grouper
season continues to be closed
until the middle of March.
Mike Hopkins said they had
an excellent day on Saturday
and lots of boats were on the
water. He says they have already
sold more seasonal passes to the
ramp right now than they did last
year so they're expecting a real
busy season. Lots of boats went
grouper fishing and most came in
with four or five fish. One of his
customers from Alabama strictly
trolls the Mann's Stretch 30's and
they came in with a limit of 10
grouper, which they caught in 35
feet of water off Dog Island.
Quite a few amberjack were
caught on the Yamaha and Bryson
Reef but most were short and had
to be put back. I was talking with
someone yesterday and he com-
pared catching a big amberjack to
catching a tuna. Both never quit.
I've caught amberjack before and
know even those that aren't legal
fight. I'm heading to Venice, La.


this weekend to fish for tuna so
I'll let you know. (Hopefully)
Lots of trout are being caught
near the channel running into
the Marine Lab. Capt. Terry Car-
ruthers got their limit fishing
shrimp and grubs in the deeper
water along the edges. They
had several fish over 24 inches.
I talked to Capt. Vic Davis and
he said they also fished over at
Lanark last weekend and did very
well on trout. They also caught a
cooler full of pink mouth grunts
in about 30 feet of water. The
docks are still holding plenty of
reds and the Gulp or live shrimp
will do the trick. Mike said most
people are reporting water tem-
peratures of 64 to 65 degrees,
which means it won't be long
until pompano show up. In fact,
they are already catching them in
Panama City.
Dale Evans at Advantage Ma-
rine said Tommy Martin fished
at Lanark over the weekend and
limited on trout. He went to the
Ochlockonee looking for reds on
Sunday and caught stripers.
Kenny Clark from Shell Point
fished Saturday and caught trout


and reds in the Oyster Bay area.
Mark and Louise Prance from
Shell Point are now into Kayak
fishing and they went to Hickory
Mount for the first time. They
fished the mouth of the creek
and caught five nice trout using
live shrimp and gulps.
Tammy Morgan at Jerry's
Bait and Tackle wants to remind
everyone of their Team Seatrout
Tournament, which will be held
March 16. This past weekend
was their redfish tournament
and nine teams entered. Adam
Hooker and Brett Bryon came in
with two reds weighing a total of
10 pounds, 8 ounces to take first
place. Colby Hough and Gerald
Everton won second place. They
had two reds that weighed 9
pounds, 5 ounces. Casey Cook
and Skip Cook placed third with
two reds weighing 8 pounds, 2
ounces. Other catches were two
reds by Brian Showman and Jeff
Suber that weighed 6 pounds,
14 ounces and Keith Cardin and
Charles Hunter brought in a red
weighing 3 pounds, 13 ounces.
Brian Lowe at the Moorings in:
Carrabelle said Buck Pegg fished
out of Carrabelle this past week-
end and came in with four grou-
per. Brandon Fox fished Lanark
Reef and had four nice trout
Looks like it's going to be an
early season and a good season.
Remember to leave those float
plans with someone and know
your limits. Good luck and good
fishing


Red Snapper rules are aired


The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC)
approved changes to management
rules for red snapper harvested in
Gulf of Mexico state waters. The
FWC also approved new rules that
will require all commercial and
recreational anglers fishing for
any Gulf reef fish species to use
circle hooks, dehooking devices
and venting tools.
These new rules are similar to
recently implemented red snap-
per regulations in Gulf federal
waters that are intended to end
overfishihg of:red snapper in the
Gulf and reduce release'mortality
of Gulf reef fish.
The new rules reduce the daily
recreational bag limit for red snap-
per from four fish to two fish per
person and establish a zero daily
bag limit for captains and crew of
for-hire vessels in all Gulf waters
off Florida's coast.
No change will be made to
the April 15 through Oct. 31 Gulf
recreational red snapper harvest
season in state waters. However,
new federal rules establish a June
1 through Sept. 30 recreational
harvest season in Gulf federal wa-
ters adjacent to Florida waters.
Other new FWC rules reduce
the minimum size for commer-
dally harvested red snapper in the
Gulf and for imported red snapper
from 15 to 13 inches total length,
and reduce the daily commercial
bag and trip limit for red snapper
harvested in Gulf state waters off
Florida from four fish to two fish
daily per person.
At least one dehooking device
is required as well and must be
used to remove hooks embedded
in Gulf reef fish with minimum
damage. The dehooking device
must be constructed to allow the


hook to be secured and the barb munities," said FWC Chairman


shielded without re-engaging dur-
ing the removal process.
"Today's action will help to
improve Gulf red snapper popu-
lations while maintaining the
sport fishing season that benefits
several North Florida fishing com-


Rodney Barreto.
FWC's new red snapper rules
take effect on April 1. The rules
requiring circle hooks, dehooking
devices and venting tools for all
reef fish species take effect on
June 1.


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Grouper changes planned


The Gulf of Mexico Fishery
Management Council will hold a
series of public hearings to solicit
comments on a proposed amend-
ment to the Reef Fish Fishery
Management Plan.
A recent stock assessment
completed under the Southeast
Data, Assessment and Review
(SEDAR) program, indicates that
gag grouper are undergoing
overfishing. The Magnuson-Ste-
vens Reauthorization Act of 2006
mandates that the council end
overfishing immediately. As a
result, the council is considering
the various management mea-
sures outlined below.
For gag, the fishing mortality
rate has been above the current
overfishing threshold since 1998,
indicating that overfishing is oc-
curring. The stock biomass level
is not sustainable at the current
fishing mortality rates and is
projected to decline unless fish-
ing mortality is reduced by 28 to
45 percent.
Red grouper were determined
overfished in the 1990s, accord-
ing to both the 1999 and 2002
stock assessments, prompting
the implementation of a rebuild-
ing plan in 2004. A 2007 stock
assessment showed strong year
classes in the late 1990s through
2000 allowed the stock biomass
to reach its maximum sustain-
able yield. Further rebuilding
occurred under the provisions of
the rebuilding plan, and by 2005
the stock biomass increased to
just above its optimum yield. As
a result, a 15 percent increase in


926-3425
926-3655


red grouper total allowable catch
may be implemented.
The proposed amendment
- Amendment 30B contains po-
tential alternatives that propose
to: set management thresholds
and targets for gag, set total
allowable catch (TAC) for gag
and red grouper, set commercial
and recreational allocations for
gag and red grouper, establish
accountability measures for gag
and red grouper, adjust commer-
cial quotas for gag red grouper
and the shallow-water grouper
aggregate, adjust recreational
management measures for grou-
pers, which includes: o bag limits,
o size limits, o closed seasons
address by catch and bycatch
mortality of groupers create new
marine reserves and/or extend
the duration of existing marine
reserves address regulatory com-
pliance of federally permitted
reef fish vessels when fishing in
state waters.
Public hearings begin at 6 p.m.
and are scheduled at several loca-
tions throughout the southeast.
The location closest to Wakulla
County is: Thursday, March 13
at Edgewater Conference Cen-
ter, 11212 Front Beach Blvd. in
Panama City.
For stakeholders and other
interested parties who are unable


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to participate in the public meet.
ings, comments and suggestions
may be submitted to the Council
via e-mail: Amendment30B@
gulfcouncil.org, US mail: 2203 Irj
Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tamp$,
FL 33607, or fax: (813) 348-1714
Comments should be received no
later than April 3. A final public
hearing will be held in Apro
during the regularly scheduled
Council meeting.
Copies of the draft public hea-
ing document can be obtained
by calling the Council at 813-34t
1630, or by e-mailing the CouncI
at gulfcouncil@gulfcouncil.org.
Meetings are open to the pul
lic and are accessible to people
with disabilities. Requests fct
sign language interpretation cr
other auxiliary aids should be
directed to the Council office
within five business days of the
meeting date. '
The Gulf of Mexico Fisheri
Management Council is one 6f
eight regional\ fishery manage-
ment councils established by
the Magnuson Stevens Fisher7
Conservation and Management
Act of 1976. The Gulf of Mexice
Fishery Management Counci
prepares fishery management
plans designed to manage fist
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FSt/CrSnitU


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 6, 2008 Page 11
1


S850-224-4960 www.fsucu.org

~ MORTGAGES -FREE CHECKING N AUTO LOANS ~ CREDIT CARDS


Gulf Coast Weekly Almanac


Tide charts by
Zihua Software, LLC

St. Marks River Entrance


March 6 March 12

City of St. Marks


For tides at the following points
add to Dog Island Listings: Carrabelle
Apalachicola


'~ -m-w~


Cat Point
Lower Anchorage
West Pass


High Tide
28 Min.
1 Hr., 53 Min.
1 Hr., 13 Min.
1 Hr., 36 Min.
1 Hr., 26 Min.


Low Tide
25 Min.
2 Hrs., 38 Min.
2 Hrs., 31 Min.
2 Hrs., 3 Min.
2 Hrs., 39 Min.


Shell Point, Spring Creek


Thu 3.3 ft. -0.6 ft. 3.3 ft. 0.4 ft.
ar 6, 08 12:54 AM 7:29 AM 1:46 PM 7:34 PM
ri 3.5 ft. -0.4 ft. 3.4 ft. -0.0 ft.
ar 7, 08 1:36 AM 7:57 AM 2:08 PM 8:10 PM
at 3.6 ft. -0.2 ft. 3.6 ft. -0.4 ft.
ar 8, 08 2:18 AM 8:25 AM 2:29 PM 8:47 PM
un 3.5 ft. 0.1 ft. 3.7 ft. -0.7 ft.
ar 9, 08 3:01 AM 8:53 AM 2:52 PM 9:26 PM
on 3.3 ft. 0.5 ft. 3.8 ft. -0.8 ft.
ar 10, 08 3:47 AM 9:21 AM 3:16 PM 10:09 PM
ue 3.0 ft. 0.9 ft. 3.9 ft. -0.7 ft.
ar 11, 08 4:36 AM 9:50 AM 3:43 PM 10:58 PM
ed 2.6 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.8 ft. -0.5 ft.
Mar12, 08 5:33 AM 10:19 AM 4:14 PM 11:58 PM


Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay

Thu 2.5 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.5 ft. 0.3 ft.
Mar 6, 08 12:46 AM 7:40 AM 1:38 PM 7:45 PM
Fri 2.6 ft. -0.3 ft. 2.6 ft. -0.0 ft.
Mar 7, 08 1:28 AM 8:08 AM 2:00 PM 8:21 PM
Sat 2.7 ft. -0.1 ft. 2.7 ft. -0.3 ft.
Mar 8, 08 2:10 AM 8:36 AM 2:21 PM 8:58 PM
Sun 2.6 ft. 0;.1 ft. 2.8 ft. -0.5 ft.
Mar 9, 08 2:53 AM 9:04 AM 2:44 PM 9:37 PM
Mon 2.5 ft. .3 ft. 2.9 ft. -0.6 ft.
Mar 10, 08 3:39 AM 9:32 AM 3:08 PM 10:20 PM
Tue 2.3 ft. 9.6 ft. 2.9 ft. -0.5 ft.
Mar 11, 08 4:28 AM 10:01 AM 3:35 PM 11:09 PM
Wed 2.0 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.8 ft.
Mar 12, 08 5:25 AM 10:30 AM 4:06 PM_


Date High Low High Low
Thu 3.1 ft. -0.5 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.4 ft.
Mar 6, 08 1:30 AM 8:33 AM 2:22 PM 8:38 PM
Fri 3.3 ft. -0.4 ft. 3.2 ft. -0.0 ft.
Mar 7, 08 2:12 AM 9:01 AM 2:44 PM 9:14 PM
Sat 3.3 ft. -0.2 ft. 3.3 ft. -0.4 ft.
Mar 8, 08 2:54 AM 9:29 AM 3:05 PM 9:51 PM
Sun 3.3 ft. 0.1 ft. 3.5 ft. -0.6 ft.
Mar 9, 08 3:37 AM 9:57 AM 3:28 PM 10:30 PM
Mon 3.1 ft. 0.4 ft. 3.6 ft. -0.7 ft.
Mar 10, 08 4:23 AM 10:25 AM 3:52 PM 11:13 PM
Tue 2.8 ft. 0.8 ft. 3.6 ft.
Mar 11, 08 5:12 AM 10:54 AM 4:19 PM
Wed -0.6 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.1 ft.
Mar 12, 08 12:02 AM 6:09 AM 11:23 AM


St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.

Thu 2.6 ft. -0.5 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.4 ft.
Mar 6, 08 12:38 AM 7:08 AM 1:30 PM 7:13 PM
Fri 2.7 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.7 ft. -0.0 ft.
Mar 7, 08 1:20 AM 7:36 AM 1:52 PM 7:49 PM
Sat 2.8 ft. -0.2 ft. 2.8 ft. -0.4 ft.
Mar 8, 08 2:02 AM 8:04 AM 2:13 PM 8:26 PM
Sun 2.7 ft. 0.1 ft. 2.9 ft. -0.7 ft.
Mar 9, 08 2:45 AM 8:32 AM 2:36 PM 9:05 PM
Mon 2.6 ft. 0.5 ft. 3.0 ft. -0.8 ft.
Mar 10, 08 3:31 AM 9:00 AM 3:00 PM 9:48 PM
Tue 2.3 ft. 0.8 ft. 3.0 ft. -0.7 ft.
Mar 11, 08 4:20 AM 9:29 AM 3:27 PM 10:37 PM
Wed 2.0 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.0 ft. -0.5 ft.
Mar 12, 08 5:17 AM 9:58 AM 3:58 PM 11:37 PM


Thu 3.4 ft. -0.6 ft. 3.3 ft. 0.4 ft.
Mar 6, 08 12:51 AM 7:26 AM 1:43 PM 7:31 PM,
Fri 3.6 ft. -0.5 ft. 3.5 ft. -0.0 ft.
Mar 7, 08 1:33 AM 7:54 AM 2:05 PM 8:07 PM
Sat 3.6 ft. -0.2 ft. 3.7 ft. -0.4 ft.
Mar 8, 08 2:15 AM 8:22 AM 2:26 PM 8:44 PM
Sun 3.6 ft. 0.1 ft. 3.8 ft. -0.7 ft.
Mar 9, 08 2:58 AM 8:50 AM 2:49 PM 9:23 PM
Mon 3.4 ft. 0.5 ft. 3.9 ft. -0.8 ft.
Mar 10, 08 3:44 AM 9:18 AM 3:13 PM 10:06 PM
Tue 3.1 ft. 0.9 ft. 3.9 ft. -0.8 ft.
Mar 11, 08 4:33 AM 9:47 AM 3:40 PM 10:55 PM
Wed 2.7 ft. 1.3 ft. 3.9 ft. -0.5 ft.
Mar 12, 08 5:30 AM 10:16 AM 4:11 PM 11:55 PM


Dog Island West End

Thu -0.3 ft. 2.1 ft. 0.8 ft.
Mar 6, 08 6:56 AM 2:04 PM 6:43 PM
Fri 2.5 ft. -0.0 ft. 2.1 ft. 0.5 ft.
Mar 7, 08 1:08 AM 7:25 AM 2:13 PM 7:20 PM
Sat 2.5 ft. 0.2 ft. 2.2 ft. 0.2 ft.
Mar 8, 08 2:06 AM 7:51 AM 2:23 PM 7:59 PM
Sun 2.4 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.4 ft. -0.1 ft.
Mar 9, 08 3:05 AM 8:15 AM 2:37 PM 8:41 PM
Mon 2.2 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.6 ft. -0.3 ft.
Mar 10, 08 4:09 AM 8:37 AM 2:55 PM 9:30 PM
Tue 2.1 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.8 ft. -0.4 ft.
Mar 11, 08 5:23 AM 8:56 AM 3:20 PM 10:28 PM
Wed 1.9 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.8 ft.
Mar 12, 08 6:58 AM 9:06 AM 3:51 PM


Sunrise
Sunset
Moon rise
Moon set
Brightness


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday wednesday
6:57 am 6:55 am 6:54 am 6:53 am 6:52 am 6:51 am 6:50 am
6:39 pm 6:40 pm 6:41 pm 6:41 pm 6:42 pm 6:43 pm 6:43 pm


6:15 am
5:50 pm
10%


6:47 am
6:54 pm
3%


7:18 am
7:59 pm
4%


_- A -


7:51 am
9:06 pm
12%


8:26 am
10:15 pm
19%


I" I Boating Emergencies
Coast Guard Station
.Panama City ... ..................... ....................... (850) 234-4228 .
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown ........................................................ (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
St. Marks (Flotilla 12) .......................................... (850) 906-0540
qr ... .................................. .................................... 893-5,137
AShell Point (Flotilla 13) ............. ...... (850) 926-2606
dr ........ .... ........................ ..................................... 926-5654


Coast Guard

Auxiliary Reports

By Sherrie Alverson


Springs

event set
Wakulla Springs State Park
will offer a forest ecology hike on
Saturday, March 8, from 10 a.m.
until noon. The event is free with
regular park admission.
Visitors are invited to explore
the park's unique forest ecology,
plants and animals on the hike.
Guests are invited to enjoy break-
fast before the event or lunch
after it in the historic Wakulla
Springs Lodge. For more infor-
mation, call 926-0700.


'What a gorgeous weekend
it 'was, especially Sunday. As I
stood at the window waiting
for my ride to church, I sud-
denly realized that there was
a steady stream of small boats
being towed into Shell Point.
.: It reminded me of the way
it used to be. Long before there
was Sea Tow in our area, the
boating public depended on
tlie Coast Guard Auxiliary to
rescue them in time of emer-
gency.
The two local Coast Guard
units, Flotilla 12 at St Marks
and 13 at Shell Point, were kept
busy. Way back then, with all
those small boats going out,
some of them would forget
to stay close in and we would
certainly be needed.


Things are different now, for
a variety of reasons. Beside
the towing services, I believe
boater education is probably
the biggest boost to safe boat-
ing. If we teach them how to
be safer boaters before they go
to sea most of them will come
back without help.
Flotilla 13 will hold a meet-
ing Saturday, March 8, at 6 p.m.
at Shell Point. Following the
business meeting there will
the usual pot-luck with Helen
Branan's wonderful dessert.
Visitors are always welcomed.
Carolyn Brown Treadon
shared St Marks' flotilla activi-
ties.
Members of Flotilla 12 had a
great week. Prior to our month-
ly meeting, Mark Rosen coordi-


Duane Treadon presents Larry Kolk with award


Mark Rosen, Chuck Hickman, Duane Treadon, Carolyn B. Treadon and Tim Ashley


nated a facility inspection for
four of our operational facili-
ties. Several members came to
participate either as a trainee
or examiner. After meeting at
Shell Island Fish Camp for the
inspections, we headed over to
the Volunteer Fire Department
to participate in Team Coordi-
nation Training and to practice
towing procedures. Thanks to
all who participated in a great
training day.
Later that evening we gath-
ered for our meeting. We had
two guests, Don and Justin
Johnson. Justin is deciding if
he wants to pursue a military
career and wanted to see what
the Coast Guard Auxiliary had
to offer him in his decision
making process. His father
joined to learn more about us,
as well.
It was a fast paced meeting
with a lot to cover. As it was
the first meeting following
the Division Meeting, there
were several awards to present.
Duane Treadon, our Flotilla
Commander, made the pre-
sentations awards to members
present.


Total Mission Hours, Tim
Ashley with 810; Duane Tre-
adon with 809; Rich Rasmus-
sen with 1183; Chuck Hickman
with 683 hours and 120 Ma-
rine Dealer Visits 647, Carolyn
Brown Treadon with 647, and a
five year Auxiliary Membership
Service Medal.
Sustained Service Awards
went to Larry Kolk and Chuck
Hickman.
Volunteer Service Awards
went to Mark Rosen and Duane
and Carolyn Treadon.
These awards are the only
payment Auxiliarists receive
since our service is all volun-
teer. It is nice for members to
be recognized for all they do to
support our organization and
the boating public.
Larry Kolk took some time
to discuss our future boating
safety classes including an up-
coming America's Boating class
on March 15 and a basic naviga-
tion class on March 29. Anyone
interested in the classes offered
can contact Larry by going on
our Flotilla web site or picking
up a flyer at many of our local
boating supply stores.


Tim Ashley also talked about
our upcoming public affairs
events including Springtime
Tallahassee at the end of the
month. All of our other staff
officers and members continue
to work hard to increase aware-
ness on boating safety and
be Semper Paratus Always
Ready.
REMEMBER SAFE BOATING
IS NO ACCIDENT.


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Franklin, Gulf &
Wakulla Counties
Commercial
Residential
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First
March 14





Full
March 21





Last
March 29


New
March 7


Major
Activity
Minor
:Activity


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
10:15 am 11:00 am 11:50 am 12:20 am 2:15 am 3:10 am 4:10 am
10:40 pm 11:20pm --:--pm 1:45 pm 2:40 pm 3:40 pm 4:45 pm
4:10 am 4:55 am 5:35 am 7:40 am 8:25 am 9:20 am 10:25 am
4:25 pm 5:10 pm 6:00 pm 8:05 pm 8:55 pm 9:55 pm 11:00 pm


9:06 ami
11:25 pm
27%


Attack-One Fire

Management

Services
GT-18XP Gyro-Trac
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Commercial & Residential
Land Clearing Timberland Management Industrial Sites
Forestry
Hazardous Fuel Reduction Habitat Restoration
Wildland-Urban Interface Temporary Fire Lanes
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Utilities & Transportation Phone: 850-926-6534
Clearing & Right of Way Maintenance Survey Lines Fax: 850-926-6529
Highways Power & Gas Lines Canals & Waterways Cell: 850-528-1743


3232 Crawfordville Hwy. Crafordville
Owned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lie. # CAC1814304


9:52 am







Page 12 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 6,2008


Sheriff's Report


A 22-year-old man was caught
on hidden camera breaking into
his neighbor's garage to raid a re-
frigerator for beer. The man, Scott
Evans, was arrested and charged
with burglary.
According to the police report, a
homeowner on Jane Drive noticed
that the attached garage at his
home had been entered several
times over the past several weeks.
In an effort to find out who was
coming into the garage and steal-
ing alcoholic beverages, he placed
a hidden camera.
On Tuesday. Feb. 26, he called
sheriff's deputies to report that
the camera had photographed a
white male standing in front of the
refrigerator wearing a black T-shirt
emblazoned with the name of a


local sports restaurant, Champs.
Deputy Vicki Mitchell contacted
the manager of Champs who told
her that the shirts are only avail-
able to employees as uniforms.
He provided a list of employees,
including past employees who
had not turned in their shirts.
The manager said the man in the
photograph taken by the hidden
camera appeared to be a former
employee named Scott Evans.
Deputy Mitchell went to Evans'
home, which is just west of the
victim's home, and told Evans that
he was a suspect in a burglary. Af-
ter being given a Miranda warning,
Evans allegedly admitted that he
had broken into the garage to get
beer from the refrigerator and said
he had a drinking problem.


Fire Rescue Report


During the past two weeks,
Wakulla County firefighters re-
sponded to two brush fires, two
fire alarms, six miscellaneous
fires, sixteen vehicle accidents,
two public assistance incidents,
three power lines down, one
hazardous materials incident and
thirty-one medical first responder
emergency incidents.
Here are some tips for dealing
with electrical emergencies:
Electrical Contact Accidents
- If someone comes in contact
with an energized wire or power


line, do not touch the victim until
you are sure the current has been
turned off you could become
part of the circuit and be injured
or killed. Unplug the device or cut
power at the service panel first.
When you are sure the power
has been turned off, call 911 for
emergency assistance.
If the victim is not breathing,
administer CPR until help arrives.
Burns must be treated only by
medical professionals. Always
seek medical help for an electri-
cal contact accident no matter


He allegedly said that he had
entered the home on several oc-
casions in recent weeks to get
beer. Evans said, in the most
recent burglary, he had broken in
around 4 a.m. while the family was
asleep. He reportedly said he did
not know the victims.
After taking Evans into custody,
Mitchell notified the victims that
an arrest had been made in the
case. The wife reported that her
youngest son had asked to sleep
with her that night because he was
afraid the burglar might return.
In other activity reported by the
Wakulla County Sheriff's Office
during the past week-
A criminal mischief was
reported in Mallard Pond subdivi-
sion on Friday, Feb. 29, with some
electrical wiring being cut inside a
home under construction.
According to the police report,
"The suspects) appeared to have

how minor it appears. Electricity
burns from inside out, so injuries
might not be visible. In addition,
the heart can be affected several
hours later.
Electrical Fires If possible,
unplug the device or shut off
power at the main service panel.
Never use water on an electrical
fire use a multipurpose fire
extinguisher. When calling 911,
tell the dispatcher it's an electri-
cal fire.
Downed Power Lines Imme-
diately call 911 to report downed
power lines. Do not let anyone
touch or drive over a downed
power line even experienced
utility personnel can't tell if a


Pregnant woman given three year sentence


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
A woman nearly six months
pregnant received three years in
prison after violating her probation
three times in a year.
Autumn Rowan pleaded in the
spring to a felony charge of driving
while license suspended or revoked
and violated a few months later
when she failed to complete a drug
test and left the area without per-
mission. She violated again with a
new charge in the summer and was
given a suspended prison sentence.
With a third violation, this time for

Traffic

accidents..
' William B. Hart, 60. of Tallahas-
see was charged with careless driv-
ing in a Friday, Feb. 29 accident at
U.S. Highway 319 and Russell Drive,
according to the Florida Highway
patrol. The accident occurred at
6:27 p.m.
Hart was traveling north on
U.S. Highway 319 while two other
vehicles were stopped on the
highway waiting for a vehicle to
turn onto Russell Drive. Hart failed
to observe the stopped vehicles
and collided with the rear of a
vehicle driven by Shontal D. Al-
len, 32, of Crawfordville. Allen's
vehicle overturned onto its right
side and collided with a vehicle
driven by Melissa S. Walker, 16, of
Crawfordville.
Hart and Allen suffered minor
injuries while James L. Harvey, 42,
of Crawfordville, a passenger in
Allen's vehicle, also suffered minor
injuries.
An accident in Leon County
on Feb. 27 resulted in Christopher
Ward, 33, of Crawfordville being
charged with improper U-turn, ac-
cording to the FHP.
Ward was stopped in a construc-
tion zone on Interstate 10. He at-
tempted to make a U-turn to travel
east and traveled into the path of
an Osteen motorist. The Osteen
motorist avoided the collision, but
crashed into a concrete barrier.
The Osteen driver was driv-
ing a tractor trailer and broke his
fuel tanks spilling fuel onto the
highway,


failing to complete drug counseling,
Assistant State Attorney Ashleigh
Stowell asked the court to hold
Rowan responsible for her actions
and send her to prison.
Attorney Chuck Hobbs, repre-
senting Rowan, told the court at a
hearing on Thursday, Feb. 14, that
Rowan is five and a half months
pregnant. The. state had taken her
children as a result of her drug
problem, and she had recently
gotten custody of her children
back, Hobbs said. He called drug
counselor Joanna Johnson to testify
that Rowan told her she was unable
to attend sessions because she had
no phone, no car, no job and was
suffering from nausea as a result of
her pregnancy.


Rowan, handcuffed and dressed
in an orange jail jumpsuit, said
nothing during the hearing.
Hobbs asked the court for mercy
and leniency, adding: "Three years
in prison for felony DWLSR is un-
conscionable."
After Hobbs called a prison
sentence "draconian," Wakulla Cir-
cuit Judge N. Sanders Sauls noted
that he's aware that Rowan has a
serious drug abuse problem. "She's
already been afforded opportunity
after opportunity," he said, but had
failed to "take any responsibility
whatsoever."
"This court has no alternative,"
Judge Sauls said, ordering Rowan
to three years in prison with credit
for 177 days served,


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This is now possible thanks
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rtisement


walked randomly throughout the
home cutting wires from the top
of the electrical boxes, leaving the
wires short (and) causing the elec-
trician to rerun the circuits."
Five wires were found cut. The
cost to replace the wires was esti-
mated at $300.
Since there were not any doors
hung on the exterior, whoever
entered was able to do so without
use of force. Deputy James Plouffe
investigated.
A 61-year-old Crawfordville
man was in the bedroom of his
trailer on Dolly Drive when he
heard a loud explosion and looked
out the window to see his 1995
Buick LeSabre sedan on fire.
The incident occurred at around
10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Feb.
27. The fire department arrived
at the scene and put out the
fire. The cause of the fire is not
known. Deputy Sherrell Morrison

line is energized just by looking
at it.
Avoid touching anything
a downed line is contacting,
especially metal fences and
equipment. Remember that the
area around the downed line,
including the soil, equipment
and other objects, could also be
energized.
If a downed line comes in
contact with a vehicle, instruct
the driver to stay in the vehicle
and avoid touching any metal
parts,


investigated.
A retail theft was reported on
Sunday, March 2, at the Murphy
Oil station at Wal-Mart where a
Chevy Silverado allegedly drove
off after pumping $45 worth of
gas.
The suspect in the case is
described as a white female with
gray hair, mid-50s, in a charcoal
gray Silverado with an extended
cab. The vehicle's tag was cov-
ered.


The alleged theft was recorded
by the store's surveillance cameras
and the matter was turned over to
detectives in criminal investiga-
tions division.
The Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office received 995 calls for service
during the past week.
Note to our readers: The people
who are reported as charged with
crimes in this column have not
yet been to trial and are therefore
innocent until proven guilty.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 6, 2008 Page 13


Romance
Continued from Page 1
The location was Machegg near
the famous Danube River east of
Vienna in Austria. "That is where
I got the horse bug when I was
about 10 years old" and where
she met Mischa who had moved
there with his family when he was
a young boy. Both attended school
in Machegg, both learned about
horses and the Austrian Lippizan
horse traditions.
"You could say we were like
brother and sister, but then it oc-
curred to me when I was getting
my doctorate in electrical engi-
neering in Zurich, Switzerland,
that I should really propose to
hir," said Mischa.
,,He returned to Machegg for
hi graduation party, remembered
that there was a jewelry store
alpng the way, bought two rings
and turned the party into a memo-
rible day when he proposed. "My
mother cried," says Maria as that
scene turned into something out
cf a Jane Austen novel.
:-Machegg is the center of a net-
wt'ik of bicycle paths that begin
along the Danube River. The fai-
rytale surroundings also include a
Roman archaeological park while
the Baroque period is represented
ii-the former Empress Maria
Tberesa's summer castles. Austria
ikwell-known for its music, par-
ticularly waltzes. But Maria and
Mischa prefer bluegrass.
- -"I just love the harmonies and
Mischa is really the one who had
iritroduced this music to Austria,"
she: says. Coon Bottom Creek will
play for the public during the
free "Edutainment" at the annual
Wakulla Wildlife Festival on Sat-
urday, April 5.
Musicians will play between
10:50 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. and Maria
an'd Mischa's band will alternate
with another well-known blue-
grass band called City Limits:
As an electrical engineer and


Erosion
Continued from Page 1
A positive result of reseeding
the beaches with dredged sand
is ,that it would help mitigate
the impact of future storms, the
consultants told the board.
SA staff analysis provided to
commissioners said that, "With-
out state assistance to restore
thq beach, the rate of erosion
will continue to escalate and
could potentially place private
property owners at risk.
A staff analysis of the project
put the total cost of beach resto-
ration at Shell Point at $5.1 mil-
lion with $2.5 million of that
from county matching funds.


Independent

Reporter

fundraiser

An evening of irreverent mu-
sic,will be presented by Master
musical satirist Roy Zimmer-
man (heard on National Public
Radlio) and alternative southern
musician and songwriter Grant
Peeples on Friday, March 7 at
8:15 p.m. at the
American Legion Hall, 229
Lake Ella Drive in Tallahassee.
Tickets are $10 and are avail-
able at Quarter Moon (1641 N.
Mdnroe, Tallahassee); e-mail
ziniconcert@google.com or call
877-7661 for other options.
This event is a benefit for the
Wakulla Independent Reporter.
Please make checks payable to
"The Sid Torbit Memorial Fund,
LLC."


WILD to hold

meeting

-The Wildnerness Coast Pub-
lic Libraries (WILD) Governing
Board will meet on Monday,
lMarch' 10 at 1 p.m. at the Franklin
County Public Library in Car-
rabelle. The library is located at
311 James Avenue. The public is
invited to attend. For more infor-
mation, call (850) 997-7400.


Women's safety

program set

Wakulla County Sheriff David
Harvey and Major Larry Massa
will speak on "Women's Safety
and Personal Protection" at the
Crawfordville Woman's Club on
Tuesday, March 11, from 7 p.m.
to 8:30 p.m.
The lecture is free and refresh-
ments will be served. Anyone in
the community who is interested
is invited to attend.


a scientist, Mischa and his col-
leagues are exploring new trans-
portation methods, and hopefully,
new ways to harness and store
energy. "We love living here near
Springhill Road because it is a
quick and straight road to our
workplaces," says Mischa. He's
well-acquainted with the pro-
totype electric boat at Wakulla
Springs that CAPS developed and
installed, and "As with all proto-
types, we're studying how that
one is working out."
Both of them ride their horses
into the adjacent Apalachicola
National Forest. "Can you imagine
doing this in Europe? Can you just
imagine the look on people's faces
if we even dared take our horses
into some of the ponds? Here, we
ride up to the chain of lakes near
Lost Lake and the horses cool off
on one side and people wave from
the other," Mischa says.
He and Maria both agree that
the friendliness of all people in
their neighborhood is something
they cherish. "We all look out for
each other as well," Maria says
about this informal neighborhood
watch.
On trail rides through their
childhood neighborhoods, Maria
and Mischa might have ridden
through fields of artichokes and
asparagus that are cultivated in
the fertile Danube lowlands.
Here, a vegetable garden has been
installed in boxes, off the ground
and protected by an electric fence.
"Mischa built it and I won't have
to bend down," she explains,
The boxes are filled with a
combination of manure and com-
post from their own farm.
And the goat, Nibbles? "He's
only been here a couple of weeks.
We rescued him after he'd been
horribly torn up by barbed wire,"
and he seems to really enjoy
attention from people and espe-
cially the dogs. Unless he learns
to jump, the lofty vegetable patch
is safe.


For Mashes Sands, the es-
timate was $2.8 million of
which $1.4 million would be
county match.
Both Shell Point and Mashes
Sands were severely impacted
by Hurricane Dennis in 2005.
Shell Point is owned by
Wakulla County; Mashes Sands
is owned by the State of Florida
but managed by the county. Both
beaches have significant beds of
seagrass just off the beach, as
well as areas of cordgrass on the
land both seagrass and cord-
grass are protected species.


Inside their modest house,
instruments are lined up in a row,
adjacent to an aquarium with two
rare blue crayfish and a very large
white goldfish.
And during the spring squirrel
season Maria will once again be
taking in orphaned squirrels, rais-
ing them and releasing them in
the adjacent national forest.
The Steurers continue in a long
tradition of settlers in Wakulla
County who are affiliated with
higher education. Today's arrivals
join earlier physicists, biologists,
geologists, and historians as they
arrive to add their expertise in
exploring and researching the
newest technologies both at CAPS
and the MagLab.
Mischa's offer from FSU's CAPS
program almost a decade ago
came while he attended a confer-
ence in Jacksonville. "Maria was
supposed to be with me but one
of her horses had a pulled muscle
and needed 'attention. It is quite
possible that we might not be
here had she come.
"We would have been at the
beach and I would have missed
the tour of the MagLab at FSU
during which I was asked about
coming over here," he says, adding
that FSU obtained visas and even-
tually green cards for both.
Now the Steurers have dis-
covered the beauty of wide-open
trails and hope to buy more land
near their small farm. "That is
my own dream," says Maria and
explains, "I want to take care of
more animals but some of the
available former farms around
here have all been rezoned out of
our affordable range."
Wakulla Springs State Park will
host the Wildlife Festival from
April 3 through April 5.


Track team opens competition


The Wakulla High School
track teams opened the 2008
season at the Rickards' Relays
last Wednesday, Feb. 20. All of
the events at this meet, except
for the 3200 meter run, were
relay events with four runners
per team per event.
WHS had teams in the boys
and girls 4x100 meters, 4x200
meters, 4x400 meters, 4x800
meters and the Distance Med-
ley events. Twenty seven (27)
athletes represented the high
school at this meet. The girls
teams won the 4x200 meters,
were second in the 4x400 meters
and the Distance Medley and
placed third in the 4x800 meters
and 4x100 meters.
The boys teams placed sec-
ond in the 4x800 meters and
the Distance Medley and were
solidly represented in the other
events.
"We've made a concerted
effort this year to increase the
participation in the track pro-
gram," said Coach Simeon Nel-
son. "And the fact that we took
27 athletes to this meet was a
real positive for us. Our kids
have worked hard and competed
well against a couple of the best
track programs in our District.
We areproud of their efforts
and look forward to even better
things from them as the season
progresses."
On Saturday, March 1, the
Wakulla High School track team
competed at the Jesse Forbes
Meet held at Godby High School
in Tallahassee. This meet is one
of the largest in North Florida
and this year there were in ex-
cess of 800 entrants representing


JOYCE C. MILLENDER

Certified Public Accountant

* Electronic Filing of Tax Returns Available
(At No Extra Charge When We Prepare The Return)
Accounting
Tax Preparation & Planning
Corporation
Partnership
Estate
Fiduciary


4432 Crawfordville lwy.
:. Crawfordville, FL 32327


NOTICE OF

PUBLIC HEARING

The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners pro-
poses to adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled
Public Hearings regarding the following before the Wakulla
County Board of County Commissioners on Monday,
April 7, 2008, beginning at 6:00 PM, unless otherwise
noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held
in the County Commission Chambers located west of the
County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida
32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present
testimony.


1. Short Form Final Plat Application: SF08-01
Applicant: Kala Preserve, LLC


Agent:
Proposal:
Tax ID Number:
Existing FLU Map:
Existing Zoning:
FEMA Flood Info:
Parcel Size:
Location:


Edwin Brown and Associates
42 lot Short Form Subdivision
23-3s-02e-000-05990-000
Agriculture (FLUE Policy 1.2.2)
AG (Section 5-25, LDC)
"C & A" zone on Panel 0300-B
2800.66 +/- acres
North of Coastal Highway and west
of the Wakulla/Jefferson County line


Hearings Required: County Commission 04/07/2008 @ 6:00 PM
Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record files may be
viewed at the County Planning Department located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person
desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript
or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons
needing special access considerations should call the Board Office at least 48 hours
before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Office may be contacted at (850)
926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.


(850) 926-8272
(850) 926-8273 ,:


more than 30 schools. Due to
some logistical problems only
about one half of the team that
was scheduled to attend actually
made it to the meet, but they
represented the school well.
The boys 4x800 meter team
made up of Ben Anderson, Ste-
ven Urling, Brandon Maloy and
Adam Carr placed 7th. Sydney
Nutting placed 6th in the girls
1600 meter run in the very good
time of 5:36 and then came back
to win the 800 meter run in the
excellent time of 2:28, which is
the best time in the Big Bend so


far this year. Freshmen Steven
Urling posted a very good time
of 5:18 in the boys 1600 meters
and Robert Carroway threw
89'04" in the discuss in their first
high school competition. Other
girls competing included: Susan
Hansen, Kayla Love,
Marissa Paul, Stephanie Huf-
fam and Jessica Parker. Other
boys included: Ben Anderson,
Scott Kelly, Frankie Humphries,
Terrance Sellers and Shawn Mor-
ris. The team competed Tuesday,
March 4 at another meet held at
Godby High School.


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Tallahassee, FL 32305-3461
Bus: 850-222-6208
gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com





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WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION SCHEDULE

WORKSHOPS PUBLIC HEARINGS MEETINGS

2008 CALENDAR


March 11, 2008





March 11, 2008


March 11, 2008


March 24, 2008


April 7, 2008


April 7, 2008


April 21, 2008


May 5, 2008


May 19, 2008



May 19, 2008


June 2, 2008


June 23, 2008


July 21, 2008


Workshop: Policy Number 07-01 Rules
Of Procedure for Meetings of the
Wakulla County BOCC
Commission Chambers

Public Hearing: Animal Control Ordinance
Commission Chambers

Regular Board Meeting
Commission Chambers

Regular Board Meeting
Commission Chambers

Workshop: To discuss Wakulla County
Becoming A Chartered County

Regular Board Meeting
Commission Chambers,

Regular Board Meeting
Commission Chambers

Regular Board Meeting
Commission Chambers

Workshop: 2nd Budget Development
Workshop
Commission Chambers

Regular Board Meeting
Commission Chambers

Regular Board Meeting
Commission Chambers


Regular Board Meeting
Commission Chambers

Regular Board Meeting
Commission Chambers


5:00 P.M.





6:00 P.M.


6:00 P.M.


6:00 P.M.


5:00 P.M.


6:00 P.M.


6:00 P.M.


6:00 P.M.


5:00 P.M.



6:00 P.M.


6:00 P.M.


6:00 P.M.


6:00 P.M.


All Workshops, Public Hearings and Commission Meetings are open to the public. Wakulla County does not
discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age or handicapped status in employment
or the provision of services. Handicapped individuals may receive special accommodations with one working
day's notice as per section 286.011(6) F.S. If special accommodations are required, please call Debbie DuBose,
Executive Assistant to the County Administrator at (850) 926-0919.


PUBLIC NOTICE

The Wakulla County Housing
Department will accept applications for
the Section 8 Voucher program
beginning March 17, 2008
Sand ending
March 31, 2008.
S.akulla We will take applications
county from 9:00 to 12:00
Housing each day.


I..











By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Several commercial fishermen
and two county commissioners
attended a workshop on some
proposed changes to rules in
the mullet fishery, including the
possibility of lifting the week-
end closure. But the main issue
brought up at the hearing was a
request for state wildlife officials
to change regulations dealing
with mullet nets to allow larger
mesh size.
The Crawfordville workshop,
held on Wednesday, Feb. 20, was
one of seven to be held around
the state by Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission offi-
cials to get public testimony on
weekend closures and a proposal
to allow mullet fishing more
than three miles offshore. The
issues are scheduled to go before
the FWC at a meeting in June.
Mullet fishermen complained
that the once lucrative Asian roe
market was taken over last year
by South American fisheries, the
only place they have to sell their
fish is as fresh market seafood.
The small-mesh nets they are
currently required to fish with,
'they said, lead to a lot of waste
because of bycatch as much
as 10 undersize mullet killed for
every legal fish.
Fishermen have complained
for years about the small mesh
size they are required to have in
their nets. The former Marine
Fisheries Commission inter-
preted the prohibition against
gill nets in the constitutional
amendment that limited marine
net fishing the so-called net
ban to be defined as nets with
large mesh that catch fish by
killing them. The FWC created
out of a merger of the MFC and
the Game and Fish Commission
has continued that interpreta-
tion.
The rule changes up for dis-
cussion were proposals to change
the weekend closure rule, which
forbids commercial fishermen
netting mullet on Saturdays
and Sundays between July and
January. All of those at the work-
shop indicated they supported
dropping the closure entirely,
rather than other options which
were either dropping it during
;a portion of those months and

;Soccer Awards
More than 100 players, guests
and family members attended
the Wakulla High School boys
soccer banquet held at the First
Baptist Church of Crawfordville
last week.
Catered with a great dinner by
Scratch Cakes Bakery and Eatery,
those in attendance enjoyed a
slide show presentation ofthe
past season's highlights present-
ed by Carl and Patty Herold.
Both teams had successful
seasons as the JV squad finished
5-4-2 while the varsity complet-
ed their season 9-7- 7- 1 (eight
point buck) while also winning
the inaugural Wakulla Soccer
Tournament held in December
against Taylor County, Mosley
and Maclay,
The seven draws this past
season tied a school record set
during the 1997-98 season when
the team finished 10-8-7.
Although in a drought of hav-
ing not made it out of districts
during the past three seasons,
the varsity record improved
Coach Bob Wallace's 19-year
reign as head coach to an overall
record of 143-194-47.
When taking into account
that the first seven years of high
school varsity soccer started
out with a combined record of
17-100-15 only speaks volumes
of the increasing success of the
soccer program at WHS.
Both teams honored their
respective players receiving
Sa limited edition WHS soccer
: T-shirt from the Soccer Boost-
Sers followed by individual
: awards,
: Junior Varsity Awards
S MVP Brandon Maloy
Offense Ben Anderson
Defense Wayne Murray
Varsity Awards
MVP Brett Wilson


Leading Scorer- Patrick Stewart
Offense Patrick Stewart
Defense Matt Reich
Most Improved Trevor Nason
Unsung Hero-Raleigh Clarke
Coach Wallace and Coach
Gregg recognized the 11 senior
players. They included: Nick
Baxter, Raleigh Clarke, Reggie
Coles, Shane Davis, Chad Her-
old, Robbie McPherson, Trevor
Nason, Adam Perkins, Marcus
SPosey, Patrick Stewart, and Brett
Wilson.


leaving the closure in place for
one day, or else keeping the
closure in place for one day of
the weekend.
Environmental consultant
Paul Johnson contended at the
hearing that the weekend clo-
sure never had anything to do
with fishery regulation, rather it
was intended to deal with com-
petition between recreational
and commercial fishermen. He
added that the FWC's model of
the impact of eliminating the
weekend closure accounted for
fishers going out seven days a
week an unrealistic expecta-
tion since mullet fishermen are
impacted by weather and when
the fish are in the bays.
Johnson and others at the
hearing also indicated they
were opposed to proposals to
allow harvest of mullet more
than three miles offshore as
much as five miles offshore in
federal waters. That proposal
was deemed ludicrous by those
at the workshop since 500 square
foot nets are hardly feasible for
use in deep water. Johnson add-
ed that there is nothing known
about where mullet go after the
fall spawning run when they
head into deep water.
County. Commission Chair-
man Ed Brimner questioned
whether the FWC's information
on how much mullet is caught
annually takes into consider-
ation how much undersize mul-
let is thrown away because of
the small mesh. He also asked
that the FWC allow fishermen
to have larger mesh so that they
can continue a traditional way of
life and earn a living.
Commissioner Howard Kes-
sler urged the FWC to listen to
the fishermen at the meeting
and take advantage of their years


of experience, saying they have
knowledge beyond what's found
in books.
There has been nothing for-
mally proposed by the FWC
about any change in net regula-
tions, though Ronald Fred Crum,
president of the Wakulla Fish-
ermen's Association, indicated
at the rule workshop that some
FWC commissioners have appar-
ently become more sympathetic
to the fishermen.
Crum was also concerned that
the FWC's numbers on mullet
landings only went up to 2005,
which only added to his sense
that there is no biology and sci-
ence to the agency's rule-making.
With Brazil taking over the roe
market last year, local fisher-
men had no market for roe and
statewide landings of mullet
were down millions of pounds,
he said.
St. Marks fisherman Keith
Ward, a fifth generation fisher-
man, said that all through his
family's decades of fishing, there
has never been a year in which
there were no sales of roe fish
- until this past year.
Panacea fisherman Richard
Van Munster complained that
the recovery of mullet stocks
risked being compromised by
the small mesh size and the high
rate of bycatch of juvenile mullet
that has yet to spawn.
Johnson said that increasing
the mesh size in mullet nets is
not a legal issue. "It's a good,
common-sense regulation issue,"
he said.
When the meeting first got
underway, when officials said
that the issues to be discussed
were weekend closure and off-
shore rules, nothing about nets,
Spring Creek fisherman Leo
Lovel walked out.


Tech @ Night

Te chnology Workshops

The TCC Wakulla Center will premier different
training workshops every Thursday evening
March 20 July 3.

Join us 6 9 p.m.
at the TCC Wakulla Center

S$20 each workshop
Schedule & registration online at
.- ", wb .tcc.fl.edu/iti or call 201-8760








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Page 14 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 6, 2008


FWC rule workshop held


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
The sponge fishery was one of
Florida's most lucrative fisheries
in the 19th century, and at one
point Apalachicola had the largest
sponge fleet in the state. That is,
until Greek immigrants in Tarpon
Springs diving for sponges rather
than using hooks began to domi-
nant the fishery.
That was one of the stories of
changes in Florida's maritime his-
tory shared by Tina Bucuvalas, state
folklorist and director of the Florida
Folklife Program, at a folklife and
maritime heritage program held
at TCC Wakulla on Thursday, Feb.
28. The event was sponsored by
the Big Bend Maritime Center in
Panacea.
Bucuvalas showed photographs
of Tarpon Springs sponge divers,
their specialized equipment, and
boats modeled on traditional Greek
boats. There was also a photograph
of a former sponge warehouse in
Apalachicola, now operating as an
antique shop.
Focusing on those folk cultural
expressions of Florida's commercial
fishermen,
Bucuvalas spoke on fishing gear
and boat building traditions from
around the state.
She spoke on oystering in the


Eastpoint-Apalachicola area and the
specialized gear used in the fishery
- the rake-like, long-handled tongs
used to scrape up oysters, and the
skiff boats with a deck to stand on
while tonging, and a "doghouse"
cabin for the oystermen to get out
of the weather.
The oyster skiff as currently
used is from a design by Eastpoint
boat builder James Lolly. The
mullet boats that ply local waters
were also mentioned, referred
to sometimes as tunnel boats or
"bird dogs."
Glen Summers of the Everglades
makes a boat modeled after the
dugout canoes made by Seminole
and Miccosukee indians. The long,
narrow boats are built to glide
through the shallow waters, guided
by a pole.
Bucuvalas also featured tradi-
tional bateaus made in Blount-


stown, modeled after the boats
used by the French and indians
in the Louisiana bayous. The old
boat builder makes the vessels out
of cypress and juniper, and all the
plans for how to build the boats are
kept in his head and have been
passed down from father to son
over generations.
Of signs and beliefs, Bucuvalas
noted the use of the term "miles"
in Apalachicola as place names.
She also noted some traditions that
are said to create bad luck, such As
leaving the dock on a Friday,,hav-
ing a woman onboard, whistling
on a boat (because you threaten to
"whistle up a storm), and sayihg
"alligator." .
The next maritime speaker
will be Debra Shelfi of the Florida
Department of State's Bureau bof
Archaeological Research speaking
on "Shipwrecks of the Big Bend."


Folklorist Tina Bucuvalas speaks at

maritime heritage workshop








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 6, 2008 Page 15


Deadline





11:00 A.CL AIf ED

926-7102


35 Cents


ADf^ 3Per Word



ADS $8.00
Minimum


Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


CATEGORIES
-100 EMPLOYMENT
105 Business Opportunities
.110 Help Wanted
115 Work Wanted
'120 Services and Businesses
125 Schools and Instruction
-130 Entertainment
200 ITEMS FOR SALE
.205 Antiques
.210 Auctions
215 Auto Parts and Accessories
'220 Cars
225 Trucks
:230 Motor Homes and Campers
235 Motorcycles and 4-Wheelers
:240 Boats and Motors
`245 Personal Watercraft r
:250 Sporting Goods -------


.260 Business Equipment
265 Computers and Internet
^70 Electronics
275 Home Furnishings


280 Home Appliances
285 Jewelry
290 Musical Instruments
295 Building Materials
300 MISC. FOR SALE
305 Machinery, Tools & Equipment
310 Firewood Products .- ,
315 Farm & Garden Equipment
320 Farm Products & Produce
325 Horses
330 Livestock, Farm Animals
335 Pets
340 Plants
345 Swap, Barter, Trade
350 Wanted to Buy E?-
355 Yard Sales
400 NOTICES YARP
410 Free Items AIG ,'-
415 Announcements '
420 Card of Thanks
425 Occasion Cards
430 In Memoriam
435 Lost and Found
440 Personals and Notices


500 REAL ESTATE, HOMES, MOBILES
505 Acreage for Lease
510 Acreage for Sale
515 Apartments for Rent
520 Townhouses for Rent
525 Townhouses for Sale
530 Commercial Property for Rent
535 Commercial Property for Sale
540 Farms for Sale
545 Homes for Sale
550 Homes with Acreage for Sale
555 Houses for Rent
560 Land for Sale
565 Mobile Homes for Rent IqI
570 Mobile Homes for Sale
575 Mobile Homes with Land for Sale
580 Rooms for Rent/Roommates Wanted
585 Wanted to Rent
590 Waterfront Homes/Land for Sale
595 Vacation Rental



CALL 926-7102 TODAY
Email: classifieds@thewakullanews.net


Legal Notice


F APPLE


FOR TAX DEED


2007 TXD 037
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Angela or Ruth
Dockery the holder of the following certificate has
filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued
theLeon. The certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property, and the
names in which it was assessed are as follows:
SCertificate # 661 year of Issuance 2000
Description of Property
.22-2S-01W-000-03942-014
P-1-14-M-61
A 2 AC Tract Located in the NE Corner of the NW
1/4 of Section 22
.Name in which assessed Ralph G. & Linda Ward,
Said property being in the County of Wakulla.
State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be
redeemed according to law the property described
in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bid-
der'at the courthouse door on the 26th day of
March, 2008, at 10:00 AM.
Dated this 25th day of February, 2008.
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
March 6, 2008
IN rTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION- --.
CASE NO.: 07-112-FC
DIVISION
TAYLOR, BEAN AND WHITAKER MORTGAGE
CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROBERT HEARING JR, et al,
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated Feb-
ruary 19, 2006 and entered in Case No.
07-112-FC of the Circuit Court of the SECOND
Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Flor-
ida wherein TAYLOR, BEAN, AND WHITAKER
MORTGAGE CORPORATION, is the Plaintiff, and
ROBERT HEARING JR; HEATHER HEARING;
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS; are the Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT
FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURT-
--HOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 20th day of March,
$ 2008, the following described property as set forth
-,in-said Final Judgment:
TRACT 34, SHADY ACRES, AN UNRECORDED
SBBDIVISION,BEING MORE PARTICULARLY
..DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER
SOF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE
1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA;
THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 30
SECONDS WEST 168.00 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 25 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 20 SEC-
ONDS WEST ALONG THE WEST
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF PINECREST DRIVE 276.62
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 39 MIN-
UTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE
NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY OF OAKMONT DRIVE
1573.95 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 30 SEC-
ONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF OAKMONT DRIVE 195.00
FEET TO POINT OF CURVATURE; THENCE
ALONG A CURVE TO THE RIGHT WITH A RA-
', DIUS OF 20.31 FEET FOR A DISTANCE OF
31.59 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY;
THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 30
SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF OAKMONT DRIVE 182.50
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 15 MIN-
UTES 30 SECONDS EAST 215.00 FEET;
- THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 55
SECONDS EAST 198.44 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; AND BEING SITUATED IN THE
SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP
2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MANUFAC-
STURED HOME SERIAL NUMBERS
FLTHLCT2801-1482A/B.
A/K/A 99 OAKMONT DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE,
FL 32327
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file
a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
o WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court
on February 20, 2008.
Brent X. Thurmond
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
February 28, 2008
March 6, 2008
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 07-140-FC
DIV.
AMERIS BANK, successor by merger with CITI-
ZENS BANK WAKULLA,
PLAINTIFF,
vs.
WILBURN LEE MCCALVIN, et al.,
DEFENDANTSS.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered
herein, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash in the lobby of the Wakulla County Court-
Shouse, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on the
3rd day of April, 2008, the following described
property:


LOT 4 OF SWIRLING SINKS, A SUBDIVISION
AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 106, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this
Court on Feb. 26, 2008.
*AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA)
NOTICE
INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES NEEDING A
REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION TO PAR-
TICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING SHOULD
CONTACT THE COURT ADMINISTRATORS OF-
FICE, AS SOON AS POSSIBLE, TELEPHONE:
850-926-0323; OR, IF HEARING IMPAIRED,
1-800-995-8771 (TTD); OR 1-800-955-8770 (V),
VIA FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
March 6, 13, 2008
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 07-159-CA
CHRISTINA ANN BRAZIER,
Plaintiff,
vs.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANT-
EES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES, OR OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST EMORY
LOUIS McDONALD, DECEASED; and ALL UN-
KNOWN PERSONS CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY
-RIGHT; TITLE OR INTERESTIN--THE PROP-
ERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT, IF
ALIVE; AND IF DEAD, OR NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES OR OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER
OR AGAINST THE UNKNOWN PERSONS,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: All defendants named above
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a complaint to Quiet
Title has been filed against you and that you are
required to serve a copy of your written defenses,
if any, to Christina Ann Brazier, c/o Valerie E.
Janard, Esquire, whose address is 237 East
Washington Street, Quincy, Florida 32351, on or
before March 17, 2008, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court before service on Plaintiff
or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a de-
fault may be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint.
Copies of all court documents in this case are
available at the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Wakulla County. You may review these
documents upon request.
February 14, 21, 28, 2008
March 6, 2008
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION '
CASE NO. 07-96-FC
DIVISION
COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC. FOR THE
BENEFIT OF UBS REAL ESTATE
INVESTMENTS INC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BOBBY G. CARPENTER, et al,
Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated Feb-
ruary 25, 2008 and entered in Case No. 07-96 FC
of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein
COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC. FOR THE
BENEFIT OF UBS REAL ESTATE
INVESTMENTS INC, is the Plaintiff and BOBBY
G. CARPENTER; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
BOBBY G. CARPENTER N/K/A KEILA CARPEN-
TER; TENANT #1 N/K/A ANA ADAMS, and TEN-
ANT #2 N/K/A ANTHONY MILLS are the Defen-
dants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the
27th day of March, 2008, the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment:
LOT 6 AND THE SOUTH HALF OF LOT 7,
BLOCK 25, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT NO.3,
AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43, PUBLIC RECORDS
OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 168 MOHAVE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE,
FL 32327
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file
a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court
on Feb. 26, 2008.
Brent X. Thurmond
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
March 6, 13, 2008
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 08- 10-PR
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE ESTATE OF
CHERYL HODGES DUNLAP,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DE-
MANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
The administration of the estate of CHERYL
HODGES DUNLAP, deceased, File Number 08 -
10-PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawford-
ville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses
of the personal representatives and the personal


iePi i ldtiv~e dUliu le.y d 1 e c t Iui ml U IUW.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED
THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of the first publication
of this notice must file their claims with the Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons
having claims or demands against the estate must
file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
DATED this 15th day of February, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Reoresentatlve:
SHAWN P. GOLETZ, ESQUIRE
Florida Bar No. 0338450
Smith, Thompson, Shaw & Manausa, P.A.
2075 Centre Pointe Boulevard *
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
Tel: (850) 402-4100
Fax: (850) 402-1508
Personal Representatives:
MICHAEL ANTHONY DUNLAP
9514 Lance Road
Tallahassee, Florida 32305
DAVID JACOB DUNLAP
63 Mayberry Road
Crawfordville, Florida 32327
February 28, 2008
March 6, 2008
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 07-128-CA
HELEN LUPER,
Plaintiff,
v.
MARY LEE JOLLEY-THOMPSON,
Defendant.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MARY LEE JOLLEY-THOMPSON
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for per-
sonal injury has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on Fred E. Pearson, P.A., At-
torney for Plaintiff, whose address is 703 North
Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32303 on or be-
fore April 7, 2008, a date which is thirty (30) days
after the first publication of this Notice and file the
original with the Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabili-
ties Act of 1990 (ADA), disabled persons who, be-
cause of their disabilities, need special accommo-
dation to participate in this proceeding should con-
tact ADA Coordinator at 301 South Monroe Street,
Tallahassee, FL 32301 or Telephone Voice/TrrDD
(850) 488-1357 not later than five (5) business
days prior to such proceeding. WITNESS my
hand and the seal of this Court this 20 day of Feb-
ruary, 2008.
Brent X. Thurmond
As Clerk of this Court
By: Teresa Brannan
As Deputy Clerk


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 07-470-DR
DIVISION:
MICHAEL W. CARTER,
Petitioner
and
ELIZABETH ALLBAUGH,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ELIZABETH ALLBAUGH
178 Fox Run
Crawfordville, FL 32327
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been
filed against you and that you are required to
serve a copy of your.written defenses, if any, to it
on Michael W. Carter, on or before March 21,
2008, and file the original with the clerk of this
court at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawford-
ville, Florida 32327, before service on Petitioner or
immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a de-
fault may be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this case, In-
cluding orders, are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office. You may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office notified of your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Assress, Florida Supreme
Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future
papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address
on record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law
Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and information. Failure
to comply can result in sanctions, including dis-
missal or striking of pleadings.
DATED: Feb. 11, 2008
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
February 21, 28, 2008
March 6, 13, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO: 07000170FC
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
TRIA E. PARSONS, et al,
Defendants(s).


NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MARLON D. REED
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 34 Inez Lane
Crawfordville, Fl 32327
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following property in WA-
KULLA County, Florida:
LOT 3, MEADOW ACRES, A SUBDIVISION AS
PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MOBILE
HOME LOCATED THEREON, SERIAL NUMBER
035111A & 035111 B, TITLE #S 64853826 AND
64853824
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses within 30
days after the first publication, if any, on Florida
Default Law Group, P.L., Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is 9119 Corporate Lake Drive,
Suite 300, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the
original with this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; oth-
erwise a default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the Complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court
on this 21 day of Feb., 2008.
Brent X. Thurmond
Clerk of the Court
By: Teresa Brannann
As Deputy Clerk
February 28, 2008
March 6, 2008

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the following vehicles
will be sold for towing & storage charges pursuant
to F.S. 713.78.
Auction date of 3/30/08 10:30 a.m.
1971 CHEV 164471S238401
1992 CHEV 1 G1 BL53E6NR152123
1998 PLYM 3P3ES47Y5WT277340
1995 TOYT JT3VN39W3S0171896
2005 SUZI VTTGM51A152103282
1989 FORD 1FTCR10A2KU56597
1994 JEEP 1J4FX58S5RC170904
1982 DODGE 1B7FD14E3CS223023
Notice is hereby given that on 3/27/08 at 10:30
am the following vehicle will be sold for towing &
storage charges pursuant to F.S. 713.78.
1997 NISS 1N4BU31D1VC187504
ALL Sales to be held at Quic-Towing Inc., 3216
Springhill Rd., Tallahasee, Fl. 32305
850-491-1950.
March 6, 2008
* *


110 Help Wanted


CBK, a leading national home de-
cor and accessories company w/an
extensive product line has immedi-
ate position available for a District
Account Manager In Tallahassee,
FL area. Est. acct. base, includes
furniture stores, gift shops, etc.
Must have road sales experience
and reside in the territory. We offer
a full benefits package, and ad-
vancement opportunities. Please
complete our application process
at: cbk.iapplicants.com or fax re-
sume to 731-884-4922. Visit our
website at: www.cbkhome.com.

Christian musicians & singers
wanted. 421-2633.

Janitor
St. Marks Powder is seeking respon-
sible individuals to train for work in a
safety and quality-minded manufac-
turing setting. Candidates should be
dependable and have a stable work
history. Interested candidates
should call 577-2403 for further in-
structions and requirements. $9.00hr.
+ shift differential.

Needed experienced cook. Also
dishwasher/bus person. Apply in per-
son. Ask for Sunny. Riverside Cafe,
St. Marks.

Non-smoking, professional, fast-
paced Crawfordville office needs de-
tail-oriented, organized person for full
time position. Mon Fri 8 to 5. Call
926-7920 for information and appli-
cation times.

NOW HIRING! Busy real estate com-
pany needs full-time agents. Real
estate license is required. Contact
Ochlockonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001 or 850-926-9260
obr@obrealty.com
www.obrealty.com


PART-TIME DIRECTOR
WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST
DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
Qualifications include knowledge of
the Wakulla County community and
tourist related activities. Experience
in partnership building, administra-
tion, budgeting and related fields is
required, experience in community
relations and volunteer management
is preferred. Salary $17k/yr. Cover
letter stating candidates' desire for
position, a resume, and references
should be mailed to:
P.O. Box 67, Panacea, FL 32346
Prior to March 13, 2008

Part-time help needed for the care of
non-venomous reptiles. Afternoon or
evening hours; 15-20 hrs. per week
call 850-926-6248.
120 Services and Busi-
nesses

A NEW LOOK PAINTING, serving
Wakulla County for 14 years. Li-
censed & Insured. Call Jim or Teresa
Porter. (850)926-2400.

A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING
Free Estimates
Licensed John Farrell
926-5179
566-7550


AIR CON OF WAKULLA
Heating and Cooling
Gary Limbaugh 926-5592
3232 Crawfordville Highway
Service, Repair, Installation
FL Lic. #CAC1814304

All about concrete. Joseph Francis.
850-556-1178 or 850-926-9064.

ANYTIME ELECTRIC
Specializing in repair and service,
residential and commercial, homes
and mobile homes. 24-hour service.
Mark Oliver, ER0015233. 421-3012.

BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE
Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway.
Larry Carter Owner/Operator.
850-925-7931, 850-694-7041. Li-
censed/Insured.

Bella's Bed & Biscuit Doggie
Daycare.
Overnight boarding. Extended stays.
Kennel free home environment. Lots
of love & pampering. 926-1016.

C & R Tractor/Backhoe Services,
large tract and residential site clear-
ing rock, dirt, and road base hauling.
call Crandall (850)933-3346.


Casey's

Lawn &

,Tree
k C^--a


HS


Harold Burse Stump Grinding
926-7291.


















Interior/exterior painting, cleaning &
pressure washing. Handyman serv-
ices also available. Affordable rates.
Free estimates. Boat cleaning and
re-carpeting. Days: Bobby-459-1071.
Carol-559-7306.
Evenings: 926-2462.


KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR
Commercial, residential and mobile
homes. Repair, sales, service, instal-
lation. All makes and models. Lic.
#RA0062516. 926-3546.

Mr. Stump
Stump Grinding
Quick Service
Cellular: 509-8530
Munges Tree- 24 hour emergency
service (850)421-8104. Firewood also
available.


Five Star.7

Plumbing

Big Bend, Inc.
Commercial & Residential Service

Billy B. Rathel, Jr.
850-544-5062
850-421-1237 Fax
plumbingjivestar@yahoo.com
Lic#CFC1427547 State Certified


Tractor Work-Bushhog, lawn, drive-
way/dirt road grading, fencing, tree
trimming, plow. Call (850)545-8921.

We do alterations, embroidery,
monogramming, sewing in my home.
Cal April @ 251-3323.


125 Schools and Instruc-
tion


Sa rvIC Michelle Snow
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
9 2 6-57 59 Piano-Voice-Guitar-Woodwinds
926-7627
528-3478 0--- e -YOUR NEWSPAPER

A PEOPLE
sSERVING

Compost for sale. 850-556-1178 or PEOPLE
850-926-9064.


Affordable Home

Maintenance

Tired of paying too
much for home repairs?

C^ Professional

Repairs
with a working
S man's prices

Any repair
minor to major
Call (850) 926-4374

(850) 212-7762

LLC#098172


I








Page 16 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 6, 2008


200 Items For Sale ;

30ft. X 40ft. long U.S. Steel Building.
12ft. side walls; 16ft. center. New in
crate. $9,995. 850/926-6114 leave
message.
215 Auto Parts and Acces-
25u series I

Four 195/65 R1591H low profile tires
w/15" chrome rims. Two different
lugg patterns. Less than lyr usage.
Bought new, paid $1,100. Asking
$250. Taken off a 1997 Ford Escort.
850-544-6791.
Four P255170R16 tires w/16"
chrome rims. Tires and rims in great
condition. $250. Taken off Ford
Truck. 850-544-6791.
220 Cars

1984 Chevy Camaro. Z28 running
305, V8 w/only 40K miles, clear title.
Needs body work. $750 OBO. Con-
tact Eric (850)926-8997.
2002 Nissan Sentra, Silver. 98,000
miles. $5,500 OBO. Great car for
new driver. Please call Jamie @
879-1065.
230 Motor Homes and
Campers

1995 Star Craft Pop-Up Camper.
Sleeps 6. Recent races, tires, bear-
ings. Good Condition. $3,500.
850-544-6791.

240 Boats and Motors

1999 16 ft. Horizon Bass Boat, alumi-
num, 50 hp Johnson, trolling motor,
depth finder & trailer. $5900.
566-7391.

255 Guns

Deer and Turkey Hunting.
350 Acres with 3 miles of River
Frontage. 850-443-0482.

275 Home Furnishings

$150 queen pillowtop mattress and
box set, unused with warranty,
222-7783.
$400 New NASA Visco Memory
Foam mattress set with warranty.
Can deliver. 222-9879.
5 piece 100% MicroFiber sofa/chair
and 3 pc coffee set $600, All New in
boxes. Delivery available. 222-7783.
6 piece, Pub Table, solid wood & up-
holstery chairs. New in crate. Lst
$1300, Take $590. 425-8374.
Bed-King Pillowtop Orthopedic Mat-
tress Set. Brand new in plastic. Must
move, $400. 545-7112.
Bedroom: 4 pc set still boxed, $499,
can deliver. Brand new! 222-7783.
Cherry-New Queen Louis Phillip
sleigh 7pc bedroom set. $2400
value, must sell $999. 425-8374. De-
livery available.
Dining Room-Beautiful cherry table,
2 arm & 4 side chairs, lighted china
cabinet. Brand new in boxes, can de-
liver. Must move, $799. 222-9879.
Full mattress set. $125. Twin mat-
tress set. $100. Both New. 545-7112.


Queen Orthopedic Pillowtop New
mattress set in sealed plastic. Full
warranty. Sacrifice $279. Can deliver.
850-222-7783.
320 Farm Products &
Produce

Fresh Mushroom Compost, small
load of field dirt, red mulch, potting
soil, delivery available. Call
(850)926-3280 or (850)445-3681.

335 Pets

Adopt a pet from the animal shelter:
Dogs:
Lab mix, yellow
Terrier mix
Hound mixes
Lab mixes
Bluetick Hound

Many other nice mixes. Come and
take a look.

Puppies:
Lab mixes
Pointer mixes, very cute
Rottie mixes
Lab/Bulldog mixes

Adult cats and a few kittens.

355 Yard Sales

Estate Sale. Behind Channel Marker
Deli, St. Marks. 9-? Sat.-Sun.
925-6850.

Huge Yard Sale! March 7th & 8th.
Friday 8AM-4PM; Saturday
8AM-3PM. 75 Simmons Ct. Rain or
Shine. 22HP mower, tackle, rods,
reels, antique and new tools. Lots
More!!

Moving sale. Furniture, appliances,
clothes, housewares, holiday decora-
tions, baby items, toys, plus alot
more. Sat. 7-1. 22 King Arthur's Ct.
519-4201.

3rd Annual"

Sopchoppy
Community-Wide
YARD SALE
Sat. March 8* 8am 2pm
Sopchoppy
residents
sign-up at: I
962-2550 Antiques Umniques
61 Rose Street, Sopchoppy

Yard Sale. Couch, sleeper sofa,
washing machine, barstools, house-
hold items, men's, women's, chil-
dren's clothes, & much more. 113
Cochise St., Sat. 8-until.

435 Lost and Found |

Female beagle. Approximately 6-8
years old. Found on Callahan Road.
926-2462.

Lost dog. Looks like chocolate lab.
Answers to "Maggie." Piece of ear is
missing. 926-9110 or 284-6336.

White Nano Ipod lost at Hudson
Park. Please call 544-9627.


500 Real Estate, Homes 520 Tonhousesfor Rent
Mobiles I T


For sale, lease purchase, or rent.
3BR/2BA on a double lot located in
Wakulla Gardens. Privacy fenced
backyard and sheds. Sale Price
$127,500 or $900/mo. + deposit.
850-694-0075.

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference, limi-
tation, or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status or national origin or
an intention to make any such pref-
erence, limitation or discrimination."
Familial status includes children un-
der the age of 18 living with parents
or legal custodians, pregnant wom-
en and people securing the custody
of children under the age of 18.
This newspaper will not accept any
advertising for real estate that is a
violation of the law. Our readers are
hereby informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are
available on an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of discrimination
call HU D toll free at 1-800-669-9777.
The toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


OPPORTUNrTY

515 Apartments for Rent

Summer Trace Apartments now rent-
ing 1 bedroom apartment. Basic rent
beginning at $483.00. We are an
equal opportunity housing for the
elderly and disabled. Office hours are
9-2:30 M-F (850)984-4811.


Crawfordville! 3BR/2BA Townhome
in Camelot Subdivision with commu-
nity pool. $895/month $895/deposit
No Pets. No Smoking. $50.00 move
in bonus!! Ochlockonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001 www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com
530 Comm. Property for
Rent

Business/Retail Space at the corner
of Spring Creek & Hwy 98 in Craw-
fordville (at the road to Shell Point).
Only $705/mo. Ask about Move in
Specials! Owner/Agent, Sherri Merkle
850-926-5725 or 322-7106.
GRADE A
OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT
New Year's Special:
FIRST MONTH FREE!
w/13-month lease.
Several Hwy. frontage office spaces
available. Great atmosphere!
All rents, plus sales tax, inc. all utilities,
trash p/u, full kitchen use, & clean
restrooms. Common area cleaned
twice/weekly.
Rates: $300.00, $325.00, $400.00, &
$425.00. First and last month's rent.

CALL (850) 926-4511

Woodville Retail Space
Available
Fitness Studio-1000/sf
Wall to wall mat & mirrors
Retail -1250/sf
Storefront w/back storage
Two-Bay Garage-1200/sf
Divided Office Space-1074/sf
Lewiswood Center
421-5039


A. WAKULLA
boarding COUNTYh.

space ANIMAL0

limited HOSPITAL

Make your pets' 926-7153


boarding reservations
NOW for any holiday

trips!


1


MAR -LUC

PROPERTIES, INC.
Wonderful home feels and looks like a
brand new home with soaring ceilings,'
hardwood floors throughout, tile in
kitchen, baths and Florida room.
Professionally landscaped Oriental gar-
Idens, privacy fenced, w/irrigation system
and its own well for watering on .53 ,
acres within walking distance to shopping
and restaurants. 3/2, FP never used, shop
that's truly a man's world! I yr home warranty, inspection completed for your
review. $229,000, 7HummingBirdLane.com
Adorable, bright, spacey and airy 2/2's with
average utility bills of $60 mo. And low yearly
insurance rates make this a great home to
live in and enjoy. Only $105,000 with
average mortgage payments including escrow m
of $475 to $575 month *including escrowed ,
taxes & insurance (*depends on credit wor-
thiness). Lot40MontgomeryDrive.com
_k tLovely 3/2 home features 1,248-
S1 SF on half acre with Florida style.
-. ;. privacy fenced back yard w/hot
S" tub, decking, picnic area great
I - !for entertaining. Home features .
galley kitchen split floor plan, FP
roo, .and 2 car garage plus more in an
established neighborhood with ,
great atmosphere and neighbors. Convenient in town location & a must see to,
appreciate. I yr. home warranty, inspection completed for your review. -
Affordable at $176,000, 44HummingBirdLane.com
Located in N.Wakulla
and 10 min. south of the ,d.
Capital, Newer 2005 wall the
upgrades barely lived in 4/3
brick faced home on 5 acres
with wild apple, persimmons,
oak trees features hardwood i
floors, Corian counters, large screened in porch, FPR 2 car garage, formal dining
room, vaulted/cathedral ceilings, plant shelves plus more. I yr.home warranty, n-
spection completed for your review $339,000, 82MariaDelCarmen.com
2_sory3_bdrom,__&_ _bt _Located just off Lower Bridge
Rd. has more than just
personality. Offering 3/2 with

kitchen pantry. Oak kitchen cablt-
nets, Trane heater/air system,..
J Jacuzzi tub, arched doorways
that give this home flair and soaring ceilings. Custom window treatments stay
w/home, one car garage, one & half lots. Seller worked out of town 90% of
ownership so this 2 yr. old home is barely lived in! $129,900, 20Sudai.com
2 story 3 bedroom, 2 & V2 bath home with a'
to-die-for master suite w/French doors leading to
your own private balcony. Master bath has fabulous
Jacuzzi tub, large walk in closet, cathedral ceilings
throughout downstairs & upstairs, custom wood
kitchen cabinets, wooden floors, truly a home that
speaks lifestyle. REDUCED $ 159,900, 9
55MerwynDrive.com

10.53 acres (2801 Coastal Hwy) on Hwy 98/319 just
before elementary school, over 1,100 ft. on Hwy commercial.
Reduced for quick sale $350,000
46 Tharpe Lane on .87 acres, 2002 home w/3/2
in country. Washer/Dryer included. $139,900

Double lots together on Arikara, $17,000
Single lot Sarsi and Squaw, $7,000


%%'.% Marl-uProperties.com
wwhtnBookmillerHomes com
%vvv~. NIPC uslom Homes. com
ell North Pointe Center

office C ra',i. ,lI & F L '1 23 2,


Mary A. Bookmiller
GRI, CRS
Broker/Onner Reallor

850-597-2923 Ce
850-926-0235 Fa
850-926-0230 01


Shell Point
926-7811


Florida
Coastal
Properties, Inc.


T. Gaupin, Broker


Crawfordville
926-5111


Silver Coast
Realty


www.c21fcp.com

REAL ESTATE SHOPPING "24/7"

Today's Buys Are

Tomorrow's Best Investments
Take a look then give us a call!

*** RENTALS ***
LARGE BRICK HOME with 4BR/3BA available for rent in beautiful
River Plantation Subdivision. $1,800/month and $1,800 security deposit.
2BR/2.5BA TOWNHOME on canal in Snug Harbor at Shell
Point Beach available for $ 1,500/month with $ 1,500
security deposit. Four month minimum rental required.
3BR/2BA Crawfordville home available for $975/month
with $975 security deposit.


Panacea at Bridge
984-5007


HLARTUNG AND i ,
NOBLIN, INC. Your Perfect Partner
REALTORS for Real Estate!
Magnolia Gardens
$119,900
Great open plan, L shaped front
U porch. Seller will pay up to
S...... $2,000 in closing costs.
#150005, Jeannie Porter, CRS
GRI, CeMS 566-4510

2 acres on Woodville Hwy
$84,900 -
Power pole, city water V2
cleared, backs to Old Woodville
Hwy & bike path. #180711,
Joi Hope 210-7300 or .--..
Dawn Reed 294-3468

Just Reduced! $144,500
3BrI2Ba 1385 Sq.Ft. Stacked
Stone entrance. Upgrades Galore!
Seller will pay typical closing
costs. Downtown Crawfordville.
#173631
,- Ed McGuffy 524-4940 or
-- Lentz Walker 528-3572

Great Beginnings
$117,900
Your First Home is built and
ready for your family. 3BR/
2BA, 1,205 sq.ft. #172174
Dawn Reed 294-3468 or Joi JL _:
Hope 210-7300

~ OPEN HOUSE-
Gardens of Saralan
open every Saturday from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Directions: 319 S, Left on Wakulla Arran Rd. approx. 1 mile on left.
www.coldwellbankerwakulla.com
2650-1 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327
.. 850-926-2994 Phone 850-926-4875 Fax
. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated MIS- A,
IQ...(-


S, i Lic. Real Estate Broker
oi=- .Crawfordville Hwy.

FgORGs (850) 926-7043
-] (850) 926-2898 Fax


www.Forestrealty@earthlink.net

COMMERCIAL- Hwy 319-1.21 Acres -151 ft. on Hwy $275,000
WAKULLA GARDENS 3BR/2BA Home, 1,150 sq. ft.,
adjoins large farm to the rear. Located on 2 lots, porches, deck,
outbuildings, and many extras. $130,000
SOPCHOPPY Minutes to Apalachicola National
Forest 5 Acres and M/H $79,900
TRADEWINDS SUBD. Lot 25 includes boat slip. $259,000
OCHLOCKONEE RIVER 22.6 Acres, 537 ft. on River. $400,000
SMITH CREEK SOPCHOPPY 33.6
Wooded Acres $6,000/acre.


Wakulla Station
421-3133


--


1


B



is









510 Comm. Property for h
Rent





]STORAGE
MINI-WAREHOUSES
BOATS RV'S

519-5128 508-5177
2 miles South of Courthouse
.on Hwy. 319 in Crawfordville
24 HourAccess Video Surveillance

Mini-Warehouse Spaces for lease,
8X10 and 10X12 now available.
Come by or call Wakulla Realty,
926-5084.
UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY. New of-
fice space. Hwy 319 Sopchoppy.
$200/month rent if help answer and
lease storage space part-time.
962-2456.

545 Homes for Sale

3/2,Villa for sale by owner lease opt.
possible, 33 Covington Circle Craw-
fordville 1,588 sq. ft. all appli. / blinds
Florida room, sprinklers, fans, fenced
backyard, 2 car garage. $165,000.00
85O-926-8774
Best Deal in Crawfordville.
Logated-Wakulla Gardens. 3BR/2BA.
Vaulted ceilings, huge den.
1;850sq./ft. w/500sq./ft. storage
shed. Large screened-in patio. Set
on 4'lots w/paved drive, fenced. Ask-
igr) $150,000. Call
850-556-5906/229-377-9836.

555 Houses for Rent

2BR/2BA Completely renovated/like
new. W/D, Fenced back yard, Lower
Bridge Road. $795/mo. Deposit
$795, No Pets. Call 926-8452.
Brand New 3BR/2BA energy-efficient
green house. Very low utility bills.
Walking distance to gorgeous
15(-acre Lake Ellen and boat ramp.
3T John David Dr. $950/mo.
R.jn-to-own option. 850-443-3300.
FRa.teh style home in Panacea.
3ER12BA w/office, den, fenced back-
yard'w/gazebo, heated screened-in
pbdil, fenced ten-acre pasture, work-
shed, carport. Very nice and se-
cluded. Borders national refuge
$1250/mo. $1250/security.
9,84-3278/251-7965.

9 560 Land for Sale

1.1 acres in Smith Creek on creek.
Homes or mobile homes. $100,000.
Revell Realty 962-2212.
Sacres'ir Stnith Creek. Planted pine.
Homes or mobile homes. $50,000.
Revell Realty. 962-2212.








Florida
Wild Mammal
Association
To report
orphaned or injured
wildlife, please call
S 926-8308 )


5 lots in Panacea. On small lake, fac-
ing wildlife refuge. 1 with 3BR/2BA
SW. $85,000. $10,000 below ap-
praisal. Other 4, $35,000 each. Each
$10,000 below appraisal. Discount
for all five lots together. 926-2358.

Beautiful, untimbered, mature
wooded 20-acre tract. Easy access
from Hwy 98. Reduced $139,000.
Call Susan McKaye, owner/agent
(850)510-2477. Ochlockonee Bay
Realty.
www.hardwoodhammock.com

Five tracts on Smith Creek. 1 5-acre,
2 10-acre, 1 99-acre, 1 124-acre.
$7,000/acre. Owner financing possi-
ble. 984-0093.
565 Mobile Homes for
Rent |

2BR/1BA SW W/shed, large rear
deck, large yard, nice neighborhood.
NO PETS. $550/month. $500/secu-
rity. 926-6212.

3BR/2BA DW. Front and rear decks.
All electric. Great neighborhood. NO
PETS. $745/mo. $650/deposit.
926-6212.

For Rent: 3/2 w/bonus room. Mobile
home $750 1st/last and deposit.
850/524-2062 or 850/524-1.147.

MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT
Clean well-maintained DW
Mobilehomes. S. Leon &
Wakulla Co.-Sugar Pine Ct. off
Hwy 319 and Ridgeway Ct. off
Hwy 61.3 bed/2 bath,
front/back decks. Nice private
yards. Family room, large shed
and new carpet. For rent or
lease purchase option. No
pets. First, last and security
deposit. Rates: $725.00,
$750.00, and $800.00/month.
Call 926-4511
SOPCHOPPY. Newer 2BR/2BA No
pets. Unique opportunity. Will reduce
rent for minimal task. Retired couple
preferred. $495/month. 962-2456.

1570 Mobile Homes for Salej

Wakulla Gardens 2BR/1 BA SW. No
Pets. References required. $450/mo.
$200/deposit. 926-2358.

Mobile
Solutions

Buy/Sell

Used Mobile

Homes

850-258-3338
Mike Wahl


PROPERTIES


The Wakulla County His-
torical Society's March meeting
will be held at the Wakulla
County Public Library on Tues-
day, March 11 at 7 p.m.
The program for this meet-
ing will be a study of the
early development of Wakulla
County including areas of
Curtis Mills, Sopchoppy and
Ashmore. Information col-
lected from individuals having
lived in those areas as well as
archival information will be
presented by individual Society
members. The public is always
encouraged and welcome to

Health

program

planned

Please join us for a work-
shop on Women's Health Sat-
urday, March 15, at 11 a.m. The
program will include: Body-
Physical Activity, Nutrition,
Screenings & Immunizations,
Smoking, HIV Aids; Mind-
Stress, Depression, Domestic
and Sexual Violence: Spirit-
Spirituality, Community Ser-
vice, Rest and Recreation.
Little Salem Primitive Bap-
tist Church,1998 Wakulla Arran
Road, Crawfordville, will host
the workshop. For more infor-
mation, call 519-0071.

FWMA fundraiser
The Florida Wild Mammal As-
sociation is hosting a yard sale at
Hudson Park Friday and Saturday,
March 7 and March 8, from 8 a.m.
until 4 p.m. Donations will be hap-
pily accepted on Thursday after 5
p.m. or during the sale.
Every penny earned from this
sale goes to help the injured and
orphaned animals at Wakulla's only
wildlife rescue facility.


David Hoover, Realtor
(850) 519-7944
dhoover2@hotmail.com


II Powhatan
New Construction 3/2 brick
front with I-car garage in
Wakulla Gardens. Designer
details with laminate wood floors
and ceramic tile. Built by
Southpointe Builders.
$126,500.


Brain


1 6


attend WCHS meetings. Come
early for refreshments and fel-
lowship.
The Society's February meet-
ing, held at the Welcome Cen-
ter in Panacea, was very well
attended with delightful re-
freshments and speakers, said
Betty Green. "We thank Sher-
rie Posey Miller for her help
in providing refreshments and
making arrangements for the
meeting and
we greatly appreciate and ad-
mire the work of Paige Killeen
in collecting, framing and dis-
playing old photographs of the


Panacea area."
Bonnie Holub, who has been
researching the history of Pana-
cea, reported much of what she
has written, followed by Linda
Thompson, WCHS member and
former Panacea Postmaster,
who shared memories of her
own and many of the stories
collected by her grandfather,
the well-known Capt. Schley.
Also speaking to the group,
sharing a lifetime of memories
and a map of Panacea that
represented the community
when she was a girl, was Vivian
Taylor Johnson, whose father


was Henry Taylor, a remarkable
boat-builder known throughout
the local fishing world.
All Wakulla County residents
are reminded the WCHS
is seeking stories for pub-
lishing in The Heritage of
Wakulla County, Fl. Brochures
giving instructions may be
picked up at the Wakulla Coun-
ty Public Library, or you may
call Betty Green, 926-7405, or
e-mail bgreen@nettally.com.
Deadline for the submissions
is March 31.







1W PAP[


"IT All


106 W.Sth Ave.
Tallahassee, FL 32303
850-222-2166 tel..
www.wmleeco.com


** New Subdivisions***
All subdivisions have
underground electric and water.
Carmen Maria $34,900. 1 ac.
tracts near Lake Talquin.
Savannah Forest $45,900.
1 ac. tracts offWak. ArranRd.
Established Community!
Sellars Crossing $65,900.
1+ ac lots in North Wakulla.
Steeplechase $96,900 to
$109,900.5 ac. wooded tracts.
Horse friendly!
Walkers Mll $69,900.
2 ac. wooded lots, located on
Lower Bridge Road.


Come Home to the Coast
77 Gulf Breeze Dr.
2BR/2BA coastal home on deep
canal w/ dock located in beautiful
Bay Estates. Features custom tile in
area, wrap-around deck, outdoor sh
screened porch, large mezzanine
hurricane shutters $6"0.000


2 acre tract in Wakulla Forest
with paved roads and city water.
$47,900: UNDER CONTRACT
Carmen Roclo Perfect
opportunity >> lowest priced lot!
2 ac. lot off Shadeville Hwy near
Wakulla Station. $64,900.
Two 5+ acre tracts off
Rehwinkel Rd. with large trees
on the back of properties and a
small pond.
$134,750 and $136,250.
2 acre tract with large
hardwoods in Beechwood
Subdivision off
Shadeville Highway. $52,900.


UNDER
CONTRACT!
HOP approved
1219 sq. ft. home in
Montejo,
Tallahassee.
3BR/2BA custom
trim package,
knockdown finish
walls, & ceiling
fans.
Call to see the
new construction
next door!


vater
Oyster
i living Call
shower, Donna Card
, & 850-508-1235




More Bang for Your Buck!
Come home to this spacious
3BR/2BA 1515 square foot
home. Features include brick
and Hardie board, patio, sprin-
kler system and a large 2 car
garage. See ceiling fans
throughout, vaulted ceilings
and wood floors in the living
area, & in the master bedroom
tray ceilings and his/her
closets. Great for first time
home buyers!f $189,900.


NEW CONSTRUCTION

65 Susquehanna Trail
1,204 sq. ft. 3BR/2BA, awesome floorplan with
ft wood flooring. Great master bedroom with large
walk-in closet and master bath completely tiled.
Quality built at great price!!! $ 117,900

XX Pueblo Trail This 1,260 sq. ft.
3BR/2BA is a new construction with many upgrades. This extraordinary
home has an awesome floorplan. Call now to pick colors. $ 121,700


V BlueWater
Susan Jones Real y uo .t
(850) 566-7584 Realty Group Quality Built Homes


Teasers


- ~


06

3,


Sonya Hall
Lic. Real Estate Broker
"Specializing in Wakulla Co."'
(850) 926-5084
FOR RENT:
"4Br 2Ba House $975mo
+ Sec. Dep. (N. Location)
3Br 2Ba House $1,400mo
+ Sec. Dep. (2 Car Garage)
3Br 2Ba House $1,350mo
+ Sec. Dep. (2 Car Garage)
3Br 2Ba House $1,250mo
+ Sec. Dep. (2 Car Garage)
3Br 2Ba House $1,1 00mo
+ Sec. Dep. (2 Car Garage)
3Br 2Ba House $925mo
+ Sec. Dep.
3Br 2Ba House $900mo
+ Sec. Dep.
3Br 2.5Ba Twnhs $850mo
: + Sec. Dep.
3Br 2.5Ba Twnhs $800mo
+ Sec. Dep.


S. "Copyrighted Material



S Syndicated Content



.'Available from Commercial News Providers"


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 6, 2008 Page 17

Historical Society to meet


6 1


- 0


2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $800mo
+ Sec. Dep.
- 2Br 1Ba House $575mo
+ Sec. Dep.


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Page 18 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 6, 2008


Special Olympics held Deputy resigns after DUI arrest FCAT is coming, rest up
I -...1... ~ I h A- T7- ..11-I20-~1 -1nr;-f +fI nwompLCU11


By KEITH CLINE
Special to The Wakulla News
Lots of fans were on hand
for the Special Olympics Florida
track and field competition on
Feb. 25.
All of Wakulla County
Schools' ESE students partici-
pated in two of the three events
that were chosen by the athlete
or the athlete's teacher.
This year, the Wakulla Coun-
ty Shediffs Office came out and
eoked hot dogs for those who
axtnded the Special Olympics

Tho Olympic Village is a
ptece where the athletes play
am s and win cool prizes
fAi- they firtsh their events.


This year they added some-
thing brand new to the village
- a giant inflatable slidel Ath-
letes played on it all day long.
Wakulla High
School cheerleaders volun-
teered their time and helped
with the booths in the village.
All the coaches came out
and helped with the races. At
the end, the athletes were re-
warded with ribbons for first
through fifth places.
The next Special Olympics
event will be in Tallahassee at
Godby High School on March
29. The athletes will be cel-
ebrating with an "End of the
Year" party on May 16.


0 ,


District is ready for FCAT and
they hope students are ready.
too.
The FCAT testing will take
place from Tuesday, March 11 to
Tuesday, March 25 throughout
the district. School officials ask
parents to make sure their chil-
dren get plenty of rest heading


Uiit Anut un1110 VVw nu wVl Thet Scholin


confronted by the officers. It
later turned out that the man
who was killed. Christopher
Wilson, was carrying a replica
BB gun that looked like a Colt
.45 semi-automatic pistol.
Both officers were cleared
in the shooting by a Wakulla
County grand jury.


&A.-- .- -'-
In addition, students will lose
of hour of sleep this weekend as
a result of the time change back
to Daylight Saving Time. County
officials encourage students
to take into account the time
change in their activity planning
since it occurs only two days
before testing begins.


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla Sheriff's Deputy
Roger Rankin, who was one
of the officers involved in the
shooting last year in which
a robbery suspect was killed,
resigned from the department
last week after being charged
with DUI in Leon County.
Rankin, a road deputy for
the sheriff's office, was ar-
rested several weeks ago by
FSU Police on a misdemeanor
DUI charge.
In May 2007, Rankin and Lt.
Boonie Mitchell were involved
in the fatal shooting of a 22-
year-old man who was alleg-
edly holding up the Murphy
Oil gas station and refused to


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Habitat for Humanity

L "Re-Store"

Shadeville Highway

926-4544
Open Tues. Sat. 9 a.m. 5 p.m.




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