Title: Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00152
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: January 3, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028313
Volume ID: VID00152
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Full Text









2007: A look back



News Editor Keith Blackmar compiles a review of the news
we made, observed and lived in Wakulla County in 2007.
It begins on Page 3.


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Published Weekly,
Read Daily


Thursday, January 0


50


Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century


Manatees


still visit


state park
By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net

Many area businesses close
for the Christmas holidays, but
one operation that never doses is
Wakulla Springs State Park. Christ-
mas visits to the park during the
holidays often find Europeans
enjoying the chilly swimming
area while many languages can
be overheard on a walk through
the Wakulla Springs Lodge. Other
visitors enjoy the crackling of a
fire in the fireplace or a meal in
the dining room,
On Christmas eve, Wakulla
Springs was full of visitors plunk-
ing down their money to take
part in the popular jungle cruise.
There were many birds identi-
fled by the tour boat operators
and care was taken to make sure
all of the visitors got a glimpse
of the famous Wakulla Springs
alligators.
None of the glassbottom boats
were operating during the holi-
days. since the -water was not as-
dear as it was during the spring
when a ranger reported that the
boats operated for approximately
two months in April and May.
But on this day, visitors on the
boat put away their binoculars to
finish up the tour with a special
treat As the park anger prepared
to return to the boat dock, a sharp
eye in the boat observed three
manatees swimming about in an
area just outside the swimming
zone and just down river from
the springs boil.
A large group of visitors gath-
ered on the dive tower to get a
better look; Park officials reported
that manatees have been ob-
served during the past few weeks
despite colder weather. A mother
and calf was observed along with
a calf without a mother, an obser-
vation that was of "concern" to
the park staff.
The manatees peacefully
poked their heads out of the
cold water to get a gulp of air. The
park ranger said having manatees
around the property at Christmas
is unusual but not completely out
of the ordinary. The manatees
usually swim back down to the
warmer waters of Citrus County
when Wakulla County weather
turns cold. One winter a mother
and calf got stranded in the
colder waters of North Florida
and did not make it back to Citrus
County.
Wakulla Springs State Park
officials have been documenting
the manatee visits for the past
decade. The popular state park is
open 365 days each year and 366
in 2008 as part of Leap Year,';.
For more information about i
Wakulla Springs State Park activi- '
ties, call 926-0700.


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Community



remembers



Cheryl Dunlap


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Crawfordville homicide vic-
tim Cheryl Hodges Dunlap, 46,
was buried at Whiddon Lake
Cemetery in Crawfordville on
Thursday, Dec. 27 following.
a funeral service at River of
Life. The church also hosted a
visitation on Wednesday, Dec.
26. Both functions were filled
with residents expressing their
sympathies.


Following the funeral, a slow
moving procession of vehicles
drove along U.S. Highway 319
from the church to the cem-
etery. Several hundred mourn-
ers attended the visitation and
memorial service for Dunlap at
River. Fresh flowers remain on
the side -of U.S. Highway 319
where a sign remains posted
asking for information about
See DUNLAP on Page 12


Candidates



set for '08


By KEITH BLACKMA*
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Two Wakulla County candi-
dates for public office did not
wait until 2008 to open their
campaign accounts and get
ready for the fall elections.
Sheriff David Harvey, a Dem-
ocrat, opened his account on
Oct. 10 and Virginia Brock, a
Republican, opened her cam-
paign account on Nov. 9. Brock
is seeking the District : Wakulla
County Commission seat. Both
candidates live in Crawford-
ville.
There are a number of local
A dripping apple hides the smile on Alexandria Hamel's face during the Promise Land Part seats up for election in 2008
ners Day including the Clerk of the Court,
P Sheriff, Property Appraiser,
a misS Land L g h h Tax Collector, Supervisor of
PElections, Superintendent of
Schools, County Commission-
ers in District 1, District 3 and
Ptov1C d 1g District 5, and School Board
Pi members in District 2 and Dis-
Dtrict 4.
ster andThe incumbents are: Clerk
shelter andBrent Thurmond, Sheriff David


hope for


homeless


in Wakulla


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla County has a homeless shelter that
s working to turn around the lives of men
who are without a place to live and are seeking
spiritual enlightenment.
Promise Land Ministries Lighthouse, near
Shell Point and Spring Creek, and Pastor Glenn
M. Hamel, have provided 4,523 nights of lodg-
ng for an average of 14 men per day at the
ministry.
"We supplied emergency food for 196 house-
holds and prepared 12,568 meals," said Hamel.
'Most importantly, there were 64 personal com-
nitments made for Christ."
Serving men in need would not be pos-
sible without the support of Wakulla County,
said Hamel. Promise Land is supported by the
donation based Handy Man Lawn Maintenance
program where homeless residents go out as a
group to do yard work and handy man work at
area residences.
Hamel wanted to give back to the county
and hosted the second annual Partner Appre-
:iation Day. On Dec. 1, more than 120 residents
attended the event for "fun, food, fellowship
and music."
"We work with homeless men and provide
housing, food, clothing and rehabilitation in


the 12 step style," said Hamel.
The residents work through the donation
based handy man and lawn service where
residents donate as much as they can afford in
exchange for services such as yard cleanup. The
men come as a group to mow grass, edge the
lawn, prune, weed, remove debris, plant flower
beds, landscape, remove small tress, pressure
wash and more. All of the donations are tax
deductible,
In addition to Glenn Hamel serving as pas-
tor, Joe Brown is the program director. "We
have an emergency food bank on a referral
basis," said Hamel. "We also have a clothing
closet. I want to say thank you to those who
have been supporting us."
The homeless shelter opened in 1991 in
connection with the Spring Creek Community
Church and served both men and women.
Hamel joined the operation in 2001. The focus
was changed to serving only men.
"We average 15 clients a month on a vol-
unteer basis," he added. The organization has
served as many as 150 individuals in a year, but
Hamel said the number has gone down to 65
to 80 individuals each year.
The clients may stay for four months or they
may stay longer, said Hamel, "depending on
See SHELTER on Page 12


Harvey, Property Appraiser
Donnie Sparkman, Superinten-
dent of Schools David Miller,
County Commissioner Brian
Langston, Commissioner Ed
Brimner, Commissioner Maxie
Lawhon, Tax Collector Cheryll
Olah, Supervisor of Elections
Sherida Crum and School Board
members Mike Scott and Greg
Thomas.
The president and vice presi-
dent will be on the ballot in
2008 as well as U.S. Rep. Allen
Boyd's seat and the seats of
Florida Reps. Marti Coley of
District 7 and WilfKendrick of
District 10..
Florida's first election of the
year will be the Presidential
Preference Primary which has
been moved from' March to
Tuesday, Jan. 29.
Wakulla County Democrats
will have the Constitutional Re-
vision, Property Tax Exemptions
and Limitations on Property Tax
Assessments to vote on as
See CANDIDATES on Page 12


P&Z gets wetland


use permit requests


The months of January
and February will provide the
Wakulla County Planning and
Zoning Commission (P and Z)
and county commission with
five new items for consideration
including two conditional use
requests and three rezoning ap-
plications.
The P and Z will be meeting
on Monday, Jan. 14 and the
county commission will con-
sider the recommended items
on Monday, Feb. 4.
The conditional use requests
will be considered by the P and
Z members only. The rezoning
requests will be heard by both
boards.
B & C, LLC and agent Kris
Veach have requested a condi-
tional use to construct a plat-
ted roadway within a wetland
boundary. The .21 of an acre
site is located on the east end
of Drew Lane in Crawfordville.
The request is allowed under
the wetlands ordinance.
Wakulla County Commis-
sioners are seeking a condi-
tional use to replace a public
dock and observation platform


within the wetland setback. The
agent is Florida Environmental
and Land Services, Inc. The
project is located on the north
side of Rock Landing Road in
Panacea and the acreage is .33
of an acre.
William J. Bowman is
seeking a rezoning from R-1
residential to RR-2 residential to
allow a mobile home on his 2.56
acres just west of 1491 Shadevlle
Highway.
Linda H. Lane and agent
Kathy Shirah are seeking a
rezoning from RR-1 residential
to C-2 commercial on 1.13 acres
on the northwest corner of
Shadeville Highway and Valley
Road in Crawfordville. The ap-
plicant is planning to open a
new gymnastics center.
Clarence Travis Hallman
and agent Rita Chadwell are
seeking a rezoning from RR-1
residential to Agriculture on
8.08 acres on Captain James
Street in northeastern Wakulla
County. The applicant is seeking
a "down zoning" in order to take
care of Jack Russell Terriers on
the property.


Cents


I '' I 'r I I I


8Q


Our 113th Vimr, 1st is e








Page 2 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 3, 2008



Comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895


MY VIEW


Santa gives thanks

to the community

: By KEITH BLACKMAR
Skbackmar@thewakullanews.net
SIt's not Thanksgiving any longer. We slipped past that holiday
a month ago. But it is never too late to give thanks. I received a
request from Santa Claus that I wanted to pass along.
I know that I am too old to believe in Santa Claus, but we can
believe in the spirit of the holiday season no matter what faith
yqu are.
SFor several years now my friends over at the Wakulla County
"4rks and Recreation Department have volunteered their time to
w4swer letters to Santa Claus from the community.
,:This is the electronic age so they have moved from the pen
Mid paper to the telephone. Several dedicated "elves" operated
je telephones and sent their best wishes to the boys and girls
kio dropped Santa a letter in his mailbox on the Wakulla County
iurthouse lawn.
SSanta's request to me was to "thank all the children who wrote
letters to me and I hope everyone had a safe and Merry Christ-
:mas."
SI was happy to pass along Santa's good wishes. You never know
:when having a positive connection to the man in the red suit may
'come in handy.
SI also wanted to take the time to thank his "elves." I have always
'felt that Wakulla County goes above and beyond the call of duty
to serve the community during times of need and times of holiday
cheer. We have a special community in that way.
SSanta's elves finished calling all of the children the Friday before
Christmas. The holidays are always an exciting time for children.
Jo school to worry about, staying up late at night, sleeping in dur-
ing the morning hours and enjoying time with family members
highlight the end of each year.
.. I wanted to share one letter from a young resident who has the
spirit of Christmas down pat.
,. 12/16/07
Dear Santa,
.,-I just want to say Thank You. You are never too old to believe
,and receive. Please thank all you helpers for making Christmas
special for all the less fortunate families in the world, especially
,here in Crawfordville.
Sincerely,
"A Receiving Family"
As we get ready to jump into a new year, now more than three-
quarters through the first decade of the new century, we wish all
of Wakulla County the very best in 2008 and thank you for sup-
porting us and the community in 2007.
Best wishes for a prosperous New Yearll

.ieith Blackmar is News Editor of The Wakulla News.


YOUR VIlWS


-Thanks for your
:interest in Springs
Editor, The Newss
'As all of us give thanks for
Cthe beautiful county we live in,
the changes and challenges life
present, I want to thank The
Wakulla News for its continued
interest in issues surrounding
Wakulla Springs.
Your coverage of Woodville
Karst Plain divers' traverse is
such an example. While I am
not the president of the Friends
of Wakulla Springs State Park
(that has been ably handled
by Della Parker-Hanson), this
organization has offered many
of us an opportunity-to truly be
'involved in so many aspects of
Community service.
So I want to thank the many
volunteers who are helping
keep Wakulla Springs on the
front burner. I want to thank
Sandy Cook for her exemplary
stewardship in managing this


state park, and the staff of
the park for keeping visitors
happy.
Friends of Wakulla Springs
State Park is only one of many
citizens organizations in Florida
that support park activities. We
are open to all (wakullasprings.
org) and new members are par-
ticularly encouraged to contact
us any tinfe.
And while I am at it, let's not
forget those cave divers. Every-
one in the Big Bend needs to
thank them for their courage.
Without their diligence and
that world record seven mile
underground traverse that cold
December morning, we might
not know to inspect our septic
systems regularly.
Particularly if you live in the
northern portion of Wakulla
County and want to protect all
of Wakulla's springs.

Madeleine H. Carr
Crawfordville


Wakulla County remembers...


By KEITH BLACKMAR

The recent homicide involving Cheryl
Hodges Dunlap is a sad and very jarring
reminder of how short life can be. One
week she is teaching Sunday School
and working at Florida State University,
the next she is the focus of a widescale
search to find her body. Her death was
one of several that touched Wakulla
County in 2007.
The feeling of loss was one of many
that I ran into during the past 12 months
as Wakulla residents said goodbye to
loved ones who had an impact on the
community where we live.
January featured the deaths of Vicky
Nelson Smith and William "Heck" Lynn.
Smith operated the county's housing
department before losing her battle with
cancer. She had a profound effect on the
many county employees who worked
with her or knew her. Lynn was one
of a handful of commercial fishermen
who passed away. The City of St. Marks
remembered Lynn with benches in the
community park.
S February was the month that
Charles C. Clifton left us. Clifton was the
husband of CHAT President Heide Clifton
and a guiding light for Heide and her ef-
forts to help animals in Wakulla County.
Heide's rose sale fundraiser went on later
in the year in memory of her husband.
April was the month that Zeke Gos-
sett, 22, of Panacea was gunned down
near his home. His dramatic death oc-
curred as he attempted to make it back to
his home before collapsing,
May was Hal Dolan's death month.
Hal was a Florida Highway Patrol dis-
patcher from the days when FHP had
a station in Eastpoint. I found Hal to
be the most helpful public servant in
the FHP dispatch operation. He always
did his best to make sure that I made
contact with the patrol deputies when I
needed them. This was long before the


FHP Communications Center opened in
Tallahassee. Calls to Eastpoint were long
distance and Hal did his best to handle
my requests quickly and not drive up our
phone bill.
May was the month that Viola K.
Tully passed away at age 93. Viola was
the aunt of one of our longtime employ-
ees. My friend and coworker, Karen Tully,
used to fill me ears with stories about
her aunt and the joy that she brought to
Karen's life.
June marked the death of Wayne
Buttram, Sr., 90, of Crawfordville. I did
not know Wayne personally, but I know
that everyone who had dealings with
him spoke very highly of him. Rotary
Club members loved his presence at their
meetings.
Septic tank company founder Charles
J. Malphurs, Sr. passed away in June. The
Malphurs trucks have been familiar sight-
ings on Wakulla County roads for many
years.
August brought the death of
Wakulla County Sheriff's Office Detective
Jack Schliep, Jr. Jack worked in the fraud
division for Sheriff David Harvey and
did a wonderful job keeping the public
informed about ways to avoid becoming
a victim of fraud. His experience in his
field made it difficult for Sheriff Harvey
to replace him following his passing.
August was also the month that Sally
C. Levings of Sopchoppy and Allen R.
"Pete" Gerrell left us. Sally was Brandi's
top notch assistant at Just Fruits. My wife
loved bending Sally's ear about plants
and landscaping ideas and expressed
how much fun Sally was to be around.
Pete Gerrell was a wonderful resource
of historical information about the Wood-
ville area, forests, turpentine and other
subjects. I always felt like I had attended
a college class whenever Pete shared any
of his massive knowledge with me.
In September, we said goodbye to
Hugh McCallister. Hugh was a mainstay


in the Shadeville community with Mac's
Meats and his connection to the old days
of farming and produce. Hugh was an-
other resident who loved to share stories
of the past and experiences as a county
commissioner.
Eileen Landstorm left us in Septem-
ber, but not before we did a story on her
exploits on her scooter. She loved to ride
her motorcycle scooter, even as she ap-
proached age 77.
Homemaker and senior citizens center
mainstay Eula S. Mathers died in Septem-
ber at age 99. I can still hear the senior
citizens staff on the phone letting me
know that they were getting ready to
host another birthday party for her.
In October, Joann G. Brown passed
away in Cumming, Ga. Brown was a liv-
ing connection to the days of lighthouse
keepers in St. Marks as both her father
and grandfather were lighthouse keepers
in St. Marks.
November was a month to lose edu-
cators as Wakulla High School coach and
Wakulla Middle School educator Dave
Price died after a battle with ALS. Former
educator Harold Blanton, Sr. also passed
away along with Robert Lee of the sher-
iff's office. Bob Lee ran the jail operation
for Sheriff Harvey until his retirement.
Crawfordville business owner Patricia
Roberts passed away in December along
with another commercial fisherman,
Odell Thomas, Sr. of Panacea.
Former Sopchoppy resident John E.
Quigg passed away in December shortly
before word of Dunlap's death shocked,
angered and saddened all of Wakulla
County.
Time doesn't wait for anyone, and
the calendar says it 2008. Happy Newl
Yearll It's time to go work on some other
stories.
Keith Blackmar is news editor of The
Wakulla News. He can be reached at
kblacknmar@thewakullanews.net.


How to contact your
elected officials...

Constitutional officers
Wakulla CouyptyClerk BreptThur-
mond, www.wakullaclerk.con 926-
0905. Term Expires 2008.
Wakulla County Judge Jill Walker,
www.2ndcircuit.leon.flus, 926-0943.
Term Expires 2010.
Wakulla County Circuit Court Judge
N. Sanders Sauls, www.2ndcircuit.leon.
fl.us, 926-0917. Term Expires 2008.
Wakulla County Property Appraiser
Donnie Sparkman, www.qpublic.net,
926-3271, Term Expires 2008.
Wakulla County Sheriff David
Harvey, www.wcso.org, 926-7171. Term
Expires 2008.
Wakulla County Supervisor of
Elections Sherida Crum, www.wakul-
laelection.com, 926-7575. Term Expires
2008.
Wakulla County Tax Collector
Cheryll Olah, www.wakullacountytax-
collector.com, 926-3371. Term Expires
2008..
School Board
David Miller, Superintendent,
www.wakullaschool districtorg. Term
Expires 2008
MillerD@wakulla.k12.fl.us
926-5869-926-0065
Becky Cook, School Board-District
3, Term Expires 2010
Cookb@wakulla.kl2.fl.us
926-5689
Jerry Evans, School Board District
5, Term Expires 2010
Evansje@wakulla.k.12.fl.us
962-2430
Ray Gray, School Board, District 1,
Term Expires 2010
Grayray@wakulla.kl2.fl.us
926-7227, 421-0523
Mike Scott, School Board, District
2, Term Expires 2008
Scottm@wakulla.kl2.fl.us
926-2829
Greg Thomas, School Board, Dis-
trict 4, Term Expires 2008
Thomasg@wakulla.kl2.fl.us
984-5488

Wakulla County Commissioners
926-0919
Maxie Lawhon, County Commis-
sioner District 5, No e-mail, Term
Expires 2008.(contact through Ben
Pingree)
Ed Brimner, County Commissioner,
District 3, Term Expires 2008. ebrim-
ner@mywakulla.com
Howard Kessler, County Commis-
sioner. District 4, Term Expires 2010.
hkessler@mywakulla.com
George Green, County Commis-
sioner, District 2, Term Expires 2010.
ggreen@mywakulla.com
Brian Langston, County Commis-
sioner, District 1, Term Expires 2008.
blangston@mywakulla.com
Ben Pingree, Wakulla County Ad-
ministrator. benpingree@mywakulla.
com


By CHRISTINE BARNES

There are, no doubt, more visitors go-
ing to Disneyland today than we will see
at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge in a
year.
That's why I'm here. Not to avoid the
crowds, but to lend my support to the
cause of the refuge system and their mis-
sion: To conserve the natural diversity of
plants and animals, the cultural resources,
and to provide opportunities for research,
environmental education and outdoor
recreation.
Growing up in love with the fields and
woods of Maryland and Connecticut, my
childhood was gentled by the brooks and
rivers, the birds and critters that abound-
ed near our homes over the years. I never
took any of it for granted. I still don't.
The struggle we now share on this
planet is of deep concern to me. As
prophesied by strange bedfellows Chief
Seattle, Rachel Carson and Al Gore,
Earth's precious resources are indeed
linked in a web that has become increas-
ingly tangled and unforgiving from our
years of abuse. The planet's limited
resources are becoming severely stressed.
Changing and unpredictable weather
patterns resulting, in part at least from
the imbalance in the atmosphere, leave
formerly lush and verdant sections of our
country parched and thirsty, or drown
towns in a sea of mud; possession of oil
is a worldwide threat to peace and harmo-
ny among people of many nations; water
is becoming the new oil; with states at
loggerheads with each other states over
endangered species, people included, and
fishing industries. Population continues
to grow beyond our ability to regulate
its consequential consumption. Land is
gobbled up for development from paper
companies who can no longer afford to
hold it, because the prices for lumber
harvested from precious forests overseas
is cheaper, by far.
Cultural historians have preached for
years about the increasing globalization of
our planet. It began with radio, airplanes
and television, and has grown to satellites
and instant information available across
wide and distant oceans. The data we
receive on a daily basis is strangling us.
We do not even process it any longer into
knowledge. To me, things seem a little
out of control.
And that's just here in America. Never
mind the exploding growth of Third
World countries such as China and India.
A while ago I read that people in this
country are living with a lot of stress. I,
for one, know that on my mind is our
well-being, not only in this country, but as
a worldwide nation of people.
The refuge system is a haven not just
for wildlife. It is ours, for us to step away
from this stress, to reflect on how it used
to be, to simply be present. The walks


through the woods, along the rivers and
shores, the sounds or lack thereof, are
quieting to the soul. People come to visit,
and they breathe in its peace, some for
the first time in a long while. "It's so
beautiful," they sigh. Gratefully, they stay
a lot longer than they had planned.
Those who come from the city just
north of St. Marks, Tallahassee, are among
the more fortunate, as this refuge is a
mere half hour's drive. Such dose proxim-
ity is not always the case.
There are more than 500 wildlife
refuges in this country. The government
should consider another name for these
places. Gifts of grace that they are for
wildlife, for us, they amount to precious
few acres of solitude across our land. I
look out the window as a winged seed
drifts by on a gentle breeze. The fact
that I even notice it is evidence of a
slower pace. The fact that it's here at all is
remarkable. Surely, it wouldn't be drift-
ing along the streets of New York or Los
Angeles.
I look at the map. The United States
has 2.3 billion acres of land. Of this, 60
percent is privately owned. In the lower
48 states, only approximately 4 percent of
the land is protected by the federal gov-
ernment in the refuge system. Visually,
the atlas shows minute pieces of land
marked by the key for wildlife refuges
- merely tiny splashes of color dotted
here and there. Further, since 1997, the
refuge system has lost 12 million acres.
It follows that the options for access to
refuges are few and far between inmost
states. This means that not only does
wildlife lack the opportunity to traverse
many miles to find new territory to
expand their species, but also the genetic
pools are seriously limited, making birds
and animals more vulnerable to such
things as disease or catastrophic weather
events. And it means that we must drive
farther away from our cities to find refuge
for ourselves. We become less in touch
with our planet, less aware of its own
stresses and calamities. Resource con-
sumption becomes an entitlement, and
we forget our place in the greater scheme
of the web of life.
While the mission of the national wild-
life refuge system is strong, it would be
more timely if it read, "...and to provide
opportunities for research, environmental
education, outdoor recreation and reflec-
tion." I am a concerned citizen, and I
work here because I want to make a state-
ment. The preservation of what keeps us
whole, gives us perspective, and feeds our
soul is a beginning step to reordering our
place in the web of life. With opportuni-
ties for reflection, perhaps we can unite to
reclaim the health of our planet and all of
its cherished inhabitants.

Christine Barnes is a volunteers at the
St. Marks Nation Wildlife Refuge


I t


Reflections


from a volunteer


TOi akiulla e
The Wakulla News (USPS 644-640) is published weekly at
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla
S News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
Publisher: Ron Isbell..................................................... ...ron.isbell@gmail.com
.News Editor: Keith Blackmar............................. kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Reporter: William Snowden.............................. wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey ...................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net
Bookkeeping: Sherry Balchuck ..........................accounting@thewakullanews.net
-Classifieds: Alex Brimner ..................................classifieds@thewakullanews.net
Circulation: Colin Taviner ............................... circulation@thewakullanews.net
Graphic Artists: Eric Stanton/Jessi Smith.......... advertising@thewakullanews.net
Typesetter: Karen Tully...................................... advertising@thewakullanews.net
Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable
one year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In .County $25, Out of County $30
a $35. Out ofClouitry on Request








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 8, 2008 Paged3


2007: The year begins with bottled water


January

Attorneys for Wakulla Springs
Bottled Water filed papers requesting
that the county's comprehensive plan
be amended to include a new land use
for bottled water facilities.
In addition to the new land use
category, the company has requested
a comp plan amendment to permit the
70,000 square-foot water bottling plant
which has been sought by Dan and
Ruth High and Sidney Gray.
Cleve Fleming returned to Wakulla
County to manage the new ESG public
works operation. ESG replaced Veolia
in late 2006.
The Wakulla County School District
announced school-level teachers of
the year. The teachers included Pat
Calhoun of Crawfordville Elementary
School; Connie Worrill of Medart El-
ementary School; Rhonda Traweek of
Shadeville Elementary School; Crissy
Sarvis of Riversprings Middle School;
Angie Walker of Wakulla Middle
School; Sunny Chancy of Wakulla High
School; and Ashley Andersor, repre-
senting all of the district professionals
who work with children.
Salaries of elected public officials
soared as pay raises were received.
The sheriff jumped to a base salary
of $104,000 while most of the rest of
the constitutional officers saw their
salaries jump to $95,000.
Panacea was featured in a book
on interesting town names. Author
and photographer Gary Gladstone
discussed Panacea and environmental
consultant Bonnie Holub in his second
book, "Climax-More Portraits from the
Heartland." His first book was "Pass-
ing Gas and Other Towns Along The
American Highway."
Two men were arrested and a third
man sought in a machete-wielding
theft at Wal-Mart in Crawfordville.
The men took televisions and other
merchandise from the supercenter as
employees attempted to stop them.
The two men were arrested a short


time later in Leon County. The third
man was arrested a few days later in
Tallahassee.
New Wakulla County Administra-
tor Ben Pingree helped county com-
missioners create a legislative project
list for Florida lawmakers only three
days after joining the county. The list
will lead lawmakers in their attempt
to fund Wakulla projects during the
2007 session. Sewage expansion and
upgrades topped the list along with
a treated sewage water reuse plan
for Wildwood Country Club and U.S.
Highway 319 right-of-way acquisition
money.
A federal judge ruled that a lawsuit
against General Dynamics, Primex and
Olin could move forward as filed. A
former employee claimed the compa-
nies committed fraud by not properly
testing gun powder sold to the U.S.
military.
Winter rains restored the flow of
water to Spring Creek. Divers con-
nected to the Wakulla Bottled Water
plant postponed plans to swim the
main spring after discovering the wa-
ter flow had started again.
Sopchoppy's Jim Tartt helped the
Florida Gators win the 2006 NCAA
National Football Championship in
Glendale, Ariz. The Gators walloped
the Ohio State Buckeyes 41-14 on
Monday, Jan. 8.
County commissioners scraped
plans to use the school board owned
community center property after coun- day service
ty officials objected to the proposed Baptist Chui
lease agreement and the size of the a week of ac
school board owned parcel. civil rights i
A plan by the St. Marks City Com- A judge
mission to rejuvenate its waterfront Wakulla Co
with a mixed-use zoning that would controversy
allow as many as 16 units per acre Children an
drew concern from the state. The city beds for cri
is proposing a Riverwalk Redevelop- found incoh
mentPlan. home locall'
About 75 people attended a ground- continued t
breaking ceremony at the courthouse state psychi
for the placement of a monument for While a r
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Another 50 up to oppose
people attended the annual King holi- Amendmen


at Mount Olive Primitive
rch. The events highlighted
ctivities to honor the slain
leader.
ordered the state to take a
unty inmate. A statewide
Over the Department of
.d Families having enough
minal defendants who are
mpetent by courts struck
y when a Wakulla prisoner
o wait for placement in a
iatric facility.
lumber of residents geared
e the proposed Comp Plan
t to create a land use for


County Administrator Ben Pingree
a bottled water facility, several other
projects requested higher density de-
velopment through the same planning
method.
New Wakulla County Administra-
tor Ben Pingree began to settle into
his new post in January following a
lengthy search by the Wakulla County
Commission to replace former ad-
ministrator Parrish Barwick. The first
three months on the job Pingree was
assisted by Deputy County Administra-
tor Joe Blanchard.
County commissioners adopted
the school board recommended resi-
dential impact fees. The fees will be


implemented over a three year period
with the fee collection ranging from
$3,800 in the beginning to a maximifr
of $6,300 at the end of the three year
period.
Pingree recommended county coii-
missioners go on an out-of-county
retreat to brainstorm priorities for the
coming year. The board selected a site
in Havana for their meeting.
A tax break was approved for resi-
dents who house the elderly in thefr
homes. The tax break will cover the
portion of the structure constructed Bdr
elderly parents or grandparents.


February
The 2006 Florida Youth Sub-
stance Abuse Survey noted that
Wakulla County youth were not
using illegal narcotics as much
as their tountrparts who were
interviewed in the same survey
a few years earlier.
While drug use continued
to fall, the survey noted that
consumption of alcohol contin-
ues to be high. Marijuana and
cigarette use dropped by a large
percentage.
: Wakulla County Commission-
ers, working with the Wakulla
County Health Department,
required homeowners to use
performance-based septic sys-
tems. The goal, to ocean up the
environment, will hit property
owners hard in the wallet. Engi-
neering may also be required for
all systems.
The county's Code Enforce-
ment Board listened to a loud
music complaint in the Newport
community. The board members
required Ouzts Too to apply for
a conditional use permit to play
loud music outside the establish-
ment on Sundays.
St Marks City Commissioners
agreed to scale down a riverfront
development. The development
will be decreased from 113 acres
to less than half the original
size in an effort to ease state'
Department of Community Af-
fairs concerns.
Wakulla County Commission-
ers extended the date to require
performance-based septic sys-
tems to Oct. 1 after health de-
partment officials told the board
| that the language in the board's
ordinance required enginering
stamps on each system. County
officials decided to modify the
S ordinance which went into law
prior to the deadline change.
The original deadline was set
........ ~.. ..... ..... .. .....m l .i. l................ ......i.... ..........m..t..


for March 1.
Commissioners discussed
the Wakulla Springs Bottled
Water plant project and voted
3-2 to spend as much as $20,000
to hire experts to represent the
county's interests. The ..sus-
sion came only ys be e
matter was to be hear bythe
planning and zoning commis-
sion and one month prior to a
county commission hearing on
the matter,
Hydrologist Sean McGlynn
said,, he opposed the water
bottling request because not
enough is known about the


Boneless
Chuck$ 59
Roast b.


aquifer.
Riversprings Middle School
teacher Crissy Sarvis was named
Teacher of the Year. She will
represent the county in the
Florida Teacher of the Year
competition.
A AProijet pCkfesaver tracking
bracelet helped law enforce-
ment officials use a radio signal
to track a missing Alzheimeifs
patient who had walked away
from his home without the pri6r
knowledge of his relatives.
Local fishermen lost an ap-
peal of their challenge to some
See February on Page 5
'* A


Crissy Sarvis was named Wakulla County Teacher of the Year


Color


Cuts
Low-lites

Waxing



926-4080
I is& HerBarberShop & Salon
Across from Gulf Coast Lumber
I,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,..............,,,


Boneless
Chuck 89
Steak lb.


T-Bone $ 59 Pork $ 99
Family Pack T b. Tenderloin Ib.


Leg Quarters $499
Bag ib.

USDA Approved Prices good Dec. 20 Jan. 2, 2008

NOW ACCEPTINC i




Family owned & operated, Kenneth and Abbie Shivel
1353 Coastal Hwy., Panacea


>~eQ 8 AAL .07.
W iMY a S
* ..- .
II~lBPSH^~i ^jiB^^T ?B^?^@ ^ H ?*








Page 4 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 3,2008


Church


Obituaries


Church News


William R. Brooks
: William R. "Bill" Brooks, 82, of
Sopchoppy died Friday, Dec. 21
in Sopchoppy.
The funeral service was held
Sunday, Dec. 23, at Culley's
MeadowWood Funeral Home
in Tallahassee with interment
in Culley's MeadowWood Me-
morial Park. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be
niade to Big Bend Hospice, 1723
Mahan Center Blvd. Tallahassee,
FL 32308; American Cancer Soci-
ety, 241 John Knox Road, Suite
100, Tallahassee, FL 32303 or the
Sopchoppy United Methodist
Church, 131 Rose St, Sopchoppy,
FL, 32358.
A native of Midway, he was a
longtime Tallahassee resident.
He moved to Sopchoppy after
retiring from the City of Tallahas-
see Water Department. He was
a'World War II Navy veteran,
serving on the USS Walter C.
Wann, DE 412.
Survivors include his wife
of 61 years, Dot Brooks of Sop-
choppy; two sons, William R.
Brooks, Jr. and wife Lynn and
George Brooks and companion
Cathy; a daughter, Lucy Edwards
and husband, Randy; two broth-
ers, Garrett Brooks and Harry
Brooks; four grandchildren, Greg
Marr, Billy Brooks, Travis Brooks
and Justin Brooks; and four great-
grandchildren.
S Culley's MeadowWood Fu-
neral Home in Tallahassee was
in charge of the arrangements.

Franklin L. Hutto, Sr.
Franklin Leo Hutto, Sr., 71,
of Tallahassee died Friday, Dec.
21.
Graveside service was held
Monday, Dec. 24 at Brinson Cem-
etery in Brinson, Ga.
A native of Bainbridge, Ga., he
was a longtime resident of Tal-
lahassee. He was an avid fisher-
man and a veteran of the Florida
National Guard. He was an equip-
ment maintenace engineer for
Stewardship Drycleaners.'
Survivors include his wife,
Vivian Hutto of Tallahassee; two
daughters, Gwen Banks of Craw-
fordville and Toni Verhoeven of
Boca Raton; a son, Franklin Leo
Hutto, Jr. of West Palm Beach;
three brothers, Tom Hutto of
Claxton, Ga., Ennis Hutto of McE-
wen, Tenn., and Aubrey Hutto of
Ervin, Tenn.; three grandchildren




Sopchoppy
United
Methodist
Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship I a.m.
Pastor Brett Templeton
850-962-251 I1



Panacea Park

Baptist Church
24 Mission Road, Panacea
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Worship 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 p.m.
Pastor, Jerry Spears


; Saint Teresa


Church
1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98
Sunday School
Holy Eucharist 8:30 am
Youth & Adults 9:30 AM
Children 10:30 AM
Worship 10:30 AM
Reverend John Spicer
926-4288
,;-/


* Non-denominational
SBible centered, and
* Grace based theology


and two great-grandchildren.
Bevis Funeral Home in Tal-
lahassee was in charge of the
arrangements.

Roy E. McCord
Roy Edward McCord, 68, of
Woodville died Saturday, Dec.
22 in Woodville.
The funeral service was held
Thursday, Dec. 27 at Harvey-
Young Funeral Home in Craw-
fordville. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be
made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723
Mahan Center Boulevard, Tal-
lahassee, FL 32308.
A native of Kinsey, Ala. near
Dothan, he was born on Dec. 8,
1939, to Desmal and Luney Mc-
Cord. He retired from the City
of Tallahassee Water Production
Department in August 1985, and
he was the former owner of
Woodville Swap Shop & M & M
Enterprises of Woodville, Fla. He
was a member of Robert Butler
Masonic Lodge No. 305.
Survivors include his wife
of 41 years, Virginia "Ginny"
McCord; two sons, Eddie Mc-
Cord and Cliff McCord, both
of Woodville; a daughter, Paula
McCord of Crawfordville; 10
grandchildren; and eight great-
grandchildren.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.

Daniel C. McElveen
Daniel Cannon McElveen, 85,
of Sopchoppy died Wednesday,
Dec. 26 in Sopchoppy.
The funeral service was held
Friday, Dec. 28 at Harvey-Young
Funeral Home in Crawfordville.
Burial was held Monday, Dec.
31 at the Garden of Memories
Cemetery in Tampa.
A welder and mechanic for
the City of Tampa, he had lived
in Sopchoppy for 30 years, hav-
ing come from Brandon. He as
of the Christian faith and was
an avid hunter, fisherman and
gardener and a big Florida State
University fan.
Survivors include a son,
Thosm~ts McE'lveen and wifei
Judith of Tampa; a, daughter,
Victord Kathleen McElveen of
Sopchoppy; a brother, David
McElveen and wife Dorothy of
Oklahoma: two sisters, Edith
Rickard and husband Johnny of
Zephyrhills and Verona Helms


Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worship.................. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .............5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details,
962-2213

Trinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
TrinityLutheranofWakulla.com
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Les Kimball
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557


Mission by the Sea
On the Alligator Point Road
Sunday Services: 9 a.m.
It's a church of warm Christian
fellowship that loves the Lord and
loves to study his word.

It's a church that understands the
grace of God and seeks to be a
conduit for his love to others.

Join us Sunday mornings at
9:00 a.m. as we search the scriptures
for inspiration and instruction.
A time of rich fellowship follows the
worship and study hour.


and husband Charles of Panama
City; seven grandchildren; 14
great-grandchildren; and his
companion of 14 years, Corky.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.

Melba R. Nelms
Melba R. Nelms, 65, of Talla-
hassee died Saturday, Dec. 22.
The funeral service was held
Thursday, Dec. 27 at Abbey-Ri-
posta Funeral Home with burial
at Roselawn Cemetery.
A retired vice president at the
Florida Department of Highway
Safety and Motor Vehicles Credit
Union, she will be remembered
as a loving wife and mother who
enjoyed her family.
Survivors include by her hus-
band of 36 years, Gene E. Nelms
of Tallahassee; two daughters,
Tara West and Robert and Brandi
Nelms, 'all of Tallahassee; a
brother, Carlos Revels of Craw-
fordville; four grandchildren,
Victoria Key, Melissa West, Kris-
tin West and Mandy West, all of
Tallahassee; and many nieces
and nephews.
Avvey-Riposta Funeral Home
in Tallahassee was in charge of
the arrangements.

Joseph F. Rabitaille, Sr.
Joseph Frank Rabitaille, Sr.,
86, of Tallahassee died Wednes-
day, Dec. 26 in Tallahassee.
The funeral service was held
Saturday, Dec. 29 at Blessed
Sacrament Catholic Church with
burial at Woodville Cemetery. In
lieu of flowers, memorial con-
tributions may be made to Big
Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Cen-
ter Blvd., Tallahasse, FL 32308.
A native of Pascoag, Rhode
Island, he was born on Dec. 4,
1921. He served in the Air Force
on the island of Saipan during
World War II, attached to the
73rd Bomb Wing. After his tour
of duty he returned stateside to
Dale Mabry Field where he mar-
ried the love of his life, Gwen
(Vause) Rabitaille. He took a job
at Good Luck Electric until 1956,
and then took a teaching posi-
tion at Lively Vocational-Techni-
cal School in the electricity field.
He was proud of all the high
quality electricians that studied
under him. He also had a great
love of fishing in Apalachee Bay,
which he shared with family and



Oc lockonee


United
Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship 9 a.m.
Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
nastot f rett 'empleton
(850) 984-0127


Pioneer Baptist
Church (SBC)
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.
Wed. adult, children & youth 7 p.m.
486 Beechwood Drive Crawfordville, FL.
(North of the Lower Bridge Road and
Spring Creek Highway intersection)
Rev. Dennis Hall, Pastor
850-926-6161


friends, especially after retiring
in 1984. Frank was voted Teacher
of the Year for Leon County
in 1970. He was a member of
Blessed Sacrament Catholic
Church and the Knights of Co-
lumbus. He was also a member
of Iota Lambda Sigma
Survivors include his beloved
wife, Gwen of Tallahassee; two
children, Sheila Smith and hus-
band Brett of New Smyrna Beach
and Joe Rabitaille of Shell Point
and Tallahassee; two grand-
children, Mackenzie Smith of
Tallahassee (FSU) and Taylor
Smith of Boca Raton (Florida
Atlantic University); four sisters-
in-law, Ruby Nell Anderson,
Gladys Strickland, Pearl Vause
and Viola Rabitaille; as well as
several nieces and nephews, and
adopted children, Frank Dennard
and Frances Dennard.
Culley's MeadowWood Fu-
neral Home in Tallahassee was
in charge of the arrangements.


Master's Men Quartet To Perform
Crawfordville First Baptist Church will host the Master's Men
Quartet on Sunday, Jan. 6 at 6 p.m. The well known group has'
traveled extensively sharing their faith through traditional gospel)
music.
During the past 12 years they have performed more than 700
concerts and have released five recording projects. Everyone is
invited to attend.


Kidcare enrollment


Wakulla County youths and
children from all around Florida
have benefitted from the KidCare
health insurance program as the
enrollment has recently jumped.
The insurance is available to
many children who otherwise
would not be able to affird it,
said Mary Fleming Tollefsen, RN,
MPH, Wakulla County resident
of the Florida Department of
Health.
Dr. Ana Viamonte Ros, M.D.,
M.P.H., State Surgeon General
said, "Our theme is 'Give Your
Child the Gift of Health Care
Coverage.'"
The ongoing community
campaign to reach families with
uninsured children is working
to boost enrollment in Florida
KidCare. During the month of
October, 17,497 more children
were covered. Florida KidCare
currently serves nearly 1.4 mil-
lion children, of which 1.1 mil-
lion are Medicaid customers and
more than 255,000 are enrolled
in MediKids, Children's Medical
r,' "i:!? ."nf ,jr 4 .ii" ;, n""fiA;' -
Services or ealthy Kids. Chil-
dren, enrollI in these programs
receive regular doctor visits, den-
tal check-ups and immunizations
at little to no cost.
"The significant increase in
enrollment shows that a sus-
tained statewide outreach effort



St. Elizabeth

Ann Seton

Catholic Ciic
Mass 9 a.m. Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Father James MacGee, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
926-1797


Wakulla
United MethodistChurch
Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m
Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship 11 a.m.
Wednesday Service -7 p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor Drew Standridge


Crawfordville United

Methodist Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 926-7209
Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us" www.crawfordville-umc.org


IL0ake Elle 4
M 0
D

1Cs nd


Hwy 319 Medart,
Office 926-5265
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.


Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org


is important and necessary to
get more kids insured through
KidCare," said Florida Chief Fi-
nancial Officer Alex Sink, who
chairs the Healthy Kids board.
"This is a vital program, and
we are going to continue our
grassroots approach to promot-
ing KidCare and helping families
enroll in the program. Our goal
'is to get as many uninsured
children irto the program as
possible."
Since July, staff and lead-
ers from Florida KidCare, the
Florida Department of Health,
the Department of Children and
Families, the Agency for Work-
force Innovation and the Agency
for Healthcare Administration
have distributed millions of
KidCare applications at schools
and community events to reach
more families with uninsured
children.
Local community groups
and businesses with access to
families are also participating.
KidCare distributed more than
I million inmatchinggrgants' to.
organizations thatdemonstrated
creative outreach strategies to
help enroll eligible families. In
addition, large retailers such
as Albertson's, Walgreens, and
Sweetbay are displaying KidCare
information in their stores state-
wide. The health insurance plans
that-provide medical coverage
to children enrolled in KidCare
also contribute. The Florida As-
sociation of Health Plans (FAHP)


Sog Ochlockonee
srit rouiht Christian Center
)Wrd Taught '
A Word of Faith Church

Schedule of Services
*Sunday 11 a.m.
Wednesday 7 p.m. i
Thursday Ladies
Bible Study 10 a.m.
2263 Curtis Mill Rd.
Sopchoppy, FL 962-3774
Pastor John S. Dunning
S(Fromn Rhena Bible Training Center)


jumps
recently funded a statewide
radio advertisirlg campaign to
promote KidCare through urban
and Hispanic radio stations.
The campaign is producing
application volume at historic
levels. More than 38,000 applica-
tions were received in'August,
which was an increase over the
same time period last year. A re-
cord number 39,833 applications
were received in September,
which is a 30 percent increase
compared to, last year.
"The proof is in the numbers.
Application volume keeps going,
up, up, up and more kids arel
getting covered," said KidCare.
consultant Rose Naff.
For more information about
enrollment in Florida KidCare,
visit www.floridakidcare.org to
apply on-line or call 1-888-540-
5437 to receive an application
by mail.





S55 ,Lowe; Bridge R.iad," .

Sunday Sdchool 10 AM
Worship 11 AM
Wed. Prayer Meeing 7 P.M

Pastor, Mike Bowen



Pre/yt riat

3383 Coastal Hwy.
1/3rd mile east of Wakulla High School
9:30 a.m. Bible Study
10:30 a.m. Worship Service
10:45 a.m. Children's Sunday School
Nursery Provided
926-4569
www.wakullapres.org
,\ .44
l

f-i' ,S A '.4 ',,,' *. I
,W4ee Heate 4ada4 7in WeFealt I
Z. isextad Pi atoW
VW"n eme d .awd W 9ad 0 l .,


Af'_co el, Mte 4fe./e ,w cee


First
BApFis (,h u I-cII



3086 Crawfordville Hwy.
(South of the Courthouse)
Church Office: 926-7896
www.fbccrawfordville.org
or
(youth) www.crosstraining.org


SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Fellowship Meal 6:00 p.m.
(call for reservations)
Prayer/ Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
IMPACT (Youth) 7:00 p.m.
Children's Events 6:30 p.m.


Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church
117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy
962-7822
Come and Join us on December 16th
at :OOPM
for an "Old Fashioned" Carol Sing


I a -I








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 3, 2008 Page 5


C ommunity


February
Continued from Page 3
net rules, which they argued
violated the intent of the consti-
tutional amendment on marine
nets by causing juvenile fish to
be killed and wasted.
The Wakulla County Plan-
nin and Zoning Commission
overwhelmingly voted against
a new Comprehensive Plan land
use that would have allowed
a bottled water plant in the
Shadeville community. County
commissioner Ed Brimner asked
county officials to discuss the
proposal more prior to taking a
vote on the request in March.
The Ochlockonee Bay Trail
moved forward during the
month with a new plan to relo-
cate the path to the south side
of Mashes Sands and Surf roads
in an effort to reduce the envi-
ronmental impact in the coastal
community. The project is being
completed in five phases.
County commissioners ap-
proved a zoning variance for the
Happy Time Daycare operation
in Crawfordville allowing own-
ers to change the parking lot
configuration to make it safer
for parents and their children
during the peak traffic times on
U.S. Highway 319.
Two new exercise areas at
Azalea Park in Crawfordville
broke ground as county officials
began work to create exercise
areas next to the popular walk-
ing trail.
Officials with the Wakulla
Springs Bottled Water Company
agreed to drop a proposal to
establish a water bottling plant
in the Shadeville community fol-
lowing strong opposition from
the community and a negative
vote by the planning and zoning
commission.
County commissioners prom-
ised to study water use issues
despite the dropping of the
Comprehensive Plan Future Land
Use map amendment by Wakulla
Springs Bottled Water.
County commissioners agreed
to make improvements to Mash
Island Park and the boat ramp ca-
rial by agreeing to build a groin
tb reduce erosion around the
canal in Ochlockonee Bay.
A former substitute teacher
and teacher's aide at Wakulla
High School was given a sec-
ond chance after she violated
the terms of her probation on
ai charge of having sex with a
student. The teacher received a
suspended prison sentence.
S Wakulla High School officials
continued to spruce up the facil-
ity as part of an overall plan to
improve the school performance
grade and student academic
achievement. The opening of the
new fieldhouse was just one of
several improvements made at
WHS during the early days of
Principal Mike Crouch running
the school.
A consultant held a workshop
ih Crawfordville to discuss a
proposal to increase highway
access across the Florida Pan-
handle. The improvements in-
cude work in Wakulla County on
U.S. Highway 98. The Northwest
Florida Transportation Corridor
Authority includes Wakulla and
seven other counties. Wakulla is
represented on the authority by
Maurice Langston.


In 2007, we adopted more animals than ever!


On behalf of all the members
of CHAT, I want to wish you a
very happy and healthy New
Year and thank you for your
generous donations during the
past year.
The year 2007 seemed to fly
by, and in many ways, it was a
good year. We adopted more
animals than ever, raised money
for spay/neuter programs, and
increased the number of dedi-
cated volunteers. And now, it's
that time again, to set goals for
the year 2008.
Our primary goal for the com-
ing year is to make sure that all
the animals at the shelter are
cared for humanely, and have
necessary medical treatment and
preventive care.
In 2007, we were able to
improve our preventive care
program and in 2008, we will do
a better job because there will be
a veterinarian technician on staff
at the shelter, who will oversee
the daily care of the animals.
Too often, we have had adop-
tive families return animals to us
because of heartworms, parvo, or
other medical conditions.
We know most of the animals
at the shelter have not had a
good life. We can't rehabilitate
all of them, but we do have a
responsibility to test and treat
animals prior to making a place-


CHAT'
Wakulla




[Susan Yelton
ment. Our goal for 2008 is to
make sure no animal is returned
for medical reasons. It's a big
task, but we think we are up
to it.
We always preach about
spay/neutering of your pet. In
2008, our goal is to have shelter
animals neutered prior to place-
ment if they are over six months
of age.
When this is not feasible, our
voucher system will be used and
we will follow up on all adop-
tions. This goal would not be
possible without the support of
Wakulla Animal Hospital and
Animal Aid Center. A special
thanks to them for providing
low cost neutering for shelter
animals.
We always set a goal to in-
crease adoptive placements, but
this year we have some ideas
about how to accomplish that
task. First, we are changing the
hours of the shelter. Starting


Jan. 6, CHAT volunteers will
staff the adoption center every
Sunday afternoon. The hours for
Saturday will also be extended to
5 p.m. We hope these changes
make it more convenient for you
to visit us.
Since many of our shelter ani-
mals are not adoptable because
they lack social skills, we have
started a Buddy Program. We still
need many more volunteers for
the program to be effective.
It only takes a few hours a
month of your time to walk a dog
or play with some of our kittens
and puppies. It can be done on
your schedule and can make a
huge difference in the behavior
of our animals.
Our commitment to the com-
munity will also be high on our
priority list. We will continue to
reach the children in third and
fifth grades with the publica-
tion, Kind News, but we will add
something for the adults, guest
speakers on animal issues at our
CHAT meetings.
On Feb. 12, Laura Bevan, the
Southeast Regional Director
of the Humane Society of the
United States will be our guest
speaker. The public is invited
and we hope you join us at the
shelter that evening at 7 p.m.
We ask you to make a reso-
lution this year to spay/neuter


Historical Society plans 1st '08 meeting


The Wakulla County Historical Society's first
meeting of the new year will be heid at the
Wakulla County Public Library, Tuesday, Jan. 8 at
7 p.m. The group is excited
about our programs in the next few months as
will focus on different communities in the county,
their histories and their people.
Dell Gray, whose memories of the Spring Creek
area go back to the 1930s has agreed to share
some of those
experiences. He is hoping some of his friends
and fellow inhabitants of that area will join him
as he meets those of us who are anxious to look
back and appreciate
the past. The public is always invited and
encouraged to attend historical programs as you
will always find out something interesting about


this special place called Wakulla.
The Society is still soliciting stories to be used
in our book, The Heritage of Wakulla County, FL,
to be published this year. They are very excited
and appreciative of the contributions already
received.
"We would like to see every family in the
county represented in this book," said Betty
Green.
"Those of you who have recently moved here
have a story to tell. Where did you come from and
why did you come to Wakulla? Tell some stories
about your life here, share pictures and anecdotes.
Of course, we hope all of the pioneer families will
tell their stories." For more information, pick up
brochures at the library, call 926-7405 or e-mail
bgreen@nettally.com.


Pregnancy center opening soon


The Wakulla Pregnancy Cen-
ter is opening soon and there
are still some things the orga-
nization is seeking from the
community.
An open house will be held
on Sunday Jan. 20 from 1 p.m.
to 3 p.m. The center is located
at 886 Woodville Highway next
to the Kastnet Restaurant, just
north of intersection of Highway
267 and Highway 363.
"We would love to have
guests drop in and find out what

Guardian Ad Litem

Change a life in 2008 by
becoming a volunteer with the
Guardian ad Litem Program.
Sign up for the January 2008
training and help an abused
child overcome his or her cir-
cumstances.
For more information, call
(850) 488-7612 and receive an ap-
plication or visit the website at
www.guardianadlitembigbend.
org.


Wakulla Dive Club
The Wakulla Dive Club will meet on Saturday, Jan. 5 at 5 p.m.
at St. Teresa Episcopal Church. Heather Armstrong will make the
presentation, "Diving the Oriskany." All interested divers are wel-
come to attend.
SThe church is located at 1255 Rehwinkel Road, at the intersection
of Rehwinkel Road and U.S. Highway 98. For more information,
call 926-4288.



Tucker Life-Health

Insurance, Inc.



Medicare

Plans
and

Medicare


RX
Ross E. Tucker, CLU

926-2200 Registered Health
926220 Underwriter


the center is all about," said An-
gie Holshouser. "We open to the
public on Jan 21."
The center has worked for
two years to finally be able to
offer services to women who
find themselves in an unplanned
pregnancy. All services will be
free and confidential.
"We will offer pregnancy test-
ing, ultra sounds, information
on adoption, abortion, parent-
ing and access to available re-


sources in the community," said
Holshouser. "We will offer free
maternity clothing, baby items,
and counseling. There will also
be post abortion counseling."
The center needs some comfy
chairs for counseling, and end
tables. Donations for diapers,
maternity clothes and baby
items will gladly be accepted.
Call Angie Holshouser at 926-
9698 to donate or find out about
volunteering.


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your pets, and also find a few
hours a month to volunteer at
the shelter or with our Adop-
tion Program. In closing, as a
reminder, this Saturday, Jan. 5,
Animal Health Services will be
at the Shelter from 11 a.m. until
noon. It will be a good time to
start the New Year with preven-
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thanks to a Home Equity
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Page 6 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 3, 2008


Sports


3 Lady War Eagles All-Big Bend
Three members of the Wakulla Lady War Eagle Mathers and Kiara Gay were named to the second
volleyball team were selected to the Tallahassee team and Madison Hollington was selected to the
Democrat's All-Big Bend all-star squad. Kristen honorable mention unit.


Chelsea Schlegel


Kara Graves


Kasey Johnson


Lizzie Buttler


Dance Academy advanced dancers display their trophies.


Meagan Bieber


Melissa Walker


Sarah Morgan


8 seniors ready for last match


The Wakulla Lady War Eagles
will play John Paul II at home
at 7 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 11. The
game will have special mean-
ing for eight seniors who will
be recognized on the field at
halftime.
Seniors Lizzie Butler, Mea-
gan Bieber, Kara Graves, Kasey
Johnson, Meghan McCallister,
Sarah Morgan, Chelsea Schlegel,
and Melissa Walker and their
parents will be honored as part
of the annual senior recognition
night. "These seniors have con-


tributed so much to the success
of the girls soccer program,"
varsity coach Jessica Bishop
said. "They have been leaders
on and off of the field. It will
be hard next year without them.
They are a great group of girls
and we will miss them."
The eight seniors have had
three head coaches in four
years. Under the leadership
of former head coach David
Seitz, the Lady War Eagles were
District Champions during the
2004-05 season. The 2005-06


season opened with Wakulla
adjusting to playing in a new
district under the leadership of
new varsity coaches.
Coach Jessica Bishop came to
Wakulla in 2006. "Coach Bishop
really helped us find our footing
in the new district. Throughout
multiple staff changes, the class
of 2008 has stuck together and
focused onplaying the game,"
junior varsity coach Rachel
Pienta said.


Boys soccer record is deceiving


Wakulla Dance Academy intermediate dancers competed in November


Wakulla dancers place 1st


On Nov. 17 and Nov. 18,
Wakulla Dance Academy partici-
pated in the Dance Makers, Inc.
dance competition in Daytona
Beach. Local dancers performed
exceptionally well.
"The girls worked extremely
hard prior to the competition,
and their dedication paid off
royally," said academy offi-
cials.
Intermediate dancers re-
ceived first place trophies in
their "Potters Waltz" ballet


number, "On Broadway" jazz
routine, and their "Holiday"
tap dance.
The advanced dancers re-
ceived first place trophies for
their "Dance of the Hours"
ballet and their "Welcome to
the Jungle" jazz routine. They
also received a second place
trophy for their lyrical routine
performed to "Gravity."
"We are very proud of our
dancers, and look forward to
their continued success in


20081" dance officials said.
The Advanced Dancers in-
clude: Casey Lowe, Haley Hurst,
Jasmine Casey, Dyan Talbot, Ju-
lia Marsh, Christine Gatlin and
instructor Haley Mahaffey.
The intermediate dancers
include: Skyllar Cobb, Shaylee
Wisecup, Torie Crum, Emily
Westmark, Alex Porter, Shelby
Lenk, Jordan Webster and Cay-
lee Cox. The instructor is Haley
Mahaffey.


By JOHN REICH
Special toThe Wakulla News
With previous back-to-back
school record seasons with
13 and 14 wins respectively,
Wakulla's current record of
6-5-5 (4-1-3 in district play) is
deceiving.
Coach 'Bob Wallace wisely
constructed a hectic 2007-08
soccer schedule in preparation
for and advancing past Districts.
Of Wakulla's five overall losses,
three have come from the Tal-
lahassee teams of Leon, Maclay
and Lincoln. The War Eagles


lone district loss was a 1-0
nail-biter at Panama City Beach
Arnold.
Of the five draws, two were
1-1 matches against district op-
ponents Panama City Bay and a
much-improved&East Gadsden
team.
The remaining .two draws
were with Lynn Haven Mosley
and Maclay. The boys' team
has five remaining matches,
but none are bigger than the
two remaining district matches
against PCB Arnold on Jan. 9 at
home before traveling to Godby
on Jan. 11. Senior Night has


been designated for Saturday;
Jan. 19.

TCC reps at WHS
Representatives from TCC
will be available Jan. 17, 2008
fronmi6:PO 8.00' p.m. minthe
Wakulla Highi Schoo' Audi-
torium to answer questions
concerning admissions and
financial aid. All Juniors, Seniors
and their parents are invited to
attend. If you have. any ques-
tions please call Bonny Salih
in the Wakulla High Guidance,
Department at 926-2221.


2007: The year in review...March


WHS gets 1st basketball win


The Wakulla High School boys' basketball
team won its first game of the season against
John Paul II during the Elks Lodge Shootout at
Tallahassee Lincoln High School Dec. 21 and
Dec. 22.
Wakulla won 61-58 and had three players score
in double figures. Anthony Mills scored 17 points
and Travis McKinney added 16. Wilton Booth
scored 13. Jared McKenzie scored five points and
Tavaris Booth chipped in with four.


Smith is

Democrat

coach

of year
Wakulla War Eagle Coach
Mike Smith was recognized by
the Tallahassee Democrat as
2007 Coach of the Year for the
male athletes.
Smith and the All-Big Bend
all-star team members were se-
lected by area coaches. Smith led
Wakulla to a district title and the
Big Bend Championship.
His son, Spencer Smith, a
sophomore, was named to the
first team. Smith shot a 68 to
win the District 3 Class A title.
He tied for fourth best in the
region.
Wakulla was represented on
the second team by Stone Cowie,
a freshmen. William Davis was
selected to the honorable men-
tion team.
The Lady War Eagles were
represented on the second team
by Devin Lowe and Karlyn Scott.
Making it on the honorable men-
tion team were Rebecca Rivers
and Brooklyn Tindall.


Wakulla also lost 73-70 against North Florida
Christian. The War Eagles are 1-12 overall and 0-6
in district contest.
The team will play in the Maclay Holiday
Hoops Tournament on Jan. 3, Jan. 4 and Jan. 5 in
Tallahassee. The tourney games will be followed
by a string of four straight district contests against
.East Gadsden, Panama City,Bay and two games
against Godby beginning Jan. 8.


WHS Varsity Soccer Team


WHS Junior Varsity Soccer Team


Soccer boosters to hold

fundraiser this weekend

The WHS Ladies and Men's soccer boosters will be conducting
a fundraiser at the Crawfordville Wal-Mart on Saturday, Jan. 5 and
Sunday, Jan. 6. The scheduled times are from lo a.m. until 3 p.m.,
weather permitting. While seeking contributions, tickets are also
available for the Wakulla High Boys and Girls Soccer Raffle consist-
ing of more than $2,500 in prizes. Tickets are $2 each or three for
$5. The drawing will be held in late January and winners do not
need to be present.


A 6-year-old Panacea boy
was mauled by a Perro de Presa
bulldog while he waited for the
school bus. The boy was rushed
to the hospital with severe
wounds to his head. He was
released from the hospital five
days later.
Wakulla County Extension
Agent Dale Bennett worked his
20th and final swine show as
head of the extension office.
The show honored Florida Ga-
tor Jim Tartt. Mattie Barwick
had the Grand Champion hog.
State legislators Sen. Al Law-
son, Rep. Will Kendrick and Rep.
Marti Coley listened to concerns
of area residents during the
annual legislative delegation
meeting. The major concerns


included a state proposal to re-
duce property taxes and a clash
between commercial fishermen
and the Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission.
Consultants gathered input
from residents on ways to
improve transportation along
the U.S. Highway 98 corridor.
Maurice Langston is Wakulla
County's representative on the
Northwest Florida Transporta-
tion Corridor Authority.
Ron Gagliardi was re-elected
to the St. Marks City Commis-
sion by a vote of 50-5 over Karl
Halbert.
Shadeville Elementary
School's Michelle Hunter was
selected as one of five national
winners in the outstanding


educator program through the
Project Learning Tree environ-
mental program.
County commissioners set-
tled with a Maine couple over
the taking of their property near
the recreation park in Medart.
The family received $180,000
from the county and the county
was allowed to keep the ball
field improvements that had
been made on the five acre par-
cel without their knowledge.
County Administrator Ben
Pingree gave county commis-
sioners a proposal to address
state tax reforms and the po-
tential loss of local tax revenue.
County officials hope state
See MARCH on Page 7


I ,









THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 3, 2008 Page 7


March
Continued from Page 6

lawmakers do not change
the property tax payment re-
quirements to the point where
many local dollars are lost.
Two young children were
rescued by Deputy Matt Helms
and his K-9 "Cowboy" after
the children walked away from
home and were discovered in a
field near a pond. The children
were spotted walking along a
road without adult supervision
by a wrecker operator.
The county commission con-
tiniied to tinker with septic tank
requirements in March as the
board repealed one emergency
ordinance and replaced it with
a second, all while builders and
septic tank installers wondered
how- the board action would
impact their businesses.


Commissioners continued
to discuss the impact the new
septic tank requirements would
have and health department
officials began permitting new
performance-based septic sys-
tems.
The City of Sopchoppy and
the county commission drew
doser to an agreement to pro-
vide sewer service billing for
Wakulla County. County of-
ficials have been forced to
use minimum water readings
for billing purposes because
Talquin Electric Cooperative
declined a board request to
release customer water billing
information.
A horse at the St. Patrick's
Day Festival gave birth to a foal
during the middle of the event.
Festival-goers scurried from all
areas of Hudson Park to watch
one of the miracles of nature.
A grant provided Wakulla
County Airport with a consul-


tant to create a new master plan
for the facility. The master plan
would be the first step toward
making improvements at the
grass landing strip.
Wakulla County Extension
Director Dale Bennett an-
nounced plans to retire in May
after 20 years at the helm of
the extension service. Bennett
said he will retire to the hills of
West Virginia.
Wakulla County Commis-
sioners listed traffic problems
and road building as two of
the top priorities in the coming
year following a retreat that was
held in Gadsden County.
County commissioners ex-
pressed concern over enormous
attorney fees from Ron Mowrey
that exceeded $500,000 in less
than 18 months. Two commis-
sioners suggested investigating
whether it was cost effective
to hire an "in house" attorney
to do the commission's legal


work.
The first Green Living & En-
ergy Expo drew a large crowd of
visitors to Riversprings Middle
School. The turnout included
residents from both Wakulla
and Leon counties.
County Administrator Ben
Pingree gave commissioners
a plan to address major tax
reform in the state legisla-
ture. Board members stated
they would consider Municipal
Service Taxing Units to make
up any loss of revenue from
changes in the existing tax
structure.
Betty Green of the Histori-
cal Society lamented the loss
of Wakulla County's heritage
as the McKenzie House in the
Sanborn community was de-
molished to make room for new
construction. The house was
more than 100 years old.
More than a month after a
private attorney-client meet-


ing between Mowrey and the
county commission over county
employee Colleen Skipper, the
county commission had still
not assigned Skipper to a new
post as required in the media-
tion agreement. Skipper sued
the former property appraiser
after being fired following the
death of her original boss Ron-
nie Kilgore.
Performance-based septic
tank requirements that Wakulla
County Commissioners at-
tempted to delay were put in
place by order of the Florida
Department of Community Af-
fairs in March. Commissioners
had hoped to delay the stricter
requirements until October.
A jury found Jerry Davis
guilty of murdering his wife.
But the 74-year-old Crawford-
ville man faced second degree
charges in the case and avoided
the death penalty. Davis was
convicted of killing his wife in


2004 and taking her body to Ala-
bama where it was discovered.
A new right-of-way acquisi-
tion position was added by the
board. The new employee will
be asked to keep track of land.,
acquisition needs prior to road
paving projects.
California Secretary of State
Debra Bowen visited Wakulla
County Supervisor of Elections
Sherida Crum to learn more
about the Florida Voter Regis-
tration System. Officials in the
Golden State were attempting
to meet federal mandates for
a statewide voter registration
system.
Commissioners heard a re-
port from consultants regard-o
ing an economic development'
plan. The $200,000 grant was
provided by the Department of
Defense to help Wakulla Coun-
ty diversify its economic base
beyond St. Marks Powder.


April

Citizens asked county com-
missioners to fight the stricter
septic tank regulations that
were adopted through a water
protection ordinance in 2006.
State Department of Commu-
nity Affairs officials told county
commissioners that their per-
formance-based system require-
ments could not be delayed un-
til October as board members
had attempted to do.
Two young men died in a
Crawfordville mobile bnme fire.
Chris Miller and Justin Sims
were so badly burned that law
enforcement officials could not
identify their bodies during the
original investigation.
Florida State University and
Sheriff David Harvey planned
the Second Annual Seminole
Booster Appreciation Day Cook-
out and Golf Tournament at
Wildwood golf course.
The money raised during
the fundraiser will be donated
to a scholarship fund for FSU
student-athletes who are from
Wakulla County.
Taxpayers came closer to a
resolution over the refunding of
illegally charged special assess-
ments for emergency medical
service. Judge N. Sanders Sauls
set a timetable for issuing re-
funds through a court order in
a case that has .been pending
for months.
Wakulla County Sheriff Da-


vid Harvey recognized a friend
and the stepfather of a young
Panacea resident who was the
victim of a serious dog attack.
The sheriff said stepfather
Thomas Tidwell and friend
Austin Miller saved Jackson
Allbritton Hampton, 6, from
possible death as they chased
away an attacking dog.
Andrea Simpson replaced Joe
Blanchard as the deputy county
administrator as County Admin-
istrator Ben Pingree brought
Simpson to Wakulla County for
her post in Leon County.
County commissioners con-
tinue to wrestle with building
density increases as a land use
change for Floyd "Mann" Rob-
erts was approved by a narrow
3-2 margin. The 9.9 acre parcel
could have as many as:50 units
built on it.
A 22-year-old Pan'acea man
was killed in a late-night shoot-
ing near his home. Zeke Spen-
cer Gossett died ofwounds re-
ceived from multiple gunshots.
Two 17-year-old suspects, Jesse
Aaron Chrysler, Jr. and Chris-
topher Lee HartSfield, were
charged in Gossett's death.
Wakulla War Eagle football.
players Nigel Bradham and C.J;
Holten verbally committed to
play for Coach Bobby Bowden
and Florida State University.,
The two players will graduate:
from WHS in 2008.
County commissioners en-
tered into a sewer agreement
with developer Ben Boynton


Sheriff David Harvey with 2007's heros. Their fast action saved a young boy from death following a dog attack.


to provide a large sewage treat-
ment line from the Flowers
subdivision to existing 'sewer
lines near Wal-Mart. As-part of
the agreement, Boyfiton will
receive 50 percent of the con-


nection fees from those who
connect to the new line.
The rocky relationship be-
tween Wakulla County Attorney
Ron Mowrey and Commis-
sioner Ed Brimner got rockier


when the two officials tossed
e-mails back and forth to each
other. Brimner accused Mowrey
of giving the county expensive
and bad legal advice while
Mowrey accused Brimner of


"playing politics."
The annual American Cancer
Society Relay For Life raised ap-
proximately $80,000 during the.
overnight event at the Wakulla
High School track.


4 visitor observes the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. memorial.


May

Wakulla County eighth grad-
ers led the State of Florida as
education officials released
the "Writing +" scores for Riv-
ersprings and Wakulla middle
school students. Several stu-
dents at both schools received
perfect scores on the first phase
of the FCAT.
Lawyers attempting to ham-
mer out a Municipal Service Ben-
efit Unit (MSBU) refund agree-
ment through the court system
continued to battle with Judge
N. Sanders Sauls over how the
agreement should be handled
and the matter settled. In May,
the lawyers pulled a potential
agreement off the table.
Commercial fishermen filed


an appeal with the Florida
Supreme Court to argue that
the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission's
rules were in conflict with the
constitutional amendment creat-
ing the so-called "net ban."
County commissioners and
officials with the City of Sop-
choppy ironed out the details
of the interlocal agreement that
will allow the city to connect
sewer lines to the county waste-
water plant in Otter Creek in
exchange for the city providing
sewer bill processing for county
sewer customers who are also
Sopchoppy Water System water
customers.
A monument was erected at
the Wakulla County Courthouse
to honor slain civil rights leader
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The


ceremony was sponsored by
the Wakulla County Christian
Coalition.
Wakulla County received
nearly $23 million worth of
funding from the Florida Leg-
islature as the 2007 session
concluded on May 4. County of-
ficials had to wait several weeks
to find out which projects were
approved by Gov. Charlie Crist
as Crist signed the 2007-2008
budget into law.
Two historical preservation
projects, the renovation of the
old county jail and Sopchoppy
School, did not receive funding
in the latest legislative cycle.
County officials will have to ap-
ply for more funding in future
grant cycles.
The number of parcels ad-
vertised on the delinquent tax
roll increased slightly in 2007
when compared to the roll that
was published in 2006. The two
most recent delinquent tax rolls
represent the 2005 and 2006 tax
years since the county collects
taxes the year after they are
charged.
Wakulla County third grad-
ers led the Big Bend in Florida
Comprehensive Assessment
Test (FCAT), reading scores and
students also performed well in
the math portion of the exam.
Adult charges were filed
against two juveniles charged in
the death of a Panacea man in
April. Open charges of murder
were filed against Jesse Aaron
Chrysler, Jr. and Christopher Lee
Hartsfield, both 17, in the case,
Wakulla County law enforce-
ment officials shot and killed a
22-year-old Tallahassee man as
he attempted to rob the Murphy
Oil filling station near Wal-Mart.
Kristopher Wilson died on the
way to a Tallahassee hospital.
He failed to obey the commands
of the responding officers who
opened fire on the suspect.
County commissioners
cleared the way for another
dense Crawfordville develop-
ment by approving Phase 4
of the Camelot project near
Winn-Dixie. The development
includes 67 detached garden
homes on 8.38 acres.
Wakulla Springs turned "em-
erald green" as a result of a
dye-tracer study in which hydro-
geologists began a project to de-
termine a link between Wakulla


WCSO deputies killed a man as he attempted to rob the Murphy Oil Station.


Springs and Spring Creek.
Commissioners discussed the
proposed development impact
fee rate increases with legal
counsel and consultants who
worked on a recommendation
of updates for the board. But
the board declined to take any
action on May 7.
Wakulla Middle School teach-
er and coach Dave Price resigned
from coaching tennis, soccer and
cross country to concentrate on
teaching and his battle against
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis,
also known as ALS or Lou
Gehrig's Disease. Price has been
an educator for 30 years and has
spent nearly all of his career in
Wakulla County.
Wakulla County Commis-
sioner Howard Kessler was
ruled out of order at the May
21 board meeting. Kessler and
other commissioners clashed
over the question of whether a
number of issues could be dis-
cussed before the the meeting
was adjourned.
Dry weather created a ban
on all burning in the county.
Wakulla County Emergency
Management Director Scott
Nelson said severe drought
conditions forced the county to
take the action.


Circuit Court Judge N. Sand-
ers Sauls sentenced 74-year-old
Jerry Davis of Crawfordville to 20
years in prison for the murder of
his wife. Davis drove the body
of his wife to Alabama where he
dumped it. The body was found
a short time later.
Wakulla County attorney
Mike Carter announced his
retirement after serving the
Wakulla Academic Boosters for
years. The boosters helped hun-
dreds of high school students
through scholarship opportuni-
ties. Carter also served Wakulla
County as judge prior to being
defeated by current County
Judge Jill Walker.
The Public Broadcasting Sys-
tem (PBS) televised a docu-
mentary by Robert Seidler of
Sopchoppy in May. Seidler
Productions created a 27 minute
film on the Florida Trail.
County commissioners,
school board members, and
members of the Sopchoppy
and St. Marks city commissions
met in a joint meeting to create
concurrency management plans
to address school growth and
eliminate the possibility of al-
lowing growth to outpace school
capacity.
Sopchoppy Water System of-


ficials asked residents to volun-i
tarily restrict water consumption
'during the spring drought. The
city commission also consid-
ered increasing water rates in
an effort to encourage water,
conservation.
Wakulla High School gradu-
ated a record number of seniors
on May 25 as 262 of the 287
eligible students tpok part in
the commencement exercises at,
Reynolds Stadium.
Wakulla County schools
ranked in the top 10 in the state
in 18 out of 22 test areas in the,
Florida Comprehensive Assess-,
ment Test (FCAT) scoring. Ninth
graders were tops in the state for
math and eighth graders were
tops in the state in writing.
Wakulla County remembered
military men and women who
have given their lives in defense
of the country during Memo-
rial Day ceremonies outside
the Wakulla County Courthouse
May 28.
Maurice Burgess and Bon-
nie Brown were charged with
allegedly stealing money from
the Wakulla County Rotary
Club in May. The charges allege
that the couple was involved in
taking more than $20,000 from
the club.








Page 8 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 3, 2008


June

Wakulla County Commis-
sioners prepared for the poten-
tial loss of tax revenue due to
legislative changes in property
taxation by advertising their
intent to create a new Munici-
pal Service Taxing Unit (MSTU)
for law enforcement, parks and
recreation and fire services.
Commissioners hoped to
be ready to address funding
shortfalls following a special
session of the state legislature.
They wanted to have the MSTU
ready to replace lost funds as
a result of the action taken by
state lawmakers.
A study of sewage treatment
billing revealed the scope of
how much money the county
has never received from custom-
ers who were billed below their
actual water usage or never
billed at all. The consultant's
study made several recommen-
dations in an effort to correct
the problems.
Attorneys hoping to iron out
a settlement over illegally col-
lected Municipal Service Benefit
Unit (MSBU) fees for emergency
medical services scrapped the
refund proposal after Circuit
Judge N. Sanders Sauls rejected
the attorney fees earmarked to
legal counsel working on the
case.
A wildlife haven, equestrian
center and historical village
may share space on county
land on Lawhon Mill Road if
grant funding can be acquired
to build the complex. The com-
plex could address the concerns
of the Wakulla Horseman's
Association, Wakulla Historical
Society and Florida Wild Mam-
mal Association.
A Crawfordville woman ex-
perienced a "scary" brush with
an aggressive black bear after
stopping on the side of the
road in St. Teresa. The woman


and her son were not injured.
The bear weighed 250 pounds,
was spotted by witnesses, but
was not located by state FWC
officials who investigated the
complaint.
Debate ranged on as to
whether the Flowers subdivi-
sion sewage treatment agree-
ment with developer Ben Boyn-
ton was a "cherry or a lemon."
County commissioners were
split on whether the deal was
good for Wakulla County tax-
payers or just good for Boyn-
ton.
Major Maurice Langston
returned to the sheriff's office
after a 19 month absence. He
has been in law enforcement
since the early 1980s and in the
pastoral field for 23 years.
The Marshes at Evans Creek
development stirred heated
debate over development in
the marshes of Ochlockonee
Bay. The county commission
approved a rezoning and pre-
liminary plat for the 13 single
family dwellings clustered on
10.4 acres off U.S. Highway 98.
An ex-sheriff's office em-
ployee and her husband were
charged in a "doctor shopping"
drug case in Wakulla and Leon
counties. Farrah and Christo-
pher Ward face multiple charges
as law enforcement officials
investigated the alleged pre-
scription drug offenses.
County commissioners
dropped a proposal to create
a Municipal Service Taxing.
Unit (MSTU) for parks and
recreation, fire service and law
enforcement following a brief
public hearing. Board members
said they would cut expenses
before creating the new taxes.
The MSTU had to be in place by
July 1 to be collected during the
2007-2008 budget year.
The Stone Crab Festival in
St. Marks was scrapped after
organizer Stan West and city
commissioners disagreed on


Divers search Cherokee Sink for a White City woman who drowned while swimming with friends.


the organization of the event.
West organized the event for
nine years.
Consultants working on the
expansion of U.S. Highway 319
from Crawfordville to Medart
created a preliminary plan for
the intersection at U.S. Highway
98. The new intersection may be
moved to face the high school
bus loading area driveway.
County commissioners said
they will oppose the relocation
of the busy intersection to the
high school area.


County officials proposed a
budget cut at a workshop that
followed a special session of
the Florida Legislature in June.
Despite the cut to the millage
"roll back rate," the county com-
mission prepared to approve a
larger budget than 2006-2007
operating budget.
A new extension agent,
building department director,
planning department director
and housing director came
on board during the summer
months. The commission added


Scott Jackson as extension direc-
tor, Luther Council as deputy
building official to replace the
retiring Joln Ross, Lindsey Ste-
vens as planning and zoning
director and Catherine Aponte
Gray as thehousing director.
A White City woman
drowned in'Cherokee Sink on
June 25 while swimming with
friends at the popular county
sinkhole. Divers recovered her
body in 55 feet of water.


Wakulla Countys Cal Ripken All Stars won state and regional titles and played for a national championship
Wakulla County's Cal Ripken All Stars won state and regional titles and played for a national championship.


July

The Wakulla County School
District received an "A" grade
and nearly all of the county
schools received individual "A"
grades as the state Department
of Education released the an-
nual "school grades."
The school district broke
ground on the new elementary
school. The $18 million facility
will have a capacity of 601 stu-
dents and will open in August
2008.
A report by a group at the
University of Florida, prepared
for- 1000 'Friends of Florida,
noted that most of Wakulla
County will be built out by 2060.
Despite building on almost all
of the vacant land, Wakulla
County will have more green
space thanks to state and fed-






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The Wakulla County tax roll
jumped by $106 million creat-
ing additional tax revenue for
county taxing authorities to
overcome state mandated mill-
age reduction.
Sopchoppy and St. Marks cel-
ebrated the July 4 holiday with
fireworks, a parade and fellow-
ship in the communities.
The Wakulla Cal Ripken
Baseball Stars won a state title
and advanced to play in the
southeastern regionals with
an opportunity to play for a
national title.
Wakulla County Commis-
sioners concluded their July
16 meeting by ending in a
deadlocked vote over the ap-
proval of the agenda. With one
commissioner not attending the
meeting, the vote to approve
the agenda was tied 2-2. When


commissioners failed to break
the tie, two members left the
meeting and it ended due to a
lack of a quorum.
A Wakulla grand jury indict-
ed two teenagers for the murder
of a Panacea man in April. The
pair could face the death pen-
alty in the murder case. They
were accused of attempting to
steal items from the victim's
truck prior to the shooting.
Three law enforcement of-
ficers were cleared in the fatal
shooting of a Tallahassee man
who was attempting to rob Mur-
phy Oil during an early morn-
ing incident in May. Deputies
Roger Rankin and Sean Wheeler
and Lt. Ronald Mitchell were
cleared of any wrongdoing in
the case.
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A traffic accident at the inter-
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one from Wakulla and another
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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 3, 2008 Page 9



School


Matthew Cozzy named

Sunshine State Scholar


WHS art class wins 27 ribbons at fair


. Wakulla High School art
students won 27 ribbons at
this year's North Florida Fair for
their submissions.
Art teacher Cassie Tucker
submitted 25 paintings and
seven three-dimensional masks
to the fair's Youth Art Contest.


"Thinking outside the box,
being original and creative as
well as problem solving are a
few benefits students in art
classes gain," Tucker said.
WHS art students garnered
seven first place awards, includ-
ing: Justin Morgan for his 3D


mask; Lauren Gentry for her
self-portrait in acrylic, and for
her New Orleans pen-and-ink;
Caitlin Culbertsor for her oil
pastel "Girl in the Road;" Jef-
fery Johnson for his self-portrait
in pencil; Bailey Russom for
"Charlie," pen-and-ink animals;


and Rebecca Williams for mixed
media "Woman's Face."
Students Nadine Tang, Bridg-
et Anne Burke and Jennifer
Greene won second place rib-
bons. Victoria Hamel and Caitlin
Culbertson won third place
ribbons.


Wakulla High School student
Matthew Cozzy has been des-
ignated as a District Sunshine
State Scholar in mathematics
and science.
Ninety-five graduating seniors
from high schools throughout
the state have been designated
District Sunshine State Scholars
in Mathematics and Science for
the current year. The students
will compete on Wednesday,
Jan. 9, 2008 to become one of
the 10 Regional Scholars to vie
in March 2008 for the title State-
wide Sunshine State Scholar in
Mathematics and Science for
2008.
The Sunshine State Scholars
Program was established in 1997
to recognize the achievement
of Florida's graduating seniors
who have demonstrated excel-
lence in both mathematics and
science. All scholars receive dis-


trict recognition and individual
awards from the program. The
10 Regional Scholars and their .
selected teachers receive further
recognition from the Governor ,
and Cabinet, the Florida Legis-..
lature, the Florida Department
of Education, and private busi-."
nesses.
The Sunshine State Scholars
Program is coordinated through ,.
the Florida Institute of Educa-7,
tion at the University of North
Florida. The program receives .
support from the Florida Depart-
ment of Education, the Florida
Lottery, the Florida Education,
Foundation, Florida mathemat- ,i
ics and science teachers' and
supervisors' organizations, and
private corporations. Additional
information on the Sunshine
State Scholars Program can be,-
found at http://www.unf.edu/ ;
dept/sunshine/. ,
L


JJ's self portrait, left. Bailey's Max, above.


$3000 to localiShools
Wal-Mart Manager Richard Russell, Susan Brazier, Jo Ann -
Daniels, Tanya English, and Wal-Mart Assistant Manager
Rebecca Fowler with a representative check from the store's ^
local school grant recipients on Wednesday, Dec. 19. Shadev- K
ille Elementary School Principal Susan Brazier, Crawfordville
Elementary School Principal Tanya English and Wakulla
Middle School Principal Jo Ann Daniels each accepted $1,000'
donations on behalf of their schools. "Wal-mart is a valuable t
business partner to our schools," said WMS Principal Jo Ann .-
Daniels. "What a nice present for our schools at this time of
year." Principal Tanya English added, "We all plan to use the
donation to enhance tecWiology at our schools."


1it1


ultion Register Today
Register now for Spring sessions online at GoToTCC.com, or call
e TuitionPay plan. (850) 201-TCC-1. Remember, you can register and pay fees anytime
nawmpnt information.' I o.im. An -I..


go to www.tcc.fl.edu/tuition,


Professional Development
on Your Lunch Hour
Join us on'the first Friday of every month from noon to 1 p.m
at the TCC Capitol Center for the Learn @ Lunch on First. ;
Fridays series. The topic for Friday, February 1 is "Essential
Skills of.Leadership."
To register, log on towww.tcc.fl.edu/ewd or contact
Bridget Elwell at (850) 201-8069, or at elwellb@tcc.fl.edu.


OSHA Safety and Health
Training Available
Tallahassee Community College, in partnership with the University
of South Florida Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)
Training Institute Education Center, is offering OSHA safety and
health training to our local community. The first class offering,
OSHA Standards for the General Industry (OTI0101 will take place
on January 14 -17, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. atTCC's Center for
'Economic & Workforce Development, room 207.
For more information, contact Carol Easley, director,
Workforce & Continuing Education Operations, by phone
at (850) 201-8481, or e-mail easleyc@tcc.fl.edu.


African-American History
Month Calendar
TCC will unveil its 8h Annual African-American History Calendar
on January 28, beginning with a reception at 5:45 p.m.
and program at 7 p.m. The event will be in the TCC Student
Union Ballroom. Each year the calendar showcases African-
Americans who have made significant contributions in Leon,
Gadsden and Wakulla counties. This year honorees include
Mayor John Marks, Rev. R. B. Holmes, Dr. Helena Barrington
and Dr. James Ammons.
For more information, call (850) 201-8396.


at a ;TP8assport.tcc.tl.edu.





Information Technology Institute
Vista Basic Office 2007 Series
Tuesday, January 15 Tuesdays and Thursdays
1 4 p.m., $49 January 22-29
Outlook Basic 9 a.m. 4 p.m., $279
Wednesday, January 16 Excel 2007
1 4 p.m., $49 Thursday, January 24
Introduction to Digital Camera 9 a.m. 4 p.m., $99
Thursday, January 17 PowerPoint 2007
9 am. 4 p.m., $99 Tuesday, January 29
Introduction to Digital 9 a.m. 4 p.m., $99
Photography Adobe Acrobat Basic
Tuesday, January 22 Thursday, January 31
9 a.m. 4 p.m., $99 9 a.m. 4:30 p.m., $119
Word 2007
Tuesday, January 22
9 a.m. 4 p.m., $99


Wakulla Center
Ecotourism Introduction
Sunday, January 27
2 4 p.m., Free
Business Basics and Startup I
Monday, January 28
6 9 p.m., $29
Wakulla Landscape I
Monday, January 29
6-9 p.m., $29
Water-Related Businesses
Tuesday, January 29
6-9 p.m., $29
St. Mark's Refuge Field Trip
Saturday, February 2
9 a.m. -1 p.m., $49


Construction/Industrial
Trades
Electrical-Level 1
Monday-Thursday
January 22-March 6
6-10 p.m., $350
Masonry-Level 1
Monday-Thursday
January 22-March 6
6- 10 p.m., $350
Plumbing-Level 1
Monday-Thursday
January 22-March 20
6- 10 p.m., $396
HVAC-Level 1
Tuesday-Thursday
January 22-March 20
6- 10 p.m., $312


Safety Training
Occupational Safety and
Health Standards for the
General Industry
Monday-Thursday
January 14-17
8 a.m.- 4:30 p.m., $750
OSHA Ergonomics Guidelines
Training for Nursing Homes
Tuesday, February 5
8 a.m.- 4:30 p.m., $160


TCC offers a convenif
To find out more this


uaenis


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-pity IIMI LI H l I CLIU I








Page 10 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 3, 2008


August

Wakulla County entered a
new age with paid firefight-
ers protecting the community.
The six new firefighters joined
Fire Chief Jason Honeybone in
ap effort to supplement the
dedicated volunteer firefighters
who have served the county for
many years.
Cave divers linked the Leon
Sinks area to Wakulla Springs
following a series of dives.
Dye studies had confirmed
a: connection, but the actual
rgute was not known until
divers found an underground
ppssageway that linked Turner
Snk to Wakulla Springs. The
link increased the number of
nMapped underground caves to
28 miles.
The Wakulla County Cal
Ripken All-Star baseball team
won the Southeastern Regional
STpurnament and a berth in the
national championships. The
team won the state and regional
cbmpetitions without dropping
atgame.
: Rep. Will Kendrick presented
the county with a $200,000
check to begin improvements
at Hickory Park in Crawfordville.
The park improvements will
include a playground, tennis
curt, volleyball court, improved
parking and a restroom. The
money is part of a state recre-
a.ion grant program.
5 School board members ap-
poved a $76 million budget
ai an August hearing that did
riot draw a single member of
tie public. Much of the budget
b6ost of 43 percent was a result
of $21 million for construction
ot the new elementary school.
, Traci and Jerry Cash of Craw-
fordville returned from China
where Jerry had special medi-
cal treatment. The Cash family
hopes the 2007 trip and poten-
tial trips in the future will help
Jerry overcome his paralysis as
a result of a work accident nine
years earlier.
;iThe Wakulla County crime
rate inched up in 2006, but the
county is still one of the safest
places to live in Florida. The
crime rate increased at a lower
rate than the population in-
crease. Wakulla County remains
ocie of the top six growing coun-
ti*s in the state.
i A 49-year-old Crawfordville


September

S Former Wakulla County
farmer and business owner
Iugh McCallister died of cancer
water becoming a fixture in the
Shadeville community as for-
mer owner of Mack's Country
Meats. McCallister also served
on the Wakulla County Com-
inission.
SState lawmakers prepared
for a special session on the
budget by asking state agencies
to cut budgets, which in turn
Could require local budget cuts
is well.
Dozens of residents from
Wakulla and Franklin counties
attended a transportation meet-
ing to express concern over
highway plans in both coun-
ties. One of the local concerns
involved the redesign of the
U1S. Highway 98 and U.S. High-
way 319 intersection in Medart.
The change could result in the
intersection being moved near
the entrance to the Wakulla
High School bus garage and bus
loading area.
Last minute haggling by the
county commission resulted in
two workshops being held on
the 2007-2008 budget. The first
of two budget hearings was
held on Sept. 4 while a second
hearing was held for Sept. 17.
Wakulla teachers received
pay increases and the school
board approved its 2007-2008
budget. The teacher salary
schedule began at $33,500 and
topped out at $54,700.


Wakulla County entered a new era in public safety with the addition of a paid firefighting st


man died in a Liberty County
traffic accident. William Clayton
Nix'died of injuries he received
on Aug. 4.
A wetlands setback vari-
ance request was denied by
the county commission as an
applicant was seeking to build
a commercial subdivision near
Wal-Mart. The 13 foot variance
of the 75 foot setback was
denied as commissioners said
the developer could shrink his
development by three to five
percent and meet the setback
requirements.
Commissioners asked staff
to look into using the Wakulla
Expo Center property on Lower
Bridge Road as a potential site
for the proposed community
center. However, the county
must own the property contain-
ing the community center and
expo officials were asked to
consider turning the property
over to the county.
Wakulla County residents
met with U.S. Senator Bill Nel-
son in Crawfordville to discuss
federal questions of concern
ranging from local funding to
global warming.

Wakulla County Sheriff Da-
vid Harvey, public officials and
emergency response officials,
honored the memory of those
who lost their lives during the
Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks
by holding the annual memo-
rial service.
Chris and Mike Beatty of
Florida Wild Mammal Associa-
tion lost their home to a fire on
Sept. 5. The buildings and pens
associated with the wild mam-
mal association operation were
not seriously damaged. Damage
to their home and surround-
ing property was estimated at
$170,000.
Wakulla County Commis-
sioners officially approved the
2007-2008 millage rate and
budget at the second and final
public hearing on Monday,
Sept. 17. The board budget of
$43.3 million included a mill-
age rate of 7.625, which was
down from 8.18 mills last year.
The budget hearing drew only
a handful of residents to speak
on the matter.
Vera Harvey retired from her
post as FAMU Agricultural Pro-
gram Assistant at the Wakulla
County Extension Office after
a 31 year career. Her desire was
to have an impact on the lives
of Wakulla County residents
from the time she graduated
from Shadeville High School
in 1960.
A massive cleaning effort
was conducted along the coast
and at other environmentally
sensitive areas in the county
during the annual Coastal


County commissioners en-
countered more controversy
over their agenda as board,
members clashed over items
placed on the consent agenda.
By the 3-2 vote, the board ap-
proved a slate of consent agen-
da items without additional
discussion.
Sheriff David Harvey tackled
the link of animal cruelty with
abuse of humans by holding
a major fundraiser to help
fund the efforts of Citizens for
Humane Animal Treatment
(CHAT). The fundraiser included
a drawing for a Harvey-Da-
vidson motorcycle to provide
operational funds for the volun-
teers who work with the animal
control unit.
Wakulla County Commis-
sioners missed a deadline to
submit the Evaluation and
Appraisal Report (EAR) to the
Department of Community Af-
fairs. The deadline was Sept.
1 and missing it means the
county will not have any Com-
prehensive Plan Amendments
approved by the state until the
EAR is approved sometime in
2008.


Commissioners approved an-
other dense residential develop-
ment near Wal-Mart in August
as Spears Crossing received a
rezoning and preliminary plat
approval. The 31 acre parcel
will become home to 69 homes
north of Crawfordville.
Enrollment grew by 56 stu-
dents on opening day of school
on Aug. 20 compared to open-
ing day in 2006. School district
officials expected the number of
new students to climb to more
than 125 after Labor Day.
The Wakulla County age 12
and under Cal Ripken All-Star
baseball team placed third at
the World Series in Van Bu-
ren, Ark. The team beat every
squad it faced during the state,
regional and national competi-
tion except for a team from
Arizona.
Glenn Wheeler received
two more life sentences in
connection with two cases of
breaking into women's homes
in May 2005. The crimes set
off a countywide manhunt by
the sheriff's office that ended
when law enforcement officials
caught Wheeler and a friend
; 1


July
Continued from Page 8

tor Ben Pingree presented the
county commission with a iew
budget that included millage
and budget cuts without having
to cut services. The budget was
based on a millage rate of 7.625,
down three percent from 2006-
2007 budget year.
SJudge N. Sanders Sauls re-
fused to dismiss a lawsuit over
the cleanup of the St. Marks
SRefinery. The suit was filed by
"the state Department of ,Envi-
ironmental Protection. Judge
Sauls said the state still bears
the responsibility of cleaning up
contamination at the site.
A four vehicle accident in-
jured two juvenile passengers
who were riding in a pickup
truck at the intersection of
Highway 365 and Highway 61.
The juveniles were hurt when
the driver crashed into'a teenage
motorist who had crossed into
his path. Two other motorists at
the intersection were hit during
the wreck as they waited at the
highway stop sign.
Wakulla County Building In-
taff in Crawwfordville. spector John Ross announced his
ner Ote retirement after more than two
near Oyster Bay. decades on the job, He will'be
Law enforcement officials decades on therjob. He will be
grabbed 35 mature marijuana replaced by Luther Councill who
grabbed 35 mature mariju had worked with Ross during a
plants in the Sopchoppy area had worked with Ross during a
during a: joint operation that summer transition period.
included the sheriff's office, State health officials have
Franklin 'County Sheriff's Of- been keeping an eye on water

fice, Florida Department of Law quality at two beach locations in
Enforcement, and federal Drug Wakulla County. Rainy summer
Enforcement Agency. The plants weather has increased the bacte-
Enforcement Agency. The plants ria counts in area waters which
were valued at approximately ra counts in area waters which
$35,000. resulted in warnings against
County commissioners voted swimming.
to consider paving several dirt,
roads in the Panacea commu- Wakulla Springs
nity. The roads would provide Fireside Chat set
residents with alternate es-
cape routes at times of severe for Jan. 26
weather.
The equestrian center project Wakulla Springs State Park
moved along as a public hearing will kick-off 2008 with a Fire-
resulted in more support for side Chat on Saturday, Jan. 26
the grant project. There were at 8 p.m. Visitors are invited to
no objections to the develop- relax before a crackling fire and
ment plan. listen to tales of Florida folklore
New Wakulla County Exten- and lodge legends. The event
sion Director Scott Jackson ar- is free with regular park admis-
rived in the county. The marine sion. Dinner is available in the
science expert replaced Dale historic Wakulla Springs Lodge
Bennett who retired after 20 and reservations are suggested.
years in the post and a lifetime For more information, call the
in teaching and agriculture. park at 926-0700. :


Chris and Mike Beatty lost their home and the Florida Wild Mammal Association lost deer that were threatened by fire
and released,


Cleanup program. Hundreds
of volunteers took part in the
effort.
Senior citizens will have
the opportunity to have an
additional $25,000 Homestead
Exemption in January 2008 as
a result of action taken by the
county commission. Senior
citizens must qualify for the
exemption by meeting certain
financial criteria.
Residents in Sopchoppy
were joined by two new doc-
tors as Chris and Kim Rittman


opened a family practice clinic
in the community. They hoped
to practice medicine "the way
we were taught to do it."
Florida Surgeon General Ana
Viamonte Ros, M.D. visited the
Wakulla County Health De-
partment to speak to Director
Marlon Hunter and his staff
about local health department
issues.
Wakulla County Sheriff Da-
vid Harvey and members of
the Community Traffic Safety
Team requested funding for


dangerous intersections at U.S.
Highway 319 and Highway 267
and Highway 267 and Highway
363. Some work.to make the
intersections safer has already
begun.
Wakulla County Commis-
sioners worked with a represen-
tative of the Apalachee Regional
Planning Council to submit
road improvement projects to
the state Department of Trans-
portation. Some of the submit-
ted ideas include a realignment
of the U.S. Highway 319 and


U.S. Highway 98 intersection, a
widening of the U.S. Highway
319 curve radius that slashes
through the City of Sopchoppy
and a turn lanes on U.S. High-
way 98 in the Panacea commu-
nity to help traffic flow.
Wakulla County Animal
Control Chief Gail Obenland
resigned amidst a probe into
the animal control's financial
statements. Obenland had'
been with the animal shelter
for eight years.


October

- The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection (DEP)
filed a lawsuit against Murphy
6il over spills at the company's
St. Marks facility. The lawsuit
seeks an immediate assessment
if contamination of the deep-
water aquifer at the site.
County commissioners held
Workshop with new Com-
imunity Development Director
Eindsay Stevens to discuss the
future of the Comprehensive
Plan and the Future Land Use
Map. Stevens promised to
update the aging planning
document.
' Commissioners voted 4-1 to
approve a residential rezoning


for Scott Gaby in Crawfordville.
Gaby converted a nine acre site
to three, three acre parcels. The
zoning changed from agricul-
ture to RR-2 residential which
increased the density on the
property.
Eric, Darlene, Shannon and
Dusty Mills were selected as the
2007 Wakulla County Outstand-
ing Farm Family. The family
was honored by the county Ex-
tension Service and the North
Florida Fair.
Wakulla County Supervisor
of Elections Sherida Crum an-
nounced that she will not seek
another term in her office. First
elected in 1984, Crum said she
wanted to get on with another
phase of her life. She added that
changes in the election laws


since 2000 have made her office
duties much more complicated
than when she started in the
1980s.
Wakulla County elected of-
ficials received their annual pay
raises for the 2007-2008 budget
year. In past years, the raises
have been $3,000 or more for
constitutional officers. This year
the increases were only a few
hundred dollars each.
The Wakulla Springs Coali-
tion aired plans to request
an expansion of the Springs
Protection Zone. Officials also
took the time to present infor-
mation on the record breaking
Woodville Karst Plain cave div-
ing results and the impact on
the environment. The protective
zone limits development activ-


ity near the Wakulla Springs
State Park.,
Local author, photographer,
adventurer and environmental-
ist Doug Alderson described
his book writing efforts and
activities to establish a kayak
trail around the entire State of
Florida. Alderson was a guest
speaker at a luncheon in Craw-
fordville.
City of Sopchoppy officials
announced plans to describe
the proposed sewage expansion
in the community. The city and
county commission are working
jointly to clean up the environ-
ment by allowing the city to
use the county's wastewater
treatment plant.
Wakulla County Commis-
sioners delayed taking any


action on increasing their im-
pact fees. The proposal to
increase the residential fees
from approximately $1,200 to
approximately $4,100 was met
with stiff opposition. Board
members promised to take the
matter up again despite a 10
month delay.
Former Wakulla War Eagle
athlete Leston Green landed
a job at sports media giant
ESPN after attending college at
Florida A & M University. Green
grabbed the job after being
interviewed at a Tallahassee
college job fair. He began work-
ing in Bristol, Conn. less than
a month after graduating from
college.
Former Wakulla High School
teacher Elaine Turner received


jail time for being sexually
involved with a student. The
case arose from an incident in
February 2006.
County commissioners dis-
cussed the future of the Wakilla
County Airport with consul-
tants hired to develop a master
plan with improvements to
the grass field. Board members
discuss security issues and the
possibility of creating a con-
crete runway on a lengthened
air strip.
Shadeville Elementary
School opened the Pumpkin
Patch as part of the school's an-
nual fundraiser. The pumpkins,
from New Mexico, helped the
school get the community ex-
'cited about the annual Fall Fes
See OCTOBER on Page 13


::: ::;:;








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 3, 2008 Page 11q

T Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open
224-4960
Crawfordville Branch w.fsucu.or
NOW OPEN-
____ *'" y >T ^^ A jJ.1 _________ i~r____________________________ "'____ *____________________________________________U


Coast

Guard

Auxiliary

Reports

By Jim McGill



Several auxiliarists have ex-
pressed interest in getting their
Captain li-
censes from
the Coast oeST
Guard and I
have taken m
the time
to find out
what you
would need. I am only going to
talk about the "6 Pack" Captain's
license.
With a "6 Pack" license, a cap-
tain can take up to six people out
on his boat, not counting himself
and his crew. This is the license
that most Captains have when
engaged in fishing, diving, and
tour cruises.
This license is also known as
an OUPV (Operator of Uninspect-
ed Passenger Vessel) license.
The license can be for "Inland
Waters," "Great Lakes," or "Near
Coastal" areas, The captain must
have experience within the ap-
propriate area.
There are many OUPV license
courses available where you
do not have to go to the Coast
Guard for testing. The course
costs vary and are usually about
a $1,000. You can also study for
this license on your own and
take the tests at an official Coast
Guard Regional Exam Center
(REC). There is an REC in Miami
and another in New Orleans.
Coast Guard fees are a $100 Eval-
uation Fee, a $110 Examination
Fee and a $45 License Issuance
Fee (total of $255).
The Coast Guard likes its
forms, and true to its nature,
there are several of them that
must be filled out to apply for
this license. To discuss the re-
quirements for this license, I will
briefly go over each form.
Form CG-719b is the four page
application form titled "Applica-
tion for License as an Officer,
Staff Officer, or Operator and for
Merchant Mariner's Document."
The first page asks for name,
address, and other personal in-
formation like next-of-kin. You
also must indicate which license
you want. The second page asks
for details concerning drug, D.UI
or other convictions. If you must
answer "yes" to any of the ques-
tions, you must attach a state-
ment to explain what happened.
Three character reference letters
are required. Page 2 concludes
with a waiver so that the Coast
Guard can check your driving
record. On the third page of the'
CG-719b, you sign an oath that
states that everything on the
form is correct. The fourth page
is a "Privacy Act Statement."
To obtain the OUPV license,
you must pass a physical. The
CG-719k form is the "Merchant
Mariner Physical Examination


Gulf Coast Weekly Almana


Tide charts by
Zihua Software, LLC


St. Marks River Entrance
Date High Low High Low High
Thu -0.1 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.8 ft. 2.7 ft.
Jan 3, 08 5:03 AM 12:00 PM 4:02 PM 10:14 PM
Fri -0.3 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.7 ft. 2.8 ft.
Jan 4, 08 5:54 AM 12:41 PM 5:09 PM 11:09 PM
Sat -0.5 ft. 2.6 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.9 ft.
Jan 5, 08 6:37 AM 1:15 PM 6:00 PM 11:54 PM
Sun -0.7 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.5 ft.
Jan 6, 08 7:15 AM 1:48 PM 6:42 PM
Mon 3.1 ft. -0.8 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.3 ft.
Jan 7, 08 12:33 AM 7:50 AM 2:19 PM 7:20 PM
Tue 3.2 ft. -0.9 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.1 ft.
Jan 8, 08 1:09 AM 8:22 AM 2:50 PM 7:57 PM
Wed 3.3 ft. -0.9ft. 3.0 ft. 1.0ft.
Jan 9, 08 1:45 AM 8:52 AM 3:19 PM 8:35 PM


Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay
Date High Low High Low High
Thu -0.0 ft. 1.7ft. 1.3 ft. 2.0 ft.
Jan 3, 08 5:14 AM 11:52 AM 4:13 PM 10:06 PM
Fri -0.2 ft. 1.8 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.1 ft.
Jan 4; 08 6:05 AM 12:33 PM 5:20 PM 11:01 PM
Sat v -0.4 ft. 1.9 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.2 ft.
Jan 5, 08 6:48 AM 1:07 PM 6:11 PM 11:46 PM
Sun -0.5 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.1 ft.
Jan 6, 08 7:26 AM 1:40 PM 6:53 PM
Mon 2.3 ft. -0.6 ft. 2.1 ft. 0.9 ft.
Jan 7, 08 12:25 AM 8:01 AM 2:11 PM 7:31 PM
Tue 2.4 ft. -0.7 ft. 2.2 ft. 0.8 ft.
Jan 8, 08 1:01 AM 8:33 AM 2:42 PM 8:08 PM
Wed 2.5 ft. -0.7 ft. 2.3 ft. 0.7 ft.
Jan 9, 08 1:37 AM 9:03 AM 3:11 PM 8:46PM


Major
Activity
Minor
Activity


Report." Your doctor must certify
that you are of sound health,
have ,no physical limitations
that would hinder or prevent
performance of duties, are physi-
cally fit to stay alert for four to
six hour shifts and that you are
free from any medical condi-
tions that pose a risk of sudden
incapacitation,
The CG-719p, "DOT/USCG
Periodic Drug.Testing Form," is
used to report the results of a
mandatory drug test. Drug test-
ing can be done by any SAMHSA
Accredited Laboratory.
The CG-719s, "Small Vessel
Sea Service Form," is used to doc-
ument your experience on the
water. You fill out days served by
month and year on this form for
each boat that you have been out
on. For the OUPV license, you
need to have a lifetime (since
age 13) time of 360 days on the
water. Each day is considered to
be six hours, Ninety days must
have been served in the three
years prior to application for the
license. If you are going for the
"Great Lakes" or "Near Coastal"
license, at least 90 days must be
'"Great Lakes" or "Near Coastal"
days. If you were not the owner


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LC


January 3 January 9


City of St. Marks


Date High Low High Low High
Thu -0.0 ft. 2.1 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.5 ft.
Jan 3, 08 6:07 AM 12:36 PM 5:06 PM 10:50 PM
Fri -0.3 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.6 ft.
Jan 4, 08 6:58 AM 1:17 PM 6:13 PM 11:45 PM
Sat -0.5 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.5 ft.
Jan 5, 08 7:41 AM 1:51 PM 7:04 PM
Sun 2.7 ft. -0.6 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.3 ft.
Jan 6, 08 12:30 AM 8:19 AM 2:24 PM 7:46 PM
Mon 2.9 ft. -0.7 ft. 2.6 ft. 1.2 ft.
Jan 7, 08 1:09 AM 8:54 AM 2:55 PM 8:24 PM
Tue 3.0 ft. -0.8 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.0 ft.
Jan 8, 08 1:45AM 9:26 AM 3:26 PM 9:01 PM
Wed 3.1 ft. -0.8 ft. 2.8 ft. 0.9 ft.
Jan 9, 08 2:21 AM 9:56 AM 3:55 PM 9:39 PM


St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.
Date High Low High Low High
Thu -0.1 ft. 1.7 ft. 1.8 ft. 2.1 ft.
Jan 3, 08 4:42 AM 11:44 AM 3:41 PM 9:58 PM
Fri -0.3 ft. 1.9 ft. 1.7 ft. 2.2 ft.
Jan 4, 08 5:33 AM 12:25 PM 4:48 PM 10:53 PM
Sat -0.5 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.3 ft.
Jan 5, 08 6:16 AM 12:59'PM 5:39 PM 11:38 PM
Sun -0.7 ft. 2.1 ft. 1.4 ft.
Jan 6, 08 6:54 AM 1:32PM 6:21 PM
Mon 2.4 ft. -0.8 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.3 ft.
Jan 7, 08 12:17 AM 7:29 AM 2:03 PM 6:59 PM
Tue 2.5 ft. -0.9ft. 2.3 ft. 1.1 ft.
Jan 8, 08 12:53 AM 8:01 AM 2:34 PM 7:36 PM
Wed 2.6 ft. -0.9 ft. 2.4 ft. 0.9 ft.
Jan 9, 08 1:29 AM 8:31 AM 3:03 PM 8:14 PM


of the vessel, the owner needs
to sign off on your time.
You must provide proof of
citizenship and age. -You must be
age 18 or older to get an OPUV li-
cense. Two forms of ID, one with
a picture, are required. As this is
a new license, an Original Social
Security Card is required. A valid
driver license, passport, and a
Social Security card are good
for this requirement. Other IDs
may include birth certificates,
military ID, etc,
You must have a certificate to
show that you have completed
a Red Cross (or equivalent) First
Aid/CPR course within the last
12 months. These courses are
given frequently in Tallahassee,
take about four hours and cost
about $45.
You must submit fingerprint
cards and undergo a security
check. These cards can be done
at the Wakulla County (or Leon
County) Sheriff's Office. You
must sign another form that
will allow them to perform the
security check.
There are four examination
modules that you pass to get
the OUPV license. These are the
"Rules of the Road," "Navigation
General," "Chart Navigation,"
and "Deck General + Deck Safety
& Environmental Protection."
The "Rules of the Road" is a
closed-book exam and the other
three are open book exams. All
four exam modules must be
completed on consecutive days
and no more than 3 VI hours is
allowed to complete any mod-
ule. All four modules can be
done in one day,
The "Rules of the Road" exam
module has 30 questions and a
passing score is 90 percent. This
means that you can miss only


Sunrise
Sunset
Moon rise
Moon set
Brightness


three questions. This exam is
on the Coast Guard Navigation
Rules (COLREGS) book.
The "Navigation General"
exam module has 20 questions
and a passing score of 70 per-
cent. This means that you can
miss six questions. This test asks
questions about navigation.
The "Chart Navigation" exam
module requires the use of plot-
ting tools and knowledge of
concepts such as set and drift. It
has 10 questions and a passing
score of 70 percent. You can miss
three questions and pass.
The "Deck General + Deck
Safety & Environmental Protec-
tion" module covers deck hand
knowledge and environmental
issues. It has 60 questions and
you must score 70 percent to
pass. You can miss 18 ques-
tions.
Study questions and the
required forms are available
on the Internet at http://www.
uscg.mil/STCW/. There are a lot
of other places on the Internet
to get study information. There
are several books, such as Chap-
man's, that also provide good
information.
Once you have the license,
you can conduct a for-hire fishing
business after paying business
costs such as insurance, equip-
See COAST GUARD on Page 16


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In the office of Lynn Alan Thompson


For tides at the following points
add to Dog Island Listings: Carrabelle
Apalachicola


High Tide
28 Min.
1 Hr., 53 Min.


, Cat Point 1 Hi
ST-o Lower Anchorage 1 Hi
.1 West Pass 1 HI

-- ai Shell Point, Spring Creek


r., 13 Min.
r., 36 Min.
r., 26 Min.


Date High Low High Low High
Thu -0.1 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.9 ft. 2.7 ft.
Jan 3, 08 5:00 AM 11:57 AM 3:59 PM 10:11 PM
Fri -0.3 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.9ft. 2.8 ft.
Jan 4, 08 5:51 AM 12:38 PM 5:06 PM 11:06 PM
Sat -0.6 ft. 2.6 ft. 1.7 ft. 3.0 ft.
Jan 5, 08 6:34 AM 1:12 PM 5:57 PM 11:51 PM
Sun -0.7 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.6 ft.
Jan 6, 08 7:12 AM 1:45 PM 6:39 PM
Mon 3.1 ft. -0.9 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.4 ft.
Jan 7, 08 12:30 AM 7:47 AM 2:16 PM 7:17 PM
Tue 3.3 ft. -1.0 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.2 ft.
Jan 8,08 1:06 AM 8:19 AM 2:47 PM 7:54 PM
Wed 3.4 ft. -1.0 ft. 3.1 ft. 1.0 ft.
Jan 9, 081:42 AM 8:49 AM 3:16 PM 8:32 PM


Dog Island West End
Date High Low High Low High
Thu -0.5 ft. 2.3 ft.
Jan 3, 08 4:29 AM 8:36 PM
Fri -0.7 ft. 2.3 ft.
Jan 4, 08 5:20 AM 9:21 PM
Sat -0.8 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.5 ft. 2.4 ft.
Jan 5, 08 6:06 AM 3:07 PM 5:01 PM. 10:13 PM
Sun -0.9 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.5 ft. 2.4 ft.
Jan 6, 08 6:47 AM 3:30 PM 5:54 PM 11:06 PM
Mon -0.9 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.4 ft.
Jan 7, 08 7:24 AM 3:53 PM 6:36 PM 11:57 PM
Tue -0.9 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.4ft.
Jan 8, 08 7:57 AM 4:14 PM 7:13 PM
Wed 22.4 ft. -0.9ft. 2.0 ft. 1.2 ft.
Jan 9, 08 12:46 AM 8:26 AM 4:32 PM 7:50 PM


Low Tide
25 Min.
2 Hrs., 38 Min
2 Hrs., 31 Min:
2 Hrs., 3 Min. 6
2 Hrs., 39 Min.






First
Jan. 15





Full
Jan. 22





Last
Jan. 30

*1


New
Jan. 8


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
7:33 am 7:33 am 7:34 am 7:34 am 7:34 am 7:34 am. 7:34 am
5:49 pm 5:50 pm 5:51 pm 5:51 pm 5:52 pm 5:53 pm 5:54 pm
3:25 am. 4:22 am 5:19 am 6:14 am 7:06 am 7:53am 8:35am
1:56 pm 2:35 pm 3:20 pm 4:12 pm 5:08 pm 6:09 pm 7:11 pm
32% 26% 20% 14% 8% 1% 1 5%


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PROFESSIONAL ENGINEER
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Boating Emergencies ,

Coast Guard Station
Panama City .................................................. 1 (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown ................................................. 1 (352) 447-6900
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St. M arks (Flotilla 12) ........................................ 1 (850) 906-0540
or ............... ....... .............. 893-5137
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e
e








Page 12 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 3, 2008


Dunlap
t, Continued from Page 1

uinlap's death.
; Throughout the process of her
disappearance on Dec. 1, until
,ihnters found her body in the
aalachicola National Forest on
Ec 15, residents have expressed
liheir love and adoration for
,he late Florida State University
health professional.
While the visitation and fu-
neral service cose another chap-
ter in the saga, law enforcement
;officials continue to seek answers
:to questions surrounding the
mysterious homicide.
"The investigation is still
ongoing," said Major Maurice
Langston of the Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office.
Wakulla Sheriff's Office, Leon
Sheriff's Office and Florida De-
partment of Law Enforcement
officials are seeking information
.on two "vehicles of interest" they
hope will lead them to the indi-
vidual or individuals who mur-
idered Cheryl Hodges Dunlap.
SThe first vehicle is a 2005 or
5ewer Nissan Titan truck with
Extended cab. The truck has a
design connected to the vehicle
iith adhesive which includes the
Back window. The second vehicle
is a black Dodge Ram truck with
an extended cab that was last
seen on the shoulder of U.S. High-
way 319 in Leon County.
; "We're still getting calls on
various vehicles," said Langston.
"We follow up on every tidbit
of information. We're meeting
regularly with Leon County on
this. We've had a great response
from the public."
I' Anyone with information
about the case is asked to call
Grime Stoppers at 574-8477, the
Ieon County Sheriff's Office at
922-3300 or the Wakulla County
Sheriffs Office at 926-0800.
Dunlap disappeared on Dec.
1 and was reported missing by
friends on Dec. 3. Her body was
discovered by hunters in rural
Ion County on Dec. 15. Her bank
c&d was used by a masked man
at a Leon. County ATM shortly
after she disappeared.


Candidates
, Continued from Page 1

Vell as eight candidates for
PIesident.
.,The Democratic candidates
lipping voters select them in-
lude: Joe Biden, Hillary Clinton,
Chris Dodd, John Edwards, Mike
Gravel, Dennis Kucinich, Barack
Obama and Bill Richardson.
, Republican voters will be
asked to vote for the same Con-
stitutional Revision as well as
selecting one of nine Republican
candidates for President The can-
didates include: Rudy Giuliani,
Mike Huckabee, Duncan Hunter,
Alan Keyes, John McCain, Ron
Paul, Mitt Romney, Tom Tancredo
-nd Fred Thompson.
S Wakulla County voters who
are not registered as Democrats
or Republicans can still go to the
polls on Jan. 29 and vote on the
Constitutional Revision.
The fall Primary Election will
b held Tuesday, Aug. 26 and the
cineral Election will be held on
Tuesday, Nov. 4.
SVoter registration closes 29
dys ,before each election. A
v ter photograph and signature
identification are required at the
pblls.
For more information about
tjfe 2008 elections, call Supervisor
of Elections Sherida Crum's office
at 926-7575.


Shelter
SContinued from Page 1

vwhen they can get on their feet
atid be free and dear of substance
abuse."
,. The Handy Man Service not
qrily helps the community, it
allows the clients to "learn how
to save their money and try and
&id their (abuse) cycle."
^ Hamel has made Partners
lfay an annual event to allow
t3e shelter to thank those who


tpport the organization.
S "It has been very successful,"
d Hamel of the program and
ters Day. "I'm pleased. It
s been a success story. We're
ppy to give back to the com-
unity."
Wakulla County residents
n help the Promise Land Min-
ties Lighthouse with dona-
lns other than cash.
"As always, this time of year,
eare in need of twin sheets,
ankets, towels, pillows,
iene products and cleaning
plies," Hamel concluded.
ucan find out more about
ministry by calling 251-4302
Visiting us at www.promise-
landministires.org."


FWC seeks

information

on slaughtered

Gulf Co. bears

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) officials are requesting the
public's help in determining who slaughtered
two Florida black bears in Gulf County.
FWC received notification on Dec. 22 that
two bears had been killed illegally. One was a
195-pound female found on Road 20, and the
other was a 125-pound female found on Jarrott
Daniels Road. Both bears had been shot, FWC
officials said.
The roads are located between two private
properties that are leased for hunting. Florida
banned the hunting of black bears in 1994.
The bears are now listed as threatened in
the state.
The investigation into who committed
these crimes continues, and a reward is being
offered if the information leads to an arrest,
according to FWC officials. Call Wildlife Alert
toll-free at 1-888-404-3922 to report any infor-
mation about this crime. Callers can remain
anonymous.

Manatee art contest
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) announces its 17th Annual
Manatee Decal Art Contest and invites middle
and high school art students to submit their
manatee artwork for consideration,
Students must work through their school's
art teacher to submit artwork since only five
art entries are allowed per school.
Contest information is listed on the mana-
tee pages of FWC's Web site at www.MyFWC.
com..


Sheriff's Report


Wakulla County Sheriff's Office officials
are investigating a grand theft reported
at the Wildwood Country Club in Medart
on Dec. 21, according to Sheriff David
Harvey.
Kenneth Todd Carlton of Crawfordville
and the club reported that someone failed
to return a golf cart. The electric cart was
valued at $3,846. An area search failed to
turn up the lost cart. The golf cart was en-
tered in the FCIC/NCIC computer. Deputy
Ward Kromer investigated.

In other activity reported by the Wakulla
County Sheriff's Office during the past
week:
On Dec. 22, Finley L. McMillan of Och-
lockonee Bay reported a criminal mischief
as someone damaged two windows on his
vacant residence. Damage was estimated
at $250 and was created by a pellet gun.
Deputy Ward Kromer investigated.
On Dec. 21, Alton M. Towles of Craw-
fordville reported the theft of a Quantum
Service garbage bin valued at $25. The bin
was taken from the end of the victim's
driveway. Deputy Ward Kromer investi-
gated.
On Dec. 22, Shannon Michael Willis,
32, of Sopchoppy was charged with posses-
sion of cocaine and possession of drug par-
phernalia in connection with a disturbance
at a Crawfordville lounge. Deputy Sean
Wheeler found the narcotics during the
investigation of another complaint. It was
also determined that Willis had outstand-
ing warrants. The narcotics were discovered
during the arrest process. Willis was trans-
ported to the Wakulla County Jail,
On Dec. 22, Tiffany Lashawn Lindsey,


Lt. Chris Savary and Sheriff David Harvey

Lt. Savary graduates

from FBI academy


Lt. Chris Savary of the Wakul-
la County Sheriff's office re-
cently graduated from the FBI
National Academy. The academy
provides a professional course
of study for U.S. and interna-
tional law enforcement leaders
that serves to improve adminis-
tration of justice in sheriff's and
police departments at home and
abroad and to raise law enforce-
ment standards, knowledge and
cooperation worldwide.
The mission of the program
is "to support, promote and
enhance the personal and pro-
fessional development of law
enforcement leaders by prepar-
ing them for complex, dynamic
and contemporary challenges
through innovative techniques,
facilitating excellence in educa-
tion and research."
Participation in the program
is by invitation only, through
a nomination process. Par-
ticipants are drawn from every
state in the union, U.S. territo-
ries and more than 150 foreign
countries.
For 10 classroom hour weeks,
four times a year, law enforce-
ment officials take undergradu-
ate and graduate courses on the
Quantico, Va. campus in law,
behavioral science, forensic sci-
ence, leadership development,
communication and health/fit-
ness. Officers participate in a
wide range of leadership and
specialized training and they
share ideas, techniques and
experiences with each other, cre-

926-3425 926-3655


ating lifelong partnerships that
span state and national lines.
The prestigious FBI Academy
has been training law enforce-
ment professionals since July
23, 1935.
Sheriff Harvey graduated
from a similar class early in his
own law enforcement career.
"Chris Savary is a perfect
example of the high calibre of
law enforcement excellence at
the Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office," said the sheriff. "He
has brought his competency,
cooperation and integrity to an
even higher level. He is the face
of the future of law enforcement
for Wakulla County."
"This is the highest level of
training a local law enforcement
officer can get," concluded Ma-
jor Maurice Langston.


28, of Crawfordville was charged with in-
troduction of contraband into the Wakulla
County Jail facility. Correctional Officer
Lisa Gowdy was making her rounds of the
pods when she smelled tobacco. Tobacco
was discovered in the inmates sweat pants.
Deputy Lindsay Allen investigated.
Om Dec. 26, Deputy Nick Petowsky
investigated a report of recovered property
at Goodwill in Crawfordville. A .22 calibre
rifle, valued at $100, was dropped off at the
store. The firearm was not reported stolen
and was taken by the sheriff's office with
a property receipt.
On Dec. 27, Tiffany A. Hudson of Craw-
fordville reported the loss of her.purse and
wallet at a local pizza parlor. The victim was
making pizza deliveries when the property
was lost. The lost property is valued at $51.
Deputy James Plouffe investigated.
On Dec. 28, Kristina Lynn Harris, 32, of
Crawfordville was arrested for DUI and driv-
ing while license is suspended or revoked,
third or subsequent conviction. Deputy
Matt Helms observed Harris allegedly cross
the center line of Shadeville Highway five
times at a speed of more than 60 miles
per hour. During the traffic stop, Deputy
Helms learned that the driver's license
was revoked for a prior DUI charge. FHP
Trooper Mike Simmons assisted with the
investigation.
The Wakulla County Sheriff's Office
received 689 calls for service during the
past week.
Note to our readers: The people who
are reported as charged with crimes in this
column have not yet been to trial and are
therefore innocent until proven guilty.


"Flattops
$12.00


Women's

firearm,

safety course
Jan. 12,26

The Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office will be offering the Fire-
arms and Personal Safety Course
for Women again on Saturday,
Jan. 12 and Saturday, Jan. 26, be-
ginning at 8 a.m. at the sheriff's
office, 15 Oak Street in Craw-
fordville.
There will be four hours of
classroom instruction, before
participants move to the Firing
Range for hands-on experience.
The course will be taught by
WCSO Firearms Instructors and
will cover safe gun handling,
carrying a firearm, proper ammu-
nition and loading and shooting
a firearm.
A discussion of non-lethal
pepper spray and stun guns will
help you choose what type of
protection you feel is right for
your situation.
The fee for the course will be
$30, and covers ammunition.
For more information or to
register for the course, please
e-mail Sgt. Fred Nichols at fnich-
ols@wcso.org with your name
and contact information and
what date you would like to
attend.
He will respond back to you.
If you need to contact the sher-
iff's office you may call 850-926-
0800.


WCSO, Blood Center

to sponsor drive to

benefit Jack Leppert

The Wakulla County Sheriff's Office and the Southeastern
Community Blood Center will sponsor a Blood Drive in support
of Wakulla County resident Jack Leppert of the Friends of Wakulla
Springs State Park.
The drive will be held on Friday, Jan. 11 from 11 a.m. until 3
p.m. at the sheriff's office in Crawfordville.
To register to give blood, call Major Larry Massa at 926-0821.
Walk-ins are also welcome. Anyone who donates blood during the
drive will receive a charcoal fleece stadium blanket. All donors must
present a picture identification at the time of the donation. For
more information, call 877-7181 or go to www.scbcinfo.org.

FHP to check sobriety


The Florida Highway Patrol,
with the assistance of other
state and local law enforcement
agencies, will be conducting a
sobriety checkpoint on Saturday
Dec. 29 from 10 p.m. until 2 a.m.
on Dec. 30.
The checkpoint will be con-
ducted on U.S. Highway 319 in
the area of Glenda's County
Store, located at 525 Crawford-
ville Highway.
Motorists are urged to con-
tact the FHP or local law enforce-


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2181 Crawfordville Hwy.
Crawfordville, Florida
Phone: (850) 926-3942
Fax: (850) 926-9044
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an impaired, aggressive, or
dangerous driver by dialing
*FHP (*347) from their cell
phones. Callers may remain
anonymous.


Wishing All of Our
Readers a Fantastic
2008!

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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 3, 2008 Page 13


Speakers at the ceremonial "first brick" laying at Wakulla County's newest elementary school.


Lindsay Stevens joined Wakulla County as the new Director
of Community Development.


October
Continued from Page 10
tival, the largest fundraiser for
the school year. The pumpkins
helped get the students fired
up for the Fall Festival in No-
vember.
School district officials part-
nered with the Wakulla County
Health Department to educate
and address the student body
about the threat of staph infec-
tions. School officials regularly
cleaned the places where stu-
dents are likely to be infected
as well as placing signs around
campuses warning students to
constantly wash their hands
and avoid sharing soft drinks.


December

The Wakulla County School
District scored in the top 14
counties for its high school
graduation rate. Florida has a
total of 67 counties. The 82.5 per-
cent graduation rate ranked the
county 10.1 percent higher than
the state average of 72.4 percent.
Wakulla County also improved
its graduation rate from 2005-
2006 to 2006-2007 from 77.6
percent to 82.5 percent.
,A Wakulla Correctional Insti-
tution correctional officer was
fired and arrested in a sex case
involving two juvenile females.
Dennis Joseph Pumphrey of
Crawfordville was charged with
two counts of sexual battery of
a.mior person and two counts
of lewd and lascivious molesta-
tion of a minor over age 12 and
under age 16,
Crawfordville resident Cheryl
Hpdges Dunlap was reported
missing by friends on Dec. 3
when she failed to show up for
Sunday School class and work
over the previous two days. Her
disappearance set up a joint ef-
fort to find her by law enforce-
ment and friends.
Sopchoppy resident George
Griffin took part in the Paws
with'a Cause program that trains
dogs to help individuals with a
disability. Griffin volunteered
his time to help Julep for a full
year.
A freeze of the state govern-
ment investment pool did not
hurt the Wakulla County School
District because Wakulla had
withdrawn money from the
fund the day before the freeze.
County governments that failed
to withdraw funds prior to the
freeze had difficulty meeting
payroll. Gov. Charlie Crist and
other state officials put the
freeze in place when a number
of local governments began
withdrawing money from the
fund. The governments had
received word that the fund
had invested in some securities
backed by subprime mortgages.
The run reduced the fund from
$27 billion to $11 billion over a
five month period.
Wakulla County celebrated
Christmas with events involving
Santa Claus in Crawfordville,
Sopchoppy and Panacea.
A masked man was observed


The Wakulla War Eagle foot-
ball team topped Godby 10-0 for
Sthe first victory over the Cougars
since Godby and WVakulla be-
came district foes.
St. Marks hosted the St.
Marks Riverfront Festival which
celebrated the return of the
stone crabs The event also
featured old cars, motorcycles
and more.
Wakulla County Director of
Special Projects Pam Portwood
resigned her job to become Ex-
ecutive Director of the Florida
Hydrogen Initiative. Portwood
said she would stay on to assist
the county through the transi-
tion of hiring a new special
projects coordinator.


Cheryl Hodges Dunlap
at a Tallahassee ATM machine
using a bank card owned by
Cheryl Hodges Dunlap of Craw-
fordville. The card was used over
a three day period before and
after Dunlap was reported miss-
ing. She was last seen on Dec.
1 in Wakulla County. Three law
enforcement agencies contin-
ued to work to determine what
happened to the 46-year-old
Wakulla County woman,
Local families were given the
opportunity to remember lost
loved ones during the holiday
season at the annual Big Bend
Hospice Service of Remem-
brance.
A female body was recovered
in the Apalachicola National
Forest in rural southern Leon
County, but investigators could
not say whether the body was
that of Cheryl Hodges Dunlap.
Dunlap was reported missing
on Dec. 1.
Wakulla County Commission-
ers ranked cleaning up the envi-
ronment and the bay as one of
their top priorities for 2008. The
board met in a retreat session to
create a list of funding priorities
for state and federal lawmakers
as well as prioritize important
issues to the board.
The Pritchett family of Craw-
fordville decorated the Pickin'
Parlour Park with holiday deco-
rations. The decorations in-
cluded mannequins, wreaths,
Christmas trees and many other
items.
Sadly, the year came to a close
as law enforcement officials re-
vealed that the remains found in
the Apalachicola National Forest
were those of Dunlap.


November

Wakulla County honored
veterans as part of a Veterans'
Day holiday celebration in Hud-
son Park and other locations in
Wakulla County, Many of the
celebrations were sponsored
by the school district. Veterans
were given an opportunity to
tell what is was like to represent
their country and serve in the
U.S. military.
County commissioners con-
tinue to haggle over the updat-
ing of new development impact
fees. The board received a study
from a governmental consultant
recommending the fees in 2006
and received an ordinance to
adopt the fees in early 2007.
After a number of workshops
on the matter, the board was
still not sure where to set the
new fees.
The consultant's recommend-
ed fee increase was higher than
county commissioners wanted
to go.
Wakulla Gardens subdivision
residents braced for information
about the cost of hooking their
homes to the proposed central
sewage system. County commis-
sioners wanted to connect the
environmentally sensitive com-
munity to sewer lines when the
treatment plant in Otter Creek
is expanded. The entire sewer
project, which includes connect-
ing the City of Sopchoppy, is
expected to cost approximately
$20 million. Residents were
concerned that the cost to con-
nect to the sewer system could
top $6,000.
A Gulf County teenager was
arrested in a "buy-bust" sting
set up by Wakulla County law
enforcement officials. The youth
was arrested as he attempted to
sell a "cocaine cookie" to a confi-
dential informant. The man, who
was armed, was apprehended a
short distance from the bust site
in Panacea.
The Wakulla County lion
at Azalea Park dressed for the
Halloween holiday as Spider-
man. The lion was donated to
the county by Laura Gentry, the
former owner of Tattered Pages
book store. The county plans
to continue "dressing" the lion
up for holidays and different
seasons.
Wakulla County hopes to
expand the recycling program
when the transfer site on Lower
Bridge Road, formerly the county
landfill, is expanded. The public
works department, under the
leadership of Cleve Fleming and
ESG, hopes to add a large build-
ing on the transfer site where
residents can dump their gar-
bage on a concrete pad and ma-
terials can be easily recycled.
Wakulla County Commission-
ers tabled another opportunity to
approve updated impact fees on
Nov. 5. Board members could not
agree on an amount to increase
the fees and two members of
the board suggested keeping the
fees at the present rate.
Comments from the public
ranged from supporters who
asked the board to adopt the
fees to opponents who said the
fees will hurt an already sagging
economy in the county,
Wakulla County made plans
to celebrate Veterans' Day and
honor the services of those
residents who have served in the
military over the past decades.
Mullet was the star attraction
for the Second Annual Mighty
Mullet Festival in Panacea. The
event was a benefit event for the


Big Bend Maritime Museum.
Wakulla Middle School and
Riversprings Middle School com-
peted in the annual rivalry game
Thursday, Nov. 1 at Wakulla
High School. The coaches, Scott
Collins of WMS and Joe Jacobs
of RMS, got their teams fired up
for the season ending game. The
WMS Wildcats had just enough
offense to win the game 18-6.
Wakulla County school buses
roll more than one million miles
per year and transport more
than 4,000 students to and from
school each day. Transportation
Director Pat Jones uses recently
acquired computer software to
keep track of every bus route and
student during the school year.
Two school buses were in-
volved in a minor accident in
Crawfordville in November, A
student distracted a bus driver
who bumped into a bus in front
of him. The second bus was
waiting for a third school bus to
discharge students.
Wakulla War Eagle football
linebacker Nigel Bradham was
selected to the U.S. Army All-
American team. He will play
with his fellow all-stars in Janu-
ary.
Former Wakulla War Eagle
*coach and Wakulla Middle
School teacher Dave Price died
Nov. 9 after a battle with ALS.
Hundreds of friends attended
his funeral in Tallahassee as
Wakulla educators remembered
their friend and colleague fond-
ly.
A 40-year-old Crawfordville
motorcyclist died in a head-on
crash in Liberty County during
the month. The driver of the
other vehicle was not seriously
injured.
Board of Directors of the
former Wakulla Expo Center
announced plans to change
the name of their project to the
Wakulla Civic Center as support-


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ers made a push to raise private
money for an awareness cam-
paign. The group will attempt
to get construction money for
the building in the 2008 state
legislative session.
Wakulla School Board mem-
bers heard a presentation from
staff regarding the proposed
adoption of the zoning plans
for the new elementary school
and how it will impact students
at the other three elementary
schools. There were some mi-
nor adjustments made to the
middle school zones as well.
The proposal was scheduled to
go before the board for final ap-
proval in December.
Wakulla County Commission-
ers voted 3-2 to keep the build-
ing impact fees at their existing
level. Commissioner Ed Brimner
was the deciding vote and stated
that Wakulla County growth was
already paying for itself. Board
members are using impact fee
amount recommendations that
are more than a decade old.
Two Gadsden County men
were arrested in a crack cocaine
bust that included fake cocaine.
Major Maurice Larigstonf the
sheriff's office said law enforce-
ment officials are seeing more
cases involving fake narcotics
and suspects intending to com-
mit a robbery during the drug
sale.
The school district honored
former superintendents of
schools and their widows dur-
ing the ceremonial brick laying
at the new elementary school.
All of the former superinten-
dents were represented except
Dr. William Whaley.
Locklyn Tucker won the 2007
Miss Wakulla County Pageant
held at Wakulla High School The
runners-up were Sara Daw, Han-
nah Battle and Jordyn Brooks.
More than 3,600 mouths were
fed by the school district during


RIVER PLANI'A'IUON
4/3 Custom Built Green Home in
Gated Community on the Wakulla
River with a board walk to the river.
REDUCED $599,000


an average school day. The food
service operation has changed"
greatly over the years, but stu-'
dent meals are still less than $2
at the elementary schools. The'
district has also been careful tf"
feed students healthy food that
is low in fat content. ,;
A workshop on the renaming:
of Lower Bridge Road after slain
civil rights leader Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr, proved divisive,
as some residents discussed the:
community as "we and them.e-
County commissioners refused,
to rename the road despite a
plea from the Wakulla County
Christian Coalition.
Old subdivisions will face
limit on the number of home.
after county officials discovered,
an overlooked provision in the
Comprehensive Plan. The prov,
sion limits property owners t
one single family dwelling unit
in subdivisions such as Wakull
Gardens no matter how mant
contiguous lots are owned.
Commissioner Ed Brimner
was named the new chairman
and George Green was selected'
as vice chairman as board mefii
bers continued'to pass over.
Commissioner HowIard Kes'1i&
kessler has been vice chairmai?
of the board during his time asa
county commissioner, but never'
the chairman. r.
Wakulla County Clerk Brent
Thurmond opened the courti
house to visitors to enjoy once
more before the newest renovav
tion begins and changes the look
of the facility. ''
County residents made it:
through the 2007 hurricari~
season without damage, but thi
Emergency Management team of
Director Scott Nelson and Major
Maurice Langston were ready:
with plans of action and ideal
how the community can prepare
for the next Storm.


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Page 14 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 3, 2008


Deadline

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100 EMPLOYMENT
,105 Business Opportunities
110 Help Wanted
115 Work Wanted
120 Services and Businesses
125 Schools and Instruction
130 Entertainment
200 ITEMS FOR SALE
205 Antiques
210 Auctions
215 Auto Parts and Accessories
220 Cars
225 Trucks
230 Motor Homes and Campers
235 Motorcycles and 4-Wheelers
240 Boats and Motors
245 Personal Watercraft
250 Sporting Goods
255 Guns
260 Business Equipment
265 Computers and Internet
270 Electronics
275 Home Furnishings


280 Home Appliances
285 Jewelry
290 Musical Instruments
295 Building Materials
300 MISC. FOR SALE
305 Machinery, Tools & Equipment
310 Firewood Products
315 Farm & Garden Equipment
320 Farm Products & Produce
325 Horses.
330 Livestock, Farm Animals
335 Pets
340 Plants
345 Swap, Barter, Trade
350 Wanted to Buy
355 Yard Sales
400 NOTICES YA
410 Free Items
415 Announcements
420 Card of Thanks
425 Occasion Cards
430 In Memoriam
435 Lost and Found
440 Personals and Notices


500 REAL ESTATE, HOMES, MOBILES
505 Acreage for Lease
510 Acreage for Sale
515 Apartments for Rent
520 Townhouses for Rent
525 Townhouses for Sale
530 Commercial Property for Rent
535 Commercial Property for Sale
540 Farms for Sale
545 Homes for Sale
550 Homes with Acreage for Sale
555 Houses for Rent
560 Land for Sale
565 Mobile Homes for Rent
570 Mobile Homesfor Sale
575 Mobile Homes with Land for Sale
580 Rooms for Rent/Roommates Wanted
585 Wanted to Rent
590 Waterfront Homes/Land for Sale
595 Vacation Rental


CALL 926-7102 TODAY
Email: classifieds@thewakullanews.net


Legal Notice


' IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 06-81-FC
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR
THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLD-
ERS; PARK PLACE SECURITIES, INC.
ASSET-BACKED PASS THROUGH CERTIFI-
CATES SERIES 2005-WCW2
PLAINTIFF
ys.
PUZANNE F. LITTLE; AUGUSTUS L. LITTLE;.
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
EIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER
LAIMANTS; BUNTING NEIGHBORHOOD
ROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION; SONG-
IRD SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS AS-
MOCIATION, INC; SUBURBAN PROPANE;
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS
UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION.
DEFENDANT(S)
S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
,ummary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
he DEC 17, 2007 entered in Civil Case No.
06-81-FC of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial
irculit In and for WAKULLA County, CRAW-
fORDVILLE, Florida, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at THE FRONT DOOR OF
the WAKULLA County Courthouse located at
056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY in CRAW-
VORDVILLE, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 24th
Day of January, 2008 the following described
property as set forth in said Summary Final Judg-
pent, to-wit:
kOT 5, BLOCK "-", SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION,
PHASE II, A SUBDIVSION AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3,
PAGE 113 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WA-
KULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale. if any. other than the property own-
ers of the date of the lis oendens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 19th day of December, 2007.
BrentX. Thurmond
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
ITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons with disabili-
ies needing a special accommodation should
contact COURT ADMINISTRATION, at the WA-
KULLA County Courthouse at 850-9268-3341,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) orl-800-955-8770, via
Florida Relay Service.
January 3, 10, 2007


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 07-136-CA
ERIC MILLS, and DARLENE MILLS,
Plaintiff,
v.
G.A. PHILLIPS, and CHARLOTTE S. PHILLIPS,
Defendant.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: G.A. PHILLIPS, and CHARLOTTE S. PHIL-
IPPS
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Quiet
Title to the following property in Wakulla County,
Florida:
LOT(S) NUMBERED 19, 20, 51, & 52 IN BLOCK
49 OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT V, AS
SHOWN BY PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION OF
RECORD ON PAGE 56 PLAT BOOK NO. ONE
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Wakulla County Parcel ID No.
00-00-034-012-09580-000
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on DANIEL E. MANAUSA, ESQUIRE, SMITH,
THOMPSON, SHAW & MANAUSA, P.A., Plain-
tiff's attorneys, 3520 Thomasville Road, 4th Floor,
Tallahassee, Florida 32309-3469, no more than
thirty (30) days from the first publication date of
this notice of action, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before service on Plain-
tiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; other-
wise, a default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint or petition.
DATED this 10th day December, 2007.
BRENT X. THURMOND
By: Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
December 20,27, 2007
January 3,.10, 2007


NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage
Facility Act, Flonda Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV,
that ABC Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on
Saturday, January 12th, 2008 at 11:00 a.m. at
3743 Crawfordvlle Hwy., Crawfordville, FL
32327, of the contents of Mini Warehouse con-
taining personal property of:
Michelle Dawson
Julie Frazier
G. June Maxwell III
Ernest Jackson Jr.
Miguel Robinson
Payments must be made on January 11th, 2008
by 5:00 p.m. before the sale date of January 12th,
2008. The owners may redeem their property by
payment of the Outstanding Balance and cost by
contacting ABC Storage at 508-5177. Or by pay-
ing in person at the warehouse location.
December 27, 2007
January 3, 2007


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 07-137-CA
CUTCHIN PROPERTIES, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MRS. ROSA LEE LYNCH;
Defendant.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MRS. ROSA LEE LYNCH and UNKNOWN
HEIRS OF MRS. ROSA LEE LYNCH
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Quiet
Title to the following property in Wakulla County,
Florida:
LOT(S) NUMBERED 18 (EIGHTEEN) IN BLOCK
20 (TWENTY) OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 1,
AS SHOWN BY PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION
OF RECORD ON PAGE 39 PLAT BOOK NO.
ONE OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Wakulla County Parcel ID No.
00-00-035-008-07641 -000
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on DANIEL E. MANAUSA, ESQUIRE, SMITH,
THOMPSON, SHAW & MANAUSA, P.A., Plain-
tiff's attorneys, 3520 Thomasville Road, 4th Floor,
Tallahassee, Florida 32309-3469, no more than
thirty (30) days from the first publication date of
this.notice of action, and file the original with the
Clerl~dfthis Court either before service on Plain-
tiff's attorneys or immediately thereafter; other-
wise, a default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint or petition.
DATED this 7th day December, 2007.
BRENT X. THURMOND
By: Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
December 13, 20, 27, 3, 2007
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 07-138-CA
CUTCHIN PROPERTIES, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
J. LEONARD DEVINS,
Defendant.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: J. LEONARD DEVINS
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Quiet
Title to the following property in Wakulla County,
Florida:
LOT(S) NUMBERED* FORTY EIGHT (48) IN
BLOCK TWENTY (20) OF WAKULLA GARDENS,
UNIT 1, AS SHOWN BY PLAT OF SAID SUBDI-
VISION OF RECORD ON PAGE 39 PLAT BOOK
NO. ONE OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WA-
KULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Wakulla County Parcel ID No.
00-00-035-008-07671-000
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to It
on DANIEL E. MANAUSA, ESQUIRE, SMITH,
THOMPSON, SHAW & MANAUSA, P.A., Plain-
tiff's attorneys, 3520 Thomasville Road, 4th Floor,
Tallahassee, Florida 32309-3469, no more than
thirty (30) days from the first publication date of
this notice of action, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before service on Plain-
tiff's attorneys or immediately thereafter; other-
wise, a default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint or petition.
DATED this 10th day December, 2007.
BRENT X. THURMOND
By: Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
December 20,27,2007
January 3, 10, 2007
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 07-69-FC
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COM-
PANY AS TRUSTEE FOR MORGAN STANLEY
ABS CAPITAL I INC. TRUST 2006-HE6, MORT-
GAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SE-
RIES 2006-HE6
PLAINTIFF
VS.
WILLIAM JOSEPH WHEELER; TRACEY MI-
CHELLE WHEELER; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PATIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER,
AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVID-
UAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARITES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND JANE
DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSES-
SION
DEFENDANT(S)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
the DEC 17, 2007 entered in Civil Case No.
07-69-FC of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial
Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, CRAW-
FORDVILLE, Florida, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at THE FRONT DOOR OF
the WAKULLA County Courthouse located at
3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY in CRAW-
FORDVILLE, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 24th
day of January, 2008 the following described
property as set forth in said Summary Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:
LOT 7, FAIRWINDS SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVI-
SION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 68, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale. if any. other than the orooertv own-
ers of the date of the is oendens. must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 19th day of December, 2007.


Brent X. Thurmond
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons with disabili-
ties needing a special accommodation should
contact COURT ADMINISTRATION, at the WA-
KULLA County Courthouse at 850-926-3341,
1-800-955-8771 (TOD) orl-800-955-8770, via
Florida Relay Service.
January 3, 10, 2007


THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 2007 CA 000137
21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAMES C. BARBER, III; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF JAMES C. BARBER, III; DEBORAH L.
HEATER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DEBORAH L.
HEITER; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF
REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RE-
SPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIEN-
ORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PER-
SONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR
AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT
#2;
Defendant(s)

NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to'a Final
Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the
above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wa-
kulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situate
In Wakulla County, Florida, described as:
Lot 6, Wakulla Farm Estates Unit 2, according to
the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page
8, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Flor-
ida
To include a:
1996 CHANDLER VIN GAFLS05B24430CW21
70174330
A/K/A
58 Mount Zion Road
Crawfordville, Fl 32327
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for
cash, at the front lobby of the Wakulla County
Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Craw-
fordville, FL. 32327 at 11:00 o'clock, A.M., on Jan,
24, 2008.
DATED THIS 18th DAY OF Dec, 2007.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the
19th day of Nov., 2007.
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By: Teresa Brannan
Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the American with Disabilities
Act of1990, persons needing a special accommo-
dation to participate in this proceeding should con-
tact the ASA Coordinator no later than seven (7)
days prior to the proceedings. If hearing impaired,
please call (800) 955-9771 (TDD) or (800)
955-8770 (voice), via Florida Relay Service.
January 3, 10, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY,
FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 652007CA000115XXXXXX
BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE
CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWABS, INC.
ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2006-3,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANTHONY SCOTT, et al.
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure
dated December 18, 2007 and entered in Case
No. 652007CA000115XXXXXX of the Circuit
Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wa-
kulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF NEW
YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE-
HOLDERS CWABS, INC. ASSET-BACKED CER-
TIFICATES, SERIES 2006-3 Is Plaintiff and AN-
THONY SCOTT; SHERRY SCOTT; UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTER-
ESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A
NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR
HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT,
TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY
HEREIN DESCRIBED are Defendants, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front
Foyer of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056
Crawfordville Highway,Crawfordville, FL 32327 in
Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on the
24TH day of January, 2008, the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Order or Final
Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 40, CAMELOT, A SUBDIVISION AS PER
MAP OR PLAT THEROF, RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 3, PAGE 122 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE
DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
DATED at Crawfordville, Florida on Dec. 19,
2007.
BRENT X. THURMOND
As Clerk, Circuit Court
By: Teresa Brannan
As Deputy Clerk
January 3, 10, 2007

110 Help Wanted


Caregiver for handicapped male.
Part-time. 7:30am-2:30pm Sat.-Sun.
$7/hr. 926-4843.


Floor Technician. Supervisor & lead
worker. Must have good DL & clean
hanknrnund Call 681-3148.


Harold Burse Stump Grinding
926-7291.


Why Drive To Tallahassee?
Save Money Now.
Join Our Team At
Eden Springs Nursing & CMPAT
Rehab Center
Excellent Salary & Benefits A.8ir N
Call 926-7181 Fiom Here To Yonder in a Day's Time...

0GEDEN 528-3487

_SPRINGS 962-2437


HVAC MECHANICS
& HELPERS
WITH EXPERIENCE

Top Pay, Excellent Benefits, Vaca-
tion/Holiday Pay, 401-K

Keith Lawson Company
Will Yandle (850) 528-2524
(850) 562-3795 FAX
Submit application @ 4557 Cap Cir
NW

KLC is an EOE/AAE & DFWP
Min app encouraged to apply
Need part-time driver 4-8hrs/week.
Must be available 7 days/week. Must
have home phone, drivers license.
Previous need not inquire. Call
926-5166. Leave message, all calls
will be returned.
120 Services and Busi-
nesses

A NEW LOOK PAINTING, serving
Wakulla County for 14 years. Li-
censed & Insured. Call Jim or Teresa
Porter. (850)926-2400. .
A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING
Free Estimates
Licensed John Farrell
926-5179
566-7550

AIR-CON OF WAKULLA
HEATIN & A/C
Maintenance & Service
Gary Limbaugh, 926-5592
FL Lic. #CAC1814304
3232 Crawfordville Highway

All about concrete. Joseph Francis.
850-556-1178 or 850-926-9064.

ALL PRO FENCE
Residential-Commercial
Fencing. 519-1416.


ANYTIME ELECTRIC
Specializing in repair and service,
residential and commercial, homes
and mobile homes. 24-hour service.
Mark Oliver, ER0015233. 421-3012.

BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE
Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway.
Larry Carter Owner/Operator.
850-925-7931, 850-694-7041. Li-
censed/Insured.

C & R Tractor/Backhoe Services,
large tract and residential site clear-
ing rock, dirt, and road base hauling.
call Crandall (850)933-3346.


Casey's

Lawn &

Tree

Service

926-5759

528-3478




CJ SERVICES-Lawn service; haul-
ing; cleanup; phone jacks installed;
house washing, etc. Call 421-9365
for estimate.

Compost for sale. 850-556-1178 or
850-926-9064.


KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR
Commercial, residential and mobile
homes. Repair, sales, service, instal-
lation. All makes and models. Lit.
#RA0062516. 926-3546.

MORRIS BROWN CONSTRUCTION
Residential and Commercial: New
Construction, Additions, and Remod-
eling. Lic.#CRC057939 Morris Brown
509-3632, Paul Williams 933-5174.


Mr. Stump
STUMP GRINDING
Quick Service
Cellular: 509-8530

Munges Tree- 24 hour emergency
service (850)421-8104. Firewood also
available.
Need Cash?
Got Junk Cars, Trucks, & Scrap?
I Buy Scrap Metals!!
850-838-JUNK (5865)
State Certified Scales.

New construction, additions, wood
rot, decks & fences. Lic. & Ins. 25yrs
experience. Call David 345-0336 or
Bryan 363-1401. Chatham Construc-
tion, Inc.

Nikki's Trucking, LLC. Licensed and
bonded. Mobile home transport & in-
stall services. We also haul rock,
sand and gravel. Donnie Cruse
(850)510-2195. Nicole Cruse
(850)510-5498.

Paul's Trucking.
10-wheeler. Road-base, fill dirt, &
gravel. Call for more information.
850-528-6722. Call Paul for better
prices. Paulstrucking.com.

THE WOOD SHOP
Furniture refinishing. No vat dipping.
Antique restoration. Custom design
built-ins & accent pieces.
30 yrs. experience. 273-0689.


We do alterations, embroidery,
monogramming, sewing in my home.
Cal April @ 251-3323.

We Process Deer. Raker Farms.
926-7561.

125 Schools and Instruc-
tion


Michelle Snow
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Piano-Voice-Guitar-Woodwinds
926-7627

200 Items For Sale


HABITAT RE-STORE
Abundance of bedding, sofas, inte-
rior/exterior doors, windows/screens,
fiberglass shower units and light fix-
tures. Open Tuesday thru Saturday,
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., 940 Shadeville Hwy;
(Hwy. 61), 926-4544.


Selling Slim PS2 with 1 controller, 2Z
SMemory Sticks, and 8 Games. Very
Nice Condition $140.00 Z(3al
850-210-9790 or 850-556-6577.

Selling XBox with 2 Controllers and
12 Games. Mint Condition. $130.00
Call 850-210-9790 or 850-556-6577.


225 Trucks


'91 GMC Truck. Black. 350 Engine.
Completely rebuilt. $4,000 OBO.
329-7643 or 321-4416.

240 Boats and Motors


FOLD-A-BOAT ,12 ft. with accesso-
ries, 5 hp Yamaha motor and nearly
new galv. trailer. Great for Camping!!
$1,475 (850) 926-3101.

275 Home Furnishings


$150 Queen Pillow-Top Mattress Set.
New in plastic with warranty.
850-222-9879.

Designer Bedroom complete 8 piece
set including TV Armoire, all new.:
Sacrifice $995. (850)545-7112. Can
deliver.

Dinette Set, Solid.Wood table & 4
chairs-$149. New In Box. Call Sandi
(850) 222-9879.

Dining Room Beautiful cherry table,
2 arm &-4 side chairs, lighted china
cabinet. Brand new in boxes, can de-
liver. Must move, $799.
850-222-7783.

King Pillow Top Mattress Set. $299.;
New in plastic with warranty.
850-545-7112. Can deliver.

Mattress-New Nasa Visco Memory -
Foam Mattress Set with warranty.
Never used. Must move: $350.
(850)222-7783.

Solid Wood sleigh bed-Brand New in
box, $250. (850)425-8374.


Nursing & Rehab Center


z


L I I


HOME COMFORT

INDUSTRIES*
CENTRAi- HEATING &, Am
Sales Installation & Repair
Eii:c-iiucm, Si;iwicLs
Fans, Lighting, Wiring for
Electrical, Phones, TV,
CompUtCr & S01111d
Located in Craii f0rdi Me
DOL1,1 & ShC1TVQL1 ig.l,, 0\\ ilCI-S
Lic. N,,',. 1: RN 10924, CAC 1814' 68
(850) 926-5790


i













335 Pets


Adopt a pet from the animal shelter:

Dogs:
Lab, yellow
Labs, black
Terrier mix
'Hound mixes
Jack Russell mix
Lab mixes .
St. Bernard mix
.Chihuahua mixes
Rat Terrier mixes
Many other nice mixes. Come and
take a look.

Puppies:
Dachshund/Terrier mixes
White Lab/Husky mix
Lab mixes, choc.

Adult cats and kittens, very nice.

Get hook, round, & tapeworms. Ro-
tate Happy Jack tapeworm tablets
and Liqui-Vict.(tag). SOPCHOPPY
HARDWARE (962-3180) (www.hap-
pyjackinc.com)
500vReal Estate, Homes L
Mobiles I


3BR/2BA duplex, Ruby Hills Subdivi-
sion in Crawfordville. Paved street,
street lights, sewer, water under con-
struction. Ready Feb. 2008. (850)
926-8905. Leave message.
$125,000.

LEASE PURCHASE
Wakulla Gardens 3/2.
$2000 down-lease for lyr. $900/mo.
Call Sally Young @ Keller Williams for
more info. 850-201-4663.


PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference, limi-
tation, or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status or national origin or
an intention to make any such pref-
erence, limitation or discrimination."
Familial status includes children un-
der the age of 18 living with parents
or legal custodians, pregnant wom-
en and people securing the custody
of children under the age of 18.

This newspaper will not accept any
advertising for real estate that is a
violation of the law. Our readers are
hereby informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are
available on an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of discrimination
call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777.
The toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


11i
[OQuII OUSINI
OPPORTUNITY

510 Acreage for Sale


20 acres $179,000 Wakulla County.
Call Susan McKaye, owner/agent
(850)510-2477. Ochlockonee Bay
Realty.
www.hardwoodhammock.com

520 Townhouses for Rent


2BR/2.5BA Townhouse for rent. With
screened porch. 18C Old Courthouse
Way. First month half rent. Section 8
accepted. $800/mo. 933-5242.

3BR/1BA Duplex in Tallahassee be-
hind FSU off Lake Bradford. 1 ready
to rent. $700/mo. Call (321)439-8200.
530 Comm. Property for
Rent I


L Mini-Warehouse Spaces.for lease,
8X10 and 10X12 now available.
Come by or call Wakulla Realty,
926-5084.


'Shell Point
926-7811


Crawfordville
926-5111


T. Gaupin, Broker

SFlorida Coastal

Properties, Inc.


Silver Coast

Realty


1,074 sq. ft. Retail Store Front for
Rent in Lewiswood Center, Wood-
ville. Growing area, convenient to
Wakulla and Leon Counties.
421-5039.



FOR RENT

GRADE A
OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT
$325/month plus tax
Electric, Water and Sewer
Included Full Kitchen Use
New Years Special
First Month Rent Free!

Call (850) 926-4511
for more information





SBCTO

STORAGE


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 3, 2008 Page 15





BlueWater


Realty Group


Let Tami and Susan help you

get financed and into

your new home today.


Susan Jones NEW Tami McDowell

(850) 566-7584 CONSTRUCTION (850) 556-1396

IjrH L- I 119 Hickory Ave MelodydvLane i_..._


1,260 sq. ft. 3BR/2BA
Awesome floorplan, carport,
large beautiful lot,
$132,500
Seller will pay $2,500
in closing cost G]
-..- JM
l**lTOX *ff~


1,242 sq. ft.
3BR/2BA
Great floorplan.
$126,300


www.c21fcp.com


REAL ESTATE SHOPPING "24/7"

Today's Buys Are
2 T" :9 ..... 1 i ... .

Tomiorrow's Best Mi.vestments

Take a look then give us a call!


Panacea at Bridge
984-5007


Wakulla Station
421-3133


Wakulla

Real



Sonya Hall
Lic. Real Estate Broker
"Specializing in Wakulla Co.
(850) 926-5084

FOR RENT:

2BR 1BA SWMH $400 + Sec. Dep.

2BR 1BA House $625 + Sec. Dep.

2BR 2BA Duplex $750 + Sec. Dep.
2Br 2.5BA Twnhs $800 + Sec. Dep.

3BR 2BA SWMH $700 + Sec. Dep.

3BR 2.5BA Twnhs $850 + Sec. Dep.

3BR 2BA DWMH $825 + Sec. Dep.

3BR 2BA House $1400 + Sec. Dep.

3BR 2BA House $950 + Sec. Dep.

3BR 2BA House $900 + Sec. Dep.



.I M. PECKHAM
[ENTERPRISES,


RESIDENT AL

IOMMERCIAI


ROOM ADDITIONS

STARTING AT

s74.95 SO.FT.

COMPLETE TO THE
PAINT & CARPET


School Lunch Menu

January 2008

Start this year making healthy choices.
Eat something from every food
group and exercise.


Wakulla High School
ie Wed


Mon


Lunch Prices
Student $2.00 Reed $.40 Adult
$3.00


Teacher Planning
Day


14 (choose one)
Barbeque on Bun
Macaroni, Ham, &
Cheese
Casserole w/Roll
Fish Sandwich
(choose two)
Spinach
Potato Wedge
Baked Beans
Mixed Fruit
Apple


8 (choose one)
Pizza
Chicken Nuggets w/ Roll
(choose two)
Baked Beans
Whole Kernel Corn
Mandarin Oranges
Strawberry Cup
Peaches


9
Vegetable Beef Soup
w/
Grilled Cheese Sand-
wich
(choose two)
Mixed Fruit
Apple
Banana
Orange Wedges


I. I I-


15 (choose ore)
Charbroiled Beef Patty
on Bun
Chicken Parmesan w/
Roll
(choose two)
Tossed Salad
Vegetable Medley
Strawberry Cup
Orange Wedges


16 (choose one)
Pizza
Fish Nuggets w/Roll
(choose two)
Spinach
Carrot Sticks
Baked Beans
Peach Cup
Apple
Or Chef Salad w/


10 (choose one)
Ham, Macaroni &
Cheese
Casserole w/Roll
Hamburger on Bun
(choose two)
Green Beans
Breaded Okra
Carrot Sticks
Assorted Fruit
Or Chef Salad w/
17 (choose one)
Chicken Fajita Wrap
Hot Dog
(choose two)
Green Beans
Mixed Vegetables
Strawberry Cup
Pineapple


28 (choose
one)
Hamburger Gravy w/
Rice & Corbread
Chicken Nuggets
Smoked Sausage w/
Biscuit
(choose two)
Mixed Vegetables
Tossed Salad
Apple


29 (choose one)
Beef a Roni w/Roll
Fish Nuggets w/Roll
Chicken Sandwich
(choose two)
Baked Beans
Steamed Broccoli
Carrot Sticks
Pineapple
Strawberry Cup


30 (choose one)
Barbeque on Bun
Pizza
(choose two)
Breaded Okra
Seasoned Green
Beans
Tossed Salad
Banana
Applesauce


31 (choose one)
Deli Turkey Wrap
Fish Nuggets/w Roll
(choose two)
Sweet Potato Fries
Green Peas
Mixed Fruit
Orange Wedges
Grapes


Elementary School
Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri
7 8 9 10 11 "
Pizza Fish Wedge Turkey & Rice Hamburger Gravy
Teacher Planning Whole Kernel Corn Macaroni & Cheese Steamed Broccoli Whipped Potatoes
Day Applesauce Green Beans Roll Turnip Greens
Milk Roll Apple Wedges Cornbread
Mixed Fruit Milk Jello
Milk Milk
14 15 16 17 18
Salisbury Steak Turkey & Cheese Wrap w/ Chicken Nuggets Spaghetti w/Meat Sauce Deli Turkey Sub /w
Fluffy Rice Ranch Dressing Dip Whipped Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Lettuce & Pickle Spear
Seasoned Green Beans Breaded Okra Mixed Vegetables French Bread Potato Wedge
Roll Apple Roll Banana Fruit Cup
Mixed Fruit Milk Pudding Milk Milk
Milk Milk
21 22 23 '24 25
i Corndog Taco Salad w/Salsa Turkey & Noodles Vegetable Beef Soup
Tater Tots Whole Kernel Corn Peas & Carrots Saltine Crackers
Orange Wedges Cherries Cornbread Apple Wedges
Martin Luther King, Jr. Milk Milk Banana Milk
Holiday Milk
28 29 30 31
Fish Wedge Shepherds Pie Charbroiled Beef Patty Chicken Parmesan sp D,,,,ith Fao c.s
Macaroni & Cheese Mixed Vegetables on Bun WhippedPotatoes shmnainstio pmhibitn fo
disc6iminadng on the huhi of r.
Seasoned Green Beans Biscuit French Fries Steamed Broccoli '' i'o "r a "opf
Ro Shrbe Cdiriminion l USD. Dioor.
Roll Sherbet Cup Apple Wedges Roll Ri h. 400 ndpnd-
Mixed Fruit Milk Milk Jello202594 S II079S.3C272
Milk Milk (vi) o (2021721632 (TTY).
Milk Milk iSDAon opInmityprovider
Od n-mplo r."

Middle School


Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri
Lunch Prices
MMStvO dentS2.00 Reduced 40 Adtl $3.00


11 (choose one)
Fajita Wrap w/Yellow
Rice
Ravioli w/Mozzarella
Cheese Topping
(choose two)
Whole Kernel Corn
Tossed Salad
Assorted Fruit


Teacher Planning
Day


8 (choose one)
Salisbiry Steak & Gravy
w/Roll
SRavioli w/Mozzarella
Cheese Topping
Fish Nuggets w/ Roll
(choose two)
Whipped Potatoes
Steamed Brocroli
Strawberry Cup
Mandarin Oranges
Peaches


9 (choose one)
Vegetable BeefSoup iw/
Grilled Cheese Sandw'ich
Corndog
(choose two)
Baked Beans
Carrot Sticks
Apple
Banana
Orange Wedges
Or ChefSalad uwCrackers


10 (choose one)
Salisbury Steak & Gravy
w/Roll
Ravioli w/Mozarella
Cheese Topping
Fish Nuggets w/ Roll
(choose two)
Whipped Potatoes
Steamed Broccoli
Strawberry Cup
Mandarin Oranges
Peaches


I. l' --I'


18
Chicken Sandwich
(choose two)
Tossed Salad
Potato Wedge
Mixed Fruit
Orange Wedges
Or Chili w/Saltines,
Cinnamon Roll & Fruit


14 (choose one)
Barheque on Bun
Macaroni. Hami. &
Cheese Casserole w/Roll
Fish Nuggets w/Roll
(choose two)
Spinach
Potato Wedge
Baked Beans
MLred Fr it
Apple

21





Martin Luther King, Jr
Holiday


28 (choose one)
Hamburger Gravy &
Rice w/Roll
Chicken Parmesan, /Roll
ort Dog
(choose twvo)
Mixed Vegetables
Tossed Salad
Apple
Peaches
Pears


15 (choose one)
Charbroiled BeefPatty
on Bun
Chicken Parmesan w/Roll
Hot Dog
(choose two)
Tossed Salad
Vegetable Medley
Strawberry Cup
Orange Wedges


22 (choose one)
Spaghetti w/Meat Sauce
& Roll
Deli Turkey Sub w/
Lettuce & Tomato
Ravioli w/Mozzarella
Cheese Topping
(choose two)
Steamed Broccoli
Green Peas
Applesauce
Mixed Fruit
Peaches
29 (choose one)
Beef a Roni w/Roll
Fish Nuggets w/Roll
onam, Egg & Cheese Combo
on Biun
(choose two)
Baked Beans
Steamed Broccoli
Carrot Sticks w/Dip
Pineapple
Strawberrn Cup


16 (choose one)
Pizza
Macaroni. Ham, &
Cheese Casserole w/Roli
Fish Nuggets w/Roll
(choose two)
Whole Kernel Corn
Carrot Sticks
Baked Beans
Peach Cup
Apple

23 (choose one)
Turkey &Rice iw/
Cornbreod
Pizza
(choose twno)
Turnip Greens
Whole Kernel Corn
Pineapple
Banana

Or Chef Salad w/Crackers

30 (choose one)
Barbeque on Bun
Pizza
(choose two)
Whole Kernel Corn
Seasoned Green Beans
Potato Wedges
Bananao
Applesauce


17 (choose one)
Fajita Wrap
Hot Dog
(choose two)
Seasoned Green Beans
Mixed Vegetables
Strawberry Cup
Pineapple

Or Chef Salad w/Crackers
24 (choose one)
Oven Fried Chicken w/
Biscuit
Deli Tourke Subh w/
Lettuce Tomato
(choose two)
Green Beato
Whipped Potatoes
Orange Wedges
Strawberry Cup


II (choose one)
Vegetable BeefSoup w/
Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Corndog
(choose two)
Baked Beans
Carrot Sticks
Assorted Fnrit
Or Chef Salad w/Crackers


18
Chicken Sandwvich
(choose two)
Tossed Salad
Potato Wedge
Mixed Fruit
Orange Wedges
Or Chili w/Saltines.
Cinnamon Roll & Fruit

25 (choose one)
Turkev &Rice w/
Cornbread
Corndog
Chicken Nuggets
(choose two)
Tossed Salad
tWhole Kernel Corn
Assorted Fruit


Or Chef Salad ow/rackers r


31 (choose one)
Ham & Cheese on Bun
Fish Nuggets w/Roll
(choose two)
Sweet Potato Fries
Greon Peas
Mixed Fruit
Orange Wedges
Apple


Or Chef Salad n/Crackersl Or CchfSalad w/Crackers


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CLASSIFIEDS

As Low

SAs $7

Per Week AS


21 22 (choose one) 23 (choose one) 24 (choose one) 25 (choose one)
Spaghetti w/Meal Sauce Turkey & Rice w/ Oven Fried Chicken w/ Turkey & Rice w/
& Roll Cornbread Biscuit Cornbread
Cordog Pizza Ravioli w/Mozzarella Hot Dog
(choose two) (choose two) Cheese Topping
Steamed Broccoli Turnip Greens (choose two)
French Fries Whole Kernel Com (choose two) Tossed Salad
Applesauce Pineapple Green Beans Whole Kernel Corn
Martin Luther King, Mixed Fruit Banana Whipped Potatoes Potato Wedges
Jr Peaches Mandarin Oranges Apple Assorted Fruit
Holiday Strawberry Cup


"


~~~nlh~ ~ ~~wu iorll iiani









Page 16 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 3, 2008
530 Comm Property for Wakulla horse shows are held
I ~Rent*7


Warehouse space available. 1440 sq
ft. Equipment or commercial parking.
142,6 Shadeville Hwy. Call
(850)251-2851.
545, Homes for Sale

Best Deal in Crawfordville.
Located-Wakulla Gardens. 3BR/2BA.
Vaulted ceilings, huge den.
1850sq./ft. w/500sq./ft. storage
shed. Large screened-in patio. Set
on 4 lots w/paved drive, fenced. Ask-
ing $$164,900. Call
850-556-5906/229-377-9836.

555 Houses for Rent

3BR/2BA Duplex in Crawfordville.
Water/appliances included. Privacy
fenced back. $850/mo. $600/de-
posit. Pets allowed. 926-8905 leave
message.
3BR/2BA in downtown Crawfordville!
$750/mo. $750/security. Ochlock-
onee Bay Realty: 850-984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obi@obrealty.com
Home for rent, Ig 3/2 w/family room
& fireplace. Approximately 2,200 sf.
on 2 acres. Available immediately,
$1,250/mo. Call now (321)439-8200.






LARGE BRICK HOME with
4BR/3BA available for rent in
beautiful River Plantation Subdi-
Vision. $1,800/month and $1,80
security deposit.
BR/2.5BA TOWNHOME on ca-
al in peaceful Shell Point Beach
vailable for $1,500/month and
1,500 security deposit. Four
month minimum rental required.

New Houses For Rent
90 Nelson Road,
40 Melody Road,
4 ted Lot Lane
Calf 850-556-1961


WATERFRONT CONDO FOR RENT
3BR/2.5BA Spectacular view, pool,
tennis courts, & walk to Angelo's.
$1300/monthly & seasonal rates
available. 850-766-2123.

560 Land for Sale

18 lots in Magnolia Gardens. All
cleared. All permits and plans site
ready:No impact fee required. Regu-
lar septic available. Starting at
122,000. 926-7076 or 933-6862.
acres for sale off Shadeville Rd.
commercial potential. Highest & best
6ffer. Call 407-718-8469.
20 lots left in Ruby Hills Subdivision
in Crawfordville. Paved street, street
lights, sewer, water, electric. $25,000
each. 926-8905. Leave message.
Five tracts on Smith Creek. 1 5-acre,
2 10-acre, 1 99-acre, 1 124-acre.
$7,000/acre. Owner financing possi-
ble. 984-0093.
565 Mobile Homes for
Rent

3BR/2.5BA DWMH, firepiace, roman
tub, living room, family room on 2.3
acres. Private area/secluded in
Crawfordville off Shadeville Hwy.
$800/mo. (321)439-8200.
4 BD/3BA CHA. Utility Room with
W/D Hook Ups. Dishwasher, Fire-
place, 100sqft. on 1 Ac. in Medart
2511 Coastal Hwy. $895.00 A
Month/$600.00 Deposit
850-228-7197
MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT. Clean,
neat, and well-maintained. Front and
rear decks. New paint, carpet and
some appliances. No pets. Lease
purchase option, owner-financing
available for qualified buyers. Call
Leigh for more information
(850)926-4511.
I I


80 Rooms for Rent/Room-
mates
Roommates wanted to share beauti-
ful new home, should be ready Jan.
1, 2008. Each bedroom has private
bathroom attached. All utilities in-
cluded $450/mo. 850-273-0926 or
850-294-6237.


Birth
Wyatt A. Gebhart
Heath and Angle Shivers of
Woodville announce the birth of
their son, Wyatt Allen Gebhart,
on Thursday, Nov. 1 at Talla-
hassee Memorial Hospital. He
weighed 6 pounds, 13 ounces
and measured 19 1/2 inches in
length.
Maternal grandparents are
Gary and Rita Shivers of Wood-
ville. Paternal grandparents are
Gary and Nancy Gebhart of
Waukeenah.
Maternal great-grandparents
are Floyd and Margaret deMont-
mollin of Woodville, John and
Betty Shivers of Crawfordville,
Ellsworth Sponnseller, Jr. of
Waukeenah and Betty Sponn-
seller of New Oxford, Penn.
Paternal great-grandparents were
the late Leon and Jane Gebhart,
formerly of Gettysburg, Penn,


The Wakulla County Horse-
man's Association held two
shows in November. The first
show was held on Nov. 10 and
the second show was held on
Nov. 17.

Nov. 10.
1. Small Fry Class (0-5 years)
Poles Nathan Money
Cones Nathan Money
Arena Nathan Money
STexas Nathan Money
Cloverleaf Nathan Money
2. Pee Wee (6-9 years)
Poles Abigail Morgan, Allie
Sheffield, Todd Porter, Morgan
Gray
Cones Abigail Morgan, Allie
Sheffield, Dalton Gray, Morgan
Gray
Arena Allie Sheffield, Todd
Porter, Abigail Morgan, Morgan
Gray
Texas Todd Porter, Abigail'
Morgan, Allie Sheffield, Morgan
Gray
Cloverleaf Abigail Morgan,
Todd Porter, Morgan Sheffield,
Allie Sheffield
3. Youth (10 13 years)
Poles -- Alicia Porter, Kendall
King, Lindsey Sheffield, Autumn
Coppinger
Cones- Alicia Porter, Kendall
King, Georgia Posey, Autumn


O O


0 *


Coppinger
Arena Alicia Porter, Alyssa
Porter, Kendall King, Summer
Shiver
Texas Summer Shiver, Ali-
cia Porter, Kendall King, Alexis
Synder
Cloverleaf Alicia Porter, Ann
Munroe, Alyssa Porter, Summer
Shiver
4. Junior (14-17 years)
Poles- Natalie Sheffield, Terri
Jo Shiver
Cones Natalie Sheffield,
Terri Jo Shiver
Arena- Natalie Sheffield, Jus-
tin Morgan, Terri Jo Shiver
Texas- Justin Morgan ,Natalie
Sheffield, Terri Jo Shiver
Cloverleaf- Natalie Sheffield,
Justin Morgan, Terri Jo Shiver
5. Senior (18.and over)
Poles- Jessica Shepard, Pam
Caya
Cones Jessica Sheppard,
Pam Caya
Arena Jessica Shepard, Shei-
la Johnson, Pam Caya
Texas- Jessica Shepard, Pam
Caya, Shelia Johnson
Cloverleaf- Jessica Shepard,
Sheila Johnson
6. Novice (novice horse or
rider)
Poles- Cathy Lauder, Autumn
Coppinger, Tammie Sanders,


Manatee art contest


The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC)
announces its 17th Annual Mana-
tee Decal Art Contest and invites
middle and high school art stu-
dents to submit their manatee
artwork for consideration.
Students must work through
their school's art teacher to sub-
mit artwork since only five art
entries are allowed per school.
Sales from the manatee decals
provide funds for the state's
manatee protection program.
Decals are available at county tax
collectors' offices in Florida with
a donation of $5 or more to the
Save the Manatee
Trust Fund. Money from the
sale of these decals supports
manatee protection efforts, such
as rehabilitation, rescue, re-
search, enforcement and public
.education. In June, 15,000 decals
with'artwork provided by Coral
Reef Senior High School student
Natasha Thornton were
distributed statewide for sale
until June 2008.
Requirements for the Mana-
tee Decal Art Contest are as
follows:
All entries must be the sole
original work of the artist.
Student artists must at-
tend a Florida public, private or
home school for middle or high


school.
Students must submit their
artwork through their school or
art teacher.
Art teachers should submit
no-more than five entries per
school.
The designs should be in
full color in a medium of the
artist's choice and may be real-
istic or abstract as long as the
image depicts a recognizable
manatee.
The artwork image and page
size should be no larger than
8.5 inches by 11 inches with the
image centered. Do not add any
text or captions to the artwork.
Mount artwork on art board
with a protective paper covering.
No frames, glass coverings or dry
mounting will be accepted.
Design entries will be ac-
cepted only if postmarked on or
before Jan. 31, 2008.
On Feb. 14, 2008, FWC staff
will judge all qualified entries.
The winning design will be
used to create a final decal for
distribution to county tax offices
in July.
To see previous manatee de-
cals, please visit FWC's Web site
at www.MyFWC.com. Contest
information is listed on
the manatee pages.


Brain


Brenda Gerrell
Cones Cathy Lauder, Tam-
mie Sanders, Brenda Gerrell,
Autumn Coppinger
Arena- Tammie Sanders, Cathy
Lauder, Brenda Gerrell, Autumn
Coppinger
Texas- Tammie Sanders, Cathy
Lauder, Brenda Gerrell, Autumn
Coppinger
Cloverleaf- Tammie Sander,
Autumn Coppinger, Cathy Laud-
er, Brenda Gerrell
Show Results
Nov. 17.
1. Small Fry Class (0-5 years)
Poles Nathan Money
Cones Nathan Money, Zach
Money
Arena Nathan Money, Zach
Money
Texas Nathan, Zach Money
Cloverleaf Nathan Money,
Zach Money
2. Pee Wee (6-9 years)
Poles Allie Sheffield, Dalton
Gray, Rebecca Money, Morgan
Gray
Cones Allie Sheffield, Dal-
ton Gray, Morgan Gray, Rebecca
Money
Arena Allie Sheffield, Todd
Porter, Morgan Gray, Dalton
Gray
Texas Todd Porter, Allie
Sheffield, Morgan Gray, Dalton


Gray
Cloverleaf Todd Porter, Allie
Sheffield, Morgan Gray, Dalton
Gray
3. Youth (10 13 years)
Poles -- Kendall King, Georgia
Posey, Victoria Money, Alyssa
Porter
Cones- Alyssa Porter, Kendall
King, Autumn Coppinger, Alyssa
Porter
Arena Alyssa Porter, Kendall
King, Georgia Posey, Autumn
Coppinger
Texas Alyssa Porter, Kendall
King, Georgia Posey, Autumn
Coppinger
Cloverleaf Alyssa Porter,
Kendall King, Autumn Cop-
pinger, Victoria Money
4. Junior (14-17 years)
Poles- Natalie Sheffield, Erika
Wilson, Julie Hough
Cones Erika Wilson, Julie
Hough, Natalie Sheffield
Arena- Natalie Sheffield, Julie
Hough, Erika Wilson
Texas- Julie Hough, Erika Wil-
son, Natalie Sheffield
Cloverleaf Erika Wilson,
Natalie Sheffield, Julie Hough
5. Senior (18 and over)
Poles- Judy Sineath, Jessica
Shepard, Pam Caya, Sheila John-
son
Cones Jessica Sheppard,


Judy Sineath, Pam Caya, Sheila
Johnson
Arena Judy Sineath, Jessica
Shepard, Howard Durham, Sheila
Johnson
Texas- Jessica Shepard, Sheila
Johnson, Pam Caya
Cloverleaf- Jessica Shepard,
Howard Durham, Judy Sineath,
Pam Caya
6. Novice (novice horse or
rider)
Poles- Cathy Lauder, Autumn
Coppinger, Julie Hough, Brenda
Gerrell
Cones Cathy Lauder, Au-
tumn Coppinger, Brenda Gerrell,
Julie Hough
Arena- Cathy Lauder, Tammie
Sanders, Autumn Coppinger,
Julie Hough
Texas- Cathy Lauder, Tammie
Sanders, Julie Hough, Autumn
Coppinger
Cloverleaf- Cathy Lauder, Tam-
mie Sanders, Autumn Coppinger,
Brenda Gerrell
7. Jackpot results
1D first Alicia Porter (16.818)
$50.
2D first Judy Sineath (18.085)
$30.
3D first Allie Sheffied
(20.713) $20.


Red Cross first aid for pets


American Red Cross has
worked to keep area residents
and their families safe and
prepared. Now, the Capital Area
Chapter is spreading the word
that it can do the same for our
four-legged loved ones through
its Dog & Cat First Aid manuals.
"This first aid manual is de-
signed especially for cats and
dogs," stated Joseph Agostini,
CEO of the Capital Area Chapter.
"Each manual explains emergen-
cy care procedures for your pet
in simple terms. The full-color
book also includes a companion
DVD and features step-by-step
directions for topics ranging from
giving medication to administer-
ing CPR and rescue breathing.
The manuals are available at the
Capital Area Chapter office and
are flying off the shelves since
we test-marketed them," added
Agostini. "As a pet owner, I know
my family enjoys a very special
bond with our pet-they're a part
of the family. Just like with peo-
ple, accidents and emergencies
can happen and being prepared
by knowing what to do could
make a lifesaving difference."
"This manual is another life-
saving resource that supports our
mission of keeping our commu-
nity and their families healthy
and safe," said Jerry Osteryoung,


Chairman of the Capital Area
Chapter Board of Directors. "We
own three dogs and a cat that
we care for very much. They are
integral members of our family.
That is why the manuals are a
perfect addition to home refer-
ence libraries and they also make
a great gift"
In the manual, you will learn
to:
Administer medications


Recognize an emergency
Perform CPR and First Aid
Treat common problems and
emergencies requiring immedi-
ate attention
SStock a pet First Aid kit
For more information or to
purchase manuals, contact Helen
Michel at (850) 878-6080, ext. 110,
or via e-mail at MichelH@usa:
redcross.org


Spotted seatrout season


The recreational harvest sea-
son for spotted seatrout re-
opened in the southern half of
Florida on Jan. 1.
Spotted seatrout harvest has
been closed since Nov. 1 in Flori-
da Atlantic Coast waters south of
the Flagler-Volusia counties line
and in Gulf Coast waters south
of a line running due,west from
the westernmost point of Fred
Howard Park Causeway, which
is about 1.17 miles south of the
Pinellas/Pasco counties line.
This two-month closure occurs
each year to help maintain the
abundance of spotted seatrout.
The maximum daily bag limit
for spotted seatrout in these
areas is four fish per person. In
all Florida waters north and west
of these areas, the daily limit is
five fish per person.


The statewide slot limit for
spotted seatrout is 15 to 20
inches total length. However,
anglers may keep one spotted
seatrout larger than 20 inches as
part of the daily bag limits.
Spotted seatrout may not be
harvested by using any multiple
hooks with live or dead-natural
bait, and snagging or snatch
hooking spotted seatrout is not
allowed. Spotted seatrout may be
taken only with hook,
line gear and cast nets and
must be landed in a whole
condition.
The harvest of spotted seat-
rout will close during the month
of February in northeast and
northwest Florida waters.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 3, 2008 Page 17


Week in Wakulla


Thursday, January 3, 2008
BOOK NOOK, for children in grades K-5, will be held at the
public library at 10:30 a.m.
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB meets at Posey's Up the Creek in
panacea at noon.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at 12 noon.
VFW BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from
6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Friday, January 4, 2008
AA meets at the American Legion Building next to the Women's
Club in Crawfordville with an open meeting at 8 p.m. There are
also open meetings Sunday at 6 p.m., Monday for women at 6 p.m.,
and Wednesday at 8 p.m.
PICKIN' 'N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at the senior
center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
N:- Saturday, January 5, 2008
NA meets at the Torch, 16 Lower Bridge Road, at 5 p.m. For more
information, call 599-2876.
ANNUAL FROSTBITE REGATTA 1 p.m. at Shell Point.
WAKULLA DIVE CLUB "Diving the Oriskany" presentation at 5
p.m. at St. Teresa Church.
Monday, January 7, 2008
WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION meets at 6 p.m. in the board-
room. A workshop has been scheduled for 5 p.m. to discuss Rules
of Procedure for meetings.
TEACHERS return to' the classroom. Teacher Planning Day for
students. NO SCHOOL.
Tuesday, January 8, 2008
SCHOOL OPENS for second semester. Five months to WHS
graduation.
WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will meet at 7 p.m.
at the library in Medart.

NJROTC visits Parris


By c/LTJG Bennett
,Special to The Wakulla News
You know you have entered
another world when the gate
guards at Parris Island wave
you inl You are soon engulfed in
the Marine Corps training base,
known as Parris Island, and the
excitement of the unknown is
Overwhelming. Our bus drove
on and came to a halt in front
of our assigned barracks, where
we would be staying for the next
three days.
. Our meeting with the Drill
S instructors was an interesting
one. They beckoned us off the
bus with their screams. The fun
eganas we ran upstairs with
our luggage.
SDespite being yelled at, the
trip proved very educational.
Not only did we get a peak at
life at Marine Boot Camp, but
we .also learned the history of
the MarineCorps. We were-able
to try out the Confidence
Course and the Rifle Range
that all Marines have to pass
in order to become one of the
few and the proud. However,
the most moving part of the
educational journey was when
we stepped on.the yellow foot-
prints.
L It is there that every recruit
who enters Parris Island must
stand. It becomes a solemn oc-


CLASSIFIEDS As Low
As $7 Per Week!
Call 926-7102


casion when you think of how
you could be standing where
a Marine in the Iraq War was
standing last year.
Even though most of the ca-
dets found the Drill Instructors
unpleasant to deal with, they
taught us a lot. We learned new
ways to drill, and better ways
to be efficient. Most of us will
never forget this small glimpse
into the journey of a Marine.



Easy Mafil


Pre-PRaid Drop-Offs
Welcome
(Residential Customers)
FEDEXI/DHL
Supplies Available
We Sell
BOXES TAPE
ENVELOPES BUBBLE WRAP
PEANUTS OFFICE SUPPLIES
RUBBER STAMPS
DESK NAME PLATE & HOLDERS
NAME BADGES
Copy/Fax Service
Mail Box Rental
Notary
(85)i26-42
OPN -F8 7p~.S at.8-6pm


Will Work
Locatt(


Save Time and Energy!
Without having to drive long distances or spend countless
hours on the telephone, you have more time and energy


^for fun this holiday season.


BlueWater Realty Group 926-8777


Save Money!
Check the local ads for the best sales and take
i advantage of all the money-saving ideas local
m* be stores have to offer.


Crums Mini Mall 984-5501


More sales mean more people are needed. That's good for
the economy and provides jobs for your family, friends
and neighbors. Maybe even you.


Glenda's Country Store 926-1672


Get Personal Service!
You know you can trust the person behind the counter to
L-rW )give you the best advice and value when you know them
VIf personally. The personal touch is still important.


Lynn Cole-Eddinger 545-8284


J ;Find Great Variety!; . :-
The area has great selection of stores with a super : :: :
assortment of goods and gifts. Doing your shopping
Locally lets you check out all the stores and shops.


Bayside Deli 984-9994
^------------ -,',;,


a
I,44


Ever tried to return something from out of town? When you
Sf shop locally, your friends are the ones solving your problems.
r' 6*They'll do what it takes to help make your shopping fun.


By The Sea Stained Glass & More 510-1815


SPromote Economic Development!
More local sales mean more money in circulation. That
means more businesses can grow, and new businesses can
start. That improves the area for everyone.


Century 21 926-5111


Foster a Sense of Community!
When you shop locally, a portion of the money from your
/ purchases pays the wages of your friends, family and
i j neighbors who work at local businesses.


The Wakulla News 926-7102


Help Others!
Owners and employees of local business support a wide
range of community services and charitable projects with
H their time, talents and money.

IsNeeded Why not give it a try and keep your shopping close to home!
You'll be glad you did!

O| Lower Your Tax Bill!
More sales means more taxes are collected. That means
f a bigger portion of money comes back to this area for
Community services. And that could save you tax money.
".......)


Ftnessenter Fitess Center
New Member Promotion

+:Tax
'D Per Month
1 Year Contract No Sign-Up Fee

FULL SERVICE GYM
1, 3 & 6 Month Contracts Available
Gift Certificates Make Great Gifts!


Memberships Include:
- Aerobic Classes Group Cycling Body Sculpting Circuit Training
Also Available:
Supplements Smoothies Personal Training


GYM HOURS: MON. & WED. 5:30 AM 9 PM; TUES. & THURS. 9 AM 9 PM;
FRI. 5:30 AM -8 PM; SAT. 9AM -1 PM; SUN. 2 PM 6 PM' j
et Our Professional Staff Help You Reach Your Fitness Goals!.
56 Rainbow Drive C'ville. Call 926-BFIT (2348) for details


I- ; ,


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January 3, 2008


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Unleash
Your
Tastebuds


V Fr$ & Sat 11 9: i3 -
Prices are tLower
Exitmig New Sped si
; kCnl h bflfet M F nfw oly $6.5
ay & Wednesdak nighs are StakNights,112ozRibey $9.95
edhoesiay ni-15 pC. Wg with Fies & Slaw $5
4150%926-9727


984-8130
Coastal Highway 98
1 mile North of Angelos at the County Airport


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Signature
appetizers,
pizzas, salads,
oven baked
sandwiches,
special entrees
and desserts
ViZONE
FAA Fl ~%


Live Entertainment
Friday Night Karaoke
Sat. Jan. 5............. Free Wheelin'
Sat. Jan. 12 ...Trafton Harvey Band
Sat. Jan. 19 ............*. .i...:1..CPRWl
Sat. Jan. 26.............. ocamotie
Sat. Feb. 2................ Road House


P .1 T,


Thurs. Sun. Lunch & Dinner
I ... ... ... I


Banqu


'51


M, W, T* 4:30 -7
Fri & Sat~ i11 -
Sunday.* 11 1
Closed Tuesdai
At the Bridge Ochlocko


et No Music in January
leiIS Will Return With Warmer Weather
e Now.Serving
8 Fresh Loca
Ra'w Oysters
on the
11 Half Shell
'0, I-----------
0 Be Sure To See
y The Jewelry Man
Fine Sterling Silver
nee and 10 KL & 14 Kt Gold


Open i Pays at 5 A.M.





Fri. SSat.Night
All you ca eat seafood buffet
ir A A*a~


e,, Dinner Entree

.p Dinne ith f appetizer
p nDinnerwitith Ptizer:


SBuffet (Fri. or Sat. only)
y Seafood Combo
Groaper or Shrimp Dinner


, OFF The Eatin'Path


Entry Form


Please drop off
at any participa
Eatin' Place


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Every Restaurant


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