Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00143
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Uniform Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: November 1, 2007
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00143
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Full Text









































With conflict in far away lands like Iraq and Afghanistan and American
military personnel in harms way. suffering injuries and death. Veterans' Day
2007 will have a strong meaning to those who have served and those who
may one day serve their country.
Wakulla Middle School will hold a special ceremony, an annual event for
the Wildcats, to help students understand the sacrifices Americans have made
for freedom. This year the assembly will be held on Friday. Nov. 9 at 8:15 a.m.
It is open to the public.
The program will include local veterans who will wear their uniforms so
[students get a better understanding of what it means to serve the country.
The program includes the WMS band and chorus performing along with
'the announcement of the Patriots Pen essay contest winner. One of the guest
packerss will be Captain Ron Huddleston of the Wakulla High School NJROTC.
Captain Huddleston will bring the NJROTC Honor Guard and Color Guard to
Wakulla Middle School to be part of the program.
'Captain Huddleston and Lt. Mike Stewart are two military veterans who not
only understand the meaning of Veterans' Day. but have the opportunity each
'day to. teach high school students through the NJROTC program.
The NJROTC program began at Wakulla High School in 1993. Lt. Stewart
.was getting ready to retire after 20 years in the Navy and inquired about the
possibility of getting a Naval Science job in the Tallahassee area.
. Stewart's timing was perfect. The Navy was getting ready to expand in the


Teen arrested in


cocaine 'buy-bust'


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kclackmar@thewakullanews.net
An 18-year-old Gulf County
man faces four charges follow-
ing a "buy-bust" conducted in
Panacea at 9:30 p.m. Monday,
Oct. 29, according to Sheriff
David Harvey.
Rashawne K. Thomas of Port
St. Joe was charged with resist-
ing an officer, possession of a
weapon, possession of cocaine
and sale of cocaine following a
controlled purchased conducted
by the Wakulla County Sheriff's
office Narcotics and Special Op-
erations Units.
According to Major Maurice
Langston, a confidential infor-
mant was used to purchase a
"cookie of crack cocaine" from
the suspect. The purchase was
conducted for $1,100, but when
law enforcement officers closed
in on the suspect, he fled the
scene.
Det. Jason Newlin and Depu-
ty Mike Crum apprehended the
suspect in a nearby ditch. Law
enforcement officials discovered
a .22 calibre automatic pistol on
Thomas with one bullet in the
chamber and nine more in the
magazine. No shots were fired
in the arrest process,

Inside

This Week
Almanac.....................Page 11A
Church.......................Page 4A
Classifieds................ Page 3B
Comment & Opinion Page 2A
Outdoors................... Page 10A
People........................Page 8A
School....................... Page 14A
Sheriff's Report........ Page 12A
Sports-........................Page 6A
Week n Wakulla........Page 3A

Next Week
It's said a picture is
worth a thousand
words. Next week
we'll hear a few thou-
sand words from the
St. Marks Refuge
Photography Club.


6 84578 202151 o0


Thomas is a convicted felon
from Gulf County who has
also been involved in prop-
erty crimes. Major Langston
said law enforcement officials
have found many of their drug
suspects to also be involved in
crimes against property since
"one supports the other."
He added that the narcotics
deals are getting more danger-
ous as some suspects are bring-
ing weapons to the drug deals.
The major noted that Thomas
probably came to the drug deal
with the intention of robbing
the confidential informant,
Thomas is in the Wakulla
County Jail awaiting his first
appearance. The narcotics unit
has also been busy serving
search warrants at two homes
in Sopchoppy. In bothcases, the
search warrants involved homes
and suspects who have been
served before, Major Langston
concluded.


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakuilanews.net
improvements and modifications at the
Wakulla County waste transfer site, for-
merly the Lower Bridge Road Landfill, may
result in a larger and improved recycling
program for the residents of the county.
County officials don't project a curbside
recycling service in Wakulla in the near fu-
ture, but hope that a covered building and
better transfer site layout will make it easier
for residents to drop off their recyclables.
Cleve Fleming is the Project Manager for
ESG, the county commission's public works
operation. Fleming said some progress has
been made in the recycling program, but
more is needed.
"We're recycling every day," he said.
"Hopefully, we can improve on the program
as we expand the landfill."
Some of the items that are being recycled
include cardboard, aluminum, plastic, glass,
scrap metal and newspapers. Fleming called
the county's ability to make money in the
recycling program" a spartan market. We're
kind of at the mercy of the groups we deal
with," he said.
Washing machines, dryers, broken
down appliances and furniture create some


money for the county in scrap metal col-
lections. Aluminum also brings in some
money. Plastic, glass, newspapers and
cardboard do not generate a great deal of
revenue, he said.
Part of a proposal from waste consultants
is to make improvements at the transfer site
on Lower Bridge Road. The redesign of the
property will make it easier to dump gar-
bage while providing a metal building that
will have a concrete floor where residents
can dump their garbage and recyclables can
be pulled out of the waste stream. Right
now, the county does not have the enough
space or a covered structure to pull material
from the waste stream.
Fleming said he is also considering
longer hours at satellite "convenience cen-
ters" where recycling bins will bemanned
to eliminate individuals using recycling
bins as garage units to avoid paying tip-
ping fees.
"The recycling effort could be better in
Wakulla County," said Fleming. "We have a
steady customer base, but recycling is not
widespread."
County officials will be asked to ratify
the discussion from a recent solid waste
workshop at their Nov. 5 board meeting.
The issue of the transfer station improve-


Standard

time returns

this Sunday

Wakulla County residents and ,
residents of most of the United Z fg..-
States will be getting an extra -
hour of sleep this weekend as " "W
Standard Time Returns. ,
Sunday, Nov. 4 at 2 a.m.,
Wakulla Coun-
ty and the ma-
jority of the i
country will
drop Daylight
Saving Time
and return
to Standard
Time. Those states that do not ,
observe Daylight Saving Time
will remain on Standard Time.
The change requires the
clocks to be set back one hour ."
and means it will be getting
darker earlier in the evening and .
light earlier in the morning.
Just remember to "fall back"
on the first weekend in Novem-.
ber and "spring forward" the the
second weekend in March. V
The schedule for Daylight,
Saving Time was altered by Presi-
dent George W. Bush. In 2008,
Daylight Saving Time will begin . _
on Sunday, March 9. Standard All dressed up and no where to go. Laura Gentry has donated the lion that formerly stood
Time returns again on Sunday, guard over her shop to the county, Dressed up for Halloween in Spiderman paint, the big
Nov. 2, 2008. cat will get a makeover for fall, then Christmas.


ments, better traffic flow and tipping fees.
will be addressed in the next phase of the
planning process.
Fleming said Wakulla County will not
have a curbside recycling program until
there is a larger volume of solid waste be-
ing collected. "It's a matter of economy of.
scale," he said. "We don't have the tonnage
to be able to afford conveyor belts and me-
chanical sorters. We're still so small."
Wakulla County Administrator Ben,
Pingree has been working with Fleming
to address the recycling and other solid
waste concerns.
"While challenges do exist with imple.
meeting expanded recycling services in'
a rural county such as ours, the Wakulla
County Commission has made making
these improvements to recycling and en-
vironmental protection a priority," said
Pingree. "As such, staff is continuing to
work closely with ESG and our solid waste
management consultants to identify cost
effective ways to expand and improve
Wakulla County's recycling program."
Wakulla County has experienced rapid
growth during the past 15 years and
families like Richard and Sherry Parks have

See RECYCLE on Page 13A


County's

lion dresses

for holiday

By KEITH BLACKMAR
k lackmar@thewakullanews.net
He is one of Wakulla County's
most recognizable figures, even
if he keeps changing his coat,
Thanks to the generosity of
Laura Gentry, he is now the
property of Wakulla County.
Gentry donated her lion to
the Parks and Recreation Depart-
ment after closing her store, Tat-
tered Pages in June. Now the lion
inhabits Azalea Park in Craw-
fordville. He is all dressed up for
Halloween as Spiderman.
Wakulla County Parks and
Recreation Director Ray Gray
said, "The county is split 50-50
on this." Some residents love
the colorful lion while others
complain that it should not be
at the park, he said.
Gentry's only request was to
keep the lion on U.S. Highway
319 for the majority of the com-
munity to enjoy. After Hallow-
een, the lion will be getting an
Autumn coat of paint. Last year,
the lion celebrated the anniver-
sary of the Grinch with a Dr.
Seuss paint job. This Christmas
See LION on Page 13A


County wants more recycling









Page 2A - THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007




Comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895


My View


The World Series


Child support
cases deserve


(and some other thoughts for the week) more stateaction
Editor, The News:


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net

It didn't happen in my father's lifetime. My
mother never saw it happen either. But for me,
I was lucky enough to see my beloved Boston
Red Sox win a championship in 2004.
The title set off a celebration in New Eng-
land that was felt in the six northeastern states
and many other parts of the country. I was in
the Caribbean on a cruise ship right after the
Red Sox came back from a 3-0 deficit against
the hated New York Yankees in the American
League Championship Series and won the right
to sweep the St. Louis Cardinals in the World
Series.
.I was in a theme park during the final game
against the Yankees and ride operators were
yelling scores at each other from dozens of
yards away. During the cruise and after return-
ing to Orlando after the championship was
over, was a surreal experience as dozens of
strangers came up to me and chatted up the
series, just because I was wearing my Red
Sox cap. Based on the number of people who
spoke to me, Florida tourism officials had to
be pleased with their marketing efforts in New
England.
This year the hated Yankees, the New
York baseball team, not the carpetbaggers
who romped through Atlanta, were just good
enough to make the playoffs before falling
on their faces against the Cleveland Indians.
Attorney Steve Glazer loves to display his love
for the Pinstrippers. I went easy on him after
Joe Torre's bunch lost their series in front of
the Bronx faithful. Now the Yankees have lost
Torre.
The 2007 Indians were slightly better than
Charlie Sheen's "Major League" movie team,
but not quite good enough to make the World
Series.
" It seems odd to me as a baseball oldtimer
that the Red Sox have been playing something
called the Colorado Rockies. Without question,
the Rockies have the worst looking uniforms in
the major leagues. It seems wrong that a team
named after a mountain chain made the World
series when the great old teams like the Cubs,
Pirates, Giants, Cardinals and Dodgers-were
also-rans.
Every night for the past month Red Sox
addicts have been turning on TBS and Fox to
watch the Olde Towne Team try to win another
title. Fox could do us all a favor and start the
games a little earlier. The impact of victory over
the Rockies was cheapened by the fact that all
'of my family, human and animals, were fast
asleep by the time the final out was recorded.
SI watched in amazement as Boston fans kept
their very young children up past midnight to
watch the games on a weeknight. Too bad Fox
and Major League Baseball is not cultivating
the young fan as the old networks were when I
,was growing up in the 1960s.
SI would have little memory of the Impos-
Sible Dream season of 1967 if the playoffs had.
been aired late at night. What in the world
is wrong with a baseball day game over the
Weekend?
Part of the appeal of NFL football is the Sun-
day afternoon games with a few night games
sprinkled in to raise the excitement. The Super
Bowl airs between 6 p.m. and 7 p.m., not from
&:37 p.m. to 10 p.m.
A full page ad from USA Today still hangs on
my office wall. It is turning quite yellow after
three years. In 2004, it celebrated a Red Sox
championship after 86 years. It asked, "Could
This Be The Year?"
As Wakulla County Administrator Ben Pin-
gree told me as the Red Sox faced elimination
in the Cleveland series, all you need to root for
the Red Sox is a respirator. Yes, Boston fans,
we do expect it to be our year every yearl Sorry
Steve Glazer, no room for the Yankees, not this
year.
Now that the Sox have won a second title in
'the 21st century, it seems like old times. I know
Red Sox fans everywhere will be happy about
the championship. We are also excited about
getting to bed before 1 a.m.

Now on to a few other topics:
* I had an opportunity to interview Leston
Green at ESPN recently. Leston is having the
time of his life in Bristol, Conn. I have a smile
on my face when I turn on SportsCenter now
knowing that Leston probably had something
to do with the highlights I am watching.
* A clarification is necessary from Superin-
tendent David Miller who noted that school
board members, after setting their own salaries
for a few years, have gone back to the state
setting them. The $25,416 is their latest salary
following a small increase for 2007-2008.
* I was sorry to see Pam Portwood decide
to move on. Pam has done a wonderful job for
the county commission over the past decade.
She has always been very professional and
competent in completing her tasks.
* I was wondering if local offices have set
up any office pools to bet when the Wakulla
County Commission decides to adopt new
impact fee rates. The proposal has been on the
table since January. For the record, the board
has only three more meetings in 2007.
* The newspaper lost "a real good guy/gal"
when Tammie Barfield resigned and took a job


Boudreaux and Clotile living life as it
should be.
with Big Bend Hospice. Tammie served as our
advertising manager. We wish her well in her
new surroundings.
* The Wakulla War Eagle football game
against Godby Oct. 18 was another .case of why
we play the games. The War Eagle offense had
provided few points in the games leading up to
the district showdown.
Everyone knew the defense would be stout,
but I could not find anyone who thought
Wakulla would shut down the high powered
Cougars. To their credit, Coach Scott Klees and
the players did feel they could beat'the Cou-.
gars in Tallahassee without the turnovers from
the 2006 game in Medart.
* I am constantly amazed at the talented
people who live in Wakulla County. Editing
or writing feature stories on the citizens gives
me a clear view of the many talented folks we
have living here. We will continue to find them
and tell you their stories.
* I know that the many Florida State foot-
ball fans in the area did not like the Miami
game result, but I thought it was a very inter-
esting game. College football remains one of
the most popular spectator sports because you
just never know what will happen.
ESG Project Manager Cleve Fleming is an Au-
burn man and he had lots to crow about when
the Tigers went to Gainesville and popped the
Gators. This same Tiger team lost to Missis-
sippi State at home and stubbed toes against,
LSU. It isn't safe to bet on conference games
anymore.
* The state legislature has created some in-
teresting stories for journalists who are on the
state lawmakers' beat. I bet the legislators have
a few interesting stories to tell their spouses
when they come home at the end of the day.
Silly me, I thought the legislative session was
held in the spring.
* I've had a difficult time at home recently
as I have lost two of my cats who passed away.
I worked with the CHAT volunteers who set
me up with two new kitties. I would encour-
age anyone looking for a new pet to give the
animal shelter a visit to see if an animal there
meets your needs.
Glenda, Heide, Anne, Susan and the rest of
the volunteers are dedicated to making life bet-
ter for Wakulla County animals. I appreciated
their compassion and helpfulness when I told
them about my loss.
Now I am able to share my home with two
new friends, Boudreaux and Clotile, a Cajun
joke suggested by some friends who left Louisi-
ana after Hurricane Katrina. Boudreaux and Clo-
tile have shown their appreciation by sharing
their high spirits with us every day.

Keith Blackmar is the News Editor of The
Wakulla News.


The purpose of this letter
is to make citizens of Wakulla
County aware of all the child
support cases that do not make
it into The Wakulla News. Yes,
there are thousands of child
support cases that do not make
it into the paper.
Why? While writing this I
have to be very careful not to
"embarrass" the non-custodial
parent in my situation, so I will
do my best.
Like me, you are probably
wondering, "Why should I save
them the embarrassment?" I
think that every once in a while
something should be printed so
that people know that the fight
is not over and there are people
out there struggling to make
ends meet because a non-cus-
todial parent is not doing their
part in taking care of their child
from a financial standpoint.
Not only is it the non-custo-
dial parent that drops the ball,
but too many times I have talk-
ed with single parents and their
friends about trials and tribula-
tions that they have faced while
trying to understand and collect
child support.
Every story that I have heard
from parents who have dealt
with the State of Florida in
representing their cases has
been truly a mess and a disap-
pointment. Not only do I know
from personal experience, but I
also hear it all around me every
single day from other people.
Which brings me to my ques-
tion. Why is it so hard to collect
child support from non-custo-
dial parents when you have a
case with the State of Florida?
We all know the notorious
and vigorous process that we
face when dealing with the
state. The endless phone calls,
visits to their office, and count-
less letters that we provide to
the people that work for the
state to help them do their job,
but with no prevail.
I can't count on both hands
how many times I have made a
call to the state and gotten ei-
ther a wrong answer, that leads
to even more work on my part,
or the same information that I
got the previous hundred times
that I have called, and of course
that tells me that nothing has
been done with my case.
Also, you will find that if you
don't have a clue of the right
questions to ask or if you don't
understand something, they are
not going to help you. Their mis-
sion is to get you off the phone
as quickly as possible; call times
are limited to seven minutes or
less. I mean really, who is work-
ing for whom here?
It's a shame that people who
are "low income" can't get the
help they need from the state
that is supposed to be working
for the people. Yeah sure, some
people are doing just fine with
their cases with the state, but I
pray for you to never come into
any problems; such as, the non-
custodial parent losing their
jobs or the non-custodial parent
losing their driver license that
the state apprehends because
they think that this will matter
somehow. Hello! People drive
everyday on suspended licenses
and nothing ever happens to
them
Plus, how does the state
think that taking the non-cus-
todial parent's license away
is going to help the situation,
because if they don't have a job,
how are they going to get one
without a valid driver license?
The only thing that I can sug-
gest to parents who are going
through this ordeal is to just
"fire" the state off your case and
represent yourself, or if you are
lucky, get legal representation.
Of course you can't get the
state off your case if you are
on assistance, which I have
learned the hard way. But as
soon as possible, get off the as-
sistance and represent yourself.
Trust me, it is worth it in the
long run.
You can do more on your own
than anyone with the state ever
can for you. I must warn you
though, it's an ongoing battle


Your View

and never ending struggle, but
you can get through it if you are
persistent.
While I am still going through
my situation, all I have to think
of every time I want to give
up is my sweet little girl that
I am trying to take care of and
provide for. I know that all my
hard work and efforts won't
be a waste in the end, because
I will know that I have done
the right thing and fought for
her, for something that is truly,
rightfully hers.
Sometimes the non-custodial
parent needs a little push, but
sometimes the non-custodial
parent needs a swift kick in
the right direction. I can't stress
enough that it is the responsi-
bility of both parents to take
care of a child, financially and
emotionally.
Believe me, the decision to
take on such a huge task on
your own takes a lot of courage.
It took me a long time to bring
myself to the point where I was
fed up with just letting things
be as they were and not seeing
any results. I knew I wanted to
make a better life for my child
and I couldn't do that without
the support of the other parent.
After so long I finally realized
that my non-custodial parent
wasn't going to do the right
thing on his or her own so I
made the choice to represent
myself in court.
I cannot say enough good
things about the Wakulla Coun-
ty Courthouse and the staff.
From the Clerk of the Court
to the Honorable Judge Sauls,
it is unbelievable the support
that our courthouse has for the
people in this county.
There was never a time that
I called and wasn't assisted
promptly and with respect.
Which brings me to my next
point. The Honorable Judge
Sauls is nothing to be played
with. This. man is absolutely
brilliant. Ife has helpecLame so
much with my case when we
have been in court. He has made
me see the light, and believe
that I can make a difference in
the way my child is being taken
care of.
Believe me, he will make sure
that things are fair for the sake
of the child and I respect him
greatly for this. Not only is he
a great judge, but also he took
the time to figure out all the
details with my case, when it's
not his job to do so. As he says
"that's what attorney's are for."
Nevertheless, he did a wonder-
ful job with my situation and I
thank him for that.
After all is said and done, I
don't regret the things that have
occurred in my case. I know that
it's for the well-being of my
child and I have learned a lot
-from trial and error.
SI hope that what has been
said in this article has inspired
or touched parents going
through this same situation and
makes them aware that they are
not alone.
Keep fighting and hold your
head up, good things come to


those who wait. If you do what
is right, and live by morals, you
will succeed.
If you would like to add
your two cents into this debate
please feel free to contact me
at jenjen0062@yahoo.com. I
would be more than happy to
discuss child support ideas with
you in hopes of making things
better for all the single parents
out there.

Jennifer Collins
Crawfordville

Caregiver names
are needed

For many people, it is not a
matter if we become caregiv-
ers, but when. Caregivers are
family members or friends who
provide both short term and
ongoing care and assistance,
without pay, to those in need
of support due to physical,
cognitive or mental health con-
ditions. They are our parents,
siblings, children of all ages,
grandchildren, grandparents,
friends and neighbors.
SNovember will be recognized
as National Caregivers Month
and the Wakulla County Sher-
iff's Office is seeking the names
of local citizens who are caregiv-
ers so they may be honored at
a luncheon. Caregivers are a
precious commodity and serve
a critical role in the community.
While caregiving includes im-
measurable personal rewards;
the physical, psychological, and
social contributions can lead to
isolation.
If you are a caregiver or
you know one, please call the
Wakulla County Sheriff's Office
at 926-0822 and leave the name
and contact information so a
formal invitation to the event
may be sent.

Give blood,
lots of blood
The Southeastern Commu-
nity Blood Center will be con-
ducting a blood drive at the
Wakulla County Sheriffs Office
on Friday, Nov. 2. The SCBC
Bloodmobile will be parked at
the sheriff's office from noon
to 4 p.m.
Just one donation can save
up to three lives. It takes less
than an hour to donate blood.
With each blood donation last-
ing only 42 days, the supply
must be replenished. A donor
may donate blood every 56
days. Locally, 750 blood dona-
tions are needed each week.
Anyone who is healthy, at
least 17 years old and weighs
more than 110 pounds should
try and donate. Donors must eat
and drink plenty of decaffein-
ated beverages prior to donat-
ing blood and all donors must
present a picture identification
at the time of the donation.
According to the SCBC, less
than five percent of the eligible
population actually donates
blood. For more information,
contact the SCBC at 877-7181.


The Wakulla News (USPS 644-640) is published weekly at
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla
News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
Publisher: Ron Isbell...... ............................................. ron.isbell@gmail.com
News Editor: Keith Blackmar............................. kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Reporter: William Snowden................................ wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Sales Manager: Tammie Barfield............................tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey ..................kinsey@thewakullanews.net
Bookkeeping: Sherry Balchuck ..........................accounting@thewakullanews.net
Classifieds: Alex Brimner................................classifieds@thewakullanews.net
Circulation: Colin Taviner.................................. circulation@thewakullanews.net
Graphic Artists: Eric Stanton/Jessi Smith.......... advertising@thewakullanews.net
Typesetter: Karen Tully...................................... advertising@thewakullanews.net
Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable
one year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County - $25, Out of County - $30
Out of State - $35. Out of Country on Request










THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007-Page 3A


To fee or not to fee...


Actually, that's not the

question. It's the amount.

And, who lives where


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
At a two-hour workshop this
week, county commissioners
seemed to agree on the neces-
sity of increasing impact fees
- though the obvious stumbling
block is the amount.
A study completed more
than a year ago recommended
an increase in impact fees, go-
ing up for single-family homes
from the current $1,246 to more
than $4,100.
The matter is set to come
before the board for a vote at
the meeting on Monday, Nov.
5. It seems likely that the board
will consider some percentage
increase rather than the full
amount.
The issue continued to be
framed as the need to have
growth pay for itself versus the
possible negative effect of the
fees - especially on commercial
growth.
The workshop got off to a
testy start when County Com-
missioner Howard Kessler,
chairing the meeting until
Chairman Brian Langston ar-
rived, challenged developer Ben
Boynton over his contention
that the county's higher tax
base due to growth - and the
resulting property taxes - was
of more value to local govern-
ment than impact fees.
After some sharp exchanges,
Boynton came out and stated
what many pro-development
believers have contended - that
Kessler's support for an increase
in impact fees is part of his
effort to stop growth in the
county.
Kessler denied it, and shot
back at Boynton: "Do you live
in our county?"
Boynton hesitated, then an-
swered: "I pay more property


taxes than you do."
Commissioner Ed Brimner
spoke up to say he objected tc
how Kessler was conducting the
meeting. "I know you're acting
chairman, but your conversa
tion with a citizen was a little
overboard."
The issue of who lives where
came back up when local activist
and Leon County resident Hugh
Taylor went to the podium tc
speak and several people called
out, "Ask him where he lives!'
Taylor responded that while his
primary residence is in Leon
he has a house here. "What
was attractive here is becoming
unattractive," Taylor said.
During board comments,
Kessler spoke of a free.market
economy and said that he ob-
jected to what he described as a
welfare subsidy for developers.
He said he was also opposed to
"the idea that people outside
the county should be telling
people what kind of tax burden
the county residents should be
paying."
Realtor-broker Penny McK-
inney of McKinney Properties
called the proposed impact
fees "outrageous" and said
she was concerned about the
situation of a family living in a
doublewide and having to pay
thousands of dollars for a site-
built home.
Attorney Heather Encinosa
of the Nabors, Giblin & Nick-
erson law firm in Tallahassee,
who drafted the new impact
fee ordinance, said that in such
a situation that the difference
in fees would be just a few dol-
lars - ranging from $4 to $85,
she said.
Developer Ted Gaupin said
the effect on commercial growth
would be devastating. "You
won't be collecting very many
impact fees because businesses


are not going to be opening up,"
he told the board. He said he
had been in discussions with
a potential grocery store and
said the amount of impact fees
would likely make such a proj-
ect less than feasible.
A 100,000 square foot com-
mercial building would be liable
for $35,000 under the current
ordinance. Under what's pro-
posed, those fees would rise to
$325,000.
"You're pulling this rabbit
out of the hat the same time the
economy is in terrible shape,"
Gaupin said.
Steve Brown, developer of
the Century Park business park,
echoed that. He said there's a
need for impact fees but right
now there is no growth.
"Whatever you do," Brown
said of commercial impact fees,
"(set) it so people can pay it
- because they have to pass it
on to customers and you can
only charge so much for ham-
burgers."
During board discussion,
it seemed there was majority
support for an.increase in the
fees, but the question was how
much.
"I don't have a problem
with it going up," Commis-
sioner Maxie Lawhon said of
the fees, but added that the
amount was what concerned
him. Pointing to the example of
a small plumbing shop that has
operated out of a garage, has
10 employees, and decides to
build an office - they can't pay
$150,000 in impact fees; Lawhon
said. And he questioned what
the real impact would be on the
county in such a scenario.
Lawhon noted that, under
the proposed impact fees, if
Wal-Mart were looking to locate
in Crawfordville the -company
would be liable for $1.5 million
in fees. "They wouldn't pay
that," he said.
Kessler objected to the con-


tention that a business wouldn't
come to the county because of
higher impact fees. Wal-Mart
only paid $129,000 in impact
fees, he said, which represented
25 percent of what a 1999 study
said should have been paid.
"We don't have to be sitting
here giving away the farm,"
Kessler said.
Brimner said any calculation
of impact should also take into
account that some businesses
have positive impacts. Wal-Mart,
for example, offers residents 10
to 15 percent savings on grocer-
ies, Brimner said.
Brimner also said that Wal-
Mart voluntarily paid for some
improvements at its location,
pointing to the traffic light and
the turn lane.
Chairman Langston antici-
pated that the housing market
would not be back for quite
some time, given the insurance
crisis and the frequent legisla-
tive special sessions.
"I want to make it easy
for business to come here,"
Langston said, noting that he
is frequently asked by residents
why can't we have a bowling al-
ley or a new restaurant. "Quite
frankly," he said, "we just don't
have enough people."
With an economy already
in a downturn, Langston said
he worried about the effect
of increased impact fees. "I'm
pro-development," he said, "but
we've done a lot of things to
slow down growth" - such as
the advanced septic system re-
quirement the board approved
last year.
Lawhon brought up the issue
of family enclaves, saying he
could not vote for the ordinance
if there was no provision to
exclude impact fees being as-
sessed in such situations. An
example of that would be a

See FEES on Page 13A


Week in
Thursday, November 1
ALZHEIMER'S SUPPORT
GROUP will be held at the public
library at 6 p.m.
BOOK NOOK, for children in
grades K-5, will be held at the
public library at 10:30 a.m. Local
author and poet Norma Sundberg
will read from her book, "An Odd
Fable."
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB
meets at Posey's Up the Creek in
Panacea at noon.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the
senior center at 12 noon.
VFW BINGO will be held at the
VFW Post on Arran Road from 6
p.m. to 9 p.m.

Friday, November 2
AA meets at the American
Legion Building next to the Wom-
en's Club in Crawfordville with
an open meeting at 8 p.m. There
are also open meetings Sunday at
6 p.m., Monday for women at 6
p.m., and Wednesday at 8 p.m.
CHURCH BAZAAR, featuring
arts and crafts, Christmas decora-
tions and bake sale items, will
be held at First Baptist Church of
Wakulla Station beginning at 7
a.m. (Continues Saturday, Nov. 3,
and next week Nov. 9 and 10)
FALL FLING, the fourth annual
fundraiser, will be held at the pub-
lic library from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
IRIS GARDEN CLUB WORKDAY
at the public library will be held
at 8 a.m.
PICKING' 'N' GRINNIN' JAM SES-
SION will be held at the senior
center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also
on Tuesday)

Saturday, November AS-
TRONOMY PROGRAM will be
held at the Apalachee Bay Yacht
Club, on Harbour Point Drive,
in Shell Point with an indoor
presentation beginning at 8 p.m.
followed by an outdoor star
viewing. Amateur astronomers
Al and Darlene Oosterhof will
conduct the program with help
from Doug Jones of the Wakulla
County Public Library. (Another
program is set for Nov. 10 at


Wakulla
Wakulla Presbyterian Church)
NA meets at the Torch, 16
Lower Bridge Road, at 5 p.m. For
more information, call 599-2876.
OLD JAIL MUSEUM will be
open selling thrift shop and hf's
torical society items to benefit
renovation of the museum from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
SHADEVILLE FALL FESTIVAL
will be held at Shadeville Elemen-
tary from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m

Sunday, November 4
BENEFIT for Bonnie Stanley
at Hudson Park in Crawfordville.
Live music. barbecue pork sand-
wiches and brunswick stew at
11 a.m.

Monday, November 5 .
COUNTY COMMISSION will
meet in the commission board
room at 6 p.m.

Tuesday, November 6
BOOK BABIES, for infants ani
toddlers, will be held at the publ
library at 10:30 a.m.
MOOSE LODGE #2510 will
meet at the lodge in Panacea PlaiA
at 7:30 p.m. '
TRANSPORTATION DISADt
VANTAGED Coordinating Board
will meet at the senior center at
10 a.m. -
TWILIGHT TALES, bedtime
stories for children, will be read
at the public library from 7 p.mn
to 7:30 p.m. Children are encous
aged to wear pajamas and bring
a stuffed animal.
YOGA CLASS will be held. a
the Crawfordville Women's Club
at 6:30 p.m. For information;
contact Della Parker-Hanson at
926-4293.

Wednesday, November 7.,
AA meets at Ochlockonee Bay
UMC on Surf Road at noon.
BOOK BUNCH, for pre-school
and home school families, meefs
at the public library at 10:30 a.in
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be
held at the senior citizens center
at 10:30 a.m.


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Page 4A-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007


Church


Obituaries


Robert G. Barrett
Robert Glenn Barrett, 50, of
Crawfordville died Wednesday,
Oct. 24 in Tallahassee.
The funeral service was held
Saturday, Oct. 27 at Beggs Funeral
Home in Tallahassee with inter-
ment at Mount Zion Cemetery
in Jefferson County. In lieu of
powers, memorial contributions
may be made to Big Bend Hos-
pice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd.,
Tallahassee. FL 32308-5428.
A self employed truck driver,
he was a lifelong resident of the
Tallahassee area. He was of the
Pentecostal faith and a member
of New Light Church.
SSurvivors include his wife,
Rhonda Hodges Barrett of Craw-
fordville; two sons, David Glenn
Barrett and Michael Kevin Bar-
rett, both of Tallahassee; two
daughters, Tasha Denise Walker
of Jacksonville and Tiffany Lynn
Barrett of Tallahassee; his father,
George Barrett of Crawfordville;
two brothers, Donald A. Bar-
rett of Chaires and Michael D.
Barrett of Woodville; a sister,
Susan Berry of Tallahassee; and
two grandchildren, Mary Eliza-
beth Barrett and Trenton Dale
Walker.
S Beggs Funeral Home in Tal-
lahassee was in charge of the
arrangements.

George C. Brand, Jr.
George Cravey Brand, Jr. died
Monday, Oct. 29 at the Margaret
Dozier Hospice House.
The graveside service will be
held at 4 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 1
at Roselawn Cemetery with full
military honors. A reception
will be held immediately fol-
lowing the service at the home
of Sarah and Mike Grant at 594
Frank Shaw Road, Tallahassee.
Memorial contributions may be
made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723
Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee,
FL 32308 or Leon High School
Foundation, P.O. Box 15963, Tal-

Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
Crawfordville
* Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey
Come .. worship With
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School........................ 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship...................... 11 a.m.
Evening Worship.................... 6 p.m.
Wednesday Service .................7 p.m.
& Youth Service....................... p.m.
Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m.
M issionettes ............................... 7 p.m.


St. Elizabeth
Ann Seton
Catholic
Mass 9 a.m. Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Father James MacGee, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
926-1797


lahassee, FL 32317.
Bevis Funeral Home in Tal-
lahassee is in charge of the ar-
rangements.

Joyce W. Clayton
Joyce White Clayton, 77, of
Lloyd died Thursday, Oct. 25
in Lloyd.
The service was held Tuesday,
Oct. 30 at Harvey-Young Funeral
Home in Crawfordville with
burial at Springfield Cemetery
in Lloyd.
A native of Medart, she had
lived in Lloyd since 1990. She
was a longtime banker who at-
tended Perry Seven Day Adven-
tist Church.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Sanford "Sandy" Clayton
of Lloyd; a son, Charles Lamar
Clayton of Tallahassee; three
daughters, Sandra Clayton Em-
merson and Andrea Lynn Ste-
phens both of Tallahassee, and
Karan Schafer of Lacomb, Al-
berta, Canada; a brother, Bobby
Jack White of Crawfordville; two
sisters, Wilhemina Morrison of
Crawfordville, and June Purvis of
Valdosta, Ga.; six grandchildren,
Chase Clayton, Krysta Whipple,
Jaime Stephens Glass, Biian
Stephens, Ariel Emmerson and
Allison Emmerson; five great-
grandchildren, Avery Glass, Tyler
Glass, Cole Glass, Rylee Stephens
and Drake Whipple.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.

Linda J.V. Erikson
Linda Joan Vick Erikson, 61,
of Tallahassee died Monday,
Oct 22.
The funeral service was held
Friday, Oct. 26 at Culley's Mead-
owWood Funeral Home in Tal-
lahassee with burial at Roselawn
Cemetery.
A native of Tallahassee, she
was a retired executive secretary
with the Department of Educa-


Octk ockonee


United
Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship 9 a.m.
Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
'Pastor Irett 'fempleton
(850) 984-0127


SUnited
I Methodist
Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship II a.m.
Pastor Brett Templeton
850-962-2511 I


- Crawfordville United

Methodist Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 926-7209
Ochlockonee & Arran Road "CoWe GroWf Wth Us' www.rawfordville-me.corg


S16%wutmentl zf ef
123 Elena Drive
Tallahassee, FL 32305
Owned & Operated By Wesley Schweinsberg
Son of the Late Harold Schweinsberg o
Office: (850) 421-7211 Mobile: (850) 510-3983
Call and Compare... You'll Save Time & Money
Same Quality & Service"



Hwy 319 Medart,
e eOffice 926-5265
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
0 Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
D Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
h Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
SEvening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeelenbaptistchurch.org


tion. Joan learned to read at an
early age and reading was one of
her favorite pasttimes. She was
an avid NASCAR fan. She was a
member of the Tallahassee Sev-
enth Day Adventist Church.
Survivors include her hus-
band of 26 years, Lyndol D. Er-
ikson of Tallahassee; two sons,
J. Levi Owens and wife Kerri
of Crawfordville and Matthew
C. Owens of Nome, Alaska; her
daughter, Melanie D. Woodall
and husband Neal of Tallahas-
see; two brothers, Thomas D.
Vick and wife Dorothy E. of Tal-
lahassee and Henry Randy Vick
and wife Debbie of Panama City;
and six grandchildren, Adam,
Kelsie, Hunter, Cody, Charlie
and Katie.
Culley's MeadowWood Fu-
neral Home in Tallahassee was
in charge of the arrangements.

Cornelia W. Harden
Cornelia Whaley Harden, 94,
of Sopchoppy died Saturday, Oct.
27 in Tallahassee.
The funeral service was held
Tuesday, Oct. 30 at Sopchoppy
United Methodist Church in
Sopchoppy with burial at West
Sopchoppy Cemetery. Memorial
contributions may be made to
Sopchoppy United Methodist
Church Building Fund, P.O. Box
85, Sopchoppy, FL 32358.
She was a member of Sop-
choppy United Methodist Church
and the Sopchoppy United Meth-
odist Women's Group. She was
a native of the area and was
very active in church. She was
a nurse.
Survivors include three sons,
Warren Harden, Larry Harden
and wife Teresa and Gerald
Harden and wife Becky, all of
Sopchoppy; two daughters, Lou-
ise McCauley and Jean Dunlap
and husband David, all of Sop-
choppy; a sister, Mary Wiggins of
Atlanta; eight grandchildren, 12
great-grandchildren, two great-
great-grandchildren and many
other family members.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.
Trinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
TrinityLutheranofWakulla.com
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Les Kimball
Church 926-7808 * Pre-School 926-5557

IPioneer Baptist
Church (SBC)


Sunday School
Sunday Worship


9:15 a.m.
10:30 a.m.


Wed. adult, children & youth 7 p.m.
486 Beechwood Drive * Crawfordville, FL.
(North of the Lower Bridge Road and
Spring Creek Highway intersection)
Rev. Dennis Hall, Pastor
850-926-6161


John V. Harper .1 ..yK.. . .
John V. Harper, 53, of Thom- . " "... -
asville, Ga. died Sunday, Oct. 21 * .
in Pelham, Ga.
The funeral service was held
Wednesday, Oct. 24 at Capel
Baptist Church in Cairo, Ga. with
burial at the church cemetery.
He was a truck driver for i,
Harper Seafood.
Survivors include his children,
Daisy Lance, Lacey Harper and
Bo Harper all of Thomasville;
his mother, Edith H. Gainous of
Cairo; two sisters, June Harper St. Nora celebr
of Crawfordville and Betty Pe-
terson-Terrell of Perry; and a Saint Nora Primitive
brother, Spider Harper of Cairo. Church concluded their ]
Clark Funeral Home in Cairo, second anniversary cele
Ga. was in charge of the arrange- recently. This year's then
ments. Steps of A Good Man is C


Pamela L. Hoke
Pamela Lynn Hoke, 40, of
Wakulla County died Sunday,
Oct. 21 in Leon County.
A memorial service was held
Friday, Oct. 26 at Culley's Mead-
owWood Funeral in Tallahas-
see.
A native of Quincy, she was
a lifelong resident of the Talla-
hassee area. She was a Program
Assistant 3 for P.B.S.&J. Inc. She
was a beloved sister of the Iron
Ravens Motorcycle Family.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Charles E. Hoke; a son,
William Andrew Vincent Clark;
a daughter, Catherine Hoke; her
mother and stepfather, Linda
and John H. Bruner; her father,
Donnie Clark; two sisters, Cas-
sandra Brown and Kimberly
Skinner; her mother-in-law, Nel-
lie Ruth *Hoke; and a host of
nieces, nephews, cousins and
other family.
Culley's MeadowWood Fu-
neral Home in Tallahassee was
in charge of the arrangements.

Mary E. K. Hurley
Mary Elizabeth King Hurley,
90, of Alligator Point died Tues-
day, Oct. 23.
The funeral service was held
Saturday. Qct. 27 at the Church
of the Ascension in Lanark Vil-

Saint Teresa
Episcopal
Church
1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98
Sunday School
Holy Eucharist 8:30 am
Youth & Adults 9:30 AM
Children 10:30 AM
Worship 10:30 AM
Reverend John Spicer
926-4288


r Panacea Park Q


rated with guest speaker


Baptist
Pastor's
bration
ae: "The
)rder By


the Lord" Psalm 37:23 accompa-
nied by the program main head-
ing Better Days Ahead...Keep On
Looking Up, with a picture of
Pastor Sims dressed in his robe,
arms stretch wide, and eyes
looking to the hill from whence
cometh our help.
Two years ago Pastor Stanley
Sims, Sr. accepted the church's
invitation to be Saint Nora's
Spiritual leader with only six
members, and the church has
never looked back. Even though
the pastor and family lives in
Tallahassee, there is constant
communication.
"We might be small in mem-
bership compared to other
churches within the community,
but we won't allow our physical
size to limit Saint Nora's respon-
sibility of having'a spiritual
impact in the community we
worship in. If we continue to
think small, we will always be
small," said Pastor Sims.


GRACE

BAPTIST CHURCH
"Where everybody is somebody in His body."
Sunday School ............... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ............10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship.................. p.m.
Wednesday Evening ......... 6:45 p.m.
Pastor Gary Tucker
926-3217


Sopchoppy
Baptist Church I Schf Christ
24 Mission Rad, Paaacea ChrCh Ofu Christ
SCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.


Sunday School 10 a.m.
Worship 11a.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 p.m.
Pastor, Jerry Spears


I 6scaoer- -e' -C&Zt


FIRST
BAPTIST ChuRclr



3086 Crawfordville Hwy.
(South of the Courthouse)
Church Office: 926-7896
www.fbccrawfordville.org
or
(youth) www.crosstraining.org


SUNDAY


Early Worship
Sunday School
Morning Worship
Evening Worship


8:30 a.m.
9:45 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
6:00 p.m.


WEDNESDAY


Fellowship Meal
(call for reservations)
Prayer/ Bible Study
IMPACT (Youth)
Children's Events


6:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
6:30 p.m.


Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worship ...............10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .............5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details,
962-2213


Wakulla
United Methodist Church
SSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School for all ages -10 a.m.
I Sunday Worship - 11 a.m.
Wednesday Service - 7 p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor Drew Standridge


"We were blessed to have
Elder Barnard C. Yates, Vice
President of the National Primi-
tive Baptist Convention, Florida
State Primitive Baptist Conven-
tion Bible Expositor, and the
Senior Pastor of the Zion Hope
Primitive Baptist Church in
Pensacola, to preach a message
of encouragement during our
celebration," said Sims. "Elder
Yates subject really was parallel
with the characteristics of our
church. His sermon subject,
What God Can't Do," Elder
Clinton H. Smith, Moderator of
the Old West Florida Primitive
Baptist Association commended
Elder Yates for accepting the
invitation to preach the gospel
in a small church located in
Sopchoppy."
Please turn to page 13A

Ochlockonee
Blood Bought
spin wrought Christian Center
Word Taught
A Word of Faith Church

Schedule of Services
* Sunday 11 a.m. t
* Wednesday 7 p.m. I I
* Thursday Ladies
Bible Study 10 a.m.
2263 Curtis Mill Rd.
Sopchoppy, FL * 962-3774
Pastor John S. Dunning
(From Rhema Bible Training Center)



Pres6ytrui4t
3383 Coastal Hwy.
1/3rd mile east of Wakulla High School
9:30 a.m. Bible Study
10:30 a.m. Worship Service
10:45 a.m. Children's Sunday School
Nursery Provided
926-4569
www.wakullapres.org





itA 4s e A dl5;9 defoamc





STRONG

& JONES

Funeral Home, Inc.
551 West Carolina St.
Tallahassee, FL 32301

Gracious,

Dignified Service

svan 224-2139
Day or Night
Pre-Arrangements
Silver Shield
Notary
DARRELL L. LAWRENCE
LINN ANN GRIFFIN
J. GRIFFIN
Licensed Funeral Directors


117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy


Sunday School 9A5 AM
Church Office Morning Worship 11 AM
962-7822 AWANA CLUB 5PM
Evening Worship 6 PM

Wednesday 7 PM - Prayer Mooting,
Youth a Children's Programs
Dr. Bill Jonkns, Pastor
Randy Inderson, Minister of Music
Vickl Anderson, Youth Director
Jerry Evans, Mike Crouch, Bernie Kemp - Musicians


II


I1







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007-Page 5A


Communi


Hi neighbors. First of all, I
want to apologize for the mis-
understanding that was put in
our column last week about
the antique car owners being
charged for bringing their cars
to St. Marks.
What I wrote was that "a
business owner " was trying to
charge $20 to bring your antique
cars to our St. Marks River Fes-
tival. Never did I write that all
business owners were charging
any money for this. At that
time I was not told who was in
charge of this car show.
Neighbors, this will be my
last column and I am sure you
will enjoy reading whoever
takes it over.
I have always believed that
you get more flies with honey
than with vinegar, meaning
that there is a way to talk to
people without raising your
voice.
I grew up in the childhood
from hell and choose, therefore,
to live alone. Nobody in this
world has the right to raise their
voice to you, me or anyone.
Anytime there is a misprint of
information I get phone calls
that could be handled differ-
ently.
I don't care who you are or
what business you do or do not


Happy birthday greetings to
Roosevelt Ross on Nov. 1, from
all your family and friends.
Let us not forget our sick and
shut-in, those who are in the
hospitals, and nursing homes,
the prisons, the homeless, and
all in need of help and prayer
all over this world.
I have been very busy these
past few weeks and just have
not had the time to write. Many
times we don't have news items
for the paper. Everyone likes to
do their own things and that's
okay. We need to watch the
things around us. Sometimes
we go day after day, and never
take time or think to watch the
things around us. Next door
neighbors, parked cars, people
walking around with their
heads down, and backs turned,
everyone needs to be more
wvatchful '
SSunday, Nov.. 4, will be the
end of Daylight Saving Time.


ST. MARKS
By Linda Walker
own, you will not raise your
voice to me. It's not okay just
to say well, you know that's
just how that person is. It still
isn't okay.
I have enjoyed writing the
column for almost five years
and it is now time for someone
in better health to take this
over. Thank you all for your
kindness and taking time to
tell me you enjoyed the column.
May God continue to bless each
of you.
The following is from the St.
Marks VFD:
The St. Marks Volunteer Fire
Department was in charge of
the car show and there was a
$15 donation fee to the fire de-
partment to enter the show. The
fire department welcomed all
cars and we even advertised for
antique cars. The information in
the St. Marks news column was
wrong. No business had a car
show at the festival. The only
car show was the one by the
St. Marks Fire Department. The
money from this event is in the
St. Marks Fire Department bank
account if anyone would like to


Don't forget to turn your clocks
back one hour.
We welcome you to fellow-
ship with us on Sunday at
Skipper Temple Church. Sunday
school is at 10:30 a.m. and wor-
ship is at 11:30 a.m. Come and
be blessed, and you will be a
blessing.
Mark your calendar, WCCC,
Inc. celebrates African-American
Heritage Saturday, Feb. 16, 2008
with a parade and day in the
park. Information booths, food
booths, singing, performances,
and fun for the children and
seniors will be included. Plan
now to join us. For information,
call Malenie at 850-926-7506 or
Bossie at 850-656-2578. Parade


see the checkbook.
The city had no part in this
car show except for backing
the fire department. We greatly
appreciate our city for their sup-
port and appreciated their help
with the festival. We appreciate
our local news column, but get
your facts straight before you
print this kind of information.
My father always said believe
nothing you hear and only half
of what you see. Thank you.
Fire Chief of the St. Marks
Volunteer Fire Department.
Thought for this week:
Let us all remember to have
all the facts before we raise our
voice at someone. We can all be
wrong some of the time.
Neighbors, I cannot put the
business or owner's name in
this column, but I will do my
best to get one of the flyers
that were being passed out in
Tallahassee.
I have truly enjoyed writ-
ing our column and will miss
doing it, but hopefully there
will be someone who will do a
better job.
Thank you for your kind-
ness.
Linda Walker


participants are needed.
We wish a happy birthday to
Ethel Brannen on Nov. 3, and
to Deacon Raymond Plummer
on Nov, 8, from missionary Eva
Mae Johnson. Hope you both
have a blessed day.
Macedonia Church, with
Pastor Elder Andrew Morris,
will render service on Sunday
at Halstead Memorial Church
of Christ in Panama City. Host
Pastor is Elder T. Bell. Hope to
see everyone.

Chiari support
group to meet
A support group is being
started in Wakulla County for
individuals who have been
diagnosed with Chiari Malfor-
mation; Anyone it-re'sted in
joini tfh" neroup is' asked to
call (850) 5446598:'8 "


Vitreoretinal Surgeons
CHARLES K.NEWELL MD EMILY D ASHMORE, MD ROBERT L STEINMETZ. MD H. LOGAN BROOKS, JR, MD

I THE ABILITY TO SEE is one of life's greatest gifts, but diseases of the retina
are a leading cause of blindness.

At The Center for Retina Care, we treat difficult cases using the most advanced
technology from retinopathy in premature babies to macular degeneration in the
elderly. And we have a special interest in helping people with diabetes preserve
their vision.

The Center for Retina Care combines the experience of vitreoretinal surgery
specialists from Southern Vitreoretinal Associates with the region's most advanced
surgical technologies at Tallahassee Memorial.

To find out more about The Center for Retina Care, call us at 1-800-940-1225 or
log on to www.TallahasseeRetinaCare.com


(800) 940-1225
www.TallahasseeRetinaCare.com
The physicians) referred to herein are independent practitioners and not
agents or employees of Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare.


The Center For Retina Care
JL.Ts Salass.ee MV j ia lytnh e Vitoraeltinal
A 5a0ACIAT-k P.1t.
,,,,,.,.;~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~� ,, H,(:l~A;n,;.,i;.� AioiT ,?PI. -.,-*- .:


Heritage book deadline

is extended to Jan. 31


The date for submissions to
The Heritage of Wakulla County,
FL book has been extended to
Jan. 31, 2008. The Wakulla Coun-
ty Historical Society, sponsor of
the project, is pleased with the
activity and interest being shown
in writing and collecting articles
and photographs.
Additional time over the
holidays will allow families to
gather stories and photographs
of people, places, politics, par-
ties of past years in Wakulla
County.
Once again, the group re-
minds everyone who lives here
now,or has lived here in the past
or who has ancestors who lived
here to write about their families,
jobs, schools, churches, whatever
stories come to mind when you
think of Wakulla County.
Brochures with further infor-
mation, details and addresses
for submission may be picked
up at the Wakulla County Public
Library, the Old Jail Museum
Shop or you may call 926-7405 or
email bgreen@nettally.com.
Upcoming fundraising activi-
ties for the Society indude:My-
ers Carter holding his annual


syrupmaking and sale for the
Society on Nov. 10 and there
will be a Silent Auction held at
the Library, Nov. 13 at 7 p.m. The
public is encouraged to support
these activities which will in-
crease the efforts of the Society
in completing the Museum in
the old jail.
The Museum Shop is open
on Saturday, from 9 a.m. until
1 p.m., each week.

Quill Turk wins
SPI Restaurant Equipment
and Supplies announced that
Dr. Quill Turk won the drawing
for the $50 worth of kitchen
small wares from their show-
room. Every guest visiting the
SPI Restaurant Equipment show-
room from Sept. 20 through Oct.
5 was invited to register for the
drawing which was held on Oct.
12 at the business, 872 Coastal
Highway in Panacea.
Dr. Turk can choose from
any of the variety of items in
the showroom such as commer-
cial quality pots, pans, knives,
bar supplies, kitchen gadgets,
glasses, flatware, serving ware
and baking pans.


SERFOOD
TUESDAY * PRIME RIB
FRIDAY * RIBEYE
STUFFED: GROUPER - FLOUNDER - LOBSTER
SATURDAY * PRIME RIB
COUNTRY STYLE HOME COOKING LUNCH SPECIALS $6.50
(INCLUDES TEA & TAX)
COME SEE OUR NEW MENU
REMEMBER - YOU CAN ALWAYS COUNT ON POSEYS FRESH SEAKFOO
984-5243 * 1506 COASTAL HWY., PANACEA
OPEN TUESDAY. WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY * II AM - 9 PM
FRIDAY & SATURDAY * II AM - i0 PM * SUNDAY * 4 PM - 9 PM


n
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CALLING ALL MILITARY

FAMILIES IN WAKULLA!

PARADE AND CELEBRATION ON NOVEMBER 10TH
IN CRAWFORDVILLE TO HONOR OUR FIGHTING
TROOPS AND OUR VETERANS.


ALL MILITARY FAMILIES ARE INVITED TO RIDE IN THE PARADE
WITH PHOTOS OF THEIR LOVED ONES PROMINENTLY DISPLAYED.

Wakulla County will take this opportunity to applaud and honor the family members
of troops who are serving, or have served our country in the U.S. and around the
world. Servicemen and women who have served in previous wars will be honored
also. Wakulla families whose loved ones.have been wounded, or killed, have paid
a high price to keep the U.S. strong and free for all of us. It is only right that we
should honor our neighbors by showing our appreciation for their sacrifice.

TO TAKE PART IN THE PARADE ALL YOU NEED TO DO IS TO SHOW UP IN
YOUR VEHICLE AROUND 9:00 A.M., SATURDAY,' NOVEMBER 10TH
ACROSS THE ROAD FROM ACE HARDWARE. THE PARADE BEGINS TO
ROLL AT 10:00 A.M. SOMEONE WILL BE THERE TO POINT YOU TO A
"LINE-UP" LOCATION.

After the parade please take photographs of your family members to the "Wall of
Honor" at Hudson Park Celebration site and post them there along with any
information you would like to give. At the park there will be a Patriotic Concert
which will start at 11:30 a.m. and continue 'till 4:00 p.m., also activities for the
children, lots of food, and craft booths,

For more information call Celebration Chairman, Cynthia Thomas at
251-0439. Please leave a message and she will call you back. Come on Wakulla
County! Let's show our appreciation to those families who have sacrificed so
much for us! See you there for the Parade, Saturday November 10th. Be there
early by 9:00 a.m.

Jim Pound for the
Wakulla Celebration Organizing Committee to
Support our Troops and Honor our Veterans.


V


BUCKHORN
By Ethel Skipper


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''







Page 6A - THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007
fJ


Sports


War Eagles top district rival Jaguars 21-7


By KEITH BLACKMAR
' kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
A sluggish start in a district
contest against the East Gads-
den Jagaurs on Friday, Oct.
26, almost spelled disaster on
Homecoming night for Coach
Scott Klees and his Wakulla
War Eagles.
But the defense turned the
tide and pushed Wakulla to a
21-7 victory over the district
rival despite the Jaguars light-
irg up the scoreboard first in
the contest.
: Wakulla gave up a touch-
down in the first quarter and
did not knot the score at 7-7 un-
timinidway through the second
piiod. Tyrell Gavin caught a 26
yad pass for a touchdown from
qiirterback Casey Eddinger.
Edlinger replaced senior Cory
Edinger who suffered a sepa-
ra#Ed shoulder and will miss
a4igut four weeks of the season.
Tl* elder Eddinger is hoping to
relrn to the team in time for
th4 state playoffs.
,Wakulla ended any hope
E.t Gadsden had of an upset
bicoring on a 65 yard intercep-
ti(l return by Kendell Gavin in
tlh third quarter. Xavier Blocker


War Eagles stay at 7th

The Wakulla War Eagle football team remained the seventh
ranked team in Class 3A in the latest Florida Sports Writers As-
sociation poll.
There hasn't been much movement at the top of the poll. Belle
Glade Glades Central is the top ranked team in the state followed
by Naples, Citra North Marion, St. Augustine, Sarasota Booker and
Lakeland Kathleen.
Tallahassee Godby fell to 12th in the poll with another loss
last week.


gave Wakulla a 14 point cushion
by scoring on a nine yard run
late in the third period.
"We struggled," said Coach
Klees. "We just weren't ready
to play. It's my job to make
sure they are ready to play and
I didn't do that. We were fortu-
nate to win."
Klees said the sluggish ef-
fort followed a major victory
over Godby the week before.
However, Wakulla must play
more consistently if it hopes to
advance in the state playoffs.
"You can't take a week off in
the playoffs," he added. "You
have to be ready every week or
you'll be going home."
Casey Eddinger was the
offensive player of the week


after stepping in for his injured
brother. "He did well for a ninth
grader," said Klees. Eddinger
completed seven of 16 passes
for 106 yards and a touchdown.
He also threw an interception.
Kendell Gavin had nine
rushes for 75 yards while Xavier
Blocker had 14 rushes for 120
yards and a touchdown. Tyrell
Gavin led the receiving corps
with five catches for 78 yards
and a score.
"We did a lot of good things
and some bad things," said
Klees of his offense. Fumbles,
dropped passes and two missed
field goals hurt the cause. How-
ever, the defense forced East
Gadsden into seven turnovers,
three interceptions and four


fumbles.
Gavin's interception for a
touchdown turned the momen-
tum of the game and Wakulla
marched to another district win.
"We need to eliminate the mis-
takes," said Klees. Blocker was
the offensive knock 'em back
award winner and Tim Dawson
was the defensive knock 'em
back award winner.
Dawson caused all kinds of
problems for East Gadsden as
he had six tackles, four assists,
three caused fumbles and five
sacks. He was the defensive
player of the game.
C.J. Holton, Lee Smalls and
Kendell Gavin all had intercep-
tions. Rashard Mills and Jacob
Kemp had fumble recoveries.
Nigel Bradham had six tackles
and two assists. Vince Walker
added three tackles and four
assists.
Wakulla can clinch the dis-
trict title with a victory over
Panama City Bay on Friday,
Nov. 2 at J.D. Jones Stadium at
Reynolds Field. The title will
allow Wakulla to host a first
round state playoff game. If
Wakulla loses against Bay, WHS,
Bay and Godby will be involved
in a three team tiebreaker after


the season. The top two teams
will make the playoffs. Godby
must beat East Gadsden to stay
in the playoff hunt.
If Wakulla beats Bay, Godby
will be the second place team
in the district and Bay will
not make the playoffs. Bay
has already lost to Godby and
Wakulla has defeated Godby.
"They are very capable of
beating us," said Coach Klees.


Will Wakulla be fired up this
week? "I hope so," he said.
Wakulla improved to 7-1
overall and 3-0 in district games.
Bay is 3-5 overall and 2-1 in dis-
trict games. Godby is 6-2 overall
and 2-1 in district. Rickards is
1-7 overall and 0-4 in district.
East Gadsden is 1-6 overall and
1-2 in district. East Gadsden still
must play Godby on Nov. 1 in
Gadsden County.


" Lady War Eagles
wrapping up
volleyball season


Quarterback Austin Lentz prepares to pass the ball in the East Gadsden game,

JV football team ends year with loss
The 2007 Wakulla War Eagle junior varsity Wakulla finished the season 0-7 with a game
football season came to a close on Thurtday. against Leon cancelled by bad weather. Despite
Oct. 25 when the East Gadsden Jaguars came to the record, the coaching staff said the players
Reynolds Field at J.D. Jones Stadium. made great strides during the season.
.The JV squad was without a number of play- Wakulla competed against Rickards, Chiles,
ers'who were required to sit out the game after Madison County, Florida High, Taylor County,
a fight broke out at the Taylor County game Oct. Godby and East Gadsden. To view more photo-
11i The shorthanded War Eagles fell 32-21 to the graphs from the game, log on to www.kenfields-
Jaguars. photography.photoreflect.com.


Parks & Rec news
By CAITLIN FLEMING or playing games. Right now,
S Special To The Wakulla News football, cheerleading and fall
From kindergarten to mid- girls' softball are in full swing
w\y through my sophomore and registration for soccer and
yehr in college, I have played, basketball have already begun.
refereed and worked for the Check out the WCPRD website
Pa ks and Recreation Depart- at www.wcprd.com for informa-
ment. My drawers are packed tion.
wi an abundance of colorful ' On Saturday mornings, all six
jeseys, both mine and my acres of parking are filled with
brothers. Like many children players, families and devoted
in Oe county, most of my child- spectators who want to watch
hood memories, good and bad, the games and support the kids.
hav: been from the Recreation Most come to enjoy the atmo-
Pari'in Medart. sphere, but many work behind
1 remember half-time snacks, the scenes, devoted long after
Hi s and Twinkies, the high- "paying their dues," to keep the
light of my six year old life was sports programs alive.
getting smacked in the head High-schoolers referee the
one time in Super Six soccer so games, work in concession
hafd that part of my head was stands and volunteer as coach-
numnb and the other half of my es. Senior Doug Chadwell has
head was ringing. There is noth- coached a soccer team for the
ing like the good old days. But past two years and Cora Doug-
while my game nights are long las has volunteered as a cheer-
gohe, the circle of life continues leading coach. Parents take on
and a new generation is making the grueling task of chauffeur
memories, and audience and a brave few
-On almost any night of the take on the responsibilities of
week, teams are practicing coach. Each coach I have inter-
viewed over the past month


WHS names soccer

By JOHN REICH of the strongest team during
SSpecialToTheWakulla News the past five years with surreal
ith consecutive varsity sea- expectations of advancing well
sois of high school soccer team beyond districts, team officials
rechards, 13-6-2 during 2005/06 said.
ant 14-6-1 during 2006/07, the
WS soccer program named VARSITY ROSTER
th4a2007/08 varsity and junior Head Coach: Mr. Bob Wal-
var3ty squads. lace / Assoc. Coach: Mr. Don
Che varsity and junior var- Gregg
sity teams welcomes back 12 Nick Baxter - S, Raleigh Clarke
seniors: Nick Baxter, Raleigh - S, Shane Davis - S, Chad Herold
Claike, Reggie Coles, Shane - S, Trevor Nason - S, Patrick
Da Zis, Chad Herold, Robert Stewart - S, Brett Wilson - S,
McMherson (JV), Trevor Nason, Marcus Posey - S, Elliot Seidler
AdQn Perkins, Marcus Posey, - S Adam Perkins - S,
Ellt Seidler, Patrick Stewart, Reggie Coles - S, Matt Reich
andeBrett Wilson. - J, Ryan Smith- J, Siul Vega - J,
Phe varsity roster consists Will Harvey - J, Jacob Blume -J,
4:


has cherished the parent-child
bonding that they share. To
me, what is remarkable are the
coaches who don't have kids on
the team.
Veteran coaches Troy Nelson,
who coached his stepson's team
for one year almost a decade
ago, and Robby Taylor, who
never had a child on a team,
have devoted themselves to the
football program for the invalu-
able lessons learned.

This bustling beehive of ac-
tivity is fascinating in itself but
even more so, is the motivation
behind it. Very few are paid
monetarily for their devotion,
but all involved are rewarded
immensely with the satisfaction
of influencing a generation. As
a child and as a worker, the
experience is unforgettable.
For those who have remained
dedicated supporters for years,
I applaud your hard work and
for those of you who have never
gotten involved, I urge you to
check this scene out or get in-
volved. You might be surprised
at what you find.



squads

Zach Swain - So, Liam Daniels
- So, Morgan Henry - So, and
Josh Oliver - So.

JUNIOR VARSITY
JV Coach: TBA.
Robert McPherson - S, Sam
Hicks - J, Tyler Unger - J, Ben An-
derson - So, Justin Cronan - So,
William Davis - So, Rico Forrest
- So, Travis Harrell - So, Rhett
Harvey - So, Jacob Kilpatrick
- So, Wayne Murray - So, Josh
Sanders - So, Vincent Treltas -
So, Donald Bramblett - F, Tanner
Cash - F, Frankie Humphries - F,
Brandon Maloy - F, Steven Urling
- F, and Josh Smith- J (OUT FOR
SEASON).


The Wakulla Lady War Eagles
volleyball team is wrapping up
their season. They traveled to
Panama City Beach to play in
the District 2, Class 4A matches
at Arnold last week and won
the district title. They made
it through the semifinals into
the finals where they defeated
Panama City Bay, allowing them
to continue on to play for the
state championship.
On Wednesday, Oct. 31,
Wakulla will be taking on Na-
varre in Medart in the WHS gym.
If they win this match, the War
Eagles will go on to play either
Bay or Persacola Washington on
Nov. 6 in the regionalsemifinals.
The regional finals are Nov. 10 if
Wakulla keeps winning.


Boys open soccer JV soccer coaches
season Nov. 6 with needed at WHS


home game

The 2007-2008 Wakulla War
Eagle soccer season will open
Nov. 6 with a home game
against East Gadsden. Leon
will host Wakulla Nov. 8 and
Godby will come to Medart on
Nov. 14.
Suwannee County will host
Wakulla Nov. 17 and Panama
City Bay will visit Medart on
Nov. 20.
The rest of the schedule in-
cudes Rickards, Maclay, Panama
City Beach Arnold, Lincoln, Flor-
ida High and Chiles. Wakulla
will host a tournament with
Taylor, Lynn Haven Mosley and
Maclay Dec. 14 and Dec. 15.
The district tournament will
be played at home on Jan. 22
and Jan. 23.


The Wakulla High School
men's junior varsity soccer
program is seeking a Head JV
and assistant soccer coach.
Interested candidates must be
available for practices from 2
p.m. or 3 p.m until 4 p.m. to 6
p.m. and evenings for games,
including some Saturday games.
The season runs from October
through Jan. 26.
For more details, contact
Varsity Coach Bob Wallace or
Athletic Director Buddy Tomaini
at 926-7125.

Thanks to al those who
shared news about their
teams with our readers.
Your help is greatly ap-
preciated.


Players of the week


B
P~1.A


Tim Dawson Casey Eddinger


WANTED

Help round-up the following

Notorious Household Hazardous Wastes














PAINT OIL SOLVENT

And gang members Fuel, Batteries, Antifreeze, Automotive Fluids,
Pesticides, Pool Chemicals, Cleaners, Compact & Fluorescent Bulbs,
Acids, Drain Cleaner, Spray Cans, Computer Parts
NO TIRES


If you find these villains hiding out in your home,
round them up and bring them in.

Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day
Small businesses must register in advance
Call 926-0830
Saturday, Nov. 17 * 8:30 a.m. - 2 p.m.
ESG (Wakulla County Solid Waste) 340 Trice Lane
Small Business * 1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Not accepted: explosives, biohazardous or radioactive materials



REWARD

Put Hazardous Waste in its place. Keep Wakulla County Beautiful!
For more information, please call 926-3153 or 926-0830.
This service coordinated by Wakulla County Solid Waste,
Jefferson County Solid Waste, Keep Wakulla County Beautiful
and Wakulla County Commissioners


F Aff








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007-Page 7A



',


Sports


I A


WHS ends

Golf season
The 2007 Wakulla War Eagle
and Lady War Eagle golf sea-
sons ended at the Region 1-1A
tournaments at SouthWood
Golf Club in Tallahassee last
week.
The War Eagles placed in a


tie for third and the Lady War
Eagles placed fourth after out-
standing performances at the
district tournament.
Pensacola Catholic won the
boys' tournament followed by
Walton County. Wakulla and
Macay were tied for third.
Spencer Smith shot a 75 fol-
lowed by William Davis with an
81, Stone Cowie with an 82 and
Cody Sapp with an 85.
The Lady War Eagles finished


behind Gulf Breeze, Pensacola
Catholic and Maclay. Devin
Lowe shot a 101 followed by
Karlyn Scott with a 103, Rebecca
Rivers shot a 115 and Brooklyn,
Tindall shot a 123.
The top two teams and top,.
two individuals advanced to the.:
state tournament The low score
for the boys' was a 71. The lowi.
score for the girls' was a 74.


Wakulla High School Lady War Eagles varsity soccer team


Sandy's Special


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And Happy Halloween


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SANDY'S SPECIAL




McKINNs E
PROPERTIES


Wakulla High School Lady War Eagles junior varsity soccer team

Lady War Eagles soccer team opens year
The Wakulla Lady War Eagle soccer team 9 and Nov. 10.
opened the 2007-2008 season against the Taylor Other teams on the schedule this season in-
County Lady Bulldogs Tuesday, Oct. 30 in Medart. chide Rickards, Panama City Bay, Maclay, Florida
On Nov. 1, Godby will host Wakulla and Madison High, Franklin County, John Paul II, Panama City
County will come to Medart on Nov. 3. Beach Arnold, and Lincoln.
Taylor County will host Wakulla Nov. 6 and Wakulla will host the district tournament Jan.
Chiles will host a tournament with Wakulla Nov. 14 through Jan. 18.


Cross country team gets
T-h; Wakulla High School viously had warmups and it
cross country teams now have was important to me that we
warmups thanks to a grant from provided them," said Coach
the Chenoweth Fund. Paul Hoover.
.The Gulf Winds Track Club "They work hard, they are
(GWTC), through its Chenoweth dedicated and it helps promote
Fund, awarded the high school a feeling of team unity and
a $1,000 grant for th6 purchase pride in what they are doing.
of warmups for both the boys It was also important that we
and girls cross country teams. found a way to accomplish this
The Chenoweth Fund was without causing a financial bur-
established to. support and pro- den to the parents.
mote youth running in the area "It costs enough to keep
and is funded by donations, kids in sports without the
from members, non-members added expense of having to
and businesses, and fundrais- buy warmups and it was not
ing events, acceptable to make their pur-
To date, the Track Club has chase optional and end up in
awarded more than $40,000 a situation where some of the
to individuals, schools and team members had them and
clubs to purchase equipment, some didn't.
directly assist young runners or "This is where the Che-
prqmote the involvement of the noweth Fund came to our res-
area's youth in running events, cue. The committee members
"Our runners have not pre- very quickly and graciously


warmups.
approved our grant:,request so
that our teams c6"ild get the
warmups for this season. They
were provided for the team just
before the Panhandle Champi-
onships, and the kids looked
sharp in them"
Hoover was on the Board of
Directors for Gulf Winds for two
years and voted on a number of
Chenoweth Fund requests.
"Frankly, I never fully un-
derstood how important and
meaningful these grants really
were until I was on this side of
a request," said Hoover. "The
GWTC, through the Chenoweth
Fund, does a wonderful public
service and we are definitely
indebted to them"
The next completion for the
cross country teams will be the
District Meet on Saturday, Nov.
3 in Niceville.


Wildcats remain unbeaten


The Wildcats of Wakulla
Middle School remained unde-
feated after traveling to Perry
and earning a hardfought vic-
tory over the Taylor County
Bulldogs on Tuesday, Oct. 16.
Will Thomas had 143 yards
rushing and two touchdowns
on 24 carries to lead the Wild-
cats. Kevin James added 33
yards and a touchdown on six
carries.
Defensive back Quanzee
Davis returned a kick-off 57


yards for the the final Wakulla
touchdown. Dionte Gavin had
11 yards on four carries and
Marshane Godbolt had 17 yards
on five carries.
Wakulla's defense held Tay-
lor County to 45 yards rushing
and posted a four play goal-line
stand.
"Our defense played great
and Will (Thomas) made several
plays which allowed our of-
fense to control the ball and the
clock," said WMS head coach


Scott Collins.
The Wildcats improved to
7-0 and face cross-county rival
Riversprings in what should be
a classic battle between two of
the better middle school teams
in the Big Bend.
"We are going to have to
be at our very best beat those
guys." said Collins.
The Wildcats improved to
7-0.


Riversprings falls 22-6


The Riversprings Middle
School Bears bid for an unde-
feated season ended Thursday,
Oct. 25 in Madison County,
when the Bears fell short to the
Broncos 22-6.
According to Head Coach Joe
Jacobs, "We came out of the
gate hot, and after the first four
plays it looked like we would
roll right down the field and
score." Instead, the Bears would
turn the ball over and the Madi-
son County squad would never
look back.
The RMS offense was led by
running back Demetrius Lind-
sey, who had 12 carries and 87
yards rushing. Dillon Norman
had 22 yards on two carries,
but was injured early in the
contest. "We missed Dillon in
a big way. After Jordan, Dillon
knows the offense probably bet-


ter than anybody on the team,"
Jacobs said. "Dillon is also our
punter, and field position was
key in the game. Madison's last
touchdown came with about
one minute to go in the first
half, and with Dillon out we had
to go for a fourth and long deep
in our territory."
The only Riversprings touch-
down came in the third quarter
on a 24-yard pass from quar-
terback Jordan Montague to
Damonta Morris.
Brandon Morgan and Ryan
Henderson, each chipping in
five tackles respectively, led the
Bears defensively. Luke Taylor,
Dalton Norman, and Demetrius
Lindsey also had four tackles
each. Luke Taylor and Ivery
Guyton also forced fumbles on
the night.
See RIVERSPRINGS on P. 13A


Land & Acreage
Wakulla Gardens Lots......$10,000
4 acres Running Deer.......$89,000
Lots on Buckhorn Creek.......$86,000
4.5 Acres North Wakulla.......$105,000
20 Acres on Ashley Hall.......$199,900
28Acres on Bob Miller.........$300,000
48 Acres on Bob Miller ........$475,200
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Page 8A - THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007


People


�HH ,Hannah Deal, the 'Princess Party' girl, dies


Joseph L. Burlingame and Serena L. Maiorano

Joseph Burlingame,

Serena Maiorano to wed
STony and Suzanne Maiorano Burlingame of New York.
of Crawfordville announce the The wedding will be held on
engagement and upcoming wed- Saturday, Nov. 17 at 2 p.m. at the
ding of their daughter, Serena Lake Ella Gazebo in Tallahas-
LeAnn Maiorano of Tallahas- see. A reception will follow. All
see, to Joseph Lee Burlingame friends and relatives are invited
of Tallahassee. He is the son of to attend.
Debra Snyder of Havana and Lee


Dennis Smith and Diana Anderson

Diana Anderson, Dennis

Smith to marry Nov. 10
SDonald and Edna Anderson on Saturday, Nov. 10 at 3 p.m. at
of Bunnell announce the en- Crawfordville United Methodist
gagement and upcoming wed- Church. Rev. Tony Rosenberger
ding of their daughter, Diana will perform the ceremony.
Anderson of Crawfordville, to The couple will host a recep-
Dennis Smith of Crawfordville. tion at the Wakulla Shrine Club
He is the son of James and Ag- immediately following the
atha Smith of Crawfordville. ceremony.
SThe wedding will take place
Birth 19 3/4 inches in length.
Maternal grandparents are
Owen M. Spence Michael Burdeshaw and Sheila
Billy Jene Spence, Jr. and Ellis of Tallahassee. Paternal
Courtney Burdeshaw of Craw- grandparents are Pastor Billy
fordville announce the birth of Jene Spence, Sr. and Jean Spence
their son, Owen Michael Spen- of Tallahassee. Maternal great-
ce, on Aug. 10 at Tallahassee Me- grandparent is Tynie Ellis of
riorial Hospital. He weighed 7 Marianna.
pounds, 8 ounces and measured


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aqttoweuz aqtk fPaw
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Crawfordville, FL
wwVw.franciclowv.coil


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Hannah Deal, the little girl
from Largo with an inoperable
brain tumor whose Crawford-

Volunteers

collect gifts

for suffering

children
Wakulla County volunteers
are collecting simple shoe box
gifts personally packed by chil-
dren, families, and individuals
here in the county.
From Wakulla County, the
shoe box gifts will be sorted and
sent using whatever means nec-
essary-sea containers, trucks,
buses, trains, airplanes, helicop-
ters, boats, camels, even dog
sleds-to reach suffering chil-
dren around the world.
"This simple and fun project
gives churches, families, and
children right here in this com-
munity a chance to reach out
to needy and hurting children
around the world," said Cindy
Beyer, Operation Christmas
Child Regional Director. "Not
only does a shoe box gift bring
a smile to the face of a child,
but also a message of love and
hope."
The collection site will be
the River of Life Church on U.S.
Highway 319 in Crawfordville.
The hours of operation are 6 p.m.
until 7:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 12
through Friday, Nov. 16, 9 a.m.
until noon on Saturday, Nov. 17
and noon until 2 p.m. on Sunday,
Nov. 18.
Right now you can join the
effort to help the world's largest
Christmas project hand-deliver
more than eight million person-
alized gift-filled shoe boxes to
children in some 90 countries
suffering from natural disaster,
war, terrorism, disease, famine,
and poverty.
Since 1993, Operation Christ-
mas Child has delivered more
than 54 million gift-filled shoe
boxes to needy children in some
120 countries.
For more information on
how to participate in Opera-
tion Christmas Child, call (407)
852-3727 or visit www.samari-
tanspurse.org. National Collec-
tion Week is Nov. 12 to Nov. 19.

Tarsus Temple
hosts fashion show,
luncheon
Tarsus Temple No. 161,
Daughters of the Nile, will host
a luncheon, Rose Taft Fashion
Show, silent auction and live
music entertainment program
Saturday, Nov. 10 at 11:30 a.m. at
The Bistro at Wildwood Country
Club in Medart. The cost is $25
per lunch ticket.
The honored guests will be
three children receiving treat-
ment at the Shriners hospitals.
Each year Daughters of the
Nile contributes more than $1.5
million to the hospitals. Shriners
hospitals treat children with or-
thopedic problems, severe burns
and spinal cord injuries at no
cost to the family.
For more information, call
Ruth High at 926-4576 or Kathie
Brown at 984-2209.


ville family held a "Princess
Party" for her that was featured
in The Wakulla News last year,
has died.
Hannah, who was 5 years
old, died at All Children's Hos-
pital in St. Petersburg on Oct.
4, where she was a patient.
A funeral was held Oct. 10 in
Largo.
In August 2006, Hannah and
her mom, Lisa Deal, visited her
grandparents, Robert and Lee
Ann Hebenthal of Crawfordville.
While there, Sue Marks, a neigh-
bor of the Hebenthals, arranged
for a princess theme party for
Hannah and her friends.


In her blog at www.helphan-
nah.org, Lisa Deal wrote of her
daughter's illness and the little
girl's brave struggle. Hannah
had been diagnosed with dif-
fuse pontine glioma, a tumor
of the brain stem.
Of the funeral, Lisa wrote:
"She was dressed in her beau-
tiful Belle outfit down to the
shoes and (to) the crown on
her head. She is now resting
for ever in the dress that she
adored so much.
"The room was decorated
with all the things that she
loved dearly," Lisa wrote. "There
were her princess dress and


crowns, pink princess van-
ity, pillows of princess, stuff
princess dolls, lady bug items
princess chairs, her huge Barbie
navigator, and countless other
treasures."
A toy drive is being held,
through Nov. 17, with the toys
collected to be donated in
Hannah's name to the hospice
at the Florida Suncoast Pedi-
atrics Unit. Donations of toys
are needed for children from
newborns to teenagers and
should be sent to Ladybug Toy
Drive, P.O. Box 4424, Seminole,
FL 33775-4424.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007 - Page 9A


People


Old towels gh
The days are getting shorter
and it is getting a bit cooler out
there. Citizens have been great
about giving the shelter their
old towels and blankets in years
past and I hope that they will
do it again.
Please, check your linen
closet for towels and blankets.
The animals will surely appreci-
ate the extra comfort once the
really cold weather gets here.
All members and interested
parties are invited to a Pot-Luck
Dinner at 5 p.m. on Dec. 11. The
CHAT election for the Board of
Directors will be on the same
day and time.


Happy Time preschool children with Fireighter Louis Russell LaMarche III and Fire Pup.
Happy Time preschool children with Firefighter Louis Russell LaMarche III and Fire Pup.


Fire Department ..-

visits Happy

Time Preschool


The preschool children at
Happy Time Instructional Child
Care learned a great deal about
fire prevention and safety when
Wakulla County Firefighters
came to visit on Wednesday,
Oct. 10.
The children were taught
to "stop, drop and roll" in the
event of a fire and to stay low
to avoid smoke. The students
were also reminded about how
to dial "9-1-1" on their telephone
and to never play with matches
or lighters.
Wakulla Firefighter Louis Rus-
sell LaMarche III and Fire Pup
demonstrated the full uniform
and mask they wear when they
are fighting fires as well as the
oxygen tanks and other life
saving equipment on the fire
trucks.
In addition, the children
received coloring books that
focused on fire safety.


We've heard about "green"
homebuilding and "green"
hotels, but recently one of
my friends asked me what
about "green" living in exist-
ing homes. What would that
entail?
Mostly, I believe green liv-
ing is a state of mind. It's a
willingness to change behavior
patterns to reduce, recycle and
conserve. This requires re-think-
ing our daily habits. Changing a
habit is a difficult thing to do.
However, if we reconsider how
we live and if we sincerely want
to change, then we will form
new "green" habits.
Modifying a definition of
"green home building," we
could say that green living is
"applying environmentally
sensitive habits to reduce and
conserve our resources."
Because of our water short-
age, conserving water is a
fine place to start. Water flow
reduction devices can be very


A Wakulla County Dive Club
is being formed to draw togeth-
er those who love the sport.
The club will promote safe
participation in recreational
SCUBA diving, foster an interest
in SCUBA by providing leader-
ship, programs, services and
trips, provide education in the
skills of safe recreational SCUBA


ayden J A astineira
Jayden J. A. Castineira


Mathew Ainsworth demonstrates hose
control to WCS student


Wakulla Christian School stu-
dents recently enjoyed a day as
a firefighter. During one of the
monthly fire drills, the Wakulla
County Fire Rescue trucks roared
into the school parking lot with
lights flashing and sirens blar-
ing.


The firefighters arrived to
demonstrate the equipment on
the fire trucks and allow each
child a chance to hold the fire
hose as it sprayed water. The
children were shown the Stop,
Drop and Roll technique of put-
ting out fire on their clothing.


Green is a state of mind


inexpensive: They are made to
go on faucets and showerheads.
We can conserve the amount of
times we flush toilets, or we can
use water restriction devices in
the tanks. Fixing all leaking or
dripping faucets and toilets is
important, too.
How many of us leave water
running while we brush our
teeth? Does water need to be
running in the shower as we
soap up? Speaking of soap, I
need to purchase one of those
dispensers that foams the soap
and uses less!
By the way, how long do we
take in the shower? How deep
does the water need to be in
the tub?
Irrigating lawns and flow-
erbeds is a huge consumption
of water. Can we water less
frequently? Can we install drip
irrigation systems?
Our air conditioners/heat-
ing systems are responsible for
a large portion of our electric


diving and cave diving, advance
the protection of the aquatic
environment and provide for
social interaction between club
members.
The first meeting will be held
on Monday, Nov. 5 at 7 p.m. at
St. Teresa Episcopal Church,
1255 Rehwinkel Road, at the
corner of U.S. Highway 98.


bills. What is the warmest our
comfort level can stand in the
summer? (Let's get real, and
learn to survive a bit of heat)
Changing the thermostat is an
obvious difference. Also, ac-
cording to Peter Goren of DEP,
having our air conditioners
well maintained, cleaned, and
changing our air filters regu-
larly can save one-third on our
electric bills. I was surprised
about that.
Cleaning refrigerator coils
regularly saves, too. (Egadl
When was the last time I did
that?l)


Gregg Stanton, founder and
25 year director of the Florida
State University Academic Dive
Program, will share some of his
recent experiences cataloging
crustaceans from the underwa-
ter caves of the Bahamas.
For more information, call
John Spicer at 926-4288 or 445-
4062.


Call Attorney

Daren Shippy
for a free confidential initial consultation.

850-877-6555
O e 2 . 'SlJ i Pi i v. laeIoia


Jayden is one

Happy first birthday to Jayden
James Antonio Castineira on
Oct. 18. He is the son of John
and Jennifer Castineira of Craw-
fordville.
Maternal grandparents are
Gary and Joyce Ashburn of Craw-
fordville. Paternal grandparents
are Migdalia Castineira of Miami
and the lat Juan Castineira.
Maternal great-grandparents
are John and Norma Whiddon
and Shirley Ashburn, all of Craw-
fordville, and the late Herman
and Margaret Metcalf, formerly
of Panacea.


Recently, I was at a Rotary
meeting where septic tanks
were discussed, so I asked about
using garbage disposals. Do
they cause harm to the septic
system? I asked.
Apparently, it's not a good
idea to use the garbage disposal
a lot, was the answer. Compost-
ing is better, and good for the
flower beds, too.
Well, it seems easier for me
to shove garbage down the dis-
posal, but that's another habit
to change.
Habits are hard to break.
Most habits are born of com-
fort, ease of use and personal
preference. If we can learn to
change our comfort level and
personal preferences, and if
we are willing to go to a bit of
inconvenience, we can learn to
live more "green."
So, who in the family gets
control over that thermostat?


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aide Clifton


Hopefully you will consider
our shelter as an option when
thinking about a new pet at
Christmas time. We have many
nice dogs and cats that are
desperately looking for a new
home.
Sometimes it might be a
good idea to give a gift cer-
tificate so that the intended
recipient of a pet can pick out
the animal that will appeal to
him or her.
On occasion we adopt an
animal and after a few hours
the dog or cat will be returned
with the remark that their dogs
did not like the new puppy or
kitten. There is no way that
one can make that judgment
in a day.
A new dog or cat needs to
be introduced very carefully
and slowly. Of course the old


Christmas festival
seeks participants

Chiefland's Christmas and
Winter Festival of 2007 is shap-
ing up, to take place on Dec. 1.
The activities will occur in
downtown Chiefland, primarily
around the train depot at the
Trailhead Park on Highway 19
South. The festival will begin
at 9 a.m. with arts and crafts,
food, music and song, and chil-
dren's games. The lighted parade
themed "A Season for Giving"
marches at 6 p.m., followed
by the evening celebrations to
include the lighting ceremony,
caroling, and visits with Santa.
Vendors, artists, fundraisers,
entertainers, and volunteers are
needed. For more information,
call the Greater Chiefland Area
Chamber of Commerce at.(352)
493-1849.


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Wakulla dive club being formed


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I


ort to pets
gang will not welcome the new-
comer right away. A new animal
means competition for love and
food. I have been bringing new
animals home for many years
and it always worked out in the
long run.
It is smart to crate a new
dog for a while and put it in an
area where the other animals
can see and smell it but cannot
hurt it. After a period of time,
most animals will come around
and get used to the new family
member.
Please, remember to bring
your animal to the "Animal
Health Services" on Nov. 3. They
will be at the Wakulla Animal
SShelter for one hour only, 11
a.m. to noon.
Shots will be available at af-
fordable rates. Animal Health
Services will be at the shelter
for the public on the first Sat-
urday of each month. For more
information, call the shelter at
926-0891.

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Page 10A - THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007


Outdoors
doors


Strong winds, low tides keep fishermen off th


There's not a lot to report
this week because of strong
winds and extremely low tides.
Some folks went offshore last
week, but needless to say, no-
body ventured off on Saturday
or Sunday.
Mike Hopkins at Lanark Vil-
lage said some folks got out
and fished but had to wait for
the water to come in before
finding any water to fish in.
Trout fishing continues to be
good around Lanark Reef and
on Turkey Point Shoals. Red
fishing can't get any better and
live shrimp, the Gulp and gold
spoons are all producing. La-
riark Reef is the main spot, but
around the docks when the tide
is in. Lots of sheepshead are be-
ing caught using shrimp on the
bottom around pilings and the


From The Dock
BY CAPT, JODY CAMPBELL


sunken barge off the reef. Those
people who did manage to get
offshore last week caught plenty
of grouper. Kings and cobia are
also being caught. Most folks
are fishing in 30 to 65 feet of
water.
Scott at Jerry's Bait and Tack-
le said quite a few people fished
from shore at the Lighthouse
over the weekend and had
very good success. Mike Coady
fished from shore and caught


five nice flounder and two trout
using live shrimp. Niguel Mar-
tinez fished from shore at the
Lighthouse and caught two nice
trout using the Berkley Gulp.
Jordan Hults didn't have to go
out very far to catch the biggest
trout he has ever caught. In fact,
he was also fishing from shore
at the Lighthouse and caught
a four pound trout. Bob O'Lary
and Flora Bennett weren't far
from the Lighthouse when they


caught their two limits of trout
using live shrimp. They were
fishing the bars at the mouth
of East River.
Capt. Luke Frazier said one
of his customers caught a few
trout in the white trout hole off
the Panacea channel and then
moved in toward the south end
of Piney and caught some nice
trout and Spanish. Luke said
fishing in Purify Bay is very good
now for trout and reds and one
customer did extremely well us-
ing the Terror Eyes around the
oyster bars. Luke said there are
plenty of reds in the Ochlock-
onee up as far at the state park
and I talked to a young lady this
morning who said she and her
husband caught 12 reds using
top water plugs along the grass
in the Ochlockonee. They were


fishing late Saturday when the
tide started falling out.
First let me thank Capt. Jerry
Alexander for the use of his boat
on Thursday and Dr. Phil Sharp
for the use of his boat on Friday
and Saturday. It felt funny fish-
ing from a different boat even
though Jerry got his Sea Pro
from me after I fished in it for
two years. Thursday's tides were
fairly low, but Friday and Satur-
day were extremely low. In fact,
on Saturday it was 3 p.m. before
enough water came in for us to
leave where we were fishing.
One of the people on the boat
started eating his sandwich and
I told him he might want to save
some of it because if the tide
didn't come in, he may want to
have it for breakfast.
Jerry and I fished with the


e water

Kevin Walsh party from Macon,
Ga. and caught a lot of fish.
Jerry's group got their limit of
reds and some trout and were
very happy. We got our limit of
reds and probably caught an-
other 50, of which 40 of those
were more than 20 inches. We
also caught about 60 trout and
kept 11. Because of the strong
winds and extremely low tides,,
I called them on Wednesday to
see if they wanted to cancel the
trip. Fortunately they wanted to'
come fishing.
The weather definitely hasn't
cooperated, but the fish are
there. It's just being able to go
and get to them. Remember to
leave that float plan with some-
one out there and be careful.
Good luck and good fishing


Pet vulture teaches lessons in bite and power of their feet


Nora and Don Dretline, who
back in the 1970s lived on
Sanibel Island, had a 'pet' Black
culture. It was, perhaps, a year
old when I first saw it and was
extremely gentle and clean.
They fed it chunks of chopped
beef, pork, and you name it, as
lbng as it was of animal nature.
Since vultures do not have the
long sharp talons that most
lirds of prey have for capturing
and killing their prey, the bird
could perch on your bare arm
without sending you "up the
iall" with pain
SActually, up cose a vultures
talons are about the same basic
shape as a big rooster's, not too
long, and dull and round at the
tip. These birds do have very
strong feet just like other birds
of prey, just not the super sharp
talons. It takes strength to rip a
recently deceased critter apart,
so their legs and feet have to
be strongly
The same with their neck and


BY GEORGE WEYMOUTH


biting ability. Though "Buzz," as
the Dretlines had named this
bird, had a gentle nibble, in
the real world its bite would
be awesome. Buzz would, if you
made a fist, gently nibble in the
pocket of your curled fingers. It
was fascinated by any holes in
your body, ears, mouth, etc. be-
cause in the wild if an animal is
dying from say a wound where
its flesh is turning gangrene,
vultures will often not wait
for the unfortunate creature to
expire. Instead, they'll get doser
and closer to the dying, and one
will get the nerve and reach way


Visitors outnumber
IThe. Monarch Butterflies
Were outnumbered seven-to
One by visitors to the St. Marks
National Wildlife Refuge Satur-
day, Oct. 27 at the 19th annual
Monarch Butterfly Festival.
But the visitors did not seem
to mind the lack of butterflies.
Refuge Ranger Robin Will said
the weather has not been cold
enough to bring as many butter-
flies down to St. Marks on the
inigration to warmer climates.
"They must be stuck some place
in North Carolina," she joked.
"We've had so much strange
weather."
SThe event has grown into
bne of the most popular events
offered by the refuge. The 2007
festival drew 3,500 people and
outdrew the record turnout
from 2006.
SButterfly tagging efforts have areas. Four open wagon tours
be ongoing and will continue were also operated. The tours
until around the Thanksgiving have been immensely popular
holiday. Approximately 500 but- with refuge guests who paid
terflies were observed by the $5 per vehicle just to get into
visitors last week. the refuge.
' Visitors were thrilled to Will said the festival may not
watch as butterflies were tagged get much larger because the ref-
and released. Eight van tours uge is running out of places for
were conducted to show visitors visitors to park. "It was a crazy
butterflies in the less traveled day," said Will. The number of


Obituaries
SContinued from Page 4A
William L. Lescoe, Jr.
William Loche Lescoe, Jr., 70,
pf Smith Creek died Monday,
pct. 29 in Smith Creek.
SThe funeral service will be
Sheld at 11 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 1
at Smith Creek Cemetery. Family
,will receive friends from 6 p.m.
until 8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 31
Ay Harvey-Young Funeral Home.
Memorial contributions may
be made to Medart Assembly
,bf God Church Building Fund,
P.O. Box 190, Crawfordville, FL
32326.
He met and married Barbara
Langston Lescoe 40 years ago.
tAfter living in Leon County for
50 years, they returned to Smith
Creek. He was of the Catholic
faith and a member of Jackson
Bluff Community Church at
Bloxham. A native of Detroit,
Mvich., he received his education
in the Oakland County School
iSystem and university.
He retired from Olin Corpora-.
:tion in St. Marks and served as
-the financial treasurer for the


United Steel Workers Union for
many years in St. Marks. He also
retired from Tallahassee Memo-
rial Regional Hospital. He was a
member of the Moose Lodge #
1149 in Holly, Mich., was former
youth director of many churches
in the Tallahassee area and
served in many other capacities
in the churches.
He served as a volunteer
firefighter for Leon and Wakulla
counties, a volunteer for the
Leon County Sheriff's Office
and was a member of the Wood-
men of the World and Florida
Farm Bureau.
Survivors include his wife,
Barbara Langston Lescoe of
Smith Creek; a son, John Loche
Lescoe of Smith Creek; a daugh-
ter-in-law, Eva Sanchez Thorpe
of Smith Creek; a sister, Sue
Ann Marietta and husband
Dave of Puerto, Colo.; a sister-
in-law, Laura Lescoe of Warren,
Mich.; three area grandchildren,
Adam Sanchez III, Barbara Ivana
Monica Thorpe and Michelle
Loche Lecoe, all of Smith Creek;
his mother-in-law, Mary Ola
Langston of Smith Creek; a
brother-in-law, Gerald Langston


out to peck their potential meal,
immediately jumping back. If
the victim doesn't respond,
these bare-headed birds will
overwhelm it, dead or alive, and
proceed to start opening it up at
the eyes, nostrils, anus, etc., or
where a wound exists. It would
be a horrible way to meet your
maker, but in nature with the
dying or sick, that's the way the
dice often rolls.
Vultures do prefer fresh meat
if they can get it, like a freshly
smashed bullfrog or snake or
as we've all seen, possums and
deer on our highways. If the


skin is tough, they may hang
around a carcass for weeks,
as we the staff of Tates Hell
State Forest recently witnessed
when somebody dumped a Bull
Snake in one of our ditches.
Finally, they'll abandon it when
the tough-skinned critter has
turned to mush. Yuckl
Getting back to their bite,
years ago, while working in a
private zoo just north of Naples
called the Everglades Wonder
Gardens (still in operation),
my boss Lester Piper asked me
to get some lineman's electri-
cal gloves and capture a King
Vulture from one of our pens
to pose with the bird for a
photographer doing a story on
the Wonder Gardens. We had
about six to eight of the rather
attractive South and Central
American Vultures. They were
black with white plumage and
a reddish head. (In John James
Audubon's day, while exploring
South Florida, he actually saw


and collected this species, so
they used to range into Florida,
but no longer). I stepped into
the pen and finally got one
of the birds about the, size of
our species, and was in for a
surprise.
Despite having on extra
thick gloves, when my captive
decided to defend itself by peck-
ing me, I did all but yell from
the pain. I could not believe the
strength in their bitel It was like
someone clamping down on
my hand with a pair of channel
lock pliers!
When researching these
birds, biologists have another
unpleasantry to deal with. If
the bird has just eaten and is
pursued, they'll often vomit
their meal as their being dosed
in on. In nature, for them giv-
ing up their meal to another
aggressive scavenger would be
better than being killed or eaten
themselves.
As mentioned in my first;


butterflies at St. Marks fest
addition, the turnout was out-
standing despite being held
.. .. on Homecoming weekend at
Florida State University.
. , The St. Marks Refuge Photo
Club provided a popular family
photo opportunity and many of
the visitors visited their booth.
There were live butterflies, peo-
. ple tagging, arts and crafts, food
vendors and discussion about
*O . the colorful flying visitors.
Will said the refuge was
pleased to be able to partner
--"s with Wakulla County busi-
nesses to provide an "eco-
event" that supported the local
economy. "This was the peak
week," Will concluded of the
migration. Photo by Lou Kel-
lenberger.


Visitors check out the butterfly-related crafts
the festival in the photo above. A Monarch is
(digital) film at left.


guests purchasing butterfly re-
lated merchandise at the refuge
visitor center store caused lines
to back up in the facility. The
many dedicated volunteers ran
out of energy before the visitors


and wife Sue; and a host of ex-
tended family and friends.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville is in charge of
the arrangements.

Charles A. Metcalf

Charles A. "Harrison" Met-
calf, 65, of Crawfordville died
Sunday, Oct. 28 in Hagerman,
N.M.
A memorial service will be
held at 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov.
3 at Shady Sea Baptist Church
in Spring Creek. Memorial con-
tributions may be made to a
favorite charity.
A native of Tallahassee, he
was born on Sept. 19, 1942.
He loved fishing and being
involved in politics. He was a
volunteer with the Boy Scouts
of America.
Survivors include his wife,
Yvonne P. Metcalf of Craw-
fordville; two stepdaughters;
four children, Charles Edward
Metcalf of Overton, Texas, Jack
Metcalf of Roswell, N.M., Bonnie
Morris of Artesia, N.M. and May
Helen White of Hagerman, N.M.;
his father, Charles A. Metcalf


available at
captured on


ran out of a desire to see the
butterflies, said Will.
Hotel rooms were hard to
find as the festival brought visi-
tors from outside the Wakulla
and Leon County region. In


of Crawfordville; a sister, Helen
Smith of Quincy; a brother, Jeff
Metcalf of Crawfordville; eight
grandchildren; one great-grand-
child; and numerous nieces and
nephews.


926-3425
926-3655


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two Wakulla Wildlife articles
on Vultures, we've got two spe-
cies here in the Big Bend (and
the U.S., too), the Black and the
Turkey Vultures. The Black has
a shorter tail and wings, which
while flying and viewed from
below have somewhat whiteish
tips to them. The underside
of the primaries are lighter.
The head of the Black while
in flight barely protrudes past
the leading edge of the wings.
While flying low just over the
trees they'll flap about three
times then glide for a hundred
feet or so to stay in flight. If
there are no updrafts they've
got to flapl
. The Turkey Vulture starts
out with a grayish head as a
fledgling but as an adult their
head is always red, and like all
vultures, naked. Naked so as to
reach in a carcass and get the
goodies out without matting up
their feathers with yuck; blood,
and more.

Bear seen



Gardens area

Deer, possum and raccoons
are not the only animals on
the move in Crawfordville this
month,
A large black bear was spotted
wandering around between the
Mysterious Waters and Wakulla
Gardens subdivisions last week,
north and south of Lower Bridge
Road.
The bear was also observed
a second time in the Wakulla
Gardens subdivision.
Residents are reminded not
to leave pet food outside so that
bears are offered less temptation
to visit.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007 - Page 11A


Th U Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open
Te 5pearicr5r 224-4960
Crawfordville Branch Ji tS S it Ure- www.fsucu.org
NOW OPEN J


Coast

Guard

Auxiliary

Reports

By Sherrie Alverson


This past weekend was a busy
one for Auxiliarists from all eight
flotillas in Division 1: Flotilla 12
at St Marks;
13 at Shell
Point; 14 at cl
Fort Walton;
5 at Apal-
hicola; 16 at
anama City;
7 at Pensac-
'la; 19 at Panama City Beach; and
-10 at Sneads. The local Flotilla
9 hosted the three day Fall Divi-
ion Meeting.
Carolyn Brown Treadon of
flotilla 12 is the Division's
secretaryy and she provided de-
ails for the column.
"On Friday several mem-
)ers of Flotilla 12 drove over
:o Panama City Beach for the
:nock Search and Rescue (SAR)
exercise scheduled by Flotilla
19 in conjunction with Coast
Guard Station Panama City and
Sector Mobile. Rich Rasmussen.
Mark Rosen, Gloria Sammons,
Carolyn Brown Treadon and
Duane Treadon all participated
in various ways."
"Let me paint you a picture. A
group of people are out fishing
for an afternoon (staged by an
auxiliary boat and crew) when
another boater in a john boat
rams into the side of their boat.
The driver of the john boat is
thrown into the water and is
unconscious (okay, maybe he fell
on purpose and was in a wet suit
and life jacket for protection).
On board the fishing boat
one person is thrown down
and has a broken leg, another is
cut severely on the arm because
he was cutting bait when hit. A
third person is banged up, but
not seriously injured. The boat
has a simulated large hole in the
side and is taking on water faster
than they can bail out.
The skipper of the fishing
boat calls for Coast Guard as-
sistance. Members from Station
Panama City arrive at the scene
of the accident in a 41-foot fully
crewed utility boat and begin
providing assistance for the
injured boaters. They tended to
the injuries and call in an HH-65
Dolphin helicopter from Sector
Mobile to remove the injured
john boat operator.
Two auxiliary boats were
called to assist in returning the
damaged boats to the marina.
The training involved .a rescue
swimmer being lowered to the
deck of the Coast Guard boat
to lift the unconscious boater
to the helicopter. All in all the
training took about an hour and
a half and was a great learning
experience for both the auxiliary
and active duty. It was a great
opportunity for members in our
area since we do not have an
active duty station close by to
train alongside.
SSaturday was filled with train-
ing throughout the day. Mark
Rosen presented a member train-
ing and .crew qualification pro-
gram. Other training included
new member recruitment and
retention. Tim Ashley, David
Guttman and Bob Surdakowski
attended these sessions from
Llotilla 12. The afternoon was
again active training as we had
the opportunity to demonstrate
bur proficiencies in operating a
de-watering pump, heaving line,
knot tying (marlinspike) and
tossing a ring buoy. These are
all activities that are part of the
SAREX competition held annu-


Date High Low High Low High
Thu 3.3 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.5 ft.
Nov 1, 07 5:00 AM 1:36 PM 8:28 PM
Fri 2.0 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.6 ft.
Nov 2, 07 12:41 AM 6:37 AM 2:55 PM 9:33 PM
Sat 1.8 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.8 ft.
Nov 3, 07 2:39 AM 9:05 AM 4:01 PM 10:18 PM
Sun 1.4 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.0 ft.
Nov 4, 07 4:07 AM 10:35 AM 4:50 PM 10:53 PM
Mon 0.9 ft. 3.1 ft. 1.3 ft. 3.2 ft.
Nov 5, 07 5:04 AM 11:33 AM 5:28 PM 11:23 PM
Tue 0.4 ft. 3.2 ft. 1.4 ft. 3.4 ft.
Nov 6, 07 5:49 AM 12:17 PM 5:58 PM 11:51 PM
Wed 0.1 ft. 3.3 ft. 1.5 ft.
Nov 7, 07 6:27 AM 12:55 PM 6:25 PM


Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay
Date High Low High Low High
Thu 2.5 ft. 0.4 ft. 1.9 ft.
Nov 1, 07 4:52 AM 1:47 PM 8:20 PM
Fri 1.5 ft. 2.2 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.0ft.
Nov 2, 07 12:52 AM 6:29 AM 3:06 PM 9:25 PM
Sat 1.3 ft. 2.1 ft. 0.7 ft. 2.1 ft.
Nov 3; 07 2:50 AM 8:57 AM 4:12 PM 10:10 PM
Sun 1.0 ft. 2.2 ft. 0.8 ft. 2.3 ft.
Nov 4, 07 4:18 AM 10:27 AM 5:01 PM 10:45 PM
Mon 0.6 ft. 2.3 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.4 ft.
Nov 5, 07 5:15 AM 11:25 AM 5:39 PM 11:16 PM
Tue 0.3 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.5 ft.
Nov 6, 07 6:00 AM 12:09 PM 6:09 PM 11:43 PM
Wed 0.1 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.1 ft.
Nov 7, 07 6:38 AM 12:47 PM 6:36 PM


Major
Activity
Minor
Activity


Thursday
6:05 am
6:30 pm
-:- am
12:15 pm


Friday
6:50 am
7:15pm
12:45 am
1:00 pm


Saturday
7:30 am
7:55 pm
1:30 am
1:45 pm


Sunday
7:10am
7:30 pm
2:00 am
1:25 pm


Date High Low High Low High
Thu 1.9 ft. 3.1 ft. 0.5 ft. 2.3 ft.
Nov 1, 07 12:14 AM 5:36 AM 2:40 PM 9:04 PM
Fri 1.9 ft. 2.7 ft. 0.8 ft. 2.4 ft.
Nov 2, 07 1:45 AM 7:13 AM 3:59 PM 10:09 PM
Sat 1.6 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.6 ft.
Nov 3, 07 3:43 AM 9:41 AM 5:05 PM 10:54 PM
Sun 1.2 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.1 ft. 2.8 ft.
Nov 4, 07 5:11 AM 11:11 AM 5:54 PM 11:29 PM
Mon 0.8 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.0 ft.
Nov 5, 07 6:08 AM 12:09 PM 6:32 PM 11:59 PM
Tue 0.4 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.3 ft.
Nov 6, 07 _ 6:53 AM 12:53 PM 7:02 PM
Wed 3.1 ft. 0.1 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.3 ft.
Nov 7, 07 12:27 AM 7:31 AM 1:31 PM 7:29 PM

St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.
Date High Low High Low High
Thu 2.6 ft. 0.6 ft, 2.0 ft.
Nov 1, 07 4:44 AM 1:15 PM 8:12 PM
Fri 2.0 ft. 2.3 ft. 0.8 ft. 2.1 ft.
Nov 2, 07 12:20 AM 6:21 AM 2:34 PM 9:17 PM
Sat 1.8 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.2 ft.
Nov 3, 07 2:18 AM 8:49 AM 3:40 PM 10:02 PM
Sun 1.3 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.1 ft. 2.4 ft.
Nov 4, 07 3:46 AM 10:19 AM 4:29 PM 10:37 PM
Mon 0.9 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.5 ft.
Nov 5, 07 4:43 AM 11:17 AM 5:07 PM 11:08 PM
Tue 0.4 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.6 ft.
Nov 6, 07 5:28 AM 12:01 PM 5:37 PM 11:35 PM
Wed 0.1 ft. 2.6 ft. 1.4 ft.
Nov 7, 07 6:06 AM 12:39 PM 6:04 PM


Monday
7:50 am
8:10pm
1:50 am
2:00 pm


Boating Emergencies
-j i


Coast Guard Station
Panama City ........................ ..................... 1 (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown ............................................... 1 (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................ 1 (850) 906-0540
or ......................................................... 893-5137
Shell Point (Flotilla 13) ...................................... 1 (850) 926-2606
or ................................................................................... 926-5654


Mark Rosen and Rich Rasmussen


Gloria Sammons


ally where auxiliarists compete
in several areas.
During the Saturday night
banquet, Ron and Angret Pi-
asecki of Flotilla 13 received
Five Year Membership Service
Awards.
Sunday morning was the
board meeting. Ron Piasecki


represented Flotilla 13 as their
commander and Tim Ashley,
David Guttman, Rich Rasmussen,
Mark Rosen, Bob Surdakowski,
Carolyn Brown Treadon and
Duane Treadon attended from
Flotilla 12.
Steve Chammoun, Garland
Pendergraph and Ed Zapata


I* GAS *-DIESEL GROERIES * .I


All Types of FEED
OurBrandls Southern States FEED

/Chickens /Goates
/Hogs /Cows
/Dogs /Cats, Etc.


SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL BUSINESSES
STORE HOURS 6 A.M. - 8 P.M. * 7 DAYS A WEEK

PETTY
BPCNVAAL TR BP
1 11 o t.C i oc le-91 -13


Sunrise
Sunset
Moon rise
Moon set
Brightness


represented Flotilla 1-10. We had
the honor of also having Chief
Warrant Officer Ashley Gordon
from DIRAUX, Captain Edwin
Stanton from Sector Mobile and
our District Commodore Bill
Crouch attending.
* Flotilla 12 will be holding
our November meeting Saturday
Nov. 3 at the St. Marks Volunteer
Fire Department beginning at
6 p.m. Fellowship will begin at
5:30 p.m.

REMEMBER SAFE BOATING
IS NO ACCIDENT



Electric utility

offers web tool

to find outages

A new self-service tool that
allows customers to search
for information about power
outages is now available on
Progress Energy's external web
site at www.progress-energy.
com/outagemap.
Progress Energy Florida is the
first investor-owned utility in the
state to institute the progressive
tool on a daily basis.
The Progress Energy outage
map tool provides real-time re-
ports on power outages, includ-
ing both planned maintenance
outages and unplanned outages
caused by storms, traffic acci-
dents or equipment failure.
It is available seven days a
week, 24 hours a day.
The online maps provide out-
age information down to city
and town detail. They include
information such as the num-
ber of customers affected, the
time the outage occurred and
an, estimated time power will
be restored.
To protect customer privacy
and security, the outage map
tool does not display outage
views to a specific address.


Leave othimn But
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ATTORNEYS
Al Penson * Mary Ellen Davis
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17 High Drive, Suite C * Courthouse Square * Crawfordville
The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisement.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience.


For tides at the following points
add to Dog Island Listings: Carrabelle
Apalachicola


High Tide
28 Min.
1 Hr., 53 Min.


Cat Point 1 Hi
Lower Anchorage 1 Hr
, . .West Pass 1 Hi

.-- * Shell Point, Spring Creek


r., 13 Min.
r., 36 Min.
r., 26 Min.


Date High Low High Low High
Thu 3.4 ft. 0.7 ft. 2.6 ft.
Nov 1, 07 4:57 AM 1:33 PM 8:25 PM
Fri 2.2 ". 3.0 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.7 ft.
Nov 2, 07 12:38 AM 6:34 AM- 2:52 PM 9:30 PM
Sat 2.0 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.1 ft. 2.9 ft.
Nov 3, 07 2:36 AM 9:02 AM 3:58 PM 10:15 PM
Sun 1.5 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.3 ft. 3.1 ft.
Nov 4, 07 4:04 AM 10:32 AM 4:47 PM 10:50 PM
Mon 1.0 ft. 3.1 ft. 1.4 ft. 3.3 ft.
Nov 5, 07 5:01 AM 11:30 AM 5:25 PM 11:20 PM
Tue 0.5 ft. 3.3 ft. 1.5 ft. 3.4 ft.
Nov 6, 07 5:46 AM 12:14 PM 5:55 PM 11:48 PM
Wed 0.1 ft. 3.3 ft. 1.6 ft.
Nov 7, 07 6:24 AM 12:52 PM 6:22 PM

Dog Island West End
Date High Low High Low High
Thu 2.9 ft. 0.2 ft. 2.4 ft.
Nov 1, 07 4:29 AM 1:13 PM 9:41 PM
Fri 1.8 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.4 ft. 2.4 ft.
Nov 2, 07 12:50 AM 5:57 AM 2:16 PM 10:03 PM
Sat 1.5 ft. 2.4 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.5 ft.
Nov 3, 07 2:28 AM 7:53 AM 3:11 PM 10:22 PM
Sun 1.1 ft. 2.3 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.5 ft.
Nov 4, 07 3:38 AM 9:55 AM 3:56 PM 10:38 PM
Mon 0.8 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.1 ft. 2.6 ft.
Nov 5, 07 4:33 AM 11:31 AM 4:35 PM 10:52 PM
Tue 0.4 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.7 ft.
Nov 6, 07 5:19 AM 12:45 PM 5:08 PM 11:05 PM
Wed 0.2 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.8 ft.
Nov 7, 07 5:59 AM 1:47 PM 5:37 PM 11:19 PM


- I


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{i Gulf Coast Weekly Almanac
Tide charts by November 1 - November 7
Zihua Software, LLC

St. Marks River Entrance City of St. Marks


Tuesday Wednesday
8:25 am 9:00 am
8:45 pm 9:20 pm
2:25 am 3:00 am
2:40pm 3:15pm.


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Thesday Wednesday
6:50 am 6:51 am 6:52 am 6:53 am 6:54 am 6:54 am 6:55 am
5:50 pm 5:49 pm 5:48 pm 5:47 pm 5:47 pm 5:46 pm 5:45 pm
- 12:14 am 1:14 am 2:11 am 3:06 am 3:59 am 4:53 am
1:27pm 2:02pm 2:32pm 3:00pm 3:26pm 3:52pm 4:19pm
54% 47% 41% 35% 28% 22% 16%


clt ;o ~


Rrl


Low Tide
25 Min.
2 Hrs., 38 Min.
2 Hrs., 31 Min.
2 Hrs., 3 Min.
2 Hrs., 39 Min.






First
Nov. 17



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Full
Nov. 24





Last
Nov. 1


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Page 12A - THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007


EMS director

inspects new

ambulance

Wakulla County EMS Director Fran Councill
was in Madison, Ala. recently inspecting the new-
est member of the county ambulance fleet.
A second new vehicle and an old truck, that
will be used as a back-up, bring the total number
of ambulances in the county to seven. Originally,
the second new ambulance was going to be a


Sheriff's Report


SThe Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office and the state Fire Marshal
are investigating a structure fire
reported Saturday, Oct. 27 at 1:45
p.m. at NAPA Auto Parts store in
Crawfordville, according to Sher-
iff David Harvey.
Firefighters and two Florida
State Troopers responded to
the scene and observed smoke
emitting from the rear top of the
building. NAPA employee Chris
Wilson reported smelling an
odor of wiring burning during
the day, but no fire was observed
and workers continued with their
work. Later, nore smoke was
observed in a workshop and the
building was evacuated.
The Fire Marshal arrived on
the scene and determined that
the fire was not suspicious in
nature and was caused by an
electrical malfunction with a
hydraulic hose cutter.
Officials have not determined
an exact damage estimate, but
the NAPA portion of the Ace
Hardware complex was destroyed
by fire, according to Lt. C.L. Mor-
rison and Deputy Evelyn Harris
who investigated.

In otheractivity reported by
the Wakulla County Sheriff's Of-
fice during the past week:
* On Oct. 24, Faye A. Brain-
ard of Crawfordville reported a
grand theft and burglary at her
home. A juvenile observed a
forced entry at the home and
called law enforcement from a
neighbor's home. The victim re-
ported the theft of $1,222 worth
of electronics including a plasma
television. Damage to the home
was estimated at $300. Deputy
Pam Veltkamp, Deputy Lindsay
Allen, Crime Scene Investiga-
tors Richele Brooks and Melissa
Harris and Detective Brad Taylor
investigated.
* On Oct 23, Gary L. Regis-
ter of Crawfordville reported a
grand theft from a storage unit.
Several pieces of furniture, three
sewing machines, three printers
and a copy machine, valued at
$1,450, were stolen. The case
was turned over to the criminal
investigations unit. Deputy Casey
Whitlock investigated.
* On Oct. 24, Autumn N. Per-
kins of Panacea reported an arson
as a wooded area was discovered
burning near Rock Landing Road.
A gas can was discovered in the
center of the flames. Panacea
Volunteer Firefighters put out


the blaze. The fire occurred on
property housing a music studio
owned by Michael L Jett of Pana-
cea. Lt. C.L. Morrison andDeputy
Roger Rankin investigated.
* On Oct. 24, Patricia A. G.
Wagoner of Crawfordville re-
ported a grand theft at her home.
A large sum of money was taken
from the victim's home. A suspect
has been identified. Deputy Matt
Helms investigated.
* On Oct. 23, Larry W. Ru-
dolph of Crawfordville reported
the theft of a debit card. Law
enforcement officials discovered
that the card had been used at
a local bar. A suspect has been
identified. Charges at the bar to-
taled $136. Deputy James Plouffe.
investigated.
* On Oct.25, Robert C. Camp
of Tallahassee was the victim
of a theft of his boat that was
recovered in Sopchoppy north
of Curtis Mill Road. The boat had
been stored in Franklin County at
a St. Teresa vacation home, but
had not been reported stolen at
the time Detective Jason Newlin
and Deputy Mike Crum investi-
gated. The information was also
passed along to the Franklin
County Sheriff's Office.
* On Oct. 25, Elysabeth M.
Love of Crawfordville reported
the theft of a bicycle from her
home. The bike was valued at
$100. Deputy Casey Whitlock
investigated.
* On Oct. 26, Sgt. Danny Har-
rell, Deputy Matt Helms, Deputy
Jason Brooks and Lt. Sherrell
Morrison made an arrest while
investigated a wanted person at a
Crawfordville residence. Cocaine
was discovered in a vehicle on
the property. The vehicle had
been occupied by two females.
A second bag of cocaine was re-
covered in the vehicle during the
investigation and Jennifer Carroll,
27, of Tallahassee was charged
with possession of cocaine. The
total weight of the cocaine was
11.2 grams.
* On Oct. 27, a clerk at the Dol-
lar General in Panacea reported
two women allegedly shoplifting
property from the store. A suspect
allegedly removed shoes from
the store without paying, put
them in her vehicle, and returned
to the store. A relative of the first
suspect was also charged with
retail theft. Karen Sue Hall, 42, of
Panacea and Joanne Murphy, 62,
of Panacea were issued notices to
appear in court. The stolen prop-


reconditioned vehicle.
Council said her goal was to have two ambu-
lances at each of the three EMS stations located
in Crawfordville, Medart and Wakulla Station.
"I am very appreciative that the county com-
missioners were able to see the need for the ad-
ditional vehicle and provided the means to fund
it," she said. "Kudos to the commissioners."
The EMS unit is in the process of licensing
and stocking the new ambulance. It was manu-
factured by Excellance of Madison, Ala.
The older truck can be rotated from station to
station when the newer trucks are out for main-
tenance. Three ambulances are in use in the fleet
at any given time, Councill concluded.


erty was valued at $53. Deputy
Ward Kromer investigated.
S- On Oct. 27, Karen D. Bing-
ham of Crawfordville reported
a vehicle fire. Firefighters were
attempting to put out the fire
when Lt. Ray Johnson arrived on
the scene. The fire was caused
by a hose that had come loose
from the radiator. Damage was
estimated at $4,000.
* On Oct. 27, U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Officer Joey Lord inves-
tigated a grass fire with Lt. C.L.
Morrison. Sopchoppy Volunteer
Fire Department firefighters put
out a trash blaze near. Skipper
Temple Church in the Sopdhoppy
area. The cause of the fire has
not been determined. There was
no monetary loss as a result of
the fire.
* On Oct. 28, Joshua Randall
Stalker, 23, of Crawfordville was
charged with disorderly conduct
at the Skybox Lounge. Stalker had
allegedly attempted to remove a
Florida flag from the establish-
ment. Deputy Andree Brown
attempted to separate the parties
and investigate when Stalker al-
legedly became belligerent The
suspect continued to curse the
law enforcement officials as he
was being taken to the county
jail.
The Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office received 850 calls for ser-
vice during the past week.

Note to our readers: The peo-
ple who are reported as charged
with crimes in this column have
not yet been to trial and are
therefore innocent until proven
guilty.


Fire Rescue
Report
This past week, Wakulla
County Fire Rescue and volun-
teer fire departments responded
to one structure fire, two fire
alarms, one brush fire, six mis-
cellaneous fires, four vehicle
accidents and 16 first responder
medical emergency incidents
Saturday, at about 1 p.m.,
the Wakulla Fire Rescue Service
and Crawfordville VFRD were
dispatched to a reported fire
at Ace Hardware. On arrival,
firefighters observed smoke
but initially had trouble locat-
ing the fire. The seat of fire
was finally located at the rear
of the building in the machine
shop. Firefighters conducted an
interior attack and extinguished
the fire. The.hardware section of
the store suffered some smoke
damage. Because of the size of
the building, the incident com-
mander called for assistance
and firefighters responded from
Riversink, Wakulla Station, Med-
art, Apalachee Bay and Panacea.
The State Fire Marshall's office
was contacted to determine
the cause of the fire. It appears
the fire might have started in
the vicinity of a hydraulic hose
machine.
While working the fire at
Ace Hardware, the Crawfordville
Department was dispatched to a
fully involved car fire at Fulton
Harvey and Cynthia streets. Two
fire trucks and personnel were
able to leave the Ace fire and
respond to the car fire.

Time to change smoke
alarm batteries
Daylight Saving Time chang-
es Sunday, Nov. 4. Why is that
important information for this
Fire Rescue Report? Because a
good and potentially lifesav-
ing rule-of- thumb is to replace
smoke alarm batteries with new
ones when time changes in the
fall andspring of each year.
Smoke alarms are, indisput-
ably, a family's first line of
defense against fire related
tragedy. It is crucially important
for the welfare of your family to
have smoke alarms on all levels
of your home and preferably
in each bedroom and insure
that the alarms remain in good
working order... .. .
:.!Yo.u smoke alarms ,should
be regul~Ay cleaned of dust ac-
cumulation, checked monthly
for working order and, as stated
above, have their batteries re-
placed at least twice a year. So,
when you reset your home's
clocks, please replace your
smoke alarm batteries.
If you need assistance chang-
ing alarm batteries or cannot
afford to purchase batteries or
smoke alarms, please contact
your local fire department or
call 544-2205.


The following news release
was issued by the Florida Divi-
sion of Forestry:

California fires serve
to remind us
Presently, the fires in South-
ern California are being touted
as the worst in the state's
history. Overcrowded develop-
ments in the middle of wildland


areas are under continued peril
from raging wildfire powered by
strong Santa Ana winds sweep-
ing over drought laden land.
It wasn't that long ago that
Florida was experiencing ex-
treme drought and drying con-
ditions. Although recent rains
have brought some relief, water
table levels continue to show
sufficient deficits from last
year's levels. Tree and plant
growth show signs of moisture
deprivation.
The story being told today
is one of continued dryer than
normal conditions throughout


fall and into next summer.
Precipitation will continue to
be sporadic and unpredictable.
Cold fronts will bring more dry-
ing to our area.
Vigilance in maintaining
good wildfire prevention prac-
tices and.fire awareness is still
imperative at this time. Stay
aware and focused. If you must
burn, always call the Division
of Forestry to confirm status,
weather conditions and restric-
tions before you begin burning.
They can be reached at (850),
414-1871.


Correction
Due to incorrect information provided to The News in the Oct
25 issue, Koree Eglton was misidentified in the pumpkin patch
picture at Shadeville Elementary School. We regret the error.






SEscao, - Nature
Esca peo Nature
* .*: "*'; .1


NOTICE OF LAND USE
CHANGE
The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to adopt
the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings regarding
the following before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners
on Monday, December 03, 2007, beginning at 6:00 PM, and unless oth-
erwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held in the
County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse
at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are
invited to attend and present testimony.


1. Variant
Applicant:
Agent:
Proposal:
Tax ID Number:


:e Appl


Existing FLU Map:
Existing Zoning:
FEMA Flood Info:
Parcel Size:
Location:


ication: V07-18
Marsh Harbor Marina, Inc.
GPI Southeast, Inc.
wetland setback variance
00-00-121-000-11964-003 & 00-00-121-
156-11964-110
Urban 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6)
C-2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
"V20" zones on 0390-D
11.64 +/- acres
Marsh Harbor Marina, Harbour Point
Drive, Shell Point


Hearings Required: County Commission 12/03/2007 @ 6:00 PM


2 Site Plan Application:
Applicant: M;
Agent: GI
Proposal: Co
Tax ID Number: 00

Existing FLU Map: Ur
Existing Zoning: C-
FEMA Flood Info: "V
Parcel Size: 11
Location: Mi


SP07-14
harsh Harbor Marina, Inc.
PI Southeast, Inc.
instruct boat storage and parking area
-00-121-000-11964-003 & 00-00-121-
156-11964-110
ban 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6)
2 (Section 5-38, LDC)
'20" zones on 0390-D
.64 +/- acres
harsh Harbor Marina, Harbour Point
ive, Shell Point


Hearings Required: County Commission 12/03/2007 @ 6:00 PM
Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record files may be viewed at the County
Planning Department located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327,8 AM to 4:30 PM
M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure
a verbatim tanscript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons
needing special access considerations should call the Board Office at least 48 hours before the date for
scheduling purposes. The Board Office may be contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.


Habitat for Humanity
L "Re-Store"
Shadeville Highway
926-4 544
Open Tues. - Sat. * 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.


rime Sies


1-(888)-876-TIPS (850)-574-TIPS A

Paid for by the office of the Attomey General, rime Stoppers Trust und


FIRST READING

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING on ENACTING A NEW
CODE FOR THE CITY OF ST. MARKS
THE CITY OF ST. MARKS WILL HOLD A PUBLIC
HEARING
Date: November8 at 7:30
Location: 788 Port Leon Drive, St. Marks FL 32355

ORDINANCE 2007-01
An Ordinance Adopting And Enacting A New Code For The
City Of St. Marks; Providing For The Repeal Of Certain
Ordincances Not Included Therin; Proving A Penilty For The
Violation Therof; Proving For The Manner Of The Amending
Such Code; And Proving For An Effective Date.

The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F;
Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call
the City Office at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The
Board Office may be contacted at (850) 925-6224
---^^--^ ---- ----- ---- ----^ ---- ---- ---- k--i








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Novembser.1, 2007 - Page 13A


Lion
Continued from Page 1A

he will probably dress up as Santa Claus.
Gray said the lion has been stabilized at
the park so it won't fall over. There is little
threat of theft as it took a septic tank back-
hoe to move the lion across the highway
six weeks ago.
"We're hoping to leave it there, but I'n
not sure where it will end up," said Gray.
"The decision will be made in a couple of
months. I want to make sure Laura is okay


Golf tourney to :

Big Bend Hospic


On Friday, Nov. 2, Big Bend
Hospice will sponsor a golf tour-
nament at Wildwood Country
Club to raise money for patients
in Wakulla County. Four man
teams are $400, individual play-
ers are $125 with breakfast and
lunch being included. Registra-
tion will begin at 7:30 a.m. with
a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m.
"So many of our patients
have special needs or requests
that we would like to help with
but which are not a routine
part of hospice care. Items
like ramps, hot water heaters,
special dinners out, bringing
in out-of-town family for final
goodbyes are all things that
our patients have wished for.
Fundraisers such as this allow
us to grant special wishes and
provide extra care to those we

Obituaries
grandchildren; one great-
grandchild; and numerous nieces
and nephews.

Edward W. Sanders
Edward W. Sanders, 60, of
Fort Braden died Wednesday,
Oct. 24.
The funeral service was held
Saturday, Oct. 27, at Mount Zion
Pentecostal Holiness Church in
Hosford, with burial at Hosford
Cemetery.
He retired after 27 years in the
U.S. Army. His love in life was
family and the outdoors. He re-
tired from Florida State University
with 33 years of service.
He is survived by his wife of
17 years, Charlette Sanders of
Fort Braden;-a son, Kirk Sanders
kad wife Amanda of Smith Creek;
'vo daughters, Stacy Fletcher and
husband James of Fort Braden
and Arminda Ward and husband
Scott of Tallahassee; his mother-
in-law, Barbara Green of Fort
Braden; and five grandchildren,
Dustin, Hayley, Cody, Haidyn
and Jake.
Independent Funeral Home
in Quincy was in charge' of the
arrangements.

Oren T. Snow
Oren Theodore "Ted" Snow,
52, died Monday, Oct. 22 in
Panacea.
A memorial service was held
Monday, Oct. 29 at St. John's Epis-
copal Church, followed by a fam-
ily visitation. The family requests
no flowers. Donations may be
made to St. Francis Wildlife As-
sociation (850-386-6296).
A native of Tallahassee, he was
born August 4, 1955, the son of
Bud and Betty Snow, both now
deceased. Ted attended Rickards
High School and Tallahassee
Community College. He grew up
attending St. John's Episcopal
Church.
Survivors include two his sis-
ters, Rea Snow of Bonita Springs
and Martha Werner and Don of
Geneva, Ill.

Lamar E. Strickland
Lamar Eugene Strickland, 58,
of Morganton, N.C., died Tuesday,
Oct. 23 at Frye Regional Medical
Center.
A celebration of life service
was held Saturday, Oct. 27 at his
home. Memorial contributions
may be made to: Pediatric Brain
Tumor Foundation of the United
States, 302 Ridgefield Court,
Asheville, NC 28806.
Born on Jan. 16, 1949 in Colum-
bus, Ga., he was the son of the


serve" said
Team Man
Franklin C
Last yea
Sharlene
event for i
memory o
Smith. The
tournament
a special rc
so dying
families wo
in which to
The Big Be
Advisory
continue w
year. Come
cause and
nizers said
are still ava
For moi
register, c
878-5310.

Continue

late Mildrec
Strickland.
and had a
He was a r
Motorcyle
bies."
Survivor
ers, Jerry Si
see and Ke
wife Barba
a sister, Ka
Tallahassee
mother-in-la
ley Rhodes
Bass-Smi
Crematory
was in cha
ments.

Ann
Annette
died Satur
lahassee.
.1r- L�-


with the location. It was a huge gesture, the quesi
She knew that people loved it." from Me
Gentry never gave the lion a name as came to
nothing seemed to jump out as the ap- winched
propriate moniker. "I could never come store," sh
up with one," she said. "Nothing really hit After
me right." Following hurricane damage in 2 1/2 yea
2005, Gentry said she was feeling depressed the parki
when she saw the lion for sale at the To- She wan
mato Patch in Medart. loved the
"It raised my spirits and I said I gotta Gray s
have him" she said. "He just captured the continue
hearts of many people in Crawfordville." lion's att
Gentry knew it was love at first sight, but

benefitt Recycle
Continued om Page 1A
;e moved to Crawfordville to take
Regina ComptonRN advantage of everything the
ager for Wakulla and county has to offer.
iager for Wakulla and
counties. Many of the residents mov-
STi, t ing to the community hope to
r Tina Langston and bring some of the positive ser-
Posey hosted a golf
g Bend hospice in vices they had in their former
Big Bend Hospice in towns to Wakulla.
>f their father A. M.
"We moved from a small
money raised at that town of 1,500 residents in
t was used to furnish Southern Illinois in 2002," said
oom at Eden Springs Rick Parks. "We had to find and
patients and their start our trash service, similar
would have the privacy to here in Wakulla. Our small
o say their goodbyes service provider eventually
end Hospice Wakulla added a separate day to pick up
Council decided to recyclables."
ith a golf event this recyclables."
"Just before we moved, the
Splay golf for a good village voted to go out for bid
win great prizes, orga. for one trash service to service
. Hole sponsorships the whole community which

re information or to involved a recycling component
:all Laura Glenn at and similar one day for trash/
garbage and another separate
day for recyclables," added
Parks. "This was a cost savings
ed from Page 4A to residents and they began
charging this to the sewer/wa-
d Peacock and Wyley ter bills that were sent out. With
He was a truck driver the combination billing and
love for motorcycles. bid contract, our family saved
member of the Knob several dollars a month."
Chapter "The Knob- Parks and his fellow church
members have tossed around
s include two broth- recycling ideas themselves.
trickland of Tallahas- "One approach I thought
enny Strickland and could be considered is to start
ra of Crawfordville; with the developed neigh-
athy Jo Strickland of borhoods," he said. "I live in
e; and a father and Magnolia Ridge and with the.
aw, Charles and Shir- confined, organized setup of
of Morganton, N.C. our neighborhood, and others
ith Funeral Home and like Songbird, The Farm, Bridle
in Morganton, N.C. Gate, and others, the county
irge of the arrange- could consider a pilot project of
recycling in these areas first and
then expanding to other, more
ette Tolbert sparsely populated areas."
Tolbert, 50, of Quincy Parks would love to' see the
day, Oct. 20 in Tal- TCC Wakulla Center involved in
the process to find, secure and


mTe uineral service was neld
Saturday, Oct. 27 at Arnett Cha-
pel AME Church in Quincy with
burial at Sunnyvale Cemetery.
Survivors include five sons,
Antonio Drayton, Shundel Dray-
ton, Ronternus Tolbert, and Ri-
cardo Drayton, all of Quincy, and
Dexter Drayton of Atlanta; two
daughters, Yolanda Drayton and
Patricia Drayton, both of Quincy;
two brothers, James Zackery of
Quincy and Herman Tolbert and
Stephanie of Midway; eight sis-
ters, Lillie Mashburn and Ricky
of Havana, Delores Baxter and
David of Quincy, Mary Webster
of Crawfordville, Jeanetter Tol-
bert of Douglasville, Ga., Wanda
Tolbert of Quincy, Sharon Tolbert
of Tallahassee, Rhonda Cun-
ningham and Venson of Havana,
and Shonda Tolbert of Quincy;
a devoted friend, Alton "Bubba"
Drayton of Quincy; and seven
grandchildren.
Williams Funeral Home in
Quincy was in charge of the ar-
rangements.

Wilson E. Wheatley
Wilson Edward "Papaw"
Wheatley, 89, of Tallahassee died
Tuesday, Oct. 23 at his home.
Please See Page 15A


Riversprings
Continued from Page 7A

"Our defense struggled in
the first half, but came out and
played more like their usual
selves in the second half," Coach
Jacobs said.
The Bears will look to rebound
on Thursday, Nov. 1, when they
take on their cross-county rivals
from Wakulla Middle School for
the County Championship. The
game will be played at J.D. Jones
Stadium at Reynolds Field at 7
p.m. RMS will be the visiting
team.
RMS fell to 6-1.

Babe Ruth
officials needed
A meeting of the Babe Ruth
League will be held at 5 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 4 at the Babe Ruth
Pavilion at the recreation park
in Medart.
The league needs board mem-
bers and officers to serve the
league for the upcoming season.
For more information, call Nor-
een Britt at 544-5826.


Call Attorney

Daren Shippy
for a free confidential initial consultation.

850-877-6555
ti Offic:24 irsto ine D ive alhase lrid


Q '"Flattops"
926-4282 $12.00
Located at
Rose Alley Business Center
2543 Crawfordville Hwy.


tion remained of getting the beast
dart to Crawfordville. KC Towing
the rescue. "They strapped and
him in and brought him to the
ie said.
five years in business, more than
Irs with the lion standing guard in
ng lot, Gentry dosed her business.
ted to share her joy. "I've always
e lion figure," she concluded.
;aid Gentry and other groups will
to be involved in changing the
ire as the seasons change.


manage grants.
"It seems like it would be
in their, and the county's, best
interest to at least lookat a part-
nership or explore what funding
from private or government
programs are available," he
continued. "It just seems ironic
that we have a whole green tour
industry in a county that has no
organized recycling program. I
think if it was more common
and convenient for citizens to
recycle, that people would be
less likely to throw something
away or out the window."
Parks also believes the re-
cycling program must start in
the schools with education
programs and encouragement
of students practicing what they
are taught.
In the meantime, Wakulla
County must haul. garbage 100
miles each way to the Spring-
hill Landfill in Jackson County.
Fleming said the landfill had
the best price when it was most
recently bid.
Panama City has an opera-
tion with an incinerator and
longer hours, but is more ex-
pensive than Jackson County.
Leon County may be willing to
take Wakulla County garbage,
but the Leon operation would
only accept garbage from ma-
jor haulers with automated
trucks, said Fleming. Some of
the waste haulers in Wakulla
County would not be allowed
to dump their waste in Leon
County due to their equipment
limitations. "We will still have
to have a transfer station," Flem-
ing concluded.
In a related matter, a House-
hold Hazradous Waste Day will
be held Saturday, Nov. 17 from
8:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the ESG
offices on Trice Lane. Residents
can dispose of old household
chemicals, cleaners, solvents
and more for free.


Fees
Continued from Page 3A
family putting a mobile home
on their property as a mother-in-
law apartment.
An additional issue is grand-
fathering. Lawhon questioned
the eight year limit, and said if
a property owner paid an impact
fee once he didn't see the logic
of having to pay it again.
Brimner said he wasn't set on
a number, but there had to be
some line. He said, for example,
that he owns 4.3 acres in Medart
that is an old family homestead
- but the house has been gone 25
years. In such a case, he couldn't
see not charging an impact fee if
a new house is built.
Kessler said a compromise
was needed. He suggested that
if property had ever been des-
ignated residential, then its use
had already been calculated on
the impact to the county and it
would never have to pay - un-
less the use changed or it was
subdivided.


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Page 14A - THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007


School


School board set to look at new school zoning plan


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
The committee drawing up
proposals for which students
will be attending the new el-
ementary school is expected to
recommend that students be
drawn from the area in Craw-
fordville north of Wal-Mart, and
the areas west of Old Woodville
Road and north of Wakulla-Ar-
ran Road.
The Wakulla County School
Board is also expected to con-
sider a grandfathering policy
that would allow rising fifth


graders to finish their final year
at the school they have been
attending rather than be re-
zoned - as long as the parents
provide transportation. The
proposed policy would also al-
low a younger sibling to attend
with the fifth grader.
The school board is set to
look at the proposed zones and
other matters at a workshop to
be held Nov. 8, and considered
at a meeting on Nov. 20 before
a vote in December.
At a meeting on Tuesday,
Oct. 23, held at Wakulla Edu-


national Center in Shadeville,
members of the rezoning com-
mittee looked at which resi-
dential areas should be zoned
for what schools. The zoning
for the new, as-yet-unnamed
elementary school is roughly
carved out of Crawfordville and
Shadeville elementary zones.
Medart Elementary would
also be affected, with its zone
adjusted further south. Stu-
dents who live on Lisa Drive,
who were formerly zoned for
Medart, would now attend
Crawfordville.


District Transportation Direc-
tor Pat Jones presented recom-
mendations on zones based on
which school is closer based on
the bus routes.
The numbers were also run
for comparison by grade, by
lunch code (full pay, reduced,
free), by race, and by student
code.
Jones also developed bus
routes looking at where sexual
offenders live, since state law
limits how close bus stops
should be to such people.
(There is only one designated


Students get a chat about FCAT


More 91 percent of Wakulla
High School ninth and tenth
grade students got a little bit of
extra attention on Oct. 10.
The third annual "FCAT
Chat" Day was held in the WHS
media center, where 33 admin-
istrators, counselors, coaches
and teachers held individual
dialogues with students about
their goals for the year, includ-
ing a look at their achievement
in reading and math on the
Florida Comprehensive Achieve-
ment Test (FCAT) over the past
two years.
The 652 freshmen and soph-
omores chatted with one per-
son during 15 to 20 minute
sessions. Chatters ranged from
Superintendent David Miller
to WHS Head Football Coach
Scott Klees,jokingly dubbed the
"Most Requested Chatter" at the
end of the day.
"It was a very rewarding day
for both sides of the table,"
stated Superintendent Miller.
"I was impressed with how
the awareness of our students
has grown over three years
about their goals and academic
achievement."
The purpose of the day was
to make a connection with
each student, letting him or
hjr know that-the adults in the
school community care about
their achievement and are avail-
able to help them reach their


w IN-;dlIm .- .-.I


sexual predator living in the
county.)
Currently, the district has
2,059 elementary students di-
vided between three schools:
Crawfordville, with a student
enrollment of 842 with 699 stu-
dent stations; Medart with 677
students and 669 stations; and
Shadeville with 760 students
and 691 stations.
In August 2008, when the
new school opens on Bloxham
Cutoff near the intersection of
U.S. Highway 319, it is anticipat-
ed to have 501 students and 601
stations. The other schools will
see their populations reduced:
Crawfordville to 580, Medart to;
591, and Shadeville to 607.
Under the proposed zones,
elementary students would atT
tend the new school who live:,
* on Highway 319 north of
Mike Stewart Drive and Mose
Strickland Road to the county
line (Ivan Church Road is Craw-
fordville);


* on Revadee Spears Road
and tributaries north, induding-
Mose Strickland;
* Highway 267 including
Paige Oliver Road (Rock Road
is Shadeville);
* on Bob Miller Road and its
tributaries west of Old Wood-
ville Road (Old Woodville and
its tributaries are Shadeville);
* on Wakulla Springs Road
and north to the county line; ,
* on Old Bethel Road north,
of Wakulla-Arran Road.
* on East Ivan Road and,
tributaries north of Wakulla,
Arran.
The largest zone in terms.
of area is Medart's. It stretches.
from Smith Creek in the north-.
west part of the county to.
Sopchoppy and-along the coast.
to Panacea and to St. Marks,
and Newport. The student.
farthest from school is from
Smith Creek, Jones said, who,
must travel 28 miles to Medart.
Elementary.


Reggie Coles, Kiara


Gay named 2007


Homecoming royalty


Superintendent of Schools David Miller chats with a student.


goals. Chatters came armed
with a packet of information,
including each student's test
scores for the past two years
with explanations of them,
their prior year's attendance,
information on classes students
can take to achieve their goals,
and pamphlets on the Bright
Futures Scholarship program.
Noted one chatter, "Three
years ago the students were
wondering why we were talk-
ing with them. Now they are
so in tune with 'FCAT Chat'


Day that they come to us say-
ing, 'I almost made a Level 4 in
reading last year. Missed it by
two points. I bet that was one
question.'" The FCAT levels
range from 1 to 5, with Level 3
considered on grade level.
Students in grades 3 through
10 take the FCAT in the spring
of each year. Scores on the
FCAT can determine placement
in classes such as Intensive
Reading for remediation or
Advanced Placement for enrich-
ment. The combined scores of


the students also determine the
school's overall letter grade.
"Last year we were two points
away from being an 'A,' but were
a 'B' lowered to a 'C' due to 46
percent of the lowest quartile
of students in reading making a
learning gain when we needed
50 percent," said Principal Mike
Crouch. "That translated into a
handful of students. If this day
helps even a few students know
that we care about their success,
then the day is worth it."


Wakulla High School seniors
Reggie Coles and Kiara Gay were
named the 2007 Homecoming
King and Queen Friday, Oct. 26
at J.D. Jones Stadium at Reyn-
olds Field.
The king and queen were
selected by the student body
from a group of students that
included Hannah Battle, Jessica
Hicks, Carly Hillier, Karlyn Scott,
Nick Baxter, Nigel Bradham,
Cory Eddinger and C.J. Holton.
The students wore suits or
gowns, unless they were in their
football gear, and were accompa-
nied by their parents.


The War Eagle football team
added to the festivities by rally'
ing for a 21-7 victory over district
foe East Gadsden. The week
of activities included a dance,'
dress up days, a bon fire, powder
puff game and pep rally. The
students were honored on the
field at halftime of the football'
game.
The rest of the Homecomn
ing Court included freshmen
Blair Tucker and Tanner Cash.,
sophomores Denver Defend and
Jay Peacock and juniors Shelby,
Cash, Kelsey Harrell, Mookie-
Forbes and Ant Mills.'


Medart plans veterans program:
Medart Elementary School at 9:30 a.m. Friday, Nov. 9 in the:
will honor Wakulla County multipurpose room.
veterans with their annual pro- The public is invited to attend
gram, American Pride Celebra- and veterans will have reserved
tion. The program will be held seating for the function.

WHS band to honor veterans


Wakulla High School students with Justice Lewis, Judge Walker and Annette Boyd Pitts.


Chief Justice visits law studies class


The Chief Justice of Florida's Supreme
Court, R. Fred Lewis, came and spoke to
Wakulla High School Law Studies students
on Thursday, Oct. 25. Justice Lewis has been
on the Supreme Court since January 1999.
He works with teachers and schools
throughout Florida to better educate stu-
dents on law related issues, said teacher
Joanna Colvin. The Justice and his executive
director, Annette Boyd Pitts, gave a very
engaging lesson to Colvin's Law Studies
students which included a PowerPoint
presentation and a video.
The 17 students who attended were
taught who judges are, what they do, who
influences them and how they make their
decisions. Then the students were asked to
examine in detail the fourth Amendment
and understand exactly what it does.


Lastly, the students got to become
prosecutors, public defenders and judges.
Students also had to break into groups and
become their own Supreme Court. They got
to examine a real case and decide, based
on the evidence presented, how they would
rule and explain why they ruled that way.
Justice Lewis told the students how the
real court ruled so students could see if
their decision matched the courts. "This
engaging, hands on style of interacting
with students, is best way for students to
learn the law process," said Colvin. "This
gets them involved in how the legal process
actually works and why it works that way.
He made them interact with him, learn
something, decide something based on
what they had learned and back up that
decision. The students thoroughly enjoyed


the Justice's visit."
At the end of the lecture the students
presented the Judge with an honorary
homecoming T-shirt for coming to visit with
them. Wakulla County Judge Jill Walker also
sat in on the visit.
The Justice's wife, Judith, and daughter,
Lindsey, also came along with him. Some
visitors from Hungary who were touring
the state were also with the Judge. Mark
Schlakman, who is a currently a program
director at FSU, but in the past has worked
with Bill Clinton and Jeb Bush, also came
with the Judge. Logan Spivey, a senior
who attended the Judge's presentation said
"He was cool. We had an actual discussion
with him and he was very personable and
approachable."


Wakulla, High School will
host a Veterans' Day recognition
at the War Eagle football game
against the Madison County
Cowboys on Friday, Nov. 9.
The joint marching bands of
Madison County and Wakulla
High Schools and the Wakulla
High School ROTC Color Guard
will be involved and invite
any veterans of the United
States military or any enlisted
personnel currently serving in
the United States military to
be their guest during halftime
of the Wakulla and Madison
football game at Reynolds Field
in Medart.
The bands will conclude with
a patriotic tribute and the ROTC
Color Guard will lead all those
involved onto the field to be
honored during this time. Any-

TCC Wakulla Cen-
ter to host student
services night
The TCC Wakulla Center in
Crawfordville will host a Student
Services Night Thursday, Nov. 1
at 6 p.m. The program will offer
registration, financial aid and
scholarship information to stu-
dents of all ages. The program
is open to the public.


one interested in participating,
please call 926-7125 ext. 282 and
leave your name so WHS knows
how many to expect.
The game begins at 7:30 p.n
and the bands will meet at the
far end zone midway through
the second quarter on the eve-
ning of the game. "Please feel.
free to wear a military uniform
(dress or combat) or any regalia,
awards, etc that you choose,'"
said Becky Carlan, the WHS
Band Director.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007-Page 15A


Veterans
Continued from Page 1A

Tallahassee area as well as
in Crawfordville. School Super-
intendent Roger Stokley and the
school board approved Stewart
and Commander Guy Connell
as the first leaders of the WHS
program.
' Three years later Captain
Huddleston moved from Penn-
sylvania and replaced Connell
who resigned during the sum-
mer of 1996. Lt. Stewart credited
Dr. Andrea Carter, former WHS
principal, for being supportive
of the program in its infancy.
S"I've come full circle," said Lt.
Stewart. "Two weeks after high
school I joined the Navy. Two
weeks after the Navy, I joined
the high school."
Huddleston went to the Na-
val Academy after being raised
ii Mississippi and Arkansas.
He was on a trip through the
south seeking a post in high
school when his Tallahassee
stop allowed him to interview
with WHS Principal Randy New-
land. After 26 years in the Navy,
Captain Huddleston landed in
Wakulla County.
S"We've seen the world and
there is no place like Wakulla
County," said Stewart. "I wanted
to get out when I was in high
school. But it's a unique place to
live. We take for granted what
we've got here. This place beats
anything else."
"This is fun," added Stewart.
"Having an impact on their
(student) lives and working
with kids."
The NJROTC program has
encouraged students to get
into the military, but it isn't
the only focus at WHS. "It's not
about getting into the military,
although we're here to help
them get there if that is what
they want," said Stewart. "The
focus is to teach them character
and things that will help them
be successful in life."
As Stewart and Huddleston
spoke about their program and
former students, 2007 graduate
David Evans walked through
the office in uniform. He was
on leave from the Coast Guard
and was back in town to talk to
students about his experiences
in completing boot camp.
Former WHS football star
Sea Htarris is now a junior
at the Naval Academy where
he will graduate as an ensign.
Wakulla students have joined
all of the branches of the mili-
tary and several local residents
have served or are serving in
Iraq and other war zones.
As Veterans' day approaches,
the ROTC will share their stu-
dent run program with the
middle school students.
"They appreciate hearing the
other speeches," said Stewart.
"i think they have a greater ap-
preciation than the average high
school student."
,Stewart and Huddleston
have emotional stories to tell
about how they have received
support and appreciation from
the community, despite a less


>'.


Hodge to emcee Mullet festival


-AII


Huddleston and Stewart with many NJROTC trophies


than happy military welcome
from the country after the Viet-
nam War.
"The simpliest way to thank
veterans is shaking hands with
them and saying thank you,"
said Stewart.
Stewart and Huddleston
related a story of a recent trip
to Jacksonville to attend the
Naval re-enlistment of former
student Johnny Golden. During
a meal and gasoline break, the
two men were approached by
strangers who thanked them
for serving their country. "It
was gratifying to have people
come up to us and thank us,"
added Stewart. The two Naval
Science instructors wear their
uniforms to school and special
events each day except on ca-
sual Fridays.
"We serve because we think
it's the right thing to do,"
Stewart said. "It's nice to be
recognized. Less than one per-
cent of our nation serves in the
military. The uniform represents
something far greater than
themselves."
Stewart continued that mili-
tary personnel miss events
such as birthdays, Christmas,
anniversaries and the births of
'" childrehd:' was on a ship when
my dad died," he added.
Huddleston said part of his
Naval pilot training was prepara-
tion for the possibility of being
shot down and captured. The
U.S. military training brought
back several emotions to Hud-
dleston as he described long
hours of interrogation and be-
ing placed in a small box.
At the end of the grueling
training, Huddleston said he
and the other trainees were
told they were going to have to
pay respects to the enemy flag.
Instead, they turned around to
see the American flag flying.
"The American flag meant
more to me because of what
it represents," said Captain
Huddleston, "The freedoms we


have, what we in the military
are willing to fight and die for.
It hurts when people disrespect
veterans. We still have the free-
dom to say things. That is not
the case in other places we've.
been. I'm reminded of that ev-
ery time Veterans' Day comes
around."
This year the WHS NJROTC
unit will be competing in an
ROTC competition in Orlando
during Veterans' Day. Normally,
the students are part of the Tal-
lahassee Veterans' Day parade.
"It has always been meaningful
to participate," said Huddleston.
The cadets will be competing in
11 different events in Orlando.
"We're not teaching the kids
about getting into the military,"
said Stewart. "We teach citizen-
ship and how to do it the right
way."
But for the students who do
end up in the military, many
build a special bond with their
Naval Science instructors.
Amber Holmes of the WHS
Class of 1997 joined the Army
and is now a captain serving
in Iraq. She was one of the first
four-year NJROTC unit students
who became friends with Mike
Stewart and his wife, Ann. Hol-
mes' husband was injured in
the war and has returned to the
United States. Holmes has been
back to the Middle East several
times. The couple has a child
who has been helped in being
raised by relatives. A picture of
Holmes and many other former
students adorn the walls of the
NJROTC offices in Medart.
"We've got a good unit,"
said Stewart. "We have had
several success stories that are
unrelated to the military, but it
is a tribute to what they have
learned here."
Stewart concluded that the
success of the program goes
back to the support within the
school, school board and super-
intendents David Miller and the
late Roger Stokley.


Several educators tied to military


It is fitting that the Wakulla County
School District host a program for veterans.
Several employees in the Wakulla County
School System have ties to the United
States Military.
SThe Wakulla County School District
salutes district military servicemen: David
Miller, Superintendent, Army National
Guard; Jimmie Dugger, Assistant Superin-
tendent, Army Reserve; Jim Griner, Safety &
Risk Coordinator, Coast Guard; Tim Baggett,
Medart 5th grade teacher, Marine Corps/
Staff Sgt.; Russell Herron, MES 5th grade
teacher, Navy; Robert Myhre, RMS/WMS
Guidance Counselor, Army; Mike Stewart,
WHS Jr. ROTC, Navy; and Ron Huddleston,
WHS Jr. ROTC, Navy.
: In. addition: John McMillon, Shadeville
Operations Foreman, Navy; Buddy Lawhon,
Trade Specialist, Army; Earl Vause, Jr.; Trade
Specialist, Navy; and Daniel Moseley, Trade


Specialist, Air Force, are veterans.
Finally: Frank Loney, School Bus Driver,
Army; J.D. Jones, WHS PE Teacher, Army
- Presidential Honor Guard; Billy Tully,
RMS Operations Foreman, Air Force; Wil-
ton Booth, WMS Custodian, Army; Alton
Farmer, WEC Custodian, Army; Kelly Rob-
erts, WEC Operations Foreman, Air Force;
and Buddy Page, School Bus Inspector,
Navy have also served.
Moses Howard, School Bus Driver, Navy;
Dennis Whiddon, School Bus Driver, Navy;
Bill Taylor, RMS School Teacher, Army;
Shannon Smith, RMS School Teacher/
Coach, Marine Corps; Bill Peck, WMS
Teacher, Army; Ronnie Gray, Truant Officer,
Air Force; Larry Shiver, WMS Operations
Foreman, Navy; and Deputy Jeff Barteld,
WMS, School Resource Officer, Navy; Tom
Graham, WHS, Air Force; Don White, WHS,
Navy; and Bob Blanton; WHS, Army..


School plans military parade
On Saturday, Nov. 10, Wakulla Christian School wi be sponsoring a Crawfordville parade and
celebration honoring local veterans. Principal Jim Pound invited all military families to ride in the
parade and display photographs of their loved ones at Hudson Park.
S"Some Wakulla families whose loved ones have been wounded or killed have paid a high price to
serve our country in doing their duty to keep the U.S. strong and safe," said Pound. "Most of them
have received little, if any, thanks from our community. It is only right and proper that we honor
these neighbors by showing our appreciation for their sacrifice."
STo take part in the parade, show up with a vehicle at 9 a.m. across the highway from Ace Hardware.
The parade begins at 10 a.m. Photos will be posted on the Wall of Honor at Hudson Park.
Throughout the day there will be entertainment, children's activities, food, crafts booths and a
patriotic concert that will begin at 11:30 a.m. and continue until 4 p.m. For more information, call
Celebration Chairperson Cynthia Thomas at 251-0439



Thanks for reading The Wakulla News!


Rex Hodge, national award-
winning news anchor at ABC 27
News, has been named Master
of Ceremonies for the Mighty
Mullet Maritime Festival, Satur-
day Nov. 10, in Panacea's Wool-
ley Park.
Hodge - whose honors in-
clude a first-place news/public
affairs award for in-depth report-
ing on Native Americans, and a
first-place documentary award
for his reporting from war-torn
Bosnia - said he is "definitely
looking forward to participat-
ing" in this year's festival.
"The organizers have put to-
gether a great lineup of events,"
he said, "and were going to have
a full day of family fun."
Among his duties will be to
crown and cape the 2007 festi-
val king and queen, introduce
the judges for the second an-
nual $2,000 International Mullet
Cook-Off, introduce members of
the guest band City Limits, and
emcee a new event, the "Fishy


Hospice to host ice
cream social Nov. 2
In celebration of National
Hospice Month, Covenant Hos-
pice is inviting the community
to an ice cream social from 2
p.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Nov. 2 at
the Thomasville Road Wal-Mart.
The social is free and open to
the public. In addition to ice
cream, attendees will receive a
copy of Five Wishes, an easy to
use living will, and will also be
encouraged to share their story
and legacy with their family and
loved ones.
This local event is part of
a broader national campaign
launched by the National Hos-
pice and'Palliative Care Orga-
nization (NHPCO) reminding
people that hospice is not about
how you die but how you live.
There will be a range of-activities
across the country.throughout
November focusing on living
as fully as possible up until the
end of life.
"National Hospice Month pro-
vides a wonderful opportunity
to raise awareness of available
care options," commented Dale
O. Knee, president and CEO of
Covenant Hospice. "Far too many
people wait until they are facing
a health crisis to learn about
care options. The time to learn
about end-of-life care is before it
becomes a serious issue."
For more information about
the ice cream social or National
Hospice Month, contact Cov-
enant Hospice at 575-4998 or visit
www.covenanthospice.org.


S Office Of

D. Sanders

Attorney At Law
Wills, Trusts, Estates,
Family Law-Divorce,
Custody, Contracts, Deeds,
Incorporation, Development
Permits, Environmental
Law, General Litigation
Owner:
Doris "Dallas" Sanders
2181 Crawfordville Hwy.
Crawfordville, Florida
Phone: (850) 926-3942
Fax: (850) 926-9044
24 Minute First
Consultation $32



Mallard
Pond
N ,M-I. -I -- -.:


Rex Hodge
Fashion Show" with local mod-
els displaying such creations as
Pearl of the Oyster, Crab Belle,
Sea Vamp, Sea Warrior, Cabana
Girl, Fisherman's Daughter,
Bride and Groom, and more.
"Think of this fashion show
as 'haute couture meets sea-
shore flotsam and jetsam,' "
said Hodge.
For attendees who would
like an up close and personal
look at mullet, another new
feature of this year's festival
will be the availability of T-n-T
Hide-A-Way canoes and kayaks


for use on Dickerson Bay which
adjoins Woolley Park
Other features will include
food stands, arts and crafts ven-
dors, a maritime sell and swap
flea market, children's games,
a photography contest, classic
boats, historic re-enactors, story
tellers, and maritime displays.
Gates will open at 9 a.m. with
the Coastal Optimist Club on
hand to serve breakfast to early
goers. The festival will conclude
at 4 p.m. following the judging
of the mullet cook-off and a.
Harley-Davidson raffle drawing
by the Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office to benefit Citizens for
Humane Animal Treatment.
Raffle tickets will be available
at the festival.
Additional information, plus
registration forms, rules and
fees, are available from festival
organizer Bill Lowrie at 850-962-
7845 or at www.mightymullet.
com.


Chamber offers member

to member discounts


The Wakulla County Cham-
ber of Commerce Membership
Committee is pleased to intro-
duce a new membership benefit
- a member to member discount
program.
How does it work? Participat-
ing businesses agree to give a
discounted product or service
to fellow members, or offer a
punch card, available from the
Chamber office on request.
The amount of discount is left
to the discretion of participating
members. All Wakulla Chamber
of Commerce members and


Medart will

host program
Medart Elementary School
will honor Wakulla County vet-
erans with their annual program,
American Pride Celebration. The
program will be held at 9:30 a.m.
Friday, Nov. 9 in the multipur-
pose room.
The public is invited to attend
and veterans will have reserved
seating for the function.







ndl"t OniAon
VOil: UUN

850.224.4960

www.fsucu.org


their employees are eligible for-
the offered discount.
The participating Chamber.
members and their discounts
will be published in the Cham-.
ber's monthly newsletter and'
will be active unless offer is:
withdrawn by merchant in writ-
ing to the Chamber office.
Call the Chamber office or
email petra@wakullacoun-
tychamber.com to participate.-
Offers must be received by.
Oct. 26 to be included in Novem-.
ber newsletter.


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on
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1373 COASTl Hwy.,


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UwK Music On WEtkadsl B-eR, WimE & FRozi DNRWstl
rUOY BMS1M OR HEATED OUTSPE DMCI





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ar AE ENd of Rock L diof i Road


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Phone 933-3899
Triple H.
Construction Inc.
CRC058555









Page 16A- THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007


'My Safe Florida Home' program can help with repairs


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
The Florida Department of Financial
Services has a program that can help
Wakulla County residents protect their
homes and even pay for some of the
recommended improvements.
The My Safe Florida Home pro-
gram offers free wind inspections to
Floridians living in single family and
site built homes. The free inspections


will recommend improvements while
providing cost estimates to make the
improvements. The improvements may
provide potential insurance premium
discounts.
Grants are available to homeown-
ers. The maximum grant is $5,000 and
requires a dollar-for-dollar match unless
the homeowner qualifies as a low-in-
come homeowner.
Arthur V. Youngblood, Outreach Co-
ordinator for the Division of Consumer


Services, said that 101,919 homes have
been inspected in the state and 12,392
homeowners are working to "harden"
their homes. A total of 1,478 homeown-
ers have received grant reimbursements
valued at $4.7 million.
"We are finding that 74 percent of
Floridians receiving a free wind inspec-
tion are eligible for discounts on their
wind insurance premium without mak-
ing a single improvement," he said.
After being elected, Florida Chief


Financial Officer Alex Sink worked
with the department to streamline the
program and inspections began in April
"Our goal is to do 400,000 free wind
inspections over the next two years,"
said Youngblood. "About four to six
weeks after the free wind inspection,
homeowners will receive a detailed in-
spection report that will tell them how
safe their home is, the steps needed to
harden the home and, if they qualify,
what kind of a discount on insurance


premiums individuals can expect"
The state goal is to complete 400,000
inspections and provide 35,000 grants
to homeowners. The program was cre-
ated by the 2006 Florida Legislature.
Wakulla County residents have sent
in 76 applications and 68 homes have
been inspected. To learn more about the
program or apply for a home inspection,
log on to www.mysafefloridahome.com
or call the helpline at 1-866-513-6734.


P&Z to hear rezoning request


The Wakulla County Plan-
ning and Zoning Commission
(P and Z) will consider a large
rezoning request and two final
plat applications during Novem-
ber and the county commission
will hear a wetlands setback
variance in November.
SThe rezoning request was
submitted by Hudson. Land
Co-Op, LTD on 43 acres on the
southwest intersection of U.S.
Highway 319 and Whiddon Lake
Road. The zoning change will be
from Agriculture and RR-5 resi-
dential to C-2 commercial. The


applicant has not announced
plans for the commercial devel-
opment which will be near the
newest Dollar General.
Planning commissioners will
hear the request on Tuesday,
Nov. 13 and county commis-
sioners will hear the request
twice on Monday, Dec. 3 and
Monday, Jan. 7.
In other planning and zoning
matters in front of the P and Z
on Nov. 13:
* The Ben Boynton family
and agent Penny McKinney are
requesting a re-plat of property


lines on lots 88 and 89 of The
Hammocks subdivision, 44
Hemlock Way. The P and Z will
hear the request on Nov. 13 and
the county commission will
hear it on Dec. 3.
* A final plat request from
Harry Spears, John and Eliza-
beth Stone and Lois Sarna
will create four lots out of 110
acres in a re-plat of Lot 22 of
the Hunters Glen subdivision.
The property is located on the
north side of River Plantation
Road near Pine Lane. The P and
Z will hear the request on Nov.


13 and the county commission
will hear it on Dec. 3.
* The wetlands setback vari-
ance request is from Robert and
Deborah Bass on 13.813 acres on
the east side of Tiger Hammock
Road north of Mysterious Wa-
ters near the Wakulla River. The
applicant is seeking wetland
setbacks of 13 to 38 feet on the
property.
P and Z members will not
hear the request. The county
commission will hear it on
Nov. 19.


Your tax bill is on its way this week


SWakulla County property owners will be
receiving some mail from Wakulla County
Tax Collector Cheryll Olah this week.
Olah and her staff were putting the fin-
ishing touches on the tax bills earlier this
week. She said they will be mailed out on
Wednesday, Oct.31.
Taxpayers will receive a four percent dis-
count if they pay their tax bills in Novem-


ber. The discount shrinks to three percent
in December, tio percent in January and
one percent in February.
There is no discount for payments made
in March and a three percent penalty will
be assessed for tax bills paid in April. Bills
that are not paid by April are subject to
delinquent tax advertising and the tax
certificate sale in May.


The tax collector's staff mailed out
22,582 tax bills which included real estate
and personal property bills. Olah recom-
mended that taxpayers review their bills
when they receive them. For more informa-
tion, call the tax collectq,'s office at 926-3371
or 926-5201. i


Wakulla Gardens residents gasp



at cost of planned sewer project
B By WILLJAM SNOWDEN Utilities told commissioners at paying a plumber to connect the back to the board with quar-
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net a workshop on Monday, Oct. 29, line to their home. terly reports and later, as the
County commissioners got that the firm has completed the Some homes in the subdivi- project is being built, monthly
an update at a workshop this engineering design of two units sion have septic tanks in the updates.


ieek on the progress of the
Wakulla Gardens sewer expan-
sion project.
And some Wakulla Gardens
Sgsidents who were at the
workshop were left wondering
how they will afford to pay to
hook up.
Poor drainage and small lots
in the Wakulla Gardens subdivi-
sion have presented ongoing
problems for the county. The
property was platted decades
Ago, and was marketed to snow-
birds during the 1964 World's
Fair in New York.
' The county is planning to
spend some $20 million on
providing sewer service to the
hundreds of lots in the subdivi-
sion, as well as on significant
improvements to the wastewa-
ter treatment plant located in
Otter Creek.
Consultants with Eutaw


in the subdivision and a third
is being surveyed.
The service would be con-
structed in phases, with a force
main and lift station built on
Lower Bridge Road.
Much of the board's discus-
sion focused on the require-
ment that residents must hook
up to the sewer line when it
comes by their home.
County Administrator Ben
Pingree stressed to commis-
sioners that the sewer system
will not function without the
revenues.
In the past, the county has
mandated that residents hook
up to sewer but has been lacka-
daisical in enforcing it.
Some Wakulla Gardens resi-
dents in the audience gasped at
the costs they will be respon-
sible, for paying. Besides the
$3,850 to the county to hook up,
they will also be responsible for


back, meaning the pipes con-
necting to the county sewer
line will have to go to the back
of the house. Additionally, the
county requires that the exist-
ing septic tank be crushed and
filled.
And some homes, down-
.grade from the county's gravity
lines, will have the additional
expense of grinder pumps to
create low-pressure.
While the design and plan-
ning for the project is ongoing,
it was expected that bids for
construction could be let in
April 2008.
Eutaw has also been in ne-
gotiations with the Wildwood
Country Club to take reuse
water from the wastewater
treatment plant to irrigate the
golf course. That portion of the
project is anticipated to go out
for bid in March 2009.
Eutaw anticipated coming


Transportation
board to meet
The Wakulla County Trans-
portation Disadvantaged Coordi-
nating Board (TDCB) announces
a meeting to which all persons
are invited. The agenda will
include the annual evaluation,
operating report, annual budget
estimates/annual expenditures
and a staff report.
The meeting will be held
Tuesday, Nov. 6 at 10 a.m. at the
Wakulla County Senior Citizens
Center, 33 Michael Drive in
Crawfordville.
For more information, or if
you require special accommo-
dations because of a physical
impairment, contact Vanita An-
derson at (850) 674-4571 or by
email at arpc7@gtcom.net.


Shop early at

Library Fall Fling
The Friends of the Wakulla
County Public Library invite the
public to do some early Christ-
mas shopping at the Fourth
Annual Fall Fling scheduled
for Saturday, Nov. 3 from 9 a.m.
until 1 p.m. The fundraiser will
benefit the library's children's
programs and services and, as
an added bonus, the Tallahassee
Chapter of Thrivent Financial for
Lutherans will match the pro-
ceeds raised during the event.
To entertain the younger set,
an animated feature film will
be shown in the children's room
from 10 a.m. until noon.
The Friends. Wakulla County
Historical Society. and Iris Gar-
den Club. all will have items for
sale at the event. The hallmark
of the event is the Friend's Free
Book Extravaganza where thou-
sands of books are available free
for the taking with members of
the Friends gratefully accepting
monetary donations to help sup-
port the library.
The Historical Society will
have their Wakulla County His-
tory Christmas Tree Ornaments
for sale, the latest edition de-
picting the historic Sopchoppy
School. Ornaments depicting
the Old County Courthouse and
Saint Marks Lighthouse will also
be on sale. Beautiful afghan
"throws" depicting Wakulla's
heritage will be available for
purchase as will the Society's
various historical publications.
Members of the Iris Garden
Club will arrive at 8 a.m. on the
day of the event for a workday
on the library landscape, a volun-
teer task the club has faithfully
provided at the library for more
than 30 years Pruning, weeding,
and the planting of new items
will be the order of the day. Vol-
unteers are welcome. For those
who don't remember or are new
to our community, the library's
three acre site was a barren tract
of land when it was purchased
by the county in 1995. It is now
planted with hundreds of beauti-
ful trees, shrubs, and flowers, all
courtesy of the Iris Garden Club
and its many volunteers.
The Friends of the Library
sponsor programs and services
during the entire year. The Sum-


From the Desk
of the Public
Library


Doug Jones

mer Reading Program, Friday
Night at the Movies, various
Florida Humanities Council pre-
sentations, and part of the audio
book and DVD collection are all
made possible by memberships
and funds raised at events like
the Fall Fling.
The Iris Garden Club presents
excellent gardening programs at
the library at 1 p.m. on the third
Tuesday of each 'moith. The
public is invited to attend these
meetings and ne memberss are
always welcome. The ~ub also
sponsors the Youth Gardening
Program at the COAST Charter
School where t6e students plant
and maintain sevfyal raised gar-
den beds and butterfly gardens.
This year the students will be
adding a Native Plant Garden.
They club also provide schol-
arships to middle school stu-
dents to attend to: the Florida
Federation of Garden Clubs
Wekiva Youth:Camp and high
school students to the SEEK
Workshop in Gainesville.
The Wakulla County Histori-
cal Society has many ongoing
projects supporting efforts to
preserve our local history and
heritage. The public is invited
to attend their monthly local
history programs that take place
at 7 p.m. on the second Tuesday
of each month qr write a family
history to be included in the
Wakulla County Fanily Heritage
Book now being written and
compiled by members of the
community and the Heritage
Publishing Company.
All programs of the Friends,
Iris Garden Club, and Historical
Society are free and open to
the public. New members and
volunteers are always welcome.
Please come out on Saturday,
Nov. 3 and help support these
groups that help make Wakulla
County a wonderful place to live,
work and play.
For more information about
the event, please contact Doug
Jones at 926-7415.


It's Medicare Made Easy by the local health plan you have
known and trusted for more than 25 years.
Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage plans offer PartA, Part B, and Part D
(prescription drug) coverage,PLUS more benefits than original Medicare, including:


- Routine checkups and preventive care
* Fitness center reimbursement*
* Routine eye exams
* Eyeglasses*
. Health education programs and
classes


* Hearing exams
* 24 hour health care professional
hotline
* Option for unlimited generic
prescription drug coverage
(no coverage gap for generics)


Call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 to RSVP or for More Information.
(TTY/TDD: 850-383-3534 or 1-800-955-8771)
8:00 a.m.- 8:00 p.m., Seven Days a Week
or visit us at: www.capltalhealth.com/medlcare


Capital Health
INU' P L A N
n CO ,Blu C Son BlShlIMAOuc4Uon
Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodations of persons with
special needs at sales meetings, call the numbers above. A sales representative will be present with
information and applications. *Limitations and restrictions apply.
Benefits may change on January 1,2009 H5938_2008_0907_024_100107.


C4WUi ft Pl r Prom* Phww*


Ant^t lt'ms haiinqsl eaw(Bg^ti�(w

Join us Friday, November 2, at Noon
at CHP's Governor's Square Auditorium
((11r91 (fltrW nltortrrfli, fldlahdiatwS R li,



Take a Breath of Fresh Air
- Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease -
RlrS5egted by: 1Maiausbta^ dipal, I Pi .
jIHI1|

tP-~a~rmkarbac~Bft~,i~ lUa~da

alt~�i~cl~P 8_~. Hs~ sl~'p~Zs~riUcA~lH j


Inlwaf~M.~~ l~nEtlf I ar~i~r


O W to8O5"23-73M3
I l111ti roms BlueShield
LANpitalHelt of'Flors


"


I i II ' i I -ii 3�







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007


A crane is used to lower poulcers
A-40,i i- VA . '- ! re . . !..i 4 A


INTERNATIONAL MULLET COOK-OFF


Gravel drops on larger boulders to build foundation for beach


LIVING LEGENDS - MARITIME STORIES
CORONATION OF MULLET KING AND QUEEN
MARINE FLEA MARKET (new and used boats,
trailers, equipment, rods and reels, etc.)
FISHY FASHION SHOW
C.H.A.T.'S HARLEY DAVIDSON RAFFLE
GAMES & ACTIVITIES FOR KIDS
.. LIVE MUSIC ....
ARTS AND CRAFTS VENDORS
FRESH FLORIDA SEAFOOD
MARITIME EXHIBITS & SKILLS DEMONSTRATIONS
CLASSIC BOATS
BIG BEND PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST
To benefit the Big Bend Maritime Center.
For details go to www.mightymullet.com
or call Bill Lowrie at 962-4138
_______ _ _^�1*^' ^^^^_^^^^ -
""*'^B* �^ *l'^'r^g''--'^ ^� I krTvw 1 -- s ^^ ^^^ H H B


Jail inmates spread sand on newly created beach


It's Ouro,- I
JKE~IT CLEAN








Page 2B - THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007


Business


Rusty Mulvaney ana cnucK M ciroy at tneir computer business

2M Networking Opens


Rose's Botanical
: Rose's Botanicals in Panacea is a mother-
daughter gift shop where they specialize in
unique items such as clothing, jewelry, gifts and
,bcal art.
SRose Edwards makes all the soaps, creams,
iody butters and more from scratch on her farm
heree she grows a lot of the herbs that are
infused and used in her products. Each product
Ss created with a lot of love one small batch at
a time.
' They also carry a great selection of vitamins
and supplements for all your nutritional needs.


s ribbon cutting
They have extensive studies in Herbal, Chinese
and Homeopathic Remedies. Rose is always avail-
able for free consultations while Rachel Brown
specializes in gift baskets. She enjoys creating a
lovely gift basket for every budget and all occa-
sions. They invite visitors to come by and visit
them. They are located at 1089 Coastal Highway,
Suite B, Panacea, and can be reached at 850-984-
0004. The store hours are Thursday through
Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday 12 p.m. to 4
p.m. and Monday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. "This truly is
your one stop shop" they said.


Wakulla Bank E-Blast


Wakulla Bank will launch its
new "Statement of Interest" e-
blast communication in October
for customers and community
members interested in staying
informed the latest bank news
and financial consumer infor-
mation.
The registration link is found
on the bank's Web site main
page at www.wakullabank.
com. Click "Sign Up for E-Mail
Updates" and complete the
registration form to receive the
e-mail newsletter.
"This new, e-mail commu-
nication about bank and com-


munity news is an excellent
addition to our growing list of
services," said President and
CEO Walter C. Dodson, Jr. "We
encourage everyone who is in-
terested in learning more about
Wakulla Bank and its products
to sign up and stay informed."
The bank invited employees
to submit ideas for newsletter
names, and Matt Bryant, a staff
member at the bank's South-
wood branch, came up with the
winning "Statement of Interest"
title. Finalists included Rebecca
Moore, Connie Kinsey and
Lylith Carraway with "Dollars


and Sense," and Shirley Hard-
ing with "WeB-Blast." All of the
finalists received prizes.
Customers who sign up can
modify their subscriptions or
cancel at any time, and the bank
does not share information
with outside organizations.
Wakulla Bank is an FDIC
insured independent bank
dedicated to quality and innova-
tive service, with 15 locations
in Calhoun, Leon, Liberty and
Wakulla counties. The bank
maintains more than $475 mil-
lion in assets.


September unemployment


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla County's unemploy-
ment rate was down in Sep-
tember to 2.8 percent from 3.1
percent in August, according to
the state Agency for Workforce
Innovation.
, The Wakulla labor force
increased in September, up to
15,114 people of which 14,689
were employed and 425 were
unemployed.
In August, the labor force
consisted of 14,816 people of
which 14,356 were employed
and 460 were unemployed.


The unemployment rate
was also down in neighboring
Leon County, to 3.1 percent in
September from 3.3 percent in
August. In Franklin County the
rate was down to 3.0 percent
from 3.2 percent in August.
The Tallahassee Metropoli-
tan Area, which includes Wakul-
la, Leon, Jefferson and Gadsden
counties for the purpose of
market analysis, had an overall
unemployment rate of 3.2 per-
cent in September, down from
3.5 percent in August.
The labor force in the met-
ropolitan area consisted of


188,288 people of which 182,240
were employed and 6,048 were
unemployed.
The lowest unemployment
in the state continued to be in
Walton County with a rate of 2.4
percent. The highest unemploy-
ment in the state continued to
be in Hendry County where the
rate was 9.9 percent. Florida's
overall unemployment rate was
4.0 percent in September. The
national unemployment rate
was up slightly to 4.7 percent
from 4.6 percent in August.


There's a new IT consulting
company in Wakulla County.
2M Networking, LLC, opened
by Rusty Mulvaney and Chuck
McElroy, is located in the Bay
Springs Plaza on Crawfordville
Highway in the old A Computer
Place store.
2M Networking offers a com-
prehensive portfolio of IT con-
sulting and managed services,
tailored to meet specific busi-
ness and IT requirements - now
and in the future.
The company works closely





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GEO-ENERGY
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OF EQUIPMENT
WE SOLVE JUST ABOUT
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926-8116


with customers to help them
design, implement, manage, and


maintain an adaptive IT system
that allows them to quickly and
effectively respond to changes in
their business.
By providing full life cycle
management of a company's IT
operations, 2M Networking al-
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in reduced annual technology
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2M Networking also offers
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Whatever your computer
related needs, just call or stop
by 2M Networking Monday
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and Saturdays 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The business can be reached
at (850) 926-9192 or (850) 926-
9293 or through the Internet,
www.2mnetworking.com.


Manufacturing

Jcob Faixr



Thursday, November 15

9 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Tallahassee Community College EWD Building


Area manufacturing companies
will be on-hand to fill positions
with competitive pay and benefits.


For more information call

(850) 201-8760


A I nVI

I LOCATION
Crawfordville HwyJMike Stewar
" ,. Wal-Mart, Crawfordville

Always Working to Serve Our Members
TALLAHASSEE~LEON 576-8134
. Federal Credit Union Located in the N
Craw
Open: Monday - Friday * 9 am - 5 pm


N
t Lane at


4 *press 3
North Pointe Center,
wfordville


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Tom Wollschlager, D.M.D. Thurs. 8:15 a.m. - 3 p.m.


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For Tickets:
Fancy's Pets - 669 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, 352-563-5100

Wishful Thinking
Western World
(Ocala, Gainesville, Leesburg)
352-629-7676


MIKE HAMPTON
PITCHING-IN FOUNDATION
352-527-3297


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Gates open at 3 p
Cates open at 3 p.m.


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or call
1-800-370-8669

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NEW

CONVENIENT
Ak � *


r -H











THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1. 2007-Page 3B


Deadline


klonday


11:00 A.CLA9f IED

926-7102


35 Cents


Per Word



ADinimum
minimum


Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


CATEGORIES

100 EMPLOYMENT

105 Business Opportunities

110 Help Wanted

115 Work Wanted

120 Services and Businesses

125 Schools and Instruction

130 Entertainment

200 ITEMS FOR SALE

205 Antiques

210 Auctions

215 Auto Parts and Accessories

220 Cars

225 Trucks

230 Motor Homes and Campers

235 Motorcycles and 4-Wheelers

240 Boats and Motors

245 Personal Watercraft , a

250 Sporting Goods
255 Guns

260 Business Equipment

265 Computers and Internet

270 Electronics

275 Home Furnishings


280 Home Appliances

285 Jewelry

290 Musical Instruments

295 Building Materials

300 MISC. FOR SALE

305 Machinery, Tools & Equipment

310 Firewood Products

315 Farm & Garden Equipmenti

320 Farm Products & Produce

325 Horses

330 Livestock, Farm Animals

335 Pets

340 Plants

345 Swap, Barter, Trade

350 Wanted to Buy

355 Yard Sales

400 NOTICES

410 Free Items

415 Announcements

420 Card of Thanks,

425 Occasion Cards

430 In Memoriam

435 Lost and lound

440 Personals and Notices


500 REAL ESTATE, HOMES, MOBILES

505 Acreage for Lease

510 Acreage for Sale

515 Apartments for Rent

520 Townhouses for Rent

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a 535 Commercial Property for Sale

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545 Homes for Sale

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580 Rooms for Rent/Roommates Wanted

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590 Waterfront Homes/Land for Sale

595 Vacation Rental



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Email: classifieds@thewakullanews.net


NOTICE OF APPLives my run


Legal Notice


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
2007 TXD 038
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Pluto I LLC. the
holder of the.following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 385 year of Issuance 2005
Description of Property
01-6S-02W-286-03569-A20
Tide Creek Landing Lot 20
Name in which assessed Pan Fla Development,
Said property being in the County of Wakulla.
State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be
redeemed according to law the property described
in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bid-
der at the courthouse door on the 5th day of De-
cember, 2007, at 10:00 AM.
Dated this 21st day of September, 2007.
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
October 18, 25, 2007
November 1, 8, 2007

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
2007 TXD 039
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Pluto I LLC. the
holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate #400 year of Issuance 2005
Description of Property
01 -6S-02W-286-03569-A47
Tide Creek Landing Lot 47
Name in which assessed Pan Fla Development,
Said property being in the County of Wakulla.
State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be
redeemed according to law the property described
in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bid-
der at the courthouse door on the 5th day of De-
cember, 2007, at 10:00 AM.
Dated this 21st day of September, 2007.
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
October 18, 25, 2007
November 1, 8, 2007

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
2007 TXD 040
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Pluto I LLC. the
holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate #'376 year of Issuance 2005
Description of Property
01-6S-02W-286-03569-Ap2
Tide Creek Landing Lot 2
Name in which assessed Pan Fla Development,
Said property being In the County of Wakulla.
State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be
redeemed according to law the property described
in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bid-
der at the courthouse door on the 5th day of De-
cember, 2007, at 10:00 AM.
Dated this 21st day of September, 2007.
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
October 18, 25, 2007
November 1, 8, 2007

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
2007 TXD 041
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Pluto I LLC. the
holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 397 year of Issuance 2005
Description of Property
01-6S-02W-286-03569-A43
Tide Creek Landing Lot 43
Name in which assessed J. Donald Nichols, Said
property being in the County of Wakulla. State of
Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed
according to law the property described in such
certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the
courthouse door on the 5th day of December,
2007, at 10:00 AM:
Dated this 21st day of September, 2007.
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
October 18, 25, 2007
November 1, 8, 2007

The School Board of Wakulla County announces
a School Board workshop to which all interested
persons are invited.
Date: Thursday, November 8, 2007
Time: 6:00 p.m.
Place: School Board Room
69 Arran Road
Crawfordville, Florida
Purpose: School Board Workshop to review the
proposed re-zoning for Elementary
Schools.
For further information plese contact:
Superintendent's Office
Wakulla County Schools
P.O.Box 100, 69 Arran Road
Crawfordvllle, FL 32326
850-926-0065


2007 TXD 042
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that e
holder of the following certificate I
certificate for a tax deed to be Issue
certificate number and year of issue
scriptlon of the property, and the nal
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 391 year of Issuance 2C
Description of Property
01-6S-02W-286-03569-A36
Tide Creek Landing Lot 36
Name in which assessed Pan Fla
Said property being in the Count
State of Florida. Unless such certify
redeemed according to law the prop
in such certificate shall be sold to th
der at the courthouse door on the
member, 2007, at 10:00 AM.
Dated this 21st day of September, 2
Signature: Brent X. Th
By: Letha M. Wells
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla C
Octobi
Noven


TAX DEED certificate shall be sold to'the highest bidder at the lorida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed
courthouse door on the 5th day of December, according to law the property described in such
2007, at 10:00 AM. certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the
courthouse door on the 5th day of December,
sluto I LLC. the Dated this 21st day of September, 2007. 2007, at 10:00 AM.
Nas filed said
d thereon. The Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk Dated this 21st day of September, 2007.
uance, the de- By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
mes in which it Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
October 18, 25, 2007 Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
005 November 1, 8, 2007
October 18, 25, 2007
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED November 1, 8, 2007


Development,
y of Wakulla.
icate shall be
lerty described
he highest bid-
5th day of De-

!007.
lurmond, Clerk
s, Deputy Clerk
County, Florida
ar 18, 25, 2007
nber 1,8, 2007


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
.2007 TXD 045,,
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Charles W.
Ford the holder of the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and year of issi-
ance, the description of the property, and the
names in which it was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 404 year of Issuance 2000
Description of Property
Parcel 24-5S-02W-057-03108-000
Panacea Mineral Springs 1st Unit Block 7
Lots 52 & 53
Name in which assessed Robert and James Ste-
vens, Said property being in the County of Wa-
kulla. State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall
be redeemed according to law the property de-
scribed in such certificate shall be sold to the
highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 5th
day of December, 2007, at 10:00 AM.
Dated this 21st day of September, 2007.
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
October 18, 25, 2007
November 1, 8, 2007


2007 TXD 046
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Charles W.
Ford the holder of the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and year of Issu-
ance, the description of the property, and the
names in which it was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 865 year of Issuance 2000
Description of Property
30-2S-01 E-000-04967-009
30-2S1E P-16-9-M-70
Parcel cont 1.50 Ac in Sec 30
Name in which assessed Sherri Ann Pope, Said
property being in the County of Wakulla. State of
Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed
according to law the property described in such
certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the
courthouse door on the 5th day of December,
2007, at 10:00 AM.
Dated this 21st day of September, 2007.
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
October 18, 25, 2007
November 1,8, 2007



NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
2007 TXD 047
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Mars I LLC the
holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be Issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 320 year of Issuance 2005
Description of Property
25-5S-02W-046-03300-000
Aqua de Vida Block A Lots 16-22
Name in which assessed Pan Fla Development,
Said property being in the County of Wakulla.
State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be
redeemed according to law the property described
in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bid-
der at the courthouse door on the 5th day of De-
cember, 2007, at 10:00 AM.
Dated this 21st day of September, 2007.
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
October 18, 25, 2007
November 1, 8, 2007


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
2007 TXD 048
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Mars I LLC the
holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 342 year of Issuance 2005
Description of Property
25-5S-02W-046-03429-000
Aqua de Vida Block L Lots 12 & 13 & 14
Name In which assessed J. Donald Nichols, Said
property being in the County of Wakulla. State of
lorida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed
according to law the property described in such


2007 TXD 049
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Mars I LLC the
holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 360 year of Issuance 2005
Description of Property
25-5S-02W-046-03489-000
Aqua de Vida Block O Lots 10 & 11
Name in which assessed J. Donald Nichols, Said
property being in the County of Wakulla. State of
lorida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed
according to law the property described in such
certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the
courthouse door on the 5th day of December,
2007, at 10:00 AM.
Dated this 21st day of September, 2007.
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
October 18, 25, 2007
November 1, 8,.2007
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
2007 TXD 050
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Mars I LLC the
holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names In which it
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 345 year of Issuance 2005
Description of Property
25-5S-02W-046-03433-000
Aqua de Vida Block L Lots 19 & 20
Name in which assessed J. Donald Nichols, Said
property being in the County of Wakulla. State of
lorida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed
according to law the property described in such
certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the
courthouse door on the 5th day of December,
2007, at 10:00 AM.
Dated-this 21st day of September, 2007.
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
October 18, 25, 2007
November 1, 8, 2007
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
2007 TXD 051
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Mars I LLC the
holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of Issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 374 year of Issuance 2005
Description of Property
36-5S-02W-000-03568-001
36-5S-2W P-36-4-1-M-54
Being In S 1/2 of Sec 36 cont 140 Ac M/L
Name in which assessed Pan Fla Development,
Said property being in the County of Wakulla.
State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be
redeemed according to law the property described
in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bid-
der at the courthouse door on the 5th day of De-
cember, 2007, at 10:00 AM.
Dated this 21st day of September, 2007.
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
.... By-LetheaM. Wells, DeputyClerk
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
October 18, 25, 2007
November 1,8,2007
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED


2007 TXD 052
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, I
holder of the following certific
certificate for a tax deed to be
certificate number and year o
scription of the property, and th
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 312 year of Issuan
Description of Property
25-5S-02W-000-03248-012
P-17-12-M-54 commence at th
Aqua de Vida said Parcel cont
Name in which assessed Pan
Said property being in the C
State of Florida. Unless such
redeemed according to law the
in such certificate shall be sold
der at the courthouse door on
cember, 2007, at 10:00 AM.
Dated this 21st day of Septemb
Signature: Brent
By: Letha M.
Clerk of Circuit Court Wak
O
N
NOTICE OF APPLICATION


2
that Pluto I LLC the
cate has filed said
issued thereon. The
f issuance, the de-
he names in which it

nce 2005


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
2007 TXD 054
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Pluto I LLC the
holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 343 year of Issuance 2005
Description of Property
25-5S-02W-046-03431-000
Aqua de Vida Block L Lots 15 & 16
Name in which assessed J. Donald Nichols, Said
property being in the County of Wakulla. State of
Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed
according to law the property described in such
certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the
courthouse door on the 5th day of December,
2007, at 10:00 AM.
Dated this 21st day of September, 2007.
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
October 18, 25, 2007
November 1, 8, 2007
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
2007 TXD 055
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Pluto I LLC the
holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 336 year of Issuance 2005
Description of Property
25-5S-02W-046-03414-000
Aqua de Vida Block I Lots 14 & 15
Name in which assessed J. Donald Nichols, Said
property being in the County of Wakulla. State of
Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed
according to law the property described in such
certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the
courthouse door on the 5th day of December,
2007, at 10:00 AM.
Dated this 21st day of September, 2007.
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
October 18, 25, 2007
November 1, 8, 2007
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
2007 TXD 056
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Pluto I LLC the
holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the de-
scriptlon of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 321 year of Issuance 2005
Description of Property
25-5S-02W-046-03301-000
Aqua de Vida Block A Lots 23-26
Name in which assessed Pan Fla Development,
Said property being in the County of Wakulla.
State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be
redeemed according to law the property described
in such certificate shall be sold to the. highest bid-
der at the courthouse door on the 5th day of De-
cember, 2007, at 10:00 AM.
Dated this 21st day of September, 2007.
. . . Signature: Brent X Thurmond, Clerk
By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
October 18, 25, 2007
November 1, 8, 2007
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
2007 TXD 057
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Pluto I LLC the
holder of.the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:


Certificate # 361 year of Issuance 2005
Description of Property
e NW cor of Lot 26 25-5S-02W-046-03522-000
1 AC M/L Aqua de Vida Block B Lots 5, 6, 15, & 16
Fla Development, Name in which assessed J. Donald Nichols, Said
countyy of Wakulla. property being in the County of Wakulla. State of
certificate shall be Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed
Property described according to law the property described in such
d to the highest bid- certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the
the 5th day of De- courthouse door on the 5th day of December,
2007, at 10:00 AM.
ber, 2007. Dated this 21st day of September, 2007.
X. Thurmond, Clerk Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
Wells, Deputy Clerk By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
;ulla County,.Florida Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
October 18, 25, 2007 October 18, 25, 2007
november 1, 8, 2007 November 1, 8, 2007
FOR TAX DEED NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED


2007 TXD 053
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Pluto I LLC the
holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 349 year of Issuance 2005
Description of Property
25-5S-02W-046-03452-000
Aqua de Vida Block M Lots f8,, 19, 20
Name In which assessed J. Donald Nichols, Said
property being in the County of Wakulla. State of


2007 TXD 058
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Pluto I LLC the
holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 359 year of Issuance 2005
Description of Property
25-5S-02W-046-03483-000
Aqua de Vida Block N Lots 34, 35 & 36
Name In which assessed J. Donald Nichols, Said
property being in the County of Wakulla. State of


Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed
according to law the property described in such
certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the
courthouse door on the 5th day of December,
2007, at 10:00 AM.
Dated this 21st day of September, 2007.
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
* By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
October 18, 25, 2007
November 1, 8, 2007
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
2007 TXD 059
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Pluto I LLC the
holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 352 year of Issuance 2005
Description of Property
25-5S-02W-046-03455-000
Aqua de Vida.Block M Lots 23 & 24
Name in which assessed J. Donald Nichols, Said
property being in the County qf Wakulla. State of
Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed
according to law the property described in such
certificate shall be sold to the highest.bidder at the
courthouse door on the 5th day of December,
2007, at 10:00 AM.
Dated this 21st day of September, 2007.
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
October 18, 25, 2007
November 1, 8,2007
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
2007 TXD 060
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Mars I LLC the
holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 364 year of Issuance 2005
Description of Property
25-5S-02W-046-03526-000
Aqua de Vida Block S Lot 1
Name in which assessed J. Donald Nichols, Said
property being in the County of Wakulla. State of
Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed
according to law the property described in such
certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the
courthouse door on the 5th day of December,
2007, at 10:00 AM.
Dated this 21st day of September, 2007.
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
October 18, 25, 2007
November 1, 8, 2007
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
2007 TXD 061
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Mars I LLC the
holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 353 year of Issuance 2005
Description of Property
25-5S-02W-046-03470-000
Aqua de Vida Block N Lot 13 & 14 -
Name in which assessed J. Donald Nichols, Said
property being In the County of Wakulla. State of
Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed
according to law the property described in such
certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the
courthouse door on the 5th day of December,
2007, at 10:00 AM.
SDated this 21st day of September, 2007.
Signature: Brent X; Thurmond, Clerk
By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
October 18, 25, 2007
November 1, 8, 2007


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 2007-40-FC
DIVISION
HSBC BANK USA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANTHONY STEWART, et al,
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated October
24, 2007 and entered in Case No. 2007-40-FC of
the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit
in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein
HSBC BANK USA, N.A., is the Plaintiff and AN-
THONY STEWART; JEANNIE STEWART; AC-
CREDITED HOME LENDERS, INC. SUCCES-
SOR BY MERGER TO AAMEES FUNDING COR-
PORATION; are the Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT
FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 29th day of Novem-
ber, 2007, the following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment:
LOT 30 OF EASTGATE SUBDIVI-
SION (UNRECORDED) AND BEING
MORE PARTICULARLY DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE
MONUMENT MARKING THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 59
OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF
LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 72 DE-
GREES 30 MINUTES 30 SECONDS
WEST ALONG THE NORTH
BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 59 A DS- -
TANCE OF 2365.00 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT THENCE
SOUTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES
45 SECONDS EAST 1050.52 FEET


TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE NORTHEAST COR-
NER OF SAID EASTGATE SUBDIVI-
SION; THENCE ALONG THE
NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID
EASTGATE SUBDIVISION RUN
SOUTH 72.DEGREES 40 MINUTES
45 SECONDS WEST 1000.00 FEET
TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON
THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY
BOUNDARY OF A COUNTY ROAD
(GRIFFIN ROAD); THENCE ALONG
SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY
SOUTH 17 DEGREES 51 MINUTES.
45 SECONDS EAST 466.75 FEET
TO THE CENTERLINE A 50 FOOT
ROADWAY EASEMENT (MIDWAY
COURT); THENCE ALONG SAID
CENTERLINE NORTH 72 DEGREES
40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST
300.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72
DEGREES 40 MINUTES 45 SEC-
ONDS EAST 100.00 FEET; THENCE
RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 51 MIN-
UTES 45 SECONDS EAST 155.59
FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DE-
GREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS
WEST 100.00 FEET; THENCE RUN
NORTH 17 DEGREES 51 MINUTES
45 SECONDS WEST 155.59 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
SUBJECT TO A 5 FOOT ROADWAY
EASEMENT ALONG THE NORTH-
ERN PORTION OF SAID PROP-
ERTY.
A/K/A 24 MIDWAY COURT, CRAW-
FORDVIL, FL 32327
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file
a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court
on Oct. 24, 2007.
Brent X. Thurmond
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Stephanie Rankin
Deputy Clerk
November 1, 8, 2007
June 14, 21, 2007

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
.CASE NO.:07-89-FC
GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAMES JEREMY VICE and TAMMY L. VICE,
husband and wife,
Defendants.

NOTICE Of SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the
Order of Summary.Judgment of Foreclosure in
this cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County,
Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla
County, Florida described as. .
Commence at the Southwest comer of Lot 24 of
the Hartsfield Survey of Lands ih Wakulla County,,
Florida, thence run North 17 degrees 30 minutes .
00 seconds West along the West boundary of said
Lot 24, a distance of 433.35 feet to the POINT OF'
BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING
continue North 17 degrees 30 minutes 00 sec-
onds West fori said West boundary 433i35feet ,
to an iron rodantrdcap (marked #7160), thence
leaving said Westiundary run North 72degrees.
30 minutes 13aeoornds East 201.00 feet to an iron
rod and cap (#7160), thence run South 17 de- ..
grees 30 minutes 01 seconds East 433.33 feet to.-
an iron rod and cap (marked #7160), thence run
South 72 degrees 29 minutes 48 seconds West
201.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING con-
taining2.00 acres, more or less.
SUBJECT TO and together with a 20.00 foot wide.
roadway easement as described in Official Re-
cords Book 529, Page 867 of the Public Records..
of Wakulla County, Florida and described as fol- -
lows: 20 foot roadway lying 10.00 feet on each -
side of the following described centerline: Con-
mence at a concrete monument marking the
Southwest comer of the Northwest Quarter of Lot"
24 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla
County, Florida, and thence run North 17 degrees,
30 minutes West along the West boundary of said,
Lot 24,-a distance of 433.35 feetto a concrete
monument, thence run North 72 degrees 23 min-.
utes 53 seconds East 586.50 feet thence run
North 19 degrees 04 minutes 07 seconds West
90.52 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING of said
centerilne. From said POINT OF BEGINNING
thence run South 69 degrees 55 minutes 36 sec-
onds West 58.46 feet, thence run South 63 de- -
grees 18 minutes 10 seconds West 124.92 feet,-.
thence run South 68 degrees 21 minutes 45 sec-.
onds West 125.27 feet, thence run South 72 de-'
grees 15 minutes 25 seconds West 52.22 feet, --
thence run South 77 degrees 56 minutes 02 sec-
onds West 218.28 feet, thence run SpUth 78 de-
grees 00 minutes 17 seconds West 26.67 feet,
thence run South 71 degrees 25 minutes 26 sec-.
onds West 26.09 feet, thence run South 65 de- -
grees 55 minutes 26 seconds West 85.52 feet to .
the centerline of Iroquois Road for the termination.
of said centerline.
A/K/A: 10 Brave Drive, Crawfordville, FL
at Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at
the Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Court-
house, Crawfordville, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on
November 29, 2007.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN -
THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS Of
THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE;
A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. ;
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this
24th day of Oct.
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
BY: Stephanie Rankin
Deputy Cler)
Steve M. Watkins
215 Delta Court
Tallahassee, Fl 32303
(850)523-0550
November 1,8, 2007

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA .
CASE NO.: 07-127-CA
STEPHEN J. REMKE and BRENDA
R. REMKE, Husband and Wife,
Plaintiffs,
vs.


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Page 4B-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007


Legal Notice

ELLA CENEY BROWN, her unknown
spouse, unknown heirs or beneficiaries
of the Estate of ELLA CENEY BROWN,
if deceased, and any and all others
claiming by and through ELLA CENEY
BROWN,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO DEFENDANT, ELLA CENEY BROWN, HER
UNKNOWN SPOUSE, UNKNOWN HEIRS OR
BENEFICIARIES OF THE ESTATE OF ELLA CE-
NEY BROWN, IF DECEASED, AND ANY AND
ALL OTHERS CLAIMING BY AND THROUGH
ELLA CENEY BROWN.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action pursuant
to Chapter 65.081, Florida Statutes (2007), to
quiet and confirm title of Plaintiffs, STEPHEN J.
REMKE and BRENDA R. REMKE, in and to lands
located in Wakulla County, Florida:
The East half of the Southwest Quarter of the
Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (El/2
of SW1/4 of NE1/4 of NE1/4) of Section 3, Town-
ship 3, Township 3 South, Range one West, Less
one-half (1/2) acre of land heretofore conveyed of
the above described property as recorded in Deed
Book 53 on Page 430 of the Public Records of
Wakulla County, Florida.
LESS AND EXCEPT:
Commence at the Northeast corner of the East
Half of the Southwest Quarter of the Northeast
Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section Three
(3), Township 3 South, Range 1 West, and run
South 60 feet, thence West 210 feet, thence
South 106.2 feet to the POINT OF BEGININNG.
From said POINT OF BEGINNfNG run West 100
feet, thence South 217.8 feet, thence East 100
feet, thence North 217.8 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING, containing one-half (1/2) of.an acre,
more or less, in the NE1/4 of NE1/4 of Section 3,
Township 3 South, Range 1 West.
LESS AND EXCEPT:
Commence at an iron pipe marking the Northeast
Corner of the West Half of the Northeast Quarter
of the Northeast Quarter of Section 3, Township 3
South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida,
and thence run South 659.77 feet to an iron pipe,
thence run South 00 degrees 49 minutes 29 sec-
onds West 131.52 feet to the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING con-
tinue South 00 degrees 49 minutes 29 seconds
West 208.71 feet, thence run North 89 degrees 10
minutes 31 seconds West 210.00 feet, thence run
North 00 degrees 49 minutes 29 seconds East
208.71 feet, thence run South 89 degrees 10 min-
utes 31 seconds East 210.00 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING, containing 1.01 acres, more or
less.
LESS AND EXCEPT:
A tract or parcel of land situate in the West Half
(W1/2) of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast
Quarter (NE1/4 of NE1/4) of Section Three (3),
Township Three (3) South, Range One (1) West,
described by metes and bounds as follows: Com-
mence at the Northeast corner of the West Half of
the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter
(W1/2 of NE1/4 of NE1/4) of said Section 3 and
run thence South 1000 feet to a point which is the
POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF
BEGINNING run West 105 feet, thence run South
210 feet, thence East 105 feet, thence North 210
feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing
one-half (1/2) acre, more or less, in the NE1/4 of
Section Three (3), Township Three (3) South,
-Range One (1) West.


Drive, Suite C, Post Office Box 1720, Crawford-
ville, Florida 32326, on or before November 12,
2007, and file the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on the Plaintiffs' attor-
ney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint.
DATED ON Oct. 5, 2007.
Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court
By: Becky Whale
As Deputy Clerk
October 11, 18, 25, 2007
November 1, 2007
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 2007-52-FC consolidated with
CASE NO. 2007-42-FC
CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARION T. BRATHWAITE, ISHMAEL A.
BRATHWAITE, EQUITY DIRECT MORTGAGE
CORP., BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., and UN-
KNOWN TENANTSS,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated October 8, 2007, in Case no.
2007-52-FC, consolidated with Case No.
07-42-FC, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judi-
cial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, in
which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and
MARION T. BRATHWAITE, ISHMAEL A.
BRATHWAITE, EQUITY DIRECT MORTGAGE
CORP., BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., DEUTSCHE
BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY and BRIDLE
GATE HOMEOWNERS' ASSOCIATION, INC. are
the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the front lobby of the Wakulla
County Courthouse in Crawfordville, Wakulla
County, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on Nov. 29, 2007,
the property set forth in the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure and more particularly described as
follows:
Lot 62 of BRIDLEGATE, phase II, ACCORDING
TO THE Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3,
Page(s) 59, of the Public Records of Wakulla
County, Florida.
Dated: Oct. 8, 2007
Brent X. Thurmond
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Tamika Peterson
Deputy CLerk
Garvin B. Bowden, Esq.
Gardner, Wadsworth, Duggar, Bist, & Wiener,P.A.
1300 Thomaswood Drive
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
October 25, 2007
November 1, 2007
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LEON COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2007-2406
DIVISION:
BECKY B. ROCK & MITCHELL J. ROCK, SR.
PETITIONER,
AND

RESPONDENT.


As more recently described by Edwin G. Brown & NOTICE OF ACTION FOR TEMPRARY CUS-
Associates, Inc.: TODY BY EXTENDED FAMILY


Steve Remke


2.51 ACRES
I hereby certify that this is a true and correct rep-
resentation of the following described property and
that this description substantially meets the mini-
rum technical standard for land surveying (Chap-
ter 61 G17, Florida Administrative Code).
Commence at an iron pipe marking the Northeast
Corner of the West Half of the Northeast Quarter
of the Northeast Quarter of Section 3, Township 3
South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida;
thence South 659.62 feet to an iron pipe for the
POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT
dF BEGINNING run South 00 degrees 48 min-
utes 53 seconds West 131.52 feet to a rod and
cap; thence North 89 degrees 11 minutes 07 sec-
onds West'210.00 feet to a rod and cap; thence
South 00 degrees 45 minutes 08 seconds West
34.68 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 89 de-
grees 12 minutes 20 seconds West 100.00 feet to
a rod and cap; thence South 00 degrees 47 min-
utes 40 seconds West 217.80 feet to a rod and
cap; thence South 89 degrees 12 minutes 20 sec-
onds East 100.00 feet to a rod and cap; thence
North 00 degrees 47 minutes 40 seconds East
43.79 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 89 de-
grees 12 minutes 15 seconds East 104.94 feet to
a concrete monument; thence South 00 degrees
47 minutes 35 seconds West 209.79 feet to a con-
.crte..monument; thence South 89 degrees 11
minutes 55 seconds East 104.88 feet to a con-
ciete monument; thence South 00 degrees 55
minutes 57 seconds West 51.70 feet to a rod and
cap; thence South 89 degrees 01 minutes 27 sec-
onids West 316.50 feet to a rod and cap; thence
North 00 degrees 42 minutes 27 seconds West
208.67 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 00 de-
grees 41 minutes 26 seconds West 410.40'feet to
a rod and cap; thence South 89 degrees 00 min-
utes 45 seconds East 332.62 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING, containing 2.51 acres more or
less.
The undersigned surveyor has not been provided
current title opinion or abstract of matters affect-
ing title or boundary to the subject property. It is
possible there are deeds of records, unrecorded
deeds, easements or other instruments, which
could affect the boundaries.
-s- Wade G. Brown
Surveyor & Mapper
Florida Certificate No. 5959 (LB6475)
Parcel ID 03-3S-01W-000-04244-000
has been filed against you. You are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on Mary Ellen.Davis, the Plaintiffs' attorney,
whose address is Penson & Davis, P.A., 17 High


Wakulla

Real


Sonya Hall
Lic. Real Estate Broker
"Specializing in Wakulla Co."
(850)926-5084
FOR RENT:
* 2Br 1Ba House $625 + Sec. Dep.
. 2Br 2Ba Duplex $750 + Sec. Dep.
* 3Br 2.5Ba Twnhs $900 + Sec. Dep.
* 3Br 2Ba House $750 + Sec. Dep.
* 3Br 2Ba House $775 + Sec. Dep.
* 3Br 2Ba House 1 Car Garage
$1100 + Sec. Dep. (Avail. Aug. 1st)
* 4Br 2Ba DWMH $800 + Sec. Dep.



Mallard

Pond
. 3 - -. .t . .


March 9, 2007
TO: TIMOTHY OWENS & SUSAN FAULK


LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action had been filed
against you and you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to it on Becky B.
Rock, whose address is 9214 Bartlett Lane, Talla-
hassee, FI 32305 on or before 10-12-2007, and
file the original with the clerk of this court at 301 S.
Monroe St Rm 153, Tallahassee, FI 32301, before
service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If
you fail to do so, a default may be entered against


Certified Florida Wastewater
Operator - Wakulla County
ESG Operations, Inc. is one of the fastest
growing utility management and engineer-
ing companies in the Southeast, currently
providing engineering and operations
services in 6 states across the Southeast
U.S.
Responsibilities include:
Operating the Wastewater Plants on a
daily basis, monitoring equipment, chemi-
cals, and assuring the effluent water meets
applicable standards
Knowledge of process control and perti-
nent laboratory procedures
Valid Florida Wastewater Operators License
Compensation is commensurate with
experience along with a generous benefits
and bonus plan. Relocation assistance is
offered.
John Eddlemon
1815 Satellite Blvd, Suite 103
Duluth, GA 30097
employment@esginc.net
Fax:
678-475-9293

Exhibit Specialist: construction and
installation of museum displays,
minimum of 2 yrs. experience, cabi-
netry, carpentry or remodeling skills
are required. Travel. FT w/benefits,
EOE, Drug free. Call personnel,
224-6414.
Exhibits Shop Assistant - assist in
construction, packing, and shipping
museum displays and general shop
help. Experience with power tools re-
quired. Travel. FT or PT, EOE, Drug
Free. Call personnel 224-6414.
Local Cleaning Lady hiring full-time
day cleaning personnel. Must have
experience, transportation and must
pass a background check. Serious
inquiries only. Call (850)509-0623.

Wakulla Christian
Elementary School
(Just N of Crawfordville on U.S. 319)
Would like to contact
qualified substitute pre-
school or lower elemen-
tary teachers & aides for
future employment.
Please call 926-5583 for
application.


CLASSIFIED


Wakulla Christian
Elementary Schoo
(Just N of Crawfordville on U.S. 319)
Wishes to employ a
Teacher Aide Full-Time
Monday through Friday.
'Must be 18 or over.
Call 850-926-5583 for
appointment with Principa
or fax resume to
850-926-5825.

115 Work Wanted

Dixon & Dixon LLC. All types of ca
pentry repairs, decks, fencing, floc
ing, termite, water damage. L
censed, Insured/LLC. (850)528-225
120 Services and Busi-
nesses


U m l


Casey's

Lawn &

Tree

i Service

S926-5759


I, I 528-3478



Harold Burse Stump Grinding
962-6174


1


A NEW LOOK PAINTING, serving
Wakulla County for 14 years. Li-
censed & Insured. Call Jim or Teresa
Porter. (850)926-2400.
A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING
Free Estimates
Licensed - John Farrell
926-5179
AIR-CON OF WAKULLA
HEATING & A/C
Maintenance & Service
Gary Limbaugh, 926-5592
FL Lic. #CAC1814304
3232 Crawfordville Highway
ALL PRO FENCE
Residential-Commercial
Fencing. 519-1416.

ANYTIME ELECTRIC
Specializing in repair and service,
residential and commercial, homes
and mobile homes. 24-hour service.
Mark Oliver, ER0015233. 421-3012.
BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE
Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway.
Larry Carter Owner/Operator.
850-925-7931, 850-694-7041. Li-
censed/Insured.
C & R Tractor/Backhoe Services,
large tract and residential site clear-
ing rock, dirt, and road base hauling.
call Crandall (850)933-3346.
Nikki's Trucking, LLC. Licensed and
bonded. Mobile home transport & in-
stall services. We also haul rock,
sand and gravel. Donnie Cruse
(850)510-2195. Nicole Cruse
(850)510-5498.


you for the relief demanded in the petition. J SERVICES n s ;
Copies of all court documents in this case, includ-SERVICESLawn service haul-
ing orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit ing; cleanup; phone jacks installed;
Court's office. You may review these documents W house washing, etc. Call 421-9365
upon request. W e e house washing, etc. Call 421-9365
upofor estimate.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court"s of-
fice notified of your current address (You may file
Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court
Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future pa-
pers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address
on record at the clerk's office. Ran V II ILL 251-8860
Warning: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules - 8 ( 6
sure of documents and information. Failure to
comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal $102,000 'N w Construction
or striking of pleadings.
Dated Sept. 14, 2007.t walking distance
Clerk of the Circuit Court Cute 2BR/2BA- Short walking distance
Adrian Carroll -
Deputy Clerk I . to Lake Ellen with public boat ramp.
DOctob epr11,16,25 ,"2007 .- Lake Ellen is a large lake with many
November, 1 2007 recreational opportunities. Hurricane


110 Help Wanted I


Branch Managers/Owners: Needed
for Internet Mall. No start-up cost or
monthly fees. Team Force/Universal
Fortu nte Group
http://mpm.cauleys.com

Laborer, masonry work. 519-5057.


September
Top Producer


M PROPERTIES
(850) 926-9991



LA!


Brenda Greg
Aaron Adams
508-7760 545-6058




n1n


Lisa
Council
519-1080







Kelly
Dykes
528-3063


James
Roberts
570-5074


Penny McKinney, CRS
Broker/Owner
508-8929


Dooin
Ridley
294-7966


"- f resistant solid textured concrete block
Construction with all tile and carpet
flooring. 55 Lake Ellen Dr.


.962-2437 _

PORTER PAINTING, LLC
Residenrtial/Commercial, New Con-
struction. Remodeling. Soft
Wash/Pressure Wash. Licensed and
Insured. Free Estimates. Worker's
Comp. Certified. (850) 519-0416.
In-home daycare in Crawfordville has
openings. Experience & references.
Please call 926-3547 for'more infor-
mation.


HEY YOU - NEED QUIK $
WE BUY:


-Copper
-Aluminum
-Transmissions
- A/C Compressors
-Aluminum Rims
-Catalytic Convertors


- Starters
-Lead
-Batteries
- Alternators
-etc.


Call: 528-7077
519-0870 * 962-1013
















KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR
Commercial, residential and mobile
homes. Repair, sales, service, instal-
lation. All makes and models. Lic.
#RA0062516. 926-3546.
Mowing & Tractor work. Lot & Debris '
clean-up. Free estimates. 556-3333.
Mr. Stump
STUMP GRINDING
Quick Service
Cellular: 509-8530


Individual lots for sale in Mallard Pond subdivision in Wakulla
County. Located in Crawfordville 1.25 miles east of the courthouse
on Lower Bridge Road, these lots have central water and sewer, feature
paved roads with a bike path, underground utilities, streetlights, as
well as two private parks. Lots sizes range from .33 acres to .5 acres.
Deed restricted community, homes only. Prices start at $39,900.
Build your own home or bring us your dream home plans and we
will build it for the actual cost of construction plus 12%.
TMT Builders, Inc. * CRC 1327521
Randy Merritt, PE Licensed and Insured * 251-8860


Play Where You Live!

SHELL POINT BEACH
Reduced $40,000
53 JANET DRIVE.PARADISE VILLAGE
3BR/2BA DW with 1,152 sq. ft. plus large
screened porch. #1025 Only $289,000
Reduced $35,000
HARBOUR POINT SNUG HARBOR
Town house 2BR/2BA & loft, 1,440 sq. ft.
with fabulous views #815 Only $349,900
2 choice locations in golf cart community, security gate, pool,
nice dock on deep water canals to gulf. Short walk to beach.
S Coastal Hwv./Sprini Creek Hwy. Crawfordville
T.Ats. (850) 926-8120 www.shellpointrealty.com (850) 926-9261 Jggg


oott McKinney
Realtor
508-0707


(850) 697-9020


September
Top Seller "

September September
Top Lister Most Listings .




SLoren W.
Joiner
544-3508
Ann Sandy
Henson Lott
519-1215 926-1010


turner
Browne
510-9684


Julie
Cox-Money
591-2599


Rebecca
Eisman
228-1003







David
Rossetti
591-6161


David
Hoover
519-7944


Richard
Ryan
228-5688


Debbie
Lewis
273-1030


Alisa
Smith
545-9220


t 1


J.J.
Mahaffey
933-8765


Katrina
Mathews
528-5856


John


Sharlot
Snyder
508-4492


i E Kathy
j'= Crosby
694-1487







Bonnie
Revell
519-1223







Stephanie
Watson
251-9263


Kim
Cieslinski
445-7798







Deanne
DelBeato
933-0120







Richard
Ridley
519-3378




tU


Alicia
Wellman
510-9662


M(KINNEY


PROPERTIES


?'e Ytre Wakuffa,
q4'a *�-,


Affordable

Homes in a

Private Community

with Bike Trails,

Two Parks with

Fish Ponds, and

Comcast.


SStarting at

.. $19, 900 .


Phone 933-3899
Triple H.
Construction Inc.
CRC058555


* * -


i


I









THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007-Page 5B


Munges Tree- 24 hour emergency
service (850)421-8104. Firewood also
available.
Need Cash?
Got Junk Cars, Trucks, & Scrap?
I Buy Scrap Metals!!
850-838-JUNK (5865)
State Certified Scales.
Semi-retired nanny available to care
for one infant in my home. Refer-
ences & background check. All hours
available. 926-8871.






Antiques and Uniques
"Something for Everyone"
61 Rose Street, Sopchoppy
sistersanfiquesanduniques@yahoo.com
850-962-2550
Open Tuesday-Saturday 10a.m, -6p.m.

Tria's Home Daycare is now accept-
ing 6wks-8yrs of age. 24hrs, includ-
ing weekends. 421-1982 or
210-2491.
We do alterations, embroidery,
monogramming, sewing in my home.
Cal April @ 251-3323.
125 Schools and Instruc-
tion

Michelle Snow
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Piano-Voice-Guitar-Woodwinds
926-7627
North Florida Child Development,
Inc. is now accepting bids on a 1995
Blue Bird School Bus. For more in-
formation please contact Gerald
Thompson at 850-639-5080*14.
Please mail bids to:
North FI. Child Development, Inc.
PO Box 38
Weewahitchka, Fl 32465
Closing Date: November 2, 2007

200 Items For Sale


$150 Queen Pillow-Top Mattress Set.
New in plastic with warranty.
850-222-9879.
Beautiful High End Dining Room Set,
Leather inlays, detailed carving, felt-
lined/dovetail drawers, hardwood.
Table, 6 chairs, & curio. Retailed at
$7995. Still New will sacrifice at
$2999 OBO. Delivery available.
850-425-8374.
Contemporary Love Seat/Sofa. Cas-
ual yet elegant. Never used/still in
plastic. Sugg list $1399, sacrifice
$899. Can deliver. (850)222-9879.
Designer Bedroom complete 8 piece
set including TV Armoire, all new.
Sacrifice $995. (850)545-7112. Can
deliver.
Dinette Set, Solid Wood table & 4
chairs-$149. New In Box. Call Sandi
(850) 222-9879.
High Quality 100% Leather. New/still
boxed. Approx, woth over $4900.
Sofa $999, Love $899, Chair $799.
Will separate or take $2500 for whole
set. Can deliver. 850-545-7112.
Leather Loveseat, Brown, over-
stuffed cushions, hardwood frames
w/lifetime warranty. Like New. Re-
tailed at $1999, will let go for $799
OBO. (850)545-7112.
Mattress-New Nasa Visco Memory
Foam mattress set with warranty.
Never used. Must move: $350.
850-222-7783.
King Pillow-Top Mattress Set $299.
New in plastic with warranty.
850-545-7112. Can deliver.
Solid Wood sleigh bed-Brand New in
box, $250. (850)425-8374..

300 Misc. for Sale

Beautiful pine dining room set-table,
6 chairs, large china hutch; Red slip
cover sofa and recliner. Call Donna
850-508-1235.
Steel Buildings Custom Sizes, Sur-
plus Inventory Discounted.
www.scg-grp.com source #0F3.
Dave (850)251-4947.


2 mortar mixers. One for $1500 & 305 Machinery Tools & L
one for $500. 519-5057.I Eauin I


HABITAT RE-STORE
Abundance of bedding, sofas, inte-
rior/exterior doors, windows/screens,
fiberglass shower units and light fix-
tures. Open Tuesday thru Saturday,
9 a.m. to 5"p.m., 940 Shadeville Hwy.
(Hwy. 61), 926-4544.
Rawleigh Products: "A Friend of The
Family Since 1889." Remember the
Rawleigh Man? Order Online and
Save Huge! http://www.cauleys.com
Sofa w/small stripes, green and
beige. Great condition. 2 yrs old.
$250.
4-pc Queen bedroom set. Great con-
dition. $150.
Queen mattress set in great condi-
tion. $125.
926-9948 or 926-6247.

220 Cars

2002 Honda Odyssey Ex. Silver,
Automatic, V6. 139,000 miles. Good
condition, runs great. $9,450. Call
926-2621 or 566-2782.
230 Motor Homes and
Campers

For sale: 2004 Coachman chapparal
fifth wheel. 27' 5" with 12' side-out.
Lots of extras. $17,500. 421-9534 or
556-3333.




"Open Houses"
Open houses provide an oppor-
tunity for both the buyer and the
seller to accomplish their goals.
The seller gets the chance to show
off their home, while the buyer
gets an opportunity to actually see
the home in its best light.

Susan Council
(850) 251-1468
Broker/Owner,
Alliance Realty Company
www.susancouncil.com


If you're trying to sell your
house, there are some things that
you can do to help,make sure that
your home makes the best appear-
ance possible for your visitors.
The very first is to give your home
a good, thorough cleaning. If you
want to leave an outstanding im-
pression with prospective buyers,
then you must make your home
appear outstanding as well.
An enemy of successful open
house showings is any foul or mys-
terious odor in the home. If there
are foul odors in your home, those
will most likely be remembered
more than any of the positive as-
pects of your home.
Finally, if you must remain at
home while others come through
to view it, resist the temptation to
follow them around and sell them
on all of its features. Many people
feel pressured if you don't allow
them some space of their own.
Just call me and Alliance Realty to
ensure a positive, memorable open
house!



A( ALLIANCE
E A I T Y C M P A N


Gehl teleloader w/grappel bucket.
Model CT5-16T. $35,000. 556-3333.


Okra & green boiling peanuts. Raker
Farms. 926-7561.

335 Pets

3 lab puppies. All shots. $50.
519-3756 or 962-1269.
Adopt a pet from the animal shelter:
Dogs:
Aussie mix
Lab, yellow
Labs, black and brown
Terrier mix
Hound mixes
Jack Russell mix
Lab mixes
St. Beard mix
Lab/Husky mix
Chihuahua mixes
Rat Terrier mixes
Many other nice mixes. Come and
take a look.


Puppies:
Lab mixes
Hound mixes


Adult cats and kittens, very nice.
Get hook, round, & tapeworms. Ro-
tate Happy Jack tapeworm tablets
and Liqui-Vict.(tag). SOPCHOPPY
HARDWARE (962-3180) (www.hap-
pyjackinc.com)

355 Yard Sales

2-family Garage Sale. Sat. Nov. 3rd
7:00-2:00. Boys clothes 2-8, stroll-
ers, high chairs, bouncers, play crib,
misc. items. Songbird sub. 53 Gold-
finch Way.

3-family yard sale. Furniture, lots of
new and used Christmas items.
Something for everyone. In front of
Mike's Automotive in Sopchoppy.
Sat. 8-until.

Back Again. Sat. Yard Sale-ABC
Storage 8A.M. No early birds. 3743
Crawfordville Hwy. 508-5177.

Find treasures and historical publica-,
tions at The Old Jail Museum Thrift
Shop, High Drive, behind Court-
house, Saturdays 9 to 1.
Mark your calendar for next Sat. Nov.
10. First annual Lesha Neighborhood
yard sale.


120 Services and Busi- 275 Home Furnishings 320 Farm Products &
I nesses I I Produce I


ACROSS
1. Nose-in-the-air
sorts
6. Adriatic port
10. Robin Cook thriller
14. USNA part
15. "Author
unknown," for
short
16. Congregational
comeback
17. 1970 Creedence
Clearwater
Revival hit
20. Strong wind
21. Marina del
22. Planet beyond
Saturn
23. Seeks a doggie
treat
25. Mideast's Gulf of

26. Pain-relieving
drug
29. Ovine utterance
30. Regarding, in
memos
34. Dressing style
35. MetLife
competitor
37. Pricing word
38. Acting the
contrarian
41. "Life _beach"
42. Menagerie units
43. Get a feeling
44. Beta version, e.g.
46. Up to, in ads
47. Rug-cleaning
gadget
48. Mayberry moppet
50. Like a Jekyll-Hyde
personality
51. Baby syllables
54. Klutz
55. ZZ Top, musically
59. Hobbes, to Calvin
62. Satirical Mort
63. Mideast's Gulf of

64. Overdo the acting


510 Acreage for Sale


20 acres $179,000 Wakulla County.
Call Susan McKaye, owner/agent
(850)510-2477. Ochlockonee Bay
Realty.
www.hardwoodhammock.com


65. "Can't argue with
that"
66. Take a pounding
67. Cozumel cash

DOWN
1. Close-fitting
2. California wine
valley
3. Locket shape
4. Like some circus
riders
5. -pitch softball
6. Causes of ruin
7. 48-Across's dad
8. Go bad
9. Lacking
compassion
10. Poolside
enclosure
11. Black cat, to
some
12. Beanery handout


11C Townhome in Camelot subdivi-
sion/Crawfordville. 3BR/2BA
$885.00/month. Requires 1 year
lease and security deposit of
$885.00. No pets. Ready at end of
July. Ochlockonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001.
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com.


Huge Christmas Bazaar, Yard, and
Bake Sale.
Arts/crafts, Christmas decorations,
wreaths, baskets, flower arrange-
ments, artificial trees. Brand new
clothes and shoes, furniture, books,
tapes, toys-too much to mention.
First Baptist Church of Wakulla Sta-
tion. 945 Woodville Hwy.
7:OOAM-Until. Rain or Shine. Nov.
2-3.


Sat. Nov. 3rd 8-12. 539 Rock Rd.
(Just off highway 267 west of Wa-
kulla Station). Cancel if rains.


Efficiency apartment (1BR/living
room) for rent. $550/mo. Electric and
water included. References required.
WI M S Wnhiffln l Cf ll


500 Real Estate, Homes 926 r5575 or 459-7162.
Mobiles926-5 or
1 520 Townhouses for Rent


CASH in 5 days!! we buy existing
mortgages, homes, trailers, lots &
land! We give equity advances &
make new mortgage loans! Ron Har-
ris, Traders Realty, Inc., Licensed
Mortgage Lender 878-3957.


Duplex in Tallahassee behind FSU off
Lake Bradford. 1 ready to rent, 1
needs rehab. $85,000. Call
407-718-8469 ext. 300.


2BR/21/2BA Townhouse for rent.
With screened porch. 18C Old Court-
house Way. Section 8 accepted.
$850/mo. 933-5242.


Shell Point
926-7811

Florida Coastal
Properties, Inc.


1,074 sq. ft. Retail Store Front for
Rent in Lewiswood Center, Wood-
ville. Growing area, convenient to
Wakulla and Leon Counties.
421-5039.

Mini-Warehouse Spaces for lease.,
8X10 and 10X12 now available.
Come by or call Wakulla Realty,-
926-5084.
CLASSIFIED
$7 Per Week!


Crawfordville
926-5111

Silver Coast
Realty


NO TRICKS - ALL TREATS on these fabulous properties!!!
1. ONCE IN A LIFETIME do you get such a property. This pristine sanctuary of 30�
acres runs along the meandering Sopchoppy River for a mile, a private deeded easement
road 1/3rd mile and 30 ft. wide gives you access through the surrounding Apalachicola
National Forest. Priced below appraisal at $825,000. Appointment necessary to
show/ask for property #3913-W MLS# 176495.
2. PRICE, PRICE, PRICE, simply put, it's the PRICE for this all brick contemporary
home, very noticeable! Not to mention it has 3,000 sq. ft. 4BR/3BA, 5th could be an of-
fice, 9' ceilings, and a large in-ground pool on 4.5 acres (MOL). Only 15 minutes from
the capital!!! Definitely worth a trip to see, so call for property. #105-W MLS# 164480
PRICED'AT ONLY $399,900.
3. AFTER THE SUN GOES DOWN - Crickets sing and pine trees whisper in the gentle
setting of this 6.74 � acre parcel that adjoins the Bike Trail. Close to Tallahassee - Priced
at $139,900.Ask for property#112-W MLS# 140695
4. COMMODORE COMMONS - Only 3 lots left in this prime commercial development
south of Winn-Dixie on Taff Street. Completed storm water retention. Architectural ap-
proval before construction. These 3 lots together total 1.38 acres which would be per-
fect for Dr., Lawyer or Dentist business. Priced at $333,000. Ask for property 840-W
MLS#176966
5. NEW CONSTRUCTION - Ready for immediate occupancy. 3BR/2BA, 1,205 sq. ft.
home features large kitchen with custom cabinets and all appliances, trey ceiling in Mas-
ter BR, neutral color paint/carpet. Architectural shingles. Great location close to schools
and town. $119,500.Ask for property#909-W, MLS#172911


Ochlockonee Bay
984-5007


NJFI COINJVTTI ICTIOINJ


.IMMKU INNEY I W \'v ll U I

PROPERTIES in Wakulla Gradens


$124,900
113 Cochise Street
This 1,200 sq. ft., 3BR/2BA home
has many upgrades with fenced backyard.
Call Now to pick colors & flooring


COPPUEmHEA

-osrcio


Brain


1 2 3


4 5 6


3 7 6 4


6 8 7 2


8 2 4 7


3 2 4 9


8 3 9 1


2 6 3 6 3


7 5 8

Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section
has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with
numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of
the nine sections that you've already used elsewhere in that
section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each
horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of
nine squares.The puzzle is completed when you correctly fill
every square.


V98LZ96CL
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9iZL6L898V
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suoilnios


Wakulla Station
421-3133


ri


Will build your Dream Home from
your plans or one of there.
Let Tami help get you financed and
into a quality built home by
Copperhead Construction today.


BlueWater

Realty Group


New Const


13. Added
stipulations
18. Twist the arm of
19. Victorian
24. Set of principles
25. "Egads!" and
others
26. Lunar path
27. Tape deck button
28. Cuzco people
29. Narcotic-yielding
palm
31. Shelled out
32. All in knots
33. Judge's shout
35. Animal
husbandry major,
say
36. On the briny
39. D.C. ballplayer
40. Hours actually
elapsed


45. On-off switch,
for one
47. Put a shine on
49. Luau fare
50. Pop's Taylor_
51. Main point
52. Sharif of film
53. Diamond Head's
island
54. They need
refinement
56. Vintage autos
57. Gung-ho about
58. Pindaric works
60. Commotion
61. Agent, familiarly


parent for Rnt 530 Comm. Property for
515 Apartments for Rent 53ret
Rent


PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference, limi-
tation, or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status or national origin or
an intention to make any such pref-
erence, limitation or discrimination."
Familial status includes children un-
der the age of 18 living with parents
or legal custodians, pregnant wom-
en and people securing the custody
of children under the age of 18.
This newspaper will not accept any
advertising for real estate that is a
violation of the law. Our readers are
hereby informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are
available on an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of discrimination
call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777.
The toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


IOPPORTUNIMN
OPPORTUNITY


Teasers


. =


PANACEA: lo, CRAWFORI)VILLEI:
DWIMH on 2 buildable lots \�ith c c S\VlI I on"IAVO �Icics. Can hc 11,cd lor
proximity to the water and parks. List: rental or hilild \ our o\\ 11 hollic.
$125,600!!! Call DavidTodav''I GRI�AFIJM, PRICE (11 $69,900.00

LOTS:
SWEErwAi'E'R RIDGEI: 5 acrc,, pa\cd rd. - S115,900
BROOK FORESr: 5 acres, paved 1-d., cily \\zitcrand \\cll - $108,900


I


I


r



a~i~-~ssa-r









Page 6B-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007


530 Comm. Property for
Rent


I


CirIe J's Buildin9
2,400 sq. ft.
$1,400/mo.
Commercial
equipment for sale
Ice machine &
Three-door Cooler
926-2480


FOR RENT
GRADE A
OFFICE RENTAL
$325/month plus tax
Electric, Water
and Sewer Included
Full Kitchen Use
Call (850) 926-4511
for more information




STORAGE
MINI-WAREHOUSES
BOATS * RV'S
519-5128 * 508-5177
2 miles South of Courthouse
on Hwy. 319 in Crawfordville
24 Hour Access * Video Surveillance

545 Homes for Sale

$79,900 Cute 2BR/1BA. CH/A. 15
Catawba Trl-Wakulla Gardens. Great
starter or for investment. Zoned for
Shadeville/RiverSprings. 926-7372.
Best Deal in Crawfordvilie.
Located-Wakulla Gardens. 3BR/2BA.
Vaulted ceilings, huge den.
1850sq./ft. w/500sq./ft. storage
shed. Large screened-in patio. Set
on 4 lots w/paved drive, fenced. Ask-
ing $164,900. Call
850-556-5906/229-377-9836.

GREAT BUYS
*House, Fenced 2� Acres North
Wakulla Qualifies for First Time
Home Buyer Programs Priced To Sell
* Brick, 3BR/2BA, 2� Acres
Storage Building, Wood Floor
Ceramic Tile, & Bonus Room
* Well Maintained 3BR/2BA MH on
2.5 acres Near Schools
Brenda Hicks Realty
926-2080 * 251-1253
Just Reduced! $93,000 Firm.
1273 Old Woodville Road - cozy,
sturdy renovated older 3BR/1BA
home on corner lot in Wakulla con-
venient to Tallahassee. New AC/heat
and-vinyl.with antique pot belly stove
for charm and large garage that can
be enclosed for more room. Includes
1 year warranty. Premier Properties,
(850)421-0020.
555 Houses for Rent

19 Magpie Trail/Songbird Subd!
3BR/2BA $975/mo. and $975/secu-
rity deposit. Ochlockonee Bay Re-
alty: 850-984-0001.
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com
22 Mardi Gras Way/Alligator Point.
2BR/2BA Canalfront.
$850.00/month. Requires 1 year
lease and security deposit of
$850.00. Ochlockonee Bay Realty:
850-984-0001.
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com.
2BR/1BA waterfront rental. Central
heat/air. On St. Marks River. No
smoking/pets. $900/mo. First, last, &
deposit. 850-228-8411.


2BR/1BA on Chatahoochee
St./Panacea. $575/mo. plus $575 se-
curity. Requires 1 year lease. Och-
lockonee Bay Realty: 850-984-0001.
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com


3BR/1BA home located in Sop-
choppy, bonus room and fenced
yard. No Pets. References required.
$650/mo. Ist/last/dep. Owner/Broker
984-5017.
3BR/2BA. 2400 Spring Creek Hwy.
Family room w/fireplace. 1900+ sq.
ft. CHA. Swimming pool on acreage.
$1,095/rent. Call 850-228-7197.
82 Lake Ave, Panacea. Small
3BR/1 BA home. No pets. $550/mo,
$550/security. 984-3278.
Home for rent, Ig 3/2 w/family room
& fireplace. Approximately 2,200 sf.
on 2 acres. Available immediately,
$1,150/mo. Call now (850)926-2100.

House/Acres
* Charming 2BR, Rock-
ing Chair Porches, 2 Acres
Fenced w/Automatic Gate,
Storage Bldg., Paved Road.
* Quiet 2BR, 3 Acres Fenced,
Storage Building.
BOTH NORTH WAKULLA
No Pets/Lease Required
Brenda Hicks Realty
926-2080 * 251-1253
Very nice, 2BR/2BA house on 4 quiet
acres. 5 minutes from WHS, next to
wildlife refuge. Cypress, tin-roof,
large screened porch. Includes water
& lawncare. No smokers, pets con-
sidered. $725/mo. First, last,
$500/dep. 251-4166.
560 Land for Sale

18 lots in Magnolia Gardens. All
cleared. All permits and plans site
ready. No impact fee required. Regu-
lar septic available. Starting at
$22,000. 926-7076 or 933-6862.
2 acres for sale off Shadeville Rd.
Commercial potential. Highest & best
offer. Call 407-718-8469 ext. 300.

Land For Sale
* 5 Acres Near Crawfordville
Elementary, Hardwood Trees,
Homes/MH Allowed
* 5 Acres North Wakulla
Cleared and ready to build on
* Lot Wakulla Gardens
Brenda Hicks Realty
926-2080 * 251-1253
565 Mobile Homes for
L Rent
2BR/1BA MH. Sopchoppy Area. on
Ochlockonee River. $450/mo. & de-
posit. 570-9942.
2BR/2BA 14X70, gas heat/range,
central A/C. Located off E. Ivan Rd.
$450/deposit and $575/mo. Gar-
bage/water furnished. Call 926-1428
leave message.
3BR/2BA DWMH, completely remod-
eled, quiet neighborhood, large deck.
NO PETS. $675/mo, $600/security.
926-6212.
3BR/2BA newer DW. Fenced yard,
long-term. $875/mo. plus deposits.
6:30pm-8:30pm only. 925-7879.
MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT. Clean,
neat, and well-maintained. Front and
rear decks. New paint, carpet and
some appliances. No pets: Lease
purchase option, owner-financing
available for qualified buyers. Call
Leigh for more information
(850)926-4511.

570 Mobile Homes for Sale

3/2.5 DWMH, fireplace, roman tub,
living room, family room on 2.3
acres. Private area/secluded in
Crawfordville off Shadeville Hwy
$109,900. 407-718-8469 ext. 300.


ACCESS D[SION

CAD DRAFTING * ENERGY FORMS
BLUEPRINTS * RESIDENTIAL * COMMERCIAL
CUSTOM BUILDING PLANS
P.O. Box 1665 * Crawfordville, FL 32326
Phone: 850-926-2821 * Email: accessdesign@aol.com
Since 1989







REVERSE MORTGAGES
CALL TODAY to learn how you can access the cash you
need or want (for any purpose) without
EVER making a single payment!


CLASSIFIED As
Low As $7 Per
Week!
Call 926-7102


J.M. PECKHAM
ENTERPRISES*

RESIDENTIAL
COMMERCIAL

ROOM ADDITIONS
STARTING AT
s74.95 so.Ft.
COMPLETE TO THE
PAINT & CARPET


85-90-82

CB#1230


Mike
Gale
567-2227





Jim
Hallowell
566-5165





Justin
Moore
321-2027





Curtis
Benton
228-5821


Bill
Turner
510-0283





Patricia
McGill
294-4994





Susan
Brooks
545-6678


Ginny
Delaney
566-6271


2 BR/2 BA and over
1,500 sq. ft. Stainless
appliances, laminate
wood and tile floors,
new light fixtures,
and new paint. You
have to see
this home! I I


I


575 Mobile Homes w/
Land
5-acres with doublewide. 4BR/2BA
Needs work, close to town.
$120,000.926-9415.
580 Rooms for Rent/Room-
mates
59 year old blackman. Female rom-
mate wanted in home. Tallahassee.
265/mo. Free phone, light, cable.
386-6645.
Weekly Rentals Available,$175-$200
per week, wireless Internet, Panacea
Motel,(850)984-5421.


Phone


BlueWater














Interview Susan Today...
Realtor 5rou8p
, ck rELCOMES



SUSAN ^ONES



Realtor 566-7584


A P'EW 'LEVEL OF SERVICE

'IN iEAL ESTATE!


Mike
Delaney
524-7325


Tim
Jordan
Broker
567-9296


Marsha Josh Alan
Tucker Brown Reese
Broker 528-6385 5674860
570-9214


,Lou ANY Property 0. t , -


Cathy
Mathews
519-0960


Panacea
146 Coastal Hwy.
Panacea, FL 32341
Office: 850-984-00(
Fax: 850-984-474:


Ochlockonee Bay


N


Realty


6
01
8


28
Cr
C


Kenny
Lovel
519-2510


Crawfordville
51 Crawfordville Hwy.
awfordville, FL 32346
office : 850-926-9260
Fax: 850-926-9150


PO Box 556 Panacea, FL 32346 www.obrealty.com obr@obrealty.com


Preston
Strickland
508-3296





Nancy
Strickland
508-2902





Susan
McKaye
510-2477


........


Aught
Spears
545-5831


Diane
Chason
559-8545


Matt
Tucker
519-1609


Mariko
Chaviano
Beach Rentals/
Advertising


Joelea
Josey
Office
Manager


Wendy
Isbell
P.A.to
Marsha Tucker


Teresa
Shepherd
567-6776


Nicole
Thomas
5094987


Donna
Dickens
524-0473





Anita
Clements
766-4458





Carmen
Wesley
294-8215





Shayla
Dang
566-3335


Recipient of Wah Counlty 28 m Bui s Ei c iAenceAwa


HARTUNG AND
NOBLIN, INC.
REALTORS�


We Would Like To Say

Thank You
To The Following Businesses For Their Donations
To The Realtors And Public Grand Opening For
The Gardens Of Saralan
Homes and Land of Tallahassee
Smith, Thompson, Shaw & Manausa
Francis Casey Lowe
Wakulla Title
North State Title
Ace Hardware
Movie Gallery
Family Dollar
2 Blonds Liquor
Coke-a-Cola
Good Fencing Good Neighbors
Public Grand Opening
Country Wide Home Loans
Kerry Gaby
provided all the food and refreshments
Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated
2650-1 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327
r 850-926-2994 Phone 850-926-4875 Fax ...-
..m.. www.coldwellbanker.com MLS.


Selling


Something?


Classified


Ads For


As Little As


$7 A Week


926-7102

14


Call
David
Hoover
519-7944


1


I -^- - I--------















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The Wakulla News


Is Available For Purchase


At The Following Locations:


IN CRAWFORDVILLE
Crawfordville Post Office
Beall's Outlet
Food Mart
Karol's Korner Petro
Stop N Save
CVS Pharmacy
Dux Liquors
Glenda's Country Store
Huddle House
Lee's Liquor/Sky Box Sports
Bar
Mack's Country Meats
Michele's Convenience Store
Myra Jeans
Petty's BP
Murphy's
Wal-Mart
Wakulla Springs Lodge
Williams BP
Winn Dixie

IN PANACEA
Bayside Grocery Store
Tobacco & Beverage E-Z Serve
Crum's Mini Mall
posey's up the creek

IN OCHLOCKONEE BAY
Jay Food Mart
Mashes Sands BP
Hamaknockers oasis

IN SOPCHOPPY
Express Lane
Lou's Bait and Tackle
Sopchoppy Grocery
IN MEDART


Inland Store
Best Western
Wildwood INN
Petro

IN ST. MARKS
BoLynn's
Express Lane

IN WOODVILLE
Ace Hardware
Bert Thomas Grocery
Gas Mart
IGA Grocery Store
Los Amigos
Gulf Coast Lumber

IN TALLAHASSEE

Circle K (Capital Circle &
C'ville Highway)
Publix (Capital Circle &
C'ville Highway)

IN WAKULLA STATION
Wakulla Station BP
Stop N Save
Wakulla station pharmacy

AND ELSEWHERE
Spring Creek Restaurant
Stop N Save (Bloxham Cutoff/
H'way 319)
Stop N Save (H'way 98/Spring
Creek Road)

More Locations
Coming Soon!


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007-Page 7B


Today's Weather


Wed
10/31


Thu
11/1


Fri
11/2


_________ I


81/61
Mix of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
low 80s and
lows in the
low 60s.


Sunrise:
7:50 AM
Sunset:
6:51 PM


82/61
Partly
cloudy.
Highs in the
low 80s and
lows in the
low 60s.


Sunrise:
7:51 AM
Sunset:
6:50 PM


80/57
Mix of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
low 80s and
lows in the
upper 50s.


Sunrise:
7:52 AM
Sunset:
6:49 PM


79/57
Partly
cloudy.
Highs in the
upper 70s
and lows in
the upper
50s.

Sunrise:
7:53 AM
Sunset:
6:48 PM


Sun1
11/4


77/52
Mix of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
upper 70s
and lows in
the low 50s.


Sunrise:
7:53 AM
Sunset:
6:47 PM


'We Celebraete H
Stories for and about hor
,- .. OLvo.or-us -


Florida At A Glance


Jacksonville
74/68


79/60


Tampa
85/71


Sat
11/3


106 W. 5th Ave.
Tallahassee, FL 32303
850-222-2166tel
www.wmleeco.com


***New Subdivisions**
All subdivisions have
underground electric and water.
Carmen Maria - $34,900. 1 ac.
tracts ntar Lake Talquin.
Savannah Forest - $45,900.
1� ac. tracts offWak. Arran Rd.
Established Community!
Sellars Crossing - $65,900.
1+ ac lots in North Wakulla.
Steeplechase - $96,900 to
$109,900. 5 ac. wooded tracts.
Horse friendly!
Walkers Mill - $69,900.
2 ac. wooded lots, located on
Lower Bridge Road.


Beautiful Canal-Side Abode
77 Gulf Breeze Dr.
2BR/2BA coastal home on deepwater ca-
nal w/ dock located in beautiful Oyster
Bay Estates. Features custom tile in living
area, wrap-around deck, outdoor shower,
screened porch, large mezzanine, &
hurricane shutters. $670.000.


2 acre tract in Wakulla Forest with
paved roads and city water. $2,500
allowance. $54,900.
Carmen Rocio - Perfect opportunity
> lowest priced lot! 2 ac. lot off
Shadeville Hwy near
Wakulla Station. $64,900.
Two 5+ acre tracts off Rehwinkel
Rd. with large trees on the back of
properties and a small pond.
$134,750 and $136,250.
2 acre tract with large hardwoods in
Beechwood Subdivision off
Shadeville Hwy. $52,900.


Call
Donna Card
850-508-1235
E3 _


Estimated Completion: Nov. 30th
Come home to this s-pacious
3BR/2BA 1515 square foot home.
Features include brick and Hardie
board, 11' x 17' patio, large 2 car
garage, ceiling fans throughout,
vaulted ceilings in the living area, &
in the master bedroom - tray ceilings
and his and her closets. Great for
first time home buyers!! 1lS,9u0.
Upgrade package available!


Area Cities
City Hi Lo0Coind.


Clearwater 84
Crestview 79
Daytona Beach 80
Fort Lauderdale 84
Fort Myers 85
Gainesville 77
Hollywood 84
Jacksonville 74
Key West 84
Lady Lake 81
Lake City 77
Madison 80
Melbourne 84
Miami 84
N Smyrna Beach 80


t-storm
mst sunny
rain
rain
t-storm
rain
rain
rain
rain
t-storm
rain
rain
rain
t-storm
rain


Ocala
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Plant City
Pompano Beach
Port Charlotte
Saint Augustine
Saint Petersburg
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Titusville
Venice
W Palm Beach


0ct 0


t-storm
rain
pt sunny
mst sunny
t-storm
rain
t-storm
rain
t-storm
t-storm
pt sunny
t-storm
rain
t-storm
rain


National Cities
CiyHiL FConrre-d.


I0c ity0i Lo 0ond


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Houston
Los Angeles
Miami


mst sunny
cloudy
rain
sunny
pt sunny
sunny
pt sunny
t-storm


Minneapolis
New York
Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


windy
pt sunny
mst sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
sunny


At Jim Walter Homes, we are so confideil Irit we can cualily you lor new
home financing, we'll put our money on i Visit one il our sales
centers, complete our full, no cost credit
application and we'll give you a free ..
$50 MasterCard gift card! .


When other builders say no, Jim Walter Homes says yes!


Jim Walter
HOMES
www.jimwalterhomes.com

Home illustration may include additions, options or modifications
not part of our standard offerings. Shrubs and landscaping have
been added lor effect. Specifications and plans subject to change
and elimination. State license number: FL-CRC057112. �2007 Jim
Walter Homes, Inc. Copyright strictly enforced.


Moon Phases








Full Last New First
Oct 26 Nov 1 Nov 9 Nov 17



UV Index

Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
10/31 1 1/1 11/2 11/3 11/4
5 6 6 6 5 I
Moderate High High High Moderate

The UV Index is measured on a 0 - 11 number scale, 0 ...* 11
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.
skin po tion


I I


an


' "


E(nap~_










Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2007


Volunteers share their love for the

outdoors with Wakulla County Scouts


It's around midnight, the winds continue to
build, the rain is hammering the thin nylon walls
of our tent from all directions and waves are crash-
ing just 20 feet away. I was asleep until the front
of the tent blew in so far that it was. just for a
nioment, laying horizontally across me before it
snapped back into it's upright position. The rain
fly is now trying to go airborne like a kite, taking
the tent with it.
I look across the tent, my son, Gil is sound
asleep as the winds continue to howl and the tent
sounds like it has come alive to battle the wind.
The storm hit with the fury that so many do as
they cross the Gulf in the summer. Horizontal rain
and gusts up to 60 miles per hour aren't uncom-
mon. What is uncommon, however, is when you
find yourself camping in a tent, on an island, with
Boy Scouts when a front barrels through.
At 11 years old, these are younger scouts.
Younger maybe, but with more camping experi-
ence than most adults.
Since first grade, at the age of five. these boys
began camping as Cub Scouts in Pack 33 at Medart
Elementary School. Pack 33 probably does more
camping than most Cub Scout Packs. The camp-
ing trips usually have a focus, whether it's going
to Manatee Springs State Park to learn about
Manatees or to the Marianna Caverns State Park
for pioneer days.
- .In the past year alone "my boys" have gone
:from camping at Kennedy Space Center to hiking
and camping along the Appalachian Trail when
there was still snow in the higher elevations. They
.have been whitewater rafting and gone into caves
at night looking for bats. They have been part of
:a reenactment at The National Naval Civil War
Museum and they have hiked along mountain
:streams as well as fallen into them on occasion.
Just recently, they were volunteer crew for The
:Commodores Cup sailboat race out of Shell Point.
Together as Cub Scouts and now as Boy Scouts
in Troop 7, they have shared many adventures
:over the years.
:, Gradually, each of them has learned the skills
:and gained the confidence needed to get to this
point, three days of primitive camping on an un-
;inhabited island, Little Saint George Island. Little
:St George Island or Cape St. George as it is also
:called, lies between St George Island to the east
:and St. Vincent Island to the West.
Until 1954 it was part of St. George Island before
:the Army Corp of Engineers dredged Bob Sikes
Cut Little St. George is about 10 miles long, a mile
across at its widest point and six miles offshore
'from Apalachicola. It is' accessible only by boat.
There is no Wal-Mart, no bathrooms and whatever
'you forgot, you will do without. No television, no
:video games, no air conditioning and on this, the


second night. no dry cozy bed.
The day had started with winds out of the
East blowing 15 to 20 knots, and seas building
in the sound to keep us from fishing or getting
over to St Vincent's Island to explore. The good
news is these winds have kept the swarms of
mosquitoes off of the shoreline. Stepping 10 feet
into the woods you realize very quickly that this
wind isn't all bad.
It was time for "Plan B" to kick in. Fishing off
the old Government dock, followed by a hike and
a service project. A service project is any project
that the boys can do to leave the place where
we camp. better than we have found it. With the
waves pushing in the garbage from the mainland.
that choice was easy. pick up trash. It is amazing
just how many plastic water bottles and plastic
drink bottles litter the beaches at high tide.
Walking along the shore we also find old
"catfaced" pines. These are the remnants from
the days of the turpentine business from 1910 to
1916 and then again from 1950 to 1956. We find
a pine stump standing out in the water where
it was once high and dry. We climb up on its
exposed root system and count the rings, it was
06 years old when it was cut down. Once back at
the camp. the boys mess around with a seine net
and take turns skim boarding. Gil and Zack have
waded along the shoreline with gigs hoping to
get a Flounder, but without any luck.
By around 5 p.m., the winds changed slightly
to the southeast, allowing the waves along the
shoreline to lay down enough to fish. The plan
ahead of time was to have fish, wrapped in tin
foil with onions, lemon and butter for supper. The
weather is threatening our plans but this small
window of southeast winds gives us a little hope.
The bottom along this stretch of the bay side of
the island is made up of grass beds spotted with
pockets of sand in about two to three feet of water.
It looks like the perfect bottom for trout fishing.
.We untie the boats from the dock and drift west.
In a little over an hour we catch enough trout for
the boys to cook fish as planned. When we arrive
back at the campsite, gathering wood to get the
fire going becomes a priority. We need to make
enough coals to cook the fish. On the horizon the
sky is getting darker and there are gray streaks
of rain reaching from the clouds to the water at
sharp angles indicating strong winds.
As I begin cleaning fish, Mitch insists on dean-
ing his own. He is right of course, he should clean
his own. The adult urge to just get the job done
has taken over the scout leaders job to teach
whenever you can. To make things even more of
a challenge, and certainly a credit to Mitch, he has
a leg in a cast. He has recently had surgery that
has left a scar from his ankle to his knee.
At the edge of the water, we clean fish on top
of an overturned five-gallon bucket. Slowly and
with great care we clean his trout. I demonstrate


on one side of the fish and then flip it over and
Mitch cleans the other side. He does a very good
job. He will keep track of "his" trout from the
moment he caught it until he has eaten it. With
little time to waste before the fast approaching
storm on the horizon gets to us, the fish, wrapped
in foil go into the hot coals. It takes about five
minutes on each side. The boys take charge of the
cooking while we begin to secure the campsite for
what looks like some very bad weather. I add a
few more lines to our tent, tying them off to tree
roots this time, instead of to stakes in the sand.
Not long after eating, the rains start as we make
a run to the tents.
It's now 2 a.m., and I awake again, this time by
a drip, drip, drip. The horizontal rain has finally
found it's way through the zipper on the tent door
and onto my foot. The winds have eased a-bit, I
look over at Gil, and he's fine. The drip is no big
deal and I'm too tired to care. I move my foot and
go back to sleep.
Just before sunrise I wake up, it's quiet, almost
too quiet. There's just a peaceful lapping of the
waves on the beach. I get up quickly and look
around the campsite, Everything's wet and blown
around some, but otherwise okay. Next, I head
down the beach to check on the boats, they're
fine too, the bow lines and anchors have held,
that's a relief.


It's a beautiful morning as the storm weary
campers emerge from their tents. Everyone's safe,
just a little soggy and a little grumpy. It's time
to load the wet and sandy gear and boys into
the boats; and head back to the mainland. We
will each have a different story to tell about this
adventure. The boat ride back gives us time to
think. One thing is for sure; this trip, won't soon
be forgotten. Hopefully a few thingswere learned
along the way aid these boys can add this to their
long list of Scout adventures.
Tired of your kids sitting around the house
watching television and playing video games?
Look into Cub Scouts. First through fifth grades,
or Boy Scouts, 10 years old and up. Plan to be
involved as parents, you will learn along with
your kids. It requires no experience; just a desire
to show kids an alternative to what they're used
to. Maybe you don't have kids, you can still be a
volunteer, teach a skill or even become a leader.
You will find yourself doing things you wouldn't
likely be doing and making a difference in a young
persons life, as well as your own.
For more information, contact: Cub Scouts Pack
33, Alphie and Vicki Boone, 926-2560; Boy Scouts
Troop 7, John and Pam Harrell, 926-6430; or David
Damon, 251-4166.
David Damon writes from Crawfordville.


Night sky program to be held Nov. 3, Nov. 10


Wakulla County residents will
have the opportunity to see the
night sky through a telescope on
Saturday, Nov. 3 and Saturday,
Nov. 10.
- The dates provide two op-
portunities to view unusual
and spectacular objects in the
night sky using a telescope. This
Saturday at Shell Point and next
Saturday at Wakulla Presbyterian
you can see the remains of stars
that recently exploded, compact
star dusters each consisting of
hundreds of thousands of stars,
and galaxies containing billions
of stars that are so far away their
light takes millions of years to
reach Earth.
SAn indoor program presented
by amateur astronomers Al and
Darlene Oosterhof will precede


the star viewing. With Doug
Jones, Director of the Wakulla
Public Library, they will describe
what you will see that night with
the telescope.
The indoor program includes
hands-on demonstrations of
interests to adults and children,
and also color photographs of
objects in space projected on a
large screen. The Hubble Space
Telescope took some of these
photographs. Both the photo-
graphs and the objects viewed
live with a telescope are inspir-
ing as well as educational.
Bring binoculars for your per-
sonal use. Help will be provided
finding objects in the sky that
can be seen with binoculars. Un-
like the Tallahassee metropoli-
tan area, Wakulla County offers


superb views of the night sky.
The program will first be pre-
sented at 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3
at the Apalachee Bay Yacht Club,
located on Harbour Point Drive
in Shell Point. The same program
is offered one week later at the
Wakulla Presbyterian Church,
on U.S. Highway 98 one-third of
a mile east of the high school.
Because of space restrictions at
the yacht club, individuals liv-
ing away from the Shell Point
area are encouraged to attend
the Nov. 10 program at Wakulla
Presbyterian. The Nov. 3 program
at Shell Point begins at 8 p.m.
The Nov. 10 program at Wakulla
Presbyterian begins earlier, at
6 p.m. Singles and families are
welcomed at both programs.


WA V EI


SEHIID IOR SOLDIERS


Large group of pelicans gather on island dock


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in a tree stand, or even on horseback
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Pane 2C - The Wakulla News Outdoors November 1,2007


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net


On a recent afternoon, green guide
students were launching kayaks from T-n-T
Canoe Rental for a trip up the Wakulla River.
The field trip was being led by instructor
Kent Mayer as part of the students' course-
work.
The Sunday afternoon in mid-October
was perfect for an outing on the river:
sunny and warm, but not too hot. The river
water, though, appeared greenish and the
eel grass on the river bottom was covered
with filamentous algae.
The fleet of colorful kayaks started up-
river from the lower bridge and the voices
of the chattering students - who range in
age from 20s to retirement age - carried
across the water.
A few hundred yards upriver they visit
Jenny's Spring, a sulfur spring that flows
into the Wakulla and can be reached by
kayak. On the river, there are osprey nests
on the crown of old cypress trees, an eight-
foot gator sunning on the riverbank, and
numerous manatees. For some of the stu-
dents, it was their first time in a kayak, and
their first time seeing a manatee.
The students are part of Tallahassee
Community College's Wakulla Ecotourism


Institute and are working toward earning
their certification as green guides - trained
to lead tourists on environmental and
socially responsible explorations of the
Wakulla area's natural history.
The classes include courses on starting
up a business; landscape topics such as
soil, native plants and ecosystems; ethical
ecotourism practices; and fishing, birding
and wildlife. The Sunday field trips include
visits to Wakulla Springs, St. Marks National
Wildlife Refuge, Gulf Specimen Marine
Laboratories, historical and cultural sites
such as Fort San Marcos de Apalachee, as
well as state and national forests and trails,
and coastal, karst and sinkhole sites.
Mayer, an avid outdoorsman, glides
through the water on a narrow kayak he
bought years ago. He talks about a long
kayaking trip in Alaska and a trip through
the Everglades. Knowledgeable and easygo-
ing, he strikes up conversations with his
students and answers questions.
Mayer hadn't been on the Wakulla River
in two decades, he says, and he blames area
development for ruining the river. "People
who see the Wakulla River for the first
time say, 'Oh, it's so beautiful.' But they
have nothing to compare it to. If you saw
it years ago, you know how much it has


degraded."
About two hours later, students arrive
at the upper bridge and beach their kayaks
at the boat ramp to get out and stretch
their legs.
At the upper bridge there are clumps of
wild rice in the shallows. Mayer chuckles
and tells about volunteering at Wakulla
Springs to run the boat tour. He went out
with one of the tour boat guides to hear his


spiel and among the gems was that marsh
hens love wild rice. (Which Mayer says :
true.) The alligators love it too because
means they can eat marsh hen stuffed wit
wild rice. (Mayer moans at the bad joke.)
This is what green guides learn from
instructors like Mayer, perhaps. That you
are not leading a tour so much as sharing
your love for the place.


Wakulla


Equipment Rental

Contractors & Homeowners
Skid-steers * Excavators
Mowers * Tractors * Chippers
Box Blades * Augers * Nailers
Saws * Plumbing Equipment

November Special
5% Discount on Rentals Under $150
10% Discount Over $150
Must Present Ad

2235 Crawfordville Hwy. (Across from Score Credit Union)

926-3600
Mon.- Fri. 7 - 6pm Sat. 7 - 4pm
www.wakulla-equipment-rental.com


SJOHNDEERE


Concealed Weapons Classes

with Robert Kendrick
NRA Certified Instructor
40 Years of Combined Experience

Sunday, Nov. 18 & Sunday, Dec. 16
2008 Classes Will Be Held the Last Sunday of Every Month

Group Rates - 10 or more *Special Rates for Women

926-5500


Featuring:


SBobcat.


h____


Page 2C - The Wakulla News


Outdoors


November 1, 2007


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Noebe .207OtdosTh aklaNes-Pae3


Outta' the woods...


By Tony Young

Crossbow season opens and so do
muzzleloading and dove.
Football season's in full swing, and
the 2007-08 hunting season's starting to
crank up. Archery season's been going
on in most of the state, and I want to talk
about three other seasons about to start:
crossbow, muzzleloading gun and the first
phase of dove season.
Crossbow season occurs between
archery and muzzleloading gun season in
the Central and South hunting zones, last-
ing five days: Oct. 22 to Oct. 26 and Oct. 8
to Oct. 12, respectively. In the Northwest
zone, it comes in later, on the Monday
after Thanksgiving (Nov. 26), and lasts one
week through Dec. 3.
This season's for any hunter who'd
like to use a crossbow or continue using
a bow on private lands. This is not just
for disabled hunters. Crossbow season
doesn't apply to wildlife management
areas (WMAs), however.
The most common game to take during
crossbow season will be deer and wild
hog. Only bucks may be taken, and one
antler must be at least five-inches long
above the hairline. The daily bag limit on
antlered deer is two. Wild hogs - con-
sidered livestock on private lands - may,
with landowner permission, be hunted
year-round with no bag or size limits.
It's also legal to shoot gobblers and
bearded turkeys during crossbow sea-
son. Only one may be taken per day, and
there's a two-bird fall-season limit. But
you can't hunt turkeys in Holmes County
during the fall and winter.
Crossbows and bows must have a
minimum draw weight of 35 pounds,
and hand-held releases on bows are
permitted. For hunting deer, hog and
turkey, broadheads must have at least two
sharpened edges with a minimum width
of 7/8 inch.
Legal shooting hours are a half-hour
before sunrise to a half-hour after sunset.
Except for turkeys, hunters may take resi-
dent game over bait on private lands.
Some things you can't do during cross-
bow season include hunting deer, hog or
turkey with dogs, using explosive or drug-
injecting arrows, and possessing firearms.
Immediately following the cose of
crossbow season in the Central and South
hunting zones is the beginning of muzzle-
loading gun season. Season dates run Oct.
27 to Nov. 4 and Oct. 13 to Oct.-21 respec-
tively. Muzzleloading season comes in
later in the Northwest zone and runs Nov.
16 to Nov. 18.
During muzzleloading gun season,
bows and crossbows are legal methods of
taking game on private lands, along with
muzzleloaders. On WMAs, only muzzle-


loaders may be used.
Legal shooting hours are the same for
muzzleloading gun season as crossbow
season. And, legal game, including bag
limits and prohibited methods for taking
game, also are the same as crossbow sea-
son. Bag limits and antler/size restrictions
for game on WMAs can differ, so check
the specifics of the area before you hunt.
For hunting deer, muzzleloaders firing
single bullets must be at least .40-cali-
ber. Guns firing two or more balls must
be 20-gauge or larger. You may not use
muzzleloaders with self-contained car-
tridge ammunition capabilities or possess
modern firearms during muzzleloading
gun season.
The first phase of the mourning and
white-winged dove season began Oct.
6 and ends Oct. 29 statewide. Shooting
hours during this first phase are noon
to sunset, and there's a 12-bird daily bag
limit.
wed to hunt doves with is a shotgun,
but you can't use one larger than a 10-
gauge. Shotguns must be plugged to a
three-shell capacity (magazine and cham-
ber combined).
You may hunt doves over an agricul-
tural field, as long as the crop's been
planted as part of regular agricultural
practices. However, it's against the law
to scatter agricultural products over an
area for the purpose of baiting.
Some things you can't do while dove
hunting are using rifles, pistols or cross-
bows; shooting from a moving vehicle; or
herding or driving doves with a vehicle.
In addition to a Florida hunting license,
you'll need a $5 crossbow permit to hunt
during crossbow season. A $5 muzzle-
loading gun permit is needed to hunt
during muzzleloader season, and you'll
need a no-cost migratory bird permit if
you're going to hunt doves. If you hunt
on a WMA, you must have a management
area permit that costs $26.50.
All are available at county tax collec-
tors' offices or license agents or by calling
toll-free 1-888-HUNT-FLORIDA or clicking
MyFWC.com/license.
So if you're going after that monster
buck during the crossbow and muzzle-
loading gun seasons or dove hunting with
friends and family, I hope I've helped
explain the rules and regulations on some
of Florida's hunting seasons.

Tony Young, of the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission,
looks forward to using an old cross-
bow his mother bought him when
he was 14 and putting it to good use
during the crossbow and muzzleload-
ing gun seasons. He also likes dove
hunting with good friends.


S OS
Get lw pries o


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NOVEMBER





of the morrth


GULF COAST Lumber & Supply, Inc.

3361 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville 926-5559
Mon.-Fri. 7AM-6PM * Sat. 7:30AM-5PM

9141 Woodville Hwy., Woodville 421-5295
Mon.-Fri. 6AM-6PM * Sat. 6AM-5PM




. . START RIGHT.- START MERE .........


The Wakulla News - Page 3C


Outdoors


November 1, 2007







Do a AC - hp' W u - NewOdN b


By ALEX BRIMNER
OfTheWakulla News
There is now an equestrian center in the works for development in Wakulla
County. It has not yet been approved, but the Wakulla County Horseman's Associa-
tion is hopeful it will be given the green light by the middle of next year.
If it is built the way they have planned, it will be a fully working arena, com-
plete with everything needed for a rodeo, including team roping and bucking
shoots.
"The association will be partnering with the county to help manage the cen-
ter," said President Jim Porter. "We have committed to providing the announcer's
booth."
Currently, there isn't a public place that can house events as large as rodeos, but
with the center there will be the possibility for the expansion into areas such as
team roping.
This will benefit many people who are involved in these types of events, such
as 20-year-old Timothy Sanders.
Timmy, as he is called by most, has been roping since about the age of 14. He
said that he has always enjoyed everything to do with horses, and it is obvious

Wakulla

Cowboys... 4 -

Wakulla County resi- .
dents Timmy Sanders,
left in both photos, pre-
pares to rope the hind
feet of the calf as team-
mate Mike takes care
of the front end of the
chore. Team roping in-
volves two riders, one of.
whom lassos the head of
the steer and the second
the hind legs.


Photo by Alex Brimner


that he has worked hard at his hobby.
"It's just fun," Timmy said. "But it's not as easy as it looks."
There is more to the sport of team roping than it seems, it is not just about the
rope connecting with the steer.
There are two types of team ropers, those who head and those who heel. In his
six years of learning, Timmy has practiced for both sides of roping, learning the
techniques and importance of each.
There are several rules that comprise the winning score, such as adding five sec-
onds to the time if the rider only ropes one foot. It is actually a difficult sport that
takes years of practice. "It takes a long time to learn how to do it," TImmy said.
"But it's worth the time."
Team roping is not only a sport for the experienced, but it is one that can be
enjoyed by all ages. It can be a family event or a lifetime passion.
When it is finally decided upon, the equestrian center will help to greatly en-
hance the interest and opportunity of unique horse sports. It will not only serve as
a source of entertainment for the citizens, but will also serve to enhance the world
of horsemanship in the county.


November 1, 2007,


Outdoors


DarrP d~ ,ThP W~lrlllln NPwn


a








The Wakulla News - Page 5C


By KEITH BLACKMAR the Office of Greenways and Trails' website, wwvw.floridagreenwaysandtrails.com.
kblackmar@lhewakullanews.nel Furthermore, the trail has recently been designated a National Recreation Trail."
The Florida Department of Environmental Protection's Office of Greenways and But Alderson said there is still much more work that needs to be done. "There are
Trails calls the Florida Circumnavigational Saltwater Paddling Trail the "saltwater ver- additional campsites to be established and existing campsites to be improved upon
sion of the Appalachian Trail." and maintained, along with numerous other projects to enhance the quality of the
Wakulla County outdoorsmen can paddle all 26 segments of the trail from Pen- trail experience," he said. "The trail is much larger than any one person or agency
sacola and the Alabama border to Jacksonville and the Georgia border. Segment 4 can accomplish. Plus, because state government is feeling the pinch of projected
and Segment 5 are located off the Franklin and Wakulla county coasts, budget shortfalls, I can no longer devote my full-time attention to the circumnaviga-
One of the scouts and mappers of the saltwater paddling trail lives in southern tional trail. Therefore, there is a need for a strong independent statewide non-profit
Leon County near the Wakulla County border. Doug Alderson has been part of creat- organization similar to the Florida Trail Association."
ing Florida's longest and most amb' sea kayaking trail. Alderson has proposed that it be called the Florida Circumnavigational Trail As-
"For the past three years, I ha outing and mapping the 1,550-mile Florida sociation (FCTA). but the name is subject to discussion.
Circumnavigational Saltw er P around Florida's coast. I have had a Alderson organized the inaugural meeting of the FCTA on Monday, Oct 15 since
chance to work closely wit paddlers, outfitters businesses, and Mondays are good times for most outfitters government employees and business
tourism and government o al a reality" said Alderson. "Maps people. Future meeting times and dates will be decided upon by the group. The
and guides for the majority eens can no be downloaded from meeting was held at the Bella Oasis Hotel adjacent to the Homosassa Springs Wild
'To. .. v. . r. ' . .. .v --'w 15 - See SALTWATER TRAIL on Page 7C































r n .... -T.nGuid.. id lmericln Ti sstranird n iihb n meo Ac(o
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November 1, 2007


Outdoors .










Page 6C - The Wakulla News


Our Parks...

Mash Island Park Beach

MASH ISLAND PARK BEACH is located at
the end of Mashes Sands Road east of U.S.
Highway 98 where the highway intersects
with the Ochlockonee Bay Bridge (Walker
Bridge).
The beach and park area includes a pier
and a boat ramp, which are open to the
public.

Park Fees:
* Annual Pass for Mashes Sands Pier,
$35.
* Daily Pass for Mashes Sands Pier, $2.
* Please call WCPRD for more informa-
tion, 926-7227


Natural Bridge Battlefield
Historic State Park
Natural Bridge is the site of the second
largest Civil War battle in Florida and where
the St. Marks River drops into a sinkhole
and flows underground for one-quarter of
a mile before reemerging. During the final
weeks of the Civil War, a Union flotilla
landed it Apalachee Bay, planning to cap-
ture Foit Ward (San Marcos de Apalache
Historic State Park) and march north to the
state capital.
With a timely warning, volunteers from
the Tallahassee area-Confederate soldiers,
old men, and young boys-met the Union
forces at Natural Bridge and successfully
repelled three major attacks.
The Union troops were forced to retreat
to the coast and Tallahassee was the only
Confederate capital east of the Mississippi
not captured by the Union. A reenactment of
the battle is held at the park every March. It
is located on Natural Bridge Road, six miles
east of Woodville, off State Road 363.
For Information about Natural Bridge
Battlefield Historic State Park, please call
850-922-6007. Barry Burch is Park Manager.


Medart Park
MEDART PARK is the recreation park for
Wakulla County.
The sports that are offered are tackle and
flag football, cheerleading, soccer, basket-
ball, Girls Fast Pitch Softball, T-ball, Pitch-
ing Machine Baseball, Cal Ripken Baseball,
Babe Ruth Baseball, Dizzy Dean, and Adult
Softball for Coed and a Men's League.
The Park also has a playground and bat-
ting cage at the east end and the west end
of the park.
The Recreation Park in Medart has 12
playing fields; nine baseball fields, two mul-
tipurpose fields, and one basketball court.

Park Fees:
* Daily Medart Park Pavilion Rental,
$35.
* Medart Park Fields or WCPRD informa-
tion, call 926-7227


Outdoors


Newport Campground

NEWPORT CAMPGROUND is located on
U.S. Highway 98,near the St. Marks National
Wildlife Refuge. The amenities include:
* 13 full hookups
* 21 primitive campsites
* Sewage hookup and treatment area
* Bathhouse/restroom
* Boat Ramp
* Boat Dock
* River observation area
* Wooden observation area
* Playground,

Park Fees:
* Camping Full Hook Up, $20.
* Primitive Camping, $15.
* Please contact WCPRD to reserve a
site, 926-7227

Ochlockonee River
This jewel of a park is a great place to
get away for a weekend or a weeklong vaca-
tion. Picnic facilities and a swimming area
are located near the scenic point where
the Ochlockonee and Dead rivers intersect.
Ochlockonee, which means "yellow waters,"
is a mix of brackish, tidal surge, and fresh
water. Pristine and deep, the river empties
into the Gulf of Mexico.
Trails allow visitors to explore the park
and see the diverse wildlife, including the
red-cockaded woodpecker, and natural com-
munities such as pine flatwoods and oak
thickets. A boat ramp provides easy access
to the river. Both freshwater and saltwater
fish inhabit the waters around the park,
including largemouth bass, bream, catfish
and speckled perch.
For overnight visitors, there are full-fa-
cility campsites with access to restrooms
and showers. Youth group camping is also
available.
For Information about Ochlockonee River
State Park, please call 850-962-2771. Kevin
Patton is Park Manager.


Shell Point Beach

SHELL POINT BEACH is located off of
Spring Creek Highway. Turn onto Highway
367 and follow to Beatty Taff Road.
The beach includes:
* A brand new playground.
* A restroom facility.
* A large pavilion.
* 3 sun shelters.


St. Marks Refuge

This unique refuge was established in
1931 to provide wintering habitat for migra-
tory birds. It is one of the oldest refuges
in the National Wildlife Refuge System.
It encompasses 68,000 acres spread out
between Wakulla, Jefferson, and Taylor
counties along the Gulf Coast of northwest
Florida.
The refuge includes coastal marshes,
islands. tidal creeks and estuaries of seven


north Florida rivers, and is home to a di-
verse community of plant and animal life.
The refuge also has strong ties to a rich
cultural past, and is home to the St. Marks
Lighthouse, which was built in 1832 and is
still in use today.

A Diverse Wildlife Refuge
St. Marks Unit: The St. Marks Unit of
the St. Marks NWR is the location for the
refuge headquarters and visitor center. A
seven mile drive winds it way from the
visitor center through fresh and brackish
water impoundments and ends at the foot
of the Apalachee Bay, near the historic St.
Marks Lighthouse.
Boat ramps, nature trails and a picnic area
are located within this unit, and a road-side
auto tour booklet is available for purchase in
the visitor center. Uplands forests, forested
swamps, fresh and brackish water marshes
and a pristine salt water estuary ecosystem
compose this unique area of Florida's Gulf
Coast, making the St. Marks Unit a favorite
for birders and outdoor enthusiasts alike.
Federal entrance fees are in effect.
Wakulla Unit: Located off U.S. Highway
98, west of the town of St. Marks, the
Wakulla Unit of the wildlife refuge offers
upland forests, palm hammocks, fresh and
brackish water marshes and tidal beach ac-
cess to the Apalachee Bay. This unit is open
to quota-hunts during the fall and winter
months, and it provides an ideal launching
point for small boats year-round.
Approximately 5.5 miles of the Florida
National Scenic Trail traverses through this
portion of the refuge. No facilities are avail-
able. Use of launch point and access to trails
are free to the public.
Panacea Unit: The Panacea Unit is largely
dominated by upland pines and oak forests,
with several fresh water lakes interspersed.
Primitive walking trails criss-cross through
this unit, and like the Wakulla Unit, this
unit is open to quota-hunts during the fall
and winter months. Located within the
Panacea Unit is the Otter Lake Recreation
Area, which offers picnic shelters, restrooms
and a launching point for small boats, with a
motor size limit of 10 horsepower or less.
About 6.5 miles of the Florida National

Wakulla County


offers variety of sports activities

The Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department offers a variety of sports during
fall, winter and springs sports seasons.
In the fall, the county offers football and cheerleading. The flag football divisions are
for children ages 6 to 11 years old in various age groups. Flag football cheerleading is
also offered.
Tackle football and cheerleading is offered in two age divisions, Pee Wee and Junior.
Pee Wee players are ages 9 to 11 and the junior division is for players ages 12 to 14.
The Girls Fast Pitch Softball association also offers softball to girls ages 8 to 16.
The winter sports are soccer and basketball. Players ages 5 to 14 are eligible to play
soccer. Basketball is offered to players age 6 to 9.
Spring sports includes baseball and softball. The recreation department offers T-ball
for players age 4 to 8 in several divisions.
The baseball associations include Cal Ripken for players age 8 to 12, in two divisions,
Babe Ruth Baseball for players ages 13 to 15 and fast pitch softball for girls age 8 to 16 in
three different divisions. ................................ ....


November 1, 2007
Scenic Trail traverses this unit of the ref-
uge. The Panacea Unit is located west of
the Wakulla Unit on U.S. Highway 98, just
inside the Medart community, and along
U.S. Highway 319 south, toward the City of
Sopchoppy. Use of picnic facilities, trails
and launch point is free to the public.
Aucilla River Unit: Located along the
banks of the Aucilla River, this unique area
features a boat ramp and plenty of fishing
opportunities for visitors. This area is cur-
rently managed by Taylor County in a co-
operative agreement with the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service. The Aucilla River unit is
located off U.S. Highway 98, approximately
15 miles east of the Newport community.
A Users' Fee is charged to access the boat
ramp.
For more information on St. Marks
National Wildlife Refuge write Refuge
Manager, P.O. Box 68, St. Marks, FL 32355.
Phone: (850) 925-6121 or e-mail at: saint-
marks@fws.gov.

Wakulla Springs State Park

Home of one of the largest and deepest
freshwater springs in the world, this park
plays host to an abundance of wildlife, in-
cluding alligators, turtles, deer, and birds.
Daily guided riverboat tours provide a closer
view of wildlife, and glass bottom boat
tours are offered when the water is dear.
Swimming is a popular activity during the
hot summer months. A nature trail offers
a leisurely walk along the upland wooded
areas of the park.
The Wakulla Springs Lodge was built in
1937 by financier Edward Ball and is open
year-round. A full-service dining room over-
looks the spring; lodge meeting facilities
offer an excellent place for retreats. Wakulla
Springs State Park and Lodge is listed on
the Natural Register of Historic Places and is
designated as a National Natural Landmark.
To reserve a guest or meeting room, please
call the park. It is located 14 miles south of
Tallahassee on State Road 267 at the inter-
section with State Road 61.
For Information about Edward Ball
Wakulla Springs State Park, please call 850-
224-5950. Sandy Cook is the Park Manager.

Parks, Rec






Noeme 1.07tor h aklaNw ae7


Our Parks...

Welcome to Bald
Point State Park
Some of the most picturesque scenic ar-
eas along north Florida's Gulf Coast can be
found at this park. Located on Alligator Point
where Ochlockonee Bay meets Apalachee
Bay, Bald Point offers a multitude of land
and water activities.
Coastal marshes, pine flatwoods, and
oak thickets foster a diversity of biological
communities that make the park a popular
destination for birding and wildlife viewing.
Every fall, bald eagles, other migrating rap-
tors, and monarch butterflies are commonly
sighted as they head south for the winter.
Bald Point offers access to two Apalachee
Bay beaches for swimming, sunbathing,
and fishing.
Other activities include canoeing, kaya-
king, windsurfing, and hiking. Facilities
include a fishing dock and picnic pavilions.
It is located off U.S. Highway 98, one mile
south of Ochlockonee Bay. Take State Road
370 for three miles to Bald Point Road.
For Information about Bald Point State
Park, please call 850-349-9146. Kevin Patton
is Park Manager.

Azalea Park
AZALEA PARK is a community park in the
center of Crawfordville next to Hudson Park.


The park has the following amenities:
* Walking trail (two laps=l.l miles)
* Workout stations (located at the North
and South ends of the park)
* Restroom facilities
* Picnic gazeboes
* Picnic tables.

Park Fees:
* Daily Azalea Park Gazebo Rental, $35.
* Please contact WCPRD for information,
926-7227

Hickory Park
The Hickory Park Grant Project in Craw-
fordville should begin no later than Nov. 1,
2007 and should be completed by April 30,
2010, county officials said.
The park improvements include play-
ground equipment, a tennis court, walking/
bike trail, restroom, playground equipment,
parking, security lighting and renovation of
picnic facilities.
For more information, please contact
Park Facilities Coordinator Sheryl Mosley
at 926-7227.



Saltwater trail
Continued from Page 5C

life Park on Highway 19.
The group kayaked through a remote
section of the scenic Chassahowitzka Na-


tional Wildlife Refuge on Tuesday, Oct. 16.
Alderson said the early agenda of
the group will be simple. The organiza-
tion must determine a decision-making
process, name, statement of purpose, and
structure while electing officers, creating
an outline of potential regional chapters,
brainstorming about fundraising opportu-
nities and setting a meeting schedule.
SThe future tasks include: the Adoption
of by-laws and application for non-profit
status, the establishment of a web site
and on-line newsletter, and the applica-
tion of grant funds.
The best background for the trail is on
the state Department of Environmental
Protection website: http://www.dep.state.
fl.us/gwt/paddling/saltwater.htm. Seg-
ment 5 maps and guide covers most of
Wakulla County.
"We're finishing up maps for segment
6, which covers the rest of the county and
beyond," said Alderson. "We are pleased
that the St. Marks National Wildlife
Refuge has been very supportive and is
allowing us to use a spoil island at the
mouth of the St. Marks River and two
existing Florida Trail campsites accessible
along the coast. We've also helped to
establish two primitive campsites at Bald
Point State Park, and Lee Spears of Spring
Creek will allow kayakers to camp near
his landing for a small fee."
Alderson started scouting the trail for
the Office of Greenways and Trails three


years ago and helped to write the guide
for the Big Bend Saltwater Paddling Trail,
a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission project, which goes from the
Aucilla River to the Town of Suwannee.
"That experience with the Big Bend
trail inspired me to write Waters Less
Traveled," he said. "Sea kayaking has
seemed like a natural extension to my
background as a
backpacker, long distance walker, and
canoe camper. With Florida's rivers and
coast, it's an ideal outdoor pursuit and
helps me to appreciate this incredible
resource that we have in our backyard. I
hope we never take it for granted."
With a starting point at St. George
Island State Park and an ending point at
Wakulla Beach, the local segment is 72 to
76 miles long and should take six days
to paddle. Extreme caution is advised in
paddling open waters from St. George Is-
land to Carrabelle and in paddling across
Ochlockonee Bay.
Alderson has been field director for
the Florida circumnavigational trail, but
recently took on extra duties as coordina-
tor of Florida's designated paddling trails,
which includes several scenic rivers such
as the Wakulla and Wacissa.
Wakulla County residents appreciate
the natural resources of the county. The
head of Alderson's office, Jena Brooks, is a
resident of Wakulla County from Sop-
choppy.


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~-~--~-- �


I


The Wakulla News - Page XC


Outdoors


November 1, 2007


J






Pato RC - The Waknlla News


C . "



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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


HUNTING SEASON DATES
Seasons and dates are not applicable on WMAs. Forspecific WMA regulations, obtain individual WMA brochures published annually for each area.


BAG LIMITS
(Bag limits can differ on WMAs)


Season

Archery


Deer-Dog Training


Crossbow


Muzzleloading Gun

General Gun

Antlerless Deer


Fall Trkey*


Quail and Gray Squirrel


Bobcat and Otter


Spring Turkey


Northwest Hunting Zone


Oct. 13 - Nov. 11

Oct. 27 - Nov. 15

Nov. 26- Dec. 2


Nov. 16-18
Feb. 14-24


Nov. 22-25
Dec. 8- Feb. 13


Dec. 15-21


Nov. 22-25
Dec. 8 - Jan. 13

Nov. 10 - March 2

Dec. 1 - March 1

March 15 - April 20 **


Central Hunting Zone


Sept. 22- ct. 21


Oct. 6-25

Oct. 22-26


Oct. 27- Nov. 4

Nov. 10.- Jan. 20


'jo, 17 23


Nov. 10 - Jan. 6

lo:v 10 - March 2

Dec. 1 - March 1

Mar.-: 15 - Aprl 20


South Hunting Zone

Sept, 8- Oct. 7


[r. 6 25

Oct. 8-12

Ol 13-21


Oct. 27 - Jan. 6


Nov. 3.9


Nov. 10- Jan. 6

Nrov 10 - March 2

Dec. 1- March 1

March 1 Apnl 6


Species


Daily


Season Possession


Turkey (all fall seasons) * 1 2 ** 2

Turkey (spnng season) 1 2*** 2***

Quail 12 No limit 24

Gray Squirrel 12 No limit 24

Rabbit 12 No limit 24

Wild Hog, raccoon, bobcat, otter,
opossum, coyote, nutria, skunk No limit No limit No limit
and beaver

* No fall harvest of turkeys allowed in Holmes County.
** Season limit includes turkeys taken during all archery, crossbow, muzzleloading gun
and fall turkey seasons combined.
*** Season and possession limit in Holmes County is one turkey.


Wild hogs, rabbits, raccoons, opossums, skunks, nutrias, beavers and coyotes may be taken year-round. * Except for Holmes County where there is no fall harvest of turkeys allowed. * Spring turkey season is limited to March 15-17 in Holmes County.


MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING SEASON DATES


Rail and Common Moorhen Season
Season: September 1 - November 9
Shooting Hours: One-half hour before sunrise to sunset
Bag Limits (daily/possession):
Clapper & King rails - 15/30 (singly or in aggregate)
Sora & Virginia rails - 25/25 (singly or in aggregate)
Common Moorhen - 15/30
Purple Gallinule - NO OPEN SEASON
Limited Canada Goose Season
September Season: September 1-26
Regular Season, First Phase: November 17-25
Regular Season, Second Phase: December 1 - January 30
Canada geese may be taken only in the Florida waters of Lake Seminole in Jackson
County that are south of SR 2, north of the Jim Woodruff Dam and east of CR 271.
Shooting Hours: One-half hour before sunrise to sunset.
Bag Limit (daily/possession): 5/10 Taking or attempting to take brant or geese
(except as described above) is prohibited.

Same Day Financing Available

mmw w


Mourning and White-Winged Dove Seasons
Season:
First Phase - October 6-29
Second Phase - November 10-25
Third Phase - December 8 - January 6
Shooting Hours:
First Phase - 12 Noon to sunset
Second & Third phases - One-half hour before sunrise to sunset
Bag Limit (daily/possession): 12/24 (singly or in aggregate)
Snipe Season
Season: November 1 - February 15
Shooting Hours: One-half hour before sunrise to sunset
Bag Limit (daily/possession): 8/16
Woodcock Season
Season: December 15 - January 13
Shooting Hours: One-half hour before sunrise to sunset
Bag Limit (daily/possession): 3/6
Crow Season
Season: August 11 - October 28, 2007 (Saturdays and Sundays only) and


November 11,2007 - February 18, 2008.
Shooting Hours: One-half hour before sunrise to sunset
Bag Limit: No bag or possession limits.

Waterfowl and Coot Seasons
Season:
First Phase - November 17-25
Second Phase - December 8 - January 27
Youth Waterfowl Days - February 2-3
Shooting Hours: One-half hour before sunrise to sunset
Light (snow includingg blue] and Ross') geese may be taken statewide.
Bag Limit (daily/possession): Ducks - 6/12; no more than one black duck, one
mottled duck, one fulvous whistling-duck, one pintail, two canvasback, two
redheads, two wood ducks, two scaup, four scoters, and four mallards (no more than
two of which may be females). All other species of duck (except harlequin ducks)
may be taken up to the six-duck daily limit. Light geese - 15/no possession limit.
Taking or attempting to take brant or geese (except as described above) is
prohibited.
Coots-15/30
Mergansers: Daily limit 5, only two of which may be a hooded merganser;
possession limit 10, only four of which may be hooded mergansers.


2


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November 1, 2007


Outdoors


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