Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00139
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Uniform Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: October 4, 2007
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00139
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Full Text





AllhU


Thursday, October 4, 2007


,50


Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century


Cents


County

examines

planning

woes
By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
New Wakulla County Com-
munity Development Director
Lindsay Stevens has only been
on the job for a little more than
one month, but on Monday, Oct.
1, Wakulla County Commission-
ers held a workshop to pick her
brain over the Comprehensive
Plan.
Stevens said her short time
on the job has shown her that
the Comprehensive Plan and
elements within the plan are
"outdated" and will require
updating.
She added that the county can
revise the Land Development
Code (LDC) to better reflect how
the board wants the community
to be developed. "By law the
code and zoning must be con-
sistent," said Stevens. "The two
are not consistent. The zoning
(in some cases) is more intense
than what is allowed by the
Future Land Use Map."
'Code Enforcement Officer
Jamie Baze said she has had
difficulty enforcing the county
codes because they are so out-
dated. She gave an outdoor
entertainment example where
regulations are so old they ref-
erenced "Woodstock" outdoor
entertainment. .Stevens agreed
and added that the county does
not have any minimum housing
standards.
The Evaluation and Appraisal
Report (EAR) is underway with
the assistance of Tallahassee con-
sultants. But it will be months
before the EAR is approved. The
EAR is a regular updating of
the Comprehensive Plan that is
required by the state.
"I do think the Land Develop-
ment Code needs an overhaul,"
said Stevens. She added that
grant funding may be acquired
to help the county with the
process. She noted that the LDC
could include specific subdivi-
sion requirements and encour-
age "Green Infrastructure" such
as parks.
"We know what Wakulla
County wants but we don't have
the LDC to get us there," said
Commissioner Ed Brimner.
Brimner added that Crawford-
ville could become a special area
study and noted that "Crawford-
ville needs to be incorporated."
"I agree with you about incor-
porating Crawfordville," said
See ISSUES on Page 16A


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackrniar@thewakullanews.net
The Wakulla County Planning and
Zoning Department was operating under
the leadership of Donnie Sparkman dur-
ing the fall of 2006 when Sparkman won
election to the post of Wakulla County
Property Appraiser.
Sparkman was asked to take his new
office a few days after the November
election rather than wait until January
2007. His loss sparked a long search for
a replacement that culminated with the
hiring of Lindsay E. Stevens in June.
Losing Sparkman quickly after the
General Election in 2006 also created a
shuffling of duties within the planning
department. Two employees served
as the acting director until Stevens ar-
rived.


Stevens tied up all of her own per-
sonal activities in the months that
followed her hiring and she took her
spot next to the rest of the staff on
Aug. 27, approximately 10 months after
Sparkman's departure.
Wakulla County Administrator Ben
Pingree said he has high expectations
for Stevens who has an impressive
planning background and knowledge of
Wakulla County through her husband,
Heath R. Stokley, son of the late Wakulla
County School Superintendent Roger
Stokley.
Her first weeks on the job have been
busy despite a slow down in the local
real estate market and the county's
failure to submit the Evaluation and
See STEVENS on page 15A


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
The state Department of
Environmental Protection has
filed a lawsuit against Murphy
Oil over spills at the company's
St. Marks facility.
The agency's complaint por-
trays Murphy Oil as unrespon-
sive and late with required
filings, and seeks to have the
court order the company to im-
mediately submit a assessment
of contamination of the deep-
water aquifer at the site.
The site has been operated
as a vehicle fuel storage facility
since 1957. In 1982, Murphy Oil
USA, a Delaware corporation
based in Arkansas, took own-
ership of the property, which
includes eight aboveground
storage tanks. According.to the
lawsuit, a petroleum discharge
of at least 25 gallons was found
in the soil and groundwater at
the property in August 2000,
including benzene, toluene, and
methyl tert-butyl ether.
The contamination was
-found a-couple of months after-
an aboveground storage tank
had been removed from the
property. Several monitoring
wells were placed around the
site and test results showed
contamination of the shallow
aquifer groundwater.
In June 2001, according to the
lawsuit, Murphy Oil submitted
a site assessment report that
was 29 days late and assessed
only the shallow aquifer not
the deepwater aquifer. The
agency claims that the company
submitted incomplete adden-
dums and missed deadline after
deadline.
"Despite (Murphy Oil's) fail-
ure to complete assessment for
more than six years," the lawsuit
states, in July 2007, the agency
requested a site assessment
"by Oct. 1, 2007 containing the
complete deep aquifer assess-
ment."
DEP filed its lawsuit against
Murphy Oil on Sept. 7, 2007,
asking for an injunction against
the company requiring it to im-
mediately submit a complete
assessment. Noting dozens of al-
leged violations of state regula-


tions, the agency also seeks civil'
penalties "not to exceed $10,000.
per day per violation," as well as
attorney's fees, expert witness
fees and investigative costs.
In March 2003, the agency.
approved Murphy Oil's reme-
dial action plan for the shallow
aquifer which called for quar-
terly monitoring reports and the,
injection of calcium peroxide irn
a grid around the property to
enhance the natural breakdown
as far as impacts on shalloWv
groundwater. (No deep aquifei
remediation was authorized"
because, DEP claims, a complete
assessment was never been
done by the company.)
DEP claims Murphy Oil failed
to submit timely monitoring
samples and did not complete
the calcium peroxide injection%
within the required time period.
As in the earlier count, DEP
seeks a civil penalty of up to
$10,000 per day per violation
as well as attorney's fees, costs
of litigation and investigative
expenses.
On Oct. 1, the company
filed its answer to the agency's
complaint denying all the al-
legations.


Gaby

rezoning

gets OK

By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
A rezoning request from Craw-
fordville resident Scott Gaby was
approved by a 4-1 vote Monday,
Oct. 1 as Gaby asked the board to
create three, three .acre parcels on
nine acres on the south side of
Harvey-Mill Road, east of Bostic
Pelt Road,
The zoning change from
agriculture to RR-2 residential
increased density from one unit
per five acres to one unit per two
acres. Gaby said he had planned
to market the property as two,
five acre tracts, but changing
See GABY on Page 3A


Inside

This Week
Almanac.................. Page 11 A
Church.................... Page 4A
Classitlfieds................ Page 3B
Comment & Opinion Page 2A
Outdoors................Page 10
People..................... Page 8A
School.................... Page 14A
Sheriff's Report........ Page 12A
Sports..................... Page 6A
Week In Wakulla........Page 3A

Next Week
Doug Alderson
loves natural
beauty. Therefore,
he loves Wakulla
County. See where
he's been in next
week's issue.






16 84578 20215 o


Elections supervisor casts ballot for retirement


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla County will lose a longtime consti-
tutional officer after the 2008 election season as
Supervisor of Elections Sherida Crum will not be
seeking another term in her post.
She will have 24 years in office when she
completes her final term. Crum, 61, said she has
worked for more than 40 years and is looking
forward to beginning a new phase of her life.
She segmented her life into three chapters
including the first phase of her youth with her
parents, the second phase of family life with
her late husband, George, and a third phase of
retirement.
"The second chapter of my life ended un-
expectedly and, for me, too soon," she said of
George's illness and death. "I thought my life
was over in 2000 when he died."
Little did she know at the time, but national
politics would help her through her mourning
period. The 2000 election turned all eyes on the
state as national political parties battled for the
White House.
"The 2000 election as really good for me," she
said. "The Lord gave me the strength to carry on
and we did not have any problems that year. But
it was a challenge."
George died around the time of the elections
and Crum was forced to put her mind on her job


as media coverage of hanging chads and uncount-
ed votes in South Florida resulted in national
party observers camping out in the hallways of
the courthouse near her office.
"After five years of being numb I decided to
start a new chapter, retirement and travel," she
continued.
Crum has six grandchildren and a seventh
child due soon. She has two children. Derick and
Kim Crum live in Crawfordville, and Keisha and
David Cannon live in Fairhope, Ala. Sherida is ex-
cited that her newest grandchild will be a boy and
carry the name of her late husband, George.
"Work has always been a family affair," she
stated. George, Derick and other family members
have always assisted Sherida on election night.
"I began waking up and realizing that I was
ready to live again and start a new chapter in
my life," said Crum. "That was two years ago." A
friend, Jay Leffert, has also helped her through
the process.
A native of Sopchoppy, Crum worked for the
school district for 18 years, a year for Sheriff David
Harvey and two years for attorney Bill Webster
prior to becoming a constitutional officer.
When Crum took office in early 1985 she was
the only employee in the office and had to train
herself. She said she was not sure she could walk
into the office as a newly elected supervisor today
See CRUM on page 15A


Sherida Crum has cast her vote for retirement and will leave
her position of Supervisor of Elections behind after 24 years
when her current term ends.
Photo by Keith Blackmar


tws F'' ram

POBO


Waua


Our 112th Year, 40th Issue


State sues



Murphy Oil



nvpr QniilIs


indsay Stevens at her desk i her new office
Lindsay Stevens at her desk in her new office,


Stevens fills vacancy at


top of Wakulla's P&Z


ol),


WakuH








Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007


Comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895


My View


Things I recently learned:

By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net

The Internet was invented by Al Gore and Larry Flynt and
consists of a series of tubes and wires through which junk mail
and porn are shipped directly into your home through your
computer. )
Twinkles are actually a byproduct of petroleum refining.
Well okay, not directly. But among the zillion or so chemical
compounds that give Twinkies that one-of-a-kind artificial taste
are petrochemical-based ingredients like Polysorbate 80, which is C
used as a cheap replacement for cream and eggs, and is manu-
factured from corn, palm oil and petroleum. Yuml
The latest in carnival food goodness? Deep-fried Twinkies
on a stick. You should probably have your cardiologist on speed-
dial before you eat one. And go ahead and make out your will.
Although I've never seen the product on store shelves,
Hershey Company has allegedly put out a limited edition peanut
butter and banana creme cup in honor of the King of Rock 'n'
Roll. Yes, the Reese's Elvis Cup as it is called was created
in time for the 30th anniversary of the death of Elvis back in
August and is intended as an homage the King's preference for
fried peanut butter and banana sandwiches. (Hm, wonder if you
could put Elvis Cups on a stick and deep-fat fry them?)
I can imagine commercials for this candy that would feature a
couple of chubby Elvis impersonators in those horrible rhine- -
stone-encrusted, one-piece bellbottomed jumpsuits Elvis wore
when he was fat and in the final phase of his career, playing a E 7 i'* 10
caricature of himself for Las Vegas tourists "Hunk of Burning
"Love" indeed. In the commercial I envision, the impersonators
,are backstage, snacking, when they accidentally bump into
each other. They drawl Elvis-like: "Hey, you got some nana in
.,ay peanut butter!" "Hunh, you got some peanut butter on my
'nanal" Then: Two great tastes that taste great together. Thankya
,veramuch.
Al Gore discovered the Internet while he was a college
student at the University of Tennessee. One day, Larry Flynt, the
inventor of pornography, was walking down the street in Knox- Help make Beatty
ville when he accidentally bumped into Al Gore. "Hey dude, you house an 'Extreme
got porn on my internet!" And so forth. Makeover' project
I saw a news story about a recent U.S. Navy report that
likens the MySpace generation to an "alien life force." The Navy Editor, The News:
,report, best described as an unintentional laugh riot, notes that Your immediate support is
this generation has always had Internet and cellphones during Your immediate spportty
their lifetimes; that they share such strange pop culture refer- needed to nominate theBeatty
ence points as emoticons and Napoleon Dynamite; and offers family for "Extreme Makeover:
a translation of such text-speak as "suuuuuuupllI" (Translation: Home Edition how.
What's up?) and "omg" (Translation: Oh my God). First and foremost, a sincere
Thank You from me to all who
The point of the Navy report is that these spoiled brats aren't have been so very kind all who
interested in joining the military preferring instead to go to have been so very kid and
college and party. And a lot of this selfish generation also thinks supportive of my sister and
that joining the service and being sent to the Middle East for her family. Ma God bless each
that whole Iraq-thing isn't very appealing. It makes recruitment of you.
difficult, and these kids are so soft they aren't even suitable for Ever since the fire that de-
the military. stroyed the home of Chris and
My favorite part of the report is the description of the genera- Mike Beatty, owners of Florida
tion as having to be coddled and praised for doing the slightest Wild Mammal Association,
thing right calling them "narcissistic praise junkies." friends and supporters have be-
As a youngster I was a victim of the so-called "education" lived the Beatty family would
offered by Georgia Public Schools. Because I suffered from child- be a great candidate for the
hood epilepsy, it was determined that I was/must be mentally "Extreme Makeover: Home Edi-
retarded. (One of my daughters winces when I say "mentally tion" showwhch ars on ourn
retarded" because it's not politically correct nowadays. I try to locanights, This is to help those
explain to her that, when I was a kid, to say somebody was nights. This is to help those
retarded was considered the height of sensitivity.) My second- who would like to be a part of
grade experience was like a version of "One Flew Over the Familis e ffor e selected by
Cuckoo's Nest" played by children, with a teacher who oversaw theFamili showes are selected by
us very much like Nurse Ratched only not as nice. the show basedonan applica-
Unlike the Jack Nicholson character in the film of "Cuckoo's tion they submit The casting
Nest," however, I did not lead my fellow inmates/classmates in department selects from the
a rebellion against the misuse of authority by Mrs. Wretched (or applications and decides who
whatever my teacher's name was). Instead, while she drilled the the most deserving and inspira-
other students on reciting the alphabet all day, everyday, all I tional family will be to receive
did was stare out the window and daydream about the Mach 5, the home makeover. Part of the
Which is not a razor, but Speed Racer's car. casting departments decision is
A pre-anime cartoon from Japan, Speed Racer was the story based on the information they
of boy who wanted to be a race car driver and whose father, receive from supporters who
coincidentally named Pops, had invented a car that was bul- fill out a certain section of the
letproof, could drive underwater, jump in the air, and had giant application explaining why they
sawblades that popped out of the front so that you could mow believe the family should re-
down forests while driving 100 mph. All the qualities you look ceive the home makeover. This
for in a competitive race car. Speed had a girlfriend, Trixie, who section of the application is
flew helicopters and airplanes. His little brother Sprittle and his very straight forward for anyone
pet monkey Chim-Chim were always stowing away in the trunk wanting to nominate the Beatty
of the Mach 5 (yes, it was a race car with a trunk). As a retarded family for the home makeover.
second grader, I thought it was the greatest TV show ever. All you need to do is provide
Eventually, my parents managed to convince the polite but your name, address, contact in-
cruel school principal (picture Strother Martin in "Cool Hand formation and a brief narrative
Luke") that maybe I didn't belong in The Box/MR class. I was of not more than one page tell-
moved to General Population but the drawback was that, unlike ng why you believe the Beatty
my tenure with the MRs, I was never again to be thought of as family would be a good candi-
an overachiever date for the home makeover,
A decade later, after mastering such academic challenges as a such as their contribution to
high school elective course on Fishing (I kid you not) in which you or your family, contribution
our final exam consisted of casting into a target chalked onto to the community, the unique-
the football field, I earned my release/diploma and was sent ness of the situation, need of
into the world clueless and ill-prepared for life, but ready to cast the family etc.
a fishing lure at any chalked targets in my path. This section istiffed IfYou
Cut from that soft-focus flashback of golden-hued nostalgia Are Nominating A Family" on
to the present day: I have obtained a DVD featuring numerous Page 4 of the application. The
episodes of Speed Racer. (That I obtained it is proof that there complete application can be
are two types of fools in this world: Those who loan DVDs, and obtained online by simply typ-
those who return them. This goes double for books.) It had ing in "extreme makeover home
been years since I saw Speed Racer; my kids had never seen it, edition" in your address bar. If
but they knew of its significance to me and my oft-told story you don't have a computer but
of overcoming the adversity of my alleged mental retardation would liketo obtain a copy of
and all that, bla-bla-blah, whatever. I gathered my kids around Page 4 of the application, please
the TV, their little eyes glowing with the reflected light of the call me at the number below
screen, breathing through their little mouths in anticipation. and I will gladly send you a
Soon their smiles faded and they began to fidget. "Do we HAVE copy. Again, please limit your
to watch this?" explanation to not more than
Okav. Speed Racer was not as good as I remembered it. I was one page; otherwise the casting


in second grade, give me a break. department may not accept it.
"Maybe they were right when you were in second giade," my You can either send your
smart-aleck daughter says with a smirk. "If you thought this was nomination directly to the show
good, maybe you WERE mentally challenged." at Lock & Key Productions, c/o
Oh, you narcissistic praise monkey, you got sarcasm on my Family Castingeles, P.O. 900Box 3867, or, you
embarrassment. Los Angeles, CA. 90038, or, you
can send it to me, Vicki Sharpe,

William Snowden, craving a brief return to the 1950s at 193 Tupelo Drive, Crawford-
and 1960s, is a reporter, cartoonist and fan of all things we ville, Florida, 32327, and I will
remember fondly that weren't as good as they seemed back package them together and
in the "good ole days." send them to the show. All
nominations must be received


by the show no later than Oct.
8 in order to meet the casting
deadline for the upcoming sea-
son. Please do not send them
FED EX to the show because
they will not ship to a post of-
fice box.
If you are sending your re-
sponse directly to the show,
.please be sure to include the
name and address of the Beatty
family at the top of your submit-
tal (Chris and Mike Beatty, 198
Edgar Poole Road, Crawford-
ville, Florida, 32327).
If you have any questions,
please call me (Vicki Sharpe) at
926-8965.
Let's keep our fingers crossed
that one day in the not too
distant future that big bus will
come to Wakulla County, make
a turn onto Edgar Poole Road
and Ty will yell from his bull
horn, "Hello, Beatty Familyl"
Vicki Sharpe
Crawfordville

Rozanski columns
are a pleasure
Editor, The News:
What a pleasure it has been
to read the last few My View
columns by Courtney Laine
Rozanski. She presents such
a refreshing and positive view
of life,
I'm sure everyone's day is
brighter and more pleasant
because of her writing.
This is in stark contrast to
the usual editorial page sick
hate mail by the same egoma-
niacs week after week.
Let's have more of Courtney
Rozanski. I wish you could
make her a regular contributor
and leave off a few of the sicko
radicals.
Robert Roddenberry
Sopchoppy

Trice not the man
article portrays
Editor, The News:
I take great umbrage with
the article written by William
Snowden regarding John Trice.
The John Trice I know is not
the person portrayed in that
article. He is the consummate
gentleman, a devoted husband,
father and grandfather. He and
his family have deeply religious
beliefs.
How many times must a man
ask the driver, politely, to stop
his dangerous driving habits
and be given the international
gesture and cursed at? How
many times must a man call
the WCSO and report these
situations and get no response?
Should he have waited until
one of his grandchildren was
killed by the abusive driver?
Mr. Snowden also fails to
report that John Trice called the
WCSO with three witnesses to
the event waiting there with
him for two hours and they
never showed up. According


to those witnesses, John did
not drag the 17-year-old out of
his truck, the kid exited his ve-
hicle in an aggressive manner.
It should also be pointed out
that J & K Lane is owned by
the property owners and they
maintain that road.
How odd that Snowden
doesn't name the probation
officer to whom he attributed
these remarks "[Trice] poses
a risk to the community and
received a lenient sentence
despite the circumstances of
the offense." If not sentenced
to prison for the violation, the
officer recommended a 7 p.m.
to 7 a.m. curfew with a mental
health evaluation. Odd, if the
probation officer had read the
file, he'd know Mr. Trice had a
mental health evaluation before
he was allowed to ask for bail.
Snowden knows this as I sat
right behind him in court when
Judge Sauls made his ruling
and this was mentioned. Mr.
Snowden should also be aware
that Mr. Trice has had three
probation officers.
As for the probation viola-
tion, that is the single dumbest
thing I've seen yet. Had I read
the question asked, I would
have assumed they were ask-
ing if I'd been stopped for a
traffic violation, a tail light out
or something of that nature.
The question on the form is
ambiguous at best. How many
times have many of us watched
John go over and chat in a
friendly manner with members
of the WCSO at commission
meetings? Does he report that
as well?
Who amongst us would not
have reported that trampoline


stolen? His daughter worked
very hard to save the money to
buy that for her child, and re-
porting the missing trampoline
to the proper authorities is now
very possibly going to send Mr.
Trice to prison? Justice is blind
only if we allow her to be so.
Suzanne M, Smith
Crawfordville

Trice doesn't warrant
this kind of attention
Editor, The News:
I absolutely cannot wrap
my mind around the fact that
people in this county have noth-
ing better to do than harass my
63-year-old father. You should
all be ashamed of yourselves.
I am on probation and when
I go in every month to report
to my officer, I check "no" that
I haven't had any contact with
the police, even on a month
when I had a car accident and
had to call the police.
The reason why? As I am sure
everyone on probation would
say, I am under the impres-
sion that the question, "Have
you had any contact with law
enforcement?" means negative
contact.
My dad called the cops to
report a theft for my sister. It
seems to be as if some people
are looking for any excuse to
throw my father in jail. This
whole situation is ridiculous. To
begin with, the charges against
my father were bogus and the
media coverage was very one-
sided. One of the issues of this
newspaper gave my father his

See LETTERS on Page 15A


Your View


Sbte akuUa tos
The Wakulla News (USPS 644-640) is published weekly at
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla
News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
Publisher: Ron Isbell............................ ......................... ron.isbell@ gmail.com
News Editor: Keith Blackmar..........................kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Reporter: William Snowden.............................wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Sales Manager: Tammie Barfield.........................tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey ...............l....kinsey@thewakullanews.net
Bookkeeping: Sherry Balchuck .......................accounting@thewakullanews.net
Classifieds: Alex Brimner................................. classifieds@thewakullanews.net
Circulation: Colin Taviner............................... circulation@thewakullanews.net
Graphic Artists: Eric Stanton/Jessi Smith.......... advertising@thewakullanews.net
Typesetter: Karen Tully............................. advertising@thewakullanews.net
Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable
one year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $25, Out of County $30
Out of State $35. Out of Country on Request








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Octobser 4, 2007-Page 3A


Refuge Week spotlights St. Marks


Hearing wolves howl, tag-
ging monarch butterflies, snap-
ping pictures of soaring eagles,
or just walking in the woods,
thousands of Americans will
be making a special connection
with- nature during National
Wildlife Refuge Week Oct, 7
through Oct. 13.
The National Wildlife Refuge
System, with 547 national wild-
life refuges nationwide, protects
approximately 97 million acres
of fish and wildlife habitat.
St. Marks National Wildlife
Refuge will offer free entry and
special hand-outs about refuge
events to celebrate National


Gaby
Continued from Page 1A

economic conditions changed
his mind.
Gaby received support from
all of the commissioners except
Ed Brimner. "This board has
not stepped forth with a plan
for infrastructure needs," he
said. "We've got to slow down
approving these sorts of subdi-
visions."
Gaby countered that his
property use is consistent with
surrounding property. Commis-
sioner Howard Kessler added
that the small parcels will not
generate a great deal of addi-
tional traffic in the area.
In other matters in front of
the Wakulla County Commis-
sion on Monday, Oct. 1:
The board approved Oc-
tober as Domestic Violence
Awareness Month. A banner
will be erected at the court-
house to remind residents
about the dangers of domestic
and sexual violence in the com-
munity.
The board approved a
closed attorney-client meeting
on Monday, Oct. 15 at 6:10 p.m.
Attorney Ron Mowrey will dis-
cuss pending litigation from the
McCorvey family over planning
and zoning.
The commission will hold
the second annual winter re-
treat at Wakulla Springs Lodge
or another location on Tuesday,


Wildlife Refuge Week.
Florida Disabled Outdoors
Association is providing a Birds
of Prey demonstration at the
refuge on Saturday, Oct. 6 at 10
a.m. The refuge is also offering
a wildlife digital photography
class on Saturday,'Oct. 13.
St. Marks NWR is especially
popular for hosting migrating
monarch butterflies in Octo-
ber.
For more information on the
refuge's 19th Annual Monarch
Butterfly Festival on Sat. Oct.
27 and to sign up for the photo
class, please contact the refuge
at 925-6121.


Dec. 4 from non to 4 p.m. The
meeting will discuss priorities
set last year and create new
board priorities.
A budget workshop was
set for Monday, Dec. 3 at 5 p.m.
to discuss strategies for the
2008-2009 budget year.
The commission approved
a complete overhaul of the Per-
sonnel Policy and Procedures
Manual with the help of Deputy
County Administrator Andrea
Simpson and consultant Paula
Arnold of Quest Management
Consultants in Greenville. "I
think it is a great product," said
Administrator Pingree.
The board ratified a draft
of the Wakulla County Eco-
nomic Development Plan from
a July 16 meeting. The motion
to accept the document passed
3-2 with Commissioners George
Green and Howard Kessler op-
posed.
"People come to Wakulla
County for the wilderness,"
said Kessler. "Wakulla County
doesn't need to be industrial-
ized. We need to protect the
environment that we have."
The board approved ,a
dual certification of the tax roll
so Tax Collector Cheryll Olah
can begin work to get tax bills
ready for mailing. The county
Value Adjustment Board will
not be meeting until Oct. 18,
but Olah did not want to hold
up the entire roll waiting for a
few small changes.
Olah said she expected no
worse than a one week delay


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Being both resistant to black-spot and drought tolerant makes it an
excellent choice for your garden. This heavy bloomer is available in
Red, Pink, and Blush, with Rainbow and Yellow coming soon. The
foliage is a dark purplish green and turns to a burgundy in the fall.


Available in our garden center








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The week highlights the six
wildlife-dependent recreation
uses offered on national wild-
life refuges: hunting, fishing,
wildlife photography, wildlife
observation, and environmental
education and interpretation.
The week-long celebration
is also part of a year-long com-
memoration of the 100th birth-
day of pioneering conservation-
ist and writer Rachel Carson.
Last year more than 39 mil-
lion people visited America's
national wildlife refuges. There
is at least one national wildlife
refuge in every state.
Families in most metropoli-


and will still get the tax bills
mailed out in November. "I
don't think I'm going to need
it," said Olah of the extra time,
But she said she wanted to play
it safe.
Wakulla County will enter
into negotiations with a new
CPA firm, Powell & Jones, to
replace the department James
Moore and Company. Powell &
Jones was the top ranked firm


tan areas can find a national
wildlife refuge less than an
hour's drive from their front
doors.
The National Wildlife Refuge
System's more than 2,500 miles
of land and water trails appeal
to visitors who come to bird
watch, fish, hunt, photograph
nature, hike, or just to be out-
doors.
This year also marks the 10th
anniversary of the National
Wildlife Refuge System Im-
provement Act, which provides
guidance to the Secretary of the
Interior for the overall manage-
ment of the Refuge System.


of four that submitted qualifica-
tions to the county.
The four firms submitting
proposals include Powell &
Jones, Thomas Howell Fergu-
son; Carr, Riggs & Ingram, La-
nigan and Associates and Law,
Redd. Crona & Monroe.
The county will attempt to
seek a financial agreement with
the Powell & Jones firm or move
on to the second ranked firm.


Workshop held to protect manatees


The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission
(FWC) sponsored a workshop
Wednesday, Sept. 26 to meet
with officials from other agen-
cies to discuss plans and tech-
nology to protect the Florida
manatee.
The Law Enforcement Mana-
tee Protection Workshop was
a one-day event held in Fort
Myers. It was co-hosted by the
Lee County Sheriff's Office and
included biologists and law
enforcement officials from the
FWC, the Lee County Sheriff's
Office, other local law enforce-
ment agencies and the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service. FWC
Chairman Rodney Barreto also


attended the workshop.
"There has been a lot of
debate lately about changes
concerning the protection of
manatees," Barreto said.
"But nothing changes the
laws that protect the manatee.
The manatee will get the same
amount of protection whether
it's listed as endangered or
threatened."
The workshop covered a
variety of topics, including the
proposed manatee manage-
ment plan and reclassification,
an overview of recent unusual
manatee deaths in Southwest
Florida, manatee harassment
and enforcement technology.


Week in Wakulla

Thursday, October 4, 2007
ALZHEIMER'S SUPPORT GROUP meets at the public library at
6 p.m.
BOOK NOOK, for children in grades K-5, will be held at the
public library at 4:30 p.m.
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB meets at Posey's Up the Creek in
Panacea at noon.
PUBLIC HEARING on issues regarding the county's comprehen-
sive growth plan will be held at the senior center from 6 p.m. to
8:30 p.m.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at 12 noon.
VFW BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from
6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Friday, October 5, 2007
AA meets at the American Legion Building next to the Women's
Club in Crawfordville with an open meeting at 8 p.m. There are
also open meetings Sunday at 6 p.m., Monday for women at 6 p.m.,
and Wednesday at 8 p.m.
PICKIN' 'N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at the senior
center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
SCHOOL ADVISORY COUNCIL for Medart Elementary in the
art room at 7:45 a.m.
Saturday, October 6, 2007
OLD JAIL MUSEUM will be open selling thrift shop and histoti-
cal society items to benefit renovation of the museum from 9 a.mi.
to 1 p.m.

Monday, October 8, 2007
CHRISTIAN COALITION meets in the public library at 7 p.m.'
PLANNING COMMISSION meets in the commission boardroomi
at 7 p.m.
SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION meets at city hall in Sopchoppy
at 6:30 p.m.

Tuesday, October 9, 2007
BOOK BABIES, for infants and toddlers, will be held at the public
library at 10:30 a.m.
BROWN BAG CHECK, conducted by Florida A&M Pharmacy
students, will be held at the senior center from 10:30 a.mn. to 12:30
p.m. Bring prescription medications or a list and the students
review them.
NA meets at Joanna Johnson's office on Crawfordville Highway
at 7 p.m.
YOGA CLASS will be held at the Crawfordville Women's Club at
7:30 p.m. (Usual class times are Tuesday evenings at 6:30 p.m.) For
information, contact Della Parker-Hanson at 926-4293.
Wednesday, October 3, 2007
AA meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.
BOOK BUNCH, for pre-school and home school families, meets
at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior citizens center at
10:30 a.m.



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Page 4A-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007


Church


Obituaries


Joann G. Brown
Joann Gresham Brown, 68, of
Cumming, Ga., died Wednesday,
Sept. 19.
The funeral services were
held Saturday, Sept. 22 at the
Alpharetta Presbyterian Church
with the Rev. Joel Alvis, officiat-
ing.
A native of Mobile, Ala.,
she was the daughter of Alton
Gresham and the former Connie
Mann. She and her father, who
was a career Coast Guardsman,
spent her formative years in
various locations along the Gulf
Coast. The family became per-
manent residents of Tallahassee
following her father's retirement
from the Coast Guard, and Joann
was a 1958 graduate of Leon
High school. One of her father's
Coast Guard assignments was
as keeper of the St. Marks Light-
house, a position also held
by his father and grandfather,
dating back to 1892. Joann was
fortunate to have resided there
as a child. On March 16, 1963,
she married the love of her life,
Vernon Otis Brown, of Jackson-
ville. They eventually moved
to Cumming, Ga., where they
both played active roles in their
church. Joann became a Stephen
Minister at the Alpharetta Pres-
byterian Church, Alpharetta, Ga.
She always worked in her faith
at helping those in need.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Vernon 0. Brown of
Cumming; a son, Matthew Y.
Brown of Cumming; a son and
daughter-in-law, Joseph W. and
Angie Brown of Alpharetta and
their three children, Mackenzie
Brown, Zachary Brown, and
Emma Brown; a brother and
sister-in-law, Alton T. and Millie
Gresham, Jr. of Tallahassee; and


Oc0 lockonee


United
Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship 9 a.m.
Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
vastofr ett Zempteton
(850) 984-0127


Panacea Park

Baptist Church
24 Mission Road, Panacea
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Worship 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 p.m.
Pastor, Jerry Spears


Mass 9 a.m. Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Father James MacGee, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
926-1797 '


two nieces Misty and Mandy.
Ingram Funeral Home in Cum-
ming, Ga., was in charge of the
arrangements.

Kenneth D. Corbin
Kenneth "Ken" Dale Corbin,
54, died Monday, Sept. 24 in
Shreveport, La.
A native of in El Paso, Texas,
he was born Oct. 15, 1952. He
resided in Wakulla County for 12
years and was a concrete finisher
and draftsman by trade. He had
many friends and will be missed
very much.
Survivors include his fiance,
Brenda Clenney of Woodville;
three sons, Courtney Corbin
and wife Misty of Shreveport,
La. Ben Corbin and fiance Crys-
tal of O'Fallon, Mo. and Colby
Moore of Monroe, La. two step-
daughters, Joni Rei and husband
Michael and Lela Jacobs and
husband Shawn, all of Craw-
fordville; a brother, Curtis Ray
Corbin of Monroe, La.; and three
grandchildren, Gabriel, Kaileigh,
and Breeana.

Margaret E. Frye
Margaret Elizabeth Frye, 65,
of Tallahassee died Wednesday,
Sept. 19.
A memorial service was held
Saturday, Sept. 29 at Panacea Full
Gospel Assembly on Joe Mack
Smith Road.
A longtime resident of Tal-
lahassee, she was of the Baptist
faith.
Survivors include three sons,
Chris Stedman, Robert Stedman
and Bo Barwick, all of Tallahas-
see; a daughter, Heidi Raker of
Tallahassee; six grandchildren;
and two great-grandchildren.
Culley's MeadowWood Fu-


I Wakulla
United Methodist Church
Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m,
Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m.
I Sunday Worship -11 a.m.
Wednesday Service 7 p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor Drew Standridge


Pioneer Baptist
Church (SBC)


Sunday School
Sunday Worship


9:15 a.m.
10:30 a.m.


Wed. adult, children & youth 7 p.m.
486 Beechwood Drive Crawfordville, FL.
(North of the Lower Bridge Road and
Spring Creek Highway intersection)
Rev. Dennis Hall, Pastor
850-926-6161

J Saint Teresa
Episcopal
Church
1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98
Sunday School
Holy Eucharist 8:30 am
Youth & Adults 9:30 AM
Children 10:30 AM
Worship 10:30 AM
Reverend John Spicer
926-4288


neral Home Riggins Road Chapel
in Tallahassee was in charge of
the arrangements.

Muriel S. Simpson
Muriel Strickland Simpson,
86, of Tallahassee died Tuesday,
Sept. 25.
The funeral service was held
Friday, Sept, 28 at Friendship
Primitive Baptist Church in Me-
dart with burial at Lake Ellen
Cemetery. Memorial contribu-
tions may be made to Big Bend
Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center
Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308 or
the Florida Baptist Children's
Home, 8415 Buck Lane Road,
Tallahassee, FL 32317.
A resident of Tallahassee, she
was a member of Forest Heights
Baptist Church. She was a native
of Wakulla County who had
been a switchboard operator
during World War II. She was
a former clerk and proofreader
for the Tallahassee Democrat
and owned and operated "Our
Restaurant" in Chattahoochee
and "Our Tara" restaurant in
Bainbridge, Ga. She was a former
church secretary for Fellowship
Baptist Church who was well
known for her Heavenly Hash
and coconut cream pies.
Survivors include a son, Max
Simpson, Jr. and wife Gerry of
Jacksonville; a daughter, Dolo-
res Pigott and husband Paul of
Medart; a sister, Opal Mobley of
Thomasville, Ga.; six grandchil-
dren; eight great-grandchildren;
and one great-great-grandson.
Culley's MeadowWood Fu-
neral Home in Tallahassee was
in charge of the arrangements.

GRACE
BAPTIST CHURCH
"Where everybody is somebody in His body."
Sunday School ................ 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ............10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship.............7...7 p.m.
Wednesday Evening .........6:45 p.m.
Pastor Gary Tucker
S 926-3217


Trinity @
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
TrinityLutheranofWakulla.com
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Les Kimball
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557

o Bought Ochlockonee
Sprint Wrought Christian Center
Word Tiught
A Word of Faith Church

Schedule of Services I
* Sunday 11 a.m.
* Wednesday 7 p.m. I ^ I -
* Thursday Ladies
Bible Study 10 a.m.
2263 Curtis Mill Rd.
Sopchoppy, FL 962-3774
Pastor John S. Dunning
(From Rhema Bible Training Center)


3086 Crawfordville Hwy.
(South of the Courthouse)
Church Office: 926-7896
www.fbccrawfordville.org
or
(youth) www.crosstraining.org


SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY


Fellowship Meal
(call for reservations)
Prayer/ Bible Study
IMPACT (Youth)
Children's Events


6:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
6:30 p.m.


'Hwy 319 Medart,

alke Ell Office 926-5265
S Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
) Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
SMorning Worship 11:00 a.m.
1 Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
SEvening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org


[


SopchoppyI
United
Methodist
Church STRONG


Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship I I a.m.
Pastor Brett Templeton
850-962-2511


Wa kbd 14
Prefbyteimt
3383 Coastal Hwy.
1/3rd mile east of Wakulla High School
9:30 a.m. Bible Study
10:30 a.m. Worship Services
10:45 a.m. Children's Sunday School
Nursery Provided
926-4569
www.wakullapres.org
A Ik 4, ,



V W 4 t ad W
Vs. %M<0 ?ev iiaa. PaawC
~'4seV 'east~u e W^W ?

iarof'd~ /{orinen et Jer cet
123 Elena Drive
Tallahassee, FL 32305
Owned & Operated By Wesley Schweinsberg
Son of the Late Harold Schweinsberg
Office: (850) 421-7211 Mobile: (850) 510-3983
Call and Compare... You'll Save Time & Money
Same Quality & Service
-~ ~-* L


rn
-.,


117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy

Sunday School 9:40
Church Office Morning Worship11
962-7822 Evening Wersbl 6 I


Wednesday 7 PM Prayer Meeting,
Youth & Children's Programs II


iAM
IAM
I AN


Randy iAierso, Minister of Muslic
icki Anderseon. Yutb director
Jenry Evans, Mike Creuch, Berile Kemig Msicians


Baptist Assn. to meet


Church

News

PANACEA REVIVAL
Panacea Congregational Holi-
ness Church will host a Home-
coming Revival from Wednesday,
Oct. 10 to Sunday, Oct. 14. Ser-
vices will be held at 7:30 p.m.
nightly except for Sunday when
the services will be held at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m.
The special speakers will be
Brother Tommy and Sister La-
verne Taylor and Bonny Ison. A
covered dish dinner will be held
after the Sunday morning ser-
vice. Everyone is invited to bring
a covered dish and attend,

BAPTISM SUNDAY
A community wide multi-de-
nominational baptism event will
be held at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 7
at Wakulla Springs State Park.
The ceremony will be fash-
ioned after a similar event that
was held at the Ichetucknee
Springs outside of Lake City last
fall.
All churches in the community
who participate in baptism are
invited to participate. Each pastor
may baptize his respective mem-
bers in the manner they choose.
Following the baptisms, there will
be gospel singing and fellowship
through a covered dish dinner.
Experiencing a baptism in the
beautiful spring waters as believ-
ers did over 2,000 years ago, will
only deepen our connection and
relationship with our creator and
savior, organizers said.


Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
Crawfordville
Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey
"Cme & Worship Ith Us"
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School............. 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship..................l.... a.m.
Evening Worship.....................6 p.m.
Wednesday Service...................7 p.m.
& Youth Service..................... 7 p.m.
Royal Rangers........................7 p.m.
M issionettes ........................... 7 p.m.


Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worship ............... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship............. 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study... 7 p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details,
962-2213


& JONES

Funeral Home, Inc.
551 West Carolina St.
Tallahassee, FL 32301

Gracious,
Dignified Service

snvHR 224-2139
SHI Day or Night
Pre-Arrangements
Silver Shield
Notary
DARRELL L. LAWRENCE
LINN ANN GRIFFIN
J. GRIFFIN
Licensed Funeral Directors


The 141st Annual Session of
the First Bethlehem Missionary
Baptist Association, Inc., under
the spiritual leadership of Rever-
end James B. Duval, Moderator,
will be held October 8 to Oct. 13
in Quincy. Elder Melvin Craw-
ford and the Mt. Moriah First
Missionary Baptist Church fam-
ily, located at 302 South Tenth
Street will serve as host to the
Association's Parent Body and
Laymen's Department. Reverend
Lloyd Graham and the Antioch
Missionary Baptist Church family,
located at 1003 W. Clark St., will
co-host the session, providing
meeting space for the Women's
Auxiliary.
Organized in the summer of
1869 under the leadership of Rev.
James Page of Tallahassee, the
First Bethlehem Baptist Associa-
tion is currently made up of 87
member churches representing
a geographical area that includes
Suwannee, Madison, Taylor, Jef-
ferson, Leon, Wakulla and Gads-
den counties.
The stated purpose in the first
constitution of the association
adopted on Oct. 7, 1969 was: The
establishment and union of our
churches upon Christian prin-
ciples, embracing organization,
church government and good
discipline; To encourage among
our brethren, by all Christian
means, education, industry, self-
reliance, general improvement,
and especially spiritual elevation;
To do what we can, in compli-
ance with the commission of
our Blessed Redeemer, to spread
the Gospel through the world;
To secure these ends, we pledge
ourselves to God and to each


A Skipper
A Temple
Sunday e Senices:
11:30 Worship
10:30 Sunday School
0\Tuesdays:
7:30 Prayer Meeting
Pastor Ethel Skioper
962.7838
165 Surf Rd., Sopchopy


Office Of:

D. Sanders
Attorney At Law
Wills, Trusts, Estates,
Family Law-Divorce,
Custody, Contracts, Deeds,
Incorporation, Development
Permits, Environmental
Law, General Litigation
Owner:
Doris "Dallas" Sanders
2181 Crawfordville Hwy.
Crawfordville, Florida
Phone: (850) 926-3942
Fax: (850) 926-9044
24 Minute First
Consultation $32


Crawfordville United

4 Methodist Church,
Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 926-7409,


Ochlockonte & Arran Road "Come Grow With Use' WWW.crawfordVille-lame.ortg


I .1


The Ladies at


St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
are getting things started for their Annual



October 13, 2007

9:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m.

Stop By and Do Some Shopping
Clothing Crafts Bakery Yard Sale
Plants Order your Thanksgiving and
Christmas Cheese Balls Car Wash
Come, support and enjoy our special day.

L Located in Medart on Hwy 98
by Just Fruits!


rWe will have authentic German Lunch
from 11:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m. $8 per person
For reservations call 926-5037
19P by October 5th. (


c6~cOv ei~- tAe' i4/J~~ten ce'!


other to sustain, by our prayers,
our efforts and our means as God
shall enable us, the principles in
the constitution.
The opening session begins
on Monday, Oct. 8 at 7 p.m.
with a local program by the
host church followed by the
official opening of the session
by Moderator Duval at 8:30 p.m.
Activities throughout the session
will continue Tuesday through
Friday morning with devotion at
9:30 a.m., followed by periods of
study, tutor sessions and work-
shops in the Men, Women and
Laymen's departments. Preach,
ing will begin at 7 p.m. nightly.
The 141st Annual Session will
conclude on Saturday with Youth
Department activities beginning
at 9:30 a.m. at Mount Moriah First
M. B. Church.
Other activities of interest inm
clude Moderator Duval's address
at 7 p.m. on Wednesday and the
address of the Women's Depart-
ment President, Sister Elesta
Pritchett will be Wednesday at 2
p.m. The address of the President
of the Laymen's Department,
Deacon Harvord Francis, will be
on Thursday at 6:30 p.m.
For more information, coxi_
tact Sister Jacquelyn Brown at
386-6567 or Sister Eva Adams ai
942-1938.
Outdoor worship:
Wakulla Presbyterian Church
will host a morning service on
Sunday, Oct. 7 at 10:30 a.m. at
Ochlockonee River State Park
in Sopchoppy. The communion
service is open to the public. Fol-
lowing the service, there will be
a picnic lunch held.


PM







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007-Page 5A


Commune


Hey there friends, it's me
again. I am loving this cool
morning weather.
This is almost my favorite
time of yeir. I say almost be-
cause it still gets up in the 80s
and 90s. I vant it to get down to
the 60s anrd stay there all year.
Oh, yes, Ws. Nameless, who by
the way has probably pulled
out her dectric blankets, never
gets warn.
Neighbors, we have a lot go-
ing on tlis month so listen up
and writ, it down!
On Saturday, Oct. 20, starting
at 10 a.n., the St. Marks River
Festivalwill begin. Everyone
is invited to come and join the
fun. Ths year we will have car
shows, honest to goodness
stone ;rab claws and lots of
seafood cooked by the Wakulla
County Fisherman's Associa-
tion. There will be other food
vendors, craft booths, game
booths for the kids, and too
much riore to tell you about.
But you have to get in on
the millet toss. If you haven't
tried iI you haven't done any-
thing ret. This is the real St.
Marks River Festival and it
will become an annual event
for allof us. Our whole town
is joining together as one to
make this a special day of fun,
food and Eriends. Ya'll come on
down and see what St. Marks
is really like.
In addition, write down
Halloweea night at 6 p.m. at
the St. Marks Volunteer Fire
Department on Shell Island
Road. They will have hot dogs,


Skippr Temple Church will
celebrate their pastor's anni-
versary services from Oct. 10
through Oct. 15: Churches on
the program include Wednes-
day nigit, Macedonia Church,
Elder A.Morris; Thursday night,
St. JohnrP.B. ChUrch, Elder Ray-
mond Sanders: Friday night,
Elder Joseph Forest and Zion'
Hope ?.B. Church; Saturday
night will be a music program
with IV'other Caine Gleen, The
Gospel Traveleis, local soloist,
Gospe_,Groups, and choirs.
SOn-'Sunday, a service will
be held at 11 am. with Guest
Speaker Elder T. Bell from Pan-


ST. MARKS
By Linda Walker

hamburgers, the Haunted hay-
ride trail and all local kids and
their parents are invited to
come have some fun.
The fire department can also
use some cupcakes and candy.
Do your part for our town and
our children. If you want I will
put you in our column. Don't
forget the date of Oct. 31 at 6
p.m.
Now I need to wish our town
manager and her husband, Zoie
and Ed Mansfield a late but
very special happy 46th wed-
ding anniversary on sept 25. In
this day and time it is rare to
know people who can stand
each other that long. But it is
a blessing and I am proud to
know them.
For myself, I was never very
good at the marriage thing, the
staying together part. If you
just look around you there are
a lot of people who have been
together forever.
Neighbors, I heard that Thel-
ma Murphy is back home and
doing a little better. Keep her
and Kent in your prayers. Lynda
Humphries is able to get out and
about again which she needs to
do being married to Jeff.
Neighbor alert! Angel wings
go to "Rico" for waiting at the
store when I thought my car
was not going to start. I keep


BUCKHORN
By Ethel Skipper

ama City and Pastor Britt Pastar
from Burney Temple Church in
Crawfordville. Everyone is wel-
come. There will be Songs of
Praise by the Skipper Sisters.
We want to wish a belated
birthday to Joseph Williams.
He celebrated on Sunday, Sept.
30 with his family and enjoyed
a good meal at Angelo's in
Panacea.
These wonderful people


Local artists perform


telling you that angels come in
all shapes and sizes.
We have a new restaurant
opening up the road again. It
is called "Jimmy's Seafood and
Steakhouse." Since I don't get
out very much I haven't eaten
there, but they say the food is
good.
Don't forget Two Nichols
Seafood Restaurant's Halloween
party in their lounge. Please call
them at 925-4850 for time and
details. I told you I don't get
out much.
Now let's wish these special
people happy birthday; Jason
Ward on Oct. 2, Kent Murphy
on Oct. 7, Jacob Ruetth on Oct.
9, and two of my ex-husbands
who shall remain nameless on
Oct 15. No anniversaries this
week.
But on our prayer list please
remember Kathleen Causey,
Newell Ladd, Margaret Pelt, Net-
tie, Junior and Gordon Strick-
land, Jim, Betty, Eddie and Mary
Ward, Shane and Shana, Nancy
Nichols, Debra Valencourt,
Maurice and Zelda Barron,
Jewel Franklin, Jett Harper, Sam
Donaldson, and me. Please pray
for our families, our town and
each other. Pray for our soldiers
overseas and their families,
Pray for peace.
Thought for the week:
Let me remember that just
because know one thing about
a person, Doesn't mean I know
it all.There is good in all of us


will celebrate their birthdays
in October: Wylonda Skipper,
Oct. 19; Chinesta Smith, Oct. 18;
Charlene Green, Oct. 7; Felicia,
Oct. 6; and Elder Frank Johnson,
Oct 17.
I want Mary Ann Gavin
to know we have not forgot-
ten your visit a short while
ago. Also, Ernestine and your
daughter, our girls enjoyed you
as always.
Our prayers go out to all
the sick and shut-in, those in
the hospitals, nursing homes,
the prisons, and all in need
everywhere.


Vitreoretinal Surgeons
CHARLES KNEvwELLD. 10 EMILY 0 .SHMO'FE .1D RO'BERTL. 3TEIN.ETZ7. MD H LOGAN BROOKS JR,MD.

* THE ABILITY TO SEE is one of life's greatest gifts, but diseases of the retina
ar-. a leading cause of blindness.

At The Center for Retina Care, we treat difficult cases using the most advanced
technology from retinopathy in premature babies to macular degeneration in the
elderly. And we have a special interest in helping people with diabetes preserve
their vision.

The Center for Retina Care combines the experience of vitreoretinal surgery
specialists from Southern Vitreoretinal Associates with the region's most advanced
surgical technologies at Tallahassee Memorial.

To find out more about The Center for Retina Care, call us at 1-800-940-1225 or
log on to www.TallahasseeRetinaCare.com


(800) 940-1225
www.TallahasseeRetinaCare.com
The physicians) referred to herein are independent practitioners and not
agents or employees of Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare.


The Center For Retina Care
JlA Tallahassee Memorial Southern oVitreoretinal
ir HealthCare .AS. SOCIATES, P.L.


The Wakulla News...Your Best Advertising Value!

i_ ^ iiiinini- '"


at Backwoods Bistro

Saturday e nings in down- ers, entrees and d
&wn Sopcholpy are alive with hours of operation
music from Iclal artists on the through Thursda3
back porch ofBackwoods Bistro 4 p.m. to 9 p.m., Fr
ppstaurant. tor residents who p.m. to 10 p.m., an
ire seeking/a relaxing way to a.m. to 10 p.m.
spend yourPaturday night with For more infor
wonderful bod and great music, receive e-mails reg
BackwoodJBistro fits the bill. end specials and e
Backwcbds Bistro features please send your e
-ew weekend specials and is to backwoodsbist
locally Swned and operated net or call (850) 9(
business in downtown Sop-
choppy. -
I; The enu includes the ever
popular pizza, hot sandwiches, a
fresh satads, special appetiz-


() THE WATER AT
PA EA HArboEAR M ARIN
Lw Music ,WoiwkErdsI BEER, WiNE & FROZEN DRiNsl
ENI Y ?)E OR HEATED OUTSIDE DINING



II I
984-5544
PANCEA HaRbot MARiNA Locatrd off of CoAsTAL Hwy. 98
S T he end of Rock LANdioqRoad


esserts. Their
i are Tuesday
y nights from
riday nights 4
d Saturday 11
mation or to
garding week-
ntertainment
e-mail address
ro@earthlink.
62-2220.


NBC

STORAGE

Mini-Warehouses Boats RV's
519-5128 508-5177

AUTUMN

YARD SALE

Oct. 6 8:00 a.m.

8:00 AM 4:00 PM

NO EARLY BIRDS!
2 Miles S uth of Courthouse, Crawfordville
^ ---- ^^^^ ^-^^ ^^^^ ^^^^


WAKULLA COUNTY'S

CELEBRATION TO SUPPORT OUR

TROOPS AND HONOR OUR VETERANS


Saturday, November 10, 2007

at Hudson Park,


PROUDLY HOSTED BY

WAKULLA CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

It is important to all Americans that we show with pride and honor, OUR appreciation to
those men and women who have served, and are currently serving, OUR great nation.


Parade, Rides, Entertainment,

Food and Family Fun!

Your family or organization is invited to be involved as a vital part of this
celebration by entering your loved ones name on your car, truck, or float in the parade or
by contributing as a sponsor, in honoring our brave troops and veterans.
Please complete the form below and fax to Cynthia Thomas, Coordinator
(850) 926-4554 or email her at Cynthia@amerifirstdirect.net

Name of Float/Group:
Contact Person:
Contact Telephone or Email Address:
I would like information concerning: (check all that apply)
[] Donations E Sponsorship D1 Float/Parade
0] Other:

A portion of the proceeds from this grand
event will be donated to local Veteran's groups,
as well as for our new school facility.

Wakulla Christian School 1391 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville, FL 32327
Telephone: (850) 926-5583 Fax: (850) 926-5186
E-mail: wakullachristian@yahoo.com www.wakullachristian.com


2- FAMILY

YARD SALE

Sat. 10/6

8 am 'til Dark
Between 13 & 23
Marie Circle


Rmlaa=


MEE




MEM







Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007


Sports


War Eagle 'D' racks up 2nd straight shutout


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
The Wakulla War Eagle offense is
still not hitting on all cylinders, but the
defense has picked up the slack with
two straight shutouts against Rickards
and Blountstown.
On Friday, Sept. 28, it was the Blount-
stown Tigers who found out first-hand
that the Wakulla defense is very good.
Coach Scott Klees and his troops topped
a tough Blountstown team 16-0 to im-
prove to 4-0 on the season. Wakulla is
1-0 in district games.
Wakulla produced a touchdown on
offense and another on defense. Kicker
Brett Wilson added a field goal and
an extra point to account for the final
margin. All of the scoring came in the
first half of the game.
Blountstown had two opportunities
to score from inside the Wakulla 10 yard
line, but the Tigers could not get the
ball over the goal-line.
Quarterback Cory Eddinger con-
nected with Kendrick Hall on a 40 yard
pass play in the opening period to give
Wakulla a 6-0 lead. Later in the quarter,
Hall intercepted a Blountstown pass
and returned it 70 yards to 'increase the
margin to 12-0. Brett Wilson added the
extra point to bring the lead to 13-0.
Both teams fought over the pigskin
for the remainder of the first half be-
fore Wilson added a 33 yard field goal.


'Tiny Mites' take field

Friday, Sept. 28, was high school football
"Jaguar Night."
Youth football player Paxton Tomaini of
the Woodville Jaguars Tiny Mite team and his
teammates wore their jerseys to the Wakulla
War Eagle game and came out on the field right
before the high school boys.
The boys on the team were excited about
the opportunity in the days that led up to the
game.
The boys, ages five to seven, have been
working hard since July and attending school,
keeping an impressive record of 3-0-2.
Quite a few of the boys are from Wakulla
County. Woodville Park is where many of the
players zoned with Pop Warner. This is the only
program in the area that allows this age group
to play tackle football.


The second half was another defensive
struggle as neither team could dent the
goal-line.
"Our defense did really well," said
Coach Klees. "The offense really strug-
gled." Klees added that Blountstown
has a good program and the small
school will probably do well in their
classification later in the year.
Klees said he was pleased that
his team was able to hold Blount-


Players of the Week





.* P


Cain Foard


stown to less than 100 yards of total
offense.
Quarterback Eddinger connected
on eight of his 15 passes for 140 yards
and one touchdown. He did not have
an interception. Kendell Gavin had
six rushes for 40 yards and Kendrick
Hall added five rushes for 40 yards
and a reception for 40 yards and the
touchdown.
Eddinger spread the ball around to


Kendrick Hall


several receivers as Hall had a catch
along with Kendrick Gavin, Mookie
Forbes, Tyrell Gavin, Lee Smalls and
Harold Williams.
Klees said he hopes his offensive line
will play better as the season continues.
"The offensive line struggled," he said.
"They are not playing as a unit."
Cain Foard was named the offensive
player of the week at center. Foard
graded out to a 79 percent for WHS.


Girls soccer tryouts Oct. 11


JV Quarterback Austin Lentz gets ready to pass against the Madison County Cowboys.



Cowboys outshoot JV


The Wakulla War Eagle junior
varsity football team traveled to
Madison County for an old fash-
ioned wild west shootout Thurs-
day, Sept. 27. Madison County
has a few more weapons and
won the high scoring game.
Wakulla got off to a slow
start against the Cowboys be-
fore the two JV squads com-
bined for 82 points.


"Madison has a program
we have a great deal of respect
for. It was a hard fought game.
Quarterback Austin Lentz led
the offense and together they
put 25 points on the board. The
intensity increased after half-
time. This week we are going
to concentrate on getting fired
up as soon as we hit the field,"
said Coach Cole Wells. The final


score was Madison County JV
57, Wakulla 25.
The War Eagle JV football
team will play at home this
week, Oct. 4 at 7 p.m., against
Florida High.
For more pictures of the
Madison County game, log on
to photographer Ken Fields web
site at www.kenfieldsphotogra-
phy.photoreflect.com.


n I I IICL
The Wakulla Lady War Eagle
golf team placed second in a
three team match against Lin-
coln and Rickards last week. The
team also placed second in a
four team match against Maclay,
Florida High and Godby. Chiles
and Leon topped Wakulla in a
three team battle.
I The Lincoln and Rickards
match was held at Hilaman Golf
Course. Lincoln shot a 211 and
Wakulla shot a 214. Chelsea Col-
lins shot a 49 while Devin Lowe
added a 50, Karlyn Scott shot a
52 and Brooklyn Tindall added
a 63 for WHS.
Maclay shot a 185 to 234
for Wakulla while Florida High
shot a 251 and Godby had a 274
at Wildwood Country Club in
Medart.
Scott shot a 53 to lead Wakul-
la followed by Collins at 57, Lowe
at 61 and Tindell at 63.
Chiles shot a 192 and Leon
shot a 196 while Wakulla had
a 218 at Capital City Country
Club.
Collins shot a 52 while Lowe
shot a 53, Rebecca Rivers added
a 55 and Brooklyn Tindell added
a 58.


FSU ON TV

The Florida State University
Seminoles will host the North
Carolina State University Wolf-
pack on Saturday, Oct. 6 at Doak
Campbell Stadium.
I ABC television, WTXL Chan-
nel 27, will broadcast the game
at 3:30 p.m. WTNT radio, 94.9 FM,
and WNLS radio, 1270 AM will
also broadcast the contest.


Want to earn three tickets
to a Jacksonville Jaguars NFL
game?.
Boys'and girls ages 8 to 15
are invited to come compete at
the NFL Pepsi Punt, Pass and
Kick Competition being held
Saturday, Oct. 6 at the recreation
park in Medart at 1 p.m.
The winners will advance to
the sectional competition which
will be held in Noveminber. A
win at sectionals will advance
players and their three tickets
to a Jaguars game and an oppor-
tunity to compete at the Team
championship where athletes
will be on the field during
halftime,
Each competitor will have
one punt, pass and kick on
which they will be judged for


WMS adjusts

schedule
The Wakulla Middle School
football game scheduled for
Thursday, Oct. 4 against Howard
Middle School has been can-
celled. It will not be rescheduled.
Howard cancelled their 2007
schedule.
The Thursday, Oct. 25 home
football game against Taylor
County has been rescheduled
for Tuesday, Oct. 16 at 7 p.m. The
game will be played at Taylor
County.
The Wildcats won their divi-
sion and will be playing for the
conference championship on
Thursday, Oct. 11 against Grand
Ridge. The game will be played
in Liberty County and will begin
at 7 p.m.


distance and accuracy. The
competitor with the longest
distance in each age group will
win. The cost is free. No cleats
allowed.
Athletes must bring a copy of
their birth certificates. For more
information, call Noreen Britt at
544-5826.'


The Wakulla Lady War Eagle
Soccer Boosters announced this
week that tryouts for the varsity
and junior varsity girls' soccer
teams will be held on Monday,
Oct. 8 through Thursday, Oct.
11 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at
Wakulla High School. Prospec-
tive players should wear soccer
gear including cleats and shin
guards. All players should bring
water bottles.
Players must have a current
physical, participation waiver,
and birth certificate on file with
the school. Please contact soccer
sponsor Dr. Rachel Pienta for
forms at 926-7125 or pientar@
wakulla.k12.fl.us.
Teams will be announced
the morning of Friday, Oct. 12.


By Caitlin Fleming
Special to The Wakulla News
As a soccer player, I have
never understood the appeal
of football. It's abrupt and the
players don't even use their feet
But, regardless of my opinion, in
a town where the ESPN football
lineup interferes with the Sun-
day lunch, it's hard to say that
football is just a game.
For reasons unknown to me,
half of the county shows up ev-
ery year for the kickoff Football
Jamboree at recreation park in
Medart.
I decided to ask some veteran
coaches about the football pro-
gram for an insider's perspective.
Junior league Bulldogs coach
Robby Taylor can't remember


A mandatory player meeting is
scheduled for Friday, Oct. 12 at 3
p.m. Players can expect to meet
until 5 p.m. that day.
A fundraiser is scheduled for
Saturday, Oct. 13 at the Wal-Mart
in Crawfordville from 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. Players will be asked to
sign up for shirts at the Oct. 12
meeting. Fundraising activities
help pay for overnight trips,
tournament expenses, the end
of year banquet, and player
equipment.
The boosters and coaches
will hold a mandatory parent
meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 16 at
8 p.m. at Wakulla High School.
Parents will receive a letter with
the room location and planned
meeting agenda after the teams


how long he has coached, but
he has never had a son on one
of his teams! This Wakulla High
Alum started coaching with a
friend and never quit because
he loves to see the kids'! prog-
ress through the season, .
Falcons Coach Troy Nelson
has been coaching for 10 years.
He began to coach when his
stepson played years ago and
stuck around to give back to the
community what he learned in
his college days at Central Mis-
souri. Without a doubt, Nelson
stated to me, "Teaching the kids
is the best part of our program.
It's the kids."
Maybe football is more than
a game. Just ask one of the
many people who were at the
Jamboree last Saturday.


are announced., ,
Boosters' Coordinator Justine
Capps can be reached gt justin-
ecapps@hotmail.com Coach
David Pienta has creatd an e-
mail notification system where
parents and players can register
to receive electronic updates.
The address is http:/Avhssoc-
cer.no-ip.com.

JV cheerleaders
selling mums for
homecoming
The Wakulla High School
Junior Varsity CheerleadErs will
be selling mums1for ever3pne to
wear at the WIH Homecpming
game on Friday, Oct. 26 against
East Gadsden. !
The cost to coder the flowers
is $8 in advance and $10 at the
game. Individuals can pre-order
by e-mailing Wakullajv@yahoo.
com, by calling 519-1080 or
through any JV cheerleader.
"Don't get caught without
your Homecoming mum on
Oct. 26," organizes said. North-
ern Lights Florial helped the
cheerleading squad with the
fundraiser.

S A hrsonal
iS~ Trainer is a
.. safe, effective
S way to
maximize your
worlbut.
Call today!
Gena Davis
Personal Traintr
926-7685 or 510-2326


Deer Mix (wheat, oats, rye) 50 Ib...$1 595 J/
TECOMATE Monster Mix..........$4499
TECOMATE Max Attract........$4995 Shell
BioLogic Bio Mix...............$8995 C o rn
Rye Grass 50 Ib...........$2695 50 L

FRM Deer Pellets 50 lb........$1 275
FRM Apple Corn 40 Ib.......$650 4

Ladder Stand 10' ............ $6995
Chair Stand 10'............$1 5500


- L~'~I~ER~SS
1/ISA'N


Prices good through
Oct. 17, 2007


Gulf Coast

Lumber & Supply, Inc.

3361 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville
Mon. Fri. 7 a.m. 6 p.m. Sat. 7:30 a.m. 5 p.m.
926-5559
9141 Woodville Hwy., Woodville
Mon. -Sat. 6 a.m. 5 p.m.
421-5295


Parks & Rec news


Lady War Eagle Punt, Pass & Kick contest Oct. 6

golfers 2nd at Medart offers NFL tickets
in 2 motdhno


Kendrick Hall was named the de-
fensive player of the game with his
interception return for a touchdown.
The cornerback also had a pass break
up in the end zone and six tackles.
Linebacker Nigel Bradharm made his
presence felt with a 15 tacde game.
Tim Dawson had a strong game at the
defensive line with nine tales and
two sacks.
Neil Donaldson had six tackles and
two sacks and Kendrick Gavir had five
tackles and graded out at 93 percent.
Dawson was named the knock'em back
award winner on defense. The offense
did not have a knock 'em ba& award
winner this week.
Wakulla will travel to Talhhassee
Chiles on Friday, Oct. 5 for i game
against the Timberwolves. Ckiles is
undefeated at 3-0. Klees said tht Chiles
defense has played well and trey run
the ball effectively. Wakulla hasplayed
well against Chiles over the years. "We
seem to have their number," he said.
Chiles beat Williston in LevyiCounty
last week, 10-3.
"I'm not pleased offensively' Klees
concluded. "We have a lot of york to
do. The defense has played veil all
season."
Wakulla and Godby have the early
district lead at 1-0 and Rickards and
Panama City Bay are both 0-11 East
Gadsden has not played a district op-
ponent. I ;











AKULLA


12U


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007-Page 7A



ALLSTARS


THANKS SPONSORS
The Wakulla 12u AlIstars experienced an outstanding summer, finishing with an impressive 28 wins and only 2 losses.
The team carries four championship titles and a 3rd place finish in the Cal Ripken World Series. They demonstrated
exceptional talent and sportsmanship to make history for Wakulila County. These accomplishments could not have
been possible without the generous support from individuals, businesses and our community's civic organizations. In
appreciation for this support, the 2007 Wakulla 12u AIIstars extends a sincere thank you to the following:


DIAMOND SPONSORS


Brook's Concrete
Capital City Bank
Coastal Optimist Club
DEA Solutions, Inc.


Edwin Brown and Associates
Financial Healthcare Strategies
Hyatt Plumbing
Jackson-Cook, LC


James and Stacey Flores
Marpan Supply Company
Ralph and Trisha Fisher
Vause Mechanical


Contracting, Inc.
Wakulla Bank
Wakulla Recreation Association
Wakulla Men's Club


PLATINUM SPONSORS


GOLD SPONSORS


Ameris Bank
Bob and Janie Ross
Body-Tek Fitness
Bubba and Tracey Dempsey
Crawfordville Women's Club
CSG Systems, Inc.
Donnie and Rita Sparkman
Eli Roberts & Son's, Inc.
Finlayson Forest Management, Inc.
Finley Engineering Group
Flint Equipment Company
Hog Wild Bar-B-Q
Hook Wreck, Inc.
Jimmie Crowder Excavating
& Land Clearing
Larry and Lucy Lassiter
LisasListing.com
Moore Bass Consulting, Inc.
Peavy and Sons Construction


Sopchoppy Southern Advantage Marine
Baptist Church Allen's Decorative Curbing
Stephen Ferrell Roofing and Landscape
Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic Anthony Millender
Tallahassee Welding Bellamy's Outdoor Sports
and Machine Shop Ben Withers and Lisa Clark
Tom's Palms, Best Value Tire & Wheel
Bryant Partnership, Inc.
Bud and Bea Dugger






OFBABE RUMt


SILVER SPONSORS


C & L Construction, LLC
Farmer's & Merchant's Bank
First Florida Credit Union
Gulf State Community Bank
Inn at Wildwood
Judy Sarvis
Kevin and Tonya Carter
Lawhon Apiaries
Nortn Florida
Reforestation, Inc.
Peavy & Sons
Construction Company
Purple Martin Nurseries
Re/Max Professionals Realty
Roger and Anne Nichols
Shannon and Lynn Smith
Sperry and Associates
Tallahassee Professional
Firefighters
Tom Eddinger


Barbara Updegraff
Bayside IGA
Big Bend Equipment Company
Brandon DeJaynes Carpentry, LLC
Brenda Hicks Realty
Brenda's Hair Works
Buddy Abbott Contracting, Inc.
Caspers Group McDonalds
Crawford Lodge..
oirbssla'd Investment Co., Inc.
David and Jenny Nichols
David Martin
Dale and Karen Wise
Derrick and Kim Crum
E.J. and Susan Yelton
Educational Learning Systems, Inc.
Edward Bolton
SEnvision Credit Union


Fonvielle Lewis Foote & Messer
Gail Mathers
Geri Eaton
Gulf Coast Lumber & Supply
Hazel and Bill Walker
Hodges Concrete Pumping, LLC
Howard and Anne Kessler
J.B. And Bertie Crutchfield
James and Quida McGill
Jimmie and Dora Dugger
John and Dorothy Edrington
John and Susanne Kane
Kevin and Crystal Parsons
Krep's Technologies
Land of Wakulla, Inc.
Lawrence Atkinson
Leonie Chubb
Lex and Carol Ann Thompson


Lost Creek Land Development
Lt. Jackie Norman
Mark and Karen Parsons
Marty Causseaux
Masters and Wardens Association
Maurice and Judy Langston
Maxey's Night Owl Bail Bond
Agency
Maxie and Lori Lawhon
Mike and Crissy Sarvis
Mike and Margaret Faulk
Mike Carter, Attorney
Muhammad Awan
Pat and Carol Evan
Porter Painting, LLC
Premier Motorcar Gallery, LLC
Ralph and Anita Pigott
Randall Pest Management


Richard and Suzanne Smith
Robert Crane and Betty Harvey
Robert Sand Company
Sarah Strickland
Sights and Sounds Company
Spears Seafood Market Store #1
Spears Seafood Market Store #3
Taff Furr and Alligator Products
Tallahassee Land Company
Talquin Electric Cooperative
Total Sunshine Car Care, LLC
The Pelt and Klein Family
Tiki Tanning Salon
VFW Post 4538
Wakulla Moose Lodge 2510


WE APPRECIATE OUR SUPPORTERS!
The AIIstar team was blessed with overwhelming community support. The Wakulla 12u AIIlstars extends a thank you to
the following individuals and business who helped make everything a success.

FISH FRY SUPPORTERS
Sheriff David Harvey, Rhonda Harvey & Skip Young for the use of Harvey Young Farm facilities; Nichols Seafood, Andrew
Sanders & My Way Seafood for the catching and cleaning of the fish; Forgotten Coast Seafood, Lindy's Fried Chicken, Spring
Creek Restaurant, The Landing & The Seineyard Restaurant for the food donations; Captain Larry Massa, Ameris Bank, Mark
Mitchell, Mark Stafford and Bubba Dempsey, & Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church for cleanup, drinks, ice, tables/chairs, and
the sound system; Casper Group/McDonalds, Doyle Hester, Crawfordville Winn Dixie, Sonic, Hardee's & Burger King for
paper goods/supplies; and Paul & Tasa Barwick, Edward Clark, Bea, Bud & Jimmie Dugger, Bruce Harvey, Billy Porter, and
SBilly & Vicki Johnson for preparations & cooking.
SASPECIAL THANK YOU TO POSEY'S BEYOND THE BAY & THE NOAH POSEY FAMILY
FOR THE USE OF THE CATERING TRAILER.

OTHER SUPPORTERS
A special appreciation goes to Keith Blackmar & The Wakulla News, Mary Katherine Westmark & Wakulla.Com, and
Doug & Ashlynn Apple & WAKU 94. 1FM (The Wave) for the extensive media coverage given to the team.

The team would also like to thank the Wakulla County School Board & Lessie Crum; Wakulla County Sheriffs Office;
Allen's Quality Plus Communications; Buddy Ward & Sons Seafood; Pizza Hut; Myra Jeans
and Walt & Shelly Griffin & Champs for all their support.


2007


Southeast
I giona[
Champs


2007


Wortd
State
Champs


'Third (P,4tce

Cat lRipn

WorhfSeties


2007


(District
Two
Cfiamps


2007
Woovi(e
Ozog Shirt
Clamps


THANK YOU FROM THE PLAYERS, COACHES, AND THE TEAM FAMILIES
Players: Jeffery Barnes, Lance Barwick, Jack Battle, Dalton Dugger, Jay Estes, Tyler Kreps,
Brandon Nichols, Bryan Nichols, Colton Pelt, Michael Sarvis, Jacob Walker, Jake Walker
Coaches: Bobble Dugger, Randy Barnes, James Estes







Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Ocober 4, 2007


People


Community Theater's 'Sound of Music'


Local cast brings Switzerland to Wakulla County for


The Wakulla County Com-
munity Theatre will present
The Sound of Music on March
14 and March 15 and March 21
and March 22.
WCT director Reba Mason
is doing a great job working
hand-in-hand with her two as-
sistant directors, Mina Sutton
and Jan Pearce.
On Monday, Sept. 24, the
Wakulla Community Threatre
young cast members gath-
ered for their second reading
through The Sound Of Music
manuscript.
The local cast includes
little brown hair, bright eyed,
Kelly Ferreira playing the
part of nine-year-old, Brigitta,
Madison Metcalf shines as she
reads her part playing seven-
year-old, Marta.
Kaitlyn Sheffield sparkles
as she repeats the part of
four-year-old, Gretl. Rest-
ing comfortably on the soft
carpet Seth McManus, play-
ing the part of ten-year-old,
Kurt, speaks his part with
enthusiasm. Shannon Egler
patiently waits for her turn to
read the part of 13-year-old,


Historical Society plans

annual dinner for Oct. 9

The Wakulla County Historical Society's annual dinner meeting
will be held at the historic Wakulla Springs Lodge on Tuesday,
Oct. 9 at 6:30 p.m.
Letters have been sent to members, but the public is always
invited to attend society meetings. A special tribute to Pete Ger-
rell as the founding president of WCHS is planned as well as a
program pertaining to the history of Wakulla Springs presented
by Park Manager Sandy Cook.
Those planning to attend the dinner should call or e-mail Betty
Green, 926-7405, or bgreen@nettally.com by the evening of Oct.


Pelt reunion Oct. 7

The annual Pelt reunion will
be held Sunday, Oct. 7 at Ock-
locknee River' State Park. A cov-
ered dish lunch will be served at
about 12:30 p.m.
Durant John Pelt arrived in
Wakulla County around 1848.
After here he met and married
Melvina Posey, daughter of Noah
and Feribay Shepard Posey, on
March 16, 1855, they had nine
children and many of their,de-
scendants still live in Wakulla
County.
Several family members have
been working on the Wakulla
County Pelt genealogy and would
love to have input from others.
Organizers invite all of Durant
and Melvina's descendants to
the annual Pelt reunion.


&


By Joan E. Smith
Special to The Wakulla News
"Over the mountains and
through the woods ... to
Switzerland we go." Waitll!
Something is amiss ... it
should read "to Grandma's
house we go."
Although, the original
vintage melody did refer to
grandma the von Trapp Fam-
ily Singers could easily insert
Switzerland, because, this
is where they found refuge
during the 1938 Anschluss
(annexation); a Nazis military
forced incorporation of Austria
into Germany.
The true story of the Von
Trapp Family Singers will re-
main forever treasured in the
hearts of America. The Trapp
story has been featured in
film and books and media of
all sorts. But, the most memo-
rable is found in Rodgers and
Hammerstein's musical, The
Sound Of Music,
On Nov. 16, 1959, the award
winning musical ran for 1,443
performances on Broadway at
the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre.
The original cast included


Kristopher E. M. Bennett


Happy first birthday

Happy first birthday to Kris-
topher Ethan Mikel Bennett on
Sept. 8. He is the son of Kris and
Amy Bennett of Crawfordville.
Maternal grandparents are
Floyd and Ethelle Robinson of
Crawfordville. Paternal grandpar-
ents are Peggy Bennett of Craw-
fordville and Dennis Bennett of
Tallahassee.
He has a sister, Haley.


Akeriah Harper is One

Happy first birthday to Ake-
riah Errielle Antinique Harper on
Sept. 30. She is the daughter of
Yolanda Timmons and Anthony
Harper of Crawfordville,
Maternal grandparents are
Malda and Kenneth Timmons of
Crawfordville. Paternal grandpar-
ents are Lisa Harper and Jessie
Sampson of Crawfordville.
Maternal great-grandparent is
Eula Williams of Crawfordville.
Paternal great-grandparents are
Odessa Green of Crawfordville
and Rosetta Callaway of Tal-
lahassee.

..'- ". -1
9 Keep -
Wakulla County
Beautiful
Offers special thanks to:
A.L. & S.A. Bowen
Edwin & Sharol Brown,
and VMS
These great people
supported our KWCB
Litter Loot Program during
Coastal Cleanup 2007,
helping our young folk to
remember they enjoyed
their day of volunteerism.


Mary Martin and Theodore
Bikel. Mary Martin was award-
ed as Best Featured Actress in
a Musical. She played the part
of Maria von Trapp. Theodore
Bikel as Captain Georg von
Trapp, playing the part of the
father of the seven children,
won Best Featured Actor in
a Musical. It is said that at
least three million people
purchased the original album
of the 1959 Broadway musical
production of The Sound Of
Music.
The musical attempts to
capture the character of the
real von Trapp family. The
action takes place just prior to
World War II in the Austrian
town of Salzburg.
Maria's strong convictions
and faith prove to bring stabil-
ity and hope. Even though
she faces some troublesome
situations she finds peace
and happiness and shares a
treasure of songs with her
new family, the Von Trapp
children. Maria's passion is to
bring young people and adults
closer together as a family
unit.


Rosa L. Hernandez Knitting class eyed

Rosa Hernandez is one at Senior Center
Looking for something to.
Happy first birthday to Rosa do in your spare time? The
Lauree Hernandez on' Sept. 11. Wakulila County Senior Citizens'
She is the daughter of Nario Center has had requests for a
and Christina Hernandez of Tal- knitting class. There has also
lahassee. been some interest in the card
Maternal grandparents are games "Phase 10" and "Euchre."
John and Lori Hudson of Craw- If you would like to participate
fordville. Paternal grandparents in these activities, please call the
are Alberto and Rosa Maria Her- center and give your name and
nandez of Vera Cruz, Mexico. phone number.
Maternal great-grandparents On Oct. 9, Florida A&M Uni-
are Doye and Sherry Hudson of versity of Pharmacy students
Crawfordville. Maternal great- will be at the center from 10:30
great-grandparent is Nancy S.- a.m. until 12:30 p.m. conducting
Roth of Crawfordville. a "Brown Bag Check." Bring your


Council reunion to be
held Oct. 13,14
The descendants of John Ce-
cil Council, an early pioneer of
Wakulla County, will hold their
55th annual Council reunion
at the Council Family Picnic
Grounds in Crawfordville.
Festivities include a fish fry
on Saturday, Oct. 13 at 6 p.m. and
a basket lunch on Sunday, Oct.
14 at 11 a.m. Family members
from all over Florida and other
states are expected to attend
for a weekend full of family
activities.

Thanks for reading The
Wakulla News


Michel Amnalfitano,
LMT
(M A 46294)


prescription medicines or a list
of them and students will go
over these with you. A pharma-
cist will be available to answer
any questions you might have.
For more information on
these or any other activities, you
may call 926-7145.


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P.O. Box 867 Crawfordville, FL 32326
2887 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite 1
Telephone (850)926-1227 Fax (850)926-6550
^ William Treichel, D.C.
Chiropractic Physician


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Open Mon.-Fri. 8-5:00 Closed Tues.


4 days in March
Louisa. Tucker Pearce is acting
the part of mature pre-teen,
Friedrich.
Katelyn Fiorini is a perfect
match for the inspiring pretty
16-year-old, Liesl. Jay Egler's
part as 18-year-old, Rolf Gruber
pleases everyone as his char-
acter interacts with Liesl.
Featured character, Maria,
is played by Leah McManus.
Her character starts out as
governess to the seven chil-
dren of Captain Georg Ritter
von Trapp, a widower and
decorated war captain. The
Captain is raising his children
in a strict military way. Maria
quickly finds a way to soften
the home life by bringing in
the joy of singing songs like
"Do-Re-Me" and "My Favorite
Things."
If the deep centered loy-
altyi to character and personal
focus on subject matter keep
flowing from this group of
young actors and actresses as
on this second reading, then,
for sure Wakulla County
is in for a great treat. Who,
needs Broadway? We have the
Wakulla Community Threatre.


4 FULL SERVICE HAIR AND
NAIL SALON


.............


/







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007 Page 9A


People


Garage sale


Cheerleaders give teddy bears to EMS


The Wakulla High School Junior Varsity
Cheerleaders collected teddy bears and recently
presented them to Wakulla Emergency Medical
Service Director Fran Council as a community
service project.
The stuffed animals were given to Councill
on Thursday, Sept. 26. EMS and law enforce-
ment officials used the stuffed animals to help
calm children who may be involved in a crisis
situation.
"The Wakulla High School Junior Varsity Cheer-
leaders are proud to help the Wakulla County
Ambulance Service by donating stuffed animals
to be used in a time of crisis," said JV Cheerlead-


ing Sponsor Lori Sangren.
"It is a wonderful service to help young chil-
dren in a time of need and to give back to the
community that sponsors cheerleaders at Wakulla
High School. We feel honored and privileged to
be part of such a wonderful organization,"
The 2007-2008 JV Cheerleaders include Captain
Amanda Council, Captain Jennifer McIntyre, Co-
Captain Blair Tucker, Chelsi Taff, Olivia Tooke,
Meci Brown, Emily Stewart, Jasmine Casey, Cassi
McFarland, Shelbi Davis, Kelsey Weems, Cheslyn
Cogland, Meredeth Flanders, Amanda Piland and
Coach Lori Sangren.


Last Friday and Saturday, vol-
unteers from the Florida Wild
Mammal Association (FWMA),
held a large garage sale in Hud-
son Park. This sale raises funds
to support FWMA, but it accom-
plishes far more than that.
First, this sale is a fine ex-
ample of recycling. Almost all
items donated are pre-used.
Donations are, most often, in
good or "as new" condition.
Prices asked are a pittance of
the original cost. This way, you
get a bargain for something you
desire, and you also donate to
a worthy cause when you pay
for it.
Did you know that recycling
begets recycling?
I watched people as they
came to the sale. They came
in waves. With one big wave,
contents on the picnic tables
thinned out. A line of people


helped more than FWMA

Keep Wakulla see something entirely differ-
County ent than they did on their first
Beautiful visit.


- I -


stretched across the front of the
stage, arms laden with goodies.
Was this to be an early end of
the sale?
The next thing I observed
was a group of people coming
to the stage itself, arms full of
more items to be placed on
the tables. Suddenly, the picnic
tables and benches were piled
high again! This is an element
of the sale.which is well-known
to our residents. Soon, some
of the original purchasers re-
turned, knowing they would


Tiny Miss Wakulla pageant set


Applications for the Tiny
Miss Wakulla County, (Pre-
K4/Kindergarten), Little Miss
Wakulla County, (grades 1 and
2), Young Miss Wakulla County,
(grades 3 to 5), and Jr. Miss
Wakulla County, (grades 6 to 8),
are now available.
Applications may be printed
online at www.MissWakulla-


County.com. The entry fee is
$45 and the deadline for entry
is Oct. 22. The pageant will be
held Saturday, Nov. 10 at 7 p.m.
at Wakulla High School.
For more information, you
may contact the pageant at miss-
wakullacounty@yahoo.com or
visit their website, http://www.
misswakullacounty.com.


!I


October is Breast Cancer Awareness month


115% ~O]FF2 TFacasI


The Wakulla County Health
Department (CHD) and the
Florida Department of Health
(DOH) recognizes October as
Breast Cancer Awareness Month
and encourages women to learn
their personal risk and report
any breast changes promptly to
their doctor.
All women, beginning in
their 20s, should have a clini-
cal breast exam as part of their
regular annual physical.
According to the U.S. Preven-
tive Task Force, women age 40
and older should have a mam-
mogram and clinical breast
exam every one to two years.
Additionally; women should
talk to a doctor to learn how to
perform breast self exams.
The CHD's Breast and Cer-
vical Cancer Early Detection
Program assists uninsured or
underinsured women in Florida,
ages 50 to 64, who are at or
below the poverty level. This
program offers free mammo-


grams, pap smears and clinical
breast exams. To be assessed
for eligibility, please contact
Sherry Bramblett at (850) 926-
3591 ext. 105.
Symptoms indicating breast
cancer may include:
Lump or thickening in or
near the breast or underarm
area.
Change in the size or
shape of the breast.
Nipple discharge (other
than milk).
Inward-turning nipple.
Change in the color or tex-
ture of the skin on or near the
breast or underarm area.
On Oct. 15, DOH's Women's
Health Team and Office of
Minority Health will promote
breast cancer awareness at
the "It's a Pink Affair" Breast
Health Fair.
The event takes place from
8 a.m. to noon and from 2 p.m.
to 5 p.m. at Bond Community
Health Center, located at 872


W. Orange Ave., Tallahassee, FL
32310. Mammography vouchers
and pink awareness ribbons
will be distributed, along with
breast health information and
Mary Kay products. The breast
health fair will also include a
cooking demonstration featur-
ing cancer-preventing foods.
At 11 a.m., the breast can-
cer awareness press confer-
ence starts at Bond. Tamara
Demko, J.D., Florida's Officer of
Women's Health Strategy and
DOH Asst. Deputy Secretary for
Health, along with representa-
tives from the American Cancer
Society and Tallahassee Memo-
rial Hospital's Breast Health
Center, will discuss how.breast
cancer impacts women of color
at disproportionate rates.
The mission of the health de-
partiient is to promote, protect
and improve the health of all
people in Wakulla County.
For more information about
the CHD's Breast and Cervical


Special events held


at Senior Center


' a. .



Stephen A. Bonney
Bonney graduates

from MP school
Stephen Alexander Bonney of
Gulfport, Miss. graduated with
Platoon Honors from the U.S.
Army Military Police School of
Ft. Leonardwood, Mo. on July
26 and is honored to be serving
with the 10th Mountain Division
at Fort Drum, N.Y.
Bonney is the son of Jennifer
Bonney-Strachan and Edward
Strachan of Gulfport, Miss, and
biological son of Brian Taylor of
Crawfordville.
"Stephen proudly serves his
country in honor of his siblings
Alivia Bonney, Chris Kroll, and
Andrew Strachan, all of Gulfport,
Miss., and Whitney Taylor and
Ashlye Taylor, both of Wakulla
County.


There seems to be one or
more special events at the
Wakulla County Senior Citizens
Center every day that stories
could be written to share with
you.
I normally don't mention our
regular events, but in October
we have three special events
that I want our community to
know about,
Old Fashioned Day is planned
for Friday, Oct. 5. Dress for old
fashioned day is very familiar
to me and most of the other
seniors. Mr. And Mrs. Jim Miller
told me how to find the peanuts
grown for boiling in Chipley.
Larry and Kenneth Bruner are
picking the peanuts just before
our event.
I do not know our complete
menu but I have asked our chef
to include fried chicken and
corn on the cob. Our Pickin'
N Grinin' Band will be playing
music from the past to celebrate
this event.
Also, one of the band mem-
bers will be celebrating their
65th wedding anniversary on
this day and they have volun-
teered to bring cake for des-
sert.
The Wakulla County Com-
mission has demonstrated their
support of the Senior Citizens'


Programs at a time that bud-
geting .has become a real chal-
lenge.
They have continued their
support and the Senior Citizens
Board of Directors, staff and
senior citizens really appreciate
their recognition of the needs in
our older population and their
firm commitment to support
those needs.
Therefore, they and some of
their staff, have been invited to
attend our County Commission
Appreciation Day on Oct. 12.
Jerrell Metcalf, Donnie Spark-
man and some of their friends
will be here to fry mullet and
hush puppies while our chef
prepares items to be served with
the fish.
On Friday, Oct. 26, from 7
p.m. to 9 p.m. there will be
a dance in the senior center.
All senior citizens of Wakulla
County are invited to enjoy this
event that will include appetiz-
ers and soft drinks. There is
no charge.
Hopefully we will have some
extras here so all the ladies can
dance all they desire.

Thanks for reading
The Wakulla News


Cancer Early Detection Program,
visit www.wakullahealth.com.
To learn more about breast can-
cer, visit the National Cancer In-
stitute at www.cancer.gov, the
Centers for Disease Control site
at www.cdc.gov, the American
Cancer Society at www.cancer.
org or the Florida Cancer Data
System (FCDS) at www.fcds.
med.miami.edu.
For detailed breast cancer
statistics, visit Florida's Com-
munity Health Assessment
Resource Tool Set web page
(CHARTS) at www.floridacha-
rts.com and search for "breast
cancer."

Wakulla Christian
Coalition to meet.
The monthly' meeting of
the Wakulla County Christian
Coalition will be -held at 7 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 8 at the Wakulla
County Public Library. The public
is invited to attend.


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If I were a betting gal, I'd
guess that the sale day brought
in a pile of donations for FWMA.
On top of giving cash donations
for items, many people said,
"oh, and keep the change."
It was a wonderful thing to
see. FWMA's sale brought out
not only donations and cash,
but it also brought out, in large
amounts, the generosity of
spirit and innate goodwill that
thrives in the people of Wakulla
County.



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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007



Outdoors


Lousy weather, but some good


: We had very good tides
.this week, but bad weather. I
?thought the wind couldn't blow
;:any harder than it did on Satur-
-day, but I was wrong. I fished
Sunday and the wind blew
;:even harder. Despite the lousy
;-weather some nice catches were
:made over the weekend.
" The C Quarters 5th Annual
VKingFish Shootout was sched-
uled for Saturday and Sunday
;and because of high winds and
:a small craft advisory they had
-to cancel Sunday and go with
'Saturday's results. The team of
,Renegade II out of Panama City
-took first place honors with a
'king weighing 26.90 pounds
;and On the Edge placed second
$with a 22.95 pound king. This
tournament is put on each year
Sin memory of Lisa Crowder
Jackson and proceeds go to the
Leukemia Foundation. A total of
4360,000 was donated from the
past four tournaments and after
'ithe tournament this weekend,
;the Crowders gave a check to


From The Dock
BY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL


the Leukemia Foundation in the
amount of $130,000 in memory
of their daughter.
Mike Hopkins said nobody
ventured offshore for grouper,
but several boats did fish the
flats for trout and reds and
quite a few fish were caught.
Red fishing continues to be
good around the docks using
live pilchards and gold spoons.
A lot of small trout are being
caught but quite a few big trout
are mixed in with them. Some
pompano were caught over the
weekend and Mike said Dog
Island Reef is holding some of
the fall run Spanish. One boat
fished the sunken shrimp boat


of Dog Island and caught two
nice gag grouper and quite a
few short fish.
Tom Riddle of Tifton tried
out his new boat on Thursday,
Sept. 27 and they came in with
two scamp, four red grouper,
their limit of red snapper and
seven gag grouper to 15 pounds.
They fished in 90 feet of water
with live pinfish and dead bait.
Jeff May of Carrolton, Ga. also
tried out his new boat on Friday
and they came back to the hill
with five nice grouper from 50
feet of water. They said they
threw back 15 small grouper
and were very happy with their
maiden voyage.


Jeff and family
the flats but de
bigger boat for
had plans of fis
and Sunday but
sent them pac
morning. Step]
from Cincinnati
over at Shell Isla
in St. Marks an
Thursday, Friday
and left early S
of the weather. V
caught quite a f
flounder and si
Friday they hoo
thought at first
but after a shor
ered it was about
bull shark. Tw
fighting the fis
off. Stephan had
ence with a boai
Steinhatchee, a
they leave the d
a float plan wi
planned stops w
They also call
from spot to spc


catches anyway
ly typically fish at Shell Island said their folks his keeper and threw back two
cided to get a have been catching plenty of others that were legal.
offshore. They trout and reds but the strong On Sunday, I fished with
shing Saturday winds slowed the weekend Steve Reznik and Jay Cicone
t bad weather down. The white and new from Tallahassee and we had
king Saturday penny Gulp with a 1/16-ounce a good day. We had a limit of
han Shelhaus lead head under the Cajun reds, two Spanish and nine nice
keeps his boat Thunder have been the main trout. Most were caught on live
and Fish Camp baits of their guides. shrimp and the Gulp around
id they fished Scott at Jerry's Bait and the oyster bars. On Saturday, I
y and Saturday Tackle said he saw lots of fish had fished with Joe Blackmon
unday because over the weekend despite the from Columbus Ga. and we
Vhile here they weather. Last week before the caught a few reds and trout, but
few trout, reds, winds blew, Otto Hough and I just couldn't find many fish.
mall cobia. On Randy Trousdell fished one of The spots where I had been do-
cked what they the near shore reefs and caught ing so well were impossible to
was a tarpon, two nice gag grouper and had fish because of the wind. I have
t while discov- quite a few shorts. Tim Gordon fished with a lot of people over
it an eight foot fished the St. Marks Buoy line the years and he was one of the
'o hours after with live pinfish and caught nicest and most sincere people I
sh they broke a legal cobia and said he saw have ever been around for eight
d a bad experi- several others. The Mark Cann hours. They have had a house at
t sinking out of party fished around Gray Mare Alligator Point for 52 years and
nd now when Rock with live shrimp and I think he knew everybody in
lock they leave caught 10 trout and two reds. Wakulla County.


th all of their
ith Shell Island.
when moving
ot. Allen Hobbs


Allan Carter fished Little Pass
and caught his keeper red and
threw back three. James Moore
fished the Rock Garden and got


Remember to leave that float
plan like Stephan from Cincin-
nati and take those kids fishing.
Good luck and good fishing!


IApalach roac


, The long awaited decision on a
:roads and trails system for the Apala-
,chicola National Forest is anticipated
:in the next week. It will, no doubt, pro-
voke controversy; but the decision will
'provide a balance between resource
^protection and recreational opportuni-
ties.
. Getting to this decision has been
-a long, often arduous, and frustrating
.-process. Deciding where off-road ve-
- hicles should be allowed is one of the
-most controversial issues facing the
'Forest Service today, and the Apala-
chicola National Forest is no exception.
The reality is that we cannot meet
all the demands of the many groups
'.who use and love the forest and still
-adequately protect the sensitive re-
4'sources that are in our care.
In the past decades, off-road riders
. enjoyed almost unlimited freedom in


Js, trails decision will be controversial


the forest. Their low numbers followed
old logging roads and fire-plow lines
that were designed for temporary use
and left few impacts on the land. We
allowed use of these features to foster
recreational opportunities.
Over the years, however, the num-
ber and kinds of off-road vehicles has
skyrocketed, creating a latticework of
trails that impact the health of the for-
est. Not just in Florida, either public
land managers everywhere are forced
to leave behind the hands-off attitude
of previous years and learn how to
manage off-road recreation. In fact,
in 2005 the Forest Service adopted a
nationwide policy that mandated all
National Forests designate exactly
where motor vehicles will be allowed
to go.
The Apalachicola National Forest
is richly diverse with sensitive plant
and animal species. It is a landscape of


ephemeral ponds, pitcher plant bogs,
endangered and threatened plant and
animal species, and sensitive cultural
sites that could yield valuable insights
about our ancestors. Motorized ve-
hicles not only impact these resources
but their vehicle noise also affects
those seeking solitude.
To reach this decision, the Forest
Service considered a wide range of
alternatives from very limited access to
continuation of the freedoms of past
years.
This decision will fall somewhere in
the middle achieving a level of balance
for all forest visitors those seeking
motorized opportunities and those
seeking the peace and quiet of the for-
est while also ensuring the wonder-
ful ecological diversity of the Apala-
chicola is sustained for future genera-
tions. We must serve the people, but
we must also care for the land.


I want to thank the many groups
and individuals who have given their
time, ideas and support throughout
the process. I ask them to now support
this decision and help make it work.
Before you go out to visit the forest,
learn what the rules are; respect the
forest, and respect other users.. Tell
us about problems as they occur, and
help get the right information to other
users.
Implementing the new motor ve-
hicle trail system will take time, Once
this system is in place, trail riders will
have a clearly marked, mapped, and
maintained road and trail system that
they can enjoy and follow.
We will actively be sharing informa-
tion about the process over the next
several months as we go about signing
and mapping the routes. Look for
more information soon.


My View

By Marsha Kearney
Marsha Kearney is Forest
Supervisor, National Forests
in Florida.


;St. Marks River Stt
. The Florida Department of Environmental
%,Protection's (DEP) Florida Park Service is wel-
'coming visitors to the 161st state park, St. Marks
;:River State Park. Located in Jefferson and Leon
,'counties, the 2,589-acre property lies only 20 miles
x-outside of Tallahassee, The state park aids in buff-
- ering the St. Marks River from development and
-preserves its water quality while also protecting
the natural communities in the floodplain.
"The division will hold public workshops for
interested community members to help develop
the unit management plan for the park," said
Florida Park Service Director Mike Bullock. "We
anticipate adding a parking area, accessible rest-
room facilities, a picnic facility and a kiosk with
brochures and information about the park in the
'upcoming months."
Rich in cultural and natural resources, St.
'Marks River State Park houses dirt road systems
dating back to the mid-1800s. State park archae-
ologists and resource managers are studying
these road systems as well as sinkholes and other
cultural sites to develop a historical understand-
ing of the area. Currently, visitors can explore
the property's wildlife by hiking or biking on
,the park's existing road system while the Florida


ate Park to open
Park Service develops the management plan and
necessary infrastructure for the park.
St. Marks River State Park is home to a variety
of native wildlife for visitors to experience, indud-
ing the threatened black bear, bobcats, fox, deer,
turkeys and fox squirrels. Birding enthusiasts can
spot an array of hawks, owls and ducks wading
and flying within the park. The plush river land
provides a scenic assortment of plant communi-
ties including a floodplain forest, xeric hammock,
flatwoods, sandhill and bay heads.
The first two-time Gold Medal winner honor-
ing the nation's best state park service, Florida's
state park system is one of the largest in the
country with 161 parks spanning almost 700,000
acres and 100 miles of sandy white beach. From
swimming and diving in Florida's rivers and
springs to birding and fishing or hiking and rid-
ing on natural scenic trails, Florida's state parks
offer year-round outdoor activities for all ages.
Battle reenactments and Native American festi-
vals celebrate Florida's unique history, while art
shows, museums and lighthouses offer a window
into Florida's cultural heritage.
For more information about Florida State
Parks, visit www.FloridaStateParks.org.


Deer hunters with dogs must register


Hunters who use dogs to
hunt deer on private lands in
Florida must register those
-properties for the 2007-08 hunt-
'ing season.
- The statewide, no-cost regis-
-tration is not only mandatory
during any open deer-hunting
,season when taking deer with
-dogs is permitted, but also
during the upcoming deer-dog
training season.
This regulation does not
apply to training or hunting
deer-dogs on public lands and
.wildlife management areas.
The deer-dog training season
opens Oct. 6 and runs through
Oct. 25 in-the Central and South
Shunting zones. In the Northwest
Hunting Zone, the training sea-
son runs Oct. 27 to Nov. 15.


Registration may be issued
to hunting clubs or landowners
for anyone who wants to hunt
deer with dogs on a particular
tract of private land. A specific
registration number will be is-
sued from the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion (FWC), and that number
must be attached to the collars
of all dogs used to hunt deer on
those registered properties.
To comply, the landowner or
representative from each hunt-
ing club must complete the
appropriate application, which
is available from regional FWC
offices and at MyFWC.com/hunt-
ing. Proof of landowner permis-
sion or
a copy of the written lease
agreement must be provided


along with a general map of
the property showing boundary
lines and a legal description.
Hunters must possess copies
of their registration while they
are hunting, and they must
contain their dogs to those reg-
istered properties. Possessing
firearms or bows is prohibited
while training deer dogs during
the deer-dog training season.
For more information on how
to register, visit MyFWC.com/
hunting or call (850) 488-3641.


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Tide charts by
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St. Marks River Entrance


Date High Low High Low High
Thu 2.4 ft. 3.3 ft. 0.7 ft. 2.7 ft.
Oct 4, 07 1:25 AM 7:31 AM 4:38 PM 11:32 PM
Fri 2.3 ft. 3.2 ft. 0.7 ft.
Oct 5, 07 3:35 AM 10:10 AM 5:48 PM_
Sat 2.9 ft. 1.9 ft. 3.4 ft. 0.7 ft.
Oct 6, 07 12:15 AM 5:21 AM 11:46 AM 6:37 PM
Sun 3.1 ft. 1.4 ft. 3.5 ft. 0.8 ft.
Oct 7, 07 12:47 AM 6:23 AM 12:44 PM 7:14 PM
Mon 3.3 ft. 1.0 ft. 3.7 ft. 0.9 ft.
Oct 8, 07 1:14 AM 7:08 AM 1:28 PM 7:44 PM_
Tue 3.5 ft. 0.6 ft. 3.7 ft. 1.1 ft.
Oct 9, 07 1:40 AM 7:47 AM 2:06 PM 8:09 PM
Wed 3.7 ft. 0.3 ft. 3.7 ft. 1.2 ft.
Oct 10, 07 2:0'4 AM 8:22-AM 2:41 PM 8:31 PM


Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 1.7 ft. 2.5 ft. 0.5 ft. 2.0 ft.
Oct 4, 07 1:36 AM 7:23 AM 4:49 PM 11:24 PM
Fri 1.7 ft. 2.4 ft. 0.5 ft.
Oct 5, 07 3:46 AM 10:02 AM 5:59 PM_
Sat 2.2 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.5 ft. 0.5 ft.
Oct 6, 07 12:07 AM 5:32 AM 11:38 AM 6:48 PM
Sun 2.3 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.7 ft. 0.6 ft.
Oct 7, 07 12:39 AM 6:34 AM 12:36 PM 7:25 PM
Mon 2.5 ft. 0.7 ft. 2.7 ft. 0.7 ft.
Oct 8, 07 1:06 AM 7:19 AM 1:20 PM 7:55 PM
Tue 2.6 ft. 0.4 ft. 2.8 ft. 0.8 ft.
Oct 9, 07 1:32 AM 7:58 AM 1:58 PM 8:20 PM_
Wed 2.7 ft. 0.2 ft. 2.8 ft. 0.9 ft.
Oct 10, 07 1:56 AM 8:33 AM 2:33 PM 8:42 PM


October 3 October 10


City of St. Marks


Date High Low High Low
Thu 2.1 ft. 3.1 ft. 0.6 ft.
Oct 4, 07 2:29 AM 8:07 AM 5:42 PM
Fri 2.5 ft. 2.1 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.6 ft.
Oct 5, 07 12:08 AM 4:39 AM 10:46 AM 6:52 PM
Sat 2.7 ft. 1.7 ft. 3.1 ft. 0.7 ft.
Oct 6, 07 12:51 AM 6:25 AM 12:22 PM 7:41 PM
Sun 2.9 ft. 1.3 ft. 3.3 ft. 0.7 ft.
Oct 7, 07 1:23 AM 7:27 AM 1:20 PM 8:18 PM
Mon 3.1 ft. 0.9 ft. 3.4 ft. 0.8 ft.
Oct 8, 07 1:50 AM 8:12 AM 2:04 PM 8:48 PM
Tue 3.3 ft. 0.5 ft. 3.5 ft. 1.0 ft.
Oct 9, 07 2:16 AM 8:51 AM 2:42 PM 9:13 PM
Wed 3.4 ft. 0.3 ft. 3.5 ft. 1.1 ft.
Oct 10, 07 2:40 AM 9:26 AM 3:17 PM 9:35 PM


St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 2.3 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.7 ft. 2.1 ft.
Oct 4, 07 1:04 AM 7:15 AM 4:17 PM 11:16 PM
Fri 2.2 ft. 2.5 ft. 0.7 ft. 2.3 ft.
Oct 5, 07 3:14 AM 9:54 AM 5:27 PM 11:59 PM
Sat 1.9 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.7 ft.
Oct 6, 07 5:00 AM 11:30 AM 6:16 PM
Sun 2.4 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.8 ft. 0.8 ft.
Oct 7, 07 12:31 AM 6:02 AM 12:28 PM 6:53 PM_
Mon 2.6 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.8 ft. 0.9 ft.
Oct 8, 07 12:58 AM 6:47 AM 1:12 PM 7:23 PM
Tue 2.7 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.0 ft.
Oct 9, 07 1:24 AM 7:26 AM 1:50 PM 7:48 PM_____
Wed 2.9 ft. 0.3 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.1 ft.
Oct 10, 07 1:48 AM 8:01 AM 2:25 PM 8:10 PM


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4,2007 Page 11A
I


ranch Now Open

im 224-4960
www.fsucu.org


For tides at the following points
add to Dog Island Listings: Carrabelle


Apalachicola
Cat Point
Lower Anchorage
West Pass


I *. .
~


'To LOW llO1


High Tide
28 Min.
1 Hr., 53 Min.
1 Hr., 13Min.
1 Hr., 36 Min.
1 Hr., 26 Min.


Shell Point, Spring Creek

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 2.5 ft. 3.4 ft. 0.8 ft. 2.8 ft.
Oct 4, 07 1:22 AM 7:2C AM 4:35 PM 11:29 PM
Fri 2.5 ft. 3.3 ft. 0.8 ft.
Oct 5, 07 3:32 AM 10:07 AM 5:45 PM
Sat 3.0 ft. 2.0 ft. 3.4 ft. 0.8 ft.
Oct 6, 07 12:12 AM 5:18 AM 11:43 AM 6:34 PM
Sun 3.2 ft. 1.5 ft. 3.6 ft. 0.9 ft.
Oct 7, 07 12:44 AM 6:20 AM 12:41 PM 7:11 PM
Mon 3.4 ft. 1.0 ft. 3.7 ft. 1.0 ft.
Oct 8, 07 1:11 AM 7:05 AM 1:25 PM 7:41 PM
Tue 3.6 ft. 0.6 ft. 3.8 ft. 1.1 ft.
Oct 9, 07 1:37 AM 7:44 AM 2:03 PM 8:06 PM
Wed 3.7 ft. 0.3 ft. 3.8 ft. 1.3 ft.
Oct 10, 07 2:01 AM 8:19 AM 2:38 PM 8:28 PM


Dog Island West End

Date High Low High Low
Thu 3.1 ft. 0.4 ft.
Oct 4, 07 6:52 AM 4:08 PM
FTri 2.7 ft. 2.1 ft. 2.9 ft. 0.5 ft.
Oct 5, 07 12:47 AM 3:31 AM 8:44 AM 5:09 PM
Sat 2.7 ft. 1.8 ft. 2.8 ft. 0.6 ft.
Oct 6, 07 12:58 AM 4:51 AM 10:43 AM 5:57 PM
Sun 2.7 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.9 ft. 0.8 ft.
Oct 7, 07 1:11 AM 5:48 AM 12:13 PM 6:36 PM
Mon 2.7 ft. 1.1 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.0 ft.
Oct 8, 07 1:23 AM 6:34 AM 1:20 PM 7:07 PM
Tue 2.8 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.2 ft.
Oct 9, 07 1:32 AM 7:15 AM 2:15 PM 7:32 PM
Wed 2.9 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.5 ft.
Oct 10, 07 1:40 AM 7:51 AM 3:06 PM 7:52 PM


Saturday
8:45 am
9:10 pm
2:40 am
3:00 pm


I r T T


Sunday
9:25 am
9:45 pm
3:25 am
3:35 pm


Monday
10:05 am
10:25 pm
4:00 am
4:20 pm


Tuesday
10:40 am
11:00 pm
4:45 am
5:00 pm


J ______ L L & ______ =


Wednesday
11:15 am
11:35 pm
5:15 am
5:30 pm


Sunrise
Sunset
Moon rise
Moon set
Brightness


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
7:32 am 7:32 am 7:33 am 7:33 am 7:34 am 7:35 am 7:35 am
7:19 pm 7:18 pm 7:16 pm 7:15 pm 7:14 pm 7:13 pm 7:12 pm


1:15 am
3:48 pm
44%


2:19 am
4:27 pm
37%


____________I ___________* L


3:21 am
5:00 pm
31%


4:19 am
5:29 pm
24%


5:16 am
5:56 pm
18%


6:10 am
6:22 pm
12%


7:04 am
6:48 pm
6%


COAST GUARD


AUXILIARY REPORTS

By Jim McGill


The 2007 Shell Point Golf
Cart Treasure Hunt was held on
Saturday, Sept. 29. A $10 per cart
donation was collected for the
fundraiser held at the station.
For those who have no idea of
this strange event, I am post-
ing the rules that Chuck King
put together and gave to the
contestants.



Stuff you need to know

1. Golf Carts or bicycles or
other small vehicles that are
dangerous to operate on roads
are allowed. Any vehicle wider'
than a golf cart may be too
large to go all of the places you
need to go.
2. Do not trespass on private
property. The gates to Royster
and Snug Harbour have been
opened for us. There is no
need to open any dosed gates.
We will not send you over
any standing water but if you
choose to get wet at some point
you will not be penalized.
3. You will not need to speak
any foreign languages or re-
move your shoes. If you en-
counter a wild boar, just go on
to the next clue. If you don't
have binoculars with you, get
some when you go near your
place. They may come in handy
at the end.
4. We did the best we could
to ensure the accuracy of the
clues. They have all been dou-
ble checked for accuracy. If you
dispute a clue, it will be settled
by a highly biased judge, so
don't even bother because you
will be ignored, out-yelled or
poked in the eye with a Sty-
rofoam peanut. If there is a
legitimate screw-up, and lots of
participants complain about the
same thing, then we will give
extra credit to whoever throws
the biggest hissey.
5. The geographic limits are
shown on the Treasure Map.
Any part of the known world
may hold a clue. Just to let you
know, there are dues near all
corners of the known world. We
have anticipated the tide during
the event and will let you know
if a clue needs to be thrown out
due to lack of world.
6. Measurements vary. My
left leg pace covers about 2,214


.ia, Boating Emergencies .- -.

Coast Guard Station
Panama City ................................................. 1 (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown .................................................. 1 (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........... .................. 1 (850) 906-0540
or ........................ ...... ...... ....................... 893-5137
Shell Point (Flotilla 13) ................................... 1 (850) 926-2606
or .................................................................................... 926-5654


feet. My right leg pace is around
2,337 feet. Spitting distance
is defined as my memory of
placing in a watermelon seed
conveyance contest when 15
years old. That means that I
have no idea of what spitting
distance is, so just figure it out
for yourself.


How it works
1. Is this really a scavenger
hunt? NO. It just got called that
because we don't know what it
is. You don't get items (at least
not until the end), but you get
numbers.
2. All clues will result in a
number. If we lead you to a boat
with a registration number of
FL1234GM, the answer should
be 1234. We may specify the
first, last or middle digits of a
number.
3. Write down ALL numbers
on your "Clue Cards."
4. We won't require as much
addition or numeric manipula-
tion this time because of the
rampant drunkenness encoun-
tered in previous events.
5. When you correctly solve
all 10 clues, return to the Coast
Guard station and you will
receive the final clue that will
lead you to the treasure. If you
are first to find the treasure,
return to the station, while
blowing the horn that is with
the treasure.
6. We got carried away this
time and have too many clues
for the time allotted. We really
like the clues, so we did not
throw any out. Some clues will
be solved quickly and others
may take some time, so if you
have not finished by 3:15 p.m.,
you may return to the station
for hints.


The Clues
Each clue was on its own
"Clue Card" and the order of the
clues has no significance.
1. What is the area code on
the sign with wooden posts
closest to the two permanent
"Compliments of Century 21"
signs?
Note: It is possible that the
phone number is not visible
from the signs.
2. What is the street address
of the house closest to "Caution
Manatee Area"?
3. What are the last two dig-
its of the serial number on the
fire hydrant across from the tree
island on Lake View Ct.?
4. What is the street address
of the house with the red and
white lighthouse that is more
than 10 feet tall?
5. What are the first two
digits of the Talquin Bar Code
number on the electric meter
with Tiki motif within spitting
distance of a publicly accessible
restroom?
6. What is the area code on
the "Aluminum" device south
of the gate to the only area in
Shell Point that does not allow
roller skates?
7. The Village has some new
homes on stilts. What is the
sum when you add up of all of
their street addresses?
8. What is the street address
of the house that has a PVC pipe
newspaper box? This house is
across from a group of boats
used by young sailors.i
9. What is the address of one
of the two houses that has a
"Mile 0 Key West" sign on it?
10. Find the SUDOKU place,
"take one" and solve it. Write
the first four numbers in the
answer space below.
Final Clue to the treasure:
Find the treasure chest. It is
9.25 inches x 16 inches x 8.75


inches. The treasure is visible
from Walker Creek. "It" is dearly
marked. You will need one of
your clues to unlock the trea-
sure. Follow the instructions
and bring your treasure back to
the station for a photo op and
bragging rights.
Who won? The Tatum family
found the treasure chest. I am
told that after three hours of
the hunt, several people con-
verged on the treasure within
seconds of each other.
The treasure chest contained
Gold Kugerands (made out
of chocolate), valuable jewels
(beads anyway) and a much
coveted trophy.

Saturday busy
day at Shell Point

By SHERRIE ALVERSON
Saturday was a busy day at
Shell Point. It seemed that ev-
ery6ne was either sponsoring
or participating in a fun event.
Jim McGill was involved in both
fundraisers for the Apalachee
Bay Marine Safety Support
Group, Inc, the organization
that is responsible for the main-
tenance of the building know as
the Coast Guard Auxiliary Sta-
tion/Seafarers Chapel located at
the end of County Road 327.
Jim and Chuck King put to-
gether and ran the 2007 Shell
Point Golf Cart Treasure Hunt.
A $10 per cart donation was
collected and certainly added
to the day's income.
Before we go any further,
wish to thank Randy and Becky
Armstrong for the wonderful
T-shirts they donated. We still
have a few, if you are interested
in one, contact Dorothy Edring-
ton at jedrington@comcast.
net.
And now, the First Annual
Pig Roast. We are happy to
report it was a tremendous
success for two reasons the
hard working people that put
it together and the wonderful
people who bought tickets and
often gave a donation, too.
Bob Morgan, John Edring-
ton and Jim McGill were the
chief honchos, but they had
a lot of wonderful help. That
included Michael Longanecker,
Joe Warren, Louvenia Morgan,
Dorothy Edrington, Ron and
Angret Piasecki, James Taylor,
Mae Waters, Alice Lindquist,
Chuck and Gloria Klieforth, and
your reporter. If anyone was
overlooked, I apologize. John E.
went over the list, too.
When you have lived here
as long as I have, you know a
large percentage of those who
live in Wakulla County. Ticket
Taker was my assigned duty,
along with Dorothy Edrington


The winning Tatum family displays their treasure.


Contestants get ready to take part in Shell Point activities


and Angret Piasecki.
Imagine my surprise when
this handsome man got out of
an equally gorgeous car. After
looking about he called, "Is this
the place where they are having
a Pork Roast Benefit?"
After receiving an affirmative
reply from me, he smiled and
asked where he could park his
car. "At my house," I thought,
but did not say. I walked out to
the edge of the concrete, and af-
ter the introductions, I couldn't
resist asking his wife, "Are you
visiting in our county?"


"No," he said, and then went
on to explain that they were
having coffee and desert in a
restaurant in Panacea when a
woman leaving a nearby table
offered them a newspaper.
She mentioned that it was The
Wakulla News and they would
enjoy it. And so they did.
The man explained that they
travel extensively and they have
learned that food at benefits is
usually excellent and reason-
ably inexpensive. "If it isn't, we
have wasted very little time and
See COAST GUARD on Page 17


Low Tide
25 Min.
2 Hrs., 38 Min.
2 Hrs., 31 Min.
2 Hrs., 3 Min.
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First
Oct. 19






Full
Oct. 26






Last
Nov. 1


New
Oct. 11


Major
Activity

Minor
Activity


Thursday
7:10 am
7:40 pm
1:00 am
1:20 pm


Friday
8:00 am
8:25 pm
1:55 am
2:10pm


Attack-One Fire
Management


Services
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Commercial & Residential
Land Clearing Timberland Management Industrial Sites
Forestry
Hazardous Fuel Reduction Habitat Restoration
Wildland-Urban Interface Temporary Fire Lanes
Pre-Fire Suppression Kevin Carter, Owner
Utilities & Transportation Phone: 850-926-6534
Clearing & Right of Way Maintenance Survey Lines Fax: 850-926-6529
Highways Power & Gas Lines Canals & Waterways Cell: 850-528-1743


r


w


IVV ti irrili


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400w-*







Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007


Court Shorts


, The attorney representing a
17-year-old charged with first de-
gree murder has filed a motion
seeking to have the teenager
declared incompetent to stand
trial.
. The teen, Christopher Lee
Hartsfield, is incompetent due
to mental retardation, according
to the motion filed by attorney
Lynn Alan Thompson. It is in-
dicated in the court documents
that Assistant State Attorney Jack
Campbell has no objection.
Hartsfield had already been
found incompetent in juvenile
cases that were pending before
the alleged murder.
Thompson is seeking to have
Wakulla Circuit Judge N. Sand-
ers Sauls approve the transfer
of Hartsfield to the Agency
for Persons with Disabilities
Mentally Retarded Defendant
Program (MRDP) at Florida State
Hospital.
Hartsfield and co-defendant
Jesse Chrysler, who is now 18,
are charged with shooting Zeke
Spencer Gossett to death outside
Gossett's home on Jer-Be-Lou Cir-
cle in Panacea during the early
rporning hours of April 17. One


or both teens had allegedly bro-
ken into Gossett's truck search-
ing for a gun he supposedly kept
there. Reportedly, there was no
gun in the vehicle but they did
allegedly take some CDs.
Gossett, who was 22, heard a
noise outside his home at about
2 a.m. and discovered one or
both of the teens and confronted
them and a fight broke out.
Chrysler, who was reputed to
carry a pistol, allegedly fired at
Gossett as Hartsfield ran away.
Mortally wounded, Gossett
made it back to the doorway
of his home, calling 'for his
mother, before he collapsed
and died from multiple gunshot
wounds.
The owner of a Panacea
restaurant has filed court papers
suggesting she intends to file for
bankruptcy protection.
Kay Kinser, owner of Harbor
House restaurant, which recently
closed, filed the suggestion of
bankruptcy in small claims court
last week in the case of former
chef Nola Tolbert, who is seek-
ing back pay she claims she is
owed.


Fire Rescue report
This past week, Wakulla County firefighters responded to one
ucture fire, one brush fire, one miscellaneous fire, four vehicle
accidents and 17 medical first responder emergency incidents.
Executive Officers: At the September business meeting held at
4palachee Bay Volunteer Fire Rescue Department (Shell Point), the
Ifakulla County United Firefighters Association elected its executive
officerss for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1. They will be: David
garrison, President; Steve Pigott, Vice President; Andy Bowman,
Secretary; Lettie Harvey, Treasurer; and Ken Matthews, Sergeant-
4-Arms. The Association's Board of Directors is comprised of the
fire chiefs of the county's 10 volunteer fire departments and the
4ected officers.

* National Fire Prevention Week

. Each year, the National Fire Protection Association recognizes
PIre Prevention Week during the calendar week in which Oct. 9
folls.
f On Oct. 9, 1871, the Great Chicago Fire killed 250 people and
caused more than $160 million in property damage. If there was
any positive side to that devastating event, the infamous fire
wyas responsible for turning people's focus from fighting fires to
preventing fires.
SNearly 1,000 children under the age of 14 die in house fires
,ch year. Fire Prevention Week offers an excellent opportunity
t educate children about how to handle fire emergencies and,
equally important, how to prevent fires.
: Each year, in observance of National Fire Prevention Week,
'akulla County Fire Rescue personnel visit local elementary
4hools, pre-schools and day-care centers to conduct fire prevention
nd fire safety instructional programs for the students. Firefighters
tke fire trucks and other fire rescue equipment to the schools and
demonstrate their use for the students. It only takes one big red
fre truck to grab and hold a kid's undivided attention! Firefighters
demonstrate numerous fire protection and prevention techniques
znd handout fire safety informational pamphlets for the children
t take home. Hopefully, parents will read the handouts and
rather discuss the importance of fire prevention and safety with
teir children.
' Our county's firefighters have participated in the National Fire
prevention Week fire safety education program at local schools,
tid day care centers for a number of years with, what we believe,
+ry favorable results.


Sycle crashes; teen hurt

A 15-year-old Crawfordville Wes Underwood.
juvenile was injured in a mo- Charged in the case were Cur-
tbrcycle accident Saturday, Sept. tis Lee Morgan, 18, of Crawford-
49 at 2:02 p.m. at East Ivan ville and Jack David Carpenter,
Ruad and Rumblewood Road in 18, of Crawfordville. Morgan
rawfordville, according to the possessed a 2003 Polaris four
lorida Highway Patrol. wheeler and Carpenter was in
Trooper Scotty A. Lolley ar- possession of a 2003 Kawaski
ved at the scene to observe four wheeler, both were re-
tree off road vehicles and the ported stolen along with' the
venile on his back near the motorcycle.
fee line. The juvenile suffered The trio has been charged
. rious injuries when he fell off with theft, use of a motor ve-
te 2003 Honda motorcycle. hide in commission of a felony
i As the investigation unfold- and improper operation of ATVs
Trooper Lolley discovered on certain roadways. Only Mor-
tat all three operators of the gan had a driver license.
f -road vehicles were involved The juvenile was taken to
t the theft of the vehicles they Tallahassee Memorial Hospital
fere operating. A Bolo was for treatment of his injuries.
sued for the stolen property The motorcycle suffered $300
t 1:41 p.m. and the recovery worth of damage in the ac-
as made at 2:40 p.m. with the cident. Morgan's four wheeler
4sistance of Trooper Bryan suffered $1,000 worth of dam-
toddenberry, Trooper Michael age. Carpenter and Morgan were
Commons and Reserve Trooper not injured.


Higher courts decline local tax sale case


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Higher courts have refused
to take up appeals in a local
tax sale case. In September, the
Florida Supreme Court declined
to hear Brad Higginbotham's
appeal of a case in which he
lost his Wakulla County land
because of past-due taxes. Last
week, the First District Court
of Appeal denied an appeal
by Higginbotham's mortgage
company over a mobile home
that was on the land.
It was the latest development
in a case that Higginbotham's
attorney, Mike Carter, has called



" -


a "tragedy."
Higginbotham was a heli-
copter mechanic whose job
took him out-of-state and he
failed to update his permanent
address and so never received
his tax bills or notice that his
taxes were delinquent. The law
requires a sign to be posted on
the property that the land is
up for sale because of unpaid
taxes, but that sign was put up
by a deputy sheriff on the back
part of the property, not near
the driveway or home, and was
stuck with duct tape to a fence
and never seen by the person
who served as caretaker on the


property.
A friend alerted Higginbo-
tham that his name was in the
delinquent tax list published in
the newspaper, and Higginbo-
tham called the Tax Collector's
office to find out how much
he owed. He was unaware, and
wasn't told by the deputy tax
collector, that the tax sale was
only a few days away. His check
for past-due taxes was mailed
from Alaska and did not arrive
until two days after the sale was
completed.
At that tax sale in March
2004, Tim Bozeman, an inves-
tor in tax certificates, bought


SE offiCER


Sheriff David Harvey, Superintendent David Miller, Major Maurice Langston, Safety and Risk
Coordinator Jim Griner with the new Wakulla County Schools Safety Officer vehicle.


Sheriff furnishes schools with

SUV for district safety officer


School safety is a major issue in communities
across the country and Wakulla County is no ex-
ception. Law enforcement and school personnel
represent highly trained professionals who have
the health and welfare of the students and school
community as their primary concern. While other
school districts are reducing school safety bud-
gets, Wakulla County is increasing resources and
firming effective partnerships.
"Wakulla schools have developed much closer
partnerships with local law enforcement offi-
cials," said Superintendent David Miller. "This is
particularly helpful as school officials evaluate
the risk of rumors and threats. Student safety is
of paramount importance. The cooperation from
the Sheriff's Office provides us with additional
resources and support to ensure student and
school community safety."
In an effort to create a stronger partnership,


Sheriff David Harvey donated a 2000 white Chev-
rolet Blazer for use by the Wakulla County School
District Safety Officer Jim Griner.
"One of the main reasons for this donation is
to continue and further expand the liaison with
the Superintendent's Safety Program," said Sheriff
David Harvey. Safety and Risk Coordinator Jim
Griner will use the vehicle to assist with investiga-
tions, safety trips and training from school site to
school site, inspections, provide damage control
as well as attending emergency operation center,
PAEC Risk Management, Homeland Security and
Incident Command meetings.
Formal and informal meetings with law en-
forcement representatives, district administrators
and school employees provides the opportunity
for reciprocal briefings on safety issues as well
as prevention and intervention strategies, said
Superintendent Miller.


Crawfordville woman


'serious' after crash


A 24-year-old Crawfordville
woman suffered serious injuries
in a one vehicle crash Sunday,
Sept. 30 at 9:14 p.m. on Forest
Highway 13 five miles west of
Crawfordville, according to the
Florida Highway Patrol.
Jessica M. Moran was travel-
ing west on FH 13 in her 2005
Ford. FHP officials said the
motorist was traveling on the
wrong side of the road and
steered to the right causing the
vehicle to rotate clockwise.
The vehicle traveled off the
main portion of the roadway
into a ditch on the north shoul-
der, While traveling into the
ditch, the front of her vehicle
struck several trees, officials
said.
The vehicle continued rotat-
ing clockwise traveling down
the ditch embankment until it
was stopped by trees. The Ford
came to final rest in the ditch
along the side of the roadway,
facing north. Damage to the
vehicle was estimated at $8,000.
The victim was taken to Talla-
hassee Memorial Hospital for
treatment.
Charges are pending as FHP
officials said the accident was
alcohol related. Moran was not
using a seatbelt at the time of
the crash. FHP Trooper Brian


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Speigner was the crash inves-
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the Wakulla Fire Department,
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Higginbotham's property 10
acres of land and a double-wide
mobile home valued at more
than $200,000 with a bid of
$14,000.
Higginbotham filed a lawsuit
claiming problems with the
notice should invalidate the
sale. Wakulla Circuit Judge N.
Sanders Sauls ruled for Hig-
ginbotham, finding that notice
requirements should be viewed
by the courts as mandatory, not
just procedural.
The First District Court of
Appeal reversed Sauls in Febru-
ary 2006, and especially bristled
at a line in Sauls' order that
"Perpetuating an error in le-
gal thinking... serves no one
well and only undermines the
integrity and credibility of a
court... And, if the court is a
trial court, pointing such out to
appellate courts." A three-judge
panel at the appellate court
ordered Bozeman's tax deed to
be granted.
Shortly after, on April 26,
2006, the U.S. Supreme Court is-
sued a ruling in a case strikingly
similar to Higginbotham's in
which they found as Sauls had
- that such tax sales are invalid
if proper notice to taxpayers is
not followed. But since that Su-
preme Court ruling came after
Sauls' decision, it isn't binding
in Higginbotham's case.
Higginbotham filed a motion
in circuit court asking Sauls
to vacate the final judgment,
claiming the appeal court erred
in its legal reasoning. Sauls re-
fused, writing that he did not
have the "authority, power, or
prerogative to in any way alter,
let alone vacate the judgment
of the First District (Court of
Appeal)."
The case went back before
the appeal court, which of
course declined to reverse it-
self, and then on to the state
Supreme Court which, on Sept.
6, denied Higginbotham's ap-
peal.
In the other case, Green Tree
Servicing, a finance company,
filed a lawsuit to repossess the
mobile home that had been
bought by Higginbotham. The
major point of contention in
the case was whether the mo-
bile home since it was never
See CASE on Page 13A


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007 Page 13A


Case
Continued from Page 12A
permanently affixed to the
land and could be moved was
considered a part of the land,
as a house is, or whether it was
personal property, such as a car
or boat,
The case was further compli-
cated because the finance com-
pany a.pp.npintlv never recorded
its inolt .ige on the mobile
home and so the company did
not receive notice of the tax
sale,
Sauls found that a mobile
home is a fixture to the land
and not personal property and
that it was purchased as part of
the tax sale.
Green Tree appealed the deci-
sion to the First District Court of
Appeal, which on Friday, Sept.
28, indicated it would not hear
the case.


FWC fights

boat thefts

The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission's
(FWC), Division of Law Enforce-
ment urges boat owners to pro-
tect their boats from theft and to
avoid boat title fraud schemes.
More than 1,200 boats have
been reported stolen in Florida
this year. That reflects a 30 per-
cent increase compared to the
same period last year.
"Go-fast boats, 26 to 39 feet
long, are being targeted with
greater frequency than in previ-
ous years," said Lt. John Hum-
phreys of FWC's Investigations
Section. "These boats are tar-
geted by criminals because of
their high-dollar value and for
use in maritime-based smug-
gling activities."
FWC officers possess a tre-
mendous amount of experience
and knowledge relative to the
boating industry. This resource
is available to law enforcement
partners and private industry
through active partnerships with
the Florida Marine Intelligence
Unit (FMIU) and through several
other marine intelligence-shar-
ing initiatives.
Dade, Monroe and Broward
counties have the highest num-
ber of boat thefts; however,
thefts have been reported from
every county in the state.
Readers are reminded to con-
tact their local sheriff's office
or police department to report
a stolen boat or suspected boat
title fraud.
Additional information and
tips for avoiding boat theft and
boat title fraud can be found
at MyFWC.com/Law and at
the Florida Marine Intelligence
Unit's Web site, www.FMIU.org.


Sheriff's

Report

The Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office charged an 18-year-old
Perry man in connection with
a gasoline drive off and retail
theft at the St. Marks Express
Lane on Wednesday, Sept. 26,
according to Sheriff David
Harvey.
Haywood Tullus Kinsey was
charged after a traffic stop on
U.S. Highway 98. Kinsey al-
legedly pumped $60 worth of
gasoline into his vehicle and
drove off without paying for it.
Deputy Ward Kromer stopped
the suspect near Rehwinkel
Road.
Kinsey told Deputy Kromer
that he purchased gas in Perry,
but had a gas gauge marked
full when the deputy checked
the vehicle. Kinsey was arrested
for retail theft of gasoline and
two female juveniles in the ve-
hicle were reported as missing
runaways.
Property was seized inside
the vehicle that may have come
from the recently burglarized
JR's Store near Perry. A Taylor
County deputy picked up the
two female juveniles, each age
16, and a 14-year-old male ju-


venile, and took them back to
Perry to face potential charges
in the burglary at JR's.
Kinsey's driver license was
seized as part of the gas theft. In
addition to Deputy Kromer, Sgt.
Mike Kemp, Deputy Casey Whit-
lock and Taylor County Deputy
Chambers investigated.
In other activity reported by
the Wakulla County Sheriff's Of-
fice during the past week:
On Sept. 27, Mark S. Mitch-
ell of Panacea reported the theft
of fuel from one of his ice com-
pany vehicles The diesel fuel
was valued at $72. Deputy Roger
Rankin investigated.
On Sept. 27, Deputy Matt
Helms investigated a vehicle
accident with a deer near the
Wakulla Correctional Institu-
tion. The driver was not injured
and Deputy Helms offered the
deer meat to officials at the
prison facility and gave the vic-
tim crash report paperwork.
On Sept. 26, Katherine
A. Zavala of Crawfordville re-
ported a burglary to her former
residence. A forced entry was
discovered and $660 worth of
personal property, a propane
tank, trash can and electronics
were removed. Deputy Matt
Helms investigated.
On Sept. 26, John D. An-
till of Crawfordville reported
a criminal mischief. Someone


punctured the victim's car tire.
Damage was estimated at $100.
Sgt. Danny Harrell investi-
gated.
On Sept. 26, April J. Zanco
of Crawfordville discovered
a wallet in the parking lot at
Champs Restaurant in Craw-
fordville. The victim was iden-
tified as Kyla A. T. Fountain
of Tallahassee. Deputy Scott
Powell took possession of the
wallet.
On Sept. 26, Candice M.
Allen of Crawfordville reported
a criminal mischief at her rental
home. Former tenants allegedly
wrote about the victim on the
cabinets. A forced entry was
also discovered at the home.
Deputy Scott Powell and Sgt.
Scott DelBeato investigated.
On Sept. 26, a vehicle
burglary was reported by Benjai-
min J. Parrish III of Tallahassee
at Cherokee Sink at Wakulla
Springs State Park. A cellular
telephone and electronic equip-
ment, valued at $300, were
reported missing. The victim
reported observing someone
removing items from his unat-
tended vehicle. Deputy Nick
Boutwell investigated.
On Oct. 1, Kathryn S. Wil-
son of Crawfordville reported
the theft of 60 boxes containing
items from the Florida Wild
Mammal Association yard sale


Hunters must leave some deer behind


It is illegal to bring into
Florida carcasses of any species
of the family Cervidae (deer, elk
and moose) from 14 states and
two Canadian provinces where
chronic wasting disease (CWD)
has been detected, according
to the Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission
(FWC).
The states and provinces
where the deadly disease has
been detected are: New Mexico,
Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, South
Dakota, Nebraska, Wisconsin, Il-
linois, New York, West Virginia,
Kansas, Oklahoma, Montana,
Minnesota, Saskatchewan and
Alberta. Visit the CWD Alliance

Civil law enforcement
academy scheduled
The Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office will host a 12 week Civil-
ian Law Enforcement Academy
beginning Tuesday, Oct. 9. The
program gives an overview of
the entire sheriff's office opera-
tion.
The program is held from 6:30
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. every Tuesday.
Meals are provided. Participants
must be age 18 or older and have
no criminal record. The academy
is free.
To register for the academy,
contact Major Larry Massa at
926-0821.


FHP names interim chief


Effective immediately, Lt.
Colonel John Czernis has been
appointed Interim Director for
the Florida Highway Patrol, suc-
ceeding former Colonel Christo-
pher Knight who resigned his
position.
Colonel Czernis will serve
the Florida Highway Patrol until
a new director is named.
Colonel John Czernis earned
a Bachelor's Degree in 1981 in
Criminal Justice from Rollins
College and a Master's Degree
in 2005 in Public Administration.
Colonel Czernis is a 30 year vet-
eran of the FHP, who began his
career in law enforcement in
1974 with the Vero Beach Police
Department before joining the


Patrol in 1977. He served as a
trooper in Monroe and Orange
Counties, a traffic homicide in-
vestigator in Orlando, and a first
line supervisor in Miami-Dade
and Orange counties.
In 1994, after his promotion
to Major, Colonel Czernis moved
to Tallahassee and became the
Grants, Accreditation and Policy
Administrator for the Patrol. In
November 1996, Colonel Czernis
was promoted to Bureau Chief
and served as the agency's
Chief Training Officer.
Two years later, he was reas-
signed to the Bureau of Inves-
tigations as Chief Investigator.
In June 2003, he was promoted
to Lt. Colonel.


Web site at http://www.cwd-
info.org/ for the most up-to-date
CWD information.
"To date, no cases of CWD
have been found in Florida,"
said FWC's wildlife veterinarian,
Mark Cunningham. "Hunters can
help prevent the spread of CWD
into Florida by observing the
restrictions placed on bringing
carcasses in from other areas
where the disease has been
detected."
CWD, first identified in Colo-
rado in 1967, is a disease that
affects the central nervous sys-
tem and is related to "mad cow"
disease in cattle and scrapie in
sheep. The disease always is


fatal to the infected animalbut
there are no known cases of it
being transmitted to people, do-
mestic animals or livestock.
Hunters still can bring back
de-boned meat from any CWD-
affected region, as well as fin-
ished taxidermy mounts, hides,
skulls, antlers and teeth as long
as all soft tissue has been re-
moved. Whole, bone-in carcasses
and parts may be brought back
to Florida if they were harvested
from non-affected CWD states or
provinces.
To report sick or dead deer
suspected of having CWD, call
the CWD hotline, (866) 293-
9282.


Advertising in The Wakulla News puts
your business in front of more than
12,000 readers! Call us today.


926-7102



NOTICE OF INTENT TO
ADOPT AN ORDINANCE
The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to adopt the fol-
lowing by ordinance and has scheduled a public meeting regarding the following
before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday,
October 15, 2007, beginning at 6:10 PM, unless otherwise noted as fur-
ther shown below or as time permits. All public meetings are held in the County
Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road,
Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present
testimony.
1. Wakulla County Ordinance
ORDINANCE NO. 2007-
An Ordinance To Be Known As The Wakulla County Comprehensive
Impact Fee Ordinance; Providing General Definitions Applicable To All
Impact Fees, Providing For Rules Of Construction And Legislative Find-
ings Applicable To All Impact Fees; Imposing Parks And Recreational
Facilities Impact Fees; Providing Definitions And Findings Applicable
To Parks And Recreational Facilities Impact Fees; Adopting The Park
Impact Fee Study; Providing For The Use Of Parks And Recreational
Facilities Impact Fees; Providing For An Alternative Parks And Recre-
ational Facilities Impact Fee Calculation; Imposing Emergency Medi-
cal System Impact Fees; Providing Definitions And Findings Applicable
To Emergency Medical System Impact Fees; Adopting The Emergency
Medical System Impact Fee Study; Providing For The Use Of Emergency
Medical System Impact Fees; Providing For An Alternative Emergency
Medical System Impact Fee Calculation; Imposing Fire Rescue Impact
Fees; Providing Definitions And Findings Applicable To Fire Rescue
Impact Fees; Adopting The Fire Rescue Impact Fee Study; Providing
For The Use Of Fire Rescue Impact Fees; Providing For An Alternative
Fire Rescue Impact Fee Calculation; Imposing Correctional Facilities
Impact Fees; Providing Definitions And Findings Applicable To Correc-
tional Facilities Impact Fees; Adopting The Correctional Facilities Im-
pact Fee Study; Providing For The Use Of Correctional Facilities Impact
Fees; Providing For An Alternative Correctional Facilities Impact Fee
Calculation; Imposing Road Impact Fees; Providing Definitions And
Findings Applicable To Road Impact Fees; Adopting The Road Impact
Fee Study; Providing For The Use Of Road Impact Fees; Providing For
An Alternative Road Impact Fee Calculation; Imposing Library Impact
Fees; Providing Definitions And Findings Applicable To Library Impact
Fees; Adopting The Library Impact Fee Study; Providing For The Use
Of Library Impact Fees; Providing For An Alternative Library Impact
Fee Calculation; Imposing Correctional Facilities Impact Fees; Provid-
ing Definitions And Findings Applicable To Law Enforcement Impact
Fees; Adopting The Law Enforcement Impact Fee Study; Providing For
The Use Of Law Enforcement Impact Fees; Providing For An Alterna-
tive Law Enforcement Impact Fee Calculation; Providing For Exemp-
tions And Deferrals; Providing An Economic Development Impact Fee
Mitigation Program;providing For Accounting And Reporting Of The
Impact Fees; Providing Credit For Developer Contributions; Providing
For Changes In Size And Use; Providing For Review Hearings; Provid-
ing For Applicability; Requiring Review Of The Impact Fee Studies And
The Comprehensive Impact Fee Ordinance; Declaration Of Exclusion
From The Administrative Procedures Act; Providing For Severability;
Providing For Notice Of Impact Fee Rates; Providing For Inclusion In
The Wakulla County Code; Repealing Sections 24.101 Through 24.118
Of The Wakulla County Code; And Providing An Effective Date.
Meeting Required: County Commission 10/15/07 @ 6:10PM
Copies of applications, draft ordinance, and any related public record files may be viewed at
the County Administrator's Office located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL
32327, 8 AM to '1:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-0919. Any person desiring to appeal a deci-
sion of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony
and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should
call the Board Office at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of-
fice may be contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD number 1-800 955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770
(voice), via Florida Relay Service..


at Hudson Park. After the sale,
Wilson went to the park to pick
up the boxes and discovered
them missing. The value of the
stolen items was estimated
at $300. Deputy Mike Crum
investigated.
On Sept. 30, Christopher J.
Davis and Katie C. Stringer, both
of Crawfordville, reported a ve-
hicle theft. The victims reported
the loss of jewelry, CDs, and
cash, valued at $660. Deputy
Andrew Vass investigated.
On Sept. 29, Jeffrey S. Davis
of Crawfordville reported the
theft of an ATV from his home.
The sports equipment was val-
ued at $4,000. FHP Trooper Scot-
ty Lolley investigated a Craw-
fordville accident involving the
victim's vehicle, a motorcycle
and a 15-year-old juvenile. The
suspects, Jack David Carpenter,
18, the juvenile and Curtis Lee
Morgan, 18, were charged with
grand theft. Deputy Ben Steinle
investigated.
On Sept. 28, Lt. Scott R.
Barwick of the Wakulla County
Jail reported the introduction of
contraband into a correctional
facility. During a random check,
John Christopher Burgess, 39,
of Crawfordville, was found to
have tobacco, rolling papers and
a lighter on him. Deputy Ward
Kromer investigated.


On Sept. 28, Lt. Scott R. Bar-
wick discovered contraband in"'
the jail facility on Farell Dwight
Turner, 32, of Jacksonville.
Cigarette tobacco was found
in the pod along with an extra .
mattress, extra sheets and extra
uniforms. Deputy Ward Kromer
investigated.
On Sept. 29, Dallas W.
Miller of Crawfordville reported
a burglary at the VFW post in-.
Crawfordville. Someone broke
into the office and stole an un-
disclosed amount of cash. The,
office door and door jam were:
damaged. Deputy Sean Wheeler
investigated.
On Sept. 28, Richard R."
Mills of Crawfordville reported -
a vehicle burglary. Radio equip- ,
ment, speakers and amplifiers -
were stolen from the victim's
vehicles. The equipment in the -
three vehicles was valued at a'
total of $3,400. Deputy James
Plouffe, Crime Scene Investiga- -'
tor Melissa Harris and Sgt Mike.'
Kemp investigated.
The Wakulla County Sheriffs
Office received 835 calls for ser-
vice during the past week.
Note to our readers: The ;
people who are reported as'
charged with crimes in this .,
column have not yet been to"
trial and are therefore innocent-
until proven guilty.


Notice of Amendment of
CITY OF SOPCHOPPY
Comprehensive Plan
The City Commission of the City of Sopchoppy proposes
to transmit an amendment to its Comprehensive Plan add-
ing the Public Schools Facilities Element.
A public hearing on the proposal will be held on Monday,
October 15, 2007, at 6:30 p.m., or as soon as can be
herd in the City Hall, 100 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy,
FL. More information can be obtained and the proposed
amendments may be inspected at the City Hall (telephone:
850-962-4611).
Persons wishing to comment may do so in person at the
public hearing or by writing to the City Commission at P.O.
Box 1219, Sopchoppy, Florida 32358.
If an individual decides to appeal any decision made my the
commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim tran-
script may be required. If so, the individual should make
provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE:
Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring spe-
cial accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked
to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by
contacting Jackie Lawhon at the above address or phone:
number.



Notice of Proposed

Amendment of

Comprehensive Plan

Future Land Use Map,

City of Sopchoppy

The City Commission proposes to change the City of
Sopchoppy Comprehensive Plan, for the areas shown on
the map in this advertisement and further described:


Folio Numbers: Parcel 1
Parcel 2
Parcel 3


12-5S-03W-040-00891-000
12-5S-03W-000-00679-000
12-5S-03W-000-00678-001


The proposed amendment changes the land use from
Residential to Commercial. These are small scale
amendments affecting less than ten acres as described
in Section 163.3187(l)(c), Florida Statutes.

A public hearing on the proposal will be held on Mon-
day, October 15, 2007, at 7:00 p.m., or as soon
as can be heard in the City Hall, 100 Municipal
Avenue, Sopchoppy, Florida. More information can be
obtained and the proposed land use may be inspected
at City Hall or by calling 850-962-4611. Persons wish-
ing to comment may do so in person at the public hear-
ing or by writing to the City of Sopchoppy, P.O. Box
1219, Sopchoppy, Florida 32358.

If an individual decides to appeal any decision made
my the commission with respect to this meeting, a ver-
batim transcript may be required. If so, the individual
should make provision for a transcript to be made at
the meeting, (RE: Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursu-
ant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities
Act, any person requiring special accommodation to
participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at
least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Jackie
Lawhon at the above address or phone number.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC

MEETING

The Wakulla County Board of
County Commissioners has
scheduled a Public Meeting of the
Citizens Advisory Committee on
Infrastructure Development on
October 8, 2007 at 9 A.M. in the
Commission Complex conference
room at 3093 Crawfordville Highway
in Crawfordville, FL. Interested
parties are invited to attend and
participate.
Persons needing special access considerations should
call the Wakulla County Administrative Offices at
least 48 hours before the date for scheduling pur-
poses. The Administrative Offices may be contacted
at (850) 926-0919.






Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007


School


Student vote is high tech


In an effort to enhance the
Social Studies curriculum this
: year, Medart Elementary School
students were involved in a
S.special type of Student Council
:-Officer election on Sept. 21.
i Instead of voting on school-
,made paper ballots, the Mus-
-tangs experienced real-life vot-
" ing on Wakulla County touch
screen voting machines.
4 The event was organized
3 by Guidance Counselor Laurie
Beaton who is also the Student
Council sponsor. She worked
' closely with Supervisor of Elec-
tions Sherida Crum to provide
the voting opportunity for third,
'fourth and fifth graders.
"I wanted to provide an ex-
| perience for the students that
2 would hopefully encourage
i and excite them about becom-
" ing adult voters," she said. The
school used 12 Touch Screen
, machines and 20 fifth grade
, poll workers were trained to
\ demonstrate how ihey work to
, the young voters.
, Jan Colvin and Paul Daven-
, port of the supervisor of elec-
\ tions office served as on-site
i supervisors and trainers,
The students received "I
i, Voted" stickers and provided


Students line up for their turn at a health screening by county health department nurses.
Students line up for their turn at a health screening by county health department nurses.


Guidance Counselor Laurie Beaton with Jan Colvin and Paul
Davenport of the Supervisor of Elections office and student
poll workers Keefer Beatty, Tucker Pearce and Haley Brown.


positive comments about the
experience after voting.
At the end of the day, Medart
Elementary congratulated its
new 2007-2008 Student Council
Officers: President Josie Brooks;


Bears beat Rattlers;


The Riversprings Middle
School Bears football team
improved to 3-0 on the season
with a 29-14 victory over the
FAMU Rattlers on Tuesday,
Sept. 25.
Once again the Bears were
tough on defense, while the
offense scored its highest point
total of the year,
Defensively RMS was led by
Luke Taylor and Mike Aikens.
Taylor had four tackles on the
night, with one sack and a
forced fumble. Aikens also had


four tackles. Mikal Cromartie,
who had three tackles and one
interception, Bubba Murray,
who had three tackles and a
fumble recovery, and Dalton
Norman, who ripped the ball
from a Rattler and returned it
53 yards for a touchdown, also
shined on defense.
Ryan Henderson also had
some big hits in the game. The
starting defense did not give up
any points and only allowed
nine total yards on the night,
said Coach Joe Jacobs.


Vice President Adam Dodson;
Assistant Vice President Nico-
lette Anico; Treasurer Taylor
Vernon; Secretary Kyleigh Sand-
ers; and Sergeant-At-Arms Haley
Carlton.


go to 3-0
The Bears were led offen-
sively by Demetrius Lindsey
and Dillon Norman. Demetrius
picked up 42 yards on nine
carries with two touchdowns,
and Dillon racked up 76 yards
on seven carries with one
touchdown.
RMS will be back in action
Thursday, Oct. 4 at Taylor
County. The Bears will return
home to play Franklin County
on Tuesday, Oct. 9. Both games
will be played at 6 p.m.


Health screening
at Crawfordville
On Tuesday, Sept. 25, com-
munity members joined forces
to provide health screenings for
Crawfordville Elementary School
students.
Wakulla County Health De-
partment nurse Lori Lawhon,
Wal-Mart's Optical Department
Manager Matthew Kirksey, FSU
College of Nursing students, and
Crawfordville Elementary parent
volunteers were all on hand to
individually screen kindergarten,
first, and third grade students.
Professional health volun-
teers focused on height, weight,
vision and hearing. School
partnerships with local busi-
nesses, universities, community
agencies and parents help to
grow academically, socially and
physically fit students at Craw-
fordville Elementary School. "A
big Cougar thank you goes out
to all," said Assistant Principal
Kim Dutton.
WHS school advisory
meeting Oct. 11
The Wakulla High School
Advisory Committee will hold
a meeting on Thursday, Oct.
11 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in.the
school media center. The pub-
lic is invited to attend. Sunny
Chancy is the committee chair.


October 1 October 5
WAKULLA ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
Monday: Chicken parmesan, yellow rice, green beans, yeast roll,
mixed fruit, milk.
Tuesday: Ham-mac & cheese casserole, steamed broccoli, fluffy
biscuit, strawberry cup, milk.
Wednesday: Oven fried chicken, whipped potatoes, fluffy biscuit, banana, milk.
Thursday: Salisbury steak w/rice, mixed veggies, yeast roll, peach cup, milk.
Friday: Ham & cheese on bun, seasoned green beans, fruit, milk.
MIDDLE SCHOOLS & WHS
(Choose One) (Choose Two)
Monday: Oven fried chicken w/biscuit, Baked beans, mixed veggies, or-
ham-mac & cheese casserole, angewedges, peaches, strawbemes
fish nuggets
Tuesday: Chicken on bun, beef-a-oni Broccoli, tossed salad, pineapple,
wholl,comdog apple, mixed fruit
Wednesday: Oven fried chicken w/biscuit, Baked beans, mixed veggies, or-
ham-mac & cheese casserole, angewedges, peaches, strawberries
fish nuggets
Thursday: Chicken on bun, beef-a-oni woll, Broccoli, tossed salad, pineapple,
comdog, (Or) Chefsalad w/cackes apple, mixed fruit
Friday: Oven fried chicken w/biscuit, Baked beans, mixed veggies, as-
ham-mac & cheese casserole,
fish nuggets sorted fruits
Riversprings Middle and Wakulla High Menus Available Online


Ift'sOur^


cuity.Spotlight

Dr. Thomas Waller always believed he
would go into research to explore the
ideas of the social world, but that was
Before he was bitten by the teaching
bug. "What I enjoy most about teaching
is the interaction with students, seeing
the light bulb go on and that recognition
.. ,of something new," he says

TAoiology professor at Tallahassee Community College,
laler launched his teaching career when he entered
dhe.classroom as a graduate assistant at the University ol
ttmia San Diego.Since earning his Ph.D. in Sociology
QfllCSD in 1992, he has held teaching positions on both
if the country- first as an adjunct at six different
iesiJnLos Angeles, then.at Boston University, and
1',i Jyflynding up in Tallahassee five years ago. He explains
j taing feels natural to him because the best thing you can
:kth knowledge is try to.pass it along to others"
IrYWallers passion for teaching is evident when he talks
-his newly developed Global Issues class. An inveterate
:AleYer himself, he recognizes that his class may be the
Sff'exposure that students have to global issues such
-t'Aiternational inequality, environmental problems, and
o-. raf diversity. "I try to make the class relevant to students'
4fi';. find the connection between where they're at and
3'I i -out there in the rest ot the world." He acknowledges
'tha-stijdents may be overwhelmed at first, but he hopes that
e. ipg-them to global issues will open new avenues o
thinlkng, and give them a sense ol appreciation for their own
A the world.

er is the Faculty Senate Chair Elect, actively participating
-.merous committees and activities across campus.
f his greatest interests is the Write to Learn initiative,
.tfiexplores ways to get students to learn through writing
,' ihg -forces you to think," he explains. "Through writing
19 make the material their own, master course content.
~asJOfesllons, and express coherent ideas"

T.ari-mbre about the Write to Learn initiative at TCC,
Ii olllert@tcc.fl.edu. ,


Advising and
Registration
for Spring 2008
Current Students
October 1-31
Current students may participate in
priority advising and registration
during the month ol October Log on
to m 'success.tcc.1l edu to update your
advising and registration information
before registering lor classes.


TCC Spirit Day
October 3, 11 a.m.
Intramural Fields
Be a part ol the inaugural TCC Spirit Day
Music, games and entertainment are lust
part of what in store Free blood also
available lor students, faculty and stall
Catch the Blue & Gold Spirit'


No Go Gala,
sponsored by
the TCC Alumni
Association
October 6
Support TCC students Irom the peace
and tranquility of your own home
Rela, and kick back knowing Ihat
your contribullon will help deserving
students attend Tallahassee Communitlv
College lor years to come
For more information, contact
the TCC Alumni Association at
(850) 201-6065.


0f0


TheatreTCC! presents:
October 11-13 18-10. 8 p.m.
Turner Auditorium
Thi heartbrel,g memory play allows us to
peal' inio the world o the doomed WinghelB
family Ama.dnda sa laded Southern belle who clings to memories ot her genteel past
on the MisKissippi Delta She shares her world, a dingy SI. Louis apartment, with
her iwo grown and Iroubled children The themes of this staple ol American literature,
speak as loudly to us today as ever--managing single households. coping with parental
e-peclatioris. and our nmid-lile disappointments Hailed as one of Tennessee Williams
masterpieces, The Glass Menagerie is a timeless drama of power, tenderness, and beauty
For tickets, call 644-6500.


Wakulla Center
Offering courses for the Green Guide Certificate Program


Ecotourism/First Aid
Monday, October 1
6 9 p.m. $32
Wakulla Landscape I
Tuesday, October 2
6 -9 p.m., $29
Business Basics II
Wednesday, October 3
6 9 p.m., $29
Wakulla Springs Field Trip
Sunday, October 7
1-5 p.m., no charge


Creating Web Pages
& Web Marketing I
Monday, October 8
6 9 p.m., $29
Wakulla Landscape II
Tuesday, October 9
6- 9 p.m., $29


Historical and Cultural Sites
Field Trip I
Sunday, October 14
1 5 p.m., $29


Creating Web Pages
& Web Marketing II
Monday, October 15
6 9 p.m., $29


Wakulla Geological Features
Tuesday, October 16
6 -9 p.m., $29


Forest Field Trip -
Leon & Wakulla Sinks
Sunday, October 21
8:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m., No charge
Traditional Marketing and Brochure
Development
Monday, October 22
6- 9 p.m., $29


Nature Based Laws & Rules -
Panel Discussion
Tuesday, October 23
6 9 p.m.. $29


Reptiles in Wakulla County
Wednesday, October 24
6 9 p.m., $29
Advanced Business and Legal Issues
for Small Businesses
Monday, October 29
6 9 p.m., $29


Birds of the Region
Tuesday, October 30
6 9 p.m., $29


Go to www.tcc.fl.eduiti for registration and a schedule of classes.


------KFEP IT CLEAN








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007-Page 15A


Stevens
Continued from Page 1

Appraisal Report (EAR) to the
Florida Department of Com-
munity Affairs (DCA) by a recent
deadline.
"It has been going fine," she
said of her first few weeks on
the job. "There is a lot going
on."
"The (planning) staff did a
great job maintaining the of-
fice on an even keel," Stevens
added. "This staff really stepped
up."
Following Sparkman's de-
parture, Melissa Corbett served
as interim planning director
and Code Enforcement Officer
Jamie Baze served in the same
post after Corbett asked to be
returned to her original Planner
2 position.
Both Corbett and Baze said
they were pleased when Ste-
vens arrived which allowed
them to return to their regular
tasks.
Stevens' first task is to make
sure the EAR is completed and
accepted by the state agencies.
A public hearing to discuss the
"'major issues" of the EAR has
been scheduled for Thursday,
Oct. 4 from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in
the Wakulla County Senior Citi-
zens Center in Crawfordville.
The EAR evaluates how well
the county Comprehensive
Plan is serving the community.
The plan will address how the
county can best address growth
over the next seven years, she
said.
"I anticipate building bridges

Letters
Continued from Page 2A

very own article with a big, bold
headline, while a murderer got
nothing more than a little spot
in the Court Shorts.
What has my dad done to
warrant this kind of attention
and abuse? Nothing, but try to
make this county a better place
for everyone and expose a few
people who do nothing short of
rob Wakulla County.
The only crime my father is
guilty of is loving this county.
When did that become illegal?
To the probation officer who
feels that my father "poses a risk
to thq community" and should
receive a prison sentence, you
are not the judge or the jury. My
father is a kind and gentle man
who has five children and five
grandchildren. He is human just
like everyone else. We all make
mistakes.
How can a man who has
accompanied me on all my
field trips, coached softball at
the recreation park for many
years, volunteered to help run
concession stands at Wakulla
High and generally helped out
whenever he could be a threat
to our society?
Don't believe the hype. John
Trice is a wonderful person.
Melinda Trice
Crawfordville


Thanks for success of
Wild Mammal yard sale

Editor, The News:

The Florida Wild Mammal
Association bi-annual yard sale
was a great success. It could not
have happened without the help
of many people.
I wish to thank: The CCOW
group, especially Victor Lambou,
Hugh Taylor and Jimmie Doyle,
for the use of their sign and
spreading the word about the
sale;George at Nad's Mini Stor-
age; the Sheriff's Office, especial-
ly Major Larry Massa, Sgt. Mike
Alley, Deputy Sedwick Williams
and the work release crew; Tasty
Creations by Sweetwater Blues
for the yummy treats brought
Saturday morning; all of the
FWMA volunteers:Nancy Gabri-
elsen, Karla Brant, Gigi Cavallaro,
Tisha Womack, Mary Kathryn
Westmark, Shirley Hanifer, Bar-
bara Shugar, Brenda and Joel De-


Volentine, Judy Cooke, Jim and
Linda Guy, Gail Thorton, Glenda
McCarthy, Miriam Curving, Grant
Peoples, and anyone who came
to help that I may have forgotten
to thank. And the two wonderful
Blue Grass Groups that sang for
us on Saturday.
Our next sale will be held
Friday, Jan. 11, 2008 and Satur-
day, Jan. 12, 2008 and you may
drop off donations at the park
pavillion on Thursday, Jan. 10
, after 5 p.m.
Once again, Thank you all.
Kathryn "Kat" Wilson
Crawfordville


Planning and Zoning staff members, front row from left, Melissa Corbett, Lindsay Stevens,
Jamie Baze, Somer Strickland. Back row from left, Chris Lesser, Sybil Taylor and Pamela Joy.


with Tallahassee and the adja-
cent counties and municipali-
ties," said Stevens. "There are
regional issues out there that
don't stop at the county lines."
Stevens has spent time meet-
ing members of the community
as they visit her office.
Her staff now includes GIS
Specialist Chris Lesser, Adminis-
trator and Budget staff member
Pamela Joy, Planning Technician
Somer Strickland, Planner II Me-
lissa Corbett and Cartographer
Sybil Taylor.
Stevens said she does not
see any reason why Wakulla
County will not continue to
grow. The attractive assets in-
clude its people, natural beauty
and the school system.
"The people move here for
the quality of life," said Stevens.


Crum
Continued from Page 1
and pick up all she needed to
know without help.
She plans to assist the win-
ner of the 2008 election by pre-
paring a transition plan. "There
is so much more to this office
than there was back then," she
said. Many of the state legisla-
tive changes came as a result of
the 2000 election controversy.
Looking back at 1984 statis-
tics, Wakulla County had nine
precincts and 6,980 registered
voters. The office had one desk,
one filing cabinet and no com-
puter equipment. There were 11
voting machines that worked
with levers and curtains that
opened and closed as voters
voted.
When she realized the old
voting equipment was outdated
and posed a threat to break
down during elections, Crum
changed voting systems in 1986.
The 1986 system was a punch
card and card reader operation
that worked well for her.
One election night the card
reader broke down and a ser-
viceman was called from sev-
eral counties away to fix the
problem. The serviceman roared
through the surrounding coun-


"But the secret has started to
get out. There are positives and
negatives to growth. There is
also the'desire (in the county) to
have things stay the same."
Stevens has a varied back-
ground as her professional ex-
perience includes several years
in Jacksonville working for the
Trust For Public Lands. She
worked for the Trust in convey-
ing land into public ownership.
As a member of the Florida Bar,
she worked as an attorney for a
firm in Orlando.
A native of Northern Cali-
fornia, she has lived in Texas,
Illinois, Washington state and
Florida. She has degrees from
Winthrop University in Rock
Hill, S.C. and Florida State Uni-
versity.
Stevens met her husband


ties with law enforcement
escort as heavy fog covered the
Big Bend area. Crum shook her
head in amazement as memo-
ries of some of the experiences
flooded back.
As of 2007, Wakulla County
has 16,847 voters, 92 voting
booths, one ballot box per 12
precincts and everything has be-
come computerized. There were
60 pollworkers in 1984 and there
are now 95 indivdiuals helping
out on election nights.
"It's a whole lot more compli-
cated and difficult," she said. "I
grew with it over the years. I will
give my best regards to whoever
wins, because they have a lot to
learn. But I will leave them in
good shape. When I came into
office there wasn't anybody here
to teach me."
Crum took over for Elnita
Burke following the 1984 elec-
tion. Burke replaced Nell Russ in
the middle of her term around
1982. Clerk Moody Pierce helped
with the elections before the
law changed and more of the
duties fell upon the supervisor
of elections.
The largest precinct, Craw-
fordville, has 3,620 voters in
2007, but in 1984 only 1,713
people voted in Crawfordville.
The smallest precinct is rural
Smith Creek. The number of vot-


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Leon Propane
4750 Woodville Hwy
Tallahassee, FL 32305


at FSU and married in 2000.
In February, the couple wel-
comed their son, Ryan, into the
world.
She said she has been famil-
iar with Wakulla County since
1996 and has witnessed some
of the changes experienced
by residents as a result of the
growth. She regrets not having
the chance to meet Roger Stok-
ley who died in 1995.
Heath Stokley graduated
from Wakulla High School in
1992 and has gone on to be-
come an attorney specializing
on local government, land use
and environmental law.
"It's definitely a challenge,
but certainly one worth tak-
ing," she concluded. "I hope I
can help."


ers increased from 121 in 1984
to 162 today.
Crum's close friend and
Deputy Supervisor of Elections
Jan Colvin retired from her post
on Sept. 30. The staff includes
three fulltime positions and a
part-time post. The office moved
from the courthouse to the old
Department of Children and
Families building prior to the
2006 election. "I've really en-
joyed this location," she said,
The 2008 election season will
come quickly as the Presidential
Preference Primary will be held
Tuesday, Jan. 29. The first prima-
ry will be held on Tuesday, Aug.
26 and the General Election will
be held on Tuesday, Nov. 4.
"I plan to do more church
work. I'll still be around and
involved in the community," she
concluded.


Senior citizens who
are at least 62 years old and
have equity in a home, should
never spend their time
worrying about money. A
Federal Government program
now makes it possible to
replace that worry with real
money that belongs to you
already. You can utilize the
money for just about
anything, without ever having
to make payments.
You worked hard to
build equity in your home.
Isn't it time for that equity to
work hard for you?
This is now possible
thanks to a Home Equity
Conversion Mortgage created
by the Federal Government's
Department of Housing and
Urban Development.
1. Eliminate your
current mortgage
2. Pay medical expenses
3. Supplement income
4. Supplement savings
5. Make home repairs


6. Provide financial
assistance to family
members
7. Establish a line of
credit that can be used
if needed in the future
8. Vacation and travel
There is never a risk of
losing your home and you are
free to sell or refinance the
home, without penalty, at any
time. All money received is
tax free and has no effect on
Social Security or retirement
income.
A free report reveals how
citizens of Wakulla County
can utilize this opportunity to
ease financial burdens for
themselves, or their loved
ones courtesy of this United
States Government insured
assistance program.
For more information,
call the Consumer Awareness
hotline for a free recorded
message, anytime 24 hours a
day at 1-888-812-33 6,.
ext. 8. .


Advertisement


WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION SCHEDULE

WORKSHOPS PUBLIC HEARINGS MEETINGS

2007 CALENDAR


October 1, 2007




October 1, 2007


October 4, 2007



October 15, 2007


October 15, 2007


October 15, 2007



November 5, 2007


November 5, 2007


November 19, 2007




November 19, 2007


Workshop: Development Agreements
And Best Practices for Planning and
Community Development
Commission Chambers

Regular Board Meeting
Commission Chambers

Public Hearing: Evaluation & Appraisal
Report (EAR)
Commission Chambers

Workshop: Wakulla County Airport
Commission Chambers

Regular Board Meeting
Commission Chambers

Public Hearing: Awards and Presentations
Ordinance
Commission Chambers

Workshop: Road Paving Issues
Commission Chambers

Regular Board Meeting
Commission Chambers

Workshop: Renaming Lower Bridge
Road to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Memorial Road
Commission Chambers

Regular Board Meeting
Commission Chambers


5:00 P.M.




6:00 P.M.


6:00 P.M.



5:00 P.M.


6:00 P.M.


6:00 P.M.



5:00 P.M.


6:00 P.M.


5:00 P.M.




6:00 P.M.


All Workshops, Public Hearings and Commission Meetings are open to the public. Wakulla County does not discriminate on
the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age or handicapped status in employment or the provision of services.
Handicapped individuals may receive special accommodations with one working day's notice as per section 286.011(6) F.S.
If special accommodations are required, please call Debbie DuBose, Executive Assistant to the County Administrator at (850)
926-0919.


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Page 16A- THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007


Issues

Continued from Page 1A

Commissioner Maxie Lawhon.
"I don't think it will ever hap-
pen."
Lawhon suggested having
more recommendations from
the community development de-
partment when citizens submit
planning and zoning requests.
Without a department direc-
tor in the past 11 months, the
department has presented the
citizen requests without making
recommendations of approval or
denial to the board.
"We'll get there," said Stevens
of planning and zoning improve-
ments. She estimated that the
EAR will take 18 months to
complete and the first draft will
be ready by Jan. 1, 2008. "It's not
an overnight fix," she said.
"Did we start off with some-
thing that was decent?" asked
Commissioner Howard Kessler
of the original Comprehensive
Plan.
"I've heard a couple of opin-
ions on that," Stevens responded.
"We've got what we've got. How
do we fix it and move forward
with it."
"It's really not what we start-
ed off with," said Commissioner
Kessler. "It has evolved."
Commissioner Brian Langston
thanked everyone for their input
and said additional workshops
will be held on the topic in the
coming weeks.


School gets

training in

software

School administrators from
the Panhandle Area Educational
Consortium (PAEC) participated
in a Classroom Walk Through
(CWT) training recently to up-
date their knowledge and skill
in working with new software
published by TeachScape.
The training is one compo-
nent of Leadership PAEC, a lead-
ership development program for
school leaders in PAEC member
districts like Wakulla.
The CWT consists of school
administrators conducting two--
to-four-minute classroom visits
to take a "snapshot" of what is
going on with instruction in the
classroom setting. Observations
are recorded on a hand-held
computer and saved until the
administrators return to their
offices to generate data and print
reports about what was seen and
if the teacher is teaching appro-
priate standards relevant to the
requirements of the subject.
Teachers from two school dis-
tricts participated in the training
at Riversprings Middle School in
Crawfordville.
Principal Dod Walker of Riv-
ersprings Middle School was
joined by Tanya English, Princi-
pal of Crawfordville Elementary
School and Kimberly Dutton, As-
sistant Principal at Crawfordville
Elementary School.


War Eagle

golfers 2nd

The Wakulla War Eagle golf
team placed second in a four
team match against Leon, Florida
High and Port St. Joe on Tuesday,
Sept. 25 at SouthWood Golf
Club.
Leon won the match with a
score of 151. Wakulla scored a
156 and Florida High came in
with a 188. Port St. Joe had a
score of 189.
Wakulla was led by Stone
Cowie with a score of 37 fol-
lowed by Spencer Smith at 39,
Warren Hess at 40 and William
Davis at 40. Leon and Florida
High had golfers with lower
individual scores, but Wakulla's
balanced team helped the War
Eagles top two of the three op-
ponents.


Leave Wothvns But
Your Footprvlnts









K~eep' Waku((a
County Beautlful


WMS beats Franklin Co.


Pizza fundraiser for cheerleaders


Thanks to Champs Pizza and Wings and Winn-Dixie in Crawfordville the Wakulla High
School varsity cheerleaders were able to sell pizza and soft drinks to their fellow students
for an end of the school day snack on Friday, Sept. 28. "The fundraiser was a great success,"
according to WHS Cheerleading sponsor Kasey Hollington.


Sam Myrick honored


Principal Mike Crouch of Wakulla High School
announced this weekt that Samuel Myrick has
been named a Commended Student in the 2008
National Merit Scholarship Program.
A Letter of Commendation from the school
and National Merit Scholarship Corporation
(NMSC), which conducts the program, will be
presented by the principal to this scholastically
talented senior.
About 34,000 Commended Students through-
out the nation are being recognized for their
exceptional academic promise.
Although they will not continue in the 2008
competition for National Merit Scholarships,
Commended Students placed among the top
five percent of more than 1.4 million students
who entered the 2008 competition by taking
the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship
Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT).
"The young people named Commended Stu-
dents in the 2008 National Merit Scholarship
Program are distinguished by their strong aca-
demic performance in this rigorous competition,"
commented a spokesperson for NMSC.
"Our nation's pursuit of educational excellence


can be furthered by publicly honoring these
outstanding students and by acknowledging
the important role schools play in fostering their
development. We hope that this recognition will
contribute to their educational opportunities and
encourage all students to strive to realize their
potential."
Samuel Myrick has also been recognized by
the College Board's National Hispanic Recognition
Program, as announced by the principal.
This program, established in 1983, is a College
Board program that provided national recogni-
tion of the exceptional academic achievements
of Hispanic high school seniors and identifies
them for post-secondary institutions.
Students enter the program by taking the Pre-
liminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualify-
ing Test (PSAT/NMSQT) as high school juniors
and by identifying themselves as HIspanic. This
year, more than 196,000 PSAT/NMSQT takers na-
tionwide identified themselves as Hispanic, and
more than 4,000 of those have been recognized as
National Hispanic Scholars or Honorable Mention
Finalists based upon their PSAT/NMSQT scores
and their academic achievements.


WMS hosts conference


Wakulla Middle School will
host the Florida League of
Middle Schools Conference,
"On Top and In the Middle," on
Saturday, Nov. 3.
Nationally recognized middle
school expert, Dr. Paul S. George,
will be featured as the keynote
speaker for the Nov. 3 Florida
League of Middle Schools Re-
gion 2 Drive-in Conference.
Jo Ann Daniels, Region 2
Director and Wakulla Middle
School Principal, enthusiasti-
cally announced the conference
theme as "On Top and In the
Middle" and invited all fifth
through ninth grade teachers
and administrators to WMS on
Saturday, Nov. 3. "Come share
with your peers and return
home with lots of terrific ideas,"
she said.
The Nov. 3 conference reg-
istration fee is only $40 and
includes breakfast, lunch, lesson
plan ideas, instructional strate-
gies and more. Some of the top-
ics to be presented by middle
school teachers will include:
Using Data to Improve
Student Performance;
FCAT Math Strategies;
Reading in the Content
Area;
Differentiated Instruction;
FCAT Science Strategies;
Lessons and Activities in
Social Studies;
The four paragraph essay;
Motivation and Learning
Styles;
Internet Resources; and
Brain Based Learning.


Superintendent David Miller
said he is honored to host the
conference in Wakulla County.
"Networking with colleagues
and sharing ideas tends to
spark the imagination," said
Miller. "Wakulla County middle
schools continue to be success-
ful because of the expertise our
teachers and staff so readily
share with one another. On be-
half of Wakulla County Schools,
Welcome!"
"WMS is proud to host the
first-ever Florida League of
Middle Schools Conference
in our area. All fifth through
ninth grade interested teachers
and administrators are invited,"
said Principal Daniels. "Dr.
George, our keynote speaker,
, has been the foremost middle
level expert to influence our
own school philosophy and vi-
sion. He is widely known for his
writings and extensive knowl-
edge of effective practices for
exemplary middle schools."
Breakfast will be served at
7:30 a.m. and the last session
will end at 4:30 p.m. The key-
note speaker begins at 9 a.m.
For additional information
contact Principal Jo Ann Dan-
iels at danielsj@wakulla.kl2.
fl.us; or Nancy Commander at
commandern@wakulla.kl2.fl.us.
Visit www.wakullaschooldis-
trict.org to download a copy
of the registration form and
informational flyer.
Wakulla Middle School is
located at 22 Jean Drive in Me-
dart. Region 2 includes: Wakulla,


Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden,
Gulf, Jackson, Jefferson, Liberty,
Madison, and Leon counties.






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The Wakulla Middle School
Wildcats improved to 4-0 af-
ter defeating Franklin County
Thursday, Sept. 27 by a score of
34-8 at J.D. Jones Stadium.
Will Thomas had a 52-yard
receiving touchdown, a 64-yard
rushing touchdown and a two-
point conversion. Kevin James
added a 37-yard touchdown run
and had 77 yards rushing on
four carries.
Josh Collins had a 22-yard
rushing touchdown, a 52- yard
touchdown pass and a rushing
two-point conversion. He was
five of six passing for 96 yards.
Marshane Godbolt had a 16
yard reception and two
rushes for 17 yards. Dustin
Roberts completed two of four
passes for 34 yards. Dionte
Hutchinson had a six yard rush-
ing touchdown. Kyle Bradley
had three catches for 32 yards
and Brandon Nichols had two
carries for 37 yards rushing.
"We wanted to open our of-
fense up and work on our pass-
ing attack tonight," said Coach
Scott Collins. "Our guys have
put a lot of practice time into
throwing lately and their effort
paid off tonight."
As has been the case all
season, the Wildcat defense
controlled the line of scrimmage
and limited Franklin County to
74 yards rushing. Todd Dixon,
Evan McCoy and C.J. Roberts
had three tackles each to lead
the Wildcats.
WMS has an open week next
week as Howard Middle School
cancelled the remainder of
their season and forfeited next
Thursday's scheduled game to
the Wildcats.
The team next plays again on
Oct. 11 at Liberty
County High School against
Grand Ridge. Grand Ridge com-


bined with Sneads Middle
School this year. It will be
a game that determines the
conference championship. The
game will be played at 7 p.m.
ET and will be preceded by a
5 p.m. game between the two
second place teams from the
Eastern and Western side of the
conference, Florida High and
Liberty County.
"Grand Ridge has an explo-
sive team and has dominated
their side of the conference,"
said Collins. "Our kids are very
excited and their number one
goal all season has been to win
our conference championship,
but Grand Ridge will be a dif-
ficult challenge."


Kayaking

seminar at

St. George
The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's Dr.
Julian G. Bruce St. George Island
State Park will be hosting a free
kayak demonstration seminar
on Saturday, Oct. 13.
Topics include equipment,
paddling and kayak and setup
instruction. Drinks and hot dogs
will be provided. Participants
should bring sunscreen, bug
spray and appropriate cloth-
ing.
The event will take place
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.' at the
park, 1900 East Gulf Beach Drive,
on St. George Island.
For additional information,
contact the park office at (850)
927-2111. For more information
on Florida's state parks, visit
www.FloridaStateParks.org.


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NOTICE OF
PUBLIC HEARING
The Wakulla County Code Enforcement Board has sched-
ulecd a Public Hearing on October 4, 2007 at 5:30 p.m. in
the Wakulla County Commissioners Chambers located at
29 Arran Road in Crawfordville, FL. Interested parties are
invited to attend and participate.
IPcrsons needing sp cial access considerations should call the Wakulla County
Administration Ofliccs least .18 hours before the date for scheduling purposes.
Thle .\Adninis'raLtive Ollices may be contacted at (850) 926-0919.


The Wakulla Lady War Eagles
split two matches last week
against North Florida Christian
and Rickards.
On Tuesday, Sept. 25, the
Lady War Eagles took on North
Florida Christian. After three
games, the Eagles defeated the
WHS team, scoring 25-17, 25-14,
27-25.
On Sept. 27, the team de-
feated Rickards at home, with
scores of 25-19, 25-9, 25-12. The
players leading the team in kills
were Summer Stokley with four,
Madison Hollington with four,
Hannah Lovestrand with five,
Kristin Mathers with 13, Kiara
Gay with seven, Meghan McCal-
lister with one and Kara Smith
with four.
Blocks were made by Kara
$


Smith with two, Kiara Gay with
one, Summer Stokley with two,
and Kristin Mathers with two.
Digs were recorded by Meghan
McCallister and Kiara Gay with
one each. The aces were re-
corded by Meghan McCallister
with six, Hannah Lovestrand
with three, Crystal Chadwell
with two, and Kristin Mathers
with one.
On Tuesday, Oct. 2, the girls
played Panama City Beach Ar-
nold on the road. Upcoming for
the Lady War Eagles team is an
away game at Chiles on Oct. 5.
They play against Rickards on
Oct. 9, again traveling to Tal-
lahassee.
Wakulla's record improved
to 7-3.


Volleyball team splits 2

with NFC and Rickards


Running on empty?
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well away from sparks or flames,
buildings and foliage, and make
sure the motor has cooled down
before you fill the tank.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Oct. 4, 2007-Page 17A


Wakulla Horseman's Association

holds monthly horse show
The Wakulla County Horse- Grey, Morgan Gray and Allie son and Natalie Sheffield. Cones
man's Association holds month- Sheffield. The Arena competi- featured Terri Jo Shiver, Justin
ly horse shows, mostly on third tion was held with the same Morgan, J.C. Morgan and Natalie
Saturday of the month at the four youths competing. Sheffield.
Livestock Pavilion in Crawford- Todd Porter, Morgan Gray, Arena featured Sheffield, the
ville. Dalton Gray and Allie Sheffield two Morgans and Curt Milner.
Registration for each show competed in Texas. Porter, Texas featured the two Mor-
is held at 10 a.m. and the show Sheffield, Abigail Morgan and gans, Milner and Terri Jo Shiver.
begins at noon. No show is held Morgan Gray competed in the Cloverleaf featured Sheffield,
during the month of July. Cloverleaf. Milner and the two Morgans.
A show was held on April In the Youth division, Alicia In the Senior division, Poles
21 featuring six classes. In the Porter, Lindsey Sheffield, Sum- featured Judy Sineath, Patrice
Small Fry Class, Nathan Money mer Shiver and Rachael Farmer Richert, Jessica Shepard and
and Mackenzie Crokett compet- competed in Poles. Pam Caya. The same group comrn-
ed in the Poles. Money, Lynette The Cones featured Alicia peted in Cones, Arena, Texas
Lovelace and Mackenzie Crokett Porter, Summer Shiver, Georgia and Cloverleaf. Tammie Sanders
competed in the Cones. Posey and Alyssa Porter. The also competed in Cloverleaf.
Loveless, Money and Crokett Arena included Alicia Porter, In the Novice division, Cathy
competed in the Arena as well Alyssa Porter, Kendall King Lauder, Tammie Sanders and
as the Texas competition. Na- and Summer Shiver. Texas was Julie Redman competed in
than Money, Lynette Loveless, competed by Kendell King, Ali- Poles. Sanders, Lauder Redman
Zachery Money and Mackenzie cia Porter, Georgia Posey and and Brenda Gerrell competed
Crokett competed in the Clo- Rachael Farmer, in Cones. The same group com-
verleaf. Cloverleaf was competed by peted in Arena and Texas along
In the Pee Wee Division, Alicia Porter, Lindsey Sheffield, with Gaylon Shiver in Texas.
Abigail Morgan, Todd Porter, Summer Shiver and Georgia Cloverleaf featured Lauder,
Allie Sheffield and Dalton Gray Posey. Sanders, Redman and Gerrell.
competed in the Poles. In the Junior division, Poles The association also held
The Cones competition fea- were competed by Justin Mor- shows in May, June and Au-
tured Abigail Morgan, Dalton gan, J.C. Morgan, Brittany Ben- gust.

County July jobless rate up slightly


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla County's unemploy-
ment rate continued to increase
in July, up to 3.2 percent from
3.0 percent in June and 2.6
percent in May, according to
the state Agency for Workforce
Innovation.
The Wakulla labor force
increased in June, as did the
number of employed and the
number of unemployed. The
July labor force was up to
14,958 people of which 14,485
were employed and 473 were
unemployed.
In June the labor force con-
sisted of 14,821 people of which


14,372 were employed and 449
were unemployed.
Thq unemployment rate was
also up in neighboring Leon
County, to 3.4 percent in July.
from 3.2 percent in June and
2.6 percent in May. In Franklin
County the rate was up to 3.2
percent in July from 2.8 percent
in June.
The Tallahassee Metropoli-
tan Area, which includes Wakul-
la, Leon, Jefferson and Gadsden
counties for the purpose of
market analysis, had an overall
unemployment rate of 3.5 per-
cent in July, up from 3.2 percent
in June.
The labor force in the met-


ropolitan area consisted of
186,257 people of which 179,710
employed and 6,547 were un-
employed.
The lowest unemployment in
the state was in Walton County
with a rate of 2.4 percent.
The highest unemployment
in the state continued to be in
Hendry County where the rate
was up to 9.9 percent, up from
June's rate of 7.8 percent and 5.1
percent in May.
Florida's overall unemploy-
ment rate was up to 3.9 percent
from 3.5 percent in June. The
national unemployment rate
was up slightly at 4.5 percent
in June.


Dinner, cruise at Wakulla Springs
Wakulla Springs State Park will host an eve- followed by a dinner served in the comfort and
ning cruise and dinner on Saturday, Oct. 20 at charm of the historic Wakulla Springs Lodge.
5:30 p.m. The cost is $29 for adults and $18 for children
Visitors are invited to treat someone special age 12 and younger. Reservations are suggested
to a romantic cruise down the Wakulla River and may be made by calling 224-5950.



Capital Health Plan Proudly Presents










SI

A series of lunch and learn programs for seniors who want to learn more
about creating and maintaining healthy, happy, and active lifestyles.

Join us Friday, October 5, at 12:30 p.m.

at CHP's Governor's Square Auditorium
(1491 Governor's Square Boulevard, Tallahassee, FL)

to Learn About

The ABC's of Vitamin D
Vitamin D in Muscle & Bone Health -
Presented by: John Agens, MD
Hosted by: Anna Johnson- Riedel


Dr. Agens is a board certified geriatrician
and internist and is Director of CHP's Center
for Chronic Care.

Anna is one of the most familiar faces in
Tallahassee as the former morning host for
WCTV's "Good Morning Show."


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participate, and become a Savvy Senior.

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926-7102 The Wakulla News


Coast Guard
Continued from Page 11A
money and have supported a
worthy cause."
Our Pork/Pig (his wife had
corrected him) sounded the
most interesting. Later, when
they were leaving, they stopped
to commend us for "A benefit
worthwhile" and also gave us a
nice donation.
When all was said and done,
it was a highly successful day.
We want to thank everyone who
supported the project through
ticket purchase and additional
donations. citement of Saturday,
Sunday was a very quiet. Ron
Piasecki and Michael Longan-
ecker went on patrol and took
the water samples for the FSU
Red Tide project. Recently, the
Flotilla Commanders involved
received the following e-mail
from Dr Michael J. Sullivan who
is charge of the testing.
"This past week samples col-
lected off Panama City Beach
and in St. Joseph Bay contained
the red tide organism Karenia
brevis at medium and back-
ground to very low concentra-
tions, respectively (please see
the relevant portion of this
week's red tide status report
from FWRI that I've copied be-
low). It is possible that Karenia
brevis is present in Apalachicola
Bay based on satellite imagery.
"PRESENT STATUS, NORTH-


WEST: Water samples collected
this week from Northwest
Florida detected medium con-
centrations of Karenia brevis,
the Florida red tide organism
two to 19 miles west of the
mouth of St. Andrews Bay (Bay
County).
K. brevis as also detected
at background to very low
concentrations in St. Joseph
Bay (Gulf County). Reports of
fish kills, discolored water and
respiratory irritation have been
received from the Panama City
area and portions of Walton
County. Respiratory irritation
remains possible in areas with
above background concentra-
tions of K. brevis and fish kills
are possible at concentrations
above LOWb."
In closing, Dr. Sullivan
thanked the Coast Guard Aux-
iliary personnel for helping in
this very important effort.
Carolyn Brown Treadon filed
the following news report for
Flotilla 12 at St Marks:
This week members of Flo-
tilla 12 are preparing for our
monthly meeting which will be
held at the Florida State Univer-
sity Reservation located at 3226
Flastacowo Road, Tallahassee.
The meeting will be on
Thursday, Oct. 4 at 6:30 p.m.
This is the time of year that
we will hold our elections for
the coming year for Flotilla
Commander and Flotilla Vice
Commander. Once elections are


completed, the new team will
begin planning for the coming
year and assembling their new
team of staff officers.
In addition to our meeting,
many of us are preparing for.
our re-qualifications. Periodi,
cally, crew and Coxswains are
required to demonstrate profi-
ciency in several tasks. Those,
needing to re-qualify this year.
met recently to review tasks
and prepare."

Two WHS

seniors are

National

scholarship

semi-finalists,
Wakulla High School offi-
cials said they were proud to.
have two seniors who qualified,
as semi-finalists in the 2008.
National Merit Scholarship,
Program.
Michael Andrews and Eliza-;
beth Butler will continue in the.
Merit Scholarship competition,
and hope to qualify as Final-
ists.
There will be a brief cer-
emony ceremony honoring,
these students for their accom-
plishments on Tuesday, Oct. 9,
at WHS.


Franklin Humane Society to hold concert fundraiser


The Franklin County Hu-
mane Society will benefit from
the Third Annual "Blues in the
Lot" concert on Oct. 19 and Oct.
20 in Apalachicola.
This popular event will be
held in the heart of down-
town in the parking lot next to
Apalachicola's historic Sponge
Exchange building overlook-
ing the beautiful Apalachicola
River.
A variety of crowd-pleasing
blues musicians from Tallahas-
see to Tennessee will perform.
Blues artists Steve Sternberg's
Blues & Boogie Band of Tal-
lahassee, the Charles Atkins
Blues Band of Tallahassee, Delta
Highway of Memphis, Tenn.,


Panama City's Slim Fatz "Slide
guitar extraordinary," Joe Mar-
tin and his "12 Strings" from
Milton, Fla., and Apalachicola's
own Smackwater Retrievers will
entertain the crowds.
Attendees will have the op-
portunity to make a voluntary
donation which will benefit in
part the Franklin County Hu-
mane Society.
The Humane Society will
also benefit from their on-site
opportunity to adopt homeless
dogs and cats.
Appealing door prizes in-
clude a new Fender Stratocaster
guitar, a case of harmonicas,
and a dynamic acoustic/electric
guitar.


The concert hours are Fridayk'
Oct. 19 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.
and Saturday, Oct. 20 from,
noon until 10 p.m. Attendees
are welcome to bring a chair
and cooler.
Concert sponsorships are
available. For $100 the sponsor's
name will be displayed at the
concert and the sponsor will'
receive 10 tickets.
Blues In The Lot is hosted
by Apalachicola Sponge Cow':
and & Smokehouse Antiques;
For more information, please
call 850/653-3550, e-mail to,:
ggarlick@gtcom.net. Tickets are
available at the gate or online at
www.apalachspongecompany.
com


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Page 18A- THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007


Kessler's Wakulla Gardens moratorium attempt fails


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla County Commis-
sioner Howard Kessler failed
in an attempt to declare a
moratorium on building in the
Wakulla Gardens subdivision
Monday, Oct. 1.
All he could get for support
was a second to his motion by
Commissioner George Green.
The vote for a potential morato-
rium failed by a 3-2 margin.
Kessler asked board mem-


The Wakulla County Plan-
ning and Zoning Commission
(P and Z) will consider a condi-
tional use request for a private
airstrip at their meeting on
Monday, Oct. 8.
Daniel and Barbara Crockett
have proposed a 3,000 foot by
100 foot landing strip on the
east side of Tiger Hammock
Road.
The landing strip would
follow from the road to the
Wakulla River. The Wakulla
County Commission will not
hear the matter.
In other matters in front of
the P and Z on Monday, Oct. 8:
The board will hear a con-
ditional use request from Jason
Walker of Hook Wreck, Inc. and
Panacea Marine Properties. The
request is to allow patio enter-
tainment at 99 Rock Landing
Road. The county commission
will not hear the request.


WHS cross

country

teams 4th

The Wakulla High School
boys' and girls' cross country
teams competed Saturday, Sept.
29 in the Prefontaine Classic
5K held at Silver Lake in the
Apalachicola National Forest just
west of Tallahassee. Both teams
represented the school well by
finishing fourth.
"Once again Sydney Nutting
led the girls' team with a fine
time of 21:08 on a challenging
course and finished second
overall in the girls' race," said
Coach Paul Hoover. She was
followed by Amanda McCullers,
Nina Reich, Rachel Capps, Sarah
Morgan and Susan Hansen.
On the boys side, Ben Mathers
led the way with in a time of
19:48 and was followed by Scott


bers to consider a 24 month
moratorium on residential con-
struction through the adoption
of a resolution.
"A temporary moratorium on
new residential construction in
Wakulla Gardens for a period of
24 months, or until sewer hook-
up becomes available, would
protect the integrity of the
performance-based septic tank
ordinance and avoid a double
expense to landowners who
would be required to initially in-


Joseph R and Sue B. Boyd
have requested a rezoning and
preliminary plat approval on
1.25 acres on Beaty Taff Drive at
Shell Point. The zoning change
will be from R-1 residential to
Planned Unit Development. A
total of five lots could be ap-
proved on the parcel.
-A final plat request has
been submitted for Wayne
Cooper on 1.34 acres on Par-
sons Lane in Sopchoppy. The
applicant is seeking to replat
four lots.
A final plat request has
been submitted by Bobby H.
and Voy Danzey on one acre
on Wakulla Arran Road. The
applicant hopes to replat one
lot in the Saralan subdivision,
Block B, Lot 1.
The Wakulla County Commis-
sion will hear all of the requests
except the conditional use appli-
cations on Monday, Nov. 5.


Kelly, Casey Fort, Adam Carr,
Michael Andrews, Will Harvey
and Liam Daniels. "Interestingly,
we had nine boys go under 22:00
minutes," said the coach.
Two other Wakulla County
school girls also participated in
the 5K-Open (Community) Race
after the high schoolers were
done.
Riversprings Middle School
twins and sisters to varsity run-
ner Amamda McCullers, Alena
and Emily McCullers ran with
the "big" people and served
notice that they will be a factor
next year when they enter the
high school arena. Alena ran
25:36 and finished as the 10th
overall female and Emily ran
27:15 and was the 14th overall
female.

' 926-3425 926-3655


'---- A ---M


stall a performance-based septic
tank and ultimately hook-up to
the sewer system a short time
later," said Kessler.
But Commissioner Ed Brim-
ner said Kessler gave away his
development strategy for the
county. "This clearly shows
Commissioner Kessler's hand
and where he wants to go with
the county," said Brimner. "We
can fix things and continue to
grow at the same time."
There was a mixed reaction
from the few members of the
audience who spoke to the
commission. Dana Peck asked
the board members why they
would want septic tanks in
Wakulla Gardens? "Septic there
is just a stupefying concept to
me," she said. "What kind of
a legacy do you want to leave
this county?" Peck asked the
board.
Resident Bob Danzey said he
opposed the moratorium, but
favoring linking the cost of con-
necting to sewage treatment to
the cost of putting a new septic
S. '----


tank in the ground.
Victor Lambou stated that
the moratorium will help land-
owners in the subdivision be-
cause they won't have to worry
about septic tanks. "Just have
them hook up to the sewer sy-
etm when it comes," he said.
Builder Randy Nelson said
economics have already created
a moratorium. He added that
building activity has dropped
dramatically and affordable
housing is becoming a thing of
the past in Wakulla.
Development Permit Applica-
tions (DPA) in Wakulla Gardens
topped 11 every month of 2006
except April, July and October.
In 2007, DPAs topped six only
during the months of January,
February and March when the
board was getting ready to
adopt new school board impact
fees. Since April 2007, only 11
DPAs were issued in the Wakul-
la Gardens subdivision.
Jay Culley told the board
that the moratorium does not
address the county's problem.


There are 900 septic tanks in
the ground and another 3,000
more could be added, he said.
"We have a solution. Eutaw is
working on the solution. This
does nothing to address the
problem."
County records note that
909 housing units have been
constructed in Wakulla Gardens
and another 2,426 lots remain
vacant.
"This will stop 30 to 40
septic tanks in the next few
months, not the 900 that are in
the ground," Culley stated. The
moratorium will not address
the pollution threat that exists
now, but will have a negative
impact on builders, real estate
people and those who rely
on the building industry, he
added.
"It's a start," countered Karla
Brandt. "It's not going to solve
the problem, but it will help."
Builder Tim Bozeman said
commissioners should be con-
centrating on how to "fast track
the sewer system" and get treat-


p


Wakulla Bank President and CEO Walter Dodson, Jr. with Ashley Savary, Heather Benton
and Will Davis, bank employees who recently graduated from the Florida School of Banking.
Wakulla Bank employees graduate from Florida School of Banking.


ment lines to the area quickly.
Wakulla County Administra-
tor Ben Pingree suggested com-
pleting the project in phases.
A representative from Eutaw
Utilities said sewer survey work
is being completed and a target
date of late spring has been set
to go out for construction bids.
Construction of the sewage
treatment lines is expected to
take 120 days.
"This is premature," said
Commissioner Brian Langston
of the moratorium request. "I'm
not going to vote for it."
Commissioner Brimner
asked Pingree to discuss the
potential phasing of the sewer
project with Eutaw. Eutaw is
working on a number of differ-
ent aspects of the sewer expan-
sion including improvements
to the treatment plant in Otter
Creek, connecting the City of
Sopchoppy to sewage treatment
and reuse of treated water at
the Wildwood Golf Course in
Medart.


3 complete

bank course
Three Wakulla Bank employees
recently graduated from the Florida
School of Banking in Gainesville.
The three-year school is designed
to provide bank personnel at the
supervisory and junior-officer
levels the opportunity to increase
their knowledge about the banking
industry and the economy.
The school, provided by the
Florida Bankers Association, offers
courses such as leadership styles,
financial deregulation, financial
statement analysis and asset/li-
ability management.
"Wakulla Bank strives for ex-
cellence in all of our customer
relations and banking strategies,"
said Wakulla Bank President and
CEO Walter C. Dodson, Jr. "We
commend these employees on
their participation in this highly
acclaimed education program."
Wakulla Bank employees who
graduated from the Florida School
of Banking: Ashley. Savary, execu-
tive assistant, Woodville branch;
Will Davis, loan officer, Centerville
branch; and Heather Benton, in-
store branch manager, Crawford-
ville Winn-Dixie branch.
i


SSturdy, October 6th from 9 to 3
Live musie cy the Nw k Shoelces o
CraHudsor di tl CrwF Dle.

*EethiDn is hd mad. & S




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Toehae M 4ra Daily Buffet M F
ie ckirs to GreaiBurgers,
I Wraps, Salads
=8/ <^and Seafood
3870 Coastal Highway Po Boys
Crawfordville, FL DINNER
SAt Wildwood Golf Course S

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| Come have a Great Meal!! HAPPY HOUR
Quick Breakfast Daily
S and Lunch Daily 4 p.m. 7 p.m.
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- 9 m


P&Z to consider


private air strip


on Wakulla River


40.
40,







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007


Section B


The


Mills


Family


Eric and Darlene Mills with children, Shannon and Dusty, and some of their animal friends.




Farm family


of year


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmiar@thewakullanews.riet
Not far from the hustle and bustle
of the U.S. Highway 319 traffic lives the
Mills family, the Wakulla County Out-
standing Farm Family of 2007. Looking
out over the 55 acres of Mills family land
it is hard to imagine the urban environ-
ment with many vehicles cruising on the
highway less than a mile away.
Being close to Crawfordville, but still
far away from the traffic is one of the
attractions of living on the family land.
There isn't much money to be made in
small farming anymore and Eric works
for his Mills and McKinnon Contracting
company. Darlene helps Eric with his
business and also homeschools son,
Dusty.
The family dog, Scooter, greets visi-
tors with a happy bark and many of the
goats and horses keep a curious eye


out for strangers walking near their
fence-line.
Eric and Darlene are native Florid-
ians who have lived in the county for 20
years. There were cows on the property
when Eric's family owned the property
years ago. He continues the tradition
with a few of them. The goats frolic
around their enclosure hoping for atten-
tion from the family members. Nearby,
the family pigs squeal in their pen asking
for attention and a bite to eat. Free range
chickens roam the property until Scooter
decides it's time to show off and chase
one for a short distance.
After trying his best to impress the
chickens, Scooter shows off his speed
and barking skills attempting to scare
the horses, being careful to stay on his
side of the fence. Eric and Darlene are
quick to point out that Scooter isn't quite
as brave when he doesn't have the fence
between himself and the horses.


Darlene became president of the
Wakulla County Youth Fair Association
through her children's interest in raising
pigs for the annual swine show. Both
Shannon and Dusty have been involved
in the swine show, and Dusty has had
grand champion hogs. He plans on enter-
ing one of the hogs in the family pen in
the February 2008 show.
There is much to do on the farm, but
the Mills family loves the experience.
"It takes all four of us," said Darlene
of farm management and upkeep. "It's
non-stop."
"I've got a lot of help," said Eric of
his family members. "There is always
something that needs to be fixed or im-
proved." Darlene joked that goats don't
seem to care if the family is dressed to
go to a wedding. "They just want you
to help them get their head out of the
fence, now," she said.
In addition to the smaller animals


and birds, the Mills family has a quar-
terhorse and three adopted government
mustangs as well as Tupelo honey
bees.
"It's a hobby," said Eric. "I like the
lifestyle," said Shannon. "It builds a re-
ally good work ethic in the children,"
said Darlene. "We don't have cable
television or satellite. I like to expose
kids to something besides games and
TV. The swine show is a great learning
experience. The kids can win $1,000, so
it's very rewarding."
Darlene calls the family farm "relax-
ing" while Eric agrees. "It's an escape.
You can forget (worries) it."
The goats have multiplied recently
because the Mills' can't bear to get
rid of any of them. "They are so darn
cute," said Darlene. "We haven't sold
any yet."
See FARM FAMILY on Page 2B


"I highly recommend Wakulla Bank. They
helped me bring my business to a new level."


For Theophalis McBride, the point of running his night club is to give
people a place to come out and have a good time. When he decided to
really let the good times roll, he talked to Wakulla Bank.


Additional parking. A 5,000 square foot addition. Wakulla Bank's loan officers
were able to walk him through the process and make it all happen.


From business checking, to loans, to merchant cards, Wakulla Bank
S has the services that businesses need most. When you have a vision,
you need a bank that can help make it real. That's Wakulla Bank.


Your Life. Your Business. Your Bank.


T....D


t1 FQAL OUSh LENDEa


BANk.com
www.wakullabank.com


iVi








Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007


Business


Panacea firm -



SPI puts the' -


'gourmet' in



restaurant .


kitchens


Triples square footage

in recent expansion

SPI restaurant equipment and Supply, LLC. in equipment
panacea is owned and operated by George and brands lik
Iebecca Black and their son, David, along with Randall, M
Martha Jeffers their showroom manager. APS, Hatcc
: SPI started as a division of Southpoint Indus- in good wi
tries, Inc., a material handling company which "SPI lov
the Blacks have operated with various names for front to th,
more than 43 years. kitchen eq
.. "SPI opened in January with a 2,000 square foot machines,
showroom and it has grown so fast we decided bar equipn
to'incorporate SPI as an LLC," said George Black. and lightix
"We enlarged the showroom to 6,500 square feet "Restau
keeping the original 2,000 square feet for small mixed var
wares." have it all.
The showroom is open Monday through Fri- ing the en
day from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. "We wi
to 3 p.m. SPI serves restaurants and food service beginning
operations throughout the southeast. be there fi
:SPI invites the public to visit the showroom their dish
kitchen shop to browse through the gourmet emergency
itens and high quality commercial kitchen small Black in
iares. and they v
SPI offers the largest variety of new and used best prices
restaurant equipment in the area. It features "SPI's fi
brands like Tri Star ranges, Beverage air refrig- working w
eration, Hoshizaki Ice machines in several sizes you want (
including two under the counter models that can Black conc
be built into your cabinets as well as models up "We wa
to .2,000 pounds per day for heavy users, new shove
1 SPI constantly buys out entire restaurants and something
removes all of the equipment and ships it to the or home."
showroom where it is cleaned and every piece of The est
.qtiipment is tested so The Blacks can guarantee Highway i
what they sell. 984-4406.
SSPI has the largest selection of used restaurant


SPI owners George, Rebecca and David Black join the Wakulla Chamber of Commerce in a ribbon-cutting ceremony.


t in North Florida. Featuring name
e Blodget, Wolf, Vulcan, Beverage Air,
AcCall, Vollrath, Star, Vitamix, Warring,
and many other famous brands, all
working order.
res to do entire restaurants from the
e back, we furnish everything from the
uipment, dishes, flat ware, glasses, ice
tables, booths and chairs, including
nent," said Black. "We even have d&cor
ng."
grants can chose from all new to a
iety of new arid used," he said. "We
We can help with planning and design-
tire restaurant if needed.
11 work with our customers from the
right through opening day and will
or them as long as needed. We stock
and flatware patterns for reorder and
es."
[vites the community to bring in plans
rill be glad to quote you promising the
S.
friendly, efficient staff look forward to
'ith you every step of the way whether
one soup ladle or an entire restaurant,"
:luded.
Lnt to see you and show off our great
vroom and kitchen shop. We have
g for every one's kitchen, restaurant
:ablishment is located at 872 Coastal
n Panacea. For more information, call


P'IZ

-1. iqimm


The SPI showroom displays a wide selection of commercial kitchen and dining equipment.
The Panacea firm services restaurants and commercial kitchens throughout the Southeast.


Farm family
., Continued from Page B
The Mills' have been on their
Crawfordville property for four
years. The busy crew includes
Shannon, balancing biology
studies at Florida State Univer-
sity, and Dusty, dual-enrolled at
T411ahassee Community College
and being home-schooled. The
children are not sure where
their secondary studies will lead
them, but Shannon arid Dusty
are pretty sure it won't be small
framing.
S- The Mills family will be hon-
ored in November at the an-
nual Farm Bureau Breakfast in


. 11


Crawfordville. North Florida Fair
officials plan to honor the family
as part of the breakfast this year
rather than holding a dinner in
Tallahassee.
The 66th Annual North Florida
Fair will be held Nov. 8 through
Nov. 18 at the fairgrounds in
Tallahassee. The county exten-
sion office will be creating a
county exhibit for the fair using
the "How The West Was Fun"
theme.
"It was a honor," Eric said of
the Farm Family selection. "We
weren't sure we qualified. We've
had to scale back since many
of the (animal) auction places
have closed. I guess there isn't as
much demand for it now."


RANDY MERRITT
PROFESSIONAL ENGINEER
Reasonable rates; fast turn around for all your Civil Engineering needs.
Soil boring reports & wind load
Analysis for new construction; additions; sheds
Engineered design of performance based septic systems using the county
A. approved FAST System


(850)251-8860
97 Lonnie Raker Lane
Crawfordville, FL 32327
FL Professional Engineer #52714
Florida Class "C" Wastewater Operator #0009411
Certified Residential Contractor #CRC1327521


Easy Mail






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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007- B


Deadline





Noon LA/IfIED


926-7102


S35 Cents


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Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


CATEGORIES

100 EMPLOYMENT
105 Business Opportunities

110 Help Wanted
115 Work Wanted

120 Services and Businesses

125 Schools and Instruction
130 Entertainment ,"o

200 ITEMS FOR SALE

205 Antiques
210 Auctions

215 Auto Parts and Accessories
220 Cars

225 Trucks

230 Motor Homes and Campers

235 Motorcycles and 4-Wheelers
240 Boats and Motors

245 Personal Watercraft .

250 Sporting Goods ..

255 Guns
260 Business Equipment

265 Computers and Internet
270 Electronics

275 Home Furnishings


280 Home Appliances
285 Jewelry

290 Musical Instruments

295 Building Materials

300 MISC. FOR SALE
305 Machinery, Tools & Equipment

310 Firewood Products

315 Farm & Garden EquipmentI

320 Farm Products & Produce

325 Horses

330 Livestock, Farm Animals

335 Pets

340 Plants

345 Swap, Barter, Trade A

350 Wanted to Buy

355 Yard Sales

400 NOTICES
410 Free Items aS

415 Announcements -

420 Card of Thanks

425 Occasion Cards

430 In Mertoriam

435 Lost and Found
440 Personals and Notices


V "".


500 REAL ESTATE, HOMES, MOBILES
505 Acreage for Lease

510 Acreage for Sale

515 Apartments for Rent

520 Townhouses for Rent

525 Townhouses for Sale

530 Commercial Property for Rent

535 Commercial Property for Sale
540 Farms for Sale

545 Homes for Sale

550 Homes with Acreage for
555 Houses for Rent

560 Land for Sale

565 Mobile Homes for Rent -:.' '"

570 Mobile Homes for Sale

575 Mobile Homes with Land for Sale :

580 Rooms for Rent/Roommates Wanted

585 Wanted to Rent '

590 Waterfront Homes/Land for Sale

595 Vacation Rental- .



CALL 926-7102 TODAY

Email: classifieds@thewakuHanerws.net


Legal Notice



NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
2007 TXD 033
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Deloriss Fort or
Clyde K. Carter Sr. the holder of the following cer-
tificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to
be Issued thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of the property,
and the names in which it was assessed are as
follows:
Certificate # 792 year of Issuance 2000
Description of Property
Parcel 10-3S-01W-000-04371-004
1 Acre More or Less 208.7 x 208.7 in Sec
10-3S-IW P-116-4 63 as recorded in or III P 688
Name in which assessed Wilburt Gavin, Said
property being in the County of Wakulla. State of
lorida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed
according to law the property described in such
certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the
courthouse door on the 10th day of October,
2007, at 10:00 AM.
Dated this 16th day of August, 2007.
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida
September 13, 20, 27 2007
October 4, 2007




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY
CASE NO. 07-41-FC
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST, AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS
OF SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST
2005-OPT3, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2005-OPT3,
Plaintiff,
vs
KEVEN MATHEWS; ET AL
Defendants.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HERBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated SEPT. 24, 2007
and entered in Case No. 07-41-FC, of the Circuit
Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wa-
kulla County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK
NATIONAL TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE-
HOLDERS OF SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN
TRUST 2005-OPT3, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2005-OPT3, is a Plaintiff and
KEVEN MATHEWS; MICHAEL MATHEWS; OP-
TION ONE MORTGAGE CORPORATION;
SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWN-
ERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT,
are the Defendants. I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at Front Lobby, Crawfordville
Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawford-
ville, FL 32327, at 11:00 AM on OCT. 25, 2007
the following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 11, BLOCK "1", SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION,
PHASER II, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3,
PAGE 113 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WA-
KULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from sale, if any, other thanthe property owner as
of the dated of the lis pendens must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.
BRENT X. THURMOND
As Clerk of the Court
By:Becky Whaley
As Deputy Clerk
Dated this 25th day of Sept., 2007
IMPORTANT
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a reasonable accommoda-
tion to participate in this proceeding should, no
later than seven (7) days prior, contact the Clerk
of the Court's disability coordinator at (850)
926-0905, WAKULLA CO. CTHSE., CRAW-
FORDVILLE FL, 32327. If hearing impaired, con-
tact (TDD) via Florida Relay System.
Submitted By:
Ben-Ezra & Katz, P.A.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2901 Stirling Road, Suite 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312
Telephone: (305)770-4100
Fax: (305)653-2329
October 4, 11, 2007


LEGAL NOTICE
WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COM-
MISSIONERS INVITATION TO BID WAKULLA
COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSION-
ERS INVITES YOU TO SUBMIT A BID ON THE
FOLLOWING: BID NUMBER: 2007-014
BID OPENING DATE AND TIME: October 18,
2007, 2PM EST
ITEM: HVAC MAINTENANCE SERVICE AGREE-
MENT
ALL BIDDERS MUST BE CERTIFIED HVAC
CONTRACTORS AND PRODUCE GENERAL LI-
ABILITY & W/C INSURANCE CERTIFICATES.
ALL BIDS SHOULD BE CLEARLY MARKED AS
"SEALED BID" WITH THE BID #, OPENING
DATE AND TIME.
A PUBLIC OPENING WILL BE HELD AT THE
COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR'S OFFICE
CONTACT PERSON: BILL GREEN (519-4790)
THE WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO
REJECT ANY AND ALL BIDS OR PORTIONS
THEREOF.
WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COM-
MISSIONERS, 3093 CRAWFORDVILLE
HWY,CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327
October 4, 11, 2007


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 07-104-FC
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE,
Plaintiff,
vs.
HEATHER LYNN OBENLAND, JACK CARSON
GRANGER, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGIS-
TRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR
DECISION ONE MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC
(MIN# 100077910004729113), WAKULLA BANK,
UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN POSSESSION #1
and #2, et al,
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated Sept. 24, 2007,
entered in Civil Case No. 07-104-FC, of the Circuit
Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for WA-
KULLA County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE
BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUS-
TEE, Plaintiff and HEATHER LYNN OBENLAND,
JACK CARSON GRANGER, MORTGAGE ELEC-
TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS
NOMINEE FOR DECISION ONE MORTGAGE
COMPANY, LLC (MIN# 100077910004729113),
and WAKULLA BANK, are defendants.
I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at
the FRONT LOBBY OF COURTHOUSE of the
Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crdwfordville
Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on
the 25th day of October, 2007, the following de-
scribed real property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit:
LOT 25, BLOCK Q, AMELIAWOOD, A
SUBDIVISION AS PER THE MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 6, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
If you are a person claiming a right to funds re-
maining after the sale, you must file a claim with
the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If
you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to
any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the
owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens
may claim the surplus.
Witness my hand and the seal of the court on-
Sept. 25, 2007.
BRENT X. THURMOND
Clerk of the Court
By: Becky Whaley
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff:
Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire
POPKIN & ROSALER, P.A.
1701 West Hillsboro Boulevard Suite 302
Deerfield Beach, FL 33442
Telephone: (954)360-9030
Facsimile: (954)420-5187
October 4, 11, 2007


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
FILE NO 203"7 86-PR
Probable D.vision
IN RE: ESTATE OF Richard L. Rigglo,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Richard L. Rig-
gio, deceased, File Number 2007-86 -PR, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for Wakulla, County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of which Is
3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Flor-
ida 32327. The name and address'of the personal
representative and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against the decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is served
within three months after the date of the first publi-
cation of this notice must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS .AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and person
having claims or demands against the decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is
September 27, 2007.
Personal Representative
Shari Rigglo Rosner
1400 Crestwood Court South #1401
Royal Palm Beach, Florida 33411
Attorney for Personal Representative
Deidre A. Farrington
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 488690
2887 Crawfordville Highway Suite 4
Crawfordville, Florida 32327-2173
Telephone: (850)926-2700
September 27, 2007
October 4, 2004



NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that on 10/15/2007 at
10:30 am the following vehicle will be sold for tow-
ing & storage charges pursuant to F.S. 713.78.
1996 CHRY CIRRUS 1C3EJ56H9TN154697
Notice is hereby given that on 10/25/2007 at
10:30 am the following vehicles will be sold for
towing and & storage charges pursuant to F.S.
713.78.
1982 JAGU SAJAV1241CC343304
1985 VOLV YV1AX8843F1095320
89 HONDA 2HGED6345KH506550
95 TOYT JT3VN39W3S0171896
94 JEEP 1J4FX5855RC170904
Sales to be held at Quic-Towing Inc. 3216
Springhill Rd. Tallahassee, Fl 32305
850-491-1950.
October 4, 2007


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA


Case No. 07-84-CA
LYNN COLE EDDINGER, JAMES THOMAS
WELCH, and WAYNE R. VEARIL
Plaintiff,
vs.
MINNIE F. MITCHELL, ROSCOE F. TRIPLETT,
Trustee of the Roscoe F. Triplett
Separate Property Trust, PAULA KNOWLES,
DORIS TRIPLETT DABNEY, JONNIE TRIPLETT
POWELL, RACHEL L. TRIPLETT, ROOSEVELT
FRANKLIN TRIPLETT, QMIE L. TRIPLETT
HOMER, ROSA TRIPLETT BROWN, and HENRY
TRIPLETT;
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JONNIE TRIPLETT POWELL, UNKNOWN
HEIRS OF JOHNNIE TRIPLETT POWELL, RA-
CHEL L. TRIPLETT, OMIE L. TRIPLETT HOMER,
UNKNOWN HEIRS OF OMIE L. TRIPLETT
HOMER and HENRY TRIPLETT UNKNOWN
HEIRS OF HENRY TRIPLETT; UNKNOWN
HEIRS OF RACHEL L. TRIPLETT
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Complaint for Quiet
Title for the following property:
Commence at a government concrete monument
marking the Northwest corner of Lot 6, of the
Hartsfield Survey of Lands In Wakulla County,
Florida, and run South 18 degrees 00 minutes 10
seodrtdts East alohg' said Westerly boundary,
1206.24 feet to a re-rod (marked #7160), thence
continue South 18 degrees 00 minutes 10 sec-
onds East along said section line, 435.55 feet to a
re-rod (marked #7160), thence run North 72 de-
grees 15 minutes 30 seconds East 988.29 feet to
.a re-rod (marked #7160), thence run South 18 de-
grees 00 minutes 10 seconds East 411.91 feet to
a re-rod (marked #7160) marking the POINT OF
BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING
run South 17 degrees 59 minutes 49 seconds
East 390.28 feet to an Iron rod and cap (marked
#4261), thence run South 17 degrees 58 minutes
45 seconds East 401.08 feet to an iron rod and
cap (marked #7160), thence run South 17 de-
grees 57 minutes 34 seconds East 400.97 feet to
an iron rod and cap (marked #4261), thence con-
tinue South 17 degrees 57 minutes 34 seconds
East 119.69 feet to the Northwest comer of an ex-
isting 15.00 foot access easement, as per Official
Records Book 362, pages 820-823 of the Public
Records of Wakulla County, Florida, thence con-
tinue South 17 degrees 57 minutes 34 seconds
East along said Westerly easement boundary
668.43 feet to a point lying on the Northerly
right-of-way boundary of U.S Highway No. 98 said
point also lying on a point of curve concave to the
Northwesterly, thence leaving said Westerly ease-
ment boundary run Southwesterly along said
Northerly right-of-way boundary and said curve
with a radius 2732.93 feet, through a central angle
of 00 degrees 38 minutes 05 seconds for an arc
distance of 30.28 feet, chord being South 64 de-
grees 14 minutes 08 seconds West 30 26 leel.
thence leaving said Northerly rinni-oflway bound
ary and-said curve run North I degrees 57 min-
utes 34 seconds West 1193 20 lee[t. Inence run
North 17 degrees 58 minutes 45 seconds West
401.07 feet, thence run North 17 degrees 59 min-
utes 49 seconds West 430.28 feet, thence run
florin 71 degree' 59 minutes 50 second Ea'i
30 00 leel. Inence tun Sourf. 18 degrees 00 mmn.
utes 10 seconds East 40.00 feel to the POINT OF
BEGINNING
Commence at the NortneBsr corner of the Weal
hall of Lot 6 ol. Ils Harlstield Survey and thence
run along nte East line or tme Weal hell or Lot 6
Eouin It degrees 55 minutes West a distance of
2 052 79 feel 10 a point and the Nonheasi corner
of Parcel 7 of mthe John Tilplen Estate. accoidin.
to a survey by BrowarO P Davis January 9. 196t
hence run Norin 72 agrees 05 mlnulei West
997 38 feal 1.3 a points hence run Souitr 17 deo
agree 55 minute WisI 150 least to a poir,., wnicn
s the Point of Beginning. Thence run South 72
degrees 30 minutes East a distance of 210 feet,
parallel to the West boundary of the West half of
lot 6; thence run In a Southerly direction 17 de-
grees 55 minutes West 210 feet, which line is par-
allel to the EaSt line of the West half of Lot 6,.
Hartsfield Survey, to a point; thence run North 72
degrees 05 minutes West 210 feet to the West
line of the East half of Lot 6 of Hartsfield survey to
a point; thence run North 18 degrees 00 minutes
10 seconds East 210 feet to the Point of BeginT-
ning, containing 1 acres, more or less.
Commrence'at the Northealst comer of the West
half of Lot 6 of the Hertsfield Survey and thence-
run along the East line of'the West half of Lot 6'
Sootatf Tdegrees'55 minutes'West 'a'distanceWof
2,052.79 feet to a point which is the point of be-
ginning and the Northeast corner of Parcel 7 of
the John Triplett Estate, according to a survey by
Br ward P. Davis, January 9, 1966; thence run
North 72 degrees 05 minutes West 997.38 feet to
a point; thence run South 17 degrees 55 minutes
West 150 feet to a point; thence East and parallel
to the West boundary line of the West half of Lot
6, 210 feet to a point; thence South 17 degrees 55
minutes West 210 feet to a point; thence North 72
degrees 05 minutes West 210 feet to a point on .
the line of the East half of the West half of Lot 6 of
the John Triplett Estate, and thence South 17 de-
grees 55 minutes West 434.40 feet to the South-
west corner of Parcel 7 of the John Triplett Estate;
thence In an Easterly direction and parallel to the
East line of the West Half of Lot 6 of Hartsfield
Survey a distance of 998.57 feet to a point; thence
In a Northerly direction 18 degrees 10 minutes
East 794.40 feet to the point of beginning, con-
taining 17.2 acres, more or less.
has been flied against you and others, ou.
are required to serve a copy of your W9rftenlde-'
fenses, if any, to it on MARY W. COLON, ES-
QUIRE, SMITH, THOMPSON, SHAW &
MANAUSA, P.A., Plaintiffs' attorneys,-3520 Tho-
masville Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida
32309-3469, no more than thirty (30) days from
the first publication date of this notice of action,
and file the original with the Clerk of this Court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiff's attorneys or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
DATED this 4th day of September, 2007.
BRENT X. THURMOND
By: Becky Whaley
Deputy Clerk

September 13, 20, 27, 2007
October 4, 2007


NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER
83, PART IV
Notice is hereby given pursuant to "Florida Self
Storage Facility Act Florida Statutes," Chapter 83,
part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale
by sealed bid on Thursday, October 11, 2007 at
11:00 am at the junction of Highway 98 and
Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of a Mini Self
Storage-unit containing the personal property of:
Katherine Pope
Before the sale date of October 11, 2007, the
owners may redeem their property by payment of
the outstanding'balance and costs by paying in
person at the Stow Away Center, 2669 Spring
Creek Hwy; Crawfordville, FL 32327
September 27, 2007
October 4, 2007


NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER
83, PART IV
Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage
Faciltiy Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV
that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by
sealed bid on Friday, October 12, 2007 at 10:00
a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of
Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of:
Dennis Pearson
Pat Barrena
Linda Boatenreiter
Shawn Poole
Tina Gall Morse
Before the sale date of October 12, 2007 the own-
ers may redeem their property by payment of the
outstanding balance and cost by paying in person
at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy.
September 27, 2007
October 4, 2007

WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVITATION TO BID
DATE: 09/27/07
TO: ALL BIDDERS
THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD IN-
VITES YOU TO SUBMIT A BID ON THE FOL-
LOWING DESCRIBED ITEMS:
BID NUMBER: WCSB# 07/08-06
ITEMS TO PURCHASE: FOOD/NON-FOOD
ITEMS
SEALED BIDS SHALL BE RECEIVED BY THE
WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD UNTIL:
OCTOBER 24, 2007, 4:00 PM
ALL BIDS SHALL BE OPENED A READ ALOUD
PUBLICLY, AT THE WAKULLA COUNTY
SCHOOL BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE,
69 ARRAN ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLOR-
IDA, ON: OCTOBER 24, 2007, 4:00 PM
THE BIDS SHALL BE CONSIDERED BY THE
WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD DURING.
REGULAR SCHEDULED MEETING ON: NO-
VEMBER 19, 2007
THE SCHOOL.BOARD RESERVES THE TIGHT
TO REJECT ANY AND ALL BIDS OR PORTIONS
THEREOF.
BID FORMS AND SPECIFICATIONS MAY BE
OBTAINED FROM:
WVAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
GAIL MATi-iERS SCHOOL FOOD SERVICE
69 AARAN ROAD
CRAWFOROVILLE FL 32327
ALL BIDS SHOULD BE SEALED AND CLEARLY
MARKED ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE ENVE-
LOPE SEALED BID BID #07108-06
FOOD, NON FOOD ITEMS"
ALL BIDS SHOULD BE MAILED TO.
WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
P.O BOX lo00
CRAWFORDVILLE. FL 32326-0100r
.. OCTOBER 11, 2007

Approved 09/17/07
Board of County Commissioners
Wakulla County, Florida
Regular Board Meeting
Tuesday, September 4, 2007
The Board of County Commissioners of Wakulla
County, Florida, met in regular session on Sep-
tember 4, 2.007, Et 6:00 p.m. with Chairman Brian
SLaigstdn presiding. Present were Comissioners
Howard Kessler, Ed Brimner, George Green and
Maxie Lawhon. Also present were County Attor-
ney Ron Mowrey, County Administrator Ben Pin-
gree and Deputy Clerk Evelyn Evans.
Invocation and Pledge of Allegiance provided by
Commissioner Ed Brimner.
(CD5:58) APPROVAL OP AGENDA
Commissioner Lawhon made a motion to approve
the Agenda with Planning and Zoning items 19,
20 arid 21 removed at the request of the Appli-
cant. Second by Commissioner Brimner. All for.
Motion Carried. 5-0
PUBLIC HEARING
(CD5:59) 1. Impact Fee Ordinance
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to continue
this public hearing until the next meeting so that
revisions can be made to the proposed ordinance.
Second by Commissioner Green. All for. Motion
Carried. 5-0

PUBLIC HEARING
(CD6:43) 2. Budget and Adoption of Millage Rate
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to open the
Public Hearing. Second by. Commissioner
Brimner.
Commissioner Lawhon made a motion to close
the Public Hearing. Second by Commissioner
Kessler.

(CD7:45) Commissioner Kessler made a motion
to set the Tentative Millage at 7.0 mills. Second
by Commissioner Brimner. Voting for: Brimner,
Green and Kessler. Opposed: Langston and Law-
hon. Motion Carried. 3-2
(CD8:26) Commissioner Brimner made a motion
to reconsider the last motion and vote taken on
the Tentative Millage. Second by Commissioner
Lawhon. Voting for: Langston, Lawhon and
Brimner. Opposed: Kessler and Green. Motion
Carried. 3-2
(CD8:27) Commissioner Lawhon made a motion
to set the Tentative Millage at 7.6252 mills. Sec-
ond by Commissioner Brimner. Voting for: Lang-
ston, Lawhon and Brimner. Opposed: Kessler and
Green. Motion Carried. 3-2
(CD8:28) Commissioner Brimner made a motion


to' a o p i hT70i T e as p- r


to adopt the 07-08 Tentative Budget as presented.
Second by Commissioner Lawhon. Voting for:
Langston, Lawhon and Brimner. Opposed:.
Kessler and Green. Motion Carried. 3-2
Commissioner Brimner made a motion to hold a:
Budget Workshop on Thursday, September 6,
2007 at 5:00 p.m. and Wednesday, September
12, 2007 at 5:00 p.m. Second by Commissioner,
Kessler. Voting for: Brimner, Kessler and Green .
Opposed: Langston and Lawhon. Motion Carried.:
3-2
(CD8:37) 3. FRDAP Grant Application Medart
Park Improvements Phase 2
Comm.5i,or.er Lawnon rrmde a rml.on to approve
Opt.or.' 1 & 2 Anlcn are to nla Ine public neaiing
ana authorize expenditure ol an amount rnl to ex.
cecd t10.000 i00 orm Park; & Recreato-, impactt
fee; 1or casr n rnlv.r i.,ward in- Meaart ParK im-
proverrieni Prolec Prane 2 ano approve Ine
iesoiluior. 1.3 amenr 3 re Comprehens.ve Plan
Capital Irr.prcurer e i.s Elerrent tor clude Ine Me-
dart Recreaiior PaiK, impocvementi PiOlect.
Prase 2- Second t'l Con-,m,.on.er Kessler All
for. Motion Carried. 5-0
(CD8:44) AWARDS AND PRESENTATIONS
4-H Open House September 8, 2007
(CD8:46) CONSENT AGENDA
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to approve
the Consent Agenda with the exclusion of items
(7) Approval of Resolution to Amend State Hous-
ing Initiatives Program (SHIP) Local Housing As-
sistance Plan, (15) Major Issue Meeting regarding
Wakulla County Evaluation and Appraisal Report
and checks from; bills andi vouchers H.197146
119689 and 119861. Second by Co.,r,ir:-rljrer
Lawhon. All for. Motion Carried. 5-0
4. Approval of Minutes August 20, 200"Regular
Meeting
5. Approval of Payment of Bills and Vouchers
Submitted for August 16, 2007 August 29, 2007
6. Approval of Resolution and Budget Amendment
for Additional Funding to Weatherization Low In-
come Home Energy Assistance Program
7. Approval of Resolution to amend State Housing
Initiatives Program (SHIP) Local Housing Assis-
tance Plans
8. Approval of Resolution to accept 2007-08 LI-
HEAP Funds in the amount of $6,404.00
9. Approval of State Housing Initiatives Program
(SHIP) Annual Reports
10. Approval of Resolution to amend the Capital
Improvements Element to Include the Wakulla
Equestrian Center
11. Approval of Resolution and Budget Amend-
ment for Purchase of Automai.c Exiternal Def.bni-
lators (AEDs)
12 Approal to Accept i e Giant Associalea with
the Jomni Participal.on Agreement with Florinda De-
partmneni ol Tran.portalion Regaraong the Airport
"$75,000.00 to update the Airpon Masier Piar,
and Airport Layout Plan.
13 ApprO iai .i 007 Sie-amTirEa Annual PuDl.c
HoJu .rng A"isiance Fiar.
-4. Jusl..: Ar.,silance Grant d007 Local Solicla-
t'onr, G, errir, Bc:,0ay Review
"'Eward Byrri Memorial Jualice Assislance
Granm JAGi will Do used to purchase AuFomatic
Vneracl Lcalor SofftWart. ,lor .he Wekuiae County
Sheriff's Department.-
15. "Major Issues Meeting Wai-ulia County
Evaluation and Appraisal Report
CONSENT ITEMS PULLED FOR DISCUSSION"
(CD8:48) Checks pulled 'or discussion 119746.
119689 and 119861.
Commissioner Kessler made a motion Io pac
checks 119746, 119689 and 11 8611 Second by
Commissioner Lawhon. All wcr Moion Car.ed
5-0
(CD8:58) 7, Approval of Resolul.on to ameno
State Housing Initiatives Program (SHIPI LOCal
Housing Assistance Plan.
Commissioner Lawhon made a motion to approve
the Resolution to amend State Housing InitiatIves
Program (SHIP) Local Housing Assistarn:e Plan..
Second by Commissioner Brimner. Voling for
Langston, Lawhon, Brimner and-Greet, Opposed.
Kessler. Motion Carried. 4-1
LCD9:13) 15. Major Issues Meeting Wakulla
county Evaluation and Appraisal Report
To be re-scheduled
CITIZENS TO BE HEARD
(CD9:16) 1. Al Shylkofski Unsafe Swimming and
requesting an apology from a Commissioner for
missing a Board Meeting.
(CD9:19) 2. Karla Brandt (1) Roberts Rules and
pulling items from the Consent Agenda (2) Free-
dom of Speech
(CD9:20) 3. Chad Hansen Act of requesting
Public Records
(CD9:23) 4. Michael Keys Welcome to Lindsay
tephenss the new Planning Director and Comp
Plan CP07-12.
(CD9:26) 5. Larry Roberts Budget process
(CD9:27) 6. Virginia Brock Budget issues
CD9:28) 7. Vic Lambou P& Z Director, growth In
coastal Zones
(CD9:29) 8. Dana Peck 1st Amendment and the
right to be heard, Workshops, Commissioners
serving the County, and the paying for the food
that is served at the board meetings.
PLANNING AND ZONING
16. Board of Adjustment: BOA 07-03
Appeal the Planning Commissioners decision to
place restrictions on the Conditional Use approval
for a live entertainment establishment at Outz
Too. Dorothy White is the applicant.
Commissioner Brimner made a motion to approve
the Conditional Use with the use of speakers and
amplifiers within the stipulations that were set
forth; summer Sunday hours to be from 4:00 p.m.
to 7:00 p.m. and Sunday winter hours to be from
3:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.; Special events are limited
to 4 times per year and must be at least 90 days
apart; 80 decibels from the Outz Too property
lines. Second by Commissioner Lawhon. Al for.
Motion Carried. 5-0
17. Rezoning Application: R07-10 .


Requei Ito rezone a 5 .44i.- acre parcel from AG
iAqriclture) to RR-2 Restricted to Single Family
Owellings (Rural Residenlial), This property is to-
calea on the east side of f610fitnKle Road. be,
Iteen Hicwory Hill Road .ndM Harley Davidson
Lane Edward C and Sonya R Hicks are the ip-'
pl.cants
Comm.ssioner Lawhon made a motion to approve
Rezoniln application R07-10 Gavel passed to
Commissioner Kessler and Commissioner Lang-
sion made a second to Ine motion Secono with-
Orawn Motion dies for lack of netw second
ICD10 37) 18 Sile Plan Application: SP07-10
Request to construct a 26,700 square foot corn-
merc.al building This proper is located on Craw-
foidville Hlgnway. immediately south of Ine Geo
Golf sile Mallard crossing. LLC. applicants and
Rfany Merritt is Ie ageni
Comfrii.aioner Lawnon made a motion to continue
S.le Plan Applical.on SP07-10 to Ine October 15,
2007 meeting Second by Commissioner Brimrler
All for Motion Carried 6-0
19. Comprehensive Plan Map Amendment Appli-
cation: CPO7-11
Request to re-designate the Future Land Use qn a
26 53+/- acre parcel form Rural 2 to Commerciat-
and Rurat 3. This property is located at 771 Craw-
fordville Highway and Is known' as the former
U-Haul Rental site. ; .

Big Bend, LLC. applicants and Robert RoUa is
tie agent Tris item was witnorawn oy ine app"i-
car,

20 Comprehenswe Plan Map Ahbndment Appli'
caler. CP07-12
Request to re-designate the Future Land Use on a
229 744+i. acre parcel from Agnculture to Rural 1
Tris property .s localed south of Coastal Hignipay
an west of Spnng CreeK Highway Sprnng Cree
F-arm LLC are ina applicants and RooDerfRouta is
:ne agent Tnis item was withdrawn Dy the appil
calL
21 Corpreennsive Plan Map Amendment Appli-
cation CP07.13
Request to re-designrate the Future Ladd Use orta
20.52+/- acre-parcel from Agticultur0to Rural T,
This property. Is located on the north side of,
Thornwood Road across from Greenlea Drive.
John and Janna Richardson are the applicants
and Robert Routa Is the agent. This item was
withdrawn by the applicant.
(CD10:41) 22. Compret~latve'Plan Text Amends
ment: CP07-14
Request to amend the text of the Comprehensive
Plan and amend the Inter-local Agteerent ei-
tween Wakulla County and the City of Sopchopy
and the City of St. Marks. Wakulla County Schoo
Board is the applicant
Commissioner Kessler made a moltiontto transmit
Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment CPO7-14
to DCA Segond by Cornilssioner Lawhon All
lot. MotionCarned 5-0
(CDI 1 00 Commissioner Kessler madi a motion
to eaernd this meeting to midnight or before il. all
,lems have been addressed Second by Commis-
s.oner Brimner All lor Molion Camed 5-0
General Buslhes'
(C6 1:081) 23.. R quesl or Board Dirso ion Re-
garding County Assistance rn Roatrsh Ione Pana-
cea Mfneral Springid SuboMBion .
'Commissioner Bilrtflnr e rmplto_ Jo direct
ESG toclear County Road In 'eWai Springs
Sutdivision Motion dibs for 11-orfgcori
Comitnssiner IWl~hdn made a motion thal'the
property owner is Jo clear tme roadis-nd the
County mll mtasitain inqm Second by Commis-
sboner Keaslet. All for 'Motion Carriea 5-0
(C011 26) 24 ApprtbvIf to Submit a Lt.t1 Gov-
ernmet Fund.ng'Reduesl Id Beach ReStoretion
Corntmrrswoher tKessler madflmollorn to t a
Rasoditidtautnonzrng submittal of a Lcl Iov-
errment Funding Request for the Masnes Sands
arnd Sr.eil Point Beach Resloratio.n prolecl. Sec-
ono Dy Comrrmssioner Lawhon. All for. Motion
Carned 5-0
iCD 11 28) 25 Appointment o 'Commissioners
ior Value Adjustment Board IVAB) ari~ Setting of.
VAB Hearing Date(s)
Commissioner Lawhon, Comrmlosioner Kessler
and Commissioner Grelin ware ppbited Tfo'sit on
the Value Adlustment Boerd The Board wilI meet
October 15, 17, 18, Or 19
iCD11.311 2 Follow up Regarding Proposal to
Acquire and Lease Back tne Wakulla Espo Cvicc
Center I
CQmirssoneor Br ner a motion to pursue
option 1, dtreptlrtgat ff ft.id6t.e County Atttmney to
pursue acquteolaet wacth. ,,u akulla ..xp
Association Ifclidnhg th e'Waliu;ufr.Cirimuntlty
Cariter being but on the Civic Ceir .pety.
Should these-negotiations fall, the Medalt Reora-
tion Park site will be designated for the omrrM-.
nity Center (so that grant funding for the Conu-.
nity Center Is protected). Second by C6mm5i-
sioner Lawhon. All for. Motion Carried. 5-0
:CD1 41) 27 Approval p Budget Amlendmerit
and Purchase of Ertncai0on Equipmnti,. '
Commissioner Lawli'opfa aSiniotiont prove:
the budget afniendfiletit-and the purchase of tfie
Extrication Equipment (Jaws-of-Ufe) at the Talla-.
hassee contract pricing. Second by Commissioner.
Kessler. All for. Motion Carried. 5-0

(CD11:42) 28. Ratification of Upgrading the.
weet/Ortlvus Software for Ambulance Billing and
the EMSTAR Grant Changes .

Commissioner Brimner made a motion to ratify the
EMSTAR Grant changes and pa ment. Second
by Commissioner Lawhon. All for. Motoh Carried:.
5-0
COMMISSIONER AGENDA ITEMS
COMMISSIONER GREEN
(CD11:43) 29. Renaming of Lower Bridge Road
to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Road

Commissioner Kessler made a motion to approve
re-naming Lower Bridge Road to Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr. Road. Second by Cortimissloner Greeor.
Voting for: Kessler and Green. Opposed: Lang-
ston, Lawhon and Brmner. Motion Falls. 2-3
Commissioner Lawhon made a motion to direct
staff to bring back a date for a Workshop regard.
ing the re-naming of Lower Bridge Road to Qrr
Martin Luther King, Jr. Road. Second by Colrf
missioner Kessler. All for. Motion Carried. 5-0 .
I. CD 1 O4) Commissioner Brimnar mae a motioit
to etrfend igre tlng to T17-16 44 t,
'Commisi8onier0Gree1n 116t. Y C


OWN


\










Page 4B-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007


Legal Notice


COMMISSIONER KESSLER
(CD11:55) 30. Chevron Energy Solutions
Commissioner Kessler made a motion to direct
staff-to bring back a proposed performance con-
tract with Chevron to participate in an Energy
ConServation Program. Second by Commissioner
Brimner. All for. Motion Carried. 5-0
(CDil:56) 31. County Expenditure for Meals for
Commissioners during BOCC Meetings
Commissioner Kessler made a motion that the
Commissioners will provide their own meals dur-
ing meetings on a rotational basis and that coffee
an4 cookies will no longer be provided at the
board meetings. Second by Commissioner Green.
All for. Motion Carried. 5-0
(CD12:05) Commissioner Brimner made a motion
to adjourn. Second by Commissioner Lawhon. All
for.'Motion Carried. 5-0
12:06 a.m. Meeting adjourned.


THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE C
AND FOR WAKULLA C
CIVIL DIVISION
CAS


October 4, 2007
SECOND JUDI-
OF FLORIDA, IN
COUNTY

SE NO. 07-94-FC


CITIMORTGAGE, INC. SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO CITIFINANCIAL MORTGAGE
COMPANY, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.:
JON C. LONGER A/K/A JOHN CLAYTON
LONGER; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JOHN C. LONGER A/K/A JOHN CLAYTON
LONGER; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RE-
SPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIEN-
ORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PER-
SONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS;
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; FIRST
COASTAL BUILDING SUPPLY, INC. D/B/A
FIRST COASTAL BUILDING SUPPLY, A DIS-
SOLVED CORPORATION; CAPITAL CITY
BANK; WHETHER DISSOLVED OR PRES-
ENTLY EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH ANY
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIEN-
ORS, OR TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFENDANTS)
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFEN-
DANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN
TENANT #2;
Defendants)

NOTICE OF SALE
.Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final
Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered In the
above?styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wa-
kulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situate
in Wakulla County, Florida, described as:
COMMENCE AT ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY
PERMANENT REFERENCE MONUMENT
MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH; RANGE 1
WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND
RUN THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 53 MIN-
UTES 20 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE
NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 24 A
DISTANCE OF 2230.41 FEET TO THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER OF PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN
DEED BOOK 38, PAGE 229-231 OF THE PUB-
LIC, RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 22 MIN-
UTES 25 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST
BOUNDARY OF THE AFOREMENTIONED
PROPERTY 626.10 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF SAID PROPERTY, THENCE
NORTH 88 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 20 SEC-
ONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY
OFrSAID PROPERTY AND PARALLEL TO THE
NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 24 A
DISTANCE OF 417.40 FEET TO THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF SAID PROPERTY, THENCE
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 25 SEC-
ONDS EAST 803.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING
CONTINUE THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 22
MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 740.40 FEET TO
AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE
SOUTH 87 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 58 SEC-
ONDS EAST 922.40 FEET TO A POINT ON THE
WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A
CITY OF TALLAHASSEE POWER LINE,
THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 44
SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 843.72 FEET,
THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 20
SECONDS WEST PARALLEL TO THE NORTH
BqUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 24 A DIS-
TANCE OF 572.99 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING;
LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING DE-
SCRIBED PROPERTY:
COMMENCE AT ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY
PERMANENT REFERENCE MONUMENT
MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1
WORST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND
RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 20
SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUND-
AFIY OF SAID SECTION 24 A DISTANCE OF
2230.41 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER
Of PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK
38, PAGES 229-231 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
Of WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA THENCE
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 25 SEC-
ONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY
OP THE AFOREMENTIONED PROPERTY
626.10 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER
OF SAID PROPERTY, THENCE NORTH 88 DE-
GREES 53 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST
ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID
PROPERTY AND PARALLEL TO THE NORTH
BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 24 A DIS-
TNCE OF 417.40 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST
CORNER OF SAID PROPERTY, THENCE
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 25 SEC-
ONDS EAST 1543.40 FEET TO AN OLD CON-
CRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 87 DE-
GREES 42 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST
484.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE
SOUTH 87 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 58 SEC-
ONDS EAST 438.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 25
DEGREES 14 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST
ALONG THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY F A CITY OF TALLAHASSEE
POWERLINE 257.50 FEET, THENCE NORTH 87




"Remodeling?"
I get quite a few questions from
buyers and sellers about remodel-
ing costs and possibilities. Here
are a few pointers from me and the
"This Old House" folks. Busting
the budget is everyone's biggest
fear when it comes to renovation.
Always build in a 20% cushion to
your budget and banish the words
"while you're at it" from your vo-
cabulary.


Susan

Council





Thinking about redoing your
kitchen? If you can reorganize and
equip your kitchen for maximum
utility, you may not need an ex-
pansion. Replace space hogging
shelves with pullout drawers to
double or triple your usable space.
Need more light? Before cut-
ting a big hole in the side of your
house and rearranging the fram-
ing, consider a less expensive way
of capturing light. To brighten up
a windowless bath or hallway, you
could install a "light tube," which
slips between roof rafters and fun-
nels sunshine down into the living
space. This solution typically is
one-third the cost of adding a new
double-pane insulated window.
So save a little here, save a little
there, and pretty soon you're talk-
ing about real money. For more
tips on anything in real estate, call
me and Alliance Realty.

Susan Council
(850) 251-1468
Broker/Owner, Alliance Realty Company
www.susancou ncil.com


DEGREES 42 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST
320.98 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 05 DEGREES 41
MINUTES 01 SECOND EAST 57.50 FEET,
THENCE SOUTH 04 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 04
SECONDS WEST 166.50 FEET, THENCE
SOUTH 02 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 02 SEC-
ONDS WEST 5.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING.
A/K/A
130 Ashley Hall Rd
Crawfordville, Fl 32327
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for
cash, at the front entrance of the Wakulla County
Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Craw-
fordville, FL. 32327 at at 11:00 o'clock, A.M., on
Oct. 25, 2007
DATED THIS 25th DAY OF Sept., 2007.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the
25th day of Sept., 2007.
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By: Becky Whaley
Deputy Clerk


THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Attorneys for Plaintiff
In accordance with the American with Disabilities
Act of 1990, persons needing a special accommo-
dation to participate in this proceeding should con-
tact the ASA Coordinator no later than seven (7)
days prior to the proceedings. If hearing impaired,
please call (800) 955-9771 (TDD) or (800)
955-8770 (voice), via Florida Relay Service.
October 4, 11, 2007


110 Help Wanted


Administrative-Customer Service
We are currently taking applications
for the position of Customer Service
representative at our Limerock Mine,
23 MI E of Perry, Fl. MS Office expe-
rience required. Hours:5am-4pm; 5
days/week. Must be dependable,
possess good interpersonal skills,
and team oriented. Background,
physical, and drug test required.
EXCELLENT PAY & BENEFITS
Apply in person to Martin Marietta
Materials, 22550 Nutall Rise Rd,
Perry, FL
www.martinmarietta.com
EEOC/M/F/D/V


Breakfast cook needed. Apply in per-
son 10-2 at Savannah's Country Buf-
fet. 681-3663.


Drivers: Home Daily!
Top pay benefits! Pd. Holidays/Time
off + perks! S/T & L/T Disability.
CDL-A w/X, 25YOA.
866-FLA-ROCK.


Local bed & breakfast resident inn-
keeper position available. Energetic,
hospitality oriented applicants re-
quested. Training provided. E-mail:
thesweetmagnolia@comcast.net or
Fax: (850)925-0569.


10o \%%.th AMe.
1 allah1ssee. FL 32303
85o-222-2166 iel.
%\%11.n Imleeco.Cons
***New Subdivisions***
All subdivisions have
underground electric and water.
Carmen Maria $34,900. l1
ac. tracts near Lake Talquin.
Savannah Forest $45,900.
1 ac. tracts off Wak. Arran Rd.
Established Community!
Sellars Crossing $65,900.
1+ ac lots in North Wakulla.
Steeplechase $96,900 to
$109,900. 5 ac. wooded tracts.
Horse friendly!
Walkers Mill $69,900.
2 ac. wooded lots, located on
Lower Bridae Road.


938 Rehwinkel Rd.
This North Florida
mini farm is a rare
find! Features an
updated 3 BR/2BA
1644 square foot
home, sun porch,
gorgeous trees, and
several original out
buildings all on 5.5
acres. Must have
appointment to
show. $239,000.


2 acre tract in Wakulla
Forest with paved roads
and city water. $2,500
allowance. $54,900.
Carmen Rocio Per-
fect opportunity > low-
estpriced lot! 2 ac. lot
off Shadeville Hwy
near Wakulla Station.
$64,900.
Two 5+ acre tracts off
Rehwinkel Rd. with
large trees on the back
of properties and a
small pond.
$134,750 and $136,250.


The Farm Homeowner's Assoc.
seeking yearly lawn maintenance for
housing development in Crawford-
ville, FL. Interested contractors write
to PO Box 758 for bid proposal.

115 Work Wanted


Dixon & Dixon LLC. All types of car-
pentry repairs, decks, fencing, floor-
ing, termite, water damage. Li-
censed, Insured/LLC. (850)528-2253.
120 Services and Busi-
nesses |

A NEW LOOK PAINTING, serving
Wakulla County for 14 years. Li-
censed & Insured. Call Jim or Teresa
Porter. (850)926-2400.
A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING
Free Estimates
Licensed John Farrell
926-5179
AIR-CON OF WAKULLA
HEATING & A/C
Maintenance & Service
Gary Limbaugh, 926-5592
FL Lic. #CAC1814304
3232 Crawfordville Highway
ALL PRO FENCE
Residential-Commercial
Fencing. 519-1416.


ANYTIME ELECTRIC
Specializing in repair and service,
residential and commercial, homes
and mobile homes. 24-hour service.
Mark Oliver, ER0015233. 421-3012.

BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE
Bushhogging, .Boxblading Driveway.
Larry Carter Owner/Operator.
850-925-7931, 850-694-7041. Li-
censed/Insured.

Backhoe and Tractor Services-land
clearing, mowing. No minimum, large
or small job. 30 years experience.
Call 933-1118.
C & R Tractor/Backhoe Services,
large tract and residential site clear-
ing rock, dirt, and road base hauling:
call Crandall (850)933-3346.
Nikki's Trucking, LLC. Licensed and
bonded. Mobile home transport & in-
stall services. We also haul rock,
sand and gravel. Donnie Cruse
(850)510-2195. Nicole Cruse
(850)510-5498.

PORTER PAINTING, LLC
Residential/Commercial, New Con-
struction. Remodeling. Soft
Wash/Pressure Wash. Licensed and
Insured. Free Estimates. Worker's
Comp. Certified. (850) 519-0416.


528-3487

962-2437


















KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR
Commercial, residential and mobile
homes. Repair, sales, service, instal-
lation. All makes and models. Lic.
#RA0062516. 926-3546.
Land Clearing
Free estimates. 519-3965.


Call
Donna Card
850-508-1235
D 8 5


- .

New Construction!
Come home to this spacious
3BR/2BA 1515 square foot
home. Features include brick
and Hardie board, 11' x 17'
patio, large 2 car garage, ceiling
fans throughout, vaulted ceil-
ings in the living area, and tray
ceilings and his and her closets
in the master bedroom.
$189,900.
Upgrade package available!


Lighthouse House Produce.
3098 Coastal Hwy.-Medart.
Going-out-of-business sale-Lots of
great deals. Concrete Statuarys up to
50% off. Call for info 294-0213.

Loving In-Home 24-hour Daycare.
Now enrolling ages 4wks to school
age. Call 745-8057 for interview.


Mr. Stump
STUMP GRINDING
Quick Service
Cellular: 509-8530


Munges Tree- 24 hour emergency
service (850)421-8104.



PAUL SMITH

TRENCHING

SERVICE LLC
We dig trenches for water,
electric, etc.
Have riders and walk-behind.
We rent Trenchers with
Operator or without.
Licensed & Insured.
Call 926-7794 Office
510-2049 Mobile








Antiques and Uniques
"Something for Everyone"
61 Rose Street, Sopchoppy

sistersantiquesanduniques@yahoocom

850-962-2550
Spen: Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m.- 6 p.m.


C PRE-FORECLOSURE
uPREA CnONJ


SFor Complete Details
r owellauctions.com
800-323-8388
Myers Jackson, CAI, AARE, CES, Auction Coordinator MyersJacksoncorn
Rowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc.
10% Buyers Premium AU 479,AB 296

Regi-B ron eauctioni.Upaer..*i.,ions..i m


Disco% er coastal bliss
at 77 Gulf Breeze Dr.
'BR 2BA c.-.astal home on deep%%ater
canal %.' d,,-ck located in beautiful Criter
Bay Estate; Features custom tile ii
Inving area ,vrap-arounii deck outdoor
shower, screened porch larae mezza-
nine & hurricane htullerl W,6"',hi'


Sue's Small Steps
Registered, insured Family Home
Day Care has openings. Call Miss
Sue at 926-9225.
125 Schools and Instruc-
tion

Michelle Snow
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Piano-Voice-Guitar-Woodwinds
926-7627

200 Items For Sale


HABITAT RE-STORE
Abundance of bedding, sofas, inte-
rior/exterior doors, windows/screens,
fiberglass shower units and light fix-
tures. Open Tuesday thru Saturday,
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., 940 Shadeville Hwy.
(Hwy. 61), 926-4544.

240 Boats and Motors


20ft. Deck boat. 225 Johnson Ocean
Runner. Motor needs work. Hull re-
built lyr ago. $2500 OBO.
20ft. Mark Twain, V8, endboard. Out-
drive needs work. $2000 OBO.
12ft. Winner. 50-horse evinrude. Foot
petal trolling motor. $1000 OBO.
926-1669.
265 Computers and Inter-i
net

Two used IBM personal computers.
Desktop. Excellent condition. Good
for small business or home. Call
John 850-508-3011.

275 Home Furnishings


5 Piece Living Room set with 100%
MicroFiber sofa/chair and 3 piece
coffee set $600, All New in boxes.
Delivery available. 850-222-7783.


CJ SERVICES-Lawn service; haul-
ing; cleanup; phone jacks installed;
house washing, etc. Call 421-9365
for estimate.
Deke & Faris LLC
Custom Decks & Construction
Bryan Dekle 850-519-1021
Terry Faris 850-694-1344
Dirt, Rock, Gravel, Etc.
Free estimates. 519-3965.

Harold Burse Stump Grinding
962-6174









THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007-Page 5B.


275 Home Furnishings

Cherrywood 4-poster bed w/dresser,
mirror, chest, & nightstand. Can be
full-size or queen. Great condition.
$500 OBO. 926-8786.
King Designer Bedroom complete
set including TV Armoire, all new.
Sacrifice $995. (850)545-7112.
New Air Bed Mattress set with dual
controls adjustable by the number.
Retails at $1999 will let go at $1299.
Call today (850)222-9879.
Pillowtop Mattress-Queen, brand
new $1201 Call today 850-545-7112
(can deliver).
Pub/Empire Set-6 piece, solid wood
$575 Brand New still in the boxes.
850-425-8374.
305 Machinery Tools &
Equip J

185 SCFM Diesel Air-compressor. 3
boring missiles w/jack hammer. Call
for more details. $10,000 for all. Will
separate. 926-1669.
320 Farm Products &
Produce

Okra & green boiling peanuts. Raker
Farms. 926-7561.

335 Pets

Adopt a pet from the animal shelter:
Dogs:
Bloodhound
Dachshund
Schnauzer mix
Lab, yellow
Labs, black and brown
Terrier mix
Hound mixes
Jack Russell mix
Boston Terrier mix
Lab mixes
St. Bernard mix
Lab/Husky mix
Chihuahua mixes
Rat Terrier mixes
Many other nice mixes. Come and
take a look.

Puppies:
Lab mixes
Hound mixes
Weimaraner mixes
Shepherd mixes
Adult cats and kittens. Cats and kit-
tens are only $25 adoption fee. CHAT
is paying for the spay/neuter and ra-
bies shot of the adorited cats.
Free to good home, 5yr. old 181b. fe-
male tabby cat. Fixed & declawed.
Good w/kids, dogs, people. Grerat
family cat. 779-6054.

345 Swap Barter Trade


REGISTER NOW TO
SELL or SWAP
USED & NEW FISHING
& BOATING GEAR
ATTHE
FIRST ANNUAL MARINE
FLEA MARKET
Saturday, November 10th
9am 4pm
Woolley Park, Panacea
This Market is a feature of the
MIGHTY MULLET
MARITIME FESTIVAL
Arts and Crafts Vendors and
Food Vendors also welcome
TO REGISTER FOR A BOOTH
Contact Bill Lowrie at 962-4138
or billlowrie@embarqmail.com.

355 Yard Sales

Back Again. Sat. Yard Sale-ABC
Storage 8A.M. No early birds. 3743
Crawfordville Hwy. 508-5177.
Find treasures and historical publica-
tions at The Old Jail Museum Thrift
Shop, High Drive, behind Court-
house, Saturdays 9 to 1.
Huge garage sale. Furniture, appli-
ances, home decor, toys, clothes,
holiday decorations, shoes, & much
more. Sat. 7AM-12PM. 22 King Ar-
thur's Court off Taff Ln. 519-4201.
Moving Sale. Furniture, lawn equip-
ment, 42-inch Samsung HDTV, flat
screen w/surround sound, everything
must go. By appt. only. 926-1080.
Multi-family yard sale. 71 Sam Marks
Rd. New tires, camper shell, & lots of
stuff. Btwn 319 & Springhill.
Yard Sale. Masonic lodge behind
Hudson Park on Ochlockonee St.
Sat, Oct. 6th, 8-1.
Yard Sale. Sopchoppy. Fri-Sat.
8AM-4PM. Look for signs.

435 Lost and Found

Blue JVC Camcorder w/case at
JCPenney parking lot. Please con-


tact me at (850)879-6117. Thank
You.
Lost Female Boxer mix. Reddish
brown, medium height, skinny build.
Springhill, New Light Church Rd.
area. Reward! 926-3868.
500 Real Estate, Homes
Mobiles

CASH in 5 days!! We buy existing
mortgages, homes, trailers, lots &
land! We give equity advances &
make new mortgage loans! Ron Har-
ris, Traders Realty, Inc., Licensed
Mortgage Lender 878-3957.
Duplex in Tallahassee behind FSU off
Lake Bradford. 1 ready to rent, 1
needs rehab. $85,000. Call
407-718-8469 ext. 300.


PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference, limi-
tation, or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status or national origin or
an intention to make any such pref-
erence, limitation or discrimination."
Familial status includes children un-
der the age of 18 living with parents
or legal custodians, pregnant wom-
en and people securing the custody
of children under the age of 18.
This newspaper will not accept any
advertising for real estate that is a
violation of the law. Our readers are
hereby informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are
available on an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of discrimination
call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777.
The toll free number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


EQUAL INMNC
OPPORTUNITY

510 Acreage for Sale

20 acres $179,000 Wakulla County.
Call Susan McKaye, owner/agent
(850)510-2477. Ochlockonee Bay
Realty.
www.hardwoodhammock.com
530 Comm. Property for h
Rent |

1,074 sq. ft. Retail Store Front for
Rent in Lewiswood Center, Wood-
ville. Growing area, convenient to
Wakulla and Leon Counties.
421-5039.

Crawfordville

Climate Control

Storage

228-7197
Find out how easy and
affordable storage is
24 hour video surveillance
Locally Owned
(many sizes)


FOR RENT
GRADE A
OFFICE RENTAL
$325/month plus tax
Electric, Water
and Sewer Included
Full Kitchen Use
Call (850) 926-4511
for more information





STORAGE

MINI-WAREHOUSES
BOATS RV'S

519-5128 508-5177
2 miles South of Courthouse
on Hwy. 319 in Crawfordville
24 Hour Access Video Surveillance


Mini-Warehouse Spaces for lease,
8X10 and 10X12 now available.
Come by or call Wakulla Realty,
926-5084.

545 Homes for Sale

Excellent location. 3BR/2BA in Craw-
fordville on 1-acre. Approximately
1mi. from Wal-Mart. Limerock drive-
way, partial privacy fence, vinyl sid-
ing, alarm system, covered porch,
back patio, metal utility building, all
appliances stay. Must see. $162,000.
251-2289.

For Sale/Lease to Own
On 3 lots in Wakulla Gardens. 23
Neeley Rd. 1800SF. 4BR/2BA. Com-
pletely renovated. Call Nick
766-7750.

Just Reduced! $93,000 Firm.
1273 Old Woodville Road cozy,
sturdy renovated older 3BR/1BA
home on corner lot in Wakulla con-
venient to Tallahassee. New AC/heat
and vinyl with antique pot belly stove
for charm and large garage that can
be enclosed for more room. Includes
1 year warranty. Premier Properties,
(850)421-0020.

555 Houses for Rent

2BR/1BA houses. 206 Broken Bow.
$675/mo.
65 Neely Rd. $625/mo. No pets. Call
926-8795.
3 BR/2BA in Mysterious Waters $725
rent & Deposit. Call Larry at
386-6116.

Crawfordville, like new, large 2 bed-
room, 2 full bath duplex. $675 per
month. Call Linda 926-1467.


Mike
Gale
567-2227






Jim
Hallowell
566-5165


Justin
Moore
321-2027


Bill
Turner
510-0283






Teresa
Shepherd
567-6776






Susan
Brooks
545-6678


Diane Cathy
Chason Mathews
559-I545. 519-0960


For Rent 2BR/1 BA near downtown
Crawfordville. $600/mo. $400/de-
posit. 926-3880.
For Rent. 2BR/1BA 161 Hickory Rd.
$600/mo. $400/deposit. Call
528-7295 or 570-0575.
Home for rent, Ig 3/2 w/family room
& fireplace. Approximately 2,200 sf.
on 2 acres. Available immediately,
$1,150/mo. Call now (850)926-2100.
HOUSE FOR RENT. 3BD/2BA, 3
year old home. Hardwood floors,
clean. Fenced backyard w/large stor-
age shed. No pets. Lease purchase
option, owner-financing available for
qualified buyers. Call (850)926-4511
for more information.
Newer 3BR/2BA in Crawfordville.
Split plan, 2 car garage, new patio,
cathedral ceilings. $975/mo.
284-7496 by appt.
Unfurnished 3BR/2.5BA house sitting
on 2-acres at end of Mill Creek Road
in Crawfordville. $1000/mo w/de-
posit. Please call for more informa-
tion. 528-1687.
Wakulla Gardens cottage. 2BR/1 BA
All new inside & out. Hardwood
floors, extra large shady lot. For rent
or lease-purchase. $595/mo plus de-
posits. 926-4217.
Wakulla Gardens. 3BR/2BA almost
new. Fireplace, family room, huge
screened porch, large yard w/stor-
age. $1200/mo, plus security.
556-5906/510-5906, or
229-377-9836.

560 Land for Sale

2 acres for sale off Shadeville Rd.
Commercial potential. Highest & best
offer. Call 407-718-8469 ext. 300.


Ginny
Delaney
566-6271


Mike Tim
Delaney Jordal
524-7325 Broke
567-929


Panacea Office:
146 Coastal Hwy.
PO Box 556 Panacea, FL 32346
Office: 850-984-0001
Fax: 850-984-4748
obr@obrealty.com


Classified Ads For
As Uttle As $7 A Week


"-S RNGTHE 7 1 --

^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ A M E R I C A N D R E A M **^^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^


I1-


FHA & VA Home Loans
Adjustable Rate Conversions


Foreclosure / Home$aver
Zero Down Payments
Mobile Homes
Reverse Mortgages (senior citizens)
"Ask about the new FHA Secure Mortgage"


"Call Me Today for Courteous, Professional,
Confidential Home Loan Service"
BOBBY SMITH 926-9105
Florida Licensed Broker


|DI=\/CD I= M DT-r*ArFSl


Marsha
n Tucker
,r Broker
96 570-9214


Josh Alan
Brown Reese
528-6385 567-4860


Ochlockonee Ba)


Aught Matt
Spears Tucker
545-5831 519-1609


Curtis Sara
Benton Simmons
228-5821 509.3874


Mariko Joelea
Chaviano Josey
Beach RentalsI Office


Jacki
Youngstrand
509-1062


Patricia
McGill
294-4994


Preston
Strickland
508 3296






Nancy
Strickland
508-2902






Susan
McKaye
510.2477


Wendy Carmen Shayla
Isbell Wesley Dang
P.A to 294-8215 566-3335


Donna
Dickens
524-0473






Anita
Clements
766-4458






Kenny
Lovel
519-2510


Nicole
Thomas
509-4987


ver nSIg manager marsna u I er -


Brain


1 23 4 5


3 65 21

7 8

4 1 3


2 7


8 9 5


4 1


539 81 _13


1 8 2 4 6

Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section
has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with
numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of
the nine sections that you've already used elsewhere in that
section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each
horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of
nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly fill
every square.


6 9 9V S8 L L
V C L L89 6 9
L 9L 9 6 9 V Z
t 9 9ZL 6 L C9
L LC 9V Z9 6
C 6 ZL 89 9 1L
9 C 96V L L9 Z
I 6 9 9 L C 8 Vp
9LVZ 6 L9


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s I I N I WE "1 I av I1JI


1 1 1 | 1 1 11 d
1 s 1 1-1-
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As sn xa1 3 1
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3sz v I v su v v
ma a 3 a1x v 31 n i
u vs >)1 3 d S S V a


Teasers


ACROSS
1. Low voice
5. Hit a high
9. Morley of "60
Minutes"
14. Minstrel's
instrument
15. Wheel holder
16. Give the slip to
17. Petri dish gel
18. Pro
(proportionately)
19. Popeye creator
Segar
20. Comstock Lode
figure
23. Z, to a Brit
24. Fax precursor
25. Words on an
expiration notice
27. Bacon unit
31. Mingo player on
"Daniel Boone"
34. MDs' org.
37. Old, but new
again
39. iPod model
40. MTA driver
44. Jessica of "Dark
Angel"
45. Mr. (Tati role)
46. FDR successor
47. Reese in
Cooperstown
50. Units of force
52. Bosox rivals
54. Martini &
vermouth
58. Dept. head
60. Ed Norton,
notably
64. Garlicky sauce
66. Geometry
calculation
67. Go out together
68. Pioneer's path
69. Subcompact
70. 'Tell it like !"
71. Discombobulate
72. Do a KP chore
73. Fender dina


American Profile Hometown Content


DOWN
1. Use TNT
2. Hanna-Barbera's
Doggie
3. Play for time
4. Waits on
5. Henry VI II's sixth
wife, Catherine

6. Proctored event
7. Height: Prefix
8. Reeves of "The
Matrix"
9. Be furious
10. The whole
shebang
11. Bush accused
Gore of using this
12. Falco of "The
Sopranos"


22. Language suffix
26. Judge's seat
28. Marina del _,
Cal.
29. Result of a bug
bite
30. Like a peacock?
32. Son of Seth
33. Do mailroom work
34. "Rush!" letters
35. Stubborn equine
36. Beatles album of
1969
38. Part of SRO
41. Babwa (Gilder
Radner role)
42. Crime head
43. In (not yet
born)
48. Store, as fodder
49. out (barely
mananon


070923


51. Morally degraded
53. Boggy area
55. Do figure eights
56. Take effect
57. my case!"
58. Spy_ Had
59. one's loins
(prepare for
action)
61. Toledo's lake
62. Artist Magritte
63. Cry like a
banshee
65, Capp's"_
Abner"


Crawfordville Office:
2851 Crawfordville Hwy.
Crawfordville, FL 32346
Office: 850-926-9260
Fax: 850-926-9150
www.obrealty.com


suoi~lnios


I


-


dA ti i M M h T k








Page 6B-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4,2007

r-"560 Land for Sale

2 lots in Wakulla Gardens. $30,000.
786-200-8666.
6-:Acres (MoL) across from middle
$ohool and golf course on highwayI11
98. Possible zone commercial. 430'
road front. Owner/realtor.
850-984-1143.


-T e


Building lots for sale. River Bend
Subdivision. FLexible terms.
$175,000. 1-888-842-4407.
565 Mobile Homes for
Rent j
2BR/1BA very nice. Wakulla Station
area. 2 people only. No pets. Refer-
ences required. $450/mo., $300/de-
posit, 2/months rent. 925-6704 after
6PM.
2BR/2BA Doublewide borders state
forest. 21/2 miles from Woodville.
Fenced yard, covered deck, storage
shed. $675/mo. 1st, last, security re-
quired. Pet deposit. 574-4354.
4BR/3BA Mobile Home on 5 acres
on the river adjacent to Sopchoppy
City Park. $950 mo. Deposit,
no pets or smokers.
(850)962-3890/(850)566-5833.
MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT. Clean,
neat, and well-maintained. Front and
rear decks. New paint, carpet and
some appliances. No pets. Lease
purchase option, owner-financing
available for qualified buyers. Call
Leigh for more information
(850)926-4511.

570 Mobile Homes for Sale

3/2.5 DWMH, fireplace, roman tub,
living room, family room on 2.3
acres. Private area/secluded in
Crawfordville off Shadeville Hwy
$109,900. 407-718-8469 ext. 300.
580 Rooms for Rent/Rooml
mates j
Weekly Rentals Available,$175-$200
per week, wireless Internet, Panacea
Motel,(850)984-5421.

.M.PECKHAM
ENTERPRISES,,


e *


~ERA~
Community Realty

A UTITTLE TLC COULD GO A LONG WAYII
Great investment in an awesome loca-
tion! IOlder 3 bd/ I bth w/fenced yard
for pets and kids. Large storage shed,
two car carport, recent ac, a 15x6
front porch and a I2x8 back porch.
All of this and seconds from downtown
Crawfordville. $97,000
INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY
Don't mind the age of this home.
Extremely well kept 3 bdr, I 1/2 bath
1964 mobile home on a 1/4 of an acre
(mol), with a 2 car carport, 2 storage
units both with electric and one with
water, and every well landscaped front
lawn. This would make an awesome
rental property or an overnight base for
you hunters $40,000
The Farm
Beautiful 3/2 Turner Heritage resale.
Shows like new with very attractive
yard. Great Curb appeal and extremely
clean. Great Location, quiet yet close to
town. Must See, Only:$239,900.
LIVE ON VACATION
Cute 3/2 brick front home in St. Marks.
Next to the bike traffil, close to rivers
and free boat ramp, and within walking
distance of stores and restaurants. This
is a great priced home to live in a river
front community. Just $149,900
Close to St. James Golf Club.
Large 3/2 home that has never been
lied in on I acre lot. Only 2 blocks
from the Gulf, this home features a
debauched 3 car garage for car and
boats. Concrete block construction, top
of the line fixtures, handicap accessible.
REDUCED to only: 299,9001
WHAT'S YOUR PLEASURE?
Boating, fishing, taking a swim in the
pool, or just enjoy eating out? This
3bdr/2bth located on I & 1/4 acres is
just minutes from two free boat ramps
and awesome restaurants. Wait there is
more: planting area for gardeners, an
above ground pool for swimming, two
storage units one with electric, and a
one car carport. $175,000.


Mandy McCranie Debbie Kosec
509-1155 566-2039
A r


AM~d~fT~


HARTUNGAND OTIH& 7 I H '
NOBLIN. INC. 1 P.M. TO 3 P.M. OPE
.- REALTORS
]us
]l

adre

I I A Open


5 CAROUSEL CIRCLE $244,900
Superb Construction 3BR.2B. 1.808 sq. ft. Fireplace. -
clubhouse and pool. #169400 Lenlz walker r 528-3572 or
Ed Mel Guffe) 524-49411 Direction.: 319 S. L at 11akulla ,rran
Rd. thru 4-w a. Lon Saralan. R on Carousl
1-. -
a *, .
. .- ..... .. ... .. ... . ' _, '


$127,900
3/1 with screened porches; this is a
great deal for a weekend getaway or full
time coastal living.


$229,900
3/2 in gated community in
downtown crawfordville; huge
lot with many upgrades -:


$138,900
3/2 on two lots; large,
beautiful manicured lawn;
A MUST SEE...


V ~- A
~


:5 Acres Beautiful homesite located on paved
S Cul-de-sac in N. Wakulla County $99,900 .


BlueWater

Realty Group


Call (850)'55.-1396
Tami McDowell@, eanor
New Construction-SeiaI iS


You Q Build Now!




$250 MILLION


OF IN-HOUSE FINANCING!


When Others
Say No, Jim Walter
Homes Says YES!

Why? Because we have offered traditional, fixed-rate
financing for more than 50 years and don't play games
with ARMs or interest-only loans. In today's market, you
should put your confidence in larger, stronger
companies that put stable, risk-free financing within
reach. As America's largest on-your-lot homebuilder,
we offer financing that works with individual needs,
including credit issues. Plus, zero down payment for
qualified landowners, no points, no closing costs and
no payments or interest during construction!


TALLAHASSEE, FL
2535 W. Tennessee St.
800-283-3930


Home illustration may include additions options or modifications not part of our
standard offerings Shrubs and landscaping have been added for effect Speciftcations
and plans subject to change and elimination State license number FL CRCC0571112
c2007 Jim Waller Homes Inc Copyright strictly enforced


LA L




JUST REDUCED! 12 JANET DRIVE
Fabulous Deep Water Canal Front with full length view
3BR/2BA has new carpeting & new paint Huge screened
porch, dock, community pool, tennis court, Golf cart
community & a walk to the beach. #1015 $309,000
Call Dee Shriver 926-8120







Crawfordville Coastal Hwv./Sprine Creek Hwv.
(850) 926-9261 www.shellpointrealry.com (850) 926-8120




(850) 926-8038 (850) 926-2390 fax
520 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1 3 Builder's Clearance!
3BR/2BA home with 1,613 sq. ft. in the Hammocks. 8' garage door, 9' walls,
wired for security and networking. Lighted built-in entertainment center, gas
fireplace, stainless steel appliances, huge master bedroom and luxury bath
with walk-in tile shower and jacuzzi tub. Large patio off the back of home only
$209,9001
New Construction only $124,900! 3BR/2BA with lots of open space.
Kitchen with bar, dining room, large utility room and pantry. Trey ceilings in
every bedroom, large master bed and bath. Vaulted ceilings in living room
and much more. Call for more info.
New construction almost complete. Two story 3BR/2BA home with
1,384 sq. ft. Quality construction throughout with upgraded light fixtures, 5
1/2" decorative base trim, cast Kohler sink in kitchen, glass top range with
micro hood vent, refrigerator w/ ice maker, deck and much more. Asking
$138,900oo
Just Reduced to $133,900! Beautiful home in Magnolia Gardens,
3BR/2BA and over 1,400 sq. ft. situated on 2 lots. Large master suite that has
walk-in closet, large master bath with garden tub and walk-in shower. Kitchen
with bar, dining room and large living room.
OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY 10 12 Just completed!
2BR/2BA home with open floor plan. Island in kitchen for extra storage and
bar seating, dining room and living room. Large spare bath and bedroom.
Upgraded light fixtures, double closet in master bedroom, deck off back of
home and partially fenced. Only $101,900!


Great rental property!
MH that sits on two 60x120
lots on Spring Creek Hwy. MH
could be fixed up and rented,
or moved to build two new
homes. Lots are located next
to new construction homes, on
septic and city water. Asking
$40,000 will look at offers.


HARTUNG AND
NOBLIN, INC.
REALTORS


g4~


GARDEN HOME $198,000
New Construction, quality &
style in this 3BR/2BA 1,555
Sq. Ft. Garden home w/ga-
rage. Located in The Gardens
of Saralan. #175646 Peggy
Fox 524-4294 or Kai Page
CNS,GRI 519-3781









Marianne Dazevedo 212-1415

LOVELY WAKULLA
RIVER SUBDIVISION
$249,000 3BR/2BA split plan
with vaulted ceilings. Liv-
Sing room that opens to large
screened porch. Community
park with dock & boat ramp.
#165535 Peggy Fox 524-4294


Sherri Parsons
519-2186
sherriparsons@gmail.com
Lynn Cole-Eddinger/
Broker 9 V a


H


Your Perfect Partner
for Real Estate!


90 NELSON $121,000
This 3BR/2BA home has a
great open floor plan. Large
kitchen w/bar and L shaped front
porch. Ceramic tile and brick
front. #163476 Jeannie Porter
CRS,GRI 566-4510


RIVER PLANTATION
$245,000 3BR/2BA 1,714
Sq. Ft. located in gated
community with boat ramp
& dock on the Wakulla
River, pool and tennis
courts with in walking
distance. #173283


If you are in the market for land or lots we have an extensive
inventory of everything from 50X100 lots to 40 acre tracts.


Jeannie Porter Managing Broker 566-4510
Lentz Walker 528-3572 Ed McGuffey 524-4940
Don Henderson 510-4178 Marsha Hampton 445-1906
Bob Monahan 508-1934 Peggy Fox 524-4294
Dawn Reed GRI 294-3468 Lionel Dazevedo 284-6961
Kai Page CNS, GRI 519-3781
Marianne Dazevedo Broker Associate 212-1415
Joi Hope Broker Associate 210-7300
Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated
2650-1 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327
S850-926-2994 Phone 850-926-4875 Fax
u www.coldwellbanker.com MLS.


NOR


0 1111-1 L


a


I -,-


mm










THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007-Page 7B


Record response to animal event was wonderful


For so many years, you as
a community, have supported
CHAT's mission, and helped us
make our Animal Shelter a caring
place for homeless animals. Last
Saturday, the event we hosted at
the Shelter, called "Homecom-
ing," was our thank-you for all
your support over the years.
Hope you enjoyed yourself if you
were there. I
The event was the "brain-
child" of one of our longtime
members, Susan Harp. Based
upon the laughter of the children
and chatter of conversations, I
think everyone had a good time.
For me, it was a special day,
because so many of our animals
were adopted.
The adoption team of Melissa
Hooke and Debbie Casto and her
two daughters, were really kept
busy last Saturday. We had nine
adoptions and 19 adoptions for
the week. That may be a record
for us. October is National Adopt
a Dog Month, but I can never
remember when so many large
sized Shelter dogs were adopted


CHATI
of
Wakulla





Susan Yelton

in one day.
It is difficult for the adoption
team to take large dogs off site;
therefore, the public rarely sees
the beautiful animals we have,
that need a good home. The
large dogs who are brought to
the Shelter, are usually what
we call "owner give ups," or
sometimes they are an abuse
case. It is when an abuse case
dog gets a good home that we
really celebrate. That happened
on Saturday, when a German
Shepherd was adopted.
I remember when that dog
was brought to the Shelter two
weeks ago by the animal control
staff. The dog's collar had grown
into its neck because the owner


never bothered to change the
collar as the dog grew in size.
CHAT funds provided for the
dog's medical care and on Sat-
urday the dog got a new home.
I understand it is also going to
have an important job in life: it
will be trained for drug enforce-
ment.
We have not made any plans
yet for a "Second Homecoming,"
however, we do have an upcom-
ing program at the Shelter to
tell you about. In November, the
Shelter will be a new site for
Animal Health Services,
Some of you who read this
column might be familiar with
their services, because they have
been providing monthly clinics
in Tallahassee and at the Feed
Shack in Woodville for several
years. For those of you who are
not familiar with the service,
Animal Health Services is a
mobile clinic of animal health
professionals who offer pet
owners affordable, high quality
vaccinations and diagnostics for
dogs, cats and ferrets. The clinic


is not a substitute for your pet's
annual exam or other health ser-
vices at an animal hospital.
Mark your calendar. Starting
on Nov. 3, and every first Sat-
urday of the month thereafter,
Animal Health Service staff will
be at the Shelter from 11 a.m. to
noon to provide vaccinations,
such as rabies vaccination, and
other preventive services at a
reasonable fee.
In the coming weeks, we will
post Animal Health Services' fees
at the Shelter. If you go on line,
to their web site, www.animal-
health.com, you will find their
fees for packages of services,
but when they are at the Shelter,
you can request only part of the
package.
If you have been postponing
vaccinating your animal for ra-
bies, Nov. 3 will be a good time
to take care of that legal require-
ment. Animal Health Services
does not provide spay/neuter
services, but please, neuter your
pet so we can control the animal
population in our county.


Maritime Festival will host Sell and Swap


The Panacea Mighty Mullet
Festival will host a Big Bend
Maritime Sell and Swap.
Got an old rod and reel you
don't take fishing anymore? How
about a boat and motor which
need to be replaced? Would you
like some cash for those dust-
catching collectibles?
Bring everything nautical to
the Florida Big Bend's first ever
maritime swap & sell flea market
Saturday, Nov. 10, as a featured
part of the Mighty Mullet Mari-
time Festival in Panacea. The
event will be held from 9 a.m.
until 4 p.m.


Festival organizer Bill Lowrie
said booth space is available to
area businesses and to individu-
als. "Anyone who has new or
used fishing gear, boating equip-
ment, marine items, collectibles,
or antiques of nautical interest is
invited," said Lowrie.
SFor a registration fee of $25,
participants are provided their
own space, a banquet table and
a chair, "and the seller gets to
keep all proceeds from any sales
he or she makes," Lowrie added.
Larger spaces are also available
for boats and trailers.
Because the overall festival


grounds along Dickerson Bay at
Woolley Park are limited, Lowrie
is accepting booth reservations
on a first-come, first-served basis.
He can be contacted at 962-4138
or billlowrie@embarqmail.com.
Items likely to be most popular
for sale include rods and reels,
lures, boats, motors, trailers,
traps, binoculars, and cast nets.
Other featured events at
the second annual festival are
scheduled to include the coro-
nation of the mullet king and
queen, games and activities for
children, arts and crafts vendors,
food vendors, classic boats on


display, maritime exhibits and
demonstrations, live music, a
fashion show featuring "fishy"
outfits, a maritime topic pho-
tography contest, a children's
art exhibit, a Harley-Davidson
raffle by the Sheriff's Office to
benefit Citizens for Humane
Animal Treatment (CHAT), and
the judging of the International
Mullet Cook-Off. Anyone inter-
ested in participating in any of
these events are also asked to
contact Lowrie.


NWFWMD, DEP Implement New Regulations


In response to growing citizen
awareness of interconnected
systems, the first phase of Envi-
ronmental Resource Permitting
(ERP), stormwater rule, took
effect in Northwest Florida on
Monday, Oct. 1. ERP has been in
effect for the rest of the state for
more than a decade and last year
the Florida Legislature mandated
that the Northwest Florida Water
Management District work with
the Florida Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection (DEP) to
write and implement new rules
for Florida's Panhandle.
"The old stormwater rule
required pollution control; we're
adding flood control in the Pan-
handle," said Grady "Lee" March-
man, Chief of the District's new
Bureau of Environmental and
Resource Regulation.
"We're bringing consistency
to the state," said District Execu-
tive Director Douglas E. Barr. "In
the four other water manage-
ment districts, you apply for
one ERP permit. In Northwest
Florida, you currently apply for
two, a stormwater permit from
the District and a dredge and fill
permit from DEP. After Phase II
(wetlands) begins next July, you


will only need one permit from
the District."
"As of this fall, regulations
that governed four-fifths of
Florida, govern the Panhandle
as well," said Guy Gowens, Di-
rector of the District's Resource
Regulation Division. "Developers
from west Jefferson to Escambia
County must secure a permit
from the District if their project
is located entirely in the uplands
and from the DEP if their project
involves wetland impacts. The
goal of Phase II is to shift more
of the program, including wet-
lands regulation, to the District
by summer 2008."
A 72-page ERP rule and Appli-
cant's Handbook has been writ-
ten, reviewed, and adopted. The
rule supersedes those in effect
since 1982 requiring large devel-
opments to protect neighbors
from stormwater pollution only.
For the rest of Florida, rules were
added in 1995 requiring projects
to be controlled for stormwater
runoff quantity- and rate (flood),
as well as cleanliness.
"The rule encourages off-line
systems over on-line systems,"
Marchman said. "On-line sys-
tems run stormwater straight


through a retention pond and
out again. Off-line systems divert
the first flush of stormwater to
a retention area and reliably
remove 80 percent of average
annual pollutant loading."
The legislature appropriated
$2.74 million for Phase I and $3.8
million for full implementation,
including Phase II. However,
permit revenues are expected to
recoup only a small percentage
of program costs. Application
fees range from $300 to $2,500,
depending on project size. A
project area of 40 to 100 acres
that impounds 40 to 120 acre-feet
of water, or one that hardens 12
or more acres with impervious
surface and also constitutes
more than 40 percent of the total
area, will cost $1,300 to permit.
Projects above those thresholds
will cost $2,500 and below will
cost $300.
For easy access, offices were
established at two ends of the
District, in Tallahassee at 2252
Killearn Center Boulevard (the
Delaney Building, Suite 2D) and
in Crestview at 800 Hospital
Drive.
Of concern to Marchman is
that ERP in the northwest was


required to implement the "least
restrictive'" rule of all the water
management districts. Written
under clear guidance of the
Florida Statutes, it was a bal-
ancing act, he said. "It required
that we improve water quality
and add flood protection while
taking into account the unique
Panhandle geology.
"Also, we get roughly the
same amount of rainfall on av-
erage but we have fewer, more
intensive rains so we are more
prone to drought and more
prone to larger rainfalls spaced
out over longer intervals. You
need bigger stormwater ponds
that are used less often."
To prepare developers, con-
tractors, and consulting firms
for online permitting, ERP staff
conducted workshops in Talla-
hassee, Crestview, and Panama
City in September. A tutorial is
available October 1. on the ERP
web page, http://www.nwfwmd.
state.fl.us/permits/permits-ERP.
html. A link connects to the DEP
rules page where Applicant's
Handbooks and other resources
can be downloaded.


Disasters can strike quickly, be prepared with a plan


Disaster can strike quickly
and without warning. Where
will your family be when it does?
How will you find each other?
Will you know if your children
are safe?
Families can and do cope with
disaster by preparing in advance
and working together as a team.
The National Weather Service,
the Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Agency and the American
Red Cross urge each and every
family to develop a family di-
saster plan. Here are the steps to
follow to create and implement
a family plan:
Gather information about
hazards in your area by con-
tacting your local chapter of
the American Red Cross, your
county emergency management
office, or the National Weather
Service. Find out what types of
disasters could occur and how
you should respond. Learn your
community's warning signals
and evacuation plans.
Meet with your family to
create a plan. Plan to share re-





"IT ALL


sponsibilities and work together
as a team. It is a good idea to
pick places to meet: right outside
your home in case of a sudden
emergency, like a fire, and out-
side your neighborhood. Every-


fall, break, or cause fire. Stock
supplies and assemble a Disaster
Supplies Kit. Determine the best
escape routes and find the safe
spots for different disasters.
DISASTER SUPPLIES KIT


one, including small children, Your kit should include
should know your address and enough supplies to meet your
phone number. needs for three days, Store them
Ask an out-of-state friend in sturdy, easy to carry, water-
to be your "family contact" if resistant containers. It is a good
the family gets separated. After idea to keep a smaller kit in the
a disaster it is often easier to trunk of your car. Your kit should
call long distance. Have a plan include:
for your pets be aware pets are A three day supply of water
not allowed in American Red (one gallon per person per day)
Cross shelters, and food that won't spoil.
Once you have created a One change of clothing and
family disaster plan, it is time footwear per person.
to implement it so it may be One blanket or sleeping bag
activated at any time. Post emer- per person.
agency telephone numbers. Teach A first aid kit, including
children how and when to call prescription medicines.
911. Have your family learn basic Emergency tools, including
safety measures, such as CPR. a battery-powered radio, flash-
Show each family member how light, and extra batteries
and when to turn off water, gas, An extra set of keys, cash,
and electricity, and how to use special items for infants, elderly
a fire extinguisher. Inspect your or disabled and an extra pair of
home for items that can move, glasses.




,TA 1WM


Practice and maintain your
plan. Conduct drills. You want
to replace stored water every
three months and stored food
every six months. Test and
recharge your fire extinguisher.
Smoke alarms should be checked
monthly and batteries changed
once a year.
Something else to keep in
mind is the value of neighbors.
If you are a member of a neigh-
borhood organization, introduce
disaster preparedness as a new
activity. Know your neighbors
special skills and consider how
you could help your neighbors
who have special needs. Make
plans for child care in case par-
ents cannot get home.
For additional information
on preparing for disaster or to
become a Disaster Resistant
Neighborhood please contact
the Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross in Tallahas-
see at 878-6080 or visit our web
site at www.cacarc.org.







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Today's Weather


Wed Thu Fnri Sat Sun
10/3 10/4 10/5 10/6 10/7


/.

89/69
A few thun-
derstorms
possible.




Sunrise:
7:31 AM
Sunset:
7:20 PM


89/70
Isolated
thunder-
storms.
Highs in the
upper 80s
and lows in
the low 70s.

Sunrise:
7:32 AM
Sunset:
7:19 PM


89/68
Partly
cloudy,
chance of a
thunder-.
storm.


Sunrise:
7:33 AM
Sunset:
7:18 PM


91/67
Partly
cloudy,
chance of a
thunder-
storm.


Sunrise:
7:33 AM,
Sunset:
7:17 PM


J-


90/66
Sunshine.
Highs in the
low 90s and
lows in the
mid 60s.


Sunrise:
7:34 AM
Sunset:
7-15 PM


SWe Celebrate 'H


Stories for and about hometown
Look for us ea wek ._


Florida At A Glance


Jacksonville
\ 87/75


88'72


Tampa
90/75


Area Cities


I ciy H Lomond


Clearwater 89
Crestview 87
Daytona Beach 87
Fort Lauderdale 89
Fort Myers 89
Gainesville 88
Hollywood 90
Jacksonville 87
Key West 88
Lady Lake 89
Lake City 88
Madison 89
Melbourne 89
Miami 88
N Smyrna Beach 87

National Citie


Atlanta pt suCnny


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Houston
Los Angeles
Miami


74 t-storm
68 t-storm
73 t-storm
79 rain
74 t-storm
69 t-storm
77 rain
75 rain
81 rain
72 t-storm
69 t-storm
70 t-storm
76 t-storm
77 t-storm
74 t-storm

IS


IOCaiat9 Hi tormnd


Ocala 91
Orlando 91
Panama City 87
Pensacola 88
Plant City 92
Pompano Beach 89
Port Charlotte 91
Saint Augustine 86
Saint Petersburg 88
Sarasota 89
Tallahassee 89
Tampa 90
Titusville 88
Venice 89
W Palm Beach 89


t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
rain
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
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t-storm
t-storm
rain


I Ciy H Lo ond


pt sunny
cloudy
pt sunny
t-storm
sunny
mst sunny
sunny
t-storm


Minneapolis
New York
Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


mst sunny
cloudy
mst sunny
sunny
rain
pt sunny
ptsunny


Moon Phases






Full Last New First
Sep 26 Oct 3 Oct 11 Oct 19


UV Index
Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
10/3 10/4 10/5 10/6 10/7

High Very High Very High Very High Very High
The UV index is measured on a 0 -11 number scale, 0 .. 11
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.


WIN DOW 1


0TINTN'



GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

SIGNS


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77


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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 4, 2007


The magic of aging...some stories from our seniors


What a wonderful time of
the year. The mornings and eve-
nings are getting cooler and the
birds, squirrels and deer have
so much to eat. The squirrels
are beginning to store acorns
for winter. It's just as exciting
at the Wakulla County Senior
Citizens Center.
We continue to experience
illnesses and often experience
the loss of a dear friend in the


Wakulla County Administra-
tor Ben Pingree has been asked
to serve on the Board of Direc-
tors of the Economic Develop-
ment Council of Tallahassee/
Leon County, Inc. He accepted
to serve as a representative from
Wakulla County.
"This is exciting for a num-


center.
However, the seniors in the
center enjoy the time they have
knowing they won't be here
forever. Happiness and excite-
ment are the prevailing feelings
in this environment. Recently, I
discussed life with a few seniors
and received their approval to
share it with others.

Billie Stradleigh just turned


ber of reasons," said Pingree.
"However, I am most pleased
as it is precisely in line with the
board's desire to increase our'
level of representation across
this region on issues, such as
economic development, that
are board priorities for Wakulla
County."


Lawson, Richardson

host summit to restore

civil rights to felons


C


Wakulla *. Rebecca Harris Adison
County Senior has lived in Wakulla County all
Center of her life. She is a very youth-
ybl,,,at ful 73 years old. She was born
at Wakulla Station and lived
there and in Mt. Zion most of
her life.
She was married for 26 years
R.H. Carter and had six children, of which
eteree are still living There are


97. She attends church at St Te-
resa. She loves to read and still
corresponds with her friends
around the country. She was
born in New York and married
a lieutenant in the Air Force.
Wherever they were stationed
she volunteered her services.
She was a Grey Lady vol-
unteer at hospitals in Texas,
served as a choir mother in Falls
Church, Va. and Washington.
She has been a member of the
Women's Auxiliary of the VFW
for more than 50 years.
"Ms. Billie" has been coming
to the senior center for more
than 15 years. She enjoys the
food and music but most of all
she enjoys being around other
people. As she talked with me,
her greatest smiles came when
she talked about her husband
and talking with her friends.


13 grandchildren and seven
great-grandchildren.

Lewis Bailey, better known
as Deacon Bailey, was her great-
uncle. Back in the 1960s and
1970s, Deacon Bailey used to
visit me regularly in the court-
house where I worked.
Ms. Addison worked at
Metcaff's Crab House until she
was 65. She started coming to
the Senior Center before she
retired.
She and Marjorie McPhear-
son were the first two seniors
from our center to move into
the apartments next door. Her
apartment is the nicest place
she has ever lived. It's the first
time she has had air condition-
ing.
She loves the other seniors
and thinks the staff is the


greatest group of people in the
world. She really enjoys fold-
ing newspapers for the Wild
Mammals Association. Her
children call her regularly to
make sure she is happy visiting
the center.

Bob Robertson was intro-
duced to the senior center by
Buck Miller. He believed he
was blessed by God for Miller
to bring him here. He brings his
wife, Betty and they enjoy our
center together.
He fought in World War II
from 1943 to 1946 and the Ko-
rean War in 1950. He would go
fight in Iraq right now if they
would let him. During the two
wars he grew from 6 feet to 6
feed 4 1/ inches tall.
He believes in freedom and
understands the price that has
been paid for our freedom. He
believes in structure and strong
discipline and is not tolerant of
irresponsibility. His greatest joy
in life is to make other people
happy.
You should see him dance
with his wife and all of the
other ladies. He and several
other seniors go to the VFW
center one day each month and


State Senator Alfred Lawson,
Jr. (D-6) and State Representative
Curtis Richardson (D-8) are host-
ing an outreach summit to assist
individuals with felony records
in restoring civil rights. The
first Restoration of CIvil Rights
Outreach Summit is scheduled
for Saturday, Oct. 13.
It is expected to hail dozens
of local citizens seeking resto-
ration of their civil rights. The
Outreach Summit will be held
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the
Tallahassee Community College,
Legislative Research Center and
Museum, located at 444 Apple-
yard Drive in Tallahassee.
Together with the Florida
Parole Commission, Office of
Executive Clemency, the state
legislators are bringing the
first Restoration of Civil Rights
Outreach to the Big Bend area.
Similar events have been held
throughout the state over the
past summer by members of
the Florida Legislative Black
Caucus.
Restoration of Civil Rights
Outreach programs have been
fundamental,in ensuring the
-democratic process is main-
tained by educating past felons
of the resources available to
them. "The Civil Rights Work-
shop is aimed at simplifying the
process by which former felons
can have their rights restored,"


The American Cancer Soci-
ety's Relay For Life of Wakulla
2008 event kick-off rally will be
held Thursday, Oct. 4 from 6
p.m. until 7:30 p.m. at the Wakul-
la Bank Community Room, 2932
Crawfordville Highway.
Organizers invite the public
to join them to celebrate the
beginning of relay season Par-
ticipants can learn how they
can make a difference in the
fight against cancer.
There are many different
ways to get involved and'help
find a cure. Guests will also
have an opportunity to view the
Warriors In Pink 2008 Mustang
that has been donated by All
American Ford.
Chance drawing tickets will
be available for $1. The drawing
for the vehicle will be held at


stated Senator Lawson.
Through these events, ex-fel-
ons are able to determine what
rights are currently available to
them after the completion of
their sentences.
Several organizations such
as the Florida Department of
Corrections, Clerk of Court,
Supervisor of Elections, NAACP,
AFL-CIO, Workforce Plus, lo-
cal university criminology de-
partments, and the League
of Women Voters have been
invited to the event to ensure
that ex-felons civil rights are re-
instated and respected.
Currently, ex-felons are un-
aware that they may be granted
rights they were ,at one-time
deprived of, namely the right
to vote.
"It's dismal, that in today's
day and age, an ex-felon is
required to pay taxes and live
as a law-abiding citizen, but is
not aware they have the right
to vote, a right that should be
extended to every man and
woman," stated Rep. Richard-
son.
The event is open to the pub-
lic and there is no cost for the
process of restoration of civil
rights. To pre-register and for
more information, call Senator
Lawson's office at (850) 414-5088
or Representative Richardson's
office at (850) 488-1798.


United Way campaign

is under way locally


"Hey Wakulla, Give Where
You Live!" It's time for United
Way's annual Wakulla County
fundraising campaign. The cam-
paign officially kicked-off Mon-
day, Oct. 1 during the county
commission meeting.
The goal for this year's cam-
paign is $125,000. This year's ef-
fort will be lead by 2007 Wakulla
County United Way Chair, Amy
Geiger. She will be joined by the
2007 campaign committee, R.H.
Carter, Allen Freeland, David
Miller, Ray Thompson, Susan
Payne Turner, Ben Pingree, Mike
Helms, Allison Defoor, Mary
Katherine Westmark, Eileen
Debish and our 2007 Leader-


ship Giving Chairman, Walter
Dodson.
The 2006 donations to the
Wakulla County United Way
campaign have been put to good
use. A few services donations
rendered included helping 103
people through Big Bend Hos-
pice, 270 Boy Scouts, 862 people
through Wakulla Senior Citizens
Council and seven children were
mentored through Big Brothers
Big Sisters.
The community is counting
on the help of Wakulla residents
through their support of United
Way. Please look for upcoming
events in our community and
get involved.


the Relay For Life of Leon Fair-
grounds closing ceremonies on
Saturday, May 10 at 11:30 a.m.
The Event Chair is Linda
Stalvey at 926-5602/ Istalvey@
embarqmail.com. ACS Staff Part-
ner is Tonya Law at 228-4013/
tonya.law@cancer.org.

Covenant Hospice
Boston Butt sale
The second annual Boston
Butt sale will be held on Friday,
Oct. 12 from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m.
and Saturday, Oct. 13 from 8
a.m. to 8 p.m. at the Wal-Mart
parking lot, Thomasville Road
in Tallahassee.
Each Boston Butt is $25. Pro-
ceeds benefit Covenant Hospice
Patients. For more information,
call 575-4998


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GSE4x151004WN-4C


OEqual OppworftLmde


Pingree named


to Leon economic


development board


Relay for Life campaign

kicks off with rally Oct. 4


he volunteers calling Bingo.
On June 3, 2007, he suffered a
stroke that left him paralyzed
on his left side and with double
vision.
He refused therapy and be-
gan his own exercise program
that sounded excessive to me,
but he has no remaining paraly-
sis or double vision. It doesn't
appear that he has ever been ill
in his life.

It's a real pleasure to discuss
individual lives and experi-
ences with seniors. Try it you'll
like it.
Maintaining the senior cen-
ter is a financial challenge. We
could not succeed without com-
munity support. We are proud
of Wakulla County and how our
citizens love and contribute to
senior programs.
I especially want to thank
the Wakulla County Commis-
sion for their continued sup-
port. Times are tough for those
trying to reduce taxes without
hurting public services. The
county commission must be
commended for standing firm
in supporting our older popu-
lation.




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