Title: Wakulla news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00107
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Uniform Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: February 22, 2007
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028313
Volume ID: VID00107
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Full Text









District honors teachers
See Page 1 B


Local guitarist featured
See Page 5A


********************,*3-DIGIT 326
2562 06-08-07 100P 55S
UNIVERSITY OF FL. LIBRARY
UNIVERSITY OF FL. LIBRARY
PO BOX 117001
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7001
I,,II,,,I, I ,I I ,,,,,II,,, III,,,II ,,,1 II,,,,,, IIII,,I



WHS grads still shining
See Page 8A


bet )Wakulla


Published
Weekly,
Read Daily


Our 113th Year, 8th Issue


Thursday, February 22, 2007


Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century


Bottl

By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
After being voted down by
the planning commission at
a meeting at which dozens of
people spoke out against it,
Wakulla Springs Bottled Water
is dropping its proposal to build
a water bottling plant.
A statement released by the
company on Sunday said that
the best consultants had been
hired and residents' concerns
answered, but "every effort we
pursued was questioned and
met with strong, emotional op-
position."


ing plant

The company, which had to pump up to 70,000 gallons o
been set to go before county water a day a fraction of the
commissioners for a vote on 1.4 million gallons per day tha
March 5, sent in its request to had been allowed in an earlier
the county Community Develop- permit.
ment Department to withdraw Wakulla Springs Bottled
the land use change and text Water had proposed a new
amendment on Monday, Feb. land use Bottle Water Corn
19. County offices were closed pany that would set stringen
for the Presidents Day holiday, requirements for opening
but staff members confirmed bottling facility. The planned
Tuesday that the request had 70,000-square-foot plant would
been received, bring with it 52 jobs and, as
The bottled water company, sweetener to the deal, offer rev
headed by D.P. and Ruth High enue sharing with the county
with financial backing from Sid- that could be used as a funding
ney Gray, had secured a permit source to retrofit septic tanks.


to scra


f
e
t
r
d
i
1-
t
a
d
d
a
i-

g


"These offers were mocked,"
the company's statement said.
"The company developed regu-
latory strategies to be placed
in the county's comprehensive
plan to establish the strictest
standards in the state for lo-
cating bottled water plants. In
response, the vocal opposition
exaggerated and distorted the
results and played to the fears
of the community."
The main issues opponents
focused on in comments to
the planning commission were
Please turn to Page 3A


n


County still plans

to study water uses


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Even with the Highs' water
bottling plant taken off the
table, there still are issues re-
lated to water that the county
should study and develop into
a policy, County Commissioner
Ed Brimner told constituents in
one of his frequent e-mails.
The county commission, at
Brimner's suggestion, voted 3-


2 several weeks ago to spend
$20,000 on some as-yet-un-
named consultants to look into
the issues and make recommen-
dations to the board.
County Commissioner George
Green, who voted in support of
the motion, said this week that
he was in favor with going for-
ward with having consultants
Please turn to Page 3A


Second

chance

for former

substitute
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
A former substitute teacher
and teacher's aide at Wakulla
High School was given a sec-
ond chance after she violated
the terms of her probation on
a charge of having sex with a
16-year-old student.
Qunikiya Thomas, 25, was
in court on Thursday to be
sentenced for violating her com-
munity control by leaving home
without permission. She scored
a prison sentence of between
40.5 months and 15 years.
About a half-dozen of Thom-
as' family members and friends
- many of whom are prominent
and respected in the community
- made a plea to Circuit Judge
N. Sanders Sauls to not send the
young woman away to prison
and take her from her 5-year-old
daughter and 2-month-old son.
The judge obviously wrestled
with what to do, noting in his
comments from the bench that
Thomas had already received a
number of breaks in the case:
she was allowed to plea to a
lesser felony, had adjudica-
tion withheld (meaning there
was no finding of guilt), had
avoided a minimum mandatory
prison sentence of three years
through mitigating factors such
as no prior criminal history,
and she had also avoided being
Please turn to Page 14A

Inside
This Week
Almanac.................... Page 11A
Church Page 4A
Classifieds................ Page 3B
Comment & Opinion Page 2A
Crossword Puzzle.....Page 5B
Outdoors................ Page 10A
People Page 2B
School Page 1B
Sheriff's Report........ Page 13A
Sports Page 8A
Week In Wakulla........Page 3A

Coming
Next Week
A Closer Look At The
Proposed U.S. 98
Corridor







6 84578 22"'5 0


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
One of the first tasks new
Wakulla High School Principal
Mike Crouch took on in his post
last summer was to raise the
school grade and the academic
performances of War Eagle
students.
The high school has a differ-
ent look since Randy Newland
retired from the school after the
2005-2006 school year. The front
office of the school has been
remodeled and Crouch moved
the principal's office a few yards
down the hallway.
Crouch said the challenge
was to "change the culture of
the school," which has become
a team effort between the
district administration, school
administrators, teachers and
students. Late last fall, the high
school took another step toward
making improvements at WHS
by opening the new fieldhouse
at Reynolds Stadium.
Assistant Superintendent
Jimmie Dugger said the district


spent $1.6 million to provide the
new building on the northeast
end of the stadium. The facility
replaced an outdated fieldhouse
under the stadium.
The original fieldhouse was
built by several people includ-
ing former Coach J.D. Jones,
Dugger and Superintendent
David Miller. "It was built in
the mid to late 1970s," said
Dugger of the carpentry work
completed by district staff.
"We felt it was unsafe. It will
be torn out."
Eventually, the district plans
to renovate the old restroom
facilities in the original field-
house, but the rest of the facility
will be demolished.
War Eagle football coach
Scott Klees said he could not
be happier with the new field-
house. The football and soccer
teams use the facility which
has one large locker area, a
smaller locker room, two sets of
restrooms and showers on each
end of the building, office and


meeting room space.
A strong football team draws
college football coaches to
visit potential recruits and Klees
said WHS has been visited by
55 college coaches during the
past month and head coaches
Bobby Bowden of Florida State
University, Urban Meyer of the
University of Florida and Phil-
lip Fulmer of Tennessee in one
week close to national signing
day.
As Klees gets ready to coach
the 2007 weightlifting season,
he has been wildly busy at-
tempting to get football game
film to college coaches to evalu-
ate War Eagle prospects. "No-
body is happier than me," said
Klees of the opening of the
fieldhouse. The War Eagles were
able to use the building prior
to the final 2006 home game
against Tallahassee Chiles.
The facility is so new that
much of the furniture has
not been delivered. Coaches
Please turn to Page 14A


County eyes


improvements


at Mash Island


E7ib. K HI *. 5

Deep freeze
Molly Schoffel, 6, and her sister, Alexa, 4, of
Crawfordville enjoy a rare chance to touch icicles

Workshop held for
The first of four public hear- portation Corri
ings on a new highway cor- will consider fo
ridor plan for U.S. Highway 98 to improve traffic
was held in Crawfordville on times and hurric;
Tuesday, Feb. 20. The workshop in the Florida Pa
gave residents an opportunity Former Wakul
to discuss proposed changes iff's Office Maj
on the corridor, which includes pastor Maurice
approximately 250 miles from Wakulla County's
Wakulla County to Escambia on the corridor ai
County. ton and repress
The Northwest Florida Trans- the eight county


in north Florida. Sprinklers a
running Friday night at Craw
Park in an effort to keep pipes
ing an overnight freeze. The
to melt until about 10 a.m.

U.S. 98 cor


dor Authority
ur alternatives
ic safety, travel
ane evacuation
handle.
la County Sher-
or and church
SLangston is
Representative
authority. Langs-
entatives from
Area will con-


sider option
the four lani
98; creation
eastbound-v
inland from
and improve
267 and Hi
would crea
east-west tra
The alte
bypass rout
Please t


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla County Commission-
ers have a grant and a contractor
-- ... ... all lined up as board members
"* hope to address erosion prob-
.i;..; lems at the Mash Island Park
boat ramp in Ochlockonee Bay.
But board members were
forced to delay the construction
of a marine groin near the boat
ramp canal in an attempt to
identify additional funding to
complete the project.
Commissioners hope the
groin will reduce the amount
of sand that filters into the boat
ramp canal and make it easier
for boaters to reach the bay.
Without the groin, boaters must
apparently were left be careful to avoid launching at
Yfordville's Hudson low tide.
s from bursting dur- Contractor Ben Withers was
icicles didn't begin the only bidder for the project,
but his bid and the required
engineering left the county ap-
rildor proximately $153,000 short of
*II I having the funds to complete
s that could include the work. Withers bid $260,000
ing of U.S. Highway to place lime rock at the site
of a limited access rather than the original bid for
westbound highway granite. The granite bid was
the Gulf of Mexico; $286,500.
ements to Highway Wakulla County Grants and
highway 20 which Special Projects Director Pam
te another wider Portwood said the county has
avel option, been involved in the permitting
*rnatives include process for three years. If the
:e around Panama county can't determine where
urn to Page 3A to get the additional funds, the


grant money will have to be
sent back to the state and fed-
eral agencies, FWC and NOAA,
from which it came.
Deputy County Administrator
Joe Blanchard said the county
may have some hurricane dam-
age funding that can be used for
the project, but it is doubtful the
entire shortfall will be covered.
Commissioner Ed Brimner said
it is doubtful the county has
enough reserve funding to cover
the expense either.
Commissioners made a mo-
tion to continue the request
until the Feb. 20 board meeting
in an effort to identify funding
sources. The project must be
completed by June 30. Withers
said the project can meet the
deadline if the board approves
it before March.
In a related matter, the com-
mission approved the expendi-
ture of boat ramp repairs at the
Mash Island Park Boat Ramp.
Withers was selected as the low
bidder with a bid of $36,600. The
grant is funded by the state.
In other matters in front of
the Wakulla County Commis-
sion on Monday. Feb. 6:
Commissioners approved
a resolution recognizing Feb-
ruary as Black History Month
in Wakulla County. The third
Saturday in February has been
Please turn to Page 14A


Photo by Keith Blackmar
Wakulla High School Principal Mike Crouch and head
football coach Scott Klees are proud of the War Eagles'
new fieldhouse. It is one of many cosmetic changes
taking place at the school.


50

Cents


Wakulla High gives


facilities a facelift


ii'


I' __ I I


ifitbi'









Page 2A-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007




Comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895


My View



Let's embrace the


essence of water


To all of you watching and
reading the Water Wars, here are
a few items to consider.
It is not the emotional top-
pings or quick judgments we see
spread so fully in the lines of
text rattling with vindictive and
distinctively destructive prose.
For those of you continuing your
education, it is a different per-
spective, one of self education,
compromise and action.
Economics still drive change
in this culture and so do the
folks with the economic power.
Change their recovery planning
and change anything. Time,
partnerships and education are
key words here.
First rule is mother nature al-
ways bats last and does not care
about our thoughts or actions.
We simply exist as life's way of
keeping meat fresh, innovate
or perish.
Rule two is change is eter-
nally ongoing and in 100 years
nobody who is available now
for debate will be available
then.
Rule three to the end is water
rules everything. Well, every-
-thing alive.
Look at your hand and real-
ize it is water, 80 percent water.
Your body 80 percent water, and
the earth's surface 80 percent
water. The basic element of all
things of life and tied to life,
but do we really notice or un-
derstand that simple seemingly
endless stream of water?
Water rules everything that
is alive. This simple odorless,
-tasteless, clear substance is the
most available commodity on
the planet, of which 97 percent
is salty, 1 percent drinkable
and the rest locked up in polar
ice. It is soft and supple, but
Created the Grand Canyon and
; has turned many a mountain to
piles of small grains of sand.
Power is not in its nature
or desire but it exists in water
infinitely. Water is the only
substance that is naturally a
Sgas, liquid or solid along side us
as living creatures. Suck on an
ice cube as you drink your cold
water looking at the clouds and
quickly get all three.
Clear clean water brings life
and dirty polluted water death.
Squeeze anything alive and wa-
ter will come out; life and water
are one and life without water
does not exist. The 80 percent
rule is almost everywhere liv-
ing things are almost always 80
percent water. Pick one. Jellyfish
are often referred to as living
water 99 percent of their
makeup is H20.
In reality, bottled water may
be the first icon for th, true
value of clean water. Look at
your hand and think about
. flushing toilets, turning fau-
; cets, and opening bottles. But
Think most about how the edu-



wn w
- q.V


Comment


Robert Seidler
cated brain, the hand, eyes and
their movement regulate future
thirsty mouths or educates
consumers.
Think about water as the
most used solution in industry,
all the time making the items
we possess as they heat, beat
and treat everything to make
the stuff of the day.
Think and act as educat-
ed conservationalists. Let us
change our personal world first
and affect the entire world.
Education, accountability and
personal actions are more pow-
erful than anything.
As for the water plant, it
certainly began the thought
process of thinking about water.
But if it is stopped, we will for-
get and go on doing as we did.
Bigger players will in the end
get even more from us unless
we change.
Set the tone of change now
and demand them to do as
you do.
If it is allowed, just maybe
we could begin to understand
and celebrate the value of water
and brand Wakulla (the county)
as something truly special and
the water worth protecting as
the most and all valuable asset.
Each bottle a little messenger
about Wakulla and its pro-ac-
tive attitude and life-producing
product, the best product in
the universe, clean water. We
could do this but would have to
work together in ways not yet
dreamed of.
Personally, my compromise
would be to fold the talked-
about profit sharing into envi-
ronmental education on water.
We have the opportunity to
do this as partners with Gulf
Specimen Marine Lab (Jack
Rudloe willing). This saltwater
life and wonder-based place
could stimulate fully the type of
change we are hoping for.
Let's create our way out of
this destruction and deadlock
pro-actively for once by grow-
ing water-empowered children.
They are 80 percent water. you
know
I am for putting value on
water and protecting it. I am
for focused education on water
and its powers, conservation
and uses.
If the Highs and their water
plant could achieve this unreal-
ized goal, we would be a model
for the Greening of Florida.
Let us draw the good from
the bad and move ahead where
no one has gone before. Hypo-
crites or visionaries, it is our
choice.
Robert Seidler writes from
Sopchoppy.


Zbe Wakulla Aetu
The Wakulla News (USPS 644-640) is published weekly at
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla
News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
Editor & General Manager: Ira Schoffel............... ischoffel@thewakullanews.net
News Editor: Keith Blackmar kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Reporter: William Snowden wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Sales Manager: Tammie Barfield tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey................... kinsey@thewakullanews.net
Bookkeeping: Sherry Balchuck accounting@thewakullanews.net
Classifieds: Robin Moreno classifieds@thewakullanews.net
Circulation: Cyndi Perkins/Jamie Ridley............ circulation@thewakullanews.net
Graphic Artist: Eric Stanton advertising@thewakullanews.net
Typesetter: Jessie Maynor advertising@thewakullanews.net
Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable
one year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $25, Out of County $30
Out of State $35. Out of Country on Request

GET THE WAKULLA NEWS DELIVERED
Call 926-7102


Your Views


Highs deserve credit
for heeding concerns
Editor, The News:
According to published re-
ports, the Highs are withdraw-
ing their application to build
a bottling plant and to pump
water from the Wakulla Springs
area. In the words of their pub-
lic-relations firm, "... the owners
realized the project would not
be embraced."
Speaking on behalf of the
Wakulla Watershed Coalition,
I respect and commend the
Highs for coming to the real-
ization that the general public
was overwhelmingly opposed
to this project and for having
the fortitude to pull the plug
on the project, thus sparing the
community further turmoil on
the issue.
The Highs, in essence, are
respecting the will of the com-
munity of which they have
long been a part.
The will of the community,
I think, was epitomized by the
events surrounding the Plan-
ning and Zoning Commission
meeting on Feb. 12. At that
time, a great number of Wakulla
citizens took the time to appear
and voice their strong opposi-
tion to the project.
The commissioners listened
attentively and, at the end of the
discussion, voted by a margin
of 6-1 that this water project
was not a good fit for Wakulla
County. The Coalition com-
mends these six commission-
ers for having the courage to
stand up and make a statement
about the quality of life here in
Wakulla County.
In relation to our spearhead-
ing of the opposition to this
water-pumping project, it should
be noted that the Wakulla Wa-
tershed Coalition was formed by
concerned civic-minded groups
and individuals in an effort to
protect our water resources, our
quiet, rural way of life, and our
natural treasures like Wakulla
Springs.
A major component of the
Coalition's reason for being is
to provide education in these ar-
eas. In this regard, the Coalition
is sponsoring an educational
seminar at the Wakulla County
Library at 7 p.m. on Feb. 26.
Among the presentations will
be the airing of an excellent
video discussing Wakulla's wa-
ter issues and the impact on our
citizens. The public is invited,
and we welcome the opportu-
nity to shed more light on the
subject of preserving Wakulla
County's water resources and
our unique way of life.
David Murrell, president,
Wakulla Watershed
Coalition, Inc.
Crawfordville

Water supply should
be cherished, not sold
Editor, The News:
I will say first off that my
wife and I are transplants from
Manatee County to Wakulla
County, coming 3 1/2 years ago.
We subscribed to The Wakulla
News just after we moved up
here, and I usually read all the
articles concerning the pro-
posed water bottling plant.
It makes chills run up my
spine to think that the people
of Wakulla County should come
together and stop this theft of
the most precious liquid on this
planet.
I have been associated with
wells and pumps for the longest
part of my life. About 65 years


ago, my dad started his own
business with wells and pumps.
I remember when a lot of people
raised their families on what
we now call surface water, or
groundwater, which came from
wells that were hand dug or
simply a piece of 1 1/4-inch
steel pipe driven down to 15
or 20 feet with a hand/pitcher
pump.
We could even drink water
from the creek and rivers with-
out any type of purifying addi-
tives or filtering, and had no
fear of getting sick. People who
had a drilled well and pump,
including us, used the water for
all their needs. And the wells
were usually no larger than two
inches and approximately 50
feet deep. I am writing all this
to say that I'm not barking up
the wrong tree.
I have lived to see water
contaminated from saltwater
intrusion to the point that it is
virtually useless. Some of the
wells that used to water beauti-
ful lawns and shrubs have such
a high content of salt that the
grass, shrubs and flowers all
turned brown and died. Some
of the wells were so corroded
with rust and junk that they
had to be cemented in, so that
the wells could not allow the
underground stream to pull in
more salt.
All of this is caused by the
thousands of wells inland reduc-
ing the pressure on the aquifer
and letting the gulf saltwater
push in. Fortunately, the powers
that be had enough forethought
to put a dam across the upper
Manatee River to create Lake
Manatee, which is now several
thousand acres.
They also bought up all the
watershed property surround-
ing the lake, which had several
ranches, farms and phosphate
mines. For several years, the
phosphate transports were go-
ing 24 hours a day and really
degraded the highway to the
point it was dangerous.
All of the residents of Wakul-
la, Leon and the surrounding
counties should fight this rip-off
of all of us, because after all, the
water has to come from some
place upstream.
This whole thing is just to
line the pockets of a few, and
most of us will get only prob-
lems.
Harvey C. Albritton
Crawfordville

Independent Reporter
story missed mark
Editor, The Newss
After receiving a call concern-
ing the article last week (writ-
ten by Wakulla News reporter
William Snowden) about the
Wakulla Independent Reporter,
I picked up The Wakulla News
to get the "facts."
Well, the facts weren't quite
right. The one that jumped out
the most was the one claim-
ing that the first issue of the
Wakulla Independent Report-
er had asked citizens to vote
against Maxie Lawhon and Mike
Stewart, who were running for
re-election at the time.
The article also noted that
was Mr. Wurster's (the gentle-
man who filed the complaint
against the newspaper with the
Florida Election Commission)
biggest complaint against the
inaugural issue of the Wakulla
Independent Reporter. That
wasn't quite right either. Wurst-
er's biggest complaint was that
he perceived the newspaper to
be anti-development.


Letters Policy
The Wakulla News welcomes your letters, but we request that
you adhere to the following guidelines:
Letters should not be longer than 300 words.
They must include the writer's name, home address and
telephone number. (Only name and town will be listed; the rest
is used solely for the purpose of verification.)
Writers may be limited to one letter per month, depending
upon space limitations.
With very few exceptions, anonymous letters will not be
published.
Letters can be sent via mail or e-mail (newsroom@
thewakullanews.net), or they can be dropped off at our Craw-
fordville Highway office.
The Wakulla News reserves the right to edit all letters.


In fact, the Wakulla Indepen-
dent Reporter did not endorse
any candidates in the first issue.
However, in 2006, the newspa-
per did choose to endorse can-
didates, which is well within the
rights of any of any newspaper
as Mr. Snowden knows.
Mr. Wurster was also wrong
about the anti-development
viewpoints. Not only is the
Reporter entitled to have a
viewpoint, but The Reporter's
viewpoint is not anti-develop-
ment, but in fact is pro-planned
development in the interests of
continuing growth and creating
a viable economic community.
This was also clearly expressed
in an editorial in that first is-
sue.
Julia Hanway
Wakulla Independent
Reporter
Crawfordville

Editor's notes The Inde-
pendent Reporter's first issue
featured photographs of bill-
boards calling for change in the
pending election.
The Wakulla News' Feb. 15
article about The Reporter did
not make any assertions about
Walter Wurster's motivation for
complaining about the publica-
tion.

Musicians better than
blaring car stereos
Editor, The News:
Ouzts it isn't, but it's nearby;
a place to hear local musicians.
They are under fire for being
heard twice a week, while
people with no apparent musi-
cal talent or taste can be heard
24 hours a day on our highways
roads and streets.
If we're going to suppress
noise, let's not be discrimina-
tory. Or, let's be really discrimi-
natory and decide who has the
most to offer; a business that
provides jobs and can be,made
to comply or people who are
simply bored and waste gaso-
line to disturb the peace over a
much wider area.


While asking t
on the street to tu
generally produces
gesture, I'm sure O
not be so inclined.


Students' beha
was appalling
Editor, The Newss
I was parked a
High School waiti
up my wife after a r
her job. The school
squad came marchir
formation and off to
them came a group
walking to what I I
out was the entrance
locker room area.
A pair of stude
second group start
Stepping" through t
formation with t
raised into the air i
fashion.
For those of you
know what it mean
Step, this is the wa
marched for Adolf H
World War II. Once
got over to the lo
one of them started
on the door and ye
quote, "Hurry and
(expletive) doorl" TI
school grounds arou
on Tuesday morni.
Wakulla County.
There were seven
students walking p
student was expr
true upbringing an
If this was an isolat
or an everyday occ
was pitiful. Not o
for all the parents,
parents of these tw
who they will even
up to become.
The lack of respect
the junior members
and the young ladi
by at the time was a
pointment to me.
Some parents I
managed to raise a
misguided children.
holding my name a
has a job with the cc
have found out here


that retribution is possible.
Name withheld

Money the only thing
that matters to some
Editor, The Newss
The truth is no one knows
what effect the water plant will
have on the environment. The
real issue here is what money,
or the prospect of money, does
to unprincipled people. Money
is usually the motivating factor
in local politics, and Waktilla
County has always been the
poster child.
When I moved to Sanborn
in 1989, I had no sooner gotten
home from the health depart-
ment (septic system permit) that
I received a phone call from a
prominent plumbing contrac-
tor/county commissioner: to
solicit my business. We all
remember Mike Stewart, who
voted against the self-sustaining
community before he voted for
it, a week later.
People get into national
politics for ideological reasons;
to make a difference. People
enter the local political scene
because there is something
they want, generally something
material that pertains to per-
mitting. That's why the com-
mission roster is typically rife
with contractors and real estate
developers.
As far as the principals (not
principles) in the water deal are
concerned, the people of Wakul-
la County are a stumbling block
in their quest for riches and they
will spare no treasure to bully
their way into the spring water
business.
If the people of Wakulla
County stand still for this trav-
esty, I'm standing ready to fence
off 40 acres of the Apalachicola
National Forest for my proposed
artichoke farm.
Rodney W. Saucier
Sopchoppy

County has done
plenty to save water


he people Editor, The Newss
rn it down In 1994, upon learning about
an obscene the cave that conducts water to
uzts would Wakulla Springs, the Wakulla
County Commission created a
Ted Pusey mile-wide protection zone over
Medart the cave to protect the waters
flowing to Wakulla Spring.
Ivior This is the first, and to date the
only, protection zone created to
protect a Florida spring and it
demonstrated progressive envi-
at Wakulla ronmental leadership.
ng to pick In 2006, the Wakulla County
meeting for Commission, and other parties,
l's R.O.T.C. pressed the City of Tallahassee
ng along in to substantially reduce the ni-.
the right of trogen being discharged at the
of students Southeast Sprayfield. The city
later found has agreed to do so.
Sof the boys In January, the Leon County
Commission agreed to move
nts in the forward with the drafting of an
:ed "Goose ordinance to require nitrogen-
:he R.O.T.C. reducing septic systems for new
heir arms development in the vulnerable
n true Nazi portion of the county south of
the Cody Scarp. This too, will
who do not be an important contribution
is to Goose for the protection of Wakulla
y the Nazis Spring.
itler during Now the Wakulla County
the youths Commission is poised to dem-
cked door, onstrate progressive leadership
d pounding again by requiring nitrogen-re-
elled, and I during septic systems for new
open this development in the county.
hat was on This action will be a major
und 10 a.m. contribution to the protection
ng here in of Wakulla Spring, Apalachee
Bay and the drinking water of
eral female their citizens.
)ast as this Our local governments are
essing his taking action to protect Wakulla
d heritage. Spring and our drinking water.
ed incident Jim Stevenson
:urrence, it Tallahassee


nly pitiful
but for the
o boys and
tually grow

:t shown for
of R.O.T.C.
es walking
total disap-

have truly
Couple of
I am with-
as my wife
county and I
in Wakulla


Leave Nothing Butt
Your Footprint;








Keep MakuD(a

County Beautlfu(


I A










THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007-Page 3A


Water plant's confusing final days


Flurry of

activity

created uproar

By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
The plan to withdraw the
Wakulla Springs Bottled Water
plant proposal seemed easy
enough: draft a press release
explaining your reasons, send
it out, then mail in the request
that the project be dropped.


It did not work so simply,
and that only seemed to fuel
some citizens' distrust of the
project.
The two-page statement,
drafted late last week by com-
pany officials, was sent by
e-mail to area media around 5
p.m. Friday.
It was headed EMBARGOED
UNTIL SUNDAY, meaning in
news talk that it was supposed
to be held until Sunday.
Disregarding the embargo,
WCTV broke the news in its


11 p.m. broadcast on Friday
night.
On Monday, the company
faxed in a letter to the county
requesting the comprehensive
plan amendment be withdrawn
- but county offices were closed
for the Presidents Day holi-
day.
On Tuesday, the letter was
received, but there was also a
communication from Darrin
Taylor, the official agent on the
project, requesting officials to
disregard the letter. Then, later,


a clarification: No, the matter is
withdrawn.
"The amendment is with-
drawn," Taylor confirmed on
Tuesday afternoon. "The press
release is very clear."
Paul Johnson, an environ-
mental consultant on the proj-
ect, confirmed that it is the
intent of the company not to
pursue the matter any further,
despite the second Tuesday cor-
respondence.
Melissa Coleman Corbett,
interim planning director of the


county, sent out a memo later
on Tuesday to Taylor, Sidney
Gray, and Ruth and D.P. High,
copied to county commission-
ers and the county administra-
tor, saying the application is
withdrawn.
"For purposes of clarifica-
tion," Corbett wrote, "this let-
ter is to acknowledge receipt
of your withdrawal letter for
Comprehensive Plan Amend-
ments ...
"The two applications are
now officially withdrawn."


Legislative

group to meet

The Wakulla County Legisla-
tive Delegation will hold its
annual legislative delegation
hearing in Crawfordville on
Thursday, Feb. 25.
The public hearing will be
held at 6 p.m. at the county
commission chambers on Arran
Road.
The 2007 Legislative Session
begins on Tuesday, March 6.
Wakulla County legislators
include Senator Al Lawson, Rep.
Will Kendrick and Rep. Marti
Coley.


U.S. 98
Continued from Page 1A
City and the Fort Walton Beach
areas as well as connections to
the proposed Red Hills Parkway
from Interstate 10 in Tallahassee
to U.S. Highway 98 in Wakulla
County. The price tag for the
most ambitious project proposal
is $11.5 billion.
Residents who did not attend
the Feb. 20 meeting still have


-Water
Continued from Page 1A
look into the matter. "I don't
think there's anything wrong
with studying the issue," he said.
"We need to have some kind of
backup-fallback plan; some direc-
tion to go in that's in the interest
of the county."
The main thrust of Brimner's
e-mail, sent out Sunday night,
.was gaining local control over
local water issues.
"There are at least five water
operations in Wakulla County,"
he writes. "Sopchoppy Water,
City of Tallahassee, Panacea Area
Water, Mysterious Waters, Riv-
ersink Area Water. (Brimner did
not mention Talquin Electric Co-
operative's water service.) "And
we have no controls over four of
these and no formal policy over
the Riversink system, which is
owned by Wakulla County."
Brimner noted that he had
heard a rumor that Panacea Area
Water is negotiating to provide
water to homes in Alligator Point
as well as the St. Joe-planned
-SummerCamp development,
both of which are in Franklin
County.
"I'm convinced once Wakulla
County begins selling water
to other areas of the state, the
argument against 'selling' water


Plant
Continued from Page 1A
concerns about heavy truck
traffic and that it was an indus-
trial land use in an otherwise
rural residential neighborhood
:- which begged the question
of whether it would be spot
zoning.
Underneath those stated con-
cerns was water and the argu-
ment about who should control
and profit from the resource.
"We're pleased that they saw
the light," said Della Parker-
Hanson, president of Friends
of Wakulla Springs, which had
opposed construction of the
plant.
That sentiment was echoed
by David Murrell, president of
the Wakulla Watershed Coali-
tion. "I think the Highs made
a good decision," he said. "The
community was overwhelmingly
opposed to it.
"I respect and commend the
Highs for pulling the project,"
Murrell said. "It's been a big,
emotional issue for the county


time to comment on the trans-
portation maps. The proposals
can be found at www.nwftca.
com and comments may be sent
electronically.
The project master plan will
be adopted on March 15. For
more information about the cor-
ridor project and its impact on
Wakulla County, please see the
March 3 issue of The Wakulla
News.



to South Florida or other areas
is much less convincing," he
wrote. "After all, what is the
difference in pumping water 15
miles or 150 miles? As of now,
Wakulla County has no voice in
this issue."
Brimner also wrote that he
had committed to voting against
the land use proposal from
Wakulla Springs Bottled Water,
not because it was a bad pro-
posal but because, he said, he
didn't have enough facts to make
the decision.
Brimner also fired a few light
barbs at County Attorney Ron
Mowrey in the e-mail, indicating
without mentioning Mowrey by
name that he would not be an
appropriate choice as a proposed
consultant to look into the water
issues.
"In my view, we cannot de-
pend on our current legal counsel
(his expertise is not in this area
and he would want extra pay
to do this job)," Brimner wrote,
although he did add: "I'm sure
our current legal counsel will
be extremely helpful to ensure
whatever policies we implement
*will be legally defensible."
Mowrey had indicated that he
might be useful in making rec-
ommendations for consultants
to the board.


and the citizens obviously don't
want it."
But opponent Madeleine
Carr had a different take on
the matter, saying she felt the
issue was being pulled before
the questions were answered
including any potential legal
challenges, which leaves the
matter unresolved.
"I'm not happy," Carr said. "I
think they threw in the towel,"
she said, "and it's going to come
back again."
"I trust the process; I don't
trust our elected officials," she
Added. "I don't trust double-talk;
SI don't trust anyone who said
it's 'transparent.' I trust the citi-
zens to know they need to stay
involved."
The company statement con-
cluded by saying, "The greatest
disappointment is the death of
the dream of D.P. and Ruth High.
SThe Highs, life-long residents
with deep roots in the county,
literally gave all they had to the
project. They ran their race and
Fought the good fight."


Commercial fishermen file for rehearing


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Fishermen filed a request
for rehearing at the First Dis-
trict Court of Appeal last week,
arguing that the judicial panel
erred in its decision upholding
net rules passed by the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission.
Ron Mowrey, attorney for
Wakulla Commercial Fisher-
men's Association, filed a mo-
tion at the appeal court on
Friday asking the three-judge
panel to reconsider their ruling,
saying the court overlooked
expert testimony and statistics
that showed the FWC's rules
were having an adverse affect
on mullet population.
The motion also claims that
the agency did not consider the
amount of bycatch that would
be the result of requiring small
mesh nets and the fishermen
argue that juvenile mullet are
caught in the nets while larger,
marketable fish escape.
"Liberty is dependent on the
rule, which in turn is dependent
on a true separation of powers
enforced by a system of checks
and balances," the motion ar-
gues. "Though the judiciary


is left as the sole check upon
(the FWC), the court's opinion,
whether intentionally or not,
has set the precedent for (the
FWC) to evade any constitution-
al challenge of its authority by
submitting an affidavit of one of
its employees representing that
its rules are without fault."
That sentiment was echoed
in the dissenting opinion of one
judge on the panel, Chief Judge
Edwin Browning Jr., who sug-
gested the ruling would serve
as a precedent that would make
it difficult for citizens to chal-
lenge agency rules and lead to
"the growth of imperious agen-
cies, with all of the mischief it
entails."
But two other members of
the panel upheld an original
ruling by Leon Circuit Judge
Janet Ferris in which she ruled
for the agency, finding that the
FWC is authorized to make rules
to regulate fishing and that,
as long as the rules meet the
rational basis test of fulfilling a
public purpose, the court had to
uphold them.
The net ban included the
outlawing of gill and entangl-
ing nets, which has led to years


of legal wrangling over what
constitutes a gill net. With the
intention of creating a "bright
line" for legal nets, the agency
passed a rule requiring nets
have mesh no larger than two
inches stretched.
The latest legal action by
fishermen was an attempt to
have a court declare that the
two-inch rule violated the net
ban because the smaller mesh
resulted in a considerably high-
er rate of bycatch, and therefore

YARD SALE

SATURDAY, FEB. 24
2638 Coastal Highway in
Medart (Brown's Seafood)

Furniture Beds Clothes
(including petite women's) *
Dresser Dishes More
GREAT DEALS!!!
8:30 a.m. 1 p.m.


overfishing and waste, than
larger mesh nets.
Judge Ferris scoffed at the
idea, saying that if the argument
were carried to the logical con-
clusion it would result in every
net being banned.
Not so, fishermen countered,
saying that the larger mesh nets
capture the targeted species and
have less bycatch. To which the
agency said: It has less bycatch
because the large nets illegally
gill marketable-size mullet.

AKC BOSTON
TERRIERS
I For Sale!!!
***Parents on Premises***

S FLORIDA HEALTH
CERTIFICATES AND
FIRST VACCINATIONS

Call Angela (850) 926-3223


WEEK IN WAKULLA


Thursday, February 22, 2007
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB meets at Posey's Up the Creek in Panacea at noon.
LEGISLATIVE DELEGATION will discuss issues of the upcoming legislative
session at a public hearing in the commission boardroom at 6 p.m. The delegation
includes Sen. Al Lawson (D-Tallahassee), Rep. Will Kendrick (R-Carrabelle) and
Rep. Marti Coley (R-Marianna).
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at 12 noon.
WATER FORUM, sponsored by Concerned Citizens of Wakulla (CCOW), will be
held at TCC Wakulla from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Scheduled speakers include Hal Davis
with the U.S. Geological Survey, also planned is a screening of "The Heart of Wakul-
la County," a short video on local water issues produced by the Wakulla Watershed
Coalition. A social will be held at 6:30 p.m.
Friday, February 23, 2007
AA meets at the American Legion Building next to the Women's Club in Crawford-
ville with an open women's meeting at 6 p.m. There are also open meetings Wednes-
day at 8 p.m., Friday at 8 p.m., and Sunday at 6 p.m.
ALZHEIMER'S SUPPORT GROUP meets at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.
PICKIN' 'N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10
a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
Saturday, February 24, 2007
FREE TAX AID is available at the public library from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
OLD JAIL MUSEUM will be open selling thrift shop and historical society items to
benefit renovation of the museum from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday, February 27, 2007
BOOK BABIES, for infants and toddlers, meets at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
FREE TAX AID is available at the public library from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.
NA meets at Joanna Johnson's office in the Barry Building at 7 p.m.
WRITERS OF WAKULLA meet at the public library at 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday, February 28, 2007
AA meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.
BOOK BUNCH, for pre-school and home school families, meets at the public library
at 10:30 a.m.
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior citizens center at 10:30 a.m.
FREE TAX AID is available at the senior center from I p.m. to 4 p.m.


RACHAEL'S CLOSET

Where You'll Find A Little Of Everything

Now accepting Consignments
for Spring clothing.
Infants Toddlers Teens Baby Items
Home Decor.& Housewares


2310 Crawfordville Hwy.
Next Door To The Forgotten Coast
926-2247


ck'oom2n 3


TUESDAY PRIME RIB
FRIDAY RIBEYE
STUFFED: GROUPER -- FLOUNDER -- LOBSTER
SATURDAY PRIME RIB

COUNTRY STYLE HOME COOKING L J
LUNCH SPECIALS S6.50 h .
(INCLUDES TEA & TAX))

COME SEE OUR NEW MENU
& REMEMBER -- YOU CAN ALWAYS
COUNT ON POSEY'S FRESH SEAFOOD'

984-5243
OPEN TUESDAY WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY' I AM. 9 PM
FRIDAY & SATURDAY II AM 10 PM SUNDAY 4 PM 'M. '
1506 COASTAL HIGHWAY PANACEA


MMOMMI


4:.StE4


3a7;








Page 4A-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007


Church


Obituaries
LaUna J. Anderson
LaUna Joy "Sissy" Anderson,
68, of Woodville died Sunday,
Feb. 18 at Margaret Dozier Hos-
pice House.
A celebration of her life for
friends and family will be held
from 3 p.m. until 5 p.m. Sunday,
Feb. 25 at the home of Jeff and
Gini West, 3815 East Millers
Bridge Road in Tallahassee.
Memorial contributions may be
made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723
Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee,
FL 32308.
She was born Nov. 10, 1938
in Tallahassee to the late Wil-
liam Thomas Cogswell, Sr. and
Mary LaUna Hosford Cogswell.
Her passion was cooking. She
was a member of Trinity United
Methodist Church.
Survivors include a broth-
er, William Thomas "Bubba"
Cogswell, Jr. of Tallahassee;
a sister, Lucy Hosford Krontz
of St. George Island; a niece,
Alexis Carol Gaston; two neph-
ews, Charles Everett "Charlie"
Cogswell and Stephan Scot
Abcarian; two grandnephews,
Carlos Everett Gaston and Reese
Everett Cogswell: two aunts,
Lucy Hosford Yancey and Betty
Hosford Thompson; and a host
of cousins.
Bevis Funeral Home in Tal-
lahassee is in charge of the ar-
rangements.

Harland E. Beebe
Harland Earl Beebe, 92, of
Fredonia, Kan., formerly of Iola
and Geneva, died Monday, Feb.
12 in Fredonia.
Graveside services were held
on Friday, Feb. 16 at Buckeye
Cemetery near Kanopolis, Kan.
with Rev. Stephen Holmes of
Kanopolis United Methodist
Church officiating. A memo-
rial has been established in
his name at the Crawfordville
United Methodist Church and
may be sent to the funeral home.
Family condolences may be sent
to www.timmonsfuneralhome.
com.
A native of Ellsworth County,
Kan., he was the son of Ernest
W. and Bell Alcorn Beebe. He
served in the U.S. Army dur-
ing World War II and lived and
farmed most of his life in the
Iola and Geneva areas. He owned
a salvage yard in lola and also
worked updating rural maps
and directories. He married
the late Cornelia Black on Oct.
2, 1941. She died on March 23,
1953. He was a member of the
First United Methodist Church
and the American Legion and
enjoyed dances in the area.
Survivors include a daugh-
ter, Fern Sloan of Tallahassee;
two sons, Buddy Beebe of For-
est, Miss. and Kent Beebe of
Kanopolis; four step-sons, Martin
Canfield of Iola, Steve Canfield
of Crawfordville, Ron Canfield of
Northeast, Md. and Rick Hudson
of Salsbury, N.C.; a companion,
Wilma Condit of Fredonia; a
sister, Cleora Mabie of Park City,
Kan.; 13 grandchildren; nine
great-grandchildren and one
great-great-grandchild.
Timmons Funeral Home in


Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worship................ 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .............5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details,
962-2213


Fredonia, Kan. was in charge of
the arrangements.

James F. Dannelly, Sr.
James Fredrick Dannelly Sr.,
89, Of Crawfordville died Sun-
day, Feb. 18 in Tallahassee.
The funeral service was held
Wednesday, Feb. 21 at Bevis Fu-
neral Home in Tallahassee with
burial at Woodville Cemetery.
A native and lifelong resident
of Wakulla County, he was a
veteran of World War II having
served in the Army Air Corps
in the Pacific Theater in New
Guinea. He worked for 25 years
with the Chevrolet dealership
as a paint-and-body technician.
He loved the outdoors, hunting
and fishing.
Survivors include a son, Jim-
my Dannelly of Crawfordville;
a stepdaughter, Ann Little of
Wakulla; a nephew, Cal Miller
and wife Jewell of Zephyrhills;
and a number of grandchildren
and great-grandchildren.
Bevis Funeral Home in Tal-
lahassee was in charge of the
arrangements.

Emma M. Davis
Emma Mae Davis, 79, of Tal-
lahassee died Saturday, Feb. 10.
The funeral service was held
Saturday, Feb. 17 at Woodville
Church of Christ Written in
Heaven with burial at English
Cemetery.
She, was a member of Wood-
ville Church of Christ Written in
Heaven, where she sang in the
choir and served on the Usher
Board. She was a homemaker
and a member of the Order of
the Eastern Star.
Survivors include a son, An-
drew Thompson and Sabrina
of Tallahassee; a brother-in-
law, Dosh White and Ruby of
Crawfordville; four sisters, Mae
Frances Gay and the Rev. Dan Sr.,
Eartha Lee Gallon and Rosa Mae
Washington, all of Crawfordville,
and Willie Mae Gavin of Phila-
delphia; a sister-in-law, Nellie
White; eight grandchildren; and
four great-grandchildren.
Strong & Jones Funeral Home
in Tallahassee was in charge of
the arrangements.

Mary L. Hissong
Mary Louise Hissong, 60, of
Panacea died Wednesday, Feb.
14 in Tallahassee.
The funeral service was held
Saturday, Feb. 17 at Harvey-Young
Funeral Home in Crawfordville.
A native of Mesick, Mich., she
had lived in Panacea for 12 years
after moving from Clearwater.
She was a housekeeper in the
hotel industry and of the Baptist
faith.

Wakulla
United Methodist Church
SSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m.
S Sunday Worship 11 a.m.
Wednesday Service 7 p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor Drew Standridge

Trinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
TrinityLutheranofWakulla.com
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Les Kimball
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557


Crawfordville United

Methodist Church

Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 926-7209
Ochlockonee &Arran Road "Come Grow With Us" www.crawfordville-umc.org

oiscooe,"L e J ,c,,e/ ece.e/


FiRS1
BAJp)st (l .hUCI-I


:3086 Crawfordville Hwy.
(South of the Courthouse)
Church Office: 926-7896
www.fbccrawfordville.org
or
(youth) Www.crosstrailiming.org


SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Fellowship Meal 6:00 p.m.
(call for reservations)
Prayer/ Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
IMPACT (Youth) 7:00 p.m.
Children's Events 6:30 p.m.


Survivors include her mother,
Velma Hissong of Panacea, and
a brother, Ronnie Hissong and
wife Brenda of Clearwater.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.

Ronda M. Hurley
Ronda M. Hurley, 42, of Craw-
fordville died Saturday, Feb. 17
in St. Marks.
The graveside service will be
at 2 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 22 at
Hurley Hill Cemetery in Spring
Creek. A gathering will be at
*6 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 21, at
Ronnie's home, 12 Fulford St.,
St. Marks. Memorial contribu-
tions may be made to Covenant
Hospice, 1545 Raymond Diehl
Road, suite 102, Tallahassee, FL
32308. A native of Murphy, N.C.,
she was a resident of Wakulla
County since 1969, coming from
North Carolina. She was of the
Baptist faith and a legal secretary
for a law firm.
Survivors include a son, Mi-
chael Hurley Jr. and wife Sheree
of Woodville; two daughters,
Christina Pilgrim and husband
Bryon and Ashley Hurley, all of
Crawfordville; a bother, Ronnie
Day and wife Michelle of St.
Marks; three sisters, Charlotte
Stanley and husband Carson
of St. Marks, Lisa Alvarez and
husband John of Jacksonville
and Paula Barfield and husband
Bryan of Monticello; her compan-
ion, David Byrd of Crawfordville;
four grandchildren; and a host of
nieces and nephews.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville is in charge of
the arrangements.

Mary E. Knott
Mary E. Knott, 87, of Tallahas-
see died Thursday, Feb. 15 in
Tallahassee.
A memorial service will be
held at a later date.
A native of Milford, N.Y., she
was a homemaker and attended
Beulah Baptist Church.
Survivors include a son, Ken-
neth Knott of Oneonta, N.Y.; two
daughters, Judith Crabtree of Tal-
lahassee and Pamela Wiedeman
and husband Steve of Maryland,
N.Y.; a sister, Helen Carley of
Milford; a sister-in-law, Marian
Martin of Crawfordville; several
grandchildren; two great-grand-
children; and a host of nieces
and nephews.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge

St. Elizabetht\ _-
v-S -
Ann Seton ;V-

Catholic Chii li
Mass 9 a.m. Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Father James MacGee, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
926-1797
U -


W k ll S n 1391 Crawfordville Highway
W A t l Op i gS Crawfordville, FL 32327
IsArPTIS UIJRCI-i

Sunday Activities Wednesday Evening Activities
Continental Breakfast 9:15 a.m. Family Night Supper 5:30 p.m.
Bible Study/Fellowship 9:45 a.m. Children/Youth/Adult Activities 6:45 p.m.
Worship Service 11 a.m.
General Office Hours: Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m.
Office 850-926-5152 Fax 850-926-5825 School Office 850-926-5583
Website: www.byhisgrace.cc/wsbc
L-

Hwy 319 Medart,
Office 926-5265
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
M o00C ^u Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
[) Morning Worship l1:00 a.m.
S ,E AWANA Clubs 4:00 p.m.
h Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org


of the arrangements.

Doris L. Staples
Doris Lee "Sam" Staples, 72,
of Crawfordville died Friday, Feb.
16 in Tallahassee.
A memorial service will be
held at 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 24
at Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville
A native of Pell City, Ala., she
had lived in Crawfordville for
four years after moving from Pell
City. She was of the Baptist faith
and a homemaker.
Survivors include three sons,
Charles Ray Coshatt and wife
Willie Belle of Pell City, Bobby
Coshatt and wife Penny of
Crawfordville and Alton Wyatt
Coshatt of Opelika, Ala.; a broth-
er, Major Lee of Oklahoma City,
Okla.; a sister, Jeanette Lee of
Pell City; 13 grandchildren; and
six great-grandchildren.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville is in charge of
the arrangements.
Thomas E.Whaley
Thomas Evans Whaley, 89, of
North Fort Myers died Friday,
Feb. 16 in Bonita Springs.
The funeral service was held
Wednesday, Feb. 21 at Lake El-
len Baptist Church with burial
at Lake Ellen Cemetery. Memo-
rial contributions may be made
to the Florida Sheriff's Youth
Ranch, P.O. Box 2000, Boys
Ranch, FL 32064.
He moved to Fort Myers in
1958 from St. Petersburg and to
North Fort Myers in 1961. A vet-
eran of World War II, he served
in the U.S. Army and was the
former owner of Whaley's Bar-
ber Shop in North Fort Myers.
He was plant manager for more
than 20 years at the Sinclair Oil
Company in Fort Myers. He was
a member of the North Fort My-
ers First Baptist Church and Lake
Ellen Baptist Church in Medart.
Survivors include his wife of
60 years, Nellie Ople Whaley of
North Fort Myers: two daugh-
ters, Charlene Whaley Day and
husband Ron of Savannah, Ga.
and Karen Sue Berman and
husband Richard of North Fort
Myers; a son, Michael E. Whaley
and wife Judy of Bonita Springs;
two sisters, Cornelia Harden of
Sopchoppy and Mary Wiggins of
Atlanta; nine grandchildren; and
12 great-grandchildren.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.

Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
~ Ruit.W Craufordville
IPastor,
Daniel Cooksey
"Come& Worsmhip Witeh Us"
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship ...................... 11 a.m.
Evening Worship....................... 6 p.m.
Wednesday Service .................7 p.m.
& Youth Service 7 p.m.
Royal Rangers 7 p.m.
Missionettes 7 p.m.


Panacea Park'

Baptist Church
24 Mission Road, Panacea
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Worship 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 p.m.
Pastor, Jerry Spears


Church News
Anniversary
Thessalonia Missionary Bap-
tist Church in the Hyde Park
community will host a 49th anni-
versary senior choir celebration
on Sunday, Feb. 25. At 11 a.m.,
Rev. Stanley Sims of St. Nora
Primitive Baptist Church will
deliver the message.
At 3 p.m., a gospel explosion
will be held with Greg Hines and
the Harmony Quintet, Phoebe
and the Chosen Ones, Casey
and Divine Purpose and others
performing.
The mistress of ceremonies
will be Dot Brown of 93.3 FM in
Quincy. For more information,
call Joeann Nelson at 926-8329
or 544-8956.

Concert
Crawfordville United Method-
ist Church will host a concert and
fellowship on Sunday, March 11
featuring Christian music record-
ing artist Todd Carter Koeppen.
The concert will be held at 6 p.m.
and dinner will be held at 7 p.m.
Admission is free.
Koeppen leads worship
weekly at DeLong Community
Center in Tacoma, Wash. He
has performed and led worship
extensively in the U.S., as well
as Thailand, Cambodia and The
Philippines. He has also made
several television and radio ap-
pearances.
For more information or din-
ner reservations, call 926-8144
or 228-6746.

Homecoming
A Homecoming Revival will
be held at the Christian Worship
Center, 3922 Coastal Highway
98 from March 4 to March 7. On
Sunday, March 4, Homecoming
and dinner will be held on the
grounds at 11 a.m.
The speaker will be Pastor T.R.
Williams of Five Points, Tenn.
The services will also be held at
6 p.m. Sunday, March 4 and 7:30
p.m. on Monday, March 5 and
Wednesday, March 7. Everyone
is welcome to attend.
The pastors are Steve and
Malissa Taylor.


I .'r%....rr I
I- N United
Saint Teresa Methodist
Episcopal Church
Church
1255 Rehinkel Rd. Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98 Worship I I a.m.
Sunday School Pastor Brett Templeton
Holy Eucharist 8:30 am
Youth & Adults 9:30 AM 850-962-2984
Children 10:30 AM
Worship 10:30 AM
Reverend John Spicer
926-4288 I Fa/ ma


2263 Curtis Mill Rd.
Sopchoppy, FL 962-3774
Pastor John S. Dunning
(From Rlhemia Biblel 7aiings Cen',r)


Pr&ebytiruiaft
3383 Coastal Hwy.
1/3rd mile east of Wakulla High School
9:30 a.m. Sunday School
10:30 a.m. Worship Services
Nursery Provided
926-4569
www.wakullapres.org

M L



Vitrsm Are Ai Wdeiwum
Dr. NMty Fowinas, Patmr
wK4m Hrtcand tMad find faiAtk wi d


t t' foit( e t J ,(Yelwke
123 Elena Drive
Tallahassee, FL 32305
Owned & Operated By Wesley Schweinsberg
Son of the Late Harold Schweinsberg
Office: (850) 421-7211 Mobile: (850) 510-3983
Call and Compare... You'll Save Time & Money
Same Quality & Service



Sopclhopp Southern Baptist Church
117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy
962-7822

Sunday SChool 9:45 AM
Morning ship 11AM

AWANI Club 5 PM
Evening W Ilp PM
A- .T


Worship service
Faith Lutheran Church of Tal-
lahassee is now offering worship
opportunities in Crawfordville.
Faith Lutheran as part of the
Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran
Synod. A worship service will be
held on Sunday, Feb. 25 at 6 p.m.
at the Wakulla County Library.
The public is welcome to attend.
If you have any questions, please
contact Pastor John Gensmer at
Faith Lutheran Church at (850)
383-1125.

Special program
In conjunction with Faith"'
Radio, 105.7 FM and 1070 AM,'
the Sopchoppy Southern Baptist
Church will host two special
speakers all the way from Kenya,
Africa, on Sunday, Feb. 25.
Stephen Mairori and Ptallah
Butaki will be sharing their ex-
periences with the church about
Imani Radio which broadcasts
the Gospel message of Jesus
Christ in many African languages
and dialects to Kenya and other
remote areas of Africa.
At 5 p.m. they will shares
with the Awana children and
at 6 p.m. they will share with
the congregation. They will be
reporting on the need for more
solar powered transistor radios
to distribute in remote areas,
prisons and hospitals.
Everyone is invited to join
Sopchoppy Southern Baptist
Church, located at 117 Curtis
Mill Road, Sopchoppy. For more
information, contact the church
at 962-7822.


Pioneer Baptist
Church (SBC)
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.
Wed. adult, children & youth 7 p.m.
486 Beechwood Drive Crawfordville, FL.
(North of the Lower Bridge Road and
Spring Creek Highway intersection)
Rev. Dennis Hall, Pastor
850-926-6161


I cnnrhnnnv


Q _*









THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007-Page 5A


Communi


Hi neighbors. I guess those
of you who have been fussing
about this cold weather will get
your wish now. It is supposed
to get up into the 70s the next
few days.
The very idea that some
people want it to be warm in
February. Shame on you.
We can't have everything,
and I guess it is your turn. She,
who shall remain nameless, are
you happy now? You can even
pack up your long johns. I said
maybe.
Listen up people, I need to
pin angel wings on Kenneth
Daniels for his kindness to me
on Saturday. I had another flat
tire and got Melodee to go to
Ms. Joy's for that stuff that blows
your tire up, and Kenneth hap-
pened to be in the store.
This is St. Marks after all, and
he came right on to my house
and took care of my flat tire.
He does deserve angel wings in
my book.
People who live elsewhere
just won't take time to help each
other. Thank you Debra Valen-


ST. MARKS
NEWS
By Linda Walker


court for taking time to change
the belt on my vacuum cleaner. I
couldn't get the part off to get to
the belt. Actually I didn't know
which part it was.
A late happy anniversary to
Debra and Justin on their an-
niversary on Valentine's Day.
He is still in training, but Debra
is working hard on getting him
just right.
Friends, our thoughts and
prayers go to the family and
friends of Ronda Hurley due to
her passing on Feb 17. Friends
and relatives will meet at her
brother's, Ronnie Day, on
Wednesday, Feb. 21, at 6 p.m.
I know you get tired of me
asking everyone to take time for
each other while you can. Don't
wait until you have to go to a
funeral. Then it is too late to say
I love you or I care.


Radio documentary

features local guitarist


In observance of Black His-
tory Month 2007, Public Radio
International (PRI) member sta-
tions across the United States
are airing the national radio
documentary, The Life and
Times of Zora Neale Hurston,
which was written, produced
and engineered by three local
people, including one from
Crawfordville.
Aaron Meyers (producer)
from Tallahassee, Taylor Cox
(engineer) from Quincy, and
Brett Wellman from Crawford-
ville worked together to record
and produce the absorbing
hour-long examination of one
of America's most celebrated
writers associated with the
Harlem Renaissance, who grew
up in Eatonville, just outside of
Orlando.
Actress Vanessa Williams
hosts this new documentary, il-
luminating the life and works of
the Florida folklorist, novelist,
and playwright. The documen-
tary also shares the insights
of historians and biographers,
while evoking 1920s Black Amer-
ica.through music and dramatic
readings of Hurston's work.
During two recording ses-
sions in December 2006, Craw-
fordville resident Brett Wellman
transposed the acapella 1930s-
era recordings of Hurston to his
guitar, giving them a vintage
feel with the modern-day sound,
first using his own professional
recording studio, then traveling
to several other area studios to
finish the documentary.
Using both an acoustic and
a steel guitar, the music on the
documentary played by Well-
man is an example of the age-
less and deeply-moving music
that is rooted in the South, and
specifically from Florida in the
early 1900s.
SHaving done voice recording
for years at his home studio as
Hot Spots Productions, being
behind a microphone comes
naturally. However, having a
producer and an engineer, plus
knowing that someone was
paying money to rent a studio
to capture the recordings of the
music for the documentary, was
very intimidating.
"One of my fondest memo-
ries of this project is how the
people in the sound booth were
willing to let me try anything in
the studio, just to get the sound
to be the way we thought it


would best represent the music
of that era," said Wellman. "At
one point, I actually laid down
five tracks, all layered and mixed
down to sound like one. The
end result sounds like a bunch
of guitarists sitting around,
plucking and playing this one
song in someone's living room.
It was an incredible opportunity,
to be creative and to learn."
Before entering each record-
ing session, Wellman had put in
almost 10 hours, picking apart
the original recordings, trying to
learn every nuance of the songs
so he could best reproduce them
in the studio. The biggest chal-
lenge of the sessions is featured
in the last few minutes of the
documentary.
In it, Wellman begins to play
Halimufact, a song featured
throughout the documentary,
but this time it's played to the
singing of both Robert Hem-
enway and then to Hurston
herself. The result is a smooth
transition from one voice to an-
other, all the while the guitar ac-
companies in the background.
"This was such a challenge,"
he said. "I thought we had it
after the first recording session,
but after listening back to it, the
pace just wasn't right. I don't
know how many takes or how
much time was spent in the
studio for just this one part, but
the results speak for themselves.
It's a fantastic ending to the
documentary."
Wellman has been involved
in music since he first held a
violin at the age of five. By the
time he was 11 he had toured
extensively throughout the
east coast of the United States
and through western Europe.
However, it was in his late teens
that Wellman was grabbed by
the blues.
"It rocked me to my core"
says Wellman. "Something
so simple, so forceful, and so
powerful. There's nothing bet-
ter than a Saturday evening
on the back porch with fellow
musicians and letting the magic
unfold itself through the guitar
strings."
Along with harmonica mas-
ter Mike Palecki, Wellman will
be performing at the Breakfast
in the Park in downtown Talla-
hassee from 6:30 a.m. to 10 a.m.
on Wednesday, March 7, and at
Springtime Tallahassee at noon
on March 31.


"Taco"
Do you enjoy energetic, fun loving pets? If you
do, you'll love me! I enjoy attention, activity and
play-guess that's how I wandered away from
home. The Wakulla Animal Shelter is my tempo-
rary home until I am
adopted. Would you
be interested in giv-
ing a cute, year old
(approx.), male Chi-
huahua a home? If so,
please call the shelter
at 926-0890. Thank
you!
Please have your pets
spayed or neutered.


Listen up people! Do not
forget to go and vote on Wednes-
day, Feb. 21, at town hall. Your
vote could be the one that
makes the difference. Just do
it, please.
Let's wish these special
people happy birthday; John
Kirby on Feb. 16, Christie Ward
Scarborough on Feb. 17, and
happy birthday to all of you who
haven't signed our birthday book
at Bo Lynn's store.
On our prayer list please re-
member Ronda Hurley's family,
Newell Ladd, Thelma Murphy,
Jim, Eddie and Jamie Ward, Jett
Harper (now at Eden Springs),
Nancy Nichols, Kathleen Causey,
Jerelene Howard, Benita Trilett
and her family, Alice Knowles,
and all of those not named
here.
Please pray for our soldiers
still overseas, pray for our fami-
lies, our town, our country and
pray for peace.


WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION SCHEDULE

WORKSHOPS PUBLIC HEARINGS MEETINGS

2007 CALENDAR


March 5, 2007



March 5, 2007



March 19, 2007


5:00 P.M.


Workshop: Committees
Commission Chambers


Regular Board Meeting
Commission Chambers


Regular Board Meeting
Commission Chamber


6:00 P.M.


6:00 P.M.


All Workshops. Public I lcmlnigs iadII ('(ininissiriMl MeeCinC ale peli to he public. Wakllla (Colnly does not di criminate i theC basis ol race. color, national origin, sex.
religion, age or Ihandicalpcpd stas in eiplloy cnIt or lie poII sion oIf SIrvci's. Handicapped individuals may receive special accommodations with one working day's
notice as per Seclion 2l(.(011(6) l I Ip I I special accioInIioialiiiiis are icquiried. please call Pamela Raker Allbritton al (850) 926-0919; TDD (850) 926-1201.


WF








Page 6A-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007


People


L Losing trash can be expensive


,B, f .- .-, *r. *.r...
Deloris Robison and Paul Causseaux

Deloris Robison to

wed Causseaux


Bobby Robison, Jason Ro-
bison and John Robison, all of
Crawfordville, announce the
engagement and upcoming mar-
riage of their mother, Deloris
Robison of Crawfordville, to
Paul Causseaux of Crawford-


ville,
The wedding will be held at
73 Henry Forbes Road in Craw-
fordville at 2 p.m. on Saturday,
Feb. 24.
All friends and family are
invited to attend.


By MARJ LAW
Of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful
Did you ever wonder what
happens when trash falls off or
out of a vehicle?
Did you want something to
be done when you saw a bag of
trash on the side of the road?
Did you want to see some
enforcement of the covered-
load law?
Well, it's happening now.
The Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office is protecting its residents
by checking to see if loads on


The Concerned Citizens of
Wakulla (CCOW) will host a
Water Forum on Thursday,
Feb. 22, at Tallahassee Commu-
nity College's Wakulla Center in
Crawfordville. The forum will
be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
with a social time beginning at
6:30 p.m. The public is invited
to attend.
Hal Davis with the U.S. Geo-
logical Survey will be speaking
about the springsheds in Wakul-
la County, including specific
information about the Wakulla
and Spring Creek springs sys-
tems. A representative from
the Northwest Florida Water
Management District will be


vehicles are covered properly.
All loads are supposed to be
covered, by law, but this doesn't
alivays occur.
Some people believe that
trash, carefully stowed in heavy
trash bags, is secure enough to
take to the landfill.
"We're finding trash bags
by the side of the road," said
Deputy Mike Helms.
A bump in the road, or a
sudden turn of a vehicle, can
pop a bag right out of the truck
and onto the side of the road.


speaking about water use in the
region with specific information
about water use sustainability
and the permitting process.
The forum is an opportunity
for the public to learn more
about the water resource issues
in the county and region. Time
will be allotted for audience
participation.
Following the speakers, there
will be a public video screening
of a recently produced short
film produced by the Wakulla
Watershed Coalition about the
bottled water plant proposal
and other local issues relating
to water titled, "The Heart of
Wakulla County."


BIRTHS


Marj Law, Maurice Burgess, Pamela Skinner,
Don Henderson and Donna Bass


Maurice Burgess with Ruby Metcalf and Donna Bass

Skinner, Metcalf win

Winn-Dixie sprees


The excitement of Rotary's
recent Valentine's Day Celebra-
tion culminated with a $1,000
Winn-Dixie shopping spree
raffle. Pamela Skinner won this
top prize.
Second place in the raffle
was a $500 Winn-Dixie shop-
ping spree. Ruby Metcalf won
this prize.
Winn-Dixie has sponsored


the raffle and much of Rotary's
Valentine fun for the past two
years.
"We plan to stay an active
participant in the community,"
said Winn-Dixie Location Man-
ager Maurice Burgess, who
gave Skinner and Metcalf the
gift cards they held while their
pictures were taken wirh Rotary
officials.


Ayden G. Payne
Mark and Ann Payne of Tal-
lahassee announce the birth
of their daughter, Ayden Grace
Payne, on Jan. 22 at Tallahassee
Memorial Hospital. She weighed
5 pounds, 13 ounces and mea-
sured 18 inches in length.

. ""' You don't have
2".'s to go out!
I' I Will Come
To You!!!
Start working out NOW!
Call today!
Gena Davis
Personal Trainer
926-7685 or 510-2326



+@eadioShack

da ? Free si299
Ud7 -",I wth local
Dish U S! channels
theiit4 Sou.cs Co
635 Wakulla Arran Rd.
926-5092


Maternal grandparents are
JoAnn B. Council of Crawford-
ville and the late Dennis B.
Council. Paternal grandparents
are Bill and Irene Payne of
Crawfordville. Ayden joins two
sisters, Annabeth, age 8, and
Ansley Kate, -age 4.


That's why we all are supposed
to cover our loads.
Deputies will try to dis-
cover the owners of these bags.
Make certain, if you are paying
someone to haul your trash,
that the hauler is covering his
load. You sure wouldn't want
to be called about your trash if
someone else is bringing it to
the landfill.
The fine for an uncovered
load is $71.50. Already, deputies
have started to hand out tickets
to drivers who have uncovered


loads.
Sheriff's office deputies will
also hand out covered-load fly-
ers made jointly by the sheriff's
office and Keep Wakulla County
Beautiful. The flyers contain
the actual words of the law,
and then explain it so that it
is easy to understand. The law
will be posted on a big sign at
the landfill, too.
Trash is unsightly. It's bad for
our environment and for small
animals and birds.
Now it's expensive, too.


I P at os S u nr o m s S cr e n R o ms.


LEON SCREENING

B3252 CRC1327280 "Serving Tallahassee with Quality Work Since 1976"'


-Open T-F 10-7 Sat. 9-3
ALL ROADS LEAD TO...

I
t(is & (olor 4
926-8319 Lori Melissa Lori
Stylist Stylist Stylist
*Manicures
SPedicures Mn Mineral Make Up
* Pedicures *Men Aab
Now Available!
0 Highlights *Women
*Colors*Perms *Children Gift Certificates
S2481 Crawfordville Hwy. #6 Crawfordville, FL 32327 _

CLASSIFIED As Low As $7 Per Week!

Call 926-7102


SRADER- .
IN THE VILLAGES OF ST. MARKS
A Unique Place to Shop for Your Home Decor Needs.
Furniture Art
SWood Carvings Gifts From The Sea
Stop in and say hello to George and Pam McCreery
TAKE A LITTLE PIECE OF THE COAST HOME WITH YOU!
Open Fri., Sat., & Sun. 10 A.M. 6 PM.
or call for an appointment (850) 925-0400


WAL*MART
Vision Center
Convenient Contact Lens Phone Orders (with on file prescription)
Kids Glasses starting at $48 for frame and lens with a one year warranty
Eye exams by independent doctor of optometry.
Appointments Recommended, Walk-Ins Welcome
SPhone 926-2990 Fax 926-2952
N! .,. Stop by today to transfer your prescription. (-
Single Vision Polarized Sunglass Lenses -
S' Starting at $68 (not including frame) p
\Mon. Fri. 9-9 Sat. 8-8 Sun. 12-5 '
-l I


rCba"e. William Treichel, D.C. 2887 Crawfordville Hwy
_U.b Chiropractic Physician ( 0 Open Monday-Friday







LLC

Banners Magnetics


Real Estate Signs


Amazing
-MAIL
Solutions, rn.

27 Azalea Drive, Unit E
Beside Domino's Pizza
926-2995
Fax 926-9613
LV ^^^^M ]OPEN^^^^^^


Mention
this Ad
and Recive

10% Off


Fed''


I,(50 528-


* Shirts & Hats


CCOW plans water


forum at TCC center "'I 2


Lighted Signs Window Lettering


Cai 2ba fo4 ee Ci dt ate !!!


4 A


7105.


111 .11


I1













Landfill unveils n


ESG Project Director Cleve
Fleming has announced a land-
fill plan that he hopes will
reduce the lines waiting to use
the Lower Bridge Road landfill
on Tuesday while increasing
security at the facility.
.Commercial customers now
have the option of opening an
account with ESG, which allows
them to dump at the landfill
on Monday when it is closed
to residential dumping. The
landfill security has also been


beefed up and locks changed
following reports of individuals
illegally dumping at the facility
during closed hours.
Fleming said the lines to
dump at the landfill were some-
times long on Tuesdays follow-
ing a weekend of commercial
trash collection.
Commercial customers can
acquire a key to the landfill for
Monday dumping. The landfill
is open to commercial dumpers
from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Monday


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007-Page 7A

W plan Junior Golf Association holds registration
w In The Wakulla County Junior course. The fee is $40 per player and
through Saturday. Golf Association, with coop- The season begins on Satur- the program is open to players
Residential dumpers can drop eration from the Wildwood golf day. March 3, and runs for a total ages 6 through 18. The Wakulla
off trash during the same hourly course, will host registration for of six weeks, from 4 p.m. until 5 junior golf program began in
schedule Tuesday through Sat- the 2007 season, p.m. each week. 1988.
urday. The registration will be held The association will take For more information, call
Commercial accounts may on Saturday, Feb. 24 from 4 p.m. Easter weekend off. Broward Sapp at 926-5283.
contact ESG at 926-3153 to set until 5 p.m. at the Medart golf
up an account to allow dump- o n i/,' Leave Wo+ehino Bu+
ing on Mondays. Fleming con-t ve oh0n FOB 00 ti f
cluded that security measures ,ourFootp
to eliminate illegal dumping
at the facility have reduced the "
number of individuals in the A
facility after hours. Crfedi / I i


The WHS Model United Nations Team competed Friday against other schools.


The teams were:
USA
Security- Council: Michael
Andrews and Tiffany Treltas
UNAIDS: Joey Yore and Kyle
Patterson
IAEA: Tim Kenyon
General Assembly: Will
Shepherd and Kayla Cleveland

QATAR
Security Council: Lucy Carter
and Paul Murphy
UNAIDS: Lauren Garcia
UNESCO: Sam Myrick and
Emma Stewart
IAEA: David Murphy and
Amanda Council
General Assembly: Joey Eye

NORTH KOREA
UNAIDS: Tyler Price and
Kelly Resha
UNESCO: Cataia Ives and
Rochelle Bennett
General Assembly: Daniel
Miller and Lauren Gentry


boA0
po 0,rc 160
suo'ess.


S, .t t- -p
Crawfordville
store for $10.00
OFF ar,, ANEW
Cbni,:al pr,:,-,:/L.:to

Hvfy.I


Introducing the EMBARQ" TOGETHER PLAN5"
A NEW WAY TO LINK EMBARQ WIRELESS AND HOME PHONES FOR UNDER $75/MO**
lOthw ":1on !hl- cw.': Je app'y ;
* Unlimited local and nationwide long distance calling from your home phone
* Hot Ih home phone and wireless services on one plan with one bill and one point of contact
- 350 Anytime wireless minutes with nationwide long distance, or get 700 Anytime wireless minutes for $10 more a month
* Unlimited calling between your EMBARQ"' wireless and home phones
* One voicemail to access your messages from your EMBARQ' wireless and home phones

CALL 888-EMBARQ2 OR VISIT embarq.com/togetherplan
lB88-1362-2772)
VISITAN FT. WALTON BEACH 411 Mary Esther Cutoff just north of Sun Plaza
EMBARQ" TALLAHASSEE- 1544-2 Governor's Square Blvd. behind Governor's Square Mall
STORE NEW LOCATION! TALLAHASSEE (MARKET) 1410 Market Street in The Pavilions shopping center


*I GETA GREAT DEAL ON A SUPER-SLIM SANYO KATANA CAMERA PHONE
WITH EMBARQ" WIRELESS INTERNET FOR A LIMITED TIME. ASK US HOW.


E
Where Common S


MBARQ"
ense Meets Innovation'"


"Taxes, fees, and surcharges (including a USF charge of up to 8.07% that vanes quarterly, cost recovery fees of $0.55 per line, and stateflocal fees that vary by area; a Camer Universal Service charge of 9.1%, which may vary by month; Carrier Cost
Recovery surcharge of $0.99; and certain in-state surcharges) are excluded. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or govemment required charges. Services may not be available everywhere. Residential customers only. EMBARQ may cancel servces or offer
or substitute similar services at its sole discretion without notice. Additional restrictions apply. Requires approved credit. Monthly fee: $74.90 promotional monthly rate applies while customer subscnbes to all services. If one service is cancelled, the standard
monthly rate will apply for the remaining services. Taxes, fees, and surcharges are additional, subject to change without notice, and are based on non-promotional standard monthly rate. Local service: includes local service plus call waiting, caller ID and
voicemail Local and in-state long distance (including local toll) services are governed by the applicable slate tariffs and/or state terms and conditions See rates, terms and conditions at embarq.com. Unlimited Nationwide Long Distance: Residential voice
usage only. State-to-state and international long distance services governed by Embarq Communications, Inc. terms and conditions at embarq.com. Usage for DirectoryAssistance. EMBARQr Calling Card service, operator services, and calls to 900, 986,
555, and 700 NPAs excluded. One plan per qualifying residential access line. Not available in student housing associated with educational institutions. Usage not for person-to-person conversations or voice messages may be assessed a data usage fee
or have service disconnected U S residents in EMBARQ local territories only with dial- service qualify. Includes one phone line. No pro-ration of any monthly recurring charge for partial bill when customer cancels service. Local toll and intematonal rates
vary, and surcharges may apply, including surcharges on residential calls made to foreign mobile phones Call 1-866-421-7935 for local toll and international rates. Operator-assisted calls and toll-free/calling card calls made from payphones in the U.S. will
be assessed a surcharge. All rates subject to change Wireless service: Coverage not available everywhere. Terms and conditions apply, see store or embarq.com for details. May not be combined with other offers Device subject to availability $75 (1-yr
term) or $150 (2-yr. term) early termination and, if not an EMBARQ'" wireline customer, a $36 activation fee applies per line. Deposit may be required. Unused plan minutes do not carry forward Partial minutes are charged as full minutes. Overage charges
apply. Equipment credit: Requires purchase and new service activation by 4111107 Applied at point of sale or on initial invoice, depending on purchase location. Not available on accounts that received equipment credits associated wilh renewal or activation
within the last 12 months. Cannot exceed customer's actual purchase price of devicess. Activation at time of purchase required for credit. Phone features: Customer must subscribe to EMBARQ1 Wireless Intemet or voice-activated dialing options to
utilize phone features Unlimited Calling to EMBARQ Home Phone: Calls to your EMBARQU home wireline number do not count toward any minute allocation. One Volcemail: Supports only EMBARQO Wireless (pnmary line only) and wreline phones.
All phones must be under the same customer name. Wireless Internet requirement: To receive special phone offer, customer mst subscribe to EMBARQ Wireless Internet for one year at $9.95 a month Separate $100 early termination fee will apply
2007 Embarq Holdings Company LLC All rights reserved. The name EMBARQ and the jet logo are trademarks of Embarq Holdings Company LLC. EMB1-07-01555


Savannah's Country buffet

Country Lunch Buffet 7 Pays A Week!
Nightly Specials

S681-3663
Open Sun. Tues. 5 a.m. 3 p.m.
Wed. Sat." 5 a.m..- 9 p.m.
968 Woodville Hwy. & Wakulla Station


46drums M '
-Penn Dealer
\ 984-5 01
--- Panacea, FL

ONE STOP SHOPPING
Over 3,000 Rods & Reels In Stock!
Open Every Day 5:30 a.m. 9 p.m.
-- i


HOME PHONE + WIRELESS.


0


*~


ih









Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007


Sports


War Eagles knock off


Leon, fall to Lincoln ij


Wakulla War Eagle baseball
players battled against bad
weather and two Tallahassee
opponents last week to start the
2007 season with a 1-1 record.
Wakulla beat Leon 17-7 in five
innings before Lincoln won a
close contest, 5-2. Both games
were played in Medart.
WHS pitcher Kevin Langston
was the winner against Leon de-
spite giving up four first-inning
runs. Wakulla responded with
a seven-run second inning and
four runs in both the third and
fourth frames.
Langston went four innings,
and Stuart Gilley and Ryan
Smith pitched in relief for the
War Eagles.
Kyle Marks had a productive
game by going 3-for-3 with a
triple, home run, 7 RBIs, four
runs scored and two walks. Jus-
tin Posey was 3-3 with a double
and 4 RBIs. Andrew Mellow was
1-2 with four runs scored.
Nick Baxter and Cameron
Graves each had hits, and Graves
had three walks. "It looks like
we will be pretty competitive
this year," said WHS coach Mike
Gauger.
In the Lincoln contest, the
Trojans broke open a 3-2 game
with two runs in the top of the
seventh inning. Lincoln led the
game 1-0, 2-1 and 3-2 before the
final inning.
Ryan Leutner pitched four in-
nings and was the losing pitch-
er. He gave up two runs and
struck out two. Casey Brown
pitched two innings and gave
up an unearned run, and Ryan


Wakulla War Eagle Baseball 2007 Schedule
Thursday Feb. 22 @ Arnold JV/Varsity 4/7 p.m.
Tuesday Feb. 27 @ Sneads Varsity only 7 p.m.
Wednesday Feb. 28 @ Wakulla JV/Varsity 4/7 p.m.
Saturday Mar. 3 Florida High JV/Varsity 12/3 p.m.
Tuesday Mar. 6 @ Rickards JV/Varsity 4/7 p.m.
Thursday Mar. 8 @ Bay JV/Varsity 4/7 p.m.
Friday Mar. 9 @ Maclay Varsity only 4 p.m
Tuesday Mar. 13 @ Taylor JV/Varsity 4/7 p.m.
Thursday Mar. 15 Godby JV/Varsity 4/7 p.m.
Wednesday Mar. 21 Valdosta Varsity only 5 p.m
Friday Mar. 23 Arnold JV/Varsity 4/7 p.m.
Tuesday Mar. 27 @ E. Gadsden Varsity only 7 p.m.
Wednesday Mar. 28 @ Leon JV/Varsity 4/7 p.m.
Friday Mar. 30 Rickards JV/Varsity 4/7 p.m.
Monday Apr. 02 Brookwood Varsity only 6 p.m
Tuesday Apr. 03 @ Fla. High JV/Varsity 4/7 p.m.
Thursday Apr. 05 @ Lincoln JV/Varsity 4/7 p.m.
Monday Apr. 09 Bishop Kenny Varsity only 5 p.m.
Tuesday Apr. 10 East Gadsden Varsity only 7 p.m.
Thursday Apr. 12 Maclay Varsity only 6 p.m.
Mon.-Sat. Apr. 16-21 JV Tournament @ Godby T.B.A.
Thursday Apr. 19 Taylor Varsity only 7 p.m.
Friday Apr. 20 Sneads Varsity only 7 p.m.
Tues.-Sat. Apr. 23-28 District Tournament Varsity T.B.A
Head Coach Mike Gauger
Assistant Coach Mike Smith


Cross pitched one inning and
gave up two unearned runs.
Justin Posey had two of
Wakulla's four hits, going 2-3 at
the plate. Kyle Marks had a hit,
and scored both runs.
Gauger plans to use Langs-
ton, Brown, Gilley, Cross, Smith,
Rance McBratney and Cory
Eddinger on the mound this
season. Eddinger is recovering
from a shoulder injury.
"Our defense has been pretty
good." said Gauger. "We blew
two bunt coverages that cost us
two runs in the Lincoln game."
Wakulla plays in a tough
district with Godby, Rickards,


East Gadsden, Panama City Bay
and Panama City Beach Arnold.
Wakulla traveled to Godby on
Feb. 20 and will travel to Arnold
for a game on Feb. 22. The War
Eagles will play a road game
against Sneads on Feb. 27, and
home games against Bay and
Florida High on Feb. 28 and
March 3 respectively.
The infield will feature Posey,
Marks, Smith and Graves while
the outfield will have Mellow,
Baxter, Gilley, Leutner and
Matthew Sharp. Gilley and
Leutner have been catching
until Eddinger recovers from
his injury.


Softball team earns two road wins


The Wakulla Lady War soft-
ball team rebounded from a
season-opening loss to Lincoln
by topping former district rival
Madison County and current
district foe East Gadsden in two
road contests on Feb. 12 and Feb.
15 respectively.
SWakulla built an 11-2 lead
against Madison County before
the Cowgirls cut into the margin
with a five-run sixth inning.
Dana Roloff pitched six innings,
and Brianna Fordham pitched
the final inning.
Coach Tom Graham said
both of his pitchers threw well,
although Roloff tired late in the
game.
Wakulla had 14 hits, including
three extra-base hits.
"Everybody got a hit," said the
coach. "We're hitting the ball re-
ally well. It isn't just one player,
it's everybody."
Wakulla scored in every in-
ning except the first and seventh
and scored six runs in the sixth
inning.
The Lady War Eagle defense
made seven errors in the contest,
and errors led to the big Madi-
son inning.
Dana Roloff was 3-for-4 with
a run scored, while Meghan
Rollins was 2-4 with a double,
a run scored apd 2 RBIs. Lacey
Crum was 2-4 with a run scored.
Kaitlin Gallamore was 2-3 with
a run scored and 2 RBIs. Roloff
improved to 1-0.
Wakulla crushed East Gads-
den 28-1 in a game shortened to
five innings by the 10-run mercy
rule. WHS had 24 hits in only five
innings. Fordham pitched three
innings, and Roloff pitched two.
The hurlers combined to give up
two hits.
Wakulla had four home runs
in the game as Lacey Crum, Dana
Roloff, Karlyn Scott and Ashley
Delong hit round-trippers.
Fordham was 3-4 with a triple
and scored four runs. Karlyn
Scott was 3-4 with three runs
scored, the home run and 8
RBIs. Ashley Delong was a per-
fect 4-4 with four runs scored, a
double, home run, and 5 RBIs.
The offense scored 18 runs in
the first inning, and WHS scored
seven runs in the third inning.
Fordham improved to 1-1 on the
mound.
The Wakulla defense com-
mitted only two errors in the
East Gadsden game, although
the Lady Jaguars didn't hit the
ball well.
Wakulla hosted district tival
Panama City Bay on Tuesday,
GET THE NEWS
DELIVERED
EACH WEEK!
Call 926-7102


Feb. 20, and will host small-
school powerhouse Wewahi-
tchka on Feb. 22. The final game
of the week will be played at
district opponent Panama City
Beach Arnold on Feb. 23.
The district games continue
on Feb. 27 and March 2 against
Rickards and East Gadsden re-
spectively.




CAR CARE
Specializing in
Japanese Makes &
Models
SToyota Mazda zuzu
SHyunda Honda Subaru
Mitsubishi Nissan
Also Repair
American-made



- /- -


Wakulla improved to 2-1
overall and 1-0 in Class 4A Dis-
trict 2.


I.


Congratulations!!!
For a job well done
and a great season.
(and for being #1 in our eyes)
We Love You
Keep on Keepin on...
Mom, Dad, E.J.,
Mekhi and Alexis


S






























4%


Coaches Chris Helton (from left), James Vernon and John Wainwright were pleased by
Mookie Forbes' performance at the state championships in Lakeland.

Wrestlers learn at state meet


Wakulla War Eagle wrestling
coach John Wainwright took
four grapplers to, the state
championships last weekend
in Lakeland. Although none of
the wrestlers won their weight
classes, he called the trip a posi-
tive experience for the young
squad.
Sophomore Mookie Forbes
placed in the top eight at 103
pounds by winning two match-
es. He also lost two. Junior Ryan
Quails placed in the top 12 of
his 145-pound weight class by
going 1-2.
Freshman Scotty Varner
lost two close matches at 112
pounds. Senior Adam Pen-


.., :
S I- E



SWrIE
SERVING HEALTH
INSURANCE NEEDS
OF ELDERS


dris lost two matches at 171
pounds.
Palmetto Ridge won the state
championship.
"For our first year, we did
well," said rookie coach Wain-
wright. "We're going to have
to have more commitment.
We have to work a whole lot
harder."
Wainwright said the off-sea-
son program at Riversprings
Middle School is going well,
and several younger wrestlers
are involved and getting mat
experience. He added that he
needs more wrestlers to form a
junior varsity.
The off-season program is


held on Tuesdays and Thurs-
days from 5 p.m. until 6:30 p.m.
at RMS. The program is open to
individuals age 5 and older.
Contact Wainwright or RMS
coach Shannon Smith for more
information about the program.
The next tournament will be
held at RMS on Feb. 24.
"We have a good group of
kids coming back," said Wain-
wright. "It took part of the sea-
son to get the attitude changed
around. I think we have a com-
mitted group."
The state tournament had
89 schools represented in Lake-
land, and Wakulla took 48th
place.


SHINE VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!
(SERVING HEALTH INSURANCE NEEDS OF ELDERS)

Help seniors in your community:
* Answer Medicare Questions and Resolve Problems
* Make Informed Choices About Their Health Insurance
* Save Money on Their Prescription Medications
* Inform Them of Programs for which They May be Eligible
COMPREHENSIVE TRAINING PROVIDED AT NO COST
CALL THE ELDER HELPLINE TODAY
1-800-962-5337


ireen


8 a.m.


!TFUNIVERSI1Y of
U FLORIDA
IFAS


- 5 p.m.


Find ways to create
a simple, healthy life!


www.green livingenergyexpo.com


The institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity-Affirma-
:ive Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only
:o individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national
origin. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICES, UNIVER-
SITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.
/


u


K


Florida Big Bend


March 17


Riversprings


Middle School
800 Spring Creek Hwy.
Crawfordville


how your support for


Green Living and Saving Energy
Place your ad in the special Green Living

&, Energy Section of !re Wakulla MaJebO.

The special section will be included in the
March 15 edition of Ne W akula 1Meus
and distributed on location at the show!

Call now for rates and information.
(Deadline March 1, 2007)

850-926-7102.

Discover hundreds of the best products
and services that promote sustainability!


- --I

SA Sweetheart of a Deal
Tuesday and Thursdays ALL Ladies and anyone over 60
can play 18 holes for only
$20.00 Including the cart.
No coupon required. Proper attire required
Offer ends 03/3112007
IBook your round today at
850.926.GOLF (4653)
3870 Coastal Highway I www.innatwildwood.com | 850.926.GOLF



I01- FORQ
I

ORDER YOUR

Banners

T-Shirts

Magnetic Signs

St. Patrick's Day Celebration
Saturday, March 10


NthDEoS IGNte &

926-2211
North Pointe Center


-.


r


|


T
ti
tc
0I
s


\








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007-Page 9A


The Wakulla High School
girls soccer program celebrated
the conclusion of a successful
season Tuesday, Feb. 13, with
an awards banquet at Medart
Assembly of God Church.
The evening's program in-
cluded the presentation of
awards and special recognition
to graduating seniors Kym Keller,
Cecilia McClain and Lauren Mc-
Call. The awards were presented
to: Most Valuable Player, Lizzie
Butler; Defensive Player of the
Year, Kym Keller; Offensive
Player of the Year, Lizzie But-
ler: Assists Leader, Brooklyn
Roddenberry; Most Improved
Player, Mary Kate Murphy; Lead-
ership Award, Sarah Morgan;


RMS girls

finish 10-2

in hoops

The Lady Bears basketball
team of Riversprings Middle
School began the 2006-2007
seaSOn with great expectations
of improving on last season's
4-7 mark. Five returning players
who understood the system, and
seven more who were willing to
learn it helped the Lady Bears
accomplish the goal, said Coach
Devon Miles.
The team finished the season
10-2, while giving Blountstown
its only loss in two seasons
and splitting two games with
Wakulla Middle School. Fueled
by a chaotic half-court trapping
defense that led to a run-and-gun
offense, the Lady Bears were
exciting to watch and a joy to
coach, he said.
"With the exception of one
game, the players executed trap-
ping defense as well as I have
ever seen it done in middle
school," said Miles. "They also
understood the best way to
score against zone defenses and
entertain the spectators simulta-
neously, is to get the ball from
end to end in a hurry, and we
worked on that in every practice
and every game."
The Lady Bears thanked Terri
Robinson for buying shoes and
shirts for every girl on the team
and Casey Godwin and William
Manning for buying all the girls
traveling bags.
-Head coach Devon Miles
and assistant coach Joe Jacobs
tlianked the players, their fami-
lies, and the fans for a great sea-
son. "We appreciated it greatly,"
they said.
The Lady Bears included Macy
Miles, Julia Turner, Kayla Hurst,
Shelby Bunce, Cedar Carter,
Keyna Brown, Kraven White,
K-istell Robinson, Kieifi Myrick,
Taylor Washington, Jasmine Rol-
litis Charmane Ackerman and
Bieighley Bolton. The manager
was Cara Raker,


The Indomitable Spirit Award,
Bridget Burke; Rookie of the
Year, Meghan Rollins; Sports-
manship Award, Rachel Capps;
Senior with the Highest Grades,
Cecilia McClain; Junior with the
Highest Grades, Lizzie Butler;
Sophomore with the Highest
Grades, Amanda McCullers;
and Freshman with the Highest
Grades, Meghan Rollins
Junior Varsity awards were
presented to: Most Valuable
Player, Kacy Johnson; Best De-
fensive Player, Meghan McCal-
lister; Best Offensive Player,
Jessica Varner; Most Improved
Player, Shelbie Barrow; and the
Coaches Award was presented
to Kara Graves.


$TIT[ CWS CUR


Wrestlers shine

Team Wakulla sent seven wrestlers to the
Deerfield-Windsor Tournament in Albany, Ga.,
on Saturday, Feb. 17.
Five of the local wrestlers came back from
the competition with first-place medals while


the other two wrestlers came back with silver
medals.
The first-place finishers were Seth Hyman,
Tyler Corbett, Dillon Hill, Tyler Hill and Tre Mc-
Cullough. The second-place winners were Travis
McCullough and 4-year-old Oakley Smith.
The tournaments will continue throughout
the coming months.


The Junior with the Highest
Grades was Meghan McCallis-
ter; Sophomore with the High-
est Grades was Amber Hart;
Freshman with the Highest
Grades was a three-way tie be-
tween Casey Henderson, Shel-
bie Barrow and Carole Toler. The
Sportsmanship Award went to
Stevey Roberts.
A buffet dinner was catered
by Old South. A slideshow pre-
sentation sponsored by Itech
Consulting Solutions show-
cased the season's highlights.
Additional copies of the slide-
show are available for purchase.
Please contact David Pienta at
ceo@itechconsult.net or call 459-
7857 for more information.


War Eagles have

high hopes in tennis


Rainy weather wiped out
the first Wakulla Lady War
Eagle tennis match on Feb. 13
against Maclay, and the Feb. 15
boys match against Maclay was
postponed when the opponent
failed to show up in Medart.
But sandwiched inside the
two postponed matches was
a 7-0 Lady War Eagles victory
against Taylor County in Perry.
Coach Dave Price has a young,
inexperienced Lady War Eagle
team, but the War Eagle squad
has several seasoned players.
Nina Reich is the top-seeded
female player, and she won her
match against Taylor 8-2. J.V.
Varner won 8-0 at second-seeded
singles. Jennifer Roberts won
her match 8-1 at third-seeded
singles.
Jessie Mohr won 8-2 at fourth-
seeded singles, and Ginny Weiss
won 8-0 at fifth-seeded singles.
Down 5-0, Taylor County for-
feited the doubles matches due
to the cold weather. Reich is the
only returning varsity player.
Coach Price said he would
have used Reich and Varner at
first-seeded doubles and Rob-
erts and Mohr at second-seeded
Basketball Camps
Accept Registrations
Registration is now open
for the Ten Star All-Star Sum-
mer Basketball Camp and the
Bryan Adrian Summer Basketball
Camp. The Ten Star camp is by
invitation only. Athletes ages 10
to 19 are eligible to apply.
Former participants include
NBA players such as Michael Jor-
dan, Tim Duncan, Vince Carter,
Jerry Stackhouse, Grant Hill
and Antawn Jamison. The Flor-
ida camp location is in Babson
Park.
Registration for the 29th an-
nual Bryan Adrian Basketball
Camp is also open. Players ages
6 to 18 are eligible. For free bro-
chures on the summer camps,
call (704) 373-0873 anytime.


Rdear PodsO

850-925-4674 -' \

All Work Guaranteed
Custom Designed Vinyl Liner Pools
Replacement Liners
Family Owned & Operated Since 1989
Tim Pearce Lic. # CPC1457242


EBBB
Member
Florida


doubles. The coach said he will
attempt to make up the two
Maclay matches that were not
played.
Tyler Price is the top-seeded
male player, and Joey Yore is
the second seed. Jared Lowe
is the third-ranked player and
Will Harvey is ranked fourth.
Jonathan Johnson is ranked
fifth. The rankings are "subject
to change." Price said his male
squad has more experience.
"I had 40 kids come out and
I plan to hang on to them," said
Coach Price, who is assisted by
Noreen Britt and Teresa Har-
rell.
The Taylor County boys vis-
ited Medart on Feb. 20, and
the Panama City Beach Arnold
boys will visit on Feb. 22. The
Godby boys will visit on Feb. 27,
and the Arnold girls will host
Wakulla on March 1.


COLLEGE NOTES


millmilrli


Erin Brown sparks
college softball team
Former Wakulla Lady War Ea-
gle softball player Erin Brown is
leading her Columbus (Ga.) State
University Lady Cougar team on
the college softball field. The
senior had a hit and scored a
run in a 3-1 CSU win over Florida
Southern on Feb. 16.
Florida Southern was ranked
second and CSU was ranked 16th
in the latest softball poll. The
game was played in Carrollton,
Ga., as part of the West Georgia
Invitational.
Erin Brown led off the CSU
first inning with a double and
was at third with two outs when
she was singled home. CSU
improved to 7-0 with a 9-1 win
over Southern Indiana later in
the tournament.
Brown, an outfielder, played
all 54 games last season for CSU.
She had the fourth-best batting
average and led the team in runs
scored and walks. She hit three
home runs and had 28 RBIs. She
made only two errors in the field


Wrestling program holds fund-raiser
Team Wakulla wrestlers will The team is receiving dona-
host a yard sale on Saturday, tions of articles that can be sold
March 10. at the sale. Anyone with articles
The proceeds from the sale to donate may have them picked
will help pay for wrestlers to up by calling Coach Shannon
attend state and national com- Smith at 926-6311, Ray or Terry
petitions. Smith at 421-6138 or Laura Taylor
The sale will be held on at 926-2261.
Hickory Avenue in Crawford-
ville from 8 a.m. until 2:30 p.m.
Individuals seeking the sale are
asked to watch for the signs JOYCE C. Y
along the road.


GEO-ENERGY
Since 1985
CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:
MacCLEAN
WATER TREATMENT
SYSTEMS
LEASING
SSALES & SERVICE
COMPLETE LINE
OF EQUIPMENT

WE SOLVE JUST ABOUT
ANY WATER PROBLEM
926-8116




Easy Mail
"flitdr lu tir k UIllianul tii"I"


WE SELL
*BOXES *TAPE
-ENVELOPES
*BUBBLE WRAP
*PEANUTS
*SHREDDED PAPER
AND MORE
WE
*PACK IT
-SEAL IT
*WEIGH IT AND
*SHIP IT YOUR WAY
COPY SERVICE
COLOR & BLACK & WHITE
NOTARY
(85)96-42
OPNM S7r~t 8-
Su .1 -5p


and was successful on seven of
eight stolen-base attempts.

Kelly Jo Langston
playing for Seminoles
Former Wakulla Lady War
Eagle softball player Kelly Jo
Langston has joined the Florida
State University Lady Seminoles
softball team as an invited walk-
on. Langston is hitting .500 (best
on the team) while splitting
time at first base.
The junior from Sopchoppy
has helped FSU to an -1 mark
this season. She has a double
and 2 RBIs. Langston was All-
Conference at Tallahassee Com-
munity College before moving
across town to FSU.
She is a sports managements
major and the daughter of Daryl
and Tina Langston.

Only five home games
for FSU football
The 2007 Florida State Uni-
versity football season will be
easier on the sports budget


1ILLNDRI
11LLENDER


Certified Public Accountant

* Electronic Filing of Tax Returns Available
(At No Extra Charge When We Prepare The Return)
* Accounting
* Tax Preparation & Planning
* Corporation


Partnership
Estate
Fiduciary

4432 CrawfordviHe lwy.
:, Crawfordville, fL 32327


(850) 926-8272
(850) 926-8273 .:


BODY-TEK


FITNESS CENTER


Fitness Center



Must Present Coupon
Not Good With Any
Other Offer. Offer
Ends Feb. 28, 2007


;PVt 7ay A

2 Week Pas

GET

TWO

WEEKS

FREE


56 Rainbow Drive Crawfordville
MON. & WED. 5:30 A 9 PM; TUE. & THURS. 9 AM- 9 PM;
I FRI. 5:30 AM 8 PM; SAT. 9 AM -1 PM; SUN. 2 PM 6 PM
S926-BFIT (2348) OPEN 7 DAYS
Full Service Fitness Center Full Line of Supplements Tanning Beds& Products
L I 11m I m ---


PUBLIC NOTICE



Public Boat Ramp at Mash Island Park

and Fishing Pier at Mash Island Park


The public is hereby noticed that the public boat ramp at Mash Island Park will be closed
effective February 21, 2007 for a period of not less than 60 days for construction of im-
provements to the boat ramp.


In addition, the fishing pier at Mash Island Park will be closed effective February 21, 2007
for a period of not less than 90 days for construction of a beach erosion control structure
(groin).


Due to extensive machinery and truck traffic and concerns for public safety, this portion of
Mash Island park will be closed to the public as posted at the park and until construction
is completed. The County seeks to complete the projects as soon as possible so that public
boating access can resume. Construction of these facilities is provided by funding from the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission (FWC) and the National Oceanic & Atmospheric
Administration (NOAA) and the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners.


If you have any questions, please contact Ms. Sheryl Mosley at the Grants & Special Proj-
ects Department at 926-9500.


WHS girls soccer team


honors student-athletes


this fall. The Seminoles have
only five home games on the
12-game schedule.
The season opens on Labor
Day with an 8 p.m. game at
Clemson. ESPN will broadcast
the game to a national televi-
sion audience.
The first home game will be
played on Sept. 8 against the
University of Alabama-Birming-
ham. The other home games
will be played Oct. 6 against
North Carolina State, Oct. 20
against Miami, Oct. 27 against
Duke and Nov. 17 against Mary-
land.
In addition to Clemson, the
road games will be played
against Colorado, Wake Forest,
Boston College, Virginia Tech
and Florida.
The Virginia Tech game will
.replace the Virginia contest in
the Atlantic Coast Conference
rotation.
FSU also has a game in Jack-
sonville against the University
of Alabama on Sept. 29. FSU was
7-6 in 2006.


SAVE YOURSELF
A TRIP!
GET THE NEWS
DELIVERED
EACH WEEK!
Call 926-7102








Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007


Outdoors


By GEORGE WEYMOUTH
Special to the Wakulla News
I took a day off, recently, just
to "smell the roses." My hopes
were to check out the wildlife
at the St. Marks Refuge, because
the conditions on Monday, Feb.
19, were nearly perfect.
Except for being rather cold,
in the 20s at dawn, the breeze
was predicted to be light and it
was supposed to be sunny all
day, reaching about 60 degrees
around 2 p.m. As it turned out, I
couldn't make it there by dawn
- some bills and taxidermy
took priority.
I did reach the refuge by 11
a.m., and by then it was starting
to warm up nicely. I saw no rare
or extremely unusual wildlife
except for one "Pink Roadrun-
ner" jogging Lighthouse Road.
That sighting made me happy.
By 5 p.m., I'd recorded about
60 species, and though that's
a fair count, there were many
species I should have seen and
probably would have, if I'd been
out there longer.
Here's what I recorded, start-
ing with the little "Tweety
Birds," and ending with the
larger, more primitive avian
species, along with a few com-
ments.
Boat-tailed Grackles- 20, in-
duding a partially albino female
with white feathers; Red-winged
Blackbirds-12; Son Sparrows-
10: Swamp Sparrows-6; Savan-
nah Sparrows-8; Rufous-sided
Towhees-1; Northern Cardi-
nals-3; Common Yellowthroat
Warblers-1; Yellow-rumped
Warblers, 200 or more; Euro-
pean Starlings-3; Ruby-crowned
Kinglets-1; Northern Mock-
ingbirds-5; Gray Catbirds-6:


By NANCY GEORGE
Special toTheWakulla News
Winter is the perfect time to
appreciate houseplants. Over
the years, different types of
houseplants have come in and
out of fashion but today's con-
sumers want a healthy lifestyle
that includes the calming ef-
fects and purifying properties
of plants.
Foliage plants provide vari-
ous shades of green, and shapes
from mammoth to minute to
match your interior design
beautifully. New introductions
are more colorful and compact
and many can be transplant-
ed to your garden in warmer
weather.

What to buy/plant
To utilize the air purifying
properties of plants, use one to
two medium to large plants for
every 100 square feet of interior
space. All plants contribute to a
healthier indoor environment,
but some are better at filtering
pollutants than others: Aloe, Ag-
lonema, Dracaena, English Ivy,
Pothos, Spathiphyllum, Philo-
dendron, Sansevera, and ficus
are great recommendations.

Prune/propagate
When frost damage occurs,
you could choose not to prune
it off right away. Try leaving the
damaged foliage in place to pro-
tect the plant from future frost
damage. When new growth
begins in spring, trim the plant
back to just above where new
growth is beginning. Finish any
pruning of deciduous fruit trees
and cut back grape vines.
Sow seeds like a pro. Start
seeds about three to four weeks
before planting in flats with
drainage or six packs filled with
potting soil. Read package direc-
tions for cultivation notes. Place
flats in bright, filtered light.
Keep the soil moist and main-
tain soil temperature between
40 degrees and 68 degrees.
When sprouts are ready to go
in the ground, introduce seed-
lings gradually to full sun over
a few days. After transplanting
keeping the soil moist is par-
ticularly critical the first week.
For successive crops, sow seeds
every week and plant between
developing heads.

Watering/fertilizing
Don't kill plants with kind-
ness. More houseplants die
from overwatering than any
other culprit. Water logging
your soil will suffocate the roots,
causing the plant to wilt.
The touch test works best.
Feel the soil before watering to


St. Marks Refuge


changes boating policy


American Robins-20; Hermit
Thrush-4; House Wrens-4;
Carolina Wrens-2; and Brown-
headed Nuthatches-3.
A couple of tiny Nuthatches,
normally found high in the
Southeastern pines, were actu-
ally feeding on the ground next
to Plum Orchard Pond at the
refuge headquarters building.
A first for me.
Tufted Titmouse-2; Fish
Crows-30; Tree Swallows-200;
Eastern Phoebe-8; Pileated
Woodpeckers-1; Red-bellied
Woodpeckers-2; Belted King-
fishers-4; Forster's Terns-1;
Royal Terns-12; Herring Gulls-
1; Ring-billed Gulls-2; Laugh-
ing Gulls-1; and Common
Snipe-3.
On Friday, Feb. 16, in Franklin
County's Tate's Hell State Forest,
a co-worker, John Wesley Crews,
and I flushed a Woodcock, a
rather unique and rarely seen
forest "shorebird."
Short-billed Dowitcher-6;
Dunlin-180; Least Sandpip-
ers-i; Western Sandpipers-60;
Willets-500; Lesser Yellow-
legs-10; Killdeer-10; Semi-
palmated Plovers-200 or more,
the most I've ever seen grouped
together; Black-bellied Plo-
vers-4; Common Moorhens-
12; Red-shouldered Hawks-2;
Osprey-1; Turkey Vultures-
1; Hooded Mergansers-14;


make sure your plant has ap-
proached dryness. If you have
a saucer under your plants,
be sure to empty out excess
water.
Most synthetic fertilizers
are derived from ammonium ni-
trates and contain phosphates,
which end up polluting our wa-
ter systems. For this reason they
are prohibited in organic farm-
ing, and because they weaken
the soil's biology.
A better alternative is to
build your soil structure with
organic fertilizers or simply add
one inch of compost in each
bedding area.

Edibles
Cold tolerant salad greens
worth trying include spinach,
savoy, swiss chard, red mustard,
arugula, endive, radicchio, esca-
role, borage, sorrel, and loose
leaf lettuces such as red oak leaf,
tom thumb, mascara, reine des
glaces, and Amish deer tongue,
Plant potatoes by Valentine's
Day. There is still time to plant
sweet peas from seed, but don't
wait much longer.

Pests
Give your plants a thorough
inspection, checking for pests,
diseases, and any other prob-
lems that prevent them from
looking their best. If insects
invade a plant, first try wash-
ing them away with water. If
that doesn't work, use organic
pesticides such as neem or
pyrethrine sprays. Spray indoor
plants outside if possible.

For fun
For a quick, colorful cake
decoration use pansies which
can be added directly on top of
the iced cake or candied for a
frosty appearance by brushing
with egg whites and sprinkled
with sugar. Shape flowers into
a heart design for Valentine's


Lesser Scaup-60; American
Widgeons-30; Northern Shovel-
ers-20; Green-winged Teal-4;
Blue-winged Teal-30; North-
ern Pintails-1; White Ibis-40;
Black-crowned Night Herons-4;
Reddish Egrets-8 (observed
at the lighthouse pool); Tri-
colored Herons-16; Little Blue
Herons-2; Snowy Egrets-40;
Great Egrets-16; Great Blue
Herons-3; Anhingas-5; Double-
crested Cormorants-200; Brown
Pelicans-20; Horned Grebes-1;
Pied-billed Grebes-10; and
Common Loons-6.
I guess because the morning
was rather cold, my count of
many species was rather low,
but all in all, it was another day
in paradise. On the way to the
refuge, as I drove Forest Road 13,
a nice gray-colored Florida Fox
Squirrel crossed the road.
Last Saturday, after doing St.
Marks Refuge's first Wildlife
Heritage Festival, I drove into
the refuge to the lighthouse and
on the way back near East Pool.
I had an adult bobcat run on the
road for perhaps 200 yards.
Any time I get into the ref-
uge, almost without fail, I see
something I did not expect. For
instance, I saw about three Yel-
low-rumped Warblers, jokingly
called "Butter Butts," hopping
around on lily pads in Plum
Orchard Pond-also a first!


waku&a


All Types of FEED
OurBrand Is Southern States FEED

/Chickens /Goates P
/Hogs /Cows
/Dogs /Cats, Etc. "-.

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL BUSINESSES
STORE HOURS 6 A.M. 8 P.M. 7 DAYS A WEEK










YES, we do sell W
Sod Palms Shrubs
& Plants of all varieties

But, WE DO SO MUCH MORE!

Landscape Design & Installation
is our #1 Business.

From Traditional to Native
to Tropical Dreams,
we Make Landscapes
Come Alive.


at ,r, i l I Im i
"'1311
A ) ,i


Hand-launch boats include
any boats such as jon boats,
kayaks, and canoes that can
be unloaded and loaded by
hand. The hand-launch boat
restriction only applies to the
impoundments found along
Lighthouse Road in the refuge.
It does not apply to Otter Lake
or other lakes found along
Surf Road (State Rd. 372) in the
Panacea Unit of the refuge. For
questions or more information,
please call Project Leader James
Burnett at 925-6121 or email him
at jamesburnett@fws.gov.

FWC charges man
with gun in refuge
A three-month long Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission investigation

YARDSALE
Every Saturday
Come ~ Bring Your
Goods & Your Table
49%A A 1 afffi.


ended with the arrest of a Craw-
fordville man on Feb. 4. Lt. Jeff
Schremser assisted U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service officers with
surveillance of bait piles for
several months in the St. Marks
National Wildlife Refuge.
On Sunday morning, a sus- -
pect was stopped as he was
checking his bait piles, and
was found to be in possession
of a loaded firearm, a violation .
in the Refuge. The suspect-is a
habitual, felonious, multi-state
offender who is now facing a
minimum of 15 years in federal .
prison. Bail has been denied.
Since he was with his wife at
the time, fingerprints and DNA '
testing on his guns is being
done prior to charging him with
federal felony firearms posses- -
sion.




w a ff a
I * *


St. Marks National Wildlife
Refuge announces a change in its
boating policy in the refuge im-
poundments along Lighthouse
Rd. (Co. Rd. 59).
Based on scientific data and
the refuge compatibility determi-
nations, the impoundments will
be open to hand-launch boats
with electric trolling motors
only. This change will go into
effect immediately and will im-
pact spring fishermen preparing
to fish when the impoundments
open to boats March 15.
Boat launching via trailer is
prohibited to reduce the poten-
tial for spread of highly invasive
water weeds, Hydrilla and Eur-
asian water-milfoil.
Hydrilla is native to the warm-
er areas of Asia and was discov-
ered in the United States in 1960.
In the South, Hydrilla can have
major detrimental impacts on
water use by forming dense can-
opies that often shade out native
vegetation, raise the water's pH,
decrease oxygen under the mats
and increase temperature and
bottom sediments.
It can grow an inch a day in
waters a few inches deep to an
excess of 30 feet deep.
How do we stop the spread
of Hydrilla? Boaters must clean
their boats, propellers and trail-
ers after leaving a launch ramp.
Transporting plant fragments on
boats, trailers, and in livewells
are the main ways to introduce
Hydrilla to new lakes and riv-


Serving Leon, Wakulla and surrounding counties.
Irrigation. Sod, LjL n Renor? ailon.
Nc, and E\ in neBed-. Commercial and Reiidr ial
Contracts. cedingng. Pine Stra\'. etc.
Tallahassee. FL
1;n 850-556-7459 L' ro


Help your children get an

early start on reading.


Just fill out this form
and send it with a check for:

D 1 yr. in Wakulla
$25.00

0 1 yr. in Florida
$30.00
0 1 yr. out of state
$35.00

T!Ie vakfulla Qetos3
- --Mail to-
The Wakulla News
P.O. Box 307
Crawfordville, FL 32326
or bring to


3119A Crawfordville Hwy.


David Hinu
New Constrution M
Ask Me Abot
BORA-CA

Serving
"


iyeryjhing From TermnIto 1~e ke

122-6808
1225 Commerce Blvd., Midway


on
flflrgW~


IName:


Dane Moses
Sales Representative


iRE' "We Stand Behind Our Warranty"
Service Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing Available
The Residents Of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.
Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla South Georgia


Address:


|City:
State: Zip:

hone: ( )
Most Major Credit Cards Accepted


I


Mn- Fi'.-


I A.M. Until
Call To Reserve Your | I
Free Space 18501925-644
At The St. Marks River Bridge i






John Hurst
Outdoor Services
Over 11 Years Experience
COMPLETE LAWN CARE
AND MAINTENANCE









THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007-Page 11A


T e 5pear5 H Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open
I Crawfordville TT Ae it lniAlI 224-4960
Crawfordville Branch y .lo I It il www.fsucu.org
NOW OPEN -" ...


For tides at the following points


add to Dog Island

Gulf Coast Weekly Almanac D

le charts by Feb. 22 Feb. 28
Software, LLC


Listings: Carrabelle
Apalachicola
Cat Point
Lower Anchorage
West Pass


High Tide
28 Min.
1 Hr., 53 Min.
1 Hr., 13 Min.
1 Hr., 36 Min.
1 Hr., 26 Min.


Low Tide
25 Min.
2 Hrs., 38 Min.
2 Hrs., 31 Min.
2 Hrs., 3 Min.
2 Hrs., 39 Min.


St. Marks River Entrance

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 2.6 ft. 0.9 ft. 3.5 ft.
Feb 22, 07 5:30 AM 10:35 AM 4:33 PM
Fri -0.5 ft. 2.1 ft. 1.4 ft. 3.4 ft.
Feb 23, 07 12:04 AM 6:43 AM 11:02 AM 5:04 PM
Sat -0.3 ft. 1.9 ft. 1.7 ft.- 3.2 ft.
Feb 24, 07 1:22 AM 8:38 AM 11:29 AM 5:43 PM
Sun -0.2 ft. 2.9 ft.
Feb 25, 07 3:04 AM 6:49 PM
Mon -0.3 ft. 2.2 ft. 2.1 ft. 2.7 ft.
Feb 26, 07 4:38 AM 12:09 PM 3:10 PM 9:26 PM
Tue -0.4 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.8 ft. 2.9 ft.
Feb 27, 07 5:44 AM 12:36 PM 5:11 PM 11:11 PM
Wed -0.5 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.4 ft.
Feb 28, 07 6:31 AM 1:02 PM 6:11 PM


Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 1.9 ft. 0.7 ft. 2.7 ft.
Feb 22, 07 5:22 AM 10:46 AM 4:25 PM
Fri -0.3 ft. 1.6 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.6 ft.
Feb 23, 07 12:15 AM 6:35 AM 11:13 AM 4:56 PM
Sat -0.2 ft. 1.4 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.4 ft.
Feb 24, 07 1:33 AM 8:30 AM 11:40 AM 5:35 PM
Sun -0.1 ft. 2.2 ft.
Feb 25, 07 3:15 AM 6:41 PM
Mon -0.2 ft. 1.7 ft. 1.5 ft. 2.0 ft.
Feb 26, 07 4:49 AM 12:01 PM 3:21 PM 9:18 PM
Tue -0.3 ft. 1.8 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.2 ft.
Feb 27, 07 5:55 AM 12:28 PM 5:22 PM 11:03 PM
Wed -0.4 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.0 ft.
:Feb 28, 07 6:42 AM 12:54 PM 6:22 PM


City of St. Marks

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 2.4 ft. 0.9 ft. 3.3 ft.
Feb 22, 07 6:06 AM 11:39 AM 5:09 PM
Fri -0.4 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.2 ft.
Feb 23, 07 1:08 AM 7:19 AM 12:06 PM 5:40 PM
Sat -0.2 ft. 1.7 ft. 1.6 ft. 3.0 ft. -
Feb 24, 07 2:26 AM 9:14 AM 12:33 PM 6:19 PM
Sun -0.2 ft. 2.7 ft.
Feb 25, 07 4:08 AM 7:25 PM
Mon -0.2 ft. 2.1 ft. 1.9 ft. 2.5 ft.
Feb 26, 07 5:42 AM 12:45 PM 4:14 PM 10:02 PM
Tue -0.4 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.7 ft.
Feb 27, 07 6:48 AM 1:12 PM 6:15 PM 11:47 PM
Wed -0.5 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.2 ft.
Feb 28, 07 7:35 AM 1:38 PM 7:15 PM


St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 2.0 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.8 ft. -0.4 ft.
Feb 22, 07 5:14 AM 10:14 AM 4:17 PM 11:43 PM
Fri 1.7 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.7. ft.
Feb 23, 07 6:27 AM 10:41 AM 4:48 PM
Sat -0.3 ft. 1.5 ft. 1.7 ft. 2.5 ft.
Feb 24, 07 1:01 AM 8:22 AM 11:08 AM 5:27 PM
Sun -0.2 ft. 2.2 ft.
Feb 25, 07 2:43 AM 6:33 PM
Mon -0.3 ft. 1.7 ft. 2.0 ft. 2.1 ft.
Feb 26, 07 4:17 AM 11:53 AM 2:49 PM 9:10 PM
Tue -0.4 ft. 1.9 ft. 1.7 ft. 2.2 ft.
Feb 27, 07 5:23 AM 12:20 PM 4:50 PM 10:55 PM
Wed -0.5 ft. 2.1 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.4 ft.
Feb 28, 07 6:10 AM 12:46 PM 5:50 PM 11:54 PM


Shell Point, Spring Creek


Date
Thu
Feb 22, 07
Fri
Feb 23, 07
Sat
Feb 24, 07
Sun
Feb 25, 07
Mon
Feb 26, 07
Tue
Feb 27, 07
Wed
Feb 28, 07


High
2.6 ft.
5:27 AM


Low High Low
1.0 ft. 3.6 ft.
10:32 AM 4:30 PM
-0.5 ft. 12.2 ft. 1.5 ft.
12:01 AM 6:40 AM 10:59 AM
-0.3 ft. 1.9 ft. 1.8 ft.
1:19 AM 8:35 AM 11:26 AM
-0.2 ft. 2.9 ft.
3:01 AM 6:46 PM
-0.3 ft. 2.3 ftl 2.2 ft.
4:35 AM 12:06 PM 3:07 PM
-0.4 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.9 ft.
5:41 AM 12:33 PM 5:08 PM
-0.5 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.5 ft.
6:28 AM 12:59 PM 6:08 PM


High

3.5 ft.
5:01 PM
3.2 ft.
5:40 PM


2.8 ft.
9:23 PM
2.9 ft.
11:08 PM


Dog Island West End

Date High Low High Low_ High
Thu 1.8 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.5 ft. -0.3 ft.
Feb 22, 07 6:09 AM 9:46 AM 4:23 PM 11:46 PM
Fri 1.6 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.6 ft.
Feb 23, 07 8:15 AM 9:34 AM 4:52 PM
Sat -0.4 ft. 12.6 ft.
Feb 24, 07 1:17 AM 5:30 PM
Sun -0.4 ft. 2.5 ft.
Feb 25, 07 2:50 AM 6:23 PM
Mon -0.5 ft. 2.3 ft.
Feb 26, 07 4:08 AM 7:47 PM
Tue -0.5 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.5 ft. 2.3 ft.
Feb 27, 07 5:10 AM 2:00 PM 4:21 PM 9:33 PM
Wed -0.5 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.3 ft. 12.3 ft.
Feb 28, 07 5:59 AM 2:06 PM 5:23 PM 11:04 PM


Sunrise
Sunset
Moon rise
Moon set
Brightness


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
7:10 am 7:09 am 7:08 am 7:07 am 7:06 am 7:05 am 7:04 am
6:31 pm 6:31 pm 6:32 pm 6:33 pm 6:33 pm 6:34 pm 6:35 pm


10:13 am

35%


10:55 am
12:25 am
43%


11:44 am
1:34 am
50%


12:38 pm
2:39 am
57%


1:38 pm
3:39 am
64%


2:40 pm
4:31 am
70%


3:42 pm
5:15 am
77%


It really wasn't boating weath-
er this past week and the Coast
Guard Auxiliary was grateful that
the boaters used good judgment
and stayed safely ashore. It was
much nicer being in a warm
house than out on the water
with almost freezing tempera-
tures and wind gusts of 20 to 25
miles per hour.
Despite the temperature Sat-
urday morning, Flotilla 13 at
Shell Point presented their third
Florida Safe Boating course.
There were two students, Curt
Spangler and Pamela Prince, resi-
dents of St. George Island, and
there were two Instructors, John
Edrington and Jim McGill. This
was especially beneficial for the
students on a one-on-one basis
tutoring, you can't beat that.
Saturday night Flotilla 13
held its February meeting. I fear
the cold temperatures affected
the attendance. Those braving
the wintertime blasts were the
Flotilla Commander, Ron Pias-
ecki, and his wife, Angret; John
Edrington, Tom and Marge Jones,
Mimi Lewis, Bob Morgan, James
and Edith Taylor, your reporter
and soon-to-be member, Charlie
Schrader. The other three were
our faithful Honorary Members,
Helen Branan, Dorothy Edring-
ton and Ouida McGill.
During our business meet-
ing, John Edrington recapped
the Division meeting that John,
Jim McGill and I attended in
Fort Walton Beach last Sunday.
Discussion followed of the up-
coming changes in procedures
and the additional educational
requirements for a member to
remain qualified to perform
operational duties.
Next was Fun Time, the pre-
sentation of awards earned. As
many of you know, the Auxiliary
is the non-paid branch of the
Coast Guard. The only payment
received for the volunteer hours
spent in support of the Coast
Guard is the awards, certificate
and ribbons presented.
Jim McGill was presented an-
other bronze star, representing
another 750 volunteer hours, to
attach to his Coast Guard Aux-
iliary Sustained Service Award
ribbon.
Bob Morgan received a mem-
bership service award for 15
years of dedicated service.


Boating Emergencies

Coast Guard Station
Panama City ............................................... 1 (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown ........................ .......................... 1 (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................ 1 (850) 906-0540
or .............................................. .............. 893-5137
Shell Point (Flotilla 13) ...................................... 1(850) 926-2606
or ........................................................ ..................... 926-5654


Flotilla 13 presented various awards during its February meeting.


Jim McGill


Bob Morgan receives award from Ron Piasecki.


Your reporter also received
a service award, for 35 years. I
had intended to retire when I
reached 30. I honestly do not
know where the time went.
Suddenly I am working on 36
years, maybe I will just stay a
little longer.
Ron then read the citation
that accompanied the Presiden-
tial Unit Citation ribbon with a
special clasp in the form of the
internationally recognized "hur-
ricane symbol."
A condensed version of the
citation follows: "For meritorious
achievement and outstanding
performance in action from Aug.
29 to Sept. 13 2005 in preparation
for, and response and recovery
to the devastation wrought by
Hurricane Katrina."
"This inspiring response is
a direct result of the spirit and
practice of operational initiative,
positive leadership and courage
of the total Coast Guard force of
active duty reserve, auxiliary and
civilian members."
This is only part of praise ex-
pressed, but space in this column
indicates this is all for today.
In her report last week, Caro-


lyn Brown Treadon from Flo-
tilla 12 wrote the following
paragraph. "Another special
mention was one of our own!
Sherrie Alverson was awarded
the Division's E. Phillip Hansen
Memorial Media Award. This
award is given to an auxiliarist
who has done the most to pro-
mote the USCG Auxiliary in the
media. For many of you who
read The Wakulla News on a
regular basis, you will notice that
Sherrie completes this column
faithfully and has been doing
that since June 1974...longer than
some of us have been around
Her dedication truly exemplifies
the Auxiliary." This was the sec-
ond time Sherrie was presented
this award.
And now, Carolyn's report
for this week on Flotilla 12 (St
Marks) activities. She wrote, "As
with the Post Office, rain, sleet,
wind and snow cannot stop the
Coast Guard Auxiliaryl Members
of Flotilla 12 were asked to par-
ticipate in a parade to kick off
the African American Heritage
Celebration. The event parade,
organized by the Wakulla County
Christian Association, ran from


Azalea Road and Crawfordville
Highway to end at Hudson Park
in Crawfordville. The Treadon's
facility, The Doc B, proudly dis-
played the Auxiliary insignia
with Duane Treadon onboard.
Two special assistants also
joined to bring attention to the
Auxiliary, Marcus and Nicholas
Smith. Both had come over from
Panama City for the day's festivi-
ties with their parents Franlisa
and Mark.
Following the parade, the rest
of the day was spent at Hudson
Park enjoying good food and
good friends. A sight rarely
seen in Florida greeted us at
the park, trees encased in icel
The low temperatures overnight
and a sprinkler system made
a small, but impressive winter
wonderland.
Next weekend will be the
North Florida Boat Show held
at the Leon County Civic Center.
Beginning on Friday at 10 a.m.
and ending Sunday evening,
Flotilla 12 will have an infor-
mational booth at the bottom
on the escalators to provide
safe boating literature and also
information on our upcoming
Boating classes. Stop by and see
the latest in boating and how to
be safe on the water
"That is all for this weekly"
REMEMBER SAFE BOATING
IS NO ACCIDENT


Sherrie Alverson receives her award.


RIENTZ MARINE

S Outboard Service & Sales

Yamaha mercury omc Iissan

) 421-5205

8724 Woodville Highway, Tallahassee


-,, Attack-One Fire

Management

Services

GT-18 XP Gyro-Trac
High Speed Mulcher

Commercial & Residential
Land Clearing Timberland Management Industrial Sites
Forestry
Hazardous Fuel Reduction Habitat Restoration
Wildland-Urban Interface Temporary Fire Lanes
Pre-Fire Suppression Kevin Carter, Owner
Utilities & Transportation Phone: 850-926-6534
Clearing & Right of Way Maintenance Survey Lines Fax: 850-926-6529
Highways Power & Gas Lines Canals & Waterways Cell: 850-528-1743


STid
Zihua


First
Feb. 24


Full
March 3






Last
March 11


New
March 18


Major
Activity

Minor
Activity


Thursday
3:20 am
3:45 pm

9:30 am
10:00 pm


Friday
4:20 am
4:45 pm

10:30 am
11:00 pm


Saturday
5:20 am
5:50 pm


1:30 am
--:--


Sunday
6:15 am
6:45 pm

12:05 am
12:25 pm


Monday
7:10 am
7:35 pm

1:00 am
1:20 pm


Tuesday
8:00 am
8:30 pm

1:50 am
2:10 pm'


Wednesday
8:50 am
9:15 pm

2:50 am
3:05 pm











Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007

COURT SHORTS


A six-person jury was chosen
on Tuesday, Feb. 20, for a two-
day murder trial scheduled to
get under way on Thursday.
Steven Watson, 36, faces
charges of manslaughter and
two counts of battery for an
incident on July 29, 2005, when
he allegedly got drunk and beat
up several people. Deputies
responded to a disturbance call
at the Panacea Motel where
two friends of Watson, a man
and woman, claimed he had hit
them and pulled some of the
woman's hair out.
The dead body of another
man, Roger Dorsey, was found
and reported the next day; it
was next to a broken golf club
and a shoe, according to the
police report.
Manslaughter, a third-degree
felony, is charged when a death
is the result of culpable neg-
ligence. The State Attorney's
office contends Watson struck
the victim with the golf club,
knocking him unconscious,
and he was left on the ground
where he fell. Reportedly, at one
point, Dorsey, who was 51 years
old, was seen raising his head,
but put his head back down
and subsequently died of his
injuries.
Watson is being represented
by Tallahassee attorney Greg
Cummings. The case is being
prosecuted by Assistant State
Attorney Kathryn Ray.
A motion to dismiss sexual
battery charges against Andrew
Haubrick and Justin Millians
was continued after one of the
attorneys in the case claimed
he had not had enough time to
study the state's response.
Haubrick, 26, who is repre-
sented by Crawfordville attor-
ney Mike Carter, and Millians,
21, represented by Tallahassee
attorney Tony Bajoczky, are
charged with raping a woman
after a night of drinking. The
two have contended that the
sex was consensual.
The victim has said she was
drinking with the men on the
porch and went inside to use
the bathroom and has no mem-
ory of what happened until she
woke up in a hospital room.
At a motion hearing on
Thursday, Feb. 15, the attor-


VFDs sign

agreement

On Monday, Feb. 12, the Me-
dart Volunteer Fire and Rescue
Department and the Apalachee
Bay Volunteer Fire and Rescue
Department (ABVFRD) signed
a "Fire Protection Services Au-
tomatic Aid Agreement" to pro-


Burning

resumes

at National

Forest
The Apalachicola National
Forest is set to resume its pre-
scribed burning program for this
year.. Prescribed burning is an
invaluable tool used to maintain
the health and productivity of
Florida's fire dependant ecosys-
tems. Many species of plants lit-
erally depend on fire to complete
their reproductive cycles.
Prescribed fire also plays an
important role in improving
wildlife habitat, eliminating
competing vegetation, and re-
ducing the threat of catastrophic
wildfires to adjacent communi-
ties.
Prescribed burns are fully con-
trolled. Due to the unpredictable
nature of weather conditions
calendar dates for specific burn
activity remain fluid. Maps of
the areas scheduled for burn
are available through your local
ranger district.
Drivers in these areas are
reminded of the possibility of
unexpected shifting winds in-
creasing the risk of smoke escap-
ing onto nearby roads.


neys argued for a dismissal of
charges, claiming courts have
held that voluntary intoxication
by a victim is not grounds to
support a charge of rape. The
victim had a blood alcohol level
of .23, nearly three times the
legal limit of what constitutes
intoxicated.
"You cannot merely say you
don't remember what hap-
pened," Bajoczky told the court,
noting the evidence shows the
woman mixed her own drinks.
Claims that the men may have
slipped something in her drink
are not supported by lab results
from FDLE, Bajoczky said, nor
is there evidence of her being
beaten up or knocked uncon-
scious.
Carter complained that As-
sistant State Attorney Kathryn
Ray had sought to late-file an
amended response to the mo-
tion and that he had not had
time to review it at which
point Judge Sauls continued the
matter until March.
A grand jury is to be con-
vened on Wednesday to re-hear
a murder case in order to correct
an error in an earlier indictment,
Assistant State Attorney Kath-
ryn Ray said in open court.
Daniel Chavez, 25, was indict-
ed for first-degree murder by a
grand jury in November, but the
indictment had a typographical
error saying that it was in Leon
County, not Wakulla.
Chavez could face the death
penalty if convicted. He was
recently found incompetent to
stand trial and sent to a South
Florida state hospital for treat-
ment. Chavez is charged with
killing his wife, Kathy Chavez, at
a home in Medart in September
2005. The Chavezes, who lived
in Quincy, had been married
only seven months when Kathy
Chavez, 23, went to the home of
a former employer.
Daniel Chavez, 24 at the time,
reportedly went over to the
house on a Sunday morning
to talk to his estranged wife.
Chavez allegedly pulled a lock-
blade knife and stabbed his wife
twice in the chest and then tried
to cut himself. She was taken by
LifeFlight to Tallahassee Memo-
rial Hospital and died from her
wounds.


vide mutual fire suppression aid
for all structure fires and other
fire emergencies.
It was signed by Medart
Chief Steven Pigott, ABVFRD
Chief Walter McMullen, and
Wakulla County United Fire-
fighters Association President
David Harrison
David Harrison also talked
about the numerous functions
of the Wakulla County United
Firefighters Association.


Specializing In
1I1 Repair & Service

SERrsir i Residential &
.BRI Commercial

Homes &
MARK OLIVER o e H
(850) 421-3012 Mobile Homes
(850) 421-3012 ER0015233
24-Hour Service
















INJURY FROM ANY EMERGENCY
- - - -













Injured by the actions of any emergency medical

Call Attorney Brian J. Wolk at 841-7611 in

Tallahassee, or 926-3221 in Crawfordville,
for a case review and to learn about your legal rights and
remedies. Your consultation is free, and if your case is
taken, there are no fees or costs unless there is a recovery.


Habitat intros bd Habitat benefits from sales at the Re-Store located on Shadeville
Habitat introduces board Highway. The group invites residents to come to the store and
The Wakulla County Habitat for Humanity is busy getting ready check out the items for sale.
for 2007 activities. The group is planning to build its seventh. Habitat is always seeking goods to sell at Re-Store to raise funds
home with the assistance of previous families and community to build the new homes.
volunteers. Habitat for Humanity is hoping to share its message with church
The new Habitat family will be selected at the March meet- groups, business organizations and clubs. Call Ruby Snyder at 984-
ing. An "application meeting" will also be held on a date to be 5486 to set up a date.
determined. "The support of the community is very important to our cause
Habitat for Humanity will also host a Fall Dinner with some and we appreciate all that has been done in the past and.hope
new ideas being shared and "down home cooking." for future support," said Peggy Mackin of Habitat.


Local woman injured in fatal wreck


A Wakulla County motorist
was injured in a two-vehicle
accident that killed a Franklin
County woman on Tuesday,
Feb. 13, according to the Florida
Highway Patrol (FHP).
FHP officials reported that
Jesetta L. Dalton, 55, of Eastpoint
was killed at 9:45 a.m. on U.S.
Highway 98, one mile west of
State Road 65.
Bobbie Lee Dugger, 51, of
Crawfordville suffered injuries
along with her passenger, Joe
Keith Finlayson, 44, of Tallahas-
see.
According to the FHP, Dalton
was driving a 1994 Oldsmobile
eastbound on U.S. Highway
98. Dugger was driving a 2003
Ford truck westbound on the
highway. Dalton traveled off the
highway completely onto the
south shoulder, over-steered to
the left, causing her vehicle to
re-enter the highway in a coun-
terclockwise spin.
Dalton spun into the path of
Dugger and the front of Dugger's
vehicle struck the right front of
Dalton's vehicle. With the impact
of the crash, Dalton was ejected
from her vehicle, FHP officials
said.
Dalton was taken to Tallahas-
see Memorial Hospital, where

Say you saw it in

The Wakulla News

ON THE WATER AT
PANACEA HARBOR MARINA
Liw Music ON W EeklEds! BEER, WiNE & FRozE DRiNks!
ENJOY INSIDE OR HEATED OUTSIDE DINING!


she was pronounced dead. She
was not wearing a seatbelt. Her
vehicle suffered $7,500 worth of
damage.
Dugger suffered serious in-
juries and was taken to Weems


Hospital in Apalachicola for
treatment.
Finlayson suffered minor in-
juries, according to the FHP.
Both Dugger and Finlayson
were wearing seatbelts at the


Our Vision:
RECOGNIZED WORLD CLASS HEALTHCARE





Heart Disease
is the Leading Killer of Women

Find Out If You're at Risk


Lady Haskins
Publisher, The Wakulla Area Times
2007 Woman Wearing Red to Fight Heart Disease


time of the crash. The Dugger
vehicle suffered $15,000 worth
of damage.
FHP Corporal Patricia Jeffer-
son-Shaw was the accident and
homicide investigator.


"I
.1


* ..: '.'


The Signs & Symptoms
of a Heart Attack


Chest, stomach, back, It is important to learn the symptoms of heart disease in
neck or jaw pain women and that these symptoms are often different than
Shortness of breath in men. That's why Tallahassee Memorial has developed
Indigestion or gas-like pain a woman's heat care program designed to increase
Nausea or dizziness awareness of heart disease and encourage women who
Unexplained anxiety, experience heart attack symptoms to seek immediate
weakness or fatigue treatment.
Discomfort or pain between
the shoulder blades At TM H, we're in the forefront nationally for providing
Sense of impending doom rapid, life-saving treatment of heart attacks making your
-Irregular heartbeat, cold chance for survival much greater. To learn more about
sweat or paleness women and heart disease and find out if you are at risk,
visit www.tmh.org/womensheart.

Listen to Your Heart.





1300 Miccosukee Road
JL Tallahassee. FL 32308


Tallahassee Memorial 850.431.2727
Heart &Vascular Center www.tmh.org/womensheart


ti *


Sandy's Special

A little experience upsets a lot of theory.
Irving Kristol


e w- c Can Sandy Lott
2006 Top Producer
lill (850) 926-1010
www SandyLott.com,

Panacea
Eighth Avenue Remodeled 4BR/2BA, new kitchen,
New construction a cute 3BR/2BA bathrooms, HVAC unit, appliances,
home with custom build cabinets range, plumbing and electrical fixtures,
refrigerator, dishwasher, and builder will flooding and paint. Less than a mile
help with your closing cost. from public boat ramp.
Priced $125,900 Priced $145,000 M PROPERTIES








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007-Page 13A


Sheriff's Report


The Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office investigated a case of al-
leged grand theft and defraud-
ing of an innkeeper in Panacea
on Feb. 13, according to Sheriff
David Harvey.
Anne Morgan, owner of the
Panacea Motel, reported that
three suspects failed to pay
her $700 in outstanding room
Bills. One of the suspects was
caught smoking crack on the
property and was asked to
leave. The victim discovered
that a refrigerator, valued at
$450, and towels and pillows
were stolen from the motel. In
addition to the theft, the carpet
had been trashed. Suspects have
been. identified. Deputy Nick
: tefowsky investigated.
-lother activity reported by
t, e Wakulla County Sheriff's Of-
i fie:diuring the past week:
-. On Feb. 13, Gloria C. Met-
calfofPanacea found a woman's
"wallet on U.S. Highway 319 near
W: akulla Bank. Captain Steve
Ganey identified the owner of
the wallet, which contained a
substantial amount of money
and a Florida identification card
in it The owner of the property
was Tiffany Yolanda Gavin of
Tallahassee. Captain Ganey
was unsuccessful in locating
the owner.
On Feb. 14, Willie L. Man-
ning of Crawfordville and the
U.S. Forest Service turned in a
wallet that was recovered on
Forest Highway 13. The wallet
had been discovered by an em-
ployee of R.G. Brown Surveyors.
SThe wallet was owned by Ron-
h'ie Reid Joyner of Crawfordville
and contained cash and a credit
S-card" Captain Steve Ganey in-
i vestigated.
S On Feb. 13. Carissa L. Vearil
; of Crawfordville reported a
Burglary and grand theft at her
Residence. The victim reported
Sthe theft of $5,135 worth of
Furniture and a plasma televi-
sion. The property was owned
by Rent-A-Center. A forced entry
Swas discovered. A suspect has
been identified. Detective Eddie
?- Wester, Crime Scene Investiga-
Stor Steve Walker and Deputy
Andrew Vass investigated.
On Feb. 13, Thomasine
ST. Carden of Crawfordville re-
Sported a grand theft as someone
Removed $2,000 worth of copper
wire barrels from her home. A
suspect has been identified. Sgt.
SMike Kemp investigated.
.*. .On Feb. 14, David T. Dod-
son of Tallahassee reported a
criminal mischief to a Crawford-
ville house he was building.

FIRE

RESCUE

REPORT
During the 2006 calendar
year, the Wakulla County Vol-
unteer Fire Rescue Departments
responded to a total of 1,705
emergency incidents: Fires 359
S(includes structure fires, grass
Sfires, vehicle fires, fire alarms
"' and other type fires; Vehicle
*Accidents 259; Medical First
SResponder Incidents 938; and
SOther Emergency Incidents 149
i includess hazardous materials
incidents, road obstructions,
* electric power lines down, inves-
Stigations, etc.)
The number of incidents
handled by department: Craw-
fordville 747; Wakulla Station
270; Medart 215; Sopchoppy
137; Panacea 120; St. Marks
95; Apalachee Bay 63; Och-
lockonee Bay 48; and Smith
Creek 10.
The Wakulla Station Fire Res-
cue Department will conduct a
Family Fun Day at the station on
Saturday, March 3, from 11 a.m.
until 4 p.m. The event will be
for the entire family with great
food, air-filled jumping bags for
the children, and games and fire
trucks and fire-fighting equip-
ment will be on display. Mark
you calendar and bring the chil-
dren to this community event.

Sopchoppy yard sale
planned for March 10


The second annual Sopchop-
py Community Yard Sale will be
held on Saturday, March 10. The
coordination of the registration
will be handled by Linda at Sis-
ters Antiques and Uniques, 61
Rose Street, 962-2550.
Individuals who take part in
the program will be included
on a map and will only have to
provide site signs.
Advertisements will be han-
dled by the community. Space
is available next to Sisters for
those who want to be located
downtown.


Two windows were damaged
by B.B. gun pellets. Damage was
estimated at $100. Deputy Pam
Veltkamp investigated.
On Feb. 14,William W.
Causseaux of Crawfordville re-
ported a fraudulent use of his
credit card at a Target in Crest-
wood, Ill. The charge was in the
amount of $1,118. Lt. Sherrell
Morrison investigated.
On Feb. 14, Edwin C. Brown
of Crawfordville reported a
criminal mischief at Newport
Park. Individuals using the
property hung beer cans from
trees and shot at them with a
BB gun. Trash and food was all
over the ground and a shower
head was broken. Damage was
estimated at $250. Sgt. Jud McAl-
pin investigated.
On Feb. 14, Michael W.
Bradsher of Crawfordville and
the U.S. Forest Service recovered
a motorcycle in the Apalachicola
National Forest. The motorcycle
was found following a controlled
forest burn and was destroyed
by the fire. The motorcycle was
towed from the scene. Deputy
Matt Helms investigated.
On Feb. 16, Mike Barwick of
Wakulla Middle School reported
a criminal mischief as someone
painted graffiti on the school.
Graffiti was found in several lo-
cations with vulgar words spray
painted on the walls. Damage
was estimated at $1,000. Deputy
Jeff Barteld, Deputy Vicki Mitch-
ell, Sgt. C.L. Morrison and Crime
Scene Investigator Steve Walker
investigated.
On Feb. 15, George C. Nel-
son of Crawfordville and the
Wakulla Parks and Recreation
Department reported a burglary
at the recreation park. A conces-
sion stand door was kicked in.
The department reported the
theft of $100 worth of candy
and beverages. Damage to the
building was estimated at $250.
Deputy Roger Rankin investi-
gated.
On Feb. 15, Gerald K.
Knight, 29, of Crawfordville was
charged with sale of cocaine,
possession of cocaine with in-
tent to sell and attempting to
elude law enforcement officials
following a drug bust involving
a confidential informant. The
informant allegedly purchased
crack cocaine in the operation.
Knight allegedly attempted
to elude law enforcement of-
ficials by quickly driving away
and nearly crashed his vehicle.
The vehicle ended up in a ditch,
and Knight was captured on
foot by Lt. Pat Smith. Cocaine


HARTUNG AND
NOBLIN, INC.
REALTORS


and cash were recovered in the
investigation. Knight was out on
bond awaiting sentencing for a
conviction of possession of ille-
gal narcotics. Det. Fred Nichols
investigated.
On Feb. 15, Lawana D.
Matthews of Southern Spirits
reported a burglary. A forced
entry was discovered. Cash and
cigarettes were taken with a
value of $190. Damage to the
property was estimated at $200.
Deputy Robert Giddens and Sgt.
Jud McAlpin investigated.
On Feb. 15, Sgt. Jimmy
Sessor investigated a battery
reported on a Wakulla County
school bus. The bus driver alleg-
edly pushed a student causing
him to fall down and injure him-
self. The district transportation
office and sheriff's office are still
investigating the case.
On Feb. 13, Raymond J.
Gustetic of Crawfordville report-
ed a burglary at his home. Beer
and cash, valued at $57, were
taken from the home. Deputy
Nick Petowsky investigated.
On Feb. 17, Kristy Biddle of
Tallahassee reported a burglary
to her Crawfordville home.

YOUR NEWSPAPER
PEOPLE
SERVING
PEOPLE








Lic. Real Estate Broker
Crawfordville Hwy.
(850) 926-7043
(850) 926-2898 Fax
www.Forestrealty@earthlink.net
OCHLOCKONEE RIVER-
SOPCHOPPY 22.6 Acres, 2 Par-
cel with approximately 537 feet on
River. Well, power pole and septic
on property (AS IS Condition) and
priced to sell at $400,000.
NO. CRAWFORDVILLE HWY
319 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY
1.21 Acres w/ 151'on Hwy.
Older mobile home, storage bldg &
pole barn- "AS IS". $275,000
SMITH CREEK SOP-
CHOPPY 33.60 Will Divide,
wooded, convenient to the
Apalachicola National Forest.
Priced at $6,000/acre.
BOB MILLER ROAD Partially
cleared 13.32 Acres in North
Wakulla County. Ready for your
custom home, BRING OFFERS
Asking $220,000


wJ --
"w ,
Your Perfect Partner
for Real Estate!


5 acres tucked away in
the woods, but just off the
paved road of Emmett Whaley.
There is a creek across the back
of the property, a work shop,
new, big modem kitchen, new,
M wood laminate floors, new built
in cabinets in the dining room,
with built in computer desk,
and large walk in closet in master. This is the perfect family home
with 4 bedrooms and 2 full baths and one 1/2 bath. There is even
a screened room off the workshop for family cook outs. Priced
$20,000 below recent appraisal. Horses welcome!! #163479
$199,900 Dawn Reed 2943468 Joi Hope 210-7300
* Great investment potential. 1.70 acres (mol) This prop-
erty is located 1/10 mile from Walmart. Property may be able to be
re-zoned to commercial #143862 $199,000
Donna Bass 766-4827
*Seller Motivatedl Bring Offers! 5 Beautiful wooded acres
in a peaceful, private setting just perfect for your new house or
mobile home. Dual access from Hwy 267 and Hwy 61. Minutes
from Crawfordville, excellent schools, swimming, boating and
golfing. Zoned Agricultural with horses allowed, Great investment.
#138691 $95,000 Call Kai Page, CNS 519-3781
*4 acres with big trees. If you are in the market to build
your dream home on beautiful acreage. This is the property for
you. Property is located in north Wakulla County. #148431
$125,000 Joi Hope 210-7300
*This is one of the very best lots in the Villages of St.
Marks. This .46 acres is located on high ground. Located close to
two rivers for excellent fishing, boating or a stroll along the river
banks. #161037 $49,000 Joi Hope 210-7300
*Lot 15 Lucy Lane 100x200 partially cleared lot for homes
or MH. Just four blocks from the Gulf, paved road, city sewer
and water. Walk to post office, shopping, fishing and restaurants.
#162732 $59,000 Lentz Walker 528-3572


If you are in the market for a new home. You can choose
a lot from our extensive inventory and one of our builders
will build you a custom home. Call for details.


Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated
2650 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327
r1 850-926-2994 Phone 850-926-4875 Fax
.ATO- www.coldwellbanker.com MS.


Someone entered the home and
removed $300 worth of electron-
ics and bedding. Deputy Danny
Harrell investigated.
On Feb. 17, Deputy Jason
Newlin investigated a DUI in-
volving a motorist driving 106
miles per hour in the Riversink
community. Upon seeing law
enforcement officials, the driver
slowed down to 101 miles per
hour. Deputy Matt Helms and
Newlin eventually stopped the
motorist after a three-mile emer-
gency pursuit.
Gerome Gavin Thompson, 28,
of Crawfordville was charged
with DUI, fleeing and attempt-
ing to elude and driving with a
suspended license.
On Feb. 18, Tim G. Williams
of Panacea reported a trash burn
pile fire that got out of control
and created a grass fire. Ap-
proximately one-half acre was
damaged. No structures suffered
any damage. The investigation
was turned over to the Florida
Division of Forestry. Deputy
Mike Crum investigated.
On Feb. 18, Nathaniel Wil-







FG l plhl),I


x t ange'
BuIb


liams of Crawfordville reported
the theft of pool cues valued
at $1,300. The cues were taken
from the victim's vehicle. A sus-
pect has been identified. Deputy
Danny Harrell investigated.
On Feb. 18, Ashley W.
Poitevint of Crawfordville re-
ported being injured by some-
one who shot him in the face
as he worked on his vehicle.
EMS officials checked the victim
who suffered a facial laceration.
He was not transported to the
hospital. Deputy Scott Rojas
investigated.
On Feb. 18, James M. Al-
derman of St. Marks reported
a grand theft of a firearm and
movies from St. Marks property.
The missing property is valued
at $700. A suspect has been
identified. Deputy Mike Crum
investigated.
On Feb. 18, Donnie L.


Brown of Crawfordville reported
a grand theft of a boat, paddles
and life jackets valued at $580.
The boat was taken from the
Syfrett Creek area near Smith
Creek. Deputy Andrew Vass
investigated.
The Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office received 789 calls for ser-
vice during the past week.

Note to our readers: The
people who are reported as
charged with crimes in this col-
umn have not yet been to trial
and are therefore innocent until
proven guilty.

GET THE NEWS
DELIVERED
EACH WEEK!
Call 926-7102


^J/r All I iI e



K VYrOUR Rent Club House for Christmas parties,
I*SO A IUeS -receptions, bridal luncheons, baby
S*i L showers, birthdays, FSU games,
N iOW anniversaries, baby showers, etc.
The club house is equipped with a 52-inch wide-screen television, refrigerator, microwave,
dishwasher, complete dining set for up to 50 people, rental tables and chairs.
Ask about our help with set up and clean up!
For more information call (850) 556-5606



le 'BEING ABLE TO SEE

YOUR WORLD AS WELL

AS YOU DID WHEN YOU WERE YOUNGER!

PREMIUM IMPLANTS ARE A BREAKTHROUGH IN TECHNOLOGY,

ALLOWING FOR CLEAR DISTANCE AND NEAR VISION


SIMULTANEOUSLY WITHOUT GLASSES.


FREE

PREMIUM IMPLANT,

LASIK, CATARACT & NEW

IMPLANTABLE CONTACT LENS

SEMINAR


TUESDAY EVENING MARCH 13"
THE INN AT WILDWOOD
3896 COASTAL HWY 98
CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA
7:00PM


Trust Your Eyes to Dr. Siuaar.

DR. JOEL SHUGAR, MD, MSEE is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist who has performed
OVER 30,000 LASER PROCEDURES. Dr. Shugar will personally share information on
the new Premium Implant, Cataract, LASIK and Implantable Contact Lens procedures.


SEATING IS UIMITED
SO CALL TODAY
TO RESERVE
YOUR PLACE!


Receive a FREE
personal consrltatiu
at the seminar
from Dr. Shgar.


NATURE COAST
EyeCare Institute
555 Nort Byron Bule Pr kway Perry Florid


555 North Byron Butler Parkway Perry, Florida
www.naturecoasteye.com



(800) 870-6001 677


THE PAllENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS THE RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FORANY OTHER
SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT WHICH IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADERTISEMEItfl TE
FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT. PURSUANT TO SECTION 455.225(1) FOIDA STATUI
' 's'-- r l , I t 1 I I I I I "r- ^


Lso an uMad l E9sta
Jtanwaaionr s
Es&&a Iplnian & AotaO i



9tatnaAes eay fOWE, P.c4.

cAttoitm cAt-Pw
926-8245 3119-B Crawfordville Hwy.
Crawfordville, FL
www.francielowe.com


'
''


JAd & B,,. M.i



i


5 '-~a


,AAW








Page 14A-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007


Swine Show will have


a swampy feel this year


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
He may be a Florida Gator,
but for one Saturday in February
Sopchoppy resident Jim Tartt
will be associated with hogs.
This time it will be swine show
hogs, not the Razorbacks from
Arkansas.
The 41st annual Wakulla
County Swine Show and Sale
will carry Jim Tartt's name fol-
lowing the Florida Gators' na-
tional football championship in
Arizona in January. Tartt is very
familiar with the swine show as
he and his hog were selected as
Grand Champions in 2004.
The event actually begins on
Thursday, Feb. 22, with a pork
cooking contest. The Wakulla
County Youth Fair Association
is the event sponsor.
The contest is open to all
residents of Wakulla County
regardless of age, and partici-
pants need not be in the Swine
Show to participate. Anyone
interested in participating can
register by calling Tina Brimner


at 926-1935. Dishes should con-
tain pork as one of the main in-
gredients. Bring your dish and
a copy of your recipe (if you can
share it) to the Wakulla County
Extension Office at 84 Cedar
Avenue by 7 p.m. on Thursday,
Feb. 22.
All dishes will be sampled
by the judges to determine
the winnerss. Winners will be
announced, and prizes will be
awarded at the Swine Show, Sat-
urday, Feb. 24 during the awards
ceremony at 1:00 p.m.
On Friday, Feb. 23, youths
will turn in their hogs for weigh-
ing from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. The
swine record books are due at
5 p.m. and the 4-H FFA Swine
Judging Contest will be held
at 6:30 p.m. at the livestock
pavilion. Registration for the
swine judging begins at 6 p.m.
Youths representing Wakulla
and other counties are expected
to take part in the swine judg-
ing contest.
The 2007 show will feature
41 youths showing 58 hogs at


the livestock pavilion as the
show has increased in size over
the 2006 edition.
The show will begin at 10
a.m. at the extension arena at 84
Cedar Avenue. A proclamation
dedicating the show to Jim Tartt
will be read at 9:45 a.m.
"There is no cost to attend
the show, and participants re-
ally appreciate the support of
local people that come by to
cheer them on," said organizer
Darlene Mills of the Youth fair
Association.
After the show there will be
barbecue lunch available for $6
a plate. The barbeque will in-
clude pulled pork, baked beans,
cole slaw, bread, and tea.
A number of antique tractors,
owned by John Gosford, will be
on display throughout the day.
Showmanship competition be-
gins at approximately 11:30 a.m.
and pig scrambles will follow.
The event is free and open
to the public.
For more information, call
926-3931.


P&Z agenda dealt with more than plant


While more than 100 people
crammed into the Wakulla
County Commission chambers
on Monday, Feb. 12 to discuss a
proposed water bottling plant,
the Comprehensive Plan Large
Scale Map Amendment and text
amendment were not the only
matters in front of the board.
A record five additional items
were advertised, but continued
due to not being ready to be
heard by the P and Z.
P and Z members recom-
mended an approval of a rezon-
ing request from W.K. Whitfield,
Jr. and Jean Whitfield Revell on
4.28 acres on the northeast cor-
ner of the intersection of East
Ivan Road and U.S. Highway 319.
The zoning change will be from
Agriculture to C-2 Commercial
in anticipation of a three lot
commercial subdivision on the
site.
A rezoning request was
recommended for approval
for Damon C. and Jacquelyn


McMillan on two acres on Old
Woodville Road. The change is
from Agriculture to RR-2 Resi-
dential to allow the family to
sell a portion of the property
for residential use.
Magnolia Park Develop-
ment and agent Moore Bass
Consulting received a recom-
mendation of approval for a
final plat request on 33.33 acres
on the south side of Harvey
Mill Road near Cynthia Street
in Crawfordville. The Magnolia
Park subdivision will include
47 residential units on the
acreage.
Parrish Barwick and agent
Edwin Brown and Associates
received a recommendation of
approval for a Small Scale Com-
prehensive Plan Amendment on
9.73 acres on the west side of
U.S. Highway 319 near Council
Moore Road in Crawfordville.
Barwick is seeking a land use
change from Urban 1 to Urban
2 which increases the density


from two units per acre to a
maximum of 10 units per acre.
A large scale Compre-
hensive Plan Future Land Use
Map Amendment request from
Mickey Harbin on 53 acres on
the northwest side of Woodville
Highway and Acorn Trail north
of St. Marks was recommended
for approval. The requested land
use change would be from one
unit per 20 acres to one unit per
two acres.
A large scale Comprehen-
sive Plan Future Land Use Map
amendment from New Life
Ministries of Crawfordville, Inc.
and agent Bob Routa was recom-
mended for approval. The 12.43
acre project is located at 318
Shadeville Highway. The land
use change would be Urban 1 to
Urban 2 which increases density
from two units per acre to a
maximum of 10 units per acre.
Wakulla County Commis-
sioners will hear the requests
on Monday, March 5.


Chance-
Continued from Page 1A
designated as a sexual offend-
er.
"What is heartening," Judge
Sauls said, "is that over the past
four months there have been no
violations.... I'm inclined to give
her another opportunity."
The judge gave Thomas a
suspended prison sentence of
40 months, meaning she won't
have to serve time if she avoids
further trouble. He ordered her
to serve another five months
of community control followed
by 48 months of sex offender
probation.
Family members jumped up
and embraced after the judge
pronounced sentence.
Those who testified at the
hearing on behalf of Thomas
included the Rev. S.L. Phillips,
vice-president of the Florida
chapter of the Southern Chris-
tian Leadership Conference,
Leon County Sheriff's Deputy
Nate Maxwell and his wife Tawa-
nna, who are Thomas' aunt and
uncle, her aunt Ruth Francis, and
her mother, Lutheria Jones.
Thomas broke down in tears
as she asked the judge to for-
give her. Her attorney, Matthew
Willard, asked her if her biggest
fear was to have her children
taken away.
Thomas began to sob, unable
to speak.
Thomas was charged at the
same time as a teacher at the
high school, Elaine Turner, was
charged with having a sexual
relationship with another stu-
dent.
Turner, 37, is scheduled to go
to trial in May on four counts
of sexual activity with a 16 or
17 year old, second-degree felo-
nies punishable by a maximum
of 15 years in prison. Another
teacher, Jeff Duggar, 38, faces a
felony charge of tampering with
a witness for allegedly trying to
pressure the victim in the case
to recant his story.
In July 2006, Thomas pleaded
no contest to lewd and lascivious
contact, a second-degree felony,
and was ordered to serve three
months of community control
and three years of probation.


High
Continued from Page 1A
and players will have space to
look at game films and discuss
strategy.
"We've had less than 10 fights
this year," said Principal Crouch.
"Our teachers are really working
hard with students. They are
greeting students in the halls
and sending a message that
we're happy that you're here."
Klees said he wants to rec-
ognize the contributions of
former players who have gone
on to play college football with
a "Wall of Fame" as you enter the
fieldhouse. He asked parents to
send photographs of their chil-
dren in their college uniforms
to the high school so that WHS
can frame the photographs and
hang them on the wall.
Sports fans also appreciate
the new fieldhouse because it
has heated restrooms and con-
cession stands to hide from the
cold weather.
Crouch added that the district
is planning to improve the sound
system at Reynolds Stadium so
that everyone can hear the
public address announcements
during games.
Crouch said the new field-
house and parking area are the
start of improvements outside
the school. Much is happening
inside as well. Interior walls
are being repainted, poles are
being eliminated in the labo-
ratories and doors are being
replaced. Sidewalks have been
pressure cleaned and new "white
boards" have been added in
classrooms.
"A lot of it is just a new pair
of eyes looking around at things
and seeing something that needs


Dog show coming
The Ochlocknee River Kennel
Club will more than 1,300 pure
bred dogs at its show on Feb.
24 and Feb. 25. All major breeds
and many rare breeds will be
shown. The show will be held at
the North Florida Fair Grounds
with judging beginning at 8:30
a.m. each day. The dogs will be
judged on how close they come
to matching the standards is-
sued by the American Kennel


to be painted," said Crouch. "We
have great kids at this school.
There is no gang activity that I
am aware of. Attendance is up
and referrals are down."
New carpeting and chairs
have been added in some class-
rooms and windows have been
replaced. "We want to make it a
good environment for the kids,"
he said.
The shop classes are building
the school cases to display vari-
ous trophies. Many of the school
trophies have been in storage
in Crouch's office. Crouch has
already emphasized the past
history of the school by hang-
ing football team pictures and
graduating classes around the
school.
Crouch added that he is
expecting steady growth for
the next three years before the
fifth-grade classes make it to the
high school level and increase
enrollment beyond the approxi-
mately 1,260 students at the
school now.
Students will be taking FCAT
examinations in February and
early March, which will help
determine if the new principal
can improve on the state's "D"
grade given to WHS the past
two years.
"We think things are going
well," he said. "But the grade is
the public's perception of how
things are going."
Crouch is confident that the
district and school have taken
the necessary measures to im-
prove the school grade. Im-
proving the grade is important
because "the kids and teachers
deserve it," he concluded.
The state releases school
grades in June.


this weekend
Club. People who are thinking
of buying a dog will benefit
from attending the show so that
they can get important informa-
tion about the different breeds
before they select a particular
breed of dog to own.
Agility events will also be
held in conjunction with the
show. Agility will begin on Fri-
day at 1 p.m. and will continue
on Saturday and Sunday.


County
Continued from Page 1A


designated as the date for a
Black History Month celebration
at Hudson Park.
Board members approved
a resolution recognizing Florida
Gator football player Jim Tartt
of Sopchoppy by renaming the
annual swine show the 2007
Jim Tartt Swine Show and Sale.
Tartt showed the 2004 grand
champion hog. The 2007 show
will be held on Feb. 24.
The county EMS department
was authorized to purchase Au-
tomatic External Defibrillators
through a grant program. The
AEDs will cost $70,500 with the
match requirement paid through
the fire association and the
sheriff's office.
The grant match is either 10
percent or 25 percent of the cost
depending on which grant the
county receives.
The EMS department was
approved for a $150,000 Trice
Lane Station renovation. The
project will include building a
metal building at the end of
the ambulance bays to house
additional ambulances. Old
bays will be remodeled as crew
living quarters. The exact cost of


the project will be determined
during the bid process. The
$150,000 was budgeted for the
project last year.
The board approved the
week of Feb. 11 through Feb. 17
as American Red Cross Hazard-
ous Weather Awareness Week
through a Proclamation.
Commissioners approved
the expenditure of $5,000 from
the sheriff's office "Rainy Day
Fund" to pay insurance deduct-
ibles. The claims were made in
August 2006 after the sheriff's
office was struck by lightning
on two occasions.
A temporary road dosing of
U.S. Highway 319 was approved
by the board on Feb. 17. The
request came from the Wakulla
County Christian Coalition for
the African American Heritage
Celebration and Parade. The
festival will be held at Hudson
Park. The road will be closed
for an hour from 10 a.m. until
11 a.m.
The county EMS unit was
reimbursed $1,020'for providing
services during Wakulla War
Eagle football games in 2006.
The money was approved as
unanticipated funds.
One cent sales tax funding
will be used as match money for


vehicles and equipment for the
EMS unit. The cost of the two
grants are $48,170 for one and
$34,970 for a second.
Commissioners authorized
County Administrator Ben Pin-
gree to prepare an application
for the Community Develop-
ment Block Grant to partially
fund sewer expansion into
Wakulla Gardens. Residents in
the Wakulla Gardens area may
be eligible for sewer connection
assistance.
The EMS unit was grant-
ed an approval to apply for
EMS Dispatch Screen Laptops
through a $79,332 grant. The
match funding will be paid
through the Moving Violations
Fund.
A $57,250 grant application
was approved by the board for
the EMS department to obtain
automated stretchers that assist
paramedics lift large patients
without injuring themselves.
The stretchers are raised using
a motor instead of the strength
of the paramedic.
A $77,400 "Tuff Book"
computer grant was approved
for the EMS unit to fulfill re-
quirements that the EMS unit
submit all EMS reports to the
state electronically.


U


S9LL


ITW


. ...


KENNEL CLUB
OF FLORIDA, INC.


bOG SHOW


AKC All-Breed Conformation Show

and Agility Trial

February 24 & 25, 2007


Judging starts at 8:00 a.m.
North Florida \ K
Fair Grounds


\i K\~t~FF


Say You Saw It In The Wakulla News


WVIOcLES


PUBLIC DISPLAY SALES LOT

GRAND OPENING SPECIAL

1/2 OFF REGULAR FEE ($125)

$62.50
WILL PERMIT YOU UP TO 45 DAYS DISPLAY
(DISPLAY OR SALE WHICH EVER COMES FIRST)

WIN!! WIN!! SITUATION
BUYER & SELLER DEAL DIRECT (NO MIDDLE MAN)
LOCATED NEAR MAIN ENTRANCE OF NEW CRAWFORDVILLE WALMART SUPER CENTER
2106 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. PH. 926-1006
ALL VEHICLES MUST BE REGISTERED AT SELF SERVICE BOOTH ON PREMISE
SPECIAL FEE OF $62.50 MUST BE SUBMITTED WITH THIS AD
OFFER EXPIRES 03/1/07


%IS









THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007


School


,re CLASS NOTES


Wakulla's top teachers and staff members of the year were treated to a special celebration on Friday, Feb. 16.



Honoring their 'team'


District pays

tribute to top

teachers, staff
Wakulla County school teach-
ers, administrative staff and
school board members honored
the education profession at a
celebration, Friday, Feb. 16, at
Riversprings Middle School.
Beth O'Donnell, assistant su-
perintendent, selected a theme
centered on a song written by
Laura Hudson, WMS Band Direc-
tor, entitled, "Because of You."
Every 2006-07 District Teach-
er of the Month, every school's
Teacher of the Year and the
Wakulla District Teacher of
the Year were recognized. Su-
perintendent David Miller was
thrilled with the opportunity to
salute educators.
"Education and technology
are changing exponentially
compared to days of yesteryear.
We are constantly challenged
to learn, to polish, to improve,"
Miller said. "Today, we honor all
Wakulla teachers."
Mike Carter of the Wakulla
Academic Boosters and Ray
Cromer of Envision Credit Union


also made presentations to the
teachers.
The 2007 Wakulla County
School District Teacher of the
Year was Crissy Sarvis, a River-
springs Middle School teacher.
Sarvis went through rigorous
judging of an extensive written
packet as well as face-to-face
interviews by educators from
outside Wakulla County.
Also in the competition, elect-
ed as their respective school's
Teacher of the Year were: Pat
Calhoun, Crawfordville Elemen-
tary; Connie Worrill, Medart
Elementary; Rhonda Traweek,
Shadeville Elementary: Angie
Walker, Wakulla Middle School;
Sunny Chancy, Wakulla High
and Ashley Anderson, represent-
ing all the district professionals
who work with children.
After a festive morning, the
school district continued the
recognition for all instructional
support staff and business pro-
fessionals.
Each of these employees
received appreciation gifts, a
fried chicken dinner catered by
the Wakulla cafeteria ladies and
mini-all-star jerseys.
Every school principal
cheered for their teams as


Wal-Mart accepting top

teacher nominations
Do you have a favorite teach- ceive $25,000 when the National
er who deserves some recogni- Teacher of the Year award is an-
tion? If so, stop by your area nounced in November.
Wal-Mart or Sam's Club location a:,;
from Feb. 5 through Feb. 23 to ''
submit a nomination form for ':.'
the company's annual Teacher
of the Year program.
Outstanding educators are
eligible for a $1,000 grant in ad-
dition to other prizes.
"Everyone has someone who
inspired them to be successful
- whether you're still a student
or not," said Wayne Newell, store ,
manager of the Crawfordville
Wal-Mart. "The Wakulla County
community is full of great teach-
ers who deserve our thanks."
Each Wal-Mart and Sam's
Club location across the coun-
try will name a winning local
Teacher of the Year in honor of
National Teacher's Day, which
is Tuesday, May 8. Through this
year's program, more than 4,000
teachers nationwide will be
recognized, and the Wal-Mart
and Sam's Club Foundation will
donate approximately $5 million
for three types of awards:
Local Teacher of the Year
honorees receive $1,000 for their
school, a $100 gift card to buy
supplies for their classroom, an
honorary Teacher of the Year
polo shirt, and a personalized
certificate. All local winners are Mu
invited to apply for state honors
by completing and submitting 0lJya,' lI
a comprehensive application
form by June 1. State winners,
selected by members of the 1 oc
Phi Delta Kappa international
educational fraternity, receive mffi B
$10,000 for their school, business
cards, a certificate and a one-year
membership to PDK.
All state winners are automat-
ically entered into the national
competition.
One national winner will re-


Superintendent David Miller salutes district staffers (from
left) Jennifer Raker, Rita Sparkman and Shirley Core.
well. Superintendent Miller said
Karen J. Wells, director of he firmly believes in team
human resources, said, "The loyalty.
All-Stars theme was selected "When you are part of a team,
because of two key words: Team you stand up for your team-
and Stars. Our Wakulla all-star mates," he said. "Your loyalty is
team is composed chiefly of to them. That's why we take the
outstanding performers." time to recognize our team."

HOHMMA, BABY M HORE
3336 Crawfordville Highway
cross from Gulf Coast Lumber
850-926-7336
Baby & IVIaternity Bargains!
Authorized Dealer of
SDIXIE OUTFITTERS
o NOW OPEN
THURS., FRI. & SAT.
12 5 pm


Thomas gears up for
Regional Spelling Bee
Wakulla Middle School sev-
enth-grader Jacob Thomas will
represent the county at the Big
Bend Regional Spelling Bee on
Saturday, Feb. 24, at WFSU-TV in
Tallahassee.
Thomas will compete against
spelling bee champions from Di-
xie, Franklin, Gadsden, Gilchrist,
Grady (Ga.), Jackson, Jefferson,
Leon, Levy, Taylor and Thomas
(Ga.) counties.
The competition is spon-
sored by the Tallahassee Demo-
crat. The bee will be taped at
12:30 p.m. and will be broadcast
throughout the month of WFSU-
TV Channel 11.

McKay Scholarship
seeking applications
Wakulla County children may
be eligible to participate in the
John M. McKay Scholarship for
Students with Disabilities Pro-
gram for the 2007-2008 school
year.
Currently, more than 15,000
Florida students are participat-
ing in this program, which
allows parents to request a dif-
ferent public school within the
district, request a public school
in an adjacent school district or
receive a scholarship for your
child to attend a participating
private school.
In order to participate, your
child must meet certain require-
ments including being enrolled
in a Florida public school for the
2006-2007 school year as well
as having an active Individual
Education Plan (IEP).
If your child meets these
requirements and you are in-
terested in finding out more
information, call the Parent
Choice Information Hotline at
1-800-447-1636 or visit the Web


Monday: Hamburger on bun
w/lettuce & pickle, french fries,
apple, milk
Tuesday: Ham, macaroni and
cheese casserole, green peas,
school-made roll, peach cup,
milk.
Wednesday: Turkey and rice,
mixed vegetables, cornbread,
grapes, milk.
Thursday: Check Wakulla
County Schools' Web site.
Friday: Check Wakulla County
Schools' Web site.


site at www.floridaschoolchoice.
org and select McKay Scholar-
ship option. The deadline for
applying for a school within
the district is June 1. You may
apply to private schools anytime
during the school year.

School improvement
meeting held at WHS
On Jan. 25, a School Im-
provement meeting was held
at Wakulla High School. Many
topics were discussed, but one
burning issue at WHS was how
to improve classrooms so teach-
ers can better prepare students
for upcoming standardized
tests.
Principal Mike Crouch was in
attendance and requested that
"whiteboards" be ordered from
School Improvement funds. The
committee voted and awarded
$6,240 to provide teachers with
at least 16 feet of whiteboards
for instruction.
The purchase will be particu-
larly helpful for WHS English
teachers who are focusing with
their students on the six traits
of writing.
Throughout the curriculum,
students are encouraged to
develop, apply and enhance
their reading and writing skills.
Students in Dr. Rachel Pienta's
English class practiced their
writing skills while also express-
ing their opinions about their
high school.

BBB offers student
ethics scholarship
The Better Business Bureau
Foundation of Northwest Flori-
da, Inc., is accepting applications
from area high school juniors
and seniors for the BBB's 2007
Student Ethics Scholarship
program. Applications must be
postmarked by April 25.


Monday: Chicken Parme-
san, pasta salad, green beans,
school-made roll, peach cup,
milk.
Tuesday: Beef A Roni, tossed
salad, french bread, orange
wedges, milk.
Wednesday: Barbecue chick-
en sandwich, potato rounds,
cantaloupe, milk.
Thursday: Check Wakulla
County Schools' Web site.
Friday: Check Wakulla Coun-
ty Schools' Web site.


Section B


February 26-March 2
ELEMENTARY MIDDLE SCHOOL


High School Menus Available Online


,s holdbe imletosavr n act w'r hre o ha yo cn ak
Bankhasheled ur fiens ahoue yur hme.Ask ushow








Page 2B-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007


People


White House home to ma


By SUSAN YELTON
CHAT Board Member
Today is the birthday of the
"Father of our Country," George
Washington. We have had 42
different presidents during our
short history and each one of
them has had a love affair with
animals. Our first president.
George Washington, was often
painted astride his big white
stallion, Blueskin. No ... that
was not his favorite horse.
The horse who held his
affection was Nelson, a light
chestnut gelding, who was with
him during the Revolutionary
War and lived his later years at
Mount Vernon. Blueskin was
known to be afraid of cannon
fire, but I guess if you are brave
like Nelson, but not particularly
attractive, you don't get to be in
pictures.
George Washington never
lived in the White House, since
it was not completed until the
term of John Adams, our second
president. But since then, The
White House has been filled
with almost 400 pets. Dur-
ing some administrations, the
White House was like a zoo.
Abraham Lincoln's birthday
was this month, too. He was


known to be a very permissive
parent and allowed his sons
to keep as many pets as they
wanted. The Lincoln household
was a menagerie of rabbits, cats,
dogs, goats, ponies, pigs and the
famous Jack the turkey, whose
life was spared when Lincoln's
son Todd pleaded with his fa-
ther to spare Jack's life. During
Lincoln's term of office, it was
not unusual to see the two
goats, Nanny and Nanko, riding
in the presidential carriage.
Our 26th president, "Teddy"
Roosevelt, was best known
as a big-game hunter, but he
had a soft spot for his family's
pets. His White House was like
Noah's Ark. His six children had
pets that ranged from a small
bear named Jonathan Edwards,
to birds, pigs, flying squirrels.
horses, ponies, dogs. lizards,
and the list goes on. In addition
to all his presidential responsi-
bilities, Roosevelt pursued his


lifelong interest in ornithology
and published a bird-watching
book during his second term
of office.
Dogs have always had a spe-
cial place in the White House.
Calvin Coolidge has a least 12,
as well as a pet raccoon named
Rebecca, whom he walked on
a leash.
President Franklin D. Roos-
evelt's dog Fala, a Scottish Ter-
rier, became a household name
during World War II. Who can
forget President George H.W.
Bush's Springer Spaniel named
Millie and her puppies. Millie's
book about the White House
was a best seller for many years,
but I always thought she had
some help in writing it from
First Lady Barbara Bush.
Our current president, George
W. Bush, and his wife, Laura,
like Scottish Terriers. Barney
must have been lonesome be-
cause now he has a new play-
mate, Miss Beazley. She was the
President's birthday gift to the
First Lady in 2004.
I guess we can say that no
matter what their politics, our
presidents have been ardent
animal lovers. Unfortunately,
what has not been a tradition is


ny pets
being a spokesperson for all the
unwanted animals that live in
the shelters or wander without
homes.
I know President Bush is
very busy these days, but it is
my dream that maybe someone
in the White House would tell
the American people that this
month, we not only celebrate
President's Day, but on Feb. 27
we celebrate Spay Day USA.
You are probably tired of us
reminding you about having
your animal spayed or neutered.
However, it really can make a
difference in the over-popula-
tion of unwanted animals.
Although we are finding
homes for our shelter animals,
I am sad to say that last month
we had to euthanize 230 ani-
mals.
If lack of financial resources
is preventing you from having
your animal neutered, please
call the Wakulla Animal Shelter
at 926-0890 and ask how CHAT
funds can help you.
This month, let's not only
recognize presidential birth-
days, but also remember Spay
Day and do something about
our over-population of unwant-
ed animals.



Felicia Hutchinson

marries Thurmond
Felicia Hutchinson of Craw- ceremony.
fordville and Colby Thurmond The bride is the daughter 6f
of Crawfordville were married Willie and Deborah McRoy. of
on Saturday, Feb. 3, at Rocky Crawfordville. A reception was
Mount Church. Minister Der- held at the couple's home. They
rick Nelson performed the are living in Crawfordville.


. -: "' e v t


SLive Professional Theatre at it's best! phaps sste

SmoKe On The Mountain -February 16, 17, 18-23,24.25
BULLY -March3&4 The DIXIE Does Nashville-~Mach9&o1
The Queen of Bingo March 16, 17, 18- 23, 24, 25
SIXIE

-iA Call 850/653-3200 I THEATRE
A ,A,, E www.dixietheatre.com "WhereQuali is Par Mt


PUBLIC HEARING
The City of Sopchoppy will be holding a public hear-
ing on the closing of an abandoned alley which is
situated in the middle of the block between Yellow
Jacket Avenue and Blossom Avenue, (formerly re-
ferred to as 2nd Avenue and 3rd Avenue), from Dixon
Street to Winter Street. Lots 166 and 167 border this
alley on the west side and lots 164 and 165 border the
lots on the east side. The closing will be done by Or-
dinance and the first public hearing will be Monday,
Feb. 12, followed by the second and final reading and
adoption on Monday, March 12, 2007. Both hearings
will take place at 6:30 p.m., at 100 Municipal Av-
enue, Sopchoppy, Florida. Any person attending re-
quiring special assistance should contact the Clerk's
Office at 962-4611.

CLASSIFIED As Low As $7 Per Week!
Call 926-7102


Debbie Kirkley
Technology Service J
Representative


Open: Monday, Tuesday
Thursday & Friday 9 am 5 pm
Wednesday 11 am 5 pm
Located in the North Pointe Center


HAPPENINGS


"We would like to thank the community for the support," said
Sweetheart dance organizer Tammy Thomas.
The Crawfordville Woman's Club hosted the second annual "We would also like to thank the Crawfordville Winn-Dixie,
Family Sweetheart Dance on Saturday, Feb. 10. Organizers said the Leslie Carl Herold Photography and Marguerite Robison (Karaoke)
dance was a great success with ice cream sundaes and ice cream for helping to make the Sweatheart Dance a success for the second
soda floats enjoyed by guests of all ages. year in a row."


AARP

Schedules

driver safety

;.classes
An AARP driver safety class
will be held in Wakulla County
in April.
This class is available to any
individual age 50 or older with
:a valid driver license. No testing
.-and no "hands-on" driving is
S-required.
Completion of AARP class
should result in a savings on
your Florida auto insurance for
up to three years. All eight hours
of class work must be completed
before a certificate is issued by
AARP. The insurance discount
is available only for participants
- with good driving records for
ages 55 and older.
The program will be held on
: April 17 and April 18 from 8:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on both days at
the TCC Wakulla Center, located
at 5 Crescent Way, U.S. Highway
319 in Crawfordville.
Classes generally fill up quick-
ly. For reservations or informa-
tion, contact Ed Puletz, AARP
Driver Training Asst. State Coor-
dinator, at (850) 893-2060.
After making your reserva-
tion, mail a $10 check (per per-
son, made out to AARP) to: Ed
Puletz, 5984 Ansel Ferrel Road,
Tallahassee, FL 32309.

SAY YOU SAW
IT IN THE
WAKULLA NEWS


Better Breathers
support group forming
Become part of a sharing,
caring group that seeks solu-
tions to living with lung disease.
The American Lung Association
of Florida, Big Bend Region, is
inviting residents to attend the
first Better Breathers Support
Group of Wakulla County.
The Better Breathers group
provides an opportunity for
people to meet and learn about
their lung condition from con-
cerned health care professionals
and other lung disease patients,
family and friends.. .......
The first informational meet-
ing will be on Feb. 21 from 1
p.m. until 2 p.m. at the Wakulla
County Senior Services Center
located at 33 Michael Dr. in
Crawfordville. The meetings are
free and open to anyone.
For more information, call
386-2065 or 1-800-LUNG-USA.

Pregnancy center
plans LIFEWALK
The Wakulla Pregnancy Cen-
ter invites residents to partici-
pate in the LIFEWALK to save
lives on Saturday, March 24.
The walk will begin at 8:30


a.m. at Woodville First Baptist
Church on the St. Marks Trail.
The group will walk two miles.
There will be music, baked
goods, and a silent auction with
items to buy, face painting, and
plenty of fun.

Wakulla Springs offers
evening dinner cruise
Wakulla Springs State Park
will host an evening cruise and
dinner on Saturday, March 3, at
5:30 p.m.
Park officials invite visitors
to celebrate the beginning of.
spring by taking an evening
cruise down the Wakulla River
and follow it with a dinner in
the historic Wakulla Springs
Lodge. The event is $29 per
person and reservations are
required. For more information,
call the park at 224-5950.

Agency on Aging
to hold board meeting
The Area Agency on Aging
for North Florida, Inc. will hold
its board of directors meeting
on Thursday, Feb. 22, at 10:30
a.m. at 2414 Mahan Drive in Tal-
lahassee. The meeting is open
to the public.


I Get The News Delivered Each Week: 926-7102 |


Matt Fitz-Randolph
Information
Services Manager


576-8134 WAK( II .1 A
s 3 CREDIT UNION SERVICES
press 3 An oflcr of Taflshs..-Leon Fk.erafCwedt Unto


san


The Dixie Theatre presents... The 2007 Season
A N,il -Por-Profit Theatre


FREE CHECKING
Call or come by for more information on how you and your family members can join!


WAKULLA T

URGENT CARE

& DIAGNOSTIC
CENTER, PLC
!-^ itll"
AFTERNOON & EVENING HouRs
^J^^^^MONDAY- Fmi^^\^
'^^^^^^^^^3 PA^. 11 I'M^


David Keen, M.D.


Now Accepting Primary Care

We Accept Most Major Insurance Including: Vista, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Medicare, Medicaid, Etc.
Walk-Ins Welcome
Please call for information (850) 984-3132
1325 Coastal Hwy., Panacea, FL 32346


- -- I -










THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007-Page 3B


Deadline


9 -onday


CNoonCLASSIf IED

926-7102


35 Cents

Per Word



ADinimum
Minimum


Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


CATEGORIES
100 EMPLOYMENT
105 Business Opportunities
110 Help Wanted
115 Services
120 Work Wanted
200 ITEMS FOR SALE
205 Antiques
210 Auctions
215 Auto Parts and Accessories
220 Cars
225 Trucks
230 Motor Homes and Campers
235 Motorcycles and 4-Wheelers
240 Boats and Motors
245 Personal Watercraft :
250 Sporting Goods --
255 Guns
260 Business Equipment
265 Computers and Internet
270 Electronics
275 Home Furnishings
280 Home Appliances
285 Jewelry


290 Musical Instruments
295 Building Materials
300 MISC. FOR SALE
305 Machinery, Tools & Equipment
310 Firewood Products
315 Farm & Garden Equipment
320 Farm Products & Produce
325 Horses
330 Livestock, Farm Animals
335 Pets
340 Plants
345 Swap, Barter, Trade
350 Wanted to Buy
355 Yard Sales
400 NOTICES 'R GESALE
410 Free Items IE i;
415 Announcements --a
420 Card of Thanks rtSALE~
425 Occasion Cards
430 In Memoriam
435 Lost and Found
440 Personals and Notices
500 REAL ESTATE, HOMES, MOBILES
505 Acreage for Lease


510 Acreage for Sale
515 Apartments for Rent
520 Townhouses for Rent
525 Townhouses for Sale
530 Commercial Property for Rent
535 Commercial Property for Sale
540 Farms for Sale
545 Homes for Sale
550 Homes with Acreage for Sale
555 Houses for Rent
560 Land for Sale
565 Mobile Homes for Rent
570 Mobile Homes for Sale
575 Mobile Homes with Land for Sale
580 Rooms for Rent/Roommates Wanted
585 Wanted to Rent
590 Waterfront Homes/Land for Sale
595 Vacation Rental
600 SERVICES AND BUSINESS ADV.
605 Entertainment
610 Schools and Instruction
615 Business Opportunities

CALL 926-7102 TODAY
Email: classifieds@thewakullanews.net


Legal Notice f


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 06-302-CA
CLYDE K. CARTER;
and DELORIS FORT,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
WILLIAM K. NORTON;
MARIA S. NORTON;
and WAKULLA COUNTY;
.Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MARIA S. NORTON
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Tax
Deed Quiet Title to the following property in
Leon County, Florida:
Lot 25, Block 32, WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT
III, as shown by plat of said subdivision of
Record in Plat Book 1, Page 43 of the Public
Records of Wakulla County, Florida
Wakulla County Parcel ID No. 00-00-043-010-
09189-000
has been filed against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses, If
any, to it on DANIEL E. MANAUSA, ESQUIRE,
SMITH, THOMPSON, SHAW & MANAUSA,
PA., Plaintiff's attorneys, 3520 Thomasville
Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida 32309-
3469, no more than thirty (30) days from the
first publication date of this notice of action,
and file the original with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's attorneys or
immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will
be entered against you for the relief demanded
in the complaint or petition.
DATED this 22nd day January, 2007.
BRENT X. THURMOND
By: -s- Chris Gibson
Deputy Clerk
(Wakulla County Circuit
Court Seal)
Feb. 1,8, 15,22,2007


Legal Notice


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY
CASE NO. 04-92-FC
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST,
AS TRUSTEE OF AMERIQUEST
MORTGAGE SECURITIES, INC.,
SERIES 2001-A, ASSET BACKED
CERTIFICATES, UNDER THE
POOLING & SERVICING AGREEMENT
DATED AS OF NOVEMBER 2, 2001,
WITHOUT RECOURSE,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARY K. WALKER' et, al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated 2/12/2007
and entered in Case No. 04-92-FC, of the Circuit
Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for
Wakulla County, Florida wherein DEUTSCHE
BANK NATIONAL TRUST, AS TRUSTEE OF
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES,
INC., SERIES 2001-A, ASSET BACKED
CERTIFICATES, UNDER THE POOLING &
SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF
NOVEMBER 2.2001 WITHOUT RECOURSE,
"is PPlaintiff and MARY K. WALKER; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF MARY K. WALKER; RANDAL
LEE WALTMAN, JR.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
RANDAL LEE WALTMAN, JR.; WOODVILLE
SOUTH II, HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION,
SINC.; __, UNKNOWN TENANT #1; __,
UNKNOWN TENANT #2, are the Defendants.
I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash
at Front lobby, Crawfordville Courthouse, 3056
Crawfordvllle Hwy., Crawfordvile, FL 32327, at
11:00 a.m. on March 15, 2007, the following
described property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit:
EXHIBIT A
SITUATED In Wakulla County, Florida,
and being more particularly described
as follows:
EAST HALF OF LOT 3, WOODVILLE
SOUTH, UNIT II (UNRECORDED).
Commence at the Northeast corner
of Lot 9, Block "C", of WOODVILLE
SOUTH, a subdivision as per map
or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book
2, Page 31, of the Public Records of
Wakulla County, Florida and thence
run South 89 degrees 44 minutes 21
seconds East along the Southerly
boundary of said subdivision 1837.32
feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
From said POINT OF BEGINNING
continue South 89 degrees 44 minutes
21 seconds East along said Southerly
boundary 455.00 feet to the centerline
of a 60.00 foot roadway easement
(Capt. James Street), thence run South
00 degrees 24 minutes 21 seconds
West along said centerline 240.00
feet to the intersection with another
60.00 foot roadway easement (J & K
Lane), thence run North 89 degrees
44 minutes 21 seconds West along
said centerline 455.00 feet, thence run
North 00 degrees 24 minutes 21 sec-


onds East 240.00 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING, containing 2.505 acres,
more or less. According to the survey
by Edwin G. Brown & Associates, Inc.,
Donnie R. Sparkman, Surveyor #5147,
dated July 30, 2001.
SUBJECT TO a roadway and utility
easement over and across the Easterly
and Southerly 30.00 feet thereof.
Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file
a claim within 60 days after the sale.
BRENT X. THURMOND
As Clerk of the Court
By: -s-Chris Gibson
As Deputy Clerk
(Seal of the Wakulla
County Circuit Court)
Dated this 12th day of February, 2007.
In accordance with the Americans with Dis-
abilities Act, persons needing a reasonable
accommodation to participate in this proceed-
ing should, no later than seven (7) days prior,
contact the Clerk of the Court's disability coor-
dinator at 850-926-0905, WAKULLA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL
32327. If hearing impaired, contact (TDD) via
Florida Relay System.
Feb. 22, March 1, 2007


Legal Notice

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO, 07-02-CA
RICHARD CICCKETTI;
Plaintiff,
vs.
UNKNOWN HEIRS OF WAYNE VONN
HIEBER; and IRENE VON HIEBER;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF
WAYNE VON HIEBER
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for
Quiet Title to the following property in Wakulla
County, Florida:
LOT 37, BLOCK 5 WAKULLA GAR-
DENS, AS SHOWN BY MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 1, PAGE 39 OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any,
to It on DANIEL E. MANAUSA, ESQUIRE,
SMITH, THOMPSON, SHAW & MANAUSA,
P.A., Plaintiff's attorneys, 3520 Thomasville
Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida 32309-
3469, no more than thirty (30) days from the
first publication date of this notice of action,
and file the original with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's attorneys or
immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will
be entered against you for the relief demanded
In the complaint or petition.
DATED this 12th day February, 2007.
BRENT X. THURMOND
By: -s-Chris Gibson
Deputy Clerk
(Wakulla County
Circuit Court Seal)
Feb. 22, March 1, 8, 15, 2007


Legal Notice


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 07-06-PR
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE ESTATE OF
HELENA P WATKINS,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR
DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
The administration of the estate of HELENA P
WATKINS, deceased, File Number 07-06-PR, Is
pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which
is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE
NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is served
within three months after the date of the first
publication of this notice must file their claims
with the Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons
having claims or demands against the estate
must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.


The date of the first publication of this
Notice is Feb. 15, 2007.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
DATED this 8th day of February, 2007.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Personal Representative:
SHAWN P. GOLETZ, ESQUIRE
EUGENE D. WATKIINS
Florida Bar No. 0338450
35 Rough Cut Road
Smith, Thompson, Shaw & Manausa PA.
Crawfordville, Florida 32327
2075 Centre Pointe Boulevard
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
Tel: (850) 402-4100
Fax: (850)402-1508
Feb. 15, 22, 2007


Legal Notice


REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
FOR
CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT
SERVICES
WAKULLA COUNTY CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE
HISTORIC PRESERVATION,
RELOCATION OF
WAKULLA COUNTY ORIGINAL
COURTHOUSE
I. INTRODUCTION
Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce is
requesting written proposals from qualified
construction firms to provide Professional Con-
struction Management Services for Renovation
of the Historic Wakulla Co. Courthouse.
II. It Is the Chamber of Commerce intention
to employ the Construction Firm to provide
overall Project Construction Management,
Cost Benefit Studies, Information Management,
Construction Contract Management, Claims
Management and Technical Inspection during
the Construction on a cost plus a fee basis,
with a guaranteed maximum price.
III. PROPOSAL INSTRUCTIONS AND GEN-
ERAL INFORMATION:
Proposal Submissions: Submit six (6) copies
of a written proposal no later than 1:00 PM on
Monday, March 5, 2007 to:
Rick Hilburn
Clemons Rutherford and Associates
2027 Thomasville Road
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
Proposals must be responsive to the require-
ments and questions of the Request for
Proposal.
Reservations: Wakulla County Chamber of
Commerce reserves the right to reject any
and all proposals, to negotiate changes in any
new scope of work or services to be provided,
and to otherwise waive any technicalities or
informalities.
Method of Selection: Proposals will be re-
viewed and a short list of recommendations will
be made by the Chamber of Commerce Selec-
tion Committee to the Wakulla County Chamber
of Commerce on the basis of proposals.
Please respond by including but not limiting
your response to the following:
1. Company name and length of time in
business.
2. Company location (Home and Local
Office.)
3. Bonding capability and name of bonding
company.
4. Insurance carrier and applicable cover-
age.
5. Description of previous projects
($300,000 or less) experience.
6. Describe previous historic renovation
projects completed by Construction Man-
ager.
7. Provide resume of Project Manager who
would be delegated for this Project.
8. Provide information regarding cost
structure for reimbursable expenses, including
project management, superintendent, OH & P
for company.
9. Present work-on-hand report.
10. Is the Project Manager willing to work
with Inmate labor on a limited basis?
11. Is the Construction Manager willing to
lock in his P.M. & superintendent costs at time
of G.M.P.?
Any information required to better explain
the project can be received from the office of
Clemons, Rutherford and Associates.
Feb. 15, 22, March 1,2007


Legal Notice


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RUBY L. GAINEY, Deceased
File Number: 06-201-PR
Probate Division
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Ruby L.
Gainey, deceased, File Number 06-201-PR, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which
is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327. The name and address of the
personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
the decedent's estate on whom a copy of
this notice is served within three months after
the date of the first publication of this notice
must file their claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE


ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this
Notice is February 15, 2007.
Personal Representative:
James L. Gainey
77 Springwood Boulevard
Crawfordville, Florida 32327-0517
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Deirdre A. Farrington
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 488690
2887 Crawfordville Highway Suite 4
Crawfordville, Florida 32327-2173
Telephone: 850/926-2700
Feb.15,22,2007

Legal Notice |


Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage
Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part
IV that Seminole Self Storage will hold a sale
by sealed bid on FEBRUARY 24, 2007 at 10:00
a.m., at 2314 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville,
Florida 32327, of the contents of Mini-Ware-
house containing personal property of:
SUE TAYLOR
Before the sale date of FEBRUARY 24, 2007,
the Owners may redeem their property by
payment of the Outstanding Balance and cost
by mailing it to 2314 Crawfordville Hwy., Craw-
fordville, Florida 32327, or by paying in person
at the warehouse location.
Feb. 15, 22, 2007

Legal Notice


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given the following vehicles
will be sold for towing and storage pursuant
to Florida Statute 713.78. Sale is to be held at
SADISCO OF FLORIDA, 4477 Entrepot Blvd.,
Tallahassee, FL 32310 at 9 a.m. on March
12,2007.
Year/ModelNIN
1993 INFINITY JNKAY21D8PM013669
1994 FORD 1FAPP36X7RK183355
2002 FORD 1FBSS31L22HA03715
2004 TOYOTA 4T1 BF32K64U076307
2002 CHEVY 1G1JH12FX27190297
2000 DODGE 1B3EJ46X8YN136116
1994 ACURA JH4DC4349RS018558
1997 FORD 1FALP62W9VH153570
1992 CHEVY 1G1JC1444N7197678
1976 FORD P37ZUCB2734
2005 BUICK 3G5DA03E15S570070
1959 FORD A9AG1942112
1986 PONTIAC 1G2NE27U9GL541105
1987 SUBARU JF1AC42BXHC203401
1977 CHEVY 1LN6NU75281362
1967 FORD 2T01 T271569
Feb.22,2007

Say You Saw It In


The Wakulla News


Legal Notice


NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT
TO CHAPTER 83, PART IV
Notice is hereby given pursuant to "Florida Self
Service Storage Facility Act Florida Statutes",
Chapter 83, Part IV that Galveston and Linda's
Mini Warehouses will hold a sale by sealed bid
on Thursday, March 8, 2007 at 10:00 a.m. at
the Junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek
Highway for the contents of Mini Warehouse
containing personal property of:
ANGELA MARIE LOTT
Before the sale date of Thursday, March 8,
2007, the Owners may redeem their property by
payment of the outstanding balance and cost by
paying in person at 2669 Spring Creek Highway,
Galveston and Linda's Mini Warehouses, Junc-
tion of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Highway,
Crawfordville, Florida 32327.
Feb. 22, March 1, 2007










926-6003
17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square
P.O. Box 1720 Crawfordville, FL 32326
Estate Planning & Probate
Commercial Transactions
Real Property Transfers


SITE WORK BASE & PAVING
LAND CLEARING
FILL SAND TOP SOIL




LAND DEVELOPMENT, INC,
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
(850)926-7876
4851 Coastal Hwy. 98
Crawfordville, FL 32327
-S -u


M(KINNEY

" PROPERTIES

a "YOUR HOME TOWNREALTOR"

David SEE MY VISUAL TOUR LISTINGS
AT
Rossetti AT
591-6161 DavidRossetti.PennyMcKinney.com


Stephanie Watson, Realtor with


SM PROPERTIES


Invites all Wakulla County Realtors to a...


Realtor's Italian

Luncheon f& Open House

There 's no better way to salute 2007
than to gather with old friends and welcome new ones!

Join us on Tuesday, February 27th and get a first-class tour of this beautiful home
while enjoying lunch and catching up with our colleagues in the real estate industry.


SDate: Tuesday, February 27th

Time: 11:30 1:00 p.m.

l^l a Place: 244 J.K. Moore Road Crawfordville, FL




All realtors in attendance will be eligible to win dinner for two at Sopchoppy's Backwoods Bistro!

Please RSVP by February 23rd to stepIljewevhydiva(alyahoo.com or,
for more information, contact Stephanie (@ 251-9263.










Page 4B-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007


Deadline 35 Cents

klonday Per Word


SCLASSIf IED ADS$.0
926-7102 Minimum


Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


Florida Commerce Credit Union
L al Notie P.O. Box 923148
Legal Notice Norcross, GA 30010-3148


The Board of Directors for the Big Bend Jobs
& Education Council, Inc. d/b/a WORKFORCE
plus is calling for proposals to service our com-
munity partners, jobseekers and employers
in Gadsden, Leon and Wakulla counties, for:
2007-01 Workforce Development Services-to
design, administer and deliver various welfare
reform and workforce development services;
2007-02 Workforce Investment Act Youth
Services-to provide a comprehensive set of
services to eligible youth; 2007-03 Business &
Employer Services-to design, administer and
deliver business and employer services.
Interested parties should contact the WORK-
FORCE plus Administrative Office by phone
at (850) 414-6085 or by mail at 325 John Knox
Road, Building B100, Tallahassee, FL 32303
or fax a request to (850) 410-2595 to receive a
copy of these RFPs.
Sealed proposals will be received until 2:00
p.m. EST, Thursday, March 15, 2007 at the
WORKFORCE plus Administrative Office, 325
John Knox Road, Building B100 Tallahassee,
FL 32303. Proposals received after this time will
not be accepted. Letters of Intent to Bid must
be received by March 1, 2007.
Anyone interested in bidding on these propos-
als is highly encouraged to attend the Bidder's
Conferences scheduled for: RFP 2001-01
Friday, February 23, 2007 at 1:00 p.m., RFP
2007-02 Friday, February 23, 2007 at 9:00
a.m., RFP 2007-03 Friday, February 23, 2007
at 3:00 p.m.
Under the provisions of Section 120.47(3)(b),
Florida Statutes, failure to file protest within the
time prescribed in Section 120.57(3), Florida
Statutes, shall constitute a waiver of proceed-
ings under Chapter 120, Florida Statutes.
WORKFORCE plus reserves the right to waive
irregularities and to reject any and all proposals.
The BBJEC is an equal opportunity agency.
Minorities and women owned businesses are
encouraged to apply. Programs funded through
WORKFORCE plus are equal opportunity pro-
grams with auxiliary aids and services available
upon request to individuals with disabilities.
Persons using TTY/TTD equipment use Florida
Relay Service 711.
Feb. 22, 2007

Legal Notice

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
File No. 07-14-PR
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DOROTHY REYNOLDS MILLER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DE-
MANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of
Summary Administration has been entered in
the estate of DOROTHY REYNOLDS MILLER,
deceased, File Number 07-14-PR, by the Cir-
cuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 301 South
Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; that
the decedent's date of death was December
10, 2006, that the total value of the estate is ap-
proximately $45,178.00 and that the names and
addresses of those to whom it has been assigned
by such order are:


NXPmANN




CBC1254511


Harvey-Young Funeral Home
3106 Crawfordville Highway
Crawfordville, FL 32327
BP Visa
P. O.Box 15298
Wilmington, DE 19850
Daniel Reynolds Miller
109 Wheeler Court
Macon, GA 31211
David Buchanan Miller
227 Buck Miller Road
Crawfordville, FL 32327
John Mark Miller
352 Buck Miller Road
Crawfordville, FL 32327
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTI-
FIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against
the estate of the decedent other than those
for whom provision for payment was made in
the Order of Summary Administration must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLI-
CABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE IS: February 22.2007.
Attorney for Persons Giving Notice:
AARON R. HOLLOWAY
Florida Bar No. 0096426352
Ausley & McMullen
Post Office Box 391
Tallahassee, Florida 32302
(850) 224-9115
Persons Giving Notice:
John Mark Miller
Buck Miller Road
Crawfordville, FL 32327
Feb. 22, March 1, 2007

Legal Notice

STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
PROTECTION
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
The Department announces receipt of an ap-
plication for a permit from Cypress Glen, file
number 65-0268800-001-DF, to construct a
road crossing project. The proposed project
consists of constructing a road crossing across
State jurisdictional wetlands.The proposed proj-
ect will be located off U.S. Highway 319 South,
adjacent to wetlands that are connected to
tributaries of Buckhorn Creek, near Sopchoppy,
Florida, at Sections 5, 7, and 8 of Township 5
South, Range 2 East, Latitude/Longitude: 30
degrees 03 minutes 53 seconds, 84 degrees 27
minutes 45 seconds, Wakulla County.


105 Business Opportunities

Travel Agency, Full Service.
Alohatravelsandcruises.com
(850)514-9900.

110 Help Wanted

CJIS GROUP, Inc. is expanding and
needs professional applicants for full
time Research Analyst and Executive
Assistant positions in Medart. Execu-
tive Assistant must have Excel, Quick
Books, and Power Point. All appli-
cants must have office experience
and good written, verbal and tele-
phone communication skills. Appli-
cants must have excellent references
and attendance record. Beginning
salary from 20K to 24K, benefits in-
clude Group Health, 12 leave days
per year plus holidays and 401(K).
Please E-mail resume to Louise@cjis-
group.com
Deisel & Equipment Mechanic
needed with tools & transportation.
Roberts Sand Company Call (850)
627-4224. A drug free workplace.

WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL
BOARD VACANCIES: Wakulla
County School Board is accepting ap-
plications for instructional and non-in-
structional positions for the 2006-07
school year. Interested individuals
please call the job line at 926-0098 to
hear a recorded message regarding
all vacancies OR visit the WCSB web
site: www.wakullaschooldistrict.org to
view all vacancies and download an
application.
Medical Assistant. Immediate open-
ing in busy family practice office in
Panacea. Great interpersonal skills
and computer skills required. Must
be organized and able to multi-task
in a fast-paced environment. Please
fax resume to (850)984-4742 or mail
to attention office manager, P.O. Box
959, Wakulla, FL 32346
EOE/DFWP/M-F
LANDSCAPE FOREMAN Experience
required. Full-time, great benefits.
Must have valid FL driver's license,
pay based on experience. Apply at:
Tallahassee Nurseries, 2911 Tho-
masville Rd. A Drug Free Workplace.


The application is being processed and is The Wakulla Springs State Lodge is
available for public inspection during normal
business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Mon- accepting applications for dining
day through Friday, except legal holidays, at room servers. Applications are avail-
the Northwest District Branch Office at 2815
Remington Green Circle, Suite A, Tallahassee, able at the front desk of the lodge.
Florida 32308-1513. For more information please call
Feb. 22,2007(850)224-5950.
Feb. 22, 2007


NEW HOMES STARTING
AT $134,900
Recessed Lighting
Covered Back Porch
Ceiling Fans In All Rooms
Vaulted Ceilings
Appliance Package
And So Much More!


Debbie Myers
REALTORS
850-251-0684

www.naumanngroup.com


"Brrrr! !"
Wow, it turned cold all of a sud-
den! At least we don't have to
contend with 10 feet of snow like
up north. As you heat up your
homes, please make sure you take
some precautions. There's always
the triple threat of heater failures,
carbon monoxide poisoning, and
power outages according to the
Home Safety Council. Here are a
few of the council's safety guide-
lines for keeping your home warm
and safe.


Firefighters
The Wakulla County Board of County
Commissioners in conjunction with
the Wakulla County United Firefight-
ers Association is seeking qualified
applicant's for full-time and flex-time
firefighter positions. Successful ap-
plicants will perform a variety of fire
and rescue functions including but
not limited to extinguishing fires, en-
tering burning buildings to rescue
trapped occupants, extricating indi-
viduals from wrecked vehicles, main-
taining fire trucks and equipment,
conducting fire hydrant inspections,
developing pre-fire management
plans, assisting with school fire
safety presentations and other re-
lated duties and responsibilities. Will
work under the supervision of a paid
fire chief and will work closely with
volunteer fire chiefs and volunteer
firefighters throughout the county.
Applicants must be eighteen years of
age, graduation from high school or
equivalent, able to pass a medical
physical examination, able to pass
an endurance and agility test, be a
non-user of tobacco products for at
least one-year immediately preced-
ing date of application, possess a
Florida driver's license, possess a
State of Florida Firefighter II certifica-
tion and have at least three years ex-
perience as a paid and/or volunteer
firefighter. Starting salary is $13.50
per hour.
To apply, send a Wakulla County
application to Human Resources,
P.O. B ox 1263, Crawfordville, FL
32326. Applications may be obtained
b visiting our website at www.mywa-
kulla.com or at the County Adminis-
trator's. If you have questions re-
garding qualifications and/or duties
and responsibilities, you may contact
Colleen Skipper at (850)926-0919.
Drug, alcohol and tobacco screening
is required. Veteran's preference will
be given to qualified applicants. Wa-
kulla County is an Affirmative
Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.
Application closing date is February
28, 2007.
FULL-TIME CARPENTERS
NEEDED. CALL (850)228-2126.
Local Durable Medical Equipment
Co. seeking Medical Assistant, com-
puter skills a must. Great pay and
benefits, full time. Fax confidential
resume to: (850)926-9766.
Now hiring full or part-time real es-
tate agents. Call Othell Broger at
(850)878-5589.. Broger Real Estate
Services, Inc.


INVESTOR'S
WANTED
Looking for Investors
to join partnership
for Flips or
Long-Term projects.
Also, Individuals
looking to
trade equities or
1031 Transfers.
Beachfront,
Lake Front, Residential
Rental Units,
Residential Acreage
Lots, & Large Acreage
trades avail. Call
Karen Veal Agent at
508-7458 or 926-8101.


Outside sales, restaurant equipment
commission and draw. Also inside
showroom mgr./ sales. Both must be
computer literate. Salary and bene-
fits. (850)984-0236.
Repair Technician needed, will train.
Full time or Part time. Call
(850)668-4441 or apply in person @
Seminole Construction Supply
1709-D Crawfordville Hwy.
Riverside Cafe in St. Marks now ac-
cepting applications for experienced
short order cooks, preps and serv-
ers. Apply in person.
Sales/inside telephone, nation wide
material handling equipment. Must
be computer literate and mechani-
cally inclined, commission and bene-
fits (850)984-0236.
Service Technician for local Durable
Medical Equipment Co. Full time with
great benefits. Must be able to lift 50
Ibs. Fax confidential resume/applica-
tion to (850)926-9766.

115 Services

A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING
Free Estimates
Licensed ~ John Farrell
926-5179


Shell Point
926-7811


Florida Coastal
Properties, Inc.


Place


Your


Classified


Liner


Ad or


Classified


Display


Ad Here!


Crawfordville
926-5111


Silver Coast
Realty


www.c2lfcp.com


REAL ESTATE SHOPPING

FOR REAL PEOPLE... really!!!

Take a look then, give us a call!

Panacea at Bridge Wakulla Station
984-5007 421-3133




MCKINNEY


PROPERTIES


> ." i



2Con t i aisshi

Chance OfA" eiml


oint Realt,









LISTINGS
North Wakulla County, 3BR/2BA manufactured home
on 5 beautiful acres. #1250 $140,000

Wakulla Gardens, like new 3BR/2BA starter home, on
100 X 100 lot. #1411 $129,900

Pine Lane, Wooded 5 3/4 acres in nice neighborhood.
#1615 $125,000

Pineway, Beautiful 1 acre lot homes only area. #1620
$60,000

Jean Dr, 1 acre lot cleared and ready for your home or
manufactured home. #1030 $55,000

Catawba Trail, gorgeous 3BR/2BA home with garage on
100 X 100 lot. Great yard, patio and more. #310 $165,000
Coastal Hwy. 98/Spring Creek Hwy.
(850) 926-8120
Crawfordville Wakulla Station
(850) 926-9261 .( 8', (850) 421-7494
LENI DE R


Susan

Council


Nearly 300 home-based deaths a
year occur due to carbon monox-
ide. In addition to smoke detec-
tors, install at least one CO alarm
to protect sleeping areas. Keep
heating systems and gas applianc-
es properly adjusted and serviced.
Don't use an oven to heat your
home and never use a gas grill in-
side your home.
This time of year is also the
peak period for home fires from
fireplaces or wood-burning stoves.
Burn only well-seasoned wood,
preferably hardwoods and not
trash, newspapers, cardboard, etc.
Artificial logs should typically be
burned one at a time to avoid over-
heating the firebox. Finally, keep
children away from wood stoves
and fireplaces. I know that one's
hard as I have been teaching my
young son how to build a fire.
Be careful and stay warm out
there and call me for any of your
real estate needs.

Susan Council
(850) 251-1468
Broker Associate, RE/MAX Professionals
www.susancouncil.coim


ww.w.TurnerHeritage.com

Heritage llones Really of Tallabassee, Ine and Hlerilage Homes Realty rpressenting Thrner Heritage Hnnes, Inc.


BAY SPRINGS MOR TGA GE SER VICES

926-9105
WWW.BAYSPRINGSMORTGAGE.COM

"HOME REFINANCING SPECIALIST"
HOME EOUITYLOANS ARM CONVERSIONS REVERSE MORTGAGES

Bobby Smith Brandon Strickland Kenny Glover
Loan Officer Loan Officer Loan Officer
bsmith@bayspriunsmortgage corn brandon@bayspringsmortgage com kenny@bayspringsmortgage com

BANCPLUS HOME MORTGAGE CENTER INC.


,,, LI








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007-Page 5B

Deadline 35 Cents

"onday Per Word

NoCLASSIFIED ADS s$.0
926-7102 Minimum

Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


115 Services

AAA CONSTANT COMFORT
Air cond. and heating, service and in-
stallation. Free quotes on new
equipment. Trane dealer. We fix all
brands and mobile homes.
926-8999. RA006672.
AIR-CON OF WAKULLA
HEATING & A/C
Maintenance & Service
Gary Limbaugh, 926-5592
FL Lic. #CAC1814304
3232 Crawfordville Highway
ALL PRO FENCE
Residential-Commercial
Fencing. 519-1416.

ALL SEASONS IRRIGATION
Now is the best time to have your
sprinkler system evaluated. Call
(850)510-0170 for appointment.
ANYTIME ELECTRIC
Specializing in repair and service,
residential and commercial, homes
and mobile homes. 24-hour service.
Mark Oliver, ER0015233. 421-3012.
BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE
Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway.
Larry Carter Owner/Operator.
850-925-7931, 850-694-7041. Li-
censed/Insured.
Backhoe and tractor work, top soil,
fill dirt, gravel & mowing large or
small. Free estimates, 30 years expe-
rience.(850)926-2900 or 933-1118.

Bookkeeping
Services
specializing in
SMALL
BUSINESSES
Accounts Payable/Receivable
Payroll & Sales Tax
878-3237

BRUSH CLEARING SPECIALIST
Loader work, food plots, land clear-
ing, oak firewood split and delivered.
For free estimates call
(850)445-4020.
C & R Tractor/Backhoe Services,
large tract and residential site clear-
ing rock, dirt, and road base hauling.
call Crandall (850)933-3346.


CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION
Foundations, slabs, driveways, etc.
Stan Poole at 251-0189.
Crystal & Leighanne's housekeeping.
(850)926-2193 or (850)210-2449.
Dirt, rock, gravel, sand, etc. Stephen
(850)519-3965.
Driveways, culverts. Stephen
(850)519-3965.
Handy man Own truck & tools,
wood rot & painting. Wakulla area.
Call Bobby at (850)519-6810.
HAROLD BURSE
STUMP GRINDING
962-6174












Home maintenance specialist. Com-
plete maintenance, quality work, a
reasonable price. (850)926-4374,
(850)926-7583.
KEITH KEY HEATING AND AIR
Commercial, residential and mobile
homes. Repair, sales, service, instal-
lation. All makes and models. Lic.
#RA0062516. 926-3546.
Land clearing. Stephen
(850)519-3965.
Mr. Stump
STUMP GRINDING
Quick Service
Cellular: 509-8530


mmmmmmmm


MSR TRACTOR SERVICE, LLC
Free Estimates-Affordable Prices
421-7464 or Cell 508-5378
MUNGE'S TREE SERVICE
Professional Work-Affordable
Rates-Tree Removal & Trimming
Firewood & Stump Grinding
Fully Insured 421-8104
PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Residential/Commercial
Pressure Washing
Billy Roddenberry
962-4271
PORTER PAINTING, LLC
Residential/Commercial, New Con-
struction. Remodeling. Soft
Wash/Pressure Wash. Licensed and
Insured. Free Estimates. Worker's
Comp. Certified. (850) 519-0416.
QUICK LOANS
We get you approved faster than
anyone else. All credit types wel-
come No Fees, Call 888-588-9242.
Radical CarCare Specializing in
Japanese makes and models and
American models. Call
(850)877-5860.

4^^ Residential
&
Commercial
Licensed
** Insured
8 S EI Reliable
Re-Roofs New Metal Patch
Maurice Herndon
Over 20 Yeors Experience
(850) 962-2437
or (850) 528-3487
Lie. #RC0066773


Classifieds As Low As $7 Per Week!!!


NATHEA

SKFAL tTATE, IN(C.

We're Growing ....
and looking for a few Good Men and Women
to join our sales team.
Professional Environment, Effective Training, Three Locations.
The best career choice you'll ever make.
e-mail resume to celia@naumanngroup.com
www.naumanngroup.com


r-.
Antiques and Uniques




Open Wed.- Fri.1 6 p.m.
S Saturday 10 am.. 6p.m.

220 Cars

1994 Saturn SL1, 5 spd, blue, $1000.
Call Jennifer (850)926-3885.


This Could
Be Your
Classified
Display
Advertisement

Don't Forget:
Businesses
That Advertise
Get Business!


REVELL WELL &
PUMP REPAIR
We stock water pumps, electric mo-
tors and parts. Complete installation
and repair services. 962-3051.
ROBERT TAYLOR LLC
(850)528-4824 mobile, (850)
984-1024 after 6 p.m. Decks, hand-
rails, steps, siding, woodrot repair,
int/ext painting, finish trim (base, 1/4
round, shoe molding, chair rail,
crown molding), fire and water dam-
age.
Wakulla Painting & Restoration, LLC.
Interior/Exterior, Residential/Com-
mercial, Licensed/Insured Work
guaranteed in writing. Daniel
(850)212-1496.


WINDOW

0TINT "



GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

SIGNS
200 Items For Sale

HABITAT RE-STORE
Abundance of bedding, sofas, inte-
rior/exterior doors, windows/screens,
fiberglass shower units and light fix-
tures. Open Tuesday thru Saturday,
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., 940 Shadeville Hwy.
(Hwy. 61), 926-4544.


a)
V.,





a0L


u
Cu...~

a~~aa



Cu


-C


'V


C)




Q.


V



a)


Cu


LM



E

E

O




E
0
LM
%4



Co





>1


%1a 926-9663
n Don't Make A Move Without Us!
4W e Can Show You
Any Property Listed!
RO PERT IES Marsha Misso, Broker
3BR/2BA... on 7 acres, Hwy. 98 frontage...$475,000 Re-zone Commercial?
Lot... in Wakulla Gardens, TEC water,
3BR/2BA Fenced... Rezone Commercial... Off 319... $159,000
Panacea... 2BR/1.5BA Cottage... $119,999
5 Lots in Panacea... Call for pricing
3BR/2BA... Remodeled... FEMA Foundation... $124,000... Coastal
r www.flsunproperties.com
2747 Crawfordville Hwy. marshamisso@msn.com

Advertisement

Buildable Lot For Sale,

Wakulla Gardens,

Lot 6, Unit 3, Block 22
Lot is located on Klickitat Purchase now before the pend-
Drive. Property measures 50 x ing increase for impact fees and
100, suitable for building or for septic system fees become effec-
a mobile home. Public water is tive. This lot is priced at $8,000
available to this lot. Water deter- or best offer. Seller will consider
mination has already been cor- all reasonable offers. For more
pleted by Talquin Electric Co. information, call Ralph at 850-
Title is guaranteed clear. 251-0415.
Arivprti cPmPnt








Page 6B-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007


Deadline 35 Cents"




NoCLAS&IFIED ADS $7.00
926-10i2 Mainimum

Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


220 Cars

1997 Saturn L.S., 5 speed, leather
seats, CD player. $2,900 obo.,
(850)926-6297 or (850)508-8976.
275 Home Furnishings

$150 Queen Pillow-Top Mattress Set.
New in plastic with warranty.
(850)222-7783.
BEDROOM: New complete 6 piece
set still boxed, $599, can deliver
(850)222-7783.
LEATHER SOFA & LOVESEAT. NEW,
lifetime warranty, sacrifice $795.
(Can deliver). (850)425-8374.
SOLID WOOD Cherry sleigh bed -
BRAND NEW in box, $250.
(850)545-7112.
SOLID WOOD DINETTE SET, table &
4 chairs $149. NEW IN BOX
(850)222-9879.
285 Jewelry

Hamilton R.R. watches, 16s, 999,
23J, (1910-15) SN B601802. 992B,
21J, (1940) SN C37961. Both 1,350.
(850)528-6002.
320 Farm Products &
Produce

Grain-fed Beef for your freezer. Half
or whole. Cut, wrapped and frozen to
your specifications. $2.69/lb. Raker
Farm (850)926-7561.
Mushroom Compost $15 per scoop,
sm. load of field dirt, red mulch, pot-
ting soil, delivery available. Call
(850)926-3280.
335 Pets

2 Boxer/Standard Poodle mix, 8 wks.
old, shots, tails docked, vet checked.
1 male black w/white paw, $60 ea.
(850)212-1815.
Adopt a pet from the shelter:
DOGS:
Beagle
Blue heeler
Lab, yellow
Bulldog mixes
Aussie mix, beautiful
Dachshund mix, longhaired
Lab mixed
Cocker Spaniel, older
iChihuahua mixes, older
German Shepherd mix
Many other nice mixes. Come and
take a look.
PUPPIES:--
None at this time.
Adult cats only.
Adoption fees include a deposit for
spaying or neutering and rabies vac-
cination. Come see us at #1 Oak
Street, next to the sheriff's office.
Shelter Hours: Tues. Thurs., 10
a.m.-5p.m., Fri. and Sat., 10
a.m.-4:30 p.m. Closed Sun. and
Mon. (850)926-0890 www.chatofwa-
kulla.org
355 Yard Sales

Their trash, your treasure at the Old
Jail Museum Shop, High Drive,
across from Old Wooden Courthouse
Saturday 9 to 1.
IfYOU CAN READ...


share the gift with a
young adult student.


81BC

STORAGE

SPRING CLEANING
GARAGE SALE
Saturday, March 3
8 A.M. 4 P.M. No Early Birds
Call
519-5128 508-5177

Garage Sale 2/24, 38 Purple Martin
Cove 7a.m. 1p.m. Cross stitch
items, gardening tools, daybed, sew-
ing machine in cabinet, household
items & adult clothing.
LOST CREEK YARD SALE
Sat. Feb. 24th at 9:00 a.m. 4851
Coastal Hwy. 98 @ Lost Creek Land
Development just past the
Stop-N-Save Too many items to list.
435 Lost and Found

Chocolate Brown Pitt w/white chest,
3 yrs. old. Lost on Lower Bridge Rd,
goes by Tater. (850)926-7527.
500 Real Estate, Homes
Mobiles I

What an opportunity Large brick
home with fireplace, in ground pool,
workshop, barn & more on nearly 4
acres with Hig 319 frontage The
possible 806,000
ana Sell Your highway
f ro0 ,boat
SHouse 0
T on the date of your el
S choice. At a fair price ee
without doing anyt


nj 926-21 00 nal
front
$9 C www.homesellersdepot.com!

room, work ~mwall- all
at a reduced price-607,500
Panacea Mineral springs! Several
lots to choose from in fast-growing
coastal area $74,900 each.

505 Acreage for Lease

For Lease. 7 cleared lots at 98 and
Tully.
(614)268-7109 or
happycamper9@columbus.rr.com for
aeriel.
520 Townhouses for Rent


3BR/2BA Townhome in Crawford-
ville. $825/month $825/security re-
quires one year lease. No Pets/No
Smoking. Ochlockonee Bay Realty.
(850)984-0001. www.obrealty.com

530 Comm. Property for
Rent



NBBC

STORAGE
MINI-WAREHOUSES
BOATS RV'S

519-5128 508-5177
2 miles South of Courthouse
on Hwy. 319 in Crawfordville
24 Hour Access Video Surveillance

1,074 sq. ft. Retail Store Front for
Rent in Lewiswood Center, Wood-
ville. Growing area, convenient to
Wakulla and Leon Counties.
421-5039.

Professional space on Crawfordville
Hwy, near Walmart. 1,030 sq. ft.
Available now. Beautiful building. 3
yr. lease $1,287.50 a month, plus
prorated real estate taxes, sales
taxes, security deposit, 1st & last
months. (850)877-9229.


OPL/1 mOU/L


GRADE A

OFFICE RENTAL
$400 a month plus tax
Includes Utilities
And
Full Kitchen Use
Call Edna at 339-0511

Mini-Warehouse Spaces for lease,
8X10 and 10X12 now available.
Come by or call Wakulla Realty,
926-5084.
Mini-warehouse storage units for
lease, very clean, also boat and R.V.
storage, located at 2669 Spring
Creek Hwy., 6 miles north of Shell
Point, call (850)926-1467
545 Homes for Sale


Mysterious Waters 41 Eagle Drive.
Custom home, 3 years old 3BR/2BA
on wooded .92 acres. Access to
community boat launch, dock and
park. $279,000. (850)510-3527.
NEW CONSTRUCTION 1634 LOWER
BRIDGE RD. 3BD/2BA 2 car ga-
rage, Corian countertops, ceiling
fans, oversized lot, gas fireplace,
wood floors, open floor plan, vaulted
ceilings, appliances, many upgrades
$129,500. (850)933-1992 by appt.
only.
OPEN HOUSE 2/24/07 2-4 P.M. 64
McCallister, future Commercial near
Walmart. Brick home on 1.27 acres,
fenced. Florida Sun Properties
(850)524-1388.
550 Homes w/ Acreage for
Sale
2BR/2BA furnished home on Alligator
Point. $1300/month. 1 year lease. No
Pets/ No Smoking. Ochlockonee Bay
Realty. (850)984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com


3BR/2BA New 1004 sq. ft. $110,000. 5I Huses
(850)570-0575. 555 Houses for Rent


Gorgeous New 3BR/2BA 1,400 sq. ft.
Home built with insulated concrete
form technology, generator back-up
system, tankless water heater. Walk-
ing distance to 150 ac. Lake Ellen w/
private Boat Ramp. Developer will
pay $5,000 closing cost. 100% fi-
nancing. $159,900 37 John David Dr.
Call (850)443-3300.


Saturday 2/24
10 am 1 pm
Sunday 2/25
1 pm 3 pm


. . .-. Z o- M.A .
35 Purple Martin Cove Songbird Subdivision
Just off Hwy. 319 in Crawfordville, FL
Located in one of Wakulla's most prestigious neighborhoods, this
Songbird home is 5 minutes away from Crawfordville conveniences
and only a 15 minute drive to Tallahassee.
The 4 bedroom, 3 bath Turner Heritage home was upgraded
with over $20,000 in additional
amenities including: Corian f MCKINNEY
countertops, beautifully crafted U PROPERTIES
molding, gas fireplace with custom
built-in surrounds, large master suite


.
with Jacuzzi tub, screened-in porch,
formal living and dining room


Stephanie
117-r .-


2BR / 2.5BA townhome on Ochlock- ... WaiSOn
onee Bay. $800 unfurnished. $900 bar and breakfast area and the most _
furnished. No pets/No smoking. Och- immaculate 2-car garage you've ever 251-9263
lockonee Bay Realty: (850)984-0001 seen. Come take a look!
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com Classifieds As Low As $7 Per Week!!!


2 BD/1BA $500 month $300 deposit.
161 Hickory Ave. Crawfordville.
(850)528-7295, (850)570-0575.


Are

Yard Sales

Too

Much

Trouble?



Call The

Wakulla

News:

926-7102

To Place

A Classified

Ad


OASSTAL





984-5800
www.coastalshores.com
Ochlockonee Bay at the Bridge

Mary Shepard Broker/Realtor 528-0226
Alice Ann Swartz Broker/Assoc. 559-8979
Jacque Eubanks Realtor 228-3218
Glenn Eubanks Realtor 228-3217
Donald R. Smith Realtor 984-5477
Alicia Crum Realtor 984-0292
Merle Robb Realtor 508-5524
Tom Maddi Realtor 591-8415
Sandra Maddi 591-8442
Jodi Revell Vacation Rental Mgr. 984-0171

Call us for your Long Term and Vacation Rentals!:
3BR/2BA home on Lucy. $825 Mo.
2BR/2.5BA Condo. $950 Mo.
3BR/2BA Mashes Sands, water view. $850 Mo.
2BR/1BA Surf Road animal friendly $700 Mo.
3BR/2BA Gentleman Road, furnished. $1,000 Mo.
2BR/1.5BA Secluded $650 Mo.


'''


I









THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007-Page 7B


.Deadline 35 Cents

klonday Per Word

CLASSIFIED ADS.
926-7102 Minimum


Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


555 Houses for Rent

2BR/1BA Bayview Cottage on Och-
lockonee Bay! Newly remodeled.
$600/month. (850)984-0001.
2BR/2BA on Alligator Point!
$850/month-requires first and last. 1
year lease. Ochlockonee Bay Realty.
No Pets/No Smoking. (850)984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com
4BR/2BA home in Medart.
$800/month $500/security-requires 1
year lease. No pets / No smoking.
Ochlockonee Bay Realty.
(850)984-0001 www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com
For Rent, 2 bedroom 1 bath house.
$450 month, $500 deposit. No Pets.
850-509-4388.
Sparkling, split 3BR/2BA, garage,
fenced, decks $975 mo. + Dep. (s)
(850)385-3175.
560 Land for Sale i

By owner-Lot in Mysterious Waters,
access to river, for sale $65,000. Call
(850)926-1385.
Panacea lots for sale starting at
$29,000 $49,900. Owner financing,
.$-1000 down. Blocks from the Gulf.
hot-properties.biz (770)654-0111.
Picture-perfect 5 ac. is ready for new
home. Private, quiet, fenced w/ ma-
ture-hardwoods. Ideal for children,
horses. 30 mins. to coast or Capitol;
2 mi. to Crawfordville. Must see.
137K (850)893-0686.
565 Mobile Homes for
Rent
2 BR/2BA double wide on 4 acres,
fence yard, 1 side cover carport, plus
'storage shed in Wakulla County bor-
dering the State Forest, secluded
and nice. $675 first, last and security.
(850)574-4354.
For rent off Sopchoppy Hwy. 3BR
(+office) 2BA. Call Everett
(850)926-3544, (850)570-0213.
REDUCED 83 Kathy Ann Drive,
2BR/2BA with front porch, screened
back porch, utility room and storage
shed on 3 acres. $650 mo., $400 se-
curity deposit, 1st /last months rent
(850)528-2289. NO INDOOR PETS,
NO SMOKING.


570 Mobile Homes for SaleI 595 Vacation Rental


For sale by owner 24x60 doublewide
trailer on two beautiful wooded
acres, $109,000 (850)926-7876.
Off Wakulla Beach Rd. 2.89 gor-
geous acreage with SWMH, fenced,
carport, dog pen and covered deck.
$79,900. Broker/Owner 841-0606
580 Rooms for Rent/ L
Roommates j
Room for rent flex/lease. Separate
entrance on the River in Mysterious
Waters, 75.00 a week.
(850)926-7538.
Weekly Rentals Available,$175-$200
per week, wireless internet, Panacea
Motel,(850)984-5421.


Vacation Rental Apple Mountian
Golf Resort North Georgia, close to
Helen & Franklin N.C. July 21-28,
2007 $675. (850)545-8885.
610 Schools and
Instruction
Michelle Snow's
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Piano-Voice -Guitar-Strings-etc.
926-7627

Say You Saw It In

The Wakulla News


Classifieds As Low As $7 PerWeek!!!


ROOK I Serving The Area 34 Years!
ROOMK CR

COCnoTRE rFe


(850) 984-5279
L.B. Brooks
Fax: (850) 984-5203 Mobile: 251-6594
www.brooksconcrete.com
1532 Coastal Highway, Panacea, FL 32346


0 Redi-Mix Concrete
0 Pilings
0 Septic Tank Sales
0 Crane Rental
O Rock and Sand Sales


e X


OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2 5
58 Gulf Breeze Drive MLS #164708
visit www.KarenVeal.com

ERA -
Community Realty

KAREN VEAL (850) 508-7458
Karenveal@earthlink.net
www.karenveal.com ,


GET THE NEWS
DELIVERED
EAC H WEEK!
Call 926-7102


Carol Ann
Wi lliams,
Lic. Real
Estate
SBroker
- 566-9293
BEAUTIFUL 11 ACRES
hardwood hammock,
secluded area near Wakulla
Beach. Nearly square
shape property
ONLY $299,000
SILVER LAKE FRONT
Exclusive homesite
paved road, city water
$350,000
Call Carol Ann at
926-1340
3295 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, FL
84 Tallahassee St. Carrabelle, FL
566-9293


106 W. 5th Ave.
Tallahassee, FL 32303
222-2166 tel.
222-7102 fax no.


187 Beechwood Drive
Crawfordville
Large 3BR/2BA home located
on a county paved road, with a
large workshop nestled on 5.3
beautiful acres. Located just
off the Shadeville Hwy.
$249,900.


Gorgeous 5 acre tract with paved
road frontage.
This would make a beautiful home
site. Property could possibly be
subdivided. Close to downtown
Crawfordville. Just minutes from
schools, coast, & Tallahassee.
$175,000.


**New Subdivisions**
All subdivisions have under-
ground electric and water.
Walkers Mill $69,900
S2"ac. wooded lots, located on
S '. Lower Bridge Road.
Steeplechase $94,900 to
$109,900.
5 ac. wooded tracts. Horse
friendly!
Sellars Crossing $65,900
1+ ac lots in North Wakulla.














tip

Offering
to youl
S1em plo.

.. -. If you d(
S health b
40% pre
Plan cov
Partner
.' .B. z.


Appealing 2-acre
lot located in
Wakulla Forest
Subdivision.
Located near
the best of
Wakulla County's
recreation
activities & an
easy commute to
Tallahassee.
$63,900.


Great Fixer-upper!
3BR/2BA DW lo-
cated on 2.5 secluded
acres with paved road
frontage and beauti-
ful hardwoods. Con-
veniently located
close to schools,
shopping, coast, and
Tallahassee. Shown
by appointment only.
$79,000.


**63 Mohave Rd.**
Ranch Style 3BR/2BA
Home located in
Wakulla County.
1268 Sq. Ft. with an
adjoining lot. Master BR
has 2 closets with an over-
sized tile shower in Master
BA. Kitchen appliances
and blinds included.
Builder will pay $1,500 on
closing costs. $139,900.


Starting in the 200's Starting in the 190's www.TurnerHeritage.com

Heritage Homes Realty of Tallahassee, Inc. and Heritage Homes Realty representing Turner Heritage Homes, Inc.


Call Donna
508-1235
Ia ,


A Subscription


bt r Wakulula aQobs.


For One Year Subscription,
Use This Convenient Form!



Mail To:

The Wakulla News

P.O. Box 307 Crawfordville, FL 32326



$25 Wakulla County

$30 Out Of County

$35 Out Of State


Mail subscription to:


Name

Address


City, State, Zip



Phone


'


to .







Page 8B-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007



nn-


Visit from the heart ds with theresidents of Eden Spings on Feb.
Kindergarten students from Medart Elemen- The group of 136 students also sang songs and
tary School visited and shared Valentine's Day enjoyed interacting with the residents.

Lions Club planning

St. Patrick's festival


The annual St. Patrick's Day
Parade and Festival, sponsored
by the Crawfordville Lions
Club, will be held on Saturday,
March 10, at Hudson Park in
Crawfordville.
The parade line-up will start
promptly at 9 a.m. on Azalea
Drive, across from Ace Hard-
ware on the west side of U.S.
Highway 319, with the parade
beginning at 10 a.m.
The festival will follow in the
park until 4 p.m. Activities will
include food vendors and con-
cessions, arts and crafts booths,
rides, carnival games, a petting
farm, pony rides, exhibits, and
more. Featured entertainment
under the pavilion will include
music by Glen Phillips at 11:30
a.m. and the High Mileage Band
at noon, followed by Coast Char-
ter School Irish Dancing and
Taekwando demonstration.


Event will promote
healthy lifestyles
The Wakulla County Health
Department, Wakulla County
Christian Coalition and multiple
other partners will host the
"Step Up, Florida on our way
to healthy living" statewide
event that promotes physical
activity and healthy lifestyles
for all Floridians.
The event highlights local
and state-level opportunities
for people of all abilities to be
physically active, and provides
an opportunity to forge part-
nerships on a state and local
level among healthy lifestyle
stakeholders.
The event will be held at
Hudson Park in Crawfordville
on Saturday, Feb. 17, from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. "Step Up, Floridal"
was designed to promote the
role that communities, fami-
lies, schools and public health
practitioners have in promoting
lifelong healthy nutrition and
physical activity to all Florid-
ians.
"Step Up, Floridal" also pro-
vides an outlet for community
members to learn about local
opportunities for physical activ-
ity in their community.
AA meetings to take
place in Crawfordville
AA meetings will be held


A special highlight at this
year's festival will be the
Bassmasters Casting Contest
for children, sponsored by the
Hydrilla Gnats and Bass. This is
a free event and is open to boys
and girls in age groups 7 to 10
and 11 to 14.
Each competitor must be
accompanied by a parent or
guardian. Official rules will be
on hand at the event. The com-
petition tests the basic skills of
fishing flipping, pitching and
casting. Rods and reels will be
provided, and instructors from
the Hydrilla Gnats will be avail-
able to help teach skills prior to
the competition..Experience is
not necessary.
Two winners from the event,
one from each age group, will
advance to the state finals.
From there, two will advance
to the national competition and


at the American Legion build-
ing next to the Crawfordville
Women's Club. The Sunday
meetings will include a closed
meeting at 10 a.m. and an open
meeting at 6 p.m.
On Monday, the meetings
include an open women's meet-
ing at 6 p.m. and a closed meet-
ing at 8 p.m. There is a closed
men's meeting on Tuesdays at
8 p.m. On Wednesdays, there is
an open meeting at 8 p.m.
On Thursday, there is a
closed meeting at 8 p.m. On Fri-
days at 8 p.m., an open meeting
will be held. Saturday at 8 p.m., a
closed meeting will be held.
Daughtry-Crum family
reunion scheduled
The Daughtry-Crum family
reunion will be held on Satur-
day, March 3 at Sopchoppy City
Park. Guests are invited to bring
a covered dish and lunch will be
served at noon.
All family members are in-
vited to attend.
St. Marks Refuge To
Hold Ranger Program
St. Marks National Wildlife
Refuge will host a Ranger Pro-
gram on Sunday, March 4, at 2
p.m. at the education cabin near
the visitor center.
A refuge ranger will put on
an informative program for


% -RESIDENTIAL

GARBAGE

SERVICES, L


To Arrange Pick-Up Service
Call Anytime
850-926-9654

Locally Owned & Operated

Specializing In Household Garbage

We Supply The Containers
Our company is dedicated to providing our customers with the
highest quality in waste collection at the lowest price.


an opportunity at casting for
more than $21,000 in scholar-
ships and prizes at the Citgo
Bassmaster Classic.
A raffle will be held at 3
p.m. and prizes will include a
$1,000 savings bond donated
by Wakulla Bank, and three bass
fishing trips for two along with
lodging at Wingate's Lunker
Lodge on Lake Seminole, spon-
sored by Wingate's Lodge.
For more information, con-
tact Buddy Wells at 926-3473;
Anyone interested in participat-
ing in the parade may contact
Gary Scott at 926-2673. To secure
arts and crafts booth space, con-
tact Faye Shepard at 926-1269.
This year's festival is shaping
up to be one of the best ever,
so mark your calendars. Plan
to bring the family and enjoy
a day of good food, fun, and
entertainment.


guests at the property. There is
no cost for the program. Regular
entrance fees do apply. For more
information, call the refuge at
925-6121.


&^


Florida Big Bend


a


Expo


March 17


8 a.m.


- 5 p.m.


Riversprings

Middle School
800 Spring Creek Hwy.
Crawfordville


* The Wakulla News
* Simpler Solar
* 3W Studios
* New Leaf Market
* Inn at Wildwood
* Winn-Dixie


SPONSORS:


* Mama and Baby Love
* Talquin Electric Cooperative
* Natural Awakenings Magazine
* Apalachee Tortoise
* Progress Energy


* Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education
* University of Florida Florida Yards & Neighborhoods Program
FREE admission to educational workshops, children's activities,
vendors and exhibitors, light bulb exchange (bring an incandes-
cent bulb and get a free compact fluorescent while supplies last!),
silent auction, door prizes, and so much more...
Discover hundreds of the best products
and services that promote sustainability!

UNI% U 1,s Find ways to create
UF FLORIDA a simple, healthy life!
IFAS
www.greenlivingenergyexpo.com
The institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity-Affirma-
tive Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only
to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national
origin. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICES, UNIVER-
SITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.


The Wakulla News Is Available For


Purchase At The Following Locations:


IN CRAWFORDVILLE
Ace Home Center
Beall's Outlet
Food Mart
Karol's Korner Petro
Stop N Save
CVS Pharmacy
Dux Liquors
Glenda's Country Store
Gulf Coast Lumber
Huddle House
Lee's Liquor/Sky Box Sports Bar
Mack's Country Meats
Michele's Convenience Store
Myra Jeans
Petty's BP
Tattered Pages Book Store
Wal-Mart
Wakulla Springs Lodge
Williams BP
Winn Dixie

IN PANACEA
Bayside Grocery Store
E-Z Serve
Crum's Mini Mall

IN OCHLOCKONEE BAY
Jay Food Mart
Mashes Sands BP

IN SOPCHOPPY
Express Lane
Lou's Bait and Tackle
Sopchoppy Grocery


IN MEDART
Circle J's Bait & Tackle
Inland Store
Petro
Wakulla Public Library

IN ST. MARKS
BoLynn's
Express Lane

IN WOODVILLE
Ace Hardware
Bert Thomas Grocery
Gas Mart
IGA Grocery Store

IN TALLAHASSEE
Barinek's
Circle K (Capital Circle & C'ville Highway)
Publix (Capital Circle & C'ville Highway)

IN WAKULLA STATION
Wakulla Station BP
Stop N Save

AND ELSEWHERE
Spring Creek Restaurant
Stop N Save (Bloxham Cutoff/H'way 319)
Stop N Save (H'way 98/Spring Creek Road)


More Locations
Coming Soonl


Green


HAPPENINGS


---- ----- -----~--- __


i




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs