Title: Wakulla news
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00105
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Uniform Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Wakulla news
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: February 8, 2007
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00028313
Volume ID: VID00105
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACE7818
oclc - 33429964
alephbibnum - 000401960
lccn - sn 95047268
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Full Text
***********************DIGIT326
2562 06-08-07 DIIT 326
UNIVERSITY OF FL 99P 54S
UNIVERSITY OF FL. LIBRARy
PO BOX 117001
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7001
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Arrest in '05 Bank Heist

See Page 3A


Valentine Festival

See Page 5A


Wrestlers Advance

See Page 8A


Published
Weekly,
Read Daily


Our 113th Year, 6th Issue


Thursday, February 8, 2007


50

Cents


Septic Failure? Law Now On Hold


County Stymied By Own

Treatment Ordinance


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Attention all builders: Scratch
that March 1 deadline off your
calendar.
Wakulla County Commis-
sioners voted Monday, Feb. 5,
not to use the March 1 date for
requiring performance-based
septic systems in new county
development and to replace


failing old systems.
Contractors and residents
filled the boardroom to request
an extension of the perfor-
mance-based septic system re-
quirement. After a lengthy dis-
cussion by the board, residents
and Environmental Health
Director Padraic Juarez of the
Wakulla County Health Depart-


ment, commissioners agreed
to delay septic action until at
least Oct. 1.
"More time is needed to
understand the process," said
Commission Chairman Brian
Langston.
Juarez told commissioners
that specific nutrient reducing
language in the board's new
ordinance will require a stamp
of approval from an engineer
on each installation, making the
process even more costly than
originally expected.


Juarez continued that the
increased cost of the perfor-
mance-based system raises the
septic price to homeowners
by approximately $8,000, even
without the engineering cost
added in.
The county commission has
already sent the adopted septic
tank requirements to the state.
On March 1, Padraic said, state
officials will be required to en-
force the new ordinance unless
commissioners change it.
Commissioner Ed Brimner


added that the Oct. 1 deadline
is more reasonable as an adop-
tion date since contractors need
time to acquire materials and
make sure they are not stuck
with materials that are useless
after the new deadline.
"Contractors need time to
prepare for significant changes,"
he said. "We also need to de-
termine how to monitor the
systems."
Septic tank permits are good
for 18 months after the date
of the application and those


who apply late in 2007 can still
install standard septic systems
well into 2008 and beyond.
"We need to drive down
the cost of the engineering,"
said Commissioner Howard
Kessler.
Juarez said board members
and residents do not have "a
canned system to be put in the
ground," and there is no "stan-
dard engineering system that
can be plugged in now."
"Requiring a separate
Please turn to Page 3A


Sarvis Named County's Top Teacher
Riversprings Middle School .
teacher Crissy Sarvis was named
the 2007 Wakulla County District 01
Teacher of the Year on Friday,
Feb. 2. Amidst cheers and tears
from her students and col- i
leagues, Sarvis was surprised
in her classroom by Superin-
tendent David Miller when he
announced the award. -
Nominated as her school's
Teacher of the Year in December,
Sarvis went thorough rigorous : _
judging of an extensive written
packet and face-to-face interview
by educators from outside of
Wakulla County.
Also in the competition elect-
ed as their schools' Teachers
of the Year were Pat Calhoun,
Crawfordville Elementary; Con-
nie Worrill, Medart Elementary;
Rhonda Traweek, Shadeville Ele-
mentary; Angie Walker, Wakulla
Middle; Sunny Chancy, Wakulla
High; and Ashley Anderson
representing all the district
professionals who work with
children.
"Mrs. Sarvis is the epitome
of a caring teacher who knows
her material well, but always
puts her students' emotional
Superintendent David Miller, Crissy Sarvis, Assistant Superintendent Beth O'Donnell
Please turn to Page 3 And Riversprings Principal Dod Walker

Tracking Bracelet Leads To Elderly Man's Rescue


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
A missing Sopchoppy man
was found on Sunday, Feb. 4, by
law enforcement thanks to the
electronic assistance from the
Project Lifesaver device program
put into place last year by Sher-
iff David Harvey and Captain
Randall Taylor of the Wakulla
County Sheriff's Office.
Captain Taylor said the

Inside
This Week
Almanac.................... Page 11A
Church Page 4A
Classifleds................ Page 3B
Comment & Opinion Page 2A
Crossword Puzzle.... Page 12A
Outdoors................... Page 10A
People Page 28
School Page 1B
Sheriff's Report........ Page 14A
Sports Page 8A
Week In Wakulla....... Page 3A

Coming
,,Next Week
More Coverage Of The
Water Bottling Plant
Proposal







6 I4578 2702' 5 o


Duane Lyle LaBounty, 89, was
last seen at 9 p.m. at his Sop-
choppy home Saturday, Feb. 3.
Relatives reported him missing
shortly after 6 a.m. on Sunday.
Captain Taylor and Sgt. John
Zarate began a search using
the Project Lifesaver tracking
device as LaBounty was wearing
a tracking bracelet. The victim
'is an Alzheimer's patient who
had wandered out of his home


during the night and his son be-
came concerned about his wel-
fare in 30-degree temperatures.
Taylor and Zarate picked up
a faint signal when they set up
their equipment, but they were
able to track LaBounty down
Fonigan Road. The elderly man
was discovered sitting between
a truck and a house where he
was not visible. Sgt. Zarate got
as dose as 20 feet before discov-


ering his subject.
LaBounty was transported
back to his home and EMS of-
ficials checked him for injuries
and exposure. LaBounty was
found approximately three-
tenths of a mile from his resi-
dence. "It was a success," said
Taylor of the Project Lifesaver
equipment. "This is the first one
we've had." Deputy Mike Crum
also investigated.


Swinging For Success


Wildwood Sees
Growth At Inn,
Course, Bistro
Due to a production error,
this article in the Thursday, Feb.
1, issue of The Wakulla News
was cut short.

By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
On a recent chilly January
morning golfers at Wildwood
Country Club in Medart packed
up their clubs, pulled on light
jackets and hopped into golf
carts for a few hours of outdoor
recreation.
The golf course is part of
the Wildwood Resort, which
has grown to include the Inn
at Wildwood and The Bistro res-
taurant which serves breakfast,
lunch and dinner seven days
each week.
Wildwood Country Club
opened in 1995 with the finan-
cial investment of several local
golf enthusiasts. The present
ownership of Sheriff David
Harvey, Joe Barry and Gerald


Randy Esser, Bonnie Holub And David Beck


Thompson, took ownership
in November 2005 and hope
to make Wildwood one of the
most popular golf courses in the
Big Bend.


Randy Esser is general man-
ager of the golf course. A nearby
resident, Esser retired from the
State of Florida's Department of
Please turn to Page 5A


Bottling Plant


Already Has


BOCC Talking


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla Springs Bottled
Water's Comprehensive Plan
Land Use change request and
text amendment has garnered
so much attention in Wakulla
County that county commission-
ers couldn't even wait to discuss
the matter on Monday, Feb. 5.
The February discussion came a
full month before the matter was
scheduled to be heard.
The discussion also came
despite advice from Wakulla
County Attorney Ron Mowrey
not to comment on a planning
and zoning issue that will be be-
fore the board for consideration
on Monday, March 5.
Commissioners voted 3-2
to authorize Wakulla County
Administrator Ben Pingree to
spend as much as $20,000 to
hire an unbiased water expert
to help commissioners with
the decision-making process.
Commissioners did not address
where the $20,000 would come
from or who Pingree should hire
to assist them.
Commissioner Ed Brimner
said the idea of water bottling
plants in Wakulla County is
not bad if the county maintains
some control over the ventures.
"I don't think a bottling plant is
bad," he said. "But we've got to
have some controls in place."
Brimner suggested that the
Please turn to Page 3A


Local Expert

Says He'd

Oppose Any

Water Plant
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden thewakullanews.net
At a meeting of the Wakulla
Springs Basin Working Group in
Tallahassee this week, hydrolo-
gist Sean McGlynn was present-
ing a report on protecting water
in the recharge basin. He gave a
list of questions prompted by his
study and concluded by saying
he opposes any plan to bottle
water in the area because its
impacts are unknown.
"It's obvious," he said, "that
we don't understand this aqui-
fer."
McGlynn's remark prompted
clapping from a few people in
the room which included
research scientists, environ-
mentalists, officials from state
agencies. Also at the meeting
was one county commissioner,
Ed Brimner, and a consultant
for the bottling company, Paul
Johnson.
What McGlynn said created
questions for him were the re-
sults of deepwater wells, drilled
as part of his study, that showed
saltwater at 300 feet beneath
the sand, limestone and hard
Please turn to Page 3A


DCA Rules Against

Commercial Fishermen


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Local fishermen lost the ap-
peal of their challenge to some
net rules, which they argued
violated the intent of the consti-
tutional amendment on marine
nets by causing juvenile fish to
be killed and wasted.
Two members of the three-
judge panel contended, in a
written order released on Friday,
Feb. 2, that the state Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion was legally able to make
rules outlawing large mesh
nets, define entangling nets
as any net that ensnares fish
in the meshes or pockets, and
prohibits taking mullet by any
gear not specifically listed by
the agency.
Wakulla Fishermen's Asso-
ciation President Ronald Fred
Crum said he intended to take
the matter before the state
legislature, saying the FWC has
no checks and balances on its
power.
Appeal judges Marguerite
Davis and Joseph Lewis found


that FWC's rules were valid as
long as they met the legal test of
whether any state of facts may
be conceived to justify the rules.
Noting that the agency submit-
ted an affidavit that the mullet
population had increased since
the rule was approved that lim-
ited seine nets to a maximum
of two inches stretched.
Chief Appeal Court Judge
Edwin Browning Jr. dissented
from the other members of the
panel with a written opinion in
which he noted that fishermen
provided two affidavits contend-
ing that the nets gill juvenile
fish, not marketable fish, and
arguing that the matter at least
should be sent back to Leon
Circuit Judge Janet Ferris for an
evidentiary hearing.
Judge Browning indicated
he was concerned that the rul-
ing would be a precedent that
would make it difficult for aver-
age citizens to challenge agency
rules in the future and would
pave the way for "the growth of
imperious agencies, with all of
Please turn to Page 3A


Wakulla


le I'VKJWZq f.-;_~










Page 2A-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007




Comment & Opinion

Established in Wakulla County in 1895


Our View



Time To Focus


On Big Issues
With just a few days before the owners of Wakulla
Springs Bottled Water appear for the planning and zon-
ing commission with their request for a new land use
designation, it's no surprise that public sentiment is
raging in a variety of directions.
A quick glance at The Wakulla News' opinions page
over the past few weeks shows a glimpse of the pas-
sion that is sweeping through the county. Of course,
those emotions were already simmering when one of
the plant's principals, Allison DeFoor, made the curious
decision to stir make that shake the hornets' nest
with his opinion piece in the Jan. 18 edition of The
News. In that column, DeFoor challenged the bottling
plant's vocal critics to "stop pounding the table ... and
show us all your data and facts."
We, too, wish both sides would focus more on the
facts and less on the rhetoric. But at the same time,
when your business model is predicated upon tapping
into a public resource for profit, then it's probably not
a brilliant idea to start throwing ultimatums at the
public.
While it's admirable that DeFoor felt compelled
to defend his friend and colleague, Paul Johnson, he
might have better served his cause by not taking such
a caustic tone. He and his partners are understandably
frustrated by the outpouring of negative comments, but
the citizens on both sides of the issue have every right
to speak their minds.
After years of work in public service, DeFoor certainly
knows that. Besides, such strong words will only serve
to strengthen the resolve of his foes and erase some of
the goodwill his group has worked to foster over the
past several months.
Unfortunately, DeFoor isn't the only one who has
allowed his emotions to push him into making ques-
tionable assertions. Some of the plant's opponents ap-
parently are so troubled by the proposal that they have
latched onto every argument imaginable to cause its de-
feat. While they have raised some real issues and done
a good bit of research, they also have unintentionally
diminished their case by trying to counter-punch every
statement that comes from the bottling plant camp.
When the Highs have offered to share revenues with
the county, the critics have tried to portray the offer as
a bribe. When the plant's operators have pledged to
provide 52 new jobs, the skeptics have turned up their
noses, saying the county's unemployment already is so
low that these positions aren't needed.
That's just silly. While it's true that Wakulla's unem-
ployment rate is low, that's only because most of our
residents are willing to drive to and from Leon County
each day for a decent wage. Frankly speaking, our eco-
nomic base is sorely lacking, and the promise of any
new jobs should be considered, not shunned.
Does that mean we should throw caution to the
wind and roll out the red carpet for this or any other
water bottling plant? Of course not.
But with so many substantial issues to be resolved
- such as land use and water protection and property
rights we should be leery of anyone who is trying to
muddy the waters.


Letters Policy
The Wakulla News welcomes your letters, but we request that
you adhere to the following guidelines:
Letters should not be longer than 300 words.
They must include the writer's name, home address and
telephone number. (Only name and town will be listed; the rest
is used solely for the purpose of verification.)
Writers may be limited to one letter per month, depending
upon space limitations.
With very few exceptions, anonymous letters will not be
published.
Letters can be sent via mail or e-mail (newsroom@
thewakullanews.net), or they can be dropped off at our Craw-
fordville Highway office.
The Wakulla News reserves the right to edit all letters.


TObe akulla etso
The Wakulla News (USPS 644-640) is published weekly at
3119 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla
News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
Editor & General Manager: Ira Schoffel............... ischoffel@thewakullanews.net
News Editor: Keith Blackmar kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Reporter: William Snowden wsnowden@thewakullanews.net
Sales Manager: Tammie Barfield tbarfield@thewakullanews.net
Advertising Sales/Photo: Lynda Kinsey...................kinsey@thewakullanews.net
Bookkeeping: Sherry Balchuck accounting@thewakullanews.net
Classifieds: Robin Moreno classifieds@thewakullanews.net
Circulation: Cyndi Perkins/Jamie Ridley............circulation@thewakullanews.net
Graphic Artist: Eric Stanton advertising@thewakullanews.net
Typesetter: Jessie Maynor advertising@thewakullanews.net
Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable
one year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $25, Out of County $30
Out of State $35. Out of Country on Request


My View


Who Should Control Our Water Supply?


Mark Twain once noted
that, "Whiskey is for drinking;
water is for fighting over." That
seems to be the case, again in
our county,
We have before us, the pro-
posed Wakulla Springs Water
Bottling Plant. On March 5,
2007, the Board of County Com-
missioners is scheduled to vote
on creating a brand new land
use category that does not ex-
ist anywhere else in the state
of Florida. This precedent land
use change, or zoning, will al-
low the water bottlers to export
water out of our county.
I take issue with people tak-
ing water and selling it. What
gives a few people the right
to make millions of dollars by
selling what belongs to all of
us? What gives them the right
to take it at all? What about the'
other 20,000-plus people in this
county? What effects will the
new water bottling industry
have on all of us?
We will have hundreds of
semi-trucks a day; day and
night; traveling through our
county bringing plastics, etc.,


Comment


Sue Damon
in, and taking our water away.
The semi-trucks will be travel-
ing by our schools, and by our
neighborhoods. Why? So a few
people can profit.
The water bottlers say that
they will only take 70,000 gal-
lons a day (to start) and that
local irrigation uses more water.
That might be true, but it is ir-
relevant.
Any large groundwater with-
drawal from one site risks dry-
ing up local homeowners' wells,
and depleting our springs and
our wetlands. Groundwater
levels could drop dangerously.
And, unlike irrigation, once the
water bottlers put water into a
bottle, it is gone. It is no longer
a part of our ecosystem.
The water bottlers will say
that they are monitoring the
water flow and that it is not in
their best interest to threaten
their investment by depleting
their (our) water source. Cor-


portions exist to make profits
- not to preserve water's qual-
ity. Geologists cannot predict
with any certainty what will
happen when we start remov-
ing water from our aquifer, but
with certainty, these few inves-
tors will profit greatly with our
county's resources.
The water bottlers will say
that they will bring new jobs
with this new land use category.
Are the questionable claims of
50 jobs worth the destruction
of our aquifer, the threat of our
water, our wells, our springs
and our ecosystem? All of this,
so that a few can prosper?
The water bottlers say that
this is an industry that is pro-
ducing a dean, safe, and healthy
product. "What could be more
pure?" But what they don't say
is that this rezoning opens the
gates to other bottling compa-
nies coming into our county,
and they can be as close as two
miles apart from each other.
Industry of any kind, scattered
throughout our county as this
will be, is a threat to our qual-
ity of life. This is a zoning


change that will affect this
entire county.
When you factor in the dev-
astating environmental costs as-.
sociated with bottling a public,.
natural resource, and mixing
it with semi-trucks, families
neighborhoods, children aid
depleting the springs, how
could our Board of County Com-
missioners even consider vot-
ing "yes" to this new land use
category and allowing our lives
and our community to change
so dramatically?
Is trading our quality of
life for a few jobs worth all of
this?
Is it too late to stop this? Nol
What can you do? Attend the
Board of County Commission-
ers meeting on March 5, or call
or e-mail Governor Crist and
your county commissioners,
and tell them to stop the new
land use category that allows.
water bottlers into our county.
You can help us all to make a
difference.

Sue Damon writes from
Crawfordville.


Your Views


There's Nothing Wrong
With Making A Buck
Editor, The News:
Some folks in this county
don't understand the business
community. Everyone's well-be-
ing would evaporate without a
healthy economy. Whether we
like it or not, we all rely upon
the commerce that employs
us (or the commerce that pays
taxes to the government that
employs us).
Without private enterprise,
we'd be reduced to the days of
subsistence farming. This seems
so obvious to the business
community, yet others attack
the integrity of one company
- Wakulla Springs Bottled Water
- without regard for the local
economy.
The last time I checked, not
one of my fellow residents has
horns, yet the naysayers are act-
ing as if seeking profit is evil.
To that I say just the opposite:
it is a necessity, a requirement
for living, and a valid purpose of
Wakulla Springs Bottled Water.
Imagine going to work and hear-
ing your boss say there was no
profit last month, so you won't
be getting paid. How long would
you stay?
For the 32 years I've lived
here, I've watched the Chamber
of Commerce, school board,
Rotary and county commis-
sioners all try to bring clean
industry with good paying jobs
to our county. This proposal
to build and operate a bottled
water plant seems to me to fit
the bill.
The bottling company is un-
der fire because it's seeking to
operate as a legitimate business.
Of course, businesses should
have to prove they will not harm
the environment and will be
compatible with the community
they want to locate in. Wakulla
Springs Bottled Water has prov-
en that, and so it should not
have to endure scorn for trying
to put a paycheck in people's
pockets, food on local families'
tables, create tax income for the
county, and make some profit in
the process.
If done properly and profes-
sionally, which it appears the
Highs have assembled the right
team to do, we could all profit
from this business venture.
Burt Poole, Lt. Col. (ret.)
Crawfordville

Top 10 Reasons To
Bottle Springs Water
Editor, The News:
I recently started thinking
about the water bottling issue
in a new light.
Regardless of the fact that a
scheme to create new land use
regulations in order to allow
an industrial plant amongst
residential neighborhoods must
first be approved, when the lay-
ers are peeled back, this may
actually be a short-sighted boon


for the county with any negative
effects to our water well more
than two to three years away.
By this time, my 2-year-old
will already be playing in the
parks and recreation soccer
league and will need to be drink-
ing bottled water anyway. So I
started jotting down the pros
and cons, and after reviewing
my lists, the pros won out.
Thus, I thought I would share
what I learned in my personal
deliberations.
Here are my top 10 reasons
to allow Wakulla Springs to be
bottled and sold.
10. The company is owned
by local residents, at least un-
til they sell it to Nestle right
after the spot-zoning issues get
resolved.
9. It's okay if the springs
at Spring Creek quit flowing
because the bottles will say
Wakulla Springs.
8. A good way to get a new
four-lane truck route through
the middle of a rural part of
the county is to create artificial
demand by trucking big semis
back and forth near school
zones and through residential
neighborhoods all day long.
7. The company will work
hard to dean up Wakulla Springs
because they won't want to sell
tainted water ... unless they use
those green bottles.
6. Industrial manufacturing
plants and semi-trucks are part
of the county's new integrated
growth plan where residential
neighborhoods will no longer
be isolated from progress.
5. The amount of water being
extracted is so minimal that the
neighbors won't even notice
when the withdrawal amount is
increased 20-fold or other plants
open up nearby. Unless they
have well water, of course.
4. It's really Spring Creek
spring water anyway ... except
sometimes.
3. A good way to prevent
Wakulla Springs from getting
too much nutrient pollution is
to bottle, ship and sell the wa-
ter before it gets there.
2. Wakulla Springs water
already comes flavored with
that yummy algae taste that kids
love these days.
1. Hey, at least it ain't an
oxygen plant.
Chad W. Hanson
Crawfordville

Group Is Dedicated
To Preserving Springs
Editor, The News:
I would like to take this op-
portunity to apologize to those
who might have been offended
by comments in my last letter
to the editor. Hindering good-
natured dialogue of the Wakulla
Springs Bottled Water project is
not my intent.
Rather, I am a Floridian
who over the past 20 years has
worked tirelessly to protect the
environment. I was twice the


chair of the Council for Sustain-
able Florida and put together
the largest environmental res-
toration project in the history
of the world, the Everglades.
I have or currently sit on the
board of a half-dozen environ-
mental groups, including 1000
Friends of Florida.
I know a sustainable venture
when I see one; bottling is pos-
sible, with the appropriate safe-
guards by water managers, the
Department of Environmental
Protection, and the county.
All of us involved in the
project live here, the Highs for
generations, and we will have
to look our neighbors in the
eye with whatever we do. This
is why we have not pumped an
ounce of Wakulla water, despite
several years of authority to do
so. Instead, we are trying to find
common ground out of deep
respect for our fellow residents,
community, and the water.
Our tremendous respect for
the environment has crafted a
responsible, sustainable project.
The permit issued by the Water
Management District is quite ex-
plicit in its terms and has rigor-
ous measures in place to ensure
protection of the Springs. Water
levels will be monitored strin-
gently and reports submitted to
water district regulators.
Additionally, we are propos-
ing terms so that the land use
category of Bottled Water Plant
in Wakulla County will have
its own oversight and controls,
with very high standards. This
includes a requirement that
one must prove no harm to the
resource.
The simple facts are that the
decision as to whether the wa-
ter may be withdrawn and trans-
ferred out of the county has
been made by the appropriate
folks the water management
district and the DEP, stewards
of the Park. The experts found
this is a viable project with
"indiscernible" effect on the
environment.
This project is a win-win for
our community, creating 52 jobs
for our hard-working neighbors.
Additionally, the project will
generate much-needed revenue
for the county and may increase
our burgeoning ecotourism in-
dustry by attracting visitors to
the source of the crystal-clear
water. This is what bottled
water has done for some other
communities in Florida.
The Highs, who are the heart
of this venture, grew up playing
in the clear, beautiful Springs
when most of us in this argu-
ment never heard of Wakulla
County. Ruth High worked as
manager of the Springs for Ed
Ball. The Highs love this place
more than most ever will. The
site where they want to bottle is
Ruth's family homestead. Their
ties to this community alone
should reassure everyone that
they are committed to the well
being of Wakulla County and


the Springs.
They are taking every piecau-
tion to make their company just
as wholeheartedly committed
to their neighbors and the en-
vironment.
Allison DeFo6r
Crawfordville

A Human Poem
Editor, The News:
The land is pure. Come the
humans. Destroy the land. Move
the humans.
Repeat.
The land is pure. Come the
humans. Destroy the land. Move
the humans.
Repeat.
Repeat.
Jack Collins
Sopchoppy

Thanks For Support
Editor, The News -
We would like to express
our gratitude and apprecia'-
tion to the St. Marks Baptist
Church, Brother Emmett Whal-
ey, Brother David Carraway, Mr.,
and Mrs. Boby Key, City of St..
Marks, St. Marks Volunteer Fire.
Department, Wakulla County
Sheriff's Department, Harvey
Young Funeral Home, andthe
many, many friends for the-
prayers, food, flowers, and other
expressions of sympathy and-
kindness shown to our family
during the loss of our husband,
father, grandfather, and great
grandfather.
The outpouring of love and
compassion was overwhelming
and we are very fortunate to
have such wonderful friends
and neighbors. Hopefully, this
public acknowledgment: will
reach everyone we have -n6t
been able to personally see and
thank.
The family of
W.A. "Heck" Lynn


Citizens Form
Watershed Coalition,
Editor, The Newss
The creation of a new land
use category for the water
bottling industry in Wakulla
County is generating local and
regional opposition. In response
to a growing demand for accu-
rate information, the Wakulla
Watershed Coalition has been
incorporated.
Wakulla Watershed Coalition,
Inc. consists of members of oth-
er local organizations, including
Friends of Wakulla Springs State
Park and Concerned Citizens of
Wakulla, and other non-affili-
ated county voters.
The lack of straightforward
information in an application
to the Board of County Com-
missioners to create a new land
use for what is an industrial
plant has implications on the
county's quality of life. Working'
Please turn to Page 3








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007-Page 3A


Arrest Made In 2005 Bank


By KEITH BLACKMAR
kblackmar@thewakullanews.net
Wakulla County Sheriff's Of-
fice investigators have made an
arrest in an open 2005 Sopchop-
py bank robbery case with the
assistance of law enforcement
officials in Georgia, according
to Sheriff David Harvey.
On Oct. 14, 2005, Citizens
Bank was robbed at gunpoint
and an undisclosed amount
of money was taken from the
facility.
The gunman fled the area
on'foot and investigators de-
termined that their suspect had
been picked up by a driver in a


Water
-... Continued from Page 1A
dolomite layer. Is it a stagnant
se6 layer, as in South Florida
around Lake Okeechobee? Is it
saltwater intrusion?
On Monday, the planning
c'omnlission will hear the land
rise request for the proposed wa-
ter bottling plant. The planning
commission's vote, up or down,
will serve as a recommendation
for the Wakulla County Commis-
sion to consider when it hears
the matter on March 5.
Supporters and opponents
have been lining up since the
plant, .voted down last year by
the county commission, was
resurrected for consideration.
SAt the forefront of the new
plant effort has been Allison
DeFoor, a politically connected
Republican with a reputation
as an environmentalist. He had
originally opposed the project.
The main thing DeFoor has
stressed in the project's make-
over has been "transparency"
inthe process to invite the
community in, share the plan,
answer questions and fears.
,While DeFoor said at one
of two public forums that his
ambition was to have the proj-
ect embraced by groups such
as Friends of Wakulla Springs,
the organization that seeks to
promote and preserve the park,
the Friends governing board
voted unanimously to oppose
the plant.
'The resolution, passed by the
board in early January, contend-
ed that the water bottling plant
is, "wasteful, unsustainable, and
serves only to profit a small
number of individuals while
diminishing the source (and the
abundant life that depends on
thtat'source)."
- 'Saying the plant would pose
a threat to the water quality and
quantity of Wakulla Springs and


Plant
S'Continued from Page 1A
county should not only have con-
trol over the water operations
but should benefit financially.
Commissioner Brimner said he
did not have a revenue-sharing
proposal to offer and was unsure
"i ind how to proceed with the
water land use change."
'"We don't have the ability
to' turn it off," Commissioner
Howard Kessler said of state
controls over water resources..
"We should not move forward
with it."
'The county can control water
bottling plants through the land
use,- said Pingree. "The county


nearby vehicle.
On Jan. 26, Wakulla Coun-
ty investigators determined
through collected evidence that
Travis Joseph Powell, 22, was
one of the suspects in the case.
Powell was located in Cobb
County, Ga. and interviews were
conducted.
The sheriff said that state-
ments from Powell connected
him to physical evidence and
intelligence that was known
only to law enforcement offi-
cials at the time.
Cobb County authorities
arrested Powell in Marietta,
Ga., on a fugitive warrant out


its ecosystem, Friends President
Della Parker-Hanson said, "This
is a threat that will grow more
severe as our population inevi-
tably increases."
Over the past weekend, a
new group was formed in op-
position to the water bottling
plant the Wakulla Watershed
Coalition, which touts itself as
consisting of members of other
local organizations, including
Friends of Wakulla Springs and
Concerned Citizens of Wakulla
(CCOW) and others.
The group's state incorpora-
tion documents list local at-
torney Palmer Carr as the sole
officer.
CCOW put out a position
paper this week indicating its
opposition, with CCOW Chair
Chad Hanson (husband of
Friends' Parker-Hanson) claim-
ing the proposal amounted to
an "exploitation of our drinking
water and springs to the detri-
ment of the general public."
The opposition to the plant
and its land use designation has
focused mainly on the tractor-
trailer truck traffic that would
be going through the Shadeville
area, which the coalition group
puts at 300 trips a day. The
group has created a Web site,
wakullawatershed.com, which
only has a logo for "Stop Bottled
Water" and an.e-mail address
for more information.
Among the numerous special
development standards that the
plant owners have proposed is a
truck route to avoid the nearby
schools.
The company has suggested
it will build an internal road
to connect to State Road 61
and route truck traffic on State
Roads 61, 267 and 59.
Opponents have argued that
the plant is not properly located
- that it would effectively be
the only industrial-type facility
in an otherwise rural residential


commission could bring in
experts to negotiate on behalf
of the county," he said. "But I'm
going to need the resources to
do that."
Brimner said D.P. and Ruth
High could have trucked wa-
ter out of the county already,
but have agreed not to do so
until the land use issue can be
addressed. Commissioner Kes-
sler, however, disagreed with
Brimner's assertion, shaking his
head in opposition.
Pingree added that while
state officials control the
amount of water that is re-
moved from the ground, the
county does have control over
the use of the land.


of Wakulla County for the rob-
bery. Powell was charged with
robbery with a firearm and ag-
gravated assault with intent to
commit a felony.
Further investigation identi-
fied the get-away driver as Wil-
liam Larry Easterwood, Jr., 29.
Easterwood is incarcerated by
the Florida Department of Cor-
rections on unrelated charges.
The investigation identified
Easterwood's red Ford truck as
the vehicle used in the robbery
through specific features and
after market accessories on it,
the sheriff added.
Witnesses reported spotting


area. A residential development
with 150 homes is proposed to
be located immediately south
of the bottling plant, and an-
other residential development
is planned across Spring Creek
Highway to the west.
The only other commercial
enterprises are the country
store at the intersection of
Spring Creek Highway and
Shadeville Road, and Hobby
Brothers wrecker service east of
the intersection on Shadeville
Road.
The company has insisted
no existing zoning is appropri-
ate for a water bottling plant,
contending that industrial land
uses are not compatible and
should not be located next to
bottling plants with wells on
site. Thus, the new land use
of Bottled Water Plant was put
forth.
"What we have proposed,"
attorney for the project Nancy
Linnan said, "is A) more restric-
tive, and B) more stringent than
anything anywhere else in the
state or the country."
As part of the effort to an-
swer critics, the company has
proposed extensive buffering
to minimize impact to surround-
ing rural lands, including a 35
percent set-aside of open space,
or six to seven acres.
The proposed land-use would
require that the facility must be
served with water and sewer
connections; encourage use of
green building standards; and
has proposed revenue sharing
with the county for protection
of the water resource, with a
recommendation that money
go toward retrofitting septic sys-
tems with performance-based
systems.
Under the conditions of the
water management district per-
mit, the company must report
its daily and monthly withdraw-
als; mitigate any unexpected


"We're getting into a long,
heated debate on this," said
Chairman Brian Langston, slow-
ing board input. Mowrey asked
board members to refrain from
discussing project specifics or
risk having to recuse them-
selves at the March 5 hearing.
"To continue is dangerous,"
Mowrey said.
"I think you're prejudicing
yourself," resident Victor Lam-
bou said to Brimner. "You ought
to excuse yourself. You've al-
ready taken a stand. Why you
bring this up now, I don't
know."
Chuck Hess said county offi-
cials have to be careful to moni-
tor water pumping because


robbery
the vehicle where the K-9 unit
tracked the suspect out of a
wooded area. Physical evidence
was collected at the location,
the sheriff said.
"The detectives were able
to piece together the day of
the robbery and the following
days," he said. "It has been
determined what actions the
suspects utilized to evade detec-
tion and apprehension."
The investigation is continu-
ing and new evidence is being
identified and collected.
The investigation was led by
Detective Eddie Wester and Sgt.
C.L. Morrison.


impacts due to the pumping;
and limit or stop its pumping
once minimum flow levels are
determined for area waters or
any declared water shortage is
declared by the district.
DeFoor and environmental
consultant Johnson were each
offered a share of the company
in exchange for their work in
selling the plant, and they
brought in respected govern-
ment attorney Linnan of the
Carlton Fields law firm to draft
the proposed new land use of
Bottled Water Plant. They also
brought in renowned hydrolo-
gist Todd Kincaid, whose work
mapping the Wakulla Springs
caverns is widely recognized, to
talk about the minimal effect of
the water company's wells on
the local system.
DeFoor then organized com-
munity forums to listen to
concerns and answer questions,
posting Kincaid's study results
and forum answers on a Web
site, wakullaspringswater.com.
When the county commis-
sion rejected the bottled water
plant in 2005, owners Dan and
Ruth High and partner Sidney
Gray had a permit from North-
west Florida Water Manage-
ment District to pump up to 1.4
million gallons of water a day.
A new permit, approved by
the water management district
in August 2006, is for a sliver of
that, a maximum of 70,900 gal-
lons a day and is good until
February 2009.
The company is seeking the
land use for 17 acres in the
Shadeville area, where it has
proposed a 70,000-square foot
plant, which breaks down as
a 17,500-square foot produc-
tion area; 43,500-square foot
warehouse; 5.000 square feet
of space for utilities (compres-
sor and boiler room); and 2,000
square feet each for offices and
shipping and receiving.


reduced water levels could have
negative impacts in the county.
He asked the board to protect
the resources to make sure
development doesn't impact
freshwater levels, ecotourism
and the fishing industry.
"We all want what's best for
the county," said resident John
Trice.
Commissioners voted to ap-
prove the spending of money
for experts with Commission-
ers Howard Kessler and Brian
Langston voting in the minor-
ity.
"I don't know which way I
will vote (in March), but I know
I wouldn't have brought it up
tonight," Langston concluded.


Teacher-
Continued from Page 1A
well-being first," stated Superin-
tendent David Miller. "It is no
wonder that the children love
her, but to have her peers and
then impartial judges recognize
this is yet another confirmation
of her talent."
A product of the Wakulla
County School System, she
earned her bachelor's degree
from Florida State University and
has taught in Wakulla County
for 15 years.
Her areas of certification are
English grades 6 through 12;
math grades 5 through 9; and
reading grades K through 12.
She is currently teaching reading
to students in grades 6, 7 and 8
using the READ 180 program.
Sarvis is a National Board
Certified teacher, a member of
the women's national educa-
tor honor society Delta Kappa
Gamma, and a member of the
Wakulla County Teachers' As-
sociation.
In addition, she mentors
teachers in many areas, from
those working on their Reading
Endorsement to new teachers
seeking alternative certifica-
tion.
As a Reading Endorsement
teacher, she had to go through
training herself after earning
the Reading Endorsement com-
prised of six competencies or
classes.
"Her adult students, who
are also her colleagues, rave
about her teaching on evalu-
ations," said Assistant Super-
intedent for Instruction Beth
O'Donnell.
"Crissy made the time fly. She
is well-prepared, professional,
and great all around," her peers
said. Sarvis herself benefits from
the experience of teaching teach-
ers as she notes, "I am renewed
through the learning community
that is created in every class I
teach."
Fellow teacher Angie Wil-
liams has been through the
Teacher of the Year process her
self.
"Any task given to Crissy
will be done well. Best of all,
she works hard to instill this
quality in her students, making
sure their work is thorough in
its execution and completion,"
said Williams.
Sarvis will now go on to com-
pete with teachers from each dis-
trict in the state for the Florida
Teacher of the Year award.
All of the Wakulla County
teachers will be honored at a
Teacher Appreciation Breakfast
on Friday, Feb. 16, at Riversprings
Middle School.
Crissy Sarvis is married to
Mike Sarvis and they have three
children: Michael, Meghan, and
Madison.


Letters
Continued from Page ZA
with scientists and other pro-
fessionals, Wakulla Watershed
Coalition is offering information
to citizens who are concerned
that alleged misstatements are
being circulated about the need
for a new land use category.
As a grass roots initiative, the
coalition has begun offering
bumper stickers to those who


County

Settles Suit

With Skipper
Nearly a year to the day after
being fired from her property
appraiser's job and filing a law-
suit against her former employer,
Wakulla County Commission-
ers agreed to a lawsuit settle-
ment with county commission
employee Colleen Skipper on
Monday, Feb. 5.
Board members held a pri-
vate attorney-client confidential
meeting to discuss the settle-
ment which includes a monetary
award to Skipper and potential
position reinstatement.
Wakulla County Attorney
Ron Mowrey said the terms of
the settlement will remain con-
fidential until the settlement is
approved in court by a judge.
He declined to elaborate on
the details of the settlement.
Efforts to contact Skipper for
comment were unsuccessful on
Tuesday, Feb. 6. Skipper has been
represented by attorney Marie
Mattox. The county has been rep-
resented by attorney Tim Warner
of the Florida Association of
Counties Trust (FACT).
A handful of residents urged
the board to discuss the Skip-
per settlement in public. Com-
missioner Howard Kessler said
board members were told by
Mowrey not to comment on the
private discussions.
The agreement will have to be
signed by Skipper and approved
by the court for implementation,
said Mowrey.
Attorney Mowrey called the
monetary settlement "not sub-
stantial, but not peanuts ei-
ther."
FACT will pay three-quarters
of the monetary settlement.


DCA
Continued from Page 1A
the mischief it entails."
Attorney Ron Mowrey, who
represents the fishermen, said
he intends to file a motion for
rehearing before the appeals
court. "I believe the court was
entirely wrong on the law and
the facts," Mowrey said.
"I'm distraught over the
lengths the cdirt wfit'to to find;
some meagre reason.to support
that ruling," he said.
Two years ago, local state
Rep. Will Kendrick (R-Carrabelle)
took the issue of whether citi-
zens have due process rights to
challenge FWC decisions before
the legislature and got as far as
having a legislative committee
agree to study the matter. Those
complaining about the decisions
of the agency ranged from fisher-
men to hunters to scuba divers.


oppose an industrial plant and
more than 300 18-wheel trucks
daily in rural residential areas
in Shadeville.
Information about co-
alition activities may be ob-
tained by sending an e-mail to
moreinfo@wakullawatershed.
corn, visiting the Web site:
wakullawatershed.com, or leav-
ing a message at 926-2063.
Madeleine Carr
Crawfordville


Septic
Continued from Page 1A


engineering stamp on each
system is subsidizing engineers
very well," said Commissioner
Brimner. "We are way beyond
the requirements of the state."
"I will push wholeheartedly
to amend the ordinance in a big
way," said Commissioner Maxie
Iawhon. Juarez added that there
are only "one or two companies
that can do installation in the
County today."
SWakulla County Attorney Ron
MVbwtey said commissioners will
riot find it easy to make changes
tothe septic ordinance since it is
already gone to the state to be
accepted as law.
. The board will be required
to make a motion to advertise
modifications to the ordinance
at, the Feb. 20 board meeting.
The board action to adopt the
new standards set off a feeding
frenzy in the county community
development office and at the
health department, as contrac-
tors and builders worked quickly
to acquire permits before the
d adline.
SBen Withers was one of sev-
eral contractors who asked the


board to push the deadline date
back. "We need to identify how
we want to implement our or-
dinance," said Withers. "I don't
want my livelihood taken away.
We don't need to reinvent the
wheel every time we move from
lot to lot."
Ron Piasecki, chairman of the
county infrastructure commit-
tee, said Florida State University
and the state Department of
Environmental Protection are
working to address septic con-
cerns in the county.
Piasecki added that a state
study will be completed in the
fall and include issues such as
management of performance-
based systems, cost and lev-
els of required treatment. The
study will address the need
for the performance-based sys-
tems based on soil conditions
throughout the county.
Parts of the county may need
more stringent septic regula-
tions while other parts of the
community may not need more
than a standard system, he said.
Piasecki asked the board to
delay any action until the FSU
study is completed.
Wakulla County Administra-
tor Ben Pingree said Piasecki's


presentation was a "separate
but related issue," and board
members declined to comment
or consider his state-funded
study.
Resident Randy Nelson asked
board members to be careful
about pricing county residents
out of Wakulla County. "We
don't want to limit Wakulla
County to people who can af-
ford $400,000 homes. Between
the septic costs and impact fees,
you can't afford to live here."
Jay Culley asked the board
to take its time to see if the
industry cuts its costs for perfor-
mance-based units. Ken Davis
said contractors and subcontrac-
tors face the pinch of losing
work during a quiet economic
time. "We need to implement
something that supports af-
fordable housing," said Davis.
"Everybody is scared."
"We, as a county, put out in-
formation that was inaccurate,"
said Commissioner Howard Kes-
sler. "We have created a problem
that we have to fix."
Builder Morris Brown said
the board action created a
"frantic panic" in the commu-
nity with contractors "grabbing
plans and turning them in" to


beat the deadline. Brown said
the action has created "wrong
houses on the wrong lots to get
under the deadline."
Commissioners agreed to ad-
dress the septic regulations as
soon as possible.
"When you do something
that is groundbreaking, you hit a
roadblock along the way," Com-
missioner Langston concluded.
Commissioners approved the
motion to delay the deadline
unanimously.


Turn to the Experts 850 926-5592
3232 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville
Owned & Operated by Gary 'imbaugh Lic # CAC1814304


T EA

ITRADO

IN THE VILLAGES OF ST. MARKS

A Unique Place to Shop for Your Home Decor Needs.
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Open Fri., Sat., & Sun. 10 AM. 6 PM.: '-
or call for an appointment (850) 925-0400









Page 4A-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007


Church


Obituaries
Emma J. Buchanan
Emma Jean Buchanan, 69, of
Hendersonville, Tenn, died Sun-
day, Jan. 28 in Nashville, Tenn.
The service was held on
Friday, Feb. 2 at Bevis Funeral
Home in Tallahassee with burial
at Tallahassee Memory Gardens.
Memorial contributions may be
made to the American Cancer So-
ciety, 241 John Knox Road, Suite
100, Tallahassee, FL 32303.
She was a native Floridian
and resided in the state until
Nov. 26, 1961. She married James
Buchanan and began a life in
Tennessee. She was a member
of Whitsett Chapel in Nashville
and a homemaker.
She is survived by her hus-
band, James D. "Jimmy" Buchan-
an of Hendersonville;a daughter,
Jan Buchanan of Nashville; three
sons, Mark Buchanan of Milwau-
kee, Wis., Ronnie Buchanan and
Connie of Nashville and David
Buchanan and Aida of Louisville,
Ky.; a stepson, Delbert Buchanan
and Beth of Murray, Ky.; two
sisters, Mary Barclay and Donnie
of Greenville and Edith Marie
Lee of Tallahassee; two brothers,
A.J. Lee and Annette of Quincy
and Robert Lee and Joyce of
Crawfordville; two sisters-in-law,
Mary Ellen Lee of Crawfordville
and Sandy Lee of Tallahassee;
three grandchildren, Connor
Buchanan, David Buchanan and
Neal Buchanan; seven nieces;
and 14 nephews.
Bevis Funeral Home in Tal-
lahassee was in charge of the
arrangements.

Dan O. Colvin
Dan Oscar Colvin, 74, of Craw-
fordville died Tuesday, Jan. 30
in Crawfordville.
The graveside service was
held on Friday, Feb. 2 at Hosford
Cemetery. Memorial contribu-
tions may be made to Big Bend
Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center
Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308.
He was born in Jamierson,
and was a resident of Crawford-
ville for 16 years coming from
Boston, Ga. He was of the Baptist
faith and a self employed auto
mechanic.
Survivors include his wife of
54 years, Flora Mae Colvin of
Crawfordville; three sons, Henry
Colvin and wife Linda, Thomas
Colvin and Richard Colvin, all
of Boston; two daughters, Mary
"Sara" Lindsey and husband
Curtis of Tifton, Ga., and Kathy


Trinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
TrinityLutheranofWakulla.com
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Les Kimball
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557


Church News


Duncan and husband Charles
of Crawfordville; five broth-
ers, William Colvin of Havana,
George Colvin and wife Sandra
of Cordele, Ga., James Colvin
and wife Charlotte of Perry, Ga.,
Curtis Colvin of Bainbridge, Ga.,
and Harmon Colvin of Havana;
three sisters, Jessie Mae Dicker-
son of Pine Hurst, Ga., Mildred
Brock of Thomasville, Ga., and
Virginia Barrett of Cairo, Ga.;
nine grandchildren and eight
great-grandchildren.
Harvey Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.

Charles A. Golden
Charles Amos Golden, 65, of
Panacea died Friday, Feb. 2 in
Medart.
No funeral services are
planned. Memorial contribu-
tions may be made to a charity
of your choice.
A native of White County,
Tenn., he had lived in Panacea
since 1987.
He was a self-employed auto
mechanic. He was of the Protes-
tant faith and a veteran of the
U.S. Air Force.
Survivors include his wife of
21 years, Thelma Lois Golden
of Panacea; a son, John Edward
Golden and wife Sherri of Or-
lando; a stepson, Bobby Neal
Pittman of Barnesville, Ga.; two
daughters, Anita Divers and hus-
band Buddy and Emily Johanna
Golden, all of Orlando; a step-
daughter, Renee Pittman and
husband David of Fayetteville,
Ga.; five grandchildren; and four
great-grandchildren.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.

Debbie Ingram
Debbie Ingram, 51, of Sop-
choppy died Friday, Feb. 2 in
Tallahassee.
The funeral service was held
Monday, Feb. 5 at Mount Beasor
Primitive Baptist Church in Sop-
choppy with burial at Archers
Chapel Cemetery in Jamison,
Ala.
A native of Smith Creek, she
was a longtime resident of Sop-
choppy. She was a member of
Mount Beasor Primitive Baptist
Church and was a certified phar-
macy technician.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Herman Ingram, Sr. of
Sopchoppy; three sons, Herman


Saint Teresa
Episcopal
Church
1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & US 98
Sunday School
Holy Eucharist 8:30 am
Youth & Adults 9:30 AM
Children 10:30 AM
Worship 10:30 AM
Reverend John Spicer
926-4288


S 11 1391 Crawfordville Highway
W aku la S rings Crawfordville, FL 32327
BAJTISr~3 URCI-I

Sunday Activities Wednesday Evening Activities
Continental Breakfast 9:15 a.m. Family Night Supper 5:30 p.m.
Bible Study/Fellowship 9:45 a.m. Children/Youth/Adult Activities 6:45 p.m.
Worship Service 11 a.m.
General Office Hours: Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m.
Office 850-926-5152 Fax 850-926-5825 School Office 850-926-5583
Website: www.byhisgrace.cc/wsbc


S Hwy 319 Medart,
a e office 926-5265
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
S) 0 Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
S Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
h c AWANA Clubs 4:00 p.m.
Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org


Steve Ingram, Jr. and wife Amy
of Crawfordville, Donnie Wayne
Ingram and wife Hope of Wood-
ville and David Eli Ingram and
wife Shaun of Sopchoppy; two
brothers, Dickie McKenzie of
Crawfordville and Frazier Martin
of Panacea; six sisters, Connie
White of Hastings, Frances Lom-
bard of Ocala, Marion Blackmon
of Sopchoppy, Voncille Black-
mon of Panacea, and Naomi
McKenzie and Loyce Reeves,
both of Crawfordville; and nine
grandchildren.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home
in Crawfordville was in charge
of the arrangements.

Chester D. Johnson
Chester Daniel "Big Chet"
Johnson, 74, of Tallahassee died
Sunday, Jan. 28 in Ayer, Mass.
The funeral service was held
Tuesday, Feb. 6 at the chapel of
Bevis Funeral Home of Tallahas-
see with burial at Roselawn
Cemetery.
A native of Moultrie, Ga., he
was a lifelong resident of Leon
County. He was a brick mason
in the construction business
and had worked for Culpepper
Construction.
He was a mason and a mem-
ber of Larson Lodge in Tallahas-
see. He loved the outdoors and
to hunt and fish.
Survivors include his wife,
Virginia Johnson of Tallahas-
see; four sons, Danny Johnson
of Tallahassee, Loren Johnson
of Thomasville, Ga., Chester
Johnson II of Tallahassee and
Ryn Powell of Marietta, Ga.; two
daughters, Donnagail Keyden
of Denver, Colo., and Carol Luke
of Tallahassee; two brothers,
Fred Johnson and Roy Johnson,
both of Tallahassee; two sisters,
Eva Williams of Tallahassee and
Christine Taylor of Moultrie;
17 grandchildren; and 11 great-
grandchildren.
Bevis Funeral Home in Tal-
lahassee was in charge of the
arrangements.




Prefbyteiuut
3383 Coastal Hwy.
1/3rd mile east of Wakulla High School
9:30 a.m. Sunday School
10:30 a.m. Worship Services
Nursery Provided
926-4569
www.wakullapres.org










Church (ssB)

Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.
Wed. adult, children & youth 7 p.m.
486 Beechwood Drive Crawfordville, FL.
(North of the Lower Bridge Road and
Spring Creek Highway intersection)
Rev. Dennis Hall, Pastor
850-926-6161


'a'


Ordination Service
On Sunday, Jan. 21, Sopchop-
py Southern Baptist Church
Ordained two men to serve as
deacons in the church. The men
selected for this office were Jerry
S. Evans and Charles S. Cook,
both of Sopchoppy.
Jerry Evans has been serving
as pianist in the church since it
was founded in 1997. He is mar-
ried to Pam Lawhon Evans, and
they reside in Sopchoppy. Evans
has worked with the youth and
has represented the church in
many community events. Jerry
and Pam have three children,
Lindsay, Bethany and Chandler
Evans. Evans is employed by
Wakulla Bank in the Crawford-
ville Office.
Charles (Chuck) Cook, and
his wife, Diane, are long-stand-
ing members of the church and
hold leadership roles in the
church youth program. Chuck
and Diane have two children,
Kelsey and Beau Cook. Cook
is employed with the Florida
Highway Patrol.
SThe two men, join 19 other
men currently serving as dea-
cons of Sopchoppy Southern
Baptist Church.
*
Valentine Gala
The Mount Pleasant Mission-
ary Baptist Church in Wakulla
Station will host a Valentine
Gala and Minority Recognition
program on Saturday, Feb. 10
* lBlBmtnBI--.7uK. MB lra a


Panacea Park

Baptist Church
24 Mission Road, Panacea
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Worship 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 p.m,
Pastor, Jerry Spears


& C///// ffo /He/( (ji /-w e e
123 Elena Drive
Tallahassee, FL 32305
Owned & Operated By Wesley Schweinsberg
Son of the Late Harold Schweinsberg
Office: (850) 421-7211 Mobile: (850) 510-3983
Call and Compare... You'll Save Time & Money
Same Quality & Service



SoochIo uv Southern Baptist Church
117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy
962-7822

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Morning ship 11n AM

AWANA Cub 5 FPM
Evenin ip' PM


from 6 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. at the
Wakulla County Senior Citizens
Center in Crawfordville.
For more information or
tickets, call Deacon Robert Man-
ning III at 421-1917 or Sister Ann
Norton at 264-2669.

'Faith in Action'
Millard Fuller; founder of
Habitat for Humanity and cur-
rent president of the Fuller Cen-
ter for Housing in Americus, Ga;
and a world renowned speaker,
will share his experiences with
us at a "Faith in Action" Celebra-
tion, Saturday, Feb. 24, from 9:30
a.m. to 2 p.m. at Good Shepherd
Parish, 4665 Thomasville Road,
Tallahassee.
Local ministry leaders will
also share their story of hearing
and acting on the call to minis-
try. A book signing will immedi-
ately follow the event.
Fuller's 29 year leadership
forged Habitat into a worldwide
Christian housing ministry,

Wakulla
United Methodist Church
Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m.
S Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship -11 a.m.
Wednesday Service 7 p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor Drew Standridge


Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worship 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .............5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details,
962-2213


building 200,000 homes with
projects in 100 countries world-
wide. "I see life as both a gift'
and a responsibility," he said. My'
responsibility is to use what God '
has given me to help his people'
in need." Mr. Fuller travels
and speaks worldwide and has
earned international recognition
for his work advocating decent
affordable housing for all.
A love offering will be re-
quested at the conclusion of
the event, with all proceeds to
be donated to the Fuller Center
for Housing. You may bring yrout
own lunch, or we will provide' '
lunch for $6.00. Pre-registratibn"
is required by Feb. 19 if'ybuo
intend to purchase lunch. For A'
complete schedule, and to' pe'-
register, please visit the web site '
at: http://tallahasseejustfaith:.
eventbrite.com.

Ivan Assembly of God ,
202 Ivan Church Road
~IMsIIBSUESM OI Crawfordville .
Pastor, ,
Daniel Cooksey'
"Come & Worship llh Us'' "
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship ................... 11 a.m.
Evening Worship........................6 p.n.: i
Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. .
& Youth Service 7 p.n.-
Royal Rangers 7 p.m. ,
Missionettes 7 p.m.

Bl0dB Ochlockonee
spi roughtJ Christian Center
WordTaught
A Word of Faith Church '

Schedule of Services
Sunday 11 a.m.
Wednesday 7 p.m. I I
Thursday Ladies
Bible Study 10 a.m.
2263 Curtis Mill Rd.
Sopchoppy, FL* 962-3774 ,
Pastor John S. Dunning
(From Rhema Bible Training Center)


Crawfordville United .

Methodist Church

Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.,.'
Pastor Tony Rosenberger 926-7209
Ochlockonee & Artn Road "Come Grow With Us"' ww.crawfordville.-m c.ort I

(J,,c ove/o /,le e/4 '/Pce/ W, '


4 SI
BAI) I .,I Ch LI W 1


3086 Crawfordville Hwy.
(South of the Courthouse)
Church Office: 926-7896
www.fbccrawfordville.org
or
(youth) www.crosstraining.org


I


SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Fellowship Meal 6:00 p.m.


(call for reservations)
Prayer/ Bible Study
IMPACT (Youth)
Children's Events


7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
6:30 p.m.


Chuck Cook, Diane Cook, Pastor Maurice Langston, Pam Evans And Jerry Evans


;" .4






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Rotary Hosts Valentine Celebration


By MARJ LAW
Past President, Rotary Club of Wakulla County
You'eW been hearing about
it for several weeks now, and
this is the Saturday for Rotary's
Annual Valentine Day Celebra-
tion!
Breakfast in the Park begins
at 8 a.m. Brave the elements
with Major Jared Miller and
grab Ameris Bank's big early
breakfast before the Parade at
10 a.m.,
The Winn-Dixie Sweetheart
Parade will be huge this year.
Parade Chairman Vic Culley
doesn't know what happened,
but attendance has grown tre-
mendpcusly. Bring your sweet-
heart:and your sweet tooth
because parade people have a
tendency to toss candy to spec-
tators lining Highway 319.
Wakulla County has more
businesses and organizations
than ever before, and it seems


Growth


Continued from Page 1A
of Highway Safety and was look-
ing to keep himself active in his
retirement when the golf course
opportunity presented itself.
Esser said the attention the
new ownership has given to
the course is giving Wildwood a
new life. "The weather has been
very conducive to good golf," he
said of the winter months. "The
greens are in fantastic shape
and we've had a lot of positive
comments from visitors and our
regular players."
Local golfers and golfers
from other counties appreciate
Wildivood as "a friendly course
to the average golfer," said Es-
ser. "We're looking forward to a
good year."
The course has water and
sand hazards, but an average
golfer won't spend the day at-
tempting to locate golf balls in
the water, said Bonnie Holub,
vice president of the Ladies Golf
Association.
Holub said female players
have begun to overcome their
fear of failure on the course and
are beginning to make their
presence felt. Holub said she
was looking for something to
do to remain physically fit a few
years: ago. She was encouraged
to try golf by her husband, Tim
Jordan,- whose encouragement
has helped her play as much as
twice each week.
"The ladies participation is
growing," she said. "We've of-
fered ladies' golf clinics to help
grow the ladies' interest. We
now have 28 to 30 women in our
association."
Female golfers may contact
Holub at 984-2966 for more in-
formatini about the cub.
The Inn is building clients
on the nature and ecotourism
theme. Inn guests can stay at
the hotel for as little as $89 and
play a round of golf, or the Inn
can set up several nature tours
for guests to take advantage of
Wakulla's. natural offerings.
The Wildwood facilities in-
clude a pool, putting areas, driv-
ing range and tennis court.
David G. Beck is the Director
of Golf at Wildwood Country
Club. He assumed control of the
golf operations in August. Beck
played golf at Leon High School
and Florida State University.
The four-year letterman played
at FSt from 1984 to 1989, was
team captain for two years and
played in the NCAA National
Championships.
For seven years Beck com-
peted on national golf tours,
including the Ben Hogan, Nike,
Emerald Coast and Hooters
circuits. He has coached at FSU
and was a golf professional at
Marlborough Country Club in
Massachusetts.
"I'"e worked at golf courses
all my life," he said. "We have a
beautiful facility with a 72-room
otel and three putting greens.
he opportunity is really good
here. Things are looking on the
way up and up."
Wildwood is a semi-private
club, which means golfers can
join the club and become a
member, or can also play the
course without being a member.
The course is 6,504 yards long
from the championship tees.
"It's challenging, yet playable,"
said Beck.
Don "T.D." Smith is the presi-
dent of the Men's Golf Associa-
tion. He said the association has
grown to more than 140 mem-
bers, increasing its membership
greatly since 2000. The associa-
tion members not only play golf
four days each week but promote
junior golf through tournaments,
providing equipment and allow-
ing the high school teams to
compete on the course.

.1


like they'll all be marching in
the parade. Wait until you see
the amount of vendors at Hud-
son Park after the parade.
Save room for traditional
festival food and for Wakulla
County's special seafood and
treats. Vendor Chairman Doug
Jones sent out early notices to
vendors of past years, and new
vendors got the word, too. This
region has a lot of talented
craftspeople. You can purchase
something unique at Wakulla
Bank's Celebration in the Park
for Valentine's Day-what great
timing
Rotary's Valentine Celebra-
tion includes a carnival, which
always adds excitement to our
festival. Wal-Mart's Carnival in
the Park will draw young and
old to ride high on the Ferris
wheel, or to brave a fast swing
around and around. If you have


"We want the best and larg-
est men's association in the Big
Bend," said Smith, a Crawford-
ville resident. "We want to give
them a reason to come here. The
new owners have spent a lot of
money on equipment and they
have put the right people in the
right positions. They are doing
an outstanding job."
Male golfers can contact
Smith at 926-3234 for more infor-
mation about his association.
James Ponder is the chef at
The Bistro. Ponder must fill a
demanding three-meal menu,
which includes opening hours
from 6:30 a.m. until 10 p.m. Mon-
day through Saturday, and 6:30
a.m. until 7 p.m. on Sundays and
a Sunday brunch.
Sue Ann Smith, who helps run
the food service operation, said
Ponder is working on a fresh,
seasonal menu that will include
some local organic ingredients
from county producers. Ponder
worked at Kool Beanz Cafe in
Tallahassee and has other prior
food service experience.
Smith said The Bistro has
a variety of menu items for
lunch and dinner as well as the
breakfast buffet. Lunch includes
several starters, salads, sand-
wiches and entree items. The
sandwiches include chicken,
tuna, cheese steak, hamburgers
and BLTs.
The dinner menu includes


the nerve, get in line for the
ride
Entertainment Chairperson
Michelle Snow knows you're
probably friends with the vol-
unteers who have come to sing
and dance for most of the day
after the parade. Among oth-
ers, the fun will begin with
the High Mileage Band. COAST
Charter School will also be
represented.
Bring your folding chairs
and make an afternoon of it.
Our Rotary Valentine Festival
is a family fun day; a time to
relax and enjoy your children
and your friends who come to
sing, and encourage those you
don't know.
Do you have your Winn-
Dixie Shopping Spree raffle
tickets yet? You can get them
anytime at Winn-Dixie before
the Celebration and all day in


three starters, three salads and
seven entree items including
duck breast, chicken breast, rib-
eye steak, sesame tuna, bronzed
salmon, eggplant puttanesca
and shrimp linquini. The menu
includes a few children's selec-
tions and two desserts.
"Eventually we would like to
do room service at the Inn," said
Smith. "We also have nightly
special of whatever we can find
fresh."


WINDOW


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WAKULLA COL

WORKSHOPS *

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Page 6A-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007


Gaby S. Bruce
Happy first birthday to Gaby
Scott Bruce on Feb. 8. He is the
son of Richard Alton Bruce and
Millie Gaby Bruce of Crawford-
ville.
Maternal grandparents are
Scott and Julie Gaby of Craw-
fordville. Paternal grandparents
are Larry and Sue Bruce of Craw-
fordville.
Maternal great-grandparents
are Wayne Buttram of Crawford-
ville and the late Doris Buttrum,
Harper and Mary Lou Carter of
Crawfordville, and the late Billy
Gaby. Paternal great-grandpar-
ents are the late A.J. and SedaV
McLaughlin and Samuel and
Emma Bruce of Tallahassee.


trative Commission.
Her fiance is also a graduate
of Tallahassee Community Col-
lege and is pursuing a degree in
Business Administration while
working for Larry Hagaman
Plumbing Contractor.
The wedding will be held at
3 p.m. on Saturday, March 3, at
Wakulla Springs Baptist Church
in Crawfordville.


HAPPENINGS


Wakulla 4-H to Hold
Babysitting Workshop
The Wakulla County Exten-
sion Service will hold a babysit-
ting workshop for youth ages
12 and older at the extension
office at 84 Cedar Avenue, from
9 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Feb. 16.
Topics will include roles and
responsibilities of babysitters,
nutritious snacks, safety and
first aid, infant care, behavior
of children and setting limits
for children.
Cost for the entire day is $10
and includes all supplies, lunch,
and snacks. Participation is lim-
ited to 25 participants. Payment
of the fee secures a spot in the
workshop. Preregistration is
required and there will be no
registration at the door. Dead-
line for registration is Feb. 13.
Registration forms are available
at the County Extension Office.
For more information, contact


Angie Bradshaw at 926-3931.

Residents To Form
New Sewing Group
Wakulla County residents
with embroidery sewing ma-
chines are invited to join a new
club for sewing and fellowship.
The club has beer, formed in
Tallahassee and will meet on
Wednesday, Feb. 22, at 10 a.m.
at the community center of the
Good Shepherd Catholic Church
on Thomasville Road in Tal-
lahassee.
Visitors are invited to bring
embroidered work for a "show
and tell" while sharing knowl-
edge and creative ideas. Some
of the sewing machines offering
embroidery include the Design-
er One, Designer One Plus and
Designer SE, all manufactured
by Viking.
For more information, call
Mary Ann at 926-1966.


Open T-F 10-7 Sat. 9-3
ALL ROADS LEAD TO...

I


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*Manicures
Pedicures *Men Mineral Make Up
*Pedicures *Men Now Available!
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REG. HOURS:
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926-BFIT (2348) OPEN 7 DAYS


Bruce Geiger
Happy first birthday to Bruce
Geiger on Feb. 9. He is the son
of Jennifer Weeks of Crawford-
ville.
Maternal grandparents are
Mike and Bonnie Weeks of Craw-
fordville and Tammy and Tony
Smith of Bristol.


I.


- First Birthdays-


r I"'


cr


Sandy's Special
Half-heartedness never won a battle.
William McKinley U.S. President

LOTS & LAND
Great Buy 4.5 Fenced Acres
complete with well & septic
Reduced $84,900.
North Crawfordville
Coral Way 4.5 Acres $105,000.
i on 1/2 Acre, fenced Oyster Bay
k yard on paved road. City water, Septic & Dock
$189,000. $425,000.


(850) 926-7837
Store Hours:
Mon-Fri 10:00 a.m.-6 p.m. ,
Sat. 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. :.-


Winter Clearance!
Check Out Our $9.99 Rack &
Sales Up To 75% Off!!


.9 4.


Our new Spring Line will be arriving
February and March!


Featuring Karen Kane, Rafaella, Liz Claiborne,
Bentley a., Columbia, and coming soon we will
be selling Men's and Women's Fossil Watchie!


NOW OFFERING:
Alterations by Wanda &
Green Turtle Embroidery & Monogramming



V Sauy Sae .
F
y Shop for that special someone for
9 Valentine's Day! Y
w We have great jewelry
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V Receive an additional 10% offofyour totalpurchase with this coupon., :-;a
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2671 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL


ARE YARD SALES TOO MUCH TROUBLE?
Sell it in THE CLASSIFIEDS, As Low As $7 Per Week! ... Call 926-7102

New Firefighter 1 Class
( Starts Feb. 13 Tues. & Thurs. 6 PM
e)/_ I Volunteer Firefighter Training da Medical First Respdnder
) U160 Hours Tuition $352 40 Hours Tuition $88
CPR (For Rescuers) $28 Registration Fee $5 4obks $5
te tSupplies $20 Total $400 CPR (For RescUers)$28
^ rVolunteer Firefighter Supplies $15 Total,$186
After First Responder W Emergency Vehicle
120 Hours Tuition $264 Operations Certification
SSupplies $20 Total $284 16 Hours Tuition $35.20
"/ Fire Fighter Training Grounds
Call Allen Harvey 926-7950
r Humanity Adult Education Classes GED Prep. Cost $5 Registrption
tore" L Fee/School Year Day Class: M-F 8AM-11AM orMIW,F
SHit ghway 8AM-1:40PM Evening Class: Tues/Thurs 5-9PM
ig way 126 High Drive (Behind Old Crawfordville Elementary
4 a -54 p.. Call 926-1841 or 962-2151
- 9 a.m. 5 p.m.


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Ryan Porter And Tiffany Taylor

Tiffany Taylor

To Marry Porter


Bruce and Sybil Taylor of
Crawfordville announce the up-
coming marriage of their daugh-
ter, Tiffany Erin Taylor, to Ryan
Porter. He is the son of John and
Judy Porter of Tallahassee.
The bride-elect is a graduate
of Tallahassee Community Col-
lege. She is pursuing a degree in
accounting while working at the
State of Florida Justice Adminis-


































"* \ In



- it


Adam Lassiter And Bethany Smith

Bethany Smith To

Wed Lassiter


Leshan Smith and Bill Smith
of Crawfordville announce the
engagement and upcoming mar-
riage of their daughter, Bethany
M. Smith of Crawfordville, to
Adam K. Lassiter of Crawford-
ville. He is the son of Susan and
Mike Lassiter of Crawfordville.
The bride-elect is a 2003 grad-
uate of Wakulla High School and
is owner of Dazzles Hair Studio
in Crawfordville.


Her fiance is a 1999 graduate
of Wakulla High School and a
2003 graduate of Florida State
University. He is employed with
the Florida Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection.
The wedding will be held on
Saturday, March 24, at 4:30 p.m.
at Willow Pond Plantation in
Monticello.
All friends and relatives are
invited to attend.


By HEIDE CLIFTON
President, CHAT of Wakulla, Inc.
Who do you call when you
have a two-day-old litter, kittens
or puppies, that are dumped
in the woods? You call Glenda
McCarthy. Well, that is what
we do at the Wakulla County
Animal Shelter and our humane
organization, CHAT.
It is very hard to keep ani-
mals that are so young alive.
However, that does not seem
to be the problem when Glenda
handles the case.
For weeks, she will feed the
animals every hour on the hour.
Not only does it cut into her
ability to sleep, it also keeps her
from doing anything else dur-
ing the day. The amazing thing
is that by socializing a litter in
such a fashion, most animals
she raises will find a home.
Glenda mentioned that as
far back as her memory goes,
animals have always been a
major part of her life. Virtually
all her life she has been saving
puppies that were certainly
doomed to die in traffic, and
horses that were destined for
slaughterhouses.
In the early 1970s, Glenda
moved from the Miami area
to Wakulla County and experi-
enced a culture shock. She got
involved with some other citi-
zens to start a horseman's asso-
ciation. It was important to her
to get young people and fami-
lies involved in horsemanship.
With the help of many citizens
an arena was built where young
people had a chance to display
their skills in local shows.
Glenda became aware of the
cruelty and neglect with horses


Ta i




and other animals that was go-
ing on at that time in Wakulla
County. She found herself sav-
ing horses that were destined
for the slaughterhouse.
One day Glenda received a
call about a small colt nursing
on the body of his dead mother.
After she paid the owner $50,
she took the animal home. De-
spite predictions by a veterinar-
ian that there would be hardly
a chance for that colt to live,
Glenda proved them all wrong.
She named the horse "Muffin"
and taught him how to pull a
wagon. The horse participated
in the 200th Bicentennial of our
nation.
Glenda mentioned how hap-
py she is that we now have a
very nice animal shelter. In her
younger days, her inspiration
was Suzanne Johnson, who was
the President of the Wakulla
County Humane Society. People
such as Glenda McCarthy and
Suzanne Johnson paved the way
for a kinder Wakulla County.
The Wakulla Rotary Club will
host their annual Valentine's
Parade starting at 10 a.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 10. You can walk your
dog behind the Animal Control
Truck and the CHAT Banner.
The Wakulla Animal Shelter
and CHAT will have their volun-
teers and some animals that are
up for adoption at Hudson Park.
Hope to see you there.


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007-Page 7A

Fish Fry Organized To Help Fund Girl's Education
A mullet fish fry fund-raiser tend the Barbizon School in slaw, baked beans and sweet like to contribute to the cause.
will be held on Saturday, Feb. Tallahassee. tea. The event will be held at the
10, at 1 p.m. to assist Maria The dinners are $5 per plate A donation jar will also be Panacea Volunteer Fire Depart-
Crawford raise money to at- and include hush puppies, cole available for those who would ment.



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WAKULLA COUNTY OFFICES HAVE MOVED:
EFFECTIVE DATE: FEBRUARY 12, 2007

The Wakulla County Grants Department is now located at:

Physical Address: 196 Ochlocknee Street
Crawfordville, Florida 32327

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 309
Crawfordville, Florida 32326

Phone: (850) 926-9500 Fax: (850) 926-9006


The Wakulla Veteran's Office in now located at:

Physical Address: 3093 Crawfordville Highway
Crawfordville, Florida 32327

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1263
Crawfordville, Florida 32326

Phone: (850) 926-1072 Fax: (850) 926-0940

READ WITH A CHILD 20 MINUTES A DAY ...
It can make all the difference!


Animals Have A True

Friend In McCarthy






Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007


Sports


11 WHS Wrestlers Advance


The Wakulla War Eagle wres-
tling team will be sending 11
wrestlers to the regional com-
petition on Friday and Saturday,
Feb. 9 and Feb. 10 after the
squad finished second in the
district tournament Feb. 2 at
Suwannee County.
Coach John Wainwright said
his team did very well and
held off the more experienced
Suwannee County Bulldogs
until the final round. Suwannee
trailed Wakulla by nine points
going into the final matches,
but the Bulldogs topped Mookie
Forbes, Adam Pendris and
Jonathan Daily in head-to-head
matches in the final round.


Suwannee finished with
183.5 points while Wakulla had
157. Baker County placed third
while Godby was fourth, Brad-
ford County was fifth and Fort
White was sixth.
Wakulla will not have wres-
tlers in three weight classes at
regionals which will be held
at Matanzas High School near
Flagler. The War Eagles did not
have a 152 pound wrestler and
Brandon Chew did not qualify
at 125 and Leland Alyea did not
qualify at 160 pounds. Wres-
tlers qualified for the regional
competition by finishing in the
top four places in their weight
classes.


Scotty Varner won the 112
pound class and Ryan Qualls
won the 145 pound class. The
second place finishers included
Mookie Forbes at 103, Kendrick
Hall at 135 and Adam Pendris at
171. Jonathan Daily was second
at 189 and Troy Walker placed
second at heavyweight.
Walker moved up in weight
classes for the district tourna-
ment.
A third place finish was
recorded by Garrett Barco at
140. Fourth place finishes were
secured by Brock Glover at 119,
Chandler Evans at 130 and Mi-
chael Hudson at 189.
Coach Wainwright said the


team will leave for Matanzas on
Thursday, Feb. 8, and wrestling
will begin in the morning on
Feb. 9.
"We'll be picking up some
of the southern (Florida) teams
and it will get tougher at region-
als," said the coach. "I'm hoping
for a good week of practice and
hope we can get in a little bet-
ter shape."
The regionals will have 16
wrestlers in each weight class
and the top four will advance
to the state championships Feb.
15 through Feb. 17 in Lakeland.
"I hope we can have some kids
qualify for state," Wainwright
concluded.


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Lady War Eagles
Headed To State
Wakulla High School quali-
fied five female athletes to par-
ticipate in the state weighlifting
competition.
The Lady War Eagles who
qualified and will be going to
state include: Chelsea Collins,
Tiffany Quintero, Hannah Battle,
Torey Jo Nunn and Shannon
Mills. WHS is coached by Shelly
Moore.
The FHSAA Finals will be
held on Saturday, Feb. 10 at
River Ridge High School, New
Port Richey. Admission is $6.
SCompetition begins at 11
a.m. and an awards ceremony
will be held at the completion
of competition. A souvenir pro-
gram is available for $4. It will
be available at the event.
Television highlights will be
broadcast on the Dodge High
School Sports Report.
The 2006 team champion
was Spruce Creek from Port
Orange.

WHS Baseball Team
To Open Against Leon
SThe baseballs are already
zipping around the Wakulla
War Eagle baseball complex as
Coach Mike Gauger and his play-
ers get ready for another year on
the diamond.
If Mother Nature allows the
players to use the field, the
season will open on Tuesday,
Feb. 13, at home against Leon
High. Lincoln will visit Medart
on Feb. 15.
The War Eagles get into the
district portion of the schedule
on Feb. 20 at Godby. Panama City
Beach Arnold will host Wakulla
on Feb. 22. In addition to the
district games against Arnold,
Panama City Bay, Rickards, East
Gadsden and Godby, Wakulla
will play Sneads, Florida High,
Maclay, Taylor County, Valdosta,
Thomasville Brookwood and
Jacksonville Bishop Kenny dur-
ing the regular season.

Girls Season Ends
The 2006-2007 Wakulla Lady
War Eagle basketball season
came to a dose on Tuesday, Jan.
30, with a loss against Panama
City Bay in the first round of the
Class 4A District 2 Tournament.
The game was played at Panama
City Beach Arnold.
Despite the loss, the Lady
War Eagles had one of the best
seasons in recent memory.
Wakulla finished 15-11 despite
missing Kiara Gay with an
injury for a large chunk of the
campaign.
Coach Nate Jackson had a
number of his younger players
step up and play well in Gay's
absence.


Softball Games Wiped
Out By Weather
Two pre-season Wakulla Lady
War Eagle softball games were
washed out by severe weather
on Thursday, Feb. 1.
Coach Tom Graham and his
Lady War Eagles were scheduled
to play Marianna and Leon at
Leon.
The games will not be made
up.
Wakulla opens the 2007 sea-
son on Feb. 9 at home against
Tallahassee Lincoln. Madison
will host Wakulla on Feb. 12.
The first two district games of
the season will be played Feb.
15 at East Gadsden and Feb. 20
at home against Panama City
Bay.

Tennis Teams Ready
To Open Season
The Wakulla War Eagle and
Lady War Eagle tennis teams
hope for many victories to
go along with warm and dry
spring weather during the 2007
season. Tennis is a difficult
sport when played under ideal
conditions, but WHS has played
some matches in cold and
damp weather during past early
seasons.
Coach Dave Price and his
players will open the season
with two Lady War Eagle match-
es Feb. 13 at Maclay and Feb. 15
at Taylor County.
The first match for the War
Eagles will be Feb. 15 at home
against Maclay. The Taylor
County boys, Panama City Beach
Arnold boys and Godby boys
will all visit Medart on Feb.
20, Feb. 22 and Feb. 27 respec-
tively.
The rest of the schedule
includes Madison County, Su-
wannee County, Florida High,
Panama City Bay and Rickards.
The district tournament will be
held at Tom Brown Park on April
9 and April 10.


War Eagles Pick Up

Third Hoops Win


The Wakulla War Eagle bas-
ketball team split the final two
regular season games last week
as Coach Jay Hipps' squad won
for the third time this year.
Leon topped Wakulla 49-39 on
Tuesday, Jan. 30 in Tallahassee,
but Wakulla turned the tables on
Taylor County 68-63 in overtime
in Perry on Friday, Feb. 2.
In the Leon contest, Wakulla
had the lead late in the game
but could not hold it. Josh Con-
rad led Wakulla with 11 points.
Prince Poole added nine points
and 10 rebounds. Tavaris McKin-
ney had eight points and Wilton
Booth chipped in with seven.
Jared McKenzie and Clint Can-
field had two points each. Travis
Williams had six assists.
Wakulla kept the game close
until the fourth quarter when
the Lions outscored Wakulla by
six points.
The first half belonged to
Taylor County as the Bulldogs
led by three points after one
quarter and stretched the lead
to 19-15 at halftime. But Wakulla
took over in the second half and
erased the four point Taylor lead.
The two teams took the contest
into overtime where Wakulla
outscored the Bulldogs by a 10-
5 mark.
Wakulla had three players
score in double figures as Wilton
Booth had 20, Josh Conrad had
19 and 10 rebounds and Prince
Poole had 16 points and a school
record 28 rebounds. Tavaris
McKinney chipped in with eight
while Jared McKenzie had four
and Travis Williams had three.
Taylor County came into the
game with a 14-10 record before
falling at home to the War Ea-
gles. Wakulla had a school record
61 rebounds as a team.
Wakulla played in the district
tournament on Tuesday, Feb. 6
against Panama City Beach Ar-


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nold. East Gadsden is the host
team. The top two teams from
the tournament advance to the
state playoffs. Rickards, Godby,
Panama City Bay, Wakulla, Ar-
nold and East Gadsden are in
the district.
Wakulla will play Bay on
Wednesday, Feb. 7 if the War
Eagles beat Arnold. Wakulla
improved to 3-22 overall and
finished district play at 0-10.
Seniors on the team include
Josh Conrad, Prince Poole, Clint
Canfield, Robert Hershmann and
Markael Jones.





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Senior citizens who are
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own a home, can now
borrow against the equity in
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money for just about any-
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to repay the debt. They can
continue living in the home
for the rest of their lives
without the burden of mak-
ing monthly payments.
This is now possible
thanks to a Home Equity
Conversion Mortgage crea-
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ing and Urban Develop-
ment, also know as HUD.
This money can be used
to:
1. Payoff an existing mort-
gage
2. Pay for medical expenses
3. Supplement income
4. Supplement savings
5. Make repairs to the home


6. Provide financial assis-
tance to family members
7. Establish a line of credit
that can be used if needed in
the future
8. Vacation and travel
There is never a risk of
losing their home and they
are free to sell or refinance
the home, without penalty,
at any time. All money
received is tax free and has
no effect on Social Security
or retirement income.
A free report reveals how
citizens of Wakulla County
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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007-Page 9A


REC NOTES
The Wakulla County Parks
and Recreation Department will
host spring sports registration
on Saturday, Feb. 10, from 8 a.m.
until noon.
T-ball will be offered in
two age groups, ages 4 and 5.
and ages 6 and 7. The fee is $35
per player.
A pitching machine base-
ball league will be offered for
players ages 7 and 8 for a fee
of $40.
Wakulla Cal Ripken As-
sociation will offer a baseball
league for players ages 8 to 10
with a fee of $65.
Wakulla Cal Ripken Asso-
ciation baseball will be offered
for players ages 11 and 12 with
a fee of $75 per player.
The Babe Ruth Association
is open to players ages 13 to 15


The Wakulla Lady War Eagle
softball program will begin the
2007 season on Friday, Feb. 9,
at home against Lincoln. Coach
Tom Graham returns many ex-
perienced players to compete
against a difficult regular season
schedule.
Dana Roloff will pitch and
play in the infield during her
final season. She has signed
a scholarship to play college
softball at Pensacola Junior
College.
Ashley Delong, Karlyn Scott
and Brianna Fordham are all
three year varsity team mem-
bers and Katelyn Gallamore has
played at WHS for four years.
Lindsey Bolin, Hannah
Lovestrand and Ashley Spears
are all playing their second
season on the varsity. Chelsea
Collins has joined the varsity
from the JV team along with
Torey Jo Nunn. Lacey Crum and
Meagan Rollins have joined the


with a fee of $95 per player.
The Girls Softball Asso-
ciation has three age divisions,
ages 8 to 10; ages 11 and 12; and
ages 13 to 16. The fee is $55 per
player. Proof of age through a
birth certificate is required for
the baseball and softball asso-
ciation leagues.
The girls softball league
age determining date is Jan. 1.
All other leagues have an age
determining date of April 30.
Athletes must provide proof of
health insurance or purchase
a policy from the county for
$7.50.
The registration deadline for
the T-Ball and pitching machine
leagues is Feb. 11 at noon. The
other deadlines may vary. Par-
ents are reminded to register
their children early to secure


team as freshmen.
"This is probably the best
overall bunch that I have had,"
said Coach Tom Graham. "We
have a lot of experience and lots
of kids fighting for positions."

Wakulla will travel to Madi-
son County on Feb. 12 before
playing the first district game
of the year in Feb. 15 at East
Gadsden. The first district home
game will be played Feb. 20
against Panama City Bay. We-
wahitchka joins the schedule
on Feb. 22.
In addition to the district
teams, Bay, Panama City Beach
Arnold, Godby, Rickards and
East Gadsden, Wakulla will play
Marianna, Leon, and Florida
High.
Wakulla and Godby are fa-
vored to advance to the state
playoffs from the district. Godby
will host the district tourna-
ment beginning on April 16.


a spot.
For more information, call
the parks and recreation depart-
ment at 926-7227 or visit www.
wcprd.com.

Registration Planned
For Babe Ruth League
Babe Ruth Baseball registra-
tion will be held on Saturday,
Feb. 10 from 8 a.m. until noon
at the recreation park in Med-
art. Players must bring a copy
of their birth certificates or a
Babe Ruth baseball card from a
previous season.
Babe Ruth is open to all play-
ers ages 13 to 15 with a birthday
cutoff date prior to April 30. The
cost is $95 per player. For more
information, call Noreen Britt
at 544-5826.
The Babe Ruth League will


be hosting a Home Run Derby
for all registered players on
Saturday, Feb. 10 beginning at
noon at the recreation park.
The cost is $5 per player and all
three age divisions will select a
winner.


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ALL ROADS LEAD TO...





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a 2481 Crawfordville Hwy. #6 Crawfordville, FL 32327 I


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February 12-16
ELEMENTARY MIDDLE SCHOOL
Monday: Cordog, potato Monday: Chicken sandwich,
wedge, green beans, chocolate breaded okra, peach cobbler,
pudding, milk milk.
Tuesday: Spaghetti & meat Tuesday: Comdog, potato
sauce, steamed broccoli, wedge, green beans, chocolate
french bread, apple, milk. pudding w/whipped topping,
Wednesday: Chicken fajita milk.
strips, tossed salad w/saltines, Wednesday: Taco salad,
whole kernel corn, dessert whole kernel corn, apple crisp,
cup, milk. milk.
Thursday: Hamburger gravy Thursday: Turkey and noodles,
w/fluffy rice, seasoned turnip steamed broccoli, school made
greens, cornbread, peach cup, roll, orange wedges, milk.
milk. Friday: Teacher Planning Day.
Friday: Teacher Planning
Day.
High School Menus Available Online


Come Expecting:
Miracles, Healings, Deliverance,
Anointed Praise & Worship, Dynamic
Preaching & Teaching
For a ride to service contact:
(850)219-1800


Faculty Spotlight TCC in Peru February Community and Continuing Education
STallahassee Community Collee C res at TCC's Wakulla Center
"Students come into my President Bill Law invites you to-qoin Courses at TCCIs Wakulla Center
Students ome into my him on an 18-day trip of hlifetirle i Wakulla Offers the Green Guide Orienting, Compass Use, Map
office seeking help in to Peru. This tour will be le by Certification Program Reading, GPS
Spanish and advice for the Betty Jensen, TCC Counselor and The Wakulla Ecotourism Institute offers Tuesday
future." said Dr. Nelson in mnttinnnl It dert drvisnr d ,- i ..... . .an .,n ..,


Madera, a full-time Spanish'
professor at Tallahassed .
Community CollegeA It ,I
wonderful to hearfrom;.
former students when they..
-call or drop in and rewarding to hear theiF sucos'.e
Stories. It is a very humbling experience.when they .
:-thank me for their accomplishments. I know thel *tle
am doing a good job and I thank God for His gift to mer?'

Dr. Madera has been teaching Spanish at TCG since.
.1999. Originally from Cuba, he has been inthe United
States for 45 years and was transferred to tallahassee
in 1973 from New York while employed by ,M.
4-' ,t'
In 1985 Madera decided to go back to school.for his
master's degree and teaching'certificate. He also
received his PhD from Florida State in '92. He then
spent 11 years teaching at FAMU High School during
the day and was an adjunct instructor at FloridaA&M
University in the evening. Madera went on to teach the
International Baccalaureate program at Rickards High
School before arriving at TCC.

As part of his duties at the College, Madera takes a group
to Spain every other summer a program in which
students earn credit and are able to experience another
culture and immerse themselves in the native language.
However, according to the professor, it is his daily routine
of teaching in the classroom that keeps him going.

"My favorite part of this job is just coming in every day
and interacting with not only my students, but all of my
co-workers as well," said Madera. "TCC is an excellent
place to work and everyone here has a great rapport with
each other. And when it comes to the students, knowing
that I'm helping somebody gives me a good feeling."


IlrillnaUI I n a QI LUU IIL iulVi i, WIu d
native of Peru. Everyone is invited
to come experience the diverse
culture, coastal deserts, farming
oasis, quaint villages, the Amazon
basin, andyhe tallAndfel
where thenimy~ery'ard ntrgig
the ancient Inca Empire still lies.
Cost for tie trp is $2,700 and
spaces are filling up fast. L.I
today at (850) 201-84
her at jensenb tccfli .lr (nor6
information or to your



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Cynthia Nunez-
Artwork on Display
Artist Cynthia Nunez's "New Work"
exhibit will be on display in the
TCC Fine Art Gallery February 15
- March 29. There will be a pubic
reception on Thursday, Februay. 7 :
15 from 6:30 8 p.m. andth~i i.
artist will be present on Saturday,
February 17, from 7 8 p.m.


YU IlUUrs Ui lasse illu felu tlilJa eacll
fall and spring, beginning on the third
weekend of September and January.
Classes are offered Monday and Tuesday
evenings and a half day on weekends
for ten weeks. For specific dates and
times, go to www.tcc.fl.edu and search
for "ecotourism." For more information,
please call (850) 922-6290 or e-mail
wakullacenter@tcc.fl.edu.

Historical & Cultural Sites Field Trip
Saturday
February 10
8:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m., $29
Wakulla Landscape III
Monday
February 12
6-9 p.m., $29
Nature-Based Laws and Rules
Tuesday
February 13
6 9 p.m., $29
Forest Field Trip I
Saturday
February 17
8:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m., $49


UI UQary cZ
6 9 p.m., $29
Coastal & Marine Field Trip I
Saturday
February 24
8:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m., $49
Web Marketing II
Monday
February 26
6 9 p m., $29
Birds, Reptiles, Mammals
Tuesday
February 27
6-9p m., $29
Coastal & Marine Field Trip II
Saturday
March 3
8:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m., $49
Green Guide Ethical Code
Tuesday
March 6
6 9 p.m., $29


FSU Advising Day at TCC
On Wednesday, February 14, Florida State advisors, honors-in-the-malor, and admission sta3f
will be on the campus of TCC to answer all questions about course pre-requisites, admissions
requirements, and all aspects of completing an education at FSU. Advisors
will be set up in the TCC Student Union Ballroom from 10 a m 3 p.m
Students can schedule an appointment by visiting the TCC Student
Success Center on the second floor of the Student Union, or by
calling (850) 201-8440. Walk-ins are welcome! All students are
asked to please bring a copy of their transcripts to the appointment


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Tabernacle of Praise s
"The Church Where Love Lives" I









Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007


Outdoors


The sun finally came out
Tuesday and it feels good. It
won't be long until our fishing
bursts wide open and I know
some folks at bait and tackle
stores that will sure be happy.
They're catching a few reds
and sheepshead in the Wakulla
River and Josh at T-n-T Hide-A-
Way on the Wakulla River said
he has been seeing some big
reds in the river in the deep
holes. He also said bass were
bedding before the real cold
snap last week.
Mike Hopkins said they had
one boat fishing on Sunday for
grouper and he left at 11 a.m.
and was back by 1 p.m. with
his limit. He was fishing LYs on
the bottom in 35 feet of water.
On Saturday nobody went out
fishing, but he heard some trout
and reds were still being caught
in the basin at the FSU Marine
Lab. It was hit and miss. He also
heard of a few fish being caught
in Poston Bayou. Remember, if
you catch trout now you have to
put them back due to a closed
season until March 1. Mike also
said the water was off-colored
in the bay due to the heavy rain
we had last week.
Juanise at Circle J's said
she's selling some bait but not
hearing of much being caught.


S rom The Dock

)' BY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL


I haven't talked to anyone that
has fished out of Shell Point
in the last week, but I did hear
a 10-pound sheepshead was
caught in one of the canals
under a dock.
Scott at Jerry's Bait and Tack-
le said as long as the weather is
good folks are going fishing.
Jason and Kane Curtin fished
live shrimp up past the Pur-
dom Power Plant on the St.
Marks River and caught six reds
and kept their two fish limit.
John Alford rode his bike into
Stoney Bayou and fished from
shore catching a 22-inch red
on his very first cast using live
shrimp.
Randy Trousdell was trolling
a Stretch 25 between St. George
and Dog Island and landed a 39-
inch red. He was so interested
in telling Scott about the red
he didn't mention if he caught
any grouper. Gerald Biddle
fished the St. Marks River with
artificial lizards and got his


yWakuee "



UWieei-


By GEORGE WEYMOUTH
Special To The Wakulla News
In my article last week I got
into some of the experiences I
had as a child which eventually
S- led me to become a professional
guide. I conducted nature-ori-
ented tours, focusing on birds,
because that's mostly what we
see in the wild.
Since early childhood, I've
had a fascination with wildlife.
In fact, for years I was called
"Wildlife Weymouth" after
working as a counselor/natu-
ralist at a private boys camp
in Canada. Then, years later,
after returning to Indiana from
Florida, I got labeled "White
Cloud."
I liked that name because it
labeled me like an Indian until
I realized it was also the name
of a brand of toilet paper. Fortu-
nately, about that time I moved
back to Florida, and "White
Cloud" went down the ... well,
you know.
When I worked at Wakulla
Springs as a boat guide on the


jungle cruise, I got the name
"George of the Jungle." When
telling folks my name is George,
I often add of the jungle, and
people rarely forget. I guess
now that I'm a single man again,
I feel more like "Lonesome
George."
Going back to my childhood,
critters always fascinated me. I
can still visualize a Horned Toad
(actually a species of lizard) I
caught in Texas. I was very
proud of it, but my older and
wiser sister (she felt), Nancy, let
it loosely I'm still upset.
When I was about seven
or eight years old, my parents
erected a bird feeder outside
the kitchen window, and Cedar
Waxwings would come to feed.
They're very handsome .birds
and feed in tight flocks while
perched on limbs of fruit trees.
They would pass fruit (like cher-
ries) up and down the line until
a hungry bird finally swallowed
it. I was fascinated!
In junior high at University
High School in Bloomington,


limit of five bass and released
another 15.
I told you last week that
the Shell Point boat ramp was
closed for repairs. Actually it
was closed because they tore
it up. They plan on putting the
new ramp on the other side of
the basin where the old dry
storage was.
They are in the process of
working on that now, but I don't
know when it will be open. I
will keep you posted.
The closest ramp to Shell
Point now is at Oyster Bay but
there is only parking for about
one vehicle. If you go to the end
of Spring Creek Road you come
to the Spears property on the
left and you can launch a boat
there for a fee.
The St. Marks Lighthouse
is the most popular launching
spot in Wakulla County and it is
located on the right just before
you get to the Lighthouse. There
is a park fee noted at the entry


Ind., I joined a sort of nature
club. Out of about 12 that joined,
only three stayed on, and I was
one of the three boys. Soon, we
were out checking out Snow
Geese and other water fowl on
our lakes, as well as Long-Eared
Owls and Worm Eating Warblers
- the first spring migrants of
their type. I got hooked.
I found an article of the late
Roger Tory Peterson, the man
who started the Peterson Field
guide series. He'd been to the
Antarctic photographing pen-
guins and was busy illustrating
his up and coming field guides.
Enjoying art myself, he became
a hero to me.
I posted an article in my daily
log book in which I kept records
of my nature observations and
soon became an authority on
birds. I had a butterfly collection
which my cat sat down on in-
sect pins and all and a pet al-
ligator which reached seven feet
and bellowed constantly in the
warmer months. By the way, he
was given to the Evansville, Ind.
Zoo where he killed a few other
smaller gators, bit a zookeeper
severely and was then traded off
for a big African cat. So much for
Algo the Gator.
A year later I became a full-
time guide on Sanibel Island off
the coast of southwest Florida.
I guided for about 15 years and
concluded my guiding by tak-


ing out who else but Roger Tory
Peterson, the very man I'd wor-
shipped as a child. I gave him a
private tour through Everglades
National Park. He wrote about
our adventure in the publication
"Bird Watchers Digest" (July/Au-
gust 1986). Peterson passed on
about 10 years ago, but for a long
time he was the top authority in
his field the Tiger Woods of
nature photography/painting.
While we were at Everglades
National Park, though much
older than me, he wore me out.
In the evening we'd dine at the
park's lodge. There I was in-
formed of all the great biologists
he personally knew Dian Fos-
sey, Jane Goodall, Louis Leakey
and many others. He knew them
as well as he knew about birds.
He was an amazing man with
endless energy, and I was privi-
leged to have met him.


FWC Officers Make Wakulla Arrest


The Florida Fish and Wild-
..life Conservation Commission
made a recent arrest in Wakulla
County.
On Jan. 21, Officer Antonio
Kilpatrick was dispatched to a
Wakulla County residence in
reference to an antlerless deer.
Upon arrival at the residence,
Officer Kilpatrick found a doe
deer hanging from a gamble in
an oak tree, but could not find
anyone at the residence.
Officer Kilpatrick waited
for the owners of the deer to


return, but to no avail. The fol-
lowing morning, Officer Kilpat-
rick returned to the residence
with Lt. Jeff Schremser to again
try to establish contact with
someone.
They found numerous otter,
deer and hog parts in various
stages of decomposition all
over the property. Since children
resided at the residence, the
Department of Children and
Families was notified of the
unsanitary conditions.
After breaking several sched-


Check me out! I am a five month old, female lab mix
puppy called "Baby Girl." At present, I am living in a fos-
ter home, but my foster family tells me that I am ready for
a permanent home. Would you be interested? I am smart,
have a sweet disposition, like other dogs and cats, and
like to ride in the car. Oh, I am also crate and leash trained
plus house broken! What more could anyone want? If you
are interested in adopting me, call the animal shelter at
926-0890 and mention this article. Thank you.


Habitat for Humanity
"Re-Store"
Shadeville Highway
926-4544
Open Tues. Sat. 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.


uled appointments to meet with
FWC officers, the owner of the
residence was contacted in per-
son on the morning of Jan. 24 by
Officer Kilpatrick, Lt. Schremser,
Investigators from DCF, and
officers and deputies from the
Wakulla County Animal Control
and Sheriff's Department.
A misdemeanor citation was
issued to the subject for pos-
session of the antlerless deer
and he was also arrested on
an outstanding warrant, FWC
officials said.

GET THE NEWS
DELIVERED
EACH WEEK!
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SUNDAY 4 PM. 9 P.M.
1506 COASTAL HIGHWAY PANACEA
i


to the park. In St. Marks there
is a boat ramp at Shell Island
Fish camp, Shields Marina and
at the San Marcos Fort where
the St. Marks and Wakulla rivers
come together. There is a fee for
launching at Shields and Shell
Island Fish Camp.
For those of you new to the
area, St. Marks is located at the
end of Highway 363 heading
south. The road to the Light-
house is off Highway 98 heading
east just after you cross the St.
Marks River at Newport. There
is also a ramp in Newport on
the left side of the bridge as
you are traveling east, just before
you get to the turnoff to the
Lighthouse.
On the Wakulla River there is
a boat ramp beside T-n-T Hide-A-
Way which is on Highway 98 at
the Wakulla River Bridge and at
the upper bridge off Highway
61.
If you have a kayak or small
boat you can launch at the end
of Wakulla Beach Road but it's a
dirt launching area.
In Panacea there is a boat
ramp at the end of Highway
372A (Bottoms Road) which
turns off Highway 98 just before
you get into Panacea. The other
launch ramp in Panacea is at


Panacea Harbor Marina. Travel-
ing west on Highway 98, turn left
in front of the Landing's Motel
and Restaurant.
On the Ochlockonee River
there is a boat ramp at Mash Is-
land County Park. Heading west
on Highway 98 you can turn left
at Mashes Sands Road (At the
BP Station just before you cross
the Ochlockonee River) and go
almost to the end of the road
and the ramp will be on the right
side of the road.
It can be hard getting out of
the canal to the river on a real
low tide. If you turn right at the
BP Station you will be on Surf
Road and there is a boat ramp
where the old Clayton's Restau-
rant used to be years ago. There
is very limited parking there.
The other boat ramp on the
Ochlockonee is up the river at
the Ochlockonee River State
Park, which is located off High-
way 319 west of Sopchoppy.
In Franklin County the launch
ramp at Lanark Village is prob-
ably the most popular. This is
located right behind Mike Hop-
kins Village Mart.
Remember that trout sea-
son is closed the entire month
of February and recreational
grouper fishing will be closed


from Feb. 15 until March 15 in
federal waters, which is nine
miles offshore. Nobody has said
anything about state waters and
from what I am hearing it will
be open.
Remember to leave that float
plan and be careful out there.
Good luck and good fishing

Don't Wait Till
I'm Sick As A
Dog!







Many serious diseases
can be prevented
by vaccination.
Take me to see the
Veterinarians at

Sorest animal

J2ospital

926-7153


GO AHEAD, DRAG OUR NAME THROUGH THIEM7UD.!


XX IAF


[ PROWLER ]







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007-Page 11A

Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville B1ranch Now Open
he) pear sere CrediEt Unir 224-4960

Crawfordville Branch F I UNION
NOW OPEN ff" m"


STide charts by
Zihua Software. LLC


St. Marks River Entrance


Date I High Low High Low High
Thu 12.3 ft. 0.8 ft. 2.9 ft.
Feb 8, 07 '5:26 AM 10:48 AM 4:55 PM
Fn 0: II II t 1 1 II "- I 1
Feb9,07 :12:14 AM ;6:28 AM 11:17 AM 5:18 PM
Stl .0 i 1 11 15 t1 IT
Feb 10,07 1:25 AM 8:09 AM 11:55 AM 5:51 PM
Sun 0 2 II. 1 'f tl 11 5 11
Feb 11, 07 2:59 AM [10:28 AM 1:07 PM 6:45 PM
Mon -0.1 ft. i2.2i -t. 2.0 ft. 2.5 ft.
Feb 12, 07 4:26 AM 11:50 AM 3:17 PM 18:46 PM
Tue I-0. l 2 5 11 1 11l II
Feb 13, 07 5:29 AM 12:33 PM 5:01 PM i10:36 PM
Wed i 2 t 6 11 ,3 0 1
Feb 14, 07j 6:17 AM 1:06 PM 16:01 PM 111:41 PM


Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay

Date High Low_ High I Low High
Thu 1 7 06 1II ' 2
Feb 8, 07 5:18 AM 10:59 AM 14:47 PM
Fn 0 2 I 1 5 1 0 8 t 21 II
Feb 9, 07 12:25 AM 6:20 AM 11:28 AM 5:10 PM
Sat i0.2 ft. .4ft.. 1.T ft. 2.0 ft.
Feb 10, 07 1:36 AM 8:01 AM 12:06 PM 5:43 PM
Sun 0.2 ft. .. 5 ft. 1.3 ft. 1.9 ft.
Feb 11, 07 3:10 AM 10:20 AM 1:18 PM 6:37 PM
Mon -0.0 ft. 1.7 ft. 1.5 ft. 1.9 ft.
M o n fti . ..... ^..................t.. ............ :,9 .....
Feb 12, 07 4:37 AM 11:42 AM 3:28 PM 8:38 PM
Tue -0.3 ft. 1.9 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.0 ft.
Feb 13, 07 5:40 AM 12:25 PM 5:12 PM 10:28 PM
Wed *0 t 2 1 t '1 1l 31II1
Feb 14, 07 6:28 AM 12:58 PM 6:12 PM 11:33 PM


Feb. 8- Feb. 14


City of St. Marks

Date High Low High Low High
Thu 0.2 ft. 2.1 ft. 0.7 ft. 2.7 ft.
Feb 8, 07 12:28 AM 6:02 AM 11:52 AM 5:31 PM
Fri 0.2 ft. 1.9 ft. 1.0 fti 2.6 ft.
Feb 9, 07 1:18 AM '7:04 AM 12:21 PM 5:54 PM
Sa' 0.3 ft. ;17 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.5 ft.
Feb 10, 07 2:29 AM 8:45 AM 12:59 PM 6:27 PM
Sun 0.2 ft. 1.8 ft. 1.7 ft. 2.4 ft.
Feb 11, 071 4:03 AM 11:04 AM 2:11 PM 7:21 PM
Mon -0.0 ft. 2.1 ft. 1.8 ft. 2.3 ft.
Feb 12, 07 '5:30 AM 12:26 PM 4:21 PM 9:22 PM
Tue 0 4-1 II 24 1 1 I 2 II
Feb 13, 07 6:33 AM 1:09 PM 6:05 PM 11:12 PM
Wed -0.7 ft. 2.6 ft. 1.5 ft.
Feb 14, 07 7:21 AM 1:42 PM 7:05 PM


St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.


Thu
Feb 8, 07
Fri
Feb 9, 07
Sat
Feb 10, 07
Sun
Feb 11, 07
r.lor,
Feb 12, 07
Tue
Feb 13, 07
Wed
Feb 14, 07


Hiqrih Low Hir,,
S1.8 ft. 0.8 ft. 2.3 ft.
j5:10 AM 110:27 AM 4:39 P
1.6 ft. 1.1 ft. 2.2 ft.
6:12 AM 10:56 AM 5:02 P
S0.3 ft. 1.4 ft.


;1:04 AM
0.2 ft.
2:38 AM
.I) l ll
4:05 AM
-0.4 ft.
:5:08 AM

S5:56 AM


7:53 A
1.5 ft.
10:12
1. 1II
11:34
2.0 f.
12:17

12:50


I l:.w Hlh
0.2 ft.
M 11:53 PM

M
1.5 ft. 2.1 ft.
M 11:34 AM 5:35 PM
S 1.8 ft. 2.0 ft.
AM 12:46 PM 6:29 PM
1 I I 1 I I
AM i2:56 PM 8:30 PM
.8 ft. 2.1 ft.
PM 4:40 PM 110:20 PM
l ll 41II
PM 5:40 PM 11:25 PM


For tides at the following points
add to Dog Island Listings: Carrabelle
Apalachicola
Cat Point
Lower Anchorage
West Pass


High Tide
28 Min.
1 Hr., 53 Min.
1 Hr., 13 Min.
1 Hr., 36 Min.
1 Hr., 26 Min.


Shell Point, Spring Creek

I 1i l Hilh L:'.'. HiQlh L:ow High
Thu 2.4 ft. 0.9 ft. 3.0 ft.
Feb 8, 07 5:23 AM 10:45 AM 4:52 PM
Fri 0.3 ft. 2.1 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.9 ft.
Feb 9, 07 12:11 AM 6:25 AM 11:14 AM 5:15 PM
Sat 0.3 ft. 1.9 ft. 16 ft '2.7 ft.
Feb 10, 07 1:22 AM _8:06 AM 11:52 AM 15:48 PM
Sun 0.2 ft. 12.0 ft. 2.0 ft. -2.6 ft.
Feb 11, 07 2:56 AM 10:25 AM 1:04 PM 6:42 PM
Mon -0.1 ft. 2.3 ft. 2.2 ft. 2.5 ft.
Feb 12, 07 4:23 AM 11:47 AM 3:14 PM 8:43 PM
Tue -0.4 ft.' 2.6 ft. 2.0 ft. 2.8 ft.
Feb 13, 07 5:26 AM 12:30 PM 4:58 PM 110:33 PM
Wed -0.8 ft. "2.8ft. 1.7 ft. 3.1 ft.
Feb 14, 07 6:14 AM 1:03 PM :5:58 PM 11:38 PM


Dog Island West End


i H-Ie High
Thu 1.4 ft.
Feb 8, 07 ;6:10 AM
Fri
Feb 9, 07
Sat
Feb 10, 07
Sun
Feb 11, 07
Mon
Feb 12, 07
Tue
Feb 13, 07
Wed
Feb 14, 07


Low
0.7 ft.
9:52 AM
-0.1 ft.
12:04 AM
-0.2 ft.
1:20 AM
-0.3 ft.
2:45 AM
-0.5 ft.
3:58 AM
.11 0 ll
4:57 AM

5:47 AM


Hiqh LW Hih
2.3 ft. i
5:00 PM
1.3 ft. -0.9 7ft. 2.4 ft.
7:50 AM 10:01 AM 5:27 PM
2.4 ft.
5:59 PM
2.4 ft.
6:42 PM
j2.4 ft.
7:43 PM
2 1 1 1 E. t 2 4 ti
12:24 PM 13:50 PM 9:00 PM
2 1 11 1 6. 2 5 1i
2:33 PM 15:01 PM 10:19 Pn


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
3:40 am 4:25 am 5:10 am 5:55 am 6:45 am 7:35 am 8:30 am
4:00 pm 4:45 pm 5:35 pm 6:20 pm 7:10 pm 8:05 pm 9:00 pm

9:50 am 10:35 am 11:20 am --:-- 12:35 am 1:25 am 2:20 am
10:15 pm 11:00 pm 11:50 pm 12:05 pm 12:55 pm 1:50 pm 2:45 pm


Sunrise
Sunset
Moon rise
Moon set
Brightness


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
7:23 am 7:22 am 7:21 am 7:20 am 7:19 am 7:19 am 7:18-am
6:20 pm 6:20 pm 6:21 pm 6:22 pm 6:23 pm 6:24 pm 6:24 pm


10:35 am
63%


12:18 am
11:06 am
57%


1:15 am
11:41 am
51%


2:14 am
12:22 pm
45%


3:14 am
1:11 pm
38%


4:13 am
2:08 pm
32%


5:08 am
3:13,pm
25.%


COAST GUARD


AUXILIARY REPORTS


By Sherrie Alverson


It was a quiet week for Flotilla
13 at Shell Point, but over at St
Marks things were different.
Carolyn Brown Treadon filed the
following report on Flotilla 12's
activities:
Our flotilla held its February
meeting on Saturday and we had
several guests and potential new
members in attendance along
with our regular membership.
We had the pleasure of welcom-
ing John West from Tow Boat
US who came to discuss with us
what he does and how we could
work together to better assist the
boating public. We would like
to extend our gratitude again for
his taking time on a Saturday
evening to come and share in
our fellowship.
We also had MK1 Joe Story
from Station Panama City visit-
ing. Joe is our Flotilla Liaison.
Under Master Chief Cantrell,
each flotilla has been assigned a
liaison with the active duty. Dur-
ing the meeting, Joe discussed
the new Rescue 21 system.
While there are still many bugs
to work out, the system will
assist in locating a boater in dis-
tress with much greater accuracy
than we currently have.
He also addressed how the
Auxiliary is, and can continue to
be, an asset to the Active Duty
Personnel.
We also had two of the pre-
OCS students at Florida State at-
tending, Austin Glass and Deidra
Harrison.
Both are enrolled in the uni-
versity and upon graduation
will attend officer's candidate
school.
Gwen Gilbert received her
certificate of retirement form
the Auxiliary. After more than
35 years in the auxiliary, Gwen
has chosen to take retirement
status. Gwen, as an auxiliarist
enrolled prior to October 2005
received a Presidential Citation
for the role of the auxiliary in
response to Hurricane Katrina.
Citation to the Coast Guard in-
cludes the Coast Guard family
- Active Duty, Reservists and
Auxiliary,
The citation read: "The Presi-
dent of the United States takes
pleasure in presenting the PRESI-
DENTIAL UNIT CITATION to the
UNITED STATES COAST GUARD
for service as set forth in the
following


.. Boating Emergencies .

Coast Guard Station
Panama City .................. ...... ............. 1 (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown ............................................ 1 (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ......................... ........ 1 (850) 906-0540
or ....................................... ................ ... 893-5137
Shell Point (Flotilla 13) ...................................... 1 (850) 926-2606
or ........................................................... 926-5654


Joe Story Discusses Rescue 21 System


"For meritorious achieve-
ment and outstanding perfor-
mance in action from Aug. 29
to Sept. 13, 2005 in preparation
for, and response and recovery
to the devastation wrought by
Hurricane Katrina.
The United States Coast
Guard anticipated the potential
for significant loss of life and
property and, in advance of
Hurricane Katrina, relocated its
personnel, vessels, and aircraft
out of harm's way.
The Coast Guard successfully
executed multiple primary mis-
sions throughout the Gulf Coast
in the wake of the worst natural
disaster in United States history.
Responding with more than
4,500 personnel, 130 small boats,
four cutters, and 60 aircraft to
devastation and despair across
more than 90,000 square miles
and 6,400 miles of coastline, the
Coast Guard rescued more than
33,000 people, began cleanup
operations of 9.4 million gallons
of oil, replaced and repaired
over 1,800 aids to navigation,
and, most importantly, provided
hope to hundreds of thousands


of displaced citizens through its
proactive and vigorous actions.
This inspiring response is a
direct result of the spirit and
practice of operational initia-
tive, positive leadership and
courage of the total Coast Guard
force of active duty, reserve,
auxiliary and civilian members.
Every Coast Guard man and
woman demonstrated superior
professionalism, commitment,
humanitarianism, tenacity, tacti-
cal acumen, technical expertise,
compassion and support while
maintaining the highest level of
operational readiness.
By their outstanding courage,
resourcefulness, and aggres-
sive actions under desperate
conditions, the members of
the United States Coast Guard
reflected great credit upon them-
selves and upheld the highest
traditions of the United States
of America. All Coast Guard
members are authorized to wear
the Presidential Unit Citation
ribbon with a special clasp in
the form of the internationally
recognized "hurricane symbol."
We in Flotilla 13 wish Gwen


.11 l/


I ,


1if' A


all the happiness in the world.
To me personally, Gwen is very
special. She and her late hus-
band, Don, joined Flotilla 13
first, then later, daughter, Laurie,
became our youngest member
on the day she turned 17. She
later left us to go to college and
a busy career.
When Don and Gwen accept-
ed the challenge of reestablish-
ing Flotilla 12, I watched them go
with a touch of sadness, but was
so very proud of them. I knew
Flotilla 12 would again become
a flotilla to be proud of. The
Gilberts loved the Auxiliary in a
very special way.
The next week will continue
to be a busy time for many of
us in Flotilla 12 as we prepare to
head over to Fort Walton Beach
for the District/Division meet-



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Due to the above-mentioned t; ,.. .
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SOP*" TR) PM. Fe idb & Smn d~y Cood MI l*ys
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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007


Business


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Tanning Majik
A grand opening was held Jan. 27 with a rib-
bon cutting the following Tuesday at the new
Moon Majik (formerly Sun Shak II) Tanning and
Unique Gifts Salon located at North Point shop-
ping center next to Iris Anne's. Moon Majik offers
the best tanning beds available, featuring Wolf
tanning bulbs and a wide assortment of tanning
lotions. Each room has its own CD/radio system.
Moon Majik also features unique gifts, such as
incense, oils and oil burners, figurines and statu-


ettes along with many handcrafted items such
as jewelry and paintings. Plus soy candles, soaps
and bath salts, and more made by local crafters
and artisans.
Moon Majik is owned by Debbie Wisecup of
Crawfordville and is co-operated by Peggy Wit-
tmeir, also of Crawfordville. The two bring their
own style to the store, a style that lies somewhere
between the hippies of the '60s and the new-age
phenomenon that seems to be sweeping the na-
tion. Moon Majik is open from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Monday through Thursday, 10-to-7 on Friday and
10-to-5 on Saturday,


Gaby Elected Chamber President
Wakulla Bank announced they contribute." Community College bo
that Executive Vice President Gaby is a 1969 graduate of ee from 1991 to 1998,
Scott Gaby has been elected Wakulla High School. He holds chairman from 1997 tc
2007 Wakulla County Chamber an Associate of Arts degree from The Wakulla Coun
of Commerce president. Chipola Col- erative Extension Serv
Gaby is a 30-year employee lege and a the Gaby family 1996 C
of Wakulla Bank and has served Bachelor of ing Farm Family for
on the bank's board of directors Science de- County.
since 1990. Gaby said his goals gree in fi- "On behalf of all
are to support business growth nance from Bank employees, offi
and keep chamber members Florida State directors, we offer ou
informed about relevant govern- University. congratulations and
ment changes. He is also a for Scott Gaby during h
"Businesses lend their sup- graduate of as chamber preside]
port to many worthy nonprofit the Univer- Gaby President Walter C. Do
and civic endeavors in this com- sity of Flor- "His leadership and se
rrunity" said Gaby. "Without ida School an integral part of our
our business community many of Banking and the Graduate growth and success."
of these things would not be School of Banking at Louisiana
possible, and I would like to see State University.
businesses get credit for what Gaby served as a Tallahassee


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007-Page 13A


Library Announces February Calendar Of Events


By DOUG JONES
Wakulla County Library Director
The Wakulla County Public
Library will host a variety of
programs and workshops dur-
ing February. All programs are
free and the public is invited
to attend.
For gardening enthusiasts,
there are three opportunities:
On Thursday, Feb. 8 at 6:30
p.m., Joanna Booth will present
a program on "Native Wildflow-
ers and Propagation" at the
monthly Florida Native Plant
Society meeting.
On Tuesday, Feb. 20 at 1
p.m., Dean Jue will present a
program on "Butterflies and
Butterfly Gardening" at the Iris
Garden Clubs day meeting. On
Tuesday, Feb. 27 at 7 p.m.. Dale
Bennett will present a program
on "Best Management Practices
for Your Yard" at the Iris at Night
meeting.
History buffs won't want to
miss the Historical Society's
program on Tuesday, Feb. 13
at 7 p.m. Esther Ladd Wood-
ward will present "Memories
of Newport" and Shirley Raker
Nelson will present "Memories


of Newport and its Shipyard
during WWII."
On Thursday, Feb. 22 at 6
p.m., the Wakulla County Heri-
tage Book will have its second
monthly meeting. This multi-
year project is just getting start-
ed and everyone is encouraged
to bring their family stories.
Please join us at this meeting
to learn more about how you
can get your family story and
photographs published in this
book.
On Friday, Feb. 16, at 7 p.m.,
Friday Night at the Movies re-
turns with a recently released
feature film projected on the
big screen in the library meet-
ing room.
The library's public perfor-
mance license does not allow it
to publicize the name of the film
but anyone wishing to know
the title may contact the library
at 926-7415 or send an email to
friends@wakullalibrary.org to be
added to our email notification
mailing list.

Computer Classes
There is plenty of space avail-


able in the computer classes the
library scheduled for February.
Instructor Deanna Ramsey will
be offering beginning classes in
Excel on Tuesday, Feb. 13, from
5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Power-
Point on Thursday, Feb. 15, 9:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Internet utiliz-
ing the new Internet Explorer 7
on Thursday, Feb. 15, 1:30 p.m.
to 4:30 p.m., and Business Cards
and Letterheads on Thursday,
Feb. 22, 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
There will also be several geneal-
ogy classes offered including an
Introduction to Ancestry.com on
Tuesday, February 20 from 9:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
There are many other ad-
vanced classes and specialty
classes offered throughout the
month. For a complete listing,
please consult the library's web
page at www.wakulllibrary.org
or come in or contact the library
for more information. Space is
limited to 12 students per class
and pre-registration is required.

Parenting Workshops
Beginning Tuesday, Feb. 20,
and lasting for eight consecu-


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Make Informed Choices About Their Health Insurance
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SERVING HEALTH CALL THE ELDER HELPLINE TODAY
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tive Tuesdays, a free Parenting
Workshop will be offered in
the Children's Room at 11:30
a.m., immediately following the
weekly Book Babies program.
The program is intended for
parents of newborns to three
years of age and children are
welcome to attend with their
parents.
Led by Kristy Lee, the Smart
Start Program Coordinator and
Parent Educator with Capital
Area Healthy Start Coalition,
each workshop will last approxi-
mately one hour.
Topics to be presented in-
clude Nutrition, Oral Health,
Language development, Child-
care/Finding Quality Childcare,
Smoking, and Safety Proofing
Your Home. All presentations
are promised to be informative
but not overbearing.

Income Tax Assistance
The Library is pleased to
once again serve as host for
the AARP Tax Aide Program.
Staffed by trained volunteers,


the Tax Aide Program provides
tax counseling for moderate to
low income taxpayers and free
e-filing of all returns completed
on site, including 2006 Income
Tax Returns and 2006 Telephone
Tax Refunds.
Last year the volunteers com-
pleted 355 tax returns for Wakul-
la residents.
The free service will be pro-
vided at the library every Tues-
day from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. and


every Saturday (except April 7)
from 9:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m.
through April 14. The service
is also provided at the Wakulla-.
Senior Center on most Wednes-.
days from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Shut-ins or taxpayers with
special needs may contact Gor-.
don Anthony (570-4949) or Bet-
tye Trites (926-4912) for other
arrangements. Service is pro-
vided on a first come-first served:
basis.


INJURY FROM ANY EMERGENCY
MEDICAL SERVICE PROVIDER
Injured by the actions of any emergency medical
service providers or their failure to act?
Call Attorney Brian J. Wolk at 841-7611 in
Tallahassee, or 926-3221 in Crawfordville,
for a case review and to learn about your legal rights and
remedies. Your consultation is free, and if your case is
taken, there are no fees or costs unless there is a recovery.


Low-Income Senior

Exemption Filing Information


Are you eligible for an additional savings on your property tax bill? You are if you
meet ALL of the following requirements:

* Have a total household income of $24,214 OR LESS
* Age 65 or older as of Jan. 1, 2007
* Eligible for Homestead Exemption
* This exemption will be applied to your 2007 tax bill

The Wakulla County Property Appraiser's Office will be taking applications for
the Senior Exemption as well as any other that you may qualify for at the Wakulla
County Senior Citizen Center located at 33 Michael Drive each Friday during the
month of February. The following dates and times will apply. .

February 02, 2007 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m.
February 09, 2007 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m.
February 16, 2007 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m.
February 23, 2007 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m.


All seniors receiving Social Security benefits will receive a SSA-1099 form from
the Social Security Administration. Please make sure you bring this' form in with '
you at the time you apply. If you have any questions, please feel free to give us a call:
at 926-0500 or stop by the office located at 3115-A Crawfordville Hwy.


A tL


The Signs & Symptoms
of a Heart Attack

Chest, stomach, back,
neck or jaw pain
Shortness of breath
Indigestion or gas-like pain
Nausea or dizziness
Unexplained anxiety,
weakness or fatigue
Discomfort or pain between
the shoulder blades
Sense of impending doom
Irregular heartbeat, cold
sweat or paleness


It is important to learn the symptoms of heart disease in
women and that these symptoms are often different than
in men. That's why Tallahassee Memorial has developed
a woman's heart care program designed to increase
awareness of heart disease and encourage women who
experience heart attack symptoms to seek immediate
treatment.

At TMH, we're in the forefront nationally for providing
rapid, life-saving treatment of heart attacks.making your
chance for survival much greater. To learn more about
women and heart disease and find out if you are at risk,
visit www.tmh.org/womensheart.


Listen to Your Heart.


.JL
"ir
Tallahassee Memorial
Heart & Vascular Center


1300 Miccosukce Road
Tallahassee, FL 32308


850.431.2727
www.tmh.org/womensheart


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Lady Haskins
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2007 Woman Wearing Red to Fight Heart Disease


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Page 14A-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007


Sheriff's Report


The Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office investigated a grand theft
at the Crawfordville Wal-Mart
on Wednesday, Jan. 31, accord-
ing to Sheriff David Harvey.
Two black male suspects
were observed removing a shop-
ping cart full of merchandise
from the store without paying
for the items. The suspects set
off the store alarm when fleeing
into a wooded area.
Laptop computers, DVDs and
a pillow, valued at $3,456, were
removed from the store. The
items were recovered. Deputy
Scott Powell, Lt. Ray Johnson,
Deputy Matt Helms, Deputy
Evelyn Brown, Lt. Sherrell Mor-
rison and Deputy Scott Rojas
investigated.
In other activity reported by
the Wakulla County Sheriff's Of-
fice during the past week:
On Feb. 1, Ruth M. High of
Crawfordville reported a grand
theft after money was stolen
from her wallet at Winn-Dixie.
The victim left her wallet on
a store counter and returned
later to recover it. However, a


large sum of cash was missing
when the wallet was recovered.
Suspects have been identified.
Deputy Roger Rankin investi-
gated.
On Jan. 30, Tasha Y. Miller
of Sopchoppy reported a struc-
ture fire in Sopchoppy. A gas
space heater caused a fire that
was extinguished by the Sop-
choppy Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment and the victim. The fire
was ruled accidental. Deputy
Nick Petowsky investigated.
On Feb. 1, Thomas K.
Wright of the Wakulla Station
Volunteer Fire Department
reported a grand theft. Wright
reported that $605 was stolen
from a recent fund-raiser. A
suspect has been identified.
The case was turned over to
the criminal investigations
division. Deputy Ward Kromer
investigated.
On Feb. 3, John Fain of
Crawfordville reported a grand
theft of an outboard motor from
his home. The 25 horsepower
motor was taken from his ves-
sel on the St. Marks River. It


is valued at $3,500. The motor
was entered in the NCIC/FCIC
computer. Deputy Danny Harrell
investigated.
On Feb. 3, Isaac Allen of
Beal!s Outlet in Crawfordville re-
ported the theft of clothing from
the store. Two juveniles and
Amanda Lee Woodward, 18, of
Crawfordville attempted to leave
the store without paying for
the merchandise. It was valued
at $26. The girls were charged
with retail theft and were given
trespass warnings about return-
ing to the store. Deputy Evelyn
Brown investigated.
On Feb. 3, Deputy Jason
Newlin and Deputy Evelyn
Brown investigated a physi-
cal disturbance at a Crawford-
ville residence when it was
determined that the homeowner
owned several dogs used in Tal-
lahassee area dog fighting. The
suspect, who was identified, was
given 30 days to remove the dogs
from the residence. The suspect,
a state corrections officer, was
written up at work for bring-
ing inmates to his residence to
show them his dogs. The case
was turned over the criminal


FIRE RESCUE REPORT


This past week, Wakulla
County volunteer firefighters re-
sponded to a one-structure fire,
two fire alarms, one brush fire,
three miscellaneous fires, three
vehicle accidents, two calls for
public assistance and 21 medi-
cal first-responder emergency
incidents.
At 5:30 p.m., Sunday, Feb.
4, the Crawfordville Volunteer
Fire Rescue Department was
dispatched to a residential struc-
ture fire at 472 Lower Bridge
Road. On arrival, firefighters ob-
served heavy smoke showing. It
was quickly determined that the
kitchen was fully engulfed with
fire. Captain Rhea called for the
Wakulla Station department to
respond with equipment and
personnel to assist the Craw-
fordville Department.
The fire was initially attacked
and knocked down by firefight-
ers through a rear door that led
into the kitchen. Following the
initial knockdown, firefighters


made entry into the house
through the front door, moved
to the kitchen area and com-
pleted extinguishing the fire. Al-
though fire damage was limited
to the kitchen, the entire inte-
rior of the home suffered smoke
damage. Firefighters stayed on
scene until 7 p.m. making sure
the fire was completely out and
had not spread.
The fire was caused by a
kitchen stove grease fire. The
Red Cross was called to provide
assistance to the homeowners.
* *
Extension Cords Can
Increase Fire Risk
The U.S. Consumer Product
Safety Commission estimates
that approximately 4,700 resi-
dential fires originate in exten-
sion cords each year, killing 50
people and injuring 280 oth-
ers. Overheating of extension
cords can occur at the plug, at
the socket or over the entire


length of the cord. Hot plugs
and sockets are often caused by
deteriorated connections to the
cord wires.
Overheating of the entire
cord is usually caused by over-
loading (connecting appliances
that need too many watts for
the wire size of the cord). Many
older extension cords made
with small (No. 18 gauge) wire
that can overheat at 15 or 20
amps are in use.
Consumers should feel the
temperature of the cords when
they are in use. If they are hot
to the touch, disconnect the ap-
pliance. Extension cords should
not be placed under rugs or un-
der furniture where they can be
damaged. If there is any sign of
overheating, replace the exten-
sion cord with new ones having
No. 16 or heavier gauge wire
(the lower the gauge number,
the heavier the wire and the
more electrical current the cord
can safely carry).


Sgt. John Zarate and Lt. Pat Smith

WCSO Divers Complete Course


Two members of the Wakulla
County Sheriff's Office Dive
Team completed the Florida
State University College of
Criminology and Criminal Jus-
tice Underwater Crime Scene
Investigation program held
recently in Panama City, accord-


ing to Wakulla County Sheriff
David Harvey.
Sgt. John Zarate and Lt. Pat
Smith were challenged both
physically and mentally in
difficult conditions, said the
sheriff.
The course consisted of un-


derwater mapping, evidence
retrieval, body removal and
many other investigative pro-
cedures.
"I'm proud of the officers and
all the hard work they put into
the dive team," Sheriff Harvey
concluded.


investigations division.
On Feb. 3, Deputy Ward
Kromer investigated a disabled
vehicle in Sopchoppy. During
the investigation, Dewayne
Samuel Reed, 40, of Sopchoppy
was discovered in the vehicle.
Reed had active warrants and
was taken into custody. During
the search of Reed at the jail,
drug paraphernalia was alleg-
edly discovered on him. Reed
was charged with theft, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia and
introduction of contraband into
a detention facility.
On Feb. 4, Sonya Farmer
Davis of Crawfordville reported
a house fire. The fire started as
a result of grease on the kitchen
stove. Damage to the home was
estimated at $20,000. Sgt. Mike
Kemp investigated.
On Feb. 5, Assistant Prin-
cipal Randy Barnes of Wakulla
High School recovered a mari-
juana cigarette in the school. A
17-year-old Panacea juvenile will
be charged with possession of


vehicle theft from his home. A
suspect has been identified. The
location of the vehicle has not
been determined. Deputy Scott
Powell investigated.
On Feb. 5, Michael R. Hut-
ter of Crawfordville reported the
theft of a street sign, valued at
$175. The sign was for "Ameri-
can Way." Deputy Pam Veltkamp
investigated.
On Feb. 5, William M.
Bishop of St. Marks reported the
theft of a trailer tag. The theft
is the second time the victim
has lost his tag. It is valued at
$35. The tag was entered in the
NCIC/FCIC computer. Captain
Steve Ganey investigated.
The Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office received 820 calls for ser-
vice during the past week.
Note to our readers: The
people who are reported as
charged with crimes in this col-
umn have not yet been to trial
and are therefore innocent until
proven guilty.


LI: bi


926-TREE
(8733)


marijuana in the case. Deputy u Mini Mall
Billy Jones investigated. ullls Mini Mall
On Feb. 5, Eric J. Bollivar Penn Dealer
of Crawfordville reported a 984- 501

Sp t Stll -- Panacea, FL
Spots Still ONE STOP SHOPPING

Open For Over 3,000 Rods & Reels In Stockl
Open Every Day 5:30 a.m. 9 p.m.

Citizens


Academy
The Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office will sponsor another
Citizens Academy beginning
Tuesday, Feb. 20. The program
gives participants an overview
of the entire sheriff's office
operation over the course of 12
Tuesday nights.
The academy will be held
from 6:30 p.m. until 9 p.m. each
Tuesday and a meal will be
provided. The program is free.
For more information or to reg-
ister, call Major Larry Massa at
926-0821.







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NOTICE OF INTENT TO APPLY

WAKULLA COUNTY
Wakulla County, Florida, Intends to apply for a Wa-
ter and Waste Loan/Grant form the U.S. Department
of Agriculture, Rural Utilities Service. The purpose of
the project is to extend a Sewer Force Main from the
Crawfordville City Limits North on U.S. Highway 319
to State Road 267 in Wakulla County, Florida. This
notification complies with the requirements of 7CFR
1780.19 (a).
Brian Langston, Wakulla Commission Chairman
3056 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville, FL 32327


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007-Page 15A;


Always Something New At Keep Wakulla County Beautiful


By MARJ LAW
Of KeepWakulla County Beautiful
If you've been to the Wakulla
County Public Library recently,
you've seen the large Keep
Wakulla County Beautiful (KWCB)
display over by the round tables.
It's three-paneled and self-stand-
ing to show off KWCB's recent
programs or events.
The first exhibits we put
up display volunteers working
at the Coastal Cleanup and
members, sponsors and award-
winners who came to KWCB's
Annual Meeting and Awards
Ceremony.
New and coming up this week
we'll change the exhibit by dis-
playing photos of KWCB's Holi-
day Lights Program. You'll see
the pictures of those who won
the contest in three homeowners
associations: Songbird, Audobon
Forest and Bridle Gate.
As Sheriff David Harvey has
often said: "A clean and beauti-
ful community is a safer com-
rmunity."
'This is why Sheriff Harvey
partners with us at Keep Wakulla
County Beautiful in so many
projects, and why he has given
us office space within his of-
fices.
SResidents show they care
about their community when
they clean up their yards and
puit a lot of thought into deco-
rating them to boost everyone's
holiday spirit.
Another panel of the ex-
hibit will show us at Household
Hazardous Waste Day. Certain
substances would be harmful
if placed into our landfill, so
we have a special roundup for
paint, solvents, fertilizers, acids,
and pesticides. We also picked
up fluorescent bulbs, batteries
and computer parts. Normally,
around 100 residents come to
a-Household Hazardous Waste
Day. On Jan. 20, 173 residents
came pouring into the driveway
of our public works building at
Trice Lane.
Cleve Fleming and ESG, our
county commissioners, Jefferson
County Solid Waste and KWCB
worked together to put on this
roundup. We were surprised and
pleased that so many people
took time out of their Saturday
morning to clean off their ga-
rage shelves and to bring their
old materials to Trice Lane for
proper disposal.
The Hazardous Waste panel is

Imagination

Library

Gets Going
SDolly Parton has partnered
with the Early Learning Coali-
tion of the Big Bend Region to
bring the Imagination Library to
children in Wakulla County.
_ On Friday, Feb. 2, the first
Wakulla County Imagination Li-
brary Advisory Committee meet-
ing was held. This committee
of community leaders from all
corners of Wakulla County came
together in support of starting
the train rolling for Wakulla
County's Imagination Library.
:'The Imagination Library is
a literacy initiative launched
by 'Dolly Parton in 1996 for the
diildren of Sevier County, Tenn.,
Dolly's hometown, as a gift of
encouragement.
All children under the age of
five can register for the Imagina-
tion Library. Once enrolled into
the Dollywood Foundation's
database, children will receive an
age-appropriate book delivered
to their home each month.
Dolly Parton's Imagination
Library is a free gift to the chil-
dren of your community. The
Imagination Library is made
possible through the generosity
of the community. As Dolly says,
"Across America the Imagination
Library is helping children to
"dream more, learn more, care
more, and be more."
The community leaders were
invited to attend the first Advi-
sory Committee gathering out at
the Inn at Wildwood in Medart.
A brainstorm session was held
to determine how to get children


registered and how to support
the $30 per year costs for chil-
dren registered from Wakulla.
The community leaders that
were able to attend this first
meeting are committed to mak-
ing sure that the children of
Wakulla County are able to get
on board, said Rue Luttrell, Com-
munity Outreach Director, Early
Learning Coalition of the Big
Bend Region. For information,
call John Hodge at the Early
Learning Coalition, 385-0551 ext.
310 or email him at jhodge@
elcbigbend.org.


a tribute to all those residents
who participated.
Now, are you collecting flip-
pies for us?
The Flippie Jar still resides at
the reception desk in the Sher-
iff's Office. Don't forget to pinch
off the pull-tab of your Coke,
Pepsi, or other soft drink can.
Aluminum in these "flippies"
will be sold to raise money for
the Ronald McDonald House.
This is the place where families
may stay for $10 per night when
they have a child in the hospital
for a long and serious illness or


accident.
Of all local organizations,
the Ladies of the Sopchoppy
Women's Club have collected
most of these flippies. You'd
be surprised at what a group
of determined women can dol
The Flippie Jar is an ongoing
program: one that unites KWCB
with the Sheriff's Office and
Rotary of Wakulla County.
KWCB doesn't work by itself.
KWCB brings parts of our com-
munity together for really good
programs that help everyone.
Stop by our display in the Li-


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brary. You'll probably see people
you know there.
Our goal is that, someday,


U

U
*

*

1


everyone in Wakulla County
will have been pictured on the
KWCB exhibit as they work


hard to reduce trash, promote,,,
recycling and beautify Wakulla,
County.


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Page 16A-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007


Social Gumbo To Help

Raise Funds For

Maritime Center


The Big Bend Maritime Cen-
ter (BBMC) will host a Gumbo
Social at the home of Diane
Delaney and Don Lesh.
The BBMC project is now
focusing on designing and creat-
ing museum displays and inter-
pretation for the Mini-Museum
in Panacea.
The Gumbo Social will be
held at High Point on Bay,
2489 Surf Road in Ochlockonee
Bay from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. on
Wednesday, Feb. 14.
The plan is to have the center
completed to the point where it
can be opened to the public by
late April.
It is located in commercial
space in the shopping strip on
Coastal Highway that will be
its home until the permanent
Maritime Center opens.
Curt Bowman, a maritime
museum consultant who worked
on the Strategic Plan for the
Center a couple of years ago,


will be at the Social as well.
All of the BBMC information
will be discussed informally at
the Social.


Woman Faces Attempted Murder Charges


A 54-year-old Crawfordville
woman was charged with two
counts of attempted first degree
murder in connection with a Jan.
21 two vehicle traffic accident in
Franklin County, according to
the Florida Highway Patrol.
FHP officials responded to


,V1awe ~yoi.,'
7W,07o


SFLL


ITr


a 7:35 p.m. accident on U.S.
Highway 98 in Lanark Village.
The investigation revealed the
Stephane Joel Horvath was
traveling westbound on the
highway and Gregory Wynot
and his passenger Lauri A. Ryan,
both of Eastpoint, were traveling


westbound on the highway.
Horvath, in an attempt to
end her own life, intentionally
drove head-on into Wynot, FHP
investigators said.
The State Attorney's office
in Apalachicola filed the two
counts of attempted second-de-


gree murder.
Horvath was taken into cus-
tody at her residence by the
Florida Highway Patrol and
was transferred to the Wakulla
County Jail, FHP officials said.
Troopers J.B. Woodward and S.T.
Wilson investigated the crash.


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Say You Saw It In The Wakulla News


9 To one of
9, the most special
human beings
we have ever known!!!
Thanks for
everything you do
to make our lives special!
Happy Valentine's Day!!!
With Hugs and Kisses,
Bert and Sully


9
WAV


Readers Share The Love Through
Valentine's Day wishes to the ones they love.


9, T...
The River is High...
The Music is Sweet!
Let this serve
to deliver a
"Happy Valentine"
With a jazzy little
Beat!
...L


9
VI


Joey,
Happy 12th V
Birthday!
Love.


9 Frankie,
Happy Valentine's Day
M.


My Valentines go out to
all the veterans,
military & families
for all they go through.
God Bless our law enforcement &
emergency personnel, volunteers
& families, they are always there for us.
With Wakulla growing as it has,
show new neighbors that this is
a county that cares for each other,
Through thick and thin.
Special Hugs & Kisses to Charles, Christy,
Grannie Tommie, Red, Agatha, Timmy, Lita,
Alan, Tina, all nieces, nephews, Aunts, Uncles,
cousins, neighbors, special friends & every
man, woman and child of Wakulla
this Valentine is for you!
Sheila Byrne May


9
Vy
,i


9 Mr. Awesome,
9 Happy Valentines Day
?


SFrom our first sunset
Until our last
Will you be mine
V^ My Valentine.



Rodger Wesley Beaver
January 10, 1988- V
February 14,2005 11
Remembering your gift of Love.


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F Happy Valentine's Day
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silly books: Molly, Alexa &
Camryn... Love, Daddy


Dylan, Emily & Harper -
Happy Valentine's Day
from your
"Old" Man 9"


Howard,
Thank you for yesterday,
today and always
For bringing me happiness right from
the start -
For giving me your heart and love -
For being so thoughtful in all that you
do-
For all our tomorrows whatever they
hold that will never grow old.
Thank you for 11 wonderful years.
I love you with all my heart.
Lovingly yours,
Your wife Linda Faye


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007


School


Robinson Wins Geography Bee


Seventh-grader Belle Rob-
inson won first place in the
Wakulla Middle School Geogra-
phy Bee held on Dec. 18. She is a
student in Derek Miller's history
class. Zac Broadway, a seventh-
grader in Terri Price's history
class, placed second. And Robert
Hunt, an eighth-grader in Kathy
Spivey's class, placed third.
The other participants were
Jeffery Miller, Cody James, Shan-
non Egler, Christian Payne, An-
thony Lanier, Kiersten Simmons,
Olivia Koppenaal, Mathew Phil-
lips, Morgan Kilgore, Delmesha
Calloway, Chelsea DiPrima,
Jeremey Robichaux, Kaylee Cha-
tham, Jasmine Casey, Logan
Swanson, Tylher Tillman, Alex
Broger, Tyler Metcalf, Kenyard
Coleman and Jacob Sparks.
Teacher Lori Sandgren coor-
dinated the event, and teacher
Joshua Sandgren served as the
master of ceremonies.
Robinson has a chance to
win a $25,000 scholarship from
National Geographic Society if
she can advance to the national
competition. The school-level


Lori Sandgren, Zac Broadway, Belle Robinson, Robert Hunt and Joshua Sandgren


bee is the first round of the 19th
annual National Geographic
Bee. Students are asked to


answer questions orally in the
first round of the competition
before a written exam is given


Two Wakulla County Teach-
ers, Margaret Callaghan of
Medart Elementary School and
Diane Driggers of Crawfordville
Elementary School, received
grants from the Air Force As-
sociation in support of their
efforts teaching student science,
technology, engineering, or
mathematics, according to Air
Force Association member and
Wakulla County Commissioner
Ed Brimner.
Callaghan and Driggers are
the first teachers from Wakulla
County to receive the grants and
were two of only 138 teachers
nationwide to receive these
competitive grants.
"I hope to see Wakulla Coun-


SCHOOL_

NOTES
Four-Day Weekend
Coming This Month
Wakulla County teachers will
have a teacher planning day on
Friday, Feb. 16, and students will
not have any school. In addition,
students will be off on Monday,
Feb. 19, in honor of Presidents'
Day.
School district staff members
who are 10-month, nine-month
and 9 1/2-month employees will
also be off on Feb. 19.
SThe fourth six-week session
of school will end on Thurs-
day, Feb. 22. Report cards from
the fourth six-week session of
school will be issued on Thurs-
day, March 1.

Education Group
Receives Math Grant
The Panhandle Area Educa-
tional Consortium (PAEC) has
received a $1.2 million grant
from the Florida Department of
Education to infuse technology
into middle-grades mathematics
education and prepare teachers
in the new methods of teaching.
Wakulla County is a member of
the consortium.
Principals will select two
math teachers who work with
grades six through eight to par-
ticipate in 12 days of training
provided by the FloridaLearns
Academy Math Experts (FAME)
grant. Teachers who complete
the training will receive a laptop
computer, math software and
other technology tools.
Belva Free, director of PAEC's
FloridaLearns Academy, and
project consultant Mona Ra-
meriz have brought in content
experts to write curriculum for
the training and to work with
grant participants during a two-
week summer session. They are
Dr. Elizabeth Jakubowski, Florida
State University; Dr. Steven Blum-
sack, Florida State University; Dr.
David Stout, University of West
Florida, and Dr. Lou Cleveland,
Chipola College.
"We are very fortunate to
have the support and assistance
of these distinguished math pro-
fessors from our area as content
experts and writers," said Free.
Principals have been encour-
aged to select candidates who
are new to mathematics, or who
have alternative certification.


ty teachers receiving grants
every year." said Brimner.
John Schmidt, president of
the Colonel H.M. "Bud" West
chapter of the Air Force Associa-
tion, announced the awarding
of Educator Grants of $250 to
four Leon and two Wakulla
county teachers.
The Educator Grants are
awarded to teachers nation-
wide for aerospace activities to
promote academic excellence in
math, science and technologies
in the classroom.
The grants can be used for
field trips to aerospace muse-
ums, Air Force bases, or other
aerospace facilities, to purchase
textbooks, software, videotapes,


simulators, and other aerospace
education instructional materi-
als.
Callaghan and Driggers re-
ceived a check from the Air
Force Association and have
been invited to attend the local
Tallahassee Chapter's dinner
meeting on Feb. 15 at the Ra-
mada Inn North.
Each grant winner will also
be presented a guest member-
ship in the Association.
According to its Web site,
the Air Force Association is an
independent, nonprofit, civilian
education organization promot-
ing understanding of aerospace
power and the role it plays in
the security of the nation.


Wakulla High School students
selected a topic that has been
covered during the school year
in teacher Teresa Murphy's social
studies classes and did basic
research before Christmas.
Students continued to re-
search during the holidays and
they made their visual presen-
tations during the break so
that they would have plenty of
time.
After returning from the
holidays, each student wrote
their report, practiced their oral
presentation, and wrote their
title page and bibliography. On
their due date, they gave an oral
report explaining their topic and
their visual.
Jay Egler did his on the Spar-
tan Military. His project was a
recreation of the armor/dress of
a Spartan soldier.
Lauren Gentry did her re-
search on the Oracle at the
Temple of Delphi. Her project
was a painting of the modern
ruins of this temple. Her project
was full of details about the his-
tory of this site and the legends
that surround the oracle.


to determine if the student
will advance to the state and
national competitions.

GET THE NEWS
DELIVERED
EACH WEEK!
Call 926-7102


JoLn 1Iw fot


ii7cT4U


Jay Egler gave a presenta-
tion on the Spartan Military.
Jaterrica Brown did her re-
search on the Parthenon, and
built a model of the famous site
in Athens.
Paul Murphy did his research
on the Valley of the Kings in
Egypt. He drew a very detailed
map of the area with key sites,
and even included the lesser
known area of the Valley of the
Queens.


oiptg'"


istro


ach16 V


(VaLLnkIn4E Zay

Begin your meal with a complimentary
appetizer and a glass of wine!
Then prepare your tastebuds for
an amazing dinner from
the new Bistro menu.
Reservations Suggested
926-1085
The Bistro at Wildwood 3870 Coastal Highway
r 9 ,

r ^ o O


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Section B


WHS Students

Bring History To Life


Teachers Callaghan, Driggers

Earn Science Education Grants


CLASSIFIED As Low As $7 Per Week!
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Page 2B-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007


People


1/ lHistorical Society


Plans Meeting,


Other Events


Members of the Wakulla County 4-H Horsemasters enjoy a taste of polo.


4-H Horsemasters Take On Polo


The warm north Florida
sunset brought a visitor from
California to Wakulla County
on Jan. 12. Wilbur O'Ferrall, an
instructor from the U.S. Polo
Association (USPA), visited the
county.
The Wakulla County 4-H
Horsemasters invited O'Ferrall
to introduce polo, a growing,
not-just-for-the-elite sport the
ancient game features horses,
mallets and a ball. The free
three-day clinic, made possible
through a grant from the Polo
Training Foundation, was held
at the Harvey-Young Farm and
enjoyed by 10 4-H youths with
an array of equine interests.
O'Ferrall's accommodation
. was provided by the 4-H Horse-
masters, thanks to another

Legal Advice
Returns To
Senior Center
Legal services will resume at
the Wakulla County Senior Cen-
ter. Richard M. Smith provided
free legal services in the Senior
Center for more than 20 years.
After his passing in July, 2006,
there have been several attor-
neys who occasionally provided
S* these services.
On Jan. 8, Jason David Winn
'began providing free legal ser-
vices to the senior citizens in the
Senior Center. He is scheduled to
Sbe available in the center on the
second Monday of each month
:in 2007.
Winn earned his law degree
::in 2000. His work experience
'began on Capitol Hill, where
he served as an intern and leg-
islative assistant for Sen. Bob
Graham and others. He later
moved on to work with Sen. Bob
Dole on his 1996 presidential
campaign. Following his time in
Washington, D.C., Winn gained
: extensive trial work as an as-
isistant public defender in the
: Central Florida area. He spent
-more than three years represent-
'ing those in need of assistance
: with criminal trial work.
After his return to Tallahas-
see in 2004, Winn worked for
the law firm of Clyde M. Taylor
Jr., and eventually opened his
own practice in 2006. He has
Since expanded his services to
include civil law matters, family
law, wills and trusts.
He is a member of the Florida
Bar, Tallahassee Bar, Legal Ser-
vices of North Florida, a lifetime
member of the state FACDL, and
vice-president of the local FACDL
chapter.
To schedule an appointment,
call Shelly Homan at 926-7145.

YOUR NEWSPAPER

PEOPLE

SERVING

t u.PEOPLE


(bt a 8509267102
(850) 926-7102


grant from the Wakulla County
4-H office.
The kids brought their own
horses quarter horses, thor-
oughbred, pony, and an Arabian
- English and Western saddles.
These same youths play soccer,
run track, and play basketball.
But polo, a strong team sport,
isn't soccer. O'Ferrall provided
videos, mallets, balls, team
shirts, and more than 20 years
of professional polo experience
as a former National Intercol-
legiate Champion.
During three basic lessons
the youths learned the concept
of "The Man." to prevent the
opponent from hitting the
ball or ride off the opponent;
understand the "Right of Way"
and don't foul by crossing the


imaginary line of other riders;
and understand the "Line of the
Ball" and follow the direction
of the ball.
After watching a polo video
introducing the game and learn-
ing some of the rules Friday,
Jan. 12, the youths got to have
some fun on Saturday, Jan. 13,
when they learned the basic
lessons while on foot. They
practiced four basic polo strokes
and how not to hit their "imagi-
nary" horse,
Sunday, Jan. 14, was filled
with practice, before a couple
of chukkerss" (the timed pe-
riod of play). "It was just as
entertaining for the parents to
watch their children learn and
play the sport on their beloved
horses," said 4-H Leader Tracie
aM- t -is


Churchard.
O'Ferrall expects to return in
the spring to check on the club's
progress. Anyone interested in
visiting Wakulla County 4-H
Horsemasters for a polo demon-
stration, or for joining or spon-
soring (the equipment cost can
grow quickly), please contact
the extension office at 926-3139
or Tracie Churchard (926-7985)
for more information.
Youths, especially high
school ages, may be interested
to know that the U.S. Polo Asso-
ciation has Intercollegiate and
Interscholastic programs. Please
visit www.polotraining.org.
Churchard thanked Harvey-
Young Farms for allowing the
4-H youths to use the farm
property.


The Wakulla County Histori-
cal Society will hold its regularly
scheduled meeting, on Tuesday,
Feb. 13 at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla
County Public Library. The pro-
gram will include a continued
review of the development of
eastern Wakulla County towns.
The speakers will be Esther
Ladd Woodward and Shirley
Raker Nelson. A descendant of
Daniel Ladd, who played a key
role in the development of the
towns along the St. Marks River,
Woodward will share memories
of her life in the area and stories
passed down through the Ladd
family.
Nelson, a descendant of the
Raker and Vause families of
Crawfordville, lived in Newport
as a girl when the shipyard was
active during World War II and
she will share a little book of
memories about those days.
The public is always invited and
welcome to attend all WCHS
meetings.
The society also reminds
all Wakulla families of a major
effort to create and have pub-
lished, The Heritage of Wakulla
County, FL. The second organi-
zational meeting will be held on
Feb. 22 at 6 p.m. at the Wakulla
County Public Library.


"We had a good turnout for
the first meeting and expect
most of those people to return,"
said Betty Green of the historical
society. "It is not necessary to at-
tend the meetings to contribute
to the book. Brochures will be
developed and distributed as
plans are made for the develop-
ment and sales of the book.
"We want every family that
lives here, or has lived here, or
who had ancestors who lived
here to participate in the con-
tributions to this book. We are
beginning with enthusiasm, but
know we have approximately
two years of work ahead of
us.
The Historical Society's Mu-
seum Thrift Shop in the old jail
behind the courthouse is open
on Saturday from 9 a.m. until
1 p.m.
Visitors may find a treasure.
All proceeds from this endeavor
are used to further the Society's
contributions to the cost of
completing the museum and
archives in the building across
from the old wooden court-
house.
"Some day this will be a nice
little corner for visitors as well
as local citizens to spend enjoy-
able time," Green concluded.


Mackin Honored

For Volunteer Efforts


Crawfordville resident Peggy
Mackin was recently selected
as Senior Citizens Volunteer of
the Year.
Mackin was recognized by
the Area Agency on Aging at
a luncheon on Jan. 25 at the
Holiday Inn Hotel and Suites in
Tallahassee. Janice Wise, execu-
tive director of the Area Agency
on Aging of North Florida pre-
sented the award.
She commended Mackin for
her service to the senior citizens
of Wakulla County. Mackin has
served on the board 20 years
and has served as board presi-
dent for the past 12 years.
She attends all board meet-
ings, is active in all fund-raising
events, and volunteers in the
senior center weekly. Our com-


munity is very indebted to her
for her service. In addition to
volunteering for seniors she is
actively involved working with
Habitat for Humanity and her
church.
She said she is so proud
of the accomplishments the
county has seen in the last few
years.
"We have a new senior center
that serves an increased number
of seniors," she said. "We hold
a golf tournament annually and
have a wonderful 'Christmas in
July' luncheon each year that
raises much needed funding for
our seniors."
Mackin will be recognized at
the annual Volunteer Apprecia-
tion Luncheon held in the Se-
nior Citizens Center in April.


I Pais- uros cee om


EON SCREENING

OB32582* CRC]327W "Seoing Talliahassee with Quality Work Since M976'


I Sesoa Roo PooEncosur


Spend Spring



for as little as


SAplies from Crawfordville Wal-Mart manager
School Aid 1Wayne Newell. Receiving the check are Cynthia
Wakulla Christian School was pleased recently Thompson and Jim Pound, as well as students
to receive a $500 donation for educational sup- from Wakulla Christian School.

I I


Garage Filling Up? Sell your stuff in the Classifieds.
As Low As $7 Per Week! ... Call 926-7102


-Break *

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195 per night.-


ira
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lil
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bars &
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4
golf courlss


on.
world


- Sandesfin,
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Off in our own little world"
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Convnlintly located on the Northwet Floia Gulf Coast. t,,
sandestin com/npt.asp 877.905,1,658


FKTRAo


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Oiff. adfd 31b/07 -4/21027 S*,j-of aaaat&Ao'ly D-m, Iat tkk famaw gma Da'r ,.h'dab6 rit 14 day. at ,,of


WAKULLA T

URGENT CARE

& DIAGNOSTIC
CENTER, PLC
opiie
AFENO & VEIG HOR


David Keen, M.D.


Now Accepting Primary Care

We Accept Most Major Insurance Including: Vista, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Medicare, Medicaid, Etc.
Walk-Ins Welcome
Please call for information (850) 984-3132
1325 Coastal Hwy., Panacea, FL 32346


I


Pakgeicldsdal bekas orto


I


I


,,








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007-Page 3B



Deadline 35 Cents

"onday Per Word


NoonCLASSIFIED ADS$.
926-7102 Minimum


Classified Advertisement in the news doesn't Cost It Pays and Pays and Pays


Legal Notice i


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 06-84-FC
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COM-
PANY IN TRUST FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE
CERTIFICATEHOLDERS FINANCIAL ASSET
SECURITIES CORP. SOUNDVIEW HOME
LOAN TRUST 2005-DO1 ASSET-BACKED-
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-DO1
PLAINTIFF
VS.
ANNA CLARISSA ZAMORA RASMUSSEN;
DEREK CLIFFORD RASMUSSEN; ANY AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC
REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.; JOHN DOE
AND D JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS
IN POSSESSION
DEFENDANTS)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
Jan. 8, 2007 entered in Civil Case No. 06-84-FC
of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in
and for WAKULLA County, CRAWFORDVILLE,
Florida, I will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at THE FRONT OF THE COURT-
HOUSE at the WAKULLA County Courthouse
located at 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY
in CRAWFORDVILLE, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on
the 15th day of February, 2007 the following
described property as set forth in said Sum-
mary Final Judgment, to-wit:
ALL THAT TRACT OF LAND SITUATE,
LYING AND BEING IN WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND BEING
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT AN IRON PIPE
MARKING THE SW CORNER OF THE
SE 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION
27 TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 2
WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DE-
GREES 00 MINUTES 40 SECONDS
EAST ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY
OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE WEST 1/2
OF SAID SECTION 27, A DISTANCE
OF 1772.97 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH
89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 40 SEC-
ONDS EAST 363.50 FEET TO AN
OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT ON
THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY
BOUNDARY OFTALL TIMBERS DRIVE
FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING
THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES
00 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUND-
ARY 143.62 FEET; THENCE RUN
NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES
. 06 SECONDS EAST 303.37 FEET;
THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES
03 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST
143.62 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE
MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH
89 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 06 SEC-
ONDS WEST 303.25 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
Any person claiming an interest in the
Surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pen-
Sdens, must file a claim within 60 days after
-the sale.
Dated this 9th day of January, 2007.
BRENT X.THURMOND
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: -s-Chris Gibson
Deputy Clerk
(Seal of The Wakulla County Circuit Court)
The Law Offices Of
David J. Stern, PA.
Attorney for Plaintiff
: 801 S. University Drive Suite 500
] Plantation, FL 33324
S-(954)233-8000
06-58975 (CWF)
Jan.18, 25, Feb.1,8, 2007


Legal Notice


NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT
TO CHAPTER 83, PART IV
Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Stor-
age Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83,
Part IV that Sopchoppy Mini Warehouses will
hold a sale by sealed bid on Feb. 12, 2007 at
10:00 a.m. at Sopchoppy Mini Warehouses,
Sopchoppy, Florida of the contents of the mini-
warehouse containing personal property of
JENELL CURLES
Before the sale date of Feb. 12, 2007 the owner
may redeem their property by payment of the
outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to
PO. Box 235, Sopchoppy. Florida 32358 or by
paying in person at the warehouse location.
Feb. 1,8,2007

Legal Notice

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 06-302-CA
CLYDE K. CARTER;
and DELORIS FORT,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
WILLIAM K. NORTON;
MARIA S. NORTON;
and WAKULLA COUNTY;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF.ACTION
TO: MARIA S. NORTON
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Tax
Deed Quiet Title to the following property in
Leon County, Flonda:
Lot 25, Block 32, WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT
III, as shown by plat of said subdivision of
Record in Plat Book 1, Page 43 of the Public
Records of Wakulla County, Florida
Wakulla County Parcel ID No. 00-00-043-010-
09189-000
has been filed against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on DANIEL E. MANAUSA, ESQUIRE,
SMITH, THOMPSON, SHAW & MANAUSA,
P.A., Plaintiff's attorneys, 3520 Thomasville
Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida 32309-
3469, no more than thirty (30) days from the
first publication date of this notice of action,
and file the original with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's attorneys or
immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will
be entered against you for the relief demanded
in the complaint or petition.
DATED this 22nd day January, 2007.
BRENT X. THURMOND
-. -By-sCrsGbo


By: -s- Chris Gibson
Deputy Clerk
(Wakulla County Circuit
Court Seal)
Feb. 1, 8,15,22, 2007


FRONT FOYER OF THE WAI
Selal ti COURTHOUSE at 11:00 a.m.
Legal Noticeof February, 2007 the following
I j__ erty as set forth in said Final


NOTICE OF SALE PUF
TO CHAPTER 83, PA
Notice is given pursuant to Fl
age Facility Act, Florida Statut
Part IV that Sopchoppy Mini V
hold a sale by sealed bid on F
10:00 a.m. at Sopchoppy Mi
Sopchoppy, Florida of the cont
warehouse containing person;
DANIEL DABNEY
Before the sale date of Feb. 12,
may redeem their property by
outstanding balance and cost
P.O. Box 235, Sopchoppy. Flor
paying in person at the warehc


Legal Not


Request For General Co
Building Contract
Residential Contrac
The Wakulla County Board o
missioners request that Contra
in performing repairs/rehabili
Wakulla County Housing De
at 11 Bream Fountain Road
Florida. Applications will be acc
p.m. February 9, 2007.
Contractors must be insured,
State of Florida license and ar
certificate required by Wakulla
form work within the County
debarred from working under
The pool contractors created b
bid on Wakulla County Housir
further advertisement. The V
Board of County Commissioi
time reserve the right to reject
or portions thereof.
All work to be funded by the
Program and the State Hou
partnership. All work will be p
cordance with state and local
guidelines set forth by the fun(


RSUANT
ART IV


LOT 27, WOODVILLE SO
II UNRECORDED, MOR
LARLY DESCRIBED AS F


uoria ael-oror- COMMENCE AT THE S
es, Chapter 83, CORNER OF LOT 8, BL
Warehouses will WOODVILLE SOUTH, A S
Feb. 12, 2007 at AS PER MAP OR PLA
ni Warehouses, RECORDED IN PLAT BC
ents of themini- 31., OF THE PUBLIC RE
al property of WAKULLA COUNTY, FL
THENCE RUN NORTH 8
39 MINUTES 26 SECC
ALONG THE SOUTHER
,2007 the owner ARY OF SECTION 20, T
payment of the SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST
by mailing it to COUNTY, FLORIDA, 2,3
'ida 32358 or by TO AN IRON PIPE, TH
house location. SOUTH 89 DEGREES 5
04 SECONDS EAST A
Feb. 1,8, 2007 SOUTH BOUNDARY 8.
THENCE RUN NORTH 0
30 MINUTES 56 SECO
ie 519.87 FEET TO THE
BEGINNING. FROM SAI
BEGINNING CONTINUE
DEGREES 30 MINUTES 5
WEST 278.21 FEET, TH
ntractors/ NORTH 83 DEGREES 2
ors 04 SECONDS EAST 709
actors THE CENTERLINE OF A
ROAD EASEMENT, TH
f County Com- SOUTH 23 DEGREES 20
actors interested SECONDS EAST ALONG
station work for TERLINE 60.79 FEET, TI
apartment apply SOUTH 29 DEGREES 30
, Crawfordville, SECONDS EAST ALONG
cepted until 4:00 TERLINE 203.57 FEET, T
SOUTH 07 DEGREES 09
SECONDS EAST ALONG
possess current TERLINE 47.66 FEET, TI
ly other license/ SOUTH 84 DEGREES 3
a County to per- 04 SECONDS WEST 807
'and cannot be THE POINT OF BEGINNI
Federal Grants.
iy this notice will TOGETHER WITH A MC
ng work without LOCATED THEREON AS
Wakulla County AND APPURTENANCE T
ners will at that
any and all bids A/K/A 48 WILLIE JENK
CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32
Weatherization Any person claiming ai
sing Initiatives surplus from the sale, if any
performed in ac- property owner as of the dat
I codes and the dens must file a claim with
ding programs, after the sale.


For further information, call Mr. Robin Dias at WITNESS MY HAND ant
(850) 926-6292. Wakulla County is an Equal Court on Jan. 11,2007.
Opportunity Employer.


Feb. 1, 8,2007


Legal Notice


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 2006-75-FC
HOUSEHOLD FINANCE
CORPORATION I1l,
Plaintiff,
vs.
WENDELL HARRELL, et al,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to
a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure
dated January 11, 2007 and entered in Case
No. 2006-75-FC of the Circuit Court of the
SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA
County, Florida, wherein HOUSEHOLD FI-
NANCE CORPORATION III, is the Plaintiff
and WENDELL HARRELL; DAWN LEIPERT
N/K/A DAWN HARRELL, ANY AND ALL UN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN
INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; BENEFI-
CIAL FLORIDA, INC.; are the Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at


M
PROPERTIES
(850) 926-9991


i.a*

Brenda Greg
Aaron Adams
980-0739 545-6058




L 14
I 1 \


Lisa Joe i14k.I
Council Cox eP
519-1080 728-0901








Kelly Ann Tim
Dykes Henson Hester
528-3063 519-1215 508-1452







David Richard Jack
Rossetti Ryan Seitzinger
591-6161 228-5688 567-5568


Br
Clerk of
By
(Seal of thi
Clerk of


Business Oppor


tunties I


Travel Agency, Full Service.
Alohatravelsandcruises.com
(850)514-9900.

Help Wanted


CDL Driver needed. Drug free work
place (850)519-7690.
Deisel & Equipment mechanic
needed with tools & transportation.
Roberts Sand Company Call (850)
627-4224. A drug free workplace.


Established Cleaning Company
needs full time cleaning help, must
have transportation. Call
(850)926-7919 leave message.
Full and Part-time Help needed. Fry
Cooks and Grill Cooks needed. Ap-
ply in person @ The Seinyard in
Woodville.


Penny McKinney, CRS
Broker/Owner
508-8929


Local Durable Medical Equipment
Co. seeking Medical Assistant, com-
puter skills a must. Great pay and
benefits, full time. Fax confidential
resume to: (850)926-9766.

Looking for energetic, enthusiastic
Licensed Real Estate Sales Associ-
ate part or full time, for our Crawford-
ville office. Complete training by ex-
perienced Broker will be provided.
Must be eat, clean, honest, reliable,
ethical, punctual, have your own de-
pendable car, basic computer skills,
and be a good speller..Must return
phone calls. Must be a non-smoker.
Call Carol Ann Williams, Broker, for
interview. (850)566-9293, evening
9850)9262811, office (850)926-1340
Coastal Gems Real Estate Inc.

Now hiring full or part-time real es-
tate agents. Call Othell Broger at
(850)878-5589. Broger Real Estate
Services, Inc.


December December
Top Producer Top Seller

IA December December
Top Lister Most Listings




.. I n.... C.
-~u


LOtt.
926-1010


Hoover
519-7944


LOtt
926-1010


uavia
Hoover
519-7944


Outside sales, restaurant equipment
commission and draw. Also inside
showroom mgr./ sales. Both must be
computer literate. Salary and bene-
fits. (850)984-0236.

Receptionist for Crawfordville office,
duties include answering telephone,
greeting clients and general clerical
responsibilities. Must have great cus-
tomer service skills, ability to handle
multiple tasks efficiently, and typing
and computer skills. Mail or fax
(850-325-2331) cover letter and re-
sume to H R Manager, 3520 Tho-
masville Rd. Fourth Floor, Tallahas-
see, FL. 32309

Repair Technician needed, will train.
Full time or Part time. Call
(850)668-4441 or apply in person @
Seminole Construction Supply
1709-D Crawfordville Hwy.

Riverside Cafe in St. Marks now ac-
cepting applications for experienced
short order cooks, preps and serv-
ers. Apply in person.
Sales/inside telephone, nation wide
material handling equipment. Must
be computer literate and mechani-
cally inclined, commission and bene-
fits (850)984-0236.


Service Technician for local Durable
Medical Equipment Co. Full time with
great benefits. Must be able to lift 50
Ibs. Fax confidential resume/applica-
tion to (850)926-9766.

The Inn At Wildwood is looking for a
friendly, mature person to fill a posi-
tion at the front desk. Computer
skills and a professional phone voice
are a must for this position. Inter-
ested? Stop in at The Inn at Wild-
wood, 3896 Coastal Highway and
ask for Jennifer. No phone calls
please.
WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL
BOARD VACANCIES: Wakulla
County School Board is accepting ap-
plications for instructional and non-in-
structional positions for the 2006-07
school year. Interested individuals
please call the job line at 926-0098 to
hear a recorded message regarding
all vacancies OR visit the WCSB web
site: www.wakullaschooldistrict.org to
view all vacancies and download an
application.

GET THE NEWS
DELIVERED
EACH WEEK!
Call 926-7102


KULLA COUNTY Firefighters
on the edp5thdr The Wakulla County Board of County
Judgment: Commissioners in conjunction with
IUTH PHASE the Wakulla County United Firefight-
E PARTICU- ers Association is seeking qualified
FOLLOWS: applicant's for full-time and flex-time
IOUTHEAST firefighter positions. Successful ap-
OCK "D" OF plicants will perform a variety of fire
SUBDIVISION
T THEREOF and rescue functions including but
)OK 2, PAGE not limited to extinguishing fires, en-
ECORDS OF
ORIDA, AND tering burning buildings to rescue
B9 DEGREES trapped occupants, extricating indi-
ONDS EAST viduals from wrecked vehicles, main-
OWNSHIP 2 training fire trucks and equipment,
T, WAKULLA conducting fire hydrant inspections,
325.29 FEET
IENCE RUN developing pre-fire management
i8 MINUTES plans, assisting with school fire
LONG SAID
06.96 FEET, safety presentations and other re-
i6 DEGREES lated duties and responsibilities. Will
) IN T OES work under the supervision of a paid
D POINT OF fire chief and will work closely with
SNORTH 06 volunteer fire chiefs and volunteer
56 SECONDS
HENCE RUN firefighters throughout the county.
29 MINUTES Applicants must be eighteen years of
.18 FEET TO
60.00 FOOT age, graduation from high school or
IENCE RUN equivalent, able to pass a medical
SAIDCEN7 physical examination, able to pass
HENCE RUN an endurance and agility test, be a
MINUTES 59 non-user of tobacco products for at
i SAID CEN-
HENCE RUN least one-year immediately preced-
MINFUTES 08 ing date of application, possess a
G SAID CEN-
HENCE RUN Florida driver's license, possess a
33 MINUTES State of Florida Firefighter II certifica-
.00 FEET TO
NG. tion and have at least three years ex-
perience as a paid and/or volunteer
DBILE HOME firefighter. Starting salary is $13.50
S A FIXTURE
THERETO per hour.
INS ROAD To apply, send a Wakulla County
KINS ROAD,
2327 application to Human Resources,
P.O. B ox 1263, Crawfordville, FL
n interest in the
y, other than the 32326. Applications may be obtained
:e of the Lis Pen- b visiting our website at www.mywa-
n sixty (60) days kulla.com or at the County Adminis-
trator's. If you have questions re-
d the seal of this guarding qualifications and/or duties
and responsibilities, you may contact
rent X.Thurmond Colleen Skipper at (850)926-0919.
the Circuit Court
the circuit Court Drug, alcohol and tobacco screening
Ss-Chris Gibson is required. Veteran's preference will
WakullaCounty be given to qualified applicants. Wa-
the Circuit Court) kulla County is an Affirmative
Fieb. 8, 15, 2007 Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.
Application closing date is February
... 28,2007.


Scott McKinney
Realtor
508-0707


(850) 697-9020


Ye 5re 'Nvaku fCa


Loren vv.
Joiner
544-3508


Debbie J.J.
Lewis Mahaffey
273-1030 933-8765


Julie
Cox-Money
591-2599


Bonnie Robin
Revell Ridley
519-1223 294-7966


Stephanie
Watson


Turner
Browne
510-9684







n
S Deanne
DelBeato
933-0120








Richard
Ridley
519-3378




AI


Alicia
Wellman
510-9662


Kim
Cieslinski
445-7798


Kathy
Crosby
694-1487


Roberts
570-5074








Allison
Wright
519-0916


6 ws OLS


984-5800

www.coastalshores.com
Ochlockonee Bay at the Bridge

Mary Shepard Broker/Realtor 528-0226
Alice Ann Swartz Broker/Assoc. 559-8979
Jacque Eubanks Realtor 228-3218
Glenn Eubanks Realtor 228-3217
Donald R. Smith Realtor 984-5477
Alicia Crum Realtor 984-0292
Merle Robb Realtor 508-5524
Tom Maddi Realtor 591-8415
Sandra Maddi 591-8442
Jodi Revell Vacation Rental Mgr. 984-0171

Call us for your Long Term and Vacation Rentals!

3BR/2BA home on Lucy. $825 Mo.
2BR/2.5BA Condo.$950 Mo.
3BR/2BA Mashes Sands, water view. $850 Mo.
2BR/1 BA Surf Road animal friendly $700 Mo.
3BR/2BA Gentleman Road, furnished. $1,000 Mo.
2BR/1.5BA Secluded $650 Mo.
W> 4


I


Arlo


AL A


k








Page 4B-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007


Help Wanted

Wakulla County
Board of County Commissioners
Planning and Community
Development Director
Readvertisement
The Wakulla County Board of County
Commissioners is seeking qualified
applicants for a full time position in
the Planning and Zoning Department.
The successful candidate will work
under limited supervision performing
supervisory and administrative work
directing and carrying out county poli-
cies and procedures relating to all as-
pects of Land Use Planning and De-
velopment Review. Typical work in-
cludes developing and managing the
long-range planning program, daily
zoning permits and development per-
mit applications, working with and ad-
vising the County Administrator and
Board of County Commissioners,
Planning Commission, and various
other County and governmental offi-
cials.
The director is responsible for the-
daily operation of the Planning and
Zoning offices and attends County
Commission and Planning Commis-
sion meetings and supervises the
staff necessary for planning related
information, the development of
needed regulations pertaining to
growth management and serves as
the Chairperson of the County Tech-
nical Review Committee, and en-
forces compliance with the Compre-
hensive Plan and Development Code
requirements. Candidate must be
computer literate and familiar with
internet research, work well with the
public and communicate clearly ver-
bally and in writing. A Master's de-
gree in urban or regional planning or
ICP registry is preferred with at
least three years of progressively re-
sponsible professional experience. A
combination of experience and edu-
cation may substitute for the educa-
tional requirements. Future certifica-
tion as an AICP may be suitable if
completed within two years of the hir-
ing date. Salary will commensurate
with experience and education.
To apply, send a Wakulla County ap-
plication to Human Resources, P.O.
Box 1263, Crawfordville, FL 32326.
Applications may be obtained by visit-
ing our website at HYPERLINK
"http://www.mywakulla.com"
www.mywakulla.com or at the County
Administrator's office. If you have
questions, you may contact the
County Administrator's office at
850-926-0919. Drug screening is re-
quired. Veteran's preference will be
given to qualified applicants. Wakulla
County is an Affirmative Action/Equal
Opportunity Employer. Opened until
filled.





A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING
Free Estimates
Licensed ~ John Farrell
926-5179
AAA CONSTANT COMFORT
Air cond. and heating, service and in-
stallation. Free quotes on new
equipment. Trane dealer. We fix all
brands and mobile homes.
926-8999. RA006672.
AIR-CON OF WAKULLA
HEATING & A/C
Maintenance & Service
Gary Limbaugh, 926-5592
FL Lic. #CAC1814304
3232 Crawfordville Highway
ALL PRO FENCE
Residential-Commercial
Fencing. 519-1416.

ANYTIME ELECTRIC
Specializing in repair and service,
residential and commercial, homes
and mobile homes. 24-hour service.
Mark Oliver, ER0015233. 421-3012.





"IT'S NO SECRET"
What's the secret to selling
your home and receiving the
rery best price possible? Well,
there is no secret-only research
and hard work.
: Some sellers price their home
based on their own purchase cost

Susan
Council


M-iLS. 'j

plus any improvements plus an
appreciation percentage for each
year they occupied the property.
Others base their price on need.
For example, financial needs for
buying or building a new home
may enter the equation. Others
may be considering college tu-
ition or medical bills.
Regardless of the financial
motivations, it is important to
understand that the right selling
price is the one that buyers are
willing to pay. It's really the buy-
ers who set the final sale price,
because until the buyers agree to
pay, there is no sale. Of course,


buyers cannot simply offer a low
price and automatically buy the
home even if it's the only offer.
The sellers must agree as well.
Always remember that a home
priced too high will not sell and
may even become "shop worn."
That is, buyers begin wonder-
ing why it hasn't sold or what's
wrong with it. With the assis-
tance of your real estate agent,
price your home correctly from
the beginning and you can start
packing.
Call me for any real estate
need--even a simple question!

Susan Council
(850) 251-1468
Broker Associate, RE/MAX Professionals
www.susancouncil.com


BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE
Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway.
Larry Carter Owner/Operator.
850-925-7931, 850-694-7041. Li-
censed/Insured.


Backhoe and tractor work, top soil,
fill dirt, gravel & mowing large or
small. Free estimates, 30 years expe-
rience.(850)926-2900 or 933-1118.
BRUSH CLEARING SPECIALIST
Loader work, food plots, land clear-
ing, oak firewood split and delivered.
For free estimates call
(850)445-4020.


CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION
Foundations, slabs, driveways, etc.
Stan Poole at 251-0189.
Dirt, rock, gravel, sand, etc. Stephen
(850)519-3965.
Driveways, culverts. Stephen
(850)519-3965.
Handy man Own truck & tools,
wood rot & painting. Wakulla area.
(850)519-6810.
HAROLD BURSE
STUMP GRINDING
962-6174















House cleaning no job to small.
Woodville and St. Marks area. Call
Wanda for free estimate @
(850)421-2741 or 591-9818.
KEITH KEY HEATING AND AIR
Commercial, residential and mobile
homes. Repair, sales, service, instal-
lation. All makes and models. Lic.
#RA0062516. 926-3546.
Land clearing. Stephen
(850)519-3965.
Mr. Stump
STUMP GRINDING
Quick Service
Cellular: 509-8530
MSR TRACTOR SERVICE, LLC
Free Estimates-Affordable Prices
421-7464 or Cell 508-5378


MUNGE'S TREE SERVICE
Professional Work-Affordable
Rates-Tree Removal & Trimming
Firewood & Stump Grinding
Fully Insured 421-8104
PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Residential/Commercial
Pressure Washing
Billy Roddenberry
962-4271


PORTER PAINTING, LLC
Residential/Commercial, New Con-
struction. Remodeling. Soft
Wash/Pressure Wash. Licensed and
Insured. Free Estimates. Worker's
Comp. Certified. (850) 519-0416.
Radical Car Care Specializing in
Japanese makes and models and
American models. Call
(850)877-5860.


8 ,S Reliable
Re-Roofs New Metal Potch
Maurice Herndon
Over 20 Years Experience
(850) 962-2437
or (850) 528-3487
Lic. #RC0066773
REVELL WELL &
PUMP REPAIR
We stock water pumps, electric mo-
tors and parts. Complete installation
and repair services. 962-3051.
ROBERT TAYLOR LLC
(850)528-4824 mobile, (850)
984-1024 after 6 p.m. Decks, hand-
rails, steps, siding, woodrot repair,
int/ext painting, finish'trim (base, 1/4
round, shoe molding, chair rail,
crown molding), fire and water dam-
age.
Vision Home Builders, Inc.,
Specializing in custom built homes
and additions. Office: (850) 926-1294
fax: (850) 926-1890 visionhomebuild-
ers@earthlink.net Lic# CBC1254992

Items For Sale

$150 Queen Pillow-Top Mattress Set.
New in plastic with warranty.
(850)222-9879.
Cherry sleigh bed SOLID WOOD-
BRAND NEW IN BOX, $250.
(850)545-7112.
For Sale Roll top desk $75, Blue
wing-back chair $35, old glassware,
pictures, coffee makers, jewelry, tea-
pots, etc. The Consignment Shop in
Linda's Beauty Salon.
(850)926-7686.
HABITAT RE-STORE
Abundance of bedding, sleeper so-
fas, interior/exterior doors,
windows/screens, fiberglass shower
units and light fixtures. Open Tues-
day thru Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
940 Shadeville Hwy. (Hwy. 61),
926-4544.


HARTUNG AND N'v z
, NOBLIN, INC. Your Perfect Partner
V REALTORS for Real Estate! i

OPEN HOUSE
V) LOGANS RIDGE
S SATURDAY AND SUNDAY February 10 & 11
FROM 12 P.M. TO 3 P.M."
The "ORCHID MODEL"
NSj, New Construction with
-' fully landscaped, split plan.
i -* *.. fireplace, on paved roads,
One car garage and separate
dining room. This is a VERY
V'1 ATTRACTIVE floor plan, and
we have several other homes to
choose from. Many are built and
(^ ready to move into today. Come and take a look at our subdivision
Today. If you have a buyer that needs IMMEDIATE OCCUPAN-
'iCY we have the home. #162981 $166,500
Marsha Hampton 445-1934 S on 319 L on Lower Bridge
C Rd. R on Rehwinkle L on Homan Point to homes

i. Beautiful 3BR/2BA ..
1,176 sq. ft. Home '
on Dickerson Bay. ..
spectacular panoramic
views in a private set-
ting. Huge screen porch,
outdoor shower, hur-
Sricane shutters, new roof .-,.
and many more updates.
Close to shopping centers.
#162392 $749,900 Call for lease purchase options.
Dawn Reed 294-3468 or Joi Hope 210-7300

cj Bring All Offers! Move
NN in ready 3BR/2BA with
split floor plan, open
and bright interior,
spacious rooms, large
walk-in closet in mas-
ter, carpety and ceramic
,j tile, ceiling fans, side
.door to outside from kitchen to patio and a cozy front
X 'porch for those lazy fall evenings. Excellent qual-
C.ity construction! 39 Melody also available! #152770 C
_ $144,900. Call Kai at 519-3781 for more info.


Are you thinking about buying a house?
Call us, while interest rates are still low.




[. w850-926-2994 Phone 850-926-4875 Fax
REAOn www.coldwellbanker.com MIS.


KING PILLOWTOP Mattress Set.
Brand new in plastic. Must move,
$225. (850)222-9879.
LEATHER SOFA & LOVESEAT. NEW,
warranty, sacrifice $795. (Can de-
liver). (850)425-8374.
Let me sell your stuff on E-Bay
(850)926-8315 or (850)322-0979.


NEW King POSTER bedroom set -
bed, dresser, mirror, chest, 2 night-
stands. $4400 value, must sell
$1650. (850)545-7112.
SHEDS 1 8'X9', metal, MH Door 2
windows, s. rock and insulation. 1
8'x10' wood w/vinyl siding DBL
metal roof, 36" steel door, 1 window.
1 8'x14' built as a front porch, 36"
steel door, 2 windows, metal roof.
$450, $550, $650 (850)544-7053.





Antiques and Uniqfes
"Something for Everyone"
61 Rose Street, Sopchoppy
sistersantiquesanduniques@yahoo.com
850-962-2550
Open Wed.- Fri. 6 p.m.
Saturday 10a.m.- 6 p.m.


U


A Free Press
Your Key
To Freedom


Shell Point 926-7811
Crawfordville 926-5111
Wakulla Station 421-3133
Panacea at the Bridge 984-5007


EMCKINNEY


1 PROPERTIES


Starting at $89, 900




" -, m* ".

2bon't Mliss Mis ';

(Chance Of 4 Lfetimel

Call me About sit 7mne
Aomebuyets ProgamsI

Penny 9'lcinney, CiS [R

(850) 508-8929 -


CLASSIFIED As Low As $7 Per Week!
Call 926-7102


T. Gaupin, Broker



Florida Coastal Properties, Inc. / Silver Coast Realty
Each Office is Independently Owned & Operated
www.c21fcp.com www.silverglenunit2.com
c21scoast@aol.com (e-mail) c21fcp@aol.com (e-mail)


THE COASTAL WAY OF LIFE CAN BE YOUR WAY OF LIFE!

2nd TIER ON ALLIGATOR POINT! View of Gulf, deeded easement, short
walk to sandy white beach! Build here and live the dream! #203F1 MLS#150616
$285,000

HOUSE BEAUTIFUL! Nearly 2,000 sf in the desirable new subdivision THE
FARM has 4BR/2BA, lots of upgrades, deluxe master bath, fireplace, screened patio,
oversized 2-car garage, and much more! #1307W1 MLS#145065 $249,900

LIKE A ROCK! Concrete 3BR/2BA with 2,020 sq. ft. on 2+ acres is built to last!
Screened porch, LR/DR/FR w/FP, and more! #2202W1 MLS#139088 $255,000

GIGANTIC! Top line Palm Harbor DWMH has vaulted ceilings, luxury master
suite, ceramic tile and spacious family kitchen. Close to downtown Tallahassee,
but a nice rural atmosphere where you can get away from it all. #2226L1
MLS#158593 $109,900

NICE BUILDING LOT IN AREA OF NEW CONSTRUCTION ON
TAFFLINGER! #2261W1 MLS#157038 $20,000

CHARMED, I'M SURE! Adorable 3BR/2BA home with 1,572 sq. ft. completely
renovated with hardwood floors throughout, distinctive archway defining living
room, all appliances, large screened porch, carport & shop. ALL YOU NEED!
#2263W1 MLS#163886 $165,000

MYSTERIOUS WATERS! Woodsy setting surrounds 3BR/2.5B home on .87
(mol) acre in community with private boat launch on Wakulla River and park.
Nearly 2,000 sq. ft. #2401W1 MLS#143205 $230,000

OYSTER BAY! Spectacular views everywhere you look! Custom 2BR/
2BA, nearly 1600 sq. ft. with loft. That once-in-a-lifetime place! #2701W1
MLS#146814 $850,000

PANACEA MINERAL SPRINGS! Beautiful wooded lots in fast-growing
coastal area near beach, gulf, great fishing. #2811W1-#2814W1 MLS#140927
$49,900 each.

TOWN HOME LUXURY! Beautifully appointed residence decked out with
the best upgrades includes canal boat slip and amenities of gated Snug Harbour
community. Stroll or golf cart ride to the sandy white beach of Shell Point.
#3701W1 MLS#139880 $449,500

SPRING CREEK! Wooded "old Florida" lot in fishing community is perfect for
your new home. Walk to fishing & restaurant. #4102W1 MLS#161780 $36,000.

i*1 le [,11 L[ [) IAhd 'O ~ l F"lll [ ]
A!l~ t]' ~i i|s* l~lqtl q6f


~I









THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007-Page 5B


Items For Sale

THRIFT STORE
4360 Crawfordville Hwy
(850)926-2900
Bassinet, Highchair, Smoker, Raleigh
Pursuit mountain bike, lateral filing
cabinet, washer and dryer.


USED FURNITURE STORE
4360 Crawfordville Hwy
(850)926-2900
Cherry entertainment center, formal
Italian dining set, chest of drawers,
bunk bed, a canopy metal frame bed
2 matching maple twin beds.


Home Appliances


Used vacuum cleaners, most like
new, many brands, prices start at
$25 Call 508-8778.

Building Materials


Pair of Craftsman 1/2 HP garage
doors, top panel light, remote, hard-
ware, all included. $1000. 926-7431.

Misc. for Sale

Log cabin
KOA-type, 12x16, excellent condi-
tion. $7,700 call 556-4441.


Machinery Tools & Equip

John Deere Riding mower, 91 hours,
$975.00. (850)926-5180.

Pets


Adopt a pet from the shelter:

DOGS:
Dachshund mix, longhaired
Pekingese mixes
Lab mixes
Cocker Spaniel, older
Chihuahua mixes, older
German Shepherd mix
Many other nice mixes. Come and
take a look.

PUPPIES:
Lab mixes, 4 mo. old

Adult cats and some kittens.

Adoption fees include a deposit for
spaying or neutering and rabies vac-
cination. Come see us at #1 Oak
Street, next to the sheriff's office.
Shelter Hours: Tues. Thurs., 10
a-m.-5p.m., Fri. and Sat., 10
a;m.-4:30 p.m. Closed Sun. and
Mon. (850)926-0890 www.chatofwa-
kulla.org

Yard Sales


Garage Sale 664 Woodville Hwy.,
Sat. 8 a.m. 2 p.m.
Their trash, your treasure at the Old
Jail Museum Shop, High Drive,
across from Old Wooden Courthouse
Saturday 9 to 1.
Yard Sales, Fri. -Sat. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
135 Burnt Pine Loop, 538 Port Leon
Dr. St. Marks. Look for signs and bal-
loons.

Card of Thanks


The Family of Vicky Nelson Smith
would like to thank everyone for their
acts of kindness during our loss.
Your thoughts, visits and prayers are
truly appreciated.
Thank You,
The Crump, Thomas and Nelson
Family

Lost and Found

REWARD
Lost male Boxer, tan & white. Lonnie
Raker & 267 area. (850)926-6446 or
(850)294-7091.


Real Estate, Homes,
Mobiles

What an opportunity Large brick
home with fireplace, in ground pool,
workshop, barn & more on nearly 4
acres withHi 319 frontage The
possible 806,000
Lana Sell Your highway
froo boat
I, House
T on the date of your e
S choice. At a fair price ee
B without doing any

$9 Call me NOW!
Enjoy 926-2100 nal
f r o n t h e d t o e r e d
h www.homesellersdepot.com p
porch patio
room, work al a wall all
at a reduced priceT6D7,500
Panacea Mineral springs! Several
lots to choose from in fast-growing
coastal area! $74,900 each.

Acreage for Lease

For Lease. 7 cleared lots at 98 and
Tully.
(614)268-7109 or
happycamper9@columbus.rr.com for
aeriel.

Acreage for Sale

Picture-perfect 5 ac. is ready for
new home. Private, quiet, fenced w/
mature hardwoods. Ideal for children,
horses. 30 mins. to coast or Capitol;
2 mi. to Crawfordville. Must see.
137K (850)893-0686.

Commercial Property for a
Rent

1,074 sq. ft. Retail Store Front for
Rent in Lewiswood Center, Wood-
ville. Growing area, convenient to
Wakulla and Leon Counties.
421-5039.


GRADE A

OFFICE RENTAL

$400 a month plus tax

Includes Utilities

And

Full Kitchen Use

Call Edna at 339-0511











Lic. Real Estate Broker
Crawfordville Hwy.
(850) 926-7043
(850) 926-2898 Fax
www.Forestrealty@earthlink.net
NORTH CRAWFORDVILLE
HIGHWAY 319
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY
1.21 Acres w/151 ft. on highway.
Older mobile home, storage bldg.
and pole barn. "AS IS" $275,000.
FISH COVE SUBDIVISION New
home located just off Ochlockonee
River, 3/4 Acre Lot. 3BR/2BA, wood
flooring in Living/Kitchen/
Dining, large screened porch,
parking below, screen
room/storage. $299,000.
SMITH CREEK SOPCHOPPY
33.60 -Will Divide, wooded, con-
venient to the Apalachicola National
Forest. Priced at $6,000/acre.
SOPCHOPPY Walking distance
to the River in an area of homes
w/acreage, 3BR/2BA Mobile Home,
1,990 SF, large porches on front &
rear, barn/pole barn &
workshop. 8.8 MOL. $200,000.
SOPCHOPPY RIVER GET-AWAY
Cozy Cottage high and dry, 200
ft. on the scenic river w/dock. 2BR/
2BA, needs some work, new porch &
deck overlooking river. $130,000.
TRADEWINDS SUBDIVISION LOT
25 New subdivision w/custom built
homes located on Ochlockonee Bay
w/paved roads, clubhouse & pool.
Lot comes with boat slip. $259,000.
MASHES SANDS COASTAL HOME
Custom built 3BR/2BA on canal
with boat ramp. Many extras, great
entertainment home. Storage build-
ing, concrete below for boat and
cars. $575,000.


Mini-Warehouse Spaces for lease,
8X10 and 10X12 now available.
Come by or call Wakulla Realty,
926-5084.
Professional space on Crawfordville
Hwy, near Walmart. 1,030 sq. ft.
Available now. Beautiful building. 3
yr. lease $1,287.50 a month, plus
prorated real estate taxes, sales
taxes, security deposit, 1st & last
months. (850)877-9229.

Homes for Sale


3BR / 2BA Spacious Modular Home
on DOUBLE lot, appraises as site
built, split floor plan, garden tub &
master bath, beveled glass in entry
way, wood storage shed 36
Shar-mel-Re Lane $138,900 call
(850) 519-7950 to schedule showing.
By Owner 1515 sq. ft. Completely
renovated with new stainless steel
kitchen appliances, huge master
suite with bath, wooburning fire
place, screened in back porch on 1
acre lot, fenced back yard, 12x24
utility building 179,500
(850)926-9828.
Gorgeous New 3BR/2BA 1,400 sq. ft.
Home built with insulated concrete
form technology, generator back-up
system, tankless water heater. Walk-
ing distance to 150 ac. Lake Ellen w/
private Boat Ramp. Developer will
pay $5,000 closing cost. 100% fi-
nancing. $159,900 37 John David Dr.
Call. (850)443-3300.
Spacious
3BR / 2BA
Modular Home (on DOU-
BLE lot), appraises as
site built, split floor plan,
garden tub in master
bath, beveled glass in
entry way, wood storage
shed 36 Shar-mel-Re
Lane $138,900 call
(850)519-7950 to sched-
ule showing.

Mysterious Waters-custom home, 3
years old 3BD/2BA on wooded .92
acres. Access to community boat
launch, dock and park. $279,000.00
(850)510-3527.


Land Lots & Homes
Real Estate, Mortgages, Property
Mgmt, new Construction. N FI Office:
(850)556-6694 or 877-477-SOLD
Crawforville, Fl: 850-926-6994
Featuring the Following Properties
"FOR SALE"
BEACH LOT IN FRANKLIN
COUNTY
Bald point, Fl, short drive to Tallahas-
see. One lot from Gulf of Mexico,
quiet and peaceful community next
to State Park $325,000
HOME IN HAVANA WITH 2.8
ACRES
3BR/2B, 1 car garage, 2.8 acres,
screened porch, fireplace, storage
shed, appliances included $224,900

****OPEN HOUSE SAT 2-5 PM****
BIG LOT AND HOME IN SONG-
BIRD
98 Meadowlark -- 3BR/2B, 1 car ga-
rage, 1,200 sq ft, built in 2004, huge
fenced lot, enormous covered
porches, Culdesac, $184,500

1937 FORGET ME NOT TRL
3BR/2B, MH, 1512 sq ft, built in
1987, above ground pool with new
liner and water pump, updated stove
and refrigerator, $90,000

Houses for Rent

2 BR, 1 Bath house $475 a month
$500 deposit, no pets.
(850)509-4388


2BR / 2.5BA townhome on Ochlock-
onee Bay. $800 unfurnished. $900
furnished. No pets/No smoking. Och-
lockonee Bay Realty: (850)984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com

2BR/1BA Bayview Cottage on Och-
lockonee Bay! Newly remodeled.
$600/month. (850)984-0001.

2BR/2BA furnished home on Alligator
Point. $1300/month. 1 year lease. No
Pets/ No Smoking. Ochlockonee Bay
Realty. (850)984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com


106 W. 5th Ave.
Tallahassee, FL 32303
222-2166 tel.
222-7102 fax no.


**New Subdivisions**
All subdivisions have under-
ground electric and water.
Walkers Mill $69,900
2 ac. wooded lots, located on
Lower Bridge Road.
Steeplechase $94,900 to
$109,900.
5 ac. wooded tracts. Horse
friendly!
Sellars Crossing $65,900
1+ ac lots in North Wakulla.



Bookkeeping

Services
specializing in
SMALL

BUSINESSES
Accounts Payable/Receivable
Payroll & Sales Tax
878-3237












Ak;"E$1GN.e;%\'4'RS
926-2211
North Pointe Center

YOUR NEWSPAPER
PEOPLE
SERVING
Ak PEOPLE


(850) 926-7102a
(850)926-7102


187 Beechwood Drive
Crawfordville
Large 3BR/2BA home located
on a county paved road, with a
large workshop nestled on 5.3
beautiful acres. Located just
off the Shadeville Hwy.
$249,900.


Appealing 2-acre
lot located in
Wakulla Forest
Subdivision.
Located near
the best of
Wakulla County's
recreation
activities & an
easy commute to
Tallahassee.
$63,900.


Carol Ann
Williams,
I Llcw. Real
Estate
Broker
"--. 566-9293

12,000 sq. ft. Commercial Build-
ing, Hwy. 319, Crawfordville
Hwy., 1-1/4 acres, next to library,
South of Crawfordville, good
highway frontage. Building has
two sides in which to easily op-
erate two businesses, clear span,
great retail space. Only $799,000.
Come See or
Call Carol Ann at
3295 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, FL
926-1340
84 Tallahassee St. Carrabelle, FL
566-9293
www.coastalgems.com


Gorgeous 5 acre tract with paved
road frontage.
This would make a beautiful home
site. Property could possibly be
subdivided. Close to downtown
Crawfordville. Just minutes from
schools, coast, & Tallahassee.
$175,000.


Great Fixer-upper!
3BR/2BA DW lo-
cated on 2.5 secluded
acres with paved road
frontage and beauti-
ful hardwoods. Con-
veniently located
close to schools,
shopping, coast, and
Tallahassee. Shown
by appointment only.
$79,000.


**63 Mohave Rd.**
Ranch Style 3BR/2BA
Home located in
Wakulla County.
1268 Sq. Ft. with an
adjoining lot. Master BR
has 2 closets with an over-
sized tile shower in Master
BA. Kitchen appliances
and blinds included.
Builder will pay $1,500 on.
closing costs. $139,900.


Call Donna
508-1235


.Avalon Construction Group, Inc.

OVIAZ 16 N FARS EXPE.10FM F

(850) -5 19-3422

RESIDENTIAL CONINIFRCIAL
NE.WCONSTRI CTION RENMATION'

FORA ot.XITI-) BI IIJ- 110\1F?
CALL ME! MIKE D.A\ IS, CERTIFIED lit ILDIMI ( ONTR Mp
LK EW i4 II( 12,;2;90









Page 6B-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007


Houses for Rent

2BR/2BA on Alligator Point!
$850/month-requires first and last. 1
year lease. Ochlockonee Bay Realty.
No Pets/No Smoking. (850)984-0001
www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com
4BR/2BA home in Medart.
$800/month $500/security-requires 1
year lease. No pets / No smoking.
Ochlockonee Bay Realty.
(850)984-0001 www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com
FOR RENT 2 Bedroom, 1.5 Bath,
fenced yard. Available Now, $695.00
month. Call Tami @ (850)556-1396.
For Rent, 2 bedroom 1.5 bath. Great
yard/carport. $795 month Available
now. Call Tami @ (850)556-1396.
Furnished cottage Crawfordville
2BR/1BA, Liv/Din area, kit. W/D,
CHA. No pets/smoking $600 + dep.
(850)926-2293.
Rental Surf Rd. next to boat ramp,
3BR/2BA home. Perfect for room-
mates, Mother-in-law suite down-
stairs. Fenced yard w/pool and serv-
ibe included, no smoking, no pets in-
Side. $1250.00 a monthlst and last,
security deposit. (850)567-3315 or
(850) 984-3263.
liew house, 2BR/2BA, 1,054 sq. ft.,
$750/month in Wakullla Gardens on
Comanche. (850)528-3692 or
(850)528-1867.
Land Lots & Homes LLC
Real Estate, Mortgage, Property
Mgmt, New Construction N FL Of-
f.ce: (850)556-6694 or
877-477-SOLD Crawfordville, Fl:
850-926-6994
Featuring the Following Properties
"FOR RENT"
Adams Place 3000 S Adams St.
3BR/3B. appliances included, com-


munity gym, pool, free cable/high
speed, and theater. Great for stu-
dents, individuals lease available for
$425 or $433.33. Price for unit
$1275 (unfurnished) or $1300 (fur-
nished).
Woodbriar Townhomes on Fred
George Rd.
Huge 3BR/3B Townhomes, all appli-
ances included, close to TCC/FSU.
Great for students, professionals,
and families! Individual lease avail-
able starting at $1100-$1200
House By The River
Great 2B/1B in Mysterious Waters,
$775/mo. or 6 mo lease. Walk to
river, boat ramp, private dock and
park, new appliances, washer/dryer,
new carpet, new paint/ Fenced on
.44 acre

Land for Sale

Cheapest 1 acre lot in Lanark. 1/4
mile from the Gulf. $72,000 call
George @ (850)653-7635.
TIME IS RUNNING OUT
Buy my 1/2 acre lot zoned for MH /
Houses on paved Rd., partly fenced
w/other extras before impact fees &
septic fees go up! Call my Realtor
@(850)570-9214 to see this beautiful
lot by appointment only. $55,000
(neg.)
Mobile Homes for Rent

24X48 3B/R 2 bath w/Jacuzzi tub.
No pets allowed. Garbage & water
furnished. "All Electric" Talquin De-
posit $400.00 and $700.00 monthly.
Located off E. Ivan Rd. References
Required. (850)926-1428, leave mes-
sage on answering machine.
2BR/2B Mobile home n 1.95 acres.
No pets, No smoking. $625/mo. plus
$625 deposit. Blue Water Realty
Group (850)926-8777.


83 Kathy Ann Drive, 2BR/2BA SWMH
with front porch, screened back
porch, utility room, storage shed on 3
acres. $700 mo., $400 security de-
posit, 1st / last months rent
(850)528-2289. No indoor pets, no
smoking.
For rent off Sopchoppy Hwy. 3BR
(+office) 2BA. Call Everett
(850)926-3544, (850)570-0213.
Mobile Homes for Sale

For sale by owner 24x60 doublewide
trailer on two beautiful wooded
acres, $109,000 (850)926-7876.


Lake Ellen. DWMH for sale. Deck,
fenced yard, dishwasher, CH/A.
owner to assist with closing cost.
656-8252.
Mobile Homes w/ Land forS
Sale
2,000 sq. ft. MH on 2 acres near the
high school. $95,000 OBO. AS IS.
Evalee 545-6704.
Rooms for Rent/
Roommates
Room for rent flex/lease. Separate
entrance on the River in Mysterious
Waters, 75.00 a week.
(850)926-7538.
Weekly Rentals Available,$175-$200
per week, wireless internet, Panacea
Motel,(850)984-5421.
Wanted to Rent

WANTED: Furnished house in wa-
kulla to rent for summer months.
Need to escape alligator point.
(850)566-8874.

Say You Saw It In
The Wakulla News


Schools and Instruction

Art Lesson, 6.00 hr. Call Win Conger
@ (850)926-7874 Tue. and Thur. no
experience necessary. Drawing pas-
tels oil acrylics, portraits an minia-
tures.
Michelle Snow's
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Piano-Voice-Guitar-Strings-etc.
926-7627


BAY SPRINGS MOR TGA GE SER VICES

926-9105
WWW.BAYSPRINGSMORTGAGE.COM
"HOME REFINANCING SPECIALIST"
HOME EOUITY LOANS ARM CONVERSIONS REVERSE MORTGAGES


Bobby Smith Brandon Strickland
Loan Officer Loan Officer
bsmith@bayspringsmortgage cor brandon@hayspringsmortgage corn


Kenny Glover
Loan Officer
kenny@bayspringpmortgage cor


BANCPLUS HOME MORTGAGE CENTER INC.
-.-


CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: i926-
. MacCLEAN 92
WATER TREATMENT Don't Make A Move Without Us!
SYSTEMS 94 We Can Show You
Any Property Listedl
LEASING SI R
SALES& SERVICE RO PE RTI ES Marsha Misso, Broker
SCOMPLETE LINE 3BR/2BA... on 7 acres, Hwy. 98 frontage...$475,000 Re-zone Commercial?
OF EQUIPMENT Lot... in Wakulla Gardens, TEC water,
3BR/2BA Fenced... Rezone Commercial... Off 319... $159,000
Panacea... 2BR/1.5BA Cottage... $119,999
WE SOLVE JUST ABOUT 5 Lots in Panacea... Call for pricing
ANY WATER PROBLEM 3BR/2BA... Remodeled... FEMA Foundation... $124,000... Coastal
926-8116 www.flsunproperties.com 1E
.- .... 2747 Crawfordville Hwy. marshamisso@msn.com


WE.KiAV/ING






FREE CHECKING
Call or come by for more information on how you and your family members can join!


Open: Monday, Tuesday
Thursday & Friday 9 am 5 pm
Wednesday 11 am 5 pm
Located in the North Pointe Center


576-8134 WAKULLA
*p press 3 ,.CREDIT UNION SERVICES
press An office of Tallahassee-Leon Federal Credit Union


Debi Cad -ATMAcces Hme anin


laling in meI zu U Starting in the 190's www.TurnerHeritage.com
Heritage Homes Realty of Tallahassee, Inc. and Heritage Homes Realy representing Tuer Heeritage Homes, Inc.


Florida Big Bend


Green Living & Energy Expo



March 17


8 a.m.


-5


p.m.


Riversprings


Middle School

800 Spring Creek Hwy.
Crawfordville .


SPONSORS:

* The Wakulla News Mama and Baby Love
* Simpler Solar Talquin Electric Cooperative
* 3W Studios Natural Awakenings Magazine
* New Leaf Market Apalachee Tortoise
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* University of Florida Florida Yards & Neighborhoods Program

FREE admission to educational workshops, children's activities,
vendors and exhibitors, light bulb exchange (bring an incandes-
cent bulb and get a free compact fluorescent while supplies last!),
silent auction, door prizes, and so much more...

Discover hundreds of the best products

and services that promote sustainability


UFT~IA
SI PA 'n


Find ways to create

a simple, healthy life!

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The institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity-Affirma-
tive Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only
to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national
origin. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICES, UNIVER-
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