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Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00054
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Creation Date: January 12, 2006
Publication Date: 1969-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00054
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
    Main: Comment and Opinion
        page 2
    Main continued
        page 3
    Main: Church
        page 4
    Main: Community
        page 5
    Main: People
        page 6
    Main continued
        page 7
        page 8
    Main: Business
        page 9
    Main: School
        page 10
    Main: Sports
        page 11
    Main: Outdoors
        page 12
        page 13
    Main continued
        page 14
        page 15
        page 16
        page 17
        page 18
        page 19
    Main: Classified Ads
        page 20
        page 21
    Main continued
        page 22
Full Text

4/1/2006
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 S.M.A. UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
P.O. BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE, FL 32611


Don't Feed The Alligators
See Page 12


Business
See Page 9


Appraiser's Budget Not Settled
See Page 3


Ceremony

Will Be Held

To Honor King
A service commemorating the
birthday of the late Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. will be held at 6:30
p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15 at Thess-
alonia Missionary Baptist Church
in the Hyde Park community.
, Dr. Osefield Anderson, Profes-
sor Emeritus, Department of
Mathematics at Florida A & M
University, will be the main
speaker.
Dr. Anderson received a Ph.D.
in mathematics from The Ohio
State University in Columbus, OH
and served as professor of math-
ematics at FAMU for more than
40 years. He is a lecturer and
speaker known throughout Flor-
ida and the nation,
The church is located at 223
Triplett Road. The service is open
to the public.

King Holiday

Will Bring

Closings
The 2005 holiday season has
concluded but much of the
Wakulla County workforce will
receive a three day weekend as a
result of the Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr. holiday next week.
Federal, state and county em-
ployees will observe the holiday
Monday, Jan. 16 while King's
birthday is actually on Jan. 15.
School students will have their
first day off from school since
returning to the classroom fol-
lowing the Christmas holidays.
The school board has moved
its meeting from Monday, Jan. 16
to Tuesday, Jan. 17 at 5:30 p.m. in
order to avoid a conflict with the
holiday. The county commission
has moved its meeting from Mon-
day, Jan. 16 to Tuesday, Jan. 17 at
6 p.m. A workshop will begin at
5 p.m.
Local banks, post offices, the
health department, the county
landfill and the Wakulla County
Public Library will be closed Mon-
day, Jan. 16 to observe the holi-
day.
The Wakulla News office will
be open for business as usual.

Lawhon To

Face Heart

Surgery
A Dec. 26 hunting trip into the
Wakulla County woods nearly
turned tragic for Wakulla County
Commission Chairman Maxie
Lawhon.
The 51-year-old veteran com-
missioner began to feel pressure
in his chest while enjoying the
outdoors. After relaxing against
the side of his vehicle and feel-
ing better, Lawhon said he felt
more pressure in his chest a short
time later.
"I didn't have any of the clas-
sic symptoms of shooting pains
down my arm," he said of his
Christmas holiday heart attack.
"It just felt like someone was
standing on my chest."
After returning to Sopchoppy,
family members administered
oxygen and aspirin which medi-
cal personnel in Tallahassee said
saved his life.
Lawhon was hospitalized for
three days and returned to the
hospital Thursday, Jan. 5 to dis-
Please turn to Page 16

Inside

This Week
Almanac..................... Page 13
Business..................... Page 9
Church Page 4
Classifieds............... Page 20
Crossword Puzzle........Page 20
Outdoors. Page 12
People..... Page 6
School Page 10


Published
Weekly,
Read Daily


Sopchoppy

Will Consider

Compromise
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
Of The Wakulla News '
It was standing-room only at
the Sopchoppy City Commission
meeting this week, with more
than 50 residents there to speak
on the continuing issue over
whether alcohol sales should be
allowed at Backwoods Pizza.
After two hours, the city com-
mission voted to move ahead
with a compromise that might
give Backwoods a temporary per-
mit to sell beer and wine while,
the city. moves forward with a
June referendum to give voters
the final say.
City commissioners voted last
month, 4-1. not to allow the pizza
restaurant to serve beer and wine
for on-site consumption.
At the meeting on Monday,:
Jan. 9, city commissioners voted
4-1 to hold a special meeting on
Tuesday, Jan. 24 to discuss spe-
cial conditions for allowing Back-
woods to temporarily sell alcohol
through June. In February, the
city commission would vote on
whether to go forward with the
conditional use.
The proposed referendum
would be set for June 13.
Backwoods owner Robert
Seidler sjid he would agiee tod
abide by the results of the refer-
endum, no matter which way it
goes.
The idea for the compromise,
the temporary sales and referen-
dum, was suggested by attorney
Mike Carter, who was at the
meeting in support of the restau-
rant.
Backwoods has been closed
since the Dec. 12 vote. Plywood
was tacked up: over the plate
glass windows of the historic
downtown building, which
opened in 1912 as a pharmacy
and was restored several years
ago by partners Seidler, Nelson
Martin, and Dr. Dave Pearce.
The partners had worked with
the city commission for some
time on revising the city's alco-
hol ordinance, which kept Back-
woods from selling beer and
Please turn to Page 16

Glenda's

Zoning Will

Not Change
Wakulla County Commission-
ers will not be taking up the re-
zoning request at Glenda's BP in
the Riversink community in the
near future. On Tuesday, Jan. 3,
Assistant County Attorney Donna
Biggins told board members that
a year must pass before the issue
can be addressed again.
At the Dec. 19 board meeting,
commissioners asked County At-
torney Ron Mowrey to give a le-
gal opinion whether a board
member could bring the matter
up a second time and perhaps
change his vote. On Dec. 5, the
board voted 3-2 to deny the re-
zoning request which was frorni'
Agriculture to C-2 commercial.
Commissioner Howard Kessler
questioned whether Robert's
Rules of Order allowed Commis-
sioner Ed Brimner to discuss the
request a second time. Brimner
said he acquired more informa-
tion since the first vote was taken
and wanted to address Marvin
McKenzie's request again.
Attorney Biggins said the
Wakulla County Land Develop-
ment Code does not allow the
commission to bring the rezon-
ing up again.
"No public body of Wakulla
County shall thereafter take any
Please turn to Page 14


Our 111th Year, 2nd Issue Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006 50

Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Cents


nfl'


-'r j.


Congressional Visit

Congressman Allen Boyd was in Crawfordville on
Tuesday, Jan. 10 to hear a report on local storm
readiness from Emergency Management Director
Joe Blanchard and County Commissioner Ed
Brimner. Boyd expressed concern that certain
storm projects, especially those from 2004, had


I


been abandoned by FEMA alter the number or
storms in '2005 and the extent of damage stretched
the agency's resources. The congressman, who
returns to Washington later this month, heard
from Blanchard on the need for more state and
federal funding for emergency management and
homeland security. Boyd toured the area to see
the recovery of storm-damaged coastal areas, as
well as the damage from a recent tornado in
Crawfordville. (Photo by William Snowden)


Century Park Project Is Stopped


A final platapplicatioh request
for a Crawfordville commercial
subdivision was issued a. stop
work order Tuesday, Jan. 3 after
Wakulla County Commissioners
expressed dismay at the way the
property was clear-cut.
Century Park, formerly Annie
Square, was submitted by agent
Kathy Shirah for owner Steve
Brown and Annie's Square, LLC.
The 14.70 acre, 15 lot parcel, is
located on the west side of U.S.
Highway 319 near McCallister
Road and Bob's Transmissions.
Before board members could
put a motion on the floor, Com-
missioner Ed Brimner said the
parcel was improperly clear-cut
and burned. He added that de-
velopers could have saved some
trees on the parcel and asked the
board to issue a stop work order
until the applicant meets with
the county to discuss remedial
activities which must include
new plantings.


, Perhaps the developer and
-engineer can get together with
the planning department and fix
the property," said Brimner. "This
is unacceptable." Commissioner
Brian Langston seconded the
motion.
"It's a good project," added
Brimner. "It's,a shame it's being
pursued in the way it is. I don't
know what the proper remedial
process will be."
Agent Kathy Shirah said the
project did not violate any Wa-
kulla County ordinances. "I take
full responsibility for the clearing
, of those lots," she said. "It (clear-
ing) is necessary for engineering
purposes and drainage."
Shirah continued that "new
construction is very shocking"
but the upscale project will in-
clude curbs and gutters on the
streets, sidewalks, architectural
controls and landscape require-
ments.
"There were trees out there


that could have been left.," said
Brimner. "It really shouldn't be a
problem when we get together
(to remediate)."
"I didn't think it was an issue,"
Shirah responded. "I don't believe
the (planning) process was ig-
nored."
Wakulla County Community
Development Director Donnie
Sparkman said his office began
to receive calls about what was
happening at the parcel when the
clearing began. "By the time we
got up there it was too late and
the trees were gone," he said.
Brimner said that developers
cannot clear-cut commercial sub-
division lots. "There needs to be
some serious remediating,"
Brimner stated. "We are abso-
lutely decimating Crawfordville
Highway."
Shirah responded that she re-
cently led the development of
The Villas at Covington Park
Please turn to Page 22

',.,.:.. s .


Pnoto Dy Lynaa mnsey
Miller, Kelly, Taylor, Musgrove, O'Donnell, Mohr, Alexander, Thomas And Spivey


Teachers Of The Year Announced


Superintendent David Miller
and some of his staff announced,
the school-level 2006 Teachers of
the Year on Dec. 9. Surprising the
teachers with flowers and bal-
loons, Superintendent Miller re-


ceived enthusiastic responses
from students as he entered each
classroom: to present the honor
to their teacher.
The seven Teachers of the Year
for 2006 are: Renee Kelly, Craw-


fordville Elementary; Brooke
Mohr, Medart Elementary;
Patricia Thomas, Shadeville El-
ementary; Bill Taylor, River-
springs Middle; Katherine
Please turn to Page 16


Sheriffs Report........... Page 19
Sports................... Page 11
Week In Wakulla......... Page 2


I I I I


I I


- III'I I I I 1 I


City Agrees To

Concessions

At Sprayfield
By KEITH BLACKMAR
Of The Wakulla News
Wakulla County Commission-
ers approved a Wakulla Springs
water resolution Tuesday, Jan. 3
that makes demands on the City
of Tallahassee and the way the
city operates the Southeast
Sprayfield.
But, before the resolution
could be sent to Tallahassee, city
officials agreed to make some
concessions at the sprayfield in
an effort to reduce the nitrogen
threat to Wakulla Springs.
Tallahassee City Manager
Anita Favors Thompson an-
nounced that the city will remove
all cattle that have grazed on the
property and eliminate the use
of fertilizer at the sprayfield by
June 2006.
"We are announcing these
steps to help put to rest the con-
troversy and concerns raised by
the Wakulla County Commission,
other governmental entities, and
local citizens," said Thompson.
"We are ardent supporters of
Wakulla Springs and our commis-
sion has committed from the be-
ginning that if our wastewater
system is part of the problem,
we'll be a part of the solution."
"The purpose of the proposed
city action is to be proactive and
in the best interest of the region-
and specifically our friends in
Wakulla County," said Tallahas-
see City Commissioner Debbie
Lightsey. "The city is taking due
diligence with this proposal de-
spite the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection not re-
quiring such actions. We want to
assure Wakulla County and inter-
ested parties of our good inten-
tions to negotiate in good faith.":
Tallahassee officials are in the;
middle of getting the sprayfield;
re-permitted by the state and'
Wakulla County officials want to'
be considered an affected party;
in the process.
Commissioner Howard Kessler,
said the county water committee
worked on developing the reso-
lution for 1 1/2 years. He said the
Please turn to Page 14

Local Man

Wins $10,000

From Store
A Crawfordville man was given
$10,000 by the Winn-Dixie gro-
cery chain as part of Winn-Dixie's.
Better Holidays Daily Cash Give-
away Sweepstakes Thursday, Jan..
5 in Tallahassee.
James Lee received his cash
award from Winn-Dixie Store Di-
rector Sam Henderson at the Paul
Russell Road store.
By shopping at Winn-Dixie
during the sweepstakes period
and using his Customer Reward
Card, Lee was entered into the
drawing for the prize.
Lee, a former school bus me-
chanic who no longer works due
to an illness, said the cash award
was "a blessing." He added that
the money will go toward "bills
that need to be paid and on a well
that needs to be turned on."
Lee accepted and unwrapped
an oversized $10,000 bill from the
grocery chain and Winn-Dixie
associates offered him a toast
with cider poured into cham-
pagne flutes.
"I can hardly believe this." said
Lee. "I am so thankful to Winn-
Dixie and to the Lord for this
blessing. I have not even told
some of my family members yet
because I was afraid it was not
true. I surely will tell them now.
Please turn to Page 22


lmiiwpo -









Page 2-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006



Comment and Opinon

Established In Wakulla County In 1895



Thanks For Commitment To Protect Springs


Editor, The News:
The Wakulla County Board of
County Commissioners (WCB
OCC) has performed a commend-
able task in their adoption of
Resolution 06-02. The resolution
sends a clear message to the City
of Tallahassee that because their
wastewater facility and spray-
field are responsible for the vast
majority of the nutrient loading
occurring in the Wakulla River,
action from the city is necessary
ini order to restore Wakulla
Springs.
-,It also conveys that Wakulla
Springs is of vital and central
importance both economically
arid environmentally to the area
at:large; it's worth extending well
beyond the county's borders. For
these reasons, the resolution
demands several actions be
taken by the city including:
:1. operating the sprayfield pri-
marily as a wastewater treatment
facility and not as a for-profit
farm:
S2, operating the farm so that
no increase of nitrogen loading
occurs to the background ground-
water;
3. immediately eliminating
commercial fertilizer being ad-
ded to the sprayfield:; ,
4. immediately removing all
cattle from the sprayfield, and
afny feed grown at the sprayfield
be fed to the cattle off-site where
doing so poses no threat to the
groundwater that feeds Wakulla
Springs;
',5. only applying a quantity of
wastewater to the sprayfield that
the soil can absorb;
6. wastewater not be applied
to: the sprayfield during periods
of high rainfall when the soil is
saturated.
The Friends of Wakulla Springs
State Park, Inc. supports the
WCBOCC's resolution. In the past
several years, Wakulla County
has watched the quality of the
spring's water and its dependent
biota decline substantially. Al-
though we recognize that there
are other contributing factors to
this decline, the preponderance
of evidence points to the Talla-
hassee Southeast Sprayfield as
the most likely and the most
controllable of the contributing
sources.
i Strong, specific language must
be incorporated within the terms
of the permit renewal of the

Backwoods


wastewater facility and the asso-
ciated sprayfields, which estab-
lishes, as the central goal, the
reduction of nutrient compounds
which enter into the groundwa-
ter. This includes the prohibition.
of applications of residuals/
biosolids in the Wakulla Springs
Basin.


As our organization was cre-
ated to serve and protect Wakulla
Springs State Park, the Friends
share the love for the spring and
concerns for its health. The pur-
pose of the Friends is to support
the protection of the park and
the spring for future generations.
We thank the WCBOCC for their


commitment to further protec-
tion of the spring and ensuring
its well-being in perpetuity.

Della Parker-Hanson,
President
Friends of Wakulla Springs
State Park, Inc.


City Is Not To Blame For Problems


Editor. The News:
I would like to share my views
with your readers concerning the
recent Sopchoppy City Commis-
sion denial of a beer and wine
license to the Backwoods Pizza
Parlor.-
The city commission is not to
blame under any circumstances
for Backwoods having to go out
of business. The reason Back-
woods went out of business is
,because of inconsistent food
quality and bad service. Back-
woods had "years" to get it right
and this business simply failed.
Our little town was as excited
as the then owners were when
the renovation started and was
completed. But the food and ser-
vice, over the years, failed to
meet up with the inner beauty
of this building.
Backwoods had the area to
themselves when Moms shut
down and Sandbanks, structur-
ally. was being completed. This
was a period of over a year. Be-
ing the only restaurant in town,
it sputtered and missed a really
perfect opportunity to strive.
Again, with inconsistent food
quality and hours,, the business
was failing.
Not enough business to sur-,
vive? Not so. Anybody having
trouble believing this need only
to drive by Sandbanks any week
day between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.,
any weekend, and most eve-
nings. The parking lot is full.
There has been such an increase
in local patronage that mobile,
sidewalk cafe has survived. Both
have survived by.applying simple
rules to their business good
food, good service, and accept-
able prices. It's that simple.
When the city commission of
Sopchoppy denied the Back-
woods request for the beer and
wine license, they did exactly
what they were elected to do -
they voted the minds of the

Decision


Seems Short Sighted


Editor, The News:
; We were very disappointed'to
read of the Sopchoppy City
Commission's vote turning down
Backwoods Pizza's request to
serve beer and wine. The argu-
mnent that allowing the sale of
beer and wine for on-site con-
stimption would lead to an in-
crease in drunk driving seems
weak at best.
Indeed, it seems that this
would have given management
the responsibility to control the
amount of alcohol consumed. If
the commission were true to its
convictions it would move to
prohibit the sale of alcohol
within the city limits, period.
I It seems very short sighted of
the city commission to preclude
the sale of beer and wine at Back-
w:oods Pizza, It should be the
duty of the city commission to
encourage a diversity of respon-
sible businesses to thrive in


town and the jobs that come
with them.
If the commission is inter-
ested in growth it should not
limit the opportunities of busi-
nesses unless it can demonstrate
with more than a presumption
of effect that granting the request
would have a negative effect on
the city.
We will miss Backwoods Pizza,
and/while we enjoy our remain-
ing restaurant, we do not look
forward to the drive to town
when we have a taste for some-
thing different. I hope that, if
given the opportunity to revisit
this issue, the commission will
give the business, be it Back-
woods or someone else, a chance
to demonstrate their ability to
manage the responsibility before
they condemn them,
Nathan and Nancy Lewis
Sopchoppy


Letters
people who voted them into of-
fice. And all these people live
within the city limits. And we
simply said, "No."
If that group of elected offi-
cials had approved Backwoods'
request, most would be gone the
next election. My main message
and reason for this letter: Get off
and stay off of the backs of the
Sopchoppy City Commission.,
They listened to and spoke the
minds of the residents of Sop-


choppy and enforced the aged
contents of the city's charter.
Age old politics has it that if
you are losing the game, change
the rules. And even that attempt
couldn't save Backwoods. What
a, beautiful, beautiful building.
And what good people operated
it. But the business failed. It is
that simple. And if it takes chang-
ing the rules to stay in the game,
it's time for the player to leave.
I am not happy that Back-
woods failed. I am, however,
happy that I will not see drink-
ing on both sides of the streets
and on the sidewalks again. Yes,
this did happen and on a regu-
lar basis and being witnessed, no
doubt, strongly shaped the opin-
ions that doomed any local sup-
port that they could have hoped
for.
The body and soul of Sop-
choppy that drew me and my
family here? Sidewalks that are
rolled up at dark and school
buses that stop in front of my
house. That is my Sopchoppy.
Selah
Neal Walker
Sopchoppy


Thursday, January 12, 2006
BINGO will be held at VFW Post 4538 in Ochlockonee Bay from 6 to 10 p.m.
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB meets at Posey's Up the Creek in Panacea at noon.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at 12 noon. Speaker will be Karen DeRosier,
prevention education coordinator for the Epilepsy Association.
ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION meets at city hall in St. Marks at 7:30 p.m.
WOMEN OF THE MOOSE meet at the Moose Lodge in Panacea Plaza at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, January 13, 2006
BLOOD DRIVE will be held at the Wakulla County Sheriff's Office from 11 a.m. to 3
pm To schedule a time, call Major Larry Massa at 926-0821.
COMPUTER CLASSES will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p,m._
PICKIN" "N'GRINN1N' JAM SESSION will be-held at the sefiibrtenter from 10m'tl'm
noon. (Also on Tuesdays.)
SPELLING BEE, sponsored by The Waiulla News, will be held at Shadeville' Elemen-
tary School at 9:30 a.m. Contestants will include fourth through eighth graders
from district schools.
Saturday, January 14, 2006
ALZHEIMER'S SUPPORT GROUP meets at the Ameris Bank in Crawfordville at 10 a.m.
BINGO, sponsored by the Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Post 4538. will be held at the post
in Ochlockonee Bay at 6:30 p.m.
CHURCH SING, to celebrate the 48th anniversary of Thessalonia Missionary Baptist
Church, will be held at the church at 6 p.m. Performers will include Febe and the
Chosen Ones. New Jackson Singers. Carl Joseph and the True Tones.
FIRESIDE CHAT will be held at Wakulla Springs State Park at 8 p.m. Florida folklore
and lodge legends will be told in front of a crackling fire. For information, call the
park at 224-5950.
Sunday, January 15, 2006
MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. SERVICE to commemorate the slain civil rights leader, will
be held at Thessalonia Missionary Baptist Church in the Hyde Park community at
6:30 p.m. Dr. Osefield Anderson of Florida A&M will be the speaker.
Monday, January 16, 2006
MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. HOLIDAY -- Banks, government offices and schools will be
closed.
Tuesday, January 17, 2006
BOOK BABIES, a program for children up to 3 years old and their parents, meets at the
public library from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
\ BOOK BUNCH. a program for elementary school age students, meets at the public
library from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
COUNTY COMMISSION meets in the commission boardroom at 6 p.m. A workshop
on the county administrator will be held at 5 p.m.
DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP meets at the health department at 6 p.m. Guest speaker
will be Ruth Bowden from Winners Weight Loss.
THE GATHERING, a program for high school students, meets at the public library
from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
HOMESCHOOLERS and stay-at-home preschoolers meet at Wakulla Springs State Park
playground from 1 to 5 p.m.
MOOSE LODGE #2510 meets at the lodge in Panacea Plaza at 7:30 p.m.
SCHOOL BOARD meets in the school administration building at 5:30 p.m.
YOGA will be offered at the Dancing with Miss Denise studio at 7:30 p.m. For infor-
mation. call 926-4293 or e-mail della.parker@earthlink.net.
Wednesday, January 18, 2006
AA meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.
BIG BEND HOSPICE will present a program on their services and answer questions at
the senior center at 11 a.m.
BOOK BUNCH, for pre-school children, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior citizens center at 10:30 a.m.
CINEMANIACS, a middle school film studies class, meets at the public library from 3
to 5 p.m.
MEDICARE MASTERPIECE representative will be at the senior center to answer ques-
tions at 10 a.m. For information or an appointment, call Universal Health at 671-
3680.


wants to rectify the perception
that they make the rules as each
BOCC meeting progresses.
I can support any decision
made by a board that follows the
rules even though that decision
is contrary to my personal de-
sires. It has been very difficult
to support past decisions made
when negative votes were re-
scinded, Wakulla Code and/or
Florida Statutes were ignored
and decisions were made con-
trary to the will of the majority
of the people,
Again, good work Commis-
sioner Lawhon and Attorney
Mowreyl Please keep it up.
Jimmie Doyle
Crawfordville


Editor, The News:
SIt is with great pleasure I con-
gratulate BOCC Chairman Law-
hon for not letting the motion
to rescind a negative vote go for-
ward at the Dec. 19 county com-
mission meeting.
County Attorney Mowrey also
is' to be congratulated for his
support of Robert's Rules of Or-
der. I feel sure all the commis-
sioners appreciate Attorney
Mowrey's detailed explanation
of the proper procedure to fol-
low with respect to rescinding/
reconsidering a prior motion.
My hat is off to the full board
of commissioners and to the
county attorney. It is my prayer
this is an indication this board


Rotary of


Wakulla County's

Annual


VALENTINE



CELEBRATION

Hudson Park

Saturday, February 11

8 a.m. ~ Breakfast

10 a.m. ~ Parade

11:30 a.m.
Entertainment & Music
Arts & Crafts
Food Booths
Carnival Rides

3 p.m. Drawing
First Prize $1,ooo Winn-Dixie Shopping Spree
Second Prize $500 Winn-Dixie Shopping Spree


Festival Vendors call Doug Jones 926-9685 .
Parade Participants call Vic Culley 510-3592 5
U. ; m aaIN *I


Sae aulla _etoP 3
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POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O.
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Editor 1976-1987: William M. Phillips
Publisher 1976-1989-: Marjorie H. Phillips
Publisher: Wakulla Publishing Company
Ediior Stacie Phillips
s i; .-". .,ManagingEditorE-:Shannon Phillips Joiner
Reporter: Keith Blackmar
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WEEK IN WAKULLA


..,Wl% urh~F9





THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006-Page 3

Property Appraiser, County Still Need To Address Annual Budget


Four months into the 2005-
2006 budget year, Wakulla County
Commissioners have still not
settled the question of how much
money Property Appraiser Anne
Ahrendt will receive in her bud-
get.
The property appraiser and her
budget officer, Brad Harvey, are
still operating off the $906,513
budget approved in late Septem-
ber. However, the board initiated
an appeal of Ahrendt's budget
after a deadline to approach the
Florida Department of Revenue
passed during the late summer.
At the Tuesday, Jan. 3 board
meeting, Wakulla County Admin-
istrator Parrish Barwick asked
board members to put a budget
reduction request in writing for
Chairman Maxie Lawhon to sign
and send to the state.
The commission is seeking a
reduction of approximately $19,000
of Ahrendt's budget. The reduction
includes the cost of a vehicle and
money not needed to pay for
employee health insurance ben-
efits.
Ahrendt said she has not
agreed to a reduction of her bud-
get and her office legal counsel
has filed a motion to dismiss the
appeal with the state Division of
Administrative Hearings.
Commissioners said during
the hearings in September that
they were concerned with the 32
percent increase in the property
appraiser's budget. However,
Ahrendt said the large increase
was the result of the creation of
needed positions and equipment.
The property appraiser's budget
represents five percent of the
$16.1 million general revenue
fund. Ahrendt noted that the per-
centage of the budget pie the
property appraiser's office re-
ceived has not increased in the
past two years.
The property appraiser, despite.
not being appointed by Gov. Jeb
Bush to replace the late Ronnie
Kilgore until'May, met the June 1
deadline for submitting a budget
to the state Department of Rev-'
enue, (DOR). The DOR was given
until July 15 to approve the bud-
get and the state met its dead-
line by cutting Ahrendt's requests
by $65,000. Budget Officer Harvey
said he created a line item bud-..
get which gave the state justifi-..1,
cation for every financial request
that was made. o'. "
The county commission had
until Aug. 15 to appeal the bud-
get to DOR but failed to do so.
The budget issue has since gone
to: the governor and cabinet sit-
ting as the Administration Com-
mission.
On Dec. 14, representatives of
DOR met with Ahrendt, Harvey
and staff member James Burke,
Commissioner Ed Brimner and
Assistant County Attorney Donna
Biggins to discuss the stalemate.
The question of the $19,000
reduction was addressed. Harvey
said he is required to submit his
budget to the state two months
before officials find out how
much of an increase will be
needed to cover employee health
insurance costs. To cover the an-
ticipated expenses, Harvey used
a 10 percent increase figure. The
figure turned out to be $4,876
more than needed.
Ahrendt said the truck issue
stems from office vehicles that
are getting old and do not serve
the needs of the office. She is
hoping to purchase a larger ve-
hicle to take staff to training ses-
sions without having to send
multiple vehicles. Ahrendt said
her office is faced with the prob-
lem of retiring two old trucks
while also addressing the 1999
GMC Yukon that was used by
Kilgore as his personal vehicle.
Ahrendt said she decided not to
drive the large, aging Yukon when
she took office.
Commissioners have also dis-
cussed the possibility of using
one cent local option sales tax


Take A Kid
Fishing


collections to fund the office
since growth has created some of
the needs such as new comput-
ers that are capable of running
mandated software.
Ahrendt added that her staff
is falling behind in keeping up
with the workload because of
county growth, a shortage of staff


Yellow
Onions
3 LB. BAG

5/$5


and a lack of equipment. In the -
meantime,/the county commis-
sion has never formally given the
property appraiser a specific line
item to reduce in the budget.
Vice Chairman Howard Kessler
said the issue was not included
in the Jan. J agenda and should
not be addressed until it was on


e agenda. In addition, Chair-
an Maxie Lawhon missed the
meeting due to illness. Kessler
suggested Barwick and other
commissioners construct the bud-
aget reduction request for the
board to consider at the Tuesday,
sJhn. 17 meeting.
-' With work to create the new


tax roll underway, Ahrendt and
her staff are getting ready to
move to the renovated Florida
Department of Children and
Families building on U.S. High-
way 319.
The office is nearly ready as a
telephone system, inside office
doors and a counter are still to


be finished for Ahrendt. She said
she hopes to be in the new of-
fice by Feb. 1.
Supervisor of Elections Sher-
ida Crum received an extension
of a state mandate to be in the:-
office by Jan. 3. She is expected
to move to her new location by
mid-January.


BOSTON
BUTT PORK
ROAST


*1


J I Z- Ja nuar
--(-o-r
p Pp 6 606 6]L 0~j ^^H^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^0


Fresh 'N' Easy
Garden Salad
LB. BAG

4/$5


Golden Ripe Fresh 'N' Easy
Dole Bananas Coleslaw
LB. BAG
390 LB .'
5/$5

Florida Temple ..* ,
Oranges "p
EACH




FROZEN FOOD


Stouffer's
Mac C& Cheese
40 OZ.

$5


Lean Cusine
Entrees
Several Varieties
8-13 OZ.
21/$5


Green Giant
Vegetables
With Sauce
9-10 OZ.

4/$16


Totino's
Pizza
10.2-10.6 OZ.



iLUEBEIX
ICE CREAM

Blue Bell
Ice Cream
1/2 GAL.

2/$8

Pictsweet
Cream Corn
Yellow Or White
20 OZ.


DAIRY


Pepito Corn
Tortillas
100 CT.
2/$6


Hood
Small Curd
Cottage Cheese
16 OZ.

315


Pepito Flour Texas Style
Tortillas Biscuits
10/9" 12 OZ.7


3/$5


3/$250


BONEF.LES
TOP ROUND
STEAKS

$319 LB.



BAR,-S
CORN DOGS

S69LB.


SW ,ARF.RDEEN
CENTER CUT HICKORY SMOKED
PORK CHOPS SLICED BACON
929 16 OZ. PKG.
L9 LB. .


XTRA LAUNDRY
DETERGENT
128 OZ.
69
$29


CAMPBELL'S
CHICKEN NOODLE
OR TOMATO
SOUP
10.75 OZ.

6/$5


PREGO
SPAGHETTI
SAUCE
26 OZ.

3/$5


HYTOP FRUIT
COCKTAIL
29 OZ.

3/$5


CLOROX
ULTRA
96 OZ.

3/$5


FOLGERS
CLASSIC
ROAST COFFEE
39 OZ.
$699


STARKIST
CHUNK LITE
TUNA
OIL OR WATER
6 OZ.

8/$5


VAN CAMP
PORK & BEANS
15 OZ.

10/$5


MARUCHEN
.RAMEN
NOODLE SOUP
3 OZ.

6/99C


HUNTS
KETCHUP
24 OZ.

5/$5


HYTOP PEACH
HALVES OR SLICES
29 OZ.

3/$5


KELLOGG'S
APPLE JACKS, SUGAR
CORN POPS OR SUGAR
FROSTED FLAKES
15 OZ.

, 21$6
Ho


7- DyA e : a0-8 m


I


``


m 2







Page 4-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006


Church


" Obituaries
Loren H. Carter
Loren H. Carter, 51, of Tallahas-
g see died Monday, Jan. 2.
The funeral service was held
Friday, Jan. 6 at Culley's Mead-
owWood Funeral Home in Talla-
i hassee with burial at Culley's
5 MeadowWood Memorial Park.
or A native and lifelong resident
i of Tallahassee, he was a member
P of Gospel Light Church and was
employed as an orthotist techni-
, cian by Williams Orthotics-Pros-
, thetic.
? Survivors include three sons,
w Travis Carter, Corey Carter and
Kyle Carter, all of Tallahassee; his
t; mother, Jacquelyn Carter of
Woodville; a sister, Judy Sarvis of
Crawfordville; two brothers, Fred
, Carter and Mike Carter, both of
'w Woodville; his mother and father-
in-law, Danielle and Harvey
K, Shuford, both of Tallahassee; a
sister and brother-in-law, Jo and
Kirk Hutchison of Monticello;' and
several nieces and nephews.
Culley's MeadowWood Fu-
neral Home in Tallahassee was
, in charge of the arrangements.
Prentice M. Crium
Prentice M. Crum of Carrabelle
died Tuesday, Jan. 10 in Carra-
Sbelle.
The funeral service will be
held at a later date;
Harvey-Young Funeral Home in
, Crawfordville is in charge of the
arrangements. '
W Steve A. Edwvards, Jr.
Steve Angus Edwards, Jr., 73,
of Crawfordville died Saturday,
Jan, 7 in Lake City.
The funeral service was held
Wednesday, Jan. 11 at Harvey-
Young Funeral Home in Craw-
fordville with burial at a later date
at Pelt Cemetery in Crawfordville.
He was employed by Eastern.
I Airlines and was a veteran of the
U.S. Army having served 'in the
Korean War. He was a member
of the VFW. ,
Survivors include a sonriDarrel
Edwards and wife Kasandra of
Apalachicola; a sister:, Ruby
Snyder of Ochlockonee Bay; a
granddaughter, Lawanda Ander-.
son; two great-granddaughters,
Emily Andeison and Madison
. Anderson; a devoted friend, Viola
'Harvey of Crawfordville; a care-
giver, Ann Estes of Crawfordville;
Cheryll Olah of Crawfordville;
and many nieces and nephews.
Harvey-Young Funeral ,Home in
Crawfordville was in charge of
the arrangements.
Birdie L. N. Fulford
Birdie Louise Nelson Fulford,
83, of Topton, NC died Monday,.
Dec. 26 in Andrews, NC.
The funeral service was held,
Wednesday, Dec. 28 at Red Mar-
ble Baptist Church in Andrews,
NC. The Rev. France Postell offi-
ciated. Pallbearers were David
Holloway, Eddie Holloway, Roger
Holloway, Harold Holloway,
Tommy Holloway and Mike
Matheson. Memorial contribu-
tions may be made to the Park-
inson Foundation, Inc., 1501 NW
9th Avenue, Bob Hope Road, Mi-
ami, FL 33136-1494,
A native of Cherokee County,
NC, she and her late husband,
James, lived in Crawfordville and

Choir Will Sing

On Jan. 14
The Thessalonia Missionary
Baptist Church Senior Choir will
host a pre-anniversary sing on
Saturday, Jan. 14 at 6 p.m. The
church will celebrate its 48th an-
niversary.,
Some of the groups appearing
will bbeFebe and the Chosen
Ones, New Jackson Singers. Carl
Joseph and the True Tones, Dot
Brown and the Gospel Interpret-
ers, Charles Peterson and the
Tones of Harmony and more.
For more information, call
Joeann Nelson at 926-1515 or
Martha Hawkins at 656-2578. Rev.
Fredrick Bell is the church pas-
tor.


Sopchoppy

Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study...............9:30 a.m.
Worship 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study............... 7 p.m.
Visitors Are Welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details, 962-2213


St. Marks for more than 40 years.
They owned and operated the
Topton Drive-In Restaurant in
Topton, NC.
Survivors include two daugh-
ters, Wanda Beck and husband
David of Topton, NC and Zoe A.
Mansfield and husband Ed of St.
Marks; two sisters, Pauline Wil-
son of Westown, PA and Viola
Holland of Charlotte, NC; five
grandchildren, Debbie Beck of
Marianna, Sandie Spell of Craw-
fordville, and Michelle Mansfield,
Michael Mansfield and Shelley
Daniels; four great-grandchildren,
Tiffany Mansfield, Brandie Mans-
field, LeAnn Spell and Jimmy
Mansfield; and several nieces and
nephews.
Townson Rose Funeral Home
in Murphy, NC was in charge of
the arrangements.
Oscar Griffin
,Oscar Griffin, 85, of Tallahas-
see died Friday, Jan. 6 in Talla-
hassee.
The graveside service was held
Monday, Jan. 9 at Hopewell Bap-
tist Church Cemetery in Moultrie,
GA.
He moved to Tallahassee from
Georgia in 1959 and was an inde-
pendent farmer.
Survivors include five sons,
Oscar E. Griffin, R. Randall Grif-
fin and wife Pat, and Allen Grif-
fin and wife Paula, all of Talla-
hassee, Frank Griffin and wife
Joan of Rockmart, GA, and Ellis
N. Griffin and wife Maureen of
Crawfordville; two daughters,
Mary Sisco and husband Richard
of Tallahassee and Jean Love and
husband Guy of Quincy; 13 grand-
children; and nine great-grand-
. children.
Culley's MeadowWood Fu-
neral Home in Tallahassee was
in charge of the arrangements.
Homer Howard, Jr.
Homer "Snow" Howard, Jr., 66,
of Wakulla County died Thursday,
Dec. 29 in Tallahassee.
The funeral service was held
Saturday, Jan. 7 at East Grove
Missionary Baptist Church in
Woodville with burial at Walker
cemetery inm rawfordville.
-He was a laborer.
Survivors include his wife,
Wanda Howard of Crawfordville;
two sisters, Julia Brown and hus-
band Burlein of Tampa and
Patricia Harvey of Tallahassee;
two aunts, Sally Fuller of Talla-
hassee and Beatrice Farmer of
Crawfordville; and his caregiver,
Mozelle Barnes.
Strong & Jones Funeral Home.
in Tallahassee was in charge of
the arrangements.
Melissa L. Howard
Melissa Lynn Howard, 33, of
Crestview died Friday, Jan. 6 in
Crestview.
The funeral service will be
held Thursday, Jan. 12 at 11 a.m.
at Harvey-Young Funeral Home in
Crawfordville with burial at Lake
Ellen Cemetery. Family will re-
ceive friends from 6 p.m. until 8
p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 11 at Har-
vey-Young Funeral Home.
A nurse at North Okaloosa -
Medical Center, she was a mem-
ber of First United Methodist
Church in Crestview.
Survivors include her father, ,
Gary Soldatek of Ohio; her
mother, Janet Beal of Ohio; her
stepfather, Ernest Crabtree of Tal-
lahassee; a son, Taylor Howard of
Crestview; two daughters, Keri
Winkler and Kristie Winkler, both
of Crawfordville; a stepdaughter,
Skyler Howard of Crestview; a
brother, Ernest Crabtree, Jr. of
Crawfordville; and two sisters,



United Methodist Church
Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship -11 a.m.
Wednesday Service 7 p.m.
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor John Peavey
"The end of your search for a friendly church"


Jennifer Beal of Tallahassee and
Annie White of Crawfordville.,
Harvey-Young Funeral Home'in
Crawfordville is in charge of the
arrangements.
Martha J. 0. Kelley
Martha Jean Osbourne Kelley,
76, of Fernandina Beach died Fri-
day, Jan. 6 in Nassau County.
The funeral service will be
held at 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 14 at
St. Peter's Episcopal Church with
the Revs. Lisa Flores and Gerri
Walston officiating. Family will
receive friends after the service
at the church. Memorial contri-
butions may be made to the
Adam .Kelley Memorial Scholar-
ship Fund, P.O. Box 521, Fer-
nandina Beach, FL 32035.
A native of Pensacola, she
graduated from Pensacola High
School in 1947 and' attended
Pensacola Junior College and
Florida College for Women (FSU).
She attended Florida Community
College in Jacksonville and was
a homemaker.
She and her late husband, Rev.
Ralph E. Kelley, moved to Sop-
choppy in 1988, and he served as
a bailiff for the Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office. She worked with
youth through the Gateway
Council Girl Scout Program in
Nassau County. She taught school
and was instrumental in found-
ing the Fine Arts Series in

Fernandina Beach. She played the
church organ, and was active in
the altar guild.
Survivors include four chil-
dren, Mike Kelley and wife Penny,
Steve Kelley and wife Bernice,
and Pat Gass and husband Billy,
all of Fernandina Beach, and
Phyllis Pumphrey and husband
Roy of Gainesville; nine grand-
children, Patrick Kelley, Pamela
Marshall and husband Kevin,
Michael Gass and wife Allie,
Kelley Allgood and husband Ja-
son, Martha G. Lee, Ross Gass,
Thomas Kelley, Donald Wallace,
and Amanda Cornelius and hus-
band Larry; and four great-grand-
children, Madison, Brett, Abbie
and Gretchen.
Oxley-Heard Funeral Home in
Fernandina Beach is in charge of
the arrangements;.
Gay Hamrick Laffitte
Gay H. Laffitte, 74, of Rock Hill,
SC died Friday, Dec. 23 at Pied-
mont Medical Center.
The funeral service was held
Wednesday, Dec. 28 at Neely's
Creek Associate Reformed Presby-
terian Church with burial at
Ebenezer Presbyterian Church
Cemetery. The Rev. Jan Senneker
officiated with Dr. Jack Basie as-
sisting. Memorial contributions
may be made to the Alzheimer's
Diseases and Related Disorders
Association, 222 South Cherry
Road,' Rock Hill, SC 29732 or the
Area 11 Special Olympics, P.O.:
Box 11706, Rock Hill, SC 29731.
A native of Leesburg,. she at-
tended Leon High School and
graduated from Florida State Uni.
versity with a major in library
science. She was a librarian at

Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
sUiMmi o Crawfordville
UA Rev. Donald Gerrell
Interim Pastor
926-8666
Sunday School.................10 a.m.
Sunday Worship....... 11 a'.m.
Evening Worship................ 6 p.m.
Wednesday Service...... 7:30 p.m.
& Youth Service................. 7 p.m.
Royal Rangers....... 7:30 p.m.
Missionettes.... ......... 7:30 p.m.


RIVERSINK

Baptist (burcb

Sunday School.......9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship....10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship..........7 p.m.
Wednesday Evening......?7 p.m.
Pastor Gary Tucker
926-3217


Crawfordville High School and
also worked for the Federal Bu-
reau of Investigation in Washing-
ton, DC. She was a member of
Delta Gamma Sorority and the
Florida State University Orches-
tra.
She received a Master's degree
in library science from Winthrop
College and retired as a librarian
from the Chester County School
District in South Carolina in 1997.
She was a member and past presi-
dent of the Rock Hill Women's
Club and a member of Neely's
Creek Associate Reformed Presby-
terian Church, where she was
active in the Caroline Boyd Circle,
and was involved in a Rock Hill
book and sewing club.
Survivors include a brother, H.
Pope Hamrick, Jr. of Ormond
Beach; a sister, Janet Dickson of
of Fernandina Beach; four chil-
dren, Ronnie Laffitte and wife
Polly of Knoxville, TN, Lloyd
Laffitte of Sharon, SC, Alice Gay
Carpenter and husband Mark of
Plano, TX, and Garnet McKeown
and husband David of Rock Hill;
and 10 grandchildren.
Green Funeral Home in Rock
Hill, SC was in charge of the ar-
rangements.
James E. McKinnon
James E. McKinnon, 69, of
Panacea died Saturday, Jan. 7 in
Panacea.
The funeral service was held
Tuesday, Jan. 10 at Panacea Cem-
etery.
He was a U.S. Postal Service
employee and an electrical engi-
neer.
Survivors include an aunt,
Myrtle Roden; three cousins, Judy
Robinson, Barbara Mathews and
Glenda Young; three stepsons,
Roger Savage, Terry Savage and
Tim Savage; and four step-grand-
children.
Harvey-Young Funeral Home in
Crawfordville was in charge of
the arrangements.
Isaac H. Wilder
Isaac H. Wilder, 96, of Tallahas-
see died Monday, Jan. 2.

SI. Elizabelhl -
Ann Seton

Catholic Ch r|
Mass 9 a.m. Sunday
Sunday School 10 AM
Father James MacGee, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. (US 98)
926-1797



Panacea Park

Baptist Church
24 Mission Road, Panacea
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Worship 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 p.m.
Pastor, Jerry Spears


Trinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
TrinityLutheranofWakulla.com
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Worship 10:30 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor David W. Raetz
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557


S Sopchoppy
SUnited
SMethodist
Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship 11 a.m.
Pastor Bob Laidlaw
850-962-2984



Pioneer Baptist
Church (SBC)
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.


The funeral service was held
Thursday, Jan. 5 at Bevis Funeral
Home in Tallahassee with burial
at Tallahassee Memory Gardens.
Memorial contributions may be
made to a favorite charity.
A native of Wakulla County, he
had lived in Tallahassee for most
of his life. He was the retired
owner of Wilder Electric and a
U.S. Coast Guard veteran. He was
a member of Forrest Heights Bap-
tist Church.
Survivors include his wife of


72 years and 7 months, Margie
Wilder of Tallahassee; a brother,
Rubin Wilder of Long Beach, CA;
five sisters, Myra Parson of Nash-
ville, TN, Marjorie Moore of Lake-
land, TN, Ruth Montana of Gads-
den, IN, and Merrendia Morris
and Leona Shiver, both of Mobile,
AL; and several nieces and neph-
ews.

Bevis Funeral Home in Talla-
hassee was in charge of the ar-
rangements.


Webbs Will Be At Providence


The Webbs, a family evange-
listic team based near Cumber-
land, MD, will hold evangelist
meetings at Providence Bible
Church during the coming week,
Sunday through Wednesday, Jan.
15 through Jan. 18.
Barry is the son of well-known
evangelist Dr. Hal Webb. His
wife, Cheryl, is the daughter of
Pastor Clifford Proper, who pas-
tors a Baptist church in Elmira,
NY. Together they make up an
unusual family envangelistic
team. They have two daughters,
Bethany and Rachel, who are in
college at Bob Jones University
in Greenville, SC.
The Webbs have a variety of
talents. First, they are accom-
plished musicians. In their meet-
ings they sing solos, duets and
mixed quartets. Cheryl is an ex-
*cellent pianist and Barry plays
the Baritone and Flugabone
horns.
Barry is also a ventriloquist
and has more than 25 years ex-
perience in the field of puppetry.
He does all of the voices for the
20 puppets that travel with the
team in their puppet castle stage.


Some nights Barry will draw
a chalk art picture, complete with
background music, a dramatized
story and colored and black
lights.
Mrs. Webb conducts a child-
ren's Bible hour during the
preaching time. ,
All of their talents work .to-
gether to point to the most im-
portant facet of their ministry,
the preaching of the Bible.
Pastor Earl Dechant said,
,"With all of these different min-
istries, there is surely something
for everyone, young and old. The
ministry of the Webbs will cer-
tainly bless and appeal to your
whole family! Come join us this
Sunday for a combined worship
service beginning at 10 a.m. Then
make plans to attend services at
7:30 p.m., Sunday through Wed-
nesday."
Providence Bible Church of
Crawfordville is located two
miles northeast of the Wakulla
County Courthouse at 710 Shade-
ville Road (look for the new,
white vinyl fence). Call 926-2456
or 926-1326 to request transpor-
tation or more information.


Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship 8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m.
UNITED Pastor Gary Morris ome
METHODIST 926-7209 ome Grow With Us'
CHURCH Ochlockonee & Arran Road
--,,-W- ww.gbgmh-umc.org/cvilleumc


Sunday School-

Presbyter 'an1 9:30 a.m.
c .4 Worship 10:30 a.m.
3383 Coastal Hwy.
Across from Medart Rec Park Nursery PrOVided
and Head Find Fait926-4569h in God
www.wakullapres.org Where Heart and Head Find Faith in God


Wak-all1Sprin6s


1391 Crawfordville Highway
Crawfordville, FL 32327


Sunday Activities Wednesday Evening Activities
Continental Breakfast 9:15 a.m. Family Night Supper 5:30 p.m.
Bible Study/Fellowship 9:45 a.m. Children/Youth/Adult Activities 6:45 p.m.
Worship Service 11 a.m.
General Office Hours: Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m.
Office 850-926-5152 Fax 850-926-5825 School Office 850-926-5583
Wcbsitc: www.byhisgracc.cc/wsbc

Ml e, e e


FiRST
BApT .IST ChURCh


3086 Crawfordville Hwy.
(South of the Courthouse)
Church Office: 926-7896

www.fbccrawfordville.org
Youth.
www.crosstramining.org


SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Fellowship Meal 6:00 p.m.
(call for reservations)
Prayer/ Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
CrossTraining (Youth) 7:00 p.m.
Children's Events 6:30 p.m.


Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church
117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy
962-7822

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Morning Wbrship 11 AM


AWANA Club 5 PM
Evening. Worship 6 PM
^Z^


Wed. adult, children & youth 7 p.m.
486 Beechwood Drive Crawfordville, FL.
(North of the Lower Bridge Road and
Spring Creek Highway intersection)
Rev. Dennis Hall, Pastor
850-926-6161







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006-Page 5


C omniunity


ST. MARKS
NEWS
By Linda Walker

Hi neighbors, it looks like and
i'J feel like we have a crudademic
;here in our town. Just about all
'of us have some kind of sinus
infection or really bad cold. It
makes you feel like yuk. Maybe
'it is this weather changing that
keeps it going around. One day
it is 29 degrees and the next day
it is in the 70s! I think this whole
SAnd. believe it or not, it is not
cold weather that makes you
sick. It is germs in the air, or so
someone told me. I just feel bet-
ter when it is really cold and I
guess that comes from being
-iraised up in North Georgia, We
'actually had snow at Christmas
time and my first Christmas
-rdown here it was about 80 de-
- grees and I got the worst case of
,,.flu from that. Yuh huh, I did.
Neighbors, I know we all do
,'stupid things sometimes but I
-need to warn you about super,
Glue and cats. Now I use super
glue quite often on jewelry and
-stuff and I never thought about
" my cat messing with it. But I
[-think Sophie just waits until I
frepair something and then tries
' lo take it apart. Well, she now
fhas a big patch of fur missing
-from her left front leg.
I was designing a mirror with
i stones and super glue and
Sophie decided she liked the,
'shiny stones and tried to take
"them off. She only managed one
and it was glued to her leg. Af-
ter she finally, quit running try-
ing to get away from whatever
she thought had grabbed her, I
had to cut the fur off to get that
rhinestone back. Have you ever
seen a fuzzy rhinestone? Anyway.
!be extra careful when you aie
. gluing, painting or doing any-
jthing that your cat might want
Sto help you with.
Congratulations to Kendrick
Sellars on being the top winner
., in his class at school for raising
the most money in theiin fund
"raising event. Kendrick wants to
Thank everyone who helped to


make this happen. Kendrick is
the son of Lynn and Danny
Sellars and the grandson of
Sandy Chapman and is in kinder-
garten. Some of you may remem-
ber Kendrick from when he used
to lock his dad out of the truck
at Ms. Joy's store when he was
only 3 years old. This boy is too
smart.
Neighbors, our thoughts and
prayers go to Zoe Mansfield and
her family due to the passing of
her mother, Birdie Fulford, on
Dec. 26. And to the family of
"Big" Joe Brown of Perry, FL due
to his passing. His father was the
late Arron Brown of St. Marks. Big
Joe was doing what he loved best
when he passed away. He was
fishing and you can't ask for bet-
ter than that.
Listen up people! We have
new doors at town hall. They are
pure tee glass and you can see
just everything. Not bullet proof
or anything like that, just glass.
And we now no longer have a
drop box to pay our water bills.
But we will survive. And we don't
have to like everything that
changes. I do not like any change
at all that happens in our beauti-
ful little town. Please leave it
alone.
Now, let's wish 'these people
happy birthday: Gazzie Hobbs on
Jan. 12, Tracy Ward on Jan. 16 and
-Thelma Murphy on Jan. 18. And
no anniversaries this week.
On our prayer list please re-
member Newell Ladd, Thelma
Murphy, Norma Folks, Kathleen
Causey, Zoe Mansfield and fam-
ily, Nancy Nichols, Gina, Jeff
Humphries. Bob and Annette
Carey, Jett Harper, B.enita Triplett,
Jerelene Howard, Nettie, Junior
and Gordon Strickland, and all of
those not named here. Pray for

Ochlockonee"

United
Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship 9 a.m.
Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m..
u7I5or 96o2 -9.uiai -
(850) 962-2984


our families, our town and pray
for peace.
Listen up people If you have '
old towels, blankets or newspa-
pers, please take them to. our ani- i
mal shelter in Crawfordville to '
help keep the animals warm and
dry. If you can't take them, please
call me for pick up or leave them
on my porch, 925-0234.


Happy
Birthday
January 11
Colleen
Skipper
From Your Parents



go Saint Teresa
Episcopal
Church
1255 Rehwinkel Rd.
At the corner of Rehwinkel Rd. & U.S. 98
Sunday School
Holy Eucharist 8:30 AM
Youth & Adults 9:30 AM
Children 10:30 AM
Worship 10:30 AM
Father John Spicer
926-4288


January 17


January 17


January 19


January 20


January 31


February 6


February 20


February 21


Commission Meeting
Commission Chambers
Workshop County Administrator Contract
Commission Chambers
Workshop PSG Contract
Commission Chambers
Workshop Budget'
Commission Complex
Wetlands Committee
Commission Complex
Commission Meeting
Commission Chambers


Martin Luther King Holiday
County Offices Closed
Cominission Meeting
Commission Complex


6:00 p.m.


5:00 p.m.


6:00 p.m.


10:00 a.m.


6-8 p.m.


6:00 p.m.


6:00 p.m.


ALL WORKSHOPS, PUBLIC HEARINGS AND COMMISSION MEETINGS ARE OPEN
TO THE PUBLIC.WE WELCOME YOUR COMMENTS/PARTICIPATION.
Wakulla County does not discriminate on the basis of Race, Color, National Origin, Sex, Religion, and Age or Handicapped status in
employment or the provision of services. Handicapped individuals may 'receive special accommodations with one working day's notice
as per section 286.01 I(6)F.S.(If you need special accommodations, please call (850) 926-0919,TDD (850) 926-1201.
If additional information is needed on the above mentioned Workshops, Public Hearings, etc.,
please contact The Board of County Commissioners' Office at (850) 926-0919 or FAX (850) 926-0940,TDD (850)926-1201.
.. .. ^^ .- ,--.- ---. ^^* ^ ---,^^ .


kERel


2263 Curtis Mill Rd.
Sopchoppy, FL 962-3774
Pastor John S. Dunning
(From Rhema Bible Trininng Center)



l4- TAi 4NW-,


Hwy 319 Medart,
Office 926-5265
Early Worship 8:30 a.m,
Sunday School .9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
AWANA Clubs 4:00 p.m.
Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.


Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the .Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you-this Lord's.Day' .
ww"'' ikeellenbaptistchurch.org


for you


- OJ4j


WHEN:
January 12, 7:00 p.m.

WHERE:
Tallahassee Community College
Student Union Ballroom
Student Union Building, first floor

WHO:
All seniors, juniors and parents who are
interested in scholarships and financial aid
for any college, not just TCC.

SPECIAL SESSIONS ON:
Prepaid College Tuition
Bright Futures Scholarships
Ask a Counselor
Managing your College Finances
Introduction to Financial Aid

SPECIAL HELP WITH FINANCIAL AID:
Completion of the Free Application for Student
FinancialAid (FASFA) and scholarship searches.
Reminder: If you would like help with your FASFA, please
bring your 2005 tax information with you.


A scholarship drawing will
be held at the end of the
evening in which at least
four $500 scholarships will
be awarded to students for
the college of their choice.
Must be present to win.


a--M


o tI'--d 196


.. (850) 201 -TCC-1 WWW.TCC.FL.EDU


WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION CALENDAR 2005


'.4
t, "4


A41


- -- 1


444 P LY R DRV


TALLAHASSEE, FLRD 320


~cQ~:~:


RM*- W-








Page 6-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006
0


People


Olive Oil, Other Products Group Hopes To Use Money For Education,


Have Many Uses At Home


By MARJ LAW
Of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful
When was the last time you.
looked under your bathroom
sink? If you're like a lot of us,
you'll see dozens of bottles, all
designed to perform specific
tasks. You might be surprised to
know that some simple products
you keep around the house
might take the place of three or
four manufactured and some-
times toxic goods. Oil is one ex-
ample. :'.
While skimming through
Reader's Digest's Extraordinary
Uses for Ordinary Things,,I no-
ticed they recommended, using
oil to get rid of scuff ma iks on
patent leather shoes. Since the
leather cleaning product I'd pur-
chased for removing the, .black
marks from some tan colored
shoes smelled bad and didn't
work, it seemed worthwhile giv-
ing the suggestion a tty.
Skin So Soft by Avon was the
only oil I could locate at the
moment, so I took a cotton pad
and rubbed it on the black scuff
mark. The mark came off. The tan:
color remained perfectly tan!
I told an artist of this revela-
tion, and she said olive oil is'
great, for cleaning her brushes
Turpentine, paint thinner, and
similar products produce strong
odors and can be harnmfuil. In
stead, she rubs oil into her'
brushes. Then she takes a dish.
washing liquid like Dawn and
works it though them with "
warm water It cleans well and,,
also conditions the brushes so
they are soft for the next use.
Wow! When I got black greasy
stuff from the car dooi all over
my hands, I turned back to the
Extraordinary Uses book. It sug-
gested you guessed it;, oil!
Back to that Skin So Soft still sit

Superior S uoli ty
Construction i
A FrVirtually Maintepance
A 10 Year Warranty
Affordable, Financing
unroo Cd,,. FREE







.. Everyone s
New Year's
Resolution is
.to get into shape
Start working out NOW!
Call today!
A ena Davis


926-7685 or 510-2326
LCAS94001 GB32582 CRC1327280









926-6003
17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square
P.O. Box 1720' Crawfordvile, FL 32326
SEstate Plawonning & Probate
*Commercial Transactions
Real Property Transfers
*Real Property Transfers


ting on the counter! And it
worked, smelled great, and left
my hands smooth!
Other uses for oil include: re-
moving glue from labels or ban-
dages, prying apart stuck drink-
ing glasses, loosening chewing
gum from carpet, softening a
new baseball glove (you might
not want a girlie-smelling oil for
this one), revitalizing vinyl uphol-
stery in your car, sliding together
pipe joints, buffing up golt clubs,
slipping off stuck rings, cleaning
bathtub.'showers kbe careful to
wipe' it off: it's slippery), shining
stainless steel sinks and chrome
trim,, removing scratches from
dashboards, removing latex paint
from skin and treating cradle cap.
One ordinary product can
have so many uses You can pur-
chase fewer household hazard-
ous waste products when you
replace them with one simple
thing: oil.


Physician


Care Of Wakulla





Family Practice
Pediatrics Ages 2-18.
Immunizations
DOT & Sports Physicals
Well Women Exam
Diabetes
Hypertension
Family Health Care








: '. .l ','; :

Dr. Robert S. Frable
Office Hours Mon. Fri. 8 A.M. 4:30 P.M.
Crawfordville Hwy. N
Goodfellas ,


Winn


Physician
Care


2615 Crawfordville Highway, Suite 103
Crawfordville >* 926-6363


Wakulla County residents
Verna Brock and Dr. Mae Waters
are collecting petitions for Flo-
ridians for Youth Tobacco Edu-
cation to place a constitutional.
amendment on the 2006 ballot-
that would require the Florida,
Legislature to use tobacco settle-
ment money to annually fund a ,.
statewide youth tobacco educa-
tion and prevention program.
"It has been wonderful gath- -
ering petitions in Wakulla Coun-,
ty because of the overwhelming,
support our residents have
shown for youth tobacco educa-
tion," said Brock. "We owe it to
our children and grandchildren,
to provide them with accurate
information to make smart deci-
sions about smoking. It is encour-
aging to know that our county is-
a vanguard for youth tobacco
education and prevention pro-
grams."
As the advocacy chairwomen
for Floridians for Youth Tobacco'
Education's petition drive in
Wakulla County, Brock and Wa-
ters are working closely with
numerous community members
and nonprofit organizations to
gather signatures. Having ex-
ceeded their goal to date, Brock
and Waters are bringing the pro-
posed constitutional amendment"
one step closer to being placed
on the 2006 ballot.
"Having the opportunity to
work with like-minded volun-


w pp. fOOTPRIK'S
Keep WakUlf a Countiy Beautifuj


and Waters have spent co
hours collecting petitions
the youth tobacco educat
gram that they believe in
"Our state's youth toba
vention programs must
turned to their original
visibility and effective
the only way to do that
store the funding," said
Forchilli, Campaign Mana
ridians for Youth Tobacco
tion. "By preventing kid
becoming adult smokers,
can improve public hea
help reduce the enormous


unlesss cial costs and taxpayer burdens,
to save associated with smoking."
ion pro- Approximately 35,900 Floridac
n. youths become new daily smok-
icco pre- ers each year in Florida, andf
t be re- 296,900 kids under the age of 18,
level of living in this state today will,
ess, and eventually die prematurely frormi
is to re- smoking. Nevertheless, more
Cheryl money is being spent to promoted
iger, Flo- tobacco in Florida than in any,
p Educa- other state in the country. In-t
ds from 2003, the industry spent nearly
, Florida $968.million in Florida alone to,
ilth and promote their products to a newy
is finan- generation of smokers. ,;1




1926-4504
OPEN 7 DAYS 8 A.M. 8 -PM.
Corner of Hwy. 61 & Spring Creek Hwy.


Crums Mini Mall

Penn Dealer

r gt 984-5501

Panacea, FL



ONE STOP SHOPPING
Look for Grand Opening News It's Going to be Big!


Home Hardware


Marine Hardware


T-Shirts Souvenirs Fishing Supplies

Live Bait Frozen Bait

Open Every Day 5:30 a.m. 9 p.m.
!


The TCC Wakiila Service Center focufse on

community seri ce, profedfonal trailn/in,

learning and profesdional development.


For more information, please call 201-8760.


teers to gather petitions for this
important effort has been very
satisfying," said Dr. Waters. "We
are proud to be a part of this his-
toric endeavor to promote youth
tobacco education and improve
health in Florida."
Brock and Waters have worked
with youth tobacco education
programs since the early days of
the Florida Tobacco Pilot Project.
They were involved with the de-
velopment of Students Working
Against Tobacco and continued
with the program since its incep-
tion. When the Florida Legisla-
ture reduced funding for the pro-
gram in 2001, Brock and Waters
were determined to reinstate it.
Joining forces with Floridians for
Youth Tobacco Education, Brock


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422-2116
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926-8245 3119-B Crawfordvill~e Hwy.
www.francielow~e.com


- r r


"efitat Stuld b Outu Ilmatz Uu latyl)





THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006-Page 7


Taf Wa gers
By HEIDE CLIFTON
President, CHAT of Wakulla, Inc.


1" Why do people turn in their
own animal to an animal shel-
ter? Well, there are many reasons.
Some of them are valid, most of
them are not. Bringing a seven
month old lab to the shelter be-
cause he is too rough with the
children makes me wonder.
SLabs arid some other .large
liteeds take a couple of years to
mature. Just like human babies,
puppies do not come trained.
Many dogs are bought or
adopted, put in the backyard by
their owners, seldom looked at
or handled, and the owners hope
for the best.
' Unfortunately, that is not the
way it works. An animal needs
training in order to fit into the
family and many people just do
not know how or do not want to
spend time to at least teach their,
animal the most basic things.
There are thousands of books on
dog training and TV shows about
raining your. dog,
! Very inexpensive obedience
classes are offered by PETCO and
OETSMART. Training is a vital
part of raising a! happy, healthy
dog. Walking on a leash and be-
ing house trained are essential.
In the wild a dog's survival
depends on a strong, stable and


organized pack where every
member follows the rules estab-
lished by the pack leader. The
pack instinct is the strongest
natural motivator for a dog.
In every group of dogs, there
is one leader, a head honcho,
commonly known.as the Alpha
dog. An Alpha dog can be male
or female. Many aspects of pack
behavior are controlled by the Al-
pha dog, including hunting, eat-
ing, and sleeping. Pack order is
based on leadership. The Alpha
dog tells the other dogs what to
do and disciplines them and, in
turn, they look up to him and
respect him.
Dogs view any family, canine
or human, as a pack. Therefore,
if you become the Alpha to your
dog, he will respect your wishes
and accept your training and
commands.
If you train your animal there
will seldom be a need to turn it
in to a shelter where it will face
a very uncertain future,
Please, have your animal
spayed/neutered. For assistance,
call the Wakulla Animal Shelter
at 926-0890. Visit our web site to
see what is available for adop-
tion at the shelter, www.chatof
wakulla.org


Chili Cooks Will Gather

At The Fairgrounds


' On Jan. 14 from 11 a.m. until
3Jp.m. at the North Florida Fair-
8rounds, more than 50 chili
lOoks will compete for cash'
aards in four categories as part
of the sixth annual Marzuq
Shrine Center Chili Cook-Off and
Silent Auction. The Marzuq
Shrine Center includes Shriners
from the local seven county area
of Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden,
J efferson, Taylor, Madison and
Lafayette.
* The categories for the chili
cook-off are: the hottest, the
mjieatiest, the most unusual, and
the judges' choice. Three divi-
sions will be judged individual,
commercial, and law enforce-
ment/first responders.
There will also be cash awards
for the best decorated booth-afid
the people's choice award. The
people's choice award is voted on
by the people tasting the chili.
A vote is placed by putting
money in the cook's jar at their
booth; Hot dogs, drinks, and des-
serts will also be available.
The judges include local dig-
nitaries and chefs from Keiser
Project Hope
To Assist
Evacuees
The Apalachee Center, Inc. is
offering Project Hope services to
evacuees of Hurricane Katrina
and Hurricane Rita.
Project Hope is the result of a
grant which makes it possible to
continue identifying and provid-
ing services for mental health
related needs for the hurricane
evacuees.
The no cost services include
professional and client education,
counseling and linking of ser-
vices.
Apalachee Center can help
with counseling issues such as
grief and loss, behavioral prob-
lems, crisis intervention, stress
coping and management, em-
ployment, alcohol and drug prob-
lems, domestic violence, coping
skills training, post traumatic
stress, mental health, family and
relationships counseling, par-
enting issues and others as
needed.
For more information, call 523-
3337 or 1-800-500-9611.
Say You s w It In The News


Culinary College.
The silent auction consists of
items that include collectibles,
framed prints, golf packages, gift
baskets, and gift certificates from
the area restaurants and mer-
chants
Entertainment will be pro-
vided by the Messer Brothers,
Gabby and the Gang from 93.3,
Hoot Gibson, Trafton Harvey and
others. Along with the musical
entertainment will be the Moun-
tain Dew Cloggers, clowns, face
painting, classic cars and motor-
cycles.
For more information, call the
Marzuq Shrine Center at 385-
3010,


What's
this,
a bed


bowl? to.


I really need people to teach me things like this. I am 10
weeks old and have not seen my mom since I was very small.
Would you like to adopt me and teach me manners and
tricks? As you can see I am cute, curious and a mixed breed
puppy. Please call or visit the Wakulla County Animal Shelter
for more information about me or other animals for adoption.
Thank you. 926-0890


flabitat for Humanity

"Re-Store"
Shadeville Highway 926-4544



WO'S A0

Cbhifopractor









Friends' ,

SCRAWFORDVILLE
CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC
Dubreja Bldg., Crawfordville Hwy.
William Treichel, D.C.
Chiropractic Physician (850) 926-1 227
OPEN Monday Friday Serving North Florida For Over 12 Years.


JoJo's Taxes
at Mike's Qwik Cash

INSTANT REFUNDS*
ELECTRONIC FILING *
WALK-INS WELCOME *
ALSO, AFTER HOURS APPT. AVAILABLE
3039 Crawfordville Hwy.
(courthouse intersection)
(850) 926-6970


1 --i^


Fitness Center




January Special
Sign Up For
Annual
Membership.
Just $29.95 Mo.+ Tax
NO SIGN UP FEE

Full Service


90 Days...


>12Weeks...


Can you

take the
Body-Tek

Challenge?

Stop in or call by Tues. Jan. 17
CASH & PRIZES AWARDED
Fitness Center


MON. & WED. 5:30 AM- 9 PM; TUE. & THURS. 9 AM 9 PM;
RE. HOURS: FRI. 5:30AM- 8 PM; SAT. 9AM -1 PM; SUN. 2 PM 6 PM

,26-BFIT (2348) OPEN 7 DAYS 56 Rainbow DrivU


GEO-ENERGY
Since 1985
CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:
MacCLEAN
WATER TREATMENT
SYSTEMS
S *LEASING
SALES & SERVICE
COMPLETE LINE
OF EQUIPMENT
WE SOLVE JUST ABOUT
ANY WATER PROBLEM
926-8116


- ALL ROADS LEAD TO... --- -- Open M-F 9-7 Sat. 9-lnt 1I



Got
*Manicures Certificates
*Pedicures *Men
*Highlights *Women
Colors *Children Karen & M Melissa
Perms (850) 926-8319, Barber Stylist
- .2481 Crawfordville Hwy. #6 Crawfordville, FL 32327- -






Page 8-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006

Senior Citizens' News
By DELYNN BASTIAN easier. You are going to need to
Beginning Feb. 14, glucose know what's going to happen
testing will be done at the seni 'A"' when, and you need to make
center. Testing will be held from sure you choose a plan that
10:30 a.m. until 12 noon'. You o works for you. All beneficiaries
not need to make an appoint- of Medicare are eligible for any
ment. Testing will continue one Part D plan.
day per month: March 17, April Prescription costs vary de-
11, May 16 and June 13. drID pending on the particular drug
The new year has finally aj- plan you choose. There are two
rived and Part D has kicked in. If ways to get Medicare prescrip-
I had a dollar for every piece of tion drug coverage Stand-Alone
information I knew about the Plan (PDP) and Medicare Advan-
"new" Medicare, I'd be as poor tage or other plan such as an
as a church mouse. I gleaned HMO or PPO. You will probably
some information from a recent pay a monthly premium and a
.periodical that may be of some yearly deductible of no more
help. than $250 in 2006.
As we know, Medicare Part A If you haven't joined already,
"7- for hospital coverage and Part your. coverage will begin, on the
B for outpatient medical have first day of the month after the
Been around a long time. Now month in which you join. If you
we have Part D which offers a don't sign up by May 15. you may
NX01'*choice of plans and, in order to pay a penalty. Your next oppor-
# -oilget the coverage, you must join tunity to enroll will be from Nov.
,,1.V.:,a plan with a private company. 15 to Dec. 31. You may call 1-800-
49*4, The question is now, which plan. 633-4227 if you have questions
,, g0 You can start with the web site and speaking with your pharma-
(www. Medicare.gov). which of- cist is also a good idea.
fers some help with the decision A representative from Univer-
II And Crystal J. Sanders making. If you break the. plan sal Masterpiece will be at the
James W. Hurley down into parts and decide senior center every Wednesday
CI Awhich applies to you or your fam- to answer your questions or you
C crystal J ,, Sanders W ill ily members, the rest becomes may call their office at 671-3680.

Mar ry Jam es W. Hurley II United Way Begins Final Push
Marr Jaes W Huley ,#


Percell and Brenda Sanders of
Sopchoppy announce the engage-
ment of their daughter, Crystal
Julie Sanders of Sopchoppy, to
James "Jamie" Wesley Hurley II
of Ochlockonee Bay. He is the son
of Mahaley Ruth Watts of Pana-
cea and the late James Wesley
Hurley.


The bride-elect is a 2000 gradu-.
ate of Wakulla High School and
is employed as a secretary at
Hurley Roofing and Construction
Company in Crawfordville. Her
fiance owns James Hurley Roof-
ing and Construction Company.
The wedding will be held later
in 2006.


Rotary Club Meetings

Feature Weekly Speakers


By MARJ LAW
President Rotary Club of Wakulla County
Rotary of Wakulla County
meets Thursdays at the Wakulla
County Senior Citizens Center.
Program Director and President-
Elect Donna Bass has selected
special speakers for several fu-
ture meetings.
On Thursday, Jan. 12, Karen De
Rosier, ,Prevention Education
Coordinator for the Epilepsy As-
sociation, wil1 discuss' many is-
sues relating to epilepsy such as
conditions whch may be tug-
gers, first aid procedures and
what to do if there is an emer-
gency.
She show a video portray-
ing different types of seizures,
and will talk about special issues
with seniors. This will be a joint,
meeting between Rotary of
Wakulla County and the senior
center. Luncheon is $7.
The Jan. 19 meeting will con-
tinue the "tell your story" theme.
Rotarians are encouraged to
think of something or an inci-
dent which describes an impor-

Senior Citiz

Will Host Pr
Big Bend Hospice will have a
representative at the Wakulla
County Senior Citizens Center in
Grant Writing

Workshop Set
The American Society for Con-
cerned Citizens (ASCC) will host
a half-day grant writing workshop
for Wakulla County residents on
Wednesday, Feb. 8 at the Mary
Brogan Museum of Art and Sci-.
ence in Tallahassee.
Attendees will receive a step-
by-step approach to the identifi-
cation of funding needs, funding
sources, obtaining a request for
proposal, preparing a winning
proposal and laying the ground-
work for successfully completing
the grant project.
' A $135 per person registration
fee is due before Jan. 20; The fee
goes up to $160 after Jan. 20. For
more information, call Art Brown
at 284-3250 or visit www.
asccnet.org.

In Service
Shaun M. Burnum
U.S. Air Force Airman Shaun M.
Burnum has arrived for duty at
Tyndall Air Force Base in Panama
City. Burnum, a munitions sys-
tems apprentice with two years
of military service, is assigned to
the 325th Maintenance Squadron.
He is the son of Debra K.
Burnum of Crawfordville. The air-
man is a 2003 graduate of Wa-
kulla High School.


tant theme in his/her life.
On Jan. 26, Dr. Cho of the
Southeast Regional Cancer Cen-
ter in Tallahassee will be here to
talk about Tomography, a new
and exciting cancer treatment
which gives radiation in such a
focused manner that damage to
Other tissue is greatly minimized
over the traditional methods.
At this meeting, the Optimists
of Wakulla County and the
Waeufia County,Senior, Center
participants are''nted. Ag min.'
luncheon is $7 per person.-
The Feb. 9 meeting features
humorist Jerry Kinder. Jerry is,
known worldwide, having writ-
ten for famous people including.
Bob Newhart. We are fortunate
to be able to enjoy his humor
again, and we have invited the
Optimist Club and the Senior
Citizens Center participants to
this meeting.
"We're honored to have such
fine speakers," said President-
Elect Bass, "and we're happy to
be able -to share them with the
Optimists and the Seniors."

ens Center

ograms
Crawfordville Wednesday, Jan. 18
at 11 a.m. to share information
about hospice programs and ser-
vices and answer questions from
the audience. For more informa-
tion, call 926-7145.
A Medicare Masterpiece repre-
sentative will be at the center
every Wednesday at 10 a.m. to
answer questions about the pro-
gram. For more information or to
make an appointment, call Uni-
versal Health at 671-3680.
The podiatrist will no longer
be providing his services at the
senior center. Center officials are
attempting to find a replacement.
Once a replacement is found, a
notice of visitation schedules will
be published.
Daughter Born
To Crums
Dana and Caleb Crum of
Crawfordville announce the birth
of their daughter, Rylee Grace
Crum, on Dec., 15 in Tallahassee.
She weighed 7 pounds, 3 ounces'
and measured 20 inches in
length.
Maternal grandparents are
Todd and Colleen Howell of
Ocala. Paternal grandparents are
Mike and Colleen Crum of Craw-
fordville.
Maternal great-grandparents
are Gordon and Betty Howell and
Lorraine Dano-Recko, all of Ocala,
and the late Howard Dano. Pater-
nal great-grandparents are Earl
and Evelyn Cronan of Craw-
fordville and the late George W.
and Jeanette Crum.


Wakulla County's united Way
campaign is making its final
push to reach 100 percent of its
goal. With only 10 percent to go,
United Way officials are asking
for help. Last year's donations
helped thousands of Wakulla
residents, including 3:512 Wak-
ulla seniors through the Wakulla.
Senior Citizens Council, 355
women and children through


RKeuge nouse ana 135 Wakuua
County Girl Scouts.
Below is a copy of the Wakulla
County United Way contribution
card, that can be detached and
mailed with your gift to P.O. Box
966 Crawfordville, FL 32326. For
more information, contact Alison
Dodson, United Way of the Big
Bend Campaign Manager, at (850)
487-2087.


KARAOKE


Now Every '
Friday Night .... ,
9 p.m. until midnight
Open: Wed. Sun. 10 a.m. until US 98 EAST
iMEWPORT, FRIDA
At The St. Marks River Bridge (850) 925-6448
_______


Do you want to exercise but
don't have childcare?




at Dancing you wanith Miss Denise's studio but



on Tuesday and Thursdays
at 10:00 a.m.
Call 510-2326 for more information


Diabetes Meeting Is Slated


The Wakulla County, Health
Department will host a diabetes
meeting, on Tuesday, Jan. 17 at 6
p.m. in Crawfordville. The guest
speaker will be Ruth Bowden
from Winners Weight Loss in
Crawfordville. .
The meeting is open to every-
one and will offer insight on dia-


betes management,' the truth
about sugar and good nutrition
for the diabetic.
Future diabetes meetings will
be held on the third Tuesday of
each month at the health depart-
ment. For more information, call
the health department at 926-
3591.


Fireside Chat Will Be Held


Wakulla Springs State Park will
host a "Fireside .ChatttlSaturday
Jain l4zat t ,a inTheievnt is.free.
Volunteers
May Give Blood
The Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office will host a "Southeastern
Community Blood Center blood
drive Friday, Jan.'13 froni 11 a.m.
until 3 p.m.
Blood donors are needed. Any-
one interested in donating blood
may contact Major Larry Massa
at 926-0821 to schedule a time.


Visitors can relax in front of a
crackling, fire and listen' to tales
of-klorida'Tolklore and lodge leg.
ends. Dinner is. available in the
Wakulla Springs Lodge. Reserva-
tions are suggested.
For more information, call 224-
5950.


Say You Saw It

In The News


All Types of FEED
,'Chickens /G6ats /Hogs ll
./Cows /Dogs /Cats, Etc. I


Proud
suppliers of.,


II


MINff k


A JLP '-- --
Feed Room Open Monday Friday 6 a.m. 4 p.m.
Store Hours 6 a.m. 8 p.m. 7 Days


WOWIK CAS


Authorized Dealers
Of


&


NEXTEL


liteL


Stop In Or Call For All Your Cellular Needs!


Tina Miller
850-421-5960
Cell 251- 8099
8167 Woodville Hwy.
Lewiswood Center
Woodio


Teresa Cabanas
850-562-6000
E 3404-B Apalachee Parkway
(across from Wil-Marl)
STaliahass


Wakulla Boy's Soccer Association
Invites You To Come And Support
Soccer Senior Night
WHS Stadium


Kids We
Kids We;


Tuesday, Jan. 1 7
S 5P.M.-JV
7 P.M. .- Varsity,

aring Wakulla Rec. Park"'Soccer Shirts
Get In Free With Paid Adult


Adult Admission $3
For more information call Mr. Davis 509-8708



A mHAI YOU

The Ivan Assembly of God Church would
like to thank everyone for their assistance
with damages from the tornado to the
church, parsonage, cemetery and property. i

Special thanks to the Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office, Winn Dixie,
Air-Con of Wakulla, Lamar Advertising,
Medart Assembly of God Church,
Evangel Assembly of God Church and any
others we have neglected to mention.

~ Ivan Assembly of God Church
E B|>||||||>||_|>|_|-|^ )f


j7*rc~; :1


Country Club
WEEKLY

LUNCH SPECIALS
JAN. 16 -JAN. 20
MON. ~-VEG. BEEF SOUP, GRILLED CHEESE TOMATO
SAND WHICH & DESSERT $595
TUES. CHICKEN FRIED S TEAK, MA SHED POTA TOES
& VEGETABLES $59'
WED. -GROUPER SANDWICH, FRENCH FRIES & SLA W $595
THUR. -GRILLED CHICKEN CAESAR SALAD $595
FRI. -BUFFET BBQ RIBS, BAKED BEANS,
SALAD BAR & DESSERT $69s
LUNCH SPECIAL: 11 A.M. 2:30 PM.
CALL 926-GOLF (4653)
FOR TAKE OUT ORDERS


X 7-NeNoK()W


"4


I


--


!


lii


-t






THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006-Page 9



Business


Jon Sheppard Buys Radio Shack


,Center Will Offer 'Episodic Care'


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
The Wakulla News
As of two weeks ago, Jon
Sheppard bought out the Sights
and Sounds Radio Shack store in
Crawfordville from his father, lo-
&l businessman Dan Sheppard.
In the 'ext few weeks, the
Store located on Wakulla-Arran
Road downtown behind Karol's
1prner will be undergoing a
tenovatiop with new fixtures,
brighter colors and a center
cOunter.
"It will'give a whole new feel-
0ng to the store,'! Sheppard says.
: One bit of renrodeling already
underway is a display room for
,he home theatres offered. The
_iew generation of projectors are
1he next big thing; Sheppard says,
less expensive than plasma TVs
,nd with a screen as big as you
rant.
Top of the line features can in-
Olude a screen that unscrolls au-
somatically from the ceiling and
olls back up when done. And
projectors nowadays are small
boxes that can be fixed in the ceil-
ing or put in a piece of furniture.
"Not a store in Tallahassee has
something like that," he says.
People interested in home the-
atre systems like that typically
bring Sheppard in during the
building of a home so that wir-
ing can be installed during the
construction process.
It's not only the high-end elec-
,tronics that Sheppard sells, but
also gear in the moderate to af-
fordable ranger And Sheppard
says he is competitive with prices
of Tallahassee shops, and
stresses he sells names like Sony,
Panasonic and;Yamaha. "I've got
all the big names in here that
Tallahassee (stores) can't beat,"


New Owner Jon Sheppard In The Electronics Store


he says.,
Still, he says, the challenge is
to get Wakulla residents to shop
locally.
When Wal-Mart opens its su-
per store in the next few months,
Sheppard is actually anticipating
his sales will increase. He notes
that he will lose the buyer look-
ing for a $99 television prices
he can't compete with but the
discount chain has a limited se-
lection of electronics. Sheppard
says Radio Shack has a better
selection of specialty items, and
offers as an example that Wal-
Mart may carry four or five dif-
ferent cellular phone chargers; he
has 50 in stock,
Since Dan Sheppard began
selling and installing Dish Net-
work and DIRECTV 25 years ago,
satellite TV sales continue to be
a huge part of the business as
well.
Dan Sheppard started Sights


and Sounds 23 years ago in the
old IGA grocery store in Craw-
fordville, offering movie rentals
in the store before he opened the
stand-alone store.
Sights and Sounds was the,
original cellular phone retailer in
Wakulla County, and remains the
number one retailer of Nextel and
Cingular service.
And Jon is still a 50-50 partner
with his father in The Spa
Shoppe, which sells hot tubs and
jacuzzis.
Dan ,owns the Karol's Korner
gas station, which is leased out,
and runs the Down Under Dive
Center, which offers lessons and
equipment for scuba diving,
Sights and Sounds Radio
Shack is open weekdays from 9
a.m. to 7 p.m., on Saturdays from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and closed on
Sundays.Telephone is 926-5092.


... ......... '-

Seven Drive-Thru Lanes Are Now Open At Wakulla Bank's New Addition


Wakulla Bank Expands Facilities


i Dr. David Keen says that one
of his goals with the new Urgent
Fare and Diagnostic Center be-
ing set up in Panacea is to have
more time to go on medical mis-
sions to the Caribbean.
The center, he says, is a way
to provide his family with a se-
cure income when he takes time
off. Last year, Keen went on seven
medical missions for three differ-
ent organizations.
..One of those groups is his
own, CAMEO, or Caribbean-
American Medical Education Or-
ganization. Another group is
Health and Education Relief for
Guyana, or HERG. Working with
the Adopt-A-Village Mission to Ja-
maica, Keen helped bring a 6-year-
old boy from St. Vincent to Talla-
hassee for an operation and to
be fitted for some artificial legs.
Workmen are busy renovating
the offices of Wakulla Medical
Center's former facility in Pana-
cea Plaza as Keen shows off his
plans for the space: five exami-
nation rooms, an x-ray room,
laboratory, pharmacy room,
DEXA scan room that tests bone
density, and an ultrasound room.
Lab work will be basic blood
tests and urinalysis.
The office will be all digital,
Keen says, with no paper records.
'Besides the medical testing,
Keen says the center will offer
what he describes as "episodic
medical care." And he stresses
that. He won't have regular pa-
" tients coming in for care, but he
and a nurse practioner will treat
those who have small medical
problems.
S"If you, have a small cut, yes;
but if you sever your arm, no,"
Keen says of who he plans to
treat.
I Keen notes that since Gadsden
Memorial Hospital in Quincy
closed last month, the emergency
room at Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital is backed up, he heard,
for several hours.
"In these time it takes to drive
to Tallahassee," Keen said,
'chances are we could have seen

.~,is.mi madeadAst4Fsrif. anlitak
care of small things and I want
to underline'miiall things then
it can free tip the emergency
room to take care of other
things," Keen says. "No sense
driving 30 minutes to an hour to
sit in ER for hours" for treatment
of minor injuries or ailments.
Urgent care will be available
from 3 to 11 p.m., on weekdays.
Keen :was formerly the, direc-


it


4


Dr. David Keen, Former Health Department Director


tor of the Wakulla County Health
Department and is currently at
Doctors Memorial Hospital in
Perry.
The x-ray machine will be one
of only a few in the county. The
ultrasound will be available for
obstetric exams.
The DEXA scan is essential for
women older than 65 or after
menopause, Keen says, to check
for osteoporosis,.
"I read that every year 300,000
women fall," Keen says. "Of those
100,000 are killed, and 100,000 are
maimed. The other 100,000 re-


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cover:. But that's two-thirds of
older women who fall who are
permanently injured."
The most 'susceptible to os-
teoporosis are white, elderly fe-
males;who smoke.
Keen says he expects to open
the facility in late January or early
February.
Meantime, he plans to return
to St. Vincent later this year.
"I want to help more kids," he
says. "I would like to donate more:
of my time to giving back to my3
communityy"


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It In The News


Walter C. Dodson, Jr.; CEO and
President of Wakulla Bank, an-
nounced that the new drive-thru
facility at the bank's main office
in Crawfordville is now open.
* "We are very excited about our
rtew facility," stated Dodson.
"With the implementation of
riew banking technologies and


seven lanes, the new drive-thru.
facility will bring an enhanced
level of service and convenience
to our customers."
In addition to the expanded
drive-thru, the facility will serve
as the bank's Saturday lobby. Jan.
21 will mark the bank's first day
of operation for its Saturday


lobby.
The drive-thru and Saturday
hours will remain the same. The
drive-thru is open from 8:30 a.m.
to 5 p.m., Monday through Thurs-,
day, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Fri-
days and 8:30 a.m. to 12 noon on
Saturday. The Saturday lobby will
be open from 9 a.m. to 12 noon.


STAY CONNECTED

FREE. i710.
. Wt.tWo -year agreement.
, -


Fate Continues To Be Lowest


Wakulla County continued to
have the lowest unemployment
rite in the state in November,
tying with Alachua County at 2.6
percent, according to the state De-
partment of Labor and Employ-
ment Security.
Wakulla's unemployment rate
moved up slightly in November
from 2.5 percent in October. The
local jobless rate had steadily de-
clined from 3.1,percent in June.
In November, the Wakulla la-
bor force decreased to 13,542
people of which 13,189 were em-
ployed and 353 were unem-
ployed.
In October, the local labor
force consisted of 13,610 people
of which 13,274 were employed
and 336 were unemployed.
In neighboring Leon County,
the unemployment rate was also
up slightly, to 3.0 percent in No-
vember from 2.9 percent in Octo-'
ber, according to the state.
Franklin County's unemploy-
ment rate was was down in No-
vember to 3.5 percent from 3.7
percent in October,
The jobless rate for the Talla-
hassee Metropolitan Service
Area, which consists of Wakulla,
Gadsden, Jefferson and Leon
counties, was steady at 3.0 per-
cent in November.
The totalworkforce in the Tal-


lahassee MSA was down to
180,306 in November, of which
174,822 were employed and 5,484
were unemployed. In October,
the labor force consisted of
181,363 people of which 175,945
were employed and 5,418 were
unemployed.
The state's highest unemploy-


ment continued to be in Hendry
County, where the jobless rate.
was down a full percentage point
to 7.2 percent in November, from
8.2 percent in October.
The overall state unemploy-
ment rate was up slightly to 3.6
percent in November from 3.5
percent in October.


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Phone: 850-925-3178
Fax: 850-925-3179
E-mail: LeeNanBurton@comcast.net
Cell: 850-519-6693

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I






Page 10-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday Jan. 12, 2006


School


Parks Wins WMS Geography Bee


COAST Stingray Step Dancers Performed At Title 1 Dinner

'Residents Attend Title 1 Dinner


More than 300 students and
parents attended the annual Title
I Parent Dinner on Monday, Nov.
14 at Medart Elementary School.
Families that Read Together Suc-
ceed Together was this year's
theme.
Those in attendance were
,treated to a performance by the
ICOAST Stingray Step Dancers.
iSara Brown, the dance instructor,
Sis also a pre-k and kindergarten
teacher at COAST Charter School.
She is a member of the Tallahas-


TCC Servic

Tallahassee Community Col-
lege turns 40 in 2006 and the year
|is certain to be memorable, Col-
lege officials and the TCC Alumni
-Association have worked to-
gether to develop celebration
,activities for the college's 40th
anniversary.
Founded in 1960,. TCC has pro-
,vided top-quality post-secondary
-education to the citizens of
Wakulla, Leon, and Gadsden
counties, along with students
from throughout the state; na-
tion and world. TCC has grown
from serving approximately 700
students on the campus of
Godby and Rickards high schools
when its doors first opened to
now serving over 25,000 on the
main campus and in the tri-
county area.
TCC has established service
centers in Gadsden County and
downtown Tallahassee and will
open its Wakulla County Service
Center in Crawfordville on Jan.
17.
Students

Help Plant

Wiregrass
Shadeville Elementary School
students participated in a wire-
grass restoration project on St.
Marks National Wildlife Refuge
property near Sopchoppy Tues-
day, Jan. 10.
Teacher Michelle Hunter's stu-
dents have been studying forest
ecosystems and their participa-
tion in the project continues the
award winning partnership be-
tween Shadeville Elementary
School and the St. Marks Refuge,
said Refuge Ranger Robin Will.
The students served as'volun-
teers to help restore the native
longleaf pine and wiregrass eco-
system on the refuge. Only three
,percent of the historic.longleaf
pine ecosystem remains in the
southeast, added Will.

School Lunch
Menus
Jan. 16 Jan. 20;
ALL SCHOOLS
Monday: Martin Luther King,
Jr. Holiday
Tuesday: Milk, hamburger
gravy with fluffy rice, turnip
greens, cornbread, mixed fruit
cup.
Wednesday: Milk; macaroni,
ham and cheese casserole, green
beans, school made roll, peach
cobbler.
Thursday: Milk, meatloaf with
ketchup, green peas, whipped
potatoes, school made roll,
banana.
Friday: Milk, chicken & cheese
wrap w/ salsa, tossed salad w/
crackers, mixed vegetables, jello.


see Irish Step Dancers, a profes-
sional dance company.
Lori White, local ventriloquist,
and Sid, her dummy, entertained
the crowd while demonstrating
reading strategies for parents to
use when reading to their child.
Parents were given additional
tips on how to help their child
improve his/her reading and
math skills. All children who at-
tended.weie given, a free book.
.Title I is a federally funded
program that provides resources


to schools with 35 percent
more students on free and i
duced priced lunches. Funds a
used to provide for smaller class
rooms, to purchase materials as
equipment for individualized i
struction, and to provide oth
services to meet the needs,
students who need extra help
reading and math. Currently
Shadeville Elementary-, Meda
Elementary, COAST chart
school and Wakulla Midd
School receive Title I funding.


PA Wakulla Middle School sev-
enth grader Eric Parks won the
HI annual National Geographic
School Geography Bee Friday, Jan.
6. Parks survived the Panthers
team competition before winning
L the school wide battle.

competitions through the history
classes and team winners ad-
vanced to the school final. Parks
won the school title for the sec-
o" nd year in a row, Maya Bateman
.j of the Snow Leopards team was
s the runner-up. She is also a sev-
enth grader. The geography bee
was open to students in all three
-.. grades.
Parks has a chance to win a
$25,000 college scholarship if he
can become the Florida champion
and wins the national title in
Washington, DC. "Jeopardy!" host
'Alex Trebek will moderate the
national finals on May 24.
The local competition was an
oral bee. But Parks will take a
or written test to become one of the
re- top scorers in Florida. The state
ire competition will'be held March
31 with the Florida winner being .


nd
in-
er
of
in
ly,
Lrt
er
le


.e Center Opens Jan. 17


An extensive 'marketing cam-
paign will accompany the 40 year
celebration. TCC recently re-
leased an anniversary logo and
has adapted a new official col-
lege logo. TCC will also unveil a
revamped web site in 2006, a tool
that will be used extensively, in
student recruitment.
The TCC Alumni Association

Henderson

Is Selected

State Scholar
Logan Kayne Henderson, a
graduating senior at Wakulla
High School, has been desig-
nated the Wakulla District Sun-
shine State Scholar in Mathemat-
ics and Science for the current
year. He will compete with the
other 74 District' Scholars from
around Florida on Thursday, Jan.
19, to become one of the six Re-
gional Scholars who then will vie
in March for the title Statewide
Sunshine State Scholar in Math-
ematics and Science for 2006.
The Sunshine State Scholars
Program was established in 1997
to recognize the achievement of
Florida's graduating seniors who
have demonstrated excellence in
both mathematics and science.
All scholars receive district rec-
ognition and individual awards
from the program.
The six Regional Scholarsaih'd
their teachers receive further rec-
ognition from the Governor and
Cabinet, the Florida Legislature,
the Department of Education,
and private businesses.
The Sunshine State Scholars
Program is coordinated through
the Florida Institute of Education
at the University of North Florida,
and receives its major financial
support from the Florida Depart-
ment of Education, the Florida
Lottery, and the Technological
Research and Development
Foundation. Information on the
Florida Sunshine State Scholars
Program can be found on the
web at http://www.unf:edu/
dept/sunshine/.
4ABEOr Ie6 OT YOOR FOOTPRI/S



*.. % *,'
Keep Wakuola County Beautifu(


has joined the College's efforts
by coordinating a series of com-
munity and alumni events
throughout the year, each cel-
ebrating the accomplishments of
TCC and its over 200,000 alumni.
In February, the'Alumni Associa-
tion will induct its second class
into the TCC Alumni Hall of
Fame.
Keep WaIkuffa County Beaut!fif


~e


Lori Hill, Maya Bateman, Eric Parks, Josh Sandgren


sent to Washington,
Lori Hill is the WMS geogra-
phy bee coordinator, Josh Sand-


gren, the Pumas history teacher,
served as the master of ceremp-
nies and read the questions. ,


Florida Wild Mammal Association
To report orphaned or injured wildlife,
F'U,. please call 926-8308 -
r? ji '.-


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006-Page 11


Sports


'U


Soccer Team Heads Toward Record Finish


The Wakulla War Eagle soccer
team is heading toward the best
finish in the history of the pro-
gram as Coach Bob Wallace's
squad returned from the Christ-
mas break to win three more
matches.
The War Eagles topped John
Paul II 4-0 before defeating the
Port St. Joe Sharks 5-1. In the only
district match of the week,
Wakulla topped East Gadsden 5-
0.
In the John Paul II game, David
Reich scored in the 29th minute
on an assist from Patrick Stewart
Ito give WHS a; 1-0 lead. A few
minutes later. goalkeeper Matt
Reich stopped a John Paul II scor-
ing attempt with his leg to keep
Wakulla in the lead. Reich made
two more saves in the 38th and
39th minutes.
Shortly before halftime, Ste-
wart set up David Reich to give
Wakulla a 2-0 lead. Mason Alford
set up Stewart for the third goal
and Ryan Smith scored the final
goal for Wakulla on a rebound of
a Stuart Gilley shot.
Matt Reich ended the game
with five saves and Allen Dotson
played the second half and did
not have any saves. He only had
to touch the ball once.
The defense was led by Mason
Alford, Eric Davis, Brett Wilson,
Patrick Stewart, Raleigh Clarke
and Chad Herold. Nick Baxter,
Cory\Wilson, Trevor Nason, Pat'
Talbott and Woody Harvey dogged
up the midfield to keep John Paul
II from having many scoring
chances. '


In the Port St. Joe match, Chad
Herold scored in the 20th minute.
Mason Alford scored in the 36th
minute on an assist from Stewart.
Kyle Marks scored in the 50th and
61st minutes on assists from
Mason Alford and Nick Baxter
respectively.
PSJ scored its only goal in the
73rd minute before Keith Chew
added a goal in the 78th minute
on an assist from Brett Wilson.
Matt Reich had nine saves and
Allen Dotson had three as the
goalkeepers split the game in net.
Patrick Stewait, Eric Davis,
Shane Davis, Mason Alford, Brett
Wilson and Cory Wilson led the
WHS defense.
The victory over East Gadsden
on Jan. 7 was a makeup game
from Dec. 8. Wakulla received
goals from five different players.
Ryan Smith scored in the 19th
minute on an assist from Raleigh
Clarke. Stuart Gilley scored in the
40th minute on an assist from
Keith Chew. Patrick Stewart
scored in the 47th minute on an
assist from Clarke. Matt Reich
scored in the 67th minute off a
Gilley assist. Cory Wilson scored
in the 71st minute from Matt
Reich.
Matt Reich and Allen Dotson
split the goal tending duties but
neither player was forced to make
a save against East Gadsden.
Eric Davis, Shane Davis, Mason
Alford, Brett Wilson, Chad Herold
and Patrick Stewart led the de-
fense as the Jaguars were unable
to get a shot on goal.
Wakulla hosted district rival


Apalachicola Drops Wakulla
Coach Simeon Nelson and his Jefferson County Jan. 12. Tallahas-
Wakulla War Eagle basketball see Chiles will host Wakulla on
players dropped a contest to the Jan. 13. District foe Godby comes
Apalachicola Sharks Jan. 5 in to Medart Jan. 17 and Maclay will
Franklin County, host Wakulla Jan. 20.
The Sharks outscored Wakulla FAMU High will play Wakulla
in every quarter except the fourth in Medart Jan. 24 and WHS will
in posting an i82-57 victory. The take the Panama City road trip to
Sharks got off to a fast start and play Arnold Jan. 27 and Bay Jan.
expanded a 25-14 first quarter 28. The final two regular season
lead into a 46-27 halftime advan- games will be played against
tage. The' lehd expanded to 67-39 Apalachicola in Medart Jan. 31
after three quarters of play. and 'FAMU High in Tallahassee
Three War Eagles scored in Feb. 2.
double figures as Sam Harris led The district tournament will
Wakulla with 23 points and The district tournament will
Terrance Webster added 16. begin Feb. 14 at Tallahassee
Darrion Wilson contributed 10 Godby. Bay, Arnold, Rickards,
Daron Wilson contributed 10Godby, Wakulla and East Gads-
points. Prince Poole added six Godby Wakulla and East Gads-
points d Clint Canfieled had den will compete in the district
points and Clint Canfield had tournament.
two.
Wakulla hosted district foe Wakulla fell to 0-11 overall and
Rickards Jan. 10' and will host 0-6 in district games.

Lady War Eagles Top Godby


The Wakulla' Lady War Eagle
soccer team finished the 2005-
2006 regular season with a win
and two losses last week. Coach,
Gordon Lepp and his players will,
have a few days off before tak-
ing part in the Class 4A District 2
tournament which will be hosted
by Panama City Bay High School
the week of Tu'esday, Jan. 17.
Leon defeated Wakulla 9-0 on
Jan. 3 before the Lady War Eagles
rebounded against Godby Jan. 5
with a 6-1. victory. The regular
season ended with an 8-0 loss
against. Panama City Bay. Both
Bay and Godby were district op-
ponents.
The players on the roster for
the district tournament include.
Megan Beibet, Jessica Bouchard,

RMS Wins Bea
The Riversprings Middle School
Bears wrestling team won the first
annual BearClaw Classic Dec. 17
at Wakulla High School. Six teams
participated in the tournament
and the Bears had a total of 10
champions.
All 25 wrestlers from RMS

Registration To

Be Held Feb. 4
The Wakulla County Babe Ruth
baseball league will host registra-
tion on Satuirday, Feb. 4 and Sat-
urday, Feb. 11 from 8 a.m. until
noon at the recreation park in
Medart. The fee is $90 per player.
The age determining date for
players is April 30. Players need
to bring a copy of their birth cer-
tificates or their Babe Ruth card.
Anyone interested in coaching
must attend a 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan.
17 meeting at the conference
room at the park in Medart. For
more information, call Noreen
Britt at 926-1847.


Lizzie Butler, Rachel Capps,
Caitlyn Chrisco, Kelsey Crossman,
Caitlin Fleming, Addie Flournoy,
Kara Graves, Ashelyn Hester,
Carly Hillier, Kasey Johnson, Kym
Keller, Rebekah Lepp, Kelly
Marks, Jessie Maynor, Jessica
McBride, Lauren McCall, Megan
McCallister, Amanda McCullers,,
Kara McLaughlin, Sarah Morgan,
Mary Kate Murphy, Dianna Por-
ter, Chelsea Schlegel, Katie Smith
and Melissa Walker.
Wakulla finished the regular
season with a record of 3-10-1
overall and 2-6-0 in district con-
tests. Wakulla beat Godby twice
and Port St. Joe once. The team
tied the Leon junior varsity.
Wakulla has played with a young
team with only a few seniors,
Coach Lepp said.

irClaw Classic
placed in the top four places of
their respective weight classes,
Tre' McCullough was named
the outstanding wrestler of the
tournament. Andrew Carter had
the fastest pin of the 'tourney
with an eight second fall. Once
again Tyler Hill finished the en-
tire tournament without allowing
a single point to be scored against
him.
The first place winners were
Jordan Montague, Brandon Crisp,
Tyler Hill, Tre' McCullough, Chase
Maxwell, Skyler Kreps, Brandon
Carden, Luke Taylor, Dustin
Kendall and Andrew Carter.
The second place finishers
were Seth Hyman, Tylor Hudson,
Adam Platt, Phillip House, Rich-
ard Coleman, Jarrod Ward, Tucker
Purvis and Cody Seber.
The third place finishers were
Josh Collins, Tyler Lanter, William
Harrod, Travis McCullough and
Justin Alday.
The fourth place finishers
were Randall Phillips and Tyler
Corbett.


Godby Jan. 10 and will host
Rickards Jan. 12 and John Paul II
on Jan. 13. The home stand con-
tinues Jan. 17 against Taylor
County and Jan. 19 against Mari-
anna. The district tournament
will be played at Panama City Bay


beginning Jan. 24.
Wakulla improved to 10-4-2
I overall and 5-1-2 in Class 4A Dis-
trict 2. The most victories in a
WHS season are 13 and WHS can
break the record against either
Taylor or Marianna.


Gay Leads Wakulla

To Victory Over Arnold


The Wakulla Lady War Eagle
basketball team dropped two
games last week before winning
its first district contest of the year.
Taylor County defeated Wakulla
50-32 Jan. 4 and East Gadsden
topped Wakulla 63-30 Jan. 5. But,
with only three more district
games to play, Wakulla defeated
Panama City Beach Arnold 51-35
Jan. 6, improving to 3-10 overall
and 1-6 in district games.
Kiara Gay and Sandi Dunlap
accounted for 27 of Wakulla's 32

Wrestlers

Win In

Lake City
The Wakulla War Eagle wres-
tling team won a six team tour-
nament at Columbia High School
in Lake City Saturday, Jan. 7 as
the team gears up for a busy week
against tough competition.
Wakulla wrestlers outdis-
tanced wrestlers from Columbia
County, Gainesville' Buchholz,
Tallahassee Chiles, North Marion
and Westport.
Six WHS wrestlers finished
undefeated including Adam
Plouffe at 112 pounds, Jeremy
Parmer at 130, Chris Helton at 135,.
Victor Porter at 152, Troy Walker
at 189 and Jon Dailey at 215.
Dailey ended his last match with
.an injury default. .
Mookie Forbes wrestled at 103,
Chris Johnson wrestled at 119 and
Spencer Brunson wrestled at 125.
Ryan Quails grappled at 140 while
Kendrick Hall wrestled at 145.
Carlos Wisham wrestled at 166.
Raven Schlegel narrowly missed
weight at 171 and did not wrestle.
Wakulla does not have a heavy-
weight wrestler.
Victor Porter was selected as
the outstanding wrestler in the
tourney and other wrestlers con-
tinue to make improvements, ac-
cording to Coach James Vernon.
"The team as a whole is get-
ting better as well as many of the
wrestlers on an individual level,"
said Vernon.
Wakulla will take on Godby in
a dual meet in Medart Jan. 11 and
will follow that with a three team
meet in Suwannee County a-
gainst the Bulldogs and a team
from Texas Friday, Jan. 13. On
Saturday, Jan. 14, Wakulla will
participate in a tournament in,
Suwannee County against .top:
competition.
"This one will test our salt and
really show a lot of our guys,
where they are at, this far into
the season," said Coach Aaron,
Griffin. "If we come out of this
one as a team placer with some,
of our guys winning their weight
classes, then we will feel good'
about the rest of the season."
The junior varsity will host the:
first ever JV tournament Saturday,"
Jan. 14' at WHS. Competition will,
start at 10 a.m.
Wakulla will travel to Orlando
Bishop Moore for a tournament
Jan. 21 and Lincoln and Wakulla
will battle in Tallahassee Jan, 25.
The Wakulla Bank Classic will be
held Jan. 28 in Medart.

Youth Players

Get In Free
The Wakulla High School boys'
soccer team will host Senior'
Night Tuesday, Jan. 17 at Reynolds
Stadium. Wakulla will host Tay-
lor County in junior varsity and
varsity action.
Wakulla County recreation
league soccer players will be ad-
mitted free with a paid adult ad-
mission. The players must be
wearing their recreation league
uniforms.
The JV game will begin at 5
p.m. and the varsity game begins
at 7 p.m. The recreation players
will be admitted to both games
with the paying adult.

Say You Sow It In The News


points against Taylor as Gay had
15 and Dunlap had 12. Gay hit a
three point field goal in the game.
Kelly Parker scored three points
and Sharisa Arnold had two.,
Wakulla was outscored in every.,
quarter.
.East Gadsden held Wakulla to
less than 10 points in every quar-
ter. Gay was the only Lady War
Eagle to score in double figures
as she had 17 points. Sharisa
Arnold and Sandi Dunlap had
four points each. Jameiha Max-
well had three points and Derron
Webster had two.
Maxwell had 10 rebounds and
three assists while Gay had four
steals and four blocks for Wa-
kulla.
Gay had a monster game for
the Lady War Eagles against
Arnold with 23 points, 13 re-
bounds, 10 assists, 11 steals and
two blocked shots. Wakulla ex-
panded a 10 point first quarter
lead to 11 at halftime and led 39-
24 after three quarters.
Jameiha Maxwell added 11
points along with Sharisa Arnold.
Sandi Dunlap scored four and
Jatterica Brown added two.
Wakulla hosted district rival
Godby Jan. 9 and played the Lin-
coln junior varsity Jan. 10. District

foe Rickards will host Wakulla
Jan. 12. Panama City Bay will
come to Medart Jan. 18 and the
Lincoln JV will visit Jan. 19.
Apalachicola will host Wakulla
Jan. 23. The district tournament
will be played the week of Jan.
31 at East Gadsden High School.


Registration For Spring

Sports Will Be Held


The Wakulla County Parks and
Recreation Department will host
spring sports registration Satur-
day, Feb. 4 and Saturday, Feb. 11
from 8 a.m. until noon at the rec-
reation park in Medart.
T-ball will be offered to
youths ages 4 and 5 with a regis-
tration fee of $35 per player.
T-ball will also be offered to
players age 6 and 7 with a regis-
tration fee of $35 per player.
Minor Cub league baseball
will be offered for players age 7
and 8 at a cost of $40 per player.
The Cub League Baseball
Association will have a league for
players ages 8 to 10 with a fee of
$45.
The Little League Baseball
Association will offer a league
,that will be open to players ages
11 and 12 with a registration fee
of $60.
The Babe Ruth Baseball As-


sociation will offer a league for
players ages 13 to 15 with a regis-
tration fee of $90.
The Girls Softball Associa-
tion will offer three age divisions
for fast pitch softball ages 8 to
10; ages 11 and 12; and ages 13 to
16. The registration fee is $50 per
player. A copy of the player's birth
certificate is required at registra-
tion for all leagues except. the
Minor Cub and T-ball leagues.
The girls softball age determin-
ing date is Jan. 1 while the other
leagues will use April 30 as the
age determining date. All players
must have proof of insurance or
purchase a policy from the county
at a cost of $7.50.
The deadline for T-ball and
Minor Cub is Feb. 11 at noon. The
association registration deadlines
vary. Register athletes early to
secure' a spot in the league,
For more information, call 926-
7227.


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Page 12-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006


I don't know about you but to
me it's really hard to believe it's
2006. That means I'm about 20
'; years older than I feel like I
should be. Well, since I can't do
:' anything about that, let's just talk
about fishing a little. The
weather looks like it's gonna be
; warm for a while and, with the
full moon Saturday, fishing may
be good this weekend. Fish have
- moved out of the creeks so you
, might concentrate on the oyster
a bars at the mouth of the rivers
, and creeks.
I just got off the phone with
. JR at the Aucilla and he said he
fished all day Sunday and the
, only saving grace to the trip was
some mullet he caught. The
heavy rain we had last week has
moved the fish out of the rivers
and creeks. He did have a cus-
tomer come through this morn-
ing who was heading to the
Econfina where he said his son
did real well this past weekend.
Scott said he didn't hear of
any trout or reds being caught
over the weekend. Otto Hough
:l fished with Randy Trousdell in
the Pinhook and they caught
Over 100 sheepshead. Robert
SHoughton and Tim Gordan
fished south of K Tower in 45 to
50 feet of water and caught their


'rom The Dock


"'-/ By CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL


limit of grouper and quite a few
rock bass. They were fishing LYs
on the bottom.
Juanise said she didn't hear of
anyone catching fish inshore and
very few were freshwater fishing.
Alan Pierce and Brian Bristo
fished off Dog Island with LYs
and got their limit of grouper in
about 40 feet of water.
Mike Hopkins said the fish
had moved out of the Carrabelle
River but quite a few trout were
caught around the docks and in
the bay. However, he said the
best spot to fish was the oyster
bars between the mouth of the
Carrabelle River and Carrabelle
Beach.
The marine lab is also full of
trout again and about the only
thing they will hit is live shrimp.
Doug Russell caught his limit on
shrimp and a few on slow sink-
ing Mirrolures.
The gulf side of Dog Island is
also producing trout in some of
the troughs on both the east and
west end of Dog Island. Reds are


.




By GEORGE WEYMOUTH
Years ago, back when I was a "living stud" (now I'm just living) I
used to wrestle alligators technically, I researched and relocated
nuisance alligators. My friend, Charles LeBuff of the Fish and Wild-
life Service on Sanibel Island, helped us get the state permits needed
to deal with these then threatened (status) critters and together,
over the years, we tagged and relocated hundreds.
SNow how.do you tag an alligator? You guessed it VERY CARE-
FULLYI! Nevertheless, I still ended up in the hospital twice from
gator bites, but that's another story To tag them, you've got two
. methods. Either you go after them. or you have them come to you,
; through the use of bait Baiting or feeding gators is now illegal in
"' Florida. but back then. in the 1970s. especially on Sanibel. every-
3 -!b:ody fed alligators.
The whole island was a preserve so no hunting was allowed, and
3 _anN, of its gators had become veiy big. bold and potentially dan-
S'""eious. from' being fe'd for years! People were feeding thernm '''rsh
mallows, bread you name it! Yes, even their pet poodles by acci-
dent and, of course, the big fear was these "tame" toothy reptiles
"with their constant smile would entice some young child to "drop
T ;in for lunch."
And, since I've moved up to beautiful Wakulla County in 1986,
-exactly that has happened on Sanibel and here, too. The moral of
the story is DO NOT feed alligators! If you know of someone who is
feeding them, you should have a long, serious, talk with them, and
if they continue this practice you should call the authorities pronto!!
Anyway, in order to relocate these crocodilians we'd take advan-
tage of their being fed habit, by tossing chunks of fat (trimmings
from a meat market) into the water and calling for them, and often
clapping our hands, too, the standard practice on the island. Almost
immediately here'd come old "jaws" swimming across the pond or
canal, literally creating a wake.
The fact we'd hung a snare between the gator and the floating
fat made little difference to the gator, for they constantly rush rac-
'coons, possums and other gulp sized meals in the wild, by plowing
through vines and other stringy vegetation. So, to the gator, the
snare posed no threat.
Our snare was made from plastic coated aircraft cable like we use
in our boats for steering. We clipped this cable to a long, strong
fishing pole and hung the snare off the poles's tip. Once the gator
swam through the noose, we'd raise the pole (like catching a fish)
and the noose would tighten around that scaly neck.
As one could imagine, all hell then broke loose. The 20 foot long
SAcable was torn out of the pole's clips and the pole was tossed off to
Sthe side; You dug your heels in and hung on. The water boiled as
Sthe large reptile rolled over and over trying to get free of this thing
around its neck!
Finally, with all your effort pulling on the cable, you manage to
'pull him to the surface (a big one can weigh hundreds of pounds)
,and there you meet you huffing and puffing and usually pouring
'I sweat and the gator hissing loudly with jaws agape, displaying
- *roughly 80 pointy teeth. Now you've got to pull him completely out
,of the water and pin him no wonder I no longer tag alligators!
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still being caught around the
docks in fairly good numbers
with live bait and gold spoons.


By NANCY GEORGE
Ornamental Horticulturist
we are fortunate enough to
live in an area where winters are
..mild. So, our gardening year be-
gins in January. Despite the fact
that it is one the coldest months,.
it's often one of the nicest times
to work outdoors while the days
are crisp and clear. There are so
many plants to care for and
January's tasks cannot be put off.
The promise of a new year to a
true gardener is that this year, my
garden will be better than ever.
What to Buy/Plant: Camellias,
and azaleas are best planted
while in bloom not only because
you can see what colors you are
adding to your garden but also
because you can take advantage
of the postbloom growth spurt,
Plant them in a location that pro-
vides afternoon shade,
Continue to add, color by
planting cool season annuals and
perennials, which include calen-
dula, dusty miller, dianthus, del-
phiniums, iceland poppies, lobe-
lia, nemesia, pansies, snap-
dragon, stock, and baby's breath.
Perennials include bulbine, glox-
inia, diascia, artemesia, ajuga,,
stokesia, heuchera, and lambs
ear.
Prune/Propagte: Prune decidu-i
ous fruit trees before new buds


Very few people are fishing
offshore or inshore for that mat-
ter, but Craig Ross got his limit
of grouper two days last week in
about 50 feet of water.
One thing is for sure, if you
don't go you're not gonna know
if they're biting. Remember to
leave that float plan with some-
one and be careful out there.
Good luck and good fishing!


have swelled. Prune roses, leav-
ing the thick healthy canes and.
removing suckers.
Fertilizing: Citrus suffering
from chlorosis will have light
green leaves with dark green
veins. Treat with chelated iron
combined with zinc. Apply ac-
cording to package directions or
purchase a product for foliar ap-
plications and spray onto the
tree. Feed cool season flowers
with a slow release fertilizer.
Edibles: Plant peas, onion sets,
asparagus, rhubarb, beets, car-
rots, cauliflower, broccoli, cab-
bage, spinach, mustard and tur-
nips. Water well until estab-
lished.
Pests: To prevent disease and
.rid plants of overwintering in-
sects, spray dormant sprays such
as horticultural oil or lime sul-
fur on deciduous trees and roses.
Check citrus for pests, look for
curled leaves, sooty'mold, and
various scales which attach
themselves to trunks, twigs, and
fruit.
For Fun: Most seed catalogs
arrive in January. Order now so
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For tides at the following points

Gulf Coast W eekly Alm anac to Dog island Listings:

Tide charts by Jan. 12 Jan. 18
Zihua Software, LLC


St. Marks River Entrance
Date High Low High Low
Thu -0.9 ft. 2.6 ft. 1.4 ft
Jan 12, 06 7:16 AM 1:51 PM 6:35 PM
Fri 3.2 ft. -0.9 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.2 ft.
Jan 13, 06 12:30 AM 7:55 AM 2:22 PM 7:18 PM
Sat 3.2 ft. -0.8 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.0 ft.
Jan 14, 06 1:12 AM 8:29 AM 2:52 PM 7:58 PM
Sun 3.3 ft. -0.7 ft. 2.8 ft. 0.9 ft.
Jan 15, 06 1:49 AM 8:58 AM 3:20 PM 8:36 PM
Mon 3.2 ft. -0.6 ft. 2.9 ft. 0.7 ft. .
.Jan 16, 06 2:25 AM 9:24AM 3:47 PM 9:13 PM
Tue 3.1 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.9 ft. 0.6 ft.
Jan 17, 06 2:59 AM 9:48 AM 4:13 PM 9:51 PM
Wed 3.0 ft. -0.2 ft. 2.9 ft. 0:6 ft.
Jan 18, 06 3:36.AM 10:11 AM 4:37 PM 10:31 PM

Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay

Date High Low High Low
Thu -0.6 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.1 ft.
Jan 12, 06 7:27 AM: 1:43 PM 6:46 PM
Fri 2.4 ft. -0.6 ft. 2.0 ft. 0.9 ft.
Jan 13, 06 12:22 AM 8:06 AM 2:14 PM 7:29 PM
Sat 2.4 ft. -0.6 ft. 2.1 ft. 0.8 ft.
Jan 14, 06 1:04 AM 8:40 AM 2:44 PM 8:09 PM
Sun 2.4 ft. -0.5 ft. 2.1 ft. 0.6 ft.
Jan 15, 06 1:41 AM 9:09 AM 3:12 PM 8:47 PM
Mon 2.4 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.2 ft. 0.5 ft. '
Jan 16, 06 2:17 AM 9:35 AM 3:39 PM 9:24 PM
Tue 2.4 ft. -0.3 ft. 2.2 ft. 0.5 ft.
Jan 17, 06 2:51 AM 9:59 AM 4:05 PM 10:02 PM
Wed 2.2 ft. -0.2 ft. 2.2 ft. 0.4 ft.
Jan 18,06 3:28 AM 10:22 AM 4:29 PM 10:42PM


City of St. Marks
Date High Low High Low
Thu 2.9 ft. -0.8 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.3 ft.
Jan 12, 06 12:18 AM 8:20 AM 2:27 PM 7:39 PM
Fri 3.0 ft. -0.8 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.1 ft.
Jan 13, 06 1:06 AM 8:59 AM 2:58 PM 8:22 PM
Sat 3.0 ft. -0.7 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.9 ft.
Jan 14, 06 1:48 AM 9:33 AM 3:28 PM 9:02 PM
Sun 3.0 ft. -0.7 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.8 ft.
Jan 15, 06 2:25 AM 10:02 AM 3:56 PM 9:40 PM
Mon 3.0 ft. -0.5 ft.. 2.7 ft. 0.7 ft.
Jan 16, 06 3:01 AM 10:28 AM 4:23 PM 10:17 PM
Tue 2.9 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.7 ft. 0.6 ft.
Jan 17, 06 3:35 AM 10:52 AM 4:49 PM 10:55 PM
Wed 2.8 ft. -0.2 ft. 2.7 ft. 0.5 ft.
Jan 18, 06 4:12AM 11:15AM 5:13 PM 11:35 PM

St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.

Date High Low High Low
Thu -0.9 ft. 2.1 ft. 1.4 ft.
Jan 12, 06 6:55 AM 1:35 PM 6:14 PM
Fri 2.5 ft. -0.8 ft. 2.1 ft. 1.2 ft.
Jan 13, 06 12:14 AM 7:34 AM 2:06 PM 6:57 PM
Sat 2.5 ft. -0.8 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.0 ft.
Jan 14, 06 12:56 AM 8:08 AM 2:36 PM 7:37 PM
Sun 2.5 ft. -0.7.. ft. 2.2 ft. 0.9 ft.
Jan 15, 06 1:33 AM 8:37 AM 3:04 PM 8:15 PM
Mon 2.5 ft. -0.6 ft. 2.2 ft. 0.7 ft.
Jan 16, 06 2:09 AM 9:03 AM 3:31 PM 8:52 PM
Tue 2.4 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.3 ft. 0.6 ft.
Jan 17, 06 2:43 AM 9:27 AM 3:57 PM 9:30 PM
Wed 2.3 ft. -0.2 ft, 2.3 ft. 0.5 ft.
Jan 18,06 3:20 AM 9:50 AM .4:21 PM 10:10 PM


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006-Page 13


Carrabelle
Apalachicola
Cat Point
Lower Anchorage
West Pass


High Tide
28 Min.
1 Hr., 53'Min..
1 Hr., 13 Min.
1 Hr., 36 Min.
1 Hr., 26 Min.


Shell Point, Spring Creek
Date High Low High Low
Thu -0.9 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.6 ft.
Jan 12, 06 7:13 AM 1:48 PM 6:32 PM
Fri 3.2 ft. -0.9 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.3 ft.
Jan 13, 06 12:27 AM 7:52 AM 2:19 PM 7:15 PM
Sat 3.3 ft. -0.9 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.1 ft.
Jan 14, 06 1:09 AM 8:26 AM 2:49 PM 7:55 PM
Sun 3.3 ft. -0.8 ft. 2.9 ft. 0.9 ft.
Jan 15, 06 1:46 AM 8:55 AM 3:17 PM 8:33 PM
Mon 3.3 ft. -0.6 ft. 2.9 ft. 0.8 ft.
Jan 16, 06 2:22 AM 9:21 AM 3:44 PM 9:10 PM
Tue 3.2 ft.. -0.5 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.7 ft.
Jan 17, 06 2:56 AM 9:45 AM 4:10 PM 9:48 PM
Wed 3.1 ft. -0.2 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.6 ft.
Jan 18, 06 3:33 AM 10:08 AM 4:34 PM 10:28 PM

Dog Island West End

Date High Low High Low 'High
Thu -0.9 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.5 ft. 2.3 ft.
Jan 12, 06 6:50 AM '3:43 PM 5:51 PM 11:00 PM
Fri -0.9 ft. 1.9 ft.. 1.4 ft. 2.3 ft.
Jan 13, 06 7:31 AM 4:00 PM 6:38 PM 11:57 PM
Sat- -0.8 ft. 1.9 ft. 1.3 ft.
Jan 14, 06 8:06 AM 4:15 PM 7:17 PM
Sun 2.3 ft. -0.7 ft. 1.8 'ft. 1.1 ft.
Jan 15, 06 12:49 AM 8:36 AM 4:28 PM 7:55 PM
Mon 2.2 ft. -0.6 ft. 1.8 ft. 1.0 ft.
Jan 16, 06 1:37 AM 9:00 AM 4:40 PM 8:34 PM
Tue 2.1 ft. -0.4 ft. 1.9 ft. 0.8 ft.
Jan 17, 06 2:24 AM 9:19 AM 4:51 PM 9:17 PM
Wed 2.0 ft. -0.3 ft. 1.9 ft. 0.6 ft.
Jan 18, 06 3:12 AM 9:36 AM 5:04 PM 10:03 PM


Low Tide
25 Min.
? Hrs., 38 Min.
0 Hrs., 31 Min.
? Hrs., 3 Min.
2 Hrs., 39 Min.






First
Feb. 5






Full
Jan. 14


Last
Jan. 22


New
Jan. 29


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
9:40 am 10:30 am 11:20 am 12:35 am 1:25 am 2:10 am
10:05 pm 10:55 pm 11:40 pm 12:10 pm 1:00 pm 1:45 pm 2:30 pm

3:30 am 4:20 am 5:10 am 5:55 am 6:45 am 7:35 am 8:20 am
3:50 pm 4:45 pm 5:30,pm 6:20 pm 7:15 pm 8:00 pm 8:50 pm


Sunrise
Sunset
Moon rise
Moon set
Brightness


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
7:34 am 7:34 am 7:34 am 7:34 am 7:34 am 7:33 am 7:33 am
5:56 pm 5:57 pm 5:58 pm 5:59 pm 6:00 pm 6:01 pm 6:01 pm
4:21 pm 5:18 pm 6:16 pm 7:14 pm 8:11 pm 9:05 pm 9:59 pm
6:24 am 7:15 am 8:01 am 8:39 am 9:13 am 9:43 am 10:09 am
87% 93% 99% 95% 89% 83% 77%


You never know about the
weather in our part of Florida,
but itais always interesting. This
past weekend w'sr cddl' ahd
bieezy. but otherwise delightful.
Flotilla 12 (St. Marks) and Flotilla
14 (Shell Pomint were busy with
projects. Some will be activated
in the near future. others later
in the year
Flotilla ;1 is cui rently present-
ing at their Shell Point auxiliary
station the member training
AUXWEA short for Coast Guard
Auxiliary W'Veathern specialty
course The first lesson, an intro-
ducto iy type. was taught Tues-
day. If you missed it, but are re-
ally interested and willing to
study diligently, you can make it
up. The remaining classes will be
Jan. 12,,17 and 19. Non-auxilia-
rists can attend, too, on a lim-
ited basis.
A special fifth session will be
held prior to taking the test on
Saturday, Jan. 22 at 9 a.m. Non-
auxiliarists may take the test, but
do not receive the ribbon (unless
they decide to join the Coast
Guard Auxiliary.)
Jim McGill, Flotilla .13's mem-
ber training officer, provided the
following information about the
course.
AUXWEA, the Auxiliary Wea-
ther speciality course, is de-
signed to present the auxiliary
with a thorough knowledge of
weather, its importance in the
marine environment and the
conduct of safe and effective op-
erations. An AUXWEA Specialist
is able to make accurate and valu-
able short range (several hours)
weather forecasts to enable crew
mates to, avoid dangerous
weather conditions while per-
forming their patrol activities.












**f;1

Bnl


SBoating Emergencies '

Coast Guard Station
Panama City .............. ...............1 (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown ........................ ............................. 1 (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
St. M arks (Flotilla 12)....................... ...........1..... (850) 906-0540
or ............... .............. ..... ..... .. .. ................. 893-5137
Shell Pomnt iFlotilla 13,1.............................. 1 S50) 026-5049
or ... ... ....... ...:....... ..... .. 926-5654


. ..
*. ^ '':


cc'~


I,.,


Duane Treadon, Debbie Champion And T


Long range (two or more days)
forecasts are also developed to
assist in planning operational
activities.


The Auxiliary Weather Special-
ist develops a keen sense of
weather processes, including
those which have an element of


VEGETABLE PLANT
VEGETABLE SEED
FLOWER SEED
SEED POTATOES
ONION SETS


danger: the thunderstorm, the
squall line, fog, tornadoes and
other severe phenomena. A com-
prehensive knowledge of wea-
ther processes and effects is es-
sential to the competent mariner,
whether on the high seas, the
coastal areas, lakes and rivers or
local reservoirs.
You can achieve success as an
AUXWEA Specialist by passing a
closed book, proctored examina-
tion with a score of 75 percent
or better. For additional inf6rma-
tion and non-auxiliarist registra-
tion, contact Jim McGill at 026-
S4550.
The Flotilla 13 meeting will be
this coming Saturday, Jan. 14 at
6 p.m. at the Shell Point auxil-
iary station. A covered dish buf-
fet and lots of fellowship will
follow the business meeting.
Guests are welcomed.


The following is. Carolyn
Brown Treadon's report for Flo-
tilla 12.,
"We had our first meeting of
the new year Saturday, Jan. 7. Our
immediate past Flotilla Com-
mander, Rich Rasmussen, swore
in our new staff officers.
"Tim Ashley, the new Flotilla
< Commander, presented Debbie
Champion with the Gilbert/
Champion award for her dedi-
cated service to the auxiliary. The
award was developed to honor
the memories of two of our
founding members, Don Gilbert
and John Champion. "


'I


S


1i 0I 1SA mSMnTeh F i


Rich Rasmussen


850-697-8403

OFFICE


~*) ~
E~ ~'

'I
.1'.
-



~iaiuir~4


New Staff Officers Of Flotilla 12 Were Sworn InI


"Our immediate past Flotilla
Commander, Rich Rasmussen,
was presented with an award for


his past two years of service/
Remember, Safe Boating IsrNo
Accident.


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Page 14-THE WAKULA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006


Sprayfield
Continued from Page 1
re oval of the cattle from the
serayfield and the elimination of
th fertilizer application will help
reduce the threat to the springs.
Commissioners voted 4-0 in
favor of the resolution and both
Kessler and Assistant to the City
IVDanager Michelle Bono said they
w|re pleased that the city and
county have been able to work
toward springs pollution threats
arpicably. Kessler invited city of-
ficials to the Jan. 3 meeting and
several other city officials at-
tesided in addition to Bono,
"There are 11 members of the
wpter committee and this is their
document," said Kessler. "This is
nrt my document. The county
commission is appreciative of the
efforts of the City of Tallahassee
inr providing information."
In 2005, the city approved a
$*,000 partnership with the
U.S. Geological Survey to drill at
least six monitoring wells to help
tr4ck where the water from the
sprayfield was flowing along
with documenting the nitrates
fond away from the sprayfield.
Bono said 10 wells have been
drilled to date and data from the
wells will be available in late
2c 6.
tThe city is working with the
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences (IFAS) at the University
ofV Florida to review sprayfield
operations for optimal nutrient
uptake. Tallahassee officials have
413o reduced the applications of
lahd biosolids by 90 percent by
purchasing a "Dragon Dryer" that
dr'es and processes waste into
Class A fertilizer that can be safely
used in home gardens.
In addition, the city is plan-
nihg to build a water reuse plant
within the next year that will
cl an wastewater to be used for
irrigation on the SouthWood Golf
,Cdurse and for landscaped medi-
a4s in the area, said Bono. "What-
ever the problem is, we want to
see it addressed," she said.
|A number of speakers at the
meeting said they were encour-
aged by the progress made in
acqdressing pollution concerns.
iMadeleine Carr said Wakulla
County must continue to work
with Tallahassee and Leon Coun-
ty officials to protect the springs.
"I'm very encouraged," said
Pa il Johnson, a committee mem-
bjr. "Things do need to change.,
Wikulla Springs is near dying or
dE d. It will not ever be the way
it was." Johnson said he hopes
Ta lahassee will consider con-
stiu:cting an Advanced Wastewa-
tei Treatment System.
,Resident Ron Piasecki said he
w4s pleased to see "regional co-
oieration" and not an adversarial

Glenda's
Continued from Page 1
further action on another appli-
cation for rezoning or for substan-
tially the same requested relief on
the same premises for a period
of. "12 months from the date of
the prior action disapproving
such relief," Biggins wrote in her
opinion. "Accordingly, this provi-
sion bars the board from renew-
ing the motion to approve the
rezoning because the motion
would provide substantially the
sane relief originally requested
orni the same property."
,Attorney Biggins added that
the county Land Development
Code "trumps anything related to
Robert's Rules of Order."
(Marvin McKenzie attended the
meeting Jan. 3 but declined to
sppak about the matter. None of
the board members offered any
coinments about the request ei-
ther.
tl1cKenzie was seeking a cornm.-
mercial zoning on four acres
wl(ich would allow him to move
th< store and expand it when the
highway is widened.
'Residents in the area have ex-
pressed their concern over the
rezoning changing the residential
nature of the community. Com-
mi'fsioner Howard Kessler led the


vo e against the request on the
grounds that the store is a non-
co:iforming use on the site due
to the agricultural land surround-
ing it. The store was already in
the community prior to rezoning.
.Wakulla County Community
D development Director Donnie
Sparkman disagreed with Kess-
lerns opinion stating that many
commercial parcels in Wakulla
Station are in the same situation
as lenda's.

Freedom Of The Press
Is Your Freedom
5-


relationship between the city and
county government. He added
that "Wakulla County septic sys-
tems are also contributing to the
problem."
"The sprayfield is only one
part of the problem," said Victor
Lambou. "I commend you for tak-
ing the first step but there's a
heck of a lot more to do."
Dorothy Routh and Jack Lep-
pert added that scientific evi-
dence presented in a 2005 Wa-
kulla Springs water quality deg-
radation report noted that ap-
proximately 16 percent of the ni-
trate pollution in the Wakulla
Rivershed comes from commer-
cial fertilizer and livestock. The
majority of the nitrate loading
comes from septic tanks and
wastewater treatment facilities.
Manley Fuller, president of the
Florida Wildlife Federation, said
the board adoption of the reso-
lution was a "clear signal to the
department (DEP) that Wakulla
County is officially interested in
this."
Crystal Wakoa said Tallahas-
see residents have been shocked
to see pictures of the Wakulla


Springs swimming area choked
out by nonnative plants such as
hydrilla. "There is ample evi-
dence that the sprayfield is a con-
tributing problem," she said.
Chad Hanson, water commit-
tee member and the head of Con-
cerned Citizens Of Wakulla
(CCOW) said the health of Wa-
kulla Springs must be protected.
"We really need to do some-
thing," he said. "This is every-
body's baby."
Following some discussion
about changing the wording of
the resolution, the document was
approved without dissent.
The Southeast Sprayfield was
developed in the early 1980s to
create an innovative use of
treated wastewater, city officials
said. Water used for household
needs is sent to the T. P. Smith
Treatment Plant where solids are
removed and wastewaterr is
treated. The treated water is then
piped to the sprayfield, where it
is used to irrigate plants that, in
turn absorb many of the nutrients
from the treated wastewater, low-
ering the amount that enters the
groundwater.


Federal Government

Recently Increased


Your Benefit
A new twist has recently
been added to an old prograin.
The US Government, speci-
fically the Department of
housing and Urban Develop-
ment (HUD), has just rolled
out a new program that may
greatly increase the amount of
mortgage that you can have on
your home.
If you currently have an FHA
mortgage on your home, this
new program may be of par-
ticular interest to you. If you
do not have an FHA mortgage,
you may still benefit from the
new program.
HUD realized that many
people are refinancing their
homes, converting their equity
into substantial savings by
paying off their monthly non-
mortgage debt and by re-
ceiving a greater tax deduction
on their personal income taxes.
Under the old system, a
refinance could potentially


result in the savings of thou-
sands of dollars over the life of
the loan. If this wasn't reason
enough, the new changes will
greatly increase the amount of
loan that you may qualify for,
while still keeping the security
that has always been present on
this Government insured pro-
gram. That translates into even
greater savings for you. Even if
you have already refinanced
your home within the past 2
years, it may still be Worth-
while to consider this program,
as the savings that you receive
may justify- the cost of another
refinance.
A Free report reveals how you
can be one of the first people to
take advantage of this new
program.
For more information, call
the Consumer Awareness hot-
line for a free recorded mes-
sage, anytime 24 hours a day at
1-888-483-0031, ext. 86188
Source: www.hud.gov


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006-Page 1


(S Top 10 Florida Seafood Trivia


Everyone knows that Florida
is world renown for the beauti-
ful beaches that border almost
2,000 miles of its coastline. The
attraction to the sea and sand
brings droves of tourists to the
state each year.
As a part of the sun and sea
experience, if you ask any vaca-
tioner what they want to do
while they are here, the response
will be nearly unanimous. They
plan to eat just as much Florida
seafood as they can possibly con-
sume.
The question is, as a Florid-
ian, could you guide them in this
pursuit? Do you know enough
about one of your state's largest
resources to carry on a conversa-
tion over dinner with your out,
of state guests? If not, the Florida
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services Bureau of
Seafood and Aquaculture Market-
ing want to help you avoid go-
ing out to sea without a paddle.
For starters; you could tell
your guests, according to the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser-
vation Commission, commercial
fishermen landed over 110 mil-
lion pounds of seafood in 2004.
Guess how many fishing trips to
sea it took to bring this much in.
It was a mere 226,710 trips. Now
that's a lot of traveling to bring
home the groceries. The whole-
sale value of all this seafood was
almost $189 million in 2004.
There are over 80 different
kinds of seafood in Florida, The
top 10 species landed are many
of your favorites so you'll be able
to share recipes and menus us-
ing them. But if you want to
throw around some eye opener
stats, here's a few you can use,
No surprise here arid shrimp
is at the, top of the chart with
almost 28 million pounds caught
from Florida' waters in 2004.
Don't even try to guess how'
many actual shrimp it took to
make up 28 million pounds un-
less you are having trouble sleep-
ing and prefer to count shrimp
instead of sheep.,
It's a good thing the shrimp-
ers harvest such large quantities
because, according to the United
States Department of Commerce,
it is the favorite among consum-
ers with an annual 4.2 pounds
consumed per person in 2004.
This consumption is up from pre-
vious years,
Grouper and blue crab come
in as a not-so-close second and
third with almost 12 million
pounds harvested in the same
year. The remaining top seven
species, in order of ranking by
pounds, include mullet, spiny
lobster, king and Spanish mack-
erel, stone crab claws, shark, and
oysters.
However, if statistics put 'you
to sleep, here are some fascinat-
ing little tidbits of information
about the top 10 species as well
as other seafood trivia.
Although you probably won't
hear this in your average social
circle, seafood is generally re-
ferred to as either finfish or shell-
fish. Finfish have a backbone,
fins and breathe through gills.
Some have scales like a red snap-
per but some, like catfish, do not.
Shellfish have, you guessed it,
shells. Some are called mollusks
which are enclosed in a shell, i.e.
scallops and oysters. Other shell-
fish are referred to as crustaceans
because they have a shell-like
exoskeleton. Shrimp and crabs
are examples.

Top Ten Trivia

The life cycle of a shrimp in
the wild is only about 13 months.
They reproduce rapidly which is
a good thing since so many
people like to eat them. Shrimp
fishing is only done at night. In
Florida, there are four shrimp
species of commercial value in
the Gulf of Mexico and South
Atlantic waters. They are catagor-
ized by four major colors; brown,
pink, white and royal red shrimp.
The majority of the shrimp har-
vested in Florida are the pink
species.
a When you order grouper in
a restaurant, depending on the


time of the year, you could be
served one of many different
kinds. In Florida, the main grou-
per species are gag, black, red,
scamp, snowy,, warsaw, yellow-
edge and yellowfin. It might be
fun to see if you can stump your
waiter or waitress by asking the
name of the grouper they are
serving.
How do you tell a boy blue
crab from a girl blue crab? The
tips of the female's claws are
bright red. Blue crabs are found
along Florida's Atlantic and Gulf


*.. "" .- "
z', : :- --


Rotary of


Wakulla County's

Annual



VALENTINE




CELEBRATION


Hudson Park

Saturday,

February 11


8 a.m. ~ Breakfast

10 a.m.~ Parade


11:30 a.m.

Entertainment & Music

Arts & Crafts

Food Booths

Carnival Rides


3 p.m. Drawing
First Prize $1,ooo000
Winn-Dixie Shopping Spree


Second Prize $500
Winn-Dixie Shopping Spree



Festival Vendors call Doug Jones 926-9685
S Parade Participants call Vic Culley 510-3592


iv g tBe ememfazin, we/discave new'nd HoeinespiAo ant new' cowaae


Big Bend Hospice


coasts. As a shallow water crab,
it can live in salt, fresh and brack-
ish waters of bays, sounds, chan-
nels and river mouths. They are
omnivorous, feeding on plants
and animals. During the winter
months, blue crabs move into
deeper water and enter a state
of semi-hibernation.
The mullet is considered a
vegetarian and is the only fish
that has a gizzard, much like a
chicken, that grinds up and di-
gests the plant materials. This is
another species that we all typi-
cally purchase just as "mullet"
but there are actually several va-
rieties. The striped mullet is com-
monly called a black mullet, gray.
mullet or jumping mullet. The
white mullet is typically referred
to as silver mullet.
All lobsters do not have
claws. The Florida spiny lobsters
have long feelers instead. When
caught by a predator. a spiny lob-
ster has the ability to break off
the appendage, 'escape and grow
another one. Another interesting
fact about spiny lobsters is that,
during seasonal migrations, they
form a single line, called "mar-
ches," as they move from shal-
low to deep water.
Quite an athlete, the king,
mackerel is noted for its remark-
able leaps, often clearing the
water by 10 feet or more. This
species 'are schooling fish that
migrate from South Florida wa-
ters in winter to more northerly
waters in the spring.
Spanish mackerel and snow-
bird tourists also have something
in common. This species is a
schooling fish that migrates
northward in the spring and re-
turns to southern waters when
the temperature drops. The aver-
age catch is less than 2 pounds
but a record weight of 12 pounds
has been recorded.
The stone crab can regener-
ate its claws three to four times.
Florida law forbids the taking of
whole stone crabs. Fishermen are
allowed to take claws at least 2
3/4 inches long and are required
to return stone crabs safely to the
water. Of course, they really do
have to be careful when they are
doing this because a stone crab's
claw is strong enough to crush a
finger. Ouchl
Sharks are ancient creatures


that have changed very little over
millions of years. They are char-
acterized by a cartilaginous skel-
eton (no true bones), five to
seven pairs of gills and moveable
eyelids. Except for the tail, sharks
do not use their fins for propul-
sion but use their pectoral and
dorsal fins for stabilization and
balance.
Sharks yield more marketable
products than any other single
group of fishes. The flesh is used
for food; the liver yields oils and
vitamins; they can be rendered
into fish meal or fertilizer; the
skin can be processed into
leather; they are used for bio-
medical research and dissection
in anatomy courses; and their
teeth often become jewelry.
People have been eating
oysters for a long, long time. The
cultivation of oysters began more
than 2,000 years ago when Ro-
mans collected oyster seed stock
near the mouth of the Adriatic
Sea and transported them to an-
other part of Italy for grow-out.
The Romans had such a passion
for oysters, that they imported
them from all over the Mediter-.
ranean and European coasts.
Today, oysters flourish in
Florida estuaries where nutrient-
rich fresh water meets the salt
water. They feed mainly on
single-cell plants. When feeding.
the oyster can pump and filter
25 gallons of water in 24 hours.
In Florida, where the water is,
warmer, they can reach market-
able size in less than two years.
It may take oysters as long as six
years to reach marketable size in
colder northern waters.

If this small amount of Florida
seafood trivia has been just
enough to whet your appetite to
learn more about the fascinating
sea creatures your state proudly
boasts, you can visit the Florida
Department .of Agriculture and
Consumer Services' Bureau of
Seafood and Aquaculture Market-
ing web site at www.fl-sea
food.com. At this site, you will
find more information about
these and other species. And, if
you are tired of preparing your
favorite seafood the same old
way, you can try something new
by using one of the many' reci-
pes.


Thi


; Bend
)spice


2889 Crawfordvllle Hwy., Suite 4
Crawfordvllle, FL 32327
(850) 566-2132
www.blgbendhosplce.org


In Honor/Memory of
Keith Putt
Albert Strickland
Judy C. Duprey
Diane M. Curlee
Mike Thomas
Mike Thomas
Dessera Atkinson
Eleanor S. Barbree
Blondell Hale
Roberts Sand Company, Inc.
Eleanor S. Barbree
Helen M. Porter
Scott Gaby
Helen M. Porter
Martin Causseaux
Sue Duggar & Norma Claycomb
Mom and Dad & Jimmy
David Coleman
Frank Slaughter
Frank Slaughter'
Frank Slaughter
Frank Slaughter
Cindy Hightower
Richard A. Wasser
Marion Dunbar,.
Burrell Nellums
Dale A. Elzie
Jane P. Fleming
Dorothy A. Frye
Dorothy A. Frye
Dorothy A. Frye
Scott &Julie Gaby
W. L. Moore
Jo Carroll
Edith S. Galloway
Dessera Atkinson
Connie, Staley, Brooke,;
Lorettaand Borinie
Barbara Guidos
Keith & Kathy Johnson
Forrest Hale
Olin R. Bishop
Cy/nthia L. Harris
James B. O'Bryan
Robert Hayes
Arthur R. McPherson
Jackie'Jackson-Coleman
Keith Johnson
Florence Keating, Jr.
Nicole, Justin, Gabby "'
and Solomon Keith
Lynn Maxwell
Marshall, Janet and Angie Spears
Shelly Johnson
Tom Clark
Charles S. Landrum
Lois K. Martin'
SSally Leonard
Benny Lovel
Benny Lovel
John Lynn
" Lottie Mann
Virginia Trimble
Malcolm McCoy
Anita Hill
Robin D. Oaks
LeAnne Johnson
Lisa A. Mooney
SFrances F. Musser
Sandra C. Mock
James B. O'Bryan
Greg Thomas
Greg Thomas
Eddie Page
Patricia B. Tadlock
VidaMae Pelt
Wynelle Wiginton,
Kathy A. Giddens
Bill Andrews
Fred Quigg
Hardy Revell .
Joeann V. Vesecky,
Gene Cutchin
Fred Quigg
Martha Brim
Martha Brim
Denis Crawford
Cathy C. Taylor
Willie S. Carpenter and Children
Greg Thomas
Marshall, Janet and Angie Spears
Alice E. Stokley
Richard W. Strickland
Albert Strickland
Michael K. Sullivan
Vida Mae Pelt
George S. Taff, Jr.& Dana Taff
George S. Taff, Jr. & Dana Taff
Martha Taunton
Roy Thompson:
Trey Thrasher
Anne L. Johnson
Cherrie L. Whaley
Greg Thomas
Stephen and Darlyne Bryarit
D.G. and G.W. Faughnan
Greg Thomas
NancyJ. Wyant
Wilton S. Mathis
Beverly Council
Sondra Gaczewski
Charles Updegraff
City of St. Marks
Air-Con of Wakulla, LLC
Francis S. Cooper
Wynelle Wiginton


Member FDIC
Member FDIC


r9Bank -,
SMember FDIC

A merts
..i.n ..oMember FDIC
Member FDIC


z o o 5~~


Z 'NW
wel


Heartfelt thanks to anyone who contributed to the Big Bend Hospice Tree of Remembrance.
Your gifts will allow Big Bend Hospice to provide care, comfort and hope to over 300
patients each day. In over 22 years, Big Bend Hospice has never turned away
anyone for financial reasons. With your continued support we never will.
"t'omneout/o tie cise- at/. timene a i~ntor t/we cle ,o e ,ow."


Memorial Name
Lois S. Abbott '
Gladys and H.T. Adams '
Robbie Alexander
Autumn L. Andrews
Cary Ard
Cary Ard
Buddy Atkinson '
Joe Barbree
Bobby Bateman
Darwin L. Britton
Julia Ann Scarborough Burgess a
Doris Amos Buttram a
Doris Amos Buttram l
Wayne M. Buttram
G.W. Causseaux C
Rev. Kenneth Claycomb T
Cynthia Cockerham .
Quintus & Alfrey Coleman 3
Buck Council
Dennis Council
Orlene Council
Sonny Council
Donald Dempsey o
Beth Dumas
Major Robert B. Dunbar
Linda Lou Eakin
Edgar Elzie .
Howard M. Fleming, Jr. .,
Carrie Ann Frye
Sharon Frye
Terry Frye
Billy,& Gilda Gaby '
Billy Gaby '
Huey L. Galloway u
Catherine Glover a
Troy Guess, Jr.
Eileen,Guides
Blondell Hale
Sharon Lee Henderson Hale
Angeline E. Harrell
Albert L. Harris
J.D. Harvey .
Margaret Elizabeth Hayes
Albert Humphries
O'neal Jackson, Sr.
Eric Johnson
Paul P. KeatingJr. : ,'~' o" r ,s ,
-- -meairn -mem ;srni mmor s E .nrsnot II
S Bradley Patrick keith r' ''
David Kendrick
Melanie King r
Willena Gail Kirkland
J. C. Kyle
J.C. Kyle
J. C. Kyle
Coman Cicero Leonard
Carolyn B. Lovel I
Carolyn B. Lovel
Phyllis Ann Lynn
Ruben F. Mann
Robert McCauley
Geraldine McCoy
Robin McDuffie
Bob McKenzie
James H. Metcalf
Susan Mooney ,
Charles "Charley" A. Musser
Gertrude'D. Oaks '
Gertrude D. Oaks
Josephine Oberhardt
Rolland B. Oberhardt
Edward L. Page, Sr.
Edward L. Page; Sr.
Edward M Pelt
Susan T. Peterson '
William Peurifoy
Louise Pittman '
Montie Quigg
Doris Broome Revell -
John S. ',Jack" Ridner
Chad Roberts A
Delma Roberts
Raymond Sarvis
Zachary Sarvis .
The Schlauch Family
Daisy Smith
David Smith
Roy & Eula Smith
Keith Spears
Roger Stokley
Colby Strickland
Gloria, Sadie and Abel Strickland
Helen Sullivah
Joan D. Swindall
Betty Taff
George S. Taff, Sr. 4
C. Earl Taunton
Ella Thompson
Antonio Vargas
Ettore "Otto" Vidas
Albert Whaley
Geneva Whisenant
George Wildern 3
Bill and Merle Williams
Griffin 0. Willis .*.
Charles M. Wyant





Susan T. Peterson p
GULF STATE
s ad sponsored by: Community


w






Page 16-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006


Teachers


Continued from Page 1
Spivey, Wakulla Middle; Karrie
Musgrove, Wakulla High; and Pat
Alexander representing Sop-
choppy Educational Center and
Wakulla Educational Center.
- Nominations from each school's
faculty began the process in No-
vember, and then nominees sub-
mitted professional and bio-
graphical information forms for
the faculty to read. Faculties then
voted for their school's Teacher
of the Year. Selected teachers'
qames were concealed until Su-
perintendent Miller visited each
school in December.
The seven are now in the run-
ning for Wakulla County's Teach-
er of .the Year, who will be an-
nounced at the end of January.
4 qualified panel of judges from
outside Wakulla County will rate
4n extensive Written packet and
an interview from each teacher.
the 2006 Wakulla County Teach-
4r of the Year will then compete
With the other 66 districts' Teach-
ers of the Year for the Florida
Teacher of the Year award in the
spring.
Renee Kelly of Crawfordville'
Elementary School is certified in
Elementary Education and also
has a degree in Marketing. Eight
of her 12 years have been in her
current position teaching fifth
grade. Her beliefs about teaching
are clear: "Being a caring teacher
who goes above and beyond to
reach a child is a rewarding and
important service."
Kelly is a member of the Delta
Kappa Gamma honorary women
educators' organization, a Na-
tional Board Certified teacher,
jand in Who's Who Among
American Teachers, She is a
member of the School Advisory
Council and coordinates the
Brain Bowl team, among her
many other duties.
Brooke Mohr of Medart El-
ementary has certification in
Early Childhood, Elementary
Education, and Gifted Studies.
She has been teaching for 21
years and is currently working
with fourth graders. Besides en-
gaging students in a lifelong pur-
suit of learning, she states, "I
believe that it is my role to teach
kindness and respect and to
riake my classroom a safe and
inviting place."
t Mohr serves as a representa-
tive for the Wakulla County
Teachers Association, and is a
ember of both Delta Kappa
qamma and the National Coun-
cil of Teachers of Mathematics.
.he has served in many leader-
ship positions such as chairper-
spn of the Brain Bowl, the Spell-
ing Bee, and Social Studies Fair.
Shadeville Elementary boasts
kindergarten teacher Patricia
7Thomas as their Teacher of the
lear. She is certified in Early
Childhood, Elementary Educa-
tion, Reading, and holds a Mas-
ter's degree in Educational Lead-
ership. With almost 30 years of
teaching experience, Thomas be-
lieves that "children are unique
a'nd valuable resources to our
ever-changing world. Teaching is
a way to touch our future and
make a positive difference within
qur society."
SLeadership positions she has
held 'include Wakulla County
Teachers Association President,
PTO teacher representative,
School Advisory Council mem-
ber, and membership in Delta
Kappa Gamma.
Bill Taylor is the representa-
tive from Riversprings Middle
school. With degrees in History
nd Social ci ience Education, he
also is certified to teach middle
grades language arts, science and
mhath. For five years he has
taught many subjects, specializ-
ihg in social studies. He notes, "I
aim most proud of my three yehr
participation in the Teaching
American History grant that
seeks to examine, quantify, and
improve the methodology of
teaching history in the class-
rbom."
STaylor is the RMS Brain Bowl
sponsor and is the creator of the
Igiving History memorial photo
project. He recently became Na-
tionally Board Certified.

Lawhon


Continued from Page 1
cuss expected heart surgery.
Chairman LAwhon thanked
the community for the concern
shown during his time of illness.
While the doctors told Lawhon
to take it easy prior to having
surgery, the board chairman did
Aot miss the opportunity to
vatch his peers on cable televi-
sion during the Tuesday, Jan. 3
lioard.meeting.


At Wakulla Middle School,
Katherine Spivey represents her
teachers. She has earned certifi-
cation in middle grades language
arts and math, plus Science and
Social Studies Education. With
one Master's degree in Curricu-
lum and Instruction, she is work-
ing on a second one in Adminis-
tration and Supervision. She has
been teaching eighth graders for
13 years.
Spivey believes, "As a teacher,
my role is to facilitate the learner,
guide them and, most of all, be-
lieve that their individual dreams
can be achieved." She is coordi-
nator of the Veteran's Program,
chairperson of the Science Fair,
yearbook sponsor, and a mem-
ber of Delta Kappa Gamma.
Wakulla High School's Teacher
of the Year is Karrie Musgrove.
With a Master's degree in Excep-
tional Education, she specializes
Sopchoppy


Continued from Page 1
wine because it is within 1,000
feet of a church.
The new ordinance is more
stringent, dropping the 1,000 foot
restriction, limiting alcohol sales
to a percentage of food sales and
setting hours of operation.
After last month's vote, Mar-
tin said the restaurant would
close until there was a city com-
mission that supported local busi-
nesses.
Prior to the Monday night
meeting, on the plywood over
Backwood's windows, someone
spray painted a plea for the res-
taurant to re-open.
City Commissioner Eddie
Evans was a proponent for work-
ing out a revised ordinance
though he ultimately joined with
the majority of other commis-
sioners in voting against the
restaurant's request. Evans then
made a motion, which passed
unanimously, to ban all alcohol
sales for on-site consumption.
Evans backed away from the
idea of a ban on Monday, and
made the motion to move for-
ward with the special meeting in
two weeks.
City Commissioner Richard
Harden seconded the motion, but
commented that it, was not an
indication of how he would vote
because he had not made up his
mind.
Evans said that the issue of
alcohol sales was splitting the
community. "There's strong feel-
ings on both sides and hard feel-
ings on both sides," he said.
"We're at a flashpoint, I'm afraid."
Prior to the idea of the refer-
endum and temporary sales,
Evans asked Siedler to consider
what else could be done to pro-
mote and support the city's
downtown businesses. At one
point, Evans shook his head and
expressed dismay that "every-
thing could go iip in smoke over
whether somebody can drink a
beer while they're eating a pizza."
During public comments,
former Sopchoppy mayor Robert
Roddenberry was sharply critical
of the city commission's no vote
last month. "I don't know what
message y'all intended," he said.
"But the message sent out was,
'we don't want you, we don't
need you, and we will make it as
hard as possible on you.'"
"Don't throw up a smoke-
screen," Roddenberry said of the
issue. "It's not about alcohol. It's
about power and control, and a
limited number of people who
want to hold on to power."
A show of hands among the
50 or so people, at the meeting
showed it about even between
city residents who support Back-
D0 '+

oN'fWaf

S~c((AM ~g


many sertocjs
4rsea~fes can fOe
prevented Ofy
%/accrflatflo.
Take me to see the
Vetermnarlafl5at
FORMSTANIMAL
ffOSPITAL'
92.6-7153


in teaching all subjects to stu-
dents with special needs and
exceptionalities. For 13 years she
taught emotionally handicapped
and severely emotionally dis-
turbed students in the WHS be-
havior program. She currently
teaches Intensive Reading to
ninth graders and is a National
Board Certified teacher,
Musgrove observes, "In addi-
tion to teaching the subjects that
we are assigned, we also teach
ethics, relationships and how to
live in the real world. Bringing
this to the classroom with re-
spect and love creates a safe en-
vironment in which a student
can take risks and learn."
' She is a team leader for the
Positive Behavior Program, vice
president of the Wakulla County
Teachers Association, and the
Read-a-Thon coordinator.
Pat Alexander represents


Wakulla and Sopchoppy Educa-
tional Centers. With 19 years ex-
perience, she has been teaching
in the Wakulla Pre-Kindergarten
program for five years. She is cer-
tified to teach Elementary Edu-,
cation, Pre-K, has a Master's de-
gree in Varying Exceptionalities
for special needs children, and is
a National Board Certified teach-
er.
For her, "Foremost is develop-
ing a relationship with the child
so that he/she feels important
and successful." She is a mem-
ber of Delta Kappa Gamma, a
mentor/trainer for Pre-K, the
School Improvement co-chair,
and is on the Curriculum Com-
mittee.
These teachers and all of the
Wakulla County teachers will be
honored at a breakfast on Feb.
17 at Wakulla'Middle School.


woods being allowed alcohol the hearing on conditional use
sales and those opposed. Those was supported by Evans, Harden,
from outside the city limits were Colleen Skipper and Mayor Rob-
overwhelmingly in favor of the ert Greener. City Commissioner
restaurant selling alcohol. Martha Hodge Evans cast the dis-
The 4-1 vote to go forward with senting vote.

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PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE

The City Council of the City of Sopchoppy will be holding
a public hearing and a special called meeting for the
purpose of gathering public opinion with regards to the
sale of beer and wine at Backwoods Pizza. Ordinance
2005-02, an Ordinance of the City of Sopchoppy with
regards to the sale of alcoholic beverages within the city
limits, provides that the location for sale of alcoholic
beverages must be approved by the City Commission by
resolution.at a public hearing held specifically for that
purpose.

The Public Hearing and Special Called Meeting of the
Council will be held, Tuesday, January 24, 2006 at 7 p.m.
The meeting will take place at the City Council Meeting
Room, 100 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL.

If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the
above City Council with respect to any matter considered
at such hearing, he will need a record of the proceedings
and for such purpose may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made.






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Mary Shepard Broker 528-0226
Jacque Eubanks 228-3218
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Donald R. Smith 984-5477
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Tom Maddi 591-8415
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FIRST READING OF ORDINANCE 79-4
AMENDMENT #3
Establishing a Plan for Flood Damage Prevention and
Protection on January 12, 2006 regular meeting at
7:30 p.m. at 788 Port Leon Drive, St. Marks, FL.
Ordinance may be inspected by public at 788 Port Leon
Drive during regular business hours.



SECOND READING OF ORDINANCE 79-4
AMENDMENT #3
Establishing a Plan for Flood Damage Prevention "and
Protection on January 25, 2006 special meeting at
12:00 p.m. at 788 Port Leon Drive, St. Marks, FL.
Ordinance may be inspected by public at 788 Port Leon
Drive during regular business hours.





WMKINNEY
PROPERTIES



Deanne

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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006-Page 17


Board Hopes To Address Flooding


A violent storm system dumped
up to five inches of rain on
Wakulla County Monday, Jan. 2
and created temporary flooding
at several locations around the
county,
But, for Crawfordville resident
Melody Redman, the flooding
nightmare did not end as the rain
stopped and the water drained
into the soil in the late afternoon
on Jan. 2..
Jimmie Doyle, a resident off
Rehwinkel Road, told commis-
sioners that new development in
the Magnolia Gardens and Grin-
ers Addition subdivisions flood-
ed Redman's property including
a van parked on the property.
She blamed the county's lack
of a comprehensive stormwater
plan for the problems. Doyle sug-
gested putting a moratorium on
county development until a
stormwater drainage plan can be
developed. She said a stormwater
plan would make homeowners
aware of the threat while stop-
ping developers from flooding
surrounding property. "They (de-
velopers) don't have any guid-
ance," said Doyle.
Redman agreed with Doyle
and said the recent development
near her home resulted in trees
being removed and loads of dirt
being hauled into the property.
"The water used to go into the
flood plain, now I have a lake in
my yard," said Redman.
The extreme weather caused
rain water to fill her septic tank,
drain field, air conditioning unit
and partially flood her van.
"There is no planning in this,"
she said. '"The water is all com-
ing my way."
Commissioner Howard Kessler
expressed empathy toward Red-
man. "I have seen your property,"'
he' said. "What recourse do we
have?" he asked Wakulla Commu-
nity Development Director Don-
nie Sparkman.
Sparkman said the Magnolia
Gardens and Griners Addition
property has been platted since
the 1950s, 30 years before the
county created development regu-
lations such as zoning.
"That area is in the bottom of
a bowl," he said. "'It has flooded
before." Sparkman added that
Wakulla County received an in-
tense rainfallin such a shoi oe"&




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riod of time that there was stand-
ing water on even high ground.
Commissioner Ed Brimner
stated that properties in the
Wakulla Gardens area have suf-
fered the same fate. "It's past time
to address this," said Brimner.
"Half of the board was not alive
when this stuff was approved. It
is a problem and we're going to
have to solve it. It's not going to
be cheap."
Commissioner Kessler told
Redman the county would at-
tempt to work with her to find a
solution. Sparkman concluded

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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006-Page 19


Sheriff's Report


Wakulla County Sheriff's Of-
fice officials arrested a 33-year-old
Huntsville, AL man in connection
with an altercation in the recre-
ation yard at the Wakulla County
Jail, according to Sheriff David
Harvey.
Nathan Larry Parsons was
charged with aggravated battery
and obstructing justice on Jan. 5.
Parsons allegedly beat up Jimmy
L. Timmons, Jr., 30, of Crawford-
ville. Timmons was taken to a
Tallahassee hospital for treat-
ment of his injuries.
Parsons allegedly knocked
Timmons to the ground and be-
gan biting the victim's left cheek
and ear lobe. He told investiga-
tors that he wanted to get at
Timmons for "snitching on him."
Timmons declined to speak to
investigators,
Lt. Sherrell Morrison investi-
gated with Officer Andree Brown,
Officer Julie Martin, Sgt. John
Johnson and Captain Tommy
Martin.
In other activity reported by
the Wakulla County Sheriff's Of-
fice during the past week:
On Jan. 4, Michael S. Cronan
of Crawfordville reported a bur-
glary and grand theft at his resi-
dence. A forced entry was discov-
ered and a bank, firearm, paint
guns, television, jewelry, electron-
ics, DVDs and other items, valued
at $2,210, were taken. Suspects
have been identified through evi-
dence collected at the scene.
Deputy Billy Jones, Deputy Eddie
Wester, Det. Scott DelBeato and
Det. John Schliep investigated.
On Jan. 4, Richard W. Harden
of Sopchoppy reported a burglary
of tools from his home. A forced
entry was discovered and $210
worth of property was taken. Two
other neighbors of the victim re-
ported an unknown male in the
neighborhood. Deputy Billy Jones
investigated.
On Jan. 5, Jason E. Rooks of
Tallahassee reported a criminal
mischief in Crawfordville. Rooks,
of Turner Heritage Homes, re-


ported a broken window at a
Scotch Pine Court construction
site. The window had been bro-
ken with a brick, Damage is esti-
mated at $100. Deputy Scott
Powell investigated.
On Jan. 3, Barbara A. Scott
of Crawfordville reported a crimi-
nal mischief as someone punched
holes in three of her car tires. Dam-
age was estimated at $135 and a
suspect has been identified.
Deputy Scott Rojas investigated.
On Jan. 5, James W. Cooper
of Panacea reported a burglary at
his home. Prescription drugs
were taken and a suspect has
been identified. Deputy Roger
Rankin investigated.
On Jan. 5, William Henry
Miller, 26, of Tallahassee was
charged with possession of nar-
cotics and possession of narcotic
equipment following a traffic
stop. Law enforcement officials
discovered that Miller was driv-
ing with a vehicle tag that had
been assigned to a different ve-
hicle. He was also driving with a
suspended license.
The K-9, Cowboy, discovered .8
of a gram of methamphetamine
in the vehicle. Deputy Matt
Helms, Deputy Rick Buckley and
FHP Trooper Chuck Cook investi-
gated.
On Jan. -7, Maurice Raker of
Crawfordville reported the theft
of fishing equipment from his
home. An aluminum boat and
fishing poles, valued at $130, were
taken. Deputy Evelyn Brown in-
vestigated.
On Jan. 7, Maurice Raker of
Crawfordville reported a criminal
mischief as someone set four
rolls of hay on fire. The hay is
valued at $140 and volunteer
firefighters were called to the
scene. Deputy Evelyn Brown in-
vestigated.
SOn Jan. 8, Patricia Politis of
Crawfordville reported that
Raker's hay rolls ignited again.
Juveniles were observed near the
hay rolls. Deputy Nick Petowsky
investigated.


On Jan. 6, Lisa R. Shiver of
Crawfordville reported a criminal
mischief as someone broke some
glass in her bedroom and kicked
a crock pot into the front yard. A
suspect has been identified. Dam-
age is estimated at $20. Deputy
Danny Harrell investigated.

On Jan. 6, Ben L. Williams
of Tallahassee reported a retail
theft as a 17-year-old Craw-
fordville male juvenile removed
a loaf of garlic bread from Winn-


Dixie without paying for it. The
bread is valued at $2.49. The ju-
venile was caught outside the
store with the bread stuffed un-
der his jacket. The juvenile was
issued a trespass warning at the
store and charged with retail
theft. Deputy Vicki Mitchell inves-
tigated.

On Jan. 6, Tena L. Altman of
Crawfordville reported the theft
of a bicycle, valued at $45. The
bike was taken from the victim's


home. Deputy Evelyn Brown in-
vestigated.
On Jan. 6, David A. Grethe
of Crawfordville reported the
theft of a chain link dog kennel,
mobile home skirting and a
smoker, valued at $1,012. The
items were taken from the vic-
tim's lot following the removal
of a mobile home.
Det. Chris Savary learned the
whereabouts of the missing prop-
erty from another source. The


detective observed the stolen
property at the home of David
Lee Free, 20, of Crawfordville. Free
was charged with grand theft and
was taken to the county jail. ,
The Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office received 685 calls for ser-
vice during the past week.
Note to our readers: The
people who are reported as
charged with crimes in this col-
umn have not yet been to trial
and are therefore presumed in-
nocent until proven guilty.


Court Shorts


One part of a lawsuit was dis-
missed against the Wakulla
County School Board that claims
a football player was beaten up
by'a group of other football play-
ers during spring training last
year.
There are two counts in the
lawsuit: one claims the school
board was negligent in supervi-
sion of the students during the
alleged incident, and the other is
a count of battery, arguing that
the football players acted as
agents for the school board in the
alleged beating.
At a hearing on Monday, Jan.
9, Wakulla Circuit Judge N. Sand-
ers Sauls dismissed the count of
battery, saying there was no alle-
gation of action by the school
board itself to batter the student.
The count of negligence re-
mains in the case, with the fam-
ily alleging the school board had
a liability because it was negli-
gent in its hiring of personnel
and knew or should have known
of problems.
The lawsuit claims the student
was attacked by a group of eight
other football players during prac-
tice in April 2005.
The student is represented in
by Tallahassee attorney Phelicia
Stiell.
The school board is repre-
sented by Tallahassee attorney
Holly Dincman.
Judge Sauls also clarified dis-
covery for the parties, saying the
school board could supply re-
ports on past violent incidents at
the school with names of any
student not involved in the spe-


cific incident redacted to protect
confidentiality.
In other court matters this
week:
A man who didn't show up
at the jail to serve a '10 day sen-
tence was ordered to serve an
additional 10 days in jail.
Henry Powell, 56, had been
ordered by County Judge Jill
Walker to serve 10 days in the
Wakulla County Jail for driving
with a suspended license. He did
not show up on his report date.
At misdemeanor arraignment
on Tuesday, Jan. 10, Powell told
the judge, that he was unable to,
go to jail because his health had
deteriorated with high blood
pressure.
Judge Walker noted that
Powell made no effort to contact
the court to explain why he felt
he wouldn't be able to serve his
time, and it was only after his
report date that family members
tried to contact the judge to say
that Powell had health problems.
It was also after Powell got
arrested in Leon County on a new
criminal charge.
Judge Walker found Powell in
'contempt of court and ordered
him to serve an additional 10
days in jail.
A woman pleaded guilty to
a criminal charge of disclosing
confidential information and was
given a sentence that included 40
hours of community service and
six months of probation.
Teresa Hampton was charged
with disclosing a report from the
state Department of Children and
Families that dealt with her ex-


mother-in-law, who works for the
school board. She admitted to
meeting with Superintendent of
Schools David Miller and divulg-
ing the contents of the report,
which was a background check
on her ex-mother-in-law.
It was noted in open court,
however, that the information in
the report was incorrect. The re-
port was on a person with the
same name who had an exten-
sive criminal record. Though
Hampton had signed a confiden-
tiality agreement to get the re-
port, she indicated she divulged
it out of concern for children.
Disclosure of confidential in-


formation is a second degree
misdemeanor punishable by 'a
maximum sentence of 60 days in
jail and a $500 fine.
At arraignment on Tuesday,
Judge Walker chastised Hampton
for dealing with the matter "in a
brash and inappropriate way." ,
The judge sentenced the
woman to pay the $190 court
costs, perform 40 hours commu-
nity service or pay it off at mini-
mum wage, write a letter of apol-
ogy to the victim, have no cori-
tact with the victim, and serve six
months probation with early tei-
mination possible after fulfilling
the conditions.


Helms, Harvey With Harley-Davidson Road King


Sheriff's Office Adds A


Harley For Traffic Work


Through a grant and partner-
ship with the Florida Department
of Transportation (DOT), the
Wakulla County Sheriff's Office
recently added to its stock of ve-
hicles.
Deputy Mike Helms is the op-
erator of a 2006 Harley-Davidson
Road King which was acquired at
a cost of $26,000. The motorcycle
has helped Deputy Helms during
his traffic details.
"I didn't think I'd ever see the
day when we'd have the traffic
density to justify a motorcycle,"
said Sheriff David Harvey. But
unprecedented growth in Wa-
kulla County has required the
sheriff to acquire the motorcycle
for traffic patrols.
The motorcycle not only has
all of the law enforcement decals
but was manufactured with a
hard mount radio on the back,
antilock brakes, fuel injectionand
radar.
Citizens Academy

Will Be Held
The first Wakulla County
Sheriff's office Citizens Academy
of 2006 will be offered beginning
Tuesday, Feb. 14 from 6:30 p.m.
until 8:30 p.m.
The 12 week program will be
held on consecutive Tuesday
nights and a meal will be pro-
vided. The program discusses all
aspects of the sheriff's office op-
eration.
To register for the program, call
Major Larry Massa at 926-0821..


The motorcycle is more eco-
nomical to operate and eases the
workload for other deputies in
handling funerals, traffic control
and special events such as pa-
rades, said the sheriff.
Deputy Helms said the motor-
cycle has been a very effective
addition to the sheriff's fleet of
vehicles. "We're really proud of
it," said the sheriff. The deputy
communicates with the dispatch-
ers through his protective helmet.
In addition, the DOT and
WCSO have partnered to allow
the office to acquire an $18,500
orange road message board. The
boards are used along the high-
way to warn motorists of traffic
conditions or other advisories.
Last year the county borrowed
message boards to alert property
owners of the location of hurri-
cane relief officials.
The first round of DOT grants
allowed the county to acquire the
Chevrolet Monte Carlo that
Deputy Helms uses for traffic
enforcement as well. Leon County
law enforcement officials also
have a Monte Carlo that is used
for traffic enforcement and the
two counties work in conjunction
when necessary.
The sheriff's office recently put
emphasis on road safety and the
program has already paid divi-
dends as only three road deaths
were recorded in the county in
2005, In previous years, county
highway fatalities have exceeded
10.


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Page 20-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006



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Legal Notice |


NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED #2005-025
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Denzel Dockery
the holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate No. 475. Year of Issuance 1998
Description of Property: 25-5S-02W-046-03407-
000. Aqua De Vida, Block H. Lot 20
Name in which assessed: David R. Cole
Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State
of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law the property described
in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bid-
der at the courthouse door on the 1st day of Feb-
ruary. 2006 at 10:00 a.m.
Dated this 19th day of Dec., 2005.

Signature: Brent X. Thurmond. Clerk
By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court
Wakulla County, Florida
December 29. 2005, January, 5, 12. 19, 2006


Legal Notice


NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED #2005-024
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Clyde K. Carte(,
Sr. or Deloriss Fort the holder of the following cer-
tificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to
be issued thereon. The certificate number and year
of issuance, the description of the property, and
the names in which it was assessed are as fol-
lows:
Certificate No. 1657. Year of IBsuance 2002
Desc.,,pri.on or Prcperr, '00-00-036-007-09707-
000 Pan ,era Eut., Se:-:,.n 1,.Lot 12
Name in which assessed: "Mary D. & Carroll A.
Ashby
Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State
of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be re-'
jeere,3 ac,: r.i.-.y no -,. me property described
r. c., ':r, ,:nrc.,- r., ,i te sold to'the highest bid-
-ier a ire r ..inc, or on the 1st day of Feb-
ruary. 2006. at 10:00 a.m.
Dated this'19th day of Dec., 2005.

Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By:.Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court
Wakulla County, Florida
DeC-cemrr ,29. 2005. January, 5, 12, 19, 2006


Legal Notice f


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 05-231-CA
TIM)THY B:--"E -t t. '
Plaintiff.
v.
ZORA BAKER; ANGELINE TAYLOR THOMAS;
WILLIE ALBERT TAYLOR; VARNELL TAYLOR;
HARRY L. TAYLOR: MYRTLE D. TAYLOR; et al..
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ZORA BAKER; ANGELINE TAYLOR THO-
MAS; WILLIE ALBERT TAYLOR; VARNELL TAY-
LOR; HARRY L: TAYLOR; MYRTLE D. TAYLOR;
.THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF LIZZIE TAYLOR; THE
UNKNOWN HEIRS. DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS CREDITORS, TRUST-
EES, OR OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST ZORA BAKER,
ANGELINE TAYLOR THOMAS, WILL ALBERT
TAYLOR, VARNELLTAYLOR, HARRY L. TAYLOR,
OR MYRTLE D. TAYLOR; AND ALL UNKNOWN
PERSONS, IF ALIVE, AND IF DEAD. OR NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, THEIR UN-
KNOWN SPOUSES. HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANT-
EES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS. CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES OR OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE UN-
KNOWN PERSONS; ANY RIGHT TITLE OR IN-
TEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN
THIS i NJCTICE OFi ACT,-.,N'
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet
title to the following property in Wakulla County,
Florida:
Commencing at a point that intersects the
south boundary of Section 10, Township 3
South. Range 1 West, and the westerly
right-of-way limits of State Road S-365.
and run thence North 10 degrees 22 min-
utes 23 seconds West along said right-of-
way limits 586.19 feet to a point of curve
to the left, whose radius is 7589.44 feet
and central angle is 5 degrees 37 minutes
50 seconds, then run along said curve
Northwesterly a chord bearing of North 11
degrees 14 minutes West a distance of
229.54 feet then North 11 degrees 38 min-
utes West a distance of 51.8 feet. thence
along said curve northwesterly a chord
bearing of North 13 degrees 25 minutes
40 seconds West a distance of 238.82 feet
to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said
POINT OF BEGINNING, run North 88 de-
grees 59 minutes 35 seconds West 975.30
feet to the west boundary of the Lizzie
Taylor property, then run North 1 degrees
17 minutes 27 seconds East along west
boundary of Lizzie Taylor property 290.0
feet, then run South 89 degrees 03 min-
utes 20 seconds East 888.34 feet to the
westerly right-of-way limits of State Road
S-365, then run South 16 degrees 00 min-
utes 15 seconds East along said right-of-
way 77.77 feet to a point of curve to the
right, whose radius is 7589.44 feet and
central angle is 5 degrees 37 minutes 50
seconds, then run along said curve South-
easterly a chord bearing of South 15 de-
grees 09 minutes 11 seconds East a dis-
Stance of 225.53 feet to the POINT OF BE-
GINNING. In the Southwest Quarter of
Section 10, Township 3 South, Range 1
West, Wakulla County, Florida.

has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on GARVIN B. B OWDEN, the Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is Gardner, Wadsworth, Duggar,
Bist & Wiener, P.A., 1300 Thomaswood Drive, Tal-
lahassee, Florida 32308 within 30 days of first pub-
lication and file the original with the clerk of this
court either before service on plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
Dated Dec. 19, 2005.'
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Wakulla County, Florida
-s- Becky Whaley
As Deputy Clerk
December 29, 2005, January 5, 12, 19, 2006


Legal Notice f


WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS


REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
TECHNICAL FEASIBILITY STUDY AND
IMPLEMENTATION OF IMPACT FEES


PROGRAM WAIKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
RFP NO. (2006-002)
WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
TO PROVIDE TECHNICAL FEASIBILITY
STUDY AND IMPLEMENTATION OF IMPACT
FEES PROGRAM
Proposals will be received by the Board of County
Commissioners of Wakulla County, Florida at the
office of the Wakulla County Board of County Com-
missioners, 3093 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville FL 32327, office (850) 926-0919, fac-
simile: (850) 926-0940, proposals will be publicly
opened at (2:00 p.m., January 26. 2006).
Proposals shall be submitted in a sealed envelope,
plainly marked with the proposer's name, address,
date and time of proposal opening, and RFP No:
(2006-002) for WAKULLA COUNTY TECHNICAL
FEASIBILITY STUDY AND IMPLEMENTATION OF
IMPACT FEES PROGRAM. No proposals will be
opened unless accompanied by proof of payment
of all Wakulla County taxes. Proof of payment must
be attached to the outside of the proposal.
RFP NO: (2006-002)
SCOPE OF WORK: The Board of Commissioners
of Wakulla County,.Florida is seeking proposals to
retain the services of a firm(s) to assist Wakulla
County in the implementation of an impact fee pro-
gram in the following areas:
* Transportation System (Street, road, bridge and
bicycle/pedestrian systems)
* Public Building Facilities and Services
* Stormwater Drainage System Structure improve-
ments and/or additions, detention and retention
facilities and delivery systems
* Parks and Recreation Facilities
* Library
* Law Enforcement
* Corrections Facilities and Services
* Fire Protection
* Emergency Medical Services
Proposal documents are available to prospective
proposers at the Office of the Wakulla County
Board of County Coimmissioners, 3093
Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville FL. 32327.
and may be examined or obtained at this address
at no cost. ,
Point of contact is: p Parrish Barwick, County Ad.
ministrator).
The Board of County Commissioners reserves the
right to accept or reject any and all proposals in
whole or in part, to waive informalities in the pro-
cess, to obtain new proposals, or to postpone the
proposals opening pursuant to Board Purchasing
Policy. Each proposal shall be valid to WAKULLA
COUNTY for a period of ninety (90) days after the
proposal opening. Wakulla County is an Equal
Opportunity Employer.
This notice date ir., ,--,=.- r.,re. 2005).
Submitted by (F .r.r, b .r..,.:,
December 29, 2005, January 5. 12, 19. 2006


Legal Notice


NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED #2005-026
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that William Baxley
the holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:
Certificate No. 1454, Year of Issuance 2003
',-::-r;o'i;.;.r,: IF,.:.-.,.ni", C'r0 nt 01,_l0, ru-? 0nr01

Name in which assessed: Cynthia J,.Jones
Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State
of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be re-'
deemed according to law the property described
in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bid-
der at the courthouse door on the 1st day of Feb-
ruary, 2006 at 10:00 a.m.
Dated this 19th day of Dec., 2005.

Signature: Brent X. Thurmond. Clerk
By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court
Wakulla County, Florida

December 29, 2005, January, 5, 12, 19, 2006


Legal Notice


INVITATION TO BID
BID NO.: WC2006-003
WAKULLA COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
LOWER BRIDGE BOAT RAMP REPAIRS
The Wakulla County Commissioners hereby invite
bids from Certified or Registered Generbl Contrac-
tors, licensed to do business in Wakulla County to
bid on repairs to the Lower Bridge Boat Ramp.
A copy of the bid specifications may be obtained
from the Grants Department, by contacting Pam
Portwood, at (850) 926-0909, or fax (850) 926-
0941.
Sealed bids will be received in the Grants Office.
located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville, Florida 32327 or Post Office Box 309,
Crawfordville, Florida 32326 until Thursday, Janu-
ary 26, 2006 at 4:00 p.m.
All Technical questions should be directed to the
Grants Coordinator, Pam. Portwood at (850) 926-
0909 or by mailing written questions to Post Office
Box 309, Crawfordville, Florida 32326.
A public bid opening will be held at the Grants
Department located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 4:00 p.m., January
26, 2006.
Sealed Bids should be'clearly marked and mailed
to :
Wakulila County Grants Department,
Invitation to Bid #WC2006-003
Post Office Box 309
Crawfordville, Florida 32326
Or deliver to : 3093 Crawfordville Highway
Crawfordville, Florida 32327
WAKULLA COUNTY RESERVES THE RIGHT TO
REJECT ANY AND ALL QUALIFICATIONS, TO
WAIVE ANY INFORMALITIES OR IRREGULARI-
TIES IN THE QUALIFICATIONS PROCESS AND
TO AWARD THE CONTRACT IN THE BEST IN-
TEREST OF THE COUNTY.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. FAIR
HOUSING, HANDICAP ACCESS JURISDICTION.
January 19, 26, 2006


Legal Notice


INVITATION TO BID
BID NO.: WC2006-005
WAKULLA COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
MASHES SANDS BOAT RAMP REPAIRS
The Wakulla County Commissioners hereby invite
bids from Certified or Registered General Contrac-
tors, licensed to do business in Wakulla County to
bid on repairs to the Mashes Sands Boat Ramp..
A copy of the'bid specifications may be obtained
from the Grants Department, by contacting Pam
Portwood, at (850) 926-0909, or fax (850) 926-
0941.
Sealed bids will be received in the Grants Office,
located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville, Florida 32327. or Post Office Box
309, Crawfordville, Florida 32326 until Thursday,


January 26. 2006 at 4:00 p.m.
All Technical questions should be directed to the
Grants Coordinator, Pam Portwood at (850) 926-
0909 or by mailing written questions to Post Office
Box 309, Crawfordville, Florida 32326.
A public bid opening will be held at the Grants
Department located at 3093 Crawfordville High-
way, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 4:00 p.m.,
January 26, 2006.
Sealed Bids should be clearly marked and mailed
to :
Wakulla County Grants Department
Invitation to Bid #WC2006-005
Post Office Box 309
Crawfordville,, Florida 32326
Or deliver to : 3093 Crawfordville Highway
Crawfordville, Florida 32327
WAKULLA COUNTY RESERVES THE RIGHTTO
REJECT ANY AND ALL QUALIFICATIONS, TO
WAIVE ANY INFORMALITIES OR IRREGULARI-
TIES IN THE QUALIFICATIONS PROCESS AND
TO AWARD THE CONTRACT IN THE BEST,IN-
TEREST OF THE COUNTY.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER, FAIR
HOUSING, HANDICAPACCESS JURISDICTION.
January 19, 26, 2006


Legal Notice


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Case No.: 05-34-FC
CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC, SUCCESSOR
BY MERGER TO CHASE MANHATTAN
MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOHN W. HERNDON, JR., et al.,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated Dec.
29. 2005 and a Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated October 10, 2005, and entered in Case No.
05-34-FC, of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Ju-
dicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida
wherein CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC, SUCCES-
SOR BY MERGER TO CHASE MANHATTAN
MORTGAGE CORPORATION is Plaintiff and
JOHN W. HERNDON, JR., et al., are Defendants,
I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at
the front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse,
in Crawfordville, WAKULLA County, Florida, 11:00
AM o'clock on the 26th day of January, 2006, the
following described property as set forth in said
Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 17, ELLENWOOD, AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 3, PAGE 10 OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY.
FLORIDA. a/k/a 80 Carolina Court.
Crawfordville, Florida 32327.
Dated this 3rd day of Dec., 2005
BRENT X: THURMOND
As Clerk of said Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: -s- BeckyWhaley
As Deputy ClerFk
Faber & Gitlitz, P.A.
9830 S.W. 77th Avenue, Second Floor
Miami, Florida 33156
(305) 662-4110
January 12. 19. 2006


Legal Notice


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 05-321-CA
WILLIAM JACK ASHBURN.
alkla JACK W. ASHBURN,
Plaintiff,
vs.
HOWARD H. COUNTS a/k/a H.H. COUNTS;
and FRANCES P. COUNTS
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: HOWARD H. COUNTS a/k/a H.H. COUNTS;
FRANCES P. COUNTS; and UNKNOWN HEIRS
OF FRANCES P. COUNTS
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Complaint for
Quiet Title has been filed against you and others,
and you are required to serve a copy of your writ-.
ten defenses, if any, to it on DANIEL E. MANAUSA,
ESQUIRE, SMITH, THOMPSON, SHAW &
MANAUSA, P.A., Planitiffs' attorneys, 3520
Thomasville Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida
32309-3469, no more than thirty (30) days from
the first publication date of this notice of action,
and file the original with the Clerk of this Court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiff's attorneys or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise,' a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
Dated this 3rd day of January, 2006.
BRENT X. THURMOND
Clerk of the Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
-s- Becky Whaley
As Deputy Clerk

January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 2006


Legal Notice


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 05-331-CA


CLAUDETTE L. FARMER,
Plaintiff,
vs.
EZRA R. JOHNSON
Defendant.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: EZRA R. JOHNSON
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Complaint for
Quiet Titles has been filed against you and oth-
ers, and you are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on DANIEL E.
MANAUSA, ESQUIRE, SMITH, THOMPSON,
SHAW & MANAUSA, P.A., Planitiffs' attorneys,
3520 Thomasville Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee,
Florida 32309-3469, no more than thirty (30) days
from the first publication date of this notice of ac-
tion, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's attorneys or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
Dated this 3rd day of January, 2006.
BRENT X. THURMOND
Clerk of the Court ,
(Circuit Court Seal)'
-s- Becky Whaley
As Deputy Clerk
January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 2006'


Legal Notice


INVITATION TO BID .
BID NO.: WC2006-007
WAKULLA COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
ST. MARKS RIVER SIGN INSTALLATION
The Wakulla County Commissioners hereby invite
bids from licensed business' to bid on installation
of signs on the St. Marks River.
A copy of the bid specifications may be obtained
from,the Grants Department, by contacting Pam
Portwood, at (850) 926-0909, or fax (850) 926-
0941.
Sealed bids will be received in the Grants Office,
located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville, Florida 32327 or Post Office Box
309, Crawfordville, Florida 32326 until Thursday,
at 4:00 p.m. February, 2, 2006.
All Technical questions should be directed to the
Grants Coordinator, Pam Portwood at (850) 926-
0909 or by mailing written questions to Post Office
Box 309, Crawfordville, Florida 32326.
A public bid opening will be held at the Grants De-
partment located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 4:00 p.m., Febru-
ary 2, 2006.
Sealed Bids should be clearly marked and mailed
to :
Wakulla County Grants Department
Invitation to Bid #WC2006-007
Post Office Box 309
Crawfordville, Florida 32326
Or deliver to : 3093 Crawfordville Highway
Crawfordville, Florida 32327
WAKULLACOUNTY RESERVES THE RIGHTTO
REJECT ANY AND ALL QUALIFICATIONS, TO
WAIVE ANY INFORMALITIES OR IRREGULARI-
TIES IN THE QUALIFICATIONS PROCESS AND
TO AWARD THE CONTRACT IN THE BEST IN-
TEREST OF THE COUNTY.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER, FAIR
HOUSING. HANDICAP ACCESS JURISDICTION.,
January 12, 19, 2006


Legal Notice


NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT
TO CHAPTER 83, PART IV
Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage
Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV
that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by
sealed bid on Saturday, January 28, 2006 at 10:00
a.m. at 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of
Mini- Warehouse containing personal property of:
Ashley Poitevint
Before the sale date of January 28, 2006, the own-
ers may redeem their property by payment of the
outstanding balance and cost by paying in person
at 3295 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL.
January 12, 19, 2006


Legal Notice f


The Board of County Commissioners, pursuant to
Section 125.37, Florida Statutes,. hereby notices
its intent to exchange improved property described
as:
Lot #44 Parcel ID #23-5S-02W-095-02849-000
for property currently owned by B & F Ventures,
LLC, more particularly described as:
Lot #35 Parcel ID #23-5S-02W-095-02852-000
The Board will hold a public hearing on the ex-
change of property on February 6, 2006, at 6:10
p.m., at the Board of County Commissioners'
Chambers.
January 12, 19, 2006


Services


Legal Notice


INVITATION TO BID
BID NO.: WC2006-006
WAKULLA COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
SIGNS FOR ST. MARKS RIVER
The Wakulla County Commissioners hereby invite
bids from licensed business' to bid on creating signs
for the St. Marks River.
A copy of the bid specifications may be obtained
from the Grants Department, by contacting Pam
Portwood, at (850) 926-0909, or fax (850) 926-
0941.
Sealed bids will be received in the Grants Office,
located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville, Florida 32327 or Post Office Box 309,
Crawfordville, Florida 32326 until Thursday, at 3:00
p.m. February 2, 2006.
All Technical'questions should be directed to the
SGraitmer0ododin.atb r,.iParnifortwood!at (8510Y e2'Ull
0909 or by mailing written questions to Post Office
Box 309, Crawfordville, Florida 32326.
A public bid opening will be held at the Grants De-
partment located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway;
Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 3:00 p.m., Febru-
ary 2, 2006.
SSealed Bids should be clearly marked and mailed
to :
Wakulla County Grants Department
Invitation to Bid #WC2006-006
Post Office Box 309
Crawfordville, Florida 32326
Or deliver to : 3093 Crawfordville Highway
Crawfordville, Florida 32327
WAKULLA COUNTY RESERVES THE RIGHT TO
REJECT ANY AND ALL QUALIFICATIONS, TO
WAIVE ANY INFORMALITIES OR IRREGULARI-
TIES IN THE QUALIFICATIONS PROCESS AND
TO AWARD THE CONTRACT IN THE BEST IN-
TEREST OF THE COUNTY.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER, FAIR
HOUSING, HANDICAP ACCESS JURISDICTION.
January 12, 19, 2006


Legal Notice


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 05-161-PR
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
KENNETH RUDOLPH HILYER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The ancillary administration of the Estate of
KENNETH RUDOLPH HILYER, deceased, Case
Number 05-161-PR, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville,, Florida 32327. The names and ad-
dresses of the Personal Representative and the
Personal Representative's attorney are set forth
below.
ALL CREDITORS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and other'persons
having claims or demands against decedent's Es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of the first publication
"of this notice must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons
having claims or demands against the decedent's
Estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice
is January 12, 2006.
Personal Representative:
-s- Joyce Hilyer
JOYCE HILYER
Post Office Box 141
St. Marks, FL 32355
Attorney for Personal Representative:
-s- Mary Ellen Davis
Mary Ellen Davis, Lawyer
Florida Bar No. 949884
Post Office Box 1720
Crawfordville, FL 32326
(850) 926-6003
January 12, 19, 2006


Landscaping, plant sales, maintenance,
and installation. 962-4861. F


I-








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Say You Saw It

In The News


Services


W IIa4,- !u


I By

Ae-v-;-EIGN *Ia
926221
Not Pon Center -


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*-q


KEITH KEY HEATING AND AIR
Commercial, residential and mobile homes.
Repair, sales, service, installation/alll-'
makes and models. Lic. No. RA0062516. "'l
926-3546. F '
A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING
Free Estimates
Licensed
John Farrell 926-5179 F
MSR TRACTOR SERVICE LLC
Free Estimates, Affordable Prices
421-7464 or Cell #508-5378 BF
HAROLD BURSE
STUMP GRINDING
962-6174 BF
TIM HOUCK'S
HOME IMPROVEMENTS :B
Interior and Exterior Remodeling
Barns, Decks, Pergola
,30 years experience.License. #3538
(850)926-2027 or cell 570-0480 BF *
AFFORDABLE LAND CLEARING L.L.C. ,
Specializing in Small "Tracts"
David (850)251-0628, 926-7386 BF ,



4 4. Residential


S-' Commercial
i',l'|i'' Licensed S
SInsured
ry. -,r p- Reliable -

Re-Roofs New e Metoal POtchl
Maurice Herndon
Over 20 Veors Experience
(850) 962-2437
or (850) 528-3487
Lic. #RC0066773

Michelle Snow's
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Pi Gq,'i.:; "3uil a r- S i;r, q etc.., .
92 6-762.7 '
ANYTIME ELECTRIC
Specializing in repair and service, resi- -
dential and commercial, homes and mo-
bile homes. 24-hour service. Mark Oliver,
ER0015233, 421-3012., F
MUNGE'S TREE SERVICE
Professional Work-Affordable Rates
Tree Removal & Trimming
Firewood & Stump Grinding
Fully Insured, 421-8104. F
AIR-CON OF WAKULLA
HEATING & AYC
Maintenance & Service. Gary Limbaugh,
926-5592, FL License No. CAC1814304. BF
JIMBO'S
HOME IMPROVEMENTS
Interior, exterior repairs bottom/top. '
Homes, mobile homes, boats, carports, u
porches. Roofing, installation on floors, :1
carpet, ceramic tile and linoleum, wallpa-
per, blinds, leaks, windows. Clean outside
roof, kool seal, painting, vinyl siding and
pressure washing. (850)524-5462. BF


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006-Page 21


Deadline 35 Cents

Monday Per Wordjd

N oon rn.
ClAs CASiflTED ADS ady
926-7102 Minimum


Classified Advertising In The News Doesn't Cost, It Pays and,Pays and Pays


Services

Mr. Stump
STUMP GRINDING
Quick Service
Cellular: 509-8530 F
AAA CONSTANT COMFORT
Air cond. and heating, service and instal-
lation. Free quote on new equipment.
Trane dealer. We fix all brands and mobile
homes. 926-8999. RA0066721 F


CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION
Foundations, slabs, driveways, etc.
Stan Poole at 251-0189. F


BACKHOE AND TRACTOR WORK
Bushhogging, Box Blade, Disc, Fence
Post Dug, Driveways, Clearing. Free Es-
timates. Richard Miller 926-2900. BF
Licensed Daycare has openings from birth
thru 12 years, before and after school
care. For more information, please call
926-3359. P12
FORE CONSTRUCTION & DESIGN, LLC
Commercial & Residential Construction
510-6893, License #CGC150705 BF


ANGEL'S CLEANING SERVICE
Free Estimates, Licensed
(850)926-9611 P12


ALL PRO FENCE
Residential-Commercial Fencing
519-1416 BF
VINCENT J. TRELTAS, LLC
Production Painter
New Construction, Repaint, Faux Painting
Licensed & Insured, Workman's Comp.
210-4317 P5,12,19,26


REVELL WELL & PUMP REPAIR
We stock water pumps, electric motors
and parts. Complete installation and re-
pair services. 962-3051. F
HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIES
Central Heating & Air: Sales, Installation &
Repair. Electrical Services: Fans, Light-
ing, Wiring for electrical, phones, TV, com-
puter & sound. Located in Crawfordville.
Doug and Sherry Quigg, Owners'
License No.'s ER001 0924, CAC1814368
Phone (850)926-5790. BF
PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Residential/Commercial
Pressure Washing
Billy Roddenberry
962-4271 F


For Sale

HABITAT RE-STORE
Abundance of bedding, sleeper sofas,
computers, interior/exterior doors, win-
dows/screens, fiberglass shower units and
light fixtures. Open Tuesday thru Satur-
day, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 940 Shadeville Hwy.
(Hwy. 61), 926-4544. BF
$275 BRAND NEW KING PILLOWTOP
SET. Factory sealed with warranty. Can
deliver. 545-7112. BEF
6 PC. BEDROOM SET-Brand new sleigh
bed ,dresser, mirror and nightstand. $575,
still boxed, can deliver. 222-9879. BF
BED, a sleigh bed including headboard,
footboard and rails. NEW in box, only
$275. Call 222-7783. BF
BED-DOUBLE QUEEN PILLOWTOP SET
New in plastic with warranty. $165, can
deliver. 425-8374. BF
Bedroom-ALL NEW 7 PC. set: All dove-
tailed, all wood-still boxed. Retail $4K,
must sell $1,500, can deliver. 222-2113.
BF
CHAIR/LOVESEAT/SOFA-$650-NEW
Micro fiber upholstery, hardwood frame
and warranty, unopened. 545-7112. BF
DINING, A CHARMING NEW oak table
with in lay, ball and claw feet, leaf, 2 arm
chairs, 4 side chairs, hutch/buffet. $4,500
suggested list, sacrifice $1,900.222-2113.
BF
LEATHER Sofa, Loveseat and Chair still
wrapped: Retail $3,400, sell brand new
with warranty, $1,250. 425-8374. BF
MATTRESS-New full set in plastic with
warranty, $120. 222-9879. BF



Coastal Consignment

Furniture
Looking for Furniture!
New Gently Used
Find It -Sell It
2481 Crawfordville Hwy.

926-8765

Galvanized boat trailer, dual axle, tilt, up to
20 ft. boat. Needs minor repair, good con-
dition, $600.984-4982. P12
OFFICE SUPPLIES up to 50% OFF!
Available at the Thrift Store, 3360
Crawfordville Highway. 926-2900. B12
BIG JANUARY SALE! The Consignment
Shop in Linda's Beauty Salon on the cor-
ner near sheriff's office. 926-7686.
B12,19,26
Proform 325 Treadmill, like new, $150.'
3x6 wooden office desk, 6 drawer, $50.
926-2513, P12


For Sale

DINING ROOM-Brand new cherry table
with leaf, 6 chairs and lighted china cabi-
net. Still boxed. $900. Can deliver. 222-
9879. BF
*2004 Elite, 44 ft., dbl/slide Deluxe Park
model, $21 K. -2003 Elite, 36 ft., like new,
w/d, $17K. -2002 Elite, 44 ft., kingbed/
slide,$16K. -Elite, 44 ft, $9K. and -1989
Overland, 40 ft. 'diesel pusher', excellent
condition, low miles, $29K. (850)899-9148.
P12
Travel Trailer, 2003 Trail Light, 30 ft. very
good condition, $18,000 obo. Call Bill 925-
6332. P12
2003 Honda Motorcycle, 50cc, $1,100 obo.
Helmet, chest pad, goggles and gloves
included for 7 to 10 yr. old. Excellent
condition. Call Bill 925-6332. P12


Help Wanted

Experienced Short Order Cook and Prep
needed as soon as possible., Apply in
person, Riverside Cafe in St. Marks or
Riverside by the Bay in Shell Point. 925-
5668 or 926-4499. BF


Wakulla Christian School is interviewing
to employ a Fulltime Teacher's Aid. Hours
8 a.m. until 12 noon-21/2 hour break-2:30
p.m. until 6:30 p.m. Call 926-5583 for
application and interview. B12,19
The Wakulla Co. Health Dept. has an
opening for a Community Health Nursing
Director. Annual Salary range: $42,750.50-
$81,516.70. Bachelors degree required.
Please apply on-line at: https:/
jobs.myflorida.com. Refer to requisition
number 64029709-51272756-
20051213090350. Only State of Florida
Applicationswill be accepted-no resumes,
please. State of Florida applications may
be faxed to the People First Service Cen-
ter at (904)636-2627 (faxed applications
should include the position # on each
page). If you experience problems apply-
ing on-line, please call the People First
Service Center at (877)562-7287. Appli-
cation deadline: January 20, 2006..
EO/AA/VP Employer. B12,19
Need immediately-professional house
painters, individual hourly painter or sub-
contractors. Call Billy Roddenberry 962-
4271 or 228-5552. BF
Lighthouse Lady Cleaning hiring fulltime
day cleaning personnel. Must have expe-
rience, transportation and must pass a
background check. Serious inquiries only.
Call 509-0623. 6B12


Localcontractorlooking for-help, experi- i'
ence a plus but not required. Call Aaron
519-2185. B12

Carrabelle Boat Club
Accepting Applications

Dock Hands
Lift Operators

Apply in Person
Hwy. 98 & Timber Island Rd.
Weekdays


Miscellaneous .

This is the listforthe shelter animals up for
adoption:
DOGS:
* German Shepherd.
SBloodhound, female.
SChow mix.
* Brittany Spaniel mix.
* Catahoula mix.
SHound mix.
Black, Yellow and Brown Labs.
* Bulldog mixes.
* Many other nice mixes. Come and
take a look.
* PUPPIES:
Bulldog mixes.
SBorder Collie mix.
* Hound/Bulldog mixes, very cute.
* Border Collie/Shepherd mixes.
Adult cats and adorable kittens.
Adoption fees include a deposit for spay-
ing or neutering and rabies vaccination.
Come see us at #1 Oak Street, next to
sheriff's office. Shelter Hours: Tues. -
Thurs., 10 a.m. 5 p.m., Fri. and Sat., 10
a.m. 4:30 p.m. Closed Sun. and Mon.
926-0890. P
FREE CAT-1 year old spade female,
housebroken. Sweet and affectionate.
926-9202. P12

Yard Sale

Friday and Saturday, Jan. 13 and 14,7:30
a.m., 980 Wakulla-Arran Rd. Too many
items to list. P12
Saturday, Jan. 14, 128 Rehwinkel Rd.,
Crawfordville. Cleaning out sheds, house-
hold items, tools, fishing equipment, mo-
tor home and big boat. 8 a.m. until. 926-
8635. P12

Card Of Thanks

We would like to extend our thanks to
everyone who gave their love and support
during our time of grief.
The Family of Terry I. Harris, Jr.

Say You Saw It
In he N ews


Auction



uzh Real Estate

Wed., Jan. 25 11 A.M.
6 ac. with 3BR/1BA Home
850-9i-9160 Oak's Vineyard
AB2387 John Deere Portable Shed
ABALAuctionCompanyv.com
(850) 926-9160
www.LandLotsAndHomes.com LLC
Licensed
Real Estate Broker


Lost

Black and tan male Miniature Pinscher
with red collar and ID tag. Last seen Dec.
22. Call 926-9553 or 577-2010. P5,12
Black and white female cat with blue collar
on 208 Mill Creek Rd., Crawfordville. Call
926-3040. P12
Burgandy Wallet (clutch purse), lost Sat-
urday evening, Jan. 7, possibly Winn-
Dixie parking lot. If found, please call 926-
6635. P12


Mobile Home-Rent

3BR/2B DWMH on 2 acres (MOL), access
to Lake Ellen, large workshed included.
Rough outside, newer appliances, carpet
and cabinets. Available Feb. 15. $625/mo.
rental. References and proof of income
required. Call Pam Hitt, owner, for details
(941)223-2713. Call Theresa (current ten-
ant) to see at 228-8875. BF


Mobile Home-Sale

Triplewide MH For Sale
10497 Elgin Lane, Woodville. 4BR/2B,
2,000+ sq. ft., $65,000 obo. Call (850)556-
6694. B12,19


Real Estate-Rent


2BR/1 B, Spring Creek-ceramic tile floors
throughout, CHA..References and,,applim-, ,
cation required. 933-6020 e -::9. "
Luxury Townhome, Old Courthouse
Square, Crawfordville. 2BR/2.5B, fur-
nished. $850/mo. Minutes to Winn Dixie,
school, up-coming Wal-Mart. Ready to
move in. 933-5242. P5,12
Medart, close to schools-3BR/2B, $800/
mo. plus dep. 3 references. 926-2405,
leave msg. B12


Summer Trace
Apartments
Attn: Senior Citizens
62 years or older,
handicap or disabled.
Unfurnished 1 & 2 BR
apartments w/appliances.
Rental rates begin at
$498 plus utilities
For rental info. 850-984-4811
TTY 1-800-955-8771
Rental Office 45 Otter Lake
Road, #303 Panacea
9 a.m. 4 p.m. Mon. Fri.
Equal Housing Opportunity


Real Estate-Sale

LOTS, LOTS, LOTS
We have coastal lots in St. Marks,
Carrabelle, Eastpoint &
Steinhatchee, starting at $45K
Neil Ryder Realty, Inc.
656-0006 508-6988 BF
5 ACRES
NORTH CRAWFORDVILLE
$110,000
528-5898 BF
OWNER FINANCING
1998 Clayton, 28'x60', 3BR/2B on 100'x50'
lot. 6 6th Ave., Crawfordville. Take Lower
Bridge Rd. to Rehwinkel Rd., go straight on
Tafflinger Rd. to 6th Ave. (386)867-0048.
B29,5,12,19


OWNER FINANCING-8 acres on Staten
Rd. near Woodville. Lots of trees and 4"
well. $120,000. (386)935-2301. P22,29,5,12
2BR/1 B home and workshop on 5 acres.
Wooded, fenced, very private, 2 miles
from Crawfordville courthouse. $197K.
926-7228. P5,12
5 acres, wooded, private with 1 acre
cleared homesite close to downtown
Crawfordville. 524-5647. P5,12
Crawfordville, 5.4 acres Rehwinkel Rd.,
prominent central location, beautiful ma-
ture hardwoods, cleared homesite, well/
city water, paved frontage, $157,000. Call
694-2415. P12
By Owner: 7.76 acres, Harvey Mill Rd., 1
mile from pavement, $120,000.1/3 down,
balance financed by owner for 7 to 10
years. Serious inquiries ONLY! 926-3381.
P12,19
Home For Sale
136 Catawba Trail, Crawfordville. 3BR/
2B, 1,594 sq. ft. with pool, hot tub and
fenced yard. $162,900. Call (850)556-
6694. B12,19


Commercial

Nad's Enterprises.Mini-Warehouses 6x6
and up. Hwy. 61 across from cemetery.
Anita Townsend. 926-3151 or 926-5419.
BF
Mini-Warehouse Spaces for lease, 8x10
and 10x12 now available. Come by or call
Wakulla Realty, 926-5084. BF

Keep Wauff(a County Beautiful

Commercial Rental! Ochlockonee Bay/
Panacea! Large 1,000 sq. ft. block build-
ing in downtown Panacea. Great store-
front on busy Hwy. 98. Just $1,000 per
month. Contact Ochlockonee Bay Realty
(850)984-0001. www.obrealty.com
obr@obrealty.com. B12
Commercial Rental! Downtown Panacea!
Large 2,000+/- sq. ft. on busy Hwy. 98.
Great rental with great visibility. Just$1,500
per month. Contact Ochlockonee Bay
Realty (850)984-0001. www.obrealty. com
obr@obrealty.com. B12
Commercial block building fronting on Hwy.
319 in Sopchoppy. 26'x50' space, perfect
for retail or storage with adjoining 12'x20'
office, CHA, $600 per month. 962-1 000.BF
Commercial Rental in Medart fronting
Crawfordville Hwy. 4BR/2B commercial
building. Great for office or storage. Just
$850/mo. Contact Ochlockonee Bay Re-
alty (850)984-0001. www.obrealty.com.
obr@obrealty.com. B12


I~It~~ic3


HARTUNG AND
NOBLIN, INC.
REALTORS
www.coldwellbanker.com.


PROUDLY ANNOUNCE
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December 2005 December 200!
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5







Page 22-THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006


Tax Discount Proposal Is On Holdi


A proposal by the Wakulla
County Commission to extend
early payment discounts for ad
valorem taxes has been tempo-
rarily put on hold. Commissioner


Howard Kessler, who has been
pushing the measure to help resi-
dents hurt by Hurricane Dennis,
put the item on the agenda Tues-
day, Jan. 2.


Century


Continued from Page 1
which was also clear-cut prior to
the building of homes and added
that Wal-Mart officials clear-cut
their parcel before construction.
But Sparkman said the Cov-
ington Park development is a resi-
dential project with different

$10,000
Continued from Page 1
There is a church convention we
would really like to go to so I
think I will spend some of the
money on that, too."
"What could be better than to
go into the store to do some holi-
day shopping and come out with
$10,000," said Terry Derreberry of
Winn-Dixie. "The Winn-Dixie Re-
ward Card is designed to reward
loyal customers like James Lee
every time they buy groceries.
We're happy to give James Lee
and his family a great start to
2006."
The "Better Holidays Daily
Cash Giveaway Sweepstakes"
gave Winn-Dixie customers the
chance to win the daily prize by
using their reward cards when
they purchased groceries from
Nov. 30 through Dec. 23. A non-
local $50,000 grand prize winner
was announced on Dec. 24.


IMssamc, fRemInIOCIpIoMim13 KiDISI


regulations while Wal-Mart was
a single commercial develop-
ment, not a commercial subdivi-
sion. He continued that in a com-
mercial subdivision, each indi-
vidual commercially developed
lot will be required to submit a
site plan which will include a
landscaping plan.
Three residents spoke to the
board about Century Park. "They
intend for this to be a showplace,
a beautiful development that ev-
eryone can be proud of," said
Donna Card.
"If they Idid violate the (Land
Development) Code fines and
penalties should be assessed,"
said Chad Hanson of the Con-
cerned Citizens Of Wakulla
(CCOW).
"It's definitely an eyesore,"
said Chuck Hess. "There were
longleaf pines on the site that
could have grown up into pretty,
majestic trees." Hess added that
Wal-Mart has damaged the root
systems of trees on their parcel
which will result in the trees
eventually dying.
Brimner's motion noted that
the final plat request will not be
allowed to come back before the
board for approval until the miti-
gation plan is approved. Commis-
sioners voted 4-0 to approve
Brimner's motion.


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However, he said the discount
extension proposal was not ready
for discussion as additional infor-
mation was needed. Board mem-
bers have been working with Tax
Collector Cheryll Olah to make
sure whatever is implemented
can be easily handled by her com-
puter system.
Normally, payments made in
January are subject to a two per-
cent discount and those made in
February are subject to a one per-
cent discount. The board proposal
extends the four percent discount
that is given in November to Janu-
ary. The proposal includes a three
percent discount for payments
made in February and a two per-
cent discount for payments made
in March. Normally, payments
made in March are not subject to
a discount. Payments made in
April are subject to penalties.
In December, Gov. Jeb Bush
signed the discount extension
legislation into law for counties
that were declared disaster areas.
Kessler added that he would
bring the matter up again at a
future board meeting.
In other matters in front of the
Wakulla County Commission
Tuesday, Jan. 2:
The county received a bill of
$12,246.17 from the Capital Re-
gion Transportation Planning
Agency (CRTPA) for expenses dur-
ing 2005. Part of Wakulla County
was recently added to the CRTPA
planning area and the county has
a voting member on the CRTPA
board in Commissioner Brian
Langston.
The Wakulla County Low-
Income Home Energy Assistance
Program (LIHEAP) received an
additional funding supplement of
$3,773 for the 2005 200o budget
year to assist county residentss
with weather related problems at
their homes. Commissioners ap-
proved a budget amendment in-'
creasing the energy assistance
budget from $79,033 to $82.S06.


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"Enviro III"
This is the 3rd in a series of columns
about environmental disclosures. Last
week, we talked about lead sources and
impacts. What about radon? Many
authorities believe radon gas is the
second leading cause of lung cancer in
the country. Radon gas occurs when
radioactive materials in the soil break
down. The gas seeps into -buildings
through the foundations.

Susan ,
Council


Florida law requires a mandatory
radon disclosure at the time or before
a person enters into a contract for sale
and purchase. The law does not
require testing to determine radon
levels before the sale. If the buyer
wants a test, the contract should be
contingent on acceptable gas levels,
generally less than four picocuries per
liter of air.
The required radon disclosure
language is: "RADON GAS: Radon is
a naturally occurring radioactive gas
that, when it has accumulated in a
building in sufficient quantities, may
present health risks to persons ex-
posed to it over time. Levels of radon
gas that exceed federal and state
guidelines have been found in buil-
dings in Florida. Additional infor-
mation regarding radon and radon
testing may be obtained from your
county health department."
Finally, the law doesn't require the
notification be acknowledged by a
signature although I certainly recom-
mend it. Call me for any of your real
estate needs.
Susan Council
(850) 251-1468
susancouncil.com
Broker Associate, Revell Realty, Inc.


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