Citation
Washington County news

Material Information

Title:
Washington County news
Uniform Title:
Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Place of Publication:
Chipley FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Nicole Barfield - Publisher
Creation Date:
January 5, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiweekly[<1994>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1931>]
semiweekly
regular
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
Coordinates:
30.780922 x -85.539289

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began May 23, 1924.
General Note:
L.E. Sellers, editor.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Washington County News. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000384704 ( ALEPH )
07260886 ( OCLC )
ACC5987 ( NOTIS )
sn 81000810 ( LCCN )
0279-795X ( ISSN )

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** A8COMMUNITYSenior Health Fair is next week Volume 95 Number 44 Phone: 850-638-0212 Fax: 850-638-4601 Opinion ....................A4 Local & State .............A6 Community ................A8 Faith .........................B4 Obituaries .................B5 Classifieds .................B8 A12Chipley and Vernon to go head-to-head FridayB7Health: Pot vaping @WCN_HCT facebook.com/WashingtonCountyNews.HolmesCountyTimes50 ¢ chipleypaper.com Washington CountyWednesday, September 12, 2018 Staff reportCHIPLEY A recent undercover narcotics operation has led to mul-tiple arrests in Washington County. A number of sus-pects are still being sought after. "During this opera-tion, we maintained a focus on those who are dealing drugs within Washington County," Sheriff Kevin Crews said in a statement. "Not only are we effectively removing dealers from the streets, who are continuously preying on the vulnerability of those battling addiction, we have also experienced a signifi-cant decline in overall crime rates as a result."The Washington County Drug Task Force, a collaborative team of law enforcement officers from the Washington County Sheriffs Office and Chipley Police Department, spent the last few months work-ing several undercover cases within the county, according to the WCSO news release.The collaborative effort sends the signal that local law enforcement is committed to ensuring the county is "a safe county to live, work, and raise our children in," the release stated.Narcotics operation leads to multiple arrestsBy Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY Eyeing the hori-zon for future fundingof new and current projects, Washington County School Board still did not budge on its decision to decrease its property tax levy. However, the amount of the decrease was debated at a recent final budget hearing.At the final hearing held Monday evening to approve the tentative millage and budget, the School Board voted down Superintendent Joseph Taylor's recommendation to decrease the capital expense millage rate to 1.25 mills a quarter less than the maximum amount of 1.5 mills, which the district has usually held.However, after School Board member Milton Brown made the motion to approved Tay-lor's recommendation, School Board members Terry Ellis and Dr. Lou Cleveland were silent, causing the vote to die for lack of a second. School Board member Vann Brock was absent at the meeting."My personal opinion is it's too early to be taking a further hit on the millage rate," Ellis said. "I think the needs are going to be there especially if we're going to continue to have student growth. It would be better to hold the line in the reduction of over the last few years. Let's see what we can do to move forward not just tow the line and tread water."In addition to stating that the half-cent sales tax monies should be used for "enhancements ... rather than going towards supplanting what we could've done maintenance wise with our 1.5 mills," Ellis pointed out the state required millage rate has decreased by about 1.5 mills over the course of three years.School Board approves budget, decreases millageA ribbon-cutting ceremony commemorated the opening of WAVE, Washington Academy of Varying Exceptionalities By Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY In the short time since school has started at the newly opened Washington Academyof Varying Excep-tionalities, four-year-old Lilith has learned how to say quite a few words.She doesnt really talk yet, but coming here, she has learned to say more in sign language, she says thank you,Ž said Liliths mother Melissa Nowell.She is progressing more,Ž she added.Nowells excitement about the new school is a testament of the impact of the School Boards decision to open a school designed to meet the needs of students with a range of abilities.Washington County Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon-cutting on Monday afternoon for the new school, which is housed at the former 5th grade wing of Roulhac Middle School.The event also served as a moment of gratitude from school district officials. This is for our future,Ž said Superintendent Joseph Taylor. This is something the district wanted for our own community, for own needs, for our students needs more than anything else.ŽWhen we talked about this in the beginning of the summer, it was like well, were looking at maybe 30, but now were sitting her with 52 students,Ž he said. Obviously theres a need here. It benefits the students and the family.ŽIn addition to adding new students to the program, the school offers a qualitative learning environment for opti-mal academic and social and behavioral success.The school has its own administrator, speech therapist, behavioral specialist, and a number of ESE-dedicated teachers and paraprofessionals.Each classroom has an inter-active touch-screen board and five computer stations. This is for our futureMelissa Nowell (center) sits at a table in Ms. Linda Minceys classroom with her daughters, Miranda, 14, (left) and Lilith, 4, following a ribbon-cutting Monday afternoon hosted by Washington County Chamber of Commerce in honor of the opening of Washington Academy for Varying Exceptionalities. [JACQUELINE BOSTICK PHOTOS | THE NEWS] Washington County School Board Chairwoman Susan Roberts gleefully cuts the ribbon Monday afternoon during a ceremony hosted by Washington County Chamber of Commerce in honor of the opening of Washington Academy for Varying Exceptionalities. See ARRESTS, A6 See BOARD, A2 See WAVE, A2

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** A2 Wednesday, September 12, 2018 | Washington County News Office of Congrassman Neal DunnWASHINGTON, DC … Congressman Neal Dunns (FL-02) legislation to expand veterans job and edu-cational opportunities in the sciences passed the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. Senator Dean Heller (NV) introduced companion legislation in the Senate similar to Dr. Dunns bill. Dr. Dunns bill, H.R. 4323, Supporting Veter-ans in STEM Careers Act, passed out of committee with minor changes authored by Chairman John Thune (SD)."Our veterans deserve every opportunity to succeed when they enter civilian life and this important legislation is a step in the right direction by expanding educational and job opportunities for our heroes. With the surge in technology over the last decade, we desperately need more experts in the science and math fields. Our veterans are equipped to take on this challenge and many have already worked in the technology field while serving our country," said Dr. Dunn. "Thank you to Senator Heller for working with me on this important legislation and getting it one step closer to President Trumps desk."The Supporting Veterans in STEM Careers Act requires the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop a veterans outreach plan and publish data on veterans participation in science, technology, engineering, and math-ematics (STEM) fields in its annual "Indicators" report. The bill updates the NSF Noyce Teacher Scholarship program, fellowship program, and cyber grant programs to include outreach to veterans. Additionally, the bill tasks the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy with examining how to increase veteran partici-pation in STEM career fields.The Supporting Veter-ans in STEM Careers Act is cosponsored by House Science, Space, and Technology Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (TX-21), as well as several veterans who serve on the committee, including Reps. Barry Loudermilk (GA-11), Mark Takano (CA-41), Jim Banks (IN-03), Brian Babin (TX-36), Ralph Abraham (LA-05), Steve Knight (CA-25), and Roger Marshall (KS-01).Dunns Veterans STEM Education Bill passes Senate Commerce Committee However, Taylor rebutted Ellis' statement, reminding the board the state required rate does not reflect a conscious decision by the School Board and is only the result of the decline in property value."We haven't done anything," Taylor said. "We've done what the state has told us to do. The state has said this is what you levied. I don't want us to take credit for something we haven't done."Brown articulated his support for the decreased 1.25 mills under the School Board's repeated assurance to voters to decrease mill-age rates if they were to vote in favor of the Half-Cent Sales Tax which passed Aug. 28 referendum with 2,646 votes or 58-percent of the vote and 1,931 against."I agree with all of that, I agree with the need, and I've agreed with it all along as far as not cutting back," Brown said. "However, it was stated we'd take a serious look at it and my fear is that people might say 'well, we supported the half-cent sales tax' based on what might've been said at some of the meetings.""I don't want people think we're changing things," he added.After hearing the breakdown of millages from Director of Finance Lucy Carmichael and the dying of the first motion for 1.25 mills, Superintendent Taylor made a new recommendation of 1.35 mills.With Brown making the motion, and a second from Ellis, the motion passed unanimously."I was fine with the decrease, I was afraid decreasing it to the 1.25 was a little bit too much," she said, noting she had previously inquired about reducing the rate by a tenth, but had not received a clear answer."I didn't want us to get into our five-year plan of what we have to build and then not have the money to do it because we decreased the millage rate and then we have to raise it," Cleveland added. "My concern was can we sustain that over the years."She said she was satis-fied with the 1.35 mills, that "it was a reduction that we can substain."The .10 increase in recommended millage equals about $134,000 in tax revenue. The breakdown of the School Board's total millage of 6.2900 is as follows: required local effort 4.1920, discretionary operating 0.7480, local capital improve-ment 1.3500.Trailing at the end of the millage discus-sion and vote, the board approved the tentative district budget at $88,276,881.36 with $39,667,731.46 under the general fund and $3,119,922.33 for capital projects.Also at the meeting, the School Board learned it will not be able to move forward with building ADA com-plaint restrooms at the stadium. A geo-technician report showed "bad dirt," which would cost the district $61,500 at minimum to dig out and replace. The board scheduled a workshop to discuss the way forward to be held 3 p.m. Tuesday. BOARDFrom Page A1Students learn to communicate their needs using this interactive board in Ms. Linda Minceys pre-K class at Washington Academy for Varying Exceptionalities. The school had a ribbon-cutting ceremony Monday afternoon hosted by Washington County Chamber of Commerce in honor of its opening. WAVE student Lilith, 4, peruses a bookcase in Ms. Linda Minceys classroom following a ribbon-cutting Monday afternoon hosted by Washington County Chamber of Commerce in honor of the opening of Washington Academy for Varying Exceptionalities. [JACQUELINE BOSTICK PHOTOS | THE NEWS] Miranda, 14, and Lilith, 4, embrace their mother, Melissa Nowell, during a ribbon-cutting Monday afternoon hosted by Washington County Chamber of Commerce in honor of the opening of Washington Academy for Varying Exceptionalities. Although the school is self-contained, there are opportunities for middle and high school students to interact with their peers outside of the school during lunch and, for some, elec-tive classes.One recent milestone occurred last week when Teacher on Special Assign-ment Brenda Bausnaw took students to qualify for the Special Olympics. She said the group will compete against students at Hope School in Marianna.We just keep growing and growing,Ž Bausnaw said. Were excited, the students are excited.ŽMondays event was nothing short of a celebration. WAVE student Miranda, 14, played with and followed her little sister Lilith, as the little one ener-getically ran around and tugged at her mothers gray tank top shirt that read A proud autism momŽ on the outer edges of a color-ful heart-shaped puzzle a symbol of autism. Eventu-ally, they ended up in Ms. Linda Minceys pre-K classroom.Were replacing a non-communication system with a communication system,Ž Mincey said, pointing at various words on a poster board that give students the ability to com-municate how they feel and what they would like to do. Boards are everywhere in the classroom. Everything we do revolves around the communication system.ŽMincey said WAVE is effective because it unites resources and individuals who have confidence in a like-minded system to help individuals with special needs.Ž She said it is amazing to have a communication system now, because that had not always been available.As a teacher for 17 years in the school district, Mincey said the opening of WAVE came full-circle,Ž referencing a former student she taught several years ago, who was non-verbal, is now a senior student at the new school.And hes talking to me now, he remembers me,Ž she said with tears in the wells of her eyes. He comes in every morning. And its special.Ž WAVEFrom Page A1

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, September 12, 2018 A3

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** A4 Wednesday, September 12, 2018 | Washington County News OPINION Have something to say?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri“ cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by GateHouse Media LLC at 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2018, GateHouse Media LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright Notice: The entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of GateHouse Media LLC. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or GateHouse Media. Postmaster: Send address change to Washington County News, P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428, USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES In county Out of county 13 weeks: $20 $24.30 26 weeks: $28.70 $36.40 52 weeks: $48.60 $60.70 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US Publisher: Nicole Bare“ eld nbare“ eld@chipleypaper.com Editor: Jacqueline Bostick jbostick@chipleypaper.com, 850-638-0212 News, sports, opinion: news@chipleypaper.com Classi“ ed: 850-638-0212, clamb@chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service: 1-850-522-5197 Washington CountyPUBLISHER Nicole P. Bare“ eld EDITOR Jacqueline Bostick PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR Cameron Everett Resea rchers and government officials have pondered the unfortunate decline in pollinators,Ž the term that applies to honeybees and other types of bees as well as birds, butterflies, lizards and other creatures we tend to not think about but are vitally important to our survival. In May 2016, the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) noted in a report that pollinators are a $24 billion cog in the U.S. economy, with some $15 billion attributable just to honey bees. Roughly one of every three mouthfuls we take results in some way from honey bee production, the report said. Yet the population of these important links in the food chain is declining. The NCSL reported the number of bee colonies has plunged from 6 million colonies in 1947 to 2.5 million now. The decrease, according to the NCSL, is blamed on a number of factors „ with insufficient diets, mites, habitat loss, disease and pesticides topping the list. A phenomenon known as colony collapse disorder „ wherein worker bees suddenly left the hive „ also was pegged as a culprit. But the U.S. Department of Agriculture said it has waned within the last five years. Skeptics also point out, citing USDA data, that managed honey bee colony populations have remained stable for the past two decades. Still, as the NCSL notes, The health of bees and other pollinators is an important and growing concern among state legislatures. At least 18 states have enacted legislation on this topic in recent years. Legislation generally falls into one of five categories: research, pesticides, habitat protection, awareness and beekeeping.Ž Florida is not among them, but perhaps it should be. Agriculture, of course, is a critical component of our economy, and bees are important to sustain it. But beekeeping also is rapidly becoming a pastime. In July 2017, the South Florida Sun-Sentinel reported there were 4,400 state-registered backyardŽ beekeepers, which was five times the number of a decade earlier, and that the number of managed colonies had rocketed from 158,000 to 520,000. More bees are good for all, and we need to make sure they remain healthy. That is what the actor Chuck Norris, himself a beekeeper, is trying to do. In recent pieces about the fate of bees, Norris points out that hobbyists like himself are helping augment an increasingly threatened wild bee population. He noted the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is reviewing the use of certain insecticides to determine their effect on bee population decline, and that Monsanto and Walmart seek to corner the robotic bee market in anticipation of the trend continuing. We dont need to overreact. But all of us, including our policymakers, should take more of an interest in bee health. Albeit important to the livelihood of folks who manage bees and sell honey from their hives, bees make life better for all of us. Lets keep it that way. A version of this editorial first appeared in The Ledger, a sister paper of The News with GateHouse Media.Decline of bees a major threat ANOTHER VIEW By Mark L. HopkinsEvery week that passes it seems that we read yet another major issue with our president and the operation of our government. This past week, we had the publication of Bob Woodwards book, Fear,Ž that called activities in the White House chaotic and the president, unbalanced.Ž Many top officials were quoted, lending credence to Woodwards findings. Later in the week there was an op-ed published in the New York Times that was supposedly written by a White House insider who said there were several close to the president who were attempting to deal with the erratic actions of the president in order to protect the country. The talking heads on the TV news shows say that (choose one) 1) such behavior by White House staff personnel is treasonous; 2) The groundwork is being laid for impeachment by Congress; 3) We are headed for a major Constitutional crisis.Ž The crisis they are talking about is a direct confrontation between the Executive branch of the government with the Legislative and Judicial branches. So, are we headed for a Constitutional crisis? The answer is a resounding YES.Ž However, it wont be as debilitating as the talking heads think. This isnt a firstŽ for us. We have had many Constitutional crises over the years and have weathered every one. Our Constitution was born in crisis. It was written in secret and in violation of the existing document, the Articles of Confederation, at a time when we didnt even have a president. Many of our founding fathers were skeptical that this new democracy could even exist for more than a few years. After all, this was a government without precedent in the history of the world. It was just a theory advanced by the ancient Greeks. Benjamin Franklin wasnt sure it could work at all. Alexander Hamilton wondered whether Washington should be appointed King. Thomas Jefferson, our first Secretary of State and third president, wasnt even sure of the constitutionality of his own Louisiana Purchase. The wheels of government had just started to turn when the details of running a government reared their ugly heads. Somehow the devil is always in the details. The current crisis has its foundation in the limitation of the power of the presidency. From time to time in our history, a president will be elected who envisions himself as having more power than the office is allowed by the Constitution. When that occurs trouble quickly follows. The framers of the Constitution did not envision an allpowerful presidency. When they were writing our Constitution, they looked closely at the monarchies of Europe and decided they did not want a king like George of England or Louis XVI of France. Instead, the powers of the government were centered in Congress and our forefathers designed a relatively weak presidency, an administrative post to carry out the will of Congress. That means that any president has limitations on what he/she can do from the White House. Our last two presidents had to resort to executive orders to get anything done because our two political parties have forgotten how to work together thus creating gridlock in Congress. In the recent past conflict seems the order of the day in Congress. We have a president with possibilities,Ž who is caught up in that conflict. So, are we headed into a Constitutional crisis? Oh, yes. We get one of those about every decade. But, our Constitution can handle ambiguity and it can handle change. It has flexibility. As written, it is a set of principles not a code of laws. We just have to remember to live by those principles. And, it is perfectly capable of handling conflict at the highest levels.Are we headed for a constitutional crisis?U.S. Senator John McCain (R-AZ), Vietnam War hero and POW, 2008 Republican presidential nominee, committed but pragmatic conservative legislator, has concluded a remarkable career with the grace of his departure. He was hardly a saint, but unlike many politicians „ and other people „ never pretended to be one. Senator McCain was at his most eloquent when under duress. For example, while in the Hanoi Hilton prison in Vietnam, he refused any special privilege even though tortured by North Vietnamese captors. He was at his best when he went out of his way to praise rival Democratic presidential candidate Senator Barack Obama (D-IL), and when he lost that election and called for national unity. McCain was at his most inspiring at the end; facing death, he praised our great country and the opportunities Americans enjoy. During McCains life, he could be angry, confrontational, rough and sarcastic, but not at the important times when behavior most mattered. Finally, he was not a hater. Famously, in the intense 2008 presidential campaign he corrected a woman clearly highly upset regarding Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama. She declared that she could not trust Obama, an Arab.Ž Without hesitation, McCain defended his election campaign opponent as a good family man, a citizenŽ who was on the other side of policy and political fences. That was an exemplary act. Senator McCain was extremely active in both domestic and foreign policy arenas. Regarding the former, he and Senator Russ Feingold (D-WI) cosponsored bipartisan legislation to try to rein in the influence of money in politics. He was also extremely engaged in immigration reform, a complex subject that involves both domestic and foreign policy dimensions. Arguably, he was most effective on a sustained basis in foreign policy. Influential and prolific journalist Max Boot, an expert on foreign and especially defense policies, served as an adviser in McCains 2008 presidential campaign. Boot has written an analysis of Senator McCains legacy in The Washington Post that stands out in the flood of current commentaries about this important leader. Above all, he praises the mans sheer physical courage. Additionally, he emphasizes an authenticity that contrasts with other politicians, past and present. He describes Senator McCains serious, sustained study and knowledge of history. While they were both on a flight to the Munich Security Conference, he found McCain focused on reading a challenging history book, for education and not for show. Up until a few decades ago, the vulgarity and simple-mindedness of what is termed realityŽ television excluded such programming from major media. Now, reality TV is mainstream, and reality TV personalities are in our national and presidential politics, and now in the White House. That trend stands out as disturbing for our nation. In complete contrast in terms of commitment and purposes, declared 2016 presidential candidates included four military veterans: Former Governor Jim Gilmore (R-VA), Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Governor Rick Perry (R-TX) and former Senator Jim Webb (D-VA), a highly decorated Vietnam combat veteran.McCains best legacy Arthur Cyr

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, September 12, 2018 A5

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** A6 Wednesday, September 12, 2018 | Washington County News LOCAL & STATEChipley Chief of Police Scott Thompson said he is happy with the conclusion of the operation."Cases like these do not stop at the arrest, the damage created by drug abuse goes much further than a criminal record," he said in the state-ment. "We are working every day to provide a safer and healthier community to raise our families in."This investigation follows multiple "roundups" that have been conducted since Sheriff Kevin Crews took office in 2018, the release stated.Sheriff Crews urges anyone with information on the whereabouts of those listed on the wanted list to con-tact the Washington County Sheriffs Office at 850-6386111, or anonymously, at 850-638-TIPS (8477) or by email at tips@wcso.us.The undercover narcotics operation led to the follow-ing arrests:Kenneth Wade Bowers, 44, Ebro, cocaine … sell; Calvin Oliver, 48, Ebro, cocaine sell; Cindy Nell Warren, 28, Chipley, marijuana … sell; Kyree Burns, 26, Chipley, methamphetamine … sell; Elta Wise, 42, Vernon, meth-amphetamine … sell; Dwight "DJ" Neal Jr., 27, Chipley, marijuana … sell; Thomas Smith III, 35, Chipley, cocaine … sell; Joshua Davis, 18, Chipley, marijuana … sell; Cayden George, 18, Graceville, cocaine … sell; Della M. Hertkorn, 70, Vernon, mari-juana … sell; Allen Wright, 31, Chipley, Cocaine … sell and possession of cocaine; Marcus Bland, 51, Ebro, methamphetamine … sell; Lyron Walker, 44, Chipley, cocaine … sell; Christopher Norton, 36, Chipley, methamphetamine … sell; James Lee Coatney, 51, Vernon, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, possession of drug paraphernalia (while out on bond for unrelated felony drug charges); Lawrence Hathaway, 49, Wausau, possession of firearm by con-victed felon and possession of drug paraphernalia … cur-rently on state probation for unrelated felony charges ; Rita Edwards, 46, Wausau, pos-session of drug paraphernalia … currently on state proba-tion for unrelated felony drug charges; Shon Massey, 44, Marianna, methamphetamine … sell; Hurtis Jackson, 37, Chipley, marijuana … sell; Dominique Martin, 29, Chipley, mari-juana … sell;The following individuals are currently being sought for selling illegal narcotics in Washington County:Neatron Curry, 35, Chipley, methamphetamine … sell; Ricky Stasko, 20, Chi-pley, marijuana … sell; David Melanchuck, 31, Cotton-dale, marijuana … sell; Clyde Daniel Ladd, 21, Cottondale, methamphetamine … sell; Byron Watford, 26, Chipley, marijuana … sell; Margrett Mclaughlin, 41, Chipley, methamphetamine … sell; Eric Hooks, 45, Chipley, posses-sion of cocaine with intent to sell, manufacture, or deliver … currently out on bond for unrelated drug charges; Stephanie Hutchinson, 45, Bonifay, methamphetamine … sell (violation of state probation).Sheriff Crews urges anyone with information as to the whereabouts of those listed above to contact the Wash-ington County Sheriffs Office at 850-638-6111. You may also contact us anonymously by calling 850-638-TIPS (8477) or by email at tips@wcso.us. ARRESTSFrom Page A1Wright George Oliver Norton Warren Hertkorn Martin Neal Wise Jackson Coatney Bowers Hathaway Davis Burns Walker Edwards Smith Bland By Lloyd DunklebrgerNews Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ Florida voters will get a chance in November to ban commercial greyhound racing but will not vote on a measure that could have led to the expansion of charter schools, the Florida Supreme Court decided in a series of rulings on Friday.In all, the states highest court decided the fate of four proposed constitutional amendments slated for the Nov. 6 general-election ballot. The court:--Approved Amendment 13, which would ban commer-cial greyhound racing in the state after Dec. 31, 2020.--Rejected Amendment 8, which would have imposed term limits on school board members, required civic liter-acy to be taught in schools and taken away the exclusive power of local school boards to oversee charter schools.--Approved Amendment 6, known as Marsys Law,Ž that would create a series of consti-tutional rights for crime victims and would also increase the retirement age for judges.--Approved Amendment 10, which would require all local constitutional officers, including sheriffs, to be elected, and would remove the ability of charter counties to modify those offices.All of the proposed amendments under scrutiny were approved by the Florida Constitution Revision Commission, a 37-member panel that meets every 20 years and has the unique power to place constitutional changes directly on the ballot.The most significant ruling came in a 4-3 decision removing Amendment 8 from the ballot.Without issuing an immedi-ate opinion, the divided court upheld a ruling from Leon County Circuit Judge John Cooper that found the school-related ballot measure was misleading because it failed to inform voters of the chief pur-pose and effectŽ of the proposal.The proposal was challenged by the League of Women Voters of Florida, which argued that a provision in the amendment that would allow the state to operate and control public schools not established by the school boardŽ would have led to the expansion of charter schools.Supporters of the measure said it would expand educational choices in Florida and was aimed at overturning a 2008 appellate court decision that found the Legislatures cre-ation of a statewide commission to authorize charter schools was unconstitutional.The court will issue a full opinion later. But in Fridays split decision, justices Barbara Pariente, R. Fred Lewis, Peggy Quince and Jorge Labarga voted to affirm Coopers ruling. Chief Justice Charles Canady and justices Ricky Polston and Alan Lawson voted to overturn the lower courts decision.Patricia Brigham, president of the League of Women Voters, praised Fridays court ruling, saying it removed a proposal that was blatantly and inten-tionally misleading.ŽThe backers of this pro-posal on the CRC went to great lengths to hide the ball because they realized that Floridians would never knowingly forfeit their right to local control over their local public schools,Ž she said.But Erika Donalds, a CRC member and Collier County School Board member who helped craft the measure, said students and parents lost today.ŽFlorida voters deserved to decide on Amendment 8, not activist judges,Ž she tweeted. Defenders of the education monopoly prevailed this time, but we will continue to fight for education.ŽIn a separate 6-1 decision, the Supreme Court upheld the placement of a greyhoundracing ban on the ballot, overturning a ruling by Leon County Circuit Judge Karen Gievers, who found Amendment 13s ballot title and summary --which is what voters see --was misleading.The justices rejected the argument that the proposed amendment was deceptive since it would not actually ban all dog racing because it would allow non-commercial racing, and off-track wagering on dog races in other states, to continue.The ballot language accurately describes the scope of Amendment 13 as being limited to racing of dogs in connection with wagering,Ž the majority opinion said.Quince, the sole dissenter, wrote that the ballot proposal was clearly and conclusively defectiveŽ since it did not fully explain its potential impact on other gambling activity in the state, including facilities with slot machines that were authorized contingent on dog racing.The Yes on 13 Campaign, which supports the proposed amendment, hailed the high court decision.This ridiculous challenge was a desperate attempt to prevent voters from having a voice on whether greyhound confinement and deaths should continue,Ž the group said in a statement.In another 4-3 decision issued without an immediate opinion, the Supreme Court upheld Amendment 6, which would create a variety of constitutional rights for crime victims.Opponents, including defense lawyers, had argued the ballot language was misleading because it did not fully explain the potential impact on the rights of Floridians accused of crimes.Chief Justice Canady and Justices Polston, Labarga and Lawson voted to overturn a ruling Gievers, who found the ballot measure was mislead-ing. Justices Pariente, Lewis and Quince voted to affirm the lower court decision.Greg Ungru, head of the Marsys Law for Florida group, said he was pleased the court found the ballot language to be fair and accurate.ŽThe decision will give voters the opportunity to decide if they believe our state Constitution should provide victims of crime with rights and protections equal to those already afforded the accused and con-victed,Ž Ungru said.But Howard Simon, executive director of the ACLU of Florida, said he was disappointedŽ by the courts ruling on Amend-ment 6.The amendment would upset the balance between the rights of victims and people accused of crimes by deleting part of our Constitution that balances the rights of everyone involved in a criminal case,Ž Simon said.In other action, the Supreme Court unanimously upheld Amendment 10, rejecting a challenge from Volusia, Broward and Miami-Dade counties.The proposed amendment would make five constitutional offices -sheriff, tax collector, supervisor of elections, clerk of the courts and property appraiser -mandatory and require all of the offices to be elected in each of the states 67 counties. It would also prohibit charter counties from abolishing or modifying those offices.Court rejects school proposal, keeps dog-racing ban on ballotBy Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY A recent $75,000 bad check has bounced a Chipley resident back into the hands of law enforcement.Tyler Porter, 35, who listed an address of 855 Hwy. 277 in Chipley, was arrested Aug. 31in Washington County on a warrant out of Bay County for grand theft of over $100,000, issuing worthless checks and scheming to defraud a finan-cial institution.According to the Panama City Police Department arrest affidavit, Porter knowingly gave a $75,000 worthless check to the branch manager at the 23rd Street Suntrust Bank from his per-sonal checking account at Peoples South Bank in which he had less than $2,000.His Suntrust account was already $36,875.97 in the negative.The defendant lied to the branch manager that the funds were available in his Peoples South account, and requested immediate access to the deposited funds in his Suntrust account,Ž the affidavit states. The defendant immediately made a series of wire transfers and withdraw-als which again brought his account into the negative,Ž leaving his account balance at $103,023.91 overdrawn.Porter gave several stories on why he couldnt repay the money, however, those sto-ries have been debunked and the defendant has further refused to cooperateŽ with the bank, the affidavit states.Calls to Porter for comment were not returned Monday or by press time Tuesday. According to court records, Porters bonds totaled $80,000 and he was released after posting a surety bond. His next court appearance is set for Oct. 2 for first arraignment in Bay County.This isnt the first time Porter has faced a bad check allegation for a large sum.According to officials in Mississippi and an affadavit, there is an active investigation there into a March 2 check for $107,222 Porter drew at Sun-trust Bank for the purpose of obtaining money from Lonnie Alton Roberts at a time when he knew he did not have suf-ficient funds on deposit.ŽOn June 4, an affidavit by Roberts and Justice of Court of Clerk in Greene County stated Porter had attempted to intimidate Roberts in order to influence Roberts testimony against him. The State of Mississippi Greene County Justice Court confirmed last month that law enforcement was continuing to investigate that case. Porter attended high school in Marianna but was arrested after authorities said he made a series of bomb threats to the school including one on Sept. 11, 2001, the day hijacked jets were flown into the World Trade Center in the deadliest terrorist attack ever on U.S. soil, according to a News Herald story from Sept. 14, 2001.Though he was initially ordered to serve five years in prison, the Department of Corrections sent him to a boot camp and he was released in June 2002, according to records. In October 2006, after he violated probation in 2004 and was ordered to serve eight years in state prison, the District Court of Appeals sided with his appeal on the grounds that he had completed his requirements as a youthful offender and therefore could not be punished as an adult.Chipley resident issues $75k bad check, arrestedPorter

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** A8 Wednesday, September 12, 2018 | Washington County News COMMUNITYAugust 2018€ Kijuana Smith and Chris Smith € Michelle J Daniels and Chadwick A. Daniels € Lucas E Morris and Jessica Morris € Robert Moeschl and Rebecca Parsons € Sara Mayo and Greg Mayo WASHINGTON COUNTY DIVORCESSpecial to WCN/HCTAMARINANNA Sunland Center recently announced its Student/Teacher Art Exhibition, to be held from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 13 in the Historical Bank Building and MultiUse Cultural Facility, in downtown Marianna.The event is open to the public and admission is free. The show will feature works created by students from The Hub Art Center and their instructor, Volunteer Services Coordi-nator and local artist Maria Lincoln Johnson.When asked about the event, Johnson stated, "I feel truly honored and humbled as an artist to share creative moments with these amazing students. Teaching art at Sunland has been one of the most rewarding and grati-fying journeys in my life."Sunland Center to hold art exhibitionSunland Volunteer Coordinator and artist, Maria Johnson displays Sunland art during a presentation to the Chipola Regional Arts Association. Sunland resident Robert C. contemplates his work on a mixed medium piece. Sunland resident Ruby P. works on her rendition of a pelican. [PHOTOS SPECIAL TO WCN/HCTA] If you would like your Relay Events included in this list, email information to clamb@chipleypaper.com. Relay For Life Committee to meet CHIPLEY … The Washing-ton-Holmes County Relay For Life Committee will meet at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, September 18 in the Administration Building at Florida Panhandle Technical College. If interested in joining the committee, call Jody Bush at 850-260-4348. Relay For Life Committee to meet CHIPLEY … The Washing-ton-Holmes Relay For Life Committee will meet at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, October 2 in the Administration Building at Florida Panhandle Tech-nical College. If interested in joining the committee, call Jody Bush at 850-260-4348. 2019 Relay For Life Kick-Off scheduledCHIPLEY The 2019 Washington-Holmes Relay For Life Kick-Off will be held at 6 p.m. Tuesday, September 16 in the Cafeteria at Florida Panhandle Technical College. FPTC is located at 757 Hoyt Street in Chipley. For more information call Jody Bush at 850-260-4348. Relay For Life Committee to meet CHIPLEY … The Washing-ton-Holmes County Relay For Life Committee will meet at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, November 6 in the Administration Building at Florida Panhandle Technical College. If interested in joining the committee, call Jody Bush at 850-260-4348. 1st annual Holiday ExtravaganzaCHIPLEY … The Relay For Life of Washington-Holmes County will host the 1st annual Holiday Extravaganza from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, November 10 at the Washington County Agricul-ture Center in Chipley. Come shop with more than 20 local vendors. There will also be food and door prizes. The Agriculture Center is located at 1424 West Jackson Avenue. For more information on becoming a vendor or on the extravaganza call Kristy Aycock at 850-849-0171 or Jody Bush at 850-260-4348. Relay For Life Committee to meet CHIPLEY … The Washing-ton-Holmes County Relay For Life Committee will meet at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, December 4 in the Administration Building at Florida Panhandle Technical College. If interested in joining the committee, call Jody Bush at 850-260-4348. Relay For Life Committee to meet CHIPLEY … The Washing-ton-Holmes County Relay For Life Committee will meet at 5:30 p.m. Monday, January 7 in the Administration Building at Florida Panhandle Technical College. If interested in joining the committee, call Jody Bush at 850-260-4348. 2019 Relay For Life Spring Kick-Off/Workshop scheduledCHIPLEY The 2019 Washington-Holmes Relay For Life Spring Kick-Off/ Workshop will be held from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Saturday, January 12 in Washington County the location will be announced at a later date. For more information call Jody Bush at 850-260-4348. Relay For Life Committee to meet CHIPLEY … The Washing-ton-Holmes County Relay For Life Committee will meet at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, February 5 in the Administration Building at Florida Panhandle Technical College. If interested in joining the committee, call Jody Bush at 850-260-4348. Love Survivor Team Party scheduledHOLMES COUNTY …Washington-Holmes County Relay For Life Committee will hold a Love a Survivor Team Party at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb-ruary 5 in Holmes county, the location will be announced at a later date. For more information call Jody Bush at 850-260-4348. Relay For Life Committee to meet CHIPLEY … The Washing-ton-Holmes County Relay For Life Committee will meet at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 5 in the Administration Building at Florida Panhandle Technical College. If interested in joining the committee, call Jody Bush at 850-260-4348. Caregiver Celebration scheduledWASHINGTON COUNTY …Washington-Holmes County Relay For Life Com-mittee will hold a Caregiver Celebration will be held at 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 19 in Washington County, the location will be announced at a later date. For more information call Jody Bush at 850-260-4348. Relay For Life Bank Night and Final Committee meetingCHIPLEY … The Washington-Holmes County Relay For Life will hold Bank Night and the Final Committee meeting at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 2 at Wells Fargo in Chipley. For more information call Jody Bush at 850-260-4348. Relay For Life Event scheduledCHIPLEY … The 2019 Washington-Holmes Relay For Life Event will be held from 5 p.m. to midnight Friday, April 12. This years theme if "Cross Cancer off the Calendar!" (holidays). The event will begin a 5 p.m. with live music and opening ceremonies beginning at 6 p.m. with the survivor lap. For more information call Jody Bush at 850-260-4348.RELAY FOR LIFE EVENTSStaff reportCHIPLEY Northwest Florida Community Hospital will hold its annual senior health fair Tuesday, Sept. 18 from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the NFCH Education Audi-torium, 1360 Brickyard Road.The screening is free and covers the following screen-ings: cholesterol, diabetes, blood pressure, hearing and vision.NFCH Specialist Services will be onsite with informa-tion regarding additional services, including: Dexa scan, mammography, swing bed services, senior enrichment, wound care services, diabetes care, home health services, physical therapy and more.For more information, or to reserve a booth, call 850-415-8137 or email spitttman@nfch.org.NFCH to hold Senior Health Fair If you would like your events included in this list, email information to news@chipleypaper.com. Grazing school announcedGREENWOOD … UF/IFAS will hold a grazing school from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Friday September 14 at the North Florida Research and Educa-tion Center Beef Cattle Unit in Greenwood. Meeting fee is $20 participants may pre-register at https://nwflgrazingschool.eventbrite.com. All sessions will be held outside. Morning sessions will be pasture estab-lishment, pasture fertility and supplement grazing animals. Afternoon sessions will include temporary fencing tools and technologies and calibration of planting equipment. COMMUNITY EVENTS See EVENTS, A9

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, September 12, 2018 A9 COMMUNITY HCHS band to host Rodeo Pageant BONIFAY … The Holmes County High School will host the 2018 Northwest Florida Rodeo Pageant Sat-urday, September 15 in the HCHS Auditorium. Tiny Miss through Little King will be held at 4 p.m. and Little Miss through Miss will be held at 6 p.m. Door admission will be $5 for ages 10 and up and $2 for ages nine and under. For more information call 850-766-7569 or email pageant@hchsbluepride.com. WCCOA seeking volunteers WASHINGTON COUNTY … Washington County Council on Aging is currently seeking volunteers. If you have an hour and a half to spare on Thursdays and are interested in volunteering, we could use your help. WCCOA offers Bingo for seniors every Thursday from 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. and we are in need of someone to call Bingo. If you are interested in volunteering call Andrea at 638-6216 or stop by the Washington County Council on Aging to discuss this and other volunteeropportunities.Chipley Womans Club to hold annual fall yard saleCHIPLEY … The Chipley Womans Club will hold their annual Fall Yard Sale from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, September 21 and and from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, September 22. The Sale will be inside their clubhouse located at 607 North 5th Street. The sale will be held rain or shine. There will be toys, holiday decorations, furniture, tools, appliances, electron-ics, dishes, linens, books, clothes, jewelry, purses, and lots more. Proceeds from this project will help fund scholarships and other donations given by the Club throughout the year. If anyone would like to donate items for the Sale, these would be very much appre-ciated. Members will accept any items at the Clubhouse on the day before the sale, or call 850-260-5896 to have your items picked up. Scarec rows & Indians announcedCHIPLEY … Members of the Chipley Garden Club have announced that "Scarecrows and Indians" the annual scarecrow con-test and history festival will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, September 22 at the Washington County Historical Society Museum/Farmers Market. Chipley Garden Club and Washington County Historical Society are both pleased to present a com-munity wide event that can be enjoyed by citizens and visitors of all ages. Watch for additional information about the contest and fest coming soon. If you would like to be a vendor at the fest, please call 850-638-0358. Scarecrow contest entry information is available by calling 850-260-4049. We Care, You Matter health fairEBRO „ The Florida Department of Health in Washington County will host the "We Care, You Matter" health fair in Ebro from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, September 29 at Ebro City Hall, 6629 Dog Track Road. There will be health screenings, educational information, door prizes, and refreshments. For more information contact Susie Sewell at (850) 638-6240. Swindle reunion to be heldCARYVILLE … The Swindle family reunion will be held at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, September 29 at Lakeview Methodist Church. Bring a covered dish or dished. Lunch will be served at noon. The church is located on Lakeview Drive and Pate Pond Road in Caryville. Date set for Bull Run 5K and Kids Fun RunBONIFAY Bull Run 5K & Kids Fun Run will be held at 8 a.m. Saturday, September 29 at Middlebrooks Park. All proceeds raised will be donated to the local Food-4Kids Backpack Program. Peanut Butter donations will also be accepted. For more information go to www.bonifayrodeo.com, Facebook, or call Miranda Hudson 850-373-5003 Child Passenger Safety Week car seat safety checksBONIFAY/CHI-PLEY … Child Passenger Safety Week is Sunday, September 23 through Saturday, September 29. Holmes and Washington County Healthy Start in partnership with the Florida Department of Transportation will be conducting car seat checks in Holmes County Friday, September 28 at the Piggly Wiggly, 911 North Wauke-sha Street, Bonifay from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Car seat checks in Washington County will take place on National Seat Check Sat-urday which is September 29. The car seat checks will take place with the Ebro Health Fair at Ebro City Hall, 6629 Dog Track Road. The car seat checks will begin at 10 a.m. For more information, please contact Holmes County Healthy Start at (850) 614-6043 or Washington County Healthy Start at (850) 845-5106 We Care, You Matter health fair to be heldEBRO … The Florida Department of Health in Washington County will host the "We care, You Matter" health fair will be held in Ebro from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, September 29 at Ebro City Hall. The will be health screenings, educational information, door prizes and refreshments. The city hall is located 6629 Dog Track Road. For more infor-mation please contact Susie Sewell at 850-845-5068. HCSO to host inaugural softball tournamentBONIFAY Holmes County Sheriffs Office would like to invite neigh-boring agencies, businesses, organizations, and other interested teams to participate in the 1st Annual Officers Memorial Co-Ed Showdown Softball Tourna-ment. This tournament will kick off at 8 a.m. at Holmes County High School Saturday, September 29, with all proceeds benefiting the Officers Memorial Scholar-ships awarded each year in honor of Holmes Countys fallen law enforcement offi-cers. The event will feature a Homerun Derby Contest for a $10 buy-in with half the pot going to the winner (12 pitches with 10 hits). Players may buy in twice. Entry fee is $250 per team with the first place prize to be announced later (prize will depend on number of teams registered). Entry fees are due by Saturday, Sep-tember 1 with space limited to eight teams. Admission is free, and concessions will be available. Those not wishing to play are invited to cheer on their favorite team as they help honor Holmes Countys fallen heroes. For more information contact Deputy Ryan Segers at 850-768-9219. EVENTSFrom Page A8

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** A10 Wednesday, September 12, 2018 | Washington County News NASCAR THIS WEEKTHREE THINGS TO WATCHINDIANAPOLIS THREE THINGS WE LEARNEDLAS VEGASWHATS ON TAP QUESTIONS & ATTITUDECompelling questions ... and maybe a few actual answersIs Kasey Kahne done, and how big of an issue is it?Kahne already announced this would be his last full-time Cup season, but then he skipped the Indy weekend after suffering dehydration during the previous weeks race at Darlington. I dont want to create any more damage to myself, to my body, until I understand it better,Ž he said last week. Hes lucky in a sense, because he has built the type of bankroll that allows him to walk away without “ nancial worries.Will dehydration join concussions as a modern issue?Anything is possible, but this seems like a caseby-case deal. Everyones body reacts differently to stressful conditions. But like the modern focus on concussions, it does make you wonder just how many guys, over the years, toughed it out when their bodies seriously needed a break. Back when men were men,Ž sure, but how many physical prices were paid in later life? Well never know.„ Ken Willis, ken. willis@news-jrnl.comCUP SERIES: South Point 400 SITE: Las Vegas Motor Speedway (1.5-mile tri-oval) SCHEDULE: Friday, practice (NBC Sports Network, 2 p.m.), qualifying (NBC Sports Network, 7:30 p.m.). Saturday, practice (NBC Sports Network, 1 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.). Sunday, race (NBC Sports Network, coverage begins at 1:30 p.m.; green ” ag, 3:15 p.m.) XFINITY: DC Solar 300 SITE: Las Vegas Motor Speedway SCHEDULE: Friday, practice (NBC Sports Network, 3 p.m. and 5 p.m.). Saturday, qualifying (NBC Sports Network, 2 p.m.), race (NBC Sports Network, 5 p.m.) CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS: World of Westgate 200 SITE: Las Vegas Motor Speedway TV SCHEDULE: Friday, race (Fox Sports 1, 9 p.m.)1. Kyles championshipKyle Busch captured the NASCAR Cup Series regular-season title, 15 bonus points, and got a trophy. He was not happy “ nishing eighth at Indy. Ugly day,Ž Busch said before the award presentation. Thats not what we were hoping for; grand scheme, cool to get bonus points.Ž2. Late cautionsTwo cautions over the last 16 laps helped Brad Keselowski overtake Denny Hamlin for the win. Hamlin was not happy. He said the yellow ” ags were shown for meaningless guys who wrecked.Ž Hamlin got into the playoffs on points.3. Tough brakesIts rare to see multiple brakesystem failures, but Indy produced two that caused the yellow ” ag to come out of the holster. Martin Truex Jr. and Bubba Wallace each had brakes come apart. Truex maintained control of his car, but Wallace crashed hard into the outside wall.„ Godwin Kelly, godwin. kelly@news-jrnl.comKyle Busch, who drives the No. 18 Toyota, had a rough day at Indianapolis but earned NASCARs regular-season title. [AP/AJ MAST] 1. Sweet 16The NASCAR Cup Series regular season ended a day late because of rain at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, but produced a 16-driver playoff “ eld. The drivers going through are: Kyle Busch, Kevin Harvick, Martin Truex Jr., Brad Keselowski, Clint Bowyer, Joey Logano, Kurt Busch, Chase Elliott, Ryan Blaney, Erik Jones, Austin Dillon, Kyle Larson, Denny Hamlin, Aric Almirola, Jimmie Johnson and Alex Bowman.2. Rising, fallingAfter winning back-to-back NASCAR crown jewelŽ events with the Southern 500 and Brickyard 400, Keselowski has suddenly emerged as a championship contender. Crew chief Paul Wolfe used pit strategy to help secure the wins. He (Wolfe) gave me the ball, and I had to make a play,Ž Keselowski said. Truex “ nished last at Indy. Hopefully well get this bad luck out of the way before the playoffs start next week,Ž he said.3. Stewarts fourOf all the teams in the NASCAR Cup Series, Stewart-Haas Racing has the edge as far as pure numbers. SHR saw all four of its drivers make the playoffs, led by Kevin Harvick, who has a series-high eight wins. As a team, SHR scooped up 11 regular-season victories. Almirola advanced into the playoffs on points. Joe Gibbs Racing and Hendrick Motorsports each pushed three drivers into the postseason.„ Godwin Kelly, godwin. kelly@news-jrnl.comBrad Keselowski will surge into the NASCAR playoffs after capping the regular season with two huge victories. [AP/AJ MAST]

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, September 12, 2018 A11

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** A12 Wednesday, September 12, 2018 | Washington County News SPORTSBy Pat McCannThe News HeraldSAND HILLS „ It should nt come as a surprise that the Chipley-Bozeman football series has been tilted heavily in favor of the Wash-ington County school.Entering their Region 1-1A collision on Friday, the Tigers had won seven of the nine meetings between the schools as the Bucks were building their program while Chipley had long been estab-lished in Panhandle football.But if the 23-12 win by Bozeman in the latest rendition Friday night is any indication, some parity has come to this series, and in the not-so-distant future it could become a budding rivalry.If nothing e lse, Chipley surely will hold a grudge after suffering its first loss of the season, and after building a 12-0 halftime edge.Bozeman coach Jason Griffin felt his team had given one away in a one-point loss at Holmes County last week. Well, this was a victory that the Bucks stole.Consider that they compiled 23 points on just 70 total yards as Chipley was more stout up front. Or that the Bucks nearly forced as many turnovers (six) as they had first downs (seven).Or that defensive players accounted for the go-ahead and clinching touchdowns, and you start to get the picture.The Tigers not only fell to 2-1, they had some selfinflicted wounds while committing 16 penalties for 102 yards.And it seemed so far-fetched that Bozeman would rally after halftime as Chipley had controlled the action while outgaining Bozeman 148 yards to 22.The start of the game was delayed 52 minutes by a thunderstorm passing through the area, and then Chipleys Andrew Lawton returned the opening kickoff 72 yards.A personal foul penalty on the Bucks on the end of the return gave the Tigers first-and-goal from the 7. It took four runs by Lawton to reach the end zone, but he slid off a hit by linebacker Jaidon Dorsey on fourth down and Chipley scored less than 3 minutes into the game.Lawton was stopped on a conversion run and Chipley led 6-0.An interception by Chipleys Riley Gavaller ended Bozeman initial possession, and the Tigers put together the only extended scoring drive of the game to go up two touchdowns with 4:29 left in the first quarter.Tyler Hall made the big plays on this series. He turned a hitch pass into a 16-yard gain by making a Bozeman defender miss, then took a pitch around the right side for 22 yards to Bozemans 1.Dorsey broke through to drop Hall for a 2-yard loss on first-and-goal, but it only delayed the inevitable. Quarterback Isaac Berry kept around the left slide, split two defenders and reached the ball across the goal line to score from the 3.This time Hall was stopped on a conversion run and Chipley led 12-0.Bozemans only threat of the half came when Brian Zerr intercepted a tipped pass and streaked 78 yards, Hall making a saving tackle at Chipleys 15.Bozeman reached the 8, but on fourth down an attempt to run a reverse was fumbled away and Chipley survived until halftime.It didnt take long for things to go sour for the Tigers in the third quarter. It began when Bozeman held on Chipleys first series and a high snap went over punter Gage Sims head. Jesus Garcia and Dorsey combined to keep Sims in the end zone for a safety.Tyler Bates returned the free kick to Chipleys 38, Gabe Clouds diving tackle preventing him from break-ing free. It was here that the Bucks finally produced a key play on offense.Quarterback Zac Foster, who splits time with Blake Embrick, ran an option to the right side with tailback Hunter Kruger trailing.With Chipley keying on Bozemans top offensive threat, Foster kept and skirted the visiting sideline for a 29-yard touchdown run. Kruger pounded in the conversion and suddenly it was 12-10 with 7:30 still remaining in the third quarter. From that stage, Bozeman produced interceptions by Zerr, Lane Kyser, Kruger and Garcia, and a fumble recov-ery by Chuck Trumbull.What really was telling, however, was that when Tyler Isenhoff tipped a pass by Berry early in the fourth quarter, Garcia hauled it in and dashed 65 yards to put Bozeman on top 16-12.The Bucks took over on Chipleys 42 with 6:50 remaining in the game, but produced only one clock-draining first down.When Chipley regained possession, this time it was Kruger intercepting and returning 25 yards for the touchdown that clinched the outcome for Bozeman.It was telling that the Bucks 168 yards of interception returns more than doubled their offensive output.Kruger was their lone weapon most of the night with 40 yards rushing on 14 attempts. L awton had 103 yards on 25 carries for Chi-pley, but already had gained 90 yards by halftime.Chipley continued to handcuff its cause on both sides of the ball with penalties. The most costly by far was a holding call that negated a 61-yard scoring romp by Lawton that would have given the Tigers the lead following Garcias intercep-tion return. Bozeman is at Sneads next week. Chipley has a county showdown when it hosts Vernon.Bozeman rally stuns ChipleyBozemans Tyler Bates confronts Chipley quarterback Isaac Berry during a short gain. [JOSHUA BOUCHER PHOTOS/THE NEWS HERALD] Bozemans Hunter Kruger “ nds some open room to run during the “ rst half. Staff Report VERNON After losing 19-7 to Baker, the Jackets are riled up to face a county rival.At the Aug. 31 away game in Baker (2-0), Vernon (0-1) took the loss. However, Jacket fans can look forward to an intense and energetic game Friday when the team hits the field at Philip Rountree Stadium against the Chipley Tigers (2-1).Scores provided by Vernon Athletic Department.Friday: Jackets vs TigersSophomore Kwan Powell pushes through any Baker opposition at the Aug. 31 game. [PHOTO CREDIT: VERNON ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT] PREP FOOTBALL Andrew Jackson 25, Hilliard 0 Armwood 21, Plant 18 Atlantic Community 35, Pahokee 21 Baker County 8, Ribault 6 Baldwin 50, Dixie County 43 Barron Collier 44, Immokalee 33 Bartram Trail 34, Clay 13 Bayshore 8, Island Coast 0 Belen Jesuit 36, North Miami Beach 26 Bell 20, Franklin County 13 Bishop Kenny 9, Nease 6 Bishop Verot 17, Lakeland Christian 10 Bloomingdale 51, Middleton 0 Blountstown 48, Marianna 27 Boca Raton Community 30, Boynton Beach 7 Booker 37, Sarasota 13 Boone 21, Ocoee 20 Braden River 41, Manatee 31 Bradford 28, Keystone Heights 14 Calvary Christian-Clearwater 61, Anclote 13 Cambridge Christian 35, Village Academy 0 Cape Coral 43, East Lee County 0 Cardinal Gibbons 34, Dillard 12 Cardinal Mooney 28, Berkeley Prep 17 Cardinal Newman 40, Olympic Heights 20 Carrollwood Day 44, Tampa Bay Christian 6 Cedar Creek Christian 50, Seven Rivers Christian 6 Cedar Hill Trinity, Texas 45, FAMU 8 Celebration 36, Cypress Creek-Orlando 28 Chamberlain 42, Riverview 7 Chie” and 37, Lafayette 14 Chiles 28, Rickards 7 Clearwater Central Catholic 34, Tampa Catholic 14 Cocoa 57, Jensen Beach 14 Cocoa Beach 33, Halifax Academy 20 Coffee, Ga. 54, Ta ravella 6 Columbia 39, Buchholz 0 Coral Gables 28, Miami Killian 14 Coral Springs 13, Coral Glades 6 Cottondale 20, Liberty County 16 Countryside 23, Clearwater 20 Creekside 48, Paxon 17 Crystal River 45, South Lake 40 Cypress Creek-Wesley Chapel 42, Bishop McLaughlin 22 DeLand 31, Deltona 14 DeSoto County 43, Mulberry 0 Douglas 23, South Broward 6 Dwyer 42, Glades Central 14 East Bay 35, Robinson 12 East Lake 27, Tarpon Springs 2 Eastside 64, Brooksville Central 0 Eau Gallie 47, Seabreeze 7 Edgewater 49, Olympia 21 Estero 23, Ida S. Baker 13 Father Lopez Catholic 12, Satellite 3 First Academy-Orlando 20, Orlando Christian 15 Fleming Island 35, Middleburg 14 Fletcher 47, Englewood 7 Forest Hill 50, John I. Leonard 14 Fort Lauderdale University 52, Everglades Preparatory Academy 14 Fort White 43, Santa Fe 6 Foundation Academy 30, Bradenton Christian 0 Gaither 35, Lennard 12 George Jenkins 44, Lake Region 13 Godby 14, Lake Mary 11 Golden Gate 14, Lely 7 Gulf Breeze 58, Tate 25 Gulliver Prep 55, North Broward 31 Hardee 39, Avon Park 0 Harmony 49, Tohopekaliga 0 Hawthorne 51, P .K. Yonge 20 Heritage 13, Palm Bay 7 Hernando 48, Land O'Lakes 14 Holy Trinity Episcopal 78, Berean Christian 0 IMG Academy White 16, Zephyrhills Christian 10 Jay 52, Rocky Bayou Christian 0 Jefferson 44, Brandon 0 Jesuit 35, George Steinbrenner 10 Jones 40, Colonial 7 Kathleen 19, Ridge Community 7 Kissimmee Osceola 34, Viera 14 Lake Howell 14, Winter Springs 0 Lake Minneola 26, Lyman 13 Lake Nona 42, Orlando Freedom 0 Lake Wales 50, Haines City 6 Lake Weir 45, Eustis 6 Lakeland 37, Apopka 20 Lakewood 12, Dunnellon 6, OT Largo 48, Palm Harbor University 13 Legacy Charter 43, Ocala Christian Academy 0 Lehigh 27, South Fort Myers 13 Liberty 42, Poinciana 0 Lighthouse Christian 53, St. John Paul II Catholic Tallahassee 8 Lincoln 75, Hudson 0 Maclay 35, Nation Christian 12 Mainland 36, Treasure Coast 22 Martin County 25, Fort Pierce Central 0 McArthur 25, West Broward 14 Melbourne 30, Bayside 7 Menendez 40, Yulee 15 Merritt Island 10, Astronaut 9 Miami Carol City 35, Christopher Columbus Catholic 0 Miami Christian 12, Palm Glades Prep 6 Miami Palmetto 42, Miami Ferguson 0 Monsignor Pace 35, Gulf Coast 33 Mosley 36, Rutherford 7 Nature Coast Tech 32, Springstead 7 Newsome 28, Durant 14 North Florida Christian 35, Valwood, Ga. 7 North Fort Myers 15, Palmetto Ridge 10 Northview 14, South Walton 7 Oak Hall 45, Bronson 6 Oak Ridge 42, Evans 8 Oasis 67, Evangelical Christian 33 Ocala Forest 32, Mount Dora 26 Ocala Trinity Catholic 46, Stanton College Prep 14 Ocala Vanguard 20, North Marion 14 Orange Park 35, Atlantic Coast 20 Orlando University 35, Windermere 21 Out-of-Door Academy 33, Santa Fe Catholic 0 Oviedo 44, Hagerty 23 Oviedo Master's Academy 52, Orangewood Christian 21 Palatka 47, Belleview 7 Palm Beach Central 63, Braddock 7 Palm Beach Gardens 28, Lake Worth 0 Palmer Trinity 35, Westminster Academy 21 Palmetto 42, Sarasota Riverview 35 Pensacola 14, Pensacola Washington 7 Pine Crest 35, Fort Lauderdale Calvary Christian 34 Pinellas Park 64, Seminole Osceola 0 Piper 34, Boyd Anderson 7 Plant City 44, Wharton 7 Plantation American Heritage 11, Miramar 3 Ponte Vedra 21, St. Augustine 14 Port Charlotte 34, Lemon Bay 14 Port Orange Atlantic 22, Pine Ridge 0 Port St. Joe 27, Bay 0 R.E. Lee 38, Mandarin 13 Ridgeview 42, Westside 7 Rockledge 27, Bolles School 24 Sandalwood 41, Leon 16 Sanford Seminole 21, Flagler Palm Coast 0 Santaluces 19, West Boca Raton Community 0 Sebastian River 28, South Fork 16 Seffner Christian 56, Four Corners 0 Seminole 31, Dunedin 12 Shorecrest Prep 34, Fort Myers Canterbury 14 Somerset Academy-Pembroke Pines 31, SomersetCanyons 7 South Dade 20, Miami Northwestern 18 South Sumter 42, Trenton 6 Southeast 40, Lakewood Ranch 3 Southwest Florida Christian 27, Community School of Naples 22 Southwest Miami 34, Miami 0 Space Coast 42, Port St. Lucie 21 Spruce Creek 34, Matanzas 3 St. John Neumann 55, Gateway Charter 0 St. Joseph Academy 31, Eagle's View 8 St. Petersburg Catholic 20, Indian Rocks 3 St. Petersburg Northeast 26, Gibbs 20 St. Thomas Aquinas 62, Flanagan 0 Suncoast 32, Spanish River 25 Tampa Bay Tech 19, Sickles 6 Tampa Freedom 7, Spoto 6 Tavares 37, Umatilla 0 Tenoroc 26, Discovery 6 The Villages 39, Taylor 14 Thomasville, Ga. 39, Everglades 0 Timber Creek 16, East River 3 Trinity Christian-Deltona 42, Cornerstone Charter 7 Trinity Christian-Jacksonville 44, Terry Parker 0 Union County 43, Interlachen 9 University (Orange City) 29, Leesburg 6 University Christian 33, Crescent City 15 Venice 49, Charlotte 13 Vero Beach 44, Miami Krop 0 Weeki Wachee 52, Fivay 14 Wekiva 25, Winter Park 22 Wellington 14, Park Vista Community 8 Wesley Chapel 39, Pasco 33 West Orange 31, Dr. Phillips 28 West Port 42, Citrus 14 Western 24, Hallandale 8 Westminster Christian 10, Ransom Everglades 7 Wildwood 20, Mount Dora Christian 16 Windermere Prep 35, St. Stephen's Episcopal 21 Wiregrass Ranch 7, Sunlake 6 Zephyrhills 28, Lake Gibson 13STATE SCORESWCN/HCTA staff reportWASHINGTON AND HOLMES COUNTIES Sports. It's one of those things that all Americans regardless of our diversities will get behind. And in Washington and Holmes Counties, not only will we get behind it, but we are engulfed in it. Washington County News and Holmes County TimesAdvertiser are currently searching for an energetic sports writer to cover high school football and other sports in both counties. If you are interested, contact the editor at jbostick@chipley-paper.com or 850-630-6167.In the meantime: Due to limited staffing, we regret we are not able to make all the local sporting events, but we welcome any help ensur-ing Holmes and Washington County athletes are recognized for their hard work! If you have sports photos or stats you'd like to share with your fellow fans, please send information to: news@chipleypaper.com.WCN/HCTA seeks Sports Writer

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, September 12, 2018 A13 REFLECTIONSLOOKING BACK IN THE WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS:Heres a glance at the top stories for September 8, 1949 Source: History.com 1777Congress receives news of defeat at BrandywineOn this day in 1777, the Continental Congress receives a letter from Conti-nental Army General George Washington informing them of the Patriot defeat at Brandywine, Pennsylvania. 1846Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning elopeOn this day in 1846, Elizabeth Barrett eloped with Robert Browing. 1861The First Battle of Lexington, Missouri, beginsConfederate General Sterling Price con-tinues his campaign to secure Missouri in the early days of the war by converging on a Union garrison at Lexington, Missouri. The First Battle of Lexington ended after a week with the surrender of the Federals.1918U.S. launches Saint-Mihiel offensiveOn this day in 1918, the American Expe-ditionary Force (AEF) under the command of General John J. Pershing launches its first major offensive operation as an inde-pendent army during World War I. 1940Lascaux cave paintings discoveredNear Montignac, France, a collection of prehistoric cave paintings are discovered by four teenagers who stumbled upon the ancient artwork after following their dog down a narrow entrance into a cavern. The 15,000to 17,000-year-old paintings, consisting mostly of animal representa-tions, are among the finest examples of art from the Upper Paleolithic period. 1942The Laconia is sunkOn this day in 1942, a German U-boat sinks a British troop ship, the Laconia, killing more than 1,400 men. The com-mander of the German sub, Capt. Werner Hartenstein, realizing that Italians POWs were among the passengers, strove to aid in their rescue. 1944Barry White is bornBorn in Galveston, Texas, on this day in 1944, Barry White…or "the Maestro"…went on to stunningly successful career as a pop singer that spanned five decades, and made him a star of the disco era. 1951Sugar Ray Robinson wins back belt On September 12, 1951, former middle-weight champion Sugar Ray Robinson defeats Randy Turpin to win back the belt in front of 61,370 spectators at the Polo Grounds in New York City. Robinson, a New York City native, had lost the belt to Turpin two months prior in Turpins native London. 1953JFK marries Jacqueline BouvierSenator John Fitzgerald Kennedy of Massachusetts marries Jacqueline Lee Bouvier, a photographer for the Washing-ton Times-Herald, at St. Marys Church in Newport, Rhode Island. More than 750 guests attended the ceremony presided over by Boston Archbishop Richard Cush-ing and featuring Boston tenor Luigi Vena, who sang "Ave Maria." A crowd of 3,000 onlookers waited outside the church for a glimpse of the newlyweds, who were taken by motorcycle escort to their wed-ding reception at Hammersmith Farm, an estate overlooking Naragansett Bay. Ken-nedy was elected the 35th president of the United States seven years later.ON THIS DAY

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** A14 Wednesday, September 12, 2018 | Washington County News

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, September 12, 2018 B1 CELEBRATE By Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY What is the main ingredient in yeilding a life of independence and longevity? Anita Clarke, Executive Director of Washington County Council on Aging, says the answer is a consistent stream of support. Were here to held the elderly and let them age with dignity,Ž Clarke said. Most of them like to stay in their own homes.Ž And an upcoming cookbook fundraiser is set to help WCCOA meet that need in Washington County. The project presents several opportunities to support the elderly: businesses can receive a free ad placement in the cookbook in return for placing the book sale flyer at their place of business and/ or invite patrons to purchase the book, individuals and businesses can take out a paid advertisement, also, contribute recipes to the book. The deadline for ads and contributions is Sept. 26. WCCOA, 1348 South Blvd., is a not-for-profit organization that provides in-home and onsite services for the local aging and disable community. The program is funded by governmental grants and programs, private donations and communityoriented fundraisers. It serves about 125 clients in Washington County, where about 20-percent of the population is 65 years of age or older, according to a 2017 report from U.S. Census Bureau. Currently, about 90 people are on the waiting list to receive WCCOA services, including the meal program. We struggle here because its so rural and everyone is needing,Ž Clarke said. So, when you ask [for private financial support], people get tired of it.Ž Thats why we started our cake auction and our Senior Expo,Ž she said, noting the fundraisers raise about $4,500 combined. The majority of WCCOAs comes from governmental grants. However, some of them still require matching funds. And then we dont get enough funding to see all of our seniors in our county, so then we use that money to put in the pot to help provide services for them,Ž Clarke said referring to fundraisers. It goes back into the community.Ž The multi-level services the organization provides include meals, baths, caregiver relief, and homemaker and housekeeping services. WCCOA also offers a free day center for individuals with memory disorders. Clarke said the primary misconception about WCCOA lies in how people perceive the program. Unfortunately, that misconception results in fewer resources getting to the people who actually need them. A lot of people think its for really low-income people,Ž she said. Its not. It covers anybody. The only difference is they have a co-pay if theyre not eligible for Medicaid, but it is very low compared to the services you receive.Ž The organization provides opportunities for sponsorship to provide meals to clients for as low as $5 per meal. Other sponsorships for other amounts are available. Volunteers are needed, particularly to deliver meals. To support the program, cookbook sale or to find elderly services, contact Washington County Council on Aging at 850-638-6216 or wccoa@bellsouth.net.WCCOA kicks o cookbook sale to help elderlyWashington County Council on Aging clients take a day trip to visit clients at the Vernon branch for a “ sh fry during Older American Month. [COURTESY PHOTO/WASHINGTON COUNTY COUNCIL ON AGING] Washington County Council on Aging clients make a day trip to Imax Theater in Tallahassee. [COURTESY PHOTO/WASHINGTON COUNTY COUNCIL ON AGING] Senior citizens at Washington County Council on Aging listen to Neysa Semmlersing during an annual Christmas Senior Luncheon held during the holidays. [COURTESY PHOTO/WASHINGTON COUNTY COUNCIL ON AGING] Washington County Council on Aging is a premier site for senior citizens to engage and be engaged with the community. [COURTESY PHOTO/ WASHINGTON COUNTY COUNCIL ON AGING] Interested in supporting the cookbook sale?Contact Washington County Council on Aging at 850-638-6216 or wccoa@bellsouth.net.

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** B2 Wednesday, September 12, 2018 | Washington County NewsTim Thompson given regional duties over GateHouses 2 daily and 8 weekly Panhandle propertiesNews Herald staff reportPANAMA CITY „ News Herald Publisher Tim Thompson is taking on additional duties as publisher of the North-west Florida Daily News and now will oversee the Pan-handles two dailies and eight weeklies in a move expected to bring even more collaboration between the properties.Thompson is filling the void created with the retirement of Diane Winnemuller as publisher of the NWFDN in Fort Walton Beach.Tim is a passionate leader committed to strong and direct community engagement and excellence across all our platforms and services,Ž said Patrick Dorsey, regional vice president of GateHouse Medias Coastal Publishing Group. He knows the Panhandle very well and will be a strong leader for all our Northwest Florida properties. Tim is a long-time publisher and has excelled everywhere he has been. I know his lively and engaging personality will be well received in Fort Walton Beach as it has been in Panama City.ŽThompson said he is excited at the new oppor-tunity but made it clear his heart and calendar have room for both prop-erties and he isnt leaving Panama City.Our role in the communities we serve has never been more important and I have tremendous respect for the hard work our staffs are doing,Ž Thompson said. Northwest Florida has obviously become a very important footprint for our company „ with eight weeklies and two dailies stretching from Apalachicola to Santa Rosa „ and GateHouse Media takes great pride in our connection to all the communities we serve.ŽDorsey called Winnemuller one of the most creative advertis-ing mindsŽ and noted her dedication to the Emerald Coast since her arrival.She has become deeply involved in the Fort Walton Beach area and has ensured the Daily News remains an integral part of the community,Ž Dorsey said, paving the way for Thompsons new role.Thompson joined The News Herald in 2014 as publisher and also oversees the regions four eastern weekliesŽ in Chipley, Bonifay, Port St. Joe and Apalachicola. In addition to taking over at the NWFDN he also will oversee weeklies in Destin, Walton County, Crestview and Santa Rosa.I wish Diane the very best in her well-deserved retirement,Ž Thompson said. We moved to Fort Walton Beach and Panama City at about the same time, and early on I realized just how impor-tant this community was „ and is, to Diane.Im excited about taking on these additional responsibilities. We are fortunate to have so many outstanding leaders at our weekly and daily news organiza-tions in the Panhandle. I consider it a privilege to offer my support on all the efforts at hand.ŽThe transition, however, does not mean Thompson will be difficult to find in Panama City.Im not going anywhere,Ž he said. I love living in Panama City and hold dear so many special relationships here, both business and personal.ŽThompsons fondness for the surf, sand, food and lifestyle of the area extends beyond him, he said, noting this slice of the coast is simply unique. Ive moved to the top of the list for destinations when the voting takes place on where this years family reunion will be held,Ž he said.News Herald publishers role expands west Thompson By Mae AndersonThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ The resignation of longtime CBS chief Les Moonves wont likely lead to drastic changes in network programs, but it could make the company ripe for a takeover as traditional media companies com-pete with upstarts such as Netflix and Amazon.Moonves was ousted Sunday, just hours after the New Yorker detailed more sexual misconduct allegations against him. A dozen women have alleged mistreatment, including forced oral sex, groping and retaliation if they resisted him. CBS is on the hook for $120 million in severance if its investigation, being con-ducted by two outside law firms, finds no evidence of wrongdoing. Moonves has denied wrongdoing.CBS also shook up its board and settled a larger fight with its parent company, National Amusements Inc. As part of the settlement, National Amusements agreed not to push for a merger between CBS and sibling company Viacom for at least two years. As CEO, Moonves had opposed such a merger on grounds CBS was doing well, while Viacom was not.The network was strug-gling when Moonves took over as entertainment chief in 1995. He quickly turned things around and churned out shows appealing to the older, more tradition-bound CBS audience „ broadappeal sitcoms such as Two and a Half MenŽ and The Big Bang TheoryŽ and procedural dramas such as CSI: Crime Scene InvestigationŽ and NCIS.Ž SurvivorŽ was an early reality show hit, and continues to this day. Moonves became CEO of CBS Television in 1998 and CEO of the newly created CBS Corp. in 2006 after it split from Viacom.Moonves temporary replacement, Chief Operating Officer Joseph Ianniello, has steered top projects such as standalone streaming services for CBS and the Show-time cable channel. But he doesnt have a creative or sales background, which might make him an awk-ward long-term leader for the company.For now, Ianniello is unlikely to make drastic changes in programming, particularly since CBS formula has been work-ing. Programming changes could be more substantial if CBS chooses someone outside the company as a permanent replacement.B. Riley FBR analyst Barton Crockett said CBS could remain successful without Moonves. He noted the continued suc-cess of other networks that have lost top executives to sexual misconduct claims, including Roger Ailes and Bill OReilly at Fox News and Matt Lauer at NBC News.Strong performance can continue even when a vaunted, tainted star departs,Ž Crockett said. These groups have deep talent pools.ŽA broader question is whether CBS will remain standalone company at all.To better compete with tech companies such as Netflix, companies that have traditionally distributed TV shows and movies have been buying the producers of such programs. The producers, themselves, have been consolidating as well. AT&T bought Time Warner for $85 billion in June, while Disney is in the process of acquiring the entertainment assets of Fox for $71.3 billion.That makes CBS a hot commodity. With the shake-up of its board, there are 11 independent directors and two affiliated with National Amusements, down from three. One of the new directors, Candace Beinecke, is a lawyer with expertise in mergers and acquisitions. National Amusements agreed to give good faith considerationŽ to any offer the new board deems good for shareholders.Eye of the beholder BUSINESS A er Moonves, CBS takeover possible in new media landscapeOn Sunday, CBS said longtime CEO Les Moonves has resigned, just hours after more sexual harassment allegations involving the networks longtime leader surfaced. [CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/AP]

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, September 12, 2018 B3 SCHOOLS & SOCIETY CROSSWORDSpecial to WCN\HCTAThe Chipola Regional Arts Association (CRAA) kicks off its 29th year of enhancing the arts and arts education at noon Tuesday, September 18 at Jim's Buffet in Marianna.The guest speakers are Chipola faculty Connie Smith and Dr. Rachel West who will be speaking on the status of the Chipola Techni-cal Theatre Program and students who are working in the field. Additionally, they will share about the World War II letter proj-ect which will culminate in a Chipola Artist Series event on March 14, 2019. The event is a collaboration among Chipola, FSU's Institute on World War II and the Human experience, and the Northern Illinois Uni-versity School of Theatre and Dance. Monologues will be created from the scores of WWII letters from the Institute. Writ-ers will be brought to life by the actors from North-ern Illinois University.Smith also will be introducing opportunities with the Volunteer Group which is being formed to assist in all facets of production sup-port from preparing scenery and costumes to assisting backstage.Smith, who has worked in theatrical design and technical production for 30 years, serves as Director of Technical Theatre for the Center for the Arts where she is responsible for Scenic/ Lighting Design and Technical Direction of all productions. She has designed scenery for University of Mobile, University of South Ala-bama, and community theatres in the Southeast. She holds a BFA in Theatrical Design & Technology from Auburn, an MS in Recreational Therapy (Expressive Arts) from the University of South Alabama, and an MFA in Theatre Technical Production FSU. She has served as the Job Fair Services Manager for the Southeastern Theatre Conference (SETC) since 2001.Dr. West is in her 27th year of teaching English at Chipola. She earned a BA in Literature from FSU, a masters in litera-ture from the University of Central Florida, and a PhD in Higher Education from FSU. She is coordinator of Chipolas Throssell Literature/ Language Festival. She presents at conferences, and assists in creating the technical theatre cur-riculum at Chipola. She has also begun teaching Script Analysis as part of the technical theatre track.CRAA is a volunteer organization under the umbrella of the Chipola Foundation. The group works to enhance the arts in the district and offers mini-grants to teachers in the arts. CRAA contributes to the Artist Series which brings in professional performers to the Chipola stage, sup-ports the college's theatre program through the ACT Fund, and provides chil-dren's programming in the arts for area students.CRAA meetings are open to the public. All are welcome to enjoy the programs and Dutch-treat luncheon.For information, contact Joan Stadsklev, CRAA President, at 850-482-7365.Chipola faculty to speak at CRAA meetingPictured is Connie Smith and Dr. Rachel West Special to WCN/HCTAThe Chipola Col-lege Teacher Education Department will offer a new part-time schedule for the Elementary and Exceptional Student Education Bachelors Degree programs.Courses will be offered in a combination of online, evening, and Saturday classes beginning in January 2019. An informational meeting will be held at 5 p.m. Monday, September 17, in Building O, Room 101. Several prerequisites must be met in order to enter the program. These require-ments will be discussed at the meeting.For information, contact Dr. Gina McAl-lister at 850-718-2326 or email mcallisterg@chipola.eduChipola o ering part-time education degreesSeptember17: Recognition of "Constitution Day" at Schools 24-28: Recognition of "Celebrate Freedom Week" at Schools 26: Early Release/Professional Development (Students Released at 1 p.m.)October12: Vernon High School Homecoming 15-16: Fall Break (Students/Teachers/Paras/10 Month and Lunchroom Personnel/Bus Drivers Out) 19: Chipley High School Homecoming 30: Report Cards Go Out 31: Early Release/Professional Development (Students Released at 1 p.m.)November9: Recognition of Veterans Chipley and Vernon Schools 13: Progress Reports Go Out 19-23: Thanksgiving Holidays (Students/Teachers/Paras/ 10 Month and Lunchroom Personnel/ Bus Drivers Out) 21-23: Thanksgiving Holidays (12 Month Personnel Out)December21: Early Release (Students Released at 1 p.m.) 24-31: Christmas Break (Students/Teachers/ Paras/10 Month Personnel and Lunchroom Personnel/ Bus Drivers Out) 24-25: 12 Month Personnel Out 31: 12 Month Personnel OutJanuary 20191: 12 Month Personnel Out 1-3: Teachers/10 Month Personnel Out 1-4: Students/Lunchroom Personnel/Bus Drivers Out 4: Teachers Planning Day 7: Classes Resume 21: Martin Luther King Day (Students and All Personnel Out) 23: Report Cards Go OutFebruary7: Progress Reports Go Out 13: Early Release/Professional Development (Students Released at 1 p.m.) 18: Presidents Day (Students/Teachers/Paras/ 10 Month and Lunchroom Personnel/ Buss Drivers Out)March6: Early Release/Professional Development (Students Released at 1 p.m.) 25-29: Spring Break (Students and All Personnel Out)April9: Report Cards Go Out 19: Spring Day (Students/ Teachers/Paras/10 Month and Lunchroom Personnel/ Bus Drivers Out) 23: Progress Reports Go OutMay7: FPTC Graduation 21: Vernon High School Senior Awards 5:30 p.m. 21: Chipley High School Senior Awards 7:30 p.m. 23: Vernon High School Graduation 24: Last Day of School (Students Released at 1 p.m.) 24: WISE Graduation 24: Chipley High School Graduation 27: Memorial Day (All Personnel Out) 28-30: Post Planning Days for Teachers/Paras/10 Month PersonnelJune10: Report Cards Go Out2018 … 2019 WASHINGTON COUNTY SCHOOL CALENDARTrivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy. com 1. What best describes and makes the sound heard if crackingŽ ones knuckles? Bones scraping together, Joint ” uids releasing gases, Cartilage stretching 2. Which is not a member of The Fantastic FourŽ? Mr. Fantastic, Green Lantern, Invisible Girl, Thing, Human Torch 3. From the nursery rhyme, which Little TommyŽ sings for his supper? Jones, Tucker, Boy, Oliver 4. What comic strips original name was Lil FolksŽ? Peanuts,Ž Gasoline Alley,Ž Family Circus,Ž DoonesburyŽ 5. Which NBA team started out as the Buffalo Braves? N.Y. Knicks, Boston Celtics, Chicago Bulls, L.A. Clippers 6. Who hid in the Trojan Horse to enter the city of Troy? Greeks, Romans, Syrians, Egyptians ANSWERS: 1. Joint ” uids releasing gases, 2. Green Lantern, 3. Tucker, 4. Peanuts,Ž 5. L.A. Clippers, 6. GreeksTRIVIA GUY W i l s o n C a s e y Wilson Casey

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** B4 Wednesday, September 12, 2018 | Washington County News FAITHIf you would like your Washington County church listed here, please send information to: news@chipleypaper.com. Due to space limitation, please only send regular church services. For special services, please send separate submission. ASSEMBLY OF GODCorbin Road Assembly of GodMorning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 105 Corbin Road in Chipley.Cords of Love Assembly of GodSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study is a 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 2060 Bethlehem Road in Cottondale.Grace Assembly of God @ ChipleyMorning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 567 North Main Street, ChipleyNew Bethany Assembly of GodSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Shaky Joe Road just off Hig hway 280 at Hinsons Crossroads.New Life Fellowship Assembly of GodSunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 695 5th Street, Chipley.Wausau Assembly of GodSunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 3537 Washington Street in Wausau.BAPTISTAbigail Free Will Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located on Dawkins Street in Vernon.Berean Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1438 Nearing Hills Drive in Chipley. Blue Lake Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 1405 Blue Lake Road in Chipley.Chipley First Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship Service is at 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship Service is at 10:30 a.m. Discipleship Training is at 5 p.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday AWANA is at 5:15 p.m. Wednesday, Prayer Meeting Is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1300 South Boulevard.Country Oaks Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 574 Buckhorn BoulevardEastside Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at Hig hway 277 in Vernon.First Free Will Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1387 South Boulevard.Gap Pond Free Will Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 1980 Gap Boulevard in Sunny Hills.Grace Baptist Chapel MissionSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:50 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 440 Lot E Second Street, Chipley.Holmes Creek Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service AWANA is at 5:30 p.m. and Bible Study is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 335 Cope Road in Chipley.Holyneck Missionary Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located 3395 Cemetery Lane, Campbellton.Jerusalem Missionary Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 614 Bennett Drive in Chipley.Mt. Ararat Missionary Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1233 Old Bonifay Road in Chipley.New Orange Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located on Alford Road in Washington County.New Prospect Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship services are at 11 a.m. Sunday evening services are at 5 p.m. Wednesday services supper is at 5 p.m. Wednesday prayer meeting, bible study and childrens classes start at 5:45. The church is at 761 New Prospect Road in Chipley. Oakie Ridge Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is at the corner of Orange Hill Road and Gilberts Mill Road. Orange Hill Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday prayer and Bible Study is as 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3485 Gainer Road in Chipley.Orange Hill Missionary Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship on the “ rst and third Sunday of the month is at 11 a.m. Wednesday night prayer meeting is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 816 Sunday Road in Chipley.WASHINGTON COUNTY CHURCH LISTINGSSee CHURCHES, B6

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, September 12, 2018 B5 OBITUARIESDeborah C. Andrews, age 61, passed from this life Monday, September 3, 2018 at her home. She was born in Chipley, FL on December 26, 1956 to Billy Ray and Ozie Marie (Strickland) Andrews. Deborah graduated from Holmes County High School 1975, attended Chipola Jr. College in 1976 and Pensacola Jr. College Police Academy in 1977. She worked for Holmes County Sheriffs Department 1976, Pinkerton Security Company in Gonzales, LA in 1976-1977, Defuniak Nursing Home from 1979-1983, city of Defuniak Police Dept. from 1980-1986 (First Female), Graceville Police from 1986-1989 (First Female), State of Florida DOT from 1989-1992 (Weight Inspector), and Sate of Florida DOT Motor Carrier Compliance (1991-2001). She is preceded in death by her grandparents; Ray and Ocie Dell Andrews and Walter and Minnie Strickland, her great grandparents; Barney and Daisey Retherford, and her aunts and uncles Charles Andrews, Charles M. Strickland, Margaret Bishop and Doyle Taylor. Deborah is survived by her parents, a special friend; Elaine Arcabascio and her sons; Charlie and his wife Amanda and children, Chris and his wife Amanda and children, her Brother; Charles Edward Andrews, his wife Menette, Nephews; Angus Wilson Andrews and Jacob Ruger Andrews and his wife Leslie, great nieces; Hayes Andrews, Rae Andrews, great Nephews; Bryce, Trace, great, great niece Kylee, aunts and uncles; Sue Andrews, Roy and Maxine Strickland, Betty Taylor, Annette and Ken Adkinson. Funeral service were held 2:00 P.M., Thursday, September 6, 2018 at Calvary Baptist Church with the Rev. Ike Steverson officiating. Interment followed in the Bonifay City Cemetery. Visitation was held one hour prior to service. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley, FL in charge of arrangements. Family and friends may sign the online register at www. brownfh.netDEBORAH C. ANDREWSEugene Crews, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, went home to be with the Lord on Monday, August 27, 2018 in the comfort of his home. He was 77 years old and a native of Campbellton, Florida. Eugene was born on September 2, 1940 to the late Frank and Ardie Mae Crews in Jackson County, Florida. He attended the St. Paul High School, graduating in the Class of 1958. Upon his completion of high school, Eugene enlisted in the United States Army where he served for two (2) years. After serving his country honorably, Eugene became employed with the United States Postal Service where he retired from after 30 years of employment. Having a deep love for Christ, Eugene grew up in the St. Paul A.M.E. Church of Campbellton, Florida. After his move to Philadelphia, he became a faithful member of Allen A.M.E. Church where he served as a deacon, and a trustee of the church. He loved the Lord and exemplified it in the way that he lived his life. He leaves to cherish his precious memories his beloved son: Vincent Crews (Veronica); two (2) grandsons: Vincent Crews, Jr. and Cornelius Crews; one (1) granddaughter who preceded him in death: Pernell Crews; eight (8) great-grandchildren; sister-in-law: Nadine Crews of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; three (3) nieces: Thawanda Renee Crews (Zannie), Jacqueline Brown (Jerome), Elaine Pittman (Tony); two (2) nephews: Tony Crews (Rachel) and Jason Crews; along with a host of great & greatgreat nieces, nephews, cousins, other relatives and friends. Eugene was preceded in death by his parents, siblings: Betty Sue Crews, Herbert Otis Crews, Leroy Crews (Margaret), Annie Lou Pittman (Benjamin), Johnnie Lee (Willie Ann) Crews; niece: Shirley Pittman; and nephew: Frankie Crews. A Service of Remembrance was held 11 AM CST, Monday, September 10, 2018 from the grounds of the St. Paul Cemetery of Campbellton, Florida with Rev. L.V. Farmer, officiating. Committal Services and Military Honors followed the service with Cooper Funeral Home of Chipley, Florida, directing. Public Viewing for Eugene was held from 12 Noon … 9 PM CST, Sunday, September 9, 2018 in the Cooper Funeral Home Chapel of Chipley, Florida. The remains were in repose at the cemetery 1hr prior to services on Monday. Friends may sign the guestbook online at www.cooperfchchipley. com. EUGENE CREWS Sherry Millicent (Whitfield) Echols, of Bonifay, Florida, went home to be with the Lord on August 31, 2018 in the Bay Medical Care Center of Panama City, Florida. She was 67 years old and a native of Panama City, Florida. Sherry was born on October 24, 1950 to Mae Bell Williams and the late Henry Whitfield in Panama City. She was of the Methodist faith and a member of the Mt. Olive A.M.E. Church of Panama City and worked as a Certified Nursing Assistant with National Health Care for numerous years. She leaves to cherish her memories four (4) children: Lashunda Edwards of Bonifay, Florida, Quennon Echols of Moorhead, Minnesota, Anthony Echols of Phoenix, Arizona, and Gemel Cook of Panama City, Florida; six (6) grandchildren and one (1) greatgrandchild; mother: Mae Bell Williams of Panama City, Florida; four (4) sisters: Carolyn Foster (Eugene), Cynthia Goode, both of Dallas, Texas, Doris McNabb (James) of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, and Mavis Whitfield of Panama City, Florida; three (3) brothers: Charles Whitfield of Long Beach, California, James Whitfield and Jerome Whitfield, both of Panama City, Florida; along with a host of nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. A Celebration of Sherrys Life was held 1 PM CST, Saturday, September 8, 2018 from the sanctuary of the Mt. Olive A.M.E. Church of Panama City, Florida with pastor, Rev. Michael Johnson, Elder Terry Whitehurst, Rev. David Rhone, Sr., and Rev. Barbara Brinson, officiating. Committal Service followed in the Hillside Cemetery with Cooper Funeral Home of Chipley, Florida, directing. Public viewing was held 2 hours prior to services on Saturday at the church. Friends may sign the guestbook online at www.cooperfhchipley. com.SHERRY M. ECHOLS Edith Finch, age 84, of Marianna, FL, went home to be with the Lord on Thursday, August 30, 2018. She was born on May 21, 1934 in Bremerhaven, Germany. Edith is preceded in death by her parents, and her husband, Cleavon Finch. She is survived by two sons: Mark Finch and wife Robbie, and Gary Finch and wife Shannon; her brother, Harold Matys; her sister, Vera Kautz; and two grandchildren: Katelyn Finch and Christopher Finch. Funeral Service was held on Tuesday, September 4, 2018, at 11:00 A.M. at the Brown Funeral Home Chapel in Chipley, FL. Visitation was from 9:00-11:00 A.M. Interment will be at Gap Pond Cemetery in Sunny Hills, FL. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley, FL is in charge of arrangements. Family and friends may sign the online register at www. brownfh.netEDITH FINCHLouise Hall was the firstborn child of Katherine"Lee" and Minter Hall born on May 3, 1929 in Frostproof, FL. She passed away on September 6, 2018 at her home in Bonifay. Louise Graduated from Frostproof High in 1947. She married the love of her life Charles E Hall in Tampa, FL in 1958, where they resided until moving to Bonifay in 1976. During her life, she was the director of the Kindergarten program for Temple Heights Christian School in Tampa Florida until she moved to Bonifay. She then founded Small World Daycare in 1977 and was actively involved until her death. Many of her current students are grandchildren of her original ones. She was a born again Christian and active in the Church where she did Childrens Ministry. She was a member of Live Oak Assembly of God at the time of her death. She loved God first, her husband and her entire family. She was a Godly woman who never met a child she didnt love. She will be missed by everyone who knew and loved her. She was proceeded in death by her husband Charlie Hall, Parents Minter and Lee Hall, Siblings, Minter Hall, Maryann Whitehurst and Myra Ward Ferguson. She leaves behind her 4 children, Terry Greeley, Betty Flynn, Kitty Fletcher Young and Charlie H. Hall, 9 Grandchildren, 15 great grandchildren, 2 great great grandchildren as well as many nieces and nephews. Services will be held on Saturday, September 15 at Live Oak Assembly of God. Viewing will begin at 3:00 pm with services following at 4:00 pm with burial at Shady Grove Baptist Church Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing.LOUISE HALLRusty Scott Mertes, age 27, a former resident of Bonifay, Florida died August 25, 2018. Funeral services were held Saturday, September 1, 2018. Interment followed in the Union Hill Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing.RUSTY S. MERTESJames Earl Wood, 76, of Westville, died Thursday, September 06, 2018. Memorial services will be held at 10:00 AM on September 15, 2018, at Corinth Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing.JAMES E. WOODTimothy Michael Yarbrough, age 61, of Westville, FL passed away Wednesday, September 4, 2018 after an extended illness. He was born March 31, 1957, in Geneva, AL, the son of Phillip Jr. and Sylvia Yarbrough. He graduated from Ponce de Leon High School in 1975. After high school, he went to work offshore on the oil rigs as a cook for 4 years. He started with Clinton Mills in Geneva, AL, known as the "Cotton Mill" in 1979 and worked there for 22 years until the last whistle blew. He then went to Micolas in Opp, AL for a while before ending up at Lincoln Fabrics in Geneva, AL. He helped to open and set up operations at the plant. He took great pride in making Kevlar for bulletproof vests for our men in blue and our troops. Tim spent most of his childhood in the woods squirrel hunting with his father, when he wasn't in the flower garden or kitchen with his mother. He loved to go to the casinos in Biloxi, MS and would often go with his sister, mother and niece. He enjoyed fishing, growing beautiful daylilies, and spending time with his family. He was adored by many and will truly be missed. He is preceded in death by his father, Columbus Phillip Yarbrough, Jr. He is survived by his mother, Sylvia Yarbrough, of Westville, FL; one sister, Jan Burke and husband Richard of Samson, AL; one niece, Amber Merritt and husband Mike of Westville, FL; one great niece, Mikayla Morgan of Jacksonville, FL; one great nephew, Hunter Merritt of Westville, FL At his request, he did not want a memorial service or flowers. However, if you would like to honor his memory, you can donate to the Esophageal Cancer Awareness Association in his memory. You can go to their website, www. ecaware.org, click on the "Honor Someone" link and make a donation in his name. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www. themagnoliafh.com. Arrangements are under the direction of Magnolia Funeral Home of Hartford Alabama.TIMOTHY M. YARBROUGH OBITUARIES CONTINUED ON B6

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** B6 Wednesday, September 12, 2018 | Washington County NewsHarold Lee Bailow, age 80, of Bonifay, Florida died September 3, 2018. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.HAROLD L. BAILOWJames Moore of Bonifay, Florida passed away on September 4, 2018. He was 90 years old. Mr. Moore was born in Geneva, AL on January 3, 1928 to the late J.P. and Pinkie Donaldson Moore. Mr. Moore was preceded in death by his loving wife, Lucille Moore, and his beloved grandson, James Tyler Moore. In addition to his wife, grandson and parents, he is preceded in death by seven brothers, Ocie Sr., Otis J., Arthur, Hubert, Jearl, Curtis, and Donald Ray Moore; two sisters, Lois Lee and Lalay Whitaker. Survivors include his dev oted wife, Helen Harris Moore of Bonifay, FL; one son, James Timothy Moore, Sr. and wife, Mary Ann of Tallahassee, FL; one daughter, Brenda Dianne Owen and husband, Jempsey of Bonifay, Fl; two grandsons, James Timothy Moore Jr. and wife, Ashley; Christopher Todd Owen; one granddaughter, Jamie Dianne Edwards and husband, Cody; two great grandchildren, Madeline Tyler Moore and Tristan Cody Edwards; Mr. Moore is also survived by stepson, Roger Harris and wife, Kathi; stepdaughter, Regina Yoder and husband, Greg; step grandchildren include Cliff Harris and wife, Renee, Rihanna Henderson and husband, Phillip and Rachael Burch; two sisters, Donna Faye Williams, and Geraldine Baxley; numerous nieces and nephews. Serviceswere held at 2 p.m., Saturday, September 8, 2018 at Carmel Assembly of God Church in Bonifay with the Rev. Tommy Moore and Rev. Jerry Moore officiating. Burial followed in the church cem etery with James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel of Marianna directing and overseeing arrangements. The family received friends at Carmel Assembly of God Church, Friday, September 7th from 6 to 8 p.m. Expressions of sympathy may be made online at www.james andsikesfuneralhomes. com.JAMES MOORE Margaret MargieŽ Agnes Sims, age 86 of Graceville passed away on Wednesday, September 5, 2018 at her home. She was born in Rhode Island on October 29, 1931. Margie has lived in Graceville for the past 66 years and was a member of the First Baptist Church of Graceville. She enjoyed knitting, crocheting and watching Little League Baseball. Margie was preceded in death by her parents, James E. Spelman and Gladys Carter Spelman; husband, Jim Sims Sr. and son Jim Sims Jr. She is survived by her sons, David Sims, Charles Sims (Twila) and Steve Sims (Donna); daughters, LuAnne Arnold (Ricardo Melendez) and Dianna Garcia (Daniel); grandchildren, Greg Arnold (Terre), Kevin Arnold (Georgia), Derrick Arnold (Amy), Colby Sims, Darah Tisdale (Justin), Brandon Ducker and Justin Ducker (Tiffany); great-grandchildren, Chase Arnold (Dara), Andrea Arnold, Brantley Arnold, Emma Kate Arnold, Wiley Beachamp (Meghan), Jon Beachamp (Kendra), Alexis Ducker, Alivia Ducker, Zane Ducker and Della OBrian; great-great-grandchildren, Fenton Beachamp, Annabella Beachamp and Bristol Beachamp. Funeral services for Margie were held at 10 a.m. on Saturday, September 8, 2018 in the Williams Funeral Home. Interment followed in the Marvin Chapel Cemetery. A time of visitation was held from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Friday, September 7, 2018 in the Williams Funeral Home. Williams Funeral Home of Graceville is in charge of the arrangements. Expression of sympathy can be made at www.williamsfhs.com/.MARGARET A. SIMS FAITHPiney G rove Free Will Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1783 Piney G rove Road south of Chipley.Pleasant Hill Free Will Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is south of Bonifay at 1900 Pleasant Hill Road.Poplar Springs Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1098 Lovewood Road two miles east of Highway 77.Poplar Head Independent Free Will Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located on Poplar Head Road.Sand Hills Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 6758 Highway 77.Shiloh Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 5:45 p.m. The church is located on Highway 277, three miles south of Highway 90 in Chipley.Shiloh Missionary Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:15 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 3013 Moss Hill Road in Vernon.St. John Free Will Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m.St. Matthews Missionary Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 4156 St. Matthews Road in Caryville.Salem Free Will Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Worship service is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Church is at 2555 Kynesville Highway in Alford. Sunny Hills First Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m.Unity Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3274 River Road in Vernon.Vernon First Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is at 2888 Church Street in Vernon.Wausau First Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 3493 Washington Street in Wausau.CATHOLICSt. Joseph The Worker Catholic ChurchSunday Mass is at 11 a.m. Tuesday Mass is at 9 a.m. The church is located at 1664 Main Street in Chipley.St. Theresa Catholic ChurchSunday Mass is at 9 a.m. Monday through Friday Mass is at 8 a.m. Saturday Mass is at 5 p.m. Adoration is the “ rst Friday after 8 a.m. Mass. The church is located at 2071 Sunny Hills Blvd and the Rectory is located at 2056 Sunny Hills Boulevard in Sunny Hills.CHURCHOF CHRISTChipley Church of ChristSunday morning bible study is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1295 Brickyard Road in Chipley.Spirit-Filled Church of God in ChristSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Tuesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 2128 Pate Pond Road in Caryville.EPISCOPALGrant Tabernacle AMESunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is at 577 Martin Luther King Boulevard in Chipley.St. John AMEMorning Worship is at 11:30 a.m.St. Joseph AMESunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1401 Monroe Shef“ eld Road, Chipley.St. Luke African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME)Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located on Jackson Community Road.St. Mary African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME)Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is at 1035 St. Mary Road, in Caryville.St. Matthews Episcopal ChurchMorning worship is at 9 a.m. The church is located on Highway 90 west in Chipley.EVANGELISTICVernon Evangelistic ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Highway 79 in Vernon.Caryville Evangelistic CenterSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Wrights Creek Road in Caryville, just north of Highway 90.HOLINESSHarris Chapel Holiness ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is 8 miles north of Caryville on Highway 179.Johnson Temple First Born HolinessSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. Friday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 793 Orange Street, Chipley.Miracle Valley Spirit of HolinessSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located 3754 Bunyon Drive, off Hig hway 77 near Sunny Hills.METHODISTChipley First United Methodist ChurchSunday School is at 9:50 a.m. Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. (contemporary service) and 11 a.m. (traditional service). The church is located at 1285 Jackson AvenueEast Mount Zion United Methodist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday fellowship meal and Bible study is at 6 p.m. The church is at 1590 Highway 173 in Graceville.Lakeview United MethodistMorning Worship is at 9 a.m. Thursday morning Bible Study 9 a.m. The church is located on Highway 279 near Five Points.New Hope United Methodist ChurchMorning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study is at 10 a.m. The church is located at on Highway 79 in New Hope.New Vision United Methodist ChurchSunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday night supper is at 5:45. Wednesday Bible Study is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Hig hway 77 and BlockerChurch Road in Greenhead.Orange Hill United Methodist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located on Sunday Road just off Orange Hill Road.Vernon United Methodist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m.Wausau United Methodist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is on State Road 77PENTECOSTALHouse of Healing United Pentecostal ChurchSunday School is at 1 p.m. Worship is at 2 p.m. Thursday Bible Study is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1816 Highway 90 in Chipley.Wausau Pentecostal HolinessSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is at 2201 Pioneer Road in Wausau.Rock Hill ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Friday Night Worship is at 6 p.m. The church is at 339 Rockhill Church Road in Chipley.Trinity Pentecostal TabernacleMorning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Turnin Point Home of the First United Pentecostal Church Sunday School is at 1 p.m. Worship Service is at 2 p.m. Bible Study Thursday is at 7 p.m.PRESBYTERIANChipley First Presbyterian ChurchSunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday, night sing-along is at 6 p.m. The church is at Fifth Street and Watts Avenue Sunny Hills PresbyterianMorning Worship is at 9 a.m. Sunday School is at 10:30 a.m. The church is located at 3768 Country Club BoulevardOTHERBonnett Pond ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 2680 Bonnett Pond Road in Chipley.Christian Fellowship CenterSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1458 Monroe Shef“ eld Road in Chipley.Christian HavenSunday school is h at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m.Church of God by FaithSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:45 a.m. Tuesday service is at 7:30 p.m. The church is at 3012 Church Street.Church of God of ProphecyMorning Worship is at 9:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1386 W. Jackson Avenue in Chipley.Courts of PraiseMorning Worship is at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 1720 Clayton Road in Chipley.Cypress CreekSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1772 Macedonia Road.Faith Covenant FellowshipMorning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is on Highway 277 CHURCHESFrom Page B4OBITUARIES| CONTINUED FROM B5 See CHURCHES, B7

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, September 12, 2018 B7 AGINGTECH THAT CAN HELPHeres a few of the innovative technologies that are helping aging boomers stay independent, according to Consumer Cellular: € Seniors can be le out of the family communications loop. Fill that gap with a touchscreenbased tablet with simpli ed apps. € Wearable devices that monitor and track health can summon help in a range of emergency situations. € Automated pill counters can help with following medication regimens. ENVIRONMENTGREENERY BENEFITSHere are a few ways wellmanaged landscapes o er tremendous bene ts for the environment, according to LoveYour Landscape.org: € Greenery, including grass, catch dust, smoke particles and other pollutants to make the air you breathe fresher and cleaner. € Well-maintained yards and lawns help prevent soil erosion and unwanted runo into nearby lakes, streams and rivers. HEALTH By Ana B. Ibarra Kaiser Health NewsBy now, many parents know kids are vaping sweetsmelling tobacco „ often using devices that look deceptively like pens or flash drives. And most parents are hip to the prevalence of underage marijuana use. Now comes a combo of the two: vaping pot. Experts and educators say young people are „ once again „ one step ahead of the adults in their lives, experimenting with this new and more heady way to consume weed. Its only a matter of timeŽ before adolescents are vaping nicotine and pot in equal measure, said Mila Vascones-Gatski, a substance abuse counselor at Arlington Public Schools in Virginia. Anything in liquid form can go into a vape, and thats scary.Ž Surveys provide a snapshot of the problem. Among California high school students who have used an electronic smoking device, 27 percent said they used it with some form of cannabis, according to a report by the state Department of Public Health, based on 2016 data, the latest available. Nationally, among high school seniors who reported using a vaping device in the past year, 11 percent said they had vaped cannabis, according to a 2017 survey by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the University of Michigan. More than half said they vaped just flavoringŽ and about 33 percent said nicotine. Controversial and concentrated The California Department of Public Health says researchers do not fully understand how using cannabis oils and waxes with vapes affects health. What they do know is that vaporized cannabis can contain a lot more THC, the cannabis ingredient responsible for psychoactive effects such as anxiety and paranoia. When you make it into an oil or wax, the [THC] concentration can be very high,Ž Vascones-Gatski said. This is when psychotic symptoms are intensified.Ž Recreational marijuana use is illegal among children in all states. In California, such use was legalized for adults 21 and older beginning this year. Critics argue the change could make pot more accessible to young people, although researchers say it is too early to tell. Meanwhile, as vaping becomes more popular and socially acceptable, more young people are bound to try pot in this form, said Stanton Glantz, professor of medicine and director of the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education at University of California-San Francisco. You are starting to see the much more aggressive push for flavorsŽ in the cannabis liquids, he said. Some popular cannabis oil flavors include mint, jasmine, banana smoothie, pumpkin spice and gummy fish, according to industry sites. Even if the cannabis industry says its target is not youth, there is no denying fruity smells attract kids, Glantz said. A call for more regulation Some experts say the dangers of pot vaping among kids are receiving less attention than they should, and that the vaping industry needs more regulation. Schools tell us that tobacco prevention is important, but we really need something on marijuana,Ž said Ryan Crowdis, with the Tobacco-Use Prevention Education program at the Orange County Department of Education. The problem is our hands are tied because our funding comes from the tobacco tax revenue, so thats what we have to focus on.Ž The California Department of Education said it expects to receive funding from Proposition 64, the ballot measure that legalized recreational pot, in the 2019-20 budget to help fund education and awareness around youth use of marijuana. Industry representatives deny trying to appeal to youths. In no way, shape or form do I see brands trying to ingratiate children or underage users. Theres plenty of business in the adult market,Ž said Farley Cahen, the founder and CEO of Elevated Agency, which does marketing for cannabis companies. Cahen said the California law legalizing recreational pot for adults came with strict packaging regulations that prohibit language or wrapping that could be attractive to children. Some of the fruity smells in some cannabis oils come from the manipulation of terpenes, the compound responsible for the plants aroma, he explained. But he said that flavorings are in no way promoted like candy-like nicotine juices. By the numbers€ Adolescents says vaping devices are easy to get, with 78.2 percent of 12thgraders reporting they could get a device fairly or very easily, ranking slightly behind marijuana (79.8 percent) and alcohol (87.1 percent) and just ahead of cigarettes (77.9 percent). € Teens are not always aware whats in these devices as manufacturers dont have to report e-cig ingredients. 66.0 percent say its just ” avoring, 13.7 percent dont know, 13.2 percent say nicotine, 5.8 percent say marijuana, and 1.3 percent say other. „ Monitoring the Future Survey teen drug use and behavior survey, National Institute on Drug Abuse and University of Michigan, https:// www.drugabuse.gov/related-topics/ trends-statistics/monitoring-future VISUALHUNT S a v v y t e e n s Savvy teens h a c k i n g d e v i c e s hacking devices t o i n h a l e c a n n a b i s to inhale cannabis P O T POT V A P I N G : VAPING: mile south of I-10.Family Worship CenterMorning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 531 Rock Hill Church Road, Chipley.Graceville Community ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 1005 E. Prim AvenueGrahams ChapelMorning worship at 11 a.m. Tuesday Bible Study at 7 p.m. The chapel is at 1218 Campbellton Avenue in Chipley.Hard Labor Creek Community ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1705 Pioneer Road 3 miles east of caution light.Holmes Valley Community ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 3550Fannig Branch Road in Vernon.House of Prayer Worship CenterSunday School and Childrens Church is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Youth activities on Wednesday begin at 4:30 p.m. Praise and worship services are at 6:30 p.m. on Friday. The church is at 763 West Boulevard in Chipley. Impact Worship CenterSunday. Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Thursday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3006 New Hope Road Marianna.LibertySunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3983 Creek Road in Vernon.McQueens Temple First Born Church of Living GodSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 5681 Highway 79 South, Vernon.New Faith TempleSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 841 Orange Hill Road.New Foundation FellowshipMorning Worship is at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located on Rock Hill Church Road.Northwest Florida Christian ChurchMorning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. The church is located at 4465 Highway 77.Rhema Praise and Worship CenterMorning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Thursday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located 763 West Boulevard in Chipley.Sunny Hills ChapelSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 4283 Highway 77. Pleasant Grove ChurchMorning Worship is at 9 a.m. The church is located at 2430 Shakey Joe Road in the Hinsons Crossroads Community.Tabernacle of Praise Church of GodSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located on Highway 77 South.The Living WordMorning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Highway 77 and Blocker Road in Greenhead.White Double PondSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is on Creek Road in Vernon.Yes Lord Deliverance COGICSunday School is at 10:30 a.m. Worship is at noon. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 739 Seventh Street in Chipley. CHURCHESFrom Page B6

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B B 8 8 Wednesday, September 12, 2018 | Washington County News NF-5037139 (850) 638-3611 HastyHeating & Cooling NF-5028471 NF-5032729 C & CBookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE OR BUSINESS FOR AS LITTLE AS $10 A WEEK!*Reach thousands of potential customers with your Business Guide ad in the:WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS HOLMES COUNTY-TIMES ADVERTISER WEEKLY ADVERTISER CALL TODAY! 850-638-0212*Minimum 8-week contract. NF-5036305 NF-5032769 Hazardous Aerial Tree Removal € Stump Grinding Trimming & Pruning € Emergency Tree Service € Lot Clean UpDow Morris,Owner/Operator 850-527-6291 € 850-849-3825 NF-5032785 Mr.Eddies4BarberShop $14 includes: cut, neck shave, & neck massage 844 Main Street, Chipley, FL 32408 Its not just a Haircutƒ Its an experience!!!! 850-600-7055 NF-5032787 N F-503 2787 787 Arturo Luebano 2455 N Hwy. 81, Ponce De Leon, FL 32455850.658.6189arthurluebano@yahoo.com We have been in business since 2007.We are licensed and insured. Luebano Lawn Service, LLC.Lawn Maint., Irrigation, Pressure Wash, Pavers & Paver Repair, Tree Trimming, Fertilization, Spring Clean-Ups, Etc. is accepting applications for the following position:Program CoordinatorTake Stock in ChildrenChipola is looking to hire a highly organized and hard working person to coordinate activities of the Take Stock in Children Program. This person must have a bachelor’s degree, be good at reporting results and meeting deadlines, and be committed to working with schools and communities to help deserving students change their life situation through higher education. For more information, please contact Nancy Chabot at 850-718-2205 or email at chabotn@chipola.edu EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER The City of Chipley is accepting applications for aWater Crewman I .Minimum Qualifications: Limited knowledge of materials, methods, practices and equipment used in water facilities maintenance and repair activities. Education and Experience: High School diploma or possession of an acceptable equivalency diploma. Two (2) years of experience in heavy manual labor, and the use of hand and light power tools preferably in distribution systems. This position is subject to on-call requirements. Must possess a valid State of Florida Driver’s License Class “B” CDL with air brakes endorsement. A job description is available upon request. The City participates in the Florida Retirement System (FRS). Mail or hand deliver application and/or resume to Assistant City Administrator/City Clerk, City of Chipley, 1442 Jackson Ave., Post Office Box 1007, Chipley, FL 32428. Deadline: Open until filled. EOE/Drug Free Workplace. 10-3520 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given BLAINE INVESTMENTS LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 16-00-01169 Year of Issuance 2016 Parcel 00-4096-0004assessed to: Steven W. Harris, Sharlene Pringle, Ronald D. Harris, Joseph Lee Harris & Joann Wood. Description of Property 25 5 14 5 ORB 142 P264 BEG. AT SWC OF N 1/2 OF SE OF SE 1/4, RUN N. 840’ FOR BEG, RUN E. TO E. LINE OF RD. E. 466 1/2’, N. PARALLEL TO RD. 466 1/2’ W. 466 1/2’, S. ON RD. 466 1/2’ TO POB, ORB 921 P 24.All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on OCTOBER 17, 2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk SEP. 12, 19, 26, OCT. 3, 2018. 10-3521 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given CHARLES PROTHRO the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 16-00-01183 Year of Issuance 2016 Parcel 00-4139-0104 assessed to: Washington County Equities Inc. Description of Property LOT BB4 3RD ADD. TO LEISURE LAK REC PLAT ORB 750 P 316 All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on OCTOBER 17, 2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk SEP. 12, 19, 26, OCT. 3, 2018. 9-3538 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 18000064CAAXMX CALIBER HOME LOANS, INC., Plaintiff, vs. JAMES JASPER MILLER; TABATHA ANN MILLER; LEISURE LAKES PROPERTY OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 and #2, and ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, et.al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE (Publish in the Washington County News) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 30, 2018, entered in Civil Case No.: 18000064CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Washington County, Florida, wherein CALIBER HOME LOANS, INC., Plaintiff, and JAMES JASPER MILLER; TABATHA ANN MILLER; LEISURE LAKES PROPERTY OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC.;, are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at the Front Steps of the Washington County Courthouse, 1293 Jackson Avenue,, Chipley, FL 32428 at 11:00 AM, on the 3 day of October, 2018, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT B-I07, FIRST ADDITION TO LEISURE LAKES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 179, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 2003 MERT MOBILE HOME, VIN NOS. FLHML3N177327050A AND FLHML3N177327050B, TITLE NOS. 89454197 AND 89453156. A/K/A: 4262 LEISURE LAKES DR, CHIPLEY, FL., 32428 If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire Popkin & Rosaler, P .A. 1701West Hillsboro Boulevard Suite 400 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Telephone: (954) 360-9030 Facsimile: (954) 420-5187 Sept 12, 19, 2018 9-3541 Public Auction The following vehicles will be sold at Public Auction at Nichols Auto Repair and Towing @ 1146 Jackson Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 @ 8:00 AM on the following dates: September 25 1G1NE52J2X6107402 1999 Chev September 27 1HGCG2259YA000910 2000 Honda October 1 2GCEC19HJN1117578 1992 Chev October 9 2G4WS52J641191758 2004 Buick 9-3542 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE BROCK AUTO & TOWING gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 09/21/2018 08:00am at 707 East Blvd., CHIPLEY, FL 32428, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. BROCK AUTO & TOWING reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. VIN# 1FTZF17W1WNC02749 1998 Ford September 12, 2018 AVIATION Grads work with JetBlue, United, Delta and others-start here with hands on training for FAA certification. Financial aid if qualified. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-2649. Lung Cancer? And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 855-259-0557 for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. AUCTION Annual Fall Farm and Construction 8:00 AM CST Saturday September 15, 2018 Highway 231 North Campbellton, FLLocal farm dispersals, estates, bank repos, sheriff departments, city and count, plus approved consignments. Mason Auction & Sales LLC FL# 642 850-263-0473 850-258-7652 Chad Mason 850-849-0792 Gerald Mason www.masonauction.com On-site only Public Auction Tues, September 18th, 2018 at 11:00 A.M. Granite Express of USA, Inc. 1055 S.E. 9th Terrace Hialeah, FL 33010 3,500+ Granite slabs (various sizes and types) including vehicles and forklifts. Will be sold in (2) bulk lots = Lot #1 Granite slabs and Lot #2 Vehicles and forklifts. Catalog and photos available at www.moeckerauctions.co m Preview: Morning of sale 9AM to 11AM. 15% BP. Assignment for the Benefit of Creditors Case # 2018-26969-CA-01 (11) To register: $10,000 refundable certified funds deposit and valid driver’s license. (800) 840-BIDS info@moeckerauctions.co m AB-1098 AU-3219 Eric Rubin SAWMILLS from only $4397.00-MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill-Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-567-0404 Ext.300N Estate Sale for Tommy & Juanita Stanley1439 Stanley Loop Ponce De Leon, FL 32455 Fri & Sat Sept. 14 & 15 8 AM -4 PM Directions : From Hwy 90 in Ponce De Leon, go north on Hwy 81, past school to Mitchell Rd. take left to Stanley Loop and follow signs Contents: Furniture for Living Room, Dining Room & Bedrooms. Clothes dryer, books, microwave, small kitch appliances, linens, dishes, glassware, ladies & mens clothes and shoes. Too much to list. No early sales. Please be prepared to move merchandise and furniture. T&C Estate Sales Multi Family Yard Sale September 13, 14 and 15 1280 S. Weeks St. Bonifay, Fl Furniture & Household items, antiques. SALE———SALE September 14 and 15 Come picking from the entire contenst of antique store. No reasonable offer refused or buy the entire contents for $13K 1334 North Railroad Ave. Yard Sale September 14 and 15 located at 2957 Highway 90, Bonifay, Florida. 8am to 3pm September 14 and 8am to 12pm September 15. Phone 850-547-2895 GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FLSept. 22nd & Sept. 23rd 9:00 am -5:00 pmGeneral Admission $6Concealed Weapons Classes 1pm Daily, $50Reservation Suggested850-957-4952 or 850-261-8407Please Support Your Local Small Gun Shows K&LFarm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 Hog Eradication Services,$35.00 per pig, killed. Will remove from field & leave on property. No paid hunters. Two to three people depending on size of sounder. Farmer and/or land owner written permission & a tour of property required. 850-774-7429 ON CALL PARAMEDIC & EMT NEEDEDThe Holmes County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for the position of On Call Paramedic & EMT. For an application you may go online to holmescountyfla.com or contact the EMS Office; located at 949 E Hwy 90, Bonifay, FL 32425 or call (850)547-4671. Please turn in an updated application to the EMS Office no later than 10:00 am on Sept. 21st, 2018. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer. Snelgrove Surveying & Mapping, Inc.Now Hiring:Crew Chief and Instrument men with previous experience. Rodman -no experience necessary. Also, openings for Project Surveyor or S.I.T. Drivers license a must for all field crew personnel. Call 850-526-3991 for info. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 For Rent One Bedroom apartments for rent in Chipley. Convenient location. Stove and refrigerator furnished. No Pets. Smoke free environment. Call 850-638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For Rent 3, 4 and 5BR fully furnished, CH/A, 6 Miles from town, very private, no pets. 850-547-2096. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. Rooms For Rent By Week.Comfortable rooms with microwave & refrigerator. All utilities paid. Cable and internet. Pet friendly at extra charge. Economy Lodge, Bonifay. 850-547-4167. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/ sewage/ lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 2BR/1BAMH For Rent $500.00/mth, $500.00/deposit. CH&A. No pets. 547-2043, 850-768-9670. Bonifay, 2BR/1BA MH. Renovated. 3/4 mile from elementary school on Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500.00/mo, $500.00/deposit. Call 850-547-3746. For Rent. SW Mobile Home. Private lot. 3BR/2BA. All electric. Deposit $600.00, Rent $600.00. Call 850-373-6154. No pets, nonsmoking environment. For Sale Two acre plot and one acre plot in Jacob City, FL. Call 850-849-9338. Highway 77 2 miles south of Chipley 4-8 acre tract Bedie Road. Call Milton Peel at 850-326-9109 BEST BUY ON THE COAST Yacht Club Homesite with boat slip. Gated, Luxury, Community. ONLY $49,880. Way under value!!! WWW.WATERFRONTLIFEFL.NET 1.855.459.1128 Florida Waterway Sales, LLC. Licensed Real Estate Broker CASH FOR CARS: We Buy Any Condition Vehicle, 2002 and Newer. Nation’s Top Car Buyer! Free Towing from Anywhere! Call Now: 1-888-995-2702 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely.

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The Weekly Advertiser | Wednesday, September 12, 2018 1 Volume 89 Number 37 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2018NF-5037123 NF-5037139 (850) 638-3611 HastyHeating & Cooling NF-5028471 NF-5032729 C & CBookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE OR BUSINESS FOR AS LITTLE AS $10 A WEEK!*Reach thousands of potential customers with your Business Guide ad in the:WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS HOLMES COUNTY-TIMES ADVERTISER WEEKLY ADVERTISER CALL TODAY! 850-638-0212*Minimum 8-week contract. NF-5036305 NF-5032769 Hazardous Aerial Tree Removal € Stump Grinding Trimming & Pruning € Emergency Tree Service € Lot Clean UpDow Morris,Owner/Operator 850-527-6291 € 850-849-3825 NF-5032785 Mr.Eddies4BarberShop $14 includes: cut, neck shave, & neck massage 844 Main Street, Chipley, FL 32408 Its not just a Haircutƒ Its an experience!!!! 850-600-7055 NF-5032787 N F-503 2787 787 Arturo Luebano 2455 N Hwy. 81, Ponce De Leon, FL 32455850.658.6189arthurluebano@yahoo.com We have been in business since 2007.We are licensed and insured. Luebano Lawn Service, LLC.Lawn Maint., Irrigation, Pressure Wash, Pavers & Paver Repair, Tree Trimming, Fertilization, Spring Clean-Ups, Etc. Losing the Grand Canyon v w t v t r wr t r M v t r 650+ tookthrough now r t t r ty crown w N t y t October 11, 2017The Orlando Museum of ArtDetails: floridafaf.orgFor more information: Email: info@floridafaf.org Phone: (850) 224 4555 Presented by: NF-5037606 NF-5037607 is accepting applications for the following position:Program CoordinatorTake Stock in ChildrenChipola is looking to hire a highly organized and hard working person to coordinate activities of the Take Stock in Children Program. This person must have a bachelor’s degree, be good at reporting results and meeting deadlines, and be committed to working with schools and communities to help deserving students change their life situation through higher education. For more information, please contact Nancy Chabot at 850-718-2205 or email at chabotn@chipola.edu EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER The City of Chipley is accepting applications for aWater Crewman I .Minimum Qualifications: Limited knowledge of materials, methods, practices and equipment used in water facilities maintenance and repair activities. Education and Experience: High School diploma or possession of an acceptable equivalency diploma. Two (2) years of experience in heavy manual labor, and the use of hand and light power tools preferably in distribution systems. This position is subject to on-call requirements. Must possess a valid State of Florida Driver’s License Class “B” CDL with air brakes endorsement. A job description is available upon request. The City participates in the Florida Retirement System (FRS). Mail or hand deliver application and/or resume to Assistant City Administrator/City Clerk, City of Chipley, 1442 Jackson Ave., Post Office Box 1007, Chipley, FL 32428. Deadline: Open until filled. EOE/Drug Free Workplace. AVIATION Grads work with JetBlue, United, Delta and others-start here with hands on training for FAA certification. Financial aid if qualified. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-2649. Lung Cancer? And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 855-259-0557 for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. AUCTION Annual Fall Farm and Construction 8:00 AM CST Saturday September 15, 2018 Highway 231 North Campbellton, FLLocal farm dispersals, estates, bank repos, sheriff departments, city and count, plus approved consignments. Mason Auction & Sales LLC FL# 642 850-263-0473 850-258-7652 Chad Mason 850-849-0792 Gerald Mason www.masonauction.com On-site only Public Auction Tues, September 18th, 2018 at 11:00 A.M. Granite Express of USA, Inc. 1055 S.E. 9th Terrace Hialeah, FL 33010 3,500+ Granite slabs (various sizes and types) including vehicles and forklifts. Will be sold in (2) bulk lots = Lot #1 Granite slabs and Lot #2 Vehicles and forklifts. Catalog and photos available at www.moeckerauctions.co m Preview: Morning of sale 9AM to 11AM. 15% BP. Assignment for the Benefit of Creditors Case # 2018-26969-CA-01 (11) To register: $10,000 refundable certified funds deposit and valid driver’s license. (800) 840-BIDS info@moeckerauctions.co m AB-1098 AU-3219 Eric Rubin SAWMILLS from only $4397.00-MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill-Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-567-0404 Ext.300N Estate Sale for Tommy & Juanita Stanley1439 Stanley Loop Ponce De Leon, FL 32455 Fri & Sat Sept. 14 & 15 8 AM -4 PM Directions : From Hwy 90 in Ponce De Leon, go north on Hwy 81, past school to Mitchell Rd. take left to Stanley Loop and follow signs Contents: Furniture for Living Room, Dining Room & Bedrooms. Clothes dryer, books, microwave, small kitch appliances, linens, dishes, glassware, ladies & mens clothes and shoes. Too much to list. No early sales. Please be prepared to move merchandise and furniture. T&C Estate Sales Multi Family Yard Sale September 13, 14 and 15 1280 S. Weeks St. Bonifay, Fl Furniture & Household items, antiques. SALE———SALE September 14 and 15 Come picking from the entire contenst of antique store. No reasonable offer refused or buy the entire contents for $13K 1334 North Railroad Ave. Yard Sale September 14 and 15 located at 2957 Highway 90, Bonifay, Florida. 8am to 3pm September 14 and 8am to 12pm September 15. Phone 850-547-2895 GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FLSept. 22nd & Sept. 23rd 9:00 am -5:00 pmGeneral Admission $6Concealed Weapons Classes 1pm Daily, $50Reservation Suggested850-957-4952 or 850-261-8407Please Support Your Local Small Gun Shows K&LFarm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 Hog Eradication Services,$35.00 per pig, killed. Will remove from field & leave on property. No paid hunters. Two to three people depending on size of sounder. Farmer and/or land owner written permission & a tour of property required. 850-774-7429 ON CALL PARAMEDIC & EMT NEEDEDThe Holmes County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for the position of On Call Paramedic & EMT. For an application you may go online to holmescountyfla.com or contact the EMS Office; located at 949 E Hwy 90, Bonifay, FL 32425 or call (850)547-4671. Please turn in an updated application to the EMS Office no later than 10:00 am on Sept. 21st, 2018. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer. Snelgrove Surveying & Mapping, Inc.Now Hiring:Crew Chief and Instrument men with previous experience. Rodman -no experience necessary. Also, openings for Project Surveyor or S.I.T. Drivers license a must for all field crew personnel. Call 850-526-3991 for info. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 For Rent One Bedroom apartments for rent in Chipley. Convenient location. Stove and refrigerator furnished. No Pets. Smoke free environment. Call 850-638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For Rent 3, 4 and 5BR fully furnished, CH/A, 6 Miles from town, very private, no pets. 850-547-2096. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. Rooms For Rent By Week.Comfortable rooms with microwave & refrigerator. All utilities paid. Cable and internet. Pet friendly at extra charge. Economy Lodge, Bonifay. 850-547-4167. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/ sewage/ lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 2BR/1BAMH For Rent $500.00/mth, $500.00/deposit. CH&A. No pets. 547-2043, 850-768-9670. Bonifay, 2BR/1BA MH. Renovated. 3/4 mile from elementary school on Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500.00/mo, $500.00/deposit. Call 850-547-3746. For Rent. SW Mobile Home. Private lot. 3BR/2BA. All electric. Deposit $600.00, Rent $600.00. Call 850-373-6154. No pets, nonsmoking environment. For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains!

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2 Wednesday, September 12, 2018 | The Weekly Advertiser #ISLANDHOPPERFESTDon’t miss rising Nashville stars Midland and more at intimate venues across Captiva Island, Fort Myers Beach and Downtown Fort Myers. See the full lineup and download our app at IslandHopperFest.com. NF-5037609 Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centersSTOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com“2-Night Free Vacation!”or Car Today! 800 700 BOAT -(2628)NF-5037608 For Sale Two acre plot and one acre plot in Jacob City, FL. Call 850-849-9338. Highway 77 2 miles south of Chipley 4-8 acre tract Bedie Road. Call Milton Peel at 850-326-9109 BEST BUY ON THE COAST Yacht Club Homesite with boat slip. Gated, Luxury, Community. ONLY $49,880. Way under value!!! WWW.WATERFRONTLIFEFL.NET 1.855.459.1128 Florida Waterway Sales, LLC. Licensed Real Estate Broker CASH FOR CARS: We Buy Any Condition Vehicle, 2002 and Newer. Nation’s Top Car Buyer! Free Towing from Anywhere! Call Now: 1-888-995-2702 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.

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The Weekly Advertiser | Wednesday, September 12, 2018 3

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4 Wednesday, September 12, 2018 | The Weekly Advertiser NF-5037388 $ 4 55 USDA Select Beef BONELESS NEW YORK STRIP STEAKS Family Pk, Per Lb $ 1 18 Fresh Lean Premium BONE-IN QUARTER LOIN PORK CHOPS Family Pk, Per Lb $ 1 98 Fresh Lean Premium 80/20 GROUND CHUCK Family Pk, Per Lb 98 ¢ Super Fresh Premium FRYER WINGS Family Pk, Per Lb $ 1 35 Fresh Lean Premium PORK SPARE RIBS 2 Pk, Per Lb $ 2 65 USDA Select Beef BONELESS TOP ROUND ROAST 2 Pk, Per Lb 2/$ 5 Farm Grown RUSSET POTATOES 10 Lb Bag 37 ¢ Premium GOLDEN RIPE BANANAS Per Lb 2/$ 5 Michigan Grown GINGER GOLD APPLES 3 Lb Bag 77 ¢ Farm Fresh FANCY YELLOW SQUASH Per Lb 98 ¢ Farm Fresh SWEET PEACHES Per Lb $ 1 25 Farm Fresh CHERRY GRAPE TOMATOES Clamshell $ 1 15 Farm Grown BROCCOLI CROWNS Per Lb 88 ¢ Farm Fresh CRISP HEAD LETTUCE Each $ 1 48 Fresh Lean Premium CENTER CUT PORK CHOPS Family Pk, Per Lb $ 2 77 USDA Choice Beef BONELESS STEW MEAT Family Pk, Per Lb $ 18 95 CONECUH HICKORY SLICED BACON 5 Lb Pkg $ 2 98 Regular & Baby Link KELLEY'S SMOKED SAUSAGE 1 Lb Pkg $ 2 77 LAND O' FROST BISTRO DELI SLICED LUNCHMEATS 8 Oz Pkg 95 ¢ BAR-S JUMBO MEAT FRANKS 1 Lb Pkg $ 18 75 REAL TREE WHOLE QUAIL 12 Ct Box $ 3 88 All Varieties PREMIUM GOURMET SEAFOOD MEDLEY 28 Oz $ 4 28 IQF NATURE'S BEST PREMIUM CATFISH FILLETS 1 Lb $ 4 44 Piggly Wiggly Vegetable Oil Gallon Jug 47 ¢ Corn, Peas, Beans Libby's Vegetables 14.5-15.25 Oz Can 2/$ 8 Blue Bell Ice Cream 1/2 Gal Ctn or 12 Ct Cups $ 1 88 Coca-Cola Products 6 Pk 7.5 Oz Cans 2/$ 4 Fruity or Cocoa Pebbles or Honey Bunches of Oats w/ Almonds Post Cereal Box 3/$ 4 Bars or Shreds Dutch Farms Cheese 8 Oz Pkg 2/$ 3 Ragu Pasta Sauce 23.9-24 Oz Jar $ 1 88 Kool-Aid Jammers 10 Ct Box $ 2 77 Original, Golden, Double Stuff Oreo Cookies Family Size $ 1 28 Quaker Instant Grits 11-12 Oz Box 48 ¢ Van Camp's Pork and Beans 15 Oz Can 68 ¢ Banquet Pot Pies 7 Oz Box $ 1 65 Taco, Fajita, Enchilada Old El Paso Dinner Kits 8.4-14 Oz Box $ 4 77 Utz Cheeseballs, Pretzel, or Pork Rind Barrels 23-28 Oz 2/$ 11 Frito-Lay Variety Pack 18 Ct Pkg $ 9 25 Budweiser or Bud Light 12 Pk Cans or Btls 1264 CHURCH AVENUE  CHIPLEY, FL  324286AM-7PM  7 Days a Week  850-638-1751WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO CORRECT TYPOGRAPHICAL AND PICTORAL ERRORS. QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS. WE DO NOT AC CEPT INTERNET PRINTED COUPONS.EBT Cardholders and WIC Vouchers Welcomed. Most Major Credit Cards Accepted Our Beef is USDA Select or Higher.PRICES GOOD SEPTEMBER 12 THRU SEPTEMBER 18, 2018 OF CHIPLEY, FL COST PLUS 10% Text GOGRO to 1-844764-6476 to get the smartphone app!iPhone and Android GoGro Special Deal Every Week!