Citation
Washington County news

Material Information

Title:
Washington County news
Uniform Title:
Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Place of Publication:
Chipley FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Nicole Barfield - Publisher
Creation Date:
January 5, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiweekly[<1994>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1931>]
semiweekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
Coordinates:
30.780922 x -85.539289

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began May 23, 1924.
General Note:
L.E. Sellers, editor.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Washington County News. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000384704 ( ALEPH )
07260886 ( OCLC )
ACC5987 ( NOTIS )
sn 81000810 ( LCCN )
0279-795X ( ISSN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Chipley banner

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Digital Newspaper Library

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

** CHARLOTTES WEB TAKES STAGE FRIDAY | A6 Volume 95 Number 32 Phone: 850-638-0212 Fax: 850-638-4601 Opinion ....................A4 Local & State ..............A5 NASCAR ..................A10 Faith .........................B4 Obituaries ..................B5 Classifieds .................B8 A6Community events listB6HEALTH: Beating the heat @WCN_HCT facebook.com/WashingtonCountyNews.HolmesCountyTimes50 ¢ chipleypaper.com Washington CountyWednesday, August 1, 2018 Northwest Florida Community Hospital acquires CampbelltonGraceville Hospital By Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comGRACEVILLE All members of the Campbellton-Graceville Hospital Board of Trustees exhaled a solemn sigh of relief after voting unanimously to approve the sale of the hospital property.The vote came during a public hearing held Monday night at Campbellton-Graceville Hospital, 5429 College Drive, in Graceville."We live in a small community, where you rely on your neighbors in tough times. And what we did, we reached out to our neighbor," said Trustee Chris Jernigan, who made the motion for the final approval of the resolution to sale the property to Chipley-based Northwest Florida Community Hospital. "Our neighbor stepped up and helped us out and will carry us on to the future."The approval of the resolution served as the final hurdle for the district to return much needed medical services back to the community.The hospital closed down a few years ago and filed for bankruptcy, which involved about $120 million in claims. Most of the claims were in rela-tion to insurance companies that had asserted claims for alleged over-billing related to a lab pro-cessing scheme, according to the hospitals bankruptcy lawyer Brian Rich of Berger Singer-man, a business law firm out of Tallahassee.The scheme hit a number of rural hospitals across the country."We were at our wits end on what we were going to do, how were we going to continue some kind of health care," Jernigan said. CGH Trustee: Our neighbor stepped up and helped usBy Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY Washington County unemployment rate crept up slightly over last month, though down by year-over-year.The unemployment rate in Washington County was 3.9 percent in June, which was .5 percentage point higher than the previous month and .4 percentage point lower than the county's rate a year ago.Florida Department of Economic Opportunity releases seasonally adjusted unemployment data each month.In June, Washington County saw the lowest unemployment rate out of the five-county CareerSource Chipola region, which includes Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson, Liberty and Washington. The county also had a lower unemployment rate than the region's rate of 4.4 percent.The data showed an over-all trend, including for the region, of slightly higher unemployment rates from May to June.Liberty County had a June rate of 4.2 percent and the rest of the counties in the CareerSource Chipola region showed a rate of 4.5 percent.The state's rate was 3.8 percent in June, which was constant with the May rate and down .3 percentage Unemployment lowest in region, slightly up since MayBy Diane M. RobinsonTimes Advertiser | @HCTA_Diane Drobinson@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY „ At a meeting held Monday, Washington County School Board tentatively approved a millage rate of 6.4400, down from last years rate of 6.663.District Director of Finance Lucy Carmichael presented the millage rate to the board for approval."The millage rate is lower than the rolled-back rate," Carmichael said. "That rate is 6.6014."That proposal includes a 4.1920 required local effort rate, a discretion-ary rate of 0.748, and a 1.5 mill property tax for capital outlay projects.Superintendent Joe Taylor said the 1.5 mill property tax could be decreased during the final budget hearing. By law, rates can be lowered not raised after advertisement.Carmichael also presented a proposed $83,403,304 budget, of which $36,640,390 would go into the gen-eral fund.The board approved the proposed budget unanimously.The final budget hearing will be held September 10 at 5:05 p.m.School Board approves tentative millage and budget Northwest Florida Community Hospital CEO Michael Kozar, left, shakes hands with Campbellton-Graceville Hospital Board of Trustees Chairman Heston Hicks, right, on Monday evening after the three-member Board of Trustees voted unanimously to approve the sale of CGH to NFCH. [JACQUELINE BOSTICK | THE NEWS] The crowning game will be held today at 10 a.m. at Chipley High School. By Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY Flashes from bolts of light-ening that ripped the skies over the baseball fields at Chipley High School during Satur-day's game signaled only one thing: baseball is baseball.Although they got off field immediately, the five-day Dixie Pre-Majors World Series continued on throughout the weekend. The crowning game will be held today at 10 a.m. on the field. A second game, if necessary, will be held at 4 p.m."In Chipley, there's only one thing going on right now: it's the World Series. And we're here to play baseball," said Ronnie Jackson, Deputy Commissioner of the Majors Program and Chairman of Board of Dixie Boys Baseball. "You'll see some great baseball. Most of these are high school kids. It's very good talent."Dixie Pre-Majors World Series hits ChipleyA Chipley baseball player takes a swing against a Dixie team from Ozark, Ala. on Chipley High Schools baseball “ eld Saturday during the “ ve-day Dixie Pre-Majors World Series. [DANIEL MCCONNELL | CONTRIBUTOR] See CGH, A2 See RATES, A2 See DIXIE, A2

PAGE 2

** A2 Wednesday, August 1, 2018 | Washington County News Thomas Voting Reports WASHINGTON D.C. „ Here is how area congressmen „ Rep. Neal Dunn, Rep. Matt Gaetz, Sen. Bill Nelson and Sen. Marco Rubio„ voted on major issues during the week ending July 27.HOUSEBAN ON `JUNK INSURANCE' HEALTH PLANS: Voting 224 for and 184 against, the House on July 24 blocked a Democratic attempt to call up a bill (HR 6479) designed to gird the Affordable Care Act (ACA) against a new order by President Trump that would circumvent many of the law's core provisions. The bill would effectively prohibit a revival of health insurance plans that do not meet ACA requirements such as coverage of pre-existing conditions and "essential health bene“ ts" including maternity and pediatric care. A yes vote was in opposition to bringing the bill to the ” oor. Voting yes: Gaetz, Dunn EXPANSION OF HEALTH SAVINGS ACCOUNTS: Voting 277 for and 142 against, the House on July 25 passed a bill (HR 6199) that would add payments for “ tness-center fees and over-the-counter drugs to the list of medical expenses reimbursable from taxadvantaged Health Savings Accounts (HSAs). A yes vote was to send the bill to the Senate. Voting yes: Gaetz, Dunn REPEAL OF MEDICALDEVICE TAX: Voting 283 for and 132 against, the House on July 24 passed a bill (HR 184) that would repeal a 2.3 percent excise tax levied by the Affordable Care Act on manufacturers and importers of medical devices used by hospitals and doctors, from CT scanners to surgical tools. A yes vote was to send the bill to the Senate. Voting yes: Gaetz, Dunn BROADER ACCESS TO CATASTROPHIC PLANS: Voting 242 for and 176 against, the House on July 25 passed a bill (HR 6311) that would expand access to the Affordable Care Act's catastrophic, or "copper" health plans. A yes vote was to send the bill to the Senate. Voting yes: Gaetz, Dunn U.S. PUSHBACK ON ELECTION ATTACKS: Voting 226 for and 183 against, the House on July 26 blocked a Democratic attempt to call up for debate a bill (HR 6494) imposing economic sanctions on any country, individual or other entity found to have interfered with a U.S. federal election in 2015 or any later year. A yes vote was in opposition to allowing debate on the Democratic bill. Voting yes: Gaetz, Dunn $717 BILLION FOR MILITARY IN 2019: Voting 359 for and 54 against, the House on July 26 approved the conference report on a bill (HR 5515) that would authorize a $717 billion military budget for “ scal 2019, including $69 billion for war in Afghanistan, Iraq and other overseas theaters and $57 billion for active-duty and retiree health care. A yes vote was to adopt the conference report. Voting yes: Gaetz, Dunn MEDICARE SOLVENCY VS. GOP TAX CUTS: Voting 187 for and 229 against, the House on July 25 defeated Democratic attempt to delay a GOP-sponsored healthcare bill (HR 6311, above) until Congress scales back a 2017 package of corporate and individual tax cuts projected to increase annual de“ cits by at least $1 trillion over 10 years. A yes vote was to adopt the motion Voting yes: Gaetz Not Voting: Dunn SENATEROBERT WILKIE, SECRETARY OF VETERANS AFFAIRS: Voting 86 for and nine against, the Senate on July 23 con“ rmed Robert L. Wilkie, 55, to head the 360,000-employee Department of Veterans Affairs A yes vote was to con“ rm Wilkie as the nation's 10th secretary of veterans affairs. Voting yes: Nelson, Rubio REFUSAL TO CUT 2019 SPENDING BILL: Voting 25-75, the Senate on July 25 defeated an amendment that sought to in” ict an 11.4 percent across-theboard cut in a bill (HR 6147) still in debate that would appropriate $58.7 billion for the “ scal 2019 budgets of the Treasury and Interior departments and numerous agencies including the Environmental Protection Administration. A yes vote was to adopt the amendment. Voting no: Nelson, RubioROLL CALL Dunn Gaetz Rubio Nelson "We were losing $400,000 a month. We couldn't continue going to keep the clinic open or anything.""So, we made a meet-ing with Mr. Kozar and we talked about it for a couple of hours," he added. "His people responded with 'they need help, they need health care in that community, let's go and help them.'"The process of acquiring the property has been a lengthy one with the CGH Board more than two years ago brainstorming on ways to retain medical ser-vices, and NFCH diligently working for a little over a year with the CGH trustees, state legislators and legal and financial teams to acquire the property.NFCH CEO Michael Kozar counted Monday's approval of the resolution for sale as "critical.""There's some anxiety when your starting a new venture that we're under-taking here, but we feel very fortunate that we can be a part of the com-munity here and to be able to grow the right services that are needed, not only for Graceville, but for the whole region and we're excited about taking on this new venture," Kozar said.On Tuesday, the entities met at bankruptcy court to approve the transfer of deed and the hospital's state license to NFCH. The license, though having no real value, will enable NFCH to have medical beds for the detoxification program it is looking to establish at the soon-to-be repurposed facility. NFCH also plans to include a geriatric wing."We've been working on this for over a year now and we're finally seeing the light at the end of the tunnel, as far as being able to make this a reality," Kozar said. "And it's exciting." In addition to the afore-mentioned programs, NFCH will lease at a nominal rate, according to Kozar one of the buildings to Jackson County for an emergency medical services (EMS) station. Currently, the county's EMS division operates out of a trailer, officials said.The EMS station will open as soon as the sale is closed which will be in about two weeks, according to the attorney and the appropriate renovations are done to the building."We felt it was very important, if they needed the location, that we could accommodate them," Kozar said. "We've very excited about that because it helps us and the citizens of Graceville to continue to expand services in the future. Having an EMS sta-tion here that will be able to respond to that need."Kozar also added that the EMS station would work well with the existing pro-gram proposals, allowing patients who need more intense medical attention to be transported to NFCH in Chipley. Also, the station would be in close proximity to local schools, athletic events, the college campus, sawmill, nursing home and clinic."I feel good we hate it had to happen but I feel good that there still will be some medical stuff going on in the hospital and I thank the Chipley hospi-tal for coming and helping us forward," said Trustee Patrick Pelham.The fair market value of the property is $485,765.75, according to the resolution. The approval eliminated ad valorem for taxpayers in the district."Our objective was to get this off the tax roll and get his into the hands of someone who provides health care for a living and that's what we've done," Jernigan said. CGHFrom Page A1The tournament brought in 11 teams, with Chipley Dixie Majors, Inc. in partnership with Washington County Tourist Development Council as the host. The teams ages 13 to 19 cover the 11 southern states. The program fur-nishes five World Series tournaments from July to August.Chipley Dixie Majors, Inc. President Andy Compton has coached with Dixie for several years including for the Dixie National Team which is affiliated to USA Baseball, a derivative of Major League Baseball.Jackson said speaking with Compton has encouraged the tournament to continue to come to Chipley."Just talking to Coach Compton, you have an overflow of support coming from the commu-nity," Jackson said. "It's great for the area to bring all of these people. And, plus, it's great people. Chi-pley is a small town, but a great town. That's why we come here."The tournament has made an economic impact. When Chipley hosted it in 2014, it brought in about $360,000 and about $21,500 in state sales tax, according to TDC officials. This year, hotel rooms were scarce or sold-out during the time of the tournament."We really like to come to smaller communities because we're here to play baseball it seems that the smaller communities really buy into that, instead of going to the big communi-ties where there's too much stuff to do," Jackson added.The organization is allvolunteer. Jackson, who has been with Dixie for more than three decades, contrasted the nonprofit Dixie to travel-bought programs in which kids can play to pay."Most tournaments you have, you can buy your way in," he said. "Our World Series, you have to play at the district level, state level and then you can come to the world series. It's a progressive thing where you have to win to get in."Popular MLB names such as Tom "Flash" Gordon, Mike Hampton and Jeff "Frenchy" Francoeur came out of the Dixie teams."Baseball is baseball," Jackson said. "We've been trying to expand, it's hard to expand with all the other organizations. Travel-ball has affected us."However, "Our thing is we try to teach them to not only be better base-ball players, but also to be better citizens," he added. "That's what our purpose is." DIXIEFrom Page A1point from a year ago, a CareerSource Chipola news release stated. The state gained 17,500 jobs over the year, an increase of 2 percent.The U.S. unemploy-ment rate was 4.0 percent. RATESFrom Page A1 Florida Department of Economic Opportunity June-18 May-18 June-17 Calhoun 4.5 3.9 5.4 Holmes 4.5 3.7 5.2 Jackson 4.5 3.5 4.9 Liberty 4.2 3.5 4.7 Washington 3.9 3.4 4.3 Region 4.4 3.6 4.9Campbellton-Graceville Hospital

PAGE 3

** Washington County News | Wednesday, August 1, 2018 A3

PAGE 4

** A4 Wednesday, August 1, 2018 | Washington County News OPINION The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by GateHouse Media LLC at 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2018, GateHouse Media LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright Notice: The entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of GateHouse Media LLC. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or GateHouse Media. Postmaster: Send address change to Washington County News, P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428, USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES In county Out of county 13 weeks: $20 $24.30 26 weeks: $28.70 $36.40 52 weeks: $48.60 $60.70 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US Publisher: Nicole Bare“ eld nbare“ eld@chipleypaper.com Editor: Jacqueline Bostick jbostick@chipleypaper.com, 850-638-0212 News, sports, opinion: news@chipleypaper.com Classi“ ed: 850-638-0212, clamb@chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service: 1-850-522-5197 Washington CountyPUBLISHER Nicole P. Bare“ eld EDITOR Jacqueline Bostick PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR Cameron Everett A federal judges injunction temporarily lifting Floridas misguided ban on early voting on college campuses is welcome. The ruling by Chief Judge Mark E. Walker, of Floridas northern district, dismantles discriminatory and legally indefensible efforts by the state to prohibit county elections supervisors from conducting early voting at public colleges and universities. The decision underscores how far Florida Secretary of State Kenneth Detzner, appointed by Gov. Rick Scott, went to deter students from exercising their constitutional rights to vote without undue burdens. The order is also a reminder of the Republican-led Legislatures inexcusable refusal to pass a law overruling Detzners opinion „ despite its overreach. The immediate, practical effect of the order, which granted the plaintiffs motion for a preliminary injunction, requires Detzner, who oversees the Division of Elections, to issue a directive rescinding a January 2014 opinion that local election supervisors were expected to follow. Detzner issued the opinion in response to questions from the Gainesville City Commission, which had been asked to help arrange an early voting site on the University of Florida campus. His opinion referred to a 2013 law passed by the Legislature after complaints about long lines and excessive waiting periods to vote in 2012. The Early Voting Statute permitted county elections supervisors to designate „ in addition to their main or branch offices „ any City Hall, permanent public library facility, fairground, civic center, courthouse, county commission building, stadium, convention center, governmentowned senior center or government-owned community center as early voting sites.Ž A plain reading of the statute strongly suggests a student union on the campus of a public university would qualify as a government-owned community center. But Detzner didnt reach that reasonable conclusion. Whats more, he ignored that the university campus has multiple stadiums and determined that the law excluded not only the union but any other collegeor university-related facilitiesŽ as early voting sites. As Judge Walker wrote, the statute contains no such exclusions. None. In the order, the judge emphasized several key points: the size and density of the UF campus warrant an early voting site, based on criteria used to assess whether all voters access to polling places is adequate and constitutional; college students engage in early voting at higher rates than the general population; mail-in ballots used by students are rejected at higher rates than those submitted by voters in other age groups. Walker found that Detzners prohibition disparately imposes significant burdens on plaintiffs rights weighted against insufficiently weighty government interests.Ž The injunction enables elections supervisors to consider campuses for early voting. It remains in effect until the case ultimately isdecided. Whatever the case, in its next session the Legislature should make clear in the law that campuses are appropriate venues for early voting. A version of this editorial first appeared in the Gainesville Sun, a sister paper with GateHouse Media.Early voting sites belong on campus ANOTHER VIEW If a liberal like Jesse Jackson went on CNN and accused my father of being a "known womanizer" like President Trump, conservatives across America would go off the rails. They'd defend the reputation of Ronald Reagan to the max and blast Jackson for his false and evil equivalency. They'd point out that it is totally outrageous to compare the personal lives of President Trump and my father. Yet look what happened last week when a prominent conservative evangelical pastor from Dallas went on Fox News and called my father a "known womanizer." The Rev. Robert Jeffress, who's a Fox contributor, was asked by Ed Henry to respond to another minister who had accused Republican lawmakers of selling their good Christian souls by supporting a serial bed-hopper like Trump. "You know," Jeffress responded, "this is not an unusual thing we've been here before. Back in 1980, evangelicals chose to support a twice-married Hollywood actor who was a known womanizer in Hollywood. His name was Ronald Reagan. ... "The reason we supported President Reagan was not because we were supporting womanizing or divorce. We supported his policies." When I heard Jeffress say that I blew my top and started angrily tweeting. The first tweet I fired off to the Southern Baptist minister was pretty blunt "All I can say is go F yourself." My second tweet was "Dr. Jeffress. How dare you compare my father to Trump." Apparently, I was the only conservative Reagan Republican in North America who actually cared that Pastor Jeffress was casually throwing my father under the bus to support his beloved sinner-in-chief. All I heard from my fellow conservatives in the twittersphere was crickets -and a week later I still do. What that holy man from Dallas said was absolutely outrageous. He equated my father who was divorced from my mother Jane Wyman when he was dating in Hollywood and not yet married to Nancy to Donald Trump, who was dating Playboy playmates and who knows who else when he was married. What was more outrageous, however, was that no conservative Republicans or Fox commentators rose up in defense of my father and his reputation. As I also pointed out in a tweet last week, all those conservative talk show hosts and politicians who keep saying how much they love Ronald Reagan are either lying or have lost their spines and a pair of other things. I don't believe those so-called "Reagan conservatives" anymore. If they wouldn't stand up and defend my father against a vile and uninformed statement from someone like Jeffress', there's no reason to assume they love my father at all. I don't care what the president of the United States does in his personal life. I care what he does as president of the United States. If you want to defend Trump, fine. But for God's sake, why would you use my father to make excuses for a president who has cheated on every woman he's been married to? To rephrase that famous old line, Rev. Jeffress, "I knew Ronald Reagan. Ronald Reagan was a friend of mine. And Donald Trump ain't no Ronald Reagan a vice versa."A Man of God sins against my fatherThe pollsters at Pew recently reported that 68 percent of Americans are suffering from news exhaustion, and that jibes with what I witness on an anecdotal basis. I don't presume to everyone, but many of you probably agree that conversations with friends these days are sometimes strained. The dialogue often goes something like this: "We've gotta talk about Trump and everything that's going on." "I'm so sick of it. Must we?" "How can we not?" "Can't we talk about something else?" Sure we can. But we're also well aware (or we certainly should be) that democracy at home and the western peacekeeping alliance abroad are under unprecedented attack by destructive forces in Washington and Moscow. With each passing week, the challenge facing each of us becomes more urgent: What's the best way to remain vigilant and still lead a sane life? What's the best way to balance obligations to self, friends, and family with the obligations of citizenship? Is it possible to monitor the avalanche of news without going nuts? How can we best calibrate these factors in year two of Trumplandia? I brought this up on Facebook recently, and not surprisingly, nearly 100 friends shared their angst and exhaustion. One popular piece of advice, as articulated by Steve Rosenthal: "No cable news. Repeat, no cable news ever." Peter Landry seconds that: "I never watch ShoutTV on cable."Karen Rile says: "Something about large talking heads in the house is particularly stressful." Glenn Burkins says: "In our house, my wife keeps CNN on constantly, but I have limited my time with (cable) to the time it takes me to walk across our family room." Some of my respondents gave shout-outs to Rachel Maddow, Brian Williams, and Nicolle Wallace (I do like Wallace, a career Republican who has great Republican sources), but there seems to be a general belief (which I endorse) that cable commentary is shrill, speculative, repetitive, and therefore easily culled. As for me, I'm not the best person to advise anyone on the proper calibration. My latest idea of escapist reading was Daniel Silva's excellent new spy novel, "The Other Woman" which turned out to be a parallel-universe tale of Russia's penetration of America. In the author's note, he writes: "Russia under Vladimir Putin is both revanchist and paranoid, a dangerous combination...When Putin sows political chaos in Western Europe and seeks to disrupt and discredit an American election, he is reaching deep in the KGB's playbook." I suppose I can escape, albeit temporarily, by hanging with the grandchildren  ' another popular tip. But my oldest one, who is five, recently informed me with great solemnity: "There are bad guys in the world. You know that, right?" I managed a reassuring smile. But I said to myself: "Yeah. I think I read something about that." Perhaps cockeyed optimism is the best escape of all. As Phaedra Trethan says that "while we all know our history is rife with racism, injustice, corruption and genocide, I still believe that arc bends toward justice. Maybe because if I didn't believe that, I'd have drawn a nice warm bath, gotten in the tub, and opened my wrists by now."Lots of Tips on How to Live Sanely in Trumplandia Michael Reagan D i c k P o l m a n Dick Polman

PAGE 5

** Washington County News | Wednesday, August 1, 2018 A5 LOCAL & STATEBy Brendan FarringtonThe Associated PressCHIPLEY „ Down a network of dirt roads that defies GPS navigation, Florida Republican gubernatorial candidate Adam Putnam and about 100 supporters gathered at a hunting plantation tucked into the Panhandles pine trees.There were no television cameras, no throngs of media „ just barbecue and sweet tea for the crowd that clearly hadnt migrated from colder climes. Agricul-ture Commissioner Putnam introduced himself as a fifth generation Floridian, part of the personal outreach central to his campaign.We have a lot of native Floridians here, people who love our state, whose families who have bled and sweat and worked their fingers to the bone to carve out of this beautiful penin-sula „ the civilization that we call modern Florida,Ž Putnam said. It sets out a marker that says because of all that my family went through to make Florida Florida, Im committed to doing the right things for the right reasons.ŽThat same day, primary opponent U.S. Rep. Ron DeSantis appeared on Fox News from Israel, where he defended President Donald Trump amid an FBI investi-gation of Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Were actively trying to get the underlying documents that would tell us, did they (the FBI) spy on the Trump campaign or not?Ž DeSantis said.The free airtime is worth millions „ putting him in front of large numbers of conservative voters who will decide the Republican nominee to replace Gov. Rick Scott „ and, coupled with Trumps endorse-ment, forms the basis of his campaign.In a state with more than 4.5 million Republican voters, the candidates facing off in the Aug. 28 primary are a study in con-trasting campaign styles. Putnam has been to more than 100 breakfasts, bar-becues and parades, talking with Floridians about Flor-ida issues. DeSantis has been on Fox News more than 100 times, usually talking about federal issues and defending the president.The race will test which strategy works best in these times when White House tweets make international headlines and political divides are as wide as they ever have been: Shaking a lot of hands or shaking things up on TV. Its an interesting test,Ž said Rick Wilson, a Tallahassee-based Republican strategist. Putnam has name ID, hes got experience, hes got money. Its sort of the like the Florida guy versus the Fox guy, and were going to see if thats sufficient anymore.ŽDuring the candidates first debate, which was broadcast on Fox News, Fox anchor Martha MacCallum asked DeSantis about the criticism that hes campaigning from a Wash-ington TV studio.DeSantis replied that there have been plenty of times he couldnt be in Flor-ida when he wanted to, like when he spent Christmas 2006 on a Navy assignment in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and the following Christ-mas in Iraq.I would have loved to have been in Florida with my family, but sometimes duty calls and sometimes youve got to step up and do whats right,Ž DeSantis said.He said that duty now includes supporting Trumps agenda and uncovering the anti-Trump bias at the FBI and the U.S. Department of Justice.Thats what Im paid to do, so Im going to do my job,Ž he said.Even while campaigning in Florida, Fox and Trump are a theme. DeSantis did a statewide tour with Foxs Sean Hannity, held a rally with Donald Trump Jr. and plans to stand on stage with the president on Tuesday in Tampa.At Putnams event in Chipley, Nick Dillard acknowledged that many supporters there were sur-prised he would bother to come to a town of less than 4,000 people when there where places he could reach a larger audience and raise more money.I think it makes him more reachable,Ž Dillard said. They get it if he wants to go to Pensacola or Panama City, but to come to Chipley „ were a small town. ... Whys he coming here? I think it speaks to his philosophy „ the grass-roots movement.ŽUndecided Republican voter Ellen Petrokiewizz, who lives in the Orlando area, said she likes that Trump continues to rally supporters and back state candidates.Hes going back and saying, Hey, get behind your local politician. Sup-port this guy. Support that guy, Ž she said. DeSantis has already been in the Washington element, so he has been working back and forth there, so its a differ-ent style. I do like the true grassroots of going to the average person, and thats what Putnam has been doing. So, theres positives in both approaches.ŽGOP primary for governor down to Florida guy vs. Fox guyBy Eryn Dion 747-5069 | @PCNHErynDion edion@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ The Road to Change Tour, part of the March for Our Lives movement that sprung out of the Feb. 14 Parkland school shoot-ing, made a stop in Panama City Beach Sunday, holding a panel at Arnold High School, a voter registration event at Pier Park, and a more intimate forum at Moseys Downtown in Panama City.Survivors of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas school shooting, along with alumni from the school and politically active students from other districts shared their experiences and the hope that their actions will motivate others in their age group to register to vote and exercise their political power. Many stated they hadnt been politically active or politically minded before the shooting, but were called to action, both as a way to cope with the loss and to also enact the kind of change that would prevent future shootings.We want to make sure this doesnt happen to other families, they dont lose loved ones in an issue that is completely preventable,Ž said Robert Schentrup, who graduated from Marjory Stoneman Douglas in 2017 and whose 16-year-old sister was one of the 17 killed in the Feb. 14 shooting.While focusing largely on youth activism, the panel, hosted by the League of Women Voters, did get into gun control, with the students dispelling the belief that theyre anti-Second Amendment and how, with an issue as emotion-ally charged as gun violence and gun control, the biggest enemy in that conversation is narrow mindedness.Ž The groups position, framed as gun violence prevention, centers around three points „ mandatory reporting for gun thefts, preventing those convicted of domestic violence from owning a gun and universal background checks for those purchasing guns.If youre amicable of what were talking about, you go through the policy points, they tend to agree with you, because every single person, no matter their party affiliation, they want to be safe,Ž said Kayla Dixon, a student from Pinellas County who is traveling with the Road to Change tour. They want to protect their families and have a good well-being and our push is to do it responsi-bly and put buffers in order to make that happen.ŽFor many Bay County residents, like John Parker and Darian Furtaw, the Second Amendment, and any perceived threats against it, is deeply personal. Before the town hall, Parker sat in his pickup truck in the Arnold High School parking lot, a flag with a large AR-15 and the words Come and take itŽ flying in the wind, fixed to the bed of his truck. Before heading into the event, Parker rolled up the flag and put it in his truck, but not before changing into an army green shirt with the same AR-15 and same motto, and grabbing his GoPro to record the event. Left behind in his truck was a sign, Criminals for gunfree zones.ŽI wanted to come here and tell them they should advocate for the end of gun-free zones,Ž Parker said. Where theyre having this, its a gun-free zone. The next event is in a bar, another gun-free zone. Nobody is going to protect you in those zones.ŽFurtaw said they were going into the event with an open mind, and also hoping for the opportunity to educate people on responsible gun ownership. Concealed carry, he argued, helps make sure the elderly and the disabled, who oth-erwise wouldnt be able to defend themselves, were taken care of. He was, he said, adamantly against any form of gun control, saying irresponsible gun owner-ship is a myth.ŽThere should be no control of a firearm,Ž he said. Im tired of going on the defensive about the Second Amendment. I kind of want to go on the offensive.ŽDespite party affiliations or where they land on the political spectrum, the students spent much of the panel encouraging respectful conversations between students and other students, adults and students and sides that dont agree. They also pushed people, particularly those under the age of 25, to be more politically active, to hold their legis-lators accountable and to go out into their commu-nity and organize. After the panel, the Parkland students met with Arnold students in a small group setting, talking to them about how they feel about school safety and sharing methods and strategies to organize.No matter what the issue, people care about other people,Ž said Marjory Stoneman Douglas sophomore Ryan Servites.The Road to Change Tour continues Monday in Pensacola at the Uni-versity of West Florida.Parkland students visit PCB on Road to Change TourTyra Simons speaks during the March for Our Lives Road to Change town hall meeting at Arnold High School on Sunday. The students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and nearby schools answered questions from the audience and focused on how to organize for change around gun violence. [PHOTOS BY JOSHUA BOUCHER/ THE NEWS HERALD]

PAGE 6

** A6 Wednesday, August 1, 2018 | Washington County News COMMUNITYSpecial to The NewsCHIPLEY „ A children's classic is set to take stage next month.The Spanish Trail Playhouse, 680 Second Street, will hold performances of Charlottes Web at 7 p.m. Friday, August 3 and Saturday, August 4, and at 2 p.m. Sunday, August 5.Written by E.B. White and directed by Kevin Russell, this classic story of loyalty, trust and sacrifice will come to life in this live-action adaptation.Fern is one of the only two living beings who sees that Wilbur is a special animal as she raises him, the runt of the litter, into a terrific and radi-ant pig. As Wilbur moves into a new barn, he begins a second profound friendship with the most unlikely of creatures … a spider named Charlotte. Their bond inspires the animals around them to become a family. When the news that Wilburs days are numbered, it seems that only a miracle will save his life. A determined Charlotte, who sees miracles in the ordinary, spins words into her web in an effort to convince the farmer that Wilbur is "some pig" and worth saving. This play is pre-sented by special arrangement with The Dramatic Publishing Company of Woodstock, Illinois.Tickets are limited. Purchase online at www.spanishtrailplayhouse.com, and the Spanish Trail Playhouse office by calling 850-638-9113. The ticket office is open Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to noon.For more information, email spanishtrailplayhouse@gmail.com.Spanish Trail Playhouse presents Charlottes Web Special to The NewsCHIPLEY „ Team members from Emerald Coast Hospice will canvass the Chipley area throughout August, distributing food collection bags and gather-ing donations for Shepherds Gate Church, one of many benefactors of Kindreds 14th annual food drive.Emerald Coast Hospice is collecting food for Shepherds Gate Church to help support that organizations work on behalf of individuals and families in the community unable to afford or access an adequate amount of food.Our caregivers often tap into community resources to best serve our patients and their families, so they know firsthand the demand for assistance placed upon food banks, pantries and other charitable organiza-tions,Ž said Sunshine Speers, Emerald Coast Hospices Clinical Hospice Specialist. Making sure that the most basic component of good health, food, is available for those in need is the right thing to do for a health-care company like Kindred at Home and for the community as a whole.ŽEmerald Coast Hospice Chipley Branch provides a full range of hospice services to patients in Washington and Holmes counties, as well as, in the Graceville area. The Chipley office is an affiliate of Kindred at Home, the nations largest provider of comprehensive home health and hospice services.Kindred Hospice and Kindred at Home employees across the country are placing the food collection bags at healthcare and other facilities in their respective communities and will collect their harvestŽ during the entire month of August. They are focused on beat-ing the tally from last year, when the companys annual food drive yielded more than 300,000 meals for donation to food banks and charitable organizations across the country. To learn more about Emerald Coast Hospice in Chipley, call 850-638-8787 or visit the Kindred Hospice website at www.kindredhealthcare. com/our-services/hospice.Emerald Coast Hospice launches food driveIf you would like your events included in this list, email information to: news@chipleypaper.com Food coupons still availableWASHINGTON COUNTY … Washington County Council on Aging still has Farmers Market Nutrition Program Coupons available. If interested and have not already received coupons this year, contact Washington County Council on Aging at 850-638-6216 for more information on how you can participate in this program. HCSO to host a free food distributionPONCE DE LEON … Holmes County Sheriffs Office will host a free food distribution at 8 a.m. Saturday, August 11 at Ponce de Leon High School. This will be a drive-thruŽ event to help accommodate those with disabilities or small children. There will be someone there as long as there are supplies. For more information call the Holmes County Sher-iffs Office at 850-547-4421. FTR representative to be at WCCOACHIPLEY „ A representative from Florida Telecommunications Relay, INC. will be at Washington County Council on Aging at 9:30 a.m. Thursday, August 16, 2018. Seniors will be assessed to determine eligi-bility to receive an amplified or specialized telephone at no cost. For more information or to schedule an appointment call 850-638-6216. HOSO to offer concealed weapons classBONIFAY … The Holmes County Sheriffs Office will present a Concealed Weap-ons class at 10 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 18, in the Holmes County Jail classroom, located at 3207 Lonny Lindsey Drive in Bonifay. Sheriff John Tate will instruct the class, which is expected to last about two hours. This class will meet the firearms training class require-ment mandated by the Florida Department of Agriculture concealed weapon permit application. The class is open to ages 18 and up; however the minimum age to be granted a permit from the state is 21. Participants ages 21 and up may bring their own gun and rounds or use those provided by the sheriffs office. Participants under the age of 21 are asked to use the provided gun and rounds. No pre-registration is required, and the cost is $25 per person. All proceeds will benefit Holmes County High School Project Graduation. WCCOA to hold pampering dayCHIPLEY „ In recognition of National Senior Citizens Day on Tuesday, August 21, 2018, Washington County Council on Aging in partnership with Interim Healthcare, will be hosting a pampering session to seniors 60 and older.COMMUNITY EVENTSIf you would like a recurring event included in this list, please email the information to news@ chipleypaper.com MONDAY9:30 a.m.: Car Seat Safety Classes (“ rst Monday of each month); Florida Department of Health Holmes County. For more information, call 850-5478500 ext 248. 9:30 a.m.: Car Seat Safety Classes (third Monday of each month); Florida Department of Health Washington County. For more information, call 850-6386240, Ext 144. 10 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging senior Bingo. For more info rmation, call 850-547-2345. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise. For more information, call Andrea at 850-638-6216 11 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging senior lunch. For more information, call 850-547-2345 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining. For reservations, call 6 38-6216. Donations accepted. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach of“ ce. For more information, call Emma or Jess at 415-5999. 8 p.m.: Al-Anon meeting Blessed Trinity Church 8 p.m.: AA meeting Blessed Trinity ChurchTUESDAYWashington County Council on Aging Tuesday Group. For more information, call Kim at 850-638-6216 8-10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 9a.m.: Washington County Community Traf“ c Safety Team Meeting (Third Tuesday of each month) in the WCBOCC conference room. COMMUNITY CALENDAR See EVENTS, A7See CALENDAR, A7

PAGE 7

** Washington County News | Wednesday, August 1, 2018 A7 COMMUNITYFor more information call Renae Rountree at 850638-1314 or Lynne Abel at 850-638-6203 10 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging Movie Day. For more information, call 850-547-2345 10 a.m. Home Extension Club Meeting/Luncheon; Hinsons Crossroads Fire Department. 10:30 a.m.: Letter Learners; Washington County Public Library. For more information, call 850-638-1314 11 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging senior lunch. For more information, call 850-547-2345 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; For reservations, call 638-6216. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. 12:30 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) Tuesday Group. For more information call Andrea at 638-6216 5:30 p.m.: Chemical Addiction Recovery Effort group; Caryville Baptist Church Fellowship Hall, For more information, call 850-326-0886. 6:10 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church; Games start at 6:10 p.m. For more information, call Peg Russ at 638-7654 or 638-7654. 7 p.m.: "A Drop of Faith" Narcotics Anonymous meeting; Blessed Trinity Catholic Church.WEDNESDAY10 a.m.: Holmes Council on Aging Games and Activities. For more information, call 850-547-2345 10 a.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are held the fourth Wednesday of the month at 2 p.m. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise. For more information, call Andrea at 850-638-6216 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes County Healthy Start Safe Beds Make Safe Babies SIDS class (fourth Wednesday of each month) at Florida Department of Health in Bonifay. For more information call 850-5478500 EXT 248. 10 a.m. to noon: Washington County Healthy Start Safe Beds Make Safe Babies SIDS class (fourth Wednesday of each month) at Florida Department of Health in Chipley. For more information call 850-6386240 ext 144 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.: Holmes County Healthy Start Parenting 101 classes (“ rst, second and third Wednesday of each month) at Florida Department of Health in Bonifay 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.: Washington County Healthy Start Parenting 101 classes (“ rst, second and third Wednesday of each month) at Florida Department of Health in Chipley 11 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging senior lunch. For more information, call 850-547-2345 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; For reservations, call 638-6216. Donations accepted. 12:30 p.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) Games and Activities. For more information, Call Andrea at 850-638-6216 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.: Holmes County Tobacco Cessation Classes, (second Wednesday of every month) at Doctors Memorial Hospital. For more information, call James Lewis at 850-224-9340 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Bible Study 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURSDAY9 a.m. to 11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution, every third Thursday (Holmes County residents only). For more information, call 547-0190. 9 a.m. to noon: Washington County Council on Aging Advanced Portrait Art Class. For more information call Kim at 850-638-6216 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; all 6380093; every third Thursday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: First Thursday Bene“ ts program staff will be at Washington County Council on Aging. For more information, call 850-638-6216. 10 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging Games and Activities. For more information, call 850-547-2345 11 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging senior lunch. For more information, call 850-547-2345 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; For reservations, call 638-6216. Donations accepted. Noon: Washington County Chamber of Commerce luncheon (every third Thursday) at Northwest Florida Community Hospital Specialty Center. Noon to 2 p.m.: Holmes County Tobacco Cessation Classes fourth (“ rst Thursday of every month) at Holmes County Health Department. For more information, call James Lewis at 850-224-9340 12:30 p.m. Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) BINGO. For more information, call Andrea at 850-638-6216 1 p.m.: Care Givers Support group, third Thursday of each month at the First Presbyterian Church on 5th Street in Chipley. For more information, call Recie Culpepper at 850-566-2553. 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the “ rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 3 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society (second Thursday of each month). The public is invited to attend. 5:30 p.m.: Chemical Addiction Recovery Effort group Caryville Baptist Church Fellowship Hall. For more information, call 850-326-0886. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.: Washington County Tobacco Cessation Classes (second Thursday of each month) at Washington County Health Department. For more information, call James Lewis at 850-224-9340 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church in Bonifay 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.: Washington Council on Aging in Chipley Advanced Line dancing. For more information, call Kim at 850-638-6216 7 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Library Annex Building 330 Harvey Etheridge Street in Bonifay. Call Linda Fowler for more information at 547-3655 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting at Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A 7 p.m.: William Dunaway Chapter of the National Society Sons of the American Revolution (“ rst Thursday of each month) at Jim Buffet and Grill in MariannaFRIDAY6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals, and socialization. For more information call 850-547-2345. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise. For more information call Andrea at 850-638-6216. 10:30 a.m.: Washington County Public Library (Chipley) "Knitting with Looms" third Friday every month. For more information call 850-638-1314. 11 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging senior lunch for more information call 850-547-2345 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; For reservations, call Andrea at 850-638-6216. Donations accepted. 12:30 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) Games and Activities. For more information call Andrea at 850-638-6216 3:30 p.m.: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery. For more information, call 703-0347. 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper (fourth Friday of every month, January to September) 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.: 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced meet on the last Friday of the month at Eastside Baptist Church. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks. For more information, call 850-272-6611. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church.SATURDAYUSDA (third Saturday of January, March, May, July September and November) at Shepherds Gate Church. For more information, call James Guy at 850-258-5854 or John Williamson at 850-703-9681 7 a.m.: Farm Share (second Saturday of each month) at Shepherds Gate Church. For more information, call James Guy at 850-258-5854 or John Williamson at 850-703-9681 8 a.m.: North Bay Clan of The Lower Muskogee Creek Yard Sale (“ rst Saturday of each month until 2 p.m.) Location is 1560 Lonnie Road in Chipley. 9 a.m. to noon: Mobile Food Pantry (fourth Saturday of each month) at Cypress Creek Church in Chipley. For more information, call James Guy at 850-258-5854 or John Williamson at 850-703-9681. 9 a.m.: Food Pantry (second Saturday of each month) at 808 E. Highway 90. For more information call Dr. Yunus of“ ce at 850-547-4284. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: The Holmes County Community Health Clinic at 203 W. Iowa St., Bonifay will be open the “ rst and third Saturday. 9 a.m.: Emergency Food Pantry is open Monday Wednesday and Friday at Shepherds Gate Church in Chipley. For more information, call James Guy at 850-258-5854 or John Williamson at 850-703-9681 10 a.m.: The Alford Community Health Clinic will be open the fourth Saturdays of each month until the last patient is seen. For more information, call 850-2720101 or 850-209-5501 10 a.m. to noon: Childrens education day (fourth Saturday of each month) at the North Bay Clan Tribal Grounds, located at 1560 Lonnie Road in ChipleySUNDAY8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting board room at Graceville-Campbellton Hospital in Graceville. CALENDARFrom Page A6 Manicures and hand massages will be provided. This event will begin at 10 a.m. and will take place at 1348 South Boulevard in Chipley. For more information on this or other events call 850-638-6216. PDL “ re to host RTIC raf” ePONCE DE LEON … Ponce De Leon Volunteer Fire Department will host a raffle for a 65 Quart RTic cooler. The raffle will run through Thursday, Aug. 23. Tickets are $5 each or 3 for $12. There are only 300 tickets available. All proceeds go to benefit the fire department. Contact any member of the PDL fire department or contact the department on Facebook. Hearing life representative to be at WCCOACHIPLEY „ A representative with Hearing Life will be at Washington County Council on Aging from 10:30 a.m. to noon Thursday, Aug. 23 to conduct hearing screenings. This event is open to seniors 60 or older. For information call 850-638-6216. Holmes County UF/IFAS to host Outdoor ExpoBONIFAY „ The Holmes County UF/ IFAS Extension Office will host an Outdoor Expo Friday, Sept. 7, and Saturday, Sept. 8, at the Holmes County Agricul-ture Center in Bonifay. There will be a concert, improved outdoor venue, NWFT Grand National Turkey Calling Contest and vendors. For more information on the event or becom-ing a vendor visit www.hcoutdoorexpo.com or call Kayla Welch at 850-547-1108. HCHS band to host Rodeo PageantBONIFAY … Holmes County High School will host the 2018 Northwest Florida Rodeo Pageant Saturday, Sep. 15 in the HCHS auditorium. Tiny Miss through Little King will be held at 4 p.m. and Little Miss through Miss will be held at 6 p.m. The pageant is open to ages 4 through 20 and the contestant fee is $50. Online registration and credit card payments will be available Thursday, Aug. 30 through Saturday, Sept. 8 at WWW/HCHSBLUEPRIDE.com/Pageant. Participants may also register from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 30, and Tuesday, September 4 and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, September 8 I the auditorium. Par-ticipants may also register from 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, September 11 with a $10 late fee added to the registration. Rehearsals will take place at registration. Door admission will be $5 for ages 10 and up and $2 for ages nine and under. For more information call 850-766-7569 or email pageant@hchsbluepride. com We Care, You MatterŽ health fairEBRO „ The Florida Department of Health in Washington County will host the We Care, You MatterŽ health fair in Ebro from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, September 29 at Ebro City Hall, 6629 Dog Track Road. There will be health screenings, educational information, door prizes, and refreshments. For more information contact Susie Sewell at (850) 638-6240. Open auditions announced for Grease: The MusicalThe Spanish Trail Playhouse will hold open auditions for Grease: The Musical at 6 p.m. Monday, September 10 and Tuesday, September 11. Auditions will be held at The Spanish Trail Playhouse (Historic Chipley High School) located at 680 Second Street in Chipley. Grease: The Musical will take the stage Thursday, November 8 through Monday, November 12. Audition packets will be available two weeks prior to auditions on the Spanish Trail Playhouse website: www.spanishtrailplayhouse.com, the Spanish Trail Playhouse office and at the Washington County Public Library. To inquire about a certain role or about volunteering or with other questions pertaining to production email span-ishtrailplayhouse@gmail. com. EVENTSFrom Page A6

PAGE 8

** A8 Wednesday, August 1, 2018 | Washington County News REAL ESTATEReader Question: I am interested in starting a career as a real estate investor. Both remodeling to flip or hold homes for the long-term interest me. I do not have any construction experience, nor have I any actual real estate experience. I am quick to pick up on training, and Im people orientated so I feel I can handle renting apartments or houses, and learn what it takes to be a flipper. How would you compare flipping houses to being a landlord?Montys Answer: Both methods can be solid roads to wealth building, and both share similar strategies in the acquisition phase. A keen understanding of the market dynamics in the location you choose to invest, knowing how to evaluate a property and selecting the improvements to add value are the keys to minimizing risk. Investors that understand these principal factors will build their nest egg faster and more efficiently than investors who jump in without considering the big picture. Here is a link potential investors may find helpful:https://dearmonty. com/before-becominga-real-estate-investor/ Pros of flippingFlipping provides quick returns in the world of real estate. From the purchase to the sale of a home may be within six months. The yield on invested capital is not tracked independently for flippers; anecdotally, 15-25 percent gains are not unusual for skilled practitioners. As a cautionary note, flipping and remodeling may not be as easy as television shows make it appear. The absence of property management is appealing to many flippers. Minor maintenance done while workers complete the necessary fixes and keeping the lawn mowed are the main tasks. Flippers see the lack of duties commonly found in nonowner occupied housing as an advantage. No rental showings, vetting tenants, collecting rent, and other activities present in rental property is attractive. Cons of ipping The short holding period means income is taxed as ordinary income rather than the capital gain tax. The dilemma for a flipper owning a property long enough to qualify for capital gain treatment may mean no gain to tax. There is higher risk in flipping; hidden or unknown defects only discoverable when a wall is torn out, cost overruns, scheduling delays, extended holding time, value misjudgments, and more make this a not-for-the-faint-ofheart business. However, despite the risks, the potential for high returns brings competition that affects margins, which margins are necessary to reduce the risks mentioned above. The population of sellers that will sell at a price the flipper can tolerate is small, so there is effort invested in discovery and presentation as most sellers will shop flippers, as they shop for real estate agents. Finally, there is no depreciation allowance to shelter gain on sale. Pros of buying to hold One builds a portfolio of property. This method translates to an annual income stream over time that generates cash flow. Renting is lower risk than flipping because there are likely more renters in the market than buyers. The population of qualified sellers is higher because buying to hold the property allows more flexibility on the purchase price. Unlike the flipper, when they make a mistake, they have time to recover through rental income and appreciation. Finally, when it comes time to sell, they have had depreciation to recapture part of their improvement cost and qualify for capital gain treatment.Cons of buying to holdProperty management is necessary for holding property. An investor has to maintain, rent, and service property. Property management services add cost against the income, or if you self-manage, it becomes a second job. There is a learning curve in buying to hold. Property management, landlord-tenant laws, tenant selection, qualifying tenants, best practices in maintenance and repair, and more. If a landlord does not do well in this area, the degree of success diminishes. Investors here must be patient as the returns are slow to materialize, but comes two ways. While there is rental income, the total return is unknown until the property sells years later. Buying to hold is more complicated. Houses and components wear out, vacancies, evictions, and more. Here is a link to an article about what it takes to be a good landlord:https://dearmonty.com/ avoid-tenant-complaints/Many flippers are also landlords; some not by choice. The lack of a timely sale caused them to become landlords to recover over time. Either choice, or even both combined is a satisfying endeavor. You are in business for yourself, and you are improving neighborhoods. Richard Montgomery is the author of "House Money An Insiders Secrets to Saving Thousands When You Buy or Sell a Home." He is a real estate industry veteran who advocates industry reform and offers readers unbiased real estate advice. Find him at DearMonty.com.DEAR MONTYFlip or hold real estate? Reader Question: My wife and her three siblings inherited the family home when their mother died. My wife was 20 years old at that time, the eldest, and invested 10k in keeping the house. It is now 39 years later, and the siblings want their share. My wife is the only one who has remained living there and has paid over $700k in upkeep, mortgage, property taxes etc. She also refinanced the home many years ago because each sibling wanted cash for personal reasons. My wife has paid all the interest and principal on these refinances. Another 250k was refinanced to care for their father. Again, my wife is the only one who paid anything. How does one divide the shares in this situation? Montys Answer: Assuming your wife has been keeping good records on the costs and the refinances, here are some suggestions to consider going forward. Assuming the relationship between the siblings is positive, the goal might be to ensure they are still talking to each other after they reach a settlement. If each siblings percentage interest is in the title, there is still a long history here with conversations that were likely oral, and today, remembered differently. Whenever money is involved transparency and experienced counsel is often useful in keeping relationships intact. Call a family meeting It would be beneficial if the siblings could agree up-front on a plan to sort out and decide on how to proceed to avoid any misunderstandings. Create an agenda and appoint someone to take notes in the meeting. After the meeting send a memo of the discussion that includes the plan agreed upon to each sibling. There is no mention of a partnership agreement established when the siblings inherited the house. It will be helpful If one exists. Was probate involved in transferring the title? The more detail on costs and timing you can furnish the less time a consultant will have to spend reconstructing a forty year history. The more uncontested data you can produce, the more unlikely you will encounter impediments. Your wifes training is unclear, but making the calculations on her own, she may overlook certain components. Has your wife been deducting mortgage interest on your income tax returns? An accountant will also be able to guide you with tax advice. Seek outside counsel Seeking competent advice that is outside the family can prevent future misunderstandings that change the family dynamics. Were the siblings named on the mortgage? Consider retaining a certified public accountant (CPA) to recommend the best way to approach the expenses, the payouts, and the refinances from the date the siblings received the title. It may be helpful to engage a CPA that is also an attorney. The CPA will know how to account for the periods of time all the siblings, including yourselves, lived in the home. With the amounts and the dates of distributions and shared expenses, or other items, the consultant may utilize time-value-of-money calculations. The accountant may have alternate ideas on the best methods for making these calculations. Because the CPA is a knowledgeable outsider acting as a consultant, engage he or she to represent all of the siblings. Guidance on the calculations from an experienced accountant with no financial interest in the outcome will be very helpful in avoiding suspicion about the fairness of the results. Your wife sought outside advice because she is a fair person. Consider exiting ownership together It is not clear if you plan on continuing to live in the home. If you and your wife continue to live in the house, the siblings will need to establish a value for the CPA to use in making calculations. Should all the siblings contribute to deciding on the amount? If two appraisals are obtained and averaged (they will be different values) to set value, what happens if the estimates are far apart? Do you then get a third appraisal and average to two closest? Do you choose the two highest; the two lowest; the average all three? Determining the approach can be influenced by the motives and beliefs of each sibling. Also, if you stay in the home, should future selling expenses be considered in calculating the current buy-out price? By selling the home in a simultaneous exit the transaction may be less complicated because the market itself sets the value of the house as opposed to paying for and relying on appraisals.DEAR MONTYWhy a partnership agreement is needed with inherited property R i c h a r d M o n t g o m e r y Richard Montgomery CHIPLEYPAPER.COM

PAGE 9

** Washington County News | Wednesday, August 1, 2018 A9

PAGE 10

** A10 Wednesday, August 1, 2018 | Washington County NewsFeb. 11: Clash at Daytona (Brad Keselowski) Feb. 15: Can-Am Duel at Daytona (Ryan Blaney and Chase Elliott) Feb. 18: Daytona 500 (Austin Dillon) Feb. 25: Folds of Honor 500 at Atlanta (Kevin Harvick) March 4: Kobalt 400 at Las Vegas (Kevin Harvick) March 11: Camping World 500(k) at Phoenix (Kevin Harvick) March 18: Auto Club 400 at Fontana (Martin Truex Jr.) March 26: STP 500 at Martinsville (Clint Bowyer) April 8: OReilly Auto Parts 500 at Texas (Kyle Busch) April 15: Food City 500 at Bristol (Kyle Busch) April 21: Toyota Owners 400 at Richmond (Kyle Busch) April 29: Geico 500 at Talladega (Joey Logano) May 6: AAA 400 at Dover (Kevin Harvick) May 12: Go Bowling 400 at Kansas (Kevin Harvick) May 19: All-Star Race at Charlotte (Kevin Harvick) May 27: Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte (Kyle Busch) June 3: Pocono 400 (Martin Truex Jr.) June 10: FireKeepers Casino 400 at Michigan (Clint Bowyer) June 24: Toyota/Save Mart 350 at Sonoma (Martin Truex Jr.) July 1: Chicago 400 at Chicagoland (Kyle Busch) July 7: Coke Zero 400 at Daytona (Erik Jones) July 14: Quaker State 400 at Kentucky (Martin Truex Jr.) July 22: New Hampshire 301 (Kevin Harvick) July 29: Pennsylvania 400 at Pocono (Kyle Busch) Aug. 5: 355 at the Glen, at Watkins Glen Aug. 12: Pure Michigan 400 Aug. 18: Night Race at Bristol Sept. 2: Southern 500 at Darlington Sept. 9: Brickyard 400 at Indianapolis Sept. 16: Las Vegas 400 Sept. 22: Federated Auto Parts 400 at Richmond Sept. 30: Bank of America 500(k) at Charlotte road course Oct. 7: Delaware 400 at Dover Oct. 14: Alabama 500 at Talladega Oct. 21: Hollywood Casino 400 at Kansas Oct. 28: First Data 500 at Martinsville Nov. 4: Texas 500 Nov. 11: Can-Am 500(k) at Phoenix Nov. 18: Ford EcoBoost 400 at Homestead NASCAR THIS WEEKCUP STANDINGS WHATS ON TAP QUESTIONS & ATTITUDECompelling questions ... and maybe a few actual answers2018 SCHEDULE AND WINNERS 12345678910 KEN WILLIS TOP 10 NASCAR DRIVER RANKINGSKYLE BUSCH His turn up top KEVIN HARVICK Rough weekend, still “ nished MARTIN TRUEX JR. Pocono delivered a rare clunker ERIK JONES Becoming a lead-pack “ xture KURT BUSCH Piling up top-10s like Smokey JOEY LOGANO One Cup, two X“ nity wins at The Glen ARIC ALMIROLA Not exactly a road-course ringer RYAN BLANEY The Blaneys arent big on road courses either CHASE ELLIOTT 0-for-98 The Daytona Beach News-Journals Godwin Kelly & Ken Willis have covered NASCAR for nearly 60 years combined. godwin.kelly@ news-jrnl.com ken.willis@news-jrnl.com CLINT BOWYER Four weeks without a top-10 THREE THINGS TO WATCHPOCONO THREE THINGS WE LEARNED WATKINS GLENFEUD OF THE WEEK SPEED FREAKSA few questions we had to ask ourselvesGODWINS PICKS FOR WATKINS GLEN MOTOR MOUTHS PODCASTWho was Watkins and who was Glen? Maybe we “ nd out in the pod. Maybe not. Tune in online at www.news-journalonline.com/ daytonamotormouths A runner-up for Daniel Suarez. Is he now on the watchlistŽ for victory? GODSPEAK: Yes, he is gaining momentum at a really, really good time. But I think Chase Elliott beats him to the checkered ” ag. KEN'S CALL: Obviously, there's only one place better, but I still think Aric Almirola wins under green before Suarez breaks the seal.Better career: Kyle Busch or Tony Stewart? GODSPEAK: Call it a tie. Busch is closing in on 200 overall national series wins, which is impressive. Another Cup title puts him over the top. KEN'S CALL: Good question. They're tied in Cup wins (49), and Kyle is light-years ahead in overall NASCAR wins, but Tony has those three Cup titles, compared with Kyle's one. Until further notice, Tony. MATT DIBENEDETTO VS. ARIC ALMIROLA: The two drivers were “ ghting for position on the last lap when Almirolas No. 10 Ford and DiBenedettos No. 32 Ford tangled. Almirola spun. Matty D. was 27th. GODWIN KELLYS TAKE: NBCSN caught DiBenedetto walking aggressively up to Almirola on pit road, issuing a complaint and walking away. They run races in different ZIP codes, so this wont escalate. WINNER: Martin Truex Jr. REST OF TOP 5: Kyle Busch, Kyle Larson, Joey Logano, Clint Bowyer FIRST ONE OUT: Matt DiBenedetto DARK HORSE: AJ Allmendinger DONT BE SURPRISED IF: The Big 3Ž surge continues as Truex, with onlyŽ four wins, plays catch-up to Busch and Harvick.When do we start paying attention to Christopher Bell?Good question. The 23-year-old Oklahoma native has won the past three X“ nity Series races in Joe Gibbs No. 20 Toyota. He has four overall wins this year after a “ ve-win 2017 in the Truck Series. Several years ago, when sponsors grew on trees and lower-level victories often meant an eventual promotion, there would be plenty of speculation as to how Bell would be worked into Gibbs Cup plans for next year.Any chance of that?Not sure, but did you notice the strong second-place showing by Daniel Suarez at Pocono? His No. 19 team has been Gibbs leastproductive car since Carl Edwards retirement, and on the immediate heels of Bells third straight win, Suarez produced his career-best “ nish. Strictly a coincidence? Maybe, but maybe not. Sometimes its as if a racer-in-need can will a few more horses into the engine.„Ken Willis, ken.willis@ news-jrnl.com1. Kyle Busch 891 2. Kevin Harvick 843 3. Martin Truex Jr. 762 4. Joey Logano 690 5. Clint Bowyer 677 5. Kurt Busch 677 7. Brad Keselowski 644 8. Kyle Larson 626 9. Denny Hamlin 618 10. Ryan Blaney 612 11. Aric Almirola 587 12. Chase Elliott 569 13. Jimmie Johnson 547 14. Erik Jones 533 15. Alex Bowman 496 16. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. 440 16. Paul Menard 440 18. Ryan Newman 408 19. Austin Dillon 402 20. Daniel Suarez 400 CUP SERIES: Go Bowling at The Glen SITE: Watkins Glen International (2.45-mile road course) SCHEDULE: Saturday, practice (NBC Sports Network, 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.), qualifying (NBC Sports Network, 6:30 p.m.). Sunday, race (NBC, coverage begins at 2 p.m.; green ” ag, 3:15 p.m.) XFINITY: Zippo 200 at The Glen SITE: Watkins Glen International SCHEDULE: Saturday, qualifying (NBC Sports Network, 11:30 a.m.), race (NBC, 3 p.m.)1. Hold your breathBubba Wallace provided the holdyour-breath moment at Pocono when he crashed hard into Turn 1, destroying his No. 43 Chevy. Hardest one of my career,Ž the rookie said. There is no feeling like being helpless in that situation going off into Turn 1, and it scared the hell out of me.Ž2. Showing imp rovementHendrick Motorsports is showing signs of improvement. It had three drivers score top-10 “ nishes, with Alex Bowman leading the charge, producing his career-best third-place effort. William Byron had his best “ nish, too, a sixth. Jimmie Johnson? He wound up 17th.3. Changing lexiconNASCAR folk are famous for inventing new words. Driver Sterling Marlin came up with ” ustrated,Ž while Larry McReynolds, who was making a point on TV, invented interate.Ž While talking about Bubba Wallaces crash, Dale Earnhardt Jr. used the word frighteningness.Ž„ Godwin Kelly, godwin. kelly@news-jrnl.comBubba Wallace said he was OK after his violent crash at Pocono. [AP/DERIK HAMILTON] 1. NASCAR Tres GrandesYes, we are growing weary of the term Big 3,Ž which describes the trio of drivers (Kyle Busch, Kevin Harvick, Martin Truex Jr.) hogging NASCAR Cup Series wins. When asked about tying Tony Stewart on the all-time wins list with 49 victories, Busch said he wants to keep climbing and added this: Whats crazy is how this year keeps going. Its like Harvick gets one, we get one, Truex gets one and were all back and forth.Ž We get it.2. Bodines strategyDriver Geoff Bodine and crew chief Paul Andrews devised a winning Watkins Glen strategy in 1996, which many teams use as a guideline for the 2.45-mile road course. Bodine simply divided the 90-lap race into two pit stops at predetermined times and beat the likes of Terry Labonte, Mark Martin and Jeff Gordon that day. And just for the record, it was Bodines last career win in the Cup Series. He ended with 18 total wins.3. One eye on AJWith a lack of road-racing ringers participating in one-off races these days, the victories usually get pocketed by NASCAR elite. Not so fast, my friend. AJ Allmendingers name has become synonymous with The Glen. The 36-year-old driver pulled off the upset win in 2014, and when Cup Racing heads to upstate New York, AJs name gets tossed in the hat. In nine starts, he has that win and “ ve other top-10 “ nishes.„ Godwin Kelly, godwin. kelly@news-jrnl.comKyle Busch celebrates his sixth win of the season with a burnout at Pocono. [AP/DERIK HAMILTON]

PAGE 11

** Washington County News | Wednesday, August 1, 2018 A11Members of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School football team take the “ eld to begin practice for a new season just after midnight on Monday in Parkland, Fla. The players, their school, and community still grieve for the 17 lives lost at the school on Feb. 14. [PHOTOS BY JOE SKIPPER/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Tim ReynoldsThe Associated PressPARKLAND, Fla. „ The first practice of the new season was over, and the only sound on the campus of Marjory Stone-man Douglas High School was dozens of football players screaming in delight.It was 2:15 a.m., and they were having a water balloon fight .At last, on a campus shaken by tragedy, there was joy.The Eagles „ now ambassadors for a school and community still reeling from the Feb. 14 massacre that left 17 people dead, including assistant football coach Aaron Feis who was killed while trying to use his body to shield students from the cascade of bullets „ took the field for practice at 12:01 a.m. Monday.Under Florida rules, teams could begin fall workouts July 30. The Eagles didnt wait a minute longer.This is the only thing we have to show our respect,Ž coach Willis May Jr. said. This is the way we can show our respect to those guys, with our great effort and with our great attitudes. Be leaders within the school. I hope we see all that from these kids this year.ŽDouglas has had the midnight madnessŽ practice on opening day several times before, but this was different. A uniformed sheriffs deputy was on campus throughout the evening, his patrol vehicle parked adjacent to the field during practice. The site of the shootings „ the 1200 building „ still stands, cordoned off by a chain-link fence. Many want it leveled, but for now it stands because its essentially evi-dence, a crime scene.Players, as they walked out of the locker room in rows of two shortly before midnight, had to stroll past the 1200 building on their way to the field for prac-tice. Barely anyone seemed to look its way.Our community is still very much in the traumatized healing process,Ž said Parkland Mayor Christine Hunschofsky, who sat in the bleachers with about 100 other people for the middle-of-the-night practice. This is not a sprint. This is absolutely a marathon. And we will never forget. No one who was here will ever forget. But we also have to look at a way forward.ŽAnd Monday was a small step forward.But the reminders of Feb. 14 remain everywhere.There is one locker with a door painted gold in the locker room „ it belonged to Joaquin GuacŽ Oliver, one of the 17 victims, the boy who adored Miami Heat star Dwyane Wade so much that his family buried him in a Wade jersey. The fence around the 1200 building is partially covered by banners with messages of sup-port from neighboring schools. Inside the cafeteria, where par-ents reported for the preseason meeting, another banner still hangs. Its from the students of Columbine High School, where a similar tragedy took place in 1999.On the field, there are more signs, reminders to play for Feis and how to be MSD Strong.Ž The shirts most of the coaches wore had some reminder of the shooting. May tugged on a new shirt just before practice, one with 17Ž in the middle, the reasoning there obvious.Put simply, theres no escap-ing what happened.A school that was a sanctuary is now, in many ways, a memorial .Are we perfect? Are we happy all the time? How can we be?Ž said Johanna Feis, the younger sister of the slain coach whose desk remains next to Mays inside a cramped football office and hasnt been issued to anyone else on the staff. Im not OK at this moment, but were pushing through, so we are OK.Ž The Eagles obviously did not want this attention.They did not want to be asked to play a Canadian team in Georgia on Sept. 1, but now view the trip as a great opportunity. They did not want to see Feis, athletic director Chris Hixon, cross country coach Scott Beigel „ all victims on Feb. 14 „ honored with the Best Coach award at the ESPYs. They did not want to turn Feis name into a motivational acronym, the letters in foot-ball parlance now standing for Fearless, Emotion, Intensity and Sacrifice.ŽThey would rather see things go back to normal, whatever that was before the afternoon of Feb. 14.You represent this high school,Ž May told his team just before practice started. Every time you put that Doug-las (jersey) on, make it count for something. Make it mean something. When somebody faces us this year, one thing I want them to know is, you aint getting an injured Eagle. Youre not facing an injured Eagle thats just going to let you roll over them. This is the only thing we have to show our respect SPORTS TICKER IN BRIEFPHILADELPHIANFL concussion claims hit $500M in less than 2 yearsMore than $500 million in claims were approved as of Monday under the NFLs concussion settlement, nearly a decade earlier than league officials estimated they would reach that amount.Claims administrators in the settlement released an updated report on the concussion settlement information website saying about $502 mil-lion had been approved in less than two years of the settlement. The original actuarial esti-mates from the NFL estimated a little more than $400 million would be paid out in the first decade.Attorneys for the retired players adjusted their estimates on the total payout of expected claims earlier this month, saying the set-tlement would likely reach $1.4 billion„ almost a half billion more than the NFL originally estimated.Almost 2,000 claims have been filed in less than two years, according to the update filed Monday. Hundreds more of the nearly 20,500 retired players signed up to be prequalified to file claims than were expected, outpacing all previous projections.NEW YORKPitino promises to tell all in upcoming memoirRick Pitino is ready to tell his story.The former Louisville coach has a memoir coming in September that will lay all his cards on the table,Ž Diversion Books announced Monday. Pitino: My Story,Ž co-written by Seth Kaufman, is coming out Sept. 4. The book will cover everything from his time coaching the New York Knicks and Boston Celtics to his triumphant and troubled career in the NCAA.Pitino was ousted from Louisville in 2017 amid a multiyear, mul-tischool investigation into the alleged payment of hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes and kickbacks designed to influence recruits. The NCAA vacated the Cardinals 2013 national championship. Pitino, who has denied any wrong-doing, will take on opportunistic agentsŽ and predatory apparel companiesŽ among others, according to his publisher. By Regina Garcia Cano and Wayne ParryThe Associated PressLAS VEGAS „ Two titans of the casino indus-try are racing to cash in on the newly created U.S. sports betting market, taking steps to expand their footprint and strengthen their positions as more states approve necessary regulations and people become more interested in legally gambling on pro and college sports. MGM Resorts Interna-tional rea ched separate agreements Monday with a European bookmaker and a U.S.-based regional casino operator that will give it technological expertise and market access in several states where it doesnt already operate casino-resorts. Meanwhile, Caesars Entertainment opened the sports book at one of its New Jersey casinos and will do the same Wednes-day at another property.The moves from the casino operators come more than two months after the U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way for all 50 states to offer legal sports betting, should they desire. The first of two agreements MGM Resorts announced Monday is a joint venture with the United Kingdom-based owner of Ladbrokes, GVC Holdings, that will lead to the creation of a sports betting and online gam-bling platform in the U.S. The platform will include a mobile app and website with features like odds and highlights.The separate agreement with Boyd Gaming Corp. opens markets for both companies, allowing them to offer sports betting and online wagering in 15 states where they operate casino-resorts. Boyd will give MGM access to Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana and other states pending the closure of planned casino purchases.We believe the joint venture deal is a net posi-tive for both GVC and MGM as MGM gains the invaluable, and difficult to recreate technology plat-form and online expertise that GVC possesses in a cost efficient manner,Ž Deutsche Bank analyst Carlo Santarelli wrote in a note to investors. We also believe the deal helps both Companies in their speed to market, an important element, in our view, of U.S. sports betting as we expect market shares on a state by state basis to be largely concen-trated over time.ŽMGM, Caesars jump into sports betting At Stoneman Douglas, football season comes with heavy heartsMembers of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School football team pray together as they began practice for a new season just after midnight on Monday in Parkland, Fla.

PAGE 12

** A12 Wednesday, August 1, 2018 | Washington County News

PAGE 13

** Washington County News | Wednesday, August 1, 2018 B1 CELEBRATE Staff ReportWASHINGTON COUNTY … The Washington County Public Library System had a rocking time this summer during their activities programs. There were activities for everyone and from everyone. The library hosted playful and educational events by Dr. Magical Balloons, Tampa Taiko Japanese Drumming, and the Florida Public Archaeology Network with Underwater Archaeology. Trips to any of the branches had kids picking out books related to this years theme, Libraries Rock. Thirty-six programs have been offered during the summer with 428 kids participating in learning about music history, creating instruments, and the science behind sounds. Over 2,700 books were checked out since school let out on May 25. Reading logs were distributed and children completed them to earn prizes from the library, helping children avoid the summer slide.Ž Library Director Renae Rountree said the summer slide is a challenge that every child faces during their time off from school. The summer slide is not playground equipment,Ž said Rountree. It is the drop in educational skills that result in weeks of remediation at the beginning of the school year. This takes away critical time from teachers and students who are looking to advance their education. The library seeks to help fill this gap in Washington County by providing summer programming.Ž The library also partnered with Feeding the Gulf Coast to help provide children with good nutrition during the summer months. The Chipley Library, the Sam Mitchell Library in Vernon, Wausau Library, and Gilmore Park served a combined total of 188 breakfasts, lunches, and snacks in a nine-week period with over 1,000 children receiving free meals. Washington County Library wishes to send special thanks to their summer supporters, the Friends of the Washington County Public Library, Community South Credit Union, and the Chipley Kiwanis Club this year for helping fund their programming. Partnerships are an essential part of the librarys function as a community center. This is also evident in the Museum on Mainstreet exhibit, Hometown Teams: How Sports Shaped America, that will be opening on October 1, at the Chipley Library. The Washington County Library in partnership with the Smithsonian Institution and the Florida Humanities Council is excited to bring a slice of Americana to Washington County, Rountree said.Library rocked summer programsThese kids learned from Tampa Taiko a little about the drumming art. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] Dr. Magical Balloons entertained those in attendance with his talents. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] Kids learned about underwater archaeology during a program provided by Florida Public Archaeology Network with Underwater Archaeology. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS]

PAGE 14

** B2 Wednesday, August 1, 2018 | Washington County NewsBy Stan Choe and Marley JayThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ Technology stocks tumbled for the third day in a row Monday as a sharp reversal for some of Wall Streets recent favorites worsened. Major U.S. indexes skidded.Technology compa-nies have done far better than the rest of the market in recent years, but theyve fallen after Facebook and Twitter both reported weak user growth in the second quarter. Microsoft and Alphabet slumped Monday and Facebook, Twitter and Netflix have all fallen at least 20 per-cent from their record highs earlier this month. Elsewhere, energy companies climbed along with the price of crude oil but industrial companies like Caterpillar continued to lose ground. Meat producer Tyson became the latest company to cut its profit projections and point to tariffs.The S&P 500 lost 16.22 points, or 0.6 percent, at 2,802.60, and the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 144.23 points, or 0.6 percent, to 25,306.83.The Nasdaq compos-ite has more technology stocks among its ranks, and it fell 107.41 points, or 1.4 percent, to 7,630. The Nasdaq has fallen at least 1 percent for three days in a row, which hadnt happened in three years.Smaller companies fared as badly as larger ones. The Russell 2000 index slid 10.21 points, or 0.6 percent, to 1,653.13.Twitter dropped 8 percent to $31.38, extending its 20.5 percent plunge on Friday. Facebook fell another 2.2 percent to $171.06. Netflix, which reported weak subscriber growth in early July, fell 5.7 per-cent to $334.96. Even with its recent tumble, the technology sector of the S&P 500 is up almost 26 percent over the last year. The S&P 500 itself is up a bit more than 13 percent over that time.Energy companies climbed as the price of benchmark U.S. oil spurted higher by 2.1 percent to $70.13 a barrel. Brent crude, the international standard, rose 0.9 percent to $74.97 a barrel in London.Wholesale gasoline lost 0.1 percent to $2.16 a gallon. Heating oil gained 0.7 percent to $2.17 a gallon. Natu-ral gas rose 0.5 percent to $2.80 per 1,000 cubic feet.Tech stumbles; indexes plungeBy Martin CrutsingerThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ The Federal Reserve will meet this week to assess an economy that has just enjoyed a healthy spurt of growth but faces a flurry of trade fights pushed by President Donald Trump that could imperil that growth over time.If those concerns werent enough, Trump has openly expressed his displeasure at the Feds interest rate increases „ something no president has done publicly in more than two decades.No one expects the Fed to announce a rate increase when its latest policy meeting ends Wednesday. But the central bank is widely expected to set the stage for tightening credit again in September for a third time this year and then likely raise rates once again by December. This years rate increases follow three hikes in 2017 and one each in 2015 and 2016.The central banks rate increases „ to a still-low level „ reflect the economys resilience and are intended to prevent growth from overheating or infla-tion from accelerating too high. But higher rates make borrowing costlier for con-sumers and businesses and can weigh down stock prices. Trump has made clear he has little patience for the Feds efforts to restrain the economy to control inflation.Tightening now hurts all that we have done,Ž Trump tweeted earlier this month, a day after he said in a television interview that he was not happyŽ with the Feds rate increases.Some of Trumps economic advisers, notably Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, have tried to strike a reassuring note that the White House doesnt want to interfere with the Feds policymaking.We as an administra-tion absolutely support the independence of the Fed, and the president has made it clear that this is the Feds decision,Ž Mnuchin said on Fox News Sunday.Ž The market expects interest rates to keep going up. So, the only question is how far and for how long? And we think the Fed will be very careful in managing the economy.ŽThe administrations message is that although borrowing rates remain historically low, tighter credit could eventually imperil an economy that grew at a brisk 4.1 percent annual rate in the April-June quarter, the government estimated Friday. Unemployment is at a low 4 percent.But there is worry, too, reflected in periodic sinking spells in financial markets, often involving developments in the Trump-led trade war, which has resulted in puni-tive tariffs on billions of dollars of U.S. and foreign goods. Staying putBy Candice ChoiThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ McDon-alds is fighting to hold onto customers as the Big Mac turns 50, but it isnt changing the makings of its most famous burger.The company is cele-brating the 1968 national launch of the doubledecker sandwich whose ingredients of two all-beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions and a sesame seed bunŽ were seared into American memories by a TV jingle. But the milestone comes as the company reduces its number of U.S. stores. McDonalds said Thurs-day that customers are visiting less often. Other trendy burger options are reaching into the heartland.The Golden ArchesŽ still have a massive global reach, and the McDonalds brand of cheeseburgers, chicken nuggets and french fries remains recognizable around the world. But on its critical home turf, the company is toiling to stay relevant. Kale now appears in salads, fresh has replaced frozen beef patties in Quarter Pounders, and some stores now offer ordering kiosks, food delivery and barista-style cafes.The milestone for the Big Mac shows how much McDonalds and the rest of fast-food have evolved around it. Clearly, weve gotten a little more sophisticated in our menu develop-ment,Ž McDonalds CEO Steve Easterbrook said in a phone interview.As with many of its popular and long-lasting menu items, the idea for the Big Mac came from a franchisee.In 1967, Michael James JimŽ Delligatti lobbied the company to let him test the burger at his Pittsburgh restaurants.Later, he acknowledged the Big Macs similarity to a popular sandwich sold by the Big Boy chain.This wasnt like discovering the light bulb. The bulb was already there. All I did was screw it in the socket,Ž Delligatti said, according to Behind the Arches.ŽMcDonalds agreed to let Delligatti sell the sandwich at a single loca-tion, on the condition that he use the companys standard bun. It didnt work. Delligatti tried a bigger sesame seed bun, and the burger soon lifted sales by more than 12 percent.After similar results at more stores, the Big Mac was added to the national menu in 1968. Other ideas from franchi-sees that hit the big time include the Filet-O-Fish, Egg McMuffin, Apple Pie (once deep-fried but now baked), and the Shamrock Shake.The company has benefited from the inge-nuity of its small business men,Ž wrote Ray Kroc, who transformed the McDonalds into a global franchise, in his book, Grinding It Out.ŽFranchisees still play an important role, driving the recent switch to fresh from frozen for the beef in Quarter Pounders, Easterbrook says. 50 years on, McDonalds and fast-food evolve around Big Mac BRIEFCASESPRINGDALE, ARK.Tyson cites tariffs in cutting earnings outlookTyson Foods is citing higher tariffs and uncertainty about trade policies in cut-ting its profit forecast.The Springdale, Arkansas-based com-pany said Monday the tariffs are primarily affecting chicken and pork prices, in the U.S. and elsewhere. President Donald Trump has imposed tariffs on a range of goods, and China retaliated with tariffs on U.S. exports.Tariffs on steel and aluminum have pres-sured automakers, and General Motors also cut its outlook for the year.Tyson Foods Inc. says it now expects adjusted earnings of about $5.70 to $6 for the year. It pre-viously expected $6.55 to $6.70 per share. CEO Tom Hayes said chang-ing global trade policies here and abroadŽ and the uncertainty of any resolutionŽ contributed to lower prices and an oversupply. Caterpillar has a big 2Q, raises outlook againCaterpillars second-quarter easily beat Wall Street expectations thanks in part to the blistering pace of construction and demand for big machines, a the company boosted its full-year earnings forecast again.Shares rose more than 3 percent Monday in premarket trading.Caterpillar now antic-ipates full-year adjusted earnings in a range of $11 to $12 per share. The Associated Press Fed is set to leave rates alone as trade war raises anxiety BUSINESS President Donald Trump walks Sunday on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, after returning via Marine One. The Federal Reserve will meet this week to assess an economy that has just enjoyed a healthy spurt of growth but faces a ” urry of trade “ ghts pushed by Trump that could imperil that growth over time. [SUSAN WALSH/ ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO]

PAGE 15

** Washington County News | Wednesday, August 1, 2018 B3 SCHOOLS & SOCIETY CROSSWORDStaff ReportParents can stock up on clothing and school supplies the first weekend in August tax free. The back-to-school sales tax holiday, passed by the Florida legislature and signed into law by Gov. Rick Scott, will begin 12:01 a.m. Friday, Aug. 3 and end at 11:59 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 5. During the tax-free weekend, sales tax will not be collected on certain school supplies for $15 or less per item, as well as, clothing, footwear and certain accessories selling for $60 or less per item. Excluded items are briefcases, suitcases and other garment bags, watches, jewelry, umbrellas, handkerchiefs, skis, swim fins, roller blades and skates. For a complete list, visit floridarevenue. com.Tax-free weekend begins August 3By Melissa EricksonMore Content NowHow families react to childrens performance in school can have lasting consequences on a childs development and self-esteem, according to experts. What should a parent do when one child is a better student? In some ways its complicated, and parents perceptions are not always accurate,Ž said Alexander Jensen, assistant professor at Brigham Young Universitys School of Family Life. In a 2015 study, Jensen asked parents which of their children was better at schoolwork. Turns out, parents believed their firstborn was smarter „ unless the firstborn was a son and the second was a daughter. In that case, the daughter was deemed smarter. Between two siblings of the same sex, parents believed the firstborn was smarter. Between female and male siblings, parents on average believed girls were smarter in school regardless of birth order. While the study didnt ask why, it may have been that parents conflate age with natural ability. Then, theres the gender issue,Ž Jensen said. Parents tend to view older siblings as more capable, but on average older siblings are not doing better in school than their younger siblings.Ž Regardless of whos smarter, the social comparison of grades between siblings has negative implications for kids. Its linked to depression, increased fighting,Ž Jensen said. Parents should minimize comparisons as much as possible, he said. Children are vigilant in comparisons, and it can backfire and be a negative. Parents need to be aware of that,Ž said Susan McHale, distinguished professor of human development and family studies, professor of demography and director of the Social Science Research Institute at Pennsylvania State University. A child can be smart, but if a brother or sister is seen as smarter, that can have implications as far as future goals and plans, their sense of self, and it can affect their everyday performance,Ž she said. When a child is seen to be second-best (or thirdor fourth-) academically, she may withdraw rather than compete, McHale said. Instead she focuses her efforts toward a different way to compete: If one child is the smart one,Ž another may be the sporty oneŽ or the musical oneŽ or the one on the debate team.Ž It minimizes opportunities, and you really want to avoid this,Ž McHale said. Parents need to help kids see beyond whos getting better grades. Pick and praise Focus on what the less better-performing child is doing right versus wrong, so to speak,Ž said licensed marriage and family therapist Lisa Bahar. They are excelling at something „ figure that out and nurture it. Focus on their character development versus performance. Build them up on their attributes from small to big things. Remember their actions in the past that had a positive effect on the family and you.Ž All kids have different strengths, and they need to hear their parents recognize them for it, Jensen said. Praise e ort, not achievement Parents should praise a childs effort rather than the outcome,Ž such as grades, Jensen said. That will make the grade comparison conversation come up less often, he said. Work effort is something that all children can change, while top grades are not always achievable for all students. Reinforce kids for what theyre doing. If their work ethic is terrific, tell them,Ž McHale said. Motivate positively Parents may think comparing grades will spur kids to do better, but its not effective. It may generate motivation, but the longterm effects are mostly negative,Ž Bahar said. Remember that youre the parent of more than one child, McHale said. Both kids hear what you say to them and their siblings, and that gives them a sense of who they are. Its hard for parents to not notice or think about differences between their children; its only natural,Ž Jensen said. But to help all children succeed, parents should focus on recognizing the strengths of each of their children and be careful about vocally making comparisons in front of them.Ž [FREEPIK.COM]August2: First Day for Teachers/ Paras/10 Month Personnel (Professional Development Day) 3: Professional Development Day 6-9: Pre-Planning Days (Teachers/Paras/10 Month Personnel) 10: First Day of School for StudentsSeptember3: Labor Day (Students and All Personnel Out) 10: Progress Reports Go Out 11: Recognition of "Patriot Day" at Schools 17: Recognition of "Constitution Day" at Schools 24-28: Recognition of "Celebrate Freedom Week" at Schools 26: Early Release/Professional Development (Students Released at 1 p.m.)October12: Vernon High School Homecoming 15-16: Fall Break (Students/Teachers/Paras/10 Month and Lunchroom Personnel/Bus Drivers Out) 19: Chipley High School Homecoming 30: Report Cards Go Out 31: Early Release/Professional Development (Students Released at 1 p.m.)November9: Recognition of Veterans Chipley and Vernon Schools 13: Progress Reports Go Out 19-23: Thanksgiving Holidays (Students/Teachers/Paras/ 10 Month and Lunchroom Personnel/ Bus Drivers Out) 21-23: Thanksgiving Holidays (12 Month Personnel Out)December21: Early Release (Students Released at 1 p.m.) 24-31: Christmas Break (Students/Teachers/ Paras/10 Month Personnel and Lunchroom Personnel/ Bus Drivers Out) 24-25: 12 Month Personnel Out 31: 12 Month Personnel OutJanuary 20191: 12 Month Personnel Out 1-3: Teachers/10 Month Personnel Out 1-4: Students/Lunchroom Personnel/Bus Drivers Out 4: Teachers Planning Day 7: Classes Resume 21: Martin Luther King Day (Students and All Personnel Out) 23: Report Cards Go OutFebruary7: Progress Reports Go Out 13: Early Release/Professional Development (Students Released at 1 p.m.) 18: Presidents Day (Students/Teachers/Paras/ 10 Month and Lunchroom Personnel/ Buss Drivers Out)March6: Early Release/Professional Development (Students Released at 1 p.m.) 25-29: Spring Break (Students and All Personnel Out)April9: Report Cards Go Out 19: Spring Day (Students/ Teachers/Paras/10 Month and Lunchroom Personnel/ Bus Drivers Out) 23: Progress Reports Go OutMay7: FPTC Graduation 21: Vernon High School Senior Awards 5:30 p.m. 21: Chipley High School Senior Awards 7:30 p.m. 23: Vernon High School Graduation 24: Last Day of School (Students Released at 1 p.m.)2018 … 2019 WASHINGTON COUNTY SCHOOL CALENDARTrivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@ TriviaGuy.com 1. Who notably left $2,500 for a farewell party, So my friends can have a ball after Im gone.Ž? Janis Joplin, Judy Garland, Tammy Wynette, Dinah Shore 2. Since 1984, what is the most commonly recurring category on TVs Jeopardy!Ž? Potpourri, Colleges & Universities, Literature, Before & After 3. In the 1900 Sears, Roebuck and Co. catalog, how much did a piano cost? $48, $98, $148, $198 4. The 1974 biography Shooting StarŽ was about whose life story? Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, John Wayne, Randolph Scott 5.What boxers powerful right hand was nicknamed Suzi-QŽ? Bob Curry, Joe Louis, Rocky Marciano, Jack Dempsey 6. Whose secret identity is Oliver Queen? Blue Beetle, Spider-man, Green Arrow, The Flash ANSWERS: 1. Janis Joplin, 2. Before & After (Jeopardy began in 1964), 3. $98, 4. John Wayne, 5. Rocky Marciano, 6. Green ArrowTRIVIA GUY W i l s o n C a s e y Wilson Casey When one child is a better student

PAGE 16

** B4 Wednesday, August 1, 2018 | Washington County News FAITHIf you would like your Washington County church listed here, please send information to: news@chipleypaper.com. Due to space limitation, please only send regular church services. For special services, please send separate submission. Assembly of GodCorbin Road Assembly of God Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 105 Corbin Road in Chipley. Cords of Love Assembly of God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study is a 6:30 p.m. The church is at 2060 Bethlehem Road in Cottondale. Grace Assembly of God @ Chipley Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 567 North Main Street, Chipley New Bethany Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Shaky Joe Road just off Hig hway 280 at Hinsons Crossroads. New Life Fellowship Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 695 5th Street, Chipley. Wausau Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 3537 Washington Street in Wausau.BaptistAbigail Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located on Dawkins Street in Vernon. Berean Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1438 Nearing Hills Drive in Chipley. Blue Lake Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 1405 Blue Lake Road in Chipley. Chipley First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship Service is at 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship Service is at 10:30 a.m. Discipleship Training is at 5 p.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday AWANA is at 5:15 p.m. Wednesday, Prayer Meeting Is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1300 South Boulevard Country Oaks Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 574 Buckhorn Blvd. Eastside Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at Hig hway 277 in Vernon. First Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1387 South Boulevard. Gap Pond Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 1980 Gap Boulevard in Sunny Hills. Grace Baptist Chapel Mission Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:50 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 440 Lot E Second Street, Chipley. Holmes Creek Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service AWANA is at 5:30 p.m. and Bible Study is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 335 Cope Road in Chipley. Holyneck Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located 3395 Cemetery Lane, Campbellton. Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 614 Bennett Drive in Chipley. Mt. Ararat Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1233 Old Bonifay Road in Chipley. New Orange Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located on Alford Road in Washington County. New Prospect Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship services are at 11 a.m. Sunday evening services are at 5 p.m. Wednesday services supper is at 5 p.m. Wednesday prayer meeting, bible study and childrens classes start at 5:45. The church is located at 761 New Prospect Road in Chipley. Oakie Ridge Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Orange Hill Road and Gilberts Mill Road. Orange Hill Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday prayer and Bible Study is as 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3485 Gainer Road in Chipley. Orange Hill Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship on the “ rst and third Sunday of the month is at 11 a.m. Wednesday night prayer meeting is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 816 Sunday Road in Chipley. Piney G rove Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1783 Piney Grove R oad south of Chipley. Pleasant Hill Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located south of Bonifay at 1900 Pleasant Hill Road. Poplar Springs Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1098 Lovewood Road two miles east of Highway 77. Poplar Head Independent Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located on Poplar Head Road. Sand Hills Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 6758 Highway 77. Shiloh Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 5:45 p.m. The church is located on Hig hway 277, three miles south of Hig hway 90 in Chipley. Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:15 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 3013 Moss Hill Road in Vernon. St. John Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. St. Matthews Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 4156 St. Matthews Road in Caryville. Salem Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Worship service is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Church is at 2555 Kynesville Highway in Alford. Sunny Hills First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Unity Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3274 River Road in Vernon.WASHINGTON COUNTY CHURCH LISTINGSSee CHURCHES, B6

PAGE 17

** Washington County News | Wednesday, August 1, 2018 B5 OBITUARIESJohn D. Coomer Jr., 94, of London, Ohio formerly of Bonifay, FL, died Friday, July 20, 2018 in London Health and Rehab. Born October 22, 1923 in Lindsay, CA; he was the oldest son of the late John D. and Anna (Lloyd) Coomer. After serving his country in WWII and Korea, John retired from the US Army in 1965 and after returning to college, he then worked as a social worker for the Ohio Department of Corrections. He was a life member of the American Legion, Disabled American Veterans and the Masonic lodge. He was preceded in death by his wife Evelyn Coomer in 2002; brothers George W., Fred D., Harold D. and Billy Joe Coomer; sisters Carol Hansen and Neva Nell Dupler and several brothers and sisters in law. Survivors include his children David L. (Elizabeth) Coomer of NC, Vicki (Ray) Skidmore of London and Cindi (Tim) Price of Grove City; numerous grandchildren, greatgrandchildren and two great-great grandchildren plus one on the way; brother Edward (Margaret) Coomer of Cincinnati, sisters Constance SisŽ Petty of Louisville, KY, Mary Lou Inman of Cincinnati and Bobbie Jean Dickson of Columbus; many nieces and nephews and dear friends Dot and Betty. Funeral services will were held 11 AM Tuesday, July 24 in the EBERLE-FISHER FUNERAL HOME AND CREMATORY, 103 N. Main Street, London, Ohio with Rev. J.D. Coomer officiating. Interment followed at Oak Hill Cemetery, London, Ohio. Friends called at the funeral home from 4-8 PM Monday. Online condolences for the family may be sent to www. eberlefisherfuneral home.com.JOHN D. COOMER JR.Wendell Riley Hall, 70, of Cypress died Wednesday, July 25, 2018 at Bay Medical Specialty Care in Panama City. Wendell was born March 16, 1948 in Calhoun County. He spent most of his life in Jackson County, retiring as an automotive paint and body technician. Mr. Hall served in the U.S. Army, Stationed at Fort Sherman in the Panama Canal Zone training as a jungle expert boat operator. He was preceded in death by his parents, Buford Hall and Alma Mayo Hall; paternal grandparents, George and Harvie Hill; maternal grandparents, Robert and Willie Mayo. Survivors include his children, Rebecca Shafer Stout of Rochester, NY, Jason Hall of Bushnell; Jamie (Peewee) Hall of Jacksonville; Wendy Hall Short of Virginia and Andy Robinson of Texas. Nineteen grandchildren; one sister, Billie Faye Rogers and husband Curtis three brothers, Leon Hall and wife Barbara, Donnie Hall and wife Pat and Obie Hall. Funeral services were held at 11 am Monday, July 30, 2018 at James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel. Interment followed at Cypress Cemetery with James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel directing. The family received friends from 10 am Monday at James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel until funeral time.WENDELL R. HALLJimmie Ivery Jr., of Tallahassee, Florida, went home to be with the Lord on Monday, July 23, 2018 in the Consulate Health Care of Tallahassee, Florida. He was 69 years old and a native of Chipley, Florida. Jimmie was born on April 19, 1949 to the late Jimmie Ivery, Sr. and Maggie (Hodges) Ivery in Fayetteville, North Carolina. He was of the Christian faith and a member of the Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church in Tallahassee, Florida. Jimmie was employed and retired with Florida State University as a Building Maintenance Supervisor for over 30 years. He later became a Chef at the Western Sizzle Steak House in Tallahassee, Florida. He leaves to cherish his memories his beloved wife of 50 years: Eria Ivery of Tallahassee, Florida; four (4) daughters: Kimberly (Adrian) Andrews of Havana, Florida, Monica (Keith) Clayton, Sherri Brown, both of Tallahassee, Florida, and Shareika (Charles) Reed of Seffner, Florida; one (1) son: Jimmie Ivery III, of Tampa, Florida; 11 grandchildren; two (2) sisters: Shirley (Harry) Meek and Joyce (Johnny) Ivery-Lester, both of Boynton Beach, Florida; two (2) brothers: Washington (Dee) Ivery of Lake Worth, Florida, and Wayne (Barbara) Ivery of Tallahassee, Florida; mother-in-law: Minnie Bullock of Chipley, Florida; a special aunt: Frances Hodge; 2 sisters-in-law, 5 brothers-in-law, and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins, other relatives and friends. A Celebration of Jimmies Life was held at 11 AM EST, Saturday, July 28, 2018 from the sanctuary of the Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church of Tallahassee, Florida with pastor, Rev. Joseph Wright, Bishop Titus B. Deas, Jr., Rev. LaNorris D. McFadden, Rev. Edward Butler, and Rev. Carl Bullock, officiating. Committal Services were held approx. at 2:30 PM CST in the Northside Cemetery of Chipley, Florida with Cooper Funeral Home of Chipley, Florida, directing. The family received friends on Friday, July 27, 2018 from 6-8 PM CST in the Cooper Funeral Home Chapel. The remains were in repose at the church on Saturday 2hrs. prior to services. Friends may sign the guestbook online at www.cooperfhchipley. com.JIMMIE IVERY JR.James L. Sellers age 60, a resident of Westville, Florida passed away July 18, 2018 at Flowers Hospital in Dothan, Alabama. James was born in Arkansas to Leonard Sellers and Floy Patterson Sellers. He was a retired truck driver and mechanic. He enjoyed NASCAR Racing and woodworking. James is survived by his wife Rebecca Sellers; daughters, Teresa Donaldson, Krystina Hunter and Elaina Cogburn; 9 grandchildren and 3 great grandchildren; 2 sisters, Brenda Carter, Vivian Hummell and a brother William Sellers, Jr. A loving husband, father, grandfather and brother. A celebration of live ceremony will be held in August 2018. Friends and family will be notified.JAMES L. SELLERS Arnett Billy Warr, age 80, passed from this life Wednesday, July 25, 2018, at his home. He was born in Ozona, Texas on September 27, 1937, to Arnett Charles and Ida Kate Worrell Warr. Billy worked as a truck driver, and was a veteran of the United States Air Force. He is preceded in death by his parents. Billy is survived by his children: Billy Dale Warr, Debbie Barreto, David Warr, John R. Warr, and Renee Otto; his brother, Jimmy Warr; and eight grandchildren. The funeral service was held at the graveside at Pleasant Hill Baptist Church, in Sardis Alabama, at 12:00 P.M., Monday, July 30, 2018. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net.ARNETT B. WARRMr. Fred Doyle Wilson of Bonifay, FL went home to be with the Lord, Sunday, July 22, 2018 at his home surrounded by his loving family. He was 79. Mr. Wilson was born December 28, 1938 in Holmes County to the late Coley and Lillie Mae Mattox Wilson. Fred loved spending time outdoors, tending his cattle and horses, hunting and fishing. He also enjoyed sports, especially high school basketball and was an avid Florida Gator fan. Mr. Wilson was a great man of faith, loved people and never met a stranger. Above all else Fred loved his family and enjoyed spending time with them. He will be dearly missed by all who knew and loved him. In addition to his parents; siblings: Helen Bailey, Rayford Adkins, Evelyn Lumpkin, Millard Wilson, Coley Wilson Jr., Eunice KoonceŽ Smith, Oveal Lyman, Bill Wilson, Jack Wilson, Bob Wilson and Sonny Wilson all preceded him in death. Survivors include his wife, Virginia Lockamy Wilson; daughters: Renee Trammell (Kirk) and Lori Wilson; sons: Ted Wilson and Darren Wilson; granddaughter, Torrie Wilson; grandson, Keston Trammell (Amanda); greatgranddaughter, Lainey Trammell; great grandson, Crosby Trammell; a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and other extended family and friends. A Celebration of Life Service was held at 10:00 a.m. on Friday, July 27, 2018 at Carmel Assembly of God Church, 1485 Carmel Church Road, Bonifay, FL 32425, with Rev. Jerry Moore and Rev. Johnathan West officiating. Burial followed in the church cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home of Slocomb directing. The family received friends at Carmel Assembly of God Church on Thursday from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m.FRED D. WILSON Jewel KatrineŽ Bush SmithDillon, 68, of Lake Placid; wife of the late Kevin Dillon, went home to be with her Lord on Thursday evening July 19, 2018 at Florida Hospital Orlando. Katrine was born as one of ten siblings to Ms. Jewel Walker Bush and Broward Bush January 19, 1950 in Jackson County, Fl. Her family came to Lake Placid in 1960. She moved to Bonifay, where she married, had one child, and remained 20 years. In Bonifay she farmed as well as owned /operated a country store and game room. Upon return to Lake Placid, she discovered her passion for nursing and became a Certified Nursing Assistant. After several fun years in Ft. Myers she retired to Lake Placid. Her pastimes included antiquing, gardening, fishing, family joking/ pranking, cat rescue and volunteering with the American Legion Auxiliary. She was feisty, funny, kind and generous. Her large family was everything to her! They were also each others best friends. She LIVED to dote on her loved ones, especially her son, grandchildren and great-grandson. Katrine is survived by her loving son Clinton Smith (Bobbie) and grandchildren Cody (Megan), Morgan Meagan and Zachary Smith; great-grandson Alistair Smith; along with stepson Jeff Dillon and step grandchildren Alyssa Mallory and Blake Dillon; as well as brothers, Robert Bush (Helen), Charles Walker; devoted brothers-in-law Martin Mackay and Donald Smith; dear friends Cheryl Taylor and Debbie Edwards, many adoring extended family members and beloved kitties Cuddles, Trouble, Hitty, Nemo and Fergis. Katrine was preceded in death by siblings Winnie Irene JeanŽ Smith, Bill Bush, James Bush, Francis Bush, Tommy Bush, Harry Bush, Maureen Wittwer and Judy Mackay. As well as former husband William Robert Smith. A service to celebrate her life was held at 11:00 AM, Saturday, July 28, 2018 at the Scott Funeral Home 504 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid with Pastor Melinda Brown officiating. Graveside services took place 11:00 AM, Saturday, August 4, 2018 at the Brown-Bush and Tindell Cemetery in Graceville, FL. Words of comfort to the family can be made by visiting www. scottfuneralservices. com. Arrangements entrusted with the Scott Funeral Home, Lake Placid, 863-465-4134.JEWEL KATRINE B. DILLONMrs. Beulah Mae Wright, age 92, of Vernon, Florida passed away July 20, 2018 at Northwest Florida Community Hospital in Chipley, Florida. She was born July 3, 1926 in Edmonton, Kentucky. Mrs. Wright was preceded in death by her father, Robert Garmon, her mother, Esta Hubbard Garmon and one sister, Dorothy Garmon and one half-sister, Lillie Mae Garmon Barkley. Mrs. Wright is survived by one daughter, Judith Patricia Bilick and husband Timothy of Bonifay, FL; one son, Gail Allen Sparks and wife Lynn of Jacksonville, FL; one brother, Bill Garmon of TX; one grandchild, three greatgrandchildren and six great-great-grandchildren. Funeral serviceswere held at 2:00 PM Wednesday, July 25, 2018, in the Peel Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. Eugene Skipper officiating. Anatomical donationfollowed after the service. The family received friends one hour prior to the service.BEULAH M. WRIGHT CONTINUED ON B6

PAGE 18

** B6 Wednesday, August 1, 2018 | Washington County NewsPatricia Eileen Davis, age 75, passed from this life Sunday, July 22, 2018 at Doctors Memorial Hospital in Bonifay, FL. She was born in Johnstown, PA on January 17, 1943 to Melvin and Ruth (Shaner) Jones. Patricia was a homemaker for her family and a member of the First Baptist Church in Chipley, FL. She is preceded in death by her parents and her husband James Walter Davis. Patricia is survived by her son; Brian James Davis and wife Melanie, two daughters; Amy Cutts and husband B.D. and Lisa Bross and husband Jeffrey, one brother; Melvin Jones Jr. and 4 grandchildren. A memorial service will held at a later date in Pennsylvania. In lieu of flowers, donations are to be sent to a missionary team that Patricia deeply cared for: Send International P.O. Box 513 Farmington, MI 48332, for David and Sharon Bezel #113009. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh.netPATRICIA E. DAVISMr. Randell Fulford, age 85, of Bonifay, FL, passed away July 24, 2018 at Bonifay Nursing & Rehab Center. A native of Florida, he was born in Bonifay July 2, 1933. He was preceded in death by his father, Rannie Fulford; his mother, Lula Mae Crosby Fulford Webb; his wife, Bonnie Fulford; and one one brother, Charles Webb. Mr. Fulford was survived by two sisters; Betty Sims of Bonifay and Shirley Purvis of Hartford, AL; and one brother, Glenn Webb and wife Jackie of Bonifay; along with several nieces and nephews. A Graveside Service was held July 27, 2018 Friday 3:00 Pm in the Bonifay Cemetery. Rev. Ike Steverson will officiate with Peel Funeral Home directing.RANDELL FULFORDMartha Ann Giddiens, age of 78 of Chipley died on Thursday, July 26, 2018. Memorialization will be by cremation. Williams Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements.MARTHA A. GIDDIENS OBITUARIES |CONTINUED FROM B5 Vernon First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 2888 Church Street in Vernon. Wausau First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 3493 Washington Street in Wausau.CatholicSt. Joseph The Worker Catholic Church Sunday Mass is at 11 a.m. Tuesday Mass is at 9 a.m. The church is located at 1664 Main Street in Chipley. St. Theresa Catholic Church Sunday Mass is at 9 a.m. Monday through Friday Mass is at 8 a.m. Saturday Mass is at 5 p.m. Adoration is the “ rst Friday after 8 a.m. Mass. The church is located at 2071 Sunny Hills Blvd and the Rectory is located at 2056 Sunny Hills Boulevard in Sunny Hills.Church of ChristChipley Church of Christ Sunday morning bible study is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1295 Brickyard Road in Chipley. Spirit-Filled Church of God in Christ Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Tuesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 2128 Pate Pond Road in Caryville.EpiscopalGrant Tabernacle AME Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 577 Martin Luther King Boulevard in Chipley. St. John AME Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. St. Joseph AME Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1401 Monroe Shef“ eld Road, Chipley. St. Luke African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME) Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located on Jackson Community Road. St. Mary African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME) Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 1035 St. Mary CHURCHESFrom Page B4 See CHURCHES, B7By American Heart Association Its the time of year when temperatures soar, and sometimes to deadly effect, especially for the elderly and very young. Already this year, sweltering days have proved dangerous as heat waves smother parts of the world. At least 70 people reportedly died this summer from scorching heat and humidity that hit eastern and central Canada, while more than 40 people died in Japan. More than 600 people die every year from heatrelated illnesses that are preventable, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The agency estimates more than 65,000 Americans visit an emergency room for acute heat illness each summer. I think people underestimate how quickly it happens. And when it starts to happen, if someone is progressing to heat exhaustion or heat stroke, you lose your selfawareness,Ž said Dr. Robert OConnor, professor and chair of emergency medicine at the University of Virginia. Its important to keep an eye on those around you for heatrelated problems. If someone is flushed, dizzy or uncoordinated, it can be an early sign.Ž Dehydration can begin within just a few hours of extreme heat, so drinking extra fluids is important, especially when taking certain medications. Fatigue, headaches, muscle cramps, dizziness, sleepiness and dry mouth can all be signs of dehydration. Dehydration causes the heart to work harder, putting it at risk. Hydration helps the heart more easily pump blood through the blood vessels to the muscles. And it helps the muscles work efficiently. A 2016 Environmental Protection Agency analysis of heat-related deaths said high temps could be a factor in many more deaths than officials realize … or count. By studying how daily death rates vary with temperature in selected cities, scientists have found that extreme heat contributes to far more deaths than the official death certificates might suggest,Ž the report said. This is because the stress of a hot day can increase the chance of dying from a heart attack, other heart conditions, or respiratory diseases such as pneumonia.Ž While infants and the elderly are more vulnerable to problems from heat, OConnor said sometimes medicines can make someone more sensitive to heat and dehydration. They should talk to their doctor and look up their medications to see if it predisposes them,Ž he said. Heat exhaustion and heat stroke are serious medical emergencies that require treatment. Both can cause headaches, nausea or vomiting. Heat stroke also can cause a high fever, warm skin with no sweating and confusion or unconsciousness. Beyond some of the obvious and sometimes extreme physical symptoms brought on by sweltering temperatures, a recent study showed it could affect how we think. And it doesnt just affect the most vulnerable. A group of Harvard researchers published an observational study in July showing students who lived in dormitories without air conditioning during a heat wave performed worse on a series of cognitive tests compared with students who lived in air-conditioned dorms. The study was conducted over 12 consecutive days in the summer of 2016. Students in buildings without AC experienced 13.4 percent longer reaction times on color-word tests, and 13.3 percent lower scores on addition/subtraction tests compared with students in air-conditioned rooms. The research showed students in rooms with AC were not just faster in their responses, but also more accurate. Hot summers and heat waves wont be going away any time soon, according to federal research. In fact, unusually high temperatures have become more common in recent decades, and heat waves are expected to become longer, more frequent and more intense in the future, according to the EPA and the CDC. OConnor said thinking ahead and being prepared in the heat will help prevent trouble. Drink plenty of fluids and limit the amount of time you are in the heat,Ž he said. Even if someone comes into a cooler environment for a few minutes every hour, that can prevent a heat-related illness. Limit outdoor activity to early morning or late evening, and stay in the shade,Ž OConnor said. It might be tough if you are working outside or on the golf course. Soak a towel in cold water and put it around your neck. Evaporative cooling, dousing in cold water and letting it evaporate, is the best way to eliminate heat.Ž600More than 600 people die every year from heat-related illnesses that are preventable, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 65,000The agency estimates more than 65,000 Americans visit an emergency room for acute heat illness each summer. BIGSTOCKWatch out for heat stroke HEALTHHow to protect your heart and health during the sweltering days of summer

PAGE 19

** Washington County News | Wednesday, August 1, 2018 B7 8-3488 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County Commissioners in and for Washington County, Florida, will consider a proposed Ordinance to be titled as follows: AN ORDINANCE OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AMENDING SECTION 62-52 AND 62-53 OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The passage of the proposed Ordinance will be considered by the Board of County Commissioners, at their regular meeting at 9:00 A. M., C.S.T., on Thursday, the 23rd day of August, 2018, at the County Commission Boardroom, 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, Florida. A copy of the proposed Ordinance can be inspected by the public at the County Commissioners Office, 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, Florida. All interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. WITNESS my Hand and Official Seal, this the 24th day of July, 2018. Lora C. Bell LORA C. BELL, Washington County Clerk August 1, 2018 8-3492 CITY OF CHIPLEY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Chipley City Council will conduct a PUBLIC HEARING regarding adoption of the following ordinance on Tuesday, August 14, 2018 at 6:00 p.m., at the City Hall Council Chambers, 1442 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida. ORDINANCE NO. 952 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CHIPLEY, FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY; PROVIDING FOR AN AMENDMENT TO PART II, CHAPTER 3 OF THE CITY CODE, ENTITLED ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGESŽ; PROVIDING FOR REGULATIONS OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS; PROVIDING FOR DEFINITIONS; PROVIDING FOR RESTRICTIONS ON THE LOCATIONS OF THE SALE, SERVICE, AND CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS; PROVIDING FOR THE PROHIBITION OF THE SALE, SERVICE, AND CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES BY VENDORS OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES WITHIN CERTAIN HOURS OF THE DAY; PROVIDING FOR THE PROHIBITION OF THE SALE, SERVICE, AND CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES IN CERTAIN PUBLIC PLACES; PROVIDING FOR PENALTIES FOR VIOLATION; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICTS; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE This ordinance, if approved, will change the requirements for the sale of alcoholic beverages. All citizens and interested parties are encouraged to attend the public hearing and to provide written and/or verbal comments on the matter under consideration. Any person requiring a special accommodation at this hearing because of disability or physical impairments should contact the City at (850) 638-6350, 48 hours prior to the hearing. For further information pertaining to the proposed ordinance, contact Dan Miner, City Administrator August 1, 2018 8-3490 LEGAL AD Tri-County Community Council, Inc., Board of Directors will meet on Thursday, AUG 09, 2018 at 5:00 P.M., with Finance Committee meeting at 4:15 p.m. & Head Start Committee at 4:15 p.m. at McLains Restaurant located on 331 South in DeFuniak Springs. August 1, 2018 8-3494 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2017-CA-000129 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, v.DALE T. BURNETT A/K/A DALE THOMAS BURNETT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DALE T. BURNETT A/K/A DALE THOMAS BURNETT; LEISURE LAKES PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. F/K/A LEISURE LAKES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1; TENANT #2, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause, in the Circuit Court of WASHINGTON County, Florida, the Clerk of the Court will sell the property situated in WASHINGTON County, Florida described as: LOT A-160, LEISURE LAKES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 167, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 160 Partridge Place, Chipley, Florida 32428, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the front steps of the Courthouse located at 1293 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, FL 32428, on September 5, 2018, at 11:00 a.m. (CST) ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@jud14.flcour ts.org. Dated this July 26, 2018 LORA C. BELL Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk PLEASE PUBLISH THE ABOVE IN: Washington County News Invoice to: Robert M. Coplen, P.A., 10225 Ulmerton Rd. Suite 5A, Largo, FL 33771 Phone (727) 588-4550 foreclosure@coplenlaw.ne t Aug 1, 8, 2018 8-3497 Public Auction The following vehicles will be sold at Public Auction at Nichols Auto Repair and Towing @ 1146 Jackson Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 @ 8:00 AM on the following dates: August 10 3B7HC13Z5WG243999 1998 Dodge LJ4TCKPB18Y010863 2008 Shen August 17 1G1ZG57B48F245828 2008 Chev 1GYEC63NB6R118755 2006 Cadi August 1, 2018 8-3402 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given JAMES SLEDGE the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 11-00870 Year of Issuance 2011 Parcel 00-3238-0010 assessed to: MOREQUITY INC Description of Property 11 2 14 1.87 PARCEL DESC IN OR 297 P 458 All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such CertifiRoad, in Caryville. St. Matthews Episcopal Church Morning worship is at 9 a.m. The church is located on Highway 90 west in Chipley.EvangelisticVernon Evangelistic Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Hig hway 79 in Vernon. Caryville Evangelistic Center Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Wrights Creek Road in Caryville, just north of Highway 90.HolinessHarris Chapel Holiness Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located eight miles north of Caryville on Hig hway 179. Johnson Temple First Born Holiness Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. Friday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 793 Orange Street, Chipley. Miracle Valley Spirit of Holiness Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located 3754 Bunyon Drive, off Highway 77 near Sunny Hills.MethodistChipley First United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 9:50 a.m. Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. (contemporary service) and 11 a.m. (traditional service). The church is located at 1285 Jackson Avenue East Mount Zion United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday fellowship meal and Bible study is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1590 Hig hway 173 in Graceville. Lakeview United Methodist Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. Thursday morning Bible Study 9 a.m. The church is located on Highway 279 near Five Points. New Hope United Methodist Church Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study is at 10 a.m. The church is located at on Highway 79 in New Hope. New Vision United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday night supper is at 5:45. Wednesday Bible Study is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Hig hway 77 and BlockerChurch Road in Greenhead. Orange Hill United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located on Sunday Road just off Orange Hill Road. Vernon United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wausau United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located on State Road 77PentecostalHouse of Healing United Pentecostal Church Sunday School is at 1 p.m. Worship is at 2 p.m. Thursday Bible Study is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1816 Highway 90 in Chipley. Wausau Pentecostal Holiness Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 2201 Pioneer Road in Wausau. Rock Hill Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Friday Night Worship is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 339 Rockhill Church Road in Chipley. Trinity Pentecostal Tabernacle Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Turnin Point Home of the First United Pentecostal Church Sunday School is at 1 p.m. Worship Service is at 2 p.m. Bible Study Thursday is at 7 p.m.PresbyterianChipley First Presbyterian Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday, night sing-along is at 6 p.m. The church is at Fifth Street and Watts Avenue Sunny Hills Presbyterian Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. Sunday School is at 10:30 a.m. The church is located at 3768 Country Club BoulevardOtherBonnett Pond Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 2680 Bonnett Pond Road in Chipley. Christian Fellowship Center Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1458 Monroe Shef“ eld Road in Chipley. Christian Haven Sunday school is h at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Church of God by Faith Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:45 a.m. Tuesday service is at 7:30 p.m. The church is located at 3012 Church Street. Church of God of Prophecy Morning Worship is at 9:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1386 W. Jackson Avenue in Chipley. Courts of Praise Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 1720 Clayton Road in Chipley. Cypress Creek Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at1772 Macedonia Road. Faith Covenant Fellowship Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Hig hway 277 mile south of I-10. Family Worship Center Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located 531 Rock Hill Church Road, Chipley. Graceville Community Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 1005 E. Prim Avenue Grahams Chapel Morning worship at 11 a.m. Tuesday Bible Study at 7 p.m. The chapel is located ate 1218 Campbellton Avenue in Chipley. Hard Labor Creek Community Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1705 Pioneer Road three miles east of caution light. Holmes Valley Community Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 3550Fannig Branch Road in Vernon. House of Prayer Worship Center Sunday School and Children's Church is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Youth activities on Wednesday begin at 4:30 p.m. Praise and worship services are at 6:30 p.m. on Friday. The church is located at 763 West Boulevard in Chipley. Imp act Worship Center Sunday. Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Thursday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3006 New Hope Road Marianna. Liberty Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3983 Creek Road in Vernon. McQueens Temple First Born Church of Living God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 5681 Hig hway 79 South, Vernon. New Faith Temple Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 841 Orange Hill Road. New Foundation Fellowship Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located on Rock Hill Church Road. Northwest Florida Christian Church Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. The church is at 4465 Hig hway 77. Rhema Praise and Worship Center Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Thursday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located 763 West Boulevard in Chipley. Sunny Hills Chapel Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 4283 Hig hway 77. Pleasant G rove Church Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. The church is located at 2430 Shakey Joe Road in the Hinsons Crossroads Community. Tabernacle of Praise Church of God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located on Hig hway 77 South. The Living Word Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Hig hway 77 and Blocker Road in Greenhead. White Double Pond Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located on Creek Road in Vernon. Yes Lord Deliverance COGIC Sunday School is at 10:30 a.m. Worship is at noon. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 739 Seventh Street in Chipley. CHURCHESFrom Page B6

PAGE 20

B8| Washington County News Wednesday, August 1, 2018 NF-5036053 NF-5032797 3 3 NF-503 3 2797 2 2 2 Lawn Maint., Irrigation, Pressure Wash, Pavers & Paver Repair, Tree Trimming, Fertilization, Spring Clean-Ups, Etc.Arturo Luebano 2455 N Hwy. 81, Ponce De Leon, FL 32455 850.658.6189 arthurluebano@yahoo.comWe have been in business since 2007. We are licensed and insured. Luebano Lawn Service, LLC. (850) 638-3611 HastyHeating & Cooling NF-5028471 NF-5032729 C & CBookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE OR BUSINESS FOR AS LITTLE AS $10 A WEEK!*Reach thousands of potential customers with your Business Guide ad in the:WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS HOLMES COUNTY-TIMES ADVERTISER WEEKLY ADVERTISER CALL TODAY! 850-638-0212*Minimum 8-week contract. NF-5036305 NF-5032769 Hazardous Aerial Tree Removal € Stump Grinding Trimming & Pruning € Emergency Tree Service € Lot Clean UpDow Morris,Owner/Operator 850-527-6291 € 850-849-3825 is currently seekingFull Time Counselors, Case Managers, and Nursesto work with children and adults in Bay, Gulf, Calhoun, Jackson, Holmes and Washington Counties. For more details on these and other positions, please visit us online at: http://lmccares.org/careers/employment opportunities cate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk AUG 1,8,15,22,2018 8-3489 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County Commissioners in and for Washington County, Florida, will consider a proposed Ordinance to be titled as follows: AN ORDINANCE OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR THE SALE OF COUNTY OWNED REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The passage of the proposed Ordinance will be considered by the Board of County Commissioners, at their regular meeting at 9:00 A. M., C.S.T., on Thursday, the 23rd day of August, 2018, at the County Commission Boardroom, 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, Florida. A copy of the proposed Ordinance can be inspected by the public at the County Commissioners’ Office, 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, Florida. All interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. WITNESS my Hand and Official Seal, this the 24th day of July, 2018. Lora C. Bell LORA C. BELL, Washington County Clerk August 1, 2018 8-3403 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given JAMES SLEDGE the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 11-01916 Year of Issuance 2011 Parcel 00-5669-0113 assessed to: Roberto Reyes Sr & Jessica Reyes. Description of Property 26 3 16 2.50 ORB 706 P 253 LOT 13 CYPRESS CROSSING PLAT BK 5 PG 46-47All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk AUG 1,8,15,22,2018 8-3420 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given ETO FBO JANET H KINNEY IRA the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 11-00324 Year of Issuance 2011 Parcel 00-0836-0015 assessed to: BRANDON DEMMONS Description of Property 22 3 13 ORB 711 P 271 PARCEL DESC IN ORB 711 P 271 & EASEMENTAll of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk AUG 1,8,15,22,2018 8-3396 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given REEL PROPERTIES LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 11-00601 Year of Issuance 2011 Parcel 00-2563-0004 assessed to: LUTHER AND MARY HILTY Description of Property 20 5 13 14 OR 339 P 252 W2 OF NW4 OF NE4 LESS BEG SWC OF NW4 OF NE4, RUN N 417.4 FT, E 626.1 FT, S417.4 FT, W 626.1 FT TO POB All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk AUG 1,8,15,22,2018 8-3395 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given HENRY MATTESON the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 14-00-02136 Year of Issuance 2014 Parcel 04-0149-0002 assessed to: MCQUAGGE REAL ESTATE HOLDINGS LLC Description of Property SUNNY HILLS UNIT #4 LOT 2 ORB 544 P 205 BLK 0149 All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk AUG 1,8,15,22,2018 8-3422 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given REI HOLDINGS the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 11-02753 Year of Issuance 2011 Parcel 06-0396-0001 assessed to: KENNETH CHADBOURNE Description of Property SUNNY HILLS #6 LOT 1 BLK 0396 ORB 607 P 317 All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk AUG 1,8,15,22,2018 8-3397 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given SIMON G PRICE OR E W PRICE the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 11-00804 Year of Issuance 2011 Parcel 00-3133-0069 assessed to: CHARLIE J & DOROTHY BURNHAM Description of Property 27 1 14 5.750 ORB 174 P 700 LOT 33 UNREC. PLAT ROLLING PINES All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk AUG 1,8,15,22,2018 8-3428 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given JCN PROPERTY SOLUTIONS LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 11-03379 Year of Issuance 2011 Parcel 11-0815-0016 assessed to: BERNARD W & LOELLA M NASS Description of Property SUNNY HILLS UNIT #11 LOT 16 ORB 158 P 156 BLK 0815 All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk AUG 1,8,15,22,2018 8-3426 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given JCN PROPERTY SOLUTIONS LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 11-03173 Year of Issuance 2011 Parcel 10-0576-0016 assessed to: FRIEDRICH & IRMGARD GOTTSCHLING Description of Property SUNNY HILLS UNIT #10 LOT 16 ORB 84 P 179 BLK 0576All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk AUG 1,8,15,22,2018 8-3427 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given JCN PROPERTY SOLUTIONS LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 11-02348 Year of Issuance 2011 Parcel 02-0252-0007 assessed to: BERNEITA HOLMES Description of Property SUNNY HILLS UNIT #2 LOT 7 ORB 237 P 1904 BLK 0252 7All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk AUG 1,8,15,22,2018 8-3472 PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE TOWN OF CARYVILLE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Town of Caryville Town Council will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, August 14, at 6:00 P.M., at Caryville Town Hall, 4436 Old Spanish Trail, Caryville, Florida, to consider the following ordinance which title reads: ORDINANCE 18-02 AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF CARYVILLE: PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY; PROVIDING FOR TOWN COUNCIL, PROVIDING FOR COUNCIL ORGANIZATION; PROVIDING FOR COUNCIL VACANCY; PROVIDING FOR FORFEITURE OF OFFICE; PROVIDING FOR OFFICIAL ACTS; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR REPEALER; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Copies of the above-mentioned subject may be reviewed at the Caryville Town Hall Town Clerk’s Office, The public is encourage to provide written and/or verbal comments on the above referenced matters. All person are advised that, if any person decides to appeal any decision made at any of these meetings, he/she will need a record of the proceedings and, for such purpose, they need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based (Florida Statutes 286.0105). Persons with disabilities who require assistance to participate in this meeting are requested to notify the Town Clerk’s office at (850) 548-5571 at least 48 hours in advance. August 1, 2018 Free Lab/mix puppies If interested call 443-8760721 Estate Sale for Mr. Mario Corradino3933 Ambassador Dr. Chipley, FL 32428 (Sunny Hills, FL) Fri & Sat Aug. 3 & 4 8 AM -3 PM Directions : Take Hwy 77 to SunnyHills Blvd, follow signs to Ambassador Dr, take left, first house on right. Bedroom furniture, linens, dishes, small kitchen appliances, coffee tables, lamps, tools, men’s shoes & clothing, clay flower pots, office chairs, computer desk, collection of Hamilton penguin items, several pieces of lladro figurines, CD’s, movies, tapes, entertainment center, 2 flat screen tv’s, wicker love seat, patio set, indoor water fountain, slot machines, bookcases, curio, cedar chest, rugs and lots of misc. Please bring help to load furniture! T&C Estate Sales LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE Friday and Saturday, August 3 & 4, 2018. 8:00AM to 5:00PM. Located on Maple Avenue, Geneva, Alabama, near courthouse. Indoor Plus Size Yard Sale 3280 Highway 2 in Bonifay (Esto Community) Plus size clothes new or like new condition. Smoke and pet free home. Nothing over $10. Call for Appointment 547-4591 or 730-6919. Dot’s Caring Hands Senior care available 24/7. Call Dorothy Peacock at 850-482-1781. License# 233976 For Sale 2014 Murry Lawn Tractor Like New 6-speed 38-inch cutting deck $650. 850-547-0560. Log Truck Driver wanted with a clean driving record. Call 850-956-2266 or 850-956-2215. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 For Rent 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments in Vernon. Clean, stove, refrigerator, central heat/air, convenient to Panama City Beach, section 8, Rental assistance. 850-638-4640 For Rent One Bedroom apartments for rent in Chipley. Convenient location. Stove and refrigerator furnished. No Pets. Smoke free environment. Call 850-638-4640. One and two bedroom apartments available. References required. No pets. Call 850-547-9340. Leave message. For Rent 3, 4 and 5BR fully furnished, CH/A, 6 Miles from time, very private, no pets. 850-547-2096. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. Sunny Hills:2 bedroom, 2 bath, near County Library, Gas Stove, No outside storage or Garage/carport. Rent $550 per month, Damage Deposit $550, or $1100 to move in Progressive Realty, (850)-638-8220, Ready for occupancy. Rooms For Rent By Week.Comfortable rooms with microwave & refrigerator. All utilities paid. Cable and internet. Pet friendly at extra charge. Economy Lodge, Bonifay. 850-547-4167. 2BR/2BA Mobile Home. Quiet country setting, garden spot. No pets. Reference. $500/mth plus deposit. Ponce de Leon. 850-830-1505. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/ sewage/ lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 Bonifay, 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from school on Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $600 rent/$600 deposit. 850-547-3746. For Sale Two acre plot and one acre plot in Jacob City, FL. Call 850-849-9338. Highway 77 2 miles south of Chipley 4-8 acre tract Bedie Road. Call Milton Peel at 850-638-1858 or 326-9109 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains!

PAGE 21

Wednesday, August 1, 2018 The Weekly Advertiser | 1 is currently seekingFull Time Counselors, Case Managers, and Nursesto work with children and adults in Bay, Gulf, Calhoun, Jackson, Holmes and Washington Counties. For more details on these and other positions, please visit us online at: http://lmccares.org/careers/employment opportunities NF-5036053 NF-5032797 3 3 NF-503 3 2797 2 2 2 Lawn Maint., Irrigation, Pressure Wash, Pavers & Paver Repair, Tree Trimming, Fertilization, Spring Clean-Ups, Etc.Arturo Luebano 2455 N Hwy. 81, Ponce De Leon, FL 32455 850.658.6189 arthurluebano@yahoo.comWe have been in business since 2007. We are licensed and insured. Luebano Lawn Service, LLC. (850) 638-3611 HastyHeating & Cooling NF-5028471 NF-5032729 C & CBookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE OR BUSINESS FOR AS LITTLE AS $10 A WEEK!*Reach thousands of potential customers with your Business Guide ad in the:WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS HOLMES COUNTY-TIMES ADVERTISER WEEKLY ADVERTISER CALL TODAY! 850-638-0212*Minimum 8-week contract. NF-5036305 NF-5032769 Hazardous Aerial Tree Removal € Stump Grinding Trimming & Pruning € Emergency Tree Service € Lot Clean UpDow Morris,Owner/Operator 850-527-6291 € 850-849-3825 Volume 89 Number 31 WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 1, 2018NF-5036063 NF-5032781 Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centersSTOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com“2-Night Free Vacation!”or Car Today! 800 700 BOAT -(2628) Free Lab/mix puppies If interested call 443-8760721 LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE Friday and Saturday, August 3 & 4, 2018. 8:00AM to 5:00PM. Located on Maple Avenue, Geneva, Alabama, near courthouse. Indoor Plus Size Yard Sale 3280 Highway 2 in Bonifay (Esto Community) Plus size clothes new or like new condition. Smoke and pet free home. Nothing over $10. Call for Appointment 547-4591 or 730-6919. Estate Sale for Mr. Mario Corradino3933 Ambassador Dr. Chipley, FL 32428 (Sunny Hills, FL) Fri & Sat Aug. 3 & 4 8 AM -3 PM Directions : Take Hwy 77 to SunnyHills Blvd, follow signs to Ambassador Dr, take left, first house on right. Bedroom furniture, linens, dishes, small kitchen appliances, coffee tables, lamps, tools, men’s shoes & clothing, clay flower pots, office chairs, computer desk, collection of Hamilton penguin items, several pieces of lladro figurines, CD’s, movies, tapes, entertainment center, 2 flat screen tv’s, wicker love seat, patio set, indoor water fountain, slot machines, bookcases, curio, cedar chest, rugs and lots of misc. Please bring help to load furniture! T&C Estate Sales K&LFarm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 Dot’s Caring Hands Senior care available 24/7. Call Dorothy Peacock at 850-482-1781. License# 233976 For Sale 2014 Murry Lawn Tractor Like New 6-speed 38-inch cutting deck $650. 850-547-0560. Log Truck Driver wanted with a clean driving record. Call 850-956-2266 or 850-956-2215. The Holmes County Board of County Commissionersis currently accepting applications for the part-time position of4-H Program AssistantApplicants must apply in person at County Commissioners Office, 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, by 4:00 PM on August 13, 2018. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 For Rent 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments in Vernon. Clean, stove, refrigerator, central heat/air, convenient to Panama City Beach, section 8, Rental assistance. 850-638-4640 For Rent One Bedroom apartments for rent in Chipley. Convenient location. Stove and refrigerator furnished. No Pets. Smoke free environment. Call 850-638-4640. One and two bedroom apartments available. References required. No pets. Call 850-547-9340. Leave message. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For Rent 3, 4 and 5BR fully furnished, CH/A, 6 Miles from time, very private, no pets. 850-547-2096. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. Sunny Hills:2 bedroom, 2 bath, near County Library, Gas Stove, No outside storage or Garage/carport. Rent $550 per month, Damage Deposit $550, or $1100 to move in Progressive Realty, (850)-638-8220, Ready for occupancy. Rooms For Rent By Week.Comfortable rooms with microwave & refrigerator. All utilities paid. Cable and internet. Pet friendly at extra charge. Economy Lodge, Bonifay. 850-547-4167. 2BR/2BA Mobile Home. Quiet country setting, garden spot. No pets. Reference. $500/mth plus deposit. Ponce de Leon. 850-830-1505. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/ sewage/ lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 Bonifay, 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from school on Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $600 rent/$600 deposit. 850-547-3746. For Sale Two acre plot and one acre plot in Jacob City, FL. Call 850-849-9338. Highway 77 2 miles south of Chipley 4-8 acre tract Bedie Road. Call Milton Peel at 850-638-1858 or 326-9109 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. A icati Poce : A A 1) Complete the college Application; visit www.chipola.edu 2) Send of cial High School transcripts to the Chipola 3) Take College Placement Test (non-exempt students)Chipola College is an Equal Access/Equal Opportunity Institution http://www.chipola.edu/legal/equity.htm Fall Registration Application August 15 thru 17, 2018 www.chipola.edu NF-5037563 h Over Seventy Years of Changing Lives

PAGE 22

2| The Weekly Advertiser Wednesday, August 1, 2018 NF-5037501 $ 4 98 USDA Select Beef T-BONE STEAKS Family Pk, Per Lb $ 3 50 Super Fresh Premium FRYER LEG QUARTERS 10 Lb Bag $ 1 38 Fresh Lean Premium 73/27 GROUND BEEF Family Pk, Per Lb $ 1 28 Fresh Lean Premium WHOLE BONELESS PORK LOINS Per Lb $ 2 77 USDA Select Beef BONELESS SIRLOIN TIP ROAST 2 Pk, Per Lb $ 1 55 Fresh Lean Premium BONELESS PORK CHOPS Family Pk, Per Lb $ 1 98 Farm Grown RUSSET POTATOES 8 Lb Bag 75 ¢ Farm Fresh RED RIPE TOMATOES ON THE VINE Per Lb 2/$ 3 California Grown SWEET RIPE CANTALOUPES Each $ 1 35 Farm Grown CRISP CAULIFLOWER Each $ 1 48 Farm Fresh JUMBO GREEN SEEDLESS GRAPES Per Lb $ 1 65 Farm Fresh LEAFY GREEN BRUSSEL SPROUTS Per Lb $ 1 18 California Grown RED & BLACK PLUMS Per Lb $ 2 65 FRESH EXPRESS SALAD MIX 24 Oz Bag $ 2 98 Wisconsin OLD FASHION RED RIND CHEESE Per Lb 2/$ 3 Oscar Mayer MEAT WIENERS OR BOLOGNA 1 Lb Pkg $ 2 97 Kentucky Legend BONELESS QUARTER SLICED HAM Per Lb $ 3 96 Land O' Frost PREMIUM SUB KITS 20 Oz Pkg $ 2 88 HILLSHIRE FARMS SMOKED SAUSAGE 12-14 Oz Pkg $ 9 50 Farmland THICK SLICED HICKORY BACON 2.5 Lb, 40 Oz Pkg $ 18 95 IQF PREMIUM PARTY WINGS 10 Lb Bag $ 5 45 IQF BREADED CHICKEN TENDERS 5 Lb Bag $ 3 95 Nature's Best IQF WHITING FILLETS 2 Lb Bag 77 ¢ Honey, Original, Hickory Smoke Kraft BBQ Sauce 18 Oz Btl 58 ¢ Powerade Sports Drink 32 Oz Btl $ 5 25 Original Maxwell House Coffee 30.6 Oz Cntr $ 1 88 Self Rising or All Purpose Martha White Flour 5 Lb Bag $ 1 88 Kraft Salad Dressings 16 Oz Btl 2/$ 3 Original or Meat Ragu Pasta Sauce 24 Oz Jar 2/$ 3 Bars or Shreds Dutch Farms Cheese 8 Oz 88 ¢ Hunt's Squeeze Ketchup 24 Oz Btl 96 ¢ California or Citrus Sunny D Drink 64 Oz Btl $ 1 77 Eggo Wafes or Pancakes 10.9-16.4 Oz Pkg 98 ¢ Quick or Regular Jim Dandy Grits 2 Lb Bag $ 2 98 Mt. Olive Kosher Dill Pickles 80 Oz Jar $ 4 95 Golden Flake Variety Pack 20 Ct Pkg 85 ¢ Hunt's Manwich 15 Oz Can $ 4 48 Kingsford Charcoal 7.7 Lb Bag $ 5 95 Natural Light 15 Pk Cans 1264 CHURCH AVENUE  CHIPLEY, FL  324286AM-7PM  7 Days a Week  850-638-1751WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO CORRECT TYPOGRAPHICAL AND PICTORAL ERRORS. QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS. WE DO NOT AC CEPT INTERNET PRINTED COUPONS.EBT Cardholders and WIC Vouchers Welcomed. Most Major Credit Cards Accepted Our Beef is USDA Select or Higher.PRICES GOOD AUGUST 1 THRU AUGUST 7, 2018 OF CHIPLEY, FL COST PLUS 10% Text GOGRO to 1-844764-6476 to get the smartphone app!iPhone and Android GoGro Special Deal Every Week!