Citation
Washington County news

Material Information

Title:
Washington County news
Uniform Title:
Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Place of Publication:
Chipley FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Nicole Barfield - Publisher
Creation Date:
January 5, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiweekly[<1994>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1931>]
semiweekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
Coordinates:
30.780922 x -85.539289

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began May 23, 1924.
General Note:
L.E. Sellers, editor.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Washington County News. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000384704 ( ALEPH )
07260886 ( OCLC )
ACC5987 ( NOTIS )
sn 81000810 ( LCCN )
0279-795X ( ISSN )

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** INSIDEMAKE THE GRADE 2018 SCHOOL GUIDE Volume 95 Number 30 Phone: 850-638-0212 Fax: 850-638-4601 Opinion ....................A4 Local & State .............A6 NASCAR ..................A10 Faith .........................B4 Obituaries ..................B5 Classifieds .................B8 A7Community events listB1Kids rake in at kids flea market @WCN_HCT facebook.com/WashingtonCountyNews.HolmesCountyTimes50 ¢ chipleypaper.com Washington CountyWednesday, July 25, 2018 News Service Florida A Leon County circuit judge will hear arguments Aug. 17 in a dispute about a proposed con-stitutional amendment that calls for changes in the states education system. Judge John Cooper on Monday scheduled the hearing in the lawsuit filed by the League of Women Voters of Florida, which is trying to keep the constitutional amend-ment off the November ballot.The amendment was placed on the ballot by the state Con-stitution Revision Commission and includes three different issues: It would impose an eight-year term limit on school board members. It would require civic literacyŽ to be promoted in public schools. And it would allow charter schools and other public educa-tion initiatives to be authorized by entities other than local school boards, which now make those decisions.The lawsuit targets the charter-school part of the proposal and alleges that the ballot wording is misleading.The lawsuit contends the charter-school provision was intentionally drafted to be vagueŽ and it concealed the chief purposeŽ of the amend-ment, which is to eliminate the long-standing, exclusive authority of local elected school boards to operate, control, and supervise all public schools, including charter schools, in their respective school districts.ŽThe proposal is slated to appear on the November ballot as Amendment 8.School board term limits to be on ballot, possiblyBy Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY A new tourism report profiles vacationers to Washington County and sur-rounding areas.Heather Lopez, Director of the Washington County Tourist Development Coun-cil, presented the report at Mondays workshop.It helps us with planning, if we know who our visitor is, we know how to reach them,Ž Lopez said.A highlight from the report from Visa View show millenials make up the largest generation of travelers. The millenial spending culture demonstrated the short length of stay, single-person party travel and short period to plan a trip.Visa View collected monthly data from 2013-2017 from travelers who took either a day or overnight trip to Washington, Calhoun, Liberty, Gadsen, Holmes and Jackson counties.I figured wed have more families than 9-percent; it just means were going to have to shift the way we market maybe target families a bit heavier, but also reaching out to singles and couples that are just coming on a spontaneous weekend to make sure we keep that segment coming to us,Ž Lopez said.The report also showed 30-percent of travelers visited the area for business purposes.Millenials make economic impact in WashingtonBy Diane M. RobinsonThe News| @HCTA_Diane Drobinson@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY … Property owners in Washington County can anticipate paying less taxes if a recently proposed millage rate is approved by Washington County Board of County Commissioners.The proposed rate is 8.9735, about .25 of a mill down from last years rate of 9.2235.The board willvote to approvethe proposed rate on Thursday.County Administrator Jeff Massey said the county was able to lower the rate due to the revenue from the utility companies franchise fees.We are following through with our promise to lower taxes and be good stewards of our taxpayers money,Ž he said.The news comes as the county continues to unfold and achieve its plan to be debt-free.At a workshop held July 18, Sara Applewhite of Carr, Riggs and Ingram Account-ing firm presented the county with audit results, saying the county is in good shape.ŽWashington County is in a healthy financial position,  Applewhite said. Thanks in part to the grant funding you all have received over the last fiscal year.ŽThe county received $7.6 million in grant funding last year, and has also paid off over $9 million in debt ser-vice in order to enter into the new fiscal year, debt free.Also at the meeting, the board discussed changing insurance providers from Florida Blue to United Healthcare in order to offer savings to employees on family health coverage. Rates will drop for those with nonfamily coverage. In a special session meeting after the workshop the board voted to approve the measure.During the workshop, sev-eral items were discussed and are projected to be placed on the consent agenda. Those items included, moving the Section 8 Hous-ing Voucher Program over to Northwest Florida Regional Housing Authority. The purchase of the Big Bend building on South Boulevard for $200,000 is set to be on the consent agenda as well.In other business, the Caryville Fire Department is expected to gain board approval on the application of an Firefighters Assistance Grant for self contained breathing apparatus from the State Fire Marshalls Office.And the board discussed a triangular piece of land in the parking lot of the Sportsplex in Vernon and has made plans to deed it to the City for repair.Washington County Board of County Commissioners will meet again in regular session at 9 a.m. on July 26.BOCC to set lowered proposed millage rateStaff ReportWASHINGTON AND HOLMES COUN-TIES … When an 80-mph straight windŽ blew through the region Sunday afternoon, thousands of residents in both counties felt the impact. The storm system left several downed power lines and broken poles, as well as other debris which obstructed roadways.However, emergency management offi-cials exhaled a sigh of relief on Monday.We are very lucky to not have sustained any major damage,Ž said Washington County Emergency Management Director Lynn Abel.EOC: Damage could have been worseA large oak tree fell roots up at a home on Highway 81 in Ponce de Leon. [DIANE M. ROBINSON | TIMES -ADVERTISER] A transformer located south of Alford in the Kent Mill Pond area was severely damaged by lightning during Sundays storms. [WEST FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE] See IMPACT, A2 See STORM, A2

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** A2 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | Washington County NewsIn addition to torrential rains, heavy winds mangled trees and uprooted poles. In Washington, at 6 p.m. Sunday after the worse part of the storm hit Gulf Powers online outage map reported 29 outages and West Florida Electric Cooperative reported 340 customers without power.The damaging winds associated with the storm systemŽ added to the dam-ages of the heavy rains, said Rick Kerr, Washington County Fire Coordinator. We had several fire departments out clearing roadways and we did have downed power lines.ŽAreas of concern in Washington County included Culpepper Lane, River Road, Creek Road, several streets in the Vernon area and Parrish Steele Road where a large oak tree fell on a residents home.No injuries were reported.Drivers need to use caution,Ž Kerr said Sunday evening. Safety personnel are out trying to clear roadways. They need to use caution while traveling the roadways that are obstructed.ŽMonday morning saw crews from Gulf Power, West Florida Electric Cooperative (WFEC), vari-ous tree companies, inmate crews, residents, public officials and law enforce-ment cleaning up from the previous days storm.WFEC reported out-ages across three counties of its four-county service area, a WFEC news release stated Monday. Approximately 5,122 members were without power; however, 4,504 of those were only out six minutes due to an outage experienced by power provider, PowerSouth Energy Cooperative. Power was restored service to the majority of effected customers by 10 p.m. and to all cus-tomers by 1 a.m. Monday morning.The company reported four poles had been broken in the Ponce de Leon region, which took the brunt of the storm, causing a delay in power restoration.According to Holmes County Emergency Management Director Wendy Mayo, by Monday all roads were passable and no major damage was incurred.We are lucky the damage wasnt worse than it is,Ž Mayo said. We have no major damage in the county and no injuries have been reported.ŽA portion of the roof from Waynes Grocery in Ponce de Leon was blown onto the house behind the store, but with community help, the debris was removed and the roof was repaired.Washington County residents should call the Emergency Management Office for questions regarding after storm clean up, at 850-638-6203. STORMFrom Page A1When you see that figure go up then a lot of other figures will go up as a result,Ž said TDC chairman Bill Maphis.At the meeting following the workshop, the TDC approved a revised TDC grant request application. The new application moves to a reimbursement format that gives the applicant more control over how the advertising grant funds are spent.This new grant is going to take a lot of the in-house stuff and put it back in the event organizers hands,Ž Lopez said. Instead of the TDC paying for the advertising upfront, applicants will have to pay for the advertising and then request a reimbursement from the TDC.ŽMeaning, after appli-cations are submitted and the council initially approves the grant, the council will vote again to approve the reimburse-ment; however, the applicant has to prove and demonstrate that the funds were used according to the grant requirements.Lopez noted the new process will allow the council to observe the kind of impact events are making in terms of attracting tourism and strengthen event organizers understand-ing on how to effectively make a successful event through planning.We want to see that theyre thinking this through and really trying to improve the event, and trying to effect the economy here,Ž she added. And thats what the after-event report will show us.ŽCouncil members praised the new application as through and easy-to-complete.Also at the meeting, the council approved a $2,000 tourism education grant from Visit Florida. The grant is a matching, reimbursable grant and will be used to fund a tri-county tour-ism council workshop scheduled for February.The workshop will educate agricultural business owners from Washington, Jackson-ville and Holmes on how to market themselves, acquire extra funding and statutes relevant to agribusiness, Lopez said.A speaker will talk about how to setup an agritourism business on the farm.Its open to any farmer or any business that is in agriculture that wants to have tourism as a component,Ž Lopez said.Council members also approved a $250 payout to Washington County Chamber of Commerce to sponsor the September luncheon, to be held Thursday, Sept. 20 at noon at Northwest Florida Community Hospital; and approved Budget Amendment 3, which is also the preliminary FY 2018-19 budget.The TDC will meet again at 1:30 p.m. on July 26 at the Chamber of Commerce Build-ing, 672 N. Fifth Street, for a strategic planning workshop on developing its three-year plan. A special meeting will be held 10 a.m. Aug. 2 to approve the final budget. The next regular workshop and meeting will be held at 10 a.m. Sept. 13. IMPACTFrom Page A1Limbs and debris scattered acorss Ponce de Leon Town Hall. [DIANE M. ROBINSON | TIMES -ADVERTISER] A large tree just missed landing on one of the picnic tables at the Ponce de Leon Town Hall.[DIANE M. ROBINSON | TIMES -ADVERTISER] Inmate crews helped clear debris from Danny Byrd Ballpark in Ponce de Leon on Monday. [COURTESY PHOTO/HOLMES COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE] Council members also approved a $250 payout to Washington County Chamber of Commerce to sponsor the September luncheon, to be held Thursday, Sept. 20 at noon at Northwest Florida Community Hospital; and approved Budget Amendment 3, which is also the preliminary FY 201819 budget. The damaging winds associated with the storm system. We had several re departments out clearing roadways and we did have downed power lines.ŽRick Kerr, Washington County Fire Coordinator

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, July 25, 2018 A3

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** A4 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | Washington County News OPINION Have something to say?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri“ cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by GateHouse Media LLC at 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2018, GateHouse Media LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright Notice: The entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of GateHouse Media LLC. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or GateHouse Media. Postmaster: Send address change to Washington County News, P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428, USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES In county Out of county 13 weeks: $20 $24.30 26 weeks: $28.70 $36.40 52 weeks: $48.60 $60.70 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US Publisher: Nicole Bare“ eld nbare“ eld@chipleypaper.com Editor: Jacqueline Bostick jbostick@chipleypaper.com, 850-638-0212 News, sports, opinion: news@chipleypaper.com Classi“ ed: 850-638-0212, clamb@chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service: 1-850-522-5197 Washington CountyPUBLISHER Nicole P. Bare“ eld EDITOR Jacqueline Bostick PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR Cameron Everett Laura Ingalls Wilder (1867-1957) wrote childrens books that have sold tens of millions of copies. Her Little House on the PrairieŽ series, set in the 1870s and 1880s, when white pioneers overcame great adversity to settle in the West, introduced many girls, in particular, to the joys of reading and inspired a popular television series that ran from 1974 to 1983. But Ms. Wilder has run afoul of modern forces of political correctness. The Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) has stripped her name from a lifetime achievement award that originally went to her, in 1954. That is because her characters expressed nasty sentiments that, however historically accurate, are no longer in vogue. Multiple characters in her books intoned the ugly view of many white settlers that the only good Indian is a dead Indian.Ž This was the America of the time. Ms. Wilder and her family moved around among Wisconsin, Kansas and Minnesota on what was then the frontier. In stripping her name from the award, the ALSC said her work includes expressions of stereotypical attitudes inconsistent with ALSCs core values of inclusiveness, integrity and respect, and responsiveness.Ž The Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association pleaded to no avail for an understanding of historic context rather than indulgence in the modern spirit of censorship. While Ms. Wilders writing included the perspectives of racism that were representative of her time and place,Ž it also made positive contributions to childrens literature,Ž the association said. We believe it is not beneficial to the body of literature to sweep away her name as though the perspectives in her books never existed. Those perspectives are teaching moments to show generations to come how the past was and how we, as a society, must move forward with a more inclusive and diverse perspective,Ž the association argued. A similar spirit has led some to seek to repress and even bowdlerize perhaps the greatest American novel, Mark Twains Huckleberry FinnŽ (1884). Although it uses the N-word throughout, the book is in truth a powerful and moving condemnation of slavery and racism, eviscerating the civilizationŽ of the time that said Americans had a moral imperative to turn in escaped slaves. But some have argued both it and such books as To Kill a MockingbirdŽ are too offensive for literature students because of their use of racist language. Sending writers of the past down the memory hole because their societies embraced different ideas from our own seems unlikely to encourage an understanding of where we have come from „ something essential to understanding where and who we are. However ugly at times, history and literature do indeed offer teaching momentsŽ that help us move toward a richer understanding of our common humanity. A version of this editorial first appeared in the Providence (R.I.) Journal, a sister paper with GateHouse Media.Sweeping away an authors name ANOTHER VIEW Boy, are Americans getting old. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the median age the age at which half of the population is older and half is younger hit an alltime high of 38.0 in 2017. Why is it rising? Because our massive baby-boom generation continues to go geezer, while young moms and dads are having way fewer kids than American parents used to. Whats more interesting is that the number of Americans who were 100 years or older also hit a record in 2017 a number that is poised to explode. According to the World Future Society, we are in the early phases of a superlongevity revolution. Thanks to advances in nanotechnology and cell and gene manipulation, scientists may eventually learn how to keep humans alive for 120 to 500 years. Though its great that Americans are living longer, Im not sure Id ever want to live THAT long. Look, Im 56, a tail-end baby boomer. If I was confident Id be vibrant and healthy for another 44 years, I might finally get around to marrying and starting a family! My parents are of the silent generation. Theyre in in their 80s. Id love for them to live well beyond 100, so that I can enjoy their company at Sunday dinners for another 20 years or more. But there are downsides to living so long. Health-care costs are already out of control and the majority of that spending goes to the elderly. Such costs may become unmanageable as our median age keeps climbing. If we live 100 years or more, how are we going to pay for it? Living is expensive. Are we going to work 50 years, retire, burn through our nest eggs, then spend 20 or 30 years greeting customers at Walmart? And what of our younger generations, kids who are notorious slackers? Mother to son in year 2075: Youre 100 years old! When are you going to move out and get a job?Ž Four years shy of 60, Im already showing signs of fatigue. I dont know when it started, but, like my elderly father, I groan every time I slowly pull myself out of a chair. Sure, the primitive maleŽ part of me thinks I could still handle myself if a bar brawl were to break out but Id have to do 30 minutes of jumping jacks before I could even think about participating. Besides, in my experience, life is largely made up of colds, bills, speeding tickets and people who let you down. These experiences are connected together by a series of mundane tasks. The drudgeries are occasionally interrupted by a wonderful meal, a really good laugh or a romantic evening with a lovely lady. Then the mundane stuff starts all over again. I dont think I want 500 years of that. At 56, you see, it seems to me that the key to human happiness is not an abundance of a thing, but a lack of it. Doesnt pie taste better when we know its the last slice? Doesnt a football game capture our attention more when its the last of the season the one that determines who goes out the winner and who goes out the loser? Isnt a comedian funnier when he exits the stage BEFORE we want him to go? Besides, if I were to live to 500, Id have to endure 111 more presidential elections „ a punishment I wouldnt wish on my worst enemy!Wearing out longevitys welcomeWhen government nudgesŽ people into new behaviors, resistance is often ugly. Eric Garner died because a Democratic governor sent the message down the line that New York was losing a billion dollars in cigarette taxes and police needed to get tough on everyone, including the guy on the corner selling loosies.Ž In New Jersey, the Hampton Police Department brought in millions of dollars in 18 months selling cigarettes illegally in a stingŽ operation, during which no charges were filed, no arrests were made and police used proceeds to buy SUVs, electronics and trips to conferences. Thousands of unaccounted dollars were also reportedly withdrawn from their credit union account. The police chief resigned. States around the country told you they needed to tax cigarettes to help people quit. Then they raised the taxes more to help fill their general funds. Then they raised them more because fewer people were smoking. You create a black market for a product by slapping with extraordinary taxes, eventually reducing the amount of tax dollars coming in as people quit buying it. Then the government needs to find new funding for the extra spending that came along with the original shortterm tax revenue increases. The Tax Foundation reports the 2009 excise tax on cigarettes, from $0.39 per pack to $1.01 per pack, more than doubled revenues from $7.6 billion in 2008 to $17.1 billion in 2010, then starting to decline. The Congressional Budget office projects declining revenues will continue. Of course. Another target for sin taxŽ is your vehicle. This is not an argument for or against smoking or driving enjoyment. Its just a cautionary tale so youre prepared to pay twice as much in gas taxes than you do today... but it wont be the gas thats taxed. It will be you. For years, the federal government has been pushing for higher gas mileage vehicles.So much so that manufacturers figured out a way to sell cars as trucks because trucks are allowed to have lower emission and MPG standards. Voila!The SUV was invented: a family car built on a truck chassis thats rated as a truck, bringing the manufacturers total CAFE standard in line with government regulations. American ingenuity. In 2004, the EPA decided to hold SUVs to the same emissions as cars. Bureaucratic ingenuity. Then federal central planners decided it would be great to spend billions of taxpayer dollars on electric and hybrid vehicles that use very little or no fossil fuels at all. Additional pollution from such vehicles batteries and their manufacture notwithstanding, millions of Americans agree this is a fine idea and are quite pleased their tax dollars helped their neighbor save thousands of dollars on their Prius.When the government knows whats best for you Tom Purcell Rick Jensen

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, July 25, 2018 A5

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** A6 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | Washington County News LOCAL & STATEStaff ReportWALTON AND SURROUNDING COUNTIES The Walton County Sheriffs Office is currently seeking information regarding the whereabouts of a multi-county fugitive, according to a Walton County Sher-iffs Office news release.WCSO reported James Dexter Jackson, 32, is currently wanted by authorities in two Florida counties including Bay and Walton. Jackson is possibly eluding authori-ties in the Fort Walton Beach, Okaloosa County area also, the release stated.Walton Countys warrants include multiple grand theft charges and multiple burglary charges. In addition, Jackson is wanted by Bay County Sheriffs Office for failure to appear on original charges of grand theft auto, burglary, and criminal mischief.Anyone with information on the whereabouts of Jackson is asked to call the Walton County Sheriffs Office at (850) 892-8186 or callers may remain anonymous by calling Emerald Coast Crime Stoppers at (850) 863-TIPS.Multi-county fugitive sought by Walton County Sheri s O ce By Jim Turner News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE State Sen. Denise Grimsley would immediately order a full auditŽ of Floridas concealed-weapons licensing process, as well as examine the management structure of the program, if she is elected agriculture commissioner. And the Sebring Repub-lican is joined by two of her primary opponents, former state Rep. Baxter Troutman of Winter Haven and Plant City businessman Mike McCalister, in saying accountability for problems with background checks rests with Agricul-ture Commissioner Adam Putnam, a Republican who is running for governor.The Tampa Bay Times reported last month that state investigators found a former Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services employee, who had been promoted from a job in the mailroom, failed for a year to conduct one of the national background checks for concealed-weapons licenses.The Associated Press later reported state inves-tigators determined that 48 employees had made mistakes in the review pro-cess, requiring the agency to revoke two concealedweapons licenses and an armed security guard license.Putnams office has pushed back against the reports, with Putnam saying after the initial Times report last month that problems had been corrected and that public safety was not at risk.ŽGrimsley said an audit she plans would deter-mine if any administrative changes are needed regard-ing the licensing procedures.McCalister, also a retired Army National Guard and Reserves colonel, said no concealed-weapons license should be deemed complete until all required background checks are included with an application.Troutman intends to implement a new reporting structure that would measure outcomes and expectations. In business, things that get measured get done, and people must be held accountable,Ž Troutman said.Grimsley mirrored Troutman with a buck always stops at the topŽ comment, but added she needs to better under-stand the procedures used to process the applications.I look forward to speak-ing with Commissioner Putnam and his management team to better understand the procedures they have used and then think about ways to ensure that we are deploying resources and using pro-cesses that work to provide safety and security going forward,Ž Grimsley said.Florida is one of four states where someone other than law enforcement issues concealed-carry permits,Ž Troutman said. The Legislature and governor ultimately decide where this program is housed, and Im open to discussions exploring improvements to the application process.ŽNone of the candidates called for eliminating or scaling back the concealed-weapons licensing process. In December 2012, Florida became the first state in the nation to surpass 1 mil-lion active conceal-carry permits.Grimsley and Troutman, who recently received B plusŽ and C minusŽ grades, respectively, from the National Rifle Association, offered outright support for the Second Amendment.Grimsley added shed support any efforts to give law-abiding Floridians more freedom to exercise it.ŽThe state had surpassed 1.9 million active concealed-weapons licenses as of June 30.AG Commissioner candidates eye concealed weapons licensingJackson By John Henderson522-5108 | @PCNHjohn jhenderson@pcnh.comWEST BAY „ Four people were injured Friday night when two commercial airboats col-lided in West Bay near the State 79 bridge.An adult and a juvenile who were injured were taken to Bay Medical Sacred Heart Hospital in Panama City for treat-ment, said Bekah Nelson, a spokeswoman for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Another adult was taken to the Panama City Beach Bay Medical Center emergency room and the fourth injured person was taken from the site by family, Nelson said.She said the investigation has been taken over by the Coast Guard because the collision involved two licensed commercial captains.Coast Guard Lt. Jordan McGee said Saturday that he didnt have the names or conditions of the people involved. One had a head injury. One had an arm injury. I know the minor suffered some lacerations,Ž he said.McGee said quick reac-tions by the airboats captains prevented the collision from being more serious.I dont know how fast they were going,Ž he said. That is under investiga-tion. The initial report said one of them was coming across the bend and when he realized the other airboat was coming, both captains took reactionary action to try and get out of the way. That did prevent greater damage to the boats. They were able to reduce the impact of the collision.ŽMcGee said he didnt have the airboat companys name but said both vessels were from the same company.West Bay airboats collide; 4 people injured None of the candidates called for eliminating or scaling back the concealed-weapons licensing process. In December 2012, Florida became the rst state in the nation to surpass 1 million active conceal-carry permits.[SPECIAL TO THE NEWS]

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, July 25, 2018 A7 COMMUNITYStaff ReportWASHINGTONAND HOLMES COUNTIES„ Nearly 300 teachers from across northwest Florida and Alabama became students during an energy education workshop co-hosted by West Florida Electric Cooperative (WFEC) in June, a WFEC news release stated.I really enjoyed this con-ference, and as a new teacher, walking into a classroom without many supplies, this conference was very worthwhile,Ž 7th grade at Vernon Middle School, Carol Boswell, stated in the news release. She will begin her first full year of teaching this month.The second annual Empower Energy Education Workshop provided fun, engaging, fast-paced activities about electric generation and distribution with a focus on energy education, the release stated. Attendees received the tools and curriculum necessary to integrate the activities into their classrooms. These mate-rials, aimed at K-12 students, include hands-on activities designed to teach tomorrows leaders about all energy sources … from fossil fuels to renewables.The curriculum was developed by the National Energy Education Development (NEED) Project. The Empower Energy Education Workshop is part of an initiative to promote a balanced approach to energy education in the classroom.One of our founding principles as a cooperative is providing education and learning to our members,Ž Russell Dunaway, WFEC Executive VP & CEO, stated in the release. As the electric utility industry continues to change due to innovations in technology, we believe it is imperative to ensure educa-tors have the information and materials needed to inform future generations about the types of energy available, where it comes from, how it is generated and also how it impacts their families, our economy and quality of life. We are proud to have this opportunity to partner with NEED and PowerSouth Energy Cooperative to provide schol-arships to educators from our local schools.ŽThe conference also pro-vided attendees an opportunity to network with other teach-ers, sharing ideas and building lifelong connections. Boswell stated the connections she was able to make with some of the other teachers were important to her as a new educator.Each teacher who attended the Empower Education Workshop received a kit with experiments and resources they can use with their students in the classroom environment, the release stated.The co-op will provide scholarships to local educators to the Empower Energy Education Workshop again next summer. If you are a teacher in Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson or Washington County, contact your school districts county office for more information about how to apply.Teachers get enery educationIf you would like your events included in this list, email information to: news@chipleypaper.com Food Coupons still available WASHINGTON COUNTY … Washington County Council on Aging still has Farmers Market Nutrition Program Coupons available. If interested and have not already received coupons this year, contact Wash-ington County Council on Aging at 850-638-6216 for more information on how you can participate in this program. Bonifay Womans Club to host political rallyBONIFAY … The Bonifay Womans Club will hold a political rally Saturday, July 28. Hamburger plates consisting of grilled hamburgers, chips, cookies/brownie will be sold beginning at 5 p.m. with candidates speaking at 6 p.m. Any candidate is wel-come to come speak. There will also be a cake auction. This is a free event. The Bonifay Womans Club has been in existence since 1910. The club sponsors a scholarship and also makes donation to various school clubs. This past year the club also supported the Back-pack Program and the 24/7 Ministries. For more information contact Shirley Owens at shirleyowens52@yahoo. com Cobb family reunion to be heldBONIFAY … The decedents of Andrew and Rebecca Cobb Worley will hold the 28th annual family reunion from 9 a.m. until Saturday, July 28 at the Bonifay Florida Agriculture Center. Bring a well filled food basket and family pictures for a time of remi-niscing and fellowship. There will be lots of entertainment. The agri-culture center is located on Highway 90 one mile east of Highway 79. For more information call D.B. Worley at 850-5479282 or 850-326-0692 or Teresa Bush at 850-415-0692 or 850-263-4744 or 850-263-3072. Spanish Trail Playhouse to Present Charlottes WebCHIPLEY The Spanish Trail Playhouse will hold performances of Charlottes Web at 7 p.m. Friday, August 3 and Saturday, August 4 and at 2 p.m. Sunday, August 5.The playhouse is in the Historic Chipley High School, located at 680 Second Street in Chipley. Tickets go on sale soon and will be available online at www.spanishtrailplayhouse.com, and the Spanish Trail Playhouse office by calling 850-638-9113. The ticket office is open Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to noon. For more information email spanishtrailplay-house@gmail.com.COMMUNITY EVENTSPictured are Sybil Plazarin, Carr School; Derek Chadwell, WFEC; Carol Boswell, Vernon Middle School; Marie Ellenburg, Bonifay K8; Sheryl Swindell, Graceville Elementary; Jennifer Sapp, Roulhac Middle School; Kelsey Coats, Graceville Elementary School; Rebecca Beasley, Grand Ridge School; Reid Brockett, Cottondale Elementary; Kim Peacock, Blountstown Elementary; Keshia Lowe-Nix, Dove Academy; Frances Hawkins, Poplar Springs School; Holly Nichols, Riverside Elementary; Magen Galloway, Ponce De Leon Elementary; Paulette Williams, Dove Academy; Nirra Poret, Riverside Elementary & Candace Croft, WFEC. Not all teachers are pictured here. [SPECIAL TO WCN/HCTA] See EVENTS, A10

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** A10 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | Washington County NewsHOSO to offer concealed weapons classBONIFAY … The Holmes County Sheriffs Office will present a Concealed Weapons Class at 10 a.m., Saturday, August 18, in the Holmes County Jail class-room, located at 3207 Lonny Lindsey Drive in Bonifay. Sheriff John Tate will instruct the class, which is expected to last about two hours. This class will meet the firearms training class requirement mandated by the Florida Department of Agriculture concealed weapon permit application. The class is open to ages 18 and up; however the minimum age to be granted a permit from the state is 21. Participants ages 21 and up may bring their own gun and rounds or use those provided by the sheriffs office. Par-ticipants under the age of 21 are asked to use the provided gun and rounds. No pre-registration is required, and the cost is $25 per person. All proceeds will benefit Holmes County High School Project Graduation. PDL “ re to host RTIC raf” e PONCE DE LEON … Ponce De Leon Volunteer Fire Department will host a raffle for a 65 Quart RTic cooler. The raffle will run through Thursday, August 23. Tickets are $5 each or 3 for $12. There are only 300 tickets available. All proceeds go to benefit the fire department. Contact any member of the PDL fire department or contact the department on Facebook. Holmes County UF/IFAS to host Outdoor ExpoBONIFAY … The Holmes County UF/IFAS Extension Office will host an Outdoor Expo Friday, September 7 and Saturday, September 8 at the Holmes County Agricul-ture Center in Bonifay. There will be a concert, improved outdoor venue, NWFT Grand National Turkey Calling Contest and vendors. For more information on the event or becoming a vendor visit www.hcoutdoorexpo.com or call Kayla Welch at 850-547-1108. Open auditions announced for Grease: The MusicalThe Spanish Trail Playhouse will hold open auditions for Grease: The Musical at 6 p.m. Monday, September 10 and Tuesday, September 11. Auditions will be held at The Spanish Trail Playhouse (Historic Chipley High School) located at 680 Second Street in Chipley. Grease: The Musical will take the stage Thursday, Novem-ber 8 through Monday, November 12. Audition packets will be available two weeks prior to auditions on the Spanish Trail Playhouse website: www.spanishtrail-playhouse.com, the Spanish Trail Playhouse office and at the Washington County Public Library. To inquire about a certain role or about volunteering or with other questions pertaining to production email spanish-trailplayhouse@gmail.com. HCHS band to host Rodeo PageantBONIFAY … The Holmes County High School will host the 2018 Northwest Florida Rodeo Pageant Saturday, September 15 in the HCHS Auditorium. Tiny Miss through Little King will be held at 4 p.m. and Little Miss through Miss will be held at 6 p.m. The pageant is open to ages 4 through 20 and the contestant fee is $50. Online registration and credit card payments will be available Thursday, August 30 through Saturday, September 8 at WWW/HCHSBLUEPRIDE.com/Pageant. Participants may also register from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, August 30 and Tuesday, September 4 and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, September 8 I the auditorium. Participants may also register from 5 to 7 .m. Tuesday, September 11 with a $10 late fee added to the reg-istration. Rehearsals will take place at registration. Door admission will be $5 for ages 10 and up and $2 for ages nine and under. For more information call 850-766-7569 or email pagean t@hchsbluepride.com "We Care, You Matter" health fairEBRO „ The Florida Department of Health in Washington County will host the "We Care, You Matter" health fair in Ebro from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Septem-ber 29 at Ebro City Hall, 6629 Dog Track Road. There will be health screenings, educational information, door prizes, and refreshments. For more infor-mation contact Susie Sewell at (850) 638-6240. EVENTSFrom Page A7If you would like a recurring event included in this list, please email the information to news@chipleypaper.com MONDAY9:30 a.m.: Car Seat Safety Classes (“ rst Monday of each month); Florida Department of Health Holmes County. For more information, call 850-5478500 ext 248. 9:30 a.m.: Car Seat Safety Classes (third Monday of each month); Florida Department of Health Washington County. For more information, call 850-6386240, Ext 144. 10 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging senior Bingo. For more information, call 850-547-2345. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise. For more information, call Andrea at 850-638-6216 11 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging senior lunch. For more information, call 850-547-2345 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining. For reservations, call 638-6216. Donations accepted. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach of“ ce. For more information, call Emma or Jess at 415-5999. 8 p.m.: Al-Anon meeting Blessed Trinity Church 8 p.m.: AA meeting Blessed Trinity ChurchTUESDAYWashington County Council on Aging Tuesday Group. For more information, call Kim at 850-638-6216 8-10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 9a.m.: Washington County Community Traf“ c Safety Team Meeting (Third Tuesday of each month) in the WCBOCC conference room. For more information call Renae Rountree at 850-638-1314 or Lynne Abel at 850-638-6203 10 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging Movie Day. For more information, call 850-547-2345 10 a.m. Home Extension Club Meeting/Luncheon; Hinsons Crossroads Fire Department. 10:30 a.m.: Letter Learners; Washington County Public Library. For more information, call 850-638-1314 11 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging senior lunch. For more information, call 850-547-2345 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; For reservations, call 638-6216. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. 12:30 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) Tuesday Group. For more information call Andrea at 638-6216 5:30 p.m.: Chemical Addiction Recovery Effort group; Caryville Baptist Church Fellowship Hall, For more information, call 850-326-0886. 6:10 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church; Games start at 6:10 p.m. For more information, call Peg Russ at 638-7654 or 638-7654. 7 p.m.: "A Drop of Faith" Narcotics Anonymous meeting; Blessed Trinity Catholic Church.WEDNESDAY10 a.m.: Holmes Council on Aging Games and Activities. For more information, call 850-547-2345 10 a.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are held the fourth Wednesday of the month at 2 p.m. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise. For more information, call Andrea at 850-638-6216 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes County Healthy Start Safe Beds Make Safe Babies SIDS class (fourth Wednesday of each month) at Florida Department of Health in Bonifay. For more information call 850-5478500 EXT 248. 10 a.m. to noon: Washington County Healthy Start Safe Beds Make Safe Babies SIDS class (fourth Wednesday of each month) at Florida Department of Health in Chipley. For more information call 850-6386240 ext 144 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.: Holmes County Healthy Start Parenting 101 classes (“ rst, second and third Wednesday of each month) at Florida Department of Health in Bonifay 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.: Washington County Healthy Start Parenting 101 classes (“ rst, second and third Wednesday of each month) at Florida Department of Health in Chipley 11 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging senior lunch. For more information, call 850-547-2345 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; For reservations, call 638-6216. Donations accepted. 12:30 p.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) Games and Activities. For more information, Call Andrea at 850-638-6216 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.: Holmes County Tobacco Cessation Classes, (second Wednesday of every month) at Doctors Memorial Hospital. For more information, call James Lewis at 850-224-9340 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Bible Study 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURSDAY9 a.m. to 11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution, every third Thursday (Holmes County residents only). For more information, call 547-0190. 9 a.m. to noon: Washington County Council on Aging Advanced Portrait Art Class. For more information call Kim at 850-638-6216 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; all 638-0093; every third Thursday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: First Thursday Bene“ ts program staff will be at Washington County Council on Aging. For more information, call 850-638-6216. 10 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging Games and Activities. For more information, call 850-547-2345 11 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging senior lunch. For more information, call 850-547-2345 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; For reservations, call 638-6216. Donations accepted. Noon: Washington County Chamber of Commerce luncheon (every third Thursday) at Northwest Florida Community Hospital Specialty Center. Noon to 2 p.m.: Holmes County Tobacco Cessation Classes fourth (“ rst Thursday of every month) at Holmes County Health Department. For more information, call James Lewis at 850-224-9340 12:30 p.m. Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) BINGO. For more information, call Andrea at 850-638-6216 1 p.m.: Care Givers Support group, third Thursday of each month at the First Presbyterian Church on 5th Street in Chipley. For more information, call Recie Culpepper at 850-566-2553. 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the “ rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 3 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society (second Thursday of each month). The public is invited to attend. 5:30 p.m.: Chemical Addiction Recovery Effort group Caryville Baptist Church Fellowship Hall. For more information, call 850-326-0886. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.: Washington County Tobacco Cessation Classes (second Thursday of each month) at Washington County Health Department. For more information, call James Lewis at 850-224-9340 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church in Bonifay 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.: Washington Council on Aging in Chipley Advanced Line dancing. For more information, call Kim at 850-638-6216 7 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Library Annex Building 330 Harvey Etheridge Street in Bonifay. Call Linda Fowler for more information at 547-3655 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting at Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A 7 p.m.: William Dunaway Chapter of the National Society Sons of the American Revolution (“ rst Thursday of each month) at Jim Buffet and Grill in MariannaFRIDAY6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals, and socialization. For more information call 850-547-2345. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise. For more information call Andrea at 850-638-6216. 10:30 a.m.: Washington County Public Library (Chipley) "Knitting with Looms" third Friday every month. For more information call 850-638-1314. 11 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging senior lunch for more information call 850-547-2345 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; For reservations, call Andrea at 850-638-6216. Donations accepted. 12:30 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) Games and Activities. For more information call Andrea at 850-638-6216 3:30 p.m.: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery. For more information, call 703-0347. 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper (fourth Friday of every month, January to September) 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.: 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced meet on the last Friday of the month at Eastside Baptist Church. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks. For more information, call 850-272-6611. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church.SATURDAYUSDA (third Saturday of January, March, May, July September and November) at Shepherds Gate Church. For more information, call James Guy at 850-258-5854 or John Williamson at 850-703-9681 7 a.m.: Farm Share (second Saturday of each month) at Shepherds Gate Church. For more information, call James Guy at 850-258-5854 or John Williamson at 850-703-9681 8 a.m.: North Bay Clan of The Lower Muskogee Creek Yard Sale (“ rst Saturday of each month until 2 p.m.) Location is 1560 Lonnie Road in Chipley. 9 a.m. to noon: Mobile Food Pantry (fourth Saturday of each month) at Cypress Creek Church in Chipley. For more information, call James Guy at 850-258-5854 or John Williamson at 850-703-9681. 9 a.m.: Food Pantry (second Saturday of each month) at 808 E. Highway 90. For more information call Dr. Yunus of“ ce at 850-547-4284. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: The Holmes County Community Health Clinic at 203 W. Iowa St., Bonifay will be open the “ rst and third Saturday. 9 a.m.: Emergency Food Pantry is open Monday Wednesday and Friday at Shepherds Gate Church in Chipley. For more information, call James Guy at 850-258-5854 or John Williamson at 850-703-9681 10 a.m.: The Alford Community Health Clinic will be open the fourth Saturdays of each month until the last patient is seen. For more information, call 850-272-0101 or 850-209-5501 10 a.m. to noon: Childrens education day (fourth Saturday of each month) at the North Bay Clan Tribal Grounds, located at 1560 Lonnie Road in ChipleySUNDAY8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting board room at Graceville-Campbellton Hospital in Graceville.COMMUNITY CALENDAR COMMUNITY SEE MORE ONLINE AT CHIPLEYPAPER.COM

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, July 25, 2018 A11Reader question: My wife and her three siblings inherited the family home when their mother died. My wife was 20 years old at that time, the eldest, and invested 10k in keeping the house. It is now 39 years later, and the siblings want their share. My wife is the only one who has remained living there and has paid over $700k in upkeep, mortgage, property taxes etc. She also refinanced the home many years ago because each sibling wanted cash for personal reasons. My wife has paid all the interest and principal on these refinances. Another 250k was refinanced to care for their father. How does one divide the shares in this situation? Montys answer: Assuming the relationship between the siblings is positive, the goal might be to ensure they are still talking to each other after they reach a settlement. HOMEDEAR MONTYWhy a partnership agreement is needed with inhe rited property R i c h a r d M o n t g o m e r y Richard MontgomeryHow to plant owersBy Laura FirsztMore Content NowAre you trying your hand at flower gardening for the first time this year? Lucky you. Theres nothing quite like helping to bring lovely flowers out of the bare soil, or nurturing spindly seedlings to full, luscious life. Heres a helpful guide to planting flowers for beginners. Flower gardening must-haves€ A place to plant, such as ” owerbeds or containers. € Flower seeds or seedlings. € DiggersŽ: A sturdy stainless steel hand t rowel is a must. Add a shovel for large-scale ” ower gardening. € Sharp shears for pruning plants „ and cutting a bunch of beautiful blossoms to decorate your home. € A garden hose or a watering can with sprinkler head. € A ” ower garden journal (more about this later).Choose seeds or seedlings Start with easy flower species like pansies or geraniums. Look for varieties that will thrive in both your local USDA Plant Hardiness Zone and your particular yard. Buying ready-to-plant seedlings from a nursery is great for impatient gardeners „ like kids or kids-at-heart „ who want to see beautiful blooms right away, or if its later in the growing season. If you prefer the old-fashioned way, try sowing with heirloom seeds. These are openpollinated traditional seed varieties, which tend to require less care in terms of water and fertilizer than modern hybridized types. Where to plant Your yard may already have beds laid out. If not, choose a sunny, well-drained corner, with easy access to a source of water. Be sure to position flower patches where theirsight and scent will enhanceyour outdoor enjoyment (perhaps adjacent to your backyard patio) and may even attract birds and honeybees to the landscape. Container gardening has become uber popular these days ƒ and with good reason. Strategically placed raised beds, window boxes, or planter pots allow you easily to optimize growing conditions. How to water No need to install a landscape irrigation system just yet. As a beginner, you can water your new flower patch using a hose with a removable sprayer head. For a container garden, a watering can will be just perfect, not to mention fun. A good rule of thumb is to water flowering plants infrequently „ once or twice a week is usually enough „ but deeply, so that the water will reach right down into the soil to nourish the roots. Avoid wetting the leaves or watering only one side (which tends to encourage uneven root growth). Care and feeding of owering plants Nourish your flowers with organic fertilizer or compost matched to your garden soil, especially during periods of active growth. When the posies are past their prime, they should be deadheaded. No, were not making musical recommendations here, but rather talking about pinching or clipping off withered blossoms. This is not just for good looks, but also to direct the plants energies away from developing seeds and into making more flowers. Woody plants, such as roses, will benefit from an occasional pruning of their stems; best times are early spring or after blooming season. Keep a garden journal Make the most ofyour first flower gardening experience. Keep a journal in writing or online to document your garden journey. List any or all of the following:€ The ” ower varieties you tried € The weather in your area this year € How much and how often you watered € Whether you added fertilizer or compost € Which tools you used € What succeeded; what not so much € What surprised you € What youll need to know for next year € How you felt about the whole enterprise.Be sure to include pictures of your bestlooking results. Laura Firszt writes for networx.com BIGSTOCK IMAGES See MONTY A12

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** A12 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | Washington County News JOBSBy Jeffery MarinoZipRecruiter.comWe are in the midst of the great autonomous car race. Within the past few years, automakers have been making rapid strides toward improving driverless capabilities. Theyve also been making big promises to deploy fully autonomous vehicles (no steering wheels, no pedals) by deadlines ranging from 20 19 to 2021. The autonomy level for driverless cars is ranked on a scale from 1 to 5, with 1 being a low form of driver assistance „ such as hands-free parallel parking „ and 5 being full automation requiring no driver intervention or monitoring at all. Most 2018 model cars have some level of automation, but no automaker has yet to reach level 5. Every automaker wants to be the first to do so, which means industry competition is redlining. This also means automakers and autonomous driving software companies are hiring at rapid rates in order to be the first to cross the finish line. Autonomous driving jobs posted to ZipRecruiter.com jumped 27 percent year over year in January 2018. At the close of Q2 2018, autonomous driving jobs increased 250 percent compared to Q2 2017 because of a massive hiring spree that started at the beginning of the year. Top job titles Its not surprising that engineers are in high demand. But whats unique here is the high degree of specialization within the engineering discipline, especially when it comes to perception technology such as light imaging, detection and ranging (LIDAR). Of course, as automakers and software companies continue to innovate in the field, they need someone to sell their products. Thats why strategic account managers are nearly as coveted as engineers. And although not required, most of the job postings for this role state a bachelors degree is preferred.€ Perception software engineer € Strategic account manager € Field service technician € Industrial engineer € Customer success “ eld representative € Field autonomy engineer € Functional safety engineer € Autonomous navigation software engineer € Robotics engineer € Electrical engineerCities with the jobs It may come as no surprise to see Silicon Valley well-represented here. But what is Pittsburgh doing in the top spot? It turns out that Pittsburgh is indeed the epicenter of autonomous driving innovation. Sebastian Thrun and Chris Urmson, the minds behind Googles self-driving car project, were scientists working in the Robotic Learning Laboratory at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. The Steel City is also home to Ubers Advanced Technologies Group, which is the engineering and design team leading the way in creating and testing autonomous Ubers.€ Pittsburgh € Detroit € San Francisco € San Jose, California € Ann Arbor, Michigan The Waymo Fire” y is a fully self-driving car that uses technology developed in Google labs. [WAYMO] Whos driving the An Uber self-driving car does a test drive around San Francisco. [UBER ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES GROUP] autonomous car industry If each siblings percentage interest is in the title, there is still a long history here with conversations that were likely oral, and today, remembered differently. Whenever money is involved transparency and experienced counsel is often useful in keeping relationships intact. It would be beneficial if the siblings could agree up-front on a plan to sort out and decide on how to proceed to avoid any misunderstandings. Create an agenda and appoint someone to take notes in the meeting. After the meeting send a memo of the discussion that includes the plan agreed upon to each sibling. There is no mention of a partnership agreement established when the siblings inherited the house. It will be helpful If one exists. Was probate involved in transferring the title? The more detail on costs and timing you can furnish the less time a consultant will have to spend reconstructing a forty year history. The more uncontested data you can produce, the more unlikely you will encounter impediments. Seeking competent advice that is outside the family can prevent future misunderstandings that change the family dynamics. Consider retaining a certified public accountant (CPA) to recommend the best way to approach the expenses, the payouts, and the refinances from the date the siblings received the title. It may be helpful to engage a CPA that is also an attorney. Richard Montgomery is the author of House Money An Insiders Secrets to Saving Thousands When You Buy or Sell a Home.Ž He is a real estate industry veteran who advocates industry reform and offers readers unbiased real estate advice. Find him at DearMonty.com. MONTYFrom Page A11There is no mention of a partnership agreement established when the siblings inherited the house. It will be helpful If one exists.

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, July 25, 2018 A13

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** A14 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | Washington County News Feb. 11: Clash at Daytona (Brad Keselowski) Feb. 15: Can-Am Duel at Daytona (Ryan Blaney and Chase Elliott) Feb. 18: Daytona 500 (Austin Dillon) Feb. 25: Folds of Honor 500 at Atlanta (Kevin Harvick) March 4: Kobalt 400 at Las Vegas (Kevin Harvick) March 11: Camping World 500(k) at Phoenix (Kevin Harvick) March 18: Auto Club 400 at Fontana (Martin Truex Jr.) March 26: STP 500 at Martinsville (Clint Bowyer) April 8: OReilly Auto Parts 500 at Texas (Kyle Busch) April 15: Food City 500 at Bristol (Kyle Busch) April 21: Toyota Owners 400 at Richmond (Kyle Busch) April 29: Geico 500 at Talladega (Joey Logano) May 6: AAA 400 at Dover (Kevin Harvick) May 12: Go Bowling 400 at Kansas (Kevin Harvick) May 19: All-Star Race at Charlotte (Kevin Harvick) May 27: Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte (Kyle Busch) June 3: Pocono 400 (Martin Truex Jr.) June 10: FireKeepers Casino 400 at Michigan (Clint Bowyer) June 24: Toyota/Save Mart 350 at Sonoma (Martin Truex Jr.) July 1: Chicago 400 at Chicagoland (Kyle Busch) July 7: Coke Zero 400 at Daytona (Erik Jones) July 14: Quaker State 400 at Kentucky (Martin Truex Jr.) July 22: New Hampshire 301 (Kevin Harvick) July 29: Pennsylvania 400 at Pocono Aug. 5: 355 at the Glen, at Watkins Glen Aug. 12: Pure Michigan 400 Aug. 18: Night Race at Bristol Sept. 2: Southern 500 at Darlington Sept. 9: Brickyard 400 at Indianapolis Sept. 16: Las Vegas 400 Sept. 22: Federated Auto Parts 400 at Richmond Sept. 30: Bank of America 500(k) at Charlotte road course Oct. 7: Delaware 400 at Dover Oct. 14: Alabama 500 at Talladega Oct. 21: Hollywood Casino 400 at Kansas Oct. 28: First Data 500 at Martinsville Nov. 4: Texas 500 Nov. 11: Can-Am 500(k) at Phoenix Nov. 18: Ford EcoBoost 400 at Homestead NASCAR THIS WEEKFEUD OF THE WEEK SPEED FREAKSA few questions we had to ask ourselvesCUP STANDINGS WHATS ON TAP QUESTIONS & ATTITUDECompelling questions ... and maybe a few actual answersGODWINS PICKS FOR POCONO 2018 SCHEDULE AND WINNERS 12345678910 KEN WILLIS TOP 10 NASCAR DRIVER RANKINGSKEVIN HARVICK His turn up top KYLE BUSCH Scared of Harvick? MARTIN TRUEX JR. Was only renting top spot here last week KURT BUSCH Running well enough to consider winning ERIK JONES Roll interrupted by 16th at N.H. ARIC ALMIROLA Getting closer and closer CLINT BOWYER Its been a bad few weeks KYLE LARSON Runner-up at Pocono last month JOEY LOGANO Fifteen top-10s in 20 starts this season The Daytona Beach News-Journals Godwin Kelly & Ken Willis have covered NASCAR for nearly 60 years combined. godwin.kelly@ news-jrnl.com ken.willis@news-jrnl.comMOTOR MOUTHS PODCASTThe pod is immune to the dog days of summer. Come in, be cool. Tune in online at www.news-journalonline.com/ daytonamotormouths RYAN BLANEY Middle name is Michael THREE THINGS TO WATCHNEW HAMPSHIRE THREE THINGS WE LEARNED More impressed with Kevin Harvick or Aric Almirola? GODSPEAK: Considering his age, give me Harvick. At 42, he knows there wont be many more seasons like this. Making hay while the sun is shining. KENS CALL: Almirolas performance this year tells you how much of a difference equipment plays. It also tells you that Danica simply wasnt built for stock-car racin.Pocono again this week? Is it time to make Pocono a once-ayear stop? GODSPEAK: When all the contracts (next TV deal) are renewed in 2025, Pocono may be a one-stop Cup Series track with an extra ARCA race. KENS CALL: Absolutely. Especially if it brings a date (or second date) to a great venue ... or shortens the season. WINNER: Kevin Harvick REST OF TOP 5: Kyle Busch, Martin Truex Jr., Chase Elliott, Kyle Larson FIRST ONE OUT: Ty Dillon DARK HORSE: Denny Hamlin DONT BE SURPRISED IF: Harvick continues with his season trend of winning consecutive races. KYLE BUSCH VS. KEVIN HARVICK: Busch had the lead, but the handling of his No. 18 Toyota was fading. Harvick was faster in his No. 4 Ford, tapped him out of the way and took the checkered ” ag. GODWIN KELLYS TAKE: This Big 3Ž deal just got more interesting. After the race, Busch leaned on his car and said of the bump-and-run, How you race is how you get raced.ŽThumbs-up for Kyle Busch after New Hampshire runner-up?A slightly hesitant thumbs-up, but a thumbs-up nonetheless. Kyle generally seems OK with rough-and-tumble racing whenever he turns out on top, but hes not always “ ne when hes the victim. Sunday at New Hampshire, he was the victim as Kevin Harvick gave him the thump-and-run in the late laps. It was enough to move onlookers to the edge of their seats, wondering what might follow.And ƒ nothing?Not much. Kyle did say, How you race is how you get raced,Ž which some might see as an ominous warning to Harvick. But it also couldve been Kyle admitting that hes been in Harvicks shoes before and shouldnt complain about being on the other side of that transaction.Ž Also, theres this: Not many guys in that garage want to mess with Kevin Harvick. That mightve also played a role in Kyles newfound congeniality.„ Ken Willis, ken.willis @news-jrnl.com1. Kyle Busch 844 2. Kevin Harvick 791 3. Martin Truex Jr. 740 4. Joey Logano 679 5. Kurt Busch 646 6. Clint Bowyer 638 7. Brad Keselowski 635 8. Kyle Larson 606 9. Ryan Blaney 584 10. Denny Hamlin 583 11. Aric Almirola 575 12. Jimmie Johnson 522 13. Chase Elliott 520 14. Erik Jones 501 15. Alex Bowman 453 16. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. 425 17. Paul Menard 424 18. Ryan Newman 379 19. Austin Dillon 378 20. Daniel Suarez 359 CUP SERIES: Gander Outdoors 400 SITE: Pocono Raceway (2.5-mile triangle) SCHEDULE: Saturday, practice (CNBC, 9 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.), qualifying (NBC Sports Network, 4 p.m.). Sunday, race (NBC Sports Network, coverage begins at 2 p.m.; green ” ag, 2:45 p.m.) XFINITY: U.S. Cellular 250 SITE: Iowa Speedway (0.875-mile oval) SCHEDULE: Friday, practice (NBC Sports Network, 5 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.). Saturday, qualifying (NBC Sports Network, 3 p.m.), race (NBC Sports Network, 5:30 p.m.) CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS: Gander Outdoors 150 SITE: Pocono Raceway TV SCHEDULE: Saturday, race (Fox Sports 1, 1 p.m.)1. Few le oversAs many as 40 stock cars can start a Cup Series race, but only three drivers are winning, and so the Big 3Ž is alive and well. Through 20 races, Kevin Harvick, Kyle Busch and Martin Truex Jr. have won 15 of them. Harvick and Busch have “ nished 1-2 four times this season.2. Dennys dealDenny Hamlin has the feel of that guy paddling harder but going slower in the rowboat. He “ nished 13th at New Hampshire. (The car) just would not turn,Ž he said. I think our cars have speed, we just have to do the best to get our setup on there that we can be aggressive with.Ž3. Head to headIn their head-to-head statistical comparison in the No. 6 Roush Fenway Racing Ford, Trevor Bayne has scored the best “ nish this season. He was 12th at Texas. Matt Kenseths best “ nish was 13th at Pocono. Kenseth was 15th at New Hampshire, with Pocono 2 on deck.„ Godwin Kelly, godwin. kelly@news-jrnl.comKevin Harvick is all smiles as he holds up a large lobster in Victory Lane after winning Sundays race at New Hampshire. [AP/MARY SCHWALM] 1. Pocono dj vuIf it seems like the Cup Series was just at Pocono Raceway, you are not going bananas. NASCAR held an event there on June 3, and six races later, they are back in the mountain region of Pennsylvania. The Tricky TriangleŽ has long been the track with two Cup race dates closest together. This tradition started in 1982 when Bobby Allison swept both races that season.2. Charlotte crashesThe Charlotte road-course race later this season should be interesting. Several drivers crashed heavily (as they say in sports-car racing) after an open test on the of“ cially dubbed and trademarked ROVAL (road course/oval). The track will use the road course for its Sept. 30 Cup Series playoff race. William Byron got the worst of it. His No. 24 Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet failed to make the hard left turn off the oval and slammed into a temporary tire barrier.3. Silly season?Its getting to that time of year when rumors start ” ying about the status of teams, drivers and sponsors for the next season of competition. Kurt Busch has started talking about his lack of a contract with Stewart-Haas Racing in 2019. Meanwhile, Jimmie Johnson will lose his primary sponsor Lowes after 2018 runs its course, and 5-hour Energy wont be back next year with Martin Truex Jr. All of this news is not so silly.„ Godwin Kelly, godwin. kelly@news-jrnl.com Not long ago, Martin Truex Jr. celebrated with a burnout after winning Junes Pocono Raceway Cup race. [AP/DERIK HAMILTON]POCONO

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, July 25, 2018 A15 SPORTS TICKER IN BRIEFATLANTIC CITY, N.J.Meadowlands initial sports bets total $3.5MThe Meadowlands Racetrack in New Jersey took in nearly $3.5 million in sports bets during its first nine days of accept-ing such bets.And most of that came from two weekends that sandwiched a dead period for major professional sports caused by baseballs All-Star break, when there was little to bet on, with basketball and soccer World Cup over, and football and hockey months away from beginning their seasons. Meadowlands operator Jeff Gural told The Associated Press it accepted just under $3.5 million worth of sports bets since it began taking them on July 14.This past Saturday, with baseball having resumed, the track took in over $650,000, and additional bets on baseball and other sports came in on Sunday.LONDONChallenger Tour revamped to bolster lower levelsThe ATP is changing its Challenger Tour, look-ing to streamline tennis at lower levels and make it easier for players to earn a living.Starting in 2019, draw sizes will be increased from 32 to 48 at all events in the second rung of the mens tennis. All players will earn prize money and receive hotel accommoda-tions. The ATP estimates an additional $1 million in prize money.There are more than 160 tournaments worldwide on this years Challenger Tour. Starting next year, they will be rebranded as ATP Challenger 70, 80, 95, 110 and 125, according to the prize-money levels and ranking points. The highest-level Challengers will offer $162,480.DALLASNowitzki signs for record 21st season with MavsDirk Nowitzki is offi-cially signed for a record 21st season with the Dallas Mavericks.The Mavericks announced Monday that they had re-signed the 13-time All-Star. That was their plan when they declined a team option on Nowitzkis contract at the start of free agency to create more room under the salary cap before signing DeAndre Jordan. Nowitzki, a former NBA MVP who turned 40 last month, is set to become the first player in NBA history to play 21 consecutive seasons for the same franchise. The 7-foot German is one of six players overall, and the only international player, with more than 30,000 career points.Japanese interpreter Mariko Nagai speaks during an interview with a backdrop of Yoyogi National Stadium in Tokyo, which symbolized Japans revival just 19 years after World War II. The stadium hosted swimming in 1964 and will host handball in 2020. Nagai was a university student from northern Japan who landed a job as an interpreter at the dazzling swimming venue, where American Don Schollander would win four gold medals. [KOJI UEDA/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] Two years out from the 2020 Games, Tokyos Olympic plans echo its 1964 e ortsBy Stephen WadeThe Associated PressTOKYO „ Mariko Nagai walked outside Yoyogi National Stadium „ the late-architect Kenzo Tanges masterpiece from Tokyos 1964 Olympics „ and pic-tured the city in that era.She was a university student from northern Japan who landed a job as an interpreter at the dazzling swimming venue, where American Don Schollander would win four gold medals.I wouldnt say Japanese people were confident about the ability to become one of the advanced nations,Ž Nagai said. But we wanted to show how much recovery we had made.ŽTanges jewel, with a soar-ing roofline that still defines modern architecture, symbolized Japans revival just 19 years after the ravages of World War II. A centerpiece in 64, it will host handball in Tokyos 2020 Olympics, a link between the now-and-then in the Japanese capital.Tuesday will mark two years before the opening cer-emony of the 2020 Games. A new National Stadium is rising on the site of the demolished one that hosted the opening in 1964. Tokyo organizers, though, chose to re-use several older build-ings, partly to cut costs. They include the Nippon Budokan, the spiritual home of Japanese judo and other martial arts that became a wellknown rock concert venue in the ensuing decades.For Nagai, the theme of recovery also links now and then.She grew up in Sendai, a city near the northeast coast that was devastated by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami. The 9.0 quake destroyed the house where she lived until she was 18. No one was living there at the time, but family treasures were lost or destroyed.Again, this is an opportu-nity to showcase to the world how much recovery we have made,Ž she said.Nagai still has her blue Olympic blazer, now faded and minus a pocket patch that she removed after the games „ and has since lost, possibly in the earthquake rubble. The embroidered emblem featured Japans rising sun, the Olympic rings and TOKYO 1964Ž etched across the bottom.Few foreigners walked Tokyos streets back then, unlike in todays tourism boom. Japan had 29 million foreign visitors last year and expects 40 million in 2020.A lot of ordinary people who were not used to seeing foreigners felt extraordinary that they could be surrounded by so many non-Japanese,Ž Nagai said. It was something very extraor-dinary, very special.ŽShe was an exception more than 50 years ago, having picked up English as a high-school exchange student in Dallas.In 1964, you could say almost nobody was able to speak English,Ž she said. So the organizing committee had a very hard time recruit-ing interpreters.ŽShe laughs about it now. The job didnt even involve interpreting.The text would be handed to me in English. All I had to do was read it aloud. I remember that announcing the names was very difficult,Ž she said, still able to recall the tricky pronunciations of some Swedish swimmers.Her part-time job as a 21-year-old announcer turned into a career at Simul International as one of Japans best-known inter-preters. She has worked with American presidents, British royals and Japanese prime ministers, from Masayoshi Ohira four decades ago to current leader Shinzo Abe.Japan has joined the ranks of the worlds rich nations, but the Yoyogi stadium fits into 21st-century Tokyo, just as it did in the 1960s and much in the way a 500-year-old European cathedral remains timeless.Thats the beauty of a classic building,Ž said Amer-ican-born architect James Lambiasi, who has worked in Tokyo for 25 years. It does not age. Its always wonder-ful. Remember, Tokyo was a wooden city recovering from the war, and these new tech-nologies of steel and concrete gave the city its rebirth.ŽThe stadiums sweeping roof is anchored to earth by steel cables, like a suspension bridge, and mixes the modern with traditional forms found in Japanese temples and shrines.Lambiasi, who teaches design at Shibaura University and the Japan campus of Temple University, described the stadium as the pinnacle of modern architecture.ŽHe minced few words when talking about its importance and that of its designer, Tange, whose tools were slide rules and his imagination. The building is a techno-logical wonder,Ž Lambiasi said. And you have to keep in mind he did it before any type of computer graphics, any computer modeling.ŽCutting costs for host cities has become a priority for the International Olym-pic Committee, which has been criticized for pressuring them to overspend on new venues in the past.Look to the pastBy Jerome PugmireThe Associated PressHOCKENHEIM, Germany „ There is something about adversity that brings out the best in Lewis Hamilton.Even though he has won four Formula One titles, and 66 races, Hamilton draws huge motivation from being against the odds.In the past two races, he has finished first and second after being way down on the grid. He won Sundays rain-hit German Grand Prix after starting from 14th In the previous race, he was bumped off the track on the first lap but rose from last to second at the British GP with another superbly skilled and resil-ient drive.When youre up against adversity ... its always a chance to show what you can do and driving from the back is so much more fun,Ž Hamilton said. You never know how far you can go. Sometimes you are able to go the distance.ŽHamiltons love of fighting from the back is somewhat ironic, con-sidering he is F1s record holder with 76 pole posi-tions „ eight more than Michael Schumacher.But carving through the field gives him a form of pure energy, rekindling the joy from his cash-strapped youth competing in go-karts.Its very reminiscent of how I started out. The kart that I had was really, really old, owned by five different families,Ž Hamilton recalled. My dad spent a little bit of money to shave it down and re-spray it ... and made it as brand new as it could be. But it was still, he would call it, a four-poster bed.But Id always start at the back and Id have to wriggle through the more experienced (drivers) and faster cars,Ž added the 33-year-old Hamilton, fondly remembering his formative racing years. Thats where I learned to do it, thats what I was best at doing.ŽFew backed Hamilton to succeed in Germany, especially after a hydrau-lic failure hampered his qualifying session.Furthermore, archrival Sebastian Vettel was on pole position in a supremely quick Ferrari and gunning to extend his championship lead.But Hamilton won, with a little help from Vettels sudden crash on a sodden circuit and described his performance as possibly his best.Resilient Hamilton revels in adversity

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** A16 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | Washington County News

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, July 25, 2018 B1 CELEBRATE Douglas Wolter tries to make the sale of his mini dirt bike so he can take his mom on a special trip. [DIANE M. ROBINSON | THE NEWS] Sisters Clemisha Hudson and Makalah Bell set up shop at T&B Hidden Treasures to sell their goods and raise money for school. [DIANE M. ROBINSON | THE NEWS] Though there were not many vendors this year, the Tinsleys hope to grow the event in the years to come.[DIANE M. ROBINSON | THE NEWS] Kaitlyn and Cassie Hildebrand were on hand to sell clothes, shoes and toys to help raise money for school supplies. [DIANE M. ROBINSON | THE NEWS] By Diane M. RobinsonThe News| @HCTA_Diane drobinson@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY … With spirited young entrepreneurs all around, T&B Hidden Treasures in Chipley hosted the first annual Flea Market and Funday on July 21.Owners Bill and Sunny Tinsley said the idea came to them as they watched children tag along to the store with their parents and grandparents; also, after watching an episode of American Pickers where a similar event was held in Iowa.Trying to encourage the entrepreneurial spirit, the Tinsleys held the kids only flea market where children could come sell their things and keep all of the profits.Kids ages 6-16 were invited to come set up shop to raise money for themselves. At the event, there were also sprinklers to enjoy when the kids wanted to cool off. Lunch plates were served along with drinks and popsicles throughout the day.We want to help teach these kids how to start making their own money,Ž said Bill Tin-sley. Kids needs something productive to do, how else will they learn if not by doing.ŽSunny Tinsley said she loves seeing the kids come in and watching them learn to love history.Some of the kids that come in here have old souls,Ž she said. They begin collecting things and learning about history, its awesome to see.ŽThe kid vendors had their own reason for items. Ten-year-old Douglas Wolter was no exception.Douglas had his mini dirt bike up for sale so he could take his mom to Panama City for a special outing. I am selling my dirt bike to help raise some money because I want to take my mom on a helicopter ride over Panama City,Ž Douglas said. I sure hope I can raise enough to take her.ŽKaitlyn Hildebrand, 14, says her reason for selling her things is so she can buy a laptop.Im older now and I need a laptop for school things,Ž said Hildebrand. They are expensive so I want to help my parents buy one for me.ŽThe Tinsleys hope to make this an annual event like Flea Across Florida, which is Sep-tember 14-15, and hope to watch the event grow in the same way.Encouraging the entrepreneurial spirit

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** B2 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | Washington County News The Associated PressLOUISVILLE, Ky. „ Papa Johns is attempting to ward off its controversial founder from amassing a controlling stake in the company by adopting a poison-pillŽ plan.The company is struggling to distance itself from John Schnatter, who resigned as chairman this month after his use of a racial slur during a media training session was revealed. Schnatter has since said his resigna-tion was a mistakeŽ and criticized the companys handling of the incident.Papa Johns, based in Louisville, Kentucky, said its shareholder rights plan would be activated if anyone acquires 15 percent or more of outstanding shares without board approval. The plan works by letting shareholders buy additional stock at a discounted price, which in turn would dilute the acquirers shares.Papa Johns said Schnatter and his affiliates, who currently own more than 30 percent of shares, have been grand-fathered into the plan. But they will be consid-ered an acquiring party if they amass 31 or more of shares, the company said.The company said the plan wont keep its board from considering any offer that is fair and in the best interest of shareholders.Schnatter, who founded the company in 1984, had already stepped down late last year as CEO after blaming disappointing pizza sales on the NFLs handling of the player protests during the national anthem. After this months controversy, Papa Johns said it would start scrubbing Schnatters image from its marketing materials and that it is evaluating all ties with him.Schnatter remains on the company board.After reporting Schnat-ters use of a racial slur, Forbes published another story last week detailing a corporate culture where women were subject to sexist behavior. The mag-azine said male employees made crude comments without consequence, and that executives were rewarded based on their personal ties to Schnatter.A representative for Schnatter said the story contains numerous inaccuracies and misrepresentations.ŽIn a note to investors Monday, Stifel analyst Chris OCull said the outlook for Papa Johns is growing dimmerŽ and that media reports are reinforcing the public perception that its not a trusted brand.Shares of Papa Johns International Inc. are down more than 30 per-cent over the past year.Papa Johns tries to prevent founder from gaining control BUSINESSBRIEFCASEApollo to spend $5.6B on rural hospital chainPrivate equity firm Apollo Global Manage-ment will spend about $5.6 billion to buy the rural hos-pital chain LifePoint and combine it with health system operator RCCH HealthCare Partners.LifePoint shareholders will receive $65 in cash for each share in a deal thats worth about $2.7 billion not counting net debt and minority interest, the companies said. Thats a premium of nearly 36 percent to Brentwood, Tennessee-based LifePoint Health Inc.s closing price July 20. That was the last trading day before the deal announcement.DETROITDetroit auto show will be in June starting in 2020Organizers of the North American International Auto Show say that starting in 2020 the annual Detroit event will take place in June instead of January.A statement from the show Monday says the new schedule will enable automakers, industry suppliers and others to deliver dynamic exhibits and experiential opportunities outside of the shows four wallsŽ at downtowns Cobo Center.BEIJINGChina probing European, Korean steel importsChina launched a trade investigation Monday of steel from Europe and South Korea, potentially complicating efforts to recruit them as allies in its tariff dispute with U.S. President Donald Trump.The Commerce Ministry said it will look into whether some stainless steel products from the European Union, South Korea, Japan and Indonesia are sold at improperly low prices and should be subject to anti-dumping duties. The Associated PressBy Colleen BarryThe Associated PressMILAN „ Fiat Chrysler shares were vol-atile Monday as investors expressed worry about the exit of ailing CEO Sergio Marchionne, whose driven and creative management style has been the com-panys fortune.Shares in the Italian-American carmaker closed down 1.5 percent after a harder 4 percent opening tumble in the first trading since Marchionnes grave health condition was dis-closed over the weekend.Trading was volatile, particularly after news that the head of the companys big European operations, who had been considered one of Marchionnes potential successors, was quitting. Ferrari, where Marchionne was also replaced at the helm, closed down about 5 percent.The Fiat Chrysler board on Saturday named long-time Jeep execu-tive Mike Manley as CEO, unexpectedly accelerating a transition that was planned for early next year. The company said the 66-year-old Marchionne suffered complications from shoulder surgery in Zurich, Switzerland, last month that worsened in recent days, and that he could not resume his duties. No other details were released.Marchionne will be a hard act to follow. Analysts credit his industry vision and ability to strike deals and take risks for increas-ing the market value of Fiat by tenfold since he took over in 2004. And while he was due to retire in 2019, most expected him to stay on in some role to guide the company.Some of us assumed hed remain as chairman and be there to phone in his instructions,Ž said Max Warburton, an analyst at market research firm Ber-nstein who often publicly tussled with Marchionne on conference calls about the companys earnings.Marchionne ran FCA in a command and control style, with constant firefighting measures. There is no operating manual to follow,Ž he said.Marchionne engineered both the turnarounds of Italian carmaker Fiat and Chrysler, which Fiat acquired in 2009 in a deal with the U.S. govern-ment, creating the worlds seventh-largest carmaker out of two formerly dysfunctional entities. He created shareholder value for the Fiat-founding Agnelli family with successful spinoffs of Fiats heavy vehicle maker CNH Industrial and of the iconic Ferrari super sports car company. But his goal of another big merger failed to find any takers.Marchionne proved himself a consummate deal-maker. He won con-trol of Chrysler in a 2009 deal with U.S. President Barack Obamas government without putting a penny down, only in exchange for bringing more small-car technol-ogy to Chrysler.In May of 2011, less than two years after leaving bankruptcy, Marchionne pulled off a huge refinanc-ing of the companys $7.5 billion loan from the U.S. government, retiring it with a combination of cor-porate bonds, loans and payments, even though Chrysler had not yet turned an annual profit. Some of the debt carried at 12 percent interest rate and cost the company $1.2 billion in interest per year. The maneuver helped the com-pany to start making money again.The Italian Canadian manager later demonstrated his agility by refocusing U.S. production on trucks and SUVS and away from passenger cars to meet market demand, a process that got underway in 2016.And when President Donald Trump took office, Marchionne quickly responded to his calls to keep jobs in America by repatriating production at a Mexican plant. On Monday, Trump called Elkann to inquire about Marchionnes condition, the company confirmed.In Italy, Marchionne moved production away from low-margin small cars and toward pricier Alfa Romeo and Maserati models for the export market, even if his relaunch of Alfa still has not reached his targets.Manleys first appointment in the role was at a regular Fiat Chrysler executive council meeting in Turin on Monday, and his first public appearance will be to present FCAs second quarter earnings on Wednesday.Marchionne had announced in his last major presentation to analysts last month that the quarterly results would show Fiat Chrysler at zero debt for the first time „ an occasion for which the normally casually attired Italian-Canadian manager donned a tie „ even if only briefly. The five-year plan included a significant shift to electrified motors.Manley, 54, has been key to transforming the quintessentially American Jeep brand into a global marquee since taking over there in 2009, and he also has been the head of the Ram truck division since 2015. Both brands have formed the leading edge of Fiat Chryslers North American strategy to move away from passenger car production and focus on SUVs and trucks to meet market demand.No power steering? Fiat Chrysler is shaken without visionary CEO behind wheelChrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne, left, is seen with Jeep brand President and CEO Mike Manley on May 10, 2010, at the Jefferson North Assembly Plant in Detroit. Fiat Chryslers board recommended Manley to replace the seriously ill Marchionne. [CARLOS OSORIO/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO]

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, July 25, 2018 B3 SCHOOLS & SOCIETY Trivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy.com 1. From fun surveys, whats the most popular response when asked to name a food tasting better if fried? Potatoes, Chicken, Okra, Fish 2. Which candy bar originally came in three pieces of one chocolate, one vanilla and one strawberry? 3 Musketeers, Baby Ruth, Mr. Goodbar, 5th Avenue 3. Who actually buried the treasure in Robert Louis Stevensons Treasure IslandŽ? Capt. Kidd, Long John Silver, Blackbeard, Capt. Flint 4. Jean Vander Pyl was the most-famous voice of ...? Olive Oyl, Phone operator, Betty Boop, Wilma Flintstone 5. Who was the last U.S. president to type all his own letters? Wilson, Taft, Hoover, Truman 6. In mph, whats the approximate top speed of a roadrunner? 8, 14, 20, 35 ANSWERS: 1. Chicken, 2. 3 Musketeers, 3. Capt. Flint, 4. Wilma Flintstone, 5. Wilson, 6. 20TRIVIA BY WILSON CASEY Wilson CaseySpecial to The NewsCHIPLEY „ The Chipley High School Band hosting a world-class musical group for two days of rehearsals at the schools facilities Thurs-day and Friday.The Academy Drum & Bugle Corps, based in Arizona, is midway through a six-week competitive tour across the country, concluding with the Drum Corps International World Championships in Indi-anapolis, Indiana, in the second week of August. The corps will stay at CHS on Thursday, July 26 and Friday, July 27, as they prepare for a competition in Dothan, Alabama on Friday night.In 2001, group was formed to give some of Arizonas finest young musicians an introduction to the incredibly unique activity of drum and bugle corps. By 2006, the corps had grown to 135 members and competed for the first time in Drum Corps International World Championships in Madison, Wisconsin where they earned the title of Division II World Champion. The year 2007 marked their first year competing in Division I, now called World Class, where they continue to compete today. In 2009, The Academy was named the official drum and bugle corps of the City of Tempe. The 2016 marked a his-toric season for the corps with its first appearance in World Class Finals competition, placing 11th overall. The corps is well on its way to providing another amazing season to 150 young adults in 2018.The corps is open to young adults from age 16 to 21. Members are required to audition for the corps each year and are accepted primarily based on their positive attitude, self-discipline and dedication, in addition to their musical ability and marching skills.The corps will be rehearsing on the CHS practice fields behind the school, and area band students are encouraged to come observe the rehearsals. The timing of the corps visit is ideal for the members of the CHS "Spirit of the Tiger" Marching Band as they will observe this inspir-ing group ahead of their own preseason marching camp slated to start Monday, July 30.The CHS Band thanks the Washington County School Board and many area businesses that have helped roll out the wel-come for this prestigious group.CHS Band hosting The Academy Drum & Bugle Corps AUGUST2: First Day for Teachers/Paras/10 Month Personnel (Professional Development Day) 3: Professional Development Day 6-9: Pre-Planning Days (Teachers/ Paras/10 Month Personnel) 10: First Day of School for StudentsSEPTEMBER3: Labor Day (Students and All Personnel Out) 10: Progress Reports Go Out 11: Recognition of "Patriot Day" at Schools 17: Recognition of "Constitution Day" at Schools 24-28: Recognition of "Celebrate Freedom Week" at Schools 26: Early Release/Professional Development (Students Released at 1 p.m.)OCTOBER12: Vernon High School Homecoming 15-16: Fall Break (Students/Teachers/Paras/10 Month and Lunchroom Personnel/Bus Drivers Out) 19: Chipley High School Homecoming 30: Report Cards Go Out 31: Early Release/Professional Development (Students Released at 1 p.m.)NOVEMBER9: Recognition of Veterans Chipley and Vernon Schools 13: Progress Reports Go Out 19-23: Thanksgiving Holidays (Students/Teachers/Paras/ 10 Month and Lunchroom Personnel/ Bus Drivers Out) 21-23: Thanksgiving Holidays (12 Month Personnel Out)DECEMBER21: Early Release (Students Released at 1 p.m.) 24-31: Christmas Break (Students/ Teachers/Paras/10 Month Personnel and Lunchroom Personnel/Bus Drivers Out) 24-25: 12 Month Personnel Out 31: 12 Month Personnel OutJANUARY 20191: 12 Month Personnel Out 1-3: Teachers/10 Month Personnel Out 1-4: Students/Lunchroom Personnel/ Bus Drivers Out 4: Teachers Planning Day 7: Classes Resume 21: Martin Luther King Day (Students and All Personnel Out) 23: Report Cards Go OutFEBRUARY7: Progress Reports Go Out 13: Early Release/Professional Development (Students Released at 1 p.m.) 18: Presidents Day (Students/ Teachers/Paras/ 10 Month and Lunchroom Personnel/ Buss Drivers Out)MARCH6: Early Release/Professional Development (Students Released at 1 p.m.) 25-29: Spring Break (Students and All Personnel Out)APRIL9: Report Cards Go Out 19: Spring Day (Students/Teachers/ Paras/10 Month and Lunchroom Personnel/Bus Drivers Out) 23: Progress Reports Go OutMAY7: FPTC Graduation 21: Vernon High School Senior Awards 5:30 p.m. 21: Chipley High School Senior Awards 7:30 p.m. 23: Vernon High School Graduation 24: Last Day of School (Students Released at 1 p.m.) 24: WISE Graduation 24: Chipley High School Graduation 27: Memorial Day (All Personnel Out) 28-30: Post Planning Days for Teachers/Paras/10 Month PersonnelJUNE10: Report Cards Go Out 2018 … 2019 WASHINGTON COUNTY SCHOOL CALENDAR By Melissa EricksonMore Content NowWhether theyre studying for a world history final or concen-trating on programming homework for coding class, students are often plugged in and listening to music on headphones. Enter a library or home-work space and it seems studying with music is the norm rather than the exception. But should your child study with music? It depends.The effect of background sound on task performance has been studied in depth for the past 40 years in a phenomenon known as the irrelevant sound effect,Ž said Dr. Nick Perham, a lecturer in the School of Health Sciences at the Univer-sity of Wales Institute in Cardiff, U.K. The Mozart effectŽ theory is often dumbed down to listening to music will make you smarter,Ž but studies do show that music can improve memory and attention, pump you up or slow you down, among other things. One study from the Stanford School of Medicine showed that music engages the areas of the brain involved with paying attention, making predictions and updating the event in memory. Helpful types of musicSound affects performance in a variety of ways, Perham said.If a task requires some mental arithmetic, such as recalling a list of items in order, background sound that contains acoustical variation will impair this. Most sounds do this. Someone speaking is an example of acousti-cally varying sound,Ž Perham said. On the other hand, a task that requires infor-mation to be processed semantically, such as reading comprehension, is impaired by music with lyrics. Nonspeech sounds dont impair reading comprehension compared to quiet, but speech does. Same for lyrical and nonlyrical music,Ž Perham said.Many people listen to music to help them concentrate, but it really depends on the kind of music thats playing and what effect you want that music to have, said Benjamin Hardy, a writer at Medium. com and doctoral candidate at Clemson University. For many, listening to music while doing another task „ including aca-demics „ has a positive effect on performance, creativity, motivation and concentration, said Hardy, author of Will-power Doesnt Work: Discover the Hidden Keys to Success.Ž To banish the dis-traction of music while studying, choose songs that are highly repetitive, ambient sounds or classical music, said Hardy, who often writes while listening to one song on repeat. It allows you to dis-solve into the noise, stops your brain from wandering and allows you to focus on the task at hand,Ž he said. Studying with music can bene t certain students

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** B4 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | Washington County NewsIts hard to walk away from something. I dont often write about my realŽ job, what I do during the day. I literally had a job that was a perfect fit, I helped people and I got to run the show, what is not to love? But as we are looking to move on to our next adventure, I gave my notice and started to prepare for the process of handing over my job to someone else. Turns out its really hard when you build something up and then you have to hand it over. It was my last day recently. I had kinda ignored it, the ticking of the countdown clock. I knew two months in advance and I shared that knowledge with my leadership. I had to admit to myself that I was going to have to start distancing myself from the thing I worked so hard to build, from the people that I worked so hard to help but the truth is, it was not mine to keep and I knew that I had to move on and frankly I knew that it would be in good hands. So I ignored the final countdown except for the fact that I spent many nights working on my standard operating procedures. I needed to know that I was giving the person after me the very best information to succeed and also to make sure that my clients would be well taken care of.The hardest thing is to take apart your office. Are we ever really ready to move on? The answer is yes. We have to move on and we have to grow. Moving on means that there are clearly other things out there for us, out there for me. So in the process of preparing for the new, I have to let go of the old. Once I sat in an interview where they viewed my resume with sceptic distrust: Why was it that I had so many jobs over the past 10 years? Why did I relocate so often? And ehy in the world should they hire me?Ž Its simple, I told them. You hire me knowing that while I might not be here long, I will make my mark and I will benefit your company. Better yet, when my time is up, I will train a better meŽ to continue the work. As a military wife and then an oil industry wife, I pack my house and move often. Its something that is just a given about us, my family. We are nomadic and frankly, I love it. I love the adventure that awaits us at the next move, the next state, the next house and yes, the next job. While few will understand that, many will understand that feeling of leaving behind something that is good. My coworkers became family and through them and those relationships, I grew. So while I hope that I have imprinted something on them and their life, I know they have done so on mine. I watched as a dear friend and coworker stretched to take over that role. As the crew rallied to cover the gaps until they found a new, smooth groove. Truth is that no one is irreplaceable and thats a good thing. Life is a short and fragile thing. We each have a purpose and to reach that purpose we have to be willing to move. Whether its moving forward or backward... lateral or to a whole new state like me... its movement that will sustain us. „ Kalynn Brazeal can be reached by email at kmbrazeal@icloud.com.Next steps K a l y n n B r a z e a l Kalynn Brazeal FAITH EVENTSIf you would like your Washington County church listed here, please send information to: news@ chipleypaper.com. Due to space limitation, please only send regular church services. For special services, please send separate submission. Assembly of GodCorbin Road Assembly of God Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 105 Corbin Road in Chipley. Cords of Love Assembly of God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study is a 6:30 p.m. The church is at 2060 Bethlehem Road in Cottondale. Grace Assembly of God @ Chipley Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 567 North Main Street, Chipley New Bethany Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Shaky Joe Road just off Highway 280 at Hinsons Crossroads. New Life Fellowship Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 695 5th Street, Chipley. Wausau Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 3537 Washington Street in Wausau.BaptistAbigail Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located on Dawkins Street in Vernon. Berean Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1438 Nearing Hills Drive in Chipley. Blue Lake Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 1405 Blue Lake Road in Chipley. Chipley First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship Service is at 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship Service is at 10:30 a.m. Discipleship Training is at 5 p.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday AWANA is at 5:15 p.m. Wednesday, Prayer Meeting Is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1300 South Boulevard Country Oaks Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 574 Buckhorn Blvd. Eastside Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at Highway 277 in Vernon. First Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1387 South Boulevard. Gap Pond Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 1980 Gap Boulevard in Sunny Hills. Grace Baptist Chapel Mission Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:50 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 440 Lot E Second Street, Chipley. Holmes Creek Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service AWANA is at 5:30 p.m. and Bible Study is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 335 WASHINGTON COUNTY CHURCH LISTINGSSee LISTINGS, B6If you would like to include an event in this list, email information to: news@chipleypaper.com Sunny Hills Chapel to host The Masters Men Plus One SUNNY HILLS … Sunny Hills Chapel Church will host The Masters Men Plus One at 11 a.m. Sunday, July 29. Lunch will be served at noon. Bring a covered dish and enjoy the Christian fellowship. The church is located three miles south of Wausau on Highway 77. For more information call the pastor at 850-548-5649.

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, July 25, 2018 B5 OBITUARIESWilliam Ernest Foxworth, age 77 of Chipley, passed from this life on July 18, 2018 at Southeast Alabama Medical Center in Dothan, Alabama surrounded by his loving family. William was born on February 21, 1941 in Washington County, Florida to William and Louiza Creamer Foxworth. He was a lifelong resident of Washington County and was a Carpenter by trade. He was of the Baptist faith. He was preceded in death by his parents: William and Louiza Foxworth; brother: Eugene Foxworth; sister: Arlene Nettles Ward. He is survived by his loving wife of 57 years, Linda Gibson Foxworth of Chipley, FL; two sons: Buddy Foxworth of Chipley, FL, He nry Foxworth (Jessi) of Bonifay, FL; four daughters: Theresa Foxworth (Todd Weeks) of Chipley, FL, Mary Slack (Michael) of Chipley, FL, Kim Brantley (Billy) of Chipley, FL, Mandy Bailey (Nick) of Chipley, FL ; fifteen grandchildren; four great grandchildren. Graveside services were held 4:30P.M. Monday, July 23, 2018 at Glenwood Cemetery in Chipley, Florida with Bro. Terry Burchard officiating. Obert Funeral Home of Chipley, Florida directing. The family received friends from 5-7P.M. Sunday, July 22, 2018 at Obert Funeral Home in Chipley, Florida.WILLIAM E. FOXWORTH Richard DonŽ Harrell, 69, of Tallahassee died Tuesday (7-17) at Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare. He was raised in Wausau, FL and came to Tallahassee to attend FSU in the late 1960s and remained here working as an engineer for 30 years at the Department of Transportation in both Tallahassee and Chipley. Following his retirement, he was employed by Post, Buckley, Schuh and Jernigan in the Tallahassee office. He was a member of Bradfordville First Baptist Church. He enjoyed boating and fishing and was a sports enthusiast. He loved to make people laugh and his faith and family were always his top priorities. Don is survived by his wife: Judith; children: Melissa (Warren) Whittaker, Andrew (Julianna) Harrell both of Tallahassee, Melanie Harrell of Jacksonville; brothers: Doug of Tallahassee, Dix of Gainesville; sister: Dale Gauthier of Wausau, and grandchildren: Trey Whittaker, Ansley Whittaker, Parker Jones, and Jackson Harrell. Friends called at Culleys MeadowWood Funeral Home, Timberlane Road, Friday (7-20) evening from 6 to 8 PM. Services were held Saturday (7-21) at 10:00 AM in the McMillian Center at Bradfordville First Baptist Church with burial following in MeadowWood Memorial Park. For friends who wish, the family suggests memorial donations to the Bradfordville First Baptist Church Building Fund, 6524 Thomasville Rd, Tallahassee, FL 32312 or Lighthouse Childrens Home, 2810 S Adams St, Tallahassee, FL 32301. Culleys MeadowWood Funeral Home, Tallahassee, is in charge of services.RICHARD HARRELL Johnny M. Kelly, age 87 of Cottondale, FL passed from this life on Monday, July 16, 2018 at his home surrounded by his loving family. He was born on November 7, 1930 to the late Richard and Ophelia (Reynolds) Kelly in Georgiana, AL. Mr. Kelly loved to hunt and fish and worked most of his life as a truck driver. He is preceded in death by his wife, Imogene Kelly, son, John Carmel Kelly, four brothers and three sisters. Survivors include, two sons; Jessie Richard Kelly and wife Norma of Cottondale, FL, Jack Allen Kelly and wife Mary of Cottondale, FL, foster sons; Ron Whiting Kelly and Leroy Newton Kelly of Cottondale, FL, three daughters; Dwana Mullins and husband Jeff of Cottondale, FL, Marie Kimbrel and husband Donnie of Altha, FL, Sherry Daffin of Cottondale, FL, one sister, Lanie Graham and husband Doug of Highland Home, AL, one daughter in law, Norma Kelly of Chipley, FL, sixteen grandchildren and nineteen great grandchildren. Funeral Services were held on Thursday, July 19, 2018 at Brown Funeral Home. Visitation was held from 1:00-2:00 P.M. in the Chapel with the Service following after. Jesse Kelly will be officiated the service. Interment followed at the Kelly Family Cemetery in Cottondale, FL. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley, FL are in charge of arrangements. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh.netJOHNNY M. KELLYThelma Mae Oldaker, 63, of Bonifay Florida, passed away on July 14, 2018 in Panama City Florida, surrounded by her loving family. Thelma was born and raised in Huntington West Virginia and moved to the greater Holmes county area with her family in 1994. Thelma dedicated her life to her family, and she was the glue that bound three Oldaker generations into a single family. As the family matriarch, she loved, raised, cuddled, scolded and mentored children, grandchildren, greatgrandchildren, nieces and nephews for her entire life. She will always be loved and missed by those who knew her. She was preceded in death by her husband of 43 years, Curtis Ray Oldaker, her mother, Mary Flora of Huntington West Virginia, father Roy Zornes of Logan West Virginia, and one sister, Mary Jane Hooker of Huntington West Virginia. She is survived by her four children: Maria Taylor; Rayleana Outler; Trish Corbin, and Curtis Ray Oldaker, Jr. All of her children reside in the greater Holmes county area. She is also survived by two sisters, Kimberly (Zornes) Hodges, Ladysmith Virginia and Patricia Davis, Huntington West Virginia. Thelma leaves behind 12 grandchildren, 3 great grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews across this country.THELMA M. OLDAKER Larry Alexander Smith, age 67, of Chipley, FL passed away on July 17, 2018 at home. He was born in Bonifay, FL on August 9, 1951. He was a veteran of Vietnam War and served in the United Sates Army Reserves. He had a long productive career as an entrepreneur in various businesses along with his wife, Betty. Larry was an avid Corvette collector and restorer. He was known among the Corvette World as Corvette LarryŽ. He enjoyed traveling and camping, especially out west. He was a born again Christian and a member of the First Baptist Church of Chipley and the David Hiltons Sunday School Class. Family would like to thank Emerald Coast Hospice of Chipley and Staff of M.D. Anderson Cancer Center of Houston, Texas. He is survived by his loving wife of 49 years, Betty S. Smith, two brothers, Franklin P. Smith, Jr. and wife Bennie of Graceville, FL, and Dalton Hyman of Crawfordville, FL. Two sisters, Mary Boyd and husband Kenny of Panama City, FL and Barbara Dixon of Panama City, FL, and numerous nieces and nephews. Larry is preceded in death by his parents, Franklin P. Smith SR. and Evie Dell Smith and his grandparents, Dannie and Mittie Smith. Memorials may be made to Emerald Coast Hospice of Chipley and M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX. Memorialization was by cremation. A celebration of life will be held at a later date. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley, FL is in charge of arrangements. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh.netLARRY A. SMITHMrs. Margaret Taylor, 92 of Graceville, Florida, formerly of Tallahassee, Florida, passed away Tuesday, July 17, 2018. Mrs. Taylor was born in Corry, Pennsylvania on December 20, 1925. A beloved mother and grandmother, Mrs. Taylor enjoyed time spent with her family. She was a member of Deer Lake United Methodist Church in Tallahassee. Predeceased by her husband L. D. BoŽ Taylor and one son Larry Thomas Taylor. Survived by two sons John Dennis Taylor(Kay), Tallahassee; Donald K. DonŽ Taylor(Debbie), Graceville; five grandchildren Michael Dennis Taylor(Jill), Brian Thomas Taylor(Amanda), Jason Matthew Taylor(Ashley), Kelli Alise Taylor, Kevin Allen Taylor(Candace) and eleven great grandchildren. Funeral service was held at 11 a.m.(CDT), Saturday, July 21, 2018 at East Mt. Zion United Methodist Church with Rev. Josh Blount, Debbie Taylor and Brian Taylor officiating. Graveside service followed at 4 p.m.(EDT), Saturday at Roselawn Cemetery 843 Piedmont Drive Tallahassee, Florida with Rev. Jim Govatos officiating, James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Family received friends at East Mt. Zion United Methodist Church on Saturday, 10 a.m. until time of service.MARGARET TAYLORHester Lee Lucas Wells, age 89, passed from this life on July 13, 2018, in the Washington Rehabilitation and Nursing Center, Chipley, Florida. She was born and reared in Holmes County on a farm on Ten Mile Creek. She attended Esto School through the ninth grade, transferring to Holmes County High School in Bonifay, and graduating in April 1945. Hester has the distinction of being a student in the last eight-month school term in the State of Florida. She attended Mt. Zion Church near Esto, and was baptized in nearby Ten Mile Creek. After marriage, she attended Primitive Baptist churches in Panama City, the Bethel community in Washington County, and Chipley Chapel. Hester and Perry married in October 4, 1952 in Cottonwood, Alabama. Their first home was in Panama City. In 1970, the Wells family moved to Chipley, Florida to own and operate the Sears Catalog store where Hester was an integral part. She later ran the historic T.L. Wells and Bro. department store in town. Hester was an accomplished seamstress and cook, and throughout her life enjoyed attending bluegrass events, gospel sings, and church sings. Hester was predeceased in death by her parents, Herbert Timothy Lucas and Pauline Hartzog Lucas, two brothers, Milton Cortez Lucas and Daniel Leon Lucas, one sister, Era Martiel Lucas White, and a grandson, Ryan Lee Wells. She is survived by her husband of 65 years, Perry Wells, and their four sons: Tim (Debbie), Grant (Lynn), Emory (Robbin), and Gordon (Donna). She leaves eight grandchildren: Laura, Julie and Perry Edward Wells II (Tim), Dan Murray and Deanna Marie Wells (Gordon), Lucas McLean and Virginia Marie Wells (Grant), and Courtney Elyse Wells (Emory). She also leaves a host of nieces, nephews and cousins, all of whom she loved dearly. Funeral Services were held Tuesday, July 17, at Shiloh Baptist Church, with Eric Smith officiating. Visitation was from 9:00 a.m. 11:00 a.m., with the service immediately following. Interment followed at Bethany Baptist Church cemetery in Holmes County where three generations of Hesters ancestors are buried. In lieu of flowers please make donations to the Bethany Baptist cemetery fund. Obert Funeral Home of Chipley, Florida directing.HESTER L. WELLS Columbus PhillipŽ Yarbrough, Jr., age 80, of Westville, Florida passed away Tuesday, July 17, 2018 in Dothan, Alabama. He was born November 3, 1937 in Holmes County, the son of Phillip and Hettie Royals Yarbrough. He was employed with the family owned logging business when a traumatic accident occurred on the job making it impossible for him to continue logging, but as they say, you cant keep a good man down!Ž Following the accident, during the 1970s, he and his wife Sylvia operated the store/ gas station located at the intersection known to locals as Royals Crossroads. Then he started his own trucking company. He was a member of Hurricane Creek Church. Hunting and fishing were his favorite pastimes, with fishing being his favorite. Mr. Phillip was adored by many and will be truly missed. He is preceded in death by his parents, Phillip and Hettie Yarbrough and two brothers: infant brother, Lavelle and Kenneth Yarbrough. He is survived by his wife of 61 years Sylvia Yarbrough; one son, Timothy TimŽ Yarbrough of Geneva, Alabama; one daughter, Jan Burke and husband COLUMBUS YARBROUGH, JR. See YARBROUGH, B6

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** B6 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | Washington County NewsRichard of Samson, Alabama; two sisters, Quida Zorn of Westville, Florida and Mary Goldbach and husband Vic of Pensacola, Florida; one granddaughter, Amber Merritt of Westville, Florida; and two greatgrandchildren, Mikayla Morgan and Hunter Merritt. A time of visitation was held Monday, July 23, 2018 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at Hurricane Creek Baptist Church, Westville, Florida 32464. Funeral services were held Tuesday, July 24, 2018 beginning at 1:00 p.m. at Hurricane Creek Baptist Church with Pastor Billy Locke officiating. Committal services followed at Hurricane Creek Baptist Church Cemetery. Flowers are being accepted. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www.themagnoliafh.com. Arrangements and services are under the direction of Magnolia Funeral Home of Hartford, Alabama. YARBROUGHFrom Page B5Cope Road in Chipley. Holyneck Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located 3395 Cemetery Lane, Campbellton. Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 614 Bennett Drive in Chipley. Mt. Ararat Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1233 Old Bonifay Road in Chipley. New Orange Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located on Alford Road in Washington County. New Prospect Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship services are at 11 a.m. Sunday evening services are at 5 p.m. Wednesday services supper is at 5 p.m. Wednesday prayer meeting, bible study and childrens classes start at 5:45. The church is located at 761 New Prospect Road in Chipley. Oakie Ridge Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Orange Hill Road and Gilberts Mill Road. Orange Hill Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday prayer and Bible Study is as 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3485 Gainer Road in Chipley. Orange Hill Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship on the “ rst and third Sunday of the month is at 11 a.m. Wednesday night prayer meeting is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 816 Sunday Road in Chipley. Piney G rove Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1783 Piney G rove Road south of Chipley. Pleasant Hill Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located south of Bonifay at 1900 Pleasant Hill Road. Poplar Springs Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1098 Lovewood Road two miles east of Hig hway 77. Poplar Head Independent Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located on Poplar Head Road. Sand Hills Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 6758 Hig hway 77. Shiloh Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 5:45 p.m. The church is located on Hig hway 277, three miles south of Hig hway 90 in Chipley. Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:15 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 3013 Moss Hill Road in Vernon. St. John Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. St. Matthews Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 4156 St. Matthews Road in Caryville. Salem Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Worship service is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Church is at 2555 Kynesville Highway in Alford. Sunny Hills First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Unity Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3274 River Road in Vernon. Vernon First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 2888 Church Street in Vernon. Wausau First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 3493 Washington Street in Wausau.CatholicSt. Joseph The Worker Catholic Church Sunday Mass is at 11 a.m. Tuesday Mass is at 9 a.m. The church is located at 1664 Main Street in Chipley. St. Theresa Catholic Church Sunday Mass is at 9 a.m. Monday through Friday Mass is at 8 a.m. Saturday Mass is at 5 p.m. Adoration is the “ rst Friday after 8 a.m. Mass. The church is located at 2071 Sunny Hills Blvd and the Rectory is located at 2056 Sunny Hills Boulevard in Sunny Hills.Church of ChristChipley Church of Christ Sunday morning bible study is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1295 Brickyard Road in Chipley. Spirit-Filled Church of God in Christ Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Tuesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 2128 Pate Pond Road in Caryville.EpiscopalGrant Tabernacle AME Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 577 Martin Luther King Boulevard in Chipley. St. John AME Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. St. Joseph AME Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1401 Monroe Shef“ eld Road, Chipley. St. Luke African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME) Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located on Jackson Community Road. St. Mary African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME) Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 1035 St. Mary Road, in Caryville. St. Matthews Episcopal Church Morning worship is at 9 a.m. The church is located on Highway 90 west in Chipley.EvangelisticVernon Evangelistic Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Hig hway 79 in Vernon. Caryville Evangelistic Center Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Wrights Creek Road in Caryville, just north of Hig hway 90.HolinessHarris Chapel Holiness Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located eight miles north of Caryville on Hig hway 179. Johnson Temple First Born Holiness Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. Friday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 793 Orange Street, Chipley. Miracle Valley Spirit of Holiness Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located 3754 Bunyon Drive, off Highway 77 near Sunny Hills.MethodistChipley First United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 9:50 a.m. Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. (contemporary service) and 11 a.m. (traditional service). The church is located at 1285 Jackson Avenue East Mount Zion United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday fellowship meal and Bible study is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1590 Highway 173 in Graceville. Lakeview United Methodist Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. Thursday morning Bible Study 9 a.m. The church is located on Highway 279 near Five Points. New Hope United Methodist Church Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study is at 10 a.m. The church is located at on Hig hway 79 in New Hope. New Vision United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday night supper is at 5:45. Wednesday Bible Study is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Hig hway 77 and BlockerChurch Road in Greenhead. Orange Hill United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located on Sunday Road just off Orange Hill Road. Vernon United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wausau United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located on State Road 77PentecostalHouse of Healing United Pentecostal Church Sunday School is at 1 p.m. Worship is at 2 p.m. Thursday Bible Study is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1816 Highway 90 in Chipley. Wausau Pentecostal Holiness Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 2201 Pioneer Road in Wausau. Rock Hill Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Friday Night Worship is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 339 Rockhill Church Road in Chipley. Trinity Pentecostal Tabernacle Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Turnin Point Home of the First United Pentecostal Church Sunday School is at 1 p.m. Worship Service is at 2 p.m. Bible Study Thursday is at 7 p.m. Presbyterian Chipley First Presbyterian Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday, night sing-along is at 6 p.m. The church is at Fifth Street and Watts Avenue Sunny Hills Presbyterian Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. Sunday School is at 10:30 a.m. The church is located at 3768 Country Club BoulevardOtherBonnett Pond Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 2680 Bonnett Pond Road in Chipley. Christian Fellowship Center Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1458 Monroe Shef“ eld Road in Chipley. Christian Haven Sunday school is h at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Church of God by Faith Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:45 a.m. Tuesday service is at 7:30 p.m. The church is located at 3012 Church Street. Church of God of Prophecy Morning Worship is at 9:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1386 W. Jackson Avenue in Chipley. Courts of Praise Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 1720 Clayton Road in Chipley. Cypress Creek Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at1772 Macedonia Road. Faith Covenant Fellowship Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Hig hway 277 mile south of I-10. Family Worship Center Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located 531 Rock Hill Church Road, Chipley. Graceville Community Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 1005 E. Prim Avenue Grahams Chapel Morning worship at 11 a.m. Tuesday Bible Study at 7 p.m. The chapel is located ate 1218 Campbellton Avenue in Chipley. Hard Labor Creek Community Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1705 Pioneer Road three miles east of caution light. Holmes Valley Community Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 3550Fannig Branch Road in Vernon. House of Prayer Worship Center Sunday School and Children's Church is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Youth activities on Wednesday begin at 4:30 p.m. Praise and worship services are at 6:30 p.m. on Friday. The church is located at 763 West Boulevard in Chipley. Impact Worship Center Sunday. Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Thursday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3006 New Hope Road Marianna. Liberty Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3983 Creek Road in Vernon. McQueens Temple First Born Church of Living God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 5681 Highway 79 South, Vernon. New Faith Temple Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 841 Orange Hill Road. New Foundation Fellowship Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located on Rock Hill Church Road. Northwest Florida Christian Church Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. The church is at 4465 Highway 77. Rhema Praise and Worship Center Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Thursday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located 763 West Boulevard in Chipley. Sunny Hills Chapel Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 4283 Hig hway 77. Pleasant G rove Church Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. The church is located at 2430 Shakey Joe Road in the Hinsons Crossroads Community. Tabernacle of Praise Church of God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located on Hig hway 77 South. The Living Word Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Highway 77 and Blocker Road in Greenhead. White Double Pond Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located on Creek Road in Vernon. Yes Lord Deliverance COGIC Sunday School is at 10:30 a.m. Worship is at noon. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 739 Seventh Street in Chipley. LISTINGSFrom Page B4

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, July 25, 2018 B7 WATERSTAYING HYDRATED Staying hydrated is a necessity, but sometimes its di cult to tell when your body needs water, especially during warmer months. Try these tips from Culligan to keep yourself well hydrated. € Bring a reusable water bottle with you when on the go. € Use a ltration system at home. € Establish a hydration routine, like drinking water at the beginning of each hour. € Load up on fruits and veggies that are high in water content. TIP OF THE WEEKSUMMER FITNESS AND EATINGHave a healthy summer with these tips from Egglands Best: Explore Mother Nature: Hike local parks, visit a beach and take a paddleboard class, rent a kayak with a friend and explore a regional river „ the opportunities are endless. Eat a wholesome breakfast: Registered dietitian and nutritionist Dawn Jackson Blatner recommends staying fueled with eggs. HEALTHY LIVINGCLEANING BENEFITSA study at Indiana University showed that people with clean houses are healthier than people with messy houses. Regular household chores like vacuuming and washing windows can be great physical activity. A tidy home can also mean were more likely to invite people over, which can help alleviate feelings of depression and isolation that can accompany aging. „ Brandpoint HEALTHTODAYS WORKOUTHurdler stretch good for hips and lower back By Marlo AllevaMore Content NowNo matter the physical activity, stretching and warming up is imperative to your performance. The intensity of the activity will depend on how in-depth your pre-stretching and post-stretching will be. And always remember, stretching doesnt have to be connected to physical activity or intense fitness. It can simply be a way to wake up, preparing your body for the day, or taking a few moments for yourself and giving your body a stress release. Our move today is a hurdler stretch. This move will be stretching your hips, hamstrings, inner thighs and your lower back. All you will need is a flat surface and a yoga mat. Begin this move by sitting and positioning one leg in front of your body, bending your knee in a 90-degree angle, pointing the foot inward while the knee is placed outward. Take the other leg to your backside and position it opposite of the front leg, bending in the knee and placing your weight on the inner thigh. Imagine watching an Olympic hurdlers body position as they cross over the hurdle. Once you find your proper positioning, proceed to lean forward into a fold over the front leg. Go as far as you can and hold this stance until you feel a good release in the hips, hamstrings, and lower back. Shoot for at least a 10 count, or even a 30 second hold would be substantial. Release, and repeat on the opposite side. You may notice one side is always more comfortable than the other, as we tend to use one side of our body more than the other. This stretch is good for lower-body workouts and for runners as well. So even when youre taking a small break in your day to watch a little TV, this stretch is a great viewing position. Marlo Alleva, an instructor at Golds Gym and group fitness coordinator at Fontaine-Gills YMCA in Florida, can be reached at faluvzpa@msn.com.Marlo Alleva demonstrates a hurdler stretch. [ERNST PETERS/THE LEDGER] By Bruce Horovitz Kaiser Health NewsDonn Trenner, 91, estimates that two-thirds of his friends are dead. Thats a hard one for me,Ž he said. Ive lost a lot of people.Ž As baby boomers age, more and more folks will reach their 80s, 90s and beyond. They will not only lose friends but face the daunting task of making new friends at an advanced age. Friendship in old age plays a critical role in health and well-being, according to recent findings from the Stanford Center on Longevitys Sightlines Project. Socially isolated individuals face health risks comparable to those of smokers, and their mortality risk is twice that of obese individuals, the study notes. Baby boomers are more disengaged with their neighbors and even their loved ones than any other generation, said Dr. Laura Carstensen, who is director of the Stanford Center on Longevity and herself a boomer, in her 60s. If were disengaged, its going to be harder to make new friends,Ž she said. Trenner knows how that feels. In 2017, right before New Years, he tried to reach his longtime friend Rose Marie, former actress and co-star on the 1960s sitcom The Dick Van Dyke Show.Ž Trenner traveled with Rose Marie as a pianist and arranger doing shows at senior centers along the Florida coast more than four decades ago. When we were performing, you could hear all the hearing aids screaming in the audience,Ž he joked. The news that shed died shook him to the core. Although she was a friend who, he said, cannot be replaced, neither her passing nor the deaths of dozens of his other friends and associates will stop Trenner from making new friends. Thats one reason he still plays, on Monday nights, with the Hartford Jazz Orchestra at the Arch Street Tavern in Hartford, Connecticut. For the past 19 years, hes been the orchestras pianist and musical conductor. Often, at least one or two members of the 17-piece orchestra cant make it to the gig but must arrange for someone to stand in for them. As a result, Trenner said, he not only has regular contact with longtime friends but keeps meeting and making friends with new musicians „ most of whom are under 50. Twice divorced, he also remains good friends with both of his former wives. And not too long ago, Trenner flew to San Diego to visit his best friend, also a musician, who was celebrating his 90th birthday. Theyve known each other since they met at age 18 in the United States Army Air Corps. They still speak almost daily. Friendship is not be taken for granted,Ž said Trenner. You have to invest in friendship.Ž Even in your 90s, the notion of being a sole survivor can seem surprising. Perhaps thats why 91-year-old Lucille Simmons of Lakeland, Fla., halts, midsentence, as she traces the multiple losses of friends and family members. She has not only lost her two closest friends, but a granddaughter, a daughter and her husband of 68 years. Although her husband came from a large family of 13 children, his siblings have mostly all vanished. Theres only one living sibling „ and Im having dinner with him tonight,Ž said Simmons. Five years ago, Simmons left her native Hamilton, Ohio, to move in with her son and his wife, in a gated, 55-and-over community midway between Tampa and Orlando. She had to learn how to make friends all over again. Raised as an only child, she said, she was up to the task. Simmons takes classes and plays games at her community. She also putters around her community on a golf cart (which she won in a raffle) inviting folks to ride along with her. For his part, Trenner doesnt need a golf cart. His personal formula for making friends is music, laughter and staying active. He makes friends whether hes performing or attending music events or teaching. Simmons has her own formula. Its a roughly 50-50 split of spending quality time with relatives (whom she regards as friends) and nonfamily friends. The odds are with her. This, after all, is a woman who spent 30 years as the official registrar of vital statistics for Hamilton. In that job, she was responsible for recording every birth „ and every death „ in the city. Experts say theyre both doing the right thing by not only remaining open to new friendships but constantly creating new ways to seek them out „ even at an advanced age. Genuine friendships at any age typically require repeated contact, said Dr. Andrea Bonior, author of The Friendship Fix: The Complete Guide to Choosing, Losing and Keeping Up with Your Friends.Ž She advises older folks to join group exercise classes or knitting or book clubs. She also suggests that seniors get involved in altruistic behaviorŽ like volunteering in a soup kitchen or an animal shelter or tutoring English as a second language. Friendships dont happen in a vacuum,Ž she said. You dont meet someone at Starbucks and suddenly become best friends.Ž Bonior recommends that seniors embrace social media. These social media connections can help older people strike up new friendships with nieces, nephews and even grandchildren, said Alan Wolfelt, an author, educator and founder of the Center for Loss and Life Transition. KHNs coverage related to aging and improving care of older adults is supported in part by The John A. Hartford Foundation.How to form new friendships as you ageLast friend standing Staying engagedAccording to Stanford Center on Longevitys Sightlines Project, social engagement is linked to higher levels of physical, mental and cognitive functioning and longer life spans. Some ways to up your social engagement include volunteer work, religious organizations, book clubs and taking classes (exercise or educational). BIGSTOCK IMAGES

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B B 8 8 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | Washington County News NF-5036053 NF-5032797 3 3 NF-503 3 2797 2 2 2 Lawn Maint., Irrigation, Pressure Wash, Pavers & Paver Repair, Tree Trimming, Fertilization, Spring Clean-Ups, Etc.Arturo Luebano 2455 N Hwy. 81, Ponce De Leon, FL 32455 850.658.6189 arthurluebano@yahoo.comWe have been in business since 2007. We are licensed and insured. Luebano Lawn Service, LLC. (850) 638-3611 HastyHeating & Cooling NF-5028471 NF-5032729 C & CBookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE OR BUSINESS FOR AS LITTLE AS $10 A WEEK!*Reach thousands of potential customers with your Business Guide ad in the:WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS HOLMES COUNTY-TIMES ADVERTISER WEEKLY ADVERTISER CALL TODAY! 850-638-0212*Minimum 8-week contract. NF-5036305 NF-5032769 Hazardous Aerial Tree Removal € Stump Grinding Trimming & Pruning € Emergency Tree Service € Lot Clean UpDow Morris,Owner/Operator 850-527-6291 € 850-849-3825 Chipley Housing AuthorityMaintenance Mechanic AssistantChipley Housing Authority has a Maintenance Mechanic Assistant position available immediately. Duties include: Assist in making repairs on electrical systems, plumbing, refrigerators and gas equipment. Operation of proper tools, equipment, etc. to assist in performing necessary work needed to maintain the units, grounds and equipment. Assist with any contracted personnel. Perform roofing repairs, painting, grass cutting, making units ready for prospective tenants and assist with inspection of grounds and buildings. Submit written reports as required, attend meetings as assigned and other duties as assigned by supervisor. Must have and maintain a valid Florida Drivers License at all times. Must have dependable transportation. Must complete a physical exam and pre-employment drug test. Applications may be made at the office located at 1370 Old Bonifay Road in Chipley, Florida. Applications will be accepted until Monday July 30, 2018 at 2:00pm. Chipley Housing Authority is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. is currently seekingFull Time Counselors, Case Managers, and Nursesto work with children and adults in Bay, Gulf, Calhoun, Jackson, Holmes and Washington Counties. For more details on these and other positions, please visit us online at: http://lmccares.org/careers/employment opportunities The City of Chipley is accepting applications for a Grounds Keeper Minimum Qualifications: Responsible for supervision of inmates and general grounds maintenance throughout the City. General knowledge of lawn care and basic knowledge of the functions of lawn equipment. Education and Experience: High School diploma or possession of an acceptable equivalency diploma. Must possess a valid State of Florida Driver’s License. Must be eligible for a Department of Corrections Inmate Supervisor Card. A job description is available upon request. The City participates in the Florida Retirement System (FRS). Mail or hand deliver application and/or resume to Assistant City Administrator/City Clerk, City of Chipley, 1442 Jackson Ave., Post Office Box 1007, Chipley, Florida 32428. Deadline: Open until filled. EOE/Drug Free Workplace. 7-3392 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given ETC FBO JANET H KINNEY IRA the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 12-00831 Year of Issuance 2012 Parcel 00-3321-0035 assessed to; FRED F BENSON ESTATE % ERIC BENSON Description of Property 20 2 14 2.34 ORB 301 P 295 BG 2020’ S OF NWC OF NE 4 OF NW 4, RN S 210’, E 446.88’ TO HWY, NE ON HWY 224.09’, W 525.68’ TO POB All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on AUGUST 8, 2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk JULY 4, 11, 18,25, 2018 7-3393 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given ETC FBO JANET H KINNEY IRA the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 11-00035 Year of Issuance 2011 Parcel 00-0004-0112 assessed to: ADEL A BUNASHI Description of Property LOT 6 BLK 11 BUCKHORN CRK REC PLAT 3.11 AC ORB 277 P 1888 All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on AUGUST 8, 2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk JULY 4, 11, 18,25, 2018 7-3369 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given SASHA J MINOR the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 00-00422 Year of Issuance 2014 Parcel 00-1881-0000 assessed to CHARLES E SELLERS ESTATE Description of Property 4 4 13 ORB 244 P 337 BEG. SEC OF BLK. 16, RN N 150’, W 150’, S TO DITCH, NE ALONG DITCH TO POB. DIE, LESS N 150’ AS DESC IN OR 833 P 257, LESS ORB 833 P 258, LESS ORB 833 P 362All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on AUGUST 1, 2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk JULY 4,11,18,25,2018 7-3471 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NUMBER: 2018-50-CA ONE SOUTH BANK, Plaintiff, vs. CROSSROADS CARING HOME, LLC; CLIFTON RYAN HAMMACK; AIMEE M. HAMMACK; and HAMMACK CONTRACTING, LLC;, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 9th day of July, 2018, in Case Number 18-50 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Washington County, Florida, wherein ONE SOUTH BANK is Plaintiff, and CROSSROADS CARING HOME, LLC, CLIFTON RYAN HAMMACK, AIMEE M. HAMMACK and HAMMACK CONTRACTING, LLC, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front door of the Washington County Courthouse, Chipley, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., on the 22nd day of August, 2018, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Commence at the NW Corner of the NE of NE of Section 16, Township 3 North, Range 16 West, Washington County, Florida, thence East along the North line of said Section 194.8 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue East along said North line 577.80 feet; thence departing said North line on a bearing of S 1211’42” W 794.68 feet; thence N 8303’01” W 240.0 feet; thence N 5023’01” W 189.18 feet; thence S 8418’34” W 171.86 feet to the East R/W line of State Road No. 284; thence N 0651’59” W along said R/W line 437.34 feet; thence departing said R/W line on a bearing of N 8959’49” E 197.44 feet; thence North 001’45” W 209.91 feet to the Point of Beginning. AND A parcel of land beginning at the Northeast corner of the Northwest of the Northeast of Section 16, Township 3 North, Range 16 West, and running South 130’ East along forty line 210 feet; thence West 1.7 feet to East boundary line of State Road # 284; thence Northerly along said road line to forty line; thence North 8830’ East 23.7 feet to Point of Beginning. AND Beginning at the Northwest corner of the Northeast of the Northeast of Section 16, Township 3 North, Range 16 West and running North 8830’ East along Section line 194.8 feet; thence South 130’ East 210 feet; thence South 8830’ West 194.8 feet to forty line; thence North 130’ West along forty line 210 feet to Point of Beginning, being in the Northeast of Northeast of Section 16, Township 3 North, Range 16 West, all lying and being in Washington County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE POLICY OF THE CLERK OF COURT. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the lis pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 12th day of July, 2018 LORA C. BELL, CLERK Washington County By: Tamara Donjuan As Deputy Clerk PLEASE PUBLISH ONCE A WEEK FOR TWO CONSECUTIVE WEEKS: PLEASE RETURN PROOF OF PUBLICATION TO: sthompson@fmc.legal A. Clay Milton, Esq.. Fuqua & Milton, P. A. Post Office Box 1508 Marianna, Florida 32447 July 18, 25, 2018 7-3394 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given ETC FBO JANET H KINNEY IRA the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 12-01265 Year of Issuance 2012 Parcel 00-4141-0105 assessed to; DONNIE J NEWSOME Description of Property LOT A-105 LEISURE LAKES REC PLAT ORB 265 P 351All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on AUGUST 8, 2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk JULY 4, 11, 18,25, 2018 7-3370 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given SIMON G PRICE OR E W PRICE the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 11-01363 Year of Issuance 2011 Parcel 00-4151-0238 assessed to; RICK PONTELLO Description of Property LOT B-238 LEISURE LAKES 1ST ADDITION REC PLAT ORB 239 P 2471, ORB 823 P 189All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on AUGUST 8, 2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk JULY 4, 11, 18,25, 2018 7-3476 ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS BID NAME: Chipley Pals Park New Playground Equipment BID NUMBER: 18-08 Notice is hereby given to all interested persons or firms that sealed bids, submitted in triplicate, will be accepted by the City of Chipley, located at the Chipley City Hall, 1442 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida 32428, until 2:00 p.m., local time on August 9, 2018 for the following item or items: Pals Park New Playground Equipment Bids will be opened in the Meeting Room in the City of Chipley City Hall located at 1442 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida 32428 at 2:05 p.m., local time on August 9, 2018. Detailed specifications and a bid sheet may be obtained from: Guy Lane, Public Works Director Public Works Office 671 Rustin Drive (850) 638-6346 IMPORTANT: Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope marked: “Chipley Pals Park New Playground Equipment” and identified by the Name of the Company, Name and Number of the Bid, along with the Date and Time of Opening. Bids will be received by either hand delivery to the City Clerk’s Office located at 1442 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida or by mail at City of Chipley, Post Office Box 1007, Chipley, Florida 32428 by the Bid closing deadline. SPECIAL NOTE: The City requires an occupational license tax be paid for the privilege of engaging in any business within the city limits. Please contact the City Clerk’s Office for a fee schedule. No bid may be withdrawn for a period of fifteen days after the scheduled closing time for receipt of bids. Bid award will be made to the lowest responsive bidder, but the right is reserved to reject any or all bids. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE/FAIR HOUSING JURISDICTION July 21 and 25, 2018 Free Lab/mix puppies If interested call 443-8760721 Indoor Plus Size Yard Sale 3280 Highway 2 in Bonifay (Esto Community) Plus size clothes new or like new condition. Smoke and pet free home. Nothing over $10. Call for Appointment 547-4591 or 730-6919. K&LFarm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 Log Truck Driver wanted with a clean driving record. Call 850-956-2266 or 850-956-2215. Seeking Admin. Asst / Receptionist for small, non-profit. Must have excellent organizational skills, can multi-task, be customer service oriented, proficient with MS Office Suite and have solid written and verbal communication skills. Professional attitude and appearance. Call Chris @ 850.638.4157 The Holmes County Board of County Commissionersis currently accepting applications for the part-time position of4-H Program AssistantApplicants must apply in person at County Commissioners Office, 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, by 4:00 PM on August 13, 2018. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 For Rent 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments in Vernon. Clean, stove, refrigerator, central heat/air, convenient to Panama City Beach, section 8, Rental assistance. 850-638-4640 For Rent One Bedroom apartments for rent in Chipley. Convenient location. Stove and refrigerator furnished. No Pets. Smoke free environment. Call 850-638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For Rent 3, 4 and 5BR fully furnished, CH/A, 6 Miles from time, very private, no pets. 850-547-2096. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. Rooms For Rent By Week.Comfortable rooms with microwave & refrigerator. All utilities paid. Cable and internet. Pet friendly at extra charge. Economy Lodge, Bonifay. 850-547-4167. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/ sewage/ lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 2BR/1.5BAMH For Rent $400.00/month, $400.00/deposit. No pets. In the country. 547-2043 or 768-9670. For Sale Two acre plot and one acre plot in Jacob City, FL. Call 850-849-9338. Highway 77 2 miles south of Chipley 4-8 acre tract Bedie Road. Call Milton Peel at 850-638-1858 or 326-9109 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. Turn to classified’s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you! Spot Advertising works!

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Washington County imes A dvertiser HOLMES COUNTY T @WCN_HCT facebook.com/WashingtonCountyNews.HolmesCountyTimes chipleypaper.com Wednesday, July 25, 2018 SCHOOLS TALK SAFETY | PAGE 4 REGISTERING YOUR CHILD | PAGE 6 BACK TO SCHOOL INSIDE:SCHOOL CALENDARS BUSING INFORMATION SCHOOLS SUPPLY LISTS

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M2 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | I t is with great excitement to welcome you to the 2018-19 school year. Holmes District Schools constantly strive to ensure our students achieve their highest potential by providing a rigorous curriculum that will ensure success in college or their chosen career. Several issues have occurred this past year that have changed our lives forever. Your childrens safety has always been the most paramount in the education of our students. When our doors open for the 2018-2019 school year each of our schools will have a dedicated School Resource Officer; also access to our students will be constantly monitored and changed as needed. The School Board is committed to providing the resources necessary to educate our students and ensure they graduate college or career ready. We provide meaningful professional development for teachers that will be beneficial in the classroom and will impact student achievement. In addition to a strong academic preparation, we offer industry certification programs through our high schools in agriculture, welding, business, culinary, and aerospace. These certifications provide students with post-graduation employment opportunities. Holmes County Schools welcome and encourage parent and community involvement. As a team, we can work together to create a solid foundation for learning to help ensure the future success of our young citizens. We are excited about the 2018-19 school year and the opportunities it will bring for our students to succeed. We hope you will join us on our mission to provide a sustainable pathway for all Holmes County students to realize and achieve their dreams. Sincerely, Terry MearsFROM SUPERINTENDENT TERRY MEARS HOLMES COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT I t is my privilege and honor to serve as Superintendent of Washington County School District.I continue to have the passion and commitment to serve this organization, as well as the desire to continue to make a difference in the Washington County School District. For 2018-2019 school year as the Superintendent of Schools, I remain committed to the students of the Washington County School District. Together we will continue to move forward with every child in mind. Our goal is to provide excellent instruction to every child to be an academically successful student and a socially responsible citizen. In order to continue to advance our mission to empower all students to become well educated, productive citizens by providing appropriate, high quality, and rigorous educational programs in a safe learning environment the school district is placing on the August 28, 2018 ballot a measure that would levy a half cent (.005) sales tax on purchases within Washington County for the purpose of funding technology and facility needs. I certainly ask for the publics support in this. On behalf of the Washington County School District, School Board Members, the leadership and administrative team, professional staff and support staff, I welcome you to join us in preparing your child for their future. Please do not hesitate to contact us if we can be of assistance to you at any time during the school year. I have an open door policy and always invite your comments. Respectfully, Joseph TaylorFROM SUPERINTENDENT JOSEPH TAYLOR WASHINGTON COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICTMears Taylor Holmes CountyBonifay K-8: Thursday, Aug. 9 Pre-K through 2nd grade 9 a.m. 3rd through 5th grade 9 a.m. 6th through 8th grade 11 a.m. Ponce de Leon Elementary: Thursday, Aug. 9 All grades 9 to 11 a.m. Ponce de Leon High: Thursday, Aug. 9 6th grade 1 p.m. 7th through 12th grade schedules are available for pick-up at 1 p.m. Poplar Springs: Thursday, Aug. 9 All grades 1 to 2:30 p.m.*No other Holmes County schools have provided orientation information at press time. Washington County Kate M. Smith: Thursday, Aug. 9 (in cafeteria) 3rd through 5th grade 8 a.m. 1st and 2nd grade 10 a.m. Pre-K and kindergarten 1 p.m. Vernon Elementary: Wednesday, Aug. 8 3rd through 5th grade 12 p.m. noon 1st and 2nd grade 1 p.m. VPK and kindergarten 2 p.m. Washington County Christian: Friday, Aug. 3 Preschool, pre-K and kindergarten 9 a.m. 1st through 12th grade 3 p.m. Grace and Glory: Friday, Aug. 10 (open house) All grades 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Roulhac Middle: Thursday, Aug. 9 6th grade 11:30 a.m. 7th and 8th grade 12:14 p.m. Vernon Middle: Wednesday, Aug. 8 All grades 8 a.m. Chipley High: Tuesday, Aug. 7 9th grade 1 p.m. All grades 1:30 p.m. (open house)*No other Washington County schools have provided orientation information at press time. A NOTE FROM LOCAL SUPERINTENDENTS SCHOOL ORIENTATIONS AND OPEN HOUSE

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| Wednesday, July 25, 2018 M3

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M4 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | By Jacqueline Bostick W ASHINGTON AND HOLMES COUNTIES The Valentines Day shooting in Parkland, Fla., that left school campuses teeming with fear and shock, also met school districts across the state with a new level of accountability for student safety. Governor Rick Scott and state legislators responded with a $400 million package designated for school safety and mental health. With the funds, Washington and Holmes County school districts in conjunction with other county agencies added school resource officers to each campus, hired a school safety administrator and met state-mandated mental health requirements. Holmes County School District received about $383,000 in school safety funds and $168,000 in mental health funding for the 2018-2019 school year. Washington County School District received $430,000, with $172,599 being designated to the mental health component. My number one priority is the safety of all students and staff within the district,Ž said HCSD School Safety Specialist Greg Sallas. I am pleased to be able to provide this service and am happy to be a part of the Holmes County School District.Ž WCSD hired Kimberly Register to serve in the capacity. The new position, which is state-mandated, offers up a broad job description mainly stating the specialist should oversee all facets of safety district-wide and coordinate with county and state departments to make schools safer. While Sallas will also serve as HCSDs Mental Health Administrator, WCSD hired two licensed professional counselors. According to Director of Students and ESE Services Elizabeth Arnold, the new hires will fulfill a growing need for mental health response, as the number and incidents of Baker Act students grows within her school district. In the 2017-18 school year, there were 24 incidents that required students to be declared under the Baker Act, Arnold said. A number of those students were at the elementary school level. We see that number rising I know thats a national trend as well; but we feel that this would assist those families meeting those childrens needs,Ž Arnold said. Were wanting someone who can meet the familys need as well,Ž Arnold said, noting that the counselors will be active and visible in schools and the community. School districts aim for safer schoolsBy Diane Robinson W ASHINGTON COUNTY A good diet is one of the best ways to promote learning. And food service management company Chartwells is asking the students what would make their pallets happy. Chartwells Resident District Manager Julio Narvaez said the company will roll out a new program called Student Choice. A pilot of the program will begin in October at Vernon High School. Students will taste-test new Chartwells recipes and provide feedback regarding what theyd like to see on the school menu. The program is expected to move to Chipley High School later on in the school year. In addition to the Student Choice pilot program, Chartwells will offer new, fresher meals through an initiative called Embracing Berries.Ž The first item will include a strawberry chicken salad. WCSD began using an app two years ago that has proven to be a helpful aid to parents who are concerned about what their child eats for lunch. Nutrislice is a free app and website that provides easy access to interactive school menus that allow parents to see photos and descriptions of menu items and easily filter through allergens such as, nuts, dairy or wheat. Nutritional information like carbohydrate and calorie counts are available with just a few clicks. Breakfast and lunch menus for are available for every school in the Washington County district. Visit the website at wcsdschools.nutrislice. com or download the app from GooglePlay or the Apple App Store.Chartwells o er student options[CHARTWELLS] Washington County€ Reduced Breakfast … .30 cent € Reduced Lunch … .40 cent € Full Price Breakfast $1.45 € Elementary Full Price Lunch $2.50 € Middle/High School Full Price Lunch $2.75Holmes CountyFor Holmes County, a Community Eligibility provision, which implements national lunch and breakfast program, will allow every student in Holmes County to eat breakfast and lunch for free. By Jacqueline Bostick P OPLAR SPRINGS When a leading robotics team was robbed of a few items while on its way to a national STEM competition last month, individuals from throughout the region responded with financial gifts of support. We raised over $2,600 through the GoFundMe page and other small donations,Ž said Laura Wells, teacher at Poplar Springs High School and assistant robotics coach. In addition to the funds from the crowdfundraising page, a donation of $3,000 provided immediate relief and toppled the $4,000 goal. This just means the world,Ž she said, glancing down at the check. It really does. These boys and Mr. Paul theres Community support is everything to robotics teamPictured on day one of competition in Dartmouth, Mass., at the SeaPerch International Competition. From left: Bryson Potts, Coach Trey Paul and Joseph Godwin. [SPECIAL TO TIMES-ADVERTISER] See ROBOTICS M8

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| Wednesday, July 25, 2018 M5

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M6 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | By Jacqueline Bostick C HIPLEY A new school is sending waves of excitement across Washington County School District. Washington Academy of Varying Exceptionalities (WAVE) will open its doors to students three years old through 12th grade. The new school is housed at the former fifth grade wing at Roulhac Middle School. This school will also provide a choice, a place where resources are focused on kids with those needs,Ž said Director of Students and ESE Services Elizabeth Arnold. We are combining resources in the district so that teachers that have a passion for students with disabilities can provide needed assistance in a rich learning environment.Ž The school has already enrolled more than 37 students, with eight coming from Mariannas Hope School. The school has its own administrator, speech therapist, behavioral specialist, and a number of ESEdedicated teachers and paraprofessionals. Last month,crews were onsite at the sixclassroom hall painting walls, waxing the floors and preparing to move-in furniture. Fourteen-year ESE teacher Connie Crutchfield is one of the teachers who will teach at the school starting this fall. I think its going to be a good thing for the area, the county,Ž she said. Were going to be able to provide what we havent been able to provide the kids more intensive centered things, things that apply to them specifically.Ž Arnold emphasized that the school is still a school choice option for parents. That is, just because a child qualifies to enroll in the school, doesnt mean that parents must send their student to the school. The bottom line is the parent has the right to say that their children will or will not go there, it still requires parental consent,Ž she said. The benefits for students include: smaller classroom sizes allow for more one-to-one teacherstudent interaction and ESE professionals will work together in close proximity to meet students specific needs, and adaptive physical education or music classes will be offered. Each classroom has an interactive touchscreen board and five computer stations. And, although the school is self-contained, there are opportunities for middle and high school students to interact with their peers outside of the school during lunch and, some, for elective classes. Additionally, Arnold added, Chipley High School has a credit program for students between 18 and 22 that will provide mentors, reading buddies and teacher assistants to WAVE students.New school for special needs opens doorsBy Diane Robinson W ASHINGTON AND HOLMES COUNTIES … School registration is open and parents should not delay. Washington and Holmes County school district officials encourage parents to stop-in and register their child. It is never too early to begin the enrollment process,Ž Superintendent Joseph Taylor. Enrolling early just makes the process easier so you are not pressed for time.Ž Online registration is partially available to Washington County students. However, Taylor feels face to face communication is important. I like that we are not completely online as far as registration is concerned because you lose that personal touch,Ž said Taylor. While you can do some things online, there are some things that are better understood with face to face contact.Ž If parents opt to take the online route, it is important to note that the parent must visit the childs campus in order to complete the registration process. For more information, go to www.wcdschools.com. Holmes County provides enrollment applications for printing online and at schools. After printing and completing the form from the school districts website, the forms must be submitted to the school the child will attend. For more information, go to www.hdsb.org. The following information is required to enroll a student according to the Florida Department of Educations website. € Proof of age. A certified birth certificate for US citizens may be requested online. € A Florida Certificate of Immunization, Form 680 (blue card), completed by a Florida physician or by a Florida county health department. Information on Florida school immunization requirements is available online. € Evidence of a medical exam completed no less than 12 months prior to the childs school entry date. As long as the medical exam meets this 12-month requirement, parents may submit this information on the School-Entry Health Exam Form (DH 3040) or provide a copy of the exam obtained from their current physician before moving to Florida. This form and the accompanying guide are available online. € Official documentation that the parent(s) or guardian(s) is a legal resident(s) of the school district attendance area.School registration is open Roulhac Middle School is now home to a new school for students with special needs, Washington Academy of Varying Exceptionalities (WAVE). The school will serve Exceptional Student Education (ESE) students three years old through 12th grade. [JACQUELINE BOSTICK | WCN/ HCTA]

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| Wednesday, July 25, 2018 M7By Jacqueline Bostick W ASHINGTON AND HOLMES COUNTIES According to the National Committee for Citizens in Education, active and engaged p arents prepare their children for success in the classroom. From fewer behavioral problems to better academic performance, parental involvement increases the likelihood of children completing high school. Curriculum andInstruction Administrators for both Washington and Holmes Counties chimed in on the importance of parental involvement and what parents can do to be engaged in their childs educational success. Studies show that students who have parental involvement in their school work and activities are more successful in the educational careers,Ž said Pam Price, HCSD Curriculum and Assessment Administrator. We encourage our parents to become involved in their students school day.Ž Parents should be connected to their childs school in understanding the class schedule of the child, activities throughout the school and the access to their childs grades on the parent portal,Ž said Gail Riley, WCSD Director of Curriculum and Instruction. While the cogs on the curriculum and instruction wheel are many, Riley reminded parents that they will get a jump start to understanding their childs education by attending orientation. These orientation meetings are very important which include meeting their childs teachers, understanding the requirements of each class being taken and the grading system,Ž she said. Parental involvement is key to student successAugust 2: First Day for Teachers/ Paras/10 Month Personnel (Professional Development Day) 3: Professional Development Day 6-9: Pre-Planning Days (Teachers/Paras/10 Month Personnel) 10: First Day of School for Students September 3: Labor Day (Students and All Personnel Out) 10: Progress Reports Go Out 11: Recognition of Patriot DayŽ at Schools 17: Recognition of Constitution DayŽ at Schools 24-28: Recognition of Celebrate Freedom WeekŽ at Schools 26: Early Release/Professional Development (Students Released at 1 p.m.) October 12: Vernon High School Homecoming 15-16: Fall Break (Students/ Teachers/Paras/10 Month and Lunchroom Personnel/Bus Drivers Out) 19: Chipley High School Homecoming 30: Report Cards Go Out 31: Early Release/Professional Development (Students Released at 1 p.m.) November 9: Recognition of Veterans Chipley and Vernon Schools 13: Progress Reports Go Out 19-23: Thanksgiving Holidays (Students/Teachers/Paras/ 10 Month and Lunchroom Personnel/ Bus Drivers Out) 21-23: Thanksgiving Holidays (12 Month Personnel Out) December 21: Early Release (Students Released at 1 p.m.) 24-31: Christmas Break (Students/Teachers/Paras/10 Month Personnel and Lunchroom Personnel/Bus Drivers Out) 24-25: 12 Month Personnel Out 31: 12 Month Personnel Out January 2019 1: 12 Month Personnel Out 1-3: Teachers/10 Month Personnel Out 1-4: Students/Lunchroom Personnel/Bus Drivers Out 4: Teachers Planning Day 7: Classes Resume 21: Martin Luther King Day (Students and All Personnel Out) 23: Report Cards Go Out February 7: Progress Reports Go Out 13: Early Release/Professional Development (Students Released at 1 p.m.) 18: Presidents Day (Students/ Teachers/Paras/ 10 Month and Lunchroom Personnel/ Buss Drivers Out) March 6: Early Release/Professional Development (Students Released at 1 p.m.) 25-29: Spring Break (Students and All Personnel Out) April 9: Report Cards Go Out 19: Spring Day (Students/ Teachers/Paras/10 Month and Lunchroom Personnel/Bus Drivers Out) 23: Progress Reports Go Out May 7: FPTC Graduation 21: Vernon High School Senior Awards 5:30 p.m. 21: Chipley High School Senior Awards 7:30 p.m. 23: Vernon High School Graduation 24: Last Day of School (Students Released at 1 p.m.) 24: WISE Graduation 24: Chipley High School Graduation 27: Memorial Day (All Personnel Out) 28-30: Post Planning Days for Teachers/Paras/10 Month Personnel June 10: Report Cards Go Out August 1: Pre-School Begins for Teachers and Non-Instructional working teacher days 10: Classes Begin for Students September 3: Labor Day (Students and All Personnel Out/Paid Holiday for Teachers) October 5: Students and All Personnel Out 12: End of First Grading Period 18:Report Cards Go Home 26 … 29: Fall Break (Students, Teachers and 10 Month NonInstructional Personnel out) 30: Classes Resume November 19-23: Students, Teachers and 10 Month Non-Instructional Personnel Out 22: Paid Holiday for Teachers 21-23: 12 Month Personnel out December 21: End “ rst Semester Student Early Release Day/Professional Development 24-Jan. 4, 2019:Students, Teachers and 10 Month Non-Instructional Personnel out 25: Paid Holiday for Teachers 24-Jan 1, 2019: 12 Month Personnel out January 2019 7: Classes Resume for Students and all Personnel return to work 10: Report Cards Go Home 21: Students and All Personnel out/ Paid Holiday for Teachers February 18: Students and all Personnel out/ Paid Holiday for teachers March 15: End Third Grading Period 21: Report Cards Go Home 25-29: Spring Break (Students and All Personnel Out) April 1: Classes Resume May 20: Ponce de Leon High School Graduation 21: Poplar Springs High School Graduation 23: Bethlehem High School Graduation 24: Holmes County High School Graduation 24: End of Second Semester/ Student Early Release Day/Professional Development 27: All Personnel Out/Paid Holiday For Teachers 28-30: Post-School for Teachers and Non-Instructional Teacher Working Days 2018 … 19 WASHINGTON COUNTY SCHOOL CALENDAR 2018 … 19 HOLMES COUNTY SCHOOL CALENDAR Four tips to being involvedFrom WCSD Curriculum and Instruction Director Gail Riley and HCSD Curriculum and Assessment Administrator Pam Price 1. Be involved. Become involved in the school-life of your child: know what their progress is in the classroom, schedule a conference whether it be face to face or by phone if progress is not being made. 2. Read. Elementary school parents should read to or listen to your child read. This is very important to promote reading in the home and discuss what has been read. Middle and high school students should be encouraged to read for enjoyment. 3. Attendance is key. All parents are strongly encouraged to make sure that the student is following the attendance policy. Success in the classroom is dependent on the student being in school. 4. Review the day. Review their students work daily and let the child tell them what they learned in doing the work.See PARENTS M8

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M8 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | nobody that works harder than them.Ž Wells launched the campaign after Poplar Springs High School recent graduates Joseph Godwin, Bryson Potts and their robotics coach Trey Paul, discovered their laptops had been stolen out of their vehicle while at a stop in Atlanta on their way to the International SeaPerch competition last month being held at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. SeaPerch is an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV) competition, in which, the students have won at the regional level for three consecutive years. I thought maybe the community would come out again for this, and it did,Ž Wells said. The lump sum donation came from area businessman and politician Allan Bense. Its always gratifying to try and help people who are doing everything they can to better themselves and make their community a better place,Ž Bense said. Here you have students going out of their way on their own time to participate in high-level tech activities with teachers willing to help them, and someone steals their equipment. We all know there are some bad people out there but we really want them to know and remember that there are also a lot of good people around, and that people who work hard and do the right thing are more likely to have things go their way,Ž he added. The community had already pitched in, were just reinforcing that the path theyve chosen is a good one.Ž Wells said the feedback from the team was one of gratitude and surprise. And, although the team did not win in the robotics competition, Wells said everyone was glad because despite the robbery they were able to successfully operate their robot and represent their school, region and state with pride. The community came out and the really helped us,Ž Wells said. This means everything to them, it means everything to me.Ž ROBOTICSFrom Page M4[AP IMAGES] These orientation meetings will guide the parents to get them involved in all elements of the school environment.Ž Parent-Teacher Organizations/Parent-Teacher Associations are available at both school districts. Parents should attend orientations and/or contact schools staff to find out how to get involved. Having daily conversations with your child and asking specific questions, is another way to keep up with the day-to-day classroom developments. Talk with your child nightly about their school day,Ž Price said. Ask specific questions such as, What story did you read today in ELA?; Follow that with another question such as, Who were the main characters?Ž Do not just simply ask, How was your day?Ž The bottom line is parental support is the launching pad from which students take their educational leap. Washington and Holmes counties offer resources to help parents understand their childs educational pathway and tools to help them perform successfully. Theres room for every parent at many different steps. Get involved,Ž Riley cheerfully said. Students are actively involved in many areas from athletics, band, music, drama and so much more. Parents can support these activities in so many ways.Ž PARENTSFrom Page M7Riley Wells

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| Wednesday, July 25, 2018 M9By Jacqueline Bostick W ASHINGTON AND HOLMES COUNTIES Not only is mid-August the commencement of schools, its also the peak of hurricane season. Torrential rains usually flood roads and make dirt or clayed roads impassible. The inclement weather poses an inconvenience and hazard for school buses. But when it comes to transporting students, bus departments in Washington and Holmes counties run fleets that prioritize safety. The goal that we always have is to transport our kids to and from each school each day,Ž said Washington County School District Director of Operations Bill Lee. And that starts at the first day of school and goes to the last day of the school year.Ž Lee, who runs a fleet of 50 buses over 40 routes and transports about 2,500 students, will transfer his duty to Dawn Spooner in December. Spooner, who has been with WCSD for 17 years, emphasized the importance of keeping an open line of communication between the school bus driver and parent. We really rely on our relationship between our driver and our parent,Ž Spooner said, noting the district doesnt have software that will send out notifications to parents when buses are delayed or canceled. Our drivers pick up the phone and call every parent ... they will give them alternative bus stops.Ž Parents should make sure their drivers have always have updated and accurate telephone numbers, Spooner said. If parents have questions, they may call her at the district office. All of Washington County school buses are equipped with cameras and GPS. Holmes County School District has revisited some of its procedures following a bus accident that occurred on a rainy day in March that, although no students were seriously injured, caused a good amount of panic after the bus was unable to be located. As most of you know, we can talk to the moon, but we cant talk across Holmes County on our cellphones,Ž HCSD Superintendent Terry Mears told agencies in attendance at the followup meeting held at Doctors Memorial Hospital in March. So that was a long trip not knowing (more information about what was happening). And then I was calling and sometimes I could talk and sometimes I couldnt.Ž The bus was equipped with GPS, however, since the transportation director was called to the scene prior to arriving at the office where she could have viewed the coordinates of the bus, she and other officials relied on using their cell phones to communicate to each other and locate the bus. They would realize the inclement weather would weaken signal and obstruct communication. The sheriffs office has since given two two-way radio scanners to the school district. I want to thank that driver for fighting that bus,Ž Mears said at the March meeting. She did a really good job at fighting that bus and keeping it from being worse trouble than it was.Ž Both school districts work with local emergency management offices to monitor traffic, weather and road conditions. Drivers should pay attention to bus signs, particularly when a bus is stopped and the signs wing outward signaling traffic from both directions to stop, officials said. It takes a whole team to make sure our buses and routes are safe,Ž Lee said.Fleets ready for start of school, stress safety Drivers are wanted in Washington and Holmes counties. To apply, contact the school districts. Washington: 850-638-6222, wcsdschools.com Holmes: 850-547-9341, hdsb.org

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M10 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | Staff Report F lorida Panhandle Technical College offers a learning environment that extends far beyond the training facility. From Clinicals and job-shadowing to internships and cooperative education students are given the opportunity to create connections and experiences relevant to the real world. Regional employers and educators help keep our programs in synch with the demands of the modern workplace. In this way, FPTC puts students on the fast-track to a satisfying career. The staff and administrators are proud to work with Washington County leaders to create a workforce that attracts high-skill, high-wages jobs. The technical college has adopted the view that "together, we make things happen." Another way FPTC connects with the community and positions its students on a highway to satisfying careers is through articulation agreements. FPTC students can earn postsecondary credit while still in high school and enter college in advanced standing. Possibly most importantly, such agreements make college affordable. Dual enrolled students attend the technical college at no cost to the student. And adult students can attend the college for a fraction of the cost of tuition at other postsecondary institutions. Financial assistance and foundation scholarship are available to those who qualify. FPTC encourages students to take advantage of those opportunities Industry certifications and licensures make students better candidates when applying for specific advanced university degree programs. Finding the career pathway and choosing a career is one of the most important decisions an individual makes in his or her life. Students aspiring to work in the medical field should consider initial training as a certified nursing assistant (CNA) or patient care technician (PCT). Future engineers should consider an electrician program or the drafting program, which is deisgned to train students in the use of AutoCAD. Prospective pharmacists should consider the pharmacy technician program. Whether it's a career in a year, or a pathway to a four-year university, Florida Panhandle Technical College is the first step of that journey.FPTC: fast track to career By Jacqueline Bostick C HIPLEY As the campus continues to grow into its college label, the areas only institution for higher education is attracting droves of students from outside of the county. According to Florida Panhandle Technical College Director Martha Compton, about 30-percent of the colleges students are from other counties. While many are from neighboring counties, the campus has students from as far as Seminole County, near Orlando, and about 20 from out-of-state. Theyre coming for specific training,Ž Compton said. I think they come here for opportunity that they cant get in their own counties.Ž Most popular programs include practical nursing, correctional officer and cosmetology. FPTC works hard to accommodate the skill sets needed for the area and is willing to specially train its students to develop skills for particular industries that may arise in the area, Compton noted. For example, FPTC is one of a handful of institutions that offer the commercial driver licensure program (CDL). The campus boasts a 94 percent job placement rate, which speaks to the success of the programs. But, compared with previous years, enrollment numbers are down and graduates usually find jobs outside of the county. Compton points to the lack of jobs opportunities and salary competitiveness in the local area. In a small rural community where there is no increase in jobs, the job training is going to be down,Ž Compton said. So, weve got to be able to get jobs in our area.Ž She said the shipbuilding contracts going forward in Bay County and manufacturing companies that are eyeing Holmes and Jackson counties help to anchor FPTC as the institution of choice for students across the region.FPTC boosts regional work force Enroll at Florida Panhandle Technical CollegeClasses start Aug. 10. 1. Pick-Up Application w/ Florida Residency Form and if applicable, Pre-Register for the Test for Adult Basic Education (TABE) Exam: Application packets are available anytime from 8 a.m. 3 p.m. in Student Affairs. 2. Complete Testing Requirements within first six weeks of enrollment: Applicants must take the TABE unless exempt with other scores or degrees. The exam is administered Friday mornings. Applicants must pre-register for the exam. 3. Check with Financial Aid Staff if Applicable: While completing registration requirements, applicants may need to meet with Financial Aid staff. 4. Complete Registration Process: All admission requirements must be met before registration is complete. Applicants will pay tuition and appropriate fees at the Business Of“ ce.*You may also apply online at ftpc.edu. Counties servedHere are the percentage of students enrolled in Fall 2016 at Florida Panhandle Technical College from these areas.Source: Florida Panhandle Technical College GATEHOUSE MEDIA Washington Jackson Holmes Escambia Bay Walton Santa Rosa Okaloosa Calhoun Out of state 34% 20% 16% 7% 5% 4% 4% 3% 3% 2%

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| Wednesday, July 25, 2018 M11Tax-free weekend begins Aug.3Parents can stock up on clothing and school supplies the “ rst weekend in August tax free. The back-to-school sales tax holiday, passed by the Florida legislature and signed into law by Gov. Rick Scott, will begin 12:01 a.m. Friday, Aug. 3 and end at 11:59 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 5. During the tax-free weekend, sales tax will not be collected on certain school supplies for $15 or less per item, as well as, clothing, footwear and certain accessories selling for $60 or less per item. Excluded items are briefcases, suitcases and other garment bags, watches, jewelry, umbrellas, handkerchiefs, skis, swim “ ns, roller blades and skates. For a complete list, visit ” oridarevenue.com.Staff Report W ASHINGTON AND HOLMES COUNTIES School dress codes have become increasingly specific over the years due to changes in fashion, safety issues, and trends. Its something that both Washington and Holmes school districts have taken into consideration when designing their dress code policies. School district officials say an enforced dress code should be at the top of parents to-do-list. Preparing your child to follow the rules and the dress code will help day-to-day operations run more smoothly,Ž said Washington County School Board chairman Susan Roberts. Faculty and staff should be prepared to enforce the dress code with consistency throughout the entire student body.Ž Parents can save money and frustration by becoming familiar with their school districts dress code before shopping for back to school apparel. Tax-free weekend is Aug. 3-5. Here are a few guidelines to remember when shopping for clothes for your Holmes or Washington County student: € Students may not wear any garment with suggestive, obscene, offensive, or gang-related language; or drug, tobacco or alcoholic beverage advertisement on it. € Shoes (not bedroom shoes) must be worn at all times. € Students may not wear clothing that reveals undergarments, the midriff, or cleavage. Blouses or shirts that are low-cut or see-through may not be worn. **Note that Poplar Springs High School students may not wear gym shorts, and all shorts and skirts much be knee length or longer. € Head coverings, sunglasses or jacket hoods (hats, caps, stockings, etc.) are not allowed to be worn in school buildings. However, these items must be properly stored at all other times. Bandanas, do-rags, and stocking caps are not allowed on campus.SHOPPING SUCCESS DMH hosts Back-to-School fairWhat: Back-to-School Candy Land Adventure Where: Doctors Memorial Hospital, 2600 Hospital Drive in Bonifay When: 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Friday, Aug. 3 Why: To assist local children with school supplies Details: Children must be present to receive supplies. Event is free; features, games, supply giveaway and food. Contact: 850-547-8003, doctorsmemorial. org, on Facebook

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**Bonifay K-8 does not allow rolling backpacks** KINDERGARTEN Pre-packaged supply kit from Bonifay K-8 ($25) Regular sized backpack (no wheels) Change of clothes BOYS BRING 2 Boxes of Kleenex Large bottle of Germ-X Container of Clorox wipes Box of gallon size Ziploc bags 30 Ounce box f gold“ sh GIRLS BRING Pack of white paper towels Container of baby wipes Bottle of hand soap Box of quart Ziploc bags Large bag of Smarties or Dum Dum suckers Box of Fruit Loops **Be sure to write your childs name in their backpack and each piece of clothing FIRST GRADE Large backpack (no rolling M12 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | SIXTH GRADE 4 One inch 3 ring binders with pockets Pack of college ruled loose leaf paper for each notebook 5 Tab dividers for each notebook Pack of assorted highlighters 2 Packs of 24-count#2 pencils Pack of pens (blue or black ink only) Pack of colored pencils 6 Glue sticks Pair of scissors 3-holed pencil pouch with zipper 3 or 5 Subject spiral notebook with pockets for science Box of tissues Bottle of hand sanitizer Tub of Clorox clean up wipes Pack assorted dry erase markers Box of sandwich size Ziploc backs Box of quart size Ziploc bags SEVENTH GRADE 3 One inch 3 ring binders with pockets Two inch 3-ring binder with pockets Pack of college ruled loose leaf paper for each notebook 5 Tab dividers for each notebook Pack of assorted highlighters 2 Packs of 24-count#2 pencils Pack of pens (blue or black ink only) Pack of colored pencils 6 Glue sticks Pair of scissors 3-holed pencil pouch with zipper 3 or 5 Subject spiral notebook with pockets for science Box of tissues Bottle of hand sanitizer Tub of Clorox clean up wipes Pack assorted dry erase markers Box of sandwich size Ziploc backs Box of quart size Ziploc bags TI-30XA Calculator EIGHTH GRADE 4 One inch 3 ring binders with pockets Pack of college ruled loose leaf paper for each notebook 5 Tab dividers for each notebook Pack of assorted highlighters 2 Packs of 24-count#2 pencils Pack of pens (blue or black ink only) Pack of colored pencils 6 Glue sticks Pair of scissors 3-holed pencil pouch with zipper 3 or 5 Subject spiral notebook with pockets for science Box of tissues Bottle of hand sanitizer Tub of Clorox clean up wipes Pack assorted dry erase markers Box of sandwich size Ziploc backs Box of quart size Ziploc bags TI-30XA CalculatorBETHLEHEM MIDDLE *No large backpacks or rolling backpacks *Pre-K students: All students are required to have a full size backpack. If your child will be staying all day, they must also have a mat for nap time and a blanket. We accept donations of liquid hand soap and re“ lls, boxes of tissues, paper towels, bottles of ” ue, glue sticks, baby wipes, disinfecting wipes, disinfecting spray and any size Ziploc bags. KINDERGARTEN Pack of Crayola markers 2 Packs 24-count Crayola crayons Fiskars scissors Pack of 24-count colored pencils Plastic school box Rest mat (Plastic on both sides) 2 Pump bottles of liquid soap Pack of 24-count #2 pencils 2 Boxes of baby wipes Disinfecting wipes Large eraser 2 Coloring books Backpack 10 Glue sticks Hand sanitizer 2 Plastic folders with pockets and prongs 2 Black dry erase markers Headphones (no earbuds) FIRST GRADE 4 Packs 24-count Crayola crayons Pair of Fiskars scissors Plastic school box 2 Boxes of tissues Pump bottle of liquid soap 4 Packs 24-count #2 pencils Disinfecting wipes Large eraser Coloring book Backpack 8 Glue sticks Hand sanitizer 2 Plastic folders with pockets and prongs 2 Black dry erase markers Headphones (no earbuds) SECOND GRADE Pack of 24-count Crayola crayons Pair of Fiskars scissors Pack of 24-count colored pencils Plastic school box 2 Boxes of tissues Pump bottle of liquid soap 2 Packs of 24-count #2 pencils Ruler (w/centimeter and inch marks) Pack of wide ruled paper Box of baby wipes Disinfecting wipes Red pen 2 Large erasers Backpack 2 Glue sticks 2 Bottles of hand sanitizer 2 Plastic folders with pockets and prongs Pack of yellow highlighters 2 Three ring 1-inch view binders w/pockets THIRD GRADE Pack of 24-count Crayola crayons Pair of Fiskars scissors Pack of 24-count colored pencils Plastic school box Assorted pack off construction paper 3 Boxes of tissues Pump bottle of liquid soap Girls box of gallon size Ziploc bags Boys box of quart size Ziploc bags 2 Packs 24-count #2 pencils Ruler (W/centimeter and inch marks) 2 Packs of wide ruled paper Disinfecting wipes 2 Red pens 2 Large erasers 2 Rolls of paper towels Backpack 2 Glue sticks 2 Bottles of hand sanitizer 8 Plastic folders with pockets and prongs 2 Packs of yellow highlighters 4 Black dry erase markers 3 Three-ring 1-inch view binders with pockets Headphones (No earbuds) FOURTH GRADE Pack of 24-count Crayola crayons Pack of 24-count colored pencils 2 Boxes of tissues Pump bottle of liquid hand soap Girls box of gallon size Ziploc bags Pack of 24-count #2 pencils 2 Packs wide ruled paper Disinfecting wipes 2 Large erasers Roll of paper towels Backpack 2 Glue sticks Hand sanitizer Pack of yellow highlighters 2 Packs black dry erase markers 2 Three-ring 1-inch view binders with pockets 2 Writing journals (not spiral bound) Earbuds Pack of 8 dividers Pack of eraser caps FIFTH GRADE Pack of 24-count Crayola crayons Pair of Fiskars scissors Pack of 24-count colored pencils 3 Boxes of tissues 3 Pump bottles liquid soap Girls box of gallon Ziploc bags Boys box of quart Ziploc bags 3 Packs 24-count #2 pencils Pack of wide ruled paper Boys box of baby wipes Girls disinfecting wipes 3 Large erasers Roll of paper towels Backpack 2 Glue sticks 3 Bottles of hand sanitizer 2 Packs of yellow highlighters 3 Black dry erase markers 2 Three-ring 1-inch view binders with pockets 3 Three-ring 2-inch view binders with pockets Pack of copy paper Pack of 24-count markersBETHLEHEM ELEMENTARY BONIFAY K-8MATH 1-Inch 3-ring binder with pockets 2 Packs of college ruled lose leaf paper (no spiral notebooks) 2 Packs of graph paper Pack of dividers 2 Packs of pencils (no pens allowed) READING 1-Inch 3-rings binder with pockets Pack of dividers 2 Packs college ruled loose leaf paper Pack of assorted color highlighters Pens (Blue or Black) 2 Packs pencils Spiral notebook Bottle of Germ-X Pair of headphones or earbuds Box of tissues COLLEGE ENGLISH 1-Inch binder College ruled loose leaf paper Pens and pencils USB ” ash drive CULINARY 2 Rolls of paper towels Large container of Clorox wipes Bottle of Dawn liquid dish soap Bottle of hand soap (No hand sanitizer) BUSINESS 2 Packs of printer paper 8GB USB ” ash drive Box of tissues Bottle of hand sanitizer Tub of Clorox clean up wipesBETHLEHEM HIGH SCHOOL SUPPLY LISTS

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| Wednesday, July 25, 2018 M13backpacks) 2 Large pink erasers Box of pencil top erasers Pack of 24-count or more #2 wood pencils 4 Boxes of Crayola crayons (not more than 24-count boxes) 12 Pack of colored pencils Pencil box 2 Dry erase markers Pair of Fiskars scissors 2 Wide-ruled spiral composition books (70 page each) Bottle of Elmers glue 2 Glue sticks Large box of antibacterial wet wipes Large box of Kleenex Bottle of hand sanitizer Bottle of hand soap Boys gallon Ziploc bags Girls quart Ziploc bags $8 for class t-shirt ***Bring all supplies and money to “ rst grade orientation*** SECOND GRADE Pack of wide-ruled notebook paper (200 sheets) Pack of #2 Ticonderoga pencils (24 count) Green plastic folder (must be three pronged) Composition notebook (70 pages) Pack of dry erase markers Pair of childrens Fiskars scissors 2 Large pink erasers Glue stick Bottle of Elmers glue (4 ounces) 4 Boxes 24-count Crayola crayons Large box of antibacterial baby wipes Large box of facial tissue Bottle of Germ-X Bottle of antibacterial soap Zippered pencil bag Headphones (no earbuds) Girls quart Ziploc bags Boys gallon Ziploc bags THIRD GRADE Pack of highlighters 2 packs of #2 pencils Wide-ruled notebook paper Crayons, markers and or colored pencils Glue sticks Scissors Pencil cap erasers and or Pink erasers Pencil bag Pack of red pens Germ-X Baby wipes 5 Folders mist be three pronged (1 each blue, red, green, purple and yellow) Pack of Expo markers 2 Boxes of Kleenex tissues Girls quart Ziploc bags Boys gallon Ziploc bags FOURTH GRADE Backpack Zippered pencil bag 4 pack #2 pencils (Prefer Ticonderoga or Americas Pencils US Gold) 2 Packs of paper 4 Packs pencil cap erasers Pack of dry erase markers Baby wipes 3 Boxes of Kleenex Germ-X Liquid soap 3 Composition notebooks 6 Three pronged plastic folders $10 For class shirt Boys box of quart Ziploc bags Girls box of gallon Ziploc bags Pack of blue pens 2 Glue sticks Pack of colored pencils Headphones (no earbuds) Box of crayons 2 Containers of antibacterial wipes FIFTH GRADE 3 Packs wide ruled notebook paper 3 Packs of pencils Earbuds or headphones Grading pens (for student use) Cap erasers Pack of colored pencils Yellow highlighter 4 Spiral one subject wide ruled notebooks 3 Boxes of tissues Lysol antibacterial wipes Girls quart Ziploc bags Boys gallon Ziploc bags Glue stick Handheld pencil sharpener Pair of scissors Pack of 4-count dry erase markers (for student use) Pencil pouch (no boxes) ELA … 3 plastic folders with pockets (blue, red and green) Science … Folder with pockets ***Check with your child periodically concerning supply replenishments. These may not last all year, depending on use loss.*** SIXTH GRADE Notebook paper (all classes) Mechanical pencils Pencil erasers (all classes) Red pens (all classes) Dry erase Expo marker (all classes) Highlighters (all classes) Plastic folders (double pockets with three prongs) ( Red-Language Arts, OrangeMath, Yellow … Social Studies, Green … Science) Colored pencils (Language arts) 2 One subject Spiral notebooks (Science/Language Arts) 2 Composition books (Math class notes/Math i-ready notes) 3 Packs black Expo dry erase markers (Math, ELA, Science) 5X8 Index cards (ELA) Kleenex (3 Boxes to homeroom teacher) Paper towels (1 roll to homeroom teacher) Hand sanitizer or wipes (to homeroom teacher) SEVENTH GRADE 1-Inch binder (civics 1 -Inch binder (Reading/ ELA) Package of dividers (at least 5) (Reading/ELA) Composition notebook (Science) Plastic 3-prong folder with pockets (Science) 3 Packs 3X5 index cards (Science) Black and white composition notebook, not spiral bound (Math) Red folder plain or 3 pronged (Math) ITEMS TO BE KEPT BY THE STUDENT TO BE USED IN EVERY CLASS:#2 Pencils (Mechanical can be used, but 1 box of #2 wooden pencils is required) Colored pencilsBONIFAY K-8 CONTINUED

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M14 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | Pack of Post-It notes Red ink pens Pack of 4 color highlighters White standard ruled loose leaf notebook paper (not college ruled) Calculator (Scienti“ c or basic) (write name on calculator in permanent marker) Flash drive or jump drive (at least 2 GB, may reuse last years) BRING TO YOUR HOMEROOM TEACHER: 2 Boxes Kleenex Bottle of Germ-X Box disinfecting wipes Bottle of antibacterial soap EIGHTH GRADE 2 1-Inch 3-Ring binders (for ELA and science) Three 3-Prong plastic folders with pockets (for history, math, computers) One composition notebook (math) White standard ruled loose leaf notebook paper (not college ruled) Package of loose leaf graph paper(Not in a composition book) 2 Packages of dividers (Necessary for all 1-inch binders) ITEMS TO BE KEPT BY THE STUDENT AND AVAILABLE TO USE IN EVERY CLASS:#2 Pencils Colored pencils Red Ink pens Highlighters (Pink, yellow, blue, and purple) Pack of small Expo markers (math) Pack of Post-It notes Calculator (Scienti“ c preferred) (Be sure it is a Texas Instrument 30Xa (TI-30Xa). Be sure to write your name on the calculator with a permanent marker) Flash drive/jump drive(at least 2 GB) EarbudsITEMS TO BRING TO YOUR HOMEROOM TEACHER: 2 Boxes of Kleenex 2 Containers of disinfecting wipesBONIFAY K-8 CONTINUEDKINDERGARTEN Pack of Clorox wipes Box of Kleenex Eight pack of crayons Pencil box Bottle of glue Pencils Erasers Pack of washable markers Pair of child scissors 3 Folders GRADES 1 AND 2 Pack of Clorox wipes Box of Kleenex Eight pack of crayons Pencil box Sick of glue Pencils Erasers Pack of washable markers Pair of child scissors 2 Pocket folders -Inch three ring binder with pockets GRADES 3 AND 4 Pack of Clorox wipes Box of Kleenex 24-Count box of crayons Pencil box Glue sticks Pencils Erasers Pack of colored pencils Pair of child scissors 3 Packs of wide ruled paper 3 Folders 1-Inch three ring binder GRADES 5 THROUGH 8 3 Ring binder 3 Packs of wide ruled paper Binder dividers Pencils Erasers Pack of Clorox wipes Box of Kleenex Combination lock (for those that chose to use a locker) GRADES 9 THROUGH 12 8 Spiral notebooks Composition book Pack of red pens Pack of black pens Scienti“ c calculator Pencils Pack of Clorox wipes Box of Kleenex Combination lock (for those that chose to use a locker)GRACE AND GLORY *PE requires athletic type tennis shoes* *Computer lab requires headphones or earbuds* PRE-K ALL DAY STUDENTS: $50 A WEEK Back pack (large enough for towel and folder) Kinder Mat and large towel (beach towel is perfect) Box of wet wipes Box of tissues Box of gallon Ziploc bags Family size box of crackers, cookies or cereal Snack drinks (like Capri Sun) Complete change of clothes HALF DAY STUDENTS (8 A.M. TO 11 A.M.) Complete change of clothes Back pack large enough to hold folder Vortex Springs has purchased all Kindergarten supplies FIRST GRADE 2 Packs of pencils (preferably Dixon or Ticonderoga) Pair of scissors (preferably Fiskars) 4 Boxes of 24-count Crayola crayons 4 Large glue sticks 4 Expo dry erase markers 4 Block pink erasers 4 Composition notebooks (NO spiral) Pack of highlighters Plastic folder no prongs Backpack (NO rolling) Pack cap erasers for pencils GIRLS Quart Ziploc bags Large box of Kleenex Germ-X BOYS Gallon Ziploc bags Disinfecting wipes Baby wipes SECOND GRADE 2 Packs of wide ruled notebook paper 2 Packs of pencils (Ticonderoga recommended) Journal type notebook Zipper pencil bag (no boxes) 2 Packs 24-count Crayola crayons Pack of Crayola markers Pair of Fiskars scissors Pack of glue sticks Pocket folder Pack of cap erasers Pack of dry erase markers Box of tissues Backpack (no rolling) GIRLS Gallon Ziploc bags Baby wipes BOYS Quart Ziploc bags Clorox/Lysol wipes *Due to limited amount of space in the desks, please donot buy 3-ring notebooks or pencil boxes* THIRD GRADE 2 Packs wide ruled notebook paper 3 Boxes of Crayola crayons 3 or 4 Pack of glue sticks Pack of highlighters 1 Each red, green and yellow prong folders with pockets Sticky notes 24 Pack of Ticonderoga pencils Pack of cap erasers 2 Composition notebooks (no spiral) Pair of Fiskars scissors Box of tissues Container of baby wipes Ziploc bags (Boys gallon and girls quart) Backpack (no rolling) Pencil box Pack of big dry erase markers Pack of small dry erase markers Earbuds Pack of regular size index cards OPTIONAL WISH LIST Clorox wipes Hand sanitizer Extra box of tissues Sticky notes *No small pencil sharpeners or rolling backpacks* FOURTH GRADE 2 Pack of notebook paper 4 Packs of pencils (Ticonderoga) 3X5 Index cards Box 24-count Crayola crayons Pack of clear page protectors 2 Wireless black and white composition notebooks Clear protractor Lysol or Clorox wipes Box of Kleenex tissues OPTIONAL WISH LIST Band aids Sticky notes Germ-X Ziploc bags (any size) Wet wipes *Please purchase suggested name brands, types and colors FIFTH GRADE 3 Packs of pencils Box of facial tissues Girls (quart bags) Boys (Germ-X 10 ounce or larger) 2 Packs notebook “ ller paper wide ruled 150 pages One subject notebook/ wide ruled 3Mead folders with prongs (1 purple, 1 red and 1 yellow) 24-Count crayons Box of colored pencils Pack of 4 black Expo markers Pack of 3 Elmers glue sticks 2 Packs highlighters Container baby wipes Pack of 3 big pink erasers OPTIONAL WISH LIST Liquid hand soap Band aids Pencil pouched (no boxes)PONCE DE LEON ELEMENTARY KINDERGARTEN 2 Boxes of tissues Package of dry erase markers Complete change of clothes to be left at school Standard size backpack to “ t 8X10 folders, no wheels 2 Containers of disinfectant wipes BOYS Box of Ziploc bags (Quart size, no zipper) GIRLS Box of Ziploc bags (Gallon, no zipper) FIRST GRADE Pair of headphones (no earbuds) 2 Containers of Clorox/ Lysol wipes Can of disinfectant spray 3 Large boxes of tissues 2 Pump bottles of Germ-X BOYS Box of gallon size Ziploc bags GIRLS Box of quart size Ziploc bags SECOND GRADE Pair of headphones (no earbuds) Container of Clorox wipes Can of Lysol spray 2 Large boxes of tissues Pump battle of hand sanitizer Bottle of had soap BOYS Box of gallon size Ziploc bags GIRLS Box of quart size Ziploc bags THIRD GRADE 3 Packs of 24 count pencils Pack of large pink erasers Container of Clorox wipes 2 Spiral notebooks Pair of headphones (no earbuds) Bottle of pump hand sanitizer BOYS 2 Rolls of paper towels GIRLS 2 Boxes f tissues FOURTH GRADE 2 Packs of 24 count #2 pencils 3 Containers of disinfectant wipes Bottle of hand soap Pair of headphones or earbuds 3 Boxes of tissues 3 Rolls of paper towels FIFTH GRADE 2 Packs of large Post-It notes 2 Packs of small Post-It notes Pair of headphones or earbuds Large pump bottle of Germ-X 2 Large boxes of tissues Bottle of antibacterial hand soapKATE M. SMITH ELEMENTARY

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| Wednesday, July 25, 2018 M15ALL GRADES Loose leaf paper#2 Pencils (Any kind) Pens Flash Drive Pack of whiteboard eraser markers (four pack) 3 Marble composition notebooks Pack of big pink erasers Pack of highlighters (four per pack w/ different colors) 2 Packs of dividers Zipper pencil pouches Pair of earbuds (Headphones) OPTIONAL SUPPLIES Ream of copy paper Box of Great Value ziplock sandwich bags Kleenex Clorox wipes Magic erasers (Great Value brand) Paper towels Binders will be furnished by the schoolVERNON MIDDLEPreschool through sixth grade supplies will be supplied by the school. 7TH GRADE 8 to 12 #2 Pencils (standard or mechanical) 6 to 10 Black or blue pens (no gel) Ruler (with metric) Compass Protractor 3X5 Index cards (100 count) 4X6 Index cards (100 count) 6 Folders (3 prong/2pocket) 3 Packs wide ruled notebook paper 8 Spiral notebooks (2 each of red, blue, green and yellow) 2 Poster boards (for insect collection) 8TH GRADE 8 to 12 #2 Pencils (standard or mechanical) 6 to 10 Black or blue pens (no gel) Colored pencils (twistable if possible) Ruler (with metric) Compass Protractor 3X5 Index cards (100 count) 4X6 Index cards (100 count) 6 Folders (3 prong/2pocket) 3 Packs wide ruled notebook paper 8 Spiral notebooks (2 each of red, blue, green and yellow) Tri-fold display board (science project) HIGH SCHOOL 8 to 12 #2 Pencils (standard or mechanical) 6 to 10 Black or blue pens (no gel) Ruler (with metric) Compass (geometry only) Protractor (geometry only) 3X5 Index cards (100 count) 4X6 Index cards (100 count) 6 Folders (3 prong/2pocket) 3 Packs wide ruled notebook paper Graph paper (50 count) 8 to 12 Spiral notebooks (2 of each color) Tri-fold display board (science project) 2 Dry erase markers *This is a basic supply list for average consumption. If your student requires a higher consumption yield then additional supplies will be required. Individual styles and brands are acceptable without offensive subject matter. Additional projects may be assigned at the teachers discretion and minimal supplies may be required as needed.WASHINGTON COUNTY CHRISTIAN KINDERGARTEN Backpack (NO rolling back packs) Set of extra clothes labeled in bag (in case of an accident) Pair of small Fisker scissors (round tip) 4 Large glue sticks 4 Boxes of crayons Package of pencils sharpened 2 Block style erasers Small supply box for crayons and pencils Box of tissues GIRLS Bring Clorox wipes BOYS Bring can of Lysol spray NO REST MAT NEEDED FIRST GRADE Scissors Glue (bottle and stick) 2 Boxes of 24 count crayons 2 Packs of #2 pencils Packs of pencil erasers 3 Dry erase markers 3 Highlighters Set of earbuds to use with computers School box 1 Subject notebooks 2 Boxes of Kleenex Container of disinfecting wipes GIRLS Bottle of antibacterial soap BOYS Bottle of hand sanitizer GIRLS Box of quart Ziploc bags BOYS Box of gallon Ziploc bags Backpack SECOND GRADE Bottle of Elmers glue Scissors 2 Boxes 16-count Crayola Crayons Plastic pencil/crayon box Pack of 24-count #2 pencils (no decorative wrap) Pencil top erasers 2 Highlighters 2 Expo whiteboard markers 100 Page composition note book, wide rules, sewn (no spiral) Backpack (no wheels) GIRLS Box of gallon Ziploc bags and bottle hand sanitizer BOYS Box of quart Ziploc bags, disinfectant wipes THIRD GRADE Scissors Pack of glue sticks Pencil box Box of Ziploc bags (Girls sandwich size/Boys gallon size) Antibacterial hand wipes Hand soap 4 Packs of pencil erasers (Ticonderoga preferred) 2 Packs of 16-count Crayola crayons Highlighters Backpack Pack of dry erase markers (any size) Pack of colored pencils Box of Kleenex FOURTH AND FIFTH GRADE Packs of #2 pencils (not mechanical) Cap erasers Packs of loose leaf paper (wide ruled) Spiral note book 70-pae (for fourth grade science) 3-ring binder or zipper style Tapper Keeper (at least 2-inches) Set of index tabs for binder (5-tab or 8-tab) 2 Boxes of Tissues Pack of highlighters Red pen Box of colored pencils Box of Anti-Bacterial wipes *Students extra paper, pencils and erasers may be kept in their lockers at school. Locks on lockers are NOT recommended.POPLAR SPRINGSSIXTH GRADE 2 One subject spiral notebooks Twelve pack of pencils Pack of page protectors 2 Expo markers Box of Kleenex Container of Clorox wipes SEVENTH GRADE TIGER BINDER: Every student in the 7th grade will be provided with the following school supplies by the district. Three inch binder Five tab set of dividers Pencil pouch 12 pack of wooden pencils 12 pack of erasers 12 pack of colored pencils 150 sheets of wide ruled paper 100 Lined index cards 2 red checking pens 2 yellow highlighters Space is limited in the binder. Encourage your child not to put too many supplies in this binder. They only need two or three pencils and approximately 25 sheets of paper in the Tiger Binder at any given time. Parents will be responsible, however, for replenishing these supplies. PURCHASE THE FOLLOWING ITEMS: Earbuds Basic calculator 75 Page spiral composition notebook *If possible purchase one or more of the following for Flex class Kleenex Clorox wipes Computer screen wipes EIGHTH GRADE TIGER BINDER: Every student in the 8th grade will be provided with the following school supplies by the district. Three inch binder Five tab set of dividers Pencil pouch 12 pack of wooden pencils 12 pack of erasers 12 pack of colored pencils 150 sheets of wide ruled paper 100 Lined index cards 2 red checking pens 2 yellow highlighters *Space is limited in the binder. Encourage your child not to put too many supplies in this binder. They only need two or three pencils and approximately 25 sheets of paper in the Tiger Binder at any given time. Keep extra supplies at home and restock as needed. PURCHASE THE FOLLOWING ITEMS: Ti-30Xa calculator (found at Walmart and used on EOC and FSA) 70 Page spiral notebook (science) Extra packs of loose leaf paper (regular, NOT college ruled) Earbuds Flash drive Blue or black pens (language arts) Handheld pencil sharpener 2 Boxes of Kleenex (FLEX period) Bottle of hand sanitizer (FLEX period)ROULHAC MIDDLE VPK Box of tissues Baby wipes Regular size backpack *Full day students only: KinderMat and Blanket KINDERGARTEN Disinfecting wipes Box of tissues Pack of #2 yellow pencils (8 Count) Regular size backpack 1ST GRADE 2 Boxes of tissues 1 Container of disinfecting wipes 1 Box of #2 yellow pencils (24 Count) 1 Multi-color pack of Expo markers 1 Multi-color pack of highlighters 2ND GRADE 1 Box of issues 1 Container of disinfecting wipes 1 Bottle of hand sanitizer 2 Boxes of #2 yellow pencils (24 Count) Boys: 1 Box gallon Ziploc bags Girls: 1 Box quart Ziploc bags 3RD GRADE 2 Boxes of tissues Boys: 1 Box gallon Ziploc bags Girls: 1 Box quart Ziploc bags 2 Boxes of #2 yellow pencils (24 Count) Headphones/earbuds 4TH GRADE 1 Container of disinfecting wipes 1 Roll paper towels 2Boxes of tissues 4 Boxes of #2 yellow or mechanical Pencils (24 Count) Headphones/earbuds 5TH GRADE 1 Container of disinfecting wipes 1 Box of tissues 1 Bottle of hand sanitizer 2 Boxes of #2 yellow pencils (24 Count) Headphones/earbudsVERNON ELEMENTARY

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M16 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 |

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The Weekly Advertiser | Wednesday, July 25, 2018 1 NF-5036053 NF-5032797 3 3 NF-503 3 2797 2 2 2 Lawn Maint., Irrigation, Pressure Wash, Pavers & Paver Repair, Tree Trimming, Fertilization, Spring Clean-Ups, Etc.Arturo Luebano 2455 N Hwy. 81, Ponce De Leon, FL 32455 850.658.6189 arthurluebano@yahoo.comWe have been in business since 2007. We are licensed and insured. Luebano Lawn Service, LLC. (850) 638-3611 HastyHeating & Cooling NF-5028471 NF-5032729 C & CBookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE OR BUSINESS FOR AS LITTLE AS $10 A WEEK!*Reach thousands of potential customers with your Business Guide ad in the:WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS HOLMES COUNTY-TIMES ADVERTISER WEEKLY ADVERTISER CALL TODAY! 850-638-0212*Minimum 8-week contract. NF-5036305 NF-5032769 Hazardous Aerial Tree Removal € Stump Grinding Trimming & Pruning € Emergency Tree Service € Lot Clean UpDow Morris,Owner/Operator 850-527-6291 € 850-849-3825 Volume 89 Number 30 WEDNESDAY, JULY 25, 2018NF-5036062 Chipley Housing AuthorityMaintenance Mechanic AssistantChipley Housing Authority has a Maintenance Mechanic Assistant position available immediately. Duties include: Assist in making repairs on electrical systems, plumbing, refrigerators and gas equipment. Operation of proper tools, equipment, etc. to assist in performing necessary work needed to maintain the units, grounds and equipment. Assist with any contracted personnel. Perform roofing repairs, painting, grass cutting, making units ready for prospective tenants and assist with inspection of grounds and buildings. Submit written reports as required, attend meetings as assigned and other duties as assigned by supervisor. Must have and maintain a valid Florida Drivers License at all times. Must have dependable transportation. Must complete a physical exam and pre-employment drug test. Applications may be made at the office located at 1370 Old Bonifay Road in Chipley, Florida. Applications will be accepted until Monday July 30, 2018 at 2:00pm. Chipley Housing Authority is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. is currently seekingFull Time Counselors, Case Managers, and Nursesto work with children and adults in Bay, Gulf, Calhoun, Jackson, Holmes and Washington Counties. For more details on these and other positions, please visit us online at: http://lmccares.org/careers/employment opportunities The City of Chipley is accepting applications for a Grounds Keeper Minimum Qualifications: Responsible for supervision of inmates and general grounds maintenance throughout the City. General knowledge of lawn care and basic knowledge of the functions of lawn equipment. Education and Experience: High School diploma or possession of an acceptable equivalency diploma. Must possess a valid State of Florida Driver’s License. Must be eligible for a Department of Corrections Inmate Supervisor Card. A job description is available upon request. The City participates in the Florida Retirement System (FRS). Mail or hand deliver application and/or resume to Assistant City Administrator/City Clerk, City of Chipley, 1442 Jackson Ave., Post Office Box 1007, Chipley, Florida 32428. Deadline: Open until filled. EOE/Drug Free Workplace. Free Lab/mix puppies If interested call 443-8760721 Indoor Plus Size Yard Sale 3280 Highway 2 in Bonifay (Esto Community) Plus size clothes new or like new condition. Smoke and pet free home. Nothing over $10. Call for Appointment 547-4591 or 730-6919. K&LFarm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 Log Truck Driver wanted with a clean driving record. Call 850-956-2266 or 850-956-2215. Seeking Admin. Asst / Receptionist for small, non-profit. Must have excellent organizational skills, can multi-task, be customer service oriented, proficient with MS Office Suite and have solid written and verbal communication skills. Professional attitude and appearance. Call Chris @ 850.638.4157 The Holmes County Board of County Commissionersis currently accepting applications for the part-time position of4-H Program AssistantApplicants must apply in person at County Commissioners Office, 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, by 4:00 PM on August 13, 2018. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 For Rent 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments in Vernon. Clean, stove, refrigerator, central heat/air, convenient to Panama City Beach, section 8, Rental assistance. 850-638-4640 For Rent One Bedroom apartments for rent in Chipley. Convenient location. Stove and refrigerator furnished. No Pets. Smoke free environment. Call 850-638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For Rent 3, 4 and 5BR fully furnished, CH/A, 6 Miles from time, very private, no pets. 850-547-2096. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. Rooms For Rent By Week.Comfortable rooms with microwave & refrigerator. All utilities paid. Cable and internet. Pet friendly at extra charge. Economy Lodge, Bonifay. 850-547-4167. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/ sewage/ lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 2BR/1.5BAMH For Rent $400.00/month, $400.00/deposit. No pets. In the country. 547-2043 or 768-9670. For Sale Two acre plot and one acre plot in Jacob City, FL. Call 850-849-9338. Highway 77 2 miles south of Chipley 4-8 acre tract Bedie Road. Call Milton Peel at 850-638-1858 or 326-9109 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! Turn to classified’s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you! NF-5032778 ABSOLUTE LAKE PROPERTY LIQUIDATIONJULY 28TH10 AM –PRICES STARTING AT $29,900 WATCH THE VIDEOLakeLotsCloseout.com 3 LAKES FORECLOSURE RESALESLAKEVIEW & LAKEFRONT LOTS

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2 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | The Weekly Advertiser

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The Weekly Advertiser | Wednesday, July 25, 2018 3 NF-5037531 2018 FordFIESTA SEAuto Transmission, Alloy Wheels Stock # 18274MSRP........................................................$17,845 NOW........ $14,995SAVE $3,150 2018 FordFOCUS SEL5 Door, Remote Start Stock # 18211MSRP......................................................$22,895 NOW........$17,995SAVE $4,900 2018 FordTAURUS LIMITEDNavigation, LeatherStock # 18266MSRP........................................................$39,145 NOW.......$31,495SAVE $7,650 2018 FordESCAPE SStock # 18236MSRP....................................................................$24,935 NOW.......$21,495SAVE $3,440 2018 FordEDGE SELLeather, Navigation, Hands Free Ligate Stock # 18119MSRP....................................................................$37,580 NOW.......$31,995SAVE $5,585 2018 FordF150 XLTCrew Cab, Chrome pkg. Stock # 18115MSRP.....................................................................$45,375 NOW.......$36,945SAVE $8,430 2018Ford SAVE$3,150 ALL PRICES PLUS $299.50 P&H, TAX, TAG & TITLE. ALL INCENTIVES APPLIED. INCENTIVES GOOD THRU 07/31/2018 PICTURES FOR ILLUSTRAT ION PURPOSES ONLY. PRICES GOOD THRU 07/31/2018 RICK BARNESSales Manager4242 Lafayette Street Marianna, FL 32446www.chipolaford.com(850) 482-4043 1 (866) 587-3673 Plenty more great deals on the lot to choose from! OUR SALES TEAM IS HERE TO HELP YOU! Jackson County Used Car & Truck Center NEW NEW NEW NEW NEW SAVE$7,650 NEW NEW 2018Ford NEW 2013 FORD EDGE SEL Leather, Navigation, Stock # 17358A..........................................................was $19,995 NOW $16,995 2015 FORD EDGE SEL Leather, Navigation, 1 Owner, Stock # 17369A........................................was $29,995 NOW $25,995 2016 FORD F250 Supercab4x4,Diesel, Brushguard,Low Miles, Stock # 18139A.............................was $42,995 NOW $39,995 2015 FORD F150 Platinum, Crewcab, Loaded, Nice, Stock # 18174A.....................................................was $40,995 NOW $37,995 2016 FORD FUSION SE Moonroof, Navigation, Stock # 17238B................................................was $18,995 NOW $16,995 2016 DODGE 2500 4x4, 6.4L Gas, Gooseneck, Low Miles, Stock # 18140A...................................was $40,995 NOW $38,995 2015 FORD EXPLORER Sport Pkg, Leather, Stock # R3722......................................................was $29,995 NOW $26,995 2015 NISSAN QUEST SV Leather, Loaded, Stock # R3723A.......................................................was $18,995 NOW $15,995 2017 TOYOTO TACOMA 4x4, O Road Pkg., Only 2k Miles, Stock # 18233A...........................was $37,995 NOW $34,995 2015 FORD ESCAPE Titanium,Leather, Moonroof, Navigation, Stock # R3727.........................was $23,995 NOW $20,995 CHAD CAPPS CRAIG SMITH RAY MAGUIRE JOHN ALLEN NF-5037532

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4 Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | The Weekly Advertiser $ 3 58 USDA Select Beef BONENLESS TOP SIRLOIN STEAKS Family Pk, Per Lb 78 ¢ Fresh Lean Premium BONE-IN SIRLOIN END CHOPS Family Pk, Per Lb $ 1 28 Super Fresh Premium BONELESS FRYER BREAST Family Pk, Per Lb $ 2 45 USDA Select Beef BONELESS SHOULDER ROAST 2 Pk, Per Lb $ 2 55 Fresh Lean Premium BABY BACK PORK RIBS Per Lb $ 2 65 USDA Select Beef BONELESS SHOULDER STEAK Family Pk, Per Lb 3/$ 5 Farm Grown RED POTATOES 5 Lb 98 ¢ Southern Grown SWEET RIPE PEACHES Per Lb 2/$ 1 Farm Grown EXTRA LARGE GREEN BELL PEPPER OR SELECT CUCUMBERS Each $ 1 77 Chiquita GOLD RIPE PINEAPPLES Each 85 ¢ Farm Grown FANCY YELLOW SQUASH Per Lb $ 1 95 Farm Fresh SWEET BLUEBERRIES Pint 78 ¢ Farm Grown JUMBO RED ONIONS Per Lb 95 ¢ DOLE SHREDDED LETTUCE 8 Oz Bag $ 2 78 SMOKED PORK CHOPS Per Lb 88 ¢ BAR-S MEAT FRANKS 12 Oz Pkg 2/$ 5 Sunnyland HOTEL SLICED BACON 12 Oz Pkg $ 2 98 ANDY'S SMOKED SAUSAGE 28 Oz Box $ 2 25 Cook's SMOKED HAM STEAKS Per Lb $ 6 44 Foster Farms PREMIUM CHICKEN STRIPS & WINGS 20-24 Oz Pkg 4/$ 5 HORMEL LITTLE SIZZLERS 12 Oz Box 98 ¢ Hot & Mild GWALTNEY ROLL SAUSAGE Pkg $ 3 98 IQF POPCORN CHICKEN 5 Lb Bag $ 1 98 Coca-Cola Products 6 Pk, .5 Ltr Btls 2/$ 3 Piggly Wiggly Vegetable Oil 48 Oz Btl 2/$ 5 Piggly Wiggly Milk Gallon Varieties 50 ¢ Starkist Tuna 5 Oz Can $ 2 55 Crunchy or Smooth JIF Peanut Butter 28 Oz Giant Jar 88 ¢ Select Varieties Betty Crocker Hamburger Helper Pkg 2/$ 5 Simply Orange Juice 52 Oz Btl $ 2 18 Capri Sun Pouch Drinks 10 Ct Box 2 / 88 ¢ Castleberry Hot Dog Chili 10 Oz Can 95 ¢ Cool Whip Frozen Topping 8 Oz Cntr $ 1 67 Smucker's Grape Jelly 32 Oz Jar $ 1 55 Hungry Jack Pancake Mix 2 Lb Box $ 1 97 Piggly Wiggly Freezer Pops 36 Ct Pkg 4/$ 5 Golden Flake Cheese Puffs or Curl 5-6 Oz Bags $ 4 77 Charmin Essential Bath Tissue 12 Roll $ 15 95 Bud Light Beer 18 Pk Cans & Btls 1264 CHURCH AVENUE  CHIPLEY, FL  324286AM-7PM  7 Days a Week  850-638-1751WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO CORRECT TYPOGRAPHICAL AND PICTORAL ERRORS. QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS. WE DO NOT AC CEPT INTERNET PRINTED COUPONS.EBT Cardholders and WIC Vouchers Welcomed. Most Major Credit Cards Accepted Our Beef is USDA Select or Higher.PRICES GOOD JULY 25 THRU JULY 31, 2018 OF CHIPLEY, FL COST PLUS 10% Text GOGRO to 1-844764-6476 to get the smartphone app!iPhone and Android GoGro Special Deal Every Week! 8 PK, 20 OZPOWERADE SPORTS DRINKS 3 /$ 11NF-5038000