Citation
Washington County news

Material Information

Title:
Washington County news
Uniform Title:
Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Place of Publication:
Chipley FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Nicole Barfield - Publisher
Creation Date:
January 5, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiweekly[<1994>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1931>]
semiweekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
Coordinates:
30.780922 x -85.539289

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began May 23, 1924.
General Note:
L.E. Sellers, editor.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Washington County News. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000384704 ( ALEPH )
07260886 ( OCLC )
ACC5987 ( NOTIS )
sn 81000810 ( LCCN )
0279-795X ( ISSN )

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** LEOS CARRY TORCH FOR SPECIAL OLYMPICS, B1 Volume 94 Number 84 Phone: 850-638-0212 Fax: 850-638-4601 Opinion ....................A4 Local & State ..............A5 Sports.......................A9 Faith .........................B4 Obituaries ..................B5 Classifieds .................B8 @WCN_HCT facebook.com/WashingtonCountyNews.HolmesCountyTimes50 ¢ chipleypaper.com Washington County A9Vernon weightlifting competes at stateB3Honor Roll students named Wednesday, April 4, 2018 By Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY „ With a growing labor force, Washington County is following the regional unemployment trend, according to recent data released by CareerSource Chipola.February data shows unemployment has decrease by nearly 0.8 percent over last year and a half-percent from January. Meanwhile, the number of employed has increased by 166 individuals over last year.CareerSource Chipola Executive Director Richard Williams says he is encouragedŽ by the data, but reluctant to qualify it as a sign of long-term change.I am encouraged by signs that our decline in both labor force and actual employment are reversing,Ž he said. How-ever, Im not going to be doing a happy dance until this trend continues for several months „ as a change over a month or two doesnt necessarily mean things have actu-ally changed long term.ŽAcross the region, which also includes Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson and Liberty counties, unemployment fell by a 0.8 per-cent and an increase in its labor force and employment numbers. Williams noted the data is salient considering, since the reces-sion, rural counties across the country have experienced a population shrinkage, as well as, a decline in its labor force and actual employment.Holmes County led the region in growth in both employment and decline in unemployment.Unemployment drops, workforce growsStaff ReportVERNON „ The City of Vernon has won the unemployment suit filed by its former City Clerk.At Mondays city council workshop, Vernon City Attorney Michelle Jordan announced that the unem-ployment suit filed by former City Clerk Michelle Cook has ended in favor of the City. Cook filed unemployment after submitting a resignation effective January this year.The news comes amid a state Department of Law Enforcement investigation into alleged embezzlement by Cook relating to payroll dis-crepancies, as well as, misuse of the Citys credit card. Also at the workshop, offi-cials approved the second reading of Ordinance No. 18-219 which, if approved Vernon wins suit against former City ClerkBy Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY „ Heritage will be on display this weekend.The 3rd Annual Washington County Heritage Festival will be held 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at Fall-ing Waters State Park, 1130 State Park Road. Entry is $5 per vehicle. Offsite parking will be avai lable at Rivertown Community Church located at 1317 State Park Road. Shuttle service will be available to transport guests to the festival grounds.Come out and experience how life used to be lived by visiting with our demonstrators that will include anything from a blacksmith to a flint knapper to a full agricultural display com-plete with 4-H show animals, antique tractors and farm implements,Ž Washington County Tourist Development Director Heather Lopez state in a news release.Heritage Festival is this weekendBy Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comGRACEVILLE „ Claims in excess of $120 million have been filed against Campbell-ton-Grace Hospital (CGH) in a bankruptcy case. Most of the claims are in relation to insurance companies that have asserted claims for alleged over-billing related to a lab processing scheme, according to the hospitals bankruptcy lawyer Brian Rich of Berger Singerman, a business law firm out of Tallahassee.The Debtor (CGH) will also be pursuing significant litigation claims to recover as much money as possible for the creditors,Ž Rich stated. He also noted the recovery and repayment amounts will depend upon the recoveries from the litigation in the bankruptcy case. The Chapter 11 case, which aims to restructure a companys debts and business organization, involves the CGH ghts $120 million in claimsBy Diane M. RobinsonThe News | @HCTA_Diane Drobinson@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY „ A new school for special needs students could be coming to the Washington County School District.Modeled after Hope School in Jackson County, the yet-to-be-named school will be located in the fifth grade building of Rouhlac Middle School as its own entity. The topic was discussed when Wash-ington County School Board met at a workshop Tuesday.An application for a school number was submit-ted earlier this week with an answer expected in two weeks, WCSB officials said.The school would be for students from pre-K to 22 years old for Exceptional Student Education (ESE) students..WCSB considers new ESE schoolSee SUIT, A2 See WCSB, A2 See FESTIVAL, A2 See CGH, A2 See LABOR, A2By Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY „ The conversation is one that is being had across the country: How safe are our campuses? School administrators voiced their safety concerns Monday at a school board round table meeting.According to feedback from principals, campus staff had a range of concerns „ from bulletproofing glass windows to erecting fencing.Whatever we do, we got to be in a position where its something we can maintain going forward and continue to make sure its operational,Ž said School Board member Terry Ellis. The communication system is one of the most important things,Ž he noted. Ive heard that thats an issue as well. Thats a very basic thing that we have to make sure were staying on top of.ŽVernon Elementary Schools Steve Griffin brought up fencing and other point-of-entry related concerns.Administrators discuss school safety, the way forwardDirector of Student and ESE Services Elizabeth Arnold speaks about mental health and the process of referral at a roundtable Monday afternoon at the old Chipley High School auditorium. From left: School Board Attorney Matthew Fuqua, Dr. Lou Cleveland (District 2), Vann Brock (District 1), Chairman Susan Roberts (District 5), Terry Ellis (District 4), Milton Brown (District 3) and Superintendent Joseph Taylor. [PHOTOS BY JACQUELINE BOSTICK | THE NEWS] Washington County School Board school board members, from left: School Board Attorney Matthew Fuqua, Dr. Lou Cleveland (District 2), Vann Brock (District 1), Chairman Susan Roberts (District 5), Terry Ellis (District 4), Milton Brown (District 3) and Superintendent Joseph Taylor, discuss school safety Monday at the old Chipley High School auditorium. See SAFETY, A2

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** A2 Wednesday, April 4, 2018 | Washington County Newsin a final vote, will delay the Ma rch elections until another election date is established. The intention of the ordinance lies in the councils effort to synchronize its election dates with general elec-tions held in November.In other news, the coun-cil approved a reading of the waste water resolution that adopts a Fiscal Sustainability Analysis and Wastewater Asset Management Plan. The council also learned that the county will acquire the Vernon library.Vernon City Council meets at 7 p.m. on the first and third Monday of the month at City Hall, 2808 Yellow Jacket Drive. SUITFrom Page A1 Currently, nine WCSD students attend Hope School and seven of those students will be moving back to their home district at the end of this school year, officials said.Students with an Indi-vidualized Education Plan (IEP) and their parents will begin meeting with school officials as soon as April to discuss the option of moving to the new facility, officials said. There are approximately 25 students in the district that meet the eligibility requirements to attend the new school. Parental consent is a requirement for students to attend an ESE centered school.Transportation would be provided for those students but would not include the WISE or Flor-ida Panhandle Technical College school buses.The hope it to have the school opened by July to start the Extended School Year, which some ESE students are required to have by federal law, officials said.The new facility would have its own administra-tor and operate as its own entity in the district. WCSBFrom Page A1North Florida Artillery Civil War reenactment at last years Washington County Heritage Festival. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] The event has steadily drawn more attendees. About 4,500 people attended the event last year „ up by more than 1,500 people the previous year.The event is hosted by Florida Farm Bureau and Farm Bureau Insurance.A kid zone will be avail-able for the little ones with a bounce house, inflatable slide and pony rides on Saturday,Ž Lopez stated. Live entertainment on Saturday will be by Panama City locals the East Bay 3 Band. Great food and the beautiful backdrop of one of the most beautiful state parks in Florida will round out this event.ŽThe event will also feature local arts and crafts vendors and a North Florida Artillery Civil War reenactment camp with two cannons that will be firing every 45 minutes.For more information about the festival, go to www.visitwcfla.com or call 850-638-6130. FESTIVALFrom Page A1Campbellton-Graceville Hospital. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] sale of the hospital building to Northwest Florida Community Hospital, which currently leases a clinic on the property and has proposed to repurpose the Graceville hospital for mental health services.Administration at NFCH were relieved earlier this month when Governor Rick Scott signed a piece of legislation „ heavily supported by Representative Brad Drake and Senator George Gainer „ that allows the hospital to acquire the CGH.The bankruptcy was a significant development for the hospital and the community,Ž Rich stated.ŽIt is unfortunate, the CGH, like many rural hos-pitals across the country are suffering financially and that here, CGH was victimized by a fraudulent scheme to utilize the hospital for what we view as a fraudulent billing scheme.Ž CGHFrom Page A1 The one-year gain of 132 extra employed individuals in the county is a good sign for Holmes County,Ž Williams said. That represents a 2-percent gain in employment over a year and that is a very good sign. The key will be to see if this trend contin-ues in the coming months.ŽUnemployment in the county dropped by one percent over last year „ also the largest gain in the region. Williams said the way to continue this trend lies in creating attractive coun-ties for job growth.The key for our counties to attract new jobs and have existing companies expand is to have the workforce these companies need,Ž he added. An increase in the size of the labor force and the number of people actually employed make it easier to grow our local economy.ŽStatewide unemployment decreased by 0.6 percent. LABORFrom Page A1SOURCE: CAREERSOURCE CHIPOLA CountyLabor ForceEmploymentUnemployment Washington94166-0.8% Holmes68132-1% Calhoun3870-0.7% Jackson136269-0.8% Liberty-510-0.6% Region331647-0.8% State215000268000-0.6% Comparison of February 2018 to February 2017The biggest thing for us is „ we have a single point of entry „ but the recommendation for our guys was to have somebody buzz folks in,Ž he said, also requesting higher fencing.Our single greatest need, in terms of secur-ing our campus is, by far, updated video cameras,Ž the principal at WISE stated.Vernon Middle Principal Kimberly Register said her school doesnt have a track and uses the bus loop as a track route for physical education.Put some increased fencing,Ž she said. How-ever, We are a school, we are an institution where were trying to welcome children into our facilities. Yes, were talking safety, but you dont have to keep anybody safe if you dont have kids there because it looks like an institution. We dont want that.ŽMental health was a blaring topic. Director of Student and ESE Ser-vices Elizabeth Arnold spoke about the process of a student being brought under the Baker Act from the campus. Some administrators had stated the breakdown in the referral system between the dis-trict, parents and mental health facilities.The greatest barrier to that is the violation of HIPAA „ because that family has a right to say no, were not going to share that information with you,Ž Arnold said in regards to why information isnt always easily passed. We are aware of that and we respect that, but, at the same time, we continue to do the same thing „ document.ŽShe also noted the dis-trict has recently hired a behavioral specialist. School Resource Offi-cers with Washington County Sheriffs Office are trained to mitigate a mental health crisis on campus, officials stated.Armed officers in schools is just one leg, weve got the mental health side of it mandated by our agencies that weve got to follow,Ž WCSO Sheriff Kevin Crews said.Ive had nothing but positive feedback from everybody Ive talked to about our new school resource officer program,Ž Crews added. I think were here to stay.ŽSuperintendent Joseph Taylor, School Board member Milton Brown and Crews reminded school administration that familiarizing and equipping elementary school children with safety tools is one of the most effective ways to create safer schools in the future.We cant do it just by fencing and cameras, but its the interaction of those officers with those indi-vidual students and those students feeling comfort-able enough to go to those officers and say Hey, I have a concern about this student,Ž Brown said. And doing it before the problem occurs is going to make the difference.ŽCurrently, all schools, with the except ion of WISE and Florida Pan-handle Technical College are SRO staffed. SAFETYFrom Page A1The greatest barrier to that is the violation of HIPAA „ because that family has a right to say no, were not going to share that information with you. We are aware of that and we respect that, but, at the same time, we continue to do the same thing „ document.ŽElizabeth Arnold

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, April 4, 2018 A3

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** A4 Wednesday, April 4, 2018 | Washington County News OPINION The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by GateHouse Media LLC at 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2018, GateHouse Media LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright Notice: The entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of GateHouse Media LLC. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or GateHouse Media. Postmaster: Send address change to Washington County News, P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428, USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES In county Out of county 13 weeks: $20 $24.30 26 weeks: $28.70 $36.40 52 weeks: $48.60 $60.70 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US Publisher: Nicole Bare“ eld nbare“ eld@chipleypaper.com Interim Editor: Jacqueline Bostick jbostick@chipleypaper.com, 850-638-0212 News, sports, opinion: news@chipleypaper.com Classi“ ed: 850-638-0212, clamb@chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service: 1-850-522-5197Have something to say?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri“ cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper.com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. Washington CountyPUBLISHER Nicole P. Bare“ eld INTERIM EDITOR Jacqueline Bostick PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR Cameron Everett People and paper. Thats what it takes to publish a newspaper, the old saw goes. There are other requirements „ printing presses and ink „ and additional costs related to digital-news production. But next to the price of employing people „ salaries and benefits „ paper remains the second-largest individual cost of a publishing company such as GateHouse Media, the parent company of Washington County News and Holmes County Times-Advertiser. And that is one of the reasons we are concerned about the tariffs imposed on a certain type of paper imported from Canada into the United States. Known as uncoated groundwood paper, the product is used for newsprint, the cost of which has risen in the U.S. as a result of the tariffs. News organizations fear, rationally, that rising newsprint costs related to the tariffs will force publishers to cut people or paper, or raise costs to consumers „ or a combination of all three. We recognize our financial interest in this matter, but none of those outcomes would be good for the workers, readers, advertisers and communities that depend on professional journalism published in print, as so many subscribers still desire, or in digital form. Papers and magazines published by nonprofit organizations are suffering the effects as well. And its not just about newspapers: Uncoated groundwood paper is used in books, directories, writing pads and advertising brochures. The tariffs „ technically, anti-dumping and countervailing duties „ were initiated by the U.S. Department of Commerce in response to a petition by one paper producer in Washington state. North Pacific Paper Co. (NORPAC), which has fewer than 300 employees and is owned by a hedge fund, alleged the Canadian government subsidizes paper exports. The Commerce Department agreed and imposed the two duties „ combined, ranging up to 32 percent „ preliminarily in January and March. Final determinations are pending. The newspaper industry is mobilizing opposition, but its not alone. A small but bipartisan group in Congress has asked Commerce to lift the tariffs. We hope the Florida congressional delegation will join them, not solely for the benefit of newspapers, but because of the negative, overall economic impacts. Most notable among the opponents is the American Forest and Paper Association. "The uncoated groundwood and newsprint market is a North American market, and AF&PA has opposed the request for duties to be imposed on imports from Canada," said the associations chief executive, Donna Harman. Imports are necessary, in part, because many U.S. companies abandoned newsprint production in favor of products with higher profit margins. Nevertheless, consider this: Two of the leading Canadian producers have a total of nearly 4,000 U.S. employees, more than 13 times the number of NORPAC, the petitioner. More than 600,000 workers in the U.S. are employed in the publishing, printing and paper-producing industries that overwhelmingly oppose the tariffs because of their potential to kill jobs and depress economic activity. A version of this editorial first appeared in the Sarasota Herald-Tribune, a sister paper with GateHouse Media.Paper tari s deal blow to the economyANOTHER VIEW Roseanne Barr has risen from the dead. After a lengthy absence from television, Roseanne and the rest of her fictional Conner family are once again gracing our living rooms. And now, as then, she's not limiting herself to once-weekly sitcom appearances to make her presence known. Her recent use of Twitter assures us of that. Roseanne was and remains a brilliant media strategist. In addition to the role she played on her show, she fostered a public persona that sometimes, quite deliberately, left her looking as though she were the sole survivor of a very bad train wreck. And the American people loved her for it. For close to a decade, Roseanne was fine fodder for the tabloids as well. They endlessly detailed her personal foibles, multiple marriages, family crises, and fractious relationships with co-workers and network executives. Viewers and readers hung on every word, both in print and on-screen. If the share of viewers who tuned in to her revamped show's premiere last week is any indicator, the romance continues. Roof-raising ratings demonstrate that, 30 years later, Roseanne is still relevant. And it's not just because the character of Roseanne Conner is a lapsed Clintonite who has wholeheartedly embraced Donald Trump. To many, her evolution makes sense. Working-class Americans like the Conners have always struggled to get by. Whereas former President Bill Clinton once stood up for working men and women and fought to make America a more equitable place for them to live (at least publicly), so, too, does President Trump today (at least publicly). Comparisons, however, end there. When Bill Clinton left office, he left behind an economy that was healthier than it had been in decades. Rather than increase the budget deficits he inherited at the beginning of his first term, Clinton left office with the government in the black and surpluses recorded for the better part of his last term. Moral failings aside, President Clinton did, for the most part, take care of the little guy. Moral failings aside, President Trump's ability to do so will be left for future historians to decide. Supporters of the president point to the current state of the economy: significant reductions in taxes, a jump in the stock market, and the prospect of a resurgent probusiness environment in part, through massive deregulation and punishing tariffs. In exchange, we've been saddled with a deficit of approximately $1.5 trillion dollars. As for middle-class tax breaks, most of them will expire in 2025. Roseanne and Dan Conner better start socking away any refund checks they're hoping to get as a result of recent Republican tax legislation. They're going to need all the cash they can muster when it comes time for them to enjoy retirement. If they can ever afford to have a retirement. Not too much of a concern for Roseanne Barr, however. That same Republican tax legislation assures her of personally faring quite nicely. Realistically, she didn't have to come out of retirement for the money. She came back because she missed us. Then again, Roseanne never really went away. There was her turn as the moderately successful host of a television talk show. Her 2012 run for the Green Party presidential nomination. Her eventual campaign as the Peace and Freedom Party candidate. The documentary about her presidential bid. Her reality show. The NBC sitcom pilot that was never picked up. And now, Roseanne: The Reboot. Screen superstardom was never enough for Roseanne, though, nor will it ever be. And that's just fine. As is her decision calculated or not to embrace the man who will make America great again. And while her somewhat skewed ideology may make for good ratings, it is potentially harmful to her and those whom she has chosen to target. Like Parkland shooting survivor David Hogg. Roseanne recently re-tweeted a doctored photo of Hogg and accused him of giving the "Nazi salute" (False). Past re-tweets have included untruths about Hillary Clinton being part of a sex trafficking ring. Then there's the interminable list of right-wing conspiracy theories she's espoused. But, hey, let Roseanne be Roseanne. She's not the president. She's a comedian. It's all just an act. Right?She's messing with us, telling jokes funny enough to make network executives squirm in their seats; which may possibly have led to the sudden disappearance of her ill-advised tweets. Better those than a sitcom destined to rake in huge profits. Now, that's show biz.Roseanne is Raising the Barr B l a i r B e s s Blair Bess There was her turn as the moderately successful host of a television talk show. Her 2012 run for the Green Party presidential nomination. Her eventual campaign as the Peace and Freedom Party candidate. The documentary about her presidential bid. Her reality show. The NBC sitcom pilot that was never picked up. And now, Roseanne: The Reboot.

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, April 4, 2018 A5 LOCAL & STATEBy Collin Breaux 747-5081 | @PCNHCollinB CollinB@pcnh.com GULF COUNTY „ A major Gulf County wildfire that had been spreading since Tuesday was mostly under control Friday, according to the Florida Forestry Services Chipola District.As of noon Friday, the fire „ which had spread to an estimated 8,044 acres of rural land south of Wewahitchka „ was 75 percent contained, according to district public information officer Hannah Bowers.The weather, especially with this rain, has really benefited us,Ž Bowers said by phone Friday.No homes or structures were threatened at any point, Bowers said, as the affected land con-tained just timber.Ž The wildfire was raging between the White City work center on County 71 and Overstreet Tower on County 386, land owned by Deseret Cattle of North Florida.We would like to express our deepest grati-tude and appreciation for the tireless work of the Florida Forest Services wildland firefighters in containing the Fire Break 56 Wildfire,Ž Michael Archibald, Deseret Cattle & Timber general manager, said in a news release. The extra-mile efforts, combined with tremendous cooperation by local firefighters, first responders, and neigh-boring landowners, were indispensable in bringing this fire under control.ŽBowers said the district would begin reducing the number of crews in the area „ at one point, more than 60 air and ground vehicles were working the fire „ though smoke and smoldering likely would linger for a while.No flare-ups were expected Friday afternoon.Gulf County 8,000-acre wild re 75 percent containedThe News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE Members of the Florida Board of Pharmacy were told Monday that it shouldnt take long to alter regulations for phar-macists to comply with a new law aimed at combat-ing the opioid epidemic.Board of Pharmacy counsel David Flynn told members of the boards Legislative Committee that, given the boards experience in past crack-downs on controlled substances, it shouldnt take long for the Board of Pharmacy to revamp the regulations.Seven-day supplies of controlled substances are allowable if deemed medically necessary.Among other things, the new law also addresses situations in which pharmacists dispense controlled sub-stances to people they do not know. In such situations, the pharmacist must require people getting controlled substances to present valid photo identification of other verification of their identity.The Legislative Committee met in Monday in Tallahassee as part of Board of Pharmacy meet-ings this week.Board of Pharmacy eyes opioid regulations[SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] A wild“ re in Gulf County was 75 percent contained by Friday afternoon. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] This map shows the location of an 8,000-acre wild“ re in Gulf County. [CONTRIBUTED]

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** A6 Wednesday, April 4, 2018 | Washington County News COMMUNITYEgg hunting on the beach at SchoonersCindy Johnson Brown submitted a photo of seven-yearold Olivia Brown at an egg hunt at Schooners on Panama City Beach this past weekend. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] Special to The News Members of the Kids Safety Fun Expose Arinne Kirfman, 14, and Azzie Rudd, 17, landed a largemouth bass on a recent fishing trip. Kirfman landed a 10-pound bass. This was Rudds first time fishing. Both girls „ being good sportsmen „ released their largemouth bass.Youth reels largemouth bassAzzie Rudd. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] Alexander M. Boston will celebrate his 16th birthday today, April 4. He is the son of Ms. Sabrina Boston and Mr. Rory Moore, and the grandson of Martha Boston of Chipley.Alexander Boston turns 16 todayAlexander Boston. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] If you would like your events included in this list, email information to news@chipleypaper.com. Kid Safety Expo announces dates BONIFAY/CHIPLEY/ MARIANNA/LYNN HAVEN „ Kid Safety Expo will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the following Saturdays: Art KidDoo at Shivers Park in Chipley, April 14: Chipley Walmart, April 21 and Lynn Haven Walmart, April 28. The Kid Safety Expo will also be at: Community Egg Hunt at Shivers Park in Chipley, Wednesday, March 28; Falling Waters State Park in Chipley, Friday, April 6 and Saturday, April 7 and as Family Farm Day at Lynn Haven Elementary School, Friday, April 13. For more informa-tion call 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. Dixie Youth opening day VERNON „ The City of Vernon Dixie Youth will hold opening day ceremo-nies at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, April 7 at the ball fields. Volunteers are needed and vendor booths are avail-able. There will be raffles, cake auction and more. For more information about the event, volunteering or a vendor booth call or text Brent Gibson at 850-258-9492. Free Tax-AideCHIPLEY „ The AARP Tax-Aide Program and Washington County Council on Aging will provide free income tax assistance, tax counseling and electronic filing for 2017 tax returns. Spe-cial attention is provided to filers 60 and older, but AARP membership is not required. These services are available each Tuesday now through April 10 by appointment at the Council on Aging, located at 1348 South Blvd. in Chi-pley. Individuals seeking assistance need to fill out an interview sheet, available at the Council on Aging, and bring all their 2017 tax documents including; Social security card; drivers license or photo ID; copy of last years tax return; a check for bank information; 1095-A Form if you bought insurance from Marketplace/exchange; SSA-1099 Social security benefits; 1099-R pensions, retirement, and annuities; 1099-INT interest; 1099-DIV dividends; and 1099-B stock sale; W-2s; 1099-MISC other income; 1099-G unemployment; Any document showing you paid Federal Income Tax; 1099-S sale of home, land, or timber; W-2G gambling winnings; 1098-E student loan interest; 1098-T tuition payments; Information needed to itemize: medical expenses, medical miles driven, con-tributions, home mortgage interest, and real estate taxes. The service will not prepare Schedule F … Farms, Schedule E … Rental Property, Schedule C … Business income with expenses that exceed $25,000, multiple Sched-ule Cs for one individual, Clergy, or Form 3903 … Moving expenses. These are considered Out of Scope.Ž For more infor-mation call 850-638-6216.Baby BeesCHIPLEY „ The Washington County Public Library will host Baby Bees at 10 a.m., Wednesday, April 11 and Wednesday, May 2. Baby Bees will be an hour of stories, music, sing-a-longs and activi-ties designed just for baby. Each month will have a new theme. For more information call 850-638-1314. Game night CHIPLEY „ Friends of the Washington County Libraries will host a games nights at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 12 in the John Wesley Worship Center at the First United Methodist Church of Chipley. Tickets ate $10 per person, with door prizes and refreshments provided. All proceeds go to the libraries in Wash-ington County. For more information or to buy tickets call the library at 850-638-1314 or contact any Friends of the Wash-ington County Libraries member. Jazzmatazz 2018MARIANNA „ Jazzmatazz 2018 will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday April 12 and Friday, April 13. The annual shows by Chipolas Show Choir will feature high energy, song and dance favorites performed by the group under the direction of Angie White and Dr. Josh Martin. Tickets are $10 and are available at the Chipola Box Office. Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida to host ArtKidDooCHIPLEY … The 6th Annual ArtKidDoo will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, April 14, at Chipleys Shivers Park. ArtKidDoo is a collab-orative effort among the Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida, child care providers, local businesses, non-profit and civic organizations to encourage aware-ness for the arts in young children. To join as a vendor or offer a special performance, visit the website at http://www.elcnwf.org/artkiddoo/ to download the vendor booth application. Once completed, return the form to Sallie Brosnan at sallie.brosnan@ elcnwf.org. If an agency or organization would like to participate as volunteers, they may also reach out to Sallie Brosnan to learn about the various oppor-tunities for volunteering the day of ArtKidDoo. Free grief support groupMARIANNA Feelings of grief and loss can be overwhelming. For this reason, Covenant Care will be offering a six-week grief support group in Marianna at the Cov-enant Care office, located at 4540 Lafayette St, Suite E from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesdays April 17 through, May 22. Those who attend will have the opportunity to explore their grief in a safe and caring environment. The support group is free but registration is required. Light refreshments will be served. To register for the support group, or for additional information, call Jaci Bartley at 850-7010132 or email at Jacqueline.bartley@choosecovenant.org. Graceville spring pageantGRACEVILLE „ The Graceville Womens Club will host the Graceville Spring Pageant at 5 p.m. Saturday, April 21. This pageant is open to girls baby through teen. A parents meeting will be held at 6 p.m. Monday, April 9 at the Graceville Civic Center. All fees and applications are due by Saturday, April 14. Prac-tice will begin Monday, April 16. For more infor-mation contact Samantha Angerbrandt at 850703-0996 or email at samantha.angerbrandt@gmail.com Spanish Trial OpryCHIPLEY „ The Span-ish Trail Playhouse will honor legendary country music with their Spanish Trail Opry at 7 p.m. Saturday, April 14 and at 2 p.m. Sunday, April 15. Performers from the area will participate in the show along with a country band made up of local performers. Reserved seating tickets ate $15 and are available online at www.spanishtrailplayhouse.com or at the playhouse box office located at 680 2nd Street. For more information call 850-6379113 or 850-326-3685.COMMUNITY EVENTS

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, April 4, 2018 A7

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** A8 Wednesday, April 4, 2018 | Washington County NewsBy Ken ThomasThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ The Trump administration opened the door to a potential White House meeting between President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin on Monday, raising the possibility of an Oval Office welcome for Putin for the first time in more than a decade even as relations between the two powers have deteriorated.The Kremlin said Monday that Trump had invited the Russian leader to the White House when they spoke by telephone last month. White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders responded that the White House was among a number of potential venuesŽ discussed. Both sides said they hadnt started preparations for such a visit.If it happens, Putin would be getting the honor of an Oval Office tete-a-tete for the first time since he met President George W. Bush at the White House in 2005. Alarms rang in diplomatic and foreign policy circles over the prospect that Trump might offer Putin that venue with-out confronting him about Russias interference in the 2016 presidential election or allegations that Russia mas-terminded the March 4 nerve agent attack on a former Rus-sian double agent.It would confer a certain normalization of relations and were certainly not in a normal space,Ž said Alina Polyakova, a foreign policy fellow at the Brookings Insti-tution. Nothing about this is normal.ŽMuch has happened since Trump and Putin spoke in the March 20 phone call. Trump said afterward he hoped to meet with Putin in the not too distant futureŽ to discuss the nuclear arms race and other matters. But their call was followed by reports that Trump had been warned in briefing materials not to congratulate the Russian president on his re-election but did so anyway.Since the call, two dozen countries, including the U.S. and many European Union nations, and NATO expelled more than 150 Russian diplo-mats in solidarity with Britain over the poisoning of Sergei Skripal, the former spy, and his daughter Yulia. Moscow has denied any involvement in the nerve attack and retal-iated by expelling the same number of diplomats from each nation.Putins foreign affairs adviser, Yuri Ushakov, told reporters Monday that when the two leaders spoke by phone, Trump suggested to have the first meeting in Washington, in the White House,Ž calling it a quite interesting and positive idea.ŽUshakov voiced hope that tensions resulting from the diplomatic expulsions wouldnt derail discussions about a summit.Trump has said maintaining a strong personal relation-ship with Putin is in the U.S. interest and has signaled to allies that he trusts his own instincts in dealing with the Russian president.A White House official, speaking on condition of anonymity to describe private discussions, said Trump raised the possibil-ity of a White House meeting in a casual, open-endedŽ fashion during the call. The official reiterated that no extensive preparations had taken place.Talk of a White House summit comes as Trump is preparing to meet North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at an undetermined location. White House welcomes are typically reserved for friends and allies.Trump has avoided criticizing Putin personally even as his administration has crossed Moscow by providing Ukraine with lethal weapons and upholding Obama-era sanctions against Russia and its shuttering of diplomatic outposts.Michael McFaul, who served as the U.S. ambassador to Russia under President Barack Obama, said the symbolism of Putin standing in the East Room with the president at a news conferenceŽ would be a major goal for the Russian leader. The only reason you should do it is if youre going to obtain a concrete objective that serves Ameri-cas national security interest before the meeting,Ž he said.McFaul said he feared that Trump thinks that a good meeting with Putin is the objective of his foreign policy with Russia. That should never be the objective. That should be the means to achieve things that are actually of importance to the United States.ŽUS opens door to Trump-Putin meetingIn this Nov. 11 photo, President Donald Trump, right, and Russia President Vladimir Putin talk during the family photo session at the APEC Summit in Danang. [MIKHAIL KLIMENTYEV, SPUTNIK, KREMLIN POOL PHOTO VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] NATION & WORLDBy Christopher TorchiaThe Associated PressJOHANNESBURG „ Even the name given to Winnie Madikizela-Mandela at birth „ Nomzamo, one who under-goes trialsŽ „ foretold a life of struggle.During her nearly 38-year marriage to Nelson Mandela, she fought for black majority rule even as she vowed to escape the shadow of the great man.And although many South Africans called her the Mother of the Nation,Ž she would become engulfed in criminal convictions and scandals.Madikizela-Mandela died Monday in a Johannesburg hospital at the age of 81 after a long illness, her family announced. She will be honored with a state funeral on April 14, President Cyril Ramaphosa said Monday evening after paying a condolence visit to Madikizela-Mandelas home in Johannesburgs Soweto township.Over the years, MadikizelaMandela became a symbol of the suffering caused by South Africas system of white minor-ity rule known as apartheid and became a force against it, ulti-mately serving as a member of parliament. She and her husband began a family before Nelson Mandela went underground and then was imprisoned for more than a quarter-century. Left with two young daughters, Madikizela-Mandela was persecuted by police and banished to a remote town where neighbors were forbidden to speak with her. As Nelson Mandela emerged from 27 years in prison seeking reconciliation and forgiveness, Winnie Madikizela-Mandela wanted the perpetrators of apartheid punished.What brutalized me so much was that I knew what it is to hate,Ž she once said in a South African television interview.Madikizela-Mandelas story grabbed the imagination of people around the world. Its been told in books as well as the Hollywood movie Winnie,Ž starring Oscar-winning actress and singer Jennifer Hudson.The young Winnie grew up in what is now Eastern Cape prov-ince and came to Johannesburg as the citys first black female social worker. Her research into the high infant mortality rate in a black township, which she linked to poverty caused by racism, first sparked her interest in politics.I started to realize the abject poverty under which most people were forced to live, the appalling conditions created by the inequalities of the system,Ž she said.In 1957, she met Nelson Mandela, a rising lawyer and anti-apartheid activist 18 years her senior, and they married a year later following his divorce from his first wife. The first five turbulent years of their marriage saw Mandela going underground to build the armed struggle against apartheid, and finally to prison in 1963, while his wife gave birth to two daughters.Even before they were sepa-rated by Nelson Mandelas long stay in prison, she was jailed for two weeks while pregnant for participating in a womens protest against apartheid restrictions on blacks.The apartheid police later harassed her, sometimes dragging her from bed at night without giving her a chance to make arrangements for her daughters.Madikizela-Mandela complained bitterly on a North American tour after she was forced to testify to South Afri-cas Truth and Reconciliation Commission in 1997 that the commission never asked her about the treatment she suf-fered over 18 months in solitary confinement.In 1977, she was banished to a remote town, Brandfort, where neighbors were forbidden to speak to her. She was banned from meeting with more than one person at a time. The woman who returned to Johannesburg in 1985 was much harder, more ruthless and bel-licose, branded by the cruelty of apartheid and determined vengeance. In an infamous 1986 speech she threatened no more peaceful protests.ŽInstead, she endorsed the necklacingŽ method of killing suspected informers and police with fuel-doused tires put around the neck and set alight.Together hand-in-hand, with our boxes of matches and our necklaces, we shall liberate this country,Ž she said.At the time, the African National Congress party and its army of guerrilla fighters were riddled with spies and informers, some willing, others tortured into submission.Still harassed by police, Madikizela-Mandela gathered a group of young men known as the Mandela United Football Club, who lived on her property.But they turned into thugs who so terrorized the black township of Soweto that people set ablaze Madikizela-Mande-las home there, according to an autobiography by ANC veteran Amina Cachalia and other accounts.Her bodyguards were accused of the disappearances and killings of at least 18 boys and young men. In the most infamous case, her bodyguards in 1989 kidnapped four boys including 14-year-old James StompieŽ Seipei Moeketsi.He was accused of being a police informer, badly beaten and his throat slit. In 1991, Madikizela-Mandela was charged with Moeketsis kill-ing. A court found her guilty of his kidnapping and assault and sentenced her to six years in jail.She appealed and was found guilty of being an accessory in the assault, and the sentence was reduced to a fine and a suspended prison term. Madikizela-Mandela steadfastly denied any knowl-edge of any killings, leading the judge in that case to brand her an unblushing liar.ŽThe newly freed Mandela stood by his wife, urging friends to come to court to show their support, according to Cachalia in her autobiography When Hope and History Rhyme.Ž The marriage that survived decades of prison bars dissolved with a formal separation in 1992, two years after Mandelas release.The couple divorced in 1996, two years after Mandela became president in South Africas first all-race elections. He accused his wife of infidelity.She kept his name, adding her maiden name. In 2003, Madikizela-Mandela was convicted on fraud and theft charges and sentenced to five years in jail, though she ended up serving no time.The conviction appeared to end her career: She quit Parliament and resigned from her posts as president of the ANC Womans League and a member of the partys execu-tive committee.But her base of support remained loyal. In 2009, months before general elections, ANC members made her No. 5 on their election list, a measure of her enduring popularity.She remained outspoken and joined the rising anger against then-President Jacob Zuma over multiple scandals that hurt the reputation of the ANC, call-ing with other longtime party veterans for his departure. Zuma resigned in February.As the mother of two of Mandelas children, Madikizela-Mandela and her ex-husband appeared to rebuild a friendship in his final years. It was not unusual to see him at public events with her on one side and his third wife, Graca Machel, on the other. Winnie Madikizela-Mandela: A life of struggleIn this Jan. 22, 1986, photo, activist Winnie Mandela is cheered by supporters after appearing in the Krugersdorp Magistrates court, West of Johannesburg in connection with her arrest for ” outing a banning order which prevents her from living in her Soweto home. [ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO]

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, April 4, 2018 A9 SPORTSStaff ReportVERNON Four state qualifiers from Vernon High School will compete in this weekend's weightlifting championship.Dameion Stephens, Demetreous Walston, Tyrick Davis and Antonio Rodriguez will compete in the Florida High School Athletic Association State Championship to be held Friday and Satur-day at Arnold High School in Panama City Beach.VHS weightlifting: 4 compete at state Vernon High School weightlifters are celebrate with Coach Lee Richardson on Tuesday after winning the schools “ rst ever Boys Weightlifting Regional Championship. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] As NCAA Tournament comes to a close, an uncertain future looms for college hoopsBy Eddie PellsThe Associated PressSAN ANTONIO „ For the past three weeks, its been all about buzzer-beaters, bracket-busters and basketball „ a much-needed reminder about just how beautiful this game can be. For the next six months, it will be all about ugliness and uncer-tainty, while college basketball wrestles with the changes it must make to keep the sport alive. The 2017-18 campaign could very well be remembered as the season that ridded the upper echelon of college hoops of any last whiffs of the notion that it is all about amateurs, student-athletesŽ and playing for nothing more than a scholarship and pride. An FBI inve stigation that resulted in the September arrests of 10 agents, coaches and business-men with basketball ties did what the NCAA never really could „ laid bare the inner-workings of a shady, money-grubbing business thats been teetering on the edge of the rulebook, and the law, for decades.The state of the game, theres no doubt, theres some question marks now,Ž Kansas State coach Bruce Weber said. Between the FBI probe and other media reports, violations have been alleged at 28 schools, ranging from businessmen taking recruits parents out to lunch to $100,000 payoffs to get them to sign with certain programs; 17 of those teams were in the March Madness bracket. A panel led by Condoleezza Rice is examining the problems and is expected to release a report, and its recommendations, on April 25. The president of the NCAA has promised action, but said he would not support anything truly game-changing „ as in, rules that would fundamentally alter the amateur status of the student-athletesŽ whose efforts are the underpinnings of the $1.1 billion the NCAA earned in 2017. The lions share of that comes from the mens basketball tournament that brought Villanova and Michigan to Monday nights final. More significant change might have to come from the NBA, which is considering ending the one and doneŽ rule that calls for players to either be 19 or complete at least one year in college before becoming eli-gible for the draft. Passed in 2005, that rule altered the landscape of college basketball, putting the lie to the notion that these players „ at least the very best ones „ come to school to earn a degree. One and DoneŽ is often derided as the catchall explanation for everything bad about the college game. Changing the rule, however, wont necessarily change the roles of agents, AAU coaches, college coaches, middlemen, handlers and shoe companies, all of whom partake in what is essentially an unregulated, underground talent-acquisition business, the likes of which the NCAA hasnt the resources or rulebook to control. Any time theres money involved, isnt there always cor-ruption?Ž West Virginia coach Bob Huggins asked, rhetorically. Well have to wait and see how widespread it is. If thats it, and you see its only four (coaches) who were guilty, thats pretty good.ŽBut Huggins, like most coaches The Associated Press talked to last week, says he has no idea what to expect. Nothing personal, but Im the wrong person to ask,Ž said Andy Enfield, the coach of Southern California, which fired associate coach Tony Bland after he was arrested in the FBI probe, accused of accepting $13,000 for steering two players to specific business representatives. Bland has pleaded not guilty. At risk are college basketball and, most notably, the future of a tournament that shows, time and again, exactly why the sport is worth saving. The MVP award for this years tournament may as well have gone to a 98-year-old nun, Sister Jean Dolores Schmidt, who willed her underdog team from Loyola-Chicago all the way to the Final Four as an 11th seed, while reminding fans that basketball, like life, is about more than mere winning and losing. The Ramblers werent the only underdog to come up big.A tournament turned upsidedown featured the first-ever 16 vs. 1 upset when MarylandBaltimore County knocked off Virginia. A heck of a season,Ž said Vir-ginias coach, Tony Bennett, with a heck of a loss at the end, of course.ŽLike the UMBC-Virginia game, the best of the tournament is often centered around upsets. It brings about an uncomfort-able paradox: These three weeks invariably place a few spunky lit-tle-guy teams that presumably do things the right way against a few fearsome behemoth programs that presumably dont. Its the reason we watch. Yes, the sport is overdue for a good scrubbing. But if, some-day, everyone really is playing by the same rules, will that ruin the event we love? By Doug FergusonThe Associated PressAUGUSTA, Ga. „ The roar sounded like Sunday at Augusta National.This was Monday afternoon, and it was so sudden and thunderous that it reached the club-house. It was loud enough to startle spectators who wondered what they had missed. They had a pretty good idea who it was. Tiger Woods is back at the Masters.Woods teed off with Justin Thomas and Fred Couples shortly before 3 p.m. when thousands of fans were making their way toward the exit. Thou-sands more crowded around the tee, lined the first fairway and followed him down the par-5 second hole. Some of them rushed over to the third hole to stake out a spot. Most of them surrounded the second green, and they were responsible for all the noise when Woods chipped in from behind the green.About the only thing missing was a beam of light from the heavens. Any talk about this being one of the most antic-ipated Masters in years starts with one player. Woods is at Augusta National for the first time since 2015, at least with his golf clubs, and he showed during the Florida swing of the PGA Tour that he is more than capable of winning a fifth green jacket. When Tiger walked onto the range today, you can tell theres an anticipation and an excitement from the crowd to watch him compete again,Ž Justin Rose said.Woods was at Augusta National last year only for the Champions Dinner, and it wasnt much fun. If the pain in his lower back wasnt enough, it was looking out at the course he loves and know-ing that he wouldnt be playing the major he calls a players heavenŽ for the second straight year, and maybe never. Fusion surgery „ his fourth on his lower back in four years „ followed a few weeks later. And now it looks as though he never left. Woods still hasnt won a tournament in the five PGA Tour events he has played this year, but he has shot par or better in his last 10 rounds. He was runner-up by one shot at the Valspar Championship. He was one shot out of the lead at the Arnold Palmer Invitational until indecision sent his tee shot on the 16th hole out of bounds.He hasnt won the Masters since 2005, so long ago that only 18 players from then are in the field this year, and 15 of them are Masters champions.You hear guys talk about the early 2000s and that intimidation factor,Ž said Rickie Fowler, who made his major championship debut 10 years ago at Torrey Pines, where Woods won his 14th and last major. The young guys in a way have heard about that. I think theyre getting to see some of that as far as his presence and him being out on the golf course and getting a glimpse of what hes capable of. But I think we relish the opportunity to play against him and see him back to maybe close to where he was.ŽMonday is typically a lazy practice round at the Masters, which has only 87 players competing this year. Most players have been to Augusta National over the last few weeks to get acquainted with any subtle changes and recall sight lines. Thats the heavy work, followed by a light load in the practice rounds this week to conserve energy.So it was unusual to see so many people, so late in the afternoon, chasing after Woods.He is not a one-man show when it comes to slipping on the green jacket. Rose badly wants one, especially after missing a short par putt on the 17th hole and losing in a playoff last year. So does Jason Day, who still hasnt watched the 2013 highlights when he lost a two-shot lead with three holes to play and saw Adam Scott become the first Australian to win the Masters.Woods brings the roars early at AugustaSeason of strifeLoyola-Chicago guard Clayton Custer shoots over the Tennessee defense in the “ nal seconds of a 63-62 win in a second-round game at the NCAA Tournament in Dallas. [TONY GUTIERREZ/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] Changing the rule, however, wont necessarily change the roles of agents, AAU coaches, college coaches, middlemen, handlers and shoe companies, all of whom partake in what is essentially an unregulated, underground talent-acquisition business, the likes of which the NCAA hasnt the resources or rulebook to control.

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** A10 Wednesday, April 4, 2018 | Washington County News

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, April 4, 2018 B1By Diane M. RobinsonThe News | @HCTA_Diane Drobinson@chipleypaper.comHOLMES AND WASHINGTON COUNTIES … The annual Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olym-pics made its way through the community.Over the past several days, the torch to raise aware-ness about Special Olympics was held high by several area agencies, including Northwest Florida Recep-tion Center (NWFRC), Holmes Correctional Institute, Holmes and Washington County Sheriffs Offices, Chipley and Bonifay Police Departments, and mem-bers of Florida Panhandle Technical Colleges Criminal Justice class.The relay, which began last month, is the precursor to the Special Olympics Florida State Summer Games, and will end with officers bringing the Flame of Hope into the Special Olympics Stadium. Washington Countys leg began at the Washington County Courthouse and ended at Peoples South Bank and Holmes Countys portion of the run went from the starting line in front of Piggly Wiggly in Boni-fay and crossed the finish line at the Holmes County Courthouse.The agencies joined more than 300 other agencies across the state in what is recognized as the largest fundraising and public awareness project for Special Olympics Florida.Each year, the Flame of Hope is carried by more than 5,000 officers on a 1,500 mile relay through Floridas 67 counties.Washington and Holmes Counties have partici-pated in the Law Enforcement Torch Run for the past 17 years.Local law enforcement agencies participate in Torch RunMembers of Washington County Sheriffs Of“ ce, Northwest Florida Reception Center, and Panhandle Technical College Criminal Justice Class, gathered to run the Washington County leg of the annual Law Enforcement Torch Run. [DIANE M. ROBINSON | THE NEWS] The Special Olympics Torch made its way through Washington County on April 2, on its way to the opening ceremonies of the Flori da Special Olympics. [DIANE M. ROBINSON | THE NEWS] CELEBRATE

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** B2 Wednesday, April 4, 2018 | Washington County NewsBy Marley JayThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ Stocks fell sharply on Monday as investors responded to rising trade tensions between the United States and China and mounting scrutiny of big technology com-panies from consumers and politicians.China imposed $3 bil-lion of tariffs on U.S. farm goods and other exports, bringing the worlds two largest economies closer to a full-on trade conflict.Amazon sank follow-ing weekend broadsides from President Donald Trump on Twitter, while Facebook tumbled as a widening privacy scandal continued to weigh on the companys stock.The looming threat of tighter regulation of the tech sector in Europe and the U.S. prompted investors to pull money out of high-flying com-panies, such as Netflix, Microsoft and Alphabet, Googles parent company.Among other recent winners, Intel dove 6.1 percent following a report in Bloomberg News that Apple plans to start using its own chips in Mac computers.The Dow Jones industrial average fell as much as 758 points, although major indexes regained some of their losses later in the after-noon. The Dow lost 458.92 points, or 1.9 percent, to 23,644.19. The S&P 500 index gave up 58.99 points, or 2.2 percent, to 2,581.88.The Nasdaq composite slumped 193.33 points, or 2.7 percent, to 6,870.12. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks fell 36.90 points, or 2.4 percent, to 1,492.53.Kate Warne, an investment strategist for Edward Jones, said the step by China is small but significant. The fact that a coun-try has actually raised tariffs in retaliation is an important step in the wrong direction,Ž she said. The tariffs imposed by China today lead to greater worries that we will see escalating tariffs and the possibility of a much bigger impact than investors were anticipating last week. And that could be true for Mexico as well as for China.Ž Tech woes, tensions with China sink stocksBy Joe McDonaldThe Associated PressBEIJING „ China raised import duties on a $3 billion list of U.S. pork, apples and other products Monday in an escalating dispute with Washington over trade and industrial policy.The government of President Xi Jinping said it was responding to a U.S. tariff hike on steel and aluminum. But that is just one facet of sprawling tensions with Washington, Europe and Japan over a stateled economic model they complain hampers market access, protects Chinese companies and subsidizes exports in violation of Beijings free-trade commitments.Already, companies are looking ahead to a bigger fight over U.S. President Donald Trumps approval of higher duties on up to $50 billion of Chinese goods in response to complaints that Beijing steals or pressures foreign companies to hand over technology.Forecasters say the impact of Mondays move should be limited, but investors worry the global recovery might be set back if other govern-ments respond by raising import barriers.On Monday, the main stock market indexes in Tokyo and Shanghai ended the day down.The tariffs signal a most unwelcome development, which is that countries are becoming protectionist,Ž said econ-omist Taimur Baig of DBS Group. But in commercial terms, they are not very substantialŽ compared with Chinas $150 billion in annual imports of U.S. goods, he said.Mondays tariff increase will hit Ameri-can farm states, many of which voted for Trump in 2016.Beijing is imposing a 25 percent tariff on U.S. pork and aluminum scrap and 15 percent on spar-kling wine, steel pipe used by oil and gas companies, and an array of fruits and nuts including apples, walnuts and grapes.American farm exports to China in 2017 totaled nearly $20 billion, includ-ing $1.1 billion of pork products.There was no indication whether Beijing might exempt Chinese-owned American suppliers such as Smithfield Foods, the biggest U.S. pork producer, which is ramping up exports to China.The U.S. tariff hike has has seriously damaged our interests,Ž the Finance Ministry said in a statement.Our country advocates and supports the multilateral trading system,Ž it said. Chinas tariff increase is a proper measure adopted by our country using World Trade Organization rules to protect our interests,Ž the statement said.White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Monday on the television show Fox and FriendsŽ that Trump was going to fight back and hes going to push back.ŽDeputy Press Secretary Lindsay Walters said Chi-nas subsidization and continued overcapacityŽ were the root cause of low steel prices that have hurt U.S. producers.Instead of targeting fairly traded U.S. exports, China needs to stop its unfair trading practices which are harming U.S. national security and dis-torting global markets,Ž Walters said.The United States buys little Chinese steel and aluminum, but analysts said Beijing was certain to retaliate, partly to show its toughness ahead of possible bigger disputes.Chinese officials have said Beijing is willing to negotiate, but in a confrontation will fight to the end.ŽChina has already pre-pared for the worst,Ž said Liu Yuanchun, execu-tive dean of the National Academy of Develop-ment Strategy at Renmin University in Beijing. The two sides, there-fore, should sit down and negotiate.ŽThe dispute reflects the clash between Trumps promise to narrow the U.S. trade surplus with China „ a record $375.2 billion last year „ and Beijings ambitious plans to develop Chinese industry and technology.Like them apples?China raises tari s on US pork, fruit in escalating trade disputeA man chooses bananas near imported apples from the United States on Monday at a supermarket in Beijing. [ANDY WONG/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] BUSINESS

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, April 4, 2018 B3 SCHOOLS & SOCIETY CROSSWORDSpecial to WCN/HCTACHIPOLA Chipola College made history Saturday, March 17 when the colleges Brain Bowl team captured the FCSAA State Championship, the schools eighth state title.Chipolas Blue Team went 10-0 in the state tournament, beating Valencia in overtime in the championship round. Trailing by 175 points at the break, Chipola mounted a second-half surge to win the championship by the score of 530 to 395.Blue Team members are: Hunter Davis, who finished second in overall scoring and Katie Everett, who finished fifth overall, Alex Tharp and Garrett McDaniel.Chipolas eight state titles breaks the previous records set by Valencia and Broward Colleges both of which have won seven. Chipola won seven straight State Championships from 2008 to 2015 and has won three Community College National ChampionshipsChipola Gold finished with a 3 and 6 record in the state tournament. Michael Young finished 12th overall in individual scoring. Other Gold Team members are: Hayden Church, Caroline Gilley and Mathew Pelham.Chipola Brain Bowl is currently seeded as the number one Community College team in the nation. Chipola did not lose a single match against a community college teams during their fall season. The team won the Florida Gateway Open, the Erik Korray Open and the Delta Burke Tourna-ment this past fall.The team practices year round under the direction of coach Stan Young and assis-tant coach Dr. Robert Dunkle. Both coaches are members of the FCSAA Hall of Fame.Chipola next plays at the International Championship Tournament in Chicago Saturday, April 14. Chipola will be one of the four community colleges playing for the four-year college title.Chipola Brain Bowl team wins state championshipMembers of the Chipola College State Champion Brain Bowl team are, from left: assistant coach Dr. Robert Dunkle, head coach Sta n Young, Hunter Davis, Katie Everett, Alex Tharp and Garrett McDaniel. 3rd Quarter Honor RollFIRST GRADE ASJaci Dickens and Chianne SavellFIRST GRADE A/BSHailey Baker, Noah Boles, Makayla Mitchell, Blake Motos, Armanii Simmons, Jacob Stevenson and Ethan WilliamsSECOND GRADE ASTeddi Thornton and Emma RichbourgSECOND GRADE A/BSJulie Culbreth, Gabriel Halderson, Priscilla Kent, Hannah Perez, Alexis Register, Mercee Rutherford, Lexie Scott, Hunter Whittal and Analee WoodhamTHIRD GRADE ASLydia PalmerTHIRD GRADE A/BSSamantha Bush, Breanna Hall, Chason Love, Addison Short, Emalee Souders, Faith Spence, Myah Sprague, Ava Stevenson, Emma Weeks, Jace Williams and Cole WilliamsonFOURTH GRADE ASHayden Bennett, Julia Mitchell, Jilian Pedraja and Douglas WolterFOURTH GRADE A/BSHayley Carter, Chelsea Corbin, Alaina Finch, Reid Hinson and Brenlea ThorntonFIFTH GRADE ASJoanna KentFIFTH GRADE A/BSZach Halderson, Italy Laurel and Peyton WhittalSIXTH GRADE ASHannah Richbourg and Isabella ThorntonSIXTH GRADE A/BSHaley Jenkins, Nate Motos and Carson ThorntonSEVENTH A/BSSarah BushEIGHTH A/BSBritten Bossert, Canyon Laurel and Raelynn SimpsonNINTH GRADE ASBrandi Register and Chloe RichbourgTENTH GRADE ASEmma RinesELEVENTH GRADE A/BSJordan Bynum and Zoe ShaferTWELFTH GRADE ASAllyanna HaddockTWELFTH GRADE A/BSGarrett Kent, Kaliegh Laurel and Kelly PrikkenWASHINGTON COUNTY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL April4: Report Cards go Out 20: Progress ReportsMay8: Florida Panhandle Technical College Graduation 22: Chipley High School Senior Awards at 5:30 p.m. 22: Vernon High School Senior Awards at 7:30 p.m. 24: Chipley High School Graduation 25: WISE Graduation 25: Last Day of School (Students Released at 1 p.m.) 25: Vernon High School Graduation 28: Memorial Day (All Personnel Out) 29-30: Post Planning Days for Teachers/Paras/10 Month Personnel)June11: Report Cards go Out 2018 WASHINGTON COUNTY SCHOOL CALENDAR

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** B4 Wednesday, April 4, 2018 | Washington County News FAITHIf you would like your Washington County church listed here, please send information to: news@chipleypaper.com. Due to space limitation, please only send regular church services. For special services, please send separate submission.Assembly of GodCorbin Road Assembly of God Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 105 Corbin Road in Chipley. Cords of Love Assembly of God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study is a 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 2060 Bethlehem Road in Cottondale. Grace Assembly of God @ Chipley Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 567 North Main Street, Chipley New Bethany Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Shaky Joe Road just off Hig hway 280 at Hinsons Crossroads. New Life Fellowship Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 695 5th Street, Chipley. Wausau Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 3537 Washington Street in Wausau.BaptistAbigail Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located on Dawkins Street in Vernon. Berean Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1438 Nearing Hills Drive in Chipley. Blue Lake Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 1405 Blue Lake Road in Chipley. Chipley First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship Service is at 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship Service is at 10:30 a.m. Discipleship Training is at 5 p.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday AWANA is at 5:15 p.m. Wednesday, Prayer Meeting Is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1300 South Boulevard Country Oaks Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 574 Buckhorn Boulevard Eastside Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at Highway 277 in Vernon. First Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1387 South Boulevard. Gap Pond Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 1980 Gap Boulevard in Sunny Hills. Grace Baptist Chapel Mission Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:50 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 440 Lot E Second Street, Chipley. Holmes Creek Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service AWANA is at 5:30 p.m. and Bible Study is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 335 Cope Road in Chipley. Holyneck Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located 3395 Cemetery Lane, Campbellton. Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 614 Bennett Drive in Chipley. Mt. Ararat Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1233 Old Bonifay Road in Chipley. New Orange Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located on Alford Road in Washington County. New Prospect Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship services are at 11 a.m. Sunday evening services are at 5 p.m. Wednesday services supper is at 5 p.m. Wednesday prayer meeting, bible study and childrens classes start at 5:45. The church is located at 761 New Prospect Road in Chipley. Oakie Ridge Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Orange Hill Road and Gilberts Mill Road. Orange Hill Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday prayer and Bible Study is as 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3485 Gainer Road in Chipley. Orange Hill Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship on the “ rst and third Sunday of the month is at 11 a.m. Wednesday night prayer meeting is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 816 Sunday Road in Chipley. Piney Grove Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1783 Piney Grove Road south of Chipley. Pleasant Hill Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located south of Bonifay at 1900 Pleasant Hill Road. Poplar Springs Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1098 Lovewood Road two miles east of Highway 77. Poplar Head Independent Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 WASHINGTON COUNTY CHURCH LISTINGSSee CHURCHES, B7

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, April 4, 2018 B5 OBITUARIESRobert Louis Adkins, 91, of Marianna, FL died Thursday, March 22, 2018 at his residence. Robert was born in Jackson County, where he was a lifelong resident. He enjoyed farming, carpentry work, hunting, and fishing. Robert is preceded in death by his parents, John Daniel and Mandy Adkins; his wife, Maxine Adkins and two brothers, Ted and Buster Adkins. He is survived by his daughters, Gail Laramore and husband, Hub, of Marianna, Amanda Cuzzort of Bonifay, Bernice Carter and husband, Carl, of Alford, Brenda Sloan and husband, Donald, of Alford, Glenda Sloan and husband, William, of Greenwood, and Linda Laramore and husband, John, of Marianna; grandchildren, Jean Copeland, Boss and Angela O'bryan, Robert Carter, Brandy Sloan, William and Larry Sloan, Josephine Adkins, Sarah Laramore, and Russell Hansford; very special great grandchild, Cameron Hansford and numerous great grandchildren and great great grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. Monday, March 26, 2018 at James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel. Interment followed in the Hickory Level Cemetery with James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel directing. The family received friends from 6-8 p.m. Sunday, March 25, 2018 at James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel. Expressions of Sympathy may be made at http://www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes. com.ROBERT L. ADKINSMrs. Eunice Altman, of Ft. Walton Beach, Florida, went home to be with the Lord on Tuesday, March 20, 2018 at her residence in Ft. Walton Beach, Florida. She was 97 years old. Eunice was born on December 2, 1920 to the late Lee Benjamin Riley and Lola Brown in Vernon, Florida. She was a faithful member of Hollywood Church of God In Christ serving until her health failed her. She is survived by her sister: Mary Williams Riley of Cleveland, Ohio; along with a host of nieces, nephews, cousins, other relatives and friends. A Celebration of Eunices Life was held at 11 AM CST, Saturday, March 31, 2018 from the sanctuary of the Hollywood Church of God In Christ with Supt. Willie Sheffield, Pastor/ Officiating. Committal Services followed in the Beal Memorial Cemetery, all of Ft. Walton Beach, Florida with Cooper Funeral Home of Chipley, Florida, directing. The family received friends 1hr prior to services on Saturday. Friends may sign the guestbook online at www.cooperfhchipley. com.EUNICE ALTMAN Raymond J. Evans, age 66, of Ponce De Leon, FL passed away Saturday, March 24, 2018 surrounded by his family at his home. He was born June 18, 1951 in DeFuniak Springs, FL. Raymond spent almost fifty years of his life working on the intercoastal waterways as a tugboat pilot. In his spare time, he enjoyed fishing with friends and family, watching the western channel, listening to George Jones, and cheering on Alabama football. Roll Tide! He is preceded in death by his parents, Cecil Raymond Evans and Hattie Mae Byrd Sargent; one sister, Carolyn Hayslip; one brother, Charles Wayne Evans and wife Anna; and one grandson Joseph Daniel Evans. Raymond is survived by one daughter, Linda Curtis and husband Eric of Fort Walton Beach, Fl; one son, Charles Daniel Evans and wife Christina of DeFuniak Springs, FL; three grandchildren, Alexis Curtis, Dawson Evans, and Kaydie Evans; one brother, Roy Evans and wife Evelyn of Ponce De Leon, FL; two sisters, Sandra Beck and husband Dave of Crestview, Fl and Julie Audas and husband Gary of Ponce De Leon, FL; as well as numerous nieces, nephews, and extended family. A time of visitation was held Wednesday, March 28, 2018 in the chapel of Davis-Watkins Funeral Home, 1474 Highway 83 North, DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32433 from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m. Funeral services were held Thursday, March 29, 2018 at Davis-Watkins Funeral Home beginning at 11:00 a.m. with Minister Robin Ford officiating. Committal services followed at Black Creek Cemetery in Freeport. The family would like to extend a special thanks to Dr. Behairy, and nurses Ashley and Jessica with 21st Century Oncology, and nurse Wendy with Covenant Hospice of Marianna. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www.daviswatkins. com. Arrangements and services are under the direction of DavisWatkins Funeral Home.RAYMOND J. EVANS Luther LukeŽ Eugene Hilty Jr. 88 of Coral Springs, Fl. was called to his Heavenly home on Jan. 4, 2018. He was born April 8, 1929 in Brackenridge Pa. to Luther E. and Thelma Hilty. Mr. Hilty served in the U.S. Army. After the military he continued working in the aircraft and turbine engine field. He loved to travel, trying different foods, attending church, Bible study, jigsaw puzzles, building Christmas village displays, spending time with his family. He is preceded in death by his parents, his sister Sis, his first wife and mother of his children Janice, daughter Susie, grandchildren Robert, Michael, Angelina, Timmy, and great granddaughter Emily. Luke is survived by his wife, Diana of Coral Springs, FL, his children Martha Miles, Fadette, AL Luther E. Hilty III (Mary), Chipley, FL, Valerie Parmele (Bruce), Bonifay, FL, Patricia Williams, Chipley, FL. Stepchildren Jack Ebert(Aida), Coral Springs, FL, Susan Bee, Coral Springs, FL, Linda Garcia (Josh) Albuquerque, NM, Steven Sutor (Christina) Bradenton, FL, Rick Sutor. Nephew Jerry Hartzog (Tina), Opp, AL. Many grandchildren, great grandchildren and great great grandchildren. Memorialization was by cremation. His children will be having a celebration of his life on April 7,2018 2pm at John Clark Park Community Center in Esto, FL.LUTHER EUGENE HILTY JR. Mrs. Mellie Jean Marell, age 85, of Bonifay, Florida passed away March 24, 2018. She was born December 4, 1932 in Holmes County Florida to the late John and Kit Spikes Butler. In addition to her parents, Mellie was preceded in death by her husband, Arelee Marell, four sisters and three brothers. Mrs. Marell is survived by two sons, Wendal Marell and wife Sandra and Jack Marell and wife Ann both of Bonifay, FL; one daughter, Linda Roberts and husband Dale of Bonifay, FL; one brother, Wentford Butler of Bonifay, FL; three grandsons, David Marell and wife Barbara, Eric Marell and wife Kristen and River Roberts and wife Morgan; six great-grandchildren and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 3:00 PM Thursday, March 29, 2018 in the Peel Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. Mitch Johnson officiating. Interment followed in the Bonifay Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. The family received friends one hour prior to the service. Serving as pallbearers were Charles Brown, Mike Moore, Ashley Register, Billy Shirah, Bryan Johnson and Dennis Brunk.MELLIE J. MARELL Jack Wilton Miller, 91, went home to be with our Lord March 28, 2018. Jack was born in Holmes County, Florida on October 29, 1926. He began his career as a surveyor for the Florida Department of Transportation until relocating to Pensacola, Florida where he became a surveyor for the City of Pensacola. A couple of years later, Jack moved to Lakeland, Florida and spent the next 31 years working for the United States Department of Agriculture as a Soil Conservationist providing technical assistance to farmers and other private landowners and managers. Also during this time, Jack became a licensed Florida civil engineer. After retiring from the US Department of Agriculture, Jack moved back to Ponce de Leon with Marie in 1986 and became a part time civil engineering consultant. During retirement, Jack enjoyed taking trips and gardening with his wife, Marie. Jack was preceded in death by his loving wife of 61 years, Marie McCall Miller; his mother, Jimmie Bradley Miller; his father, Douglas Miller, Sr.; sisters, Vonzeal Rains and Levoy Carr; and two stepsons, Robert Humphreys and Duane Humphreys. He leaves behind his caregivers … niece and nephew, Sabrina and Steve Gibbons of Ponce de Leon, Florida; his foster daughter, Syble Cocozza and husband Bill of Hendersonville, North Carolina; brothers and sisters-in-law, Doug and Lourene Miller and Sefton and Udeen Miller all of Ponce de Leon and several nieces and nephews. The family is very appreciative to J.R. French and Stephanie French, for all the care and assistance they provided during his time of need. A graveside funeral service celebrating his life was held on March 30, 2018 at Oak Grove Baptist Church in Ponce de Leon, Florida with Rev. Timothy Harris officiating. Peel Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements.JACK W. MILLER Geraldine Wilson Moulton, age 67, of Ponce de Leon, Florida died March 23, 2018. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.GERALDINE W. MOULTONMary Pearl Paul, 82, of Bonifay,died Wednesday, March 28, 2018. Funeral services were held on Monday, April 02, 2018. Interment followed at Bonifay Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing.MARY P. PAULJulie Marie Williams (Kitty), age 35 of Niceville, Florida, formally of Chipley, went home to be with the Lord on Saturday, March 24, 2018. Julie Marie was born in Marianna, Florida on September 24, 1982 to Juliet (Sauls) Ward Valencia and Thomas Everitt Brown III of Chipley. She is the granddaughter of Barbara Varros and Eldon Crawley of Chipley and Sammie Lou and Thomas Brown Jr. (Junior Brown) of Chipley. She leaves behind 4 children: Destiny Hatten, 17 of Chipley, Adrian Hatten, 16 of North Carolina, Aaliyah Knochemeus, 11 of Fort Walton Beach and Isaiah White, 20 months of Niceville. She also leaves behind her sister Amber Williams Jimenez (Jorge), her brother, Joshua Valencia (Rachael) of Fort Walton Beach and her fianc, Ronnie White Jr. of Crestview as well as 3 nephews and a niece. She was so loved by her family and friends and always had a smile. A memorial service will be held at Ross Marler Park 1275 Santa Rosa Boulevard, Okaloosa Island, Florida 32548 on Saturday, March 31 from 2-5. All family and friends are invited. There will be food and just a celebration of her life.JULIE M. WILLIAMS CONTINUED ON B6

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** B6 Wednesday, April 4, 2018 | Washington County NewsBy April DemboskyKQED/Kaiser Health NewsLawmakers in California will soon begin debate on a bill that would require doctors to screen new moms for mental health problems „ once while theyre pregnant and again after they give birth. But many obstetricians and pediatricians bristle at the idea, saying they are afraid to screen new moms for depression and anxiety. What are you going to do with those people who screen positive?Ž said Dr. Laura Sirott, an OB-GYN who practices in Pasadena. Some providers have nowhere to send them.Ž Nationally, depression affects up to 1 in 7 women during or after pregnancy, according to the American Psychological Association. And of women who screen positive for the condition, 78 percent dont get mental health treatment, according to a 2015 research review published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology. Sirott said her patients give a range of reasons why they dont take her up on a referral to a psychologist: Oh, they dont take my insurance. Or my insurance pays for three visits. I cant take time off work to go to those visits. Its a three-month wait to get in to that person.Ž She said its also hard to find a psychiatrist who is trained in the complexities of prescribing medications to pregnant or breastfeeding women, and who is willing to treat them, especially in rural areas. So its very frustrating,Ž Sirott said, to ask patients about a problem and then not have any way to solve that problem.Ž Moms are frustrated, too. Wendy Root Askew struggled for years to get pregnant, and when she finally did, her anxiety got worse. And then, after I had my son, I would have these dreams where someone would come to the door and they would say, Well, you know, were just going to wait two weeks to see if you get to keep your baby or not,Ž Root Askew said. And it really impacted my ability to bond with him.Ž She likes Californias bill, AB 2193, because it goes beyond mandated screening. It would require health insurance companies to set up case management programs to help moms find a therapist, and connect obstetricians or pediatricians to a psychiatric specialist. Health insurance companies havent taken a position on the legislation. Its unclear how much it would cost them to comply, because some already have infrastructure in place for case management programs, and some do not. But there is consensus among insurers and health advocates that such programs save money in the long run. Some doctors still have their objections. Under the bill, they could be disciplined for not screening. Some have said they worry about how much time it would take. The health care system, and the incentives, arent set up for this sort of screening, Sirott said. Currently, I get $6 for screening a patient,Ž she said. By the time I put it on a piece of paper and print it, its not worth it.Ž Its not clear whether the direct and indirect costs of screening would be worth it to the patients, either. Four other states „ Illinois, Massachusetts, New Jersey and West Virginia „ have tried mandated screening, and it did not result in more women getting treatment, according to a study published in Psychiatric Services in 2015. Even with Californias extra requirement that insurance companies facilitate care, women could still face high copays or limits on the number of therapy sessions. Or, the new mothers might be so overwhelmed with their care for a newborn, that it would be difficult to add anything to their busy schedules. What does seem to work, according to the study of mandated screening in other states, is when nurses or mental health providers visit new moms at home. Supporters of Californias proposed bill, however, say doctors need to start somewhere. Screening is the first step in recognizing the full scope of the problem, said Dr. Nirmaljit Dhami, a Mountain View, California, psychiatrist. Women should be screened on an ongoing basis throughout pregnancy and for a year after birth, Dhami said, not just once or twice as the bill requires. This story is part of a partnership that includes KQED, NPR and Kaiser Health News. HEALTHMaternal mental healthDoctors worry theres nowhere to send new and expectant moms with depression BIGSTOCK Identifying symptomsPostpartum depression may be mistaken for baby blues at “ rst „ but the signs and symptoms are more intense and last longer, eventually interfering with your ability to care for your baby and handle other daily tasks. Symptoms usually develop within the “ rst few weeks after giving birth, but may begin later „ up to six months after birth. Postpartum depression symptoms may include: € Depressed mood or severe mood swings € Excessive crying € Dif“ culty bonding with your baby € Withdrawing from family and friends € Loss of appetite or eating much more than usual € Inability to sleep (insomnia) or sleeping too much € Overwhelming fatigue or loss of energy € Reduced interest and pleasure in activities you used to enjoy € Intense irritability and anger € Fear that youre not a good mother € Feelings of worthlessness, shame, guilt or inadequacy € Diminished ability to think clearly, concentrate or make decisions € Severe anxiety and panic attacks € Thoughts of harming yourself or your baby € Recurrent thoughts of death or suicide € Untreated, postpartum depression may last for many months or longer.Source: Mayo Clinic Mrs. Joan Scott Ellis August 1st, 1934 … March 14th, 2018 Mrs. Joan Scott Ellis died on March 14 in Pensacola Florida. Born in Bonifay to Dallas Virgil and Charline Parrish Scott, Joans remarkable music talent appeared in grade school and developed rapidly with the mastery of clarinet, saxophone, piano, and organ. An extrovert among her peers, she marched with the Bonifay High School Band before entering high school. After graduating from Florida State Universitys School of Music in 1957, Joan taught elementary school music in Pensacola before becoming a certified librarian and completing many happy years of service in Escambia County, where her intellect, knowledge, and friendly nature won the respect of her friends and colleagues. Loving friends knew that whenever Joan walked into a room, she was often the most talented person there. Joan was preceded in death by her daughter Martha Lee Stephenson and her husband, Austin F. Ellis. She is survived by sons Keith and Scott, her sister Alice Rockwell, and by eight grandchildren.JOAN S. ELLISGail Goodwin Griggs died early Saturday morning, March 24, 2018, surrounded by a host of family, slipped from this world. Gail was born in Birmingham, Alabama on March 10, 1935. She graduated from Marianna High School, Chipola College, The University of West Florida, and Valdosta State College. Gail taught both elementary and high school and served as principal of Tift County High School for many years. In 1997, after retiring, she and her husband, Dr. Eddie M. Griggs moved to Silver Lake near Marianna to be closer to the children. Some other realm is much richer and this one much poorer indeed, due to this loss. She loved everyone and was always glad to help anyone. She never complained about life's bumps and bruises. She will be missed beyond measure and her life will seldom come this way again. She is preceded in death by her mother, father and brother. She is survived by her husband, Dr. Eddie M. Griggs; two sons, Alan and Michael Braxton; one daughter, Bunny and son-in-law, Butch Odom; brother and sister-in-law, Jimmy and Carolyn Goodwin; stepdaughter, Gayle Marie Griggs-Kurian; grandchildren, April Allday and husband, Joe, Natasha Phillips and husband, Ken, Ben Odom and wife, Amanda; great grandchildren, Beau and Juilet Allday, Audra and Tret Phillips, and Elanore and Oliver Odom, all of Marianna. Service of remembrance were held at 2 p.m. Thursday, March 29, 2018 at James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox chapel. Family received friends one hour prior to services. Memorialization was by cremation with James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel directing. Expressions of sympathy may be made online at www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.comGAIL G. GRIGGSTerry James McDade TJŽ, age 82, passed from this life Thursday, March 22, 2018 at his home. He was born in Tampa, FL on October 2, 1935 to Arthur and Cora (Wilcox) McDade. TJ was worked in construction building bridges. He is preceded in death by his parents, one son, Jimmy McDade, one daughter, Patsy Ross. Terry is survived by his wife; Lois McDade of Vernon, FL, his sons; Doug McDade, Isaiah Ortiz, Randy Willis and wife Kathy, daughters, Debbie Dumas, Melanie McDade, Tammy Mitcham, Mildred Duncan and husband Craig of Juneau, Alaska and his brother, Ernest McDade and wife Marie and several grandchildren and great grandchildren. Funeral service were held at 2:00 P.M., Tuesday, March 27, 2018 at Eastside Baptist Church in Vernon, FL with Rev. Jonathan Taylor officiating. Interment followed in the Eastside Baptist Church Cemetery. Visitation was held one hour prior to the service.TERRY J. MCDADE Mr. Louis Earl Wolter, 32 of Tallahassee, Florida died on Monday, March 26, 2018, at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital in Tallahassee, Florida. Born Monday, July 8, 1985 in Ft. Lauderdale. Death is hard, dealing with the loss of a loved one is something that we must know isn't meant by God to hurt us, but to make us to remember. Remember the memories and the love felt with them. When the day comes that I leave with this world, please smile. Smile knowing that I have given life every moment and made the most out of what I had. Know that if I don't get to say goodbye I meant to. Never miss those who left, remember them, and keep those memories close. Carpe diem. Louis was a inspirater and lived life to the fullest. His journey was ended early, but his spirit was carried on through all the hearts he touched. He is survive by his father Tim Wolter of Bonifay and mother,Jennie Niedzwiec Wolter. of Vernon, FL. Also surviving are son, Douglas Wolter of Vernon, FL, brother, Kenny Wolter of Bonifay, FL. Grandmother, Claudette Mazzoli of Bonifay, Fl. The family received friends from 12:00 PM to 3:00 PM on Saturday, March 31, 2018, at Sims Funeral Home 201 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Bonifay, Florida.LOUIS E. WOLTER OBITUARIES |CONTINUED FROM B5

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, April 4, 2018 B7a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located on Poplar Head Road. Sand Hills Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 6758 Highway 77. Shiloh Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 5:45 p.m. The church is located on Highway 277, three miles south of Highway 90 in Chipley. Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:15 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 3013 Moss Hill Road in Vernon. St. John Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. St. Matthews Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 4156 St. Matthews Road in Caryville. Salem Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Worship service is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Church is located at 2555 Kynesville Highway in Alford. Sunny Hills First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Unity Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3274 River Road in Vernon. Vernon First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 2888 Church Street in Vernon. Wausau First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 3493 Washington Street in Wausau.CatholicSt. Joseph The Worker Catholic Church Sunday Mass is at 11 a.m. Tuesday Mass is at 9 a.m. The church is located at 1664 Main Street in Chipley. St. Theresa Catholic Church Sunday Mass is at 9 a.m. Monday through Friday Mass is at 8 a.m. Saturday Mass is at 5 p.m. Adoration is the “ rst Friday after 8 a.m. Mass. The church is located at 2071 Sunny Hills Blvd and the Rectory is located at 2056 Sunny Hills Boulevard in Sunny Hills.Church of ChristChipley Church of Christ Sunday morning bible study is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1295 Brickyard Road in Chipley. Spirit-Filled Church of God in Christ Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Tuesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 2128 Pate Pond Road in Caryville.EpiscopalGrant Tabernacle AME Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 577 Martin Luther King Boulevard in Chipley. St. John AME Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. St. Joseph AME Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1401 Monroe Shef“ eld Road, Chipley. St. Luke African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME) Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located on Jackson Community Road. St. Mary African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME) Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 1035 St. Mary Road, in Caryville. St. Matthews Episcopal Church Morning worship is at 9 a.m. The church is located on Highway 90 west in Chipley.EvangelisticVernon Evangelistic Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Highway 79 in Vernon. Caryville Evangelistic Center Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Wrights Creek Road in Caryville, just north of Highway 90.HolinessHarris Chapel Holiness Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located eight miles north of Caryville on Highway 179. Johnson Temple First Born Holiness Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. Friday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 793 Orange Street, Chipley. Miracle Valley Spirit of Holiness Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located 3754 Bunyon Drive, off Highway 77 near Sunny Hills.MethodistChipley First United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 9:50 a.m. Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. (contemporary service) and 11 a.m. (traditional service). The church is located at 1285 Jackson Avenue East Mount Zion United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday fellowship meal and Bible study is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1590 Highway 173 in Graceville. Lakeview United Methodist Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. Thursday morning Bible Study 9 a.m. The church is located on Highway 279 near Five Points. New Hope United Methodist Church Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study is at 10 a.m. The church is located at on Highway 79 in New Hope. New Vision United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday night supper is at 5:45. Wednesday Bible Study is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Highway 77 and BlockerChurch Road in Greenhead. Orange Hill United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located on Sunday Road just off Orange Hill Road. Pleasant Grove United Methodist Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. The church is located near Hinsons Crossroads. Vernon United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wausau United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located on State Road 77PentecostalFirst United Pentecostal Church Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1816 Highway 90 in Chipley. Wausau Pentecostal Holiness Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 2201 Pioneer Road in Wausau. Rock Hill Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Friday Night Worship is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 339 Rockhill Church Road in Chipley. Trinity Pentecostal Tabernacle Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Turnin Point Home of the First United Pentecostal Church Sunday School is at 1 p.m. Worship Service is at 2 p.m. Bible Study Thursday is at 7 p.m.PresbyterianChipley First Presbyterian Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday, night sing-along is at 6 p.m. The church is located at Fifth Street and Watts Avenue Sunny Hills Presbyterian Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. Sunday School is at 10:30 a.m. The church is located at 3768 Country Club BoulevardOtherBonnett Pond Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 2680 Bonnett Pond Road in Chipley. Christian Fellowship Center Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1458 Monroe Shef“ eld Road in Chipley. Christian Haven Sunday school is h at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Church of God by Faith Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:45 a.m. Tuesday service is at 7:30 p.m. The church is located at 3012 Church Street. Church of God of Prophecy Morning Worship is at 9:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1386 W. Jackson Avenue in Chipley. Courts of Praise Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 1720 Clayton Road in Chipley. Cypress Creek Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at1772 Macedonia Road. Faith Covenant Fellowship Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Highway 277 mile south of I-10. Family Worship Center Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located 531 Rock Hill Church Road, Chipley. Graceville Community Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1005 E. Prim Avenue Grahams Chapel Morning worship at 11 a.m. Tuesday Bible Study at 7 p.m. The chapel is located ate 1218 Campbellton Avenue in Chipley. Hard Labor Creek Community Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1705 Pioneer Road three miles east of caution light. Holmes Valley Community Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 3550Fannig Branch Road in Vernon. House of Prayer Worship Center Sunday School and Children's Church is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Youth activities on Wednesday begin at 4:30 p.m. Praise and worship services are at 6:30 p.m. on Friday. The church is located at 763 West Boulevard in Chipley. Impact Worship Center Sunday. Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Thursday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3006 New Hope Road Marianna. Liberty Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3983 Creek Road in Vernon. McQueens Temple First Born Church of Living God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 5681 Highway 79 South, Vernon. New Faith Temple Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 841 Orange Hill Road. New Foundation Fellowship Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located on Rock Hill Church Road. Northwest Florida Christian Church Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. The church is located at 4465 Hig hway 77. Rhema Praise and Worship Center Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Thursday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located 763 West Boulevard in Chipley. Sunny Hills Chapel Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 4283 Highway 77. Tabernacle of Praise Church of God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located on Highway 77 South. The Living Word Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Highway 77 and Blocker Road in Greenhead. White Double Pond Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located on Creek Road in Vernon. Yes Lord Deliverance COGIC Sunday School is at 10:30 a.m. Worship is at noon. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 739 Seventh Street in Chipley. CHURCHESFrom Page B4 FAITH

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B B 8 8 Wednesday, April 4, 2018 | Washington County News NF-5036304 NF-5031562 Hazardous Aerial Tree Removal  Stump Grinding Trimming & Pruning  Emergency Tree Service  Lot Clean UpDow Morris,Owner/Operator 850-527-6291  850-849-3825 Readers’ Choice2017WASHINGTON HOLMES JACKSON (850) 638-3611 HastyHeating & Cooling NF-5028471 ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE OR BUSINESS FOR AS LITTLE AS $10 A WEEK!Reach thousands of potential customers with your Business Guide ad in the:WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS HOLMES COUNTY-TIMES ADVERTISER WEEKLY ADVERTISER CALL TODAY! 850-638-0212 NF-5036305 NF-5032746JOEYS SPORTING GOODSBAIT & TACKLE, GUNS & AMMO, ACCESSORIES & SPORT CLOTHINGJOEY SELLERSJOEYSSPORTINGGOODS 2064 Holly Street Westville, Fla. 32464850-548-5055 NF-5031560 C & CBookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available 4-3469 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY CASE NO 672018CP00021 IN RE: ESTATE OF EDWIN A. NICHOLSON, JR., Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of EDWIN A. NICHOLSON, JR., deceased, Case Number 672018CP00021 is pending in the Circuit Court for Washington County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Post Office Box 647, Chipley, Florida 332428. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representatives’ attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is March 28, 2018. Attorney for Personal Representative Greg Wilson Greg Wilson Law, LLC P. O. Box 986 Chipley, FL 32428 850-600-7088 Florida Bar No 0641480 greg@gregwilsonlaw.net Personal Representative Deidre Nicholson Roy 65 Bevic Drive Laper, MI 48446 March 28, April 4, 2018 3-3478 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE BROCK AUTO & TOWING gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 04/25/2018 08:00am at 707 East Blvd., CHIPLEY, FL 32428, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. BROCK AUTO & TOWING reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. VIN# 1HGCP3F84AA025584 2010 Honda April 4, 2018 4-3480 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISOION IN RE: ESTATE OF CHRISTOPHER MONROE SAPP Deceased NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Any and All Creditors, Unknown Adress(es), regarding the following real property: Parcel No. 00000000-00-5154-0000 Described as: Commence at the N.E. Corner of the NW of the NE of Section 36, Township 4 North, Range 15 West, thence East 73.0 feet to the Point of Beginning, thence South 373.07 feet, thence East 592.0 feet; thence North along the West right-of-way of State Road 79 373.07 feet: thence West 592 feet to Point of Beginning, and said parcel containing 5.07 Acres, more or less, and lying in Washington, County, Florida. Also identified as: 3021 Leavins Road, Bonifay, Florida 32425 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that petition for Summary Administration in Probate has been filed in this court. Your are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, on petitioner’s attorney, whose name and address are: Zachary R. White, P.A., P.O. Box 5196, Tallahassee, FL 32314 on or before April 30, 2018, and to file the original of the written defenses with the clerk of this court either before service or immediately thereafter. Failure to serve and file written defenses as required may result in a judgment or order for the relief demanded, without further notice. Signed on this 29 day of March, 2018. Lora C Bell As Clerk of the Court By: JoAnn Hayes As Deputy Clerk First Publication on April 4, 2018 April 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2018 4-3477 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given IDE TECHNOLOGIES the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 12-00440 Year of Issuance 2012 Parcel 00-1881-0002 assessed to: MARGARET S ROGERS ESTATE Description of Property 4 4 13 .13 ORB 833 P 258 BEG @ SEC OF BLK #16, W 150’, N 40’, E 150’, S ALNG MAIN ST TO POB, AS DESC IN ORB 833 P 128, ORB 859 P 144, ORB 859 P 336 PARCEL NO. 00000000-00-1881-0002. All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on APRIL 18,2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk MARCH 31, APRIL 4,11,18, 2018 4-3481 SECTION 106 PUBLIC NOTICE C4 Towers is proposing to construct a 310’ tall self-support telecommunications tower located at 4173 Douglas Ferry Road, Caryville, Washington County, FL, 32427, tax parcel ID 00000000-00-5118-0000 at Latitude N30 42’ 37.813”, Longitude W85 44’ 16.543”. C4 Towers seeks comments from all interested persons on the impact of the tower on any districts, sites, buildings, structures, or objects significant in American history, architecture, archaeology, engineering, or culture, that are listed or eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Specific information about the project, including the historic preservation reviews that C4 Towers is conducting pursuant to the rules of the Federal Communications Commission (47 C.F.R. Sections 1.1307(4)) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (36 C.F.R. Part 800) will be made available to interested persons who request the information from the contact below. All questions, comments, and correspondence should be directed to Virginia Janssen at Dynamic Environmental Associates, Inc., 3850 Lake Street, Suite C, Macon, GA 31204, 877-968-4787, Sec106@DynamicEnvironme ntal.com within 30 days from the date of this publication. Re: 21803024. 4-3479 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given BLAINE INVESTMENTS, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 00-00278 Year of Issuance 2015 Parcel 00-0913-0013 assessed to: BANK OF AMERICA NA Description of Property 30 3 13 2.96 ORB 255 P 76 BG 717.47’ W, 330’ S OF NEC OF NW , RN S. 330’, W. 463.10’, N. 330’, E. 463.10’ TO POB AS DESC IN ORB 255 P 76, LESS ORB 771 P 291 PARCEL NO. 00000000-00-0913-0013. All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on APRIL 18,2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk MARCH 31, APRIL 4,11,18, 2018 4-3482 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: John W. Goodman Jr. 2461 Angelena Ct Chipley, FL 32428 You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are hereby notified to contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Washington County, Florida no later than thirty (30) days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. April 4, 2018 4-3483 Public Auction The following vehicles will be sold at Public Auction at Nichols Auto Repair and Towing @ 1146 Jackson Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 @ 8:00 AM on the following dates: April 20 1N6SD16S7SC391075 1995 Niss April 4, 2018 Yorkshire Boar 3-Years-Old, approx 385-Pounds. Very tame. Needs home with a large wife. For sale or trade 850-333-6831. Nice Couch $30, Coffee Table glass and wrought iron $40, two small desk $10/each. Call before 7pm 850-415-6368 BIG YARD SALE! April 6 and 7 behind Armory (Bonifay). Too much to list. Something for everyone men and women’s stuff. Yall Come! Check it out! Friday & Saturday April6 & 7 Multi-Family Garage Sale. 896 HWY 277, Chipley. Pre-Estate. Something for everyone. Some clothes. Some furniture. Yard Sale 111 E. Wisconsin Ave in Bonifay April 6 and 7, 8AM until, Clothes, Furniture, household items LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE Friday and Saturday, April 6-7, 2018. 8:00AM to 5:00PM. Located on Maple Avenue, Geneva, Alabama, near courthouse. Yard Sale 1622 Brickyard Rd. West of High School. Saturday, April 7 from 7AM to noon. Art, Housewares and more. Yard Sale Friday and Saturday 8AM-noon. 854 Haley Dr. Chipley Flower pots, trellises, stereo units, household items, generator, art and more Furniture for sale: Curio cabinet $300, Dining Room set $300, Lift Chair $200, Storage Unit with baskets $100, Chest Freezer $200. For Sale 2007 Kawasaki Prairie 360 4-Wheeler only 326 hours $2,500 Call 850-703-1161. Employment OpportunityThe Holmes County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for the positions of: Assistant County Veteran Service Officer, Full-Time Temporary Project Monitor, Part-time seasonal Parks/Inmate Work Squad Supervisor and Part-time seasonal Bushhog Operator. For applications and job descriptions contact Hannah Benton in the Holmes County Commissioner’s Office at 850-547-1119. Please turn in completed applications to the County Commissioner’s Office located at 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, no later than 2:00 PM on April 13, 2018. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employe r. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 For Rent 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments in Vernon. Clean, stove, refrigerator, central heat/air, convenient to Panama City Beach, section 8, Rental assistance. 850-638-4640 For Rent One Bedroom apartments for rent in Chipley. Convenient location. Stove and refrigerator furnished. No Pets. Smoke free environment. Call 850-638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 2BR/1BA House for rent. Between Sunny Hills & Wausau. 1st, last & deposit. $600/month. Prefer mature adults. 850-733-2605 For Rent 4BR/1.5BA, no pets, HUD approved. CH&A. Chipley. $700/MO, $700/DEP 850-638-7601. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/ sewage/ lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 Bonifay, 3BD/2BA MH w/covered deck. 3/4 mile from school on Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $700 rent/$700 deposit. 850-547-3746. For Sale Two acre plot and one acre plot in Jacob City, FL. Call 850-849-9338. Highway 77 2 miles south of Chipley 4-8 acre tract Bedie Road. Call Milton Peel at 850-638-1858 or 326-9109 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. Do you need adependable, honest, caring and experienced home health provider or care giver for your love one. Then call Theresa at 850-326-6054. References upon request. The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely.

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Wednesday, April 4, 2018 The Weekly Advertiser | 1 NF-5036304 NF-5031562 Hazardous Aerial Tree Removal  Stump Grinding Trimming & Pruning  Emergency Tree Service  Lot Clean UpDow Morris,Owner/Operator 850-527-6291  850-849-3825 Readers’ Choice2017WASHINGTON HOLMES JACKSON (850) 638-3611 HastyHeating & Cooling NF-5028471 ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE OR BUSINESS FOR AS LITTLE AS $10 A WEEK!Reach thousands of potential customers with your Business Guide ad in the:WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS HOLMES COUNTY-TIMES ADVERTISER WEEKLY ADVERTISER CALL TODAY! 850-638-0212 NF-5036305 NF-5032746JOEYS SPORTING GOODSBAIT & TACKLE, GUNS & AMMO, ACCESSORIES & SPORT CLOTHINGJOEY SELLERSJOEYSSPORTINGGOODS 2064 Holly Street Westville, Fla. 32464850-548-5055 NF-5031560 C & CBookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available Volume 89 Number 14 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 4, 2018NF-5036260 Yorkshire Boar 3-Years-Old, approx 385-Pounds. Very tame. Needs home with a large wife. For sale or trade 850-333-6831. Nice Couch $30, Coffee Table glass and wrought iron $40, two small desk $10/each. Call before 7pm 850-415-6368 BIG YARD SALE! April 6 and 7 behind Armory (Bonifay). Too much to list. Something for everyone men and women’s stuff. Yall Come! Check it out! Friday & Saturday April6 & 7 Multi-Family Garage Sale. 896 HWY 277, Chipley. Pre-Estate. Something for everyone. Some clothes. Some furniture. LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE Friday and Saturday, April 6-7, 2018. 8:00AM to 5:00PM. Located on Maple Avenue, Geneva, Alabama, near courthouse. Yard Sale 111 E. Wisconsin Ave in Bonifay April 6 and 7, 8AM until, Clothes, Furniture, household items Yard Sale 1622 Brickyard Rd. West of High School. Saturday, April 7 from 7AM to noon. Art, Housewares and more. Yard Sale Friday and Saturday 8AM-noon. 854 Haley Dr. Chipley Flower pots, trellises, stereo units, household items, generator, art and more Furniture for sale: Curio cabinet $300, Dining Room set $300, Lift Chair $200, Storage Unit with baskets $100, Chest Freezer $200. For Sale 2007 Kawasaki Prairie 360 4-Wheeler only 326 hours $2,500 Call 850-703-1161. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 For Rent 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments in Vernon. Clean, stove, refrigerator, central heat/air, convenient to Panama City Beach, section 8, Rental assistance. 850-638-4640 For Rent One Bedroom apartments for rent in Chipley. Convenient location. Stove and refrigerator furnished. No Pets. Smoke free environment. Call 850-638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 2BR/1BA House for rent. Between Sunny Hills & Wausau. 1st, last & deposit. $600/month. Prefer mature adults. 850-733-2605 For Rent 4BR/1.5BA, no pets, HUD approved. CH&A. Chipley. $700/MO, $700/DEP 850-638-7601. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/ sewage/ lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 Bonifay, 3BD/2BA MH w/covered deck. 3/4 mile from school on Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $700 rent/$700 deposit. 850-547-3746. For Sale Two acre plot and one acre plot in Jacob City, FL. Call 850-849-9338. Highway 77 2 miles south of Chipley 4-8 acre tract Bedie Road. Call Milton Peel at 850-638-1858 or 326-9109 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. Do you need adependable, honest, caring and experienced home health provider or care giver for your love one. Then call Theresa at 850-326-6054. References upon request. Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you.

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2| The Weekly Advertiser Wednesday, April 4, 2018 NF-5036703 PRICES GOOD APRIL 4 THRU APRIL 10, 2018 $ 5 44 $ 1 18 $ 1 48 2 /$ 6 $ 4 88 $ 2 98 $ 2 88 $ 12 88 $ 9 98 $ 7 98 $ 14 88 $ 2 88 88 ¢ $ 1 58 $ 2 58 USDA Select Beef T-BONE STEAKSPer Lb Family Pk Lean Premium WhjoleFRESH BONELESSPORK LOINSPer Lb Fresh Lean Premium BONELESS PORK CHOPS Per Lb Family Pk Johnsonville Smoked Stadium BUN LENGTH BRATS 14 Oz Pkg Flanders BEEF PATTIES 4 Lb Box Royal Premium BONE-IN SMOKED PORK CHOPS Per Lb Hillshire Farms DELI SLICED TUB LUNCHMEATS 7-9 Oz Papa Luigi's RESTAURANT STYLE MEATBALLS 5 Lb Bag Smitheld THICK SLICED BACON 2.5 Lb Pkg Packer Label BULK CORN DOGS 10 Lb Box Narure's Best E-Z PEEL SHRIMP 21/30 Ct, 3 Lb BagFresh Lean PremiumSEASONED ST LOUIS PORK RIBSPer Lb Super Fresh PremiumFRYER SPLIT BREASTPer Lb Family PkFresh Lean Premium73/27 GROUND BEEF Per Lb Family Pk USDA Select BeefBONELESS TOP ROUND ROASTPer Lb 2 Pk1264 CHURCH AVENUE  CHIPLEY, FL  324286AM-7PM  7 Days a Week  850-638-1751WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO CORRECT TYPOGRAPHICAL AND PICTORAL ERRORS. QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS. WE DO NOT AC CEPT INTERNET PRINTED COUPONS.EBT Cardholders and WIC Vouchers Welcomed. Most Major Credit Cards Accepted 68 ¢ 58 ¢ $ 1 48 77 ¢ 2 /$ 4 98 ¢ $ 2 28 2 /$ 1 Farm Fresh GRAPE TOMATOES 4 Oz Cup Farm Grown JUMBO RED ONIONS Per Lb Farm Fresh RED GLOBE GRAPES Per Lb Farm Grown YELLOW SQUASH OR ZUCCHINI Per Lb Farm Grown GRANNY SMITH APPLES 3 Lb Bag Fresh Express GREEN CRISP SALAD 11 Oz Bag Farm Grown RUSSET POTATOES 8 Lb Bag California Green Giant CARROTS 1 Lb Bag Select Varieties Malt-O-Meal Cereal Giant Size Domino Sugar 4 Lb Bag Frito-Lay Multi Packs 32 Ct Box Select Varieties Capri Suns 10 Ct Box Ball Park Hamburger or Hot Dog Buns 12 Ct Pkg Assorted Flavors Folgers Coffee 24.2-30.5 Oz Can Hamburger Helper 4.7-7.4 Oz Box Piggly Wiggly Charcoal 15.4 Lb Bag Natural Light 18 Pk Cans Golden Flake Potato Chips 5 Oz Bag 6 Pack Coca-Cola Products .5 Ltr Btls Castleberry Hot Dog Chili 10 Oz Can Shreds or Bars Dutch Farms Cheese 8 Oz Pkg Crisco Vegetable Oil 48 Oz Btl Crinkle or Straight Cut TJ Farms Fries 5 Lb Bag Hunt's Squeeze Ketchup 24 Oz Btl Berry, Fruit or Tropical Tropicana Punch 59 Oz Crtn 98 ¢ 3 / $ 7 2 / 88 ¢ 2 / $ 3 $ 1 98 $ 2 88 88 ¢ 85 ¢ 2 / $ 5 2 / $ 3 $ 7 88 $ 1 88 $ 1 88 $ 5 98 98 ¢ $ 3 98 $ 7 75 Our Beef is USDA Select or Higher. EACH SWEET RIPE CANTALOUPES 2 /$ 3 COST PLUS 10% OF CHIPLEY, FL ALL WEEK LONG!