Citation
Washington County news

Material Information

Title:
Washington County news
Uniform Title:
Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Place of Publication:
Chipley FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Nicole Barfield - Publisher
Creation Date:
January 5, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiweekly[<1994>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1931>]
semiweekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
Coordinates:
30.780922 x -85.539289

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began May 23, 1924.
General Note:
L.E. Sellers, editor.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Washington County News. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000384704 ( ALEPH )
07260886 ( OCLC )
ACC5987 ( NOTIS )
sn 81000810 ( LCCN )
0279-795X ( ISSN )

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** SEE A LIST OF FAITH EVENTS | B4 Volume 95 Number 6 Phone: 850-638-0212 Fax: 850-638-4601 Opinion ....................A4 Local & State ..............A5 NASCAR ...................A11 Faith .........................B4 Obituaries ..................B5 Classifieds ............B7-B8 @WCN_HCT facebook.com/WashingtonCountyNews.HolmesCountyTimes50 ¢ chipleypaper.com Washington County A5New monthly column!: Sheriffs CornerB3CHS band earns high ratings at state assessment Wednesday, May 2, 2018 By Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comWASHINGTONCOUNTY „ Unemployment in Washington County is down from last month and year-over-year.The Florida Department of Economic Opportunity recently released its month unemployment data report for March. The report shows the unemployment rate in Washington County down from 4.1 in February to 3.8 in March.In the five-county region, which alsoincludes Holmes, Liberty, Calhoun and Jackson,Washington County has the lowest unemployment rate.Floridas seasonally unemployment rate was 3.9 percent in March 2018, unchanged from the Febru-ary 2018 rate, but down 0.5 percentage point from a year ago, a CareerSource Chipola news release stated. There were 400,000 job-less Floridians out of a labor force of 10,193,000.The U.S. unemployment rate was 4.1 percent in March.Floridas seasonally adjusted nonagricultural employment was 8,716,800 in March 2018, an increase of 13,800 jobs over the month, the release stated. The state gained 173,100 job over the year, an increase of 2.0 percent.Year-over-year, the countys unemployment rate has dropped 0.6 percent, a rate on par with that of Liberty County and greater contrast than rates in the rest of the counties in the region.The unemployment rate in the CareerSource Chipola region was 4.0 percent in March 2018. This rate was 0.5 percentage point lower than the regions year ago rate of 4.5 percent. The labor force was 41,717 up 137 over the year. There were 1,687 unemployed in the region.Unemployment rates continue to dropWashington County has lowest unemployment rate in the region UNEMPLOYMENT RATES Mar-18 Feb-18 Mar-17 Region 4.0 4.1 4.5 Calhoun 4.4 4.4 4.9 Holmes 4.2 4.3 4.6 Jackson 4.0 4.0 4.4 Liberty 4.2 4.4 4.8 Washington 3.8 4.1 4.4 Information provided by Florida Department of Economic Opportunity Staff ReportCHIPLEY „ One man has been charged with aggravated battery with a deadly weapon after police discovered he had stabbed a man.Raul Escalera, 52, of Chipley, was arrested after Chipley Police Department officers responded to a call in reference to a stabbing at 688 Deermont Circle, a CHP news release stated. When officers arrived on the scene, they found the victim sitting on the porch with large knife protruding from his shoulder.Man stabs man, leaves knife in victims shoulderBy Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comCARYVILLE „ Theres only one way to celebrate worm fiddlin, and Caryville does it appropriately „ with a festival.The annual Worm Fiddlin Festival will be held 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.Saturday at 4436 Old Spanish Trail (Highway 90) in Caryville, on the west side of the town hall build-ing. The event kicks off with an opening prayer and pledge, followed by an inaugural parade at 10 a.m.We had a real good one last year and I think its going to be a lot bigger this year,Ž said Coordinator Becky Pate. People come from through-out the region.ŽAccording to officials, the parade this year is the towns first parade ever. Although it will be small, Pate said, attendees can expect floats, emergency agencies vehicles and plenty of candy and beads.Worm Fiddlin Festival is SaturdayEscalera By Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY „ A painter out of Dothan isillustrat-ing local history through murals.Illustrating local historyGrocers murals put area heritage on displayMelinda E. Kellenberger paints a mural on the Piggly Wiggly building on State Road 77. [PHOTOS BY JACQUELINE BOSTICK | THE NEWS] Melinda E. Kellenberger captures local farm life in this part of a mural she is painting on the Piggly Wiggly building, located on State Road 77. See STABBING, A2 See FESTIVAL, A2 See HISTORY, A2

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** A2 Wednesday, May 2, 2018 | Washington County News Staff ReportCHIPLEY „ Its not too late to get tickets to the worlds largest one-day leadership conference. Leadercast-Wash-ington County will be held Friday at Rivertown Community Church in Chipley. Tickets are $45 each and covers materi-als and lunch.In its 18th year, Leadercast will broadcast live from Atlanta and simulcast to hundreds of locations around the world. This year marks the fourth year that the Washington County Chamber of Commerce is hosting the event, in part-nership with the Jackson and Calhoun County Chambers of Commerce. With a constantly impressive lineup of speakers and the on-target themes year-over-year (and at such a value), I con-sider Leadercast a cant miss event,Ž Kalpana OOmmen, Vice President Talent Acquisition, Cox Enterprises & 9-year Leadercast attendee.The theme of this years conference is, Lead Yourself.Ž Top leadership experts will inspire local business and community members.Among the leadership experts speaking this year are: Mae Jemison „ NASA astronaut, engineer & physician; Ian Cron „ bestselling author, psychotherapist, Ennea-gram teacher and speaker; Andy Stanley „ leadership author and communicator, Jim Loehr „ co-founder of the Human Performance Institute, Jen Bricker „ acrobat, aerialist, author & speaker, Michael Hyatt „ author, speaker and CEO of Michael Hyatt & Compa ny; and Carey Lohrenz „ the first female F-14 pilot, sp eaker & trainer.For more information and to purchase your ticket or group tickets to Leadercast-Washington County, search Leader-cast Washington CountyŽ at Eventbrite.com or call the Chamber at 850-638-4157. Seating is limited.Leadership conference to be simulcast Friday Tickets are still availableMelinda E. Kellenberger illustrates old-time business life near the train depot in this part of a mural she is painting on the Piggly Wiggly building, located on State Road 77. The victim was in stable condition Monday and expected to make a full recovery, the release stated.Officers found Escal-era on the property. An investigation into the incident suggest that alcohol and drug use played a role in the altercation that led to the stabbing, the release stated.In addition to the aforementioned charges, Escalera remains in custody at Washington County Jail with a $50,000 bond. STABBINGFrom Page A1 Were looking for a good day,Ž she added.The main event is the worm fiddling contest, in which contestants drive stakes in the ground and tap on the stake in order to make vibrations which cause the worms to surface. Each round is about 10 min-utes long.Worm fiddling is a prac-tice that dates back to the 1800s after it was discovered fiddling was an easier method of acquiring fish-ing bait than attempting to gather worms by digging in the ground. It gets its name from the motion made to produce vibrations to attract ground worms. Caryville considers itself as the worm fiddlin capital of the world.ŽAs with any competi-tion, the team that extracts the most worms wins. A second and third place is also announced.The event will also feature lived gospel and country musica, sack races, a cornhole tournament, train rides, crafts and food vendors. Organizers noted door prizes will be given on the hour, every hour through-out the festival.We welcome everyone and would just be delighted for the community come out and enjoy a day out of fun,Ž Pate said.For more information call 850-548-5571 or email townofcaryville@gmail. com. FESTIVALFrom Page A1In planning the art, Melinda E. Kellenberger said she researched the area and found a number of things to illustrate „ from tur-pentine to pine trees. She decided to go with a few scenes from archived pictures that she sketched out that reflected the areas most currently valuable and viewable features, including the train (and depot), farm-ing and emblems of the Panhandle Watermelon Festival.Last week she could be seenadding some final touches toa mural on the Piggly Wiggly building on State Road 77. The mural is the largest one she has ever painted outside, she said. She started paint-ing it April 9 and plans to complete it this week.Her other works can be found inside the Piggly Wiggly as well as at The Brickyard Market, also on State Road 77. She has done art work for the owner of both stores for more than a decade, she said.Kellenberger has been a painter for 22 years and has an art studio in Dothan. HISTORYFrom Page A1Siblings Betty and Hawk Spivey teamed up to compete in Caryvilles 2016 Worm Fiddlin contest. The festival is one of the towns few sources of revenue. [WCN]

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, May 2, 2018 A3

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** A4 Wednesday, May 2, 2018 | Washington County News OPINION The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by GateHouse Media LLC at 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2018, GateHouse Media LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright Notice: The entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of GateHouse Media LLC. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or GateHouse Media. Postmaster: Send address change to Washington County News, P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428, USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES In county Out of county 13 weeks: $20 $24.30 26 weeks: $28.70 $36.40 52 weeks: $48.60 $60.70 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US Publisher: Nicole Bare“ eld nbare“ eld@chipleypaper.com Interim Editor: Jacqueline Bostick jbostick@chipleypaper.com, 850-638-0212 News, sports, opinion: news@chipleypaper.com Classi“ ed: 850-638-0212, clamb@chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service: 1-850-522-5197 Washington CountyPUBLISHER Nicole P. Bare“ eld INTERIM EDITOR Jacqueline Bostick PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR Cameron Everett Eight years ago this month, a disaster of epic proportions began to unfold in the Gulf of Mexico. A well below the Deepwater Horizon oil rig erupted, about 40 miles off the coast of Louisiana „ triggering a fiery explosion that killed 11 workers and injured many others, toppling and sinking the massive structure, and sending an estimated total of 210 million gallons of crude into the Gulf for nearly three months. Considered the worst marine-based oil spill ever, the catastrophe resulted in both shortand long-term environmental damage. As the thick slicks spread, countless forms of wildlife were covered with oil, marshes in Louisiana and beaches in Northwest Florida were fouled, and the waterfront economies up and down the Gulf coast sustained significant losses. Researchers continued to see the effects on marine animals „ including the discovery of mutated fish and record numbers of dolphin deaths „ for years. One of the many responses was the creation of a credible, bipartisan National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling. In its January 2011 final report, the commission recommended, among other things, tighter controls on equipment designed to prevent blowouts. It took the Interior Department until April 2015 to impose the Blowout Preventer Systems and Well Control Rule, designed to stop explosions in undersea oil and gas wells. It was hardly a rush job. In light of the commissions findings, the magnitude of the spill and the fact that the Deepwater Horizon rig was considered state-of-the-art, this rule was certainly warranted. Yet the Trump administration and Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke have proposed changes to weaken the rule. For instance, Interior has called for reversing a requirement for frequent testing of blowout preventers, eliminating independent audits of safety and pollution-prevention equipment. The increased risks associated with this proposal are compounded by the administrations announced plans to dramatically expand offshore areas „ including those in the Gulf „ where testing and drilling are allowed. None of this is good for human safety or environmental protection. In January, in a bipartisan gesture, 20 of Floridas 27 U.S. representatives signed a letter in opposition to the administrations stances „ joining Sen. Bill Nelson in protesting the proposed rule changes and expansion of drilling. Last week, Nelson and fellow Democratic Sen. Maria Cantwell of Washington filed much-need legislation that would put the blowout-preventer and well-control rule into law. Their bill would also codify the Arctic Drilling Rule, which created special regulations affecting operations in icy waters. The legislation is warranted to protect not only the marine environment and coastal economies but human lives. By codifying the rules in law, the legislation would require congressional approval for any changes in them. Recollections of the Deepwater Horizon disaster may have faded a bit, so this eight-year anniversary is a reminder. Congress should pass Nelsons bill as a sign that the painful lessons learned have not been forgotten. This guest editorial was originally published in the Sarasota Herald-Tribune, a sister newspaper of the within Gatehouse Media.O shore well rules should be made law ANOTHER VIEW Observing the Swamp during the last few weeks, one trend is clear: federal courts are all-powerful, and even though the judges are appointed, not elected, they have the final say in legislative issues. Nevertheless, lower court judges dont have the right to steal American sovereignty or usurp presidential powers including those the Executive Branch has over immigration. Two recent examples: in Sessions v. Dimaya, the Supreme Court struck down a congressional statute that mandates criminal alien deportation. Dimaya is a twice-convicted foreign national and, therefore, deportable. Then, Washington, D.C., U.S. District Judge John D. Bates wrote that the Trump administrations decision to rescind the deferred action for childhood arrivals program, DACA, was unlawful and must be set aside.Ž But DACA isnt a law; President Obama created the program through an executive memo. Now, Americas attention turns to the Supreme Court hearing on Trump v. Hawaii, the third version of the presidents refugee resettlement efforts to improve vetting and tighten domestic security. But in Trump v. Hawaii, the presidents campaign rhetoric is on trial, and not the law, which is clear. Hawaiis U.S. District Judge Derrick K. Watson blocked the travel bans second version when he wrote that it was unconstitutional and discriminatory. The 1952 Immigration and Nationality Act gives the chief executive broad immigration powers: Whenever the President finds that the entry of any aliens or of any class of aliens into the United States would be detrimental to the interests of the United States, he may by proclamation, and for such period as he shall deem necessary, suspend the entry of all aliens or any class of aliens as immigrants or nonimmigrants, or impose on the entry of aliens any restrictions he may deem to be appropriate.Ž The Supreme Courts decision will be announced in June. In the meantime, intense scrutiny of U.S. refugee policy is overdue. A former refugee coordinator who served in the Middle East, Russia, Africa and Cuba provides a good starting point. In her April 24 op-ed, retired 25-year State Department veteran Mary Doetsch called for the refugee programs complete overhaul.Ž Doetsch based her conclusion on the alarmingŽ levels of pervasive fraud.Ž Doetsch witnessed widespread exploitation, abuse, identity fraud and marriage scams that dated back to 1990s Cuba and the early 2000s in Somalia. Moreover, Doetsch noted, resettlement has, over generations, shifted from privately funded charities to a taxpayersubsidized big business where executives earn from $260,000 to $700,000 annually. More refugees means higher income for the administrators. Last year, a Government Accountability Office report found the State Department and its partner, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, has a shortage of antifraud procedures in place. For its part, the Department of Homeland Security confirmed that refugee fraud is easy to commit, but not easy to investigate.Ž From the refugees perspective, the end game is worth whatever measures they take. Once entry to the U.S. is granted, a refugee may include his spouse, minor children, and after two years can petition his extended family to join him from abroad. Hell immediately receive lifetime work authorization, and after one year can file for permanent residency status that will lead to citizenship. These benefits are appropriate for deserving humanitarian cases, not for those who committed fraud. The U.S. has successfully resettled more than three million worldwide refugees. But continuing a poorly administered refugee program like the current one undermines support among Americans for the future resettlement of deserving persons.All Eyes on Supreme Court With Trump v. Hawaii J o e G u z z a r d i Joe GuzzardiFresno States refusal to fire professor Randa Jarrar is proof that our first amendment protections are important and necessary for a free society. Jarrars disgusting characterizations of the late First Lady Barbara Bush just minutes following the announcement of her passing are indeed protected, as is the right of taxpayerfunded Fresno State to define their university as a bastion of angry, foul-mouthed instructors bent on filling young minds with filth and profanity. Its also your right to withhold contributions and refuse to enroll at Fresno State. While Conservatives calling for the dismissal of Fresno State professor Randa Jarrar are wrong, Fresno President Castro was also disingenuous in stating that Fresno State has no authority to discipline Farrar due to free speech.Ž Her comments, although disgraceful, are protected free speech under the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Additionally, although Professor Jarrar used tenure to defend her behavior, this private action is an issue of free speech and not related to her job or tenure,Ž Castro wrote, adding that the university doesnt have any justificationŽ to take any disciplinary action. Free speechŽ has nothing to do with the universitys ability to discipline Farrar. As stated on page 10 of the Fresno State Staff Handbook, The university has the authority to impose discipline on employees which may include suspension, demotion or dismissal. The university encourages progressive corrective action be taken prior to the imposition of discipline. In accordance with Section 89535 of the Education Code, a permanent, probationary or temporary employee may be disciplined for any of the following reasons:Ž The list of reasons includes, but is not limited to: Immoral conduct.Ž Unprofessional conduct.Ž Dishonesty.Ž Incompetence.Ž So, it is up to the ironicallynamed President Castro to decide with his board and legal counsel whether or not Farrars public profanity-laced rage and personal attacks, which Castro himself described as ... inappropriate and an embarrassment to the university,Ž rises to the level of unprofessional conduct.Ž He has obviously decided it doesnt, and any admonition of the professors statements means absolutely nothing when Fresno State leaderships actions are nonexistent. Should Farrar be fired? Thats not up to the government... or you, unless you are a member of the Fresno State Board of Governors. Bottom line: Castro and his team crafted a false narrative to justify keeping Farrar on staff and its not up to you, me or the government to intervene. Randa Jarrar is the face of Fresno States identity.No Punishment for Barbara Bush-Hating Professor R i c k J e n s e n Rick Jensen

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, May 2, 2018 A5 LOCAL & STATESpecial to The NewsThe elephant in the room. Perception vs. Real-ity. Lets talk.The perception of law enforcement and what really drives us when choosing this career, simply put, are as different as night and day.In todays world, law enforcement officers are not seen as your friend but often as a source that cannot be trusted.Children, for example, shy away from approaching us at times, and it can begin with something as simple as a young child who is not listening to their parent in the store. As a parent uses a deputy to threaten a child, the person they trust most in this world is inadvertently teaching them we are the bad guy. The seed of distrust is planted which causes a false perception, when in reality children should understand that in any given moment we are a source of protection and their well-being is the very reason we put on this uni-form every day.Consistently building relationships with our cit-izens is critical to WCSO being successful in provid-ing the safe neighborhoods that our families deserve. Knowing transparency is the key to building trust and strengthening relationships, I am here to answer your questions, listen to your concerns, and I most certainly value your opinion and ideas.I hope the monthly Sher-iffs Corner will be another way to open the lines of communication between our agency and the public. If you have questions you would like addressed please email us at asksheriffcrews@wcso.us. My door is always open to each of you. Sheriff Kevin Crews Washington CountySheri s Corner Washington County Sheriff Kevin Crews We want to highlight our hometown businesses! Business ProfileŽ is a weekly feature designed to inform readers about the local business community. To participate, complete the following information and email it to: news@chipleypaper.com Business name:Business contact information: Number of employees:Owners or managers name:Business services provided: Years in business:How you got into this business:What you like most about your business:Name of person com-pleting this form:Business Pro leBy Jim TurnerNews Service Florida TALLAHASSEE „ BP settlement money is headed to new water and sewer lines for an industrial park, technical-education programs in two counties and expansion of the Port of Panama City. The Triumph Gulf Coast board of directors, set up by the Legislature to oversee settlement money from the Deepwater Horizon disas-ter, agreed Friday to dish out more than $18 million for the first four regionaleconomic development projects in Northwest Florida. The money came from an initial $300 million that Triumph Gulf Coast has received from the states share of the settle-ment from the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill.Before the money changes hands to the local level, terms still must be negotiated about performance requirements and how the state can recover money if the projects dont produce promised results,Ž according to a news release from Triumph.Triumph is required to spread out money to the eight Gulf Coast counties most affected by the spill, with minimum spending benchmarks for each county --Bay, Escambia, Franklin, Gulf, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, Wakulla and Walton. Triumph is expected to direct the money to regional projects rather than directly to indi-vidual businesses.The seven-member board for the non-profit Triumph is expected to eventually handle three-quarters of the $2 billion the state will get over the next 13 years from BP.The largest allocation Friday was for $10 million to the Port of Panama City to help with a $59.86 million project already underway to develop new terminal facilities.The work, which also is receiving money from the local port authority, the Florida Department of Transportation and the Florida Seaport Transportation Economic Development Council, is projected to support more than 140 direct jobs at the port and another 250 manufacturing and distri-bution jobs.Another $1.5 million will go to help pay for an Okaloosa County project to bring water and sewer lines to land east of Crestview where an industrial site is going up at a site known as Shoal River Ranch. The county has options to pur-chase several thousand acres in the more than 10,000-acre site.While a county would normally be expected to provide water and sewer as part of its basic package of services, the population density surrounding this large rural area is insuffi-cient to move the project to the top of the water/sewer priority list,Ž according to an economic advisory review posted by Triumph.The remaining $6.75 million will go to separate existing career-technical education programs in Wakulla and Escambia counties. The Wakulla School Board is getting $3.75 million to convert an existing school-bus garage into labs for information technology courses and for HVAC and automotive maintenance programs expected to handle 400 students over the next five years. The money will also help build a new bus garage.Triumph has to eventually spend at least $63 million of the BP money in Wakulla County.The Escambia school district will get just over $3 million for educational programs directed at providing programs for 1,145 high-school and college students in cybersecurity, advanced manufacturing and aerospace.BP settlement money starts owing to Panhandle This April 21, 2010, “ le photo shows a large plume of smoke rising from BPs Deepwater Horizon offshore oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico. [AP PHOTO | GERALD HERBERT] with Washington County Sheri Kevin C rews

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** A6 Wednesday, May 2, 2018 | Washington County News COMMUNITYSpecial to The NewsCHIPLEY Students at Kate M. Smith Elementary School know something about hatch-ing eggs.Beginning April 3, stu-dents in Alyson Browns first-grade classroom at participated in a 4-H in the Classroom embryology project.For 21 days the time it takes for a fertilized egg to hatch students learned new vocabulary words and discussed concepts, such as animal habitats, survival needs, parts of the egg and the importance of agriculture.Hands-on science engages children through observation, asking ques-tions, touching, smelling and engaging multiple senses effectively helping them build understanding of difficult concepts.On the 13th day, 4-H Agent Julie Pigott Dil-lard visited Mrs. Browns classroom to candle the eggs.Using a high-pow-ered lamp that illuminates the egg, students looked for blood vessels within the egg and the eye spot. They also observed the chick moving inside the shell.On April 23, students arrived in their classroom to find their baby chicks beginning to hatch.By the end of the week, 16 chicks hatched from the 30 eggs that were placed in the incubator. Students watched as the chicks fluffed out and grew stronger hour by hour. They placed them in a brooder box under a warm lamp with food and water and observed how quickly they become self-sufficient.Hatching baby chicks4-H Agent Julie Pigott Dillard talks to a student at Kate M. Smith about eggs as they were being placed in an incubator. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] On April 23, Kate M. Smith students arrived in their classroom to “ nd their baby chicks beginning to hatch. By the end of the week, 16 chicks hatched from the 30 eggs that were placed in the incubator. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] Staff ReportWASHINGTON AND HOLMES COUNTIES New council members were elected to the District 2 4-H council.Jamin Marks was elected president, Jordan Rollins vice president, Isabela Teck secretary and Matthew Speros treasurer. The district includes Bay, Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson, Walton and Washington counties.Elections were held during a meeting with district members. The meeting was also an opportunity to give project presentations.At the 4-H District 2 Showcase, members were judged individually on talent, public speaking and demonstrated or illustrated talk presentations. Blue awards earned between 90 and 100 points, and red awards earned between 80 and 89 points.Blue Award winners were Kaylee Bowen, Diana Buchanen and Raleigh Reed for public speaking. David Duncan II in talent and Lil-lian Sparks in illustrated talk.Red Award winners were Gerald Bryant and Holley Andrews in public speaking, Elizabeth Halling in talent and Emma Weeks and Elizabeth Halling in illustrated talk.Senior members David Duncan and Lillian Sparks will advance to state 4-H competitive events to be held at the University of Florida in August.Photography entries were submitted to the Florida 4-H Photography Contest and will be judged this summer. Youth entering the competition included: Emma Folwer, Moriah Chapman, Cass Dillard, Elise Sorrells and Caroline Johnson.In other business, during the event, members and parents completed a service project for Global Youth Service Day. Youth and parents assembled over 60 hygiene care packs to take back to their counties and give to local Guardian Ad Litem sites, schools, churches, sheriff's offices or police stations for youth who are in need.Each county in District 2 offers summer programs including day camps and overnight camping oppor-tunities during the summer months. For more information on 4-H, go online to the UF/IFAS Extension homepage.District 2 4H o cers electedIf you would like your events included in this list, email information to: news@chipleypaper.com ARC of Washington and Holmes to host yard saleCHIPLEY The Arc of Washington and Holmes Counties, located at 1335 South Blvd Chipley, will host a yard sale on Thurs-day and Friday, May 3 and 4,from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Library to hold Baby Bees story and music hour CHIPLEY The Wash-ington County Public Library will host Baby Bees at 10 a.m., Wednes-day, May 2. Baby Bees will be an hour of stories, music, sing-a-longs and activities designed just for baby. Each month will have a new theme. For more information call 850-638-1314. Chipola commencement set in Dothan, AlabamaDOTHAN, ALABAMA The Chipola College 2018 Commencement Ceremony will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 3, at the Dothan Civic Center. The address is 126 St. Andrews Street, Dothan, AL, 36303. Rep. Brad Drake, a member of the Florida House of Repre-sentatives, will deliver the commencement address. Graduates should receive an email from the college about caps and gowns which will be picked up in the Book Store. Counted as members of the class are all who will complete degrees or certificates from December of 2017 to May of 2018 or during the Summer 2018 terms. Diplomas will be awarded for Bachelor of Science, Associate in Science, Associate in Arts and Workforce Development Certificates. Chipola graduates may invite an unlimited number of family members and guests to share the event. The ceremony will be broadcast live on You-Tube available at this link: https://www.youtube.com/user/ChipolaCol-lege For information about the graduation ceremony, contact the Chipola Admissions and Records Office at 850718-2311 or visit www.chipola.edu. COMMUNITY EVENTS

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, May 2, 2018 A7

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** A8 Wednesday, May 2, 2018 | Washington County NewsBy Rahim Faiez and Amir ShahThe Associated PressKABUL, Afghanistan „ Two Islamic State suicide bombers struck in Afghanistans capital on Monday, killing 25 people, including nine journalists who had rushed to the scene of the first attack, in the deadliest assault on reporters since the fall of the Taliban in 2001.An Agence FrancePresse photographer, a cameraman for the local Tolo TV station and several reporters for the Afghan branch of Radio Free Europe were among the fatalities, police said. At least 45 people were wounded in the attacks, according to Kabul police spokesman Hashmat Stanekzai, who said four police were among those killed.The attack was the latest in a relentless string of large-scale bombings and assaults in the capital and elsewhere in Afghanistan this year. A few hours later, in the southern Kandahar prov-ince, a suicide car bomb targeting a NATO convoy killed 11 children from a nearby religious school, police said. The children had gathered around the NATO convoy for fun when the bomber struck, said Abdul Rahim Ayubi, a lawmaker from Kandahar. Eight Romanian NATO soldiers were wounded. The Islamic State group claimed the Kabul bomb-ings in a statement posted online, saying it targeted the Afghan intelligence headquarters. The state-ment did not say anything about specifically target-ing journalists. The blasts took place in the central Shash Darak area, home to NATO headquarters and a number of embassies and foreign offices „ as well as the Afghan intelligence service.Stanekzai said the first suicide bomber was on a motorbike, while the second targeted those scrambling to the scene to aid victims. He said the second attacker was on foot in a crowd of report-ers, pretending to be a member of the press, when he set off his payload.AFP said the news agencys chief photographer in Kabul, Shah Marai, was among those killed. Hundreds of people attended his funeral later on Monday.Media watchdog Reporters Without Borders said it was the deadliest attack targeting reporters since the U.S.-led invasion that overthrew the Taliban in 2001.The Paris-based group named the nine journal-ists killed, who worked for media organizations from multiple countries, and said another six reporters were wounded. The group, also known by its French acronym RSF, said 36 media workers have been killed in Afghanistan in attacks by IS or the Tali-ban since 2016.In a separate attack in the eastern Khost province, a 29-year-old reporter for the BBCs Afghan service was shot dead by unknown gunmen. The BBC confirmed the death of Ahmad Shah, saying he had worked for its Afghan service for more than a year. BBC World Service Director Jamie Angus called it a devas-tating loss.Ž Survivors of the attacks in Kabul recounted scenes of mayhem.When the explosion happened, everywhere was covered with dust and fire, it was such a horrific scene,Ž said Jawed Ghulam Sakhi, a 28-year-old taxi driver. I saw journalists covered with blood.ŽMasouda, a young woman who was with her husband when he was wounded in the attack, lashed out at the authorities.I dont know who is responsible for all these attacks. Every day we lose our loved ones and no one in this government is taking responsibility for the killing of these innocent people,Ž she said. Like many Afghans, she has one name.Afghan President Ashraf Ghani condemned the attacks, as did the U.S. Embassy in Kabul.We extend our deepest condolences to the families, friends, and col-leagues of all the victims, including a number of brave journalists among the dead and injured,Ž the embassy said. Where media are in danger, all other human rights are under greater threat.ŽIn other violence Monday, insurgents killed at least four Afghan policemen in an ambush in the northern Balkh prov-ince, said Sher Mohammad Abu-Tariq, the district chief in Nahri Shahi. In the eastern Nangarhar province, an explosion killed an Afghan police officer and wounded four other people, said Attuhullah Khogyani, spokesman for the provincial governor.No one claimed respon-sibility for the attacks. The IS affiliate in Afghanistan first emerged in Nangarhar a few years ago, then expanded its footprint across the country.IS and the more firmly established Taliban carry out regular attacks, with the Taliban usually targeting the Afghan government and security forces, and IS targeting the countrys Shiite minority, whom the militants view as apostates.The relentless assaults underscore the struggles that Afghan security forces have faced since the United States and NATO concluded their combat mission at the end of 2014. Both armed groups want to establish strict Islamic rule in Afghanistan.Last week, an Islamic State suicide bomber attacked a voter registration center in Kabul, killing 60 people and wounding at least 130 others. The month before, an IS suicide bomber tar-geted a Shiite shrine in Kabul where people had gathered to celebrate the Persian new year. That attack killed 31 people and wounded 65 others.Twin bombings in Afghanistan kill 25 people NATION & WORLDAttack is latest in string of large-scale assaults; victims include nine journalistsSecurity forces run from the site of a suicide attack after the second bombing Monday in Kabul, Afghanistan. A coordinated double suicide bombing hit central Kabul on Monday morning. [MASSOUD HOSSAINI/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** A10 Wednesday, May 2, 2018 | Washington County News SPORTSStaff ReportCHIPLEY One Chipley High School graduate is headed to rookie mini camp.Kobe McCrary, 24, was not one of the 256 selected for the NFL draft last week, however, the Minnesota University Golden Gopher running back was invited to attend the Minnesota Vikings rookie mini camp.The invitation is another opportunity for undrafted hopefuls to get on a pro team's roster.In his two-year football career at MU, McCrary made 11 touchdowns and rushed 738 yards, according to ESPN.com. At Chipley High School, he took home the 1A first team all-state honors in football.Chipley grad goes to Vikings campBy Pat McCannThe News HeraldSAND HILLS „ Class 1A schools have one less stage in the regional round than their counterparts in Classes 5A-9A in Florida.Part of that disparity, how-ever, is compromised by the fact that many 1A districts are twice the size of those with larger enrollment schools. At least they can be in the Panhandle.So there can be an extra round of district games played, as was the case on Monday at host Bozeman in the District 4-1A grouping.Port St. Joe and Franklin County each won elimination games. Port St. Joe advanced to meet No. 2 seed Bozeman today at 4 p.m. in one semifi-nal. Franklin County will play top-seeded Wewahitchka in the other at 6 p.m. Port St. Joe 11, Liberty County 9Through three innings the rubber match looked like a mismatch.Port St. Joe, 14-7, and Liberty County had split regular-season games. After three, however, the Lady Tiger Sharks not only had built a 9-1 lead, they had done so against two Liberty County pitchers. The mercy rule loomed.Thats when the Lady Bulldogs began to catch up to some of the offerings of Brooke Zinker, who had struck out eight entering the top of the fifth inning.With one out, Taryn Kirk-land singled sharply, and after Kacy Partridge forced her at second McKenzie Hanna slammed a two-run home run to left field.Kirkland had relieved starter Destiny Tucker in the third inning and immediately surrendered four runs. When she pitched a scoreless fourth and fifth, the Lady Bulldogs regrouped.Holly Ammons laced a two-run double in the sixth, two more baserunners crossed the plate on a Port St. Joe throwing error and Hanna thumped an RBI double.Suddenly the invincible lead had been reduced to 9-8 as Liberty County batted around.Port St. Joe made a final statement with two insur-ance runs in the bottom of the sixth. Erica Ramsey singled, was sacrificed to second and scored on a single by sev-enth-grader Kali Austerman, her third hit of the game. Brooklynn Quinns second sacrifice fly opened an 11-8 lead, and the Lady Tiger Sharks withstood a run-scor-ing double by Hanna Bailey in the top of the seventh.Hanna finished with three hits and three RBIs for Liberty County. Kirkland had two hits and Bailey two hits and an RBI.Georgia Lee had two doubles, scored twice and knocked in two runs for Port St. Joe. She also made five putouts in left field.Ramsey had two hits and an RBI and Hagen Parrish two hits and two runs. Zinker struck out 10. Liberty County 010 025 1 „ 9 10 6 Port St. Joe 144 992 x „ 11 12 4Tucker (L), Kirkland 3 and Partridge; Zinker (W) and Quinn. LOB: Liberty County 6, Port St. Joe 9. E: Copas 2, Ammons, Bailey 2, Carson, Alcorn 2, Todd, Ramsey. 2B: G.Lee 2, Austerman, Hanna, Bailey. HR: Hanna. S: Austerman, Alcorn. SF: Quinn 2, Zinker. HBP: by Zinker (King 2). WP: Tucker 4, Kirkland, Zinker 2. PB: Partridge, Quinn. IP: Tucker. RBIs: Liberty County, Hanna 3, Ammons 2, Bailey. Port St. Joe, Quinn 2, G.Lee 2, Zinker 2, Ramsey, Austerman.Franklin County 15, Vernon 0Franklin County lost a coin flip with Bozeman to deter-mine the second seed, and was forced to play a firstround game while Bozeman received a bye.The opponent was winless Vernon, which ended a frustrating season 0-20 as the 15-run threshold was reached in the bottom of the fourth inning. The Lady Seahawks, 17-9, used Jaylin Charles steady pitching and a relentless attack to advance. They scored five runs in each the first, second and fourth innings.Madison Smith set the tone initially when reaching on a bunt single, sprinting all the way to third base as Sophia Kirvin was grounding out and scoring when Vernon left third uncovered on its throw across the diamond.Alexi Johnson walked, Charles reached on an error and Michaela Cassidy was hit by a pitch to load the bases with two outs. Johnson scored on a wild pitch, and then Abby Johnson smacked a two-run triple into the left-field corner.Rosie Davis led off the second with a single and the bases quickly were loaded with no outs. Melanie Collins had an RBI single, Alexi Johnson knocked in a run with a sacrifice fly and Abby Johnson collected her third RBI with a single to left. Vernons Caitlyn Taunton stranded two Franklin County baserunners in the third, but the Seahawks bunched singles by Cassidy, Kylah Ross and Kirvin while ending the game in the fourth inning.Vernon had three hits off Charles, with leadoff hitter Faith Baxley collecting two of them. Savannah Moore stroked a double for the Yellow Jackets leading off the top of the fourth. Vernon 000 0 „ 0 3 7 Franklin County 550 5 „ 15 10 1 1 out in the fourth inning when game called. Taunton (L) and Baxley. Charles (W) and Johnson.PSJ and Franklin advance Kobe McCrary will try and earn a spot at Vikings training camp. [JESSE JOHNSON | USA TODAY SPORTS] By Ian HarrisonThe Associated PressTORONTO „ The Toronto Raptors seem to have everything lined up in their favor heading into their postseason matchup against LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers. Theyre rested. The Raptors feel they are ready. They have home-court advantage.But theyve been confident before heading into a playoff showdown with James and have come up short „ twice.Gotta go through the best to get to that trophy,Ž AllStar guard DeMar DeRozan said. Every step of the way were going to come across somebody.ŽThe Raptors open their sec-ond-round playoff series at home to James and the Cavs on Tuesday night. Cleveland has eliminated Toronto in two straight postseasons, includ-ing the 2016 conference finals and a second-round sweep last year.This time, however, Toronto is the top-seeded team in the East after a team-record 59-win season. The Raptors have been off since a Game 6 victory over Washington last Friday night finished their first-round series, while James and the Cavs were pushed to the limit in grinding out a Game 7 win over Indiana on Sunday.Thats a stark contrast to 2016, when Cleveland had eight days of rest before facing a Toronto team that had played consecutive seven-game series. Or last year, when the Cavs got a week off while wait-ing for Toronto to complete a six-game victory over Milwau-kee in the opening round. Theyre coming off a series where they were banging and bumping for seven games,Ž Raptors guard Kyle Lowry said. I think our energy has been great. I think the days off will definitely have helped us a little bit.ŽJames, meanwhile, has shouldered a heavy load for the Cavs, scoring 40 or more three times in the first round. He played 43 minutes in Game 7, and was briefly forced off the court in the second half because of leg cramps.Nevertheless, Raptors coach Dwane Casey expects James to be fully fresh once tip-off time arrives Tuesday.I dont believe hes tired,Ž Casey said. Hes on a mission. Im not saying hes a lying man, but I dont think hes tired.ŽThese Cavs dont have All-Star guard Kyrie Irving anymore, either, while Toronto has flourished with a new emphasis on ball movement and 3-point shooting.We have a great opportunity ahead of us to show how good of a team weve been,Ž Lowry said. Were ready.ŽDeRozan agreed, saying theres no questionŽ the Rap-tors are better equipped to face Cleveland than in years past.I feel it,Ž DeRozan said. We all have that confidence in ourselves.ŽSome other things to watch in the series between the Cava-liers and the Raptors: Bench mobLowry and DeRozan started resting before their first-round series with the Wizards was even over. Lowry played 31 minutes in the clincher, and DeRozan 33, as Torontos deep bench took over in the fourth quarter. The reserve unit was bolstered by the return of guard Fred VanVleet, who had missed all but three minutes of the first five games because of a sore right shoulder. Pascal Siakam led Torontos bench with 11 points in Game 6 as the Raptors outscored Washing-ton 29-14 in the fourth.Thats the type of intensity that we need from every quar-ter, every time we step on the floor,Ž Siakam said. Thats what we want, just being able to wear down our opponent and playing physical.Ž Home sweet homeThe Raptors matched Houston with an NBA-lead-ing 34-7 home record during the regular season and won all three home games against Washington in the first round. Torontos two wins against Cleveland in the 2016 Eastern Conference Finals came north of the border, and its only win in three meetings with the Cavs this season happened at home, a 133-99 win on Jan. 11.Theyre a very tough team that plays well at home,Ž Cavaliers forward Kevin Love said. Theyre another team, like Indiana, that can play a number of different ways. They have bigs that are some-what unorthodox and can play inside or outside, pick and pop. They have a lot of guards, especially those two guys out front in Lowry and DeRozan, that are going to be very tough to stop.Ž Finals fourCavs coach Tyronn Lue used four different starting lineups against the Pacers, but the one he went to in Game 7 might stick for a while. Lue started Kyle Korver alongside James, Love, Tristan Thompson and J.R. Smith „ the four remain-ing players from Clevelands 2016 championship team. The move was as savvy as it was desperate, but it worked. Now Lue, who has used 34 starting lineups this season, has something to fall back on if things dont go as planned against the Raptors.Weve been in situations before,Ž James said of the Game 7 starters. Weve played big games before so thats a comfort starting the game.Ž By GeorgeBack spasms sidelined Cavs guard George Hill for three games against Indiana, but he returned in Game 7 and sparked Cleveland. Hill attacked the rim and finished with 11 points „ nine on free throws „ and had six rebounds and three assists while playing the final 19 minutes. He gives the Cavs not only another ball handler to take pressure off James, but a dependable veteran who has been through playoff battles with San Antonio and Indiana. The 31-year-old has played in 87 postseason games, starting 75.George is a really good player,Ž Lowry said. Hes been doing this a long time. Having a healthy Hill helps them.ŽHill had one of his best games with Cleveland against the Raptors on March 21, scoring 22 points.Raptors rested, ready for third shot at LeBron, CavsToronto Raptors guard Kyle Lowry celebrates late in the second half of Game 6 of the teams NBA “ rst-round playoff series against the Washington Wizards on Friday in Washington. The Raptors won 102-92. [ALEX BRANDON/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, May 2, 2018 A11 THREE THINGS TO WATCH NASCAR THIS WEEKFEUD OF THE WEEK SPEED FREAKSA few questions we had to ask ourselvesCUP STANDINGS WHATS ON TAP QUESTIONS & ATTITUDECompelling questions ... and maybe a few actual answersGODWINS PICKS FOR DOVER TALLADEGAJoey Logano celebrates his “ rst legal winŽ since 2016. [AP/BRYNN ANDERSON] 12345678910 KEN WILLIS TOP 10 NASCAR DRIVER RANKINGSKYLE BUSCH No changes here after plate race KEVIN HARVICK Was a good Ford soldier at Talladega JOEY LOGANO An unencumbered win? So far CLINT BOWYER Only Clint to ever win in NASCAR BRAD KESELOWSKIWhen will his win come? KYLE LARSON 40th wasnt worst-ever Dega “ nish MARTIN TRUEX JR. No platerace passion here DENNY HAMLIN Mr. Hunch likes him at Dover KURT BUSCH Yet to visit Dovers white cliffs JIMMIE JOHNSON Wow, 11 career wins at Dover! The Daytona Beach News-Journals Godwin Kelly & Ken Willis have covered NASCAR for nearly 60 years combined. godwin.kelly@ news-jrnl.com ken.willis@news-jrnl.comTHREE THINGS WE LEARNEDMOTOR MOUTHS PODCASTNo restrictor plates in the pod, but were still capable of endangering bystanders. Tune in online at www.news-journalonline.com/daytonamotormouths Any chance Joey Logano is next with a three-race win streak? GODSPEAK: Sorry to all those Logano fans, but those 3-race streaks are over for now. KEN'S CALL: Absolutely, positively, no chance. That trend ends Kevin Harvick and Kyle Busch. Until Kyle does it again, of course.Will Matt Kenseth win a race this year? GODSPEAK: Of course he will win. He is the 2003 Cup Series champion Matt Kenseth. His experience will lead him to Victory Lane. Heck, maybe at Kansas. KEN'S CALL: Nope. But some top-10s will be considered a success for the No. 6 team. Trevor Bayne just got a little “ recracker slipped into his back pocket for Dover, by the way.CLINT BOWYER VS. JIMMIE JOHNSON: Bowyer was swept out of the race when Johnsons No. 48 Chevy went sideways in Turn 3 to ignite the Big One.Ž Fourteen cars were involved. GODWIN KELLYS TAKE: Yes, it is plate-racing at Talladega, but Bowyer called Johnson out. I dont know if he got loose or was trying to get in a hole, but the No. 48 wasnt clear and wrecked a bunch of us,Ž he said.WINNER: Chase Elliott REST OF TOP 5: Martin Truex Jr., Jimmie Johnson, Brad Keselowski, Kurt Busch FIRST ONE OUT: Kevin Harvick DARK HORSE: Trevor Bayne DONT BE SURPRISED IF: Elliott makes it five top-five finishes in five starts at Dover, only this time he tops the field.Feel bad for Trevor?In a way. Being replaced during the season, in such a high-pro“ le way, carries a bit of public humiliation. But its Matt Kenseth, and the team suggests there are monetary considerations with a new sponsor attached to Kenseth, so that lessens the blow a bit. Oh, and this: In older times, drivers had no contractual legs to stand on, but nowadays they know the legalities of their contracts must be followed. If youre still getting paid, it probably helps. Hershel McGriff? You kidding?Hopefully, we dont end up wishing they were kidding. McGriff, a West Coast racing legend, is scheduled to race this weekend at a K&N West event in Tucson. It will be his “ rst race since 2012 ƒ when he was 84. Yes, Hershel turned 90 last December, but a few weeks ago he practiced on the Tucson track and reportedly erased any concerns. For the record, Hershels “ rst-ever NASCAR race was the original Southern 500 at Darlington ƒ in 1950.„Ken Willis, ken.willis@news-jrnl.comCUP SERIES: AAA 400 Drive for Autism SITE: Dover International Speedway (1-mile concrete oval) TV SCHEDULE: Friday, practice (Fox Sports 1, 10:30 a.m.), qualifying (Fox Sports 1, 3 p.m.). Saturday, practice (Fox Sports 1, 9:30 a.m. and noon). Sunday, race (Fox Sports 1, coverage begins at 12:30 p.m.; green ” ag, 2:15 p.m.)XFINITY: OneMain Financial 200 SITE: Dover International Speedway SCHEDULE: Friday, practice (Fox Sports 1, 9:30 a.m. and 2 p.m.). Saturday, qualifying (Fox Sports 1, 10:30 a.m.), race (Fox Sports 1, 1:30 p.m.)CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS: JEGS 200 SITE: Dover International Speedway TV SCHEDULE: Friday, qualifying (Fox Sports 1, 1 p.m.), race (Fox Sports 1, 5 p.m.)1. Joeys winJoey Loganos Talladega win was his “ rst victory that countedŽ since winning at Phoenix in 2016. His last triumph was almost one year to the day at Richmond, but that win was deemed encumberedŽ and didnt get him into the playoffs. It feels really good,Ž he said. Now we will make a run at a championship.Ž2. Streak brokenKyle Busch watched his well-crafted, three-race winning streak come to a halt at Talladega. He “ nished a “ tting 13th place. Once we got in that wreck (Lap 166), it was over, but we had a decent car up until then,Ž said the driver of the No. 18 Toyota. But we just lack speedway speed.Ž3. Little teamsThose little teams with small budgets did OK at Talladega. David Ragan led the charge against NASCARs goliaths with a sixthplace “ nish in the No. 38 Front Row Motorsports Ford. We had a fast car all weekend,Ž he said. Chris Buescher was 11th, and Ty Dillon was 15th.„ Godwin Kelly, godwin. kelly@news-jrnl.com 1. Last chanceTrevor Bayne will get one more chance to put Roush Fenway Racing in a quandary this Sunday at Dover. If he wins the race, he would be eligible for the playoffs. He was hoping to nab the win at Talladega, but was crashed out on Lap 71. Matt Kenseth will wheel the No. 6 Ford at Kansas in two weeks. It stinks,Ž Bayne said. It is frustrating because Talladega is one of the ones you know you can win at and we wanted to do that.Ž2. No-risk finishFord had Talladega Superspeedway conquered, and none of the Blue OvalŽ drivers in a position to win made a move on leader Joey Logano. They played nice. I wanted to roll with him (Ricky Stenhouse Jr.),Ž said Kurt Busch, who finished second in his No. 41 Ford. It didn't materialize. That's how we got all strung out, trying to be the one guy by himself.Ž3. And Chase saysChase Elliott continues to chase his first NASCAR Cup Series victory. In his last two outings (Richmond, Talladega), he has scored top-three finishes. He has never finished less than fifth in four Dover starts. Elliott was frustrated by his Ford rivals at Talladega. I was trying to move forward and they (Fords) were not interested in advancing,Ž he said. It could have been a lot worse, so well move on to Dover.Ž„ Godwin Kelly, godwin. kelly@news-jrnl.comDriver Trevor Bayne will get one more chance to put a smile on team owner Jack Roushs face when the No. 6 Ford races at Dover this weekend. [AP/BUTCH DILL] 1. Kyle Busch 447 2. Joey Logano 417 3. Kevin Harvick 366 4. Clint Bowyer 335 5. Kurt Busch 320 6. Brad Keselowski 317 7. Denny Hamlin 314 8. Ryan Blaney 313 9. Martin Truex Jr. 303 10. Kyle Larson 280 11. Aric Almirola 278 12. Alex Bowman 238 13. Erik Jones 234 14. Jimmie Johnson 230 15. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. 217 16. Ryan Newman 214 17. Austin Dillon 210 18. Chase Elliott 209 19. Paul Menard 206 20. William Byron 202

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** A12 Wednesday, May 2, 2018 | Washington County News

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, May 2, 2018 B1CELEBRATE Cathrine Lamb WCN/HCTThe Annual Washington-Holmes Relay For Life was held Friday, April 27 at Pals Park in Chipley. At press time the Washington-Holmes Relay For Life webpage was showed $46,094 as being raised. This total does not include cash and checks taken at the event.Celebrating lifeLuminary bags were placed during Fridays Relay for Life for those who have fought and lost their battles with cancer and those who are still “ ghting. [CATHRINE LAMB | WCN/HCT] Holmes County Sheriffs Of“ ce Deputy Frank Tuberville models a bra during the Bros and Bras Competition at Fridays Relay for Life event. [CATHRINE LAMB | WCN/HCT] Howard Hodge, President of Panhandle Engineering and Construction, Inc. a team member of Pavement Pounders, was crowned Model King during the Bros and Bras Competition at Fridays Relay for Life event. [CATHRINE LAMB | WCN/HCT] 2018-2019 Relay For Life Queens [CATHRINE LAMB | WCN/HCT] Survivors at Fridays Relay for Life event celebrate 20 or more years of being cancer-free. [CATHRINE LAMB | WCN/HCT] The owner of Farrah Janes accepts the award for Paint The Counties Purple. [CATHRINE LAMB | WCN/HCT] Washington-Holmes Relay For Life a Success

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** B2 Wednesday, May 2, 2018 | Washington County NewsBy Stan Choe and Ken SweetThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ U.S. stocks fell moderately on Monday, giving up an early gain, but still ended April higher. It was the first monthly increase for the market since January as com-pany earnings have come in better than many expected. Indexes jumped in the early going following news of several buyout deals and more strong earnings reports, but sagged after lunchtime, weighed down by losses for telecom stocks and other areas of the market.The Dow Jones indus-trial average lost 148.04 points, or 0.6 percent, to 24,163.15. The Standard & Poors 500 index fell 21.86 points, or 0.8 per-cent, to 2,648.05 and the Nasdaq composite lost 53.53 points, or 0.8 percent, to 7,066.27.Dow member McDonalds jumped 5.8 percent to $167.83 after it reported healthier profit and revenue than analysts expected for the first three months of the year. Sales at its restau-rants open more than a year were much stronger than Wall Street had forecastMcDonalds joined the wave of companies to report big earnings growth for the first quar-ter, which has been better than analysts expected. Just over half the compa-nies in the S&P 500 have reported their earnings for the first three months of the year, and theyre on pace to deliver over-all growth of 23 percent, according to FactSet. That would be the stron-gest showing since the summer of 2010.Its been phenomenal,Ž said Phil Orlando, chief equity market strategist at Federated Investors. Corporate earnings are doing better. Economic growth is doing better, and I think the market is begrudgingly allowing those numbers to work their way into share prices.Ž The S&P 500 has been whipping higher and lower in recent months, hurt by worries about higher interest rates and the possibility of a trade war. But the index is ending April up a modest 0.3 percent, compared to the 2.7 percent loss it had in March and 3.9 percent loss it had in February.Stocks dip, but markets stay high overallBy Alex VeigaThe Associated PressLOS ANGELES „ Get ready for a little bit more pain at the pump this summer.Crude oil prices are at the highest level in more than three years and expected to climb higher, pushing up gasoline prices along the way.The U.S. daily national average for regular gaso-line is now $2.81 per gallon. Thats up from about $2.39 per gallon a year ago, according to Oil Price Information Service. And across the U.S., 13 percent of gas stations are charging $3 per gallon or more, AAA said last week.This will be the most expensive driving season since 2014,Ž said Tom Kloza, global head of energy analysis for Oil Price Infor-mation Service.The price of U.S. crude oil has been on a mostly steady incline since last June and last week hit $68.64, the highest since December 2014. Benchmark U.S. crude closed Friday at $68.10. Oil prices near $70 shouldnt put the brakes on economic growth, however. While theyre boosting costs for some sectors of the economy, the energy sector and related industries have more money to spend on equipment and workers.But higher oil prices are certainly an inconvenience for drivers, especially those with lower incomes.The good news is, both at the global level and the U.S. level, this is occurring at a time when growth is fairly robust,Ž said Nariman Behravesh, chief economist at IHS Markit. But consumers as whole will be hurt, mostly because gasoline prices are going up.ŽKevin Lanke, a motion picture lighting technician in Redondo Beach, Califor-nia, says hes now paying about $3.39 per gallon to fill up the 25-gallon tank in his 2000 Land Cruiser SUV. Thats about 20 cents more per gallon than a couple of months ago.I would fill up my car and it would be $52 or $53,Ž said Lanke, 51. Now its in the mid $60s for the same amount of gas.ŽLanke keeps the recent increase in perspective, noting the three years ago he and his fellow Californians were paying over $4 per gallon. But hes already weighing his options, saying if gas goes to $4 a gallon hell buy a more fuel-efficient car to use as his main ride and drive the Land Cruiser only when he needs it.Several factors have helped drive oil prices higher. A wave of global economic growth has driven up demand for oil. At the same time, produc-tion cutbacks initiated by OPEC last year have helped whittle down oil supplies.In the U.S., oil supplies were running 1.1 million barrels lower at the start of this summers driving season, which runs from April through September, than a year ago, according to the U.S. Energy Infor-mation Administration.That has amplified the typical increase in gas prices seen this time of year. Pump prices normally rise as demand increases from families going on vacation and taking to the highways on road trips. Already, U.S. consumer demand for gasoline hit a record high for the month of April, according to the EIA.Pain at the pumpMARKET WATCHDow 24,163.15 148.04 Nasdaq 7,066.27 53.53 S&P 2,648.05 21.86 Russell 1,541.88 14.35 NYSE 12,515.37 78.65COMMODITIES REVIEWGold 1,316.20 4.10 Silver 16.312 .094 Platinum 904.40 12.00 Copper 3.0525 .0065 Oil 68.57 0.47By Stan Choe and Tali ArbelThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ To gain approval for their $26.5 billion merger agreement, T-Mobile and Sprint aim to convince antitrust regulators that there is plenty of competition for wireless service beyond Verizon and AT&T.The deal announced Sunday would combine the nations thirdand fourth-largest wire-less companies and bulk them up to a similar size to Verizon and AT&T, the industry giants.But the companies argued that the combina-tion would allow them to better compete not only with those two rivals but also with Comcast and others as the wireless, broadband and video industries converge.This isnt a case of going from 4 to 3 wireless companies „ there are now at least 7 or 8 big competitors in this converging market,Ž T-Mobile chief execu-tive John Legere said in a statement. He would be the CEO of the combined company.T-Mobile and Sprint have been considering a combination for years. But a 2014 attempt fell apart amid resistance from the Obama admin-istration. And in 2017 another potential deal fell through as well.The combined company, to be called T-Mobile, would have about 127 million customers. Consumers worry a less crowded telecom field could result in higher prices, while unions are concerned about potential job losses.In a conference call with Wall Street analysts, Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure acknowledged that getting regulatory approval is the elephant in the room.Ž One of the first things the companies did after sending out the deals news release was to call Ajit Pai, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission.The companies stressed that they plan to have more employees following the combina-tion, particularly in rural areas, than they do as stand-alone companies now.They also emphasized that the deal would help accelerate their develop-ment of faster 5G wireless networks and ensure that the U.S. doesnt cede leadership on the tech-nology to China.And they said the com-bination would allow them to better compete with a growing number of competitors in a changing market.Verizon and AT&T have been expanding their video-content businesses, while cable companies have been moving into wireless. That allows a single com-pany to combine home and wireless internet and use content to sup-port the communications businesses.Sprint, TMobile have to sell $26.5B deal to antitrust copsMARKET MOVERS€ McDonalds Corp.: Up $9.14 to $167.44. The fastfood giant reported higher earnings and revenue in the “ rst quarter than Wall Street analysts had expected. € Sprint Corp.: Down 89 cents to $5.61. The company is trying again to combine with T-Mobile US.BRIEFCASEWASHINGTONGovt argues that AT&T deal would hurt consumersThe U.S. government pleaded its case Monday for blocking AT&T from absorbing Time Warner, saying it would hurt con-sumers as a big antitrust trial crept toward its end and a decision by a federal judge.The $85 billion proposed merger is a big deal,Ž Craig Conrath, the lead Justice Department attor-ney, said on the last day of the trial in federal court. It would have a massive effect on the structure of the pay TV industry.ŽThe Trump Justice Department sued in November to block the deal, saying it would force consumers to pay hun-dreds of millions of dollars more to watch their favor-ite shows, whether on a TV screen, smartphone or tablet. Get ready for the most expensive driving season in years BUSINESS Gas stations display the price of gasoline Monday in Englewood, N.J. [SETH WENIG/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, May 2, 2018 B3 SCHOOLS & SOCIETYCROSSWORD Staff ReportVERNON „ Vernon Elementary held its annual 5th grade Tropicana Speech contest Monday, April 23.Jonathan Grantham won first place with his speech Teachers on Summer VacationŽ, second place was Aubrey Vaught with her speech Holmes Creek Canoe LiveryŽ, third place was Jace Brown with his speech Paw Paw,Ž and an honorable mention went to Autumn Rose for her speech How to Get to Hogwarts.ŽOther participants were: Tamia Potter, Cassidy Wyatt, Tyra Potter, Kaitlyn Moore, Kendal Price, Aili Kangas, Caitlyn Harvey, Ebony Redmon, Jessica Chambers, Madison Yarbor, Ericka Perkins, and Aaliyah Parsons.The judges were Washington County School Board members Susan Roberts, Dr. Lou Cleveland, Milton Brown, and the timekeeper was Debbie Bush.The 4-H/Tropicana Public Speaking Contest has been sponsored by PepsiCo.s Tropicana Products since 1969. More than 150,000 youth participate in the contest each year.VES Tropicana Speech winners announcedVernon Elementary held its annual 5th grade Tropicana Speech contest on April 23. Pictured are “ rst place Jonathan Grantham, second place Aubrey Vaught, third place Jace Brown and honorable mention went to Autumn Rose. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] Special to The NewsCHIPLEY „ Four Chipley High School Band students earned excellent and superior ratings during a recent state assessment held in Gainesville.Senior clarinet players Gabrielle Patteson and Heather Stephens both performed solos and earned excellent ratings. Senior Ashley Bunting performed solos on both the alto sax and clarinet and earned a superior and an excellent. Junior Caleb Beckley performed on the trombone and earned a superior on his solo.The students qualified for the Florida Bandmasters Association Solo and Ensemble Assessment by first earning a Superior at the district level in Febru-ary on an advanced work.The FBA State Assess-ments use a five-tier rating system that are designed to provide high-quality performance assessment and feedback from instru-mentalists who are leaders in their field, often applied teachers on a specific instrument. The students are given immediate feed-back and helpful tips by these professional musicians, as well as written feedback on the performance itself, so that the students may take the knowledge gained from their experience back to their home band programs.All four musicians are members of the Chipley High School Symphonic Band, a group that is also putting the final touches on their music as they prepare for their State Concert Band Assessment performance Wednesday, May 2. The band will perform at 3:30 p.m. on stage at the Panama City Marina Civic Center. The band is also working on a variety of musical offerings for their Spring Band Concert, scheduled Friday, May 11 at 6 p.m. in the CHS Auditorium.CHS earns excellent, superior at band assessment Ashley Bunting performs her also saxophone solo, ConcertoŽ by Glazounov, at State Solo Assessment. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] Chipola graduates nursing studentsMembers of Chipola Colleges Associate Degree Nursing Spring 2018 class are, Colleen Mears, Desiree Goddin, Jessica Hallmon, Ryann Moore, Mallory Myhill, Ronisha Miller, Ashley Dickens, Amanda Easter, Mackenzie Stream, Rebecca Cooley, Eli Whitehead, Magnum Coker, Cody Dunaway, JoLynn Windham, Brian Williams, Arina Heleski, Joslyn Connor, Autumn Corbin, Marrah Mclain, Courtney Duffell, Hunter Dobbs, Stuart Gamble, Christchan Chaney, Kody Bryan, Shana Johnson and Emily En“ nger. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] Special to The NewsTimes-AdvertiserCHIPOLA „ Some 447 students were eligible for graduation at Chipola Col-lege at the end of the spring semester. Graduation exer-cises are scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday, May 3, at the Dothan Civic Center. Counted as members of the class are all who completed their degrees or vocational certificates from December of 2017 to May of 2018 or who will complete work at Chipola during the Summer of 2018.The class includes the following students from Holmes and Washington County:Bachelor of Science Degrees were earned by Fallon Braxton, Austin Burk, Holly Corne, Michelle Dampier, Ryan Hodge, Connie Land, Kayla Purkey, Kelsey Stewart and Sierra Taylor of Bonifay, Michala French of Caryville, Carol Boswell, Mattea Harbour, Crystal Hood, Seth Pemberton, Tyler Pickens and Shane Sapp of Chipley, Lauren Dee of Ponce de Leon and Shelby Clark of Westville. Associate in Arts Degrees were earned by Sara Coates, Chandra Cooper, Jamie Dean, John Etheridge, Colt Gardner, Fred Gilley, Richard Jackson, Bethany Jones, Cheyenne Mayo, Tanner Smith, Toni Stewart and Jessica Vergara of Bonifay, Richard Adkison, Chase Boyer, Lexi Brasher, Trenton Brock, Antonio Camacho, Tea Creamer, Selena Davis, Kaylee Finch, Elizabeth Fleener, Alyssa Gainer, Cameron Goff, Tif“ ni Guster, Shawnee Hagan, Paxton Jensen, Amber Lampley, Jessica Massey, Jordan McKinnie, Lindsay Miller, Alexandra Mitchell, Ainsley Novonglosky, Whitley Pettis, Midrell Pittman, Justyce Potter, Austin Sapp and Gregory Shaub of Chipley, Katia Roche of Vernon, Amber Riley of Wausau and Mason Carnley, Hayden Cooey, Christian FrutosCreamer, Clay Jackson, Elisabeth Jackson, Jessica Thomas and Cassidy Trammell of Westville Associate in Science Degrees were earned by Brian Williams of Bonifay, Hunter Dobbs of Caryville, Rasheida Patrick, Spencer Potter, Jeffrey Register, Caleb Rogers, Chase Smothers and Brent Whittington of Chipley and Victoria Benton and Desiree Goddin of Westville. Workforce Development Certi“ cates were earned by Destiny Martinez of Bonifay, Ryan Aycock and Daniel Galvan of Chipley and Hossameldin Elsankary of Ponce de Leon College Credit Certi“ cate was earned by Caleb Rogers of Chipley.Chipola to graduate Class of 2018

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** B4 Wednesday, May 2, 2018 | Washington County News FAITHDont get personal. Insults are a wedge in the ever-widening divide among us. We are not one-dimensional beings. Have I been guilty of hurtful language in the past? Yes. But now I realize I can voice my opinions and stay polite. Recently, we stayed with folks who have polar opposite political beliefs from our own. It can be done. It doesnt require avoidance. Being polite is not a lack of conviction. Civility doesnt equate to weakness. A conversation becomes insightful if it is not peppered with words like ignorant,Ž ridiculous,Ž or crazy.Ž Even general words like Democrats, Republicans, liberals, and conservatives are spit out with ridicule. Watch the tone. No one has ever achieved understanding through shame, guilt or insults. Cant accept a position? Roger that. But acceptance of ones humanity is easier. When my husband and I stayed with friends who hail from the other end of the political spectrum, I was a teensy bit worried about how things might play out. Our friends are good people, just like we are. Yet, nowadays, it would be typical to point at each other and insist, You are sadly misinformed.Ž When the conversation turned to politics, JanŽ first bemoaned family division. We have relatives who no longer speak to each other. Its so sad.Ž Ive heard this from other circles. Friends who are now no longer friends. Parents and siblings who disown each other, each side insisting they cannot associate with anyone who thinks like that.Ž Its one-dimensional thinking. Lives now mimic Facebook feeds, where algorithms send only the version of news FB thinks a user wants to see. The difference is Facebook manipulates this for you. In comparison, we choose to delete real relationships because of differences of opinion. Why? Do we all have to march in one-thought-lockstep? While visiting, I was mindful of the foundation of our friendship: Shared memories and experiences, a mutual trust. This respect allowed us to voice very different opinions. Nothing was held back except for name-calling and insults, with sarcasm held in check. We never got personal. Each of us used language key to conflict management. Speak from the authentic place of I thinkŽ or I feel.Ž Do not use phrases like you think,Ž you are,Ž (or the ever-offensive, you peopleŽ), which can sound accusatory or presumptive. Keep it personal without getting personal with others. Our visit went well, exceptionally so. Were there tense moments? Sure. When discussing a point of history, our friend said, I dont believe that,Ž and I blurted out, Wait. You think the Pentagon Papers was a hoax?Ž He replied, Well, I guess I dont know too much about it.Ž I so respect that. It would have been a difficult admission had the insults been flying. Do you get angry and personal in your political conversations? Stop. Hold close family and friends of every stripe. Dont reduce your life to an algorithm.When discussing politics, dont get personal S u z e t t e M a r t i n e z S t a n d r i n g Suzette Martinez StandringIf you would like to include an event in this list, email information to: news@chipleypaper.com Winterville Assembly to host The ShepherdsBONIFAY „ Winterville Assembly of God will host The Shepherds at 7 p.m. Friday, May 4 at the church. The church is located at 1897 Highway 177 A in Bonifay. Caryville Baptist to host bluegrass singCARYVILLE „ Caryville Baptist Church will host their monthly bluegrass gospel sing at 6 p.m. Friday, May 4. There will be singing fellowship and food. For more informa-tion call Blondell Freeman at 850-548-5504. KOC to host “ sh fryBONIFAY „ The Knights of Columbus will host a fish fry from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, May 4 at Blessed Trubuty Parish Center Council 10513 Infant of Prague. Plates are all-you-can-eat for $10 for adults and $7 of kids. Carry out plated are $7 for adults and $3 for kids. Plates will consist of fried catfish, fried or baked white fish, sides, tea, coffee and desserts. For more information email Joe Lollino at joelol-lino@gmail.com. Mt. Zion to host The LeFevre Quartet in concertBONIFAY „ Mt. Zion Independent Baptist Church will host The LeFevre Quartet at 7 p.m. Saturday, May 5. This is a free concert. The church is located at 3205 Highway 2 in the Esto Community. For more information call 850-768-0843 or 850-373-8416. Northside Baptist to host spring festivalPONCE DE LEON „ Northside Baptist Church will host a spring festival from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sat-urday, May 5. This is a free event. There will be festival games, a bounce house, free lunch and more. In the case of rain there will be a family friendly movie shown inside the church at noon. For more information leave a message with name and number at 850-836-4466. First Presbyterian to host Randall Franks in concertCHIPLEY „ The First Presbyterian Church will host Randall Franks in concert at 7 p.m. Saturday, May 5. Randall is known for his role from the In The Heat of The Night televi-sion series. Tickets are $10 each. All proceeds will go to the church renovation and the special projects fund. The church is located at 658 FAITH EVENTSSee EVENTS, B5

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, May 2, 2018 B5 OBITUARIESKenneth Alvin Bowen, age 67 of Marianna, FL passed from this on Friday, April 20, 2018 at his home in Marianna. He was born on May 27, 1950 to the late Cecil Alvin and Rosa Lee (Reese) Bowen in Edna, TX. Kenneth lived most of his life in the Jackson County area and before retiring he worked in the oil fields in Louisiana. Along with his parents he is preceded in death by his brother, James Bowen, sisters, Martha Deloris Bowen, Donna Kay Barus, Bonnie Bell Bowen. Survivors include, sisters, Wanda Lea Tindell of Marianna, FL, Lavern Green, Connie Casper, Iris Jean Tenney, Wynona Marlean Guthery, brothers, Virgil Bowen, Larry Bowen, nephew, Robert Tindell III and wife Helen of Graceville, FL. Memorialization was by cremation with Brown Funeral Home of Chipley, FL in charge of arrangements. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh.net.KENNETH ALVIN BOWENLucile Hodge Davis, 98, of Alford, Florida, went home to be with the Lord on Wednesday morning, April 25, 2018 at Jackson Hospital. Mrs. Davis was born in Buckingham, Florida, on June 4, 1919, to J. Perry and Frances Hodge and grew up in Laurel Hill, Fl. In 1937, she married, Joseph Percy Davis in Crestview, Florida. The couple moved to Jackson County in 1939 and settled just north of Alford where they farmed and raised seven children. Miss Lucile,Ž as she was known at her church, was a very active member of Alford Baptist Church for 70 years and was the church pianist for all those years. When she was no longer able to live at home, she went to live at The Chipola Nursing Pavilion, but never gave up playing the instrument she loved, playing for Sunday worship services there as well. She always loved trying to be a blessing to her fellow residents. Mrs. Davis was preceded in death by her husband of 66 years, Joseph JoeŽ Davis; her son, James B. Davis; her daughters, Phoebe Davis and Ellen Williams. She is survived by her sons, Vick Davis (Mary) of Mobile, Al; Bill Davis (Colleen) of St. Petersburg, FL; Donald Davis (Kay) of Panama City Beach, Fl., and Frances Melvin (Kenneth) of Marianna. She is also survived by eleven grandchildren, 18 great grandchildren, and 2 great-great grandchildren. Funeral services for Mrs. Davis were held on Saturday, April 28, 2018 at 3:00 PM, with visitation immediately prior to the service at 2:00PM at Alford Baptist Church, Alford, Florida. Interment followed in the Alford City Cemetery with James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel directing. Expressions of sympathy may be made online at www.jamesandsikesfu neralhomes.com.LUCILE H. DAVISFlora Elaine Fuller, 96, of Bonifay,died Saturday, April 21, 2018. Funeral services were held on Wednesday, April 25, 2018. Interment followed at Fairview Memorial Gardens with Sims Funeral Home in charge of local arrangements.FLORA E. FULLERKathryn Rose Harcus, 98, of Bonifay,died Monday, April 23, 2018. Memorialization was by cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. A celebration of life will be held at a later date.KATHRYN R. HARCUSLeslie Carl Labbs, age 52, died, April 3, 2018. Memorial Services will be held May 5, 2018 at New Prospect Church in Chipley.LESLIE C. LABBSMr. David Edward Mock, Sr., age 78, of Westville, Florida passed away April 20, 2018 at Wiregrass Medical Center in Geneva, Alabama. He was born May 23, 1939 in Baxley, Georgia to the late Ed and Addie Hews Mock. In addition to his parents, Mr. Mock was preceded in death by his son, David Edward Ed Mock, Jr.; four brothers, Eulis Mock, Buster Mock, Malzie Mock and Curtis Mock; two sisters, Mary Lee Chavis and Willie Nora Kersey. Mr. Mock is survived by his wife, Leater Pearl Mock of Westivlle, FL; two daughters, Jewel Wilson of Darlington, FL and Shannon Burgess and husband Roger of Westville, FL; several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 3:00 PM Tuesday, April 24, 2018 at Caryville Evangelistic Center with Rev. Charles Barton and Rev. Wayne Brannon officiating. Interment followed in the Mt. Olive Assembly of God Church with Peel Funeral Home directing. The family received friends one hour prior to the service. Serving as pallbearers were William Meeks, Trevor Brugess, Roger Burgess, Dusty Barton, Doug Kersy and Charles Smith.DAVID EDWARD MOCK SR.George Wayne Momberger, 70, of Chipley, died Friday, April 20, 2018. A private service will be held on a later date. To extend condolences, please visit www.heritagefhllc.com.GEORGE W. MOMBERGERDECEMBER 04, 1944 „ APRIL 15, 2018Don David Sims, died on Sunday, April 15, 2018 in Mobile, Alabama after a long battle with dementia & diabetes. He was the only child of Mable Gilbert Sims and Clyde David Sims. He was raised on a farm in Chipley, FL. Upon graduation from Chipley High School in 1963 he went into the Navy where he studied aviation medicine and served as a hospital corpsman in Viet Nam. He worked for many years as a Safety Engineer until poor health forced him to retire in 2002. He was preceded in death by his parents, Clyde and Mable Sims, Chipley, FL, and his daughter Kassandra Leah KassieŽ Sims of Pensacola, FL He is survived by his wife, Debbie and their daughter, Samantha Gonzalez (Jesse) grandson, Julian Gonzalez and step-son, Brenton McClellan of Pensacola, FL. He is also survived by his daughters, Sonya Sanders, Chipley, FL and Donna Christine Sims, Joplin, MO, grandsons, James Aaron Sanders and Brandon Casey Sanders and great-grandchildren Hosteen Sanders and Gabriella Sanders of Chipley, FL. Don wanted it remembered that he loved his country and he loved his family, past and present. He loved growing tomatoes, listening to Elvis and feeding the squirrels, who waited impatiently at his door for peanuts. He was an excellent Southern cook who always had a pot of beans and cornbread on the stove and sitting down to have lunch and watch The Young and The Restless with his beloved dog, Legolas. Interment was held Monday, April 30th at Barrancas National Cemetery. A memorial service will be held May 11th in Chipley, FL.DON D. SIMSWilliam Gaston Smith, age 63, passed from this life Thursday, April 26, 2018 at Washington Rehab and Nursing Center. He was born in Panama City, FL on November 27, 1954 to Felix G. and Rethie (Criswell) Smith. William worked as a painter most of his life.He is preceded in death by his parents and one sister; Doris Golden.William is survived by his son; Billy Alan Smith, one brother; Willard Smith and wife Shirley, 3 daughters; Verlon Mower and husband Richard Allen, Mary Sue Weeks, and Totsy Westbury and husband David, one grandson; Emanuel Smith and numerous nieces and nephews.Memorialization was be by cremation. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh.net.WILLIAM G. SMITH Louis Arthur Tracy, age 74 of St. Augustine, FL Died April 24, 2018. He was born in 1943 at Niagara Falls, NY, one of 8 children, he was an Eagle Scout. In 1962, he was stationed at NAS Pensacola, FL. He served 17 years in the Warrington VFD, and was a member of Warrington UMC and was Scout Master for Troop 646 in Warrington. In 1980, moved to Washington County, FL, and continued in scouting and served as County Commissioner. In 2009, relocated to St. Augustine, FL, where he was a member of Shores UMC and the Ashlar Masonic Lodge, Number 98. He is survived by his wife Patricia, children: Keith, Amy, Eileen & Joshua and 3 grandchildren Kurtis, Melody & Kimberly. Craig Funeral Home Crematory Memorial Park is in charge of the arrangements.LOUIS A. TRACYAllene Walsingham, age 89 of Chipley, FL went home to be with the Lord on Friday morning, April 20, 2018. She was born on September 21, 1928 to the late John and Louie (Owens) Hicks in Washington County, FL. Allene was a lifelong resident of Chipley and she was a member of the First United Methodist Church of Chipley. She is preceded by her loving husband, Roland B. Walsingham Sr. Survivors include, one son, Roland B. Walsingham Jr. of Wausau, FL, one brother, George Irvin Hicks and wife Joan, one sister, Geraldine Ashenback and husband Gene, four grandchildren and six great grandchildren. Family receiveed friends for visitation on Tuesday, April 24, 2018 at Brown Funeral Home from 1:00-2:00 P.M. Funeral Service was held at 2:00 P.M. with Reverend Ernie Gray officiating. Interment followed at Wausau Memorial Gardens Cemetery with Brown Funeral Home of Chipley, FL directing. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh.net.ALLENE WALSINGHAM Fifth Street in Chipley. For more information or to purchase tickets call the church at 850-6381629 or Barbara Russell at 850-960-1347. New Bethany to hold Homecoming servicesVERNON „ New Bethany Assembly of God Church will hold Homecoming services at 11 a.m. Sunday, May 6. Special music will be by Four Calvary. Lunch will follow in the fellow-ship hall at 12:30 p.m. The church is located at Hinsons Crossroads. For more information call Brother Leon Jenkins at 850-779-3003. Fish fry fundraiser for Rock Hill CemeteryCHIPLEY „ A fish fry will be held at noon Saturday, May 12 at the Rock Hill Cemetery. Bring a covered dish to share with others. The cemetery is located at 339 Rock Hill Church Road just east of Chipley. Those who cannot attend the fish fry but would like to contribute to the cemetery upkeep call Whit Gainey at 850-638-0966. Pleasant Grove to host Homecoming weekendVERNON „ Pleasant Grove Church will host a Homecoming weekend. A gospel sing will be held at 6 p.m. Saturday, May 19. Prior to the sing a free spaghetti supper will be held at 4 p.m. Homecoming services will be held at 11 a.m. Sunday, May 20 with Brother Johnny Snodgrass. Lunch will follow in the fellow-ship hall. The church is located at 2430 Shakey Joe Road in Vernon. EVENTSFrom Page B4 See more online at chipleypaper.com

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** B6 Wednesday, May 2, 2018 | Washington County News NUTRITIONHEALTHY ON THE GOUse these steps from Vitamin Packs to stay healthy while traveling. € Pack healthy snacks. Apples and nut butter, pretzels and hummus and dried, no-sugaradded fruit are a few healthy options. € Condense the medications and dietary supplements youre packing. € Do not forget essential nutrients. € Hydrate. Hydrate. Hydrate. Water should be your No. 1 travel companion. SLEEP TIPSNIGHT SHIFT ROUTINEThe American Academy of Sleep Medicine o ers tips for those who work irregular hours to get a healthy amount of sleep: € Avoid ca eine and alcohol a few hours before bed. € Plan for major schedule changes by altering your sleep time a few days in advance. € Keep the same schedule on workdays and days o and create a wind downŽ routine before bed. € Keep your bedroom cool, turn o electronics and only do relaxing activities. WEIGHT LOSSTIPS FOR SUCCESSAccording to a recent post at nbcnews.com, most successful weight-loss approaches tell participants to do these three things: € Eat more vegetables. € Eat less sugar. € Eat more whole foods like fruits, beans and eggs. „ Brandpoint HEALTHTODAYS WORKOUTTone shoulders and chest with this move By Marlo Alleva More Content NowTheres something refreshing about a springtime breeze and the warmth of the sun on your skin. A little vitamin D has many health benefits, and best of all its free. With all the sun-filled days, tank tops, spaghetti straps and sundresses are No. 1 on our wardrobe list. So upper-body workouts become a bit higher on the to-do list as well. Our move is a single arm pec deck, and you will need a set of light hand weights. It will work your chest, shoulders and upper back. You can perform this move by standing or sitting. Begin by grasping your weights in each hand, lifting your arms up and out from your body at shoulder level, and bend in the elbows. Roll your shoulders back and down to engage the proper muscles, hold your chest tall, and angle your palms forward. Now you are ready to move. Taking one arm at a time, guide your elbow in towards your chest. Keeping the weight up, and creating a squeeze in the chest. Once you reach your fullest contraction, return to the start position. Then repeat on the other arm. Continue this in and out alternating movement for at least eight to 10 times on each arm. Take a small break, rolling your shoulders and releasing your neck, then repeat for three to five sets. This move should be performed slowly and precisely to avoid any strain on your neck shoulders. If the weight becomes too much, continue without the weights. You can add this exercise to any upper-body workout, as a finisher or on its own as a little pick-me-up before you head out for your daily dose of vitamin D. Marlo Alleva, an instructor at Golds Gym and group fitness coordinator at Fontaine-Gills YMCA in Lakeland, Florida, can be reached at faluvzpa@msn.com.Marlo Alleva demonstrates a single arm pec deck. [SCOTT WHEELER/THE LEDGER] By Judith Graham Kaiser Health NewsTwo years ago, Dr. Daniel Coles 85-year-old father had heart bypass surgery. He hasnt been quite the same since. He forgets things and will ask you the same thing several times,Ž said Cole, a professor of clinical anesthesiology at UCLA and a past president of the American Society of Anesthesiologists. He never got back to his cognitive baseline,Ž Cole continued, noting that his father was sharp as a tack before the operation. Hes more like 80 percent.Ž His father likely has postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) „ a little-known condition that affects a substantial number of older adults after surgery, Cole said. Some patients with POCD experience memory problems; others have difficulty multitasking, learning new things, following multistep procedures or setting priorities. There is no single presentation for POCD. Different patients are affected in different ways,Ž said Dr. Miles Berger, a POCD specialist and assistant professor of anesthesiology at Duke University School of Medicine. Unlike delirium „ an acute, sudden-onset disorder that affects consciousness and attention „ POCD can involve subtle, difficult-to-recognize symptoms that develop days to weeks after surgery. Most of the time, POCD is transient and patients get better in several months. But sometimes „ how often hasnt been determined „ this condition lasts up to a year or longer. Dr. Roderic Eckenhoff, vice chair for research and a professor of anesthesiology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, told of an email he received recently from a 69-year-old man who had read about his research. This guy „ a very articulate man „ said he was the intellectual equal of his wife before a surgery 10 years ago, a significant operation involving general anesthesia. Since then, hes had difficulty with cognitively demanding tasks at work, such as detailed questionand-answer sessions with his colleagues,Ž Eckenhoff said. He noticed these changes immediately after the surgery and claims he did not get better.Ž There are many unanswered questions about POCD. How should it best be measured? Is it truly a stand-alone condition or part of a continuum of brain disorders after surgery? Can it be prevented or treated? Can it be distinguished in the long term from the deterioration in cognitive function that can accompany illness and advanced aging? Some clarity should come in June, when a major paper outlining standard definitions for POCD is set to publish simultaneously in six scientific journals and scientists will discuss the latest developments at a two-day POCD summit, according to Eckenhoff. Heres what scientists currently know about POCD:Background. POCD first began to be studied systematically about 20 years ago. But reports of patients who appeared cognitively compromised after surgery date back about 100 years, Eckenhoff said. An influential 1955 report in The Lancet noted common complaints by family or friends after someone dear to them had surgery: Hes become so forgetful. ƒ Shes lost all interest in the family. ƒ He cant concentrate on anything. ƒ Hes just not the same person since.ŽHow to recognize the condition. There is no short, simple test for POCD. Typically, a series of neuropsychological tests are administered before and after surgery „ a timeconsuming process. Often, tests are given one week and again three months after surgery. But the tests used and time frames differ in various studies. Studies also define POCD differently, using varying criteria to assess the kind and extent of cognitive impairment that patients experience.How common is it? The first international study of older adults with POCD (those age 60 and older) in 1999 suggested that 25.8 percent of patients had this condition one week after a major non-cardiac surgery, such as a hip replacement, while 9.9 percent had it three months after surgery. Two years later, a study by researchers at Duke University Medical Center, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that 53 percent of adults who had heart bypass surgery showed significant evidence of cognitive decline when they were discharged from the hospital; 36 percent were affected at six weeks; 24 percent, at six months; and 42 percent, five years after their operations. Other studies have produced different estimates. A current research project examining adults 55 and older who have major non-cardiac surgeries is finding that upwards of 30 percent of patients are testing significantly worse than their baseline 3 months later,Ž according to its lead researcher, Dr. Stacie Deinerof the Icahn School of Medicine. POCD facts€ Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a littleknown condition that affects a substantial number of older adults after surgery. € Adults age 60 and older are twice as likely to develop POCD as are younger adults „ a development that increases the risk of dying or having a poor quality of life after surgery. What we know and dont knowsurgeryFREEPIKMemory loss after

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Washington County News | Wednesday, May 2, 2018 B B 7 7 NF-5036304 NF-5031562 Hazardous Aerial Tree Removal  Stump Grinding Trimming & Pruning  Emergency Tree Service  Lot Clean UpDow Morris,Owner/Operator 850-527-6291  850-849-3825 Readers’ Choice2017WASHINGTON HOLMES JACKSON (850) 638-3611 HastyHeating & Cooling NF-5028471 ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE OR BUSINESS FOR AS LITTLE AS $10 A WEEK!Reach thousands of potential customers with your Business Guide ad in the:WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS HOLMES COUNTY-TIMES ADVERTISER WEEKLY ADVERTISER CALL TODAY! 850-638-0212 NF-5036305 NF-5031560 C & CBookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available SANDWICHES SALADS SOUPSandwich Platters Available Call to order!Check our Daily special!Open Mon day Saturday 10-8 Sunday 11-3 1370-A N. Railroad Ave. | Chipley, FL850-676-4163 SlicedDeliChipley NF-5032762 5-3507 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that LORA C. BELL, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Washington County, Florida, will on June 27, 2018, at 11:00 a.m. CST, at the front of the Washington County Courthouse located at 1293 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and personal property situated in Washington County, Florida: 27 3 13 40 OR 234 P 891 NE of NW , ORB 252 P 297, 298, OR 314 P 179, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA More particularly described as follows: THE NE OF NW OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER with existing or subsequently erected or affixed building, improvements and fixtures, all easements, rights of way, and appurtenances, all water, water rights, watercourses and ditch rights (including tock in utilities with ditch or irrigation rights), and all other rights, royalties and profits relating to the real property, including without limitation all minerals, oil, gas, geothermal and similar matters. pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure as to Count I of Plaintiff’s Verified Amended Complaint in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is REGIONS BANK, Plaintiff, vs. RANDY MORRIS; RANDY MORRIS INC.; and CHARLYCE MORRIS, Defendants, and the docket number of which is 17-82CA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 19 day of April 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF COURT WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Tamara Dinjuan Deputy Clerk Counsel for Plaintiff: MEGAN F. FRY Florida Bar No. 0058608 CLARK PARTINGTON P. O. Box 13010 Pensacola, FL 32591-3010 Tel:850-434-9200 Fax:850-432-7340 Primary: mfry@clarkpartington.com Secondary: ldunlap@clarkpartington.com tcourtney@clarkpartington.com April 25, May 2, 2018 5-3476 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given LARRY HIGHTOWER the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 11-00813 Year of Issuance 2011 Parcel 00-3136-0020 assessed to: KENNETH R & PAMELA E ADAMS Description of Property 30 1 14 2.3 OR 379 P 414 PARCEL DESC IN ORB 379 P 414 PARCELNO. 00000000-00-3136-0020. All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on May 16,2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk APRIL 18, 25, MAY 2,9, 2018 5-3515 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No: 18-49-CA HOB PROPERTIES, LLC, A Florida limited liability company, Plaintiff, v. MASAKO NAKAMA, AND ALL OTHERS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH AND UNDER MASAKO NAKAMA, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:MASAKO NAKAMA, AND ALL OTHERS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH AND UNDER MASAKO NAKAMA excepting only Plaintiff; and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under the above named or described defendants or parties or claiming to have any right, title, or interest in the property hereafter described and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described defendants or parties or claiming to have any right, title, or interest in the property hereafter described, YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to quiet title to following property in Washington County, Florida: Lot 38, Block 180, Sunny Hills Unit 4, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 42 through 48, inclusive, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to J. Christopher Barr, Esq., Plaintiff’s Attorney, whose address is 833 Harrison Avenue, Panama City, Florida 32401, and whose electronic mail address is cbarr@bryanthigby.com and aschull@bryanthigby.com on or before May 30, 2018 and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATED this 26 day of APRIL, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK, CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Tamara Donjuan May 2, 9, 2018 5-3517 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NUMBER: 2018-CA-08 FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF FLORIDA, a/k/a BANK OF BONIFAY, a division of FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF FLORIDA, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM L. BYRAM, AMANDA BYRAM, WALDA L. BYRAM, Deceased, ONEMAIN FINANCIAL OF AMERICA, INC., and the unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees and judgment creditors of WALDA L. BYRAM, deceased, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against defendant, WALDA L. BYRAM, deceased; and all unknown natural persons, if alive, and if dead or not known to be dead or alive, their several and respective unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees and judgment creditors, or other parties claiming by, through, under or against those unknown natural persons; and the several and respective unknown assigns, successors in interest, trustees, or any other person claiming by, through, under or against any corporation or other legal entity named as a defendant; and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described defendants or parties claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in this complaint, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: WALDA L. BYRAM and the unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees and judgment creditors of WALDA L. BYRAM, deceased, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against defendant, WALDA L. BYRAM, deceased; and all unknown natural persons, if alive, and if dead or not known to be dead or alive, their several and respective unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees and judgment creditors, or other parties claiming by, through, under or against those unknown natural persons; and the several and respective unknown assigns, successors in interest, trustees, or any other person claiming by, through, under or against any corporation or other legal entity named as a defendant; and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described defendants or parties claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in this complaint, And all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described herein. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Complaint to Foreclose Mortgage has been filed against you by FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF FLORIDA and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on A. Clay Milton, Esq., the Plaintiff’s Attorney, whose address is 4450 Lafayette Street (32446), P. O. Box 1508, Marianna, Florida 32447, and whose email address is cmilton@fmc.legal, on or before 30 days from the date of first publication of this notice, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, Jackson County Courthouse, Marianna, Florida, either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATED this 27 th day of April, 2018. LORA C. BELL, CLERK Washington County, Florida BY: /s/ Tamara Donjuan ` As Deputy Clerk May 2, 9, 16 and 23, 2018 5-3508 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2014-CA-000147 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. TRACEY Y. EDWARDS; STONEY IRIS LONG; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE (Please publish in THE WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 19, 2018, and entered in Case No. 2014-CA-000147, of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for WASHINGTON County, Florida, wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and TRACEY Y. EDWARDS; STONEY IRIS LONG; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; are defendants. LORA C. BELL, the Clerk of the Circuit Court, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE, at 1331 South Blvd., Chipley in WASHINGTON County, FLORIDA 32428, at 11:00 A.M., on the 30 day of May, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT NUMBER 18 AND THE W 1/2 OF LOT 19, AS SHOWN ON PLAT OF RE-SUBDIVISION OF THE L. W. CROW ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF CHIPLEY, FLORIDA, ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING IN BLOCK 32, AS SHOWN ON THE L. W. MORDT PLAT OF CHIPLEY, FLORIDA AND BEING IN THE SE 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 19 day of April, 2018. LORA C. BELL As Clerk of said Court By Tamara Donjuan As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the American Disabilities Act, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486 Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahaneandassociates.com April 25, May 2, 2018 5-3518 Tri-County Community Council, Inc., Board of Directors will meet on Thursday, MAY 10, 2018 at 5:00 P.M., with Finance Committee meeting at 4:15 p.m. & Head Start Committee at 4:30 p.m. at McLains Restaurant located on 331 South in DeFuniak Springs. May 2, 2018

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B B 8 8 Wednesday, May 2, 2018 | Washington County News Help WantedTree Service in Enterprise, ALSeeking an Experienced T ree Climber Applicant must have at least 6 months of experience as a Tree Climber, a valid driver’s license and dependable transportation to and from the shop. Please do not apply unless you meet this criteria. Tree Climber is the only position that we have available at this time. Starting wage is $20.00 per hour or more based on level of experience. Full Time Position. To apply, call or text Chuck Bomhard at (334) 379 2549 or call the office at (334) 347 6119. River Valley Rehabilitation Centerof Blountstown, Florida is now hiring for the following positions: CNA’s -$2000 Sign-On Bonus for Qualified CNA Applicants RN -Weekend Supervisor RN’s & LPN’s -PRN Positions Rehab Program Manager -( Must be Licensed OT, ST, or PT ) Physical, Speech & Occupational Therapist Positions We offer competitive wages & benefits, including Health, Vision and Dental To apply visit: www .rivervalleyrehab.com Equal Opportunity Employer, M/F/V-/D The Holmes County Board of County Commissionersis currently accepting applications for the full time/temporary position of Grader Operator, Road Maintenance Tech, and Heavy Equipment Operator For application contact Hannah Benton in the Holmes County Commissioner’s Office at 850-547-1119 Please turn in completed applications to the County Commissioner’s Office located at 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, no later than 2:00 pm on May 8, 2018. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer. For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. Reliable Child Care Contact Mrs. Wanda (850) 638-8983 Annual Spring Farm and Construction AuctionMay 19, 2018 at 8:00 AM, Highway 231 North, Campbellton, FL 32426. Local Farm Dispersals, Estates, Bank Repos, Sheriff Departments, City and County, Plus Consignments.Mason Auction & Sales LLCFL # 642 850-263-0473 OFFICE 850-258-7652 CHAD MASON 850-849-0792 GERALD MASON masonauction.comWebsite 1092 Orange Hill Road Chipley. Saturday, May 5, 7AM to noon. Mens clothing, + camo (L+XL), dishes, knicknacks and more. Free coffee while it lasts. Garage Sale Rain or Shine. 7AM until. Friday and Saturday, May 4 and 5. Household furniture, tools, clothes, jewelry, Kitchen Wares and LOTS more. Hellfighters Clubhouse 884 Usery Road in Chipley. For more information visit the Chipley Hellfighters Facebook Page. Garage Sale. Fri & Sat May 4&5, 8-until. 3189 Pioneer Rd, Hwy 278, between Vernon & Wausau. 850-527-7024. LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE Friday and Saturday, May 4-5, 2018. 8:00AM to 5:00PM. Located on Maple Avenue, Geneva, Alabama, near courthouse. Multi-Family Yard Sale May 5th, 7am-until, 1367 Hwy 177, North of Bonifay, then just South of Millers Crossroads. Live & Online Bankruptcy AuctionTuesday, May 8th at 12:00 PM National Shutter & Aluminum, Inc. 700 Commerce Way W, Jupiter, FL 33458 Sale will consist of: manufacturing equipment, hurricane protection parts and products, inventory, forklifts, storage containers, vehicles, office furniture, office equipment, warehouse items and related equipment. Catalog and photos available at www .moeckerauctions.c om Bankruptcy Case No. 18-12495-EPK Preview: 1 hour prior to sale. 10%-13% BP. To register: $100 refundable cash deposit and valid driver’s license. (800) 840-BIDS | info@moeckerauctions.c om AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin For Rent 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments in Vernon. Clean, stove, refrigerator, central heat/air, convenient to Panama City Beach, section 8, Rental assistance. 850-638-4640 For Rent One Bedroom apartments for rent in Chipley. Convenient location. Stove and refrigerator furnished. No Pets. Smoke free environment. Call 850-638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For Rent. 3BR/1BA Duplex Apt. near Chipley. Water & garbage & lawn care included. $600.00/month. Application and credit check required. For Info Call 850-638-7128. House for rent near Bonifay. $500/MO and $250/DEP. 850-526-6679. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/ sewage/ lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 Mobile Home for rent. 2BR/2BA, water/sewer and lawn service furnished. 3 miles east of Vernon on Pioneer Rd. No pets, don’t ask. 850-849-6842, 850-326-0528, or 850-638-9933. Real Estate Lake Property Liquidation Foreclosure Resale $39,900 Before Foreclosure sold for $137,900 Financing Available. Being sold off May 5th! Watch Video: www .LakeLotsClose out.com 877.712.3650 Florida Waterfront Marketing, LLC. Licensed Real Estate Broker. For Sale Two acre plot and one acre plot in Jacob City, FL. Call 850-849-9338. Highway 77 2 miles south of Chipley 4-8 acre tract Bedie Road. Call Milton Peel at 850-638-1858 or 326-9109 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds!

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The Weekly Advertiser | Wednesday, May 2, 2018 1 NF-5036304 NF-5031562 Hazardous Aerial Tree Removal  Stump Grinding Trimming & Pruning  Emergency Tree Service  Lot Clean UpDow Morris,Owner/Operator 850-527-6291  850-849-3825 Readers’ Choice2017WASHINGTON HOLMES JACKSON (850) 638-3611 HastyHeating & Cooling NF-5028471 ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE OR BUSINESS FOR AS LITTLE AS $10 A WEEK!Reach thousands of potential customers with your Business Guide ad in the:WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS HOLMES COUNTY-TIMES ADVERTISER WEEKLY ADVERTISER CALL TODAY! 850-638-0212 NF-5036305 NF-5031560 C & CBookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available SANDWICHES SALADS SOUPSandwich Platters Available Call to order!Check our Daily special!Open Mon day Saturday 10-8 Sunday 11-3 1370-A N. Railroad Ave. | Chipley, FL850-676-4163 SlicedDeliChipley NF-5032762 Volume 89 Number 18 WEDNESDAY, MAY 2, 2018NF-5036264 NF-1180398 The Florida Department of Health in Bay, Washington, and Holmes Counties presents:When it comes to diabetes self-management education is the key! Studies show that people who are educated in lifestyle change may better manage blood glucose levels and reduce the risk of complications. Let us help you take charge of your health; call us to schedule diabetes self-management education.The Diabetes Services Program For more information or to enroll call: DOH-Bay 850-252-9656 DOH-Holmes 850-547-8500 Ext. 267 DOH-Washington 850-638-6240 Ext. 150 Help WantedTree Service in Enterprise, ALSeeking an Experienced T ree Climber Applicant must have at least 6 months of experience as a Tree Climber, a valid driver’s license and dependable transportation to and from the shop. Please do not apply unless you meet this criteria. Tree Climber is the only position that we have available at this time. Starting wage is $20.00 per hour or more based on level of experience. Full Time Position. To apply, call or text Chuck Bomhard at (334) 379 2549 or call the office at (334) 347 6119. River Valley Rehabilitation Centerof Blountstown, Florida is now hiring for the following positions: CNA’s -$2000 Sign-On Bonus for Qualified CNA Applicants RN -Weekend Supervisor RN’s & LPN’s -PRN Positions Rehab Program Manager -( Must be Licensed OT, ST, or PT ) Physical, Speech & Occupational Therapist Positions We offer competitive wages & benefits, including Health, Vision and Dental To apply visit: www .rivervalleyrehab.com Equal Opportunity Employer, M/F/V-/D The Holmes County Board of County Commissionersis currently accepting applications for the full time/temporary position of Grader Operator, Road Maintenance Tech, and Heavy Equipment Operator For application contact Hannah Benton in the Holmes County Commissioner’s Office at 850-547-1119 Please turn in completed applications to the County Commissioner’s Office located at 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, no later than 2:00 pm on May 8, 2018. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer. Reliable Child Care Contact Mrs. Wanda (850) 638-8983 Annual Spring Farm and Construction AuctionMay 19, 2018 at 8:00 AM, Highway 231 North, Campbellton, FL 32426. Local Farm Dispersals, Estates, Bank Repos, Sheriff Departments, City and County, Plus Consignments.Mason Auction & Sales LLCFL # 642 850-263-0473 OFFICE 850-258-7652 CHAD MASON 850-849-0792 GERALD MASON masonauction.comWebsite 1092 Orange Hill Road Chipley. Saturday, May 5, 7AM to noon. Mens clothing, + camo (L+XL), dishes, knicknacks and more. Free coffee while it lasts. Garage Sale Rain or Shine. 7AM until. Friday and Saturday, May 4 and 5. Household furniture, tools, clothes, jewelry, Kitchen Wares and LOTS more. Hellfighters Clubhouse 884 Usery Road in Chipley. For more information visit the Chipley Hellfighters Facebook Page. Garage Sale. Fri & Sat May 4&5, 8-until. 3189 Pioneer Rd, Hwy 278, between Vernon & Wausau. 850-527-7024. LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE Friday and Saturday, May 4-5, 2018. 8:00AM to 5:00PM. Located on Maple Avenue, Geneva, Alabama, near courthouse. Multi-Family Yard Sale May 5th, 7am-until, 1367 Hwy 177, North of Bonifay, then just South of Millers Crossroads. Live & Online Bankruptcy AuctionTuesday, May 8th at 12:00 PM National Shutter & Aluminum, Inc. 700 Commerce Way W, Jupiter, FL 33458 Sale will consist of: manufacturing equipment, hurricane protection parts and products, inventory, forklifts, storage containers, vehicles, office furniture, office equipment, warehouse items and related equipment. Catalog and photos available at www .moeckerauctions.c om Bankruptcy Case No. 18-12495-EPK Preview: 1 hour prior to sale. 10%-13% BP. To register: $100 refundable cash deposit and valid driver’s license. (800) 840-BIDS | info@moeckerauctions.c om AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin For Rent 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments in Vernon. Clean, stove, refrigerator, central heat/air, convenient to Panama City Beach, section 8, Rental assistance. 850-638-4640 For Rent One Bedroom apartments for rent in Chipley. Convenient location. Stove and refrigerator furnished. No Pets. Smoke free environment. Call 850-638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For Rent. 3BR/1BA Duplex Apt. near Chipley. Water & garbage & lawn care included. $600.00/month. Application and credit check required. For Info Call 850-638-7128. House for rent near Bonifay. $500/MO and $250/DEP. 850-526-6679. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/ sewage/ lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 Mobile Home for rent. 2BR/2BA, water/sewer and lawn service furnished. 3 miles east of Vernon on Pioneer Rd. No pets, don’t ask. 850-849-6842, 850-326-0528, or 850-638-9933. Real Estate Lake Property Liquidation Foreclosure Resale $39,900 Before Foreclosure sold for $137,900 Financing Available. Being sold off May 5th! Watch Video: www .LakeLotsClose out.com 877.712.3650 Florida Waterfront Marketing, LLC. Licensed Real Estate Broker. For Sale Two acre plot and one acre plot in Jacob City, FL. Call 850-849-9338. Highway 77 2 miles south of Chipley 4-8 acre tract Bedie Road. Call Milton Peel at 850-638-1858 or 326-9109 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely.

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2 Wednesday, May 2, 2018 | The Weekly Advertiser