Citation
Washington County news

Material Information

Title:
Washington County news
Uniform Title:
Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Place of Publication:
Chipley FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Nicole Barfield - Publisher
Creation Date:
January 5, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiweekly[<1994>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1931>]
semiweekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
Coordinates:
30.780922 x -85.539289

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began May 23, 1924.
General Note:
L.E. Sellers, editor.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Washington County News. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000384704 ( ALEPH )
07260886 ( OCLC )
ACC5987 ( NOTIS )
sn 81000810 ( LCCN )
0279-795X ( ISSN )

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** SEE HOME & FARM TAB INSIDE! Volume 94 Number 86 Phone: 850-638-0212 Fax: 850-638-4601 Opinion ....................A4 Local & State ..............A5 Sports.......................A9 Faith .........................B4 Obituaries ..................B5 Classifieds .................B8 @WCN_HCT facebook.com/WashingtonCountyNews.HolmesCountyTimes50 ¢ chipleypaper.com Washington County A6Watermelon Fest Pageant is accepting applicationsA10NASCAR: 3 things we learned this week Wednesday, April 11, 2018 By Lloyd Dunkelberger and Christine Sexton News Service FloridaORLANDO „ Beginning what is likely to be a costly, negative campaign, Gov. Rick Scott on Monday opened his challenge to U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson by slamming career politiciansŽ and calling Wash-ington, D.C., a disaster.ŽClad in a blue, long-sleeved shirt and wearing his signa-ture Navy baseball cap, Scott made his long-anticipated announcement at an Orlando construction company.Scott, a two-term Republican governor, never mentioned Nelson, a threeterm Democratic senator, by name. But he repeatedly criti-cized career politiciansŽ and said he would push for term limits for members of the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate.We have to all acknowledge that Washington is a disaster. Its dysfunctional. There is a lot of old, tired thinking up there,Ž Scott said. Scott announces run for Senate, challenging Bill Nelson [NEWS SERVICE FLORIDA] Staff ReportCHIPLEY … A houseguest at a local residence has been charged for sexual abuse on a child.Investigators at Washington County Sheriffs Office arrested 57-year-old Allen Keith Smith, of Chipley, who had been a houseguest at a local residence, a WCSO news release stated. WCSO received reports Saturday alleging sexual abuse on the child. It was not immediately clear the age of the child. However, the release stated Smith had entered the childs bedroom where he began touching the victim.ŽSmith was arrested on charges of lewd and lascivious conduct by a person 18 years of age or older and cruelty towards a child (child abuse) by an act that could result in physical or mental injury.He was taken into custody and booked into the Wash-ington County Jail where he is being held on a $75,000 bond.Houseguest arrested, reports of sexual abuse on childSmith By Diane M. RobinsonThe News | @HCTA_Diane Drobinson@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY … Florida Department of Education recently named 12 Washing-ton County School District teachers as High Impact Teachers.Those teachers were recognized by the Washington County School Board when they met in regular session April 9.High Impact teachers are determined by FDOE for averages based on date from all the statewide tests they require.Those teachers are as follows: From Vernon High School, Sally Brock, Vernon Middle School, Tami Parish, WCSB recognizes High Impact TeachersBy Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY „ Organizers canceled the second day of the annual Heritage Festival on Saturday due to inclem-ent weather. But that didnt stop the festival from kicking-off in full steam on the first day of the event held Friday at Falling Waters State Park.The Third Annual Wash-ington County Heritage Festival bustled Friday morning and afternoon with the sounds of heritage. From antique tractors to 4-H show animals, attendees were able to glimpse into the past and relish in its simplicity.The event, hosted by Florida Farm Bureau and Farm Bureau Insurance, has steadily drawn more attend-ees. About 4,500 people attended the event last year „ up by more than 1,500 people the previous year.And „ had it not rained it out Saturday „ it was likely to attract even more.See a photo gallery online at chipleypaper.com.Heritage Fest has Friday success, rained out SaturdayRD Easterling shows a young visitor how Native Americans would have used a bow and arrow to hunt. [PHOTOS BY CATHRINE LAMB/THE NEWS] SEE MORE PICS ON A2See SCOTT, A2 See WCSB, A2

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** A2 Wednesday, April 11, 2018 | Washington County NewsGirl Scout leaders of the only troop in Washington County. Milton Peel shared his animals with local children.[PHOTOS BY CATHRINE LAMB/THE NEWS] This concept of career politicians has got to stop. We have to have term limits on Congress.ŽNelson, 75, who is the only Florida Democrat holding statewide office, said he is ready to face Scott, 65.Ive always run every race like theres no tomor-row --regardless of my opponent,Ž Nelson said in a statement. While its clear that Rick Scott will say or do anything to get elected, Ive always believed that if you just do the right thing, the politics will take care of itself.ŽScott, a wealthy businessman from Naples who never held a political office before he was elected governor in 2010, struck an outsiderŽ theme Monday that was similar to his first guber-natorial campaign, when he ran against the Talla-hassee insiders.Ž Scotts Senate announcement came on the eighth anni-versary of starting his initial bid for governor.Scott said his agenda as governor, which focused on job creation, lower taxes and fewer regulations, met resistance from the Tallahassee establishment.They (said) governor you just dont fit into Tallahassee. You know, I think thats true,Ž Scott said. I never intended to fit into Tallahassee. And guess what? Im not going to fit into Washing-ton either.ŽScott also recounted Floridas recovery from the recession under his leadership, pointing to job creation, tax cuts, a reduction in state debt and a record numbers in tourism.Now weve got to take that same mission to D.C.,Ž Scott said.Scott also talked about his early life in a family that struggled for moneyŽ and lived in public housing. He credited his late mother and the opportunities provided by living in the United States for his rise as a lawyer who founded the Columbia/HCA health conglomerate.It seems to be fashion-able now to attack and badmouth this country. Im sick of it,Ž Scott said. There is no place like America. And we need to thank God every day for this country and our opportunity to be here.ŽScott made no mention of President Donald Trump, although Scott has been a consistent sup-porter of the president. He also did not mention the Republican major-ity that controls the U.S. House and Senate.Scott, however, made several references to his lets get to workŽ slogan, which he has used since his first bid for governor in 2010.We must change Washington. We will change Washington. Together lets get Wash-ington to work,Ž he said.When he ran in 2010, Scott initially was known for his public awkwardness, stumbling through speeches and insisting on a buffer between himself and crowds.There was no evidence of that Scott on Monday, though. Scott confi-dently delivered a speech, warmly smiling at sup-porters who cheered him on, including state Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis, at least a dozen state lawmakers, Associated Industries of Florida President and Chief Exec-utive Officer Tom Feeney and prominent insurance lobbyist Fred Karlinsky.When the speech was finished, Scotts wife, Ann, placed her hands on his waist, guiding him through the crowd, help-ing negotiate an exit and avoiding reporters.Scott was introduced at the event at ODC Con-struction company by the lieutenant governor of Puerto Rico, Luis Rivera-Marin, who said the island would be forever grate-fulŽ for Scotts help in recovering from a series of damaging hurricanes.Scott also made a few concluding remarks in Spanish.The negative tone of the campaign is already well underway, with Republicans launching a nomorenelson. org website, which calls the incumbent a career politician,Ž and the Democrats having a selfservingscott.com website, which criticizes the governors economic record.Scott won his two gubernatorial campaigns in expensive, highly negative races where he edged out Democratic opponents. In 2010, he beat Chief Financial Officer Alex Sink, capturing 48.9 percent of the vote to her 47.7 percent.In 2014, Scott beat former Gov. Charlie Crist by a margin of 48.1 per-cent to 47.1 percent.However, heading into the Senate race, Scotts popularity numbers are his best since he emerged on the Florida political scene.In a February poll from Quinnipiac University, Scott had a 49-40 per-cent approval rating from voters, the highest since Quinnipiac began track-ing him in 2011. Nelson had a 48-34 percent approval rating in the same poll.In recent years, Florida governors have had mixed success in making U.S. Senate bids. Crist, a former Repub-lican governor who is now a Democratic member of Congress, lost a 2010 Senate race while running as an independent. Gov. Bob Graham, a two-term Democratic incumbent, beat U.S. Sen. Paula Hawkins, a Republican, in the 1986 Senate race.Four Scott opponents stood outside Mondays event, with motorists occasionally tooting horns or giving thumbs up as they drove past.Our street poll is great,Ž said 40-year-old Wes Hodge of Winter Park.A two-time cancer survivor whose Hodgkin lymphoma has been in remission for five years, Hodge held a sign that read healthcare is not a luxury.ŽIf not for the Afford-able Care Act I would not have access to qual-ity health care,Ž he said, adding, we are not unaware that health care is hanging.Ž SCOTTFrom Page A1 Washington County School Districts High Impact Teachers pictured, from left: Tami Parish, Agnes Harmon, Heidi Kirkland, Taura Brock, Lajuana Malloy, Melissa Whitson, Ashley Kilpatrick, Carmen Riviere,Tiffany Steverson and Superintendent Joe Taylor. [DIANE M. ROBINSON/THE NEWS] Vernon Elementary School, Agnes Harmon, Heidi Kirkland, from Rouhlac Middle School, Taura Brock, Lajuana Malloy, Melissa Whitson, William Wiggins, from Kate Smith Elementary, Ashley Kilpatrick, Carmen Riviere, Tiffany Steverson and Kimberly Tuel.In other business, a revision to the 20192019 WCSD calendar was approved. The first day of school for the 20182019 school year is set for August 13.Washington County School Board will meet again in regular session at 5 p.m. on May 14. WCSBFrom Page A1Heritage Fest Antique tractors were on display at the WC Heritage Festival. [CATHRINE LAMB | THE NEWS]Vendors were on hand to disseminate information about their organizations at the WC Heritage Festival.

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, April 11, 2018 A3

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** A4 Wednesday, April 11, 2018 | Washington County News OPINION The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by GateHouse Media LLC at 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2018, GateHouse Media LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright Notice: The entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of GateHouse Media LLC. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or GateHouse Media. Postmaster: Send address change to Washington County News, P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428, USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES In county Out of county 13 weeks: $20 $24.30 26 weeks: $28.70 $36.40 52 weeks: $48.60 $60.70 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US Publisher: Nicole Bare“ eld nbare“ eld@chipleypaper.com Interim Editor: Jacqueline Bostick jbostick@chipleypaper.com, 850-638-0212 News, sports, opinion: news@chipleypaper.com Classi“ ed: 850-638-0212, clamb@chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service: 1-850-522-5197Have something to say?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri“ cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. Washington CountyPUBLISHER Nicole P. Bare“ eld INTERIM EDITOR Jacqueline Bostick PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR Cameron Everett Near the end of last month, Gov. Rick Scott and President Donald Trump each signed massive spending bills to fund our respective state and national governments, and one key concern critics picked up on was a supposed lack of extra money for election securityŽ „ even though the federal bill contained $380 million to address this issue. As Tammy Patrick, the senior elections adviser at the Democracy Fund, told NPR, The thing that is unfortunate is that its always some catastrophic event before people start paying attention „ it took Florida in 2000, it took a foreign adversary in 2016 before this got taken seriously. [The omnibus spending bill money] will absolutely not fund or remedy us to where we need to be. But its a big step forward.Ž We think we might be overthinking this. Or perhaps thats the Russian ruse: Create doubt where none should exist. Polk County Elections Supervisor Lori Edwards told us in an email that shes not worried about digital manipulationŽ of our voting systems come November. Her confidence is rooted in the fact that Polks vote-tabulation system is never connected to the internet or her offices computer network. Additionally, the equipment itself is kept in secure areas with limited access and monitored by security cameras. When voting machines are shipped out to precincts, her staff relies on tamper-proof seals and passwords. Edwards pointed out that before each election each piece of equipment is tested with a deckŽ of ballots with a known outcome. Afterward, the machines receipt tapes are checked against the results that are phoned in. And that is verified through post-election audits „ which have paper ballots as a back-up. It sounds pretty thorough to us. Edwards said the potential vulnerability resides with the state Voter Registration System, which is linked to the internet. She notes that, as we have seen with any online data system, attempts at breaching will occur. But Tallahassee did set aside money in the 2019 budget, which begins July 1, to provide counties with monitoring devices that augment their own firewalls. This device would report intrusion attempts to the state so they can watch for trends,Ž Edwards told us. I am confident that tampering with election results or voter records would be detected and could be restored,Ž she added. Edwards said her one main concern is the potential for identity theft. A version of this editorial first appeared in the Ledger, a sister paper with GateHouse Media.We would have faith in our elections ANOTHER VIEW In spring a young mans fancy turns to thoughts of wearing out his thumbs on the keyboard.Ž with apologies to Alfred, Lord Tennyson. Late last autumn I finally upgraded to a smartphone. Although some of my relatives still cling to older communications devices (That pharmacy would get a lot more of my business if they skipped all this high-tech folderol and learned the virtues of tin cans and a really long string...Ž), I am like a hog feeding at the trough of apps. I just wish there were more apps designed specifically to help us navigate the trials and tribulations of springtime. Attention, software developers! Here are some apps we really, really need: 1. A variation of the venerable cellphone flashlight. This one would use advanced algorithms to produce just the right wavelengths of light to counteract the glare from pale, white wintertime skin that is suddenly being exposed again. 2. A comical graphics app that portrays Mother Nature as a stereotypical cat. (I think Ill make it hot...I think Ill make it cold...I think Ill make it hot...I think Ill make it cold...Oh, have some hairballs the tornado dragged in...Ž) 3. An app that notifies your local undertaker that you can now die happy because youve cut your lawn 1/ 16 of an inch shorter than that &^%$# at the end of the street. 4. An app that scans a saliva sample and searches an international database until it finds the obscure Achilles heel of all your friends and acquaintances who suffer no ill effects from snorting pollen like its cocaine. (Oh, you gave me an albino duck-billed platypus spleen sample for my centerpiece. You shouldnt have. You really shouldnt have. Throat constricting ...cant breathe...Ž) 5. Hijacking the same sentiment, an app that summons a convertible by remote control and sends it crashing through the front door of the Big Pharma execs who turn out all those ineffectual over-the-counter antihistamines, decongestants and cough remedies! 6. An unflinching app that compares Asian education to the last couple of months of the American school year, with all the movies, wander around outsideŽ days and Dress up like all those old fogeys from 2009 who knew Abe Lincoln personallyŽ days. 7. An app to forecast the exact date of your first catastrophic flip-flop incident of the season (and the likelihood of the ER attendants being in a committed relationship). 8. An app to make up cheerful happily ever afterŽ stories about all those adorable bunnies and chicks who were forgotten after the last Easter candy was gobbled down. 9. An app to send a false alarm and save you from buckling down and doing that dreaded Spring Cleaning. Dont settle for something mundane like a nuclear missile headed for Hawaii. You could have a bulletin like The Titanic has suddenly risen and is on a collision course with Ohio! Forget cleaning out the garage!Ž If anyone has already designed one of the aforementioned apps, please let me know so credit can be given. Ill even give you another assignment: design an app to produce enough white noise to drown out the people who grouse, Stop staring at that screen and admire all the weeds and bugs around you! Dadgum it, get me the string and the can for the newspaper editor so I can give this generation a piece of my mind!ŽHelp! We need these apps for spring!Im feeling human again, thanks. After three weeks of living in opioid hell of constantly being sick to my stomach, of throwing up, of having the shakes and feeling depressed and crying my body and brain are back to normal. Im no longer high and messed up on pain killers. Im no longer trying to withdraw from them. And I have a new, up-closeand-personal understanding of the countrys opioid epidemic and how easy it is for a 70-something guy like me to become addicted to potent pain pills. My opioid nightmare started on March 13 when I had my left knee replaced. The surgery went fine, but with knee replacement all the pain comes during recovery. When I was released from the hospital on March 15 my doctor wrote me a prescription for oxycodone. Fifty pills. Two every four hours at first, then one every 12 hours. Hello opioid addiction. For the first 10 days and 30 oxycodones, I was pain-free but a complete mess. I was often nauseous. I threw up now and then. I tried to do my knee exercises as I sat in my recliner chair and watched The VoiceŽ and whatever else was on. I dont really remember much else from those first 10 days, except for feeling sick and occasionally throwing up, but my wife told me my whole personality changed. I was angry. I was sad and depressed. The pressure I was putting on my family to take care of me made me start crying. On Sunday, March 25, my wife took my opioids away, but I took pill No. 30 against her will. On Monday morning I got up, felt nauseous and threw up. I threw up every day after that for ten days, but the third day of my withdrawal was the worst. I felt like I had been hit by an earthquake. I had the shakes all day. When I went to have my surgery staples removed, the knee doctor took one look at me and sent me straight to my heart doctor. The heart doctor took one look at me, ran an ultra-sound on my heart and sent me back to the ER for blood tests. At the ER I threw up. I sat in the ER for several hours, then went home and got lots of fluids. I was shaking so much I couldnt hold my hand steady or sign my name. Today April 5 I can say Im finally recovering from addiction. I now understand how powerful and dangerous opioids are. And how important it is to have a loving family at home to take care of you when youre taking them or trying to get off them. During the last few days Ive run into several other guys who had their knees replaced. What they said made me feel kind of stupid. One guy said he never touched oxycodone. He took Tylenol 3, which has codeine but is less potent. I know opioids are valuable weapons against pain, and that before they were overprescribed to help create the current crisis they were often under-prescribed. But if I have to have my other knee replaced, Im going to take Tylenol 3 and keep the oxycodone in the box.My journey to opioid hell and back Danny Tyree Michael Reagan

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, April 11, 2018 A5 Staff ReportCHIPLEY … An illegally armed convicted felon was subdued last weekend following a traffic stop at the intersection of Archie Sapp Road and Gilbert Mill Road. Early Satu-day afternoon, Washington County Sher-iffs Office deputies stopped 41-year-old Dana Lavon Lucious, of Chipley, who was driving a silver Mitsubishi car that had an expired tag reg-istered to a Chevrolet truck. At his vehicle, the deputy conducted a pat-down search. The deputy asked Lucious if he had any weapons, to which Lucious replied yesŽ and quickly stepped away from the deputy and attempted to walk around the vehicle, the release stated.Deputies immediately placed Lucious in handcuffs. Lucious then stated, I have a pistol in my pants.ŽLocated in his front waistband was a .22-caliber semi-automatic handgun with one round in the chamber and eight additional rounds in the magazine. While attempting to verify the weapon was not stolen, deputies observed the serial number had been removed, the release stated.A search of the vehicle revealed two plastic bags of methamphetamine in a metal container, the release stated.Lucious, who is a con-victed felon, has a suspended drivers license and was placed on felony state probation in 2017 for previous drug and weapon charges in Holmes County. He has been booked into the Wash-ington County Jail on the new charges of possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, possession of methamphetamine, committing a third-degree felony with a weapon, carrying a concealed weapon, possession of an altered weapon, and driving while license suspended.If you have any knowledge of crimes being committed, or tips, contact the Washing-ton County Sheriffs Office at 850-638-6111. You may also contact WCSO anonymously by calling 850-638-TIPS (8477) or by email at tips@wcso.us.Chipley man subdued, illegal rearm recoveredLucious LOCAL & STATEStaff ReportsCHIPLEY „ A curfew vio-lation of a Jackson County man led to new felony drug charges in Washington County.Just before 8 p.m. Wednesday, a Washington County Sheriffs deputy, patrolling the area near Orange Hill Road and Pioneer Road, conducted a traffic stop on a truck being driven by 44-year-old Joel Douglas Lollie of Grand Ridge, a WCSO news release stated.During the stop, deputies were notified that Lollie is currently on drug offender probation until 2026 and has a 5 p.m. curfew, according to reports. Due to the findings, Lollie was removed from the vehicle for questioning and for a pat-down search. The deputy was then granted consent to search Lollies pants pockets, at which time a plastic bag of methamphet-amine was located, the release stated.Lollie was arrested for pos-session of methamphetamine and booked into the Wash-ington County.Man arrested on new meth charges after violating curfewLollie Staff ReportWASHINGTON AND HOLMES COUNTIES A regional transportation group will hold a public hearing to discuss adding another road to its trans-portation map and adopting project priorities for the upcoming fiscal year.The Bay, Gulf, Holmes, and Washington Regional Transportation Partner-ship (RTP) will hold a public meetingMonday at 10:30 a.m.in the Bay County Government Center, located at 840 W. 11th St. in Panama City, an RTP news release stated. The RTP will consider placing Bay Parkway, from Pier Park Drive east to Nautilus Street, on the Bay, Gulf, Holmes and Washing-ton Regional Transportation Partnership (RTP) Regional Network Map and adopting Transportation Regional Incentive Program (TRIP) Application Project Priori-ties for FY 2019, the release stated. For more information, contact Jill Krug at jill.krug@wfrpc.org or 800-226-8914, ext. 214. For a full agenda, visit www.wfrpc.org.Transportation agency to meetMarch 2018Marriages Maria Orton and Benjamin Mathis Neta Cauley and Charles Owens JoAnne Gephart-Baur and John Hanson Allison Ellis and Alexander Davis Cheyenne Rabon and Codi Wood Jade Whitehead and Danny Tijerina Suzanne Crum and Dennis Crum Brandon Duncan and Stormie Wicker Kayla Wheeler and Scott Wood Fwantia Smith and Patrick Walker Jophia Melanchuk and Tony Watts Kimberly McManus and Gary Smith Nikki En“ nger and Raymond West Cortney Kassander and James Tice Karen Kennedy and James Brown Lacey Waldron and David Payne Ashley Barnes and Joshua Farris Britney Wilkes and Deana Caudill Ryan Sikora and Ariel Murphy Divorces Donnie White and Evelyn C White Tiffany Harper and Antonio Dawson Brandon J Williams and Hannah Brewer Clentis L Lucas and Julie J Lucas Steven A Roche and Tiffany R Roche Janet S. Natale and Lawrence Natale Freddy A Anderson and Jean E Anderson Nathan Burke and Virginia Burke Linda McCullers and Williams J McCullers Heather T Morris and Jason Morris Heather H Hayes and Royster S HayesWASHINGTON COUNTY MARRIAGES AND DIVORCES

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** A6 Wednesday, April 11, 2018 | Washington County NewsCHIPLEY One local construction company is digging to build healthier staff.Kent Construction and Roofing launched a com-pany-wide health initiative at the start of the year. In the "Health Challenge" program, employees were encouraged to eat healthy, exercise, and journal to jot down their food choices and activities, company officials stated in a news release.In the first run of the challenge, long-time employee Will Goodman won a "Big Green Egg" grill, along with a cook-book and accessories.The company determined the winner by applying a point system and included the amount of weight loss. Competitors received points for journaling and those points were added to the amount of weight loss.The next quarter of the challenge started March 30, the day the first one ended. The next challenge ends June 30.Company officials said in the news release the chal-lenge is not based entirely on who lost the most weight, but draws attention to the importance of living a healthy lifestyle."Kent Construction and Roofing cares about their employees and encourages them to be better today than yesterday," the press release stated.Company 'health challenge' gets employees movingStaff Report CHIPEY Applica-tions are being accepted for an upcoming pageant.The 62nd Annual Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant will be held at the Washington County Agriculture Center, located at 1424 Jackson Avenue in Chi-pley at 6:30 p.m. Friday, June 8 and at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, June 9. The Panhandle Watermelon Pageant is an open pageant.Applications are avail-able at Bush Paint and Supply in Graceville, the Washington County Ag-Extension Office in Chipley and on the website at www.pan-handlewatermelon.com/pageant.The entry fee is $70 and entry fee for the photogenic competition will be an additional $10. Photogenic entries will be limited to one photo per contestant. All proceeds will go to the Panhandle Watermelon Festival. Applications and fees must be returned by Saturday, May 12 and may be per-sonally delivered to Bush Paint and Supply or mailed to the follow-ing address: Panhandle Watermelon Pageant, C/O Bush Paint and Supply, 971Sixth Ave., Graceville, FL 32440.Checks should be made payable to Panhandle Watermelon Pageant.Winners will receive a large trophy, large crown and banner. Queens should be prepared to participate in the Water-melon Festival activities to include the parade as well as other activities related to the festival. Door admissions are $5 per person with the exception of contestants and children ages 3 and under are free.For more information call Teresa Bush at 850-263-4744 or 850-263-3072 or 850415-0692 or Melissa Miles at 850-260-4323.Watermelon Fest Pageant accepting applicationsWill Goodman won the Big Green Egg grill from a company-wide health challenge. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] FILE PHOTO. 2016. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] If you would like your events included in this list, email information to: news@chipleypaper. comLibrary to host Baby BeesCHIPLEY The Washington County Public Library will host Baby Bees at 10 a.m., Wednesday, April 11 and Wednesday, May 2. Baby Bees will be an hour of stories, music, sing-a-longs and activities designed just for baby. Each month will have a new theme. For more information call 850-638-1314.Friends of the Library to host Game nightCHIPLEY Â… Friends of the Washington County Libraries will host a games nights at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 12 in the John Wesley Worship Center at the First United Methodist Church of Chipley. Tickets ate $10 per COMMUNITY EVENTSSee BRIEFS, A12

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, April 11, 2018 A7 JOBSBy ZipRecruiter.comA nursing job interview is designed to ensure that your qualifications suit the RN or LPN role. According to Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, there are four interview types for which you should prepare: Screening, selection, series and panel. € In a screening interview, you will likely meet with a member of Human Resources to discuss the basics of your background. The goal of this interview type is to narrow down the number of candidates that will return for a selection interview. € The purpose of a selection interview is to further narrow the number of viable candidates and determine who should move forward or be removed from the candidate pool. € Series interviews are more elaborate and require that the candidate meet with multiple interviewers at different times. You might meet with the hiring manager, followed by a unit supervisor then a senior RN or LPN. € In contrast, the panel interview requires that the candidate meet with up to five interviewers at once. At every stage, prepare to discuss who you are and how your qualifications suit the needs of the organization. Although nurses wear scrubs on the job, it is best to wear a tailored, solid-colored suit for the interview. A suit helps you look and feel professional and well-groomed. Be sure to wear shoes that are polished and comfortable. Interview questions may include:Tell me about yourself. Brie” y tell the employer about your background and how you can use what you have learned in previous roles to meet the objectives of the new role. You can also mention the type of degree or certi“ cate you have earned and how that has helped prepare you for the new role. Provide an example of a time when you helped a patient in distress feel at ease „ what did you do? This behavior-based question tests your ability to recall related work experiences and gauges how well you interact with patients. Describe the situation, maintain eye contact, and be speci“ c. Describe a mistake you made on the job and how you “ xed it. What did you learn? By asking this question, employers want to be sure that you can take ownership of mistakes and demonstrate integrity. Explain how you turned the mistake into a positive lesson. Tell me about a time when you had to work with a dif“ cult coworker. How did you handle it? In nursing, teamwork is necessary to achieve quality patient care, so employers pose this question to determine whether you let workplace squabbles get in the way of doing your job well. Describe a time when you had to meet a deadline while under a great deal of pressure. How did you handle it? Nursing is rewarding yet challenging work, so employers aim to “ nd out whether you can maintain a positive attitude and do your job well in an environment that can be stressful.Questions to ask Once the interviewer has asked about your background and qualifications, he or she will ask if you have questions. Some examples of what you should ask:€ Do you provide professional growth training? € Can you describe the culture of the unit/department/ facility? € Is it possible to see the unit I would be working in? € What are the typical working hours for this role? € Who would I report to in this role, and what is his or her leadership style?

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** A8 Wednesday, April 11, 2018 | Washington County News DATELINESWASHINGTON CHICAGODuckworth has baby; 1st US senator to give birth in of“ ceSen. Tammy Duckworth has given birth to a baby girl, making her the first U.S. senator to give birth while in office.The Illinois Democrat announced she delivered her second daughter, Maile Pearl Bowlsbey, on Monday. Her office says Duckworth is recovering well and asked for privacy. Duckworth, a 50-year-old veteran who lost her legs in the Iraq War, is one of only 10 lawmakers who have given birth while in Congress. Her first daughter, Abigail, was born in 2014. Duckworth says Mailes middle name is in honor of Duckworths husbands great aunt, Pearl Bowlsbey Johnson, who was an Army officer and nurse in World War II.HOUSTONStates pledge 1,600 troops for Trumps border “ ghtArizona, New Mexico, and Texas pledged on Monday to send about 1,600 National Guard members to the U.S.Mexico border, responding to President Donald Trumps plan to use the military to help fight illegal immigration and drug trafficking. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said he would add about 300 troops a week to the 250 members of the National Guard whose deployment was announced Friday until the total number reaches at least 1,000 troops. Arizona officials announced they were sending 225 Guard members Monday and another 113 on Tuesday.New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinezs office said 250 Guard members from the state will serve on the border.WASHINGTONPorn stars attorney to offer reward for informationThe attorney for a porn actress who says she had an affair with President Donald Trump plans to release a composite sketch Tuesday of the person he says threatened Stormy Daniels to stay quiet „ and says there will be a reward for help with identification.Michael Avenatti said Monday that a sizeable mon-etary rewardŽ will be offered to anyone providing information identifying the person that Dan-iels says threatened her in a Las Vegas parking lot in 2011.Avenatti said common sense dictatesŽ that this person could only have been someone associ-ated with Trump or the Trump Organization. He said the money would likely come from a crowd-sourced legal fund.First lady Melania Trump speaks during a discussion with students regarding the issues they are facing, Monday in the Blue Room of the White House. Trump said she had gathered the children at the White House to hear about their thoughts and challenges to help children everywhere do their best.Ž The White House said the children were ages 10 to 13. The Trumps son, Barron, is 12. [MANUEL BALCE CENETA/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] MOSCOWRussian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, center, speaks Monday during his meeting with Russian diplomats who got expelled from various countries over spy poisoning accusations. Lavrov said that such a massive expulsion of Russian diplomats in unprecedented and that Russia will have an adequate response. We will never bend under ultimatums. Its not the language that they can use with Russia,Ž Lavrov said. [PAVEL GOLOVKIN/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] BUDAPEST, HUNGARYHungarian Prime Minister and Chairman of Fidesz Party Viktor Orban, right, and Deputy Prime Minister and Chairman of the Christian Democratic Party Zsolt Semjen sing as they celebrate at an election night watch event after the general elections. Orban said his re-election and the super majority in parliament of his right-wing populist party would limit the ability of civic groups to help migrants and refugees. [SZILARD KOSZTICSAK/MTI VIA AP] By Zeina Karam and Bassem MroueThe Associated PressBEIRUT „ International condemnation grew over a suspected poison gas attack in a rebel-held town near Damas-cus said to have been carried out by the Syrian government, while Syria and its main ally, Russia, blamed Israel for airstrikes on a Syrian air base Monday that reportedly killed 14 people, including four Iranians.The timing of the airstrikes in central Homs province, hours after President Donald Trump said there would be a big price to payŽ for the chemical weapons attack, raised ques-tions about whether Israel was acting alone or as a proxy for the United States.Israel did not comment on Mondays missile strike. The Jewish State typically does not comment on its airstrikes in Syria, which have been numer-ous in Syrias civil war.The fast-paced developments threatened to further hike tensions between the U.S. and Russia, which has in the past warned against any U.S. military action against President Bashar Assads government. Iran, a key ally of Assad, condemned the air-strikes, which it said killed four Iranians, including a colonel and a member of the Revolutionary Guards aerospace force.Opposition activists said 40 people died in Saturday nights chemical attack in the town of Douma, the last remaining rebel bastion in the eastern suburbs of Damascus, blaming Assads forces. The attack killed entire families in their homes and underground shel-ters, opposition activists and local rescuers said.The Syrian government strongly denied it carried out a chemical weapons attack and the Organization for the Pro-hibition of Chemical Weapons said it has opened an investigation. In a statement, it said a fact-finding mission was gathering information from all available sources to establish whether chemical weapons were used.Trump on Monday condemned the heinous attackŽ in Syria .British Prime Minister Theresa May said Assads government and its backers, including Russia, must be held to accountŽ if it is found to have been responsible for the suspected poison gas attack. Yes, this is about the actions, the brutal actions by Assad and his regime. But it also is about the backers of the regime, and of course Russia is one of those backers. ... And they need to look very carefully at the posi-tion they have taken,Ž she said.The European Union also laid the blame squarely on Assads government.The U.N. Security Council was holding an emergency meeting Monday to discuss the chemical attack.It was the second such airstrike this year on the Syrian air base, known as T4, where Iranian fighters are believed to be stationed. Israel hit the base in February, after it said an Ira-nian drone that violated Israeli airspace took off from it.Russias Defense Ministry said two Israeli aircraft targeted the base Monday, firing eight missiles. It said Syria shot down five of them while the other three landed in the western part of the base. Syrian state TV quoted an unnamed military official as saying that Israeli F-15 warplanes fired several missiles at T4. It gave no further details.Israels Foreign Ministry had no comment when asked about reports of the airstrikes. Hours after the attack, the Army of Islam rebel group agreed to surrender the town and evacuate its fighters to rebel-held northern Syria, Syrian state media reported. The group also agreed to release its prisoners, a key government demand.More than 100 buses entered Douma Sunday night to take the fighters and their families to Jarablus, which is under the shared control of Turkish troops and allied Syrian forces, Syrian stateaffiliated al-Ikhbariya TV said.Syrian state TV said two buses left early Monday and 11 more buses were getting ready to move.Syrian state media said dozens of civilians who had been held for years by the rebels were set free.The evacuations follow a pattern of departures around the capital and other major Syrian cities as the govern-ment reasserts its control after seven years of war.In his tweets Sunday, Trump called Assad an animalŽ and delivered a rare personal criticism of Putin for supporting him. Trump has declared his intent to withdraw U.S. troops from Syria in the coming months, despite resistance from many of his advisers.More than 500 people, mostly women and children, were brought to medical centers complaining of diffi-culties breathing, foaming at the mouth and burning sen-sations in the eyes. Some had bluish skin, a sign of oxygen deprivation, according to a White Helmets statement. The symptoms are consistent with chemical exposure.Douma is part of the eastern Ghouta suburbs, where a 2013 chemical attack killed hun-dreds of people and was widely blamed on the government. The U.S. threatened military action but later backed down.Syria denies ever using chemical weapons during the war and says it eliminated its chemical arsenal under a 2013 agreement brokered by the U.S. and Russia.Israel blamed for Syria strikeA bus is shown early Monday carrying civilians who were released by the Army of Islam group who were held since 2013, in Damascus, Syria, according to Syrian state media. SANA is reporting that dozens of civilians who had been held for years by the rebel group have been freed. [SANA VIA AP] NATION & WORLD

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, April 11, 2018 A9By Dustin Kent747-5065 | @PCNHDustinKent dkent@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Through nearly 35 minutes of Saturdays All-Star Bas-ketball Classic, the West boys All-Stars looked poised to make it two straight wins for the first time in the 14-year history of the series. In the final five minutes, however, the East All-Stars turned up the pressure and the wheels for the West quickly fell off the wagon.The East outscored the West 24-6 over the final 5:12 of action to rally for a 99-96 victory. Its the seventh win in the last eight years for the East All-Stars, who saw a six-game winning streak snapped last year when the West took a 104-93 victory.Rutherfords Lorenzo Ferrell scored 19 points and grabbed the East All-Stars Most Valuable Player award, while Blountstowns KK Godwin added 17 points. Rutherfords Trevon Sims added 15 points, and Mosleys Stacy Burse had 14. Choctawhatchees Aron Scott led all scorers with 30 points and earned the West All-Stars MVP. His teammate Marquis Jackson added 22 points, while Nicevilles Juanyeh Thomas had 12, and Choctaws Stacey Jones scored 11.The game was nip and tuck through much of the first half before a 15-2 run allowed the West to take control, with Scott con-tributing 13 of the 15 points. Scott started the run with a two-handed tip dunk, then added a 3-pointer, and a transition dunk plus the foul for a three-point play. He later caught a lob pass from Jackson for another dunk and nailed another three to make it 38-27.The East answered with a pair of baskets by Blountstowns Jamal Howard and a driving bucket for Burse to get to within six, but the West outscored the East 11-6 over the final 3:30 to take a 49-39 lead into the halftime break. A tip-in by Rutherfords Eddie Dubose and a reverse layup by Burse to start the second half cut the West deficit to six, but a three from Jones, a tip dunk by Scott, and a pull-up jumper by Nicevilles Trey Green-Harris quickly put the West back up double figures at 56-45.Scott continued to have his way with the East defense, hitting a short jumper, a hook shot in the lane, and then finishing a three-point play in the paint to make it 63-51. A corner three from Fort Walton Beachs Nikko Bryant moments later put the West up 15 with 13:55 to play.The West lead remained at 15 after a driving basket by Jackson made it 90-75 with 5:30 to play, but the Easts depth advantage … 12 players to just eight for the West … and the full-court defensive pressure that exploited it, quickly started to turn the tide toward the East. Burse started the decisive run with a basket, followed by a transition dunk by Ferrell, and a bucket by Antonio Bellamy following a West turnover to cut the deficit to nine.A driving basket by Godwin was followed by four straight points from Ferrell, the first two on a lob pass from a baseline out of bounds play and the second two on a pair of free throws, made it a five-point game with 3:08 to go. The East press forced another turnover that resulted in a layup by Sims to make it 92-89 moments later.Trailing 94-90, the East got another steal that led to a short bank shot by Ferrell, and a steal and layup in the backcourt by Godwin tied the game 94-94 with 1:04 on the clock. After a missed 3-pointer by Jones, Burse hit a pair of free throws to give the East the lead before a spinning jumper by Scott tied it back up with 35 sec-onds remaining.Sims split a pair of free throws with 31.5 seconds on the clock to put the East up 97-96, and Godwin came up with yet another steal on the Wests next possession Frantic nish gives East boys 9996 winBy Dustin Kent747-5065 | @PCNHDustinKent dkent@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ The East All-Stars threatened to turn Saturdays AllStar Classic into a rout on multiple occasions, but the West team was intent on making them earn their first victory in three years. Thanks to some hotshooting from Holmes Countys Laura Jones and a couple of late buck-ets by Mosleys JaTayvia Holley, thats exactly what the East All-Stars did.Jones, who was named the East Most Valuable Player, scored 23 points and Holley added 21 to lift the East to a 100-94 victory to snap a two-game losing skid to the West All-Stars in the 14th edition of the Classic. Port St. Joes Teiyahna Hutchinson added 20 points for East, with North Bay Havens Josselin Geer also scor-ing 13.Fort Walton Beachs P-Nut Payton led all scorers with 27 points and was named the MVP for the West team. Pay-tons teammate Tanyvia Tassin added 17 points, followed by Bakers Ayajah Coleman with 12, and Nicevilles Antoi-nette Lewis with 10.Its the first victory for the East All-Star girls since an 85-64 win in 2015 and the fifth win overall in the series. The East used a 14-2 run to start the second quarter to seize early control of the game, with a driving bank shot by Holley followed by 3-pointers from Hutchinson, Ponce de Leons Devyn Butorac, and Poplar Springs Robin Tate making it 34-20 with 6:40 on the clock.But the West answered right back with a 16-3 run to pull to within a point. Payton started the run with a basket and a three-point play by Tassin, a two-point jumper by Aaliyah Davenport, and a layup by Payton trimmed the defi-cit to five. Kori Jones stopped the spurt with a 3-pointer from the right wing, but a flip shot in the lane by Genesis Long, a 3-pointer by Tassin, and a free throw by Payton made it 37-36 with 1:41 to half.Hutchinson finished the quarter strong with a 3-pointer and a pair of free throws to give the East a 42-38 edge at the break. The East started light-ing it up from 3-point range again when the second half began, with a triple from Laura Jones sandwiched between a pair of Holley threes making it 53-40. After an offensive rebound and putback by Geer, Bozemans Shelby Suggs hit another 3-pointer for the East and followed with a short jumper to make it 60-45 with 6:13 left in the third.A transition basket by Hutchinson on a feed from Laura Jones gave the East its biggest lead of the day at 68-52 with 3:03 to play, but the West again fought back with a 13-2 run to get back to within five. Payton started the spurt with a 3-pointer and Tassin followed with back to back threes of her own. The East pushed the lead back to nine when Holley finished the third with a driving floater and then drove into the lane Jones, Holley spearhead East All-Stars victory SPORTS See BOYS BB, A10 See GIRLS BB, A10

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** 1. Truex streakMartin Truex Jr. had an impressive streak come to a sudden halt when his right-front tire went ” at, sending the defending Cup Series champions No. 78 Toyota into the wall. Truex had 14 consecutive top-“ ve “ nishes at non-plate tracks before “ nishing 37th (last) at Texas Motor Speedway.2. Championship tellIt is not that hard to pick out the early-season championship contenders. Kevin Harvick, Kyle Busch and Truex have combined for “ ve victories through seven races. Want more insight? Four times this season the three drivers have “ nished “ rst and second to each other.3. No cell serviceKevin Harvick had to surrender his cellphone last week to of“ cials at Augusta National Golf Club. Harvick attended the Masters on Thursday. Everything (in NASCAR) is about trying to “ gure out who's better on social media,Ž he said. And (there) they take your phone away.Ž„ Godwin Kelly, godwin. kelly@news-jrnl.com A10 Wednesday, April 11, 2018 | Washington County News NASCAR THIS WEEKTHREE THINGS TO WATCHTEXASTHREE THINGS WE LEARNED1. Rallying the troopsSeven-time NASCAR Cup Series champion Jimmie Johnson has taken on a new duty this season as Chevrolets top cheerleader. Team Chevy opened the season by winning the Daytona 500. Since that race, the Bowtie BrigadeŽ has struggled. Johnson says chin up. We are getting closer each and every week and Im really proud of everybody at Hendrick,Ž he said. We will get back to our winning ways soon.Ž2. Bubba emergesBubba Wallace had an electrifying second-place run in the Daytona 500 for Richard Petty Motorsports, then disappeared into the mist of regular-season racing. That changed at Texas when he made a strong eighth-place “ nish, one of only 10 cars to “ nish on the lead lap. What a good day, what a good weekend for us,Ž said the rookie driver. We had the mojo the whole time, and were just super excited.Ž3. Pit-gun grumblingThe grumbling from race teams about NASCAR-issued pit guns is growing. One of the biggest critics at Texas was driver Kevin Harvick. Harvick thinks an anemic pit gun cost him the win Sunday. We had a pathetic day on pit roadƒ because of pit guns,Ž he said, adding, We couldnt overcome itsƒ time after time you cant get the lug nuts tight because the pit guns dont work.Ž„Godwin Kelly, godwin. kelly@news-jrnl.comSeven-time NASCAR champion Jimmie Johnson has taken on an additional duty this season. [RANDY HOLT/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] Martin Truex Jr. saw his impressive streak of “ nishes literally go up in smoke at Texas. [ROSS HAILEY/THE ASSOCATED PRESS] and dished off to Geer for two.Another three from Laura Jones to start the fourth quarter made it 77-65, but the West countered with a 10-2 run featuring six straight points by Payton, the last on a short jumper, to get back to within four. A basket by South Waltons Allee Coble and a 3-pointer from Bakers Kashira Casey brought the West even at 89-89 with 3:37 remaining. With the game tied 91-91, Holley put the East up for good with a steal and layup with 2:15 to play, and then hit a free throw and a driving basket with 57 seconds remaining to make it 96-91. After a defensive stop, Hutchinson hit a pair of free throws to essentially ice the game at 98-91 with 38.3 seconds on the clock. WEST (94) Payton 10 4-4 27, Casey 2 2-2 7, Ricci 0 0-0 0, Long 2 0-0 5, Coble 4 0-0 8, Tassin 6 2-6 17, Coleman 4 4-4 12, Lewis 5 1-2 12, Dowden 1 2-2 4, Davenport 1 0-0 2. Totals: 35 15-20. 94. EAST (100) Holley 8 2-5 21, West 1 0-0 2, Suggs 3 0-0 7, K. Jones 1 0-2 3, Butorac 2 0-0 6, L. Jones 9 2-4 23, Cole 1 0-0 2, Holden 0 0-0 0, Tate 1 0-0 3, Hutchinson 6 6-8 20, Geer 5 3-4 13. Totals: West 18 20 27 29 „ 94 East 20 22 32 26 „ 100 3-point “ eld goals: East 13 (L. Jones 3, Holley 3, Hutchinson 2, Butorac 2, Tate, K. Jones, Suggs), West 9 (Payton 3, Tassin 3, Casey, Long, Lewis). Total fouls: West 19, East 16. Fouled out: none. GIRLS BBFrom Page A9and passed ahead to Ferrell for a breakaway dunk with 11 seconds to play. The West turned the ball over yet again on the last possession and was unable to get a shot up.Godwin and Ferrell combined for 29 points in the second half, with Godwin scoring 15 and Ferrell 14. WEST (96) Willis 3 0-0 6, Jackson 9 2-2 22, Robinson 0 0-0 0, Jones 4 0-0 11, Thomas 5 2-4 12, Green-Harris 3 0-0 6, Bryant 3 2-2 9. Scott 12 4-4 30. Totals: 39 10-12 96. EAST (99) Banks 0 0-0 0, Godwin 5 7-8 17, Hendrix 3 0-1 8, Isenhoff 1 2-2 4, Jones 2 0-0 4, Bellamy 1 2-4 4, Howard 4 0-0 8, Ferrell 8 2-2 19, Burse 6 2-4 14, Gustason 0-0 0, Dubose 3 0-0 6, Sims 5 5-6 15. Totals: 38 20-27 99. Halftime score „ West 49, East 39 3-point “ eld goals: West 6 (Jones 3, Jackson 2, Bryant), East 3 (Hendrix 2, Ferrell). Total fouls: West 21, East 11. Fouled out: Jackson. BOYS BBFrom Page A9 Holmes Countys Laura Jones (11) scored 23 points to lead the East All-Stars to a 100-94 victory in Saturdays AllStar Basketball Classic. Jones was named the East Most Valuable Player. [HEATHER HOWARD/ THE NEWS HERALD]

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, April 11, 2018 A11

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** A12 Wednesday, April 11, 2018 | Washington County Newsperson, with door prizes and refreshments provided. All proceeds go to the libraries in Washington County. For more information or to buy tickets call the library at 850-638-1314 or contact any Friends of the Washington County Libraries member.Chipolas Show Choir to host Jazzmatazz 2018MARIANNA … Jazzmatazz 2018 will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday April 12 and Friday, April 13. The annual shows by Chipolas Show Choir will feature high energy, song and dance favorites performed by the group under the direction of Angie White and Dr. Josh Martin. Tickets are $10 and are available at the Chipola Box Of“ ce.UF/IFAS to host Rock the CrockVERNONUF/FIAS will host a Rock the Crock Class from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, April 12 a Eastside Baptist Church in Vernon. New to using a slow cooker? Been using one for years, but only use it for soups and stews? Looking for ways to have a hot and ready meal when coming home from work? This class will show how versatile and easy it is to use this kitchen appliance. From appetizers to desserts there will be something for everyone. Space is limited. The cost of the class is $5 per person and includes all materials For more information or to register call the Washington County Extension Of“ ce at 850-638-6265 or the Holmes County Extension Of“ ce at 850-547-1108.Union reunion setGRACEVILLE … Classmates who attended Union School just south of Graceville will host a reunion from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, April 14 at Damascus Baptist Church Fellowship Hall. Bring a “ nger food. Church is located one mile south of Graceville on the west of Highway 77. Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida to host ArtKidDooCHIPLEY … The 6th Annual ArtKidDoo will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, April 14, at Chipleys Shivers Park. ArtKidDoo is a collaborative effort among the Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida, child care providers, local businesses, non-pro“ t and civic organizations to encourage awareness for the arts in young children. To join as a vendor or offer a special performance, visit the website at http://www.elcnwf. org/artkiddoo/ to download the vendor booth application. Once completed, return the form to Sallie Brosnan at sallie. brosnan@elcnwf.org. If an agency or organization would like to participate as volunteers, they may also reach out to Sallie Brosnan to learn about the various opportunities for volunteering the day of ArtKidDoo.Kid Safety Expo announces datesBONIFAY/CHIPLEY/MARIANNA/ LYNN HAVEN Kid Safety Expo will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the following Saturdays: Art KidDoo at Shivers Park in Chipley, April 14: Chipley Walmart, April 21 and Lynn Haven Walmart, April 28. The Kid Safety Expo will also be at: Family Farm Day at Lynn Haven Elementary School, Friday, April 13. For more information call 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. Free grief support groupMARIANNA Feelings of grief and loss can be overwhelming. For this reason, Covenant Care will be offering a sixweek grief support group in Marianna at the Covenant Care of“ ce, located at 4540 Lafayette St, Suite E from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesdays April 17 through, May 22. Those who attend will have the opportunity to explore their grief in a safe and caring environment. The support group is free but registration is required. Light refreshments will be served. To register for the support group, or for additional information, call Jaci Bartley at 850-7010132 or email atJacqueline.bartley@choosecov-enant.org.Graceville Womens Club to host spring pageantGRACEVILLE … The Graceville Womens Club will host the Graceville Spring Pageant at 5 p.m. Saturday, April 21. This pageant is open to girls baby through teen. A parents meeting will be held at 6 p.m. Monday, April 9 at the Graceville Civic Center. All fees and applications are due by Saturday, April 14. Practice will begin Monday, April 16. For more information contact Samantha Angerbrandt at 850703-0996 or email at samantha. angerbrandt@gmail.comSpanish Trial OpryCHIPLEY … The Spanish Trail Playhouse will honor legendary country music with their Spanish Trail Opry at 7 p.m. Saturday, April 14 and at 2 p.m. Sunday, April 15. Performers from the area will participate in the show along with a country band made up of local performers. Reserved seating tickets ate $15 and are available online at www.spanishtrailplayhouse. com or at the playhouse box of“ ce located at 680 2nd Street. For more information call 8506379113 or 850-326-3685.Chipola presents Christopher Mrofchak in concertMARIANNA … Chipola guitar instructor Christopher Mrofchak will present a free concert at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 17 in the Experimental Theatre of the Center for the Arts. Mrofchak studied classical performance at Youngstown Sate University. He was awarded a graduate assistantship to Florida State University where he earned a Masters Degree. Mrofchak is pursuing a Doctorate of Musical Arts at Florida State University under pedagogue Bruce Holzman. Mrofchaks treatise will consider solo works of Takashi Yoshimatsu.Chipola hosts "Artistic Expression through Con” ict: The Use of Art in World War II"MARIANNA … Chipola College and Florida State Universitys The Institute on World War II and the Human Experience will host a collaborative exhibit, "Artistic Expression through Con” ict: The Use of Art in World War II". The exhibit will be open weekdays through Wednesday, April 18. Hours of the exhibit are from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday and from 9 a.m. to noon on Friday. The exhibit will temporarily close during Spring Breach Monday, March 19 through Friday, March 23. For more information call 850-718-2264.Chipola Sophomore Cabaret to performMARIANNA … The Chipola Sophomore Cabaret featuring music majors will be held at 6 p.m. Friday, April 20 in the Experimental Theatre. Tickets are $5 and will include a sweet dessert and the sounds of selected Chipola voice, piano and instrumental majors as they perform their sophomore recitals. For more information call 850-718-2420.Cotton to speak at Garden Club teaCHIPLEY … Harvey Cotton will be the guest speaker at Chipley Garden Clubs 2018 English Teat at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, April 21 in the John Wesley Building at the First United Methodist Church of Chipley. A traditional English Tea with all the trimmings will be served at noon. Seating in limited and tickets are available by reservation only. Tickets are priced at $15 each. For more information or to purchase tickets call Club President Debbie Mitchell at 850-638-0546.Chipola to host spring ensemble concertMARIANNA … Chipolas Spring Ensemble Concert will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 24 in the Center for the Arts Main Theatre. Featuring the College Chorus, Presidents Ensemble, Community Corus, Rock and Jazz Band and the new Wind ensemble. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call 850-718-2420.Library to hold Knitting With Looms classCHIPLEY Washington County Library in Chipley is now offering a monthly class entitled "Knitting with Looms." Join the library at 10:30 a.m. the third Friday of each month, as instructors teach how to create a variety of items using looms. Class size is limited to 20. Call 850-638-1314 for more information and to register.SunSouth presents Hay Day 2018GREENWOOD … SunSouth will host Hay Day from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, April 26 at the NFREC Beef Unit. Registration will begin at 9:30 a.m. and the event will start at 9:45 a.m. Lunch will be provided. In case of rain participants will be noti“ ed of the date change. There will be live cutting demonstration, rakes, tedders, balers, disc mowers, haylage wrapping, ride-N-drive demos and net and B wrap. For more information or to RSVP call Brenna or Mac at 850-334-6340. Harris Chapel to host bene“ t for Eddie MajorsCARYVILLE … There will be a bene“ t plate lunch for Eddie Majors at 11 a.m. Saturday, April 28 at Harris Chapel Church in Caryville. Plates are $6 and will consist of chicken or pulled pork, choice of two sides, cake and drink. Plates will be eat in or carry out. All proceed will help cover Eddies medical costs due to a stroke. The church is located eight miles south of Highway 2 at Hamp Berrys Crossroads. For more information call Tessie Sellers at 850-768-2844.Chipola commencement to be held in Dothan, AlabamaDOTHAN, ALABAMA The Chipola College 2018 Commencement Ceremony will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 3, at the Dothan Civic Center. The address is 126 St. Andrews Street, Dothan, AL, 36303. Rep. Brad Drake, a member of the Florida House of Representatives, will deliver the commencement address. Graduates should receive an email from the college about caps and gowns which will be picked up in the Book Store. Counted as members of the class are all who will complete degrees or certi“ cates from December of 2017 to May of 2018 or during the Summer 2018 terms. Diplomas will be awarded for Bachelor of Science, Associate in Science, Associate in Arts and Workforce Development Certi“ cates. Chipola graduates may invite an unlimited number of family members and guests to share the event. The ceremony will be broadcast live on YouTube available at this link: https://www. youtube.com/user/ChipolaCollege For information about the graduation ceremony, contact the Chipola Admissions and Records Of“ ce at 850-718-2311 or visit www.chipola.edu. PSHS to host golf tournamentBONIFAY … Poplar Springs High School will host a 4 four man golf scramble from 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, May 5 at Dogwood Lakes Golf Corse. There will be a charge of $50 for singles or $200 per team. Mulligans will be $10 each or three for $25. Prizes will be given for longest drive, closet to pin. There will also be team awards, door prizes, and a barbeque lunch. Women and those 70 years or older will start from red and those 69 and under will start from gold. The course is located at 1934 Country Club Drive in Bonifay. All proceeds will bene“ t PSHS softball “ eld imp rovements. For more information or to register call 850-547-4653 or Brad Hall at 850-260-2855 or email bradh0007@outlook .comGirl Scouts to host recruitment eventPANAMA CITY … Girl Scouts of the Florida Panhandle will host a recruitment event from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 12 at the Panama City Service Center. This is a free event. There will be samples of the things girls can do in the Girl Scouts. The Girl Scouts are designed for girls in Kindergarten through the 12th Grade. Registration will be available at the even. For more information call April Strupp at 888-2718778 Ext. 1200 or b email at info@gscfp.org.2018 Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant to be heldCHIPLEY The 62nd Annual Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant will be held at the Washington County Agriculture Center, located at 1424 Jackson Avenue (Hig hway 90) in Chipley at 6:30 p.m. Friday, June 8 and at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, June 9. The entry fee is $70 and entry fee for the photogenic competition will be an additional $10. Photogenic entries will be limited to one photo per contestant. All proceeds will go to the Panhandle Watermelon Festival. The Panhandle Watermelon Pageant is an open pageant. Applications are available at Bush Paint and Supply in Graceville, the Washington County Ag-Extension Of“ ce in Chipley and on the website at www.panhandlewatermelon. com/pageant. Applications and fees must be returned by Saturday, May 12 and may be personally delivered to Bush Paint and Supply or mailed to the following address: Panhandle Watermelon Pageant, C/O Bush Paint and Supply, 971 6th Avenue, Graceville, Fl 32440. Checks should be made payable to Panhandle Watermelon Pageant. Winners will receive a large trophy, large crown and banner. Queens should be prepared to participate in the Watermelon Festival activities to include the parade as well as other activities related to the festival. Door admissions are $5 per person with the exception of contestants and children 3 and under are free. For more information call Teresa Bush at 850-263-4744 or 850-263-3072 or 850-415-0692 or Melissa Miles at 850-260-4323.Library to host Tampa TaikoCHIPLEY … The Washington County Library will host Tampa Taiko at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 13 at the Washington County Agriculture Center. This is an interactive program that covers the history of Taiko, the music of Japan, modern drumming performance and drum making using discarded barrels that have been recycled in to Taiko Drums. For more information call 850-638-1314.Chipley Library host Movie MondaysCHIPLEY … The Washington County Library Chipley Branch will host Movie Mondays at 10:30 a.m. each Monday in June. Monday June 4 the move will be An American Tail; Monday June 11 the movie will be The Land Before Time; Monday June 18 will be The Secret Nimh and Monday, June 25 will be The Wizard of Oz. For more information call 850-638-1314.Libraries to host summer programsWASHINGTON COUNTY … The Washington County Library will host a Summer Program at the Chipley Branch, Sam Mitchell Branch and the Wausau Branch. The Summer Program is designed for ages four and up. The program will be held at 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays May 29 through June 19 at the Chipley Branch, at 3:30 p.m. Wednesdays May 30 through June 20 at the Wausau Branch and from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. Thursdays May 31 through June 21 at the Sam Mitchell Branch. The Chipley will serve breakfast from 0 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Thursday and from 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. on Fridays, lunch will be served Monday through Thursday from noon to 2 p.m. through July 11. The Wausau Branch will serve lunch from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. The Sam Mitchell Branch will serve lunch from 1 to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday and snacks from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday and from 11 a.m. to noon of Friday Through Wednesday, June 27. For more information call 850-638-1314.Library to host Dr. Magical BalloonsCHIPLEY … The Washington County Library will host Dr. Magical Balloons at 10 a.m. Monday, July 16 at the Washington County Agriculture Center. This show is a mix of balloon shenanigans, magic and comedy. This program is designed for all ages. For more information call 850-638-1314. Services Available for CaregiversCHIPLEY Funds are currently ava ilable to provide a variety of services to persons 60 and above who live with a caregiver and need assistance with self-care, nutrition and/or homemaking activities because of chronic health conditions or other problems of aging. A small stipend for the caregiver is part of the bene“ t. Income and asset restrictions apply. Funds are currently available to provide respite services to caregivers of persons 18+ who have memory-loss related to Alzheimer's disease or other types of dementia. The caregiver must provide care on a regular basis to qualify. For more information or to access the services provided under the Home Care for the Elderly program or theAlzheimer's Disease Initiative Program, through the Washington County Council on Aging, pleasecontact the ElderHelpline at 1-800-963-5337. BRIEFSFrom Page A6

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, April 11, 2018 A13 HEALTHY EATINGEASY NUTRITION BOOSTS Add easy, healthy options to your diet with these suggestions from the Mayo Clinic: € Red beans are a good source of iron, phosphorus and potassium. € Salmon is a good source of omega3 fatty acids, which make your blood less likely to form clots that may cause heart attacks. DAIRYTIPS FOR FREEZINGWhile certain dairy products freeze well, others require more care. Check out these tips from University of Missouri Extension: € Store butter in moistureand vapor-proof freezer container or wrap for 6 to 9 months. € Cut and wrap hard cheese in small pieces; thaw in refrigerator. When frozen, may show mottled color because of surface moisture. € Do not freeze buttermilk or sour cream. TIP OF THE WEEKDONT MISS BREAKFASTTest these chefinspired timesaving tricks and shortcuts from Success: € Explore the produce section for convenient options, liked peeled eggs, cut fruit and diced veggies. € Opt for simple and creative solutions. For example, you can dress up a batch of quinoa with chopped apples, walnuts and yogurt. FOOD By Ari LeVauxMore Content NowAs the ides of April grow near, garlic lovers across the Northern Hemisphere find themselves facing a similar sight: green sprouts forming in our cloves. Like the shared bond of financial bloodletting that American wage earners endure at roughly the same time, the sprouting of the garlic signals a change in ones wealth status, regardless of the race, gender or socioeconomic status of the individual garlic eater. In the same way that taxes take a bite out of ones net worth, the annual sprouting of the garlic is our cue that the garlic stash will soon be cashed. This should matter to all eaters of garlic, and not just the growers and hoarders. Until further notice: If you purchase garlic, prepare to purchase sprouted garlic. This latitude-wide response to spring signals that the end is sight. The cloves will grow steadily softer in the coming weeks, shriveling as the little plant diverts energy from the clove (which is a actually a leaf modified into a storage organ) to the shoot thats forming in its core, and will soon emerge from the tip. A true delicacy Most cooks dig out that sprout; a common refrain is that the green part adds bitterness. But that practice never sat well with me, in part because I consider sprouts, in general, to be delicacies in the purest sense of the word: The growing tip of a plant is often the most delicate form of that plant. In many cases, such as bamboo, asparagus or ferns, the shoot form is the only part that is edible. Its springtime, after all, and sprouts are everywhere. Horsetails by the creek, weed sprouts in the garden. Everything I think I know about botany and nutrition and flavor makes me believe that garlic sprouts will be good. Props to blogger Jill McKeever, one of the few to share my view, who writes, ... the bite of garlic that hits your palate is unmistakably garlic but it doesnt hang long, compared to eating a fresh garlic clove that will stay with you for hours.Ž Thanks to my new research, Ive come back around to what most cooks do when confronted by that green sprout staring up from the cutting board: Slice open the clove and remove the sprout. But maybe I do it more carefully than most, because its the sprout I want. And I want it intact. Except the scabby part, or the area above it. Thanks to my research I now trim higher off the bottom once the clove has sprouted. This time of year, the white part of the garlic holds down the traditional garlic tasks (as long is they are crispy enough to chop), while the mild green sprouts can be used in playful, beautiful and delicious ways, similar to how scapes can be prepared. Chinese-style with pork and oyster sauce, for example, or slowly browned in butter, on toast. Growing garlic Alas, like death and taxes, the decline of garlic is inevitable this time of year. Especially if you identify with the shriveling white part, rather than the waxing green shoot, bursting with vigor. But if you can shift gears and focus on the sprout, on the other hand, the party is only getting started. And depending on how much sprouting garlic one has on ones hands, one can either prepare a tasty treat and be done with it, or get to work. One option is put your sprouts in a place where they can grow. The cloves can be planted in pots, or in the newly thawed garden. They wont develop subterranean bulbs like they would have had you planted them last fall, but they will grow lots of spicy foliage that you can use when youre low on the white stuff. For the landpoor, McKeever suggests placing your sprouting bulb in a dish with a little water and setting it on a windowsill. As they grow, use your garlic sprouts like they are chives, scallions or other spicy sprouts. Chop and sprinkle the spicy, pungent greenery wherever you wish. But unlike those onion-y shoots, garlic shoots are less hollow in the middle and have more bulk. Its more asparagus-like, and can be prepared as such, in long spears, in the pan or steamer. Just dont burn it. Thats the only way a properly trimmed garlic sprout should taste bitter.Garlic provides a di erent kind of spring sproutGiving up the greenFLASH IN THE PANVISUAL HUNT IMAGES

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** A14 Wednesday, April 11, 2018 | Washington County News

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, April 11, 2018 B1CELEBRATE By Diane M. RobinsonTimes Advertiser | @HCTA_Diane Drobinson@chipleypaper.comWASHINGTON AND HOLMES COUNTIES … Florida Department of Health (FDOH) in Holmes and Washington counties celebrated National Public Health Week.The theme was "Changing Our Future Together," which highlighted the importance of engaging communities and partners in all sectors, as public health workers strive to put health within every-ones reach.FDOH Health Officer for Washington and Holmes Counties Karen Johnson believes that both coun-ties are in decent health but could do better."We are better than we were as far as public health rankings," said Johnson. "But we can definitely do better."The 2018 County Health Rankings & Roadmaps tool show Holmes County has improved from No. 59 to 57 out of Floridas 67 counties and Washington County up to No. 50 from 66. The study was released by the University of Wisconsin and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.Two main programs that the two counties highlighted for Health Week were: Dia-betes Prevention Program and HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP).Obesity has long been an issue in both counties and can lead to the development of Type II Diabetes. And with statistics such as 15. 3 percent of adults in Washington and 16.5 percent in Holmes County having been diagnosed with diabe-tes compared to the state average of 11.8 percent it is imperative to see better health habits, FDOH offi-cials said.The goal of the program is to help adults achieve and maintain a weight loss of five to seven percent of their ini-tial body weight. Achieving and maintaining at least 150 minutes of moderate physi-cal activity per week is also part of the objective.The program is one year long with classes every week for 16 weeks that teach the tools to live a healthier life.Reducing incidences of HIV infections is another one of FDOH top priorities. By providing PrEP to those at the highest risk for HIV infection, regardless of the clients ability to pay, is one way FDOH plans to eliminate HIV transmission.A prescription of Truvada for PrEP has proven to be an effective prevention program for patients that are compliant in taking their pills every day, officials said.In 2016 there were 93 people living with HIV in Washington County and 21 people in Holmes County. Those statistics make this program essential to reduc-ing the number of local HIV cases.In order to take part in this program and be prescribed Truvada, blood work has to be completed along with questionnaires. A 30 to 90 day supply with no refills can be prescribed and follow up blood work is required every 90 days to assess side effects. Other programs that were offered during National Public Health Week were, Behavioral Health, Injury and Violence Protection and Environmental Health.If anyone is interested in either one of the pro-grams above contact FDOH in Washington County by calling 850-638-6240 or Holmes County at 850-547-8500.FDOH looks to Changing Our Future TogetherWHO SHOULD BE TESTED FOR PREDIABETES AND TYPE 2 DIABETES€ Older than age of 45 € Physically inactive € A parent, brother, or sister with diabetes € African American, Alaska Native, American Indian, Asian American, Hispanic, or Paci“ c Islander € Gave birth to a baby weighing 9 pounds or more or had diagnosed gestational diabetes € High blood pressure or undergoing treatment for high blood pressure € HDL lower than 35 mg/dL or a triglyceride level higher than 250 mg/dL € Polycystic ovary syndrome € Impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance € History of cardiovascular disease Criteria for Use of PrEP in Non-HIV-Infected At-Risk Individuals€ Men who have sex with men (MSM) who engage in unprotected anal intercourse € Individuals who are in a serodiscordant sexual relationship with a known HIV-infected partner. € Male-to-female and female-to-male transgender individuals engaging in high-risk sexual behaviors. € Individuals engaging in transactional sex, such as sex for money, drugs, or housing. € Injection drug users who report any of the following behaviors: sharing injection equipment (including to inject hormones among transgender individuals), injecting one or more times per day, injecting cocaine or methamphetamine, engaging in high-risk sexual behaviors. € Individuals who use stimulant drugs associated with high-risk behaviors, such as methamphetamine. -Individuals diagnosed with at least one bacterial sexually transmitted infection in the last year. € Individuals who have been prescribed non-occupational postexposure prophylaxis (nPEP) who anticipate continued high-risk behavior or have used multiple courses of nPEP.Students Working Against Tobacco (SWAT) is one arm of the FDOH aimed partly at Environmental Protection. [SPECIAL TO WCN/HCTA] The Green Dot Program is one that is offered by FDOH that was highlighted during the recent Public Health Week to target Injury and Violence Protection. [SPECIAL TO WCN/HCTA]

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** B2 Wednesday, April 11, 2018 | Washington County News By Marley JayThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ U.S. stock indexes finished a bit higher Monday as investors let go of some of their fears about a pos-sible trade war between the U.S. and China. But far bigger gains slipped away as the market suffered a steep afternoon decline.Stocks climbed higher and higher in the first hours of trading, and at about 2 p.m. the Dow Jones industrial average was up 440 points. That put the market on track to make up almost all of the ground it lost during a big sell-off on Friday. But stocks have repeatedly changed course as investors tried to guess the outcome of the U.S.China trade dispute, and they did it again Monday afternoon.Health care companies finished with strong gains, and technology companies like Microsoft and Apple regained some of their recent losses. Banks rose along with interest rates. But industrial and retail companies finished with losses, and smaller companies fared worse than larger ones did.Every day the market wakes up and it struggles with whether it should pay attention to noise or pay attention to fundamentals,Ž said Marina Severinovsky, an investment strategist at Schroders. She said stocks have done well recently when investors can get their minds off the trade disputes because the global economy and the U.S. economy are still growing.When companies start to report their first-quar-ter results later this week, she added, the results are likely to be good.The S&P 500 index gained 8.69 points, or 0.3 percent, to 2,613.16. The S&P 500 fell 1.4 percent last week, with large losses Monday and Friday and strong gains in between.The Dow Jones industrial average rose 46.34 points, or 0.2 percent, to 23,979.10. Stocks rise, but biggest gains fadeBy Matt OBrienThe Associated PressThe fine print of YouTubes terms of service has a warning that goes unheeded by millions of children who visit YouTube to watch cartoons, nursery rhymes, science experiments or videos of toys being unboxed.If you are under 13 years of age, then please do not use the service,Ž the terms say. There are lots of other great web sites for you.ŽIn a complaint filed Monday, child advocates and consumer groups are asking the Federal Trade Commission to investigate and impose potentially bil-lions of dollars of penalties on Google for allegedly violating childrens online privacy and allowing ads to target them.Google profits handsomely from selling advertising to kid-directed programs that it packages,Ž said Jeff Chester, director of the Center for Digital Democracy, one of the groups that drafted the complaint. They created a successful model mon-etizing kids data.ŽTelevision networks also run ads during cartoons and other programs aimed at kids.The difference? YouTube does so with a lot of data collection. Its business model relies on tracking IP addresses, search history, device identifiers, location and other personal data about its users so that it can gauge their interests and tailor advertising to them. But a 1998 federal law pro-hibits internet companies from knowingly collecting personal data from kids under 13 without their parents consent.The coalition accuses YouTube of violating that law and deliberately prof-iting off luring children into what Chester calls an ad-filled digital playgroundŽ where com-mercials for toys, theme parks or sneakers can surface alongside kid-oriented videos.YouTube said in an emailed statement that it will read the complaint thoroughly and evaluate if there are things we can do to improve. Because You-Tube is not for children, weve invested signifi-cantly in the creation of the YouTube Kids app to offer an alternative specifically designed for children.ŽThat toddler-oriented YouTube Kids app, launched in 2015, offers more parental controls but is not as widely used „ and features a selection of the same videos and chan-nels that kids can also find on the regular YouTube service.Although its not known if the FTC will take action, the complaint comes at a time of increased public scrutiny over the tech industrys mining of personal data and after the FTC opened an investigation last month into Facebooks privacy practices.For that reason, the FTC may be more reinvigorated and ready to take these issues seriously,Ž said Josh Golin, director of the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, which drafted the complaint along with the Center for Digital Democracy and a George-town University law clinic. Several other groups have signed on, including Common Sense Media, which runs a popular website for families, and the advocacy division of Consumer Reports. I think the day of reck-oning has arrived,Ž said U.S. Sen. Edward Markey, a Massachusetts Democrat who co-authored the 1998 law and says he wants the FTC to look into the YouTube complaint. Americans want to know the answers as to whether or not the privacy of their children is being compro-mised in the online world.ŽFTC spokeswoman Juliana Gruenwald Henderson said the agency looks forward to review-ing the letter. She said the FTC already has brought more than two dozen cases for violations of the 1998 law. None of those services are as popular for kids as YouTube, which has toddler-themed channels with names like ChuChuTV nursery rhymes, which as of last week counted more than 16 mil-lion subscribers and 13.4 billion views. It also has many channels that cater to preteens. Suggested viewingMARKET WATCHDow 23,979.10 46.34 Nasdaq 6,950.34 35.23 S&P 2,613.16 8.69 Russell 1,514.46 1.17 NYSE 12,380.55 31.44COMMODITIES REVIEWGold 1,336.30 4.40 Silver 16.499 .167 Platinum 933.90 21.90 Copper 3.0715 .0175 Oil 63.42 1.36The Associated PressBEIJING „ China has banned exports to North Korea of electronics and other goods that can be used in making weapons, tightening U.N. sanctions imposed over Pyong-yangs nuclear and missile development.The ban covers dual useŽ industrial components, metal alloys and other materials that can be used in both civilian products and weapons, according to a Commerce Ministry statement issued late Sunday.The U.N. Security Council has steadily tightened trade restrictions as leader Kim Jong Uns government pressed ahead with nuclear and missile development in defiance of foreign pressure.Beijing was long Pyongyangs diplomatic protector but has sup-ported the U.N. sanctions out of frustration at what Chinese leaders see as their neighbors increas-ingly reckless behavior.China accounts for nearly all of the isolated Norths trade and energy supplies.The latest ban includes components, software and tools for aircraft manufacturing, carbon fiber, high-voltage and high-temperature equip-ment, and tools for mixing and measuring chemicals.Beijing previously imposed limits on oil sales and cut deeply into the Norths revenue by banning purchases of its coal, textiles and seafood. North Korean businesses in China were ordered to close and migrant workers were sent home.Despite the loss of almost all trade, the impoverished North has pressed ahead with weap-ons development that Kims regime sees as nec-essary for its survival in the face of U.S. pressure.China has steadily increased economic pres-sure on Pyongyang while calling for dialogue to defuse the increasingly acrimonious dispute with U.S. President Donald Trumps government.Chinese leaders have resisted previous U.S. demands for an outright oil embargo but went along with imposing limits.China wont export goods to make weapons to NKorea BUSINESSWHAT TO WATCH FOR TODAY€ Labor Department releases the Producer Price Index for March. € Commerce Department releases wholesale trade inventories for February.MARKET MOVERS€ AveXis Inc.: Up $94.55 to $210.46 „ The gene therapy company agreed to be bought by Novartis for $8.7 billion. € Western Digital Corp.: Up 79 cents to $88.56 „ Technology companies climbed Monday as investors took a more optimistic view of the U.S.-China trade dispute.BRIEFCASEGENEVASwiss giant Novartis to buy AveXis in $8.7B dealSwiss pharmaceuticals giant Novartis says it has agreed to buy the U.S.-based gene therapy company AveXis Inc. for $8.7 billion, part of its goal to become a leader in the treatment of neu-rodegenerative diseases. The tender offer for $218 per share announced Monday marks a whop-ping 88 percent premium from AveXis closing price in Nasdaq trading on Friday. Child advocates ask Federal Trade Commission to investigate YouTubeThis March 20 photo shows the YouTube app on an iPad in Baltimore. [PATRICK SEMANSKY/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO]

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, April 11, 2018 B3 SCHOOLS & SOCIETYStaff ReportCHIPLEY A handful of students are helping less fortunate students have access to weather appropriate clothing.Mrs. Schimpf's fourth-period Leadership Class recently helped sort clothes for the Tiger Pride Closet, which is a place students can receive help with clothing.The class sorted the closet by taking out the winter clothes and putting out spring and summer apparel.Tiger pride: CHS students help studentsCHS students sort out clothes for the Tiger Pride Closet which provides clothing to students in need. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] Third nine weeks honor roll A Honor RollSixth Grade … Lauryn Adams, Ashlynn Barnes, Ethan Berry, Shelby Brock, Jaden Brown, Thad Brown, Isabella Clark, Nikyah Collins, Camilla Davis, Truman Dellwo, Kyndle Finch, Andrew Fleener, Autumn Futch, Izabel Henderson, Christian Hildebrand, Cray Holley, Ava Johns, Carter Kirkland, Ryleigh Kunde, McKenzie Locke, Gavin ONeill, Owen Page, Kasen Pemberton, Jadeyn Popp, Brodie Price, Kendall Riley, Jaycee Suggs, Samantha Swearingen, McKenzie Taylor and Sophie Thomas-WhitakerSeventh Grade … Tristan Brett, Grace Futch, Riley Nelson and Parker SmelcerEighth Grade … Jennah Armstrong, Nathanael Banta, Cami Brown, Nikiyah Brown, Abigail Chomos, Jaiden Clenney, James Thomas Cook, Davis Corbin, Meredith Deal, Travis Drummond, Kaitlyn Hildebrand, Audrey Holley, Ashtyn Miller, Chloe Odom, Konner Odom, Om Patel, Abbie Peters, Akeree Potter, Carson Shores, Julie Smith, Sydney Spen-cer, Gracie Standland, Ansleigh Steele, Genna Stewart, Amiya Summerwell, Will Taylor, Trace Weaver and Adriyanna White A/B Honor RollSixth Grade … Gabriel Beckley, Sydney Black, Colvin Chamberlain, Henry Creamer, Samuel Culbreth, Henry Davis, Athena Desamparado, Alyson Douglas, Hanna Duke, Jackson Feulner, Cheyenne Gainey, Timothy Gibson, Rayna Jenkins, Jacob Jones, Sarah Laursen, Alexandria Maddox, Daquan McCovery, Layla Noss, KeArian Oliver, Lana Otto, Ariel Patton, Madison Peel, Jacob Pettis, Anna Ray, Hayden Register, Emma Riviere, Alitzel Sapp, Harrison Sapp, Mikayla Seaborn, Anna Sellers, Megan Shipes, Tyler Stewart, Marlee Sullivan, Chay Wells, Caleb Williams and Logan WindhamSeventh Grade … Kacey Armstrong, Morgan Ashcraft, Hailee Brown, Jadyn Brown, Daniel Bruner, Matthew Bush, Angel Canipe, Kelcy Cooper, Kaden Creamer, Cass Dillard, Maria Gonzalez, Elijah Gurganus, Landon Hartzog, Madison Hayes, Bryson Howard, Emma Jeffries, Madison Joslin, Janzen Kindelspire, Antonio Lewis, Mia Lindahl, Juan Morado Diaz, Miranda Otto, Serenity Poh, Jessica Rosario, Audrey Shiver, Finley Smith, Skyler Spencer, Amara Stewart-Chambers and Madison WeeksEighth Grade … Cody Baker, Mason Barnes, Indiah Brown, Jakub Bruner, Vivian Cone, Bryan Cooper, Jaquavious Daniels, Jenny Davenport, Matthew Earl, Estefany Galvan, Diamond Hamilton, Mackenzie Harris, Morgan Hess, Joshua Hicks, Ashanti Hooks, Cooper Johns, Brianna Johnson, Dezirae Kincade, Gavin Kindig, Madison Martin, Paige McCrary, Rebecca McCreary, Christyn McLeroy, Javier Mercado, Porter Moore, Hannah Newcomb, Jay Register, Kiley Rich, Avery Sapp, Emma Shiver, Laney Stewart, Kaden Tharp, Bianca Tharpe, Shane Thomas and Keygan Wilson ROULHAC MIDDLE SCHOOLApril20: Progress ReportsMay8: Florida Panhandle Technical College Graduation 22: Chipley High School Senior Awards at 5:30 p.m. 22: Vernon High School Senior Awards at 7:30 p.m. 24: Chipley High School Graduation 25: WISE Graduation 25: Last Day of School (Students Released at 1 p.m.) 25: Vernon High School Graduation 28: Memorial Day (All Personnel Out) 29-30: Post Planning Days for Teachers/Paras/10 Month Personnel)June11: Report Cards go Out2018 WASHINGTON COUNTY SCHOOL CALENDARTrivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy.com 1. Whats the highest possible bowling score without getting any strikes?80, 90, 130, 1902. Where is the Painted DesertŽ that encompasses more than 93,500 acres?Israel, Arizona, Syria, Texas3. Who was U.S. president between John Tyler and Zachary Taylor?Polk, Fillmore, Van Buren, Hayes4. What is British slang for unemployment, Being on the ...Ž?Base, Horn, Dole, Bus5. Which continent has the country of Saudi Arabia?Africa, South Amer-ica, Europe, Asia6. What does the term sub rosaŽ mean?Secretly, Quietly, Boldly, Naughty ANSWERS: 1. 190, 2. Arizona, 3. Polk (11th), 4. Dole, 5. Asia, 6. SecretlyTRIVIA GUY W i l s o n C a s e y Wilson CaseySpecial to The NewsCHIPLEY Chipley High School juniorettes madea second donation to the Brown Bag Blessings program at Kate M. Smith Elementary right before Spring Break to make sure there was enough food available for small school children in need.CHS juniorettes give 'blessings' to children in need[SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] Staff ReportWASHINGTON COUNTY Registration is open for a local youth group summer program.The 4-H group in Washington County has a number of programs open for registration. Organizers remind parents the school will be out before you know it and that several opportunities including daytime and overnight are available.The 4-H Camp Timpoochee is a five-day adventure at on the Choc-tawhatchee Bay, to be held June 18-22. Camp activities will include sport fishing, creative dramatics, outdoor skills, marine explorations, mad science 101, kayaking, snorkeling, archery and crafts along with camp fires and camp songs, a news release from UF/IFAS Extension Wash-ington County stated. The camp is for ages 8 to 13 years old and offers community service hours to counselors who must be between ages 14-18.Another program, "Won-ders of the Insect World" day camp is an exploration of the insect world around humans. Youth will learn about insects and how to make an insect collection. This program is for ages 8-18 and will be held July 17-19.There will be a "STEM Challenge" program to give youth the experience of engineers and scientists working to solve real-world problems and to compete in a challenge on the final day. This program is for ages 8-18 and will be held July 25-27.For more information and registration instructions, visit the UF/IFAS Extension Washington County website: sfyl.ifas.ufl.edu/Washington or call/email the 4-H Agent, Julie Pigott Dillard, at 850-638-6180/juliepd@ufl.edu.4H summer programs registration openSummer registration is open for a number of programs with 4-H. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS]

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** B4 Wednesday, April 11, 2018 | Washington County NewsIf you would like to include an event in this list, email information to: news@ chipleypaper.com Spring CarnivalWAUSAU … Wausau Assembly of God Church will hold a Family Fun Day Spring Carnival from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 14. There will be games, food, fellowship, bouncy house, slides, face painting, a cake walk, pony rides, a petting zoo, a dunking booth and more. This is a free event. The church is located at 3537 Washington Street (Highway 77) in Wausau at the caution light. For more information call 850-814-5422 or 850-541-3241.The ShepherdsBONIFAY … Winterville Assembly of God will host The Shepherds at 7 p.m. Friday, May 4 at the church. The church is located at 1897 Hig hway 177 A in Bonifay. Community appreciation dayVERNON … Unity Baptist Church will host a community appreciation day with a free lunch from 11 a.m. until Saturday, April 21 at the church. Lunch will be cat“ sh or chicken tenders. Lunch is free to the public. The church is located at 3274 River Road (Hinsons Crossroads) in Vernon. For more information call 850-535-4669. St. Lukes to host harpist Amy StablerMARIANNA St. Lukes Episcopal Church will host harpist Amy Stabler at 4 p.m. Sunday, April 22. Child care will be provided from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Admission is free. Donations will be accepted for the Fine Arts Series. The church is located at 4362 Lafayette Street in Marianna. For more information call 850-482-2431. Orange Hill Missionary to host Nugulf Coast Youth ChoirCHIPLEY Deacon Michael Grady and the Nugulf Coast Youth Choir will be in concert at Orange Hill Missionary Baptist Church at 4 p.m. Sunday, April 29. Future Youth Workshops will be developed from the concert under the guidance and training of Deacon Grady. The church is located at 816 Sunday Road in Chipley. For further information call (850) 638-7675.FAITH EVENTS FAITH Staff ReportGRACEVILLE One Bap-tist college held an honor choir festival last month. Participating groups included students from local high schools.The Music and Worship Division of The Baptist College of Florida (BCF) in Graceville hosted a one-day Honor Choir Festival for local high school students, a BCF news release stated. The festival, coordinated by BCF Professor Buford Cox, included honor choir students selected by their choir directors from the following schools Blountstown High School, Chipley High School, Dayspring Christian Academy, Emmanuel Chris-tian School, Graceville High School, Mosley High School, Holmes County High School, and Walton High School.Together, the honor students combined with the BCF College Choir, participated in challenging and intense rehearsals conducted by members of the BCF Music and Worship Division Faculty.The climax of the festival was when the combined choir skillfully performed a demanding set of songs that included KitteryŽ by Wil-liam Billings, I Hear America SingingŽ by Andre Thomas, The Testament of Free-domŽ by Randall Thompson, The Morning TrumpetŽ by B.F. White, and God Bless AmericaŽ by Irving Berlin, the release stated.In the news release, Hannah Patton, an honor choir member from Chipley High School, noted that she really enjoyed the festival because she was able to meet students from other schools with the same passion that she has for music. Patton feels as though her singing has greatly improved after implementing the skills and techniques that she learned from the BCF Professors. She stated, If they do it again next year, I would love to be a part of it!ŽFor more information about the Music and Worship degrees offered at The Baptist College of Florida, call 800-3282660 or visit the website at www.baptistcollege.edu.Local students join regional honor choir at BCF festival If you would like to include a scholarship in this list, email information to: news@chipleypaper.com Scholarships available for CHS seniorsThe Chipley Womans Club will be awaarding scholarships worth $1,000 each to two 2018 graduating seniors from Chipley High School. The applica-tion packets are available in the Guidance Counselors office at the school. Seniors are encouraged to complete these applications and return to the Guidance Counselors office by 3 p.m. Monday, April 30. FPPA offers scholarshipThe Florida Peanut Producers Associ-ation recently announced the opening of their 2018 Scholarship Award Program, effective April 1, 2018.Two $1,200 scholarships will be awarded to deserving high school seniors and/or college students. The applicant or someone in the applicants family must be an actively producing peanut grower, not necessarily a member of the FPPA. Each winner will receive $600 when the scholarship winners are announced. The remaining $600 will be awarded after the completion of one semester and documentation of passing grades is submitted to the FPPA Office. The Florida Peanut Producers Association is committed to helping further the education of young people in Florida and the scholarship program is evidence of our commitmentŽ said Ken Barton, Executive Director of the FPPA.Ž The FPPA welcomes all applicants. The final selection will be made by the commit-tee and all applicants will be notified by mail, as will the scholarship winners, said Barton. For an application contact the FPPA Office at 2741 Penn Ave., Suite 1 Marianna, FL 32448, call (850) 526-2590 or you can print the application off the FPPA website www.flpeanuts.com. The scholarship applications must be post-marked no later than July 1, 2018.AVAILABLE SCHOLARSHIPS

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, April 11, 2018 B5 OBITUARIESHerman Bradley, Jr. of Panama City, Florida, went home to be with the Lord on March 29, 2018 in the Bay Medical Covenant Hospice Unit of Panama City, Florida. He was 61 years old. Herman was born on March 24, 1957 to Ernestine Bradley and the late Herman Bradley, Sr. in Panama City, Florida. He was reared and attended the Grove Temple First Born Church of Panama City, Florida and was an devout FSU fan. He is survived by his children: Karon Bradley and Sabrieka Bradley; six (6) grandchildren; mother: Ernestine Bradley, all of Panama City, Florida; siblings: Ronnie Wilkerson, Joyce Caldwell, David Bradley, all of Panama City, Florida, Diana Amerson of Fayetteville, North Carolina, Jacqueline Thornton of Ramstein, Germany, Christopher Bradley of Orlando Florida, and Sebrina Anglin of Alabama; along with a host of nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. A Celebration of Hermans Life was held at 11 AM CST, Saturday, April 7, 2018 from the sanctuary of the Grove Temple First Born Church of Panama City, Florida with Pastor Clinton Brown, officiating. Committal Services followed in the Hillside Cemetery of Panama City, Florida with Cooper Funeral Home of Chipley, Florida, directing. The family received friends on 1hr prior to service on Saturday at the church with the Celebration of Life to follow. Friends may sign the guestbook online at www.cooperfhchipley. com.HERMAN BRADLEY, JR.Joleen Clemens Bryan, age 81, of Slocomb, Alabama died April 2, 2018. A funeral service was held Thursday, April 5, 2018 in the Peel Funeral Home Chapel. Interment was in the Caryville City Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing.JOLEEN C. BRYANChristy Lee Burris, age 58, of Bonifay, Florida died March 30, 2018. A funeral service was held Monday, April 2, 2018. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.CHRISTY L. BURRIS Mrs. Betty Sue Crutchfield, age 76, of Bonifay, Florida passed away March 31, 2018 at Washington Nursing and Rehab in Chipley, Florida. She was born July 19, 1941 in Bonifay, Florida to the late William Carl Morris and Rosie Lee Goddin Morris. Mrs. Crutchfield is survived by three children, Rickey Raley, David Crutchfield and wife Lisa and Barbara Reeves and husband Neal all of Bonifay, FL; one brother, Bill Morris and wife Diane of Ponce de Leon, FL; a special niece, Sherri Rushing of Ponce de Leon, FL; 8 grandchildren, 5 great-grandchildren and several nieces and nephews. A graveside service was held at 3:00 PM Tuesday, April 3, 2018 in the Bonifay Cemetery with Rev. Mitch Johnson officiating. Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.BETTY S. CRUTCHFIELDClarence Thomas TommyŽ Hayden, Jr., 57, of Grand Ridge, passed into the arms of his heavenly father Tuesday, April 3, 2018 at his home with his loving family around him. A native of Julian, NC, Tommy had resided in Jackson County for the past 14 years. He previously worked as owner/operator as a truck driver and in the lawn service. He was preceded in death by his parents, Clarence Sr. and Hattie Corsbie Hayden; maternal grandparents, Roscoe and Ora Corsbie; paternal grandparents, Raleigh and Essie Hayden; a step daughter, Robin Dietrich. Survivors include his wife Alma Barfield Hayden; a step granddaughter, Amanda Williams who lovingly called him DaddyŽ; step daughters, Debra Williams, Deena Powell and husband Emmitt; seven step grandchildren, one step great grandchild, numerous nieces and nephews; three sisters, Carolyn Davis and fianc Dennis Welch, Debbie Cox and husband Ronnie, Cherise May and husband Alton; one brother, Frankie Hayden and wife Judy. Graveside funeral services were held at 2:30 p.m. Friday, April 6, 2018 at Shady Grove Cemetery with Rev. Flavious Pittman officiating with James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel directing. The family received friends from 1 p.m. until 2 p.m., Friday, April 6, 2018 at James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel. The funeral cortegedeparted James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel at 2 p.m., Friday, April 6, 2018 for the graveside service. In lieu of flowers, the family ask that contribution be made to Fund the Funeral at http://www.fundthefuneral.com.CLARENCE T. HAYDENMr. John Henry JohnnyŽ Johnson of Bonifay, FL passed away Monday, April 02, 2018, at his home surrounded by his loving family. He was 68. Mr. Johnson was born January 10, 1950 in Geneva County, AL to the late Henry Pulaski and Gertrude Boswell Johnson. He was a loving and devoted husband, father and grandfather who enjoyed making memories with his grandchildren. He possessed a strong work ethic, having worked for many years in the construction industry. He believed in hard work, always willing to help a friend in need. In his spare time, he enjoyed fishing. Mr. Johnny proudly served his country in the US Army during the Vietnam Conflict and was a proud graduate of Geneva High School, class of 1968. In addition to his parents, he is preceded in death by three sisters, Edna Adams, Nadine Adams and Judy Dozier. Survivors include his wife of 46 years, Sharon Johnson of Bonifay, FL; one daughter, Heidi Hudson (Phillip) of Bonifay, FL; four grandchildren, Arabella and Annalia Hudson of Bonifay, FL and Mallory and Molly Vann of Westville, FL; one brother, Billy Ray Johnson of Bonifay, FL; special nephew, Michael Vann (Melissa) of Westville, FL; close family friend, Matthew Clemons of Bonifay, FL; several nieces and nephews and extended family and friends. Funeral services were held at 2:00 p.m. Thursday, April 05, 2018 in the Chapel of Warren Holloway Ward Funeral Home in Geneva with Rev. Gary Armstrong officiating. Burial followed in the Friendship Community Cemetery with military honors and Warren Holloway Ward Funeral Home directing. The family received friends Wednesday, April 04, 2018 from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m. at the funeral home. Warren~Holloway~Ward Funeral Home (334) 684-9999, is in charge of arrangements. "Continuing The Trust You've Placed In UsŽ To sign a guest register, please visit: www. whwfuneralhome.comJOHN H. JOHNSON James N. Kates, 78, of Tallahassee, Florida, died Friday, March 30, 2018. James was born to Drain and Marie Kates, March 24, 1940, in Bonifay, Florida. He graduated from Holmes County High School in 1958. He attended American University in Washington, D.C., for two years while serving as an elevator operator in the House Office Building under the sponsorship of his local Congressman. He graduated from the Florida State University and became a vocational rehabilitation counselor. He met Judith Mulloy in 1965, and the two married in 1966. After an amicable divorce he met his second wife, Linda Kight, in 1989. He was Widowed by Linda in 1993, after far too short a time together. He spent the last several years of his life reunited with Judith. James spent his career with the Florida Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) as a counselor, supervisor and personnel liaison, until he retired. He touched the lives of countless people with disabilities who achieved greater independence with his assistance. He is remembered by VR staff for his kindness, generosity, and events at his picturesque home on the banks of the St. Marks River. He was a devoted, loyal, life-long friend to many. He leaves as his legacy his son and daughterin-law, Patrick Kates and Julia Bluhm Kates, and his granddaughter, Lillian Bluhm Kates. He was beloved by his step-daughters and their families: Carina and Andy Dunlap, and their children Adam and Evan, and Tara and Craig Hewitt, and their children, Craig, Catherine, Camille, and Cai. There was a visitation on Friday, April 6, 2018, from 6:00 to 8:00 PM Culley's MeadowWood Funeral Home at 1737 Riggins Road, Tallahassee, FL 32308. A reception was scheduled for April 7, 2018, at 1:00 and was followed by a celebration of life at Culleys. There was a graveside service in Bonifay, Florida at 5:00 PM EST. For additional information, please see: culleysmeadowwood.com The family requests that donations be made to the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinsons Research at https://www. michaeljfox.org/getinvolved/donation2. php or The Alzheimers Project https://www. alzheimersproject.org/ give/ in lieu of flowers.JAMES N. KATESLeslie Carl Laabs, age 52 of Chipley, FL passed from this life on April 3, 2018 at the Northwest Florida Community Hospital. He was born on December 23, 1965 in Rochester, MN to the late Carol Coe and Doris Laabs. Leslie is a lifelong resident of the Washington County area and worked as a chef at Dees Restaurant for many years. He is survived by his mother, Doris Laabs, three daughters, Megan Bethke, Jennie Ann Laabs, Cheyenne Laabs, three brothers, Rusty Coe, Brian Coe, Jeff Coe, six sisters, Brenda Shelley, Juliann Laabs, Kimberly Lawson, Tammy Robinson, Kathy Peppenger, Tracey Ristan and five grandchildren. Memorialization was by cremation. A Memorial Service to Honor Leslies life will be set at a later date. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley, FL are in charge of arrangements. Family and friends may sign the online register at www. brownfh.netLESLIE C. LAABSMr. Richard Lewis Steele, age 88, of Bonifay, Florida passed away April 4, 2018 at his home. He was born April 24, 1929 in Greenberg, Pennsylvania. Mr. Steele was preceded in death by his parents, Floyd Ferguson Steele and Bess Witt Steele and two siblings. Mr. Steele is survived by his wife, Wynelle Steele of Bonifay, FL; four sons, Mike Steele and wife Susan of Fountain, FL, Jack Steele and wife Patrice of Wesley Chapel, FL, Ron Verhine and wife Carol of Naples, FL and Don Verhine of Chipley, FL; three daughters, Donna Lance and husband Jim Bozarth of Chipley, FL, Pam Steele of Bradenton, FL and Tracy Steele of FL; ten grandchildren, Charlie Rose, Shawn Rose, Jacob Steele, Ian Verhine, Kevin Steele, Troy Steele, Shawn Steele, Michael Anderson, Tana Doolittle and Kim Connor; several great-grandchildren. A memorial service was held at 2:00 PM Saturday, April 7, 2018 in the Peel Funeral Home Chapel. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.RICHARD L. STEELE CONTINUED ON B6

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** B6 Wednesday, April 11, 2018 | Washington County News ACUPUNCTURECAFFEINE MAY AFFECT TREATMENTThe next time you have an acupuncture appointment, consider skipping that cup of co ee. Studies suggest that even trace amounts of ca eine in your system could disrupt the painrelieving e ects of acupuncture, says the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. „ Brandpoint HEALTH ASTHMACOMMON TRIGGERS TO AVOIDAn asthma attack can occur when you are exposed to things in the environment, such as house dust mites and tobacco smoke, which are known as asthma triggers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention note that some of the most important triggers are: € Environmental tobacco smoke (Secondhand smoke) € Dust mites € Outdoor air pollution € Cockroach allergen € Pets € Mold € Wood smoke By Emily Bazar Kaiser Health NewsRule No. 1: Stay alive If you or a loved one wants to beat an opioid addiction, first make sure you have a handy supply of naloxone, a medication that can reverse an overdose and save your life. Friends and families need to keep naloxone with them,Ž says Dr. David Kan, an addiction medicine specialist in Walnut Creek who is president of the California Society of Addiction Medicine. People using opioids should keep it with them, too.Ž More than 42,200 Americans died from opioid overdoses in 2016, victims of a crisis thats being fueled by the rise of a powerful synthetic opioid called fentanyl, which is 30 to 50 times more potent than heroin. Rock stars Prince and Tom Petty had fentanyl in their systems when they died. People can become addicted to opioids through long-term use, or misuse, of prescription painkillers. In most cases, that leads to heroin use, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. If youre ready to address your own addiction, or that of a loved one, know that you may not succeed „ at first. You probably wont be able to do it without outside help or medications. And youll probably have to take those medications for years „ or the rest of your life. Getting over a drug addiction is a process. There are going to be ups and downs,Ž says Patt Denning, director of clinical services and training at the Center for Harm Reduction Therapy in San Francisco and Oakland. We need to hang with people while theyre struggling. It might take awhile.Ž Thats why Denning and others suggest you start with having naloxone on hand, which can help you stay alive through the process. Naloxone, which can be administered as a nasal spray or injection, is available without a prescription in more than 40 states. Ask your pharmacy if it stocks the drug. Rehab alone doesnt work People addicted to opioids face staggering relapse rates of 80 to 90 percent within 90 days if they try short-term rehab or detox programs that wean them off the drugs without assistance from medications, says Richard Rawson, a UCLA psychiatry professor emeritus. Rawson warns that rehab can also increase the risk of an overdose, because your bodys tolerance to opioids is lower after you withdraw from them. If you leave rehab and take the same dose you used to take, youre not just going to get high, youre going to be dead,Ž he says. Instead of treating opioid addiction like a curable illness, he and other experts liken it to lifelong, chronic conditions such as diabetes that require ongoing management. This isnt going to be one visit. If you have an addictive disorder, this is going to be the rest of your life,Ž says Dr. Stuart Gitlow, an addiction specialist in New York City who is past president of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. Chronic illnesses often require medication. Rawson and others point to two drugs in particular that may help break your addiction: buprenorphine and methadone. There is some unwarranted stigma attached to these drugs, along with a belief that youre just exchanging one addiction for another,Ž Kan says. While these medications are actually opioids themselves, they control craving and withdrawal „ and help prevent the compulsive and dangerous behavior often associated with addiction. They also reduce your chances of an overdose, Rawson says. And they protect you from other risks that come with opioid addiction, such as exposure to blood-borne infections from sharing needles, including HIV and hepatitis C. Essentially, the medications make you comfortable enough physicallyŽ to confront the issues behind your addiction, from anxiety and depression to posttraumatic stress disorder, Denning says. The federal government agrees. Abundant scientific data show that long-term use of maintenance medications successfully reduces substance use, risk of relapse and overdose, associated criminal behavior, and transmission of infectious disease, as well as helps patients return to a healthy, functional life,Ž according to the Surgeon Generals 2016 report on addiction in America. To obtain methadone, you must visit a clinic governed by state and federal rules. These clinics are not particularly patient-friendly. You have to go every day. You cant travel,Ž Denning says. It takes over your life.Ž Buprenorphine, on the other hand, can be obtained from doctors, including primary care physicians, who have undergone training and received federal approval. To find a doctor who prescribes buprenorphine, go to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration website at www.samhsa.gov and click on the Find Help & TreatmentŽ link from the home page. You can search by state and ZIP code. Though you can receive care from your primary care physician, Gitlow recommends that you also consult with an addiction specialist. A er you start the medication ... Once patients start one of the medications, its not clear how long they should stay on „ a question that deserves further research, Rawson says. The longer people stay on treatment, the lower the death rate is and the more theyre able to function,Ž he says. Often patients face pressure from family members, who badger them to get off the medications even though it would be better for them to stay on them, Kan says. We dont say to patients who suffer from diabetes ƒ Have you changed your diet enough so you can get off insulin?Ž he says. Kan and other addiction specialists generally dont encourage medication treatment alone, no matter how long you stay on it. Pairing the medication with therapy or other support, including 12-step programs such as Narcotics Anonymous, can reduce relapse rates further, they say. Staying aliveHow to ght an opioid addiction FLICKRRufus Lamar Leavins, age 69, of Ponce de Leon, Florida died April 2, 2018. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.RUFUS L. LEAVINSBruce Locklear, age 75 of Vernon, FL went home to be with the Lord on April 3, 2018 at Bay Medical Center. He was born on February 17, 1943 to the late Ancel and Martha Jane (West) Locklear in West Bay, FL. Bruce worked most of his life as an orange picker and he is a member of West Bay Holiness Church. He is preceded in death by his wife, Carol Mary Locklear. Survivors include, one son, Bruce Locklear Jr.and one daughter, Laurie Baker, four grandchildren and one great grandchild. Memorialization was by cremation with Brown Funeral Home of Chipley, FL in charge of arrangements. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh.netBRUCE LOCKLEARCutis Gene Mancill, age 65, of Vernon, Florida died April 2, 2018. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangementsCUTIS G. MANCILLFred M. Strickland, age 66 of Lynn Haven, FL passed from this life early Tuesday morning, April 3, 2018 at his home with his loving family. He was born on November 22, 1951 to the late Vernon Strickland andBetty (Barnes) Strickland in Chipley, FL. Fred served his country in the United States Army and worked as a contractor after his military career. Along with his father he is preceded in death by his grandparents, Frank and Thelma Barnes and WillieMae Lamb, one brother, Kenneth Strickland, one sister, Deborah Jones. Survivors include, his wife, Brenda Strickland of Lynn Haven, FL, one son, Jonathan Strickland and wifeDonna of Slidell, LA, one daughter, Brooke Bolyard and husband William of Nashville, TN, his mother,Betty Strickland of Chipley, FL, two sisters, Jeannie Lovett and husband Terry of Chipley, FL, Judy Messerof Chipley, FL, three grandchildren, Tyler Strickland, Brant Bolyard and Barrett Bolyard. Familyreceived friends for visitation on Thursday, April 5, 2018 at Grace and Glory Worship Centerfrom 4:006:00 P.M. Funeral Services were held on Friday, April 6, 2018 at 11:00 A.M. at Grace andGlory Worship Center. Interment followed at the Wachob Forrest Lawn Cemetery with Brown FuneralHome directing. Family and friends may sign the online register at www. brownfh.netFRED M. STRICKLANDMrs. Glenda Ree Summerlin, 71 of Bonifay, Florida died on Saturday, March 31, 2018, at Bonifay Nursing and Rehab Center in Bonifay, Florida. Born Monday, November 4, 1946 in Geneva, Alabama, she was the daughter of the late Rufus Johnson and the late Mattie Wood Johnson. Surviving is her husband, Frank Summerlin, son, Danny Summerlin of Bonifay, FL, daughters, Marie Ramer of Bonifay, FL, Melissa Hood of Bonifay, FL, Sheila Harris and husband Martin of Bristol, FL and Sharon Kent of Bonifay, FL; grand children, Brenton Swindle, Ashley Hood, Brandon Ramer, Kyle Hood, Haylee Revell, Austin Kent; great grand children, Kaleb Hood, Addison Revell, Todd Revell, Harper Harris, great grandson to be, Easton Kent. A Funeral service was held at 2:00 PM on Thursday, April 5, 2018 at Bonifay Cemetery with the Rev. Ike Steverson officiating. Interment was in Bonifay Cemetery, Bonifay, FL. The family received friends from 11:30 AM to 2:00 PM on Thursday, April 5, 2018, at Sims Funeral Home 201 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Bonifay, Florida.GLENDA R. SUMMERLIN OBITUARIES| CONTINUED FROM B5

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Washington County News | Wednesday, April 11, 2018 B B 7 7 NF-5036304 NF-5031562 Hazardous Aerial Tree Removal  Stump Grinding Trimming & Pruning  Emergency Tree Service  Lot Clean UpDow Morris,Owner/Operator 850-527-6291  850-849-3825 Readers’ Choice2017WASHINGTON HOLMES JACKSON (850) 638-3611 HastyHeating & Cooling NF-5028471 ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE OR BUSINESS FOR AS LITTLE AS $10 A WEEK!Reach thousands of potential customers with your Business Guide ad in the:WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS HOLMES COUNTY-TIMES ADVERTISER WEEKLY ADVERTISER CALL TODAY! 850-638-0212 NF-5036305 NF-5032746JOEYS SPORTING GOODSBAIT & TACKLE, GUNS & AMMO, ACCESSORIES & SPORT CLOTHINGJOEY SELLERSJOEYSSPORTINGGOODS 2064 Holly Street Westville, Fla. 32464850-548-5055 NF-5031560 C & CBookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available JOB ANNOUNCEMENT HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR IPublic Works Department Advertisement Date: 04/05/18-04/19/18 The Washington County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for a HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR I position in the PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT The primary function of the Heavy Equipment Operator I will be to operate machinery in connection with the construction, repair, and maintenance of roads and right-of-ways within Washington County. Minimum Training and Experience: One year of verifiable experience in the operation and routine maintenance of heavy equipment. Valid Florida Class “A” or “B” CDL Driver’s License required. Class A preferred. The starting hourly rate is $10.16. Applications may be accessed on-line at www .washingtonfl.com Applications and job descriptions may also be obtained at the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office located at 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428. All interested applicants MUST submit an Employment Application to the Human Resources Department in the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office by 4:00 PM on April 19, 2018 All questions regarding this position or other vacancies should be directed to the Human Resources Department, 850-415-5151. The selected applicant will be subject to a preemployment physical and drug screen. Veteran’s Preference is accepted in accordance with FS 295.08. Equal Opportunity/Drug-Free Workplace Job PostingDoctors Memorial Hospital has an immediate full-time position available for an RN Director of Case Management/Utilization Review. Must be a dedicated and self-motivated individual. Current Florida Registered Nurse license and BLS certification required. Case Manager will be required to rotate call as part of Nursing Administration. Interested applicants can send their resume to Doctors Memorial Hospital Attn: Christy Booth, Human Resources Department P.O. Box 188 Bonifay, FL 32425. Or apply in person at 2600 Hospital Drive. Doctors Memorial Hospital is a Drug-Free Workplace. Tobacco-Free Campus. EOE. Position AvailableDoctors Memorial Hospital currently has a position available for a full-time (36 hour/week) Registered Nurse to work ER night shift Thursday, Friday, and every other weekend. ER or Critical Care Experience preferred. To apply please send your resume Attn: Human Resources to P.O. Box 188 Bonifay, Fl 32425. Or apply in person at 2600 Hospital Drive. Doctors Memorial Hospital is a Drug Free Workplace. Tobacco-Free Campus. EOE. The Holmes County Board of County Commissionersis currently accepting applications for the position of Tourist Development Council Administrative Assistant Part Time (16 hours a week) For applications and job descriptions contact Hannah Benton in the Holmes County Commissioner’s Office at 850 547 1119 or Rebecca Prince at the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce 850 547 6155 Please turn in completed applications to the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce located at 106 E Byrd Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425 or Holmes County Board of County Commissioners located at 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, no later than 2:00 PM on April 17, 2018. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer. 4-3480 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISOION IN RE: ESTATE OF CHRISTOPHER MONROE SAPP Deceased NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Any and All Creditors, Unknown Adress(es), regarding the following real property: Parcel No. 00000000-00-5154-0000 Described as: Commence at the N.E. Corner of the NW of the NE of Section 36, Township 4 North, Range 15 West, thence East 73.0 feet to the Point of Beginning, thence South 373.07 feet, thence East 592.0 feet; thence North along the West right-of-way of State Road 79 373.07 feet: thence West 592 feet to Point of Beginning, and said parcel containing 5.07 Acres, more or less, and lying in Washington, County, Florida. Also identified as: 3021 Leavins Road, Bonifay, Florida 32425 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that petition for Summary Administration in Probate has been filed in this court. Your are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, on petitioner’s attorney, whose name and address are: Zachary R. White, P.A., P.O. Box 5196, Tallahassee, FL 32314 on or before April 30, 2018, and to file the original of the written defenses with the clerk of this court either before service or immediately thereafter. Failure to serve and file written defenses as required may result in a judgment or order for the relief demanded, without further notice. Signed on this 29 day of March, 2018. Lora C Bell As Clerk of the Court By: JoAnn Hayes As Deputy Clerk First Publication on April 4, 2018 April 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2018 4-3477 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given IDE TECHNOLOGIES the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 12-00440 Year of Issuance 2012 Parcel 00-1881-0002 assessed to: MARGARET S ROGERS ESTATE Description of Property 4 4 13 .13 ORB 833 P 258 BEG @ SEC OF BLK #16, W 150’, N 40’, E 150’, S ALNG MAIN ST TO POB, AS DESC IN ORB 833 P 128, ORB 859 P 144, ORB 859 P 336 PARCEL NO. 00000000-00-1881-0002. All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on APRIL 18,2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk MARCH 31, APRIL 4,11,18, 2018 4-3444 **OFFICIAL** N O T I C EO F G E N E R A LE L E C T I O N I, Ken Detzner, Secretary of State of the State of Florida, do hereby give notice that a GENERAL ELECTION will be held in WASHINGTON County, State of Florida, on the SIXTH Day of NOVEMBER, 2018, A.D., to fill or retain the following offices: United States Senator Representative in Congress: District 2 Florida Cabinet -Governor Florida Cabinet -Lieutenant Governor Florida Cabinet -Attorney General Florida Cabinet -Chief Financial Officer Florida Cabinet -Commissioner of Agriculture State Senator: District 2 State Representative: District 5 Circuit Judge, Fourteenth Judicial Circuit: Groups 3, 4, 6 and 11 School Board: Districts 1, 4 and 5 County Commissioner: Districts 2 and 4 Orange Hill Soil and Water Conservation District: Groups 2 and 4 April 11, 18, 2018 4-3489 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 18-28CP IN RE: THE ESTATE OF JOHN HAYWARD ADAMS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of John Hayward Adams, deceased, whose date of death was January 9,2018, and whose file number is listed as 18-28CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Washington County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is the Washington County Clerk, 1293 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida 32428. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against decedent’s Estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims and who may have been served a copy of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedent’s Estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIMS FILED TWO YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is: April 11, 2018. Kaitlin Adams Petitioner/Executor 1212 Saxony Lake Dr Antioch, Tennessee 37013 KRISTI MILLER NOVONGLOSKY Florida Bar No. 0182044 Chipley, FL 32428 Post Office Box 1129 Telephone: (850) 638-7587 Attorney for Petitioner April 11 and 18, 2018 4-3479 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given BLAINE INVESTMENTS, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 00-00278 Year of Issuance 2015 Parcel 00-0913-0013 assessed to: BANK OF AMERICA NA Description of Property 30 3 13 2.96 ORB 255 P 76 BG 717.47’ W, 330’ S OF NEC OF NW , RN S. 330’, W. 463.10’, N. 330’, E. 463.10’ TO POB AS DESC IN ORB 255 P 76, LESS ORB 771 P 291 PARCEL NO. 00000000-00-0913-0013. All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door, 1293 Jackson Ave, Chipley on APRIL 18,2018 at 10:00 AM. Lora C Bell, Clerk of Court, Washington County Florida By: Tamara Donjuan, Deputy Clerk MARCH 31, APRIL 4,11,18, 2018 4-3445 **OFICIAL** AVISO DE ELECCIONES GENERALES Yo, Ken Detzner, Secretario de Estado del Estado de la Florida, por el presente notifico que se llevarn a cabo ELECCIONES GENERALES en el Condado de WASHINGTON, Estado de la Florida, el da SEIS de NOVIEMBRE de 2018 d. C., para determinar la ocupacin o la retencin de los siguientes cargos: Senador de los Estados Unidos Representante ante el Congreso: distrito 2 Gabinete de la Florida Gobernador Gabinete de la Florida Vicegobernador Gabinete de la Florida Procurador General Gabinete de la Florida Funcionario Principal de Finanzas Gabinete de la Florida Comisionado de Agricultura Senador estatal: distrito 2 Representante Estatal: distrito 5 Juez del Circuito, 14. Circuito Judicial: grupos 3, 4, 6 y 11 Junta Escolar: distritos 1, 4 y 5 Comisionado del Condado: distritos 2 y 4 Distrito de Conservacin de Tierra y Agua de Orange Hill: grupos 2 y 4 April 11, 18, 2018 Yorkshire Boar 3-Years-Old, approx 385-Pounds. Very tame. Needs home with a large wife. For sale or trade 850-333-6831. Garage/Estate Sale 3572#E Roache Ave. 7:00am-Noon. Sat, April 14th. Multi Family Yard Sale April 12-14, 1280 S. Weeks St. Bonifay, Fl Furniture & Household items, antiques. Estate Sale for Mr. John H. Curtis 1744 Sorrells Road, Chipley, FL 32428 Friday April 13, 2018 Saturday, April 14, 2018 8:00am to 4:00pm ( Directions: From Hwy 90 in Chipley, FL. Take Hwy 277 South to Sorrells Road, follow signs -2nd house on right) Contents of House Consists of: Living Room Sofa, recliners, wing back chairs, lamps, T.V, Curio, coffee & end tables, vintage stereo, small entertainment center, TV Stand, records, wall clock, pictures Bedroom Queen Headboard w/Bedding, Singer Sewing Machine, cedar chest, dresser, chests, misc small tables, 2 twin beds with bedding -linens & quilts, conputer desk. Kitchen Small electric applicances, refridgerator, stove, washer & dryer, oak table w/4 chairs, misc chairs, cookingware, desk sets, misc classware, crystal stemware, fenton white hobnail items, Men there are tools, tools & more tools, really too much to list but a littel of everything pertaining to tools Dont Miss Out! Employment OpportunityThe Holmes County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for the positions of: Assistant County Veteran Service Officer, Full-Time Temporary Project Monitor, Part-time seasonal Parks/Inmate Work Squad Supervisor and Part-time seasonal Bushhog Operator. For applications and job descriptions contact Hannah Benton in the Holmes County Commissioner’s Office at 850-547-1119. Please turn in completed applications to the County Commissioner’s Office located at 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, no later than 2:00 PM on April 13, 2018. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employe r. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 For Rent 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments in Vernon. Clean, stove, refrigerator, central heat/air, convenient to Panama City Beach, section 8, Rental assistance. 850-638-4640 For Rent One Bedroom apartments for rent in Chipley. Convenient location. Stove and refrigerator furnished. No Pets. Smoke free environment. Call 850-638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 2BR/1BA House for rent. Between Sunny Hills & Wausau. 1st, last & deposit. $600/month. Prefer mature adults. 850-733-2605 For Rent 4BR/1.5BA, no pets, HUD approved. CH&A. Chipley. $700/MO, $700/DEP 850-638-7601. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. 2 Bedroom Mobile Home in Bonifay. Water & sewage included. Not HUD, no pets, rental references required. $475-$550. 638-2999 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/ sewage/ lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 Bonifay, 3BD/2BA MH w/covered deck. 3/4 mile from school on Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $700 rent/$700 deposit. 850-547-3746. For Sale Two acre plot and one acre plot in Jacob City, FL. Call 850-849-9338. Highway 77 2 miles south of Chipley 4-8 acre tract Bedie Road. Call Milton Peel at 850-638-1858 or 326-9109 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. Will Clean Inside your house weekly or biweekly. Reliable, honest, 30 years experience. Have references. Call Sherry, 850-849-0644 for estimates. Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! Spot Advertising works! Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely.

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B B 8 8 Wednesday, April 11, 2018 | Washington County News NF-5036118 FOR DURABILITY, QUALITY, LINES OF SIGHT AND A QUIET CAB,MAHINDRAS EXCELLENT.ŽJOHN A.Cobleskill, NY98% OF MAHINDRA OWNERS WOULD RECOMMEND ONE TO A NEIGHBOR.Mahindra of Marianna4909 Highway 90, Marianna FL 32446PH: 850.526.3456www.MahindraOfMarianna.com

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Home & Farm SPRINGWednesday, April 11, 2018 Washington County News Holmes County Times-AdvertiserFFB names Farm Family of the Year for Washington and HolmesPage 8New yard art trends of 2018 Page 5Spring chores for your homePage 7

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H2 Wednesday, April 11, 2018 | By Jacqueline BostickHome & FarmCHIPLEY The Chipley Farmers Market starts up in May. This year, organizers are looking to kick-start it with a festival. The Farmers Market in Chipley will open the first Tuesday in May. Subsequently, the market will be open 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. noon every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday at the old Chipley train depot, at 685 Seventh Street in Chipley, one block East of Downtown Chipley. The market has had about four vendors consistently over the past two decades. However, Matthew Orwat, UF /IFAS Extension Washington County Horticulturist hopes the upcoming market will grow which is one reason for the kick-off festival. Id like to see the festival and get people out there to try different produce and maybe get some of the local businesses to maybe cook some burgers or hotdogs,Ž Orwat said. Some of the struggle with sustaining the farmers market involves the cost on the customer when purchasing fresh produce. While a pound of tomatoes may cost upwards of $2 to $3 per pound at the farmers market, big box grocers easily attract customers at a fraction of the cost. WIC and senior coupons issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture drive the farmers market. Once those customers are gone, the farmers market customer traffic thins out, Orwat pointed out. Hopefully, with the festival and more community involvement, the market will attract more vendors and customers. I want to help keep the market going because in the future it could be a really good thing,Ž Orwat said. We dont want it to go away.Ž The market will be held this year May through the end of the summer and starts back up with winter vegetablesŽ in September.Farmers Market starts MayFresh produce for sale at the Chipley Farmers Market. [MATTHEW ORWAT, UF /IFAS EXTENSION WASHINGTON COUNTY HORTICULTURIST] Vendors sells their produce at the Chipley Farmers Market. [MATTHEW ORWAT, UF /IFAS EXTENSION WASHINGTON COUNTY HORTICULTURIST] Jacqueline BostickHome & FarmWASHINGTON AND HOLMES COUNTIES You dont have to have a big yard to have a garden. This spring, consider growing out of raised beds. Bill Maphis, owner of Maphis Nursery & Tree Farm, 1532 Orange Hill Road, in Chipley,is an expert in growing from a garden box. From herbs to avocado trees, your compact garden can grow a variety of plants. All kind of things are growing now, this is the time of year that everybody plants everything,Ž Maphis said while entering his greenhouse. You dont have to have a big yard to have a garden.Ž Although spring may put one in the mind of blooming plants, the warmer temperatures of the season create an environment for seeds to sprout. Potatoes and other rustic vegetables that can sustain cooler temperatures are planted earlier in the year. They started back in January and theyll plant right on up to Mothers Day,Ž Maphis said. Right out of your raised beds, you can grow a range of plants. It is time to consider things like squash, green beans, cucumbers and tomatoes,Ž Maphis wrote in a his monthly column Landscapes, Gardens & More in the Florida Panhandle. These plants like for night time temperatures to be above 60 degrees. They will grow better and faster.Ž At his nursery, carrots, potatoes, greens, herbs from chocolate spearmint to rosemary, asparagus and even squash are planted in raised beds. Maphis has two upcoming gardening classes: Peach, Plum and Nectarine Grafting on April 19 fom 6 to 8 p.m. Cost is $25; Air Layering on May 12 from 6 to 8 p.m. Cost is $20. Classes are held at the nursery and tree farm, located at 1534 Orange Hill Road in Chipley. For more information, go to www.maphistreefarmandnursery.com.Consider raised beds this springBill Maphis, owner of Maphis Nursery & Tree Farm, in Chipley, points to the variety of plants grown at his nursery out of raised beds. [JACQUELINE BOSTICK | HOME AND FARM]

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| Wednesday, April 11, 2018 H3By Jacqueline BostickHome & FarmWASHINGTON AND HOLMES COUNTIES According to a 2015 University of Florida-IFAS Extension report, the economic contributions of agriculture remain a significant force in the region. In Holmes County, the majority of workers were employed in the broad agricultural field were found in the heart of agriculture: crop, livestock, forestry and fisheries production. With the exception of Jackson County, Holmes employed the highest number workers in that category in the entire region, which includes Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Jackson and Washington counties. Theindustry directly employed 1,828 workers in Holmes County and 1,811 in Washington County. Industry revenue directly generated $106 million in Holmes and $114 million in Washington. At $46.2 million in revenue, crop and livestock production made up the majority of the countys agricultural-based income. The category generated $37.3 million in foreign and domestic exports and had an economic impact of $75.2 million. In Washington County, the largest employment base was in food and kindred products distribution and manufacturing. The category brought in $47.8 million in revenue, $3.9 in foreign and domestic exports and had an overall economic impact of $53.4 million. Farmers face many adversities in the process of providing goods to the market, such as the cost of fertilizer, weather and the overhead of irrigation, according to local officials at UF/IFAS. Once a year, across the nation, National Ag Dayrecognizes the abundance afforded by agriculture and the farmers that provide it. Taking a day to recognize their continued contributions to the food industry and the development of infrastructure is warranted. It was observed March 20 this year. UF/IFAS Director for Washington County Julie Dillard said farmers are some of the most intelligent people in the world.Ž They know when to plant specific crops in order to produce the best bounty,Ž Dillard said. They know how to work the land in a way as to not diminish it but to leave it in such a way that it continues to give back.Ž Agriculture is what feeds the world and the hardworking local farm families are the ones to be thanked for taking on the task, she added. Reporter Diane Robinson contributed to this article.Agriculture remains signi cant economic forceA child canoes at Cypress Springs. [SPECIAL TO HOME & FARM] CountyJobs Share of county employment Value Added* impactsShare of GRP** Holmes1,82823.6%$59 million19% Washington1,81121.4%$73 million16.1%Economic Contributions of Agriculture in 2015 Source: UF/IFAS *Value Added is a broad measure of income, representing the sum of employee compensation, proprietor income, otherproperty income, indirect business taxes and capital consumption (depreciation). Value added is a commonly usedmeasure of the contribution of an industry to a regional economy because it avoids double counting of intermediate sales. ** Gross Regional Product

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H4 Wednesday, April 11, 2018 | By Betty MontgomeryMore Content NowNow that the days are getting longer and the temperature is warming up a little, it is time to start thinking about tidying up your garden and getting it ready to plant. Garden centers are starting to bring in wonderful perennials, shrubs, and trees that are looking for new homes. Removing dead wood from shrubs and leaves from those corners where the wind has taken them, is a task that needs to be done. Planning and preparing is the key to a successful garden. I try to get beds ready before plants arrive. I spend time during the late fall and winter deciding what is lacking or needed in the garden. Then I like to get the soil turned and amended. I use a product called Gardeners Choice, rich dirt that is mainly composted leaves, which is a great additive. This black goldŽ helps lighten the mineral rich red clay that is present in our area. Amending the soil breaks up the hard pan and lets water go into the soil easier. Plants and vegetables need good soil in order to produce dazzling flowers and tasty vegetables. I talked with my friend, Michael Dirr, author and plant expert, who told me he was working with his son Matt this past weekend and what fun they had visiting while pruning, cleaning up, and planting. Michael said he was, like a squirrel when working in the garden. Racing from one area to the next, never quite completing the entire task. Unfortunately, the body quits before the finish line.Ž I told him I felt the same way. I started out the morning with a goal of going from bed to bed cleaning and pruning each area, but then got sidetracked getting a bed ready for some perennials that needed to get planted. I also worked on a small hedge of boxwoods around a fountain that looked frazzled. It always amazes me how a little shaping, plus weeding and putting down pine needles can make a bed look better. This made a big difference to the entrance of the garden. I am planning on cutting back some dead limbs and branches in different plants in the garden this week and finishing the task of going from bed to bed, cleaning and pruning. It is easier to cut back and clean up before the old growth gets tangled up in the newly developing leaves. This is a good time of year to give bushes and trees a light sprinkling of a balanced fertilizer. I use a mixture of cottonseed meal, dehydrated cow manure, and a dash of Epsom salt. This is a slow release mixture and will not burn the plants. I do not fertilize spring blooming shrubbery until after they bloom. Fertilizing azaleas at this time of year will put the plants energy into new growth and may result in more leaves and less flowers. Also, if you are not sure when to prune, a good rule to follow for almost any shrubbery is to prune plants after they bloom. Many plants bloom on old wood and if you prune shortly after they bloom, you will not be cutting off the buds that will start forming for the following years flowers. This may sound tricky to some, but it is quite easy to remember. BUT, if I am doing major pruning, and not concerned about the flowers, I prune in February before the plant starts sending out new growth. Sometimes a plant has to be pruned hard and it could interfere with the blooms. There are some plants that flower on new wood; lavender, caryopteris, buddleia, Artemisia, to name a few. These are pruned in the spring after the danger of a hard frost. This will encourage the plant to put out new flowering branches. Most evergreens do not require pruning, just a little shaping is usually all that is needed. However, you can prune evergreen shrubs just before new growth starts to form. Do this after the risk of a late freeze has passed. The new growth that will come shortly will conceal any scars that are present from pruning. Enjoy these warm days and cherish being outside and accomplishing some task that are needed. Take a small area and get it all cleaned up so that you can see that you have achieved your goal. When I do this, I get great satisfaction seeing that I have accomplished something and it helps encourage me to keep working. Happy Gardening everyone! Betty Montgomery is a master gardener and author of Hydrangeas: How To Grow, Cultivate & Enjoy,Ž and A Four-Season Southern Garden.Ž She can be reached at bmontgomery40@gmail.com.ABOVE: It is time to start thinking about tidying up your garden and getting it ready to plant. [BIGSTOCK]BELOW: Cutting a stray branch that has developed on the Harry Lauders Walking Stick bush. [BETTY MONTGOMERY] Prepping forSPRING

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| Wednesday, April 11, 2018 H5Jacqueline BostickHome & FarmWASHINGTON AND HOLMES COUNTIES Yard art is one way to take your yard landscaping to the next level and make your neighbors think all of your planting and repotting was effortless. In past years, the distressed looks of shabby chic had taken the main stage in home interior and exterior design. While it remains very relevant to trend, pottery is now making its way to the top of the landscape and patio must-have lists. Pottery seems to be the big thing,Ž said Sherry Bass, manager at Orange Hill Express in Chipley. Weve sold more pottery already this season than we usually do the whole season.Ž The clay pots fit well with other simple designs, such as shepherds hooks and wooden bird feeders and houses. And the daytime winds of March and April early mornings and sunsets beckon wind chimes. Now is the blustery days,Ž Bass said, so the wind chimes would be really nice to put out on the porch or patio.Ž Other unassuming art include hanging iron and glass tree ornaments, metal yard works, wind mills, wind bottle trees and iron birds nests and moss baskets for potting. As sun sets perhaps near the time of a family picnic or barbeque glass, table torches create glowing accents of a stained glass appearance when filled with citronella and lit.Yard art trends pottery this springPottery lined in rows at Or ange Hill Express. Pottery has taken the main stage for this springs 2018 yard decor trends. [JACQUELINE BOSTICK | HOME & FARM] An iron humming bird on a chain sticks out amongst a tree of glass ornaments. Tree ornaments add color to yard trees. [JACQUELINE BOSTICK | HOME & FARM]

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H6 Wednesday, April 11, 2018 | By Jacqueline BostickHome & FarmA state tourism report shows an upward tick in tourism in Washington County. And agriculture attraction is the impetus. Agritourist and ecotourist attractions, such as canoeing and trails, are experiencing higher traffic „ currently extending their operating season to include winter. Visit Florida, the states official tourism marketing corporation, reported tourists spend about $1.5 million more in Washington County in 2015 than in 2011. The report provides the latest available data. For a rural county, were doing well,Ž Washington County Tourist Development Council Director Heather Lopez said. The uptick in direct spending I would attribute to the economy recovering from the recession,Ž Lopez said. And we have done a lot more marketing,Ž she said, noting the TDC revamped its website and launched social media channels. According to the report, tourists spent about $11.8 million in the county in 2015. The report, produced by Florida Association of Destination Marketing Organization, shows tourism in 2015 generated $263,533 in local sales tax revenue and created 212 jobs. The same year, the food and beverage industry brought in $5.7 million, lodging $2.1 million, retail $1.8 million, recreation $900,000 and transportation $1 million. Despite the uptick, from 2014 to 2015, direct spending by tourists saw only a slight increase, going from $11.7 million to $11.8. From 2013 to 2014, spending had increased by $500,000 and $900,000 from 2012 to 2013. The years 2011 and 2012 did not see any gains or losses in spending, the report shows. Lopez attributed the years of incremental growth to the economy balancing out, also to a shift in the kind of tourist the area is attracting. People are spending more, theyre vacationing more, but theyre budgeting their vacations,Ž Lopez said, in regards to the incremental growth between the 2014 and 2015 years. Theyre really planning them so theyre getting the maximum experience for their money.Ž For example, she noted, millenials demand vacations that are inexpensive, incorporating Uber and AirBnB in their stays. They are also seeking out memorable experiences over luxury vacations. A bonus for us: a lot of your vacationers,Ž she added, theyre looking for an experience, not so much your theme park type vacation anymore. They want something that will bring their family closer together. Something that will effect them emotionally and spiritually.Ž In the absence of diversity commonly found in large metros, Lopez said the TDC will look to market the neighborhoods found in the county through the charm of our people and our culture here.Ž To meet the demand, the TDC is building an agritourism trail that will highlight all local establishments tied to agriculture on a self-guided map. Also, the area has recently added a heritage geocaching trail and the Orange Hill Gator Farm.Agritourism drives local tourist industryStaff Report Home & FarmAgriculture has long been a hallmark in both history and local economy, so it is little wonder this aspect of the community has become an attraction in itself. From farmers markets to U-PickŽ farms, Washington and Holmes counties offer an organic, first-hand look at local agriculture. Here are a few local favorites. Maphis Tree Farm and Nursery Maphis Tree Farm and Nursery in Chipley is one of the last remaining Christmas tree farms in the Florida Panhandle, continuing to thrive since the family planted its first tree crop in 1995. Maphis Nursery remains the familys primary business, however. Owners Bill and Brenda Maphis have been known to demonstrate for visitors the process of making corn meal from removing kernels from the raw cob, to grinding the corn and making fresh corn bread. Maphis Tree Farm and Nursery is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and is located at the corner of the Orange Hill Highway and Rattlebox Road in Chipley.For more information, call 850-638-8243. Twin Oaks Farm Twin Oaks Farm boasts a small and authentic production. The 94-acre certified organic farm is located in Bonifay. It raises chickens, ducks, sheep and pigs on pasture, the old fashioned way. The farm is committed to organic practices, the cultivation of nongenetically modified vegetables and fruits, and the breeding of heritage livestock in an effort to support their conservation. The farm also produces a whole line of artisan food only using organic and/or local ingredients. The 94-acre certified organic farm is located in Bonifay. Main Street Market Located at 1251 Jackson Avenue in Chipley, Main Street Market takes pride in keeping its fresh fruit and produce as local as possible. Stop by and check out the markets variety of Amish goods, as well as plants and other items. Main Street Market is open from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Saturday, and is located at 1251 Jackson Ave, Chipley. Give them a call at (850) 638-7755.U-Pick Farms & farmers markets in full swing See MARKET, H10Blueberries at Gainer Blueberry Farm [SPECIAL TO HOME & FARM]

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| Wednesday, April 11, 2018 H7Special to Home & FarmAfter a long, dark winter, spring's bright sun and warm winds are, well, a breath of fresh air. The only downside? All that sunshine spotlights your leaf-filled gutters, cracked sidewalks and the dead plants in last year's flower beds. Dwight Barnett, a certified master inspector with the American Society of Home Inspectors, shared this checklist to help you target the areas that need maintenance so you can get your chores done quickly, leaving you time to go outside and play in the sunshine. Examine Roof Shingles: Examine roof shingles to see if any were lost or damaged during winter. If your home has an older roof covering, you may want to start a budget for replacement. The summer sun can really damage roof shingles. Shingles that are cracked, buckled or loose or are missing granules need to be replaced. Flashing around plumbing vents, skylights and chimneys need to be checked and repaired by a qualified roofer. Probe the Wood Trim : Use a screwdriver to probe the wood trim around windows, doors, railings and decks. Make repairs now before the spring rains do more damage to the exposed wood. Check the Gutters: Check for loose or leaky gutters. Improper drainage can lead to water in the basement or crawl space. Make sure downspouts drain away from the foundation and are clear and free of debris. Use Compacted Soil: Low areas in the yard or next to the foundation should be filled with compacted soil. Spring rains can cause yard flooding, which can lead to foundation flooding and damage. Also, when water pools in these low areas in summer, it creates a breeding ground for insects. Examine the Chimney: Examine the exterior of the chimney for signs of damage. Have the flue cleaned and inspected by a certified chimney sweep. Inspect the Concrete: Inspect concrete slabs for signs of cracks or movement. All exterior slabs except pool decks should drain away from the home's foundation. Fill cracks with a concrete crack filler or silicone caulk. When weather permits, power-wash and then seal the concrete. Move Firewood: Remove firewood stored near the home. Firewood should be stored at least 18 inches off the ground at least 2 feet from the structure. Check Outside Faucets: Check outside hose faucets for freeze damage. Turn the water on and place your thumb or finger over the opening. If you can stop the flow of water, it is likely the pipe inside the home is damaged and will need to be replaced. While you're at it, check the garden hose for dry rot. Service the AC Unit: Have a qualified heating and cooling contractor clean and service the outside unit of the air conditioning system. Clean coils operate more efficiently, and an annual service call will keep the system working at peak performance levels. Change interior filters on a regular basis. Check Power Equipment: Check your gasand battery-powered lawn equipment to make sure it is ready for summer use. Clean equipment and sharp cutting blades will make yardwork easier.Home Maintenance Tips for SpringOXFORD/GETTY IMAGES

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H8 Wednesday, April 11, 2018 | By Diane M. RobinsonFor Home & FarmCHIPLEY … Washington County celebrated its agricultural leaders at itsannual Farm to City breakfast, held at the Washington County Agriculture Center. Notably, the Bill and Laverne Williams family was honored as Washington Countys 2017 Farm Family of the Year. Farming is a way of life in the Williams family. Bill, following in his grandfathers footsteps, began raising livestock and crops in Washington County more than 40 years ago with his wife, Laverne. Williams first major enterprise was a farrow to finish hog operation, during which time he also grew the crops fed to the hogs. When market conditions persistently became poor, Williams moved away from hog production. While Williams still grows some crops, his major focus is on cattle, hay and timber. A true family farm, every generation of Williams family is involved. Their children, sons Chad and Boyd Williams and daughter Jennifer Price, still help out when they can get away from their own careers. Their grandchildren, Kristen, Haylee, and Caleb Williams and Brayden, Brodie, and Bella Price are also becoming more and more involved.Williams are Farm Family of the YearStaff ReportBONIFAY Justin and Catherine Peel were named the 2017 Farm Family of the Year when Holmes County Farm Bureau held its annual meeting. Held in conjunction with Farm Bureaus statewide Farm-City Week the event celebrated local agricultural innovators and the partnerships between urban and rural residents. Holmes County Extension Director and Agricultural Agent Kalyn Waters presented the award to the Peel family, speaking of a rich family heritage dedicated to Holmes County agriculture. The roots of the 2017 Farm Family run deep,Ž Waters said. Justin Peel began his agricultural career at an early age with strong work habits derived from his grandparents, Raymond and Idoma Tews family farm in Bethlehem.Ž Peel was a member of Future Farmers of America while attending Holmes County High School. He led the organization as FFA President, showed cattle and competed and placed in state competitions including as a state finalist in tractor driving. Peel went on to receive the American Farm Degree in 2004 and continues to work with the HCHS FFA program and sponsors local 4-H events. He began farming soybeans in partnership with his uncle, Terri Meadows in 2002 and began farming independently in 2008, starting out with about 200 acres of soybeans, cotton, and peanuts. Justin married Catherine, a 4th grade mathematics teacher at Ponce de Leon Elementary School, in 2014. Today, along with the help of his family, Peel farms 700 acres of corn, soybeans, cotton, and peanuts with 1,527 in total crop land. Farming is something that shouldnt be taken for granted,Ž said Peel. Its a hard job one that requires dedication and many sacrifices. The harder you work, the harder it pays off. At the end of harvest season, its rewarding to look back on a job well done, at the seed that was planted, the hours sacrificed, and prayers sent to help it grow, and finally, a bountiful harvest to be proud of.Ž Peel is the son of Herb and Sharon Peel and says it is his familys influence and mentors that helped mold him into the successful farmer he is today. Without the help of the entire family working during harvest season, the job cannot get done,Ž he said. Im thankful for their help, and we give God the glory for His blessings.Ž When not tending crops, Peel can be found helping his family, the Meadows at the family farm and feed store, working with cattle with his in-laws, the Tinsleys, or growing vegetables in the family garden.Peels named Farm Family of the YearJustin and Catherine Peel receive the award 2017 Farm Family of the Year from Holmes County Extension Director and Agricultural Agent Kalyn Waters. [TIMES-ADVERTISER] Washington County Farm Bureau President Bruce Christmas presents Bill and Laverne Williams with Washington County Farm Famly of the Year 2017.[DIANE M. ROBINSON | THE NEWS]

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| Wednesday, April 11, 2018 H9Laura Firszt More Content NowFor some folks, it's a dream ... a house where "move-in-ready" means just that: Everything is perfect and the new homeowners don't have to lift a finger to design or decorate. And then there are the rest of us. We prefer to struggle with choosing (perhaps even installing) our home's features ourselves. If you're one of us, you'll enjoy these 12 tips for successful DIY interior design. Research. Learn as much as you can, as if you're getting a certificate in countertops or a degree in drywall. The internet's the obvious place to start, packed with ideas and available 24/7. But don't stop there. Visit home centers and suppliers to view furniture, appliances, and materials in the flesh. Take stock. Look at your home as it is now. What do you love about it? What features could you love? For instance: There's a gorgeous view but no way to enjoy it from indoors. Can you possibly create a new window to frame it? Decide whether you're ready to renovate. "Renovate or adapt?" That is the question. What are your budget, time frame, and tolerance for chaos? Evaluate whether you're willing to undergo a fullscale home remodel (or a minor one) to get the look and the functionality you're dreaming of. Plan your intended use. Go through the house, room by room, deciding what you'd like to use each area for. Function is the foundation on which you'll base every aspect of your DIY interior design, from traffic patterns to the right type of flooring. Find a focal point. Choose a central element to design around. This may be a feature already in place, such as elegant original wooden moldings, or something meaningful you yourself bring to the space, like a treasured antique carpet. Think furnishings. What furniture and appliances do you already own? How will various furniture pieces work together and fulfill your intended use of the room? Start with an accurate floor plan and take both measurements and clearance into account. Keep some empty space. The true purpose of a home is living, not display. So leave some empty space for your family to fill. A small hallway alcove can become a beloved "cave" for children to play in, if it's not crammed with knickknacks. Coordinate. Balance elements without being too matchy-matchy; think a lamp in a subtle leaf pattern that harmonizes with your favorite philodendron. A unified theme in each room and throughout the house will avoid visual overwhelm. At the same time, a certain amount of contrast sparks interest. Look at lighting. How much natural sun comes into the room? How much light will you need for the space's intended purpose? To illustrate: A kitchen is likely to need more supplementary lighting than a home entertainment center. Choose colors. The Rule of Three applies here. Select a maximum of three colors as the basis for your DIY interior design scheme, and combine them in a proportion of 60:30:10. Bring in a touch of nature. A natural element or two, like houseplants, rocks, or even a tree trunk will add warmth and charm. This could be a stand-alone decorative element or incorporated into a larger whole „ perhaps a slate fireplace surround. Delegate. Know your limitations. Indulge in hiring a contractor, such as a professional landscaper or expert flooring installer, for part or all of the project, to make your vision come to life in the best possible way. Laura Firszt writes for networx.com.DIY Interior Design: 12 Tips

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H10 Wednesday, April 11, 2018 | By Staff ReportHome & FarmWASHINGTON COUNTY Landowner George C. Owens is the 2017 Florida Land Steward of the Year. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) at its February meeting recognized Owens for managing his property with exemplary land stewardship through his innovative use of silvipasture practices. Silvipasture is the practice of combining forestry and cattle grazing in a way that increases productivity for both. This practice has made the Owens Farm in northwest Florida more productive while also creating important environmental benefits. Conservation of private lands is so important as the state continues to grow and were approaching 21 million people,Ž said FWC Chairman Bo Rivard. Without the cooperative efforts of private landowners, the conservation efforts we are trying to achieve would be impossible. Thank you to Mr. Owens and his family for being leaders in this effort.Ž The Owens Farm, maintained by the family for over 100 years, is known as one of the most renowned silvipastures in the southeastern United States. Owens created his silvipasture in an open field, where he planted several rows of pine trees separated by alleys of bahiagrass. The silvipasture increased the farms cash flow with income from timber, hunting leases, beef production and forage crops while also benefitting wildlife and the environment. The practice improves soil and water quality and provides food, cover and nesting habitat for wildlife. Learn more about the FWCs Landowner Assistance Program and how the FWC partners with private landowners at MyFWC.com/LAP.Owens is Landowner of the Year[PHOTO CONTRIBUTED BY FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION] By Staff ReportHOLMES COUNTY Holmes County cattle producers restablished the Holmes County Cattlemens Association. Holmes Countys newly formed organization is part of the Florida Cattlemens Association, a statewide, non-profit organization established in 1934, devoted entirely and exclusively to promoting and protecting the ability of cattlemen members to produce and market their products. Floridas cattle industry is one of the 15 largest in the United States. Floridas cattlemen are dedicated to the preservation of Floridas green ranch land. Holmes County Cattle Producers are encouraged to join. Membership information is available online at www.FloridaCattlemen. org or by contacting Kalyn Waters at the Holmes County Extension at 850-547-1108.Holmes County forms local Cattlemens AssociationPictured are FCA District 1 Representative Pat Durden, Catherine Peel HCCA Secretary/Treasurer, David Adams HCCA Vice President, Reid Bowman HCCA President, Robin Carrell, Kyle Hudson, Justin Williams HCCA Board Members, Terry King HCCA State Director, Ken Griner FCA President [PHOTO BY DUSTY HOLLEY] Cypress Cattle & Produce Company Cypress Cattle & Produce Company in Ponce de Leon, 2980 R M Ward Road, has 1,100 acres of farm. It also operates a year-round produce market in Freeport, offering u-pick peaches every spring and every October hosts corn maze and pumpkin patch. The farm also has fishing lakes and a rough-cut sawmill. Find them on Facebook under Cypress Cattle & Produce Company. Chipley Farmers Market The mission of the Chipley Farmers Market is to provide the freshest fruits and vegetables from local growers. Starting the first Tuesday in May, the market is open from8 a.m. to 12 p.m. noon onTuesdays, Thursdays andSaturdays. The Chipley Farmers Market is located at 685 Seventh Street in Chipley, one block East of Downtown Chipley, by the old train depot. Gainer Blueberry Farm Gainer Blueberry Farm is open during blueberry season, beginning in June, and offers U-PickŽ blueberries. With more than 2,700 blueberry bushes, Gainer Blueberry Farm is sure to offer as many berries as you can carry. Located at 2876 Orange Hill Road in Chipley, the farm is open during blueberry season from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and from 1 to 6 p.m. on Sundays. Reach the farm by calling (850) 638-1335 or (850) 2584180, or by emailing gainerconniedennis@ att.net. Find them on Facebook under Gainer Blueberry Farm. Brocks Produce Brocks Produce is a roadside stand in Vernon that specializes in locally grown fruits and vegetables. Brocks Produce is located at 3044 Main St. in Vernon. For more information, call 850-535-1030. K & L Farm K & L Farm is located at 1567 Piney Grove Road in Chipley. Find them on Facebook under K & L Farm, or call 850-638-5002. MARKETContinued from H6

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| Wednesday, April 11, 2018 H11Betty MontgomeryMore Content NowRobert Frost said, Good fences make good neighbors.Ž Recently, while visiting with a friend, I was asked my advice about what she should use as a hedge between her house and the home of her neighbor. Her husband had just removed a Leyland cypress hedge because it had gotten too large for their lot and it was losing lower limbs and was not as pretty any more. She said that after removing it, she was amazed at how wide it had gotten and how much of their yard it had consumed. I have been asked many times about what type of hedge to install. Some are talking about hedges that give privacy from neighbors. They like their neighbors but would like some seclusion from time to time. Others are asking about hedges for other reasons. When the word hedgeŽ is mentioned, many people immediately think of an evergreen plant that conceals one from their neighbors. However, hedges can be more than that. Hedges define spaces, too. They can be used to define flowerbeds, line paths or for privacy, to name a few. Hedges can be made of a number of different types of plant material. Plus, they can be evergreen or deciduous. Choosing a hedge depends on several factors. What is the purpose? How quickly is it needed? Planting smaller plant material will be less costly. Look at all types of hedges „ evergreen, deciduous, flowering, formal or informal „ for traits you need to consider. Lets assume that you want a privacy screen that will line your back yard. You want a plant that will be thick and look attractive. Do not be in a rush to make a quick decision that you will regret. Dont be blindsided and think you have to have an evergreen hedge or that it has to be a cedar or cypress. Some of my favorite hedges are boxwood, camellia Sasanqua, holly and tea olive. Tea olive will take the sun or the shade. They can grow to 15 feet tall or you can keep them shorter. They can be pruned to be rather narrow and still be quite thick. They are fragrant in the spring and some are fragrant in the fall as well. Deer do not find them tasty and if you give them plenty of water the first couple of years, they will grow quite rapidly. For a more formal look, boxwood hedges are amazing. The American boxwoods grow faster than the English. My favorite boxwoods right now are the Korean boxwoods. They look like the American and English, but are more resistant to disease. They will grow fairly quickly with ample water and will give you a nice thick screen, all while being less expensive than American and English boxwoods. Some varieties will grow as tall as 8 feet and some American boxwoods will grow even taller. I have seen some exquisite boxwood hedges that are quite tall, thick, and lush in more formal settings. In choosing a Sasanqua hedge, you need to find a Sasanqua that will grow tall enough for your purpose. Some grow to about 5 or 6 feet and others grow quite tall. Sasanqua hedges, with their shiny leaves that glisten in the winter sun and have flowers in the late fall, will add to your landscape. They might be slower growing, but they make a wonderful screen. If you are looking for a taller hedge, Thuja Green Giant is an option. It looks like a Leyland cypress but does not have some of the problems that the Leyland cypress has. Thujas can be pruned, but you need to be careful when pruning not to cut past the last green branch. In using a hedge for privacy, evergreen hedges give you the most concealment. However, I have seen deciduous hedges used effectively. Hornbean (Carpinus) makes a thick hedge and one that is not easily penetrated by an animal or human. They can be planted quite close and trimmed to a very narrow width if you so desire. Beech (fagus) is another deciduous tree that holds onto its leaves through the winter and gives a nice screen when planted small and close together. Have you ever seen a flowering hedge? I saw a viburnum hedge once that was exceptional. We have a neighbor who has a lovely forsythia hedge that is quite thick and in the spring, it is aweinspiring. The drawback here is it can get a little unruly, growing quite wide. Since I live in the country, I am always thinking of deer and the problems they can cause. Make sure you choose a hedge that will not be bothered by the deer. I have a friend who lives in a city that has a deer problem, as the deer use the power line as a pathway to her home. She has a hedge that has been eaten at the bottom but untouched higher up. I have not seen deer eat any of the plant materials I have mentioned above. They might enjoy the tender new growth of a Sasanqua, but they have never bothered mine. Remember, one more reason for a living fence is because in some towns, you can only build a fence a certain height. I do not know of any ordinances that deal with how tall a hedge can be. Plus, a living hedge is softer than a wooden fence or stonewalls. Hedges are a great addition to any garden. And remember, you might have great neighbors today, but an unfriendly neighbor tomorrow. Think ahead, plant small, and watch your hedge grow. Betty Montgomery is a master gardener and author of Hydrangeas: How To Grow, Cultivate & Enjoy,Ž and A FourSeason Southern Garden.Ž She can be reached at bmontgomery40@ Hedges can do more than just add privacy to your yardCypress hedges can help to create a privacy screen in your yard. [BETTY MONTGOMERY]

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H12 Wednesday, April 11, 2018 | By Matthew OrwatFor Home & FarmHome gardeners, when they think of roses, their mind inevitably turns to the Knockout rose and its offspring. Thats fine, theres nothing wrong with Knockout roses, it makes a great ornamental landscape plant, and its easy to propagate. With all the Knockout mania, since the early 2000s, many garden roses that are well adapted to the Northwest Florida climate have been left out of the home garden to a large degree. Several roses, which were grown in Florida commonly in the last hundred years, and recommended by former University of Florida president H. H. Hume in his book Gardening in the Lower South are still grown here today. To obtain these roses, gardeners must look to small nurseries scattered throughout central Florida and Alabama, or order them from larger nurseries in Texas where the Texas A&M Earthkind Rose Program has taken off. Below are a few examples of easy-to-grow roses, that are just as disease resistant as the Knockout, but offer more variety in color and form that home gardeners might enjoy as much as or more than Knockout. They have been grown successfully throughout southern Texas for over 30 years, and at the Washington County Extension Office for the past seven years without spraying fungicides or insecticides. Several of these cultivars were also involved in a three-year rose trial at the UF/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center, in Quincy. Belindas Dream Belindas Dream was bred by Texas A&M Professor Robert Basye in 1988, as a culmination of years of intense breeding and selection for disease resistant landscape and cut flower roses. It makes a 4-5 foot shrub that grows about 3 feet wide. Apple-green foliage clothe its pleasing shrub form. Its free flowering but not overly vigorous, so its easy to keep in bounds. Disease resistance is high, theres rarely any blackspot of note, under no-spray conditions, and only slight powdery mildew in a few years when conditions are favorable for fungus development. In cool spring or fall conditions, the clear pink flowers can top six inches in diameter, and contain over 200 petals, but regular hot conditions during the summer usually reduce flower size to four inches. This rose loves to be part of mass plantings, particularly when planted 3 feet apart in a triangular formation. It has a reputation as being moderately easy to propagate. Rosette Delizy Rosette Delizy is a French Tea rose that was introduced to the U.S. nursery trade in the mid-1920s. Since it was bred before the days of modern fungicides, it sports excellent resistance to disease. It shows no powdery mildew, and only the occasional leaf with blackspot under nospray conditions. This is strictly a rose for the coastal south, since it does not like cold temperatures, and cannot thrive north of zone 7b without protection. Color is striking, opening yellow with petal edges changing to pink as the flowers age. Cooler weather brings out deeper russet and maroon tones. It has a light teaŽ fragrance. This mannerly shrub gets 4-5 feet tall and 3-4 feet wide. It requires very light pruning, and can actually be killed from heavy handed gardeners with shears in hand. Minor flaws noted in this rose are that it is somewhat sparsely foliated, and somewhat difficult to propagate. Madame Antoine Mari Madame Antione Mari, a Tea rose, was introduced in 1900 when the buttonhole rose was all the rage. Massive quantities of perfectly formed delicate buds of pink and ivory quickly open into 3 inch flowers that decorate the bush like butterflies fluttering in the wind. Rebloom is fast. Additional interest in the landscape is created by the deep red color of new foliage. This makes a mannerly shrub for the small landscape, easily kept at 3-4 feet tall, and 5-6 feet wide by light pruning. Disease resistance is above average in a nospray garden, with very low blackspot infection rates, and only occasional powdery mildew. This rose has been found to be easily propagated with the author reaching near 100% success rate. Mrs. B. R. Cant No mention of easy to grow roses is complete without the mention of Mrs. B. R. Cant. In the trials UF/IFAS horticulturists performed at Quincy and Plant City, this variety was rated the best performer. It has been in continuous cultivation since 1901, and is often found at old home sites and gardens in Washington County. This makes a large garden rose, easily topping 8 feet in height, and just as wide. Deep pink flowers are borne profusely from March to first frost. Disease resistance is outstanding, and its easy to propagate. Plants are densely clothed in medium green leaves. This rose is often grown in hedges as a substitute for a fence. One of the best all-around garden roses for the gulf south. Nursery Availability Orwat provide presentations at workshops on these roses multiple times a year, throughout the Florida Panhandle. The recurring question he is asked is, Where are these roses available locally?Ž Hopefully this article will inspire some local nurseries to offer these easy-to-grow roses, and others. If you are interested in propagating these roses for your nursery, contact, Matthew Orwat at UF/IFAS Extension Washington County (Ag Center), for more information on these, and other phenomenal garden roses.Consider unique roses for your garden this springRosette Delizy roses at the UF / IFAS Extension Of“ ce in Washington County. [MATTHEW ORWAT, UF /IFAS EXTENSION WASHINGTON COUNTY HORTICULTURIST]

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The Weekly Advertiser | Wednesday, April 11, 2018 1 NF-5036304 NF-5031562 Hazardous Aerial Tree Removal  Stump Grinding Trimming & Pruning  Emergency Tree Service  Lot Clean UpDow Morris,Owner/Operator 850-527-6291  850-849-3825 Readers’ Choice2017WASHINGTON HOLMES JACKSON (850) 638-3611 HastyHeating & Cooling NF-5028471 ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE OR BUSINESS FOR AS LITTLE AS $10 A WEEK!Reach thousands of potential customers with your Business Guide ad in the:WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS HOLMES COUNTY-TIMES ADVERTISER WEEKLY ADVERTISER CALL TODAY! 850-638-0212 NF-5036305 NF-5032746JOEYS SPORTING GOODSBAIT & TACKLE, GUNS & AMMO, ACCESSORIES & SPORT CLOTHINGJOEY SELLERSJOEYSSPORTINGGOODS 2064 Holly Street Westville, Fla. 32464850-548-5055 NF-5031560 C & CBookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available Volume 89 Number 15 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018NF-5036261 NF-5032760 Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centersSTOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com“2-Night Free Vacation!”or Car Today! 800 700 BOAT -(2628) JOB ANNOUNCEMENT HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR IPublic Works Department Advertisement Date: 04/05/18-04/19/18 The Washington County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for a HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR I position in the PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT The primary function of the Heavy Equipment Operator I will be to operate machinery in connection with the construction, repair, and maintenance of roads and right-of-ways within Washington County. Minimum Training and Experience: One year of verifiable experience in the operation and routine maintenance of heavy equipment. Valid Florida Class “A” or “B” CDL Driver’s License required. Class A preferred. The starting hourly rate is $10.16. Applications may be accessed on-line at www .washingtonfl.com Applications and job descriptions may also be obtained at the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office located at 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428. All interested applicants MUST submit an Employment Application to the Human Resources Department in the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office by 4:00 PM on April 19, 2018 All questions regarding this position or other vacancies should be directed to the Human Resources Department, 850-415-5151. The selected applicant will be subject to a preemployment physical and drug screen. Veteran’s Preference is accepted in accordance with FS 295.08. Equal Opportunity/Drug-Free Workplace Job PostingDoctors Memorial Hospital has an immediate full-time position available for an RN Director of Case Management/Utilization Review. Must be a dedicated and self-motivated individual. Current Florida Registered Nurse license and BLS certification required. Case Manager will be required to rotate call as part of Nursing Administration. Interested applicants can send their resume to Doctors Memorial Hospital Attn: Christy Booth, Human Resources Department P.O. Box 188 Bonifay, FL 32425. Or apply in person at 2600 Hospital Drive. Doctors Memorial Hospital is a Drug-Free Workplace. Tobacco-Free Campus. EOE. Position AvailableDoctors Memorial Hospital currently has a position available for a full-time (36 hour/week) Registered Nurse to work ER night shift Thursday, Friday, and every other weekend. ER or Critical Care Experience preferred. To apply please send your resume Attn: Human Resources to P.O. Box 188 Bonifay, Fl 32425. Or apply in person at 2600 Hospital Drive. Doctors Memorial Hospital is a Drug Free Workplace. Tobacco-Free Campus. EOE. The Holmes County Board of County Commissionersis currently accepting applications for the position of Tourist Development Council Administrative Assistant Part Time (16 hours a week) For applications and job descriptions contact Hannah Benton in the Holmes County Commissioner’s Office at 850 547 1119 or Rebecca Prince at the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce 850 547 6155 Please turn in completed applications to the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce located at 106 E Byrd Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425 or Holmes County Board of County Commissioners located at 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, no later than 2:00 PM on April 17, 2018. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer. For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. Will Clean Inside your house weekly or biweekly. Reliable, honest, 30 years experience. Have references. Call Sherry, 850-849-0644 for estimates. Yorkshire Boar 3-Years-Old, approx 385-Pounds. Very tame. Needs home with a large wife. For sale or trade 850-333-6831. Garage/Estate Sale 3572#E Roache Ave. 7:00am-Noon. Sat, April 14th. Estate Sale for Mr. John H. Curtis 1744 Sorrells Road, Chipley, FL 32428 Friday April 13, 2018 Saturday, April 14, 2018 8:00am to 4:00pm ( Directions: From Hwy 90 in Chipley, FL. Take Hwy 277 South to Sorrells Road, follow signs -2nd house on right) Contents of House Consists of: Living Room Sofa, recliners, wing back chairs, lamps, T.V, Curio, coffee & end tables, vintage stereo, small entertainment center, TV Stand, records, wall clock, pictures Bedroom Queen Headboard w/Bedding, Singer Sewing Machine, cedar chest, dresser, chests, misc small tables, 2 twin beds with bedding -linens & quilts, conputer desk. Kitchen Small electric applicances, refridgerator, stove, washer & dryer, oak table w/4 chairs, misc chairs, cookingware, desk sets, misc classware, crystal stemware, fenton white hobnail items, Men there are tools, tools & more tools, really too much to list but a littel of everything pertaining to tools Dont Miss Out! Multi Family Yard Sale April 12-14, 1280 S. Weeks St. Bonifay, Fl Furniture & Household items, antiques. Employment OpportunityThe Holmes County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for the positions of: Assistant County Veteran Service Officer, Full-Time Temporary Project Monitor, Part-time seasonal Parks/Inmate Work Squad Supervisor and Part-time seasonal Bushhog Operator. For applications and job descriptions contact Hannah Benton in the Holmes County Commissioner’s Office at 850-547-1119. Please turn in completed applications to the County Commissioner’s Office located at 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, no later than 2:00 PM on April 13, 2018. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employe r. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 For Rent 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments in Vernon. Clean, stove, refrigerator, central heat/air, convenient to Panama City Beach, section 8, Rental assistance. 850-638-4640 For Rent One Bedroom apartments for rent in Chipley. Convenient location. Stove and refrigerator furnished. No Pets. Smoke free environment. Call 850-638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 2BR/1BA House for rent. Between Sunny Hills & Wausau. 1st, last & deposit. $600/month. Prefer mature adults. 850-733-2605 For Rent 4BR/1.5BA, no pets, HUD approved. CH&A. Chipley. $700/MO, $700/DEP 850-638-7601. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. 2 Bedroom Mobile Home in Bonifay. Water & sewage included. Not HUD, no pets, rental references required. $475-$550. 638-2999 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/ sewage/ lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 Bonifay, 3BD/2BA MH w/covered deck. 3/4 mile from school on Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $700 rent/$700 deposit. 850-547-3746. For Sale Two acre plot and one acre plot in Jacob City, FL. Call 850-849-9338. Highway 77 2 miles south of Chipley 4-8 acre tract Bedie Road. Call Milton Peel at 850-638-1858 or 326-9109 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Spot Advertising works! Spot Advertising works!

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