Citation
Washington County news

Material Information

Title:
Washington County news
Uniform Title:
Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Place of Publication:
Chipley FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Nicole Barfield - Publisher
Creation Date:
January 5, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiweekly[<1994>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1931>]
semiweekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
Coordinates:
30.780922 x -85.539289

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began May 23, 1924.
General Note:
L.E. Sellers, editor.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Washington County News. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000384704 ( ALEPH )
07260886 ( OCLC )
ACC5987 ( NOTIS )
sn 81000810 ( LCCN )
0279-795X ( ISSN )

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** SPANISH TRAIL PLAYHOUSE: OPEN AUDITIONS COMING UP Volume 94 Number 77 Phone: 850-638-0212 Fax: 850-638-4601 Opinion ....................A4 Local & State ..............A5 Sports......................A10 Faith .........................B4 Obituaries ..................B5 Classifieds .................B8 @WCN_HCT facebook.com/WashingtonCountyNews.HolmesCountyTimes50 ¢ chipleypaper.com Washington County A6State ends session, approves budgetB3School board names Sunshine State Scholar Wednesday, March 14, 2018 News Service FloridaDemocratic candidates have opened campaign accounts to try to succeed Sen. Denise Grimsley, R-Sebring, and Rep. Katie Edwards-Walpole, D-Plantation, in November.Lake Wales Democrat Cath-erine Price opened an account last week to run in Senate Dis-trict 26, which includes DeSoto, Glades, Hardee, Highlands, Okeechobee and parts of Char-lotte, Lee and Polk counties, according to the state Division of Elections website.Grimsley is running this year for state agriculture commissioner.The only other candidate in the race is Rep. Ben Albritton, a Wauchula Republican who had raised $142,600 as of Feb. 28, a finance report shows. Mean-while, with Edwards-Walpoles recent announcement that she will not run for another term in Broward Countys House District 98, Plantation Democrat Louis Reinstein became the first candidate to open an account to try to win the seat.Democrats le in Grimsley districtDara Kam News Service FloridaTALLAHASSEE Despite the looming threat of a con-stitutional amendment and a potential $300 million annual hit to state coffers, Florida lawmakers abandoned an effort to reach agreement Friday on a gambling pack-age as time ran out in the 2018 legislative session.Republican legislative lead-ers had resurrected the issue in the waning days of the ses-sion as they tried to strike a deal between the gamblingleery House and the Senate, which was willing to expand slot machines to counties where voters have approved the lucrative machines.But after a day of horsetrading, House Speaker Richard Corcoran and Senate President Joe Negron declared the issue off the table.Despite the good faith efforts of both the House and Senate, a gaming bill will not pass the Legislature this House, Senate throw in towel on gambling talksStaff ReportBONIFAY „ The Down Home Street Festival will continue this weekend start-ing with the Annual Holmes County Chamber of Commerce Golf Tournament on Friday at the Dogwood Lakes Golf Club.The final festival will take place Saturday at Veterans' Memorial Park on Veterans' Blvd.Check out The News and Times-Advertiser's special wrap featured on the left fold of this publication for more detailed information.Down Home Street Festival returns this weekendStaff ReportCHIPLEY „ Like a dubious parasite, food insecurity eats away at the health of children and families across the world. Locally, the insecurity rate is about 4 percent higher than the national average.One upcoming event aims to help lighten the burden.Washington County Sheriff's Office will host a Farm Share distribution event 10 a.m. Saturday at 711 Third Street.Established in 1991, nonprofit food bank Farm Share partners with Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and inmates at Florida Depart-ment of Corrections to resort and repackage farm produce. The organization ships the produce to other agencies for local distribu-tion at no cost.The Saturday event is first-come-first-served and is organized as a drive-through to help accommodate individuals with disabilities and small children. Income information is not required. You don't have to be a Washington County resident to be a recipient.Sheri s O ce to give away food SaturdayLightens burden for struggling familiesStaff ReportHOLMES AND WASHINGTON COUNTIES The Kappa Beta chapter of Tau Omega fraternity continued their walk from Troy Uni-versity to Panama City Beach on Monday, passing through Holmes and Washington counties.The annual walk raises money for Jeep Sullivan's Wounded Warrior Outdoor Adventures, a charity that allows veterans to participate in hunting trips and other out-door experiences.WALK HARDTwo Alpha Tau Omega fraternity brothers from Troy State University run the last leg before they stop for the night in the Wounded Warrior Walk. They stopped in Vernon for the night at Camp Sunrise before resuming their trek in the morning. [DIANE M. ROBINSON | THE NEWS] Alpha Tau Omega alumni and current fraternity brothers lend support to their brothers that are on a 9-day trek from Troy State University to Panama City Beach to raise money for Wounded Warrior Outdoor Adventures. [DIANE M. ROBINSON | THE NEWS] See GAMBLING, A2 See FOOD, A2By Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY The $400 million worth of school safety legislation Gov. Rick Scott supported signed into law Sunday may not go as far as anticipated when it is allo-cated to Washington County. At a Washington County School Board meeting Monday, Superintendent Joseph Taylor pointed out the base funding per student amounts to just 47 cents. Wash-ington County School District, as other districts statewide, is reviewing the fund-ing and how it will be used.A round-table discussion has been schedule for Monday, April 2 at 4 p.m. at the districts headquarters, 652 N. Third St.The governors proclamation before the session started was that they were going with a $200 increase into the base student allocation the ultimate was 47 cents,Ž Taylor said. The monies that came (from) the $400 million actually came out of other parts of the budget; they just shifted stuff down.ŽThe math is well-convoluted. A 2018-19 Florida Department of Education funding spreadsheet shows a list of items desig-nating „ and de-funding „ programs. While $172,599 is added for the mental health component in Washington County School District, about $22,600 has been cut from other areas, such as instructional materials, digital classroom and reading allocation.We got the increase, but its very spe-cific about what we can do with it,Ž he added. I still have not seen the fine print on what they mean by safe schools.ŽSchool Board reviews safe school fundingA round-table workshop has been scheduled for April 2See BOARD, A2 LOOK INSIDE FOR HORIZONS PROGRESS EDITION

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** A2 Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | Washington County Newssession,Ž the leaders said in a statement Friday eve-ning. Gaming remains one of the most difficult issues we face as a Legislature. We are pleased with the progress made over the last week and know that our colleagues will continue to work on this important issue.ŽLawmakers were anxious to address the perennially elusive issue due to a constitutional amendment on the November ballot that would give voters control of future gambling decisions, something now largely left up to the Legislature.Also, legislators wanted to ensure a steady stream of income from the Semi-nole Tribe of Florida. The money could be in peril after a federal court ruling about controversial des-ignated playerŽ games at pari-mutuel cardrooms throughout the state.The Senate this week passed a broad gambling measure allowing slots in eight counties „ Brevard, Duval, Gadsden, Hamilton, Lee, Palm Beach, St. Lucie and Washington „ where voters have signed off on letting local pari-mutuels add the lucrative machines. The House made a con-cession Thursday evening to the Senate, by agreeing to allow slots in three counties where voters have approved them. But after two subsequent offers, the negotiators appeared to grow farther apart.I think it was time, more than anything else,Ž Sen. Bill Galvano, a Bradenton Republican who has been instrumental in crafting and passing gam-bling legislation for years, told The News Service of Florida on Friday evening.Although lawmakers were supposed to wrap up their business Friday night, Corcoran and Negron have extended the session until 11:59 p.m. Sunday after running out of time to finalize work on a new state budget.The leaders would have had to include the sticky gambling issue in the extension if the negotiations appeared to be closing in on a deal.We spent so much time, and rightfully so, on the school-safety leg-islation, and we found ourselves on a Friday, with a Sunday deadline if we had extended, and the tribes not up here,Ž Galvano said, referring to school-safety legislation stemming from the Feb. 14 mass shooting at a Broward County high school.Striking a new deal, called a compact, with the Seminoles, which would be part of any gambling legislation, has proved elusive for legislators.One of the critical provisions of a 2010 deal between the state and tribe, giving the tribe exclusivityŽ over banked card games, such as blackjack, expired in 2015. That spawned a protracted legal battle and previously futile attempts by lawmakers to seal a new agreement.The tribe pays more than $300 million a year under the banked-card games portion of the 2010 agreement.But the legal battle focused heavily on what are known as designated player games,Ž which are played at pari-mutuel facilities.After a federal judge sided with the tribe in a dispute over whether the lucrative designatedplayer games breached the Seminoles exclusivity over offering banked card games, the tribe agreed to continue making payments to the state, and gambling regulators promised to aggressively enforceŽ the manner in which card rooms conduct the desig-nated player games.While the tribe agreed to temporarily continue paying the state, some lawmakers are eager for the financial certainty a new compact would provide.But Galvano said he has spoken with a representative of the tribe, who assured him that the Seminoles intend to maintain the revenuesharing agreement with the state.Theyve made no plans to stop payment, and they still want to be partners with the state. But they werent prepared to come up here and negotiate a deal. Ive been through this before and its just logistically not work-able,Ž he said. GAMBLINGFrom Page A1 [PHOTO CREDIT: FARM SHARE] We want to let the com-munity know in everyway that we possibly can, that we are here for them,Ž WCSO Public Information Officer Kristin Martin said last month, noting the event and similar ones help foster a friendly relationship between the community and law enforcement. Our deputies are really working hard to be more active in the community.ŽMartin also said WCSO expects to give away thou-sands of pounds food and, depending on the reception, may look to institute the event annually. WCSO requests people to arrive early to the Saturday event.Were trying to assist as many families as possible,Ž she said.According to FeedAmerica.org, the nations leading network of food banks, about 5,000 people in Washington County are food-insecure, meaning, they lack access at times to enough food for a healthy life and limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate foods. FOODFrom Page A1 Most of the $723,000 in new funding is designated to the safe schools and mental health components, which total about $430,000 combined.Also, Taylor reminded School Board members, in order to receive the new funding, the school district will need to meet certain criteria and follow a checklist of stipulations guided by the state.In each of these „ whether its the school safety piece or the mental health, or any of those „were going to have to send back an approval letter saying weve ful-filled all of these,Ž Taylor said. There will be a checklist.ŽThe marshal program, which is the piece that addresses training and arming teachers, is opt-in. Although the board did not discuss the program at Mondays meeting, it may be discussed during the April 2 round-table workshop, officials said.School districts across the state, while clearly supportive of increasing mental health services and improving school safety, have reportedly been against arming teachers. According to a Tallahassee Democrat news article on March 9, the state budget had not provided enough funding to staff campuses across the state with deputies. It would cost about $360 million to get a deputy on each campus, the Florida Sheriffs Association estimates; however, the budget for the program is only $162 million. BOARDFrom Page A1The math is well-convoluted. A 2018-19 Florida Department of Education funding spreadsheet shows a list of items designating and de-funding programs. While $172,599 is added for the mental health component in Washington County School District, about $22,600 has been cut from other areas, such as instructional materials, digital classroom and reading allocation.

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, March 14, 2018 A3

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** A4 Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | Washington County News OPINION The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by GateHouse Media LLC at 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2018, GateHouse Media LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright Notice: The entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of GateHouse Media LLC. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or GateHouse Media. Postmaster: Send address change to Washington County News, P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428, USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES In county Out of county 13 weeks: $20 $24.30 26 weeks: $28.70 $36.40 52 weeks: $48.60 $60.70 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US Publisher: Nicole Bare“ eld nbare“ eld@chipleypaper.com Editor: Jacqueline Bostick jbostick@chipleypaper.com, 850-638-0212 News, sports, opinion: news@chipleypaper.com Classi“ ed: 850-638-0212, clamb@ chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service: 1-850-522-5197Have something to say?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri“ cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. Washington CountyPUBLISHER Nicole P. Bare“ eld EDITOR Jacqueline Bostick PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR Cameron Everett Weve spotted an unwelcome trend in Florida politics, and, for once, it doesnt involve the usual suspects. This time, its a fundamental aspect of Floridas Constitution and operations at state and local government. Consider the following examples reported by various news outlets during just the past three months: A state appellate court last month ruled the St. Petersburg City Council violated the law by holding a closed-door meeting to discuss a controversial ordinance related to shooing homeless people out of city parks. The city of St. Pete Beach settled a case alleging wrongful closed-door meetings over revisions to the city comprehensive land-use plan. The city of Bradenton Beach has spent more than $52,000 so far defending itself against accusations that it wrongfully withheld public records. Four current or former members and the general coun sel of the North Broward Hospital District Commission were indicted for conducting private meetings to discuss the ousting of the hospital CEO. Two Martin County commissioners and a former member were arrested for destroying public records related to a lawsuit involving a company that operates a rock quarry. A local TV station in Riviera Beach sued the city after city council members refused to turn over text messages that may indicate they discussed the firing of the city manager out of the public eye. If you havent picked up on the theme yet, were talking about Floridas Sunshine Laws, which govern, and guarantee, the publics access to government records and meetings of elected officials. We bring this up because Sunday marked the beginning of the annual Sunshine Week, an annual initiative of the Florida Society of News Editors to call attention to the value of, and threats to, our open government laws. Floridas laws and tradition of allowing its citizens access to records are among the oldest in America, dating to 1909. Measures providing for access to government meetings are a half-century old. Both have been reaffirmed by voters over the past 50 years. For the most part, state and local officials comply without question, which makes Florida both progressive and unique when compared to other states. But as shown by the disappointing cases above, some public officials still seek to sidestep the law. Nor do state lawmakers tire of trying to push more of government into the shade. The First Amendment Foundation, an open government watchdog group in Tallahassee, notes that Florida lawmakers have enacted 1,122 exemptions to our Sunshine Laws over the years and entertained another 122 this session. That is why the media and the public must partner in remaining vigilant in defense of our right to know what are leaders are doing. We must not take this obligation lightly. Once government officials sense or believe we wont strive to protect this domain, we will soon lose it. A version of this editorial first appeared in the Daytona Beach News-Journal, a sister paper with GateHouse Media.Florida needs more Sunshine ANOTHER VIEW Everyone seems to know just what is wrong with our schools. It reminds me of the first time I agreed to umpire a little league baseball game. That is when I came to the realization that every mother sitting down behind third base could call balls and strikes better than I could from behind home plate. With every newspaper article on test scores, just watch the fingers begin to point. All of us know the story. Students from Germany, Japan, and other countries continually rank above us on math and science standardized tests. Further, no matter how much money we throw at the problem and which new broom we use, (No Child Left Behind) our students do not seem to show significant progress. Logic requires that we examine the factors that make up the U.S. educational plan. These include facilities, supplies and materials, supervision, teachers, and length of school year and day, (ie. time on task). Who has better or more school facilities than we have? In many countries they meet their classes in a nearby church, in the basement of a police station, or under a tree in the front yard of a teachers home. You should see the facilities that pass for schools in much of India and Sri Lanka where my wife and I lived for a time. Who has more up-todate textbooks or supplies and materials than we do? In these important areas we would rank an undisputed number one. The same holds true for supervision. We have more principals, curriculum supervisors, personnel handlers, etc. per teacher and per pupil than are available in the schools of any other country. Here too, we rank number one. How about teacher-student ratio? Across the U.S. the student-teacher ratio averages around 17-1, with some a little higher and some a bit lower. The ratios are much higher in virtually all other countries. Only England and Germany are close to us with ratios in the mid-20s. How about teacher preparation? The primary degree for teaching in all current and former U.K. countries such as England, India, South Africa, etc. is a three-year bachelors degree. In much of Asia, it is a 2-year degree. One cannot teach in the public schools of the U.S. without at least a bachelors (4-year) degree and almost half of our teachers have masters degrees (5 years of preparation). There is no question that U.S. teachers rank number one in preparation for teaching our young people. That leaves only one factor, time on task. Unfortunately, the U.S. ranks well down the list of all industrialized nations in the time students attend school. Most schools in the U.S. are set up for 180 teaching days. By contrast, Japan has students in school 225 days and Germany 223. Korea matches Japan but most students take additional classes on Saturday running their time on taskŽ considerably higher. You do the math. Japan, Germany, and Korea all have students in school the equivalent of an additional two months each year as compared to our young people. Forty additional days of instruction for 12 years computes out to two full years more instruction than our students receive. Why shouldnt their test scores be higher? Is solving our student productivity problem and getting test scores headed upward as simple as increasing time on task?Ž Lets hope it is. That would mean we dont have to build more schools, hire more teachers, or buy more text books. We just need to give our well trained, highly motivated teachers more time with their students. If we want to match Germany and Japan we will need to add an additional two months to our school year. Any production line supervisor at a factory could have told us the key is more time on task.ŽFIXING AMERICAN EDUCATIONEvaluating education factorsI loved Margaret Lautenschlager. She was my first school teacher. Kind and welcoming, she doubtlessly played a part in fostering my love for learning and school. I last saw her at a J.J. Burns School reunion in the late 1990s, and she looked exactly as she did when I was 5. I admired Mrs. Lautenschlager so much I clipped her obituary when she died and carried it in my address book. But Im not sure how warm my memories would be had she read Three Billy Goats GruffŽ to us while strapped with a Glock. I think of the teachers I had, and cant imagine them wielding a weapon, even for my protection. Mrs. Glendening with a gat? Nah. The latest mass shooting in Florida has resurrected the idea that teachers and other school employees might have been able to take down the alleged perpetrator had they only been armed. We watch too much television. Anyone whos ever been in battle will tell you that they were scared to death, even though they ate, breathed and slept combat training. One in ve There was an experienced, armed, off-duty officer working security inside the Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, Florida, in 2016, but 49 patrons still were shot and killed. In 2012, there were active duty-soldiers present in the movie theater in Aurora, Colorado, but 12 people still died and 59 were wounded. Money for guns, but not for glue sticks? M a r k L H o p k i n s Mark L. Hopkins C h a r i t a M G o s h a y Charita M. GoshaySee GOSHAY, A8

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, March 14, 2018 A5 LOCAL & STATETri-County accepting HUD applicationsTri-County Community Council, Inc., Washington County Housing Authority (Sec-tion 8) Rental Assistance Program is currently taking applications on Wednesdays for the waiting list. Applications are taken by interview appointments only.Eligibility for assis-tance is based on income; you must be a legal citizen of the United States or have an eligible immi-grant status. Decisions may be based on criminal history and other criteria. In order to apply and applicant will need to bring verification to the interview.For more information or to set up an inter view call Steve Henderson at 638-4520 ext 103. Rental units wantedTri-County Community Council is looking for rental units for the Section 8 program. The Section 8 program provides assistance for low income families in the private renal market through the Housing Assistance Payments Program. Renter voucher holders select a unit from the private market. Requirement of a unit to be rented to an assisted family are as follows: the unit must meet HUD housing quality standards and the rent must be approvable within HUD Fair Market Rents and market rate. When a Section 8 voucher holder is interested in your unit contact Steve Henderson at 638-4520 ext 103. Chipley Housing Authority seeking applicantsChipley Housing Authority is currently seeking applicants for the Public Housing program. Applicants must complete an application and meet income guidelines based on family size as required by HUD. Appli-cations are available from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday in the office located at 1370 Old Bonifay Road in Chipley. For more information call 850-638-0134.HOUSING BRIEFSFebruary 2018Amos L Cutchins and Teresa D CutchinsAshlynn B Weston and John M. Weston, Jr.James Finch and Shir-ley FinchThomas Sisk and Dyann SiskWilliam Richard and Laura J RichardBarry K Clark and Susan ClarkRichard E Lee and Patsy N Lee Billy J Clark and Rosemary F ClarkWASHINGTON COUNTY DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGES SEE MORE ONLINE AT CHIPLEYPAPER.COMLloyd Dunkelberger News Service FloridaTALLAHASSEE Florida lawmakers ended their 2018 session Sunday by passing an $88.7 billion budget, while Gov. Rick Scott signed legislation that provides record funding for Bright Futures college scholarships and continues expanding voucher-like programs for children to attend private schools.In a 95-12 vote, the House approved the 2018-2019 budget (HB 5001), which takes effect on July 1. The Senate then approved the budget in a 31-5 vote, with opposition in both chambers coming from Democrats.The votes concluded an annual session that ran two days into overtime after lawmakers failed to agree on a budget in time to observe a constitutionally required 72-hour cooling-offŽ period before an expected Friday vote on the budget.Republican leaders touted increases money for the education system. Funding in the kindergar-ten-through-high-school system increased by $101.50 per student, while performance funding for state universities was increased by $20 million.This is an outstanding year for education,Ž Scott said in a bill-signing cere-mony with House Speaker Richard Corcoran, R-Land OLakes, and Senate Presi-dent Joe Negron, R-Stuart.Scott signed a highereducation bill (SB 4) that will permanently expand Bright Futures merit-based scholarships for university and state college students. The bill, a top priority of Negron, will cover 100 per-cent of tuition and fees for some 48,155 students who qualify as Bright Futures academic scholarsŽ next school year and provide $300 for the fall and spring semesters for textbooks.Lawmakers pass $88.7 billion budget to end session[SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] See BUDGET, A6

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** A6 Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | Washington County News STATENews Service FloridaFloridas jobless rate in January was unchanged from the end of 2017, according to numbers posted Monday by the state Department of Eco-nomic Opportunity.With growth in jobs tied to food services, accom-modations, construction and professional services, Florida posted a 3.9 per-cent unemployment rate for the first month of 2018, representing 397,000 Floridians qualifying as unemployed from a workforce of 10.15 million. The rate matches the December figure, which was initially posted at 3.7 percent but has since been revised upward. The job-less rate had reached 3.6 percent in November.Florida remains below the national mark of 4.1 percent. A year ago, Floridas unemployment rate stood at 4.6 percent, with 461,000 people listed as out of work. The January job gains were balanced with a reduction in the categories of real estate, retail trade, government, and transportation, ware-housing and utilities.In a possible sign that the Florida Keys have not fully recovered from Hur-ricane Irma in September, Monroe County --which typically has the states lowest unemployment rate --had a 3.7 percent rate in Janu-ary, behind five counties. St. Johns County was the lowest at 3.3 percent, with Okaloosa County at 3.5 percent and Orange, Seminole and Wakulla counties at 3.6 percent. Pinellas, Walton and Lafayette counties also were at 3.7 percent. Counties with the highest unemployment rates in the state were Citrus at 6 percent, up from 5.4 percent in December, and Sumter, 5.9 percent, up from 5.3 percent at the end of 2017.Florida unemployment rate at 3.9 percentThe legislation expands state aid to cover 75 percent of tuition and fees, representing $159 out of the average $211 per credit-hour cost, for 46,521 students who qualify as Bright Futures medallion scholars.ŽThe expansion will result in a $520 million Bright Futures program in the new academic year, eclipsing the previous high of $429 million set in 2008-2009.The budget continues expansion of the states main need-based aid pro-gram, Florida Student Assistance Grants, to sup-port an estimated 236,724 students, who will receive average awards of $1,155.Negron said the new law restores the promiseŽ of Bright Futures scholarships and was major part of his two-year quest as Senate president to raise the national profile of Floridas university system.Through this legislation, the Legislature and Gov. Scott are telling Florida students and fami-lies that they can count on the Bright Futures scholarship as they plan their investment in an educa-tion at one of our excellent colleges or universities,Ž Negron said.Scott also signed a far-ranging education bill (HB 7055), supported by Corcoran, that will expand the use of voucher-like scholarships to send more public-school students to private schools.While Republican lead-ers touted that bill, it drew opposition from Demo-crats. Caroline Rowland, a spokeswoman for the Florida Democratic Party, issued a statement Sunday blasting Scott for signing HB 7055.Just like hes done for years, Rick Scott is drain-ing funding from our public schools in order to give his political donors and cronies another tax-payer funded handout --its just the latest demonstration that Scott puts his own self-serving politics over Floridas schools, teachers and students,Ž Rowland said. One program in the bill will let students who face bullying or harassment in public schools transfer to private schools. The hope scholarshipsŽ will be funded by motorists who voluntarily agree to contribute the sales taxes they would normally pay on vehicle transactions to the scholarships. It is expected to generate $41.5 million for the scholarships in the next year.The legislation also allows businesses that pay a state tax on commercial leases to voluntarily shift those funds to Gardiner scholarships, which pay for services and privateschool scholarships for disabled students. The new budget boosts the Gardiner scholarships by $25 million to $128 million.The law builds on Corcorans two-year effort as House speaker to expand school choice programs, with a particular focus on helping students in low-perform-ing schools.The legislation is coupled with a budget that provides another $140 million to the schools of hopeŽ program, which is aimed at providing more services to persistentlyŽ low-performing schools and allowing more charter schools to serve students in those areas.Corcoran said the goal is to give all children of all districts, all neighbor-hoods, a real chance at a world-class education.ŽThe new law also contains a controversial provision that could force teachers unions to disband if their membership falls below 50 percent of the employees they represent in the contract-negotiating process. If decertified, the unions would be forced to reorganize and seek a new vote to represent the teachers.Nobody should be forced to be led when a majority of the people you are leading dont want to be there,Ž Corcoran said.The rare Sunday conclusion to the annual legislative session also marked Scotts last reg-ular session as governor.He won support for a constitutional amend-ment that, if approved by voters in November, will require two-thirds votes by the Legislature to raise taxes or fees in the future.Lawmakers also backed a $53 million initiative to deal with the states opioid crisis, which was another Scott priority.Scott said he is pleased by pay raises in the state budget for law enforcement officers, including the Florida Highway Patrol, and workers at the Department of Juve-nile Justice.And he cited the Legislatures support for requiring nursing homes and assisted living facili-ties to have generators to provide power to facilities in the aftermath of major storms.But Scott, as well as Negron and Corcoran, said the 2018 session may be best remembered for the response following the Feb. 14 mass shoot-ing at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.The shooting, which killed 17 people, led to a $400 million schoolsafety initiative and legislation imposing new restrictions on gun purchases.Probably the most important thing we did this year is we listened to the families of Parkland. In very short period of time, we came together and passed historic legis-lation to make our schools safer,Ž Scott said. This is my last regular legislative session and I couldnt be more proud of this session than all eight sessions Ive been a part of.Ž BUDGETFrom Page A5 Probably the most important thing we did this year is we listened to the families of Parkland. In very short period of time, we came together and passed historic legislation to make our schools safer. This is my last regular legislative session and I couldnt be more proud of this session than all eight sessions Ive been a part of.ŽGov. Rick Scott SEE MORE ONLINE AT CHIPLEYPAPER.COM

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, March 14, 2018 A7 COMMUNITYStaff ReportCHIPLEY „ Open auditions for summer play The Hallelujah Girls start in a couple of weeks.The Spanish Trail Play-house will hold open auditions for The Hallelujah GirlsŽ at 6 p.m. Monday, March 26, and Tuesday, March 27. Auditions will be held at The Spanish Trail Playhouse, historic Chi-pley High School, located at 680 Second St., Chipley. Two males and six females are needed to fill various rolls in this production. The audition age mini-mum for this production is 16. Audition packets are available now online at the playhouse website www.spanishtrail-playhouse.com. No acting experience is necessary to audition.The play will be directed by Tina Goodman and take the stage Friday, June 1, through Sunday, June 3.To inquire about a certain role or any other question pertaining to the production, email Director Tina Goodman using the link found at www. spanishtrailplayhouse.com. To inquire about volunteer-ing or ask other questions, email spanishtrailplayhouse@gmail.com or call 638-9113.Open auditions announced for The Hallelujah GirlsIf you would like your events included in this list, email information to: news@chipleypaper.com. Chipola to host College Transfer DayMARIANNA Chipola Stu-dent Support Services (SSS) will host the annual College Transfer Day from 8:45 a.m. to noon Wednesday, March 14, on the lawn of the Social Sciences building. The event will be moved to the Cafete-ria for inclement weather. Chipola students will be able to meet with university recruiters from 15 regional universities across the Southeast to explore transfer admission requirements and scholarship opportunities. Table Games with the Graceville Garden ClubGRACEVILLE „ The Graceville Garden Club will host a table games fundraiser from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday, March 15 at the Graceville Civic Center. There is a $10 donation per person required. Reservations only; no walk-ins. Refreshment will be served, and there will be door prizes. Games will include Mexican Dominions, Hand & Foot Canasta, Bridge, Bunco, and more upon request. Deadline for reservations is Tuesday, March 13. For more informa-tion or to register call Carolyn Wicksell at 850-263-3951 or Teresa Girton at 850-703-1230. Bonifay K-8 to present Annie Jr.Bonifay „ Rehearsals are now underway for the Bonifay K-8 spring musi-cal, Annie Jr.Ž The sunnyŽ cast will feature the talents of Kinsley Cook as Annie, Jevin Johnson as Oliver Warbucks, Emma Prince as Miss Hannigan, and Faith Bush as Grace Farrell. The hard-knock orphans include Alyonna Brewer (Molly), Katelyn Jones (Pepper), Casey Johnson (July), Hailee Brown (Kate), Macy Bowen (Duffy), and Gabi Steverson (Tessie). Rooster Hannigan will be played by Cade Foxworth and Lily St. Regis will be portrayed by Railee Oost. With a multitude of talent from all grade levels, this is one show you wont want to miss-bet your bottom dollar. Annie Jr.Ž will be presented to the public on March 15-17 at 6 PM nightly. Admission is $5 each and will be available at the door. For questions or information, contact Jill Cook at BK8 by phone (850-5473631) or email (cookj@hdsb.org). Master Gardeners to host seed swap CHIPLEY … The Washing-ton County Master Gardners will host their annual seed swap from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, March 17 at the Chipley Farmers Market. This is a free event open to the public. There will be free seeds for sharing. Bring extra seeds to share. Master Gardners will be on site to answer questions. Landmark Park to host Spring Farm DayDOTHAN, ALABAMA … Landmark Park will host their annual Spring Farm Day from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, March 17. There will be living history demonstrations of sheep shearing, blacksmith-ing, plowing with mules, basket weaving, quilting and other traditional springtime farm activities. Entertain-ment will include two stages of traditional music. Musicians are invited to being their instruments and jamŽ in the one-room schoolhouse. Landmark park is located at 430 Landmark Park Drive in Dothan, Alabama. For more information visit www.land-markpardothan.com or call 334-794-3452. Daughters of the American Revolution to meetMARIANNA „ Chipola Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), will meet at The Oaks Res-taurant in Marianna Monday, March 19. A social time begins at 10:45 a.m. with the DAR Opening Ritual at 11 a.m.Reservations are not needed for the Dutch treat lunch, and all interested persons are invited. Contact Mary Robbins at bluespringscar@yahoo.com or 850-209-4066 for more information. Pesticide training seriesMARIANNA … UF IFAS will host the Central Panhandle Pesticide Training Series Monday March 19 through Thursday, March 22 at the Jackson County Extension Office in Marianna. Sessions are $10 each and refreshments will be provided. Registration for sessions starts at 7:45 a.m. with meeting beginning at 8 a.m. each day. Mondays session will be CORE with exam. Tuesdays session will be Right-of-Way with exam. Wednesdays session will be Aquatic Class with exam and Natural Areas. Thursdays session will be Private Ag with exam and Row Crop. The extension office is located at 2741 Penn Ave., Marianna. Participants may register online at Eventbrite or by contacting Sabrina Far at the Jackson County Extension Office, 850-482-9620. CHS Project Graduation Boston butt saleCHIPLEY „ Chipley High School Project Graduation is hosting a Boston butt fund-raiser. Sales are going on now until March 26. Price is $25. Boston butts will be must be picked up from 10:30 a.m. … 1:30 p.m. Saturday, March 31 at the One South Bank. For more information or to order contact any Chipley High School senior or call (850)258-1580. Open auditions announced for The Hallelujah GirlsThe Spanish Trail Play-house will hold open auditions for The Hallelujah GirlsŽ at 6 p.m. Monday, March 26 and Tuesday, March 27. Auditions will be held at The Spanish Trail Playhouse, historic Chipley High School, 680 Second St., Chipley. The Hallelujah GirlsŽ will be directed by Tina Goodman and take the stage Friday, June 1, through Sunday, June 3. Two males and six females are needed to fill various rolls in this production. The audi-tion age minimum for this production is 16. Audition packets are available online at the playhouse website (www.spanishtrailplayhouse.com). No acting experience is nec-essary to audition. Free Tax-AideCHIPLEY „ The AARP Tax-Aide Program and Washington County Coun-cil on Aging will provide free income tax assistance, tax counseling and electronic filing for 2017 tax returns. Special attention is provided to filers 60 and older, but AARP membership is not required. These services are available each Tuesday now through April 10 by appoint-ment at the Council on Aging, 1348 South Blvd. Individuals seeking assistance need to fill out an interview sheet, available at the Council on Aging, and bring all their 2017 tax documents including; Social Security card; drivers license or photo ID; copy of last years tax return; a check for bank information; 1095-A Form if you bought insurance from Marketplace/exchange; SSA-1099 Social Security benefits; 1099-R pensions, retirement, and annuities; 1099-INT interest; 1099DIV dividends; and 1099-B stock sale; W-2s; 1099-MISC other income; 1099-G unem-ployment; Any document showing you paid Federal Income Tax; 1099-S sale of home, land, or timber; W-2G gambling winnings; 1098-E student loan interest; 1098-T tuition payments; Information needed to itemize: medical expenses, medical miles driven, contributions, home mortgage interest, and real estate taxes. The service will not prepare Schedule F … Farms, Schedule E … Rental Property, Schedule C … Business income with expenses that exceed $25,000, multiple Schedule Cs for one indi-vidual, Clergy, or Form 3903 … Moving expenses. These are considered Out of Scope.Ž For more information, call 850-638-6216. Baby BeesCHIPLEY „ The Wash-ington County Public Library will host Baby Bees at 10 a.m., Wednesday, April 11 and Wednesday, May 2. Baby Bees will be an hour of sto-ries, music, sing-a-longs and activities designed just for baby. Each month will have a new theme. For more infor-mation, call 850-638-1314. Services available for caregiversCHIPLEY „ Caregiving is at once an act of love and a physical, emotional and financial challenge. The National Family Caregiver Support Program recognizes these challenges and seeks to provide support for the care-giver. Funds are available to provide group respite services (periods of relief from care-giving responsibili-ties), including socialization, activities, and supervision for individuals over 60 who need assistance and/or supervision to age in place in the commu-nity. Eligible persons must have a caregiver who provides assistance on a regular basis to qualify. For more information or to access the services provided under the National Family Caregiver Support Program, through the Washington County Council on Aging, contact the Elder Helpline at 1-800-963-5337. Knitting With Looms ClassCHIPLEY „ Washington County Library in Chipley is now offering a monthly class, Knitting with Looms.Ž Join the library at 10:30 a.m. the third Friday of each month, as instructors teach how to create a variety of items using looms. Class size is limited to 20. Call 850-638-1314 for more infor-mation and to register.COMMUNITY EVENTS The Spanish Trail Playhouse will hold open auditions for The Hallelujah GirlsŽ at 6 p.m. Monday, March 26, and Tuesday, March 27. Auditions will be held at The Spanish Trail Playhouse, historic Chipley High School, located at 680 Second St., Chipley.

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** A8 Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | Washington County NewsBy Jill Lawless and Danica KirkaThe Associated PressLONDON „ Russia is highly likelyŽ to blame for poisoning a former spy and his daughter with a military-grade nerve agent, British Prime Min-ister Theresa May said Monday, demanding that Moscow give a compelling explanation or face extensiveŽ retaliation.May told lawmakers in a strongly worded statement that without a credible response from Russia by the end of Tuesday, Britain would consider the attack on Sergei Skripal and his daughter in a quiet English city an unlawful use of force by the Russian state against the United Kingdom.ŽThere can be no ques-tion of business as usual with Russia,Ž she said, without saying what mea-sures Britain might take.Russian Foreign Minis-try spokeswoman Maria Zakharova dismissed Mays allegations as a circus show in the Brit-ish Parliament.ŽSkripal, 66, and his 33-year-old daughter, Yulia, remain in critical condition after being found unconscious March 4 in Salisbury. A police detective who came in contact with them is in serious but stable condition.May said British scien-tists have determined that Skripal and his daughter were poisoned with Novichok, a class of nerve agent developed by the Soviet Union near the end of the Cold War.She said it was highly likelyŽ the substance came from Russia, and there were two possible explanations.Either this was a direct act by the Russian state against our country, or the Russian government lost control of this potentially catastrophically damaging nerve agent and allowed it to get into the hands of others,Ž she said.May said Britain had given the Russian ambas-sador in London a deadline of Tuesday to explain which version is true. She said Russia must also provide full and complete disclosureŽ of its Novichok program to the Organiza-tion for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, the oversight body for the international chemical weapons convention. May spoke in the House of Commons after she chaired a National Security Council meeting to hear the latest evidence in the case. She has been under mounting pressure to hit Russia with sanctions, diplomatic expulsions and other mea-sures in response to the poisoning, the latest in a string of mysterious mis-haps to befall Russians in Britain in recent years.May said Britain would consider tough action if Russias explanation is inadequate, though she didnt give details.She said Britain would be prepared to take much more extensive measuresŽ than the expulsions and limited sanctions imposed after the death of former Russian agent Alexander Litvinenko, who was poisoned by drinking tea laced with radioactive polonium in London in 2006.We will not tolerate such a brazen attempt to murder innocent civilians on our soil,Ž May added.The White House said the use of the nerve agent is an outrageŽ but wasnt ready to say that Russia was responsible.May: Russia highly likely behind poisoning NATIONBritains Prime Minister Theresa May speaks Monday in the House of Commons in London. May told British lawmakers that Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, were exposed to a nerve agent known as Novichok (Novice), a weapon developed in the Soviet Union at the end of the Cold War. [PA VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] There also were patrons who had concealed weapons, but they never had a chance against the confusion and James Holmes firepower. The notion that a social-studies teacher should be able to take out a moving target in the midst of terror, chaos and screaming kids is a plan rooted in fantasy and a guarantor for disaster. According to the National Alliance for Mental Illness, one in five of us suffers from some form of mental illness, and one in 25 struggles with a serious mental illness. That means teachers do, too, as we so clearly saw recently in Georgia, where a despondent teacher fired off a shot in his classroom, causing pandemonium. Ive had teachers who suffered from hangovers, teachers with hair-trigger tempers, teachers who clearly followed the wrong career path. But I also know teachers who have shaped, changed and saved kids lives by doing what they do best. They are people who have devoted their entire lives to their calling, knowing theyd never get rich, at least, not in the way we too often value wealth. Too much Unlike the rest of us, teachers have the added stress of dealing with a roomful of underdeveloped human beings and the baggage each brings from home. Now someone wants to throw in the burden of possibly having to shoot and kill? In the days following Parkland, the Florida State Legislature miraculously found $17 million to equip and train teachers who wish to carry weapons. One in every 17 kids sitting in a classroom has given serious thought to suicide. This is just a thought, but maybe, maybe, the money ought to be redirected to mental health treatment. If state governments can find money for guns, why are teachers paying for class supplies out of their own pockets? Across the country, 91 percent of teachers buy their own school supplies, spending an average of $400. In West Virginia, a state where teacher pay ranks 48th „ $44,000 a year versus the national average of $58,000 „ striking educators were feeding students out of their own pockets, knowing how much kids rely on school meals. A reluctance to pay teachers what theyre truly worth while also expecting them to be caretakers and armed guards is too much to ask. GOSHAYFrom Page A4

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, March 14, 2018 A9

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** A10 Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | Washington County News SPORTS TICKER IN BRIEFRALEIGH, N.C.Virginia unanimous No. 1 in “ nal AP poll; Kansas to 4thVirginia remains the unanimous No. 1 in the final AP Top 25 poll of the season, while Kansas jumped to No. 4 after winning the Big 12 Tournament.The Cavaliers (31-2) earned all 65 first-place votes in Mondays poll to remain on top for the fifth straight week. Vir-ginia completed a 20-1 run against Atlantic Coast Conference teams by winning the league tournament, helping the Cavs secure the No. 1 overall seed in the NCAA Tournament field unveiled Sunday night.The top four teams in the AP poll matched the selection committees No. 1 seeds. Villanova won the Big East Tournament and stayed at No. 2, while Xavier was third and Kansas jumped five spots to fourth.Further down, Ken-tucky re-entered at No. 18 after winning the Southeastern Confer-ence Tournament.WASHINGTONTrump honors WS champs Houston AstrosPresident Donald Trump recognized the Houston Astros on Monday for their first World Series win, an incredible victoryŽ that Trump said was even more special following the devastation Hurricane Harvey wrought on the Texas city.Houston defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers in Game 7 last year to clinch the title. The Astros jumped to a 5-0 lead by the second inning, ultimately win-ning the game 5-1.Trump thanked the players for spending time with people who were displaced by Harveys floodwaters, and for donating money.MIAMIDolphins discuss cutting 5-time Pro Bowler SuhThe Miami Dolphins appear ready to move on without their defen-sive anchor.Miami is discussing releasing five-time Pro Bowl tackle Ndamukong Suh when the NFLs new year begins Wednesday, a person familiar with the situation said Monday. The person said noth-ing has been finalized, and confirmed the conversations to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the Dolphins have not commented.The Dolphins are also expected to release veteran linebacker Law-rence Timmons, the person said.Suhs release is antici-pated unless he agrees to a significant contract restructuring, which is unlikely. He signed a $114 million, six-year deal with the Dolphins when he joined them in 2015, and his base salary this year would be $17 million.His anticipated depar-ture would be the latest move in an attempt to change the locker room culture under Adam Gase, who heads into his third season as coach. By Eddie PellsThe Associated PressMessage to hoops fans: This story could make you look brilliant. A computer science professor at University of Illinois has created a for-mula that predicts NCAA tournament upsets at double the success rate of someone picking at random „ including, but not limited to, those who throw darts at the bracket, or pick based on their favorite color, the most ferocious mascot or the number of vowels in the coachs last name.This years upset picks both come out of the South region. They are No. 13 Buffalo over No. 4 Arizona and No. 14 Wright State over No. 3 Tennessee. But before betting the mortgage, read on: The computer scientist who spearheads this project Sheldon Jacobson, says the computer models only analyze potential upsets by 13, 14 and 15 seeds. A 16 seed has never beaten a 1; anything involving 11s or 12s produce too much noise,Ž Jacobson says, meaning the relative closeness of the underdogs with their fifthand sixth-seeded opponents interferes with the statistical model he uses to predict the upsets. Jacobson and fellow scientists pared down 115 publicly available metrics for every team in college basketball to 15 that have served as the best predic-tors of upsets in years past. Some examples include effective possession ratio „ essentially the number of points a team scores per possession „ along with average scoring margin and opponents 3-point shooting percentage. Now for the science: The framework of these formulas is called balance optimization subset selectionŽ (BOSS), which is an artificial-intelligence algorithm The National Science Foundation initially funded Jacobson for a project that used artificial intel-ligence to explore societal issues, such as whether government-sponsored programs to enhance job skills ultimately lead to higher incomes for workers. After the funding ran out, Jacobson sought uses for his creation that could REALLY help people. March Madness gener-ates more than $10 billion a year in wagering, much of which comes when players chip in $10 or $20 and fill out brackets for their office pools and col-lect points based on the number of correct picks. Picking the eventual champion „ No. 1 seeds Villanova and Virginia started at 5-1 odds to win it all, with No. 2 Duke at 6-1 „ always helps. But sometimes the real difference makers are the correct upset picks in the early rounds. Thats when the Buffalos and Wright States of the world beat Goliath and briefly restore faith in the gumdrops-and-lollipops notion that anything really is possible. Prof has formula to predict tourney upsets By Doug FergusonThe Associated PressPALM HARBOR, Fla. „ The red shirt didnt have a collar. His head doesnt have quite as much hair. His lower spine has been fused.Everything else about Tiger Woods is starting to look familiar.For the first time since the late summer of 2013, Woods worked the fans into a frenzy on the weekend and keep them on their toes right to the very end. He wound up one shot „ one putt „ short to Paul Casey in the Valspar Championship. He broke par all four rounds and tied for second, the first time he had done either of those since the start of the FedEx Cup playoffs in August 2013.All that did was turn atten-tion to this week at Bay Hill, where Woods has won eight times and twice ended long victory droughts.He won the Arnold Palmer Invitational in 2009 for his first victory after reconstruc-tive knee surgery. He won there again in 2012 for his first victory since the scandal in his personal life, followed by vari-ous leg injuries.Its going to be good for me to get back,Ž Woods said. Ive had some great memories there.ŽCasey ended a nine-year drought on the PGA Tour when he took the lead with three straight birdies on the back nine at Innisbrook, saved par over the last four holes for a 6-under 65 and then settled into a leather sofa in the locker room to see if anyone could catch him.A playoff looked imminent when Patrick Reed tied for the lead with a birdie on the 14th hole and was in the middle of the 18th fairway, 133 yards away, for a chance at birdie for the win or a par to force a playoff.And then someone else entered the picture.Woods, who opened with a two-putt birdie to briefly share the lead, had gone 15 consecu-tive holes without a birdie and needed to finish birdie-birdie to catch Casey. His tee shot on the par-3 17th was long, rolling out some 45 feet away.From the time the ball left his club, there was something inevitable about the putt Woods posed, waiting for the grain in the green to take over, and it did at just the right time. The ball moved left and dropped into the cup, setting off more pandemonium.Brandt Snedeker, playing with Woods, just smiled. Casey even got caught up in the emotion that swept over Innisbrook for four days.I loved his putt on 17. That was amazing,Ž Casey said. I thought he was going to hole the one on 18.Ž Maybe next time.But after a week like this, next time doesnt seem all that far away „ not with Bay Hill four days away, and the Masters a few weeks behind it.Casey won on the PGA Tour for the first time since the Houston Open in 2009, a span of 132 starts, though he had won five around the world since. It was the second time he won a tournament with Woods in the field. The other occasion was in 2006 at the HSBC World Match Play at Wentworth, when Casey wore a red shirt Sunday. Woods had been eliminated at the start of the week. Woods signed for his 70 and worked his way through the crowd of camera crews and officials to seek out Casey. Its the only time hes con-gratulated me immediately after a victory,Ž Casey said. Normally, its the other way around. Thats something special. Just really cool. Im sure he was disappointed he didnt get the victory. I actually thought he was going to win today before the round started. I thought it was just teed up beautifully for him. I said a couple times, If I dont win this thing, I actually want Tiger to win it. Im glad its this way.ŽCasey, a 40-year-old from England, is among the players from the previous generation who want to see Woods at his best again. Interest spikes, as record crowds and a big boost in TV ratings indicated. The energy makes a sleepy tourna-ment feel just short of a major.They remember the domi-nance. The young kids dont.I just want the young guys to see what we saw for such a long time,Ž Casey said.There might be a chance, which is remarkable consid-ering the most recent timeline. Woods won by seven shots at Firestone in the Bridgestone Invitational in early August 2013 for his 79th career vic-tory on the PGA Tour and still his last one.Back problems first began to surface a week later. The following year, he missed the Masters after back surgery and returned too soon on a couple of occasions. Another back surgery followed in September 2015, then another a month later. He returned after 15 months and lasted two starts before he had fusion surgery.Woods still didnt know what his future held at the Presidents Cup last October. Then, on Oct. 7, he posted a video of him hitting an iron Eight days later, another video showed him hitting a driver. Another eight days passed, and he was hitting a stinger.What really gets attention are the results. He still hasnt won. By all accounts, hes get-ting closer.Woods looks closer than ever to winning againTiger Woods plays his shot from the second tee during the “ nal round of the Valspar Championship on Sunday in Palm Harbor, Fla. [PHOTOS BY MIKE CARLSON/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] Tiger Woods lines up a putt on the 13th hole during the “ nal round of the Valspar Championship on Sunday in Palm Harbor, Fla. Woods ended one stroke short of forcing a playoff with tournament winner Paul Casey. Im sure (Woods) was disappointed he didnt get the victory. I actually thought he was going to win today before the round started. I thought it was just teed up beautifully for him. I said a couple times, If I dont win this thing, I actually want Tiger to win it.ŽBritish professional golfer Paul Casey, who won the Valspar Championship golf tournament one stroke ahead of Tiger Woods

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, March 14, 2018 A11By Ari LeVauxMore Content NowAround half-past eight, in Naalehu, Hawaii, I walked into Shaka, the southernmost bar and restaurant in the United States. When I asked for food, the goateed man behind the bar apologized for the fact that the kitchen was closed. What about poke?Ž I asked. That simple question broke the tension between my hunger and his schedule. With an air of relief, he waved me toward Americas southernmost refrigerated Coca-Cola case, which contained several packages of poke (poe-kay), the Hawaiian version of sushi. It consists of cubes of raw fish, most often ahi tuna, tossed in flavorings. Conspicuously absent is any acid like lime juice, which would cook the poke into ceviche. Without such acid, poke is officially raw. In addition to ahi, other Hawaiian fish like ono and mahi mahi can be made into poke. More recently other fish like salmon or yellowtail have been discovered to make great poke, along with octopus, shrimp and other shellfish, both fresh and frozen. Hundreds of restaurants on the mainland have figured out as much in recent years, with the number of poke outlets more than quintupling. There are more than 600 poke-eries nationwide, in almost all 50 states. Until I opened Americas southernmost vintage refrigerated beverage display case, the best poke Id had on island was from ChoiceMart, a grocery store in Captain Cook that receives an early-morning delivery from the venerable Suisan Fish Market, a 110-year-old establishment with its own fleet of boats and a Japanese approach to handling raw fish. Suisans CEO was even interned during the war, after Pearl Harbor when things got real complicated for Hawaiians of Japanese decent. Today Suisans poke is in demand island-wide, a but a batch made in the early morning, even if from the freshest of fish, will be rough around the edges by afternoon. Once the fish is cut crosswise, the expiration clock starts ticking. In fact, Hawaiian poke is regularly made with ahi that isnt fresh, carefully identified as previously frozenŽ in stores. To those of us who dont live in Hawaii, this is your cue that its possible to make poke at home that a Hawaiian would eat. How to eat it Poke was originally a verb that means to cut or slice crosswise into piecesŽ in native Hawaiian. To this day, when ahi is sliced properly the grain is visible. Along with the cubes of fresh ahi, the original poke included salt, seaweed and kukui nuts, aka candlenut, named after the fact that lamp oil can be extracted from them. Over the centuries, other ingredients were incorporated into the palate of poke seasonings: first onions, then tomatoes, and so on. The poke recipe that has taken much of the world by storm in recent years is ahi tuna prepared shoyu-style, aka soy sauce, sesame oil, scallion, ginger, sesame seeds, chili peppers, salt, pepper and sometimes kukui. But any type of fish that can be served raw can be served poke-style, including yellowtail, marlin and salmon. The number of recipes that have been invented boggle the mind and tease the belly, and include the likes of spicy mayo poke, creamy wasabi with pistachios, and kim chi poke made with crab, octopus, shrimp and fish. Hawaiian-style, which includes limu seaweed, salt and ground kukui nut, is popular as well. You can even get smoked, grass-fed Hawaiian beef. Make it your own Americas southernmost poke appeared to be a simple version, little more than ahi tuna with green onions and Maui sweet onions. I asked the man, Do you have anything with which to serve the poke? Even a little ƒ Ž Rice?Ž we both asked, at the same time. Sure,Ž he said, reaching for my poke. A few minutes later he placed a to-go box on the bar, along with a caddy stocked with bottles of soy and Tabasco sauce, and slender yellow packets of Best Foods mayo. Inside the box: two scoops of rice, my poke and a plastic dish of Japanese furikake seasonings, which include small pieces of nori, sesame seeds, salt and particles of dried fish. Together with the Tabasco and mayo from the caddy, I was able to massage the poke and furikake into a spicy ahi place with a decidedly Japanese feel. I brought home a second order and ate the poke on salad greens instead of rice. Im comforted to know that when I head north to my perch on the frozen mainland, Ill be able to find frozen ahi, and make a decent version of ahi poke. FOOD FOOD SHOPPINGREIN IN SPENDINGThe following tips to help you save money on food come from a recent post on thekitchn. com. € Make a budget. Its a lot harder to stay on budget when you dont have a budget to begin with,Ž according to the post. EASY RECIPERASPBERRY BEER COCKTAILTry the following easy recipe for a refreshing spring cocktail, courtesy of Southern Living. € 3/4 cup frozen raspberries € 3 1/2 (12-oz.) bottles beer, chilled € 1 (12-oz.) container frozen raspberry lemonade concentrate, thawed € 1/2 cup vodka € Garnish: lemon and lime slices Stir together raspberries, beer, raspberry lemonade concentrate and vodka. Serve over ice. Garnish with lemon and lime slices, if desired. TIP OF THE WEEKSTEPS TO IMPROVED HEALTHLydia Kaume, a nutrition and health education specialist with the University of Missouri Extension, writes that a personalized action plan can lead to improvements in nutrition and lifestyle changes. Examples of such changes include getting more sleep, eating more fruits and vegetables, and attending a tness class. Raw mealTry popular poke the original Hawaiian wayHundreds of restaurants on the mainland have discovered Hawaiis popular poke in recent years, with the number of outlets more than quintupling. [ARI LEVAUX] VISUAL HUNT

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** A12 Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | Washington County News

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, March 14, 2018 B1CELEBRATE Staff ReportCHIPLEY The Washing-ton County Youth Fair was held Friday and Saturday, March 1-2, at the Washington County Agricultural Center in Chipley.The event has been an annual tradition in Washing-ton County since the 1970s.4-H Agent Julie Pigott Dillard states learned in a conversation with Addison Prescott that the fair originated as the Northwest Florida Dairy Show, where Prescott exhibited dairy cattle.Originally held at Shivers Park, the show was held under lights brought in by the power company,Ž said Dillard in an Washington County Youth Fair heldGrand Champion Swine: Abigail Anderson [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] Reserve Champion Steer: Chipley FFA shown by Wyatt Patterson [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] Reserve Champion Heifer: Savannah Petroff [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] Reserve Champion Swine: Breanna Brackin [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] See YOUTH, B3

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** B2 Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | Washington County News BUSINESSBy Marley JayThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ U.S. stocks were split Monday as technology companies continued to climb, but Boeing and other industrial companies gave back some of the ground they won on Friday.Companies like Apple and Alphabet, Googles parent company, and chipmakers including Micron Technology have led the markets recovery in recent weeks. Retail-ers including Amazon and Starbucks also made headway. The market was coming off its biggest gain in a month following the February jobs report, which showed strong hiring and moderate growth in wages.Inflation has been the markets dominant concern over the last six weeks, and two more measuring sticks of inflation will be reported this week as the Labor Department discloses data on consumer prices Tuesday morning and producer prices on Wednesday. Prices paid by consumers jumped in January and so did producer prices, which measure the cost of goods before they reach the consumer.The Federal Reserve is gradually raising interest rates to keep inflation in check, and it expects to boost rates at least three times this year. JJ Kinahan, chief market strategist for TD Ameritrade, said inves-tors are looking at a lot of data but are really asking one question.If you think about the selloffs that weve had, theyve all been about are we going to get a fourth rate hike or arent we?Ž he said.The S&P 500 index fell 3.55 points, or 0.1 percent, to 2,783.02. The Dow Jones industrial average declined 157.13 points, or 0.6 percent, to 25,178.61. Almost all of that loss came from three indus-trial stocks: Boeing, Caterpillar and United Technologies.The Nasdaq composite finished at another record high after it added 27.51 points, or 0.4 percent, to 7,588.32. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks rose 3.91 points, or 0.2 percent, to 1,601.06. Tech gains, industrials slide, leave indexes mixedA man works at Xiwang Special Steel on March 5 in Zouping County in eastern Chinas Shandong province. [CHINATOPIX VIA AP] By Joe McDonaldThe Associated PressBEIJING „ Chinas steel mills, a target of U.S. Presi-dent Donald Trumps ire, are their industrys 800-pound gorilla: They supply half of the worlds output, so every move they make has a global impact.The steel industry swelled over the past decade to support a history-making Chinese construction boom. Once that tailed off, the country was left with a glut of half-idle, money-losing mills.Beijing has closed some mills and eliminated 1 mil-lion jobs but is moving too gradually to defuse Ameri-can and European anger at a flood of low-cost exports that is double the volume of second-place Japan.Trump responded last week with a blanket tariff hike on steel and aluminum, another metal Chinas trading partners complain it oversupplies.Chinese authorities say they shut down 30 million tons of steel production capacity last year. That cut alone is equal in size to the annual output of the No. 9 producer, Brazil, but only a sliver of Chinas 800 mil-lion tons.Beijings goal is to make its industry more efficient and profitable, not just smaller. So while some mills close, bigger rivals step up production and could become even more formi-dable global competitors.Total steel production rose 5.7 percent last year over 2016 to a record 831 million tons, according to the Chinese Cabinets planning agency, the National Reform and Development Commission. That was on top of a 1.2 percent increase in 2016 and more than seven times Japans output.The industry is forecast-ing another 1 percent rise this year.Without the capacity cutting, there would have been much more production than there is now,Ž said Wang Suzhen, an analyst for Mysteel, a news service that follows the Chinese industry. Steel and heavy industry have long been a political touchstone for Chinese leaders, which led to eco-nomic disaster in the 1950s.In 1958, then-leader Mao Zedong encouraged the public to produce steel in backyard furnaces for his Great Leap Forward, a short-lived attempt at overnight industrialization.Villagers stripped hillsides for fuel and burned doors and furniture to melt pots and pans and whatever other metal they could find to produce use-less pig iron. The diversion of resources into the Great Leap led to famine that killed tens of millions of people. In the past two decades, production took off as Chinese cities were bulldozed and rebuilt with thousands of new office and apartment towers, shopping malls, bridges and expressways. Output rose from under 130 million tons in 2000 to more than 600 million in 2010.Chinas voracious appe-tite for iron ore helped to drive economic booms in Australia, Brazil and other supplier countries. Mills bought Western and Japa-nese smelter technology.Steel and aluminum, along with coal, glass and solar panels, are among many Chinese industries that mushroomed until supply vastly outstripped demand.Once the building boom cooled, suppliers left with vast stockpiles of unsold goods resorted to price-cutting wars that threatened many with bankruptcy.Beijing has announced plans to shrink steel and coal but has yet to outline plans for others.Chinas aluminum output is a fraction of steels size at about 36 million tons last year. But foreign competitors say the impact of low-cost Chinese exports on their industry has been even more devastating.Last years steel exports fell 30 percent from 2016 to 63 million tons, but that still was one-quarter of the global total and more than twice Japans 30 million tons.Beijing tried to defuse threats of trade sanctions by agreeing at a meeting of the Group of 20 major economies in 2016 to form a global panel to discuss how to shrink the industry. But it avoided any binding commitments.In the U.S. market, sales of Chinese steel have plunged due to earlier tar-iffs of up to 522 percent imposed on some products to offset what Washington says are improper subsi-dies to producers.That means that while Trump has singled out China for criticism, his latest tariff hike is likely to hit U.S. allies Japan and South Korea harder.The United States bought just 1.1 percent of Chinas steel exports last year compared with 12 percent for South Korea and 5 percent for Japan, according to the U.S. International Trade Commission. Cool contractionMARKET WATCHDow 25,178.61 157.13 Nasdaq 7,588.32 27.51 S&P 2,783.02 3.55 Russell 1,601.06 3.92 NYSE 12,898.40 20.42COMMODITIES REVIEWGold 1,319.40 3.00 Silver 16.470 .075 Platinum 962.90 1.30 Copper 3.1040 .0120 Oil 61.36 0.68 World marketsHow key international stock markets performed: AmsterdamAEX BrusselsBEL20 FrankfurtDAX Hong KongHang Seng LondonFTSE 100MilanFTSE MIB ParisCAC40 SydneyASX All Ordinaries TokyoNikkei ZurichSwiss Market Index % CHANGE PREVIOUS CLOSE TODAYS CLOSE ASSOCIATED PRESS KEY 0.2% 537.13 538.43 0.4% 3,987.03 4,002.47 0.6% 12,346.68 12,418.39 1.9% 30,996.21 31,594.33 -0.1% 7,224.51 7,214.76 0.1% 22,745.60 22,764.91 0.0% 5,274.40 5,276.71 0.6% 5,963.20 5,996.10 1.7% 21,469.20 21,824.03 0.4% 8,931.85 8,970.74 BRIEFCASENEW YORKGoldman Sachs CEO succession clearerGoldman Sachs said Monday that Harvey Schwartz, its co-chief operating officer, will retire next month, clear-ing the way for David Solomon to become the next chief executive of the Wall Street firm.Schwartz and Solomon jointly hold the positions of co-chief operating officer and president. Both had been considered likely successors to Lloyd Blankfein, the CEO.The Wall Street Journal reported last week that Blankfein was considering retiring at the end of this year, and named both Schwartz, 54, and Solomon, 56, as the only two candidates being considered to replace him. With Schwartz retiring effec-tive April 20, that would leave only Solomon. MINSK, BELARUSEU extends $1.2 billion loan to UkraineThe European Unions foreign policy chief says the EU will extend a 1 billion-euro ($1.2 billion) loan to struggling Ukraine.Federica Mogherini, who was visiting the cap-ital Kiev on Monday, told reporters the loan should support Ukraines eco-nomic stability and structural reforms.Ž The Associated Press China shrinks steel industry slowly, drawing Western ireMARKET MOVERS€ Broadcom Ltd.: Up $9.06 to $262.84 „ The Wall Street Journal reported that Intel might make an offer for Broadcom. € Goldman Sachs Group Inc.: Up $2.61 to $273.38 „ The investment bank said one of its copresidents will retire, paving the way for David Solomon to become its next CEO.

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, March 14, 2018 B3 SCHOOLS & SOCIETY CROSSWORDStaff ReportCHIPLEY Washington County School Board on Monday named its 2018 Sun-shine State Scholar.Vernon High School junior Lana Bush will join nearly 100 other top STEM scholars in the state at a two-day conference in Orlando in May. The event is sponsored by Florida Department of Education and seeks to bring together the states top 11th grade students who show excellence in STEM education.Bush has a GPA of 4.65 and is known at her high school for being a very well roundedŽ individual, school staff told board members and other attendees at Mondays school board meeting.At the conference, scholars will be challenged to conduct a think tank on tough Florida challenges, FDOE website states. Scholars will also be honored for their accomplishments by the Commissioner of Education.Vernon High student named 2018 Sunshine State ScholarWashington County School Board Superintendent Joseph Taylor presents Vernon High School junior Lana Bush with the 2018 Sunshine Scholar award during a Monday night WCSB meeting. [JACQUELINE BOSTICK | WCN] Staff reportCHIPOLA Chipola Theatre will hold open auditions for The Cat in the Hat LIVE!,Ž at 5 p.m. Tuesday, April 3, in the Chipola Center for the Arts, a news release states. Auditions are open to ages 16 and up.About the play: Everyones favorite cat comes to life in this theat-rical adaptation of the Dr. Seuss classic. From the moment his tall, red-and-white-striped hat appears around the door, Sally and her brother know that The Cat in the Hat is the funni-est, most mischievous cat they have ever met. With the trickiest of tricks and the craziest of ideas, he is certainly loads of fun. He turns a rainy afternoon into an amazing adven-ture. But, what will Mum find when she gets home?For more informa-tion,go toChipola Theatre on Facebook or contact Charles Sirmon, Director, at 718-2227 or email sirmonc@chipola.eduAuditions for Chipolas The Cat in The Hat April 3March19-23: Spring Break (Students and All Personnel Out)April4: Report Cards go Out 20: Progress ReportsMay8: Florida Panhandle Technical College Graduation 22: Chipley High School Senior Awards at 5:30 p.m. 22: Vernon High School Senior Awards at 7:30 p.m. 24: Chipley High School Graduation 25: WISE Graduation 25: Last Day of School (Students Released at 1 p.m.) 25: Vernon High School Graduation 28: Memorial Day (All Personnel Out) 29-30: Post Planning Days for Teachers/Paras/10 Month Personnel)June11: Report Cards go Out2018 WASHINGTON COUNTY SCHOOL CALENDAR Grand Champion Heifer: Kayla Daimler [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] Grand Champion Steer: Chipley FFA shown by Meghan Patterson [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] earlier press release.You might even remember when the ag center had a dirt floor, and the show was held in what is now the auditorium.ŽThe WCYF Live-stock Show and Sale is now held in the large barn, which Prescott was instrumental in soliciting funding for, behind the Washington County Agricultural Center.Pictured are win-ners from the Beef and Swine Market Classes. YOUTHFrom Page B1

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** B4 Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | Washington County News FAITHStaff ReportGRACEVILLE The Baptist College of Florida (BCF) last month held its 6th Annual Lakeside Echo, a multi-themed Broadway-style musical performance.This years theme was "Top Theme Songs" with skits and musical variations centered on popular theme songs. Each dorm took on the theme to produce their own unique per-formance. The Eastlake and Ogletree team won first place with their skit Friends through the Decades.Ž Smith Hall's "This is Not the Voice" and Conrad and Courtyard teams Survi-vor: SeasonedŽ tied for second place. Napier Hall's Super Mario BrothersŽ came in third.The production develops team-building skills, a BCF news release states.Other performances also included Brackin-Chandlers The Freshest PrincesŽ and Lakesides The Adventures of John Williams.ŽWinners named for Baptist College broadway-style Echo Above: The combined team of Eastlake and Ogletree claimed the “ rst place trophy for 2018 Lakeside Echo. Below: Judges for 2018 Lakeside Echo included Professor David Hecht, BCF First Lady Ruth Ann Kinchen, Missouri Mission Volunteers Shelba Knight and Lynn Gay, and new English Professor Chris Dickinson. If you would like to include an event in this list, email information to:news@chipleypaper. com. Community Easter egg huntCHIPLEY … Chipley will host their Community Easter Egg Hunt from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Wednes-day, March 28 at Shivers Park, weather permitting. The egg hunt is for children ages birth to fifth grade. EASTER EVENTS Each year, Holmes and Washington Counties partner for Relay for Life, a community based fundraising event of the American Cancer Society. Monies raised during the annual event not only funds cancer research, but also helps offset cost such as transportation to treatment for Holmes and Washington County cancer patients. In the months leading up to the annual event, local teams work to raise money for the cause. If your Relay for Life team would like a fundraising event included in this list, email information to: news@chipleypaper.com. Rib Sale WASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY The Community South Credit RELAY FOR LIFE EVENTSIf you would like your Washington County church listed here, please send information to: news@chipleypaper. com. Due to space limitation, please only send regular church services. For special services, please send separate submission.Assembly of GodCorbin Road Assembly of God Morning worship is at 10 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 105 Corbin Road in Chipley. Cords of Love Assembly of God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study is a 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 2060 Bethlehem Road in Cottondale.WASHINGTON COUNTY CHURCH LISTINGS See EASTER, B5 See RELAY, B6 See CHURCHES, B6

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** Washington County News | Wednesday, March 14, 2018 B5 OBITUARIESOn March 5, 2018, Charlotte Whitaker Hall Brown made her journey to Heaven after a long battle with Dementia. She was 76 years old. Charlotte was a strong Christian woman that loved her church family and her family very much. She loved going to yard sales, but loved spending time with her children and grandchildren the most. Charlotte was raised in Holmes County, FL and lived there most of her life before moving to Slocomb. She was preceded in death by the love of her life and father of her children, Frank Hall; parents, Adolph and Annie B. Whitaker; two brothers and one sister. She is survived by her husband, Bobby Brown; one son, Randy Hall (Linda) of Slocomb; one daughter, Lori Quick (Courtland) of Bonifay; two sisters, Brenda Rowland (Junior) of North Carolina, and Bernice Johnson (Johnny) of Chipley; four grandchildren, Aaron Hall, Caleb Hall, Brandon Quick, and Madison Quick; five great-grandchildren; several nieces and nephews that she loved dearly. Charlottes family was her heart. Funeral services were held at 12:00 p.m. Thursday, March 8, 2018 at Shiloh Baptist Church with Rev. Ricky Hall officiating. Burial followed at New Smyrna Assembly of God Church Cemetery in Bonifay, FL with Warren Holloway Ward Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the church on Thursday beginning at 10:00 a.m. The family gathered at the home of her son, Randy Hall, 782 Peters Road, Slocomb, AL 36375. Warren~Holloway~Ward Funeral Home (334) 684-9999, is in charge of arrangements. "Continuing The Trust You've Placed In Us" To sign a guest register, please visit www.whwfuneralhome.com.CHARLOTTE W. BROWNJeffrey A. Owens, age 58 of Bonifay, went home to be with his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ on March 6, 2018 at Bay Medical Center in Panama City, Florida. Jeff was born on July 6, 1960 in Orlando, Florida to Ernest and Ruth (Higgins) Owens. He had lived in the Florida panhandle since 1985, coming from Apopka, Florida. He spent his life in the outdoors as a Farmer. He attended Grace Assembly of God, as well as, Faith Covenant Church. He was preceded in death by his father, Ernest Owens. He is survived by his loving wife of 39 years, Christine ChrisŽ Owens of Bonifay, Florida; mother: Ruth Owens of Apopka, Florida; daughter: Kim Gilbert and husband Ben III of Chipley, Florida; brother: Mike Owens and wife Carrie of Orlando, Florida; sister: Tammy Owens of Apopka, Florida; two grandchildren: Clarissa Gilbert and Chloe Gilbert. Funeral services were held at 11 A.M. Monday, March 12, 2018 at Faith Covenant Church in Chipley, Florida with Rev. Cloys Joiner and Rev. Jerry Sapp officiating. Interment followed in Poplar Head Independent Free Will Baptist Cemetery with Obert Funeral Home of Chipley, Florida directing. The family received friends from 9:3011A.M. Monday, March 12, 2018 at Faith Covenant Church.JEFFREY A. OWENSGlenda Louise Pettus, age 63, of Chipley, passes from this life on March 5, 2018. Glenda was born on August 1, 194 in DeFuniak Springs to the late Mitchell and Thelma Harcus of Vernon. In addition to her parents Glenda was preceded in death by her grand son, Joshua Perea. Glenda is survived by her son, Kenneth Hall of Chipley, FL, daughter, Teresa Perea of Chipley, FL, daughter, Marsha Curtis of Atlanta, Ga., brother, Gene Hand of Wausau, Fl., brother, Eddie Harcus of Bonifay, FL., sister, Janice French of Bonifay, FL., sister, Margaret Houpt of Vernon, FL., 9 grandchildren and 5 great grandchildren. Memorialization was by cremation. A memorial service was held at 1 p.m. on Friday, March 9, 2018 at Spirit of Holiness Fellowship Church 3753 Bunyon Dr. Chipley, Fl 32428.GLENDA L. PETTUSRalph Woodard Ray departed this life to be with his Lord and Savior on March 4th, 2018. He is now rejoined with loved ones; He no longer suffers the fog that Alzheimers created late in his life; he now knows everything completely. We rejoice in his ascension! He began his long life journey in the rural countryside near McCool, Mississippi on October 15, 1927 to parents William Earl and Caudie Jane (ne Quarles) Ray. He is best known as an honored and dedicated educator, teaching over 40 years all in Chipley; 15 years at Chipley High School (1952-1967) and 25 years at the Washington-Holmes Vocation Technical Center (19671992). He now exists in the collective memories of his beloved students and loved ones. He lived a full and rewarding life. After his 11th grade year at Weir High School, Ralph decided to join the Navy as his Armydrafted brothers had wisely recommended. He finished Basic Training at Great Lakes Naval Training Center, and was stationed at Agana Naval Station, Guam. After the War, he came back to finish his 12th grade year, and used the GI Bill to attend Bowling Green Business University, graduating in 1952. He interviewed with/ was hired by Principal Colly V. Williams for the teaching position at Chipley High School in 1952. He married Marlene Jordan, a nurse he met upon the suggestion of the late Virginia Bowers, in 1960. He went on to earn his Masters Degree from Florida State University. He always considered Teaching to be a callingŽ of the highest order. Ralphs hobbyŽ was helping people. Be it a student having trouble learning shorthand, a neighbor needing a tree cut down after a hurricane, visiting the homebound parent of a friend or taking an elderly person from the nursing home to get a cup of coffee and some fresh air; Ralph Ray was a man who made it his daily purpose to serve the common good. He never expected praise nor sought notoriety. He volunteered his leadership in Lions Club for over 40 years; he worshipped, and served tirelessly in the Chipley First United Methodist Church. In his last five years, he would be gradually robbed of so much of his treasured memories and interpersonal relationships by Alzheimers; he suffered in silence as the world passed him by. He is preceded in death by his parents, three brothers; Quarles, Woodie, and Jimmy Ray and two sisters; Clytee Hunt and Edna Fryery. Ralph is survived by his wife of over 57 years, and the love of his life; Marlene Ray, his two sons; Kyle Ray and wife Miriam, and Danny Ray and wife Jenny, his daughter; Nelda Ray-Smith, husband Bruce and their children Heather Dow and Kristen Smith, one sister-in-law; Rose Ray, 4 grandchildren; Geoffrey Ray and wife Whitney, Andrew Ray, Logan Ray, and Jake Ray, one very special friend; Loretta Smith, and many nieces, nephews and cousins. Funeral services were held at 11:00A.M., Thursday, March 8, 2018 at First United Methodist Church with the Doctor Trish Bruner officiating. Interment followed in the Glenwood Cemetery. Visitation was held from 5:00 to 7:00P.M., Wednesday, March 7, 2018 at Brown Funeral Home Chapel. In lieu of flowers, the family has requested that donations be made to Florida Panhandle Technical College, 757 Hoyt St, Chipley, FL 32428 (http://www. fptc.edu) or Alzheimers Disease Research (https://www.brightfocus.org/research/ alzheimers-diseaseresearch-program)RALPH W. RAY William Arky Register, age 66, of Graceville, Florida died March 8, 2018. Funeral services were held Saturday, March 10, 2018. Interment followed in the Collins Old Mill Cemetery in Graceville, FL with Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay directing.WILLIAM A. REGISTERMrs. Eunice Murl Steverson, age 93, of Bonifay, Florida passed away March 2, 2018 at her home. She was born May 6, 1924 in Graceville, Florida to the late James Matt Taylor and Lillie Mae Cook Taylor. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Steverson was preceded in death by her husband, Harvey Alfred Steverson, Sr.; one brother, Cletus Taylor; one sister, Dorothy Watford; two granddaughters, Kim Tadlock Aycock and Sherry Lynn Griffin; two grandsons, David Wayne Griffin and Ronald Terry McNeal; one great-great-granddaughter, Maely White. Mrs. Steverson is survived by two sons, Harvey A. Steverson, Jr. and wife Beth of Caryville, FL and Joe Mack Steverson and wife Sandy of Panama City, FL; four daughters, Frances Griffin and husband Bob of Bonifay, FL, Betty Tadlock and husband Charles of Bonifay, FL, Catherine McNeal and husband Gerome of Marianna, FL and Carolyn Crawford and husband Wilton of Bonifay, FL; one sister, Edith Hicks of Lakeland, FL; 12 grandchildren, 36 great-grandchildren and 13 great-great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 11:00 AM Thursday, March 8, 2018 at Little Rock Assembly of God Church with Rev. Michael Tadlock, Rev. Ike Steverson, Rev. Jerry Moore and Rev. John Chance officiating. Interment followed in the Little Rock Assembly of God Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. The family received friends form 5-7 PM Wednesday at Peel Funeral Home.EUNICE M. STEVERSON John Albert Wranik, age 84, of Chipley, Florida, passed away Wednesday. February 14, 2018 at home surrounded by his loving family members. Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on March 22, 1933 to the late Paul and Mary Wranik (Maria Prska Sieklik). John was the last of the first generation born in the USA. He proudly served in the US Marine Corps during the Korean Conflict. John spent many years working as a Technical Illustrator and Photographer. He found his  Little Piece of HeavenŽ in Sunny Hills, where he has resided for the last 15 years. Survivors: daughter; Lisa Bowman and sonin-law; Ron Bowman of Slidell, La., daughter; Nanette Woodward of Washington State, son; John (Wranik) Maschari of Denver, Co., and daughter; Frances Liley and Son-in-law; Lee Liley of Centennial, Co., Grandchildren: Anna Maschari, Lana Liley, Christopher Wranik, Samantha Wranik, and Nicole Wranik. Great Grandchildren: Shyla, Sophia, Jesse, Ashley, Steven, and numerous nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by Nancy Artino Wranik (wife and mother of his kids) son; Daniel Wranik, grandson; Justin Wranik, and granddaughter; Loni Liley. Memorialization was by cremation. There was a Celebration of Life Service held on Saturday, May 5, 2018, 11:00am-12:30am at Brown Funeral Home Chipley, FL. The Family wants to express a Special Thank You to all the Earthly AngelsŽ at Emerald Coast Hospice that made Our Dads final days and passing a time filled with dignity and grace. God bless each on of you! Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh. netJOHN A. WRANIK There will be games, grafts, door prizes, puppet shows and more. Bring your Easter basket for the hunt. There will also be free hot dogs and cheese pizza while supplies last. UMC of Bonifay Holy Week and Easter ServicesBONIFAY … The United Methodist Church will host Holy Week and Easter services on the following: 6 p.m. Sunday, March 25 … Easter Cantata and Palm Sunday services: 7 p.m. Thursday, March 29 … Seder and Foot Washing Service: 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, March 30 … Prayer Vigil: 10 a.m. Saturday, March 31 … Easter Egg Hunt: Sunday, April 1 … 7 a.m. Early Sunrise Service (Outdoors): 8:30 a.m. Breakfast and at 10:50 a.m. Worship Service. The church is located at 202 North Oklahoma Street in Bonifay. For more information call 850-547-3785. EASTERFrom Page B4

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** B6 Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | Washington County News FAITHGrace Assembly of God at Chipley Morning worship is at 10 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 567 North Main Street in Chipley. New Bethany Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Shaky Joe Road just off Hig hway 280 at Hinsons Crossroads. New Life Fellowship Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning worship is at 10 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 695 Fifth Street in Chipley. Wausau Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 3537 Washington Street in Wausau.BaptistAbigail Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located on Dawkins Street in Vernon. Berean Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1438 Nearing Hills Drive in Chipley. Blue Lake Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning worship is at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 1405 Blue Lake Road in Chipley. Chipley First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Traditional worship service is at 9 a.m. Contemporary worship service is at 10:30 a.m. Discipleship training is at 5 p.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday AWANA is at 5:15 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1300 South Blvd.. Country Oaks Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 574 Buckhorn Blvd. Eastside Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at Hig hway 277 in Vernon. First Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship is at 10:45 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1387 South Blvd. Gap Pond Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 1980 Gap Blvd.. in Sunny Hills. Grace Baptist Chapel Mission Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship is at 10:50 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 440 Lot E Second Street, Chipley. Holmes Creek Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service AWANA is at 5:30 p.m. and Bible Study is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 335 Cope Road in Chipley. Holyneck Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located 3395 Cemetery Lane in Campbellton. Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 614 Bennett Drive in Chipley. Mt. Ararat Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1233 Old Bonifay Road in Chipley. New Orange Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located on Alford Road in Washington County. New Prospect Baptist Churc h Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship services are at 11 a.m. Sunday evening services are at 5 p.m. Wednesday services is at 5 p.m. Wednesday prayer meeting, Bible Study and childrens classes start at 5:45 p.m. The church is located at 761 New Prospect Road in Chipley. Oakie Ridge Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Orange Hill Road and Gilberts Mill Road. Orange Hill Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday prayer and Bible Study is as 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3485 Gainer Road in Chipley. Orange Hill Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship on the “ rst and third Sunday of the month is at 11 a.m. Wednesday night prayer meeting is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 816 Sunday Road in Chipley. Piney Grove Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1783 Piney G rove R oad south of Chipley. Pleasant Hill Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located south of Bonifay at 1900 Pleasant Hill Road. Poplar Springs Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1098 Lovewood Road two miles east of Highway 77. Poplar Head Independent Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located on Poplar Head Road. Sand Hills Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:15 a.m. Morning worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 6758 Highway 77. Shiloh Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:15 a.m. Morning worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 5:45 p.m. The church is located on Highway 277, three miles south of Hig hway 90 in Chipley. Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11:15 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 3013 Moss Hill Road in Vernon. St. John Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. St. Matthews Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 4156 St. Matthews Road in Caryville. Salem Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Worship service is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Church is located at 2555 Kynesville Highway in Alford. Sunny Hills First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Unity Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3274 River Road in Vernon. Vernon First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 2888 Church Street in Vernon. Wausau First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 3493 Washington Street in Wausau.CatholicSt. Joseph The Worker Catholic Church Sunday Mass is at 11 a.m. Tuesday Mass is at 9 a.m. The church is located at 1664 Main Street in Chipley. St. Theresa Catholic Church Sunday Mass is at 9 a.m. Monday through Friday Mass is at 8 a.m. Saturday Mass is at 5 p.m. Adoration is the “ rst Friday after 8 a.m. Mass. The church is located at 2071 Sunny Hills Blvd. and the Rectory is located at 2056 Sunny Hills Blvd. in Sunny Hills.Church of Christ and Church of God in Christ (COGIC)Chipley Church of Christ Sunday morning Bible study is at 9:30 a.m. Morning worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1295 Brickyard Road in Chipley. Spirit-Filled Church of God in Christ Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Tuesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 2128 Pate Pond Road in Caryville. Yes Lord Deliverance COGIC Sunday School is at 10:30 a.m. Worship is at noon. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 739 Seventh Street in Chipley.EpiscopalGrant Tabernacle AME Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 577 Martin Luther King Blvd. in Chipley. St. John AME Morning worship is at 11:30 a.m. St. Joseph AME Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 5 p.m. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1401 Monroe Shef“ eld Road in Chipley. St. Luke AME Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located on Jackson Community Road. CHURCHESFrom Page B4If you would like to include an event in this list, email information to:news@chipleypaper. com. Otter Creek to host The WatsonsPONCE DE LEON … Otter Creek Methodist Church will host The Watsons at 7 p.m. Saturday, March 17. The church is located four miles north of Ponce de Leon off Highway 81. Mt. Ararat FMBC to mark 126th anniversaryCHIPLEY Mt. Ararat First Missionary Baptist Church will celebrate their 126th anniversarySunday, March 18. Thechurch is located at1233 Old Bonifay Roadin Chipley. Revival at Bethany Baptist ChurchBONIFAY Bethany Baptist Church will celebrate revival services March 18-21 with Rev. Lee Chorn and special music each service. Music at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. onSunday, March 18 will be by Brandi Stewart, and music on March 19 will be Monday by Bethel Trio. Music on Tuesday, March 20, will be presented by Lace Justice, and music for Wednesday, March 21 will be presented byKim Tate. Everyone is invited to come out and see what a real Revival looks like. For more information, email mylinda1@yahoo.com. Bethany Baptist Church is located at 1404 N High-way 79 in Bonifay. Revival at Sunny Hills ChapelSUNNY HILLS … Sunny Hills Chapel will hold revival services at 7 p.m. nightly Sunday, March 25 through Friday, March 30. The special guest will be Evangelist Dennis Touton. The church is located three miles south of Wausau on Highway 77. For more information call the pastor at 850-548-5649. Holmes Creek Baptist Church to present 'Christ in The Passover'CHIPLEY Jesus' Last Supper was actually a Jewish Passover. Bruce Rapp of Jews for Jesus will re-create the traditional Passover service and explain how it foreshadowed Jesus' death and resurrection in a presentation called "Christ in the Passover" at Holmes Creek Baptist Church at 6 p.m., Monday, March 26. Rapp will set a table with items traditionally used at the Passover meal and detail their spiritual significance. He will also explain the con-nection between the events of the first Passover in Egypt and the redemption that Jesus accomplished, as well as the deep bond between the ancient Passover feast and the Christian communion celebration today. Jews for Jesus has presented "Christ in the Passover" at over 38,000 churches. It has been enthusiastically received by Christians who appreciate learning more about the Jewish backgrounds of their faith. Moishe Rosen, who founded Jews for Jesus in 1973, has also co-written the book, Christ in the Passover, with his wife, Ceil. This seminal work includes a look at Passover in ancient times and how it is practiced today. It will be available after the presentation. Also available will be a DVD of the Christ in the Passover presentation with David Brickner, the executive director of Jews for Jesus, officiating. Brickner, a fifth-generation Jewish believer in Jesus, succeeded Rosen as Executive Director in 1996. Brickner has kept Jews for Jesus on the cutting edge as the ministry has expanded and established branches in eleven countries, including the United States, Brazil, Israel, Russia, France, and South Africa. "We exist to make the Messiahship of Jesus an unavoidable issue to our Jewish people worldwide," Brickner states. "There are still a few that haven't heard of us!" will be happy to answer questions after the presentation. Call (850) 638-1406 or visit http://www.holmescreekbc.com for more information. There is no admission charge.FAITH EVENTSUnion Relay for Life team will host a rib saleThursday, March 15. Ribs are $20 and can be picked up betweennoon and 4 p.m. Delivery is available or several orders. Money is due at pick up or delivery. All proceeds benefit Washington/Holmes County Relay For Life. For more information, or to order, email vickie.williams@communitysouth.net. Bass TournamentVERNON The Vernon High School Fighting Jackets Dream Team will host a "Go Fish For A Cure" Bass TournamentSaturday, March 17,at Gap Pond in Vernon. Fishing will begin at daylight with weigh-in atnoon. Entry fee is $50 per boat. There will be a five fish limit for weigh-in, fish must be at least 12 inches in length. Dead fish will have a four ounces deduction from the weight. Cash prizes will be given to the top two places. All proceeds benefit Washington/Holmes County Relay For Life. For more information, call Tracie Herbert or Lora Good-man at 850-535-2046. Stick a Fork in Cancer WASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY … The Washington/Holmes Relay For Life is participating in Stick a Fork in Cancer Sunday, March 11 through Saturday, March 17. The following restaurants will give a percentage of their profits: From 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday Boar Deli will give 10 percent of each days profit: all day Monday, March 12 Phonoodle and Kaboodle will give 10 per-cent of profit: all day Tuesday, March 13 and all day Friday, March 16 Javiers will give 10 percent of each days profit: All day Thursday, March 14 Can-cuns will give 10 percent of profit. On Thursday, March 15 and Friday, March 16 Pizza Hut will give up to 20 percent when you bring in a coupon or men-tion that you want to support Stick a Fork in Cancer. There will be donation buckets at the following restaurants Skins & Bubbas, Hungry Howies (Chi-pley), Dees and M&W BBQ. Rib SaleCHIPLEY … The HTNB Relay For Life team is hosting a rib sale. Pre-orders are due by Friday, April 13. Pick-up will be from noon to 4 p.m. Thursday, April 19 at the HTNB Officce located at 777 Main Street Building A (yellow building north of Piggly Wiggly). Ribs are sold by the whole rack and cost $20. All proceeds benefit Washington/Holmes County Relay For Life. For more information or to order call 850-415-9002. 2018 Relay for LifeCHIPLEY The 2018 Holmes-Washington Relay for Life event will be held from 6 p.m. until midnight at Pals Park in Chipley on April 27, 2018. The theme of the 2018 event is "Games Over, Cancer!" For more information email bushfamily80@gmail.com or danielle.cappel@cancer.org RELAYFrom Page B4

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Washington County News | Wednesday, March 14, 2018 B B 7 7 POWERFUL. DIGITAL. MARKETING.There are more ways than ever to market your business, and News Herald is here to help! Weve added the power of ThriveHive „ everything you need to market your business online. Theres a great big world of opportunity out there waiting for you. And its closer than you think. Contact Kathleen Smith to get started today. (850) 747-5004 | www.newsherald.com + Guess who can set you up with digital marketing?(Heres a hint, its us). 3-3383 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2015-CA-132 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. COURTNEY ROGERS TABITHA ROGERS Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 27th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 14, Block 63, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT ONE, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 9 through 27, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 26th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 7, 14, 2018 3-3384 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2015-CA-134 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. SHASTRI MAHADEO Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 27th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 26, Block 236, of Sunny Hills Unit two, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 28 through 37, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 26th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamare Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 7, 14, 2018 3-3387 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2015-CA-138 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. PANSY SLEEM Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 27th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 8, Block 1099, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT NINETEEN, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, at Pages 65 through 79, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 26th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 7, 14, 2018 3-3394 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2015-CA-146 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. MARCIA GRAHAM Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 27th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 6, Block 1101, of Sunny Hills Unit nineteen, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, at Pages 65 through 79, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 26th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 7, 14, 2018 3-3397 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2015-CA114

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B B 8 8 Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | Washington County News CIVIL DIVISION THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. MAMADOU KEITA Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 27 th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 8, Block 215, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT TWO, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 28 through 37, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27 th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Tamera Donjuan By: Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135 th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 7 and 14, 2018 3-3401 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2015-CA-0079 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation, Plaintiff, vs. DAHLIA ANDREEN HARRISON, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated the 23rd day of February, 2018 and entered in Civil Case No. 2015-CA-0079 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Washington County, Florida, wherein The Deltona Corporation, a Delaware corporation, is the Plaintiff and Dahlia Andreen Harrison and Michelle Ard Miller, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front of the Washington County Courthouse, 1293 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Washington County, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. on the 27th day of March, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Judgment, being situate in Washington County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 1, Block 1078, SUNNY HILLS UNIT NINETEEN, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, at pages 65 through 69, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. Also known as: 2233 Gallagher Drive Chipley, Florida 32428 IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIEN HOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING ATER SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. THE OWNER OF THE PROPERTY MAY CLAIM SURPLUS FUNDS WITHOUT THE NEED TO HAVE A LAWYER OR OTHER REPRESENTATION. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice to Charles E. Berk, Esquire, 1485 S.E. 59th Street, Ocala, Florida 34480, (352) 629-1155, not later than seven days prior to the proceedings. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771 or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. DATED this 26th day of February, 2018. LORA C BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk Charles E. Berk, Esquire Florida Bar No. 141171 1485 S.E. 59th Street Ocala, Florida 34470 Attorney for Plaintiff (352) 629-1155 cceberk@aol.com March 7, 14, 2018 3-3432 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2016-CA-097 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. GAVIN YEARWOOD ERICA HENRY Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 29th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 2, Block 369, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT SIX, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 60 through 76, of the Public Records of WASHINGTON County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 14, 21, 2018 3-3422 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2016-CA-087 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. SHEILA STURKS Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 29th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 5, Block 228, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT TWO, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 28 through 37, of the Public Records of WASHINGTON County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 14, 21, 2018 3-3429 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2016-CA-094 THE DELTONA CORPORATION,A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. SHASHI SHERMAN Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 29th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 41, Block 588, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT TEN, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 108 through 118, of the Public Records of WASHINGTON County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 14, 21, 2018 3-3434 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2016-CA-099 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, RICHARD RAMDIN SHALINI BHARRAT Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 29th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 3, Block 84, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT ONE, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 9 through 27, of the Public Records of WASHINGTON County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 14, 21, 2018 3-3433 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2016-CA-098 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. GLADWIN YEARWOOD Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 29th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 6, Block 578, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT TEN, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 108 through 118, of the Public Records of WASHINGTON County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 14, 21, 2018 3-3438 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14th JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR, WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case No.: 2011 CP47 In Re the Estate Of: REGINAGAILSTONE, Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of REGINA GAILSTONE, deceased, whose date of death was July 20, 2009, is pending in the Circuit Court for Washington County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Clerk of the Circuit Court, Washington County Courthouse, 1293 Jackson Avenue, Chipley Florida. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and her attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedentÂ’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other person having claims or demands against decedentÂ’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN FLORIDA STATUTES SECTION 733.702 WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTÂ’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 7, 2018. Attorney for Personal Representative: Brown and Brown Attorneys at Law, P.A. Thomas J. Brown, Esq. For the Firm Florida Bar: 0781967 1102 East Tennessee Street Tallahassee, Florida 32308 (850) 224-2800 tb@brownandbrownlawyers.com Ms. Christy L. Broxton Personal Representative of the Estate of Regina Gail Stone, Deceased 4226-C St., Matthews Road Caryville, Florida 32427 March 7 and 14, 2018 3-3435 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2016-CA-100 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. KIRAN AYAZ MAHMOOD AYAZ Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 29th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 21, Block 285, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT THREE, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 38 through 41, of the Public Records of WASHINGTON County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 14, 21, 2018 3-3399 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2015-CA151 CIVIL DIVISION THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. SEEVATRI SINGH Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 27 th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 4, Block 785, of Sunny Hills Unit eleven, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 120 through 128, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27 th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Tamera Donjuan By: Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135 th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 7 and 14, 2018 3-3450 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09. FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Hammacks Retirement Home located at 4919 Hammack Road, in the County of Washington, in the city of Vernon, Florida 32462 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Chipley, Florida this 12 day of March, 2018. Cecil Roy Hammack March 14, 2018 3-3398 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2015-CA115 CIVIL DIVISION THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. LENNOX FRANCIS Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 27 th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 9, Block 154, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT FOUR, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 42 through 54, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27 th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Tamera Donjuan By: Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135 th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 7 and 14, 2018 3-3385 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2015-CA-135 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, vs. SHASTRI MAHADEO Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 27th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 6, Block 562, of Sunny Hills Unit nine, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 103 through 107, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 26th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 7, 14, 2018 3-3400 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2015-CA152 CIVIL DIVISION THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. PAVANIE MCKENZIE Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 27 th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 14, Block 158, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT FOUR, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 42 through 54, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27 th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Tamera Donjuan By: Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135 th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 7 and 14, 2018 3-3388 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2015-CA-139 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. IRMA MAHADEO SEECHARAN MAHADEO Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 27th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 15, Block 228, of Sunny Hills Unit two, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 28 through 37, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 26th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 7, 14, 2018 3-3386 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2015-CA-137 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. ROWNAK A. KHAN Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 27th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 18, Block 156, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT FOUR, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 42 through 54, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 26th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 7, 14, 2018 3-3391 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2015-CA-142 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. ANNE LEON-BERNARD Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 27th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 7, Block 352, of Sunny Hills Unit six, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 60 through 76, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 26th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 7, 14, 2018 3-3389 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2015-CA-140 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. CHARMAINE WILLIAMS Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 27th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 12, Block 1001, of Sunny Hills Unit twelve, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 129 through 138, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 26th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 7, 14, 2018 3-3390 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2015-CA-141 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. LEVI S. HAUGHTON Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 27th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 7, Block 161, of Sunny Hills Unit four, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 42 through 54, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 26th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRBy: By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 7, 14, 2018 3-3393 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2015-CA-144 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. SHANDAI B. SEEGOBIN Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL 3-3392 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2015-CA-143 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION Plaintiff, vs. LAWRENCE ST. JOHN PALMORE CLARKE Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 27th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 1, Block 1104, of Sunny Hills Unit nineteen, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, at Pages 65 through 79, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 26th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 7, 14, 2018

PAGE 21

Washington County News | Wednesday, March 14, 2018 B B 9 9 CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 27th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 12, Block 1004, of Sunny Hills Unit twelve, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 129 through 138, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 26th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 7, 14, 2018 3-3395 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2015-CA-154 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, vs. MOHAMMED B. HOSSAIN aka BARAK MOHAMMED HOSSAIN Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 27th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 4, Block 156, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT FOUR, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 42 through 54, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 7, 14, 2018 3-3403 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2016-CA-064 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. ABDOURAHMANE BAH Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 11:00 A.M. Central Time, on the 29th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 7, Block 221, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT TWO, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 28 through 37, of the Public Records of WASHINGTON County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 7, 14, 2018 3-3396 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2015-CA-155 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. SANDRALETTA C. HAUGHTON EASHWAYNE HAUGHTON Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 27th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 20, Block 152, of Sunny Hills Unit four, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 42 through 54, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 7, 14, 2018 3-3423 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2016-CA-088 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. SHASHI SHERMAN Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 29th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 4, Block 578, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT TEN, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 108 through 118, of the Public Records of WASHINGTON County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 14, 21, 2018 3-3425 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2016-CA-090 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. SHIREE I. MARIPEN Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 29th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 14, Block 1006, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT TWELVE, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 129 through 138, of the Public Records of WASHINGTON County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 14, 21, 2018 3-3424 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2016-CA-089 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. SHASHI SHERMAN Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 29th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 5, Block 337, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT FIVE, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 55 through 59, of the Public Records of WASHINGTON County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 14, 21, 2018 3-3426 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2016-CA-091 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. IGOR DZHABIYEV TAISIA KETOEVA Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 29th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 7, Block 146, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT NINETEEN, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, at Pages 65 through 79, of the Public Records of WASHINGTON County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 14, 21, 2018 3-3428 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2016-CA-093 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. SHASHI SHERMAN Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 29th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 16, Block 613, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT TEN, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 108 through 118, of the Public Records of WASHINGTON County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 14, 21, 2018 3-3427 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2016-CA-092 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. BILQUIS QADIR Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 29th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 1, Block 1102, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT NINETEEN, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, at Pages 65 through 79, of the Public Records of WASHINGTON County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 14, 21, 2018 3-3430 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2016-CA-095 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. SHASHI SHERMAN Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 29th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 8, Block 585, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT TEN, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 108 through 118, of the Public Records of WASHINGTON County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 14, 21, 2018 3-3431 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2016-CA-096 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. LLOYD FRASER Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 29th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 4, Block 10, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT ONE, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 9 through 27, of the Public Records of WASHINGTON County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 14, 21, 2018 3-3446 Early Notice for Public Review of a Proposal to Support Activity in the 100-Year Floodplain and Wetland Date: March 14, 2018 Name of Responsible Entity: Town of Caryville Address: 4436 Old Spanish Trail Caryville, FL 32427 Contact: Suzanne Floyd, Town Clerk Telephone Number: (850) 548-5571 To: All Interested Agencies, Groups, and Individuals This is to give notice that the Town of Caryville has been awarded a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds #18DB-OM-02-77-02-N24 by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO). The funding is provided by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 3-3436 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:2016-CA-102 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, vs. RAUL N. GAMBOA Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1293 Jackson Avenue, in Washington County, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 2:00 P.M. Central Time, on the 29th day of March, 2018, the following described property: Lot 26, Block 292, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT THREE, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 38 through 41, of the Public Records of WASHINGTON County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 27th day of February, 2018. LORA C. BELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Tamara Donjuan Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 charles.berk@deltona.co m March 14, 21, 2018

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B B 1 1 0 0 Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | Washington County News NF-5031562 Hazardous Aerial Tree Removal  Stump Grinding Trimming & Pruning  Emergency Tree Service  Lot Clean UpDow Morris,Owner/Operator 850-527-6291  850-849-3825 Readers’ Choice2017WASHINGTON HOLMES JACKSON (850) 638-3611 HastyHeating & Cooling NF-5028471 NF-5036304 ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE OR BUSINESS FOR AS LITTLE AS $10 A WEEK!Reach thousands of potential customers with your Business Guide ad in the:WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS HOLMES COUNTY-TIMES ADVERTISER WEEKLY ADVERTISER CALL TODAY! 850-638-0212 NF-5036305 NF-5032746JOEYS SPORTING GOODSBAIT & TACKLE, GUNS & AMMO, ACCESSORIES & SPORT CLOTHINGJOEY SELLERSJOEYSSPORTINGGOODS 2064 Holly Street Westville, Fla. 32464850-548-5055 NF-5031560 C & CBookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. Jean’s Cleaning Service Quality cleaning ant reasonable rates. Have good references and dependable. Call Jean 850-849-3535 Do you need adependable, honest, caring and experienced care giver for your love one. Then call Theresa at 850-326-6054. References upon request. Do you need adependable, honest, caring and experienced care giver for your love one. Then call Theresa at 850-326-6054. References upon request. J3’s Lawn and Palm, LLCRetired Military looking to maintain your Lawn, we also Pressure Wash. Call or text Kay or James at 850-768-4589 or 850-703-1706. Discount for more than one customer in your general area. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. and will be used in Service Area #1 to upgrade the water treatment plant located at 4320 Old Bonifay Road. In Service Area #2 CDBG funds will be used to replace the existing potable water lines running along the entire length of Palmer Drive between US Highway 90 on the south and CR 179 (Wrights Creek Road) on the east. In Service Area #3 CDBG funds will be used to replace the existing potable water lines running along CR 179 (Wrights Creek Road) between US Highway 90 on the south and a point just north of Lake Circle Drive on the north. As an Unmet Need, if funding is available, in Service Area #4 CDBG funds will be used to replace the existing potable water lines running along Lake Circle Drive between Taylor Road on the northeast and Old Bonifay Road on the southeast. As a second Unmet Need, if funding is available, in Service Area #5 CDBG funds will be used to replace the existing potable water lines running along Lake Circle Way between Old Bonifay Road on the east and Lake Circle Drive on the west. As a third Unmet Need, if funding is available, in Service Area #6 CDBG funds will be used to replace the existing potable water lines running along Old Bonifay Road between CR 179 (Wrights Creek Road) on the west and Lake Circle Way on the east. As a fourth Unmet Need, if funding is available, in Service Area #7 CDBG funds will be used to replace the existing potable water lines running along Howard Road between CR 179 (Wrights Creek Road) on the southwest and the Town Limits on the northeast. This notice is required by Section 2(a)(4) of Executive Order 11988 for Floodplain Management, and by Section 2(b) of Executive Order 11990 for the Protection of Wetlands, and is implemented by HUD Regulations found at 24 CFR 55.20(b) for the HUD action that is within and/or affects a floodplain and/or wetland. Construction may be undertaken in the 100 year floodplain and/or wetlands. The Town of Caryville is interested in alternatives and public perceptions of possible adverse impacts that could result from the project as well as potential mitigation measures. Some of the activities being carried out in the Primary and Unmet Need Service Areas will be located within a floodplain and/or wetland area. Activities: Service Area #1 -Potable Water Distribution System Wide Service Area: 03J -Water Tank/Well/Water Treatment Plant Improvements -This activity includes upgrades to the water treatment plant located at 4320 Old Bonifay Road. Specifically, the work carried out at the water treatment plant will include the following improvements: “The installation of a sodium hypochlorite chlorination system; and “The associate piping needed for the new chlorination system. Activity CDBG Cost Local Match 03J Water Tank/Well Treatment Plant Improvements $30,000.00 $ 0.00 Service Area #1 includes all of the homes served by the Town of Caryville’s potable water system: None of the work in Service Area #1 will be carried out within a flood plain or wetland. Service Area #2 Palmer Drive Water Line Replacement Service Area: 03J -Water Line Replacement Activity This activity includes the replacement of the existing potable water lines in Palmer Drive between US Highway 90 on the south and CR 179 (Wrights Creek Road) on the east, a distance of approximately three thousand five hundred linear feet (3,500’). Activity CDBG Cost Local Match 03J Water Line Replacement $180,000.00 $ 0.00 Service Area #2 is bound on the north and west by the rear property line of the properties located on the north and west sides of Palmer Drive, on the south and east by the rear property lines of the properties located on the south and east sides of Palmer Drive. Service Area #2 extends down Palmer Drive between U. S. Highway 90 on the south and CR 179 on the east. Approximately 1.5 acres of the work in Service Area #2 will be carried out within a flood plain or wetland. Service Area #3 -CR 179 (Wrights Creek Road) Water Line Replacement Service Area: 03J -Water Line Replacement Activity This activity includes the replacement of the existing potable water lines in CR 179 (Wrights Creek Road) between US Highway 90 on the south and a point just past Lake Circle Drive on the north, a distance of approximately four thousand linear feet (4,000’). Activity CDBG Cost Local Match 03J Water Line Replacement $ 245,000.00 $ 0.00 Service Area #3 is bound on the north by U. S, Highway 90, on the south by a point just north of Lake Circle Drive, on the east by the rear property line of the properties located on the east sides of CR 179 (Wrights Creek Road), and on the west by the rear property lines of the properties located on the west side of CR 179 (Wrights Creek Road). Approximately 0.1 acres of the work in Service Area #3 may be carried out within a flood plain and/or wetland. Activity CDBG Cost Local Match 016 Engineering $ 97,000.00 $ 0.00 Activity CDBG Cost Local Match 013 Administration $ 48,000.00 $ 0.00 Total CDBG Cost $600,000.00 Total City’s Local Match Claimed for Points $0.00 Total CDBG, City’s Local Match Claimed for Points -$600,000.00 Approximately 1.6 acres of the primary activities included in this project may be carried out within a flood plain and/or wetland. No additional impervious area within a flood plain and/or wetland will be created in any of the Primary Service Areas included in this project. Unmet Need: Service Area #4 -Lake Circle Drive Water Line Replacement Service Area: 03J -Water Line Replacement Activity The proposed activity, if funding is available, is the replacement of the existing potable water lines in Lake Circle Drive between Taylor Road on the northwest and Old Bonifay Road on the southeast, a distance of approximately one thousand eight hundred linear feet (1,800’). Activity CDBG Cost Local Match 03J Water Line Replacement $ 90,000.00 $ 0.00 Service Area #4 is bound on the northeast by Taylor Road, on the southeast by Old Bonifay Road, on the east by the rear property line of the properties located on the east side of Lake Circle Drive, on the west by the rear property lines of the properties located on the west side of Lake Circle Drive. Service Area #4 extends down Lake Circle Drive between Taylor Road on the northwest and Old Bonifay Road on the southeast. Approximately 0.5 acres of the work in Service Area #4 may be carried out within a flood plain and/or wetland. Service Area #5 -Lake Circle Way Water Line Replacement Service Area: 03J -Water Line Replacement Activity The proposed activity, if funding is available, is the replacement of the existing potable water lines in Lake Circle Way between Old Bonifay Road on the east and Lake Circle Drive on the west, a distance of approximately one thousand linear feet (1,000’). Activity CDBG Cost Local Match 03J Water Line Replacement $ 50,000.00 $ 0.00 Service Area #5 is bound on the north by the rear property line of the properties located on the north side of Lake Circle Way, on the south by the rear property lines of the properties located on the south side of Lake Circle Way, on the east by Old Bonifay Road, and on the west by Lake Circle Drive. Approximately 0.1 acres of the work in Service Area #4 may be carried out within a flood plain and/or wetland. Service Area #6 -Old Bonifay Road Water Line Replacement Service Area: 03J -Water Line Replacement Activity The proposed activity, if funding is available, is the replacement of the existing potable water lines in Old Bonifay Road between CR 179 (Wrights Creek Road) on the west and Lake Circle Way on the east, a distance of approximately two thousand five hundred linear feet (2,500’). Activity CDBG Cost Local Match 03J Water Line Replacement $ 150,000.00 $ 0.00 Service Area #6 is bound on the north by the rear property line of the properties located on the north side of Old Bonifay Road, on the south by the rear property lines of the properties located on the south side of Old Bonifay Road, on the west by CR 179 (Wrights Creek Road), and on the east by Lake Circle Way. Approximately 0.1 acres of the work in Service Area #6 may be carried out within a flood plain and/or wetland. Service Area #7 -Howard Road Water Line Replacement Service Area: 03J -Water Line Replacement Activity The proposed activity, if funding is available, is the replacement of the existing potable water lines in Howard Road between CR 179 (Wrights Creek Road) on the southwest and the town Limits on the northeast, a distance of approximately one thousand three hundred linear feet (1,300’). Activity CDBG Cost Local Match 03J Water Line Replacement $ 90,000.00 $ 0.00 Service Area #7 is bound on the north by the rear property lines of the properties located on the north side of Howard Road, on the south by the rear property lines of the properties located on the south side of Howard Road, on the northeast by the Town of Caryville Town limits, and on the southwest by County Road 179 (Wrights Creek Road). None of the work in Service Area #7 will be carried out within a flood plain and/or wetland. Approximately 0.7 acres of the Unmet Need activities included in this project may be carried out within a flood plain and/or wetland. No additional impervious area within a flood plain and/or wetland will be created in any of the Unmet Need Service Areas included in this project. Written comments must be received by Suzanne Floyd, Town Clerk at the Town of Caryville, 4436 Old Spanish Trail, Caryville, FL 32427 on or before March 30, 2018. Comments may also be submitted by email at townofcaryville@gmail.co m. Additional information may be obtained by contacting: Suzanne Floyd, Town Clerk telephone number (850) 548-5571. Millard French, Council Chairperson Environmental Certifying Official Town of Caryville 4436 Old Spanish Trail Caryville, FL 32427 Telephone number (850) 548-5571 March 14, 2018 Horse drawn old fashioned buggy $1,200 Call 850-548-5649. Live & Online Public AuctionTuesday, March 20th at 12:00 PM 321 Loans Inc. Receivership Case 1410 SW 3 Street, Pompano Beach, FL 33069 Sale will consist of luxury vehicles including: 2014 Tesla Model S, P85+ (miles: 47,678), 2015 BMW i8, 1.3L L3 Hybrid Super Car (miles: 15,632), 2015 Land Rover Range Rover Autobiography Edition (miles: 28,271), 2006 International 3000 Custom Luxury School Bus (upgraded and equipped) and 2003 Blue Bird Body Co. Custom Luxury School Bus (upgraded and equipped). Catalog and photos available at www .moeckerauctions.c om Receivership Case #0:17-60907-CIV-FAM Preview: Day of sale 9 AM to Noon ? 6%-18% BP ? $500 refundable cash deposit to register. (800) 840BIDS ? info@moeckerauctions.c om AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin SAWMILLS from only $4397.00-MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill! Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www .Norwood Sawmills.com or call (800)578-1363 Ext. 300N Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1BR and 2BR apartment for rent downtown Bonifay. $450 and $500. Deposit required. 305-965-1635. For Rent 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments in Vernon. Clean, stove, refrigerator, central heat/air, convenient to Panama City Beach, section 8, Rental assistance. 850-638-4640 For Rent One Bedroom apartments for rent in Chipley. Convenient location. Stove and refrigerator furnished. No Pets. Smoke free environment. Call 850-638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 2BR/1BA House for rent. Vernon area. 1st, last +deposit. $675.00/month. No pets, smoke free environment. Prefer mature adults. 850-326-2201. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. 2/2 & 2/1 MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT2bed/2bath Mobile Home for rent in Chipley city limits. 2bed/1bath Mobile Home for rent. Contact Rodney: 850.638.1124 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/ sewage/ lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 3/1 Country Home for RentDon’t miss this opportunity!! Completely remodeled 3Bed/1Bath w/ Garage.Home on Acreage Rodney: 850.638.1124 For Sale Two acre plot and one acre plot in Jacob City, FL. Call 850-849-9338. Highway 77 2 miles south of Chipley 4-8 acre tract Bedie Road. Call Milton Peel at 850-638-1858 or 326-9109 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Turn to classified’s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you!

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** | Wednesday, March 14, 2018 C1 HORIZONSINSIDE Data reveals workforce trends | C2 By Carol Kent Wyatt HorizonsHOLMES AND WASHINGTON COUNTIES The unprecedented collaborative effort between the City of Bonifay and Holmes and Washington Counties known as the 79 Corridor Project saw much progress in the last 12 months. First proposed through the Washington County Economic Development Council in June 2015 and believed to be the first of its kind in Florida the 79 Corridor Project is an interlocal agreement between the governments aimed at bringing economic growth to the area. Once complete, the project is expected to expand commercial opportunities outward from the established commercial corridor on U.S. 79 south from I-10 to Douglas Ferry Road. Senator George Gainer and Representative Brad Drake laid the financial groundwork during the 2017 legislative session by advocating for and then succeeding in netting $1 million in appropriations for the project. The next boost came in February 2018 when the project was named was among economic growth initiatives awarded grants from the Florida Job Growth Grant Fund. That award totaled $1,821,461, bringing project funding so far to nearly match the estimated $3 million total cost. The $1.8 million awarded by Governor Scott is earmarked to build approximately 2.9 miles of sewer and water infrastructure within the corridor. This portion of the 1,525-acre commercial/industrial/ mixed use development will replace the need for future wells and septic systems as a part of the development. Because the funds have to be granted to a specific 79 Corridor Project fully fundedPictured from left are Economic Development Council member Jim Town, EDC Executive Director Ted Everett, Washington County Board of County Commissioners Chairman Tray Hawkins, Governor Rick Scott, and Holmes County Board of County Commissioners Chairman Danny Powell. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] The 79 Corridor Project got its “ rst “ nancial boost in 2017 after Senator George Gainer and Representative Brad Drake netted $1 million in appropriations. Representative Brad Drake Vacant campuses to get new life | C6 More students are getting industry certi ed | C3 Uptick signals tourism growth | C8 Amtrak: Safety talks could delay return | C2See CORRIDOR, C2

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** C2 Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | government entity, the Governor awarded it to Washington County Board of County Commissioners; however, the funds will be used within the parameters of the agreement between the three governments. Richard Williams, Executive Director of Opportunity Florida, has been assisting on the project and says partnership is key. This successful application shows what can happen when two counties work together to improve the region...,Ž said Williams. Having elected officials and economic developers willing to work together is key for our rural area to create jobs and give our friends and families a chance to work and live in our region. Having this application among the first selected from over 225 from across the state is a huge victory for the Opportunity Florida region.Ž City of Bonifay officials and commissioners from both counties have also leant significant support to the project. By investing in needed infrastructure projects, we are making it easier for job creators to grow in our community and create new opportunities for our families,Ž said Washington County Commission Chairman Tray Hawkins. Washington County is proud to stand beside Governor Scott to celebrate the Florida Job Growth Grant Fund awards, and we are excited to see the completion of this project.Ž Bonifay City Councilman Roger Brooks says theres still a lot of work to be done, but he is expecting a great outcome. Everything about this project has just got success written all over it, and it puts us on a level playing field with all the interchanges along the interstate,Ž said Brooks. We have the services available, and I look forward to getting started. Also, when that fourlane is complete, it will make that interchange very popular and give an economic boost both in the city and the county.Ž Economic Development Council officials state several studies have been conducted that indicate bringing water and sewer to the corridor could mean about eight new businesses coming to Holmes and Washington counties and the City of Bonifay within three to five years of establishing the infrastructure. Completed aspects of the 79 Corridor Project include the City of Bonifay agreeing to run grant-funded sewer and water lines south of I-10 and both counties implementing overlay maps to the existing Future Land Use Maps (FLUM) to better prepare for economic development. By having possible commercial uses approved and outlined ahead of time, potential businesses can cut through the old method of first requesting for land use changes. EDC Executive Director Ted Everett states attorneys and the three governments are currently working on a second interlocal agreement that would establish an authority to manage future development over expansion along the corridor. The authority will be comprised of a commissioner from each county, a Bonifay City Council member, and one locally recognized business or civic leaders from each county. We are working on the legal aspects and getting the documents approved,Ž said Everett. There are a lot of conversations going back and forth, and we have an RFP out for hiring a General Manager who would manage the day-to-day operations of the authority. When its all said and done, we will have a comprehensive package that sets forth the terms and conditions that are required to set up the authority.Ž A lot of work has gone into this; it has been a massive undertaking, but one with the potenital for large payoffs.Ž Officials hope to have some new businesses in the area by 2019.Staff ReportWASHINGTON AND HOLMES COUNTIES „ Under most circumstances, a drop in unemployment rates is a good sign. A look into what triggered the decline can reveal underlying workforce-related trends. As is the case with Washington and Holmes counties „ where both have experienced a four-percent drop in unemployment from 2012 to 2017. In December last year, the seasonal unemployment rate in Washington County was 3.7 percent and 5 percent in December the previous year. In Holmes, for that period last year, the rate was 4.5 percent and 5.7 percent the previous, CareereSource Chipola (CSC) reports show. The respective drops in unemployment signal two opposing trends, according to data from CSC, a career center under statewide workforce policy and investment board CareerSource Florida. Lower unemployment rates do not necessarily signal a strengthening workforce, particularly if theres a decrease in the number of employed people. In a 2012 to 2017 workforce comparison, at 4 percent, unemployment in Holmes County dropped by 308 people; however the number of people in the labor force dropped by 375. Your labor force declined by a larger number then the unemployment number which is really why the unemployment percentage dropped,Ž CSC Executive Director Richard Williams stated in an email. If the labor force had stayed the same in 2017 as it was in 2012, you would have an employment rate in Holmes of 9.8 percent.Ž For Washington County, from 2012 to 2017, the unemployment rate dropped by 4.4 percent „ incrementally higher than Holmes. But, since the county had an increase in employment for those same years „ higher than the number of workers leaving the workforce „ a trend can be observed of an expanding economy. According to the CSC report, Washington County added 220 jobs in that time period. Since last year, both counties have shown some improvement in labor force and employment „ something Williams suggested should be monitored. Over the last year, Holmes and Washington both show a slight increase in labor force and employment; however, until we show that trend is stable we are still worried,Ž he wrote. Washington has moved more positively since 2014 while Holmes didnt really show a positive move until 2015.ŽWorkforce UpdateUnemployment down; numbers reveal other workforce trendsKEY ECONOMIC INDICATORS HOLMESWASHINGTON POPULATION 20,20124,985 HOUSEHOLDS 6,8098,370 MEDIUM HOUSEHOLD INCOME $37,437$38,330 AVERAGE ANNUAL WAGE $29,309$33,578 UNEMPLOYMENT RATE 4.2 %3.9 % Current year estimates are 2017. Sources: Florida O ce of Economic and Demographic ResearchStaff ReportWASHINGTON D.C. A U.S. Senator is calling on rail officials to get on track with the implementation of positive train control (PTC) on passenger rail lines. U.S. Senator Roger Wicker (R-Miss.) warned officials during a March 1 U.S. Senate hearing that without rapid placement of the railroad safety technologies on lines servicing the Gulf Coast, longplanned restoration of passenger rail service between New Orleans and Mobile, and later between New Orleans and Orlando, may be delayed. Wicker was among the group of officials on a Feb. 2016 inspection trip to examine existing infrastructure. The inspection trains route began in New Orleans and stopped in Chipley on its way to Jacksonville. The Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee hearing on PTC implementation followed a series of fatal accidents that the National Transportation Safety Board concluded could have been prevented by PTC technology. The implementation of PTC has been repeatedly delayed as rail companies and federal regulators continue to design, test, and implement the complex systems. I understand that testimony has not been particularly encouraging about our collective ability to have this requirement fulfilled by the end of the year,Ž Wicker said. The chairman and ranking members statements indicate that, on behalf of the Congress, theyre trying to say that patience is running out.Ž According to a press release from Wickers office, he asked Amtrak President and Chief Executive Officer Richard Anderson about the feasibility of implementing PTC along the Gulf Coast routes needed to restart passenger rail service that was discontinued after major damage from Hurricane Katrina. Anderson indicated that efforts are progressing, but that some operators „ including CSX have more work to do. Anderson stated that well-timed, well-run service between New Orleans and Mobile would likely be successful, but that a primary challenge to implementation has been the failure to enforce existing regulations pertaining to rail traffic preference and incremental cost rights, which help trains arrive on time, and at a reasonable cost to passengers on passenger rail routes that share tracks with freight trains. The law is there, but since 1971, but there has never been any effective enforcement over the preference action,Ž Anderson said. Thats why the long distance service at Amtrak runs at massive delays.Ž Anderson asked Wicker for help with an update to the existing law that would encourage the Surface Transportation Board to enforce the provisions necessary for Amtrak to improve passenger rail service nationwide. Wicker has championed legislative efforts to restore passenger rail service along the Gulf Coast. In 2015, he led the effort to create and fund the Gulf Coast Working Group which recently provided a report with input from the Federal Railroad Administration, Amtrak, Southern Rail Commission, CSX, and local communities along the proposed route. The stops from Amtraks pre-Katrina Sunset LimitedŽ route „ known as the legacy stopsŽ „ will remain the same. In Florida, those stops are Pensacola, Crestview, Chipley, Madison, Tallahassee, Lake City, and Jacksonville. One additional stop will be implemented in Live Oak at the request of local officials. In addition to finalizing PTC measures, agreements between Amtrak and host railroad CSX regarding infrastructure needs are still ongoing. Once those agreements are finalized, the rail service could be up and running in as little as six to 12 months, according to Amtrak Director of Government Affairs Todd Stenniss. Aaron Martin of Transportation Today and Carol Kent Wyatt contributed to this report.Safety discussions could delay Amtraks returnU.S. Senator Roger Wicker Over the last year, Holmes and Washington both show a slight increase in labor force and employment; however, until we show that trend is stable we are still worried.Ž„ Richard Williams Rick Scott speaks in Jacksonville in February, announcing $35 million in awards through the Florida Job Growth Grant Fund. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS] CORRIDORContinued from C1

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** | Wednesday, March 14, 2018 C3Staff ReportWith more than 200 payment locations in grocery and retail stores and easy access to pay online, over the phone, bill payment is easy and convenient. You can pay with cash at any Western Union or CheckFreepay. Just look for the signs at convenient locations where you shop. There are more than 200 Authorized Payment Locations right here in Northwest Florida. Pay with cash at an Authorized Payment Location ($1.50 service fee applies): € Western Union CheckFreepay € Publix Walmart € Walgreens Kmart € Winn-Dixie Mail Box Plus € Regions Bank Gulf Coast Communications & Cellular € Coastal Bank and Trust € Piggly Wiggly € Dodges stores € Greers Food Tiger € Kmart Find the authorized payment locations near you at MyGulfPower. com/WaysToPay or text GULFPAY to 40500. If you like to pay with your checking or savings account: Pay online at MyGulfPower.com or the Gulf Power app (no service fee) Set up Auto Pay for free to make payments that are automatically deducted from your checking or savings account. Mail payments the old-fashioned way to Gulf Power Payments, PO Box 830660, Birmingham, Alabama 35283-0660. If you like to pay with credit or debit card: Pay online at MyGulfPower.com or on the Gulf Power app ($2.25 service fee) Pay by phone by calling Bill Matrix at 800-831-6502 ($2.25 service fee). For more information, visit MyGulfPower.com/ WaysToPay. Also, check out MyGulfPower.com. The Gulf Power website offers a clean, modern design and is easy to navigate. You can pay your bill, sign up for text alerts, monitor your energy use, find energy efficiency tips and information on our programs, services and rebates. You can also get a free Energy Checkup online. Visit MyGulfPower. com/energycheckup, answer questions about your home and get a free, personalized report that gives you ways you can save on your home energy costs.Gulf Power, now has more than 200 locations to pay your bill Staff ReportIn 1962, a group of businessmen in a small town in North Florida united together to form First Federal Savings and Loan Association of Live Oak, as a way to provide home loans and savings accounts to their neighbors. Their passion for the local community and drive to give them the best service around has led First Federal Bank of Florida to what it is today. After steady growth in the 1960s, First Federal expanded into Hamilton, Lafayette, and Columbia Counties by the 1980s, and offered its first checking account. By 2010, the bank expanded their reach within their existing market area, opened the John S. Flood Financial Center (Operations), and new branches in Nassau and Baker Counties. In the early 2010s, First Federal expanded to the Florida Panhandle with branches in Holmes, Jackson, and Washington Counties. The bank's most recent branch opened in 2016 in Panama City, Florida.From the start, First Federal has been equally committed to exceptional service and value. Today, they are a community-based mutual bank that serves over 60,000 customers from 17 branches and 2 loan offices across North Florida. Because First Federal is a mutual bank, they are owned by their customers and not stockholders, which allows them to be more focused on their customers needs. Built on conservative yet progressive principles, over the past five years, First Federal has increased its business lines to include a mortgage processing company, wholesale lending, warehouse lending, consumer direct lending, and a manufactured housing lending division. This diversity has allowed First Federal to reach more people across the Southeast. The common thread that runs through all of this is First Federals passion to be committed to helping neighbors and local communities thrive. They offer a range of products and services aimed at giving customers all the tools they need to live full lives and run successful businesses. 2018 will be an exciting year for First Federal as they look to expand to Gainesville and Ocala. Its important to the bank as they expand to new markets to keep their commitments to each of the local communities they serve, and to bring that same level of service to new customers.Conservative yet progressiveFirst Federal Bank keeps service a priority while growing the futureStaff at First Federal Bank of Florida in Chipley. From left to right: Ryan Hodge, Sheila Bolix, Marisa Everett, Leigh Clark. Staff from First Federal Bank of Florida in Bonifay. From left to right: Celena Cook, Sam Bailey, Megan Grif“ n, Whitney Ward, Darlene Moody, Joanna Shores, Matthew Rich, Kayla Albritton, Sarah Pippin and Wesley Whitaker. [CATHERINE LAMB | TIMES-ADVERTISER] By Jacqueline Bostick HorizonsHOLMES AND WASHINGTON COUNTIES „ More high school students are earning industry certifications. Commissioner of Education Pam Stewart at Florida Department of Education announcedin Decemberthat Floridas high school students earned about more 20,000 industry certifications last year over the previous, an FDOE news release said. Tomorrows work force is sitting in our classrooms today, and it is critical that Florida students are prepared for a successful future,Ž Stewart said. Industry certifications offer Florida students lifelong learning opportunities that will open the door to highskill, high-demand career opportunities.Ž In Holmes County School District, more than a thousand students are enrolled in industry certification programs. The district offers curriculum in certification in business, agriculture, welding, TV production, aerospace and biotech. About 40-percent of students enrolled in these programs go on to receive certifications, officials said. The certifications can be used to meet clock hours in approved technical college programs or credits in approved college level programs,Ž said Pamela Price, HCSD instructional administrator. They can also be used to apply for jobs during the summer or once a student has graduated. The industry certification gives them credentials that many students do not have when applying for jobs.Ž Price said students are very interested in the programs and the school district is exploring other areas of industry certification that will provide employment opportunities for out students in areas of high demand for out local area.Ž Holmes County High School junior Zion Glass, 17, said during his upperlevel welding class that he entered the program to refine and build on existing skills. He welds at home. I like doing things with my hands; Im not much of a computer savvy guy,Ž he said. This is just something to help me learn and grow in my skill to help other people with it.Ž Glass can expect to use what he learns for more than a hobby through certification in the More high school students earning industry certi cations Holmes County High School senior Zion Glass, 17, cuts out a square piece of steel during his upper-level welding class.See INDUSTRY, C4

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** C4 Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | welding industry, which is projected to continue to grow in the upcoming years. A lot of people are looking for welders, whether it be aluminum boat builders, trailer builders,Ž said HCHS welding instructor Shane Bush, who became a welder as an adult about 20 years post high school. Theres a lot of different trades out there that needs welders. When a lot of people think of welders they think of the pipeline, (but) most of them dont go to the pipeline. They stay local.Ž Junior Seth Miles, said his uncle is welder, and, similar to fellow classmate Glasss interest in the program, I thought it would be a good trade to learn.Ž According to national estimates by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2016 a welder earned on average $42,450 annually. A welder in Florida earned much lower, ranging from $24,110 to $38,610 annually „ a mean of $31,360. In 2016, the median household income in Holmes and Washington counties was $37,437 and $38,330, respectively, a different BLS report showed. The median household income for the state was $50,860. With such skills, in a two-person household, a welder could be a lucrative occupation locally and in a position to live a comfortable middle-class lifestyle. In Washington County School District, more than 400 students have enrolled in certification programs for the current school year, district data shows. The district offers curriculum for certification in agriculture, engineering and business programs. WCSD boasts an average passing rate of 93 to 95 percent, officials said. These certifications are very valuable to the students in resume information and experience when applying for a job,Ž said Gail Riley, Director of Curriculum and Instruction at WCSD. Students may continue their education in the business and Project Lead the Way engineering programs at Florida Panhandle Technical College, Riley said, as additional courses enable students to pursue additional certifications. In both school districts, industry certification programs are offered to all students. Students may find enrollment and certification information in their Student Registration Booklet and may seek additional information from guidance counselors. All three of these programs are of high interest to the students,Ž added Riley, and the teachers are very excited about offering the curriculum which enables the students to excel.Ž The Washington County Chamber of Commerce Economic Development Council is recognized throughout our region and state for leading those initiatives that drive economic growth in Washington County. Stakeholders in the EDC work with our local, state and federal governmental leaders to build a vibrant business economy for our County and in northwest Florida. Economic growth is not an overnight process. It often takes years before the fruits of collaboration, research and planning, advocacy, financing and perseverance pay off … but when they do the outcome can be a game changer, especially for small, rural counties such as ours. One such win was the recently awarded $1.8 million grant from Floridas Job Growth Fund. This grant supports water and sewer infrastructure needs for the SR79 Corridor Project, which encompasses a commercial area of Washington and Holmes counties, as well as the city of Bonifay. The SR79 Corridor Project, proposed by the Chamber EDC in 2015, also received a $1 million grant last year with support from State Representative Brad Drake and Senator George Gainer. This project is unique in the state for its partnership between two counties and a municipality; the Washington County EDC understands the value of regional collaboration that benefits each stakeholder … a rising tide floats all boats. This is one of many economic projects in the works through the Washington County EDC. Through private and public partnership we are committed to economic growth in three areas: JOB GROWTH Recruit best possible jobs with good wages and fit for our community, while fostering a highly skilled workforce attractive to potential industry. BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Assist in retention and expansion of existing businesses, and create a business-friendly environment with collaboration from local government, industry and legislative entities. THRIVING COMMUNITY Plan for diversified economic base that conserves our "small town" values while pursuing opportunities to help our County prosper. We invite your business or organization to join the Washington County EDC, and be part of the team committed to a bright future for our residents and families. Member investment ensures we are able to fund economic and industrial projects, respond competitively to new job and industry opportunities and provide local businesses the tools to succeed. For more information about the Washington County Chamber of Commerce and Economic Development Council, contact Executive Director Ted Everett at 850-638-4157.Chamber EDC leads charge for economic growth in Washington County The Washington County Tourist Development Council (TDC) has worked hard over the last few years to completely reinvent itself as a valuable resource that can connect potential tourists to the community it serves. The focus was not just on rebranding its image but also making itself more visible in the marketing landscape and a more userfriendly resource. With the completion of its new logo and tagline, the TDC finally had its own unique identity to showcase to the world. The tagline, "Experience Life Naturally" allowed potential visitors to imagine the slow, easy Southern way of living that is present in this community and the lush and wild natural resources that we enjoy all around us. The next step was making a visual feast for visitors eyes. In August 2016, the TDC launched its new mobile responsive website using the colors and feel of the new brand. An easy to use business directory was added as well as click to call and user generated reviews on all tourist locations in the county. The website is organized using categories so people can search out their interests or find new ones to explore. The TDC is working on adding a new page that will have themed itineraries that will be focused on generational and interest themes. Special attention will also be placed on highlightingaccessibility of tourist locations to serve the senior Baby Boomer generation as well as other challenged travelers. In the Fall of 2017, the TDC finally finished its labor of love … the Washington County Visitors Guide. A beautiful, 32-page, glossy publication produced by the Washington County News highlighting everything special about the area. With the title "Wolves, Waterfalls, & Waterways," it has become a favorite of guests to pick up at trade shows, festivals and our local tourist locations. With these successes, the TDC plans to continue with its branding objective by starting up a quarterly newsletter that it will distribute to potential visitors captured by advertising efforts in current and past years. Production of user generated content that will be used on its new website, social channels and revisions of the Visitors Guide is also being explored. Additional tourism assets are also being added to the mix in the form of new trails. The Ralph Carter Wildflower Trail will be one of these new trails in the county and will include two loops. A tri-county agritourism trail will also be added and feature a Spring, Summer and Winter Farm Tour that will span Holmes, Washington and Jackson counties. Both trails are due to launch in 2019. Several other projects are also underway, including a complete revision of the TDC Policies and Procedures Manual as well as its event grant application process and funding guidelines. The TDC is always working hard to make a difference in Washington County by creating a positive economic impact for area businesses as well as increasing the quality of life for its residents.TDC: Experience Life Naturally rebrand changes tourism landscapeThe TDC unveiled the Washington County Visitors Guide in Fall 2017, Wolves, Waterfalls, & Waterways.Ž INDUSTRYContinued from C3

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** | Wednesday, March 14, 2018 C5Staff ReportWhat if a high school student in your life … a child, grandchild or the nice kid down the road whos always willing to help out a neighbor … had the opportunity to participate in a nationally recognized leadership program? What if previous participants of that program went on to serve as elected officials … or the CEO of one of the most profitable, innovative and highly respected companies in the world? What if that program was available at no cost to the student? For members of West Florida Electric Cooperative (WFEC), these arent hypothetical questions. Every summer, more than 1,600 bright and talented students from across rural American converge in Washington, D.C., for the Electric Cooperative Youth Tour. These young men and women represent our next generation of leaders. They are the people who will make our communities better places to live and lead businesses that will provide good jobs and valuable services. Participants learn about electric cooperatives and the cooperative business model, spend a day on Capitol Hill, visit monuments and memorials, explore museums and build lifelong friendships with other young leaders from across the country. But, this isnt just a field trip to Washington, D.C. Its a transformational experience that shows students the power of democracy and the importance of leadership. Youth Tour boasts many distinguished alumni, including Apple CEO Tim Cook, who represented Baldwin Electric Membership Cooperative in Summerdale, Alabama on the 1977 Youth Tour. In a commencement address to George Washington Universitys Class of 2015, Cook cited Youth Tour as a moment that helped shape his view of the world. This experience is offered at no cost to the student or family. The only out-ofpocket expenses are for incidentals, such as souvenirs and snacks. West Florida Electric has sponsored the Youth Tour since 1979 and has sent nearly 80 students on this lifechanging trip since then. We believe it is our responsibility as a not-for-profit, community-based organization to invest in our next generation of leaders. With that idea in mind, WFEC created a scholarship program to go hand-in-hand with its Youth Tour program. For the past three years, a scholarship for $4,000 to Chipola College has been awarded to the highest scoring participant from each of the four counties served by WFEC. Participants are ranked on a scale of 100 points using a panel interview process and the following categories: Communication Skills, Knowledge of Subject, Personality, Community Service and Poise/ Appearance. If the winner of the scholarship chooses not to attend Chipola College, the next highest scoring student from that county would be awarded the scholarship. Those scholarship recipients were: Anna Alday, Calhoun County; Bailey Rich, Holmes County; Elizabeth Carnley, Jackson County and Emily Broom, Washington County. Thirteen area students participated in the Youth Tour program this year. They were: Anna Alday, Altha School; Haley Mitchell, Bethlehem School; Samera Baker, Blountstown High School; Emily Broom, Chipley High School; Lilly Ball, Cottondale High School; Aliyah Wilburn, Graceville High School; Bailey Rich, Holmes County High School; Elizabeth Carnley, Malone School; Jonah Mercer, Marianna High School; Zach Prescott, Ponce De Leon High School; Reagan Joiner, Poplar Springs School; Georgia Cloud, Sneads High School and Lana Bush, Vernon High School. This years Youth Tour trip winners were Bailey Rich from Holmes County High School and Anna Alday from Altha School. The alternate winner was Elizabeth Carnley from Malone School. WFEC is strongly committed to the communities it serves and its members, and sponsoring students for this exciting, educational trip and for the scholarships at Chipola College are just some of the ways were investing in our youth. Some other ways the cooperative demonstrates its commitment to the community is by investing in memberships in local chambers of commerce, providing sponsorships for community events like the Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo, Watermelon Festival and more. The cooperative also donates to local civic clubs and organizations and provides electrical safety demonstrations to schools and first responders throughout the cooperatives service area.WFEC: Educating the next generation of community leaders2018 Youth Tour participants were: (front row: l-r) Elizabeth Carnley, Malone School; Haley Mitchell, Bethlehem School; Lana Bush, Vernon HS; Georgia Cloud, Sneads HS; Samera Baker, Blountstown HS; Lilly Ball, Cottondale HS; (back row: l-r) Emily Broom, Chipley HS; Jonah Mercer, Marianna HS; Bailey Rich, Holmes Co. HS; Zach Prescott, Ponce De Leon HS; Anna Alday, Altha School & Aliyah Wilburn, Graceville HS. Not pictured, Reagan Joiner, Poplar Springs School. 2018 Youth Tour Scholarship winners: (front: l-r) Washington County winner, Emily Broom, Chipley HS; Jackson County winner, Elizabeth Carnley, Malone School & Holmes County winner, Bailey Rich, Holmes Co. Rich will also travel to Washington, D.C. this summer to represent WFEC on the National Youth Tour. HS with WFECs Board of Trustees: (back l-r) George Clayton Owens, Randy Bush, John Adams, Myron Hudson, Tim Alford, A.C. Miles & Joe Rone. Not pictured, Calhoun County winner, Anna Alday, Altha School. Staff ReportWith more than fifty years experience, Trawick Construction Company is an established communications construction firm with an unparalleled reputation for high quality outside plant construction at competitive prices. Originally established in 1946 to provide outside plant construction services to the communications industry, the firm has been in continuous operation ever since. Today, Trawick continues to focus on the communications industry and has extensive experience with all the latest technologies, including fiber optics, as well as a comprehensive background in outside plant construction techniques, including directional boring. The firm has a history of successfully adapting to changes in the volatile communications industry. This has taken them from aerial open wire, aerial copper cable, to buried copper cable, to buried fiber-optic and buried coaxial cable. Trawick's clients include an impressive list of demanding organizations in the communications industry, public utilities, government, CATV companies.Trawick Construction continues to adapt to technoloyTrawick Construction has a history of adapting to changes in the volatile communications industry.[FILE PHOTO]

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** C6 Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | By Diane M. RobinsonThe News | @HCTA_Diane Drobinson@chipleypaper. comWASHINGTON AND HOLMES COUNTIES … Industry isnt always the first thing that comes to mind when speaking of Washington and Holmes Counties, but that doesnt mean it isnt a key factor in the area's economic base. Holmes County Industrial Park East is a very active industrial park in Holmes County. It's currently home to Paradigm Plastics, a plastic mold injection company and Transcorp, which maintains signs lights and cameras on Interstate 10. Soon, the 271-acre tract could also be home to a bottling and manufacturing plant for Asi Tea Company. The tea company is working with United States Department of Agriculture to gain permits and licenses that would allow them to proceed with constructing a facility at the industrial park. If the project moves forward, the facility would serve as a location to bottle yaupon tea, process loose tea, and manufacture tea bags. While the Savannah, Georgia based company is looking to establish a manufacturing base in Holmes County, it has actually already been harvesting the wild yaupon in Washington County for several years. Holmes County Development Commission Executive Director Raymon Thomas says it could be up and running before the end of the year. "We should know this quarter if the USDA gives Asi the go ahead," said Thomas. "We hope to have everything up and running this year." Washington County is also looking to stimulate new projects but officials are first revisiting the past in order to order to move forward. Years following a failed capital investment at Tommy McDonald Sr. Industrial Park called Project Pipe, Washington County Board of County Commissioners are still preparing to buy back the approximate 70-acre site located north of Highway 90 at the intersection of Highway 273 and North Boulevard in Chipley. According to officials, Project Pipe failed to deliver on its promise to use $12.75 million in capital investment to construct a full-service manufacturing site for large concrete pipe and box culverts and bring more than 150 jobs with an estimated $5.1 million annual payroll to the county. Additional monies were also proposed to build a rail spur and industrial-grade road. With so much time having passed since the initial purchase attempt in August last year, County Attorney Clay Milton is looking at where the county is at with the purchase. County Administrator Jeff Massey says there are many legalities that are being worked out. "There are legalities involved with the industrial park that we are trying to work through before we can move ahead on that project," said Massey.Washington, Holmes look toward industry future Staff ReportBONIFAY … Holmes Countys largest private employer is also recognized as one of North Floridas most trusted roofing companies. Locally owned and operated by Chet Sherrer, C & C Construction has provided general contracting services, metal roofing materials, and metal fabrication to the Northwest Florida Panhandle for commercial, residential and industrial clients for more than 20 years. Notable commercial projects include: roofing the newly completed Washington County Courthouse, several Jackson County schools, the Bay County Sheriffs Office Operations Center, Harbor Walk Village in Destin, and the Okaloosa County Courthouse, which is expected to be completed this Fall. The company is accredited with the Better Business Bureau and also stays active in the community though activities such as sponsoring local youth baseball teams. C & C Construction also does residential roofing and custom welding and fabrication and is accepting new construction projects and repairs. In addition to being skilled craftsmen in metal fabrication and offering metal roofing supplies to contractors and the public at low costs, C & C Construction can help contractors get the bid on jobs as they want, and make each job more profitable with low cost quality materials. For the residential do-it-yourselfersŽ, C & C Construction can help with home improvement projects, whether it is a new roof, re-roof, roof repair or adding gutters to your home. C & C Construction is licensed, bonded and insured and has been providing quality workmanship and superior customer service for more than 20 years. For more information call 850-547-1001 or visit the website at: candcroofingandconstruction.com.C & C Construction recognized among best roofers in North FloridaC&C Construction is involved with several major projects in Northwest Florida, including the construction of the new Okaloosa County Courthouse, slated to open in Fall 2018. [SPECIAL TO HORIZONS] By Carol Kent Wyatt HorizonsHOLMES AND WASHINGTON COUNTIES With both Bonifay and Chipley still celebrating the opening of newly constructed elementary schools, the question remains: What will be become of the former campuses? Kate M. Smith Elementary School welcomed students for the first time in August 2016 to its new location at 1447 South Blvd. in Chipley. Plans are already moving forward to repurpose the old campus on Sinclair Street, most of which was demolished last year. Only the cafeteria and third grade buildings remain, with the cafeteria to slated be used as a conference facility and board meeting room and the third grade wing serving as the new Washington County School District Office. The existing office board offices will then become the districts technology hub. Washington County School Board Superintendent Joe Taylor says the goal is to preserve elements of old KMS buildings' long history and that that while the cafeteria will be updated to provide restroom facilities and improve public access, he is proposing the structure retain as much of the original design as possible. A request for proposals on the renovations is currently active, and Taylor says the district will be working closely with the City of Chipley's Planning and Zoning Committee to determine the best changes to the site's land use designation as the district prepares for the listing of about 10 acres of surplus property for sale. "We are working with the city to find out what they want to see happen with the land while also watching the market to see what other needs are out there as well," said Taylor. Similarly, the old Bonifay Elementary School campus sits vacant on North Ave. in the wake of the August 2017 opening of Holmes County School District's new Bonifay K-8 School, located at 140 Blue Devil Drive in Bonifay. Currently, the old BES facilities are set to be leased by the Florida National Guard as a Readiness Center that would train and prepare troops for mobilization and deployment. The center is also anticipated to bring new jobs to the community; although it has not yet been stated how many. Negotiations for the lease are underway with the National Guard expressing an intent to purchase the property in the future. Diane M. Robinson contributed to this report.Vacant school campuses repurposed for new lifeWashington County School Superintendent Joe Taylor stands in front of demolition progress at the old Kate M. Smith Elementary School site in August 2017. Taylor says the district hopes to retain as many historic elements of the school as possible when the remaining buildings on the property are repurposed for district central of“ ce use.[FILE PHOTO BY CAROL KENT WYATT] Holmes County School District celebrated the opening of the new Bonifay K-8 School in August 2017. Of“ cials are now in negotiations with the Florida National Guard to lease the old Bonifay Elementary School campus. [FILE PHOTO]

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** | Wednesday, March 14, 2018 C7By Diane M. Robinson and Carol Wyatt HorizonsWASHINGTON COUNTY As heavy rain events recently highlighted residents concerns about the condition of county roads, several road projects were being processed for state funding. Washington County Commissioners have submitted requests to Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) for funding of repair, widening, or resurfacing projects through the agencys Small County Outreach Program (SCOP) and Small County Road Assistance Program (SCRAP). Not all requests have been accepted, however. The purpose of SCOP is to assist in paving unpaved roads, repairing or rehabilitating county bridges, addressing road-related drainage improvements, resurfacing county roads, or constructing capacity or safety improvements to county roads. The county submitted SCOP applications in March 2017 for Greenhead Road in the amount of $2,592,562.41 and River Road in the amount of $1,753,499.21. Neither road was selected for funding. Commissioners received better news about Kent Road. While the project was not scheduled for funding until Fiscal Year 2019, FDOT agreed last July to allow the county to proceed before Nov. 2017 to allow the county time to obtain necessary right-of-ways. Construction is set to begin by Jan. 2019 and the project to be completed by Dec. 2019 with reimbursement from the state expected in the 2019 fiscal year. Buckhorn Boulevard, which is also included in the FDOT District 3 Five-Year Plan, has $315,000 in flexible pavement reconstruction engineering and design scheduled for FY 2019 with construction scheduled for 2021 in the amount of $2,832,000. The SCRAP program is designed to assist small governments like Washington County in resurfacing and reconstructing county roads. Both submitted in April 2017, Obie Street ($99,751) and Bonnett Pond Road ($1,179,728) were selected for FY 2018 funding and are now in the design phase. County Road 277 (Cope Road) is funded for design only in the amount of $136,685, while Old Bonifay Road is funded for design in FY 2019 in the amount of $114,000 and for construction in 2021 in the amount of $1,040,251. Washington County Engineer Cliff Knauer states that a separate funding request has also been made to the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) for a grant that would pay for paving on Williams Road, as well as the installation of low water crossings. The state would pay 60 percent of the project in a ‡ matching grant. Knauer has also made a recommendation that officials revisit the county paving matrix, which was last updated in Feb. 2016. The matrix is designed to help serve as a guide for prioritizing larger scale road projects. The spreadsheet scores Washington Countys dirt roads based on input and rankings from the sheriffs office, school system, emergency services, postal service and county maintenance staff on a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being the worst rating. Currently, the top ten roads listed on the three-year old matrix are Buckhorn Blvd., Gilberts Mill Road, Crystal Lake Drive, Ledger Road, Firetower Road, Union Hill Road, North Silver Lake Road, South Silver Lake Road, Orange Hill Road, and Sylvania Road. The paving matrix is just a planning tool,Ž said Knauer. A lot of other factors have to be considered as well, such as the number of homes per mile on each road, annual maintenance cost of the road, and the amount of repetitive damage to the road.ŽSeveral road projects under consideration for state fundingStaff ReportBONIFAY… Landress Auto Wrecking Company (LAWCO) will mark 62 years of serving customers throughout the tri-state area on April 1, 2018. Owned by Elliott Sharon and Leigh Ann Sharon, LAWCO offers a full line of automotive recycling and owes much of its success for its reputation for quality. LAWCO only purchases insurance salvage automotive parts and processes those parts on site, allowing the company to provide premium and quality tested auto and truck parts to their customers. LAWCO provides commercial delivery to wholesale customers throughout Northwest Florida, Southeast Alabama and Southwest Georgia. The company also ships parts nationwide daily and provides parts to local customers Monday through Friday at their facility on Highway 90 in Bonifay. The business has been family owned and operated since first opening its doors in 1956. We are proud to have been at out location on Historic Highway 90 for all of our 62 years in business,Ž said Leigh Ann Sharon. Landress Auto Wrecking Company is located at 2905 Highway 90 in Bonifay. For more information call 850-547-3671 or visit landress.comLandress Auto Wrecking: 62 years of serviceStaff ReportBONIFAY … Panhandle Lumber & Supply has no doubt helped build many homes and businesses in the area … and now the company is in the process of expanding to keep up with and help local economic growth. Owner Jack Locke started the business in 1994 as a local owner and would load and sell lumber while offering welding "on the side". Since then, the business has grown under the leadership of Locke and Store Manager Miranda Hudson and has a knowledgeable staff with more than 50 years of experience. Today, Panhandle Lumber & Supply is a one-stop shop for lumber, hardware, doors, windows, pole barn kits, deck kits, power poles, cement blocks, concrete steps, molding, power tools and pool supplies. They also offer services such as pool testing and key making. Panhandle Lumber & Supply is located at 405 West Highway 90 in Bonifay. For more information, call 850-547-0810.Panhandle Lumber & Supply: Growing for the future By Diane M. Robinson HorizonsBONIFAY Holmes County Commissioners are making progress on a project to construct a county government annex that would house the majority of county agencies. After months of considering potential sites for the project, a visionary committee was put together in January 2018 to research properties. Committer member Mike Alvis recommended a 58-acre tract of land located at the corner of Deacon Road and County Road 173, with commissioners later greenlighting the purchase. The purchase price of the land with the timber still in place is $259,000. The county is expected to use a combination of funding sources to purchase the property. $223,000 would be paid from funds set aside from the sale of the old fairgrounds, and the remaining $36,275 from contingency funds. This project is expected to begin seeing more progress throughout the year, but officials say the annex is still in the early planning stages, so it is premature to predict a construction timeline.One Stop Shop for county government agencies Holmes County makes progress on county annex See ROADS, C8

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** C8 Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | Holmes County Holmes County officials have cut nearly $8.5 million in production costs across a number of FEMA-funded projects. The savings will be put toward paving county additional roads. One year after receiving the first $5 million installment of the $21.29 million in FEMA funds, Holmes County has completed 27 of 55 project worksheets that will lead to the paving of 30 miles of roads in the county. By using county employees to do in-kind work, the county has saved $8,326,686.77, according to FEMA Coordinator Joey Marsh. The 27 project worksheets projected costs totaled $12,598,313.61, but by using county employees, the total cost ended at $4,271,626.84. By doing in kind work we took having a contractor do the entire job out of the equation,Ž said Marsh. We are able to save the county money to put towards the alternative procedures that way.Ž Those savings will be put toward paving the roads when the county enters the alternative procedures portion of the project. Initially, the plan was to chip-seal the roads; however, officials said, that particular course does not hold up well and will most likely have to be redone in a couple of years. The county received the funding under a the Public Assistance Alternative Procedures (PAAP). Historically, FEMA had disbursed funds to repair roads back to their preexisting condition following a declared disaster. In 2013, former President Barak Obama authorized alternative procedures of rendering public assistance after a disaster. The goals for alternative procedures are to reduce the cost to provide funds, increase flexibility for administration, expedite disbursement and provide incentives for timely completion of projects covered by federal funds. The county is hoping to be able to pave 30-50 miles of county roads to avoid having to go back and repave the roads, officials said. The amount of miles is contingent on the cost of each road individually. Chip-sealing will be an alternative in the scope of work applications, but as a last resort. Marsh believes if the county is going to put forth that type of cost, it should be done the right way to begin with. If we are going to fix the roads, we need to pave them and be done,Ž said Marsh. If we do it right the first time, then we will save the county money in the long run.Ž An application has been submitted to request the next $5 million installment along with a request to begin the alternative procedures in August. Should FEMA deny the request for the procedures to begin in August 2018, the start date is set for August 2019. County FEMA Coordinator Joey Marsh is confident the project will be completed on schedule as the project is ahead of his projected schedule given to the Board of County Commissioners last year. ROADSContinuedfrom C7 By Jacqueline Bostick HorizonsCHIPLEY A state report shows an upward tick in tourism in Washington County. Visit Florida, the states official tourism marketing corporation, reported tourists spend about $1.5 million more in Washington County in 2015 than in 2011. The report provides the latest available data. The uptick in direct spending I would attribute to the economy recovering from the recession, accorinding to Washington County Tourist Development Council Director Heather Lopez And we have done a lot more marketing,Ž she said, noting the TDC revamped its website and launched social media channels. According to the report, tourists spent about $11.8 million in the county in 2015. For a rural county, were doing well,Ž Lopez said. Agritourist and ecotourist attractions, such as canoeing and trails, are experiencing higher traffic -currently extending their operating season to include winter. The report, produced by Florida Association of Destination Marketing Organization, shows tourism in 2015 generated $263,533 in local sales tax revenue and created 212 jobs. The same year, the food and beverage industry brought in $5.7 million, lodging $2.1 million, retail $1.8 million, recreation $900,000 and transportation $1 million. Despite the uptick, from 2014 to 2015, direct spending by tourists saw only a slight increase, going from $11.7 million to $11.8. From 2013 to 2014, spending had increased by $500,000 and $900,000 from 2012 to 2013. The years 2011 and 2012 did not see any gains or losses in spending, the report shows. Lopez attributed the years of incremental growth to the economy balancing out, also to a shift in the kind of tourist the area is attracting. People are spending more, theyre vacationing more, but theyre budgeting their vacations,Ž Lopez said, in regards to the incremental growth between the 2014 and 2015 years. Theyre really planning them so theyre getting the maximum experience for their money.Ž For example, she noted, millenials demand vacations that are inexpensive, incorporating Uber and AirBnB in their stays. They are also seeking out memorable experiences over luxury vacations. A bonus for us: a lot of your vacationers,Ž she added, theyre looking for an experience, not so much your theme park type vacation anymore. They want something that will bring their family closer together. Something that will effect them emotionally and spiritually.Ž In the absence of diversity commonly found in large metros, Lopez said the TDC will look to market the neighborhoods found in the county through the charm of our people and our culture here.Ž To meet the demand, the TDC is building an agritourism trail that will highlight all local establishments tied to agriculture on a selfguided map. The trail is slated to be complete by next year. The area has recently added a heritage geocaching trail and the Orange Hill Gator Farm. Also, Lopez said the TDC plans to focus more on user-generated content in order to illustrate to potential tourists an unruffled view of what kind of experience they can expect. Im trying to shift all of our marketing and materials towards to great experiences instead of just great places,Ž she said.Uptick in spending points to shift in tourismEcotourism is one of the largest draws for visitors to Holmes and Washington Counties with the state-designated paddling trails along Holmes Creek, the lower Choctawhatchee River, Eco“ na Creek being among the most popular attractions. Picture above is Holmes Creek. [PHOTO COURTESY OF HOLMES CREEK CANOE LIVERY] Bill Maphis demonstrates the process of making corn meal at Maphis Tree Farm and Nursery in Washington County. Agritourist attractions such as his are becoming more common to the local tourism industry. [FILE PHOTO BY CAROL KENT WYATT]

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Wednesday, March 14, 2018 The Weekly Advertiser | 1 NF-5031562 Hazardous Aerial Tree Removal  Stump Grinding Trimming & Pruning  Emergency Tree Service  Lot Clean UpDow Morris,Owner/Operator 850-527-6291  850-849-3825 Readers’ Choice2017WASHINGTON HOLMES JACKSON (850) 638-3611 HastyHeating & Cooling NF-5028471 NF-5036304 ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE OR BUSINESS FOR AS LITTLE AS $10 A WEEK!Reach thousands of potential customers with your Business Guide ad in the:WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS HOLMES COUNTY-TIMES ADVERTISER WEEKLY ADVERTISER CALL TODAY! 850-638-0212 NF-5036305 NF-5032746JOEYS SPORTING GOODSBAIT & TACKLE, GUNS & AMMO, ACCESSORIES & SPORT CLOTHINGJOEY SELLERSJOEYSSPORTINGGOODS 2064 Holly Street Westville, Fla. 32464850-548-5055 NF-5031560 C & CBookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available Volume 89 Number 11 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2018NF-5036463 Horse drawn old fashioned buggy $1,200 Call 850-548-5649. Live & Online Public AuctionTuesday, March 20th at 12:00 PM 321 Loans Inc. Receivership Case 1410 SW 3 Street, Pompano Beach, FL 33069 Sale will consist of luxury vehicles including: 2014 Tesla Model S, P85+ (miles: 47,678), 2015 BMW i8, 1.3L L3 Hybrid Super Car (miles: 15,632), 2015 Land Rover Range Rover Autobiography Edition (miles: 28,271), 2006 International 3000 Custom Luxury School Bus (upgraded and equipped) and 2003 Blue Bird Body Co. Custom Luxury School Bus (upgraded and equipped). Catalog and photos available at www .moeckerauctions.c om Receivership Case #0:17-60907-CIV-FAM Preview: Day of sale 9 AM to Noon ? 6%-18% BP ? $500 refundable cash deposit to register. (800) 840BIDS ? info@moeckerauctions.c om AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin SAWMILLS from only $4397.00-MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill! Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www .Norwood Sawmills.com or call (800)578-1363 Ext. 300N Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1BR and 2BR apartment for rent downtown Bonifay. $450 and $500. Deposit required. 305-965-1635. For Rent 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments in Vernon. Clean, stove, refrigerator, central heat/air, convenient to Panama City Beach, section 8, Rental assistance. 850-638-4640 For Rent One Bedroom apartments for rent in Chipley. Convenient location. Stove and refrigerator furnished. No Pets. Smoke free environment. Call 850-638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 2BR/1BA House for rent. Vernon area. 1st, last +deposit. $675.00/month. No pets, smoke free environment. Prefer mature adults. 850-326-2201. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. 2/2 & 2/1 MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT2bed/2bath Mobile Home for rent in Chipley city limits. 2bed/1bath Mobile Home for rent. Contact Rodney: 850.638.1124 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/ sewage/ lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 3/1 Country Home for RentDon’t miss this opportunity!! Completely remodeled 3Bed/1Bath w/ Garage.Home on Acreage Rodney: 850.638.1124 For Sale Two acre plot and one acre plot in Jacob City, FL. Call 850-849-9338. Highway 77 2 miles south of Chipley 4-8 acre tract Bedie Road. Call Milton Peel at 850-638-1858 or 326-9109 Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. Jean’s Cleaning Service Quality cleaning ant reasonable rates. Have good references and dependable. Call Jean 850-849-3535 Do you need adependable, honest, caring and experienced care giver for your love one. Then call Theresa at 850-326-6054. References upon request. Do you need adependable, honest, caring and experienced care giver for your love one. Then call Theresa at 850-326-6054. References upon request. J3’s Lawn and Palm, LLCRetired Military looking to maintain your Lawn, we also Pressure Wash. Call or text Kay or James at 850-768-4589 or 850-703-1706. Discount for more than one customer in your general area. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you.

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2| The Weekly Advertiser Wednesday, March 14, 2018 SLICED FREE! PRICES GOOD MARCH 14 THRU MARCH 20, 2018 $ 5 95 29 ¢ $ 1 65 $ 5 45 $ 7 95 $ 2 68 $ 16 75 $ 7 50 98 ¢ $ 2 98 $ 9 95 $ 2 65 $ 1 28 $ 1 98 $ 3 68 USDA Select BeefBONELESS RIBEYE STEAKSPer Lb Family Pk Super Fresh PremiumFRYER LEG QUARTERSPer Lb 10 Lb Bag Fresh Lean Premium BONELESS PORK CHOPS Per Lb Family Pk Buckley Farm THICK SLICED BACON 24 Oz Pkg IQF Premium PARTY WINGS 5 Lb Bag USDA Select Beef Boneless TOP ROUND ROAST Per Lb 2 Pk Kelley's SMOKED SAUSAGE 6 Lb Value Pk Restaurant Style Premium CHICKEN NUGGETS 5 Lb Bag Fieldstone SMOKED PICNICS Per Lb Land O' Frost PREMIUM DELI SLICED LUNCHMEATS 1 Lb Pkg Nature's Best COOKED SHRIMP 71/90 Ct, 2 Lb BagFresh Lean PremiumPORK BABY BACK RIBSPer Lb Fresh Lean Premium WholeBONELESS PORK LOINPer LbFresh Lean Premium80/20 GROUND CHUCKPer Lb Family Pk Cook's PremiumCORNED BEEF BRISKETPer Lb1264 CHURCH AVENUE  CHIPLEY, FL  324286AM-7PM  7 Days a Week  850-638-1751WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO CORRECT TYPOGRAPHICAL AND PICTORAL ERRORS. QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS. WE DO NOT AC CEPT INTERNET PRINTED COUPONS.EBT Cardholders and WIC Vouchers Welcomed. Most Major Credit Cards Accepted $ 1 88 $ 2 28 $ 1 18 $ 1 48 $ 1 95 33 ¢ $ 2 28 $ 3 65 Farm Grown FRESH COLLARD GREENS Bundles Washington Grown GALA APPLES 3 Lb Bag Farm Fresh RED GLOBE GRAPES Per Lb Farm Fresh BROCCOLI CROWNS Per Lb Farm Fresh RIPE AVOCADOS 6 Ct Bag Farm Grown CRISP GREEN CABBAGE Per Lb Farm Grown RUSSET POTATOES 8 Lb Bag Texas Grown RED GRAPEFRUIT 5 Lb Bag @ Ease Meat Lasagna 80 Oz Cntr Traditional or Meat Ragu Pasta Sauce 24 Oz Jar Charmin Essentials Bath Tissue 12 Roll Honey or Original Sweet Baby Ray's BBQ Sauce 18 Oz Btl Gatorade Sports Drink 32 Oz Btl Jiffy Corn Mufn Mix 8.5 Oz Box 18 Pack Budweiser or Bud Light Cans or Btls Del Monte Ketchup 24 Oz Btl Castleberry Hot Dog Chili 10 Oz Can Dixie Lily Yellow Rice 6.5 Oz Bag Piggly Wiggly Vegetable Oil Gal Jug Frito-Lay Multipack Chips 32 Ct Box Nabisco Oreos Family Size Piggly Wiggly Charcoal 7.7 Lb Bag Blue Bell Ice Cream 1/2 Gal Crtn 78 ¢ 2 / 88 ¢ 38 ¢ $ 4 48 $ 7 88 $ 2 77 2 / $ 5 2 / $ 9 $ 6 88 2 / $ 3 $ 4 77 97 ¢ 88 ¢ 48 ¢ $ 12 75 Our Beef is USDA Select or Higher. COST PLUS 10% OF CHIPLEY, FLNF-5036900

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NF-5036219 Schedule of EventsVeterans Memorial Park in Bonifay, FL Saturday, March 17, 2018 9am 2 pm Entertainment | Live Music | Arts & Crafts Kids Play Zone | Food Vendors | Car Show | Free Parking Prov idin g ser vi ces tha t m at te r to you wi qu ati at io ap pp ay NF-5036735 NF-5036882BONIFA Y PIGGL Y WIGGL Y"DO WN HOME" DO WN THE S TREET91 1 N. W auk esha Str eet Bonifa y, Flor ida 32425(850) 547 -3826 Fax 850-543-1323 8827 Dove Street, Bristol, Florida email: armondiroo ng@centur ylink.net Armondi Roo ng LLCKeith Armondi, OwnerLicense No. CCC1330359NF-5036732 (850) 547-3696 Home F olks Ser ving Home F olks Since 1962 NF -5 03 6886 Bonifay FLIP FL OP SEA SON IS HERE! Get y our feet conditioned f or Spr ing with our r elaxing spa pedicur e service! W alk-ins W elcome! NF-5036731 Breakfast 6:30am-10amMon.-Sat. 6:30am-9pm Sunday 6:30am-3pm HIGHW A A MEET Y OU AT THE HOLID AY REST A URANTBreakfast 6:30am-10am Mon-S at 6:30am-9pm Sunda y 6:30am-3pmNF-5036878 P ower Out? Te xt Us!Te xt (800) 342-7400 to sign up When you need to report an outage, text OUT to (800) 342-7400. Te xt STATUS for any updates, HELP for more info & STOP to unsubscribe. *Please note that your phone plans standard data charges will apply. www .westorida.coop NF-5036734 Cloud Auto Par ts, Inc .(850) 547-3646cloudautopar ts@yahoo 310 South W aukasha St., Bonifa y, NF-5036844 Make a ch ange that la st s.Is your bank changing ? 300 North W aukesha St re et Bonifa y, FL 32425 (850) 547-8250www b f.comS am Bailey We sley Wh itaker Sand y Sp ea r, Ce lena Cook, & Whitney Wa rd NF-5036218 NF-5036733 Entertainment | Live Music | Arts & Crafts Entertainment | Live Music | Arts & Crafts www .C ommunitySouth.net Bonifa y 1720 W aukesha St. 547-2260 Chipley 1044 H wy 90 East 638-8376 NF-5036217