Citation

Material Information

Title:
Washington County news
Uniform Title:
Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Place of Publication:
Chipley FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Nicole Barfield - Publisher
Creation Date:
January 5, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiweekly[<1994>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1931>]
semiweekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
Coordinates:
30.780922 x -85.539289

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began May 23, 1924.
General Note:
L.E. Sellers, editor.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Washington County News. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000384704 ( ALEPH )
07260886 ( OCLC )
ACC5987 ( NOTIS )
sn 81000810 ( LCCN )
0279-795X ( ISSN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Chipley banner

Full Text

PAGE 1

** COMMUNITY | A8AMAZING TEACHER Volume 94 Number 74 Phone: 850-638-0212 Fax: 850-638-4601 Opinion ....................A4 State ........................A6 Nation .......................A7 School News ...............B3 Obituaries ..................B5 Classifieds .................B7 @WCN_HCT facebook.com/WashingtonCountyNews.HolmesCountyTimes50 ¢ chipleypaper.com Washington County JOBSSpring Clean Your ResumeA FRESH STARTTime to Spring Clean Wednesday, February 28, 2018 Staff ReportCHIPLEY „ Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Flor-ida will host the 6th Annual ArtKidDoo event from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, April 14, in Shivers Park in Chipley.ArtKidDoo is a collaborative effort among the Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida, child care providers, local busi-nesses, non-profit and civic organizations to encourage awareness for the arts in young children.The community will come together for this free, oneday event to offer hands-on arts and crafts as well as per-formance art by local artists, musicians, and vocalists. There will be opportunities for children to paint, color, dance, mold clay, as well as create jewelry and musical instruments. Exotic animals will join the celebration, and there will be an opportunity for children to paint on a police car.ArtKidDoo is April 14Event welcomes children for celebration of the artsNews Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ A key House committee Monday approved an 83-page gambling bill that includes ratifying a 20-year agree-ment with the Seminole Tribe of Florida. With the vote by the Commerce Committee, the bill (HB 7067), sponsored by Tourism & Gaming Con-trol Chairman Mike La Rosa, R-St. Cloud, is ready to go to the House floor.The bill, which is substantially different from legislation (SB 840) in the Senate, would lead to the tribe paying $3 billion to the state over seven years. In exchange, the tribe would have exclusive rights to con-duct banked card games, such as blackjack, at five of its casinos.Also, the tribe would continue to have exclusive authority to offer slot machines outside of Gambling bill ready to go to House oorStaff ReportWASHINGTON COUNTY … Amnesty Day will soon be back for residents for the second year after a 15-year hiatus.Washington County Board of County Commissioners are hosting the dayOn Saturday, March 17 from 8 a.m. to noon, for no charge, residents can take bulk items such as furniture, white goods (appliances), passenger vehicle tires, and items deemed hazardous households materials such as old paint, peroxides, electronics, batteries, and antifreeze.A maximum of five tires may be brought to the center at no charge. $2 will be charged for each additional tire.Washington County Board of County Commissioners are hosting the day with Okaloosa County their partner in an interlo-cal agreement.County Administrator Jeff Massey says he is excited to see this years event take place.We are working to make this year more efficient for people dropping off items,Ž said Massey. I am looking forward to bringing this day to our residents.ŽThe Washington County Recycling Center is located at 3115 Highway 77 in Chipley.For more information on Amnesty Day, James Shouppe, Recycling Coordinator, at 850-638-6264.BOCC hosts Amnesty DayChipley Housing Authority seeking applicantsChipley Housing Authority is currently seeking applicants for the Public Housing program. Applicants must com-plete an application and meet income guidelines based on family size as required by HUD. Appli-cations are available from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday in the office located at 1370 Old Boni-fay Road in Chipley. For more information call 850-638-0134. Rental units wantedTri-County Community Council is looking for rental units for the Section 8 program. The Section 8 program provides assistance for low income families in the private renal market through the Housing Assistance Payments Program. Renter voucher holders select a unit from the private market. Requirement of a unit to be rented to an assisted family are as follows: the unit must meet HUD housing quality stan-dards and the rent must be approvable within HUD Fair Market Rents and market rate. When a Section 8 voucher holder is inter-ested in your unit contact Steve Henderson at 638-4520 ext 103. Tri-County accepting HUD applicationsTri-County Community Council, Inc., Washington County Housing Authority (Sec-tion 8) Rental Assistance Program is currently taking applications on Wednesdays for the waiting list. Applications are taken by interview appointments only.Eligibility for assis-tance is based on income; you must be a legal citi-zen of the United States or have an eligibleimmigrant status. Decisions may be based on criminal history and other criteria. In order to apply and applicant will need to bring verification to the interview.For more information or to set up an inter view call Steve Henderson at 638-4520 ext 103.HOUSING BRIEFS By Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY „ Several local families in need will be given free food at upcoming Farm Share events.Shepherds Gate Church and Washington County Sheriffs Office will host two inde-pendent food distribution events at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 10 at 10 a.m. and 17, respec-tively. The church, located at 1950 Ferguson Road, will combine its distribution with a free fish fry. WCSOs address is 1293 Jackson Ave.Established in 1991, nonprofit food bank Farm Share partners with Florida Depart-ment of Agriculture and Consumer Services and inmates at Florida Department of Cor-rections, and other volunteers, to re-sort and package produce from farms that would otherwise have been thrown away due to bruising or size. The organization ships the produce to other agencies for local distribu-tion at no cost.Food distribution events help needy familiesFarm Share partners with Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and inmates at Florida Department of Corrections, and other volunteers, to re-sort and package produce from farms that would otherwise have been thrown away due to bruising or size. [COURTESY PHOTO/FARMSHARE] See GAMBLING, A2Established in 1991, nonpro t food bank Farm Share partners with Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and inmates at Florida Department of Corrections, and other volunteers, to re-sort and package produce from farms that would otherwise have been thrown away due to bruising or size. The organization ships the produce to other agencies for local distribution at no cost.See ART, A2 See FOOD, A2

PAGE 2

** A2 Wednesday, February 28, 2018 | Washington County NewsFarmShare events such as the one pictured help serve the underserved. Washington County Sheriffs Of“ ce is the latest agency to help feed the communitys needy via the Farm Share program. [COURTESY PHOTO/FARMSHARE] Cultural dances, martial arts demonstrations, and a story walk are some of the highlights of this years event. Hot dogs and hamburgers will be prepared by Community South Credit Union.There are still a few vendor booth spots available, so all businesses, civic organizations, non-profit and faith-based organizations are welcome to join. The cost is free for vendors. The Early Learning Coalition asks that all vendors provide a hands-on art activity in which children and families can participate.Nearly 1,200 people attended ArtKidDoo last spring, and due to the incredible interest already this year, organizers anticipate a considerable community turnout.Those interested in joining the event as a vendor or in offer-ing a special performance may access a form online at http://www.elcnwf.org/artkiddoo/ to download the vendor booth application. Once completed, return the form to Sallie Bros-nan at sallie.brosnan@elcnwf.org. Those interested in partici-pating as a volunteer may also reach out to Brosnan to learn about the various opportuni-ties for volunteering the day of ArtKidDoo. ARTFrom Page A1Shepherds Gate hosts Farm Share distributions monthly. With the event hitting record numbers last month „ serving 149 fami-lies „ Pastor Travis Mask said theres a huge need in our area.ŽThe Bible tells us that that you do to the least of them, you do to me,Ž he added, referencing biblical scripture. Taking care of the widows and the orphans and taking care of the people that are less fortunate.ŽThe church also runs the only USDA-approved program in the county and offers food assistance bimonthly to local families that meet the federal income requirements.Anybodys welcome to come,Ž Mask said. We want everybody in Washington County to show up. Wed love to feed everybody.Ž Both agencys Farm Share distribution events are first-come first-served and are set up as a drive-through to help accommodate individuals with disabilities and small children. No form of personal information is required.We want to let the com-munity know in everyway that we possibly can, that we are here for them,Ž WCSO Public Information Officer Kristin Martin, noting the event and similar ones help foster a friendly relation-ship between the community and law enforcement. Our deputies are really working hard to be more active in the community.ŽMartin said WCSO expects to give away thousands of pounds food and, depending on the reception, may look to institute the event annu-ally. WCSO requests people to arrive early to the March 17 event. Were trying to assist as many families as possible,Ž she added.For more information, contact Travis Mask at 850-33-9521 for the March 10 distribution and Kristin Martin at 850-638-6111 for the March 17 event. FOODFrom Page A1Miami-D ade and Broward counties, and pari-mutuel facilities would be barred from offering lucrative designated playerŽ card games.Rep. Mike Miller, R-Winter Park, said the bill would pro-vide certaintyŽ after years of debate about changes in the gambling industry and after legal battles between the state and the Seminole Tribe. But Democratic opponents criti-cized part of the bill that would direct part of the money to charter schools, an issue that Rep. Joe Geller, D-Aventura, called a poison pill.ŽThe House and Senate would have to reach agree-ment on a final bill before the scheduled March 9 end of the annual legislative session. GAMBLINGFrom Page A1 Staff ReportHOLMES COUNTY „ Holmes County cattle producers met recently to establish the Holmes County Cattlemens Association. Members nominated and elected officers and board members and enjoyed peach cobbler and ice cream pro-vided by Forrest Dilmore and Robin Carrell.Holmes Countys newly formed organization is part of the Florida Cattlemens Association, a statewide, non-profit organization established in 1934, devoted entirely and exclusively to promoting and protecting the ability of cattlemen members to produce and market their products.Floridas cattle industry is one of the 15 largest in the United States. Floridas cattlemen are dedicated to the preservation of Floridas green ranch land.Holmes County Cattle Producers are encouraged to join. Membership information is available online at www.FloridaCattlemen. org or by contacting Kalyn Waters at the Holmes County Extension at 850-547-1108.Holmes County forms local Cattlemens AssociationPictured are FCA District 1 Representative Pat Durden, Catherine Peel HCCA Secretary/Treasurer, David Adams HCCA Vice President, Reid Bowman HCCA President, Robin Carrell, Kyle Hudson, Justin Williams HCCA Board Members, Terry King HCCA State Director, Ken Griner FCA President [PHOTO BY DUSTY HOLLEY]

PAGE 3

** Washington County News | Wednesday, February 28, 2018 A3

PAGE 4

** A4 Wednesday, February 28, 2018 | Washington County News OPINION The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by GateHouse Media LLC at 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2018, GateHouse Media LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright Notice: The entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of GateHouse Media LLC. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or GateHouse Media. Postmaster: Send address change to Washington County News, P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428, USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES In county Out of county 13 weeks: $20 $24.30 26 weeks: $28.70 $36.40 52 weeks: $48.60 $60.70 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US Publisher: Nicole Bare“ eld nbare“ eld@chipleypaper.com Editor: Carol Kent Wyatt cwyatt@chipley paper.com, 850-638-0212 News, sports, opinion: news@chipleypaper.com Classi“ ed: 850-638-0212, clamb@ chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service: 1-850-522-5197Have something to say?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri“ cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. Washington CountyPUBLISHER Nicole P. Bare“ eld EDITOR Carol Kent Wyatt PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR Cameron Everett Often imitated but never duplicated. Although a cliched sales pitch, that phrase aptly applies to Americas foremost Christian preacher, Billy Graham, who died Wednesday at his North Carolina home at 99. Although many may not recall his heyday, partly because he receded from public life a decade ago, Graham was the towering figure among Americas Christian leaders during the 20th century. His ministry spanned six decades, eventually reaching into every corner of the globe to an estimated 215 million people, and included serving as spiritual adviser to numerous U.S. presidents and our ambassador of faith to other world leaders. Grahams personal exhortation of the Christian Gospel through his crusades,Ž which frequently filled football stadiums to overflowing and once drew a quarter-million people to New York Citys Central Park, reportedly converted more than 3 million souls to Christianity. But his preaching also was spread through a multimedia empire that included television, radio, books and other publications and a weekly newspaper column called simply My Answer,Ž in which he answered spiritual questions from readers. Yet many respects, Graham was never far removed beyond the humble farm boy from North Carolina. And we cannot forget the pivotal role Florida played in helping launch his long and storied ministry. Graham graduated high school in 1936 and sought to go i nto the ministry at Bob Jones College, then located in Tennessee. But he struggled to follow the colleges harsh rules, admitting he preferred girls and baseball to studying, while piling up bad grades and a long list of demerits. He decided to leave for the Florida Bible Institute, then in Temple Terrace. Billy,Ž Bob Jones Sr. reportedly counseled him at the time, if you leave and throw your life away at a little country Bible school, the chances are youll never be heard of. At best, all you can amount to would be a poor country Baptist preacher somewhere out in the sticks.Ž Yet Jones also told Graham: You have a voice that pulls. God can use that voice of yours. He can use it mightily.Ž At least Jones was partly correct. Graham, according to his autobiography, wasnt sure if that would happen. But while in seminary he frequently took nighttime strolls around the golf course at the Temple Terrace Country Club, and one night along the 18th green, as he was vexed over his future, he found his answer.  Oh God, ŽI sobbed, if you want me to serve you, I will, Ž he wrote in his autobiography. And serve he did, beginning with the first sermon he preached, as a student, at the Bostwick Baptist Church in Palatka. A few years later, after his ministry garnered international acclaim, Graham told reporters his appeal was rooted in preaching a gospel not of despair but of hope „ hope for the individual, for society and for the worldŽ „ and based simply on John 3:16. His final My Answer column, approved shortly before his death, posed the question of how he wanted to be remembered. Graham replied: I hope I will be remembered as someone who was faithful „ faithful to God, faithful to the Gospel of Jesus Christ and faithful to the calling God gave me not only as an evangelist, but as a husband, father and friend.Ž A version of this editorial first appeared in the Ledger, a News and Times-Advertiser sister paper with Gatehouse MediaTruly one of a kindANOTHER VIEW We live in a country where liberals are constantly working to get rid of things that were once sacred to America. Theyve taken God out of our public schools. Theyve politicized and disrespected our national anthem. Now, exploiting a tragic school shooting in Florida, theyre aiming to get rid of our guns. Liberals think turning America into a gunfree zone will make our schools safe and stop sick young men from going on bloody killing sprees like the one in Parkland. The clamor for stricter gun control by the mainstream media and leading Democrats like Pelosi and Schumer is as simplistic as it was predictable. But its not the guns, stupids. Its not what a disturbed 19-year-old boy has in his hands that makes him kill. Its what he does not have in his heart love. I dont want to sound like a bleeding heart who thinks the Parkland shooter is a victim of society or is not totally responsible for his horrible crime. But I havent seen any evidence yet that he had anyone who loved him or truly cared about him after his adoptive mother died last year. Like other mass shooters, he was an outcast, a clearly troubled, angry and strange kid with serious behavioral and emotional issues. He had been kicked out of high school and never got the mental health help everyone who knew him knew he badly needed. Adults failed him. But so did his peers. I wonder how many of the 3,000 kids in his school embraced him or consoled him after he lost his mother. How many of his well-to-do suburban classmates from good families or his teachers showed him they really cared about his loss or tried to help him get through it? Not many, I bet. High school can be a nasty social and psychological experience, even for the most popular kids. Kids who are different, shy, poor, not-sobright, adopted or simply deemed to be not coolŽ enough by the jocks, cheerleaders and leaders of the other cliques have it extra tough. Too often they are bullied, shunned, teased and in very rare cases transformed into angry killers. When I went to school in the 1950s and the other kids found out I was adopted, I was teased unmercifully. Being teased about being adopted, about being illegitimate, about being discarded by my real parents, hurt me. It also made me a very angry kid. But it never made me want to slaughter my classmates with the rifle my father gave me and taught me how to shoot when I was 10. Times and America have changed and theres no going back to the 1950s. But school kids today can be just as cruel to each other inside their intense and closed social bubble. I think the problem is actually worse now because we have a whole generation of kids whove grown up not hearing things like The Rev. Billy Grahams powerful message of love. The great evangelist and global crusader for Christ, who died this week, always ended his sermons with You dont have to listen to me today. But just remember one thing God loves you.ŽMore love, not gun controlBy John L. MicekDonald Trump, the man who needs a cue-card to feign basic human empathy, is serious a bout gun control? Yeah, right. This is still the same president whose promises far outperform his actual ability to carry them out. Remember when Trump promised a spec-tacular replacement for Obamacare? That hasnt happened. In fact, he made it worse.Trump promised a massive infrastructure program. What we got relies on a paltry $200 billion investment from the federal government to magi-cally conjure $1.5 trillion from private interests and cash-strapped state and local governments.He loved the Dreamers until he squeezed them so he could get more money for his preposterous border wall. And immigration reform, of any kind, remains at a standstill.And now were supposed to believe that hell successfully push for comprehensive background checks, raise the age of gun-purchasers to 21 and move to ban bump-stocks?It would be nice to think Trump is serious about actually doing any of those things. Unfortunately, hard experience teaches us that his desire for approval far outweighs his desire to make substantive policy change.Only one candidate in the general election came to speak to you, and that candidate is now the president of the United States, standing before you,Ž Trump said at the NRAs 2017 annual convention, according to The New York Times. You came through for me, and I am going to come through for you.ŽOn Thursday, Trump doubled-down on his sup-port for the NRA, calling them great American patriots,Ž on Twitter.According to NBC News, the NRA donated $21 million to Trumps 2016 presidential campaign. When Republicans in Congress starts feeling the heat, Trumps base begins to squawk and the NRA mobilizes gun owners, who do you think is going to win the argument?Sadly, it probably wont be the kids from Park-land. Still, as with everything with Trump, its more important to watch what he does, not what he says.Take, for instance, how Trump proposed to ban bump-stocks, which allow semi-automatic weap-ons to be converted into nearly automatic weapons.He signed a memo recommending that Attorney General Jeff Sessions propose regulations to ban bump stocks. Unfortunately, there are more if/then statements baked into it than one of the old BASIC programs you wrote in middle school.Thats because the argument over any new regula-tion could rage on for months as it goes through the standard regulatory review process let alone any litigation.The faster way to ban bump-stocks would be through legislation, which Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, has said is the only answer.Thats because, as The Washington Examiner reports, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms lacks the power to ban the weapons on their own, leaving a bill the only answer.If [the] ATF tries to ban these devices after admit-ting repeatedly that it lacks the authority to do so, that process could be tied up in court for years, and that would mean bump stocks would continue to be sold. Legislation is the only answer,Ž Feinstein said in a statement.Getting such a bill passed, though? Thats another matter entirely.That depends on whether such a bill could garner 60 votes in the Senate,Ž and clear the U.S. House, U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., told me this week.Do you trust Trump on gun control?OPPOSING VIEWS Michael Reagan

PAGE 5

** Washington County News | Wednesday, February 28, 2018 A5 LOCAL & STATEThe Washington County Sheriffs Office is asking for the publics assistance in locating a man who is wanted on an outstanding warrant for fraud.Trent Arthur Byrd, 27, who is also an absconder from Flor-ida State Probation on other charges, is listed as a white male, about 6-foot-3 with brown hair and brown eyes.Washington County Sheriffs Office is asking that if you have any infor-mation on the whereabouts of Trent Byrd, please con-tact the office immediately at 850-6386111. The public may also contact the office anonymously by calling 850638-TIPS (8477) or by email at tips@wcso.us.County seeks man accused of fraudBy Staff ReportCHIPLEY „ A Bonifay woman is behind bars on methamphetamine charges following a traf-fic stop in Washington County.Washington County Sheriffs deputies conducted a traffic stop, for speeding, near the intersection of Palmer Drive and Highway 90 in Caryville on February 25.The driver, identified as Kevin Hammett, 51, of Bonifay, was found to be operating the vehicle with a suspended license for a prior DUI charge. Hammett, who is also on community control for unrelated drug charges out of Holmes County, was arrested for driving with a suspended license and booked into the Washington County Jail.Hammett authorized a search the vehicle, which resulted in deputies locating a small bag of crystal methamphetamine in a wallet belong-ing to the passenger. The passenger, identified as Jackie Denise Maull, 49, of Bonifay, was also in possession of a plastic straw that con-tained methamphetamine residue. Maull was arrested and charged with possession of methamphetamine and possession of paraphernalia.Washington County Sheriff Kevin Crews urges anyone with knowledge of crimes being committed to contact the Washington County Sheriffs Office at 850-638-6111. Tips may also be reported anonymously by calling 850-638-TIPS (8477) or by emailing tips@wcso.us.WCSO arrests Bonifay woman on meth countsBy Christine Sexton News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ People with cancer or terminal illnesses and cer-tain trauma patients would be exempted from opioid-prescription limits being considered by lawmakers, under a bill approved last Wednesday by a House health-care panel.Members of the House Health & Human Services Committee unanimously approved the bill (HB 21) after tagging on a 161page amendment. Bill sponsor Jim Boyd, R-Bra-denton, said he worked with the Senate and Gov. Rick Scotts office for the past three weeks on the amendment.The amended bill would limit to three days opioid prescriptions for patients suffering from acute pain,Ž which is defined as the normal, predicted, physiological, and timelimited response to an adverse chemical, thermal, or mechanical stimulus associated with surgery, trauma, or acute illness.ŽPhysicians could prescribe up to seven-day opioid supplies if they determine three days would be inadequate. They would be required to write acute pain exceptionŽ on the prescriptions. Unlike an earlier version of the bill, the latest itera-tion includes exemptions from the limits for cancer patients, people who are terminally ill and those who are receiving pallia-tive care. Trauma patients who meet certain criteria for severity of injuries also would be exempt from the limits. Despite the changes, the bill continued to face con-cerns from doctors.Florida Orthopaedic Society lobbyist Toni Large said orthopedic surgeons are aware of opioid abuse problems but maintain that the proposed fix goes a step too far.ŽLarge said the House proposal would exempt certain trauma patients from the restrictions but wouldnt provide a similar exemption for people who undergo scheduled major surgery.ŽMy orthopedic surgeons want you all to understand that when you go back after this bill passes that you are going to have patients and loved ones and constituents that we are no longer going be able to effectively manage their pain,Ž Large told the House committee. And we dont want you to vote on this bill today without us getting that message across.ŽShe also warned that requiring patients to go back to surgeons after seven days to get additional prescriptions could make it more difficult to see ortho-pedic surgeons.Its hard for many of you sitting here to get an appointment with your orthopedic surgeon today, its going to be twice as hard after this bill is passed,Ž she said.While the bill passed unanimously, several members of the committee had concerns with parts of the amendment.Rep. Gayle Harrell, R-Stuart, said she was worried about the lack of an exemption for patients who have undergone surgery. She told the committee that if her hus-band would have been required to revisit the surgeon seven days following a procedure, she would have had to get an ambulance.Ž With the annual legisla-tive session slated to end March 9, lawmakers and Scott have been trying to reach agreement on a plan to help stem an opioid epidemic that has led to widespread overdoses. Legislative proposals largely focus on trying to prevent addiction to prescribed painkillers, which can lead to people taking street drugs such as heroin and fentanyl.The House bill would require every physician registered with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Admin-istration and authorized to prescribe controlled substances to take a two-hour continuing education course.Rep. Cary Pigman, an Avon Park Republican who is a physician, said the requirement was so broad that it would impact the 44,000 physicians who are licensed in the state.Pigman also noted that the bill was specific about which organizations could offer the continuing edu-cation requirements.Boyd said that only the Florida Medical Association and the Florida Osteopathic Medical Association would qualify to offer the courses under the amendment. Pigman, who has been at odds with the Florida Medical Asso-ciation in the past for his support of bills that would increase the scope of practice for nurses, asked about the fiscal impact on physicians who would have to take the class every other year.Pigman, who has taken continuing education courses from the organizations in the past, suggested that the associations charge members $100 for such courses and non-members $200.What we are saying is (the associations) will get revenue of $4.4 million to $8.8 million every two years, which is probably why they support this bill. So when we vote for it with this piece in it, thats what we are voting for,Ž Pigman said.Boyd denied that any deal was made with either of the associations.This whole process is give and take, and those are things we just kind of negotiate along the way,Ž Boyd said. Its something that made sense to us when we did it.ŽFlorida Medical Association General Counsel Jeff Scott called Pigmans assertions absurd.ŽWe have significant concerns with the bill,Ž Scott said adding that the organization believes the Legislature should address the opioid crisisŽ but has concerns with the limita-tions being imposed.Moreover, Scott said, despite Boyds comments, other medical groups qual-ify to offer the course.As for Pigmans claims about upward of $8.8 mil-lion in revenues, Scott said, Pigman can do math all day long. He has no idea whats going to be charged. We dont either. We just saw the amendment, so we havent contemplated that.ŽHouse adds exceptions for opioid limitsBy Jim Turner News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ Gov. Rick Scott on Sunday directed the Florida Department of Law Enforcement to immediatelyŽ investigate the response of law-enforce-ment authorities to the mass shooting this month that killed 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.The directive came as House Speaker Richard Corcoran, R-Land O Lakes, sent a letter requesting that Scott sus-pend Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel. The letter, which was joined by 73 Republican House members, came a day after Rep. Bill Hager, R-Delray Beach, called for Israels removal.A Broward County deputy resigned Thursday after it was determined he failed to enter the school while the shooting was ongoing. Other questions have been raised about whether law enforcement adequately responded in the past to warnings about shooter Nikolas Cruz.Scotts directive to FDLE Commissioner Rick Swearingen did not detail the reasons for the request or how long the investigation could take.During a television appearance Sunday, Israel pushed back against Hagers removal request, which came in a letter to Scott.It was a shameful letter. It was politically motivated,Ž Israel told CNNs Jack Tapper. I never met that man (Hager). He doesnt know anything about me. And the letter was full of misinformation.ŽIn the letter, Hager, who is chairman of the House Justice Appropriations Subcommittee, called for Scott to remove Israel for neglect of duty and incompetence.Ž The letter Sunday from Corcoran used similar descriptions.Gov. Scott orders FDLE to investigate shooting responseByrd Maull See FDLE, A6

PAGE 6

** A6 Wednesday, February 28, 2018 | Washington County News STATELloyd Dunkelberger News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ Flor-ida lawmakers are dealing with the consequences of the new federal tax law, which sharply cuts the amount of taxes paid by corporations.Lawmakers are trying to understand the impact of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, which took effect Jan. 1 and cut the federal tax rate paid by major corporations and businesses from 35 percent to 21 percent. It also changed deductions and other accounting methods that can alter business tax liabilities.Since Floridas corporate income tax, which is 5.5 percent, is based on federal tax liability, changes in federal law can affect the amount of tax revenue the state collects from busi-nesses. Last year, Florida collected nearly $2.2 bil-lion in corporate taxes, making it one of the states most significant revenue sources, outside of the sales tax.Senate Finance and Tax Appropriations Chairwoman Kelli Stargel, R-Lakeland, is sponsoring an annual bill (SB 502) that conforms or piggybacksŽ Floridas corporate tax law with the federal tax code, adopt-ing or modifying changes made at the federal level.But the piggyback bill, which is scheduled to be heard by the Senate Appropriations Commit-tee on Tuesday, has taken on much greater significance this year because of the sweeping nature of the federal tax changes. It also must accommodate the new Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, which was signed into law this month and also includes some changes in federal tax law. This is a very complex issue for our corporations who look to this bill each year to try to clarify how theyre going to file their corporate income tax,Ž Stargel said before her subcommittee unanimously approved the piggyback bill last week.Were trying to rec-ognize that right now its just early for everybody, so were trying to give some accommodation to the parts that are the most significant swings from maybe what it was last year,Ž Stargel said.State officials, businesses and others are waiting for clarification from the federal government and the Internal Revenue Service on how many aspects of the new tax law will be applied.In fact, the uncertainty has left state analysts unable to say exactly what the fiscal impact of the piggyback bill could be on state revenue, although the assumption is it could have an undeter-mined negativeŽ impact through the end of this budget year and the new fiscal year, which begins July 1. In the long term, it is anticipated to have a more positive impact.To offset the initial neg-ative impact of the federal law, Stargels piggyback bill is decoupledŽ from the new federal tax code on several key provisions, including a measure in the federal law that allows corporations to immediately deduct the cost of new equipment and other capital.Under Stargels bill, Florida corporations would have to spread the federal bonus depreciationŽ over seven years and lessen its impact on the state tax collections, rather than trying to claim it immediately.The decoupling is a rou-tine occurrence for Florida and other states, accord-ing to a Jan. 29 report from the National Conference of State Legislatures on the new federal tax law.The goal is to incentivize businesses to invest more and grow the economy, but states that conform would likely see a reduction in revenues in the short term,Ž the legislative policy group said about the depreciation measure. Most states have already decoupled or modified the existing federal bonus deprecia-tion provisions.ŽBut while some federal tax law changes could reduce state rev-enue, Florida officials and national analysts also say other provisions could increase tax collections for the states.One issue still being analyzed is how state tax collections will be impacted as corporations bring back, or repatriate,Ž overseas cash and assets to the United States.This would raise revenue for the states in the short run as businesses bring back monies held overseas, but tax experts seem divided on whether this will be a small amount or a windfall,Ž the NCSL report said.In acknowledging the uncertainty and complexity of the federal tax changes, Stargels bill also would direct the state Department of Revenue to create a work group to continue to analyze the revamped tax code and offer recommendations.The work group would begin offering periodic updates in May, with a final report to state lawmakers and the governor by next Feb. 1, about a month before the start of the 2019 legislative session.Stargel said the work group will provide the opportunity to give a little bit of time for us to figure out what this is doing and report back.ŽNew tax law raises questions for state piggybackSheriff Israels fundamental duty is to keep the peace and protect the citizens of Broward County,Ž said Corcorans letter, posted on Twitter. He has the power and responsibility to appoint highly-qualified deputies and to ensure they receive state-of-the-art training. Sheriff Israel failed to maintain a culture of alertness, vigilance and thoroughness amongst his deputies.ŽAlong with the highly publicized failure of school-resource officer Scot Peterson to enter the building during the shoot-ing, Hager and Corcoran wrote that Israels agency had received numerous calls previously about threats posed by Cruz, a former Marjory Stoneman Douglas student charged with 17 counts of murder in the shooting spree.In his letter, Hager also said other agencies, including the Florida Department of Children and Families and the FBI, did not properly follow up on signals that Cruz could be a threat.Sadly, he (Israel) was not the only one that ignored it,Ž Hager wrote. DCF, Broward County Schools, the FBI and the BSO (Broward Sheriffs Office) all had the pieces to put this puzzle together but failed to communicate. While you do not have authority to remove anyone at the FBI, you do have the authority to remove Sheriff Israel, and I encourage you do to so immediately.ŽScott has called for FBI Director Christo-pher Wray to resign over the federal agencys acknowledged failure to follow protocol on a tip regarding the shooter. He has not made discussed changes in leadership at the Department of Chil-dren and Families, which deemed Cruz, who admit-ted cutting himself and planning to purchase a gun on Snapchat posts, a lowŽ threat to harm himself or others in late 2016Hager blamed Israel for failing to coordinate with the Department of Children and Families and has requested that state money intended for the Broward Sheriffs Office be redirected to the Flor-ida Department of Law Enforcement to start a pilot program in the county to better assess risk.On Saturday, Israel sent a letter to Scott, disputing information from Hager as riddled with factual errors, unsupported gossip and falsehoods.ŽIsrael wrote that Peterson was the only officer on campus at the time of the attack and that despite assertions by Hager and others, the sheriffs office didnt make 39 visits to Cruzs home.Israel agreed with Hager that the sheriffs office received 23 calls regarding Cruzs home but contended most were routineŽ parenting issues and five involved the shooters brother.Israel noted two encounters involving Cruz remain under investigation. One, for example, involved the school resource officer referring Cruz to the Department of Children and Families, which closed the case a couple of months later. He also touted the work of lawenforcement agencies, including police from Coral Springs, Sunrise and the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Fire-arms and Explosives. I am very proud of the incredible work that so many from BSO and other agencies (including CSPD, FDLE, Sunrise, FBI, ATF and others) performed on February 14,Ž Israel wrote. And I am equally appalled that Rep. Hager felt the need to engage in disingenuous political grandstanding, perhaps in the hope he will garner some headlines, at the expense of the truth.Ž FDLEFrom Page A5 By Staff ReportHOLMES COUNTY „ Minor injuries were reported when a Holmes County school bus crashed around 7:15 a.m. on February 26.Amanda Stephens was driving the school bus with 30 passengers on board, west on Steverson Road just past Guitar Lane at speeds too fast for road conditions. According to reports, the speed caused the driver to lose control and veer to the left off the roadway as it was approaching a wooden bridge.The bus traveled off the side of the bridge where it overturned onto the drivers side.Passengers were trans-ported on another bus to Doctors Memorial Hospital in Bonifay where minor injuries were reported. Alcohol was not found to be a factor in the accident. Stephens was charged with driving too fast for conditions.Minor injuries reported in school bus crash[SPECIAL TO TIMES ADVERTISER PHOTOS]

PAGE 7

** Washington County News | Wednesday, February 28, 2018 A7 By Jennifer PeltzThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ The World Trade Centers operators apologized Monday to relatives of people killed in the 1993 bombing there, saying the country was unprepared for a terror attack that foreshadowed 9/11. The families urged people to understand its legacy.Victims families, survivors, first responders and others marked the bombings 25th anniver-sary on what is now the Sept. 11 memorial plaza. They observed a silent moment, read victims names, laid roses on the memorial and reflected on an explosion that became a telling signal of terrorists aims. We were not ready for what visited us that day. Americans were not ready for what visited them that day,Ž said Kevin OToole, chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which runs the trade center. And for that, I say: Im sorry. And we are sorry.ŽThe blast in an underground parking garage on Feb. 26, 1993, killed six people, one of them pregnant. It injured more than 1,000 and forced an estimated 50,000 to flee the trade centers twin towers in a scene of smoke, fear and con-fusion that would be mirrored and magnified on Sept. 11, 2001. For families of the bombing victims,  93 is as big as 9/11,Ž said Pat Rodriguez, who lost his pregnant sister, Monica Rodriguez Smith. Its a place in history that you shouldnt forget.ŽThe anniversary ceremony and a memorial Mass at a nearby church have been held year after year, but the quarter-century mark brought renewed attention. Its long overdueŽ to Judy Shirtz, sister-in-law of victim Stephen Knapp. She feels the loss of families like hers has largely been forgotten amid the far greater toll of 9/11.It happened to us first, it shouldnt have happened again, and it did,Ž she said.Muslim extremists set off the bomb in an effort to punish the U.S. for its Middle East policies, according to federal prosecutors. The suspects werent directly connected to 9/11, but convicted bombing ringleader Ramzi Yousef is a nephew of self-proclaimed 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed. And another man convicted in the plot vowed that the World Trade Center will continue to be one of our targetsŽ in a letter later found on his laptop.New York marks 25th anniversary of 1993 bombingBy Lisa Mascaro and Matthew DalyThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ President Donald Trump declared Monday hes willing to take on the National Rifle Association over gun legisla-tion, but Republicans who control Congress arent so sure. They prefer to consider only modest changes to firearms limits in response to the mass shooting at a Florida high school.Congress returned to work Monday without following Trumps lead on any of the major initiatives he has tossed into the debate since the massacre at Marjory Stone-man Douglas High School. Despite public calls for stricter gun laws, Republican leaders have largely kept quiet after the shooting which left 17 dead and ushered in another phase in the gun debate, prompted in large part by the activism of the young survivors.Over the weekend, Trump spent time talking to Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, and the White House is inviting lawmakers from both parties for meetings this week. But Trumps ideas to arm many teachers, lift the minimum age for purchas-ing assault rifles to 21 and impose stricter background checks were falling flat.You guys, half of you are so afraid of the NRA,Ž the president said Monday at a meeting with the nations governors. Theres nothing to be afraid of. And you know what? If theyre not with you, we have to fight them every once in a while. Thats OK.ŽInstead, Senate Republicans are hoping to consider more modest legislation from Sens. John Cornyn, R-Texas, and Chris Murphy, D-Conn., to strengthen the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS). The Fix NICSŽ bill, similar to one approved last year in the House, would penalize federal agencies that dont properly report required records used to determine whether someone can legally buy a gun.Cornyn, the Senates No. 2 Republican, questioned Trumps proposal to raise the age limit for assault weapons, noting that the minimum age to enlist in the mili-tary is 18.Im not sure I understand the 21 age. I think there are better ways to address it than just an arbitrary age increase,Ž he told The Washington Times.Trump insisted Monday that sometimes political leaders need to buck the NRA, which builds its political power by major campaign spending and motivating gun rights supporters to vote. Though he did not mention increasing the minimum age for rifle purchases, he wants to toughen the Cornyn bill with stricter background checks, a change the NRA has opposed.Were going to strengthen it,Ž Trump said. Were going to make it more pertinent to what were discussing.ŽDemocrats have long pressed for more sweeping changes toward a universal background check system, including requiring inquiries for online and gun show purchases.Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York said Monday that if all Congress can accomplish is passage of the Fix NICSŽ bill it would be an abject failure and a dereliction of our duty.ŽAt a minimum, Congress should approve universal background checks, Schumer said, denounc-ing NRA-backed bills that make Republicans feel better without meaningfully addressing the issue of gun safety.ŽIn the House, many Democrats want to reinstate an assault weap-ons ban that expired more than a decade ago.But House Republican leaders believe its up to the Senate to take the next steps, according to a top House GOP aide, who spoke only on condition of anonymity because he wasnt authoriz ed to discuss legislative strategy.Trump says hes willing to buck NRA over gunsPresident Donald Trump speaks Friday during a meeting with the members of the National Governors Association in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington. [EVAN VUCCI/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] NATION & WORLD

PAGE 8

** A8 Wednesday, February 28, 2018 | Washington County News COMMUNITYIf you would like your events included in this list, email information to: news@chipleypaper.com RMS Black History ProgramCHIPLEY Roulhac Middle School will present its Black History Program will be Wednesday, February 28, from 8:30 10:30 a.m. VHS Strawberry Sale VERNON Its strawberry time! Support Vernon High School Project Graduation by purchasing flats of strawber-ries (1 flat consists of 12 pints) for $20 each. The berries will be hand-picked in Plant City, Florida the day before the sale and are fresher than what can be found in the grocery store. The order deadline is March 4 with pick up being March 7 between the hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Anyone interested in purchasing strawberries may email: 2018vhsprojectgrad@gmail.com Womanless Beauty Pageant VERNON Please note the Womanless Beauty Pageant at has been cancelled. Small business monthly workshop set at ChipolaMARIANNA„Chipola Col-lege and the Jackson County Chamber of Commerce invite college students, employees and community members interested in learning more about small business resources to attend a March 1 lunch and learn meeting. The free work-shop will be held at 11:30 a.m., Thursday, March 1, in Build-ing Z, Room 116 (Jackson Hall), on the Chipola campus. Participants are invited to bring a brown bag lunch. A different business theme will be showcased each month ranging from how to start a business, managing a budget, growing a business, establishing credit, seeking a loan, tax incentives, and other areas of interest. Those attending will have an opportunity to ask questions and to apply the concepts pre-sented. Potential collaborations with Chipola College academic programs will also be presented. For information about small business resources, visit https://www.sba.gov/ or contact Dr. David Bouvin at 718-2380 or bouvind@chipola.edu, Tiffany Garling at 482-8060 or tiffany@jackson-county.com Washington County Farm Bureau Annual Spaghetti SupperCHIPLEY The Washington County Farm Bureau will hold their annual Spa-ghetti Supper in conjunction with the Washington County Youth Fair again this year. The supper will take place from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., March 2, at the Washington County Agricultural Center. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for children under 12. Advanced tickets can be purchased at the Washington County Farm Bureau office or from any Washington County Farm Bureau Board Member. WCFB will also have their Saturday morning sausage biscuit sale Saturday, March 4. The proceeds from both of the events go to support Washington County Farm Bureau youth projects such as Ag in the Classroom and AgVenture for Washington County elementary schools. Computer engineer to discuss 'Rasberry Pi' at Chipola MARIANNA„Computer Engineer David Thomas will present a lecture on Rasberry Pi and Accessible Program-ming Skills," Friday, March 2, at 5:30 p.m., in Jackson Hall of the Literature/Language Building. The lecture is spon-sored by the Chipola Science Club. Thomas works for SAIC (Science Applications Interna-tional Corporation), a premier technology integrator providing full life cycle services and solutions in the technical, engineering, intelligence, and enterprise information tech-nology markets. Thomas earned a Masters degree in Computer Engi-neering from the University of Central Florida. The Raspberry Pi is a series of small singleboard computers developed in the United Kingdom by the Raspberry Pi Foundation to promote the teaching of basic computer science in schools and in developing countries. For information about the presentation, contact Science Club adviser Dr. Jeff Bodart at bodartj@chipola.eu or phone 718-2268. Bonifay Woman's Club BazaarBONIFAY The Bonifay Womans Club Bazaar will be held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, March 3, at the clubhouse. There will be clothes, furniture, knick knacks, appliances, crafts and more. A fill a bag for a $1 sale will begin at 1 p.m. The clubhouse is located at 212 E. Virginia Avenue in Bonifay. Pageant SocialBONIFAY The Bonifay Pageant Committee will host a pageant social at the Holmes County High School library at 6 p.m., Tuesday, March 6. Information packets will be handed out and discussed. Division requirements are: Little Miss, Bonifay address or first grader at Bonifay K-8 School, Jr. Miss, grades 8-10 at a Bonifay school, and Miss, Bonifay address or ages 17-21 who are attending/graduated from HCHS. The Bonifay pag-eant is scheduled for Saturday, April 21, 2018. For more information, call 850-768-9229. Baby BeesCHIPLEY The Washing-ton County Public Library will host Baby Bees at 10 a.m., Wednesday, March 7, Wednesday, April 11 and Wednesday, May 2. Baby Bees will be an hour of sto-ries, music, sing-a-longs and activities designed just for baby. Each month will have a new theme. For more infor-mation call 850-638-1314. PSC to visit WCCOACHIPLEY A representative from Florida Public Service Commission will be at Washington County Council on Aging at 2:15 p.m., Thursday, March 8, to discuss services available to area cit-izens. This event is open to the public and seniors are encouraged to attend. For more information, contact WCCOA at 850-638-6216. Marine Corps PLC meeting set at Chipola MARIANNA„Chipola College invites students interested in becoming a com-missioned officer in the U.S. Marine Corps to attend our next meeting at 11:30 a.m., Thursday, March 8, in Build-ing Z, Room 116 (Jackson Hall), on the Chipola campus. Stu-dents will learn how they can enroll in a bachelors degree program at Chipola; receive guidance, training, and men-toring from the Marines; and continue working toward the goal of earning a commission as a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps after graduation. In addition to scholarships and/or stipends, Marine Corps PLC students have the opportunity to participate in leadership, physical fitness events, and team-building activities. For information, visit https://www.thebalance. com/united-states-marinecorps-platoon-leaders-course-3332801or contact Dr. David Bouvin at 718-2380 or emailbouvind@chipola.edu STP to present On Golden Pond March 9-11CHIPLEY The Spanish Trail Playhouse will present the play "On Golden Pond" on Friday, March 9; Saturday, March 10 and Sunday, March 11. The play will be at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday and at 2 p.m. on Sunday at the Spanish Trail Playhouse, located at 680 Second Street in Chipley (Historic Chipley High School). Tickets for this show are $12 for adults, $10 for seniors (65 or older) and for military (with active or retired ID). Tickets are on sale and can now be purchased online at www.spanishtrailplayhouse.com. Tickets can also be purchased at the Spanish Trail Playhouse Box Office, located at 680 Second Street. The office will be open from 8 a.m. until noon. Monday through Thursday. You can also still call 638-9113 to purchase tickets. The Playhouse now accepts credit card payments. AARP Smart Driver CourseCHIPLEY AARP represen-tative Erich Beck will conduct the AARP Smart Driver Course from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, March 12, at Washington County Council on Aging, 1348 South Blvd., Chipley. Participants will be updated regarding new traffic laws and rules of the road, defensive driving techniques, and proven safety strategies. All participants receive a certificate to provide to their automobile insurer, possibly enabling them to receive a discount on their premiums, depending on their carrier's guidelines. Pre-register by calling Washington County Council on Aging, 850-638-6216. Cost is $15 for AARP members and $20 for nonAARP members. Registration fees will be collected the day of the course. For more informa-tion, visit www.aarp.org/drive Young Irelanders to Perform at ChipolaMARIANNA „ The Chipola Artist Series presents The Young Irelanders, Tuesday, March 13, at 7 p.m. in the Prough Center for the Arts. The Young Irelanders is comprised of eight sensational performers who have Irish traditional music, song and dance running through their veins. Between them, they have performed for many heads of state, Presidents of Ireland, US Presidents, the Queen of England, the President of China, Prince Albert of Monaco, Empress Michiko of Japan and more. They also have performed at Radio City Music Hall. Dont miss the chance to enjoy Irelands tradi-tions of music, song and dance in the hands of some of the worlds most talented young performers. More atwww.theyoungirelanders.com. Tickets„$25 for adults, $10 for children under 18, and $5 for Chipola students and employ-ees. For more information, call the Center for the Arts Box Office at 850-718-2420 or visit www.chipola.edu/boxoffice.COMMUNITY BRIEFS By Carol Kent Wyatt The News 703-9487 | @WCN_CarolWyatt Cwyatt@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY Kate M. Smith Elementary School 5th grade teacher Troy Rackley has been named the Amazing Teacher for the month of February.Now in his fourth year teaching, Rackley taught 5th grade first at Roulhac Middle School and then at KMS following the relocation of 5th grade classrooms to the new KMS campus.Rackley, a graduate of Victory Christian Academy in Sneads, says he started on a different career path, only to discover life was more fulfill-ing as a teacher."I received my AA in business with accounting from Chipola and then took a break from school to spend some time trying my hand in the field of accounting," he said. "Then, I went back to school a year later and received my edu-cation degree. I remembered how much I enjoyed tutoring while I was in high school, and I decided education was the right fit for me."It was that natural aptitude for tutoring that earned Rackley the Amazing Teacher nomination."Mr. Rackley tutors my children in the afternoons," read the nomination. "He has helped my son, who is in the first grade, on his reading for his AR goal when nobody else wanted to. My kids look forward to their afternoons with Mr. Rackley. He makes learning fun. We appreciate everything he does for our children."Rackely says his teaching philosophy is simple:"Ultimately, I want every child to be successful," said Rackley. "But my main goal is to help lead them in a direction in which they didn't feel they could go, or perhaps lacked the courage to go." Rackley says children have a "natural interest" in science an interest he's learned to tap into by applying classroom les-sons to real life scenarios."I want to encourage them to understand how science applies to things in the grand scheme of things," he said. "As much as I can, I try to teach in a way that relates to the real world and encourage their families to learn with them."Rackely's efforts to achieve that "real life" application can be found in his recent organiz-ing of the school's inaugural "Astronomy Night" following classroom lessons about moon phases. The event allowed par-ents and students to spend the evening learning about space and moon phases together by using telescopes and asking questions.Rackley credits his wife, Anna Beth Rackley a notable teacher in her own right and his mother, who was also a teacher, for much of his success. "AnnaBeth inspires me with her dedicated and passion for teaching, and my mother instilled a desire for learning when I was younger he said."However, Anna Beth Rack-ley says her husband's success comes from within."What makes him a great teacher is that he will do what-ever it takes, use whatever resources he has, to meet the needs of not only his students, but others around him," she said. "He is truly the most self-less and compassionate person I know."Do you know an amazing Holmes or Washington County teacher? Nominate him or her to be named an Amazing TeacherŽ by visitingwww. chipleypaper.com or www.bonifaynow.comRackely named Amazing TeacherPictured from left are News and Times Publisher Nicole Bare“ eld, February Amazing Teacher Troy Rackely, First Federal Bank Vice President/Financial Manager Marissa Everett, and First Federal Bank Financial Specialist Ryan Hodge.[CAROL KENT WYATT | THE NEWS PHOTOS ] KMS 5th grade teacher Troy Rackley poses with his class.

PAGE 9

** Washington County News | Wednesday, February 28, 2018 A9

PAGE 10

** A10 Wednesday, February 28, 2018 | Washington County News By Stan ChoeThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ Stocks jumped on Monday, with gains again accelerating in the last hour of trading, as markets around the world continue to claw back from a sharp tumble earlier this month.The Standard & Poors 500 powered to a third straight gain, and the index has erased about two-thirds of its 10 per-cent loss since setting a record a month ago.Analysts said the key reason for Mondays gain was a drop in Trea-sury yields, which have been at the center of worries for stock inves-tors in recent weeks, but some were still surprised by how much the stock market climbed.The S&P 500 gained 32.30 points, or 1.2 per-cent, to 2,779.60, with telecoms and technology stocks leading the way. For the second straight day, the market turned higher as the day wore on. Thats an encourag-ing sign to investors who see the last hour of trad-ing as being dominated by the smart money.ŽThe Dow Jones industrial average rose 399.28, or 1.6 percent, to 25,709.27, and the Nasdaq composite gained 84.07, or 1.1 per-cent, to 7,421.46. All three indexes are back within 3.4 percent of their record highs.I think you can very confidently say the worst is over for now,Ž said Randy Frederick, vice president of trading and derivatives at the Schwab Center for Financial Research. Frederick said he saw few reasons for a big move higher in stocks on Monday, with no big-ticket earnings or economic reports on the calendar. If the market continues rising at this rate, it could hit record heights again in the next couple weeks. And then wed be vulnerable to another correction, so Id prefer it to slow down a bit here,Ž Fred-erick said.What triggered the first correction, which is what traders call a 10 percent drop in stock prices, was fear that interest rates are set to march much higher, and quickly. Stocks up again as yields ease Amara Sumah, owner of Sumahs West African Restaurant, poses while holding one of the restaurants menus, Jan. 24 in the Shaw neighborhood of Washington. Twenty-“ ve years ago, Sumah and his wife, Isata, immigrated from Sierra Leone. They have a successful family-owned business in Washington. [PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Paul WisemanThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ From AT&Ts Alexander Graham Bell to Googles Sergey Brin, immigrants have long been more likely than native-born Americans to realize the dream of owning their own company.Immigrants are about twice as likely as natives to start new businesses,Ž says Arnobio Morelix, an analyst at the Kauffman Foundation, which promotes entrepreneurship.Analysts note that that entrepreneurial drive has become a more critical need as the number of newly formed American businesses has declined „ to 414,000 in 2015 from a pre-recession average of 524,000 a year in 2002-2006, the Census Bureau reports.Curbs on immigration pushed by President Donald Trump and his Republican allies in Congress alarm critics who regard foreign newcomers as a vital source of entrepreneurship.It sends a very powerful negative signal to the rest of the world: Dont come to the United States. We dont want you,  said John Dearie, president of the Center for American Entrepreneur-ship, a nonpartisan group that supports immigration. Thats terribly damaging.ŽIn a report last year, the Kauffman Foundation concluded that in 2016 nearly 30 percent of new American companies were started by first-generation immigrants, up from 13 percent in 1996.In Pittsburgh, Kenyan immi-grants Lavender Wachira and May Lebo, who met as college students, started a cleaning business five years ago with an investment of less than $500. They hope to hire people to handle marketing, accounting and other administrative tasks that they now do themselves.Immigrants have always been disproportionately entre-preneurial, in part because many cant find work that they qualify for on paper. Some U.S. employers dont know what to make of, say, a college degree from India or job experience in Lithuania. So they tend to pass over immigrants in favor of native-born applicants whose credentials they understand.Brin, born in Russia, cofounded Google. South Africa-born Elon Musk created electric car maker Tesla. Three immigrants „ Peter Thiel of Germany, Luke Nosek of Poland and Max Levchin of Ukraine „ founded PayPal.A study last year by the Center for American Entrepreneurship concluded that 43 percent of the companies in the Fortune 500 were founded by firstor second-generation immigrants.Then there are the humbler ventures started by new arriv-als „ Indian hotels, Korean groceries, Greek diners.This country is just as full of promise as it was during the days of Ellis Island,Ž says Alvaro Maurice, an immigrant from Venezuela who started the Dayton, Ohio-based man-agement consulting firm in 2011.For a quarter-century, Amara and Isata Sumah have been serving up jollof rice, hot pepper soup and other West African dishes from their eatery in Northwest Washington D.C. The husband-and-wife team puts in 12 to 14 hours daily at Sumahs West African Res-taurant & Carry Out. They say they managed to save enough to buy a house in the Maryland suburbs and put two daughters through college.The restaurant sits across the street from the $100-a-month apartment that Amara rented when he first arrived in Amer-ica, when he worked in hotel restaurants and drove a cab to get by.If you work hard, you can support yourself and your family,Ž says Amara, who remembers the exact day (Nov. 28, 1978) he arrived in Washington without any money from impoverished Sierra Leone. You can make a better life for yourself and your kids.ŽAmerican DreamersMARKET WATCHDow 25,709.27 399.28 Nasdaq 7,421.46 84.07 S&P 2,779.60 32.30 Russell 1,559.33 10.15 NYSE 2,999.62 115.51COMMODITIES REVIEWGold 1,340.50 12.30 Silver 16.542 .066 Platinum 1,001.80 3.00 Copper 3.1955 .0130By Claire GalofaroThe Associated PressPYEONGCHANG, South Korea „ He didnt get the hashtag quite right on the first try, so they withheld the free stuffed bear he waited in line a half-hour to earn.Add play,Ž the agent said. It should be #CokePlay.ŽOn the final night of the Pyeongchang Olympic Games on Sunday evening, this agentŽ was policing Daniel Zabeks Instagram feed to make sure he branded his post to exactly match the corporations chosen slogan.Zabek and hundreds of others stood in a line that snaked around the Olympic Park in the hours before the closing ceremony just for this: to take a photo in front of a corporations advertisements and post the pictures on social media with the companys pre-determined hashtag.In exchange, he would get a stuffed bear, the soda companys mascot with the brand name embroidered on a red scarf around its neck.Ok, done,Ž he said and handed his phone back to the guard. Good?ŽThe officer carefully inspected it, nodded and handed over the plush toy. Out into the digital world, Zabek had sent a promo for soda. In the real world, he walked away carrying another promo for soda. He doesnt drink soda.This was the reward for corporations that spend hundreds of millions on Olympic partner-ships in the modern, millennial world: For two weeks, specta-tors were converted into walking billboards for watches, phones, beverages, cars.This is all a big marketing scheme,Ž Zabek said. But Im so OK with that. Look at this place „ everyones happy.ŽJaunty music played in the background, and all around him people posed in front of #coke-play billboards, then handed their phones over to prove they got the hashtags right to receive their prize: another advertisement. Zabek, a 27-year-old New Yorker, is the ideal candidate for this brand of modern marketing. He proudly declares himself a millennial, and he often speaks in internet acronyms. To describe why he left the Olympics two weeks ago, only to decide at the spur of the moment to fly all the way back around the world for one day at the closing ceremony, he said this: I had FOMO.Ž Translation for non-millennials: fear of missing out. At the end of the day, youve got look at it this way. The whole world is here, for two weeks, and no one is pissed off. Its nice to see that. The world is happy.ŽA few of his friends have teased him about his corporate promotional participation. Whatever. Its fun,Ž he said. Hashtag-YOLO. Thats what I do.ŽAt the Olympics, fans became walking corporate billboards World marketsHow key international stock markets performed: AmsterdamAEX BrusselsBEL20 FrankfurtDAX Hong KongHang Seng LondonFTSE 100MilanFTSE MIB ParisCAC40 SydneyASX All Ordinaries TokyoNikkei ZurichSwiss Market Index % CHANGE PREVIOUS CLOSE TODAYS CLOSE ASSOCIATED PRESS KEY 0.8% 534.08 538.31 0.5% 3,972.53 3,992.50 0.4% 12,483.79 12,527.04 0.7% 31,267.17 31,498.60 0.6% 7,244.41 7,289.58 0.2% 22,672.15 22,706.21 0.5% 5,317.37 5,344.26 0.7% 5,999.80 6,042.20 1.2% 21,892.78 22,153.63 0.9% 8,948.19 9,026.11 Oil 63.91 0.36MARKET MOVERS€ AK Steel Holding Corp.: Up 15 cents to $5.65 „ Steelmakers rose following reports the Trump administration is preparing to place steep tariffs on imported steel. € General Electric Co.: Up 16 cents to $14.65 „ The industrial company said it will cut its reported pro“ ts from the last two years and named three new board members.BRIEFCASECBS launching a 24-hour streaming sports networkCBS Corp. is rolling out a 24-hour stream-ing sports news network that will feature the days top news, highlights and analysis.The company said Monday the network will have a DVR-like functionality that allows viewers to watch previous segments and jump back into live program-ming seamlessly. CBS Sports HQ is available on CBSSports. com; the CBS Sports app for key connected TV devices including Amazon Fire TV, Apple TV and Roku; the CBS Sports mobile app for iOS and Android; CBSN and the CBS All Access subscription service. NEW YORKSpectrum Brands merging with HRG in $10B dealConsumer products company Spectrum Brands is combining with its biggest shareholder, HRG Group Inc., in a deal valued at $10 billion.Holding company HRG, based in New York, owns about 59 percent of Spectrum, according to FactSet.Once the transaction is complete, Spectrum Brands shareholders will receive one newly issued share of the com-bined company for each share of Spectrum that they owned before the combination. LONDONUkraine police rearrest cybercrime ringleaderUkrainian police say they have rearrested the ringleader of a cybercrime group accused of inflict-ing hundreds of millions of dollars in losses world-wide. It comes 15 months after his embarrassing escape put the spotlight on corruption in the East-ern European country.Ukraines Interior Min-istry says the cybercrime boss was detained Sunday in Kiev. The ministry doesnt identify the man, but Cyberpolice spokes-woman Yulia Kvitko says he is Gennadiy Kapkanov, whose AvalancheŽ group was once described by a group of researchers as the worlds most pro-lific phishing gang. A look into why immigrants start so many businesses BUSINESS

PAGE 11

** Washington County News | Wednesday, February 28, 2018 A11 TIPS & TRICK S A fresh start How to choose a travel agent€ Make sure your agent belongs to a professional association such as ASTA, the International Air Transport Association or the Cruise Lines International Association. Some t ravel agents are also certi“ ed travel counselors and master cruise counselors. Check their credentials. € Interview more than one agent. € Compare a t ravel agents fees with your travel budget. € Consider whether their expertise is a match for your destination. € Read reviews and testimonials, and ask for references.Habits of happy couplesGood habits are a must in marriage, maintains marriage.com, a site with expert information from social workers, psychologists and counselors. Top habits that consistently draw couples together include having fun regularly, expressing appreciation, communicating and protecting date night.Dont waste cleanerTo get more of your cleaning solution where it needs to go, spray directly on the rag and then wipe, rather than spraying on the surface to be cleaned.No more bad applesSlice an apple, put it back together, and wrap it in plastic wrap or with a rubber band to keep it from browning.Voila: Lemon oilMix 2 to 3 tablespoons of grated lemon zest into about a cup of olive oil and let marinate for two weeks or so. Shake every so often. At the end of the two weeks, strain out the zest for lemoninfused olive oil. By Deena Bouknight | More Content Now F rost or snow might still cover the ground, but it is not too early to begin a spring cleaning checklist. Real Simple affirms: You must have a plan of attack.Ž Mainly, stock up on supplies before starting. Also, take some time to walk around and evaluate the home to consider all areas needing a good cleaning. While baseboards and ceiling fans may be obvious mustsŽ on a spring cleaning list, Real Simple reminds about these outof-the-ordinary areas needing at least once-a-year attention: € Wall art and framed mirrors: Take off the walls and run a microfiber cloth over the front and back. € Area rugs: Roll up and remove from rooms, then vacuum and clean floor where rugs resided. € Wall-to-wall carpeting: Use the vacuum edger suction attachment to clean where baseboard meets floor. € Refrigerator: If there is greasy buildup, clean top with a spray cleaner and move away from the wall to clean coils with vacuum brush attachment. Idreamofclean.net offers a printable ultimateŽ spring cleaning list. It reminds spring cleaners to not forget to clean the bookshelf (take off each book and wipe with a microfiber cloth), vacuum lamp shades with the brush attachment, change air conditioner and furnace filters, and schedule a chimney cleaning if necessary. Also, many may not think about ceilings, walls and window treatments because lighting often does not catch accumulated dust and cobwebs. Swipe walls and ceiling with a clean, dry microfiber cloth, shares Real Simple, before giving floors a deep cleaning. Strip fabric treatments from every window in the room and tumble them in a cool dryer for 15 minutes,Ž the publication suggests. Better Homes & Gardens advises to start high, go low,Ž meaning to take care of ceiling trim and fixtures first before moving to walls, then basebards. National cleaning service Merry Maids on its website offers a suggested four-weekend schedule for tackling the entire home. First up is bathrooms and kitchen, including cleaning or replacing shower curtains and bathmats, and cleaning on top of and inside kitchen cabinets and the pantry. Weekend 2 hits the bedrooms; 3 looks at linen closets, the mudroom and the laundry room; and the last weekend focuses on common areas indoors and out (patios and porches). Turn on the self-cleaning oven last, then head to the spa or a hammock to rest and avoid smelly fumes. Return to a home that is spotless in all areas seen „ and unseen. Time to spring-clean your home. Where to begin PERSONAL FINANCEPROS AND CONS OF CREDIT FREEZES, LOCKS BIGSTOCK IMAGES

PAGE 12

** A12 Wednesday, February 28, 2018 | Washington County News

PAGE 13

** Washington County News | Wednesday, February 28, 2018 B1CELEBRATE Staff ReportMARIANNA„Some 140 students from 12 area high schools competed in writing, reading, speech, oral interpretation, literature, humanities, grammar, and spanish contests at Chipola College on Feb. 9. The occasion was the Twentyeighth Annual Throssell Literature/ Language Festival hosted by Chipolas Letters Department. The purpose of the festival is to recognize and encourage academic excellence. Prizes were awarded to first, second and third places, as well as two honorable mentions, in each category. The winner of the Presidents Reading Contest received a special medallion as well as a cash award. Contest winners from participating schools are listed below. Presidents Reading Award„ Mikayla Morgan of Bethlehem High School. Writing: first„Kodi Krager of Bethlehem High School; second„ Emily Broom of Chipley High School; third„Cameryn Lein of Marianna High School; honorable mentions„ John Austin Roberts of Altha School and Joshua Lunsford of Vernon High School. Speech: first„Mary Beth Brown of Liberty County High School; second„ Madeline Wright of Sneads High School; third„Zoie Gainey of Vernon High School; honorable mentions„ Vontarius McCray of Liberty County High School and Kaylee Hatcher of Malone High School. Oral Interpretation: first„Tiyana Gray of Cottondale High School; second„Philip Bridges of Chipley High School; third„Lance Newcomb of Vernon School; honorable mentions„Katherine Davis of Marianna High School and Samuel White of Holmes County High School. Literature: first„Madison Miller of Marianna High School; second„ Emily Holloway of Blountstown High School; third„Nina Fuller of Holmes County High School; honorable mentions„Breanna Bennett of Blountstown High School and Kiley Justice of Cottondale High School. Humanities: first„Kain Pullam of Liberty County High School; second„ Kyle Tillman of Malone High School; third„Mary Beth Brown of Liberty County High School; honorable mentions„Sailor Blair of Blountstown High School and Samuel White of Holmes County High School. Grammar: first„Chase Corbin of Cottondale High School; second„ Shauni Hooper of Holmes County High School; third„Courtney Payne of Blountstown High School; honorable mentions„Kyle Morgan of Malone School and Lana Bush of Vernon High School. Spanish Language Contest: first„ Marcela Molina of Blountstown High School; second„Emily Barragan of Blountstown High School; third„ Ruben Chavez of Vernon High School; honorable mentions„ Melissa Jasso of Marianna High School and Luis Mendoza of Malone High School.Chipola Literature/Language Festival HUMANITIES WINNERS„ Humanities winners are, from left; honorable mentions, Sailor Blair of Blountstown HS and Samuel White of Holmes County HS; third, Mary Beth Brown of Liberty County HS; second, Kyle Tillman of Malone HS, “ rst, Kain Pullam of Liberty County HS. LITERATURE WINNERS„ Literature winners are, from left: honorable mentions Breanna Bennett of Blountstown HS and Kiley Justice of Cottondale HS; third, Nina Fuller of Holmes County HS; second, Emily Holloway of Blountstown HS; “ rst, Madison Miller of Marianna HS. INTERPRETATION WINNERS„ Oral Interpretation winners are, from left: honorable mentions, Katherine Davis of Marianna HS and Samuel White of Holmes County HS; third, Lance Newcomb of Vernon HS; second, Philip Bridges of Chipley HS; “ rst, Tiyana Gray of Cottondale HS. SPANISH LANGUAGE WINNERS„ Spanish winners are, from left: honorable mentions Melissa Jasso of Marianna HS and Luis Mendoza of Malone HS; third, Rubn Chvez of Vernon HS; second, Emily Barragan of Blountstown HS; “ rst, Marcela Molina of Blountstown HS. TOP WRITERS„ Writing award winners are, from left: honorable mentions, John Austin Roberts of Altha HS and Joshua Lunsford of Vernon HS; third, Cameryn Lein of Marianna HS, Second, Emily Broom of Chipley HS, First Kodi Krager of Bethlehem HS. GRAMMAR WINNERS„ Grammar winners are, from left: honorable mentions Kyle Morgan of Malone HS and Lana Bush of Vernon HS; third, Courtney Payne of Blountstown HS; second, Shauni Hooper of Holmes County HS; “ rst Chase Corbin of Cottondale HS. Above: BEST SPEAKERS„Speech award winners are, from left: honorable mentions, Vontarius McCray of Liberty County HS and Kaylee Hatcher of Malone HS; third, Zoie Gainey of Vernon HS, second, Madeline Wright of Sneads HS and “ rst, Mary Beth Brown of Liberty County HS. Below: PRESIDENTS READING WINNER„Some 140 students from 12 area high schools recently competed in Chipola Colleges Twenty-Eighth Annual Throssell Literature/Language Festival. Here, (right) Mikayla Morgan of Bethlehem High School is presented the award by Chipola Vice President of Student Affairs, Dr. Pam Rentz. Holmes, Washington students among top winners

PAGE 14

** B2 Wednesday, February 28, 2018 | Washington County News SOCIETY/SCHOOLSU.S. Air Force Airman Elijah S. White graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training also earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. White is a 2017 graduate of Holmes County High School in Bonifay.White graduates USAF basic trainingAirman Elijah S. White Jamesand Serena Carter of Wausau, Floridaare pleased to announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Emily Paige Carter to Martin Blane Jones, Jr., son of Martinand Laura Jones of Chipley Florida. Emily is a 2010 graduate of Vernon High School and is currently employed with Life Management of Northwest Florida. Blane attended Chipley High School and is currently employed with Southeastern Surveying & Mapping Corporation. The couple is planning to wed on November 17, 2018 at Historic Hard Labor Creek Church in Wausau Florida. Formal and out of town invitations will be sent.Carter, Jones to wed BONIFAY Holmes County Council on Aging recently celebrated February birthdays. Pictured from left are celebrants Maria Thrush, Virginia Allen, and Betty Cooper and Shelaine Nix, representing February luncheon sponsor, Bonifay Nursing and Rehab.Council on Aging celebrates birthdays MARIANNA Myrtice Register Bradley, Chipola Colleges first Homecoming Queen (1948), returned to her alma mater for Homecoming on Feb. 17. Some two dozen former queens and Mr. Chipola winners also attended. Pictured from left, are: Chipola President Dr. Sarah Clemmons, Tammy Denise Olds Billups (1986 Queen), Myrtice Register Bradley (1948) and Gloria Arnold Davis (1968 Queen).First Homecoming Queen returns to Chipola Jerry and Florene Watkins were united in marriage February 28, 1968. Jerry and Florene will celebrate the milestone anniversary with family next month at their home in Chipley. Their siblings and spouses, children and spouses and grandchildren plan to be in attendance. The Watkins have two daughters and three grandchildren: Truman, Grady, and Layla.Watkins celebrate 50 years BONIFAY Private First Class Emily Forehand has been selected as Holmes County High Schools JROTC February Cadet of the Month. Each month, the program selects a one excelling cadet who exhibits the qualities of leadership, academic achievement, and loyalty to the Blue Devil Battalion. Forehand is in 4th Platoon and performs the duties as the Battalion Public Affairs Officer. She has a 3.1 GPA, and her favorite teacher is Mr. Sims, with U.S. History being her favorite class. Her interests include listening to music, working around the house, and making plans to helping the Blue Devil Battalion record events by taking pictures and writing articles for the local newspaper. Forehands short term goals are to maintain good grades and continue leading the Blue Devil Battalion towards success. After she graduates, she plans to attend Chipola College, where she will focus on Digital Media.Forehand is Cadet of the MonthPrivate First Class Emily Forehand Staff ReportWASHINGTON, DC … Today, Congressman Neal Dunn (FL-02) announced the 2018 High School Congressional Art Competition for Floridas Second Congressional District. The United States House of Representatives sponsors this competition each spring to recognize and honor talented young artists from each congres-sional district across the country.High school students residing in Floridas Second District are encouraged to submit their work. The winning piece will be hung in the United States Capitol building along with other artwork from across the country. The Congressional Art Competition began in 1982 and since then more 650,000 young artists have been involved.The Congressional Art Competition brings together students from around the country to showcase the talent and creativity of our youth,Ž said Dr. Dunn. We have many talented young artists in Floridas Second District and I look forward to displaying the winning piece in the Capitol for all to see.Ž Kristen Bird, a senior at Port St. Joe High School in Gulf County, won the 2017 Congressional Art Competition for Floridas Second District. Kristens drawing, titled In the Eyes of an American,Ž was a self-portrait depict-ing both the American flag and military troops.Submissions can include paintings, drawings, collages, and photography, among other mediums. Artwork entered in the contest may be up to 26 inches by 26 inches, may be up to 4 inches in depth, and not weigh more than 15 pounds. All entries must be original and may not violate any U.S. copy-right laws. Any entry that has been copied from an existing photo or image will not be accepted. The deadline for submission is 5:00 PM ET on April 17, 2018. For full competition guidelines visit Dr. Dunns website at https://dunn.house.gov/art-competition.Congressman Dunn announces 2018 Congressional Art Competition[SPECIAL PHOTO] SHARE THE JOYSend social announcements to: news@chipleypaper.com

PAGE 15

** Washington County News | Wednesday, February 28, 2018 B3 SCHOOLS CROSSWORDLeft: Youth Tour scholarships 2018: 2018 Youth Tour Scholarship winners: (front: l-r) Washington County winner, Emily Broom, Chipley HS; Jackson County winner, Elizabeth Carnley, Malone School & Holmes County winner, Bailey Rich, Holmes Co. HS with WFECs Board of Trustees: (back l-r) George Clayton Owens, Randy Bush, John Adams, Myron Hudson, Tim Alford, A.C. Miles & Joe Rone. Not pictured, Calhoun County winner, Anna Alday, Altha School. FPTC Press ReleaseA graduate of Florida Panhandle Technical Col-leges Commercial Vehicle Driving (CDL) program has been named Driver of the YearŽ by McKenzie Tank Lines, one of the largest tank-platform delivery services in the United States.FPTC CDL graduate Antonio TonyŽ Cruz was recently named 2017 Driver of the YearŽ by the transportation giant.Designed to celebrate and recognize drivers who go above and beyond the expected standards of performance, dedication, community, mentorship, and other areas, the award is the culmination of the winnowing down through 52 McKenzie drivers who win the annual Million Miles Without IncidentŽ awards and 12 Driver of the MonthŽ awards to a single recipient of the prestigious annual award.A Panama City resident, Cruz is an Army veteran, wounded in combat in Iraq, and part of the Wounded Warrior Project.Cruz graduated top of his class from FPTC, where he is said to have been known for his confi-dent, positive attitude and contagious smile.We are so very proud of the accomplishments of Antonio Cruz, and all the other students we see here each year at Florida Panhandle Technical Col-lege,Ž said FPTC Director Martha Compton, and we are proud of our wide array of certification and degree programs offered here.ŽOur CDL Program is just one of many offerings here on the Chipley campus that sometimes do not get the attention they deserve, but the results of which are seen every day by graduates such as Antonio Cruz, who are in the work force, doing the jobs that need to be done, every day.ŽWe are successfully putting people into jobs in our communities every day here at Florida Panhandle Technical College and we are proud to say so.Ž she added.FPTC grad named McKenzie Tank Lines Driver of the YearFPTC CDL graduate Antonio TonyŽ Cruz (at right) is congratulated by a McKenzie Tank Lines representative upon being named the companys Driver of the YearŽ[FPTC PHOTO] The Florida College System Activities Association recently recognized Chipola College Theatre for the Fall production of The Female Odd Couple. The FCSAA respondent said, FCSAA pins were awarded for high honors to the two student actors who did much of the heavy-lifting in driving the story and managing the hilarity: Ashleigh Braswell and Mary Keyton.Ž The two are pictured here. Chipola Theatre will present The Little Mer-maid, March 1-4.Chipola Theatre recognized by FCSAA Staff ReportGRACEVILLE … Holmes County High School junior, Bailey Rich and Altha School junior, Anna Alday were named West Florida Electrics Youth Tour competition winners on Tuesday, Feb. 20. Eliz-abeth Carnley of Malone was named the alternate.Rich and Alday will represent WFEC on the National Rural Electric Youth Tour June 9-14, traveling to Washington, D.C. with more than 30 other Florida students to joinmore than1,600 high school juniors represent-ing co-ops from across the country. 13area students partici-pated in the Youth Tour program this year. They were: Anna Alday, Altha School; Haley Mitchell, Bethlehem School; Samera Baker, Blountstown High School; Emily Broom, Chipley High School; Lilly Ball, Cottondale High School; Aliyah Wilburn, Graceville High School; Bailey Rich, Holmes County High School; Elizabeth Carnley, Malone School; Jonah Mercer, Marianna High School; Zach Prescott, Ponce De Leon High School; Reagan Joiner, Poplar Springs School; Georgia Cloud, Sneads High School and Lana Bush, Vernon High School.The cooperatives Board of Trustees created a scholarship program linked to Youth Tour par-ticipation. Each year, a scholarship of $4,000 to Chipola College is awarded to the highest scoring par-ticipant from each county. Participants are ranked on a scale of 100 points using a panel interview process and the following categories: Communication Skills, Knowledge of Subject, Personality, Community Service and Poise/Appearance. Those scholarship recipients were: Anna Alday, Cal-houn County; Bailey Rich, Holmes County; Elizabeth Carnley, Jackson County and Emily Broom, Wash-ington County.The Washington, D.C. Youth Tour Program has been in existence since 1957 when co-ops sent students to Washington, D.C. to work during the summer. By 1964, the program caught on, and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) began to coordinate the efforts of the co-ops. Since then, thou-sands of young people have experienced this opportunity. WFEC has participated in the Youth Tour since 1979, sending two students to Washing-ton, D.C. each year since. For more information about the Youth Tour and the scholarship program, visit www.westflorida. coop or contact Candace Croft at ccroft@westflorida.coop.2018 WFEC Youth TourAbove; Youth Tour scholarships 2018: 2018 Youth Tour Scholarship winners: (front: l-r) Washington County winner, Emily Broom, Chipley HS; Jackson County winner, Elizabeth Carnley, Malone School & Holmes County winner, Bailey Rich, Holmes Co. HS with WFECs Board of Trustees: (back l-r) George Clayton Owens, Randy Bush, John Adams, Myron Hudson, Tim Alford, A.C. Miles & Joe Rone. Not pictured, Calhoun County winner, Anna Alday, Altha School. Washington County scholarship: Emily Broom, the Washington County 2018 Youth Tour Scholarship winner with WFEC Trustee George Clayton Owens. Holmes County scholarship: Bailey Rich, the Holmes County 2018 Youth Tour Scholarship winner with WFEC Trustees (l-r) Randy Bush, Myron Hudson & Joe Rone. Rich will also travel to Washington, D.C. this summer to represent WFEC on the National Youth Tour.

PAGE 16

** B4 Wednesday, February 28, 2018 | Washington County News FAITHIf you would like to include an event in this list, email information to: news@ chipleypaper.com Blue Grass MarchCARYVILLE Caryville Baptist Church will host Blue Grass at 6 p.m. on March 2. Please make plans to attend and enjoy picking and singing. Fellowship will follow. The church is located at 4217 Old Bonifay Road in Caryville. For more information, Blondell Freeman at 548-5504. Jeff and Sheri Easter in Concert at Mt. ZionBONIFAY Jeff and Sheri Easter will be in concert at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 3, at Mt. Zion Independent Baptist Church. This is a free event. Pastor Steve Boroughs and congregation invite everyone to join them for a wonderful evening of great singing.Ž For more information, call 768-0843, or 373-8416. The church is located at 3205 Hwy 2 in Bonifay. Family and Friends DayCHIPLEY Grant Tabernacle African Methodist Episcopal Church will host a Friends and Family Day at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 11. The theme of the day will be Families United In FaithŽ Reverend Obidiah White the pastor of Saint Mary Missionary Baptist Church of Jacob City will deliver the message with his choir. The church is located at 419 Martin Luther King Boulevard in Chipley. For more information call Josephine Robinson-Floyd st 850-638-1691. BCF to Host Evangelism ConferenceGRACEVILLE The Baptist College of Florida (BCF) in Graceville will host the FAITH EVENTSEach year, Holmes and Washington Counties partner for Relay for Life, a community based fundraising event of the American Cancer Society. Monies raised during the annual event not only funds cancer research, but also helps offset cost such as transportation to treatment for Holmes and Washington County cancer patients. In the months leading up to the annual event, local teams work to raise money for the cause. If your Relay for Life team would like a fundraising event included in this list, email information to: news@ chipleypaper.com RELAY FOR LIFE EVENTS Valery Lawton Special to the NewsCHIPLEY Sunday evening, Feb. 18, was phenomenal at Yes Lord Deliverance Church of God in Christ, Inc., in Chipley.The pews were filled with men and women who came out to a book release and signing event by new local author, Shaneekqua McCutcheon. A Caryville native, McCutcheon is one of five children and a graduate of Vernon High School.McCutcheon has had her share of tragedy but has learned to overcome these trials and tragedies. Her new book, Purpose in Pain: Cleaning Under the RugŽ is a memoir and testimony of a young girl growing up and being sexually abused for years right in her home.The abuse did not leave her unscarred, but left her broken and scared feeling along and carrying around a secretŽ no one would believe. These burdens spiraled into a life of suicide attempts, depression, and feelings of unworthiness.Purpose in Pain: Cleaning Under the RugYes Lord Deliverance Church of God in Christ, Inc. recently hosted a book release and signing party for local author, Shaneekqua McCutcheon. The Eleventh Annual Florida Panhandle Womens Retreat will take place Friday, March 2 and Saturday, March 3, at the DeFuniak Springs Commu-nity Center, located on North Tenth Street, in DeFuniak Springs. This years two part event begins at 6 p.m. Friday, March 2 and includes a meal and program.The second part of the event begins at 9 a.m. Saturday, March 3, and features speakers, music, lunch, door prizes, and more. Saturdays theme is So Let Us Number Our DaysƒŽ and is based on Psalm 90:12.The morning speaker will be Sonya Williams, a preachers daughter, preachers wife, mother and grandmother. Williams serves at Heritage Baptist Church in Bayshore, New York, with her husband, Dr. Vincent Williams. She is the church school Womens Retreat coming soonDeborah Ehler Polston Sonya Williams Local author brings hope to abuse survivors See RETREAT, B7 See FAITH, B7 See RELAY, B7 See PURPOSE, B7

PAGE 17

** Washington County News | Wednesday, February 28, 2018 B5 OBITUARIESRebecca BeckyŽ Ryken Barnes, 56 of Cottondale, FL passed away Saturday February 17, 2018. Born in Des Moines, Iowa, Becky was a graduate of Graceville High School, Class of 1979. Becky collected pigs and loved going to flea markets and yard sales. She was a member of the First Baptist Church in Graceville. Predeceased by her father, Robert BobŽ Ryken. Survived by her husband Roger Barnes, Kynesville, FL; mother, Shirley Ryken, Graceville; two sons Robert K. (Misty) Waldron, Bonifay, FL, Cory A. (Terri) Waldron, Graceville; grandchildren T.J. Waldron, Arabella Waldron, Stella Waldron, Brock Waldron; two brothers David Ryken, Purvis, MS, Johnny (Alesia) Ryken, Noma, FL; two uncles, Robert Earl (Barbara) Payne, Marianna, FL, Edward Ryken, CO, two aunts Esther Kennis, MO, Genevieve Baird, IA; several nieces, nephews and cousins. Funeral service were held at 2 p.m., Tuesday, February 20, 2018 at the First Baptist Church in Graceville, with Revs. Tom Anderson and David Eldridge officiating. Burial followed in New Hope Assembly of God Cemetery with James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Family received friends at the church Tuesday, 1 p.m. until time of service. Flowers accepted or family request those wishing to make memorials to Potters House of Prayer 3064 Russ Road Marianna, Florida 32446. Expressions of sympathy can be made at www.jamesandlipford.comREBECCA R. BARNESTravis Myerl Baxley departed from his earthly life on Thursday, February 8, 2018 at Flowers Hospital in Dothan, Alabama. Travis was born on July 24, 1975 in Bonifay, Florida to Rex and Mittie Myerl MatthewsŽ Baxley. Travis is predeceased by both parents. Survivors include: spouse, Dana Baxley; son, Travis Myerl Baxley; daughters: Monique Baxley, Angelica Baxley, Brianna Baxley, and Tara Baxley; brothers: Danny Baxley and wife (Monica), and Rex Baxley; and his sister, Jennifer Huffman and husband (Charles). Memorialization was by cremation. Family and friends may sign the online register at www. brownfh.netTRAVIS M. BAXLEYMr., Rasheem Ferinando Harmon, of Chipley, Florida, went home to be with the Lord on Thursday, February 15, 2018 in the UF Health Shands Hospital of Gainesville, Florida. He was 42 years old. Rasheem was born on September 23, 1975 to Florence (Brown) Harmon and the late Joseph Harmon in Bonifay, Florida. He was a member of the Christian Fellowship Center of Chipley, Florida. He leaves to cherish his memories his loving mother: Florence Harmon of Chipley, Florida; sweet daughter: KaNia Harmon of Sunny Hills, Florida; beloved companion: Michelle Cutler of Sunny Hills, Florida; sister: LaToya Harmon of Chipley, Florida; brother: Cory Harmon (Danielle) of Milton, Florida; along with a large host of aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends. A Celebration of Rasheems Life took place at 11 AM CST, Monday, February 19, 2018 from the sacred grounds of the St. Joseph Cemetery of Chipley, Florida with Rev. Isaac Harmon, officiating. Committal Service was held immediately following the Celebration with Cooper Funeral Home of Chipley, Florida, directing. A public viewing was held on Sunday, February 18, 2018 from 11 AM until 9 PM CST in the Chapel of Cooper Funeral Home. Friends may express their condolences online at www.cooperfhchipley.com .RASHEEM F. HARMON Mildred SandsŽ Long, age 79, passed from this life Friday, February 16, 2018 at Northwest Florida Community Hospital. She was born in Moniac, Georgia on December 23, 1938 to James and Fannie CrawfordŽ Sands. Mildred worked as a Bus Driver for the Washington County School Board and was a member of the First Baptist Church in Chipley, FL. She is preceded in death by her parents and her husband; N.L. Long. Mildred is survived by her two sons; Jeff and Wendy Long of Melbourne, FL and Greg Long of Chipley, FL, 2 daughters; Cindy Yeager of Panama City, FL and Carol Koch and husband Billy of Chipley, FL, 14 grandchildren and 26 great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 11:00 A.M., Tuesday, February 20, 2018 at Brown Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. Mike Orr, Rev. Dallas Pettis, and Rev. Shane Martin officiating. Interment followed in the Poplar Head Cemetery. Visitation was held one hour prior to the service. Family and friends may sign the online register at www. brownfh.netMILDRED LONGMr. Gerald Ray Raines, age 63, passed away Friday, February 23, 2018. He was born on September 3, 1954 in Birmingham, Alabama, to Jesse Robert Raines and Ira Albright Raines. Mr. Raines was a resident of Bonifay, Florida. He was a devoted husband, father, grandfather, great grandfather, son and brother. He especially enjoyed spending time with his family. He also enjoyed fishing and attending his childrens and grandchildrens sporting events. Mr. Raines was preceded in death by his father and mother; brother, Bodie Raines; and two sisters, Vera Glenn Locke and Faye Lush. Mr. Raines is survived by his loving wife of 40 years, Mickey Raines of Bonifay, Florida; sons, Jeremy Raines, Jeffery Raines, and Michael Raines all of Bonifay, Florida; daughter, Shelley Raines Carroll and husband Shannon of Bonifay, Florida; brothers, Bobby Raines of Panama City Beach, Florida, and Joe Raines and wife Julie of Birmingham, Alabama; sisters, Jenny Thomas and husband Raymond of Bonifay, Florida, and Ann Lowery of Oxford, North Carolina; eight grandchildren; and 1 great-grandchild. A time of visitation was held at 6:00-8:00 PM, Monday, February 26, 2018 at Clary-Glenn Funeral Home Chapel; 230 Park Avenue, DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32435. Flowers are being accepted. Memorialization was by cremation. You may go online to view obituaries, offer condolences and sign guest book at www. clary-glenn.com. ClaryGlenn Funeral Homes & Crematory is entrusted with the arrangements.GERALD R. RAINESBarbara BobbiŽ Seddon, 85 of Graceville, FL went home to be with the Lord, Thursday, February 15, 2018. Ms. Bobbi loved the Lord with all her heart. She and Mr. George were passionate about missions and were able to travel and share the Gospel on many mission trips. She was a member of Carmel Assembly of God Church where she was very involved. During the fall, Mexico Beach was their second home. Powdered doughnuts and coffee at sunset was a tradition known and shared by family and friends. Another passion was watching her grandchildren play sports. Mymommie, as they called her, could always be heard cheering them on from Little League to college play. She was a beloved wife, mother, grandmother, sister, aunt and friend. She will be truly missed. Predeceased by her parents, George and Cumi Sanders, husband George Seddon, Sr., son George Seddon, Jr., two sisters Ruth Sanders and Pat Miller. Survived by three children Anita (David) Rhoads, Anderson, SC, Susan (Matt) McIntosh, Amy (Terrell) Miller, Graceville; daughter-in-law LaVonda Seddon, Calhoun, GA. Ten grandchildren Candace (Todd) Owens, Sarah (Kyle) Bolt, Emily (David) Walker, Anderson, SC, Megan Seddon, Columbia, SC, George Seddon, III, Calhoun, GA, Seth (Mallory) Gay, Chipley, FL, Kelli (Evan) Messer, Brooke McIntosh, Graceville, Austin (Kaycie) Miller, Ocala, FL, Eli (Railey) Miller, Graceville; eleven great-grandchildren Madelynn, Carson, Tyler, Sydney, Katelyn, Claire, Logan, Lydia, Brayden, Brantley, Bryce; brother George (Ann), Sanders, Pensacola, FL, two sisters-in-law Marge (Jack) Bollinger, Peoria, IL, Linda (Don) Upton, Springfield, MO; a host of nieces and nephews. Celebration of her life was held at 10 a.m., Thursday, February 22, 2018 at Carmel Assembly of God Church with Rev. Jerry Moore officiating, James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Expressions of sympathy can be made at www.jamesandlipford. comBARBARA SEDDON Mrs. Frances Pauline Powell Laird of Westville, FL, passed away Tuesday, February 13, 2018. She was 75. Mrs. Pauline was born August 24, 1942 in Holmes County, FL to the late Paul Early and Mayoma Baker Reynolds. Mrs. Pauline was an avid gardener, and especially loved working in her flowers. She was a member of West Pittman Baptist Church and a former member of Sweet Gum Head Church of Christ. Mrs. Pauline worked tirelessly in service for the Lord as a faithful member of both of these congregations. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by husband and father of her son, Mr. Lamar Powell. Survivors include her husband, Mr. Randall Laird, Westville, FL; 1 son, Michael Powell, Minot, ND; 1 stepson, Gregory Laird (Lisa), Laurens, SC. Funeral services were hel at 11 a.m. on Friday, February 16, 2018 in the chapel of Warren Holloway Ward Funeral Home in Geneva with Rev. Eddie Eaton, Rev. Daniel Smith and Rev. Steve Connell officiating. Burial followed in the Sweet Gum Head Cemetery of Westville, FL with Warren Holloway Ward Funeral Home directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Friday from 9:30 a.m. until 11:00 a.m. Flowers will be accepted.FRANCES P. LAIRD Ray Reynolds departed from his earthly life on Saturday, February 17, 2018, surrounded by family in Chipley, Florida. Ray was born on September 27, 1954, in Chipley, Florida to Willie Thomas and Bell (Hughes) Reynolds. Ray is predeceased by both parents; brothers: Shannon Reynolds, Lloyd Reynolds, John C. Reynolds, and Arlis Reynolds; and sisters: Annie Reynolds, and Vivian Ruth Reynolds. Survivors include: spouse, Barbara (Beech) Reynolds; son, Shannon Reynolds and wife Charity; daughters: Sherry Stringer and husband Jonathan, and Samantha Reynolds; brothers: Willie T. Reynolds Jr., Kenneth E. Reynolds, and Winston H. Reynolds; sisters: Ruby Stefko, Missy Odom, Lahrue Sachon, Rachel Reynolds, and Martha Davis; and grandchildren: Cherokee Reynolds, Cheyanne Reynolds, Savannah Reynolds, Mahayla Reynolds, Allysa Stringer, Dakota Stringer, Skylor Reynolds, and Seth Reynolds, and numerous nieces and nephews. Memorialization was by cremation. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh.netRAY REYNOLDS CONTINUED ON B6

PAGE 18

** B6 Wednesday, February 28, 2018 | Washington County NewsCurtis James Sweeney, age 95, of Bonifay, Florida died February 16, 2018. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.CURTIS J. SWEENEYRichard Dean Frizzell, age 82, of Milton, Florida died February 18, 2018. A memorial service was held Wednesday, February 21, 2018 with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Memorialization was by cremation.RICHARD D. FRIZZELLClarence Eddis Bowers, Sr. was born on December 15, 1944 in Walton County, Florida and resided in Ponce de Leon, Florida. He was a proud veteran of the United States Air Force. Eddis passed away February 21, 2018 at the age of 73. Eddis was a man who lived life to the fullest and was very passionate about everything he did, always excelling at everything he took on in his life. He was always determined to do his best, and he did. He excelled in many different career paths. Also, Eddis enjoyed spending time with his family, flying, golfing, and anything that presented a challenge to him. Eddis was preceded in death by his father, Clarence Bowers and mother, Alma Lee Odom Bowers. He is survived by his wife of 38 years, Mary Berndt Bowers; son, Clarence Eddis Bowers, Jr. and wife Michele; daughter, Cheryl Lynn Bowers Nye and husband, Dale; grandchildren, Hillary Bowers Rock and husband Steve, Catelyn Bowers Lee and husband Taylor, Anna Bowers, and Emily Nye; greatgrandchildren, Lelan Lee, Kayla, Zach, and Nicolas Rock; siblings, Clarese Floyd, Carmen Wilson and husband James, Charlot Lindsay and husband Bud, Kenneth Bowers and wife Harriet, Carol Robinson and husband Terry, Ronnie Bowers and wife Becky, Robin Bowers and wife Jackie, and Connie Strickland; and numerous nephews, nieces, greatnephews and great-nieces. Because flying was his passion and he was an active member of the Young Eagles Association, in lieu of flowers donations would be appreciated to the Young Eagles, an association whose goal is to instill the love of flying in young adults. He will be missed by his family and many others. Funeral services were held Monday, February 26, 2018 in the chapel of DavisWatkins Funeral Home, 1474 Highway 83 North, DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32433, beginning at 11 a.m. A time of visitation will be held one hour prior. Military honors will be performed by the United States Air Force. Arrangements and services are under the direction of Davis-Watkins Funeral Home and Crematory.CLARENCE E. BOWERS Katie Lee Brown, age 64, of Westville, Florida died February 20, 2018. Funeral services were held Saturday, February 24, 2018. Interment followed in the Whitewater Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing.KATIE L. BROWNPhilip Franklin Carroll, age 69 of Chipley, passed away from this life on January 25, 2018 at his residence. Philip was born on May 7, 1948 in Panama City, Florida to Franklin Carroll and Pinkie Stephens. He served in the United States Army. He worked in construction as a painter. He was preceded in death by his parents and one daughter: Lisa Carroll. He is survived by his loving wife: Linda Carroll of Chipley, Florida; one son: Chris Carroll and wife Angela of Rockwall, Texas; one sister: Gloria Modlin of Lynn Haven, Florida; a host of nieces and nephews; one granddaughter: Alexandra Carroll of Rockwall, Texas. Memorialization was by cremation with Obert Funeral Home of Chipley, Florida.PHILIP F. CARROLLRev. Ellis HampŽ Christmas, 92 of the Poplar Springs Community, Graceville, FL went home to be with the Lord, Monday, February 19, 2018. Bro. Ellis, retired Chief Warrant Officer 3 of the U.S. Army, retired in 1966. He served over 21 years in both World War II and the Korean Conflict, where he received several accommodations and medals. He was a bi-vocational minister serving over the years in Jackson, Holmes and Washington Counties. He also retired from Continental Telephone known today as Verizon. He was a member of Bethel Baptist Church where he taught the Adult II Sunday School Class. Predeceased by his parents Ellis Harry and Mattie Elizabeth Burk Christmas, grandson Jonathan Harris, three brothers Don, Earl and Hubert Christmas, two sisters Arleen Gay and Mary Elaine Holley. Survived by his beloved wife of eighteen years Brenda Christmas, Graceville, four children Sandra (Fred) Brockway, Lincolnton, NC, Wanda (Roy) Harris, Pace, FL, Deborah (Eddie) Newsome, Marianna, FL, Steven (Suzette) Christmas, Cottondale, FL; four grandchildren Melissa (Tim) Smith, Jason (Jennifer) Harris, Rachel (Zeppi) Guillo, Jessica Christmas; six great grandchildren Anna and Camden Smith, Jack, Jake and Jude Harris, Rebekah Guillo; stepdaughter Brandy (Tim) Roberts, Catlettsburg, KY; three step grandchildren Madalyn, Emma Grace and C.J. Roberts; two brothers Alton AlŽ (Dale) Christmas, Cottondale, FL, Ben Christmas, Lake City, FL; one sister Helen Jean Cotton, Tallahassee, FL; a host of nieces, nephews and cousins. A Home-going service were held at 2 p.m., Thursday, February 22, 2018 at Bethel Baptist Church with Revs. Sam Totten, Mitchell Holsonback and Kent Lampp officiating. Burial followed in Piney Grove Baptist Church Cemetery with full U.S. Army Military Honors, James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Family received friends at the church Thursday, 1 p.m. until time of service. Flowers will be accepted or memorials in his name be made to Bethel Baptist Church 1349 hwy. 173 Graceville, FL 32440 or Emerald Coast Hospice 1130 South Blvd, Chipley, FL 32428. Expressions of sympathy can be made at www. jamesandlipford.com.ELLIS CHRISTMAS Mr. Joey Maxwell Faison, age 55, of Westville, Florida passed away February 15, 2018 at his home. He was born September 23, 1962 in DeFuniak Springs, Florida. Joey was preceded in death by his father, Leon Maxwell Faison; his mother, Carrie Verlon Peterson Faison Weeks; one brother, Sammy Weeks; paternal grandparents, Lonnie and Jewel Faison; maternal grandparents, Athan and Ethelle Peterson; stepgrandparents, Malgram and Cora Weeks; one aunt, Sara Peterson; three uncles, Gene Faison, Doc Faison and Charles Faison. Joey is survived by his father, Lonnie Weeks of Westville, FL; one sister, Cindy Clements and husband Terry of Dothan, AL; three nieces, Mindy Clements, Taryn Young and Casey Clements; three great-nephews, Braylen, Trent and Cruz; five aunts, Phyllis Brown, Janet Cook and husband, Edward, Sandra Peterson, Yvonne Faison and Linda Faison; one uncle, Drexel Peterson; several cousins. Funeral services were held at 11:00 AM Monday, February 19, 2018, at Cedar Springs Assembly of God Church with Rev. Adam Peterson and Rev. Roger Dale Hagan officiating. Interment followed in the Oak Grove Church Cemetery in Walton County with Peel Funeral Home directing. The family received friends one hour prior to the service.JOEY M. FAISON Adean Morrell Gomillion, age 80, of Ebro, Florida passed away Monday, February 19, 2018. She was born February 2, 1938, the daughter of Eula and Clarence Morrell. People in this area remember Adean as the owner and operator of The Ebro Caf as well as the cook for 20 years at Fannins Restaurant in DeFuniak Springs. Her family all agreed she could make the best biscuits from scratch and the best home-made chicken and dumplings they had ever tasted. With her cooking experience and ability, it was truly a delight to eat at her house! Whenever she could break away from work, she wanted to be fishing. To her it made no difference where it was as long as she could wet a hook. Adean enjoyed the time she shared eating, laughing and talking with her children and grandchildren. Her family described her as, a bundle of joy.Ž She is preceded in death by her husband Earl Gomillion; two brothers, Paul and Shelton; and three sisters, Dorothy, Edee and Eva. Adean is survived by her three daughters, Geraldean Fannin and husband Roger, Nadine Burke and husband Doyce and Darlene Fason; one son, Earl Gomillion and wife Michelle; thirteen grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Thursday, February 22, 2018 beginning at 12:00 in the chapel of DavisWatkins Funeral Home, 1474 Highway 83 North, DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32433 with a time of visitation one hour prior. Minister Joel Davis will be officiating. Committal services followed in the Ebro Community Cemetery. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www.daviswatkins.com Arrangements and services are under the direction of Davis-Watkins Funeral Home.ADEAN M. GOMILLION Douglas Holmes, 72, of Panama City, died Wednesday, February 21, 2018. Funeral services Saturday, February 24, 2018. Interment followed at Hickory Hill Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing.DOUGLAS HOLMESBuford L. Thompson, age 91 of Alford, FL passed from this life on Sunday, February 18, 2018. He was born on February 18, 1927 in Alford, FL to the late Benjamin B. Thompson and Lucinnie (Kent) Thompson.Buford is a lifelong resident of the Jackson County area and served in the United States Army. He is preceded in death by one son, Buford L. Thompson Jr. Survivors include, his loving wife, Bernice L. (Seay) Thompson of Alford, FL, one son, Benny Thompson and wife Melody of Southport, FL, two daughters, Lucy Hoelzer of Panama City, FL, Voncile Kent and husband Armond of Lynn Haven, FL, 13 grandchildren, 23 great grandchildren and 10 great great grandchildren. Funeral serviceswere held on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 at 1:00 P.M. at Brown funeral Home with Willie Melvin officiating. Visitationwas held one hour prior to funeral service. Interment followed at the Salem Freewill Baptist Cemetery with Brown Funeral Home directing. Family specifically request that in lieu of flowers donations be made any charity. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh.net.BUFORD L. THOMPSONFranklin Mack Wells, age 70, of Bonifay, Florida died February 20, 2018. Funeral services were held Thursday, February 22, 2018. Interment followed in the Little Rock Assembly of God Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing.FRANKLIN M. WELLSJohnnie Mae (Anderson) Wilson, age 72, of DeFuniak, FL, passed from this life on Saturday, February 17, 2018. She was born on August 13, 1945 in Bay County, FL, to the late John Daniel Anderson and Della Mae (Hardin) Anderson. Johnnie Mae is preceded in death by both parents, and husband Hutch C. Wilson. She is survived by: her sons, Christopher Reddic Robbins of Westville, FL and Kelvin Allen Robbins and wife Marsha of Panacea, FL; daughter, Barbara Michelle Nazaruk and husband Bill of Panama City, FL; sisters: Margrette Robbins of Crawfordville, FL, and Nell Tipton of Columbus, MS; eight grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren. Funeral service was held Friday, February 23, 2018 at 3:30 P.M. in the Brown Funeral Home Chapel, with the viewing 1 hour prior. In lieu of flowers the family has requested that donations be made to the Walton County Humane Society. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley, FL is in charge of arrangements.Family and friends may sign the online register at www. brownfh.netJOHNNIE M. WILSON OBITUARIESCONTINUED FROM B5

PAGE 19

** administrator and music director for the church. In addition, Williams speaks around the country.Deborah Ehler Polston will speak in the afternoon. Polston is married to Flor-ida Supreme Court Justice Ricky Polston and they are the parents of 10 children, six of whom are adopted. They live in Tallahassee. Polston is a child advocate and speaker. She is the author of several books and has served as a licensed foster and adop-tive parent since 2001. In 2008, Polston received the Governors Point of Light Award.Music will be provided by Undivided, a southern gospel, praise and worship trio from Panama City, who have been ministering since 1987. All three sing-ers are active in their home church, Northside Baptist, in Panama City.Early Bird Combo tick-ets are available at $40 each for both Friday night and Saturday through Wednesday, February 21, after regular rates apply. Individual ticket prices include $15 for the Friday evening event and $30 for the day-long Saturday event.Further information about registration can be obtained through the web-site at www.flpwr.org or by calling Marie Hinson, event chairperson, at 850-892-9578. Washington County News | Wednesday, February 28, 2018 B7 B7 2-3566 IN THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASENO. 17-CA-104 JANETKINNEY, Plaintiff, V. JUDYPETTIS CARTER, ALLEN B. PETTIS, MARGARET PETTIS LOCKE, QUINCYL. PETTIS, FLOREAPETTIS SEIFFERT, RAYMOND PETTIS, and ALLOF THE REMAINING HEIRS-AT-LAW AND BENEFICIARIES OF ANNIE PETTIS, DECEASED, known and unknown, and PEGGYPETTIS and all of the remaining heirs-at-law and beneficiaries of Roland R. Pettis, deceased, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: All of the heirs-at-law and beneficiaries of Roland R. Pettis, deceased, and Peggy Pettis, deceased, and Unknown Defendants who claim by, through, under, or against Roland R. Pettis and Peggy Pettis, and all other parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the action or property herein described YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Washington County, Florida: Commence at the Northeast comer of Northwest Quarter of Northeast Quarter of Section 13, Township 2 North, Range 14 West of Washington County, Florida; thence South 210.0 feet; thence West 210.0 feet; thence North 210.0 feet; thence East 210.0 feet to the Point of Beginning has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Michelle Blankenship Jordan, Attorney for Plaintiff, Fla. Bar No. 070836, 1512 Highway 90, Chipley FL32428, on or before 30 days from the first date of publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. DATED this February 7, 2018. Clerk of the Court Washington County, Florida By: Tamara Donjuan As Deputy Clerk [Please publish once a week for FOUR consecutive weeks] [Please furnish proof of publication to Michelle Blankenship Jordan, Esq.] 2-3568 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 17-000099 CA Harrison Finance Company, Plaintiff, vs. John Abe Carter, Brenda Carter, John Doe #1, a tenant in possession n/k/a Michayla Carter and John Doe #2, a tenant in possession n/k/a John Maxwell Carter, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to an Amended Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 15, 2018, in Case Number 17-000099 CA, of the Circuit Court in and for WASHINGTON County, Florida, in which Harrison Finance Company is the Plaintiff, and John Abe Carter, Brenda Carter, John Doe #1, a tenant in possession n/k/a Michayla Carter, John Doe #2, a tenant in possession n/k/a John Maxwell Carter, are the Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Washington County Courthouse, 1293 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida 32428, at 11:00 A.M. CST on April 4, 2018, the following-described property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure: THE LAND REFERRED TO HEREIN BELOW IS SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF WASHINGTON, STATE OF FLORIDA IN DEED BOOK 266 AT PAGE 741 AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE NW CORNER OF NE 1/4 OF NE 1/4, SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST FOR POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE EAST 518 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 420 FEET, THENCE WEST 518 FEET, THENCE NORTH 420 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA Notice is also given pursuant to § 45.031(2)(f), Florida Statutes, that any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED: February 19, 2018. WASHINGTON COUNTY CLERK OF COURT Clerk of the Court By: Tamara Donjuan As Deputy Clerk Feb 21, 28, 2018 2-3569 Fictitious Name Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Triple B Cabinetry located at 258 Stanton Drive, in the County of Washington, in the city of Chipley, Florida 32428 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Chipley, Florida, this 13 day of February, 2018. Christopher Brown Feb 17, 2018 2-3584 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: Dustin Durrance 321 Pleas Circle Chipley, FL 32428 You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are hereby notified to contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Washington County, Florida no later than thirty (30) days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. February 28, 2018 2-3582 LEGAL NOTICE Tri-County Community Council, Inc., Board of Directors will meet on Thursday, MAR 08, 2018 at 5:00 P.M., with Finance Committee meeting at 4:15 p.m. & Personnel Committee at 4:30 p.m. at McLains Restaurant located on 331 South in DeFuniak Springs. February 28, 2018 2-3573 IN THE COUNTY COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 17-051CC SUE BELANGER d/b/a SOUTHERN TRAILS R.V. PARK, Plaintiff, v. JIM RAY, CARLA HELTON, and ANY UNKNOWN CLAIMENT of a 1998 Hurr Recreational Vehicle, VIN # 3FCLF53GXVJA17038, if alive, and if dead, their unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, or other persons claiming by through, under or against the unknown persons Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: JIM RAY, CARLA HELTON, and ANY UNKNOWN CLAIMENT of a 1998 Hurr Recreational Vehicle, VIN # 3FCLF53GXVJA17038 AND ALL OTHER PERSONS OR ENTITIES HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY, WHICH A COMPLAINT WAS FILED ON NOVEMBER 28, 2017 IN WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action pursuant to the Florida Rules of Civil Procedure has been filed by the Plaintiff, SUE BELANGER d/b/a SOUTHER TRAILS R.V. PARK, for the above described property, in the County Court for Washington County, Florida, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on the Plaintiffs attorney, Kerry Adkison, Esq., Post Office Box 669, Chipley, Florida 32428, on or before March 5, 2018, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. DATED this 14 day of February, 2018. Lora C. Bell Clerk of the Court 1331 South Blvd. Chipley, Florida 32428 By: Tamara Donjuan As Deputy Clerk Feb 21, 28, 2018 2-3577 INVITATION TO BID WASHINGTON COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Washington County School Board Room Remodeling 750 SINCLAIR STREET CHIPLEY, FLORIDA 32428 CLEMONS, RUTHERFORD & ASSOCIATES, INC. 2027 THOMASVILLE ROAD TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32308 PHONE (850)385-6153 You are invited to bid on a General Contract, including the remodeling of the existing Kate Smith Elementary into the Board Room for the Washington County School Board in Chipley, Florida. The West Florida Ev angelism Conference in the R. G. Lee Chapel from 4 … 8 p.m. Monday, March 12. The theme for this years conference is Engaging in Gospel ConversationsŽ and includes a free steak dinner for those who make reservations. The highly anticipated conference sponsored by the Florida Baptist Convention and coordinated by Regional Catalysts Lewis Miller and Wayne Briant, features powerful preachers, Willy Rice, Senior Pastor of Calvary Baptist Church in Clearwater, and Craig Connor, the Senior Pastor of First Baptist Church in Panama City. In addition to the evangelistic preaching and praise and worship time, there will be sessions that focus on the theological, practical, and personal basis for evangelism in todays society. This is an incredible opportunity for ministry leaders, worship pastors, Sunday school teachers, faculty, students, and staff desiring to make evangelism a priority. The conference and meal is free and open to any Kingdom minded individuals desiring to Engage in Gospel Conversations.Ž Reservations are required for the steak dinner by contacting Laura Sowell at 800-328-2660 ext. 446, 850-263-9046, or emailing: ltsowell@ baptistcollege.edu. Revival at Bethany Baptist ChurchBONIFAY Bethany Baptist Church will celebrate revival services March 18-21 with Rev. Lee Chorn and special music each service. Music at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. onSunday, March 18 will be by Brandi Stewart, and music on March 19 will be Monday by Bethel Trio. Music on Tuesday, March 20, will be presented by Lace Justice, and music for Wednesday, March 21 will be presented byKim Tate. Everyone is invited to come out and see what a real Revival looks like. For more information, email mylinda1@yahoo.com. Bethany Baptist Church is located at 1404 N Hig hway 79 in Bonifay. Mt. Ararat FMBC to mark 126th anniversaryCHIPLEY Mt. Ararat First Missionary Baptist Church will celebrate their 126th anniversary Sunday, March 18. The church is located at 1233 Old Bonifay Road in Chipley. Christ In The Passover at Holmes Creek Baptist Church CHIPLEY Holmes Creek Baptist Church will present Christ in the PassoverŽ at 6 p.m., Monday, March 26. This event will re-create the traditional Passover service and explain how it foreshadowed Jesus death and resurrection. Jesus Last Supper was actually a Jewish Passover of Jews for Jesus. The church will set a table with items traditionally used at the Passover meal and detail their spiritual signi“ cance. Speakers will also explain the connection between the events of the “ rst Passover in Egypt and the redemption that Jesus accomplished, as well as the deep bond between the ancient Passover feast and the Christian communion celebration today. Jews for Jesus has presented Christ in the PassoverŽ at over 38,000 churches. It has been enthusiastically received by Christians who appreciate learning more about the Jewish backgrounds of their faith. Moishe Rosen, who founded Jews for Jesus in 1973, has also co-written the book, Christ in the Passover, with his wife, Ceil. This seminal work includes a look at Passover in ancient times and how it is practiced today. It will be available after the presentation. Also available will be a DVD of the Christ in the Passover presentation with David Brickner, the executive director of Jews for Jesus, of“ ciating. Brickner, a “ fth-generation Jewish believer in Jesus, succeeded Rosen as Executive Director in 1996. Brickner has kept Jews for Jesus on the cutting edge as the ministry has expanded and established branches in eleven countries, including the United States, Brazil, Israel, Russia, France, and South Africa. We exist to make the Messiahship of Jesus an unavoidable issue to our Jewish people worldwide,Ž Brickner states. There are still a few that havent heard of us!Ž The church will be happy to answer questions after the presentation. Call (850) 638-1406 or visit http:// www.holmescreekbc.com for more information. There is no admission charge. FAITHFrom Page B4Today, McCutcheon is a dynamic speaker and has a passion for the hurting, for those who also carry around a secret that no one will believe. McCuthcheon tells how she became a survivor of sexual abuse, giving a detailed account about the four years she endured immense pain but more importantly, a detailed account of how God restored her back to wholeness.McCutcheon says she is now using her past to help others and believes that pain has one right, and that right is to hurt you, but pain does not have the right to stop you." This mantra became her inspi-ration for writing this book, which gives hope to those dealing with pain and encouragement to those who know pain can be a promotion, because God takes the tears we are shedding, and He waters us with them and helps us to grow.McCutcheon is avail-able to bring her dynamic speaking style and message of encouragement to area womens ministries and other events to share her love of God, and how He can transform a life from nothing to something.Contact McCutcheon at (850) 624-8514, or by emailing: purposeinpain-cutr@gmail.com. PURPOSEFrom Page B4Rib SaleWASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY The Community South Credit Union Relay for Life team will host a rib sale Thursday, March 15. Ribs are $20 and can be picked up between noon and 4 p.m. Delivery is available or several orders. Money is due at pick up or delivery. For more information, or to order, email vickie.williams@ communitysouth.net Bass TournamentVERNON The Vernon High School Fighting Jackets Dream Team will host a "Go Fish For A Cure" Bass Tournament Saturday, March 17, at Gap Pond in Vernon. Fishing will begin at daylight with weigh-in at noon. Entry fee is $50 per boat. There will be a “ ve “ sh limit for weigh-in, “ sh must be at least 12 inches in length. Dead “ sh will have a four ounces deduction from the weight. Cash prizes will be given to the top two places. All proceeds will bene“ t Relay for Life of WashingtonHolmes County. For more information, call Tracie Herbert or Lora Goodman at 850-535-2046. 2018 Relay for LifeCHIPLEY The 2018 HolmesWashington Relay for Life event will be held from 6 p.m. until midnight at Pals Park in Chipley on April 27, 2018. The theme of the 2018 event is "Games Over, Cancer!" For more information email bushfamily80@ gmail.com or danielle. cappel@cancer.org RELAYFrom Page B4 RETREATFrom Page B4

PAGE 20

B B 8 8 Wednesday, February 28, 2018 | Washington County News NF-5031562 Hazardous Aerial Tree Removal  Stump Grinding Trimming & Pruning  Emergency Tree Service  Lot Clean UpDow Morris,Owner/Operator 850-527-6291  850-849-3825 Readers’ Choice2017WASHINGTON HOLMES JACKSON (850) 638-3611 HastyHeating & Cooling NF-5028471 NF-5036304 ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE OR BUSINESS FOR AS LITTLE AS $10 A WEEK!Reach thousands of potential customers with your Business Guide ad in the:WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS HOLMES COUNTY-TIMES ADVERTISER WEEKLY ADVERTISER CALL TODAY! 850-638-0212 NF-5036305 NF-5032746JOEYS SPORTING GOODSBAIT & TACKLE, GUNS & AMMO, ACCESSORIES & SPORT CLOTHINGJOEY SELLERSJOEYSSPORTINGGOODS 2064 Holly Street Westville, Fla. 32464850-548-5055 NF-5031560 C & CBookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available is accepting applications for:Registered NursesFull-time 7-3, Monday-Friday Full-time 3-11 Shift, Monday-Friday Baylor Applications may be obtained from Marianna Health & Rehabilitation Center or online at www .cityofmarianna.com/mhrc 4295 5 th Avenue Marianna, FL 32446 (850) 482-8091 We offer the Florida State Retirement System and 100% Employer Paid Health and Dental Insurance Street Crewman IIIThe City of Chipley is accepting applications for a Street Crewman III Minimum Qualifications • Knowledge of general maintenance tasks and procedures; knowledge of grounds maintenance, including preventative maintenance and operating various equipment.  Must be able to operate a cement mixer, set forms, pour, shovel and level concrete.  This position acts as assistant to the Street Department Foreman and must in the Foreman’s absence, supervise crew and continue all duties with minimum interruption to work. Education and Experience  High School diploma or possession of an acceptable equivalency diploma.  Two (2) years of experience operating heavy equipment.  Must possess a valid State of Florida Driver’s License Class “A” CDL. Must be eligible for a Department of Corrections Inmate Supervisor Card. A job description is available upon request. The City participates in the Florida Retirement System (FRS). Mail or hand deliver application and/or resume to Assistant City Administrator/City Clerk City of Chipley,1442 Jackson Avenue Post Office Box 1007, Chipley, Florida 32428. Deadline: Open until filled. EOE/Drug F ree W orkplace. construction/demolition consists of approximately 5,055 square feet. All Bids must be on a lump sum basis. All Bidders are to submit with Bid Package, a properly executed “Contractor’s Qualification Statement” AIA-305 which is to include a current financial statement, an experience, competence and performance report, and references from at least three prior projects similar in size and scope, along with the name of a contact person on each of those projects. A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held for General Contractors on March 8, at 10:00 AM CST at Washington County School Board Office located at 652 3rd Street, Chipley, FL 32428. All questions at the Pre-Bid Conference by General Contractors and Subcontractors shall be presented on the “Request for Clarification” form. See Section 000100 -Instructions to Bidders. Washington County School Board will receive sealed bids until 2:00 PM CST on March 15, at the Washington County School Board, Conference Room, 652 Third St., Chipley, FL 32428. Bids received after that time will not be accepted. Bids will be opened publicly and read aloud at 2:01 PM of the same date. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be examined at the Architect’s office: Clemons, Rutherford & Associates 2027 Thomasville Road Tallahassee, Florida 32308 (850) 385-6153 General Contractors and Mechanical, Plumbing and Electrical Subcontractors may obtain copies of the Bidding Documents at the Architect’s office in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders upon depositing the sum of $50 for an electronic set or $200 for each hard copy set of Documents. Bidders may receive bid documents in one of the following manners: (1) bring deposit check and pick up bid documents at the Architect’s office; (2) mail in deposit check and bid documents will be shipped by UPS ground $20.00 C.O.D. to cover shipping and handling; or (3) mail in deposit check and include a separate check of $10.00 for handling and your FedEx or UPS account number for shipping. Other interested parties may purchase complete sets of Bidding Documents for the sum of $50.00 for an electronic set or $200 for each hard copy set, which is non-refundable. Please note: All plan purchases are non-refundable. Bid Security in the amount of five percent (5%) of the Bid must accompany each Bid in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. A letter from a bonding company must accompany each bid, stating that the bidder is capable of obtaining all bonds required by the Construction Documents. The Washington County School Board reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any and all Bids. Feb 24, March 3, 2018 3-3580 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 17000067CAAXMX Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. Sheri L. Skinners, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 20, 2018, entered in Case No. 17000067CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Washington County, Florida, wherein Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. is the Plaintiff and Sheri Leigh Odle f/k/a Sheri L. Skinner a/k/a Sheri Leigh Skinner; Unknown Spouse of Sheri Leigh Odle f/k/a Sheri L. Skinner a/k/a Sheri Leigh Skinner; Brian Skinner a/k/a Brian S. Skinner a/k/a Brian Scott Skinner; Unknown Spouse of Brian Skinner a/k/a Brian S. Skinner a/k/a Brian Scott Skinner; Beneficial Florida Inc.; Wilmington Trust, NA, Trustee of the SpringCastle Credit Funding Trust are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, The Lobby of the Courthouse, 1293 Jackson Avenue, Building 100, Chipley, FL 32428, beginning at 11:00 AM on the 4/4/18 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 37, OF BELLE AIRE ESTATES, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 173, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A CERTAIN 1991 FLEETCRAFT MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO: VIN#GAFLL75A10999WE. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 22 day of February, 2018. Lora Bell As Clerk of the Court By: Tamara Donjuan As Deputy Clerk PUBLISH IN: THE WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Furnish Copies To: Brock & Scott PLLC 1501 NW 49th St, Suite 200 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Attorney for Plaintiff Feb 28, March 7, 2018 3-3581 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 67-2017-CA-000102 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. SCOTT T. WILLIAMS A/K/A SCOTT THEODORE WILLIAMS; STATE OF FLORIDA; CLERK OF COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated February 20, 2018 and entered in Case No. 67-2017-CA-000102 of the Circuit Court in and for Washington County, Florida, wherein FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and SCOTT T. WILLIAMS A/K/A SCOTT THEODORE WILLIAMS; STATE OF FLORIDA; CLERK OF COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the steps of the Washington County Courthouse Building, 1293 West Jackson Street, Chipley, FL 32428, 11:00 a.m., on April 4, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 2, BLOCK 185, OF SUNNY HILLS UNIT EIGHTEEN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 64, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. DATED at Chipley, Florida, on February 22, 2018. LORA C. BELL As Clerk, Circuit Court By: Tamare Donjuan As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 19519 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33318 Telephone: (954) 564-0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.com Publish in: Washington County News Please fax a first insertion to SHD Legal Group P.A. (954) 564-9252 and include price. Pursuant to Florida Statute 45.031(2), this notice shall be published twice, once a week for two consecutive weeks, with the last publication being at least 5 days prior to the sale. 1440-166033 / DJ1 Feb 28, March 7, 2018 3-3565 IN THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 18 CA16 EQUITYTRUSTCOMPANY, also known as ETC, FBO JANETH. KINNEYIRA Plaintiff, V. GEM BAY, LLC, a dissolved Florida limited liability company, also known as JEMBAY, LLC, and KHALILM. ISMAILand HAYATA. Y. ALFAHED, and THE HON. KEN NAKER, AS TAX COLLECTOR OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:GEM BAY, LLC, a dissolved Florida limited liability company, also known as JEMBAY, LLC, and KHALILM. ISMAILand HAYATA. Y. ALFAHED, and THE HON. KEN NAKER, AS TAX COLLECTOR OF WASHINGTON COUNTYand all other parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the action or property herein described YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property m Washington County, Florida: Lands in 24 2 134.98 OR 656 P599, BEG 656.68 FTN & 330.02 FTE OF SWC OF NE4 OF SE4, RUN E 330.02 FT, N 657 FT, W 330.62 FT, S 656.84 FTTO POB AS DESC IN OR, PARCELNO. 00000000-00-0562-0011; ALSO DESCRIBED AS: Commence at a half-inch rebar (#1499) marking the Southwest comer of NE 1/4 of the SE 1/4 of Section 24, Township 2 North, Range 13 West, Washington County, Florida, thence N 0108’19” W 656.58 feet along the West line of the NE 1/4 of the SE 1/4 of said Section 24 to a half-inch rebar (#1499), thence N 89 11’13” E 330.02 feet to the Point of Beginning, thence continue N 89’11’13” E 330.02 feet, thence N 0101’58” W 657.00 feet to the intersection with the North line of the SE 1/4, thence S 89’09’34” W 330.62 feet along said North line, thence S 01 05’ 09” E 656.84 feet to the Point of Beginning; and containing 4.98 acres, more or less; and subject to a 15 foot road easement along the North property line; TOGETHER WITH ACCESS IN SECTION 24 DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: All that part of Section 24, Township 2 North, Range 13 West, Washington County, Florida lying within 15 feet right and left of the following described centerline: Commence at the Southeast Comer of Section 24, Township 2 North, Range 13 West, Washington County, Florida, thence S 8g 16’15” W along South line of said Section 24, 671.40 feet, thence N or 01’ 58” W 298.50 feet to the Point of Beginning, thence continue N 01 01’58” W 358.50 feet, thence S 8g 14’34” W 642.61 feet, thence N Or 08’19” W 1970.04 feet to the intersection with the North line of the SE 1/4 of said Section 24, thence N 8g 09’34” E along said North Line 1307.48 feet to a point 15 feet West of the Northeast comer of said SE 1/4, thence Northerly, parallel with East line of said Section 24 to the intersection with Southerly right-of-way line of Alcan Boulevard and the end of centerline; BEING THE SAME LANDS AS DESCRIBED IN O.R. BOOK 656, PAGE 599, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Michelle Blankenship Jordan, Attorney for Plaintiff, Fla. Bar No. 070836, 1512 Highway 90, Chipley FL32428, on or before 30 days from the first date of publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. DATED this February 8, 2018. Clerk of the Court Washington County, Florida By: Tamera DonJuan As Deputy Clerk February 14, 21 and 28 and March 7, 2018 Huge Indoor & Outdoor yard sale. March 3rd, 1747 Bradley Rd, Westville, 7am-Until. LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE Friday and Saturday, March 2 and 3, 2018. 8:00AM to 5:00PM. Located on Maple Avenue, Geneva, Alabama, near courthouse. AVIATION Work with JetBlue, United, Delta and others Start here with hands-on training for FAA Certification Financial Aid if qualified Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-2649 FLORIDA CAR TAGS before 1956 Wanted. $1000+ for FL porcelain tags 1911-17. Jeff 727-424-1576 email gobucs13@aol.com Real EstateVARIETY OF AFFORDABLE ,Eastern Montana Properties for Sale! Many opportunities in a great recreational area! Please go to our website!www montanalandauctions .com or call (406) 366-5588 SAWMILLS from only $4397.00-MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill! Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www .Norwood Sawmills.com or call (800)578-1363 Ext. 300N Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1BR and 2BR apartment for rent downtown Bonifay. $450 and $500. Deposit required. 305-965-1635. For Rent 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments in Vernon. Clean, stove, refrigerator, central heat/air, convenient to Panama City Beach, section 8, Rental assistance. 850-638-4640 For Rent One Bedroom apartments for rent in Chipley. Convenient location. Stove and refrigerator furnished. No Pets. Smoke free environment. Call 850-638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For Rent 4BR/1.5BA, no pets, HUD approved. CH&A. Chipley. $800/MO, $800/DEP 850-638-7601. Rooms For Rent By Week.Comfortable rooms with microwave & refrigerator. All utilities paid. Cable and internet. Pet friendly at extra charge. Economy Lodge, Bonifay. 850-547-4167. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/ sewage/ lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 3BR/2BA Mobile Home on Rock Hill Church Rd, 3 miles from town. Quiet neighborhood. Water/Garbage furnished. NO PETS. Call 850-638-8570. Mobile Home for rent. 2BR/2BA, water/sewer and lawn service furnished. 3 miles east of Vernon on Pioneer Rd. No pets, don’t ask. 850-849-6842, 850-326-0528, or 850-638-9933. For Sale Two acre plot and one acre plot in Jacob City, FL. Call 850-849-9338. Highway 77 2 miles south of Chipley 4-8 acre tract Bedie Road. Call Milton Peel at 850-638-1858 or 326-9109 Jean’s Cleaning Service Quality cleaning ant reasonable rates. Have good references and dependable. Call Jean 850-849-3535 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Turn to classified’s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you!

PAGE 21

The Weekly Advertiser | Wednesday, February 28, 2018 1 NF-5031562 Hazardous Aerial Tree Removal  Stump Grinding Trimming & Pruning  Emergency Tree Service  Lot Clean UpDow Morris,Owner/Operator 850-527-6291  850-849-3825 Readers’ Choice2017WASHINGTON HOLMES JACKSON (850) 638-3611 HastyHeating & Cooling NF-5028471 NF-5036304 ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE OR BUSINESS FOR AS LITTLE AS $10 A WEEK!Reach thousands of potential customers with your Business Guide ad in the:WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS HOLMES COUNTY-TIMES ADVERTISER WEEKLY ADVERTISER CALL TODAY! 850-638-0212 NF-5036305 NF-5032746JOEYS SPORTING GOODSBAIT & TACKLE, GUNS & AMMO, ACCESSORIES & SPORT CLOTHINGJOEY SELLERSJOEYSSPORTINGGOODS 2064 Holly Street Westville, Fla. 32464850-548-5055 NF-5031560 C & CBookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available Volume 89 Number 9 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2018NF-5036447 Donate A Boat or Car Today!2-Night Free Vacation!Ž 8 0 0 7 0 0 B O A T 800-700-BOATwww.boatangel.comsponsored by boat angel outreach centersSTOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN(2628) is accepting applications for:Registered NursesFull-time 7-3, Monday-Friday Full-time 3-11 Shift, Monday-Friday Baylor Applications may be obtained from Marianna Health & Rehabilitation Center or online at www .cityofmarianna.com/mhrc 4295 5 th Avenue Marianna, FL 32446 (850) 482-8091 We offer the Florida State Retirement System and 100% Employer Paid Health and Dental Insurance Street Crewman IIIThe City of Chipley is accepting applications for a Street Crewman III Minimum Qualifications • Knowledge of general maintenance tasks and procedures; knowledge of grounds maintenance, including preventative maintenance and operating various equipment.  Must be able to operate a cement mixer, set forms, pour, shovel and level concrete.  This position acts as assistant to the Street Department Foreman and must in the Foreman’s absence, supervise crew and continue all duties with minimum interruption to work. Education and Experience  High School diploma or possession of an acceptable equivalency diploma.  Two (2) years of experience operating heavy equipment.  Must possess a valid State of Florida Driver’s License Class “A” CDL. Must be eligible for a Department of Corrections Inmate Supervisor Card. A job description is available upon request. The City participates in the Florida Retirement System (FRS). Mail or hand deliver application and/or resume to Assistant City Administrator/City Clerk City of Chipley,1442 Jackson Avenue Post Office Box 1007, Chipley, Florida 32428. Deadline: Open until filled. EOE/Drug F ree W orkplace. Huge Indoor & Outdoor yard sale. March 3rd, 1747 Bradley Rd, Westville, 7am-Until. LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE Friday and Saturday, March 2 and 3, 2018. 8:00AM to 5:00PM. Located on Maple Avenue, Geneva, Alabama, near courthouse. AVIATION Work with JetBlue, United, Delta and others Start here with hands-on training for FAA Certification Financial Aid if qualified Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-2649 FLORIDA CAR TAGS before 1956 Wanted. $1000+ for FL porcelain tags 1911-17. Jeff 727-424-1576 email gobucs13@aol.com Real EstateVARIETY OF AFFORDABLE ,Eastern Montana Properties for Sale! Many opportunities in a great recreational area! Please go to our website!www montanalandauctions .com or call (406) 366-5588 SAWMILLS from only $4397.00-MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill! Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www .Norwood Sawmills.com or call (800)578-1363 Ext. 300N Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1BR and 2BR apartment for rent downtown Bonifay. $450 and $500. Deposit required. 305-965-1635. For Rent 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments in Vernon. Clean, stove, refrigerator, central heat/air, convenient to Panama City Beach, section 8, Rental assistance. 850-638-4640 For Rent One Bedroom apartments for rent in Chipley. Convenient location. Stove and refrigerator furnished. No Pets. Smoke free environment. Call 850-638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For Rent 4BR/1.5BA, no pets, HUD approved. CH&A. Chipley. $800/MO, $800/DEP 850-638-7601. Rooms For Rent By Week.Comfortable rooms with microwave & refrigerator. All utilities paid. Cable and internet. Pet friendly at extra charge. Economy Lodge, Bonifay. 850-547-4167. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/ sewage/ lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 3BR/2BA Mobile Home on Rock Hill Church Rd, 3 miles from town. Quiet neighborhood. Water/Garbage furnished. NO PETS. Call 850-638-8570. Mobile Home for rent. 2BR/2BA, water/sewer and lawn service furnished. 3 miles east of Vernon on Pioneer Rd. No pets, don’t ask. 850-849-6842, 850-326-0528, or 850-638-9933. For Sale Two acre plot and one acre plot in Jacob City, FL. Call 850-849-9338. Highway 77 2 miles south of Chipley 4-8 acre tract Bedie Road. Call Milton Peel at 850-638-1858 or 326-9109 Jean’s Cleaning Service Quality cleaning ant reasonable rates. Have good references and dependable. Call Jean 850-849-3535 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.

PAGE 22

2 Wednesday, February 28, 2018 | The Weekly Advertiser PRICES GOOD FEBRUARY 28 THRU MARCH 6, 2018 $ 1 58 88 ¢ $ 2 48 $ 1 77 $ 2 88 $ 1 88 78 ¢ $ 4 44 $ 2 88 $ 2 98 $ 8 50 $ 1 68 $ 1 58 $ 2 77 $ 2 28 Fresh Lean Premium73/27 GROUND BEEFPer Lb Super Fresh PremiumFRYER SPLIT BREASTPer Lb Family Pk Kelley's Fresh COUNTRY STYLE PAN SAUSAGE Per Lb Thank You 4X6 HAM & TURKEY 10 Oz Pkg El Monterey BURRITOS 32 Oz Pkg Aberdeen SLICED BACON 12 Oz Pkg Armour CLASSIC HOT DOGS 12 Oz Pkg IQF Premium POPCORN CHICKEN 5 Lb Bag Wisconsin OLD FASHION RED RIND CHEESE Per Lb Sugardale SMOKED SAUSAGE 2.5 Lb Pkg Nature's Best IQF TILAPIA FILLETS 4 Lb BagFresh Lean PremiumPORK SPARERIBSPer Lb 2 Pk Fresh Lean PremiumSIRLOIN PORK CUBED CUTLETPer Lb USDA Select Beef BonelessSIRLOIN TIP ROASTPer Lb Sanderson FarmsFRYER DRUMETTESPer Lb1264 CHURCH AVENUE  CHIPLEY, FL  324286AM-7PM  7 Days a Week  850-638-1751WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO CORRECT TYPOGRAPHICAL AND PICTORAL ERRORS. QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS. WE DO NOT AC CEPT INTERNET PRINTED COUPONS.EBT Cardholders and WIC Vouchers Welcomed. Most Major Credit Cards Accepted 39 ¢ $ 2 88 65 ¢ $ 1 38 $ 1 77 2 /$ 3 28 ¢ $ 3 48 Premium GOLDEN RIPE BANANAS Per Lb Farm Grown SWEET CLEMENTINE HALOS 2 Lb Bag Florida RED RIPE TOMATOES Per Lb Southmill Farm WHITE WHOLE OR SLICED MUSHROOMS 8 Oz Pkg Kale, Collards or Turnips GEORGIA BAKER FARMS GREENS 1 Lb Pkg American or Italian FRESH EXPRESS SALAD MIX 9-11 Oz Pkg Farm Grown SWEET POTATOES Per Lb Washington RED DELICIOUS APPLES 5 Lb Bag Banquet Pot Pies 7 Oz Box Ocean Spray Juice 64 Oz Btl Dale's Steak Seasoning 16 Oz Btl Honey, Original or Hickory Smoke Kraft BBQ Sauce 18 Oz Btl Busch, Busch Light or Natural Light 18 Pk Cans Crystal Hot Sauce 6 Oz Btl Armour Vienna Sausage 4.6 Oz Can Frosted Flakes, Froot Loops, Corn Pops or Apple Jacks Kellogg's Cereal 8.7-9 Oz Box Eggo Wafes 10.7-16.4 Oz Box Kellogg's Pop Tarts 8 Ct Box Simply Orange Juice 59 Oz Btl Coca-Cola Products 12 Pk Cans, 8 Pk 12 Oz Btls or 6 Pk 8 Oz Glass Btls Frito-Lay Doritos 9.25-9.75 Oz Bag Pillsbury Grands! Biscuits 16.3 Oz Can Hunt's Diced Tomatoes 14.5 Oz Can Piggly Wiggly Milk Gallon Varieties $ 1 77 $ 1 88 $ 2 28 3 / $ 9 2 / $ 5 3 / $ 4 84 ¢ 2 / $ 5 65 ¢ $ 1 88 $ 1 97 78 ¢ $ 9 25 55 ¢ 42 ¢ 2 / $ 3 SWEET POTATOES 40 LB BOX $ 11 50 COST PLUS 10% OF CHIPLEY, FLNF-5036859