Citation

Material Information

Title:
Washington County news
Uniform Title:
Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Place of Publication:
Chipley FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Nicole Barfield - Publisher
Creation Date:
January 5, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiweekly[<1994>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1931>]
semiweekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
Coordinates:
30.780922 x -85.539289

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began May 23, 1924.
General Note:
L.E. Sellers, editor.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Washington County News. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000384704 ( ALEPH )
07260886 ( OCLC )
ACC5987 ( NOTIS )
sn 81000810 ( LCCN )
0279-795X ( ISSN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Chipley banner

Full Text

PAGE 1

** FAITH EVENTS | A10 Volume 94 Number 73 Phone: 850-638-0212 Fax: 850-638-4601 State .........................A3 Opinion ....................A4 Nation .......................A5 Kids Activities ...........A6 Community ................A8 Classifieds ...............A12 @WCN_HCT facebook.com/WashingtonCountyNews.HolmesCountyTimes50 ¢ chipleypaper.com HEALTHOrgan DonationFAITHWomens Retreat Set Saturday, February 24, 2018 Washington County News Staff ReportCHIPLEY „ At a meeting Thursday, City of Chipley Plan-ning and Zoning Commission sworn-in two new commis-sioners and appointed chairman and vice-chairman.David Ridley and Holland Kent were sworn-in as new members to the commission. The board then appointed Thomas Lancaster as chairman and former chairman Wanda Owens as vice-chairman.Members are appointed for three-year terms and serve dual terms on the board.Also at the meeting, the com-mission approved a request for development at 1142 Jackson Ave. by R.D. Easterling and Joey Nichols. The property, a used car lot, is listed commer-cial. The development involves expanding the property and enclosing it with a chain link fence.The board is responsible for management of the City Comprehensive Plan and Land Use Regulations and meets as needed.Chipley planning board swears in 2By Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comVERNON „ City of Vernon is taking proactive measures to mitigate its sewer plant issues following a spill back in August.Florida Department of Environmental Protections issued three penalties to Vernon Wastewater Treatment Plant due to a wastewater spill on Aug. 6 last year, failure to maintain plant facility and equipment, and failure to notify DEP of the incident and provide information concerning the discovery of a sinkhole.The City was fined $5,750, a DEP penalty worksheet shows."The City is working closely with DEP and have taken City corrects sewer plant violationsBy Diane M. RobinsonThe News | @HCTA_Diane Drobinson@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY „ Residents of Orange Hill Highway can look forward to paving the final portion of the road in the next six months. Washington County Board of County Commissioners approved for work to begin on the 4,400 feet unpaved stretch of Orange Hill High-way when they met in regular session February 22.County Engineer Cliff Knauer gave a cost estimate of $145,000 for the paving potion of the project. The county will do the earthwork, shoulders, pipes and culverts with the paving being put out for bid when the time comes. The project is expected to be completed in six months.Commissioners also approved the purchase of new computers for the Washing-ton County Library Chipley Branch. The $18,645.17 cost will be paid with funds available Paving set for Orange Hill RoadStaff ReportCHIPLEY „ U.S. Marshals Felony Fugitive Task Force arrested a Chipley man with the assistance of Washington County Drug Task Force, which consist of members of the Chipley Police Department and the Washington County Sheriffs Office.Together, the team served an arrest warrant at the Chipley residence of Clinton Douglas Corbin, 25, during the early morning hours of Tuesday, Feb. 20.According to reports, Corbin had been evading law enforce-ment while on the run for an outstanding warrant for the sell of narcotics. Upon Corbins arrest, he was found to be in possession of cash and various narcotics. Corbin was arrested on an outstanding warrant …for the sell of cocaine, as well as possession of methamphetamine with intent to sell, possession of marijuana with intent to sell, and possession of a controlled substance without a prescription.U.S. Marshals, drug task force arrest fugitive Corbin By Carol Kent Wyatt The News 703-9487 | @WCN_CarolWyatt Cwyatt@chipleypaper.comHOLMES COUNTY „ Officials have confirmed the identify of the pilot killed in Wednesday afternoons plane crash as Tri-County Airport Manager Clarence E. EddieŽ Bowers. Emergency responders were dispatched Pilot identi ed in plane crashCommunity remembers Ed BowersWreckage from a plane crash near the Tri-County Airport in Holmes County remains smoldering Wednesday afternoon. Law enforcement of“ cials con“ rmed the pilot died in the crash. [CAROL KENT-WYATT/THE NEWS] Clarence E. EddieŽ Bowers See CITY, A2 See ROAD, A2By Jacqueline BostickThe News 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comVERNON „ City of Vernon has initiated a complaint with the state to investigate former City Clerks payroll discrepancies and unauthorized usage of City credit cards.City of Vernon has initiated a complaint with Florida Department of Law Enforcement, but have not received a response, according to officials.Pay stubs of former Vernon City Clerk Michelle Cook from Oct. 1, 2014 to Dec. 18, 2017 show a missing hourly rate at the start of her time with City of Vernon to $12.50 an hour starting Feb. 6, 2015, ending at $16.87. However, throughout her tenure, her hourly rate fluctuated „ as high as $17.50 during some pay cycles.City officials say the City-approved hourly rate for the City Clerk position at the time of Cooks resigna-tion was $15.87.It was not immediately clear how Cook misused the Citys credit cards; however, sources say she allegedly made unau-thorized personal purchases.Calls to reach Cooks attorney Lisa Anderson of Lisa Anderson Law out of Panama City were not returned at press time.City les complaint against former City ClerkCook See COOK, A2 See PILOT, A2

PAGE 2

** A2 Saturday, February 24, 2018 | Washington County Newsthrough the State Aid to Libraries grant.A budget amendment for the Washington County Sheriffs Office was approved for $100,000 this fiscal year for federal funds allotted as compensation for housing federal inmates at the Washington County Jail. The extra funds will be used for maintaining the vehicle fleet for the WCSO.Commissioners granted approval to E911 Director Clint Erickson to apply for grants. Erickson is requesting permission to apply for rural and state grants to purchase a new recorder and furniture for the county dispatch office.Washington County Public Works was approved to purchase a 210G John Deere excava-tor from Beard Equipment for $167,007. The cost will be covered by funds raised with the sale of surplus equipment amounting in $215,127. The remaining funds will be put into public works equipment budget.The board approved funding to be retuned to the Ebro Fire Department when County Fire Coordinator Rick Kerr advised the board of the roster improvements made by the department. The department now has five active firefighters on the roster with two more expected by August.Washington County Board of County Commissioners will meet again in workshop at 9 a.m. on March 14. ROADFrom Page A1action to correct the issue at the waste water treatment plant,Ž said Vernon Mayor Tina Sloan. We are also implementing a preventative mainte-nance plan to help ensure things continue to run smoothly.ŽPublic Works has since corrected the problem and is taking preventative steps for continued opera-tion of the plant, reports show.In other business, at a city council meeting Tuesday, the council approved the purchase of a $9,400 fireworks package, accepted a tower base agreement with Pro-fessional Satellite, and changed City Halls hours of operation. City Hall will be open nine hours a day, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., as office staff will rotate lunches.Vernon City Council meets at 7 p.m. on the first and third Monday of the month at City Hall, 2808 Yellow Jacket Drive. CITYFrom Page A1 The board approved funding to be retuned to the Ebro Fire Department when County Fire Coordinator Rick Kerr advised the board of the roster improvements made by the department. The department now has ve active re ghters on the roster with two more expected by August. CHIPLEYPAPER.COMThe move to investi-gate came after Cook filed for unemployment ben-efits after resigning from the City on Dec. 6, with city council approval on Dec. 7 at a special meeting.According to Mayor Tina Sloan, the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO) accepted Cooks request for benefits because she resigned with knowl-edge of fact that she was getting another job.Ž The City voted to appeal DEOs decision and to pursue an investigation, claiming she was asked to resign because of sus-picion of embezzlement.This was not an easy decision for the council to make,Ž Sloan said following a council meeting earlier this month at which the council moved to request the state inves-tigation. The council has really struggled in how to proceed in the best light for our City.Ž COOKFrom Page A1 Fire crews attempt to put out the blaze after a small plane crash Wednesday afternoon north of Bonifay. [CAROL KENT-WYATT/THE NEWS] to the scene, located in a field off Airport Road, just before 5 p.m. Wednesday, where the plane remained on fire and crews continued to battle the blaze.Bowers friend Charles Smith said the experi-enced pilot and mechanic was test flying his airplane to help determine what mechanical problem it may have. I will miss him greatly and all the support he has given me, and I am sure his family will miss him much more,Ž said Smith in a social media post Wednes-day. He had many of years experience as a pilot, airplane owner, and aircraft maintenance expert. We will all miss him greatly. He was a good person.ŽBowers, who joined the U.S. Air Force immediately after graduating Ponce de Leon High School in 1963, served as the Airport Authority as Manager of Tri County Airport, and as an A & P mechanic, aircraft inspector, and certified flight instructor.He was passionate about flying and enjoyed seeing that passion passed on to the next generation.18-year-old Clay White of Chipley was among those learning the craft through Bowers unique and enthusiastic teaching style.Mr. Ed was a really nice guy and friend,Ž said White. He was always there to help people in need. He taught me so much valuable information, and I enjoyed my time flying with him so much. He will never be forgotten.ŽBowers told Washing-ton County News in a 2015 interview that the love of flying is rewarding in itself, and that teaching White was a labor of love.Were flying pals,Ž said Bowers of the Chipley teen. Even just sitting in the co-pilots seat, hes gaining experience. Flying has been my passion since childhood, and who better to mentor that this determined young man?ŽNational Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the crash and report that officials are considering factors such as weather conditions, Bowers as a pilot, and components observed from the wreckage itself. Memorial arrangements for Bowers had not yet been announced at press time. PILOTFrom Page A1

PAGE 3

** Washington County News | Saturday, February 24, 2018 A3 STATEBy Jim Turner News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ A week after a mass shoot-ing at a Broward County high school, survivors and gun-control advocates demanded Wednesday that state lawmakers enact tighter gun and school-safety laws as a rally drew one of the larg-est crowds at the Capitol since the 2000 election recount.Several thousand people gathered outside the Old Capitol building and overflowed onto nearby Monroe Street, as students, activists and Democratic lawmakers expressed anger amid chants of We want change,Ž Not one more,Ž Throw them out,Ž and Never again.ŽThe Feb. 14 shooting left 17 people dead at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, including 14 students. Much of the anger Wednesday was directed at legislators and the National Rifle Association.This tragedy has taught us to be fearless, because we now know what it feels like to be afraid,Ž Rachel Catania, 15, a sophomore from Marjory Stoneman Doug-las High, told a roaring crowd. How many more innocent people have to die before we make a change? Change is overdue. And we are the change. When leaders act like children and children act like leaders, you know something is about to change.ŽRep. Carlos Guillermo Smith, an Orlando Democrat who was elected following the massacre of 49 people at Orlandos Pulse nightclub in 2016, urged people who want change to register to vote.Like so many Pulse survivors, they (the victims of the school shooting) are the voices of those who were taken too soon,Ž Smith told the crowd. Yes, you know the 17 who lost their lives, they lost their voices. But you havent lost yours. You are their voices.ŽPeople attending the event vented about a need to improve safety, with banners proclaiming, It Happened at my school #NeverAgain,Ž Listen to the students, they are the targets,Ž and No fear in our schools.ŽYou can tell people from all over Florida are really serious about this issue,Ž Tallahassee resi-dent Catherine Annis said.As a sign of interest in the issues, the Leon County school district allowed its students to attend the rallyArkia Gordon, a junior from Leon High School in Tallahassee, said students support more training and security, but restrictions are needed on semiautomatic rifles such as the type used by a 19-year-old in the Marjory Stoneman Douglas shooting.The first step is this gun,Ž Gordon said. If you have a shotgun, it will take too long to reload. If people want to kill, they can kill anyway, but you wont take that many lives.ŽNot everyone fully sided with the speakers.Attending the event with her grandfather Ernie Hard, Victoria Roberts, a junior from Wakulla High School south of Tallahassee, said her campus needs more security, but she wasnt in favor of taking away guns from people and just wanted to hear what other students were saying.Me personally, Im not willing to get rid of the guns,Ž Roberts said. The police officers protecting us today have guns. If we were to have someone crazy enough to shoot at us today, the guns the police have can be used to protect us.ŽThe rally lasted nearly two hours and came in the middle of a day in which students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High met in groups with top lawmakers and state leaders. Students also appeared at a noon-hour news conference that received live national coverage.Gov. Rick Scott, whose office organized a series of workshops Tuesday with law-enforcement, educa-tion and mental-health officials, is expected to introduce a post-massacre legislative package later this week.House Speaker Rich-ard Corcoran, R-Land O Lakes, said discussions are underway about rais-ing the age to make gun purchases and to fund an expansion of armed resource officers at schools.I want to get as many law enforcement officers into the schools as pos-sible,Ž Corcoran said.While Corcoran talked to reporters after a House floor session, students who had attended the rally con-tinued to chant for change outside the entrance to the House chamber.Never Again: Capitol rally sends messageSeveral thousand people gathered outside the Old Capitol building in Tallahassee Wednesday to call on legislatures to better protect students from school shootings. [NSF PHOTO] Christine Sexton News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ Two Democratic senators are pushing to increase by $25 million the amount of funding the Senate has committed to addressing the states opioid problems in the upcoming year.Sen. Kevin Rader praised Senate leaders for propos-ing to spend $100 million on mental-health services and school-safety programs in the wake of the Marjory Stoneman Doug-las High School shooting last week that left 17 people dead. But he said they also need to put more money into a plan to curb the opioid epidemic.It looks like we are find-ing a lot of mental health funding, and thats great. And I absolutely, completely support it and its much needed,Ž said Rader, a Delray Beach Democrat whose district includes Parkland, where Marjory Stoneman Douglas High is located. I hope in the next two weeks ƒ. we can really put the money into the opioid funding to take an enormous bite out of this apple and really help Floridians who need it.ŽRaders remarks came as the Legislature enters the last two weeks of the annual legislative session and prepares to go into budget negotiations. The Senate is earmarking about $53 million for a variety of programs for opioid treat-ment, outpatient care and case management, medically assisted treatment, and naloxone for emer-gency responders.Senate President Joe Negron, R-Stuart, said Thursday he has spent a long time talkingŽ with Rader and Sen. Darryl Rouson, D-St. Petersburg, about the opioid epidemic, and he thinks the Legislature ultimately will increase funding from the current levels.Rader is working closely with Rouson, who has drafted a plan that directs funding to a number of different areas. They include spending $2 million on an additional seven bridge programsŽ between hospital emergency departments and community-based opioid programs, spending $2.9 million for evidencebased prevention and launching a statewide media campaign, similar to the states effective anti-smoking campaign.The four-page draft obtained by The News Service of Florida contains handwritten notes with numbers by each of the ideas. The proposal marked No 1 is a request to increase funding to managing entities, which have contracts with the state to coordinate care regionally, by $3.1 million to provide housing options for people who suffer from both mental health and addiction issues and are frequently jailed or require emergency room services.The proposal does not include additional funding beyond what already is targeted for medication-assisted treatment programs. Negron though, indicated that he would direct additional dollars toward medica-tion-assisted treatment.I want to make sure the prevention is directly related to tangible items that we can measure rather than just diffuse dissemination of informa-tion, which I dont think is effective,Ž Negron said.Gov. Rick Scott in May 2017 declared a state of emergency due to the opioid crisis, fueled by an increasing number of deaths associated with the drugs. A state report shows that in 2016, Flor-ida had 952 heroin deaths, 1,390 fentanyl-related deaths, 723 oxycodonecaused deaths and 245 hydrocodone-related deaths.To try to address the issues, the House and Senate are considering bills (HB 21 and SB 8) that would limit physicians abilities to prescribe opioids. Also, the state Medicaid program announced last week that it is limiting prescriptions for narcotics to a maximum seven-day supply, unless a physician determines it is medically necessary to increase the prescription.During a discussion in a Senate committee, Rader reminded Senate Health and Human Services Appropriations Chairwoman Anitere Flores, R-Miami, that she acknowledged earlier the Senate hasnt gone far enough in its recommendations for the upcoming year.You said, and I didnt put words in your mouth, that this is woefully underfunded and needed hundreds of millions of dollars of help as well,  Rader said to Flores during a Wednesday meeting. We just cant keep the eye off the ball.ŽLawmakers seek more money for opioid epidemic

PAGE 4

** A4 Saturday, February 24, 2018 | Washington County News OPINION The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by GateHouse Media LLC at 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2018, GateHouse Media LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright Notice: The entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of GateHouse Media LLC. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or GateHouse Media. Postmaster: Send address change to Washington County News, P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428, USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES In county Out of county 13 weeks: $20 $24.30 26 weeks: $28.70 $36.40 52 weeks: $48.60 $60.70 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US Publisher: Nicole Bare“ eld nbare“ eld@chipleypaper.com Editor: Carol Kent Wyatt cwyatt@chipley paper.com, 850-638-0212 News, sports, opinion: news@chipleypaper.com Classi“ ed: 850-638-0212, clamb@ chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service: 1-850-522-5197Have something to say?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri“ cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. Washington CountyPUBLISHER Nicole P. Bare“ eld EDITOR Carol Kent Wyatt PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR Cameron Everett When a regional task force was charged with recommending a plan for relieving traffic on Interstate 75, state officials encouraged it to look at building a new cross-state highway that would provide a connector between Tampa and Jacksonville and pass through Alachua and Marion counties. Using what it called guiding principlesŽ „ conservation, countryside, communities and corridors „ the 21-member task force recommended against building a new highway through the region, and instead urged the state to expand I-75, as well as U.S. 301 and 41, and implement safety steps such as truck-only and express lanes. It took two years of meetings and public hearings for the task force to reach that conclusion and issue its report to the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) and Gov. Rick Scott in early 2017. Then came Hurricane Irma, which led to the biggest evacuation in Florida history and caused massive traffic tie-ups along I-75. A state House of Representatives task force that met in the hurricanes wake urged extending the Suncoast Parkway from Hernando County to the Georgia line, and FDOT is once again resurrecting the idea of a new highway from Citrus County through Alachua and Marion counties to Jacksonville. The day will come when population growth, continued tourism expansion and increasing freight movement will demand new highways hereabouts. But it is those circumstances, not a single seminal event like the Irma evacuation, that should drive any decision to build a major highway through what is largely rural, agricultural regions of North Florida. Building such a road would not only be costly and impact sensitive wetlands and waterways like the Withlacoochee River and Rainbow Springs and tens of thousands of acres of current farmlands and open greenspace, but it would undoubtedly change the character of entire communities. The task forces recommendation to enhance existing roads is a serious and substantive start that deserves a chance. U.S. 301 from Marion County to Jacksonville is far from capacity, and U.S. 41 from Citrus County to Lake City is also underutilized. Enhancements to I-75, statistically one of the states most dangerous highways, are also prudent moves that can be achieved more economically and more quickly than a massive highway project. FDOT has been up front about its vision that a new road is inevitable in the distantŽ future. As Floridas population grows, we have no doubt such a highway will be needed. But the fact that all 21 members of the task force voted unanimously against building a new highway now indicates the citizenry wants to preserve as much of our existing lifestyle and quality of life as possible for a long as possible. A version of this editorial first appeared in the Ocala Star-Banner, a News sister paper with GateHouse MediaNew highway not yet needed ANOTHER VIEW I think I jinxed myself when I told my wife that Neil Diamond was one of the few singers I might ac tually go to the trouble of seeing in concert. Yes, not too long after I made that pronouncement, Diamond abruptly went cold turkey on touring, because of a diagnosis of Parkinsons disease. Performers such as Paul McCartney and Bruce Springsteen keep going strong (although one of The Bosss songs may be renamed Dancing In The Dark Or Are Those Just Cataracts?Ž), but an alarming number of other iconic acts are winding down. Farewell tours of one length or another have been announced by Elton John, Ozzy Osbourne, southern rockers Lynyrd Skynyrd (advancing years give new meaning to classics such as Whats Your Name?Ž and That SmellŽ), Grammywinning thrash metal band Slayer, Paul Simon, Joan Baez and Aretha Franklin. (To her credit, the Queen of SoulŽ wants to slow down while her soul and body are still together!) Some performers are calling it quits to spend more time with family or to go out on a high note. Others are dealing with health issues and dont want Needs more cowbellŽ to segue into Needs more defibrillator.Ž Young people who missed the glory days of various superstars are being prodded by their elders to see the living legends while theyre still alive. Slapping farewell tourŽ on a series of concerts adds a sense of urgency, but some acts will benefit more than others. Some performers will be able to take an actual victory lap, but others may already be past their sell byŽ date. (Thats okay. You wont have me to kick around anymore. But if you do kick me, let me know. I cant really feel much because of the neuropathy.Ž) My wife and I have always been frugal and lazy about attending musical events (weve seen Elton John, the Righteous Brothers, fiddle virtuoso Mark OConnor and thats about it), but other fans from multiple generations are willing to lay out big bucks to catch up with these tours. (I can appreciate the allure of nostalgia, but Im mostly nostalgic for the good old days when ticket scalpers could afford only ONE yacht each.) On the other hand, not everyone is enamored of live performances. A quick Google search turns up more than 2,000 listings for the phrase I hate concerts.Ž Grievances include lame opening acts, nosebleed seating, crowded bathrooms, ear-splitting sound checks, political rants and self-indulgent 10-minute kazoo solos. Diehard fans truly enjoy using the Hubble Space Telescope to watch music being made on stage; but others are happy to turn on the stereo, close their eyes and use their imagination. At a live venue, all you can imagine is ways to murder the sweaty moron who keeps vomiting on your shoes. People are quick to rationalize exorbitant ticket prices, sky-high concessions prices and nerve-wracking parking conditions with the line, At least I can say I saw him perform live.Ž Hey, theres a cheaper way to be able to say you saw him perform live: LEARN TO LIE REALLY WELL.Are you excited about rock n roll farewell tours?I know its blasphemous to many of my fellow Americans when I say that I dont care for most Olympic sporting events, especially the Winter Games. Maybe its due to the fact that I hail from East Texas where the closest we get to winter sports is that one day every decade when an inch or two of snow falls and we throw out our backs trying to luge down the driveway while destroying our complete inventory of Rubbermaid storage container lids. Despite my distaste for Olympic competition, there are aspects of the overall spectacle that even a detractor like me can appreciate. Lets begin with the opening ceremonies, which can only be described as an extravaganza of unbridled artistic pageantry that leaves most spectators somewhere between Wow!Ž and Whaaa?Ž This years opening ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea, included a special visit from Kim Yo Jong, the sister of North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un. When the American delegation marched into the Olympic stadium to the refrains of South Korean pop hit Gangnam Style,Ž the expression on Kim Yo Jongs face belied the fact that she was either severely constipated, disgusted by the stench of U.S. Vice President Mike Pences hair pomade, or resentful that the Americans entrance music was the same tune she sings to console her big brother when one of his intercontinental ballistic missiles explodes on the launch pad. Another memorable feature of this years opening ceremony was the entrance of the Tongan delegation, led by a Chippendales dancer in full, shirtless, coconut-oiled glory. I have to admit that I was impressed, even though he stole my idea for next years Valentines Day gift to my wife. The opening ceremony always culminates with the lighting of the Olympic patio fire pit. This years lighting was especially moving as two athletes, one each from North and South Korea, held the Olympic torch and ascended a flight of stairs together before passing the torch to celebrated South Korean figure skater Yuna Kim. Surprisingly, the American toy industry then took center stage as Yuna set fire to a giant Slinky that extended to ignite the cauldron sitting atop a white, porcelain plant stand. Although I usually find something more interesting to do while the Olympic sports are on television (like tightening our toilet seats or clipping my daughters pet hedgehogs toenails no, really!), my wife is always entranced by the figure skating competition. In an effort to spend some quality time with her, I do make an attempt to share her enthusiasm, but my focus is not on the romantic beauty of the skaters routines or the fluid grace of the athletes themselves. Instead, this year Ive been speculating on whether commentator Johnny Weirs hair has reached an altitude sufficient for it to be declared space debris. I also enjoy producing a variety of (sometimes) fake bodily noises at strategic moments throughout the skaters performances. (You should hear the sound I make for the triple Salchow.) This behavior elicits lots of chuckles from my youngest daughter, but my wife often responds by silently, but firmly, handing me a screwdriver and toenail clippers.A hazy shade of Winter Olympics Danny Tyree J a s e G r a v e s Jase Graves

PAGE 5

** Washington County News | Saturday, February 24, 2018 A5 NATION & WORLD DATELINESPODGORICA, MONTENEGROA police of“ cer guards the U.S. embassy Thursday in Montenegros capital Podgorica. The man who hurled a bomb into the U.S. Embassy compound in Montenegros capital, and then killed himself, was an ex-soldier, authorities said Thursday. A police of“ cial, speaking on condition of anonymity because of the ongoing investigation, said the man was 43-yearold Dalibor Jaukovic, who was identi“ ed by a close relative. [RISTO BOZOVIC/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]ATLANTAThe Rev. Bernice King, the daughter of civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr., speaks Thursday at The King Center in Atlanta. King offered condolences to the families of the over dozen people fatally shot on Feb. 14, at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., and commended survivors for their activism to change gun laws. She also plans to join them for the March for Our LivesŽ in Washington next month. [WSB-TV VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]MIDDLETOWN, CONN. Middletown “ re“ ghters, FBI, state police and local police are investigating after a car d rove into the entrance of Middlesex Hospital on Thursday in Middletown, Conn. The driver, 27-year-old Steven Ellam, of Middletown, was critically burned when he intentionally crashed a car “ lled with gasoline containers into the Connecticut hospital emergency room and then set himself on “ re. [JOHN WOIKE/ HARTFORD COURANT VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]By Carolyn ThompsonThe Associated PressUtah teacher Kasey Hansen says carrying a concealed weapon in school is more of a solutionŽ than hiding in a corner and waiting if an armed intruder enters the classroom. But Texas teacher Tara Bordeaux worries that she lacks the instinctsŽ of a law enforcement officer and cant easily see herself carry-ing a gun in class.Both say carrying a gun in school is a matter of personal preference. But in the aftermath of yet another mass school shooting, there are deep divisions, from President Donald Trump to educators, parents and school security officers, about whether teach-ers should be armed.Lawmakers in several states are wrestling with the conten-tious idea, including Florida, where the 17 victims of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland are being mourned. Trump said during a listen-ing session Wednesday with parents and survivors of school shootings that a teacher adept at firearms could very well end the attack very quickly.Ž He followed that up with a tweet Thursday that highly trained teachers would act as a deterrent to the cowards that do thisŽ and later suggested they receive bonuses for the added responsibility.The president of the 1.7 million-member American Federation of Teachers, Randi Weingarten, called arming teachers a horrible idea and said an educators handgun would be no match for the assault-style weapons often wielded by attackers.The solution is to ban these military weapons from people who shouldnt have them,Ž Weingarten said.The National Association of School Resource Officers, which provides training to school-based law enforce-ment officers, said it opposes arming teacher. Anyone who hasnt received the extensive training provided to law enforcement officers will likely be mentally unprepared to take a life, especially the life of a student assailant,Ž it said in a statement Thursday.Wayne LaPierre, vice presi-dent and CEO of the National Rifle Association, said Thursday that reactions like Weingartens are expected after mass shootings. The whole idea from some of our opponents that armed security makes us less safe is completely ridiculous,Ž he told a conference of conser-vatives in Washington.Calling schools virtu-ally wide-open soft targets,Ž LaPierre added, It should not be easier for a mad man to shoot up a school than a bank or a jewelry store.ŽIn Florida, Republican state Sen. Greg Steube has proposed allowing specially trained educators with military or law enforcement backgrounds to be armed.Our most valuable, most precious resources are our children. Why in the world are we going to put them in a circumstance where there is nobody that is armed and trained at any of our schools to be able to respond quickly to an active shooter situation?Ž Steube told The Associated Press.Similar discussions have taken place in Kentucky, Colorado, North Carolina and Alabama in recent days. In Wisconsin, the attorney general said hes open to the idea.Our students do not need to be sitting ducks. Our teachers do not need to be defending themselves with a No. 2 pencil,Ž Alabama state Rep. Will Ainsworth, a Repub-lican, said in proposing a bill days after the Valentines Day shooting in Florida.In contrast, a California law that took effect Jan. 1 halted the ability of school districts to allow non-security employees to carry guns on campus.The debate breaches state-house walls. A poll released this week by ABC News/ Washington post says 42 percent of Americans believe teachers with guns could have prevented the Florida shooting.Im not here to tell all teachers that they have to carry a gun,Ž said Hansen, the Utah teacher, whos from Salt Lake City. She said the idea to arm herself in school began with the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, where 20 children and six adults died.Searching for a solutionFrom left, President Donald Trump, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student students Carson Abt, and Ariana Klein, listen as Carsons father, Frederick Abt, speaks during a listening session with high school students, teachers, and others in the State Dining Room of the White House on Wednesday in Washington. [CAROLYN KASTER/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] President Trumps comments point to deep divisions over arming teachers

PAGE 6

** A6 Saturday, February 24, 2018 | Washington County News

PAGE 7

** Washington County News | Saturday, February 24, 2018 A7

PAGE 8

** A8 Saturday, February 24, 2018 | Washington County News COMMUNITYIf you would like your events included in this list, email information to: news@chipleypaper.com Alford Community Health ClinicAlford Community Health Clinic (ACHC) will be open from 10 a.m. until the last patient is seen, Saturday, Feb-ruary 24. ACHC is a free clinic for patients who do not have medical insurance and who meet federal income guidelines. The clinic is staffed by qualified physicians, nurses and assistants dedicated to providing quality health care to those with short-term illnesses, as well as chronic conditions; walk-ins are always welcome. New patients should telephone 850-209-5501 for more infor-mation. All patients are urged to sign-in before 11 a.m. Alford Community Health Clinic is located two blocks east of Hwy 231 in Alford, at 1770 Carolina Street and is open the fourth Saturday of each month, unless otherwise posted. Free Tax-Aide CHIPLEY „ The AARP TaxAide Program and Washington County Council on Aging will provide free income tax assistance, tax counseling and electronic filing for 2017 tax returns. Special attention is provided to filers 60 and older, but AARP membership is not required. These services are available each Tuesday now through April 10 by appointment at the Council on Aging, located at 1348 South Blvd. in Chipley. Individuals seeking assistance need to fill out an interview sheet, available at the Council on Aging, and bring all their 2017 tax documents including; Social security card; drivers license or photo ID; copy of last years tax return; a check for bank information; 1095-A Form if you bought insurance from Marketplace/exchange; SSA1099 Social security benefits; 1099-R pensions, retirement, and annuities; 1099-INT inter-est; 1099-DIV dividends; and 1099-B stock sale; W-2s; 1099-MISC other income; 1099-G unemployment; Any docu-ment showing you paid Federal Income Tax; 1099-S sale of home, land, or timber; W-2G gambling winnings; 1098-E student loan interest; 1098-T tuition payments; Information needed to itemize: medical expenses, medical miles driven, contributions, home mortgage interest, and real estate taxes. The service will not prepare Schedule F … Farms, Schedule E … Rental Property, Schedule C … Business income with expenses that exceed $25,000, multiple Schedule Cs for one individual, Clergy, or Form 3903 … Moving expenses. These are considered Out of Scope.Ž For more infor-mation call 850-638-6216. Womanless Beauty PageantVERNON „ Please note the Womanless Beauty Pageant at has been cancelled. Washington County Farm Bureau Annual Spaghetti SupperCHIPLEY „ The Washington County Farm Bureau will hold their annual Spaghetti Supper in conjunction with the Wash-ington County Youth Fair again this year. The supper will take place from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., March 2, at the Washington County Agricultural Center. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for children under 12. Advanced tickets can be purchased at the Washington County Farm Bureau office or from any Washington County Farm Bureau Board Member. WCFB will also have their Saturday morning sausage biscuit sale Saturday, March 4. The pro-ceeds from both of the events go to support Washington County Farm Bureau youth projects such as Ag in the Classroom and AgVenture for Washing-ton County elementary schools. Chipola announces The Little Mermaid eventsMARIANNA„The Chipola College Theater production of Disneys The Little Mermaid,Ž runs March. 1-4. Tickets are $10 for adults and $6 for ages 18 and under and go on sale to the gen-eral public on Feb. 14. Members of the ACT Fund are invited to a Meet the Mermaids reception, before the Thursday, March 1 show, at 5:30 p.m. Guests are invited to bring a camera and have photos with the mermaids. There is still time to join the ACT Fund to enjoy this unique opportunity. Show tick-ets are available for ACT Fund members on Feb. 7. The ACT Fund offers five levels: Spon-sor, Patron, Benefactor, Angel and Corporate Angel, with VIP seating available at all levels. A portion of the ACT Fund mem-bership is tax-deductible. ACT Fund memberships may be pur-chased now at the Box Office or online at www.chipola.edu/boxoffice. A Dinner Theatre for all patrons is Friday, March 2, at 5:30 p.m. Limited seating is available by reservation only. Tickets (including dinner and show) „ $30 „ will be avail-able at the Box Office on Feb 7. For more information, contact the Box Office at 718-2420 or www.chipola.edu/boxoffice. Visit the Chipola Theatre at www.facebook.com or www.chipola.edu/theatre Baby BeesCHIPLEY „ The Washington County Public Library will host Baby Bees at 10 a.m., Wednes-day, March 7, Wednesday, April 11 and Wednesday, May 2. Baby Bees will be an hour of stories, music, sing-a-longs and activities designed just for baby. Each month will have a new theme. For more informa-tion call 850-638-1314. STP to present On Golden Pond March 9-11CHIPLEY „ The Spanish Trail Playhouse will present the play On Golden PondŽ on Friday, March 9; Saturday, March 10 and Sunday, March 11. The play will be at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday and at 2 p.m. on Sunday at the Spanish Trail Playhouse, located at 680 Second Street in Chipley (Historic Chipley High School). Tickets for this show are $12 for adults, $10 for seniors (65 or older) and for military (with active or retired ID). Tickets are on sale and can now be purchased online at www.spanishtrailplayhouse.com. Tickets can also be purchased at the Spanish Trail Playhouse Box Office, located at 680 Second Street. The office will be open from 8 a.m. until noon. Monday through Thursday. You can also still call 638-9113 to purchase tickets. The Playhouse now accepts credit card payments. AARP Smart Driver CourseCHIPLEY „ AARP representative Erich Beck will conduct the AARP Smart Driver Course from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, March 12, at Washington County Council on Aging, 1348 South Blvd., Chipley. Participants will be updated regarding new traffic laws and rules of the road, defensive driving techniques, and proven safety strategies. All participants receive a cer-tificate to provide to their automobile insurer, possibly enabling them to receive a discount on their premiums, depending on their carriers guidelines. Preregister by calling Washington County Council on Aging, 850-6386216. Cost is $15 for AARP members and $20 for nonAARP members. Registration fees will be collected the day of the course. For more informa-tion, visit www.aarp.org/drive Young Irelanders to Perform at ChipolaMARIANNA „ The Chipola Artist Series presents The Young Irelanders, Tuesday, March 13, at 7 p.m. in the Prough Center for the Arts. The Young Irelanders is comprised of eight sensational performers who have Irish traditional music, song and dance running through their veins. Between them, they have performed for many heads of state, Presidents of Ireland, US Presidents, the Queen of England, the President of China, Prince Albert of Monaco, Empress Michiko of Japan and more. They also have performed at Radio City Music Hall. Dont miss the chance to enjoy Irelands tradi-tions of music, song and dance in the hands of some of the worlds most talented young performers. More atwww.theyoungirelanders.com. Tickets„$25 for adults, $10 for children under 18, and $5 for Chipola students and employ-ees. For more information, call the Center for the Arts Box Office at 850-718-2420 or visit www.chipola.edu/boxoffice.COMMUNITY BRIEFSCHIPLEY „The Spanish Trail Playhouse will hold three performances of the play On Golden Pond on Friday, March 9; Saturday, March 10 and Sunday, March 11. The play will be at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. on Sunday at the Spanish Trail Playhouse (Historic Chipley High School) located at 680 Second Street in Chipley.Tickets for this show are $12 for adults, $10 for seniors (65 or older) and for military (with active or retired ID). Tickets are on sale and can now be purchased online at www.spanishtrailplayhouse.com! Tickets can also be purchased at the Spanish Trail Playhouse Box Office (680 Second Street, Chipley). The office will be open from 8:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday. You can also still call 638-9113 to purchase tickets. The Playhouse now accepts credit card payments.On Golden Pond will be directed by Kevin Russell and was written by Earnest Thompson. This is the love story of Ethel and Norman Thayer, who are returning to their summer home on Golden Pond for the forty-eighth year. He is a retired professor, nearing eighty, with heart palpitations and a failing memory„but still as tart-tongued, obser-vant and eager for life as ever. Ethel, ten years younger, and the perfect foil for Norman, delights in all the small things that have enriched and continue to enri ch their long life together. They are visited by their divorced, middle-aged daughter and her dentist fianc, who then go off to Europe, leav-ing his teenage son behind for the summer. The boy quickly becomes the grandchildŽ the elderly couple have longed for, and as Norman revels in taking his ward fishing and thrusting good books at him, he also learns some lessons about modern teenage awareness„and slang„in return. In the end, as the summer wanes, so does their brief idyll, and in the final, deeply moving moments of the play, Norman and Ethel are brought even closer together by the incidence of a mild heart attack. Time, they know, is now against them, but the years have been good and, perhaps, another summer on Golden Pond still awaits. Presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., New York.For additional information, please visit the Spanish Trail Playhouse website: www. spanishtrailplayhouse.com or call 850-638-9113.Tickets on sale for On Golden PondMARIANNA „ Tickets are going quickly for the Chipola College Theater production of Disneys The Little Mer-maid,Ž which runs March. 1-4. The show plays nightly at 7 p.m. nightly with a 2 p.m. Sunday matinee.Tickets„$10 for adults and $6 for ages 18 and u nder„go on sale to the general public on Feb. 14.Members of the ACT Fund are invited to a Meet the Mer-maids reception before the Thursday, March 1 show, at 5:30 p.m. Guests are invited to bring a camera and have photos with the mermaids. There is still time to join the ACT Fund to enjoy this unique opportunity. ACT Fund memberships may be purchased now at the Box Office or online at www.chipola.edu/boxoffice.A Dinner Theatre for all patrons is Friday, March 2, at 5:30 p.m. Limited seating is available by reservation only by Feb. 26. Tickets (including dinner and show) „ $20 … are available at the Box Office.Chipola Theater Director Charles Sirmon cast the fol-lowing actors in the show: Bailey Foxworth as Ariel, Brock Harris as Prince Eric, Destin Dawson as Grimsby, Chandler King as Flounder, Mary Keyton as Scuttle, Daniel Covington as King Triton, Anthony Severson as Sebastian, Tinsley Hodges as Flotsam, Nina Boyd as Jetsam, Landry Tharp as Ursula, Sarah Liffick as Car-lotta and Caroline King as Maid. The MerSisters are: Sydney Cobb, Meghan Basford, Dianna Floyd, Olivia Wester, Karissa Mercer and Grace Wester. The Ensemble includes: Brandon Washington, Kane Keefer, Willa Wester, Irene Muriz and Jessica Kaiser.For more information, contact the Box Office at 718-2420 or www.chipola.edu/ boxoffice. Visit the Chipola Theatre at www.facebook. com or www.chipola.edu/theatreTickets on sale for Chipolas Little MermaidBailey Foxworth as Ariel and Chandler King as Flounder, rehearse a scene from Chipolas Little Mermaid.Ž [CHIPOLA PHOTO]

PAGE 9

** Washington County News | Saturday, February 24, 2018 A9 MEDICINEALTERNATE PAIN RELIEFA study released Nov. 7 suggests that a combination of Motrin and Tylenol may work as well as narcotic painkillers for ER patients who su er sprains or fractures,Ž according to a story on WebMD. The story said that ibuprofen (e.g., Motrin or Advil) and acetaminophen (Tylenol) work di erently. The combination may provide an extra pain-relieving kick, the researchers theorized.Ž PET HEALTHIS YOUR PET OBESE?In a recent WebMD story, Dr. Ernie Ward, founder of the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention, says most American pets are overweight or obese. He said that beyond looking at their belly fat, you should be able to feel your pets ribs. The story said, To determine if a pet is overweight or obese, veterinarians can look at lean muscle mass, the animals size and where they carry their weight.Ž Ward advises pet owners to talk to your vet about your pets weight and follow their advice on feeding and exercising. SMELLNOSE HAS INTERNAL CLOCKA new study has discovered that your sense of smell may uctuate in tune with your circadian clock,Ž according to The journal Chemical Senses. Over 24 hours, the sense of smell uctuates in sensitivity, and is most sensitive during the hours before you go to sleep, peaking at about 9 p.m. „ Brandpoint HEALTHTODAYS WORKOUTWork on shoulder strength with alternating row By Marion Renault More Content NowTwo days before he died of a drug overdose, Tony Shires stripped off his shirt in the middle of Circlevilles Pumpkin Show to sop up his 5-year-old nephews bloody nose. Even when he was high, Tony was looking out for others, said sister Kelsey Shires, 27. Thats just who he was. If you didnt have a dollar and he had just one in his pocket, he would end up without a dollar,Ž she said. Tony Shires, 28, of Clintonville, Ohio, had been sober from heroin for six years. In 2017, he went to treatment for Xanax and suboxone dependency and was clean for 51 days before he relapsed and overdosed on heroin Oct. 23. Even in death, he was generous. Because he was an organ donor, his kidneys, pancreas and liver saved three strangers. That was what he wanted. People can judge, but he could be the one who saved your dad, your whoever,Ž said his wife, Amanda Shires, 27. When its a hard day I think, Its not only bad. Something good did come out of it. Ž Last year was a record one across the board for the group Shires donated to, Lifeline of Ohio, central Ohios regional organ-donation organization. The nonprofit group saw a 37 percent increase in organs transplanted, as well as a record number of donors and recipients. The jump in activity stems, in part, from soaring rates of drug overdoses. Nationwide, the number of eventual organ donors who died of drug overdoses has more than doubled over the past three years, according to United Network for Organ Sharing, a nonprofit group that operates the United States only organ procurement and transplantation network. In Lifeline of Ohios service area „ which encompasses 37 Ohio counties and two in West Virginia „ a quarter of the 2017 organ donors died from overdoses in 2017, up from nearly 12 percent the previous year. Thats a drastic increase,Ž said Andrew Mullins, Lifelines director of partner services. We know the drug epidemic thats sweeping our state, and donation has had an effect on transplant rates.Ž Shires family members said they were surprised Tony could still be a donor. He took his first oxycodone pill after an eighth-grade football injury and was battling a heroin addiction by the age of 18. Although drug overdoses halt a persons breathing or stop the heart, drug addiction doesnt necessarily harm organs, said Becki Brown, a family services coordinator for Lifeline. Medical tests performed at the time of death confirm which of a patients organs are viable for transplant. Theres a lot of misconceptions about donations,Ž Brown said. Once people ask and learn, theyre almost always supportive.Ž There are no costs or age limits for organ and tissue donation. Senior citizens, newborn babies, people with poor eyesight, cancer survivors and even those with diabetes or hepatitis can donate. To be eligible for donation, a person has to be in the hospital, on a ventilator and declared brain dead. This happens in only 1 percent of all deaths in the U.S., according to Lifeline. A single person can potentially save eight lives through heart, kidney, liver, pancreas, lung and small intestine donations. They also can help heal more than 50 others by donating skin tissue for burn victims, veins for people with chronic pain, tendons for athletes or corneas for the vision-impaired. Today, about 115,000 Americans are waiting for a life-saving transplant, according to the United Network for Organ Sharing. With medical advances, organs that historically wouldnt be able to be transplanted now can be,Ž Mullins said. Its becoming more of a cultural norm. More people are saying Yes, why wouldnt I be a donor?Ž Years before his final donation, Tony Shires volunteered to give his grandmother one of his kidneys when she needed a transplant. His mother, Beth Vermillion, 51, said its painful to square the devastation of the ongoing opioid epidemic with its potential for increasing organ donations. Although the pain is still there and it doesnt fill the void of him not being there, he did some good. Im proud of my son,Ž she said. Opioid overdoses€ Overdose deaths usually occurs when oxygen cannot reach the brain, leaving most organs unaffected. The drugs and blood are ” ushed from the organs when they are removed from the body. € Opioid overdoses accounted for more than 42,000 deaths in 2016, more than any previous year on record. An estimated 40 percent of opioid overdose deaths involved a prescription opioid.„ Centers for Disease Control and PreventionOrgan donations rise due to overdose deaths After Amanda Shires husband, Tony, died of an opioid overdose last October, the family decided to donate his organs. Drug addiction doesnt necessarily harm organs, experts say. [ERIC ALBRECHT/DISPATCH] Medical advances make it possible to do transplants in opioid-related deaths By Marlo AllevaMore Content NowWhen it comes to shoulder fitness, whether you are building for strength or function, this area needs extra care. Our move today is an alternating upright row. The focus is the whole shoulder area and upper back. You will need a set of light to medium hand weights for this move, or you can improvise with water bottles, weighing in at about 1 pound. Begin this exercise with your weights in each hand and standing. Hold your chest tall, engage your core with both arms extended down in front of your body, palms facing your thighs. Roll your shoulders back and down; you are ready to start rowing. Proceed to pull one arm straight up your body, pushing the elbow to the outside, aiming for chest/ collarbone level with your hand weight. Once you reach your highest point, slowly return the weight back to starting position at thigh level. Then begin to pull your other arm up in the same fashion. Continue this alternating row for at least 10 repetitions on each arm. Take a small break and evaluate your next set, either increasing or decreasing your weight or using no weight at all. Depending on the condition and strength of your shoulder area, shoot for at least three sets. Keep your arms slightly in front of you, controlling the movement and not overextending your shoulders. This rowing motion is great for all levels, keeping the movement slow and methodic. Listen to your body, if you need, take a break and re-evaluate your position and try it again with either lighter or no weight at all. Marlo Alleva, an instructor at Golds Gym and group fitness coordinator at Fontaine-Gills YMCA, in Lakeland, Florida, can be reached at faluvzpa@msn.Marlo Alleva demonstrates alternating upright rows. [SCOTT WHEELER/THE LEDGER]

PAGE 10

** A10 Saturday, February 24, 2018 | Washington County News FAITHThe Eleventh Annual Florida Panhandle Womens Retreat will take place Friday, March 2 and Saturday, March 3, at the DeFuniak Springs Commu-nity Center, located on North Tenth Street, in DeFuniak Springs. This years two part event begins at 6 p.m. Friday, March 2 and includes a meal and program.The second part of the event begins at 9 a.m. Saturday, March 3, and features speakers, music, lunch, door prizes, and more. Saturdays theme is So Let Us Number Our DaysƒŽ and is based on Psalm 90:12.The morning speaker will be Sonya Williams, a preachers daughter, preachers wife, mother and grandmother. Williams serves at Heritage Baptist Church in Bayshore, New York, with her husband, Dr. Vincent Williams. She is the church school administra-tor and music director for the church. In addition, Williams speaks around the country.Deborah Ehler Polston will speak in the afternoon. Polston is married to Florida Supreme Court Justice Ricky Polston and they are the par-ents of 10 children, six of whom are adopted. They live in Tallahassee. Polston is a child advocate and speaker. She is the author of several books and has served as a licensed foster and adoptive parent since 2001. In 2008, Polston received the Gover-nors Point of Light Award.Music will be provided by Undivided, a southern gospel, praise and worship trio from Panama City, who have been ministering since 1987. All three singers are active in their home church, Northside Bap-tist, in Panama City.Early Bird Combo tickets are available at $40 each for both Friday night and Saturday through Wednesday, February 21, after regular rates apply. Individual ticket prices include $15 for the Friday eve-ning event and $30 for the day-long Saturday event.Further information about registration can be obtained through the website at www.flpwr.org or by calling Marie Hinson, event chairperson, at 850-892-9578.Womens Retreat coming soonDeborah Ehler Polston Sonya Williams Undivided [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTOS] If you would like to include an event in this list, email information to: news@ chipleypaper.com Gold City in Concert at Mt. ZionBONIFAY „ Southern Gospel recording artist Gold City will be in concert at 7 p.m., Saturday, February 24, at Mt. Zion Independent Baptist Church, located at 3205 Hwy 2 in Bonifay. This is a free concert, and every-one is invited to come join the church for a wonderful evening. For more information, call 768-0843, or 373-8416. Free Food GiveawayALFORD „ Cypress Creek Community Church will host a free food giveaway at 8 a.m. Saturday, February 24 at the church. Participants must be a Florida resident and present to receive food Only one person per household. The church is located two miles west of Alford at 1772 Mace-donia Road just off the Alford Highway (Highway 276). For more information, call 850-718-7311 or 850-638-0360. Blue Grass MarchCARYVILLE „ Caryville Baptist Church will host Blue Grass at 6 p.m. on March 2.. Please makeplans to attend and enjoy picking and singing. Fellow-ship will follow. The church is located at 4217 Old Bonifay Road in Caryville. For more information, Blondell Free-man at 548-5504. Family and friends dayCHIPLEY „ Grant Taberna-cle African Methodist Episcopal Church will host a friends and family day at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 11. The theme of the day will be Families United In FaithŽ Reverend Obidiah White the pastor of Saint Mary Missionary Baptist Church of Jacob City will deliver the message with his choir. The church is located at 419 Martin Luther King Boulevard in Chi-pley. For more information call Josephine Robinson-Floyd st 850-638-1691. Family and friends dayCHIPLEY „ Grant Tabernacle African Methodist Episcopal Church will host a friends and family day at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 11. The theme of the day will be Families United in FaithŽ Reverend Obidiah White the pastor of Saint Mary Missionary Baptist Church of Jacob City will deliver the message with his choir. The church is located at 419 Martin Luther King Boulevard in Chi-pley. For more information, call Josephine Robinson-Floyd at 850-638-1691. Revival at Cords of Love AOGCOTTONDALE „ Cords of Love Assembly of God will hold revival services with Rev. Tim Collins Feb. 25-28. Service times are 5:30 p.m. on Sunday and 6 p.m. Monday through Wednesday. The church is located at 2688 Dock Road in Cottondale.FAITH EVENTSIf you would like your Washington County church listed here, please send information tonews@ chipleypaper.com. Due to space limitation, please only send regular church services. For special services, please send separate submission.ASSEMBLY OF GODCorbin Road Assembly of GodMorning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 105 Corbin Road in Chipley.Cords of Love Assembly of GodSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study is a 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 2060 Bethlehem Road in Cottondale. Grace Assembly of God @ ChipleyMorning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 567 North Main Street, Chipley New Bethany Assembly of GodSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Shaky Joe Road just off Highway 280 at Hinsons Crossroads. New Life Fellowship Assembly of GodSunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 695 5th Street, Chipley. Wausau Assembly of GodSunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday ser-vices are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 3537 Washington Street in Wausau.BAPTISTAbigail Free Will Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located on Dawkins Street in Vernon.Berean Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1438 Nearing Hills Drive in Chipley. Blue Lake Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 1405 Blue Lake Road in Chipley. Chipley First Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship Service is at 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship Service is at 10:30 a.m. Discipleship Training is at 5 p.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday AWANA is at 5:15 p.m. Wednesday, Prayer Meeting Is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1300 South Boulevard Country Oaks Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 574 Buckhorn Boulevard Eastside Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at Highway 277 in Vernon. First Free Will Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1387 South Boulevard. Gap Pond Free Will Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 1980 Gap Boulevard in Sunny Hills.Grace Baptist Chapel MissionSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:50 a.m. Wednesday ser-vices are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 440 Lot E Second Street, Chipley. Holmes Creek Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service AWANA is at 5:30 p.m. and Bible Study is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 335 Cope Road in Chipley. Holyneck Missionary Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located 3395 Cemetery Lane, Campbellton.Jerusalem Missionary Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 614 Bennett Drive in Chipley.Mt. Ararat Missionary Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1233 Old Bonifay Road in Chipley. New Orange Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located on Alford Road in Washington County. New Prospect Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship services are at 11 a.m. Sunday evening services are at 5 p.m. Wednesday services supper is at 5 p.m. Wednesday prayer meeting, bible study and childrens classes start at 5:45. The church is located at 761 New Prospect Road in Chipley. Oakie Ridge Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Orange Hill Road and Gilberts Mill Road. Orange Hill Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday prayer and Bible Study is as 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3485 Gainer Road in Chipley. Orange Hill Missionary Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship on the first and third Sunday of the month is at 11 a.m. Wednesday night prayer meeting is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 816 Sunday Road in Chipley. Piney Grove Free Will Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1783 Piney Grove Road south of Chipley. Pleasant Hill Free Will Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located south of Bonifay at 1900 Pleasant Hill Road. Poplar Springs Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1098 Lovewood Road two miles east of Highway 77. Poplar Head Independent Free Will Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located on Poplar Head Road. Sand Hills Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 6758 Highway 77.WASHINGTON COUNTY CHURCH LISTINGSSee CHURCH, A11

PAGE 11

** Washington County News | Saturday, February 24, 2018 A11Shiloh Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 5:45 p.m. The church is located on Highway 277, three miles south of Highway 90 in Chipley. Shiloh Missionary Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:15 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 3013 Moss Hill Road in Vernon. St. John Free Will Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. St. Matthews Missionary Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 4156 St. Matthews Road in Caryville. Salem Free Will Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Worship service is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m.Church is located at 2555 Kynesville Highway in Alford.Sunny Hills First Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Unity Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3274 River Road in Vernon. Vernon First Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 2888 Church Street in Vernon. Wausau First Baptist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 3493 Washington Street in Wausau.CATHOLICSt. Joseph The Worker Catholic ChurchSunday Mass is at 11 a.m. Tuesday Mass is at 9 a.m. The church is located at 1664 Main Street in Chipley. St. Theresa Catholic ChurchSunday Mass is at 9 a.m. Monday through Friday Mass is at 8 a.m. Saturday Mass is at 5 p.m. Adoration is the first Friday after 8 a.m. Mass. The church is located at 2071 Sunny Hills Blvd and the Rec-tory is located at 2056 Sunny Hills Boulevard in Sunny Hills. Church of Christ Chipley Church of ChristSunday morning bible study is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1295 Brickyard Road in Chipley. Spirit-Filled Church of God in ChristSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Tuesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 2128 Pate Pond Road in Caryville.EPISCOPALGrant Tabernacle AMESunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 577 Martin Luther King Boulevard in Chipley. St. John AMEMorning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. St. Joseph AMESunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1401 Monroe Sheffield Road, Chipley. St. Luke African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME)Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located on Jackson Community Road.St. Mary African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME)Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 1035 St. Mary Road, in Caryville. St. Matthews Episcopal ChurchMorning worship is at 9 a.m. The church is located on Highway 90 west in Chipley.EVANGELISTICVernon Evangelistic ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Highway 79 in Vernon. Caryville Evangelistic CenterSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Wrights Creek Road in Caryville, just north of High-way 90.HOLINESSHarris Chapel Holiness ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located eight miles north of Caryville on Highway 179. Johnson Temple First Born HolinessSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. Friday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 793 Orange Street, Chipley. Miracle Valley Spirit of HolinessSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located 3754 Bunyon Drive, off Highway 77 near Sunny Hills.METHODISTChipley First United Methodist ChurchSunday School is at 9:50 a.m. Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. (contemporary service) and 11 a.m. (traditional service). The church is located at 1285 Jackson Avenue East Mount Zion United Methodist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday fel-lowship meal and Bible study is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1590 Highway 173 in Graceville. Lakeview United MethodistMorning Worship is at 9 a.m. Thursday morning Bible Study 9 a.m. The church is located on Highway 279 near Five Points. New Hope United Methodist ChurchMorning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study is at 10 a.m. The church is located at on Highway 79 in New Hope. New Vision United Methodist ChurchSunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday night supper is at 5:45. Wednesday Bible Study is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at the corner of High-way 77 and BlockerChurch Road in Greenhead. Orange Hill United Methodist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located on Sunday Road just off Orange Hill Road. Pleasant Grove United MethodistMorning Worship is at 9 a.m. The church is located near Hinsons Crossroads. Vernon United Methodist ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wausau United Methodist ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located on State Road 77PENTECOSTALFirst United Pentecostal ChurchMorning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1816 Highway 90 in Chipley. Wausau Pentecostal HolinessSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 2201 Pioneer Road in Wausau. Rock Hill ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Friday Night Worship is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 339 Rockhill Church Road in Chipley. Trinity Pentecostal TabernacleMorning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m.PRESBYTERIANChipley First Presbyterian ChurchSunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday, night sing-along is at 6 p.m. The church is located at Fifth Street and Watts Avenue Sunny Hills PresbyterianMorning Worship is at 9 a.m. Sunday School is at 10:30 a.m. The church is located at 3768 Country Club BoulevardOTHERBonnett Pond ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 2680 Bonnett Pond Road in Chipley. Christian Fellowship CenterSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1458 Monroe Shef-field Road in Chipley. Christian HavenSunday school is h at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Church of God by FaithSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:45 a.m. Tuesday service is at 7:30 p.m. The church is located at 3012 Church Street.Church of God of ProphecyMorning Worship is at 9:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1386 W. Jackson Avenue in Chipley. Courts of PraiseMorning Worship is at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 1720 Clayton Road in Chipley. Cypress CreekSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at1772 Macedonia Road. Faith Covenant FellowshipMorning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday ser-vices are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Highway 277 mile south of I-10. Family Worship CenterMorning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday ser-vice is at 7 p.m. The church is located 531 Rock Hill Church Road, Chipley. Graceville Community ChurchSunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1005 E. Prim Avenue Grahams ChapelMorning worship at 11 a.m. Tuesday Bible Study at 7 p.m. The chapel is located ate 1218 Campbellton Avenue in Chipley. Hard Labor Creek Community ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1705 Pioneer Road three miles east of caution light. Holmes Valley Community ChurchSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship, 11 a.m. Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 6 p.m. The church is at 3550 Fannig Branch Road in Vernon. House of Prayer Worship Center Sunday School and Childrens Church is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Youth activities on Wednesday begin at 4:30 p.m. Praise and worship services are at 6:30 p.m. on Friday. The church is located at 763 West Boulevard in Chipley. Impact Worship CenterSunday. Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Thursday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3006 New Hope Road Marianna. LibertySunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3983 Creek Road in Vernon. McQueens Temple First Born Church of Living GodSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 5681 Highway 79 South, Vernon. New Faith TempleSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 841 Orange Hill Road. New Foundation FellowshipMorning Worship is at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located on Rock Hill Church Road. Northwest Florida Christian ChurchMorning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. The church is located at 4465 Highway 77. Rhema Praise and Worship CenterMorning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Thursday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located 763 West Boulevard in Chipley. Sunny Hills ChapelSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 4283 Highway 77. Tabernacle of Praise Church of GodSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located on Highway 77 South.The Living WordMorning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Highway 77 and Blocker Road in Greenhead. White Double PondSunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located on Creek Road in Vernon. Yes Lord Deliverance COGICSunday School is at 10:30 a.m. Worship is at noon. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 739 Seventh Street in Chipley. CHURCHFrom Page A10 SEE MORE ONLINE AT CHIPLEYPAPER.COM

PAGE 12

A A 1 1 2 2 Saturday, February 24, 2018 | Washington County News CLASSIFIEDS NF-5036459 5028996FOXMEADOWAPARTMENTS25422ndStreet Chipley,Fl32428(850)638-0520 TDD7111&2bedroomsElderlyapartmentcommunity Incomeguidelinesapply EqualOpportunityProviderandEmployerThisInstitutionisanequalopportunityproviderandemployer Immediate Position for a Full Time Private Nurse!!!•Full-time LPN/CNA needed for young adult with multi-system illness in Destin Florida. Full Time Weekends with Benefits. Must have knowledge/willingness to work in a functional/holistic setting. Will work along side RN and a team of doctors. Detailed job description available upon request. Send resume to: laurap@how .gccoxmail.com is accepting applications for:Registered NursesFull-time 7-3, Monday-Friday Full-time 3-11 Shift, Monday-Friday Baylor Applications may be obtained from Marianna Health & Rehabilitation Center or online at www .cityofmarianna.com/mhrc 4295 5 th Avenue Marianna, FL 32446 (850) 482-8091 We offer the Florida State Retirement System and 100% Employer Paid Health and Dental Insurance 2-3577 INVITATION TO BID WASHINGTON COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Washington County School Board Room Remodeling 750 SINCLAIR STREET CHIPLEY, FLORIDA 32428 CLEMONS, RUTHERFORD & ASSOCIATES, INC. 2027 THOMASVILLE ROAD TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32308 PHONE (850)385-6153 You are invited to bid on a General Contract, including the remodeling of the existing Kate Smith Elementary into the Board Room for the Washington County School Board in Chipley, Florida. The construction/demolition consists of approximately 5,055 square feet. All Bids must be on a lump sum basis. All Bidders are to submit with Bid Package, a properly executed “Contractor’s Qualification Statement” AIA-305 which is to include a current financial statement, an experience, competence and performance report, and references from at least three prior projects similar in size and scope, along with the name of a contact person on each of those projects. A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held for General Contractors on March 8, at 10:00 AM CST at Washington County School Board Office located at 652 3rd Street, Chipley, FL 32428. All questions at the Pre-Bid Conference by General Contractors and Subcontractors shall be presented on the “Request for Clarification” form. See Section 000100 -Instructions to Bidders. Washington County School Board will receive sealed bids until 2:00 PM CST on March 15, at the Washington County School Board, Conference Room, 652 Third St., Chipley, FL 32428. Bids received after that time will not be accepted. Bids will be opened publicly and read aloud at 2:01 PM of the same date. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be examined at the Architect’s office: Clemons, Rutherford & Associates 2027 Thomasville Road Tallahassee, Florida 32308 (850) 385-6153 General Contractors and Mechanical, Plumbing and Electrical Subcontractors may obtain copies of the Bidding Documents at the Architect’s office in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders upon depositing the sum of $50 for an electronic set or $200 for each hard copy set of Documents. Bidders may receive bid documents in one of the following manners: (1) bring deposit check and pick up bid documents at the Architect’s office; (2) mail in deposit check and bid documents will be shipped by UPS ground $20.00 C.O.D. to cover shipping and handling; or (3) mail in deposit check and include a separate check of $10.00 for handling and your FedEx or UPS account number for shipping. Other interested parties may purchase complete sets of Bidding Documents for the sum of $50.00 for an electronic set or $200 for each hard copy set, which is non-refundable. Please note: All plan purchases are non-refundable. Bid Security in the amount of five percent (5%) of the Bid must accompany each Bid in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. A letter from a bonding company must accompany each bid, stating that the bidder is capable of obtaining all bonds required by the Construction Documents. The Washington County School Board reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any and all Bids. Feb 24, March 3, 2018 2-3578 CITY OF VERNON, FLORIDA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the City Council of the City of Vernon, Florida, will hold a public hearing for the purpose of enacting Ordinance No. 2018-221, at City Hall, Council Chambers, 2808 Yellow Jacket Drive, Vernon, Florida 32462, on March 05, 2018, at 7:00 P.M., titled as shown: ORDINANCE NO. 2018-221 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF VERNON, FLORIDA, ENTITLED “SEX OFFENDERS”, ADOPTING “SEX OFFENDER RESIDENCY PROHIBITION”; PROVIDING FOR PROHIBITIONS OF CERTAIN PROPERTY OWNERS FROM RENTING REAL PROPERTY TO SEXUAL OFFENDERS AND SEXUAL PREDATORS; PROVIDING FOR THE RESIDENCY PROHIBITIONS APPLICABLE TO CONVICTED SEXUAL OFFENDERS AND SEXUAL PREDATORS INVOLVING MINOR VICTIMS; PROVIDING FOR ENFORCEMENT AND PENALTIES; CONTAINING SEVERABILITY AND CONFLICT CLAUSES; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE The proposed ordinance may be inspected by the public at City Hall, 2808 Yellow Jacket Drive, Vernon, Florida 32462 during normal office hours. The office can be contacted by phone at 850-535-2444. If any person decides to appeal any decision made with respect to any matter considered at these hearings, such person will need a record of the proceeding and may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. The City of Vernon adheres to the Americans With Disabilities Act and will make reasonable modifications for access to these hearings upon request. Requests may be made to the City at the above address and must be made at least 48 hours in advance of the hearings to provide the requested service. Feb 24, 2018 FLORIDA CAR TAGS before 1956 Wanted. $1000+ for FL porcelain tags 1911-17. Jeff 727-424-1576 email gobucs13@aol.com Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1BR and 2BR apartment for rent downtown Bonifay. $450 and $500. Deposit required. 305-965-1635. For Rent 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments in Vernon. Clean, stove, refrigerator, central heat/air, convenient to Panama City Beach, section 8, Rental assistance. 850-638-4640 For Rent One Bedroom apartments for rent in Chipley. Convenient location. Stove and refrigerator furnished. No Pets. Smoke free environment. Call 850-638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For Rent 2BR/1BA Block Home North 2nd Street, Chipley $500/MO Serious inquires only, no call after 10pm Please Call 850-768-4812 For Rent 4BR/1.5BA, no pets, HUD approved. CH&A. Chipley. $800/MO, $800/DEP 850-638-7601. Rooms For Rent By Week.Comfortable rooms with microwave & refrigerator. All utilities paid. Cable and internet. Pet friendly at extra charge. Economy Lodge, Bonifay. 850-547-4167. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/ sewage/ lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 3BR/2BA Mobile Home on Rock Hill Church Rd, 3 miles from town. Quiet neighborhood. Water/Garbage furnished. NO PETS. Call 850-638-8570. For Sale Two acre plot and one acre plot in Jacob City, FL. Call 850-849-9338. Highway 77 2 miles south of Chipley 4-8 acre tract Bedie Road. Call Milton Peel at 850-638-1858 or 326-9109 Jean’s Cleaning Service Quality cleaning ant reasonable rates. Have good references and dependable. Call Jean 850-849-3535 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely.