Washington County news

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Title:
Washington County news
Uniform Title:
Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Chipley Fla
Creation Date:
June 22, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
Coordinates:
30.779167 x -85.539167 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began May 23, 1924.
General Note:
L.E. Sellers, editor.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000384704
oclc - 07260886
notis - ACC5987
lccn - sn 81000810
issn - 0279-795X
System ID:
UF00028312:00971

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By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT Cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Just off the winding road of State Road 177 in Holmes County, a ministry is still in the devel opment stages. Faith-Based Addic tion Regeneration Ministry, known locally as FARM, is projected to be a ministry to more than rehabilitate those with addiction; its goal is to regenerate men. We committed to pray for this place and this place only, said Shelly Chandler, pastor of the First Baptist Church of Bonifay. We wouldnt pray for ourselves. We wouldnt pray for our wives. We wouldnt pray for our children. We would pray only for three things: a name, a place and a man. Two years into prayer, there was still no answer to the name, place and man. The Holmes Baptist Associa tion leased us these 22 acres for ve years, which was given to the As sociation in 1953 for the purpose of ministry, Chandler said. Shortly af ter the place came, the name came and then the man came. God led us to this man, Jeremiah Guynn. He said Guynn would be liv ing on the facility and directing the program. Weve, me and my wife, been down in Dunklin Memorial Camp, for the last four years, Guynn said. Ive come from an 18-year addiction to drugs and alcohol, and Ive been saved for four years. The Lord has C onnec t with us 24/7 G et br eak ing new s videos e xpanded st or ies phot o galler ies opinions and mor e ... @WCN_HC T CH IPLE Y P APER C OM STAFF REPORT CHIPLEY Construction will be gin Monday along three miles of U.S. 90 in Washington County. Improvements consist of milling and resurfacing from St. Marys Road to the Holmes County line. Drivers can expect intermittent lane restrictions during construc tion. Drivers are reminded to obey the posted speed limit when travel ing through the work zone and to watch for construction workers and equipment entering and exiting the construction area. Planned construction activities are weather dependent and might be re-scheduled in the event of in clement weather. U.S. 90 resurfacing begins Monday FARM hopes to help area residents reap recovery CE CI L IA SPE ARS | The News Pastor of the First Baptist Church of Bonifay Shelly Chandler and Director of the FARM Jeremiah Guynn explain about the new regeneration program in Bonifay known as the FARM. BE P R EP AR ED FOR A D ISAS TE R C H I PLE Y The American Red Cross will be at the Washington County Public Library Chipley branch Monday, Oct. 6. Come visit with Red Cross representatives to nd out information on being prepared for a disaster and to learn about volunteer opportunities. For more information, call 638-1314. C OR E AN D RI GHT OF W AY T RAININ G C H I PLE Y There will be a Core and right of way training and exam from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 8, at the Washington County Agriculture Center in the East wing conference room. The cost for the training is $10. For more information, call 638-6180. W C PL F U N D RAIS E R C H I PLE Y The Washington County Public Library will hold a Pizza Hut Fundraiser, Friday, Oct. 10, at the Chipley Pizza Hut. Simply order a pizza anytime on Oct. 10 and present a fundraiser voucher at check out and the library earns money. Vouchers can be picked up at any branch of the Washington County Public Library. If you order online, simply enter promo code LUVLIBRARY. For more information, call 638-1314. Saturday, O C T OB E R 4 2014 INDEX NASCAR ................................. A8 Classieds ............................. A12 Phone: 850-638-0212 W ebsite: chipleypaper.com Fax: 850-638-4601 50 www.chipleypaper.com Volume 91, Number 80 Get your free copy now INSIDE For the latest breaking news, visit CHIPLEYPAPER.COM IN BRIEF Chipley High School Homecoming events PAGE A3 WEEKEND Washington County News See FARM A2 By ZACK McDONALD 747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com P ANAMA CITY A love-lost Chi pley woman who stabbed her boyfriend to death in an Ameri can Legion parking lot was sen tenced to almost 10 years in prison Thursday. Earnestine Tina Canuet, 65, pleaded no contest to manslaugh ter after an October 2013 stabbing at the Southport American Legion Post 375 at 6937 State 77, where 68year-old Richard Lielasus suffered a 6-inch gash to the left side of his stomach. DORI HO W AR D | Special to The News As crowds continue to cheer for the Vernon Yellow Jackets and Chipley Tigers during each schools Friday Night Lights, the Washington County News is taking a look at where many of these young athletes got their start: Pee-wee and middle school football. Be sure to pick up a copy of the upcoming Oct. 8 edition of the Washington County News for a glimpse at the future of football. Above, (from left) Dakota Williams protects his Chipley Mite teammate in last weeks game against the Graceville Mites. The Chipley Mites went on to win 42-20. Woman sentenced to 10 years for killing boyfriend See WOMAN A2 FOOTBALL THE FUTURE OF HOMETOWN 10 MOST W ANTED STEPHANIE CANO STEPHANIE CHESSON JEFFERY JOSLIN CHARLES BEACHUM CHARLIE GRIFFIN DAVID HANES JOHN DOWNING TAMALA PAYNE-KING BRENDA POGUE LINDA WA TKINS Washington Countys top absconders By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com C H I PLE Y Washington Countys 10 most wanted list doesnt read like a Whos Who of violent crimes, but the Washing ton County Sheriffs Ofce See W ANTED A2

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Local A2 | Washington County News Saturday, October 4, 2014 Hu ge Bl an ke t Sa le NO W 15 % di sc ou nt of f to tal pu rc ha se th ro ug h Oc to ber 31 20 14 (Y ou m us t pr esen t th is ad fo r di sc ou nt ) We st Po int Hom e Be d & Bat h Fa ct or y Ou tl et 14 14 Ma in St re et Ch ip le y, Fl ori da *I -1 0 Ex it 12 0, 1 mil e Nor th on le ft 850 -6 38 -9 42 1 ** No t to be co mb in ed wi th oth er di sco un t/ of fe rs No w Ac cepting Applications fo r GIBB CHIPLEY VILLAGE 141 1 Wa shingt on Squar e Dr iv e Chiple y, FL 32428 Apar tments fo r people with disabilities and ve ry lo w incomes. and Other Mobility Aids Fo r More Inf ormation, call: 850-57 6-71 45 TTY 711 NO TI CE OF VA LU E AD JU ST ME NT HE AR IN G Th e Va lu e Ad ju st me nt Bo ar d ha s se t Oc to be r 8, 20 14 at 9: 00 a .m as the dat e an d ti me fo r pe ti ti ons to be he ar d at Th e Wa sh in gt on Co un ty An ne x Bo ar d Me eti ng Ro om 13 31 So ut h Bo ule va rd Ch ip le y, Fl or id a 32 42 8 Total enclosed area: 6452 square feet Resident staff area: 1,367 square feet Congregate living area: 5,083 square feet Total number of client rooms: 8 Total number of client beds: 16 Clear oor area per room: 172 square feet Group dining room area: 740 square feet PROPOSED FLOOR PLAN FARM BUILDING LAUNDRY BUILDING FIRE PUMP BUILDING STATE ROAD 177 The FARM location FARM from page A1 used some different situa tions and circumstances to get my attention. He went on to say every one has been affected by addiction at some point, through friends, family members, church members or even if its just the guy who stole something out of your yard to pay for drugs or booze. God gave us a vision of this property, and when we came to look at it, we knew this is where we were sup posed to be, Guynn said. It is really beautiful here, and until six months ago, I didnt even know Bonifay existed. Weve got the sup port of not only the local sheriffs ofces but the sur rounding counties sheriffs ofces and the continued outpouring of the surround ing community has been overwhelming. He said the 22-acre facil ity will be used to the fullest, with baptisms at the creek, a dormitory for at least six men and therapy to in clude the mens family on weekends. God is creating here a safe environment for addicts to come off of the streets and to be able to come here and have a safe place to get a relationship with Jesus Christ, Guynn said. I be lieve if were going to save these guys, they must have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Were not about a rehab facility. Were about lasting changes which needs a regeneration. The denition of rehabili tation, he explained, was to return one to their former state. If you brought me back to my former state, I was about 14 when I started using drugs. My parents were divorced, and if you took me back to my former state I would still have my issues, Guynn said. Thats why we need to be regener ated into a new being, to be a new man, to be the father and the husband that Gods called us to be, and thats what were going to teach. The time frame of the program is 10 months with a ve-step program that in cludes introduction, orienta tion, restoration, evaluation and mentorship. Washington County Sher iff Bobby Haddock stood up to voice his support of the program. We wanted to get to gether and start some kind of program started right here, Haddock said. It comes from the faithfulness of people praying for the last three years, and now you are seeing the fruits of their labor. This is a program that works; there are people from this community right now that have been to that program and have come back changed people. He said what made it worthwhile was seeing the dramatic change that saved a persons life, marriage and family. When you see someone served papers in my jail for a divorce and we get him in Dunklin and his wife says no more because they chased him all over Gods creation because hes strung out on meth, then he goes to Dunklin and his family is brought in, hes reunited with his family, he comes back a changed person and that hes still with his family to this day, which makes it all worth it, Haddock said. Helping just that one fam ily breaks the chain of addic tion in that family and thats whats going on. Haddock said in his 36 years of law enforcement, he has not seen the secular programs work. Its going to take God in their lives to make a change, he said. Weve got nine sheriffs committed to this, and thats what its got to take to help this pro gram. I will challenge each and every one of you to go back to your churches and ask to put this program on your budget every month because the situation is waxing worse, from mari juana, to crack, mass meth and God knows what else, and this is going to be the turning of the tide. For more information, visit www.thefarmnwf.org. En route to the jail after the stabbing, Canuet was in hysterics, making several outbursts, according to ar rest records. He broke my heart, she said. He told me to suck it up and get over it; I dont know why I did it but I just did, and Ive never hurt anyone before. Lielasus died from his wounds about a month later. The charges against Canuet were upgraded from aggravated battery with a deadly weapon to manslaughter before a doctor deemed her incom petent to proceed in Febru ary due to depression. One witness told inves tigators Canuet came into the Legions bar Oct. 21 waving the bloodied 12-inch blade in the air, stating, I did it; I killed him, accord ing to arrest records. Circuit Court Judge Eli jah Smiley ruled Canuet was competent to continue court proceedings Aug. 18. She pleaded no con test on Aug. 28 and Smiley sentenced her Thursday to almost 10 years in pris on followed by two years probation. WOMAN from page A1 WANTED from page A1 still has a ranking of its top warrants for wanted per sons. If you know the where abouts or information on any of theses individuals, call the WCSO at 638-6111 or anonymously by call ing Washington County Crimestoppers at 638TIPS. 1) S TE P HANIE CHESSON: VOP-Poss Meth 2) S TE P HANIE CANO: VOPGrand Theft 3) JEFFERY CHRISTO P HER JOSLIN: VOP trafcking in stolen property 4) CHARLES B EA C HUM: Opi um or deriv-sell, Opium or deriv-trafc 5) CHARLIE G RIFFIN: VOPPoss Meth, Poss Marijua na, Poss drug para 6) D AVID H ANES: Larceny 7) JOHN D OWNING: VOPTrafc in stolen property 8) T AMALA PAYNE-KING: VOPMarijuana SMD x4, Poss Meth 9) B RENDA POGUE: FTAGrand Theft 10) L INDA W AT K INS: FTASmuggle contraband into detention facility, Poss control subs, Larcpetit God is creating here a safe environment for addicts to come off of the streets and to be able to come here and have a safe place to get a relationship with Jesus Christ. I believe if were going to save these guys, they must have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Were not about a rehab facility. Were about lasting changes which needs a regeneration. Jeremiah Guynn FARM director NWF State coach among 3 injured in vehicle crash By TRISTA PRUETT Halifax Media Services VALP ARAISO Hours after he was own by a medical helicopter following a headon collision Thursday, North west Florida State Colleges womens basketball coach remained hospitalized with serious injuries. Patrick Harrington and his wife, Lori, were in their 2010 Ford Fu sion traveling north on State Road 85 when they were hit head-on just before 11 a.m., according to the Florida Highway Patrol. The crash occurred just south of Northwest Florida Regional Air ports entrance. The other driver, 53-year-old Arthur Clyburn, crossed three southbound lanes and the median before he entered the northbound lanes and struck the Harringtons, the FHP reported. Clyburn, of Greeneld, Ohio, was own to Sacred Heart Hospital in serious condi tion. His condition had been upgraded to fair by Thurs day evening. Emergency crews had to cut Clyburn and Patrick Harrington out of their vehicles. Clyburns 2014 Nissan Versa and the Harringtons Fusion both sustained $20,000 in damage, the FHP said. Patrick Harrington was taken to Baptist Hospital in Pensacola in critical condition. He had injuries to his legs and had already under gone one surgery as of Thursday evening, according to NWF State athletic director Ramsey Ross. Lori Harrington was taken by ambulance to Fort Walton Beach Medical Center in serious condi tion, according to the FHP. Ross said she had cracked ribs and vertebrae. She was released early Thursday afternoon to be with her husband, he added. The accident shut down north bound trafc on State 85 for at least 90 minutes. It blocked access to the airport and stranded some passengers waiting for rides. The wreckage was cleared in time to prevent ma jor air travel delays. Both medical helicopters landed in the northbound lanes. It was not clear why Clyburn crossed into the northbound lanes, although the FHP reported that al cohol was not involved. Harrington, a Boston native, has coached the Lady Raiders for four years. He has led them to a 100-25 record and back-to-back quarter nal appearances in the NJCAA Di vision I Tournament. Northwest Florida Daily News Sports Editor Seth Stringer con tributed to this report. PATRICK HARRINGTON

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Local Washington County News | A3 Saturday, October 4, 2014 So we ll Tra ctor Co ., Inc. 2841 Hwy 77 North, Pa nama City www .so we lltr actor co .com So we ll and Ku bota 40 Ye ars of Tr usted Pe rf or manc e We Tr ade for Any thin g That Don t Eat! Financing Arranged (W AC) Style Wars Monday: Merica Day (Dress in patriotic attire or as a particular patriotic landmark.) Tuesday: Character Day (Dress creatively as your favorite character.) Wednesday: Gender Bender Day (Dress as the opposite sex) ( NOTE : No students can make inappropriate gestures regarding the outt!) Thursday: Throw Back Thursday (Dress as yourself in the past or as a past generation.) Friday: Blue and Gold Day (Be true to your school!) All attire must meet school dress code! Boy Hush/Girl Hush days Monday: Boy Hush Day Tuesday: Girl Hush Day See Mrs. Schimpf each morning to play and earn points for your grade! Wear your hush tags with pride and avoid talking to the opposite sex. On Boy Hush Day, the girls try to win tags and points by making the boys talk. On Girl Hush Day, the boys get revenge and try to get the girls tags. The girl collecting the most boy hush tags will become Miss Irresistible. The boy collecting the most girl hush tags will become Mr. Irresistible. Students will turn all tags in to Mrs. Schimpf for 20 spirit points each at the end of each day. Powderpuff games and bonre THURSDAY, OCT 9 The annual PowderPuff games will be held at the stadium beginning at 5:30 p.m. Admission will be $4. Seniors, juniors, sophomores, and freshmen, come out and sup-port your team! The nal scores will be multiplied by 1,000 to add to the spirit point totals. Afterward, the annual Tiger Spirit Bonre will be held on the old CHS baseball eld next to the football stadium. All students will sign in to earn points for their grades. Senior football players will torch the bonre and stu-dents will have paper efgies of the Hilliard Red Flashes and will be invited during the program to help burn the Hilliard Flashes! Float Construction/Class Banner Contact your class sponsors and ofcers to get involved. Build your oats during the week and weekend before Homecoming! Spirit Competition Class Spirit Competition intensies during the week of Oct. 6-10 as seniors, juniors, sophomores and freshmen work to earn Spirit Points to help their class win the Homecoming 2014 Spirit Battle! One and only one class can earn the ultimate title of the most spirited class of 2014-2015 school year. Help your class win the title and make this Homecoming 2014 week a memorable one! Penny Wars Earn Spirit Points for your grade by putting spare pennies your own jar. Put other coins and dollars in the other grades jars to subtract points. Each penny is one point. Other coins and dollars subtract points from your totals. Play during rst and second lunches outside the lunchroom. Spirit Points For Class Game Competitions on Wednesday (See Mrs. Schimpf for game details and signup!) Float Construction/Class Sign Style Wars Boy Hush/Girl Hush Penny Wars PowderPuff Games Scores Bonre Attendance Homecoming day schedule 8 a.m.: Homecoming Court Pictures 9:30 a.m.: Presentation of Homecoming Court 11 a.m.: Parade Lineup at old CHS track 12:30 p.m.: Parade 6:30 p.m.: Pregame Activities 7 p.m.: Football Game, Chipley Tigers vs Hilliard Flashes 9:30 p.m.: Midnight-Dance Party TIGERRRRRA VE!!!!!!!!! Homecoming Dance Party Date: Friday, Oct. 10 Time: 9:30 p.m. to midnight Place: CHS Gymnasium Admission: $5 or $3 with a canned food item Attire: Casual non-revealing clothing **No one 21 or older admitted **ID will be checked for non-CHS students! Thank you, DJ Kerry!!!!! CHIPLEY HIGH SCHOOL HOMECOMING Special to The News As students at The Baptist College of Florida (BCF) in Graceville look forward to the upcom ing Missions Conference scheduled, Monday, Oct. 20 through Wednesday, Oct. 22, many have shared their own missions sto ries from this past sum mer while serving on min istry teams, internships, D-NOW staffs, summer camp counselors, Vaca tion Bible School (VBS) coordinators, and disas ter relief workers. BCF Missions Major Justin Toffolio spent 12 weeks in Nazareth, Israel working in the chaplaincy program at the English Hospital preparing equip ment for operating rooms in the sterilization ward. He also dressed up as a villager at the Nazareth Village where there is a replica of rst century Nazareth illustrating what life would have been like while Jesus was ful lling his earthly minis try. According to Toffolio, God provided multiple opportunities for him to share the gospel during the summer as well as taught him how to truly love people, regardless of how different. Christian Counseling Major Kriss Marek spent her summer at Snowbird Wilderness Outtters in Andrews, NC. Mareks primary goal was to build intentional relationships with the campers and share with them the gos pel of Jesus Christ. While at Snowbird, Marek taught and facilitated the archery recreation for the camp, designed spe cically for endurance and reliance. This sum mer, God taught Marek about her own identity in Christ and the impor tance of seeking the Lord in all things. Kourtney Burcroff, BCF Ministry Studies Major, served in Jackson ville, Fla., as a VBS Sum mer Missionary working with the Florida Baptist Convention. She worked alongside churches that were organizing and host ing Vacation Bible Schools in multiple locations throughout the city. Bur croff traveled to numer ous apartment communi ties to share the gospel with people who had nev er heard about the love of Christ before. Because of her location, she was also able to share Christ with a diverse population. Bur croff stated that over the summer God showed her that she is a missionary wherever she goes. Students at The Bap tist College of Florida are called to be on mis sion every day. This past summer, over sixty BCF students shared the gos pel in other parts of the world, living out their passion to shine the light of Christ wherever they go. To learn more about missions and the upcom ing missions conference, please call 263-3261 ext. 513 or visit the website at www.baptistcollege.edu. By JENNIFER HARWOOD 747-5073 | @PCNHJennHarwood jharwood@pcnh.com P ANAMA CITY The AT&T Foundation present ed a $50,000 contribution to the Florida State Univer sity Panama City STEM In stitute on Wednesday as an investment in increasing interest among K-12 stu dents in science, technol ogy, engineering and math. Its that hook to get students interested in STEM, said Ray Walker, regional director for AT&T Florida. The investment is well spent because those jobs are growing tremendously. Steve Leach, interim dean at FSU Panama City, said 267,000 people are em ployed in STEM industries in the state and that 411,000 workers will be needed by 2018. The institute ap plied for funding in hopes of getting more young people interested in those disciplines. Ginger Littleton, direc tor of the institute and a Bay District School Board member, said the district doesnt have resources to pad STEM education. Leach echoed Little tons concern, saying there is constant pressure to cut support for programs at the college level, so dona tions from businesses are vital to helping higher edu cation institutions churn out students with skills in demand by employers. I cannot say thank you enough, Littleton told the foundation. You know it takes a village to educate a child. The institute gets its un dergrads in on the village education model by having them teach the next gener ation of STEM students in summer camp programs. Middle school and el ementary students seem to be more mesmerized by the technology, said Cody Slaybaugh, a 19-year-old junior. Slaybaugh and two other computer science majors, 19-year-old Emily Hennessy and 21-year-old Brandon Yates, were at the press conference to show benefactors how funding is used to spark interest for elementary, middle and high schoolers. The group presented Sam E. Nole, a 23-inch tall programmable humanoid robot the institute acquired with other funding from AT&T Foundation. The ro bot is a tool for teaching and promoting STEM. Littleton said part of the grant will be used to take Sam E. Nole on the road to meet with local businesses and drum up more support for STEM programs. The robot also will visit classrooms in Bay District Schools and in neighboring rural school districts. The institute strives to help public schools meet education standards aimed to make students more procient and competi tive with technology in the workplace. For businesses, we want them to understand how donations like this can educate our students expo nentially, Littleton said. With greater empha sis on technology-based learning, students are en couraged to take more re sponsibility for their edu cation. That means they must be motivated to take more challenging classes in preparation for lucrative STEM careers. The easy translation is for K-12 to pay attention in math and science and not take the low-hanging fruit as far as courses go, Littleton said. FSU PC receives $50,000 for STEM S P EC I AL T O T H E NE WS This summer, BCF Ministry Studies Major Kourtney Burcroff served as a Summer Missionary with the Florida Baptist Convention. BCF students on mission

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LIBRARY HOURS WAUSAU LIBRARY Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: ClosedH O L MES COUNTY LIBRARY ( B ONIFAY) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: ClosedWASHINGTON COUNTY LIBRARY (CHIP L EY) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed VERNON LIBRARY Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: ClosedS UNNY H I LL S LIBRARY Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: ClosedMON D AY 9:30 a.m.: Car Seat Safety Classes rst and third Monday at the Healthy Start Annex for more information call 547-8684 ext 16 or 18. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dinning; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.: Holmes County Urgent Care Clinic. For more information call 547-8500. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach ofce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999.TUES D AY 8 to 10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. Home Extension Club Meeting/Luncheon at Hinsons Crossroads Fire Department 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dinning; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 12:30 p.m. Washington County Council on Aging Tuesday Group 4 p.m. Explore a Story at the Washington County Public Library in Chipley second and fourth Tuesday for more information call 638-1314 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.: Holmes County Urgent Care Clinic. For more information call 547-8500. 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 6:10 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at speedball 6:10 p.m., Early bird 6:20, session 6:50 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 6387654 or 638-7654 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AW E D NES D AY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise 10 a.m.: Two hour Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) class on the fourth Wednesday of each month at the Healthy Start Annex in Bonifay. For more information call 547-8684 ext: 16 or 18 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dinning; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Dominoes, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Bible Study 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.: Holmes County Urgent Care Clinic. For more information call 547-8500. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURS D AY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. 11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County residents only) 9 a.m. Washington County Council on Aging Art Enthusiast 9 a.m. 3 p.m. Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 638-0093; every third Thursday 10 a.m.: Car Seat Safety Classes third Thursday of each month at the Ponce de Leon City Hall. For more information call 547-8684 ext. 16 or 18. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise 10 a.m.: Two hour Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) class on the fourth Thursday of each month at the Ponce de Leon City Hall. For more information call 547-8684 ext. 16 or 18. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church on Fifth Street in Chipley 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dinning; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society second Thursday of each month. The public is invited to attend. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.: Holmes County Urgent Care Clinic. For more information, call 547-8500. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AFRI D AY 6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dinning; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery call 703-0347 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper 4th Friday of every month January September. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.: Holmes County Urgent Care Clinic. For more information call 547-8500. 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a get-together for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Methodist Youth Center in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church.SATUR D AY 8 a.m.: North Bay Clan of The Lower Muskogee Creek Yard Sale 1st Saturday of the month until 2 p.m. at 1560 Lonnie Road 9a.m. to 1 p.m.: The Holmes County Community Health Clinic located at 203 W. Iowa St., Bonifay, will be open the rst and third Saturday 10 a.m.: The Alford Community Health Clinic will be open the 2nd and 4th Saturdays of each month, until the last patient is seen. 10 a.m. noon: Childrens education day 4th Saturday of every month North Bay Clan Tribal Grounds, 1560 Lonnie Road.SUN D AY 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at Graceville-Campbellton Hospital in Graceville. Local A4 | Washington County News Saturday, October 4, 2014 POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Washington County News P. O Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 USP S 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $20; 26 weeks: $28.70; 52 weeks: $48.60 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $24.30; 26 weeks: $36.40; 52 weeks: $60.70 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copy right 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bareeld, Publisher Carol Kent, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on F acebook or tweet us @WC N H C T CONTACT USPUBLISHER Nicole Bareeld: nbareeld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@chipleypaper.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION 850-638-0212 clamb@ chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service 800-345-8688 EDITOR Carol Kent: ckent@ chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 ADVERTISING Jessica Collins: jcollins@chipley paper.com By JIM SAUNDERS The News Service of Florida TALLAHASSEE A high-stakes le gal battle about the constitution ality of the states congressional districts should be fast-tracked to the Florida Supreme Court, a divided appeals court ruled Wednesday. Under the ruling, the 1st Dis trict Court of Appeal would not take up a challenge to districts redrawn in August by the Legis lature and to other decisions by a circuit judge. Instead, the case would go directly to the Supreme Court a relatively unusual move known as certication of the case to the higher court. A panel of the appeals court, in a 2-1 decision, agreed on the cer tication issue with voting-rights groups that have waged a drawnout legal battle about whether congressional district lines were drawn in 2012 and redrawn this year to favor Republicans. While the redrawn districts would not take effect until the 2016 elec tions, the majority of the appeals court pointed to the lengthy histo ry of the case in deciding to pass it along to the Supreme Court. In this case, any doubts about the need for immediate review by the Supreme Court should be re solved in favor of certication, said the opinion, written by Judge Philip Padovano and joined by Judge Simone Marstiller. But in a dissent, Judge Scott Makar disputed the need to quick ly send the case to the Supreme Court because the new districts wont take effect until 2016. Certication amounts to a 911 call to the Florida Supreme Court: Youre needed now! Makar wrote. That call is not justied in this case; ample time existing for the normal appellate process to be followed over the next two years. This (appeals) court can handle the matter ex peditiously, leaving more than adequate time for Supreme Court review, if it deems it necessary. Leon County Circuit Judge Terry Lewis this summer tossed out congressional districts drawn by the Legislature in 2012, ruling the districts violated the antigerrymandering Fair Districts constitutional amendments vot ers approved in 2010. Lewis sin gled out districts held by incum bent U.S. Reps. Corrine Brown and Daniel Webster. Lawmakers met in August for a special session to redraw the map. Lewis upheld the revised districts, prompting an appeal from plaintiffs in the case, which include the League of Women Voters of Florida, Common Cause and individual voters. In a notice of appeal led with the 1st District Court of Appeal, the plaintiffs said they would challenge Lewis ruling that up held the redrawn map. But they also indicated the appeal would involve parts of Lewis earlier ruling that struck down the 2012 map. The Supreme Court already is grappling with one appeal that is an offshoot of the redistrict ing case. That appeal deals with whether records of Republican consultant Pat Bainter and his rm, Gainesville-based Data Targeting Inc., should have been used in the redistricting case in circuit court. Redistricting heads to state Supreme Court Community CALENDAR ARRL Foundation accepting scholarship applications Special to the News The ARRL Founda tion has begun accepting scholarship applications from eligible young radio amateurs pursuing postsecondary education. In dividuals and clubs sup port many of the 80 schol arships, ranging from $500 to $5,000, that are awarded annually. One applicant will be selected to receive the prestigious William R. Goldfarb Memorial Schol arship, a gap scholar ship that assists with the cost of college through out four academic years to earn a bachelors de gree in a business, com puter, medical, nursing, engineering or sciencerelated eld. Applicants for all scholarships must be active radio amateurs and must complete and submit the online application. For more informa tion: www.arrl.org/news/ the-arrl-foundationinvites-scholarshipapplications-for-2015-16academic-year. WRNC hosts Hall of Fame induction Special to the News Washington Rehabilita tion and Nursing Center will host a Hall of Fame Caf celebration at 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 9, to honor residents at the local nurs ing home. The purpose of the Hall of Fame program is to recognize the out standing accomplishments and experiences of the cen ters residents. Employees, volunteers and community members also are honored for their contributions to the home and society as a whole. This years honorees are: Ralph Sanders Elaine Engram Thomas Nunnery Janet Kinney, COO Northwest Florida Com munity Hospital Washington Rehabilita tion and Nursing Center is one of 122 locations operat ed by Louisville, Ky., based Signature HealthCARE. The Hall of Fame event was hosted annually by each Signature home at dif ferent times throughout the year. In recent years, Signa ture has taken a different approach by having each center host its Hall of Fame ceremony on the same day, creating a synchronized, company-wide event. Our residents have given so much to their hometowns and our nation, and these contributions deserve to be celebrated, Signature President and CEO Joe Steier said. The Hall of Fame Caf induction ceremonies are a small way for us to say thanks. AAA: Gas prices to keep dropping in October Special to the News Drivers across the United States paid the lowest September gas prices since 2010. The national average was $3.39 per gallon, which was about 13 cents less than last year and 44 cents cheaper than 2012. Throughout September, Florida gas prices averaged $3.32, which was 14 cents cheaper than last year, and 46 cents less expensive than 2012. In Georgia, the average price was also $3.32, which was 7 cents cheaper than last year and 43 cents less than 2012. The average price in Tennessee was $3.17, which was 56 cents less than last year and 47 cents cheaper than 2012. Gas prices typically slide in Sep tember as the busy driving season ends and because many stations begin sell ing less costly winter-blend gasoline on Sept. 16, said Mark Jenkins, spokes man, AAA The Auto Club Group. Gas prices generally have been less expensive than in recent years due to the dramatic boom in North American petroleum production. Gas prices could fall another 20 cents per gallon by the time families load up the car for Thanksgiving, Jen kins said. If everything goes smoothly, buying gas for less than $3.00 per gal lon should be refreshingly common in the southeastern U.S. this winter.

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From staff reports 5K Bull Run and Fun Run BONIFAY The Bonifay Kiwanis Club will host the annual 5K Bull Run and Fun Run at 8 a.m. today, Oct. 4, at Middlebrooks Park in Bonifay. The entry fees will be as follows: If you pre-register before Sept. 30, the cost will be $15; day of run is $20. The fun run is for children 12 years and younger only, and pre-registration is $10 and race day registration is $15. For more information, call 373-5003. Pot luck supper MARIANNA There will be a pot luck meeting supper from 4 to 6 p.m. today Oct 4, at Jennings Park on South Jefferson Street in Marianna. Talk in will be on the club repeater 146.670. Come and enjoy a time of fellowship and fun. Meat will be furnished by the club; bring something to go along with it. Ice also will be furnished. Pancake breakfast BONIFAY The Bonifay Fire Department will host a pancake breakfast from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m., today, Oct. 4, at the re station. Plates will be $6 and will consist of pancakes, sausage, milk, orange juice and coffee. Kent-Collins reunion BLACK, Ala. The annual Kent-Collins family reunion will be at 10 a.m. Sunday, Oct.5, at the Black Community Center in Black, Ala. Bring a covered dish or dishes to share at lunch and any photos or other mementos. For more information, call Betty Ruth Collins Paulding at 334-692-3375. Be prepared for a disaster CHIPLEY The American Red Cross will be at the Washington County Public Library Chipley branch Monday, Oct. 6. Come visit with Red Cross representatives to nd out information on being prepared for a disaster and to learn about volunteer opportunities. For more information, call 638-1314. Core and right of way training CHIPLEY There will be a Core and ride of way training and exam from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 8, at the Washington County Agriculture Center in the East wing conference room. The cost for the training is $10. For more information, call 638-6180. WCPL fundraiser CHIPLEY The Washington County Public Library will host a Pizza Hut Fundraiser, Friday, Oct. 10, at the Chipley Pizza Hut. Simply order a pizza anytime on Oct. 10 and present a fundraiser voucher at check out and the library earns money. Vouchers may be picked up at any branch of the Washington County Public Library. If you order on line simply enter promo code LUVLIBRARY. For more information, call 638-1314. Foundation raf e BONIFAY Doctors Memorial Hospital Foundation is raf ing a weekend getaway to Lake Town Wharf in Panama City Beach on Friday, Oct. 24, through Monday, Oct. 27, and a $100 gift card. Accommodations include a two bedroom, two bath condo unit with bunk beds. The room will sleep six. The drawing will be Friday, Oct. 10. Tickets will be one for $5 or ve for $20. Call the hospital and ask for Cardio at 547-8000. Miss Florida Woodlands CHIPLEY The 2014 Miss Florida Woodlands and Miss Florida Timberlands Scholarship Pageant is scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 11, at the Washington County Agriculture Center in Chipley. For more information, email woodlands@yahoo.com, go to miss woodlands. tripod.com or call 334-3893927 or 256-306-4401. Worthington reunion VERNON The Worthington reunion will be at noon Saturday, Oct. 11, at the Hinson Cross Roads Fire Department. Bring a covered dish. For more information, call Johnny Worthington at 535-0310 or 849-7827. Curry family reunion WESTVILLE The annul Curry Family Reunion will be at Izagora Church, Sunday, Oct. 12. Church services are 11 a.m. to noon. A covered dish lunch will be served in the church fellowship hall. Everyone is encouraged to bring their favorite dish to share. Please bring and share any family history, pictures and other articles you may have. Door prizes and special recognition will be given. If you need directions, call Robert Curry 527-6402. HCHS luncheon CHIPLEY The Holmes County High School luncheon will be at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 14, at Baileys Surf and Turf in Chipley. Kick-Off BONIFAY Holmes/ Washington County American Cancer Society Relay For Life will kick-off at 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 16, at Carmel Assembly of God in Bonifay. The church is at 1485 Carmel Church Road. For more information, call Dena Cooper at 768-1221 or Shannon Rodriguez at 596-1231. Caregiver support group CHIPLEY There will be a caregiver support group meeting at 1 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 16, at the First Presbyterian Church in Chipley. The special guest will be Victoria Heuler, a board certi ed elder law and guardianship attorney from Tallahassee. For more information, call 566-2553. Stephen King fright night CHIPLEY The Chipley Branch of the Washington County Public Library will host a Stephen King fright night at 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 16, with the showing of Carrie. The movie is rated R and anyone under the age of 18 must be accompanied by and adult. For more information, call 638-1314. Prayer rally BONIFAY The 2014 Public Square Prayer Rally will be from noon to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 18, at Memorial Park on U.S. Highway 79 in Bonifay. For more information, call Mike DeRuntz at 239-273-6956. Indian summer childrens fun day CHIPLEY The Lower Muscogee Creek Tribe will host an Indian Summer Childrens Fun day from 1 to 5 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 18, at the tribal grounds. There will be free hot dogs, drinks, games, hay ride, prizes and bouncy house. The fun day is open to the public. The grounds are 4.9 miles south of Wal-Mart in Chipley at 1560 Lonnie Road. For more information, call Gerald Brock at 415-2833. Domestic violence softball tournament CHIPLEY The Washington Holmes Domestic Violence Task Force will host the second annual co-ed softball tournament at 9 a.m. Saturday, Oct 18, at Pals Park in Chipley. This will be a single elimination tournament and open to novice teams (no travel ball teams). The concession stand will be open so plan a family day full of fun. Get a team of coworkers and friends together to play. For more information, email Missy Lee at Mylisa_Lee@dcf. state. .us. Tama international pow wow WINGHAM, Ga. The Tama International Pow Wow will be Friday, Oct. 17, through Sunday, Oct. 19, at the Lower Muskogee Creek Tribe grounds. Entrance fee is $3 per vehicle. Gates will open at 5 p.m. Friday, at 9:30 a.m. Saturday and at noon Sunday. There will be native made crafts, dancing, native food a living history village and much more. The grounds are at 107 Tall Pine Drive, in Whigham, Ga. For more information, call 229-762-3165. Aquatic pesticide CHIPLEY There will be an Aquatic Pesticide training and exam from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday, Oct. 20, at the Washington County Agriculture Center in the East Wing conference room. The cost for the training is $5. For more information, call 638-6180. HCE meeting VERNON The Home Extension Club luncheon and meeting will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21, at Hinson Crossroads Fire Department Vernon. Washington/Holmes County Christmas sign ups BONIFAY/CHIPLEY Washington and Holmes County Christmas sign ups will be in Washington County from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 22, at the Agricultural Center located at 800 Highway 90 in Chipley. Holmes County Christmas sign ups will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21, at the Agricultural Center at 1169 U.S. Highway 90 in Bonifay. The sign ups are for food and toys for families with children 12 and younger. Tri-County is assisting children 13 and older. Food will be available for all others. Bring to sign ups a photo ID for the applicant and all adults in household, birth certi cates for all children, social security card for everyone in household, proof of all expenses in house hold, and proof of all household income. For more information, call 769-5259 or 638-4520 ext. 28. Tuesday movie CHIPLEY The Chipley Branch of the Washington County Public Library will be showing Marvels Captain America Winter Soldier at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21. The movie is rated PG-13 with a running time of 136 minutes. For more information, call 638-1314. Where Theres a Will Theres a Murder BONIFAY Bonifay Middle School would like to announce the upcoming fall play, Where Theres a Will, Theres a Murder, at 6 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday, Oct. 21 and 23, at the Holmes County High Auditorium. When 10 distant relatives learn each of them is about to inherit $1 million, wheels begin to turn and plots hatch. If someone doesnt make it through the stormy weekend ahead, their share will be divided equally among the others. It doesnt take a mathematical genius to gure out that less is more. As bodies pile up, the laughs come fast and furiously in this whodunit that proves that Where Theres a Will, Theres a Murder. Reserved seating will be available for purchase two weeks before the show opens. Stephen King fright night CHIPLEY The Chipley Branch of the Washington County Public Library will host a Stephen King fright night at 4 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 23, with the showing of Misery. The movie is rated R and anyone younger the age of 18 must be accompanied by and adult. For more information, call 638-1314. Halloween festival MARIANNA In our continued effort to raise money to keep the shelter open the shelter will hold a Halloween Festival from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 24. We will be having a haunted house, hay rides, games for the kids, and Trick or Treat goodies. Partners For Pets is a nonpro t, no-kill animal shelter at 4011 Maintenance Drive in Marianna. Food Day BONIFAY The Florida Department of Health in Holmes County and Farm Share of Quincy have partnered together in celebration of National Food Day by sponsoring a free event to promote healthier diets and good nutrition. Fresh fruits and vegetables will be distributed to those in attendance from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 24, at the Holmes County Agriculture Center. For more information, call Leann Jones R.N. at 547-8500 ext. 240. No person shall, on the grounds of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion or sex be excluded from participation in, be denied bene ts of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity receiving or bene ting from federal nancial assistance. Sensory impaired or Limited-English Pro ciency patients will be provided with necessary aids and interpreters at no cost by calling Fran Amerson at 547-8500 ext. 236. Gilmore reunion CHIPLEY The fourth Gilmore reunion will be Saturday, Oct. 25, at the Bonnett Pond Church fellowship hall. Doors will open at 11 a.m. Bring your best dishes and desserts. There will be a memory table set up. For more information, call Geraldine McFatter at 892-5036. Sunland fall festival MARIANNA The Sunland Fall Festival will be Saturday, Oct. 25, at the center. The festival will begin at 9 a.m. with a parade, entertainment, local artists. For more information, call 482-9210. Syrupmakers meeting BLOUNTSTOWN The fall meeting of the southern syrupmakers association will be from 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 25, at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement in Blountstown. For more information, call 674-2777. Miss Jackson County cotton pageant GRACEVILLE The Miss Jackson County Cotton Pageant will be Saturday, Oct. 25, at the Graceville Civic Center. The pageant is open to girls from Calhoun, Liberty, Jackson, Washington Gadsden and Holmes Counties, ages 3 through 21. Entry fee is $30 with an optional $10 for photogenic. Attire for Tiny Miss and Little Miss heirloom or shot pageant dresses and for Young Miss through Miss the attire will be evening gowns. There will be an evening gown competition with on stage questions. On stage questions will be excluded for thee and four year olds. The deadline to enter will be Friday, Oct. 17. Age groups will be Tiny Miss, Little Miss, Young Miss, Junior, Teen Miss and Miss. For more information, call Janice Cloud at 663-4529 or 557-2725. Punching for pink BONIFAY In celebration of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the Florida Department of Health in Holmes County will offer Punching for Pink classes. Classes are open to anyone in the community. Classes will last about 45 minutes and focus on toning and cardiovascular endurance. Must be 15 years of age or older. Classes will be offered every Thursday during the month of October from 5:15 to 6 p.m. Gift bags will be provided while supplies last. Location will be the Bonifay Athletic Club. Classes are free but a $2 donation per class is requested. All donations will go to support the Holmes County PINK (Protection Is N Knowledge) Program. This program was established in 2006 to assist uninsured, low income women between the ages of 35 and 49 to receive a screening mammogram. No registration required. For more information, please contact Leann Jones at 547-8500 ext. 240 with any questions. No person shall, on the grounds of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion or sex be excluded from participation in, be denied bene ts of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity receiving or bene ting from federal nancial assistance. Sensory impaired or Limited-English Pro ciency patients will be provided with necessary aids and interpreters at no cost by calling Fran Amerson at 547-8500 ext. 236. Local Washington County News | A5 Saturday, October 4, 2014 Community EVENTS Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER

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Local A6 | Washington County News Saturday, October 4, 2014

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Washington County News | A7 Saturday, October 4, 2014 Local | State Murder defendant takes the stand By ZACK McDONALD 747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY The Fountain man accused of stabbing, shoot ing and bludgeoning his neigh bor before robbing him took the stand Thursday against charges he planned the murder to gain riches. Philip Dean Brock, 58, has been jailed since December 2012 after Bay County Sheriffs Depu ties found 65-year-old Terry Bra zils decaying body. Brazils throat was cut, he was shot in the stom ach and beaten with a blunt object after apparently being bound with duct tape and hooded with a pillow case. Investigators found several items including guns and coins missing from Brazils home in side the home of Brock, but three different juries have failed to con vict him on the charges. Defense attorneys rested their case Thursday after Brock testied on his own behalf. While prosecutors have paint ed Brock as destitute and liv ing in squalor, he took the stand to dispute the claim he desired more and said he enjoyed his liv ing conditions. I had clean clothes, all the food I wanted, good company everything I could ask God to give me, Brock said. I needed for nothing. Asked directly, Brock denied stabbing, shooting or beating Brazil to death. I never have done anything but good for Terry, Brock said. Brock lived a meager exis tence on the 1-acre lot off Joann Lane in Fountain. He had no electricity, no plumbing or run ning water. A sparse amount of electronics, like a radio and DVD player, were powered by a solar panel. Brock regularly held yard sales at the nearby corner of U.S. 231 and County 167. As he stood before the court, he picto rially walked jurors through his property, explaining the value of several items in his possession, which appeared to be junk by other accounts. My dog drank bottled water from the dollar store, he said. A lifelong friend of Brock, Francis Bus, testied he would be shocked to nd out Brock had thousands of dollars, but Brocks counsel pointed out that was because Bus could not see why anyone with money would live like Brock. I think he just liked to be out doors, Bus said. Among the items investiga tors found on Brocks land all of which Brock argued were at his house because he and Bra zil participated together in yard sales was a pool lter with nu merous silver coins that prosecu tors said belonged to Brazil. Many of the murder weapons were never recovered. A bed post, found in the woods across from Brazils home, was the only item investigators could nd that they believed was used in the murder. Prosecutor Larry Basford has tried to convince jurors the dis covery of the coins directly con nected Brock to Brazils murder. Basford has asked jurors to use common sense to piece together Brocks actions before and after Brazils death to see he wasnt an eccentric miser sit ting on a stack of silver and gold coins. Brock was on food stamps and also used a cellphone provided by the government. Basford highlighted that, be fore moving onto his land, Brock stayed rent-free with his brother and borrowed money from sev eral people instead of cashing in coins he valued at about $45,000 which no one knew about. And nobody had ever seen that but you, Basford said. Plans to install a well and septic system on the property showed Brock actually did have some aspirations and wants, Basford said. HE ATH ER LE IPHA R T | The News Herald Philip Brock testies Thursday during his murder trial in Panama City. Club ofcial accused of grand theftTALLAHASSEE (AP) The comptroller of the athletic booster organization at Florida State University remained in jail Thursday, accused of misappropriat ing between $500,000 and $700,000. Sanford Lovingood turned himself in to the Leon County Sherriffs Of ce on Wednesday. He is charged with rst-degree grand theft of over $100,000. The bond amount is listed at $25,000. Lovingood told police he had been stealing money from the organization since 2011, according to the ar rest afdavit written by of cer Jared Lee. Seminole Boosters Se nior Vice-President Jerry Kutz said Lovingood was a 35-year employee and once held the title of chief nan cial ofcer. The two were friends for 33 years, even before Kutz began working with the organization. Surprised is an under statement, Kutz said. It just seems so out of char acter. Were all stunned. Theres a side of you that feels compassion for he and his family and theres a side of you thats really angry. And that feel ing changes from moment to moment. Lovingood said he had access to a Morgan Stan ley account in which stock donations are made to the booster organization and then sold and turned into cash. He wrote checks from the account to the Schoo ner Development Co. The Florida Department of State Division of Corpo rations lists Lovingood as the registered agent for the company, and the principal address for the business is the same as Lovingoods home address. He told po lice that he used the stolen money to pay for his own investments and personal expenses. According to the af davit, Lovingood said he understood that he could not repay the money dur ing his lifetime and thought he could repay it by willing property to the booster or ganization upon his death. The report states that an ofcer of the Schoo ner Development Com pany contacted members of the booster organization Wednesday morning and told an attorney for the or ganization that Lovingood had stolen a large amount of money. Kutz said theres an in surance policy in place and all of the money will be re covered, but that isnt his biggest concern. The trust of booster club members is critical to our mission of funding Florida State University athletics, Kutz said. We take that duciary respon sibility very seriously. One breach in our organiza tions history is one breach too many. Seminole Boosters Chief Executive Ofcer and President Andy Miller said in a news release issued jointly by the club and Flor ida State University that 65-year-old Lovingood was terminated immediately. A forensic audit is underway to determine how much money is missing and how it was taken. We know what he did, but did he do anything else? Kutz said. The du ciary responsibility is to do a top to bottom examina tion of everything, includ ing what safeguards are in place. For 35 years we havent had a problem, but one time is too many. A Florida State spokes man said athletic director Stan Wilcox and the ath letic department had no additional comment. The organization pro vides nancial support to FSUs athletic program. Jail records did not in dicate whether Lovingood has retained a lawyer. 7th Group soldier killed while in the line of duty By LAUREN SAGE REINLIE 315-4443 | @LaurenRnwfdn lreinlie@nwfdailynews.com E GLIN AFB A 30-year-old Special Forces soldier from Crestview died ear lier this week from wounds he suffered in Afghanistan. Sgt. 1st Class Andrew Weathers with the Army 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne) at Eglin Air Force Base died after he was wounded during a gun battle in Helmand Province on Sunday. He was taken to a hospital in Germany, where he was pronounced dead Tuesday. Weathers worked as a medic on a team with the 7th Groups 2nd Battalion. From the beginning of his time with 7th Group, Sgt. Weathers was the con summate teammate, Col. Robert Kirila, the groups deputy commander, said Thursday. As a Special Forces medical sergeant, Weathers was critical to the well-being of his team and those he men tored. The group mourns the loss of such a great leader, and we will support his family in every way possible. As word spread of his death, friends and strangers shared condolences, prayers and memories on Facebook. Weathers was an amazing man with a big heart, Jennifer Biddick of Navarre wrote on the Daily News Facebook page. His death is noble, and he would be proud of his brothers and sisters carrying on to complete the mission. He protected us on earth and now hell watch us from heaven. Gone but never forgotten! Weathers is survived by his parents, Mi chael and Jere Weathers of Pollock, La.; a brother, Dusten; and a sister, Carrie. He joined the Army in January 2003 just before the Iraq invasion. He deployed once to Iraq and once to Afghanistan while work ing as a crew chief and then as a ight engi neer on a CH-47 Chinook helicopter. He volunteered for Special Forces train ing in 2010. He graduated from the quali cation course and became one of the elite Green Berets. He joined the 7th Group in 2012. Weathers died during his rst deploy ment with the Army Special Forces. His team deployed in the spring. Weathers is the 43rd 7th Group soldier killed in action since 9/11. The 7th Group plans to hold a memorial service in the coming weeks. Some people already are planning for his return. Heavy heart, Lori Minnick posted on Facebooke. Ultimate sacrice Prayers for his family & friends in Crestview. Well be here to meet him when he comes home. At least one 7th Group soldier also was injured in the reght, but no additional information had been released as of late Thursday. WALDO (AP) The tiny town of Waldo in north Florida has such a notorious reputa tion as a speed trap that AAA erected bill boards to warn drivers about it, but all that may be about to change. On Tuesday, weeks after the police chief and interim chief resigned due to state investigations into ticket quotas, mishan dling of evidence and other issues, Waldos City Council disbanded its police force. While the Alachua County Sheriffs Of ce is now in charge of policing the town of 1,000, and AAA says it will consider remov ing its billboards, some citizens worry the speeding problem will worsen and crimi nals will feel they have carte blanche. I think its nuts, Waldo resident Kim Andrews said about the disbanded police force. He owns Andrews Knife and Muz zleloading, a weapon collectors shop just off the highway. Its rare that I ever wear this on my side, Andrews said, motioning to a pistol holstered on his hip. Now Ill wear it ev ery day. Ofcials in the town between Jackson ville and Gainesville never hid the fact that citations paid for the small police force, arguing that the speeding problem was a real public safety hazard. For years motorists cruising through the 2-squaremile town have passed the AAAs warning signs. Trouble with Waldos police depart ment started in August, when Chief Mike Szabo was suspended amid a Florida De partment of Law Enforcement probe into his alleged recording of conversations with fellow ofcers. A couple of weeks later the towns in terim chief, Cpl. Kenneth Smith, was also suspended after ve of the departments ofcers told the City Council that he was mishandling evidence, taking city proper ty for personal use and imposing a strict ticket quota. Smith and Szabo later resigned, and the department crumbled. Waldo really does have a speeding problem, ofcials and residents insist. They say cars and trucks regularly blow through town on U.S. 301 and State 24, en dangering residents and school children. Alachua County sheriffs Lt. Steve Maynard has been helping patrol Waldo since the departments problems began in September. He understands the concerns about losing the towns police force, but he said call response times and safety will not be compromised. We are reconguring our (assign ments) so that rapid response times will be ensured, Maynard said. On Thursday green and white sher iffs vehicles buzzed around town, while the citys black and white patrol cars sat in front of the empty police department downtown. AAA said it is still paying for billboards outside Waldo, and also nearby Lawtey. They are the only towns that AAA has sin gled out nationwide as speed traps. With the police force disbanded, AAA said it will consider whether to remove the signs and take Waldo off its list but only if it means trafc tickets are being given for safety reasons, and not revenue generation. We would certainly strongly consider not renewing the billboards on either side of Waldo when the outdoor advertising contracts come up for renewal, said AAA spokesman Kevin Bakewell. About half of the towns roughly $1 mil lion budget comes from citations, accord ing to its budget. This helped pay for the police force. Portions of revenue from citations written by sheriffs deputies will still go to Waldos coffers, Maynard said, but its unclear how the citys budgeting will be affected in the future. Waldos City Manager Kim Worley re fused to be interviewed for this article, and a Tallahassee-based spokesman, Ron Sachs, hired to handle public affairs for the city did not return an email seeking comment. While the details are hashed out, some Waldo residents worry drivers will feel free to speed through town. I hate to lose the police department, just for general safety levels, Harold Co day, 80, said outside Waldos post ofce. And the ofcers were good guys, they were just doing their job writing tickets. They had good intentions. Florida speed trap town disbands police force FSU BOOSTERS The group mourns the loss of such a great leader, and we will support his family in every way possible. Col. Robert Kirila, the groups deputy commander

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Local A8 | Washington County News Saturday, October 4, 2014

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FOOD www.chipleypaper.com Saturday, October 4, 2014 A Page 9 Section Special to The News Autumn is ripe with vibrant colors and scenery. One of the more vivid sights this time of year are the bright, orange pumpkins that adorn walkways and front porches of homes and businesses. Not only are pumpkins ideal for decorating, but theyre also great to eat. Some people who plan to carve jack-olanterns mistakenly believe the same type of pumpkin can be used in their favorite recipes. But what carving pumpkins have in visual air, they usually lack in avor and substance. Instead, would-be pumpkin cookers should look to other varieties if they plan to serve pumpkin on the menu. Pumpkins are available from September through December, but they peak in October. Many smaller pumpkins are better and sweeter for cooking. Mini pumpkins, sugar, cheese, and pie pumpkins are varieties commonly used in recipes. The big jack-o-lantern pumpkins have stringy, watery esh and will provide little to no pulp for cooking. Select a pumpkin as you would any other type of squash. Look for a rm pumpkin with no bruises or soft spots. The pumpkin also should have a deep orange color. Store pumpkins in a cool, dark area until ready for use to prolong freshness. Wash the exterior of the pumpkin in cool water before cutting to remove any dirt and bacteria on the surface of the pumpkin so it wont be transferred to the pulp of the pumpkin. Slice the pumpkin in half and remove the seeds and any stringy material. Rinse and save the seeds for planting or roasting. Put the pumpkin pieces in the microwave to cook or you can steam or bake them until the pulp is soft and the pumpkin falls off of the skin. Cool the pumpkins, then puree the pulp until its smooth. You may want to strain the pureed pumpkin with a cheese cloth to remove any excess water before using in a pie recipe. Baked breads may benet from the extra moisture. Pumpkins are a great source of dietary ber, vitamin A, vitamin C, riboavin, potassium, copper, manganese, vitamin E, thiamin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, iron, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus. Theyre also low in fat and calories. Pumpkin puree can replace the oil in some baking recipes, much as you would use applesauce. KEY TO COOKING WITH

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A10 | Washington County News Saturday, October 4, 2014 Faith If you would like your church listed here, send information to news@ chipleypaper.com. Because of space limitation, please only send regular church services. For special services, send separate submission. Assembly of God BONIF A Y F IRST ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is 116 Main St. FA ITH ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on Underwood Road behind Poplar Springs School. GR A CE ASSEM B LY OF GOD A T C HIPLEY Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 567 North Main St., Chipley L ITTLE R OCK ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. L IVE OA K ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is Sunday at 10 a.m., with Morning Worship at 11 a.m. and Evening Worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 2118 Live Oak Road in Bonifay. M T. O LIVE ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is on Highway 179-A off of Highway 2. N EW BETH A NY ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is on Shaky Joe Road just off Highway 280 at Hinsons Crossroads. N EW L IFE F ELLOWSHIP ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 695 Fifth St., Chipley. N ORTHSIDE ASSEM B LY OF GOD Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Sunday School is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1009 North Rangeline St. in Bonifay. S MITH C H A PEL ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is 2549 Smith Chapel Road, just off Highway 177-A. S WEET GUM ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Thursday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 105 Corbin Road. WA US A U ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 3537 Washington St. in Wausau. W INTERVILLE ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1897 Highway 177A in Bonifay B A PTIST Abigail Free Will Baptist Church Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is on Dawkins St. in Vernon. BERE A N B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7:30 p.m. The church is at 1438 Nearing Hills Drive in Chipley. BLUE LA KE B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 1405 Blue Lake Road in Chipley. BETHLEHEM B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The church is at 1572 Highway 177 in Bonifay. BETH A NY B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1404 N. State Road 79 in Bonifay. BETHEL B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. BONIF A Y F IRST B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 311 N. Waukesha St.. BONIF A Y F REE W ILL B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at the corner of Kansas Avenue and Oklahoma Street. C HIPLEY F IRST B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. and 11 a.m. Morning Worship is at 8:30 a.m., 9:45 a.m. and 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 1300 South Blvd. C HIPLEY F IRST F REE W ILL B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 1387 South Blvd. C OUNTRY OA KS B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 574 Buckhorn Blvd. EA ST P ITTM A N F REE W ILL B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is half a mile north of Highway 2 on Highway 179. EA STSIDE B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at Highway 277 in Vernon. E VER G REEN M ISSION A RY B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is in Westville. G A P P OND F REE W ILL B A PTIST C HURCH Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is at 1980 Gap Blvd., in Sunny Hills. GR A CE B A PTIST C H A PEL M ISSION Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:50 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 440 Lot E Second St., Chipley. GULLY S PRIN G S B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 2826 U.S. 90 in Bonifay. H ICKORY H ILL B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1656 Hickory Hill Road in Westville. H OLMES C REEK B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on Cope Road in Chipley. H OLYNECK M ISSION A RY B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is 3395 Cemetery Lane, Campbellton. JERUS A LEM M ISSION A RY B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 614 Bennett Drive in Chipley. L EONI A B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is in northwest Holmes County. M CQUEENS T EMPLE F IRST B A PTIST C HURCH OF L IVIN G GOD Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 5681 State Road 79 South, Vernon. M T. AR A R A T M ISSION A RY B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 1233 Old Bonifay Road in Chipley. Church LISTINGS See CHURCH LISTINGS A11 If you would like your churchs faith events included in this list, please email the information to news@ chipleypaper.com. P eanut Boil H A RTFORD Ala. Victory Tabernacle will have a peanut boil and bluegrass gospel sing at 5 p.m. today, Oct. 4. Special singers will be Straight and Narrow with a special appearance by Cleo and the Cholesterol, and the Cowboys of Cornbread Country. Bring your lawn chair. The church is at 10005 E. State Highway 52. For more information, call 334-588-2838. C lean up day VERNON Unity Baptist Church will hold a clean up day at 8 a.m. today, Oct. 4. For more information, call 535-4669. Gospel jam Christian Haven Church will have its monthly gospel jam today, Oct. 4. Refreshments will be served at 6 p.m., with the jam immediately after. For more information, call 773-2602. U nity Baptist homecoming VERNON Unity Baptist Church will have its 133rd homecoming at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 12, with Brother Forrest Smith as the guest speaker. The church is at 3274 River Road in Vernon. For more information, call 535-4669. L ittle R ock A O G pastor appreciation B ONIF A Y Little Rock Assembly of God will have pastor appreciation at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 12. Our senior pastor is the Rev. Buddy Pennington (wife, Kathy). Our associate pastor is Chris Steverson (wife, Pam). Several members of the congregation will speak as we introduce our newly developed mission statement, the values we consider as the unchangeable bases for our future actions and the plans we have established for the next three years in order to fulll our renewed mission as a Christian church. Please plan to remain with us after the conclusion of this important service as we enjoy a covered dish Sunday Dinner together. Little Rock Assembly of God is at 1923 Highway 173, Bonifay. For more information, call 547-4444, 547-2598 or 373-8015. F abulous fall preaching G R A CEVILLE Bethel Baptist Church invites will have a Fabulous Fall of Preaching at 7 p.m. Mondays through Oct. 13. Speakers will be Dr. Ted Traylor, pastor of Olive Baptist in Pensacola; Dr. Bradley Rushing, pastor of Mt. Gilead Baptist, Taylor, Ala.; and the Rev. Travis Free, pastor of Rehobeth Baptist, Rehobeth, Ala. Bethel Baptist is at 1349 Highway 173, Graceville, in the Poplar Springs School community. Gospel concert CRESTVIEW Libby and Friends Gospel Concert Ministry will have a gospel concert at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 24, at the Central Baptist Church in Crestview. Performing will be the LeFevre Quartet of Gainesville, Ga. A suggested donation of $10 is requested at the door. For more information, call 496-7106 or 682-5525. Summer is over, and winter is beginning to give us her cold shoulder. The only way I can really handle winter is the hope of summer coming again in all her warm embraces. I can only take the shivers for so long. In our home, there is a divide over the subject. The Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage lives for winter, and I live for summer. How two people who can be so opposite and still live together harmoniously is one of the mysteries of matrimonial bliss. I endure her complaining about how hot it is during the summer, and she somehow endures my shivering throughout the winter. And boy, do I shiver. I am not so sure what it is about winter that is so fascinating for her. Maybe it is because she gets to wear more clothing than she can during the summer. Or, maybe she just likes the cold. That is not exactly true, because once I gave her a cold shoulder, and I have been paying for that ever since. She does have that cold stare when I am in trouble, but that comes during the summer as well as the rest of the year. Maybe she likes winter because in the middle of winter is Christmas. If anybody loves Christmas, it is my wife. She begins her Christmas planning in January and knows exactly what she is going to buy throughout the year. I think it has something to do with when things go on sale or something like that. Personally, and do not let this get back to her, I think it is just an excuse to go shopping. I will not say she is a shopaholic, but give her a coupon and she is off to the mall. You did not hear it from me. Also during the winter season is Thanksgiving, when my wife outdoes herself in making Thanksgiving dinner for all the family. She makes enough for an army, and out of deep respect for her, I eat like an army. Actually, I eat until I hear that little whisper from the other end of the table, Dont you think you have had enough? What she does not understand is, when I am eating I am not thinking. As for me, I enjoy summer and all the laziness associated with summertime. All those lazy, crazy days of summer were designed for people just like me. When it comes to lazy and crazy, I am the expert. I can remember years ago when I was doing something and my wife thought it was a little out of line, she would say, Are you acting crazy? She does not say that anymore because she has concluded, and rightly so, that I am not an actor. If I were acting, she is sure I would get an Oscar. However, something about summer makes a person slow down a little bit and not be in such a hurry. One of my excuses is that it is too hot to do anything today. I love that excuse because my wife always agrees. I cannot use that excuse in winter for obvious reasons. According to her, an activity will warm me up. I have never warmed up to that idea. I like summer because there are so many fun opportunities to get together with family. Every summer, we go and spend a week with my son and his family, which is one of the highlights of the summer. I only have one week out of the year to spoil his children, so I try to make the best of it. If I had the ability to manipulate seasons, I would make sure that 11 months out of the year it would be summer. I would have to give one month to my wife for winter, but I would only give her one month. That is about all I can handle. Summer is a time to enjoy the nature God has created. It is wonderful to see green grass and green leaves on the trees and watching blossoms turn into fulledged owers. What could be better than sitting on the back porch with a tall glass of iced lemonade watching the sunset? I love hearing the crickets in full concert, and that only happens during the summer. Here in Florida, we have little frogs that think they are crickets and chime in adding their voice to the evening music. Did I mention picnics? What would summer be without a picnic? In my mind, a picnic is an excuse to overindulge in the ne art of stufng yourself. The picnic is a little different so that somebody cannot query me with, Dont you think youve had enough? The Food Whisperer is not allowed at picnics. After all, at a church picnic it is imperative that I sample every dish brought to the picnic. I do not want to leave anybody out on this. The picnic is the time to let down your hair, if you have any, and just enjoy food and fellowship. It amazes me how fast time ies when you are not paying attention. King Solomon understood this when he wrote, To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven (Ecclesiastes 3:1). One mans winter is another mans summer, and the joy of life is learning to appreciate what you may not really like. The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, P.O. Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543, email jamessnyder2@att.net or visit www.jamessnyderministries.com. Faith BRIEFS The thing I miss most about summer DR. JAMES L. SNYDER Out to Pastor Something about summer makes a person slow down a little bit and not be in such a hurry. One of my excuses is that it is too hot to do anything today. I love that excuse because my wife always agrees. I cannot use that excuse in winter for obvious reasons. According to her, an activity will warm me up. I have never warmed up to that idea.

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Washington County News | A11 Saturday, October 4, 2014 Faith CHURCH LISTINGS from page A10 MT. ZION I NDEPENDENT BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is on Highway 2 one mile west of Highway 79 in Esto. N EW CON C O R D FREE W ILL BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on James Paulk Road off Highway 177. N EW H OPE BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday morning bible study is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at the intersection of Highway 2 and Highway 179A. N EW P ROSPE C T BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship services are at 11 a.m. Sunday evening services are at 5 p.m. Wednesday services supper is at 5 p.m. Wednesday prayer meeting, bible study and chilDriveens classes start at 5:45. The church is at 761 New Prospect Road in Chipley. N EW ZION BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on Highway 177A north of Highway 2. N ORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is at the intersection of Highway 81 and U.S. 90 in Ponce de Leon. O AKIE R IDGE BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is at the corner of Orange Hill and Gilberts Mill Road. P INEY G ROVE FREE W ILL BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1783 Piney Grove Road south of Chipley. PLEASANT HILL FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is south of Bonifay at 1900 Pleasant Hill Road. P OPLAR H EAD I NDEPENDENT FREE W ILL BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is on Poplar Head Road. P OPLAR S PRINGS BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1098 Lovewood Road two miles east of Highway 77. S AND H ILLS BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:15 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 6758 Highway 77. S HADY G ROVE BAPTIST Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. S HILOH BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is on Highway 277, three miles south of U.S. 90 in Chipley. S HILOH MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:15 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 3013 Moss Hill Road in Vernon. S T. JOHN FREE W ILL BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. S T. MATTHEWS MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 4156 St. Matthews Road, Caryville. S ALE M FREE W ILL BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Worship service is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Church is at 2555 Kynesville Highway, Alford. S HADY G ROVE BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1955 Highway 177A in Bonifay. S UNNY H ILLS FIRST BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. U NITY BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 3274 River Road in Vernon. W AUSAU FIRST BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 3493 Washington St. in Wausau. W EST BONI F AY BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 609 West Indiana Ave. in Bonifay. Catholic BLESSED T RINITY CATHOLI C CHUR C H Sunday Mass is at 9 a.m. Wednesday evening Mass is at 5:30 p.m. Adoration is the rst Friday at from noon to 3 p.m. Holy Hour is Tuesday from 7-8 p.m. The church is at 2331 Hwy 177A in Bonifay. S T. JOSEPH T HE W ORKER CATHOLI C CHUR C H Sunday Mass is at 11 a.m. Tuesday Mass is at 9 a.m. The church is at 1664 Main St., in Chipley. S T. T HERESA CATHOLI C CHUR C H Sunday Mass is at 10 a.m. Monday through Friday Mass is at 8 a.m. Saturday Mass is at 5 p.m. Adoration is the rst Friday after 8 a.m. Mass. The church is at 2056 Sunny Hills Blvd., in Chipley. Church of Christ CHIPLEY CHUR C H O F CHRIST Sunday morning bible study is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1295 Brickyard Road in Chipley. S PIRIT-FILLED CHUR C H O F G OD IN CHRIST Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Tuesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 2128 Pate Pond Road in Caryville. E piscopal G RANT T A B ERNA C LE A M E Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m.. The church is at 577 Martin Luther King, Chipley. N EW BETHEL A M E Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on U.S. 90 in Bonifay. S T. JOHN A M E Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. S T. JOSEPH A M E Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1401 Monroe Shefeld Road, Chipley. S T. L UKE AF RI C AN METHODIST E PIS C OPAL CHUR C H ( A M E ) Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on Jackson Community Road. S T. MARY AF RI C AN METHODIST E PIS C OPAL CHUR C H ( A M E ) Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is at 1035 St. Mary Road, in Caryville. S T. MATTHEWS E PIS C OPAL CHUR C H Morning worship is at 9 a.m. Wednesday worship service is at 12:15 p.m. The church is on Highway 90 west in Chipley. E vangelistic V ERNON E VANGELISTI C CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is on Highway 79 in Vernon. CARYVILLE E VANGELISTI C CENTER Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is on Wrights Creek Road in Caryville, just north of U.S. 90. H oliness H ARRIS CHAPEL H OLINESS CHUR C H Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Thursday services are at 7 p.m. The church is eight miles north of Caryville on Highway 179. JOHNSON T E M PLE FIRST BORN H OLINESS Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. Friday services are at 6 p.m. The church is at 793 Orange St., Chipley. MIRA C LE V ALLEY S PIRIT O F H OLINESS Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 3754 Bunyon Drive, off Highway 77 near Sunny Hills. L UTHERAN Grace Lutheran Morning Worship is at 8:30 a.m. The church is on U.S. 90 East in Bonifay. Methodist BETHLEHE M BAPTIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is on Highway 177. BONI F AY FIRST U NITED METHODIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Worship begins at 10:45 a.m. Youth Services are on Wednesdays at 6 p.m. CEDAR G ROVE U NITED METHODIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is two miles west of Millers Crossroads on Highway 2. CHIPLEY FIRST U NITED METHODIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:50 a.m. Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. (contemporary service) and 11 a.m. (traditional service). The church is at 1285 Jackson Ave. L AKEVIEW U NITED METHODIST Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is on Highway 279 near Five Points. MT. I DA CONGREGATIONAL METHODIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is at just off Highway 2 in Holmes Countys New Hope Community. N EW H OPE U NITED METHODIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. N EW BETHEL A M E Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on Highway 90 in Bonifay. O RANGE H ILL U NITED METHODIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is on Sunday Road just off Orange Hill Road. O TTER CREEK U NITED METHODIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is north of Ponce de Leon off Highway 81. P LEASANT G ROVE U NITED METHODIST Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. The church is near Hinsons Crossroads. P OPLAR H EAD U NITED METHODIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is 1.5 miles north of Highway 2 on Highway 163. R ED H ILL U NITED METHODIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on State Road 2 two miles west of State Road 79. S T. JOHN A M E Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. S T. L UKE AF RI C AN METHODIST E PIS C OPAL CHUR C H Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on Jackson Community Road. V ERNON U NITED METHODIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. W AUSAU U NITED METHODIST CHUR C H Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m.. The church is on State Road 77 P entecostal FIRST U NITED P ENTE C OSTAL CHUR C H Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1816 Highway 90 in Chipley. W AUSAU P ENTE C OSTAL H OLINESS Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is at 2201 Pioneer Road in Wausau. O PEN P OND P ENTE C OSTAL Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1885 Highway 179-A in Westville. T RINITY P ENTE C OSTAL T A B ERNA C LE Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. P resbyterian CHIPLEY FIRST P RES B YTERIAN CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Bible study is held at 5 p.m. The church is at Fifth St. and Watts Ave. S UNNY H ILLS P RES B YTERIAN Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. The church is at 3768 Country Club Blvd. O ther BI B LEWAY L IGHTHOUSE Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on HWY 90 East in Chipley BONI F AY H OUSE O F P RAYER AND P RAISE Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. After a brief break Morning Worship follows. The church is at 826 N. Caryville Road. BONI F AY S EVENTH D AY A DVENTIST Service is on Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 604 Mathusek St. BONNETT P OND CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 2680 Bonnett Pond Road in Chipley. CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP CENTER Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1458 Monroe Shefeld Road in Chipley. CHRISTIAN H AVEN Sunday school is h at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. CHUR C H O F G OD B Y FAITH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:45 a.m. Tuesday service is at 7:30 p.m. The church is at 3012 Church St.. CHUR C H O F G OD O F P ROPHE C Y Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1386 W. Jackson Ave., Chipley. COURTS O F P RAISE Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 1720 Clayton Road, Chipley. CYPRESS CREEK Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at1772 Macedonia Road. FAITH COVENANT FELLOWSHIP Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is on Highway 277 mile south of I-10. FA M ILY W ORSHIPP CENTER Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is 531 Rock Hill Church Road, Chipley. G RA C EVILLE CO MM UNITY CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 1005 E. Prim Ave. H A R D L A B OR CREEK CO MM UNITY CHUR C H Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1705 Pioneer Road three miles east of caution light. H ARVEST CATHE D RIVEAL Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at on Highway 77 two miles north of Wausau. H OL M ES V ALLEY CO MM UNITY CHUR C H Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 3550Fannig Branch Road in Vernon. H OUSE O F P RAYER W ORSHIP CENTER Sunday School and ChilDriveens Church is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Youth activities on Wednesday begin at 4:30 p.m. Praise and worship services are at 6:30 p.m. on Friday. The church at 763 West Blvd. in Chipley. L I B ERTY Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. N EW FAITH T E M PLE Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is at 841 Orange Hill Road. N EW FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is on Rock Hill Church Road. N EW SM YRNA CHUR C H Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is Adolph Whitaker Road six miles north of Bonifay. N ORTHWEST FLORIDA CHRISTIAN CHUR C H Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. The church is at 4465 Highway 77. R HE M A P RAISE AND W ORSHIP CENTER Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Thursday service is at 7 p.m. The church is 763 West Blvd., Chipley. S UNNY H ILLS CHAPEL Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 4283 Highway 77. T A B ERNA C LE O F P RAISE CHUR C H O F G OD Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is on Highway 77 South. T HE L IVING W O R D Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at the corner of Highway 77 and Blocker Road in Greenhead. W HITE D OU B LE P OND Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is on Creek Road in Vernon. Y ES L O R D D ELIVERAN C E Sunday School is at 10:30 a.m. Worship is at noon. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 739 Seventh St. in Chipley.

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A12| Washington County News Saturday, October 4, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS Install/Maint/Repair The Washington County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for aMaintenance Shop Supervisor/Foremanposition in the Public Works Department. This position performs supervisory and skilled mechanical and fabrication work in the repair and maintenance of diesel and gasoline powered motor vehicles and heavy equipment. The position will oversee the daily operations of the repair shop, coordinating and supervising the activities of subordinate mechanics. Starting hourly rate of pay is $14.52. Minimum Training and Experience: Graduation from high school and 3 to 5 years of progressively responsible experience as an automotive mechanic, including supervisory experience, or any equivalent combination of training and experience which provides the required knowledge, skills, and abilities. Applications may be accessed on-line at www .washingtonfl.com Applications and job descriptions may also be obtained at the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office located at 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428. All interested applicants MUST submit an Employment Applica tion to the Human Resources Department in the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office by 4:00 PM on Octo ber 14, 2014. All questions regarding this position or other vacancies should be directed to the Human Resources Department, 850-415-5151. The selected applicant will be subject to a background check and pre-employment physical and drug screen. Veteran’s Preference is accepted in accordance with FS 295.08. Equal Opportunity/Drug-Free Workplace Web Id 34302192 Security The Washington County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for aFire Services CoordinatorThis position will provide support to the v olunteer fire departments in Washington County including, but not limited to the Fire Department’s daily operations, budgets, monthly reports and resolving conflicts. The position will maintain constant communication with local departments and County, State, and Federal government agencies concerning the development, and clarification of emergency procedures, plans and operational policies. Minimum Requirements: Must hold a Florida State Certified Firefighter I. Florida State Certified Fire Instructor (Must complete within one year of employment). Five years of progressively responsible experience and/or leadership in emergency services. Must possess a valid BLS (CPR) card. Must possess or obtain a valid Florida operator’s license prior to employment. Must be able to obtain additional certifications as required for the position. Consideration may also be given f or the following: Florida State Certified Fire Inspector Florida State Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) or Paramedic Associates Degree in Fire Science or related field Applications may be accessed on-line at www.washingtonfl.com. Applications and job descriptions may also be obtained at the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office located at 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428. All interested applicants MUST submit an Employment Application to the Human Resources Department in the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office by 4:00 PM on October 16, 2014. You may also attach your resume. All questions should be directed to the Human Resources Department, 850-415-5151. The selected applicant will be subject to a pre-employment physical and drug screen. Veteran’s Preference is accepted in accordance with FS 295.08. Equal Opportunity/Drug-Free Workplace Web Id 34301867 10-3374 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 14000044CAAXMX 2010-3 SFR VENTURE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. GARY M WELCH, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered September 12, 2014 in Civil Case No. 14000044CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Washington County, Chipley, Florida, wherein 2010-3 SFR VENTURE, LLC is Plaintiff and GARY M WELCH, CONNIE WELCH, COASTAL CREDIT, LLC UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1 N/K/A BRANDI GILLMAN, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Washington County Courthouse, 1293 Jackson Avenue Building 100, Chipley, FL. 32428 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 7 day of January, 2015 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: DESCRIPTION PARCEL H (AS SURVEYED) A PARCEL OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NE 1/4 OF THE NW 1/4 OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 4 N, RANGE 16 W, WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NE CORNER OF THE NW 1/4 OF SAID SECTION, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE S.0039`21”W. 457.00 FEET ALONG THE EAST LINE OF THE NW 1/4 OF SAID SECTION; THENCE N.8906`10”W. 891.45 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF SCHULL ROAD; THENCE ALONG SAID CENTERLINE THE FOLLOWING 6 CALLS: N.0113`35”E. 185.09 FEET; THENCE N.0600`24”W. 48.15 FEET; THENCE N.3720`26”W. 46.69 FEET; THENCE N.6633`43”W. 86.07 FEET; THENCE N.4707`55”W. 85.94 FEET; THENCE N.0610`19”E. 97.86 FEET TO THE N LINE OF THE NW 1/4 OF SAID SECTION; THENCE S.8904`36”E. 1094.78 FEET ALONG SAID LINE TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with a 2000 General II Doublewide Mobile Home VIN#.GMHGA1289925136A and GMHGA1289925136B. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 22 day of September, 2014. Deputy Clerk CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court BY: K. McDaniel October 4 and 11, 2014 10-3373 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 14-64-CA GRASSY POND RANCHES HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non profit corporation, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT MCCARTHY, and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERT MCCARTHY, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment entered in the above-styled cause on the 30th day of September, 2014, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash by public sale, on the 5 day of November, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. (Central Time), at 1331 South Boulevard in Washington County, Chipley, Florida, the following described real property situated in Washington County, Florida, and set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 5 of LAKEVIEW ESTATES, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 163-A, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Court, on this 30 day of September, 2014. Clerk of Court Washington County, Florida By: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk October 4 and 11, 2014 ADOPTION: Jewelry Designer & TV Journalist yearn for 1st baby to LOVEMeryl & David 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Horses For Sale. Call 326-2391 or 768-1681. Estate Sale. Friday & Saturday, Oct 3&4, 2014. 1134 10th Ave, Graceville, FL. Furniture, clothes, kitchen items, linens & bedding, clothes dryer, tilt-top kitchen table, 2 chairs, glass top surfboard coffee table, glassware and lots of misc. LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE: Friday & Saturday, October 3rd & 4th 2014. 8:00am-5:00pm. Located on Maple Avenue, Geneva, AL. near courthouse. Sat. Oct 4. 8am-2pm Lots of stuff. Something for everyone. 1540 Lonnie Rd., Chipley, 5 miles south of I10. GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FL October 11th & 12th9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons Classes10am & 2pm Daily Call: 850-602-6572)General Admission $6850-957-4952 or 850-261-8407 Conceal weapon classes offered daily. K&LFarm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 Corbin Farms.300 acres, rent or lease, for hunting. Sept-April. 638-1911 or 326-0044. Generator, Powers 3000 sq.ft., $500.00. Rototiller, $1000.00. Camouflage Gheenoe w/trailer & trolling motor, $1300.00. Have old wielding machine, make offer. Alot of tools. 535-4046 or 326-4055. Drivers Now Hiring. CDL Driver-Class A. Townsend Building Supply. Call Nathan at (850)638-1625 1520 U.S. 90, Chipley Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Logistics/TransportDRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive forNo Experience Needed Local CDL Training Apply Today! 1-800-876-7364 Web ID#: 34301791 EARN EXTRA INCOMEAre you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in Bayou George, Youngstown, Fountain, Alford, Bonifay & Chipley Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Jennifer Greene 850-768-9761 or James Meadors jmeadors@pcnh.comApply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34301583 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Office space for rent in Bonifay. 206 Harvey Ethridge St. Phone: (850)548-5045 or (850)307-3278. Real Estate For Rent 1250 & 2000 sq. ft. office/retail spaces for lease in Chipley. Some modifications possible with long term lease. 850-209-3291. Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1 Bedroom Apartment, in Chipley, covenant location, no pets. 638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Ridgewood Apartments in Bonifay Studio and 2 Bd units $375 -$480 Includes City Utilities (850)557-7732 Studio Apart., 1BR patio, Florida-room, fenced yard. $600/mo. One person only. Consider pet. Can exchange rent for carpentry work. 850-326-4649. SpaciousOne Bedroom Apartment $425.00-$450.00 Two Bedroom $475.00 Stove/Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. For Rent: Two 2BR/1BA Mobile Homes. Bonifay area. $300/month plus $300/deposit. $500.00/mo plus deposit. No pets. Call 850-547-2043 or 768-9670. 2BR/1BA Mobile Home in Chipley 1 Block to elementary school. WD hookup, CHA. No pets. $425.00/mth+deposit. 850-763-3320 or 850-774-3034. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/sewage/lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 3BR/1ba Single Wide, water & garbage furnished. Rent, $500.00/mo, deposit, $300.00, Chipley. 3BR/2Full Baths, Double wide for rent, $600.00/mo, deposit, $350.00, on acre land. 2BR MH, rent, $450.00/mo, deposit $250.00. Country setting for both. HUD accepted. 850-260-5626. For Rent. Real nice 3BR/2BA trailer just off Brickyard Rd, Chipley, on Prissy Ln. Sorry no pets. 638-4630 or 638-1434. Furnished 2BR trailer on Bonnet Pond Rd. $500.00/mo, $250.00/deposit. No pets. Call 638-1462. MH for Rent. 2BR/1BA on Corbin Rd. For more info call 638-1911 or 326-0044. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. Nice 2BR MH for rent in a great location in Chipley. Sorry no pets. 638-4640. NO PETS 3BR/2BA in counrty Chipley area $650. NO PETS 2BR/2BA in Cottondale $450. LEAVE MESAGE FOR CALL BACK 258-1594. Great Price! $57,500 1009 Depot Ave., 2BR, 2bath, 1600 sqft home, large lot, close to parks & shopping in Bonifay, Laura Parker, Finn Realty, 850-276-0219 SUNNY HILLS. Great ranch, fantastic condition. 3BR/2BA, 3 living areas, appliances incl. $84,900.00. Counts Real Estate. Barbara, 850-814-9414. Orange Hill Self Storage. 2.5 acres, plus or minus. 45 storage units, 2 houses, 3 barns. $210,000.00, OBO. 407-956-0563. 5 Acres on Hwy 77 3 miles South of Chipley. Has well, septic tank, 14x48 MH, front & back deck. 24x36 Pole Barn. 638-1858, 850-326-9109. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. 2005 Corolla 66,300MI very good condition $7,500. 1993 Nissan King Cab 4 Wheel Drive, tow package, low mileage $4,500. Call 638-2213 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds.

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A Message fr o m the President Page 2 Washington County Business Advocate June-July 2014 Washington County Business ADVOCATE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Nicole Bareeld Cindy Johnson-Brown Joy Davis Julie P. Dillard Terry Ellis Andy Fleener Wayland Fulford Janet Kinney Garrett Martin Jan Page Community South Credit Union William Steverson Darrin Wall Ami Wiwi CHAMBER STAFF Ted Everett Chris MacBlain A Message fr o m the Executive Director PROMOTES YOUR BUSINESS Visitors Guides & Relocation Packages Free Business Directory Listing Free Internet Directory Listing W/Free Local Media Coverage Referrals Use of Chamber Brochure/Business Card Racks Bi-Monthly Newsletter w/Spotlights On Member Businesses Business Card Services to New Members Advertising Opportunities in Newsletter/County Maps/Visitors Guide/Web A discounted subscription to the Washington County News for new and renew ing members NETWORKING Third Thursday Breakfast Annual Chamber Membership Banquet KEEPS YOU INFORMED Our Newsletter, Membership Directory and Website, among other resources and publica tions, are outstanding information sources. PROVIDES A BUSINESS INVESTMENT Tax Deductible Chamber Investments EDC Investments and Opportunities to be involved in Economic Development Eorts in Washington County e Chamber of Commerce held a Marketing Workshop May 29 at the PAEC that oered the attendees a closer look at marketing and translating leads into sales. e workshop featured speaker Mark Raciappa of A ctionCOACH from Tallahassee. Mark has done other seminars for the Chamber and has shown a knowledge and passion for helping small businesses achieve their goals. Some of the ground he covered is the fact that in any sale, one must understand that emotion for the product by the customer is the driving the component of making the sale. Logic plays roughly 20 percent of that decision. erefore, the objective for the salesperson becomes to tie the product being sold to why the person may need it to make them feel good emotionally. If one watches the many ads that we are bombarded with daily (typically, over 3,000) look more carefully at how they tug at your emotions. In discussing the concept of a business having a Winning Team Mark detailed the seven things a business owner must have in place to create a good team: 1. Strong leadership 2. Common goal between owner and employees 3. Understanding the rules of the game 4. Have an action plan 5. Support risk taking 6. Have a mission statement 7. 100% involvement/inclusion between owners and employees. I very much enjoyed the workshop with ActionCoach Mark Raciappa, said Jessi Collins, media consultant with the Washington County News; He taught me how to better manage my time to not only help me, but to better serve my customers. e rst thing I took away with me was to turn the automatic email Ted Everett What an exciting future Washington County has in store! Ive had the pleasure over the last few weeks to be present at many exciting events. First, the announcement of the new (and expanded) WestPoint Home Bed and Bath Outlet store in Washington Square, then the groundbreaking ceremony for Goodwills GIBB Chipley Village Apartments, and last (but not least) the groundbreaking for the new Kate M. Smith Elementary School. Residents of Washington County, this is economic development! is means jobs, better facilities for residents that are in need, more opportunities to shop locally, and a new school for our kids. I have also personally heard the promise from Sen. Don Gaetz that we will have funding for a new courthouse in the near future. None of these things could happen without coordination, phone calls, and knocking on the doors of our elected ocials. Its wonderful to see Washington County citizens working together for the betterment of our community and our future. Lets keep the momentum going! Try to attend your city/town council meetings, your county commission meetings, and join us for ird ursday breakfasts. Make sure your voice is heard and our County continues to prosper. I also must mention the many graduations that have been held over the last few weeks. I am so proud of our Washington County students, the scores they are achieving and how bright their prospects seem. Our children are our future. Lets work together to ensure they will have the opportunity to live and work in Washington County! Please check the back of the Advocate for important community dates. Following are a few of the upcoming events: Vernon, Chipley, Caryville, Ebro, and Wausau have City/Town Council meetings scheduled for June 9, 10 and 12. e Washington County BOCC Amy Wiwi See PRESIDENT page 12 See DIRECTOR page 12 A Message fr o m the President Page 2 Washington County Business Advocate June-July 2014 Washington County Business ADVOCATE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Nicole Bareeld Cindy Johnson-Brown Joy Davis Julie P. Dillard Terry Ellis Andy Fleener Wayland Fulford Janet Kinney Garrett Martin Jan Page Community South Credit Union William Steverson Darrin Wall Ami Wiwi CHAMBER STAFF Ted Everett Chris MacBlain A Message fr o m the Executive Director PROMOTES YOUR BUSINESS Visitors Guides & Relocation Packages Free Business Directory Listing Free Internet Directory Listing W/Free Local Media Coverage Referrals Use of Chamber Brochure/Business Card Racks Bi-Monthly Newsletter w/Spotlights On Member Businesses Business Card Services to New Members Advertising Opportunities in Newsletter/County Maps/Visitors Guide/Web A discounted subscription to the Washington County News for new and renew ing members NETWORKING Third Thursday Breakfast Annual Chamber Membership Banquet KEEPS YOU INFORMED Our Newsletter, Membership Directory and Website, among other resources and publica tions, are outstanding information sources. PROVIDES A BUSINESS INVESTMENT Tax Deductible Chamber Investments EDC Investments and Opportunities to be involved in Economic Development Eorts in Washington County e Chamber of Commerce held a Marketing Workshop May 29 at the PAEC that oered the attendees a closer look at marketing and translating leads into sales. e workshop featured speaker Mark Raciappa of A ctionCOACH from Tallahassee. Mark has done other seminars for the Chamber and has shown a knowledge and passion for helping small businesses achieve their goals. Some of the ground he covered is the fact that in any sale, one must understand that emotion for the product by the customer is the driving the component of making the sale. Logic plays roughly 20 percent of that decision. erefore, the objective for the salesperson becomes to tie the product being sold to why the person may need it to make them feel good emotionally. If one watches the many ads that we are bombarded with daily (typically, over 3,000) look more carefully at how they tug at your emotions. In discussing the concept of a business having a Winning Team Mark detailed the seven things a business owner must have in place to create a good team: 1. Strong leadership 2. Common goal between owner and employees 3. Understanding the rules of the game 4. Have an action plan 5. Support risk taking 6. Have a mission statement 7. 100% involvement/inclusion between owners and employees. I very much enjoyed the workshop with ActionCoach Mark Raciappa, said Jessi Collins, media consultant with the Washington County News; He taught me how to better manage my time to not only help me, but to better serve my customers. e rst thing I took away with me was to turn the automatic email Ted Everett What an exciting future Washington County has in store! Ive had the pleasure over the last few weeks to be present at many exciting events. First, the announcement of the new (and expanded) WestPoint Home Bed and Bath Outlet store in Washington Square, then the groundbreaking ceremony for Goodwills GIBB Chipley Village Apartments, and last (but not least) the groundbreaking for the new Kate M. Smith Elementary School. Residents of Washington County, this is economic development! is means jobs, better facilities for residents that are in need, more opportunities to shop locally, and a new school for our kids. I have also personally heard the promise from Sen. Don Gaetz that we will have funding for a new courthouse in the near future. None of these things could happen without coordination, phone calls, and knocking on the doors of our elected ocials. Its wonderful to see Washington County citizens working together for the betterment of our community and our future. Lets keep the momentum going! Try to attend your city/town council meetings, your county commission meetings, and join us for ird ursday breakfasts. Make sure your voice is heard and our County continues to prosper. I also must mention the many graduations that have been held over the last few weeks. I am so proud of our Washington County students, the scores they are achieving and how bright their prospects seem. Our children are our future. Lets work together to ensure they will have the opportunity to live and work in Washington County! Please check the back of the Advocate for important community dates. Following are a few of the upcoming events: Vernon, Chipley, Caryville, Ebro, and Wausau have City/Town Council meetings scheduled for June 9, 10 and 12. e Washington County BOCC Amy Wiwi See PRESIDENT page 12 See DIRECTOR page 12 A Message fr o m the President Page 2 Washington County Business Advocate June-July 2014 Washington County Business ADVOCATE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Nicole Bareeld Cindy Johnson-Brown Joy Davis Julie P. Dillard Terry Ellis Andy Fleener Wayland Fulford Janet Kinney Garrett Martin Jan Page Community South Credit Union William Steverson Darrin Wall Ami Wiwi CHAMBER STAFF Ted Everett Chris MacBlain A Message fr o m the Executive Director PROMOTES YOUR BUSINESS Visitors Guides & Relocation Packages Free Business Directory Listing Free Internet Directory Listing W/Free Local Media Coverage Referrals Use of Chamber Brochure/Business Card Racks Bi-Monthly Newsletter w/Spotlights On Member Businesses Business Card Services to New Members Advertising Opportunities in Newsletter/County Maps/Visitors Guide/Web A discounted subscription to the Washington County News for new and renew ing members NETWORKING Third Thursday Breakfast Annual Chamber Membership Banquet KEEPS YOU INFORMED Our Newsletter, Membership Directory and Website, among other resources and publica tions, are outstanding information sources. PROVIDES A BUSINESS INVESTMENT Tax Deductible Chamber Investments EDC Investments and Opportunities to be involved in Economic Development Eorts in Washington County e Chamber of Commerce held a Marketing Workshop May 29 at the PAEC that oered the attendees a closer look at marketing and translating leads into sales. e workshop featured speaker Mark Raciappa of A ctionCOACH from Tallahassee. Mark has done other seminars for the Chamber and has shown a knowledge and passion for helping small businesses achieve their goals. Some of the ground he covered is the fact that in any sale, one must understand that emotion for the product by the customer is the driving the component of making the sale. Logic plays roughly 20 percent of that decision. erefore, the objective for the salesperson becomes to tie the product being sold to why the person may need it to make them feel good emotionally. If one watches the many ads that we are bombarded with daily (typically, over 3,000) look more carefully at how they tug at your emotions. In discussing the concept of a business having a Winning Team Mark detailed the seven things a business owner must have in place to create a good team: 1. Strong leadership 2. Common goal between owner and employees 3. Understanding the rules of the game 4. Have an action plan 5. Support risk taking 6. Have a mission statement 7. 100% involvement/inclusion between owners and employees. I very much enjoyed the workshop with ActionCoach Mark Raciappa, said Jessi Collins, media consultant with the Washington County News; He taught me how to better manage my time to not only help me, but to better serve my customers. e rst thing I took away with me was to turn the automatic email Ted Everett What an exciting future Washington County has in store! Ive had the pleasure over the last few weeks to be present at many exciting events. First, the announcement of the new (and expanded) WestPoint Home Bed and Bath Outlet store in Washington Square, then the groundbreaking ceremony for Goodwills GIBB Chipley Village Apartments, and last (but not least) the groundbreaking for the new Kate M. Smith Elementary School. Residents of Washington County, this is economic development! is means jobs, better facilities for residents that are in need, more opportunities to shop locally, and a new school for our kids. I have also personally heard the promise from Sen. Don Gaetz that we will have funding for a new courthouse in the near future. None of these things could happen without coordination, phone calls, and knocking on the doors of our elected ocials. Its wonderful to see Washington County citizens working together for the betterment of our community and our future. Lets keep the momentum going! Try to attend your city/town council meetings, your county commission meetings, and join us for ird ursday breakfasts. Make sure your voice is heard and our County continues to prosper. I also must mention the many graduations that have been held over the last few weeks. I am so proud of our Washington County students, the scores they are achieving and how bright their prospects seem. Our children are our future. Lets work together to ensure they will have the opportunity to live and work in Washington County! Please check the back of the Advocate for important community dates. Following are a few of the upcoming events: Vernon, Chipley, Caryville, Ebro, and Wausau have City/Town Council meetings scheduled for June 9, 10 and 12. e Washington County BOCC Amy Wiwi See PRESIDENT page 12 See DIRECTOR page 12 A Message fr o m the President Page 2 Washington County Business Advocate June-July 2014 Washington County Business ADVOCATE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Nicole Bareeld Cindy Johnson-Brown Joy Davis Julie P. Dillard Terry Ellis Andy Fleener Wayland Fulford Janet Kinney Garrett Martin Jan Page Community South Credit Union William Steverson Darrin Wall Ami Wiwi CHAMBER STAFF Ted Everett Chris MacBlain A Message fr o m the Executive Director PROMOTES YOUR BUSINESS Visitors Guides & Relocation Packages Free Business Directory Listing Free Internet Directory Listing W/Free Local Media Coverage Referrals Use of Chamber Brochure/Business Card Racks Bi-Monthly Newsletter w/Spotlights On Member Businesses Business Card Services to New Members Advertising Opportunities in Newsletter/County Maps/Visitors Guide/Web A discounted subscription to the Washington County News for new and renew ing members NETWORKING Third Thursday Breakfast Annual Chamber Membership Banquet KEEPS YOU INFORMED Our Newsletter, Membership Directory and Website, among other resources and publica tions, are outstanding information sources. PROVIDES A BUSINESS INVESTMENT Tax Deductible Chamber Investments EDC Investments and Opportunities to be involved in Economic Development Eorts in Washington County e Chamber of Commerce held a Marketing Workshop May 29 at the PAEC that oered the attendees a closer look at marketing and translating leads into sales. e workshop featured speaker Mark Raciappa of A ctionCOACH from Tallahassee. Mark has done other seminars for the Chamber and has shown a knowledge and passion for helping small businesses achieve their goals. Some of the ground he covered is the fact that in any sale, one must understand that emotion for the product by the customer is the driving the component of making the sale. Logic plays roughly 20 percent of that decision. erefore, the objective for the salesperson becomes to tie the product being sold to why the person may need it to make them feel good emotionally. If one watches the many ads that we are bombarded with daily (typically, over 3,000) look more carefully at how they tug at your emotions. In discussing the concept of a business having a Winning Team Mark detailed the seven things a business owner must have in place to create a good team: 1. Strong leadership 2. Common goal between owner and employees 3. Understanding the rules of the game 4. Have an action plan 5. Support risk taking 6. Have a mission statement 7. 100% involvement/inclusion between owners and employees. I very much enjoyed the workshop with ActionCoach Mark Raciappa, said Jessi Collins, media consultant with the Washington County News; He taught me how to better manage my time to not only help me, but to better serve my customers. e rst thing I took away with me was to turn the automatic email Ted Everett What an exciting future Washington County has in store! Ive had the pleasure over the last few weeks to be present at many exciting events. First, the announcement of the new (and expanded) WestPoint Home Bed and Bath Outlet store in Washington Square, then the groundbreaking ceremony for Goodwills GIBB Chipley Village Apartments, and last (but not least) the groundbreaking for the new Kate M. Smith Elementary School. Residents of Washington County, this is economic development! is means jobs, better facilities for residents that are in need, more opportunities to shop locally, and a new school for our kids. I have also personally heard the promise from Sen. Don Gaetz that we will have funding for a new courthouse in the near future. None of these things could happen without coordination, phone calls, and knocking on the doors of our elected ocials. Its wonderful to see Washington County citizens working together for the betterment of our community and our future. Lets keep the momentum going! Try to attend your city/town council meetings, your county commission meetings, and join us for ird ursday breakfasts. Make sure your voice is heard and our County continues to prosper. I also must mention the many graduations that have been held over the last few weeks. I am so proud of our Washington County students, the scores they are achieving and how bright their prospects seem. Our children are our future. Lets work together to ensure they will have the opportunity to live and work in Washington County! Please check the back of the Advocate for important community dates. Following are a few of the upcoming events: Vernon, Chipley, Caryville, Ebro, and Wausau have City/Town Council meetings scheduled for June 9, 10 and 12. e Washington County BOCC Amy Wiwi See PRESIDENT page 12 See DIRECTOR page 12 A Message fr o m the President Page 2 Washington County Business Advocate June-July 2014 Washington County Business ADVOCATE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Nicole Bareeld Cindy Johnson-Brown Joy Davis Julie P. Dillard Terry Ellis Andy Fleener Wayland Fulford Janet Kinney Garrett Martin Jan Page Community South Credit Union William Steverson Darrin Wall Ami Wiwi CHAMBER STAFF Ted Everett Chris MacBlain A Message fr o m the Executive Director PROMOTES YOUR BUSINESS Visitors Guides & Relocation Packages Free Business Directory Listing Free Internet Directory Listing W/Free Local Media Coverage Referrals Use of Chamber Brochure/Business Card Racks Bi-Monthly Newsletter w/Spotlights On Member Businesses Business Card Services to New Members Advertising Opportunities in Newsletter/County Maps/Visitors Guide/Web A discounted subscription to the Washington County News for new and renew ing members NETWORKING Third Thursday Breakfast Annual Chamber Membership Banquet KEEPS YOU INFORMED Our Newsletter, Membership Directory and Website, among other resources and publica tions, are outstanding information sources. PROVIDES A BUSINESS INVESTMENT Tax Deductible Chamber Investments EDC Investments and Opportunities to be involved in Economic Development Eorts in Washington County e Chamber of Commerce held a Marketing Workshop May 29 at the PAEC that oered the attendees a closer look at marketing and translating leads into sales. e workshop featured speaker Mark Raciappa of A ctionCOACH from Tallahassee. Mark has done other seminars for the Chamber and has shown a knowledge and passion for helping small businesses achieve their goals. Some of the ground he covered is the fact that in any sale, one must understand that emotion for the product by the customer is the driving the component of making the sale. Logic plays roughly 20 percent of that decision. erefore, the objective for the salesperson becomes to tie the product being sold to why the person may need it to make them feel good emotionally. If one watches the many ads that we are bombarded with daily (typically, over 3,000) look more carefully at how they tug at your emotions. In discussing the concept of a business having a Winning Team Mark detailed the seven things a business owner must have in place to create a good team: 1. Strong leadership 2. Common goal between owner and employees 3. Understanding the rules of the game 4. Have an action plan 5. Support risk taking 6. Have a mission statement 7. 100% involvement/inclusion between owners and employees. I very much enjoyed the workshop with ActionCoach Mark Raciappa, said Jessi Collins, media consultant with the Washington County News; He taught me how to better manage my time to not only help me, but to better serve my customers. e rst thing I took away with me was to turn the automatic email Ted Everett What an exciting future Washington County has in store! Ive had the pleasure over the last few weeks to be present at many exciting events. First, the announcement of the new (and expanded) WestPoint Home Bed and Bath Outlet store in Washington Square, then the groundbreaking ceremony for Goodwills GIBB Chipley Village Apartments, and last (but not least) the groundbreaking for the new Kate M. Smith Elementary School. Residents of Washington County, this is economic development! is means jobs, better facilities for residents that are in need, more opportunities to shop locally, and a new school for our kids. I have also personally heard the promise from Sen. Don Gaetz that we will have funding for a new courthouse in the near future. None of these things could happen without coordination, phone calls, and knocking on the doors of our elected ocials. Its wonderful to see Washington County citizens working together for the betterment of our community and our future. Lets keep the momentum going! Try to attend your city/town council meetings, your county commission meetings, and join us for ird ursday breakfasts. Make sure your voice is heard and our County continues to prosper. I also must mention the many graduations that have been held over the last few weeks. I am so proud of our Washington County students, the scores they are achieving and how bright their prospects seem. Our children are our future. Lets work together to ensure they will have the opportunity to live and work in Washington County! Please check the back of the Advocate for important community dates. Following are a few of the upcoming events: Vernon, Chipley, Caryville, Ebro, and Wausau have City/Town Council meetings scheduled for June 9, 10 and 12. e Washington County BOCC Amy Wiwi See PRESIDENT page 12 See DIRECTOR page 12 A Message fr o m the President Page 2 Washington County Business Advocate June-July 2014 Washington County Business ADVOCATE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Nicole Bareeld Cindy Johnson-Brown Joy Davis Julie P. Dillard Terry Ellis Andy Fleener Wayland Fulford Janet Kinney Garrett Martin Jan Page Community South Credit Union William Steverson Darrin Wall Ami Wiwi CHAMBER STAFF Ted Everett Chris MacBlain A Message fr o m the Executive Director PROMOTES YOUR BUSINESS Visitors Guides & Relocation Packages Free Business Directory Listing Free Internet Directory Listing W/Free Local Media Coverage Referrals Use of Chamber Brochure/Business Card Racks Bi-Monthly Newsletter w/Spotlights On Member Businesses Business Card Services to New Members Advertising Opportunities in Newsletter/County Maps/Visitors Guide/Web A discounted subscription to the Washington County News for new and renew ing members NETWORKING Third Thursday Breakfast Annual Chamber Membership Banquet KEEPS YOU INFORMED Our Newsletter, Membership Directory and Website, among other resources and publica tions, are outstanding information sources. PROVIDES A BUSINESS INVESTMENT Tax Deductible Chamber Investments EDC Investments and Opportunities to be involved in Economic Development Eorts in Washington County e Chamber of Commerce held a Marketing Workshop May 29 at the PAEC that oered the attendees a closer look at marketing and translating leads into sales. e workshop featured speaker Mark Raciappa of A ctionCOACH from Tallahassee. Mark has done other seminars for the Chamber and has shown a knowledge and passion for helping small businesses achieve their goals. Some of the ground he covered is the fact that in any sale, one must understand that emotion for the product by the customer is the driving the component of making the sale. Logic plays roughly 20 percent of that decision. erefore, the objective for the salesperson becomes to tie the product being sold to why the person may need it to make them feel good emotionally. If one watches the many ads that we are bombarded with daily (typically, over 3,000) look more carefully at how they tug at your emotions. In discussing the concept of a business having a Winning Team Mark detailed the seven things a business owner must have in place to create a good team: 1. Strong leadership 2. Common goal between owner and employees 3. Understanding the rules of the game 4. Have an action plan 5. Support risk taking 6. Have a mission statement 7. 100% involvement/inclusion between owners and employees. I very much enjoyed the workshop with ActionCoach Mark Raciappa, said Jessi Collins, media consultant with the Washington County News; He taught me how to better manage my time to not only help me, but to better serve my customers. e rst thing I took away with me was to turn the automatic email Ted Everett What an exciting future Washington County has in store! Ive had the pleasure over the last few weeks to be present at many exciting events. First, the announcement of the new (and expanded) WestPoint Home Bed and Bath Outlet store in Washington Square, then the groundbreaking ceremony for Goodwills GIBB Chipley Village Apartments, and last (but not least) the groundbreaking for the new Kate M. Smith Elementary School. Residents of Washington County, this is economic development! is means jobs, better facilities for residents that are in need, more opportunities to shop locally, and a new school for our kids. I have also personally heard the promise from Sen. Don Gaetz that we will have funding for a new courthouse in the near future. None of these things could happen without coordination, phone calls, and knocking on the doors of our elected ocials. Its wonderful to see Washington County citizens working together for the betterment of our community and our future. Lets keep the momentum going! Try to attend your city/town council meetings, your county commission meetings, and join us for ird ursday breakfasts. Make sure your voice is heard and our County continues to prosper. I also must mention the many graduations that have been held over the last few weeks. I am so proud of our Washington County students, the scores they are achieving and how bright their prospects seem. Our children are our future. Lets work together to ensure they will have the opportunity to live and work in Washington County! Please check the back of the Advocate for important community dates. Following are a few of the upcoming events: Vernon, Chipley, Caryville, Ebro, and Wausau have City/Town Council meetings scheduled for June 9, 10 and 12. e Washington County BOCC Amy Wiwi See PRESIDENT page 12 See DIRECTOR page 12 A Message fr o m the President Page 2 Washington County Business Advocate June-July 2014 Washington County Business ADVOCATE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Nicole Bareeld Cindy Johnson-Brown Joy Davis Julie P. Dillard Terry Ellis Andy Fleener Wayland Fulford Janet Kinney Garrett Martin Jan Page Community South Credit Union William Steverson Darrin Wall Ami Wiwi CHAMBER STAFF Ted Everett Chris MacBlain A Message fr o m the Executive Director PROMOTES YOUR BUSINESS Visitors Guides & Relocation Packages Free Business Directory Listing Free Internet Directory Listing W/Free Local Media Coverage Referrals Use of Chamber Brochure/Business Card Racks Bi-Monthly Newsletter w/Spotlights On Member Businesses Business Card Services to New Members Advertising Opportunities in Newsletter/County Maps/Visitors Guide/Web A discounted subscription to the Washington County News for new and renew ing members NETWORKING Third Thursday Breakfast Annual Chamber Membership Banquet KEEPS YOU INFORMED Our Newsletter, Membership Directory and Website, among other resources and publica tions, are outstanding information sources. PROVIDES A BUSINESS INVESTMENT Tax Deductible Chamber Investments EDC Investments and Opportunities to be involved in Economic Development Eorts in Washington County e Chamber of Commerce held a Marketing Workshop May 29 at the PAEC that oered the attendees a closer look at marketing and translating leads into sales. e workshop featured speaker Mark Raciappa of A ctionCOACH from Tallahassee. Mark has done other seminars for the Chamber and has shown a knowledge and passion for helping small businesses achieve their goals. Some of the ground he covered is the fact that in any sale, one must understand that emotion for the product by the customer is the driving the component of making the sale. Logic plays roughly 20 percent of that decision. erefore, the objective for the salesperson becomes to tie the product being sold to why the person may need it to make them feel good emotionally. If one watches the many ads that we are bombarded with daily (typically, over 3,000) look more carefully at how they tug at your emotions. In discussing the concept of a business having a Winning Team Mark detailed the seven things a business owner must have in place to create a good team: 1. Strong leadership 2. Common goal between owner and employees 3. Understanding the rules of the game 4. Have an action plan 5. Support risk taking 6. Have a mission statement 7. 100% involvement/inclusion between owners and employees. I very much enjoyed the workshop with ActionCoach Mark Raciappa, said Jessi Collins, media consultant with the Washington County News; He taught me how to better manage my time to not only help me, but to better serve my customers. e rst thing I took away with me was to turn the automatic email Ted Everett What an exciting future Washington County has in store! Ive had the pleasure over the last few weeks to be present at many exciting events. First, the announcement of the new (and expanded) WestPoint Home Bed and Bath Outlet store in Washington Square, then the groundbreaking ceremony for Goodwills GIBB Chipley Village Apartments, and last (but not least) the groundbreaking for the new Kate M. Smith Elementary School. Residents of Washington County, this is economic development! is means jobs, better facilities for residents that are in need, more opportunities to shop locally, and a new school for our kids. I have also personally heard the promise from Sen. Don Gaetz that we will have funding for a new courthouse in the near future. None of these things could happen without coordination, phone calls, and knocking on the doors of our elected ocials. Its wonderful to see Washington County citizens working together for the betterment of our community and our future. Lets keep the momentum going! Try to attend your city/town council meetings, your county commission meetings, and join us for ird ursday breakfasts. Make sure your voice is heard and our County continues to prosper. I also must mention the many graduations that have been held over the last few weeks. I am so proud of our Washington County students, the scores they are achieving and how bright their prospects seem. Our children are our future. Lets work together to ensure they will have the opportunity to live and work in Washington County! Please check the back of the Advocate for important community dates. Following are a few of the upcoming events: Vernon, Chipley, Caryville, Ebro, and Wausau have City/Town Council meetings scheduled for June 9, 10 and 12. e Washington County BOCC Amy Wiwi See PRESIDENT page 12 See DIRECTOR page 12 Tis the season to be THANKFUL! Washington County residents should all celebrate our many recent successes: a new Kate M. Smith Elementary School, a new courthouse, a wonderful opportunity for regional recognition for the vocational school, and the County Commissioners progressive approach to setting aside funding for economic development. I am proud to be a Washington County resident and I cannot stress enough how these successes improve our competitive edge in the business community! I would like to thank all of Washington Countys elected officials; county and city staff; Economic Development Council and Chamber boards; as well as the numerous volunteers for the work they have done to make this possible to help ensure the prosperity of our county. We have been busy here at the Chamber and are always seeking ways to add value for our chamber members. Recently, we have had several successful Chamber Ambassador Cash Mobs, a successful second annual Chicken Wing Fling, and a renewed commitment to improving and restructuring our website. We have also had much excitement on the Economic Development front, as you can tell from our cover story. We are also always open to your comments and suggestions on how we can better serve our members. We want to promote our local business community and look forward to our business communities future success. Remember our Chamber offers much value! Your membership entities to you a lengthy list of direct benefits and services. It also connects you with the community and offers relationships you wont find in any other organization. Our chamber works with many local, state, and federal elected officials, business leaders, economic development boards, etc. to build relationships that will create a successful business climate to move our county forward. That is our goal, building relationships with not only business leaders, but also our community. Dont forget, we have several holidays coming up! Shop and dine locally! We believe in Washington County! Page 2 Washington County Business Advocate October-November 2014 I usually begin my Advocate message with something like, Well,it feels like fall weather, but not this time. In reflecting on the Chamber and the county, I realize there are so many things in play for Washington County. From the Chambers perspective, we are seeing an increase in members and aspiring members attending our monthly Third Thursday Chamber Breakfast. I believe it is because we have tried to provide relevant and interesting programs at these breakfast meetings. Although we want to keep the community informed about what is happening locally, it is very important to bring in a variety of people who can discuss issues which have meaning to the business people in our audience. We even highlight programs which many people do not hear about on a regular basis, such as our recent program on Guardian ad Litem. Also, I am seeing even stronger convictions on planning for the future from not only our Chamber Board and Economic Development Council Board but from the business owners and the Board of County Commissioners (read cover story). Self-reliance is still a positive step to fix our issues without relying on the State or any other entity. To that end, the Chamber Economic Development Council will soon present its fifth and final Economic Development Symposium. This will be a very exciting and informative meeting directed toward entrepreneurs or recently opened businesses in Washington County. Save the date Thursday, Oct. 30 from 6-8 p.m. More details will be provided soon on our website, www.washcomall. com and Facebook page; please make sure youre using both to stay informed. These are all good things for your county but more importantly, for you, the citizens of Washington County. Being forward thinking allows for good planning and strong commitment. I see a lot of good things happening on different levels around Washington County and that is positive progress. A Message fr o m the President Page 2 Washington County Business Advocate June-July 2014 Washington County Business ADVOCATE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Nicole Bareeld Cindy Johnson-Brown Joy Davis Julie P. Dillard Terry Ellis Andy Fleener Wayland Fulford Janet Kinney Garrett Martin Jan Page Community South Credit Union William Steverson Darrin Wall Ami Wiwi CHAMBER STAFF Ted Everett Chris MacBlain A Message fr o m the Executive Director PROMOTES YOUR BUSINESS Visitors Guides & Relocation Packages Free Business Directory Listing Free Internet Directory Listing W/Free Local Media Coverage Referrals Use of Chamber Brochure/Business Card Racks Bi-Monthly Newsletter w/Spotlights On Member Businesses Business Card Services to New Members Advertising Opportunities in Newsletter/County Maps/Visitors Guide/Web A discounted subscription to the Washington County News for new and renew ing members NETWORKING Third Thursday Breakfast Annual Chamber Membership Banquet KEEPS YOU INFORMED Our Newsletter, Membership Directory and Website, among other resources and publica tions, are outstanding information sources. PROVIDES A BUSINESS INVESTMENT Tax Deductible Chamber Investments EDC Investments and Opportunities to be involved in Economic Development Eorts in Washington County e Chamber of Commerce held a Marketing Workshop May 29 at the PAEC that oered the attendees a closer look at marketing and translating leads into sales. e workshop featured speaker Mark Raciappa of A ctionCOACH from Tallahassee. Mark has done other seminars for the Chamber and has shown a knowledge and passion for helping small businesses achieve their goals. Some of the ground he covered is the fact that in any sale, one must understand that emotion for the product by the customer is the driving the component of making the sale. Logic plays roughly 20 percent of that decision. erefore, the objective for the salesperson becomes to tie the product being sold to why the person may need it to make them feel good emotionally. If one watches the many ads that we are bombarded with daily (typically, over 3,000) look more carefully at how they tug at your emotions. In discussing the concept of a business having a Winning Team Mark detailed the seven things a business owner must have in place to create a good team: 1. Strong leadership 2. Common goal between owner and employees 3. Understanding the rules of the game 4. Have an action plan 5. Support risk taking 6. Have a mission statement 7. 100% involvement/inclusion between owners and employees. I very much enjoyed the workshop with ActionCoach Mark Raciappa, said Jessi Collins, media consultant with the Washington County News; He taught me how to better manage my time to not only help me, but to better serve my customers. e rst thing I took away with me was to turn the automatic email Ted Everett What an exciting future Washington County has in store! Ive had the pleasure over the last few weeks to be present at many exciting events. First, the announcement of the new (and expanded) WestPoint Home Bed and Bath Outlet store in Washington Square, then the groundbreaking ceremony for Goodwills GIBB Chipley Village Apartments, and last (but not least) the groundbreaking for the new Kate M. Smith Elementary School. Residents of Washington County, this is economic development! is means jobs, better facilities for residents that are in need, more opportunities to shop locally, and a new school for our kids. I have also personally heard the promise from Sen. Don Gaetz that we will have funding for a new courthouse in the near future. None of these things could happen without coordination, phone calls, and knocking on the doors of our elected ocials. Its wonderful to see Washington County citizens working together for the betterment of our community and our future. Lets keep the momentum going! Try to attend your city/town council meetings, your county commission meetings, and join us for ird ursday breakfasts. Make sure your voice is heard and our County continues to prosper. I also must mention the many graduations that have been held over the last few weeks. I am so proud of our Washington County students, the scores they are achieving and how bright their prospects seem. Our children are our future. Lets work together to ensure they will have the opportunity to live and work in Washington County! Please check the back of the Advocate for important community dates. Following are a few of the upcoming events: Vernon, Chipley, Caryville, Ebro, and Wausau have City/Town Council meetings scheduled for June 9, 10 and 12. e Washington County BOCC Amy Wiwi See PRESIDENT page 12 See DIRECTOR page 12

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1360 Br ick ya rd Ro ad Chipley Fl or ida 850-638-1610 www .nf ch.or g Nor thwest Florida Community Hospital Nor thwest Florida Community Hospital Nor thwest Florida Community Hospital Nor thwest Florida Community Hospital Fo r yo ur health, fo r yo ur co nv enienc e, fo r yo ur peac e of mind ... we ar e her e fo r yo u thr oughout the new ye ar! June-July 2014 Washington County Business Advocate Page 3 Third Thursday Programs WCC members benet from Chamber Perks 1360 Brickyard Road, Chipley, Florida 850-638-1610 www.nfch.org For your health, for your convenience, for your peace of mind... we are here for you throughout the new year! SPONSOR: Je Goodman, Attorney at Law The team at Je Goodman, P.A. is dedicated to defending your rights and protecting your interests. We have experience representing a broad range of clients, from large multinational corporations to small companies and individuals who need our services. Our commitment to service and to our clients whether large or small remains constant and we believe every client deserves respect, personal attention and attentiveness. July 17 Program and Sponsor to be announced June 19 Program: Interim Clerk of the Court Harold Bazzel will talk about the duties and responsibilities of the Clerk of the Court and provide an update on the state of the County. As a member of the Washington County Chamber of Commerce, you have the power of more than 137,000 Florida Chamber members and three million Florida employees working together. Using the inuence of the entire business community, e Florida Chamber of Commerce has negotiated savings and discounts on services that matter to you, such as: oce supplies, shipping, health insurance, payroll processing, SPAM and virus protection and employee benets. We invite you to review the ChamberPerks benets and then do what thousands of other growing businesses have done take advantage of the time and money you will save by using Chamber endorsed services. Visit the WCC Chambers website at www.washcomall.com and click on ChamberPerks. Ambassadors plan summer activities Chamber Ambassador Chair Wendy White, center, leads the Ambassadors in a planning session for summer activities including representation at local festivals and events, and ideas to support local businesses. If youre interested in participating as an Ambassador, please contact the Chamber at 638-4157. October-November 2014 Washington County Business Advocate Page 3 Washington County Chamber members benefit from Chamber Perks As a member of the Washington County Chamber of Commerce, you have the power of more than 137,000 Florida Chamber members and three million Florida employees working together. Using the influence of the entire business community, The Florida Chamber of Commerce has negotiated savings and discounts on services that matter to you, such as: office supplies, shipping, health insurance, payroll processing, SPAM and virus protection and employee benefits. We invite you to review the ChamberPerksbenefits and then do what thousands of other growing businesses have done take advantage of the time and money you will save by using Chamber endorsed services. Visit the WCC Chambers website at www.washcomall.com and click on ChamberPerks. Oct. 16 Program United Way of Northwest Florida Bryan Taylor, Executive Director of the United Way of Northwest Florida and Gina Watson, Resource Development Director, talk about what United Way does for our community. Well also hear from a couple of local agencies about how their United Way dollars get spent in Washington County, and address myths many people believe about what United Way does or doesnt do. Sponsor: United Way of Northwest Florida Nov. 20 Program Chamber Annual Meeting and New Member Meet and Greet New members bring your business cards and rack cards and join with Chamber members to share the who, what, where, when and how of your business. Sponsor: Washington County Chamber of Commerce The Washington County Chamber of Commerce is the business leader dedicated to growing a strong economy where businesses prosper and our communities thrive.

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ww w. commer cialpr opertyinvestments.us Bay County Association of Realtors Chipola Ar ea Board of Realtors Page 4 Washington County Business Advocate October-November 2014 Page Eight Washington County Business Advocate June-July 2011 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY INVESTMENTS Gary Hartman Broker Associate 850.773.3338 Fax 850.773.3332 Email: ghartman36@bellsouth.net Knowledge..., the pollen so ideas blossom. TDC UPDATE Heather Lopez Administrative Assistant Need a few ways to cool off this summer? Here are a few locations in Washington County that can assist you with this, on top of being fun and educational. These attractions also boast being family friendly. First lets take a ride down the creek at one of Washington Countys two canoe liveries. Holmes Creek Canoe Livery inside Vernon Park, off Hwy. 79 in Vernon, is sure to give you an afternoon of relaxation. Try out the rope swing, diving board, or the new water chute. Make a stop on your canoe trip at one of the natural springs found along the way. Or be a nature adventurer as you wind down the Econfina Creek at the Econfina Creek Canoe Livery inside the Northwest Florida Water Management District off Hwy. 20 in Ebro. Enjoy natural springs, a waterfall, limestone formations, and the native flora and fauna. Canoeing not your thing? Then take a dip or sunbathe on the white sand beach at Falling Waters Lake inside Falling Waters State Park. Get a little exercise on their boardwalk trails under the canopy shade of giant magnolia and oak trees to the observation deck overlooking Floridas tallest waterfall. Enjoy watching the flutter of colorful wings around Falling Waters State Parks new butterfly garden. Or sit under the cover of their pavilion and watch the kids play on the playground. Washington County has many other ways to keep you cool this summer. Try launching your boat off one of 29 different public boat ramps in the County to go fishing, horseback riding on the trails of Sunshine Riding Trails in Chipley, splashing around at Boat Lake in Sunny Hills, or a number of other activities. The tri-county day trip programs summer brochure is also out with complete listings of special events and festivals in Washington, Holmes and Jackson counties through August 2011. A downloadable version of the brochure can be found on the TDC website. For more ideas on how to beat the heat this summer visit our website at www.VisitWashingtonCountyFL.co m Family-friendly ways to beat the heat in Washington County Falling Waters State Park. TDC launches areas first geocaching trail with Oct. 11 event If you love high tech devices, the outdoors and a little adventure, then maybe geocaching is for you. Geocaching is an adult treasure hunting game played by individuals and families all over the world. Using handheld GPS devices or smartphones, players enter GPS coordinates to find hidden containers called caches that hold such things as log sheets and trackables, which are little keepsakes that you can take and leave in the caches. Once you find your cache, you can log it on www.geocaching.com, which is the official site for geocaching, so others can see what you have found. Some communities and now the Florida State Parks are creating trails and games that tie several caches together with a common theme. The Washington County Tourist Development Council (TDC), in conjunction with the Florida Geocaching Association, has been creating its Washington County Heritage GeoTrail for the past eight months. This trail is history themed and includes 32 historic sites in Washington County. The TDC also created a game tourists can play that would require completion of 15 sites. Winners would receive a series of path-tags, small metal coins with images glazed into them and a unique tracking code that can be logged. The coins will represent the TDC, the Vernon Historical Society and the Washington County Historical Society. Caches, Critters & Cars event at Falling Waters State Park on Saturday, Oct. 11, will serve as the official kick-off of the GeoTrail. There will also be history demonstrators, animal displays, arts and crafts vendors, and food. Materials for the trail such as a site brochure and grid-sheet to log your caches will be available at the event from the TDC or Florida Geocaching Association. The first 25 people to finish the TDCs game will receive a special commemorative trackable. For more information on the Washington County Heritage GeoTrail or on Washington County, visit www. visitwashingtoncountyfl. com. The Washington County TDC is funded solely from bed tax dollars collected on overnight stays in the area hotels/motels, RV parks, campgrounds and other forms of transient housing. This is a special purpose tax to be used only for tourist development for Washington County. For more information contact our office at 850-638-6013. These are the some of the pathtags that will be o ered as the prize for completing 15 sites out of 32 total. Geocachers must complete four sites in the northeast, southwest and southeast quadrants and all three sites in the northwest quadrant. For the rst 25 sites, they will receive a special trackable that will be revealed at the festival. TDC Director

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In th is mo me nt ... Ro ge rs In su ra nc e Ag en cy In c. 13 96 Ja ck so n Av en ue | Ch ip le y, FL 32 42 8 | (8 50 ) 63 818 05 October-November 2014 Washington County Business Advocate Page 5 Ambassadors Cash Mob Very rst Cash Mob by Chamber Ambassadors at Bloom Boutique LLC 1343 Brick yard Road, Chipley. Cash Mob at Chipley Hardware & Mobile Home Supplies at 1163 Jackson Ave., Chipley.

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Page 6 Washington County Business Advocate October-November 2014 THIRD THURSDAY HIGHLIGHTS Judge Jim Fensom discusses Floridas Guardian ad Litem program in August. Ted Everett receives a special photo from Ambassador Chair Wendy White for his participation at the 2014 Possum Festival. Washington County Historical Society President Dorothy Odom discusses Historic Industry in the county. Tracie Jordan shares Guardian ad Litem program of work. Garden Club and Historical Society members attended the September meeting. Members listen to September program presenter Dorothy Odom. August and September Third Thursdays

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October-November 2014 Washington County Business Advocate Page 7 Ribbon Cuttings Bloom Boutique LLC at 1343 Brickyard Road in Chipley held a ribbon cutting on Aug. 8. All About Women OB/GYN at 1360 Brickyard Road held a ribbon cutting on Aug. 27. Tim Berry Special to the Advocate Good news: Heres a simple process, five easy steps, to improve your business. Its easy to do. And, if youre not doing something like this already, then this simple addition to your process offers you substantial business improvement. The first three steps were published in the August-September edition of the Advocate; steps four and five follow below. Step 4: You need to manage your business cash Profits alone dont guarantee cash. For example, you can be profitable, but have too much cash tied up in accounts receivable, or inventory, so you end up without enough money to make payroll or cover necessary expenses. To manage cash, you need to project sales, direct costs, expenses, extra spending (for loan repayment or buying assets and such) and extra income (from borrowing, bringing in Part Two: Five simple steps for better management See STEPS 11

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AD AM J. PEADEN, DP M, AA CF AS Gu lf Co ast Po dia tr y Ch iple y O ce 1360 Br ick ya rd Av e. Chipley FL 32428 850-638-FOO T (3668) Sp ec ializing in the ev alu at ion an d trea tment of the an kl e an d fo ot In cluding Diabetic Wo und Ca re Spor ts Me dicine An kl e and Fo ot Tr auma FD A Ap pr ov ed To enail Fu ngus Laser Tr ained in Re co nstruc tiv e and Tr auma Sur ger y Dr Pe aden has privileges at Nor th we st Fl orida Co mm unit y Hospital Most insur anc e ac ce pt ed including TRIC ARE Page 8 Washington County Business Advocate October-November 2014 Membership RENEWALS Anderson Columbia Co. (1999) Blackburn Properties (2010) Business Evaluation & Appraisal Inc. (2005) Career Source Chipola (1998) Deborah Healis-Independent Beauty Consultant (2010) Dermatology Associates (2011) Emerald Coast Hospice (2012) FL Microfilm Supply, Inc. (1998) Goodwill Industries Big Bend Inc. (2008) Heather N. Wells, CPA (2012) Main Street Market, LLC (20008) NHC HomeCare (1989) Preble-Rish, Inc. (2013) Professional Real Estate Mgmt, LLC (2008) Southern Family Healthcare P.A. (2002) Sunny Hills Civic & Improvement Assn. (1980) Washington County Historical Society (2010) NEW MEMBERS Emmie & Co. (2014) Mike Owens Financial Services (2014) ECONOMIC DEVELOP COUNCIL MEMBERS Business Evaluations & Appraisals, Inc.(2005) Emerald Coast Hospice (2012) Total: 313 Member Victoria Williams honored as a Woman of Distinction by the Girl Scouts of the Florida Panhandle for her Leadership. Williams is president of VBA Design. State Rep. Jimmy Patronis appointed to the Florida Public Service Commission by Gov. Rick Scott. KUDOS TO... JIMMY PATRONIS VICTORIA WILLIAMS

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C 101 2 M S. (8 50 ) 638 -7 89 2 B 300 N. W S. (850) 547 -36 24 M 4701 Hwy 90 4215 L S. (850 ) 526-4 411 INVESTING IN LO CAL SMALL BUSINESSES FOR OV ER 50 YEARS www .sb.com G 5381 Cliff St (850) 26 3-32 25 D ON N OW ELL S AN DY S PE AR AN D W EN DY W HIT E October-November 2014 Washington County Business Advocate Page 9 CHICKEN WING FLING The day was hot, the chicken tasty and the Chambers second annual Wing Fling a success! Many thanks to our board volunteers and the community which supported this event. Clockwise, from top left: Chris MacBlain, Cindy Johnson-Brown, Ted Everett and Nicole Bare eld package orders; event chair Johnson-Brown prepares a plate; William Steverson checks the oil temperature (still cold!); Wayland Fulford helps Johnson-Brown, Julie Dillard and Ted Everett on the line.

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Qu al it y Si nc e 19 58 CB C 05 79 33 CU C 056 97 5 85 078 546 75 www .g ac co nt ra ct or s. co m Ser vi ng Ba y, Ho lm es & Wa sh in gt on Co un ti es Fo r Ov er 40 Ye ar s He at in g & Cool in g 850-638-3611 1050 Ma in St ., Ch iple y, FL 32428 Ne w HV AC Eq uipmen t Re siden tial/C ommer cial Co mmer cial Ki tc hen Hoods & Re fr iger at ion Se rv ing the Tr iCo un ty Ar ea Ov er 19 Ye ars Page 10 Washington County Business Advocate October-November 2014 Burnt Sock Landing opens VERNON The grand opening of Burnt Sock Landing, an exclusive canoe, kayak and small boat launch along Holmes Creek in Washington County, was recently celebrated. The Northwest Florida Water Management District completed public access and recreational improvements to the site, including road improvements and a parking area. Additional improvements included stabilizing the dirt boat ramp, which will improve water quality by reducing sediments owing into the spring-fed creek and allow users to hand launch canoes, kayaks and small boats. The District owns and manages more than 60,000 acres along Holmes Creek and the downstream Choctawhatchee River to improve the health of these waterways and the natural resources that surround them, said Executive Director Jon Steverson. This includes enhancing areas like Burnt Sock Landing, which will improve water quality along the creek and the 57 crystal clear springs that feed its ow. Improvements made to the boat landing at Burnt Sock Landing in Vernon will make it easier to access for recreational purposes. Chamber Executive Director Ted Ever ett shares how the improvements will not only expand public access, but also help protect Holmes Creek.

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October-November 2014 Washington County Business Advocate Page 11 new investment, or selling assets and so forth). On this one too, dont try to accurately predict the future. Instead, try to lay out how sales, costs and expenses relate to each other, so later when sales are different from expectations, you have an easy time of identifying the related changes you need to expect in direct costs and make in expenses. Think of what drives sales, such as pricing, marketing expenses, traffic, conversions, leads, pipelines and so forth. And dont go into too much detail because, as with assumptions above, youll run into diminishing returns if you do. For example, a restaurant shouldnt project sales for every menu item, but summarize and aggregate for dinners, lunches, drinks and other. And a bookstore doesnt project sales by title or author or subject, normally, but rather hard cover, soft cover, magazines and other. Keep your categories manageable. Step 5: Review, revise, repeat Set a specific day of the month, such as every third Thursday of the month, to review results and revise as necessary. If youre working with others, make sure they know about this regular monthly meeting and miss it only when they have to miss it for good business reasons. Start your review meeting with your list of assumptions. Identify whether assumptions have changed, and how, and what that means for your business. Include a review of milestones for the past month, including whether or not expected milestones were reached. Then look at milestones for the next month, to review expectations and compare the milestones with the underlying assumptions. Finally, review performance metrics. Track and manage the difference between actual performance and established expectations. And now, lo and behold, you have a business plan I didnt use the words business plan in the title or first paragraph because I dont want you to dismiss it because of the myth of the formal business plan document. Too many business owners read the words business plan and dismiss the idea, thinking of some hard-to-do term-paper-like formal document that they dont need unless they are applying for commercial credit, seeking investment, or dealing with issues like selling the business or managing a divorce settlement. The real business plan, however, is as simple as these five steps. You keep this business plan fresh and up to date and it optimizes management of your company. And when you do need a formal plan, you take this real business plan and dress it up with more description and explanations for outsiders, and print it as a formal business plan document. Tim Berry is founder and chairman of Palo Alto Software and bplans. com, on twitter as Timberry, doing social media business planning at smbplans.com and blogging at timberry. bplans.com. He is the author of business plan software Business Plan Pro and www.liveplan. com and books including The Plan As You Go Business Plan, published by Entrepreneur Press, 2008. STEPS from page 7 Front row, Ambassadors Kristin Martin and Junior Ambassadors Haylee White and Olivia Brown. Back Row, Kathy Rudd, Wendy White, Honorary Ambassador Ted Everett, Jessi Collins, Ashley Pate and Cindy Brown. Possum Festival

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Bon net t Po nd Rd Chi pl ey FL 32 42 8 wo od me n. or g Ka th y C. Ru dd FI C Fi el d Re pr ese nt at iv e Ph one : 85 083 206 60 Fa x: 85 063 8355 5 Cel l: 85 0933 -7 93 1 KC Ru dd @w oo dm en .o rg Wo od me n of th e Wo rl d Li fe In su ra nc e So ci et y, Om ah a, NE Page 12 Washington County Business Advocate June-July 2014 Washington County Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 457 Chipley, Florida 32428 ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED JULY Every Tuesday Noon Kiwanis Luncheon Every Tuesday / Thursday / Saturday (7-12) 12-5pm Farmers Market Open, 685 7th St., Chipley Every Wednesday 9-2pm Vernon Hist. Historical Society Open Every Friday and 1st Saturday 9-2pm W.C. Historical Society Museum Open JUNE Every Tuesday Noon Kiwanis Luncheon Every Tuesday / Thursday / Saturday (7-12) 12-5pm Farmers Market Open, 685 7th St., Chipley Every Wednesday 9-2pm Vernon Hist. Historical Society Open Every Friday and 1st Saturday 9-2pm W.C. Historical Society Museum Open 2 6 pm. Vernon Town Council Workshop 3 5 pm WC Planning & Zoning @ Annex 4 Last Day of School 5 Noon Friends of Library @ Chipley Library 5 pm Chipley City Council Workshop 6:30 pm Sunny Hills Civic Association Mtg. 6-8 STP Honky Tonk Angels @ Playhouse 9 5:30 pm WC School Board Meeting 7 pm Vernon Council Meeting 10 6 pm Chipley City Council Meeting 6 pm Caryville Town Council Meeting 6 pm Ebro Town Council Meeting 11 Noon Chipley Womans Club Mtg @ Clubhouse 12 Noon Chipley Lions Club @ Skins & Bubba 6 pm Wausau Town Council Meeting 13 Full Strawberry Moon 16 6 pm. Vernon Town Council Workshop 19 10:30 am Wausau Garden Club 23 4 pm WC TDC Workshop/Board Meeting 7 pm Vernon Council Meeting 25 9 am Wash. Co. Commission Workshop @ Annex 26 9 am Wash. Co. Commission Mtg @ Annex 27-28 Annual Watermelon Festival Ag Center 1 Noon Friends of Library @ Chipley Library 5 pm WC Planning & Zoning @ Annex 3 6:30pm Sunny Hills Civic Association 5:00pm Chipley City Council Workshop 4 Independence Day 7 6 pm Vernon Town Council Workshop 8 6 pm Chipley City Council Meeting 6 pm Ebro Town Council 6:pm Caryville Town Council 9 Noon Chipley Womans Club Mtg @ Clubhouse 10 Noon Chipley Lions Club @ Skins n Bubba 6 pm Wausau Town Meeting@ Town Hall 12 Full Buck Moon 14 5:30 pm Washington County School Board Meeting 7 pm Vernon City Council Meeting 16 9 am WCBOCC WorkshopAnnex 17 7:30 am Chamber 3rd Thursday Mtg@NFCH Sp.Ctr. 8:30 am Ambassador Mtg. @NFCH Sp.Ctr 9 am WCBOCC Meeting Annex 11:30 am Wausau Garden Club 21 6 pm Vernon Town Council Workshop 28 4 pm WC TDC Workshop/Board Meeting 7 pm Vernon Town Council Meeting PRESIDENT from page 2 meeting is June 29 at 9 a.m. Add these meetings to your calendar and stay involved in your community! e Chambers next ird ursday Breakfast is June 19 at 8:30 a.m. Come join us for a wonderful breakfast at the hospitals Specialty Center. Interim Clerk of Court Harold Bazzel is our speaker. He will discuss the duties and responsibilities of the Clerk of the Court as well as an update on the state of the County. e 58th annual Panhandle Watermelon Festival is June 27-28. is will be an exciting two-day music and family event, with wonderful performers, the Hot Trot Run, Watermelon Parade downtown, a ne arts show, watermelon contests and more. Come out and enjoy the event, eat plenty of watermelon, and spend time with your neighbors. generator o and I now have control of how much time I spend on emails without it causing distractions throughout my work day, said Jessi. His techniques for protable marketing -which is an investment you should see a return on -were dead on, she added. If you have any workshop or seminar ideas on what you would like the Chamber oer, please let us know. We will do our best to bring relevant and useful information to our help our small businesses develop. DIRECTOR from page 2 board; she also is involved in several community organizations and activities. Johnson-Brown is a speech language pathologist who recently opened her own business, Therapy World of Northwest Florida. She treats children and adults with a wide variety of disorders in speech sound production, voice, fluency, language, cognition, and feeding/swallowing. After graduating from Chipley High School in 1992, Johnson-Brown pursued her bachelors degree in Speech Language Pathology at the University of Central Florida in Orlando, and completed her masters degree in Speech Language Pathology at Nova Southeastern University. Johnson-Brown promotes healing for a better life. She is a member of ASHA, FLASHA, the Chamber board of directors, Kiwanis, Washington County Arts Council board of directors, and Take Stock in Children. AWARDS from page 9 Page 12 Washington County Business Advocate October-November 2014 OCTOBER Every Tuesday Noon Kiwanis Luncheon 8 a.m. Tai Chi Class @ Chipley Public LIbrary Every Thursday & 1st Saturday (9-12) 10 a.m.-2 p.m. WC Historic al Society Museum Open Every Tuesday / Thursday / Saturday (7-12) 12-5pm-Farmers Market Open 685 7th St.Chipley Every Wednesday 9-2 p.m. Vernon Hist. Historical Society Museum Open1 5 p.m. W.C. Planning Commission @ Co. Annex 10:30 a.m. Chipley Garden Club 2 Noon-Friends of Library @ Chipley Library 3 6:30 p.m. Sunny Hills Civic Assoc. Meeting 3-4 8 a.m. Chipley Womens Club Fall Yard Sale 6 4:30 p.m. Vernon City Council Workshop 7 5 p.m. WC Planning Commission @ Annex 8 Noon Chipley Womans Club @ Clubhouse Full Hunters Moon or Full Harvest Moon 9 5 p.m. Chipley City Council Workshop 6 p.m. Wausau Council Meeting Noon Chipley Lions Club @ Pattillos 10 Noon CHS Homecoming Parade 7 p.m. CHS Homecoming Football 13 5:30 p.m. Wash Co School Board Meeting 7 p.m. Vernon Council Meeting 14 6 p.m. Chipley City Council Meeting 6 p.m. Caryville Town Council Mtg 6 p.m. Ebro Town Council Mtg 15 9 a.m. BOCC Workshop 16 National Boss Day 7:30 a.m. WCCC 3rd Thursday-NFCH Special Ctr. 9 a.m. WC Commission Mtg @ Annex 11:30 a.m. Wausau Garden Club@Wausau Town Hall 20 4:30 p.m. Vernon City Council Workshop 17-19 STP Rumors @ Playhouse 23 Noon Chipley Lions Club @ Pattillos 24 Vernon Homecoming Game 24-26 Howl-O-Ween @ Seacrest Wolf Preserve 27 7 p.m. Vernon City Council Meeting 4 p.m. TDC Workshop & Mtg @ Chamber 30 4-6 p.m. WH Tech Ctr Candy & Careers 31 HAPPY HALLOWEEN! NOVEMBER Every Tuesday Noon Kiwanis Luncheon 8 a.m. Tai Chi Class @ Chipley Public Library Every Thursday & 1st Saturday (9-12) 10 a.m.-2 p.m. -WC Historical Society Museum Open Every Tuesday / Thursday / Saturday (7-12) 12-5 p.m.-Farmers Market Open 685 7th St.Chipley Every Wednesday 9-2 p.m.-Vernon Hist. Historical Society Museum Open 1 4-7 p.m. Chipley Trunk or Treat @ Pals Park 3 6 p.m. Vernon City Council Workshop 5 10:30 a.m. Chipley Garden Club 6 Noon WC Friends of the Library @ Blue Pond Comm. 5 p.m. Chipley City Council Workshop 5 p.m. WC Planning Commission @ Annex 6:30 p.m. Sunny Hills Civic Assoc. Meeting Full Beaver Moon 10 5:30 p.m. Wash Co. School Board Meeting 7 p.m. Vernon City Council Meeting 11 VETERANS DAY! 6 p.m. Chipley City Council Mtg. 6 p.m. Ebro Town Council Mtg 6 p.m. Caryville Town Council Mtg Chipley HS WC Schools Tribute to Veterans 13 6 p.m. Wausau Council Meeting 12 Noon Chipley Womans Club @ Clubhouse 17 6 p.m. Vernon City Council Workshop 20 7:30 a.m. WC Chamber 3rd Thursday @ Pattillos 9 a.m. WC Board of Co. Commission Work shop @ Annex 10:30 a.m. Wausau Garden Club @ Wausau Town 6 p.m. Farm City Banquet WC Ag Ctr 24 4 p.m. WC TDC Workshop & Mtg @ Chamber 7 p.m. Vernon City Council Meeting 24-28 WC Schools Closed Thanksgiving Holiday 26 Noon-Master Gardeners Mtg. @ Ag Ext. Oce 27 HAPPY THANKSGIVING! 27-28 Chamber Oce Closed