Washington County news

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Title:
Washington County news
Uniform Title:
Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Chipley Fla
Creation Date:
June 22, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
Coordinates:
30.779167 x -85.539167 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began May 23, 1924.
General Note:
L.E. Sellers, editor.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000384704
oclc - 07260886
notis - ACC5987
lccn - sn 81000810
issn - 0279-795X
System ID:
UF00028312:00965

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C onnec t with us 24/7 G et br eak ing new s videos e xpanded st or ies phot o galler ies opinions and mor e ... @WCN_HC T CH IPLE Y P APER C OM Phone: 850-638-0212 Website: chipleypaper.com Fax: 850-638-4601 INDEX Outdoors ......................... A9-10 Faith ............................. A14-15 Classi eds .......................... A16 50¢ Saturday, SEPTEMBER 13 2014 www.chipleypaper.com Volume 91, Number 44 For the latest breaking news, visit CHIPLEYPAPER.COM IN BRIEF Washington County observes Day of Remembrance for Sept. 11, 2001 A12-13 W EEKEND Washington County News Holmes Creek clean up VERNON — “Holmes Creek Clean-up 2014” will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 16. Bring your gloves and grabbers. There will be free canoe rentals and prizes for the most trash collected. Prizes will include free canoe rentals and a two night stay at Top of the Gulf in Panama City Beach. The group will meet at Holmes Creek Canoe Livery located at 2899 Highway 79 in Vernon. Deer nutrition, management seminar CHIPLEY — There will be a deer nutrition and management seminar from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 18, at the Washington County Agriculture Center in Chipley. The seminar will focus on management strategies to improve your deer herd and tips, techniques and recommendations for growing quality food plots and improving deer habitat. The seminar is free to the public. RSVP to the Washington County Extension of ce at 638-6180 or mdm83@ u .edu. Community Alliance CHIPLEY – Commuity Alliance for Families and the Washington County Public Library will host a support group for the caregiver/ child relationship from 5 to 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 18. Refreshments will be provided. To register, or for more information, call 638-1314. Prison of cers arrested in beating ROBERT MILLER JAMES KIRKLAND CHRISTOPHER CHRISTMAS DALTON RILEY WILLIAM FINCH JAMES PERKINS All 6 red in connection with Aug. 5 incident From staff reports CHIPLEY — Six correctional of cers have been arrested in connection with a prison beating and red from their positions with the Northwest Florida Reception Center in Chipley. Florida Department of Corrections of cials have arrested Sgt. William Finch, Sgt. James Perkins, Sgt. Robert Miller, Sgt. Christopher Christmas and Sgt. Dalton Riley on charges of malicious felony battery on an inmate. A superior of cer, Capt. James Kirkland, also was arrested with additional charges of of cial misconduct. All six have been dismissed as a result of their actions, DOC of cials said. The arrests stem from an Aug. 5 incident involving 31-year-old inmate Jeremiah L. Tatum. Tatum currently is serving a seven-year prison sentence for cocaine traf cking. See BEATING A2 Wausau considers budget, rec director By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com WAUSAU — The Wausau Town Council hosted the rst reading of an ordinance to adopt the town budget for the 2014-2015 scal year when they met in regular session Thursday. Highlights of the budget include an increase in insurance premiums through the Florida League of Cities from $13,853 to $16,020 as a result of adding coverage for new buildings not previous included in the town’s coverage. Health insurance cost decreased slightly, however, because the town clerk no longer was covered under the town’s policy. Other anticipated changes include that elected of cials will have to be covered under Florida retirement until after the election, but newly elected council members will have 90 days to opt out of the retirement system. The maintenance employee will also receive a dollar hourly salary increase in pay when their “These arrests and terminations send a very clear message: we have zero tolerance for criminal activity by our staff.” Mike Crews DOC secretary A public budget hearing will be at 5:01 p.m. Monday, Sept. 22. See BUDGET A2 Mayor Cain says goodbye By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY — Chipley Mayor Linda Cain will of ciate her last council meeting when the City of Chipley convenes in special session Monday, Sept. 29. Cain’s departure, made necessary by mandates from Florida’s retirement system, will mark the end of more than a quarter century of service to the Chipley City Council. The mayor addressed local residents in a recent letter. “With deep personal sadness, I am unable to continue my service on the city council,” Cain said. “My heart is not in this, but due to the rules of the Florida Retirement System, it has to be. It has been a pleasure to serve on your council for the past 26 years. In those years, I have many pleasant memories of the people who have served with me. I give a heartfelt thanks to each employee, past and present, for their dedication and service. Chipley is a great place to live and will always be so if we continue to work together.” Brett Butler, who quali ed to represent Ward 4 earlier this year, will step in Cain’s place on the council in October. A new mayor and mayor pro-tem, a post currently held by Councilman Lee Dell Kennedy, will be appointed at that time. Planning Commission discusses projects By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY — Members of the Washington County Planning Commission met Thursday, Sept. 11, to discuss the county’s veyear work plan for roadways in partnership with the Florida Department of Transportation. West Florida Regional Planning Council representative Mary Beth Washnock addressed the commission to discuss the projects which include lighting improvements to State Road 8/Interstate 10 at County Road 279, sidewalk repairs in conjunction with the City of Chipley, as well as the following locations: CR 273 South Boulevard from Peach Street to SR 77 Main Street; Pine Avenue from Usery Road to Third Street and SR 77 from S. Fifth Street to CR 273/South Blvd. Lane additions and reconstruction is planned for SR 79 from north of Reedy Branch Bridge to Court Street, from N. Mill Branch Bridge to SR 8 (I-10), from N. Cypress Creek Bridge to the Holmes County line, and on SR 77 from south of CR 276 Clayton Road to north of Blue Lake Road, from the north Sunny Hills entrance to one mile south of the Wausau city limits, and from 1 mile north of the Wausau city limits to CR 276/Clayton Road. Resurfacing is planned for Shakey Joe Road from the end of the pavement to CR 284/River Road, on SR 20 See PROJECTS A2 Last meeting will be Sept. 29

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Local A2 | Washington County News Saturday, September 13, 2014 Video from the prison showed Tatum be ing slammed, face rst to the concrete oor by Finch and Riley while Tatum’s hands were restrained be hind his back and his ankles restrained. The three other ofcers then jumped on Ta tum and pinned him to the ground, according to arrest records. Each of the subordinate ofcers told investigators the attack was designed by their supervisor. Kirkland told them he wanted Tatum taken to the ground during an escort, and that he would prompt the attack by yelling Tatum spit on him, investi gators reported. However, the ve subor dinate ofcers told inves tigators none of Tatum’s actions justied the use of force. They were booked into Washington County Jail with a $2,500 bond. Kirkland was given a $25,000 bond, which he post ed, resulting in his release about 4 p.m. Thursday. Kirkland was charged with two counts of ofcial misconduct for orchestrat ing the incident and then allegedly pressuring the ofcers to sign ctitious reports. The conditions of his release were unclear Thursday. “These arrests and terminations send a very clear message: we have zero tolerance for criminal activity by our staff,” DOC Secretary Mike Crews said in a press release. “I expect everyone to do what is right, and I have restated my com mitment to hold those who do not to meet our expecta tions accountable for their wrongdoing.” As investigations pro ceeded last week, DOC an nounced a strict zero-toler ance policy for employee misconduct. DOC employ ees who commit a crimi nal act will immediately be placed on administrative leave and the Department will initiate disciplinary ac tion for their dismissal. Crews and Deputy Secre tary Tim Cannon met today with the command staff at Northwest Florida Recep tion Center as part of Crews’ commitment to personally visit every Department of Corrections institution to emphasize his expectations for transparency, account ability and professionalism, DOC ofcials reported. “Our staff should be held to the highest standards, and those who fail to do the right thing will no lon ger work for this agency,” Crews said. “As I have em phasized to our staff in my meetings around the state, we will not let the bad ac tions of a few undermine our culture of professional ism and tarnish the reputa tions of all the hard work ing men and women in our Department.” Tatum entered the Dept. of Corrections Sys tem March 3, 2014, and has a listed release date of April 23, 2020. BEATING from page A1 probationary period ends in February. The maintenance assistant also will receive a 50-cent hourly raise. The town is expected to grant City Clerk Margaret Riley’s request for annual and sick leave in lieu of a salary increase. The leave would accrue at a rate of eight hours a month with the stipulation she not be paid for the leave in the event she resigns or is termination. The new budget also ear marks $3,000 for the hiring of a part-time recreational director. A public budget hearing will be at 5:01 p.m. Monday, Sept. 22. In other action, the town also set the community’s of cial Trick-or-Treat to take place from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 31. BUDGET from page A1 Caryville discusses zoning By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT Cspears@chipleypaper.com CARYVILLE — Washington County’s Senior Planner Michael DeRuntz hosted a review of the county’s com prehensive plan with the Caryville Town Council during the Sept. 9 meeting. DeRuntz explained there are properties in the county comprehen sive plan which needed updating. Some properties have been added in some zones, and others are noncom pliant with their zoning location. “We’re correcting and updating,” DeRuntz said. “Our maps haven’t been updated in 20 years. There are businesses in residential zones and (those businesses) can’t expand due to old mapping. We’re hoping to have this all corrected as soon as possible.” DeRuntz recommended the town draw out a comprehensive plan of their own for potential growth, with President Henry Chambers quip ping, “It was easy because the entire town is in a ood zone.” DeRuntz agreed to review the new information for the town of Caryville and collaborate with the council if there are any alternatives available for the town. The county also approved to nance xing the leaking roof of the Caryville Civic Center in the amount of $4,600. The next scheduled meeting of the Caryville Town Council is set for 6 p.m. Oct. 14. C ecilia ECILIA SPears EARS | The News Washington County Senior Planner Michael DeRuntz was at this month’s meeting of the Caryville Town Council to discuss corrections in Washington County’s Comprehension Plan. from the Walton County line to the Bay Coun ty line, on SR 77 from north of CR 278 Pioneer to CR 77A State Park Road, SR 77 from south of SR 8/I-10 to Fifth Street, and on SR 8/I-10 from the Choctawhatchee River to the Holmes County line. Right of Way and Fu ture Capacity is forthcom ing on SR 77 from 1 mile south of the Wausau city limit to one mile north of the Wausau city limit and from the Bay County line to north of CR 279. Two-lane road con struction is planned for Lucas Lake Road. from Lakeshore Drive to CR 279 Moss Hill Road and on Roche Road. from CR 279 Moss Hill Road to Pine Log Road. Other projects include Right of Way Acquisition on SR 79 from Pate Pond Road to north of Cypress Creek Bridge, a prelimi nary look at future capac ity on SR 77 from north of CR 279 to the north Sunny Hills Entrance, bridge repair for two locations on SR 8 (I-10) over the Choctawhatchee River Bridge, widening and re surfacing lanes located on CR 170 Wilderness Road from CR 280 Douglas Fer ry Road to CR 279 Pate Pond Road, and mainte nance resurfacing at SR 10 (U.S. Highway 90) from east of CR 179 to St. Marys to the Holmes County line. The commission also discussed the 2014-2015 Washington County Rural Works Program, which in cludes paving projects on the following roads: Miller Lane, Shell Point Road, Joe Neel Road, Rooks Circle, Pike Pond Road, Kent Road, Houston Road, Hard Labor Road, Mud Hill Road, Buckhorn Boulevard and Porter Pond Road. The county also will work with the City of Chi pley to make the follow ing improvements: storm water retention on Fifth Street, sidewalks on SR 273 from SR 277 to Ben nett Drive, and drainage and paving projects on Fifth Street at Old Bonifay Road. PROJECTS from page A1 Police: Teen injured protecting mother By ZACK McDONALD 747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com P P ANAMA CITY — Police have ar rested a Callaway man they saw beating a juvenile after he alleg edly threatened to slit the throat of the teen’s mother, ofcials said Thursday. When Panama City Police were called to a wooded area near Bay Medical Sacred Heart Health Center at 10:15 a.m. Wednesday, bystanders directed them to a ditch on the east side of Palo Alto Avenue below Sixth Street. The woman was screaming, “He’s beating my son,” according to police. About 40 feet across the murky, water-lled ditch, ofcers said they could see 41-yearold Christopher Michael Milwicz Sr. standing over a younger man, hitting and kicking him. As police crossed the ditch they ordered the man to stop, but Milwicz rubbed dirt in the young man’s face and then ran into woods, ac cording to police reports. After a 30-yard chase, ofcers caught Milwicz after shooting him twice with stun guns. Police also were called to the hospital area Tuesday about Mil wicz, but he escaped. Milwicz’s ex-girlfriend called ofcers. She told them he had made several threats to kill her over the phone and through text messages. Milwicz, the ex-girl friend and her son lived together for about two years but had ongo ing domestic issues. While ofcers were taking the mother’s statements, Milwicz called her. Ofcers could over hear Milwicz threaten to “slit her throat” over the phone, police reported. Although his vehicle was spot ted in the area and towed from a nearby gas station, police were unable to nd him. They did ob tain a warrant to arrest him for aggravated assault. On Wednesday, Milwicz again confronted the mother and son near the hospital and the skirmish ensued. The 17-year-old told ofcers Milwicz aggressively approached his mother, so he attempted to protect her by putting him in a bear hug. Milwicz broke away and slammed the juvenile to the ground before hitting him mul tiple times on his face and chest, according to police. Onlookers called police, who arrested Milwicz. The juvenile was treated at the hospital and released. Milwicz was taken to the Bay County Jail, where he was charged with domestic bat tery, child abuse, aggravated assault, harassing phone calls and resisting a law ofcer with violence. It was unclear whether the teen’s mother worked at the hospital or was a patient. Ofcers said they overheard man threatening to slit woman’s throat CHRISTOPHER MILWICZ By ZACK McDONALD 747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com P P ANAMA CITY — Pros ecutors in the 14th Judicial Circuit will seek the death penalty for triple-homi cide suspect Derrick Ray Thompson, according to court documents. The State Attorney’s Of ce led notices Tuesday saying that, if convicted, they will seek capital pun ishment for Thompson, who is accused of the July 21 killing of 66-year-old former BCSO ofcer and businessman Allen John son. The state also led a notice of aggravating cir cumstances it will have to prove for jurors to levy the death sentence. They in clude proving the alleged murder was “cold, calcu lated and premeditated.” Prosecutors in the 1st Judicial Circuit also are exploring the death pen alty against Thompson and have recently indicted him for the fatal shoot ings of Milton residents Steven Zackowski, 60, and Debra Zackowski, 59, on July 19. Because the incidents are two crimes, the 14th Judicial Circuit’s decision to seek Thompson’s death does not inuence the 1st Judicial Circuit’s pursuit of capital punishment. Thompson, a 41-yearold Pensacola resident, was considered a person of interest in the Zackowski slayings when investiga tors found Johnson in his Lynn Haven home with a single gunshot wound to the back of the head and a spent .380-caliber casing beside his body. The truck Thompson was believed to be driving following the rst killings was found at the scene. State attorneys are not allowed to discuss an ongoing case. But law en forcement agencies have released evidence that indicated Thompson was motivated by a quest for prescription narcotics and planned to amass a stash of drugs following the Zackowski slayings. Thompson stayed over night in a Chipley motel, where he borrowed a phone from the motel clerk and called Johnson to ask if he could come to his home on Wilson Avenue to borrow money. Before eeing the state to a Troy, Ala., hunting lodge, Thompson used money and a cellphone he allegedly stole from Johnson to buy numerous prescription narcotics in Panama City, investigators reported. He confessed to the three homicides after his capture, investigators said, but recently pleaded not guilty to the charges. Thompson is being held without bond in the Bay County Jail. A trial date has not been set. State seeks death for slayings suspect Thompson DERRICK THOMPSON Murder suspects plead not guilty in Tavish Greene case By ZACK McDONALD 747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com PP ANAMA CITY — Two suspects pleaded not guilty Tuesday to shoot ing Tavish Greene multiple times and concealing his body in a car trunk before eeing the state. Darryl Mack, 22, and Tyricka Woullard, 20, pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder charges in the slaying of 24-year-old Greene. The two ed to Covington, Ga., as po lice discovered Greene’s body in the trunk of a car behind an abandoned East Eighth Court home on July 24. Police say Greene’s death came at the end of a botched robbery involv ing three people. The third suspect who remained behind in Bay County, 22-year-old Dontavis Thomas, has been charged with accessory after fact to homicide but has not led a plea, according to court records. Police reports said the three suspects lured Greene to Woul lard’s home at 3710 W. 21st St., where they planned to rob him the morning of July 19. Thomas and Mack allegedly used phone calls and text messages to draw Greene into a trap through Woullard, his exgirlfriend. The three hid inside, wait ing to ambush Greene for money and drugs. Woullard and Mack then ed to Georgia the day after, police reported. Greene was discovered in the trunk of his Chevy Malibu ve days after the attempted robbery. He was shot multiple times, medical examin ers said. Mack, Woullard and Thomas al ready had been arrested and charged with conspiracy to commit armed robbery. Mack also was charged with possession of a rearm by a felon. New charges were brought against Mack and Woullard last Thursday of second-degree murder and principal to second-degree mur der, respectively. A day before Thom as was charged as an accessory. The suspects also heard reopened cases for probation violations Tuesday. Woullard is accused of violating her probation from a May 2013 scheme to defraud a bank, charges to which she pleaded no contest. Thomas al legedly violated his probation from a November 2009 burglary in which he stole rearms. He also pleaded no contest.

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Local Washington County News | A3 Saturday, September 13, 2014 BU DGET SUMMAR Y BO ARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS WA SHINGT ON COUNTY FISCAL YEAR 2014 2015 THE PR OPOSED OPERA TING BU DGET EXPENDITURES OF WA SHINGT ON COUNTY BO ARD OF COMMISSIONS ARE 23% MORE THAN LAST YEAR’S TOT AL OPERA TING EXPENDITURES MILLA GE PER $1,000.00 GENERAL FUND 9.252 CASH BALANCE FOR WA RD 96,592.00 3,438,993.00 3,535,585.00 ESTIMA TED REVENUES: TA XES: AD VA LOREM TA X 7,566,344.00 472,828.00 8,039,172.00 NON AD VA LOREM TA X SALES USES & GAS TA X 1,407,268.00 1,714,246.00 700.00 3,122,214.00 BU ILDING PERMITS 135,700.00 135,700.00 CHARGES FOR SER VICES 166,900.00 15,000.00 141,100.00 323,000.00 INTERGO VERNMENT AL REVENUES 2,787,754.00 690,317.00 8,218,527.00 11,696,598.00 FINES & FORFEITURES 259,250.00 259,250.00 MISCELLANEOUS 198,950.00 8,900.00 91,500.00 299,350.00 TOT AL REVENUES AND OT HER FINANCING SOURCES 12,127,216.00 2,525,055.00 12,758,598.00 27,410,869.00 LESS 5% (606,361.00) 121,424.00) (23,642.00) (751,427.00) TOT AL ESTIMA TED REVENUES AND 11,520,855.00 2,403,631.00 12,734,956.00 26,659,442.00 BALANCES TRANSFER INS 43,074.00 771,049.00 1,024,000.00 1,838,123.00 RESER VES 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 BALANCES 11,563,929.00 2,403,631.00 13,506,005.00 1,024,000.00 28,497,565.00 EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES GENERAL GO VERNMENT 3,991,488.00 711,227.00 4,702,715.00 PUBLIC SAFETY 4,553,241.00 1,086,320.00 5,639,561.00 PHYSICAL ENVIR ONMENT 210,204.00 177,493.00 387,697.00 TRANSPOR TAT ION 2,403,631.00 6,707,920.00 9,111,551.00 ECONOMIC ENVIR ONMENT 185,995.00 1,392,798.00 1,578,793.00 HUMAN RESER VICES 633,586.00 50,000.00 683,586.00 CUL TURE/RECREA TION 478,351.00 570,389.00 1,048,740.00 CAPIT AL OUTLA Y DEBT SER VICE 1,024,000.00 1,024,000.00 TOT AL EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES 10,052,865.00 2,403,631.00 10,696,147.00 1,024,000.00 24,176,643.00 CONTINGENCY 190,015.00 2,292,784.00 2,482,799.00 TOT AL APPR OPRIA TED EXPENDITURES AND CONTINGENCIES 10,242,880.00 2,403,631.00 12,988,931.00 1,024,000.00 26,659,442.00 TRANSFER OUTS 1,321,049.00 517,074.00 1,838,123.00 RESER VES 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 TOT AL EXPENDITURES 11,563,929.00 2,403,631.00 13,506,005.00 1,024,000.00 28,497,565.00 THE TENT AT IVE ADOPTED AND/OR FINAL BU DGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABO VE MENTIONED TA XING AU THORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD DEBT SER VICE FUND GENERAL FUND TRANSPOR T FUND SPECIAL REVENUE FUND TOT AL BU DGET NO TICE OF BUDGE T HEARING Th e Bo ar d of Co un ty Co mmissioners has te nt at iv ely adopt ed a budget fo r scal ye ar 2014-2015. A public hear ing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget AND TA XES will be held on: Se pt ember 15, 2014 5:05 P. M. at Th e Wa shingt on Co un ty An ne x Bo ar d Me eting Ro om 1331 So uth Bo ulev ar d Chipley Fl or ida 32428 By JIM TURNER The News Service of Florida TALLAHASSEE — Despite opposition from students and faculty, state Sen. John Thrasher, a well-connected Re publican from St. Augustine, remains in the hunt to be the next president of Florida State University. The university’s 27-member Pres idential Advisory Search Committee on Tuesday named four nalists, including Thrasher, to succeed for mer President Eric Barron. Barron, an academic with a track record in fundraising, was named president of Penn State University in February. While Thrasher vowed during his interview Tuesday to make the school “proud” if he gets hired, a number of students and faculty members implored the committee to focus on candidates with strong aca demic backgrounds. “Sen. Thrasher meets the quali cations that this board agreed to when we put those qualications out,” university Trustee Ed Burr, the chairman of the search committee, said after the meeting. The other nalists, chosen after the committee spent two days inter viewing a pool of 11 applicants, are Richard B. Marchase, University of Alabama at Birmingham vice presi dent for research and economic de velopment; Michele G. Wheatly, who until June had been provost at West Virginia University; and Michael V. Martin, Colorado State University System chancellor. FSU Provost Garnett Stokes, who has been serving as interim presi dent, failed in several votes to make the nalist pool, including one pro posal backed by students and faculty on the committee for her to replace Thrasher among the nalists. The nalists will be expected to attend a second round of interviews that will include meetings with groups on campus next week. Back ground checks are planned. The committee is scheduled to make a recommendation to the university’s board of trustees on Sept. 22. The trustees, who would still have to forward the nal choice to the uni versity system’s Board of Governors, are scheduled to meet Sept. 23. Thrasher, the only “nontraditional” candidate among the 11 interviewed the past two days, has been a major supporter of FSU in the Legislature, including helping the university es tablish a medical school. Currently chairman of the Sen ate Rules Committee and chair man of Gov. Rick Scott’s re-election campaign, he is also a former House speaker and former chairman of the Republican Party of Florida. During his one-hour, 15-question interview, Thrasher talked about his passion for the university and a desire to make a difference at the school where he received his under graduate and law degrees. “I want to be president of Flor ida State University. If you give me the opportunity to do it, I prom ise you, I will make you proud,” Thrasher said in response to a question from committee member and state Rep. Jimmy Patronis, R-Panama City. Thrasher among nalists for FSU job Regional VA director gets earful at meeting By LAUREN SAGE REINLIE 315-4443 | @LaurenRnwfdn Lreinlie@nwfdailynews.com PENSACOLA — About 100 veterans and family members came out for a face-to-face meeting with the leader of the Veterans Affairs Gulf Coast Health Care system Monday night. The meeting was one of the rst steps taken by Bob McDonald, the new director of the Depart ment of Veterans Affairs, who ordered all VA health care systems to host town hall meetings to hear vet erans’ concerns. The VA has been scandalized in recent months by reports of exceptionally long de lays in care and some cas es in which veterans died while waiting for appointments. “It is my honor to be here and listen to you to hear how we can do things better,” said Mark Mor gan, acting director of the Gulf Coast system, which serves about 66,000 vet erans and their families from Panama City to Bi loxi, Miss. A long line of veterans spoke, detailing various medical issues and con cerns, including delays in accessing mental health care, difculty obtaining prescriptions and alleg edly neglectful care. The most common issues raised were with disability claims, which fall outside the healthcare system’s oversight. Gary Cooper, a 62year-old Vietnam vet eran from Mobile, Ala., asked whether a new Mobile facility was in the works to replace the ex isting one, which is about 50 years old. Morgan said there was but acknowl edged that with a patient population growing by 1 to 3 percent a year, often by the time clinics are built they already have been outgrown. Cooper, who has ad vocated for better medi cal care for veterans for years, said he was thank ful for the opportunity to address the system’s leadership. “I was never told in my military career — and I was in Vietnam — that the hardest ght was going to be getting veterans benets,” he said. Morgan, who has held his post for less than a month, tried to address some of the veterans’ con cerns, but mostly he lis tened and thanked them for their input. After the veterans spoke, staff members pulled them aside to get their contact information and nd out what they could do to help. Simone Rich, 45, who came to the meeting with her father, a 70-year-old veteran who lives in Pen sacola, was concerned with a prescription issue. She said a staff mem ber did get their contact information and promised to call her back. But Rich said she was hoping veter ans would get more specif ic answers at the meeting. “I think it’s a good thing they are doing this, but they are still not addressing our issues,” she said. “It seems like they are just trying to ap pease us.” Paul Goodin, a 79-yearold vet from Pensacola, said he was happy with the care he has received from the Pensacola VA clinic, where the meeting was held. “They’re doing a good job for me,” he said. “My concern is they are getting too big, it’s going to cause more problems.” By BEN KLEINE 522-5114 | @BenKleinepcnh bkleine@pcnh.com LYNN HAVEN — Angela Fer nandez believes God is try ing to send her a message. More than 20 years ago, Fernandez was given a black, standard-sized King James Bible on her birth day. It was an occasional companion at Mosley High School, accompanying her to Fellowship of Christian Students meetings in the choir room. Somewhere along the line, the Bible was lost and forgotten in the haze of teenage activity. Now it has resurfaced, found in the rubble during construction at the school this summer, perhaps where Fernandez left it near the choir room. Deemed un wanted, one of the workers placed it atop a trash pile. But the construction manager retrieved the Bible — in part because of karmic superstition. The construction man ager brought the Bible to secretary Sheila Cook, who then relayed it to School Re source Deputy Tom Hedges, who happens to be a family friend of the Fernandezes and a pastor at a West Bay church. “The way I was brought up you never throw away a Bible,” Hedges said. “That’s like throwing away a Ouija board.” Hedges returned the Bi ble to Fernandez, who was mystied to see the written note from her mother in the rst pages and notes from high school friends serving as bookmarks. “Maybe it’s God’s way of saying don’t give up,” Fer nandez said. “God puts things in your life for a reason,” she said. Personalized Bible found years later

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Local A4 | Washington County News Saturday, September 13, 2014 POSTMASTER: S S end address change to: Washington County News P.O O Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 U SS P S S 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $20; 26 weeks: $28.70; 52 weeks: $48.60 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $24.30; 26 weeks: $36.40; 52 weeks: $60.70 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copy right 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. CO pP Y rR I ghtGHT NO tT I cC E: T he entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bareeld, Publisher Carol Kent, E E ditor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT CONTACT US PUBLIS hH ER Nicole Bareeld: nbareeld@chipleypaper.com NE wW S, S pP OR t T S OR O pP I nN IO nN news@chipleypaper.com CLASSI fF IED & c C IR cC ULA t T IO nN 850-638-0212 clamb@ chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 EDI EDI T OROR Carol Kent: ckent@ chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 A A DVER t T ISI nN G Jessica Collins: jcollins@chipley paper.com SpSP E c C IAL tT O T h H E NEw W S The Delta Theta Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma Society II nternational inducted new member Heather Berry on Tuesday, Sept. 9. Heather is a teacher at Roulhac Middle School and was the Teacher of the YY ear for Washington County in 2010. Heather said, “II ’m honored to be a member of Delta Theta, and II ’m looking forward to working with each of you.” Pictured are Lindy Mincey, Berry and Ruth McCrary, president of Delta Theta. DD EL t T A T hH E tT A I nN DU ctCT S nN E wW MEMBER N EE W YOROR K (AP) — Ra dioShack warned Thurs day that it may need to le for Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization if it can’t rework its debt or nd an other way to ease a cash crunch. The struggling retailer said in a regulatory l ing that it is in talks with its lenders, bondholders, shareholders and land lords to x its balance sheet, but if it can’t, it will try to le a prepackaged bankruptcy. RadioShack, which is based in Fort Worth, Texas, has been work ing on turning around its business for the past 18 months. The company’s efforts have included cut ting costs, renovating and closing stores, and shuf ing management. It re ported another quarterly loss on Thursday on lower revenue. CEO Joseph Magnacca said efforts to x the com pany’s problems could in clude debt restructuring, closing more stores and other cost-cutting mea sures. He said the com pany is reviewing several alternatives, some that would need consent from its lenders. RadioShack is quickly running out of cash and warned Thursday that it doesn’t have enough left to fund its operations beyond the “very near term.” The company reported $30.5 million in cash and cash equivalents on hand as of Aug. 2. That’s down from $179.8 million at the end of last year. The company has struggled to nd its place in the evolving retail and technology landscape. It’s sought to remake itself, focusing on wireless de vices and accessories, but growth in that business is slowing as more people have smartphones and see fewer reasons to up grade. The company says it is working on becoming less dependent on that business. It is trying to update its image and remain com petitive against online and discount retailers. It is also working to add new products, including pri vate-brand and exclusive items. Noting the company’s dwindling cash, Stan dard & Poor’s Ratings Services downgraded its corporate credit rat ing on RadioShack fur ther into non-investment grade, or “junk,” territory Thursday. “We believe the com pany will default or re structure in some form that is tantamount to a default within the next six months,” S&P said in cut ting its RadioShack rating to “CCC-” from “CCC.” For its second quar ter, RadioShack reported on Thursday that it lost $137.4 million, or $1.35 per share, for the period end ed Aug. 2. That compares with a loss of $52.2 million, or 51 cents per share, a year ago. Stripping out certain items, loss from continu ing operations was $1 per share. Revenue dropped 22 percent to $673.8 mil lion from $861.4 million. Analysts surveyed by FactSet expected a loss of 66 cents per share on revenue of $735.9 million. Magnacca said the quarter’s performance was mostly hurt by the postpaid mobile phone business, as customers were relatively unen thused about the current phone selections and were waiting for announce ments on new devices such as the next genera tion of iPhones. There were also intense promo tional efforts by wireless carriers, he added. Sales at stores open at least a year declined 20 percent on softer traf c and the weak per formance of the mobile phone business. That g ure is a key indicator of a retailer’s health because it excludes results from stores recently opened or closed. RadioShack’s shares rose 9 cents to close Thursday at $1.02. RadioShack cautions of possible Chapter 11 bankruptcy N E E W YOR OR K (AP) — The nation’s gathering war against a new up surge in Islamic terror hung heavy over the 13th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks Thursday, stirring both anxiety and determination among those who came to ground zero to remember their loved ones. The familiar silence to mark the attacks and the solemn roll call of the almost 3,000 dead came just hours after President Barack Obama told the country he is au thorizing stepped-up airstrikes in Iraq and Syria against Islamic State extremists. “It’s an ongoing war against ter rorists. Old ones die out and new ones pop up,” Vasile Poptean said as he left the ceremony, where he had gone to remember his brother, Joshua Poptean. “If we don’t engage them now, there’s a possibility there will be another 9/11 down the road.” Victims’ relatives and dignitar ies gathered in the plaza where the twin towers once stood, an area of shimmering new skyscrapers, in cluding the soon-to-open 1,776-foot One World Trade Center. The attacks also were commemo rated in Shanksville, Pa., where for mer House Speaker Dennis Hastert gave the ag that ew atop the U.S. Capitol on 9/11 to the Flight 93 Na tional Memorial. At the Pentagon, where Obama spoke at a wreath-laying ceremony, he didn’t mention the rise of Is lamic State extremists specically but noted: “We cannot erase every trace of evil from the world.” “That was the case before 9/11,” the president said, “and that re mains true today.” Obama’s nationally televised announcement of his plans to “de grade and ultimately destroy” the militants, coming on the eve of the anniversary, sparked mixed feelings among 9/11 victims’ relatives. Some saw it as a sign of determination, others as bad timing. “We’re all walking out the door today with tragic and sad and scary memories on us. ... It’s an invitation to ght on a day where we lost,” said Ellen Mora, who lost her cousin, Robert Higley. But she noted her mother felt differently, seeing the speech as “us standing tall on the anniversary.” So did Tom Langer, who lost his pregnant sister-in-law, Vanessa Langer. “Thirteen years later, it feels like the world is still paying attention,” he said. Still others lamented the U.S. still was battling terrorists 13 years after the attacks. “We’re ghting for nothing. We lost so many already, and we will lose so many more,” said Gary Lan ham, whose father, Michael Lowe, died at the World Trade Center. While little about the annual ceremony at ground zero has changed, much around it has. When the underground National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum opened this spring, fences around the me morial plaza above it came down, making it more easily accessible to visitors and passers-through. Still, “coming down to the area is rough,” said Franklin Murray, who wore a shirt with a photo of his slain brother, Harry Glenn, to Thursday’s ceremony. Some victims’ family members view the growing sense of normal cy around ground zero as a sign of healing. “I want to see it bustling,” said Debra Burlingame, whose brother Charles Burlingame was the pilot of the hijacked plane that crashed into the Pentagon. Others said they fear the tragedy that took place in the neighborhood is being forgotten. “Instead of a quiet place of re ection, it’s where kids are running around,” said Nancy Nee, who lost her reghter brother, George Cain. “Some people forget this is a cem etery. I would never go to the Holo caust museum and take a sele.” Around the country, obser vances were held in such plac es as Morrison, Colo., where hundreds of people walked the equivalent of the twin towers’ 110 stories by going up and down stairs at the Red Rocks Amphithe atre, and Point Lookout, N.Y., where two 18-foot, sand-covered towers were crafted in remembrance. In New York City, some relatives who read the long list of names touched on the attacks’ legacy. In one family, two boys are named for an uncle they never met, nan cial worker Michael Wittenstein. In another family, 17-year-old Jordan Thompson joined the Marines in memory of his uncle, Leon Bernard Heyward, a city consumer affairs worker. “In your honor,” Thompson said, “I have decided to serve our country.”AA P Fireghter Tim Millian, rear, rings the bell in honor of the fallen, as Police OO fcer EE van Rosenberg salutes Wednesday during the town’s annual 9/11 Memorial Ceremony in Wellesley, Mass. New terror ght casts shadow over 9/11 ceremonies

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The new app is free and available for download in app stores. “The Red Cross Blood Donor app is a new way to help meet the constant need for blood,” said Alicia Anger, external communications manager, Alabama and Central Gulf Coast Blood Services region. “The app makes it easier, faster and more convenient for users to schedule and manage their donation appointments, track the lifetime impact of their donations, and recruit friends and family to roll up a sleeve with them.” As the nation’s single largest supplier of blood and blood products, the Red Cross is uniquely positioned to bring this cutting-edge technology to blood and platelet donors. In addition to scheduling and managing blood donation appointments, other features of the app include a blood drive or blood donation locator; the ability to sync a blood donation appointment with the user’s calendar; personalized “seles” donors can use as they share their donation experience through social media; special badges donors can unlock as they interact with the app, make donations and spread the word; a chance for donors to come together to form teams, tracking their cumulative impact and viewing standings on the Blood Donor Teams Leader board; exclusive offers and discounts from some of America’s best brands, including Shari’s Berries, ProFlowers and 1A Auto, with new rewards added regularly; and uplifting donor and blood recipient stories that show the power of rolling up a sleeve to help save lives. The Red Cross has become a leader in putting vital safety information in the hands of people who need it during emergencies, with its award-winning disaster and preparedness apps downloaded more than 5 million times over the past two years. The new Blood Donor App takes it one step further by helping people save lives through blood donations. The Blood Donor App, along with the others, can be found in app stores by searching for American Red Cross, visiting redcross. org/apps or redcrossblood.org/ bloodapp, or by texting BLOODAPP to 90999 for a direct link to download. Message and data rates for texting may apply. Special to The News The Covenant Hospice Board of Directors has appointed Jeff Mislevy as president and chief executive ofcer to lead the not-for-prot health care organization. Mislevy comes to Covenant Hospice from Spectrum Health Continuing Care in Grand Rapids, Mich., where he served as president since 2011. He is a proven health care executive with a broad range of expertise including hospice, palliative care, private duty homecare, home health, skilled nursing facilities, inpatient rehabilitation, long-term acute care, assisted living and medical equipment. Mislevy specializes in strategic growth, competitive positioning, service excellence and high reliability performance. He strives to optimize talent and create a culture of quality that serves the most vulnerable populations. Mislevy is a Fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives and a Licensed Nursing Home Administrator by the state of Michigan. He received his Master of Science in allied medicine from The Ohio State University and is a nationally recognized speaker. Covenant Hospice is a notfor-prot organization dedicated to providing comprehensive, compassionate services to patients and loved ones. For more information about Covenant Hospice, visit www. choosecovenant.org. MONDAY 9:30 a.m.: Car Seat Safety Classes rst and third Mondays at the Healthy Start Annex. Call 547-8684, ext. 16 or 18. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 5-7 p.m.: Holmes County Urgent Care Clinic. Call 547-8500. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach ofce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999. TUESDAY 8-10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 12:30 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Tuesday Group 5-7 p.m.: Holmes County Urgent Care Clinic. Call 547-8500. 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 6:10 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at speedball 6:10 p.m., early bird 6:20, session 6:50 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-7654 or 638-7654. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise 10 a.m.: Two hour Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) class fourth Wednesdays at the Healthy Start Annex in Bonifay. Call 547-8684, ext. 16 or 18. 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Dominoes, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Bible Study 5-7 p.m.: Holmes County Urgent Care Clinic. Call 547-8500. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast third Thursdays 9-11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution third Thursdays (Holmes County residents only) 9 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Art Enthusiast 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center third Thursdays. Call 638-0093. 10 a.m.: Car Seat Safety Classes third Thursdays at the Ponce de Leon City Hall. Call 547-8684, ext. 16 or 18. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise 10 a.m.: Two hour Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) class fourth Thursdays at the Ponce de Leon City Hall. Call 5478684, ext. 16 or 18. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church on Fifth Street in Chipley 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets rst Thursdays at the Chipley Library. 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society second Thursdays. The public is invited. 5-7 p.m.: Holmes County Urgent Care Clinic. Call 547-8500. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh-in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church. 6 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A FRIDAY 6 a.m.: Men’s Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 3:30 p.m.: Bead Class second Fridays at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery. Call 703-0347. 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper fourth Fridays January to September. 5-7 p.m.: Holmes County Urgent Care Clinic. Call 547-8500. 6-8 p.m.: Marianna’s Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Methodist Youth Center in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks. Call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. SATURDAY 8 a.m.: North Bay Clan of The Lower Muskogee Creek Yard Sale rst Saturdays at 1560 Lonnie Road. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: Holmes County Community Health Clinic, 203 W. Iowa St., Bonifay, open rst and third Saturdays 10 a.m.: Alford Community Health Clinic open second and fourth Saturdays, until the last patient is seen. 10 a.m. to noon: Children’s education day fourth Saturday at North Bay Clan Tribal Grounds, 1560 Lonnie Road. SUNDAY 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at GracevilleCampbellton Hospital in Graceville. Community C aA L endarENDAR Red Cross launches Blood Donor app Covenant Hospice names new president/CEO J effEFF M isIS L eE V yY

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Local A6 | Washington County News Saturday, September 13, 2014 2014 Unive rsal Uclick rel ease date s: Septe mber 1319 37 -1 (14 ) fro m The Mini Page 2014 Univers al Uclic k Ple ase in clu de all of the app ropr iate reg ist ere d tra dem ar k sym bol s and copy rig ht line s in any p ubl ica tion of The Min i Pa ge To order, send $9.95 plus $3.50 postage and handling for each copy. Send check or money order (U.S. funds only) payable to: Andrews McMeel Universal, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206 or call toll-free 1-800-591-2097. Please send ______ copies of The Mini Page Guide to the Constitution (Item #0-7407-6511-6) at $13.45 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.) www.smartwarehousing.com Name: __________________ _______________ ________________ _______________ ________ Address: _____________ ________________ _______________ ________________ __________ City: ______________ ________________ ______ _____ State: _________ Zip: ______________ __ The popular nine-part series on the Constitution, written in collaboration with the National Archives, is now packaged as a colorful 32-page softcover book. The series covers: the preamble, the seven articles and 27 amendments the “big ideas” of the document the history of its making and the signers -( ,( %( -( As sc hool gets started again, you ma y find yourself using the computer tablet or cellphone more Experts sa y that in the United States more than 70 percent of kids under 8 years old ha ve used mobile devices suc h as smartphones or tablets Is your online self as well-beha ved as the offline you? This week, w ith the help of experts at the Internet Ke ep Safe Coalition (iK eepSafe), The Mini Pa ge reminds you how to be safe courteous and responsible when using the Internet. Six important skills Do you know what compe tency is ? It me ans an ab ili ty to do somet hing well When kids or adults spend time online we need to remember six competencies iK eepSafe calls these the pillars of digital citizenship and wellness The six pillars are: Balance Ethics Privacy Reputation Relationships Online security Yo u can remember them by their acronym, BEaPRO ™ Balance Comput ers a nd cel lphones have made it possible f or people to tal k wit h eac h oth er, fin d infor matio n and play games at any tim e of the day or night. S ometi mes we get so ex cited about thes e possib ilit ies tha t we spend too mu ch time look ing at a scr een. Kids can become emotionally connected with online activity. For instance, if you post something on Instagram or Facebook and many people “like” your post, it may make you feel great! But if others make fun of your post or don’t respond at all, you may be sad. How you can be balanced 1. Use your electron ics away from your bedroom. 2 Don’t use electr onics at the dinner table. Ta lk with your family inste ad. 3 Charge phon es and other devices away from beds ides. Beeps or whistles can dist urb sleep, w hich can be unheal thy. 4 Put electronics away one hour before bed time. Ethics Do you know what “ethics” means? Ethics are rules that guide people’s behavior. You use ethics to decide whether something you do or say will hurt someone else. You also use ethics every time you decide not to cheat on a test, or shoplift a candy bar from a store. When you are online, it’s important to remember that everything you post or any comment you make will live on forever. Your online self is a reflection of your “normal” self. How you can be ethical 1. Think about your audience. Who will see what you post? 2. Even if you think you are posting anonymously, you may not be. 3. Work that other people have done cannot ethically be copied and presented as your work. 4. If you see that someone has been bullied or attacked online, you can reach out to that person with support. Be just as kind to others online as you would be in person. Yo ur Digital Self Be a Pr o Online from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Mi ni Sp y Mini Spy is always very careful when she gets online. See if you can find: sailboat kite letter K number 7 number 2 pencil needle letter A tin can bell envelope letter B letter E carrot word MINI arrow letter D key safety pin ice crea m con e qu estion mark lima bean TM from The Mini Page 2014 Universa l Uclick & ,$ !" .&/ % ( 1(0(' $0( ((0(' $' -. 0 0.&(' %$/ (' .( -(00 $%0( 1 (, !" & ,$(' &-(''$ &-((( 1. Mix sugar, butter and apple s. 2. Layer in a pie shell and spr inkle with nutm eg. $/( $ '(,(( ) ( .0 $0( $( % 4. Spr inkle with cheese and bake for 10 minu tes more. Serves 8. You will need an adult’s help with this reci pe. TM Ro ok ie Co ok ie ’s Reci pe One-Crus t Apple Pie from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Meet China Ann e Mc Clai n Chi na Anne McCla in sta rs as Ga bby in the Di sney Ch annel TV mov ie “How to Bui ld a Bett er Bo y.” She an d costar Kell i Berg lun d also sing “Som ethi ng Real” in that movi e. Chi na is bes t kno wn for her roles in the Di sney Ch annel ser ie s “A.N .T. Farm” and “W izar ds of Wav erl y Plac e.” She began acti ng when she was 7, in the movi e “The Gosp el.” Chi na also sing s and writ es son gs. She and her olde r sis ters Sie rr a and La ury n pe rform ed in their own band the McCl ain Sis ters. -. $ $ % 0$ $ $' 0.( (0( .her famil y. She loves to read sing, dance and cr eate greeti ng card s. Sh e has supp orted char itie s such as the Thir st Proje ct, a stud ent grou p that hel ps prov ide peop le with clea n dri nkin g wate r. photo by John Medland, courtesy Disney Channel from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Researc h has proven that kids who ha ve positive online experiences: )((0 %(( $% -(1(0( -$ ( -($0-.( (0$.-. with others and $( 1( &&()0 $ $'0 In most families parents and ch ildren are working together to create healthy and safe habits for using electronics Cut out this ch art and post it somewhere in your house where everyone can see it and be reminded of good practices Our Online Rules %( !( (% ) +(( ( ( ( "-( % ( ( + % ( ( ( + ((' + ( +(% ( %# -(' ( ,( (( (%" +% + ( &(+( ( (-, (' ( (% (( "( # (%' (( ,( ( "( ( % + (!( % ( %++(( % + ( "(!( ( -( ( (( ( ( + -( + -( (!( ,( ( ( -( (' (( -, %# ( -( ( ( (("" %("(' ( ( ( ( ( (, !( (-" ( ( ( ("+" ( % # !( (% ( $% + -( % %( % ((" -( % (( ( ( -( % -( % % (, %("( % (% ( % + -( ( "( -( % + ( +(( -( ((% !(% ( Work together with your family members to build good online habits. from The Mini Page 2014 Universa l Uclick Professional baseball player Robinson Cano packs a punch at the plate. The six-time All-Star has a career batting average above .300, with more than 200 home runs and nearly 900 RBIs. Robinson, a second baseman, has won the Silver Slugger Award for his position four times in a row. 1 $ 0$(' ) -( ( / Yankees and was part of that team’s 2009 World Series victory. He also won Most Valuable Player honors in the World Baseball Classic representing his home country, the Dominican Republic. In December 2013, Robinson signed a 10-year contract to play for the Seattle Mariners. Some people were surprised by his decision to play in Seattle, which had suffered four straight losing seasons. But Cano, batting .+ $ ) ($0 $0($' -$ -( Mariners contending for a wild-card spot in the playoffs. TM Robinson Cano Gus Goods port’ s Superspor t Height: 6-0 Birthdate: 10-22-1982 Hometown : San Pedro de Macoris, Dominican Republic from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick The Mini Page Staff Bett y Debn am Foundin g Edi tor and Edi tor at Large Lis a Tarry Managing Edi tor Lucy Lien Asso ciate Edit or Wendy Da ley Artis t Online Security Adults and kids should always make sure their information is secure. How to be secure 1. Back up your computer frequently so you won’t lose work you’ve done. 2. In stall prot ect ion agai nst virus es an d malwar e (damag ing soft ware ). 3. Use a wireless network password. Privacy Did you kno w tha t your cel lp hone can help some one else see where you are? Man y fam ilie s are ch oosing to turn off the loc ation servi ces on their phones It’ s also important that you keep private information, suc h as your birthdate address and phone number off the Internet. How to protect your privacy 1. Ask your parents before downloading an app to any device 2. Don’t share passw ords or logi n name s wit h any one ex cep t your par ent s. 3. Don’t download any softw are without permission from your parents 4. Don’t take photos of other people without their permission. Doing so can be a violation of their privacy Relationships Cellphones and social media keep us in touch with friends. But friends can have difficult times when they don’t agree or someone is angry. “When you can’t see someone’s face, it’s harder to work out emotional issues,” says an expert from iKeepSafe. Texts and emoticons may not express very well what people are really feeling. How to protect relationships 1. Before you reply to a post or text from someone you know, ask yourself if that person would really say that. Hackers can post items that look as if they’re from one person, but they’re really not. 2. If someone does post something mean or hurtful to you, take some time to think about it before responding. Talk to an adult about how or whether you should respond at all. 3. If you’re having a hard time with a friend, talk on the phone or in person, or Skype so that you can see each other. Ar e Yo u an Inter net Pr o? Reputation In just a few years, you may be applying to college or trying to get a job. Colleges and companies have started looking at Facebook and other social media to find out more about possible students or employees. Kids and parents are learning how to protect their online reputations or what other people think about them. How to pro tect your reputati on 1. Ask parents to review posts to Snapchat, YouTube or other social media before you post. 2. Don’t “pile on” when others are commenting on someone’s post. Use that opportunity to be kind, positive and supportive. Stay positive online Experts with iKeepSafe say that 80 percent of kids will experience or see cruelty in social media. Remember, just as kids on the playground can be mean sometimes, so can online “friends.” The important thing is to react in a positive way: Provide support for the target. Most social media have a way to “flag” people who are not following the rules; look for a box you can click that will alert the company about inappropriate behavior. The Mini Page thanks Marsali Hancock, CEO and president of iKeepSafe, for help with this issue. Next week, The Mini Page is all about author Roald Dahl. -,( ( + ( ( (" from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Carrie: Where does a computer mouse live? Charlie: In a mouse pad! All the following jokes have something in common. Can you guess the common theme or category? Cecil: Why did the computer think it needed glasses? Carver: It wanted to improve its websight! TM Mighty Funny’ s Mini Jokes Cindy: Why did the computer need a doctor’s appointment? Charlotte: Because it had a virus! Ready Resour ces The Mini Page provides ideas for websites, books or other resources that will help you learn more about this week’s topics. On the Web: /.'./(($)(, %.0"!)1 )%.,"),$1("/.'"/.'$)( &(&$)(0,"$)(.$'.&( At the library: $ $# '(( -( (( ((., Children Safe Online” by Jacalyn Leavitt and Sally Linford from The Mini Page 2014 Univer sal Uclick V F S C I N O R T C E L E J N E W K M R E P U T A T I O N Y V E I S P D K L E N I L N O T I L L C I T I Z E N S H I P I T L L I L Z T G A L F U M T R I N S H L Q P R I V A C Y S U S E O T A Y C N E T E P M O C O S R E R E C N A L A B X P E P S P I H S N O I T A L E R S Wor ds that remi nd us of onlin e beh avio r ar e hidd en in th e blo ck abo ve. Som e wor ds are hidden back ward or diago nall y, and so me le tte rs are used twice See if you ca n fin d: BAL ANCE CIT IZEN SHIP, CO MPE TENCY DIG ITA L, ELE CTRON ICS, ET HICS FLA G, ON LIN E, PIL LAR POSITI VE, POST, PRIVA CY, PRO REL ATI ONSH IPS REPU TAT ION SECUR ITY SKIL LS, WELLNE SS. Be a Pr o O nline from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick TM Basset Brown’s Tr y ’n ’ Find

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Local Washington County News | A7 Saturday, September 13, 2014 From Staff Reports Bingo BONIFAY — The Pittman Volunteer Fire Department will have a bingo fundraiser at 6 p.m. today, Sept. 13. Doors will open at 5 p.m. Packs start at $6. Players must be 18 years of age. For more information, call 768-0138. Two-Toed Tom yard sale ESTO — The Two-Toed Tom Festival will have a yard sale all day today, Sept. 13, at the Esto Community Center. The cost to rent a table will be $10 inside and $5 outside. For more information, call Darlene at 263-3201. Bingo Fundraiser WESTVILLE — The Pittman Volunteer Fire Department will offer Bingo to raise money for the department at 6 p.m. today, Sept. 13. For more information, call Dottie Clark at 547-4040. 2014 Graceville Harvest Festival beauty pageant GRACEVILLE — The 34th annual Harvest Festival Pageant will be at 6 p.m. today, Sept. 13, at the Graceville Civic Center. The entry fee is $60 with all proceeds going to the Graceville Harvest Day Celebration. Contestants can participate in photogenic for an additional $10. Photogenic entries will be limited to one photo per contestant. This is an open pageant. Applications can be picked up at Bush Paint and Supply, Graceville City Hall and at Forget Me Not Photography in Bonifay. Winners will receive a large trophy, large crown and banner. Alternates and participants will receive trophies. Door admission is $5 per adult and applies to all individuals with the exception of contestants. Admission for children 3 and under will be free. For more information, call Teresa Bush at 263-4744 or 263-3072, or call Michelle Watkins at the City of Graceville at 263-3250. Mix it up! Convenience mix class BONIFAY — A Mix it up! Convenience class will be 6-8 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 16, at Carmel Assembly of God Church, 1485 Carmel Church Road. Learn how to make your own baking mix, onedish meal-type mix, and Cream of Whatever Soup mix plus many others. The registration fee is $5 and includes course materials. Pre-registration is requested by contacting the Holmes County Extension Ofce at 5471108 or the Washington County Extension Ofce at 638-6265. Extension programs are open to everyone. For persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations, call 547-1108 (TDD, via Florida Relay Service, 1-800-955-8771) at least ve working days before the class so proper consideration may be given to the request. Holmes Creek clean-up VERNON — Holmes Creek clean-up 2014 will be 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 16. Bring your gloves and grabbers. There will be free canoe rentals and prizes for the most trash collected. Prizes will include free canoe rentals and a two-night stay at Top of the Gulf in Panama City Beach. The group will meet at Holmes Creek Canoe Livery, 2899 Highway 79. Deer nutrition and management seminar CHIPLEY — A deer nutrition and management seminar will be 6:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 18, at the Washington County Agriculture Center. The seminar will focus on management strategies to improve your deer herd and tips, techniques and recommendations for growing quality food plots and improving deer habitat. The seminar is free to the public. RSVP to the Washington County Extension ofce at 6386180 or mdm83@u.edu. Chipola theatre showcase MARIANNA — Charles Sirmon, Chipola College Director of Theatre, will begin his 16th season at the college with a Theatre Showcase at 7 p.m., Thursday, Sept 18. Chipola theater majors will present scenes and skits in a showcase that Sirmon says “is a lot like ‘Saturday Night Live’ on a Thursday.” The production is general admission and allows all theatre majors the opportunity to share their talent and many for the rst time. Tickets are $10 and are available to purchase from theatre majors, at the Center for the Arts box ofce or online at www.chipola. edu. The Showcase is a fundraiser to help Chipola theatre students with their annual trip to Atlanta, where they will take a master class in improvisation and attend a performance with a professional theatre company. For more information, call 718-2420 or visit www.chipola.edu. Community Alliance CHIPLEY — The Community Alliance for Families and the Washington County Public Library will host a support group for the caregiver/ child relationship from 5-6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 18. Refreshments will be provided. To register or for more information, call 638-1314. Benet for the council BONIFAY — A benet for the Holmes County Council on Aging will be all day Friday, Sept. 19 at the council. Plates of rib steak sandwiches, potato chips, coke and pound cake will be sold for $7. To have a plate delivered, there must be a minimum of ve orders. To order or for more information, call 547-2345. Book Sale MARIANNA — The Jackson County Public Library in Marianna will have its annual Friends of the Library Book Sale from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, Sept. 18-20. Prices begin at 25 cents. For more information call 482-9631. Women’s job fair CHIPLEY — The First Presbyterian Church will host a Women’s Job Fair from 1-4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 20, at the church. Representatives from different direct selling companies will be there to discuss employment options. Refreshments will be served, and door prizes will be given. The church is at 685 Fifth St. 2014 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant BONIFAY — The 2014 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant, sponsored by the Holmes County High School Blue Pride Band Boosters, will be Saturday, Sept. 20 in the HCHS Auditorium. Boys and girls ages 4-8 will be at 4 p.m., and girls age 8-20 will be at 6 p.m. It is an open pageant for girls age 4-20, boys age 4-8. Registration will be 10 a.m. to noon today, Sept. 13, at HCHS Auditorium. Late registration will be 5-7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept 16. A $10 late fee will be added after today. Rehearsals will take place during the registrations. Instructions on where to walk will be provided; lessons on how to pose or pageant skills will not be provided. Admission for pageant will be $5 for ages 10 and older and $2 for ages 9 and younger. If you have questions, contact Anda Justice at anda@ hchsbluepride.com or 766-7569. Jacob City Day JACOB — The City of Jacob has slated Sept. 20 for its Jacob City Day Celebration. This year, Jacob City will celebrate 30 years of being a city. The theme for this year’s celebration is “Through God, Forefathers’, Prayers and Tears — Jacob City is Celebrating 30 Years.” Events will include a parade, entertainment, food and activities for all. The festivities will start at 11 a.m., with a parade along Jackson Road. Other activities will take place at the Jacob City Park on Highway 162. For more information, call Eula Johnson at 263-2120 or Verloria Wilson at 263-6636. Superheroes chili sale CHIPLEY — A Superheroes Chili sale will be 9 a.m. until it is gone, Saturday, Sept. 20, at Tractor Supply. Five dollars buys a bowl of chili, crackers and a drink. All proceeds will go to the American Cancer Society. To pre-order your Superheroes Chili, call Vicki at 326-3319, Cathrine at 326-0121 or Cecilia at 658-4038. NFREC beef forage day GREENWOOD —The 2014 NFREC beef forage day will be 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 3, in Greenwood at the NFREC beef research unit. Lunch will be provided. Registration fee is $10 payable that day. For more information, call 394-9124 or visit nfrec.ifas.u.edu. Kent-Collins reunion BLACK, Ala. — The annual Kent-Collins Family Reunion will be at 10 a.m., Sunday, Oct. 5, at the Black Community Center. Bring a covered dish or dishes to share at lunch and any photos or other mementos. For more information, call Betty Ruth Collins Paulding at 334-692-3375. HCE meeting The Home Extension Club luncheon and meeting will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21, at Hinson Crossroads Fire Department in Vernon, celebrating 90 years of volunteering. The group also meets the third Tuesday of every month. Debate of the Commanders MARIANNA — Debate of the Commanders will be 6:30-8 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 23, at the Jackson County Public Library. This debate will commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Marianna and will feature Homer Hirt as the Union commander, Brigadier Gen. Alexander Asboth, and Kelly Crocker as the Confederate commander, Col. Alexander Montgomery. Local historian and author Dale Cox will moderate the debate. Guests will be greeted by volunteers in period costumes, and refreshments will be served. For more information, call 482-9631. HCHS showcase BONIFAY — The Holmes County High School Drama and Chorus Department will present a one-nightonly “Showcase” at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 23. The evening will include the HCHS chorus, soloists, dance, acting and a song from the musical “Cats.” The HCHS Drama Department will be taking their production of “Cats” to the Florida Theatre Conference competition in November. Proceeds raised from the showcase will help fund the trip to Gainesville. Please come out and enjoy the great entertainment and support the drama department’s competition endeavor. No advance tickets will be sold. Tickets are $5 at the door. At 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 4, the HCHS Drama Department invites everyone to come out and watch the nal dress rehearsal of “Cats” before they leave for the competition. The department would like to thank the community for their support as they prepare for the competition. Senior health fair CHIPLEY — Northwest Florida Community Hospital will have a Senior Health Fair from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 25, at the hospital. The target audience is 55 and older. The fair will offer the u vaccine, including the high dose for those 65 and older. The hospital will be accepting insurance and Medicare payments with no out-of-pocket expense. There will also be a free spaghetti lunch for all attendees. For more information, call 638-1610. Swindle reunion VERNON — The Swindle reunion will be Saturday, Sept. 27, at Lakeview United Methodist Church on Pate Pond Road. The reunion will begin at 10:30 a.m. All friends and relatives are invited to attend. Bring a covered dish lunch. Designer Purse Bingo CHIPLEY —Designer Purse Bingo will be at 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 27, at the Washington County Agricultural Center. The cost to play is a $10 donation to the Gulf Coast Children’s Advocacy Center. There will be 12 opportunities to win a designer purse; all purses are valued at a minimum of $150 each. For more information, call Cheryl Powell at 252-9065. Diabetic education classes BONIFAY — The Florida Department of Health will have Diabetic Education Classes from 3-4 p.m., Wednesdays, Sept. 15, 22 and 29. The instructor will be registered nurse LeAnn Jones. Participants who attend all three classes will be eligible for a $25 gift card. For more information, call 547-8500. Wildlife presentation MARIANNA — Jackson County Public Library in Marianna will host a wildlife program featuring Donna Sue Bryant from 6-7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 30. Bryant will showcase live hawks and owls. The staff of the Florida Caverns State Park will be on hand to exhibit the wildlife of the area. Visitors will have the chance to meet some of the animals that live in that park. For more information, call 482-9631. See the world’s most wanted frog CHIPLEY — See the world’s most wanted frog at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 30, at the Chipley Branch of the Washington County Public Library. Showing will be “Muppets Most Wanted.” This is a free event, and popcorn will be provided. Pediatric death bereavement training CHIPLEY — The Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) Alliance will be facilitating pediatric death bereavement training from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 30, at PAEC. The training is for professionals in social services/child welfare, law enforcement, EMT’s, hospital staff, pastoral staff, home visitors, counselors and other professionals. This is a free training, and lunch will be provided. Many people deal with infant and child deaths in the work environment, and this will help educate on how to support the family after a loss. Call Chipola Healthy Start Coalition at 482-1236 to register. Rodeo Bible Camp BONIFAY — The Rodeo Bible Camp will be 5-8 p.m. Monday, Sept. 29, through Wednesday, Oct. 1, at Memorial Field. Signup will begin at 4 p.m. The event is free for ages 8-18. Kids under 18 must have a parent sign a release and show proof of insurance. Kids will eat free each night with concessions available for other. Professionals will teach the trades of rodeo with preachers teaching the word of God. For more information, call 548-9024, 334-494-2495 or 547-1826. Rodeo boot contest BONIFAY — The Bonifay Garden Club is hosting a boot contest now through Rodeo weekend. Small 2-foot boots will be $60, medium 3-foot boots will be $75 and tall 5-foot boots are $100. All boots are prepared with primer to be painted. All proceeds for to the Bonifay Garden Club. For more information, call DiAnn Shores at 768-2766 or email Adonna Bartlett at Adonna.bartlett@yahoo. com. 5K Bull Run and Fun Run BONIFAY — The Bonifay Kiwanis Club will host the annual 5K Bull Run and Fun Run at 8 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 4, at Middlebrooks Park. If you pre-register before Sept. 30, the cost will be $15; day of run is $20. The fun run is for children 12 years and younger only, and pre-registration is $10 and race day registration is $15. For more information, call 373-5003. So we ll Tra ctor Co ., Inc. 2841 Hwy 77 North, Pa nama City www .so we lltr actor co .com So we ll and Ku bota 40 Ye ars of Tr usted Pe rf or manc e We Tr ade for Any thin g That Don’ t Eat! Financing Arranged (W AC) Community E ventsVENTS

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ALL TIMES E D T

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O UTDOORS Saturday, September 13, 2014 Page 9 www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Send your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com A Section By FRANK SARGEANT Frankmako1@outlook.com It is a migration on a scale seen on Africa’s Serengeti Plains, and yet it all goes by almost unseen beneath the blue-green surface of the Gulf of Mexico. Each fall, the massive schools of king mackerel, Spanish mackerel, little tunny (AKA bonito) blue sh and other game sh that have spent the summer in Panhandle waters become restless about mid-September with the shortening days and the gradual decline in water temperature. The bait sh they live on are the primary driving factor, vast masses of cigar minnows, thread ns, sardines and other small, silvery creatures that create a moveable feast; where they go, the predators will not be far behind, and as the Gulf temperature drops from the 80s into the 70s — usually around the end of October or the rst of November, the race will be on. The bait often leads the train of predators near the beaches, perhaps because that’s where the microscopic plankton they feed on is most abundant, and the massing of the kings and Spanish and other species brings on a similar restlessness in Panhandle anglers — it’s time to forsake the air conditioning and head for the boat ramps and marinas once more — the Fall Run is on! Spanish often travel ahead of the king sh, perhaps because they prefer slightly warmer water — by Oct. 15, many of the sh that summered off Destin and Panama City will be at Seahorse Reef off Cedar Key, inspiring traf c jams at the boat ramps there. The run usually arrives off Tampa Bay by the second week of November — there’s frequently a “Thanksgiving Bite” that lasts through the month and just about until Christmas in these waters before the rst real cold fronts push everything all the way down the peninsula to the Keys and around the tip of the state into the Atlantic, where they mingle to some degree with Atlantic kings and Spanish that summer as far north as Cape Hatteras. It will be April before they return, but return they will, chasing the edge of increasing water temperature as it progressively warms past 68 degrees, until they nally return to the same summer spawning grounds where they swam the year before. It’s a grand cycle, but not one that has to concern anglers who simply want to get their lines stretched. Simply intersecting the run — right place, right time — is all it takes; when you hit the peak of the migration, there are sh everywhere from right against the beachfront piers to 20 miles out. How to nd the sh A call to any offshore marina or tackle shop will give you a heads-up on how the run is progressing. If you see anglers standing shoulder-to-shoulder on the big piers, you can bet the Spanish are there, and probably an occasional big king sh, too, along with a cobia or three. If you’re in a boat, the “white tornado” of birds will be your beacon — when the predators drive the bait to the surface, birds arrive from miles around to get in on the feast, and anglers who keep a sharp eye on the horizon can readily spot these ocks. When they’re thickest, it’s even possible to mark them on radar, so numerous are the gulls and pelicans. ) the Moveable Feast Fall kings and Spanish have a nal ing in Panhandle waters SCOTT MOORE | Contributed photo FRANK SARGEANT | Contributed photo Both Spanish and king mackerel will readily attack a rigged bait trolled around the schools. At top, big kings like this one are most commonly caught on live baits drifted or slow trolled around structure. Processing alligators is a growing business FORT MYERS (AP) — Thousands of hunters are plying Florida waters every night this time of year, searching the swamps for a prize alligator to take during the state’s annual 11-week public hunt. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission issued almost 6,000 permits to the public this year, with each permit allowing a hunter to take two alligators from an assigned waterway. Private hunts on farms and managed lands occur year-round, but between now and Nov. 1 the public gets its chance at gator glory. Driven by TV reality shows such as “Swamp People” and “Gator Boys” — which feature Louisiana alligator hunters and nuisance trappers in the Miami area — the sport has grown four-fold in the past decade, from 2,164 hunters in 2002 to 8,103 in 2011. The popularity of such shows has boosted the number of hunters as well as increased demand for alligator products and meat. “Every little restaurant wants to serve alligator,” said Kelvin Townsend, an alligator farmer and processor in LaBelle. “And now that they’ve seen the TV shows, everyone wants to kill an alligator.” Alligators taken during the public hunt go from the swamp marshes to various markets — leather goods, preserved heads and feet to be sold at gift shops, and as different meat products. All the work that goes into the process, and the number of people involved, make the meat and leather expensive. Cutlet and ribs go for about $18 a pound online and at specialty meat markets and delis. Hunters can make several hundred dollars during the public hunt, recouping their $272 harvesting permitting with pocket change to spare. The amount paid is based on the size of the alligator and the quality of its skin. Hunters can take their alligator to a processing facility such as Townsend and Sons in LaBelle, keep the meat for themselves and sell the hide. Hunters also sell to middlemen buyers, companies that wait at public boat ramps, buy alligators from hunters and then take them processing facilities. Processing facilities must be certi ed by the USDA in order to legally sell meat to the public or restaurants. Securing the certi cation — which allows USDA to conduct random testing at meat plants — is not the only challenge. The smell produced when skinning and processing alligator meat is somewhat gamey — somewhere between a sh market and a pile of hamburger meat. “The blood holds a certain smell on your hands,” Shawn Townsend, of Townsend and Sons, says while sorting packages of gator sausage in a car-sized freezer. When asked if he eats alligator, he says: “We See MIGRATION A10 See ALLIGATOR A10 ) )PP

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Local A10 | Washington County News Saturday, September 13, 2014 Local A10 | Washington County News Saturday, September 13, 2014 Car ol Kent: Family Advocate .H ometo wn Fan. Editor Carol re cently re tur ned “home” as editor for the News and Ti mes-Advertiser She’ sw ade d ri gh ti nt ot he task –m aking sur ew ec ov er the good, bad and inter esting stuff that mak es living in small-to wn, rur al America so special. Family brought Carol home ,a nd it’ sw her es he wa nts her v ec hildr en to gr ow up ,i n the safe and nurturing environment she enjo ye d. Her efforts to ra ise aw ar eness about domestic violence and advocate for ch ildr en pro vides Carol aw ay to help other families in our community thrive as well. Because of our people ,w e deliver mor et han the news to Wa shington and Holmes counties. It’ sj ust another wa y that we’ re committed to our communities. No body deli ver sl ike w ed o. AH alif ax Media Group Compan y ALLIGATOR from page A9 call it gator Jell-O. If you haven’t skinned an alligator, it’s good to eat because you don’t know that smell. I’m just glad I don’t cut up lobster and steak.” It’s a relatively new business model — creating a demand for alligator leather products made in the United States, but Brian Wood, owner of All American Gator in Hollywood, says he sees great potential. European fashion designers buy alligator skins for a few hundred dollars and transform them into jewelry and clothes that sell for tens of thousands of dollars. Wood wants to see that business model on a more local level, either cut off the Gucci’s of the world or at least give them competition for leather products that originally come from states such as Florida and Louisiana. He’s showed his alligator leather goods and product as the International Boston Seafood show for the past 16 years. He also travels to Las Vegas in hopes of building American brands that will, one day, sit alongside Prada and other European labels. “I’ve branched out into the leather because that’s where the money is,” said Brian Wood, owner of All American Gator. “We do belts and purses, jackets, briefcases. We did a $36,000 three-piece couch. I just got two motorcycle seats in.” Although alligator meat sales are small in comparison to beef, chicken,  sh  and other more familiar meats, some specialty butcher shops in Southwest Florida are seeing an increased demand for alligator meat. The standby “it tastes like chicken” is what most people here say when they ask about alligator meat at a restaurant or market. Popular ways to prepare alligator include fried (the most popular), braised, grilled and even made into a white breakfast gravy to be put over warm biscuits. The types of cut offered vary from tenderized cutlet to alligator sausage. Jimmy P’s Butcher Shop and Deli in Naples carries everything from ground elk to antelope, but gator meat, butcher Leonard Willis said, is king of the game meats. “We go through a lot of alligator meat,” said butcher Leonard Willis. “A lot of people just want to try new things. They want something different. We get a lot of (orders) from people up north who want something different. And people have game meat parties where that’s all they serve.” MIGRATION from page A9 Early in the morning, before many boats have arrived, the sh tend to be ridiculously easy to catch — even a noisy topwater plug, tossed among the splashing attackers, draws an instant strike — and it had better be a very tough plug, too, or the teeth of the predators will immediately turn the oater into a sinker. Wooden plugs stand no chance at all — they’re turned to splinters. Mackerel lures The more conventional way of shing the schools is to put out a spread of single-hook spoons — the Drone in about 6-inch size is the classic, but anything with wobble and ash and adequate size will draw the bite. The sh may hit unweighted spoons at rst light, pulled at about 5 to 6 knots — a fast walk. As the sun climbs higher and more boats arrive on the school, they tend to go down. Then it’s a matter of adding several ounces of bead-chain weight, or attaching the spoon to a No. 2 planer or a downrigger ball, to continue the action. However you get the lure in front of the sh, it’s necessary to run it on a piece of wire to prevent cutoffs on the shearing teeth of the kings. (Spanish can sometimes be caught on 30 to 60 pound test hard mono, but kings almost always nip anything but wire.) Most anglers use No. 6 wire, coffee-colored, with a swivel and snap on the lure, a second swivel between wire and running line. The double swivel setup helps reduce line twist, which can be a big problem in trolling spoons otherwise. Leader lengths vary — charter skippers shing for school kings prefer leaders about 4 feet long to give them some working room, and the smaller schoolies tend not to be leader shy. Typical charterboat kingsh tackle is a revolving spool 3/0 to 4/0 with 60-pound-test mono. Heavy spinning gear with 50-pound-test braid also is effective. Live baiting for kings For catching giant kings, however, tournament anglers sometimes use 12 inches or less wire, connecting it to mono testing just 12 to 15 pounds, and shed on level wind baitcasting tackle that looks more suited for redsh inshore except for larger line capacity. This is the standard setup for live bait anglers trying to fool tournament winners in clear water. Live baiting kings is a whole book in itself, but basically anglers use blue runners, ladysh, mullet, menhaden and other baits, typically 6 to 12 inches long. A single hook goes through the nose, and a “stinger” treble, often a No. 6 in 3X strong wire, is dangled along the side on a short piece of wire. Larger baits like ladysh sometimes get a second stinger added behind the rst to prevent cutoffs. This bait is either drifted or slow-trolled in areas where larger kings like to prowl — around channel markers, off passes, on the break-line where dark inshore water meets clear offshore water, and around all sorts of wrecks, reefs and shoals. The idea is to keep the bait moving just fast enough to keep it swimming — but not so fast it’s dragged and “drowns.” Most tournament anglers like to sweeten the waters where they’re drifting or slow-trolling by hanging a couple of mesh bags full of sh meal or dog food that has been moistened with menhaden oil off the transom. Fish hit the scent trail and sometimes follow it to the bait, particularly when anglers troll a repeated oval around likely locations. Some anglers also add some natural chum to the mix now and then by tossing over small pieces of chopped menhaden or threadns, along with the occasional live one. (These same tactics can be very effective on the longer Panhandle piers when current is running along the beach to carry the scent, too.) Handling big macks There’s no question when a king mackerel strikes. They take at full speed, and the rst run of a big one will make a reel appear to smoke as water ies off the line being ripped out against the drag, thus the name “smoker kingsh” applied to kings of about 20 pounds and up. Fish of 40 pounds plus are caught in Panhandle waters each fall, and occasionally 50 and even 60-pound sh are reported. The IGFA all-tackle record for the species is 93 pounds even, caught off Puerto Rico in 1999. A 20-pounder can readily steal a couple hundred yards of line in seconds—and the best way to catch these sh is to let them go. A light drag will keep the small hooks from pulling free. Once the sh begins to tire—usually after a second big run—the angler can begin to steadily pump it the boat. Kingsh headed for the cooler are usually gaffed—a small pick-style gaff on an 8 to 12 foot lightweight handle is the typical tournament kingsh killer, allowing a long reach to land big sh with light line. (Though Spanish may reach weights of 6 to 7 pounds, they’re usually not so big that a gaff is required; grabbing them in front of their stiff tail is one easy way to handle the larger ones when they’re completely tired out, or they can be netted, while smaller ones are typically just hoisted aboard with the spring of the rod.) Spanish Mackerel tips Spanish are sometimes found in the same offshore waters as kings, but they also readily prowl into considerably shallower waters, and sometimes push into larger bays. The run on the deep grass at Sea Horse Reef is famed all along the west coast, typically peaking about Oct. 15 when tens of thousands of macks swarm the outside edges of the grass at depths of 8 to 15 feet where ever the baitsh lead them. Spanish take everything that kings do, but in smaller sizes. Spoons about 4 inches long are best, half-ounce bucktail jigs tipped with a bit of shrimp or mullet (they’re active scent feeders) are also effective, and glass-minnow imitations, when they’re keyed in on these tiny baits, can also do the job — a y-rodders perfect day! Mackerel cookery Kings make excellent table fare if handled correctly—bleed them out, ice them immediately and clean them promptly. Steak the larger sh, cutting them into 2-inch-thick slabs. Then remove the skin and cut out the “medallions” or muscles, four round muscles around the backbone, getting rid of the strong-tasting red line and the bones in this step. The remaining pieces of meat are like extra-thick scallops, and are delicious when drizzled with Teriyaki and grilled until done. Spanish require special care because of a line of bones down each side — best bet is to fillet the fish, turn the fillets skin side down, and make a V cut down either side of this line of bones, separating the fillet into two pieces. Throw away the bone section, which also includes the red line, and grill or bake the narrow, boneless llets. For complete regulations on the mackerel species, visit www. myfwc.com.YAm M A h H A mM ARINE | Special to The News Heading offshore at rst light is one sure way to get into schools of Spanish and kings that are likely to be in a feeding mood.

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By JAN WADDY 747-5072 | @JanWaddy1 jwaddy@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — Chicken is a common staple in many American households, but the preparation can make all the difference when it comes to creating family favorites. Just the mention of chicken and dumplings can cause many to become overcome with nostalgia for their childhood — even if you call the “dumpling” by another name. Though I heard my grandmother in Texas once made dumplings from scratch, I only remember her making them with our tortillas cut in strips and dipped in our. “I’m from the Ozarks — we called chicken and dumplings ‘chicken and noodles,’ ” said Amanda Sorenson, whose family opened their rst Italian restaurant in Joplin, Mo., when she was 4. “Chicken and noodles was a right of passage in my family. When I was a kid growing up, everyone had to make it with dough by hand. Until I moved to the South 30 years ago, a dumpling was rolled out of pie dough and we put fruit lling in it and folded it and baked it, like an apple dumpling.” Sorenson, who has worked at Somethin’s Cookin’ on and off for about 15 years, now makes Chicken and Dumplings at the bistro using a recipe from fellow employee Linda Horne. Sorenson and Horne also are graduates of Gulf Coast’s culinary program. “We do it in a pasta machine, get the pasta dumplings a nice, even thickness. It’s easy and quick to make,” Sorenson said. “It’s much easier with the pasta machine. When I was a kid, we had to do it with a rolling pin.” The basic Southern recipe for Chicken and Dumplings is just chicken and dumplings in broth. “We add egg to it on the dumpling, really helps it stay together,” Horne said. “It’s really a pretty simple recipe. Some people put celery and carrots in it when making the broth, but we just boil the chicken and add some of our chicken base to it — makes it so rich.” Though Hannelore Holland sells grab-and-go containers of the Chicken and Dumplings at Somethin’s Cookin’, 93 E. 11th St. in Panama City, she admits she doesn’t make them. “That’s one of the recipes I don’t do, but it’s very popular. I didn’t know how to make chicken and dumplings; I am a German,” she said with a laugh. “It’s comfort food. It also can be a soup with more broth. We sell so many it’s ridiculous.” Holland rst realized just how popular chicken and dumplings was in the South when she and Sorenson were asked to cater them. “We catered chicken and dumplings for 200 people at a wedding in Marianna,” Sorenson recalled. Though Holland doesn’t make the recipe, she does make dumplings. “There are many different dumplings,” Holland explained. “In the North, they drop the dough in and it makes little balls. Dumplings can also be made out of potatoes, like German potato dumplings, or out of old bread and there are spaetzel dumplings — traditional German egg pasta.” Though Kartoffel Knoedel, “potato dumplings,” and Servietten Knoedel, “napkin dumplings,” cannot be used as dumplings in the Chicken and Dumplings recipe, Holland said, the spaetzle can be substituted. While chicken pot pie recipes might not vary as much by regions, they still conjure up the same warm feelings. Kathie Riley of My Best Friend’s Kitchen makes a Chicken Pot Pie, “just like mama used to make,” she said, as a lunch special at her restaurant, 401 E. 23rd St. in Panama City, and for customers to take and bake at home. “It was a home recipe that was created before I opened My Best Friend’s Kitchen,” Riley said. “Growing up that was a comfort food. The ones you buy in the store are not very good. I was on a quest to make that and this is what I came up with. There’s nothing to it, no story, just really good food. I tweaked and tweaked and tweaked recipes until I came up with my own. It has carrots, celery, potatoes, peas. We all grew up eating chicken pot pies, and it’s kinda just a childhood comfort thing like meatloaf or fried chicken.” Chicken and Dumplings Whole chicken Dumplings 1 tablespoon chicken base Place whole chicken in large pot, cover with water (no salt) and cook until the chicken is so tender it falls off the bone. Meanwhile, make Dumplings Remove chicken from broth and cool. Remove chicken from bone and set aside. Heat broth, add large tablespoon of chicken base and bring to a boil. Add prepared dumplings and cook until just tender. Add chicken. When hot, spoon into bowls. (Do not overcook dumplings.) Dumplings: 2 cups flour 2 teaspoons salt 2/3 cup milk 1 egg 6 tablespoons butter Mix flour, salt and butter in processor. Add remaining ingredients and process just until dough comes together. Let rest in refrigerator covered with plastic wrap. Cut into 4 wedges. Run each through pasta machine twice, once on 1 and then again on 3. Cut into strips with dough scraper. Put on cookie sheet lined with parchment. Can be frozen until needed. Source: Linda Horne, Somethin’s Cookin’ Spaetzle 1 cup flour 2 large eggs Fresh nutmeg Salt, pepper to taste Water, start with cup Mix flour, eggs, nutmeg, salt and pepper. Now add enough water until dough falls easily off the wooden spoon. Press through a spaetzle press, into a pot of hot boiling water that has been salted.* As soon as they come up to the top, scoop out onto a platter. You may dot with butter or Parmesan. I like to brown some fresh bread crumbs in butter and drizzle over; great leftovers. Source: Hannelore Holland, Somethin’s Cookin’ *If you are using this recipe as the Dumplings in Chicken and Dumplings, just cook the spaetzle in the boiling mixture of broth and chicken base. Then add chicken and serve. Kartoffel Knoedel (Potato Dumplings) 8 ounces potatoes, cooked 3 ounces flour 3 ounces potato flour 1 egg Little milk, if necessary Salt, lemon dill, Cherchies Pepper Pizzazz seasoning, to taste Croutons, optional Peel and cut potatoes in cubes, then cook in boiling salted water (best the night before; they need to be cold). Push through a ricer, add all other ingredients, except croutons. Taste for seasonings. Now form ball. You may put a crouton in the center of each ball. Bring salted water to a boil and cook knoedel for about 15 minutes until they float to the top. You may sprinkle them with breadcrumbs that have been sauted in butter; great with meat dishes with sauce. Source: Hannelore Holland, Somethin’s Cookin’ Servietten Knoedel (Napkin Dumplings) 1 French baguette, sliced stick butter Salt, pepper, fresh nutmeg ( nut), 1 tablespoon lemon dill cup warm milk 3 eggs cup fresh parsley Cube bread, add milk, then let sit for about 10 minutes until soft. Mix egg yolks and butter. Add seasonings and parsley to bread mixture. Beat egg whites and fold under. Shape into a loaf, then wrap in cheesecloth. Bring water to a boil, tie knoedel to a wooden spoon and lower into water. Let simmer for about 1 hour (check at 45 minutes), let cool, remove cheesecloth, slice knoedel and serve with sauerkraut or a creamy mushroom sauce. Source: Hannelore Holland, Somethin’s Cookin’ Chicken Pot Pie cups diced carrots cups diced celery cups frozen peas 2 cups cooked chicken, cut up into small pieces cup onion 1 cup diced potatoes teaspoon Best Friend Seasoning 1 can cream of chicken soup 1/8 tsp thyme 1 cup chicken stock cup sour cream 1 cup of half and half 1 frozen deep dish pie shell 1 rolled pie shell from refrigerated section Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Mix soup, sour cream, half and half and chicken stock together until blended smooth. Add other ingredients and stir until mixed. Pour into frozen pie shell, then top with rolled shell, crimping edges to seal. Cut small slits in the top shell for steam to escape. Bake at 400 degrees for about 1 hour. Source: Kathie Riley, My Best Friend’s Kitchen Best Friend’s Seasoning 1 cup sea salt cup coarse ground black pepper cup granulated garlic Source: Kathie Riley, My Best Friend’s Kitchen By JAN WADDY Chicken comforts P hotos by JAN WADDY | PanamaCity.com Chicken and Dumplings is a popular comfort food in the South. Somethin’s Cookin’ owner Hannelore Holland, a native of Germany, said Spaetzle can be used in place of traditional dumpling recipes. F OOD Saturday, September 13, 2014 A Page 11 Section www.chipleypaper.com

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Local A12 | Washington County News Saturday, September 13, 2014 By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT ckent@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY — Two public services were held Thursday to commemorate the events of Sept. 11, 2001. The rst event, sponsored by Bugles Across America, was in front of City Hall and featured Rev. Jerry May as the keynote speaker. Local resident and event organizer Roger VanLandingham also performed taps in honor of those who have lost their lives while in service to their country and community. The second event was hosted by Kate M. Smith Elementary School. Students recited poems and displayed artwork to show their appreciation for the men and women who serve and protect. Both events honored those who lost their lives in what many regard the most tragic day in our county’s history, as well as honored Washington County’s own emergency responders. Washington County PHOTOS BY CAROL KENT AND KATIE ADAMS | The News TOP LEFT: Chipley EMS staff make their way across the front of the stage as they are greeted by students at Kate M. Smith Elementary School. TOP RIGHT: Wausau and Chipley volunteer re ghters also were among those honored. BELOW: Roger VanLandingham plays taps in honor of fallen rst responders at the Day of Remembrance and Patriot Day ceremony, held in front of City Hall and hosted by Bugles Across America. Washington County Washington County Washington County remembers BELOW: Washington County’s rst responders were rst honored Thursday, Sept. 11, with the Day of Remembrance and Patriot Day ceremony, held in front of City Hall and hosted by Bugles Across America. Guest speaker was Rev. Jerry May of Chipley’s First United Methodist Church. TOP LEFT: From left, Albert McKinnie, Isabella Clark, Owen Page, Davis Cox, and Izabell Kent took turns reading in “A Patriot Day Tribute” at Kate M. Smith Elementary School. TOP RIGHT: The “Proud to Be” poem was recited by Alitzel Sapp, Caleb Williams, Susanna del Sol, Lana Otto, Autumn Futch and Tyler Stewart.

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Local Washington County News | A13 Saturday, September 13, 2014 Kate M. Smith Elementary School students expressed their appreciation for Washington County’s emergency responders by displaying various patriotic works of art. LEFT: Members of the Chipley Police Department were honored at Kate M. Smith Elementary. RIGHT: In addition to the Washington County Sheriff’s Department, aspiring law enforcement ofcers in the WCSO Explorers program were also recognized. Members of the community, school system staff and students gathered at Kate M. Smith Elementary School in Chipley on Thursday, Sept. 11, to express their appreciation for local rst responders. The Rev. Jerry May of First United Methodist Church was the event’s keynote speaker at the Day of Remembrance and Patriot Day ceremony and talked about the love and courage it takes to be willing to lay one’s life down for another.

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F AITH Saturday, September 13, 2014 A Page 14 Section www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Special to The News The Baptist College of Florida (BCF) in Graceville hosted the 12th annual Prayer Conference Monday, Sept. 15, through today, Sept. 17, with returning guest speakers Wayne Barber and Rick Shepherd. At in the R.G. Lee Chapel, students, faculty and guests had the opportunity to hear from these two prominent prayer warriors as they share from personal experience their lifestyle of prayer. In addition to authoring several books, Wayne Barber is the senior pastor of Woodland Park Baptist Church in Chattanooga, Tenn., and is the founder of To Live is Christ Ministries. Rick Shepherd is the Team Strategist for the Prayer/ Spiritual Awakening Team Evangelism Group at the Florida Baptist Convention. Barber and Shepherd served together from 1983 to 2000 at Woodland Park Baptist Church and continue to work closely with individuals and churches in understanding the responsibility and power of prayer. During the Prayer Conference, students had the opportunity to participate in a special Baptist Collegiate Ministry (BCM) prayer encounter in the Prayer Chapel on Tuesday, September 16. According to BCM Director Jonah Powers, the evening event included a time of student-led worship followed by a devotional message from Wayne Barber and Rick Shepherd. Included in the Prayer Conference activities, students were given the opportunity to sign up and commit to pray during the selected times between 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. each day, for the needs of the campus, community, nation, and throughout the world. The three day Prayer Conference is held each fall on the BCF campus focusing on how vital prayer is as students begin the new semester. To learn more about the Prayer Conference, call 263-3261 ext. 460 or visit the website at www.baptistcollege.edu. If you would like your church’s faith events included in this list, please email the information to: news@ chipleypaper.com CHURCH YARD SALE CHIPLEY — First Presbyterian Church in Chipley will hold a yard and bake sale in the brick house behind the church. The sale will be from 8 a.m. to noon, today, Sept. 13. The church is at 658 Fifth St. For more information call 638-1629. KENT CLEAN UP ALFORD — from 8 a.m. until noon There will be a clean up day at the Kent Cemetery, today, Sept. 13. Please come as early as possible and bring tools to work with. The cemetery is three miles southwest of Alford. Following the cleaning there will be a sh fry. Please bring a covered dish and tea for lunch. For more information, call Annie Toole at 638-1030. BACK TO SCHOOL YOUTH RALLY WESTVILLE — Mt. Pleasant Assembly of God will hold a Back to School Youth Rally at 6 p.m., today, Sept. 13. The guest speaker will be Eric Gillis, Ministries Director of Auburn YFC. Worship music will be lead by Joyful Noise. The church is located at 1996 Mt. Pleasant Road, Westville. Food will be provided afterward. Please RSVP, if possible at www.facebook. com/mt.pleasantaog SENIOR WOMEN’S MINISTRY CHIPLEY — The Senior Women’s Ministry of Mt. Ararat First Missionary Baptist Church will observe Missionary Day, at 3 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 14. The program will feature “Climbing the Eternal Ladder” with 10 Christian ladies explaining each step. The church is at 1233 Old Bonifay Road in Chipley. For more information, call Sallie Johnson at 638-4035. CLASSICAL MUSIC CONCERT BONIFAY — Bonifay First United Methodist Church (FUMC) will present a classical music event at 3 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 14. Music of Bach, Mozart, Widor, Purcell, Rutter, and others will be performed by Zachary Dobos on the French Horn, Cynthia Moses will sing and Roy Hoobler on the Keyboards. Zachary is the band director at Holmes County High School and Bonifay Middle School; Cynthia is a resident of Panama City Beach; and Roy is the music director at Bonifay FUMC. Refreshments in the fellowship hall will follow the one hour concert. For more information, email Roy Hoobler at royhoobler@ yahoo.com CONVENTION SINGERS PONCE DE LEON — The Convention Singers will be at Otter Creek Methodist Church at 7 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 20. The church is four miles north of Ponce de Leon off Highway 81. AWANAS AUCTION BONIFAY — Bethlehem Baptist Church’s Awanas will be holding an auction a 6 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 20. Steak sandwich dinner plates will be available beginning at 5 p.m. The church is at 1572 Highway 177 in Bonifay. For more information, call 768-2574. SAINT MATTHEW’S DAY CHIPLEY — Saint Matthew’s Episcopal Church will celebrate Saint Matthew’s Day Sunday, Sept. 21. Holy Eucharist will begin at 9 a.m. and will be followed by a reception from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. The church will also be celebrating Ward and Dorothy Clarks ministry. Ward will retire on Saint Matthew’s Day after more than 25 years as our Vicar. The church is at 735 West Blvd. in Chipley. MISSION’S CONVENTION WESTVILLE — There will be an area wide mission’s convention Monday, Sept. 22, through Friday, Sept. 26, at Oak Grove Pentecostal Ministries. Services will be held at 7 p.m. nightly. Guest speakers will be Daren Downs, Missions Director at Living Waters Church in Chino, Calif., and Curtis McGehee, pastor of the Abiding Life Church in Whitney, Texas. All proceeds will go to fund missions around the world the Brother Daren and Living Waters Church of Chino, Calif. For more information, call 9564339 or 956-2322 or 658-2828. FEAST OF AMERICAS CHIPLEY — St. Joseph the Worker Catholic Church will host Feast of Americas, Saturday, Sept. 27, at the church. There will be food from different Latin and Hispanic countries along with music and fun for the whole family. The church is across from Wal-Mart on Highway 77 in Chipley. FOUR CALVARY GRACEVILLE — Salem United Methodist Church will host the Four Calvary Men’s Quartet at 6:30 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 27. Light appetizers will be served at 6 p.m. The church is on TriCounty Road in Graceville. EXTREME WORSHIP CHIPLEY — Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church will hold Christian Rap Advisory Extreme Worship at 6 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 27. The worship will be featuring 517, Mario Mitchell, Shane Waller, Corey Cleare, Whiteout, Elliot Clavton and Them Hebrew Boyz. The church is at 648 Bennet Drive in Chipley. PASTOR APPRECIATION VERNON — New Bethany Baptist Church will hold pastor appreciation at 11 a.m., Sunday, Sept. 28. The Hall family will be singing. Lunch will be served in the fellowship hall at 12:30 p.m. For more information, call Brother Leon Jenkins at 773-3003. HOMECOMING GRACEVILLE — Graceville First United Methodist Church will hold homecoming services Sunday, Sept. 28. All family and friends are invited to this special day. Registration will begin at 10 a.m. with the service starting at 10:30 a.m. The Rev. Dan Rhodes will be the guest minister. He served the church from 2008-2011. A covered dish lunch will be served in the Fellowship Hall after the service. If you would like your church listed here, send information to news@ chipleypaper.com. Because of space limitation, please only send regular church services. For special services, send separate submission. Assembly of God BONIFAY FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is 116 Main St. FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on Underwood Road behind Poplar Springs School. GRACE ASSEMBLY OF GOD AT CHIPLEY Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 567 North Main St., Chipley LITTLE ROCK ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. LIVE OAK ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is Sunday at 10 a.m., with Morning Worship at 11 a.m. and Evening Worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 2118 Live Oak Road in Bonifay. MT. OLIVE ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is on Highway 179-A off of Highway 2. NEW BETHANY ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is on Shaky Joe Road just off Highway 280 at Hinson’s Crossroads. NEW LIFE FELLOWSHIP ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 695 Fifth St., Chipley. NORTHSIDE ASSEMBLY OF GOD Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Sunday School is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1009 North Rangeline St. in Bonifay. SMITH CHAPEL ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is 2549 Smith Chapel Road, just off Highway 177-A. SWEET GUM ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Thursday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 105 Corbin Road. WAUSAU ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 3537 Washington St. in Wausau. WINTERVILLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1897 Highway 177A in Bonifay BAPTIST Abigail Free Will Baptist Church Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is on Dawkins St. in Vernon. BEREAN BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7:30 p.m. The church is at 1438 Nearing Hills Drive in Chipley. BLUE LAKE BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 1405 Blue Lake Road in Chipley. BETHLEHEM BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The church is at 1572 Highway 177 in Bonifay. BETHANY BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1404 N. State Road 79 in Bonifay. BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. BONIFAY FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 311 N. Waukesha St.. BONIFAY FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at the corner of Kansas Avenue and Oklahoma Street. CHIPLEY FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. and 11 a.m. Morning Worship is at 8:30 a.m., 9:45 a.m. and 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 1300 South Blvd. CHIPLEY FIRST FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 1387 South Blvd. COUNTRY OAKS BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 574 Buckhorn Blvd. EAST PITTMAN FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is half a mile north of Highway 2 on Highway 179. EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at Highway 277 in Vernon. EVERGREEN MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is in Westville GAP POND FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is at 1980 Gap Blvd., in Sunny Hills. GRACE BAPTIST CHAPEL MISSION Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:50 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 440 Lot E Second St., Chipley. GULLY SPRINGS BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 2826 U.S. 90 in Bonifay. HICKORY HILL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1656 Hickory Hill Road in Westville. HOLMES CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on Cope Road in Chipley. HOLYNECK MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is 3395 Cemetery Lane, Campbellton. JERUSALEM MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 614 Bennett Drive in Chipley. LEONIA BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is in northwest Holmes County. MCQUEENS TEMPLE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF LIVING GOD Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 5681 State Road 79 South, Vernon. MT. ARARAT MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 1233 Old Bonifay Road in Chipley. MT. ZION INDEPENDENT BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is on Highway 2 one mile west of Highway 79 in Esto. NEW CONCOROAD FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on James Paulk Road off Highway 177. NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday morning bible study is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church Church LISTINGS See CHURCH LISTINGS A15 BCF announces prayer conference Faith EVENTS

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Local Washington County News | A15 Saturday, September 13, 2014 CHURCH LISTINGS from page A14 is at the intersection of Highway 2 and Highway 179A.NEW PROSp P ECT BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship services are at 11 a.m. Sunday evening services are at 5 p.m. Wednesday services supper is at 5 p.m. Wednesday prayer meeting, bible study and chilDriveen’s classes start at 5:45. The church is at 761 New Prospect Road in Chipley.NEW ZIOn N BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on Highway 177A north of Highway 2.NORTHSIDE BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is at the intersection of Highway 81 and U.S. 90 in Ponce de Leon.OO AKIE R R IDGE BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is at the corner of Orange Hill and Gilberts Mill Road.PIn N EY G G ROVE FREE W W ILL BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1783 Piney Grove Road south of Chipley.PLEASAn N T H H ILL FREE W W ILL BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is south of Bonifay at 1900 Pleasant Hill Road.POp P LAR H H EAD In IN DEp P E n N DEn N T FREE W W ILL BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is on Poplar Head Road.POp P LAR Sp SP RIn N GS BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1098 Lovewood Road two miles east of Highway 77.SS A n N D H H ILLS BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:15 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 6758 Highway 77.SS HADY G G ROVE BAp P TIST Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. SS HILOH BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is on Highway 277, three miles south of U.S. 90 in Chipley.SS HILOH MISSIOn N ARY BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:15 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 3013 Moss Hill Road in Vernon.SS T. JOHn N FREE W W ILL BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m.SS T. MATTHEWS MISSIOn N ARY BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 4156 St. Matthews Road, Caryville.SS ALEm M FREE W W ILL BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Worship service is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Church is at 2555 Kynesville Highway, Alford.SS HADY G G ROVE BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1955 Highway 177A in Bonifay.SS U nn NN Y H H ILLS FIRST BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. UnUN ITY BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 3274 River Road in Vernon.WW AUSAU FIRST BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 3493 Washington St. in Wausau.WW EST BOn N I f F AY BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 609 West Indiana Ave. in Bonifay.CC atholicBLESSED T T RIn N ITY C C ATHOLIC C C HURCH Sunday Mass is at 9 a.m. Wednesday evening Mass is at 5:30 p.m. Adoration is the rst Friday at from noon to 3 p.m. Holy Hour is Tuesday from 7-8 p.m. The church is at 2331 Hwy 177A in Bonifay.SS T. JOSEp P H T T HE W W ORKER C C ATHOLIC C C HURCH Sunday Mass is at 11 a.m. Tuesday Mass is at 9 a.m. The church is at 1664 Main St., in Chipley.SS T. T T HERESA C C ATHOLIC C C HURCH Sunday Mass is at 10 a.m. Monday through Friday Mass is at 8 a.m. SatuRoaday Mass is at 5 p.m. Adoration is the rst Friday after 8 a.m. Mass. The church is at 2056 Sunny Hills Blvd., in Chipley.CC hurch of C C hristCC HIp P LEY C C HURCH Of F C C HRIST Sunday morning bible study is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1295 BrickyaRoad Road in Chipley.SpSP IRIT-FILLED C C HURCH O f F G G OD In N C C HRIST Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Tuesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 2128 Pate Pond Road in Caryville.EE piscopalGG RAn N T T T A b B ERn N ACLE A A M E E Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m.. The church is at 577 Martin Luther King, Chipley.NEW BETHEL A A M E E Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on U.S. 90 in Bonifay.SS T. JOHn N A A M E E Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. SS T. JOSEp P H A A M E E Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1401 Monroe Shefeld Road, Chipley.SS T. L L UKE Af AF RICAn N METHODIST Ep EP ISCOp P AL C C HURCH (A A M E E ) Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on Jackson Community Road.SS T. MARY Af AF RICAn N METHODIST Ep EP ISCOp P AL C C HURCH (A A M E E ) Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is at 1035 St. Mary Road, in Caryville.SS T. MATTHEWS Ep EP ISCOp P AL C C HURCH Morning worship is at 9 a.m. Wednesday worship service is at 12:15 p.m. The church is on Highway 90 west in Chipley.EE vangelisticVV ERn N O n N E E VAn N GELISTIC C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is on Highway 79 in Vernon.CC ARYVILLE E E VAn N GELISTIC C C E n N TER Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is on Wrights Creek Road in Caryville, just north of Highway 90.HH olinessHH ARRIS C C HAp P EL H H OLIn N ESS C C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Thursday services are at 7 p.m. The church is eight miles north of Caryville on Highway 179.JOHn N SOn N T T E mp MP LE FIRST BORn N H H OLIn N ESS Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. Friday services are at 6 p.m. The church is at 793 Orange St., Chipley.MIRACLE V V ALLEY Sp SP IRIT Of F H H OLIn N ESS Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 3754 Bunyon Drive, off Highway 77 near Sunny Hills.LL UTHERAn N Grace Lutheran Morning Worship is at 8:30 a.m. The church is on U.S. 90 East in Bonifay. MethodistBETHLEHEm M BAp P TIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is on Highway 177.BOn N I f F AY FIRST Un UN ITED METHODIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Worship begins at 10:45 a.m. Youth Services are on Wednesday’s at 6 p.m. CC EDAR G G ROVE Un UN ITED METHODIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is two miles west of Millers Crossroads on Highway 2.CC HIp P LEY FIRST Un UN ITED METHODIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:50 a.m. Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. (contemporary service) and 11 a.m. (traditional service). The church is at 1285 Jackson Ave.LL AKEVIEW Un UN ITED METHODIST Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is on Highway 279 near Five Points.MT. I I DA C C O n N GREGATIOn N AL METHODIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is at just off Highway 2 in Holmes County’s New Hope Community.NEW H H O p P E Un UN ITED METHODIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. NEW BETHEL A A M E E Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on Highway 90 in Bonifay.OO RAn N GE H H ILL Un UN ITED METHODIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is on Sunday Road just off Orange Hill Road.OO TTER C C REEK Un UN ITED METHODIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is north of Ponce de Leon off Highway 81.PLEASAn N T G G ROVE Un UN ITED METHODIST Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. The church is near Hinson’s Crossroads.POp P LAR H H EAD Un UN ITED METHODIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is 1.5 miles north of Highway 2 on Highway 163.RR ED H H ILL Un UN ITED METHODIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on State Road 2 two miles west of State Road 79.SS T. JOHn N A A M E E Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. SS T. L L UKE Af AF RICAn N METHODIST Ep EP ISCOp P AL C C HURCH Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on Jackson Community Road.VV ERn N O n N Un UN ITED METHODIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m.WW AUSAU Un UN ITED METHODIST C C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m.. The church is on State Road 77 Pentecostal FIRST Un UN ITED PEn N TECOSTAL C C HURCH Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1816 Highway 90 in Chipley.WW AUSAU PEn N TECOSTAL H H OLIn N ESS Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is at 2201 Pioneer Road in Wausau.OpOP E n N POn N D PEn N TECOSTAL Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1885 Highway 179-A in Westville.TT RIn N ITY PEn N TECOSTAL T T A b B ERn N ACLE Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. PresbyterianCC HIp P LEY FIRST PRESb B YTERIAn N C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Bible study is held at 5 p.m. The church is at Fifth St. and Watts Ave.SS U nn NN Y H H ILLS PRESb B YTERIAn N Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. The church is at 3768 Country Club Blvd.OO therBIb B LEWAY L L IGHTHOUSE Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on HWY 90 East in ChipleyBOn N I f F AY H H OUSE Of F PRAYER A n N D PRAISE Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. After a brief break Morning Worship follows. The church is at 826 N. Caryville Road.BOn N I f F AY S S EVEn N TH D D AY A A DVEn N TIST Service is on SatuRoaday at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 604 Mathusek St..BOnn NN ETT POn N D C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 2680 Bonnett Pond Road in Chipley.CC HRISTIAn N FELLOWSHIp P C C E n N TER Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1458 Monroe Shefeld Road in Chipley.CC HRISTIAn N H H AVEn N Sunday school is h at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m.CC HURCH Of F G G OD b B Y FAITH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:45 a.m. Tuesday service is at 7:30 p.m. The church is at 3012 Church St..CC HURCH Of F G G OD O f F PROp P HECY Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1386 W. Jackson Ave., Chipley.CC OURTS Of F PRAISE Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 1720 Clayton Road, Chipley.CC Y p P RESS C C REEK Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at1772 Macedonia Road.FAITH C C OVEn N A n N T FELLOWSHIp P Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is on Highway 277 mile south of I-10.FAm M ILY W W ORSHIpp PP C C E n N TER Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is 531 Rock Hill Church Road, Chipley.GG RACEVILLE C C O mm MM U n N ITY C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 1005 E. Prim Ave.HH A R R OAD L L A b B OR C C REEK C C O mm MM U n N ITY C C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1705 Pioneer Road three miles east of caution light.HH ARVEST C C ATHED D RIVEAL Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at on Highway 77 two miles north of Wausau.HH OLm M ES V V ALLEY C C O mm MM U n N ITY C C HURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 3550Fannig Branch Road in Vernon.HH OUSE Of F PRAYER W W ORSHIp P C C E n N TER Sunday School and ChilDriveen’s Church is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Youth activities on Wednesday begin at 4:30 p.m. Praise and worship services are at 6:30 p.m. on Friday. The church at 763 West Blvd. in Chipley.LL I b B ERTY Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m.NEW FAITH T T E mp MP LE Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is at 841 Orange Hill Road.NEW FOUn N DATIOn N FELLOWSHIp P Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is on Rock Hill Church Road.NEW Sm SM YRn N A C C HURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is Adolph Whitaker Road six miles north of Bonifay. NORTHWEST FLORIDA C C HRISTIAn N C C HURCH Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. The church is at 4465 Highway 77.RR HEm M A PRAISE An N D W W ORSHIp P C C E n N TER Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Thursday service is at 7 p.m. The church is 763 West Blvd., Chipley.SS U nn NN Y H H ILLS C C HAp P EL Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 4283 Highway 77.TT A b B ERn N ACLE Of F PRAISE C C HURCH Of F G G OD Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is on Highway 77 South.TT HE L L IVIn N G W W O R R OAD Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at the corner of Highway 77 and Blocker Road in Greenhead.WW HITE D D OUb B LE POn N D Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is on Creek Road in Vernon.YY ES L L O R R OAD D D ELIVERAn N CE Sunday School is at 10:30 a.m. Worship is at noon. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 739 Seventh St. in Chipley.

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A16 | Washington County News Saturday, September 13, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. B&M Mower Repair & Service. Quality work at a fair price. Bill or Mary (850)638-4492 Brannon Family Day Care, located at 1525 Hwy 90, Ponce deLeon. Have immediate openings for 12mos up to school age. Please call 832-4067. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Summer Job Coming To An End?General Dynamics IT is Hiring Temporary Customer Service Representatives!General Dynamics offers company-paid bene ts and pays an extra 10 percent for night shifts and bilingual (English/Spanish) skills! General Dynamics Information Technology is an equal opportunity/af rmative action employer, supporting employment of quali ed minorities, females, disabled individuals, and protected veterans. The following positions are available: Temporary Customer Service Representatives English and Bilingual (English/Spanish) Apply Online: www.gdit.com/ jobsearch Job ID # 226219 (English) Job ID # 226145 (Bilingual English/Spanish) New hire classes starting throughout September We seek candidates who possess the following: € A high school diploma or GED (or above) € Six months customer service experience € Ability to type a minimum of 20 WPM € Ability to speak and read English pro“ ciently € Previous call center experience preferred € Ability to successfully pass a background check € Bilingual (Spanish) skills a plus1129991 Install/Maint/Repair Mechanic WantedTrawick Construction in Chipley, FL is looking for an Automotive and Heavy Equipment Mechanic (Gas and Diesel). Other duties will include:Hydraulic cylinder repair, hydraulic pump and motor maintenance/ repair, and brake and tire work. Some Scan Tool experience preferred. If interested, please bring your resume our main office at 1555 South Blvd., Chipley, FL 32428 and fill out an application. You may also email your resume to: joey .hurley@trawickconstruction.com Web ID#: 34300490 Business CEI INSPECTOR AIDE MTN Resources seeks an Inspector Aide to support FDOT construction projects in north FL.Full-time position with benefits. Educ/Exp: HS graduate or equivalent, basic math skills. Salary: $10-$13/hr. EOE. Email or fax resume to: ataylor@mtnresources.com 1-866-268-9253 Web ID#: 34300326 9-3559 Advertisement for Request for Proposal The Chipley Housing Authority (CHA) hereby requests proposals from qualified Architectural/ Engineering (A/E) Firms to provide design and engineering support services required to implement facility renovations funded for a two year period under the HA’s Capital Fund Program (CFP). The HA will sign a contract that covers work scheduled in Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2013 and FFY 2014, provided funds are available from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The HA cannot guarantee the annual funding amounts since CFP is a Federally Funded Program and depends upon the Federal Government’s budgeting process. Date and Time for Receiving Proposals: Thursday, September 25, 2014 by 3:00 p.m. CST Submit Proposals To: Chipley Housing Authority P.O. Box 388 Chipley, Florida 32428 Specifications and instructions for proposal submission and the criteria that will be used to evaluate submissions can be provided by contacting the CHA at: Chipley Housing Authority 1370 Old Bonifay Road – Main Office Chipley, Florida 32428 Or by contacting: Tara Finch at h_chiple@bellsouth.net By: Ms. Tara Finch, Executive Director Chipley Housing Authority, Chipley Florida Chipley Housing Authority is an Equal Opportunity Employer. September 13, 17, 20, 24, 2014. 9-3546 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 67-12-CA-000383 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. ROXICE CHOICE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROXICE CHOICE; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II; WASHINGTON COUNTY, A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Washington County, Florida, will on the 29th day of October, 2014, at 11:00 AM, at On the front steps of the Washington County Courthouse in Chipley offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Washington County, Florida: The North 109.10 feet of the East 325 feet of the South 459.10 feet of the Southeast Quarter of Section 4, Township 4 North, Range 13 West, less right-of-way of East Boulevard, being the East 45 feet of the above described parcel, Washington County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 28 day of August, 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk September 13 and 20, 2014 9-3547 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 2014-CA-000097 GENERATION MORTGAGE COMPANY Plaintiff, v. THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF CAROL J. GRUNDSTROM, DECEASED; JENNIFER CHESNUT A/K/A JENNIFER HOLLEY; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ACTING ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; CAPITAL FINANCIAL CREDIT, LLC; SHELTON CARROLL; BOBBIE CARROLL; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendant(s), NOTICE OF ACTION TO:THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF CAROL J. GRUNDSTROM, DECEASED Current Address: Unknown TO:JENNIFER CHESNUT A/K/A JENNIFER HOLLEY Last Known Address: Current Address: Previous Address: 829 Falling Waters Rd 112 Chipley, Fl 32428 Unknown 9450 Spring Creek Rd. Cookeville, TN 38506 whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown Defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein TO:ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown Defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Orange County, Florida: A PARCEL OF LAND IN BLOCKS 19 AND 22, MORDT PLAT OF CHIPLEY IN SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID BLOCK 22 AND THENCE RUN S. 86 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 40 SECONDS W., ALONG NORTH SIDE OF WELLS AVENUE, 134.14 FEET; THENCE N. 4 DEGREES, 51 MINUTES, 25 SECONDS W., 104.87 FEET; THENCE S. 85 DEGREES, 22 MINUTES, 17 SECONDS W. 4.58 FEET; THENCE N.3 DEGREES, 34 MINUTES, 17 SECONDS W. 36.44 FEET; THENCE N. 86 DEGREES, 13 MINUTES, 36 SECONDS E., 135.09 FEET TO THE WEST SIDE OF 5TH STREET; THENCE S. 5 DEGREES, 59 MINUTES, 30 SECONDS E., ALONG WEST SIDE OF 5TH STREET, 141.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF BLOCK 19, MORDT PLAT OF CHIPLEY, WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID CORNER BEING 134.10 FEET NORTH OF THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF WELLS AVENUE AND THE WEST This property is located at the Street address of: 724 5th Street, Chipley, Florida 32428 YOU ARE REQUIRED to serve a copy of your written defenses on or before October 13, 2014 a date which is within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A., Plaintiff’s Attorney, whose address is 350 Jim Moran Blvd., Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s Attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. This Notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in The Washington County News WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on August 22, 2014. HAROLD BAZZEL CLERK OF THE COURT By: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk September 13 and 20, 2014 9-3560 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Patient Practitioner located at 1165 State Park Road, in the County of Washington, in the City of Chipley, Florida 32428 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Chipley, Florida, this 8th day of September, 2014. Naomi Melvin September 13, 2014. 9-3557 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 67-2011-CA-000076 US BANK, NA, Plaintiff, VS. KENNETH B. CONNELL; et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sale will be made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on August 28, 2013 in Civil Case No. 67-2011-CA-000076, of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for WASHINGTON County, Florida, wherein, US BANK, NA is the Plaintiff, and KENNETH B. CONNELL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KENNETH B. CONNELL A/K/A KENNETH CONNELL; AND ANY UNKNOWN TENANT (S) IN POSSESSION are Defendants. The clerk of the court, Harold Bazzel will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 1331 South Blvd., Chipley, Florida 32428 at 11:00 A.M.. on the 8 day of October, 2014, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: THE NORTH OF THE EAST OF THE NORTHEAST OF THE NORTHWEST OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A PERMANENT FIXTURE AND AN APURTENANCE THERETO. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on August 13, 2014. CLERK OF THE COURT Harold Bazzel K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk Aldridge | Connors, LLP Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 7000 West Palmetto Park Rd., Suite 307 Boca Raton, FL 33433 Phone: 561.392.6391 Fax: 561.392.6965 September 13 ad 20, 2014 9-3558 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 67-2009-CA-000164 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,, Plaintiff, VS. ANTHONY H. STOCKSTILL; et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sale will be made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on August 28, 2013 in Civil Case No. 67-2009-CA-000164, of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for WASHINGTON County, Florida, wherein, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff, and ANTHONY H. STOCKSTILL; ERICA L. STOCKSTILL; DUNFORD HAVEN HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. are Defendants. The clerk of the court, Harold Bazzell will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 1331 South Blvd., Chipley, Florida 32428 at 11:00 A.M.. on the 8 day of October, 2014, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 5, BLOCK B, DUNFORD’S HAVEN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 184, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: 2981 Paradise Lakes Road, Chipley, FL 32428 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on August 13, 2014. CLERK OF THE COURT Harold Bazzell K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk Aldridge | Connors, LLP Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 7000 West Palmetto Park Rd., Suite 307 Boca Raton, FL 33433 Phone: 561.392.6391 Fax: 561.392.6965 September 13 and 20, 2014 9-3532 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2009-CA-000611 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. JAMEY R. HOLLAND A/K/A JAMEY RAY HOLLAND; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FRED BEADLEY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAMEY R. HOLLAND A/K/A JAMEY RAY HOLLAND; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed August 21, 2014 entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-000611 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Washington County, Chipley, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Washington County Courthouse, 1331 South Blvd., Chipley, FL. 32428 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 24 day of September, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE WEST LINE OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 12 WEST, OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD #276; THENCE EAST, ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 537.47 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE (#2456)(538.0 DEED); THENCE SOUTH 364.68 FEET; THENCE WEST, 537.74 FEET TO A POINT 351.15 FEET SOUTH OF THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 351.15 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 25 day of August, 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court BY: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk September 6 and 13, 2014 9-3543 Public/Private Sale As pursuant of Florida Statues 83.805 the personal property stored in the following unit(s) will be deposed of as of/or after September 19, 2014 (not necessarily auctioned off) at 77 Storage Warehouse 4259 Hwy 77, Chipley, Florida. The tenant may pay this bill prior to September 19, 2014 to recover their property, or call to set up a day to make full payment, if not paid by that day, the personal property will immediately become the property of 77 Storage Warehouses at same location. Unit #20 Robin Sapp UNIT #13 & #S-13 Jerry Peek UNIT #29 Marti Thompson and or Joyce Davis September 6, 13, 2014. AUCTION -4 ESTATESIZE LOTS on Fort Loudon Lake, Lenoir City, Tennessee. Sept. 20, 10:30 AM. Furrow Auction Co. 1-8004FURROW or www. furrow.com. TN Lic. 62 AUCTIONAnnual Fall Farm and Construction. Sept. 20, 2014. 8:00AM. Hwy 231 N., Campbellton. FL 32426. (3) Local farm dispersals, (2) Estates, Bank Repos, Sherriff Depts, City & County, Plus Consignments. MASON AUCTION & SALES LLC, FL #642. 850-623-0473, Office, 850-258-7652 Chad Mason, 850-849-0792 Gerald Mason www.masonauction.co m. Huge 8 Family Yard Sale Saturday 13th 8am-2pm, Swiftly Lube in Bonifay on Hwy 90. Children and adult clothes, all sizes. Household items, furniture, Home Interior items, lots of misc items. Great prices. Multi-family Yard Sale. Saturday from 7:30 until on hwy 90 at the Bonifay Computer shop.Lots of household items, bed frame w/dresser, pedestal sink w/faucet, bassinette, lots of baby clothes & toys, ladies and juniors clothes, too much to list. YARD SALE YARD SALE YARD SALE Friday and Saturday, September 12th & 13th, 7am until 3pm rain or shine. Located 814 Rattlebox Rd., 3 miles South of Chipley off Orange Hill Rd. Lots of items for men as well as women. Yard Sale. Sat., 9/13/14, 2244 Hwy 79, 4 miles N of Vernon. 8am-til. Yard Sale. Sat., 9/13/14, 2244 Hwy 79, 4 miles N of Vernon. 8am-til. GUN SHOW NORTH FLORIDA FAIRGROUNDSSeptember 13th & 14th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL99800 to 56654 Fresh From the Farm!Okra, squash, zucchini and pickling cucumbers. Call 850-956-4556. K&LFarm, LLC Green Peanuts for Boiling!! 1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 DIRECTV starting at $24.95/mo. Free 3-Months of HBO, Starz, SHOWTIME & CINEMAX. FREE RECEIVER Upgrade! 2014 NFL Sunday Ticket Included with Select Packages. Some exclusions apply -CALL 1-800-915-8620 DISH TV Retailer. Starting $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) Find Out How to SAVE Up to 50% Today! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL 1-800-605-0984 Hay For Sale. Round & square bales. Will deliver. Call 850-836-4223. Hunting Land for Rent in Washington County. September to April. 300 Acres, 160 acres, 60 acres, 20 acres. For more information call 850-638-1911 or 326-0044. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Install/Maint/Repair Maintenance & Prop. Management For mobile home park. Cottendale area. Call 850-209-8847 or email: charlo32431@gmail.com Logistics/TransportDrivers CDL-A:Home EVERY Weekend! ALL Loaded/ Empty Miles Paid! Dedicated Southeast! Or Walk Away Lease: No Money Down 1-888-880-5911 Web ID: 34300186 AIRLINE CAREERS Start Here -Get FAA certified with hands on training in Aviation Maintenance. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com. EOE Heavy Equipment Operators Needed Nationwide Get Hands-On training working Bulldozers, Excavators, Backhoes. Certifications also offered. Lifetime job placement assistance.VA Benefits Eligible! Call (904) 549-6055 Under Employed… Want A New Career? Become A Truck Driver! Must Have Good Driving Record No Drug or Criminal Past 5 years Earn $45,000+ In 4 Short Weeks. Carrier Sponsored Training. Call 888-693-8934 EARN EXTRA INCOME Are you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in Bayou George, Fountain, Alford, Clarksville, Chipley, Bonifay Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Jennifer Greene jgreene@pcnh.com James Meadors jmeadors@pcnh.com or call 850-747-5098 Web ID#: 34299554 Commercial Building on Highway 79 Bonifay for rent. Parking, central air, kitchen, handicap accessible. Available immediately. Call/Text Cissy at 850-768-0320. Executive Office Space for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Office space for rent in Bonifay. 206 Harvey Ethridge St. Phone: (850)548-5045 or (850)307-3278. Real Estate For Rent 1250 & 2000 sq. ft. office/retail spaces for lease in Chipley. Some modifications possible with long term lease. 850-209-3291. Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1 Bedroom Apartment, in Chipley, covenant location, no pets. 638-4640. Publisher’s Notice All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Ridgewood Apartments in Bonifay Studio and 2 Bd units $375 -$480 Includes City Utilities (850)557-7732 SpaciousOne Bedroom Apartment $450.00 Two Bedroom $500.00 Stove/Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. 2BR/1BA, CH/A, garage, screened porch. Appliances & water included. On golf course. $485.00/mth, 2749 Muir Lane, Dogwood Country Club. 334-684-2880. 2BR/1BA Remodeled Home in Vernon. $500.00 + deposit. Call 260-1873. 3BR/2BA two-story house. References and Deposit required. Chipley, No Pets. $795/MO. 638-1918. For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay city limits. $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/sewage/lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 3BR/1BAMH in quite park between Bonifay and Chipley. W/G included. $450.00 plus deposit. 3BR/2BAMH $450.00 plus deposit 547-4232, 850-527-4911. 3BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850-768-3508, 850-638-9933. Bonifay. 3BR/2BA, MH $600.00/mo, $600/deposit. Large master bedroom, large covered deck. 3/4 mile from elementary school on 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. Bonifay: 4bd/2ba, Double Wide, large shaded lot, near the school in Bonifay. Available Sept. 1st, $600mo Call: 850-699-9464 Text FL99320 to 56654 For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $500/month plus $500/deposit. CH/A. No pets. Call 850-547-2043 or 850-768-9670. Nice 2BR MH for rent in a great location in Chipley. Sorry no pets. 638-4640. NO PETS 3BR/2BA in counrty Chipley area $650. NO PETS 2BR/2BA in Cottondale $450. LEAVE MESAGE FOR CALL BACK 258-1594. 5 Acres on Hwy 77 3 miles South of Chipley. Has well, septic tank, 14x48 MH, front & back deck. 24x36 Pole Barn. 638-1858, 850-326-9109. COASTAL WATERFRONT LIQUIDATION SALE! Sat 9/13 ONLY. Ocean Access Homesite ONLY $29,900, was $149,900. World-class amenities all completed! Deep, dockable waterfront available. Best bargain in America! Low financing. Call 877-888-1416, x 138 Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. Foreclosure -NC Mtns. Handcrafted log cabin on 2 ac. w/stream. Lg loft open living area private setting needs work. Only $67,100 won’t last! 828-286-2981 Hunters Paradise 49,900 Own 40 to 350 acres From 1250 per acre Private road frontage, Creek frontage, Mountain views, Excellent hunting. Adjoins 347 acres state land Call 877-520-6719 or Remax 423-756-5700 White Diamond CTS Cadillac, 4DR, loaded. 25,000 miles. One owner, like new. 326-9109. Truck Camper for sale 8 foot bed 1985 Air and heat sleeps 3-4. Very good condition. asking $695. call 547-3246.