Washington County news

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Title:
Washington County news
Uniform Title:
Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Chipley Fla
Creation Date:
June 22, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
Coordinates:
30.779167 x -85.539167 ( Place of Publication )

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Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began May 23, 1924.
General Note:
L.E. Sellers, editor.
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Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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aleph - 000384704
oclc - 07260886
notis - ACC5987
lccn - sn 81000810
issn - 0279-795X
System ID:
UF00028312:00947

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Phone: 850-638-0212 Website: chipleypaper.com Fax: 850-638-4601 50 www.chipleypaper.com Get your free copy now INSIDE For the latest breaking news, visit CHIPLEYPAPER.COM IN BRIEF WEEKEND Washington County News By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com TAMPA Researchers from the University of South Florida say the rst set of remains from the now-closed Arthur G. Doz ier School for Boys has been identied. Forensic experts announced Thursday they used DNA and other tests to make the identi cation of George Owen Smith, who is said to have disappeared from the reform school in 1940 at the age of 14. The cause of Smiths death has not been determined. His remains, which were identied through a matching DNA sample from Smiths sis ter, are reported to have been wrapped in only a burial shroud in a hastily dug grave. Lead researcher Erin Kim merle said while Smiths full story may have died with him, Staff Report Charles Kent has formally announced his candidacy for the District 2 Washing ton County Board of County Commis sioners seat. Kent currently re sides on his familys cattle farm in northwest Washington County, helping oversee its daily operations, but he is a funeral home director by trade. Licensed since 1991, Kent received his degree from the Gupton-Jones College of Mortuary Science in Atlanta. He has overseen funeral home opera tions in Northwest Florida and Alabama since the age of 21, both building funeral homes from the ground up and revital izing struggling establishments to help them once again thrive. He also received his correctional ofcer certication from WashingtonHolmes Technical Center and worked six years collectively at Washington and Holmes Correctional facilities. Kent says its this experience that gives him the business know-how to look out for the countys bottom line while serving the needs of the community with interest and compassion. It seems that on all levels of govern ment, including here at home, leaders C onnec t with us 24/7 G et br eak ing new s videos e xpanded st or ies phot o galler ies opinions and mor e ... @WCN_HC T CH IPLE Y P APER C OM RMS orientation CHIPLEY Roulhac Middle School Open House and Orientation will be held Thursday, Aug. 14. Orientation will be held in the auditorium at the following times: Eighth grade, 3 p.m.; seventh grade, 3:30 p.m.; sixth grade, 4 p.m., and fth, 4:30 p.m. Door prizes will be given. Following the orientation, parents and students will be allowed to visit classes as well as the many informational booths that will be set up in the courtyard. Student schedules can be picked up at this time. Back to school fair CHIPLEY Northwest Florida Community Hospital will host the annual Back to School Fair from 9 a.m. to noon, Thursday, Aug. 14, on the front lawn. This is a free event to help school age children prepare to return to school, looking spiffy and equipped with the necessary school supplies. There will be a back pack drawing as well. For more information call Joanie Beard at 415-8104. By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY Over the past two weeks, a horse and a donkey have tested posi tive for the Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus (EEE) here, prompting the Flori da Department of Health in Washington County to issue a warning emphasizing the importance of protection against mosquito-borne diseases. Ofcials generally issue an advisory after at least two cases of the disease have been reported within a two-week span. The virus is transmitted by mosqui toes and can infect humans. People under the age of 15 or over 50 seem to be at greatest risk for severe dis ease. It was not conrmed if the Washington County equines had been vaccinat ed against the disease. There have been at least 40 conrmed cases of EEE in horses throughout Flori da so far this year, but that number will likely climb, according to the Florida Department of Health. Typ ically, the state averages 60 reported equine cases a year, and one or two human cases; however ofcials say the risk of transmission to humans have increased. EEE is one of the most severe mosquito-transmit ted diseases in the United States with about a 33 per cent mortality and signi cant brain damage in most survivors. Death rates for EEE are reported between one-third and two-thirds, depending on the source. It is 90 per cent for horses, but while a vaccine is available for horses, there is not one yet approved for humans. Symptoms of EEE in humans may include headache, fever, fatigue, dizziness, weakness and confusion. County health ofcials warn of EEE threat See EEE A2 CHARLES KENT Kent announces candidacy for BOCC Dist. 2 seat By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT Cspears@chipleypaper.com VERNON The setting was informal as the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) made road design maps available for public review during an informational meeting held at the Vernon Community Center Tuesday. The maps were presented during the meeting in an effort to answer questions residents may have regarding the State Road 79 Design-Build Project. The maps covered Phases A through D, which spans the distance from Mill Branch Bridge to Interstate 10 for a total length of 20 miles and includes parts of Washington and Holmes Counties. Phase A covers about 4.5 miles from Mill Branch Bridge to Reedy Branch Bridge; Phase B skips over the vast ma jority of Vernon and begins at Pate Pond Road to Cypress Creek Bridge for a total length of 3.2 miles; Phase C starts from Cypress Creek Bridge to I-10 for approxi mately six miles, and Phase D begins at Reedy Branch Bridge to Court Street, for a length of 6.4 miles. The plans also include bridges to be constructed over Cypress and Open Creek and a new trafc signal on Sapp Street. For more information, contact Project Manager Billy Robinson at 863-5713 or via email at billy.robinson@dot.state..us or District Three Public Information Direc tor Ian Satter at 330-1205, or via email at ian.satter@dot.state..us. CE CILIA SP E AR S | The News Two tables almost long enough to span the Vernon Community Center held maps equally as long for visitors to examine during FDOTs public information meeting Tuesday. Public gets birds eye view of S.R. 79 project IDENTIFIED See KENT A2 USF researchers identify rst set of Dozier remains GEORGE OWEN SMITH AP PHOTO S This Dec. 20, 2013, le photo provided by the University of South Florida, shows where researchers found some of the remains of 55 people in a graveyard at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna. See DOZIER A2 Chipleys Amp Lee makes Hall of Fame | A5 INDEX NASCAR ................................. A7 Food....................................A11 Classieds............................A16 Volume 89, N umber 34 Saturday, AU G US T 9 2014

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Local A2 | Washington County News Saturday, August 9, 2014 the university is hopeful identifying his remains will help the family gain closure. We may never know the full circumstances of what happened to Owen or why his case was handled the way it was, said Kimmerle in a press release. But we do know that he now will be buried under his own name and beside family members who longed for answers. According to the univer sity, Smiths mother wrote the school in 1940 inquiring about his well-being. What she received from thenadministrator Millard Da vidson was a letter stating that no one knew where he was. The following January, Smiths family were notied he died after an escape at tempt and was taken to an unmarked grave when they arrived to claim his body. Ofcial records indicate 31 burials at the school, but researchers found the 55 sets of remains during the excavation project. Researchers, who re ceived $190,000 in funding from the state for the proj ect, as well as a $423,528 grant from the U.S. Depart ment of Justice, were given one year to exhume, identify and rebury the remains, as well as locate additional burials at the school. The Dozier project is funded by both the State of Florida and the National Institute of Justice. USF researchers are still asking the public to help identify the remains. Researchers provided a list earlier of children whose remains they believe they have, along with their par ent or guardians name, year received at Dozier, and their last known city of residence. Anyone recognizing a name on the list is asked to contact Master Detective Greg Thomas of the Hills borough County Sheriffs Ofce at 813-247-8678. The remains of the follow ing boys are believed to be in care of USF researchers: Willie Adkins, George Adkins, 1918, Tampa or pos sibly Polk County Thomas Aikins, Nancy Aikins, 1918, Jacksonville, Florida Joe Anderson, Ben An derson, 1919, Lake County, Florida Walter Askew, Toeury Askew, 1925, Palm Beach, Florida Samuel Bethel, John Bethel, 1929, 443 N.W. 9 St., Miami, Florida James Brinson, Eliza beth Payton (Aunt), 1932, Putnam County, Florida Waldo Drew, Unknown, 1914, Pinellas County, Florida Lloyd Dutton, E.W. Dil lon, 1918, Ft. Myers, Florida Louis Fernandez, Un known, 1914, Monroe Coun ty, Florida Hilton Finley, J.D. Fin ley, 1918, Tampa, Florida Walter Fisher, Un known, 1914, Hillsborough County, Florida Edward Fonders, Ma mie Smith & Jim Fonders, 1925, Melborne, Florida George Grissam, Peg Grissam, 1918, Caryville, Washington County, Florida Louis Hafn, Unknown, 1914, Duval County, Florida James /Joseph Ham mond, Blanche Isham, 1936, Palm Beach or Jensen, Florida Schley Hunter, M. Hunter, 1922, Mayo, Florida Billey Jackson, Suzie and B.J. Jackson, 1952, Day tona Beach, Florida Joshua James, Un known, 1916, Unknown Clifford Jeffords, Un known, 1914, Pinellas Coun ty, Florida Clifford Miller, John Miller, 1924, Lake County, Florida Tillman Mohind, J.P. Mohind, 1916, Duval County, Florida Sam Morgan, E. Mor gan, 1921, Lee County, Florida Richard Nelson, Un known, 1935, Lake County, Florida Charlie Overstreet, Mamie Jones, 1924, Marvin, Georgia Clarence Parrot, Un known, 1914, Sutherland or Palm Harbor, Florida Robert Rhoden, Annie Doe & Jeff Rhoden, 1929, 441 12th St. N, St. Petersburg Fred Sams, Theodora Onie (Aunt), 1932, Jackson ville, Florida Nathaniel Sawyer, S. Sawyer, 1920, R13, Box 677, Jacksonville, Florida Archie J. Shaw Jr., Archie J. Shaw Sr., 1932, 1609 Central Ave., Tampa, Florida Leonard Simmons, Ben Simmons, 1919, Miami, Florida Wilbur Smith, Tam Smith, 1918, Tampa, Florida Lee Smith, Rev. W.M. Smith, 1932, 18th Ave, Jack sonville, Florida Joe Stephens, Luke (Brother) & Elizabeth Ste phens (Sister), 1932, Bre vard County, Florida or pos sibly South Carolina Lee Underwood, Olivia & Dave Underwood, 1932, Jacksonville, Florida Puner Warner, Un known, 1918, Atlanta, Georgia Joseph Wethersby, Fred Wethersby, 1914, Duval County, Florida Harry Wells, Unknown, 1914, Duval County, Florida Ralph Whiddon, Cor nelius Whiddon, 1918, Char lotte Harbor, Florida Sim Williams, Un known, 1916, Jackson Coun ty, Florida Arthur Williams, Lilla Williams, 1921, Micanopy, Florida John H. Williams, Jeanie Williams, 1921, Tal lahassee, Florida Calvin Williams, Gros man Williams, 1922, Well born, Florida The Associated Press contributed to this report have distanced themselves from the people who elect ed them, said Kent. Good government should serve each citizen fairly and ef ciently. I want to bring county government back to serving each citizen. Ive been out visiting with folks and appreciate the hospi tality and support Ive been shown. I know I havent been able to see everyone, but I look forward to visit ing anyone Ive missed in the near future and listen to their ideas and concerns about the future of Wash ington County. Kent and his wife, Becky, have been married for 15 years. Protect yourself, your family, and animals by taking the following precautions: DRAIN AN D COVER DRAIN standing water to stop mosquitoes from multiplying. Drain water from garbage cans, house gutters, buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, ower pots or any other containers where sprinkler or rain water has collected. Discard old tires, drums, bottles, cans, pots and pans, broken appliances and other items that arent being used. Empty and clean birdbaths and pets water bowls at least once or twice a week. Protect boats and vehicles from rain with tarps that dont accumulate water. Maintain swimming pools in good condition and appropriately chlorinated. Empty plastic swimming pools when not in use. COVER skin with clothing or repellent. Clothing Wear shoes, socks and long pants and long-sleeves. This type of protection may be necessary for people who must work in areas where mosquitoes are present. Repellent Apply mosquito repellent to bare skin and clothing. Always use repellents according to the label. Repellents with DEET(N,NDiethyl-mtoluamide), picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, and IR3535 are effective. Use mosquito netting to protect children younger than 2 months old. TIPS ON R EPELLEN T USE Always read label directions carefully for the approved usage before you apply a repellent. Some repellents are not suitable for children. Products with concentrations of up to 30 percent DEET are generally recommended. Other US Environmental Protection Agency-approved repellents contain picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, or IR3535. These products are generally available at local pharmacies. Look for active ingredients to be listed on the product label. Apply insect repellent to exposed skin, or onto clothing, but not under clothing. In protecting children, read label instructions to be sure the repellent is ageappropriate. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, mosquito repellents containing oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children under the age of three years. DEET is not recommended on children younger than two months old. Avoid applying repellents to the hands of children. Adults should apply repellent rst to their own hands and then transfer it to the childs skin and clothing. If additional protection is necessary, apply a permethrin repellent directly to your clothing. Again, always follow the manufacturers directions. COVER doors and windows with screens to keep mosquitoes out of your house. Special to The News Motorists heading to the gas pumps are nding the cheapest August gas pric es since 2010. The national average price was $2.74, Friday, Aug. 1. Since that time, average prices on Aug. 1 ranged from $3.52 in 2012, to $3.71 in 2011. The current average of $3.50 is three cents cheaper than last week and the discount at the pump should contin ue in the near future. Typically gasoline pric es uctuate in July and Au gust, but for the most part, prices have steadily de clined, said Mark Jenkins, spokesman, AAA The Auto Club Group. Oil prices de creased dramatically this week, so theres no reason gas prices should go up any time soon. In fact, if these conditions continue, prices could eventually slip below $3 a gallon by the end of the year. However, unexpected renery outages, a spike in oil prices, or the mere threat of a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico could cause gas prices to rise. Oil prices plummeted last week. The price for a barrel of WTI settled at 97.88 on the NYMEX Friday, Aug. 1, $4.21 com pared to a week ago. That was the biggest weekly decline in seven months, and the lowest settlement since February. Rener ies are running at record levels and there is more than enough gasoline in the market, which has helped bring down prices despite multiple overseas conicts. The current average price for a gallon of regu lar unleaded in Florida is $3.41. That is ve cents lower than last week and the cheapest price since February. In Georgia, the average price of $3.40 is three cents under last week and the cheapest price since March. Tennes sees average price of $3.27 is also the cheapest price since March and for cents less than last week. AAA: August gas prices hit 4-year low CURRENT AND PAST PRICE AVERAGES Regular Unleaded Gasoline Sunday Saturday Week Ago Month Ago Year Ago National $3.504 $3.510 $3.527 $3.667 $3.621 Florida $3.414 $3.420 $3.455 $3.608 $3.579 Georgia $3.396 $3.402 $3.434 $3.581 $3.480 Tennessee $3.271 $3.275 $3.307 $3.455 $3.390 Special to The News CHIPLEY The Wash ington County Board of County Commissioners will hold a called meeting at 9 a.m., Monday, Aug. 11, in the Washington Commis sion Board Room, located at 1331 South Blvd. On the agenda are the following items: 2014-2014 Insurance Re newal Marla Hayes Northwest Florida Water Management Dis trict Agreement Jeff Goodman BOCC to hold called meeting Staff Report CHIPLEY Florida High way Patrol reports that Gregory John Tavares, 56, of Chipley overturned a 2007 Volvo Semi at 3:55 the morning of Aug. 6 on Roll ing Pines Road, west of Ratcliff Circle, causing only minor injuries to himself. According to the report, Tavares was westbound on Rolling Pines Road, negoti ating a right curve when he failed to properly negotiate the curve it caused the ve hicle to cross the center double line. Tavares attempted to correct the semi by steer ing to the right, however he was unable to regain control causing the vehicle to overturn onto its left side and continued south west before coming to a nal rest in the eastbound lane as well as the south shoulder. Tavares was using his seatbelt, and alcohol is said to not be a factor in the crash. Chipley man overturns semi, minor injuries KENT from page A1 EEE from page A1 Physicians should contact the health de partment if they suspect an individual may have a mosquito-borne disease, the department advised in a press release. (We will continue) to conduct statewide surveillance for mosquito-borne illnesses, including West Nile virus infections, Eastern Equine Encephalitis, St. Louis Encephalitis, Malaria and Dengue. Residents of Florida are encouraged to report dead birds via the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissions site http:// www.myfwc.com/bird/. DOH-Washington County also continuers to remind residents and visi tors to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes and by tak ing basic precautions to help limit exposure. For more information, visit the Departments website at http://www.or idahealth.gov/diseasesand-conditions/mosquitoborne-diseases/index. html or contact the Flori da Department of Health in Washington County at www.oridahealth.gov/ CHD/Washington/Index. html or 638-6240. WHA T TO DO DOZIER from page A1 We may never know the full circumstances of what happened to Owen or why his case was handled the way it was. But we do know that he now will be buried under his own name and beside family members who longed for answers. Erin Kkimmerle lead researcher

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Local Washington County News | A3 Saturday, August 9, 2014 Special to The News A Jackson County sher iffs deputy responded to a report of a reckless driver traveling west on Highway 2, from Campbellton to ward Graceville, Saturday, Aug. 2. The vehicle reportedly ran a motorist off the road way. Upon arriving in the area, the deputy observed a vehicle matching the description parked in the westbound lane of High way 2, obstructing trafc. The deputy made con tact with the drive, Stanly Dwayne Marchant, 55, of Chipley, and observed that he appeared to be under the inuence of an intoxi cating substance. It was discovered that Marchants Florida driv ers license was revoked due to being a habitual trafc offender, and had three prior convictions for driving under the inuence. According to reports, Marchant made several statements that he had ingested bourbon and taken three prescription pain pills prior to being stopped. Marchant exited the vehicle but was unable to walk or stand without assistance due to his level of impairment. He was placed under arrest at that time pending further investigation. A vehicle inventory was conducted and a partial bottle of Kentucky Deluxe whiskey was located in the center console, a prescrip tion bottle located under the drivers seat that con tained suspected crack cocaine, and two metal paraphernalia pipes with residue also located under the drivers seat. The vehicle was turned over to a towing company, and Marchant was ar rested and charged with habitual driving while license suspended or re voked, habitual driving while under the inuence, possession of a controlled substance crack cocaine, and possession of drug paraphernalia. He was then transported to the Marianna Police Depart ment, where he provided to breath samples on the intoxilyzer that were in ex cess of the legal limit and was then transported to the Jackson County Cor rectional Facility to await rst appearance. Special to The News Deputies with the Jack son County Sheriffs Ofce (JCSO) were dispatched to a residence located on Pan handle Road in reference to an agency assist with the Department of Chil dren and Families (DCF), Saturday, Aug. 2. Deputies were advised that a com plaint was received regard ing narcotics being used and manufactured inside a home in the presence of children. Upon arrival the depu ties made contact with the home owner, Kevin James Hobgood, a white male, and a white female identied as Shon Marie Masse. As a re sult of the allegations, depu ties subsequently obtained consent to search the resi dence from Hobgood. During the course of the search of the home, deputies located a series of items consistent with the manufacture and use of methamphetamine and other illegal narcotics. The items included various forms of drug parapherna lia used to ingest narcot ics, crack cocaine, nished methamphetamine, burnt spoons, used needles and two one pot or shake and bake methamphetamine labs that were within the nal stages of the process. At the conclusion of the investigation, Massey was placed under arrest and charged with possession of methamphetamine, pos session of crack cocaine and possession of drug paraphernalia and Hob good was placed under arrest and charged with possession of metham phetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia, and attempted manufacture of methamphetamine. Both were transported to the Jackson County Correc tional Facility to await rst appearance. Special to The News A deputy from the Jack son County Sheriffs Ofce responded to a burglary located on Wintergreen Road, Sunday, Aug. 3, where numerous rearms were reported stolen. During the investigation it was learned that Joseph Alexander Redmon, 18, and a 16 year old minor had been at the house to ask for some gas before the victim went to church. Later, while the victim was gone from his resi dence, Redmon and the mi nor returned driving a gray four door car and broke into the residence. There were apprehended a short time later in Marianna. Two of the rearms were initially recovered. Direct information was led by the state attorneys ofce on the minor. Redmon was arrested and charged with armed burglary, felon in possession of a rearm and violation of state probation and the minor was arrest ed and charged with armed burglary, minor in posses sion of a rearm and carry ing a concealed rearm. Both were placed in the county jail. Special to The News Another massive data breach is in the headlines. This one follows on the heels of other high prole data breaches involving Target, Michaels, Mozilla, PF Changs and many more. Since data security is the responsibility of indi vidual merchants and web sites, theres not much that you as a consumer can do to prevent data breaches from occurring. However, you can take steps to pre vent your identity from be ing compromised. Better Business Bureau urges you to make identity theft protection a routine priority. You should be pro active and vigilant to mini mize the risk of identity theft for every member of your family by: Using passwords that include complex characters Changing your pass words frequently Not using the same password for every online account or website Monitoring your bank ing and credit card ac counts frequently, if not daily Setting up automatic activity alerts on banking and credit card accounts so that you are notied every time a transaction is made Setting up alerts on your credit reports with the three credit reporting agencies Checking your chil drens credit reports for unauthorized activity Being careful about the types of information that you disclose online Discussing identity theft and online security with every member of your family who uses the Inter net, from the youngest to the oldest. By taking these steps, you may be able to de tect unauthorized activ ity earlier so that you can minimize the damage that identity theft can do. For more information about protecting your identity, visit www.bbb.org. Cops: Chipley resident arrested in Jackson County JCSO assist DCF JCSO arrests 2 on burglary charges Protect your identity in face of data breaches

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Local A4 | Washington County News Saturday, August 9, 2014 POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Washington County News P. O Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 USP S 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $20; 26 weeks: $28.70; 52 weeks: $48.60 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $24.30; 26 weeks: $36.40; 52 weeks: $60.70 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copy right 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bareeld, Publisher Carol Kent, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bareeld: nbareeld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPOR TS OR OPINION news@chipleypaper.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULA TION 850-638-0212 clamb@ chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 EDITOR Carol Kent: ckent@ chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 ADVER TISING Jessica Collins: jcollins@chipley paper.com Special to The News August brings the end of the summer break and the beginning of a new school year in Florida. Its an ideal time for focusing on child safety, and the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles will do just that by launching its Child Safety Awareness Month. The theme of this inaugural awareness campaign is Every Child is a Human Caution Sign. Whether playing in the yard, riding in the backseat of a vehicle, or waiting at a school bus stop, a child is a human caution sign, said Captain Nancy Rasmussen, Chief of Public Affairs for the Florida Highway Patrol. They are living reminders that we need to slow down, pay attention, and abide by trafc laws for their safety as well as our own. Each week, DHSMV will focus on different trafc related safety issues involving children, such as seatbelts and child restraints, bicyclist and pedestrian tips, school bus safety, and making sure a child is not behind the vehicle when backing up. The Department, in partnership with other state agencies, will be distributing safety reminders, such as: BE ALER T WHILE BACKING Walk around your vehicle to check for children playing. Turn off your radio to better hear your surroundings. Keep your foot on the brake until you completely shift into reverse. Back out slowly. Teach children to never play in, on, around, or under vehicles. Know your vehicles blind spots and look again before backing. BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN SAFETY While on a bicycle, ride in the same direction as trafc and obey all trafc signs, signals and lane markings. Always use a headlight and taillight at night. Pedestrians should use the sidewalk if there is one; if not, walk on the side of the road facing trafc. Always cross streets where pedestrians are expected, such as corners and crosswalks. And be visible. Wear bright and reective colors on your clothes, shoes and/or wristbands. BUS SAFETY Motorists are required to stop when approaching a school bus that is stopped with its red lights ashing and stop arms extended. The only time trafc approaching an oncoming school bus does not need to stop, is if there is a raised barrier such as a concrete divider or at least ve feet of unpaved space separating the lanes of trafc. Motorists should be alert and watch for children especially near schools, bus stops, school buses, and in school parking lots. At bus stops, children should wait in a safe place away from the road. Children should never walk behind a bus. Remember, stop on red, kids ahead. SEA TBEL TS AND CHILD RESTRAINTS Buckle up. A seatbelt is your vehicles most important safety feature, but it only works if you use it. Florida law requires the use of seat belts by drivers of motor vehicles and all children riding in a vehicle under the age of 18. Keep children in the back seat, at least through age 12, if possible. Front seat air bags, when deployed, can be dangerous to children. A new law taking effect in January 2015 will require children four and ve years of age to ride in a booster seat. To view the Departments Child Safety Awareness Month video, go to www.youtube.com/ watch?vykzgp5iwiPU. For more information on this and other safety campaigns sponsored by the DHSMV visit www.hsmv. gov/SafetyTips, or contact the DHSMV Communication Ofce at (850) 617-3102. The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles provides highway safety and security through excellence in service, education and enforcement. The Department is leading the way to a safer Florida through the efcient and professional execution of its core mission: the issuance of driver licenses, vehicle tags and titles and operation of the Florida Highway Patrol. To learn more about DHSMV and the services offered, visit www.hsmv.gov, follow us on Twitter @FLHSMV or nd us on Facebook. Special to The News Continuing through Aug. 15, the Wal-Mart store located at 1621 Main St in Chipley will be collecting supplies for local students who are less fortunate. This will be the second year that United Way of Northwest Florida and Wal-Mart have partnered to help local kids going back to school. There will be a large box at the exit doors with Fill the Bus signs and we are asking the public to help us ll it up with wide ruled notebooks, paper, No. 2 pencils, crayons, black or blue ballpoint pens, pencil boxes, backpacks, scissors, erasers, Clorox wipes, sanitizer, or any other school supply requested by Washington County Schools. These supplies will be sent to the Title I schools in Washington County for distribution. If your child attends a Title I school, and you cannot afford all of the supplies your child needs, your childs teacher will be given these supplies by the main ofce to help supplement what your child was unable to bring. Special to The News The Chipley Lions Club had the pleasure of being the guest of The Kiwanis Club and presented a Lions program. Lions Forrest and Kelly Smith along with Lion Curtis were on hand to represent the Chipley Lions with an informative and educating program. Lion Curtis opened by giving a brief history of Lions International, which was established in 1917 by founder Melvin Jones, a Chicago businessman. The club has since grown to over 1,350,000 members in 46,000 local clubs in over 200 countries and touched millions of lives around the globe. Mr. Jones personal motto, You cant get very far until you start doing something for somebody else has since translated to Our Lions Motto which is simple and direct, We serve. The focus for work for the blind and sight impaired didnt begin until 1925 when Helen Keller addressed the national convention and challenged the Lions to become Knights of the Blind. This has since become a strong direction but Lions also support a vast group of other projects just to name a few, such as diabetes and cancer awareness, hearing conservation and many other youth programs around the world. Our local Chipley Lions was originally established in 1948 with 16 charter members and operated until 1009 when the charter was surrendered for lack of participation, not shortage of members by lack of participation. The Chipley Lions Club was reestablished in 2001 and has since thrived and has had great participation with enthusiastic members that have accomplished every goal that has been set forth by the club and have many more in our vision. Lion Kelly did the important part of the presentation by presenting the technical and optometric side of our effort. She had on hand out sight machine and explained the operation and benet of this outstanding piece of equipment. She also discussed the application and screening process to apply for Lions assistance with exams and glasses. She also discussed the refurbished eyewear program that is processed eyewear that has been locally donated in pickup boxes in our area that are cleaned, processed and screened. Theses glasses have been provided on several out of the country mission trips around the world as well as in the local area to provide immediate corrective vision for needy clients. She also elded a group of interesting questions from the audience with excellent and professional responses and a style that would make any Lion proud. The club was represented well and various community project both current and past were shared with the group such as: broom sales, parade events, paint the plug contest, truck or treat, face painting and Easter egg hunt, golf tournaments, partner with Crossover Ministry and our most recent the Take Stock in Children Scholarship program donation that will be presented at our next meeting. United Way partners with Wal-Mart for Fill the Bus DHSMV promotes child safety awareness M O N DAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 6 p.m.: Third Monday Holmes/Washington Relay For Life Meeting at Patillos 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach ofce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999. T UESDAY 8-9 a.m.: Tai Chi Class at the Washington County Public Library, Chipley Branch 8-10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 6:10 p.m..: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at speedball 6:10 p.m., Early bird 6:20, session 6:50 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-7654 or 638-7654 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A W ED N ESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Bible Study 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. TH URSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9-11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 1 p.m.: Caregivers Meeting at Washington County Council on Aging in Chipley for more information call 638-6216 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Line Dancing Class for more information call 638-6216 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A F RIDAY 6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 3:30 p.m.: Bead Class every second Friday at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery call 703-0347 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper 4th Friday of every month January September. 6-8 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging 50+ dance club for more information call 638-6216 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Methodist Youth Center in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. SA T URDAY Free Medical Clinic in Graceville Opens 10 a.m. third and fth Saturday of the month. Call 263-6912 or 272-0101 for information. The Alford Community Health Clinic will be open the 2nd and 4th Saturdays of each month, from 10 a.m. until the last patient is seen. 10 a.m. to noon: Childrens education day fourth Saturday of every month North Bay Clan Tribal Grounds, 1560 Lonnie Road. SU N DAY 11 a.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Worship Service 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Worship Service 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at GracevilleCampbellton Hospital in Graceville. Lions Club presents program for Kiwanis Club COMMUNITY CALENDAR

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1989 Chipley High School graduate Amp Lee dom-inated during schools 1988 football season. From staff reports TALLAHASSEE Former Chi pley High School standout Amp Lee will be inducted into the Athletics Hall of Fame at Florida State University on Sept. 5, it was announced recently. Lee will be among seven new members introduced the night before the season-open ing home game of the 2014 football season against The Citadel. He will be joined by 2004 national softball Player of the Year Jessica van der Linden Boulware, top tackler in Sem inole football history Aaron Carter, pioneer in womens athletic Harlien Johnson, one of FSUs greatest swimmers Sara Linke Valentine, base ball star Jeremy Morris and Moore-Stone Award winner Russ Morcom. Lee came to Florida State on a football scholarship in 1989 from Chipley and during three seasons became one of the best, and most popular running backs in FSU history. FSU coaches recognized immediately that Lees unique running style and sure-hand ed receiving ability would t perfectly into the Seminoles system. Lee was remarkably elusive using quick cuts and shifty moves. Lee totaled 290 yards rushing and 272 receiving as a true freshman on FSUs 10-2 Fiesta Bowl champion team in 1989. He scored long touch downs both the rst time he rushed the football and the rst time he caught a pass. He had a breakout season as a sophomore gaining 825 yards on 158 carries and was voted MVP of the inaugural Blockbuster Bowl following FSUs 24-17 win over Penn State. Lee gained 977 yards as junior in 1991, which was the fth best single season mark at FSU at the time. The Semi noles were 11-2 that season and defeated Texas A&M in the Cotton Bowl. During Lees three sea sons FSU never nished ranked lower than fourth in the AP poll. His career totals included 2,092 rushing yards and 38 career touchdowns, which is tied for the fourth most TDs in school history. Lee left early for the NFL where he was a second-round draft pick and played nine years with the 49ers, Vikings, Rams and Eagles. During his early years, Lee helped lead the Chipley Tigers to the 1998 District Champi onship with a 9-0 record in the regular season. Lee and his teammates traveled to Mon ticello to play for the Class AA Regional Championships, where they claimed a 17-14 victory. They later came up short in the sectional cham pionship against Williston, but the season is remembered as one of the most successful of that decade. So we ll Tra ctor Co ., Inc. 2841 Hwy 77 North, Pa nama City www .so we lltr actor co .com So we ll and Ku bota 40 Ye ars of Tr usted Pe rf or manc e We Tr ade for Any thin g That Don t Eat! Financing Arranged (W AC) NO TI CE OF RU LE DE VELO PMENT BY THE SU NNY HILLS UNIT S 12-15 DE PE ND ENT DI ST RI CT In acco rd wi th Ch ap te rs 120 an d 190, Flo ri da St at ut es, th e Su nn y Hi ll s Un it s 12-15 De pe nd en t Di st ri ct ( Di st ri ct ) he re by gi ve s no ti ce of it s in te nt io n to re pe al it s exi st in g Ru les of Pr oc ed ur e in to tal an d to de ve lo p ne w Ru les of Pr oc ed ur e to go ve rn th e op era ti on s of th e Di st ri ct e Ru les of Pr oc ed ur e addr es s su ch ar ea s as th e Bo ar d of Su pe rv is or s, o cer s an d vo ti ng di st ri ct o ces, pu bl ic inf or ma ti on an d in sp ec ti on of re co rd s, po licies, pu bl ic me et in gs, he ar in gs an d wo rk sho ps, ru lem aki ng pro ce ed in gs an d co mp et it ive pu rc has e in cl udin g pro ce du re un der th e Co ns ul ta nt s Co mp et it ive Ne go ti at io n Ac t, pro ce du re re ga rd in g au di to r se le ct io n, pu rc has e of in su ra nc e, pre -q ua lic at io n, co nst ru ct io n co nt rac ts, go od s, su pp lies an d ma te ri al s, ma in te na nc e se rv ices, co nt rac tu al se rv ices an d prot es ts wi th re sp ec t to pro ce ed in gs, as we ll as an y ot he r ar ea of th e ge ne ra l op era ti on of th e Di st ri ct e pu rpo se an d e ec t of th e Ru les of Pr oc ed ur e is to pro vi de fo r ecien t an d e ec ti ve Di st ri ct op era ti on s. e pu rpo se an d e ec t of th e re pe al of th e Di stri ct s cu rr en t Ru les of Pr oc ed ur e is to am on g ot he r th in gs, re pe al ru les re nd er ed ob so let e by st at ut or y ch an g es. Sp ec ic lega l au th or it y fo r th e re pe al of th e exi st in g Ru les of Pr oc ed ur e an d th e ado pt io n of th e prop os ed Ru les of Pr oc ed ur e in cl udes Se ct io ns 190.011(5), 190.011(15) an d 190.035, Flo ri da St at ut es (2012). e sp ec ic la ws im pl em en te d in th e Ru les of Pr oc ed ur e in cl ude but ar e no t limi te d to Se cti on s 112.08, 112.3143, 119.07, 189.4221, 190.006, 190.007, 190.008, 190.011(3), 190.011(5), 190.011(15), 190.033, 190.035, 218.931, 255.05, 255.0518, 255.0525, 255.20, 286.0105, 286.011, 287.017, 287.055 an d 287.084, Flo ri da St at ut es (2012), an d Ch 2013-227, La ws of Flo ri da A co py of th e pr o po se d Ru les of Pr oc ed ur e ma y be ob ta in ed by co nt ac ti ng th e Di st ri ct Ma na ge r at 12051 Co rpo ra te Bo ul ev ar d, Or la nd o, Flo ri da 32817, or by ca ll in g (407) 382-3256. Jo se ph Ma cL ar en Di st ri ct Ma na ge r Local Washington County News | A5 Saturday, August 9, 2014 New TrophyCatch website meets I Do Special to The News Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission staff was at the worlds larg est tackle trade show when it came to Florida, the Fish ing Capital of the World, in July. ICAST attracted 11,000-plus attendees, all of whom were professionals involved with recreational shing. FWC staff took this op portunity to thank the in dustry for its contributions. They also highlighted the importance of recreational shing in Florida while showcasing programs that benet Florida anglers and resources. Among these are the latest TrophyCatch website and a new I Do campaign. Recreational shing provides an $8.9-billion ben et to the states economy, which supports 79,200 sh ing related jobs, greater than in any other state. Florida shing license fees and federal aid provide criti cal investments to enhance recreational shing and boating. State statutes en sure revenues from fees paid by hunters and sport shers may not be diverted to purposes other than the administration of sh and wildlife programs by the FWC. This is a guarantee that your license money will not be diverted to other purposes. In addition to shing li cense fees, a percentage paid on the purchase of shing equipment and mo torboat fuels, and import duties on boats are placed into a federal trust fund ad ministered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. States and territories are then al located their share based on the number of paid sh ing-license holders and the states land and water area. On the freshwater side, these funds allow the Divi sion of Freshwater Fisher ies Management to produce more than 3 million sport sh per year for stocking public waters, including about 2 million largemouth bass. Biologists evaluate sh populations and an gler use in fresh waters throughout Florida. When combined with public input and research on the ecol ogy, genetics and life his tory of Floridas freshwater sport shes, this informa tion allows the FWC to fo cus management activities, such as habitat restoration, stocking and aquatic plant management, to ensure sustainable use. Boating access and safety also benet. Fuel pur chases for boats are a major source of Sport Fish Resto ration funds, so 15 percent of those dollars go to boating programs. These include an average of 30 boating-ac cess projects annually with local government entities. The FWC also maintains more than 240 boat ramps statewide, and provides location and access infor mation on about 1,700 pub lic boat ramps (MyFWC. com/BoatRamps). Through TrophyCatch, the FWC has partnered with the shing industry to reduce the need for regu lations and to bring extra value to anglers. Rewarding anglers for releasing trophy bass, rather than prohibiting their harvest, accomplishes many of the same goals and has additional benets. Tro phyCatch is a citizen-sci ence, data-collection pro gram that rewards anglers who document and release bass heavier than 8 pounds. By providing valuable re wards, donated by industry partners such as those at ICAST, TrophyCatch ac quires hard-to-obtain infor mation about when, where and how trophy bass are caught in Florida. That in formation helps determine which conservation efforts are most effective. It also encourages live release of trophy bass and keeps the mature females in their na tive waters. Thanks to Brandt In formation Services, a new TrophyCatch website (Tro phyCatchFlorida.com) was introduced at ICAST. Every angler who shes in Florida should go online and regis ter. Registering makes you eligible for a drawing for a Phoenix bass boat, powered by Mercury Marine and equipped with a Power-Pole shallow-water anchoring system and MotorGuide trolling motor, all donated by the industry to support this conservation effort. While on the site, check out the rules and be sure to have a scale, camera and tape measure with you next time you go shing. If you catch, document and re lease a qualifying bass, you will earn at least $100 in gift cards from Bass Pro Shops, Dicks Sporting Goods and/or Rapala, as well as a shirt from Bass King Cloth ing, certicate, decal and bragging rights on the Web and with your social media friends. In recognition of the importance of license fees and SFR funds, the Wild life Foundation of Florida, Florida Sportsman maga zine and other valued part ners also launched the I Do Florida shing license campaign at ICAST (Florid aFishingLicenseCampaig n.com). This campaign en courages all anglers, even those who are exempt, to buy a Florida shing license to contribute directly to im proving shing opportuni ties. Every new paid-license holder, in addition to the cost of the license, helps the FWC attain approximately $8 more from SFR. So you spend $17 but generate $25 to support your sport and conserve our sh and their habitats. Lets buy a license as an investment in the out doors we cherish, said Karl Wickstrom, founder and editor in chief of Florida Sportsman. Think of it not as a burden but a bargain. Go to License.MyFWC.com or call 888-FISH FLORIDA (888-347-4356) to order your license and to ensure ac cess to a lifetime of fun, safe and sustainable shing opportunities. Instant licenses are avail able at License.MyFWC. com or by calling 888-FISHFLORIDA (347-4356). Re port violators by calling 888404-3922, *FWC or #FWC on your cell phone, or tex ting to Tip@MyFWC.com. Visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and select more news, or scr.bi/Fish-busters for more Fish Busters Bulletins. To subscribe to FWC columns or to receive news releases automatically, click on the red envelope on any page of MyFWC.com. SP ECIAL T O THE N E W S Clay White poses with his refurbished Edge 540. Turning on mans crash into treasure Special to The News Dreams can come true if you work hard and stay focused. This was a les son recently learned by 14-year-old, Clay White, son of Clint and Wendy White of Chipley. In late spring of this year, White attended the Southern Electric Flying Festival in Ameri cus, Ga. During a ight demon stration, sponsored pilot Andrew Ritschel crashed his 74 inch Edge 540. Fortunately, for White, Ritschel had no further use for the crashed plane, and donated it to White, who had development an interest in the hobby. Whites family said de termination and excite ment were the motivating factors for him to earn the money needed to rebuild the plane, including all of the internal electrical com ponents needed to y. With the help of his fel low pilots, Drew Whitford and Frances Kellison, his dream became a reality on Aug. 3. His mother, Wendy, reports the rst ights that day started out cautiously and slowly, but as his con dence built, and his y ing abilities took over, he entertained a large crowd of friends and family with acrobatic loops, rolls, and spins. Chipleys Amp Lee soon will be Hall of Famer

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Local A6 | Washington County News Saturday, August 9, 2014 2014 Universal Uclick from The Mini Page 2014 Univ ersal Uclick Imagine yourself as a businessman living on the East Coast of the United States 170 years ago The country is growing tow ard the We st, and your company s products iceboxes are needed in new settlements But the railroad that will cross the continent is still 25 years from completion. Yo u would like to move your goods by ship In the 1800s a ship tra veling from the East Coast to the We st Coast of North America had to tra vel all the wa y around the tip of South America. The journey wa s long and dangerous as the winds around Cape Horn stir up huge wa ves Pe ople began to look for a shorter safer passage A trail across Panama As early as the 1500s Europeans thought a canal might cross the isthmus in Pa nama. In 1850, a geographer from Great Britain discovered a trail across the isthmus Officials from the U. S. Fr ance England and Colombia explored the area, but the difficulties of tra veling through the jungle discouraged them. A Century of Service A different idea A group from the United States thought a railroad could cross the isthmus. The Panama Railroad was completed in 1855 and was hugely successful. While building the railroad, engineers found a gap in the mountains at Culebra that they thought would offer a perfect setting for a ship canal. Colombia makes a deal At the time, Panama belonged to Colombia. For more than 20 years, governments and engineers argued about the best place to build a canal. A French businessman, Ferdinand de Lesseps, had built the Suez Canal connecting the Mediterranean and Red Seas in Egypt. He thought he could build a similar canal in Panama. Finally, in 1881, construction began. But the conditions in Panama were very different. Equipment rusted quickly in the humid atmosphere. An earthquake damaged the work in progress. Landslides slowed the work and killed or injured workers. Laborers suffered from disease. Finally, de Lesseps and his business partners gave up, and construction stopped on the canal in 1889. Centennial Celebration The Panam a Ca nal An isthmus is a narrow strip of land with water on either side. from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Mi ni Sp y Min i Spy an d her frien ds are visit ing the Panama Ca nal See if you can fin d: cat bell whale ladder heart peanut word MINI sailboat ruler chicken toothbrush high heel shoe snake muffin umbrella question mark key needle number 2 exclamation mark saw teapot number 7 TM from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Youl l need: What to do: 1. Cook the noodles according to package directions. Drain and transfer to a large bowl. 2. Add the remaining ingredients and mix well. 3. Refrigerate until ready to serve or pack for lunch. Serves 4. You will need an adults help with this recipe. Adapte d from The Robin Takes 5 Cookbook for Busy Families with perm ission from Andrews McMee l Publishin g ( andrews mcmeel.com). TM Ro ok ie Co ok ie s Reci pe Soba Noodles With Edamame (soybeans) soy sauce from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Me et Jess Ha rn ell Jess Harnel l is the voice of Grim Gloo m in the Disney animated comedy series The 7D, set in the world of the Seven Dwarfs. It airs on Disney XD, the Disney Chann el and Disney Junior. Jess specializes in being a voice actor. He is the voice of Cedric in the Disney Junior series Sofia the First and the voice of Chilly in the Disney Junior series Doc McStuff ins. He has been a voice actor in many movies, inclu ding Find ing Nemo, Up, the Toy Story movies, the Car s movies and the Transfor mers movies. He has also been a voice acto r in many commerci als and on TV shows, including The Simps ons and Anim aniacs. He is the announ cer for America s Funniest Home Videos. He was the lead sing er in the rock band Rock Suga r. He can imperson ate the voices of more than 150 celebr ities. Jess, 50, was born in Teanec k, New Jersey, and moved to Los Angeles when he wa s 10. photo by Rick Rowell, courtesy Disney XD from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick In baseball, middle infielders form the heart of a teams defense, turning double plays and limiting opponents chances to score runs. And Dansby Swanson, a second baseman for the Vanderbilt Commodores, plays his heart out for his team. Dansby was named the Most Outstanding Player at this years College World Series in Omaha, Nebraska, after leading his Commodores to the NCAA Division I National Championship. Over six games, he batted .323, scored five runs, drove in two runs, stole three bases and played error-free ball at second base. Vanderbilts 3-2 victory over the University of Virginia in Game 3 of the finals gave the school its firstever national champions hip in a mens sport. When youve got guys backing up each other like we do, Swanson said after the game, anything is possible. TM Da ns by Sw an so n Gus Goodsport s Supersport Height: 6-0 Birthdate: 2-11-1994 Hometown: Marietta, Georgia from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick New owners In 1902, the U.S. government bought the Panama Canal Co. As the U.S. was trying to reach agreements with Colombia about the canal, people in Panama were planning to separate from Colombia. The U.S. agreed to support Panama. In late 1903, U.S. military ships arrived near Coln, Panama, to help defend it against Colombian troops. The Panamians declared independence from Colombia without having to fight. And the United States was able to proceed with building the Panama Canal. Disease One of the biggest obstacles for the workforce was sickness. Malaria and yellow fever, spread by mosquito bites, killed more than 22,000 workers before 1889. In 1904, the United States asked Dr. William C. Gorgas to lead the fight against the deadly diseases. One worker, Alfred E. Dottin, wrote: I saw mosquitoes, I say this without fear of exaggerating, by the thousands attack one man. There were days that we could only work a few hours because of the high fever racking our bodies. Over coming Obstacles Dr. Gorgas attacked the mosquito problem in several ways: fumigating or using fumes of certain chemicals to repel insects quara ntining (KW OR-an -teening), or isola ting, peopl e who were sic k. In just one year, the number of deaths from malaria and yellow fever was greatly reduced. One of the ways Dr. Gorgas worked against mosquitoes was spraying oil on the grass in ditches. The oil would kill larvae or baby mosquitoes, after they hatched from eggs laid on the surface of standing water. photo courtesy University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries A tin y inse ct th reate ns a hug e pr oje ct photo courtesy James Gathany/CDC from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Ian: How can a broken pizza be fixed? Jamie: With tomato paste! All the following jokes have something in common. Can you guess the common theme or category? Parker: What would you get if you stacked up thousands of pizzas? Brad: The Leaning Tower of Pizzas! TM Mig hty Funn y s Mi ni Joke s David: What happens if you cross a tomato, some cheese and a mail carrier? Anjan: A pizza that delivers itself! WB NP EN IT NARAU QD PI HS AX MA LA RI AV I LA KEV NP OI ST HMU S YT AE RT AASB LO CK E AM ANA PH MN QM AB MA DA OR LI ARA SU ON JS KE TA GI MU FX II LA E LA IN NE TN ECY OTO C ZD LN OI TC UR TS NO C Words that remind us of the Panama Canal are hidden in the block above. Some words are hidden backward or diagonally, and some letters are used twice. See if you can find: CANAL, CENTENNIAL, COLOMBIA, CONSTRUCTION, DISEASE, EXPANSION, FUMIGATE, ISTHMUS, LAKE, LARVAE, LOCK, MALARIA, MOSQUITO, PANAMA, PANAMAX, QUARANTINE, RAILROAD, SHIP, TREATY. Panama Canal from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick TM Basset Browns Tr y n Fin d Re ad y Re sourc es from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick The Mini Page provides ideas for websites, books or other resources that will help you learn more about this weeks topics. On the Web: At the library: Margarita Engle from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick The Min i Pa ge Staff B ett y Deb na m Foun ding E dito r an d Ed it or at Lar ge Lis a Tar ry Man a gin g Ed it or Lu cy Li en As soc iate Edito rW end y Dal ey Artis t Building the canal As construction got underw ay again, President Theodore Roosevelt assigned the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers to take over In 1909, workers began building the loc ks What is a lock? Locks are mac hines that raise and lower ships between different levels of wa ter Fo r instance if a boat is going from a river into a lake and the river is higher than the lake the boat will steer into a loc k. The loc k will slowly release wa ter until the boat is at the lake level, and then the boat will exit the other side into the lake Panama Canal facts canal every day. hours to move through the canal. About three of those hours are spent passing through the locks. limits for ships passing through the canal. The existing locks are 110 feet wide and 1,050 feet long. Panamax ships must be no wider than 107 feet and no longer than 965 feet. Panama Canal is complete, New Panamax ships will be able to move through the canal. They will have a maximum width of 161 feet and a maximum length of 1,200 feet. Fortune Plum became the 1 millionth ship to transit the canal. A Moder n Marvel The Panama Canal today As ships have become bigger and traffic has increased, the canal has been improved and changed. In September 2007, the Panama Canal Expansion Program began. The work includes: each entrance locks and widening and deepening the existing channels Lake. From the Atlantic Ocean, ships enter the Panama Canal through the Gatn Locks. They travel over Gatn Lake, a manmade lake built for the canal, then exit through the Pedro Miguel and Miraflores Locks into the Pacific Ocean. Work is underway on one of the new locks at the Atlantic Ocean entrance of the Panama Canal. The expansion is expected to be complete in early 2016. photo courtesy Panama Canal Authority Thi s shi p barely fit s thr ough the exist ing Mira fl ores Locks New locks will allo w even la rger ships to pass thr ough th e ca nal photo by Dozenist Returning to Panama In 1977, the United States and Panama signed a treaty or agreement, that ownership and management of the canal would permanently transfer to Panama on Dec. 31, 1999. Flag of Panama The Fortune Plum Next week, The Mini Page shares awardwinning books with readers. To order, Universal Uclick. Send to The Mini Page Book of States, Universal Uclick, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206. Please send ______ copies of (Item #0-7407-8549-4) at $20.99 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.) Name: _________ _______________________ _______________________ _________________ Address: _________________ _______________________ ________________________ ______ City: ___________ _____________ ____________ _____ State: _________ Zip: ______________ __ The Mini Pag es po p ula r se rie s of iss ues abo ut eac h stat e is coll ecte d her e in a 156 -pa ge so ftc ov er boo k. Conven ie ntly spir al-bo und for eas e of use this in val uab le res our ce conta ins Ato -Z fac ts abo ut eac h st ate alo ng wi th the Di stric t of Columb ia Il lust rat ed with co l orfu l p hot og rap hs and art an d comp le te wit h upd ate d in for mat ion, The Mi ni Page Book of Sta tes wil l be a fav orit e in cla ssroo ms and hom es for year s to com e.

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Local Washington County News | A7 Saturday, August 9, 2014

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OCALA ( AP) The Florida Medical Associa tion, a statewide lobbying group for doctors, has an nounced that it strongly opposes the medical mar ijuana referendum going to voters in November. In a statement re leased Monday, the group said it unanimously voted to oppose the measure at its annual conference in July. The resolution of op position said marijuana should be subject to the same standards as other prescription drugs and be brought to mar ket through the Food and Drug Administra tions process of testing and trials, not a political vote. The group also rejected smoking as a way of tak ing a medication because it posed its own health hazards. The FMA also said vague language in the bal lot amendment would al low healthcare providers with absolutely no training in the ordering of con trolled substances, to or der medical marijuana. The FMA statement went on to say: As an association that repre sents more than 20,000 physicians, we have come together to re ject an amendment that does not have the proper regulations in place, ap proves an unsafe meth od of drug delivery and puts a substance that has drug abuse poten tial in the hands of Flo ridians, if approved in November. FMA also rejects a process whereby initia tives to approve medi cines are decided by methods other than careful science-based review. In a response re leased Monday evening, United for Care, the po litical organization advo cating for medical mari juana, said conclusions about a lack of training for health care providers were premature when the Florida Depart ment of Health would be tasked with writing up regulations to address training and qualica tions after the measure passed. United for Cares statement said: The Associations stance apparently does not take into account the many scientic studies, as well as copious anecdotal evi dence, pointing to the ef cacy of medical marijuana in alleviating symptoms from a wide range of de bilitating diseases and conditions. In our view, oppos ing the reasonable avail ability of this powerful therapeutic tool to the severely ill as outlined by Amendment 2 does not constitute the type of compassionate care that Floridians expect from their physicians. WING FL ING Wa shingt on Co unt y Cha mb er of Co mmerc e $ 10 PL AIN or BUFF AL O 10 wings with dr ink Ch ipley Wa lmar t near fr on t en tr anc e Pr eor der to da y! Ca ll 638-4157 or go to wa shc omall .c om fo r details Thursda y, Aug 21 10 a.m. 2 p. m. Pu bl ic No ti ce Bu dge t Wo rks ho p e Wa sh in gt on Co un ty Bo ar d of Co un ty Co mmi ss io ne rs wi ll be ha vi ng a Bu dg et Wo rk sho p We dn e sd ay Au gu st 13, 2014 at 9:00 A.M in th e Bo ar d Me et in g Ro om lo ca te d at 1331 So ut h Blvd. Ch ip le y, Flo ri da e Bo ar d of Co un ty Co mmi ss io ne rs wi ll acco mm od at e ha nd ic ap pe d an d di sa bl ed pe rs on s wh o wi sh to at te nd th is me et in g. Co nt ac t th e Bo ar d of Co un ty Co mm is sio n Ad mini st ra ti ve Oce at 850-638-6200, at le as t 48 ho ur s be fo re th e me et in g da te to ma ke a rr an ge me nt s. Local A8 | Washington County News Saturday, August 9, 2014 Man wounded by sheriff shot himself By ZACK McDONALD 747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY The Springeld man involved in an hour-long, armed standoff with law enforcement Tues day turned his gun on him self after Sheriff Frank McK eithen shot him in the torso, authorities said Wednesday. Bay County Sheriffs deputies had sought Aaron Lepak, 40, in connection with an aggravated bat tery incident that left his wife paralyzed before of cers cornered the armed man Tuesday at the Budget Inn, 3910 U.S. 98. Ofcials initially announced Lepak had died on the scene af ter negotiations became unruly, he waved his re arm in McKeithens direc tion and was subsequently shot in the room, according to BCSO reports. As is the standard pro cedure in ofcer-involved shootings, the Florida Department of Law En forcement (FDLE) is in vestigating the incident, but BCSO released preliminary evi dence Wednesday indicating at least one of Lepaks critical wounds was self-inicted. Maj. Tommy Ford, who had a direct phone line to the room during nego tiations, said McKeithen did not draw his gun until discussions deteriorated and Lepak began waving his rearm in the direc tion of the sheriff, who is a trained hostage or crisis negotiator Sheriff McKeithen felt that in Lepaks mind only one of them was leaving that room alive, Ford said. At that point (McKeithen) drew his rearm and red several times. Lepak fell backward, then placed his pistol in his mouth and red, Ford said. He was not breathing as BCSO medical personnel rushed on the scene. EMS staff were able to regain a pulse en route to a local hospital, where he was ad mitted in critical condition. Lepak remained in critical condition Wednesday. Springeld Police De partment wanted Lepak in connection to a July 27 domestic violence incident between he and his wife, which left Rhonda Lepak permanently disgured. According to the prob able cause afdavit, during an argument at their East Ninth Street home, Aaron Lepak reportedly grabbed Rhonda Lepak and picked her up before placing her in a headlock. When she came to, she couldnt feel her legs and couldnt get up on to her feet, Rhonda Lepak told police. After lying on the ground pleading for help, Aaron Lepak placed her on the sofa. He later carried her to their bedroom. The next day, Rhonda Lepak said she convinced him to call for help and EMS took her to the local hospital where she learned she had been para lyzed, the afdavit stated. She is still under hospi tal care. On Aug. 1, the mother of Aaron Lepak, Catherine Lepak, led a missing person report with Spring eld police before investi gators discovered he was in hiding, Chief Philip Thorne said. He retreated to the Bud get Inn until authorities confronted him Tuesday, and 90 minutes of negotia tions ended in gun re. McKeithen was placed on administrative leave pending FDLEs investi gation, a standard proce dure in a deputy-involved shooting. McKeithen is not bound to that policy, Ford said, but imposed the standard upon himself. BCSO will follow up the FDLE investigation with an administrative investi gation of its own to evalu ate BCSOs response. FRANK MCKEITHEN sheriff AARON LEPAK suspect Legislature to keep new map simple TALLAHASSEE (AP) Flor ida legislators are return ing to the state Capitol with a simple goal: Redraw the states 27 congressional districts with as few chang es as possible. The nine-day spe cial session that kicks off Thursday is being sparked by a judges ruling that found two districts were drawn illegally to benet Republicans. Circuit Judge Terry Lewis last week gave legislators until Aug. 15 to draw up a new map. But instead of ghting either ruling GOP legisla tive leaders have decided to adopt a new congres sional map that calls for changes to just a handful of districts. That map will focus primarily on the two dis tricts agged by the judge: A sprawling district that runs from Jacksonville to Orlando held by U.S. Rep. Corrine Brown and a cen tral Florida district held by U.S. Rep. Dan Webster. The nal product adopt ed by legislators will likely include targeted xes to the boundaries of those two districts and some changes to adjoining districts. It is improbable they would make widespread changes such as one proposal that calls for shifting Browns district from central Flori da to north Florida. It seems to me what the Legislature ought to do is take the judges ruling seriously and literally and resolve the problems asso ciated with the two districts that he found to be invalid and try to minimize any unintended chaos, Sen ate President Don Gaetz said Wednesday. I dont think we should look for an excuse to set off a chain of dominoes that will cause more confusion or chaos than is necessary. Voters in 2010 passed the Fair Districts amend ment that says legislators cannot draw up districts to favor incumbents or a political party. A coalition of groups, including the League of Women Voters, contended that the Repub lican consultants used a shadow process to draw districts that beneted Republicans. The lawsuits alleged that districts all over the state, including ones locat ed in South Florida and the Tampa area, violated the new standards but Lewis only ruled that two were unconstitutional. Senate Democratic Leader Chris Smith said its clear that GOP leaders are willing to draw a new map now to avoid the chance that other districts could be declared unconstitutional if a court ght lingered. I think the Republicans got the map they pretty much wanted, said Smith, D-Fort Lauderdale. They gure they can do some these little changes and stave off more changes. Once legislators adopt a new map it wont necessari ly end the legal battles. The groups that led the law suit wanted Lewis to draw up a new map and argued unsuccessfully legislators couldnt be trusted to draw up valid maps. One of their attorneys earlier this week said it remains to be seen whether they will produce maps that comply with the constitution. Legislative leaders also remain rmly opposed to holding a special election later this year with the new map. They say that the new map shouldnt be imple mented until 2016. Lewis said he is considering or dering a special election after November, but admits he hasnt made up his mind yet. If Lewis did order a spe cial election it would likely trigger a federal lawsuit from the Legislature that argues a state judge doesnt have the authority to order federal elections. Florida Medical Association opposes medical marijuana AP In a July 8 le photo, Annette Maughan, of Cedar Hills, center back, stands in line at the Utah Department of Health, while her 11-year-old son Glenn, who has a form of epilepsy, sits in the waiting room in Salt Lake City. United for Cares statement said: The Associations stance apparently does not take into account the many scientic studies, as well as copious anecdotal evidence, pointing to the efcacy of medical marijuana in alleviating symptoms from a wide range of debilitating diseases and conditions. By CHRIS OLWELL 747-5079 | @PCNHchriso colwell@pcnh.com P ANAMA CITY BEACH Military and political lead ers gathered on a dusty job site Thursday just outside the fence around Naval Support Activity Panama City to celebrate the be ginning of a project they said will give local veter ans improved access to health care. The ceremony drew dozens of civilians and a handful of spe cial guests, including Rep. Steve Southerland, R-Panama City, keynote speaker and U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Florida, former Gov. Bob Graham and sev eral high-ranking ofcials from the military and Department of Veterans Affairs. They came to celebrate the beginning of construc tion on two clinics. The larger of the two, a 30,000square-foot Community Based Outpatient Clinic for the Gulf Coast Veter ans Health Care System, is expected to cost about $8.5 million. The other facility is a 5,300-square-foot clinic for Naval Hospital Pensac ola projected to cost about $1.8 million. Both buildings are tentatively scheduled to be nished by June 30, 2015. The VA stands ready to meet the health needs and to help our veterans, and work with our partners to do so, said Gulf Coast Vet erans Health Care System Director Anthony Dawson. Capt. Maureen Padden, the commanding ofcer of Naval Hospital Pensacola, which is actually a system of 10 clinics in four states, was excited at the pros pect of a new building. What were going to have next is innitely bet ter than what we have now, she said. When construction is complete, the 16 employ ees of the existing Naval hospital facility will move into a building designed with their jobs in mind. Thats not the case with the current building, which is an armory retrotted for use as a clinic, Padden said. Even without a perfect building, those employees are able to treat some 1,400 veterans and another 2,000 civilian employees on the Navy base, Padden said. They prove my ad age that medical ... care is more about the team than the brick-and-mortar building, said Padden. Sen. Nelson said that a study done in the 1980s identied the need for ad ditional clinics in Florida, including the need for one in Northwest Florida. We are part of the ul timate movement in that direction in the dedication that we have today, Nel son said. Ground broken on 2 local VA clinics

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Ca ndida te s should ha ve prior ex perienc e in a sales en vir onmen t along with high school diploma or equiv alen t. Th e Ne ws He ra ld o e rs a co mpetitiv e bene t pack age including health, den tal lif e insur anc e, and 401(k) plan. Ca ndida te hir ed pending pr eemplo ymen t dr ug scr een and criminal back gr ound check St ro ng co mmunica tion sk ills and ve ry high at te nt ion to detail Ex ce llen t cust omer ser vic e, or ganiza tional sk ills and co mput er sk ills re quir ed Mu st be pr oc ess dr iv en and be able to fu nc tion e ec tiv ely and independen tly with asser tiv e, inno vat iv e and persuasiv e personalit y to ac hiev e sales objec tiv es on a re gular basis Th is position will wo rk co llabor at iv ely with the assig ned te am to en sur e ex ce ptional cust omer ser vic e to co mpan y s cur re nt an d pr ospec tiv e adv er tisers by helping set appoin tmen ts fo r sales te am and tak ing calls fr om clien ts SALES SUPPORT COORDINA TOR HUG E TR UC KL OA D SA LE at th e ne w lo cat io n of th e We st Po in t Ho me Be d & Ba th Fa ct or y Ou tl et on Ma in St re et in Chi ple y! 3 Da ys On ly Th ur sd ay Au gu st 7t h Sa tu rd ay Au gu st 9t h. .. Do n' t Mi ss Th is Sa le Ma ny it em s wi ll be ma rk ed do wn to th e lo we st sa le pr ic e ev er Co me ch ec k ou t ou r ne w lo ca ti on an d ta ke ad va nt age of ou r lo w pr ic es o n a hu ge se le ct io n of to we ls sh ee ts co mf or te rs bla nk et s, th ro ws pi ll ow s, an d we no w ha ve an as so rt me nt of co ast al th em ed ap pa re l! 14 14 Ma in St re et Ch ip le y, FL 85 063 894 21 Mo n Sa t: 9 to 6 | Su n: 1 to 6 Local Washington County News | A9 Saturday, August 9, 2014 Walden wins blue ribbon for quilt Bonnie Walden, a member of the Chipley Womans Club, is shown displaying the quilt she made and entered in the Florida Womans Clubs Arts and Crafts Competition. The quilt rst won a blue ribbon at the local and district levels, and when entered in the state competition, it brought back an honorable mention. This quilt is a twin bed size in red, black and white and made in the Chair Rail pattern. Bonnie has been teaching her skills to beginning quilters at the clubhouse on the Ladies Fun Night this summer and will continue to have quilting lessons on Craft and Fun nights each month. Anyone interested in learning to quilt is invited to attend. The Chipley Womans Club meets on the second Wednesday of each month and will begin the 2014-2015 year on at noon Sept. 10. For more information, call 260-5896. Large animal health in summer temperatures Special to The News Our cats and dogs arent the only animals that need special attention during the unbearable summer temperatures; horses and other large animals get hotm too. Although they might not express it in the same way as our domestic pets, heatstroke is still common among large animals, and prevention is the best cure. The important things to consider during summer heat for animals are similar as for humans, said Dr. Leslie Easterwood, assistant clinical professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. It is best to provide clean, fresh water at a rate higher than they would be losing due to sweat. The progression from dehydration to heat exhaustion and ultimately heat stroke can occur rapidly. Providing your large animals with access to plenty of water and shade is the most important way to keep their body temperatures under control. Just as with humans and other animals, the higher the temperature or activity level, the more water is required to cool the body. Most horses will consume between 5 and 10 gallons of water per day, and their daily requirement for maintenance is approximately 6 gallons for a 1,000-pound horse, Easterwood said. They will need more if they are exercising or if their housing conditions do not provide for shade or circulation of fresh air. Horses that are not sweating and are overheating can easily have their body temperatures rise to dangerous levels within minutes of exercising in the summer, and their large muscle mass allows them to generate a tremendous amount of heat, making them susceptible to a loss of water and electrolytes through sweat. As the amount of sweat increases, so does the imbalance of body uids and electrolytes. The only increased nutritional requirements for hot weather would be the intake of electrolytes, Easterwood said. Large animals that have access to mineral supplements will generally take in enough electrolytes to account for normal losses, but electrolytes can be added to their daily grain ration if the horse will be sweating excessively or exercising. Since horses cannot tell us directly that they are overheated, we must pay attention to their appearance and behavior in order to distinguish their discomfort. Some signs to look out for are an excessive amount or absence of sweating, increased respiratory rate, depression, lack of appetite, apparent weakness, or disorientation. Horses that are not sweating adequately will start to breathe rapidly in order to try to cool themselves via their respiratory system Easterwood said. This condition is called anyhdrosis and can cause them to overheat while exercising. She explains that these horses are literally trying to blow off steam and cool themselves by taking in air that is cooler than their own body temperature while blowing out the warmer air. Although most horses and other large animals are able to cool themselves by sweating, taking in an adequate amount of water, and staying in the shade, you still should keep an eye out for signs of dehydration or heat exhaustion. Whether your pet whinnies or bleats, barks or purrs, they are counting on you to keep them healthy and comfortable during these hot summer months. Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at vetmed.tamu.edu/pettalk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to editor@cvm. tamu.edu. PET T ALK Section 8 currently accepting applications Special to The News Tri-County Community Council Inc., Washington County Housing Author ity (Section8) Rental Assistance Pro gram currently is taking applications on Wednesdays for the waiting list. Appli cations are taken by interview appoint ments only. Eligibility for assistance is based on income, be a legal citizen of the United States or have an eligible immigrant sta tus, criminal history and other criteria. In order to apply, you will need to being verication to the interview, such as picture identication for every house hold member over the age of 18; social security cards for every household member; birth certicated for every household member; proof of all house hold income including social security benets, employment wages, TANF, un employment, pensions, retirement, all child support, cash received from fam ily and friends that assist with utilities; most current years tax return; medical expenses if disabled or 62 years or older; divorce papers and asset verication. For income guidelines or for an inter view appointment, call Steve Henderson at 638-4520 ext. 25. Housing rental units wanted Special to The News The Section 8 program provides assistance for low income families in the private rental market through the Housing Assistance Payments Program. Tri-County Community Council Inc., Washington County Housing Authority Section 8 Rental Assistance program currently is seeking landlords with suitable, affordable housing units in Washington County. When a Washington County Section 8 Voucher holder is interested in a landlords unit, the landlord must call Steve Henderson at 638-4520 ext. 25 or come by the ofce at 623 High way 273 in Chipley from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday.

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LIFESTY L E www.chipleypaper.com Saturday, August 9, 2014 A Page 10 Section BACK TO SCHOOL 2014

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By JAN WADDY 747-5072 | @JanWaddy1 jwaddy@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY My shelves are stocked with Ball jars lled with homemade jellies, salsa and pickled products preserved through water bath canning, but the idea of pressure canning had seemed too complicated and dangerous. But Marjorie Moore, Bay County Extension director and Family and Consumer Sciences agent at UF/ IFAS Extension, broke it down for me during a class called Preserve Your Harvest: Canning Basics on a recent Tuesday at the Bay County Extension Ofce. My mother canned and I learned a lot hands-on with colleagues, Moore said. Dont be scared of pressure canning. Be comfortable. The problem is when people turn it on and go to sleep. You have to watch it. Once you do it once, its going to be easier. Its fun; it really is fun. Finding a way to preserve the seasons harvest long has been a goal of mankind. Humans have dried, salted, frozen and fermented food for centuries, but preserving food by canning came along in the late 18th century. Through modern research, techniques have been modied as new safety guidelines have been developed. As more research about canning has been done, safer methods have been used. Only use water bath or pressure canning, said Moore, who added that guidelines even have changed in the past 30 years she has been canning. Research no longer supports canning summer squash yellow crook neck or zucchini. It got inaccurate readings because of the starch in the squash, not consistent throughout the jar, so dont do it. But you can can winter squash. Many of the more than 20 guests in the class had attempted canning, though some with better luck than others. A couple even talked about old family recipes, but Moore warns against this. The major food safety concern for home-canned products is botulism. Botulism grows with or without oxygen. The only thing that kills the spores is a temperature to reach 240 degrees, Moore said. Learn to use science-based recipes. She recommends the USDA Complete Guide to Home Canning ( https://edis.ifas.u.edu/topic canning_food ) and So Easy to Preserve from the Extension at the University of Georgia, which they have tested. Use directions from a reputable source; up-to-date methods should be used. Do not modify; follow directions exactly, said Moore, who also said Ball and Kerr recipes also could be used. Ball has a reference book, which is still reliable, but if you have a problem, you have to contact Ball, she added. Water bath canning is for highacid foods jams, jellies, fruit spreads while pressure canning is for low-acid foods, such as poultry, meat, seafood and vegetables. I have canned mullet. When canning sh, can a fattier type of sh. Ive canned some chicken, and it just takes longer processing time, Moore said. Though water bath canning is done in a large pot on the stove with a lid, pressure canning requires a pressure canner. Since pressure canning is very hands-on, get all of your tools together before beginning. You can get a canner right now around $100 or a little under, Moore said. Equipment also includes a cutting board, knife, tongs, jars, lids, rings, jar lifter, jar funnel, lid wand and bubble freer wand. And be sure to have plenty of hot pads, clean cloths or paper towels on hand. The timer can be a separate timer or one on the stove, but Moore also warned to check your stove manufacturers guidelines, because the stove can get so hot during the canning process. You can only use the lids one time, but you can use the ring over and over if it is not rusted, Moore said. The used rings on our empty Ball jars always have rusted before we could get them washed, dried and put away, but we have had no problems reusing our jars, the biggest expense. Jars should be free of nicks and cracks, which can cause a jar not to seal. Most recipes recommend pints or quarts. You get into smaller jars with jams or jellies, Moore said. Though jars must be sterilized in boiling water for 10 minutes when doing the water bath canning method, those used for pressure canning just need to be washed beforehand. You dont have to worry as much about sterilization with pressure canning because it will reach higher than 212 degrees. You can wash or bleach jars, Moore said. Canning temperatures for lowacid vegetables, meat and poultry in a pressure canner reach between 240 and 250 degrees. One of the things when canning in general is you want the freshest food as possible, said Moore, who explained, If its bad when you get it, then it will be bad when you process it. You dont want to have bruised vegetables you are trying to put away. Also, just because you can can it, doesnt mean you should can it. Does your family like them? Moore asked. If not, then its a waste. Most people like canned greens versus fresh or frozen. Moore peeled and sliced carrots to be canned. You dont want carrots too thick because they can be too brous, she said. According to the recipe from the UF/IFAS Extension, carrots can be processed through pressure canning by a hot pack or cold pack. For the hot pack, Moore simmered sliced carrots in boiling water for 5 minutes before adding to the jar. She used a funnel to help pour the rest of the water in, then a bubble wand to get the air bubbles out. Leave an inch at the top of the jar. Vegetables out of the water will just look a little darker, she said. No table knife or spoon can be used to get the bubbles out. You can reuse the jars, but if you start using metal and scratch the jar, it will etch it and start breaking the jar over time. You could do it with a wood or rubber spatula. (I remembered this after I used a fork to get a fresh pickle out of one of our Ball jars Sunday night.) PRESSURE CANNING DRYING AND FREEZING CLASS What: Learn how to preserve food and herbs through drying and freezing When: 10 a.m. to noon Aug. 14 and 16; 9:45 a.m. registration Where: Bay County Extension Ofce, 2728 E. 14th St., Panama City Cost: Free; open to everyone RSVP: 784-6105 or bay@ifas.u. edu by Aug. 11 Dont blow your top when preserving foods PHO T OS B Y JAN WADDY | PanamaCity.com Marjorie Moore, Bay County Extension director and Family and Consumer Sciences agent at UF/IFAS Extension, prefers a dial gauge pressure canner. At top, the quality of the home-canned food product diminishes after the rst year. FOOD www.chipleypaper.com Saturday, August 9, 2014 A Page 11 Section See CANNING A12

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Moore cautions to read the whole recipe and follow it dont deviate. If it says raw pack or hot pack, to me, the raw pack is better, less work, Moore explained. Just pour hot water over the raw vegetables. Boil and keep the lid hot and put it on top and turn the lid, not too tight, just to hold the lid in place. Moore used a 22-quart dial gauge pressure canner for the demonstration. You just need to put about 1 to 2 inches of water in the bottom, unlike 2 to 3 inches above the jars in a hot water bath, she said. Though the Italian green beans were washed and trimmed, they could not be processed at the same time, because the processing time is 5 minutes less on the beans. The heat up and cool down in pressure canners is counted toward heat penetration, so dont quickcool the canner, Moore said. The dial gauge pressure-canner should reach 11 pounds for altitudes of 0 (sea level) to 2,000 feet, but if a weighted-gauge pressure canner is used, it is 10 pounds. The weighted can only do 5, 10 or 15, said Moore, who explained this was built in for extra safety before guidelines were modied. When it pops up in front, let it vent for 10 minutes on top, a steady stream of steam. Then when it reaches 11 pounds pressure, start processing the 20 minutes. Though the timer is set for 20 minutes, you must keep an eye on the pressure, adjusting the heat to make sure it stays at 11 pounds. When we get to 11, dont leave it on high heat because it continues to build up pressure. You have to keep it at 11 pounds; you cant do a lot of things when youre canning, Moore said. After the timer goes off, turn the heat off of the stove and leave the canner alone until it has been completely depressurized. Remove the weight from the vent or open the petcock, then wait 10 minutes and unfasten the lid and remove it facing away from you. Take the jars out with a jar lifter and leave them on a towel on the counter to cool. Let the food sit 12 to 24 hours, then check for the seal. You dont want to make it seal. You will hear it popping. The lids should be curved downward, Moore said. The best storage temperatures for canned foods is between 50 and 70 degrees, but should never reach more than 95 degrees. If you dont have room in a pantry, put it in a box under the bed, but not in the garage, Moore said. They need to be stored inside. For the best quality and avor, Moore recommends using the canned product within a year. Specialists do say it is OK for up to ve years, but the quality diminishes, said Moore, who showed off jars of carrots from 2010, 2012 and 2013. The older carrots were more brown, while the freshest carrots were bright orange. Once the jar is opened and the seal is broken, Moore recommends using low-acid products within a week. Preparing Carrots: Sliced or Diced for Canning Quantity: An average of 17 pounds carrots without tops per canner load of 7 quarts; an average of 11 pounds per canner load of 9 pints Quality: Select small carrots, preferably 1 to 1 inches in diameter. Hot pack: Cover with boiling water; bring to boil and simmer 5 minutes. Fill jars, leaving 1-inch headspace. Raw pack: Fill jars tightly with raw carrots, leaving 1-inch headspace. Add 1 teaspoon of salt per quart to the jar, if desired. Add hot cooking liquid or water, leaving 1-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process. For hot or raw pack, the process time is 25 minutes for pints and 30 minutes for quarts. In a dial gauge pressurecanner, the pressure should be at 11 pounds for altitudes of 0 to 2,000 feet, and for a weighted-gauge pressure, it is 10 pounds of pressure for 0 to 1,000 feet. After the canner is completely depressurized, remove the weight from the vent port or open the petcock. Wait 10 minutes; then unfasten the lid and remove it carefully. Lift the lid with the underside away from you so that the steam coming out of the canner does not burn your face. Source: Pressure Canning: Vegetables, Poultry, Meat and Seafood Products, UF/IFAS Extension JAN WADDY | PanamaCity.com Carrots are peeled and sliced into rounds, and beans are washed and trimmed before being CANNING from page A11 This past week found me in a bit of trouble with the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage... well, more than normal. It has become rather normal for me to be in trouble with her. No matter how hard I try not to be, it always is to be. This week was a high point for me getting into trouble. I never relish getting into a pickle with her, but sometimes it is unavoidable. All week long, I had been murmuring and complaining about how hot it was. Ive never seen such hot weather, I grumbled. I dont know how long I can take this hot weather. You would think that someone my age would have learned long ago that some things should not be vocalized. This is America, and we all have the right to speak our mind although much of the time we should not speak our mind aloud; at least, not to the point that someone, especially someone living under the same roof, can hear you. I have found that the thing that enhances romance is the sounds of silence. I guess it was getting a little wearisome with all my complaining, but after all, the weather was really hot. Then, she looked at me and said, If I hear you complain about the weather one more time, Im... Im... Im... The look on her face indicated that she was not at a loss for words; she was just trying to control herself and save herself from early widowhood. I truly respect people who have the ability to control themselves, especially the people who live under our roof. I almost said something, but for some reason I had a ash of temporary sanity. I said nothing, but smiled. I am not boasting here, but I am really good at saying nothing. Even when talking, my wife tells me I am saying nothing. Saying nothing has gotten me out of many a jam, particularly with my wife. There are times when husbands and wives should sit down and have a rather invigorating conversation. Then there are times when the husband should shut up. I never know which time is which. It was then that my wife laid out the facts for me to evaluate. How she can remember everything is simply beyond me. However, how do I know she is actually remembering things as they were and not making them up? It seems, according to her impeccable recollection, that a few months ago I was complaining about how cold it was and anxious for the hot weather to come. You were just as grumpy about how cold it was as you are now about how hot it is. Then she put her hands on her hip and looked at me with that look, and said, I dont mind you complaining about one or the other but I really do mind you complaining about everything. Youre going to have to make up your mind whether you hate the cold or the heat, and then stick to it. That put a new light on the situation, and a new burden on me. Now, according to her latest admonition, I need to choose the heat or the cold. I am tempted, although I know better, to complain about this. I do not think it is fair that I have to choose one or the other. I think I should be able to hate both the cold and the heat. However, here is the problem. If I choose to complain about the heat, then what do I do in the wintertime when it gets cold? Faced with a real dilemma I took it to my good wife and asked, Can I hate the heat in the summer and hate the cold in the winter, if I alternate it every other year? To me this sounded like a very reasonable request. After all, I was accommodating her request and getting in my share of complaining. If you would spend as much time thinking of positive things to say as you do complaining it would be absolutely wonderful. But how can you think of something positive about the heat when you are sweltering? And, how can you think about something positive about the cold when your bones are shivering to death? Mistakenly I told my wife my dilemma. I think I have you gured out, she said. Youre positively negative about everything. There is only one thing worse than having your wife gure you out. There must be, but I cannot think of any thing right now. I will not say my wife is right, only that she is not wrong. I must say I have a tendency to complain about everything. Some people can see the silver lining in every cloud whereas I see a cloud over every silver lining. I guess it is a persons perspective. Thinking along this line, I remembered a verse in the Bible. Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things (Philippians 4:8). Some people (like me) see a glass as half empty while others see it as halffull. There are those few souls (like my wife) who are thankful that there is any water in the glass of all. The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net or website www. jamessnyderministries. com. FAITH Saturday, August 9, 2014 A Page 12 Section www.chipleypaper.com First United Methodist Church of Chipley was the scene of an evening of fun and fellowship as congregants hosted a family game night in the John Wesley Building. Folks from Chipley, Graceville, Cottondale, and Bonifay gathered to play traditional games such as chess, spades, hand and foot, canasta, bunco, and bridge. Members of the church provided refreshments for all who attended. Proceeds from the event were donated to the Sanctuary Repair Fund. Due to the success of the event, and at the request of the attendees, a similar event will be scheduled for the near future. PHOTO S SP E C I A L TO T HE NE WS DR. JAMES L. SNYDER Out to Pastor And the heat goes on... and on... and on FUMC HOSTS GAME NIGHT Helen McEntyre presents one of the many door prizes donated by Chavers Brock Furniture Dorothy Clark, Katherine Henders and Cynthia Johnson count their bridge points Ronnie and Betty Daniels with Joe and Ann McLean

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Washington County News | A13 Saturday, August 9, 2014 If you would like your church listed here, please send information to: news@chipleypaper.com. Due to space limitation, please only send regular church services. For special services, please send separate submission. Assembly of God BONIF A Y F IRST ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located 116 Main St. FA ITH ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located on Underwood Road behind Poplar Springs School. GR A CE ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located L ITTLE R OCK ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 567 North Main Street. L IVE OA K ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday Scool is held Sunday at 10 a.m., with Morning Worship at 11 a.m. and Evening Worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 2118 Live Oak Road in Bonifay. M T. O LIVE ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located on Highway 179-A off of Highway 2. N EW BETH A NY ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located on Shaky Joe Road just off Highway 280 at Hinsons Crossroads. N EW L IFE F ELLOWSHIP ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is held at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 695 5th Street, Chipley. N ORTHSIDE ASSEM B LY OF GOD Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Sunday School is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1009 North Rangeline Street in Bonifay. S MITH C H A PEL ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located 2549 Smith Chapel Road, just off Highway 177-A. S WEET GUM ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 5:30 p.m. Thursday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 105 Corbin Road. WA US A U ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 3537 Washington Street in Wausau. W INTERVILLE ASSEM B LY OF GOD Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1897 Highway 177A in Bonifay Baptist A B I GA IL F REE W ILL B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. The church is located on Dawkins St., in Vernon. BERE A N B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7:30 p.m. The church is located at 1438 Nearing Hills Drive in Chipley. BLUE LA KE B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 1405 Blue Lake Road in Chipley. BETHLEHEM B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The church is located at 1572 Highway 177 in Bonifay. BETH A NY B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1404 North Highway 79 in Bonifay. BETHEL B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 6:30 p.m. BONIF A Y F IRST B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 6 p.m. The church is located at 311 N. Waukesha Street. BONIF A Y F REE W ILL B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Kansas Ave., and Oklahoma St. C HIPLEY F IRST B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1300 South Blvd. C HIPLEY F IRST F REE W ILL B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:45 a.m. Wednesday service is held at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1387 South Blvd. C OUNTRY OA KS B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 574 Buckhorn Blvd. EA ST P ITTM A N F REE W ILL B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 6:30 p.m. The church is located mile north of Highway 2 on Highway 179. EA STSIDE B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 6 p.m. The church is located at Highway 277 in Vernon. E VER G REEN M ISSION A RY B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located in Westville G A P P OND F REE W ILL B A PTIST C HURCH Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. The church is located at 1980 Gap Blvd., in Sunny Hills. GR A CE B A PTIST C H A PEL M ISSION Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:50 a.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 440 Lot E 2nd Street, Chipley. GULLY S PRIN G S B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 2826 Highway 90 in Bonifay. H ICKORY H ILL B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1656 Hickory Hill Road in Westville. H OLMES C REEK B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located on Cope Road in Chipley. H OLYNECK M ISSION A RY B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is held at 6 p.m. The church is located 3395 Cemetery Lane, Campbellton. JERUS A LEM M ISSION A RY B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 6 p.m. The church is located at 614 Bennett Drive in Chipley. L EONI A B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 7 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located in northwest Holmes County. M CQUEENS T EMPLE F IRST B A PTIST C HURCH OF L IVIN G GOD Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11:30 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 5681 Highway 79 South, Vernon. M T. AR A R A T M ISSION A RY B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is held at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1233 Old Bonifay Road in Chipley. M T. ZION I NDEPENDENT B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 6 p.m. The church is located on Highway 2 one mile west of Highway 79 in Esto. N EW C ONCORD F REE W ILL B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located on James Paulk Road off Highway 177. N EW H OPE B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday morning bible study is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are held at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at the intersection of Highway 2 and Highway 179A. N EW P ROSPECT B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship services are held at 11 a.m. Sunday evening services are held at 5 p.m. Wednesday services supper is held 5 p.m. Wednesday prayer meeting, bible study and childrens classes start at 5:45. The church is located at 761 New Prospect Road in Chipley. N EW ZION B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located on HWY 177A north of HWY 2. N ORTHSIDE B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at the intersection of Highway 81 and Highway 90 in Ponce de Leon. OA KIE R ID G E B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Orange Hill and Gilberts Mill Road. P INEY GROVE F REE W ILL B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1783 Piney Grove Road south of Chipley. P LE A S A NT H ILL F REE W ILL B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located south of Bonifay at 1900 Pleasant Hill Road. P OPL A R H E A D I NDEPENDENT F REE W ILL B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 6 p.m. The church is located on Poplar Head Road. P OPL A R S PRIN G S B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1098 Lovewood Road two miles east of Highway 77. SA ND H ILLS B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:15 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 6758 Highway 77. S H A DY GROVE B A PTIST Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. S HILOH B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 6:30 p.m. The church is located on Highway 277, three miles south of Highway 90 in Chipley. S HILOH M ISSION A RY B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11:15 a.m. Wednesday service is held at 6 p.m. The church is located at 3013 Moss Hill Road in Vernon/ S T. JOHN F REE W ILL B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. S T. MA TTHEWS M ISSION A RY B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is held at 6 p.m. The church is located at 4156 St. Matthews Road, Caryville. SA LEM F REE W ILL B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School 10 am, worship service 11 am, Evening worship 6 pm, Wednesday service at 7 pm. Church is located at 2555 Kynesville Highway, Alford. S H A DY GROVE B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1955 Highway 177A in Bonifay. S UNNY H ILLS F IRST B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. U NITY B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3274 River Road in Vernon. WA US A U F IRST B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 3493 Washington Street in Wausau. W EST BONIF A Y B A PTIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 609 West Indiana Avenue in Bonifay. C atholic BLESSED T RINITY CA THOLIC C HURCH Sunday Mass is held at 9 a.m. Wednesday evening Mass is held at 5:30 p.m. Adoration is held the rst Friday at from noon to 3 p.m. Holy Hour is held Tuesday from 7 to 8 p.m. The church is located at 2331 Hwy 177A in Bonifay. S T. JOSEPH T HE W ORKER CA THOLIC C HURCH Sunday Mass is held at 11 a.m. Tuesday Mass is held at 9 a.m. The church is located at 1664 Main St., in Chipley. S T. T HERES A CA THOLIC C HURCH Sunday Mass is held at 10 a.m. Monday through Friday Mass is held at 8 a.m. Saturday Mass is held at 5 p.m. Adoration is held the rst Friday after 8 a.m. Mass. The church is located at 2056 Sunny Hills Blvd., in Chipley. C hurch of C hrist C HIPLEY C HURCH OF C HRIST Sunday morning bible study is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1295 Brickyard Road in Chipley. S PIRITF ILLED C HURCH OF GOD IN C HRIST Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Tuesday service is held at 6 p.m. The church is located at 2128 Pate Pond Road in Caryville. E piscopal GR A NT TAB ERN A CLE A ME Sunday School is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m.. The church is located at 577 Martin Luther King, Chipley. N EW BETHEL A ME Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located on Highway 90 in Bonifay. S T. JOHN A ME Morning Worship is held at 11:30 a.m. S T. JOSEPH A ME Sunday School is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 5 p.m. Tuesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1401 Monroe Shefeld Road, Chipley. S T. L UKE AFRIC A N M ETHODIST E PISCOP A L C HURCH (A ME ) Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located on Jackson Community Road. S T. MA TTHEWS E PISCOP A L C HURCH Morning worship is held at 9 a.m. Wednesday worship service is at 12:15 p.m. The church is located on Highway 90 west in Chipley. E vangelistic V ERNON E V A N G ELISTIC C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located on Highway 79 in Vernon. CA RYVILLE E V A N G ELISTIC C ENTER Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Thursday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located on Wrights Creek Road in Caryville, just north of Highway 90. Church listings See CHURCH A14

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A14 | Washington County News Saturday, August 9, 2014 If you would like your churchs faith events included in this list, please email the information to: news@ chipleypaper.com Back-to-School Day of Hope BONIFAY Carmel Assembly of God will host a back to school Day of Hope from 10 a.m. to noon, today, Aug. 9. Everything is free. There will be backpacks lled with school supplies for the kids, as well as, haircuts, hamburgers and hotdogs, baby items, food boxes, a car wash and games and bounce houses for the kids. Day of Hope CARYVILLE Grace Fellowship Christian Church will host a back to school Day of Hope from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. today, Aug. 9. The church will provide entertainment, a bag lunch, haircuts, inatables, a food box, back to school supplies and haircuts. The church is located at 2249 Hwy. 179 in Westville. Bethlehem UMC VBS BETHLEHEM Bethlehem United Methodist Church will hold Vacation Bible School from 6-8 p.m., through today, Aug. 9. This years theme is Learning to follow God under the stars. The church is at 1622 Bethlehem Church Road. For more information, call Matthew and Dana Rich at 547-3780. Back 2 School Weekend ALFORD Cypress Creek Community Church will host a Back 2 School Weekend, today, Aug. 9 and Sunday, Aug 10. The activities will begin at 6 p.m., Saturday, featuring the movie, Gods not Dead. There will be an intermission with drinks and popcorn midway through the movie. At 10:45 a.m., Sunday, there will be a youth led worship service conducted by Area 51 Student Ministries. Youth Minister Jason Scott will be the guest speaker. Cypress Creek Community Church is at 1772 Macedonia Road, two miles west of Alford. Pastor Celebration GRACEVILLE Mt. Calvary Church of Christ Written in Heaven will hold a 31st Anniversary celebration for pastor and rst lady Bighem at 11 a.m., Sunday, Aug. 10. The church is located at 1320 Highway 2 in Graceville. For more information, call 263-2810. Otter Creek revival PONCE DE LEON Otter Creek Methodist Church will hold revival at 7 p.m. Monday, Aug. 11 through Friday, Aug. 15. Special guests will be Gary and Debbie Gibbens. The church is located four miles north of Ponce de Leon, off Highway 81. Tribute Quartet in concert ESTO The Tribute Quartet will be in concert at Mt. Zion Independent Baptist Church Friday, August 15. The concert will begin at 7 p.m. followed by a fellowship meal. The church is located at 3205 Highway 2 in Esto. Ladies fellowship HARTFORD, ALA. Victory Tabernacle will hold ladies fellowship at 7 p.m., Aug. 15. Ladies fellowship is a time of prayer, worship and the Word of God. The special guest speaker will be Sister Dottie Carroll. A time of Fellowship will follow the service. The church is located at 10005 east State Highway 52 in Hartford, Ala. For more information, call 334-588-2838. Florida Baptist dental bus BONIFAY The Florida Baptist Dental Bus will be at Holmes County at Bethel Baptist Church from Aug. 25 through Aug. 29. Registration will be from 8 a.m. to noon, Saturday, Aug. 16, at Bethel Baptist Churchs Family Ministry Center. The church is located at 1349 Highway 173 in the Poplar Springs School Community. For more information, call 263-7727 or 2091723 to speak with the Rev. Kent Lampp. East Mount Zion sh fry and cake auction GRACEVILLE East Mount Zion United Methodist Church will hold a sh fry and cake auction beginning at 5 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 16. Fish plates and backed goods will be for donations. The cakes will be auctioned off beginning at 6 p.m. Proceeds will go toward enlarging the altar stage. Recent fth Saturday Sings have found the stage at capacity. The next fth Saturday sing will be held at 6:30 p.m., Aug. 30. The Church is located at 1590 County Highway 173, Graceville. For more information call 263-4610. Pastor appreciation day CHIPLEY Faith Covenant Fellowship Church will hold a pastor appreciation day, at 11 a.m., Sunday, Aug. 17. The church will be honoring the pastor and his wife brother and sister Cloys Joiner. The guest speaker will be brother Troy West. Lunch will follow the service. The church is located on Highway 277 in Chipley. Otter Creek Homecoming PONCE DE LEON Otter Creek Methodist Church will hold homecoming services Sunday Aug. 17. The church is located four miles north of Ponce de Leon off Highway 81. Fellowship rally BONIFAY Oak Grove Pentecostal Ministries will host the 9th Annual Fellowship Rally, at 7 p.m., Friday, Aug. 22. The guest speaker will be Pastor Don Shoots from Central Pentecostal Ministries. Special music will be provided by the Central PM Choir. Dinner will be served after the service. For more information, call 956-4339, 9562322 or 658-2828. Gospel sing First Free Will Church of Bonifay will hold a gospel sing at 6 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 30. Refreshments will follow the sing. The church is located at the corner of Oklahoma and Kansas in Bonifay. Faith EVENTS Holiness H ARRIS C HAPEL H OLINESS C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 5:30 p.m. Thursday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located eight miles north of Caryville on Highway 179. J OHNSON T EMPLE F IRST B ORN H OLINESS Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11:30 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 6 p.m. Friday services are held at 6 p.m. The church is located at 793 Orange Street, Chipley. M IRACLE V ALLEY S PIRIT OF H OLINESS Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located 3754 Bunyon Drive, off Highway 77 near Sunny Hills. Lutheran G RACE L UTHERAN Morning Worship is held at 8:30 a.m. The church is located on Highway 90 East in Bonifay. Methodist BETHLEHEM BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. The church is located on Highway 177. BONIFAY FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Worship begins at 10:45 a.m. Youth Services are held on Wednesdays at 6:00 p.m. CEDAR GROVE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 6 p.m. The church is located two miles west of Millers Crossroads on Highway 2. CHIPLEY FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1285 Jackson Ave. LAKEVIEW UNITED METHODIST Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is held at 6:30 p.m. The church is located on Highway 279 near Five Points. M T I DA C ONGREGATIONAL M ETHODIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at just off Highway 2 in Holmes Countys New Hope Community. N EW H OPE U NITED M ETHODIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 6:30 p.m. N EW B ETHEL AME Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located on Highway 90 in Bonifay. O RANGE H ILL U NITED M ETHODIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. The church is located on Sunday Road just off Orange Hill Road. O TTER C REE K U NITED M ETHODIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 6:30 p.m. The church is located north of Ponce de Leon off Highway 81. P LEASANT G ROVE U NITED M ETHODIST Morning Worship is held at 9 a.m. The church is located near Hinsons Crossroads. P OPLAR H EAD U NITED M ETHODIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 6:30 p.m. The church is located 1.5 miles north of Highway 2 on Highway 163. R ED H ILL U NITED M ETHODIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located on State Road 2 two miles west of State Road 79. S T J OHN AME Morning Worship is held at 11:30 a.m. S T L U K E A FRICAN M ETHODIST E PISCOPAL C HURCH Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located on Jackson Community Road. V ERNON U NITED M ETHODIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. W AUSAU U NITED M ETHODIST C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m.. The church is located on State Road 77 Pentecostal F IRST U NITED P ENTECOSTAL C HURCH Morning Worship is held at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1816 Highway 90 in Chipley. W AUSAU P ENTECOSTAL H OLINESS Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 6 p.m. The church is located at 2201 Pioneer Road in Wausau. O PEN P OND P ENTECOSTAL Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1885 Highway 179-A in Westville. T RINITY P ENTECOSTAL T ABERNACLE Morning Worship is held at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. Presbyterian C HIPLEY F IRST P RESBYTERIAN C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Bible study is held at 5 p.m. The church is located at Fifth street and Watts Ave. S UNNY H ILLS P RESBYTERIAN Sunday School is held at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10 a.m. The church is located at 3768 Country Club Blvd. Other B IBLEWAY L IGHTHOUSE Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held 7 p.m. The church is located on HWY 90 East in Chipley B ONIFAY H OUSE OF P RAYER Morning Worship is held at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Friday services are held at 6 p.m. The church is located at 826 N. Caryville Road. B ONIFAY S EVENTH D AY A DVENTIST Service is held on Saturday at 9:30 a.m., Wednesday services is held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 604 Mathusek Street. B ONNETT P OND C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 2680 Bonnett Pond Road in Chipley. C HRISTIAN F ELLOWSHIP C ENTER Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1458 Monroe Shefeld Road in Chipley. C HRISTIAN H AVEN Sunday school is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. C HURCH OF G OD BY F AITH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11:45 a.m. Tuesday service is held at 7:30 p.m. The church is located at 3012 Church Street. C HURCH OF G OD OF P ROPHECY Morning Worship is held at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1386 W. Jackson Avenue, Chipley. C OURTS OF P RAISE Morning Worship is held at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is held at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 1720 Clayton Road, Chipley. C YPRESS C REE K Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located at1772 Macedonia Road. F AITH C OVENANT F ELLOWSHIP Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located on Highway 277 mile south of I-10. F AMILY W ORSHIPP C ENTER Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located 531 Rock Hill Church Road, Chipley. G RACEVILLE C OMMUNITY C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1005 E. Prim Ave. H ARD L ABOR C REE K C OMMUNITY C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1705 Pioneer Road three miles east of caution light. H ARVEST C ATHEDRAL Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located at on Highway 77 two miles north of Wausau. H OLMES V ALLEY C OMMUNITY C HURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 6 p.m. The church is located at 3550Fannig Branch Road in Vernon. H OUSE OF P RAYER W ORSHIP C ENTER Sunday School and Childrens Church is held at 9 a.m. Morning Worship at 11 a.m. Youth activities on Wednesday begin at 4:30 p.m. Praise and worship services are at 6:30 p.m. on Friday. The church at 763 West Blvd in Chipley. L IBERTY Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. N EW F AITH T EMPLE Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. The church is located at 841 Orange Hill Road. N EW F OUNDATION F ELLOWSHIP Morning Worship is held at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is held at 6 p.m. The church is located on Rock Hill Church Road. N EW S MYRNA C HURCH Sunday School is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located Adolph Whitaker Road six miles north of Bonifay. N ORTHWEST F LORIDA C HRISTIAN C HURCH Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. The church is located at 4465 Highway 77. R HEMA P RAISE AND W ORSHIP C ENTER Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Thursday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located 763 West Blvd., Chipley. S UNNY H ILLS C HAPEL Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 4283 Highway 77. T ABERNACLE OF P RAISE C HURCH OF G OD Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 6:30 p.m. The church is located on Highway 77 South. T HE L IVING W ORD Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 7 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Highway 77 and Blocker Road in Greenhead. W HITE D OUBLE P OND Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is held at 6 p.m. The church is located on Creek Road in Vernon. Y ES L ORD D ELIVERANCE Sunday School is held at 10:30 a.m. Worship is held at noon. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 739 7th Street in Chipley. CHURCH from page A13 Church listings

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Local Washington County News | A15 Saturday, August 9, 2014 Community EVENTS From staff reports Political Rally NEW HOPE There will be a Political Rally at 6 p.m. today Aug. 9, at the New Hope EMS/ Fire Department/Community Center. There also will be $5 barbecue plates sold to raise money for the Bethlehem High School Volleyball Team. The BHS Sr. class also will have a silent cake auction. Acrylic painting MARIANNA The Artists Guild of Northwest Florida will offer an acrylic painting workshop at 9:30 a.m. today, Aug. 9, at the Jackson County Public Library. This is an adult only workshop and will cover painting landscapes. The fee for this class is $8 for the public and $5 for guild members. The fee will cover an 11x14 canvas, paints and brushes. For more information or to RSVP call 557-0655 An evening of southern gospel CHIPLEY The Spanish Trail Playhouses annual artists series presentation, An Evening of Southern Gospel will take the stage at 7 p.m. today, Aug. 9. The evening will feature Christian vocalists and musicians from the local area. Scheduled performers include: The Thompsons, Trish Brannon, Sheriff Bobby Haddock, Sonny and Linda Morris, Ellis Wimberley and Seth Cook. The live stage band consists of A. D. Davis, drums; Tim Thompson, lead guitar; Kirk Thompson, bass guitar and MC; Doug Salter, piano and Jimmy Miller, pedal steel guitar. This concert will take place at the Spanish Trail Playhouse, at 680 2nd St. in Chipley, and is directed by Jimmy Miller. Tickets are available now at the Washington County Public Library, and all remaining tickets will be available at the theatre the day of the show. The doors will open at 6 p.m. Tickets are $10 for general admission seating. ACHA open today only ALFORD Alford Community Health Clinic (ACHC) will be open from 10 a.m. until the last patient is seen, today, Aug. 9. ACHC is a free clinic for patients who do not have medical insurance and who meet federal income guidelines. The clinic is staffed by qualied physicians, nurses and courteous assistants dedicated to providing quality health care to those with short-term illnesses, as well as chronic conditions. Appointments are available by telephoning 272-0101 or 2095501, and walk-ins are always welcome. All patients are urged to sign-in before 11 a.m. Alford Community Health Clinic is two blocks east of Highway 231, in Alford, at 1770 Carolina St. Summer blood drive MARIANNA Milk and Honey Frozen Yogurt will host a blood drive from 2-7 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 14. All donors will receive a free beach towel and a wellness check up. To sign up or for more information, call Bethany Overholt at 482-1130. Bonifay Elementary School announces important dates BONIFAY Bonifay Elementary School reminds parents of the following upcoming events: Class lists will be posted at 3:30 p.m. Aug. 14. Kindergarten Orientation will be from 8:30-9:30 a.m. Aug. 15, and orientation for rst through fourth grades will be from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. that same day. The rst day of school begins at 7:50 a.m. Aug. 18. Bethlehem High School Open House BETHLEHEM Bethlehem High School will host Open House from 8-11 a.m. Friday, Aug. 15. Middle and high school students may pick up their schedule Thursday, Aug. 14, or Friday, Aug. 15. in the front ofce. High school students will have one week after school begins to make any needed schedule changes. Choose your Faction CHIPLEY Looking for an afternoon of entertainment escape but cannot drive to that faraway movie theater? The library will show Divergent, rated PG-13, at 3:30 p.m., Tuesday, Aug. 13. Free popcorn will be provided. For more information, call 638-1314. Holmes County 4-H will host open meeting for new livestock club The Holmes County 4-H program through the University of Florida and IFAS Extension will hold an open meeting for youth interested in raising 4-H animal projects and showing their animals in upcoming local fairs. Interested youth, parents, and individuals interested in volunteering are encouraged to attend this meeting at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 12, at the Holmes County Ag Center. Youth ages 5 to 18 and their parents will have the opportunity to explore the different animal focuses such as beef cattle, horses, poultry and rabbits being offered within the 4-H Livestock Club and meet with the 4-H Agent and volunteers. Youth also will be able to enroll in the new 4-H year which begins, Monday, Sept. 1. Volunteer information will be available for those adults interested in getting involved in this new 4-H livestock program. For more information regarding this event or for additional 4-H information, call Niki Crawson at 547-1108, ncrawson@u.edu or check out our website at http://holmes.ifas. u.edu. RMS orientation CHIPLEY Roulhac Middle School Open House and Orientation will be Thursday, Aug. 14. Orientation will be in the auditorium at the following times: Eighth grade, 3 p.m.; seventh grade, 3:30 p.m.; sixth grade, 4 p.m., and fth, 4:30 p.m. Door prizes will be given. Following the orientation, parents and students will be allowed to visit classes as well as the many informational booths that will be set up in the courtyard. Student schedules can be picked up at this time. Grill it up: Options for beef on the grill CHIPLEY Learn tips for grilling a variety of cuts of beef for delicious, healthy meals that are easy on the budget from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 14, at the Washington County Ag Center located at 1424 Jackson Avenue, Chipley. This hands-on program includes grilling tips, meat selection, and menu ideas. Registration is $5 per person and includes sample foods and materials. Preregistration is required by Aug. 11, by contacting the Washington County Extension Ofce at 638-6265, or the Holmes County Extension Ofce at 547-1108. Extension programs are open to everyone. For persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations, call 638-6265 (TDD, via Florida Relay Service, 800-955-8771) at least ve working days before the class so that proper consideration may be given to the request. Back to school fair CHIPLEY Northwest Florida Community Hospital will host the annual The Back to School Fair from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday, Aug. 14, on the front lawn. This is a free event to help school age children prepare to return to school, looking spiffy and equipped with the necessary school supplies. There will be a back pack drawing as well. For more information, call Joanie Beard at 415-8104. Reading and comprehension BONIFAY The Holmes County Public Library will host a workshop for children in pre-K through the second grade from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Aug. 14 at the library annex. The program will help with reading and comprehension with books and bubbles. 2014 peanut eld day MARIANNA The annual UF/IFAS peanut eld day will be at the Marianna North Florida Research and Education Center, Thursday Aug. 14. The event will begin at 8 a.m. and ending with a sponsored lunch. Field tours will begin at 8:30 a.m. Topics will include disease control, new varieties, crop management, and weed control. CEUs, including core, will be available at registration. For more information call 394-9124. Oneblood blood mobile CHIPLEY/BONIFAY The Oneblood blood mobile will be at the following locations doing blood drives: Tuesday, Aug. 12, at the Northwest Florida Reception Center 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., and Friday, Aug.15, at Chipley Walmart, 11a.m. 4 p.m. Braves vs. Mets WASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY The Krafty Katz Relay for Life team is hosting a fundraiser to see the Atlanta Braves vs. New York Mets, Saturday, Sept. 20. Tickets are $100 and include the bus ride to and from Atlanta and seats to the game. The bus will leave Chipley at 12:30 p.m. and return about 1 a.m. To ensure seat on the bus, call Vicki Lamb at 326-3319 or 638-1483. Political Rally BONIFAY A political Rally will be at Bethlehem United Methodist Church at 11 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 16. Dinner plates will be available for $7 and will include country style ribs or chicken leg quarters, cole slaw, baked beans, roll, drink and dessert. The plates ate a fundraiser for local missions. The church is at 1622 Bethlehem Church Road in Bonifay. For more information, call 547-3780. James Boston shing tournament VERNON The rst annual shing tournament for the James Boston scholarship fund will be held Saturday, Aug. 16. The tournament will be from 6 a.m. to 1 p.m. with weigh in time at 2 p.m. The cost of the tournament is $100 per boat. Trophies will be awarded for the highest total weight, largest and most sh caught. To reserve a spot or for more information, call Tony Davis at 326-3628 or Dexter McDonald at 326-9212. T wo weeks of free movies at Sam Mitchell Public Library VERNON The Sam Mitchell Public Library will show free movies for two weeks this month. Tuesday and Wednesday movies will start at 3:30 p.m., and on Friday, movies will start at 10:30 a.m. The movie schedule is as follows: Tuesday, Aug. 12, Monsters University; Wednesday, Aug. 13, Rio; and Friday, Aug. 15, Rio 2. The Sam Mitchell Public Library is open from 1-6 p.m., Tuesdays and Wednesdays and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Fridays. For more information, call Manager Dorothy Stichardo at 535-1208. Fruit basket giveaway CHIPLEY In honor of National Senior Citizens Day, Thursday, Aug. 21, Washington Rehabilitation and Nursing Center will be giving away fruit baskets to senior citizens in the community. To reserve a basket, call 6384654, by Friday, Aug. 15. Washington County Farm Bureau annual membership meeting CHIPLEY The annual meeting of the Washington County Farm Bureau is scheduled for Thursday, Aug. 21, at the Washington County Agricultural Center. The evenings activities will begin at 6:30 p.m. with dinner followed by a brief business meeting. The evening will feature a program by Royce Reagan and The Original Artists. In order that adequate preparation can be made, members are encouraged to conrm their attendance by notifying the Farm Bureau Ofce, 638-1756, no later than noon Monday, Aug. 18. Concerned American Patriots MARIANNA Concerned American Patriots of Jackson County will host its monthly meeting at 6 p.m. Monday, Aug. 18, at the Ag Center on U.S. Highway 90 West) in Marianna. The meeting focus will be Jackson County School Board Forum with all candidates for School Board participating. Whether your district is on the ballot this year or not, whether you have children in school or not, the decisions of this board affect you, for example taxes and future generations, you need to know where these candidates stand on current vital education issues. Everyone is invited; there is no admission charge, and free child care will be provided at the meeting. Book Sale VERNON The Sam Mitchell Public Library in Vernon will host a book sale starting, Tuesday, Aug. 19. The sale will be during regular library hours. Book prices will be $0.50 for paperbacks; $1 for hardcover; $1 for VHS tapes and $2 for DVDs. For more information, call 638-1314. Girl Scouts parent information session BONIFAY Girl Scouts of the Florida Panhandle will host a parent information session and story time from 5 to 6 p.m., Friday, Aug. 22, at the First United Methodist Church in Bonifay. To participate in Girl Scouts girls must be in kindergarten through 12th grade. For more information, call Clarissa Medina at 209-1568. Muskogee history seminar VERNON The Lower Muskogee Creek Tribe will host a Muskogee history seminar from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 23, at Holmes Valley Church in Vernon. Topics of the seminar will be how the Muskogee survived in this area after removal, aspects of daily living, genealogy and treaties of the Muskogee. There is a $20 charge that will cover all materials and lunch. The church is at 3685 Reno Drive in Vernon. For more information, call 229-762-3355. Childbirth Education Class BONIFAY The Florida Department of Health in Holmes County will be offering free Childbirth Education Classes, Aug. 12, Aug. 19 and Aug. 26. Classes will be from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Healthy Start Annex, 402 N. Oklahoma St., Bonifay. Brianne Harrison from Group B Strep International will be speaking at the class on the 12th concerning awareness and prevention of Group B Strep disease in babies before birth through early infancy. For more information or to register for classes, please contact 547-8684 ext. 16 or 18. No person shall, on the grounds of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion or sex be excluded from participation in, be denied benets of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity receiving or beneting from federal nancial assistance. Sensory impaired or LimitedEnglish Prociency patients will be provided with necessary aids and interpreters at no cost by calling Fran Amerson at 5478500 ext. 234 Finch family reunion SUNNY HILLS The Finch family reunion for descendants and friends of the late William Dallas Finch will be Saturday, Aug. 30, at the Sunny Hills Community Center, on Challenger Blvd. Relatives and friends are asked to arrive no later than 11 a.m. Bring a well lled basket to feed your family and to share with friends. Lunch will be served at noon. For more information, call Kenneth Finch at 638-5307 or Ruth Creamer at 638-4310. 2014 soccer registration CHIPL E Y The City of Chipley will be holding soccer registration from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 28 through Friday, Sept 12, at City Hall. Any child between the ages of 4 and 14 as of Oct. 1 will be eligible to participate. Teams will be picked on Sept. 15; only head coaches will be aloud in the team draft. Practice will begin Sept. 22, if a coach has not contacted you by Sept 19; call Guy Lane at 6386348 or 658-2773. If payment is made before Aug. 29 the cost is $37, be fore Sept. 12 $42, any one paying after Sept. 12 the registration is $47. All payments are to be cash, check or money order. 2014 N orthwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant BO N IFAY Sponsored by the Holmes County High School Blue Pride Band Boosters will be held Saturday, Sept. 20 in the HCHS Auditorium. Boys and girls ages 4 to 8 will be at 4 p.m., girls age 8 to 20 will be at 6 p.m. It is an open pageant for girls age 4 to 20, boys age 4-8. Registration will be at HCHS Auditorium, from 5 to 7 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 9, and from 10 a.m. to noon, Saturday, Sept 13. Late registration will be from 5 to 7 p.m., Tuesday, Sept 16. A $10 late fee will be added after Sept 13. Rehearsals will take place during the registrations, instructions on where to walk will be provided, lessons on how to pose or pageant skills not provided. Admission for pageant will be $5 for ages 10 and up and $2 for ages nine and under. If you have questions, you can email Anda Justice at anda@hchsbluepride.com or call 766-7569. Bingo fundraiser W ESTV ILL E Pittman Volunteer Fire Department with be hosting a Bingo to raise money for the re department at 6 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 13. For more information, call Dottie Clark at 547-4040. Miss Florida Woodlands CHIPL E Y The 2014 Miss Florida Woodlands and Miss Florida Timberlands Scholarship Pageant is scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 11, at the Washington County Agriculture Center in Chipley. For more information, email woodlands@ yahoo.com, visit http:// misswoodlands.tripod.com or call 334-389-3927 or 256-306-4401. Healthy cooking demonstration classes BO N IFAY Join us for healthy cooking demonstration classes sponsored by the Florida Department of Health in Holmes County and University of Florida/ IFAS Extension. All classes are free. The classes will be at noon at the Holmes County Agriculture Center, 1173 E. Highway 90, Bonifay, on the following dates: Wednesday, Aug. 20, Wednesday, Sept. 17, Wednesday, Oct. 22, Wednesday, Nov. 19, and Wednesday, Dec. 17. The classes will offer healthy cooking tips and alternatives for everyday meals. Food samples will be served. No registration is required. Extension programs are open to everyone. For persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations, call the Holmes County Extension Ofce, 547-1108, (TDD, via Florida Relay Service, 800-9558771) at least ve working days before the class so that proper consideration may be given to the request. For more information, call Leann Jones at 547-8500 ext. 240.

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A16| Washington County News Saturday, August 9, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS Install/Maint/Repair The Washington County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications forCustodianThe primary function of the Custodian is to ensure County facilities are cleaned and maintained. The Custodian position also orders, stocks, and maintains the cleaning and maintenance supplies needed for assigned County facilities. Minimum Training and Experience: Graduation from standard high school or general education degree (GED) required. Must possess and maintain a valid Florida drivers’ license with an acceptable driving record. Starting salary is $10.00 hourly. Applications may be accessed on-line at www.washingtonfl.com. Applications and job descriptions may also be obtained at the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office located at 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428. All interested applicants MUST submit an Employment Application to the Human Resource Department in the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office by 4:00 PM on August13, 2014. All questions regarding this position or other vacancies should be directed to the Human Resources Department, 850-415-5151. The selected applicant will be subject to a pre-employment physical and drug screen. Veteran’s Preference is accepted in accordance with FS 295.08. Equal Opportunity/Drug-Free Workplace Web Id 34296663 8-3481 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 67-11-CA-434 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, JOSE A. PORTILLO Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the WASHINGTON COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER, 1331 South Boulevard, in Chipley, Florida 32428, at 11:00 A.M. Central Time, on the 24 day of Sept, 2014, the following described property: Lot 05, Block 0215, of SUNNY HILLS UNIT TWO, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Pages 28 through 37, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. DATED this 20th day of June, 2014. HAROLD BAZZEL CLERK AD INTERIM OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk CHARLES E. BERK, ESQ. c/o The Deltona Corporation 8014 SW 135th Street Road Ocala, FL 34473 August 2, 9, 2014 6-3390 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR PASCO COUNTY Case No. 51-2014-CA-000518-WS Division: G AAA ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS, INC., SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA Plaintiff, -vsHEADS UP CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., A FLORIDA CORPORATION, Defendant. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: HEADS UP CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., A FLORIDA CORPORATION. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action for breach of contract has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on BEVERLY R. BARNETT, ESQ., 6709 Ridge Road, Suite 106, Port Richey, Florida 34668, on or before 8-3-14 and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. SIGNED AND THE SEAL OF THIS COURT IMPRESSED ON 30 day of June 2014 PAULA O’NEIL Clerk and Comptroller (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Sarah Lovell A Deputy Clerk July 19, 26, Aug 2, 9, 2014 8-3481 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 14CP63 IN RE: ESTATE OF DORATHEA EDNA GERTRUDE NELSON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of DORATHEA EDNA GERTRUDE NELSON, deceased, whose date of death was April 11, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for WASHINGTON County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1293 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is Aug 2, 2014 Attorney for Personal Representative: Carlotta Appleman Thacker Attorney Florida Bar Number: 0275890 Harrison Sale McCloy PO Box 1579 Panama City, FL 32402-1579 Telephone:(850)769-3434 Fax:(850)769-6121 E-Mail: cathacker@HSMcLaw.co m Personal Representative: RANDOLPH S. WOLF 305 Hiland Drive Panama City, Florida 32404 Aug 2, 9, 2014 8-3496 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: BROCK AUTO BODY & TOWING SRV. gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 08/31/2014, 8:00am at 679B MLK AVE., Chipley FL32428-0114, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. BROCK AUTO BODY& TOWING SRV reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. VIN # 1N6DD26S5YC330041 2000 Nissan August 13, 2014 8-3498 NOTICE Animal Services is now in possession of a black bull found off Gainer Road between Monroe Sheffield and Pioneer Road. If this is your animal or you think its your animal please contact Animal Services by phone 638-6306 or come by our office located at 2300 Pioneer Road in Wausau. To claim the animal, identify and pay the fees before the animal is taken to the sale. August 9, 2014 8-3496 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: BROCK AUTO BODY & TOWING SRV. gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 08/31/2014, 8:00am at 679B MLK AVE., Chipley FL32428-0114, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. BROCK AUTO BODY& TOWING SRV reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. VIN # 4S2CK58DXW4312571 August 13, 2014 ADOPTION: Adoring Teacher (will stay home) & Attorney Love awaits 1st baby. Sheila & Justin 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 ADOPTloving married couple seeks to adopt, will be hands on mom and dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592, Adam Sklar #0150789 ADOPTION: A childless loving couple seeks to adopt. Large family. Financial Security. Expenses paid. Eileen & Kim. kimandeileenadopt@ gmail.com or 1-800455-4929. Habanese Puppies Very small. 2 male, 2 female. Ready now. Half price, $250.00. 850-481-6506. Sleep Number/Select Comfort King Bed Mint condition. Firm with dual control remote memory. Graceville 850-263-2263. Garage Sale. Tools, outdoor cooking equipment, fishing equipment, antiques. Sat Aug 9th, 7AM-until. 3958 Amy Lane, Sunny Hills. Multi Family Yard Sale Sat Aug 9th, 7-12. Building supplies/materials, household items, antiques, collectibles, clothes, glassware, tools, weightbench/ weights. 586 5th Street, Chipley. Nothing but plus size clothing size 16W to 4X. 3282 Highway 2 in Esto. 1/4 mile west of Highway 79. From August 16-25 from 8AM-Until. YARD SALE 4100 PATE POND RD VERNON INDOOR/OUTDOOR AUGUST 9TH 9AM-2PM ANTIQUE SEWING MACHINES, DINING TABLES, AIR HOCKEY TABLES, METAL CHAIRS, SHELVES, CHINA CABINET, ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, BOOKS, HOUSEHOLD ITEMS AND MORE. RAIN OR SHINE. GUN SHOW PANAMACITY FAIRGROUNDSAugust 9th & 10th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL96336 to 56654 K&LFarm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 U-PICK GRAPES $4.00/Gallon (850)547-2326 Follow signs on Hwy 177Ato 1837 Flowing Well Rd., Bonifay. U-Pick 7 days, daylight Attention: VIAGRA and CIALIS USERS! A cheaper alternative to high drugstore prices! 50 Pill Special -$99 FREE Shipping! 100 Percent Guaranteed. CALL NOW: 1-800943-8953 DirectTV 2 Year Savings Event! Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only DirecTV gives you 2 YEARS of savings and a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 1-800-481-2137 DISH TV Retailer. Starting $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) Broadband Internet starting $14.95/ month (where available.) Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-980-6193 Local Country/WesternSinger& drummer looking for band. Please contact A.J. at 850-890-5684. SAFE STEP Walk-In Tub Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made Installation Included. Call 1-800-605-6035 for $750 Off. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. HVAC Technicians. 4 Week Accelerated Hands On Training Program. We Offer 6 National Certifications And Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. VA Benefits Eligible! 877-994-9904 Install/Maint/Repair The City of Chipley is accepting applications for aWater Crewman IMinimum Requirements: Limited knowledge of materials, methods, practices and equipment used in water facilities maintenance and repair activities. Education and Experience: High school diploma or possession of an acceptable equivalency diploma. Two (2) years of experience in heavy manual labor, and the use of hand and light power tools preferably in distribution systems. Must posess Class “B” CDL with air brakes endorsement. Job descriptions are available upon request on all positions. City participates in the Florida Retirement System (FRS). Mail or hand deliver application and/or resume to City Clerk, City of Chipley, 1442 Jackson Ave., P.O. Box 1007, Chipley, Florida 32428. Deadline: Open until filled. EOE/Drug Free Workplace. Web Id 34296846 Install/Maint/Repair The City of Chipley is accepting applications for aWater Crewman IIMinimum Requirements: Knowledge of materials, methods, practices and equipment used in water facilities maintenance and repair activities. Education and Experience: High school diploma or possession of an acceptable equivalency diploma. Two (2) years of experience in heavy manual labor, and the use of hand and light power tools preferably in distribution systems. Must possess Class “B” CDL. Job descriptions are available upon request on all positions. City participates in the Florida Retirement System (FRS). Mail or hand deliver application and/or resume to City Clerk, City of Chipley, 1442 Jackson Ave., P.O. Box 1007, Chipley, Florida 32428. Deadline: Open until filled. EOE/Drug Free Workplace. Web Id 34296848 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here-Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769. EXPERIENCE OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com EOE WANT A CAREER Operating Heavy Equipment? Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. “Hands On Training” & Certifications Offered. National Average 18-22 Hourly! Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1 Bedroom Apartment, in Chipley, covenant location, no pets. 638-4640. 2BR/2.5BA Apartment w/private balcony, partiality furnished w/ garage. W/D included. In Bonifay. $600/mth + deposit. 768-0394 or 547-2936. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio And 2 bdrm $375-$500 Includes City Utilities (850)557-7732 SpaciousOne Bedroom Apartment $450.00 Two Bedroom $500.00 Stove/Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. Studio Apartment Patio, Florida room, fenced backyard. $600/MO 1 person Only. consider pet. Rent can be exchanged for carpentry skills. 850-326-4649. 3BR/1BA House in Vernon. Pets welcome, fenced yard. $600.00/mth, $600.00/security. Call 850-547-6483. 3BR/2BA two-story house. References and Deposit required. Chipley, No Pets. 638-1918. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/sewage/lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 2BR/2BAMobile Homes in quite park between Bonifay and Chipley. W/G included. $425.00 plus Deposit. 547-4232, 850-527-4911. 2BR/1BA Singlewide MH near Pate Pond. $300/mo plus deposit. Call 535-2657. Bonifay. 3BR/1BA MH $400.00/deposit, $450.00/rent. Large 3/2, $600.00/rent. 3/4 mile from elementary school on 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. Ceder Gardens Mobile Home Park, Bonifay, under new management. Now available 3BR/2BA homes beginning at $450.00/mo. No pets. Contact Dan at 850-583-6554. For Rent 3BD/1BA House $275/mo.Also 36 ft Coleman Camper. Clean, fully furnished. $250/month. Ponce de Leon area. (850)226-4656. For Rent. Nice 2BR/2BA. Outside Chipley on Orange Hill Rd. Quiet area. Sorry no pets. Day phone, 850-638-4630. Night phone, 850-638-1434. Nice 2BR MH for rent in a great location in Chipley. Sorry no pets. 638-4640. PCB: 3br/2ba Glades Subdivision, 2029 sqft, Open Floorplan, Updated Throughout, Enclosed Lanai & Pool $329,000 By Appt only. 850-814-0054 SUNNY HILLS. Great ranch, fantastic condition. 3BR/2BA, 3 living areas, appliances incl. $89,000.00. Counts Real Estate. Barbara, 850-814-9414. 5 Acres on Hwy 77 3 miles South of Chipley. Has well, septic tank, 14x48 MH, front & back deck. 24x36 Pole Barn. 638-1858, 850-326-9109. Lot For Sale. 1.1 acre in Hidden Pine Subdivision by Falling Waters State Park. $10,000.00. Call 850-866-8536. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. White Diamond CTS Cadillac, 4DR, loaded. 25,000 miles. One owner, like new. 326-9109. 1991 Harley Davidson Road King 9,000 miles, $6,500. Call 850-348-7780. For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414