Washington County news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Washington County news
Uniform Title:
Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Chipley Fla
Creation Date:
June 22, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
Coordinates:
30.779167 x -85.539167 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began May 23, 1924.
General Note:
L.E. Sellers, editor.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000384704
oclc - 07260886
notis - ACC5987
lccn - sn 81000810
issn - 0279-795X
System ID:
UF00028312:00943

Related Items

Preceded by:
Chipley banner


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT Cspears@chipleypaper.com VERNON The Sam Mitchell Public Library in Vernon hosted a reopening celebration Wednesday after a two month closure for repairs. We were ofcially closed for two months, said Washington County Public Libraries Director Renae Rountree. Torrential rains last July made us have issues with the roof, issues like mold. It was the City of Vernon who took care of the roof repair for us, and under $600 of the original estimated cost, might I add. Sam Mitchell Public Library is open from 1 to 6 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays and from C onnec t with us 24/7 G et br eak ing new s videos e xpanded st or ies phot o galler ies opinions and mor e ... @WCN_HC T CH IPLE Y P APER C OM Phone: 850-638-0212 Website: chipleypaper.com Fax: 850-638-4601 INDEX Faith .................................. A12 Sports ................................... A9 Classieds ............................ A16 50 Saturday, JULY 26 2014 www.chipleypaper.com Volume 91, Number 30 Get your free copy now INSIDE For the latest breaking news, visit CHIPLEYPAPER.COM IN BRIEF Track record broken at Ebro | A9 WEEKEND Washington County News Foxy Red Hatters CHIPLEY The Foxy Red Hatters will meet at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 29, at KCs Pizza in Chipley. Movie Fun CHIP L E Y Looking for an afternoon of entertainment escape but cant drive to that far away movie theater? The Washington County Public Library will be showing Despicable Me 2 and serving free popcorn at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 29, at the Chipley Branch. For more information, call 638-1314. Swimming lessons set at Chipola MARIANNA Chipola College will offer childrens swimming lessons for ages four and up Monday, Aug. 4 through Thursday, Aug. 14, with a registration deadline of July 31. The class is available at 10 a.m. or 7 p.m. The session will include eight 45-minute classes, which meet Monday through Thursday for two weeks. Lessons are based on a combination of nationally recognized methods. Cost of the two-week session is $55. Pre-registration is required, with a $5 late registration fee. For more information, call 718-2473 or visit www.chipola.edu. Back to school fair CHIP L E Y Northwest Florida Community Hospital will host the annual The Back to School Fair from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday, Aug. 14, on the front lawn. This is a free event to help school age children prepare to return to school, looking spiffy and equipped with the necessary school supplies. There will be a back pack drawing as well. For more information, call Joanie Beard at 415-8104. P HO T O S B Y C ECI L IA SPEAR S | The News Manager Dorothy Williams, Director Renae Rountree, Mayor Michelle Cook and Cooks little friend Hope, throw up the welcome sign announcing the reopening of the Sam Mitchell Public Library on Wednesday. Sam Mitchell Public Library reopens SPECIA L T O THE N EW S Area K-9 Units made the capture in the inmate escape earlier this week. From the Holmes C.I., Jackson C.I. and NWFRC units are back row from left, Sgt. C. Price, Ofcer J. Bareld, Sgt. T. Brock, Sgt. J. Cates, Sgt. J. Walsingham, Col. S. May, and front row, Ofcer T. Benton, Ofcer K. Cooper, Ofcer S. Register and Ofcer D. Meeks. Local K-9 teams recover escapees By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com BONIFA Y K-9 units from Washington Countys Northwest Florida Reception Center, Holmes Correctional Institute and Jackson Correctional Institute apprehended two escaped inmates Wednesday. The units were among those responding to assist the Holmes County Sheriffs Ofce after two men escaped from Holmes County Jail custody about 12:40 a.m., but the K-9 teams had both recovered by 9 a.m. The escapees, Jeffery Morrill, 32, of Bonifay, and David Challender, 28, of Vernon, both were facing lengthy sentences. Morrill recently was sentenced to 30 years in the Florida Department of Corrections, and Challender, a state fugitive from Gwinnett County, Ga., also was being housed for the Bay County Sheriffs Ofce while awaiting trial for murder, home invasion/robbery with a weapon, burglary of a dwelling, and burglary with intent to commit theft. Morrill was captured without incident near Interstate 10 around 3:30 a.m., and Challender was apprehended after the units found him hiding among discarded tires at the Holmes County Recycling Center. DIRECTOR R ENAE R OUNTREE MANAGER DOROTHY WILLIAMS KRISTEN BLANKENSHIP DAVID CHALLENDER JEFFER Y MORRILL County submits rollback millage proposal By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY The Washing ton County Board of County Commissioners tentatively approved a proposed proper ty tax rollback rate of 9.252 when they met in regular ses sion Thursday. The proposed rate in crease is in proportion to the dip in the countys 2014 property tax digest and doesnt mean property taxes will rise. When property val ues decrease, so does the amount of tax collected. A millage rate to bring the same amount of property tax revenue as the year before is the rollback rate. Commissioners approved the rate so it could be submit ted to Property Appraiser Gil Carter to begin the process of issuing Truth in Millage notices to property owners. From here, we can lower the rate, but we cant raise it, Commission Chair Alan Bush said. With the 3.23 percent drop in assessed values, keep ing last years millage rate of 8.9195 would mean a bud get shortfall of more than $250,000. Commissioners also Schoen announces candidacy for House District 5 See K-9 s A2 See LIBRAR Y A2 See MILLAGE A2 From staff reports Sunny Hills resident Karen Schoen ofcially has announced her candidacy for the Florida House of Representatives District 5 seat, which soon will be vacated by state Rep. Marti Coley because of her reaching term limits. A native of Brooklyn, New York, Schoen spent 23 years as an educator in the Brooklyn area. She received her own education through the State University of New York system, earning her Bachelors of Science in Education from the SUNY Oswego and her Masters of Liberal Studies from SUNY Stony Brook. Schoen moved to Washington County in 2007 and said shes running for the Distrtict 5 seat to help educate KAREN SCHOEN Rep. Marti Coley has reached term limits See SCHOEN A2

PAGE 2

Local A2 | Washington County News Saturday, July 26, 2014 Lo ca ls Su nd ays Loc al s wi th a Fl or id a ID re ce iv e 50 % of f Ge ne ra l Pa rk ad mi ss io n on ev er y Su nd ay Da il y sh ow s fe at uri ng do lp hi ns se a li on s, tr op ic al bi rd s an d mu ch mo re Op en da il y ra in or sh in e 15 41 2 Fr on t Be ac h Rd Pa nama Ci ty Be ac h www .g ul fw or ld ma ri nep ar k. co m So we ll Tra ctor Co ., Inc. 2841 Hwy 77 North, Pa nama City www .so we lltr actor co .com So we ll and Ku bota 40 Ye ars of Tr usted Pe rf or manc e We Tr ade for Any thin g That Don t Eat! Financing Arranged (W AC) accepted the Courthouse Committees recommendation of Tallahassee Based JRA Architects. President Jim Roberson represented the rm, which also has a Panama City ofce. Roberson, who found ed the rm in 1975, stated he was excited to announced he would be working on the design himself. Roberson also has worked on other area projects, including the con struction of the new Chipley middle and high school campuses and the Bay County Administration Building, a120,000 square foot facility home to Bay County govern ment ofces. One of our rst steps (after commis sioners ofcially decided on a site) is to go to Tallahassee and check with the Secre tary of States ofce to see if we can tear the current courthouse down (if thats the chosen site), said Roberson. Courthouse Committee member and County Attorney Jeff Goodman stated a Request for Qualications would be issued soon to seek a construction management rm as well. Commissioners also heard from Dorche Circle resident Rita Jones who expressed concern that all addresses on the road were identical, with the exception of an added letter. Jones requested Com missioners reassign the addresses for the purpose of facilitating better emergency response to the homes. Theres an aging population on that road, Jones said. One resident had a stroke and had trouble getting help. Shes now looking to sell and move be cause shes just not comfortable staying there. Commissioners approved the renam ing of the road to Mallard Pond Road and address adjustments pending approval from the 911 coordinator. Look for more on E-911 address concerns and the coun tys plan to improve the mapping system in the July 30 edition of the Washington County News. In other action, the board approved the following measures: Approved the Clerk of Court to pay vouchers for June 2014 totaling $1,243,600.51 Approved a single lot subdivision exception and variance for minimum lot area requirement for resident Beth Taylor Cain for placement of a second singlefamily residence on an existing 1 acre parcel of property on Rattlebox Road. The subject property is located in Low Density Residential Future Land Use designated area. Adopted the Small County Outreach Program (SCOP) and Small County Road Assistance Program (SCRAP) Resolutions which deals with nancial assistance approved for roadway improvements from the Florida Department of Transportation through its SCOP and SCRAP programs. Roadways submitted were (SCOP): Lucas Lake Rd. at $1,608,689, Roche Rd. at $1,145,246, and (SCRAP): Wilderness Road. (CR 170) at $2,288,482.00. Approved the FEMA/FDEM 4177DR-FL agreement between the state and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) which requires the state to share costs eligible for federal nancial assistance. The state has undertaken to share those costs with Washington County. This agreement ensures local activity will be consistent with federal requirements. Approved the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund Grant: Only one organization from each county is eligible for funds from the Florida Crime Stoppers Trust Fund, and must be designated by the Board of Commissioners. Commissioners selected Crimestoppers of Washington County to receive the funding. Reappointed Value Adjustment Board Commissioner Alan Bush and Commissioner Lynn Gothard as appointed board members and added Gary Hartman. Adopted an impact fee resolution which provides citizens relief from impact fees mandated for Residential Units and nonresidential Units for a period beginning June 26, 2014 and ending June 25, 2015. Approved and invoice for Life Management Center of Northwest Florida Inc. for $12,217.45 Approved to re-advertise to ll the position of county ofce custodian and raised the pay scale from $8.40 an hour to $10 an hour. K-9 s from page A1 LIBRARY from page A1 MILLAGE from page A1 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays. Rountree said the branch averages 800 visi tors a month and circu lates more than 500 items. She added the local library branches also have started a new page program. Page positions are comprised of youth who help in the li brary in exchange for com munity service hours. The county currently has two pages; one in Chipley and one in Vernon. We want to thank our patrons for their patience, and were glad that the city and the county could come together to help us in this time of crisis, Rountree said. Vernon City Mayor Mi chelle Cook said shes hap py to have the Sam Mitchell Public Library back open. Its something that is a need for this city, Cook said. People need the re sources that the library provides, which includes internet access, as well as required reading for the youth. Rountree also added chil dren have the opportunity to see a movie every day at the Sam Mitchell Public Library, beginning Aug. 5. On Tuesdays and Wednesdays, the movies will start at 3:30 p.m., and on Fridays, the movies will start at 10:30 a.m. she said. The upcoming movie schedule includes: Aug. 5, Despicable Me; Aug. 6, Despicable Me 2; Aug. 8, Monsters Inc.; Aug. 12, Monsters University; Aug. 13, Rio, and Aug. 15, Rio 2. We are relieved and pleased that these fugitives were captured so quickly, Holmes County Sheriff Tim Brown said. It was good work by area law enforcement. In addition to local K-9 Units, the Holmes County Sheriffs Ofce was assisted in the search by the Bonifay Police Department, Jackson County Air Support, the U.S. Marshals Ofce, Bay County Sheriffs Ofce and the Dale Co., Ala. helicopter unit. and protect the people of the 5th District from failed policies, both proposed and in place. Im a teacher, and you never stop being a teacher, Schoen said. When I realized people did not understand the liberty, freedom and rights granted by our Constitution, I started a consulting business and have been traveling around the country giving seminars. I believe once people understand the truth and their rights, they will act appropriately. Education in the truth is the answer to our success. The 5th District is comprised of Washington, Walton, Holmes and Jackson counties and a portion of Bay County. SCHOEN from page A1 Murder suspect spent night in Chipley while on the run By ZACK McDONALD 747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY The ac cused murderer of three people across the Panhan dle made a Chipley motel one of his stops during his attempted getaway earlier this week. Der rick Ray Thomp son, 41, was arrested at a hunt ing lodge in Troy, Ala., where law en forcement tracked him. Authorities report he was motivated by his quest for drugs and has confessed to all three shootings. SWAT teams stunned him with ash-bang gre nades and captured him early Tuesday. He was wanted in the slaying of former Bay County Sheriffs Ofce in vestigator and controver sial nightclub owner Allen Johnson, 67, after a robbery and shooting early Monday at Johnsons home near Lynn Haven. Johnson and Thompson were friends, authorities said. Thompson also was a person of interest in the deaths of 60-year-old Ste ven Zackowski and 59year-old Debra Zackowski, both of Milton in Santa Rosa County. Authorities mobilized a nationwide manhunt Mon day that ended in a confes sion to all three slayings, authorities said. Thompson has been charged with an open count of murder in Bay County, according to law enforce ment. BCSO ofcials were not releasing details from the crime scene or the na ture of Johnsons wounds but ofcials said Thomp sons story corroborated physical evidence from the home. Thompsons motive in the slayings was clear to Bay County Sheriff Frank McKeithen. Drugs, he said. He went to borrow money from Allen, McK eithen said. We think the same situation transpired in Santa Rosa. Before eeing the state to hide out in a Troy hunt ing lodge where he once had installed electrical xtures, Thompson used money and a cellphone he allegedly stole from Johnson to buy numer ous prescription narcot ics from a drug dealer in Panama City, according to investigators. Thompson was extra dited to Bay County and arrived at the Bay County Jail late Tuesday afternoon. DERRICK THOMPSON

PAGE 3

Local Washington County News | A3 Saturday, July 26, 2014 5020370 Notice of Ta x for School Capital Outlay The Wa shington County School District will soon consider a measur e to continue to impose a 1.500 mill pr operty tax for the capital outlay pr ojects listed her ein. This tax is in addition to the school boar d s pr oposed tax of 5.904 mills for operating expenses and is pr oposed solely at the discr etion of the school boar d. The capital outlay tax will generate appr oximately $1,281,546 to be used for the following pr ojects: CONSTRUCTION AND REMODELING Kate M. Smith Elementary School new construction Wa shington-Holmes Te chnical Center classr oom re modeling Chipley High School/Roulhac Middle School cafeteria expansion Consolidated bus bar n Ve rn on High School track Ve rn on Middle School baseball eld MAINTENANCE, RENOV AT ION, AND REP AIR Maintenance of various school and district plants / ro of re pairs Ve rn on Elementary School classr oom re novations Historic Chipley High School re novations Commer cial vehicle driving testing range re surfacing Public re str oom re novations Athletic elds lighting (new & updates) MOTOR VEHICLE PURCHASES Pur chase of ten (10) school buses NEW AND REPLACEMENT EQUIPMENT COMPUTERS, ENTERPRISE RESOURCE SOFTW ARE, AND S. 1011.71(2), F. S., ELIGIBLE EXPENDITURES IN SUPPOR T OF DIGIT AL CLASSROOMS PLANS PURSUANT TO S. 1011.62(12)F .S. Pur chase school fur nitur e and equipment for new elementary school and new classr ooms at Ve rn on Elementary School Lease-pur chase of new computers Upgrade Te chnology Infrastructur e Enterprise Softwar e PAY MENT OF COSTS OF COMPLIANCE WITH ENVIRONMENT AL ST AT UTES, RULES AND REGULA TIONS Removal of Hazar dous Wa ste PAY MENT OF PREMIUMS FOR PROPER TY AND CASUAL TY INSURANCE NECESSAR Y TO INSURE THE EDUCA TIONAL AND ANCILLAR Y PLANTS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT Insurance pr emiums on district facilities PAY MENT OF COSTS OF LEASING RELOCA TA BLE EDUCA TIONAL FA CILITIES Leasing of portable classr ooms All concer ned citizens ar e invited to a public hearing to be held on July 28, 2014, at 5:05 PM in the School Boar d Meeting Room, 652 Thir d Str eet, Chipley FL. A DECISION on the pr oposed CAPIT AL OUTLA Y TA XES will be made at this hearing. 5020371 NOTICE OF BU DGET HEARING e Wa sh in gt on Co un ty Di st ri ct Sc ho ol Bo ar d wi ll so on co ns ider a bu dg et fo r s ca l ye ar 2014-2015. A pu bl ic he ar in g to ma ke a DE CIS IO N on th e bu dg et AND TA XES wi ll be he ld on Ju ly 28, 2014 at 5:05 P. M. at th e Wa sh in gt on Co un ty Di st ri ct Sc ho ol Bo ar d Oce Me et in g Ro om 652 ir d St re et, Ch ip le y, Flo ri da Special to The News As the beginning of the 2014 fall semester at The Baptist College of Florida (BCF) quickly approaches, preparations are well un derway for the arrival of new students and the excite ment of seeing returning students back on campus. Even though there is still time to enroll in classes, the administration, faculty, and staff are gearing up for all of the upcoming events that are part of this new chapter in the life of the school. During the summer, through the hard work and sacrices of volunteer mis sion teams from churches throughout the state, the campus has undergone a signicant facelift with a fresh coat of paint and nu merous facility improve ments. Steady progress has been made on BCF Presi dent Thomas A. Kinchens 20/20 Vision, including the demolition of several mar ried housing units and con struction beginning on the Deese Center, which will serve as the new cafeteria and student center at the college. The considerable progress on the Deese Cen ter is evident by the removal of the fence, strategically aligned surveying equip ment and the bulldozers, front end loaders and dump trucks rolling in and out packing down dirt preparing a solid foundation. Preparing a solid founda tion is exactly what BCF is all about. Through the process of training men and women for areas of leadership, min istry, and virtually every area of life, BCF highlights the required Bible courses contained within the curric ulum. BCF offers 23 degrees ranging from Contemporary Worship Ministry, Biblical Studies, Elementary Educa tion, Business Leadership, to Missions and Missions with a Concentration in Aviation. The foundational courses within each degree program are solid and de signed to equip the next gen eration with the skills and knowledge they will need to change the world. BCF students will begin classes on Aug. 18, eager to acquire the education, credentials, and training to prepare them for the future. In addition to the excitement of simply taking classes, stu dents look forward to the inspirational chapel ser vices, Missions Conference, Prayer Conference and team building events held on campus such as the BCF Amazing Race, BCF Olym pics, Lakeside Echo, Candy land and intramural sports. All of these opportunities of fer the potential for spiritual growth and the probability of creating lifelong friendships and memories. If you are interested in knowing more about The Baptist College of Florida, call 263-3261 ext. 460 or visit the website at www.bap tistcollege.edu. It is not too late to register for the fall semester. SPECIAL TO T HE NEW S Ebro native and Vernon High School graduate Karen Gilley Hornsby will compete on the television music competition show, Rising Star at 8 p.m., Sunday, July 27. The show will air locally on Channel 13. Hornsby is the daughter of Charles and Edell Gilley, owners of Gilleys Family Opry in Vernon. To vote, download the Rising Star app on your smart phone and support this hometown girl. Special to the News The Jackson County Sheriffs Ofce reports a new phone scam circulating locally. According to JSCO reports, the caller will pretend to be the grandchild of the victim and state that they are in jail some where needing money. The caller will say things like this is your favorite grandchild, but wont give their name. The caller will then continue to attempt to get the victim to call out the name of a grandchild and will even say that they will put the lawyer on the phone to convince them. The sheriffs ofce advises people not to send anyone any money in cases of this nature. JSCO reports phone scam HORNSBY TO COMPETE SUNDAY NIGHT BCF preps for new semester Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER

PAGE 4

POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Washington County News P. O Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 USP S 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $20; 26 weeks: $28.70; 52 weeks: $48.60 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $24.30; 26 weeks: $36.40; 52 weeks: $60.70 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copy right 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bareeld, Publisher Carol Kent, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bareeld: nbareeld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPOR TS OR OPINION news@chipleypaper.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULA TION 850-638-0212 clamb@ chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 EDITOR Carol Kent: ckent@ chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 ADVER TISING Jessica Collins: jcollins@chipley paper.com BUSINESS Saturday, July 26, 2014 A Page 4 Section www.chipleypaper.com By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com P ANAMA CITY With little space to expand, Port Pana ma City ofcials must plan for every square foot. With veand 10-year master plans in the works, the Port Authority at the small but busy facility is ex ploring ways to adapt best to the changing game of world trade as markets evolve, ships get bigger and trade routes shift. For Port Director Wayne Stubbs, a well-thought-out plan and smart investments are the ports bread and butter. Its important for me and my board so were not always debating what were going to build, Stubbs said. We make sure its carefully thought out and researched. In the last decade, the port has tripled the amount of cargo handled annually with the help of $75 million in facilities investments. But with about 40 percent of the ports 110 acres occupied by tenants Oceaneering and Berg Steel Pipe, meeting expansion goals to keep the port sustainable is a balanc ing act. Were getting a lot of bang for the buck at this port, Stubbs said. Were so small we really have to plan, plan, plan for every square foot. A master plan also helps qualify the port for grant funding through the Florida Department of Transpor tation and other agencies, which accounted for about 17 percent of the ports $13.7 million operating rev enue last year. A majority of FDOT grants require a 50 percent match from the Port Authority. MOVI N G F OR W ARD While Port Panama City is one of Floridas smaller ports, FDOT district spokes man Ian Satter said it has carved out a niche and is now working to broaden its ability to handle goods and services by improving its facilities. When you look at the Panhandle area, in Panama City for example, you have a port that brings in 50 percent of the copper that comes in through the U.S., Satter said. Were improving these ports so they become more attractive to people bringing in these goods. For Port Panama City, growth is all about building on that niche for smaller ships carrying valuable cargo. In the last ve years it has seen a 74 percent increase in cargo value. In 2012, the port handled more than $3 billion worth of waterborne cargo, ranking in Floridas top ve ports for cargo value. Currently, the Port of Pro greso in Mexicos Yucatn Peninsula is one of the Pana ma City ports most valuable trading partners, with ships coming in twice a week car rying a variety of goods. The two facilities signed a Sister Port agreement in 2008, out lining a commitment to pro mote shipping activity along the route. The port also is one of the countrys biggest importers of high-value copper, which has emerged as one of its largest and most well-known imports. But to keep the mo mentum going and remain sustainable, port ofcials are looking beyond whats working now. Currently, major ports in Florida and the United States are star ing down a lofty challenge to accommodate bigger ships calling fewer ports as trade from Europe and Asia increases. Most of the major ports are having to invest hun dreds of millions of dollars, sometimes up to a billion dollars, to be ready for these big ships, said Stubbs, de scribing a high stakes situation on the East Coast. Theyre all scrambling to do it because none of them want to lose the business. However, Stubbs sees Panama Citys future trade partners much closer to home through Carib bean transshipment hubs in places such as Kingston, Jamaica, or Freeport, the Bahamas. Nobody really expects these big ships to come into the Gulf. Theres not enough cargo for them to just come into the Gulf and back, said Stubbs, who add ed that Panama City instead will seek to attract smaller, regional ships. Were look ing for a combination of a re gional trader that also links us to some of those hubs. Thats what our focus is on in terms of growth. ST RE TCH I N G TH E DOLLARS To further enhance fund ing opportunities for the port, FDOT consultants are working hand in hand with port consultants to jointly write the master plan, which will be considered for adop tion sometime this fall. FDOT will contribute about $8 million in grant funding to the facility this year to support projects to relocate and expand truck staging, refurbish ware houses, improve rails and aid in a container terminal expansion project with a $9.5 million price tag. The project includes several components to help increase container trade, in cluding a $4.4 million mobile harbor crane and containerhandling equipment, sup port plugs for refrigerated containers, expansion of the container yard and reloca tion of the ports molasses tank, the only other option for expanding the container handling area. We could double or triple our container trade with the space weve made, said Stubbs, who added that container trade accounts for about 30 percent of port activity and allows for a high density and diversity of goods. Moving that molas ses tank is the only thing we could do for more container space. A major goal of the ports current master plan, con tainer trade expansion ef forts likely will be completed in the next planning time frame, Stubbs said. FDOTs 2015 budget also includes a $1 million appro priation, a 75 percent match ing grant, for a $1.3 million project to improve the ports west berth so it can support its new, heavier cranes. Much of the ports grant funding comes from the FDOT Strategic Intermo dal System program, which prioritizes a network of transportation systems con sidered critical to the health of the states economy and future growth. But it also gets grants from the Florida Seaport Transportation and Economic Development program, which doles out about $15 million to Florida ports annually, and the state Intermodal Logistics Cen ter program, from which Port Panama City received a $900,000 grant to construct a new distribution center on U.S. 231 last year. The state also offers grants through its Strategic Port Investment Initiative, a $35 million per year mini mum offering for port infra structure projects across the state. Overall, Satter outlined $138.9 million in the state budget this year for sea port infrastructure across Florida. These seaports are eco nomic engines for Florida and for the communities they reside in, Satter said. For us, investing in seaports is a good way to invest in the economy of Florida and in vest in these communities. Facilities investments are the key to growth EDITORS NOTE Washington County has an economic interest in the Port of Panama as a subsidiary of the port. The county has two Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ), which are classied as inland ports. Specic advantages of Foreign-Trade Zone designation include: Because duties are paid for goods when they enter a U.S. Customs territory, a company can manage when duties are paid. In some cases, duties may be completely eliminated. Merchandise can be exported out of the U.S. duty free. Duties for merchandise that is rendered as obsolete, damaged, defected, scrapped or wasted will be reduced or eliminated. PROFILE YOUR BUSINESS The Washington County News wants to highlight our hometown businesses! Business Prole is a new weekly feature designed to inform readers about the local business community. To participate, complete the following information and email it to news@ chipleypaper.com Business name: Business contact information: Number of employees: Owners or managers name: Business services provided: Y ears in business: How you got into this business: What you like most about your business: Name of person completing this form: Special to The News Projects that will help restore native longleaf pine and help protected wildlife are receiving Gulf Powersupported grants under the Longleaf Stewardship Fund. Gulf Powers parent company, Southern Com pany, joined the National Fish and Wildlife Foun dation to announce $3.38 million in grants aimed at protecting and restoring the diminishing longleaf pine ecosystem, including seven projects within the Southern Company service area in Northwest Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Georgia. The announce ment was made Tuesday, July 24, as part of a veyear anniversary celebra tion for Americas Longleaf Restoration Initiative held in Washington, D.C. The two projects in Northwest Florida spur restoration in Apalachicola National Forest and Black water River State Forest. In Apalachicola National Forest and St. Marks Na tional Wildlife Refuge, The Nature Conservancy of Florida and its partners will establish 1,700 acres of long leaf pine and enhance more than 26,000 acres of exist ing longleaf habitat with prescribed re, hardwood treatment and invasive spe cies removal. The project will benet the gopher tor toise, protect native wildlife and support the natural re source and encroachment protection goals of Tyndall Air Force Base near Pana ma City. Continuing restoration efforts at Blackwater River State Forest, the Longleaf Alliance and partners will prescribe re on 20,000 acres, control invasive spe cies on 350 acres, treat 1,100 acres of hardwoods and re store 330 acres of longleaf pine. The project also will support the natural re source and encroachment protection goals of Eglin Air Force Base by expand ing potential off-base habi tat for protected species, including the atwoods salamander. These projects are help ing restore critical native habitat that our area has lost, said Natalie Smith, Gulf Power spokesperson. It will take time, but we and our partners are committed to the long-term success of these restoration efforts. These projects throughout Northwest Florida and the Southeast all are working toward the same goal: re storing our legacy of long leaf pine and the native wildlife it supports. The Longleaf Steward ship Fund stems from the success of the Longleaf Legacy program, a part nership between Southern Company and NFWF from 2004-2011 that invested $8.7 million in projects expected to restore 82,000 acres of longleaf pine forest and the native species that rely on it. Additionally, another 20,000 acres were restored through the companys closely aligned Power of Flight program with NFWF. The majestic longleaf pine ecosystem once cov ered more than 90 million acres across nine states from Virginia to Texas, but dropped to only 3 percent of its original acreage. With the diverse public-private commitment to longleaf pine restoration in recent years, longleaf pine forest has increased from roughly 3 million acres to an esti mated 4.4 million acres, halting and reversing a cen tury-long decline, benet ing many threatened and endangered species depen dent on the habitat. Gulf Power Company is an investor-owned elec tric utility with all of its common stock owned by Atlanta-based Southern Company. Gulf Power serves more than 436,000 customers in eight coun ties throughout Northwest Florida. The companys mission is to safely provide exceptional customer value by delivering reliable, af fordable and environmen tally responsible electric ity while strengthening our communities. Visit online at GulfPower.com or on the companys Facebook page, Gulf Power Company. Little port, BIG PLANS FILE PH O T O S P E C IAL T O T H E NE W S Longleaf pine forest at Blackwater River State Forest. Longleaf pine making comeback in NW Florida

PAGE 5

COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRI C T 2 Charles Kent Jr. Filed intent to seek ofce April 21: April 1 April 30: Monetary contributions were $50; there were no expenditures reported for the reporting period; Contributions were from Charles Kent Jr., $50. May 1 May 31: Monetary contributions were $0; expenditures reported were $15.80; Expenditures were to Supervisor of Elections $15.80. June 1 June 20: Monetary contributions were $1,875; expenditures reported were $1,842.81; Contributions were from Charles Kent Sr. $100, Charles Kent Jr., $400, Bret Watson $500, Julie Kent $350 and Charles Kent Sr. $525; Expenditures were to Graphic Designs and Signs $374.50, Townsend Building Supply $90.83 and GD and S $1,377.48. June 21 July 4: Monetary contributions were $200; In-Kind contributions were $15; expenditures reported were $192.60; In-Kind contributions are from Charles Kent Jr. (embroidery) $15; Contributions were from Charles Kent Sr. $200; Expenditures were to Graphic Designs and Signs $192.60. Cameron Leigh Cope Filed intent to seek ofce April 16: April 1 April 30: Monetary contributions were $1, 005; there were no expenditures reported for the reporting period; Contributions were from Cameron Leigh Cope, $5 and Cameron Leigh Cope, $1,000. May 1 May 31: Monetary contributions were $0; expenditures reported were $15.10; Expenditures were to Washington County Supervisor of Elections $15.10. June 1 June 20: candidate led a waiver of report. June 21 July 4: Monetary contributions were $1,000; In-Kind contributions were $153.43; expenditures reported were $1,335.32; In-Kind contributions are from Michele and Leigh Cope (bottled water, candy and labels) $153.43; Contributions were from Cameron Leigh Cope $1,000; Expenditures were to GDS (political signs and shirts) $1,335.32. Joel Pate Filed intent to seek ofce Feb. 7: Feb. 1 Feb. 28: Monetary contributions were $1,000; In-Kind contributions were $300; there were no expenditures reported for the reporting period; Contributions were from Pate Enterprises, $1,000; In-Kind contributions were from Joel Pate (ink for political signs), $300. March 1 March 31: candidate led a waiver of report with the Supervisor of Elections: April 1 April 30: no Monetary contributions were reported; expenditures reported were $16.40; Expenditures were for the Supervisor of Elections Ofce (petition verication), $16.40. May 1 May 31: Monetary contributions were $1000; expenditures reported were $1605; Contributions were from Joel Pate $1000; Expenditures were to Custom Signs and Stiches (signs) $1605. June 1 June 20: Monetary contributions were $1,000; expenditures reported were $0; Contributions were from the Northern Trust Company $1,000. June 21 July 4: Monetary contributions were $0; expenditures reported were $1,070.92; Expenditures were to Washington County News (rack cards and post cards) $445.92, Chipley Postmaster (stamps) $340, Washington County SOE (Voter List) $25, Wausau Fire Department (Fun Day Sponsor) $60 and West FL. Electric (Ad) $200. COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRI C T 4 T odd Abbott Filed intent to seek ofce M arch 28: April 1 April 30: Monetary contributions were $2,000; there were no expenditures reported; Contributions were from Todd Abbott, $2,000. May 1 May 31: Monetary contributions were $2500; expenditures reported were $2500; Contributions were from Todd Abbott $2500; expenditures were for The Goulding Agency $2500. June 1 June 26: Monetary contributions were $1,000; expenditures reported were $3,000; Contributions were from Todd Abbott $1,000 Expenditures were to Supervisor of Elections (qualifying fee) $1,813.44, GDS (Shirts) $823.37 and Todd Abbott (Close account) $363.19. (Unopposed) SC HOO L BO A R D DISTRI C T 1 Van Brock Filed intent to seek ofce Feb. 24: Feb. 1 Feb. 28: Monetary contributions were $100; there were no expenditures reported for the reporting period; Contributions were from Van Brock, $100. March 1 March 31: candidate led a waiver of report. April 1April 30: candidate led a waiver of report. May 1 May 31: Monetary contributions were $0; expenditures reported were $16.50; Expenditures were to Supervisor of Elections (petition verication) $16.50. ( Unopposed) SC HOO L BO A R D DISTRI C T 4 T erry M E llis Filed intent to seek ofce M arch 18: March 1 March 31: Monetary contributions were $100; there were no expenditures reported for the reporting period; Contributions were from Terry M. Ellis, $100. April 1 April 30: there were no Monetary contributions reported; expenditures reported were $5; Expenditures were for Wells Fargo Bank (service charges) $5. May 1 May 31: Monetary contributions were $0; expenditures reported were $19.70; Expenditures were to Washington County Supervisor of Elections (campaign report) $14.70 and Wells Fargo Bank (service charge) $5 (Unopposed) SC HOO L BO A R D DISTRI C T 5 S usan R oberts Filed intent to seek ofce M arch 5: March 1 March 31: Monetary contributions were $50; there were no expenditures reported for the reporting period; Contributions were from Susan Roberts, $50. April 1April 30: candidate led a waiver of report. May 1 May 31: Monetary contributions were $0; expenditures reported were $16.20; Expenditures were to Carol F. Rudd (petition verication) $16.20 (Unopposed) C L ER K O F THE CIR C UIT COURT S teve Whittington Filed intent to seek ofce April 14: April 1 April 30: Monetary contributions were $3,000; expenditures reported were $2,515.90; Contributions were from Steve Whittington, $500 and Steve Whittington, $2,500: Expenditures were for Supervisor of Elections (petition verication), $15.90 and The Goulding Agency (Advertising), $2,500. May 1 May 31: Monetary contributions were $3850; expenditures reported were $3099.88; Contributions were from Steve Whittington $500, Steve Whittington $1000, Fred Buchanan $100, James and Dana Taylor $250 and Steve Whittington $2000; Expenditures were to Graphic Designs and Signs (T-shirts) $202.23, Wausau Vol. Fire Department (donation) $50, Graphic Designs and Signs (T-shirts) $243.96, Chipley Kiwanis Club (sponsorship and team) $250, Foster Folly News (ads) $300, Graphic Designs and Signs (Tshirts) $167.99, Panhandle Watermelon Festival (ads) $100, Graphic Designs and Signs (T-shirts) $186.18,Graphic Designs and Signs (magnetic signs) $337.05, Graphic Designs and Signs (signs and Tshirts) $557.47 and The Goulding Agency (cards and fans) $705. June 1 June 20: Monetary contributions were $3,000; expenditures reported were $3,009.83; Contributions were from Steve Whittington $2,000 and Steve Whittington $1,000; Expenditures were to GDS (T-shirts and signs) $1,635.99, Crossroads Pub (Ads) $175, GDS (T-shirts and signs) $88.73 and Lowes (lumber for signs) $309.11. June 21 July 4: Monetary contributions were $1,000; expenditures reported were $1,621.90; Contributions were from Steve Whittington $1,000; Expenditures were to The Goulding Agency (beads and Tri-fold) $812, GDS (Tshirts and signs) $357.38, Chipley Ozone All stars (donation) $50, Panhandle Watermelon Festival (watermelon) $150 and GDS (T-shirts) $252.52. Peggy Gilmore Gay Filed intent to seek ofce Feb. 6: Feb. 1Feb. 28: Monetary contributions were $350; expenditures were $16.50; Contributions were from Peggy Gay, $50 and Rodney Bledsoe, $300; expenditures are listed as Carol Finch Rudd (candidate petition verication) $10.10 and Carol Finch Rudd (candidate petition verication) $6.40. March 1 March 31: Monetary contributions were $250; there were no expenditures; Contributions were from Jim and Mary Gollehon, $100, C.E. Halley, Jr., $100, and S.B. Halley, $50; April 1 April 30: Monetary contributions were $20; In-Kind contributions were $15; expenditures reported were $182.76; Contributions were from Kim McDaniel, $20; Expenditures were to Sunland Print shop for candidate cards, $182.76. May 1 May 31: Monetary contributions were $940; In-Kind contributions were $10.95; expenditures reported were $137.95; Contributions were from Peggy Gay $250, Peggy Gay $250, Peggy Gay $120, Trudy Willis $20 and Mary Nelson $300; Expenditures were to Graphic Designs and Signs (campaign T-shirts) $121.98, Graphic Designs and Signs (campaign T-shirts) $83.46, Graphic Designs and Signs (campaign magnetic car signs) $42.80, Walmart (paint for campaign signs) $104.86, Walmart (paint for campaign signs) $23.37, Graphic Designs and Signs (campaign signs and Tshirts) $638 and Panhandle Watermelon Festival (Watermelon Festival Campaign Ad) $100. June 1 June 20: Monetary contributions were $1,370; In-Kind contributions were $10.95; expenditures reported were $1,344.89; Contributions were from George Gay $400, George Gay $470, Peggy Gay $50, Billy Brock $300 and Peggy Gay $150; Expenditures were to Jackson County Lumber (supplies for campaign signs) $54.31, Graphic Designs and signs (campaign signs) $203.30, Graphic Designs (Campaign signs) $240.75, Graphic Designs and Signs (campaign signs) $520.15 and Graphic Designs and Signs $326.35. June 21 July 4: Monetary contributions were $340; expenditures reported were $331.51; Contributions were from Johnny Shouppe $300, Trudy Willis $20 and Trudy Willis $20; Expenditures were to Wausau Volunteer Fire Department (ad) $60, Graphic Designs and Signs (T-shirts) 70.62, WalMart (giveaways) $153.06, WalMart (T-shirts) 47.83. Carnette Keith Adkison: Filed intent to seek ofce February 13: Feb. 1 Feb. 28: Monetary contributions were $100; there were no expenditures reported for the reporting period; Contributions were from Carnette Keith Adkison, $100. March 1 March 31: Monetary contributions were $200; there were no expenditures reported for the reporting period; Contributions were from Patricia A. Pitts, $200: April 1 April 30: Monetary contributions were $1,300; expenditures reported were $1,444.50; Contributions were from New Tech Electrical $200 and Carnette Keith Adkison, $1,100: Expenditures were for Ron the Sign Man (campaign sign) $1,444.50. May 1 May 31: Monetary contributions were $0; expenditures reported were $95.78; Expenditures were to Creative Printing of Bay County (business cards) $40, Washington County Supervisor of Elections (petition fee) $15.90 and Creative Printing of Bay County (business cards) $39.88. June 1 June 20: Monetary contributions were $1300; InKind contributions were $140; expenditures reported were $1,091.62; Contributions were from Keith Adkison $200 and Keith Adkison $1,100; In-Kind contributions were from Joy Danielle Coatany $42 and Dawn Nancy Adkison $98; Expenditures were to Sims Signs (T-shirts) $231.12, Ron The Sign Man (signs) $695.50, Foster Folly News (advertising) $115 and Crossroads Publishing (advertising) $50. June 21 July 4: Monetary contributions were $125; InKind contributions were $78.89; expenditures reported were $125; Contributions were from Keith Adkison $125; InKind contributions were from Dawn Nancy Adkison $78.89; Expenditures were to Panhandle Watermelon Festival (Watermelon) $125. Lora C. Bell led intent to seek ofce Feb. 19: Feb. 1 Feb. 28: Monetary contributions were $2,000; there were no expenditures reported for the reporting period; Contributions were from Lora C. Bell $2,000; March 1 March 31: there were no Monetary contributions reported; expenditures were $17.30; expenditures are listed as Washington County Supervisor of Elections $7 and Washington County Supervisor of Elections $10.30; April 1 April 30: There were no Monetary contributions for the reporting period; expenditures were $84.99; expenditures are listed as $84.99 to Lora C. Bell for RMB. May 1 May 31: Monetary contributions were $2000; expenditures reported were $2,986.76; Contributions were from Lora C. Bell $1000 and Lora C. Bell $1000; Expenditures were to Graphic Designs $2072.98, Graphic Designs $644.14 and Graphic Designs $269.64. June 1 June 20: Monetary contributions were $0; expenditures reported were $787.75; Expenditures were to Wausau Volunteer Fire Department $60, Graphic Designs $347.75, Lora C. Bell $380. June 21 July 4: Monetary contributions were $1,500; expenditures reported were $753.28; Contributions were from Lora C. Bell $1,500; Expenditures were to Graphic Designs $113.42, Lora C. Bell $325.79 and Townsends Building Supply $314.07. M elissa Whitson led intent to seek ofce M arch 24: April 1 April 30: Monetary contributions were $85.95; expenditures reported were $154.89; Contributions were from Charles Brock, $85.95: Expenditures were for Vista Print (business card) $68.94 and Vista Print (business card) $ 85.95. May 1 May 31: Monetary contributions were $300; expenditures reported were $140.96; Contributions were from Melissa Whitson $300: Expenditures were for Chipley Post Ofce (postage) $9.45, Shindigz (advertising) $114.91 and Supervisor of Elections (ling 166 petitions) $16.60. June 1 June 20: Monetary contributions were $2,000; In-Kind contributions were $322.61; In-Kind contributions were from Charles Brock (shirts) $322.61; Expenditures were to Wells Fargo (Service fee) $10. June 21 July 4: Monetary contributions were $0; expenditures reported were $2,065.51; Expenditures were to Speedy Signs USA (ads) $48.15, Speedy Signs USA (ads) $48.15, Speedy Signs USA (ads) $1,099.14, Speedy Signs USA (ads) $432.28, Discount mugs (ad) $165.12, Good Guys Signs (ad) $320.49 and Speedy Signs (refund) $48.15 PU BL IC NO TI CE Wa sh in gt on Co un ty FL Ca ro l Fi nc h Ru dd S up er vi so r of El ec ti on s an no un ce s th e Vo te r Re gi st ra ti on Bo ok s wi ll clo se Ju ly 28 20 14 fo r th e Au gu st 26 20 14 Pr im ar y El ec ti on Th e Re gi st ra ti on Boo k Cl osi ng Da te is th e st at ew id e de ad lin e to re gi st er to vo te OR ch an ge yo ur po li ti ca l pa rt y af l ia ti on fo r an y el ec ti on if yo u ar e al re ad y re gi st ere d to vo te Fo r r st ti me vo te rs in Fl or id a, a co mp le te d vo te r re gi st ra ti on fo rm mu st be i n th e Su pe rv is or of El ec ti on s of c e or po st mar ke d, by th e Boo k Cl osi ng Da te If yo u ha ve re lo ca te d fr om an ot he r Fl or id a Co un ty to Wa sh in gt on Co un ty or re lo ca te d wi th in Wa sh in gt on Co un ty ch an ge yo ur ad dr es s wi th th e Su pe rv is or of El ec ti on s of c e as so on as po ss ib le PU BL IC TE ST OF VO TI NG EQ UI PM EN T: Th e Wa sh in gt on Co un ty Ca nv as si ng Bo ar d wi ll co nv en e at th e of c e of th e Su pe rv is or of El ec ti on s, 13 31 So ut h BL VD Su it e 90 0, Ch ip le y, Fl or id a, at 10 :0 0 A. M. on We dn es da y, Au gu st 6, 20 14 Th e Ca nv as si ng Bo ar d is co nv en in g fo r th e te st in g of th e ba ll ot ta bu la ti ng eq ui pm en t to be us ed fo r th e Au gu st 26 20 14 Pr im ar y El ec ti on PA NA MA RO OF IN G si nc e 19 20 Bond ed In su re d SU MME R SA LE 20 % OF F AL L Res id en ti al Ro o ng 85 026 511 51 Fl or ida 's Ol de st Ro o ng Fi rm Re -R oo f Sp ec ia li st FL LI C CCC 13 29 654 Washin g ton Count y Cam p ai g n Contributions Washington County News | A5 Saturday, July 26, 2014

PAGE 6

Local A6 | Washington County News Saturday, July 26, 2014 2014 Universal Uclick from The Mini Page 2014 Uni versal Uclick To order, Andrews McMeel Universal, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206 Please send ______ copies of (Item #0-7407-6511-6) at $13.45 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.) www.smartwarehousing.com Name: _________ _______________________ _____________ _______________________ ____ Address: _______ ________________________ _________ _____________ _________________ City: ____________________ _________ _______ _____ State: _________ Zip: ___________ ____ The popular nine-part series on the Constitution, written in collaboration with the National Archives, is now packaged as a colorful 32-page softcover book. The series covers: the preamble, the seven articles and 27 amendments the big ideas of the document the history of its making and the signers Throughout the years arc hitecture has moved bac k and forth between cl assical styles with simple cl ean lines and styles with a lot of ornament and design, suc h as the Gothic The Mini Pa ge talked with an arc hitectural historian at the Sa vannah (Georgia) College of Art and Design to learn about arc hitecture ideas from the 1400s through toda y. Renaissance Afte r cent uries of ornamenta l Got hic desi gns arc hit ects were eager to bring bac k the cl ean lines of cl assical Rome In the 1400s they began building with Roman-style columns domes and arc hes in the style (REN-uh-zahns) means rebirth. Other arts had a rebirth during this time as well. Baroque By the 1600s, architects were making classical forms more lively and decorative. They built with large curves and dramatic, ornamental columns. This period is known as the (buh-ROKE). Furniture and art were also designed with curvier lines and decorations. Artists began creating sculptures as parts of the fronts and rooftops of buildings. Rococo Around the 1720s and 1730s, architects grew more playful with the (ru h KOE-koe) style. The insides and outsides of buildings overflowed with ornaments and decorations. The curvy lines of the Baroque grew even curvier. Rooms were filled with mirrors to make them feel more magical. Scrollwork, artwork and statues decorated buildings. During this time in Europe, wealthy people and royalty became even wealthier, while common people became poorer. The wealthy demanded more and more decorative rooms, furniture and fashion. Fr om Simple to Or nate and Beyond Ar chit ectur e Step s in Time St. Charles Church in Vienna, Austria, was built in the Baroque style. photo by David Iliff, courtesy Wikipedia The Tempietto is a Renaissancestyle chapel at a church in Rome. Can you spot the classical Roman style elements? photo by Johannes Bckh & Thomas Mirtsch The Ba silic a at Ot tobeu re n in Bava ria sh ows th e fan cy decor atin g style of Roco co archi tec tur e. The insid es of Roco co bui ldin gs are pac ked with ornam ent s and decor atio ns. Arch ite cts enjo yed decora ti ng with real go ld. Wal ls we re ligh t-c olo re d to b et te r dis pla y the deco rat ion Return to Classical Angered at the huge differences between wealthy powerful people and everyone else in the 1700s European and American citizens rebelled. American Colonists and the Fr enc h overthrew their governments Arc hite ctural styles reflec ted these revolut ions In the mid-1700 s and earl y 1800s styles switc hed bac k to simp ler cl assical l ines Pe ople thought a lot of ornament atio n wa s tastele ss They reb el le d agains t exces s. Around this time Greece again became an independent country Greece became a cool place to visit. We sterners could now view these cl assical buildings for themselves They wa nted to imitate those styles This return to the cl assical took several forms In America, for example the style offered pure cl ean, regular forms with cl assical elements In the style arc hitects designed buildings to look like Greek temples A party of styles In the 1800s, technological advances such as steam power and photography allowed people to see more of the world. People imitated architectural styles from many time periods and countries. Different styles were sometimes even mixed into one building. This is called ( eh-KLEK-ti-sizuhm). When something is it means it is made up of many different types of things. Moving Into the Moder n Age photo by Anderskev, courtesy Wikipedia The Virginia state capitol, built in 1788, was designed by Thomas Jefferson in the Neoclassical style. The former Centennial National Bank in Philadelphia, built in 1876, is an example of Eclecticism. Architect Frank Furness wanted to create a sense of motion. photo courtesy Wikipedia Into the 20th century In the early 1900s, (new-VOE), or new art, brought back curvy and ornamental designs, but with a modern twist. Art Nouveaus curvy, wild designs often imitated nature, as in the Tassel House in Brussels, Belgium. photo by Henry Townsend Ready Resources from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick The Mini Page provides ideas for websites, books or other resources that will help you learn more about this weeks topics. On the Web: At the library: Doolittle Ben Kassoy Wor ds that remi nd us of archit ectu re are hidde n in the block below Some wor ds are hidd en backwar d or dia gona lly. See if you can find: ART S, BAROQUE, BOX, CRAFTS, CURVES, DECORATIVE, DESIGN, ECLECTIC, EMPIRE, FORMS, FUN, ORNAMENTAL, NOUVEAU, POSTMODERN, RENAISSANCE, ROCOCO, SKYSCRAPER, STATE, TALL. Ar chitectur e from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Basset Browns Tr y n Fin d from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Blaise: What did the student say when the teacher asked him to use the word cousin in a sentence? Doug: I put on my mittens, cause in the winter my hands guess the common theme or category? Rose: invite the other to his house? Josh: Mig hty Funn y s Mi ni Joke s Lisa: What makes a point without using a finger? Stacia: from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Mi ni Sp y Mini Spy and the Dots are visiti ng the Guggenhei m Museu m in Bilb ao, Spain. See if you can find: cherry bell letter A key umbrella seal teapot fish ruler book dog face mug letter D kite ladder cat heart sock number 3 ring from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick 1. Wash spinach thoroughly and pat leaves dry. 2. Slice strawberries and cut apple into bite-size pieces. 3. Mix spinach, fruit, pecans and cheese in large bowl. 4. Pour poppy-seed dressing over salad and toss gently. You will need an adults help with this recipe. Ro ok ie Co ok ie s Reci pe Frui tful Sp inac h Salad spinach cheese from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Me et Spe nc er Bo ldman Spenc er Bol dman stars as Jacks on in has a cted in sev era l TV an d onl ine s hows, inc ludi ng the Disn ey XD seri es Lab Rat s, and the TV ser ies Jessie , iC arl y and mov ies, incl udin g Da kotas Sum mer. Spencer, 22, grew up outside of Dallas, Texas, with one and community plays as he was growing up. now lives in Los Angeles with his golden retriever, Jack. photo by Bob DAmico, courtesy Disney Channel The Min i Pa ge Staff B et ty Debna m Foun ding Edito r a nd E dito r at Lar ge Li sa Tarry Ma na ging E dito rL ucy Li en Ass ocia te Ed it or We ndy Daley Art ist Postmodernism or after modern, buildin gs sprang up around the 1960 s. Archi tects hono red histor y by playful ly att achin g classi cal bits to the fronts of buildings They turn ed away fro m th e mo der n glass box id ea. Leading Into the 21st Century photo by Marc Ryckaert The Steigenberger Hotel in El Gouna, Egypt, is a Postmodern style building. Deconstructivism Around the 1980s, architects began playing with wild, fun shapes. (dee-konSTRUK-ti-vi-zum) basically means structures are taken apart and put back together, or re in different ways. photo by Myk Reeve The Guggenhei m Muse um in Bilbao, Spain, was created by Frank Gehry with airplane des ig n s of twa re. Many Deconstructive st yl e b u il din g s c ou ld h av e b een built only with computer help Next week, The Mini Page celebrates the 75th anniversary of The Wizard of Oz movie. The Mini Page thanks Dr. David Gobel, architectural history professor, Savannah College of Art and Design, for help with this issue. Skyscrapers When technology such as elevators and steel frames were invented, it became possible to build a whole new type of building, the Before the late 1800s, there were few buildings taller than six stories. For many years, there were few skyscrapers outside of America. Modern styles blossom The also took hold in the early 1900s. It valued the use of natural materials, especially in homes. Nature themes inside the buildings were popular. photo courtesy Wikipedia The Gilbert House in Los Angeles is an example of Arts and Crafts architecture. An American style The Arts and Crafts movement led to the Buildings stretched across the ground and blended into their American surroundings in a natural manner. photo by Jeremy A., courtesy Wikipedia This house in Highland Park, Illinois, is one of architect Frank Lloyd Wrights Prairie style homes. photo by Hakilon The Empire State Building in New York City is 103 stories tall. After it was finished in 1931, it remained the tallest building in the world for about 40 years. Mo de rn Mo ve me n t The also known as the became popular in the 1920s. The buildings are simple and box-like. The purpose of the building is more important than what it looks like. The Villa Savoye outside Paris was designed by Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret. It was made of reinforced concrete. Finished in about 1931, it is one of the main examples of the Modern style. photo courtesy Wikipedia from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick On the trac k, sp rin ter Trayv on Br ome ll tr ies to ru n lik e the win d a na tural, smo oth un stop pable forc e. pre mier even t, the 100 -me ter dash. Trayvo n was the 2013 Gato rade Nation al Trac k Ath lete of the Yea r as a high school senior, and excel led in his freshman seaso n at Bayl or Univ ersit y in Waco Tex as. At the NCAA Out doo r Trac k an d Field Cha mpions hip s in Jun e, he won the 100 -met er title an d If the wind is blo wing too har d, it can p us h a runne r to highe r sp eed s and lower times Those resul ts are said to be win d-aid ed, an d do not count toward reco rd s. In a rac e in Ma y, Tr ayvon bl ew thr ough the 100 in 9.7 7 se con ds the ninth -fas tes t wi ndaide d time ever rec orde d. Tr ayv on Br om el l Gus Goodsport s Supersport Height: 5-9 Birthdate: 7-10-1995 Hometown: St. Petersburg, Florida

PAGE 7

Local Washington County News | A7 Saturday, July 26, 2014

PAGE 8

Local A8 | Washington County News Saturday, July 26, 2014

PAGE 9

Washington County News | A9 Saturday, July 26, 2014 Wi th our dec ades of exp er ienc e, To wn s end Bu ilding Su pply ha s gained an inc re dible amount of exp er tise in the co nstr uc tion industr y. Le t us put tha t kn ow ledge and exp er ienc e to use to help yo u with yo ur nex t pr ojec t. 1520 Hw y 90 We st Chiple y, Fl a. 850-638-1625 Ho urs: MF 7-5 and Sa t 8-N oon Wh at is Pr es su re -T re at ed (PT) Lu mb er ? Ov er 70 ye ars ag o, Dr Ka rl Wo lm an in ve nt ed th e pro ces s of inf us in g pr es er va ti ve de ep ly in to wo od pro du ct s. To da y, a gi an t in du st ry has gr ow n up ar ou nd hi s qu es t to in ve nt a wo od th at ca n la st fo re ve r. Pr es su re tr ea ti ng is a pro ces s th at fo rc es a che mic al pre se rv at iv e de ep in to th e wo od e wo od pro du ct is pl ace d in to a hu mo ngo us cy lin dr ic al ho ld in g ta nk an d th e ta nk is dep re ss ur ize d to re mo ve all th e ai r. e ta nk is th en ll ed wi th pr es er va ti ve un der hig h pre ssu re fo rc in g it de ep ly in to th e wo od e ta nk is th en dra in ed an d th e re ma inin g pre se rv at ive re us ed e wo od is re mo ve d fr om th e ta nk an d pr ep ar ed fo r sh ipm en t. Ne edl es s to sa y, th is pr oc es s ma ke s th e wo od qu it e un ap pe ti zin g to all ve rm in, in se ct s an d fu ng us wh ic h acco un ts fo r it s 20-y ea rpl us lif es pa n un der th e ha rs he st co nd it io ns Pr es su re -t re at ed wo od is tr ul y a wo od fo r all se as on s a ru gg ed ext er io r bu il din g pr od uc t th at s ro t an d in se ct re si st an t. Tr ea te d wo od is us ed fo r de ck s, ma il bo x, l ig ht po st s, sw in g se ts an d pi cnic ta bl es an d ev en re siden ti al bu il din g fo un da ti on s. Yo u ca n pu rc has e pr es su re -t re at ed wo od as lu mb er bo ar ds po st s, an d ev en ply wo od It s uniq ue ab il it y to fe nd o de ca y ma ke s it ide al in an y hig h mo is tu re an d/ or gr ou nd co nt ac t in st al la tio ns Pr es su re tr ea te d lu mb er st ar ts at $1.67. AN EXCITING SALES OPPORTUNITY IN THE NEWS HERALD, WORKING ON: To apply send resume to LGrimes@pcnh.com. Ca ndida te s should ha ve prior ex perienc e in a sales en vir onmen t along with high school diploma or equiv alen t. Th e Ne ws He ra ld o e rs a co mpetitiv e bene t pack age including health, den tal lif e insur anc e, and 401(k) plan. Ca ndida te hir ed pending pr eemplo ymen t dr ug scr een and criminal back gr ound check The News Herald is seeking a Sales Support Coordinator The ideal candidate will need: St ro ng co mmunica tion sk ills and ve ry high at te nt ion to detail Ex ce llen t cust omer ser vic e, or ganiza tional sk ills and co mput er sk ills re quir ed Mu st be pr oc ess dr iv en and be able to fu nc tion e ec tiv ely and independen tly with asser tiv e, inno vat iv e and persuasiv e personalit y to ac hiev e sales objec tiv es on a re gular basis Th is position will wo rk co llabor at iv ely with the assig ned te am to en sur e ex ce ptional cust omer ser vic e to co mpan y s cur re nt an d pr ospec tiv e adv er tisers by helping set appoin tmen ts fo r sales te am and tak ing calls fr om clien ts SALES SUPPORT COORDINA TOR Special to the News The City of Chipley and Chipley High School is hosting the 2014 Dixie PreMajors World Series. The event began yesterday, July 25, and will go through Wednesday, July 30, at the CHS Baseball complex. This event has been in the works for several years. Made possible through the efforts of Head Coach Andy Compton and Direc tors Drayton Kilpatrick and James Park, local represen tatives say Chipley is hon ored to be selected to host an event of this magnitude. Coach Compton says hes thrilled with the sup port he has received from the community. With this support and the efforts of volunteers, Chipley is poised to host a rst class tournament. It has been our goal to host the very best tourna ment possible, said Comp ton. We want the teams that play in this tournament to remember where Chipley is, and in 20-30 years think about what a great time they had there. Each team competing is the state champion for their state. Eleven state winners, plus the Chipley (host), will vie for the opportunity to be the 2014 Dixie Pre-Majors World Series Champion. The event kicked off with a welcome banquet for the teams Friday night at the Washington County Agricultural Center. Coach Bobby Pierce, Head Base ball Coach for the Troy Uni versity Trojans, was be the guest speaker. The games began early this morning, July 26, and will last until Wednesday, July 30. One of the main features of the tournament will be a Homerun Derby, scheduled for tonight. One player from each team will be selected to represent their team. The Homerun Derby will begin at 7 p.m. and is free to the public. Donations will be taken at the gate for the Homerun Derby for the Dixie Scholarship Fund, and there will be plenty of concessions. Along with plenty of baseball, there will be plen ty to eat and drink from the quickly becoming famous Kils Concession Stand. We have even heard rumors that they will be unveiling Kils Grandslam Nachos. By PAT McCANN 747-5068 | Twitter: @patmc cann pmccann@pcnh.com EBRO Stocky Hess couldnt see it coming. The president of Ebro Greyhound Park witnessed a number of outstanding young dogs in the com pound since the start of the live racing season in May. But he didnt expect the track record for 5-16 mile, the distance which the vast majority of races are con tested, to be broken during the 2014 meeting. Too much of a long shot for betting purposes. Yet a preponderance of speedy young animals raised the prospect that a greyhound would better the standard of 29.89 sec onds set by Inconvenience in 2004. Now that Cheryl White lowered it to 29.84 on Saturday, Hess doesnt know how long that mark will stand. It may last forever, Hess said. I dont know. (Inconvenience) was the fastest in 60 years here, so I dont know. Cheryl White, a Ray Thurber Kennel 57-pound female only turned 2 years old on July 15. Owned by Thurber and trained by Brenda Levesque, Cheryl White got an outstanding break from the 5 hole and led the entire race, beating second-place Flying Hu midity by 7 lengths. It was Cheryl Whites ninth win of the season, which also leads all dogs at the track. She will try for her 10th victory in the Twilight fea ture seventh race tonight. From a little over two until about four, Hess said of a greyhounds prime rac ing years, claiming that the dogs gender doesnt really make a difference. Shes just entering her prime. Hess said that the grey hound racing industry is cyclical in that some years the breeding cycle produc es faster dogs. It just runs that way, he said. In some years the quality of pups is less than other years. Another reason that winning times have been lower this summer than in recent years could be that the track racing surface is more consistent. It is wa tered daily, Hess said, but a rainy July has served to pack it down even more. The evening that Cheryl White set the track record, two Grade B races, a rung below the fastest level of greyhounds at the track, were won in 30.16 seconds and 30.23. Every track has differ ent records; they all have different surfaces, length of turns, sharpness of turns and width of turns, Hess said. When the times are good, dogs are getting good traction. The track doesnt have to be hard, but they have to get traction. If the footing is good then they can glide on it. They dont have to labor. The fact that the quinie la, or the wager for the dogs nishing rst and second in the record-setting race, paid $217 was an indication that many Grade A races have been highly competi tive this summer. Despite winning nine races in 15 starts, Cheryl White was coming off a seventhand eighth-place showing her prior two starts. You have to see the rac es to know whether or not the greyhound is in good form or not, Hess said. She couldve been trapped early or she might have got loose and had no excuses. On Saturday, Cheryl White immediately got free and cleared the rst turn with an 8-length lead. Slatex Brazos was the bet ting favorite in the race, but could do no better than sixth. Slatex Brazos will start from the 1 hole in their re match tonight. Flying Hu midity will be in the 3 hole and Cheryl White alongside in the 4. Hess didnt think the midtrack slot would be all that much of a deterrent. After all, Cheryl White had the 5 hole in her record run. I dont think so, Hess said. As long as she gets room to run. Theyll bet her down pretty good. PATTI BLAK E | The News Herald Winning times have been faster than in recent seasons this summer at Ebro Greyhound Park. Season of speed Thurber Kennels Cheryl White breaks track record EBRO GREYHOUND TRACK 2014 Dixie Pre-Majors World Series underway Sports Special to The News The Vernon High School weightlifting team had the opportunity to present J.T. Padgett with his State Championship ring in rec ognition of his winning the 2014 Class 1A State Weightlifting title. Padgett competed this season in the 183 pound class and led the Vernon Yellow Jackets to a ninth place nish at the State Fi nals. He posted a 620-pound total and brought home the gold from Kissimmee. Padgett joins a select group of students from Vernon whove ever won a State Championship, and wrestling coach Bobby Johns said the 2014 VHS graduate began a tradition for future State Champion weightlifters. J.T. also was a vital part of leading the Yellow Jackets to the schools only District Title in 2013 when the football team brought home a District Champi onship, Johns said. J.T. has since departed for Washington, D.C., to play football at Gallaudet Uni versity, and he is a shining example of what makes Vernon High School a spe cial place to attend. The entire Vernon community is proud of J.T.s accom plishments and wish him the best in the future. S PE CIAL T O T H E N E W S From left, 2014 VHS graduate J.T. Padgett poses with his new state championship ring and Head Wrestling Coach Bobby Johns Padgett receives Championship ring He is a shining example of what makes Vernon High School a special place to attend. The entire Vernon community is proud of J.T.s accomplishments and wish him the best in the future. Bobby Johns, wrestling coach

PAGE 10

SCHOOL STYLE Heres a shopping primer to satisfy parents and their children MIXING AND MATCHING COLORS AND PATTERNS GIVES KIDS SOME ROOM TO EXPRESS THEIR CREATIVITY: Just make sure there is a unifying color, as in this look from Arizona Jeans and JCPenney: Navy and oral hoodie, $26, long-sleeved graphic tee, $14, and jeans, $30. CUTE, GIRLY WITH A LITTLE BIT OF ATTITUDE: Arizona pink sweatshirt, $26, and denim skirt, $30, JCPenney. BRIGHT COLORS AND SOFT FABRICS CREATE A WINNING COMBINATION FOR SCHOOL: Total Girl Blue Tres Rad Tee, $16, Black skirt, $18, and houndstooth legging, $12, all available at JCPenney. BOLDLY COLORED SEPARATES OFFER MULTIPLE OPTIONS FOR SCHOOL DAYS: Okie Dokie white ower tee, $12, and blue and pink ower skirt, $12, JCPenney. Dont let the summer heat lull you into complacency. School is only a few short weeks away, and soon stores will be stocking up on back to school staples. Inevitably, whether youre shopping for a toddler or a teen, there is one subject that is bound to come up: back to school style. The question is whose style? There are, essentially, only two stages your kids will go through when it comes to getting dressed: 1. You pick the clothes. 2. They pick the clothes. In between, there is plenty of gray area. After all, on the bumpy road from diapers to designer denim, you will encounter stumbling blocks, detours, and other potential pitfalls, including: 1. I love my dinosaur shirt/princess dress/PJs and wont wear anything else. 2. This shirt/dress/headband is annoying because it itches/pokes/bothers. 3. You can see my belly when I lift up my arms. 4. You cant see my belly when I lift up my arms. (Worse. Much worse). 5. I wont wear the smocked dress/ cute matching outt/button-down shirt because I want to wear tees/gym shorts/sweats like all the other kids. I could go on, but if youre still reading this, chances are I dont need to. Because youve been there. We all have. This topic came up during a recent conversation with two mom friends. One has an 11-year-old daughter who is uncomfortable with the attention generated by the cute, frilly outts her mom picks, and would gladly spend the day in a graphic tee and sweatpants. The other is the mom of a 16-year-old girl whose style has evolved from dresses to denim to hip separates from teen faves like Hollister and Brandy Melville. Five years, and a whole world, apart. Looking back over a lifetime of bow battles and dress debacles, did the mom of the teenager have any words of wisdom? You dont want your kid to be that kid, the kid whose mother dresses them funny. Within reason, let them have a say in what they wear. Ouch. A little deated, we decided to set some ground rules that would make everyone happy. Here then, are the basics of back to school shopping. 1. Y ou C an T ake T hem W ith Y ou (Occasionally): A kid is much more likely to wear something he or she had a hand in choosing. Take each child shopping individually and make an afternoon of it. Try to make it a special, stress-free time. 2. G ive T hem S ome G uidelines. These might involve the types of items you need to buy, a budget, or even modesty. Short shorts and crop tops are not suitable for school, even if there is no dress code. 3. Mix and Match. Choose one item you love, and allow your child to build an outt around it. Or vice versa. If your daughter has her heart set on a little bomber jacket, show her how cute it looks over the little dress you picked up. 4. L isten. Sometimes, a child reaches for one item over another for seemingly insignicant reasons a favorite color, a soft fabric. If you pay attention to why they like something, you can nd that same quality in some of the items that you prefer. 5. C ollect C atalogs. After screening a favorite catalog, allow your child to pick a few favorite items. You can also offer them a choice of preapproved items at a favorite store. A friend of mine allows her daughter to go into a favorite, trendy store, provided she avoids the short shorts and the graphic tees. 6. C ompromise. A friend lets her daughter choose her school clothes (as long as they are neat and they match), but reserves the right to choose the outt (including hairstyle) for church. I like to choose a dress for Lola, and then let her pick out the accessories. Even if that means wearing her favorite scarf three days in a row. At some point, it becomes less about expressing your personal style through your kids, and more about allowing them to express themselves. To get you started, here are some of the top trends in microfashion for fall. 1. S choolgirl S tyle: Cool specs, knee socks, button-down shirts, and blazers are all part of this classic schoolgirl trend, which has been going strong for a couple of years. Preppy basics like button-downs and khakis make the look work for little guys, too. 2. P lay with P rints: Combining fun, brightly colored prints is absolutely on-trend this upcoming season, and a great way to allow kids to make their own statement. 3. A dd S ome A ccessories: No look is complete without the nishing touches, so pick up a few cool accessories to make back to school fashion much more fun. Some of the most versatile picks include cool boots or ats, a hip slouchy bomber or moto jacket to wear with everything, or a piece of pretty jewelry to brighten her day. For more back to school outt ideas, go to pinterest. Nada Manley The Style File FASHION Saturday, July 26, 2014 A Page 10 Section www.chipleypaper.com SPLURGES V S. STEALS Splurge (F or Girls) Lobster sweater, $49, and canvas skirt, $39, Janie & Jack; Alster oral button top, $35, and Skinny Minnie Ponte Pants, $39, teacollection.com; 1969 Floral Super Skinny Skimmer Jeans, $34.95, and Slub Hi-Low Tank, $16.95, Gap (F or Boys) Shawl collar pullover, $39, and plaid canvas short, $36, Janie & Jack; Ostsee Chambray Shirt, $39, and Surplus playwear pants, $39, teacollection.com; Zipoff cargos, $48, and casual shirt, $38, bodenusa.com S teal (F or Girls) French Bulldog glitter tee, $19.95, and sailor shorts, $26.95, Gymboree; Hotchpotch jersey dress, starting at $44, bodenusa.com; Polka dot shorts, $9.95, and jersey top, $4.95, H&M (F or Boys) Striped laceless sneakers, $26.95, Gymboree; Striped Henley shirt, $12.95, and cotton shorts, $12.95, H&M; Striped cotton shirt, $16.88, and twill shorts, $14.88, Crazy 8

PAGE 11

Local Washington County News | A11 Saturday, July 26, 2014 Health clinic open today only ALFORD Alford Community Health Clinic (ACHC) will be open from 10 a.m. until the last patient is seen today, Saturday, July 26. ACHC is a free clinic for patients who do not have medical insurance and who meet federal income guidelines. The clinic is staffed by qualied physicians, nurses and courteous assistants dedicated to providing quality health care to those with shortterm illnesses, as well as chronic conditions. Appointments are available by telephoning 850-272-0101 or 209-5501, and walk-ins are always welcome. All patients are urged to signin before 11 a.m. Alford Community Health Clinic is located two blocks east of U.S. 231 in Alford, at 1770 Carolina St. Annual old fashioned democratic picnic TALLAHASSEE The 14th annual Old Fashioned (but air-conditioned) Democratic Picnic will be held from 4-7 p.m., today, July 26, at the Southside Arts Complex. Supper will be from 4-5 p.m. with candidates beginning to speak at 5 p.m. Music will be by Craig Reeder of Hot Tamale. Admission is $5 and includes a barbecue meal and cold drinks. A cash bar with wine and beer will be available. The complex is at 2525 S. Monroe St. (E. Side Monroe at Orange) in Tallahassee. For more information, contact Dave Jacobsen at davejacobsen@msn.com. Mother daughter, father son banquet CHIPLEY A mother, daughter, father, son banquet is at 6 p.m., today, July 26, at the Washington County Agricultural Center in Chipley. This is a formal event. Tickets are $10 for a single ticket and $15 for a double ticket. For more information, call Jalessa Brown at 326-4264. Smoking Cessation BONIFAY Big Bend AHEC along with the Florida Department of Health in Holmes County will be offering a free smoking cessation class from 4-6 p.m., Monday, July 28. Class will be held at the Florida Department of Health in Holmes County 603 Scenic Circle, Bonifay. Free nicotine replacement patches, gum and lozenges are available. Class covers all forms of tobacco. For more information, contact Leann Jones at 547-8500 ext. 240 or email jlewis@bigbendahec. org No person shall, on the grounds of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion or sex be excluded from participation in, be denied benets of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity receiving or beneting from federal nancial assistance. Sensory impaired or limitedEnglish prociency patients will be provided with necessary aids and interpreters at no cost by calling Fran Amerson at 547-8500 ext. 234. Foxy Red Hatters CHIPLEY The Foxy Red Hatters will meet at 12:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 29 at KCs Pizza in Chipley. Movie Fun CHIPLEY Looking for an afternoon of entertainment escape but cannot drive to that far away movie theater? The Washington County Public Library will be showing Despicable Me 2 and serving free popcorn at 3:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 29, at the Chipley Branch. For more information, call 638-1314. Meet and eat luncheon CHIPLEY/MARIANNA Emerald Coast Hospice will host a free meet and eat luncheon to support those that have experienced a recent loss at 11 a.m., Wednesday, July 30, in the Chipley and Marianna ofces. For more information, call 526-3577 or 638-8787 to RSVP so we can prepare adequate lunch amounts. Braves vs. New York Mets WASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY The Krafty Katz Relay for Life team is holding fundraiser to see the Atlanta vs. New York Mets, Saturday, Sept. 20. Tickets are $100 and include the bus ride to and from Atlanta and seats to the game. The bus will leave Chipley at 12:30 p.m. and return at about 1 a.m. To ensure seat on the bus, call Vicki Lamb at 326-3319 or 638-1483. Swimming lessons set at Chipola MARIANNA Chipola College will offer Childrens swimming lessons for ages 4 and older on Monday, Aug. 4, through Thursday, Aug. 14, with a registration deadline of Thursday, July 31. The class is available at 10 a.m. or 7 p.m. The session will include eight 45-minute classes, which meet Monday through Thursday for two weeks. Lessons are based on a combination of nationally recognized methods. Cost of the two-week session is $55. Pre-registration is required, with a $5 late registration fee. For more information, call 718-2473 or visit www.chipola.edu. Bethlehem alumni reunion BETHLEHEM The Bethlehem Alumni Reunion is scheduled for Saturday, Aug. 2, in the cafeteria at Bethlehem School. A time of meeting and greeting will begin at 5:15 p.m., with dinner scheduled to begin at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 each. The dinner menu will consist of ribeye steak, baked potato, green salad, roll and dessert. Please make plans to attend. Tickets can be purchased at Millers Grocery or by contacting Cheryl Daughtery at 334-3600308 or Peggy Moore at 415-2438. Chipola to offer basic corrections MARRIANNA The Chipola College Public Service Department will offer a Basic Corrections course beginning Monday, Aug. 11. The 420-hour program will meet weekdays from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. through Tuesday, Nov. 11. Completion of the program prepares candidates to take the State Board Examination for entry into the Corrections eld. Candidates for all programs must be at least 19 years of age and earn a passing score on the Criminal Justice Basic Abilities Test (CJBAT) offered at the Public Service Building every Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. Cost of the test is $45. Applicants must have a standard high school diploma or its equivalent and must undergo a medical physical examination, background check and drug screening. For information regarding the application process, contact Jamie McAllister, Corrections Coordinator, at 573-0437. Holmes County 4H will hold open meeting for new livestock club The Holmes County 4-H program through the University of Florida and IFAS Extension will hold an open meeting for youth interested in raising 4-H animal projects and showing their animals in upcoming local fairs. Interested youth, parents, and individuals interested in volunteering are encouraged to attend this meeting at 6 p.m., Tuesday, Aug. 12, at the Holmes County Ag Center. Youth ages 5-18 and their parents will have the opportunity to explore the different animal focuses such as beef cattle, horses, poultry and rabbits being offered within the 4-H Livestock Club and meet with the 4-H Agent and volunteers. Youth will also be able to enroll in the new 4-H year which begins, Monday, Sept. 1. Volunteer information will be available for those adults interested in getting involved in this new 4H livestock program. For more information regarding this event or for additional 4-H information, contact Niki Crawson at 547-1108, ncrawson@u. edu or go to holmes.ifas. u.edu. Back to school fair CHIPLEY Northwest Florida Community Hospital will host the annual The Back to School Fair from 9 a.m. to noon, Thursday, Aug. 14, on the front lawn. This is a free event to help school-age children prepare to return to school, looking spiffy and equipped with the necessary school supplies. There will be a back pack drawing as well. For more information, call Joanie Beard at 415-8104. Political Rally BONIFAY A political Rally will be held at Bethlehem United Methodist Church at 11 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 16. Dinner plates will be available for $7 and will include country style ribs or chicken leg quarters, cole slaw, baked beans, roll, drink and dessert. The plates are a fundraiser for local missions. The church is at 1622 Bethlehem Church Road in Bonifay. For more information, call 547-3780. Bethlehem Peewee football to hold fundraisers The players of the Bethlehem peewee football will host a community yard sale Saturday, Aug. 2, at the Esto Park starting at 7 a.m. Tables will be available for rent inside the building for $25 or outside for $20. A spot outside with no table will be available for $10. Rentals must be paid by Wednesday, July 30. For more information call Shane Coleman at 703-0841, April Seluga at 326-7666 or Rachel at 8497076. They can also be contacted on Facebook at Bethlehem peewee fundraising. 2014 peanut eld day MARIANNA The annual UF/IFAS peanut eld day will be held at the Marianna North Florida Research and Education Center, Thursday, Aug. 14. The event will begin at 8 a.m. and ending with a sponsored lunch. Field tours will begin at 8:30 a.m. Topics will include disease control, new varieties, crop management and weed control. CEUs, including core, will be available at registration. For more information call 394-9124. Childbirth Education Class BONIFAY The Florida Department of Health in Holmes County will be offering free Childbirth Education Classes, Aug. 5, Aug. 12, Aug. 19 and Aug. 26. Classes will be held from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Healthy Start Annex, 402 N. Oklahoma St., Bonifay. Brianne Harrison from Group B Strep International will be speaking at the class held on Aug. 12 concerning awareness and prevention of Group B Strep disease in babies before birth through early infancy. For more information or to register for classes, please contact 547-8684 ext. 16 or 18. No person shall, on the grounds of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion or sex be excluded from participation in, be denied benets of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity receiving or beneting from federal nancial assistance. Sensory impaired or LimitedEnglish Prociency patients will be provided with necessary aids and interpreters at no cost by calling Fran Amerson at 547-8500 ext. 234 Community EVENTS MONDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 6 p.m.: Third Monday Holmes/ Washington Relay For Life Meeting at Patillos 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach ofce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999. TUESDAY 8-9 a.m.: Tai Chi Class at the Washington County Public Library, Chipley Branch 8-10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 6:10 p.m..: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at speedball 6:10 p.m., Early bird 6:20, session 6:50 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-7654 or 638-7654 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Bible Study 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9-11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 638-0093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 1 p.m.: Caregivers Meeting at Washington County Council on Aging in Chipley for more information call 638-6216 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society second Thursday of each month. The public is invited to attend. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Line Dancing Class for more information call 638-6216 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A FRIDAY 6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 6386216 or 638-6217. 3:30 p.m.: Bead Class every second Friday at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery call 703-0347 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper 4th Friday of every month January September. 6-8 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging 50+ dance club for more information call 638-6216 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a get-together for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Methodist Youth Center in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. SATURDAY 8 a.m.: North Bay Clan of The Lower Muskogee Creek Yard Sale rst Saturday of the month until 2 p.m. 1560 Lonnie Road. Free Medical Clinic in Graceville Opens 10 a.m. third and fth Saturday of the month. Call 263-6912 or 272-0101 for information. The Holmes County Community Health Clinic at 203 W. Iowa St., Bonifay, will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., the rst and third Saturday The Alford Community Health Clinic will be open the 2nd and 4th Saturdays of each month, from 10 a.m. until the last patient is seen. 10 a.m. to noon: Childrens education day fourth Saturday of every month North Bay Clan Tribal Grounds, 1560 Lonnie Road. SUNDAY 11 a.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Worship Service 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Worship Service 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at Graceville-Campbellton Hospital in Graceville. Library hours Wausau Library Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Holmes County Library (Bonifay) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed Washington County Library (Chipley) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed V ernon Library Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Sunny Hills Library Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed COMMUNITY CALENDAR

PAGE 12

FAITH Saturday, July 26, 2014 A Page 12 Section www.chipleypaper.com If you would like your church listed here, please send information to: news@chipleypaper.com. Due to space limitation, please only send regular church services. For special services, please send separate submission. Assembly of God LITTLE ROCK ASSEMBL Y OF GOD Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 1923 Highway 173 in Bonifay. LIVE OAK ASSEMBL Y OF GOD SER VICES Discipleship Class is held Sunday at 10 a.m., with Morning Worship at 10:45 a.m. and Evening Worship at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday Services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 2118 Live Oak Road in Bonifay. NOR THSIDE ASSEMBL Y OF GOD Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Sunday School is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 1009 North Rangeline Street in Bonifay. W AUSAU ASSEMBL Y OF GOD Sunday School is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 3537 Washington Street in Wausau. WINTER VILLE ASSEMBL Y OF GOD Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. The church is at 1897 Highway 177A in Bonifay Baptist BEREAN BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7:30 p.m. The church is at 1438 Nearing Hills Drive in Chipley. BLUE LAKE BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 1405 Blue Lake Road in Chipley. BETHLEHEM BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The church is at 1572 Highway 177 in Bonifay. BETHANY BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 1404 North Highway 79 in Bonifay. GULL Y SPRINGS BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 2826 U.S. 90 in Bonifay. SALEM FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School 10 am, worship service 11 am, Evening worship 6 pm, Wednesday service at 7 pm. Church is at 2555 Kynesville Highway, Alford, Fl. SHADY GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 1955 Highway 177A in Bonifay. UNITY BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 3274 River Road in Vernon. WEST BONIF A Y BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 609 West Indiana Ave. in Bonifay. Wausau First Baptist Church Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 3493 Washington Street in Wausau. Catholic BLESSED TRINITY CA THOLIC CHURCH Sunday Mass is held at 9 a.m. Wednesday evening Mass is held at 5:30 p.m. Adoration is held the rst Friday at from noon to 3 p.m. Holy Hour is held Tuesday from 7-8 p.m. The church is at 2331 Hwy 177A in Bonifay. ST. JOSEPH THE WORKER CA THOLIC CHURCH Sunday Mass is held at 11 a.m. Tuesday Mass is held at 9 a.m. The church is at 1664 Main St., in Chipley. ST. THERESA CA THOLIC CHURCH Sunday Mass is held at 10 a.m. Monday through Friday Mass is held at 8 a.m. Saturday Mass is held at 5 p.m. Adoration is held the rst Friday after 8 a.m. Mass. The church is at 2056 Sunny Hills Blvd., in Chipley. Church of Christ CHIPLEY CHURCH OF CHRIST Sunday morning bible study is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 1295 Brickyard Road in Chipley. Episcopal ST. MA TTHEWS EPISCOP AL CHURCH Morning worship is held at 9 a.m. Wednesday worship service is at 12:15 p.m. Evangelistic VERNON EV ANGELISTIC CHURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is on Highway 79 in Vernon. Methodist BONIF A Y FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Worship begins at 10:45 a.m. Youth Services are held on Wednesdays at 6:00 p.m. Pentecostal FIRST UNITED PENTECOST AL CHURCH Morning Worship is held at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 1816 Highway 90 in Chipley. W AUSAU PENTECOST AL HOLINESS Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 6 p.m. The church is at 2201 Pioneer Road in Wausau. Other BONNETT POND CHURCH Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 2680 Bonnett Pond Road in Chipley. CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP CENTER Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 1458 Monroe Shefeld Road in Chipley. HOUSE OF PRA YER WORSHIP CENTER Sunday School and Childrens Church is held at 9 a.m. Morning Worship at 11 a.m. Youth activities on Wednesday begin at 4:30 p.m. Praise and worship services are at 6:30 p.m. on Friday. The church is at 763 West Blvd. in Chipley. YES LORD DELIVERANCE Sunday School is held at 10:30 a.m. Worship is held at noon. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 739 7th St. n Chipley. Church LISTINGS As I settled into my pastorate in Danville, Pennsylvania, I was delighted to have as one of our parishioners a retired missionary by the name of Charles F. Stamm. It is always wonderful to have a missionary in the congregation to remind us of what we are all about. As I became acquainted with Charlie, as he wanted to be called, I grew a little disappointed. This missionary was probably the most depressed and discouraged person I had ever seen. It was hard for me to understand why a man who had committed his life to serving the Lord should come to the end of his life a discouraged and depressed old man. I did whatever I could to try to cheer him up, but to no avail. It took a while for me to come to the center of Charlies discouragement and depression. To put it simply, he and his wife had served as missionaries in Mali, West Africa for many years. According to Charlie, his entire ministry was a failure. Several years before I arrived in Danville, Charlies wife, Sadie, had died of cancer. That brought more depression upon this dear old brother. In a rare moment of condence, Charlie told me that in all his years in Africa, he had never led one soul to Jesus Christ. When he told me that, his eyes overowed with tears of sorrow and regret. What has my life really meant? he sobbed. Unfortunately, I had no words of encouragement for my dear brother. In doing a little research, I found an article in the Alliance Witness dated June 5, 1991. One sentence in that article jumped out at me. Thirtythree years later there were still no Fulbe churches. The Stamms had succeeded only in sowing the gospel seed among these people. According to the record, there was nothing to show for Charlie and his wifes ministry in Africa. After getting to know Charlie a little bit he shared with me his testimony. One night my brother and I heard a young man preach the gospel on the street corner. I do not remember just what he said but he put me under conviction. I was selfrighteous and thought I was saved because I thought I was doing the best possible for one to be saved. Billy Sunday came to Pittsburgh and as I was hungering after God I gladly attended one of his meetings. After one meeting, one of the Christian workers asked me if I was saved. I told him I thought so. He then gave me two tracts, What it means to be a Christian, and, How to make a success of the Christian life. I used to read those tracts, then read my Bible and compare my life with what I was reading. One of the rst things I saw was that I was lost and undone and that Christ had borne my sins and it was necessary for me to accept Him and live for Him. I tried my best to accept the Lord at home but something seemed to say that I needed to accept Christ publicly. I wondered where I could do such a thing. One day on my way to a Lutheran church I saw a small sign on an old building that said, Gospel Mission and something seemed to say that this is the place to accept Christ publicly. On August 1, 1915, I accepted Jesus as my Savior and my burdens rolled away. A few years later in another mission I surrendered to Christ as my Lord and the verse, Lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the age became a reality to me. Since I found Christ as my Savior I knew that there were many heathen have never heard about him and my heart went out to them. I wanted them to have a chance to accept Christ as their Savior as I did. I believe those in America can nd the Lord as their Savior easily enough if they seek and there are many who know the gospel and will give out the gospel. I believe there are many poor heathen souls who are really seeking the light and they need someone to tell them the simple gospel story. I offered, if need be, my life to serve Christ and felt certain I should offer at least as much to my Lord who bought me with his precious blood. I know I am a failure in myself, but I also know that I can do all things through Christ who strengtheneth me. I was delighted when Charlie shared his personal testimony with me. As he talked I was convinced he really had a sense of Gods calling upon his life to be a missionary. The problem he had was, he believed he was an absolute failure as a missionary. After all, the results did not show him to be very successful. Several years after coming to Danville we had a missionary conference and one of the missionaries was from Africa. After he settled in, he asked me, Does Charles F. Stamm comes to the church here? When I answered in the afrmative, he said he really needed to go and see Charlie. When we got to Charlies apartment, I introduced the two men, one an old seasoned missionary and the other a vibrant young missionary. I could see the curiosity in Charlies eyes as he looked over this young missionary. Rev. Stamm, and he stood in front of Charlie as Charlie sat in his easy chair, I want to bring you Christian greetings from He then rattled off the names of leaders of the church in Mali who were converted from the Muslim religion. As it turned out, these men all remembered Charlie and contributed their conversion to Christ to good old Charlies ministry in Africa. As the missionary told the story of how these young Africans were converted to Jesus Christ and became the leadership of the Christian and Missionary Alliance in Mali, good old Charlies eyes lled with tears and they ran down his cheeks almost unstoppable. Charlie began sobbing. Then, I began sobbing. I was not quite sure why I was sobbing, but I knew exactly why good old Charlie was sobbing. For so many years, he felt his ministry was a failure. Now, almost 20 years after he left the eld, he is witnessing the fruit of what he thought was a barren ministry. The missionary gave Charlie pictures of the leaders of the church in Mali and until the day he died, Charlie cherished those photographs. About two years later, I had the honor of ofciating at Charlies funeral. It was my privilege at that funeral to share Charlies story. I have had a long time to think about Charlies story and I have come to a very serious conclusion. Sometimes, for whatever purpose, God calls us to be light in a dark place. What we might be doing at the time may not appear to be very successful from a human standpoint. After all, were not working for a man but rather for God views our life, work and ministry from a divine perspective. Today we are worshiping at the altar of Results. If we do not get the results we want or are expecting, we close up shop and go somewhere else. The sense of the call, has somehow been watered down to a vocation. This vocation is guided and evaluated by the measurements of the world. How we can bring the worlds values to bear upon the work of the ministry is one of the neatest tricks the devil has ever played upon the church of Christ. How many people, like my friend good old Charlie, feel that their life and ministry is a failure because they do not match up to the results the world considers important? The great commission is simply Go Ye, without any mention at all of earthly results. If a person were to study the early missionary efforts under that grand missionary statesman, A. B. Simpson, we would have to conclude that he was an absolute failure in many regards. More missionaries died on their way to Africa than actually arrived in Africa. Along the way were trials, tribulations, heartaches and disappointments. Establishing Gods work in Africa was paved with the blood of the martyrs. We have forgotten our history. We look to the world for some kind of paradigm to judge what we are doing for the King of kings and Lord of lords. Charlies story taught me one thing if anything, that is, I am serving Jesus Christ and not man. I am to honor and please Christ, not me. Where are those who are willing to be, for the cause of Christ, a light in a dark place? The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@ att.net or website www. jamessnyderministries. com. Sometimes, God calls us just to be light DR. JAMES L. SNYDER Out to Pastor

PAGE 13

By TONY SIMMONS 747-5080 | @PCTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH The gospel cruises aboard the Lady Anderson Dining Yacht are a treasured memory for many visitors and locals, and while the Lady no longer sails the waters of St. Andrew Bay, the songand praise-lled excursions continue. The crews of Capt. Anderson III and the historic BetsyAnn Riverboat are lling the gap with journeys across the bay to the soundtrack of live Christian music. Each voyage has its particular attraction that makes for a memorable evening. The Praise on the Bay Sunset Cruise and Dolphin Encounter out of Capt. Andersons Marina is a twohour journey aboard Capt. Anderson III that begins with informative narration by the captain (usually Capt. Ron Spriggs) as he takes passengers to see bottlenose dolphins and seabirds. Once passengers have seen the sights, guest singers take the mic, performing old favorites, requests and original numbers as the boat cruises the bay at sunset. If you loved the Gospel Dinner Cruise on the Lady Anderson, we have a new cruise for you, said Suzie Anderson Cox, one of the owners of Capt. Andersons Marina. I think people like to have an alternative to the everyday tourist things. Its about 50/50 as far as (the percentage of) tourists and locals on the cruise. Its a great opportunity for church groups to have an outing, and not have to plan for it just show up. And a lot of times for people on vacation, its kind of nice to be able to bring your family out and know its family-friendly. Theres no alcohol served. The original dinner-cruise boat out of the marina set sail under the watch of Capt. Max Anderson, current owner Ken Andersons father, in 1973. The Lady Anderson, which began sailing in 1993 and made Grand Lagoon her permanent home in 1997, was named after Sue Anderson, Maxs wife. The Lady Anderson cruised the lagoon and bay through 2013, taking weekly Gospel Cruises during the summer season, until she was sold to a Massachusetts company and relocated. Cox worked those summers on the Lady while she was growing up. A lot of people made the Gospel Cruise a tradition whenever they came to the beach, Cox said. We didnt want to cut off the clients who enjoyed that so much, but were not in the dinner cruise business any longer. This is the baby sister of the old gospel dinner cruise. Now, the new Praise on the Bay excursion sails on the rst and third Thursdays of the month through August, boarding at 5:30 p.m. and cruising from 6-8 p.m. The schedule of upcoming performers includes Neysa Wilkins on Aug. 7, and Bill Small with Cameron Winton Aug. 21. Extra dates might become available if theres a demand. Prices are $20 for adults, $18 for seniors age 55 and older; $10 for children ages 2-11; and free for kids younger than 2 years. Group rates are available for parties of 20 or more. A cash concession stand is aboard for purchasing refreshments. Capt. Andersons Marina is at 5550 N. Lagoon Drive, Panama City Beach, right on the Grand Lagoon. Meanwhile, the BetsyAnn remains in the dinner cruise business, offering live gospel music every Tuesday through the season. Capt. Rick Ackerman said the gospel cruises might continue through October. Aside from it being fun and enjoying the beautiful scenery, the riverboat is a huge attraction in itself, Ackerman said. Its one of the last true remaining paddlewheel boats left in existence. The BetsyAnn Gospel Dinner Cruise features local musicians Ron Mashburn and Jenny Hammond performing favorites and taking requests. Dinner is a buffet of Southern fried chicken and pulled pork barbecue, with green beans, roasted potatoes, tossed salad, rolls, desert and tea. The tickets are $42.95 per adult, $26.95 for children ages 5-12; and those age 4 and younger are free. Meals are catered by Vittles Catering, a division of PoFolks, and Triple Js Steakhouse. The paddleboat pulls out of St. Andrews Marina, 3151 W. 10th St. in Panama City, for a voyage circling the bay shortly after 6:30 p.m. Guests will see playful dolphins, pelicans and other shorebirds, and thrill to the echo of a cannon blast as the paddlewheel passes under the Hathaway Bridge. BetsyAnn also sets sail for sunset dinner cruises 6:308:30 p.m. every Wednesday and Saturday; a Murder Mystery dinner cruise 6:309 p.m. every Thursday and Friday; and a live blues dinner cruise 6-8 p.m. every Monday. Praise on the Bay Sunset gospel cruises ply local waters GOSPEL DINNER CRUISE What: Sunset cruise, delicious dinner and favorite gospel songs Where: Aboard BetsyAnn Riverboat, docked at St. Andrews Marina, 3151 W. 10th St., Panama City When: 6:30-9 p.m. each Tuesday through the summer season Price: $42.95 adults, $26.95 children ages 5-12, free for age 4 and younger Details and reservations: Call 233-7487 or visit BetsyAnnRiverboat.net PRAISE ON THE BAY What: Sunset cruise, dolphin encounter, and live Christian music performances Where: Aboard Capt. Anderson III, docking at Capt. Andersons Marina, 5550 N. Lagoon Drive, Panama City Beach When: On the rst and third Thursdays of the month through August; boarding at 5:30 p.m., cruising 6-8 p.m. Price: $20 adults, $18 seniors 55 and older; $10 children ages 2-11; free for kids under 2; group rates available Details and reservations: Call 235-5940 or visit CaptAndersonsMarina.com NEYSA WILKINS BILL SMALL If you would like your churchs faith events included in this list, please email the information to news@ chipleypaper.com The Talleys in concert ESTO The Talleys will be in concert at Mt. Zion Independent Baptist Church at 7 p.m., today, July 26. With at least 10 number one songs, The Talleys are one of the most loved and respected groups in Gospel music. The church is at 3205 Highway 2 in Esto. Bethel Baptist homecoming Bethel Baptist Church will be celebrating their 123rd Homecoming Sunday, July 27. Services will begin promptly at 10 a.m. with the singing group, 4+1 from Bonifay. The guest speaker will be the Rev. Leroy Dobbs, a former pastor at Bethel. Dinner will be served in the Family Ministry Center following the morning services for all who attend. Bethel Baptist Church is in the Poplar Springs School Community at 1349 Highway 173 about 1 miles south of Highway 2. Circus VBS CHIPLEY Turning Point United Pentecostal Church will hold Vacation Bible School from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., Monday, July 28, through Friday, Aug. 1. This years theme will be the Circus. There will be free sno-cones and a bounce house. The church is at 1816 U.S. 90. For more information or transportation call 258217, 326-1716 or 890-1926. West Pittman Baptist VBS WESTVILLE West Pittman Baptist Church will hold Vacation Bible School Wednesday, July 30 through Saturday, Aug. 2. Bible school will be held Wednesday through Friday from 5-8 p.m. and on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sign up online at www. westpittman.org, and click on VBS registration. For more information or for transportation, call the church ofce Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 956-4100. Red Hill UMC Back to School Bash BONIFAY Red Hill United Methodist Church will host a back to school bash from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 2. on Highway 2 in Bonifay. There will be water slides, food and games and music through out the day. School supplies and gift cards will also be given away. For more information, call Linda Yarbrough at 334-360-0811. Bluegrass and southern gospel sing HARTFORD, ALA. Victory Tabernacle will hold a bluegrass and southern gospel sing at 6 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 2. Special guests will be the Mt. Zion Singers and Straight and Narrow. The tabernacle is at 10005 E. State Road 52 in Hartford, Ala. For more information, call 334-588-2838. Back to school clothes give away CHIPLEY Oakie Ridge Baptist Church will be giving away back to school clothes for all ages from 8-11:30 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 2, at the church. The church is 11 miles south of Chipley on the Orange Hill Highway. For more information, call Lori at 638-2340. Truckload giveaway ALFORD Cypress Creek Community Church and Share Ministries will host a truckload giveaway consisting of free food and clothes for everyone from 8 a.m. to noon on Saturday, Aug. 2. The food will consist of meats, can goods, produce, breads and etc. Clothes consist of all sizes. The church is two miles west of Alford just off Highway 276 at 1772 Macedonia Road. Wilderness Escape VBS CHIPLEY Orange Hill Baptist Church will hold Vacation Bible School, from 5:30-8:30 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 3, through Friday, Aug. 8. This years theme will be Wilderness Escape, children will escape with the Israelites as they leave Egypt. They will hang out with Moses as God leads the adventure. The church is at 3485 Gainer Road. For more information, call 638-7103. B-Shoc live COTTONDALE BShoc, a contemporary Christian artist, will be performing a back to school concert at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 5, at Southern Community Fellowship Church in Cottondale. This is an all ages show and will be free to the public. The church is at 43300 U.S. 231, seven miles north of Cottondale. For more information, visit www. B-Shoc.com Bethlehem UMC VBS BETHLEHEM Bethlehem United Methodist Church will hold Vacation Bible School from 6-8 p.m., Wednesday, Aug. 6 through Saturday, Aug. 9. This years theme is Learning to follow God under the stars. The church is at 1622 Bethlehem Church Road. For more information, call Matthew and Dana Rich at 547-3780. Otter Creek revival PONCE DE LEON Otter Creek Methodist Church will hold revival at 7 p.m. Monday, Aug. 11, to Friday, Aug. 15. Special guests will be Gary and Debbie Gibbens. The church is four miles north of Ponce de Leon off Highway 81. East Mount Zion sh fry and cake auction GRACEVILLE East Mount Zion United Methodist Church will hold a sh fry and cake auction beginning at 5 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 16. Fish plates and backed goods will be for donations. The cakes will be auctioned off beginning at 6 p.m. Proceeds will go toward enlarging the altar stage. Recent fth Saturday Sings have found the stage at capacity. The next fth Saturday sing will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Aug. 30. The church is at 1590 County Highway 173, Graceville. For more information, call 263-4610. Otter Creek Homecoming PONCE DE LEON Otter Creek Methodist Church will hold homecoming services Sunday Aug. 17. The church is four miles north of Ponce de Leon off Highway 81. Faith EVENTS Faith Washington County News | A13 Saturday, July 26, 2014

PAGE 14

LIFESTY L E Saturday, July 26, 2014 A Page 14 Section www.chipleypaper.com Photos and story by NICK TOMECEK 315-4426|@NickTnwfdn ntomecek@nwfdailynews.com NICEVILLE Horseshoe pitching might seem simple at rst glance. But like most sports, it has become highly competitive and involves countless dollars as well as hours of fun, enjoyed locally at Twin Oaks Park in Niceville. The Panhandle Horseshoe Pitching Club has been around for more than 15 years, and they host tournaments on the courts at the corner of State Road 85 and College Boulevard about twice a month. The game is made up of two throwers, each with a set of two horseshoes. The game is scored in innings; each inning a thrower plays to 50, according to Larry Mobley, tournament director for the club. There are hundreds of types of horseshoes that can cost up to $80. The style of horseshoe depends on if the thrower tosses the shoe with a turn or if the thrower ips the shoe. A ringer scores three points, which happens when a thrower hooks the shoe around the pin (stob) or within a precisely measured distance to the stob. One point is scored if the horseshoe lands within six inches of the stob. Points can be canceled out by an opponent if a shoe comes closer to the stob or knocks the opponents shoe away. Mobley said he loves the game because of how competitive it gets. I just love the outdoors and competitiveness of it. Its good exercise even when youre drinking beer, said Mobley. For more information about the Panhandle Horseshoe Pitching Club, call Larry Mobley at 850-305-8529. HORSESHOES DECEPTIVELY SIMPLE SPORT HIGHLY COMPETITIVE Larry Mobley, tournament director for the Panhandle Horseshoe Pitching Club, pitches a horseshoe recently at their court at Twin Oaks Park in Niceville. At bottom, a ringer in horseshoe pitching earns the thrower three points. The horseshoe court at Twin Oaks Park in Niceville uses clay from Kentucky around the stob (the pin). Mobley said that there are many different kinds of horseshoes that range from $40 to $80 per set. Mobley said winners of horseshoe tournaments do not usually win trophies. Instead, winners are given patches. Its good exercise even when youre drinking beer. Larry Mobley tournament director for the Panhandle Horseshoe Club

PAGE 15

By LAUREN DELGADO 315-4406 | @LaurenDnwfdn ldelgado@nwfdailynews.com Pairing food and wine should be simple. Yet how often do most of us stare at a bottle of wine in one hand and a cheese in the other, wondering how the next few bites and sips would taste? We asked Myres M. McDougal, advanced sommelier and director of wine at Seagars in Destin, to outline some basic wine pairings that would have us wanting more. Enjoy! A PRIMER FOR WINE P A IRINGS PINOT GRI G IO SAUVI G NON BLANC RIESLIN G CHARDONNAY P INOT NOIR MERLOT MALBEC CABERNET SAUVI G NON SAUCES CHEESES OTHER Pesto, light cream, light lemon Fontina, mozzarella, ricotta Garlic, fennel, onion, especially tarts Asparagus, artichoke, cucumber Asian sauces (especially spicy) Goat cheese, chevre Peaches, peppers, lemongrass Cajun or Creole, Indian, tartares Blue, soft, and triple cream Cream and butter sauces Brie, Camembert, Gouda Avocado, almonds, squash Mushroom, herb-based sauces Chaumes, Swiss, Gruyere Beets, eggplant, basil Tomato and meatbased sauces Parmesan, Jarlsberg, Gouda Lamb, pizza, stews Barbecue, sausage Gor gonzola, Humblot Fog Grilled anything! Red wine sauce, Marchand du Vin Brie, Camembert or Stinky Beef, venison, rabbit New rule for cooking with wine It used to be that people believed a wine that was undrinkable was perfectly acceptable to be used in cooking. Not any longer. As a cooking ingredient, wine does impart its avors, so the rule is now that, If you wouldnt drink it, dont cook with it. If youre looking for a rich, dark chocolate cake with a denite red wine avor, this is it. Red Wine Chocolate Cake 1 cup plus 1 tablespoon all-purpose our cup Dutch processed cocoa powder 1/8 teaspoon baking soda teaspoon baking powder teaspoon salt teaspoon cinnamon 6 tablespoons unsalted butter cup rmly packed brown sugar cup sugar 1 egg plus 1 egg yolk cup red wine (any type) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Powdered sugar (optional) Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Line the bottom of a 9-inch cake pan with parchment paper and lightly butter and our; set aside. Sift the our, cocoa, baking soda, baking powder, salt and cinnamon into a small bowl, set aside. Cream the butter until smooth. Add the sugars and beat until uffy. Continue beating, adding the eggs, red wine and vanilla. Mix in about threefourths of the our mixture with the mixer and the remainder by hand with a rubber spatula. Spread the batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes or until the cake tests done with a toothpick. Cool in the pan for about 10 minutes before removing and cooling completely on a cooling rack. Dust with powdered sugar before serving if desired. Serves 8. When I was doing research for this column, I got to wondering whether or not you could freeze wine. After a quick Internet search, I found out that you can, though freezing an expensive wine is denitely not recommended. One person even recommended freezing it in ice cube trays to make it more convenient to use in recipes. I will give it a try with the leftover Pinot noir from this recipe and let you know. Linda Murchison can be reached at 3154431 or lmurchison@ nwfdailynews.com. Write to Daily News, P.O. Box 2949, Fort Walton Beach, FL 32549. Linda Murchison Lets Eat FOOD Saturday, July 26, 2014 A Page 15 Section www.chipleypaper.com 3 guidelines for pairings Special to The News Three guidelines to think about when pairing wine and food: 1. Regional Where is the dish or culinary delight you are preparing from? For example, lamb osso bucco comes from Piedmont, Italy, where Barolo is king. How about roasted chicken and vegetables? Reminds me of the country side in France, Grenache or Syrah based wines for Northern and Southern Rhone. 2. Weight You should always consider the weight of the dish or cheese when selecting your wine. Light sauce or creamy cheese = light body wine Medium sauce or cheese = medium body wine Heavy sauce or cheese = medium plus to full body wine You dont want to tip the scales or have your wine trump the dish you just spent hours making. 3. Acidity What you need to think about here is acidity in wine helps to cut the fat in food. Now, a lot of wine consumers are not familiar with acidity but it is quite simple. Take a lemon for example, a high acid fruit, when you eat something with a lot of lemon juice you salivate and you feel it underneath your tongue. Same reaction happens with a high acid wine and, yes, its some of the same citric acid. A classic example is a pairing we nd in the South of Bordeaux, foie gras and Sauternes. Sauternes is a high acid wine and it helps cut through the fat of the delicious foie gras. The lamb osso bucco and Barolo pairing is another example because the Nebbiolo grape of Barolo is a medium plus to high acid wine that helps breakdown the fat of the osso bucco. Courtesy of Myres M. McDougal, Seagars director of wine and advanced sommelier.

PAGE 16

A16| Washington County News Saturday, July 26, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS Travel/TransportationPilot Needed in DestinPrivate equity firm in Destin area is seeking a contract pilot to fly its refurbished Piper PA-31T1. Pilot must hold a commercial pilot certificate with multi-engine land and instrument ratings, have logged at least 4,000 hours total time, including at least 2,000 hours multi-engine land and at least 1,000 hours in multi-engine turbo prop aircraft, of which at least 200 hour being logged in Cheyenne I model aircraft, and who has attended and successfully completed ground and flight (or simulator) training for the Cheyenne I conducted by FLIGHTSAFETY or SIMCOM within the last 12 calendar months. Send resume and cover letter to info@pcpaviation.com. Web ID#: 34293919 Admin/Clerical The Washington County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications forGrants/Special Projects CoordinatorThis is highly responsible and administrative work involving planning, monitoring, writing and reviewing federal and state grant programs. The position also serves as Project Manager and/or Special Projects Coordinator to provide assistance to the County Coordinator. Starting salary is $16.50 per hr. MINIMUM TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE Graduation from an accredited four year college or university with a degree in public relations, business or related field. Two years of experience in grant program management, public relations, business, marketing or government, with an emphasis on administration and management. A comparable amount of training and/or experience may be substituted for the required education. Valid Florida Driver’s License. Applications may be accessed on-line at www.washingtonfl.com. Applications and job descriptions may also be obtained at the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office located at 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428. All interested applicants MUST submit an Employment Application to the Human Resources Department in the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office by 4:00 PM on July 30, 2014. All questions regarding this position or other vacancies should be directed to the Human Resources Department, 850-415-5151. The selected applicant will be subject to a pre-employment physical and drug screen. Veteran’s Preference is accepted in accordance with FS 295.08 Web Id 34295137 7-3459 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL RFP # UNI2014-1 UNIFORM RENTAL SERVICES WASHINGTON COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 1331 SOUTH BOULEVARD CHIPLEY, FL 32428 The Washington County Board of County Commissioners (WCBOCC) requests proposals for provision of uniforms for our field employees and their supervisors. SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED: Contractor shall provide uniforms to WCBOCC employees based on the specifications as identified in this RFP. In calculating bid pricing to be offered, Contractors are cautioned to include all costs associated with providing this service. SUBMISSION OF BIDS: All proposals should be submitted in a sealed envelope. The outside of the envelope should be clearly marked with the bid number (RFP NO. UNI2014) and the date and time scheduled for the opening of the bid. Proposals should be mailed or hand delivered to the WASHINGTON COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ATTN: BRANDI BERNALES, 1331 SOUTH BLVD, CHIPLEY, FL 32428 Proposals will be accepted starting Monday, August 4, 2014 @ 8:00 a.m. and end Friday, August 8, 2014 @ 4 p.m. No proposals will be accepted after this time. Proposal’s will be opened Monday, August 11, 2014 @ 9 a.m. Proposals MUST be signed by an authorized representative of the firm. A bid packet is available for review from the WCBOCC. Submit your request to the person listed below. Direct all technical inquiries concerning this RFP to: Brandi Bernales Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m. Telephone: (850) 415-5093. E-mail: bbernales@washingtonfl.com. WCBOCC reserves the right to waive any informality, to reject any or all bids, and to accept the Bid or Bids which appear to be in the best interest of WCBOCC. July 19, 26, 2014. 6-3390 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR PASCO COUNTY Case No. 51-2014-CA-000518-WS Division: G AAA ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS, INC., SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA Plaintiff, -vsHEADS UP CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., A FLORIDA CORPORATION, Defendant. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: HEADS UP CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., A FLORIDA CORPORATION. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action for breach of contract has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on BEVERLY R. BARNETT, ESQ., 6709 Ridge Road, Suite 106, Port Richey, Florida 34668, on or before 8-3-14 and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. SIGNED AND THE SEAL OF THIS COURT IMPRESSED ON 30 day of June 2014 PAULA O’NEIL Clerk and Comptroller (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Sarah Lovell A Deputy Clerk July 19, 26, Aug 2, 9, 2014 7-3437 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY CASE NUMBER: 14-075 TRUSTMARK NATIONAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. VERA M. HERRING, and if deceased, her unknown heirs, devisees, creditors, grantees, and all persons claiming by, through, under or against her, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:Vera M. Herring, Last known residence address: 2008 Highway 71, Marianna, FL 32448 The unknown heirs, devisees, creditors, grantees and all persons claiming by, through, under or against Vera M. Herring, if deceased, Last known residence addresses : unknown YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to quiet-title to the following described real property located in Washington County, Florida, to wit: Lot 9, of Porter Lake Retreat, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 229, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. Together with a 1/28th interest in and to Lot 20, Porter Lake Retreat, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 229, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Jack G. Williams, Attorney at Law, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is Post Office Box 2176, Panama City, FL 32402, on or before the 25 day of July, 2014, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, either before service on the Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and official seal of this Court on this 18 day of June, 2014. Clerk of Circuit Court BY: K. NcDaniel Deputy Clerk July 5, 12, 19, 26, 2014 7-3442 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FOR CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT SERVICES FOR New Kate Smith K-5 School Washington County School District I. INTRODUCTION Washington County School District is requesting written proposals from qualified construction firms to provide professional At-Risk Construction Management Services for the Budgeting and Construction Phase on the proposed New Kate Smith K-5 School. II. It is the County’s intention to employ the Construction Firm at Risk to provide overall Project Construction Management, Cost Benefit Studies if needed, Information Management, Construction of Scope of Work and overall Project Management during the Construction on a cost plus a fee basis, with a guaranteed maximum price. III. PROPOSAL INSTRUCTIONS AND GENERAL INFORMATION Proposal Submissions: Submit five (5) copies of a written proposal no later than 10:00 AM CST August 11, 2014 to: Construction Management Services for New Kate Smith K-5 School Washington County School Board Attention Mike Park 652 3rd Street Chipley, Florida 32428 Proposals must be responsive to the requirements and questions of the Request for Proposal. Reservations: Washington County School District reserves the right to reject any and all proposals, to negotiate changes in the new scope of work or services to be provided, and to otherwise waive any technicalities or informalities. Method of Selection: Proposals will be reviewed by the Washington County School Board, which will recommend a ranking of firms. Upon acceptance of the recommendation, negotiations or bids will or may be entertained. Please respond by including but not limiting your response to the following: Company name and length of time in business. Company location. Availability of time to start and complete project within Owner’s requirements. Insurance carrier and applicable coverage. Qualifications of staff to be utilized on this project with names, short resumes, length of time with firm and previous clients served. Names of five (5) previous School Clients with phone numbers and contact person. Description of previous experience, to include budget, final cost, time schedule, change orders, etc. Request for information shall be in writing. No calls or visits please. Refer all written request to Clemons, Rutherford & Associates, Inc. attention Greg Kelley 2027 Thomasville Road, Suite 201 Tallahassee, Florida 32308 July 12, 19, 26, Aug 2, 2014 8-3470 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2014-CA-76 GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, A FOREIGN LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA Plaintiff, vs. CHARLES T. SHIRLEY; REBECCA J. SHIRLEY; JOHN DOE; INNOVATIONS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO THE FOLLOWING DEFENDANTS: CHARLES T. SHIRLEY 10836 S. BEAR CREEK RD PANAMA CITY, FL 32404 CHARLES T. SHIRLEY 2664 GREENHEAD RD CHIPLEY, FL 32428-6512 CHARLES T. SHIRLEY 16327 OAKVIEW DR FOUNTAIN, FL 32438-2628 REBECCA J. SHIRLEY 10836 S. BEAR CREEK RD PANAMA CITY, FL 32404 REBECCA J. SHIRLEY 2664 GREENHEAD RD CHIPLEY, FL 32428-6512 REBECCA J. SHIRLEY 16327 OAKVIEW DR FOUNTAIN, FL 32438-2628 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclosure a mortgage on the following property in WASHINGTON county, Florida: LOT 4 ACCORDING TO THE PLAT OF SUMMERWOODS SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 18, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. Has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on the attorney for the Plaintiff: GIBBONS, NEUMAN, BELLO, SEGALL, ALLEN & HALLORAN, P.A. 3321 HENDERSON BLVD TAMPA, FL 33609 EMAIL FOR THIS FILE:FORECLOSURE@GI BBLAW.COM On or before August 29, 2014, or within 30 days of the first publication of this notice of action, and file the Original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATED on July 18, 2014 Clerk of the Circuit Court, WASHINGTON County CHIPLEY, FL 32428-0647 By: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. July 26 and August 2, 2014 7-3453 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 14-028CP IN RE: THE ESTATE OF THOMAS E. HOLLEY, SR., Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of Thomas E. Holley, Sr., deceased, whose date of death was 1/22/2014, File Number 14-028CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Washington County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is the Washington County Clerk, 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, Florida, Post Office Box 647, Chipley, Florida, 32428. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against decedent’s Estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims and who may have been served a copy of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedent’s Estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOT WITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIMS FILED TWO YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is: May 14. MARY JO SASSER Petitioner/executor 1649 Falling Waters Road Chipley, Florida 32428 KRISTI MILLER NOVONGLOSKY Attorney for Petitioner Florida Bar No. 0182044 Post Office Box 1129 Chipley, Florida 32428 Telephone: (850) 638 7587 July 19, 26, 2014 8-3472 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 14-071DR IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF DEBRA SANDVIG, wife, and ROBERT L. SANDVIG, Husband. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR PUBLICATION TO:ROBERT L. SANDVIG YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action on Kristi M. Novonglosky, Petitioner’s attorney, whose address is Post Office Box 1129, Chipley, Florida 32428, on or before August 18, 2014 and file the original with the clerk of this court at Washington County Courthouse, P.O. Box 647, 1331 South Blvd., Chipley, Florida 32428, either before service on Petitioner’s attorney or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerk’s office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. DATED this 22nd day of July, 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk July 26 and August 2, 2014 8-3475 Notice Pursuant to Section 121.055 Florida Statues (as amended by the 1993 Florida Legislature), the Washington County Sheriff’s Office intends to designate a non-elective full time financial officer position for inclusion in the Senior Management Service Class effective September 1, 2014. ADOPTION: ACreative Financially Secure Family, Beach House, Music, LOVE, awaits 1st baby. Trish 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 ADOPTloving married couple seeks to adopt, will be hands on mom and dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592, Adam Sklar #0150789 ADOPTION: A childless loving couple seeks to adopt. Large family. Financial Security. Expenses paid. Eileen & Kim. kimand eileenadopt@gmail.com or 1-800-455-4929. Older Man looking for female to spend time with. Go to dinner with, hang out, have conversations with. Call Gary, 850-388-2061. AUCTION State of Georgia DOT Surplus LIVE AUCTION with Online Bidding Thursday, July 31st at 10AM 737 E. Barnard St, Glennville, GA 30427 Cars, Trucks, Buses, Loaders, Tractors, Equipment and more. L.W. Benton Co. Inc (#3215) 478-744-0027 www.bidderone.com AUCTION Date: Saturday, July 26, 2014 at 10AM Location: Highway 331 South, Opp, Alabama DISPERSAL OF BOB WILLIAMS EQUIPMENT, ALL TYPES OF CATTLE, HAY, AND FARM EQUIPMENT. *5% Buyers Premium* Mason Auction & Sales LLC —AAL 111 Office 850-263-0473 Chad Mason 850-258-7652 Gerald Mason 850-849-0792 Website: www.masonauction.com PUBLIC AUCTIONEstates, Bankruptcies, Cities Florida’s Largest Consignment Auction Sunday, July 20th 1:00 pm 422 Julia St., Titusville, FL 32796 Real Estate -‘61 TBird Trucks -Boats Motorcycles-Firearms Antiques Furniture Jewelry -Complete Woodworking Shop Contents of Antique Store Household Goods -Sun Dresses Art Work -City Surplus -Tools -Glassware And So Much More! No Charge To Attend. Sorry no pets. No Buyers Premium!!! Visit website for details & photos AB#9 Cliff Shuler Auctioneers AU#14 Life Member NAA & FAA Shuler & Shuler RE Auc., Inc., D Shuler Lic RE Broker www.soldfor.com Huge Barn Sale! Lots of construction products. Bikes, antique furniture, Asian dresses, woodworking, all kinds of misc. New commercial storm door, Dwalt products, painting products, cedar benches. Fri & Sat, 7/25&26, 7am-until. 504 Fawn Ln, in Bonifay, off Brock St. 850-217-5778. Moving Sale 851 3rd Street, July 26. 8 a.m. rain or shine. Attention: VIAGRA and CIALIS USERS! A cheaper alternative to high drugstore prices! 50 Pill Special -$99 FREE Shipping! 100 Percent Guaranteed. CALL NOW: 1-800-943-8953 DirectTV 2 Year Savings Event! Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only DirecTV gives you 2 YEARS of savings and a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 1-800-481-2137 DISH TV Retailer. Starting $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) Find Out How to SAVE Up to 50% Today! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL 1-800-605-0984 Local Country/WesternSinger& drummer looking for band. Please contact A.J. at 850-890-5684. SAFE STEP WALK-IN Tub Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 1-800605-6035 for $750 Off. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-557-1918. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. AIRLINE CAREERS begin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 EXPERIENCED OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com EOE TRAIN FROM HOME MEDICAL BILLING ACCOUNTING ASS’T CUSTOMER SERVICE NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1-800-451-0709 WANT A CAREER Operating Heavy Equipment? Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. “Hands On Training” & Certifications Offered. National Average 18-22 Hourly! Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1 Bedroom Apartment, in Chipley, covenant location, no pets. 638-4640. 2BR/2.5BA Apartment w/private balcony & garage. W/D included. In Bonifay. $600/mth + deposit. 768-0394 or 547-2936. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio And 2 bdrm $375-$500 Includes City Utilities (850)557-7732 SpaciousOne Bedroom Apartment $450.00 Two Bedroom $500.00 Stove/Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. 1BD/1BAHouse 901 Main St Chipley. Fenced yard. 1227 sqft. $625 mth. Security depo $600. Avldibale Ju1y 7 Call 850-482-4446. 3BR/1BA House in Vernon. Pets welcome, fenced yard. $600.00/mth, $600.00/security. Call 850-547-6483. 3BR/2BA, CHA, Large lot, brick, fruit trees, optional large workshop, in Chipley. 850-481-5352 or 850-326-3319. 4BR/2BA living room dining room combination. Call 850-573-0319 For Rent: 2BR/2BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $500/month plus $500/deposit. CH/A. No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. 4 Bedroom, 2 bathroom doublewide trailer in the Grassy Pond Subdivision. 1782 SQ FT, no pets inside, Rent $600, Security Deposit $500. Call 638-8220. Progressive Realty, 1046 Main ST, Chipley, Florida. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes garbage/sewage/lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 3/2 & 2/2 Mobile Home in Chipley WD hookup, CHA. No pets. $475.00/mth+deposit. 850-763-3320 or 850-774-3034. Mobile Home for Rent in the Bethlehem area. 2BR, furnished, single wide, includes washer & dryer. Call 850-547-2068. Mobile Homes For Rent 2 and 3 Bedrooms in Cottondale, Central Heat and Air. $400 -$500 a month. 850-258-1594 or 850-638-8570. Mobile Homes for rent in Chipley and Bonifay. Water and sewage included. Lease required. 850-638-2999. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. Brick 3/2 dble garage nice Martin’s Woods community Chipley.SugarShoreProperties.com850-774-0400 SUNNY HILLS. Great ranch, fantastic condition. 3BR/2BA, 3 living areas, appliances incl. $89,000.00. Counts Real Estate. Barbara, 850-814-9414. For Sale. 40 acres waterfront on Choctawhatchee River. Call 850-535-2553 Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. 1980 ClassicAntique Mercedes 450 SL. like new interior, xtra clean, very low mile tires, always stored inside, looks/runs/drives great, 2-tops, Kelly BB high/$33K, great buy asking/$13K. 850-415-7119. White Diamond Cadillac, 4DR, loaded. 25,000 miles. One owner, like new. 326-9109. 1988 GMC 6000 Farm/Moving Truck or potential billboard for business. was Supermover Uhaul. cranks/runs great. Very good watertight cargo box w/over cab also. Very low mile tires. Great for moving or hauling. Asking $3300. 850-415-7119. 1991 Harley Davidson Road King 9,000 miles, $6,500. Call 850-348-7780. For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414