Washington County news

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Title:
Washington County news
Uniform Title:
Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Chipley Fla
Creation Date:
June 22, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
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30.779167 x -85.539167 ( Place of Publication )

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Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Began May 23, 1924.
General Note:
L.E. Sellers, editor.
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Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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aleph - 000384704
oclc - 07260886
notis - ACC5987
lccn - sn 81000810
issn - 0279-795X
System ID:
UF00028312:00942

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50 Phone: 850-638-0212 Website: chipleypaper.com Fax: 850-638-4601 For the latest breaking news, visit CHIPLEYPAPER.COM www.chipleypaper.com NEWS Washington County By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY The Washington County Council on Aging has a waiting list for senior citizens in need of their Meals On Wheels service, a list Director Mary Smith hopes she will be able to shorten despite experiencing an almost $10,000 cut in funding from the federal government this year. Clients are serviced by Meals On Wheels for a variety of reasons, including that they can no longer safely drive to the grocery store or stand long enough to cook their own meal. Some are just being released from hospitals or nursing homes and need meals on a temporary basis. In addition to the Meals on Wheels waiting list, they are currently considering closing meal service days at two of our community dining By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT Cspears@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY After a day-long process of reviewing eight applicants for the position of courthouse architect on July 18, the Washington County Courthouse Committee agreed on Justice Reference Architecture Inc. as their top choice to present to the Washington County Board of County Commissioners when they meet in regular session Thursday. After assessments showed the original courthouse, built in 1932 under architect Frank Lockwood, was damaged by water with repairs estimated in the millions, the county pursued state funding and recently was allocated $9.2 million by the legislature. A committee comprised of Judge Colby Peel, Washington County Sheriff Bobby Haddock, Board of County Commissioners Chairman Alan Bush, Judge Chris Patterson, and Court Administrators Jan Shadburn and Amber Baggett was assembled to review eight architects and present their top pick to commissioners. Points proposed by JRA which seemed to interest the committee was their idea of using all the prominent historical xtures from the original courthouse in order to C onnec t with us 24/7 G et br eak ing new s videos e xpanded st or ies phot o galler ies opinions and mor e ... @WCN_HC T chipleypaper .c om Wednesday, JULY 23 2014 Volume 91, Number 29 INDEX Scene Around ....................... B6 Opinion ................................ A4 Society/Business ................... B2 Sports .................................. A7 Extra .................................... B1 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B4 Classi eds ......................... B7-8 IN BRIEF Back to school | INSIDE Foxy Red Hatters CHIPLEY The Foxy Red Hatters will meet at 12:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 29 at KCs Pizza in Chipley. Movie Fun CHIPLEY Looking for an afternoon of entertainment escape but unable drive to a movie theater that far away? The Washington County Public Library will be showing Despicable Me 2 and serving free popcorn at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 29 at the Chipley Branch. For more information, call 638-1314. Back to school fair CHIPLEY Northwest Florida Community Hospital will host the annual The Back to School Fair from 9 a.m. to noon, Thursday, Aug. 14, on the front lawn. This is a free event to help school age children prepare to return to school, looking spiffy and equipped with the necessary school supplies. There will be a back pack drawing as well. For more information, call Joanie Beard at 415-8104. JRA is committees pick Photos by CECILIA SPEARS | The News Visitors from the audience was encouraged to inspect the model presented by JRA. See COURTHOUSE A2 By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com WAUSAU Wausau postal customers recently received a survey form from the U.S. Postal Service recently asking for their input into a process that is currently reviewing the Wausau post of ce. The results of that survey were to be discussed at a meeting scheduled by the USPS for Thursday, July 17, at Wausau Town Hall. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES-ADVERTISER The meeting at the Wausau post of ce has been rescheduled for Aug. 14. Stood up! USPS apologizes for no show status at meeting they set up See USPS A2 Despite cuts, Meals on Wheels still served By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY An early morning accident claimed two lives in Washington County Tuesday morning. The Florida Highway Patrol reported Daniel Alford, 30, of Panama City Beach was traveling southbound on State Road 77 near Clayton Road around 2:30 a.m. Tuesday, July 22, when he crossed the centerline, entering the path of Glen Devuyst, 46, of Chipley, who was traveling in the northbound lane. Alfords 2002 BMW 530i collided head-on with Devuysts 2008 Toyota Scion. Alford succumbed to his injuries and was pronounced dead at Northwest Florida Community Hospital in Chipley, and Devuyst was pronounced deceased on scene. The FHP reported Devuyst was wearing his seatbelt; however, Alford was not restrained. 2 killed in Tuesday accident See MEALS A2 By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY Washington County schools retained their C grade from the Department of Education for the third consecutive year, but district wide numbers took a noticeable jump. Im very proud of the schools, said Superintendent Joseph Taylor. All of the school points went up, and the district total is up by 30 points. The last time the district received a B was 2011. However, of the four schools evaluated Vernon Middle and Elementary schools, Kate M. Smith Elementary and Roulhac Middle School in Chipley the middle school remained unchanged from their rating as C schools, while KMS and VES both rose from a B rating to an A. The grades are based on each schools performance on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT), which measures the aptitude and performance of students. The year-end state grades are used to determine whether a school received state funding, or in worst cases, closed because of a failing grade. According to the scores provided by the district, Kate M. Smith Elementary in Chipley rose the most, from 444 in 2013, which earned the school a B assignment from the state, to 528, an A grade, in 2014. Washington County schools receive C grades See SCHOOL GRADES A3

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Local A2 | Washington County News Wednesday, July 23, 2014 meal sites. Our program provides seniors with nutritious meals, social support and a chance to have fun, Smith said. We run an ef cient and effective program, but we cant tighten our belts any further. Each year, WCCOA serves about 10,200 meals annually to around 80 of Washington Countys senior citizens. But Smith points out the program delivers more than food. Our Meals On Wheels delivery volunteers spend time with the clients and develop friendships with the people they serve, she explained. For some rural clients, their volunteer driver may be the only person they have interaction with all day. Our drivers are a vital resource for helping keep a welfare check on our seniors. Smith stated meals are funded through the USDA C2 meal program, which is part of the Older Americans Act. Funding has really come down over the last two years, she said. This year, we received about $35,348. Last year, it was $46,573, and we got $59,609 in 2012. Were just steadily dropping. The agencys recent Tables of Purpose bene t dinner and 2 Wheels for Meals fundraiser hosted by the Unity Faith Riders are among efforts to assist the meal program. The agency also received a $3,500 grant from the Presbytery Of Florida. Still, their expenditures remain about 8 percent over meal cost. Despite the almost $25,000 in funding cuts the agency has seen since 2012, Smith says the council is doing its best to service those in need. Were taking some drastic measures, and thats why youre seeing so many fundraisers to bene t the council, Smith said. We hope to get names off that waiting list. For more information about how to help the Washington County Council on Aging, contact Kim Drummond at 638-6231. 879 Us er y Ro ad Chipley FL 32428 (850) 638-4654 wa shingt onr ehabandnursing .c om WRN C Re si de nt s go Ca no ei ng Wa sh in gt on Re ha bi li ta ti on an d Nu rs in g Ce nt er s re siden ts we nt ca no ei ng at th e Ec o na Cr ee k Li ve ry in Yo un gs to wn FL. i s is no t th e rs t ti me th at WRN C has tak en th ei r re siden ts ca no ein g at Ec o na e ir r st tr ip da te s ba ck to Ju ly 2007. De bb ie Ga y, of Ec o na Cr ee Li ve ry ha s be en an am azin g su pp or te r of th es e tr ip s. Be tt er He al th ma gaz in e re po rt ed t ha t, C an oe in g an d ka ya ki ng ar e lo w im pa ct ac ti vi ti es th at ca n im pro ve he al th an d t ne ss e y ca n be do ne as a ho bb y, a co mp et it iv e sp or t or as a fu n ac ti vi ty on ho lid ay s. Yo u ca n pa dd le on ri ve rs la ke s an d th e se a. We als o ta ke ca re of (850) 638-5885 Mo st Ve hicles Up to 5 qts syn thetic blend Mo st Ve hicles $ 19 95 No ti ce of Me di ca l Pr ac ti ce Cl os ur e fo r Dr H. J am es Wa ll Yo u ar e he re by no ti e d th at Dr H. Ja me s Wa ll is re ti r in g an d wi ll cl os e hi s pr ac ti ce e ecti ve Au gu st 25, 2014. Yo ur me dic al re co rd s ar e av ai la bl e to be pi ck ed up at Dr Wa ll s o ce or yo u ma y re qu es t yo ur re co rd s be tr ans fe rr ed dir ect ly to an ot he r ph ysici an of yo ur ch oi ce A re le as e of me dic al re co rd s wi ll be re qu ir ed Yo u ma y pi ck up yo ur re co rd s at th e cl inic addr es s li st ed be lo w, or yo u ma y ca ll 850-415-8185 fo r as si st an ce in re qu es ti ng yo ur re co rd s: REC OR DS ARE AV AIL AB LE IN THE CLINI C UNTIL AU GUS T 25, 2014 Ha ro ld Ja me s Wa ll MD (L oc at ed in th e Sp ec ia lt y Ce nt er at No rt hw es t Flo ri da Co mm uni ty Ho sp it al ) 1360 Br ic ky ar d Roa d, Ch ip le y, FL 32428 A er Au gu st 25, 2014, yo ur re co rd s wi ll be av ai la bl e fo r a pe ri od of ve (5) ye ar s at No rt hw es t Flo ri da Co mm uni ty Ho sp it al in th e He al th In fo rm at io n (M ed ic al Re co rd s) Oce lo ca te d on th e r st o or of th e ma in ho sp it al bu il din g. e ho sp it al addr es s is 1360 Br ic ky ar d Roa d, Ch ip le y, FL 32428 or yo u ma y ca ll 850-415-8123 fo r as si st an ce in re qu es ti ng yo ur me dic al re co rd s fo r th is cl inic. keep the original look and feel of the iconic building. The rm also suggested taking into consideration monuments and a time capsule, increasing for a total of 200 parking spaces, and ensuring secure entrances and parking for judges and staff. JRA said they would earmark 16 percent of additional space for future growth and guaranteed the project to be at least $1 million under budget and ahead of schedule. We take pride in the amount of money that is presented back to the state after projects, said JRA President Jim Robertson. I just want you to have a functional and attractive yet judicially distinctive image. Something that your community can be proud of. Each committee member ranked each presenting architect rm and selected the number one ranked rm, which was JRA, located in Panama City. The other top scoring rms were Clemons, Rutherford & Associates (CRA) and Hatch Mott MacDonald. Information provided by the other two ranking rms included: CRA: Told committee members they specialize in courthouse expansion and renovation and believe in complete transparency. The rm stated they provided additional space for growth, within budget, responsible for the new Kate M. Smith Elementary School and would do the same for the new courthouse, with an emphasis on security and foreseeing adjustments for water and sewer permits. CRA suggested upgrades to buildings architectural design for minimum maintenance and optimized utility, using three-dimensional programs for judges to adjust courtroom layout. They also stated they specialized in cost management and assured use of local labor. Hatch Mott MacDonald: Advised committee members they are experienced in restoring historic structures and are familiar with the agencies within the Washington County Courthouse. The firm also stated they could work within the budget provided. In all, committee members seemed pleased with the presentations. They were all about team work, said Sheriff Haddock. Their conceptual ideas were unique, and they came with ideas we never even thought of. One of my major concerns is about how were going to build and allow for growth in the future in such a small area. The committee will present their recommendation to commissioners Thursday. COURTHOUSE from page A1 PROFILE YOUR BUSINESS The Washington County News wants to highlight our hometown businesses! Business Pro le is a new weekly feature designed to inform readers about the local business community. To participate, compete the following information and email it to: news@chipleypaper. com Business name: Business contact information: Number of employees: Owners or managers name: Business services provided: Years in business: How you got into this business: What you like most about your business: Name of person completing this form: About 25 local residents kept the date, only to nd themselves stood up by the federal agency. Since then, USPS communications representative Dionne Montague responded to the News request for an interview, asking for her apologies to be extended to the community. We sincerely apologize that our postal representative was not present at the Post Plan meeting in Wausau, FL, said Montague. We understand our customers took time out of their busy schedules to attend the meeting, and we apologize for the inconvenience this may have caused. We value the input of the community and we are in the process of rescheduling the meeting for the 2nd or 3rd week in August; everyone will be noti ed in ample time. Thank you for your understanding in this matter. The meeting has since been rescheduled for 3 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 14, at Wausau Town Hall, at which time the results of the survey will be discussed. The USPS states unless the community has a strong preference more than 60 percent for conducting a discontinuance study for the Wausau post of ce and establishing additional sources, such as nding a suitable alternative location operated by a contractor, it intends to maintain the of ce with six hours of window service each weekday. Current Saturday window service hours and access to delivery receptacles will not change as a result of the POST Plan realignment of weekday window service hours. Despite assurances from the USPS, concerns abound that plans are in the works to close the community post of ce, forcing residents to travel to neighboring Chipley or Vernon for service. Based on this fear, residents say they plan to sign a petition requesting the of ces hours and services remain unchanged, which will be submitted to Representative Steve Southerland. USPS from page A1 MEALS from page A1 WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER Like us on

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Local Washington County News | A3 Wednesday, July 23, 2014 Unemployment increases in Washington and Holmes County NO HIDD EN CHA RGE S: It is our pol ic y that th e pa tien t an d an y othe r per so n re sp ons ib le fo r pa yment s has the ri gh t to re fus e to pa y, can cel pa yment or be re imb ur sed by pa yme nt or an y other ser vi ce ex aminat io n or tr eatm ent wh ich is perf or me d as a re sul t of and withi n 72 hou rs of re spo ndin g to the adv er tis eme nt fo r the fr ee dis co unt ed fe e or re duc ed fe e ser vice ex amina tion or tr eatm ent. "WE WELCOME NEW PA TIE NTS, CALL TODA Y FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PAT IENTS 59 AND OLDER This cer tif icat e is good fo r a complet e Medical Ey e Ex am with To dd Ro binson, M.D In Our Chiple y Of fi ce Boar d Ce rt if ied Ey e Ph ys ician and Sur geon. The ex am includes a pr es cr ip ti on fo r eye glasses and te sts fo r Glaucom a, Ca ta ra cts and other eye diseases FOR YO UR APPOINTMENT CA LL: 850-638-72 20 ELIGIBILI TY : U. S. Ci ti ze ns living in the Flor ida Pa nhand le 59 ye ar s and older not pr esentl y under our car e. Co upon Expir es: 8-1 5-1 4 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: WC00 Sm ar t Le ns es SM Ca n pr oduce clear vision without glasses at all dist ances www .m ullise ye .com MULLIS EYE INSTITUTE Chiple y Of fi ce 16 91 Main St., St e. 1 Chi ple y FL 3242 8 850-638-7220 We ar e locat ed dir ectl y acr oss the par king lot fr om the Wa lmar t in Chiple y To dd Ro binson, M.D Boar d Ce rt if ied Ey e Ph ys ician and Ca ta ra ct Sur geon So we ll Tra ctor Co ., Inc. 2841 Hwy 77 North, Pa nama City www .so we lltr actor co .com So we ll and Ku bota 40 Ye ars of Tr usted Pe rf or manc e We Tr ade for Any thin g That Don t Eat! Financing Arranged (W AC) www gcec .com PowerSouth s Ener gy Sour ces (2013) 64.8% NA TURA L GAS 5.3 % HY DRO 0. 3% RENE WA BLES 29.6% COA L In 2013, 95 per cent of our membe rs el ectr icit y was made usi n g f o s s il fuels like coal and natural gas. Yo ur electricity doesnt just come out of the wall. www westorida .coop WASHINGTON COUNTY MARRIAGES AND DIVORCES FOR THE WEEK OF JULY 13 JULY 19 MARRIAGES Dana Harris Mitchell and Joseph Arthur Hamway Jessica Renee Emanuel and Taylor Lee LandryDIVORCES Brittnie Wicker and Derek Wicker MARRIAGES AND DIVORCES Washington County seeks election workers From staff reports The Washington County Supervisor of Elections ofce is accepting applications for election workers. These positions assist the Elections ofce in conducting smooth elections by becoming efciently trained and working in different capacities before, during and or after the elections. Pay rates vary depending on the position worked. If you are interested in working during this years busy election cycle, please email crudd@wcsoe.org to have an application emailed to you. They also are available to be mailed or picked up in person. Call 638-6230 for any questions you might have. Watermelon Festival donates to foundation Special to The News Colby Peel, president of the Panhandle Water melon Festival and Lora Fisher, secretary/trea surer of the Festival, pre sented a donation to the Washington-Holmes Tech nical Center Foundation Inc., Thursday, July 17. The Panhandle Water melon Festival has been a long-time donor to the WHTC Foundation after each annual event. The donation was accepted by Jim Town, Chairman of the WHTC Founda tion Inc., who noted that donations such as this often are matched by grant money, so the im pact in the community is doubled. The Panhandle Water melon Festival recently concluded its 58th event at the end of June with events over several days and with record crowds at the Friday night free concert with national per formers, and on Saturday for the traditional parade and multitude of free ac tivities at the Washing ton County Ag Center in Chipley. This years per formances featured John Anderson, Jeff Bates, Ashton Shepard, Dailey & Vincent, as well as several local and regional musical groups. The WHTC Foundation Inc., was founded in 1986 to provide nancial assis tance to students attend ing the Technical Center, and today the school of fers some 35 degree and certication programs, as well as providing dual enrollment opportunities for high school students to obtain advanced training prior to high school gradu ation. Monday, May 12, the school graduated 342 students. During the past ve years, the WHTC Foun dation has provided more than $165,000 in nancial assistance to 229 stu dents. The foundation has endowed funds that are invested in a diverse portfolio, but depends on the fund raising campaign each year for about twothirds of its aid funds. As a IRS Section 501(c)(3) charitable organization, donations to the WHTC Foundation are tax de ductible under federal in come tax regulations for most tax payers. Governed by a Board of 9 Directors and with a Committee of Trustees of 27 that pro vides oversight and stra tegic planning, the WHTC Foundation is one of the most active scholarship programs in Washington County. Although the Foun dation needs its an nual donors to operate its successful student aid programs, it also is in need of more endow ment funds in larger donations. To learn more about the WHTC Foundation, call Jim Town at 773-8000. The assessment-based measures are based 50 percent on performance and 50 percent on learn ing gains, but the number scale varies, with elemen tary schools being grading on a 800 point scale, while middle schools are graded on a 900 point scale. Vernon Elementary School also earned an A with a total points earned of 561, an improvement over the 2013 B grade with a score of 518. Vernon Middle School earned a C with a pointsearned score of 556, up by 38 points from 2013s score of 518, which was also a C grade. Roulhac Middle School also received a C score with 547 points in 2014, up 24 points from 2013s total of 523 points, which was also a C grade. We saw some marked improvements this year and look forward to even more next year, said Taylor. Chipley High School and Vernon High Schools scores will be out closer to December, after fac tors like End of Course Tests (ECOTs) and gradu ation rates have been considered. School Grades are assigned by the Depart ment of Education of the state of Florida. School grades have been is sued since 1999 with the FCAT being the criterion used in calculating them. School grades utilize a point system, and schools are awarded one point for each percent of students who score high on the FCAT and or make learn ing gains a years worth of knowledge in a years worth of time. Percent of students tested and mea surement of reading and math gains in the lowest 25 percent of students are also used in school grades calculation. This is the nal year school grades will be cal culated using the current formula, however. Accord ing to the Florida Depart ment of Education, the new grading system next year will be more simple and transparent and support the more rigor ous Florida Standards and the Florida Standards Assessment which will re place the FCAT. SCHOOL GRADES from page A1 By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com New unemployment rates for Washington and Holmes counties were released July 18for the month of June, with both Washington and Holmes counties showing a slight in crease, deviating from its steady decrease in recent months. Washington Countys un employment rate increased by .3 percent between May 2014 at 7.1 percent and June at 7.4 percent. Washing ton County is 1.1 percent lower than June of last year with June 2013 being at 8.5 percent. Washington Countys la bor force is at 9,319 as of June 2014, which is a decrease from last months, which was 9,401, and is a decrease from June 2013, which was 9,775. Of that labor force 8,628 were employed and 691 were un employed in June 2014; 8,735 were employed and 666 were unemployed in May 2014; and 8,941 were employed and 834 were unemployed in June 2013. Holmes Countys unem ployment rate increased by .4 percent between May 2014 at 5.4 percent and June at 5.8 percent. Holm es County is .8 percent low er than June of last year with June 2013 being at 6.6 percent. Holmes Countys la bor force is at 8,426 as of June 2014, which is a de crease from last months, which were 8,484, and is a decrease from June 2013, which was 8,768. Of that labor force 7,941 were em ployed and 485 were unem ployed in June 2014; 8,024 were employed and 460 were unemployed in May 2014; and 8,183 were em ployed and 582 were unem ployed in June 2013. In other parts of the region: Calhoun Countys un employment rate increased by .3 percent between May 2014 at 6.1 percent and June at 6.4 percent. Calhoun Coun ty is .8 percent lower than June of last year with June 2013 being at 7.2 percent. Calhoun Countys labor force is at 5,608 as of June 2014, which is a decrease from last months, which was 5,670, and is an increase from June 2013, which was 5,596. Of that labor force 5,248 were employed and 360 were unemployed in June 2014; 5,324 were employed and 346 were unemployed in May 2014; and 5,194 were employed and 402 were un employed in June 2013. Jackson Countys un employment rate increased by .2 percent between May 2014 at 5.4 percent and June at 5.6 percent. Jackson Coun ty is .8 percent lower than June of last year with June 2013 being at 6.4 percent. Jackson Countys labor force is at 20,994 as of June 2014, which is a decrease from last months, which was 21,107, and is a decrease from June 2013, which was 21,866. Of that labor force 19,809 were employed and 1,185 were unemployed in June 2014; 19,964 were employed and 1,143 were unemployed in May 2014; and 20,477 were employed and 1,389 were un employed in June 2013. Liberty Countys unem ployment rate increased by .2 percent between May 2014 at 5.4 percent and June at 5.6 percent. Liberty County is .9 percent lower than May of last year with May 2013 being at 6.5 percent. Liberty Countys labor force is at 3,534 as of June 2014, which is a decrease from last months, which was 3,562, and is an increase from June 2013, which was 3,228. Of that labor force 3,337 were employed and 197 were un employed in June 2014; 3,371 were employed and 191 were unemployed in May 2014; and 3,019 were employed and 209 were unemployed in June 2013. Florida as a whole has decreased by .1 percent be tween May 2014 at 6.3 percent and June at 6.2 percent. Flor ida is 1.2 percent lower than June of last year with June 2013 being at 7.4 percent.

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OPINION www.chipleypaper.com A Page 4 Section POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Washington County News P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $20; 26 weeks: $28.70; 52 weeks: $48.60 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $24.30; 26 weeks: $36.40; 52 weeks: $60.70 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2014, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Carol Kent, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@chipleypaper.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION 850-638-0212 clamb@ chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 EDITOR Carol Kent: ckent@ chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 ADVERTISING Jessica Collins: jcollins@chipley paper.com Wednesday, July 23, 2014 Government is a business that should serve the shareholders: its citizens. Moreover, as citizens, we should reclaim our status as the foundation for our local government. We have an important stake in making sure elected and appointed of cials operate in the most ef cient and effective manner possible. How do we do that? A good start would be to pay closer attention. Attend more civic meetings and become informed about what decisions these of cials are making. Would you give your employees a percentage of your income, ask them to make vital decisions affecting your family, and then never check in to see how they are handling that responsibility? Many of us will take the time to show up when hot topics are on the table, but few attend for agendas that are more uneventful. Many rely on the newspaper, of course, to keep them lled in on current events, but sometimes the community may not be aware of issues on the horizon. Too often, we nd our input is given too late in the process. Chipley City Council was inundated with comments from Chestnut Hill Street residents a few weeks ago who objected to a proposed access road that will affect traf c and possible property values in their neighborhood. Many said they felt they werent given the opportunity to express their feelings, despite the citys advertisement of the proposal and local news coverage. It later was obvious that Mayor Linda Cain and council members had little reason to suspect how much the community would oppose the roads location at the time it was approved. Cain listened with apparent concern and empathy to the residents objections, but the councils hands were tied, bound in the form of an agreement with the property owner. Granted, while not required by law, the council could have sent letters to Chestnut Hill residents as a courtesy and likely avoided some of the con ict, but if they took all the required steps, how were they to know public sentiment? The Sunshine Law ensures accountability, but are we just assuming since meetings are open to the public, our of cials will make decisions with which we all agree? Vernon City Council is also dealing with an issue on which not everyone agrees, but one young woman attended the July 14 workshop and impressed those on both sides of the peddlers ordinance issue. When Avery Hodges of Vernon found summer employment working at a roadside fruit stand, the teenager also found herself in the middle of a local debate. Some argue such operations take revenue away from local businesses, and the City of Vernon is currently attempting to develop an ordinance that will allow roadside stands to operate with a license while also protecting the interest of local mom and pop businesses. Avery came before the council and asked that they not let her young age fool them, as politics and current events are discussed often in her home. She then explained how working at the fruit stand was helping her earn money for college, going on to make suggestions to the council on ways to generate revenue in the city, including imposing a one-cent sales tax. Why should Panama City be the only town to bene t from all the tourists coming through our town? she asked. Everyone gets gas and shops at the dollar store. The teenagers pride and love for her community was apparent in her well thought out presentation as she expressed her desire to help the small town grow, and she was truly an example of her own words: Vernon is small in people and nances, but great in heart. Hodges made sure her voice was heard. Isnt that what more of us should do? Wouldnt our community be better off if we did? Most of our of cials take the trust we put in them seriously, but they still need and want to hear from us. Being in the know is not only our right, but also a checksand-balance system for better government if we do our part as responsible members of our community. After all, how can of cials listen if we dont step up and speak? Speak up if you want of cials to listen If my world is black and white, then those in my life are the brilliant shades of color. I was the kind that thought that you had to color within the boundaries of the lines and by the guidelines of nature; the sky is always blue, the grass is always green and if there are no clouds outlined on the paper then it is a clear day. I was often intimidated by a blank page, overwhelmed by the lack of guidelines or perimeters. That was until my life was ooded by people who thought outside the box and colored outside the lines. At rst I thought these were dangerous people disrupting order with their wild ideas but then I saw those ideas were not entirely without merit. They were with the authors I read, spending time on deserted islands looking for treasure or 20,000 leagues under the sea. It started the what if? It also started the difference in perspective. The Twilight Zone helped there. Just what if the standards of reality were altered just a bit? What if you could look at things from another angle? I once had an art teacher that touched on the irony between black and white. In physics darkness or black is the absence of light and white is light containing all the colors of the spectrum, said the teacher. In art, the color black is actually the presence of all colors and white is devoid of color. Astounding. Little by little those blank white sheets of paper began to excite me instead of overwhelm me because the lack of parameters, the lack of guidelines actually meant limitless possibility. My mind opened up and craved for new ideas and I found the best teacher was just what was around me. The people I met, the everyday encounters, and just life in general. This way of thinking helped me to actively look for the new in everything and has helped with problem solving. If you really think of it, there is too much in the world for you to take in all in one lifetime. You may pass the same scenery to and from work, every day but the scenery will never be the same from day to day. The wind changes the position of the tree branches from minute to minute, the trees are growing so they are different lengths over time, and vegetation has different lifespans based on the species of plant so they may be there one day, grow, bloom, and die within a week. That is just the simple, everyday occurrence of the scenery right outside your car window. Things always stay interesting because I have an interest in everything. Sometimes, when things are quiet and I have to wait, it will appear as though Im starring off into space, when in actuality I could be looking at the contrast in color on the walls dividing texture and altering color based on varying exposure to light. Its sad really, when I think that theres so many eye-catching scenes that I cant take pictures of because itll never capture the full perspective of the moment and theres not enough time to paint them all. I guess my memory will have to suf ce. Problem salving is stepping away from the issue and looking at it from another perspective, another angle. Sometimes it becomes apparent at the beginning and other times it just takes time and distance. I think statistically. Most common problems deal with elements tied closely to the proximity or area of the problem therefore it is reasonable to assume the solution is also found within the proximity or area of the problem. If you know the problem and are trying to solve the problem then the elements of the problem are tied with every aspect of your day to day life. Sometimes it does well just to put the problem down and walk away. Statistically speaking the variable related to the solution can be found within your area. Funny enough, I usually nd my solution when not thinking of the problem at all, but when Im engaged in another matter. It can become awkward because I gured out the solution and Ill be in a position where I cant do anything about it. Another aspect of thinking outside the box has helped reduce stress because Ive learned to appreciate the irony. There are things that happen and they can be frustrating and upsetting at times but I nd a good deal of it comes with buckets and buckets of irony. Laughing has been known to physically reduce stress. Laughing off those situations doesnt reduce the seriousness of it but it does alleviate some of the stress associated with it and actually primes you to better handle the situation. Life is so full of these baf ing, mind boggling and frustrating moments that can be overwhelming or can be appreciated for something that is solely your own because you can view yourself as a unique witness; someone who is one of only a few to witness these areas of your life, committee it to memory and write the tale from whatever angle you so choose. Thank you for sitting with me again; Ill see you again next week. Pay attention to whos supporting whom politically Dear Editor, I write this letter to ask the citizens of Washington County to take notice as to where a lot of the funding for Democratic candidates is coming from. There are thousands of dollars coming in from National Democratic Party source to fund the campaign of local, state, and national candidates. Nancy Pelosi and the Obama Democrats are spending millions funding these candidates. I wonder if Mrs. Graham supports the political positions of Nancy Pelosi and President Obama? Remember, citizens, both of these Democrats refused to visit the borders of Texas and both support opening out borders to illegal immigrants. Neither of these want to secure our border and prevent illegal crossings into our country. However, all neighboring countries have strict border policies. The ads that are attacking Rep. Southerland are funded by dollars from these Democrat sources. Mrs. Graham, tell the citizens of your district just where you stand with regard to the national Democrat polices and positions. Do you support the anti-God position of President Obama and Nancy Pelosi? Do you support President Obamas actions of changing laws passed by Congress, without Congress permission, which had been declared illegal by the Supreme Court? My basic question to the Democrat Candidates is are you pro Nancy Pelosi, pro Obama and pro National Democrat policies and positions, of anti-God, anti-Bible, anti-Christians? I am neither a Democrat nor a Republican. I choose the Independent Party position. I am pro-God, pro-Christian and total support, believe and live by the Bible, Gods word. I will vote only for anyone who stands rm and lives daily upon teaching and principals of the Word of God. Wake up citizens and ask questions and stand for and speak out for the position of our founding fathers, In God we trust. Yours in Christ The Rev. Dr. Billy Bruner, Th. D. (Earned) Cottondale CAROL KENT Editor Letter to the EDITOR CECILIA SPEARS | The News I painted this life-size Olaf for the youth group at church. Painting is a fun way for me to open my thoughts to the possibilities beyond what is currently evident; to really dream. Coloring outside the lines CECILIA SPEARS Cecilias Sit Down AVERY HODGES

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Local Washington County News | A5 Wednesday, July 23, 2014 WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. – 11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 638-0093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 6386217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 1 p.m.: Caregivers Meeting at Washington County Council on Aging in Chipley for more information call 638-6216 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society 2nd Thursday of each month. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Line Dancing Class for more information call 638-6216 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A FRIDAY 6 a.m.: Men’s Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 6386217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery call 703-0347 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper 4th Friday of every month January – September. 6-8 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging 50+ dance club for more information call 638-6216 6-8 p.m.: Marianna’s Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Methodist Youth Center in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. Jessi Collins: Mom. Vo lunteer .H elper .S ales Consultant. Jessi is focused on helping her customers succeed through well-planned advertising str ategies –s he looks out for their best inter ests to ac hieve the gr eatest re sults. As am om, Jessi does the same .S he is a“ Safe to Sleep Champion” for SIDS pr evention, and volunteers with or ganizations suc ha sU nited Wa ya nd St. Jude’ st hat help mak el ife better for others. Jessi and son Ma veric kr ecently “adopted” ar esident at Wa shington Rehab Center; she thinks it’ sn ever too early to instill the va lue of ser vice to friends, family and neighbors in our communities. Because of our people ,w ed eliver mor et han the news to Wa shington and Holmes counties. It’ sj ust another wa yt hat we’ re committed to our communities. No body deli ver sl ike we do. AH alif ax Media Group Compan y SP 99147 Fizz, boom, read WASHINGTON COUNTY — “Fizz, boom, read” is sparking imaginations all across Washington County. Six weeks of ‘radioactive fun’ is underway, the Chipley main branch, Sunny Hills and Country Oaks branches of the Washington County Library and at the Vernon City Hall are all laboratories for this summer fun. This event will be held at the Country Oak branch every Wednesday at 10: 30 a.m. through today, July 23 and at the Sunny Hills branch every Wednesday at 3 p.m. through today July 23. If you would like to pictures of our summer reading mix, please check out the kids’ blog at wcplkidsrule.blogspot.co m For more information call Zedra Hawkins at 638-1314. Holmes County 4-H offers youth summer workshop BONIFAY — Holmes County 4-H has a summer day workshop open for youth ages eight and up this summer. 4-H Moo-Lah Money Camp is scheduled from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Thursday, July 24, at the Holmes County Ag Center.  The cost is $25 per youth. Snacks and drinks included. Children will need to bring a sack lunch. Youth can register at the University of Florida/IFAS Extension, Holmes County 4-H Ofce. Registration will remain open until July 11, 2014. For more information about this event, please contact Niki Crawson, UF IFAS-Holmes County Extension 4-H Agent, at 547-1108, ncrawson@ufl.ed u or check out our website at holmes. ifas.u.ed u HCPL summer programs BONIFAY — The Holmes County Public Library’s summer programs are now underway and are being held every Friday through July 25. All programs will be held at the library except the program for Friday, July 25, which will be held at the Holmes County Agricultural Center. Programs will begin at 10 a.m. each day. The nal program on July 25 and will be a day of food, fun, and games with friends and family. Annual old fashioned democratic picnic TALLAHASSEE — The 14th Annual Old Fashioned (but airconditioned) Democratic Picnic will be held from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, July 26, at the Southside Arts Complex. Supper will be from 4 to 5 p.m. with candidates beginning to speak at 5 p.m. Music will be by Craig Reeder of Hot Tamale. Admission is $5 and includes a barbecue meal and cold drinks. A Cash bar with wine and beer will be available. The complex is located at 2525 S. Monroe St. (E. Side Monroe at Orange) in Tallahassee. For more information, contact Dave Jacobsen at davejacobsen@msn. co m Mother-daughter, father-son banquet CHIPLEY — A mother, daughter, father, son banquet will be held at 6 p.m., July 26, at the Washington County Agricultural Center in Chipley. This is a formal event. Tickets are $10 for a single ticket and $15 for a double ticket. For more information call Jalessa Brown at 326-4264. Smoking Cessation BONIFAY — Big Bend AHEC along with the Florida Department of Health in Holmes County will be offering a free smoking cessation class from 4 to 6 p.m., Monday, July 28. Class will be held at the Florida Department of Health in Holmes County 603 Scenic Circle, Bonifay. Free nicotine replacement patches, gum and lozenges are available. Class covers all forms of tobacco. For more information, please contact Leann Jones at 547-8500 ext. 240 or email jlewis@bigbendahec.org No person shall, on the grounds of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion or sex be excluded from participation in, be denied benets of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity receiving or beneting from federal nancial assistance. Sensory impaired or limited-English prociency patients will be provided with necessary aids and interpreters at no cost by calling Fran Amerson at 547-8500 ext. 234. Foxy Red Hatters CHIPLEY — The Foxy Red Hatters will meet at 12:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 29, at KC’s Pizza in Chipley. Movie Fun CHIPLEY — Looking for an afternoon of entertainment escape but cannot drive to that far away movie theater? The Washington County Public Library will be showing Despicable Me 2 and serving free popcorn at 3:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 29 at the Chipley Branch. For more information call 638-1314. Braves vs. New York Mets WASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY — The Krafty Katz Relay for Life team is holding fundraiser to see the Atlanta vs. New York Mets, Saturday, September 20. Tickets are $100 and include the bus ride to and from Atlanta and eld level seats to the game. The bus will leave Chipley at 12:30 p.m. and return at approximately 1 a.m. To ensure seat on the bus, please call Vicki Lamb at 326-3319 or 638-1483. Swimming lessons set at Chipola MARIANNA — Chipola College will offer Children’s swimming lessons for ages four and up on the following dates: Session 1: Monday, June 16 through Thursday, June 26 with a registration deadline of Thursday, June 12; Session 2: Monday, July 14 through Thursday, July 24, with a registration deadline of Thursday, July 10; Session 3: Monday, August 4 through Thursday, August 14, with a registration deadline of Thursday, July 31. Classes are available at 10 a.m. or 7 p.m. Sessions include eight 45-minute classes, which meet Monday through Thursday for two weeks. Lessons are based on a combination of nationally recognized methods. Cost of each two-week session is $55. Preregistration is required, with a $5 late registration fee. For more information, call 718-2473 or visit www.chipola.ed u Free Family History Class SUNNY HILLS — Who’s your Daddy’s Daddy? For those who have wondered who they are and why they’re here, and how they can nd out free of charge: two sister missionaries from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints are hosting a weekly class providing introduction, instruction, and assistance in using the Church’s free family history website, FamilySearch. org, from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. every Wednesday, at the Sunny Hills Library located at 4083 Challenger Blvd. For more information call the sister missionaries at 525-9768. If no one answers, be sure to leave a message. Bethlehem alumni reunion BETHLEHEM —The Bethlehem Alumni Reunion is scheduled for Saturday, August 2, 2014 in the cafeteria at Bethlehem School. A time of meeting and greeting will begin at 5:15 p.m., with dinner scheduled to begin at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $15.00 each. The dinner menu will consist of ribeye steak, baked potato, green salad, roll and dessert. Please make plans to attend. Tickets may be purchased at Miller’s Grocery or by contacting Cheryl Daughtery at 334-360-0308 or Peggy Moore at 415-2438. Chipola to offer basic corrections MARIANNA — The Chipola College Public Service Department will offer a Basic Corrections course beginning Monday, Aug. 11. The 420-hour program will meet weekdays from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. through Tuesday, Nov. 11. Completion of the program prepares candidates to take the State Board Examination for entry into the Corrections eld. Candidates for all programs must be at least 19 years of age and earn a passing score on the Criminal Justice Basic Abilities Test (CJBAT) offered at the Public Service Building every Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. Cost of the test is $45. Applicants must have a standard high school diploma or its equivalent and must undergo a medical physical examination, background check and drug screening. For information regarding the application process, contact Jamie McAllister, Corrections Coordinator, at 573-0437. Holmes County 4-H will hold open meeting for new livestock club The Holmes County 4-H program through the University of Florida and IFAS Extension will hold an open meeting for youth interested in raising 4-H animal projects and showing their animals in upcoming local fairs. Interested youth, parents, and individuals interested in volunteering are encouraged to attend this meeting at 6 p.m., Tuesday, August 12, 2014, at the Holmes County Ag Center. Youth ages ve to 18 and their parents will have the opportunity to explore the different animal focuses such as beef cattle, horses, poultry and rabbits being offered within the 4-H Livestock Club and meet with the 4-H Agent and volunteers. Youth will also be able to enroll in the new 4-H year which begins, Monday, September 1. Volunteer information will be available for those adults interested in getting involved in this new 4-H livestock program. For more information regarding this event or for additional 4-H information, please contact Niki Crawson at 547-1108, ncrawson@ ufl.ed u or check out our website at holmes.ifas.u.ed u Back to school fair CHIPLEY — Northwest Florida Community Hospital will host the annual The Back to School Fair from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 14, on the front lawn. This is a free event to help school age children prepare to return to school, looking spiffy and equipped with the necessary school supplies. There will be a back pack drawing as well. For more information call Joanie Beard at 415-8104. Community EV entsENTS Community CALENDAR

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SPORT S www.chipleypaper.com A Section To learn ho w yo u can suppor t our commun ity s univ ersity contact Ma ry Be th Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. FL ORIDA ST AT E UNIVE RSIT Y PA NAMA CIT Y THE CA MP AIGN FOR OUR CO MM UNIT Y S UN IVERS IT Y En do wment for To morr ow s Jo bs $4 ,500 ,0 00 $500 ,0 00 $1,500 ,0 00 $2,500 ,0 00 $3 ,500 ,0 00 $4 ,500 ,0 00 $0 $1, 000 ,0 00 $2, 000 ,0 00 $3 ,0 00 ,0 00 $4 ,0 00 ,0 00 $5 ,0 00 ,0 00 GO AL EBRO As part of his trip to Florida each year to watch greyhound rac ing, Bob Feijo was making a round at the Ebro track Wednesday night. The New Bedford, Mass., resident, who was enjoying the races with his friends grandson, said theres noth ing like it. The kids love to watch this, he said. And its not promoting them to want to throw away all their money. They just love to watch it. They really do. You see the smiles, and its a good family thing. It really is. As he sat in a chair watching the races, children in front of him clung to the track railing in anticipation of dogs busting out of the gate. Several mothers had babies in their strollers. One parent kissed her little girl as she held her in the air. Feijo said he lost the enjoyment of watching the races in his home state in 2008, when opponents to greyhound racing in his home state were able get a ballot question to eliminate racing that passed by a nar row margin. The same organizations are at work in Florida to eliminate the sport, which they say is a form of animal abuse. But Feijo and other grey hound racing enthusiasts beg to differ. These dogs are treated well, he said. There is a 95 percent adoption rate. Its documented. Betting on live racing has fallen from almost $1 billion in 1990 to $258 million last year in Florida, home to 12 of the 21 U.S. tracks that reg ularly hold live dog races. At the Ebro track, the handle for dog racing has declined from $5.78 million in scal year 2005-2006 to $1.72 mil lion in scal year 2012-2013, which runs from October through November, gures from the states Department of Professional Regulation shows. The most recent 20122013 numbers show the Ebro track lost $2.63 million on dog racing when expenses were factored in, and made $2.22 million in the poker room, for a net loss of $409,834. Our poker room has been the bread and butter, said Rick Hess, whose fam ily owns the track. He said the track might have had to close if it werent allowed to have the poker games. You go to the dog races in the 1980s, and you would have seen it was way bet ter, he said. When they brought the lottery into the state, everything has gone down, down, down. Hess said the track is making a slight net prot when a more than $600,000 tax credit is factored in. On paper it looks like (the track is losing money), but we get tax credits that keeps us going, Hess said. And he said his family is committed to keeping the live dog races as long as the track remains protable. The track employs more than 100 people, and had a payroll of more than $1.4 mil lion in scal year 2012-2013. (The payroll) goes back in the community, he said. Some experts are pre dicting that dog racing may be on its last leg in Florida, with conservative legisla tors in leadership positions who are opposed to racing at a time when handles for live racing are declining. Even though Washington County voters approved of a refer endum to allow slots at the Ebro track a move that Hess said could revive dog racing the state refuses to grant the permits needed to get them operating. In his ofce at the track, Hess has a rendering of what the track could look like if slots were allowed. The proj ect, which would hire 1,000 people, includes a hotel, gaming center and amphi theater, retail shopping and ve-star restaurants. The slots would bring more people out, he said. Were just holding out as long as the racing is protable. Laws currently require tracks that have poker also have dog races, but there have been bills proposed to decouple them. Florida, which in 1931 was the rst state to legalize wagering on greyhound rac ing, opted against a measure in its most recent legislative session that would have al lowed tracks to keep poker and slots and ditch the rac ing. The plan, which propo nents hope to revive in the session next year, is seen as an expansion of gambling and faces opposition from gambling opponents and other competitors. The decoupling move ment has created an odd alliance between racetrack casino operators, who see the races as a burden, and animal rights groups out to end greyhound racing altogether. When decoupling pass es, it will lead to a slow and gradual end of the industry, said Carey Theil, executive director of the anti-racing group Grey2K USA. That would be a sad day, said people watching the races at the Ebro track on Wednesday night. Tracey and Tracee Pope of Rockmart, Ga., came to the track with their young children. Tracey Pope said they have no dog racing where he lives, and the Ebro track is the reason they come here as opposed to another vaca tion spot like Myrtle Beach. I love it, he said. My daddy passed away about 13 years ago, but its why he came to Florida. Dan Avery, who was visit ing from Kentucky, took his young children to the races on Wednesday night. He said his family was enjoying their rst experi ence at the dog track. I think its pretty en tertaining to watch these dogs bust out of the gate, he said. Its amazing how quick they run. Bobby Thrasher of At lanta decided to stop by the Ebro track Wednesday night. He said it would be a real loss for the local econ omy if the dog track went away. Im sure it means a lot to the economy because there are a lot of people who work here, and a lot of people who train dogs, he said. Efforts under way to make racing illegal EBRO Animal rights groups continue to push for legislation that they believe will spell the end for dog rac ing in Florida. In other states, such as Massachusetts, they helped abolish the industry. And they said they are making headway in the Sun shine State. It rubs Rick Hess, whose family owns the track and whose grandfather started it, the wrong way. He said greyhounds are born to run. If greyhound racing was ever to be abolished, people will still continue to breed and race them, he said. The difference is it will encourage illegal racing, gambling and unregulated breeding activity. He added if that hap pened the state would lose thousands of job opportuni ties and many other indi rect services related to the industry. It would cost the state to prosecute and police the ille gal activities, he said. It is unfair to stereotype anything, especially mak ing a blanket statement that greyhound racing is inhu mane, Hess said. There are bad people in all forms of business, and all it takes is a few of those bad guys to really hurt an industrys image, he said. There are many wonderful people in this business tak ing excellent care of these animals. Greyhounds love to run, they are bred for this purpose. Its how people treat them during and after their racing career is what we should focus on. Even though the grey hounds and kennels are not owned by the racetrack, the tracks presiding judge, along with state ofcials, perform weekly kennel inspections to ensure the safety and well being of the greyhounds, Hess said. We also have veterinar ians on-site to ensure the greyhounds are t to race and assist with any healthrelated issues that may come up during the races, he said. Their diet and nutrition is better than the average house pet, and they have plenty of companionship during their racing career. He said some may ar gue that the greyhounds are conned to small ken nel quarters and compare their lifestyle to the average house pet. The fact is, these grey hounds do not know any dif ference for them to compare a day at the beach or park, so they are happy with what they are used to, he said. If someone really want ed to label and compare, they could think about the reality of what goes into making a steak or burger the next time they order one of those. Certain extremists have painted ugly pictures against greyhound racing over the years, he said. The truth is, it is a very unique and beautiful sport where the many people involved are honored and privileged to be a part of, he said. Over 95 percent of the grey hounds are adopted into loving homes. Nearly 1,000 greyhounds were placed into adoption programs last year here at Ebro. Many greyhounds that race throughout the country start and nish their career at Ebro. We are considered a gateway to the racing world. Were the state to allow slots at the track, a proposal that Washington County vot ers approved, it could have the revenue to upgrade the kennel facilities, and per haps provide larger kennels and therapeutic amenities like those offered to thor oughbreds, he said. I would like to add a therapeutic pool and ul trasound muscle therapy, along with many others on my wish list, he said. Carey Theil, the execu tive director of Grey2K USA Worldwide that led the effort to get rid of racing in Massa chusetts and is leading the lobbying effort in Florida, said greyhound racing is an imal abuse on many fronts. He said state records show that between Aug. 10, 2013 and May 31, 2014, 10 greyhounds died at the Ebro track. One of the dogs was Emily Sharp, a one-yearold brindle greyhound who died at Ebro on May 22, he said. Emily died after she fell during a training race and suffered a broken right front leg, he said. When she died, she was preparing to ofcially race for the rst time. He said greyhound rac ing dogs are kept in small kennel cages for 22 hours a day, with four, 30-minute bathroom breaks. He said they are fed meat from downed animals that has been declared unt for hu man consumption, and the female dogs are given ste roids so they dont go into heat. Many dogs die from in juries sustained during rac ing, Theil said. Starting on May 21, 2013, the state began requiring that all greyhound deaths be publicly reported for the rst time. In total, between May 31, 2013 and May 31, 2014, a total of 141 greyhound deaths have been reported. This averages out to a racing greyhound death ev ery three days, Theil said. Theil said Hess was cor rect in one of his comments. Greyhounds do love to run. We certainly agree with that that, he said. Thats why it is so cruel to keep them in a cage for 20 hours a day. Theil also said grey hound racing is costing the state money. He said the state spent between $4.1 million and $6.4 million in 2012 regulating dog rac ing. During the same year, state revenue from grey hound racing amounted to only $3.1 million. Theil said his organiza tion has been pushing for the passage of a bill that would allow tracks to have poker rooms and not force tracks to offer live dog racing. He said the votes are in the Legislature to have this pass, and it will eventually. He expects bills calling for decoupling to be introduced again this year. We have the votes in both chambers and both parties, he said. The chal lenge with decoupling is twofold: Number one, it gets caught up in a bigger debate about casino gambling and slots and tribal casinos, and the politics become com plicated; and number two, track owners ght with each other. Some track owners want to use decoupling as an opportunity to get some thing else every year. Articles by JOHN HENDERSON 522-5108 | @PCNHjohn | jhenderson@pcnh.com Track owners: Greyhounds born to run PATTI BLAK E | The News Herald Dogs chase a bunny down a track on Thursday. Racing season for the Ebro Greyhound Park runs from May 16th through Sept. 20. Page A7 Wednesday, July 23, 2014

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Dr. William T. (Bill) McFatter, Jr., age 88, passed from this life unexpectedly on July 2. He was born May 1, 1926. He was in the area from his Stuart, Florida home and was at the childhood home of his wife of 53 years, Edna Jean Brock (9-26-1927-11-3-2005) when stricken. Her parents were Clarence Brock and Belva White Brock. Your writer came to know Billy McFatter in September 1939 when we became classmates in the eighth grade upon my entry into Vernon School, coming from Brackin School. His sister, Carol Lynette McFatter Hudson, was also in that class. This brother and sister duo were among a host of students this boy from the country had to get acquainted with-fast like! Carol was born on January 15, 1928 after her parents, William T. (Bill) McFatter, Sr. and Lillian Minchin McFatter, had moved to Trudie, Georgia, following the lure of the booming turpentine industry. The father reportedly told friends later that he saw his rst barrel of rosin being cooked after moving to Georgia and buying a turpentine business in Pierce County. Bill and sister, Carol, started to a rural school there at the same time. He was age six and she was only four. They all returned to Vernon in 1935 and to the general store begun by Lorenzo Dow McFatter and his wife, Sarah Clementine Brock McFatter. Neil D. Blue, Jr., a grandson of the original store owners, wrote an interesting narrative for the Heritage of Washington County Book on this pioneer family, especially his memories of the general merchandise store. Grandpa Mac sold everything in his store from candy kisses to caskets, wrote young Neil Blue. How well I remember the wonderful smell of hoop cheese blended with the barrels of salted mullet and other fragrances that you would nd only in a country store., reminisced the grandson. Upon the grandparents retirement, Bill McFatter, Sr. and wife, Lillian McFatter, became the owners and operators of this well known Vernon landmark. The business became a source of employment for other residents of Vernon who worked there as a livelihood. They include Brown Hightower, Byrd Bruce, Burl Roche, Slim Boyette, Jesse Hare and Melvin Dietz. Paula Simmons Dalton told me: Perry, I worked part time in the Bill McFatter store for 12 years. She further explained that she, Carol and Billy remained close friends throughout their adult lives. McFatters store is remembered as a fun place to work and shop. Billy McFatter was one of the many young men in Vernon School who knew that military service was imminent when the country was thrust into World War II with the bombing of Pearl Harbor by the Japanese on Dec. 7, 1941. He entered Marion Military Institute in Marion, Ala., in the fall of 1942, graduating in 1944. He entered the U. S. Army on August 25, 1944 and received Infantry Training at Camp Wheeler, Georgia. He was shipped overseas on January 23, 1945 and served in the European Theater of combat as a member of the 56th Armored Battalion, 12th. Armored Division in Rhineland, Central Europe and was awarded the Purple Heart for leg injuries received on April 1, 1945. Other medals and commendations include the Combat Infantry Badge, American Defense Ribbon, European Theater Ribbon, Victory Medal and the Good Conduct Medal. Billy McFatter returned to the United States June 30, 1945 as a patient at Walter Reed Hospital. He was discharged from the U. S. Army on March 23, 1947 after serving honorably for 31 months. We became classmates once more in September of 1947 when we were among the 2500 freshmen students enrolling in the University of Florida with most being on the GI Bill. Billy McFatter received his Masters and Doctorate Degrees in Education. He accepted a job as a teacher in Apalachicola. Visits back to Vernon resulted in meeting up with Edna Jean Brock, whom he had known from high school. A courtship developed and the two were married on June 12, 1952. McFatter was elected Superintendent of Schools in Washington County in 1953. Joyce Tyre Caylor told me that she remembers the big smile on Bill McFatters face when, as School Superintended, he handed her a Diploma as a 1956 graduate of Vernon High School. He held the position for eight years before moving to Broward County to accept the job of Assistant Superintendent in 1961. In 1979, he was appointed Superintendent of Schools and remained in that position until 1984. The McFatter Technical Center (now Technical College) and the McFatter Technical High School were subsequently named in his honor. His next career move was employment as Associate Superintendent of Schools in Fulton County, Georgia (1986-1996) and interim Superintendent of Schools in 1996. In retirement, he and Jean made their home in Stuart, Florida. Bill was honored in the Heritage of Washington County Book under the heading of A WASHINGTON COUNTY FAVORITE SON, for his outstanding achievements in the eld of education. His survivors include two sons, William T. McFatter, III, DDS and Clarence Gregory McFatter. His grandchildren are William Brent, Darren Gregory, Katie Ann and William Brock. His sister is Carol McFatter Hudson and her two children are Al Hudson and Cam Hudson. There is a host of other kinsmen also surviving. A Memorial Service was held at Shiloh Baptist Church on Saturday, July 19 at 11:00 A. M. with Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay and Vernon entrusted with all arrangements. Once again, it becomes my sad duty and honor to write this tribute to another Vernon High School Classmate. It was in April of this year when Billy wrote me that he could not attend the reunion scheduled for April 1: Perry, all of us owe you a deep debt of thanks for keeping the reunion going throughout the 70 years since 1944. Borrowing from Tom Brokows denition of men such as Bill McFatter, I want to include him as one of The Greatest Generation. It was my pleasure having known him and being able to call him my friend. See you all next week. Washington County years ago ... REFLECTIONS www.chipleypaper.com Page A8 Wednesday, July 23, 2014 50 years ago 1964 WAUSAU PLANNING VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT FOR COMMUNITY: Wausau, Washington Countys newest municipality is planning to organize a volunteer re department. M ILK COSTS LO W ER FOR SCHOOL LUNCHES: Milk for school lunches will cost the School Board a little less next school term than it did for the term ending early in June. 1 KILLED, 2 HURT IN AUTO ACCIDENT NEAR F REEPORT: A former Vernon man was killed Monday, and two Vernon residents were injured in an automobile accident near Freeport. 20 years ago 1994 C OUNTY REVEALS DISPOSAL PLANS: Washington County Administrator Roger Hagan reminds residents of plans for the disposal of household debris, spoiled food, and appliances damaged by the ood. IRS THINKING OF FLOOD VICTIMS: Florida residents in area affected by ooding caused by Tropical Storm Alberto and unable to need their federal tax obligations will receive special consideration from the Internal Revenue Service. M ATTOX EXCELS AT GOL F : Ten-year-old Ryan Mattox of Chipley competed in the Future Masters gold tournament last week in Dothan, Ala. Dr. William T. (Billy) McFatter, dies S PECIAL TO T HE NE W S Can anyone identify these clowns advertising a domestic violence fundraiser? This photo was found at the Washington County News ofce. Do you recognize these clowns? If so please email wcnnews@chipleypaper.com Your answer will appear in a future edition. Chasing Shadows is a new feature we hope to run each week. Do you have an old photo from Washington County youd like to have identied? Ask your neighbors for help by submitting it for publication. Send email submissions to wcnnews@chipleypaper.com Who are these fundraising clowns? PERRYS PRATTLE Perry Wells S PECIAL TO T HE N E W S William T. McFatter, Jr. in his U.S. Army uniform, decked with ribbons honoring his war time service, which he wore proudly. S PECIAL TO T HE N E W S In the July 16 Chasing Shadows feature, we asked local residents to identify these gentlemen. We already know Judge Perry Wells was the fellow on the left, but special thanks to Thera Harris and Joe Earl Collins for calling in to identify the gentleman on the right as V.J. Collins. SHADOWS CAUGHT!

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Washington County News Wednesday, JULY 23 2014 B PAGE 1 Section E XTRA “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Besides listening to the harp, what was G G eorge Washington’s other favorite indoor recreation? Darts, Sculpting, Billiards, Knitting What nation has a leading brand of cigarettes called Hollywood? India, China, Brazil, England From older TV’s “Seinfeld” what was the occupation of Jackie Chiles? Inventor, Lawyer, Doorman, Chef When was Hank A A aron elected into baseball’s Hall of Fame? 1974, 1982, 1991, 2003 There are almost how many million miles of roads in the UU .S.? 1, 2, 3, 4 AA merganser is a type of? Mediator, Duck, Elevator, Squirrel AA NSW EE RS: Billiards, Brazil, Lawyer, 1982, 4, Duck Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com W A A SHIN GG TON COUU NT YY — Rainy weather didn’t damp en the spirit or the purpose of those participating in Saturday’s rst annual 2 Wheels for Meals Marble Run. About 25 people came out for the event, hosted by the Unity Faith Riders mo torcycle ministry, in an ef fort to raise money for the Washington County Coun cil on Aging’s “Meals on Wheels” program, which has experienced recent nancial woes. Participants traveled by motorcycle or car to six checkpoints in Washing ton and Holmes counties, beginning with the Hell ghters motorcycle min istry clubhouse in Chipley, followed by Vernon City Hall, New Hope United Methodist Church, Unity Baptist Church in Vernon, the Caryville Community Center, and then Gully Springs Church in Bonifay. Riders received a marble picked at random at each checkpoint, with each color worth a secret number of points. Almost every check point offered a moment of prayer for the council and its efforts to provide meals to the elderly, as well as for the safety of the riders, many who were traveling in the rain by motorcycle. The group met back for a sh fry at the Coun cil on Aging in Chipley, where points were tallied, and three top prizes were awarded, including a twonight stay on Panama City Beach. About $800 was raised for the program. “I’m so proud to be part of this (fundraising effort),” said Carole Martin, wife of Unity Baptist Church Pastor Lindsey Martin. “I just can’t imagine being hungry, and it breaks my heart to think of the elderly citizens who depend on this program being affected (by budget cuts).” For more on the current plight of the Council on Ag ing, and how you can help, see Page AA 1 photosPHOTOS bB Y CAro RO L KEnt NT | The News Michelle Anderson and Time Purvis were among those braving the rainy weather to ride in the 2 Wheels for Meals benet. Unity Faith Rider Milton Feagle takes advantage of the coffee offered at the event’s registration site, Sassy Sizzors in Chipley. Retired Washington County teacher Linda Burke receives one of her marbles from Carole Martin of Unity Baptist Church at the Caryville Community Center checkpoint. ‘2 wheels for meals’ Unity Faith Riders ride for Council on Aging The event culminated at the Washington County Council on Aging’s pavilion, where guests were treated to a sh fry lunch, door prizes and a word from Unity Faith Rider Johnathan Taylor. Pastor Johnathan Taylor helped set up the registration tent at Sassy Sizzors in Chipley, however, persistent rain forced registration to be moved in inside. Troy Landry signs in for the ride with a little help from David and Connie Nelson. fF U nN D rR A isinISIN G E ffortsFFORTS About 25 people came out for the event, hosted by the Unity Faith Riders motorcycle ministry. About $800 was raised for the program.

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B2 | Washington County News Extra Wednesday, July 23, 2014 AN EXCITING SALES OPPORTUNITY IN THE NEWS HERALD, WORKING ON: To apply send resume to LGrimes@pcnh.com. Ca ndida te s should ha ve prior ex perienc e in a sales en vir onmen t along with high school diploma or equiv alen t. Th e Ne ws He ra ld o e rs a co mpetitiv e bene t pack age including health, den tal lif e insur anc e, and 401(k) plan. Ca ndida te hir ed pending pr eemplo ymen t dr ug scr een and criminal back gr ound check The News Herald is seeking a Sales Support Coordinator The ideal candidate will need: St ro ng co mmunica tion sk ills and ve ry high at te nt ion to detail Ex ce llen t cust omer ser vic e, or ganiza tional sk ills and co mput er sk ills re quir ed Mu st be pr oc ess dr iv en and be able to fu nc tion e ec tiv ely and independen tly with asser tiv e, inno vat iv e and persuasiv e personalit y to ac hiev e sales objec tiv es on a re gular basis Th is position will wo rk co llabor at iv ely with the assig ned te am to en sur e ex ce ptional cust omer ser vic e to co mpan y’ s cur re nt an d pr ospec tiv e adv er tisers by helping set appoin tmen ts fo r sales te am and tak ing calls fr om clien ts SALES SUPPORT COORDINA TOR Special to the News On Saturday, July 19, the Washington County Historical Society’s History Museum hosted its July beginning weaving class. Fourteen participants enjoyed learning about reed basket weaving and came away with a new skill, a beautiful basket and bragging rights “I did it myself!” They were able to choose from a rainbow of colors and decorative accessories to individualize their baskets. This basket design featured an antique spool reclaimed from the textile miles of Southern Georgia as the handle. Master weavers Sharon Hynes and Yvette Lerner provided kits, spools, hands-on instruction, and demonstrated various weaving techniques. “This is a great way to spend a rainy Saturday morning! We really appreciate that our museum hosts this type of class and the facility here works our great,” Hynes said. “The basket weaving classes are a lot of fun and this class is our largest so far. Our museum welcomes the opportunity to share a heritage skill such as basket weaving with our community,” Dorothy Odom, museum director, said. Stop by and check out the displays and collections at the Washington County History Museum, open Fridays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and the rst Saturday of each month from 9 a.m. until noon. Bell and Finch to wed Katie Elizabeth Bell and Colby Daniel Finch of Chipley would like to announce their upcoming marriage. Katie is the daughter of Mark Bell and Lisa Maddox both of Chipley. Katie is a graduate of Holmes County High School and is currently pursuing a degree in teaching at Chipola. The maid of honor will be Jamie Byas. Bridesmaids will be Mallory Rowell, Heisirys Ramirez and Angel Finch. Colby is the son of Danny and Missie Finch of Chipley. Colby is a graduate of Chipley High School and is currently working for Finch Fire and Water and a part of the Marines. The best man will be Michael Phipps. Groomsmen will be Cody Foxworth, Jonathan Guettler and Cullen Chance. The wedding will take place at 6 p.m., Friday, Aug. 8, at Northside Assembly of God in Bonifay, with a reception following the service. Doss and Brannon to wed Wayne and Melanie Doss of Chipley are pleased to announce the upcoming wedding of their daughter, Brittany Doss to Lee Brannon, son of Rusty and Gloria Brannon of Hartford, Ala. The wedding is planned for Friday, July 25, in Chipley Weddings SPECIAL TO EE XTRA Chipola College alumna Ashleigh Lollie was crowned Miss Florida USA in the pageant held, Saturday, July 12 in the Parker Playhouse in Fort Lauderdale. Lollie, of Grand Ridge, was crowned Miss Emerald Coast earlier this year. Seventy women were vying for the crown. She was a freshman member of the Chipola Homecoming Court in 2010. A law student at Florida State University, Lollie goes on to represent Florida in the Miss USA pageant next year. A win there would earn her a spot at Miss Universe. CC HIPOLA ALUMNU sS I sS MM I ssSS FLORI dD A UU S AA Special to Extra On the morning of, Friday, July 4, the long awaited dedication of the 1775-1783 Minuteman Memorial took place in Pensacola Veterans Memorial Park. Blue Springs Society Honorary President Katelyn Marie Miller and leaders Mr. and Mrs. Charles Aaron Wilkerson attended to represent C.A.R. (Children of the American Revolution). Katelyn is a dual member of C.A.R. and DAR (Daughters of the American Revolution), so was representing Chipola Chapter as well, along with Sharon Wilkerson, past chapter regent. Chipola Chapter, NSDAR (National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution), Blue Springs Society, N.S.C.A.R. (National Society of the Children of the American Revolution), and William Dunaway Chapter, FLSSAR (Florida Society of the Sons of the American Revolution) each supported this four-year-long project with a generous donation. The sponsors of the project to honor patriots and soldiers of the American Revolutionary War are the Pensacola Chapter, NSDAR and the Pensacola Chapter, FLSSAR. The Minuteman is a time honored symbol of those who sacriced their lives and fortunes in support of the American Revolution. The base for the Minuteman statue was dedicated on, Friday, July 4, with the actual statue to be unveiled and dedicated in the near future. For information about Chipola Chapter, NSDAR please contact Regent Carolyn Jordan at 638-1947 or cdjordan@bellsouth. net and for information about Blue Springs Society, N.S.C.A.R. contact Senior President Cynthia Brock at 334-494-0417 or cynthia. brock@outlook.com. Strickland and Wicker to wed Anthony Strickland and Margaret Gunn are pleased to announce the up coming marriage of their daughter Emily Strickland to Dalton Wicker son of Greg Wicker and Terri Savage Wicker. The bride to be is a 2011 graduate of Vernon High School and is currently employed by Family Health Care in Chipley. The groom to be is a 2010 graduate of Vernon High School and is currently employed by Lewis Bear Company in Ebro. A Saturday, Aug. 30, wedding is planned for 2 p.m., at the Sanctuary (Assembly of God) church in Ebro, with reception to follow at the Ebro City Hall. Local invitations are being sent. SPECIAL TO THE NN E ws WS A group of ladies made learned how to make baskets at the Washington County Historical Society, Saturday, July 19. Museum hosts basket weaving class SPECIAL TO EE XTRA Sharon Wilkerson (second from left) and Katelyn Miller (third from left) represented Chipola Chapter, DAR at the dedication of the base for the Pensacola Minuteman statue. Minuteman memorial dedicated

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Extra Washington County News | B3 Wednesday, July 23, 2014 Special to the News The practice of medi cine in the days before antibiotics and anesthesia will be the focus of an ex hibit and lecture hosted by Troy University at the Do than Campus. The exhibit The Hen kel Physicians: A Familys Life in Letters, developed and produced by the Na tional Library of Medicine, and National Institutes of Health, is currently on dis play inside the library at the Dothan Campus. The exhibit includes selections from the letters and writ ings of the Henkel fam ily, several generations of physicians who settled in the New Market, Va., area in 1790. The letters of the Hen kel family richly docu ment the daily life of men in medicine in the 19th century and reveal the challenges, rewards and responsibilities of the pro fession. Covering more than a century of life in the Shenandoah Valley, this exhibition features a selection of writings that detail local events, profes sional jealousies, and the national crisis of the Civil War and the dramatic tes timony of the Henkel phy sicians in a murder trial. Troy University history professor Dr. Karen Ross will deliver a lecture in con junction with the exhibit, at 7 p.m., Tuesday, July 22, inside the Harrison Room in Malone Hall. Dr. Ross will discuss the historical context of the Henkel fam ily physicians in relation to the patients and practitio ners of the South. Admission to both the lecture and exhibit are free and open to the public. The exhibit will be on dis play through the rst week of August. Dr. Ross joined the De partment of History in 2008 and teaches American his tory, history of medicine, and history of science on the Troy Campus. Her research focuses on the development of American biomedicine in the early twentieth century. For more informa tion about the exhibit or lecture, contact Dothan Campus library director Dr. Christopher Shaffer at (334) 983-6556, ext. 1320 or shafferc@troy.ed u Ca ll to ll-fr ee: 1-800-756-3857 Ar e Yo u Still Pa ying To o Much Fo r Yo ur Medications? Yo u ca n sa ve up to 93 % whe n yo u fi ll yo ur pre sc ri pt ion s at ou r Ca nadi an and In te rn at io na l pr es cr ip ti on se rv ic e. Celecoxi b $64.00 Celebr ex TM $679.41 compar ed to Our Price Ca ll To ll-fr ee: 1-800-756-3857 Please not e tha t we do not ca rr y contr olled substances and a va lid pr escription is re quired fo r all pr escription medic at ion or ders Us e of these ser vic es is subjec t to the Te rm s of Use an d acc om pa ny ing policies at www .canadadrugc en te r. co m. Ty pic al US br and pric e fo r 200mg x 100 Ge neric equiv alen t of Ce lebr ex TM Ge neric pric e fo r 200mg x 100 Ca ll the number belo w and sa ve an additio nal $10 plus get fr ee shipping on yo ur rst pr escription or der with Ca nada Dr ug Ce nte r. Expir es December 31, 2014. O er is va lid fo r pr escription or ders only and ca n not be used in co njunc tion with an y other o ers Va lid for new cu st om ers on ly On e ti me use per hou seh old Ge t An Ex tr a $10 O & Fr ee Sh ipping On Yo ur 1st Or der! Or der No w! 1-800-756-3857 Us e co de 10FREE to r ec eiv e this sp ecial o er Crossword PUZZLESOLUTION ON PAGE B5 Chipola to offer new P.E. courses for coaches Special to the News This fall Chipola will be of fering two new Physical Edu cation courses that, in con junction with a third course, will satisfy the requirements for the Florida Department of Education Athletic Coach ing Endorsement, Adminis trative Rule 6A-4.0282. Chipola Athletic Director Dr. Steve Givens, says, This is the rst time we have ever offered this opportunity to both our students and the community at large. Two of the courses will be offered during the fall se mester: Theory and Methods of Coaching, (PET 2760) will meet Tuesday and Thursday at 9 a.m., Care and Preven tion of Athletic Injuries (PET 2622) will meet Monday and Wednesday at 9 a.m. Dur ing the spring 2015 semes ter, Theory and Practice of Coaching Specic Sports (PEO 2004) will meet Tues day and Thursday, at 10:30 a.m. For information, contact the Chipola Athletic Depart ment at 718-2299. Special to the News The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commis sion on Colleges (SACSCOC) has informed Chipola College of its approval of the institutions FifthYear Interim Report. This means the college has been found in compliance with all core require ments, comprehensive stan dards, and federal requirements addressed in the report. SACS accreditation is vital to our institution, so this is great news, said Chipola President Dr. Jason Hurst. Our faculty, staff and administrators work together every day to ensure that our stu dents receive a quality education. I am proud of the diligent work that resulted in a positive out come from this fth year report. Chipola submitted its FifthYear Interim Report to SACS in 2013, ve years after the colleges most recent reafrmation of ac creditation in 2008. According to Chipolas SACS Liaison Gail Hartzog, the Fifth-Year Interim Report is considered accredita tion at the mid-point. It required the college to submit 17 reports on specic SACS Principles rang ing from institutional effective ness to student achievement. The college was required to include a QEP Impact Report on the success of its Quality En hancement Plan (QEP), which SACS approved in 2008. A Chipola committee developed the veyear plan entitled Learning to Persist. The overall goal was to increase student persistence and graduation. The plan was imple mented from 2008 through 2013. Since 2008, three-year graduation rates at Chipola have in creased by over 28% among all AA degree students. The QEP Im pact Report outlined the QEPs impact on the student learning envi ronment and les sons the institution has learned as a result of the QEP. The college has received national recognition for these efforts. Chipola has been named among the top 10% of the nations community colleges (120 colleges) and eligible to compete for the Aspen Prize for the last three years. Also, last year Wash ington Monthly ranked Chipola 14th among the top 20 community colleges in the nation. The ACE (Academic Center for Excellence), an on-demand tutoring center, was established as part of the QEP. Student enthu siasm for the ACE has been over whelming over the last ve years. ACE provides free academic as sistance for all students. The ACE operates with administra tive staff and more than a dozen students, peer-tutors who have excelled in the courses in which they tutor. Nearly 900 students made about 8,000 visits to the ACE during the 2013 fall semester. Chipola is serving as a model as other institutions learn of the success of the QEP. Visitors to campus have included a team from Missouri, which established a similar effort to increase persistence. A group from Florida State Uni versity established an Academic Center for Excellence on their campus. College personnel have also been asked to present at state and regional meetings. College ofcials have learned a great deal from the QEP pro cess. Hartzog said, We learned that some students cannot be retained with academic support alone. Though three-year gradu ation rates have increased by over 28 percent among all AA degree students and much more among developmental/remedial students, the fall-to-fall persis tence rates of entering students have not increased during the same period. This means that, while the colleges efforts have helped many students, some en tering students face issues which cannot be addressed by academic support. Life situations often pre vent students from remaining en rolled into the second year. The QEP also included work shops and guest speakers to help faculty and staff learn to re tain students. Hartzog says that changes facilitated by faculty development occurred gradually over the last ve years. Faculty came to realize that they were the only real link to the students. Other college personnel interact with students periodically, but the teachers in the classrooms must engage students and help them feel connected. The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools is the re gional body for the accreditation of degree-granting higher educa tion institutions in the Southern states. SACS is one of ve region al accrediting organizations that have regularly conducted a com prehensive review of member institutions every 10 years. The Fifth-Year Interim Report was re cently implemented to meet U.S. Department of Education require ments that accrediting agencies monitor institutions more often to ensure those having access to federal funds continue to meet accreditation standards. Special to the News New students planning to enroll in fall semester classes at Chipola Col lege are encouraged to make applica tion as soon as possible. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) application should be completed and all required documents should have been re ceived in the Chipola College Finan cial Aid Ofce by, Monday, July 21 in order to use Federal Financial Aid to cover fall tuition and fees. Application deadline for the fall se mester is, Wednesday, Aug. 6. Regis tration for returning students begins, Wednesday, Aug. 13. New and return ing student registration is, Thursday, Aug. 14 and Friday Aug. 15. Classes begin, Monday, Aug. 18. There are several steps in the ap plication process: (1) complete the college Application for Admission; call 718-2311 for assistance; (2) re quest your high school to send a nal transcript to the Chipola Admission and Records Ofce; and (3) take the College Placement Test (non-ex empt students); call 718-2284 for assistance. Students should report to Room 156 in the Student Services Building and sign in to see an aca demic advisor. Chipola offers more than 40 indi vidual programs in four major areas: the Bachelor of Science Degree, the Associate in Arts Degree, the Associ ate in Science Degree and Workforce Development programs. Bachelors Degrees include: Science Education Middle Grades (5-9); Biology Education Secondary Grades (6-12); Mathematics Educa tion Middle Grades (5-9); Mathemat ics Education Secondary Grades (612); English Education, Exceptional Student Education and Elementary Education; Business Administration with concentrations in Management or Accounting; and a Bachelor of Sci ence in Nursing (BSN). Additionally, the college offers the Educator Preparation Institute, a Teacher Certication program for those with a B.S. in a non-teaching eld. The Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree is designed for students who plan to complete their rst two years of col lege work and then transfer to a fouryear program at Chipola or another college or university. Credits earned are transferable and are applicable toward a bachelors degree. Aca demic advising guides that outline requirements for specic majors are available from Student Affairs and are located on the college website at www.chipola.ed u Several Associate in Science (AS) and Workforce programs are offered which provide training for high wage jobs. Workforce programs include: Automotive Service Technology, Fire ghter, Law Enforcement Ofcer, Correctional Ofcer, Cosmetology, Nursing Assistant and Welding. Associate in Science (AS) pro grams include: Business Adminis tration, Early Childhood Education, Computer Information Technology, Fire Science Technology, Criminal Justice Technology (Crime Scene Track), Networking Systems Tech nology, Culinary Management, Nurs ing (RN and LPN), Nursing LPN to RN, Paramedic to RN, and Recre ation Technology College Credit Certicate pro grams include: Child Care Center Management, Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) and Paramedic. Computer Information Technology certicates include: Geographic In formation System s Help Desk Sup port Technicia n and IT Support Spe cialis t Network Systems Technology Certicate s include: Digital Foren sic s Network/Cyber Securit y Net work Support Technicia n and Server Administratio n The schedule of classes is avail able online at www.chipola.ed u For in formation, call 718-2211. SACS approves Chipola for mid-point accreditation Prepare now for Chipola fall registration Exhibit, lecture exploring lives of 19th century physicians coming to TROYs Dothan campus

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If you would like your church’s faith events included in this list, please email the information to: news@chipleypaper.com St. Anne to host Life Line Screening MARIANNA — St. Anne Catholic Church at 3009 5th St., Marianna will host Life Line Screening, a leading provider of communitybased preventive health screenings Thursday, July 24.  In order to register for this event and to receive a $10 discount off any package priced above $129, call 888-653-6441 or visit www.lifelinescreening. com/community-partners. Fourth Friday mission supper BONIFAY — Red Hill United Methodist Church will host its Fourth Friday Mission Supper, Friday, July 25. The menu is fried catsh llets, smoked chicken, baked beans, coleslaw, cheese grits, hushpuppies and dessert. We begin serving at 5 p.m., dine in or carry out. All proceeds go to Missions. Donations are accepted. If you are planning to come as a group please call a few days ahead of time. For more information call Linda Yarbrough at 334-360-0811. The Talleys in concert ESTO — The Talleys will be in concert at 7 p.m., Saturday, July 26 at Mt. Zion Independent Baptist Church. With at least 10 No. 1 songs, The Talleys are one of the most loved and respected groups in Gospel music. The church is at 3205 Highway 2 in Esto. Back to school clothes give away CHIPLEY — Oakie Ridge Baptist Church will be giving away back to school clothes for all ages from 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 2, at the church. The church is 11 miles south of Chipley on the Orange Hill Highway. For more information, call Lori at 638-2340. Bethel Baptist homecoming Bethel Baptist Church will be celebrating its 123rd Homecoming Sunday, July 27. Services will begin promptly at 10 a.m. with the singing group, 4+1 from Bonifay. The guest speaker will be the Rev. Leroy Dobbs, a former pastor at Bethel. Dinner will be served in the Family Ministry Center following the morning services for all who attend. Bethel Baptist Church is in the Poplar Springs School Community at 1349 Highway 173 about one and one half miles south of Highway 2.  B-Shoc live COTTONDALE — B-Shoc, a contemporary Christian artist, will be performing a back to school concert at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 5, at Southern Community Fellowship Church in Cottondale. This is an all ages show and will be free to the public. The church is at 43300 U.S. 231, 7 miles north of Cottondale. For more information, visit www.B-Shoc.com. Truckload giveaway ALFORD — Cypress Creek Community Church and Share Ministries will host a truckload giveaway consisting of free food and clothes for everyone from 8 a.m. to noon, Saturday, Aug. 2. The food will consist of meats, can goods, produce, breads and etc. Clothes consist of all sizes. The church is 2 miles west of Alford just off Highway 276 at 1772 Macedonia Road. East Mount Zion sh fry and cake auction GRACEVILLE — East Mount Zion United Methodist Church will host a sh fry and cake auction beginning at 5 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 16. Fish plates and backed goods will be for donations. The cakes will be auctioned off beginning at 6 p.m. Proceeds will go toward enlarging the altar stage.  Recent fth Saturday Sings have found the stage at capacity. The next fth Saturday sing will be at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 30. The church is at 1590 County Highway 173, Graceville. For more information, call 263-4610. NO WO PEN in Ne wL oca tion Wa shington Square Shopping Center Main Street in Chiple y Factor yO utlet 638-9421 Fl or ida Mi cr o lm &O f ce Supply Inc. 6594 S. US 231, Dothan, AL 36301 (334) 677-3318 800-886-3318 Obar's Insurance Agency An Independen tI nsurance Agenc y Auto, Hom e, Fa rm, Com merc ial And Bonds Mobi le Homes ,L ife, Health Arthur P. W. Obar Jr AG ENT PO Box 594 5390 CLIFF ST Grace ville, FL 3244 0-059 4 Obar_i ns@bell sout h.net (850) 263-448 3V oice (850) 263-4 484 Fa x 1396 Jackson Av e (850) 638-1805 (, Home Folks serving Home Folks -$ &.! )*! $($-( BR OW N FU NE RA LH OM E 10 68 Ma in St ., Ch ip le y, FL 32 428 Ph on e: 63 840 10 Do nald Br own -L FD ,O wn er MARIANNA TO YO TA Consumer & Commer cial Power Equipment Vi sit our website at www .lanesoutdoor .com 901 Hwy 277, Chipley 850.638.436 4 (850) 638-8376 Stephen B. Register ,C PA 15 52 Bric ky ard Ro ad Chipley ,F L PE RS ON AL TO UC H CA RC AR E "W ET AK EP RI DE IN CA RI NG FO RY OU RC AR 10 6W .E va ns ,B on if ay 54 7333 0 Fi rst Ba pi st Church “Come as you are” $ ( Fi rst B ap ist Church “Come as you are ” Fi rst B ap ist Church “Come as you are ” It ’s not wh at we do bu th ow we do it 98 2O ra ng eH il lR oad ,C hi pl ey 63 895 05 507 W. Hwy 90, Bonifay 13 57 Bric ky ard Rd., Chipley !.!%& & # -$ )*! + $ $-($HA VE YOUR UNIT SER VICED TO SA VE ON YOUR ELECTRIC BILL (850) 263-2823 1075 N. HWY .7 9 BON IF AY ,F L P&P PROGRES SIVE REAL TY "See us for all your Realty needs" 850-638-8220 1046 Main St. |C hipley OB ER T FU NER AL HOM E (8 50) 63 821 22 15 56 Br ic ky ar dR d. Ch ip le y (850) 547-2163 219 N. Wa ukesha St. Bonifay ,F L Johnson’ sP harmacy 879 Us er yR oa d, Ch ip le y, Fl or id a3 2428 850-638-4654 Washington Rehabilitatio n& Nursing Center Mo or e Co Po rt er Pa in tS al es Ba it &T ac kl e 22 06 Hi gh wa y1 77 A, Bonif ay 850 -5 47 -9 51 1 Li ke us on Fa ce book @ Moo re Co of Bon if ay ,F lor ida 1254 Church Av e. Chipley FL 32438 850-638 -1751 ‘Ser ving you since 1953’ Friendly Hometown Ser vice 4242 Lafaye tte St. Marianna FL, 32446 850-482-4 043 O pen: M-F 8am-6p m, Sat 8am-6p m www .chipolaf or d.co m Ch ipo la For d 1882 Jac kson Av e. Chiple yF L 850-63 8-7445 www .aandb autosale s.net Shop With The Res tT hem Com eT oT he A&B AUTO SALES Faith eventsEVENTS F AITH Wednesday, July 23, 2014 B Page 4 Section www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Circus VBS CHIPLEY — Turning Point United Pentecostal Church will hold Vacation Bible School from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., Monday, July 28 through Friday, Aug. 1. This year’s theme will be the Circus. There will be free sno-cones and a bounce house. The church is at 1816 U.S. Highway 90. For more information or transportation, call 258217, 326-1716 or 890-1926. West Pittman Baptist VBS WESTVILLE —West Pittman Baptist Church will host Vacation Bible School Wednesday, July 30, through Saturday, Aug. 2. Bible school will be from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Sign up online at www.westpittman.org and click on VBS registration. For more information or for transportation, call the church ofce from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Thursday at 956-4100. Wilderness Escape VBS CHIPLEY — Orange Hill Baptist Church will host Vacation Bible School from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., Sunday Aug. 3 through Friday, Aug. 8. This year’s theme will be Wilderness Escape, children will escape with the Israelites as they leave Egypt. They will hang out with Moses as God leads the adventure. The church is at 3485 Gainer Road. For more information, call 638-7103.

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George Richard Seddon Sr. age 81 passed away Wednesday, July 9, 2014 at his residence. Mr. Seddon was born on July 11, 1932, in Whitt, Ill., to John and Easter Seddon. He served with the U.S. Air Force during the Korean Conict. While stationed at Eglin Air Force Base he met his wife of 62 years, Barbara. He graduated from Florida State University with a BS in accounting and was a C.P.A. in the Tallahassee area until his retirement in 1994. After retirement his wife and he moved to Holmes County and became active members at Carmel Assembly of God. Mr. George substituted at Poplar Springs High School where he delighted in teaching and interacting with the students. He was preceded in death by his son, George Richard Seddon Jr. in May, 2012. Survivors include his wife, Barbara and his three daughters and sons-inlaw, Anita and David Rhoads, Anderson, S.C., Susan and Matt McIntosh and Amy and Terrell Miller, Graceville; daughter-in-law, LaVonda Seddon, Calhoun, Ga.; 10 grandchildren, Candace Owens, Sarah Bolt, Seth Gay, Emily Walker, Megan Seddon, Austin Miller, George Seddon III, Kelli McIntosh, Eli Miller and Brooke McIntosh; and eight great grandchildren. Memorialization was by cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. A celebration of his life was held at Carmel Assembly of God, Bonifay, Saturday July 12. Gladys Mary Adams, age 86 of Graceville, passed away Sunday, July 13, 2014, at her home. Gladys was born Sept. 16, 1927, in Gadsden, Ala., to the late Marvin and Josephine (Rhodes) Qualls. She had been a resident of Graceville since 1989 coming from Ellenton. Gladys loved her family as well as, crocheting, cooking, working with owers and shing. In addition to her parents, she is predeceased by one son, Royce Lee Findley and a brother, Floyd Qualls. Survivors include her husband of 61 years, James E. Adams of Graceville; two sons, Jimmy W. Adams and wife Susan of Graceville and Edwin A. Adams and wife Cindy of Myakka; two brothers, Eugene Qualls of Vancleave, Miss., and R.J. Qualls of Ruskin; seven grandchildren; eight great grandchildren and one great, great, grandchild. The family received friends Wednesday, July 16, 2014, from 5 to 7 p.m., at Brown Funeral Home in Chipley. Funeral services were held Thursday, July 17, 2014, at 11 a.m., at Salem United Methodist Church near Graceville. Interment followed in Salem Cemetery. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh.net. Obituaries Washington County News | B5 Wednesday, July 23, 2014 John V. Foster, 83, of Chipley, passed away Wednesday, July 16, 2014, at his home in Chipley. John was born in Chicago, Ill., on July 26, 1931 to Marie Jeanne and Vernon Foster. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army, a retired architect, an avid nurseryman, and journalist. He enjoyed reading and spending time on his computer. He was active in a number of organizations throughout the years, but in recent years enjoyed assisting the Chipley Library, partnering with the Chipley and Wausau Garden Clubs, and working with the Washington County Master Gardeners. He was preceded in death by his parents, along with his rst wife and mother of his children, Ann Foster, and his second wife, Barbara Foster. Survivors include his wife of 26 years Kathy Foster; a son, John Christopher (Jess) Foster of Erie, Co.; daughter, Vicki (Mike) Kelter of Green Cove Springs; son, Matthew Foster of Holmes County; step-daughter, Theresa McDonald (Tommy) of Chipley; stepson, Chris (Amy) Strawn of DeFuniak Springs; and grandchildren, Brie Weidmen, Kathryn (Luke) Strickland, Trey McDonald, John Tomkiewicz, Kaitlin McDonald, Christian Strawn, Chase Strawn and Ashton Strawn. Family and friends were invited to a celebration of life service held Sunday, July 19, 2014, at 4 p.m., at 1365 Watford Circle in Chipley. The family received friends immediately following the service until 6 p.m. Memorialization was by cremation with Obert Funeral Home handling arrangements. In lieu of owers, Johns family requests donations be made to Covenant Hospice, Washington County Library, Chipley Garden Club or the Wausau Garden Club. John V. Foster Flora Baxley Register, 84 of Fadette, Ala., passed away, Friday, July 18, 2014, at Flowers Hospital. Ms. Flora was born in Slocomb, Ala., on Dec. 4, 1929, to the late Willie and Nena Tye Baxley. A graduate of Holmes County High School, Ms. Flora married the love of her life on June 20, 1952. She was retired from the U.S. Postal service. Ms. Flora was a member of the Slocomb First Baptist Church, WMU and the Mt. Calvary Baptist Church Womens Prayer Group. Predeceased by brothers and sisters, Harold Baxley, Lloyd Baxley, Margaret Murphy and Bertha Mae Register. Survived by her beloved husband of 62 years, Louis Register; son, Mark Register, Fadette; daughter, Nena Speigner (Chris) Waxahachie, Texas; brother, George Baxley, Slocomb; two sisters, Nora Edgerton, Graceville, Juanita Cruce, Tallahassee; four grandchildren, Danielle Dani Speigner, Matthew Register, Meghan Register and Mark Ashton Register and a host of nieces and nephews. A funeral was at 11 a.m. Monday, July 21, 2014, at Slocomb First Baptist Church with the Rev. Chester Padgett and the Rev. Vann Gauthe ofciating. Burial followed in Mt. Calvary Church Cemetery with James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Family received friends at James & Lipford, Sunday from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Flowers will be accepted or those wishing may make memorials to Slocomb First Baptist Church 225 N. Dalton, Slocomb, AL 36375. Expressions of sympathy can be made at http://www.jamesandlipford. com. Flora B. Register FLORA REGISTER Steve Mitchell Ward, 58, of Bonifay, died Monday, July 14, 2014. A memorial service was July 19, 2014, at Shady Grove Baptist Church. Memorialization was by cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Steve M. Ward Nelson Brambier Fox Sr., 100, passed away peacefully at his home on June 26, 2014, surrounded by his loving family. He was born in Proft, Va., on March 30, 1914, to Jimmie Nell and Elizabeth Eleanor (Harlow) Fox. He was the devoted husband of Gladys Marie (Johnson) Fox for 68 years. His was a life well lived. He followed his dreams, tried to do what was right, and refused to let obstacles stand in his way. Whatever he went after, he got. He was a member of the Bonifay Church of Christ and gave God the glory in all things. Nelson proudly served his country in World War II as a sergeant in the United States Armys elite ghting unit, First Special Service Force. Returning home, after the war, he began pursuing his true passion as an artist and sculptor by attending Ringling School of Art in Sarasota. His paintings and wood carvings garnered him national attention and were a great source of pride and satisfaction for him. If asked about the meaning of life, Nelson would have answered, loving one another. As he professed, so he lived every day. He was preceded in death by his parents; six brothers, Benjamin F. Frank Fox, Oley G. Fox, Robert L. Fox, Steve W. Fox, Jimmie Nell Fox Jr. Buddy and John K. Johnny Fox; two sisters, Dorothy L. Fox and Elizabeth E. Tissie (Fox) Anderson and a son-inlaw, Roy L. Dossey. Nelson is survived by his wife, Gladys Marie (Johnson) Fox; seven children, John T. Fox, Helen (Fox) Gorsuch, Nelson B. Fox Jr., Wendell J. Fox, Jimmie F. Fox, Melody M. (Fox) Dossey and Mary M. (Fox) White; 13 grandchildren; 12 greatgrandchildren; three greatgreat grandchildren. He will also be dearly missed by his extended family members and many longtime friends. Following a private service, with military honors, Nelson was laid to rest in the Sarasota National Cemetery in on July 3, 2014. Nelson B. Fox Sr. NELSON FOX Margaret Maggie Worthy Harrelson, 85, of Graceville, slipped away peacefully to our Heavenly Father on Wednesday, July 16, at her residence in Crystal Bay Senior Living Facility in San Destin. Margaret was born in Campbellton, on September 30, 1928, the eldest child of the late George Brenton Worthy and Bernice Christie Worthy. A graduate of Graceville High School (class of 1947), Margaret lived in Graceville for most of her life. Margaret was active in the First United Methodist Church of Graceville, where she was very involved in the Garden Club and Church Circle for many years. She was a wonderful (Southern Style) cook and an avid fan of the University of Florida Gators. Margaret was an elaborate homemaker and decorator, who enjoyed entertaining her family, especially during the holiday seasons. Margaret worked for many years, along with Chick, for the Florida Department of Agriculture keeping the peanut inspection team on task. Margarets family will miss her greatly, but have many wonderful memories of her smiles, wittiness, and devotion to them, that will be carried in their hearts forever. She was preceded in death by her brother, James Edward Worthy; her rst husband, Alfred Smith Solomon, Sr., and her second husband John Melvin Chick Harrelson, Jr. She is survived by her son, Alfred Smith Solomon, Jr. (and wife Debbie Vanlandingham Solomon) of Marianna; daughters, Judith Solomon Schiros of Plano, Texas and Karaen Christine Harrelson-Macmillan (and husband Miller Macmillan) of Destin; grandchildren, Ali Michelle Gilbert, Corporal Jacob Schiros and Matthew Schiros (and wife Dr. Chun Schiros) and great-grandchildren, Chloe Gilbert and Olivia Lin Schiros. A celebration of Margarets life was held on Friday, July 18, at the James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville at 10 a.m., following, a graveside service was observed at the Marvin Chapel Cemetery. Expressions of sympathy can be made at James & Lipford Funeral Home. Margaret W. Harrelson Jesse Marion Barney Rogers, 72, of Panama City, passed away Tuesday, June 10, 2014. Barney was born in Panama City, and lived most of his life in Bay, Holmes, and Washington Counties. He worked in the cable television and telecommunication eld for many years, working all across the east coast of the United States and in several foreign countries. Barney was an avid reader, and enjoyed science ction and spending time on his computer. He was preceded in life by a son, Josh Rogers, and two sisters, Wilma Pope and Deline Cornwall. Survivors include his wife of 22 years, Joyce Rogers of Panama City; a son, Jesse Elijah Rogers of DeFuniak Springs; his step-children, Linda Mincey of Esto, Gary Mincey of Chipley, Jennifer Mincey of Fort Lauderdale and Danny Brauer of Chipley; his brothers, Jerry Rogers of Sorrento, Dallas Rogers of Rock Hill, S.C., Lowell Rogers of Chipley and Gene Tunney Rogers of Wewahitchka; a sister, Imelda Taylor of Chipley; three grandchildren and one great-grandchild. A celebration of life service will be Oct. 25, 2014, at 3954 Highway 77, Chipley. In lieu of owers, Barneys family requests that you buy owers for someone you love while theyre alive. Kent-Forest Lawn, 2403 Harrison Ave., 763-4694 www. kentforestlawn.com. Jesse M. Rogers Mr. Moses ONeal, 80 of Chipley, went home to be with the Lord on Friday, July 11, 2014, in the Northwest Florida Community Hospital of Chipley. He was of the Baptist Faith and was a construction worker. Survivors include his wife of 54 years, Oree ONeal; four sons, Felix Hughes, Tony ONeal (Machell), Jeffery ONeal (Jodie) all of Chipley and Antwan ONeal (Leslie) of Cottondale; seven daughters, Debra Hughes, Phylliss ONeal Merriel (Bobby), Donna ONeal (Alvin) all of Chipley, Laura ONeal (Ann) of Chattahoochee, Felicia Reese (James of Prattville, Ala., Stacey Curry (Abraham of Campbellton, and Deonka ONeal (Richard) of Baton Rouge, La.; four brothers, Cornnell ONeal, James ONeal (Georgia), Daniel ONeal (Betty) and George ONeal (Doris) all of Prattville, Ala.; one sister, Betrice ONeal of Prattville, Ala., and a large number of grandchildren, great grands, nieces, nephews, cousins, and other relatives and friends. Home going services were at 2 p.m., Saturday, June 19, 2014, at the Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church with the Rev. Price Wilson, pastor, the Rev. Tony Davis and the Rev. George Williams, ofciating. Interment followed in the Orange Hill Cemetery of Chipley. The remains were in repose at the church one hour before services with the Copper Funeral Home of Chipley, directing. Moses ONeal Nellie (Benton) Arrant, 89, died on May 23, 2014, in her home in Panama City. She was born May 7, 1917, to Gus and Anna Lu (French) Benton, at the family homestead on what is now Benton Lane, in the Hickory Hill Community of Holmes County. She moved to Panama City with her husband in the early 1940s, where she had resided ever since. She is predeceased by her husband, Daniel Woodrow Arrant and a son Daniel Clinton Arrant. She is survived by two sons and a daughter, Kenneth Arrant (Sherry) of Destin, Karen Wilson (Donnie) of Panama City and Leonard Arrant (Debbie) of Daphne, Ala., and numerous grandchildren, great grandchildren and greatgreat grandchildren. Services were held on May 26 at Wilson Funeral Home, with the Rev. John Broome conducting. Burial was at Campground Cemetery in Westville. Nellie B. Arrant George R. Seddon Sr. David W. Carnley David Waylon Carnley, 44, of Bonifay, died Saturday, July 5, 2014. Memorial service was July 12 at the Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Memorialization was by cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Gladys M. Adams Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! W ith your paid obituar y family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos fr ee of charge. Find Obituaries. Shar e Condolences. In par tnership with Find obituaries, shar e condolences and celebrate a life at or See OBITUARIES B7

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Extra B6 | Washington County News Wednesday, July 23, 2014 Staff Report This page features photos, submitted by our staff, readers and guests, taken in and around Holmes and Washington counties. We hope to make this a weekly feature, so if you have a photo taken locally that highlights life as we know it in our community, please share. Submit photos, along with a brief description and location taken, to: Ckent@chipleypaper.com. No time to email? Text it to Carol Kent at 850-703-9487. SUBMITTED BY BB RIAN RR IVIERE 2014 Vernon High School graduate was “seen around” proudly wearing his state championship ring. Padgett earned the ring for his accomplishments as part of the VHS weightlifting team during the 2013-14 school year. PHOTO COURTEs S Y OF THE WAs S HINGTON CC OUNTY CC HAMBER OF CC OMMERCE Washington County Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors were seen launching their rst “cash mob” event. Their rst target was Bloom Boutique at 1343 Brickyard Road in Chipley. There, owner Brandy Hollis was surprised to see seven Ambassadors with “cash in hand” to spend in her shop. From left are Cindy Johnson Brown, Wendy White, Kathy Rudd, Ashley Pate, Kristin Martin and Jessi Collins. Terri Austin of Vernon is hoping her newfound ladybug friend is a symbol of good luck and blessings yet to come. SUBMITTED BY TT ERRI AA U s S TIN SUBMITTED BY JENNIFER EE LMORE Powell’s Silo is in Bonifay. SUBMITTED BY CC RYs S TAL CC ARTER Lawson Carter (at left) and Grayson Carter make good use of the left over powder from when their parents, Ambers and Crystal Carter, participated in Bay County’s 5K “Color Run” by making their front yard in Chipley — and themselves — a little more colorful. SUBMITTED BY TT ERRI AA U s S TIN Scessalie and Slayde Austin were “seen around” the ring at the recent XWX Wrestling event in Bonifay. Local photographer Jennifer Elmore took this photo of the old Holmes County High School gym in Bonifay. SUBMITTED BY JENNIFER EE LMORE

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Mr. Harold Dean Taylor, age 78, passed away July 17, 2014 in Bonifay, at his residence. He was born Oct. 29, 1935 in Bonifay to Malcolm Taylor and Idelia Barentine Taylor. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by two brothers, Lewis Taylor and Ralph Taylor and one sister, Bonnie Anderson. Mr. Taylor is survived by his wife, Marie Taylor of Bonifay; one stepson, Eddie Forehand of Dothan, Ala.; one stepdaughter, Teresa Wells and husband Keith of Ozark, Ala.; one brother, Eugene Taylor and wife Betty of Bonifay; three sisters, Lavern Gilley of Bonifay, Carolyn Bradshaw of Hartford, Ala., and Joyce Moss and husband Ernest of Panama City; three grandchildren, Blake, Jarred, and Lauren and four great-grandchildren, Kase, Carter, Rilyn, and Skylar. A funeral was at 3 p.m. Saturday, July 19, 2014, at Carmel Assembly of God with the Rev. Randall Waker, the Rev. Mike Browning and Chaplain Ernie Grey ofciating. Interment followed in the Union Hill Baptist Church Cemetery Holmes County Florida with Peel Funeral Home directing. Harold D. Taylor Annie Mae Deal, age 87 of Tallahassee, passed away Tuesday, July 15, 2014, in the Washington Rehab and Nursing Center in Chipley. Annie was born Aug. 23, 1926, in Cottondale, to the late Luther and Annie Carl (Johnson) Gainey. She had been a resident of Chipley and Tallahassee for most of her life. Anne was a homemaker and loved shing and gardening and had served as a volunteer for The Salvation Army for many years. In addition to her parents, she is predeceased by her husband, Wesley Deal and a daughter, Gloria Deal. Survivors include two sons, James Deal of Chipley and Edward Earl Deal of Tallahassee; several grandchildren, great grandchildren and great, great grandchildren. A funeral was Saturday, July 19, 2014, at 2 p.m., in the Chapel of Brown Funeral Home in Chipley with the Rev. Ernest Dupree ofciating. The family received friends one hour before services. Interment followed in Lovewood Cemetery in Jackson County. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. Annie M. Deal John Malcom McCraney, 93, of Marianna, passed away suddenly Wednesday, July 16, 2014 in Marianna. Mr. John, as he was affectionately known by many in the community, was born on a farm outside of Louisville, Ala., in 1920. He graduated from Louisville High School, Troy State University and Auburn University. His college education at Auburn was interrupted by World War II when he served in the Army in the Philippines and Okinawa from 1945 to 1946. He was awarded a Bronze Star for Valor and two Purple Hearts for wounds in combat. After returning to the United States, he completed his education in Agriculture at Auburn University. Mr. McCraney worked for the Florida State Extension Service initially and then was employed by Wilson and Toomer Fertilizer Company out of Jacksonville. Before moving to Marianna, the McCraneys lived in Bonifay, Monticello, and Douglas, Ga. Mr. McCraney continued his employment with Wilson and Toomer and their successors until his retirement in the early 1980s. John and Marguerite McCraney moved to Marianna, in 1966, where they have been active members of the First United Methodist Church and friends to many in the community. Mr. McCraney was preceded in death by his parents, John Jay McCraney and Leila Weston McCraney of Louisville, Ala., and his brother, Alvin McCraney and wife, Lorene McCraney, of Tallassee, Ala. He is survived by his wife, Dorcas Marguerite Adams McCraney; his daughter, Leila Kate McCraney Edeneld (Richard) of Marianna.; son, John Malcom McCraney Jr., M.D., (Kay) of Fernandina Beach; two granddaughters, Julia Edeneld Berry (Keith) of Lake Mary, and Anna Katherine McCraney of Brooklyn, N.Y. and one great granddaughter, Ava Kate Berry of Lake Mary. Visitation was held at 1 p.m., Saturday, July 19, at First United Methodist Church followed by funeral services at 2 p.m. following the funeral, a graveside service was conducted at 4 p.m. in Ashford City Cemetery in Ashford, Ala. with James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel directing. In lieu of owers, memorial contributions may be made to the Methodist Childrens Home, (www. methodistchildrenshome. org). Expressions of sympathy may be made online at James & Sikes Funeral Homes Maddox Chapel. John M. McCraney Mildred Kynie Penny, age 88 of Panama City, passed away Tuesday, July 15, 2014, in the Panama City Nursing Center in Panama City. Mildred was born Sept.18, 1925, in Cottondale to the late Burris D. and Loney (Melvin) Coley. A former beautician and business owner, Mildred had been a resident of the area most of her life, she dearly loved her family and enjoyed gardening. In addition to her parents, she is predeceased by her husband of 36 years, Arthur Penny Sr. Survivors include one son, Arthur Penny Jr. and wife, Barbara R. of South Pasadena; two daughters, Ronda Haddock and husband, Bo, of Southport and Barbara J. Penny of Panama City; two sisters, Helen Miller and husband, Jimmy, of Chipley and Janice Melvin of Chipley and two grandchildren, James Southall III and Joshua Haddock. Memorial services were Saturday, July 19, 2014, at 2 p.m., at Sapp Church, 3258 Sapp Road, Cottondale. The Rev. Dallon Penny will be ofciating. The family would like to express a special thank you to Emerald Coast Hospice for all their care and support. In lieu of owers, the family suggests contributions to the Alzheimers Foundation of America, 322 Eighth Ave., 7th oor, New York, NY 10001. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh.net. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. Mildred K. Penny Elizabeth Betty J. Sullivan Spiro Grossman of Roscoe, N.Y., a teacher and a long-time area resident, died Friday, July 11, 2014, at UHS Wilson Medical Center, Johnson City, N.Y. She was 78. The daughter of the late Joseph Vincent Sr. and Elizabeth L. Patterson Sullivan, she was born April 6, 1936, in Yonkers, N.Y. Betty was a teacher for many years at Holy Child Jesus Elementary School of Richmond Hill Queens, St. Johns Prep High School of Queens, and the Monticello School District, after relocating to Roscoe. Betty enjoyed turning policemen, who tried to give her tickets, into toads. She enjoyed being a mother, gramma, friend, and just being Betty. Betty and her husband, Bob, had owned Roscoe Campsites for many years; she was a communicant of Gate of Heaven Church, Roscoe, N.Y; a long-time member of the Roscoe Chamber of Commerce; a member of the O&W Railway Museum; a member of the Senior Luncheon Club; a snowbird and a member of the St. Theresa Catholic Church in Sunny Hills; and she was involved in many other organizations in the community. Betty was the mayor of Roscoe, unofcially. Survivors include her loving sister, Peggy Lewis and her husband Brad of Jefferson Valley, N.Y; loving brother, John F. Sullivan and his wife Joyce of Scottsdale, AZ; her children, Allen Spiro and his wife Alison of Beacon, NY, Elizabeth ODonnell and her husband Jack of Ashley Falls, MA., Patricia Ann Spiro and her companion, Tom Abbott, of Chipley, Susan Farrell and her husband, Edward, of Edison, NJ., Elizabeth Strode of Suffolk, N.C., Linda Simowitz and her husband, Peter, of Mooresville, N.C., Robert Grossman and his wife, Sandy, of Smitheld, Utah, Mary Jeanne Pizzariello and her husband, Nick of Las Vegas, Nev., Barbara Josephine Schaefer and her husband Mike of Mooresville, N.C., and Maria Leddy Johnson and her husband, Billy, of Queens, N.Y.; many grandchildren; great grandchildren and nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her rst husband, Allen M. Spiro; her second husband, Robert Grossman; one son, Michael Patrick Spiro; one daughter, Regina Rose Grossman and two brothers, Joseph V. Sullivan and Thomas P. Sullivan. Visitation was held Wednesday, July 16, 2014, from 2 to 4 p.m. and from 7 to 9 p.m., in the Harris Funeral Home, Railroad Ave. Roscoe, N.Y. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated Thursday, July 17, 2014, at 11 a.m., in the Gate of Heaven Church, Highland Ave., Roscoe, NY., Father Edward Bader will ofciate. Burial was in the Bon Air Cemetery, Roscoe, N.Y. Memorial contributions in Bettys name may be made to the Gate of Heaven Church C/O Father Edward Bader, Church Street, Livingston Manor, NY 12758. Arrangements have been entrusted to the Harris Funeral Home, Railroad Ave., Roscoe, NY 607-498-4929 or 845-439-5200 www. Harris-FH.com. Elizabeth J. Grossman Local Washington County News | B7 Wednesday, July 23, 2014 OBITUARIES from page B5 Lessons from a rain barrel By Julie P. Dillard and Matthew Orwat UF/IFAS Extension Washington County Did you know rain bar rels can help save you money on your water or electricity bill? Did you know that your plants re spond better to rain water because its free of miner als, uoride, chlorine and other chemicals? By installing rain bar rels, you can reduce land scape and irrigation costs. Not only are there eco nomic benets, the envi ronment also benets from the reduction on storm wa ter runoff which can cause soil erosion and movement of harmful pollutants into our streams, lakes, rivers, ponds and the Gulf. Overall plant and garden health also can be improved by provid ing water free of treatment chemicals and mineral salts from well water. Furthermore, water collected from rain barrels can be used to water indi viduals plants and gardens as well as for washing your car, windows and house. With those thoughts in mind, UF/IFAS Extension 4-H Agent Julie P. Dillard and Horticulture Agent Matt Orwat created a day camp with environmental stewardship as the focus. After learning about the benets of rain bar rels, UF/IFAS Extension Master Gardeners set up stations to move youth through constructing their own rain barrel. Youth also learned about the impor tance of pH by conduct ing tests on water and other liquid samples. They also learned about insect pests, poopers, predators and parasites in the gar den and how they play a role in the health of plants, gardens and the overall environment. Medicinal plants were the next topic, and youth extracted gel from aloe vera plants to make home made lotion. For more information on UF/IFAS Extension Washington County, visit http://washington.ifas.u. edu or call 638-6180. PH O T OS SPEC I A L T O THE N E WS Carrlee Harris cuts the hole for the top of her rain barrel with instruction from Geraline Tharp. Cole Dillard applies the glue to secure the screen to the top of his rain barrel with instruction from his grandmother and Master Gardener, Linda W. Pigott. Caroline Cushing threads the spigot for her rain barrel with the assistance of Joe Ruff. 4-H students conduct pH tests. Colvin Chamberlain preparing to extract gel from aloe vera plant. MORE INFO For more information on UF/IFAS Extension Washington County, visit http://washington.ifas.u.edu or call 638-6180.

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B8| Washington County News Wednesday, July 23, 2014 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 BUSINESS GUIDE THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5$25.68 5x10$35.31 10x10$46.01 10x20$80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted C & C Bookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available Easy Care Lawn & Tractor Service TREE REMOVAL€ 850 527-6291 850 849-3825Lawn Care € Debris Removal Tractor and Bobcat Work Pressure CleaningLicensed & Insured Aordable Self Storage ALL SIZESOrange Hill Road Self Storage897 Orange Hill Rd Chipley850-263-2817 850-768-29125020704 5020393 FOR SALEContact Perry Wells, Trustee 850-638-1016 For Viewing Property and more details.Has served as church meeting place for 30 years Equipped with Pews, Pulpit, Speaker System, Baptistry and Bathrooms. Ample Parking Space Electric Central Heat and Air. Ready for Occupancy Church Meeting House 559 5th Street, Chipley Job Position: Resident Compliance Specialist Location: Chipley, FL Hatch Mott MacDonald (HMM) is an award-winning consulting engineering rm has two openings for Resident Compliance Specialists in our Panama City and Chipley ofces. Candidate Specication: Graduation from an accredited high school or equivalent with one (1) year of experience as a resident compliance ofcer on a construction project or two (2) years of assisting the compliance ofcer in monitoring the project. Should have prior FDOT experience in both State funded and Federal Aid funded construction projects with in-depth knowledge of EEO/AA laws. Specic experience and knowledge of the FDOT's DBE and OJT programs is mandatory. Must be able to work independently to analyze, collect, evaluate data, and take appropriate action when necessary. Job Description: As directed by the District Compliance Contracts Manager, will actively engage in other aspects of project management to ensure adherence to federal/state rules and regulations. This position may be required to assist in other activiti es as directed depending upon workloads. This position may be full-time or part-time dependent on project needs or number of active projects assigned. This position is responsible for creating and maintaining various data bases as well as typing reports in order to ensure conformit y to federal state rules and regulations. As work ow dictates, perform scanning in adherence to the Electronic Document Management System (EDMS) guidelines. Please apply directly at www.hatchmott.com/careers, job reference # (13814 Chipley) EEO1130062 Education C HIPOLA COLLEGE is accepting applications for the following full-time positions:CAREER COACH, WELDING PROGRAM Position and application information are available at www.chipola.edu/personnel/jobs. Inquiries may be directed to Human Resources at pippenw@chipola.edu or (850)718-2269. Candidates may be subject to background investigations. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER Web Id 34294407 Admin/Clerical The Washington County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications forGrants/Special Projects CoordinatorThis is highly responsible and administrative work involving planning, monitoring, writing and reviewing federal and state grant programs. The position also serves as Project Manager and/or Special Projects Coordinator to provide assistance to the County Coordinator. Starting salary is $16.50 per hr. MINIMUM TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE Graduation from an accredited four year college or university with a degree in public relations, business or related field. Two years of experience in grant program management, public relations, business, marketing or government, with an emphasis on administration and management. A comparable amount of training and/or experience may be substituted for the required education. Valid Florida Driver’s License. Applications may be accessed on-line at www.washingtonfl.com. Applications and job descriptions may also be obtained at the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office located at 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428. All interested applicants MUST submit an Employment Application to the Human Resources Department in the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office by 4:00 PM on July 30, 2014. All questions regarding this position or other vacancies should be directed to the Human Resources Department, 850-415-5151. The selected applicant will be subject to a pre-employment physical and drug screen. Veteran’s Preference is accepted in accordance with FS 295.08 Web Id 34295137 Travel/TransportationPilot Needed in DestinPrivate equity firm in Destin area is seeking a contract pilot to fly its refurbished Piper PA-31T1. Pilot must hold a commercial pilot certificate with multi-engine land and instrument ratings, have logged at least 4,000 hours total time, including at least 2,000 hours multi-engine land and at least 1,000 hours in multi-engine turbo prop aircraft, of which at least 200 hour being logged in Cheyenne I model aircraft, and who has attended and successfully completed ground and flight (or simulator) training for the Cheyenne I conducted by FLIGHTSAFETY or SIMCOM within the last 12 calendar months. Send resume and cover letter to info@pcpaviation.com. Web ID#: 34293919 1980 ClassicAntique Mercedes 450 SL. like new interior, xtra clean, very low mile tires, always stored inside, looks/runs/drives great, 2-tops, Kelly BB high/$33K, great buy asking/$13K. 850-415-7119. Got Bad Credit? $0*, Ride Today!Buy Here/Pay Here Past Repos/BK’s SSI/VAok. Steve Pope 334-803-9550. *call for more details. White Diamond Cadillac, 4DR, loaded. 25,000 miles. One owner, like new. 326-9109. 2010 Ford Escape XLT 46,300 miles excellent condition inside and out. Bells and whistles to numerous to mention $13,000. 850-547-3934 1988 GMC 6000 Farm/Moving Truck or potential billboard for business. was Supermover Uhaul. cranks/runs great. Very good watertight cargo box w/over cab also. Very low mile tires. Great for moving or hauling. Asking $3300. 850-415-7119. 1991 Harley Davidson Road King 9,000 miles, $6,500. Call 850-348-7780. For Sale. 40 acres waterfront on Choctawhatchee River. Call 850-535-2553 Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. SUNNY HILLS. Great ranch, fantastic condition. 3BR/2BA, 3 living areas, appliances incl. $89,000.00. Counts Real Estate. Barbara, 850-814-9414. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO and up. Includes Garbage, sewage, and lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 3/2 & 2/2 Mobile Home in Chipley WD hookup, CHA. No pets. $475.00/mth+deposit. 850-763-3320 or 850-774-3034. Mobile Home for Rent in the Bethlehem area. 2BR, furnished, single wide, includes washer & dryer. Call 850-547-2068. Mobile Homes For Rent 2 and 3 Bedrooms in Cottondale, Central Heat and Air. $400 -$500 a month. 850-258-1594 or 850-638-8570. Mobile Homes for rent in Chipley and Bonifay. Water and sewage included. Lease required. 850-638-2999. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio And 2 bdrm $375-$500 Includes City Utilities (850)557-7732 SpaciousOne Bedroom Apartment $450.00 Two Bedroom $500.00 Stove/Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. Brick 3/2 dble garage nice Martin’s Woods community Chipley.SugarShoreProperties.com850-774-0400 1BD/1BAHouse 901 Main St Chipley. Fenced yard. 1227 sqft. $625 mth. Security depo $600. Avldibale Ju1y 7 Call 850-482-4446. 3BR/1BA House in Vernon. Pets welcome, fenced yard. $600.00/mth, $600.00/security. Call 850-547-6483. 3BR/2BA, CHA, Large lot, brick, fruit trees, optional large workshop, in Chipley. 850-481-5352 or 850-326-3319. 4BR/2BA living room dining room combination. Call 850-573-0319 For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. 4 Bedroom, 2 bathroom doublewide trailer in the Grassy Pond Subdivision. 1782 SQ FT, no pets inside, Rent $600, Security Deposit $500. Call 638-8220. Progressive Realty, 1046 Main ST, Chipley, Florida. Manuf/Prod/Op Personnel Resources has immediate openings in Geneva for welders. To apply, jgommo@prdothan.comor call (334) 794-8722. WEB ID 34293434 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 EXPERIENCED OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com EOE TRAIN FROM HOME MEDICAL BILLING ACCOUNTING ASS’T CUSTOMER SERVICE NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1-800-451-0709 WANT A CAREER Operating Heavy Equipment? Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. “Hands On Training” & Certifications Offered. National Average 18-22 Hourly! Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1 Bedroom Apartment, in Chipley, covenant location, no pets. 638-4640. 2BR/2.5BA Apartment w/private balcony & garage. W/D included. In Bonifay. $600/mth + deposit. 768-0394 or 547-2936. Lennox 2.5TON 12 seer central AC unit. $250.00. Works great. Call 850-638-2999. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-557-1918. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. DirectTV 2 Year Savings Event! Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only DirecTV gives you 2 YEARS of savings and a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 1-800-481-2137 DISH TV Retailer. Starting $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) Find Out How to SAVE Up to 50% Today! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL 1-800-605-0984 SAFE STEP WALK-IN Tub Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 1-800605-6035 for $750 Off. ADOPTION: ACreative Financially Secure Family, Beach House, Music, LOVE, awaits 1st baby. Trish 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 ADOPTloving married couple seeks to adopt, will be hands on mom and dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592, Adam Sklar #0150789 ADOPTION: A childless loving couple seeks to adopt. Large family. Financial Security. Expenses paid. Eileen & Kim. kimandeileenadopt@gmail.co m or 1-800-455-4929. Older Man looking for female to spend time with. Go to dinner with, hang out, have conversations with. Call Gary, 850-388-2061. AUCTION State of Georgia DOT Surplus LIVE AUCTION with Online Bidding Thursday, July 31st at 10AM 737 E. Barnard St, Glennville, GA 30427 Cars, Trucks, Buses, Loaders, Tractors, Equipment and more. L.W. Benton Co. Inc (#3215) 478-744-0027 www.bidderone.com PUBLIC AUCTIONEstates, Bankruptcies, Cities Florida’s Largest Consignment Auction Sunday, July 20th 1:00 pm 422 Julia St., Titusville, FL 32796 Real Estate -‘61 TBird Trucks -Boats Motorcycles-Firearms Antiques Furniture Jewelry -Complete Woodworking Shop Contents of Antique Store Household Goods -Sun Dresses Art Work -City Surplus -Tools -Glassware And So Much More! No Charge To Attend. Sorry no pets. No Buyers Premium!!! Visit website for details & photos AB#9 Cliff Shuler Auctioneers AU#14 Life Member NAA & FAA Shuler & Shuler RE Auc., Inc., D Shuler Lic RE Broker www.soldfor.com Chipley: 1483 Curry Ferry Rd 3/4 mile south of Hwy 2 off Hwy 179 on Curry Ferry Road. Follow Signs, July 24, 25, 26, 2014 8am-1pmRain or Shine Downsizingneed to get rid of it all. Candle making, crafts, office supplies, 2 recliners, 6 space heaters, AC units, 2 digital TVs w/DVD players, 2 chairs, power tools, hand tools, garden tools & equipment, pictures, picture frames, afghans & throws, blankets, curtains, small kitchen appliances, china, silver plated flatware, holiday and home dcor, sewing machines, vintage material, antiques and collectibles 7X14X6 chain link dog run and much more. Begin on back porch & walk through house 850-956-9930 for directions. Huge Barn Sale! Lots of construction products. Bikes, antique furniture, Asian dresses, woodworking, all kinds of misc. New commercial storm door, Dwalt products, painting products, cedar benches. Fri & Sat, 7/25&26, 7am-until. 504 Pond Ln, in Bonifay, off Brock St. 850-217-5778. Moving Sale 851 3rd Street, July 26. 8 a.m. rain or shine. Attention: VIAGRA and CIALIS USERS! A cheaper alternative to high drugstore prices! 50 Pill Special -$99 FREE Shipping! 100 Percent Guaranteed. CALL NOW: 1-800-943-8953 7-3462 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 14-82-DR IN RE: The Marriage of: STEPHEN R. WHITE, Husband, and TAMMY T. WHITE, Wife. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Tammy T. White 3818 Crain Ct Caryville, FL 32427 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a petition for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed by Stephen R. White at the Washington County Courthouse. You are required to answer by serving a copy of your written objections, if any, to Stephen R. White at 936 Joiner Rd, Chipley, FL 32428. You have a deadline to respond on or before August 20, 2014, and file the original document with the Clerk of the Court either before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default judgment will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on this 21st day of July, 2014. HAROLD BAZZEL Clerk of the Circuit Court July 23 and 30, August 6 and 13, 2014 7-3458 IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2012 CA 000380 Division GMAT LEGAL TITLE TRUST 2013-1, U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS LEGAL TITLE TRUSTEE, Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS OF OSCAR LERNER AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for 7-3452 INVITATION TO BID CITY OF CHIPLEY EQUIPMENT STORAGE SHED The City of Chipley is now accepting sealed bids for an Equipment Storage Shed (open pole barn) 40’ x 100’ x 14’ with steel trusses, 8 x 8 x18 pressure treated posts and Galvalume metal roof with a ridge cap, to be delivered to site. The City will receive bids until 2:00 p.m. on Friday, August 1, 2014. Bids will be opened at 2:10 p.m. on August 1, 2014 at the Chipley City Hall. Bids must be sealed and in an envelope marked “ESS”. They may be mailed to the City of Chipley, City Hall, Attention: City Clerk’s Office, Post Office Box 1007, Chipley, Florida or they may be delivered to the Chipley City Hall at 1442 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida. For specifications and other information, contact Chester Campbell or Ernie Toole at the City of Chipley, Public Works Department at (850) 638-6346 or email publicworks@cityofchipley.com. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids and waive technicalities in awarding the bid. July 19, 23, 2014 7-3461 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: BROCK AUTO BODY & TOWING SRV. gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 08/04/2014, 8:00am at 679B MLK AVE., Chipley FL32428-0114, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. BROCK AUTO BODY& TOWING SRV reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. VIN #YV1LW5576W2498209 1998 Volvo July 23, 2014. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Plaintiff entered in this cause on April 25, 2014, in the Circuit Court of Washington County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Washington County, Florida described as: LOT 7, BLOCK 175, OF SUNNY HILLS UNIT FOUR, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGES 42 THROUGH 54, INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 4083 WAYCROSS PL, CHIPLEY, FL 32428; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held on the front steps of the Washington County Courthouse, on July 30, 2014 at 11am. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 25 day of April, 2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court Harold Bazzel By: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk Invoice to: Edward B. Pritchard (813) 229-0900 x1309 Kass Shuler, P.A. P.O. Box 800 Tampa, FL 33601-0800 ForeclosureService@kasslaw.com Please fax a first insertion and costs of publishing to 813-229-3323, Attention: Foreclosure Department. PLEASE PUBLISH THE ABOVE IN: Washington County News July 19, 23, 2014 6519215Brand New 28X80 4 Bed Rm $59,900 28X60 3 Bed Rm $49,900 Set Up w/A/C, Steps & Skirt850.683.1777 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com Classifieds Biggest Sale Ever All Homes 20% Off w/FREE Furniture Ends 8/1/2014 850.683.0035 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com6519214 6519213$0 Down To All Land Owners! Your Deed Is Your Down Payment 3 & 4 BR Homes Under $500 A Month. Call Today! 850.683.0035 6519212Brand New3 Bed 16X80 $39,900 3 Bed Double Wide $48,900 Furnished 850.683.0858 6519211I Buy Used Mobile Homes! Cash Paid Immediately.. 352.316.2434 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com

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BACK TO SCHOOL WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS I HOLMES COUNTY TIMESADVERTISER I JULY 23, 2014 School Calendars I School Supplies List I New Florida Assessment Tests I School Lunches

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2 Back To School Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, July 23, 2014 Report Cards October 24, 2014 January 13, 2015 April 7, 2015 June 17, 2015 Holmes County Aug. 18, 2014 . ......................................... FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL FOR STUDENTS Sept. 1, 2014 . ..................................... Labor Day – No school Oct. 3, 2014 . ....................................... Students & All Personnel Out Oct. 17, 2014 . ..................................... End of 1st grading period Oct. 27-31, 2014 . ............................... Fall Break – No school Nov. 3, 2014 . ..................................... Classes Resume Nov. 24-28, 2013 . ............................... Thanksgiving Break – No school Dec. 19, 2014 . .................................... Early Release Day Dec. 22, 2014-Jan, 2, 2015 . ................ Christmas Break Jan. 5, 2015 . ....................................... Classes Resume Jan. 16, 2015 . ..................................... Early Release Day, End of 1st semester Jan. 19, 2015 . ..................................... Martin Luther King’s Birthday – No school Feb. 16, 2015 . ..................................... President’s Day – No school Mar. 20, 2015 . ................................... Early Release Day, End of 3rd Mar. 23-27, 2015 . ............................... Spring Break Students and All Personnel Out Mar. 30, 2015 . .................................... Classes Resume May 25, 2015 . .................................... Memorial Day – No school June 5, 2015 . ...................................... Last Day of School – Early Release Day Graduations June 1, 2015 . .......................................... Ponce de Leon High School June 2, 2015 . .......................................... Bethlehem High School June 4, 2015 . .......................................... Poplar Springs High School June 5, 2015 . .......................................... Holmes County High School Report Cards November 5, 2014 January 26, 2015 April 3, 2015 2014-2015 School Calendars Washington County Aug. 18, 2014 . .............................................. FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL FOR STUDENTS Sept. 1, 2014 . ........................... Labor Day – No school Sept. 11, 2014 . ......................... Recognition of “Patriot Day” at Schools Sept. 17, 2014 . ......................... Recognition of “Constitution Day” at Schools Sept. 22-26, 2014 . .................... Recognition of “Celebrate Freedom Week” at Schools Sept. 25, 2014 . .......................... Early Release – 1:00 pm Oct. 20, 2014 . ........................... Fall Day – No school Oct. 30, 2014 . ........................... Early Release – 1:00pm Nov. 11, 2014 . .......................... Recognition of Veterans at Chipley and Vernon Schools Nov. 24-28, 2014 . ...................... Thanksgiving Holidays – No school Dec. 19, 2014 . .......................... Early Release – 1:00pm Dec. 23, 2014 – Jan. 6, 2015 . ... Christmas Break Jan. 5, 2015 . ............................. Teacher Planning Day – No school Jan. 6, 2015 . ............................. Professional Development Day – No school Jan. 7, 2015 . ............................. CLASSES RESUME FOR STUDENTS Jan. 19, 2015 . ........................... Martin Luther King’s Birthday – No school Feb. 5, 2015 . ............................. Early Release – 1:00pm Feb.16, 2015 . ............................ President’s Day – No school Mar. 5, 2015 . ............................ Early Release – 1:00pm March 23-27, 2015 . .................. Spring Break (Students & All Personnel Out) April 3, 2015 . ............................ Spring Day – No school April 30, 2015 . .............................. Early Release – 1:00 pm May 25, 2015 ........................... Memorial Day – No school June 3, 2015 . ............................ Last Day of School (Students Released – 1:00pm) Graduations May 12, 2015 . ................................ WHTC May 28, 2015 . ............................... Vernon High School May 29, 2015 . ............................... Chipley High School June 2, 2015 . ................................ WISE 2014-2015 Immunization Requirements Before attending school in Florida (kindergarten through 12th grade), each child must provide a Form DH 680, Florida Certification of Immuniza tion, documenting the following vaccinations: Public/Non-Public Schools Kindergarten through 12th Grade: ‡)RXURUILYHGRVHVRIGLSKWKHULDWHWDQXVSHUWXVVLV (DTaP) vaccine ‡7ZRRUWKUHHGRVHVRIKHSDWLWLV%+HS%YDFFLQH ‡7KUHHIRXURUILYHGRVHVRISROLRYDFFLQH ‡7ZRGRVHVRIPHDVOHVPXPSVUXEHOOD005 vaccine ‡7ZRGRVHVRIYDULFHOODYDFFLQH‚IRUNLQGHUJDUWHQ and grades one through six ‡2QHGRVHRIYDULFHOODYDFFLQH ‚ for grades seven through twelve Seventh Grade Requirements In addition to kinder garten through 12th grade requirements, students must have the following vaccinations: ‡2QHGRVHRIWHWDQXVGLSKWKHULDSHUWXVVLV7GDS vaccine in grades seven through twelve For mor information call: Holmes County Health Dept. – 547-8500 Washington County Health Dept. – 638-6240 ,IWKHIRXUWKGRVHRIYDFFLQHLVDGPLQLVWHUHGSULRUWRWKHIRXUWK birthday, a fifth dose of polio vaccine is required for kindergarten. ‚9DULFHOODYDFFLQHLVQRWUHTXLUHGLIYDULFHOODGLVHDVHLVGRFXPHQWHG by the healthcare provider.

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July 23, 2014, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, Back To School 3 1. Why are we replacing the FCAT? With new, more rigor ous standards in place to help Florida students succeed, the FCAT 2.0 no longer serves the purpose of measuring student progress. Commissioner Pam Stewart’s top priority was to choose the best assessment for students, ensuring that the test replacing the FCAT 2.0 in the 2014-15 school year best serves Florida students by accurately measuring education gains and progress. To this end, the following goals were outlined in Governor Scott’s Execu tive Order on September 23, 2013: ‡3URYLGH WLPHO\ DQG informative reports of results ‡'R QRW VLJQLILFDQWO\ LQ crease the overall cost of testing to the state, districts or schools; ‡$OORZ VWXGHQWV WR WHVW as late in the school year as possible; ‡0HDVXUH VWXGHQW PDV tery of the standards taught; ‡3URYLGH D EDVLV IRU comparing Florida performance to that of other states; ‡0HHW KLJK TXDOLW\ VWDQ dards for assessment, including reliability and validity for a vari ety of accountability purposes; ‡3URYLGH WKH IOH[LELOLW\ necessary in order for schools and districts to build technology capacity; and, ‡,QFOXGH DSSURSULDWH accommodations for exceptional students. 2. What changes will Florida students and teachers see? What are the benefits to students? The new Florida Stan dards, adopted by the State Board of Educa tion on February after unprecedented public input and review, will prepare Florida students for success in college, career and in life by emphasizing analytical thinking. The new test will include more than PXOWLSOH FKRLFH TXHV tions. Students will be asked to create graphs, interact with test content and write and respond in different ways than on traditional rests. New TXHVWLRQ W\SHV ZLOO DVVHVV student’s higher-order thinking skills in keeping with the higher expec tations of the Florida Standards. This summer, students, educators and parents will be able to preview samples of new TXHVWLRQ W\SHV E\ WDNLQJ practice tests that will be made available for any one interested in review ing them. 3. How does this af fect school grades and teacher evaluations? After the first admin istration of the Florid Standards Assessments in English language arts (/$ DQG 0DWKHPDW ics in spring of 2015 the UHTXLUHG VWDQGDUGVHWWLQJ process will be con ducted in the summer of 2015 in order to set performance level expec tations, also referred to as “cut scores”. This will provide a new baseline for school grading and other accountability measures which will more accurately reflect student performance on the new standards and assessments. This baseline, informational approach in the first year provides parents, schools, districts and all Floridians with a clear understanding of a student’s and a school’s starting point on the new, more rigorous stan dards and assessments. 'XULQJ WKH school year, each school district will continue to set its own performance standards for teachers using data from the new assessment, to endure continuity with the 201314 evaluations within each district. 4. Will students be required to pass the new assessments in order to meet promotion and graduation require ments? The guidelines for promotion and gradua tion will remain largely FCAT replacement will help Florida’s children succeed FREE ADM ISSIO N fo r scho ol-age childr en and families Wa shingt on Co un ty He alth Dep t. IMM UNIZ AT ION CLIN IC Fo r school age childr en Tu esda y Au g. 14, 2014 9am-N oo n Fr ee Hair cuts Fo od Ba ck pack Door Pr iz es Va rious Sc hool En te rt ainmen t 1360 BRICK YA RD RO AD CHIPLEY FL 8 50 638 1 610 WWW .N FCH .O RG Ba ck pack Door P riz es ADM ISSIO N fo r scho ol-age childr en and See FCAT page 7

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4 Back To School Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, July 23, 2014 BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLIES LISTS Bethlehem Elementary Pre-K No supplies are required. How ever, donations of liquid hand soap, tissues, hand sanitizer, and baby wipes would be ap preciated. Kindergarten 4 boxes of 8 large crayons 1 pair of Fiskars scissors 1 pack of colored pencils 1 plastic school box 1 bottle of white glue (no gel) 1 rest mat (plastic on both sides) 3 boxes of tissues 2 bottles of liquid soap 1 box Ziploc bags Pack of #2 pencils 2 boxes of baby wipes 1 large eraser 2 coloring books Backpack 10 glue sticks Hand sanitizer 2 plastic folders with pockets and prongs Writing journal First Grade Crayons (24 count) 1 pair of Fiskars scissors 1 pack colored pencils 1 plastic school box 1 bottle of white glue (no gel) 2 boxes of tissues 1 bottle of liquid soap Pack of #2 pencils 1 box of baby wipes Disinfecting wipes 1 large eraser Coloring book Backpack 2 glue sticks Hand sanitizer 2 plastic folders with pockets and prongs Second Grade Crayons (24 count) 1 pair of Fiskars scissors 1 pack colored pencils 1 plastic school box 1 bottle of white glue (no gel) Box of tissue 1 bottle of liquid soap Gallon Ziploc bags 2 packs of #2 pencils Ruler with centimeter and inch marks Wide ruled notebook paper 1 box baby wipes Disinfecting wipes Red pens 1 large eraser Roll of paper towels Backpack Glue stick 2 bottles of hand sanitizer Highlighter 2 blue dry erase markers Third Grade Crayons (24 count) 1 pair of Fiskars scissors 1 pack colored pencils 1 plastic school box 1 bottle of white glue (no gel) 2 pocket folders 2 boxes of tissue 1 bottle of liquid soap Girls gallon Ziploc bags Boys quart Ziploc bags Pack of #2 pencils Ruler with cen timeter and inch marks 2 packs wide ruled notebook paper 1 box baby wipes Red pens Roll of paper towels Backpack Compo sition notebook 2 bottles of hand sanitizer 2 folders with pockets and prongs 1 pack multi-colored construc tion paper 1 pack 8 x11 copier paper Fourth Grade Crayons (24 count) 1 pack colored pencils 1 plastic school box 1 bottle of white glue (no gel) 2 boxes of tissue 1 bottle of liquid soap Girls gallon Ziploc bags Boys quart Ziploc bags Pack of 24 plain yellow #2 pencils Ruler with centimeter and inch marks Wide ruled notebook paper Boys box baby wipes Girls disinfecting wipes Red pens 1 large eraser Roll of paper towels Backpack 2 glue stick 2 bottles of hand sanitizer 4 folders with pockets and prongs (one each of yellow, blue, red, and orange) Highlighter Blue dry erase marker 1 pack 8 x11 copier paper Fifth Grade Crayons (24 count) 1 pair of Fiskars scissors 1 pack colored pencils 2 boxes of tissue 1 bottle of liquid soap Girls gallon Ziploc bags Boys quart Ziploc bags 2 packs of 24 plain yellow #2 pencils 4 packs wide ruled notebook paper Boys box baby wipes Girls disinfecting wipes Red pens 1 large eraser Roll of paper towels Backpack 2 bottles of hand sanitizer 2 highlighters 2 blue dry erase markers 3 inch three ring view bind ers No large notebooks or rolling backpacks Bonifay Elementary School Pre-K 2 boxes of baby wipes 3 bottles of liquid hand soap 2 boxes of tissues 2 boxes of snacks (fruit snacks, gold fish, graham crackers, etc.) 1 box of cereal (fruit loops, Apple Jacks, Cheerios, etc.) 1 bag of M&M or Skittles 1 bottle of table cleaner (409 or Lysol, please no bleach) 1 can of disinfect cleaner (Lysol) 6 glue sticks 1 box of Crayola markers 4 boxes of 8 count Crayola crayons 1 pair of Fiskars round tip scissors 1 regular size backpack (please no small) Extra set of clothes Blanket (please no sleeping bags, large blankets or pillows) Kindergarten 1 Pre-packaged supply kit from BES ($20 this kit has all the in dividual student supplies they will need for the entire year.) 1 regular sized backpack 1 change of clothes (write your child’s name in each item of clothing) 1 box of tissue 1 box of wipes 1 bottle of soap 1 bottle of sanitizer 1 large bag of M&M’s or Skittles 1 set of headphones (no ear buds) Girls 1 box gallon Ziploc bags and Fruit Loops Boys 1 box quart Ziploc bags and Apple Jacks The following items are optional Google eyes (assorted sizes) Cups Gummy Bears Smarties Dum Dums Lollipops Gold Fish Paper towels or napkins First Grade 1 large back pack (no rolling backpacks) 2 jumbo pink erasers 1 pack small pen cil top erasers 1 pack #2 pencils (24 or more) 4 boxes of Cray ola crayons (not more than 24 count) 2 dry erase markers 1 Pair of Fiskars scissors 2 plastic folders (3 pronged 1 green and 1 red) 1 wide ruled composition book (70 pages) 1 bottle of El mer’s Glue 2 glue sticks 1 set of headphones 1 large box of antibacterial wet wipes 1 bottle of antibacterial liquid soap 1 bottle of hand sanitizer 2 boxes of facial tissue Girls 1 box quart Ziploc bags Boys 1 box gallon Ziploc bags $8 for class T-shirt Please label supplies with child’s name and bring them to 1st Grade orientation Second Grade 1 pack wide ruled notebook paper (200 sheets) 3 dozen #2 plain yellow pencils (no mechanical) 1 pair of children’s Fiskars scissors 2 large pink erasers 1 glue stick 1 bottle of Elmer’s school glue (4 oz) 1 box crayons (not more than 32 count) 2 large boxes of baby wipes 2 large boxes of facial tissue 1 small plastic school box 1 bottle of liquid hand soap 1 bottle of hand sanitizer Ear buds or headphones Third Grade Highlighters (1 pack) #2 pencils (2 packs) Wide ruled notebook paper Crayons, Markers and or col ored pencils Glue and or glue sticks Scissors Pencil cap erasers and or pink ersaser Pencil bag Red ens (1 pack) Germ-X Baby wipes 5 3 pronged folders (1 blue, 1 red, 1 green, 1 purple and 1 yellow) Expo markers (1 pack) Tissues (2 boxes) Ear buds or headphones Girls quart Ziploc bags Boys gallon Ziploc bags Fourth Grade Backpack Zippered pencil bag Yellow wooden #2 pencils Colored pencils or crayons Paper Ruler (cm & inches) Protractor Highlighter Red pen Glue stick Scissors Baby wipes Kleenex Writing journal Pencil top erasers or large pink erasers 6 3 pronged folders (laminated plastic if possible Girls liquid soap and quart Ziploc bags Boys Germ-X and gallon Ziploc bags Ear buds or headphones (to keep in classroom) $3.50 for music recorder kit Kate M. Smith Elementary Pre-K 1 box Kleenex 1 container baby wipes 1 complete change of clothing to leave 1 backpack (no wheels) 1 bottle of Germ-X See SUPPLIES page 6

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July 23, 2014, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, Back To School 5 Back to School – It’s not just for kids anymore High school juniors and seniors can graduate with career industry certication from WHTC – and Mom or Dad can change their future careers in only one year By Stephanie Halley As the summer winds down, many 5-18 year olds are rounding up school sup plies in anticipation of the upcoming return to rigorous learning and testing. Some juniors and seniors are seri ously preparing for gradua tion and then postsecondary training, college or work. Students can dually-enroll in career and technical train ing for free and receive high school credit, postsecondary credit, and an industry certi fication along with their high school diploma. So what is an “industry certification and why is it so important?” Industry certification is certification issued by an occupational or industry group to signal completion of training, coursework, apprenticeship, or other preparation for a particular job or job category. Many jobs require some form of industry certification or legal licensure as a prereq uisite to hiring. Industry certifications are developed and offered by professional associations, state licensing agencies or industry groups, where industry representa tives convene and establish industry-wide standards and measures which are then ad opted by their members. In other cases, individual com panies such as Microsoft, offer proprietary training and certification in the use of particular products such as software or equipment. So, how can students get an industry certification and why should they? Wash ington-Holmes Technical Center offers 24 career and technical education (CTE) programs to high school stu dents in which they can earn one or more certifications in those career areas. During the 2013-14 academic year, 772 students enrolled CTE programs at WHTC. 359 of those completed their programs, and 86% (308) have earned industry certifications. Many of the remaining students are still enrolled because they enrolled later in the academic year. WHTC’s CTE programs are aligned not only with collegeand career-readiness standards, but also with the needs of employers, industry, and labor. They provide students with a curriculum based on integrated academic and technical content and strong employability skills. They provide work-based learning opportunities that enable students to connect what they are learning to real-life career scenarios. Certifications or licenses are heavily used by em ployers to make hiring and promotion decisions. Em ployees with industry certi fication usually earner high wages than those without. Certifications also convert into college credits ranging from 6 24 semester hours if students decide to pursue higher education immedi ately or as their educational and career needs evolve. For example, a CAD (Computer Assisted Drafting) Operator certified in AutoCAD and AutoDesk Inventor will earn $15-20 per hour verses $9-13 without certification. These kinds of certifications can give students 12 – 24 credits toward a degree in drafting, architecture or engineering. The same opportunities exist for adults in need of re training or enhancing career possibilities. The difference is adults do have to pay tuition and fee, but financial aid is available to assist with educational costs. So, if your children are starting back to school Aug. 18, you might want to check out the variety of career and techni cal programs at WHTC for yourself. “As technology in the world evolves, so do the available jobs. In fact, we now live in a world in which half of today’s jobs didn’t exist 25 years ago,” states Martha Compton, Direc tor of WHTC. “How do you prepare students for jobs that don’t exist today? We must continue learning throughout their lives to stay relevant. We’re talking less about K-12 education of yesterday and more about KGray education, (kindergar ten to retirement) of today.” Check out our programs at http://washingtonholm estechcenter.schoolinsites. com/ or on Facebook or call 638-1180 ext. 317.

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6 Back To School Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, July 23, 2014 OBAR’S INSURANCE AGENCY AN INDEPENDENT INSURANCE AGENCY ARTHUR P. W. OBAR, JR. hdK{ ,KD{&ZD{KDDZ/> {tKZ,KD^{KE^{>/&{,>d, P O BOX 594 850-263-4483 PHONE >/&&^dZd rr&y 'Zs/>>U&> KZz/E^›>>^Khd,XEd BO NI FA Y FI RS T ME TH OD IS T CH UR CH 20 2 N. Ok la ho ma St re et Bo ni fa y, FL (8 50 ) 54 737 85 www .b on if ay fum c. co m We ar e he re fo r yo u! Su nd ay Sc ho ol 9: 45 Su nd ay Wo rs hi p 10 :4 5 We dne sd ay Ac ti vi ti es fo r th e Wh ole Fa mi ly 1 pack primary pencils 1 blanket 2 container Clorox wipes 1 pack crayons Kindergarten Orientation will be held at 8:30 a.m., Thursday, August 14 in the Cafeteria 1 pencil box 1 box colored pencils 2 packs dry erase markers 2 packs pencils (primary or #2) 3 boxes of 24 count basic color crayons 2 containers Clorox wipes 1 complete change of clothing to be left at school 1 pair of Fiskars scissors Girls quart Ziploc bags Boys Gallon Ziploc bags 1 backpack (no wheels) 1 pack 8 count basic color markers 3 bottles Elmer’s liquid glue (not gel) 2 large erasers 1 box Kleenex tissues 1 primary notebook 1 highlighter 1 bottle of Germ-X First Grade Orientation will be held at 9:15 a.m., Thursday, August 14 in the Cafeteria 2 black and white Mead note books (stitched with heavy cardboard cover) 1 pair Fiskars scissors 2 large pink erasers 2 boxes of 12 count yellow school pencils Girls quart Ziploc bags Boys gallon Ziploc bags Girls small size black dry erase markers Boys large size black dry erase markers 2 boxes 16 count Crayola crayons 5x8 pencil box 2 bottles Elmer’s glue (4oz) 1 large box of tissues 2 pump bottle of hand soap 1 container of Clorox wipes Second Grade Orientation will be held at 10 a.m., Thursday August 14, in the Cafeteria 1 pack wide ruled loose leaf paper 1 pack #2 pencils 1 bottle Elmer’s glue 2 plastic folders Highlighters 1 pack erasers 2 packs crayons Zipper pouch 3 spiral wide ruled notebooks Glue sticks 1 box tissues Dry erase markers Third Grade BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLIES LISTS Orientation will be held at 10:30 a.m., Thursday, August 14 in the Cafeteria 2 boxes of 24 count Crayola crayons 2 Clorox wipes 2 packs of 24 count Dixon wooden pencila (no mechani cal pencils) 5 black and white Mead sewn notebooks (no spiral notebooks) 5 folders (plastic with pockets one of each color, purple, or ange, yellow, blue and red) 2 boxes of tissue 1 bottle of Germ-X 2 packs pencil top erasers 2 pack highlighters Please do not label supplies Fourth Grade Orientation will be held at 9:15 a.m., Thursday, August 14 in the Cafeteria 1 inch binder 1 pack dry erase markers Girls mini Post-it-Notes Boys standard Post-it-Notes Clorox wipes 1 pack loose leafe wide ruled paper Kleenex Hand soap 24 pencils Index cards Pink block eraser 4 Mead marble notebooks Ponce de Leon Elementary Kindergarten Each student will need to bring $35 to open house for school supplies. This supply money is used to purchase you child’s school supplies for the entire yare including the crayons, colored pencils, crayon boxes, scissors, pencils, erasers, glue, folder, markers, journals, writ ing paper, wet wipes, Kleenex, Germ-X, Zip-loc bags, and dry erase markers. Please do not buy these items and send to school, we prefer certain kinds based on how well they work and how long they last. Class t-shirts will be ordered towards the end of the first nine weeks. Theses are not included in the supply money fees. No rolling back packs will be allowed. Kindergarten open house will be from 3 to 5 p.m., Friday Au gust 15. We will meet at 3 p.m. for an orientation meeting before returning to visit the classrooms. First Grade Each student will need to bring $35 (cash only) to open house for school supplies. This sup ply money is used to purchase your child’s school supplies for the entire school year in cluding the crayons, colored pencils, scissors, pencils, eras ers, glue, folders, red checking pens, journals, notebook pa per, wet wipes, Kleenex, GermX, Zip-loc bags, and dry erase markers. Please do not buy any of these items and send to school because we prefer specific kinds only. This supply money also includes a class t-shirt. Please no other types of notebooks, composition books, pencil boxes or crayon boxes of any type. No roller back packs at all. First grade will have open house from 3 to 5 p.m., Friday August 15. Second Grade 2 packs of wide ruled note book paper 2 packs of USA green cedar pencils or 2 packs of Ticond eroga pencils. These are ex pensive but the sharpen better than other pencils 1 journal type notebook 2 packs of 24 Crayola Crayons 1 pair of Fiskars scissors 1 pack of glue sticks 1 pack of cap erasers 1 pack of dry erase markers Zipper pencil bag (no boxes) 1 pocket folder 1 box of tissues 1 container of zip lock bags (girls gallon size) (boys quart size) 1 container of baby wipes Back pack (no rolling ones) Due to the limited amount of desk space in the desks, please do not buy 3 ring notebooks or pencil boxes P.E. requires lace up or Velcro tennis shoes Headphones or Ear Buddies for the computer lab Third Grade $25 this will cover all class room school supplies and most classroom activities Backpack (no roller backpacks please) Headphones or ear buds for computer time (any kind) Class room supply money may be paid during pre-school, open house, but must be paid no later than the first day of school. Save about $3 each week to make it easy to reach $25 before school begins. This money will also be used for many classroom activities including parties. If your child does not pay the $25, he or she will be responsible for all of his or her classroom supplies and may not be able to participate in some classroom activities. Fourth Grade $35 this will cover all class room supplies and classroom activities JO HN SO N PH AR MA CY SUPPLIES from page 4 See SUPPLIES page 8

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July 23, 2014, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, Back To School 7 $5 to open Birthday Keith Kash No Minimum Balance Requirement No Monthly Service Charge S TUDENT S AVERS *Student Savers: is is an interest bearing account. $4 charge per withdrawal over 9 per quarter including in person withdrawals. Transfers to another account or 3rd parties by pre-authorization, automatic, telephone transfer limited to 6 per month. Current Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is 0.05% for balances over $5 and is eective as of 7/10/14. e interest rate and APY are subject to change without notice. Account will earn no interest any day the balance falls below $5. Fees may reduce earnings. A parent or guardian must be a signer the account with the minor. MEMBER FDICChipley (850) 638-7892 Marianna (850) 526-4411 Graceville (850) 263-3225 Bonifay (850) 547-3624 the same. Students entering 3rd grade in 2014-2015, who have only been taught using the Florida Standards since kindergarten, will be required to achieve a certain score on the 3rd grade ELA assessment in order to meet promotion requirement. The score will be determined in the spring, ensuring that stu dents are appropriately identified for retention or promotion. Students not meeting these criteria may still meet promotion requirement through any one of the six good cause exemptions. None of those have changed. Students entering 10th grade and or taking Alge bra 1 in 2014-2015 will be required to achieve a certain score on the re spective 10th grade ELA test and the Algebra 1 assessment in order to meet graduation require ments. Theses students will continue to have the opportunity for retakes that all students have had before. Students who need to retake an assess ment based on an FCAT 2.0 score will be able to retake the FCAT 2.0. 5. Will any students be taking the FCAT 2.0 in 2014-15? High school students trying to achieve the necessary score to gradu ate on their 10th grade Reading test will take the FCAT 2.0 to maintain consistency. The FCAT 2.0 science exam will be used in grades 5 and 8. 6. Will the tests that will be developed and administered under this contract cost less than what the state currently pays for comparable tests? Will they cost less than PARCC (Partner ship for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers) or SBAC (Smarter Balanced As sessment Consortium)? The cost per test and cost per student will decline. Current cost per test is $14.58 and the new costs will be $11.47. Current cost per student is $36.17 and the new cost will be $34.23. The contract is for $220 million over six years. The test cost significantly less than the publicly re ported costs projected for either PARCC or SBAC. Ju ly 30 Dea dli ne To Ha ve Fina nc i al Ai d Fil es Co mple te d fo r Fa ll Cl as s es Au gu st 6 Col le ge Ap plic at io n Dea dli ne Fo r Fa ll Te rm s A& B Au gu st 13 -1 5 Re gis tr ati on Fo r Fa ll Cl as se s Au gu st 18 Fa ll Cl a ss es Be gin B ACH ELOR OF SC IE NC E DE GR EE PR OG RA MS Bu si ne ss A dmini st ra ti on El eme nt ar y Ed uc at io n En gl is h Ed uc ati on Ex ce pt io nal St ud en t Ed uc at io n Ma th ema ti cs Ed uc at io n Nu rs in g Sc ie nce Ed uc at io n Ed uc ator Pr ep ar at io n In st itu te CO LL EG E CR ED IT CE RT IF ICA TE PR OG RA MS Ch il d Ca re Ce nt er Ma na ge me nt CIS CO Ce rt i ed Ne tw or k As soc ia te Em er gency Me di ca l Te chn ic ia n (E MT ) Inf or ma ti on Te chn olo gy Ma na ge me nt Pa ra me di c AS SO CI AT E IN SC IE NC E (A .S .) DEG REE PR OG RA MS Bu si ne ss A dmini st ra ti on Co mp ut er Inf orm at io n Cr imi nal Ju st ic e Te ch no l ogy Cu li na ry Ma na g eme nt Ea rl y Ch il dh oo d Ed uc ati on Fi re Sc ie nc e Te ch no l og y Ne tw or ki ng Se rv ic es Te ch nolo gy Nu rs in g (R N) Nu rs in g (LP N to RN ) Pa ra me di c to RN Re cr ea ti on Te ch no l og y WO RK FO RC E DE VE LO PMEN T CE RTI FI CA TE PR OG RA MS Au to mo ti ve Se rv ic e Te ch no l og y Co rr ec ti on al Of ce r Co sm et olo gy Cr os sOv er Co rr ec ti ons to La w En force me nt Cr os sOv er La w En fo rc em en t to Co rr ec ti on s Fi re gh te r II La w En force men t Of ce r Nu rs in g As si st an ce (L on g Te rm Ca re ) We ld in g Pr ogr am s of St ud y Cr os sOv er C or rec ti ons t o L aw E nf or ce men t Cr os sOv er L aw E nf or ce men t t o C or rec ti ons Cont ac t Ch ip ol a Co ll eg e To da y! ww w. ch ip ol a. ed u (8 50 ) 52 627 61 30 94 In di an Ci rc le Ma ri an na FL 32 44 6 Ou r Mo tt o: A Hi gh er De gr ee of Su cc es s Ou r Vi si on: Ch ip ol a Co ll ege pr omo tes le ar nin g an d st ud en t ach ie vem en t th ro ug h exc el le nce op po rt un it y, di ve rs it y, an d pr og res s. FCAT from page 3 2014-2015 Statewide Testing Schedule English Language Arts and Mathematics Dates Assessment Grade Level Dec. 1–19, 2014 FSA English Language Arts – 4–11 Writing Component Field Test (selected schools only) March 2–13, 2015 FSA English Language Arts – Writing Component 4*, 5–11 March 23–April 10, 2015 FSA English Language Arts*/Mathematics* 3–4 April 13–May 8, 2015 FSA English Language Arts 5–11 April 13–May 8, 2015 FSA Mathematics 5–8 FSA End-of-Course Assessments April 20–May 15, 2015 Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2 Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS) Assessments Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test FCAT 2.0 October 6–17, 2014 FCAT Mathematics Retake (SSS) Retained 10–AD and and March 23–April 10, 2015 FCAT 2.0 Reading Retake April 13–May 8, 2015 FCAT 2.0 Science* 5 and 8 NGSSS End-of-Course Assessments September 15–26, 2014 Algebra 1 Retake, Biology 1, Civics, Geometry Retake, U.S. History December 1–19, 2014 Algebra 1 Retake, Biology 1, Civics, Geometry Retake, U.S. History March 23–April 10, 2015 Algebra 1 Retake April 20–May 22, 2015 Biology 1, Civics, U.S. History July 13–24, 2015 Algebra 1 Retake, Biology 1, Civics, U.S. History *Indicates a paper-based test; all other assessments are computer-based only, with paper-based accommodations available for eligible students with disabilities.

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8 B ack To School Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, July 23, 2014 Backpack (no roller backpacks please) Headphones or ear buds for computer time Classroom supply money may be paid during pre-school, open house but must be paid no later than the first day of school. Tennis shoes will be required for P.E. They must be lace up or Velcro. Fifth Grade 24 pencils #2 Ticonderoga brand preferred (no mechani cal pencils) 1 package of pencil top erasers 1 box facial tissues 1 container of diaper wipes 1 packs notebook filler paper wide rulled 150 pages 11 pair of Fiskars scissors 1 Mead composition book 100 pages wide ruled black and white 2 glue stickes washable school glue 2 zippered mesh pencil cases for 3 ring binder 3 Mead folders 2 pocket with fasteners assorted colors 1 4 pack of highlighters as sorted colors 1 pack of Crayola thin line markers 8 count classic colors 1 pack of 24 count crayons 2 blue ink pens 2 red ink pens 1 pack rules 3x5 index cards 100 count 1 pack 12 Crayola colored pencils 1 pack of 4 Exp Low odor chisel tip bold colors dry erase mark ers and eraser 2 1-inch binders with 5 tabs 1 computer headset placed in zip lock bag labeled with stu dents name 1 hand held pencil sharpener 1 bottle of liquid hand soap 1 box quart storage bags (girls) 1 box gallon storage bags (boys) 1 package of 3x3 post-it-notes Poplar Springs Elementary Kindergarten Backpack (their size no rollers) Mat and towel for rest time Set of extra clothes (in case of an accident) 1 box of tissue 1 pair of Fiskars scissors (small round tip) 6 large glue sticks 4 boxes crayons (8 count only) 6 sharpened pencils (the size your child uses) 2 block style erasers 1 small box for crayons and pencils Label all your child’s things that come to school. Children should wear safe comfortable shoes and clothes. Ones they can handle on their own. Flipflops are a very bad choice. The dress code states that your child must be covered from neck to knees, front and back. If your child cannot tie their shoes, please send them in some thing they can handle. First Grade Scissors Glue (bottle and stick) 2 boxes of crayons 2 packs of #2 pencils Pencil erasers 1 pack dry erase markers 1 pack of highlighters School box 1 subject notebook 2 boxes of Kleenex 1 container of disin fecting wipes Girls bring 1 bottle of antibacterial soap Boys bring 1 bottle of hand sanitizer Girls bring quart Ziploc bags Boys bring gallon Zip loc bags 1 backpack Second Grade Scissors Glue Pencil box 2 boxes of Kleenex Antibacterial wipes Hand soap 2 packs of pencils erasers 2 packs of 16 count Crayola crayons 2 packs of #2 pencils Highlighters 1 subject composition book 1 backpack 1 pack of dry erase markers (any size) Ziploc bags (boys gallon size and girls sandwich size) Third Grade 2 boxes of Kleenex 1 box of disinfecting wipes (for cleaning) 1 bottle of hand sanitizer (no soap) 1 pair of scissors 1 glue stick 1 pencil box Cap erasers 1 packs of 16 count Crayloa crayons 2 packs of #2 pencils 1 pack of red pens 2 packs of loose leaf paper (wide ruled) 1 backpack 1 composition book (100 sheets with black and white cover and name plate on the front, to use as journal. Dollar General or WalMart usually has these. No spiral notebooks.) Fourth and Fifth Grade Packs of #2 pencils Cap erasers Packs of loose leaf paper (wide ruled) 1 spiral Notebook (70 page) 1 3-ring binder (at least 2”) 1 set of index tabs for binder ( 5 tab or 8 tab) 1 box of tissues 1 box of quart bags 1 pack of highlighters 1 box of anti-bacterial wipes (no baby wipes) 1 bottle of hand sanitizer (no soap) Extra paper, pencils and eras ers may be kept in student lockers. Vernon Elementary Pre-K 1 back pack 1 box of tissues 1 bottle of hand sanitizer Kindergarten 2 packs of 4 black dry erase markers 2 boxes of large Crayola cray ons eight pack 1 boxes of regular Crayola cray ons 24 pack 1 bottle of school glue 12 glue sticks 1 pack of plain #2 pencils 8 count 2 jumbo pencils with erasers 1 Crayola watercolors paint box 1 marble bound composition notebook 9x7 100 pages 1 pair of Fiskars scissors 1 plastic crayon box 5x8x3 1 plain white 3 ring binder with clear pocket on front ” or 1” 1 pack of clear sheet protectors 20 count 1 box of Ziploc bags (girls snack size and boys sandwich size) 1 box of Clorox wipes 1 box of tissue (boys only) 1 box of baby wipes (girls only) Optional: sidewalk chalk/Lysol disinfecting spry First Grade 1 pack of clue sticks 4 count 1 small bottle of hand sanitizer 1 small bottle of white glue 2 boxes of tissues 1 container of Clorox wipes 2 packs of #2 yellow pencils 24 count 1 pack of pink erasers 2 folder with pockets no prongs 4 boxes of crayons 24 count 1 zippered pencil bag 1 marbled composition book 1 yellow highlighter 1 pack multicolored dry erase markers 1 pack magic eraser 1 box quart size Ziploc bags 1 box gallon size Zip loc bags Second Grade 3 boxes of plain yellow #2 pencils 2 packs of wide ruled notebook paper 2 marbled wide ruled composition notebooks 2 pack large block erasers 2 packs small black dry erase markers 1 container of Clorox wipes 2 boxes of tissues 1 box crayons 24 count 3 small bottles of glue 1 magic eraser 1 bottle of hand sanitizer 2 marbled composition notebooks 1 pack of index cards Scissors 1 pack of construction paper assorted colors 3 two pocket folders plain Third Grade 4 packs of wide ruled note BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLIES LISTS book paper 1 box gallon size Ziploc bags 48 #2 yellow pencils 2 large pink erasers 1 container of Clorox wipes Cap erasers 2 glue sticks 1 box of crayons 24 count 1 plastic or wooden ruler 12” 1 box quart size Ziploc bags 3 boxes of tissues 5 marbled composition notebooks 2 plastic folders with pockets Optional: paper clips, staples, microfiber towels, construc tion paper, plastic spoons/ fork, scotch tape, sticky notes, expo markers, paper plates, solo cups Fourth Grade 100 cap erasers 2 packs wide ruled notebook paper 2 large rolls paper towels 2 boxes of tissues 1 bottle of hand sanitizer 1 large or 2 small containers of Clorox wipes 2 bottles of hand soap 6 paper folders with pockets 1 pack of skinny dry erase markers 4 packs of #2 yellow pencils 24 count 1 box quart size Ziploc bags 1 box gallon Ziploc bags 2 red or green ball point pens 1 book bag Fifth Grade 1 2 inch binder to trapper keeper 1 pack of 8 white dividers Endless supply of pencils 1 marbled composition notebook Endless supply of loose leaf notebook paper Crayons or colored pencils 1 pack of big pink erasers 2 highlighters 1 pack of index cards Optional: box of tissues, Clorox wipes, hand sanitizer, copy paper Please do not bring items such as hand held pencil sharpeners, binders, pencil boxes unless they are requested. Brands such as Crayola, Ticonderoga, and Pa permate will perform better for your child. SUPPLIES from page 6

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July 23, 2014, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, Back To School 9 13 43 Bri ck ya rd Ro ad ,S ui te A | Ch ip le y, Fl ori da 32 42 8 85 0. 67 6. 49 38 Bl oo mB ou ti qu ei sa n uni qu eb ou ti qu ec at er in g to t al ls iz es an da ll bu dg et s. Bl oo mi sa st or ef or in fa nt s, te en s, an dw om en of al la ge s! Understanding how free and reduced lunches are determined Many families are unsure of how meal prices are determined for each student through the free and reduced lunch applica tion process. Here’s a break down to help explain: Household size and income criteria are used to determine eligibil ity. An application can not be approved unless it contains complete eligi bility information. Once DSSURYHGPHDOEHQHWV are good for an entire year, and you need not notify the organization of changes in income and household size. Application forms are being sent to all homes with a letter to parents or guardians. To apply for Free or Reduced-Price Meals, households must complete the application and return it to the school. Additional copies are avail DEOHDWWKHSULQFLSDOVRIFH in each school. The in formation provided on the application will be used for the purpose of determining eligibility and may be veri HGDWDQ\WLPHGXULQJWKH school year. Applications may be submitted at any time during the year. Households that receive SNAP (Supplemental Nu trition Assistance Program) or TANF (Temporary As sistance for Needy Fami lies) are required to list on the application only the child’s name, SNAP/TANF case number, and signature of adult household member. Foster children will re FHLYHIUHHEHQHWVUHJDUG less of the child’s personal income or the income of the household. For the purpose of de termining household size, deployed service members are considered a part of the household. Families should include the names of the deployed service members on their application. Re port only that portion of the deployed service member’s income made available to them or on their behalf to the family. Additionally, a housing allowance that is part of the Military Hous ing Privatization Initiative is not to be included as income. All other households must provide the following information listed on the application: ‡ 7RWDOKRXVHKROGLQFRPH listed by gross amount received, type of income (e.g., wages, child sup port, etc.) and how often the income is received by each household member; ‡ 1DPHVRIDOOKRXVHKROG members – check the “no income” box if applica ble; if household member is a child, list school name for each; ‡ 6LJQDWXUHRIDQDGXOW household member certifying the information provided is correct; and ‡ 6RFLDOVHFXULW\QXPEHU of the adult signing the application or the word “NONE” for this house hold member if he or she does not have a social security number. If a household member becomes unemployed or if the household size changes, the school should be con tacted. Children of parents or guardians who become unemployed should also contact the school. Under the provisions of the Free and Reduced-Price meal policy, the county’s GHWHUPLQLQJRIFLDOZLOO review applications and determine eligibility. If a parent or guardian is dissat LVHGZLWKWKHUXOLQJRIWKH RIFLDOKHRUVKHPD\ZLVK to discuss the decision with WKHGHWHUPLQLQJRIFLDORQ an informal basis. If the parent wishes to make a formal appeal, he or she may make a request either orally or in writing to the VFKRROERDUGRIFH Unless indicated oth erwise on the application, the information on the Free and Reduced-Price Meal application may be used by the school system in deter mining eligibility for other educational programs. FLORIDA INCOME ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR FREE AND REDUCED-PRICE MEALS Eective from July 1, 2014, to June 30, 2015 FREE MEAL SCALE Household Size Annual Monthly Twice Per Month Every Two Weeks Weekly 1 15,171 1,265 633 584 292 2 20,449 1,705 853 787 394 3 25,727 2,144 1,072 990 495 4 31,005 2,584 1,292 1,193 597 5 36,283 3,024 1,512 1,396 698 6 41,561 3,464 1,732 1,599 800 7 46,839 3,904 1,952 1,802 901 8 52,117 4,344 2,172 2,005 1,003 For each additional family member, add + 5,278 + 440 + 220 + 203 + 102 REDUCED-PRICE MEAL SCALE Household Size Annual Monthly Twice Per Month Every Two Weeks Weekly 1 21,590 1,800 900 831 416 2 29,101 2,426 1,213 1,120 560 3 36,612 3,051 1,526 1,409 705 4 44,123 3,677 1,839 1,698 849 5 51,634 4,303 2,152 1,986 993 6 59,145 4,929 2,465 2,275 1,138 7 66,656 5,555 2,778 2,564 1,282 8 74,167 6,181 3,091 2,853 1,427 For each additional family member, add + 7,511 + 626 + 313 + 289 + 145 To determine annual income: r*G ZPV SFDFJWF UIF JODPNF FWFSZ XFFL NVMUJQMZ UIF UPUBM HSPTT JODPNF CZ r*G ZPV SFDFJWF UIF JODPNF FWFSZ UXP XFFLT NVMUJQMZ UIF UPUBM HSPTT JODPNF CZ r*G ZPV SFDFJWF UIF JODPNF UXJDF B NPOUI NVMUJQMZ UIF UPUBM HSPTT JODPNF CZ r*G ZPV SFDFJWF UIF JODPNF NPOUIMZ NVMUJQMZ UIF UPUBM HSPTT JODPNF CZ Remember: The total income before taxes, social security, health benets, union dues, or other deductions must be reported.

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10 Back To School Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, July 23, 2014 Eddie Dixon Superintendent Exciting things are happening in Washington County schools Joe Taylor Superintendent I would like to wel come all of our students back for a very success ful school year. ere are many things for students, parents and sta to be excited about during the 2014-2015 school year. Vernon Elementary students will begin the year with construction nished on their new Welcome to the 2014-15 school year. Holmes County Schools have been busy all summer preparing to provide students op portunities to excel ac ademically, athletically, and artistically. Our teachers, support sta, school administrators and district adminis trators are excited and eager to help students in every aspect of their academic career. We are committed to improve the future of all children in Holmes County, and we have many exciting events on the horizon, includ ing the construction of the new K-8 school in Bonifay. We hope this project will be com plete by 2017. Holmes County Schools work hard to incorporate and focus all of its resources to help each student achieve their high est potential. We will continue to support our teachers by pro viding professional development to en hance instruction in the classroom. We are continuously imple menting the newest strategies in the class room to support im proved instruction and achievement. Data analysis will be used to review student learn ing gains and to drive instruction to sup port student success. Holmes County also provides a variety of instructional models to help all students attain success. Holmes County Schools celebrate and encourage parents to It’s always a great day in Holmes County schools be actively involved in their child’s education. Our goal is to improve the lives of students by fostering good relationships between students, parents, and educators. Working together we can make a dierence in the lives of Holmes County children. Every educator in Holmes County believes that the deci sions they make every day aect a child’s life forever. I look forward to the new school year be cause it’s always a great day in Holmes County Schools. building, and the con struction process con tinues for the building of the new Kate M. Smith Elementary School. We also hope to see many technology upgrades within the year. I also want to remind everyone of the school district’s website: www. wcsdschools.com. All of our schools have links on this site. I would also like to draw special attention to the Parent Portal. is resource is invaluable in monitor ing student’s progress and the ability to contact student’s teachers. Welcome to the new academic year. I know we will all work hard to make it a success! Registration 2014 -2015 In order to register a child he or she must be five (5) years old on or before September 1, 2014. Please bring the following items when you come to the school to register: t$FSUJGJDBUF PG JNNVOJ[BUJPO t$VSSFOU 'MPSJEB QIZTJDBM GSPN B QSJWBUF physician or the Health Department) t$FSUJGJFE CJSUI DFSUJGJDBUF t4PDJBM TFDVSJUZ DBSE t1SPPG PG SFTJEFODZ TVDI BT B DVSSFOU MJHIU CJMM t1IPUP *% DBSE PG UIF QFSTPO GJMMJOH PVU UIF registration School Lunch Prices 'PS TUVEFOUT XIP SFDFJWF SFEVDFE QSJDF meals prices will be as follows: breakfast will be $0.30 and lunch will be $0.40. 'PS TUVEFOUT XIP QBZ GVMM QSJDF GPS NFBMT prices will be as follows: breakfast $1.10, lunch (elementary) $2.35 and lunch (middle and high schools) $2.40. All students will begin the school year receiving free lunches for 30 days or until applications have been processed by the district oce. Aer 30 days, any family that has not turned in an application for processing will be placed on the status of full pay. Holmes County Dental Clinic 5IF )PMNFT $PVOUZ %FOUBM $MJOJD JT MPDBUFE at 1177 East Highway 90 in Bonifay. The clinic is open from 6:45 a.m. to 5:15 p.m. Tuesday UISPVHI 'SJEBZ 5IFZ TFSWF POMZ DIJMESFO PO Medicaid through the age of 19. The clinic provides services including exams, cleanings, sealants, restorations, extractions, pulpotomy therapy, root canal therapy and nitrous oxide. To make an appointment with the clinic call 547-8572. Washington County Dental Clinic 5IF 8BTIJOHUPO $PVOUZ %FOUBM $MJOJD JT MPDBUFE BU 4PVUI #MWE JO $IJQMFZ 5IF clinic is open from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday. The clinic is closed for 30 minutes at noon for lunch. They only serve children on Medicaid up to age 21. The clinic provides services including exams, cleanings, sealants, restorations, extractions, pulpotomy therapy, root canal therapy and nitrous oxide. To make an appointment with the clinic call 6386240 ext. 171.

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July 23, 2014, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, Back To School 11 Florida sales tax holiday to be held August 1-3 Legislation has been passed to create a three day sales tax holiday that will begin at 12:01 a.m. Friday August 1 and end at midnight Sunday August 3. During this period, no Florida sales tax or local option tax will be collected on sales of clothing, footwear, and certain accessories selling for $100 or less per item, on certain school supplies selling for $15 or less per item, and on comput ers and certain related accessories selling for $750 or less per item when purchased for non commercial home or personal use. “Clothing” means any article of wearing apparel, including all foot ware (except skis, swim ns, roller blades, and skates), intended to be worn on or about the human body. However, “clothing” does not include watches, watch bands, jewelry, umbrellas, handkerchief or sporting equipment. Clothing exempt from Florida sales tax Clothing and accessories must be $100 or less. Items eligible include: aerobic clothes, alter clothing*, aprons, athletic supporters, baby cloth ing, backpacks, bandanas, barrettes, baseball cleated, bathing suits, bath ing caps, bathing cover ups, belts, belt buckles, bibs, blouses, bobby pins, book bags, boots, bow ties, bowling shoes, bras, braces*, caps, choir clothing*, cleated shoes, clerical vestments*, cloth ing shields, coats, coin purses, costumes, cover alls, diaper bags, diapers, diaper inserts, dresses, employee uniforms, fanny packs, shing vests, tness clothing, formal clothes (purachesed), gloves, dress gloves, garden gloves, leather gloves, work gloves, graduation caps, and gowns, gym suits, gym uniforms, hair bands, hair bows, hair clips, hair nets, hand bags, hats, hosiery, hunting vests, insoles, jackets, jeans, lab coats, leg warmers, leotards, lingerie, mar tial arts attire, neckwear, nightgowns, overshoes, pajamas, pants, panty hose, ponchos, pony tail holders, pursed, rain coats, rain hats, receiving blan kets, Religious clothing*, robes, rubber shoes, safety clothing, safety shoes, scarves, scout uniforms, shawls, shirts, shoes, shoe inserts, shoulder pads, shorts, ski suits, skirts, slacks, sleepwear, slippers, slips, socks, sports uni forms, spiked shoes, suits, support hosiery, suspend ers, sweat bands, sweat suits, sweaters, swim suits, swim trunks, ties, tights, tuxedos, undergarments, uniforms, vests, vintage clothing, wallets, work clothes and wraps. School supplies exempt from Florida sales tax Limit per item is $15 on these school supplies: binders, calculators, cello phane tape, colored pen cils, compasses, composi tion boos, blank computer disks, construction paper, crayons, erasers, folders, glue, highlighters, legal pads, lunch boxes, mark ers, notebook ller paper, notebooks, paste, pencils, pens, poster board, poster paper, protractors, rulers and scissors. Computer and related accessories exempt from Florida state sales tax Limit per item is $750 on these items: antivirus soft ware, blank CD’s, car adap tors for laptop, central processing unit, compact disc drives, computer bat teries, computer cables, data base software, data storage devices, desktop computers, diskettes, docking stations, ear buds, educational software, electronic book readers, nancial software, ash drives, hard drives, head phones, ink cartridges, jump drives, keyboards, lap top computer, memory cards, mice, microphone, modems, monitors, moth erboards, noncommercial use computer, personal digital assistant device, personal use computer, port replicators, portable hard drives, printer car tridges, printers, ram, rout ers, scanners, speakers, storage drives, zip drives, web cameras and word processing software. Taxable items Athletic gloves, athletic pads, baseball gloves, baseball helmets, bat teries**, boutonnieres, bowling shoes, briefcases, buttons, cases for elec tronic devices, CD’s, cell phones, checkbook cov ers, chest protectors, cloth, clothing repair items, clothing tapes, computer bags, computers designed for recreation, computer paper, copy machines, copier ink/toner, correc tion taper, correction uid, correction pens, cordages, cosmetic bags, costumes, crib blankets, digital cameras, digital media receivers, diving suits, dry diving suits, duel bags, dust masks, elbow pads, fabrics, fax machines, ns, shing boots, football helmets, football pads, football shoulder pads, formal clothing (rented), furniture, games, game consoles, game control lers, gaming software, game systems, garment bags, goggles*, golf gloves, handkerchiefs, hard hats, hockey gloves, hockey helmets, hockey pads, hockey shoulder pads, ice skates, in-line skates, iron-on patches, jewelry, key cases, key chains, knee pads, lace, life jackets, life vests, luggage, knitting yarn, make up bags, masking tape, MP3 accessories, MP3 players, rented computers, rented computer accessories, motorcycle helmets, paint masks, patterns, printer paper, projectors, protective masks, repair of wearing apparel, roller blades, roller skates, rub ber gloves, shaving kits, shin guards, shin pads, ski boots, ski vests, skin diving suits, smart phones, soc cer pads, sports helmets, sports shoulder pads, staplers, staples, surge proctors, sunglasses*, surgical gloves, swimming masks, tablet cases, tablet covers, tennis gloves, thread, TV’s, umbrellas, Uniforms (rented), video game consoles, watches, watch bands, water ski vests, weightlifting belts, wet diving suits, wigs and zippers. These items are always exempt as religious, prescrip tion, prosthetic or orthopedic items **Batteries used in prosthetic and orthopedic appliances are always tax exempt CALL KIM OR STOP BY FOR A FREE QUOTE 850.638.0212 1364 N. RAILROAD AVE. CHIPLEY, FL 32428 we print MORE THAN JUST NEWSPAPERS

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12 Back To School Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, July 23, 2014 Fr om Sc ho ol Supplies and Tr endy Ba ck Pa cks To St ylish Ap par el An d Al l Th e La te st El ec tr onics Ge t Al l Th e Ba ck -T oSc ho ol Es sen tials at 1612 Ma in St re et Ch iple y, Fl orida 850-638-2243 St or e 2114 Ta x Fr ee Da ys Au g. 2-4 Ta x Fr ee Da ys Au g. 1-3

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Wednesday, July 23, 2014 The Weekly Advertiser | 1 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Volume 52 Number 10 WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2014 Your HOMETOWN Shopping Guide For Washington & Holmes CountiesW EEKLYA DVERTISER FREE TAKE ONE 5020888 B USINESS G UIDE THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183 Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5$25.68 5x10$35.31 10x10$46.01 10x20$80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted C & C Bookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm (850) 638-1483 Notary Available Easy Care Lawn & Tractor Service TREE REMOVAL € 850 527-6291 850 849-3825 Lawn Care € Debris Removal Tractor and Bobcat Work Pressure CleaningLicensed & Insured Aordable Self Storage ALL SIZES Orange Hill Road Self Storage897 Orange Hill Rd Chipley850-263-2817 850-768-2912 5020704 5020747 Call toll-free: 1-800-756-3857Are You Still Paying Too Much For Your Medications?You can save up to 93% when you fill your prescriptions at our Canadian and International prescription service.Celecoxib $64.00 CelebrexTM $679.41 compared to Our Price Call Toll-free: 1-800-756-3857 Please note that we do not carry controlled substances and a valid prescription is required for all prescription medication ord ers.Use of these services is subject to the Terms of Use and accompanying policies at www.canadadrugcenter.com. Typical US brand price for 200mg x 100 Generic equivalent of CelebrexTM Generic price for 200mg x 100 Call the number below and save an additional $10 plus get free shipping on your rst prescription order with Canada Drug Center. Expires December 31, 2014. Oer is valid for prescription orders only and can not be used in conjunction with any other oers. Valid for new c ustomers only. One t ime use per household. Get An Extra $10 O & Free Shipping On Your 1st Order! Order Now! 1-800-756-3857Use code 10FREE to receive this special oer. 5020748 Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centersSTOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!Žor Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE 5020749 5020750 Education C HIPOLA COLLEGE is accepting applications for the following full-time positions: CAREER COACH, WELDING PROGRAM Position and application information are available at www.chipola.edu/personnel/jobs. Inquiries may be directed to Human Resources at pippenw@chipola.edu or (850)718-2269. Candidates may be subject to background investigations. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER Web Id 34294407 Admin/Clerical The Washington County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for Grants/Special Projects Coordinator This is highly responsible and administrative work involving planning, monitoring, writing and reviewing federal and state grant programs. The position also serves as Project Manager and/or Special Projects Coordinator to provide assistance to the County Coordinator. Starting salary is $16.50 per hr. MINIMUM TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE Graduation from an accredited four year college or university with a degree in public relations, business or related field. Two years of experience in grant program management, public relations, business, marketing or government, with an emphasis on administration and management. A comparable amount of training and/or experience may be substituted for the required education. Valid Florida Driver’s License. Applications may be accessed on-line at www.washingtonfl.com. Applications and job descriptions may also be obtained at the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office located at 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428. All interested applicants MUST submit an Employment Application to the Human Resources Department in the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office by 4:00 PM on July 30, 2014. All questions regarding this position or other vacancies should be directed to the Human Resources Department, 850-415-5151. The selected applicant will be subject to a pre-employment physical and drug screen. Veteran’s Preference is accepted in accordance with FS 295.08 Web Id 34295137 Travel/TransportationPilot Needed in Destin Private equity firm in Destin area is seeking a contract pilot to fly its refurbished Piper PA-31T1. Pilot must hold a commercial pilot certificate with multi-engine land and instrument ratings, have logged at least 4,000 hours total time, including at least 2,000 hours multi-engine land and at least 1,000 hours in multi-engine turbo prop aircraft, of which at least 200 hour being logged in Cheyenne I model aircraft, and who has attended and successfully completed ground and flight (or simulator) training for the Cheyenne I conducted by FLIGHTSAFETY or SIMCOM within the last 12 calendar months. Send resume and cover letter to info@pcpaviation.com. Web ID#: 34293919 WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-557-1918. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Manuf/Prod/Op Personnel Resources has immediate openings in Geneva for welders. To apply, jgommo@prdothan.com or call (334) 794-8722. WEB ID 34293434 Moving Sale 851 3rd Street, July 26. 8 a.m. rain or shine. Attention: VIAGRA and CIALIS USERS! A cheaper alternative to high drugstore prices! 50 Pill Special -$99 FREE Shipping! 100 Percent Guaranteed. CALL NOW: 1-800-943-8953 DirectTV 2 Year Savings Event! Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only DirecTV gives you 2 YEARS of savings and a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 1-800-481-2137 DISH TV Retailer. Starting $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) Find Out How to SAVE Up to 50% Today! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL 1-800-605-0984 Lennox 2.5TON 12 seer central AC unit. $250.00. Works great. Call 850-638-2999. SAFE STEP WALK-IN Tub Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 1-800605-6035 for $750 Off. Huge Barn Sale! Lots of construction products. Bikes, antique furniture, Asian dresses, woodworking, all kinds of misc. New commercial storm door, Dwalt products, painting products, cedar benches. Fri & Sat, 7/25&26, 7am-until. 504 Pond Ln, in Bonifay, off Brock St. 850-217-5778. Chipley: 1483 Curry Ferry Rd 3/4 mile south of Hwy 2 off Hwy 179 on Curry Ferry Road. Follow Signs, July 24, 25, 26, 2014 8am-1pm Rain or Shine Downsizing need to get rid of it all. Candle making, crafts, office supplies, 2 recliners, 6 space heaters, AC units, 2 digital TVs w/DVD players, 2 chairs, power tools, hand tools, garden tools & equipment, pictures, picture frames, afghans & throws, blankets, curtains, small kitchen appliances, china, silver plated flatware, holiday and home dcor, sewing machines, vintage material, antiques and collectibles 7X14X6 chain link dog run and much more. Begin on back porch & walk through house 850-956-9930 for directions. AUCTION State of Georgia DOT Surplus LIVE AUCTION with Online Bidding Thursday, July 31st at 10AM 737 E. Barnard St, Glennville, GA 30427 Cars, Trucks, Buses, Loaders, Tractors, Equipment and more. L.W. Benton Co. Inc (#3215) 478-744-0027 www.bidderone.com PUBLIC AUCTIONEstates, Bankruptcies, Cities Florida’s Largest Consignment Auction Sunday, July 20th 1:00 pm 422 Julia St., Titusville, FL 32796 Real Estate -‘61 TBird Trucks -Boats Motorcycles-Firearms Antiques Furniture Jewelry -Complete Woodworking Shop Contents of Antique Store Household Goods -Sun Dresses Art Work -City Surplus -Tools -Glassware And So Much More! No Charge To Attend. Sorry no pets. No Buyers Premium!!! Visit website for details & photos AB#9 Cliff Shuler Auctioneers AU#14 Life Member NAA & FAA Shuler & Shuler RE Auc., Inc., D Shuler Lic RE Broker www.soldfor.com j j ADOPTION: j j ACreative Financially Secure Family, Beach House, Music, LOVE, awaits 1st baby. Trishj 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 ADOPTloving married couple seeks to adopt, will be hands on mom and dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592, Adam Sklar #0150789 ADOPTION: A childless loving couple seeks to adopt. Large family. Financial Security. Expenses paid. Eileen & Kim. kimandeileenadopt@gmail.co m or 1-800-455-4929. Older Man looking for female to spend time with. Go to dinner with, hang out, have conversations with. Call Gary, 850-388-2061. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 7LUHGRI 6HDUFKLQJ )RU%X\HUV" 3ODFLQJDFODVVLHGDGLVDQ HDV\DQGDIIRUGDEOHZD\WRPDNH\RXUZDUHV WKHIRFXVRIDWWHQWLRQDPRQJSRWHQWLDOEX\ HUV:KDWDUH\RXZDLWLQJIRU"&RQWDFWXV WRGD\DQGVWDUWWXUQLQJWKHVWXII\RXGRQW ZDQWLQWRVRPHWKLQJ\RXGRZDQW &$6+ *(77+,1*6029,1* :,7+7+(&/$66,),('6 7/" "1 /9 7-nxn‡"£" "-"1 /9/-‡6,/-,nxx{‡™{£{

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2 | The Weekly Advertiser Wednesday, July 23, 2014 SP83742 WHEEL DEAL Have a car, truck, van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers.To place your ad, call850-638-0212 800-345-8688 The 8 WEEKS FOR $23.99 A SAVINGS OF $34.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE Add a black and white photo for only $5! 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price! Washington County News Holmes County Times Advertiser Weekly Advertiser 1980 ClassicAntique Mercedes 450 SL. like new interior, xtra clean, very low mile tires, always stored inside, looks/runs/drives great, 2-tops, Kelly BB high/$33K, great buy asking/$13K. 850-415-7119. Got Bad Credit? $0*, Ride Today!Buy Here/Pay Here Past Repos/BK’s SSI/VAok. Steve Pope 334-803-9550. *call for more details. White Diamond Cadillac, 4DR, loaded. 25,000 miles. One owner, like new. 326-9109. 2010 Ford Escape XLT 46,300 miles excellent condition inside and out. Bells and whistles to numerous to mention $13,000. 850-547-3934 1988 GMC 6000 Farm/Moving Truck or potential billboard for business. was Supermover Uhaul. cranks/runs great. Very good watertight cargo box w/over cab also. Very low mile tires. Great for moving or hauling. Asking $3300. 850-415-7119. 1991 Harley Davidson Road King 9,000 miles, $6,500. Call 850-348-7780. Mobile Home for Rent in the Bethlehem area. 2BR, furnished, single wide, includes washer & dryer. Call 850-547-2068. Mobile Homes For Rent 2 and 3 Bedrooms in Cottondale, Central Heat and Air. $400 -$500 a month. 850-258-1594 or 850-638-8570. Mobile Homes for rent in Chipley and Bonifay. Water and sewage included. Lease required. 850-638-2999. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. SUNNY HILLS. Great ranch, fantastic condition. 3BR/2BA, 3 living areas, appliances incl. $89,000.00. Counts Real Estate. Barbara, 850-814-9414. For Sale. 40 acres waterfront on Choctawhatchee River. Call 850-535-2553 Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. &DOORQHRIRXU §DGYLVRUV¨DQGSXWWKH &ODVVLILHGVWR :25.)25<28 7/" "1 /9 7nxn‡"£" "-"1 /9 /-‡6,/-, nxx{‡™{£{ For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. 4 Bedroom, 2 bathroom doublewide trailer in the Grassy Pond Subdivision. 1782 SQ FT, no pets inside, Rent $600, Security Deposit $500. Call 638-8220. Progressive Realty, 1046 Main ST, Chipley, Florida. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO and up. Includes Garbage, sewage, and lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 3/2 & 2/2 Mobile Home in Chipley WD hookup, CHA. No pets. $475.00/mth+deposit. 850-763-3320 or 850-774-3034. 1 Bedroom Apartment, in Chipley, covenant location, no pets. 638-4640. SpaciousOne Bedroom Apartment $450.00 Two Bedroom $500.00 Stove/Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. Brick 3/2 dble garage nice Martin’s Woods community Chipley.SugarShoreProperties.com 850-774-0400 1BD/1BAHouse 901 Main St Chipley. Fenced yard. 1227 sqft. $625 mth. Security depo $600. Avldibale Ju1y 7 Call 850-482-4446. 3BR/1BA House in Vernon. Pets welcome, fenced yard. $600.00/mth, $600.00/security. Call 850-547-6483. 3BR/2BA, CHA, Large lot, brick, fruit trees, optional large workshop, in Chipley. 850-481-5352 or 850-326-3319. 4BR/2BA living room dining room combination. Call 850-573-0319 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 EXPERIENCED OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com EOE TRAIN FROM HOME MEDICAL BILLING ACCOUNTING ASS’T CUSTOMER SERVICE NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1-800-451-0709 WANT A CAREER Operating Heavy Equipment? Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. “Hands On Training” & Certifications Offered. National Average 18-22 Hourly! Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497 Executive Office Space for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 2BR/2.5BA Apartment w/private balcony & garage. W/D included. In Bonifay. $600/mth + deposit. 768-0394 or 547-2936. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio And 2 bdrm $375-$500 Includes City Utilities (850)557-7732