Washington County news

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Title:
Washington County news
Uniform Title:
Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Chipley Fla
Creation Date:
June 22, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
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30.779167 x -85.539167 ( Place of Publication )

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Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Began May 23, 1924.
General Note:
L.E. Sellers, editor.
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Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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aleph - 000384704
oclc - 07260886
notis - ACC5987
lccn - sn 81000810
issn - 0279-795X
System ID:
UF00028312:00928

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50 Phone: 850-638-0212 Website: chipleypaper.com Fax: 850-638-4601 For the latest breaking news, visit CHIPLEYPAPER.COM www.chipleypaper.com IN BRIEF NEWS Washington County F r om the A sso ciat es of St or e 2114 Volume 90, Number 7 Wednesday, MAY 7 2014 Kent Cemetery Cleaning There will be a cleaning day at Kent Cemetery Saturday, May 10. Please bring mowers and tools to work with and arrive as early as possible to begin working. The cemetery is located three miles southwest of Alford. Ring14 Walk-a-thon CHIPLEY Roulhac Middle School will host a Walk-A-Thon to raise awareness for Ring14 at 8 a.m., Saturday, May 10. For more information, or to be a participant, visit the website at www. ring14usa.org. Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant CHIPLEY The 58th Annual Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant will be held at 6:30 p.m., Friday, June 6 and Saturday, June 7, at the Washington County Agricultural Center in Chipley. Entry Fee and applications are due to Bush Paint and Supply on or before May 16. For more information, call Teresa Bush at 263-4744 (daytime) or 263-3072 (evenings), or contact Sherry Saunders at 2633554. More details available on Page B2 SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Vernon High Schools J.T. Padgett won the title of state champion in his weight class last weekend, becoming only the fth person in school history to do so. The Yellow Jackets placed ninth in state as a team. Members of the 2014 VHS Weightlifting Team pictured are: (Front, from left) Terreaunce Brown, Jaquez Daniels, Zack Weisner, Brandon Malloy, Isaiah Cooke, Justin Oge, Marquez Brown (middle row) Joey Giminez, Khalil Stephens, Michael Evans, Ethan Register, J.T. Padgett, Jonshae Works, Marlon Stephens, Darrion Peterson (back row) Coach Bobby Johns, Bryson Potter, Darrius Peterson, Malik Sheppard, Stoney Long, Jace Baxley. Not pictured are: Austin Brown, Traice Adams, Jordan Cook, Todd Jentink, Ryan Malloy. For more on this winning team, see Page A10 Padgett is State Champ! VHS weightlifters impress at state By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | WCN_HCT Ckent@chipley paper.com CHIPLEY Like most young boys, ve-year old Cooper Brock and three-year old Cale Dietrich knew just what they wanted for their birthdays. But instead of baseball mitts or toy trucks, these local children wanted to help shelter animals. The cousins, who usually celebrate their birthdays together, asked party guests to forego the usual birthday regalia and bring supplies for Animal Control of West Floridas shelter instead. The boys were very excited about the idea, said Cales mom, Holly Dietrich. We live on a farm, so the love for animals comes naturally to Cale. Both of them were excited at the prospect of helping the puppies and kitties. Shelter Manager Belva Vaughn says she was touched by the boys generosity. The boys have visited us before, and this was very heartwarming, said Vaughn. If we could teach all of our children to have that much comA gift of giving Local boys request help for animals in lieu of birthday gifts By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY The recent heavy rains that have pummeled Washington and surrounding counties led to a tragedy at the Seacrest Wolf Preserve in Chipley. Seacrest Wolf Preserve owner and operator Cynthia Watkins said the over abundance of rain caused the pond in the Artic Enclosure at the Seacrest Wolf Preserve to overow, breaking the dam and causing a torrent of mud, water and debris to crash down the center of the 15-acre wolf preserve. The event took the life of one wolf and left another missing while causing thousands of dollars in damage for the non-pro t organization. Chaco isnt dangerous; hes just not very acclimated to people, Watkins said of the missing wolf. We saw him last night, and we hope to lure him back in today. We also have the help of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Volunteers from all around have been working day and night to repair the damage which is estimated to be about $50,000. Watkins stressed the preserve is relying on the generosity and compassion of volunteers to donate time, manpower, supplies and money to the cause. We will still be open for tours on Saturday, said Watkins. Weve repaired the visiting area, and our ambassadors are up for visitors. Because we are completely nonpro t, this is the only way we will be able to raise the money needed to repair the damage; through donations and tours. In addition to monetary donations, the preserve is in need of Mudslide devastates preserve See MUDSLIDE A2 See GIFT A2 INDEX Opinion ................................ A4 Outdoors .............................. A9 Sports ................................ A10 Extra .................................... B1 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ......................... B7-8 Possum Classic a success B1 By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY The West Florida Baptist Association is rolling up its sleeves and joining the effort to bring relief to the storm ravaged Pensacola area through coordination with the Southern Baptist Convention. In addition to hundreds being displaced by flooding, the storm caused one death the largest amount of rainfall in a single calendar day since officials started tracking precipitation in 1880, according to the National Weather Service. Director of Missions Forrest Smith and local teams are joining others from across the state in an effort to bring helping hands and reestablish hope to residents of the area but they could use more volunteers. Disaster relief is part of the Conventions ministry, said Smith. Its ran Locals join storm relief efforts CAROL KENT | The News Forrest Smith, Director of Missions for the West Florida Baptist Association, stands in front of the ministrys supply trailer, which is at the ready to help disaster victims. See RELIEF A2

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Local A2 | Washington County News Wednesday, May 7, 2014 fencing and laborers. Ma terials needed include fenc ing measuring about 10 feet tall and 11 gauge fenc ing, which is the strongest gauge for fences, fencing posts, claps, wires, logs, rocks, dirt and concrete. Labor volunteers should be adapted to heavy labor because there are rocks and debris that need to be removed. Anyone interested in making a monetary dona tion can mail a check to: Seacrest Wolf Preserve; 3449 Bennett Pond Road.; Chipley, Florida 32428 or donate through their web site via PayPal at http:// seacrestwolfpreserve.org/ howtohelp.php. Updates are being made periodically about needs and progress on their Facebook page: https://www.facebook. com/SeacrestWolfPack. For more information, contact The Seacrest Wolf Preserve at 773-2897. J D O W E N S I NC C A R PE T & C E R A M I C O U T L E T Y O U R H OM E TO WN L O W P R I CE C A R P E T C E R A M IC P O R C E L A I N V I N Y L T I L E L AM I NA T E HAR D W O O D & AR E A R U G S Y E S W E D O L A Y A W A Y T e x t u r e d P l u s h C a r p e t .......................................................... 75 / S F L o o s e L a y V i n y l ..................................................................... 6 9 / S F S u p e r T h i c k L o o s e L a y V i n y l ............................................... 9 9 / S F 1 2 X 9 6 12 X 12 12 X 12 12 X 12 3 12 X 13 7 12 X 13 1 2 X 1 4 12 X 15 4 1 2 X 1 6 3 1 2 X 1 8 5 1 2 X 1 9 3 1 2 X 2 1 7 Le v e l L oo p T a n F ri e z e Ru s t P l u sh T a n S p eck l e d T a n F ri e z e Br o wn P l u s h P a t t er n e d Lo o p B r o w n S p eck l e d G ol d F ri e z e M ed Br o wn T a n F ri e z e L t T a n F ri e z e $ 7 5 5 0 $ 1 3 5 5 0 $ 14 5 5 0 $ 14 5 5 0 $ 1 3 9 9 0 $ 1 3 5 5 0 $ 1 1 9 90 $ 1 6 5 5 0 $ 1 6 5 5 0 $ 2 1 9 90 $ 229 8 0 $ 2 4 5 5 0 S IZE C OL OR / S T Y L E P R ICE J D O W E N S C A R P E T & C E R A M I C O U T L E T M ari an na F L ( 8 5 0 ) 5 2 6 3 6 19 c ar p e t t i l e m ari an na c o m L O C A T E D B E T W E E N A r r o w h e a d C a m pg r ou n d s a n d H o p k i n s O n H w y 9 0 T he P l a c e T o S ho p I f M o n e y M a t t e r s OV E R 2 00 A R E A RU GS I N S TO C K T he Gr adua tion S ec tion publishes W ednesda y M a y 28. Plac e y our ad b y no on on W ednesda y M a y 14. S end personal c ong r a tula tions t o y our g r adua t e with an announc emen t on the Gr adua t e T r ibut e listing in the Gr adua tion sec tion. F or $15 per g r adua t e w e ll list: g r adua t e s name school up t o 20 w or ds of personal tr ibut e and the family members or fr iend sponsor ing the listing T r ibut e pa ymen t and w or ding must be r ec eiv ed b y 2 p .m. W ednesda y M a y 14. M ail or dr op b y our oc es a t 1364 N. R ailr oad A v e ., Chipley F la. 32428 or 112 E V ir g inia A v e ., B onifa y F la. 32425. T his oer is for individu als only not businesses G r ad u a t i o n 2014 A nnual G r adua tion C elebr a tion S ec tion F ea turing seniors from the follo wing high scho ols: Holmes C oun t y B ethlehem, P oplar Spr ings P onc e de L eon, Chipley V er non, Gr ac eville C ott ondale F or details c on tac t y our media c onsultan t or call (850) 638-0212 5019256 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our polic y that the patient and an y other per son r esponsib le f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimb ur sed b y pa yment or an y other ser vice e x amination or tr eatment which is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hour s of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee discount ed f ee or r educed f ee ser vice e x amination or tr eatment. "WE WELCOME NEW P A TIENTS, CALL TODA Y FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW P A TIENTS 59 AND OLDER This cer tif icat e is good f or a complet e Medical Ey e Ex am with T odd R obinson, M.D In Our Chiple y Of f ice Boar d C er tif ied Ey e Ph y sician and Sur geon. The e x am includes a pr escr iption f or e y e glasses and t ests f or Glaucoma, C at ar acts and other e y e diseases FOR Y OUR APPOINTMENT C ALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILI TY : U .S Citiz ens living in the Flor ida P anhandle 59 y ear s and older not pr esentl y under our car e C oupon Expir es: 5-30-1 4 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: WC00 S m ar t Le ns es SM C an pr oduce clear vision without glasses at all dist ances ww w .m ulli se y e .co m MULLIS EYE INSTITUTE Chiple y Of f ice 1 691 Main St., St e 1 Chiple y FL 32428 850-638-7220 W e ar e locat ed dir ectl y acr oss the par king lot fr om the W almar t in Chiple y T odd R obinson, M.D Boar d C er tif ied Ey e Ph y sician and C at ar act Sur geon passion for animals at that young age, just imagine how much better it would be for all our animals. The shelter, located in Chipley, has 74 dog kennels and is quite often lled to capacity. However, Vaughn works closely with animal rescue groups nationwide to nd homes for as many animals as possible. We do our level best to get the animals adopted after waiting for the claim period to expire, said Vaughn. We are very proac tive in rehoming them. The shelter contracts with Washington and Jack son counties and the cities of Chipley, Marianna, Cot tondale, Alford, Vernon and Graceville to provide shel ter for animals brought in by control ofcers. While the shelter cannot accept monetary donations, items needed include cat food, dog food, blankets, and toys. We cant accept cash, but if you clean out your old linen closet, we love to get old sheets and towels, said Vaughn. Meanwhile, the boys will continue their efforts to make a difference for lo cal animals. Were so very proud of them, said Dietrich. I think they got more out of being able to help the ani mals than if the guests had brought presents for them to play with instead. Cooper is the son of Mark and Hannah Brock of Chipley, and Cale is the son of Christopher and Holly Dietrich of Graceville. For more information on how to make donations to the Chipley animal shel ter, call 638-2082 between the hours of 9 a.m. and noon. SPECIAL TO THE NEW S From left, cousins Cooper Brock and Cale Dietrich used their birthday celebration as an opportunity to perform a good deed for local shelter animals. MUDSLIDE from page A1 GIFT from page A1 P HOTO BY C ECILIA SPEAR S | The News The pond in the Artic Enclosure at the Seacrest Wolf Preserve overowed in the wake of the countys recent heavy rains, breaking the dam and causing a torrent of mud, water and debris to crash down the center of the 15-acre wolf preserve. completely on a volunteer basis, but they have one of the largest disaster relief units in the country. Sometimes, the hard est part for storm victims is knowing where to start, said Smith. When youre standing there in the midst of devas tation, its good to have both a helping hand and listening ear, said Smith. Our teams help with things like debris removal and mudouts (re moving everything from the home from the ooding level down), but were also there to listen. Smith says the relief ef fort is also an opportunity to minister to those who may have given up hope. A lot of times, people dont understand why some one would drive that far and give up their time. When they turn to you and ask, Why are you doing this?, thats the open door. Were there to meet their immedi ate physical needs, but were there to meet their spiritual needs as well. Relief team member Tom Poppy of Chipley reported an 80-year old resident was upset because she had no where to keep her two dogs, which had been her constant companions for years. Tom couldnt offer a ready solution, but it helped to have that empathetic ear, said Smith. It was clear it meant a lot to her. Smith also stressed that while the Baptist Convention prefers and offers training, volunteers are still sorely needed and welcome to call the ofce to offer their time and services. A lot of people feel like they need to be very young or have special skills to vol unteer, but thats just not the case, said Smith. Whatever you can do, you surely have something to offer. For more information on how to donate or volunteer, contact Smith at the Associ ations ofce at 638-0182. RELIEF from page A1 Special to the News TALLAHASSEE Governor Rick Scott requested federal as sistance for Florida communi ties Monday to assist in recovery from the recent severe weather and ooding event. Governor Scott also requested a Major Di saster Declaration for Individual Assistance for Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties. After a disaster, our goal is to work as quickly as possible to help communities recover and rebuild, said State Coordinating Ofcer Bryan W. Koon. While no entity can fully erase the impacts of this disaster, federal assistance will go a long way to help those communities return a sense of normalcy. If a declaration is received, then Individual Assistance will be available to individuals in those qualifying counties. Gov ernor Scotts initial request is based on Preliminary Dam age Assessments, and may be amended to include additional counties as Preliminary Dam age Assessments are nalized. State ofcials, in partnership with the Federal Emergency Management Agency and local county emergency management agencies, will continue to con duct damage assessments as ad ditional counties complete their initial damage assessments. Visit www.FloridaDisaster.org/recov ery for details about the damage assessment process and types of assistance that may be available. Governor requests major disaster declaration

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Local Washington County News | A3 Wednesday, May 7, 2014 Beltone Pr omise Hearing Aid System 15% off Comes In All Models* Based on 2 Hearing aids. Clean,clear natur al sound Limit 2 fr ee packs per customer Expir es 5/24/2013 ONL Y Applies to Optima Origin2. Cannot be combined with other of fers. Not V alid on pr evious pur chases. Expir es 5/24/2013 Beltone Batteries Buy one 16 pack, get a 8 pack Fr ee. FREE Custom Digital Hearing Aid $850 Expir es 5/24/2013 Expir es 5/24/2013 Expir es 5/24/2013 A tt en tion: I mp or tan t Limit ed T ime O ers Expir es 5/30/2014 B e lt one Fi r s t Call for a FREE Hearing Evalua tion a t a Beltone Hearing Center near you. Do people you talk to seem to mumble (or not speak c learly)? Do you ha ve a problem hearing on the telephone? Do people complain tha t you turn the TV volume up too high? Ha ve you ever experienced ringing in your ears? Are conversa tions in restaurants or cro wded places dif cult? Expir es 5/30/2014 Expir es 5/30/2014 Expir es 5/30/2014 I Save $800.00 Special Financing Options FREE Expir es 5/30/2014 b e s t b e s t 2013 2013 Bill Fletcher HAS: BC-HIS 24 Y ears Experience MARIANNA 3025 6th STREET (850) 260-0436 W ednesdays & F ridays CHIPLEY 1611 MAIN STREET #4 (850) 260-0436 Monday F riday Allen Barnes HAS: BC-HIS 24 Y ears Experience Special to the News The State Emergency Re sponse Team and the Fed eral Emergency Management Agency began joint prelimi nary damage assessments to survey damage caused by the ooding incident in the Florida Panhandle. Life saving and recovery efforts are our main focus right now. PDA teams are on the ground working as quickly as possible to assist those im pacted by the recent ooding, said State Coordinating Ofcer Bryan W. Koon. Public Assistance and Indi vidual Assistance PDA teams composed of the SERT, FEMA and local emergency man agement representatives are working together to assess damages across impacted communities. The purpose of preliminary damage assess ments is to verify the severity of the impact and to determine the need to pursue a request for federal assistance. Individual Assistance PDAs are conducted in order to es timate disaster impacts to businesses, individuals and families. The determination to pro vide Individual Assistance is based upon several factors, including but not limited to, concentration and level of damages, trauma suffered by the community, special popula tions residing in the impacted area, lack of available volun teer agency assistance, under insured or uninsured popula tions and cumulative effects of recent multiple disasters. The purpose of Public As sistance PDAs is to estimate disaster impacts on govern mental and certain private non-prot entities. For Florida, before a public assistance declaration will be granted, a damage threshold of more than $26 million must typically be met. Preliminary Damage As sessments are initiated by county emergency manage ment agencies. Individuals who have experienced disas ter-related damage to homes or businesses should call the local county emergency man agement ofce to receive di saster-related information and to document damages. Visit www.FloridaDisaster.org/ recovery for details about the damage assessment process and types of assistance that may be available. Due to the impacts of ood ing in the Panhandle, Gover nor Rick Scott signed Execu tive Order 14-444, declaring a statewide state of emergency, Wednesday, April 30. The State Emergency Operations Cen ter is operating at Level Two activation. For additional information about severe weather in Flor ida, and to Get A Plan, visit www.FloridaDisaster.org Holly Kolmetz Memorial Scholarship deadline is May 16 Special to the News A scholarship in the amount of $1,500 will be awarded to one Poplar Springs High School senior, class of 2014. Another scholarship in the amount of $1,500 will be awarded to a Holmes County High School senior, class of 2014. A 2.5 GPA or higher is required. This scholarship can be used for college or vocational school. See your high school guidance counselor for application forms and details regarding scholarship. Return completed applications to guidance counselor by May 16, 2014. TALLAHASSEE (AP) Florida legislators have signed off on a record $77 billion budget. The Legislature approved a new budget Friday night, right before it ended its annual 60-day session. The Senate passed the budget unanimously, while the House vote was 102-15. The new budget is 3.5 percent higher than last years budget and includes a boost in funding for schools, child welfare and projects to battle water pollution. Legislators came into the an nual session with a $1.2 billion budget surplus. They used part of the surplus to pay for $500 million in tax and fee cuts, including a rollback in auto registration fees. But the extra money also en abled them to spread it around on dozens of hometown projects. The budget heads next to Gov. Rick Scott, who can veto individ ual spending items. The vote closes out a hectic nal day that was expected to set the stage for a crucial election year when Scott and most legis lators will be on the ballot. In the nal hours, legislators approved a measure that would allow the sale of a strain of lowTHC marijuana for medical use. They also voted to allow students living illegally in the country to qualify for in-state tuition rates for college. Both decisions were unthinkable in the last decade for many GOP lawmakers. Scott is expected to sign both. Its a great day for all of our students that want to live the American dream, Scott said shortly after the vote on the instate tuition bill. The Legislature also passed a sweeping bill aimed at overhaul ing the child-welfare system. The bill states that protecting a child from abuse is paramount and more important than keeping a family together. Thats a signi cant shift for the Department of Children and Families, which has placed a premium on putting few er children in foster care. Lawmakers also voted for a bill that will allow the Florida Su preme Court to grant law licens es to non-citizens. And in a turnabout from last year, the Legislature passed a bill that would allow professional sports teams to qualify for tax payer money. A similar bill died during the 2013 session. Legislators also approved the expansion of Floridas privateschool voucher program for lowincome children. But a big focus on the last day was the money. The states economic recov ery gave lawmakers the luxury of having a $1.2 billion budget surplus even after they had paid for school enrollment and other pressing needs such as growth in the states Medicaid program. Most of that surplus was set aside for $500 million in tax and fee cuts, including a rollback in auto registration fees that was signed into law earlier this spring by Scott. The rest of the tax cuts included a three-day back-toschool sales tax holiday in August, as well as tax holidays for hur ricane preparation supplies and energy-efciency appliances. Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, insisted the Legis lature was not awash in cash. And House Speaker Will Weath erford said lawmakers had acted responsibly because they left about $3 billion aside for reserves while also cutting taxes. This has been a scally con servative year, but at the same time there are some needs in the state and we are trying to focus on them, Weatherford said. But that didnt stop legislators from spreading millions to home town projects ranging from $2 million to help build an observa tion tower in downtown Miami to money to expand a gun range in Brevard County. I am going to go home and brag about what we have done, said Sen. Allan Hays, R-Umatilla. Some Democrats, meanwhile, questioned some of the spending priorities, especially the contin ued resistance of GOP lawmak ers to accept federal funding to expand Medicaid coverage. The Legislature has refused to accept the money because it is tied to President Barack Obamas health care overhaul. Were moving in the right direction, said Rep. Elaine Schwartz, D-Hollywood. Theres more money around but theres a problem with priorities. State budget of $77B approved Preliminary damage assessments surveys have begun in Panhandle

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HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for verication purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. OPINI O N www.chipleypaper.com Wednesday, May 7, 2014 A Page 4 Section POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Washington County News P. O Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 USP S 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $20; 26 weeks: $28.70; 52 weeks: $48.60 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $24.30; 26 weeks: $36.40; 52 weeks: $60.70 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copy right 2014, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bareeld, Publisher Carol Kent, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WC N _HC T CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bareeld: nbareeld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@chipleypaper.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION 850-638-0212 clamb@ chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 EDITOR Carol Kent: ckent@ chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 ADVERTISING Jessica Collins: jcollins@chipley paper.com Mothers possess knowledge unknown to the rest of society. Years of research has taught them the exact location of every public bathroom in town, and they can calculate the most efcient route between the T-Ball eld, dance studio, and dry cleaners. They also have ESP powers that rival those of Santa Claus, for you can bet they know when their children are sleeping or awake, behaving badly, or being good. Moms know instantly if it was little Johnny or sister Susie who broke their favorite decorative vase. They can tell if their children are really OK when asked how their day at school went, or if, in reality, their little girl or little boy is nursing their rst broken heart. Yes, its safe to say Mom knows a great deal more than their children realize. Mothers also have an innovative way of dealing with unexpected situations that qualify them to run any emergency preparedness task force. The joke in my house every morning is for me to ask, OK, who needs an orange juice can? This is in reference to a childrens song by Joe Suggs. In that song, a mother is getting children ready for school and is told, By the way, I need an orange juice can, four cotton balls and six rubber bands... also, Im an angel in the play. Im gonna sing, and I need some wings. The distressed mother hurriedly gathers most the items from around the house, digs a lemonade can from the trash (it will have to do), and loans the child his sisters buttery wings from ballet to wear in the play. What mother hasnt had to be inventive when faced with such last minute requests from a forgetful child? Mothers continue to help with those needs, even as we grow in adulthood. Even at my age, I will occasionally ask my mother for an orange juice can. Its amazing how these women balance being leaders at church or work, while holding their families together and being empathetic ears to other moms. Some may feel its cliche to state we should celebrate Mothers Day every day, but why not think of these women every day? We can be sure they are thinking of us. Happy Mothers Day, Mom. Sorry about the vase. Moms dont just know best; they know it all CAROL KENT Editor My family, friends, former WBGC Radio listeners for twentytwo years and Prattler readers for the past eleven years, know of my avocation in bluegrass, bluegrass-gospel and the old time music. Early in April when the Spanish Trail Playhouse, directed by Jimmy Miller, presented an evening concert of bluegrass music by Deep South, a group from Panama City, Perry and Hester Wells absence from the performance almost caused an all points bulletin being sent out to determine where we were and if everything was alright in our lives. The question continues to be asked three weeks later, Why did the Wellses miss the bluegrass concert? The last one asking the question was Sherry Myers Biddle, who lives in listening distance of the former Northwest Florida Music Park. She vividly recalls the Wells Family promoting and staging Bluegrass and Traditional Music Festival in the 1980s and 90s. She and her young son, Brandon, could sit in their back yard and easily hear the music and identify the performers. Her nephew, Kevin Russell, and others, are responsible for resurrecting the Spanish Trail Playhouse eight years ago after it fell by the wayside in the mid 1960s after enjoying several successful years of producing a variety of musical and plays. Thankfully, Hesters medical issues have improved to the point that we can reestablish our almost perfect record of attending all the shows presented at the Playhouse Theater. One of my favorite artist, dating back to my early interest in music, was a gentlemen by the name of Lew Childre. The Wells Family were regular Saturday night WSM Radio listeners to the Grand Ole Opry, dating back to the first radio in our home in the mid 1940s. It was a battery powered table model, with the battery weighing three time more than the radio itself. Shelby Barber, who came into our home at the age of 16, ordered this mysterious innovation from Sears, Roebuck and Company. Our very first experience with radio was when our dad, Hugh Wells, purchased one for installation in his pick up truck. It, too, attracted nearby neighbors, who gathered at the Wells Home on Saturday nights to listen to the Opry, but its main purpose was to allow our father to listen to Lum and Abner, a fifteen minute daily broadcast, coming from the make believe small town of Pine Ridge and was sponsored by Horlicks Malted Milk. The battery in the vehicle did not allow for extended use of the radio, thus the unit in the home was a really a step forward in radio listening. Lew Childre was always intriguing to hear on radio. It was exciting to know that he called Opp, Alabama his home. Even though I had never been there, I knew it was not far from Andalusia, Georgiana and Red Level, where our kindred, the Wells Family, migrated from. Later some of our kin on the Brock connection moved to Greenville, Alabama to work in the cotton mills. I recall they came back to Florida by rail for visits with family. The train brought them from Georgiana to Graceville. I guess your writer secretly felt somewhat of a kinship to the entertainer although he lived and died without me ever having seen the man. Lew Childres exit from the Saturday night Grand Ole Opry stage went like this: Well, well, this is the old boy, Lew Childre, from Alabam saying goodnight to my mammy down in Opp, Alabamy. He would then strike a few more chords, cording the guitar with a bar, thus making him the frontrunner in steel guitar playing. Then came his parting words, So Long!! The liner notes of an LP record of Lew, which the Prattler purchased many years after it was released, is entitled On The Air1946Volume I and has some interesting comments on the entertainer, prepared by Dr. Charles Wolfe, musical historian. Lew was born in Opp, Alabama in 1901, just a few miles from the Florida line. Lews father was a county judge in Opp and he was amused, then embarrassed, as young Lew, at age 7 or 8, would be found standing on street corners in downtown Opp and buck dancing for any passer-by who would give him a nickel. This whetted the appetite in young Lew, and from then on he was fascinated with show business, explains this excerpt from Dr. Charles Wolfes liner notes. Lew Childre became known for his hillbilly antics as he carried forth his career in comedy and tap dancing as he sang his novelty songs which include Horsey keep Your Tail Up, Hang Out Your Front Door Key, Everybodys Fishing and Riding The Elevated Train. A variety of hats and a pair of brown and white Wing Tips Shoes were Lews trademark as he performed his comedy in songs. Occasionally, he would sing a serious song including Little Joe The Wrangler, Rock All Our Babies To Sleep, How I Miss You Tonight and When The Fog Forms on the Rio Grande. After our move to Chipley, I recall Tillman Pippin telling me that Mr. Mack S. Huggins knew Lew Childre as the Chipley business man also grew up in Opp. I missed an opportunity to get some firsthand information on the entertainer from Mr. Mack, which I have always regretted. Saturday, May 3, was celebrated in Opp, Alabama as the towns eighth Lew Childre Day Tribute to the well known entertainer, who died December 3, 1961 at age 60. A Steel Guitar Festival was also included in this daylong event, concluded with a stage appearance by Stonewall Jackson, a well known country music star, who continues to make public appearances although approaching the age of 82. My brother, Max, and I were joined by granddaughter, Julie Wells, in making the trek to Opp for the celebration and merriment. I hope to write a second segment on the life and times of Lewis Everett (Lew) Childre, who left us too early in life. Included in that writing will be more on Lew Childres life and the entertainers who came to his hometown to honor him May 3. See you all next week. Lew Childre made music and memories PERRYS PRATTLE Perry Wells S outherlands voting record speaks for itself Dear Editor, Before we move into high gear with the political season this year, lets review what Congressman Southerland has (or hasnt) done for us in the past year or so regarding jobs, our economy, and fairness. He and his colleagues shut down the government, costing the economy $24 Billion in economic growth; he wouldve thrown the federal government into default, making it more expensive both for the government and the average citizen and small business to borrow monies due to higher interest rates, and slowing the creation of jobs. He and his colleagues in the House voted to pass Republican Paul Ryans budget plan, which among other things: (1) raises taxes on middle class families with children while lowering taxes on millionaires by an average of $87,000 apiece; (2) cuts monies to Medicare, the health care for our seniors; and (3) cuts monies for early education, pell grants, and job training, all essential for folks to get a fair shake for jobs in todays workforce. Congressman Southerland has consistently been against spending necessary monies to rebuild Americas/North Floridas crumbling infrastructure, whether it be roads, bridges, transit systems, wastewater facilities and what have you, depriving many people of employment opportunities. Hes been against increasing the minimum wage at all, and we all know that no one can support a family on the current minimum wage, much less pump necessary monies into the economy to create more needed jobs for people. Hes been against the Paycheck Fairness Act, which would work to equalize pay for the same work between men and women, where currently a woman only earns on average 83% of what a man does, and that takes necessary monies both out of peoples immediate households but also out of the overall economy which, again, would create more and better paying jobs for people. Yes, Congressman Southerland in the upcoming election might say popular statements about jobs and the economy to keep/gain your support, but his actual votes and positions show the truth of where hes really coming from and you need to remember this come when its time for you to cast your votes in November. Sincerely, John Hedrick Tallahassee Letter to the EDITOR SP E C IAL TO TH E N E W S From the album cover of a second album, Old Time Get-Together, by Lew Childre, released by Starday Records in 1975 and owned by the Prattler.

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Local Washington County News | A5 Wednesday, May 7, 2014 By BEN KLEINE and VALERIE GARMAN 522-5114 | @The_News_Herald pcnhnews@pcnh.com MARIANNA Of the coun ties around Bay County, Mother Nature was the most unkind to Jackson County on Wednesday. As of 4 p.m., there were 70 roads closed, most of them unpaved, dirt roads, although a section of State 167 was closed. There was widespread ooding dam age in the area, $14 mil lion and counting, Emer gency Manager Rodney Andreasen said. Three tornadoes touched down in Jackson County overnight, and one destroyed an un occupied home. Two other homes sustained damage with residents inside, but no one was injured, Andreasen said. He said county work ers were trying to x ood ing by unclogging pipes. With it wet like this, its almost impossible to do anything, he said. The Red Cross Central Panhandle Chapter, which covers Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson and Wash ington counties, remained on standby Wednesday afternoon. Weve been trying to make sure were doing ev erything we can for our six counties, Executive Direc tor Bob Pearce said. Its not over for us. Of the chapters cover age area, Pearce said the worst ooding was seen in Washington, Holmes and Jackson counties. The most severe ood damage, how ever, occurred to the west of their coverage area, in Pensacola on the Alabama Gulf Coast. Fortunately for us, we may just be a small part of a big weather event, said Pearce, who added the lo cal chapter is working to deploy volunteers to aid and help assess damage in those areas. Those interested in making a donation can visit RedCross.org or text redcross to 90999 to make an automat ic $10 donation that will be deducted from their phone bill. Dona tions also can be mailed or brought to the Red Cross Central Panhan dle Chapter headquarters in Panama City. Our money will be used to help disaster victims, because there are a ton of them across nine or 10 states that the Red Cross is working in, Pearce said. Its huge. Calhoun County still had several roads closed Wednesday af ternoon, including Wal ter Potts Road and 10 Mile Creek. State 69A has been reduced to one lane in one area. Holmes County closed 25 roads Wednesday. Sheriffs ofce dispatcher Cricket Hall said no ood damage was reported. Washington County closed six roads Port Pond Road, Johns Way, Douglas Ferry Road, Cat sh Alley, Treasure Terrace and Island Avenue but reported problems on sev eral others. Gulf County had no roads closed as of 4 p.m. EDT, dis patcher Jennifer Mathes said. Gulf County did sus tain minor ooding on St. Joe Beach. Franklin County received very little ooding and did not have to close roads. We lucked out more than some people did, Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce dispatcher Phyllis Turner said. Schools in Holmes and Washington counties will be closed Thursday. Safety of the students, including during transpor tation, is always considered at these times, Washing ton County Superintendent of Schools Joseph Taylor said. We have to consider the importance of getting the students home after school when the conditions may have deteriorated during the day and plan accordingly. A V AILABLE FOR LEASE 495 St. J ohns Road, Bonifay Fl mile of f I-10 ( Bonifay exit) 18,000 s/f Building w/Loading Dock 3 phase power CONT A C T : J A C K @ 850-239-0039 W e als o t ak e c ar e of (850) 638-5885 M ost V ehicles Up t o 5 qts syn thetic blend M ost V ehicles $ 19 95 3 tornadoes touch down in Jackson County Weve been trying to make sure were doing everything we can for our six counties. Its not over for us. Bob Pearce executive director for Red Cross Central Pnahandle Chapter K A DY N C AR TE R | Special to The News Herald Goodman Hill Road near Wausau in Washington County is washed out.

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Local A6 | Washington County News Wednesday, May 7, 2014 638 -48 75 M ARI ANA JE WEL R Y Kin g s D isc oun t D r ugs 10 68 Mai n St Ch ipl ey FL 32 42 8 (8 50 ) 63 8-4 01 0 Wi shi ng all the Mo ms a Ble ss ed Mo the r' s Da y B r o w n F un er a l H o me F r o m: D a n & N in a B r o wn a n d S t a of Br o w n F un er a l H o m e 1044 U .S. 90 | C hi p l e y FL 32428 (850) 638-8376 C S C U 4298 5th A venue / Marianna, FL 32446 / 850.482.5787 / www .jacksonhosp.com Y ou have 40 weeks to get ready for the big day and our obstetricians can help by ensuring you get the right prenatal care, answering your questions, and keeping a watchful eye on you and your baby throughout your pregnancy and delivery T o schedule an appointment with Dr Ricky Lef f or Nurse Practitioner Michelle Baber please call 850.482.5787 Ricky Lef f MD, F ACOG Michelle Baber MSN, ARNP-BC Baby on the W ay? By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com LYNN HAVEN Several hundred employees will be laid off from the General Dynamics call cen ter in Lynn Haven in the coming week, according to a notice post ed by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity. General Dynamics opened the call center in October and notied the public of plans to lay off 726 employees in late February, as required under the federal Work er Adjustment and Retraining Notication Act, or WARN Act. Under the WARN Act, an em ployer must provide at least a 60-day notice in advance of mass layoffs to all affected workers, the appropriate unit of local gov ernment and the state dislocated worker unit. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services contracted General Dynamics to open the call center at the old Sallie Mae building last October, where about 1,500 employees were recruited to answer questions regarding enrollment in the Affordable Care Act. General Dynamics will con tinue operations in Lynn Haven with about 360 employees, who will help assist consumers with ACA Marketplace questions and support, according to CMS. Because the ACAs open en rollment period was limited, of cials with CMS, a federal agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, said many of the jobs at the Lynn Haven call center were seasonal. General Dynamics has been quiet about the layoffs since February, refusing an offer from local workforce organiza tion CareerSource Gulf Coast to assist displaced workers with re-employment. Maria Goodwin, director of workforce services for Career Source Gulf Coast, said her or ganization received a stream of phone calls this week from those facing layoffs. Based on our phone calls, we believe their last day is today, Goodwin said Friday. Really, theyre concerned on how they can le for unemployment and when they can le. Goodwin said that while Ca reerSource Gulf Coast hosted a series of job fairs to aid General Dynamics with hiring last year, the company was not interested in having a representative on-site to help employees facing layoffs. We were really involved when they were doing the re cruiting and trying to hire peo ple, but theyve been really dis tant, Goodwin said. We havent really been involved since they announced the layoffs a couple of months ago. Goodwin said the organization also saw a stream of General Dy namics employees that quit fol lowing the layoff announcement, making them ineligible for state re-employment assistance. Kim Bodine, executive direc tor of CareerSource Gulf Coast, said that because the layoffs are occurring before the summer, there likely will be several busi nesses hiring in Panama City Beach. The good thing is that this is the time of year we have more jobs available, mostly in tour ism, Bodine said. Its not an exact crosswalk, although some of them can be. Bodine said many of the call center employees hold skills nec essary for the many clerical and administrative positions in the hospitality industry. Its never a good thing to lose 700 jobs, Bodine said. Its not a perfect situation, but if it has to happen, Im glad it happened during this time of year. Layoffs begin at General Dynamics N E WS H E R AL D FI LE P H OTO More than 700 employees of General Dynamics will be laid off.

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Local Washington County News | A7 Wednesday, May 7, 2014 Special to the News TomoTherapy, a stateof-the-art radiation therapy system that delivers precise imageguided radiation therapy, allows veterinarians to pinpoint a tumors size, shape, and location seconds before radiation therapy begins. Though fairly expensive and meticulous, the benet and accuracy of this treatment certainly exceeds the costs when your best friends life is at stake. TomoTherapy literally means slice therapy, said Dr. Michael Deveau, assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. While standard radiation therapy is currently delivered using a few static elds, helical TomoTherapy delivers treatment with a rotating beam. Performing a 360 degrees rotation around the patient, this allows for accurately directing radiation dose at the tumor itself while minimizing dose to the neighboring normal tissues. As the location or shape of the tumor evolves over time, the angles and intensity of the beams are also adapted to enhance the accuracy of the treatment. The TomoTherapy concept evolved to address deciencies in radiation therapy and provides more precise radiation delivery to the tumor, allowing for fewer side effects to normal tissue, said Deveau. It basically is hybridization between all the functional parts of a conventional C-arm style linear accelerator, a commonly used machine for radiation delivery in human and veterinary patients, and a diagnostic imaging CT scanner. Radiation is not a benign form of therapy, and tolerance to it is dependent on tumor type, tumor volume, and the volume of normal tissue irradiated. The objective of radiation therapy used to treat cancer is to eradicate the disease without producing unacceptable normal tissue complications, said Deveau. The tolerance to radiation of normal tissues depends on the volume and dose received. Unique to this radiation technique, the tumor itself is being treated while excluding or minimizing the dose to surrounding normal tissue structures. The conformal radiation beams provide more assurance that the dose will be conned to the tumor, in turn, producing far more favorable toxicity proles when compared to similar treatments with inferior techniques and machines. Ranging anywhere from $6,000 to $7,000 for a four-week session, this treatment only lasts for an average of 20 minutes, but the preparation is fastidious. Combining linear radiation therapy and CT scanning technology, TomoTherapy has the ability to treat tumors that were once considered untreatable and offers new armament for modernizing the management of cancer in veterinary patients. Suitable for almost all clinical presentations, it is one of the best, if not the best, machine for treating large complex tumors or clinical presentations requiring extended treatment elds, said Deveau. When it comes to our beloved pets, this hightech therapy brings high hopes for their ability to live long, healthy lives. About Pet Talk Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at vetmed.tamu.edu/pettalk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to editor@cvm.tamu.edu. A uth ent ic V iet na mes e C uis ine ? Ph o No od le & K ab oo dl e T r e a t M o m t o lunc h o r din ne r o n h e r s pec i a l d a y! 2005 S. W A UKESHA ST ., BONIF A Y 547-1907 f r o m a l l o f u s a t N o w O p e n o n S und a y s! a saf er salon y ou get y our o wn t ools M om s fa v orit e plac e f or a Y OU C AN T GO WRONG sinc e 97% of our clients a r e mothers V O s Nails & T ailoring Mother's Day Appreciation SALE So w ell T r actor Co ., Inc. 2841 Hwy 77 North, P anama City www .so w elltr actor co .com So w ell and K ubota 40 Y ears of T rusted P erf or mance W e T rade for Anything That Don t Eat! Financing Arranged (W AC) By RICKY WARD, Drama Director Special to The News BONIFAY The Holmes County High School Drama Department will present the musical Cats at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 8, Friday May 9, Saturday May 10, Monday May 12, and Thursday May 15 at the HCHS Auditorium. Cats is a musical composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber, based on Old Possums Book of Practical Cats by T. S. Eliot, and produced by Cameron Mackintosh. The musical tells the story of a tribe of cats called the Jellicles and the night they make what is known as the Jellicle choice and decide which cat will ascend to the Heaviside Layer and come back to a new life. Cats also introduced the song standard Memory. Cats rst opened in the West End in 1981 and then on Broadway in 1982. It won numerous awards, including Best Musical at both the Laurence Olivier Awards and the Tony Awards. The London production ran for 21 years, and the Broadway production ran for 18 years, both setting new records. Actresses Elaine Paige and Betty Buckley became particularly associated with the musical. One actress, Marlene Danielle, performed in the Broadway production for its entire run (from 1982-2000). Cats is the second longest-running show in Broadway history and was the longest running Broadway show in history from 1997-2006. It has been performed around the world many times and has been translated into more than 20 languages. In 1998, Cats was turned into a made-fortelevision lm. The cast and crew of 48 will entertain you with spectacular music, dance, lighting and special effects. Tickets for the production are on sale. Tickets are $5 in advance and $7 at the door. For more information or to reserve tickets, call HCHS at 547-9000. R I CK Y W AR D | Special to Times-Advertiser The Holmes County High School Drama Department are more than ready to take the stage after hours of practice and preparation of their upcoming production, Cats. HCHS Drama to present Cats TomoTherapy: High-tech therapy delivers high hopes PET T ALK

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Local A8 | Washington County News Wednesday, May 7, 2014 Bill to raise Florida speed limits goes to Gov. Scott TALLAHASSEE (AP) The speed limit on Florida highways would increase from 70 to 75 mph under a bill the House narrowly passed Wednesday, despite arguments that it would lead to more deaths. The measure passed on a 58-56 vote and now goes to Gov. Rick Scott. Among lawmakers who argued against it was a man whose daughter died in a car accident, a former police ofcer who has noti ed families their children have died in accidents and a funeral director who said he has seen his share of victims. You never want to get that call: Your daughter died in a car crash. Well I got the call, and one of the reasons she died was because of speed, said Rep. Irv Slosberg, D-Boca Raton, who has made road-safety issues a priority during his time in ofce. The bill (SB 392) would not raise speed limits auto matically, but would allow the Department of Trans portation to increase them when it saw t. The de partment could also raise the speed limit from 65 to 70 mph on rural, four-lane divided highways and up to 65 mph on other roads. Bill sponsor Matt Caldwell said that it could be unsafe if a speed limit is set lower than drivers are actually driving. I know that there are individuals on the oor who have deep personal expe riences that drive their decision making, said Caldwell, R-Lehigh Acres. The law is not an emo tional vehicle. Its a matter of logic and reason. There were several emotional stories during the debate. Rep. Dave Kerner, DLake Worth, said there were four times when he worked as a police ofcer that he had to tell families a relative had died in a crash. I remember one time going at 3 in the morning and I took an extra lap around the block because I was so scared to wake a mother up and tell her that her child had died, he said. Theres nothing worse for a law enforce ment ofcer. Rep. Dennis Baxley ad mitted he gets a speeding ticket almost every year, but as a funeral direc tor, he said he has had to stand by the casket of traf c accident victims and he couldnt support a bill that could lead to more deaths. Im Dennis Baxley. Im a speeder. I cant vote for this bill, said Baxley, R-Ocala. By ZACK McDONALD 747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY More than a decade of trafc issues on the Hathaway Bridge are set to get some relief. Over the next two years, the Florida Department of Trans portation will spend $102 million on the nal leg of a massive, de cade-spanning series of projects aimed at easing the ow of trafc over the bridge. However, despite the presence of FDOT workers at times, designs only are about 90 percent complete and com muters on Bay Countys busiest road will not see construction at the bridges eastern base begin until summer 2015. Design plans are expected to be nal shortly after a July public comment meeting, FDOT spokesman Ian Satter said. If we have a lot of people with concerns about a certain aspect of the project, we can go back and see if there is anything we can tweak, he said. We dont want to come to people with 100 percent of plans complete with out their input. Although some aspects of the project could change, at com plete build-out neither trafc lights nor train arrivals to Port Panama City will impede the ow of trafc from one side of the Ha thaway Bridge to the other. Ultimately, the project will elevate parts of U.S. 98 so it bypasses the 23rd Street inter section, the railroad crossing at Port Panama City and trafc lights at Gulf Coast State Col lege. Motorists heading west from 23rd Street also will be able to merge onto U.S. 98 without interference and vice-versa. The stretch of road lead ing from the Hathaway to 23rd Street will be expanded to four lanes. The nal project reliev ing congestion across the Ha thaway does not come cheap, though. Engineering and con struction costs in 2014 will run about $7 million, and FDOT will spend almost $95 million hiring contractors in 2015. Then con struction can begin in late sum mer of 2015. FDOT has secured all prop erty required for the project, and some businesses along the south shoulder of U.S. 98, east of the Hathaway, will remain open until spring of 2015, Satter said. Phase I of construction con sists of not just the westbound ramps and roadways from 23rd Street and U.S. 98, but also an alternate lane for U.S. 98 dur ing construction. Phase II is the construction of the eastbound ramps and roadways leading away from the Hathaway. The construction of the Ha thaways rst yover where Thomas Drive, Front Beach Drive and Panama City Park way all converge reached completion in 2007 after four years of construction. Comple tion of the nal portion is ex pected in 2019. Trafc issues until then are expected to vary throughout construction, with the contrac tor designing plans to mitigate trafc obstacles and FDOT alerting the public beforehand. We want to make sure we maximize lane availability; but with a project of this magnitude, there will be a lot of construc tion and different trafc align ments, Satter said. FDOT will do our best to let people know about changes, but obviously there will be several changes to trafc patterns. Hathaway project set for 2015 H EATHE R L E I PHA R T | Halifax Media Group Trafc turns onto U.S. 98 from 23rd Street on Saturday in Panama City. 5020970 1364 N. R a i lr o ad A v e C hi p le y FL 32428 (850) 638-0212 112 E. V ir g ini a A v e B o nifa y FL 32425 (850) 547-9414 H a p p y M o t h e r's D a y f r o m t h e S ta o f the W a s h i n g ton Co u n t y N e w s a n d H o l m e s Co u n t y T i m e s-A d v e r t i s e r 5020862 C H IP O L A F O R D W elcomes Back! BILL WHITTINGT ON Upgr ade Y our Skills PR OFITS & PR ODUCTIVITY Attend the 2-hour workshop for business owners, right here in Chipley presented by ActionCOACH Mark Raciappa. 4 Ar eas T o Massiv el y Incr ease R e v en ue & 4 Ar eas T o Maximiz e Y our P r oductivity In this seminar you'll be taught not just the principles of pro ts and productivity but you'll improve your skills, so you can maximize the implementation of the strategies you'll learn. RE GIS TER B Y Calling the W ashingt on County Chamber at 850-638-41 57 At P AEC, 753 W est Blvd, Chipley FL Thur sda y Ma y 29 1 0:0 0AM-1 2:0 0PM CT Seminar at t endance is FREE b ut ad v anced r egistr ation is r equir ed.

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www.chipleypaper.com A Section 5020929;;5020929; FDAN Washington County Ne WC Edition 00, Sports, 2.0x2 A long time ago in a high school history class I was told a story of some colonists in the 1700s going aboard a sailing vessel while dressed up as Indians. They threw the tea on that ship overboard because they refused to pay the tax on the tea. It was done as an act of deance and to show the king we werent about to be pushed around by England. Now some presentday patriots want to show the king (federal government) they arent going to take it any more (new snapper limits) and they plan to just go shing as if there were no rules. One called me and conded his plan and asked if I could nd out what he would pay in nes if caught. He said he and others were as mad as hell and werent going to take it anymore. Im not sure the people who make these rules really understand just how many people they are hurting with these new snapper restrictions. Think about a man who comes to the beach to stay a week. He rents a motel room with his family, eats out in restaurants, buys gas for his boat, buys bait and ice for his boat, buys tackle or maybe he goes out on a charter boat or head boat. That is just one family. Multiply that by thousands of families coming to the beach from one end of Florida to the other just to sh for snapper. Now they will get 11 days to do so in federal waters. I did a little research and the numbers I came up with would buy a lot of tea. If you get caught shing in state waters out of season the ne can run up to $500 per incident. Of course, the ne is set by a judge. If he or she is sympathetic to your cause the ne could be less or it could be high. If you get caught in federal waters its a different matter. The federal ne could be in the thousands of dollars. At least, that is what I have been told by people who say they know. Taking a stand is one thing, but paying hundreds, even thousands of dollars to make your point might not be worth it. Im sure this thing will work itself out, but in the meantime people who depend on red snapper shing are going out of business. And businesses that depend on snapper shermen coming to the beach and spending their money surely will be hurt. Is it time to throw the tea in to the harbor? Only history will tell. Put a mans back against the wall and he might do something he would not normally do. Hooked on Outdoors Outdoor Life Scott Lindsey captainlindsey@ knology.net Step 1 To get started, all you need is a fish like this four-pound summer flounder and a long, straight, sharp, flexible fillet knife. The cleaning board with clamp is optional, but if youre cleaning a lot of fish, its a time saver. Step 2 Start white side down, and make your first cut across the tail just forward of the fin. Step 3 Insert the point of the knife into the first cut and slide it as far forward toward the head as possible running it alongside the spine, represented by the red line. Youll be able to feel it. Step 4 With the knife angled just slightly down so the blade is running along the rib bones, slice carefully outward to detach the filet. On larger flounder you might have to reinsert the knife to complete the cut all the way to the head. Step 5 Repeat the process on the belly side of the fish, but make the slice carefully so the knife doesnt cut into the stomach cavity outlined in red. Step 6 This is what it looks like after the two cuts. The fillet is only attached directly behind the head. Step 7 Detach the fillet with a single cut as shown, being careful not to penetrate the stomach cavity and set it aside. Step 8 Turn the fish over and repeat the process on the bottom (white side) fillet. Step 9 Carefully remove the feathers, the tiny mus cles that power the fins around the flounders perimeter. Step 10 Lay the fillets on the cutting board skin side down, and use your finger tips to hold the very end of the tail section. Make a downward cut to the skin, turn the blade almost horizontal to the table, and carefully push the blade toward the far end using a slicing motion to separate the meat from the skin. Step 11 When done, you have a single fillet from the top and bottom of the fish that can be divided into four smaller fillets by slicing down the middle where it is thinnest, (the section that was over the backbone). For smaller fish this is not necessary; for larger fish the split fillets are more single-serving friendly. By FRANK SARGEANT Frankmako1@outlook.com Flounder arent born at, but they soon get that way. All atsh start life looking rather unassuming as baby sh go until Mother Nature does her sleight of hand. Their eggs hatch into larvae that resemble typically symmetrical sh. The larvae quickly develop into a rounded form with protective spines on the head, over the gills and in the pelvic and pectoral ns. They are born with a swim bladder for buoyancy to make it easier to roam near the surface and feed on plankton, but as they grow they turn into Frankensh. One eye migrates across the top of the head onto the other side of the body, the swim bladder and spines literally disappear, the body coloration on the sightless side turns white, while the other side assumes a darker coloration that provides camouage for lying on the bottom. Thats important because the bottom is where these critters spend the majority of their time, either scavenging for a meal or lying in wait for a hapless sh or crustacean to get too close and wham! For Panhandle anglers, ounder are a favorite target species, not because they are a hard-ghting game sh, but because they are often easy to catch both from nearshore boats and even from area piers and jetties and absolutely great to eat. (Many area small-boat guides target the atsh when other species are hard to come by one who absolutely has ounder dialed in is Captain Mike Parker of Silver King Charters, www.fishingdestin.com ). But before the eating comes the cleaning, and theres the rub. Yamaha spokesman Martin Peters shes all over America, picking up angling tips where ever he goes. Here are some cleaning tips, with how-to photos, he offers for north Florida shermen. For the best tasting ounder, try bleeding and icing them immediately after landing, says Peters. Lift the gill plate, cut the gill rakers with a scissor or knife, then put the sh in a live well or bucket of water to bleed out. When thats done, put the sh on ice in a cooler to rm up the meat for easier cleaning and to maintain the quality. After that, youre ready to follow the cleaning steps below: Cleaning Flatsh PHOTOS S PECIAL TO T HE NEWS Captain Mike Parker goes to work on a catch of ounder at the cleaning table on the Destin docks. Page 9 Wednesday, May 7, 2014 OUTD OO RS

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A10 | Washington County News Wednesday, May 7, 2014 N O P U R CH A S E NECE S S A R Y T O E N T E R A N D WI N. A P U R CH A S E WI LL N O T I MP R O V E O NE S CH A N CE O F WI N N I NG D R A WI NG C O N DUC T E D B Y T Y N D A LL F E D E R A L CR E D IT U N I O N. V I S IT T Y N D A L L O R G / W I N G A S F O R O F F I C I A L R U L E S A P R = A n n u a l P e r c e n t a g e R a t e S u b j e c t t o c o m p l e t e d a p p l i c a t i o n a n d a p p r o v a l Q u a l i f y i n g i n t e r e s t r a t e t e r m a n d l o a n t o v a l u e ( L T V ) a r e b a s e d o n c r e d i t w o r t h i n e s s A s k f o r y o u r s p e c i c r a t e F o r u s e d v e h i c l e s t h e t e r m a n d l o a n t o v a l u e m a y a l s o b e d e t e r m i n e d b y t h e v e h i c l e s m o d e l y e a r a n d / o r m i l e a g e P r o m o t i o n a l a u t o l o a n r a t e b e g i n s A p r i l 1 2 0 1 4 a n d i s f o r a l i m i t e d t i m e o n l y ; r a t e i s s u b j e c t t o c h a n g e w i t h o u t n o t i c e R a t e s h o w n i n c l u d e s a 0 2 5 % r a t e r e d u c t i o n f o r l o a n s r e p a i d t h r o u g h a n a u t o m a t i c t r a n s f e r f r o m a T y n d a l l F e d e r a l C r e d i t U n i o n a c c o u n t o n l y F i r s t p a y m e n t m u s t b e w i t h i n 4 5 d a y s o f t h e d a t e o f l o a n d i s b u r s a l T h e p a y m e n t a m o u n t p e r $ 1 0 0 0 o n a n a u t o l o a n o r i g i n a t e d a t 1 7 9 % A P R n a n c e d f o r 6 0 m o n t h s w o u l d b e $ 1 7 4 5 O e r d o e s n o t a p p l y t o e x i s t i n g T y n d a l l l o a n s R a t e s h o w n i s f o r p u r c h a s e s o r r e n a n c e s o f a N e w A u t o ; f o r r a t e s o n U s e d A u t o p u r c h a s e s a n d r e n a n c e s p l e a s e s p e a k w i t h a R e p r e s e n t a t i v e E l i g i b i l i t y f o r t h e W i n F R E E G a s f o r a Y e a r P r i z e D r a w i n g i s l i m i t e d t o q u a l i e d r e s i d e n t s o f B a y C o u n t y G u l f C o u n t y J a c k s o n C o u n t y o r W a s h i n g t o n C o u n t y i n F L o r H o u s t o n C o u n t y i n A L I t i s a l s o a v a i l a b l e f o r m e m b e r s w h o n a l i z e t h e i r T y n d a l l A u t o L o a n a t o u r B a y C o u n t y b r a n c h e s C h i p l e y B r a n c h M a r i a n n a B r a n c h P o r t S t J o e B r a n c h o r D o t h a n B r a n c h a s s t a t e d i n t h e P r i z e D r a w i n g O c i a l R u l e s P r i z e D r a w i n g p r o m o t i o n a l p e r i o d : A p r i l 1 2 0 1 4 t h r o u g h J u n e 3 0 2 0 1 4 E n t r a n t s m u s t b e 1 8 y e a r s o f a g e o r o l d e r T h e D r a w i n g i s s u b j e c t t o a l l a p p l i c a b l e f e d e r a l s t a t e a n d l o c a l l a w s a n d r e g u l a t i o n s W i n F R E E G a s f o r a Y e a r i s a p r o m o t i o n a l p h r a s e u s e d t o r e f e r t o t h e p r i z e o f a $ 1 0 0 0 G a s C a r d D e p e n d i n g u p o n t h e p r i c e o f g a s a t a n y g i v e n t i m e a n d t h e t y p e o f a u t o m o b i l e b e i n g d r i v e n t h e a c t u a l t i m e f r a m e m a y v a r y A y e a r i s a r e a s o n a b l e e s t i m a t e b a s e d o n c u r r e n t f a c t o r s W i n n e r s w i l l b e i s s u e d a n I R S F o r m 1 0 9 9 M I S C w h i c h m a y r e q u i r e p a y m e n t o f f e d e r a l i n c o m e t a x e s f o r t h i s p r i z e C o n s u l t y o u r t a x a d v i s e r V i s i t t y n d a l l o r g / w i n g a s f o r d e t a i l s d i s c l o s u r e s a n d P r i z e D r a w i n g O c i a l R u l e s V o i d w h e r e p r o h i b i t e d o r r e s t r i c t e d b y l a w M e m b e r e l i g i b i l i t y r e q u i r e d ; a n i n i t i a l $ 1 n o n r e f u n d a b l e m e m b e r s h i p f e e w i l l a p p l y W e can be saf e. Linemen of t en w or k beside a busy r oadwa y and that mak es a danger ous job mor e hazar dous When appr oaching a utilit y v ehicle mo v e o v er if saf e t o do so cr eating an empt y lane bu er When chang ing lanes isn t possible r educe y our speed L et s w or k t ogether t o f ollo w the la w pa y att ention, slo w do wn, mo v e o v er and sta y saf e T ogether w e po w er y our lif e Beginning Ma y 1, 2014 Sports Special to the News Vernon High Schools J.T. Padgett became the fth ever State Weightlifting Champion in VHS history and the VHS Team nished ninth in the state last weekend. Padgett joins Lee Richards, Jacob Presnell, Jaylon Everette, and Rolondo Brown in schools State Champion list. The competition went down to the wire for Padgett in the 183-pound weight class. He posted a 620-pound total, but had lifters from Baker County, Bronson, and Arnold with lifts to beat him. None of those lifters were able to complete their lift, however, so Padgett stood tall on the Champions podium as the 2014 Class 1A State Weightlifting Champion in the 183 weight class. This completed a great year for Padgett, as he was also a member of the Yellow Jacket football team that was the only team to win a District Championship this year at VHS and marks the rst State Champion athlete at VHS in any sport in a number of years. It was a great accomplishment for J.T., as VHS only began its competitive weightlifting team back this season, said Coach Bobby Johns. J.T. has helped lay the foundation for many State Championships to come at VHS in the coming years. Also competing at State Finals were Brandon Malloy, who placed fth in the 169 weight class with a personal best 580 pound total. Malloy was one lift from fourth but scored a valuable 2 points for the team. Malloy is a senior that also anchored the VHS football team this. Sophomore Ryan Malloy placed sixth in the 139 class with a 475 total and scored one point for the Jackets. Ryan will be back for two more years and will compete in a bid to join Padgett as a State Champion. Finally, Sophomore Marlon Stephens and Sophomore Darrion Peterson represented the Jackets well in their respective weight classes. Both of these young men will be back for two more years as well and should help lead Vernon weightlifting towards the coveted State Championship as a team next season. There have been big high school baseball games played here in the past. Mosley, for one, has hosted region championships for berths in the state Final Four. And back in the days before life consisted of bells and whistles, it was a major event whenever Bay and Rutherford got together on the diamond in the 1960s, and later when Mosley came aboard in the 1970s. But nothing that has gone before quite seems the magnitude of Tuesday night, when Rutherford will host Mosley in a Region 1-5A seminal. Judging by the throng at Bay that attended the District 1-5A title game between the same teams two weeks ago, fans might want to consider leaving early to attend Tuesday nights rematch. The district nal determined only which team would host its rst region playoff game and which team would travel. Yet, Bay athletic director Vern Barth reported that 428 tickets were sold for that game. In addition to media attending and those present on FHSAA passes and the like, the crowd that night probably was in excess of 500. And that at Bays facility, which in addition to being the oldest county high school complex is by far the most cramped for spectators behind the plate, and doesnt offer that many sight lines from rst base curling around to third. By comparison, Rutherfords Vera Shamplain Complex has the largest grandstand area in the county and more adequate standing room. The one thing it lacks, especially when compared to Bay with nearby Tommy Oliver Stadium, is ample parking. Rams athletic director Kirk Harrell said that some fans might want to consider parking in the school lot one block away and walking to the complex. The sidewalk has been upgraded to aid that endeavor. So no, the stakes arent as high as at other times in our history, but two outstanding baseball teams have ramped expectations for this collision. Rutherford is 22-4, and half of its defeats have been inicted by Mosley. Mosley is 25-3, with one-third of its losses to the Rams. Delete the results of their three previous meetings, and the ballclubs have combined for a 44-4 record, and both are highly ranked among Class 5A teams in the state. That is ample reason for great expectations. The quality of play in their last meeting is another. All local rivalry games are heated, and this will be no exception. But the overriding reaction from the opposing players seems to be underlined by respect, rather than animosity. Many of the ballplayers grew up playing together on travel teams, or have opposed each other so many times on their high school teams that theyve been well acquainted with each others skill sets. The demeanor of the opposing fan bases might not be quite as cordial, but in no sense has this become an unhealthy rivalry. However, only one of these teams will move on Tuesday night. Also noteworthy is a Bozeman ballclub that in many ways has set the recent standard for excellence in Bay County baseball. Yes, the Bucks compete in much smaller Class 1A, and their region progression consists of only seminal and nal rounds, however, back-to-back Final Four appearances are worthy of respect. Bozeman will host Northview on Tuesday night beginning its quest for a threepeat and another trip to Fort Myers. The county will have more than 1,000 baseball fans turning out at two venues that evening to witness team excellence in what in recent years has become the signature sport for our high schools. It is a deserving showcase for three local teams, and a welcome spotlight for county baseball fans. Hopefully, windshields and spectators will be spared from stray foul balls. On many levels, it should well be worth the walk. Spectators better get there early Sports Beat Pat McCann Executive Sports Editor pmccann@pcnh.com VHS Padgett is state weightlifting champS P ECIAL TO T H E N E W S J.T. Padgett won the State Weightlifting Championship in his weight class, becoming only the fth in school history to do so.

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By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com The Wausau Volunteer Fire Department and Hard Labor Creek Shooting Sports hosted the 2014 Possum Classic 3-D Archery Tournament Saturday, May 3, at Hard Labor Creek. Winners and prizes were: Mens Open Class: rst, Jacob Marlow, $500; second, Tyler Marlow, $250; and third, William Turner, $125 Mens Hunter Class: rst, Joe Lucius, $500; second, Barry Hutchinson, $250; and third, Edward Mitchell, $125 Womens Hunter: rst, Sara Mayo, $250; second, Linda Marlow, Trophy; and third, Kaylie Brown, Trophy Youth Class: rst, Zack Weeks, Mission Craze Bow; second, Jonah Baine, Trophy; and third, Whit Pettis, Trophy Kids Class: rst, Rylan Evans, Trophy and Genesis Bow; and second, Noah Owens, Trophy PHOTOS S P ECIAL TO E XTRA The Wausau Volunteer Fire Department and Hard Labor Creek Shooting Sports hosted the 2014 Possum Classic 3-D Archery Tournament Saturday, May 3, at Hard Labor Creek. TOP RIGHT : Noah Owens took home second place in the Kids Class. BOTTOM RIGHT : Barry Hutchinson took second place the Hunter Class. Possum Classic a success Rylan Evans won rst place in the Youth Division. Kaylie Brown won third place in the Womens Hunter Division. From left, Womens Hunters participants were: Kaylie Brown, third place; Sara Mayo rst, Myra Shaar; and Linda Marlow, second place. Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. 1) Who described a roc as a bird of prey big enough to grip an elephant? Marco Polo, Magellan, Cook, Columbus 2) I f a man has ever been to a tonsorialist who has he been to? Witch doctor, Dentist, Fitness trainer, Barber 3) I n 1899, where was the United States rst public parking garage established? Detroit, Boston, Baltimore, Richmond 4) M onths that begin on which day will always have a Friday the 13th? Sunday, Monday, Friday, Saturday 5) O f these which is not one of the three traditional primary colors? Red, White, Blue, Yellow 6) Whats the #1 state for reported shark attacks? New Jersey, N. Carolina, Florida, California 7) Which of these is not ordinarily found in Three-C slaw? Corn, Celery, Cabbage, Carrot 8) What is gibbous a phase of? Acne, Tuberculosis, Adolescence, Moon 9) When did explorer P once de Leon pass away? 1521, 1610, 1701, 1836 10) Which states convention did P atrick H enry address, G ive me liberty or give me death? Massachusetts, Virginia, Delaware, Maryland 11) What nickname is traditionally given to the clubhouse bar on a golf course? 10th Hole, Caddyshack, Fore, 19th Hole 12) M agnets got their name from M agnesia, a province in what country? Greece, Canada, Italy, Spain 13) Coptic was the last phase of what language that lasted over 5,000 years? Latin, Hebrew, Egyptian, Slavic 14) What was Frank Sinatras middle name? Alvin, Alton, Artie, Albert ANSWE R S 1) Marco Polo. 2) Barber. 3) Boston. 4) Sunday. 5) White. 6) Florida. 7) Corn. 8) Moon. 9) 1521. 10) Virginia. 11) 19th Hole. 12) Greece. 13) Egyptian. 14) Albert. Washington C ounty News H olmes C ounty T imesA dvertiser Wednesday, MAY 7 2014 B PAGE 1 Section EXTRA T rivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant CHIPLEY The 58th annual Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant will be held at 6:30 p.m., Friday, June 6 and Saturday, June 7, at the Washington County Agricultural Center in Chipley. The entry fee is $60; contestants can enter the photogenic competition for an additional $10. This is an open pageant. Miss contestants must be a Florida resident to participate. Age groups are as follows: Sugar Baby Miss zero to 9 months; Baby Miss 10-12 months; Toddler Miss 1323 months; Tiny Miss 2-3 years; Future Little Miss 4-5 years; Little Miss 6-7 years; Petite Miss 8-9 years; Miss Preteen 10-11 years; Young Junior Miss 12-13 years; Junior Miss 14-15 years; Teen Miss 16-17 years and Miss 1820 years. Winners will receive a large trophy, large crown and banner, alternated and participants will receive trophies. Queens should be prepared to participate in the Watermelon Festival activities to include the parade as well as other activities related to the Festival. Entry Fee and applications are due to Bush Paint and Supply on or before May 16. Checks should be made payable to Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant and mailed or brought to 917 6th Ave. in Graceville. Applications are available at Bush Paint and Supply in Graceville, Forget Me Not Photography in Bonifay and at the Washington County AgExtension Ofce at the AG Center in Chipley. For more information, call Teresa Bush at 263-4744 (daytime) or 263-3072 (evenings) or contact Sherry Saunders at 263-3554. HCHS spring musical planned BONIFAY The Holmes County High School Drama Department will present the musical Cats at 7 p.m. in the HCHS Auditorium Thursday, May 8; Friday, May 9; Saturday, May 10; Monday, May 12 and Thursday, May 15. Childbirth Education Classes The Florida Department of Health in Holmes County will be offering free Childbirth Education Classes, from 5:30-7:30 p.m., Thursday, May 8, Thursday, May 15 and Thursday, May 22 at the Healthy Start Annex, 402 N. Oklahoma St. in Bonifay. No person shall, on the grounds of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion or sex be excluded from participation in, be denied benets of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity receiving or beneting from federal nancial assistance. Sensory impaired or LimitedEnglish Prociency patients will be provided with necessary aids and interpreters at no cost by calling Fran Amerson at 547-8500 ext. 234. For more information or to register for classes, contact 5478684 ext. 16 or 18. Diabetic Class BONIFAY The Holmes County Health Department is offering free diabetic education classes. Classes last about one hour and begin at 3 p.m., Wednesday, May 7, and Wednesday, May 14, at the Holmes County Health Department. Classes are open to the public. No person shall, on the grounds of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion or sex be excluded from participation in, be denied benets of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity receiving or beneting from federal nancial assistance. Contact Leann Jones with any questions at 547-8500 ext. 240. Sensory impaired or Limited-English Prociency patients will be provided with necessary aids and interpreters at no cost by calling Fran Amerson at 547-8500 ext. 234. Game Night CHIPLEY The Friends of the Washington County Library Game Night is set to take place from 6-9 p.m., Thursday, May 8. Games being played are Bridge, Bunco, Canasta, Dominoes, Mahjong and many more. Tickets are $10 per person and include dinner. Tickets are available at the Washington County Library, the Wausau, Vernon and Sunny Hill library branches, or from any Friends member. For more information, call 638-4167. Ring14 Walk-a-thon CHIPLEY Roulhac Middle School will host a Walk-A-Thon to raise awareness for Ring14 at 8 a.m., Saturday, May 10. For more information, or to be a participant, visit the website at www.ring14usa. org. U.S. Postal Service Food Drive The 2014 U.S. Postal Service Food Drive will be held from now through May 10. All food collected will benet the Care and Share Food Pantry In Chipley, 1461 South Railroad Ave., and the Sheppards Gate Food Pantry, 1915 Ferguson Road, just south of Wausau off Highway 77. Place non-perishable items on or in your mailbox for your carrier to pick up. Collection bills will also be in the lobbies of the Chipley and Wausau Post Ofces for individuals with P.O. Boxes to make donations. Just one item from your family can help another family in need. If you have any questions, contact Jennifer Lowery at 326-5944. Mayday 2014 CAMPBELLTON Mayday will be held Saturday, May 10, at the Campbellton Park on Highway 231. Gates will open to public at noon. All vendors are asked to be ready to open to public by 11:45 a.m. This is a free public event. There will be food, fun and activities. Jackson County Fire Rescue will be on hand along with other neighboring counties and cities to show the kids equipment and do re safety and prevention. Chairs and coolers are welcome. There is no alcohol permitted on the grounds of the park. If you have a softball or baseball team that would like to play that day, submit the team. There will be an antique car show available as well. For more information and vendor booths, contact Samuel Jones at 504-252-5350. Tea Time Garden Walk CHIPLEY The Chipley Garden Club will host the 2014 Tea Time Garden Walk from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, May 10, at the Washington County Ag Center in Chipley. Tickets are $15 each. Reservations are required. For tickets and more information, call Glenda Wilson at 638-9138 or 940-0212. Rock Hill Fish Fry CHIPLEY A sh fry fundraiser is scheduled for Saturday, May 10 at the Rock Hill Church and Cemetery. Everyone with family buried in the cemetery is encouraged to come. Bring a covered dish to compliment the sh and enjoy neighborhood fellowship at noon. Donations are needed to pay for monthly mowing. For more information or to make donations, call 638-0966. History Seminar The Lower Muskogee Creek Tribe will host a History Seminar, at 10 a.m., Saturday, May 17, starting at the Washington County Public Library at 1444 Jackson Ave. Chipley. This seminar is presented to educate the general public, students and teachers on many aspects of the Muskogee History and Culture. Topics Include: History Myths and Legends of the Muskogee Creeks, How the Muskogee survived in this area after the Removal, Aspects of Daily Living, Genealogy and Treaties of the Muskogee. Registration for the seminar, materials and lunch is $20. For more information, contact 229-762-3355 Chipola to offer lifeguard course MARIANNA Chipola College will offer the American Red Cross Lifeguard Training course beginning May 12. All interested students must be 15 years of age on or before the rst day of class. The course requires a minimum of 32 hours of training in water rescue, CPR and First Aid. Attendance is required for all class meetings. Students must be in good physical condition, able to swim at least 500 yards without stopping, able to swim freestyle and breaststroke. Students also must be able to, retrieve a 10pound brick from a seven foot depth, and tread water without hands for two minutes. A prerequisite swim test must be taken before the course on May 9. There is no charge to take the test. Course meetings will be held from 4:30-8:30 p.m. May 12-15 and May 1923, with the nal test on May 23. Cost of the swim course is $200. Students must register and pay fees when they take the prequalifying swim test. For information about the course or to register for the pre-qualifying, call Rance Massengill at 718-2240. Longleaf Pine Forest Restoration and Management Workshop CHIPLEY The Apalachicola Regional Stewardship Alliance and Floridas Forest Stewardship Program will host a Longleaf Pine Forrest Restoration and Management workshop from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on May 14, at Turkey Pond Ranch. The cost of the workshop is $10 and includes lunch and materials. You can register online at fsp-workshop051414. eventbrite.com or call the Washington County Extension Ofce at 6386180. The ranch is at 3157 Chain Lake Road in Chipley. Real Estate Professionals Workshop CHIPLEY The Washington Planning Commission will be hosting a Workshop for Real Estate Professionals at 6 p.m. on May 15 at the Washington County Annex Building, 1331 South Blvd., Chipley. The Workshop discuss various Land Use Planning topics, including, State Growth Management Regulations, Large and Small Land Use Map Amendments, comprehensive Plans, Land Development Codes, Future Land Use Maps, the Role of the Planning Commission, Development Orders, and other related topics. Realtors, Developers, Builders, Property Owners, Elected Ofcials, and the public are encouraged to attend. For more information, contact Michael J. DeRuntz, Senior Planner, Washington County, at 415-5093 Benet for Bob King There will be a benet fundraiser for Bob King, who is ghting cancer, at 10:30 a.m. on May 17 at the Pittman Fire Department on Highway 2. There will be a yard sale and cake auction. Lunch plates will be available for $6 and will include fried chicken or Boston butt, baked beans, potato salad, roll and cake. Whole Boston butts will be available for a $25 donation. Whole Boston butts must be pre-ordered. For more information, call Jim King at 956-4506, Betty Watson at 956-4626, Linda Lewis at 956-2235 or David Sconiers at 956-2394. Beginners Pressure Canning Class CHIPLEY The University of Florida Extension Program will hold a pressure canning class from 69:30 p.m., Tuesday, May 20, at the Washington County Ag Center, 1424 Jackson Ave. in Chipley. Participants will learn the basics of pressure canning by canning vegetables. Registration is $5 and includes class materials. Canner gauge testing also will be available; be sure to bring canner lid with gauge. Space is limited. Pre-registration is required by contacting the Washington County Extension Ofce at 6386265, or the Holmes County Extension Ofce at 547-1108. Extension programs are open to everyone. For persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations, call 638-6265 (TDD, via Florida Relay Service, 1-800-955-8771) at least ve working days before the class so that proper consideration can be given to the request. Toss It Up Summer Salads Class CHIPLEY Build a better simple and slimming salad. Learn how to make salad, no matter your kitchen skill. You will gain many new ways and ideas for making your own wonderful, healthy creation each day. Create salads that are easy to make using easy-to-nd, inexpensive ingredients. Join us for this handson class, from 5:30-7:30 p.m., Thursday, May 22, at the Washington County Ag Center, 1424 Jackson Ave. in Chipley. Registration is $15 and includes class materials and food samples. Space is limited. Pre-registration is required by contacting the Washington County Extension Ofce at 638-6265 or the Holmes County Extension Ofce at 547-1108. Payment is required to complete registration. Extension programs are open to everyone. For persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations, contact 638-6265 (TDD, via Florida Relay Service, 1-800-955-8771) at least ve working days before the class so that proper consideration can be given to the request. A Very Disney Variety BONIFAY The Bonifay Middle School Theatre Department announces its spring show A Very Disney Variety, to be presented at 6 p.m., Thursday, May 22, and Friday, May 23, in the HCHS auditorium. Tickets are available at Bonifay Middle School two weeks before the show. Cost is $5 for adults, $3 for students, and free for kids 4 and under. Admission at the door will also be available. Reminiscent of such variety shows as Carol Burnett and Friends, Saturday Night Live! and So Random, the performance will feature original scenes based on memorable Disney characters. In addition, the BMS Treble Makers will be on hand to provide musical entertainment for the evening with favorite Disney tunes. With the Mad Hatter (Bryce Etheridge) hosting the show and the White Rabbit (Sydney Shugars) keeping things in order backstage, the evening is sure to be full of mayhem, magic and memories. For more information, contact Jill Cook at 547-2754 or cookj@ hdsb.org. Tables of Purpose CHIPLEY Washington County Council on Aging will hold a black tie event at 6 p.m., Friday, May 23. The nights events will include a steak dinner and Jazz music by Bill Covington. Tickets are $50 each. Tickets can be purchased at the Council on Aging ofce in Chipley. All proceeds will go to the Council on Aging. a nd Special to Extra Air Force Airman 1st Class David R. Worley graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical tness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Worley is the son of Jimmy R. and Ellen B. Worley of Chipley. Worley graduates basic training Community EVENTS

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 and sor enes s aches Special to Extra Take Stock In Children (TSIC), a 60-credit hour (two-year) college tuition scholarship program in Washington County for middle and high school students, recently sponsored a trip for local scholarship contract students to visit Chipola College. On April 10, 19 Washington County TSIC students boarded a Chipola College bus and were hosted by the college at a College Readiness Workshop. Reyonna Parrish, of the Florida Board of Education, presented a program on School and Life Management for the students, and a tour of the campus and lunch followed. The students were accompanied by David Solger and Gary Hartman, and the visit was coordinated by Mary Helen Smith, Take Stock In Children Program Manager, at Chipola College. Students attending from Washington County were as follows: Vernon Middle School: Faith Harmon, Dana Douglas, Jamar Massaline, Dalton Webb and Maylin Brock Vernon High School: Madisen Hawes, Courtney Hendrix, John English, Jessica Joyce and Carlos Hillman Roulhac Middle School: Aleya Louderback Chipley High School: David King, Essence Williams, Parisha Massaline, Devon James, Eli Whitehead, Cheyenne Rabon, Kallee Chamberlain and Ina Robinson. Since starting in 2004, the local TSIC has raised more than $450,000, which excludes the state-level match, and the total value of scholarships is estimated at $900,000. Since starting, the Washington County TSIC has nine college graduates, with some pursuing advanced degrees; 51 students in college or technical programs; and 37 students working toward high school graduation and a scholarship The generosity of Washington County residents and businesses has had a signicant impact on 97 young lives helping them to become productive adult citizens. What sets the TSIC program apart from other scholarship programs is the age range for qualication, the appointment of an adult mentor to coordinate with the student on a frequent basis throughout the school year, the written contract with the student to maintain average or above grades, stay away from drugs and alcohol, and generally be a good citizen and active in school and community events outside the classroom. As part of a state-wide, county-level operation, the TSIC program is organized regionally with a state college providing the overall program support and operational supervision. Chipola College is the regional coordinator for Washington, Jackson, Holmes, Calhoun and Liberty counties, and Mary Helen Smith at Chipola College is the TSIC program manager who works directly with the county sponsor organizations and school boards. In all regional counties except Washington, the sponsor entity is the school board, but the TSIC program here is operated by the Washington County Scholarship Foundation Inc. (WCSF), a private foundation, that holds federal and state income tax exemption with charitable organization registration. For more information about the program, to volunteer or to make a donation, contact David Solger, president WCSF Inc., at 638-1276 or Mary Helen Smith at 718-2428 and/or smithm@chipola. edu. Special to Extra The Chipley Kiwanis Club met for its weekly luncheon on April 29 at Pattillos Restaurant at the Washington-Holmes Technical Center. Lunch was provided by the students of the Technical Center Culinary Program. President Garrett Martin opened the meeting and noted there would be no meeting on Tuesday, June 3, because of the Pancake Supper being held at Kate Smith Elementary that evening. He also discussed the Kiwanis Golf Tournament, which has been postponed because of the recent rain. A new date will be announced. The next Kiwanis Event is the Pancake Supper, which will be held at Kate Smith Elementary from 4:30-7 p.m., on Tuesday, June 3. Dinners are $5 each and include pancakes, bacon or sausage, orange juice and coffee or milk. Tickets are available from any Kiwanian or can be purchased that evening at the Kate Smith Cafeteria. A new Kiwanian was inducted. David Solger introduced Charles Williams, the new Principal at Chipley High School. He and Laura Joiner welcomed Charles into the club. Because Kiwanis principal purpose is to support the youth of Washington County, Charles is enthusiastic about joining Kiwanis. David Solger, the Kiwanis Liaison to Take Stock in Children, then introduced Mary Helen Smith as the Program for the day. Smith is the program manager for Take Stock in Children for ve counties including Washington, Holmes and Jackson counties. Take Stock in Children is a scholarship and mentoring program for low-income, deserving youth. These are students who are doing well but have risk factors in their lives and need support. These can be children who are homeless, who have incarcerated family members, ill family members and other risk factors. Many of the children are minorities. It is a state-wide program, and across the state, 38 percent of the children are Caucasian, 33 percent are AfricanAmerican, 25 percent are Hispanic and 4 percent are other. There are 22,000 students enrolled state-wide and 75,000 mentors who contribute about one million volunteer hours each year. Each student signs a contract in the seventh or eighth grade and the contract is signed by their parents as well. Basically, they have to commit to achieving good grades (B average or better) and staying out of trouble. They must also meet with their mentors regularly. In return, on graduation they receive a two-year tuition scholarship to either a state college or university or a vocational school. The value of the scholarship is currently about $8,000 to attend Chipola College. The scholarships are supported by local contributions and the local funds are matched by an equal contribution from the State of Florida. There are currently 54 students in the ve-county area enrolled in Take Stock in Children. Thirty-seven of them are from Washington County. There have been eight college graduates so far with degrees including physical therapy, mechanical engineering and law. State-wide, 86 percent of the students graduate from at least a two-year institution. Though exact gures were unavailable, very few of the students have dropped out of the program after starting higher education. Smith noted while contributions are always needed, the greatest need at present is for more mentors. These volunteers commit to meeting 15 times during the school year, or twice a month for 30 minutes. Mentors coach the students, encourage them and can help broaden the students exposure to different career elds. The Kiwanis club meets Tuesdays at Pattillos restaurant in the middle of the WHTC campus at noon. For an invitation, contact any Kiwanian or David Solger, membership chairperson, at 638-1276. For more information about the Kiwanis Club of Chipley, visit www.ChipleyKiwanis. com Special to Extra The Washington County Master Gardeners recently visited the Fox Family Farm. What an amazing family operation, club member Glenda Wilson said. They have green houses with tomatoes which are already bearing, cabbage, various types of lettuce, kale, leeks, fennel, pole beans, squash, cauliower, broccoli, spinach, celery, corn, multiple herbs and owers, just to name a few. The farm moved from Bay County to Washington County in 2005 and presently has three large green houses with plans for a fourth. The operation is truly a family operation, which includes father, mother and son. The farm grafts their tomatoes and reports the practice as the reason they have no problems with nematodes. They did lose a total crop last year to white ies, however, prompting the owners to add screening to the sides of their green houses to keep the white ies out. Fox Family Farm also prides itself on not using chemical fertilize or pesticides but rather using ladybugs as a pest deterrent, and when necessary, parasitic wasps. The farm sells at local markets but not direct from the farm. It is unbelievable that only three people can produce the quantity and quality of vegetables that this farm produces, Wilson said. It does help that the son has a degree in horticulture and the father is an electrician with years of experience in gardening. Special to Extra Some 403 students were eligible for graduation at Chipola College at the end of the spring semester, with many coming from Washington and Holmes County. Graduation exercises were at 7 p.m. on May 1 in the Dothan Civic Center. Counted as members of the class are all who completed their degrees or vocational certicates from December of 2013 to May of 2014 or who will complete work at Chipola during the summer of 2014. The class includes the following from Washington and Holmes County: Bachelor of Science Degrees BONIFAY Misty Kirkland, Mika Moore, Anne Mary Nichols, Kaithlyn Pope, Katelyn Strickland and Caleb Whitaker C H IPLEY Ashley Ayers, Wendy Brown, Ashley Foshee, Holley Hinson, Kasey Ivey, Tasha Richter, Meghan Salter and Leigh Stone VE R NON Emily Adams and Susie Sewell WE S T V ILLE Whitney Ellenburg and Andrew Stafford A ssociate in A rts Degrees BONIFAY Holton Adams, Allison Brock, Hadley Brown, Ashlee Corbin, Christopher Dozier, John Eubanks, Andrew Fox, Thomas Herndon, Amber LaRue, Krutika Patel, Sheetal Patel, Lessie Perry, Hulon Reeves, Jr., Christopher Rockwell, Nicole Schneider, Travis Scorza, Kolton Sellers, Garet Skipper, Taylor Smith, Tyler Walker and Julie Wells C H IPLEY Kendall Alderman, Shamara Baker, Malcolm Bell, Heather Brown, Victoria Crawford, James Dilmore, Jamie Ellis, George Fisher, Nicholas Galbreath, Dustin Garner, Olivia Guettler, Mattea Harbour, Alana Hearn, Brenda Killings, Jesse Kneiss, Asia McKenzie, Mary Minchin, Jaclyn Morris, Shamara Murph, Joshua Myers, Phillip Pippin, Taylor Pope, Alexander Shatas, James Smith, Jr., Kiley Summerhill, Tori Taylor, Crystal Wedderburn and Dan Wells VE R NON Amber Brown, Dante Brown and Eric Lee WE S T V ILLE Reid Davis and Matthew Hicks A ssociate in Science Degrees BONIFAY Edna Feurtado and Chelsea Wells C H IPLEY Olivia Guettler Westville Candice Brown and Tammy Watson Chipola Class of 2014 Take Stock In Children Students tour Chipola College SPE C IAL TO E XT R A Left to Right: David Solger, Charles Williams, Laura Joiner and Garrett Martin Kiwanis induct new member SPE C IAL TO E XT R A Washington County Master Gardeners pose at Fox Family Farm. Master Gardeners visit Fox Family Farm Crossword PUZZLE SOLUTION ON PAGE B5

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Many people complain about how fast things are changing; I complain about those things that do not change at all. Interestingly, the things you want to change refuse to do so and the things you want to stay the same never do. I wish someone would gure out how to reverse this tedious trend of life. I have worked on it but to no success. I am referring to the annual Mothers Day card fetish. I am not sure where this started or why, but I have my suspicions. I think we can safely rule out husbands and men as suspects. I could see a man doing it one year, but to do it year after year is not within the scope of a mans ability. If a man does something one time and it is successful he never chances doing it the second time when it may be a failure. Now we have on our hands tremendous pressure to purchase a yearly Mothers Day card. When it comes to card buying, I simply do not know where to go. Oh, I know where to get them; I simply do not know which one to purchase. If it was up to me, and let me point out very quickly, it is not, I would have one card for sale each year. Maybe I would modify the card each year and perhaps write something different in it, but how many ways can you say Happy Mothers Day? To be efcient the choice would only be one Mothers Day card per year. As it stands (and I wish it would sit down and rest for a while), there are more Mothers Day cards than stars in the heavens. It is virtually impossible to pick out the right Mothers Day card. Since I do not keep up with the latest trends in this regard I am at quite a disadvantage. One year I tried to remedy my Mothers Day card-buying dilemma by buying a box of 50 cards that were on sale right after Mothers Day. I thought I had hit the mother lode, so to speak. With this purchase, I had enough Mothers Day cards to last my entire lifetime. Unless, of course, I live to be 129. This lasted for two years. The rst year I presented my Mothers Day card to my wife and she gave me all kinds of smiles and hugs. I was relieved to have solved a big problem in my home. I now could rest and focus on solving other problems in my life, of which there are many. It was the second year that kicked me in the teeth. As usual, that year, I presented my wife with her Mothers Day card. Trust me; I was not fully geared up for the response I got. I was expecting smiles and hugs like the year before. What I got was a glare and a shrug. She looked at me and said something I shall never forget. Isnt this the same card you gave me last year? How do wives remember these things? The only reason I knew it was the same card as last year is I had more just like it in the box it came from. This brings me to the second part of my quandary. When did it become necessary for husbands to buy their wives Mothers Day cards? Sure, she washes my clothes, cooks my meals and bosses me about. She still is not my mother. It starts out rather innocently enough as most things do. Then, in my opinion, it gets out of hand. When the children start coming into the home it is quite natural, because they are too young to make such important decisions, for the father to buy the Mothers Day card on behalf of the children. I still remember that rst Mothers Day card. Our rst baby was only seven months old and had no idea what was going on in the world or even in the home. I gave my wife her rst Mothers Day card. She was so excited. Because she was excited, so was I. This is where the whole nonsense starts. What I want to know is when do husbands stop buying Mothers Day cards for their wives? Looking back over my experience, I can see no way where I can opt out of this annual event. The last child in our home left more than 15 years ago, and still, I nd myself under the awesome pressure of purchasing a Mothers Day card for my wife. When do the children take control of this yearly responsibility? In spite of my quandary, it is important to honor both fathers and mothers. Would anybody want to buy a box of 48 Mothers Day cards, cheap? My Mothers Day card quandary Unity Faith Riders The Unity Faith Riders would like to invite everyone to their monthly community breakfast, held at 7 a.m. every fourth Saturday in the month, at the Vernon Fire Department. Breakfast is free, but donations to the ministry are accepted. For more information, call Johnathan Taylor at 768-2444. Welcome All to Blessed Trinity Catholic Church BONIFAY Blessed Trinity Catholic Church would like to invite everyone to attend services. Bible Study is held from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Sunday in the Church Hall. Sunday Mass is held from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., and on Wednesday evening Mass will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 2331 Hwy 177A in Bonifay. Mark Bishop in concert ESTO Mt. Zion Independent Baptist Church will host Mark Bishop live in concert at 7 p.m., Friday, May 16. Come enjoy a night of worship with Mark Bishop, one of Southern Gospels top singers and songwriters. A love offering will be taken at intermission. For more information, call 768-0843. B-Shoc Live CHIPLEY B-Shoc, a Christian music artist, will perform at 6 p.m. Thursday, May 8, at the First Freewill Baptist Church in Chipley. This is a free concert. The church is located at 1387 South Blvd. For more information, call 658-2565. Mothers Day sing BONIFAY New Effort Church in Bonifay will celebrate its 108th Annual Mothers Day Sing at 10 a.m., Sunday, May 11. A covered dish dinner will follow the sing at noon. For more information, call Frankie Short at 547-2996. Pleasant Grove CHIPLEY Pleasant Grove will hold an open mic. sing at 6 p.m. Friday, May 17. Hamburger and hotdogs will be served at 5 p.m. Everyone is welcome. The church is located at Hinsons Crossroads. For more information, call Brother Bufford Williams at 638-1188. Faith EVENTS DR. JAMES L. SNYDER Out to Pastor

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! W ith your paid obituar y family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos fr ee of charge. Find Obituaries. Shar e Condolences. In par tnership with Find obituaries, shar e condolences and celebrate a life at or Theodore Adolph Meinhardt, age 83 of Cottondale, passed away Saturday, May 3, 2014 at his home, surrounded by his loving family. Theodore was born May 28, 1930 in Washington D.C. to the late, Adolph and Lissette (Wagner) Meinhardt. He had been a resident of Jackson County for the past 45 years, coming from Maryland. Theodore was a farmer and in addition to his family, loved talking, carpentry and outdoor sports. He is predeceased by his parents and a sister, Clara Meinhardt. Survivors include his wife of 62 years, Marilyn (Ely) Meinhardt of Cottondale; three sons, Theodore Kirk Meinhardt and wife Catherine of Auburn, Ala., Richard Adam Meinhardt and wife Sondra of Powell Point, N.C., and Andrew Lewis Meinhardt and wife Lillie of Crawfordville; one step son, Robert Owens and wife Carol of Annandale, Va.; three daughters, Lisa Overdorp and husband Lewis of Pensacola, Julie Sasscer and husband Church of Cottondale, and Cristina Jackson and husband Keith of Brooksville; 31 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services were held Monday, May 5, 2015 at 11 a.m., at the family farm, 3209 Aycock Rd., Cottondale, Florida. Cremation followed the service. Those wishing to do so may make contributions to Covenant Hospice, 4215 Kelson Ave., Suite E. Marianna, Fla., 32446 or to Emerald Coast Hospice, 1330 South Blvd. Chipley, Florida 32428. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net. Theodore A. Meinhardt THEODORE A. MEINHARDT Michael Wallace Haile, 66, of Marianna, went home to be with the Lord on April, 29, 2014. Mike was born in Memphis, Tenn., on April 9, 1948. He graduated from Delta State University in 1970. Mike was beloved by his family and friends and will be deeply missed. He was a wonderful father and devoted family man. He is preceded in death by his wife of 38 years, Constance Wilson Haile; his mother, Mary Wieczorek, and stepfather, Stanley Wieczorek. Mike was an active member of Rivertown Community Church, where he took great joy in participating in his small group. Mike worked in the automotive industry for over 30 years and was most recently a valued Finance and Insurance executive for Zurich North America. He is survived by one son, Jeremy Haile (wife Stephanie); two daughters, Sunny Haile Heinrichs (husband Trent) and Courtney Haile Bass (husband Dylan); ve grandchildren, Jacob Haile, Joshua Haile, and Sara Claire Haile and twins, Stephen and Grace Heinrichs; his wife, Ann Christine Haile; two stepchildren, Chantel Hormuth (husband Jeff), and Sarah Escala and four step-grandchildren, Fisher Hormuth, Eli Graham, Sirela Escala and Tyler Clark. The service was ofciated by Pastor Paul Smith at 10 a.m. Friday, May 2, and was held at Rivertown Community Church 4534 Lafayette Street, Marianna, FL 32446. A private burial with the family only was held Friday, May 2, 2014, in Pinecrest Memorial Gardens with Hamp Andrews ofciating and James and Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel directing. No public viewing was planned. Flowers will be accepted or contributions may be made to Rivertown Community Church or Southeast Alabama Medical Center Infusion Lab. Expressions of sympathy may be made online at www. jamesandsikes funeralhomes.com. Michael W. Haile Richard passed away on Friday April 11, 2014 in the Utah Valley Regional Medical Center in Provo, Utah. He was 91. Rich was born in Sanford, Co., on April 6, 1923 to Wm. Alma Crowther and Marcella Christensen, one of two boys and seven girls. He married Shirley Hair in 1942, they divorced in 1970. Together they had four children. He married Elwanda Brock George in Bonifay on Sept. 6, 2008. They came to Utah to live in 2010. Rich was one of the few surviving WWII veterans, having served in the Okinawa invasion. He always acknowledged the protection he received from Heavenly Father during his war time career. He was always proud to wear his Veterans ball cap. He and Elwanda were members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. He loved the Lord, loved life and was a prayerful man. Rich lived a very full life working in lots of different jobs, from Geneva Steel to a catering delivery business in California and Arizona. He was quite a sports enthusiast and loved watching his favorite teams play. He was preceded in death by his parents and ve siblings. He is survived by his wife, Elwanda; daughters, Karen Ann, Launa Kay and Sheri Jo; one son, Richard Gary; several grand; greatgrandchildren and three siblings, Fern Van Sickle, Robert Crowther and Janette Black. Funeral services were held April 16, 2014 at Wheeler Mortuary in Springville, Utah. Graveside services were held April 18, 2014 in the Sanford Colorado Cemetery with Military Rites by the American Legion. Condolences may be sent at www. wheelermortuaries.com. William R. Crowther Carl Cutchins, age 82, of Cottondale, passed away Friday, April 25, 2014 in the Bay Medical Center in Panama City. Carl was born Dec. 30, 1931 in Cottondale to the late Andrew Kyle and Ethel (Simmons) Cutchins. He was a lifelong resident of Cottondale and a U.S. Army veteran of the Korean Conict. Carl was a former corrections ofcer with the State of Florida. In addition to his family he loved shing. He is predeceased by his wife of 30 years, Ruby Cutchins; a brother, Oland Cutchins; two sisters, Erie Braxton and Myrtle Justice. Survivors include three brothers, Orin Cutchins and wife Rachel of Cottondale, Charles Cutchins and wife Inell of Cottondale and Ray Cutchins and wife Judy of Cottondale; two sisters, Vera Holmes of Pensacola and Elizabeth Finch and husband Ronnie of Cottondale and numerous nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Memorial services were held Wednesday, April 30, 2014 at 10 a.m., at Brown Funeral Home, Main Street Chapel with the Rev. Robert Simmons ofciating. Cremation followed the service. In lieu of owers, the family suggests contributions to a favorite charity. Friends and family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. Carl Cutchins Billy Gene Morris, age 67 of Chipley, passed away Friday, May 2, 2014 surrounded by his loving family at Southeast Alabama Medical Center. Billy was born July 1, 1946 in Chipley, to the late Luther and Lois (Hutchins) Morris. He is a lifelong resident of Chipley, a member of the First Baptist Church of Chipley and the Chipley Bass Club. Billy is preceded in death by his son, Keith Morris and brother, Bobby Morris. Survivors include his loving wife, Yasuko Morris of Chipley; one daughter, Michelle Ingram of Chipley; one granddaughter, Becki Ingram of Chipley; one brother, Jimmy Morris and wife Diane of Chipley; four sisters, Margaret Crowder of Panama City, Frances Strickland and husband Robert of Chipley, Hazel Simmons of Wewahitchka and Shirley Johnston of Bonifay. Family received friends for visitation Saturday, May 3, 2014 at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel from 6-8 p.m. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Sunday, May 4, 2014 at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel with the Rev. Mike Orr and the Rev. Randy Peel ofciating. Interment followed at the Wachob Forrest Lawn Cemetery with Brown Funeral Home directing. The family is accepting owers but request donations to be made to the First Baptist Church of Chipley Building Fund P.O. Box 643 Chipley, FL. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh.net. Billy G. Morris Mrs. Annie Alice Jacobs, 80 of Bonifay, died on Monday, April 28, 2014, at Gulf Coast Medical Center in Panama City. Born Thursday, July 20, 1933 in Geneva County, Ala., she was the daughter of the late Earl Evans and the late Nancy Barnes Evans. She was the head of the family counsel program at the Bonifay Nursing Home and more recently a volunteer with Hospice. She is survived by her husband, James Jacobs; a son, Scott Jacobs of Atlanta, Ga., and sisters, Edra McKnight of Orlando and Jimmie Ramos of New Iberia, La. A Funeral service was held at 2 p.m., on Thursday, May 1, 2014 at First United Methodist Church with the Rev. Charles Fail ofciating. Interment followed in Bethlehem Methodist Church Cemetery, Bonifay with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 1 to 2 p.m., on Thursday, May 1, 2014, at First United Methodist Church, Bonifay. Annie A. Jacobs Julia Vanno Holmes was born in Dillonville, Ohio, on July 15, 1923, to parents who came to this country from Hungary seeking a better life. She was one of four children in the family, all of whom were raised in a home where hard work was a way of life. Her father worked as a coal miner from the time he was a pre-teen until he was in his mid-50s and her mother supplemented the family income by cooking and cleaning for boarders to whom Julias family rented rooms. Even as a child, Julia was known for her compassion for all living things and a truly sweet and giving disposition. After graduating from high school, Julia attended and graduated from Roanoke Business College a feat which was not as common for women then as college graduation is now. After graduation, Julia lived and worked in Washington, D.C., and Corpus Christi, Texas, until World War II ended when she married a young Navy pilot named Ed Holmes, to whom she remained married for 54 years until his death in 2004. Julia and Ed ultimately settled in Marianna, where they raised their two children, Dianne and Donald, and where Julia was employed with what was then known as the West Florida Telephone Company for over 23 years, and Ed worked as a ight instructor at Graham Air Force Base until its closure when he found employment as a pilot with the State of Florida. While Julia worked outside the home to provide needed income to help support her family, the best work she performed was in the home where she was the proverbial glue that kept her family together and where she placed the interest of every member of her family above her own. She never lost the genuine compassion that she held as a child for all living things, or the sweet and giving disposition that made her a valued friend to those who knew her and a pleasant and positive experience to those with whom she came into contact. Julia was a devoted and steadfast mother, wife, sister, daughter and friend to those in her life. She served in all of these roles in a manner that would be hard to equal. She will be greatly missed. Julia was preceded in death by her parents, William and Mary Vanno; her husband, Edward A. Holmes; her brother, Bill Vanno and her sister Margaret Carter. She is survived by her son, Don Holmes; daughter, Dianne (Gary) Gish; grandchildren, Ashley Holmes, Julianne (George) Young, Justin Gish and Molly Gish; great grand-son, Jackson Wyatt Young and sister Elizabeth (Dominic) Alecci. Funeral services were held Friday, May 2, 2014 at 11 a.m. at James & Sikes Maddox Chapel with Dr. Ted Land ofciating. Entombment was in Chapel of The Pines Mausoleum at Pinecrest Memorial Gardens in Marianna. James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel will direct. The family received friends at 10 a.m., Friday, May 2, 2014 at James & Sikes Maddox Chapel. Expressions of sympathy may be made online at www. jamesandsikesfuneral Julia V. Holmes Richard Ryals Geezer 62, of Dothan, Ala., passed away April 24, 2014 after a brief illness. His devoted wife and best friend Kathy, was at his side. He was a member of Bear Creek Assembly, Panama City, and attended Southside Baptist Church of Dothan. Richard was an avid hunter, love to sh, and loved the Lord. He had faith and hope to the end, no matter how tough the illness was he had such Courage and Boldness. Richard was employed by Martin Brower Inc. of Atlanta. A very special loving thank you to his friends and caregiver Dot Bravo and husband Jose Bravo. Survivors are his wife Kathy of 23 years; his son Richard Allen Ryals (Tammy); grandson, Colton Joshua and granddaughter, Alixandra Jordan. A celebration of life service for Richard was held at 3 p.m., Sunday, April 27, 2014 at Southside Baptist Church, Dothan, Ala. A time of remembrance will be from 2 p.m., until time of service. Flowers will be accepted or contributions may be made to the Catholic Social Services, C/O Richard Ryals, P.O. Box 6164, Dothan, Alabama 36302. Serving as ushers will be Darrin Frasier, Colton Ryals, Uncle Jeff Tabor and Steve Creamer if anyone needs assistance. Expressions of sympathy may be submitted online www.williamsfhs.com. Williams Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Richard R yals Evelyn Baxley Kinney 91 of Graceville passed away on April 24, 2014 in Chipley. Evelyn is a member of Galilee Methodist Church where she served as a Sunday school teacher and treasure for many years. She retired from Florida Bank of Chipley after 40 years of service. Evelyn began as a teller shortly after high school graduation in 1942 and later became vice president in January 1964 until retirement. She served in various positions of community civic organizations, and after retirement continued to be active in her community. Most recently as a Pink Lady at Northwest Florida Community Hospital. Evelyn was loved by all and will be dearly missed. She was preceded in death by her husband, Richard Kinney; parents, L.L. and Alva Baxley; sister, Wilma Hardy and brothers, Elmer Baxley, B.H. Baxley, Gene Baxley and Jennings Baxley. Evelyn was survived by her brother-in-law, Henry Hardy; sister-in-law, Verdi Croft and numerous nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Services for Evelyn were held at 2 p.m., on Sunday, April 27, 2014 in the Galilee Methodist Church in Graceville. A time of remembrance was held at 1 p.m. Donations may be made in memory of Evelyn Kinney to Galilee Methodist Church, Graceville, Florida 32440. Expressions of sympathy may be submitted online www.williamsfhs. com. Williams Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Evelyn Baxley Kinney Obituaries Crossword SOLUTION

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra T o learn ho w y ou can suppor t our community s univ ersity contact M ar y Beth Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR C OMMUNIT Y S UNIVERSIT Y E ndo wment for T omorr o w s J obs $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL Blue Springs Society Celebrates Thomas Jeffersons Birthday Special to Extra Sunday, April 13, was a time for celebra tion when Blue Springs Society, National Society Children of the American Revolu tion and Chipola Junior American Citizens Club met at MacKinnon Hall of St. Lukes Episcopal Church. It was the 271st birth day of President Thomas Jefferson, and there was a cake in his honor. The Chipola Chapter of the National So ciety Daughters of the American Revolu tion Regent Carolyn Jordan was there to show several certicates the two groups had received from Daughters of the Amer ican Revolution state competition and to award DAR Youth Citizenship medals and certicates to four fth grade recipients. Honored for their service, courage, lead ership, patriotism, and honor were Hailey Harrison, Nathaniel Mann, Virginia Milton, and Laurence Pender. Senior President Mary Robbins presented a Voyager Pin to out-going President Danielle Melvin. The pin indicates that a $50 donation was made to the N.S.C.A.R. Voyager Fund in Danielles honor. Madison Morris re ceived a prize for the best attendance of the year. Members had a chance to see the 27 certicates and two trophies Blue Springs Society brought home from state competition. Mr. Laurence Kinsolving, president of William Dunaway Chapter, Florida Society Sons of the American Revolution installed the new Blue Springs Society ofcers for the 2014-2015 year. The ofcers are as follows: President Madison Morris, Vice President Dillon Melvin, Second Vice President Carly Mill er, Chaplain Gabrielle Melvin, Recording Secretary Adrian Schell, Corresponding Secretary Hailey Harrison, Treasurer Vir ginia Milton, Registrar Laurence Pender, Librarian Danielle Melvin, Curator Issac Pender and Historians Tatum and Anna Beth Milton. Saturday, May 24, historian Dale Cox will be the guide as the two groups learn about the Jackson County Spanish Heri tage Trail. For information please contact Mary Robbins at 209-4066 or bluesprings car@yahoo.com. By CECILY SMITH Emerald Coast Hospice MYTH NO.1: HOSPICE LEADS TO DEATH This represents backwards thinking. Involving hospice in someones care doesnt cause the dying process; it is the other way around. Because someone is already sick and likely dying, the care option of hospice is offered. Hospice does not cause death; the underlying medical condition does. Death is just as likely whether or not hospice becomes involved (well maybe not exactly see Myth #4), because the medical condition is still there, with or without hospice. And the reality of life is that death comes to all living things. MYTH NO.2: HOSPICE IS ONLY ABOUT DEATH AND DYING Explaining why this myth is false also explains why I, as a physician, love practicing hospice medicine. Palliative medicine, as practiced in hospice, is about determining an individuals goals, matching treatments that will reasonably achieve those goals and eliminating treatments that wont, and all the while ensuring comfort is maintained. In other words, hospice is about maximizing quality of life so that life can be lived to its fullest in the setting of a serious and lifethreatening condition. When one is facing such a crisis, both the individual and the family have important things to do. Hospices intention is to facilitate making it possible to get those things done. When hospice does its job, a comfortable death would also be expected, but the emphasis of hospice care is on living, not on dying. It is important to remember that one becomes a candidate for hospice not days or weeks before death is expected, but months earlier. MYTH NO.3: HOSPICE MEANS ACCEPTING DEATH This one is tricky. We tend to naturally think issues are an either/or proposition. We either accept death or we dont accept death. The tricky part is that, in reality, we as human beings do both at the same time. Everyone knows, they are going to die someday, but we operate as if we are immortal. It is harder to achieve emotional acceptance that someday is approaching. When a medical condition occurs that makes death likely, someday is nearer. Hospice is about helping with the day-today quality of life issues (see Myth #2) in the time frame of someday being likely within the next six months. Accepting hospice means someone can still be ambivalent about accepting death, since rational and emotional acceptance does not usually occur at the same time. Name something that almost everyone admires and respects, but no one wants. That describes my particular type of medical practice hospice. As a hospice and palliative care physician with a background in family and geriatric medicine, I have felt a strong desire to help people, treat the ill, and ease distressing symptoms. But I am bothered that people recoil from what I do, even while they think positively about hospice in the abstract. Why is this? I think it all boils down to a kind of misunderstanding. Put simply, there are a lot of myths about hospice that I routinely encounter in my practice. My hope is that if these myths can be addressed and corrected, the publics thinking about hospice might be more accepting and more patients and families will receive the incredible benets of hospice care. MYTH NO.4: HOSPICE MEANS DYING FASTER Common sense says that stopping aggressive, life-prolonging treatments and switching to hospice care means someone will die faster. It turns out that a growing body of evidence proves that commonsense is wrong on this one. When palliative care, with its emphasis on comfort, is added to aggressive treatments, people actually live longer, even when so-called lifeprolonging treatments are stopped sooner. No matter how benecial it may have been earlier in a persons disease management, every treatment reaches a point when it no longer helps. Giving non-benecial treatments can only have no effect or bad effects, including shortening lives. The wonderful thing about palliative care, as provided in hospice, is that my treatments to provide comfort remain benecial until the very end. And it just so happens that making people feel better tends to make them do better and live longer. MYTH NO.5: HOSPICE MEANS GIVING UP HOPE Many feel that accepting hospice means giving up all hope. Those of us who provide hospice care know this just isnt true. Impressive demonstrations of hope are evident among those receiving hospice. What one hopes for changes over time. My hopes when I graduated from high school were different from my hopes on my wedding day, which were also different from my hopes today. Someones hope may be for a cure. I have seen impressive miracles (the only word I have for them) sometimes happen to hospice patients. But if such occurrences were commonplace, we wouldnt call them miracles. An artist acquaintance of mine hoped to complete four of his paintings before his liver cancer stopped him. He accomplished that with the help of hospice. A hope can be as simple as relief from suffering. Other possible goals are very difcult to consider in the presence of severe pain or other suffering. Hospice is very good at bringing reality to the hope of relief from suffering, and it does that without relying on death as the means to this end. Then other hopes become possible. Hope is a very human characteristic. Many have heard the saying Hope for the best, but plan for the worst. This sums up what hospice is about. Hospice does not diminish hope. When hospice has time to do its job, hope blossoms. MYTH NO. 6: HOSPICE IS THE FINAL STOP This one is hard. The nal stop is actually death. As weve already pointed out, death will happen to us all, and hospice may be present at that time. For those who didnt quite accept my discussion of Myth No.1 and still feel that hospice is too interconnected with death to separate the two, I would make another point: not every hospice admission is accompanied by death. The state of the medical arts is not good enough to always predict the dying process. Currently, about one of 10 hospice admissions does not end with a death. I tell my hospice patients well hope for a miracle, and well celebrate if it comes to pass that hospice is no longer needed. However, in the meantime, it is also reasonable to proceed with the plan for the worst part. If there is anything about hospice someone doesnt like, any hospice patient can sign off hospice at any time and restore their previous benets and care. Myths dispelled about hospice care

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B7 WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 -11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 1 p.m.: Caregivers Meeting at Washington County Council on Aging in Chipley for more information call 638-6216 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society 2nd Thursday of each month. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Line Dancing Class for more information call 638-6216 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A FRIDAY 6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30 p.m.: Bead Class every second Friday at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery call 703-0347 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper 4th Friday of every month January September. 6-8 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging 50+ dance club for more information call 638-6216 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Methodist Youth Center in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. SATURDAY The Holmes County Community Health Clinic located at 203 W. Iowa Street, Bonifay, will be open from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., the rst and third Saturday The Alford Community Health Clinic will be the 2nd and 4th Saturdays of each month, from 10 a.m. until the last patient is seen. 10 a.m. to noon: Childrens education day 4th Saturday of every month North Bay Clan Tribal Grounds, 1560 Lonnie Road. SUNDAY 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at GracevilleCampbellton Hospital in Graceville. MONDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Wednesday, May 7, 2014 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 5-3482 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 672009CA000613CAXXXX BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. BONNIE L. STRAUSE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BONNIE L. STRAUSE; GRASSY POND RANCHES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. AKA GRASSY POND HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed April 2, 2014 entered in Civil Case No. 672009CA000613CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Washington County, Chipley, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Washington County Courthouse, 1331 South Blvd, Chipley, FL. 32428 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 21 day of May, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 3 of Saddle Club Estates Unit 1, a Subdivision according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 164 of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. Subject to Easement and Restrictions of Record, if any. MFG Serial #FLHML2F560-14585ABC, HUD CERT #FLA589139, FLA589140 and FLA589141, MFG name Homes of Merit, Model unknown, date of MFG. 03/19/1996, Size 35 X 27, this manufactured home is an improvement to the land and an immovable fixture Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 8 day of April, 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court BY: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk Publish in: Washington County News Invoice: MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 110 SE 6TH STREET FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301 (407) 674-1850 PLEASE FAX A COPY OF THE FIRST INSERTION TO FAX (321) 248-0420 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 (fax 850-747-5717) at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. SERVICE LIST FOR NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE, CASE 672009CA000613CAXXXX MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC 225 E. ROBINSON ST. SUITE 660 ORLANDO, FL 32801 BONNIE L. STRAUSE 4577 QUARTER HORSE LN CHIPLEY, FL 32428 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BONNIE L. STRAUSE 4577 QUARTER HORSE LN CHIPLEY, FL 32428 TIMOTHY J. SLOAN ESQ., (COUNSEL FOR GRASSY POND RANCHES HOMEOWNERS` ASSOCIATION, INC. AKA GRASSY POND HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.) 427 MCKENZIE AVENUE P.O. BOX 2327 PANAMA CITY, FL 32402 CSTAFFORD@SOOANPA.COM UNKNOWN TENANT #1 4577 QUARTER HORSE LN CHIPLEY, FL 32428 UNKNOWN TENANT #2 4577 QUARTER HORSE LN CHIPLEY, FL 32428 April 30, May 7, 2014 5-3483 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION File No.14-27CP Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF HERMAN PAUL FOLSE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Herman P. Folse, deceased, whose date of death was January 17, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Washington County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is April 30, 2014. Attorney for Personal Representative: Lucas N. Taylor Attorney for Personal Representative Florida Bar No. 670189 122B S. Waukesha Street Bonifay, FL 32425 Telephone: (850)547-7301 Fax: (850)547-7303 Personal Representative: Michael D. Folse-Personal Representative April 30, May 7, 2014 Special to the News A natural disaster can strike anywhere at any time and leave in its wake damage and destruction that affects the nancial well-being of survivors. Here are actions to take, depending on your situation, suggested by University of Floridas Institute of Food and Animal Science, Extension Agent Julie P. Dillard. Notify your homeowners, ood or rental insurance company of the loss. Tell them how to best contact you for claims service. Report the loss even if you doubt the loss will be covered. If you lost your insurance policy, request a copy. If you have no place to stay and the shelter is full, you may be able to receive a voucher for a hotel room from the local American Red Cross or Salvation Army. If you have home owners or renters insurance, determine if you have coverage for temporary housing. When feasible, contact employers to inform them of your situation and determine time you may take off of work if needed. Let your employer know how to best contact you. If an employer noties you that your place of employment was severely damaged or destroyed and you cannot work, contact your states unemployment insurance ofce. Ask about eligibility for unemployment benets. If injured or disabled, you may be eligible for disability insurance; contact your agent. If you have natural gas service, call the natural gas company for a safety inspection before entering the home, or request a natural gas shut off for safety purposes. Cancel the account until gas is needed. If the electrical service is unsafe, do not enter. Call the electrical company to disconnect service until repairs can be made and electricity is needed. When authorities have determined that its safe to re-enter your property, assess damages and begin next steps. Document what you have done, with whom you have spoken, actions to take, contact information, deadlines for disaster assistance applications and appointments. Determine if there are other services to cancel for a period of time, such as phone, softener salt delivery or cable television. If you are going to be out of your home or rental unit, provide a change of address to your post ofce. This will ensure that mail continues to be delivered to you. Notify your home mortgage company or your landlord of disaster damage to the property. Tell them how to best contact you. If you have lost your rental or mortgage agreement, request a copy. If you have vehicle damage or loss, contact your auto insurance agent. Find out how long it will take to process your claim. Ask if you have coverage for car rental. Let the agent know how to best contact you. Request a copy of your policy if missing. Do not sign anything from insurance companies indicating that this is a nal interaction/payment to you as other disaster-related damages may surface weeks and months from now. If you anticipate having difculty paying bills, call your creditors and explain the disaster loss. Arrange payment plans before you get an overdue notice. Documentation will be required for property loss claims on homeowners and renters insurance to submit uncovered property losses for income tax purposes and to verify the need for assistance programs. Documentation should include manufacturer, model, serial number, age, value new, approximate current value and damage incurred. Keep receipts and record all expenses related to recovery or rebuild efforts. They may be covered by insurance or assistance programs or deductible on taxes. Remember receipts for lodging, clean-up supplies, eyeglasses replacement and doctor bills related to disaster injury. Community CALENDAR Putting back the pieces after disaster

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, May 7, 2014 B USINESS G UIDE HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson C ounties for 20 Years With Friendly and Reliable S ervice!638-3611HVAC Services Coolers & Freezers Service on all Makes & Models Heat Pumps, Electric & Gas Electrical Services Exterior Elevated LightingResidential and Commerical THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5$25.68 5x10$35.31 10x10$46.01 10x20$80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units ar e Carpeted Easy Care Lawn & Tractor ServiceTree ServiceLawn Care Debris Removal Tractor & Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825 MMitchs CollisionQuality Collision Repair Automotive Renishing326-4104Mitch Gainer, Owner mitch_gainer@att.net 335 Alford Road € Cottondale Florida Panhandle Concrete, LLCFREE Estimates Reasonable Rates 35 Years ExperienceTRAVIS JONES850-693-5812PHIL LIZOTTE850-592-7216 Three Chicks Cleaning Free Quotes Experienced References Available Flexible Hours (M-F) (850) 956-2408 Cell (850) 768-0022 HOLMES UNLIMITEDTREE SERVICETreats Trees € Trimming Stump GrindingNo One Can Beat Our PricesLicensed & Insured Free EstimatesJohn Holmes (850) 326-5351 (850) 428-9264 Great Rate Tree ServiceHazardous Tree Removal Stump Grinding/Removal Aerial Bucket Work Trimming/Pruning Bobcat Work Small Tract Land Clearing Adam Williams Owner/Operator850-768-1734 Advertise your service or business for as little as $10 a week.Ad runs in the Washington County News, Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser638-02125019258 5-3498 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000347 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff, vs. JONATHAN E. WILLOUGHBY A/K/A JONATHAN WILLOUGHBY et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated 4/25/13 and entered in Case No. 2010-CA-000347 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for WASHINGTON County, Florida wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP is the Plaintiff and JONATHAN E. WILLOUGHBY A/K/A JONATHAN WILLOUGHBY; THERESA WILLOUGHBY A/K/A THERESA R. WILLOUGHBY; JOHN DOE, and JANE DOE are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT STEPS OF THE WASHINGTON COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 25 day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 15, BLOCK 172, SUNNY HILLS UNIT FOUR, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGES 42 THROUGH 48 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 4072 FAIRBANKS DR, CHIPLEY, FL 32428 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on April 25, 2014. Harold Bazeel Clerk of the Circuit Court By: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk May 7 and 14, 2014 5-3499 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 67-2013-CA-000121 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. MARVEL ESTES et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated 4/25/14 and entered in Case No. 67-2013-CA-000121 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for WASHINGTON County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA is the Plaintiff and MARVEL ESTES; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARVEL ESTES N/K/A DAN ESTES; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT STEPS OF THE WASHINGTON COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 25 day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST, 15.0 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST, 1383.65 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A 60 FOOT PROPOSED ROAD, 1636.78 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 00 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 330.36 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE ON BEARING OF NORTH 89 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST, 625.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST, 330.36 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST, 624.84 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PROPERTY BEING A PART OF LOT 19, SEMINOLE PLANTATION, CRYSTAL LAKE TRACT, WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2000 GRAND SLAM MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO: VIN# GAGMTD06736A & GAGMTD06736B. A/K/A 5120 KAITLIN TRAIL, CHIPLEY, FL 32428 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on April 25, 2014. Harold Bazeel Clerk of the Circuit Court By: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk May 7 and 14, 2014 5-3489 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-000043 CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. JAMES SCOTT PALMER A/K/A JAMES S. PALMER; DESIREE PALMER; LEISURE LAKES PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE (Please publish in THE WASHINGTON COUNTYNEWS) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 15, 2014, and Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated April 16, 2014, both entered in Case No. 10-000043 CA, of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for WASHINGTON County, Florida. BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and JAMES SCOTTPALMER A/K/AJAMES S. PALMER; DESIREE PALMER; LEISURE LAKES PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; JOHN DOE and JANE DOE; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front Courthouse steps at 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428, at 11:00 a.m., Central Time, on the 21st day of May, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTB-140, FIRSTADDITION TO LEISURE LAKES, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLATTHEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 179 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 3377 CARDINALPLACE, CHIPLEY, FL32428 Dated this 21 day of April, 2014. HARROLD BAZZEL As Clerk of said Court By K. McDaniel As Deputy Clerk Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the Bay County Courts, Court Administration, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402, Phone: 850-747-5327, Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771, Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcour ts.org Submitted by: Heller & Zion, LLP, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 1428 Brickell Avenue, Suite 700, Miami, FL33131, Telephone: (305) 373-8001, Facsimile: (305) 373-8030 April 30, May 7, 2014 ADOPT loving married couple seeks to adopt, will be hands on mom and dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592, Adam Sklar #0150789 Are you pregnant? Considering adoption? A childless, caring and loving, married couple seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON mom and devoted dad. Financial security and emotional stability. All expenses paid. Call/Text Diane & Adam 1-800-790-5260. Devoted, Affectionate, Professional couple will help you, unconditionally love. Hands on with your baby. Maintain contact. Allowed expenses paid. Doug & Liz 866-777-9344 -Susan Stockman-FL # 0342521 The Romantic Novel of the Year! almostdestin.com. CUSTOM HOME 145 acres and 16 Home Sites at Lake Guntersville Some selling Absolute Scottsboro, AL Saturday May 17th 10:00am www.target auction.com 1-800 4733939 djacobs#5060 Lories Treasure Chest Yard Sale, Household items, jewelry, Avon bottles, tv stand, other. Friday/Saturday May 9/10 8a.m.-4p.m. 2886 Sandpath Road, Bonifay. 768-3646 Multi Family Yard Sale. 906 Banfill Ave, Bonifay, Fri & Sat, May 8&9, 7-Until. Furniture, clothes, baby items, etc. Multi-Family Yard Sale Saturday May 10, 8AM-until, 4100 Pate Pond Road, Vernon. Indoor/outdoor yard sale, fig trees, plants, household items and lots of miscellaneous items to numerous to list. Come shop and enjoy a free corndog and drink. Rain or shine. Sellers Welcome. 850-326-1606. YES We’re Having it AGAIN! 5 Family Yard Sale Sat. & Sun., May 10 & 11. 7 till 2:00. 1/4 mile west of 79 on Hwy. 2 at Esto. Clothing-infants to plus sizes, household furnishings, books, knick-knacks. If raining, May 17 & 18. 2430 Kubota Diesel 4-wheel drive. Like new. Only 56 hours. 6 pieces equipment. 8x16 tandom trailer. 638-1858 or 326-9109. Looking for maid for house cleaning, washing clothes, odd jobs around the house, cooking. 850-388-2061. 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-368-1964 Dump Truck Driver full/part time. Drug test required. Must be able to run loader. 638-4630. Food Svc/Hospitality Cook French’s Restaurant is now accepting applications for an Experienced Lunch Buffet Cook. Apply in person Hwy 90 Caryville, FL. 850-548-5800 Web ID#: 34288600 Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. HVAC Accelerated Hands On Training School. National Certifications With Immediate Job Placement. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-877-994-9904 Logistics/TransportClass ACDL DriversNeeded ImmediatelyDump Trailer Experience. $1000 Retention Bonus Walton/Bay/ Washington Counties Panama City Area *Home Nights Apply online: www .perdido trucking.com 1653 Maple Avenue Panama City, Florida 32405 850-784-7940 Web ID#: 34287150 NOW HIRING! Property damage inspectors needed, no experience necessary. Will train. Full-time & part-time. 877-207-6716 www. aaronspa.biz/nowhiring AIRLINE CAREERS begin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial Aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-741-9260 www.FixJets.com EXPERIENCED OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com EOE HOME BASED BUSINESSBE YOUR OWN BOSS. FULL OR PART TIME. EARN UP TO SIX FIGURES, FIRST YEAR. SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY PLEASE www.waynejohnson.myunicity.net Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1 Bedroom Apartment, in Chipley, covenant location, no pets. 638-4640. 2BR/2.5BA Apartment w/private balcony & garage. W/D included. In Bonifay. $600/mth + deposit. 768-0394 or 547-2936. SpaciousOne Bedroom Apartment $475 Everything NEW Stove/Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. 3BR/1.5BA. W&S & yard care provided. No pets. $650.00/mth. Good neighborhood, 2 miles from WalMart. 850-638-4345. Leave message. Bonifay 3bd/2ba Brick, C/H&A No Pets. $620+Dep Call 850-547-9291 House For Rent 2BR/1BAhouse in country setting, stove, fridge, DW, lawn maintenance, water and pest control services included. Application required. No smoking. $625/month plus, $625/Deposit. 850-638-4228. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO and up. Includes Garbage, sewage, and lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 2BR Trailer in Bethlehem area. Call 547-2068. 3BR/2BA MH for rent in Chipley Area. Not far from town. $525.00 to $650.00. 850-638-8570 or 850-258-1594. NO PETS. Mobile Home for rent. South of Bonifay in Washington County. 3BR/2BA Doublewide. $600.00 per mo, $600.00 security deposit. Call Progressive Realty, 638-8220. Mobile Homes For Rent 2 and 3 Bedrooms in Cottondale, Central Heat and Air. $400 -$500 a month. 850-258-1594 or 850-638-8570. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. LOANS FOR LANDLORDS! We Finance From 5-500 Units As Low As 5.5 %. 1-4 Fam, Townhome, Condos OK. Contact B2R: 1-855-940-0227 www. B2RFinance.com 40 Acre Horse Ranch for lease in Chipley, lush pastures, fence/ cross fence, barn and efficiency apt $850 mo. 334-333-2693 Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. RETIRE TO Kentucky’s BlueGrass Country! Enjoy maintenance free living! BRAND NEW LUXURY HOMES Beautiful 3 BR, 3 BA, 1,800 sf, from the low $200’s. Lowest price per sq ft in the area! Mild climate, low taxes, minutes to shopping, dining, medical & Keeneland Horse Racing. Perfect for retirement/ 2nd home. Call now for details: 877-333-2412, Ext. 121 SugarTreeHomes.com Quitting Racing2 Dragsters, Trailers, & Equipment. Many Spare Parts. 355 Chev Circle Track Motor. Turbo Hayabusa Motor. Day: 850-624-5148 Night: 850-265-6466 2004 Honda Shadow Motorcycle. Excellent condition. $3,000.00. 850-260-9085. If you need a loving experienced, dependable, and certified caregiver call Theresa at 850-319-3141. For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8:00am-4:00pm. Call (850)638-1483 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely.



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50 Phone: 850-638-0212 Website: chipleypaper.com Fax: 850-638-4601 For the latest breaking news, visitCHIPLEYPAPER.COM www.chipleypaper.com IN BRIEF NEWSWashington County FromtheAssociatesof Store2114 Volume 90, Number 7Wednesday, MAY 7 2014Kent Cemetery CleaningThere will be a cleaning day at Kent Cemetery Saturday, May 10. Please bring mowers and tools to work with and arrive as early as possible to begin working. The cemetery is located three miles southwest of Alford.Ring14 Walk-a-thonCHIPLEY Roulhac Middle School will host a Walk-A-Thon to raise awareness for Ring14 at 8 a.m., Saturday, May 10. For more information, or to be a participant, visit the website at www. ring14usa.org.Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant CHIPLEY The 58th Annual Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant will be held at 6:30 p.m., Friday, June 6 and Saturday, June 7, at the Washington County Agricultural Center in Chipley. Entry Fee and applications are due to Bush Paint and Supply on or before May 16. For more information, call Teresa Bush at 263-4744 (daytime) or 263-3072 (evenings), or contact Sherry Saunders at 2633554. More details available on Page B2. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSVernon High Schools J.T. Padgett won the title of state champion in his weight class last weekend, becoming only the fth person in school history to do so. The Yellow Jackets placed ninth in state as a team. Members of the 2014 VHS Weightlifting Team pictured are: (Front, from left) Terreaunce Brown, Jaquez Daniels, Zack Weisner, Brandon Malloy, Isaiah Cooke, Justin Oge, Marquez Brown (middle row) Joey Giminez, Khalil Stephens, Michael Evans, Ethan Register, J.T. Padgett, Jonshae Works, Marlon Stephens, Darrion Peterson (back row) Coach Bobby Johns, Bryson Potter, Darrius Peterson, Malik Sheppard, Stoney Long, Jace Baxley. Not pictured are: Austin Brown, Traice Adams, Jordan Cook, Todd Jentink, Ryan Malloy. For more on this winning team, see Page A10.Padgett is State Champ!VHS weightlifters impress at stateBy CAROL KENT638-0212 | WCN_HCT Ckent@chipley paper.com CHIPLEY Like most young boys, ve-year old Cooper Brock and three-year old Cale Dietrich knew just what they wanted for their birthdays. But instead of baseball mitts or toy trucks, these local children wanted to help shelter animals. The cousins, who usually celebrate their birthdays together, asked party guests to forego the usual birthday regalia and bring supplies for Animal Control of West Floridas shelter instead. The boys were very excited about the idea, said Cales mom, Holly Dietrich. We live on a farm, so the love for animals comes naturally to Cale. Both of them were excited at the prospect of helping the puppies and kitties. Shelter Manager Belva Vaughn says she was touched by the boys generosity. The boys have visited us before, and this was very heartwarming, said Vaughn. If we could teach all of our children to have that much com-A gift of givingLocal boys request help for animals in lieu of birthday giftsBy CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY The recent heavy rains that have pummeled Washington and surrounding counties led to a tragedy at the Seacrest Wolf Preserve in Chipley. Seacrest Wolf Preserve owner and operator Cynthia Watkins said the over abundance of rain caused the pond in the Artic Enclosure at the Seacrest Wolf Preserve to overow, breaking the dam and causing a torrent of mud, water and debris to crash down the center of the 15-acre wolf preserve. The event took the life of one wolf and left another missing while causing thousands of dollars in damage for the non-pro t organization. Chaco isnt dangerous; hes just not very acclimated to people, Watkins said of the missing wolf. We saw him last night, and we hope to lure him back in today. We also have the help of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Volunteers from all around have been working day and night to repair the damage which is estimated to be about $50,000. Watkins stressed the preserve is relying on the generosity and compassion of volunteers to donate time, manpower, supplies and money to the cause. We will still be open for tours on Saturday, said Watkins. Weve repaired the visiting area, and our ambassadors are up for visitors. Because we are completely nonpro t, this is the only way we will be able to raise the money needed to repair the damage; through donations and tours. In addition to monetary donations, the preserve is in need of Mudslide devastates preserveSee MUDSLIDE A2 See GIFT A2 INDEXOpinion ................................A4 Outdoors ..............................A9 Sports ................................A10 Extra ....................................B1 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds .........................B7-8 Possum Classic a success B1By CAROL KENT638-0212 | WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY The West Florida Baptist Association is rolling up its sleeves and joining the effort to bring relief to the storm ravaged Pensacola area through coordination with the Southern Baptist Convention. In addition to hundreds being displaced by flooding, the storm caused one death the largest amount of rainfall in a single calendar day since officials started tracking precipitation in 1880, according to the National Weather Service. Director of Missions Forrest Smith and local teams are joining others from across the state in an effort to bring helping hands and reestablish hope to residents of the area but they could use more volunteers. Disaster relief is part of the Conventions ministry, said Smith. Its ran Locals join storm relief effortsCAROL KENT | The NewsForrest Smith, Director of Missions for the West Florida Baptist Association, stands in front of the ministrys supply trailer, which is at the ready to help disaster victims.See RELIEF A2

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LocalA2 | Washington County News Wednesday, May 7, 2014fencing and laborers. Materials needed include fencing measuring about 10 feet tall and 11 gauge fencing, which is the strongest gauge for fences, fencing posts, claps, wires, logs, rocks, dirt and concrete. Labor volunteers should be adapted to heavy labor because there are rocks and debris that need to be removed. Anyone interested in making a monetary donation can mail a check to: Seacrest Wolf Preserve; 3449 Bennett Pond Road.; Chipley, Florida 32428 or donate through their website via PayPal at http:// seacrestwolfpreserve.org/ howtohelp.php. Updates are being made periodically about needs and progress on their Facebook page: https://www.facebook. com/SeacrestWolfPack. For more information, contact The Seacrest Wolf Preserve at 773-2897. J.D.OWENSINC.CARPET&CERAMICOUTLET YOURHOMETOWNLOWPRICE!CARPET,CERAMIC,PORCELAIN,VINYLTILE, LAMINATE,HARDWOOD&AREARUGSYES!WEDOLAYAWAY! TexturedPlushCarpet..........................................................75/SFLooseLayVinyl.....................................................................69/SFSuperThickLooseLayVinyl...............................................99/SF12'X9'6" 12'X12' 12'X12' 12'X12'3" 12'X13'7" 12'X13' 12'X14' 12'X15'4" 12'X16'3" 12'X18'5" 12'X19'3" 12'X21'7" LevelLoop TanFrieze RustPlush TanSpeckled TanFrieze BrownPlush PatternedLoop BrownSpeckled GoldFrieze Med.Brown TanFrieze Lt.TanFrieze $7550$13550$14550$14550$13990$13550$11990$16550$16550$21990$22980$24550SIZE COLOR/STYLE PRICEJ.D.OWENSCARPET &CERAMICOUTLETMarianna,FL (850)526-3619 carpettilemarianna.comLOCATEDBETWEENArrowheadCampgroundsandHopkins,OnHwy90 "ThePlaceToShop,IfMoneyMatters!" OVER200AREARUGS INSTOCK TheGraduationSectionpublishesWednesday,May28. PlaceyouradbynoononWednesday,May14.Sendpersonalcongratulationstoyourgraduatewithanannouncementon theGraduateTributelistingintheGraduationsection.For$15pergraduatewell list:graduatesname,school,upto20wordsofpersonaltribute,andthefamily membersorfriendsponsoringthelisting. Tributepaymentandwordingmustbereceivedby2p.m.Wednesday,May14. Mailordropbyourocesat1364N.RailroadAve.,Chipley,Fla.32428or 112E.VirginiaAve.,Bonifay,Fla.32425. Thisoerisforindividualsonly,notbusinesses.Graduation2014 AnnualGraduation CelebrationSection Featuringseniorsfromthefollowinghighschools: HolmesCounty,Bethlehem,PoplarSprings, PoncedeLeon,Chipley,Vernon,Graceville,CottondaleFordetails,contactyourmedia consultantorcall (850)638-0212 5019256 NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment."WEWELCOMENEWPATIENTS,CALLTODAYFORYOURPRIORITYAPPOINTMENT" FORNEWPATIENTS 59ANDOLDERThiscertificateisgoodforacomplete MedicalEyeExamwithToddRobinson,M.D. InOurChipleyOfficeBoardCertifiedEyePhysicianandSurgeon.Theexamincludesaprescriptionforeyeglassesandtestsfor Glaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases.FORYOURAPPOINTMENTCALL: 850-638-7220ELIGIBILITY:U.S.CitizenslivingintheFloridaPanhandle, 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. CouponExpires:5-30-14 FREEEYEEXAMCODE:WC00 SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances www.mulliseye.comMULLIS EYEINSTITUTEChipleyOffice1691MainSt.,Ste.1 ChipleyFL32428850-638-7220Wearelocateddirectlyacrosstheparking lotfromtheWalmartinChipleyToddRobinson,M.D.BoardCertifiedEyePhysicianand CataractSurgeon passion for animals at that young age, just imagine how much better it would be for all our animals. The shelter, located in Chipley, has 74 dog kennels and is quite often lled to capacity. However, Vaughn works closely with animal rescue groups nationwide to nd homes for as many animals as possible. We do our level best to get the animals adopted after waiting for the claim period to expire, said Vaughn. We are very proactive in rehoming them. The shelter contracts with Washington and Jackson counties and the cities of Chipley, Marianna, Cottondale, Alford, Vernon and Graceville to provide shelter for animals brought in by control ofcers. While the shelter cannot accept monetary donations, items needed include cat food, dog food, blankets, and toys. We cant accept cash, but if you clean out your old linen closet, we love to get old sheets and towels, said Vaughn. Meanwhile, the boys will continue their efforts to make a difference for local animals. Were so very proud of them, said Dietrich. I think they got more out of being able to help the animals than if the guests had brought presents for them to play with instead. Cooper is the son of Mark and Hannah Brock of Chipley, and Cale is the son of Christopher and Holly Dietrich of Graceville. For more information on how to make donations to the Chipley animal shelter, call 638-2082 between the hours of 9 a.m. and noon. SPECIAL TO THE NEWs SFrom left, cousins Cooper Brock and Cale Dietrich used their birthday celebration as an opportunity to perform a good deed for local shelter animals. MUDSLIDE from page A1 GIFT from page A1 PP HOTO BY CC ECILIA SPEARs S | The NewsThe pond in the Artic Enclosure at the Seacrest Wolf Preserve overowed in the wake of the countys recent heavy rains, breaking the dam and causing a torrent of mud, water and debris to crash down the center of the 15-acre wolf preserve.completely on a volunteer basis, but they have one of the largest disaster relief units in the country. Sometimes, the hardest part for storm victims is knowing where to start, said Smith. When youre standing there in the midst of devastation, its good to have both a helping hand and listening ear, said Smith. Our teams help with things like debris removal and mudouts (removing everything from the home from the ooding level down), but were also there to listen. Smith says the relief effort is also an opportunity to minister to those who may have given up hope. A lot of times, people dont understand why someone would drive that far and give up their time. When they turn to you and ask, Why are you doing this?, thats the open door. Were there to meet their immediate physical needs, but were there to meet their spiritual needs as well. Relief team member Tom Poppy of Chipley reported an 80-year old resident was upset because she had nowhere to keep her two dogs, which had been her constant companions for years. Tom couldnt offer a ready solution, but it helped to have that empathetic ear, said Smith. It was clear it meant a lot to her. Smith also stressed that while the Baptist Convention prefers and offers training, volunteers are still sorely needed and welcome to call the ofce to offer their time and services. A lot of people feel like they need to be very young or have special skills to volunteer, but thats just not the case, said Smith. Whatever you can do, you surely have something to offer. For more information on how to donate or volunteer, contact Smith at the Associations ofce at 638-0182. RELIEF from page A1Special to the NewsTALLAHASSEE Governor Rick Scott requested federal assistance for Florida communities Monday to assist in recovery from the recent severe weather and ooding event. Governor Scott also requested a Major Disaster Declaration for Individual Assistance for Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties. After a disaster, our goal is to work as quickly as possible to help communities recover and rebuild, said State Coordinating Ofcer Bryan W. Koon. While no entity can fully erase the impacts of this disaster, federal assistance will go a long way to help those communities return a sense of normalcy. If a declaration is received, then Individual Assistance will be available to individuals in those qualifying counties. Governor Scotts initial request is based on Preliminary Damage Assessments, and may be amended to include additional counties as Preliminary Damage Assessments are nalized. State ofcials, in partnership with the Federal Emergency Management Agency and local county emergency management agencies, will continue to conduct damage assessments as additional counties complete their initial damage assessments. Visit www.FloridaDisaster.org/recovery for details about the damage assessment process and types of assistance that may be available.Governor requests major disaster declaration

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LocalWashington County News | A3Wednesday, May 7, 2014 BeltonePromise HearingAidSystem15%offComesInAllModels*Basedon2Hearingaids. Clean,clear,naturalsound Limit2freepacks percustomer. Expires5/24/2013ONLYAppliestoOptimaOrigin2. Cannotbecombinedwithotheroffers. NotValidonpreviouspurchases. Expires5/24/2013BeltoneBatteriesBuyone16pack, geta8packFree.FREECustomDigital HearingAid$850 Expires5/24/2013 Expires5/24/2013 Expires5/24/2013 Attention:ImportantLimitedTimeOers Expires5/30/2014 Beltone First CallforaFREEHearingEvaluationat aBeltoneHearingCenternearyou. Dopeopleyoutalktoseemtomumble (ornotspeakclearly)? Doyouhaveaproblemhearingon thetelephone? Dopeoplecomplainthatyouturn theTVvolumeuptoohigh? Haveyoueverexperiencedringing inyourears? Areconversationsinrestaurants orcrowdedplacesdifcult? Expires5/30/2014 Expires5/30/2014 Expires5/30/2014 I Save $800.00 Special Financing Options FREE Expires5/30/2014 b e s t b e s t 2013 2013 BillFletcherHAS:BC-HIS 24Years Experience MARIANNA30256thSTREET(850)260-0436Wednesdays&FridaysCHIPLEY1611MAINSTREET#4(850)260-0436Monday-FridayAllenBarnesHAS:BC-HIS 24Years Experience Special to the NewsThe State Emergency Response Team and the Federal Emergency Management Agency began joint preliminary damage assessments to survey damage caused by the ooding incident in the Florida Panhandle. Life saving and recovery efforts are our main focus right now. PDA teams are on the ground working as quickly as possible to assist those impacted by the recent ooding, said State Coordinating Ofcer Bryan W. Koon. Public Assistance and Individual Assistance PDA teams composed of the SERT, FEMA and local emergency management representatives are working together to assess damages across impacted communities. The purpose of preliminary damage assessments is to verify the severity of the impact and to determine the need to pursue a request for federal assistance. Individual Assistance PDAs are conducted in order to estimate disaster impacts to businesses, individuals and families. The determination to provide Individual Assistance is based upon several factors, including but not limited to, concentration and level of damages, trauma suffered by the community, special populations residing in the impacted area, lack of available volunteer agency assistance, underinsured or uninsured populations and cumulative effects of recent multiple disasters. The purpose of Public Assistance PDAs is to estimate disaster impacts on governmental and certain private non-prot entities. For Florida, before a public assistance declaration will be granted, a damage threshold of more than $26 million must typically be met. Preliminary Damage Assessments are initiated by county emergency management agencies. Individuals who have experienced disaster-related damage to homes or businesses should call the local county emergency management ofce to receive disaster-related information and to document damages. Visit www.FloridaDisaster.org/ recovery for details about the damage assessment process and types of assistance that may be available. Due to the impacts of ooding in the Panhandle, Governor Rick Scott signed Executive Order 14-444, declaring a statewide state of emergency, Wednesday, April 30. The State Emergency Operations Center is operating at Level Two activation. For additional information about severe weather in Florida, and to Get A Plan, visit www.FloridaDisaster.org.Holly Kolmetz Memorial Scholarship deadline is May 16Special to the NewsA scholarship in the amount of $1,500 will be awarded to one Poplar Springs High School senior, class of 2014. Another scholarship in the amount of $1,500 will be awarded to a Holmes County High School senior, class of 2014. A 2.5 GPA or higher is required. This scholarship can be used for college or vocational school. See your high school guidance counselor for application forms and details regarding scholarship. Return completed applications to guidance counselor by May 16, 2014. TALLAHASSEE (AP) Florida legislators have signed off on a record $77 billion budget. The Legislature approved a new budget Friday night, right before it ended its annual 60-day session. The Senate passed the budget unanimously, while the House vote was 102-15. The new budget is 3.5 percent higher than last years budget and includes a boost in funding for schools, child welfare and projects to battle water pollution. Legislators came into the annual session with a $1.2 billion budget surplus. They used part of the surplus to pay for $500 million in tax and fee cuts, including a rollback in auto registration fees. But the extra money also enabled them to spread it around on dozens of hometown projects. The budget heads next to Gov. Rick Scott, who can veto individual spending items. The vote closes out a hectic nal day that was expected to set the stage for a crucial election year when Scott and most legislators will be on the ballot. In the nal hours, legislators approved a measure that would allow the sale of a strain of lowTHC marijuana for medical use. They also voted to allow students living illegally in the country to qualify for in-state tuition rates for college. Both decisions were unthinkable in the last decade for many GOP lawmakers. Scott is expected to sign both. Its a great day for all of our students that want to live the American dream, Scott said shortly after the vote on the instate tuition bill. The Legislature also passed a sweeping bill aimed at overhauling the child-welfare system. The bill states that protecting a child from abuse is paramount and more important than keeping a family together. Thats a signicant shift for the Department of Children and Families, which has placed a premium on putting fewer children in foster care. Lawmakers also voted for a bill that will allow the Florida Supreme Court to grant law licenses to non-citizens. And in a turnabout from last year, the Legislature passed a bill that would allow professional sports teams to qualify for taxpayer money. A similar bill died during the 2013 session. Legislators also approved the expansion of Floridas privateschool voucher program for lowincome children. But a big focus on the last day was the money. The states economic recovery gave lawmakers the luxury of having a $1.2 billion budget surplus even after they had paid for school enrollment and other pressing needs such as growth in the states Medicaid program. Most of that surplus was set aside for $500 million in tax and fee cuts, including a rollback in auto registration fees that was signed into law earlier this spring by Scott. The rest of the tax cuts included a three-day back-toschool sales tax holiday in August, as well as tax holidays for hurricane preparation supplies and energy-efciency appliances. Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, insisted the Legislature was not awash in cash. And House Speaker Will Weatherford said lawmakers had acted responsibly because they left about $3 billion aside for reserves while also cutting taxes. This has been a scally conservative year, but at the same time there are some needs in the state and we are trying to focus on them, Weatherford said. But that didnt stop legislators from spreading millions to hometown projects ranging from $2 million to help build an observation tower in downtown Miami to money to expand a gun range in Brevard County. I am going to go home and brag about what we have done, said Sen. Allan Hays, R-Umatilla. Some Democrats, meanwhile, questioned some of the spending priorities, especially the continued resistance of GOP lawmakers to accept federal funding to expand Medicaid coverage. The Legislature has refused to accept the money because it is tied to President Barack Obamas health care overhaul. Were moving in the right direction, said Rep. Elaine Schwartz, D-Hollywood. Theres more money around but theres a problem with priorities.State budget of $77B approved Preliminary damage assessments surveys have begun in Panhandle

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HAVE SOMEThHING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for verication purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. OPINIo O N www.chipleypaper.comWednesday, May 7, 2014 APage 4Section POSTMASTER: en SSend address change to: Washington County News P.O O Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 USSPS S 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $20; 26 weeks: $28.70; 52 weeks: $48.60OUT OF COUNTY13 weeks: $24.30; 26 weeks: $36.40; 52 weeks: $60.70 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2014, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COpPYrRIghtGHT NOtTIcCE: T he entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bareeld, Publisher Carol Kent, EEditor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN N _HCT T CONTACT US PUBLIShHER Nicole Bareeld: nbareeld@chipleypaper.comen NNEwWS, SpPORTS OR OpPINION news@chipleypaper.com CLASSIfFIED & cCIRcCULATION 850-638-0212 clamb@ chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 EDITOREDITOR Carol Kent: ckent@ chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212en AADVERTISING Jessica Collins: jcollins@chipley paper.comen Mothers possess knowledge unknown to the rest of society. Years of research has taught them the exact location of every public bathroom in town, and they can calculate the most efcient route between the T-Ball eld, dance studio, and dry cleaners. They also have ESP powers that rival those of Santa Claus, for you can bet they know when their children are sleeping or awake, behaving badly, or being good. Moms know instantly if it was little Johnny or sister Susie who broke their favorite decorative vase. They can tell if their children are really OK when asked how their day at school went, or if, in reality, their little girl or little boy is nursing their rst broken heart. Yes, its safe to say Mom knows a great deal more than their children realize. Mothers also have an innovative way of dealing with unexpected situations that qualify them to run any emergency preparedness task force. The joke in my house every morning is for me to ask, OK, who needs an orange juice can? This is in reference to a childrens song by Joe Suggs. In that song, a mother is getting children ready for school and is told, By the way, I need an orange juice can, four cotton balls and six rubber bands... also, Im an angel in the play. Im gonna sing, and I need some wings. The distressed mother hurriedly gathers most the items from around the house, digs a lemonade can from the trash (it will have to do), and loans the child his sisters buttery wings from ballet to wear in the play. What mother hasnt had to be inventive when faced with such last minute requests from a forgetful child? Mothers continue to help with those needs, even as we grow in adulthood. Even at my age, I will occasionally ask my mother for an orange juice can. Its amazing how these women balance being leaders at church or work, while holding their families together and being empathetic ears to other moms. Some may feel its cliche to state we should celebrate Mothers Day every day, but why not think of these women every day? We can be sure they are thinking of us. Happy Mothers Day, Mom. Sorry about the vase. Moms dont just know best; they know it all CAROL KENTEditor My family, friends, former WBGC Radio listeners for twentytwo years and Prattler readers for the past eleven years, know of my avocation in bluegrass, bluegrass-gospel and the old time music. Early in April when the Spanish Trail Playhouse, directed by Jimmy Miller, presented an evening concert of bluegrass music by Deep South, a group from Panama City, Perry and Hester Wells absence from the performance almost caused an all points bulletin being sent out to determine where we were and if everything was alright in our lives. The question continues to be asked three weeks later, Why did the Wellses miss the bluegrass concert? The last one asking the question was Sherry Myers Biddle, who lives in listening distance of the former Northwest Florida Music Park. She vividly recalls the Wells Family promoting and staging Bluegrass and Traditional Music Festival in the 1980s and 90s. She and her young son, Brandon, could sit in their back yard and easily hear the music and identify the performers. Her nephew, Kevin Russell, and others, are responsible for resurrecting the Spanish Trail Playhouse eight years ago after it fell by the wayside in the mid 1960s after enjoying several successful years of producing a variety of musical and plays. Thankfully, Hesters medical issues have improved to the point that we can reestablish our almost perfect record of attending all the shows presented at the Playhouse Theater. One of my favorite artist, dating back to my early interest in music, was a gentlemen by the name of Lew Childre. The Wells Family were regular Saturday night WSM Radio listeners to the Grand Ole Opry, dating back to the first radio in our home in the mid 1940s. It was a battery powered table model, with the battery weighing three time more than the radio itself. Shelby Barber, who came into our home at the age of 16, ordered this mysterious innovation from Sears, Roebuck and Company. Our very first experience with radio was when our dad, Hugh Wells, purchased one for installation in his pick up truck. It, too, attracted nearby neighbors, who gathered at the Wells Home on Saturday nights to listen to the Opry, but its main purpose was to allow our father to listen to Lum and Abner, a fifteen minute daily broadcast, coming from the make believe small town of Pine Ridge and was sponsored by Horlicks Malted Milk. The battery in the vehicle did not allow for extended use of the radio, thus the unit in the home was a really a step forward in radio listening. Lew Childre was always intriguing to hear on radio. It was exciting to know that he called Opp, Alabama his home. Even though I had never been there, I knew it was not far from Andalusia, Georgiana and Red Level, where our kindred, the Wells Family, migrated from. Later some of our kin on the Brock connection moved to Greenville, Alabama to work in the cotton mills. I recall they came back to Florida by rail for visits with family. The train brought them from Georgiana to Graceville. I guess your writer secretly felt somewhat of a kinship to the entertainer although he lived and died without me ever having seen the man. Lew Childres exit from the Saturday night Grand Ole Opry stage went like this: Well, well, this is the old boy, Lew Childre, from Alabam saying goodnight to my mammy down in Opp, Alabamy. He would then strike a few more chords, cording the guitar with a bar, thus making him the frontrunner in steel guitar playing. Then came his parting words, So Long!! The liner notes of an LP record of Lew, which the Prattler purchased many years after it was released, is entitled On The Air1946Volume I and has some interesting comments on the entertainer, prepared by Dr. Charles Wolfe, musical historian. Lew was born in Opp, Alabama in 1901, just a few miles from the Florida line. Lews father was a county judge in Opp and he was amused, then embarrassed, as young Lew, at age 7 or 8, would be found standing on street corners in downtown Opp and buck dancing for any passer-by who would give him a nickel. This whetted the appetite in young Lew, and from then on he was fascinated with show business, explains this excerpt from Dr. Charles Wolfes liner notes. Lew Childre became known for his hillbilly antics as he carried forth his career in comedy and tap dancing as he sang his novelty songs which include Horsey keep Your Tail Up, Hang Out Your Front Door Key, Everybodys Fishing and Riding The Elevated Train. A variety of hats and a pair of brown and white Wing Tips Shoes were Lews trademark as he performed his comedy in songs. Occasionally, he would sing a serious song including Little Joe The Wrangler, Rock All Our Babies To Sleep, How I Miss You Tonight and When The Fog Forms on the Rio Grande. After our move to Chipley, I recall Tillman Pippin telling me that Mr. Mack S. Huggins knew Lew Childre as the Chipley business man also grew up in Opp. I missed an opportunity to get some firsthand information on the entertainer from Mr. Mack, which I have always regretted. Saturday, May 3, was celebrated in Opp, Alabama as the towns eighth Lew Childre Day Tribute to the well known entertainer, who died December 3, 1961 at age 60. A Steel Guitar Festival was also included in this daylong event, concluded with a stage appearance by Stonewall Jackson, a well known country music star, who continues to make public appearances although approaching the age of 82. My brother, Max, and I were joined by granddaughter, Julie Wells, in making the trek to Opp for the celebration and merriment. I hope to write a second segment on the life and times of Lewis Everett (Lew) Childre, who left us too early in life. Included in that writing will be more on Lew Childres life and the entertainers who came to his hometown to honor him May 3. See you all next week.Lew Childre made music and memoriesPERRYS pPRATTLE Perry Wells SS outherlands voting record speaks for itselfDear Editor, Before we move into high gear with the political season this year, lets review what Congressman Southerland has (or hasnt) done for us in the past year or so regarding jobs, our economy, and fairness. He and his colleagues shut down the government, costing the economy $24 Billion in economic growth; he wouldve thrown the federal government into default, making it more expensive both for the government and the average citizen and small business to borrow monies due to higher interest rates, and slowing the creation of jobs. He and his colleagues in the House voted to pass Republican Paul Ryans budget plan, which among other things: (1) raises taxes on middle class families with children while lowering taxes on millionaires by an average of $87,000 apiece; (2) cuts monies to Medicare, the health care for our seniors; and (3) cuts monies for early education, pell grants, and job training, all essential for folks to get a fair shake for jobs in todays workforce. Congressman Southerland has consistently been against spending necessary monies to rebuild Americas/North Floridas crumbling infrastructure, whether it be roads, bridges, transit systems, wastewater facilities and what have you, depriving many people of employment opportunities. Hes been against increasing the minimum wage at all, and we all know that no one can support a family on the current minimum wage, much less pump necessary monies into the economy to create more needed jobs for people. Hes been against the Paycheck Fairness Act, which would work to equalize pay for the same work between men and women, where currently a woman only earns on average 83% of what a man does, and that takes necessary monies both out of peoples immediate households but also out of the overall economy which, again, would create more and better paying jobs for people. Yes, Congressman Southerland in the upcoming election might say popular statements about jobs and the economy to keep/gain your support, but his actual votes and positions show the truth of where hes really coming from and you need to remember this come when its time for you to cast your votes in November. Sincerely, John HedrickTallahassee Letter to the EDITOR SpSP Ec C IAL TO ThTH E NN Ew W S From the album cover of a second album, OOld Time Get-Together, by Lew Childre, released by Starday Records in 1975 and owned by the Prattler.

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LocalWashington County News | A5Wednesday, May 7, 2014By BEN KLEINE and VALERIE GARMAN522-5114 | @The_News_Herald pcnhnews@pcnh.com MARIANNA Of the coun ties around Bay County, Mother Nature was the most unkind to Jackson County on Wednesday. As of 4 p.m., there were 70 roads closed, most of them unpaved, dirt roads, although a section of State 167 was closed. There was widespread ooding dam age in the area, $14 mil lion and counting, Emer gency Manager Rodney Andreasen said. Three tornadoes touched down in Jackson County overnight, and one destroyed an un occupied home. Two other homes sustained damage with residents inside, but no one was injured, Andreasen said. He said county work ers were trying to x ood ing by unclogging pipes. With it wet like this, its almost impossible to do anything, he said. The Red Cross Central Panhandle Chapter, which covers Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson and Wash ington counties, remained on standby Wednesday afternoon. Weve been trying to make sure were doing ev erything we can for our six counties, Executive Direc tor Bob Pearce said. Its not over for us. Of the chapters cover age area, Pearce said the worst ooding was seen in Washington, Holmes and Jackson counties. The most severe ood damage, how ever, occurred to the west of their coverage area, in Pensacola on the Alabama Gulf Coast. Fortunately for us, we may just be a small part of a big weather event, said Pearce, who added the lo cal chapter is working to deploy volunteers to aid and help assess damage in those areas. Those interested in making a donation can visit RedCross.org or text redcross to 90999 to make an automat ic $10 donation that will be deducted from their phone bill. Dona tions also can be mailed or brought to the Red Cross Central Panhan dle Chapter headquarters in Panama City. Our money will be used to help disaster victims, because there are a ton of them across nine or 10 states that the Red Cross is working in, Pearce said. Its huge. Calhoun County still had several roads closed Wednesday af ternoon, including Wal ter Potts Road and 10 Mile Creek. State 69A has been reduced to one lane in one area. Holmes County closed 25 roads Wednesday. Sheriffs ofce dispatcher Cricket Hall said no ood damage was reported. Washington County closed six roads Port Pond Road, Johns Way, Douglas Ferry Road, Cat sh Alley, Treasure Terrace and Island Avenue but reported problems on sev eral others. Gulf County had no roads closed as of 4 p.m. EDT, dis patcher Jennifer Mathes said. Gulf County did sus tain minor ooding on St. Joe Beach. Franklin County received very little ooding and did not have to close roads. We lucked out more than some people did, Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce dispatcher Phyllis Turner said. Schools in Holmes and Washington counties will be closed Thursday. Safety of the students, including during transpor tation, is always considered at these times, Washing ton County Superintendent of Schools Joseph Taylor said. We have to consider the importance of getting the students home after school when the conditions may have deteriorated during the day and plan accordingly. AVAILABLEFORLEASE 495St.JohnsRoad,Bonifay,FlmileoffI-10(Bonifayexit) 18,000s/fBuildingw/LoadingDock 3phasepowerCONTACT:JACK@850-239-0039 Wealsotakecareof (850)638-5885 MostVehicles Upto5qts. syntheticblend MostVehicles $1995 3 tornadoes touch down in Jackson County Weve been trying to make sure were doing everything we can for our six counties. Its not over for us. Bob Pearce executive director for Red Cross Central Pnahandle Chapter Ka A DYn N Car AR TEr R | Special to The News HeraldGoodman Hill Road near Wausau in Washington County is washed out.

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LocalA6 | Washington County News Wednesday, May 7, 2014 638-4875 MARIANAJEWELRY KingsDiscountDrugs 1068MainSt Chipley,FL32428(850)638-4010Wishingallthe MomsaBlessed Mother'sDayBrownFuneralHome From: Dan&Nina Brownand StaofBrown FuneralHome 1044U.S.90|Chipley,FL32428(850)638-8376 CS CU 42985thAvenue/Marianna,FL32446/850.482.5787/www.jacksonhosp.com Youhave40weekstogetreadyforthebigday,andour obstetricianscanhelpbyensuringyougettheright prenatalcare,answeringyourquestions,andkeeping awatchfuleyeonyouandyourbabythroughout yourpregnancyanddelivery. Toscheduleanappointmentwith Dr.RickyLefforNursePractitioner MichelleBaber,pleasecall 850.482.5787 RickyLeff MD,FACOG MichelleBaber MSN,ARNP-BC BabyontheWay? By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com LYNN HAVEN Several hundred employees will be laid off from the General Dynamics call cen ter in Lynn Haven in the coming week, according to a notice post ed by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity. General Dynamics opened the call center in October and notied the public of plans to lay off 726 employees in late February, as required under the federal  Work er Adjustment and Retraining Notication Act, or WARN Act. Under the WARN Act, an em ployer must provide at least a 60-day notice in advance of mass layoffs to all affected workers, the appropriate unit of local gov ernment and the state dislocated worker unit. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services contracted General Dynamics to open the call center at the old Sallie Mae building last October, where about 1,500 employees were recruited to answer questions regarding enrollment in the Affordable Care Act. General Dynamics will con tinue operations in Lynn Haven with about 360 employees, who will help assist consumers with ACA Marketplace questions and support, according to CMS. Because the ACAs open en rollment period was limited, of cials with CMS, a federal agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, said many of the jobs at the Lynn Haven call center were seasonal. General Dynamics has been quiet about the layoffs since February, refusing an offer from local workforce organiza tion CareerSource Gulf Coast to assist displaced workers with re-employment. Maria Goodwin, director of workforce services for Career Source Gulf Coast, said her or ganization received a stream of phone calls this week from those facing layoffs. Based on our phone calls, we believe their last day is today, Goodwin said Friday. Really, theyre concerned on how they can le for unemployment and when they can le. Goodwin said that while Ca reerSource Gulf Coast hosted a series of job fairs to aid General Dynamics with hiring last year, the company was not interested in having a representative on-site to help employees facing layoffs. We were really involved when they were doing the re cruiting and trying to hire peo ple, but theyve been really distant, Goodwin said. We havent really been involved since they announced the layoffs a couple of months ago. Goodwin said the organization also saw a stream of General Dy namics employees that quit fol lowing the layoff announcement, making them ineligible for state re-employment assistance. Kim Bodine, executive direc tor of CareerSource Gulf Coast, said that because the layoffs are occurring before the summer, there likely will be several busi nesses hiring in Panama City Beach. The good thing is that this is the time of year we have more jobs available, mostly in tour ism, Bodine said. Its not an exact crosswalk, although some of them can be. Bodine said many of the call center employees hold skills nec essary for the many clerical and administrative positions in the hospitality industry. Its never a good thing to lose 700 jobs, Bodine said. Its not a perfect situation, but if it has to happen, Im glad it happened during this time of year. Layoffs begin at General Dynamics Ne E WS He E Ral AL D FIle LE Ph H OTO More than 700 employees of General Dynamics will be laid off.

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LocalWashington County News | A7Wednesday, May 7, 2014Special to the News TomoTherapy, a stateof-the-art radiation therapy system that delivers precise imageguided radiation therapy, allows veterinarians to pinpoint a tumors size, shape, and location seconds before radiation therapy begins. Though fairly expensive and meticulous, the benet and accuracy of this treatment certainly exceeds the costs when your best friends life is at stake. TomoTherapy literally means slice therapy, said Dr. Michael Deveau, assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. While standard radiation therapy is currently delivered using a few static elds, helical TomoTherapy delivers treatment with a rotating beam. Performing a 360 degrees rotation around the patient, this allows for accurately directing radiation dose at the tumor itself while minimizing dose to the neighboring normal tissues. As the location or shape of the tumor evolves over time, the angles and intensity of the beams are also adapted to enhance the accuracy of the treatment. The TomoTherapy concept evolved to address deciencies in radiation therapy and provides more precise radiation delivery to the tumor, allowing for fewer side effects to normal tissue, said Deveau. It basically is hybridization between all the functional parts of a conventional C-arm style linear accelerator, a commonly used machine for radiation delivery in human and veterinary patients, and a diagnostic imaging CT scanner. Radiation is not a benign form of therapy, and tolerance to it is dependent on tumor type, tumor volume, and the volume of normal tissue irradiated. The objective of radiation therapy used to treat cancer is to eradicate the disease without producing unacceptable normal tissue complications, said Deveau. The tolerance to radiation of normal tissues depends on the volume and dose received. Unique to this radiation technique, the tumor itself is being treated while excluding or minimizing the dose to surrounding normal tissue structures. The conformal radiation beams provide more assurance that the dose will be conned to the tumor, in turn, producing far more favorable toxicity proles when compared to similar treatments with inferior techniques and machines. Ranging anywhere from $6,000 to $7,000 for a four-week session, this treatment only lasts for an average of 20 minutes, but the preparation is fastidious. Combining linear radiation therapy and CT scanning technology, TomoTherapy has the ability to treat tumors that were once considered untreatable and offers new armament for modernizing the management of cancer in veterinary patients. Suitable for almost all clinical presentations, it is one of the best, if not the best, machine for treating large complex tumors or clinical presentations requiring extended treatment elds, said Deveau. When it comes to our beloved pets, this hightech therapy brings high hopes for their ability to live long, healthy lives.About Pet TalkPet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at vetmed.tamu.edu/pettalk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to editor@cvm.tamu.edu. AuthenticVietnameseCuisine ? PhoNoodle &Kaboodle TreatMomtolunchordinner onherspecialday!2005S.WAUKESHAST.,BONIFAY547-1907fromallofusat NowOpenonSundays! asafersalonyougetyourowntools Momsfavoriteplacefora YOUCANTGOWRONG since97%ofourclientsaremothers. VOsNails&Tailoring Mother'sDayAppreciationSALE SowellTractorCo.,Inc.2841Hwy.77North,PanamaCity www.sowelltractorco.com SowellandKubota 40YearsofTrustedPerformance WeTrade forAnything ThatDont Eat! Financing Arranged (WAC) By RICKY WArRD, DDrama DDirector Special to The News BONIFAY The Holmes County High School Drama Department will present the musical Cats at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 8, Friday May 9, Saturday May 10, Monday May 12, and Thursday May 15 at the HCHS Auditorium. Cats is a musical composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber, based on Old Possums Book of Practical Cats by T. S. Eliot, and produced by Cameron Mackintosh. The musical tells the story of a tribe of cats called the Jellicles and the night they make what is known as the Jellicle choice and decide which cat will ascend to the Heaviside Layer and come back to a new life. Cats also introduced the song standard Memory. Cats rst opened in the West End in 1981 and then on Broadway in 1982. It won numerous awards, including Best Musical at both the Laurence Olivier Awards and the Tony Awards. The London production ran for 21 years, and the Broadway production ran for 18 years, both setting new records. Actresses Elaine Paige and Betty Buckley became particularly associated with the musical. One actress, Marlene Danielle, performed in the Broadway production for its entire run (from 1982-2000). Cats is the second longest-running show in Broadway history and was the longest running Broadway show in history from 1997-2006. It has been performed around the world many times and has been translated into more than 20 languages. In 1998, Cats was turned into a made-fortelevision lm. The cast and crew of 48 will entertain you with spectacular music, dance, lighting and special effects. Tickets for the production are on sale. Tickets are $5 in advance and $7 at the door. For more information or to reserve tickets, call HCHS at 547-9000. Ri I CKy Y War ARD | Special to Times-AdvertiserThe Holmes County High School Drama Department are more than ready to take the stage after hours of practice and preparation of their upcoming production, Cats.HCHS Drama to present CatsTomoTherapy: High-tech therapy delivers high hopes PEtT Ta ALK

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LocalA8 | Washington County News Wednesday, May 7, 2014Bill to raise Florida speed limits goes to Gov. ScottTALLAHASSEE (AP) The speed limit on Florida highways would increase from 70 to 75 mph under a bill the House narrowly passed Wednesday, despite arguments that it would lead to more deaths. The measure passed on a 58-56 vote and now goes to Gov. Rick Scott. Among lawmakers who argued against it was a man whose daughter died in a car accident, a former police ofcer who has noti ed families their children have died in accidents and a funeral director who said he has seen his share of victims. You never want to get that call: Your daughter died in a car crash. Well I got the call, and one of the reasons she died was because of speed, said Rep. Irv Slosberg, D-Boca Raton, who has made road-safety issues a priority during his time in ofce. The bill (SB 392) would not raise speed limits auto matically, but would allow the Department of Trans portation to increase them when it saw t. The de partment could also raise the speed limit from 65 to 70 mph on rural, four-lane divided highways and up to 65 mph on other roads. Bill sponsor Matt Caldwell said that it could be unsafe if a speed limit is set lower than drivers are actually driving. I know that there are individuals on the oor who have deep personal expe riences that drive their decision making, said Caldwell, R-Lehigh Acres. The law is not an emo tional vehicle. Its a matter of logic and reason. There were several emotional stories during the debate. Rep. Dave Kerner, DLake Worth, said there were four times when he worked as a police ofcer that he had to tell families a relative had died in a crash. I remember one time going at 3 in the morning and I took an extra lap around the block because I was so scared to wake a mother up and tell her that her child had died, he said. Theres nothing worse for a law enforce ment ofcer. Rep. Dennis Baxley ad mitted he gets a speeding ticket almost every year, but as a funeral direc tor, he said he has had to stand by the casket of traf c accident victims and he couldnt support a bill that could lead to more deaths. Im Dennis Baxley. Im a speeder. I cant vote for this bill, said Baxley, R-Ocala.By ZACK McDONALD747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY More than a decade of trafc issues on the Hathaway Bridge are set to get some relief. Over the next two years, the Florida Department of Trans portation will spend $102 million on the nal leg of a massive, de cade-spanning series of projects aimed at easing the ow of trafc over the bridge. However, despite the presence of FDOT workers at times, designs only are about 90 percent complete and com muters on Bay Countys busiest road will not see construction at the bridges eastern base begin until summer 2015. Design plans are expected to be nal shortly after a July public comment meeting, FDOT spokesman Ian Satter said. If we have a lot of people with concerns about a certain aspect of the project, we can go back and see if there is anything we can tweak, he said. We dont want to come to people with 100 percent of plans complete with out their input. Although some aspects of the project could change, at com plete build-out neither trafc lights nor train arrivals to Port Panama City will impede the ow of trafc from one side of the Ha thaway Bridge to the other. Ultimately, the project will elevate parts of U.S. 98 so it bypasses the 23rd Street inter section, the railroad crossing at Port Panama City and trafc lights at Gulf Coast State Col lege. Motorists heading west from 23rd Street also will be able to merge onto U.S. 98 without interference and vice-versa. The stretch of road lead ing from the Hathaway to 23rd Street will be expanded to four lanes. The nal project reliev ing congestion across the Ha thaway does not come cheap, though. Engineering and con struction costs in 2014 will run about $7 million, and FDOT will spend almost $95 million hiring contractors in 2015. Then con struction can begin in late sum mer of 2015. FDOT has secured all prop erty required for the project, and some businesses along the south shoulder of U.S. 98, east of the Hathaway, will remain open until spring of 2015, Satter said. Phase I of construction con sists of not just the westbound ramps and roadways from 23rd Street and U.S. 98, but also an alternate lane for U.S. 98 dur ing construction. Phase II is the construction of the eastbound ramps and roadways leading away from the Hathaway. The construction of the Ha thaways rst yover where Thomas Drive, Front Beach Drive and Panama City Park way all converge reached completion in 2007 after four years of construction. Comple tion of the nal portion is ex pected in 2019. Trafc issues until then are expected to vary throughout construction, with the contrac tor designing plans to mitigate trafc obstacles and FDOT alerting the public beforehand. We want to make sure we maximize lane availability; but with a project of this magnitude, there will be a lot of construc tion and different trafc align ments, Satter said. FDOT will do our best to let people know about changes, but obviously there will be several changes to trafc patterns.Hathaway project set for 2015 Heathe EATHE R Le E Ipha PHA Rt T | Halifax Media GroupTrafc turns onto U.S. 98 from 23rd Street on Saturday in Panama City. 5020970 1364N.RailroadAve Chipley,FL32428 (850)638-0212 112E.VirginiaAve Bonifay,FL32425 (850)547-9414 HappyMother'sDayfromthe StaoftheWashington CountyNewsandHolmes CountyTimes-Advertiser. 5020862 CHIPOLA FORD WelcomesBack! BILLWHITTINGTON UpgradeYourSkills PROFITS&PRODUCTIVITYAttendthe2-hourworkshopforbusinessowners,rightherein Chipley,presentedby ActionCOACHMarkRaciappa.4AreasToMassivelyIncreaseRevenue&4Areas ToMaximizeYourProductivity Inthisseminar,you'llbetaughtnotjusttheprinciplesofprots andproductivity,butyou'llimproveyourskills,soyoucan maximizetheimplementationofthestrategiesyou'lllearn. REGISTERBY CallingtheWashington CountyChamberat 850-638-4157AtPAEC,753WestBlvd,Chipley,FL Thursday,May29 10:00AM-12:00PMCT Seminarattendance isFREEbut advancedregistration isrequired.

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www.chipleypaper.com ASection 5020929;;5020929; FDAN Washington County Ne WC Edition 00, Sports, 2.0x2 A long time ago in a high school history class I was told a story of some colonists in the 1700s going aboard a sailing vessel while dressed up as Indians. They threw the tea on that ship overboard because they refused to pay the tax on the tea. It was done as an act of deance and to show the king we werent about to be pushed around by England. Now some presentday patriots want to show the king (federal government) they arent going to take it any more (new snapper limits) and they plan to just go shing as if there were no rules. One called me and conded his plan and asked if I could nd out what he would pay in nes if caught. He said he and others were as mad as hell and werent going to take it anymore. Im not sure the people who make these rules really understand just how many people they are hurting with these new snapper restrictions. Think about a man who comes to the beach to stay a week. He rents a motel room with his family, eats out in restaurants, buys gas for his boat, buys bait and ice for his boat, buys tackle or maybe he goes out on a charter boat or head boat. That is just one family. Multiply that by thousands of families coming to the beach from one end of Florida to the other just to sh for snapper. Now they will get 11 days to do so in federal waters. I did a little research and the numbers I came up with would buy a lot of tea. If you get caught shing in state waters out of season the ne can run up to $500 per incident. Of course, the ne is set by a judge. If he or she is sympathetic to your cause the ne could be less or it could be high. If you get caught in federal waters its a different matter. The federal ne could be in the thousands of dollars. At least, that is what I have been told by people who say they know. Taking a stand is one thing, but paying hundreds, even thousands of dollars to make your point might not be worth it. Im sure this thing will work itself out, but in the meantime people who depend on red snapper shing are going out of business. And businesses that depend on snapper shermen coming to the beach and spending their money surely will be hurt. Is it time to throw the tea in to the harbor? Only history will tell. Put a mans back against the wall and he might do something he would not normally do.Hooked on Outdoors Outdoor LifeScott Lindseycaptainlindsey@ knology.net Step 1To get started, all you need is a fish like this four-pound summer flounder and a long, straight, sharp, flexible fillet knife. The cleaning board with clamp is optional, but if youre cleaning a lot of fish, its a time saver.  Step 2Start white side down, and make your first cut across the tail just forward of the fin.Step 3Insert the point of the knife into the first cut and slide it as far forward toward the head as possible running it alongside the spine, represented by the red line. Youll be able to feel it.  Step 4With the knife angled just slightly down so the blade is running along the rib bones, slice carefully outward to detach the filet. On larger flounder you might have to reinsert the knife to complete the cut all the way to the head.  Step 5Repeat the process on the belly side of the fish, but make the slice carefully so the knife doesnt cut into the stomach cavity outlined in red.  Step 6This is what it looks like after the two cuts. The fillet is only attached directly behind the head.  Step 7Detach the fillet with a single cut as shown, being careful not to penetrate the stomach cavity and set it aside.Step 8Turn the fish over and repeat the process on the bottom (white side) fillet.Step 9Carefully remove the feathers, the tiny mus cles that power the fins around the flounders perimeter.  Step 10Lay the fillets on the cutting board skin side down, and use your finger tips to hold the very end of the tail section. Make a downward cut to the skin, turn the blade almost horizontal to the table, and carefully push the blade toward the far end using a slicing motion to separate the meat from the skin.Step 11When done, you have a single fillet from the top and bottom of the fish that can be divided into four smaller fillets by slicing down the middle where it is thinnest, (the section that was over the backbone). For smaller fish this is not necessary; for larger fish the split fillets are more single-serving friendly. By FRANK SARGEANTFrankmako1@outlook.com Flounder arent born at, but they soon get that way. All atsh start life looking rather unassuming as baby sh go until Mother Nature does her sleight of hand. Their eggs hatch into larvae that resemble typically symmetrical sh. The larvae quickly develop into a rounded form with protective spines on the head, over the gills and in the pelvic and pectoral ns. They are born with a swim bladder for buoyancy to make it easier to roam near the surface and feed on plankton, but as they grow they turn into Frankensh. One eye migrates across the top of the head onto the other side of the body, the swim bladder and spines literally disappear, the body coloration on the sightless side turns white, while the other side assumes a darker coloration that provides camouage for lying on the bottom. Thats important because the bottom is where these critters spend the majority of their time, either scavenging for a meal or lying in wait for a hapless sh or crustacean to get too close and wham! For Panhandle anglers, ounder are a favorite target species, not because they are a hard-ghting game sh, but because they are often easy to catch both from nearshore boats and even from area piers and jetties and absolutely great to eat. (Many area small-boat guides target the atsh when other species are hard to come by one who absolutely has ounder dialed in is Captain Mike Parker of Silver King Charters, www.fishingdestin.com). But before the eating comes the cleaning, and theres the rub. Yamaha spokesman Martin Peters shes all over America, picking up angling tips where ever he goes. Here are some cleaning tips, with how-to photos, he offers for north Florida shermen. For the best tasting ounder, try bleeding and icing them immediately after landing, says Peters. Lift the gill plate, cut the gill rakers with a scissor or knife, then put the sh in a live well or bucket of water to bleed out. When thats done, put the sh on ice in a cooler to rm up the meat for easier cleaning and to maintain the quality.  After that, youre ready to follow the cleaning steps below:Cleaning Flatsh PHOTOS SS PECIAL TO TT HE NEWS Captain Mike Parker goes to work on a catch of ounder at the cleaning table on the Destin docks. Page 9 Wednesday, May 7, 2014 OUTDoo OO RS

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A10 | Washington County News Wednesday, May 7, 2014 NOPURCHASENECESSARYTOENTERANDWIN.APURCHASEWILLNOTIMPROVEONESCHANCEOFWINNING.DRAWINGCONDUCTEDBYTYNDALLFEDERALCREDITUNION.VISITTYNDALL.ORG/WIN_GASFOROFFICIALRULES.*APR=AnnualPercentageRate.Subjecttocompletedapplicationandapproval.Qualifyinginterestrate,term,andloan-to-value(LTV)arebasedoncreditworthiness.Askforyourspecicrate. Forusedvehicles,thetermandloan-to-valuemayalsobedeterminedbythevehiclesmodelyearand/ormileage.PromotionalautoloanratebeginsApril1,2014andisforalimitedtimeonly;rateissubjecttochangewithoutnotice.Rateshownincludesa0.25%ratereductionforloansrepaidthroughanautomatictransferfromaTyndallFederalCreditUnionaccountonly.Firstpaymentmustbewithin45daysofthedateofloandisbursal.Thepaymentamountper$1,000onanauto loanoriginatedat1.79%APRnancedfor60monthswouldbe$17.45.OerdoesnotapplytoexistingTyndallloans.RateshownisforpurchasesorrenancesofaNewAuto;forratesonUsedAutopurchasesandrenances,pleasespeakwitha Representative.EligibilityfortheWinFREEGasforaYearPrizeDrawingislimitedtoqualiedresidentsofBayCounty,GulfCounty,JacksonCounty,orWashingtonCountyinFL,orHoustonCountyinAL.Itisalsoavailableformemberswhonalize theirTyndallAutoLoanatourBayCountybranches,ChipleyBranch,MariannaBranch,PortSt.JoeBranch,orDothanBranch,asstatedinthePrizeDrawingOcialRules.PrizeDrawingpromotionalperiod:April1,2014throughJune30,2014.Entrants mustbe18yearsofageorolder.TheDrawingissubjecttoallapplicablefederal,state,andlocallawsandregulations.WinFREEGasforaYearisapromotionalphrase,usedtorefertotheprizeofa$1,000GasCard.Dependinguponthepriceofgas atanygiventimeandthetypeofautomobilebeingdriven,theactualtimeframemayvary.Ayearisareasonableestimatebasedoncurrentfactors.WinnerswillbeissuedanIRSForm1099-MISCwhichmayrequirepaymentoffederalincometaxes forthisprize.Consultyourtaxadviser.Visittyndall.org/win_gasfordetails,disclosures,andPrizeDrawingOcialRules.Voidwhereprohibitedorrestrictedbylaw.Membereligibilityrequired;aninitial$1non-refundablemembershipfeewillapply. Wecanbesafe. Linemenoftenworkbeside abusyroadway,andthat makesadangerousjob morehazardous.When approachingautilityvehicle, moveoverifsafetodoso, creatinganemptylane buer.Whenchanginglanes isntpossible,reduceyour speed.Letsworktogetherto followthelaw,payattention, slowdown,moveoverand staysafe.Togetherwepower yourlife. Beginning May1,2014 SportsSpecial to the NewsVernon High Schools J.T. Padgett became the fth ever State Weightlifting Champion in VHS history and the VHS Team nished ninth in the state last weekend.  Padgett joins Lee Richards, Jacob Presnell, Jaylon Everette, and Rolondo Brown in schools State Champion list. The competition went down to the wire for Padgett in the 183-pound weight class.  He posted a 620-pound total, but had lifters from Baker County, Bronson, and Arnold with lifts to beat him. None of those lifters were able to complete their lift, however, so Padgett stood tall on the Champions podium as the 2014 Class 1A State Weightlifting Champion in the 183 weight class.  This completed a great year for Padgett, as he was also a member of the Yellow Jacket football team that was the only team to win a District Championship this year at VHS and marks the rst State Champion athlete at VHS in any sport in a number of years. It was a great accomplishment for J.T., as VHS only began its competitive weightlifting team back this season, said Coach Bobby Johns.  J.T. has helped lay the foundation for many State Championships to come at VHS in the coming years. Also competing at State Finals were Brandon Malloy, who placed fth in the 169 weight class with a personal best 580 pound total.  Malloy was one lift from fourth but scored a valuable 2 points for the team.  Malloy is a senior that also anchored the VHS football team this.  Sophomore Ryan Malloy placed sixth in the 139 class with a 475 total and scored one point for the Jackets.  Ryan will be back for two more years and will compete in a bid to join Padgett as a State Champion.  Finally, Sophomore Marlon Stephens and Sophomore Darrion Peterson represented the Jackets well in their respective weight classes. Both of these young men will be back for two more years as well and should help lead Vernon weightlifting towards the coveted State Championship as a team next season. There have been big high school baseball games played here in the past. Mosley, for one, has hosted region championships for berths in the state Final Four. And back in the days before life consisted of bells and whistles, it was a major event whenever Bay and Rutherford got together on the diamond in the 1960s, and later when Mosley came aboard in the 1970s. But nothing that has gone before quite seems the magnitude of Tuesday night, when Rutherford will host Mosley in a Region 1-5A seminal. Judging by the throng at Bay that attended the District 1-5A title game between the same teams two weeks ago, fans might want to consider leaving early to attend Tuesday nights rematch. The district nal determined only which team would host its rst region playoff game and which team would travel. Yet, Bay athletic director Vern Barth reported that 428 tickets were sold for that game. In addition to media attending and those present on FHSAA passes and the like, the crowd that night probably was in excess of 500. And that at Bays facility, which in addition to being the oldest county high school complex is by far the most cramped for spectators behind the plate, and doesnt offer that many sight lines from rst base curling around to third. By comparison, Rutherfords Vera Shamplain Complex has the largest grandstand area in the county and more adequate standing room. The one thing it lacks, especially when compared to Bay with nearby Tommy Oliver Stadium, is ample parking. Rams athletic director Kirk Harrell said that some fans might want to consider parking in the school lot one block away and walking to the complex. The sidewalk has been upgraded to aid that endeavor. So no, the stakes arent as high as at other times in our history, but two outstanding baseball teams have ramped expectations for this collision. Rutherford is 22-4, and half of its defeats have been inicted by Mosley. Mosley is 25-3, with one-third of its losses to the Rams. Delete the results of their three previous meetings, and the ballclubs have combined for a 44-4 record, and both are highly ranked among Class 5A teams in the state. That is ample reason for great expectations. The quality of play in their last meeting is another. All local rivalry games are heated, and this will be no exception. But the overriding reaction from the opposing players seems to be underlined by respect, rather than animosity. Many of the ballplayers grew up playing together on travel teams, or have opposed each other so many times on their high school teams that theyve been well acquainted with each others skill sets. The demeanor of the opposing fan bases might not be quite as cordial, but in no sense has this become an unhealthy rivalry. However, only one of these teams will move on Tuesday night. Also noteworthy is a Bozeman ballclub that in many ways has set the recent standard for excellence in Bay County baseball. Yes, the Bucks compete in much smaller Class 1A, and their region progression consists of only seminal and nal rounds, however, back-to-back Final Four appearances are worthy of respect. Bozeman will host Northview on Tuesday night beginning its quest for a threepeat and another trip to Fort Myers. The county will have more than 1,000 baseball fans turning out at two venues that evening to witness team excellence in what in recent years has become the signature sport for our high schools. It is a deserving showcase for three local teams, and a welcome spotlight for county baseball fans. Hopefully, windshields and spectators will be spared from stray foul balls. On many levels, it should well be worth the walk. Spectators better get there early Sports BeatPat McCannExecutive Sports Editorpmccann@pcnh.com VHS Padgett is state weightlifting champSp P ECIAL TO Th H E NE E Ws SJ.T. Padgett won the State Weightlifting Championship in his weight class, becoming only the fth in school history to do so.

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By CAROL KENT638-0212 | WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com The Wausau Volunteer Fire Department and Hard Labor Creek Shooting Sports hosted the 2014 Possum Classic 3-D Archery Tournament Saturday, May 3, at Hard Labor Creek. Winners and prizes were: Mens Open Class: rst, Jacob Marlow, $500; second, Tyler Marlow, $250; and third, William Turner, $125 Mens Hunter Class: rst, Joe Lucius, $500; second, Barry Hutchinson, $250; and third, Edward Mitchell, $125 Womens Hunter: rst, Sara Mayo, $250; second, Linda Marlow, Trophy; and third, Kaylie Brown, Trophy Youth Class: rst, Zack Weeks, Mission Craze Bow; second, Jonah Baine, Trophy; and third, Whit Pettis, Trophy Kids Class: rst, Rylan Evans, Trophy and Genesis Bow; and second, Noah Owens, Trophy PHOTOS Sp P ECIAL TO EE XTRA The Wausau Volunteer Fire Department and Hard Labor Creek Shooting Sports hosted the 2014 Possum Classic 3-D Archery Tournament Saturday, May 3, at Hard Labor Creek. TOP RIGHtT : Noah Owens took home second place in the Kids Class. BOttTTOM RIGHtT : Barry Hutchinson took second place the Hunter Class. Possum Classic a success Rylan Evans won rst place in the Youth Division. Kaylie Brown won third place in the Womens Hunter Division. From left, Womens Hunters participants were: Kaylie Brown, third place; Sara Mayo rst, Myra Shaar; and Linda Marlow, second place. Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. 1) Who described a roc as a bird of prey big enough to grip an elephant? Marco Polo, Magellan, Cook, Columbus 2) I I f a man has ever been to a tonsorialist who has he been to? Witch doctor, Dentist, Fitness trainer, Barber 3) I I n 1899, where was the United States rst public parking garage established? Detroit, Boston, Baltimore, Richmond 4) M M onths that begin on which day will always have a Friday the 13th? Sunday, Monday, Friday, Saturday 5) O O f these which is not one of the three traditional primary colors? Red, White, Blue, Yellow 6) Whats the #1 state for reported shark attacks? New Jersey, N. Carolina, Florida, California 7) Which of these is not ordinarily found in Three-C slaw? Corn, Celery, Cabbage, Carrot 8) What is gibbous a phase of? Acne, Tuberculosis, Adolescence, Moon 9) When did explorer P P once de Leon pass away? 1521, 1610, 1701, 1836 10) Which states convention did PP atrick H H enry address, G G ive me liberty or give me death? Massachusetts, Virginia, Delaware, Maryland 11) What nickname is traditionally given to the clubhouse bar on a golf course? 10th Hole, Caddyshack, Fore, 19th Hole 12) M M agnets got their name from MM agnesia, a province in what country? Greece, Canada, Italy, Spain 13) Coptic was the last phase of what language that lasted over 5,000 years? Latin, Hebrew, Egyptian, Slavic 14) What was Frank Sinatras middle name? Alvin, Alton, Artie, Albert ANSWER R S 1) Marco Polo. 2) Barber. 3) Boston. 4) Sunday. 5) White. 6) Florida. 7) Corn. 8) Moon. 9) 1521. 10) Virginia. 11) 19th Hole. 12) Greece. 13) Egyptian. 14) Albert. Washington C C ounty News H H olmes C C ounty T T imes-A A dvertiser Wednesday, MAY 7 2014 BPAGE 1Section EXTRA TT rivia Fun Wilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News ExtraPanhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant CHIPLEY The 58th annual Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant will be held at 6:30 p.m., Friday, June 6 and Saturday, June 7, at the Washington County Agricultural Center in Chipley. The entry fee is $60; contestants can enter the photogenic competition for an additional $10. This is an open pageant. Miss contestants must be a Florida resident to participate. Age groups are as follows: Sugar Baby Miss zero to 9 months; Baby Miss 10-12 months; Toddler Miss 1323 months; Tiny Miss 2-3 years; Future Little Miss 4-5 years; Little Miss 6-7 years; Petite Miss 8-9 years; Miss Preteen 10-11 years; Young Junior Miss 12-13 years; Junior Miss 14-15 years; Teen Miss 16-17 years and Miss 1820 years. Winners will receive a large trophy, large crown and banner, alternated and participants will receive trophies. Queens should be prepared to participate in the Watermelon Festival activities to include the parade as well as other activities related to the Festival. Entry Fee and applications are due to Bush Paint and Supply on or before May 16. Checks should be made payable to Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant and mailed or brought to 917 6th Ave. in Graceville. Applications are available at Bush Paint and Supply in Graceville, Forget Me Not Photography in Bonifay and at the Washington County AgExtension Ofce at the AG Center in Chipley. For more information, call Teresa Bush at 263-4744 (daytime) or 263-3072 (evenings) or contact Sherry Saunders at 263-3554.HCHS spring musical plannedBONIFAY The Holmes County High School Drama Department will present the musical Cats at 7 p.m. in the HCHS Auditorium Thursday, May 8; Friday, May 9; Saturday, May 10; Monday, May 12 and Thursday, May 15.Childbirth Education Classes The Florida Department of Health in Holmes County will be offering free Childbirth Education Classes, from 5:30-7:30 p.m., Thursday, May 8, Thursday, May 15 and Thursday, May 22 at the Healthy Start Annex, 402 N. Oklahoma St. in Bonifay. No person shall, on the grounds of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion or sex be excluded from participation in, be denied benets of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity receiving or beneting from federal nancial assistance. Sensory impaired or LimitedEnglish Prociency patients will be provided with necessary aids and interpreters at no cost by calling Fran Amerson at 547-8500 ext. 234. For more information or to register for classes, contact 5478684 ext. 16 or 18. Diabetic ClassBONIFAY The Holmes County Health Department is offering free diabetic education classes. Classes last about one hour and begin at 3 p.m., Wednesday, May 7, and Wednesday, May 14, at the Holmes County Health Department. Classes are open to the public. No person shall, on the grounds of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion or sex be excluded from participation in, be denied benets of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity receiving or beneting from federal nancial assistance. Contact Leann Jones with any questions at 547-8500 ext. 240. Sensory impaired or Limited-English Prociency patients will be provided with necessary aids and interpreters at no cost by calling Fran Amerson at 547-8500 ext. 234.Game NightCHIPLEY The Friends of the Washington County Library Game Night is set to take place from 6-9 p.m., Thursday, May 8. Games being played are Bridge, Bunco, Canasta, Dominoes, Mahjong and many more. Tickets are $10 per person and include dinner. Tickets are available at the Washington County Library, the Wausau, Vernon and Sunny Hill library branches, or from any Friends member. For more information, call 638-4167.Ring14 Walk-a-thonCHIPLEY Roulhac Middle School will host a Walk-A-Thon to raise awareness for Ring14 at 8 a.m., Saturday, May 10. For more information, or to be a participant, visit the website at www.ring14usa. org.U.S. Postal Service Food DriveThe 2014 U.S. Postal Service Food Drive will be held from now through May 10. All food collected will benet the Care and Share Food Pantry In Chipley, 1461 South Railroad Ave., and the Sheppards Gate Food Pantry, 1915 Ferguson Road, just south of Wausau off Highway 77. Place non-perishable items on or in your mailbox for your carrier to pick up. Collection bills will also be in the lobbies of the Chipley and Wausau Post Ofces for individuals with P.O. Boxes to make donations. Just one item from your family can help another family in need. If you have any questions, contact Jennifer Lowery at 326-5944.Mayday 2014CAMPBELLTON Mayday will be held Saturday, May 10, at the Campbellton Park on Highway 231. Gates will open to public at noon. All vendors are asked to be ready to open to public by 11:45 a.m. This is a free public event. There will be food, fun and activities. Jackson County Fire Rescue will be on hand along with other neighboring counties and cities to show the kids equipment and do re safety and prevention. Chairs and coolers are welcome. There is no alcohol permitted on the grounds of the park. If you have a softball or baseball team that would like to play that day, submit the team. There will be an antique car show available as well. For more information and vendor booths, contact Samuel Jones at 504-252-5350.Tea Time Garden WalkCHIPLEY The Chipley Garden Club will host the 2014 Tea Time Garden Walk from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, May 10, at the Washington County Ag Center in Chipley. Tickets are $15 each. Reservations are required. For tickets and more information, call Glenda Wilson at 638-9138 or 940-0212.Rock Hill Fish FryCHIPLEY A sh fry fundraiser is scheduled for Saturday, May 10 at the Rock Hill Church and Cemetery. Everyone with family buried in the cemetery is encouraged to come. Bring a covered dish to compliment the sh and enjoy neighborhood fellowship at noon. Donations are needed to pay for monthly mowing. For more information or to make donations, call 638-0966.History SeminarThe Lower Muskogee Creek Tribe will host a History Seminar, at 10 a.m., Saturday, May 17, starting at the Washington County Public Library at 1444 Jackson Ave. Chipley. This seminar is presented to educate the general public, students and teachers on many aspects of the Muskogee History and Culture. Topics Include: History Myths and Legends of the Muskogee Creeks, How the Muskogee survived in this area after the Removal, Aspects of Daily Living, Genealogy and Treaties of the Muskogee. Registration for the seminar, materials and lunch is $20. For more information, contact 229-762-3355Chipola to offer lifeguard courseMARIANNA Chipola College will offer the American Red Cross Lifeguard Training course beginning May 12. All interested students must be 15 years of age on or before the rst day of class. The course requires a minimum of 32 hours of training in water rescue, CPR and First Aid. Attendance is required for all class meetings. Students must be in good physical condition, able to swim at least 500 yards without stopping, able to swim freestyle and breaststroke. Students also must be able to, retrieve a 10pound brick from a seven foot depth, and tread water without hands for two minutes. A prerequisite swim test must be taken before the course on May 9. There is no charge to take the test. Course meetings will be held from 4:30-8:30 p.m. May 12-15 and May 1923, with the nal test on May 23. Cost of the swim course is $200. Students must register and pay fees when they take the prequalifying swim test. For information about the course or to register for the pre-qualifying, call Rance Massengill at 718-2240. Longleaf Pine Forest Restoration and Management WorkshopCHIPLEY The Apalachicola Regional Stewardship Alliance and Floridas Forest Stewardship Program will host a Longleaf Pine Forrest Restoration and Management workshop from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on May 14, at Turkey Pond Ranch. The cost of the workshop is $10 and includes lunch and materials. You can register online at fsp-workshop051414. eventbrite.com or call the Washington County Extension Ofce at 6386180. The ranch is at 3157 Chain Lake Road in Chipley.Real Estate Professionals WorkshopCHIPLEY The Washington Planning Commission will be hosting a Workshop for Real Estate Professionals at 6 p.m. on May 15 at the Washington County Annex Building, 1331 South Blvd., Chipley. The Workshop discuss various Land Use Planning topics, including, State Growth Management Regulations, Large and Small Land Use Map Amendments, comprehensive Plans, Land Development Codes, Future Land Use Maps, the Role of the Planning Commission, Development Orders, and other related topics. Realtors, Developers, Builders, Property Owners, Elected Ofcials, and the public are encouraged to attend. For more information, contact Michael J. DeRuntz, Senior Planner, Washington County, at 415-5093Benet for Bob KingThere will be a benet fundraiser for Bob King, who is ghting cancer, at 10:30 a.m. on May 17 at the Pittman Fire Department on Highway 2. There will be a yard sale and cake auction. Lunch plates will be available for $6 and will include fried chicken or Boston butt, baked beans, potato salad, roll and cake. Whole Boston butts will be available for a $25 donation. Whole Boston butts must be pre-ordered. For more information, call Jim King at 956-4506, Betty Watson at 956-4626, Linda Lewis at 956-2235 or David Sconiers at 956-2394.Beginners Pressure Canning ClassCHIPLEY The University of Florida Extension Program will hold a pressure canning class from 69:30 p.m., Tuesday, May 20, at the Washington County Ag Center, 1424 Jackson Ave. in Chipley. Participants will learn the basics of pressure canning by canning vegetables. Registration is $5 and includes class materials. Canner gauge testing also will be available; be sure to bring canner lid with gauge. Space is limited. Pre-registration is required by contacting the Washington County Extension Ofce at 6386265, or the Holmes County Extension Ofce at 547-1108. Extension programs are open to everyone. For persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations, call 638-6265 (TDD, via Florida Relay Service, 1-800-955-8771) at least ve working days before the class so that proper consideration can be given to the request.Toss It Up Summer Salads Class CHIPLEY Build a better simple and slimming salad. Learn how to make salad, no matter your kitchen skill. You will gain many new ways and ideas for making your own wonderful, healthy creation each day. Create salads that are easy to make using easy-to-nd, inexpensive ingredients. Join us for this handson class, from 5:30-7:30 p.m., Thursday, May 22, at the Washington County Ag Center, 1424 Jackson Ave. in Chipley. Registration is $15 and includes class materials and food samples. Space is limited. Pre-registration is required by contacting the Washington County Extension Ofce at 638-6265 or the Holmes County Extension Ofce at 547-1108. Payment is required to complete registration. Extension programs are open to everyone. For persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations, contact 638-6265 (TDD, via Florida Relay Service, 1-800-955-8771) at least ve working days before the class so that proper consideration can be given to the request.A Very Disney VarietyBONIFAY The Bonifay Middle School Theatre Department announces its spring show A Very Disney Variety, to be presented at 6 p.m., Thursday, May 22, and Friday, May 23, in the HCHS auditorium. Tickets are available at Bonifay Middle School two weeks before the show. Cost is $5 for adults, $3 for students, and free for kids 4 and under. Admission at the door will also be available. Reminiscent of such variety shows as Carol Burnett and Friends, Saturday Night Live! and So Random, the performance will feature original scenes based on memorable Disney characters. In addition, the BMS Treble Makers will be on hand to provide musical entertainment for the evening with favorite Disney tunes. With the Mad Hatter (Bryce Etheridge) hosting the show and the White Rabbit (Sydney Shugars) keeping things in order backstage, the evening is sure to be full of mayhem, magic and memories. For more information, contact Jill Cook at 547-2754 or cookj@ hdsb.org.Tables of PurposeCHIPLEY Washington County Council on Aging will hold a black tie event at 6 p.m., Friday, May 23. The nights events will include a steak dinner and Jazz music by Bill Covington. Tickets are $50 each. Tickets can be purchased at the Council on Aging ofce in Chipley. All proceeds will go to the Council on Aging. and Special to Extra Air Force Airman 1st Class David R. Worley graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical tness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Worley is the son of Jimmy R. and Ellen B. Worley of Chipley. Worley graduates basic training Community eventsEVENTS

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 and soreness aches Special to Extra Take Stock In Children (TSIC), a 60-credit hour (two-year) college tuition scholarship program in Washington County for middle and high school students, recently sponsored a trip for local scholarship contract students to visit Chipola College. On April 10, 19 Washington County TSIC students boarded a Chipola College bus and were hosted by the college at a College Readiness Workshop. Reyonna Parrish, of the Florida Board of Education, presented a program on School and Life Management for the students, and a tour of the campus and lunch followed. The students were accompanied by David Solger and Gary Hartman, and the visit was coordinated by Mary Helen Smith, Take Stock In Children Program Manager, at Chipola College. Students attending from Washington County were as follows: Vernon Middle School: Faith Harmon, Dana Douglas, Jamar Massaline, Dalton Webb and Maylin Brock Vernon High School: Madisen Hawes, Courtney Hendrix, John English, Jessica Joyce and Carlos Hillman Roulhac Middle School: Aleya Louderback Chipley High School: David King, Essence Williams, Parisha Massaline, Devon James, Eli Whitehead, Cheyenne Rabon, Kallee Chamberlain and Ina Robinson. Since starting in 2004, the local TSIC has raised more than $450,000, which excludes the state-level match, and the total value of scholarships is estimated at $900,000. Since starting, the Washington County TSIC has nine college graduates, with some pursuing advanced degrees; 51 students in college or technical programs; and 37 students working toward high school graduation and a scholarship The generosity of Washington County residents and businesses has had a signicant impact on 97 young lives helping them to become productive adult citizens. What sets the TSIC program apart from other scholarship programs is the age range for qualication, the appointment of an adult mentor to coordinate with the student on a frequent basis throughout the school year, the written contract with the student to maintain average or above grades, stay away from drugs and alcohol, and generally be a good citizen and active in school and community events outside the classroom. As part of a state-wide, county-level operation, the TSIC program is organized regionally with a state college providing the overall program support and operational supervision. Chipola College is the regional coordinator for Washington, Jackson, Holmes, Calhoun and Liberty counties, and Mary Helen Smith at Chipola College is the TSIC program manager who works directly with the county sponsor organizations and school boards. In all regional counties except Washington, the sponsor entity is the school board, but the TSIC program here is operated by the Washington County Scholarship Foundation Inc. (WCSF), a private foundation, that holds federal and state income tax exemption with charitable organization registration. For more information about the program, to volunteer or to make a donation, contact David Solger, president WCSF Inc., at 638-1276 or Mary Helen Smith at 718-2428 and/or smithm@chipola. edu. Special to ExtraThe Chipley Kiwanis Club met for its weekly luncheon on April 29 at Pattillos Restaurant at the Washington-Holmes Technical Center. Lunch was provided by the students of the Technical Center Culinary Program. President Garrett Martin opened the meeting and noted there would be no meeting on Tuesday, June 3, because of the Pancake Supper being held at Kate Smith Elementary that evening. He also discussed the Kiwanis Golf Tournament, which has been postponed because of the recent rain. A new date will be announced. The next Kiwanis Event is the Pancake Supper, which will be held at Kate Smith Elementary from 4:30-7 p.m., on Tuesday, June 3. Dinners are $5 each and include pancakes, bacon or sausage, orange juice and coffee or milk. Tickets are available from any Kiwanian or can be purchased that evening at the Kate Smith Cafeteria. A new Kiwanian was inducted. David Solger introduced Charles Williams, the new Principal at Chipley High School. He and Laura Joiner welcomed Charles into the club. Because Kiwanis principal purpose is to support the youth of Washington County, Charles is enthusiastic about joining Kiwanis. David Solger, the Kiwanis Liaison to Take Stock in Children, then introduced Mary Helen Smith as the Program for the day. Smith is the program manager for Take Stock in Children for ve counties including Washington, Holmes and Jackson counties. Take Stock in Children is a scholarship and mentoring program for low-income, deserving youth. These are students who are doing well but have risk factors in their lives and need support. These can be children who are homeless, who have incarcerated family members, ill family members and other risk factors. Many of the children are minorities. It is a state-wide program, and across the state, 38 percent of the children are Caucasian, 33 percent are AfricanAmerican, 25 percent are Hispanic and 4 percent are other. There are 22,000 students enrolled state-wide and 75,000 mentors who contribute about one million volunteer hours each year. Each student signs a contract in the seventh or eighth grade and the contract is signed by their parents as well. Basically, they have to commit to achieving good grades (B average or better) and staying out of trouble. They must also meet with their mentors regularly. In return, on graduation they receive a two-year tuition scholarship to either a state college or university or a vocational school. The value of the scholarship is currently about $8,000 to attend Chipola College. The scholarships are supported by local contributions and the local funds are matched by an equal contribution from the State of Florida. There are currently 54 students in the ve-county area enrolled in Take Stock in Children. Thirty-seven of them are from Washington County. There have been eight college graduates so far with degrees including physical therapy, mechanical engineering and law. State-wide, 86 percent of the students graduate from at least a two-year institution. Though exact gures were unavailable, very few of the students have dropped out of the program after starting higher education. Smith noted while contributions are always needed, the greatest need at present is for more mentors. These volunteers commit to meeting 15 times during the school year, or twice a month for 30 minutes. Mentors coach the students, encourage them and can help broaden the students exposure to different career elds. The Kiwanis club meets Tuesdays at Pattillos restaurant in the middle of the WHTC campus at noon. For an invitation, contact any Kiwanian or David Solger, membership chairperson, at 638-1276. For more information about the Kiwanis Club of Chipley, visit www.ChipleyKiwanis. comSpecial to ExtraThe Washington County Master Gardeners recently visited the Fox Family Farm. What an amazing family operation, club member Glenda Wilson said. They have green houses with tomatoes which are already bearing, cabbage, various types of lettuce, kale, leeks, fennel, pole beans, squash, cauliower, broccoli, spinach, celery, corn, multiple herbs and owers, just to name a few. The farm moved from Bay County to Washington County in 2005 and presently has three large green houses with plans for a fourth. The operation is truly a family operation, which includes father, mother and son. The farm grafts their tomatoes and reports the practice as the reason they have no problems with nematodes. They did lose a total crop last year to white ies, however, prompting the owners to add screening to the sides of their green houses to keep the white ies out. Fox Family Farm also prides itself on not using chemical fertilize or pesticides but rather using ladybugs as a pest deterrent, and when necessary, parasitic wasps. The farm sells at local markets but not direct from the farm. It is unbelievable that only three people can produce the quantity and quality of vegetables that this farm produces, Wilson said. It does help that the son has a degree in horticulture and the father is an electrician with years of experience in gardening. Special to ExtraSome 403 students were eligible for graduation at Chipola College at the end of the spring semester, with many coming from Washington and Holmes County. Graduation exercises were at 7 p.m. on May 1 in the Dothan Civic Center. Counted as members of the class are all who completed their degrees or vocational certicates from December of 2013 to May of 2014 or who will complete work at Chipola during the summer of 2014. The class includes the following from Washington and Holmes County:Bachelor of Science DegreesBONIFAY Misty Kirkland, Mika Moore, Anne Mary Nichols, Kaithlyn Pope, Katelyn Strickland and Caleb Whitaker Ch H IPLEY Ashley Ayers, Wendy Brown, Ashley Foshee, Holley Hinson, Kasey Ivey, Tasha Richter, Meghan Salter and Leigh Stone VEr R NON Emily Adams and Susie Sewell WEs S Tv V ILLE Whitney Ellenburg and Andrew Stafford AA ssociate in A A rts DegreesBONIFAY Holton Adams, Allison Brock, Hadley Brown, Ashlee Corbin, Christopher Dozier, John Eubanks, Andrew Fox, Thomas Herndon, Amber LaRue, Krutika Patel, Sheetal Patel, Lessie Perry, Hulon Reeves, Jr., Christopher Rockwell, Nicole Schneider, Travis Scorza, Kolton Sellers, Garet Skipper, Taylor Smith, Tyler Walker and Julie Wells Ch H IPLEY Kendall Alderman, Shamara Baker, Malcolm Bell, Heather Brown, Victoria Crawford, James Dilmore, Jamie Ellis, George Fisher, Nicholas Galbreath, Dustin Garner, Olivia Guettler, Mattea Harbour, Alana Hearn, Brenda Killings, Jesse Kneiss, Asia McKenzie, Mary Minchin, Jaclyn Morris, Shamara Murph, Joshua Myers, Phillip Pippin, Taylor Pope, Alexander Shatas, James Smith, Jr., Kiley Summerhill, Tori Taylor, Crystal Wedderburn and Dan Wells VEr R NON Amber Brown, Dante Brown and Eric Lee WEs S Tv V ILLE Reid Davis and Matthew Hicks AA ssociate in Science DegreesBONIFAY Edna Feurtado and Chelsea Wells Ch H IPLEY Olivia Guettler Westville Candice Brown and Tammy WatsonChipola Class of 2014Take Stock In Children Students tour Chipola College SPEc C IAL TO EE XTr R A Left to Right: David Solger, Charles Williams, Laura Joiner and Garrett MartinKiwanis induct new member SPEc C IAL TO EE XTr R A Washington County Master Gardeners pose at Fox Family Farm.Master Gardeners visit Fox Family Farm Crossword PPUZZLE SOLUTIONOLUTION ONON PAPAGEE B5

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Many people complain about how fast things are changing; I complain about those things that do not change at all. Interestingly, the things you want to change refuse to do so and the things you want to stay the same never do. I wish someone would gure out how to reverse this tedious trend of life. I have worked on it but to no success. I am referring to the annual Mothers Day card fetish. I am not sure where this started or why, but I have my suspicions. I think we can safely rule out husbands and men as suspects. I could see a man doing it one year, but to do it year after year is not within the scope of a mans ability. If a man does something one time and it is successful he never chances doing it the second time when it may be a failure. Now we have on our hands tremendous pressure to purchase a yearly Mothers Day card. When it comes to card buying, I simply do not know where to go. Oh, I know where to get them; I simply do not know which one to purchase. If it was up to me, and let me point out very quickly, it is not, I would have one card for sale each year. Maybe I would modify the card each year and perhaps write something different in it, but how many ways can you say Happy Mothers Day? To be efcient the choice would only be one Mothers Day card per year. As it stands (and I wish it would sit down and rest for a while), there are more Mothers Day cards than stars in the heavens. It is virtually impossible to pick out the right Mothers Day card. Since I do not keep up with the latest trends in this regard I am at quite a disadvantage. One year I tried to remedy my Mothers Day card-buying dilemma by buying a box of 50 cards that were on sale right after Mothers Day. I thought I had hit the mother lode, so to speak. With this purchase, I had enough Mothers Day cards to last my entire lifetime. Unless, of course, I live to be 129. This lasted for two years. The rst year I presented my Mothers Day card to my wife and she gave me all kinds of smiles and hugs. I was relieved to have solved a big problem in my home. I now could rest and focus on solving other problems in my life, of which there are many. It was the second year that kicked me in the teeth. As usual, that year, I presented my wife with her Mothers Day card. Trust me; I was not fully geared up for the response I got. I was expecting smiles and hugs like the year before. What I got was a glare and a shrug. She looked at me and said something I shall never forget. Isnt this the same card you gave me last year? How do wives remember these things? The only reason I knew it was the same card as last year is I had more just like it in the box it came from. This brings me to the second part of my quandary. When did it become necessary for husbands to buy their wives Mothers Day cards? Sure, she washes my clothes, cooks my meals and bosses me about. She still is not my mother. It starts out rather innocently enough as most things do. Then, in my opinion, it gets out of hand. When the children start coming into the home it is quite natural, because they are too young to make such important decisions, for the father to buy the Mothers Day card on behalf of the children. I still remember that rst Mothers Day card. Our rst baby was only seven months old and had no idea what was going on in the world or even in the home. I gave my wife her rst Mothers Day card. She was so excited. Because she was excited, so was I. This is where the whole nonsense starts. What I want to know is when do husbands stop buying Mothers Day cards for their wives? Looking back over my experience, I can see no way where I can opt out of this annual event. The last child in our home left more than 15 years ago, and still, I nd myself under the awesome pressure of purchasing a Mothers Day card for my wife. When do the children take control of this yearly responsibility? In spite of my quandary, it is important to honor both fathers and mothers. Would anybody want to buy a box of 48 Mothers Day cards, cheap?My Mothers Day card quandaryUnity Faith RidersThe Unity Faith Riders would like to invite everyone to their monthly community breakfast, held at 7 a.m. every fourth Saturday in the month, at the Vernon Fire Department. Breakfast is free, but donations to the ministry are accepted. For more information, call Johnathan Taylor at 768-2444.Welcome All to Blessed Trinity Catholic ChurchBONIFAY Blessed Trinity Catholic Church would like to invite everyone to attend services. Bible Study is held from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Sunday in the Church Hall. Sunday Mass is held from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., and on Wednesday evening Mass will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 2331 Hwy 177A in Bonifay.Mark Bishop in concertESTO Mt. Zion Independent Baptist Church will host Mark Bishop live in concert at 7 p.m., Friday, May 16. Come enjoy a night of worship with Mark Bishop, one of Southern Gospels top singers and songwriters. A love offering will be taken at intermission. For more information, call 768-0843. B-Shoc LiveCHIPLEY B-Shoc, a Christian music artist, will perform at 6 p.m. Thursday, May 8, at the First Freewill Baptist Church in Chipley. This is a free concert. The church is located at 1387 South Blvd. For more information, call 658-2565.Mothers Day singBONIFAY New Effort Church  in Bonifay  will celebrate its 108th Annual Mothers Day Sing at 10 a.m., Sunday, May 11.  A covered dish dinner will follow the sing at noon. For more information, call Frankie Short at 547-2996.Pleasant GroveCHIPLEY Pleasant Grove will hold an open mic. sing at 6 p.m. Friday, May 17. Hamburger and hotdogs will be served at 5 p.m. Everyone is welcome. The church is located at Hinsons Crossroads. For more information, call Brother Bufford Williams at 638-1188. Faith EVENTS DrR. JamesAMES lL. snyderSNYDER Out to Pastor

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 UploadyourLegacyguestbookphotosnowforFREE!Withyourpaidobituary,familyandfriendswillnow haveunlimitedaccesstouploadedphotosfreeofcharge. FindObituaries. ShareCondolences. Inpartnershipwith. Findobituaries,sharecondolencesand celebratealifeat or Theodore Adolph Meinhardt, age 83 of Cottondale, passed away Saturday, May 3, 2014 at his home, surrounded by his loving family. Theodore was born May 28, 1930 in Washington D.C. to the late, Adolph and Lissette (Wagner) Meinhardt. He had been a resident of Jackson County for the past 45 years, coming from Maryland. Theodore was a farmer and in addition to his family, loved talking, carpentry and outdoor sports. He is predeceased by his parents and a sister, Clara Meinhardt. Survivors include his wife of 62 years, Marilyn (Ely) Meinhardt of Cottondale; three sons, Theodore Kirk Meinhardt and wife Catherine of Auburn, Ala., Richard Adam Meinhardt and wife Sondra of Powell Point, N.C., and Andrew Lewis Meinhardt and wife Lillie of Crawfordville; one step son, Robert Owens and wife Carol of Annandale, Va.; three daughters, Lisa Overdorp and husband Lewis of Pensacola, Julie Sasscer and husband Church of Cottondale, and Cristina Jackson and husband Keith of Brooksville; 31 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services were held Monday, May 5, 2015 at 11 a.m., at the family farm, 3209 Aycock Rd., Cottondale, Florida. Cremation followed the service. Those wishing to do so may make contributions to Covenant Hospice, 4215 Kelson Ave., Suite E. Marianna, Fla., 32446 or to Emerald Coast Hospice, 1330 South Blvd. Chipley, Florida 32428. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net. Theodore A. Meinhardt THEODORE A. MEINHaARDtT Michael Wallace Haile, 66, of Marianna, went home to be with the Lord on April, 29, 2014. Mike was born in Memphis, Tenn., on April 9, 1948. He graduated from Delta State University in 1970. Mike was beloved by his family and friends and will be deeply missed. He was a wonderful father and devoted family man. He is preceded in death by his wife of 38 years, Constance Wilson Haile; his mother, Mary Wieczorek, and stepfather, Stanley Wieczorek. Mike was an active member of Rivertown Community Church, where he took great joy in participating in his small group. Mike worked in the automotive industry for over 30 years and was most recently a valued Finance and Insurance executive for Zurich North America. He is survived by one son, Jeremy Haile (wife Stephanie); two daughters, Sunny Haile Heinrichs (husband Trent) and Courtney Haile Bass (husband Dylan); ve grandchildren, Jacob Haile, Joshua Haile, and Sara Claire Haile and twins, Stephen and Grace Heinrichs; his wife, Ann Christine Haile; two stepchildren, Chantel Hormuth (husband Jeff), and Sarah Escala and four step-grandchildren, Fisher Hormuth, Eli Graham, Sirela Escala and Tyler Clark. The service was ofciated by Pastor Paul Smith at 10 a.m. Friday, May 2, and was held at Rivertown Community Church 4534 Lafayette Street, Marianna, FL 32446. A private burial with the family only was held Friday, May 2, 2014, in Pinecrest Memorial Gardens with Hamp Andrews ofciating and James and Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel directing. No public viewing was planned. Flowers will be accepted or contributions may be made to Rivertown Community Church or Southeast Alabama Medical Center Infusion Lab. Expressions of sympathy may be made online at www. jamesandsikes funeralhomes.com. Michael W. HHaile Richard passed away on Friday April 11, 2014 in the Utah Valley Regional Medical Center in Provo, Utah. He was 91. Rich was born in Sanford, Co., on April 6, 1923 to Wm. Alma Crowther and Marcella Christensen, one of two boys and seven girls. He married Shirley Hair in 1942, they divorced in 1970. Together they had four children. He married Elwanda Brock George in Bonifay on Sept. 6, 2008. They came to Utah to live in 2010. Rich was one of the few surviving WWII veterans, having served in the Okinawa invasion. He always acknowledged the protection he received from Heavenly Father during his war time career. He was always proud to wear his Veterans ball cap. He and Elwanda were members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. He loved the Lord, loved life and was a prayerful man. Rich lived a very full life working in lots of different jobs, from Geneva Steel to a catering delivery business in California and Arizona. He was quite a sports enthusiast and loved watching his favorite teams play. He was preceded in death by his parents and ve siblings. He is survived by his wife, Elwanda; daughters, Karen Ann, Launa Kay and Sheri Jo; one son, Richard Gary; several grand; greatgrandchildren and three siblings, Fern Van Sickle, Robert Crowther and Janette Black. Funeral services were held April 16, 2014 at Wheeler Mortuary in Springville, Utah. Graveside services were held April 18, 2014 in the Sanford Colorado Cemetery with Military Rites by the American Legion. Condolences may be sent at www. wheelermortuaries.com. William RR. Crowther Carl Cutchins, age 82, of Cottondale, passed away Friday, April 25, 2014 in the Bay Medical Center in Panama City. Carl was born Dec. 30, 1931 in Cottondale to the late Andrew Kyle and Ethel (Simmons) Cutchins. He was a lifelong resident of Cottondale and a U.S. Army veteran of the Korean Conict. Carl was a former corrections ofcer with the State of Florida. In addition to his family he loved shing. He is predeceased by his wife of 30 years, Ruby Cutchins; a brother, Oland Cutchins; two sisters, Erie Braxton and Myrtle Justice. Survivors include three brothers, Orin Cutchins and wife Rachel of Cottondale, Charles Cutchins and wife Inell of Cottondale and Ray Cutchins and wife Judy of Cottondale; two sisters, Vera Holmes of Pensacola and Elizabeth Finch and husband Ronnie of Cottondale and numerous nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Memorial services were held Wednesday, April 30, 2014 at 10 a.m., at Brown Funeral Home, Main Street Chapel with the Rev. Robert Simmons ofciating. Cremation followed the service. In lieu of owers, the family suggests contributions to a favorite charity. Friends and family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net.Carl CutchinsBilly Gene Morris, age 67 of Chipley, passed away Friday, May 2, 2014 surrounded by his loving family at Southeast Alabama Medical Center. Billy was born July 1, 1946 in Chipley, to the late Luther and Lois (Hutchins) Morris. He is a lifelong resident of Chipley, a member of the First Baptist Church of Chipley and the Chipley Bass Club. Billy is preceded in death by his son, Keith Morris and brother, Bobby Morris. Survivors include his loving wife, Yasuko Morris of Chipley; one daughter, Michelle Ingram of Chipley; one granddaughter, Becki Ingram of Chipley; one brother, Jimmy Morris and wife Diane of Chipley; four sisters, Margaret Crowder of Panama City, Frances Strickland and husband Robert of Chipley, Hazel Simmons of Wewahitchka and Shirley Johnston of Bonifay. Family received friends for visitation Saturday, May 3, 2014 at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel from 6-8 p.m. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Sunday, May 4, 2014 at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel with the Rev. Mike Orr and the Rev. Randy Peel ofciating. Interment followed at the Wachob Forrest Lawn Cemetery with Brown Funeral Home directing. The family is accepting owers but request donations to be made to the First Baptist Church of Chipley Building Fund P.O. Box 643 Chipley, FL. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh.net.Billy G. MorrisMrs. Annie Alice Jacobs, 80 of Bonifay, died on Monday, April 28, 2014, at Gulf Coast Medical Center in Panama City. Born Thursday, July 20, 1933 in Geneva County, Ala., she was the daughter of the late Earl Evans and the late Nancy Barnes Evans. She was the head of the family counsel program at the Bonifay Nursing Home and more recently a volunteer with Hospice. She is survived by her husband, James Jacobs; a son, Scott Jacobs of Atlanta, Ga., and sisters, Edra McKnight of Orlando and Jimmie Ramos of New Iberia, La. A Funeral service was held at 2 p.m., on Thursday, May 1, 2014 at First United Methodist Church with the Rev. Charles Fail ofciating. Interment followed in Bethlehem Methodist Church Cemetery, Bonifay with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 1 to 2 p.m., on Thursday, May 1, 2014, at First United Methodist Church, Bonifay.Annie A. JacobsJulia Vanno Holmes was born in Dillonville, Ohio, on July 15, 1923, to parents who came to this country from Hungary seeking a better life. She was one of four children in the family, all of whom were raised in a home where hard work was a way of life. Her father worked as a coal miner from the time he was a pre-teen until he was in his mid-50s and her mother supplemented the family income by cooking and cleaning for boarders to whom Julias family rented rooms. Even as a child, Julia was known for her compassion for all living things and a truly sweet and giving disposition. After graduating from high school, Julia attended and graduated from Roanoke Business College a feat which was not as common for women then as college graduation is now. After graduation, Julia lived and worked in Washington, D.C., and Corpus Christi, Texas, until World War II ended when she married a young Navy pilot named Ed Holmes, to whom she remained married for 54 years until his death in 2004. Julia and Ed ultimately settled in Marianna, where they raised their two children, Dianne and Donald, and where Julia was employed with what was then known as the West Florida Telephone Company for over 23 years, and Ed worked as a ight instructor at Graham Air Force Base until its closure when he found employment as a pilot with the State of Florida. While Julia worked outside the home to provide needed income to help support her family, the best work she performed was in the home where she was the proverbial glue that kept her family together and where she placed the interest of every member of her family above her own. She never lost the genuine compassion that she held as a child for all living things, or the sweet and giving disposition that made her a valued friend to those who knew her and a pleasant and positive experience to those with whom she came into contact. Julia was a devoted and steadfast mother, wife, sister, daughter and friend to those in her life. She served in all of these roles in a manner that would be hard to equal. She will be greatly missed. Julia was preceded in death by her parents, William and Mary Vanno; her husband, Edward A. Holmes; her brother, Bill Vanno and her sister Margaret Carter. She is survived by her son, Don Holmes; daughter, Dianne (Gary) Gish; grandchildren, Ashley Holmes, Julianne (George) Young, Justin Gish and Molly Gish; great grand-son, Jackson Wyatt Young and sister Elizabeth (Dominic) Alecci. Funeral services were held Friday, May 2, 2014 at 11 a.m. at James & Sikes Maddox Chapel with Dr. Ted Land ofciating. Entombment was in Chapel of The Pines Mausoleum at Pinecrest Memorial Gardens in Marianna. James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel will direct. The family received friends at 10 a.m., Friday, May 2, 2014 at James & Sikes Maddox Chapel. Expressions of sympathy may be made online at www. jamesandsikesfuneral Julia V. HHolmes Richard Ryals Geezer 62, of Dothan, Ala., passed away April 24, 2014 after a brief illness. His devoted wife and best friend Kathy, was at his side. He was a member of Bear Creek Assembly, Panama City, and attended Southside Baptist Church of Dothan. Richard was an avid hunter, love to sh, and loved the Lord. He had faith and hope to the end, no matter how tough the illness was he had such Courage and Boldness. Richard was employed by Martin Brower Inc. of Atlanta. A very special loving thank you to his friends and caregiver Dot Bravo and husband Jose Bravo. Survivors are his wife Kathy of 23 years; his son Richard Allen Ryals (Tammy); grandson, Colton Joshua and granddaughter, Alixandra Jordan. A celebration of life service for Richard was held at 3 p.m., Sunday, April 27, 2014 at Southside Baptist Church, Dothan, Ala. A time of remembrance will be from 2 p.m., until time of service. Flowers will be accepted or contributions may be made to the Catholic Social Services, C/O Richard Ryals, P.O. Box 6164, Dothan, Alabama 36302. Serving as ushers will be Darrin Frasier, Colton Ryals, Uncle Jeff Tabor and Steve Creamer if anyone needs assistance. Expressions of sympathy may be submitted online www.williamsfhs.com. Williams Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. RRichard RR yals Evelyn Baxley Kinney 91 of Graceville passed away on April 24, 2014 in Chipley. Evelyn is a member of Galilee Methodist Church where she served as a Sunday school teacher and treasure for many years. She retired from Florida Bank of Chipley after 40 years of service. Evelyn began as a teller shortly after high school graduation in 1942 and later became vice president in January 1964 until retirement. She served in various positions of community civic organizations, and after retirement continued to be active in her community. Most recently as a Pink Lady at Northwest Florida Community Hospital. Evelyn was loved by all and will be dearly missed. She was preceded in death by her husband, Richard Kinney; parents, L.L. and Alva Baxley; sister, Wilma Hardy and brothers, Elmer Baxley, B.H. Baxley, Gene Baxley and Jennings Baxley. Evelyn was survived by her brother-in-law, Henry Hardy; sister-in-law, Verdi Croft and numerous nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Services for Evelyn were held at 2 p.m., on Sunday, April 27, 2014 in the Galilee Methodist Church in Graceville. A time of remembrance was held at 1 p.m. Donations may be made in memory of Evelyn Kinney to Galilee Methodist Church, Graceville, Florida 32440. Expressions of sympathy may be submitted online www.williamsfhs. com. Williams Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. EEvelyn Baxley Kinney Obituaries Crossword SOOLUTIONION

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Tolearnhowyoucansupportourcommunitysuniversity,contact MaryBethLovingoodat (850)770-2108ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu.THECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL Blue Springs Society Celebrates Thomas Jeffersons BirthdaySpecial to ExtraSunday, April 13, was a time for celebration when Blue Springs Society, National Society Children of the American Revolution and Chipola Junior American Citizens Club met at MacKinnon Hall of St. Lukes Episcopal Church. It was the 271st birthday of President Thomas Jefferson, and there was a cake in his honor. The Chipola Chapter of the National So ciety Daughters of the American Revolu tion Regent Carolyn Jordan was there to show several certicates the two groups had received from Daughters of the Amer ican Revolution state competition and to award DAR Youth Citizenship medals and certicates to four fth grade recipients. Honored for their service, courage, lead ership, patriotism, and honor were Hailey Harrison, Nathaniel Mann, Virginia Milton, and Laurence Pender. Senior President Mary Robbins presented a Voyager Pin to out-going President Danielle Melvin. The pin indicates that a $50 donation was made to the N.S.C.A.R. Voyager Fund in Danielles honor. Madison Morris re ceived a prize for the best attendance of the year. Members had a chance to see the 27 certicates and two trophies Blue Springs Society brought home from state competition. Mr. Laurence Kinsolving, president of William Dunaway Chapter, Florida Society Sons of the American Revolution installed the new Blue Springs Society ofcers for the 2014-2015 year. The ofcers are as follows: President Madison Morris, Vice President Dillon Melvin, Second Vice President Carly Mill er, Chaplain Gabrielle Melvin, Recording Secretary Adrian Schell, Corresponding Secretary Hailey Harrison, Treasurer Vir ginia Milton, Registrar Laurence Pender, Librarian Danielle Melvin, Curator Issac Pender and Historians Tatum and Anna Beth Milton. Saturday, May 24, historian Dale Cox will be the guide as the two groups learn about the Jackson County Spanish Heri tage Trail. For information please contact Mary Robbins at 209-4066 or bluesprings car@yahoo.com.By CecECILY SMItTH Emerald Coast Hospice MYTH NO.1: HHOSPICE LEADS TO DEATHThis represents backwards thinking. Involving hospice in someones care doesnt cause the dying process; it is the other way around. Because someone is already sick and likely dying, the care option of hospice is offered. Hospice does not cause death; the underlying medical condition does. Death is just as likely whether or not hospice becomes involved (well maybe not exactly see Myth #4), because the medical condition is still there, with or without hospice. And the reality of life is that death comes to all living things. MYTH NO.2: HHOSPICE IS OnNLY ABOUT DEATH AnND DYInNG Explaining why this myth is false also explains why I, as a physician, love practicing hospice medicine. Palliative medicine, as practiced in hospice, is about determining an individuals goals, matching treatments that will reasonably achieve those goals and eliminating treatments that wont, and all the while ensuring comfort is maintained. In other words, hospice is about maximizing quality of life so that life can be lived to its fullest in the setting of a serious and lifethreatening condition. When one is facing such a crisis, both the individual and the family have important things to do. Hospices intention is to facilitate making it possible to get those things done. When hospice does its job, a comfortable death would also be expected, but the emphasis of hospice care is on living, not on dying. It is important to remember that one becomes a candidate for hospice not days or weeks before death is expected, but months earlier. MYTH NO.3: HHOSPICE mMEAnNS ACCEPTInNG DEATH This one is tricky. We tend to naturally think issues are an either/or proposition. We either accept death or we dont accept death. The tricky part is that, in reality, we as human beings do both at the same time. Everyone knows, they are going to die someday, but we operate as if we are immortal. It is harder to achieve emotional acceptance that someday is approaching. When a medical condition occurs that makes death likely, someday is nearer. Hospice is about helping with the day-today quality of life issues (see Myth #2) in the time frame of someday being likely within the next six months. Accepting hospice means someone can still be ambivalent about accepting death, since rational and emotional acceptance does not usually occur at the same time. Name something that almost everyone admires and respects, but no one wants. That describes my particular type of medical practice hospice. As a hospice and palliative care physician with a background in family and geriatric medicine, I have felt a strong desire to help people, treat the ill, and ease distressing symptoms. But I am bothered that people recoil from what I do, even while they think positively about hospice in the abstract. Why is this? I think it all boils down to a kind of misunderstanding. Put simply, there are a lot of myths about hospice that I routinely encounter in my practice. My hope is that if these myths can be addressed and corrected, the publics thinking about hospice might be more accepting and more patients and families will receive the incredible benets of hospice care. MYTH NO.4: HHOSPICE mMEAnNS DYInNG FASTER Common sense says that stopping aggressive, life-prolonging treatments and switching to hospice care means someone will die faster. It turns out that a growing body of evidence proves that commonsense is wrong on this one. When palliative care, with its emphasis on comfort, is added to aggressive treatments, people actually live longer, even when so-called lifeprolonging treatments are stopped sooner. No matter how benecial it may have been earlier in a persons disease management, every treatment reaches a point when it no longer helps. Giving non-benecial treatments can only have no effect or bad effects, including shortening lives. The wonderful thing about palliative care, as provided in hospice, is that my treatments to provide comfort remain benecial until the very end. And it just so happens that making people feel better tends to make them do better and live longer. MYTH NO.5: HHOSPICE mMEAnNS GIVInNG UP HOPE Many feel that accepting hospice means giving up all hope. Those of us who provide hospice care know this just isnt true. Impressive demonstrations of hope are evident among those receiving hospice. What one hopes for changes over time. My hopes when I graduated from high school were different from my hopes on my wedding day, which were also different from my hopes today. Someones hope may be for a cure. I have seen impressive miracles (the only word I have for them) sometimes happen to hospice patients. But if such occurrences were commonplace, we wouldnt call them miracles. An artist acquaintance of mine hoped to complete four of his paintings before his liver cancer stopped him. He accomplished that with the help of hospice. A hope can be as simple as relief from suffering. Other possible goals are very difcult to consider in the presence of severe pain or other suffering. Hospice is very good at bringing reality to the hope of relief from suffering, and it does that without relying on death as the means to this end. Then other hopes become possible. Hope is a very human characteristic. Many have heard the saying Hope for the best, but plan for the worst. This sums up what hospice is about. Hospice does not diminish hope. When hospice has time to do its job, hope blossoms. MYTH NO. 6: HHOSPICE IS THE FInNAL STOP This one is hard. The nal stop is actually death. As weve already pointed out, death will happen to us all, and hospice may be present at that time. For those who didnt quite accept my discussion of Myth No.1 and still feel that hospice is too interconnected with death to separate the two, I would make another point: not every hospice admission is accompanied by death. The state of the medical arts is not good enough to always predict the dying process. Currently, about one of 10 hospice admissions does not end with a death. I tell my hospice patients well hope for a miracle, and well celebrate if it comes to pass that hospice is no longer needed. However, in the meantime, it is also reasonable to proceed with the plan for the worst part. If there is anything about hospice someone doesnt like, any hospice patient can sign off hospice at any time and restore their previous benets and care. Myths dispelled about hospice care

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B7WEDNESDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURSDAY7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 -11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 1 p.m.: Caregivers Meeting at Washington County Council on Aging in Chipley for more information call 638-6216 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society 2nd Thursday of each month. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Line Dancing Class for more information call 638-6216 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AFRIDAY6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30 p.m.: Bead Class every second Friday at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery call 703-0347 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper 4th Friday of every month January September. 6-8 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging 50+ dance club for more information call 638-6216 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Methodist Youth Center in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church.SATURDAYThe Holmes County Community Health Clinic located at 203 W. Iowa Street, Bonifay, will be open from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., the rst and third Saturday The Alford Community Health Clinic will be the 2nd and 4th Saturdays of each month, from 10 a.m. until the last patient is seen. 10 a.m. to noon: Childrens education day 4th Saturday of every month North Bay Clan Tribal Grounds, 1560 Lonnie Road.SUNDAY8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at GracevilleCampbellton Hospital in Graceville.MONDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Wednesday, May 7, 2014 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 5-3482 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE N O. 672009CA000613CAXXXX BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. BONNIE L. STRAUSE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BONNIE L. STRAUSE; GRASSY POND RANCHES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. AKA GRASSY POND HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed April 2, 2014 entered in Civil Case No. 672009CA000613CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Washington County, Chipley, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Washington County Courthouse, 1331 South Blvd, Chipley, FL. 32428 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 21 day of May, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 3 of Saddle Club Estates Unit 1, a Subdivision according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 164 of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. Subject to Easement and Restrictions of Record, if any. MFG Serial #FLHML2F560-14585ABC, HUD C ERT #FLA589139, FLA589140 and FLA589141, MFG name Homes of Merit, Model unknown, date of MFG. 03/19/1996, Size 35 X 27, this manufactured home is an improvement to the land and an immovable fixture Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 8 day of April, 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court BY: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk Publish in: Washington County News Invoice: MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 110 SE 6TH STREET FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301 (407) 674-1850 PLEASE FAX A COPY OF THE FIRST INSERTION TO FAX (321) 248-0420 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 ( fax 850-747-5717) at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. SERVICE LIST FOR NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE, CASE 672009CA000613CAXXXX MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC 225 E. ROBINSON ST. SUITE 660 ORLANDO, FL 32801 BONNIE L. STRAUSE 4577 QUARTER HORSE LN CHIPLEY, FL 32428 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BONNIE L. STRAUSE 4577 QUARTER HORSE LN CHIPLEY, FL 32428 TIMOTHY J. SLOAN ESQ., (COUNSEL FOR GRASSY POND RANCHES HOMEOWNERS` ASSOCIATION, INC. AKA GRASSY POND HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.) 427 MCKENZIE AVENUE P.O. BOX 2327 PANAMA CITY, FL 32402 CSTAFFORD@SOOANPA.COM UNKNOWN TENANT #1 4577 QUARTER HORSE LN CHIPLEY, FL 32428 UNKNOWN TENANT #2 4577 QUARTER HORSE LN CHIPLEY, FL 32428 April 30, May 7, 2014 5-3483 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION File No.14-27CP Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF HERMAN PAUL FOLSE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Herman P. Folse, deceased, whose date of death was January 17, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Washington County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is April 30, 2014. Attorney for Personal Representative: Lucas N. Taylor Attorney for Personal Representative Florida Bar No. 670189 122B S. Waukesha Street Bonifay, FL 32425 Telephone: (850)547-7301 Fax: (850)547-7303 Personal Representative: Michael D Folse-Personal Representative April 30, May 7, 2014 Special to the News A natural disaster can strike anywhere at any time and leave in its wake damage and destruction that affects the nancial well-being of survivors. Here are actions to take, depending on your situation, suggested by University of Floridas Institute of Food and Animal Science, Extension Agent Julie P. Dillard. Notify your homeowners, ood or rental insurance company of the loss. Tell them how to best contact you for claims service. Report the loss even if you doubt the loss will be covered. If you lost your insurance policy, request a copy. If you have no place to stay and the shelter is full, you may be able to receive a voucher for a hotel room from the local American Red Cross or Salvation Army. If you have home owners or renters insurance, determine if you have coverage for temporary housing. When feasible, contact employers to inform them of your situation and determine time you may take off of work if needed. Let your employer know how to best contact you. If an employer noties you that your place of employment was severely damaged or destroyed and you cannot work, contact your states unemployment insurance ofce. Ask about eligibility for unemployment benets. If injured or disabled, you may be eligible for disability insurance; contact your agent. If you have natural gas service, call the natural gas company for a safety inspection before entering the home, or request a natural gas shut off for safety purposes. Cancel the account until gas is needed. If the electrical service is unsafe, do not enter. Call the electrical company to disconnect service until repairs can be made and electricity is needed. When authorities have determined that its safe to re-enter your property, assess damages and begin next steps. Document what you have done, with whom you have spoken, actions to take, contact information, deadlines for disaster assistance applications and appointments. Determine if there are other services to cancel for a period of time, such as phone, softener salt delivery or cable television. If you are going to be out of your home or rental unit, provide a change of address to your post ofce. This will ensure that mail continues to be delivered to you. Notify your home mortgage company or your landlord of disaster damage to the property. Tell them how to best contact you. If you have lost your rental or mortgage agreement, request a copy. If you have vehicle damage or loss, contact your auto insurance agent. Find out how long it will take to process your claim. Ask if you have coverage for car rental. Let the agent know how to best contact you. Request a copy of your policy if missing. Do not sign anything from insurance companies indicating that this is a nal interaction/payment to you as other disaster-related damages may surface weeks and months from now. If you anticipate having difculty paying bills, call your creditors and explain the disaster loss. Arrange payment plans before you get an overdue notice. Documentation will be required for property loss claims on homeowners and renters insurance to submit uncovered property losses for income tax purposes and to verify the need for assistance programs. Documentation should include manufacturer, model, serial number, age, value new, approximate current value and damage incurred. Keep receipts and record all expenses related to recovery or rebuild efforts. They may be covered by insurance or assistance programs or deductible on taxes. Remember receipts for lodging, clean-up supplies, eyeglasses replacement and doctor bills related to disaster injury. Community CALENDARPutting back the pieces after disaster

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, May 7, 2014 B USINESS G UIDE HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson C ounties for 20 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!638-3611HVAC Services Coolers & Freezers Service on all Makes & Models Heat Pumps, Electric & Gas Electrical Services Exterior Elevated LightingResidential and Commerical THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5$25.68 5x10$35.31 10x10$46.01 10x20$80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units ar e Carpeted Easy Care Lawn & Tractor ServiceTree ServiceLawn Care Debris Removal Tractor & Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825 MMitchs CollisionQuality Collision Repair Automotive Renishing326-4104Mitch Gainer, Owner mitch_gainer@att.net 335 Alford Road Cottondale Florida Panhandle Concrete, LLCFREE Estimates Reasonable Rates 35 Years ExperienceTRAVIS JONES850-693-5812PHIL LIZOTTE850-592-7216 Three Chicks Cleaning Free Quotes Experienced References Available Flexible Hours (M-F) (850) 956-2408 Cell (850) 768-0022 HOLMES UNLIMITEDTREE SERVICETreats Trees Trimming Stump GrindingNo One Can Beat Our PricesLicensed & Insured Free EstimatesJohn Holmes (850) 326-5351 (850) 428-9264 Great Rate Tree ServiceHazardous Tree Removal Stump Grinding/Removal Aerial Bucket Work Trimming/Pruning Bobcat Work Small Tract Land Clearing Adam Williams Owner/Operator850-768-1734 Advertise your service or business for as little as $10 a week.Ad runs in the Washington County News, Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser638-02125019258 5-3498 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000347 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff, vs. JONATHAN E. WILLOUGHBY A/K/A JONATHAN WILLOUGHBY et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated 4/25/13 and entered in Case No. 2010-CA-000347 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for WASHINGTON County, Florida wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP is the Plaintiff and JONATHAN E. WILLOUGHBY A/K/A JONATHAN WILLOUGHBY; THERESA WILLOUGHBY A/K/A THERESA R. WILLOUGHBY; JOHN DOE, and JANE DOE are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT STEPS OF THE WASHINGTON COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 25 day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 15, BLOCK 172, SUNNY HILLS UNIT FOUR, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGES 42 THROUGH 48 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 4072 FAIRBANKS DR, CHIPLEY, FL 32428 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on April 25, 2014. Harold Bazeel Clerk of the Circuit Court By: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk May 7 and 14, 2014 5-3499 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 67-2013-CA-000121 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. MARVEL ESTES et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated 4/25/14 and entered in Case No. 67-2013-CA-000121 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for WASHINGTON County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA is the Plaintiff and MARVEL ESTES; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARVEL ESTES N/K/A DAN ESTES; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT STEPS OF THE WASHINGTON COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 25 day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST, 15.0 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST, 1383.65 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A 60 FOOT PROPOSED ROAD, 1636.78 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 00 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 330.36 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE ON BEARING OF NORTH 89 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST, 625.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST, 330.36 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST, 624.84 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PROPERTY BEING A PART OF LOT 19, SEMINOLE PLANTATION, CRYSTAL LAKE TRACT, WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2000 GRAND SLAM MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO: VIN# GAGMTD06736A & GAGMTD06736B. A/K/A 5120 KAITLIN TRAIL, CHIPLEY, FL 32428 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on April 25, 2014. Harold Bazeel Clerk of the Circuit Court By: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk May 7 and 14, 2014 5-3489 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-000043 CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. JAMES SCOTT PALMER A/K/A JAMES S. PALMER; DESIREE PALMER; LEISURE LAKES PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE (Please publish in THE WASHINGTON COUNTYNEWS) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 15, 2014, and Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated April 16, 2014, both entered in Case No. 10-000043 CA, of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for WASHINGTON County, Florida. BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and JAMES SCOTTPALMER A/K/AJAMES S. PALMER; DESIREE PALMER; LEISURE LAKES PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; JOHN DOE and JANE DOE; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front Courthouse steps at 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428, at 11:00 a.m., Central Time, on the 21st day of May, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTB-140, FIRSTADDITION TO LEISURE LAKES, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLATTHEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 179 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 3377 CARDINALPLACE, CHIPLEY, FL32428 Dated this 21 day of April, 2014. HARROLD BAZZEL As Clerk of said Court By K. McDaniel As Deputy Clerk Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the Bay County Courts, Court Administration, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402, Phone: 850-747-5327, Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771, Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcour ts.org Submitted by: Heller & Zion, LLP, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 1428 Brickell Avenue, Suite 700, Miami, FL33131, Telephone: (305) 373-8001, Facsimile: (305) 373-8030 April 30, May 7, 2014 ADOPT loving married couple seeks to adopt, will be hands on mom and dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592, Adam Sklar #0150789 Are you pregnant? Considering adoption? A childless, caring and loving, married couple seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON mom and devoted dad. Financial security and emotional stability. All expenses paid. Call/Text Diane & Adam 1-800-790-5260. Devoted, Affectionate, Professional couple will help you, unconditionally love. Hands on with your baby. Maintain contact. Allowed expenses paid. Doug & Liz 866-777-9344 -Susan Stockman-FL # 0342521 The Romantic Novel of the Year! almostdestin.com. CUSTOM HOME 145 acres and 16 Home Sites at Lake Guntersville Some selling Absolute Scottsboro, AL Saturday May 17th 10:00am www.target auction.com 1-800 4733939 djacobs#5060 Lories Treasure Chest Yard Sale, Household items, jewelry, Avon bottles, tv stand, other. Friday/Saturday May 9/10 8a.m.-4p.m. 2886 Sandpath Road, Bonifay. 768-3646 Multi Family Yard Sale. 906 Banfill Ave, Bonifay, Fri & Sat, May 8&9, 7-Until. Furniture, clothes, baby items, etc. Multi-Family Yard Sale, Saturday May 10, 8AM-until, 4100 Pate Pond Road, Vernon. Indoor/outdoor yard sale, fig trees, plants, household items and lots of miscellaneous items to numerous to list. Come shop and enjoy a free corndog and drink. Rain or shine. Sellers Welcome. 850-326-1606. YES Were Having it AGAIN! 5 Family Yard Sale Sat. & Sun., May 10 & 11. 7 till 2:00. 1/4 mile west of 79 on Hwy. 2 at Esto. Clothing-infants to plus sizes, household furnishings, books, knick-knacks. If raining, May 17 & 18. 2430 Kubota Diesel 4-wheel drive. Like new. Only 56 hours. 6 pieces equipment. 8x16 tandom trailer. 638-1858 or 326-9109. Looking for maid for house cleaning, washing clothes, odd jobs around the house, cooking. 850-388-2061. 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-368-1964 Dump Truck Driver full/part time. Drug test required. Must be able to run loader. 638-4630. Food Svc/Hospitality Cook Frenchs Restaurant is now accepting applications for an Experienced Lunch Buffet Cook. Apply in person Hwy 90 Caryville, FL. 850-548-5800 Web ID#: 34288600 Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. HVAC Accelerated Hands On Training School. National Certifications With Immediate Job Placement. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-877-994-9904 Logistics/TransportClass ACDL DriversNeeded ImmediatelyDump Trailer Experience. $1000 Retention Bonus Walton/Bay/ Washington Counties Panama City Area *Home Nights Apply online: www .perdido trucking.com 1653 Maple Avenue Panama City, Florida 32405 850-784-7940 Web ID#: 34287150 NOW HIRING! Property damage inspectors needed, no experience necessary. Will train. Full-time & part-time. 877-207-6716 www. aaronspa.biz/nowhiring AIRLINE CAREERS begin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial Aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-741-9260 www.FixJets.com EXPERIENCED OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com EOE HOME BASED BUSINESSBE YOUR OWN BOSS. FULL OR PART TIME. EARN UP TO SIX FIGURES, FIRST YEAR. SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY PLEASE www.waynejohnson.myunicity.net Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1 Bedroom Apartment, in Chipley, covenant location, no pets. 638-4640. 2BR/2.5BA Apartment w/private balcony & garage. W/D included. In Bonifay. $600/mth + deposit. 768-0394 or 547-2936. SpaciousOne Bedroom Apartment $475 Everything NEW Stove/Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. 3BR/1.5BA. W&S & yard care provided. No pets. $650.00/mth. Good neighborhood, 2 miles from WalMart. 850-638-4345. Leave message. Bonifay 3bd/2ba Brick, C/H&A No Pets. $620+Dep Call 850-547-9291 House For Rent 2BR/1BAhouse in country setting, stove, fridge, DW, lawn maintenance, water and pest control services included. Application required. No smoking. $625/month plus, $625/Deposit. 850-638-4228. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO and up. Includes Garbage, sewage, and lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 2BR Trailer in Bethlehem area. Call 547-2068. 3BR/2BA MH for rent in Chipley Area. Not far from town. $525.00 to $650.00. 850-638-8570 or 850-258-1594. NO PETS. Mobile Home for rent. South of Bonifay in Washington County. 3BR/2BA Doublewide. $600.00 per mo, $600.00 security deposit. Call Progressive Realty, 638-8220. Mobile Homes For Rent 2 and 3 Bedrooms in Cottondale, Central Heat and Air. $400 -$500 a month. 850-258-1594 or 850-638-8570. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. LOANS FOR LANDLORDS! We Finance From 5-500 Units As Low As 5.5 %. 1-4 Fam, Townhome, Condos OK. Contact B2R: 1-855-940-0227 www. B2RFinance.com 40 Acre Horse Ranch for lease in Chipley, lush pastures, fence/ cross fence, barn and efficiency apt $850 mo. 334-333-2693 Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. RETIRE TO Kentuckys BlueGrass Country! Enjoy maintenance free living! BRAND NEW LUXURY HOMES Beautiful 3 BR, 3 BA, 1,800 sf, from the low $200s. Lowest price per sq ft in the area! Mild climate, low taxes, minutes to shopping, dining, medical & Keeneland Horse Racing. Perfect for retirement/ 2nd home. Call now for details: 877-333-2412, Ext. 121 SugarTreeHomes.com Quitting Racing2 Dragsters, Trailers, & Equipment. Many Spare Parts. 355 Chev Circle Track Motor. Turbo Hayabusa Motor. Day: 850-624-5148 Night: 850-265-6466 2004 Honda Shadow Motorcycle. Excellent condition. $3,000.00. 850-260-9085. If you need a loving, experienced, dependable, and certified caregiver call Theresa at 850-319-3141. For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8:00am-4:00pm. Call (850)638-1483 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely.